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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

PITBLTG DOOLTMENT. 




'ill? \ 



X-SSS 



li ^^ 






TIIE -Z-E^I^ 1873. 



.i0' 



TWENTY- EIGHTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1873, 



TOGETHEK WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 
AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

JOHN B. CLARKK, PRINTER, 

1874. 



35 T. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Ik Board of Common Council. 
AN ORDER authorizing the printing of the twenty-eighth An- 
nual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are hereby 
authorized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of seventeen hundred copies of the Twenty-eighth 
Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester, including the Reports of Overseers of the Poor, Com- 
mittee on Finance, Committee on City Farm, Trustees, Librarian, 
and Treasurer of the City Library, School Committee, and Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction, Committee on Cemeteries, Board 
of Engineers of the Fire Department, and Commissioners and 
Engineers of Water- Works; and that the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for Printing and Stationery. 

January 5, 1874. Ix Board of Common Council. 

Passed. ^ CHARLES A. SMITH, President. 

January 5, 1873. In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Passed in concurrence. J. P. NEWELL, Mayor. 

A true eop3\ Attest: 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Clerk. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 

OF THE 

HON. JOHN P. NEWELL, 

TO THE 

CITY COUNCILS OF MANCHESTER, 



DELIVERED BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, 
JANUARY 5, 1874, 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

In accordance with the custom of my predecessors in 
office, and before retiring from the official positions which 
we have severally filled, I desire briefly to review the more 
important subjects to which your attention has been direct- 
ed during the year now closing, and, in a few words, to re- 
capitulate your action thereon. 

And, first of all, let us render to the Giver of all good 
the gratitude which belongs to Him, for that measure of 
prosperity which has been vouchsafed to us, and for ex- 
emption from those calamities which have visited other 
cities and other communities. No great epidemic has 
fallen upon our people, no extensive conflagration has 
swept away our homes and prostrated our industries. The 
financial crisis which has brought ruin to others, has but 
lightly touched us. For all this, it behooves us to make 
grateful acknowledgment. 

FINANCE. 

The subject of Finance is one of the greatest importance, 
and has received the careful consideration of the Finance 
Committee. 

I have received from the treasurer the following state- 
ments : 



6 

Funded debt, Jan. 1, 1873 $362,100 00 

Decrease during the year 1,600 00 

Amount funded debt Jan. 1, 1874 $360,500 00 

Temporary loan Jan. 1, 1873 S2,298 57 

Increase during the year 96.120 00 

Temporary loan Jan. 1, 1874 • $98,418 57 

Estimated interest due 10,000 00 

Outstanding bills £2,998 10 

Total indebtedness Jan. 1, 1874 Co 1,916 67 

Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1874 $32,803 11 

Xotes due the city 3,163 40 

Interest on the same 490 00 

S36,456 51 

]S"et indebtedness Jan. 1, 1874, exclusive of water bonds, §495,460 16 
Ket indebtedness Jan. 1, 1873. 3^6 .37 42 

Increase during the year $9 J,( 22 74 

This increase of the city debt arises from appropria- 
tions for water-works the past year, these appropriations 
amounting to •$150,000, while the total amount paid on ac- 
count of water -works during the year is $294,619.02. 
Tlie increase in the amount of tem])orary loan, it will read- 
ily be seen, is due to the same account, as the whole amount 
received from the sale of State and water bonds during 
the year, is only about $124,000. 

The cash in the hands of the Treasurer at the present 
time is sufticieut to meet all bills now due. The amount 
of uncollected taxes for 1873 is $25,461.30, and about this 
.sum will probably be realized from unpaid taxes. 

Some of the extraordinary or unusual items of expense 
tlie past year, are the 'Squog Bridge, $3,267 ; damages 
arising from falling of bridge, $9,200 ; commons, $3,548 ; 
new school-houses, $29,000 ; pest-house, $5,000 ; City 
Farm, ''?7,000, amounting in all to $57,015. For a part of 



this sum, to wit, f 16,515, no appropriation had been made, 
and jet I am happy to say that tlie total expenses for the 
year, exclusive oF water-works, come within the appro- 
priations. 

The foregoing statement in relation to extraordinary ex- 
penses, together with the additional fact that the State and 
County tax the j)resent year is thirty-two thousand four 
hundred twenty four dollars over any previous year, is 
more than sufficient to account for the increase in percent- 
age of taxation the past year. 

STATEMENT OF WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT AS FURNISHED BY 
THE TREASURER. 

To paid Mayor's orders S294,609 02 

Coupons. .."...... 19,044 00 

Accrued interest on bonds as discount 90 50 

$313,743 o2 

By City Bonds on hand Jan. 1, 1873... .$101,500 00 

Casli used by city, Jan. 1, 1873 40,455 51 

Accrued interest on bonds sold 193 26 

State Bonds appropriated 60,000 00 

Appropriation by City Government . 90,000 00 

Paid from city fnnds 21,594 75 

8313,743 52 
CITY LIBRARY. 

Among the institutions which are a credit to the city, 
and a blessing to our people, is our City Library, and this 
is increasing in interest and value year by year. The num- 
ber of books added to the library during the year, is 609, 
the whole numiier at the present time, 17,672, and the 
number taken out to be read, 35,180. 

Service pipes to convey water to the building, have been 
put in, and the floor has been lathed and plastered on the 
under side, to prevent the escape, through the floor, of coal 



dust and ashes from the basement, to the annoyance of the 
librarian and of visitors, and to the injury of the books. 

An appropriation was made at the commencement of 
the year, for the purpose of [irocuring tlie preparation and 
publishing of a new catalogue of the books in the library, 
but as the appropriation was not thought to be sufficiently 
large, and for other reasons, the work has not been under- 
taken. 

SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

There is good reason why we should feel an honest pride 
in our public schools. Never have they been under better 
discipline, or stood higher in all the essentials of good 
schools, than at the present time. And no surer proof of 
their superior excellence can be had, than is found in the 
fact, that tliere is not in the city a single private school, 
properly so called. The appropriation for schools is a 
large item in our annual expenses, but there is no item in 
the tax-list which our citizens more heartily approve than 
that which goes for school purposes, and they only ask that 
they be carried to the higliest point of excellence. 

The present number of schools is forty-five, the average 
number of teachers 69, — an increase over former years, 
owing to the fact that six or seven hundred French chil- 
dren have been enrolled within the year. 

The truant officer has done faithful service, and is well 
fitted to perform the duties pertaining to such an office. 

For a long time there has Ijeen a feeling of uneasiness 
among our people, because the doors of our larger school 
buildings have opened inward, as in case of fire the most 
disastrous consequences might occur. By a vote of the 
School Board, the following named school buildings have 
been so changed as to allow the doors to swing outward : 
the Merrimack, Franklin, and Spring street buildings, the 
old High and the Intermediate School buildings, and, in 



Piscataquog, the new Brick and the Grammar School 
liouses. These changes have necessarily involved other 
alterations, and have constitnted a considerable item of ex- 
pense. 

The scliool-houses at Hallsville, Youngsville, Mosqnito 
Pond, and Webster's Mills, have been painted outside and 
inside, while those at Amoskeag, on Blodgett street, and 
in the Harvey district, have been painted on the inside. 
The painting of these houses has been under the direction 
of the Committee on Lands and Buildings. The enlarged 
lot at Bakersville has been graded and enclosed by a new 
and substantial picket fence, and the lot at Hallsville has 
been enclosed by a similar fence, and a well dug for the 
use of the scholars. 

The contract to furnish materials and finish the outside 
of the Ash-street House above the basement, was awarded 
to Mr. Alpheus Gay, for the sum of twenty-two thousand 
dollars, and the work has been performed thorouglily and 
satisfactorily. This house, when completed, in achitectural 
beauty and convenience of arrangement, will be the finest 
in the city. It is a brick building with granite trimmings, 
and in the form of a cross, with towers on the northeast 
and southwest corners. It is two stories and a roof-story 
in height, and has a basement under the whole for heating- 
apparatus, water-closets, play-rooms, &c. Tiiere are to be 
four schoolrooms on each floor, each sufficiently large to 
accommodate forty-six scholars, or three hundred sixty- 
eight in all, with teachers' rooms and every modern con- 
venience. In the roof will be a large hall capable of seat- 
ing six hundred persons. In the southwest tower there is 
to be a clock and bell, and I p -iih;e it will be deemed ex- 
pedient to add the necessary attachments to make it a fire- 
alarm striker. The contract to furnish the stone steps has 
been awarded to Messrs. Lamson & Marden. There has 
already been expended on the building about twenty-nine 



10 



thousand dollars, and it is estimated that it will require 
tweiitj-live thousand dollars more to complete it ready for 
occupancy. This building, in its design and arrangement, 
docs great credit to the architect, Geo. W. Stevens, Esq., 
to wliom tlie city is under obligations, not only for this, but 
for other valuable services. 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

The constant growth of the city makes it imperative 
each year to lay out new highways, and, in doing this, the 
policy has been, so far as possible, to preserve the regular- 
ity and symmetry of the streets. The new streets laid out 
are as follows : Second street from Ferry to Manchester 
and North Weare Railroad ; Milton, from Park to Hano- 
ovcr ; Myrtle, from Maple to Ashland ; Ash east back street 
from Lowell to Bridge ; Majjle, from Hanover to Ferry 
Road ; Cedar, from Pine to Beech ; Railroad street, from 
Douglas to Wyman House ; and Taylor from Young to 
Cilley street. 

In order to secure regularity hereafter, in tlie laying out 
of streets in the southern part of the city, by making such 
streets a continuation of streets already laid out, or parallel 
with them, tlie City Council, after examination of a plan 
submitted to them, passed the following resolution : 

''That the plan presented to the City Council for the laying out 
of streets in the southern part of the city, be adopted as a guide 
for the future construction of streets in the section embraced in 
said plan, and that hereafter, when new streets shall be required 
there, they shall be laid out in accordance with such plan, and not 
otherwise ; and that the plan so adopted be prepared, and five* 
hundred copies of the same be published for the information of 
the City Council, and'of the public, and that the expense thereof 
not exceeding one hundred dollars, be charged to the ajipropria- 
tion for incidental expenses.'' 

A part of these copies are now ready for distribution. 



11 

The streets built during the year are as follows : Elm, 
from Henry F. W. Little's house to Baker street, with a 
Iiank wall near Mr. Little's house, and a dam so as to make 
a reservoir for the use of the Fire Department ; Pine from 
Hari-ison to Hooksett road ; Harrison, from Maple to Rus- 
sell ; Milton, from Hanover to Manchester ; 13eecli, from 
Young to point south of the Concord and Portsmouth Rail- 
road ; Webster, from Elm to River road ; Cedar from 
Chestnut to Beech ; Second street from Ferry to Manches- 
ter and North Weare Railroad ; Bridge street, graded from 
Maple to Russell, and built with bed of stone ten inches 
thick, and graveled on top ; Beacon, graded from Man- 
chester to Laurel ; Lincoln, from Hanover to Merrimack, 
and thoroughly built ; Ashland, partially graded, and four 
stone culverts put in. Considerable work has also beeu 
done on Railroad street. 

In making repairs, a portion of Hanover street and a 
portion of Park street have been macadamized the past 
year, and the experiment is abundantly satisfactory. The 
soil of our city is not naturally good for road making, and 
I may be permitted to suggest that the custom which has 
prevailed for years, of simply spreading gravel upon our 
worn-out streets, should at once be discontinued, for streets 
so repaired, must have the process repeated yearly, and 
even then, much of the time, are in wretched condition, 
while a street properly built, ought to last ten or twelve 
years. 

A great deal of work has been done u])on the streets the 
past year, many culverts put in, many cess-[)ools construct- 
ed, and innumerable irregularities removed, so that, not- 
withstanding tlie laying of water pipes has necessarily 
made havoc of our streets, it is believed they were never 
more smooth and level, or in better condition for travel 
than during the past year. The expenditures for repairs 
of streets in District No. 2 alone are $13,020.73. 



12 

111 February last, the iron bridge over the Piscataquog 
river fell while a loaded team was crossing it. Three 
men, wlio were upon the bridge at the time, together with 
the team, were precipitated upon the ice below, and it has 
cost the city nine thousand two hundred dollars to settle 
tlie claims thus occasioned. It was afterwards ascertained 
that this iron bridge, some eighty feet in length, weighed 
less than five tons. In place of it, a wooden bridge has 
been built of the most thorough workmanship and of great 
strength, so that, with proper care, it will last for many 
years to come. It is the work of Mr. Button Woods, the 
bridge builder of the Concord Railroad, and cost, including 
the painting, 13,267.04. 

The foot walk of the Amoskeag Bridge has been covered 
anew, and much of the carriage way of this bridge will 
need to be replanked another year. Other bridges within 
the city limits have been more or less extensively repaired, 
which I need not stop to describe. 

PAVING. 

Elm street has been paved from Bridge street to Pearl, 
and Granite street from Mr. A. C. Wallace's house to Main 
street, together with a small portion of Main street near 
the new bridge, amounting in all to 1870 1-2 yards. The 
small sized granite blocks have been used, and were fur- 
nished by Mr. Robert Bunton at $1.45 per yard. In addi- 
tion to this, ten hundred and twenty-five yards of cobble 
paving has been done in various parts of the city, 1167 feet 
of edge-stone set for sidewalks, and all the filling furnished 
for sidewalks which individuals have called for. The pol- 
icy of the city has been to set the edge-stone, when fur- 
nished, and to fill for sidewalks, whether of brick or con- 
crete, for all persons desiring it. By this fiid from the city, 
manv sidewalks have been concreted that would not other- 



13 

wise have been done, and our streets in this way have been 
much improved. Tlie expenditure for paving is -$7,614.83; 
for grading and filling for sidewalks, $1,892.90. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

More than six thousand six hundred feet of pipe for sew- 
ers, varying in size from nine to eighteen inches, have been 
laid in District No 2, and nine hundred twenty feet, vary- 
ing in size from 10 to 24 inches, liave been laid in Main 
street in Piscataquog the present year, making in all, more 
than seven thousand five hundred feet, and greatly improv- 
ing the drainage of the city. The time is prol)ably not far 
distant when it will be deemed advisable to drain the north- 
ern section of the city directly into the Merrimack, thereby 
relieving the main sewer extending through Elm street. 
Earthen pipe has been largely used in the laying of sewers 
the present year, and appears to possess all the qualities 
necessary for security against corrosion, and for strength 
and durability. Bricks were used in laying three hundred 
seventy feet of the sewer in 'Squog, and blasting was re- 
quired nearly this whole distance. Seventy-three cesspools 
have been put in and many more are needed. The appro- 
priation for sewers and drains was $10,000, the whole ex- 
penditure $12,363.41, the deficit being made up by transfers 
from other accounts. 

nOMMONS. 

A concrete walk has been laid on the south side of Mer- 
rimack square, the fence repainted, and a heavy gate, simi- 
lar to the others, hung on the east side. A concrete walk 
has also been laid across the Park near the Cemetery. 
Twenty feet have been taken from the west side of Concord 
square in order to widen Vine street so as to accommodate 



14 

the Hook and Ladder carriage and the steamers, in the 
hurr}' of coming from tlie engine-house when there is an 
alarm of fire. A new fence has been built on the west 
side of this square, and a concrete walk with edge-stone 
laid outside the fence. The Committee on Commons re- 
gretted much that the appropriation for Commons did not 
allow the building of an iron fence instead of a wooden 
one, as the city has long been under obligation by condi- 
tions of the deed from the Land and Water Power Com- 
pany to construct an iron fence around this common. 

In accordance with an order of the city government 
passed in 1872, the pond in Hanover square has been thor- 
oughly cleansed by drawing off the water and removing the 
mud and decaying matter which had been accumulating 
for years, and had become the fruitful source of offensive 
odors, and of disease. The work was one of so much dif- 
ficulty, and involving so great an expense, that it was 
deemed best, so far as possible, to guard against the neces- 
sity of repeating it in the future, by building a bank wall, 
substantial in character, and symmetrical in form, on the 
east and north sides of the pond. At the same time the 
stone culvert on the east side has been extended about 
sevent3'-five feet. By these changes, the size of the pond 
has been somewhat diminished, and the area of the land 
increased, with the design of filling and grassing over the 
land thus made. This whole work, I believe, will command 
the approval of all our citizens, as this square will thus be 
greatly improved and beautified. During the year twenty- 
four strong iron settees have been placed in our public 
squares, seven each in Merrimack and Concord squares, and 
five each in Hanover and Tremont. 

A movement has also been inaugurated, the design of 
which is to secure, at an early day, a public park of a size 
commensurate with the future wants of the city. In pur- 
suance of this object, an order was passed by the City 



15 

Council, authorizing the raising of a special committee, with 
instructions to examine localities, make surveys, and report 
their action. The matter is still under consideration. But 
I trust early action will be taken, and land suitable for the 
purpose will be secured while it is comparatively cheap. 
Then it can be improved from year to year, as the city has 
the means at command with which to make such improve- 
ments. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The expenses of the Police Department, for the year, 
have been •fl9,lti4.63, while the appropriation and receipts 
amount to $19,162,66. The whole number of arrests dur- 
ing the year is 1.443. 

The general good order and quiet of the city attest the 
fidelity of our police officers, and especially will the effi- 
ciency of this department be apparent, when we consider 
the make-up of our population, and the peculiar character 
of that large class of transient persons which our public 
works have necessarily brought into the city, for to a great 
extent the city has been free from disturbance by day, and 
from brawls by night, and from the commission of the 
graver crimes. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The appropriation for the Fire Department the past year 
was 815,000 ; the expenses of the Department are 812,- 
125.75. The whole number of alarms during the year, as 
reported by the Chief Engineer, is thirty-four, the number 
of fires twelve, there having been twenty false alarms, and 
once the Department was summoned to Pittsfield, and once 
to Suncook. The total losses by fire for the year have been 
816,900 ; the insurance 88,900. Our fire department is 
thoroughly organized and equipped, and all the companies 



16 

are in the most efficient condition. It affords me great 
pleasure to bear testimony to the zeal, the manly bearing, 
and general good conduct of our firemen. Never have 
they been found wanting in duty, when the lives and prop- 
erty of our citizens have been imperilled. 

In accordance with what was ascertained to be tlie gen- 
eral custom of other cities, the City Council decided early 
in the year, not to insure the city property, and in conse- 
quence of this action, no policies expiring on or after the 
first day of April, were renewed. I may be permitted to 
suggest that it would be a wise policy annually to appro- 
priate, and securely invest a certain sum, say $1,500, which 
is about the sum that has annually been paid for insurance, 
to meet any possible loss by fire in the future. 

A bell of 3000 pounds weight, and cast by Blake of Bos- 
ton, has been hung in the tower erected in the northern 
])art of tlie city, and a striking apparatus attached, so that 
we have four telegraph fire alarm bells ; and if one of four- 
teen or fifteen lumdred pounds weight sliould be placed in 
the tower of tlie Ash street school-house, it would seem 
that we shoukl be well provided with the means of giving 
the alarm and locating a fire anywhere in the compact part 
of the city. 

WATER-WORKS. 

The whole amount appropriated for water-works during 
the year, is $150,000. The income from water rents and 
hydrants to Dec. 20, is reported as $12,102.60. The rate 
of annual income at the beginning of the year 1874, in- 
cluding the assessment for public fire hydrants, is reported 
as $18,240. 

The works are now so nearly completed that it is expect- 
ed the city will be supplied with water from Lake Massabe- 
sic early in the spring. The pump is now being put in 



17 

place, is massive in its several parts, and gives promise of 
being capable of furnishing the city with all the water that 
shall be needed for years to come. 

The pump-house and tenement connected, is far ad- 
vanced toward completion. The building is of brick, with 
granite trimmings, and is neat though not elaborate in de- 
sign. The dam and canal are also nearly completed. The 
area of the lake will be increased about thirty acres by the 
new dam, and it is estimated that the value of the lake, as 
a water power, will be enhanced four-fold by the construc- 
tion of this dam. 

The cold weather in November caused a suspension of 
work on the distributing reservoir, and it will take some 
two months in the spring to complete it. The laying of 
the distributing pipes according to schedule No. 2, is nearly 
complete, and will be finished early in the spring. 

Sixty-five hydrants have been set during the year, mak- 
ing the whole number of public fire hydrants in the city at 
the .present time, two hundred and ten, thus furnishing a 
reasonable security against an extensive conflagration to all 
the thickly-settled portion of the city east of the Merri- 
mack river. The Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, in 
accordance with their usual courtesy and liberality, have 
permitted the Commissioners to fill, from the Company's 
reservoir, all the pipes which have been laid. In this way 
our two hundred and ten hydrants are available for fire 
purposes, and already more than three hundred applicants, 
along the line of the pipes, have been supplied with water. 
To this extent, therefore, our water-wbrks are an accom- 
plished fact. Although these works from their first incep- 
tion, have met with considerable opposition, and though 
their construction involves the expenditure of a large sum 
of money, yet I am confident that when they are completed, 
and the city is supplied with an abundance of pure water, 
the wisdom that planned, and the skill that executed these 
works, will be fully vindicated. 



18 

Service pipes, with the necessary fixtures, have been put 
into the Court House, the City Library, tlie City Hall, the 
Engine House on Yine street, and a watering-trough has 
been established at the upper end of Elm street. 

For a more particular account of the water-works, I 
refer you to the Engineer's Report. 

PEST-HOUSE. 

When the small-pox was prevailing in the city last win- 
ter, and the public mind was excited and alarmed, it be- 
came apparent to all that the pest-house, which had been 
in use for years, was so unfit for the purpose as to render 
it as unjust as it was unsafe, to take there such of our cit- 
izens as might be smitten with this dreaded disease. In 
accordance, therefore, with the public demand, an appro- 
propriation of five thousand dollars was made for the pur- 
pose of erecting a new pest-house, and a special committee 
I'aised to procure plans and locate the building. The site 
selected is on that portion of the city farm lying north of 
Bridge street and beyond the old pest-house, a hundred 
feet back from the street, a distance more than sufficient 
to preclude the possibility of taking the disease by one 
passing along the street. The contract to erect the build- 
ing was awarded to Mr. John H. Maynard for the sum of 
$4,520, and though the work has been somewhat retarded 
by the approach of cold weather at an earlier date than 
usual, yet the building is now nearly finished, and will, I 
trust, be ready for occupancy long before the city will have 
occasion to use it. 

The building is a wooden structure, the main house be- 
ing 34x44 feet, and two and a half stories high. The first 
story is eleven and one-half feet in the clear, and the sec- 
ond story, eleven feet. The L is one and a half stories 
high. The main house contains four rooms on each floor, 



19 

properly lighted and ventilated, and easily heated. The L 
contains kitchen, pantries and purifying closets on the first 
floor, two rooms in the attic, with a good cellar under the 
kitchen. There is also a wood-shed, stable and carriage- 
house. The well is thirty feet deep, and has an abundant 
supply of excellent water. 

It is estimated that to complete the grading around the 
building, and construct a road to it, will require about 
1500 in addition to the appropriation. The plan of the 
building was made by Mr. Augustus G. Stevens, while the 
work has been under the superintendence of Mr. George 
W. Stevens. 

THE CITY FARM. 

Quite extensive improvements have been made at the 
City Farm. It is well known that the house at the Farm 
is used both as an alms-house, and also as a House of Cor- 
rection. The interior of the house, and particularly of the 
L, was found to be in a very dilapidated condition, and 
absolutely unfit for the purposes for which it was used. 
The sills were decayed, the floors had settled, the plaster- 
ing was off, windows and doors were awry, and prisoners 
conhned there escaped in every direction. 

As the Committee found that the L could not be repaired, 
but must be entirely rel)uilt, they employed Mr. George W. 
Stevens to prepare a plan, and, advertising for proposals, 
the contract to furnish materials and erect a new L was 
awarded to Messrs. Ireland and Emery, and the work has 
been most faithfully done. The new L is somewhat larger 
than the old one, and is built of wood. It contains pau- 
per's sitting-room, dining-room, and sleeping-rooms, pris- 
oners' rooms, wash-rooms, pantries, tfcc, and a good cellar 
under the whole, in which is a brick cistern of two thou- 
sand gallons capacity. The giving out of the aqueduct 



20 

which supplied the house with water, rendered it necessary 
to procure a supply from some other source. A well has 
been dug through a ledge near the house, an abundant sup- 
ply of water found, and a large reservoir constructed for 
fire purposes. 

The main part of the house, also, has been thoroughly 
repaired, a work long needed to be done. It has been 
found necessary, also, to put some new furniture into the 
rooms occupied by the paupers and prisoners. 

The whole amount expended is about seven thousand 
dollars, and I am informed by Mr. Stevens that to complete 
the sheds, repair the barn, and make a few other necessary 
improvements, about a thousand dollars more will be re- 
quired. The whole number of persons in the alms-house 
during the year, is eleven ; the average number, four and 
two-thirds. The whole number of prisoners in the House 
of Correction has been two hundred forty ; the average 
number for the year twenty and one-eighth. 

The fact that a large number of men are confined in the 
House of Correction, with little or nothing to do, has sug- 
gested the idea of providing for them some special employ- 
ment, both that they may be earning something while be- 
ing supported at the city's expense, and also, as a prevent- 
ive of crime, by making it less an object to be sent there 
to be boarded through the dull season. For this purpose 
an enclosure 50x100 feet, and partially covered on one side, 
has been constructed, that the men confined there may be 
employed in breaking stone to be used in macadamizing our 
streets. 

soldiers' monument. 

An appropriation of a thousand dollars was made at the 
commencement of the year for a soldiers' monument, and 
this sum has been securely invested. I may be permitted 



21 

to suggest that larger siims must be appropriated for this 
object from year to year, or donations for the purpose must 
come from some other source, if the present generation 
would see a monument erected, worthy of the city, and 
worthy of our heroic dead. 

For an account of improvements made in our cemeteries, 
I would refer you to the Report of the Committee on Cem- 
eteries. 

CONCLUSION. 

Crentlemen of the City Councils : Thus briefly have I 
endeavored to give you a summary of our acts for the year 
now closing. Many enterprises have been undertaken, and 
a large amount of money expended. I trust that our offi- 
cial conduct may bear the test of a careful examination, 
and receive the approval of our fellow citizens. I trust that 
it shall appear that what we have done has been judiciously 
undertaken, and that the city government for 1873 has been 
wisely and economically administered. I know that our 
purpose has been honest, and that our desire to advance the 
interests and prosperity of the city has been sincere and 
uniform . 

Our official relations have been of the most agreeable 
character, and our intercourse leaves no bitterness behind. 
Personally I desire to expess my appreciation of the kind- 
ness and courtesy which you have unifoi'mly extended to 
me. I have looked to you for counsel and support in the 
discharge of duties which, at the commencement of my 
term of service, were new, and oftentimes have been per- 
plexing, and I have not looked in vain. The friendships, 
formed under such circumstances, I shall cherish to my 
latest days. 

And now as we step aside and leave our places to those 
who shall come after us, let it be our prayer to the Father 
of us all, that he may guard and keep our young but raj> 
idly-growing city in the future, as he has done in the past. 



M A N C H E S T E R 



CITY GOVERNMENT 
1873. 



MAYOR. 



* CHARLES H= BARTLETT. 
tJOHN P. NEWELL. 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — Israel W. Dickey. 

Ward 2. — Jonathan B. Moore. 
Ward 3. — Nehemiah S. Bean. 
Ward 4. — Horace Pettee. 
Ward 5. — John Sweeney. 

Ward 6.— Ephraim S. ITarvey. 
Ward 7. — Luther E. Wallace. 

Ward 8. — Albert A. Woodward. 



* Resigned February 18th. 
t Elected to fill vacancy. 



24 

PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Charles A. Smith. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Sylvanus B. Putman. 



members of 

Ward 1. 

Levi L. Aldrich, 
Sam C. Lowell, 
James L. Sweet. 

Ward 2. 

Leonard Shelters, 
John W. Dickey, 
Frank Pushee. 

Ward 3. 

Charles A. Smith, 
Rufus H. Pike, 
Robert G. Annan. 

Ward 4. 

Charles R. Colley, 
Joseph L. Smith, 
Jason Weston. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

Ward 5. 

John L. Kennedy, 
Patrick Cullity, 
John F. Cahill. 

Ward 6. 

Henry B. Fairbanks, 
Amory Cobb, 
Charles K. Tucker. 

Ward 7. 

William G. Dunham, 
Isaac W. Darrah, 
Isaac R. Dewey. 

Ward 8. 

Silas A. Felton, 
Frank D. Hanscom, 
John Field. 



MESSENGER. 

William Stevens. 



INAUGUEAL ADDEESS 

OF THE 

HON. JAMES A. WESTON^ 

TO THE 

CITY COUNCILS OF MANCHESTER, 



DELIVERED BEFORE THE TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, 
JANUARY 6, 1874. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

We have been called by our fellow-citizens to important 
and responsible positions ; we have each taken a solemn 
oath that the duties we have assumed shall be faithfully 
and impartially performed ; and the aid of the Divine Be- 
ing has been invoked to guide and direct us in the manage- 
ment of the great trusts committed to our care. 

Let us be mindful of our obligations to the whole people, 
whose servants we have become ; the solemn pledges we 
liave here made, and our dependence upon Him who holds 
the destinies of all in his hands. 

By the blessing of a kind Providence, this community 
has been prospered, in all its interests, to an unusual de- 
gree ; and its freedom from any great calamity, and from 
the many public trials to which cities are ever exposed, 
may well awaken emotions of gratitude in every heart. 

The growth of our municipality in population and wealth, 
within the last few years, has been unprecedented in its 
history. The census of 1870 credits the city with a popu- 
lation of 23,509 ; and the number of polls at the same 
time, as returned by the assessors, was 4,959. This num- 
ber was increased to 6,212 in the three years following ; 
and on the assumption that the population increased in 
the same ratio, we now number about 30,000 souls ; while 



28 

the valuation of property, during the same period, has 
increased at the rate of nearly a half million dollars 
annually. 

The check to our business industries by the late finan- 
cial embarrassments has been inconsiderable, as compared 
with its effects upon other places ; and all pursuits are 
gradually regaining- their former vigor and activity. There 
seems to be no good reason to doubt that the recent expan- 
sion of the city is permanent and substantial, and that the 
future will be fruitful in all the elements required to pro- 
mote the happiness and success of the people. With this 
encouraging view of the present and future, it behooves us, 
as we are at the threshold of our public labors, to begin' 
not only with broad and liberal purposes, but with a thor- 
ough and faithful examination of public wants, that we 
may meet the requirements, and answer the just and rea- 
sonable expectations of an intelligent and progressive com- 
munity. We cannot, however, be unmindful of the heavy 
indebtedness already incurred by the city, and the burden 
of taxation incident thereto; and while the demands for 
substantial and needful improvements ought to be heeded 
our administration must be characterized by a determina- 
tion to adhere to the most rigid economy in all business 
transactions, manfully resisting all attempts to draw upon 
the pul)lic treasury, except where the necessities are em- 
phatically apparent, and where the public welfare will be 
promoted thereby. A just discrimination, too, should ever 
be exercised between parsimony and frugality, as well as 
between extravagance and liberality. 

The annual reports of the officers of the various depart- 
ments of the city government are received too late to be of 
much service at this time. They have been submitted, 
however, and to them I must refer you for a more particu- 
lar description of their several requirements, than can now 
be furnished. The details of receipts and expenditures for 



29 

the past year will be published as usual ; but in the mean- 
time I invite your attention to the following general state- 
ments, furnished by the Treasurer, setting forth the pres- 
ent condition of the city : 

FINANCES. 

Amount funded debt Jan. 1, 1873 S762,100 00 

Decrease during the year 1,600 00 

Amount funded debt Jan. 1, 1874 $760,500 00 

Amount temporary loan Jan. 1, 1873 2,298 57 

Increase during the year 96,120 GO 

Amount temporary loan Jan. 1, 1874 $98,418 57 

Amount interest due, estimated 20,000 00 

Outstanding bills due Jan. 1, 1874 62,998 10 

Total indebtedness Jan. 1, 1874 $941,916 67 

Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1874 • • .$32,803 11 

l^otes due the city 3,163 40 

Interest on same "^^O 00 

Water bonds unsold 68,100 00 



State 



a 29,500 00 



-$134,056 51 



Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1874 • $807,860 16 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1873 530,680 91 

Increase of indebtedness during the year $277,179 25 

The Collector estimates that about $22,000 may be real- 
ized from the lists of uncollected taxes, an amount much 
less than usual at this time of the year. It will be ob- 
served by the foregoing statements that there are oustand- 
ing bills and interest now due, amounting to more than 
eighty-one thousand dollars, and that the cash on hand 
with which to meet these bills is less than thirty-three thou- 
sand dollars, leaving a balance of more than forty-eight 
-thousand five hundred dollars unprovided for. But since 



30 

this statement was furnished, the State bonds, amounting 
to $29,500, have been disposed of. 

There are also notes against the city which must be pro- 
vided for, maturing as follows : 

In the month of January ,^21 000 00 

In the niontli of Februaiy 29 000 00 

In the mouth of March 28 020 00 

In the mouth of xipril , 14 jyQ 00 

Amounting to S92,720 00 

The ordinary monthly drafts are also to be met, and in 
addition to all this, 821,500 of the. funded debt matures in 
July and August. No great amount of revenue can be ex- 
pected from taxes until the first of July ; therefore to meet 
all tliese liabilities we must rely mainly upon the city bonds 
unsold, amounting to 168,100. And I recommend that 
these be,, disposed of as fast as it can be done advantage- 
ously, and that the proceeds be applied to the reduction of 
the debt. There will still remain a balance of the floatina; 
debt unprovided for, and I see no better way than to issue 
additional bonds to an amount necessary to meet the de- 
ficiency. 

A resolution was passed by our predecessors in favor of 
discontinuing the practice of insuring the property of the 
city. No insurance has since been effected, and most of 
that formerly existing has expired. Should this policy 
be continued, 1 recommend that an am.ount equal at least 
to the sum required to effect ordinary insurance, be set 
apart as the foundation of a fund, from which to make 
good any damage resulting from fire. 

WATER-WORKS. 

The enterprise of supplying pure and abundant water 
for the benefit of its citizens, is the most important one - 



31 

that the city has ever entered upon, both as regards the 
universal benefit to be derived therefrom and the debt cre- 
ated thereby. The entire management of this work is 
confided to a Boai'd of Water Commissioners, the power of 
granting appropriations therefor being reserved to the City 
Councils. 

The amount already appropriated is §550,009 00 

Amount expeiided for construction, tools, buildings, 

machinery and engineering 507,508 91 

Balance $42,491 09 

The following sums have also been charged to the water- 
works account, the expenditures having been made under 
the direction of the Water Commissioners, with the excep- 
tion of the discounts allowed, as the bonds were sold and 
the interests or coupons paid on the same, these amounts 
not being regarded by them as legitimate expenses of con- 
struction, to wit : 

Expense of Commissioners' visiting other 

works 1^285 87 

Cost of prelimiuar}^ surveys, other than 

Lake Massabesic 1,815 38 

$2,101 2.5 

Office furniture 662 35 

Expended on highway near Geo. Porter's. .$1,535 29 

Advanced for lands on new highwa}^ 4,824 00 

Stone arch bridge on new highway 5,118 00 

Grading and culverts on new highway 2,523 24 

14,000 53 

Balance on interest in 1872 $10,4.50 77 

Discount on State bonds in 1873 .... 2,488 50 

Balance on interest in 1873, including cou- 
pons due January 1, 1874 21,381 74 

$34,321 01 

Expended for service pipes 4,990 43 

Amounting in all to $56,075 57 



32 

Should these items remain charged to the water-works 
account, it will be observed that the appropriations have 
been overdrawn in the sum of $13,584.48 ; but should it be 
deemed expedient to relieve the water-works account of 
these expenditures, the balance of the appropriation ($42,- 
491.09) will be nearly sufficient to complete the works now 
in progress — the estimated cost being from fifty to sixty 
thousand dollars. The Board of Water Commissioners 
ask to have this amount of available funds placed at their 
disposal. 

The amount of pipes laid to this date is 21,581 miles, 
and 209 public fire hydrants are set and ready for use in 
case of fire. 

There have been 326 applications made for water, and 
317 service pipes are now laid. 

The revenue derived from water takers to this date, ex- 
clusive of hydrant service, is $2,097.60 ; and the annual 
income at the present time, as estimated by the Engineer, 
is at the rate of $18,240.00, or about three per cent, on the 
cost of the works. This estimate includes the use of the 
public fire hydrants, for which the city is expected to allow 
the water-works department $60.00 per annum each. 

The dam on the outlet of the lake is completed, and the 
pumps are now being placed in position. The exterior of 
the brick pumping station is finished, and in a few months 
the pipes may be filled from the Massabesic, by forcing the 
water directly into them — the reservoir being incomplete. 
By midsummer of the present season, the works are ex- 
pected to be in full operation, and the waters of the lake 
supplied in abundance in all the principal streets. 

SCHOOLS. 

It is not necessary that I should enter into a lengthy dis- 
cussion relative to the public schools. Their control and 



management is vested in the hands of a separate board, 
chosen with special reference to their qualifications for this 
purpose. Tliey have furnished a detailed report as to their 
condition, wants and necessities, and to this report your 
earnest and favorable attention is invited, that when wc 
are called upon to make the annual appropriation for their 
maintenance, we shall be able to act with a clear under- 
standing on a matter of so much moment. Too much care 
cannot be bestowed upon this subject. Nothing we can do 
for our children will be of so much value to them, and so 
secure the interests of society, as to give them a good, sound 
education. It is the best proof of the wisdom of our fathers 
that they based the permanency and prosperity of republi- 
can institutions upon this foundation. 

SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

The foundation of a Grammar school-house on Ash street 
was commenced in 1872, and was partially laid. During 
the last year the walls have gone up, the roof has been cov- 
ered, in fact the entire outside of the structure is substan- 
tially completed ; but nothing has been done to the inte- 
rior, except such work as it was necessary to do in connec- 
tion with the outside. The house is built of brick, the 
ground plan forming a cross, and has a tower on the north- 
east and south-west corners. It has a basement, two full 
stories, and a story in the mansard roof. There are eight 
school-rooms, designed to accommodate forty-six pupils 
each, also a large hall in the roof story, capable of seating 
six hundred persons. 

The amount already expended is 828,239.76. The arch- 
itect estimates that a further expenditure of about f 26,000 
will be required to complete the building ready for occu- 
pancy. It is understood that the wants of the School De- 
partment require the completion of the building as early as 
practicable. 

3 



34 

I am not aware that any further accommodations will be 
called for the present year ; but a prudent foresight would 
suggest that convenient and ample lots be procured in such 
locations as may require the erection of school buildings 
hereafter, and before the most desirable sites are occupied 
for other purposes. 

THE CITY LIBRARY. 

The value and usefulness of the city library is every year 
more apparent, and as an educational institution it should 
receive our fostering care. It furnishes the material whereby 
all classes of the community may be entertained and in- 
structed, and its shelves are annually receiving valuable 
acquisitions. The present number ot volumes is 17,671, 
being an increase of 609 over the previous year. 

During the year 1863, a complete catalogue of the books 
was published. Since that time annual supplements have 
been prepared, some of which are now out of print, occa- 
sioning much annoyance to those in search of particular 
works. It seems reasonable that as often as once in ten 
years there should be a complete catalogue. I suggest that 
tlie necessary funds be furnished to the trustees to defray the 
expense of compiling and reprinting all the supplements. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

During the past year tlie losses by fire have been much 
below the average. There have been twenty alarms, and 
the service of the firemen were required eleven times. The 
entire loss is estimated at 116,900, on which there was an 
insurance of $8,900. 

The fire-alarm telegraph continues to meet the high ex- 
pectations entertained by its advocates ; and now that the 
firemen and tlie people have become accustomed to its work- 
ings, its value cannot be over-estimated. 



35 

The difficulty of comrauiiicatiiig the alarm to all sections 
of the city lias been substantially overcome by locating a 
bell and striker in the north-west part. It may be expe- 
dient, however, to place a striker upon the new school-house 
on Ash street. 

Fire hydrants, furnishing an ample supply of water, are 
now provided throughout the thickly-settled portion of the 
city. Ward Seven, however, an important and thriving 
locality, is not yet supplied, nor is there an adequate supply 
of water in reservoirs. I trust that the water-pipes will 
cross the river at no distant day. 

The horses used in connection with Engine Company No. 
3, are owned by an individual, and are so employed that 
delays frequently and necessarily occur. I am not at this 
time prepared to suggest the best means by which more 
promptness can be secured in this regard ; but I deem the 
subject worthy of mention and investigation. 

The outlying districts are so remote from the engine house 
on Vine street, that in case of alarms in those localities a 
long time necessarily intervenes before the arrival of the 
steam fire engines ; and a fire of little magnitude when dis- 
covered has often made considerable headway during this 
unavoidable delay. As a means of securing a more prompt 
application of water in such cases, I recommend that two 
or more small hydrant hose companies be organized, and 
provided with suitable apparatus, and buildings for its pro- 
tection ; the companies to be properly located in the out- 
skirts of the water distribution. When the full head of 
water is upon the pipes, 152 feet above Elm street at the 
City Hall, the hydrant streams will perform effective ser- 
vice and by the means suggested many fires would be ex- 
tinguished before the arrival of tlie steamers. 

The promptness and efficiency of the officers and members 
of the Fire Department were never more apparent ; and our 
exemption from disastrous conflagrations may, in a great 



36 

measure, be attributable to this cause. The firemen exhibit 
much pride in keeping their apparatus in good condition, 
and the emulation that exists is healthy and commendable. 
No better evidence is needed of the harmony and good 
feeling existing than the organization of the Firemen's Re- 
lief Association, established for the purpose of supplying 
aid to its own number in misfortune. I refer to this with 
pleasure, and crave this opportunity to commend the associ- 
ation to the favorable consideration of all public-spirited 
citizens. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The prevention of crime, the preservation of the peace- 
and the protection of the rights and property of citizens, 
are among the first duties of the Police Department. To 
maintain good order, the officers themselves should be or- 
derly ; and to secure the safety and well-being of the com- 
munity, requires the prompt action of discreet, intelligent, 
efficient and upright men. Unnecessary harshness and a use- 
less show of authority are to be avoided. The law presumes 
that all parties are innocent, until proven guilty, and those 
who are accused of crime are entitled to as much leniency 
as the nature of the case admits. 

During the past year 1,443 arrests have been made, being 
an increase of 672 over that of the previous year. The 
amounts received in fines and costs is $9,162.86. The rev- 
enue derived from licenses of job teams is 8705.83. 

COMMONS. 

The custom established some years since, of annually con- 
structing a section of iron fence to enclose our public squares, 
was discontinued the past year. But I cannot doubt the 
wisdom of the expenditures heretofore made for this pur- 



37 

pose. I therefore recommend that the practice be renewed 
the present year, by the erection of a fence of suitable de- 
sign on one side of Concord Square. 

The pond in Hanover Square was drawn off the past year, 
and the bottom thoroughly cleaned of the sand and sedi- 
ment, the accumulations of many years. A bank wall is 
partially constructed on the northerly side. It will be our 
province to complete this work, as well as to exercise a 
proper care for all the commons, that they may continue to 
be an ornament to the city, and a means of promoting the 
health and comfort of our citizens. 

Some preliminary steps have been taken by our predeces- 
sors in reference to the establishment of a Public Park of 
ample dimensions ; but no actual progress has been made. 
Of the desirableness of this enterprise there can be no doubt, 
and it should be consummated whenever the state of the 
city finances warrant an outlay in this direction. 

CEMETERIES. 

Preparations for inclosing both the Valley and Pine Grove 
Cemeteries with substantial and durable iron fences, were 
commenced in 1872 ; but the progress of the work is ne- 
cessarily slow. I apprehend that the receipts from the sale 
of lots in the valley, and from other sources, will be in- 
sufficient to do more than defray the ordinary expense of 
the proper care of the grounds, and that an appropriation 
will be asked for to aid in the construction of the contem- 
plated enclosure. 

In addition to the usual care of Pine Grove Cemetery, 
water has been introduced by an aqueduct, the wells that 
had been provided having failed to furnish a supply. This 
will be a great convenience, and will be appreciated by the 
proprietors of lots, as well as the public generally. 



38 

HIGHWAYS AND STREETS, 

No department of the public service comes more directly 
in contact with the interests of the people than that of streets 
and highways, and no one is subjected to severer criticism. 
Nearly everybody has a personal interest in having easy and 
agreeable thoroughfares, and the reputation of the commu- 
nity for its good taste, advancement and enterprise is tested 
by its action in this regard. 

It cannot be denied that our streets are, and for years 
have been, in a very unsatisfactory condition ; and it is ev- 
ident that they must remain so until some new method of 
construction and maintenance is adopted. All of the good 
road-making material within easy access of our principal 
streets is exhausted, and gravel is only obtained by long 
and expensive haulage. Nor is this the only difficulty. 
Much of the material thus obtained is unsuitable, except in 
a certain condition of moisture; but it is intolerable in 
either extreme of wet or dry weather. 

Now that the water and gas-pipes are principally laid, it 
seems to be a favorable time to inaugurate street improve- 
ments of a permanent character. 

Most of the New England cities have extensively macad- 
amized their streets, and the result has given general, but 
not universal satisfaction. My own observation induces the 
belief that we ought at least to give the plan a thorough 
trial. The Water Commissioners have procured a stone 
crusher, the use of which can probably be obtained. And 
I recommend that immediately upon the opening of spring, 
measures be taken to prepare the material for macadamizing 
some of the streets ; and that a sufficient amount of work 
be done to give the matter a fair and satisfactory test. I 
would suggest that a separate appropriation be made for 
tliis purpose. 

In all sections of the city, I hope that more than the usual 



39 

attention will be given to the interests of this department. 
The appropriations must be liberal, and when made, much 
depends upon the manner in which they are expended by 
the several surveyors. Great care should therefore be ex- 
ercised in the selection of these officers. 

The average wear of a set of planking on the Granite 
Bridge has been three years ; it having been replanked in 
1865, 1868 and 1871. This work will probably be required 
again during the present year, and a portion, or all, of the 
floor timbers will need to be renewed. 

SEWERS. 

The introduction of water into the city, for domestic and 
other purposes, renders it more imperative that adequate 
sewerage be furnished. The main sewer in Elm street 
was constructed as far northward as Amherst street in 1871, 
and no subsequent progress has been effected. The con- 
tinuation of this work seems to be required, and I trust 
such progress will be made as the state of the finances will 
permit. Other similar works will be demanded in various 
sections of the city ; and in their construction I cannot too 
earnestly urge that proper attention be paid to some well- 
defined system. 

The results of laying some of the present sewers with- 
out due consideration in this respect, are being manifested 
in various ways ; and in some instances a reconstruction 
will become necessary. 

CITY FARM. 

During the year 1868, a portion of the City Farm was lot- 
ted out, and offered for sale at prices fixed by a committee 
of the City Councils. Land to the amount of about twenty 
acres has been disposed of, from which a revenue of about 



40 

ten thousand dollars has been derived. As a result of this 
policy, several fine houses have been erected upon these 
lands, and the whole neighborhood is greatly improved. I 
trust it will be your pleasure to continue the same policy, 
until the farm is reduced to a proper size for economical 
management. The whole number of paupers at the Alms- 
house during the year, is eleven ; the average number is 
four and two-thirds. The average number of prisoners at 
the House of Correction is twenty and one-eighth ; the 
whole number is two hundred and forty. Extensive re- 
pairs upon the farm buildings are nearly completed. The 
outlay thus far is $7,689.93, and the architect estimates that 
$1,000.00 more will be required to complete what is in con- 
templation. 

PEST-HOUSE. 

Tlie late City Councils authorized the erection of a pest- 
house, Avhich is now under contract and in a good state of 
progress. The main building is 34x44 feet, two and a half 
stories high, with which is connected an L, one and a half 
stories high. There is also a wood-shed, stable and car- 
riage-house. The contract price is $4,520.00 ; but it will re- 
quire about $1,000.00 in addition to finish the building and 
surroundings ready for occupancy, exclusive of furniture. 
The contract is to be completed by the middle of February 
next. The sum of $3,459.15 has been paid toward this 
work. 

CONCLUSION. 

In the suggestions which I have presented in reference 
to some of the subjects that will engage our attention, I 
have endeavored to refer to those of the most importance, 
and have made such recommendations as appear to be 



41 

proper at this time ; but the views expressed may be modi- 
fied upon a fuller knowledge of all the circumstances in 
the several cases. Matters of moment may have been 
omitted, and unforeseen questions will undoubtedly arise 
during our official term, demanding our best judgment 
and action. 

We have voluntarily taken upon ourselves the burden of 
watching and protecting great interests, and in the per- 
formance of these trusts we should remember that we are 
only rendering to our city a portion of that service that 
every citizen owes to the community of which he forms a 
part. 

Let us go forward with vigor and perseverance, ignoring 
party lines or personal preferences, determined that if 
there are errors, they shall be without guilt ; and if there 
are failures, they shall be in the execution and not in the 
endeavor. 

Laboring in this spirit, I pledge you my hearty co-opera- 
tion in all measures calculated to promote the general wel- 
fare ; and you may be assured of my most earnest efforts 
to render our official intercourse pleasant and harmonious. 

May we engage in the work before us unitedly and zeal- 
ously, and aim to make Manchester a home to men of leis- 
ure, a convenience and a great opportunity to the busy, 
safe to the rich, just and beneficent to the poor, a light to 
ignorance and a blessing to all. 



MANCHESTER 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 
1874. 



MAYOR. 

JAMES A. WESTON. 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — Israel W. Dickey. 

Ward 2. — Jonathan B. Moore. 
Ward 3. — George R. Simmons. 

Ward 4. — Martin V. B. Edgerly. 
Ward 5. — John L. Kennedy. 
Ward 6. — John M. Hayes. 

Ward 7. — James P. Walker. 
Ward 8.— Silas A. Felton. 



44 

PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Rufiis H. Pike. 

CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam. 



members of common council. 
Ward 1. Ward 5. 



Sam C. Lowell, 
James L. Sweet, 
James Patten. 

Ward 2. 

John W. Dickey, 
Frank S. Pushee, 
Jonathan Dodge. 

Ward 3. 

Rufus H. Pike, 
Robert G. Annan, 
Thomas W. Lane. 

Ward 4. 

Samuel F. Murry, 
Augustus F. Hall, 
John K. Piper. 



Patrick Cullity, 
Patrick Riordan, 
Patrick J. O'Neil. 

Ward G. 

Isaac Huse, 
Jeremiah Abbott, 
David M. Goodwin. 

Ward 7. 

William G. Dunham, 
Isaac W. Darrah, 
Isaac R. Dewey. 

Ward 8. 

Madison Gerry, 
Warren K. Richardson, 
Lorenzo D. Colbv. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Finance. — Messrs. Dunham, Abbott and Murry ; the Mayor 
and Alderman Walker. 



45 

Accounts. — Aldermen Felton and Edgerly ; Messrs. Dar- 
rah, Pushee and Hall. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Dickey and Kennedy ; 
Messrs. Annan, Lane and Goodwin. 

Puhlio Instr^iction . — Aldermen Walker and Felton; 
Messrs. Piper, Dodge and Murry. 

Streets. — Aldermen Hayes and Kennedy ; Messrs. Dar- 
rah, Huse and Hall. 

Oity Farm. — Aldermen Simmons and Moore ; Messrs. 
Sweet, Gerry and Riordan. 

Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Edgerly and Felton ; 
Messrs. Abbott, Patten and CuUity. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Moore and Kennedy ; 
Messrs. Pushee, Huse and Goodwin. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Simmons and Walker ; 
Messrs. Lowell, Lane and Colby. 

Claims. — Aldermen Moore and Hayes ; Messrs. Dewey, 
Dickey and Annan. 

House of Correctio7i. — - Aldermen Dickey and Hayes ; 
Messrs. Lowell, Oullity and Richardson. 

Military Affairs. — Aldermen Edgerly and Simmons; 
Messrs. Murry, Pushee and Riordan. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Dickey and Walker ; Messrs. 
Patten, Richardson and O'Neil. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Moore and Edgerly. 
Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Hayes and Felton. 
Licenses. — Aldermen Kennedy and Simmons. 
MarshaVs Accounts. — Aldermen Edgerly and Dickey. 
Setting Trees. — Aldermen Simmons and Walker. 
Market. — Aldermen Dickey and Kennedy. 



46 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OP COMMON COUNCIL. 

Election Rettirns. — Messrs. Dickey, Gerry and O'Neil. 
Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Piper, Colby and 
Dewey. 

Enrollment. — Messrs. Dunham, Dodge and Sweet. 



ASSESSORS. 



Moses 0. Pearson, 
Christopher C. Colby, 
Nicholas Nichols, 
Thomas B. Brown, 



Maurice F. Sheehan, 

John C. Head, 
George H. Colby. 



OTERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



William H. Maxwell, 
Sayward J. Young, 
Jeremiah Stickney, 
Moses E. George, 



Patrick A. Devine, 
Jeremiah Abbott, 
Ebenezer Hartshorn, 
Georo'e S. Chandler. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

James A. Weston, ex-officio, B,ufus H. Pike, ex-officio, 

Henry E. Burnham, Frank S. Murray, 

Marshall P. Hall, Edwin Kennedy, 

John G. Lane, George P. Rockwell, 

Nathan P. Hunt, John E. Stearns. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 



Joseph G. Edgerly. 



47 

CITY TllEASUEER. 

Henry R. Chamberlin. Office — City Hall. 



COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 

Wm. G. Everett. Office— City Hall. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

John H. Andrews. 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Hon, E. A. Straw, 

Hon. Wm. P. Newell, Hon. Isaac W. Smith, 

Hon. Samuel N. Bell, Hon. Phineas Adams, 

Nathan P. Hunt, Esq., Rufus H. Pike, ex-officio, 

Hon. James A. Weston, ex-officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 
Samuel Upton. Office — City Hall. 

Assistant 'Justice. 
Henry E. Burnham. 

CitT/ Marshal. 
Darwin A. Simons. 



48 

Assistant Marshal. 
, Daniel R. Prescott. 

Captain of the Watch. 
Thomas L, Quimby. 

Day Police. 

Horatio W. Loiiga, George F. Laird. 

Night Watchmen. 

John C. Colburn, Hezekiah H. Noyes, 

Edward Bonner, Hiram Stearns, 

Patrick Doyle, Francis H. Webster, 

Wm. H. B. Newhall, James Bucklin, 

Samuel Boyce, Timothy P. Shea, 

Zadoc B. Wright, Michael Fox. 

Constables. 

Darwin A. Simons, Daniel R. Prescott, 

Thomas S. Montgomery, Harrison D. Lord, 

Anson Merrill, Joseph M. Rowell. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Darwin A. Simons, Patrick A. Devine. 

Richard J. P. Goodwin. 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Richard J. P. Goodwin. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Benjamin C. Kendall. 



49 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 



Wilberforce Ireland, Andrew C. Wallace, 

Albion H. Lowell, Freeman Higgins. 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR, 

Joseph E. Bennett. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 



Ward 1. — Charles H. Osgood. 
Ward 2. — John H. Rano. 

Ward 3— George W. Riddle. 
Ward 4. — Moulton Knowles. 
Ward 5. — Daniel F. Healey. 
Ward 6. — George H. Dudley. 
Ward 7. — Chauncey C. Favor. 
Ward 8. — Hiram Stearns. 

Ward Cleric a. 

Ward 1.— Silas C. Clatur. 

Ward 2. — Israel 0. Endicott. 

Ward 3. — Henry S. Clark. 

Ward 4. — Samuel S. Piper. 
Ward 5. — Martin J. Foley. 

Ward 6. — Daniel R. Prescott. 

Ward 7.— Wm. McElroy. 

Ward 8. — George I. Ayer. 



50 



Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 



Franklin W. McKinley, 
Willis P. Fogg, 
William H. Vickery. 

Ward 2. 

Abner J. Sanborn, 
David Farmer, 
John Gillespie. 

Ward 3. 

Henry F. Morse, 
George P. James, 
Clarence P. Page. 

Ward .4. 

Gustavus M. Sanborn, 
Augustus Wagner, 
Horace Gordon. 



Ward 5. 

Jeremiah O'Connell, 
Michael Kane, 
Patrick Harrington. 

Ward 6. 

Henry A. Gage, 
George W. Baker, 
Jeremiah Garvin. 

Ward 7. 

Guy B. Dunham, 
Frank W. Avery, 
Nathan B. Tilton. 

Ward 8. 

Benjamin S. Nichols, 
Henry H. Dickey, 
Robert Lund. 



MANCHESTER WATER-WORKS. 



SECOND ANNUAL EEPORT 



BoAED OF Water Commission ees, 



■X"E.A-R. 1873. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



The Board of Water Commissioners herewith present 
their second annual report relating to the construction of 
Water- Works for the city under the provisions of the ordi- 
nance adopted by the City Council, August 1, 1871. 

The amount appropriated for this purpose by the City 
Council in 1872, was four hundred thousand dollars, (1400,- 
000.00), of which sum, exclusive of interest and discount 
on bonds sold, two hundred forty-seven thousand five hun- 
dred ninety-three dollars, seventy-two cents ($247,593.72), 
was expended during that year, as appears from the report 
of the Engineer at the close of the year, leaving a balance 
of one hundred and fifty-two thousand four hundred six 
dollars, twenty-eight cents ($152,406.28), of that appropria- 
tion to be expended during the present year. 

In their report of last year the Commissioners recom- 
mended that an additional appropriation of one hundred 
fifty thousand dollars ($150,000.00) should be made for the 
purpose of- completing the works on a more extended scale 
than could be done with the appropriation as at first made ; 
that the bonds of the State of New Hampshire, then in 
the possession of the city, should be applied for such appro- 
priation and to make up the sum required in excess of what 
might be realized from the State bonds, and that the Com- 
missioners be authorized to expend the sums received for 
water rates. Early in May the Board presented a memo- 
rial to the City Council, in which they recommended that 
until the Council were satisfied of the strength and suffi- 
ciency of the pipes that had been laid, no appropriation 



54 

should be made for their extension until such doubts were 
removed, but that for the other works in progress, as esti- 
mated, they recommended an appropriation of seventy-five 
thousand dollars (175,000). 

The City Council did not adopt in full the recommenda- 
tion of the Board, but on the sixth of May, 1873, appropri- 
ated sixty thousand dollars ($60,000.00) for the construc- 
tion of the works, and on July 21, 1873, appropriated ninety 
thousand dollars ($90,000.00) more, for the extension of 
the system of water pipes in the streets of the city. 

As soon as practicable after the appropriation of May 6th 
was made, the Engineer was directed to obtain proposals for 
the construction of the reservoir, but on the proposals of- 
fered being examined, it was not deemed for the interest of 
the city to accept any of them, but to do the work under the 
direction of the Engineer. This work was prosecuted as 
rapidly as the nature of such construction would admit and 
with as large a force as could be economically employed. 

The extension of the water pipes was begun immediately 
after the adoption of the resolution appropriating ninety 
thousand dollars ($90,000.00) for that object, and was con- 
tinued as long as the season would permit the same to be 
done to advantage. The extreme cold weather in the early 
part of November, however, prevented both of these classes 
of work from being fully completed. 

The total expenditures for the present year, including the 
balance of interest for the year 1872, and the discount on 
the sale of the State bonds, has been two hundred ninety- 
four thousand, six hundred nine dollars and two cents 
($294,609.02), and the total expenditure to the end of the 
present year, five hundred forty-two thousand, two hundred 
two dollars seventy-four cents ($542,202.74), leaving un- 
expended as the accounts now stand in the office of the 
City Treasurer, the sum of seven thousand, seven hundred 
ninety-seven dollars twenty-six cents ($7,797.26). By the 
provisions of the ordinance establishing the Board of Water 



55 

Commissioners, the excess of interest on the bonds sold 
was to be carried to the construction account. Under this 
provision the discount at which the water bonds of the 
city, and the State bonds were sold, has been included in 
the above amount of expenditure, although the bonds were 
negotiated by other parties than the Water Commissioners. 

The amount of this discount, as charged on the city 
bonds, was nine thousand forty-seven dollars and fifty cents 
(19,047.50), and the discount on the State bonds was two 
thousand four hundred eighty-eight dollars fifty cents 
($2,488.50). 

The expense of the land damages on the new highway 
laid out from near the reservoir past the pumping station to 
Sawyer's Corner, amounting to four thousand eight hundred 
twenty-four dollars (14,824.00), the expense of building 
the bridge across Cohas Brook on the same highway, 
amounting to five thousand one hundred eighteen dollars 
($5,118.00), the ex:pense of grading a portion of the same 
highway and putting in culverts in the same, amounting to 
two thousand five hundred twenty-three dollars twenty-four 
cents ($2,523.24), and the amount expended in changing 
the grade of the highway near the meeting-house at Man- 
chester Centre, amounting to one thousand five hundred 
thirty-five dollars twenty-nine cents ($1,535.29), have all 
been charged in the accounts in the City Treasurer's office 
to the account of the construction of the Water-Works. 

In the opinion of the board, these sums, amounting in 
the aggregate to twenty-five thousand five hundred thirty- 
six dollars fifty-three cents ($25,536.53), should have been 
charged to other appropriations to which the expenditure 
more properly belongs, and that the accounts being cor- 
rected in these respects, there would be an unexpended 
balance of thirty-three thousand three hundred thirty-three 
dollars seventy-nine cents ($33,333.79) of the appropria- 
tion applicable to the construction of the Water-Works. 

In determining the balance of interest due and to be 



56 

charged to the construction of the Water- Works, no al- 
lowance has been made'" for the water rates due from the 
city for fire and other purposes, while by the ordinance 
above referred to, the construction of the Water- Works 
is to be charged with only the balance of interest after de- 
ducting the sums due from the city. This correction of 
the interest account will diminish the reported amount of 
expenditures to that extent, and increase the balance of 
the appropriation now unexpended. 

The amount required to be expended in the excavation of 
the canal and trench for the penstock, by reason of the un- 
precedentedly hard character of the material to be removed, 
the cost of building and setting up the pumping apparatus, 
and the laying of service pipes which it had been origin- 
ally proposed should be charged to the water-takers, has 
been considerably greater than was at first esimated, there- 
fore the appropriation thus far made will be insufficient for 
the full completion of the work that has been undertaken. 
If the City Council should think the items above referred 
to should remain charged to the cost of construction of the 
works, the amount estimated to complete the work now in 
progress would not be much, if any, short of ninety thousand 
dollars, and the Board would recommend that an appropria- 
tion be made of an amount sufficient to complete the works 
that have been commenced. 

If correction should be made of the sums charged against 
the appropriation for the Water- Works, as suggested by the 
P.oard, the amount required would be reduced to that ex- 
tent. 

The Board would recommend that surveys and estimates 
be made of the expense required to extend the system of 
water-pipes beyond the limits where it has been proposed 
heretofore to construct them, including the extension of the 
pipes to PiscataquogandAmoskeag, in order that the atten- 
tion of the public may be called to the subject, so that when, 
in the future, it may be deemed by the City Council expe- 



57 

client to extend the pipes in those directions, the cost of the 
expenditure required may be accessible to the members of 
the City Council. 

The subject of the regulation of the water rates has been 
considered by the Board, and some changes have been found 
desirable in order that they may be adjusted as near as may 
be in accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nances. The rates as modified, with the rules and regula- 
tions deemed necessary for the collection and for the pro- 
tection of the interests of the city, are appended to this 
report. 

The Board would also suggest the propriety of having the 
part of section 13 of the ordinance of August 1, 1871, re- 
lating to the time when the water-rates are payable, so mod- 
ified that they be paid quarterly in advance on the first days 
of January, April, July and October in each year, instead 
of semi-annually, as now required, experience having shown 
that they can be more easily collected and a better regula- 
tion of the use of the water secured thereby, than by the 
ordinance as now in force. 

The report of the Engineer to the Board, showing the de- 
tails of the expenditures made under his direction, with a 
statement of the work done and in progress, and schedules 
of the property now on hand, the number of parties using 
water, and the purposes to which it is applied, is herewith 
submitted as a part of this report. 

E. A. STRAW, 
WM. P. NEWELL, 
E. W. HARRINGTON, 
ALPHEUS GAY, 
A. C. WALLACE, 
J. P. NEWELL, 
ARETAS BLOOD. 

Water Comriiissiori ers . 
S. N. Bell, Clerk. 
January 1, 1874. 



MANCHESTER WATEE-WOEKS. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT, 



DECEMBER 20, 1873. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To THE Honorable Board op Water Commissioners. 

Gentlemen : Herein is respectfully presented the second 
Annual Report required from your engineering department, 
covering the period since Dec. 21, 1872, the date of the 
first Annual Report. All the works inaugurated previous 
to the date of the last report liave been pushed forward dur- 
ing the season just closed as rapidly as possible, consistent 
with economy and permanency. The works of the reservoir 
and service pipes have been commenced during the year. 
The dam and canal lacked but a few days' labor of comple- 
tion when winter closed in so abruptly ahead of its time. 



THE DAM. 



The dam has been constructed with its apron, overfall, 
abutments, and priming, of cemented masonry. The dis- 
tance between the abutments along the overfall is one hun- 
dred feet, and the height of the overfall above the surface 
of the apron is twenty-four feet. 

From the northerly abutment to the head-gates of the 
canal, has been constructed an earth embankment, with a 
grouted masonry priming along its center, forming a part of 
the dam. This embankment is twenty-two feet wide on the 
top, and together with a bridge eighteen feet wide over the 
overfall, is intended to carry the roadway to take the place 
of the one heretofore crossing the basin to be flowed by 
this dam. 



62 

The old roadway referred to has recently been discontin- 
ued by the City Councils. 

This dam will flow twenty-eight and seven-eighths acres 
additional below the present outlet of the lake. The over- 
fall of the dam is at a level about two feet below ordinary 
high water in the lake, but will be so arranged that it can 
be flashed^up to near high water mark, as occasion shall 
require. 

There has been constructed a substantial bank wall, from 
the northerly end of the dam, northerly along the highway 
to the site of the old bridge, to protect that side of the 
basin from wash. The higliway and bridge across the old 
mill pond has been raised about three feet to lift them 
above the flowage of the new dam. Messrs. Clough & Pos- 
ter removed their saw-mill in the summer, as required for 
the construction of the new dam. 

The land to be flowed by our new dam below the old 
outlet of the lake is in part of meadow, part of woodland, 
and part of pasture. The wood and brush have been re- 
moved from this, and the stumps and roots should also be 
removed. That portion of it in the immediate vicinity of 
the dam has been already cleared of its roots and vegetable 
soils. 

The outlet of the lake should be deepened so that more 
of the water of the lake might be made available during 
severe droughts, by drawing down the lake to a lower leveL 

A new sluice should be constructed at the outlet of the 
lake to take the place of the leaky flume now standing 
there, and which has been severely battered by the saw- 
logs which the former proprietors ran through it in large 
quantities. 

CANAL. 

The canal has been excavated to a depth of fifteen feet 
below the level of the overfall, and is fourteen hundred and 



63 

seventy feet long fromjthe head-gates^at^the dam] to the 
gates at the head of the penstock. 

The banks on each side^ave been built|up to a level five 
feet above the level of the|overfall of the dam, of material 
excavated from the ^canal, and the embankment on the 
northerly side has been finished thirty-six feet wide for a 
drive-way from the dam to the^pumping station. 

The water in the canal will be on a level with that in the 
lake, ordinarily. The slopes of the canal have not been 
paved, therefore the bottom of the canal may need an occa- 
sional clearing. The sluice-gates and frames at each end 
of the canal are of Georgia pine and oak, and are to be fit- 
ted with racks and fish screens. A proper, substantial rail- 
ing will be required on each side of the dam, along the north- 
erly side of the canal, and on the highway bank-wall. 

PENSTOCK. 

The penstock, so far as completed, has been constructed 
of Georgia pine. It is a cylinder six feet in diameter in- 
side, and is six hundred feet long. It has been formed of 
staves four and three inches thick and three and one-half 
inches wide, jointed to radial lines and laid so as to break 
joints, and has been hooped by 1-2 by 2 1-2 inch, and by 3-8 
by 2 1-2 inch wrought-iron hoops clamped by two wrought- 
iron bolts each. The hoops have been made in half lengths 
with the joints united by the bolts. The hoops have been 
painted with red lead and linseed oil paint. The bed of 
the tube is to be thoroughly puddled and the surface out- 
side covered with cement concrete. The penstock slopes 
twenty-six feet in its length, and the water in the lower end 
at the pump house will have forty feet head pressure. The 
lower end of the penstock enters into a large branch cast- 
ing standing in the pump house, from which branches two 
forty-two-inch pipes leading to the turbine wheels, and one 



64 

thirty-inch pipe leading to the pumps, and on which stands 
a stand-pipe. 

TAIL-RACE. 

The tail-race from the wheel-pit to the old water course 
has been excavated, and walled as far as it is proposed to 
wall it at present. A substantial stone arch has been con- 
structed over the tail-race for an approach to the main door 
of the pump-house. 

PUMP-HOUSE. 

The pump-house is seventy feet long and forty-five feet 
wide. The walls are of brick, with granite trimmings, and 
are on the rear thirty-two feet high, and on the front twen- 
ty-two and one-half feet high. To the southerly side of the 
pump-house is attached a wing with two floors and attic, 
arranged for a dwelling for the attendant who will be in 
charge of the pumping machinery. The exterior of the 
pump-house is complete. There is yet to be a gallery con- 
structed around the interior, and the interior of the dwell- 
ing remains to be finished. The foundations to receive the 
pumpingmachinery are complete. The proposed concrete 
floor of the pump-house will not be laid until the machinery 
is set up complete. 

PUMPS. 

Proposals were requested near the close of last year for 
our pumping machinery from several prominent builders of 
the class of work desired. A design and specification were 
submitted to the several parties, as a basis for their bids, 
and tenders were received ranging in amount from about 
thirty-five thousand dollars to seventy thousand dollars. 
Messrs. R. D. Wood & Co., of Philadelphia, being the low- 



65 

est bidders, received the award, and a contract for the ma- 
chinery as per the specification was completed by them on 
the fourteenth day of January, 1873. 

The contract includes two jonval turbines of one hundred 
horse-power each, and two pairs of bucket and plunger 
pumps, with cylinders sixteen inches diameter, and plung- 
ers eleven and one-quarter inches diameter with forty inch 
stroke. This machinery is now being set up in the pump- 
house by the contractors and is expected to be set up com- 
plete by the first of March next. The cost of this pumping 
machinery and the special castings that will be set in con- 
nection therewith, will be forty thousand dollars. The 
turbines will work under forty-five feet head of water. 
The lift of water from the lake to the reservoir will be one 
hundred and ten feet vertical. The length of the force 
main, which is of twenty inches diameter, is seven thousand 
feet. 

The pumps are to be capable of lifting five million gallons 
of water from the lake to the reservoir in twenty-four hours. 
The fall of water from the reservoir to Elm street at the 
City Hall, will be one hundred and fifty-two feet, and at the 
railway station one hundred and eighty-eight feet. 

PIPES. 

The force and supply mains are complete. The extension 
of distribution pipes has been carried forward as rapidly as 
possible since the appropriation was made therefor. The 
early setting in of winter prevented the extension of the 
fourteen inch pipe southerly on Elm street, and the comple- 
tion of work in the rock cut on Beech street, as was intended. 



Q6 



The amounts of pipes, gates, hydrants, and air-valves set 
during the season of 1873, have been as follows : 
2,1S9.9 feet of 20 inch diameter pipe, 



1,319 




of 14 


u 


2,926 


u 


of 12 


a 


1,241.7 


" 


of 10 


u 


1,242 


" 


of 8 


u 


29,037 


'' 


of 7 


u 


504 


il 


of 4 


u 


2 gates 


20 


inch diameter, 


1 " 


14 


u 


(,i 


2 " 


10 


a 


a 


42 " 


6 


a 


u 


4 " 


4 


a 


u 



8 air-valves 2 inch diameter, 
75 hydrants, (3 nozzle). 

The totals of pipes, gates, hydrants and air-valves laid 
and set to date is as follows : 
21,038.9 feet of 20 inch diameter pipe, 



5,207 


" of 14 


7,391 


" of 12 


1,320 


" of 10 


5,971 


" of 8 


67,292.5 


" of 6 


0,731 


" of 4 


5 gates 


20 inch > 


6 ^ '• 


14 '• 


7 " 


12 •• 


5 " 


10 " 


15 " 


8 " 


113 " 


6 " 


12 " 


4 " 



8 air-valves, 2 inch diameter, 
210 hydrants (3 nozzle each). 



The total cost of water mains and appendages laid and 
set to date, under contract, is 



273,359.68. 



67 

DISTRIBUTING RESERVOIR. 

The works of the reservoir were not commenced until in 
July last, in consequence of the appropriation therefor not 
being made until a late day. Detail drawings and forms 
of specification were prepared for this work, and proposals 
were requested for the execution of the same. Six propos- 
als were received for the work, ranging from about -1^47,000, 
to $60,000, exclusive of the sluice valves, special castings 
and wrought-iron work. 

It was not deemed to be for the interest of the city to 
accept any proposal received. 

On the rejection of the tenders, the reservoir work was at 
once commenced in accordance with instructions, by a por- 
tion of the force already engaged in water-works construc- 
tions. The work was continued to the close of the season 
with as strong a force as could be economically used. The 
earth embankments have been nearly completed. The foun- 
dations of the influent chamber have been laid, all the sluice 
valves, wrought-iron work, and the special castings, except 
one, are now on hand. Nearly all the rul)ble stone for the 
gate chambers, about one-third of the slope paving stone, 
and all of the broken stone material are now on the ground. 

The old parsonage house that formerly stood on one of 
the lots purchased for the reservoir site, has been moved to 
the southerly part of the grounds and made available for 
storage purposes, while awaiting the final decision as to its 
disposal. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

The Amoskeag Company, in response to the request of 
the City Council, having consented to supply water for do- 
mestic use in the city from their reservoir until water shall 
be introduced from Lake Massabesic, a specification was at 
once prepared for service pipes to be laid from the main 



68 

pipes to the property lines, and proposals were requested 
thereon. 

Three proposals were received from parties residing in 
this city, and three from parties residing elsewhere. The 
proposal of John Q. A. Sargent of this city being the lowest, 
was accepted, and a contract for the service pipes, as per the 
specification, was completed l)y him on the seventh day of 
July, 187-3. 

The number of applications for water, to Dec. 20th, has 
been 326. 

The service pipes of two-inch diameter, as laid, are of 
rubber-coated gas-tubing. All smaller services are of ce- 
ment-lined gas-tubing. Four services have been laid of 
four inch diameter, wrought-iron, cement-lined pipes. Two 
hundred and eighty-seven services have been laid to date, 
requiring pipes as follows, viz : 

23 services of I inch diameter. 



232 ' 


of I 


22 '■ 


of 1 


4 


of U 


2 . " 


■ of 2 


4 


■ of 4 



The total length of services laid within the highway is 
8,287 feet. Tlie cost of service pipes, to Dec. 20th, has been 
$5,132.17. 

Two hundred and ninety-five of the applicants for water 
are now being supplied. 

Twenty-two applicants have had services laid, but water 
has not yet been turned on. 

Four applicants have not yet had their services laid. 
Three applications have been canceled and renewed under 
other names. 

Two applicants have their water cut off for non-payment 
of water rent. 



69 

Water lias been cut off in nine instances for non-payment 
of water rent, in all but two of which payment has imme- 
diately followed. 

There are now seven meters in use, two of v\"hich are 
owned by the water consumers. 

WELL WATER.. 

Our city has heretofore depended mainly on wells for its 
supply of water for domestic use, as young cities are usually 
obliged to do. Well and spring water drawn from quartzose 
earths in the open country and in the outskirts of villages 
have ordinary coolness and limpidity, combined with just 
sufficient mineral impregnations to make them not only 
sparkling to the eye, but wholesome, and agreeable to the 
taste. As the villages grow into more densely populated 
towns and cities, their wells lose their original purity and 
are transformed in many instances into polluted catch-basins 
and dispensers of disease. The relative rapidity of change 
of the wells of a city from comparative purity to foulness, 
is dependent to a considerable extent on the nature of the 
soils on which the city is founded. Close and firm soils do 
for a long time resist the penetration of the dissolving refuse 
scattered over the yards and streets of a city, so that it does 
not ferment befoi'e it is washed into the sewers and water 
courses, but porous, sandy soils alisorli the decaying garbage 
and excretas below the reach of the surface wash, whei-e 
they ferment under the action of summer heats and mois- 
tures. Sandy soils also absorb readily the liquids from the 
cesspools and leaky sewers, and in process of time become so 
foul as to load the atmosphere with noxious odors and charge 
the waters that soak down through them to the wells with 
endemic properties that will, when other favorable condi- 
tions arise, develop typhus and cholera germs. The offen- 
sive odors that arise from some of our back streets after, as 



70 

well as before their periodical cleanings by the city scaven- 
gers, give evidence of the saturation of the ground with 
fermenting vegetable and animal refuse, and give warning 
that the wells in their vicinity may be polluted thereby. 
There can be but few wells in our city entirely free from the 
influence of leaky stable cellars, cesspools, and leaky sew- 
ers. The fact that many of our pump wells are driven 
down through our sandy surface soil, and thin, underlying 
impervious strata into a lower water-bearing stratum, has 
led many to believe we are thus protected against the in- 
jurious effects of the surface contaminations, while in re- 
ality the piercing of the impervious crust for the well has 
but opened a direct channel through, and every stroke of 
our pumps, tends to create a vacuum beneath the opening 
that shall suck down the surface water along the tube to be 
pumped up by the next draught of water. 

Physicians have heretofore observed that a slight im- 
pregnation of sewage gives a pleasant flavor to water, that 
causes it to be preferred by those accustomed to it, before 
the more wholesome waters of the hills, while at the same 
time it was gradually introducing disease into the blood. It 
is not less notorious that cholera and malignant fevers at- 
tack first and fiercest those dense quarters of the cities iu 
which the people most generally secure their water supply 
from wells in the court yards and public streets. 

The taste cannot ordinarily be depended upon in the 
proper selection of potable waters, nor can the uneducated 
eye detect the sewage when rendered clear and transparent 
by infiltration. A familiar instance is now recalled in which 
a deep well was located in a yard about, two rods from a sink 
cesspool, the waters of which were pronounced excellent 
in the neighborhood. The owner would not be persuaded 
that the water might be affected by leakage from the cess- 
pool, though his horses refused to drink it until compelled 
by thirst. 



71 

On one occasion a quantity of cider went to waste on his 
cellar bottom in consequence of the bursting of a hoop on 
his cider barrel. On the next day there was a new taste to 
the water in his well, and he had gained a new idea of 
the rapidity of filtration towards wells subjected to heavy 
draughts. The flavor of the cider had passed by his cess- 
pool and its influence had become perceptible in the well. 
Our city daily papers have, during the past season, given 
among their local items, two instances of infiltration worthy 
of notice. In one instance some salt which had been used 
in the manufacture of ice cream, had been allowed to re- 
main on a cellar bottom and had impregnated the waters of 
the wells in the neighborhood so as to render them unfit for 
use for a time. In the other instance, a barrel of beer that 
had gone accidentally to waste, had found its way into the 
channels leading to other wells, thus introducing new flavors 
that by their unfamiliarity in those sources, were observable. 
It has been asserted by the health officers of London, that 
one pump well in Broad street killed five hundred persons 
in a single week by disseminating cholera. 

Dr. Whitmore, in an official report relating to the recent 
outbreak of typhoid fever in a certain district of London, 
traces the outbreak of fever to a distinct cause. He made 
a thorough critical survey of the farms supplying milk to 
the district referred to, and in one of the eight farms exam- 
ined, the fact was discovered that the well furnishing the 
water for washing cans and cooling milk was located in 
proximity to the waste-drain of the house, and also tliat 
there were in the immediate neighborliood of the well, pig- 
sties and manure-heaps. The doctor remarks : "Though by 
no means a pleasing fact to contemplate, there can be but 
little doubt that the water of this well was impregnated with 
the typhoid poison conveyed into it from the drainage of 
the house-sinks. This water, thus poisoned, was daily used 
for the washing of the milk cans. Nor is it improbable that 
the v/ater was also used in adulteration of the milk itself." 



72 

It was further developed in this case that the proprietor 
of this farm had died of typhoid fever just previous to the 
breaking out of the fever in the city. 

Dr. Chandler of New York, chemist to the Metropolitan 
Board of Health, asserts that "many diseases of the most 
fatal character are now traced to the use of waters poisoned 
with the soakage from soils charged with sewage and excre- 
mental matters ; " also that "sudden outbreaks of disease of 
a dysenteric character are often caused by an irruption of 
sewage into wells." It has been clearly demonstrated in 
most of the large cities of the world, that the use of impure 
well water is one of the greatest inducements to cholera and 
epidemics. Cholera has become almost unknown in the 
sections of New York and Boston fully supplied by Croton 
and Cochituate waters, while cases are occasionally reported 
in the sections still supplied by wells. The city of Memphis 
was visited by a fearful epidemic during the past summer, 
and her leading editors charged it to the lack of wholesome, 
water and the lack of an efficient system of sewerage, while 
Charleston, though in a less healthy location, has by wise 
forethought, shielded herself almost entirely from epidemic 
scourges. 

Bombay only a few years since was subject to almost an- 
nual epidemics of cholera, which killed from three thousand 
to five thousand persons, but since the introduction of an 
abundant supply of wholesome water from the mountains, 
this scourge has never assumed epidemic proportions there. 
Nearly every ancient and modern city has experienced the 
sanitary necessity of providing for itself a more wholesome 
supply of water for its domestic uses than is yielded by the 
soil on which it stands. Next to their temples, the enlight- 
ened ancients gave to their aqueducts their best resources 
and t^kill. When Alexander the Great, after his success 
against Tyre, desiring to develop the resources of Egypt, 
planned his new capital near the delta of the Nile, he pro- 



vided conduits for water through its length and breadth, of 
substantial masonry. The historian informs us that every 
private dwelling had its reservoir of water provided for it, 
which was supplied by subterranean conduits from the Nile^ 
and that the reservoirs and conduits were lined with a fine, 
impervious cement which remains perfect at the present day. 
It is also related that when Caesar arrived at Alexandria for 
conquest, before the beginning of our Christian eia, he 
found that city almost hollow underneath from the many 
aqueducts that furnished the private houses with water from 
the Nile. 

The ancient Roman conduits and wells, of which some 
examples still remain, were lined with cement to prevent 
the percolation of sewage into them or the waste of water 
from them, and the aqueducts leading water to them from 
the base of the Appenines, have remained for two thousand 
years, unrivaled monuments of constructive skill and the 
prosperity of the empire. Byzantium, while aspiring under 
the rule of Constantine the Great to rival the older Roman 
capital in magnificence and commerce, filled her wells and 
cisterns from the slopes of the Balkan mountains and for- 
ests of Belgrade. Vienna has recently completed her ex- 
tensive water-works at a cost of about six million dollars, 
leading water from the Styrian Alpine hills. Paris has re- 
cently completed her works leading water from a distant 
tributary of the Seine, and Glasgow has tunneled through 
successive ranges of hills and spanned some of the inter- 
lying valleys with lofty aqueducts, to lead the clear and 
transparent waters of Loch Katrine within her borders. 

Our own city now, obeying as it were a law of Nature, 
turns to a neighboring lake of unusual purity, which our 
beneficent Benefactor and Law-giver has stored and replen- 
ishes for us, for an ample supply of water, more wholesome 
thin our wells afford, the introduction and general use of 
which cannot but prove a most important sanitary reform. 



74 
Financial Statement Dec. 20, 1873. 

The appropriations for construction of Water-Works 
have been as follows, viz. : 

August 1, 1871, ..,....-, ^400,000 00 

May 6, 1873, 60,000 00 

July 21, 1873, 90,000 00 

$550,000 00 
The interest account appearing in bills approved to Dec. 
20, 1873, is as follows, viz. : 



Dec. 31, 1872, discount on bonds sold, 
coupoHS paid, 

Interest credited to Water Fund, 

Balance, 
Dec. 20, 1873, *Discount on State Bonds, 



. $9,047 50 
. 8,811 00 

$17,858 50 
7,407 73 

$10,450 77 
2,488 50 



The assessments for Public Fire Hydrants to 
1873, are as follows, viz. : 
Feb. 1, 1872, 15 hydrants at $10.00, to April 1, 
April 1, '• 15 hydrants at SI 5.00 per quarter, 
July 1, " 18 hydrants at $15.00 per quarter, 
Oct. 1, " 53 hydrants at $15.00 per quarter, 
Jan. 1. 1873, 128 hydrants at $15.00 per quarter, 
April 1, " 134 hj^drants at $15.00 per quarter, 
July 1, " 137 hydrants at $15.00 per quarter, 
Oct. 1, " 172 hydrants at $15.00 per quarter, 



n2,939 27 
Dec. 20, 

. $150 00 
. 225 00 
. 270 00 
. 795 00 
. 1920 00 
. 2010 00 
. 2055 00 
. 2580 00 



$10,005 00 
The money collected during the year and paid to the 
City Treasurer is as follows, viz. : 

Collected for hay, coal and freights, . . • . . $63 00 
Collected for supplies furnished laborers, .... 114 07 



* The City Treasurer reports tlio balance of intere.st account at tliis date tor 1873 
s $21,381.74. ' 



75 



Received from water-rents, less abatements, 
" •' fines and letting on water 

'' " metered water-rents, . 

" " rents of meters, . 

" " extras, 

" " sale of one meter, 



Amount of abatements 1873, 
Sept, 27, Paid City Treasurer cash, 
Oct. 9, '^ " " " 



Oct. 


13, 


Oct. 


18, 


Oct. 


31, 


Nov. 


10, 


Dec. 


3, 


Dec. 


18, 



$54 82 





$1,628 34 




. 14 00 




. 189 26 




1 58 




. 64 35 




. 23 00 




^2,097 60 


]-2 




$175 00 




500 00 




200 00 




300 00 




400 00 




100 00 




150 00 




65 00 




207 60 






«•> nQ7 fin 



Dec. 20, 



The rate of annual income Jan. 1, 1874, for water-rates 
and hydrant assessments, will be ^18,240.00. 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES FOR WATER-WORKS TO DeC. 20, 1873. 



Expense of Commissioners to visit other 
Works, 

Cost of preliminaiy surveys of Maple Falls, 
Burnham Pond, and sources other than 
Lake Massabesic, ..... 

Office furniture, 

Expended on highway near Geo. Porter's, 
Advanced for lands on new highway, . 
Stone arched bridge on new highway, 
Grading and culverts on new highway. 

Balance on interest in 1872, 
Discount on State Bonds in 1873, 

Expended for service pipes, 
Total expended on construction, tools, 
buildings, machines and engineering, 



$285 87 



1,815 38 



51,535 29 
4,824 00 
5,118 00 
2,523 24 

10,450 77 
2,488 50 



$2,101 25 
662 35 



$14,000 53 

12,939 27 
5,132 17 

507,367 17 



$542,202 74 



76 

Amount of bills approved in 1871, . . $1,723 06 

" 1872, . 245',870 66 

" 1873, . 294,609 02 



S542,202 74 
In the above item of expenditures ($542,202.74), the 
following iferas are included, which are properly chargeable 
to accounts other than that of cost of constructing water- 
works, viz : 



Discount on bonds sold in 1873, . . . ^9,047 50 
Discount on State bonds sold, . . . 2,488 50 



Cost of land for new highway, . . , .$4,824 00 
Stone arched highway bridge, . . . 5,1 18 00 
Grading and culverts on new highway, . . 2,523 24 
Grading highway near Centre meeting house, 1,535 29 



Sll,536 00 



-$14,000 53 



There has been collected and paid to the City Treasurer 

as follows, viz: 
For supplies furnished laborers in 1872, . $573 61 

For water rents and supplies in 1873, . . 2,097 60 
There is due from the city for use of public 

hydrants, 10,005 00 

$12,675 21 



S38,211 74 
The estimated cost of completing the Reservoir is $28,- 
000 ; the pumps, $23,000 ; and the dam, canal, penstock, 
drains and tenement, $28,000. 

Memorandums of the locations of hydrants set within 

the year, the uses for which water is supplied, the kinds of 

fixtures that are supplied, and an inventory of furniture, 

supplies, tools and machines on hand, are hereto appended. 

Respectfully, 

J. T. FANNING, Engineer. 



77 
HYDRANTS. 

The hydrant which stood on the north-east corner of Pearl 
and Ehn streets has been removed to the north-west corner 
of Pearl and Ash streets. Seventy-five hydrants have been 
set since the date of the last Annual Report, and are located 
on the following named streets at the points designated : 

Amherst, north-west corner Maple Street. 

Amherst, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 

Amlierst, north-west corner Ashland Street. 

Amherst, north west corner Hall Street. 

Arlington, north-west corner Cross Street. 

Arlington, north-west corner Warren Street. 

Arlington, north-west corner Ashland. 

Ash, front of No. 32. 

Auburn, north-east corner Canal Street. 

Bedford, north-west corner Granite Street. 

Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. Corp. 

Bedford, north-west corner Central Street. 

Beech, front of No. 584. 

Bridge, north-west corner Walnut Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Beech Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Ash Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Maple Street. 

Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, north-west corner Russell Street. 

Bridge, north-west Linden Street. 

Brook, north-west Elna Street. 

Canal, north-east corner Depot Street. 

Cedar, north-east corner Canal Street. 

Cedar, north-west corner Beech Street. 
(]edar, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Central, northeast corner Canal Street. 
Central, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Central, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 



78 



Central, front of No. 374. 
Concord, north-west corner Nashua Street. 
Concord, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Concord, north-west corner Old Amherst. 
Depot, 100 feet west of Franklin Street. 
Granite, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Ashland Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Hall Street. 
Hollis, north-east corner Hobbs Street. 
Kidder, nortii-east corner Hobbs Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Lincoln Street, 
Laurel, near No. 244. 
Laurel, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner Ash Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner South Street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 
Lowell, north-west corner Wilson Road. 
Manchester, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Maple, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Maple, front of No. 580. 
Massabesic, north-west corner Old Falls Road. 
Massabesic, south-east corner Taylor Street. 
Massabesic, avenue near pumping station. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Lincoln street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Walnut Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Ash Street. 



Myrtle, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Orange, north -west corner Walnut Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Pleasant, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Pleasant, near No. 35, Manchester Corporation. 
Pleasant, north-west corner Franklin Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner Maple Street. 
State, north-west corner Granite Street. 
State, opposite No. 57, Manchester Corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13, Manchester Corporation. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 



STATEMENT, 

Showing uses for which water is supplied, Dec. 20, 1873. 

208 Dwelling Houses, 13 Boarding Houses. 

380 Families. 1898 Persons. 

54 Table Boarders and Lodgers. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

4 Hotels. 3 Banks. 

2 Churches. 1 Music Hall. 

1 Opera House. 5 Fire Engine and Hook and 

1 City Hall and City Offices. Ladder and Hose Compa- 

1 Court House. nies. 

1 City Library. 

MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

2 Breweries. 1 Brass and Copper Foundry. 
1 Dye House. 1 Cigar Manufactory. 

1 Shoe Manufactory. 1 Clothing Manufactory. 

1 Patent Medicine Manufactory. 



80 

MARKETS. 

3 Fish. 3 Meat. 

4 Meat and Fish. 

OFFICES. 

2 Dentist. 8 Printing. 
16 Professional. 

SHOPS. 

?) Barbers, (9 chairs). 2 Ciu'ryiug. 

1 Blacksmith. 2 Plumbers. 

1 Tailor. 1 Wheelwright, 

STABLES. 

4 Livery (73 horses). S Work (38 horses). 
2ii Private (32 horses and 5 neat 

cattle). 

SALOONS. 

1 Oyster. 2 Billiard. 

5 Dining. 12 Liquor. 

STORES. 

15 Groceries. 4 Boot and shoe.s. 

4 Fancy goods. 3 Drug. 

3 Gents furnishing. 2 Book. 

2 Jewelry. 3 Wholesale liquor. 

1 Hardware. 1 House furnishing goods. 

1 1 Stores, not classed, supplied in connection with dwelling houses 
and having no extra bibb. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

1 Bakery. 1 Ice house, (washing ice). 

1 Wood yard. 1 Watering trough and drink- 

ing fountain. 

2 Photographers. 2 Stationar}- engines. 
10 Building purposes. 210 Public fire hydrants. 

8 Private fire hydrants. 142 Garden and street hydrants' 



81 

STATEMENT, 

Showing the number and kind of water fixtures contained 
within the premises of water takers in the City of Manches- 
ter to Dec. 20, 1873, not inckiding fixtures supplied through 
meters. 

76 Bibbs having no connection 41 Street washers. 

with any drain or sewer. 417 Sinks. 

400 Set wash basins. 31 Bath tubs. 

1 Foot bath. 51 Pan water closets. 

15 Hopper water closet. 7 Hopper water closets, (door) . 

9 Hopper water closets, (self 20 Urinals. 

actino-). 11 Steam or liot water lieating 

35 Set wash tubs. apparatus. 

1 Jet or fountain. 115 Yard hydrants. 



INVENTORIES. 

INVENTORY OP FURNITURE, INSTRUMENTS AND SUPPLIES IN THE 

engineer's office. 

10 Drawing boards. 2 Drawing tables. 

2 Stoves. 2 Waste paper baskets. 

2 Tapes. 1 Case of drawers. 

2 Boxes for water bills. 1 Book case. 

1 Wardrobe. 1 Library table. 

1 Transit. 1 Level and target. 

1 Copying press. 1 Roll of manilla paper. 
1 Boll of mounted paper. 1 Roll of tracing muslin, 

2 Quires Whatman's double Elephant drawing paper. 

INVENTORY OF SUPPLIES AND TOOLS BELONGING TO DISTRIBU- 
TION AND SERVICE DEPARTMENT. 

2 14-inch gates. 1 hose cap. 

5 12-inch gates. 1 soldering union. 

2 10-inch gates. I service stop-box cover, 



82 



1 8-inch gate. 
16 6-inch gates. 

3 4-inch gates. 

2 2-iuch air- valves. 
21 hydrants. 

1908^1bs. special castings. 

1 lot of hydrant details. 

2 15-inch gate curbs. 

1 10-iuch air valve curb. 

1 2-inch coffin valve. 

2 1-inch Ludlow valves. 

1 1 1-2 inch Jenkins's valve. 
1 1 1-4 inch corporation stop, 
1 1-inch corporation stop. 

1 3-4 inch corporation stop. 

2 1-2 inch corjioration stop , 
1 3-4 hydrant cock. 

1 1 1-4 inch waste stop. 

2 1-inch waste stops. 

2 3-4 inch waste stops. 
1 3-4 inch service stop. 
1 pair long tougs. 
1 sheet-iron furnace. 



2 1-inch Gem water meters. 
6 3-4 inch Gem water meters. 
2 5-8 Union water meters. 
14 hydrant wrenches. 
9 gates. 
1 service stop. 

4 wrenches for repairing hy- 
drants. 
1 air-valve wrench. 

1 meter wrench. 

2 monkey wrenches. 
1 pair calipers. 

1 machinist's hammer. 

8 shovels, 1 snow shovel, 6 

, picks. 
4 lanterns, 1 dark lantern. 

2 oil cans, 1 water pail. 
1 sledge, 1 crowbar. 

1 screw-driver, 1 pair pincers. 

2 cold chisels. 
2 mauls. 

1 wheelbarrow. 



inventory of tools and fixtures at the pumping station, 
Dec. 20,1873. 



1 "Hoadley" port. 10 H. P. 

Engine. 
1 "Blake" 9x13 stone breaker. 
1 plunger pump. 
1 watering-cart body. 

1 hand drilling machine. 

2 water tanks. 

2 turnpike shovels. 

1 hand force pump. 

150 feet rubber hose. 

1 grooved road roller. 

2 harrows. 

9 stone boats. 
4 garden rakes. 



9 7-12 dozen old picks. 

5 1-12 doz, old wheelbarrows. 
11 steel crow bars. 
11 iron crow bars. 

7 grub hoes. 

4 mortar hoes. 

5 steel stone hammers. 
10 steel striking hammers. 
13 hand hammers. 

5 axes. 

2 bill-hooks. 

6 bush scythes. 

2 large wrenches. 



2 office stoves. 

2 sets Smith's bellows. 

2 anvils. 

4 plows, 2 land sides, 4 beams. 

4 full trimmed derricks. 

1 extra mast, 1 boom, 4 guys. 

1 set blocks and falls. 
570 lbs. steel drills, points and 

chisels. 
354 lbs. stone chains. 
126 lbs. scrap steel. 
638 lbs. scrap iron. 
104 lbs. of old bolts. 
2255 lbs. of old plow points. 
22 3-12 dozen old shovels. 



3 monkey wrenches. 
3 Smith's hammers. 

2 pair Smith's tongs. 

1 pair Smith's pincers, 
1 3-hook crane. 
1 14-incli rasp. 

3 spirit levels. 
10 tin cans. 

1 4-12 dozen water pails and 9 

dippers. 
1 spike hammer. 
1 machine hammer. 
7 machine drills. 
1 lot hydraulic cement. 



EULES AND REGULATIONS. 

Adopted September 22, 1873. 

Rule 1. Each person desiring a supply of water is to 
make written application at the office of the Commissioners, 
and his application must state fully and truly the location 
where, and all the purposes for whicli, water is required. 

STRENGTH OF PIPES AND FIXTURES. 

Rule 2. All pipes, valves, fixtures, and apparatus must 
be capable of withstanding a pressure of water of one hun- 
dred and fifty pounds per square inch. 

valves. 



Rule 3. All valves for water-closets and urinals are to 
be self-closing, and must be submitted to and approved by 
the Inspector to the Board. Boilers, if supplied direct 



84 

from the main, are to be fitted with vacuum valves. Tanks 
receiving water direct from the main are to be fitted with 
approved self-acting float valves. 

There is to be a stop and waste at the inside of the cel- 
lar wall or near where the service pipe enters the premises, 
and in blocks, a separate stop for each family or tenant, 
which stops, when supplied b}^ the Commissioners, shall be 
subject at all times, to their control. The pipes within 
each building are to be so pitched that they may be fully 
drained at the waste. 

PLUMBING. 

Rule 4. Water will be supplied only to pipe and fixtures 
that have been set up and completed, or examined and 
tested by a plumber licensed by the Commissioners, and 
which have been fully enumerated and described in a re- 
port made by said plumber to the Commissioners, and ap- 
proved by the Inspector. 

plumber's report. 

Rule 5. Every plumber who shall set up any pipes or 
fixtures for the use of water from the City Water- Works, 
or shall make repairs upon, or additions to pipes or fix- 
tures already set up, shall within two days after the same 
shall be completed, fill up and return to the Commission- 
ers, a report describing all fixtures, both old and new, for 
the use of water on the premises. For any misrepresenta- 
tion or omission in the statement of work done, or of work 
to which additions have been made, the plumber may be 
suspended and fined, and if such error appears to be will- 
ful, his license will be revoked. 

SERVICE pipes. 

Rule 6. The Commissioners will furnish and lay a ser- 
vice pipe from the main pipe to the line of the property to 



85 

be supplied, together with a stop to be placed at the curb 
line or inside of the cellar wall, on condition that the ap- 
plicant shall thereafter maintain and keep the whole in 
good order at his own cost, and that the same shall be at 
all times subject fully to the Commissioners' control. No 
pipe or fixture shall be connected with the city service pipe, 
nor shall water be turned on at any time, until a special per- 
mit is issued therefor. 

INSPECTIONS. 

Rule 7. The Inspector to the Board must have access 
to, and be permitted at all times to inspect, all pipes, fix- 
tures, and apparatus supplied with water, and to control 
the stop-cock in the cellar as the interest of the Works 
may require. 

WASTE. 

Rule 8. No person supplied with water shall allow the 
same to run to waste to prevent freezing, or by leak, or, 
shall introduce water into fixtures not named in his applica- 
tion, except on special agreement with the Commissioners 
and the payment of extra rates therefor such as the Com- 
missioners shall assess. 

FRAUDULENT USE OF WATER. 

Rule 9. An unnecessary use or waste of water, or per- 
mitting the same to be used for any purpose not particularly 
specified in the application, will be deemed a fraudulent use, 
and will subject the offender to an immediate stoppage of 
water and a payment of not less than double rates for such 
quantities as the Inspector shall estimate to have been 
wasted, or fraudulently used. 



86 

SPECIAL USES. 

Rule 10. "Water supplied for hydraulic power, or in 
large quantities for special uses, will be subject to such re- 
strictions as the Commissioners shall impose. 

builders' report. 

Rule 11. Each builder or superintendent of building, 
using city water shall, on or before the last day of each 
month, render at the Commissioners' office full and true ac- 
counts of all water used by him for buildiug purposes, on 
jobs completed during said month ; and it shall be the duty 
of each contractor, or owner when work is done by days' 
work, to pay at the Commissioners' office for water so used 
on the first day of the next succeeding month. 

WATER RATES PAYABLE, 

Rule 12. All water rates (except for building purposes 
and meter rates), shall be due and payable at the Commis- 
sioners' office, quarterly in advance, on the first day of each 
January, April, July, and October. Meter rates for each 
month will be due and payable at the Commissioners' office 
on the first day of the next succeeding month. The amount 
of each rate rem.aining unpaid twenty days after due, will 
be increased 5.\e per cent., and one per cent, per month 
interest will be charged on the original amount thereafter 
until paid, together with costs of collection, 

DISCOUNT FROM REGULAR RATES. 

Rule 13. Not more than twenty-five per cent, discount 
will be allowed from the regular rates when supplies are 
taken by special permit from yard fixtures, or without the 
premises. 



87 

SHUTTING OFF WATER. 

Rule 14. The Commissioners reserve the right to shut 
ofif water, after giving notice of their intention to do so, for 
the purpose of making extensions, alterations, or necessary 
repairs ; and they will shut off water, without special notice, 
from any person who shall disregard the rules for its supply, 
neglect to pay the rates therefor promptly, or shall permit 
an unauthorized use of the water. Any person receiving 
water through a stop in common with another person, will be 
liable to have his supply shut off in consequence of a viola- 
tion of the rules by the other person. 

LETTING ON WATER. 

Rule 15. When water has been shut off for disregard 
of rules, non-payment of rates, or other offense, it shall not 
be turned on again until the Commissioners are satisfied 
there will be no further cause of complaint, and a sum of 
three dollars has been paid to them to cover the costs of 
shutting off and letting on the water, in addition to such 
fine, not exceeding ten dollars, as the Commissioners may 
impose. 

STREET WASHERS AND YARD HYDRANTS. 

Rule 16. Street washers are to be used only in the morn- 
ing before eight o'clock, and are not to be made a nuisance 
to either a neighbor or passer by. Yard hydrants must 
not bo converted into jets. Street washers and yard hy- 
drants are not to be used for wetting any area other than 
the one defined in the application therefor, and they will be 
allowed only in connection with premises using water for 
other purposes. 

Private fire plugs are to be used only for fire purposes. 



88 

HYDRANTS AND STOP-COCKS. 

Rule 17. No person shall open or use water from any 
public fire hydrant without permission from proper authority, 
except in case of fire, or shall obsruct free access thereto, 
or shall open or disarrange any stop-cock or stop-cock curb, 
on penalty of twenty dollars. 

INJURY TO WORKS. 

Rule 18. No person shall divert water from, or pollute 
water running to or in the lake, canal, reservoir, or mains, 
without permission from proper authority, on penalty of 
fifty dollars. 

GENERAL FINES. 

Rule 19. The penalty for disregard or violation of any 
of the above rules, when not otherwise specified, shall be, 
in addition to the shutting off and withholding the supply 
of water, five dollars. 



meter rates. 

Rule 20. The Commissioners reserve the right to put 
in a water-meter and charge for measured water at meter 
rates whenever they shall deem such action to be for the 
best interest of the city. Whenever a consumer shall deem 
his water rate, as assessed, to be excessive, he may make 
application to the Commissioners to set a meter for him at 
his own expense and to supply him at a meter rate, provided 
however, that in no case where a meter is used by request 
of the consumer, shall the annual charge be less than eight 
dollars. 



89 



WATER RATES. 



Adopted September 22, 1873. 



$2 50 
2 50 



50 
50 



00 
00 
00 



ANNUAL DOMESTIC WATER RATES. 

ramilies, not exceeding five persons, for single bibb, . S5 00 

Each jDerson exceeding five, '^^ 

Each additional bibb, not required for set fixture herein- 
after enumerated, 20 per qent. additional. 

There will he additional Charges to each family for set Fixtures, 

as follows: 
"Wash Basin, not exceeding five persons, . 
Bath Tub, " " - " . . 

Pan Water Closet, not exceeding five persons, . 
Hopper Water Closet, not exceeding five persons, 
Each person exceeding five using above fixtures, 20 per 

cent, additional. 

Set Wash Tub, 

Urinal, with self-closing valve, 

Steam or Hot Water Heating Apparatus, .... 

Duplicate of above fixtures one-half rate each. 

Yard Hydrant, in connection with house supply, (i inch 

nozzle), per 1000 square feet area, 

Street Washer, in connection with house or store, supply 

(i inch nozzle), per 1000 square feet area. 
Private Stable, in connection with house supply, each 

horse, 

■ Private Stable, use of hose, each horse, .... 
Private Stables, neat cattle, each head, .... 

Eor team or store horses, twenty-five per cent, discount from 
the above rates, provided, however, that the total rates for any stable 
shall not he less than three and one-half dollars. 

Private Fire Plugs, to be used only in case of fire 
Each 1 inch service and f inch nozzle, 

a i^ u u u ^ u u 

u 2 " '• " I " " 

Public Wash Basins, each, . 

Public Urinals, each, .... 

Public Pan Water Closets, each, 



1 00 



3 00 



2 00 
1 50 
1 00 



$6 00 
10 00 
15 00 

5 00 

5 00 

6 00 



90 



Public Hopper Water Closets, self-acting, each, 

Public Baths, each, 

Public Driuking Fountains, each, 
Public Horse Trough, each, .... 
Public Fire Hydrant, each, .... 

Stores, ordinary uses, not including jets or fountains, 6 00 
Baths, Water Closets, and Urinals, in stores and offices, 
same as domestic rates. 



12 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

60 00 
to 15 00 



Dining Eoom or Saloon, not including jet or 



fountain, 
8 00 
8 00 
5 00 
8 00 



to 20 00 

to 12 00 

to 10 00 

to 15 00 

3 00 

15 00 

1 00 

1 00 



Bar Eoom, 

Professional and Agency offices. 

Photograph Galleries, 

Barber Shops, each chair. 

Livery Stables, not exceeding ten horses 
" " each additional horse, 

" " use of hose, each horse. 

Other commercial rates to be meter or special rates 

builders' water rates. 



The cost of Service Pipe for building purposes will he charged, 
and must he paid, in advance. 

For each thousand bricks laid, $0 08 

For each cubic yard of stone mortared masonry, . . 03 

For plastering each coat, per 100 square yards, . . 15 

For other purposes connected with construction, per bbl., 04 

INDUSTRIAL AND MECHANICAL WATER RATES. 

To be meter or special rates. 

ANNUAL METER RATES. 

For a continuous supply : 

Averaging less than 15 cubic feet per day, per 100 cubic feet $0 40 

30 

..... 20 
..... 15 
10 



" 15 to 25 cubic feet, 

'* 25 to 50 . . . . . 

" 50 to 100 

" 100 or more, 

Provided no meter rate shall be less than $8.00 per annum. 
For hjrdraulic power, special or meter rate. 
Kates not specified above, to be meter or special rate. 



EEPOUT OF OVERSEERS OE THE POOR, 



To THE Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester: 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their Annual Report. 

The whole number of families which have received more 
or less assistance during the past year, is twenty-six, con- 
sisting of seventy-two persons, of which number twenty- 
three families and sixty-three persons have a settlement 
in this city, and the remaining three families and nine per- 
sons in other towns in the State. Two persons receiving 
assistance have died, one of whom belonged to the city. 

The whole number of persons at the Almshouse during 
the year is eleven ; average number for the year, four and 
two-thirds. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN P. NEWELL, 

Chairman ex-ojjicio. 
M. E. GEORGE, 

Clerk. 
S. S. MOULTON, 
S. J. YOUNG, 
JEREMIAH STICKNEY, 
p: a. DEVINE, 
JEREMIAH ABBOTT, 
A. S. CLAPP, 
G. S. CHANDLER, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



REPORT OF J. S. COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



City of Manchester in account with City Farm. Dr. 

To stock on hand Dec. 28, 1872, . . . 15,571 01 
Expenditures during 1873, .... 3,708 44 
Interest on farm, 1,000 00 



,279 45 
Cr. 



By Stock on hand Dec. 24, 1873, . $6,038 34 
Produce sold, .... 2,151 27 
243 weeks' board for paupers and 
1,046 weeks' board for prisoners 
at an average cost per week of 
$3.17 1-3, .... 4,089 84 



110,279 45 



Average number of paupers in 1872, . . .9 1-2 
Average number of paupers in 1873, . . .4 2-3 
Average number of prisoners in 1872, . . .8 
Average number of prisoners in 1873, . . .20 1-8 
J. P. NEWELL, 
ISRAEL W. DICKEY, 
JAMES L. SWEET, 
PATRICK CULLITY, 

J. S. Committee on City Farm. 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OE THE CITY LIBUARY. 



To the City Coujicils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith submit their 
Twentieth Annual Report rehxting to the City Library, and 
with it the report made to them by the Treasurer of the 
Board, of the expenditures for the purchase of books and 
periodicals, and by the Librarian, showing the condition of 
the Library at the close of the year. 

So far as the Board are aware, the operations of the Li- 
brary have been conducted to the satisfaction of the pub- 
lic, and no unusual circumstance has occurred in connec- 
tion with the administration of its affairs. 

Soon after the water-works, now in process of construc- 
tion by the city,, had been so far completed that a supply 
of water was obtained from the reservoir of the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company, the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings of the City Council caused the necessary water 
fixtures to be placed in the Library Building, and an abun- 
dant supply has since that time been furnished for all pur- 
poses that are required at the Library. 

When the Library Building was constructed, the ceiling 
of the basement story was not finished, and it was found 
by experience that the dry air from the furnaces used for 
heating the building, had caused the floor to shrink to an 



96 

extent sufficient to make, in places, openings through the 
floor to the basement, through which the dust from the 
furnaces and from the coal stored there, passed to the Li- 
brary room, causing inconvenience to the librarian, as well 
as injury to the books. This defect has been remedied by 
direction of tlie Committee on Lands and Buildings, by 
causing the ceiling of the basement to be lathed and thor- 
oughly plastered. 

This change will add materially to the comfort of the 
persons frequenting the Library room, and also prevent 
to a great extent the accumulation of dust on the shelves 
and on the books. 

Attention was called in a former report to the heating 
apparatus in the Library, and the opinion was expressed 
that from defects of construction in the furnaces, the 
amount of heat obtained was disproportionate to the quan- 
tity of fuel consumed. At that time some changes had been 
recently made which it was hoped would cause a better re- 
sult. This anticipation has been but partially realized. 

The heating apparatus now in use was put in by direc- 
tion of the Committee of the City Council, who had charge 
of the construction of the building, and the Trustees have 
not felt that they were authorized to cause other heating 
apparatus to be substituted, even if there had been an ap- 
propriation available for such purpose, and they would 
therefore recommend that the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings, or some other Committee of the City Council, 
be authorized to make an examination and see if some 
more economical mode of heating may not be introduced, 
and a reduction made in the amount of fuel now required. 

The Trustees have deemed it proper that the books to be 
purchased with the income derived from the funds given 
the city by the late Dr. Dean, should be placed in an alcove 
by themselves, and the income of that fund has therefore 
been allowed to accumulate during the year, so that pur- 



97 

chases made with it may be made to better advantage than 
when made in small snms. 

A larger appropriation than usual was made by the 
City Council early in the year, to meet the expense of hav- 
ing a new catalogue prepared, in accordance with the re- 
commendation of the Board in their report for 1872. The 
amount thus appropriated has not been expended, for the 
reason that the Trustees experienced considerable difficulty 
in procuring the services of a suitable person to undertake 
the preparation of the catalogue for the printer. Partial 
ari'angements have been made for tliat purpose, and it is 
expected that during the year the manuscript may be pre- 
pared and the catalogue printed for distribution by the close 
of the year. 

In order that the Trustees may be able to accomplish 
this result, an increase of the appropriation will be re- 
quired to meet the expense of preparation and printing. 

The report of the librarian shows that the circulation has 
been quite equal to that of former years — the number of 
volumes taken out being being thirty-five thousand one hun- 
dred and eighty during the two hundred and sixty-eight 
days that the Library has been open for the delivery of 
books. Of this number twelve are not returned or other- 
wise accounted for at the end of the year. 

His report shows that at the beginning of tlie year the 
Library contained seventeen thousand and sixty-three books 
and pamphlets. 

Five hundred sixty-nine books and forty pamphlets have 
been added during the year, three hundred and five of 
which have been purchased. (3ne hundred eighty-eight 
books and forty pamphlets have been presented, and seventy- 
six volumes of periodicals bound. 

A list of such donations is appended to the Librarian's 
report, and to the donors the thanks of the city are due. 

Sixty different periodicals have been received regularly 



98 

during the year, and when the vohimes were completed they 
have been bound and placed on the shelves. 

The total number of volumes and pamphlets now in the 
Library, is seventeen thousand six hundred seventy-one. 

There has been expended during the year for books, six 
hundred and sixty-one dollars and ninety-one cents, and for 
periodicals, one hundred seventy-nine dollars and twenty 
cents. 

There is an unexpended balance of the appropriation 
made for the purchase of books and periodicals of twelve 
hundred sixty-two dollars, four cents, and also the income 
of the "Dean fund," now amounting to three hundred six 
dollars, which may be applied for the increase of the Library, 
the larger part of which will be expended before the appro- 
priation for the next year will be available. 

It has been the custom for several years for the trustees 
to present with the Librarian's report, a list of the titles of 
the books and pamphlets added to the Library during the 
year, which was printed with their report in the Annual 
Report of the city, but for two or three years past, this por- 
tion of their report has been omitted from the printed report. 
The trustees recommend that the list of additions should 
be printed with the other reports of the city, as thereby the 
public will have the means of knowing what additions have 
been made at a mucli earlier date than to wait the prepara- 
tion and printing of a classified catalogue, and the value of 
the Library to our citizens will be much increased. 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses have been 
two thousand twenty-three dollars, forty-seven cents. 

The items of these expenditures will appear in the finan- 
cial report of the city, and a brief summary of the same is 
appended to the report of the Treasurer of the Board. 

An appropriation of an amount equal to that made in 
former years, with such addition as the City Council may 
deem it proper to make for the preparation and printing a 



99 

catalogue will, under ordinary circumstances, be sufficient 
to meet the expenditures required for the Library for the 
ensuing year. 

In Board of Trustees, January 3, 1874. 

Read and approved, and ordered to be presented to the 

City Council. 

JOHN P. NEWELL, 
Mayor, and President ex-officio. 
ISAAC W. SMITH, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board makes the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the Board of the funds 
received by them on account of the City Library. 



1873. 
Jan. 
July 
Nov. 



1. To balance as per last report, . 

1. To income of "Dean Donation," 

1. To appropriation for 1873, undrawn, 



1873. 
Jan. 11. P'd N. E. News Co., periodicals . 
Jan. 20. N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Feb. 3. N. E. News Co., periodicals 
March 4. N. E. News Co., periodicals 
March 4. Lee & Shepard, books 
March 8. Sampson, Davenport & Co., 
books .... 
April 7. N. E. News Co., periodicals 
April 7. Sampson, Davenport & Co., 
books .... 



Dr. 

11,103 15 

306 00 

1,000 00 

12,409 15 

Cr. 
fl2 72 
4 00 
15 00 

14 06 
22 83 

6 00 

15 20 

2 00 



May 5. 

June 10. 

July 11. 

July 11. 
August 4. 

Sept. 8. 

Sept. 16. 

Oct. 6. 



Not. 

Nov. 



Dec. 



3. 

4. 

4. 
14. 

9. 

9. 
15. 
31. 



100 

N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
H. B. Dawson, periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
Daniel Clark, books . 
Lee & Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
Lee & Shepard, books 
By Balance . 



15 91 
17 94 

10 91 
5 00 

13 11 

14 95 
3 34 

11 26 

14 17 
175 81 

15 50 
83 41 
14 97 

260 11 

92 91 

1,568 04 



















12,409 


15 


INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 




Librarian's salary |800 00 


Licidentals 












46 


45 


Gas . 














198 


18 


Printing 
Fuel . 
















48 
609 


95 
63 


Binding 
















199 


69 


Insurance 
















32 


50 


Newspapers 














77 


00 


Water rates 














11 


07 


^ 


^2,023 


47 


Bala 


nee 










« 




822 


36 



12,845 83 



101 
RECAPITULATION. 

Appropriation, $3,845 83 

Paid Trustees, .... $1,000 
Incidental expenses, . . . 2,023 47 
Balance, . . . ... 822 36 



$3,845 82 
Respectfully sulnnitted, 

S. N. BELL, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

We have examined the above report and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WM. P. NEWELL, 
JOHN P. NEWELL, 

Committee of Accounts of City Library. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the Trustees of the City Library, and find tlie same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor: 
January 2, 1874. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

G-entlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

The following is a statement of the practical workings of 
the Library for the year 1873, also of its present condition, 
and is respectfully submitted. 

The past year has been one of about an average as re- 



102 

gards the usual statistics. The donations have not been 
large, but maybe considered quite as vahiable as for several 
years past, with the exception of last year, when the dona- 
tion from Mr. Brewer was received. 

Mr. B. P. Cilley has presented to the Library complete 
files of the New York Daily Herald for four and one-half 
years from April, 1861, or dmnng our late civil war. As 
yet, these have not been bound. Hon. George W. Morrison 
has presented files of the New Hampshire Patriot^ from 
1813-70, a period of fifty-eight years. A portion of these 
are in bound volumes. The circulation of books is but little 
more than for 1872. 

The total number of volumes at present belonging to the 
Library, is seventeen thousand six hundred and seventy- 
one. There are included in this number, eight hundred and 
eighty-seven pamphlets and sixteen maps, those remaining 
being bound volumes. 

The increase has been mx hundred and nine volumes. 
Of these, seventy-six are periodicals which have been bound 
and placed on tlie slielves, two hundred and twenty-eight 
are donations, forty being pamphlets, and three hundred 
and five have been purchased. A list of the donations will 
be found appended to this report. 

Seventeen volumes have been withdrawn from circulation. 
Eleven of these, together with forty others previously with- 
drawn, have been replaced by new copies, making fifty-one 
during the year. There are at present one hundred and 
eighty-five volumes Avhich cannot probably be replaced, by 
reason of being out of print. The number bought for this 
purpose since January 1870, is three hundred and seventy- 
five. 

The number of periodicals regularly received the past 
year is sixty. Two are dailies, sixteen are weeklies, thirty- 
three are monthlies, and nine are quarterlies. Five of the 
weeklies and three of the montblies are donations. Mrs. 



103 

W. A. Cochrane of this city has furnished the " New York 
(weekly) Tablet" since June 1st, and it will probably be con- 
tinued. The " London Mechanic's Magazine" has not been 
received since December, 1872. " Proceedings of the Acad- 
emy of Natural Sciences," of Philadelphia, has not been 
received for the past three years. The " Student and School- 
mate," publislied in Boston, has l^een discontinued, and not 
received since October, 1872. The "Young Folks," for- 
merly published by Messrs. James R. Osgood & Co., has 
been merged in " St. Nicholas," and published by Messrs. 
Scribner & Co., New York. The " Old and New " has not 
been received since January, 1878. 

The Library has been opened to the public two hundred 
and sixty-eight days. The circulation during this time has 
been thirty-five thousand one hundred and eighty, a daily 
average of one hundred and twenty-three. Those missing 
at last report have been returned with the exception of one. 
The number unaccounted for at present is four. Average 
number in constant circulation, fifteen hundred, requiring 
nearly one thousand cards. Total number of names now 
on the books, three thousand. 

The whole number of guarantees received is eight thou- 
sand seven hundred and sixty-three. Number received since 
last report, five hundred and fifty-three, an average of fifty 
per month. Thirteen persons have borrowed books on 
deposit. 

The amount of fines on hand January 1, 1873, was one 
hundred and live dollars, sixty-nine cents. Amount received 
during the year, sixty-seven dollars, fifty-six cents. Amount 
paid for stationery, postage, express charges, and other inci- 
dentals, twenty-four dollars, for.ty-nine cents ; leaving a bal- 
ance on hand of one hundred and forty-eight dollars, sev- 
enty-six cents. 

CHAS. H. MARSHALL, Librarian. 



104 
DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY IN 1873. 

By Hon. J. W. Patterson, Hanover. 

Report on Commerce and Navigation. 1871-72. 8 vo. 
Report of Commissioner on Prevention and Repression 
of Crime in the International Congress. London. 1871. 
8vo. 
Commercial Relations of the United States. 1871. 8vo. 
Geological Snrvey of Montana and adjacent Territories. 

1872. 8vo. 
Statistics of the population of United States ; Ninth Cen- 
sus. 1870. 4to. 
By Hon. A. H. Cragin, Lebanon. 

Report on Commerce and Navigation. 1871-72. 8vo. 
By Prop. Ben.jamin Pierce, Washington. 

Report Superintendent U. S. Coast Survey. 1860. 4to. 
By Prof. Joseph Henry, Washington. 

Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge, Vol. 18. 
1872. 4to. 
By John Eaton, Esq., Washington. 

Report Commissioner of Education. 1871. 8vo. 
By Thomas K. Cree, Esq., Washington. 

Report Board of Indian Commissioners. 1872. 8vo. 
By Hon. Saml. N. Bell, Manchester. 

Constitution of the United States, with Amendments, in- 
cluding Barcley's Digest. 1871. 8vo. 
Memorial Address on the Life and Character of Gerrett 

Davis. 1873. 8vo. 
Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion. 

2 vols. 1870. 4to. 
Message and Documents of U. S. Congress, 2d Session. 

42d Congress. 1872. 8vo. 
Treaties and Conventions between United States and 

other Powers, since July 4, 1776. 1873. 8vo. 
Report Commissioners of Agriculture. 1871. 8vo. 



105 

Geological Survey of Montana and adjacent Territories. 
" 1872. 8vo. 

Report Commissioners of Education. 1881. 8vo. 
Report Commissioner of Patents. 1869. 3 vols. 8vo. 
Report Joint Select Committee to enquire into Condition 

of Affairs in the late Insurrectionary States. 13 vols. 

1872. 8vo. 
Report Select Committee to Investigate Alleged Credit 

Mobilier Bribery. 1873. 8vo. 
Surveys for Ship-Canal between Atlantic and Pacific 

Oceans. 1872. 4to. 
Statistics of Population of United States ; Ninth Census. 

1870. 4to. 
Compendium to the Ninth Census. 1870. 8vo. 
Report on Union Pacific R. R. Company. 1872. 8vo. 
Report Secretary of the Treasury. 1872. 8vo. 
Report International Penitentiary Congress. London. 

July 1, 1872. 8vo. 
Acts and Resolutions passed at the 3d Session 42d Con- 
gress. 1872-73. 8vo. 
Congressional Globe, 2d Session 42d Congress 1872-73. 

7 vols. 4to. 

Congressional Record ; Special Session. March, 1873. 
4to. 
By William Amory, Esq., Boston. « 

Mass. Historical Collections, 1st series. Vols. 1, 4-10. 

8 vols. 

Mass. Historical Collections, 2d series. Vols. 1, 6-10. 

7 vols. 
Mass. B[istorical Collections, 3d series. Vols. 1, 3-8. 

7 vols. 
Mass. Historical Collections, 4th series. Vols. 1, 2-10. 

9 vols. 

Mass. Historical Collections, 5th series. Vol. 1. 
Proceedings Mass. Historical Society. 1855-73. 10 
vols. 



106 

By James 0. Adams, Esq., Manchester. 

Reports N. H. Board of Agriculture. 1871-72. 2 vols. 

8vo. 
Reports Maine Board of Agriculture. 1871. 8vo. 
By Geo. R. Vance, Esq., Manchester. 

Laws of the United States. 1796. 8vo. 
By Chas. E. Fitz, Manchester. 

Algebra. Todhunter. 1866. 12mo. 
By THE Trustees. 

Catalogue of the Library, Exeter, N. H. 
Catalogue of the Library, Lawrence, Mass. 
By Adventists' Tract Society. 

The United States in the Light of Prophecy. 1872. 
16rao. 
By the Order. 

Constitution and By-Laws of Mt. Washington Encamp- 
ment, No. 16, L O. 0. F. 1861. 16mo. 
By THE Board. 

Report Comr. Board of Agriculture. 1871-72. 8vo. 
By THE Trustees. 

Historical Sketch of Memorial Hall, Andover, Mass. 

1873. Pamph. 
Dedicatory Address delivered by Rev. Phillips Brooks at 
the dedication of Memorial Hall, Andover, Mass., May 
80, 18J3. Pamph. 
Report of the Holton Library, Brighton, Mass. 1872. 

Pamph . 
Report of the Public Library of Reading, Mass. 1872. 

Pamph. 
Report of the Public Library of Brookline, Mass. 1872. 

Pamph. 
Report of the Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 1872. 

Pamph. 
Report of the Public Library of Taunton, Mass. 1872. 
Pamph. 



107 

Report of the Public Library of Charlestown, Mass. 

1872. Pamph. 
Report of the Public Library of Fall River, Mass. 1872. 

2 pamphs. 
Report of Public Library New Bedford, Mass. 1872. 

Pamph. 
Report of Public Library of Manchester. 1872. Pamph. 
Bulletins of Public Library of Boston, Nos. 24-27. 1873. 

4 pamphs. 
Report of Public Library of Waltham, Mass. 1872. 

Pamph. 
Bulletin No. 2 of the Holton Library, Brighton. 1872. 

12mo. 
Catalogue of Public Library of Medford, Mass. 1872. 

2 pamphs. 

By THE COBIMITTEE. 

Catalogue of the Public School Library of St. Louis, Mo. 

1872. Pamph. 
Report of Public Schools of St. Louis, Mo. 1871-72. 

Pamph. 
Catalogue of the Free Libraries of Manchester, Eng. 

1864. 8vo. 
Catalogues of the Branch Libraries of Manchester, Eng. 

1872-73. 6 pamphs. 
Report Hartford Young Men's Institute. 1871-72, and 

1872-73. 2 pamphs. 
Reports of the Public Libraries of Manchester, Eng. 

1871-72, and 1872-73. 2 pamphs. 
By THE Board op Directors. 

Report of the Mercantile Library Association, New York, 

1872. Pamph. 
Report of Public Library of Newburyport, Mass. 1872. 

Pamph. 
Report of the Public Lil:»rary of Cincinnati, 0. 1872-72. 

Pamph. 



108 



Report of the Public Library of Chicago, 111. 1872-73. 

Pamph. 
Report of Public Library of Worcester, Mass. 1872. 

Pamph. 
Report of the Athenajuai, Providence, R. I. 1872-78. 

Pamph. 



ACCESSIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR 

1873. 

Gen. so. 

17.063 The Galaxy. Yol. 14. 2, 1872. 8vo. . 

17.064 Scribner's konthly. Vol. 4, 2, 1872. Svo. 

17.065 Atlantic Monthly. Yol 30, 2, 1872. Svo. 

17.066 Harper's Magazine. Yol. 45, 2, 1872. Svo. 

17.067 Old and I^ew. Yol. 6, 2, 1872. Svo. . 

17.068 Leisure Hour. 1S72. Svo. . 

17.069 Good Words. 1872. Svo. 

17.070 LittelFs Living Age. Yol. 114, 3, 1872. Svo. 

17.071 Littell's Living Age. Yol. 115, 4, 1872. Svo. 

17.072 Blackwood's Magazine. Yol. 112, 2, 1872 

8vo 

17.073 Temple Bar. Yol. 36, 3, 1872. Svo. . 

17.074 Cornhill Magazine. Yol. 26, 2, 1S72. Svo. 

17.075 Our Young Folks. Yol. 8, 1872. Svo. 

17.076 Our Boys and Girls. 1872. Svo. . 

17.077 Arthur's Home Magazine. Yol. 40, 2, 1S?2 

Svo 

17.078 Leslie's Magazine. Yol. 31, 1872. 4to. . 

17.079 Punch. Yol. 63, 2, 1872. 4to. 

17.080 Religious Magazine and Review. Yol. 48, 2 

1872. Svo 

17.081 Historical Magazine. Yol. S, 2d series, 2 

1870, Svo 

17.082 Historical Magazine. Yol. 9, 2d series, 1S71 

Svo 

17.083 2ir. E. Hist, and Genal. Register. Yol. 26. 

1872. Svo 



No. Shelf. 


68 


176 


59 


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54 


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50 153 


73 


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55 171 


28 


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85 


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4to. 

, Vol.2: 



17.084 Westminster Review. Vol. 97, 1, 1872. 8vo 

17.085 Westminster Review. Vol. 98, 2, 1872. 8vo 

17.086 London Quarterly Review. Vol. 132, 1, 1872 

8vo 

17.087 London Quarterly Review. Vol. 133, 2, 1872 

8vo 

17.088 British Quarterly Review. Vol. oG, 2, 1872 

8vo 

17.089 Edinburgh Review. Vol. 13-% 1, 1872. 8vo 

17.090 Edinburgh Review. Vol. 136, 2, 1872. 8vo 

17.091 Journal of Franklin Institute. Vol. 94, 2 

1872. 8vo 

17.092 Popular Science Review. Vol. 11, 1872. 8vo 

17.093 Journal of Science Arts. Vol. 104, 2, 1872 

8vo 

17.094 Van JSTostraud's Magazine. Vol. 7, 2, 1872 

8vo 

17.095 Industrial Monthly. Vol. 1, 1872. 
17,090 Commercial and Financial Chronicle 

2, 1872. 4to 

17.097 Art Journal. Vol. 11, 1872. 4to. . 

17.098 Proceedings Boston Society jSTat. History 

Vol. 14, 1870-71. 8vo. . . . " 

17.099 American ISTaturalipt. Vol. 6, 1872. 8vo. 

17.100 London Lancet. 1872. 8vo. 

17.101 Eclectic Magazine. Vol. G3, 2, 1872. 8vo. 

17.102 Peterson's Magazine. Vol. 62, 2, 1872. 8vo 

17.103 Maid of Sker. Blackmore. Svo. . 

17.104 Hope Deferred. Pollard. 8vo. 

17.105 Ombra. Oliphaiit. 8vo. 

17.106 Lady Judith. McCarthy. 8vo. . 

17.107 Ought We to Visit Her. Edwards. 8vo. 
17,108-9 Middlemarch. "Eliofe." 2 vols. 12mo. 

17.110 Vicar's Daughter. McDonald. 16mo. 

17.111 Morning-Glories and other stories. Alcctt 

16mo. ....... 

17.112 Onljr Girls, Townseud. lOmo. . 

17.113 Poet at the Breakfast Table. O. W. Holmes 
17,144 Life of Charles Dickens. Vol. 2. Forster 

12mo 

17,115 Cross and Crescent. "Optic." 16mo. . 



72 171 

73 171 

78 172 

79 172 



58 


182 


G7 


182 


G8 


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54 176 



47 


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110 



17.116 How Crops Grow. Johnfion. 16mo. . 

17.117 Oriental Religion. Johnson. 8mo. 

17.118 Earth and Sea. Figuier. 8vo. 

17.119 N. E. Business Directory, 1873. Svo. . 

17.120 Manchester Daily Union. Vols. 9-10, 2, 1872 

Folio 

17.121 Barclay's Digest. 1871. Svo. 

17,122-3 Report iS". H. Board of Agriculture, 1871-72, 
2 vols 

17.124 Report Maine Board of Agriculture. 1871 

Svo 

17.125 Algebra. Todhunter. 16mo. 

17.126 Catalogue of Exeter Public Library, 1871 

Svo 

17.127 U. S. in the Light of Prophecy. IGmo. 

17.128 Constitution and By-Laws of Mt. Washing- 

ton Encampment, No. 16. I. 0.0. F. Man- 
chester. 24mo 

17.129 Manchester Directory, 1873. Svo. 

17.130 Report Conn. Board of Agriculture, 1871-2 . 

17.131 Memorial Addresses of the Life and Char- 

acter of Hon. Garrett Davis. Svo. . 
17,132-3 Medical and Surgical History of the War of 

the Rebellion. 2 vols. Svo. 
17.134 Message of the President, and Reports of the 

several Departments, 3d Sess. 42d Cong 

1872. Svo 

17,135-8 Case of Great Britain before the Tribunal of 

Arbitration at Geneva. 4 vole. 1871. Svo 

17.139 Treaties and Conventions between United 

States and other Powers. Svo. 

17.140 Report Commissioner of Agriculture. 1871 

Svo 

17.141 Commercial Relations of U. S. 1870-71. Svo 

17.142 Commerce and Jfavigation of U. S. 1870-71 

Svo 

17,143-4 Geological Survey of Montana and adjacent 

Territories. 1871. Svo. 2 copies. . 
17,145-6 Report Commissioner of Education. 1871 

Svo. 2 copies 

17,147 R-eport Board of Indian Commissioners. 1872 

Svo 



85 


227 


27 


22 


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29 


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Ill 



17,148 Kepoi't Commissioners to represent tlie U. S. 
in the International Congress, on the Pre- 
vention and Repression of Crime. 1871. 
8vo. ........ 

17,149-51 Report Commissioner of Patents. 1869. 

3 vols. 8vo 

17,152-64 Report Committee on Affairs in the late In- 
surrectionary States. 1872. 13 vols. 8vo. . 

17,1()5 Reports of Surveys on Ship-Canal between 
Atlantic and Pacific Oceans by way of the 
Isthmus of Tehuantepec. 8vo. . 

17,166 Report Superintendent Coast Survey, 1869 
4to 

17,167-9 Statistics of Population U. S. 1870. 3 vols 
4to 

17,170-2 Statistics of Population U. S. 1870. 3 vols 

17.173 Compendiumof the Mnth Census. 1870. 4lo 

17.174 Report Committee on Credit Mobilier Brib- 

ery. 1873. 8vo. .... 

17.175 Report on Commerce and J^avigation of the 

U. S. 1871-72. 8vo. 

17.176 Index to Executive Documents, 2d Session 

40th Congress. 1867-8. 8vo. Vol. 2. 
17,177-82 Reports of Commissioners to the Paris Uni- 
versal Exposition. 1867. 6 vols. 8vo. 

17.183 Report on Treatment of Prisoners of \Var by 

Rebel authorities. 8v(). 

17.184 Miscellaneous Documents of House of Rep 

resentatives. 1st Session 41st Congress 
1869. 8vo 

17.185 Laws passed at the 3d Session 40th Congress 

1869. 8vo 

17,186-90 Report on Alabama Claims. 5 vols. 8vo. 

17.191 Reports of Committees of House of Repre- 

sentatives. 1st Session 41st Congress 
1869. 8vo 

17.192 Index to Executive Documents of House of 

Representatives. 1st Session 41st Congress 
1869. 8vo 

17.193 Index to Executive Documents of the Sen 

ate. 1st Session 41st Congress. 1869. 8vo 



14 


370 


48 


366 


56 


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23 


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36 


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42 377 

43 377 

44 377 



49 377 

50 377 

51 377 



112 



17,194 Journal of the Senate. 1st Session 41st Con- 
gress, 18(39. 8vo 

17,19.3 Journal of the House of Representatives. 1st 
Session 41st Ccnigress. 1869. 8vo. . 

17,196-8 Index to Executive Documents of the Sen- 
ate. 2d Session 41st Congress. 3 vols. 8vo. 

17,199-202 Index to Miscellaneous Documents of House 
of Eepresentatives. 2d Session 41st Con- 
gress. 1869-70. 8vo. 4 vols. . 

17,203-14 Executive Documents of the House of Eep- 
resentatives. 2d Session 41st Congress 
1869-70. 12 vols. 8vo. 

17.215 Journal of the Senate. 2d Session 41st Con- 

gress. 1869-70. 8vo. 

47.216 Journal of House of Eepresentatives. 2d Ses 

sion 41st Congress. 1869-70. 8vo. . 
17,217-28 Executive Documents of the House of Eep 
I'esentatives. 3d Session 41st Congress 
1870-71. 12 vols. 8vo. 

17.229 Eeport Commissioners of Agriculture. 1870 

8vo 

17.230 Journal of the Senate. 3d Session 41st Con 

gress. 1870-71. 8vo. . . 

12.231 Journal of House of Eepresentatives. 3d Ses 

sion, 41st Congress. 187U-71. 8vo. . 

17.232 Executive Documents of the Senate. 3d Ses 

sion 4lst Congress. 1870-71. 8vo. . 

17.234 Index to Miscellaneous Documents of the 

Senate. 3d Session 41st Congress. 1870-71 
8vo 

17.235 Eeports of Committees of House of Eepre- 

sentatives. 3d Session 41st Congress. 1870 

8vo 

17,236-7 Miscellaneous Documents of House of Eepre 
sentatives. 3d Sessionllst Congress. 1870-71 
8vo. 2 vols. 

18.238 Eeports Committees of the Senate. 2d Ses 

sion 41st Congress. 1869-70. 8vo. . 

17.239 Miscellaneous Documents of the Senate. 2c 

Session 41st Congress. 1869-70. 8vo. 

17.240 Testimony of Committee of Elections in Lou- 

isiana. 1870. 8vo 



52 377 
57 377 

54 377 

57 377 



1 


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-378 


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32 378 

33 378 

34 378 
36 378 

38 378 

39 378 



113 



17.241 Eeport Commissioner of Agriculture. 1869 

8vo 

17.242 Report on Commerce and Navigation. 1868-9 
17,243--5 Reports of Committees of the House of Rep- 
resentatives. 2d Session 41st Congress 
1869-70. 8vo 

17,246-9 Report Connnissioner of Patents. 1868. 
vols. 8vo 

17.250 Report Commissioner of Patents. 1870. Vol 

1. 8vo 

17.251 Reports of Committees on Union Pacific R. R 

the Credit Mobilier, etc. 1873. 8vo. 

17.252 Report Secretaryof the Treasury. 1872. 8vo 

17.253 Report on the International Penitentiary Con- 

gress of London. 1872. 8vo. . 

17.254 Acts and Resolutions of United States. 3d 

Session 42d Congress. 1872-73. 8ro. 
17,255-61 Congressional Globe. 2d Session 42d Con 
gress. 1871-72. 4 vols. 4to. . 

17.262 Congressional Record. Special Session of 

Senate. March, 1872. 8vo. 

17.263 Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. 

Vol. 18. 1873. 4to 

17.264 Laws of United States. 1776. 8vo. 
17,265-72 Collections Mass. Historical Society. 1st se 

ries in 10 vols. (Vols. 2 and 3 wanting) 
8vo • . 

17,273-9 Collections Mass. Historical Society. 2d se 
ries in 10 vols. (Vols. 1-9 wanting). 8vo 

17,280-86 Collections Mass. Historical Society. .3d se- 
ries in 10 vols. (Vols. 2, 9-10 wanting) 
8vo 

17,287-92 Collections Mass. Historical Society. 4th se 
ries in 10 vols. (Vols. 1, 8-10 wanting) 
8vo 

17,293-5 Collections Mass. Historical Society. 4th se 
ries. Vols. 8-10. 3 vols. 8vo. 

17,296 Collections Mass. Historical Society. 5tli se 
ries. Vol. 1. 8vo 

17,297-306 Proceedings of the Mass. Historical Society 
187.3-73. 10 vols. 8vo. . 



40 378 



42 


378 


30 


375 


38 


375 


70 369 


72 


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5 


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251 


71 


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81 251 

92 251 
38 251 
41 251 

31 283 



114 



17.307 Littell's Living Age. Vol. 116, 1, 1873. 8vo 

17.308 North xVmerican Review. Vol. 115, 2, 1862 

17.309 National Quarterly Review.^ Vol. 25, 2, 1872 

8vo 

17,:U0 National Quarterly Review. Vol. 25, 2, 1872 
8vo. . . . ■ . 

17.311 Once-a-Week. Vol. 10, 2, 1872. 8vo. 

17.312 Scribuer's Monthly. Vol. 5, 1, J873. 8vo. 
17,318 Builder. 1872. 4to 

17.314 Official Gazette of U. S. Patent Office. Vol 

2, 2, 1872. 4to 

17.315 TownsencFs Parisian Costumes. 1872. 4to 

17.316 LesUe's Magazine. Vol. 32, 1, 1873. 4to. 

17.317 Godey's Magazine. Vol. 85, 2, 1872. Svo. 

17.318 Godey's Magazine. Vol. 86, 1, 1873. Svo. 
17 319 Peterson's Magazine. Vol. 63, 1, 1873. Svo 
17,320 Arthur's Magazine. Vol. 41, 1, 1873. 8vo 
17!321 Nick-Nax. Vol. 17, 1871-2. 4to. 

17 322 Harper's Magazine. Vol. 46, 1, 1873. 8vo 

17.323 Atlantic Monthly. Vol. 31, 1, 1873. Svo. 

17.324 Eclectic Magazine. New series. Vol. 17, 1 

1873. 8vo. ... 

17.325 ReHgious Magazine. Vol. 49, 1, 1873. Svo 

17.326 Blackwood's Magazine. Vol. 113, 1, 1873 

Svo 

17.327 Littell's Living Age. Vol. 117, 2, 1873. Svo 

17.328 Galaxy. Vol. 15, 1, 1873. Svo. . 

17.329 Once-a-Week. Vol. Ill, 1873. Svo. . 

17.330 Cornhill Magazine. Vol. 27, 1, 1873. 

17.331 Temple Bar. Vol. 37, 1, 1873. Svo. 

17.332 Temple Bar. Vol. 38, 2, 1873. Svo. 

17.333 Chambers' Journal. 1872. Svo. 

17.334 Van Nostrand's Engineering Magazine 

8, 1, 1873. Svo 

17.335 Journal of the Franklin Institute. Vol 

1, 1873. 7vo 

17.336 Alpine Journal. Vol. 5, 1870-72. Svo. 

17.337 American Journal Sciences and Ai-ts. 3d 

series. Vol. 5, 1873. Svo. 

17.338 North American Review. Vol. 116, 1, 1873 

Svo 



Svo. 



Vol 



65 



86 165 

57 177 

64 196 



65 


196 


57 


174 


53 


193 


73 


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33 


343 


38 


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26 


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48 162 



60 


163 


70 


275 


55 


176 


58 


177 



115 



Good 

8vo 

1873 
1854 



17.339 British Quarterly Review. Vol. 137, 1, 1873 

8vo 

17.340 Edinburgh Review. Vol. 137, 1, 1873. 8vo 

17.341 Reports to the N.H. Legislature. 1871. 8vo 

17.342 Horticulturist. Vol. 27, 1872. 8vo. . 

17.343 Student and Schoolmate. Vols. 29-30. Jan 

Oct. 1872. 8vo 

17.344 Catalogue Public Library of Lawrence, Mass 

1873. 8vo 

17.345 The Perfect Horse. Murray. 1873. 8vo. 

17.346 A Simpleton. Reade. 1873. 8vo. 
17,347-8 Modern Persecution; or Insane Asylums Un 

veiled. 2 vols. Pa(;kard. 1873. 8vo. 
17,349-50 Johnson's Natural History. 2 vols, 
rich. 1873, 8vo. 

17.351 Lord Hope's Choice. Stephens. 1873 

17.352 Old Countess. Stephens. 1873. 8vo 

17.353 Bellehood and Bondage. Stephens. 

17.354 Pashion and Famine. Stephens. 

12mo 

17.355 Old Homestead. Stephens. 1854. 12mo. 
17,856 Keuelm Chillingly. Bulwer. 1873. 12mo 

17.357 Partingtonia Patchwork. Shillaber. 1873 

17.358 Life in Danbm-y, Bailej\ 1873. 16mo. 

17.359 Fair God. Wallace. 1873. 12mo. 

17.360 New Magdalen. Collins. 1873. 8vo. . 

17.361 Off the Skelligs. Ingelow. 1873. l2mo. 

17.362 Son of the Organ Grinder. Schwartz. 1873 

17.363 Palmetto-Leaves. Stowe. 1873. 16mo. 

17.364 Opportunity. Crane. 1871. 12mo. . 

17.365 Reginald Archer. Crane. 1871. 12mo. 

17.366 Miriam Montfort. Warfield. 1873. 12mo 

17.367 Mrs. Skagg's Husbands. Harte. 1873. l2mo 

17.368 Arthur Bonnicastle. Holland. 1873. 

17.369 Other Girls. Whitney. 1873. 12mo 

17.370 End of the World. Eggleston. 1872. 

17.371 Oldporr Days. Higginson. 1873. l2mo 

17.372 Three Years in a Man-Trap. Arthur. 1873 

i2mo 

17.373 Wandering Heir. Reade. 1873. 16mo. . 

17.374 Septimus Felton, Hawthorne. 1872. 16rao 



12mo 



12mo 



59 182 
79 182 
44 17 

62 204 

57 164 

28 316 
62 225 

85 92 

46 304 



28 


213 


43 


113 


44 


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116 



17,375 Backlog Studies. Warner. 1873. 16mo. 
17,.S76 His Level Best. Hale. 1873. l6mo. . 

17.377 Work. Alcott. 1873. 16mo. 

17.378 Loyal unto Death. 1873. l2mo. . 

17.379 Jessamine. Harland. 1873. 12mo. 

17.380 Hero Carth^w. Carr. 1873. 16rao. . 

17.381 The Hour and the Man. Martineau. . 

17.382 A Chance Acquaintance. Howells. 1873 

l6mo 

17.383 Adventures of a Brownie. Muloch. 1873 

16mo. ....... 

17.384 Child World. "Hamilton." 1873. IGmo. 

17.385 Beechnut. Abbott. 1850. 16mo. 

17.386 Seven Hills. De Mille. 1873. 18mo. . 

17.387 Tom Xewcombe. Castlemon. 1873. 16mo. 

17.388 Go Ahead. Castlemon. 1873. 18mo. . 

17.389 No Moss. Castlemon. 1873. l6mo. . 

17.390 Frank Among the Rancheros. Castlemon 

1873. 16mo 

17.391 Frank at Don Carlos. Castlemon. 1873. 16mo 

17.392 Frank in the Mountains. Castlemon. 1873 

16mo. ....... 

17.393 Camping Out. Stephens. 1873. 16mo. 

17.394 Left on Labrador, Stephens. 1873. l6mo. 
17,895 Off" to the Geysers. Stephens. 1873. 18mo. 

17.396 Lynx-hunting. Stephens. 1873. 16mo. 

17.397 Little Bobtail. Oliver Optic. 1873. 16mo 

17.398 The Yacht Club. Oliver Optic. 1873. 16mo 

17.399 John Godsoe's Legacy. Kellogg. 1873. 16mo 

17.400 The Treasure of the Seas. DeMille. 1873 

17.401 The Turning of the Tide. Kellogg. 1873 

16mo. ....... 

17.402 Strange Adventures of a Phaeton. Black 

1873. 8vo 

17.403 London's Heai't. Farjeon. 1873. 8vo. 

17.404 Grief. Farjeon. 1873. 8vo. 

17.405 Too Soon. Macquoid. 1873. 8vo. 

17.406 Old Kensington. Thackeray. 1873. 8vo. 

17.407 Little Kate Kerby. Robinson. 1873. 8vo 

17.408 Innocent. Oliphant. 1873. 8vo. 

17.409 '-He Cometh Xot, She Said." Thomas. 1873 

8vo 



66 108 
69 105 
77 105 

77 107 

78 107 

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74 87 

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89 84 

90 84 

91 84 

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76 133 

77 133 

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117 



17.410 Strangers and Pilgrims. Braddon. 1873. 8vo. 

17.411 To the Bitter End. Braddon. 1873. 8vo. . 

17.412 Aftermath. Longfellow. 1873. 16mo. 

17.413 Pennsylvania Pilgrim. Whittier. 1873. 16mo. 

17.414 Farm Ballads. Carleton. 1873. 8vo. . 

17.415 Poetical Quotations. Allibone. 1873. 8vo. 

17.416 Jfew Ylmerican Farm Book. Allen. 1871. 

l2mo 

17.417 Milch Cows and Dairy Farming. Flint. 1871. 

12mo. ........ 

17.418 Muck Manu;vl for Farmers. Dana, 1855. 

12mo. ........ 

17.419 The Jersey, Alderney, and Guernsey Cow. 

Hazard. 1872. 12mo 

17.420 The Market Assistant. DeYoe. 1873. l2mo. 

17.421 Garden Vegetables, and How to Cultivate 

Them. Burr. 18(JG. l2mo. . 

17.422 The Book of Boses. Parkmau. 18G6. 12m(). . 

17.423 Lectures on the application of Chemistr}^ and 

Geology to Agriculture. Johnston. 12mo. 

17.424 Pear Culture. Field. 1855. 12mo. . 

17.425 A Complete Manual for the Cultivation of the 

Cranberry. Eastwood. 1856. 16mo. . 

17.426 The Strawberry and its Culture. Merrick. 

17.427 The American Fruit Book. Cole. 1849. 

16mo 

17.428 A Xew System of Infantry Tactics. Upton. 

1873. l6mo 

17.429 iSTatural History of Birds. 1870. lOmo. 

17.430 The Treaty of Washington. Cushing. 1873. 

l2mo 

17.431 Church and State in the United States. Thom- 

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17.432 Protection against Fire. Bird. 1873. l2mo. 
17,483 Ancient America. Baldwin. 1872. 12mo. 

17.434 Old Eome and Xew Italy. Castelar. 1873. 

l2mo. ........ 

17.435 Old Landmarks and Historic Personages of 

Boston. Drake. 1873. l2mo. 
17,436-7 The History of Paraguay. Washburn. 2 
vols. 1871. 8vo 



79 133 

80 133 

82 96 

83 96 
77 94 
68 91 

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88 226 

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17,438 A Manual of Ancient History. Thalheimer. 
1872. 8vo. . . . ". 

17 4r>9 Steam and the Steam Engine. Evers. 1873. 
l2mo 

17,44U Journal of Eesearches into the Natural His- 
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during the Voyage of H. M. S. Beagle 
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17.441 Fragments of Science for Unscientific Peo- 

ple. Tyndall. 1873. 12mo 

17.442 The Wishing-Cap Papers. Hunt. 1873. 

17.443 Thoreau. Channing. 1873. l2mo. . 
17,444-5 An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's 

Philosophy, and of the Principal Philosoph- 
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Mill. 2 vols. 1868. l2mo. 
17,44'i The Positive Philosophy of Auguste Comte 
Mill. 1871. l2mo 

17.447 Literature and Dogma. Arnold. 1873 

l2mo. . 

17.448 The Childhood of the World. Clodd. 1873 

16mo 

17.449 Cyclopedia of Female Biography, Adams 

18(59. 16mo 

17.450 History of the American Stage. 1870. 

17.451 Monographs. Milnes. 1873. l2mo. 

17.452 Memoir of a Brother. Hughes. 1873, 

17.453 Anecdotes of Pulilic Men. Forney. 

12mo. ...... 

17.454 Character. Smiles. 1872. 

17.455 At Our Best. Ellis. 1873. 

17.456 Ijetters to Various Persons. 

12mo 

17.457 Among the Isle of Shoals. 

24mo. ....... 

17.458 Round the World. Smiles. 1873. 12mo. 

17.459 The Land of Desolation. Hayes. 1872. 12mo 

17.460 I Go A-Fishing. Prime 1873, 8vo. . 

17.461 The Woods and By-Ways of l^ew England 

Flagg. 1872. 8vo 

17.462 How I Found Livingston. Stanley. 1873 

8vo 



12mo. 
12mo. 
Thoreau. 



l2mo 

12mo 
1873 



1865 



Thaxter. 1873 



67 243 
70 257 

34 316 

41 217 

■42 217 
43 217 



27 


25 


29 


25 


25 


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12 


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39 


300 


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14 


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119 



12m( 



17.463 Art Education. Smith. 1873. 8vo. 

17.464 Elements of Physical Manipulation. Picker- 

ing. 1873. 8vo. .... 

17.465 The Ocean, Atmosphere, and Life. Reclus 

1873. 8vo 

17.466 The Atmosphere. Flammarion. 1873. 8vo 

17.467 The American Annual Cyclopedia and Reg 

ister of Important Events of the year 1872 
8vo. ....... 

17.468 An Index of Mariner's New Monthly Maga 

zine. Vols. 1-40 1871. 8vo. 

17.469 Life of Gen. Zachary Taylor. 1868. 16mo. 

17.470 Life of Gen. Lafiiyette. 1868. 16mo. . 

17.471 Life of Daniel Webster. 18G9. 16mo. 

17.472 Life of William Penn. 1869. 16mo. . 

17.473 Hymns for Mother and Children. 1872. 

17.474 The Cross of Berny. 1873. l2nio. 

17.475 Ups and Downs. Hale. 1873. 16mo. . 

17.476 Autumnal Leaves. Child. 1857. l6rao. 

17.477 A Book about Boys. Hope. 1869. 16mo 
17,478-9 xhe Iliad of Homer. 2 vols. 1869. l2mo. 

17.480 Methods of Study in iSTatural History. Ag- 

assiz. 1873. 16mo 

17.481 Domestic Poultry Book. Miner. 1853. I6mi> 

17.482 The Mineral Springs of the United States 

and Canada. Walton. 1873. l2mo. 
17,483-4 The Beginnings of Life. Bastian. 2 vols 
1872. 12mo 

17.485 Practical and Scientific Fruit Culture. Baker 

1866. l2mo 

17.486 A Manual of the Steam Engine and otliei 

Prime Movers. Rankine. 1873. l2mo. 

17.487 Considerations on Representative Govern 

ment. Mill. 1873. l2mo. 

17.488 The Clubs of New York; Pairtield. 1873 

12mo 

17,489-90 The Life of Henry J. Temple. Bulwer. 2 vols 
1871. l2mo. 

17.491 The Life of Father deRavignan. Ponleroy 

1869. 12mo 

17.492 Modern History. Michelet. 1865. iGmo. 



26 203 
52 314 

44 223 

45 223 

47 253 



30 


280 


32 


280 


36 


280 


38 


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58 


95 


67 


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70 


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58 


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120 

17.493 History of Dunbarton, X. H. Stark. I860. 

8vo 47 24o 

17.494 School Historj' of Penns_ylvania. Sypher. 

1870. 16mo". . . " . . '. . 31 247 

17.495 History of Florida. Fairbanks. 1871. l2mo. 26 236 

17.496 The History of Canada. McMullen. 1868. 

8vo 49 242 

17.497 History of Amherst College during its first 

half century. Tyler. 1873. 8vo. . . 25 233 

17.498 A Topographical and Historical Description 

of Boston. Shurtleir. 1872. 8vo. . . 26 233 

17.499 The History of ^ew Ipswich, N". H. 1852. 

8vo 51 242 

17.500 Documentary History of the State of Maine. 

Willis. 1869. 8vo 36 284 

17.501 A Comprehensive Medical Dictionary. Thom- 

as. 1873. 12mo. . . .' . . 51 206 

17.502 Fireside Saints. Jerrold. 1873. 16mo. . 37 137 

17.503 The Hoosier Schoolmaster. Eggleston. 1871. 

12mo 83 134 

17.504 Civilization considered as a Science. Harris. 

1873. 12nio , . 50 18 

17,505-6 Christian Ethics. Wuttke. 1873. 2 vols. 12mo. 36 27 
17,507-8 A Handbook of English Literature. Under- 
wood. 1873. 2 vols. l2mo. 

Vol. 1, American authors. . . . . 59 95 
Vol. 2, British authors 60 95 

17.509 The Best of all Good Company. Jerrold. 

1873. l2mo ' 61 95 

17.510 Prose Writers of Germany. Hedge. 1870. 

8vo 69 91 

17,511-12 The Literature and the Literary Men of 

Great Britain. Mills. 2 vols. 1870. 8vo. 70 91 

17.513 Manual of English Pronunciation and Spell- 

ing. Soule. 1873. l2mo 64 208 

17.514 A Selection of English Synonynies. Whatley. 

1873. 12mo 69 208 

17,515-16 Memoirs of Christian Friedrich Stockmar. 

Stockmar. 1873. 2 vols 30 294 

17,517 Autobiography of .John Stuart Mill. 1873. 

l2mo 48 304 



121 



17, 518 Memoir and Letters of Sara Coleridge 

Coleridge. 1873. 12mo. . 
17,519 The Men of the Third Kepublic. France 

1873. 12mo 

17,520-21 Life of Alexander von Humboldt. 1873 

2 Vols. 8vo 

17.522 Life and Letters of James David Forbes 

1873. 8vo 

17.523 Lives and Works of Civil and Military En- 

gineers of America. Stuart. 1871. 8vo. 

17.524 Pocket-book of Practical Eules for the Pro 

portions of Modern Engineers and Boil 
ers. Bui-gh. 1868. 24mo. 

17.525 Formulas and Tables for Architects and En 

gineers. Schumann. 1863. 16mo. . 

17.526 A Treatise on Steam Boilers. "Wilson. 1873 

16mo 

17.527 A Manual of Machinery and Millwork 

Kankine. 1869. 12mo. 

17.528 A Manual of Applied Mechanics. Eankine 

1872. 12mo 

17.529 Elementary Principles of Carpentry. Tred- 

gold. 1871. 12mo 

17.530 The Forms of Water in Clouds and Rivers 
• Tyndall. 1872. 12mo. 

17.531 The Study of Sociology. Spencer. 1873 

12mo. 

17.532 Physics and Politics. Bagehot. 1873. 12nio 

17.533 Lecture on Light. Tyndall. 1873. 12mo. 

17.534 Electricity and Magnetism. Jenkin. 1873 

16mo 

17.535 A Practical Manual of Chemical Analysis 

and Assaying. De Roninck. 1872. 16mo 

17.536 Introduction to Chemical Physics. Pynchon 

1873. 12mo 

17.537 The Spectroscope and its Applications 

Lockyer, 1873. 16mo. 

17.538 The Moon. Proctor. 1873. 12mo. 

17.539 A Manual of Practical Military Engineering 

Ernst. 1873. 12mo 

17.540 Body and Mind. Mandslcy. 1873. 12mo. 



49 


304 


58 


305 


27 


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29 


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122 



17.541-43 The Year-Book of Facts in Science and Arts 
Timbs. 1869. 3 Vols. 16mo. . 

17.544 Our Common Insects. Packard. 1873 

Kjmo 

17.545 Report on a Topograpliical Survey of the 

Adirondack Wilderness of New York 
Colvin. 1873. Svo. . . ,. 
17,54() The Depths of the Sea. Thompson. 1873 
Svo 

17.547 Pre-IIistoric Races of the United States oi 

America. Foster. 1873. Svo. 

17.548 Handbook of Hardy Trees, Shrubs and Her- 

baceous Plants. Hemsley. 1873. 8vo. 
17,54'J A General System of Botany. Le Maont 

1872. 4to 

17.550 A Treatise on the Microscopes. Beck. 1865 

Svo. ....... 

17.551 Cyclopedia of Ecclesiastical Literature. Mc- 

Clintock. Vol. 5. 1873. Svo. . 

17.552 Autology. Hamilton. 1873. Svo. 

17.553 Tlie Rebellion Record. Vol 12. 1871. Svo 

Moore. ....... 

17.554 French and Indian War. Drake. 1870. Svo 

17.555 Manners, Customs and Dress of the middle 

ages. Lacroix. 1874. Svo. . 

17.556 Historical Chronology. Woodward. 1872 

Svo. . . . . ' . 

17.557 Treatise on Bridge Building. Whipple. 1872 

Svo. ....... 

17.558 Sanitary Engineering. Latham. 1872. Svo. 

17.559 Machine Gearing. Joynson. 1868. Svo. 

17.560 Theoi'y of Strains. Stoney. 1873. Svo. 
17,561-2 Electricity and Magnetism. Maxwell. 1873 

2 Vols. Svo 

17,563-4 Manual for Railroad Engineers. A'ose 

1873. 2 Vols. Svo 

17,565 Mammoth Cave. Packard and Putnam 

1872. Svo 

17,56(5 Theory, History and Construction of the 

Stereoscope. Ilimes. 1S72. 8vo. . 
17,567 Chimneys for Furnaces. Armstrong. l(S7;l 

24ino. ....... 



46 270 
36 220 

22 62 

47 223 
32 224 

52 206 

49 202 

50 202 



24 21 
18 43 

47 263 
39 308 

28 252 

29 252 



53 314 

54 314 

55 314 

56 314 

57 203 
60 203 
32 335 

5!) 203 
51 206 



123 



17,o68 

17,569 

17,570 

17,571 

17,572- 

17,576 

17,577 
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17,580' 
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17,588 
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17,593 

17,594 

17,595 
17,596 
17,597- 

17,600- 

17,605- 

17,610 
17.611 



Ben 



1873 



-1 



Steam Boiler Explosions. Colhiirn. 1873 

24mo 

Designing of Retaining Walls. Jacob, 1873 

24mo 

Proportions of Pins used in Bridges 

der. 1873. 24mo, 
Ventilation of Buildings. Butler. 

24mo. ...... 

Medicine and Surgery. Braithwaite. 1872-3 

4 Vols. 8vo 

Anatomy of the Domesticated Animals 

Chauveau. 1873. 8vo. 
Clinical Lectures. Bennett. 1872. 8vo. 
Surgery. ISTorris. 1873. 8vo. 
Key to North American Birds. Cones 

1872-4 

Ornithology of California. 1870. 2 Vols. 4to 
Money-Maker. Oliver Optic. 1872. l6mo 
A Stout Heart. Kellogg. 1871. 16mo. 
Against the Stream. Charles. 1873. 12mo 
Foods. Smith. 1873. 12mo. 
Workshop Appliances. Shelly. 1873. IGmo 
Eust, Smut, Mildew and Mould. Cooke 

1870. 16mo 

Life of Emma Willard. Lords. 1873. l2mo 
92 j^orman Conquest of England. Freeman 

1873. 4 Vols. 8vo 

Antiquities of the Sou'thern Indians. Jones 

1873. 8vo 

Coal-Regions of America. McFarlane. 1873 

8vo. ....... 

Chemical Technology. Wagner. 1873. 8vo 

Microscopical Technology. Frey. 1872. 8vo 

-9 Medical Jurisprudence. Wharton. 1873 

3 V^ols. 8vo 

-4 Geological Survey of Illinois. Worthen 

1866. 5 Vols. 4to 

-9 American Entomology. Packard. 1868-72-5 

8vo 

Art. Long. 1871. l2mo. . 
Ornamental Art. Martel. 1857. 16m(j. 



52 260 



53 260 



54 260 



55 260 



52 214 



43 


222 


17 


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18 


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38 


191 


21 


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73 


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48 


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96 209 


16mo. . 


97 209 


16mo. . 


98 209 


Merri- 






99 209 


s. Eaw- 






100 209 


Xatiire. 






101 209 



124 

17,612 Elements of Perspective. Perley. 1872. 

l6mo 92 209 

17,618 Principles of Colouring in Painting. Martel. 

186y. 16mo 93 209 

17.614 Artistic Anatomy of Cattle and Sheep. 

Hawkins. 1869. 16mo 94 209 

17.615 Ai-tistic Anatomy of the Horse. Hawkins. 

1866. 16mo 95 209 

17.6 16 Artistic Anatomy of the Human Figui-e. 

Warren. 187."^. liimo. 

17.617 Drawing Models. Harding. 1867. 

17.618 Portrait Painting. Murray. 1872. 

17.619 Portrait Painting in Water Colours. 

field. 1868. lemo. . 

17.620 Landscape Painting in Water Colours 

botham. 1872. l6mo. 

17.621 Sketching in Water Colours Irom Xature. 

Hatton. 1867. l6mo. 

17.622 Marine Painting in Oil Colours. Carmichael. 

1873. 16mo 102 209 

17.623 Marine Painting in Water Coloiars. Cai'- 

michael. 1871. 16mo 103 209 

17.624 Flower Painting. Duffield. 1869. 16mo. . 104 209 

17.625 Mural Decoration. Goodwin. 1866. 16mo. 105 209 

17.626 Transparent Painting. Groom. 1870. 16mo. 106 209 

17.627 Transparency Painting on Linen. Williams. 

1856. l6mo 107 2U9 

17,62<S Illumination on Paper and Yellum. Lorin,-,. 

1869. l6mo 108 209 

17,629 A Companion of Illumination. Loring. 1871. 

16mo 109 209 

17,63') Preservation of Pictures. Mogford. 1872. 

16mo 110 209 

17,631 Wood Engraving. Gilks. 1871. 17rao. . Ill 209 
17,6.32 An Address delivered May 30, 1873, at the 

dedication of Memorial Hall, Audover, 

Mass., by Rev. Phillips Brooks. Andover, 

Mass., 1873. Pamph 12-1 .387 

17,633 Sketch of the Memorial Hall, Andover, 

Mass. 1873. Pampli 11-1 .387 



2-;") 


;?S7 


4-4 


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2-6 


377 


1-7 


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1-9 


3S7 


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387 


2-1 


388 


?,-] 


388 


4-1 


388 



125 

17, 634 Thirteenth Annual Eeport of the Directors 
of the Free Public Library, Worcester, 
Mass., for the ja-ar 1873. Worcester. 1873. 
Pamph 

17,63.5 Annual Eeport of the Directors ol the Prov- 
idence Atlieneum. 1872-3. Pamph. 

17.636 Annual Report Trustees, Brighton, Mass., 

Holton Library. 1872-3. Pamph. 

17.637 Annual Report Directors Chicago Public Li- 

brary. 1872-73. Pamph 

17.638 Annual Report Reading, Mass., Public Li- 

brary. 1872-73 

17.639 Annual Report Trustees Brookline Public Li- 

brary. 1872-73. Paraph 

17.640 Annual Report Hartford Young Men's Insti- 

tute, 1871-72. Pamph. .... 

17.641 Annual Report Hartford Young Men's Insti- 

tute. 1872-73. Pam])h 

17,612 Annual Report Trustees Peabody Institute. 
1872-73. Pamph 

17.643 Annual Report Trustees Taunton Pu])lic Li- 

brary. 1872. Pamph. .... 23-33 o.U 

17.644 Annual Report Trustees Charlestown Public 

Lil)rary. 1872-73. Pamph. . . . 4-34 3.")1 
17,64.5 Annual Repoz't Trustees Fall River Public 

Library. 1871-72. Pamph. . . . 12-37 ;itW 

17.646 Annual Report Trustees Fall River Pu!)lic 

Library. 1872-73. Pamph. . . . 13-37 3.51 

17.647 Annual Report Public Libnay Cincinnati. 

1872-73. Pamph 6-38 3.51 

17.648 Annual Report Mercantile Library Associ- 

ation Xew York. 1872-73. Pamph. . 12-39 3.51 

17.649 Annual Report Public Library IS'ewburyport. 

1872. Pamph 17-54 351 

17,6.50 Annual Report Trustees Free Public Library 

New Bedford. 1872-73. Pamph. . . 22-55 351 

17.651 Annual Report Trustees Manchester City Li- 

brary. 1872-73. Pami.li 8-36 351 

17.652 Annual Eeport Trustees Boston Public Li- 

brary. 1872-73. Pampi 5-45 351 

17,6,53 Bulletin Boston Public Library, ISo. 24. 

1872-73. Pamph 10-69 351 



126 



17.654 Bulletin Boston Public Library, Xo. 25 

187B. Pamph. . . . \ 

17.655 Bulletin Boston Public Librai'y, Xo. 26 

1873. Pamph. . . . ". 

17.656 Bulletin Boston Public Librarj', No. 27 

1873. Pamph 

17.657 Annual Report Waltham. 1872-73. Pamph 

17.658 Bulletin Holton Public Librar}', Brigliton 

No. 2. 1873. Pamph. 

17.659 Catalogue Manchester (England) Free Li 

brarj'. 1864. 8vo. 

17.660 Index Catalogue Manchester (Eng.) Free 

Public Libraries. 1870. Pamph. 

17.661 Index Catalogue Manchester (Eng). 1867 

Pamph. . 

17.662 Index Catalogue Rochdale .Branch. 1872 

Pamph. ...... 

17.663 Index Cataloi^ue Choolton and Ardnick 

Branch. 1872. Pamph. 

17.664 Index Catalogue Ancoates Branch. 

Pamph 

17.665 Inc'ex Catalogue Cheetham Branch 

Pamph. ....... 

17.666 Annual Report Manchester (Eng.) Free Pub 

lie Libraries. 1871-72. Pamjjh. 

17.667 Annual Report Manchester (Eng.) Free Pub 

lie Libraries. 1872-73. Pamph. 

17.668 Catalogue Medtbrd Public Library. 1871-72 

Pamph 

17.669 Supplement Catalogue Medibrd Public Li- 

brary. 1873. Pamijh. ... 

17.670 Catalogue Public School Library St. Louis 

Mo. 1872. Pamph 

17.671 Annual Report St. Louis Public School 

1872-73. Pamph 



1872, 



1873 



11-69 351 

12-69 351 

13-69 351 

9-35 351 

33 313 

32 213 

1-72 351 

2-72 351 

3-72 351 

4-72 351 

5-72 351 

6-72 351 

1-73 351 

2-73 351 

1-74 351 

2-74 351 

1-75 .351 

1-8 351 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



To THE City Council op Manchester. 

Gentlemen : At the commencement of their official year 
the Committee on Cemeteries organized by the choice of 
Sylvaims B. Putnam, Clerk , and Jacob F. James, Treas- 
urer. They chose Benjamin Stevens Superintendent of the 
" Valley" and Granvil Haselton Superintendent of " Pine 
Grove." 

A few general suggestions made last year may be repeated 
at the present time. They relate to the securing of a title 
to the old First Burying Ground on the Weston Farm ; to 
arrangements by which there may be an official supervision 
over private grounds, and to continual improvements in the 
resting places of our dead. 

THE VALLEY. 

The Sub-Committee on the Valley report that the receipts 
which have come into the hands of the Treasurer from va- 
rious sources, including sale of lots, lumber and for interest, 
amount to nine hundred sixty dollars and thirty cents 
($960.30), as follows: 

June 13, Frank L. Lynch for 1-2 lot jSTo. 326, . . . $9.00 

June 13, Frank L. Lynch tor interest, .... 8 84 

June 21, C. S. Fisher for tomb lees, 37.25 

Aug. 2.5, A. C. Wallace for himher 637.91 



128 

Aug. 30, F. C. Dow for lot N'o. 754 1-2- .... $132.30 
Sept. 17, Thomas Dunlap for let No. 757, . . . 90.00 

Nov. 19, Joseph Nichols for lot No. 1222, . . . 41.40 

Total, : $960.30 

All of which was paid to the City Treasurer immediately 
after collection as per receipts. In addition to the above, 
the Superintendent has collected twenty dollars and sixty- 
two cents ($20.62) for loam, &c., which was credited on 
his bills. 

The disbursements on approval of the committee on wall, 
as the amount of appropriation, will be found fully stated in 
the annual report of receipts and expenditures. 

One man has been employed regularly on the grounds 
through the working season, and occasionally additional 
services have been required. 

The stone wall commenced last year has been completed, 
and had there been adequate appropriation or sufficient re- 
ceipts from the sale of lots or otherwise, an iron fence would 
have been placed upon it. During the year a design has 
been made, and it is expected the casting will be done at an 
early day. 

It has been proposed that the wall and fence be extended 
as rapidly as possible on the line of Auburn Street on the 
east of the gateway, and at no distant day be continued 
down Pine Street across the deep ravine ; and that from 
year to year some portion of an iron fence be constructed, 
until the grounds shall be fully protected. 

The removal of the. old growth during the past season, 
and the more recent cutting of many dead trees and those 
injured by the falling of the branching pines, as well as the 
occasional thinning of the shade trees in the grounds, caused 
a striking change, and left the cemetery to some extent ex- 
posed to view and to the glare of summer suns and blasts 
of autumn winds. But year by year the new hard wood 



129 

growth will come rapidly forward, and the committee believe 
that the citizens will generally approve their work. 

A few new lots have been laid out and graded during the 
year, and are now in tlie market. They are generally pleas- 
antly located, and are in every way desirable lots. 

The cutting of the timt)er in the grounds, and the con- 
struction of the wall, occasioned some injury to lots and 
fences, for which claims have been made and satisfactorily 
adjusted. The same causes have required extra labor, and 
there is still, in several places, more labor needed before tlie 
grounds will be satisfactory to the public. 

The committee expended all the funds at tlieir command 
in improvements, and regret that the want of means com- 
pels them to leave much unaccomplished that they had 
proposed to do. 

At least three thousand dollars should be appropriated 
the coming year for extending the cement wall and sur- 
mounting it with a substantial iron fence. 

To make such improvements as the grounds require, and 
to meet the usual expenses, it will need an appropriation of 
four thousand dollars. 

PINE GROVE. 

The Pine Grove Cemetery has been cared for the past 
year by Mr. Haselton, who has given his whole time to the 
work of keeping the avenues and walks in order, removing 
trees and grading lots as they have been laid out by the 
engineers. 

The difficulty of cultivating flowers and shrubbery under 
the pines, has led many owners to petition for their removal. 

The committee have ordered the removal of some trees 
from lots and walks contiguous, where such removal would 
not seriously injure the general appearance. 

They have in all such cases encouraged the planting of 
evergreens and hard wood trees to take their places. 

9 



130 

The sale of lots has been greater than ever before in 
one year, showing that the grounds are appropriated more 
as a place of burial. 

Many lots have been improved by their owners, and sub- 
stantial and tasteful curb-stones and monuments have been 
placed therein. 

Nothing has been done to the fence around the cemetery 
the past year. The wooden portion is becoming old, and 
will need some repairs the coming year. The iron fence 
which was not completed wlien our predecessors made their 
report, was finished soon after, but we regret to say it has 
not proved satisfactory. 

The stone work was not set until the ground was frozen, 
and upon the opening of spring the settling and swaying 
was such that the whole structure is out of shape. It has 
seemed best to the committee that nothing should -be done 
to it until such time as the funds in their hands should 
warrant the erection of another section, and then to make 
such changes in the grade and location of the present por- 
tion as to give, in connection with the new part, a neat and 
substantial appearance, the consideration and extension of 
which must necessarily come upon our successors. 

The demand from the lot-owners, and the public generally, 
for a supply of water for the grounds for years past, has 
come to the committee this year as usual. 

The well near the tool house being worthless, we caused 
one to be sunk on the eastern side of the grounds, but it 
had no signs of water after a very few weeks. 

The committee, after ascertaining that the elevation be- 
yond the road upon the easterly side of the grounds gave 
promise of yielding a fair supply of water, took a lease of 
Mr. Joseph Poor, in behalf of the city, of a perpetual right 
to dig wells and convey water by under-ground pipes. The 
sum paid was one hundred and fifty dollars (^150.00), and 



131 

the terms of the lease are such that we may make additional 
wells by payment of fifty dollars (sS^oO.OO) for each. 

The work was entered upon at once and has been com- 
pleted in a substantial manner, and the water brought to 
the highest portion of the ground. When the gate was 
shut, just before the freezing of the ground, the flow of 
water was abundant, proving to be sufficient, if properly 
distributed, for many years to come. 

The well or reservoir is laid with heavy split stones. The 
pipes for conducting it to the grounds are cement. 

The contracts for the work were made by the treasurer 
and sub-committee, the details of which, and its speedy com- 
pletion, are largely due to the treasurer, Mr. James. 

The cost of the work will be found in detail in the an- 
nual report of receipts and expenditures. 

To make it of the greatest utility to the proprietors on 
the grounds, some plan of distribution must be adopted by 
our successors. 

A. A. WOODWARD, Chairman. 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, Qlerk. 
J. F. JAMES, Treasurer. 
JAMES 0. ADAMS, 



E. W. HARRINGTON, S "" ,7 ;; „ 
T Txr T^ A -r> r> ,» TT I the VaUey. 



Sub Committee on 

lUlN, ^ 

I. W. DARRAH, 

A. H. DANIELS, ^ 

J. L. KENNEDY, 1 Sub Committee on 

S. B. PUTNAM, f Pine Grove. 

JONA. B. MOORE, J 

HOLMES R. PETTEE, 

JAMES A. WESTON, 

OH AS. H. BARTLETT. 



132 

TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To THE Committee on Cemeteries : 

Your Treasurer respectfully submits the following report: 



THE VALLEY. 

1873. 

June 13, F. S. Lynch for 1-2 lot No. 326, ^9 60 
June 13, F. S. Lynch for interest, . 8 84 

June 21, C. S. Fisher for tomb rent, . 37 25 
Aug. 26, A. C. Wallace for timber, . 637 91 
Aug. 30, F. C. Dow for lot No. 754 1-2, 132 30 
Sept. 17, Thomas Dunlap for lot No. 757, 90 00 
Nov. 19, Joseph Nichols for lot No. 1222, 44 40 



1873. 




PAID CITY TREASURER. 




June 21, 


Paid 


City Treasurer, 


$37 25 


Aug. 26, 


(( 


" " 


637 91 


Aug. 30, 


u 


" " 


150 00 


Sept. 17, 


u 


" " 


90 00 


Nov. 22, 


(( 


" " 


45 14 



$960 30 



$960 30 

PINE GROVE. 

Cash received by J. B. Sawyer for lots sold from 

January 1 to April 22, 1873, . 
Cash paid City Treasurer, .... 
Cash received for 85 lots sold from April 27 to 

December 31, 1873, .... 

Cash paid City Treasurer as per receipts. 
Amount received for lots sold one year ending 

December 31, 1873, is ... • 

T have paid no bills during the year, but have paid the 
City Treasurer all money received on account of the ceme- 



$490 


05 


490 


05 


1,796 


83 


1,796 


83 


2,286 


88 



133 

teries, and all the bills of expenditures have been examined 
by the committee on accounts, the complete details of which 
will appear in the city Annual Report for 1873. 
To which report reference is made for particulars. 

J. F. JAMES, 
Treasurer of Committee on Cemeteries. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
Hon, Jacob F. James, Treasurer of Committee on Ceme- 
teries, and find them correctly cast, and the payments prop- 
erly vouched for. 

. JOSEPH E. BENNETT, City Auditor. 

January 1, 1874. 



ANNUAL KEPOET OF CHIEF ENGINEEE. 



Engineer's Office, December, 1873. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and City Councils of Manchester : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit herewith the 
annual report of the condition and workings of the Fire 
Department for the year ending Dec. 31, 1873. 

Tlie following is a statement of the amount and estimated 
value of the jDroperty now owned by the city in this depart- 
ment : 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 1, 

LOCATED ON VINE STEEET. 



1 first-class rotary steam fire engine 


and 


hose carriage, 


. $2,250 00 


100 feet rubber hose, .... 


. 240 00 


1600 feet leather hose, .... 


. 2,054-00 


Firemen's suits, .... 


. 203 00 


Furniture, fixtures, &c., . 


. 562 00 



Total amount, .... |5,309 00 

FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2, 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose 

carriage, 13,250 00 

100 feet rubber hose, . . , . 140 00 



136 



1500 feet leather hose, 
Firemen's suits, . 
Furniture, fixtures, &c., . 

Total amount, 



1,791 00 

187 00 

639 00 

B6,007 00 



E, W, HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3, 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 

1 second-class plunger engine and hose 



carriage, 
200 feet rubber hose, 
1600 feet leather hose. 
Firemen's suits, . 
Furniture, fixtures, &c., 



$3,200 00 

100 00 

1,924 00 

178 00 

517 75 



Total amount, . : . . $5,919 75 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 4, 



LOCATED ON VIXE STREET. 



1 second-class double-plunger engine and 

hose carriage, .... $4,250 00 

50 feet rubber hose, 
1300 feet leather hose, 
Firemen's suits, . 
Furniture, fixtures, &c.. 



71 


50 


1,757 


00 


213 


00 


609 


25 



Total amount, . . . . 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY, NO. 1, 



1,900 75 



LOCATED OK VINE STREET. 



2 four-wheeled hose carriages, 
2250 feet leather hose, 



■11,000 00 
2,466 00 



137 

Firemen's suits, .... 309 00 

Furniture, fixtures, (fee, . . . 343 00 



Total amount, .... $4,118 00 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, NO. 1, 



LOCATED ON VINE STHEET. 



1 truck, with hooks and ladders, . . $1,500 00 

Firemen's suits, . • . . . 431 00 

Furniture, fixtures, &c., . . • 383 75 



Total amount, .... f2,314 75 
gofpe's falls hose company, 

LOCATED AT DERRV MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, . 
600 feet leather hose, 

Fixtures, &c., .... 

Total amount, .... $587 00 
amoskeag hose company, 

LOCATED AT AMOSKEAG VILLAGE. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, . . . $200 00 

800 feet hose, 600 00 

Pipes, &c., 12 00 



$150 


00 


400 


00 


37 


00 



Total amount, .... $812 00 

ENGhNEERS' DEPARTMENT. 

1 supply wagon, .... $200 00 

Suits for firemen, . . . . 116 00 

Furniture, &c., 122 00 



Total amount, .... $438 00 



138 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



At cost, 



115,634 70 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag Engine Company, No. 1, 

Fire King ^' " No. 2, 

E. W. Harrington " No. 3, 

N. S. Bean " No. 4, 

Pennacook Hose " No. 1, 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, 

Goffe's Falls Hose 

Amoskeag Hose " 

Engineers' Department, 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, 

Total amount, .... 



$5,309 00 

6,007 00 

5,919 75 

6,900 75 

4,118 00 

2,314 75 

587 00 

812 00 

438 00 

15,634 70 

48,040 95 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF MEMBERS OF THE 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



ENGINEERS. 

B. C. Kendall, chief engineer, No. 311 Central street. 
Wilberforce Ireland, clerk, cor. Prospect and Union street. 
A. C. Wallace, Main street, Piscataquog. 
A. H. Lowell, Park street. 
Freeman Higgins, Bridge street. 

AMOSKEAG ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 1. 

Orrin E. Kimball, foreman, No. 9 Harrison Street. 
George R. Simmons, assistant foreman, No. 1 Pennacook St. 



139 

Horace Nichols, engineer, No. 27 machine shop block. 
Sam C. Lowell, assistant engineer, No. 5 machine shop 

block. 
James R. Carr, clerk. No. 14 Orange Street. 
G. W. Butterfield, driver, engine house, Vine Street. 
Erastus Cutting, hoseman. No. 175 Hanover Street. 
C. M. Morse, hoseman, No. 548 Chestnut Street. 
John D. Linus, hoseman. No. 5 machine shop block. 
John E. Wilson, hoseman. No. 53 machine shop block. 
John L. Avery, hoseman, No. 518 Chestnut Street. 
George W. Vickerj, hoseman. No. 60 Orange Street. 
Frank E. Stearns, hoseman, N(3. 24 Brook Street. 
John L. Underbill, hoseman. No. 14 Laurel Street. 

FIRE KING ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

James F. Pherson, foreman. No. 25 machine shop block. 

C. A. Swain, assistant foreman. No. 12 Pearl Street. 

A. M. Kenniston, clerk and treasurer. No. 14 Bridge St. 

D. W. Morse, engineer. No. 1419 Elm Street. 

S. W. Nelson, assistant engineer and steward, No. 26 ma- 
chine shop block. 
G. W. Cheney, hoseman, No.«54 machine shop block. 
J. W. Batchelder, hoseman. No. 340 Pine Street. 
C. F. Hall, hoseman. No. 42 machine shop block. 
F. W. McKinley, hoseman. No. 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Agustus Merrill, driver, engine house. Vine Street. 
W. B. Heath, hoseman, No. 63 Stark Corporation. 
A. H. Sanborn, hoseman, No. 11 Towne's block. Elm St. 
S. F. Head, hoseman. No. 403 Pine Street. 
C. H. Manley, hoseman. No. 1302 Elm Street. 

E. W. HARRINGTON ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

John Patterson, foreman, Main Street. 

Horatio Fradd, assistant foreman and clerk, Dover Street. 



140 

D. J. Warren, hoseraan, Barr & Clapp's block, Main Street. 

Horace Crandall, driver. Mast Road. 

William Doran, engineer, Douglas Street. 

H. E. Sturtevant, hoseman, Granite Street. 

B. K. Parker, hoseman. Main Street. 

George Weaver, hoseman. River Street. 

John R. Young, hoseman, Dover Street. 

Thomas Young, hoseman, Dover Street. 

Joseph Schofield, hoseman, Main Street. 

John Gildard, hoseman, Douglas Street. 

N, S. BEAN ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 4. 

G. W. Wilson, foreman, Nashua Street. 

W. H. Vickery, assistant foreman, No. 19 machine shop 

block. 
J. S. Bacheller, engineer, cor. Amherst and Beech Streets, 
A. D. Colby, assistant engineer, No. 44 machine shop block. 

A. Roby, driver, engine house. Vine Street. 

l\ W. Hannaford, clerk. No. 256 Lowell Street. 
G. H. Dodge, hoseman, No. 35 machine shop block. 
J. W. Preston, hoseman. No. 39 machine shop block. 

B. S. Stewart, hoseman, No. 80 Amoskeag Corporation. 
S. H. Batchelder, hoseman. No. 39 Mechanic Street. 

F. E. Judkins, hoseman, No. 40 machine shop block. 

C. F. Howe, hoseman, No. 99 Amoskeag Corporation. 
N. H. Dodge, hoseman. No. 34 Market Street. 

R. Hatch, hoseman, No. 53 machine shop block. 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY, NO. 1. 

H. S. Brown, foreman, No. 14 Bridge Street, Amoskeag 

Corporation. 
B. B. Aldrich, assistant foreman, No. 58 Orange Street. 

D. H. Maxfield, clerk. No. 17 Stark Corporation. 
J. E. Merrill, treasurer, No. 83 Orange Street. 



141 

J. G. Knight, steward, No. 405 Pine Street. 

A. Maxfield, hoseman, No. 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 

T. W. Lane, hoseman. No. 31 Blodgett Street. 

W. L. Blenus, hoseman. No. 153 Hanover Street. 

G. H. Porter, hoseman, Bartlett's block, Lanrel Street. 

A. J. Coburn, hoseman. No. 12 Chester Street. 

M. W. Ford, hoseman. No. 53 Water Street. 

W. R. Sawyer, hoseman, No. 7 Pearl Avenue. 

E. C. Jones, hoseman, No. 8 Pearl Avenue. 

W. 11. Cassidy, hoseman. No. 6 Pearl Avenue. 

J. M. Plaisted, hoseman. No. 21 Water Street. 

T. P, Heath, hoseman, No. 261 Manchester Street. 

G. A. Stevens, hoseman, No. 132 Merrimack Street. 

C. D. Palmer, hoseman, corner Park and Beech Streets. 

C. J. Chase, No. 31 Laurel Street. 

A. Merrill, No. 21 Water Street. 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, NO. 1. 

J. M. Jewell, foreman. No. 69 Hanover Street. 

A. L. Robertson, assistant foreman. No. 137 Amherst St. 

G. E. Glines, clerk. No. 95 Orange Street. 

Charles Canfield, steward. No. 18 Stark Street. 

Joel Daniels, treasurer. No. 32 Ash Street. 

James Kearn, driver. No. 102 Concord Street. 

G. H. Dudley, No. 152 Laurel Street. 

H. P. Young, No. 351 Pine Street. 

F. A. Senter, No. 247 Pine Street. 

J. N. Chase, No. 276 Bridge Street. 

F. H. Pike, No. 8 Lincoln block. 

E. A. S. Holmes, No. 228 Manchester Street. 
L. J. Flint, No. 211 Bridge Street. 
George Bacon, No. 45 Stark Corporation. 

G. L. Leech, No. 263 Merrimack Street. 
C. A. Clough, No. 2 Print Works. 



142 

D. M. K. Phillips, No. 310 Central Street. 
Charles Harvey, No. 320 Central Street. 
A. A. Haselton, No. 320 Central Street. 

S. Worthen, No. 137 Amherst Street. 
J. S. Dennett, No. 80 Canal Street. 
W. 0. Davidson, No. 11 Stark Street. 
H, H. Cole, No. 43 machine shop block. 
W. S. Leavitt, No. 137 Amherst Street. 
M. J. Wingate, No. 1 Stark Street. 
H. T. Miller, No. 68 Hanover Street. 
J. Orrill, No. 442 Union Street. 
G. Bj Forsaith, Towne's block. 
A. Mason, No. 137 Amherst Street. 

E. A. Waldron, No. 54 Water Street. 
H. French, No. 3 Knowles' block. 



FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The department has been called out thirty-five times as 
follows : 

First, January 8th, alarm box 6 — Fire at Pittsfield. 

Second, January 13th, alarm box 7 — Kennard's block, 
Washington Street ; caused by wood-work around chimney 
taking fire. 

Third, January 30th, alarm box 42 — caused by gas ex- 
plosion at Manchester Print Works. 

Fourth, February 10th, alarm box 13 — Blodgett Street^, 
School-house; caused by wood-work near stove taking fire. 

Fifth, February 14th, alarm box 8 — Pearl Street ; burning 
of bed in Burgess' block. 

Sixth, February 20th, alarm box 7 — Elm Street, near 
City Hotel ; effused by fire in clothes press.- 

Seventh, March 8th, alarm box 7 — Fire in stables on 
Lowell Street ; cause said to be smoking in stable ; loss 
$3,000 ; insured -$2,500. 



143 

Eighth, March 16th, alarm box 52 — Piscataquog ; cause, 
burning of a chimney. 

Ninth, April 23d, alarm box 26 — Janesville ; fire in C. 
D. Carpenters house ; incendiary, loss $2,500 ; insured 
•$2,000. 

Tenth, May 1st, alarm box 4 — A burning chimney. 

Eleventh, May 27th, alarm box 16 — Corner High and 
Pine streets ; C. W. Bartlett's house, leak in gas pipe. 

Twelfth, June 6th, alarm box 34 — Fire in harness shop. 
Mechanics' Row ; loss $r)00 ; fully insured. 

Thirteenth, June 12th, alarm box 21 — Bartlett's block. 
Chestnut Street ; caused by sparks from chimney dropping 
on roof of building. 

Fourteenth, June 13th, alarm box T — Burning chimney, 
Birch Street. 

Fifteenth, June 25th, alarm box 7 — Elm Street ; Kero- 
sene lamp explosion. 

Sixteenth, July 13th, alarm box 4 — Burning chimney, 
Park Street. 

Seventeenth, July 15th, alarm box 6 — Burning chimney. 
Concord Street. 

Eighteenth, July 23d, alarm box 7 — Kerosene lamp 
explosion. 

Nineteenth, August 2d, alarm box 4 — Fire in Patrick 
Sheehan's house ; loss, $500. 

Twentieth, August 2d, alarm box 52 — Cause unknown. 

Twenty-first, August 5th, alarm box 21 — Fire in wood- 
shed on Park Street ; loss -foOO. 

Twenty-second, August 24th, alarm box 4 — Burning 
chimney. Park Street. 

Twenty-third, August 27tli, alarm box 52 — Fire in tene- 
ment block, Piscataquog ; loss, $4,000 ; insured, $3,500. 

Twenty-fourth, September 18th, alarm box 34 — Fire in 
Hodge's dry house. Mechanics' Row ; loss, $200 ; no in- 
surance. 



144 

Tweiity-fiftli, September 20th, alarm box 6 — Amherst 
Street ; dwellingthouse, loss $300 ; insured. 

Twentj'-sixth, October 1st, alarm box 51 — Fire at S. C. 
Forsaitli's boiler room. 

Twenty-seventh, October 2d, alarm box 4 — Burning 
chimney. 

Twenty-eighth, October 3d, alarm box 4 — Burning 
chimney. 

Twenty-ninth, October Otli, alarm box 52 — Piscataquog ; 
caused by wood-work around chimney taking fire. 

Thirtieth, October 20th, alarm box 53 — Piscataquog ; 
J. P. Brock's house ; loss, $5,000 ; no insurance. 

Tliirty-first, November 12th, alarm box 53 — Piscataquog; 
fire in wood-shed at school-house, caused by putting ashes 
in barrel ; loss,. $200. 

Thirty-second, November 28th, alarm box 7^»^Caused by 
careless use of kerosene lamp. 

Thirty-third, December 5tli, alarm box G — Fire at Sun- 
cook. 

Tliirty-fourth, December 28th, alarm box 21 — Caused by 
an imperfect chimney. 

Thirty-fifth, December 30th, alarm box 8 — Fire at F. 
Preston's stable, near corner of Orange and Elm Streets ; 
loss, $400. 

Losses by fire for the year, . . . $16,900 

Total amount of insurance on property, . 8,900 



Total loss not covered by insui-ance, . $8,000 



145 

APPAEATUS. 

The steam fire engines belonging to the department are 
in first-rate working order, with the exception of the N. S. 
Bean, No. 4, This engine has been in constant service for 
seven years, and during that time a few slight repairs only 
have been made upon it. The pumps of the machine should 
be thoroughly overhauled. New steam cylinders are need- 
ed, and some other repairs should be made. Arrange- 
ments have been made with the Amoskeag Company for 
the supply of an engine to be used while the repairs upon 
the N. S. Bean are being made. 

I would suggest that the time has arrived when a span 
of horses should be permanently attached to the steamer 
E. W. Harrington, No. 3, located at Piscataquog Village. 
Heretofore this engine has been drawn to fires by horses 
which were employed at the lumber works belonging to A. 
C. Wallace. As the horses owned by Mr. Wallace were 
frequently in use at a considerable distance from the en- 
gine when a fire has occurred, it has often happened that 
the engine was greatly delayed in reaching the place. If a 
span of horses should be purchased for this service, they 
might be employed a portion of the time to advantage in 
connection with the repairs upon the streets in that vicin- 
ity. 

Since the introduction into the city of hydrants and other 
facilities for putting out fires, two new hose carriages are 
required, in order that the best results may be realized. 
Whenever a fire occurs in the vicinity of a hydrant, hose 
should be attached thereto with the least possible delay. 
According to the present system of drawing the hose carri- 
ages by hand, much more time is consumed in reaching the 
fire than would be required if the carriage were drawn by 
horses. I would, therefore, recommend the purchase of a 
new hose carriage to be drawn by liorses, and also another 



146 

light hose carriage to be drawn Ity hand. The horse hose 
carriage should be located at the engine house upon Vine 
street. The hose carriage now in use might be located near 
the Lincoln-street school-house ; and if a new hand hose 
carriage should be purchased, as recommended, it might be 
located to advantage near the new Grammar school-house 
at the corner of Bridge and Ash Streets. This arrange- 
ment, if carried out, would no doubt often tend to facilitate 
quenching of fires immediately, and before an engine would 
be needed. 

The Hook and Ladder Truck which was purchased last 
year has proved to be equal to any carriage of the kind 
now in use, and it has given great satisfaction to the fire- 
men who manage it, and to the Board of Engineers. 

The total amount of hose now in useiii the department is 
10,000 feet, 1,850 of which was purchased during the year 
past. The total amount of hose now used in the city proper 
is 8,600 feet. At Amoskeag Village there are 800 feet, and 
600 feet are in use at Goife's Falls. The most of the hose 
now used by the department is in good condition. As the 
territory of the city is steadily increasing, more hose will 
soon be needed. The hose now on hand is constantly de- 
preciating in value by wear, and consequently more will 
be needed on this account. I would, therefore, recommend 
that 1,500 feet of new hose be purchased immediately. 

I would respectfully renew the recommendation which I 
made in my report of last year concerning the heating of 
the engine houses upon Vine Street. If the houses were 
heated by steam, as recommended, much expense would 
be saved,- and during the winter months the water in the 
boilers of the engines could be kept at a high temperature, 
so that tbe engines would be ready to play upon a fire 
without a moment's delay. 

The outside doors of the engine houses on Vine Street 
have become much worn and dilapidated, and I would re- 



147 

spectfully suggest that it would be good policy to procure 
new ones, with glass panels. By this arrangement the 
rooms would he well liglited, and present a pleasant and 
cheerful appearance. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

During the year past water pipes connecting with the 
Amoskeag Company's reservoir at Janesville have been 
laid in all of the streets in the city, and as a consequence 
the supply of water for fire purposes has been full, com- 
plete and very satisfactory to all concerned. The new im- 
provements in this respect have greatly lessened the danger 
from devasting fires in the city proper. In Piscataquog 
village, however, the water supply is far short of the de- 
mand, as there are only four reservoirs in the village, and 
three of them can be pumped dry in less tban thirty min- 
utes. Many portions of the village are so far distant from 
any of these reservoirs that in case of a fire no benefit could 
be derived from them. In the case of the fire last sum- 
mer, at the tenement house belonging to the Print Works 
Corporation, water was taken from the water pipes laid on 
Granite Street, upon the east side of the river. If there 
had been a proper supply of water near at hand the build- 
ing might have I)een saved with little damage. In the case 
of the burning of the dwelling-house owned by Mr. J. P. 
Brock, in October last, the fire department could render 
but little service because of the great distance of the build- 
ing from a reservoir. More than half of the losses from 
fires in the city during the past year \ia\e been occasioned 
by the burning of buildings located in this village. If the 
City Council should deem it inexpedient to extend the 
water pipes at a very early day into this portion of the city,, 
it is evident that more reservoirs should be provided there 
without delay. 



148 

THE FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The fire alarm telegraph, which was introduced and put 
in operation in September, 1872, is giving increasing satis- 
faction as its great merits are becoming better known and 
appreciated, not only to the members of the fire depart- 
ment, but also to citizens of all classes. The system has 
worked to perfection thoughout the year, and in every 
case the location of a fire has been correctly indicated. 
The mistakes and confusion which prevailed in former 
times have been completely avoided. The labors and em- 
barrassments of the firemen have been greatly lessened, 
and when fires have broken out much valuable time has 
been saved in reaching them. A new and heavy alarm 
bell has been placed in a tower near the corner of Elm and 
Prospect streets, and several additional engineers' and 
drivers' call bells have been procured. Six additional alarm 
boxes are needed, one of which should be located near the 
Manchestei; House, one near the Lincoln-street school- 
house, one upon Elm street near the Riding Park, one at 
the corner of Elm and Water streets, one at the corner of 
Cedar and Union streets, and one at the corner of Man- 
chester and Chestnut street. 

SUGGESTIONS. 

The people of the city have great reason to congratulate 
themselves in view of the comparatively small amount of 
property which has been destroyed by fire in the city dur- 
ing the past year, and also in view of the splendid equip- 
ment of their fire department, the excellent water supply, 
and other arrangements, which have been made for the 
protection of life and property from fires. It is well, how- 
ever, for us all to remember that with all the appliances 
which art and science can furnish for these purposes, we 



149 

are never absolutely free from danger. Other cities, as 
well provided in these respects as our own, have been laid in 
ashes. It is, therefore, the imperative duty of every citi- 
zen to cooperate with the City Council and the fire depart- 
ment in every possible manner in guarding their homes 
from the ravages of the devouring element, and in provid- 
ing such apparatus as may be needed for quenching fires in 
their incipient state. In this connection, I would suggest 
that all owners of buildings would do well by providing lad- 
ders to be always ready for use in case of a fire. I would al- 
so suggest that it would be well for each family to procure 
fire buckets to be kept ready at hand in case of the break- 
ing out of a fire upon their premises. 

In this connection it may be well for the City Council 
to consider the expediency of organizing a brigade of fire 
police, whose duty should be to protect from tliieves all 
merchandise exposed to destruction at fires. Such a brig- 
ade should be placed under the authority of the Board of 
Engineers, and, among their other duties, they might be au- 
thorized to protect merchandise in stores from damage l)y 
water by the use of blankets and canvas, in case of fires in 
rooms or buildings near by. The insurance companies 
who have risks upon property in the city could well atford 
to pay the expense of sucli a brigade as is proposed. In 
this connection I would further suggest that, in case of a 
large fire, many buildings exposed to danger might be pro- 
tected if the owners were provided with canvas or blankets 
with which to shield the roofs and walls from the flying 
cinders. 

THE firemen's BELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

This association, which was formed in 1872, and consists 
of nearly every member of the department, has realized, 
thus far, the best expectations of its founders. During the 



150 

year past it has been the meajis of mitigating the suflferings 
of several firemen who were injured while in the discharge 
of their duties. In the case of John D. Linus, a hoseman, 
attached to Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine, No. 1, and who 
was very severely injured at the fire upon Lowell street in 
March last, the benefits of the association were illustrated in 
a very marked manner. During his painful confinement 
for a period of thirteen weeks, he was constantly watched, 
and everything necessary for his comfort was provided by 
his brethren of the association. ' 

The whole receipts of the association are $1,520.43 ; 
the expenses have been -1728.13, leaving a cash balance on 
hand amounting to -'$792.30. The members of the associa- 
tion are under deep obligations to Hon. Charles H. Bartlett, 
for tendering to them the entire amount of his salary as 
Mayor, upon resigning the office, amounting to $131. 

They also gratefully acknowledge the kindness of Ex-Gov. 
Smyth, and Charles Williams, Esq., the proprietors of 
Smyth's Opera House, in granting them the use of the 
liouse for a levee in aid of the funds of the association. 

The members of the association are also under obligations 
to A. G. Fairbanks, Esq., for his don,ation of $10 ; to A. 
H. Daniels, Esq., for a donation of -So ; and to J. E. Ben- 
nett, Esq., for a donation of 83. 

The members of the association desire to thank the 
citizens of the city, generally, for the interest which they 
have manifested in the institution, and especially for the 
generous patronage which they extended to the levee in aid 
of Mr. Linus, and the levee which was given to raise funds 
for the institution.* 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I desire to thank His Honor the Mayor 
for his courtesy and kindness to me, personally, and for the 



151 

warm interest which he has manifested in the department, 
as well as for his sympathy for the firemen. 

I also hereby extend my thanks to the Committee on the 
Fire Department, and the members of the City Council 
generally, for their zeal in caring for the welfare of the 
firemen, and for the readiness which they have at all times 
manifested in responding to all reasonable suggestions which 
have been made to them for improving the efficiency of this 
branch of the public service. 

I also take this occasion to thank the members of the 
Board of Engineers for their kindness and gentlemanly 
bearing towards me, while aiding me in the discharge of 
my duties. 

And finally, I hereby extend my thanks to the officers 
and members of the several companies belonging to the 
department, for the energy, the promptness, and the cheer- 
fulness they have displayed in the performance of their 
duties, and for the kindness and good will which they have 
always manifested to me, personally. 

B. C. KENDALL, Chief Engineer. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Hydrants are located on the following-named streets, at 
the points designated : 

Amherst, north-west corner Vine Street. 
Amherst, opposite south-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner Union Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner Walnut Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner Lincoln street. 
Amherst, north-west corner Ashland Street. 



' 152 

Amherst, north-west corner Hall Street. 

Arlington, north-west corner Cross Street. 

Arlington, north-west corner Warren Street. 

Arlington, north-west corner Ashland Street. 

Ash, front of No. 32. 

Auburn, north-east corner Canal Street. 

Auburn, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Auburn, front of No 40. 

Auburn, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 

Auburn, north-west corner Pine Street. 

Bedford, north-west corner Granite Street. 

Bedford, near No. 36 Manchester Prhit Works Corp. 

Bedford, north-west corner Central Street. 

Beech, north-west corner Park Street. 

Beech, front of No. 584. 

Birch, north-west corner Lowell Street. 

Birch, north-west corner Washington Street. 

Blodgett, front of Primary School House. 

Blodgett, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 

Blodgett, north-west corner Pine Street. 

Blodgett, north-west corner Union Street. 

Bridge, north-east corner Canal Street. 

Bridge, north-east corner Hobbs Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Bridge, front of No. 26. 

Bridge, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Union Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Walnnt Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Beech Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Ash Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Maple Street. 

Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, north-west corner Russell Street. 

Bridge, north-west corner Linden Street. 

Brook, north-east corner Canal Street. 



153 

Brook, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Brook, north-west corner Phinehas Adams's lot. 

Brook, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 

Brook, north-west corner Pine Street. 

Brook, north-west corner Union Street. 

Canal, north-cast corner Depot Street. 

Canal, near old office door to Locomotive Works. 

Cedar, north-east corner Canal Street. 

Cedar, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Cedar, front of No. 36. 

Cedar, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 

Cedar, north-west corner Pine Street. 

Cedar, north-west corner Union Street. 

Cedar, north-west corner Beech Street. 

Cedar, north-west corner Maple Street. 

Central, north-east corner Canal Street. 

Central, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Central, near gate to Merrimack Square. 

Central, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 

Central, north-west corner Pine street. 

Central, north-west corner Union Street. 

Central, north-west corner Beech Street. 

Central, north-west corner Maple Street. 

Central, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 

Central, front of No. 3.74. 

Chestnut, north-west corner Lowell Street. 

Chestnut, opposite High Street. 

Chestnut, north-west corner Pearl Street. 

Chestnut, north-west. corner Orange Street. 

Chestnut, north-west corner Myrtle Street. 

Chestnut, north-west corner Prospect Street. 

Concoi'd, opposite Vine Street. 

Concord, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 

Concord, north-west corner Union Street. 

Concord, north-west corner Walnut Street. 



154 



Concord, north-west corner Beech. 
Concord, north-west corner Nashua Street. 
Concord, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Concord, north-west corner Old Amherst. 
Dean, north-cast corner Canal Street. 
Depot, 100 feet west of Franklin Street. 
Depot, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Elm, front of Fisk's book-store. 
Franklin, opposite Middle Street. 
Granite, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Granite, north-west corner Elm. 
Hanover, front of First Congregational church. 
Hanover, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Planover, north-west corner Union Street. 
Hanover, north-Avest corner Beech. 
Hanover, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Ashland Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Hall Street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Harrison, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Harrison, north-west corner Union Street. 
Hollis, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Hollis, north-east corner Hobbs Street. 
Kidder, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Kidder, north-east corner Hobbs Street. 
Kidder, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Kidder's Court, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Langdon, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Union Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Laurel, nortli-wcst corner Ma})le Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 



165 

Laurel, near No. 244. 
Laurel, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner Ash Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner South Street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 
Lowell, north-west corner Wilson Road. 
Manchester, front of James Brothers' stable. 
Manchester, northwest corner Chestnut Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Union Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Maple, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Maple, front of No. 530. 
Market, near No. 54 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Market, near 2d Back Street, west of Elm Street. 
Market, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Massabesic, north-west corner Old Falls Road. 
Massabesic, south-east corner Taylor Street. 
Massabesic, avenue near pumping station. 
Mechanic, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Mechanic, near 2d Back Street, west of Elm Street. 
Mechanic, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Merrimack, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Merrimack, near No. Ill Amoskeag Corporation. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Franklin/ Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Merrimack, opposite gate to Merrimack Square. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Union Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Beech Street. 



156 

Merrimack, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Lincoln street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Middle, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Middle, near No. 67 Araoskeag Corporation. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Union Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Walnut Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Ash Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Orange, opposite Clark avenue. 
Orange, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Orange, north-west corner Union Street. 
Orange, north-west corner Walnut Street. 
Park, near No. 36. 

Park, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Park, north-west corner Union Street. 
Park, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Park, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Clark Avenue. 
Pearl, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Union Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Ash Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Park Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Hanover Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Amherst Street. ' 
Pine, north-west corner Concord Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Pine, north-west corner High Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Bridge Street. 
Pleasant, north-east corner Canal Street. 



157 



Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester Corporation. 
Pleasant, north-west corner Franklin Street. 
Pleasant, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Prospect, front of No. 16. 
Prospect, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner Union Street. 
Spring, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Spring, north-east corner Charles Street. 
Spring, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Spruce, front of No. 40. 
Spruce, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Spruce, near Pine Back Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner Union Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Stark, north-east corner Canal. 
Stark, near No. 13 Stark Corporation. 
Stark, north-west corner Elm Street. 
State, north-west corner Granite Street. 
State, opposite No. 57 Manchester Corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13 Manchester Corporation. 
Union, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Union, north-west corner High Street. 
Walnut, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Water, near No. 38 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Water, north-west corner Elm Street. 



Total number 210, of which all are in use but the one at 
the Pumping Station, Massabesic. 



158 

NUMBERS AND LOCATIONS OF ALARM BOXES 
AND KEYS. 

No. 3— Blood's Shop, Elm Street. Keys at E. P. John- 
son & Co.'s Office and Samuel Colby's residence, cor. Elm 
and Young Streets. 

No. 4 — Cor. Spruce and Elm Streets. Keys at National 
Hotel and Campbell's Drug Store. 

No. 5 — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's Office and 
Littlefield's Drug Store. 

No. 6 — Engine House, Vine Street. Keys at Engine 
House, Vine Street. 

No. 7— City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. Per- 
ry's Drug Store. 

No. 8 — Elm Street, foot of Orange Street. Keys at Grif- 
fin & Jones' Grocery and C. C. Perry's Variety Store. 

No. 12 — Blood's Shop. Keys private. 

No. 13 — Cor, Brook and Chestnut Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of W. Jencks and Lewis Simons. 

No. 14 — Cor. Prospect and Union Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. lo — Cor. Pearl and Chestnut Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Chas. Palmer and T. S. Montgomery. 

No. 16 — Cor. Lowell and Union Streets." Keys at resi- 
dences of Rev. John O'Brien and R. Hassam. 

No. 17 — Cor'. Amherst and Beech Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of J. S. Bacheller and H. P. Watts. 

No. 21 — Cor. Merrimack and Pine Streets. Keys at A. 
Mallard and Son's Grocery and residence of J. A. Emerson. 

No. 23 — Cor. Central and Beech Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Maj. J. Stevens and G. F. Lincoln. 

No. 24 — Cor. Massabesic and Park Streets. Keys at 
residences of R. W. Flanders and Ira Emery. 

No. 25 — Cor. Hanover and Ashland Streets. Keys at 
residences of Dea. Daniel C. Gould and Horace Gordon. 



159 

No. 26 — Cor. Bridge and Russell Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of E. V. Dillingham and William E. Porter. 

No. 31 — Amoskeag Village. Keys at residence of Capt. 
J. M. Varnum and Cheney & Co.'s Paper Mill. 

No. 32 — Langdon Mills, cor. Canal and Brook Streets. 
Keys at Martin's Paper Mill and at Langdon Mills Watch 
Room. 

No. 34 — Mechanics' Row. Keys at Watch Room and 
W. W. Hubbard's Office. 

No. 35— Stark Mills. Keys at Stark Mills Watch Room. 

No. 41 — Amoskeag Mills. Keys at Amoskeag Mills 
Watch Room. 

No. 42 — Manchester Mills. Keys at Manchester Mills 
Watch Room. 

No. 43 — Namaske Mills. Keys at Namaske Mills W^atch 
Room. 

No. 51 — S. C. Forsaith's Shop. Keys at S. C. Forsaith's 
Office and Freight Depot. 

No. 52 — Barr's Brick Block, 'Squog. Keys at Barr & 
Clapp's Store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53 — Wallace's Brewery. Keysat Wallace's Brewery 
Office and I. R. Dewey's Store. 

No. 01 — Cor. Elm and Hancock Streets, Bakersville. 
Keys at J. C. Howe's residence and M. O'Neil's Saloon. 

No. 62 — Massabesic Street, Hallsville. Keys at residen- 
ces of Charles Chase and A. W. Bartlett. 

Also, keys will be in the hands of all the regular police. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY HOLDERS AND OTHERS. 

I. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm box, keys to 
which are always in the hands of the police and ^responsible 
persons in the vicinity of the boxes. 



160 

2. Key holders, upon the discovery or positive informa- 
tion of a fire, will unlock the box, pull the hook down once 
as far as they can (firmly without jerking) and then let go. 
Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain 
by the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the 
box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the next 
nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure that 
the box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
cause other than an actual fire. Do not give an alarm for 
a chimney. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer, If you change your resi- 
dence or place of business where the keys are kept, return 
the key to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of the alarm boxes near 
their property ; also the places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon the fire-bells thus : For 
box 5, five strokes, 1-1-1-1-1, with short intervals, and re- 
peating. For box 32, three strokes, 1-1-1, with a pause, 
then two strokes, 1-1, a pause, and repeating. Alarms for 
other numbers are given in a like manner ; the numbers of 
each box given four times for an alarm. 

One stroke of the alarm dismisses all companies remain- 
ing at the Engine Houses. Two strokes dismisses the 
whole Department. 



161 



CONDITION OP CISTERNS AND RESERVOIRS. 



No. 



Elm street, at City Hall 

Elm street, near Smyth's Block 

Gate, Mercantile Block 

Cor. Chestuut aud Hanover streets 

Haseltine House, Manchester street 

Pine St., between Manchester and Merrimack streets. . . . 

June. Hanover and Pine streets 

Gate, June. Hanover & Pine sts., feeds No. 1, No. 6, and 

No. 9 

Cor. Pine and Central streets 

Cor. Elm and Myrtle streets 

Lowell street, near Nashua street 

Gate, June. Amherst and Chestnut sts., draws off water 

on Concord Square 

Centre of Tremont Square 

Bridge street, head of Birch 

Cor. Chestnut and Orange streets 

Hanover st., corner Union 

Cor. Laurel and Beech streets 

Cor. Walnut and Amherst streets 

Cor. Chestnut and Harrison streets 

Gate. Hanover street, feeds No. 5 

Bakersville 

'Squog, Granite St., near Fradd & Follansbee's 

'Squog, north Steam Mill, 'Squog river 

'Squog, Granite street 

'Squog near the Bowman place 

Amoskeag Penstock, north Batting Mill 

Amherst, corner of Hall street 

Merrimack street, between Hall and Wilson streets 

Corner Amherst and Hall streets 

Near J. B. McCrillis' shop, Janesville 

Gas Works 

Brook, south end of Elm street 

Elm back street, on Central street . 

Elm back street, on Park street 

Elm back street, on Spruce street 

Elm back street, on Cedar street 

Gate, cor. Hanover and Chestnut streets, feeds Concord 

Square pond, and Reservoir at Smyth's Block 



Ft.In. 
8 2 
5 
1 

1 4 
8 

4 10 
5 



6 
3 5 

2 



6 5 
6 

7 

5 7 
8 
2 3 



14 6 
6 4 



6 6 

12 



Ft.In, 
5 2 
5 10 
3 

2 6 
5 
5 11 



4 5 
4 

6 
2 

7 

4 
6 



Ft In 

None 

12 

None 

None 

6 

12 

None 



3 6 
None 



None 
1 8 
3 3 

2 

None 
None 

None 
2 

None 
None 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1873. 



CHARLES H. BARTLETT, Mayor, 

ex-officio Chairman. 
JOHN P. NEWELL, vice BARTLETT, resigned. 
CHARLES A. SMITH, 

President of the Common Council, ex-officio. 



MEMBERS OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Ward 1. — Henry E. Burnham. 
Ward 2.— Marshall P. Hall, Olerk, 
Ward 3.— Daniel Clark. 
Ward 4.— Nathan P. Hunt. 
Ward 5. — Frank J. Murray. 
Ward 6.— Prank 0. Clark. 

Edwin Kennedy, vice Clark resigned. 
Ward 7. — George P. Rockwell. 
Ward 8.— George H. Colby. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



164 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

Finance, Accounts, and Claims. — Messrs. Daniel Clark, 
Smith, Hall, and the Mayor. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerly, 
Colby, Smith and Hunt. 

Text-Books and Apparatus. — Messrs. Hall, Edgerly, F. 
G. Clark and Burnham. 

Fuel and Heating. — The Mayor, Messrs. Colby, Daniel 
Clark and Edgerly. 

Fxamination of Teachers. — Messrs. Burnham, Murray, 
Hunt and Edgerly. 

Truancy. — Messrs. F. G. Clark, Murray. Hall and Edgerly. 

Employment of Children in Mannfacturhig Establish- 
ments. — Messrs. Hunt, Daniel Clark, Rockwell and Edgerly. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Hall, Murray and Smith. 

Music. — Messrs. Daniel Clark and Rockwell. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Schools in High School Building, at Wilson Hill, and Sub- 
urban Schools Nos. 7 and 8. — Messrs. Daniel Clark, Hall 
and Hunt. 

Schools on Spring Street. — Messrs. Burnham and Daniel 
Clark. 

Schools on Franklin Street. — Messrs. Hall and Rockwell. 

Schools on Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Hunt and Hall. 

Schools on Lowell Street, in Intermediate Building, and 
Bakersville. — Messrs. Murray and Daniel Clark. 

Training School. — Messrs. F. G. Clark and Daniel Clark. 

Suburban Schools Nos. 4, 5, 6 and 9. — Messrs. F. G. Clark 
and Murray. 

Schools in Piscataquog. — Messrs. Rockwell and Colby. 

Schools in Amoskeag, on Blodgett Street, and Suburban 
School No. 1. — Messrs. Colby and Burnham. 

Note. — Mr. Kennedy was appointed upon each of the commit- 
tees where Mr. F. G. Clark served before his resignation, and also 
sub-committee on the Bakersville school. 



REPORT OE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the City Council of the City of Manchester : 

The School Committee of 1873 submit the following 
report : 

The Board has maintained forty-five regular day schools 
of the various grades, having an average daily attendance 
of twenty-two hundred and eighty-four pupils, and requiring 
the services of sixty-nine teachers, as the average number. 
The total cost of these schools, as will appear in the 
Treasurer's accounts, has been forty-nine thousand sixty- 
two dollars and seventeen cents, expended as follows : 

For Teaching, . . . f 36,451 58 



Fuel, . . . . 
Care of rooms, 
Books and stationery, 
Furniture and supplies, . 
Printing and advertising. 
Contingent expenses, 



5,676 69 

2,462 90 

533 47 
1,376 87 

500 42 
2,060 24 
149,062 17 



The item of 85,676.73, charged to account of fuel, in- 
cludes the purchase of 409 tons of coal by the committee, 
and charged to schools, but of which a part was delivered 
to and has been consumed in other departments of the city. 
A proper rendering of the fuel account of the schools would 
be as follows : 



166 



Estimated value of fuel on hand from 

1872, 11,000 00 

Purchases of 1878, . . . 5,676 73 



Amount transferred other accounts, $609 37 

" " Evening schools, 200 00 

onhand, (200tonsat;B9.62), 1,924 00 



Dr. 

$6,676 73 
Cr. 

$2,733 37 

$3,943 36 

Leaving the sum of $3,943.36 as properly chargeable to 
the schools of 1873, instead of $5,676.73. This will reduce 
the actual cost of schools for the year to $47,328.80. 

The funds for the support of the schools for the year have 
been derived as follows : 

From balance from 1872, . .^ $34 96 
Appropriation, . . . 47,800 00 
Tuitions received, . . 266 00 

$48,100 96 

Deducting the expenses as above, there remains a balance 
of $772.16. 

An appropriation of $1,500.00 was made for the evening 
schools, and there was a balance on hand from 1872, of 
$379.31 ; total, $1,879.31. The expense of evening schools 
for 1873 is $1,723.87 ; balance on hand, $255.44. ' 

Extensive repairs and alterations have been made upon 
schooMiouses, the expense of which has been charged to 
another appropriation. 

Attention was called early in tlie year to the fact that the 
outer doors of nearly every school-house in the city swung 



167 

inward. They have all been changed so as to open outward, 
and any apprehension of danger from that source, incase 
of fire or panic, is now removed. 

The average daily attendance upon our schools, as stated 
above, has been 2,284; the average number "belonging" 
has been 2,450. Addingto this the esthuated difference be- 
tween the average number and the whole number, we find 
there have been 3,779 scholars, in all, connected with 
the schools the past year. This is an increase over last 
year, but still the showing is unsatisfactory, as all such sta- 
tistics will be until we are able to reach every child in the 
city, of school age. We ought to be able to give the exact 
non-attendance, to report upon the growing ignorance of the 
town, as well as upon its education. As it is, we do not 
know how many children are kept at work, defrau.ded of 
their privileges, or how many are in private schools. Nor 
can tliese facts be known until we are fiirnished with an 
accurate census of children in the city, and the autliority 
is given us to seek them out wherever they are. 

The increase in daily attendance over last year is 174 ; 
the average number belonging is 172 greater, and the total 
number appears to be increased 279. This may be attrib- 
uted, in part, to the growth of the city, and also to the faith- 
ful labors of the Truant Officer, which have largely con- 
tributed to the result. 

The ratio of the number of teachers employed to the daily 
attendance, is as 1 to 33. This will sufficiently indicate 
that all our teachers have been well employed. Indeed, 
some, with much larger schools, have been overworked, and 
have required assistance. We have been unable to prevent 
the overcrowding of rooms in some parts of the city, and 
teacher and pupil have alike suffered in consequence. The 
section most pressed for room, is that lying south of Man- 
chester street and east of Elm. The houses within tliese 
limits have all been full, aud temporary schools have been 



168 

kept a portion of the year in ward rooms on Park and 
Spruce streets. Upon the completion of the new house on 
Ash street, such transfers may be made as will relieve this 
district for a time. The increasing population in the south- 
ern section of the city in ihe vicinity of the jail, and on 
the new streets to the east of that point, cannot now be 
accommodated nearer than Franklin or Merrimack streets, 
too far for small children, and a new house will be de- 
manded for their use at no distant day. 

In the old High-school building on Lowell street, we have 
had employed from four to eight teachers five evenings in, 
each week since the beginning of October. In November 
we opened an evening school in 'Squog, where the immedi- 
ate and very large attendance indicated a want long nnsup- 
plied. Two hundred and eleven persons, in age varying 
from fifteen to forty years, have attended these schools, 
whose earnest and continued eiforts to learn have been the 
subject of much interest and gratification to the Board. 

In October, an evening drawing school was opened, and 
has been continued since with marked success. The attend- 
ance has been large and steady, composed mainly of the 
class for whose benefit it was specially opened — the me- 
chanic and the artisan. Their testimony will be our best 
argument, if any is needed, for the establishment and main- 
tenance of this school. 

We renew the recommendation of the committee of last 
year, that the old High-school house on Lowell street be 
remodeled by raising the roof and providing larger rooms 
for the use of evening schools. 

It has been customary for committees in their annual re- 
ports to speak of the teachers of the city and their work, 
in commendation or otherwise, and sometimes to comment 
upon particular schools. The Superintindent has taken oc- 
casion, in his report, to speak more fully than usual of the 



169 

condition of the several schools and their relative merits, 
and we have not space to add to his remarks. We would 
not forbear, however, to praise, if faithful teachers would 
be rewarded thereby, nor the reverse, if necessary to con- 
vince any that we know the difference between good schools 
and poor. 

The Training school has been in successful operation for 
the year, and from it we have generally taken such female 
teachers as were required to fill vacancies, and to act as 
substitutes. Tliis institution has become a most valuable 
auxiliary in the conduct of our scliools. We have not ex- 
pected that it would invariably turn out good teachers. 
Strong beams cannot be hewn out of weak timber, and 
trained teachers are not always skilled teachers. Very much 
is expected of our Training school, and rightly so ; it is re- 
garded as a model in its management and methods. 

There are two uses to which. Training and Normal schools 
have sometimes been put, which should not be copied here. 
The one is, attempting to educate incompetent candidates 
instead of training a natural taste and ability to teach. Let 
it be understood that the establishment of this schftol makes 
it no easier for an incompetent person to find a place as 
teacher in this city. The other is, constant experiment upon 
teacher and pupil — making it a mere testing-place for tlie 
original and borrowed theories of ambitious school men, to 
the confusion and disgust of good teachers, and the spoiling 
of bright scholars. 

The High school has registered 208 scholars at one time 
during the past year, and the average attendance has been 
150, larger numbers than ever before reported. A larger 
number have entered from the Grammar schools. 

We believe our people mistake in pushing children into 
this school too early. The High school should not be en- 
tered until the scholar is able, physically and mentally, to 
begin and maintain the hard, exacting work of a student. 



170 

The High school is assuming year by year a greater im- 
portance, calling for more care and labor from its teachers, 
and more interest on the part of the committee. "With full 
numbers and ample equipment, its results should be com- 
mensurate with its high place among our schools. We look 
to see its standard for scholarship kept high, and its tone un- 
mistakable on the side of sound morals and correct training. 

Last year, all the schools, except the High, were put upon 
a revised course of study. It is too early to report upon 
the value of all the changes then introduced. Upon some 
points, however, we may speak with confidence, from the 
experience of the year. A place was given in the course 
for the study of language^ as distinct from grammar, as now 
taught. Throughout the grades, daily practice is now had 
in the correct use of words, sentences, capitals, and punc- 
tuation, upon the principle that the best knowledge of any- 
thing comes from the use of it. The plan seems to be a 
practical one. Language becomes to the scholar " an instru- 
ment for practical use, and not an object to be dissected and 
examined for other purposes.^' The work is somewhat akin 
to the drill of a printing office, where a boy handles words, 
puts them together, pulls them in pieces, and corrects his 
errors with such painstaking that he is not likely to cominifc 
the same again ; and every printer knows that a year at the 
compositor's case is worth three in tne schools, for practical 
instruction in grammar, or " the art of speaking and writing 
a language correctly." Technical grammar is now begun 
in the higher divisions of the grammar schools ; perhaps it 
might be well to postpone that study still further in the 
course. : 

A new arrangement of studies for the High school has 
now been prepared, intended to go into operation the next 
term. It eml)races three distinct courses ; a classical course 
of four years, a course in English alone, of three years, 
and a four year's course in English. French and drawing. 



iti' 

Much care has been bestowed upon the latter, to make it a 
complete and satisfactory course for those who seek a good 
English education. Drawing, free hand and mechanical, 
with its application to design and some of the industrial 
arts, has been made a prominent feature in it. A more 
extended study of Physiology and Hygiene, and Mental 
and Moral Philosophy, are introduced, for the benefit of 
young women who may become our future teachers, that 
tliey may not be, like some who have' gone before them, ig- 
norant of the laws of health, and of the orderly processes 
of physical and mental growth which make study safe and 
profitable for our children. 

No duty of the school officer demands his earnest and 
conscientious thought like that of determining what and how 
children shall be taught. Education in its best sense means 
so much that it becomes a serious matter to define its 
methods and fix its bounds. 

In the consideration of such matters, we have tried to 
apply this test : Will this proposed change or this new 
method be the best, on tlie whole, for all the two or three 
thousand children in these scliools, for rich and poor, for 
feeble and strong, for the boys and girls who may have ten 
ye^rs to study in, and those who can have but five? For 
instance, shall we shorten the hours of school throughout 
the city? We may thus satisfy one class, but should we 
not defraud another and much larger class ? One hour a 
day for a school year is eight weeks of time. In five years 
it amounts to a year's schoolinir- The one child, favored 
of fortune, may spare this, but is it just to take it from 
the ninety and nine who can have luit five years in all ? 

Again, are our schools destroying the health of children? 
Before we decide, we ask tlie further questions : Are the 
majority injui'ed, or the few, and is tbe mischief all done 
in the school-room ? We admit the existence of evils, but 
the accountability rests not wholly with us. We are not 



172 

the only "educators ;" we but share the responsibility with 
the whole people. The well-being of the child depends 
upon education and not upon schooling alone. And educa- 
tion, according to Webster, is "bringing up;" it means 
'•instruction, tuition, nurture, breeding." It is marvelous 
that fathers and mothers do not better recognize the part 
they themselves should bear in the education of their chil- 
dren. It is in their own keeping. No rule of ours re- 
quires a father.to keep his boy in school when he ought to 
be out ; no requirement which we have made obliges a 
mother to keep a daughter at brain-work at times when 
she knows the body has other uses for all its reserve force. 
There is no place in our course of study for dissipation. 
It does not ask that children attempt to serve the mam- 
mon of society and at the same time to obey the high be- 
hests of education. It recognizes study as a leisurely pro- 
cess, and assumes that outside of the school " physical 
work and regimen shall be so apportioned, that repair shall 
exceed waste, and a margin be left for development." 

We are satisfied that very little of the common criticism 
upon these matters is based upon a knowledge of the ac- 
tual requirements in our schools. It is true, thorough work 
is still required there ; but many changes have been intro- 
duced, tending to make our system more flexible. The 
time of actual study has been reduced ; study out of school 
is not required nor advised by teachers in the lower grades ; 
punishments affecting health are prohibited, physical exer- 
cises encouraged, recesses multiplied, and promotions so 
provided for, that the scholar may more readily advance, 
fall back, or rest, without disturbing the harmony of the 
school, or affecting the progress of his fellow-pupil. At- 
tention is directed to facts in this connection, presented by 
the Superintendent, which may be new to some of our 
people. 

In our review of the condition of the schools, we find 



173 

them to be systematic, thorough and strong in all that per- 
tains to the purely intellectual progress of their pupils. 
Our children have been developed along this line, until they 
are as quick, and sharp, and "forward" as can be desired. 
Yet it is quite possible that labor has been bestowed in this 
direction to the neglect of some other good things. Atten- 
tion to morals and manners used to be a requirement in 
the school. The typical youth of to-day gives little evi- 
dence that such things are known in the modern school. 
We miss in him some very precious things which mark the 
well-bred youtli«; gentle manners, reverence for men and 
women, deference to age, and respect for the wisdom and 
authority of his elders. The public school is rearing bet- 
ter scholars ; let it be kept steadily to that other work, 
which is equally its province, the maturing of better men 
and women. 

M. P. HALL, for the Committee. 
Manchester, Jan. 2, 1874. • 






SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the School Committee : 

, I submit the following, as the Nineteenth Annual Report 

of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of this city. 

. More teachers have been employed than in previous years ; 
the average attendance has been greater. 

In former years the whole number of pupils registered 
was given only approximately, owing to the great difficulty 
experienced in ascertaining the exact number. The whole 
number, as reported from the different schools each year, 
is in the aggregate a much larger number than are ac- 
tually enrolled, as many are registered at several different 
schools. This year the registers have been consulted to 
ascertain who were members of different schools, and the 
whole number is given correctly, or as nearly so as pos- 
sible. : 



SCHOOL STATISTICS FOR 1873. 

^1. Whole number of boys attending not less 

than two weeks 1,964 

2. Whole number of girls attending not less 

than two weeks . . . . . 1,815 

3. Whole number of pupils attending not less 

than two weeks . . . . . . 3,779 

4. Average number pupils belonging to the 

schools 2,450 



176 



Grammar Schools 



6. Average daily attendance .... 

6. Number of visits by members of School 

Board ....... 

7. Number of visits by Superintendent . 

8. Number of visits by citizens and others 

9. Salary of Principal of High School 

10. Salary of First and Second Assistant in the 

High School ...... 

11. Salary of Principal of Grammar Schools 

12. Salary of Principal of Training School, 

Higher Department .... 

13. Salary of Principal of Training School, 

Primary Department 

14. Salaries of Assistants in 

and Middle and Primary School Teachers 
first year ..... 

Second year .... 
Third year .... 
Fourth year and subsequently . 

15. Number of weeks in school year . 

16. Number of schools 

17. Number of teachers (average number for 

the year) 

18. School appropriation 

19. Appropriation for Evening Schools 

20. Appropriation for repairs of school buildings 

21. Appropriation for new school building . 

22. Number of school buildings in use 

23. Whole number of school-rooms . 

24. Whole number of sittings . 

25. Number graduated from High School . 

26. Number admitted to High School 

from other schools in the city 

in July 105 

In December .... 18 



2,284 

400 
1,165 
3,419 
^2,000 

800 
1,500 

600 

500 



350 
375 
400 
450 
40 
45 

69 

47,800 

1,500 

6,000 

30,000 

21 

67 

3,087 

27 



123 



17T 

At the beginning of the year there were forty-three 
schools, with sixty-nine teachers, viz. : one High school 
with four teachers, one Intermediate school with two 
teachers, one Training school with four teacliers, the tliree 
principal Grammar schools in the city proper with eighteen 
teachers, the Piscataquog Grammar scliool with three 
teachers, the Amoskeag Grammar school with one teacher, 
six Middle schools with one teacher each, fourteen Pri- 
mary schools in the city proper, live Primary schools in 
Piscataquog, and two Primary schools in Amoskeag, with 
one teacher each ; the schools at Bakersville and Hallsville 
with two teachers each, and six other suburban schools 
with one teacher each. An assistant was employed in one 
of the Primary schools in Piscataquog a part of the Spring 
term ; a school was kept in Ward 5 Ward-room six weeks 
of the Spring term ; another school was opened in May in 
Ward 6 Ward-room, which was in session till December 
5th. 

The Primary school in the old house at Amoskeag was 
discontinued at the close of the Summer term. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 

The following list contains the names of those teachers 
who have served in the different schools of the city within 
the past year : 

HIGH SCHOOL — BEECH STREET. 

Principal — William W. Colburn. 
Assistant — Mary E. Clough. 

" Lucretia E. Manahan. 

" Emma J. Ela. 

" Mary A. Buzzell ; 1 terra. 



178 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL MANCHESTER STREET. 

Principal — Alfred S. Hall ; 2 terms. 

" Sylvester Brown ; 1 term. 

Assistant — Abbie S. McClintock. 

TRAINING SCHOOL — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Principal Higher Department — Nancy S. Bunton. 
Assistant " " Mintie C. Edgerly 

Principal Primary Department — Martha N. Mason. 
Assistant '' " Anna 0. Heath. 

SPRING-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — William E. Buck. 
Assistant — Anstrice G. Flanders. 

" Sarah J. Greene. 

" Lizzie S. Campbell. 

" Mary A. Buzzell ; 2 terms. 

FRANKLIN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal — Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistant — Mary F. Dana. 

" Lottie R. Adams ; 2 terms. » 

" Carrie B. Reid. 

" Josie A. Bosher ; 1 term. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Principal — Benjamin F, Dame. ' 
Assistant — Lizzie H. Patterson. 
. " Julia A. Baker. 

" Mary J. Fife. 



179 

Assistant — Annette McDoel. 
" Eliza I. YoLing. 

" Isabelle R. Daniels. 

" Anna J. Dana. 

" Rocilla M. Tuson. . 

PISCATAQUOG GRAMMAR SCHOOL — CENTER STREET. 

Principal — Allen A. Bennet ; 2 terms. 

" Sylvester Brown ; 1 term. 

Assistant — Martha J. Boyd. 

" Addie M Lear. 

AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Charles F. Morrill ; 1 term. 
George P. Hadley ; 1 term. 
Sarah B. Hadley ; 1 term. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett Street. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 
3, Lowell Street. — Mary L. Sleeper. 

7, Franklin Street. — Hattie G. Flanders. 

8, Franklin Street. — C. Augusta Abbott. 

9, Spring Street. — Hattie S. Tozer. 
10, Spring Street. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett Street.— Ellen B. Rowell. 
" 2, Lowell Street. — Emma F. Beane. 
" 3, Beech Street. — Georgianna Dow. 
" 4, Beech Street. — Mary E. Ireland ; 1 term. 

Helen M. Morrill ; 2 terms. 
" 5, Lowell Street.— Annie M. Offut. 



180 

No. 6, Wilson Hill.— Abbie E. Abbott. 
" 7, Wilson Hill.— Emma H. Perley. 
'' 8, Lowell Street.— Elvira S. Prior. 
" 9, Manchester Street. — Helen M. Morill ; 1 term. 

Clara N. Brown ; 2 terms. 
" 10, Manchester Street. — Nellie Pearson. 
" 11, Franklin Street. — E. Jennie Campliell. 
•' 12, Franklin Street.— Martha W. Hubbard. 
" 13, Spring Street. — Emma A. Cross. 
" 14, Spring Street. — Gertrude W. Borden ; 1 term. 

Nellie M. Whitney ; 2 terms. 
" 15, North Main Street. — Sarah D. Lord ; 1 term. 

Ida F. Gee ; 2 terms. 
Augusta S. Downs ; Assistant, 
part of one term. 
" 16, North Main Street.— Celia M. Chase. 
" 17, South Main Street. — Alice G. Lord. 
" 18, Amoskeag. — Kate E. Joy ; 2 terms. This school 
was discontinued at the close of the 
summer term. 
" 19, Amoskeag. — Nellie E. Tappan. 
" 20, South Main Street. — Clara N. Brown ; 1 term. 

Sarah D. Lord ; 2 terms. 
" 21, North Main Street.— Ella F. Salisbury. 
Ward 6 Ward-room. — Asa L. Piatt. 
Ward 5 Ward-room. — Estella N. Hewlett. This school 
was in session during a portion of the spring term only, 
and the attendance is reported in connection with other 
Primary schools. 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, stark District.— Nellie M. Gate. 
" 3, Bakersville. — Principal, Addie M. Chase. 

Assistant, Addie A. Marshall ; 1 terra. 
" Cleora E. Bailey ; 2 terms. 



181 

No. 4, Goffo's Falls. — Georgie A. Nute ; 1 term. 
Belle D. Cory ; 1 term. 
Edward P. Sherburne ; 1 term. 

5, Harvey District. — Sylvester Brown ; 1 term. 
Olive J. Randall ; 2 terms. 

6, Webster's Mills. — Mary J. Reid ; 1 term. 
Helen M. Locke ; 2 terms. 

7, Hallsville. — Principal, Maria H. Hildreth. 
Assistant, Mary B. Lane ; 2 terms. 

8, Youngsville. — Marinna Waite ; 2 terms. 
N. Amanda Wyman ; 1 term. 

Mosquito Pond. — Etta M. Geore ; 2 terms. 
S. I&etta Locke ; 1 term. 

MUSIC TEACHER. 

J. J. Kimball. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



This school, at the beginning of the year, numbered 145, 
from which number it did not vary much for the first two 
terms. The whole number enrolled the fall term was 207, 
a larger number than ever before attending. An unusually 
large class entered at the beginning of the fall term, ren- 
dering it necessary to employ an additional teacher. 

Probably the whole of the building will "soon be needed 
for the accommodation of the High school, in which case 
the jjrimary schools now in the building can be transferred 
to the new building on Bridge street. The classes now in 
the Grammar schools, intending to enter the High school , 
are quite large, and in all probability the action of the 
board in deciding to admit twice a year will have the effect 
of increasing the number of admisions, and if so, six teach- 
ers will be needed in the High school. 



182 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

This is one of the most useful schools in the city, as it 
affords an opportunity for those who, from various causes, 
are unable to pursue a regular course of study in any of the 
•graded schools, to become familiar with some of the com- 
mon branches. At the present time, when there are so 
many who have been discharged from the mills, it would 
be well to establish another school similar in character to 
this, which should be composed of pupils from eight to four- 
teen'years of age, who are no further advanced than pupils 
in primary schools. Such pupils, on account of their age 
and size, ought not to be in a school with children five or 
six years of age ; they will not remain in school long enough 
to pursue an extended course, and could work better in a 
school by themselves. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The reports of the past four years have each noticed the 
workings of this school. Until this year the primary de- 
partment was in the Intermediate building, the higher de- 
partment in the Merrimack street building. 

One year ago the following votes were passed by the 
School Committee : 

First. — "That two departments for the the training of teachers 
be estabhshed in the Merriraack-street building, one on tlie second 
floor to be known as tlie Higher Department of the Trcdning School, 
and one on tlie lower floor to be known as the Primary Depart- 
ment of the Training School.'''' 

Second. — -'That the Principal of the Higher Department shall 
have charge of the order in the yards and building, the general 
supervision and instruction of the teachers, and the order, discipline 
and instruction in the rooms of her department." 

Third. — ''That the Princ'ipa.l of the Primary Depa7'tment shall 
assist in the maintenance of order in the halls and yards of the 
building, and in the supervision and instruction of the teachers, 
and shall have the charge of the order, discipline and instruction in 
the rooms of her department." 



183 

This arrangement went into effect at the beginning of the 
winter term. There have been no special regulations for 
the government of the school, but it has been conducted as 
has been deemed best for its interests. 

Young ladies — graduates of the high school, and some- 
times others — have been admitted to the school with the 
understanding that they were to remain six months with- 
out pay, then be assigned to such schools as the committee 
might determine. Previous to this year, the clianges in 
the corps of teachers were so frequent tiiat many were 
taken from the training-school who had been there but a 
few weeks, but this year there has not been that necessity 
of calling upon this school for teachers to fill vacancies, so 
that some have remained the full six months. 

The number of pupils in this school has been so large as 
to require the services of more than one teacher in each 
room, so that assistant teachers would have been required 
had there not been several sub-teachers in the school. 

With the large number of pupils and classes, the school 
has not been able to accomplish so much as it would had 
the rooms been graded like other Primary and Middle 
schools, but no pupils have been slighted on account of the 
large number of classes, as with the large number of sub- 
teachers considerable attention could be given to each 
class. The afternoon sessions are of two hours continu- 
ance. After the school is dismissed the regular teachers 
and sub-teachers assemble in one of the rooms, where the 
work of the da}^ in the various rooms is reported and criti- 
cisms made, the work for the next day planned, and such 
topics considered as are suggested from time to time. 
These sessions are as important and valuable as any part 
of the school work, and are of great benefit to those pre- 
paring for teacher§. On account of the large numl)er of 
primary childen in the section where the school is located, 
many of those belonging to the middle-school grade have 
been transferred to tiie Lincoln-street building. 



184 

The Training-school building should be re-arranged so 
as to provide for six rooms, or a building of two rooms 
erected on the Spruce-street lot. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

There has been no change of teachers in the Lincoln- 
street school. On account of a lack of school accommoda- 
tions in the northeast part of the city, more than scholars 
enough for four divisions of a grammar school are obliged 
to attend this school ; hence, the school has not just the 
required number of grammar or middle school divisions, 
btit the divisions are working harmoniously, the progress 
of no pupil being impeded by the arrangement of the 
school. At present there are five divisions, composed en- 
tirely of pupils qualified to be in a grammar school ; the 
sixth division is composed partly of grammar school and 
partly of middle school pupils, the seventh is a middle 
school, the eighth partly middle and partly primary. The 
school to be established on Bridge street will draw some 
pupils from this school. Probably enough will remain to 
form five divisions of a grammar school and two middle 
schools, leaving one room for a primary. 

In the Spring-street school there have been no changes 
in the corps of teachers of the four regular divisions. An 
additional teacher was employed for two terms. For sev- 
eral years previous to 1871 the frequent changes of teach- 
ers in this school retarded its progress, but now it is a 
gratifying fact that the school retains its teachers for a 
great length of time. 

In 1867 there were seven different teachers, five in 1868, 
nine in 1869. The present principal of the school has 
been in the position four years, two of the assistants three 
years, the other assistant two years. During the years in 
which the frequent changes occurred there were many ex- 



• 185 

cellent teachers employed, but as classes in some of the 
divisions had four or five different teachers in one year, it 
was impossible to keep the school in good condition, and 
teachers were unnecessarily blamed. The school at pres- 
ent maintains a high rank. The efficiency of the school 
is the result of persevering labor on the part of the teach- 
ers. There are no hobbies in the school, no particular 
effort to make the school appear brilliant, and it does not 
appear as well to a stranger as some others, but one who 
visits the school from day to day becomes convinced of the 
thoroughness of the instruction given there. 

At the Franklin-street school there have been several 
changes. One year ago Mr. Heath, for nearly seven years 
principal of this school, resigned ; at the same time Miss 
Manahan, first assistant, was transferred to the High school. 
Miss Adams, of the third division, was granted leave of 
absence for the fall term on account of ill health. 

With so many changes it could not be expected that the 
school would maintain its former rank, yet the work of the 
past year leads us to expect that for the coming year, as the 
teachers become more familiar with the school, it will re- 
gain its former standing. 

The school at Piscataquog, called a grammar school, in- 
cludes the two grades of middle schools, and the third and 
fourth divisions of the grammar school. The scholars be- 
longing to the first and second divisions of a grammar 
school have chosen to attend the Franklin-street school, and 
as their number has been small it has been deemed best 
they should. They could be accommodated at tlie Franklin- 
street school without increasing the number of classes, while 
the number of classes could be decreased in the Piscataquog 
school. There are now in the two upper divisions of the 
Franklin-street scliool seventeen scholars residing in this 
ward, so there is not much probability that tlie Piscataquog 
school will be kept up to the grade prescribed for Grammar 



186 

schools. The lower grade schools in this section are well 
attended, but only a small proportion remain in the upper 
grades. At the present time the Piscataquog school num- 
bers about one hundred. Mr. Bennett, for two years prin- 
cipal, resigned at the close of the summer term. 

The Amoskeag grammar school has had an average 
daily attendance of 28 for the year. This school includes 
all the grades of a grammar school, together with a part of 
the middle school grade. There has been a change of 
•teachers each term. Some special effort should be made 
the coming year to improve the condition of this school. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

There are six of this grade, viz. : one on Blodgett street, 
one on Lowell street, two on Franklin street, two on Spring 
street. The school on Wilson Hill, formerly No. 4 Middle 
school, was changed to a primary upon the opening of the 
school on Lincoln street. No. 2 on Lowell street was dis- 
continued in 1872, Nos. 5 and 6 on Merrimack street are 
now a part of the training school. There are two middle 
schools in the Lincoln-street building, but they are regard- 
ed as a part of the grammar school. No. 3, now on Low- 
ell street, will become a part of the new school on Bi-idge 
street. Both of the rooms on Blodgett street will soon be 
needed for primary schools, leaving two middle schools on 
Franklin street and two on Spring street. It is a question 
for consideration whether there should be a distinct grade 
for these schools, or that they should be regarded as a part 
of the grammar grade. There have been no changes in 
the teachers of this grade. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

There have been more changes among the teachers in 
this grade than elsewhere. Many of the primary schools 



187 

have been excessively crowded certain portions of the 
year, some of them being located in sections where pnpils 
could not well be transferred to other schools. The Ward- 
rooms on Spruce and Park streets were used for a term. 
Probably they will be needed next year. Many of the 
children in these schools do not pass beyond the limits of 
the primary school, being withdrawn to work in the mills 
and elsewhere. This is especially true of those who have 
come from Canada. Some primary schools are composed 
almost entirely of this class, while the middle schools near 
them contain but few such, and the grammar schools none. 
Many of these children are in school but a few weeks in 
the year, but generally as fast as one set of scholars leaves 
a school, another takes its place. In one of the primary 
schools on Manchester street, with an average daily attend- 
ance of 42, there have been 203 registered. Hence much 
of the additional accommodation will be needed for pri- 
mary schools. 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

The school in the Stark District opened one year ago in 
the new building. There lias been considerable interest 
manifested on the part of many of the parents, which has 
had a marked effect on tlie progress of the school. The 
school is the smallest in the city, the whole number regis- 
tered being only 26, the average daily attendance 15. 

The school at Bakersville has had an average daily at- 
tendance of 45. Some of the pupils, residing below Valley 
street, between Elm and Chestnut, must attend this school 
unless tliere is a house built in the vicinity of the Couutv 
Jail. The Bakersville scliool will accommodate 70. 

The school at Goffe's Falls has been larger than ever be- 
fore, or at least for a great many years. There has been a 
chano-e of teachers each term. 



188 

The average daily attendance for the year has been 34 ; 
in 1868, it was 11 ; in 1869, it was 17 ; in 1870, it was 16 ; 
in 1871, it was 21 ; in 1872, it was 27. 

The line between Manchester and Londonderry is but a 
few rods from the school-house. Several pupils living in 
Londonderry, only a few rods from the line, have been al- 
lowed to attend this school, as their own school in London- 
derry is over a mile from their homes. A portion of this 
town ought to be annexed to Manchester, at least for 
school purposes, for if the number in the school increases, 
tlie pupils from over the line will have to be excluded, 
which in all probability would deprive them of the benefit 
of school privileges, as they would not be likely to attend 
in their own district. 

The schools in the Harvey, Webster Mills, Youngsville 
and Mosquito Pond districts have each had one change of 
teachers during the year. 

The Youngsville school a part of the year has numbered 
between 40 and 50 ; the other three schools have not been 
large. 

The number of pupils in the Hallsville school has de- 
creased to such an extent that but one teacher is now 
needed, although the number of classes cannot be reduced 
much. Whole classes have not left the school, but some 
from each of them. 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

These schools have been well attended. So much has 
been said in previous reports, that no special mention of 
them is needed at this time, except to express the hope 
that by another year better accommodations can be pro- 
vided for them. 



189 
TRUANCY. 

Mr. Thayer has been engaged the entire year in looking 
after absentees and children not attending school. He has 
proved himself an efficient and zealous officer. Much of 
his labor is of such a nature that no special report can be 
made of it. Yet it might be well for him to make some 
kind of a report to the board, each week or each month, 
from whicli report the members could know what the woric 
of the officer had been for the previous week or month. 

The number of pupils in the schools has been increased 
by his efforts, many of those registered have attended more 
regularly than they otlierwise would. Not only those at- 
tending the city schools, but many of those in the Catholic 
schools have been obliged to attend more constantly. We 
have no authority to compel children to attend any partic- 
ular school, but we can compel them to attend somewhere. 

There are in the Catliolic schools 1500 children of whom 
no report is made, and as people in other cities read the 
reports of the schools of this city and notice that our popu- 
lation is 25,000, that there are at least 5,500 children of 
school ages in the city, but only 2,809 ^^ ^'^J ^^^^ ti^^^^ in 
school, and 3,779 the whole number registered for a year, 
they are led to think that a large number do not attend 
school, and our statistics make a poorer show than is made 
in many cities ^where thei-e is no truant officer. Hence 
when we say that our truant law is successful, others say 
there are from 1,000 to 2,000 children not enrolled in the 
schools. Some of these scholars are in school a great part 
of the year. 

I call attention to these facts as people in other cities 
have criticised our truant law, using the figures appearing 
in Manchester reports as an argument against compulsory 
education. 



190 
EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN IN THE MILLS. 

Two hundred and twenty-six certificates have been given 
this year against four hundred and twenty-one last year. 
Probably as many children have been employed this year 
as last, but it is evident that more have obtained employ- 
ment without attending school the required time. It re- 
mains to be decided what shall be done in relation to this 
matter. 



ATTENDANCE AT SCHOOL. 

The average daily attendance has been higher than for 
many years. No school census has ever been taken, or at 
least not for many years. The School Committee are re- 
quired by the laws of the State to make a report each year, 
stating the number of children between four and fourteen 
not attending school, but unless some provision is made for 
taking the school census, such a report certainly cannot be 
made. This is a subject deserving attention. Probably 
some arrangement can be made with the assessors so that 
they can make this enumeration when they take the inven- 
tory. 

In a great many cities the names of pupils not absent 
or tardy for a year are published in the annual school re- 
port. This has been done here for the past three years, 
such pupils also receiving testimonials for their punctual at- 
tendance. The names are omitted in this report, although 
the testimonials have been awarded. 

These testimonials are doubtless pleasing to the recipi- 
ents, and have a tendency to increase the percentage of 
attendance. Quite a number are punctual at school be- 
cause they hope to obtain this ; many are' thus induced to 
attend cT5nstantly who otherwise would be absent a great 



191 

deal ; but on the other hand it frequently induces some to 
attend when they really should be at home, thus endanger- 
ing their health. Should such ones lose the testimonial 
after all their efforts they become disheartened. It is well 
to urge all to attend as constantly as possible, consistent 
with their health, and notice should be taken of those who 
make extraordinary exertions to be in school ; but no 
child should be urged to attend at the risk of his health. 



STUDIES. 



The course of study revised and adopted last year for 
all grades below the High school is working well. Good 
results have been obtained in the Study of Language in the 
Middle and some of the Primary schools. In some of 
these schools pupils can write as correctly as some classes 
that formerly left the Grammar school for the High school. 
The text-book on grammar is prescribed for the first class 
of the second division of Grammar schools, but it would 
be better were it not used in that division. 

Drawing has received considerable attention ; as much 
time has been devoted to it as it ought to receive each 
year. As it has not been one of the prescribed studies a 
great while, there may be danger that too much time will 
be given to it for the present, as it is difficult to tell just 
what is needed in this department. A part of the Spring 
term a special teacher of drawing was employed. Many 
of the teachers have attended the evening Drawing school. 

At the close of the Summer term it was decided to have 
an exhibition of drawings from the various schools. In 
order to show the average work of the schools rather than 
to make an exhibition of the best drawings, it was decided 
that each school -contribute drawings to represent the in- 
dividual work of at least three-fourths of its members. To 



192 

prevent any competition among the schools, it was decided 
that no name appear on tlie face of any drawing, but that 
the drawings from the same grade of schools be placed to- 
gether, the name of each pupil being on the back of each 
slate or paper. 

There were about 2,500 different drawings on exhibition, . 
including slates from primary schools, books from middle 
schools, books and drawings on paper from the grammar 
schools, and miscellaneous work from the high school. 
The drawings were placed in the High-school lecture-room, 
the room being open Wednesday and Thursday, July 2 and 
3. Over 2,000 people visited the room during that time. 
Many were then convinced of the practicability of intro- 
ducing this study into all grades of schools. Previous to 
the exhibition it had been the opinion of some that only a 
few could be benefited by pursuing this branch, but at that 
time it became evident that it could be taught like other 
studies. 

In this connection it may not be deemed inappropriate 
to quote from the daily papers concerning the exhibition : 

From the Daily Union of July 3, 1873. 

The Exhibition of Draavings. — This exhibition, which is a 
novel feature in tlie public exercises of our scliools, is an entire 
success. The work of preparing the High-school lecture-room 
for the reception of the drawings, and the labor of their arrange- 
ment and classification, was completed yesterday, by the Superin- 
tendent and teachers, and the room was opened to the public last 
evening. 

Some of the productions were very good, others very bad, and this 
evident sincerity made one of the principal charms of the exhibi- 
tion ; it was evidently a pretty fair average of the every-day work 
of the schools. Of course very few of the drawings had names 
affixed; the absence of the names to the Grammar-school produc- 
tions was particularly noticeable, though it seems to us their pro- 
ductions compared very favorably with those of the High school. 

We contend that music and drawing are more essentially gifts, 



193 

than are most other branches of study, yet that much can be done 
for the development of latent talent is every day being proved in 
schools. 

The science of drawing has, until very recently, received but 
little attention in our schools, no teacher having been employed in 
that branch until within a short time, and even now the study is 
made a recreation rather than a task. 

Should the exhibitions occur annually, as we trust they may, the 
progress will be very marked. It must be remembered that there 
are no pupils who have passed through a regular course in draw- 
ing. 

The room was crowded all of the evening, and feelings of satis- 
faction found unanimous expression. So great was the interest 
felt, and so many people were present, that it has been decided to 
keep the room ojjen during the day and evening. 

From the Daily Mirror of July 5, 1873. 

The Art Exhibition of the Schools. — For the exhibition of 
drawings in the High-school lecture-room Wednesday and Thurs- 
day of this week, we hear none but words of praise on all sides. It 
was intended to be, and actually was, an illustration of what the 
schools have been doing of late in this department. Contributions 
representing three-fourths of the scholars were sent in from substan- 
tially all the schools, which amounted to nearly twenty-five hun- 
dred. They were arranged with a good deal of care on the walls 
of the room and on temporary frames, and occupied about all the 
available sj^ace. The room was decorated also with flowers and 
evergreens, and the whole presented an appearance at once attract- 
ive and instructive to all who are interested in the life of the 
schools. The drawings represented all ages and all grades, from 
the straight lines and numerals of some of the Primary scholars to 
the more elaborate efforts of the High school and those which 
adorn the teachers' table. All sorts of things were the subjects 
chosen — dogs, cats, horses, cows, vases, landscapes, the human face 
and figure, etc., etc. The punctuation points, the Roman and Ara- 
bic numerals, the musical staff" with notes and music, some of 
which latter were original, were displayed, so that it is at once 
seen that this was no collection of the show-pictures of the term, 
but an honest exposition of what had been accomplished under the 
present drawing system . 

If one chanced to notice on the north wall two heads of oxen, he 



194 

must have been struck by the remarkable fidelity to nature which 
they showed, and he would have been surprised to learn that they 
were made by one of the Primary scholars, a boy eight years old. 
Of course among the twenty- five hundred drawings there were 
some which bore tracesof a taste and capabilities for art, which are 
thus entitled to appreciative criticism. But, after all, to our mind, 
on the slates on which the unskillful fingers of the Primary scholars 
had put here an intended straight line and there a precise Roman 
letter, whose surfaces had been rubbed and re-rubbed in the effort 
to coax an obstinate line into the perpendicular or curve, was to 
be read the lesson of it all. We do not understand that the object 
of this drill is to enable one to put into his parlor pictures made 
by his own hands, or to raise a corps of artists, but that the educa- 
tion of the eye and hand is the aim and end, and, we believe, the 
result of it. The teachers who have directed the fingers of the 
scholars over their papers and slates, and who have, with the Sup- 
perintendent and others, done considerable work in the arrange- 
ment of the drawings, have their reward in that result. 

The committee had the liearty cooperation of most of the 
teachers, many of whom spent a great deal of time in ar- 
ranging the room and the drawings. Tliis is an important 
branch of study, yet care should be exercised lest we give 
to it the time that belongs to other branches. 

The High school course of study is now undergoing a 
thorough revision. There is much discussion and no little 
difficulty in determining what should be incorporated in 
such a course. Some contend that a great deal of attention 
should be given to the classics ; some insist that mathe- 
matics should be made the most prominent ; others, that 
among the studies the sciences are the most important ; 
some would have the pupils spend most of their time in 
reviewing the studies of previous grades ; some insist that 
music, drawing, and modern languages should receive more 
attention ; some demand that the studies should be mostly 
of a disciplinary cliaracter, while others insist that only 
practical studies should be pursued. 

There are those who think the High school should be 



195 

mainly for the benefit of boys fitting for college, while there 
are those who say that the city should not sustain such a 
school ; that boys ought not to be fitted for college at the 
public expense. 

Amid all these conflicting viev^s we are called to decide 
what shall be the course of study pursued in a school com- 
posed of children representing all these classes. All cities 
do not require the same course. In some places a large 
proportion of the graduates of the Grammar school pass 
through the High school and enter college, while in Man- 
chester not one in twenty-five from the Grammar schools 
will do it. With this in view it is desirable that our schools 
be so graded, the studies so arranged, that parents will not 
feel compelled to withdraw their children from school be- 
cause the studies are not suited to them. Our schools are 
for no special class, but for the whole community, and the 
studies should be adapted to the wants of all classes. 

It is charged that, although the common schools are sup- 
ported by all classes, much that is taught in them is of no 
benefit to many after they leave the schools. 

There is a demand for practical studies, but what are re- 
garded as practical by one person are not so regarded by 
another. 

In the High school there should be an opportunity the 
last year of the course to review the studies of the Gram- 
mar schools. After two or three years in the High school 
the pupils can review arithmetic, geography, grammar and 
history with advantage. Many of the principles not clearly 
understood in the Grammar schools can then be made clear. 

Mechanical drawing might be taught in a manner that 
would be of essential benefit to many young men in this city 
who are intending to engage in industrial pursuits. 

Surveying ought to have a place in the course, and some 
knowledge of book-keeping should be obtained there. 

There should be a definite course of instruction in English 
lan2;uao;e and literature. 



196 

Physiology should receive more attention in the schools 
than formerly. It has been studied the last year in the 
Grammar school, but it should be studied more thoroughly 
in the latter part of the High-school course. Most of the 
teachers in this city are graduates of this school. If two 
thousand children, annually, are to be intrusted to the care 
of the graduates of this school, it seems that Physiology 
should be well taught there. 

It may be said that we cannot, in this school, undertake 
to qualify teachers for their work, any more than those of 
other pursuits, but the State claims to have jurisdiction 
over the education of the children. If the State has the 
right to tax people to build school-houses, employ teachers, 
and compel children to attend school, it ought to see to it 
that those who are to be teachers should have an opportu- 
nity to become familiar with those things which are of such 
vast importance to the youth in the schools. Not only those 
who intend to teach, but all who pass through the schools, 
ought to pay special attention to this subject, even if they 
are obliged to neglect some other studies. A familiarity 
with the laws of health is of more consequence than a 
knowledge of the classics or the sciences. 

A teacher is needed in the High school to take charge of 
the natural sciences and some of the other studies. The 
increased number of pupils will necessitate the employment 
of additional teachers, but if a much larger number of pupils 
can receive the benefit of a High-school course of study, it 
will prove a good investment. Let it be understood that 
the school is for the benefit of all classes rather than for the 
education of a few in some special departments. 



197 
EXAMIXATIONS AND PROMOTIONS. 

For tlie past five years promotions have been made 
regularly twice each year in all grades below the High 
school. This has been satisfactory, until recently, as so 
many have left before reaching the highest divisions of the 
Grammar school that the first divisions have not been filled. 
At the present time so many are preparing for the High 
school that some of the upper divisions of the Grammar 
schools are becoming crowded, and promotions to the High 
school should be made twice a year. 

Some of the reasons in favor of admitting twice a year to 
the High school can be readily given. 

At the annual examinations for admission to the High 
school, many pupils are nearly, but not quite, prepared. 
They can prepare themselves in six months, and it seems 
an act of injustice to compel them to remain a whole year 
in the Grammar school. Examinations cannot be so rigid 
where promotions are made but once a year, as all commit- 
tees dislike to say to the pupils that they must remain a 
year to do the work of six months. Some of the pupils on 
being refused admittance to the High school, become dis- 
couraged by failure so nearly approaching success, and leave 
school. 

After pupils are admitted to the High school it fre- 
quently happens that many have occasion to be absent con- 
siderably, by reason of sickness and other causes, some- 
times being out a whole term. On their return to school 
they must do extra work in order to keep with their classes, 
take a partial course, or fall back a full year, and as a re- 
sult many of them leave school, thereby losing the benefit 
of two or three years of study. If they were to lose but 
six months the case would be different. 

There are also pupils who, from inattention to their 
studies or absence from school for insufficient reasons, are 



198 

unable to retain their standing in their classes. They de- 
serve to lose their standing, but a six months' loss is suffi- 
cient for them. 

There is no doubt that from twenty to forty per cent, 
more will enter the school under the new arrangement, and 
that more of those admitted will remain. 

It has been charged against the graded system of schools, 
that the classification is so rigid as to render it impossible 
for a scholar to move faster than the class, regardless of his 
ability or willingness to work. It has been the aim in our 
schools to arrange the studies and classes so that pupils 
disposed to do extra work, or having the ability to do more 
than the other members of the class, could secure extra 
promotions, and such promotions are often made. 

It frequently happens that pupils enter our schools who, 
on account of a lack of school privileges, are backward, for 
which reason they are obliged to enter one of the lower 
divisions where the children are younger than themselves. 
Others on account of sickness enter the lower divisions, 
while those of their own age are in the higher divisions. 
Soon many of these pupils, some of whom possess marked 
ability, outstrip their classmates, and it would be an act 
of injustice to compel them to remain behind. There are 
others who cannot, as the teachers well know, remain long 
in school. There are some studies in the liigher grades to 
which they ought to give some attention, and these should 
be promoted even if they are no better scholars than some 
others who are intending to complete the full course. 

The work for the schools below the High school is so 
arranged that it can be done in school, but if any desire to 
advance more rapidly they can study at home, thus some- 
times securing extra promotions. In such cases the par- 
ents, not the teachers, are responsible for the extra work. 

Sometimes a pupil is deficient in some branch, and fails 
to pass an examination. He cannot understand the subject, 



199 

althougli lie may devote terms to it. If such a pupil is 
kept in the lower grades, he malies but little progress and 
wastes his time. There are pupils in all schools who in 
some study are naturally deficient, and if there is a rigid 
standard to which all must be held, some could not enter 
the higher divisions after years of study. It is sometimes 
said in reply to this, that such pupils might as well spend 
four years in the fourth division of the Grammar school, as 
to enter the higher divisions at the end of one, two or three 
years ; that the standard of admission should not be changed 
for the benefit of any whom Nature has not furnished with 
sufficient capacity to qualify themselves for promotion. 

These are exceptional cases, and their promotions must 
be made out of the ordinary course, but it is hard to say 
that they shall not be promoted until they can attain a 
certain per cent, in their examinations, as sometimes such 
pupils upon commencing new studies work earnestly, seem- 
ing to understand the subject well. Some who are defi- 
cient in some brandies, excel in others. 

It may be urged that the promotion of such scholars, 
not so well qualified as others, two, three or five years 
younger than themselves, has a bad effect upon the lower 
classes, leading some to believe that they will obtain pro- 
motions whether qualified or not. No theory or plan in re- 
gard to promotions can be laid down, which can be fol- 
lowed to the letter. Sound judgment and good sense are 
necessary qualifications in the teacher, who can tell better 
than examining committees whether or not the pupil de- 
serves promotion. The members of the class left beliind 
must understand why others are promoted and they obliged 
to remain. 

The plan of individual promotion has worked well in 
many cases. To show its effects let us consider a few cases. 
In January, 1871, a class of thirteen went from one of our 
middle schools to the fourth division of a Grammar school. 



200 

They have just completed three years in the Grammar 
school. Three have left the city or have ceased to attend 
school, the others have attended quite constantly, more con- 
stantly than the average of classes. 

Of the number remaining, one is now in the first class of 
the first division, three in the second class of the first di- 
vision, three in the first class of the second division, two in 
the second class of the second division, and one in the first 
class of the third division. 

In the first class of the first division of one of our Gram- 
mar schools, three of the members entered the fourth divi- 
sion in January, 1869, six in September, 1869, one in April, 
1870, one in January, 1871 ; these eleven went directly 
from the Middle schools to the Grammar schools ; the other 
members have come from other places, entering the various 
divisions from time to time. 

Of the members of the classes above mentioned, none 
have been pushed, none have been kept back. It is an av- 
erage of what classes will do while attending regularly.' 
One scholar entered the fourth division of a Grammar school 
one year ago and is now in the first division, doing in one 
year the work prescribed for three ; there are others who 
have been two years in one division. We cannot be 
charged with having such a cast-iron system as to repress 
the ambition of one anxious to succeed. Let other places 
continue the plan of promoting by classes. We ought to 
adhere to our plan. 

There have been no public examinations. I liave en- 
deavored to visit the schools as frequently as possible, to 
ascertain the standing of the classes, but no days have been 
t^et apart when parents and friends should be invited, as it 
is understood that the schools are at all times open to the 
inspection of any one, and it is better that the people should 
witness the regular work of the schools, than a special order 
of exercises. An examiner wishes to visit the school when 



' 201 

it is not laboring under the influence of any excitement 
caused by the presence of many visitors. 

The High and Grammar schools are accustomed to have 
exhibitions at the close of the year, vrhen classes graduate, 
but too much importace is attached to these exercises, too 
much time taken for them, too much attention diverted from 
the studies of the school, and too much expense incurred. 

In my opinion there should be as little interference as 
possible with the regular school duties. There should be 
no exercises which tend to destroy or impair the regularity 
of school work. It must be borne in mind that all citizens 
have an equal interest in the schools. When the exercises 
are properly conducted, and not a great amount of time 
spent in preparing for them, they are beneficial. Scholars 
who have studied well for several years in a Grammar or 
High school, ought to be recognized in some way as they 
leave the school. Such exercises have a good effect upon 
the lower classes, but while preparation is made for them 
the work of the school should not be impeded or pupils 
over-tasked in the preparation. 

HEALTH OF CHILDREN AND OVERWORK IN THE SCHOOLS. 

So much has been said in former reports upon this sub- 
ject that it may seem useless to discuss it at this time, but 
the subject is now engrossing so much attention that it 
seems necessary to allude to it. In considering the ques- 
tion I must of necessity repeat views expressed in former 
reports, especially in those of 1867 and 1871. 

Four or five hours a day are enough for children entering 
school at the age of five, and attending constantly thirteen 
years, the time allowed for the completion of the full 
course. Such pupils, however, form a small proportion of 
the number enrolled. 

The laws of the State require pupils between the ages 



202 

of eight and fourteen to attend school at least twelve weeks 
each year. There are many who cannot attend more than 
this. A great many children are sent to school too young, 
and are injured thereby. It would be. better if none were 
admitted under six years of age. If parents will send their 
children to school at an earlier age, they must not complain 
that the children are obliged to do the work required of 
children a few years older. 

We should insist that the work of the school should be 
done in the school, unless, as has been said, parents insist 
that their children shall do more. Particular care has been 
exercised in arranging the studies so that no work should 
be required out of school unless in extraordinary cases. 

The teacliers of the various grades have been consulted 
in relation to the subject. 

Last May the following inquiries were submitted to the 
teachers in order that the opinions of all might be obtained 
viz. : 

1. — In order to complete the course of study prescribed 
for your grade, will it be necessary for pupils to study out 
of school ? 

2. — In order to complete the course of study prescribed 
for your grade how many more weeks should be allowed ? 

3. — Will it be practicable for your grade to do more work 
than is required by the new course of study ? 

4. — What branches require more time and what ones less 
time than is now allotted to them ? 

5. — Is it the practice of your pupils to carry home their 
books for the purpose of studying their lessons ? 

6. — Do you require them to study at home ? 

7. — Do you advise them to study at home ? 

The general response was that pupils would not, under 
ordinary circumstances, be obliged to study out of school in 
order to perform the required amount of labor. A very few 
required or advised their pupils to study at home. Some 
changes were made to bring the labor into school hours. 



203 

The question is frequently asked, " Are there not a num- 
ber of iveak, sickly^ puny children in the schools ? " The 
question must be answered in the affirmative. The large 
number of such pupils is a source of alarm, and it is the 
duty of those in charge of the schools to investigate the 
subject for the purpose of ascertaining, if possible, the true 
condition of things, as in such matters those methods should 
be sought which are best adapted to secure good health. 
If the methods adopted are not those in accordance with 
what is required for the proper physical development of 
children, then shortening the hours of study in school will 
not remedy the evils. 

I submit that the number of hours spent in a school-room 
is not the only thing to be considered. The amount of 
work required, the length of recitations, the time allowed 
for the recesses and for the intermission at noon, the 
methods of lighting, heating, and ventilating the rooms, the 
construction and arrangement of the seats and desks, all 
these things are to be taken into consideration in connection 
with the subject of the health of the pupils. There should 
be at least a half hour each day for recesses and physical 
exercises, and an intermission at noon of at least two hours. 
In some seasons of the year two hours and a half would be 
preferable, as was the case formerly in this city in the sum- 
mer months. 

Some contend that it would be better to have the recesses 
shortened, at the same time lessening the amount of time 
allowed for recreation, some favoring the plan of one session 
daily. 

In answer to this I can only repeat what has been said 
many times by others who have given this sul ject careful 
consideration. Short alternate periods of rest and work 
are better than long and exhaustive periods of work followed 
by long periods of rest. While pupils are at work they 
should work steadily, but there is a limit to the power of 
fixinar their attention. 



204 

« 

'^ It is cruel to compel children to sit still for an hour or an 
hour and a half studying their lessons. Primary schools 
should have no exercises over twenty minutes in length, 
many of their exercises ought not to be over ten or fifteen. 
All teachers in this city are requested to furnish the super- 
intendent at the beginning of each term their order of 
exercises for their respective schools. In some of the rooms 
the programme is placed upon the board, where teacher, 
pupils and visitors can see at a glance in wliat order the 
recitations occur, and the time allowed for each exercise. 

I have selected from the list of last term the progiammes 
of a Primary school, a Middle school, a fourth and a second 
division of a Grammar school, from which it can be readily 
seen how much time is spent in recitations, and also for 
how long a time pupils are required to remain in their seats 
studying : 

ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

PRIMA.RY SCHOOL, LOWER GRADE. 

9.00 A. M. Oijeniug Exercises. 

9.08 '^ Singing. 

9.20 " Marching. 

9.25 " Spelling by sound. 

9.35 " Third class. Reading and Spelling. 

9.50 " Second class. " " 

10.05 " Physical exercise. 

10.10 " Counting lesson. 

10.20 " Oral Instruction. 

10.30 " Recess. 

10.50 " Drawing or writing. 

11.10 " Spelling. Whole School. 

11.20 " Language lesson. 

11.35 " First class. Reading and Spelling. 

11.55 " Closing exercises. 

2 00 P. M. Singing. 

2.15 " Third class. Reading and Spelling. 

2.30 '■ Physical exercise. 



205 



2.35 P, M. Second class. Reading and Spelling. 

2.50 " Eoll call. 

2.55 " Oral Instruction. 

3.10 '' Recess. 

3.30 " First class. Reading and Spelling. 

3.50 " General Exercises. 

3.55 " Closins; Exercises. 



MIDDLE SCHOOL, LOWER GRADE. 

9.00 A. M. Opening Exercises. 

9.10 " Singing. 

9.25 " Yocal Gymnastics. 

9.35 " Reading. First Class. 

10.00 " " Second Class. 

10.30 " Recess. 

10.50 " Arithmetic. Second Class. 

11.20 " General Exercises. 

11.80 " Arithmetic. First Class. 

2.00 P. M. Spelling. Second Class. 

2.15 " " First Class. 

2.30 " Writing. 

3.00 " Physical Exercises. 

3.05 " Reading. First Class. 

3.30 " Recess. 

3.50 " Reading. Second Class. 

4.15 " Drawing or Geography,(oral). 

4.35 " Language. Whole School. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL, FOURTH DIVISION. 



9.00 A. M. Opening Exercises. 

9.10 " Spelling, (written). Whole School. 

9.25 " Writing. 

9.55 " Arithmetic. First Class. 

10.30 " Recess. 

10.50 " Arithmetic. Second Class. 

11.20 " Physical Exercises. 

11.25 " Reading. First Class. 

2.00 P. M. Spelling, (oral). Whole School. 

2.16 " Reading. Second Class. 



206 



2.45 


P.M. 


Language (oral). First Class, 


3.10 




Recess. 


3.30 




Language (oral). Second Class 


3.55 




Geography. First Class. 


4.25 




Physical Exercises. 


4.40 




Music. 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL, SECOND DIVISION. 

9.00 A. M. Opening Exercises. 

9.10 " Spelling. Whole School. 

9.25 *•' Drawing or Writing. 

9.55 " Arithmetic. First Class. 

10.30 " Recess. 

10.50 " Arithmetic. Second Class;. 

11.20 " Physical Exercises. 

11.25 "• Reading. First Class. 

2.00 P. M. Reading. Second Class. 

2.25 " Grammar. First Class. 

2.55 " Music. Whole School. 

3.10 " Recess. 

3.30 "■ Grammar. Second Class. 

3.55 " History. First Class. 

4.25 " Physical Exercises. 

4.35 " Histoi-y. Second Class. 



The above programmes indicate the work of the differ- 
ent schools, as the studies are the same for all schools of the 
same grade, the order in which the recitations occur varying 
according to the plans of the different teachers. There is 
singing at certain times in the day, and there are other ex- 
ercises for which no specified time can be arranged, yet I 
have generally found the schools working according to 
their programmes. The music teacher visits each school 
once in two weeks, and allowance must be made for such 
half days, as well as for the half days set apart for rhetor- 
ical exercises in the higher grades. 

In some schools more time is taken for physical exercises 
than is specified on the programmes, for the reason that 



207 

there are times when a school becomes weary and needs a 
change of exercises. 

It is the intention in Granlmar and Middle schools to 
allow at least one honr each day for recesses and physical 
exercises, about ten minutes for devotional exercises in the 
morning, and fifteen for singing, leaving not over four 
hours and twenty minutes daily, for study and recitation. 
The programme is arranged for two classes in each division, 
but in some of the exercises, as writing and drawing, some- 
times reading and spelling, both classes work to^'ether. 

If there is an adherence to the programme, no scholar 
in a Grammar school will be obliged to study more than 
thirty minutes at one time, or more than two hours and a 
quarter a day, and this at different times. 

I have dwelt at some length upon this point, for I am 
satisfied that it is not the number of hours spent in school 
that injures children so much as other things. I do not 
think if the school sessions were shortened the health of 
the children would be improved unless other changes were 
made. Possibly there are too many studies required ; the 
children may become nervous and unable to rest when out 
of school. The health of the pupils is a very important 
subject for us to consider. It is better for a child to grad- 
uate from our schools in good health than to understand all 
the branches taught in the various grades. 

The ventilation of the rooms is a subject to be consid- 
ered. Many of the rooms have poor arrangements for 
ventilation, and with the best that can be done the air will 
be too impure for healtli and comfort, although an improve, 
ment in this respect upon a great many dweUings from 
which children come to the school. In some of the rooms 
there are windows upon one side of the room only, and to 
open any of the windows exposes the pupils in such a man- 
ner as to cause sickness. There frequently is some trouble 
with a chimney so that coal gas escapes into the school- 



208 

rooms, rendering the rooms unfit for occupancy. Many 
of these things should receive attention before there is too 
much complaint of overwork. 

Again, the amount of work to be done during a term 
should be considered, and the time so apportioned to the 
different studies that the pupils can perform the labor with- 
out hurry or worry. 

It is the testimony of many parents that their children 
break down on account of undue excitement, for it is im- 
possible for some to cease thinking about their lessons even 
in the hours of night. Their sleep is disturbed on account 
of over-anxiety in regard to their lessons, their food is not 
relished, and they are troubled constantly. This would not 
be remedied by short sessions, as it would be no worse for 
them to worry and fret in the school-room than at home. 

Some of the schools have recently adopted the plan of 
two recesses in the afternoon. This gives an opportunity 
to open all the windows and change the air in the room at 
the close of each hour. It is an excellent plan, and all 
schools should adopt it, no matter if it interferes with some 
long cherished programme. 

The following extract from the school report of another 
city appeared in my report of 1867. It is as appropriate 
now as then : 

" It is quite common at the present day to attribute 
everything in the shape of disease that exists in the commu- 
nity to excessive study in our schools. Has any child a pale 
face ? it was caused by hard study. Is there a consump- 
tive in our midst ? she pursued too many studies while at 
school. Is there a fever flush upon the cheek of any pu- 
pil ? long lessons in grammar and algebra caused it. 

" Children spend less than one-seventh of their time in 
the school-room. Hence, some of the physical debility 
among pupils may be traced to other causes. There are 
many things in the household discipline and culture of our 
community which seriously affect the welfare and condi- 
tion of the child at school. The habit of late hours — the 



209 

frequenting of places of amusement — the participation in 
scenes oi" excitement — the dance, or fashionable soiree — the 
habitual reading of works of fiction, or the popular light 
literature of the day — the inconsiderate indulgence of the 
appetite — the exposure, and insufficiency of dress, particu- 
larly of the neck and feet — these, and many kindred enor- 
mities of the social and family life, are among the prolific 
causes of juvenile debility, resulting in mental sluggish- 
ness and indifference, if not prostration." 

In all the discussions upon this subject but little has been 
said of the diseases of the eye. There are many in the 
schools unable to perform their regular studies on account 
of weak eyes, and some investigation should be made in re- 
lation to this to see whether the difficulty is occasioned by 
any special arrangement of the school-rooms, or by some- 
thing entirely outside of the schools. 

teachers' meetings. 

The teachers have sustained an organization for the year. 
The meetings have been well attended, indicating a good 
degree of interest. The essays and discussions have been 
of great value. Various topics concerning the course of 
study and the management of the schools have been dis- 
cussed. The teacher^* are entitled to commendation for 
sustaining such an organization entirely voluntarily on their 
part. Mr. Kimball and others have furnished vocal and 
instrumental music at the meetings. This has been a 
pleasant feature, and has added much to the interest. 

The session of the Hillsborough County Institute at Wil- 
ton, and the State Teachers' Association at Claremont, 
were well attended by teachers from this city. Permission 
has been given teachers to close school for a day that they 
might visit schools in Boston and elsewhere. 

It is to be hoped that the Teachers' Association will be en- 
couraged by the Board, and that teachers will be granted 



210 

the privilege of attending the institutes, and visiting schools 
in other cities. , 

CONCLUSION. 

More schools will be needed the coming year. The com- 
pletion of the building on Bridge street will increase the 
school accommodations, as well as the expenses of the 
schools. With the increased expenditures for buildings and 
schools, our citizens reasonably look for better methods of 
instruction, better methods of discipline, that the youth of 
the city may be better fitted for the duties of citizenship. 
If our schools stand well to-day, it is because our people 
generally have an interest in them, and are willing to as- 
sist those who have the control of them. 

All of which is most respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLy, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
Manchester, N. H., Dec. 19, 1873. 



211 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE DIFFERENT 
SCHOOLS THE PAST YEAR. 



Schools, 



Whole number be 
longing. 



Boyg. Girls. Total 






High school ! 107 

Spring-street Grammar school ! 98 

Franklin-street Grammar school, j 100 

Ijincoln-sireet Grammar school, [ 211 

Intermediate school j '28 



Training school 

Piscataquog Grammar school, 

Amoskeag Grammar school, . 

Middle school No. 1 . . . 

" No. 3 . . . 

" " No. 7 . . . 

" " No. 8 ... 

" No. 9 ... 

" " No. 10 . . . 

Primary school No. 1 . . . 

" No. 2 . . . 

" No. 3 . . . 

" " No. 4 . . . 

" " No. 5 . . . 

'• No. 6 . . . 

" No. 7 . . . 

" " No. 8 . . . 

" " No. 9 . . . 

" No. 10 . . . 

" No. 11 . . . 

" " No. 12 . . . 

" " No. 13 . . . 

" No. 14 . . . 

" " No. 15 . . . 

" " No. 16 . . . 

" No. 17 . . . 

" No. 18 . . . 

" " No. 19 . . . 

" No. 20 . . . 

" " No. 21 . . . 

" " No. 23 . . . 

School in District No. 1 . . . 

" No. 3 . . . 



No. 4 
No. 5 
No. 6 
No. 7 
No. 8 
No. 9 



207 
80 
39 
40 
26 
54 

^4 

■be 

49 
40 
71 
30 
37 
62 
37 
28 
95 
84 
103 
63 
58 
59 
51 
75 
64 
40 
20 
42 
48 
36 
37 
16 
51 
36 
33 
17 
31 
27 
18 



146 
147 
124 
250 
49 
181 
63 
26 
42 
29 
51 
42 
44 
52 
49 
55 
47 
37 
50 
38 
21 
71 
74 
100 
59 
48 
.53 
44 
63 
53 
27 
30 
43 
51 
46 
26 
10 
36 
30 
11 
21 
27 
35 
16 



253 

245 

230 

461 

177 

.388 

143 

65 

82 

55 

10 I 

86 

100 

101 

89 

126 

77 

74 

112 

75 

49 

166 

158 

203 

122 

106 

112 

95 

138 

117 

67 

50 

85 

99 

82 

63 

26 

87 

66 

44 

38 

58 

62 

34 



153 
167 
164 
325 
53 
157 
75 
35 
42 
36 
58 
43 
37 
37 
37 
40 
32 
36 
37 
36 
28 
42 
44 
44 
46 
5-2 
38 
35 
43 
40 
32 
26 
33 
38 
36 
28 
18 
48 
37 
24 
24 
39 
36 
19 



2450 



150 
162 
161 
315 
51 
151 
72 
28 
38 
34 
45 
42 
36 
34 
33 
35 
28 
31 
34 
35 
26 
37 
43 
42 
41 
48 
35 
31 
40 
38 
30 
22 
30 
33 
30 
26 
15 
45 
34 
21 
19 
36 
31 
16 



2284 



The whole number reported from each school, if added together, would be more 
than the whole number in all the schools, as some scTiolars are reported from two or 
more ditferent schools. Tlie whole number of dirterent pupils attending last year was. 
150V.S. 1964; Girls, 1815. Total, 3779. ' 



QUESTIOXS SUBMITTED TO CANDIDATES FOR 
ADMISSION TO THE HIGH SCHOOL AT THE 
ANNUAL EXAMINATION. 



AEITHMETIC. 



1. Write the table of avoirdupois weight. 

2. Find the product, sum, diflference, and quotient of J and l 

3. What is the interest of $50, from July 7, 1871, to Mar. 19, 

1872, at 8i per cent ? 

4. A merchant sells flour at $12.50 per bbl. and gains 25 per 

cent; what would have been the gain or loss per cent, 
had the flour been sold at S9 per bbl. 

5. Multiply .0-4 by .002; .05 by 1.2; divide .016 by .OS; 1,6 by 

.02; 16 by .32. Write the answers in words. 

6. Express 1016 by t\w. Roman method of notation. 

7. A borrowed of B, §500 for six months, agreeing to pay 8 per 

cent, interest; how long a time should A loan B $1,000, 
at 6 per cent, to compgnsate him ? 

8. A pile of wood is 80 feet long, 12 feet wide, and 10 high, A 

man paid S^o.oO a cord for the wood, 75 cents a cord for 
chopping, 25 cents a cord for having it drawn Out of the 
woods and 50 cents a cord for freight ; the wood was sold 
at $8 per cord. How much per cent, was gained on the 
cost V 

9. What is a fraction ? 

10. How do you find the interest of a sum of money for a given 

time ? 

11. John Williams hired of Charles Johnson $200, payable in 6 

months at 8 per cent. Write a promissory note, dating it 
Jan. 1, ls7o, sign John Williams' name, and fiad the 
amount due at the time of settleuicut. 



214 
LANGUAGE. 

1. Correct the following where corrections are needed. 

(a) They hadn't ought to have done that but between you 
and I they did'nt know no better. 

(b) Whom shall we send to the schools. 

(c) Either I or she are wrong. 

(d) I intended to have gone but he had went before I seen 
him. 

(e) Them are the boys which done it but the^wasn't careful. 

(f) Who did you see. 

2. Write a letter to James M. Brown of Boston, Mass., acknowl- 

edging the receipt of a copy of Smith's Astronomy. 

3. Change the following stanza into prose. 

Wild was the night, yet a wilder night 

Hung round the soldier's pillow. 
In his bosom there waged a fiercer fight, 

Than the fight on the wrathful billow. 

4. He spoke well yesterday. Parse each word. 

5. Give the principal parts of lie, do, sit, teach, preach, burst, 

go- 

6. Write the plural of ox, knife, footman, sky, potato, chimney. 

7. Change the verb in the following sentence into the perfect 

tense. Do you study geography ? 

8. Write a sentence containing a numeral adjective, one con- 

taining a relative pronoun, one containing a. verb nn the 
pluperfect tense. 

9. Write a sentence containing the abbreviation for doctor, for 

percentum, for street. 

10. Copy the followiug extract from "Independence Bell," mak- 

ing corrections where they are needed, 
will they do it, dare they do it. 

who is speaking ? what's the news; 
what of adams, what of sherman ! 

oh god grant They wont refuse ? 
make some way there let Me nearer, 

i am stifling, stifle then, 
when a Nations life's at Hazzard. 

we've no time to think of men. 

11. It was the wild midnight; — a storm was in the sky 

The lightning gave its light, and the thunder echoed by; 
The torrent swept the glen, the ocean lashed the shore; 
Then rose the Spartan men, to make their bed in gore! 



215 

(a). M;iko a list of nouns in the above extract; (b). a list of pro- 
uoiuis ; (c). a list of transitive verbs; (d). a list of intransi- 
tive verbs; (e). a list of adjectives; (f). a list of adverbs. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

TOPICS. 

1. The bones. 

2. The eye. 

3. The respiratory organs. 

4. The ear. 

5. The vocal organs. 

6. Hygiene of the nervous system. 

7. Nutrition. 

8. Hygiene of the muscles. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

1. Describe the surface of Xew Hampshire. 

2. 2S"ame and locate six of the leading commercial cities of the 

world. 

3. A ship sails from Boston to Rio Janeiro and back; what 

would be the cargo in going and returning ? 
•i. Where is the place located that has neither latitude nor lon- 
gitude ? 

5. What and where are the following ? Alaska; Huron; Itasca; 

Ganges; Caribbean; Cattegat; Lisbon; Champlain; Hud- 
son; ^Nantucket. 

6. Through what waters would you pass in sailing from Quebec 

to New Orleans ? 

7. From what countries do we obtain the following named ar- 

ticles ? 1, cinnamon; 2, nutmegs; 3, cloves; 4, coffee; 5, 
tea; 6, copper; 7, tin; 8, gutta-percha. 

8. Name ami locate the principal rivers of New Hampshire. 

9. Name the states of the union bordering on the Atlantic. 
10. Name the states of the union bordering on the Pacific. 

HISTORY. 

1. What is History ? 

2. What were the "Articles of Confederation?" Give some 

account of their adoption, and naiaie some of their defects. 



216 

3. What was the Alabama, and what is meant by the "Alabama 

Claims? 

4. For what is each of the following-named places distinguished 

in American history : Jamestown, — Lexington, — Gettj's- 
burg, — Plymouth , — Ticonderoga, — Yalley Forge, — P lains 
of Abraham, — Buena Vista, — Mount Vernon? 
5; "What connection with American history had each of the fol- 
low-named persons; Roger Williams,— "William Penn, — 
Henry Clay, — Alexander Hamilton, — Millard Fillmore, — 
Benedict Arnold, — Ferdinand de Soto, — John Winthrop? 

6. Give some account of the settlement of New Hampshire. 

7. Name some of the wars known as the Inter-Colonial wars. 

8. Name the Presidents and Vice-Presidents in order. 

SPELLING. 

Privilege, anxiety, melancholy, celebrate, mysterious, companion, 
narrative, believe, relief, symmetr}^ iniquity, impostor, exhaust, 
benevolence, avalanche, guilty, laborer, obedient, uneasy, patient, 
obliging, innocent, ceiling, colored, gnawed, excellence, absent, 
surprise, disturbed, manage, politician, forfeit, assistant, catechism, 
countenance, vaccinate, progi'amme, cavalry, chariot, horizontal, 
sagacious, parallel, license, curiosity, savage, mariner, furious, dis- 
ciple, quoits, Chinese. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



The course of study, as published in the last annual report, 
has not been changed for any grade below the first division 
of the Grammar school. The following is the revised 
course for the first division of the Grammar school and the 
High school. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL— FIRST DIVISION. 



FALL TEEM— SIXTEE:N' WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading. — Fifth Reajder. 

Drawing", Writing, Spelling, and Book-keeping. 

Music.' — Observe previous dii'ections. 

Arithmetic. — Review of Practical and Mental. 

Language. — Write abstracts of lessons of the day, of descrip- 
tions, stories, etc., read by the teacher; compositions upon topics 
suggested by events of the day. 

SECOND CLASS. 

Reading. — Fifth Reader. 

History. — Campbell's, completed and reviewed. 
Arithmetic. — Practical, completed. 

Language — Text book continued; pupils will write different 
kinds of letters, such as business letters, familiar letters of intro- 



218 

duction and friendship, notes of invitation, acceptance and regret ; 
abstracts of lessons in history, geography „and other branches; se- 
lections of poetry in the Header changed to prose. Attention giv- 
en to writing promissory notes, bills of goods, etc. Observe direc- 
tions for i^receding grades. 

Drawing. Writing and Spelling. 

Music. — Singing at sight constitutes the chief study of the class, 
paying special attention to the correct method of producing tone. 
Pupils should understand all the signs and characters used in 
musical composition, and be able to comprehend and read at sight 
any ordinary music. 



WINTER TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reader. — Fifth Reader. 
Geography. — Intermediate, reviewed. 
Physiology. 

Drawing, Writing and Spelling. 

Arithmetic. — Putnam Drill Cards; Walton's Tables and Charts. 
Review of Mental. 
Language and Music. — Observe previous directions. 

SECOND CLASS. , 

Reading. — Fifth Reader. 

History. — Campbell's, completed and reviewed. 

Arithmetic. — Practical to 294th page. 

Language and Music. — Observe previous directions. 

Drawing, Writing and Spelling. 



SPRING TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Reading. — Fifth Reader. ' 

Arithmetic. — Practical reviewed. 
Drawing, Writing, Spelling, and Book-keeping. 
Language and Music. — Observe previous directions. 



219 

SECOND CLASS. 

Keading. — Fifth Reader. 

Arithmetic. — Practical completed. 

Geography. — Intermediate reviewed. 

Physiology. 

Language and Music. — Observe previous directions. 

Drawing, Writing and Spelling. 

Declamations in each grade of the Grammar School. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

In this school thei-e are three distinct courses: — 

First. An English course of three years. 

Second. A course of four years, embracing the English studies, 
together with French and Drawing. 

Third. A Classical course of four years. 

The figures annexed to the following studies denote the number of recitations each 
week. 

ENGLISH COURSE OF THREE YEARS. 

FIRST YEAR — FIRST TERM — SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Language, including punctuation, analysis, parsing, reading, 
spelling, and defining, 4 — text-book, Hillard's Sixth Reader. Rob- 
inson's Algebra, 3. Hooker's Natural History, 4. Drawing, 2. 
Music: — Pupils who have beeni through the Grammar-schools are 
expected to have acquired sufScient knowledge of the rudiments 
of music to read common chorals at sight, and to give the con- 
tents of all Major, Minor and Chromatic Scales. Chorus practice 
daily, and a general review of all the previous work. 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Algebra, 4. Physical Geography, 4. Language, 3, — text-book ; 
Quackenbos' English Composition. Drawing, 2. Music: — Chorus 
and Solfeggios practice, also the Tonic, Sub-Dominant, and Dom- 
inant in harmony; this department of music will receive careful 
attention. Also phrasing, respii-ation, and expression, and char- 



220 

acters indicating the different movements in music; as, Adagio, 
Largo, Andante, Allegro, etc. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Geometry, 4. Botany, 5. Language; Word study, derivations 
and synonyms, reading standard English works, 4. Drawing, 2. 
Music: — Chorus and Solfeggios continued. Music in varied forms 
will be introduced, and especial attention given to voice culture 
and harmony. Four-part songs from the best composers will be 
studied and carefully analyzed and their general construction ex- 
plained. 

SECOND YEAR — FIRST TERM — SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Geometry, 4; Rhetoric, 3; Astrononi}^, 4; Reading or Draw- 
ing, 2. 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Trigonometry, 4; N'atural Philosophy, 4 ; English Language and 
Literal/ure, 4; Drawing, 2. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

N"atural Philosophy, 4; Surveying, 3; Ancient History, 3; En- 
glish Language and Literature, 3. 

THIRD YEAR — FIRST TERM — SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Ancient History, 4; Physiology, 3; Arithmetic, reviewed, 3. 
Civil Government the first eight weeks of the term, 3; United 
States History, reviewed the last eight weeks of the term, 3. 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Geglogy, 4; Mental Philosophy, 4; Geography, reviewed, 4; 
Spelling and Defining, 1. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Chemistry, 4; English Grammar, reviewed, 4; Political Ecou- 
omy, 3; Reading, 2. 



221 

FOUR YEARS' COURSE, IIS^CLUDING ENGLISH, 
FREis^CH, AND DRAWING. 

FIRST YEAR — FIRST TEEM — SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Language as in preceding course, 4; Algebra, 3; Natural His- 
tory, 4; Drawing, 2. 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Algebra, 4; Physical Geography, 4 ; Language, 3; Drawing, 2. 

THIRD TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

Geometry, 4; Ancient History, 3; Language, 4; Drawing, 2. 

SECOND YEAR — FIRST TERM — SIXTEEN WEEKS, 

Geometry, 4; Ancient History, 4; Language — synonyms — crit- 
ical analysis of the language, 3; Drawing, 2. 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Trigonometry, 4 ; Natural Philosophy, 4; Drawing, 2. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Natural Philosophy, 4; Botany, 5; Surveying, 3; Drawing, 2. 

THIRD YEAR — FIRST TERM — SIXTEEN WEEKS, 

Astronomy, 4; Rhetoric, 3; Drawing, 2; Physiology, 3. 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Geology, 4; English Language and Literature, 4; French, 3; 
Drawing, 2, 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS, 

English Language and Literature, 3; French, 4; Drawing, 2; 
Political Economy, 3. 



222 

rOURTn YEAK— FIRST TERM— SIXTEKN WEEKS. 

French, 4; Arithmetic, 3; Reading, 2; Civil Government, 8 weeks, 
8; United States History, eight weeks, 3. 

SECOND-TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Mental Philosophy, 4; French, 4; Geography, 4; Spelling and 
Defining, 1. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEK*S. 

Chemistry, 4; French, 4; English Grammar, 4. 



CLASSICAL COURSE OF FOUR YEARS. 

FIRST YEAR — FIRST TERM — SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Language as in preceding courses, 4 ; Algebra, 3; Natural His- 
tory, 4; Drawing, 2. 

SECOND TERM— TWELVE WEEKS. 

Algebra, 4; Language, 3; Physical Geography, 4 ; Drawing, 2. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Ancient History, 3; Geometry, 4; Latin Lessons, 4; Drawing, 2. 

SECOND YEAR — FIRST TERM — SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Ancient History, 4 ; Geometry, 4; Latin Lessons, 4 ; Drawing, 2. 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Natural Philosophy, 4; Trigonometry, 4; Ceesar, 4; Drawing, 2. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Natural Philosophy, 4; Surveying, 3; Csesar, 4; Drawing, 2. 



223 

THIRD YEAR — FIRST TERM— SIXTEEN "WEEKS. 

Astronomy, 4; Ehetoric, 3; Virgil, 4; Reading, 2. 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE \yEEK:S. 

Geology, 4 ; English Language and Literature, 4 ; Virgil, 4; Spell- 
ing and Defining, 1. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Botany, 5; English Language and Literature, 3; Virgil, 4. 

FOURTH YEAR — FIRST TERM — SIXTEEN WEEKS. 

Arithmetic, 3; United States History, eight weeks, 3; Civil Gov- 
ernment, eight weeks, 3; Cicero, 4; Physiology, 3, 

SECOND TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Mental Philosophy, 4; Geography, 4; Cicero, 4. 

THIRD TERM — TWELVE WEEKS. 

Chemistry, 4; English Grammar, 4; Odes of Horace, 4. 

Declamations and Compositions, at regular intervals, throughout 
the course. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1874. 



JAMES A. WESTON, Mayor, 

ex-officio, chairman. 
RUFUS H. PIKE, 

President of the Common Council, ex-officio. 



^[EMBERS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



-Henry E. Burnham. 
-Marshall P. Hall. , 
-John G. Lane. 
-Nathan P. Hunt, Clerk. 
-Frank J. Murray. 
-Edwin Kennedy. 
-George P. Rockwell. 
-John E. Stearns. 



JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
Office — No. 5 City Hall ; Office Hours from 8 to 9 a. m,, 
school days. 



Ward 


1.- 


Ward 


2. 


.Ward 


3. 


Ward 


4. 


Ward 


5. 


Ward 


6. 


Ward 


7. 


Ward 


8.- 



226 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

Finance^ Accounts^ and Claims. — Messrs. Kennedy, Pike, 
Hall and the Mayor. < 

Repairs^ Furniture and Supplies. — Messrs. Edgerly, Ken- 
nedy, Pike and Hunt. 

Text-Books and Apparatus. — Messrs. Hall, Edgerly,. Rock- 
well and Buniham. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Hunt, Stearns, Rockwell, 
and Edgerly. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Burnliam, Murray, 
Hunt and Edgerly. 

Truancy. — Messrs. Murray, Lane, Hall and Edgerly. 

Employment of Children in Manufacturing Estahlish- 
ments. — Messrs. Lane, Hunt, Kennedy, Murray and Ed- 
gerly. 

Music. — Messrs. Stearns and Rockwell. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Rockwell, Hail and Burnham. 

SUB-COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

High School and Training Schoool. — Messrs. Hall, Hunt 
and Rockwell. 

Spring Street. — i^essrs.- Burnham and Lane. ' 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Hall and Rockwell. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Hunt and Kennedy. 

Intermediate Building and Wilsoyi Hill. — Messrs. Murray 
and Hall. 

Lowell Street and Blodgett Street. — Messrs. Lane and 
Stearns. 

Suburban Schools Nos. 3, 4, o, 6, 7, 8, 9. — Messrs. Ken- 
]iedy and Burnham. 

Piscataquog. — Messrs. Rockwell and Hunt. 

Amoskeag and Suburban School No. 1. — Messrs. Stearns 
and Murray. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Hall, Murray and Rockwell. 



227 
SCHOOLS AND .TEACHERS. 

HIGH SCHOOL — BEECH STREET. 

Principal, W. W. Colburn. 
Assistants, Mary E. Clougli. 

Lucretia E. Manaban. 

Emma J. Ela. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL — MANCHESTER STREET. 

Principal, Alfred S. Hall. 
Assistants, Abbie S. McClintock. 
Kate E. Joy. 

TRAINING SCHOOL — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Principal Higber Department, Nancy S. Bunton. 
Assistant, Mintie C. Edgerly. 
Principal Primary Department, Martha N. Nason. 
Assistant, Anna 0. Heath. 

SPRING-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal, William E. Buck. 
Assistants, Anstrice G-. Flanders. 

Sarah J. Greene. 

Lizzie S. Campbell. 

FRANKLIN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal, Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistants, Mary F. Dana. 

Lottie -R. Adams. 

Carrie E. Roid. 



228 

LINCOLN-STRKET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal, Benjamin F. Dame, 
Assistants, Jnlia A. Baker. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Annette McDoel. 

Eliza A. Young. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Anna J. Dana. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

Lizzie H. Patterson. 

PISCATAQUOG TxRAMMAR SCHOOL — CENTER STREET. 

Principal, Sylvester Brown. 
Assistants, Martha J. Boyd. 
Mary A. Lear. 

AMOSKEAG GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Emma A. H. Brown. 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett street. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 
3, Lowell street. — Mary L. Sleeper. 

7, Franklin street. — Hattie G. Flanders. 

8, Franklin street. — C. Augusta Abbott. 
0, Spring street. — Hattie S. Tozer. 

10, Spring street. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodgett street.— Ellen B. Rowell. 
" 2, Lowell street. — Emma F. Beane. 
" 3, Beech street. — Georffianna'Dow. 



229 

No. 4, Beech street.— Helen M. Morrill. 
5, Lowell street. — Annie M. Offnit. 
G, Wilson Hill.— Abbio E. Abbott. 

7, Wilson Hill. — Emma H. Perley. 

8, Lowell street. — Elvira S. Prior. 

9, Manchester street. — Clara N. Brown. 

10, Manchester street. — Nellie Pearson. 

11, Franklin street. — E. Jennie Campbell. 

12, Franklin street. — Martha W. Hnbbard. 
lo, Spring street. — Emma A. Cross. 

14, Spring street. — Nellie M. Whitney. 

15, North Main street. — Ida F. Gee. 

16, North Main street. — Celia M. Chase. 

17, South Main street. — Alice G. Lord. 

19, Amoskeag. — Nellie E. Tappan- 

20, South Main street. — Sarah D. Lord. 

21, Center street. — Ella F. Salisbury. 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District.— Nellie M. Gate. 
" 3, Bakersville. — Princi])al, Addie M. Chase. 
Assistant, Cleora E. Bailey. 

4, Goffe's Falls. — Edward P. Sherburne. 

5, Harvey District. — George P. Johnson. 

6, Webster's Mills.— Olive J. Randall. 

7, Hallsville.— Maria H. Hildreth. 

8, Massabesic. — N. Amanda Wyman. 

9, Mosquito Pond. — S. Isetta Locke. 

MUSIC TEACHER. 

J. J. Kimliall. 



ACCOUNT 



HENRY R. CPIAMBERLIN, 

CITY TREASURER, 



DECEMBER 31, 1872, TO DECEMBEE 31, 1873. 



9po 



Dr 



H. B. Chamherlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



To Cash in Treasury, January 1, 1873, 
Cash of Water Works, 
Water Bonds unsold Jan. 1, 1873, 
State Bonds unsold, 
Temporary Loan, 
Savings Bank Tax, 
Railroad Tax, . 
Insurance Tax, 
Literary ^'und. 
City Hall and Stores, . 
City Farm, 
Police Court, 
City Scales, 

Paupers from other towns, 
Pine Grove Cemetery, 
Valley Cemetery, 
County of Hillsborough, 
City Teams, . 
Overdrafts, 

License of Exhibitions and Shows, 
Land Sold from Farm, 
Dog Licenses, 
Sewer Licenses, 
Cost aSTou-Resident Taxes, 
Lumber sold. 
Rent of Hearse, 
Interest on State Bonds, 
Board of Inmates at State Reform School. 
Grass irom Commons, 
Interest on Taxes, 
Rent of Tenements, 
Use of Aqueduct Water, 
Taxes collected 1865, 

" " 1866, . 

1867, . 

" " 1868, . 

" " 1869, . 

" " 1870, . 



SI 6,970 88 

40,455 51 

101,500 00 

123,800 00 

159,120 00 

33,476 80 

19,629 56 

689 25 

1,435 00 

2,359 00 

2,151 27 

9,162 86 

373 72 

73 38 

2,286 88 

960 30 

2,224 29 

1,915 00 

358 73 

590 00 

1,763 74 

720 74 

918 97 

33 00 

19 50 

125 00 

6,819 00 

180 29 

49 00 

1,378 76 

96 00 

117 50 

3 00 

3 00 

190 48 

299 35 

565 31 

1,603 13 



Amount carried forward to page 234, 



534,418 20 



233 



City of Manchester (ending D 


ecemher 31, 1873). Cr. 


By Unpaid Bills, Jan. 1, 1873, . 


. $47,121 S6 


Paupers off the Farm, . 


5,432 91 


City Farm, .... 


11,398 37 


City Teams, .... 


5,599 18 


Highway District ISTo. 1, 


618 26 


" " '■• 2 


. 13,029 73 


" " " 3 


793 06 


<t U i.(. ^ 


697 75 


iC a u ^ 


. r. 618 07 


'* " " 6 


463 91 


tc cc u y 


605 76 


(( u u g 


551 23 


" " " 9 


431 91 


" ■ " " 10, 


1,187 85 


(C ct "11 


1,101 10 


U U U J2 


392 50 


« " " 13, 


290 55 


[N'ew Highways, . . . . 


6,182 78 


Granite Bridge, . . . . 


257 93 


Amoskeag Falls Bridge, 


205 25 


Sewers and Drains, 


. 12,363 41 


Reservoirs, .... 


729 58 


Commons, 


3,547 86 


Valley Cemetery, . 


2,970 49 


Pine Grove Cemetery, 


2,745 79 


Fire Department, 


, 12,125 75 


City Police, .... 


. 19,164 63 


City Officers, 


9,704 26 


Lighting Streets, . 


4,569 63 


Militia, 


608 33 


Printing and Stationery, 


2,430 64 


Incidental Expenses, 


. 13,601 47 


City Hall, ..... 


8,115 98 


City Library, . . . . 


3,023 47 


Paving Streets, . . . 


7,614 83 


VYatering Streets, 


826 73 


Discount on Taxes, 


5,993 .33 


Abatement of Taxes, . 


1,557 56 



Amount carried forward to page 235, 



208,476 70 



234 



Br. 



H. It. Gha'mherUn, Treasurer, in account with the 



$43.00, 



Amount bi'ou,<;^ht forward from page 232. 
By I'axcs collected 1871, '. 

1872, . 

1873, . 
Dog Tax, '09, .S5.00. '70, $16.00. '71 
Mary E. Myers, Laud, Hanover Street 
J. G. Edgerly. Tuition, 
Water Rent, .... 
License of Job Teams, . 
Accrued Interest oii State Bonds. 
Water Works, .... 
Pike & Heald, Stove Pipe, . 
J. P. iS^ewell, Old Bridge, . 
TI. Dickey & Co., Brick, 
Sewers and Drains, Brick from City Hall 
Pike & Heald, Old Iron, 
Pike & Heald, Work, Paving, 
J. G. Edgerly, Old Brick, . 
J. Q. A. Sargent, Work, 
Wm. P. Richardson, dis. on Lumber, 
J. G. Edgerly, Coal from Schools, 
R. G. Annan, Old Fence, 
Samuel Brown, Jr., Stone, 
License to sell, . • . . 
J. T. Fanning, Hay, etc., 
J. T. Fanning, Supplies furnished, 
Waterman Smith, Work on Well, 
Daniel Clark, Coal from Schools, . 
Main St. School-house, Brick, 
J. E. Bennett, Old Window, 

'' Billiard License, 
" " Old Copper, . 

" '' Ward Room Lot, Rent, 

" " Old School Shed, . 

Board of Inmates at Insane Asvluni, 



Outlawed Bills, 

Unpaid Bills, Jan. 1, 1874, 



1B;o34,41S 20 

4,580 69 

27,779 69 

275,306 Qb 

64 00 

180 00 

266 GO 

1,920 53 

705 88 

146 00 

11,217 64 

17 56 

188 10 

90 15 

23 80 

14 35 

2 25 

4 00 

12 00 

1 50 

740 37 

10 00 

113 00 
100 00 

63 00 

114 07 
7 50 

69 02 
27 70 
4 50 
9 00 
43 75 
12 00 
12 00 
22 18 

58,293 03 

21 12 

62,998 10 



^921,312 25 



/.,m 1. ) 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1873). 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward from page 233, . 


. ■1?208,47G 70 


By State Tax, 


54,642 00 


County Tax, 


18,010 63 


Interest, $3,841.40, Coupons, $40,58 l.o'J, 


44,422 49 


Temporary Loan, . . . . . 


63,000 00 


Eeduction of City Debt, 


1,(300 00 


Court House, 


786 92 


Insurance, 


236 19 


Iron Fence, Merrimack Square, . . . ' . 


. 62 50 


Eepairs of Buildings, 


960 49 


I^ew School Houses, 


28,239 75 


Repairs of School Houses 


6,733 19 


Evening Schools, 


1,523 87 


School Department, 


. 49,062 17 


Water-Works, 


294,609 02 


Eire Alai-ni Telegraph, .... 


4,709 64 


Land Damage, 


3,835 94 


Canal Bridge, 


1,180 05 


Decoration, 


198 50 


Grading for Concrete, .... 


1,892 90 


' Pest House, ♦ 


3,459 15 


Piscataquog Bridge, 


3,267 04 




$790,909 14 


Water Bonds unsold, 


. 68,100 00 


State Bonds unsold, 


. 29,500 00 


( 'ash in Treasury, ..... 


. 32,803 11 



$921,312 25 
HENRY R. CHAMBERLI:N, City Treasurer. 
Manchester, Jammry 1, 1874. 



FINANCE COMMITTEFyS REPOKT, 



The iindersig-ued, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
certify that we have examined tlie within account of Henry 
R. Chambei'lin, City Treasurer, and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

During the year 1873 there has been received, (includ- 
ing the balance on hand, January 1, 1873,) the sum of 
eiglit hundred fifty-eight thousand two hundred ninety-three 
dollars and three cents ('"^858,293.03), and there has been 
paid out during the same time, the sum of seven hundred 
twenty-seven thousand eight hundred eighty-nine dollars 
and ninety-two cents, ($727,889.92), lea^ving in the treas- 
ury January 1,1874, the sum of thirty-two thousand eight 
hundred three dollars and ten cents, (<'$32,803.10). 

There are Bonds in the treasury unsold as follows, to 
wit : State Bonds, twenty -nine thousand five hundred 
dollars ; City Water Bonds, sixty-eight thousand one hun- 
dred dollars. 

J. L. SMITH, 
R. H. PIKE, 
N. S. BEAN, 
WM. G. DUNHAM, 
J. P. NEWELL, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



To cash on hand January 1, 1873, . . . $57,426 39 
Receipts for Water Bonds sold, . .. . 33,400 00 
Receipts for State Bonds sold, . . . 91,796 50 
Taxes, 1873, collected, . 1268,770 45 



Abated, 
Discounted, 

Taxes, 1872, collected, 
Abated, . 

Taxes, 1871, collected. 
Abated, 

Taxes, 1870, collected. 
Abated, 

Taxes, 1869, collected. 
Abated, 

Taxes, 1868, collected, 
Abated, 

Taxes, 1867, collected, 
Abated, 

Taxes, 1866, abated, . 
Taxes, 1865, abated, . 



542 

. 5,993 


87 
33 


. 27,253 
525 


80 
89 


. 4,404 
225 


61 

08 


. 1,486 
132 


74 
39 


531 

38 


57 
74 


259 

39 


91 
44 


143 
46 


53 
95 



275,306 65 



27,779 69 



4,629 69 



1,619 13 



570 31 



299 35 



190 48 
3 00 
3 00 



238 

Costs on non-res. taxes, (H.R.C.) 
" (W.G.i].) 

Interest on taxes, (W. G. E.) . 
Interest on taxes, (H. R. C.) 

Tax on deposits in Sav. Banks, . 

Railroad tax, .... 

Insurance tax, .... 

Literary Fund,. . . 

Rent of City Hall stores, . 

Rent of City Hall, . 

Labor and produce from City Farm, 

Police Court costs and fines, 

1-2 fees from South scales, 

1-2 fees from North scales, 

Town of Alexandria for Inirial of 

F. B. Kimball, . 
Town of Goffstown for burial of 

Kidder child, 
Town of New Boston, aid to 

Joshua Rogers, . 
Town of Hooksett, aid to Mrs. 

Mary George, 

Receipts for lots in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, . . 

Receipts for lots in Valley Cem- 
etery, ..... 

Receipts for tomb rent, 

Receipts for timber, . 

Receipts for interest, 



Highway Dis. No. 2, for work of 

City Teams, . . . 1,091 00 



lo 00 




18 00 






33 00 


692 76 


tJrJ \J\J 


786 00 






1 378 76 


^ 


33,476 80 




19,629 56 


. 


689 25 




1,435 00 




2,026 00 


, 


333 00 




2,151 27 




9,162 86 


312 35 




61 37 






373 72 


28 00 


^ t tj k iU 


16 -00 




2 00 




27 38 






73 38 


. 


2,286 88 


276 30 




37 25 




637 91 




8 81 






(\a(\ p.o 



239 



New Highways, 

Paving, .... 

Sewers and Drains, . 

Grading for concrete walks, 

Ash- Street school-house, . 

City Farm, 

Reservoirii, 

Pest-House, 

Warren Harvey, 



at Reform School, 
Overdraft on account Fire Dept 
City Hall, 
Overdraft on account Highway 

Dis. No. 7, . 

License to shows, 

Land sold from City Farm, 

Dog licenses. 

Sewer licenses, . 

Old plank from Canal Bridge, 

Rent of hearse, bal. for 1872, 

Rent of hearse, for 1873, 



253 50 




172 50 




36 00 




168 00 




78 00 




6 00 




17 00 




12 00 




81 00 






1,915 00 




t of inmates 




. 


3,224 29 


10 06 




287 00 





61 67 



25 00 
100 00 



Board of inmates at Reform School, 

Interest on State Bonds, 

Orass from commons, 

Rent of tenements on Vine Street, 

Rent of aqueduct water (Hanover square) 

Land cor. Hanover and Belmont streets. 

Tuition from pupils out of town, 

Water rent, .... 

Licenses lor job teams. 

Accrued .interest on Water Bonds, 



358 73 
590 00 
1,763 73 
720 74 
918 97 
19 50 



125 00 

180 29 




6,965 00 




49 00 




96 00 


uare), . 


117 50 


;ets. 


180 00 




266 00 




1,920 53 




705 83 




. 11,217 64 



240 



Old iron sold from City Hall, 

Old iron sold from 'Squog Bridge, 

Brick sold from Lincoln-St. school-house, 

Brick sold from City Hall, . 

Brick sold from schools. 

Pike & Heald for paving, . 

J. Q. A, Sargent for work, . 

Wm. P. Richardson, dis. on lumber, . 

Coal sold, ...... 

Old fence from Bakersville School-house, 

Stone sold by Saml. Brown, jr., . 

Nicholas Nichols for license to sell, 

Hayden & Co., for license to sell. 

Hay sold from Water Works, 

Work on well for Waterman Smith, . 

Supplies furnished by Water Works, . 

Daniel Clark for coal, 

Old window sold, .... 

Billiard license, . . , . . 
Old copper sold, .... 

Rent of No. 5 Ward Room lot, . 
J. L, Kelly for old building. 
Board of inmates at Insane Asylum, . 
Temporary Loan, .... 



31 91 

188 10 

90 15 

51 50 



00 
25 



4 

2 
12 00 

1 50 

740 37 

10 00 

113 00 
50 00 
50 00 
63 00 

7 50 

114 07 
69 02 

4 50 
9 00 
43 75 
12 00 
12 00 
22 18 
159,120 00 

$758,189 53 



ACCOUNTS OF APPEOPEIATIONS. 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 

To Balance from last year, . . 17947 

Appropriation, .... 1,200 00 

Reserved Fund, . . . 1,000 00 
County of Hillsbor'gh, for board 

of Inmates at Reform School, 2,224 29 

E. Ingham, " " . 23 14 

Fannie Wallace, " " . 70 50 

George W. Riddle, " " . 61 25 

Horace Pettee, guardian " . 26 00 
Overseers of Poor for board, &c., 

of Inmates of Insane Asylum, 22 18 
Town of Alexandria for burial 

of S. C. Kimball, ... 28 00 
Town of Goffstown for burial of 

Kidder Child, ... 16 00 
Town of Hooksett for aid to Mrs. 

Mary George, . • • 27 38 
Town of New Boston for aid to 

Joshua Rodgers, ... 2 00 



4,780 21 
Balance overdrawn, . . . 652 70 



Dr. 



i,432 91 



242 




EXPENDITURES. 




By paid for board, &c., of Inmates at 




Reform School, 


$3,600 61 


for board of M. Gillis, N. H. 




Asylum, .... 


100 9T 


for board of John Connolly, N.H. 




Asylum, .... 


106 58 


for board of Inmate, N. H. 




Asylum, .... 


22 18 


for board of J. M. Dickey's family 


20 00 


for board of W. S. Dearborn, . 


8 00 


for board of Alfred Craig, . 


40 93 


for board of Etta Frost, 


99 00 


J. Abbott for aid to Mrs. S. A. 




Haselton, .... 


60 00 


for aid to Mrs. Toney, 


1 80 


C. S. Fisher for burial of Kidder 




child, 


16 00 


for aid to Roswell Towns, . 


97 28 


for rent of tenement for Mrs. 




Toney, 


40 00 


for rent of tenement for Francis 




Cahill, 


13 00 


for nurse to Mrs. Davis, . 


96 00 


for care of S. P. Greely, . 


3 00 


Z. F. Campbell for medicines, . 


24 04 


H. R. Barnard & Co., 


5 65 


Fogg & James for team to Refm 




School, 


2 00 


George Thayer & Son, for boots. 


2 00 


Mitchell & Gove, for boots. 


2 25 


Town of Bow, for aid to Susan , 




Collins, 


17 70 


Moses George, cash paid for team 




and searching records, . 


9 80 



Cb. 



243 



Paid for Provisions and Groceries, $656 67 
for Fuel, .... 387 45 



;,432 91 



CITY FARM. 

To Balance from last year, 

Appropriation, .... 
Account of land sold from Farm, 
Receipts for labor and produce. 



iD 12 
2,000 00 
6,862 58 
2,151 27 



Db. 



i$ll,398 97 



EXPENDITURES. 

By Supt's salary (J. Cross), 3 mos. 
" " (G. Reed), 9 mos 
Paid for furniture, . 

George Reed, for crockery, 
" " stoves, 

for stoves, stove furniture and 
repairs, 

H. S. Whitney, for plumbing 
and repairing pipe, 

for labor, 

for house work, 

for hardware, tools and seeds 

for tobacco, . 

for boots and shoes', 

for repairing clock, 

for flour, grain and meal, 

for Bible, 

for dry goods, 

for blacksmith work, 

for filing saw, 



Cr. 



1125 00 

375 00 

128 15 

7 50 

37 67 

107 04 

23 87 

444 33 

56 75 

93 33 

22 48 

73 12 

2 00 

461 19 

1 00 

222 09 

55 42 

90 



244 



Paid for groceries and provisions, . 


$762 59 


for crockery, . . . . 


6 95 


Reuben Morgan, for tea, 


3 50 


for meat, . . . . 


136 11 


for smoking hams. 


1 50 


for pails, . . . . 


4 58 


for repairing wagon and drag 


6 20 


for use of boar, 


3 00 


for horse blanket, whip & comt 


) 7 25 


for clothing, . 


11 05 


for soap, 


22 84 


for potatoes, . 


51 33 


Thomas G. Worthley,, for ] 




pair oxen, . 


225 00 


John N. True, for 1 bull. 


40 00 


Joseph Marsh for pasturage. 


43 00 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., for shaft 


1 80 


• for soap. 


4 50 


for faucet and plow point, 


1 01 


for fish. 


1 83 


J. M. Robinson for repairing 




wall. 


! 50 



13,571 38 



REPAIRS CITY FARM BUILDINGS. 



Paid Geo. W. Stevens, architect, 

Ireland & Emery per contract, 
Asa K. Emery extra carpenter 

work, . . 
John J. Bennett, mason work, 
A. Bodwell & Co., stone work, 
Fogg & James, team for Archi- 
tect, 

Wm. McPherson, sinking well, 



$150 


00 


8,845 


00 


750 


21 


335 


92 


569 


80 


27 


00 


484 56 



245 



Paid "N. S. Bean, No. 4," pumping 

out well $15 00 

Williams & Go. for soap-stone 
furniture, .... 

Daniels & Co., for hardware, . 

H. & H. R. Pettee, for lime & 
cement, .... 

Concord Railroad, for frieglit, 

C. H. Hodgnian & Co., for 
trucking, .... 

Pike & Heald, piping building, 

D. H. Yonng for drain pipe, . 
John L. Kennedy, painting and 

graining, .... 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co. for iron 

doors and frames, 
Lamson & Marden for cover 

to well, .... 
City Farm for excavation, 
Stewart & Robinson for plas- 
tering, .... 81 75 



106 


52 


41 


32 


58 


43 


1 


49 


10 


00 


287 


78 


48 


45 


175 


91 


323 


79 


6 


00 


371 


00 



STONE SHED. 

lid Geo, W. Goffe for chestnut 
posts, .... 
Daniels & Co., hardware, 
for labor, .... 


$19 00 

7 96 

110 10 

1 "17 (\(\ 






Angount, .... 
Balance to new account, . 


$11,398 37 
60 




$11,398 97 



246 








CITY TEAMS. 






Dr. 


To Balance from old account, 


$244 04 




Appropriation, ' . . . 


1,600 


00 




Fire Department, 


1,600 


00 




Reserved Fund, 


350 


00 




Revenue account for work, 


1,834 


00 


$5,628 04 


EXPENDITURES. 






Cr. 


Paid Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster, 


$379 


00 




Augustus Merrill, " 


394 


00 




Augustus Robie, " 


432 


00 




Fogg & James, doctoring horse, 


5 


00 




M. C. Derby, 


163 


50 




Z. F. Campbell for medicine, . 


2 


44 




S. F. Murry, 


18 


16 




'for hooks and nails, 


2 


45 




for making grain-chest, . 


9 


40 




for shoeing horses. 


217 


10 




for making and repairing carts, 


448 


18 




for hay and bedding, 


1,215 


66 




for grain and meal, 


1,053 


33 




for repairing pump. 


1 


00 




for pails, oil, soap, &c., . 


17 


89 




for gas, .... 


2 


97 




harnesses and repairs, . 


186 


25 




for 4 blankets, 


38 


00 




for rubber coat, 


9 


00 




Russell White for expense to 








Nashua, .... 


1 


10 


• 


B. C. Kendall for expense to 








Nashua, .... 


2 


75 





247 
raid for 1 pair black horses, . $1,000 00 



Amount, .... ^5,599 18 
Balance to new account, . 28 86 



HIGHWxlY DISTRICT No. 1. 



15,628 04 



Dr. 



To Balance from last year, . ■ 


$144 30 


Appropriation, .... 


200 00 


EeservGcl Fund, 


225 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




By paid John Campbell, Supt., 


187 88 


Laborers, .... 


220 38 


for teams, .... 


207 50 


for 2 picks & repairing picks, . 


2 50 


Amount, ..... 


$518 26 


Balance to new account, . 


51 04 







1569 30 



Cr. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 2. 

To Balance from old account, . 148 97 

Appropriation, .... 12,000 00 

Reserved Fund, . . . 1,000 00 

Warren Harvey, work of teams, 81 00 

Waterman Smith, work on well, 7 50 



1569 30 



Dr. 



113,137 47 



248 



paid Russell White, Supt., 


s. 

8378 00 


William T. Evans, Supt., . 


291 00 


for lumber. 


1 67 


for tools, .... 


249 42 


for work of city teams, 


935 50 


for work of other teams, . 


1,181 25 


for work of teamsters. 


977 50 


for laborers, . . . 


. 6,423 43 


for blacksmith work. 


252 41 


for rubber boots, 


19 00 


for mason work, 


19 50 


for tape measure, 


1 50 


for pails, oil, dippers, etc., 


13 61 


for Engineer's services, 


150 00 


for concrete crossings, 


2,059 46 


for stone chips. 


24 00 


for covering-stones for -culvert. 


24 00 


for whitewashing tree-boxes, 


28 00 


Amount, . . * . 


.$13,029 73 


Balance to new account. 


107 74 







Cr. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



To Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, 



810 44 
800 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



113,137 47 

Dr. 

8810 44 
Cr. 



By paid D. F. Miller, Supt., . 
for laborers, 



8162 00 
304 99 



249 



By paid for work of teams, 
for blacksmith work, 
for lumber, 
for gravel, 
pick and handle, 

Amount, . . . . 
Balance to new account. 



8269 00 


2 85 


5 25 


46 40 


2 30 


$793 06 


17 38 



^810 44 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 

To Balance from last year, . . $119 97 

Appropriation, .... 300 00 

Reserved fund, . . . 180 00 
Yf. P. Richardson, discount on 

lumber, . . . . . 1 50 



EXPENDITURES. 




By paid C. C. Webster, Supt., 


89 00 


John P. Moore, " . 


36 00 


for laborers, .... 


215 23 


for work of teams, . 


80 12 


for stone culvert, 


15 00 


for plank and timber for bridge, 


*236 42 


for nails and spikes, . 


5 88 


Amount, ..... 


$597 75 


Balance to new account. 


3 72 



I)r. 



$601 47 



$601 47 



250 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 



To Balance from last 


year, . 


18 75 


Appropriation, . 


. 


500 00 


Reserved fund, 


EXPENDITUEES. 


110 00 






By paid for labor, . 




1304 59 


for teams, 




151 11 


for lumber, 




143 90 


for gravel, 




12 02 


for stone, . 




3 50 


for shovel and pic 


V, . 


2 95 


Amount, . 


S618 07 


Balance to new 


account, 


68 







Dr. 



$618 75 



Cr. 



g618 75 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



To Balance from last year, 


1130 18 


Appropriation, .... 


300 00 


Reserved fund, ..... 


50 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




By paid Daniel H. Dickey, S.upt., . 


887 00 


for laborers, .... 


266 87 


for teams, .... 


130 04 


Amount, . . 


$463 91 


Balance to new account, 


16 27 



Dr. 



8180 18 



Cr. 



$480 18 



251 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



To Balance from last year, 


$0 


7G 




Appropriation, .... 


600 


00 




Reserved fund,' 


50 


00 




J. B. Eastman, overdraft (re- 








fmided), .... 


61 


67 


8717 43 


EXPENDITURES. 












Cr. 


By paid Peter 0. Woodman, Supt., 


$48 


00 




Joseph Marsh, Supt., 


17 


50 




for work of teams, . 


154 


18 




for laborers, .... 


371 


06 




for plank, 


15 


02 




Amount, ..... 


^605 76 




"* Balance to new account, 


111 


67 


$717 43 









HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



To Balance from last year. 


$210 21 


Appropriation, .... 


350 00 


Reserved Fund, 


50 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




By paid William Parsley, Supt., 


$120 50 


for work of teams, . 


92 75 


for laborers, .... 


334 74 


for shovel and pick handle, 


1 78 



Dr. 



$610 21 



Cr. 



252 

By paid for nails, . 
for repairing tools, . 

Amount, .... 
Balance to new account, 



•fO 36 


* 


1 10 




$551 23 




■ 58 98 






8610 21 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Dr. 



To Balance from last year, 


$85 47 




Appropriation, .... 


300 00 




Reserved Fund, 


50 00 


8435 47 
.Cr. 


EXPENDITURES. 




By paid A. W. Corning, Supt., 


$41 00 




for work of teams, . 


58 97 




for laborers, .... 


241 22 


-3 


Cloujili (fe Foster for lumber for 






bridge, .... 


82 72 




Concord Railroad, for freight on 






lumber, .... 


8 00 




Amount, ..... 


$431 91 




Balance to new account. 


3 56 


8435 47 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

Dr. 



To Balance from last year, 


. 8248 64 


Appropriation, . 


800 00 


Reserved Fund, 


150 00 




81,198 64 



253 



EXPENDITURES. 


By paid Samuel Brown, Supt., 




$107 50 


for work of teams, . 




221 75 


for laborers, 




563 20 


for tools, .... 




77 30 


blacksmith work. 




12 40 


oil, lanterns, wicking, etc.. 




7 52 


spikes, 




3 60 


brick, .... 




4 20 


A. C. Wallace for lumber. 




133 88 


G. H. Allen, for establishing 


lin€ 




of Main street, . 




56 50 


Amount, 


11,187 85 


Balance to new account. 




10 79 







Cr. 



.,198 64 



HIGHWAY DISTEICT NO. 11. 



Dr. 



To Balance from last year, 


121 19 




Appropriation, .... 


1,000 00 




Reserved Fund, . ... 


80 00 


11,101 19 






EXPENDITURES. 




Or. 


By paid D. L. Robinson, Supt., 


162 51 




Albert A. Partridge, Supt., 


131 00 




for work of teams, . 


185 45 




for labor, 


378 37 




for blacksmith work, 


2 41 




nails, 


26 09 




5 1-2 perch stone. 


22 00 




1 spade, 2 shovels, 1 bar, 1 pick, 






and 3 hoes, 


10 35 





254 



By paid for laying sidewalk, . . $38 03 

Daniel, Parmer for lumber, . 17 50 

A. C. Wallace for lumber, . 96 24 

David Wells for lumber, . . 131 15 



Amount, $1,101 10 

Balance to new account, . 09 



$1,101 19 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Dr. 



To Balance from last year, . 


$10 47 




Appropriation, .... 


400 00 


$410 47 






EXPENDITURES. 




Cr. 


By City Farm for labor of men. 


$298 00 




" " work of teams, . 


70 50 




Waterman Smith for breaking 






roads, .... 


24 00 




Amount, ..... 


$392 50 




Balance to new account, 


17 97 


$410 47 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 



To Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, . 
Reserved Fund, 



$22 


83 


250 


00 


25 


00 



Dr. 



$297 83 



255 



EXPENDITURES. 




Cr. 


By paid Eben Carr, Superintendent, 


$56 25 . 




for work of teams, 


67 25 




for labor, 


155 25 




for gravel, .... 


2 00 




for tools, 


9 80 




AmoTint, ..... 


290 55 




Balance to new account, 


7 28 


1297 83 


• 





NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Dr. 
To Balance from last year, . . $333 10 
Appropriation, .... 10,000 GO 

110,333 10 



Cr. 



EXPENDITURES. 




By paid Wm. T. Evans, Supt., 


157 00 


Samuel Brown, Jr., Supt., 


36 00 


for labor, 


2,696 52 


George H. Allen, engineer. 


380' 79 


Fogg and James, for teams for 




committee, .... 


12 00 


Luther Campbell, grading Beech 




street, .... 


497 75 


Warren Harvey, grading Beech 




street, .... 


215 00 


John P. Young, grading Milton 




street, .... 


175 00 


Taylor & Clark, for laying con- 




crete on south side of Concord 




street, .... 


235 50 



256 



By paid Hackett & Fisher, do., . 1208 50 

George Holbrook, for moving 
fence on south side of Con- 
cord street, 

for stone monuments, 

for work of city teams, 

for work of other teams, . 

for work of teamsters, 

A. W. Sanborn & Co., for repair- 
ing plow, .... 

A. Bodwell, for stone wall at 
south end of Elm street, 

J. M. Chandler, for powder, 
fuse, &G., .... 

R. W. Flanders, for blacksmith 
work, ..... 

H. S. Whitney, for drain pipe, . 

J. L. Smith & Co., for grade 
stakes, .... 

Frank Sanborn, for gravel. 



Amount, .... 
Balance to new account. 



40 


40 


3 


00 


253 50 


798 


50 


145 


00 


6 


00 


184 


00 


50 


35 


38 


30 


12 


75 


7 


37 


129 


55 


16,182 


78 


4,150 


32 




— $10,333 10 



GRANITE BRIDGE. 

Dr. 

To Balance from last year, . . $116 45 
Reserved Fund, ... 150 00 

$265 45 



257 

EXPENDITURES. 

By paid Albert J. Sawyer, for plank, $209 58 

Warren Harvey, for team work, 10 00 

for labor, ..... 88 35 

Amount, 257 93 

Balance to new account, . 8 52 



Cr. 



$266 45 



AMOSKEAG PALLS BRIDGE. 



To Balance from last year, 


$399 38 


Appropriation, 


200 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




By paid A. C. Wallace, for lumber, 


1121 25 


W. C. Rogers, for nails, . 


5 00 


Muz'zy Brothers, for oil. 


12 00 


T. L. Quimby, for lighting 4 gas 




lights, .... 


60 00 


for labor, 


7 00 


Amount, ..... 


205 25 


Balance to new account, 


394 13 







Dr. 



$599 38 



Cr. 



$599 38 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

To Balance from old account, . $331 50 
Appropriation, .... 10,000 00 



Dr. 



258 



To Reserved Fund, . . . |1,010 00 

Fees received for entering sewers 918 37 
Casli received for stones sold by 

Samuel Brown, Jr., . 113 00 







— 112,372 87 


EXPENDITURES. 








Cr. 


By paid David H. Young, for pipe 


$3,640 


71 


William McPherson, " 


434 


04 


Nasliua Drain Pipe Co., " 


' 283 


50 


H. S. Whitney, " 


276 


90 


Temple McQueston, " 


22 


50 


Concord R. R. freight on " 


, a 


97 


Drake & Carpenter, for cement 


17 


H. & H. R. Pettee, " 


338 


80 


City Hall, for brick, . 


23 


80 


E. L. Brown, for brick, 


44 


00 


D. B. Eastman, for brick, . 


282 


15 


N. & W. F. Head, for brick, . 


243 


60 


Concord R. R., freight on brick, 


20 


00 


David Wells, for plank, . 


58 


97 


Clough & Foster, for plank. 


2 


50 


A. J. Sawyer, for plank, . 


4 


21 


Geo. W. Thayer & Co., for rub- 






ber boots, . . . • 


9 


00 


Plumer & Chandler for oil-cloth 






suit, .... 


12 


50 


Plumer & Chandler, rubber coat 


4 


25 


H. Fradd & Co. for oil, &c., . 


11 


97 


Lewis Rice for damage to house 






by l)lasting, 


10 


00 


John B. Varick for tools, 


35 


56 


Barr & Clapp for tools, powdei 






and fuse, . 


107 


15 



259 



By paid R. W. Flanders, repairing 




tools, 


$31 90 


Putnam Jenkins, 


130 60 


A. P. Frje, .... 


17 15 


A. H. Lowell for castings, 


279 98 


Henry W. Clapp for castings, . 


39 00 


G. H. Allen, engineering, . 


159 00 


Geo. Holbrook for tool box and 




mortar bed. 


20 75 


N. B. Tilton for laying brick, . 


170 00 


Gilman Tucker 


64 75 


Benj. W. Robinson '' 


98 00 


Chas. H. Robinson '• 


10 00 


Hilas Dickey '' 


32 00 


City teams, . . 


36 00 


Other teams, . , . . 


245 63 


J. L. Smith, stakes and lumber. 


50 00 


for labor, ..... 


4,814 10 


Saml. Brown, jr., Supt., . 


150 00 


Wm. T. Evans, Supt., 


42 00 


Amount, .... 


$12,363 41 


Balance to new account, 


9 46 







:2,372 87 



RESERVOIRS. 

To Balance from last year, 

EXPENDITURES. 

By paid J. B. Varick for lock 
and bolts, .... 
Pike & Heald for work, 
H. & H. R. Pettee for cement, 



U 00 
6 50 
2 75 



Dr. 

L,761 45 

Cb. 



260 

By paid Geo. Holbrook, carpenter 
work, .... 

Henry Fisher, care of Reservoirs, 
B. W. Robinson, mason work, 
Henry French, carpenter work, 
for labor, ..... 
A. Bodwell, for stone work, 
work of city teams, . 

Amount, ..... 
Transferred to reserved fund, . 
Balance to new account. 



1174 26 


108 


33 


4 


00 


30 


24 


184 


50 


200 


00 


17 


00 


$729 


58 


1,000 


00 


31 


87 



COMMONS. 



To Balance from last year, . . $42 06 

Appropriation, .... 1,500 00 

Reserved Fund, . . . 2,000 00 

Receipts for grass, . . . 49 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



By paid Oliver Gay for edge stone 

for south side of Mk. sq., . $395 . 20 
G. H. Kimball for edge stone 

for south side of Mk. sq., . 5 00 

Geo. H. Allen for engineering, . 62 ) 

H. J. Poor for 2 casks nails, . 9 87 

Geo. H. Dorr, selling grass, . 2 00 

Hackett & Fisher for concreting 

walk, Mk. square, . . 309 00 
E. L. Brown for concreting walk, 

Mk. square, • . . 103 30 



.,761 45 



Dr. 



- $3,591 06 
Cr. 



261 



'■ paid B. L. Brown for concreting 

walk, Concord square, 
Geo. Holbrook, repairing fence, 
A. Dinsmore for plank, . . 
G. F. Moore, laying brick, 
W. Ireland for building fence, 

Concord square, . 
Job Team for moving tool chest, 
G. H. Kimball for building wall, 

Hanover square, 
A. H. Lowell for settees, . 
A. H. Daniels for hinges & bolts, 
John L. Kennedy for painting 

Mk. square fence, 
Clark & Garland, setting edge 

stone. Concord square, 
Kimball & Bunton, edge stones 

on Concord square, . 
John L. Kennedy for painting 

tree-boxes, 
for laborers on Hanover square, 



$119 63 


12 


75 


23 


79 


23 


50 


86 


74 


1 


75 


979 


00 


156 


00 


2 


74 


150 


27 


30 


30 


199 


55 


4 


00 


871 


47 



Amount, .... 


. $3,547 86 


Balance to new account, 


43 20 


VALLEY CEMETERY. 


To Appropriation, 


. $2,000 00 


Reserved Fund, 


300 00 


Receipts for tomb fees, 


37 25 


" " logs, 


637 91 


" " lots. 


276 30 


" " interest, . 


8 84 



,591 06 



Dr. 



5,269 30 



262 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid Gilraan H. Kimball, bal. for 

wall, .... -$1,602 50 

Gilmaii H. Kimball, excavating 
for -wall, .... 

A. H. Daniels & Co. for tools, . 

H. & H. R. Pettee for cement, . 

A. H. Lowell for castings, 

Geo. Holbrook, repairing fence, 

I. D. Palmer, repairing monu- 
ment, 

John B. Clarice for printing, 

T. McQueston for drain pipe, 

H. H. Philbrick for labor, 

Benj. Stevens " " . 

Wm. C. Chase " " . 

Plumer C. Webster for labor, 

William Howe " " 

David Allen " " 

Michael Hogan " " 

James Victory " " 

John Welch " " 

John O'Xeil " " 

Larry McCarty " " 

James Donovan " " 

Thomas Downs " " 

A. B. Chase " " 

Warren Harvey for team, 

John Campbell " "• 

Joseph Rich " " 

Amount, $2,970 49 

Balance to new account, . 289 81 



Cr. 



25 00 


8 


13 


' 2 


60 


33 


05 


82 


00 


10 


50 


12 


00 


22 


50 


12 


00 


433 


35 


316 


77 


22 


hr r 


77 


00 


17 


60 


9 


62 


10 


50 


14 


00 


5 


25 


10 


50 


45 


00 


19 87 


78 


00 


40 


00 


30 


00 


30 


00 



)5)3,2C0 30 



263 
PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



Dr, 



To Balance from last year, 


11,050 


22 


Reserved fund, 


350 


00 


Receipts, 


2,286 


88 

^?- 687 1 


EXPENDITURES. 




Cr. 


By paid Wm. C. Chase for labor, . 


$247 


28 


Granville Haselton '' " 


484 


00 


Kadmicl Haselton " " 


36 


00 


J. & J. A. Poor for water-riglit, 


150 


00 


Fogg & James for teams for com- 






mittee, .... 


18 


50 


Pike & Heald for pipe & strainer. 


5 


99 


J. L. Kennedy for painting, 


13 


20 


A. H. Lowell for iron fence. 


1,490 


50 


John B. Clai'ke for printing, 


7 


75 


Campbell & Hanscom for printing 


rr 
i 


00 


Jos. B. Sawyer for salary, plans, 






cash paid, etc., . 


219 


59 


Daniels & Co. for pump, tubing 






and ladder. 


18 


02 


Daniels & Co. for tools and oil 






cask, 


4 


30 


A. C. Wallace for lumber. 


21 


38 


J. Q. A. Sargent, 


22 


28 


Amount, ..... 


12,745 


79 


Balance to new account. 


941 


31 



264 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To Balance from last year, . . 1224 48 
Appropriation, .... 15,000 00 
Overdrafts, refunded, . . 10 06 



, EXPENDITURES. 

AMOSKEAG STEAMER COMPANY, NO. 1. 

By paid pay-roll of members, . $825 00 

Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster, . 60 00 

Wm. H. Straw, teamster, . . 21 00 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for wood 

and coal, .... 80 32 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. for wood 

and coal, .... 2 70 

C.N. Harvey, for wood and coal, 4 20 

Robert Heath, " " " " 27 00 

A. Merrill for carrying in coal, . 83 
Clough & Foster for wood, . 4 05 
M. Handly for sawing wood, . 15 95 

B. F. Fogg for repairing pipe, . 4 05 
Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 27 48 
D. S. Ames for whip and repair- 
ing harness, ... 4 95 

John B. Varickfor oil and turpen- 
tine, ..... 

A. W. Sanborn for repairs. 

Pike & Heald for repairs, . 

Daniels & Co. for pulley and 
hooks, .... 

Locke & Demick for matches, . 

Concord Railroad for freight, . 



Dr. 



.234 54 



Or. 



6 


31 




• 8 


25 




20 47 




1 


87 




2 


10 




1 


54 


$1,081 13 



265 

FIRE KING STEAMER, NO. 2. 



5 00 

60 00 

83 

4 05 

4 20 

27 00 

84 32 



By paid pay roll of members, 
A. Merrill, teamster, 

A. Merrill for putting in coal, 
Clougli & Foster for wood, 
C. N. Harvey " " 
Robert Heath " " 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for wood 

and coal, 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. for wood 

and coal, 
Ed. Bresnahan for sawing wood 
Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas 
Daniels & Co. for oil, spirits and 

rotten stone, 
Daniels & Co. for hose. 
Pike & Heald for repairing stove 

pump, etc., . 
E. Branch for harness and straps 
Locke & Demick for matches, 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co, for repair: 

and waste, . 
T. A. Lane for gas burners, 

B. C. Kendall for cash paid for 

express, 
John B. Varick for rubber hose 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAMER, NO. 3. 



5 


70 


8 


70 


69 


39 


4 


97 


7 


39 


32 


78 


161 


87 


1 


65 


80 


32 


1 


50 


1 


30 


6 


25 



By paid salary of members, bal. for 

1872,' . . . . 

salary of members for 1873, 

A. C. Wallace, for teaD"* to haul 

engine, .... 



825 00 
840 00 

75 00 



81,387 42 



266 

By paid A. C. Wallace for wood, . 
Manchester Gas-Light Co. for gas, 
for })lating trumpet, . 
Joseph Schofield for labor, 
John B. Varick for shovel, 
Isaac S. Coffin for repairs, 
Chas. O'Shauglmessj for repairs, 
Amoskeag Maimf'g Co., repairs, 
H. Fradd & Co. for supplies, 
D. J. Warren for team. 



$4 


50 


11 


88 


7 


75 


7 


50 


1 


50 


5 


25 


50 


00 


39 


55 


6 


60 


6 


60 



.,081 13 

N. S. BEAN STEAMER, NO. 4. 



By paid pay roll of members, 
pay roll of members, 1872, bal. 
A. Robie, teamster, . 
Mancliester Gas-Liglit Co. for gas, 
A. Merrill for carrying in coal, . 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for wood 

and coal, 
L. B. Bodwell, for wood, 
Robert Heath, " 
Clongh & Foster, " 

C. N. Harvey, " 
T. Bresnahan, for sawing wood, 
R. W. Flanders, for I'cp. chains, 
Pike & Heald, repairing stoves 

and pump, .... 
Locke & Demick, matches, etc., 
Amoskeag Manuf'g. Co. for re- 
pairs and waste, . 
John B. Varick for oil, spirits, etc., 
Edwin Branch, for whip, . 

D. S. Ames, for rcp'ng harness, 



$825 00 


200 


00 


60 


00 


47 


79 




84 


80 


33 


2 


70 


25 


20 


4 


05 


4 


20 


15 


20 


o 


00 


15 


45 


2 


95 


15 


30 


3 


00 


o 
O 


00 


6 


00 




— $1,314 01 



207 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, NO. 1. 



By paid pay roll of members, 

Manchester Gas-Light Co. for gas 

T. R. Hubbard, for wood, . 

Clough & Foster, for wood, 

R. Heath, for wood, . 

L. B. Bodvvell & Co., for wood, 

C. N. Harvey for wood, 

E. P. Johnson & Co. for wood 

Ed. Bresnahan for sawing wood 

Daniels & Co. for rope and hooks 

A. W. Sanborn & Co. for repairs 

on carriage, 
Wm. H. Raymond for team, 
S.S. James & Bro., " . 
J. W. Abbott for team, 
Geo. Holbrook for repairs, 
J. B. Varick, hose and pipe. 
Pike & Heald for oil, pipe and 

repairing stove, . 



. $1,600 


30 


51 


57 


2 


00 


4 


05 


27 


00 


2 


70 


4 


20 


5 


70 


7 


20 


13 


46 


94 


72 


1 


50 


3 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


16 


05 



3 71 



$1,840 66 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY, NO. 1. 



By paid pay-roll of members, 

Manchester Gas-Light Co. for gas, 
Amoskeag Manuf'g Co. for re- 
pairs, ..... 

A. W. Sanborn & Co. for repairs, 
Geo. Holbrook for repairs, 

B. F. Fogg for repairs of gas pipe. 
Pike & Heald for repairs of stoves 

and pump, .... 
S. Pubhee for repairing jacket, . 



$1,095 00 


IS 


90 


34 


00 


9 


00 


1 


75 


1 


SO 


11 


57 


1 


00 



268 



pn'd Taniels & Co. for rope & oil, 
for feather duster, 

B. C. Kendall, cash paid express, 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. for wood, 

C. N. Harvey for wood, 
Clongh & Foster for wood, 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for wood, 
K.. Heath for wood, . 
T. Bresnahan for sawing wood, 
S. S. James & Bro. for team, 

for pipe, 
T. A. Lane for gas burners, 
H. C. Merrill for soap, 
Locke & Demick for matches, 
James G. Knights, soap and labor, 



114 23 

3 00 
11 45 

2 70 

4 20 
4 
5 



05 

70 



27 00 

7 20 

49 50 

26 00 

3 03 

72 

55 

1 25 



,333 60 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



By paid Wm. T. Evans, for examin 

ing stoves, . 
John B. Clarke, for printing re 

ports, .... 
A. Ferren & Co. for oil cloth foi 

engineer's room, 
F. N. McLaren for pole straps, 
Daniels & Co. for oil, 
George P. Palmer for oil, . 
J. B. Varick for hardware, 
E. R. Coburn for paper,' 
T. A. Lane, gas burners, 
U. S. & C. Express, . 
for water rent, . 
A. H. Daniels for rope, 
S. S. James <fc Bro. for team, 



142 00 

50 25 

25 54 

3 50 

7 55 

17 50 

10 46 

5 00 

3 69 
55 

39 00 
12 24 

4 00 



269 

By paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. for fuel, $3 00 
J. Rowley for waste, . . 2 00 
for mattress, .... 5 00 
A. F. Perry for medicine, . . 7 93 
Charles A. Smith for bed-pan, . 1 75 
J. Q. A. Sargent for use of inva- 
lid bed, .... 15 00 
J. Q. A. Sargent for piping en- 
gine house, . . . 147 85 
J. Q. A. Sargent for piping en- 
gineers' room, . . . 8 80 
Win. Parlier,jr. for lamp and can, 1 37 
Charles Williams, jr. for light- 
ning arrester, ... 3 00 
A. L. Robertson for watching at 

fires, .... 1 25 

L. E. Pike, watching at fires, . 1 25 

Pike & Hcald for repairing pipe, 50 
New York Belting & Packing 

Co. for hose dressing, . 210 00 
Allen Fire Department Sup. Co. 

hose and couplings, . . 153 41 
William A. Torrey & Co. for hose 

and couplings, . . . 61 75 

Newell & Stickney for hose, . 2,309 50 

N. E. Linen Hose Co. for hose, 125 00 

J. Stickney for repairing hose, . 20 50 
F. N. McLaren for straps for 

hose at Goffe's Falls, . . 9 72 
H. A. Winship for 5 hats for en- 
gineers, . . . . 40 00 



B. C. Kendall, care of telegraph, 
B. C. Kendall for salary, . 
WilberforcQ Ireland for salary, . 







dL9 


,349 
301 


86 
00 


115 


00 








90 


00 









270 

By paid A. H. Lowell, for salary, , 
A. C. Wallace, 
Freeman Higgins, " 

Appropriation for teams trans- 
ferred, . . . . 

Amount, ..... 
Balance to new account, - 



165 
65 
65 


00 
00 
00 


$400 00 
1,600 00 








$13,725 75 
1,508 79 




$15,234 54 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account, 

Appropriation, .... 
Receipts for costs and fines, 
" old stove. 


$41 32 

10,000 00 

9,162 86 

17 56 


EXPENDITURES. 





Cb. 



By paid Samuel Upton, Police Jus- 
tice, salary, . . . $1,000 00 

Samuel Upton, rent 1 quarter, . 12 50 

E. M. Topliff, Special Justice, . 

Thomas Savage, " " 

H. E. Burnbam, " " 

Wm. B. Patten, City Marshal, 
salary, .... 

Wm. B. Patten for cash paid, . 

Oilman H. Kimball, City Mar- 
shal, salary, 

Oilman H. Kimball for travel- 
ing expenses, 



8 


00 


2 


00 


30 


00 


41 


60 


8 


47 


914 


50 


25 


00 



271 



By paid John D. Howard, asst. mar 

shal, salary, 
John D. Howard for team, 
Daniel R. Prescott, asst. mai 

shal, salary, 
Daniel R. Prescott for team, 
Daniel R. Prescott, burying nuis 

ances, 
Daniel R. Prescott, expense to 

Concord, . 
W. G. Everett for team, . 
S. S. James & Bro. for team, 
Fogg & James for team, . 
G. H. Kimball, cash pd. witness 

fees, &c., . 
for provisions for prisoners and 

travelers, . 

for burying nuisances, 

for bedding, 

G. B. Fogg for repairing locks, 

H. C. Merrill, pails, matches, &c., 

T. R, Hubbard for repairing 

furniture, . 
f 

S. E. Dinsmore for desk, . 
J. B. Jones for 7 prs. blankets, 
G. H. Kimball for badges, 
G. H. Kimball for blank books, 
P. C. Cheney & Co. for waste, 
Geo. E. Hersey for medical visit 
S. F. Murry for sulphur, . 
Thos. H. Tuson printing blanks 
Pike & Heald for rep. stove, 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. for fuel, 
"Schools" for fuel, . 
James Collins for fuel. 



133 92 


21 


50 


743 


20 


274 


50 



55 86 

3 50 

1 00 

16 00 

6 25 

43 58 



154 


90 


14 


50 


89 


50 


11 


00 


9 


00 


14 


00 


7 


00 


30 


37 


12 


15 


8 


75 


1 


54 


3 


00 




25 


4 


50 


18 


80 


248 


76 


117 


90 


2 


00 



272 



By paid H. C. Sanborn for fuel, 
William Stevens, putting in fuel, 
for washing, .... 
1). R. Prescott for soap, crash, &c., 
Daniels & Co., oil, .* 
A. M. Eastman, oil & matches, 
Doane & Greenough for court 
blanks, .... 
W. H. Fisk for court blanks, 
J. V. Sullivan for stationery, 
W. H. Fisk for stationery, 
Campbell & Hanscom for adver- 
tising, .... 
John B. Clarke for printing and 
advertising, 
' Moore & Peasley for printing, . 
Manchester Water-Works for 
water, .... 
Manchester Gas Light Co. for gas, 



19 


31 


18 


25 


86 


85 


3 


86 


8 


60 


4 


50 


11 


00 


21 


10 


10 


44 


2 


50 



43 49 

120 00 
14 75 

30 00 
496 00 



14,869 95 



NIGHT WATCHMEN. 



Thos. L. Quimby, captain, 
Patrick Doyle, . 
James Duffy, . 
John C. Colburn, 
H. H. Noyes, . 
Hiram Stearns, 
Edward Bonner, 
Samuel Boyce, . 
George L. Stearns, 
David Thayer, . 
James Bucklin, 
John F. Cassidy, 



1912 50 
317 25 
731 26 
776 25 
821 25 
821 25 
798 75 
699 75 
672 75 
160 89 
742 50 
748 25 



273 



Jotin W. Webster, . 


, . 1740 


25 


W. H. B. Newhall, . 


805 


50 


Lntlier A. Ward, 


455 


03 


B. F. Philbi-ick, 


190 


12 


Charles W. Berry, . 


112 


50 


Benj. Stevens, . 


153 


00- 


William Stevens, 


91 


27 


James G. Knights, . 


33 


76 


Horatio W. Longa, . 


23 


64 


William G. Westover, 


23 


58 


John Field, 


27 


00 


H. H. Fhilbrick, 


24 


76 


John D. Howard, 


13 


54 


E P. Cogswell, 


19 


14 


Henry Bennett, 


16 


88 


Edward W.ynian, 


11 


26 


Charles H. Fatten, . 


65 


25 


Thomas Lynch, 


12 


38 


David T. Burleigh, . 


r 

o 


50 


George W. Varnuni, . 


10 


13 


A. F. Hebard, . 


7 


88 


Samuel L. Mitchell, . 


9 


00 


T. F. Heath, . 


3 


38 


Benjamin W. Robinson, . 


3 


38 


Albert F. Quimby, . 


2 


25 


Henry B. Fairbanks, 


2 


25 


Ferdinand Pfefferkorn, 


1 


13 


Charles Canfield, 


4 


51 


E. F. Hebard, . 


1 


13 


Horatio Fradd, . 


7 


88 


Albert H. Merrill, . 


4 


50 


Russell 0. Burleigh, 


2 


25 


Charles W. Barker, . 


4 


50 


Page S. Griffin, 


2 


25 


B. J. Robinson, 


1 


13 


18 




— 111,095 16 



274 




DAY POLICE 




Horatio W, Longa, . 


i816 75 


John D. Howard, 


723 39 


Patrick Dojle, . 


400 50 


Henry Bennett, 


83 20 


Thomas L. Quimby, . 


68 28 


James Duffy, . 


124 91 


Edward Bonner, 


63 02 


H. H. Noyes, . 


55 14 


Benjamin F. Philbrick, 


101 25 


Charles F. Berry, 


92 38 


George W. Yarnum,. 


93 26 


John W. Webster, . 


47 27 


George L. Stearns, . 


45 01 


James Bucklin, 


41 65 


Hiram Stearns, 


33 76 


John F. Cassidy, 


38 52 


John C. Colbnrn, 


38 27 


William H. B. Newhall, . 


37 13 


Luther A. Ward, 


31 52 


H. H. Philbrick, 


23 63 


William G. Westover, 


15 76 


Samuel Boyce, . 


34 91 


Orrin D. Carpenter, . 


10 12 


David Thayer, . 


14 63 


Benjamin Stevens, . 


14 62 


C. C. Colby, . 


9 00 


Samuel L. Mitchell, . 


9 00 


Samuel Clark, . 


9 00 


Elbridge G. Woodman, 


9 00 


John Waters, . 


10 00 


James G. Knight, 


9 01 


Ephraim G. Hastings, 


7 88 


Augustus Merrill, 


6 62 


Thomas Howe, , 


5 63 



;i^ 



Henry Hammond, 
James E. Cloiigli, 
John E. Floyd, . 
Ferdinand Pfeiferkor 
John Field, 
Oeorge C. Batclieidei 
J, P. Burroughs, 
Edward Liuehan, 
Charles H. Reed, 
G. H. Dickerman, 
Horatio Fradd, . 
John Patterson, 
N. B. Abbott, . 
Groves Brown, . 
E. P. Cogswell, 
H. C. Sullivan, 
John Roby, 
Russell 0. Burleigh, 
Edward Wyman, 
Charles H. Patten, 
Henry B. Fairbanks. 
John D. Edgerly, 
E. F. Hebard, . 
Franklin Goss, . 
Albert H. Merrill, 
Albert Story, 
James M. Jewell, 
J. F. Sargent, . 
B. J. Robinson, 
Charles C. Frost, 
George C. Cox, 



Amount, . 

Balance to new account, 



l-i 50 


4 


50 


i 


50 


4 


50 


6 


75 




38 




38 


3 


38 


3 


37 


i) 


25 


2 


26 


2 


25 


2 


25 


2 


25 


2 


25 


2 


25 


2 


26 


2 


25 


2 


25 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 


1 


13 



3,199 52 

$19,164 63 
57 11 



,221 74 



276 



S ALARIES OF OFFICERS. 



De. 



To B ilaiicG fi'oiii last year, 


$65 69 




Appropriation, .... 


10,000 00 






i 


P10,065 69 


EXPENDITURES. 




Cr. 


By paid Chas. H. Bartlett, Mayor, 


1137 00 




John P. Newell, 


887- 26 




Joseph E. Bennett, city clerk, . 


1,000 00 




Henry R. Chamberlin, treas., . 


1,000 00 




Wm. G. Everett, collector, 


1,000 00 




Wm. Stevens, messenger, 


600 00 




John H. Andrews, solicitor, 


100 00 




Sylvanus B. Putnam, clerk of 






council, .... 


100 00 


'.«! ROzL 9ft 



ASSESSING TAXES. 



Moses 0. Pearson, clerk, 
Horace P. Simpson, . 
Nicholas Nichols, 
George W. Pinkerton, 
Thomas Howe, . 
Isaac D. Palmer, 
Isaac Whittemore, . 
• H. Fradd, 
Daniel Farmer, 
Joseph H. Haynes, . 



$201 


00 


201 


00 


201 


00 


216 


00 


120 


00 


137 


50 


170 


50 


120 


00 


150 


00 


201 


00 



,718 00 



ABATING TAXES. 



Moses 0. Pearson, 
Horace P. Simpson, 



■160 00 
48 00 



277 



Nicholas Nichols, 


$36 00 


George ^^. Pinkerton, 


120 00 


Thomas Howe, 


36 00 


Isaac D. Palmer, 


86 00 


Horatio Fradd, . 


36 00 


Daniel Farmer, 


36 00 



$408 00 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK LISTS, 



Moses 0. Pearson, 




$30 00 




Horace P. Simpson, 




30 00 




Nicholas Nichols, 




30 00 




Geo. W. Pinkerton, 




30 00 




Thomas Howe, 




30 00 




Isaac D. Palmer, 




30 00 




Horatio Fradd, 




30 00 




Daniel Farmer, 




30 00 




Isaac Whittemore, 




30 00 










$270 00 
$50 00 


Oscar D. Abbott, city 


physician. 





BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Oscar D. Abbott, 


. 


. 


$25 00 


G. H. Kimball, 


, 


. 


25 


00 


D. R. Prescott, 


• 


• 


25 


00 




SCHOOL 


BOARD 






Joseph G. Edgerly, supt. 


pub. 






instruction, 


. 




$1,800 00 


Henry E. Burnham, 


. 


10 


00 


Marshall P. Hall, 


clerk, . 


• 


35 


00 



5 00 



278 



Daniel Clark, . 
Nathan P. Hunt, 
Frank J. Murray, 
Frank G. Clark, 
Edwin Kennedy, 
George P. Rockwell. 
George H. Colby, 
John P. Newell, 
Charles A. Smith, 



-flO 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


.' . 3 


25 


6 


75 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


. . 10 


00 



$1,925 00 



OVERSEERS OP POOR. 



Samuel S. Moulton, . 


825 00 


Say ward J. Young, . 


25 00 


Jeremiah Stickney, . 


25 00 


Moses E. George, clerk, . 


75 00 


John Horan, 


12 50 


Patrick A. Devine, . 


12 50 


Jeremiah Abbott, 


25 00 


Allen N. Clapp, 


25 00 


Geo. S. Chandler, 


25 00 



8250 00 



WARD OFFICERS. 



MODERATORS. 


Charles Canfield, . > 


83 00 


John D. Powell, 


3 00 


John P. Newell, 


3 00 


Moulton Kiiowles, 


3 00 


Daniel F. Healy, 


3 00 


Geo. H. Dudley, 


3 00 


C. C. Favor, . 


3 00 


Hiram Stearns, 


3 00 



Charles H. Osgood, 
Herman F. Straw, 
Henry S. Clark, 
Samuel S. Piper, 
Edward Egan, . 
John J. Hayes, 
Daniel R. Prescott, 
George F. Perry, 
Charles M. Stevens, 



279 

CLERKS. 





15 00 




5 00 




5 00 




5 .00 




2 50 




2 50 




5 00 




5 00 




5 00 


SELECTMEN. 





140 00 



Horace C. Page, 
F. W. McKinley, 
Willis P. Fogg, 
Edwin H. Hobhs, 
John N. Marshall, 
John H. Ratio, . 
James SutcliiTe, 
Charles A. Pierce, 
Henry F. Morse, 
Augustus Wagner, 
Jasper P. George, 
Gustavus M. Sanborn 
George Fox, 
Daniel Connor, 
William Howe, 
Groves Brown, 
Henry A. Gage, 
John B. Huse, . 
John T. Dyson, 
Guy B. Dunham, 



5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


o 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



280 



Melzer E. Beard, 
Madison Gerry, 
George H. Colby, 
Thomas P. Frost, 



Amount, . 

Balance to new account 



. 


15 00 
5 00 
5 00 

5 00 

SI'^O 00 






3ount, 


$9,704 26 
361 43 




$10,065 69 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



To Balance from last year, 


. 


• $16 83 


Appropriation, . 


. 


4,500 00 


Reserved fund. 




60 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




By paid Manchester Gas Light Co. 




for gas, , . . 




$2,660 00 


Manchester Gas Light Co. 


for 




lighting, . 




1,255 48 


Manchester Gas Light Co. 


for 




repairs. 




144 70 


Pike & Heald for repairs, . 


. 


143 89 


W. F. Sleeper & Co. for oil, 


. 


8 60 


Sawyer Bros. & Co. " " 


. 


7 00 


Ban- & Clapp " " 


. 


24 62 


Chas. A. Smith for chimneys. 




wicking, etc., 




18 59 


H. H. Noyes for lighting lamps 




at 'Squog, . 


•. 


20 75 



Dr. 



$4,576 83 



Cr. 



281 



H. C. Dickey for lighting lamps 

at Bakersville, 
A. H. Lowell for lamp posts, 

Amount, ..... 
Balance to new account. 



$20 


00 


266 


00 


^4,669 


63 


7 


20 



14,576 83 



MILITIA. 



To Appropriation, 



Dii. 

.$6o0 00 



EXPENDITURES. 




paid Amoskeag Veterans, 


riOO 00 


Clark Guards, . . . 


100 00 


Sheridan Guards, 


100 00 


Manchester Veterans, 


100 00 


1st N. H. Battery, sect. "B." . 


100 00 


Straw Rifles, . 


8 33 


Head Guards, .... 


100 00 


Amount, ..... 


i608 33 


Balance to new account. 


41 67 







Cr. 



■fOoO 00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



To Balance from last year. 
Appropriation, . 
Reserved fund. 



$62 


00 


2,000 


00 


400 


00 



Dr. 



12,452 00 



282 



EXPENDITURES. Cb. 

By paid for Ijooks and stationery for City Clerk's office : 
George C. Hoitt, 



Wm. H. Fisk, . 
F. B. Eaton, . 
John A. S. Jacobs, . 
J. V. Sullivan, , 
Doane & Greenough, 
Thos. H. Tuson, 
E. Whiting, 
Manchester Post Office 



75 
11 53 
14 37 

2 50 

3 74 

4 75 
10 00 

2 75 
17 22 

COLLECTOR AND TREASURER'S OFFICE. 



Doane & Greenough, 
William H. Fisk, 
John A. S. Jacobs, . 
Manchester Post Office, 
William G. Everett, 
Campbell & Hanscom, for print 

ing and advertising, . 
Moore & Peasley, for printing, 
C. F. Livingston, for printing, 
John B. Clarke, for printing and 

advertising, 
Wm. H. Fisk, blank books for 

assessors, . 
George H. Allen, for paper, 
Dan. R. Prescott, for stationery 
S. Slade Piper, 
Republican Press Association 

for advertising, . 
Julius Mayer & Co., charts of 

Water-Works, . 

Amount, .... 
Balance to new account. 



8105 95 

24 07 

2 30 

86 00 

4 00 

179 79 

29 00 

105 35 

1,345 95 

67 68 

28 27 

24 

43 

12 00 

284 00 

2,430 64 
21 36 



-§2,452 00 



283 
INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

To Balance fi'om last year, . . 8279 88 
Appropriation, .... 14,000 00 
Reserved Fund, . . . 7,000 00 



Dr. 



- $21,279 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid C. S. Fisher, for removing 

and burying bodies, . . $19 00 

P. A. Devine, burying bodies 

from pest-house, . . . 33 00 

A. W. Sanborn & Co., for repair- 
ing hearse, . . . . 33 00 

J. B. McCrillis, for repairing and 

storing hearse, . . . 10 25 

Josiah Harvey, for loam for set- 
ting trees, .... 2 50 

H. B. Sloan, for costs in suits, . 25 00 

Jason Weston, damage to garden 10 00 

Hillsborough County for costs on 

execution, . . . . 12 43 

John H. Andrews, for dockets, 

fees and telegrams, . . 50 25 

A. D Shcrer, for services at pest- 
house, . . . . 381 50 

R. J. P. Goodwin, for medical 

attendance at pest-house, . 2i 00 

0. D. Abbott, for medical attend- 
ance in small-pox cases, . 12 00 

W. W. Wilkins, for medical at- 
tendance in small-pox cases, 3 00 

C. Chenette, for runners to pest- 
house carriage, . . . 40 00 



Cr. 



284 

G. H. Kimball, for disinfectants 

for pest-house, . . . $8 40 

Z. F. Campbell, for disinfectants 

for pest-house, . . . 13 93 

Pike & Heald, for repairing stove 

at pest-house, ... 2 85 

Piper & Hawley, for cloth for pest- 
house, . . . . 3 87 

Holton & Sprague, for cloth for 
pest-house, .... 

D. Libby, washer, for pest-house 
A. H. Daniels & Co., for wringer 

for pest-house, 
0. D. Abbott, for vaccination, . 
0. D. Abbott & A. L. Tremblay, 

for vaccination, . 
John Ferguson, for vaccination, 
M. Richards, for vaccination, 
M. Ricliards, care of small-pox 

patients, .... 33 00 

J. Q. A. Sargent, for repairing 

watering troughs, . . 35 00 

George H. Dudley, for shade tree 

destroyed , .... 3 50 

James Mitchell, for injury to 

house lot, .... 40 00 

E. S. Harvey, for injury to per- 
son by fall of bridge, . . 1,100 00 

Mark E. Harvey, for injury to 

person by fall of bridge, . 1,000 00 

Camille Duquette, for injury to 

person by fall of bridge, . 7,000 00 

Wm. F. Lahey, for injury toper- 
son by defect in highway, . 50 17 

David Alien, for injury to person 

by defect in street, . . 50 00 



2 


10 


6 


25 


10 


00 


303 


50 


88 


00 


82 


00 


192 


00 



285 

Delia Sippet, for injury to person 
' by defect in street, 
Patrick Harrington, for injury to 

person by defect in street, . 
Mary Cash, for injury to person 

by defect in street, 
Patrick Warren, for injury to 

person by defect in street, . 
John R. Hanson, for damage to 

wagon by defect in street, . 
Damon Y. Stearns, for damage 

to wagon by defect in street, 
Hugh Conroy, for defense of suit 
John Hosley, for cash paid con- 
testing election, 1865, 
D. R. Prescott, summoning wit- 
nesses, .... 
Obadiah Jackson, for earth taken 

from lot, .... 
L. D. Colby, for damage to sheep 

by dogs, .... 
Melendy & Carpenter, for burial 

of body of E. A. Pease, 
Clark & Huse, for services as 

counsel, . . . . 
Briggs & Huse, for services as 

counsel, .... 
Cross & Burnham, for services as 

counsel, .... 
Isaac W. Smith, for services as 

counsel, .... 
Cheney & Whittemore, for boxes 
Stearns & Allen, for numbering 

streets, .... 
G. H. Allen, for numbering sts., 



1500 


00 


120 


17 


175 


00 


50 


00 


4 


50 


21 


84 


26 


00 


50 


00 


10 


22 


30 


00 


10 


00 


17 


00 


92 


00 


20 


00 


40 


00 


. 156 


45 


1 


20 


17 


50 


39 


75 



286 

G. H. Allen, for team, 

Stearns & Allen, for establishing 

grades for sidewalks, . 
Joseph E. Bennett, for making 

annual report, 
Joseph E. Bennett, cash paid for 

express, .... 
Hill & Co., for express, 
James F. Putnam, for bounty 

subscription refunded, 
James B. Clough, for cleaning 

vaults, .... 

Manchester Gas Light Co., for 

gas for ward room, 
Edwin Kennedy, for team to post 

warrants, .... 

C. B. Clarkson, for team to post 

warrants, .... 

D. R. Prescott, for team to notify 

jurors, .... 

H R. Chamberlin, for telegrams, 
H. R. Chamberlin, note reporter, 
H. R. Chamberlin, expense to 

Boston, .... 
Manchester Water-Works, for 

water near Woodbury's, 
Wm. Parker, jr., for dippers and 

chains, .... 

E. Cutting, for stone work on roll 

way, city hall, 
L. A. Proctor, for shade trees, . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber for coal 

shed, ..... 
George Holbrook, building coal 

shed, 



fio 


00 


17 


50 


125 


00 


3 43 


rr 

i 


75 


5 


94 


34 


00 


1 


08 


1 


50 


1 


50 


6 


00 


2 


06 


1 


50 


3 


80 


6 


75 


5 


55 


6 


00 


29 


25 


36 


42 


199 


72 



287 

R. M. Yale, for union flag, . $80 25 

George Holbrook, making tree 

boxes, . . . . 8() 10 

H. C. Sullivan, repairing soutli 
scales, .... 

Wm. Stevens, repairing flag, . 

John D. Linus, gratuity, . 

Bill Posting Co., posting health 
notices, .... 

M. Y. B. Kinne, for work on 
trough, .... 

E. P. Richardson, for copy of 
amendment to charter, 

J. E. Bennett, for team for com- 
mittees, .... 

J. P. Newell, for team, 

S. S. James & Bro., for team, . 

R. A. Lawrence, for team, 

Wm. G. Everett, paid Dep. Sec. 
State for copying Non. Res. 
Tax list, .... 

Wm. G. Everett, paid G. W. 
Pinkerton for making bills, 

Wm. G. Everett, paid Jos. H. 
Haynes for making bills, 

Wm. G. Everett, paid express, . 

W. W. Brown, for returns of 
births and deaths, 

W. W. Brown, for medical con- 
sultation, .... 

0. D. Abbott, for medical con- 
sultation, .... 

George A. Crosby, for medical 
consultation, 



12 


9() 


1 


50 


350 00 


4 


20 


rr 

i 


39 


2 


00 


2 


25 


64 


35 


1 


00 


5 


00 


7 


00 


18 


00 


18 


00 




40 


12 


25 


5 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 



Western Telegraph Co., for re- 
porting time, 

Western Telegraph Co., for 
messages, .... 

G. H. Allen, running lines of 
Massabesic street, 

J. L. Kennedy, marking tape, . 

Charles Williams, stove for No. 3 
ward room, .... 

Fogg & James, teams for com- 
mittees, .... 

Lamson & Harden, for monu- 
ments, .... 

Fred Swett, for right of way, 

J. H. Bufford & Sons, for maps 
of south end, 

John Lee, for damage to land, . 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 

ward room, ... 4 75 

Barr & Clapp, for glass for Bow- 
man house, broken by blast- 
ing, .... 

D. H. Young, whitewashing tree 
boxes, 

A. J. Lane, piping for watering 
trough, 

Amount, . 

Reserved Fund, . 



Balance to new account. 



$12 


50 


2 


67 


4 


50 




75 


13 


45 


44 


75 


3 


00 


10 


00 


100 


00 


15 


00 



2 


35 


e 

12 


00 


15 


22 


. 13,601 


47 


. 1,910 


00 


15,811 


47 


. 5,468 


41 




121,279 



289 







CITY HALL. 




To Balance from last year, . 


$947 06 


Appropri 


ation, .... 


5,000 00 


Receipts 


for store rent, 


2,026 00 


a 


a 


Hall " 


333 00 


u 


a 


overdraft, 


287 00 


li 


a 


old iron & copper. 


60 35 


a 


a 


brick, . 


51 50 


n 


a 


old windows, 


4 50 






EXPENDITURES. 





EEPAIRS AND ALTERATIONS. 

By paid Daniels & Co. for hardware, $212 75 
A. H. Lowell for window weights, 6 04 

Pike & Heald for pipe and re- 
pairing stoves, . . . 100 29 
Augustus G. Stevens, archi- 
tect (bal.), 
N. & W. F. Head for brick, . 
A. C. Wallace for lumber, 
J. J. Bennett for brick masonry, 
E. G. Haynes for plastering, 
C. C. Fisk for whitewashing, 
H. & H. R. Fettee for lime and 
cement, .... 
Charles Bunion for iron work, . 
Marshall Bros, for building par- 
tition, .... 
Concord R. R., freight on bricks, 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., castings, 
Geo. F. Worthley for teaming, . 



50 


00 


1,058 


00 


47 


94 


383 


88 


138 


77 


49 


75 


71 


10 


13 


63 


8 


85 


17 


50 


67 


27 


30 


00 



Dr. 



,709 41 



Cr. 



290 



E. Cutting for stone woA, 
E. Young for stone work, . 
J. Q. A. Sargent for piping and 

gas fixtures, 
Walter Neal for carpenter work 
D. H. Young for soil pipe, 
Morss & Whyte for wire netting 
Colley & Kelly for painting, 
Fairbanks & Folsom, furnaces, 
Barton & Co. for carpeting, 
A. G. Fairbanks for chairs, 
J. V. Sullivan for painting signs 



72 


25 


8 


00 


756 


18 


:, 1,207 


60 


267 


64 


?, 44 


00 


870 36 


310 


73 


148 


16 


82 


50 


3, 15 


00 



;,048 14 



REPAIRING BELL TOWER. 



A. C. Wallace for lumber, . 
Walter Neal for carpenter work, 

B. W. Robinson for brick work, 
J. C. Young for roofing, . 

Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. for fuel, . 
Schools for fuel, 
Israel M. Young for fuel, . 
S. P. Murry for disinfectant, 

C. B. (;ollcy for painting, . 
John L. Kennedy, setting glass, 
for washing, .... 
Straw &. Lovejoy, repairing clocks, 
G. B. Fogg for repairing locks, 
John Q. A. Sargent for hose and 

repairing pipe, . 
Straw & Lovejoy for 5 clocks, . 
L. A. Proctor for cleaning vault. 



159 92 


357 


22 


55 


71 


70 84 


246 


47 


375 


48 


78 


60 


6 


50 


3 


25 


47 


74 


80 


55 


39 


40 


28 


86 


18 


70 


12 


00 


-117 


00 


8 


00 



$543 29 



291 



Pike & Ilcald for stoves, brooms 

and repairs, 
Pike & Heald, repairing water 

pipe, 
J. Tuck & Co. for cleaning and 

laying carpets, . 
T. R. Hubbard for laying carpet 
H. C. Merrill for matches, 
Daniels & Co. for duster, hard 

ware, &c., 
Chas. A. Smith for dusters and 

water cooler, 
Fairbanks & Folsom for repairing 

stoves and furnaces, . 

A. 0. Parker for furniture, 
Chas. A. Smith for spittoons, 
J. Stickney for enamel cloth, 
Thomas A. Lane for repairing 

clock hammer, . 

D. M. Goodwin for tin cases, 

J. L. Smith, lumber for book case 
Geo. H. Dudley for making same 
J. M. Chandler & Co., for pail 

waste, &c., 
J. L. Kennedy, painting School 

Committee's Room, . 
Geo. Holbrook, making coal bin 

E. R. Sargent for table, 

J. Twombly for repairing walk. 
Stark Mills, cloth for awning, 
J. V. Sullivan, making awning, 

B. P. Fogg for gas fixtures, 
for repairing soil pipe, 
Manchester Water-Works, water 

rent, .... 



90 


67 


39 


91 


10 


25 


3 


48 




66 



9 93 



26 26 



9 


83 


74 


25 


14 


19 


2 


12 


8 


65 


10 


00 


5 


36 


17 


50 



2 97 



16 


14 


11 


50 


18 


00 


7 


00 


13 


80 


5 


00 


6 


03 


17 


19 



60 00 



292 



H. R. Chamberlin for cash paid, 
George Holbropk, carpenter work, 
•J. S. Holt for soap, . 



4 03 
29 68 
11 49 



,529 55 



Amount, . . . . 
Balance to new account. 



,115 98 
593 45 



,709 41 



CITY I/IBRARr. 



To Balance from last year. 
Appropriation, 



$95 83 
3,750 00 



Dr. 



5,845 83 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid annual . appropriation for 

books, .... 11,000 00 
C. H. Marshall, Librarian salary, 800 00 
Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, 198 18 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for fuel, . 265 76 
Schools for coal, ... 343 87 
Foster & Clough for insurance, . 32 50 
Geo. W. Merriam for iron-work, 3 87 
Manchester Water-Works for wa- 
ter rent, .... 11 07 
Wm. H. Fisk for binding books, 224 59 
Henry French for making steps, 7 45 
John B. Clarke for printing, . 72 68 

C. F. Livingston for printing, , 31 75 

D. Allen for cutting grass, . 1 75 



Cr. 



293 



R. Gilchrist for spittoons, 
Campbell & Hanscom for printing, 

Amount, ..... 
Balance to new account. 



4 00 

26 00 



1,023 47 
822 36 



5,845 83 



PAVING STREETS. 

To Balance from last year, . . 110 00 

Appropriation, .... 8,000 00 
Rec'd of J. Q. A. Sargent for 

work, 12 00 



"Dr. 



EXPENDITURES. 




By paid W. T. Evans, Supt., . 


72 00 


Samuel Brown, jr., Supt., 


6 00 


John Eaton for paving blocks, . 


331 47 


Oliver Gay for paving blocks, . 


22 50 


Daniel W. Garland for paving 




blocks, .... 


429 00 


P. E. Blanchard for paving blocks, 


167 60 


Kimball & Bunton for paving 




blocks, .... 


3,088 86 


G. H. Kimball for flagging. 


54 40 


Hackett & Fisher, cobble stone, 


13 87 


Waterman Smith, " " 


25 00 


E. L. Brown, " " 


16 25 


Geo. F. Worthley, " 


52 50 


Theophile Sargent, " " 


14 63 


Thomas Wilson, " " 


5 00 


John H. Proctor, " " 


34 50 



;,022 00 



Cr. 



294 



City teams, .... 


172 50 


Other teams, .... 


537 00 


Teamsters, ..... 


115 00 


Laborers, 


2,249 80 


K. W. Flanders, repairing tools, 


14 85 


Geo. H. Allen, engineering. 


134 00 


Westover & Gate, straight edge, 


5 25 


J. L. Smith, stakes, . 


22 00 


A. C. Wallace, stakes. 


6 45 


Tools, 


34 40 


Amount, 


$7,6i4 83 


Balance to new account, 


407 17 







WATERING STREETS. 



To Balance from last year. 


$6 80 


Appropriation, . . . * . 


800 00 


Reserved fund, 


20 00 


EXPENDITURES. 




By paid John Campbell for team 




and teamster. 


$207 50 


Samuel Brown, jr., for team and 




teamster, .... 


471 25 


for repairing cart, 


88 08 


freight on sprinkler from Concord, 


2 70 


Amoskeag Co. No. 1, for filling 




sprinkler, .... 


27 20 



,022 00 



Dr. 



26 80 



Cr. 



295 

Fire King Co. No. 2, for filling 

sprinkler, .... 22 00 

N. S. Bean Co. No. 4, for filling 

sprinkler, .... 8 00 



Amount, 1826 73 

Balance to new account, . 07 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

To Balance from old account, . 8171 90 

Appropriation, .... 5,000 00 
Reserved fund, ... 821 43 



EXPENDITURES. 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

To Balance from last year, . . $896 00 
Reserved fund, ... 670 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



$826 80 



Dr. 



;,993 33 



Or. 



By paid sundry persons for discounts 
on taxes for 1873, paid prior 
to Aug., 1873, . , . $5,993 33 



Dr. 



$1,566 00 



Cr. 



By paid Oilman H. Kimball for wa- 
tering trough, 1865, . . 3 00 
Oilman H. Kimball for watering 

trough, 1866, ... 3 00 



296 



1867. 
Gilman H. Kimball for watering 

trough, 
Hall <fe Kimball, overtax, . 
John H. Clark, paid in Canada 
Chas. Yerrington, minor, . 
E. W. Farley, wrong, 
Joseph Clement, taxed twice, 
B. W. Bartlett, poor, 
Bernard Williams, poor, . 
Joshua K. Hastings, poor, 
William H. Perkins, poor. 



1870. 
Bernard Williams, poor, 
Baxter P. Goodale, " 



3 00 
6 84 



91 
91 
04 
91 
91 
91 
91 
61 



1868. 




John Calef, for watering trough, 


3 00 


Gilman Kimball, " " . 


3 00 


Bernard Williams, poor, . 


3 15 


Joshua K. Hastings, " 


3 15 


Wm. H. Perkins, " 


4 24 


James King, " 


22 90 


1869. 




Gilman H. Kimball, for water- 




ing trough, .... 


3 00 


John Calef, for watering trough, 


3 00 


Bernard Williams, poor, . 


3 72 


Joshua K. Hastings, " 


3 72 


John H. Clark, paid in Canada, 


3 72 


Thomas Frain, minor. 


3 72 


Andrew Hunter, taxed twice, 


3 72 


George W. Wells, taxed wrong. 


14 14 



3 27 
3 27 



146 65 



44 



74 



297 



Joshua K. Hastings, " . . 3 2T 

Samuel P. Greeley, " . . 3 27 

Gilman H. Kimball, for watering 

trough, .... 3 00 

John Calef, for watering trough, 3 00 

Orrin W. Batchelder, not here, . 3 27 

George Smith, left city, . . 3 27 

Newell Brown, " " . . 3 27 

Gorham Eaton, paid in Sanborn- 

ton, 3 27 

Albinus P. Philbrick, paid in 

Lowell, .... 3 27 

John Drown, paid in Bow, . 3 27 

Henry H. Whitcomb, paid in 

Warner, .... 3 27 

Prank W. McKinley, paid in 

Auburn, .... 3 27 

Benjamin S. Stewart, paid in 

Auburn, 
William Dolber, paid in Candia, 
Edward Ray, overtaxed, . 
John S. Elliott, " 
J. W. D. Knowlton, dead, . 
George W. Nichols, wrong, 
James Dunn, minor, 
William H. Wyman, minor, 
Charles Norton, " 

Michael Talty, over 70, 
John Murphy, one arm, . 



1871. 
Bernard Williams, 
Samuel A. Cheney, 
Baxter P. Goodale, 
Patrick McKeon, 
David Hutchins, 



poor, 



. 


3 27 


» 


3 27 




7 67 




14 17 




4 27 




38 15 




3 27 




3 27 




3 27 




3 27 




3 27 




5 12 




3 12 




3 12 




3 12 




3 12 



1132 39 



298 



David P. Haselton, poor, . 
Samuel P. Greeley, " 
Benjamin H. Chase, overtaxed 
H. H. Fuller, . " 

Ellen P. Pearson, " 

Ebenezer Sargent, over 70, 
Michael Talty, " " 

Owen Sullivan, " " 
Narcisse Gamarclie, minor, 
Miles Poster, . " 

William B. Hulme, " 
Duncan McNicol, . " 
Joseph Stone, . " 
Charles Norton, . " 
Peter McLaughlin, " 
William H. Thayer, " 
William H. Wyman, " 
Daniel B. Martin, " 

Frank P. Fifield, . " 
Gorham Eaton, paid in Sanborn 

ton, .... 
Frank W. McKinley, paid in 

Auburn, 
James W. Burrows, paid in Call 

fornia, 
, Daniel Drown, paid in Canada 
John Drown, paid in Bow, 
Henry H. Whitcomb, paid in 

Warner, 
George I. Gove, paid in Weare 
Edwin Clay, paid in Canada, 
Joseph Clough, paid in Bow, 
Frank Kendall, paid in Litchfiold, 
Thomas F. Ridge, paid in Ports- 
mouth, . . . . 
Jas. 0. Ward, paid in Campton, 



3 12 

3 12 

17 76 

10 40 



64 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 



3 12 

3 12 

3 12 
3 12 
3 12 

3 12 
3 12 
3 12 
3 12 
3 12 

3 12 
3 12 



299 



Benj. S. Stewart, paid in Auburn 
Geo. W. Platts, paid in Loudon 

derry, 
Edward Currier, paid in Henni- 

ker, .... 
Ransom Tasker, paid in Strafford 
A. H. Sanborn, paid in Auburn 
William Dolber, paid in Candia 
Geo. D. Colby, paid in Concord 
T. D. M. Hunt, paid in Ames 

bury, .... 
Charles Newton, not here, 
George ^mith, " " . 
Thomas Cagan, " " . 
David H. Burbank, " " . 
Joseph A. Merrill, dead, . 
W. N. Haradon, " 
L. & B. Hanover-street, occupied 

by Mrs. Morrill, poor, . 
Patrick McGinness, lost by fire 
Francis Gilbert, lost an arm, 
John Murphy, " " 

Charles 0. Kay, taxed twice, 
Samuel H. Runnels, . 
Gilman H. Kimball for watering 

trough, 
John Young, for watering trough 
John Calef, " " 

Jas. A. Stearns, " " 

Elbridge Gerry, no dog, . 
H. H. Fuller, " 

Edward W. Upton, " 
Henry H. Marshall, " 
Thomas J. Morrison, no dog, 
Benjamin F. Norton, " 



3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


, 3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


12 


48 


, 6 


68 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


3 


12 


^ 3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 



— 1225 08 



300 



1872. 
A. W. Sanborn,, no dog, . 
Andrew J. Butterfield, no dog, 
Daniel L. Stevens, " 

Orrin W. Batchelder, " 
H. H. Ladd, " 

Thomas Conner, " 

John Murphy, " 

N. S. Clark, " 

Jonas Everett, " 

Walter Severance, taxed twice. 
William H. Morrill, " 

Samuel B. Nichols, " 

Daniel W. Garland, " 
James S. Brown, " 

Alfred Hall, " 

Charles J. Darrah, " 

Frank R, Sanborn, " 

John B. Smith, " 

Lot cor. Prospect & Pine streets 

taxed wrong. 
Lot corner Prospect & Beech 

streets, taxed wrong, . 
Charles Theilcher, taxed wrong. 
Estate of Nancy B. French, 

taxed wrong, 
Wilson Day, taxed wrong, 
William C. Clarke, " 
Alpheus Gay, " 

Land next west of land of 

Phinehas Adams, taxed 

wrong, .... 
Andrew J. Dow, taxed wrong, . 
Richard W. Nelson, wrong name, 
Fred. L. Nelson, " 



1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


24 


1 


00 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 



13 44 



11 


20 


2 


24 


11 


20 




85 


11 


20 


22 


40 


4 48 


2 


24 


2 


24 


2 


24 



301 



H. N. Pinard, " 


2 24 


Saml. F. Knowles, disabled 




soldier, 


2 24 


Daniel M. Perkins, " 


2 24 


Joseph B. Clark, " 


2 24 


Edward Gerali, minor, 


2 24 


Thomas Solon, disabled soldier 


2 24 


Samuel Cheney, " " 


2 24 


Jerry Sheehan, " " 


2 24 


NahumA. Webster," " 


2 24 


H. W. Bickford, " " 


2 24 


Samuel 6. Martin, dead, , 


2 24 


Lewis Seymour, " 


2 24 


Charles C. Clark, " 


2 24 


Joseph A. Merrill, " 


2 24 


William McKean, " 


2 24 


James Millett, " 


2 24 


Michael Scanlan, " 


2 24 


Leroy Taylor, " 


2 24 


Michael Mackin, " 


2 24 


Charles P. Emery, pd. in Derry 


2 24 


John S. Dennett, pd. in Pittsfielc 


2 24 


J. H. French, paid in Canaan, 


2 24 


Samuel Swett, paid in Bedford, 


2 24 


Frank Dowse, pd. in Alexandria 


2 24 


Byron Richardson, paid in Hook- 




sett, .... 


2 24 


John B. Sargent, pd. in Bedford 


2 24 


John R. Flint, paid in Milton, 


2 24 


Clem Cook, paid in Lyme, 


2 24 


Joseph H. Chapman, paid ir 


I 


Newmarket, 


2 24 


George W. Cheney, paid ir 


1 


Somersworth, 


2 24 


David Collins, pd. in Wilmot, 


2 24 



302 



Ivory S. York, pd. in Great Falls, 
Wm. P. Lang, paid in Tilton, . 
Fred Holt, paid in Deerfield, 
Welman M. George, pd. in Brad- 
ford, 

Walter S. McKean, paid in 
Nashua, .... 
P. P. Hill, paid in Springfield, . 
David Page, paid in Merrimack, 
Benjamin P. Brooks, paid in 
Greenfield, .... 
Albinus P. Philbrick, paid in 
Lowell, .... 
Joseph Ciongh, paid in Bow, 
David Jones, paid in Warner, . 
Moses Dustin, paid in Henniker, 
N. H. Wilson, pd. in Dunbarton, 
Lewis D. Caldwell, pd. in Lowell, 
John P. Clough, pd. in Meredith, 
Ransom Tasker, pd. in Strafford, 
Edwin A. Eastman, pd. in New 

market, ... 
S. S. Raymond, paid in Hop' 

kinton, 
Wm. 0. Daniels, pd. in Franklin 
George Spencer, not here, 
Martin G, Brown, " 
John Farrell, 
'James Dustin, " 

John Proctor Young, overtaxed 
Blodgett & Clark, " 

Jonas J. Adams, " 

Brewery Property, " 

Nathan H. Pierce, no horse, 
John Johnson, overtaxed, . 



2 24 
2 24 
2 24 

2 24 

2 24 

2 24 
2 24 

2 24 

2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
2 24 

2 24 

2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
2 24 

2 24 
11 20 
11 20 

3 36 
112 GO 

90 
11 20 



303 



Joseph Mason, no stock, 


2 24 


Ebenezer Sargent, over 70 


2 24 


Samuel Campbell, " " 


2 24 


Wm. Murphy, " " 


2 24 


Michael Talty, " " 


2 24 


James Lyons, " " 


2 24 


Edward Gerah, mmor, 


2 24 


Leander Flanders, " 


2 24 


Josiah Woods, " 


2 24 


Lewis Roberts, " 


2 24 


Frank Boyd, 


2 24 


John Connor, " 


2 24 


Wm. E. French, " 


. .. 2 24 


Joseph Martell, " 


2 24 


Bernard Murray, " 


2-24 


Allen Nor icon, " 


2 24 


James Gerald, " 


2 24 


Michael Shannon, " 


2 24 


Benj. C. Sweat, " 


2 24 


J. D. L. Hall, 


2 24 


George H. Stewart, " 


2 24 


Lewis George, " 


2 24 


AUard Dominic, " 


2 24 


Henry Clark, " 


2 24 


Louis Levesque, " 


2 24 


Dennis McCarty, " 


2 24 


Peter McLaughlin, " 


2 24 


Charles A. Blood, " 


2 24 


Wm. E. Palmer, " 


2 24 


Jeremiah Sullivan, " 


2 24 


Thomas Dowd, taxed twic 


;e, . 2 24 


RufusW. Flanders," " 


2 24 


Henry Downs, " '- 


2 24 


Henry T. Abbott, " 


2 24 


Wm. G. Spence, " " 


2 24 



304 



Joseph Stark, taxed twice, 
John Miller, " " 

Anton Kreiger, " " 
Joseph Voran, " " 
James A. Stearns, for watering 

trough, 
John Calef, for watering trough 
John B. Clark, poor, 
Baxter P. Goodale, poor, 
L. & B. Hanover-street, occupied 

by Mrs. Morrill, . 
James Collins, poor, 
David Hutchins, " 
Charles Lodibar, " 
DavidP.Haselton," 
Frank L. Wilson, " 
Sam. P. Greeley, " 
Charles N. Clark, . 
Patrick McKean, disabled soldier 
H. D. W. Knowlton, in Asylum, 
Michael Mullens, blind. 
Lots 183 & 184 Laurel-st., wrong 
Sarah M. Perry, poor, 

1873. 
James A. Stearns, for watering 
trough, . . . . 
John Calef, for watering trough, 
Peter McLaughlin, minor 
Charles W. Goodwin, " 
Eugene Morrison, " 

Frank A. Holbrook, " 
Peter Carnier, " 

Nelson H. Evans, " 

Joseph H. Marston, " 



24 
24 
24 

24 

00 
00 
24 
24 



11 20 

2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
2 24 
8 40 
2 24 



24 
24 
24 
24 
34 



4 48 



3 00 
3 00 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 



$525 89 



30; 



George Evans, 


minor, 


2 50 


Patrick Austin, ji'., 


(( 


2 50 


William Stone, 


u 


2 50 


Edwin T. Lawrence, 


;( 


2 50 


William Simpkins, 


a 


2 50 


Napoleon About, 


<.i 


2 50 


William Bennett, 


a 


2 50 


Joseph McSliea, jr., 


u 


2 50 


Gustave Weisnar, 


a 


2 50 


Edward Sweeney, 


,4; 


2 50 


Peter Brown, 


(( 


2 50 


Frank Meserve, 


a 


2 50 


James Madden, 


a 


2 50 


Arthur E. Martin, 


u 


2 50 


James Roach, 


a 


2 50 


Charles Sadibam, 


ii 


2 50 


George Nevins, 


li 


2 50 


John Plynn, 


a 


2 50 


George Flanders, 


u 


2 50 


John Farrell, 


a 


2 50 


Alton Thompson, 


a 


2 50 


Edward Hynes, 


a 


2 50 


Magloire Bucher, 


a 


2 50 


Frank Reid, 


a 


2 50 


Frank 0. Wilson, 


ii 


2 50 


Charles Eizenzeimer, 


(( 


2 50 


Henry Holmes, 


(( 


2 50 


Byron Libenworth, 


u 


2 50 


Warren Hathaway, 


a 


2 50 


John Bassett, 


a 


2 50 


William Burbank, 


a 


2 50 


James Fitzgerald, 


a 


2 50 


Frank Dockham, 


t.i 


2 50 


B. F. Stanton, paid in 


Haverhil] 


5 


Mass., 


, 


2 50 



306 



Geo. C. Johnson, paid in Hook- 
sett, . ... 

Darius Ham, paid in Wolfboro', 

Henry E. Stearns, paid in Brad- 
ford, Vt., . 

Josiah Sanborn, paid in London- 
derry, .... 

Edwin A. Eastman, paid in New 
Market, .... 

Edgar Farrar, paid in HoUis, . 

Fred. "W. Chamberlin, paid in 
Chester, .... 

Jas. 0, Ward, paid in Carapton, 

Charles J. Darrah, paid in Bed- 
ford, 

A. J. Fifield, paid in Candia, 

0. C. Kibby, paid in Concord, . 

James Gerah, paid in Chester, . 

John B. Smith, paid in Hillsbor- 
ongh, .... 

Stephen Downs, paid in New- 
buryport, .... 

Chas. P. Shepherd, paid in Fish- 
erville, .... 

Bradley Kidder, paid in Goffs- 
town, .... 

George E. Kidder, paid in New- 
bury, 2-50 

S. S. Raymond, paid in Hopkin- 

ton, 2 50 

JamesH.French, paid in Canaan, 2 50 

F. L. Gilchrist, paid in London- 
derry, .... 2 50 

Henry Whitcomb, paid in War- ' 

ner, ..... 2 60 



2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2" 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 



307 



Lucien Davis, paid in Taunton, 

Mass., . . . . 2 50 
Frank G. Chapman, paid in West 

Fairlee, Vt., . . . 2 oO 
Alpheus J. Stephens, paid in Am- 
herst, .... 2 50 
Charles Carr, paid in Ilooksett, 2 50 
James 0. Osgood, paid in Pitts- 
field, 2 50 

Prank Roby, paid in Methuen, . 2 50 

A. W. Eastman, paid in Concord, 2 50 

Thomas Cox, paid in Holdcrness, 2 50 

James Clement, paid in Warner, 2 50 

Andrew J. Dow, overtaxed, . 2 50 

Josiah Crosby, overtaxed, . 18 00 

Timo. Sullivan, overtaxed, . 7 50 

Rebecca T. Nichols, overtaxed, 5 00 
Sylvester P. Fiske, overtaxed 

on horse, . . . " 5 00 

Ellen P. Pearson, overtaxed, . 5 00 

Wm. B. Bnllard, overtaxed, . 12 50 

L. & B., "A" street, overtaxed, 7 50 

Mrs. W. P. Jackman, overtaxed, 5 00 

John W. Brown, overtaxed, , 10 00 

Brewery property, overtaxed, . 125 00 

Chester W. Bartlett, overtaxed, 5 00 

Person C. Young, overtaxed, . 1 12 

William Whittle, overtaxed, . 2 50 

Lucy E. Rogers, overtaxed, . 5 00 

American Water & Gas Pipe Co., 5 00 

Charles Wells, no money, . 25 00 

Frank P. Carpenter, no carriage, 2 50 

William Mc Mullen, taxed twice, 2 50 

Charles Kendall, taxed twice, . 2 50 

Patrick Burk, taxed twice, . 2 50 



'308 



John Wilson, taxed twice, 
Charles A. Brown, taxed twice, 
John Bloomquist, jr., taxed twice, 
Daniel Clifford, over 70, . 
James Lyons, over 70, 
Owen Sullivan, over 70, 
Joseph N. Prescgtt, over 70, 
John Nolan, over 70, 
Levi Woodman, over 70, . 
John Mullins, disabled soldier, 
Patrick McKeon, disabled soldier, 
Patrick Mahoney, disabled sol- 
dier, . . 
Joseph Goodwin, no dog, 
A. M. Scarlet, no dog, 
Holland Knowlton, no dog 
Robert Costello, no dog, 
George M. Ford, no dog, 
Wm. H. Richmond, no dog, 
Wm. A. Babcock, no dog, 
Leonard Demary, no dog, 
J. Bradbury Cilley, no dog, 
Bartholomew Carmody, no dog 
John S. Spencer, no dog, . 
Thomas Bolton, no dog, . 
Simon Rogers, no dog, 
Charles Cheney, no dog, . 
Gustavus M. Sanborn, no dog 
Lorenzo J. Young, no horse, 
James U. Prince, no horse, 
John Horan, dead, . 
George F. Judkins, dead, . 
William A. Higgins, dead, 
Henry Wermers, lame, 
Peter Tosseau, poor, 



2 50 

2 50 
2 50 
2 60 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 50 

2 50 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



309 



David Hutch ins, poor, 


2 50 


Julius Durpuey, poor, 


2 50 


David P. Heselton, poor, . 


2 50 


Samuel P. Greeley, poor, . 


2 50 


Jolui M. Knowles, not here. 


2 50 


Charles Wright, not here. 


2 50 


Andrew J. Dow, wrong, . 


* 2 50' 


Henry I. Faucher, wrong. 


2 50 


Henry I. Faucher & Co., wrong. 


15 00 


John Calef & Cyrus Moor, wrong, 


4 25 


Jules Slavin, no such person. 


2 50 


Aimer D. Gooden, watering 




trough, . . . . 


3 00 


John Young, watering trough, . 


3 00 


Gilman H. Kimball, watering 




trough, . . . . 


3 00 


Amount, 




Balance to new account, 





$542 87 

1,557 36 
8 64 



To Appropriation, 



By paid State Treasurer, 





$1,566 00 


STATE TAX. 






Dr. 


. 


$54,642 00 




Cr. 


rer, 


$54,642 00 



310 




COUx\TY TAX. 




Dr. 


To Appropriation, . 


$18,010 63 




Cr. 


By paid County Treasurer, 


$18,010 63 


INTERESI 


1 




Dr. 


To Balance from last year, . 


. $859 93 


Appropriation, . 


. 26,000 00 


Interest on State Bonds, . 


. 6,819 00. 


Balance overdrawn, . 


. 10,743 56 




844,422 49 


EXPENDITURES. 




Cr. 


By paid Manchester National Bank 


, 8876 25 


Amoskeag " " 


876 25 


City " " 


155 76 


First " " 


808 92 


Edward W. Harrington, . 


153 75 


N. Hunt's estate, 


210 00 


Lois A. Lee, . ... 


75 00 


Louisa Wilson, 


- 15 00 


Pittsfield Savings Bank, . 


61 50 


Chas. H. Carpenter, 


27 90 


Tower, Giddings & Torry, 


115 38 


Sarah E. Knight, 


10 00 


Chas. E. Balch, 


38 25 


George W. Dodge, . 


25 00 


S. D. Bennett, . 


2 60 



.311 



William Stearns, 
Elijah Young, . 
C. A. Sulloway, 
Millie J. Eastman, 
Mary N. Preston, 
Louisa Emerson, 
J. W. Whittle, . 
J. H. Haynes, . 
John Wheeler, . 
Charles F. Warren, 
Joseph M. Emery, 
William McDonald, 
Andrew J. Dow, 
Sarah F. McQueston 
Hiram Hill, 
Nat. B. Emery, 



Amount, .... 
Coupons from City Bonds, exclu 

sive of Water Bonds, . 
Coupons from Water Bonds, 



6 


00 


2 


00 


11 


00 


7 


70 


10 


00 


15 


00 


8 


00 


41 


00 


8 


00 


10 


00 


17 


00 


166 


00 


25 


00 


33 


33 


20 


00 


10 


00 


. m,Sn 49 


. 21,585 


00 


. 18,996 


00 




$44,522 49 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 



To Anit. outstanding Jan. 
Loans during 1873, . 



1873, $2,298 57 
159,120 00 



Dr. 



-$161,418 57 



EXPENDITURES. 



Cr. 



By loans paid during the year, $63,000 00 
outstauding loan, Dec. 31, 1873, 98,418 57 



4161,418 67 



312 
REDUCTION OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Dr. 

To Appropriation, . . . $4,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Cr. 
By paid City Bonds, issued Aug. 1, 

1869, .... 11,600 00 

Balance to new account, . . 2,400 00 

14,000 00 



COURT HOUSE. 



To Balance from last year, . . $7 88 

Reserved Fund, ... 850 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid J. Q. A. Sargent for gas 

fixtures, . . . . $28 84 
J. Q. A. Sargent, for repairing 

furnace, . . . . 14 58 

J. Q. A. Sargent for piping for 

water, .... 41 55 

J. C. Sanborn, piping for water, 451 97 
Thos. A. Lane, " " . 164 12 

Daniels & Co. for duster, brush, 

and shovel, ... 4 85 

Oilman B. Fogg for keys, . 1 50 

Pike & Heald for repairing stoves 

and water closets, . . 10 25 



Dr. 



B857 



Cr. 



313 

J, B. Sawyer, ventilating vault, 

Fairbanks & Folsom for repair- 
ing pipe, &c., 

J. L. Kennedy for setting glass, 
and varnishing doors, . 

J. J. Bennett, repairing vault, . 

Geo. H. Dudley, for repairing 
drawers, .... 

Amount, ..... 
Balance to new account, 



INSURANCE. 



To Balance from last year, 
Reserved fund. 



7 


50 


25 


64 


13 


12 


16 


50 



6 50 



1786 92 
70 96 



$41 82 
194 37 



$857 88- 



Dr. 



$236 19 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid Geo. A. French, premium, $18 75 

Phoenix Ins. Co., premium, . 36 00 

Home Ins. Co., premium, . 37 50 
Merchants & Farmers' Ins. Co. 

assessment, ... 6 25 
Quincy Mutual Fire Ins. Co., as- 
sessment, .... 9 75 
Equitable F. and M. Ins. Co. pre- 
mium, .... 43 75 
^tna Ins. Co., premium, . . 38 25 
Continental Ins. Co., premium, ^ 23 44 
E. P. Richardson, . . . * 22 50 



Cr. 



$236 19 



314 

IRON FENCE ON MERRIMACK SQUARE. 

Dr. 
To Balance from last year, . 1524 87 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid A. H. Lowell for 2 1-2 feet 

fence, .... 

A. H. Lowell for hanging gates, 

Amount, ..... 
Balance to new account, 



Cr. 



$12 


50 


50 


00 


$62 


50 


462 


3T 



$524 87 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

To Balance from old account, . 179 15 

Appropriation, . . . 1,000 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid E. G. Haynes for plastering 

at City Library, ... 844 64 
Walter Neal, carpenter work at 

City Library, ... 5 75 

A. G. Stevens, Supt., . . 5 00 

Pike & Heald, piping Library 

building, . . . . 208 96 
P. A. Devine for repairs at No. 5 

ward room, , . . . 3 00 

J. L. Smith for lumber for No. 6 

ward room, . . . 53 S6 



Da. 

$1,079 15 
Cr. 



315 
City Hall for brick for No. 6 



ward room, 


2 10 




J. J. Abbott, for painting for No. 






6 ward room, 


31 61 




Fairbanks & Folsom, for stopper 






and zinc, .... 


55 




VINE STREET ENGINE ; 


HOUSE. 




B. Frank Fogg, piping building, 


69 55 




A. J. Lane, rep. gas fixtures, 


1 13 




Joel Daniels, painting and hang- 






ing paper, .... 


22 68 




Geo. Holbrook, carpenter work. 


378 01 




G. L. Moore, whitewashing and 






repairing wall, . 


110 22 




J. S. Kidder & Co., lime and 






cement, .... 


5 75 




J- L. Kennedy, setting glass and 






painting, .... 


11 73 




W, C. Rogers, locks for coal shed, 


3 45 




Amount, 


$960 49 




Balance to new account. 


118 66 


81,079 15 






FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 








Dr. 


To Appropriation, 


$4,000 00 




Reserved fund. 


1,000 00 


$5,000 00 


EXPENDITURES, 





Cr. 

By paid Charles Williams, jr., for 

wire, $68 75 



81G 

Daniels & Co. for wire, . . 8 68 

Charles Williams, jr. for 2 call 

bells, 36 00 

John B. Varick for lock, baskets, 

and cord, .... 5 24 

Manchester Print Works for vit- 
riol,- 180 62 

B. C. Kendall for cash paid and 

expenses, .... 
A. H. Lowell for zincs, 
A. H. Lowell for castings, 
W. Ireland, building bell tower, 
M. V. B. Kinne, work on bell 

tower, .... 

Pike & Heald, roofing bell tower, 
John L. Kennedy, painting bell 

tower, .... 

A. C, Wallace, board of men, . 
Howard Watch & Clock Co., for 

1 gong, .... 
J. Stickney for enameled cloth, 
E. P. Johnson & Co. for" coal, . 
James R.Carr, work on telegraph, 
Game well & Co., one striker, 

C. G. Blake for services on new 

striker, .... 12 00 
William Blake & Co., bell for 

tower, .... 1,369 25 

Concord Railroad, freight on bell, 5 95 
C. H. Hodgmanj&; Co., trucking 

bell, . . . . . 5 75 

Express bills, ... 11 54 

T. A. Lane for piping tower, . 3 18 
Colley & Kelley, painting poles 

and boxes, . . . . 78 43 



40 


00 


153 


78 


102 


08 


1,120 


81 


25 


58 


35 


46 


101 


09 


24 


00 


100 


00 


1 


60 


6 


00 


6 


75 


1,000 


00 



317 

C, Gr. Blake, repairing battery, 31 50 
Manchester Locomotive Works 

for alarm by whistle 6 mos., 150 00 

Moving striker at City Hall, . 25 60 



Amount, . . . . . 81,709 64 
Balance to new account, . 290 36 



$5,000 00 



LAND DAMAGE. 



To Balance from old account, 


S323 


23 


Appropriation, .... 


6,000 


00 


< 

EXPENDITURES. 






By paid H. A. Gage for land for 






Cypress street, . 


1175 


00 


John Templeton for land for 






Cypress street, . 


175 


00 


M. D. Stol^e.s for land for Clarke 






street, .... 


100 


00 


Cyrus Dunn, land for Clarke st. 


100 


00 


Sarah A. Hodgman for land 






for Lincoln street, 


10 


00 


H. B. & Lucretia J. Sloane, land 






for Belmont street, 


504 


89 


Maynard & Dickey for land for 






Hanover street, . 


16 


25 


C. D. Carpenter for land for 






Pearl street. 


700 


00 


Nancy F. Gooden for land for 






Belmont street, . 


105 


38 



Dr. 



),323 23 



Cr. 



318 



James Dearborn for laud for 




Belmont street, . 


202 67 


John Hoslcy for land for Bel- 




mont street, 


202 67 


George B. Brown for land for 




Maple street, 


900 00 


Thomas J. Smith for land for 




Manchester street, 


32 50 


A. T. Foss, land for Ashland st. 


134 58 


Matthew McDonald for laud for 




Ash back street, 


7 06 


Paul Graff, land for Ash back st., 


170 00 


Mrs. Hannah H. Cheney for land 




for Concord street, 


300 00 


Amount, ..... 


$3,835 94 


Balance to new account, 


2,487 29 





;,323 23 



CANAL BRIDGE— GRANITE STREET. 

Dr. 



To cash received for old plank, . $19 50 
Reserved Fund, . . . 1,181 24 



EXPENDITURES. 

By Balance from last year, . . $20 69 

W. Ireland for carpenter work, 231 60 

Clough & Foster for lumber, . 592 38 

J. L. Smith for lumber, . . 15 72 

A. C. Wallace for lumber, . 34 13 

A. H. Lowell for castings, . . 5 83 



$1,200 74 
Cr. 



319 

John B. Yarick for Spikes, 
Oliver Gay for stone, 
Sylvanus Smith for stone work, 
for laborers, . . . . 

A. G. Stevens, Supt.', 



80 


16 


32 


40 


41 


48 


141 


50 


5 


00 



PISCATAQUOG BRIDGE. 



To Appropriation, 


$3,000 00 


old iron sold, .... 


188 10 


Reserved Fund, 


78 94 


EXPENDITURES. 




By paid Saml. Brown, Jr., Supt., . 


157 75 


for teams, .... 


80 25 


for laborers, .... 


156 94 


A. C. Wallace for lumber. 


730 93 


N. R. Bixby for carpenter work, 


56 25 


E. P. Whidden for stone work, . 


49 00 


M. Lane, " " 


24 00 


J. C. Colley, " " 


11 25 


John Prindable, " " 


28 75 


T. Connor, 


23 63 


Peter Flemming, " " 


30 00 


Amoskeag Mfg. Co. for use of 




derrick, .... 


25 00 


Dutton Woods for superstruc- 




ture, 


1,884 05 


Putnam Jenkins for bolts, 


12 00 



.,200 74 



Dr. 



5,267 04 



Cr. 



320 



Putnam Jenkins, cutting up old* 

bridge, .... 17 G4 

John L. Kennedy, for painting 

bridge, . . . . 79 60 



5,267 04 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 








Dr. 


To Appropriation, .... 




$4,000 00 


EXPENDITURES 




Cr, 


By paid H. S. Whitney, drain pipe, 


14 38 




Geo. H. AUeu for engineering, . 


119 00 




M. E. Harvey, work of teams, . 


191 25 




John Campbell, " " " 


10 00 




Wm. Foster, " " ^ . 


60 00 




F. Wells, " " ^ . 


170 00 




E. L. Brown, " 


191 25 




Warren Harvey, " " 


107 50 




City teams, " " 


168 00 




City teamsters, .... 


155 86 




laborers, ..... 


705 66 




Amount, ..... 


$1,892 90 




Reserved Fund, 


1,500 00 




Balance to new account. 


607 10 


$4,000 00 







PEST HOUSE. 



To Appropriation, 



Dr. 

1,000 00 



521 



EXPENDITUUES. 

By paid J. L. Siiiitli for lumber for 




hatters, .... 


$9 88 


A. G. Stevens for plans, . 


40 00 


R. A. Lawrence for job team, . 


2 25 


J. H. Maynard on acct. of build- 




ing, 


3,000 00 


H. S. Whitney for boring and 




piping well. 


137 15 


laborers, excavating and grading, 


257 87 


City teams, 


12 00 



Amount, . . . , 
Balance to new account, 



Cb. 



13,459 15' 
1,540 85 
.__ i5,000 00 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 



To Appropriation, . 



Dr. 

$200 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid C. F. Livingston for flags, $2A 12 

German Band for services, . 42 00 
George H. Dodge for rings for 

wreaths, .... 4 00 

Henry French, lumber & work, , 17 39 
Jasper P.George for cash paid for 

sundries, .... 14, 25 

B. L. Hartshorn for job team, . 19 00 

John B. Clarke for advertising, 6 80 



Cr. 



322 

Campbell & Hanscom for adver- 
tising, .... 
Piper & Hawley for cloth, 
William Shepherd for carriages, 
Colley & Kelly for painting 

decorations, 
G. B. Fogg for cask of powder, 
Daniels & Co., twine and nails, 
Jeremiah Hodge for rods, 
Baldwin & Batchelder for use of 
piano, .... 



Amount, . . . . . |198 50 
Balance to new account, . 1 50 



88 


00 


10 


92 


13 


50 


10 


00 


4 


75 


6 


35 


10 


92 


6 


50 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

To Balance from old account, . |379 31 

Appropriation, . . . 1,500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid "Schools" for coal, . . |200 00 
George H. Dudley, for moving 

furniture, .... 28 25 

J. Q. A. Sargent for gas-piping 

and fixtures, 
Joseph Tuck for care of rooms, 
Volney W. Fairbanks for care of 

rooms, .... 
Manchester Gas Light Co., gas. 



44 


87 


88 


50 


9 


50 


48 


13 



^200 00 



Dr. 



,879 31 



Cr. 



{9S 



John B. Clarke for advertising 








and printing, 


$27 


40 




Campbell & Hanscom, advertis- 








. ing and printing, 


15 


75 




posting notices, 


2 


79 




Concord Railroad for freight on 








furniture, .... 


7 


36 




Joseph W. Ross for ink-wells, . 


17 


50 




J- B. Jones for chairs & settees, 


19 


80 




George H. Allen, di-awing paper. 


23 


27 




Bell Adams, teaching, 


18 


00 




Elvira S. Priou, " 


53 


00 




Nellie Jackson, " 


18 


00 




Addie M. Lear, " 


48 


50 




N. H. Wilson, " , . . 


81 


00 




Belle B. Corey, " 


45 


00 




Jonathan Smith, " 


110 


00 




Henry Wight, " 


60 


00 




Sylvester Brown, teaching. 


60 


00 




Mary Lessard, " 


36 


00 




Edward P. Sherljurn, " 


50 


00 




Henry Colby, " 


55 


00 




J. Warren Thwing, " 


150 


00 




Mattie S. Moore, " 


55 


00 




Estella N. Howlett, " . 


31 


50 




Addie A. Stearns, " 


46 


80 




Mary A. Smith, " 


27 


50 




Samuel T. Page, " . 


28 


00 




Martha J. Boyd, " 


17 


25 




Amount, ..... 


1,523 


87 




Balance to new account, 


355 


44 


$1,879 81 



I ' 324 

REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

To Balance from last year, . . $23 96 

Appropriation, .... 6,000 00 

Reserved Fund, ... 699 23 

Cash for old fence at Bakersville, 10 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

By paid Jas. 0. Adams, for services 

on committee, 1869, . . $100 00 
John L. Kennedy, for painting 

and glazing, . . . 665 61 
Colley & Kelly, for varnishing, . 2 25 

J. J. Abbott, for painting and 

varnishing, .... 170 10 
John L. Kelly, for painting and 

varnishing, .... 242 06 
Joel Daniels, for painting and 

varnishing, . . . . 77 18 

Wm. McPherson, for putting in 

well at Hallsville, . . 22 87 

T. McQueston, for putting in 

well at Bakersville, . . 13 50 

T. A. Lane, repairing steam pipe, 20 53 

John Q. A. Sargent, gas fixtures 

and repairing furnaces, . 126 69 
Pike <fe Heald, for pumps, repair- 
ing roofs, &c., 
Fairbanks & Folsom, stove pipe, 
Geo. W. Stevens, architectural 

services, .... 
Geo. H. Dudley, carpenter work, 
Geo. Holbrook, " " . 



191 


05 


27 


93 


100 


00 


1,152 


17 


85 


75 



Dr. 



1,733 19 



Cr. 



325 



W. Ireland, carpenter work, . 


$1,096 59 


M. V. B. Kinne, '' " 


277 73 


Jere. Hodge, for lumber, . 


145 83 


J. L. Smith, " " . . 


18 04 


A.C.Wallace," 


84 35 


Leonard Stratton, for work, 


60 00 


City Hall, for brick, . 


27 70 


Hackett & Fislier, for laying con- 




crete walks. 


538 96 


Joseph L. Ross, for seats and 




desks, .... 


325 00 


William 0. Haskell & Son, for 




settees and fluid, . 


418 00 


G. F. Bosher, for furniture, 


11 30 


Job teams, .... 


34 33 


Concord Railroad, for freiglit, . 


18 50 


John C. Young, repairing 'roofs. 


156 16 


G. H. Kimball, for thresholds, . 


18 00 


Lamson & Marden, stone posts,. 


8 00 


Daniels & Co., for hardware. 


26 42 


J. B. Varick, 


103 24 


A. G.' Stevens, architectural 




services, .... 


5 00 


Geo. H. Allen, surveying lots, . 


15 50 


Straw & Lovejoy, for clocks and 




repairs, .... 


18 25 


Dunlap &'Baker, for clocks and 




repairs, .... 


10 50 


B. W. Robinson, white-washing 




and plastering, . 


12 00 


E. G. Haynes, white-washing and 




plastering, .... 


156 60 


James Eastman, white-washing 




and plastering, . 


28 25 



326 

James F. Smith, grading Bakers- 

viUe lot, . . . . 1110 10 
John Calef, grading Bakersville 

lot, . . . . . 10 00 

W. P. Stratton, repairing pump, 2 25 



NEW SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

To Balance from last year, . . $228 38 

Appropriation, .... 30,000 00 

Rec'd of H. Dickey, for brick, . f)0 15 

Rec'd of J. L. Kelly, for old shed, 12 00 



EXPENDITURES. 



ASH-STREET SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



$6,733 19 



By paid Geo. W. Stevens, for archi- 
tectural services, . . . $650 00 
Oilman H. Kimball, for founda- 
tion (balance of account), . 1,206 25 
Gil. H. Kimball, for stone work, 264 89 
Lamson & Harden, " " 2,651 57 
Alpheus Gay, on acct. of building, 22,000 00 
Howard Clock & Watch Co., for 

clock faces, .... 52 00 
George H. Dudley, for building 

privy, .... 4 00 

Pike & Heald, for pump, . . 26 07 

Pike & Heald, for vane, . . 77 25 

W. W. Hubbard, for sash, . . 265 00 



Dr. 



.330 53 



Cr. 



327 



Daniels & Co., for glass and glaz- 
ing, 1359 12 

Labor, grading, . . . 636 20 

A. H. Lowell, for chimney caps, 47 40 



Amount, .... 


. 28,239 75 




Balance to new account. 


. 2,090 78 


S30,330 53 






SCHOOLS. 




Dr. 


To Balance from last year, . 


134 96 




Appropriation, 


47,800 00 




Receipts for tuition, . 


206 00 




Reserved Fund, 


150 00 






at' JQ oKf\ aa 






K^ni-^,»4t^v U\J 


EXPENDITURES. 








Cr. 


FUEL ACCOUNT. 




By paid Samuel W. Page for saw 






ing wood, . 


18 50 




S. B. Hill for sawing wood, 


1 50 




Fardy Conway, " " 


« 67 




«• Thomas Foley, " " 


67 




Ohas. F. Morrill, '' " 


1 25 




Harrington, " " 


9 00 




John Bashaw, " " 


4 00 




Sylvester Brown," " 


1 00 




Abram Blake, " " 


4 25 




Joseph Tuck, " " 


2 50 




E. Stearns, " " 


1 13 




John Mclntire, " " 


20 00 





328 



Geo, H. Colby for wood, 


113 59 


William Campbell for wood, 


49 75 


Harvey & Wallace, " 


253 25 


W. W. Hubbard, " 


2 50 


Clough <fe Foster, " 


96 50 


D. B. Eastman, " 


20 00 


David Wells, 


27 20 


John P. Moore, " 


6 00 


John Campbell, " 


62 00 


H. Richards, 


34 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co. for coal, . 


622 85 


D. L. Robinson for wood, . 


308 00 


J. F. Dustin, sawing wood. 


10 12 


L. B. Bod well & Co. for wood, . 


41 63 


C. W. Rowell, 


15 00 


Robert Hall, 


4 50 


N. S. Butterfield for soft coal, . 


76 94 


Bangs & Horton, for coal, 


2,008 18 


Daniel Clark, freight on coal, . 


441 00 


Schooner "M. Sewell" for freight 




on coal, .... 


477 62 


Concord Railroad for freight 




on coal, .... 


732 34 


Warren Harvey, teaming coal. 


319 26 



Amount, . ^ . . 
Charged to other accounts, 



,676 69 
809 39 



$4,867 30 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



By paid C. F. Bosher for chairs, . |19 25 

John B. Varick for sundries, . 57 37 

Daniels & Co. for sundries, . 39 04 

Ginn Brothers for charts, . 69 00 



329 



J. L. Haramett & Sons, charts, 

crayons, &g., 
Sullivan Bros, for matting, 
F. B. Eaton for books, ink, &c 
Thos. R. Hubbard foi* table and 

chairs, 
A. F. Hall for dippers and pails 
Pike i& Heald for pumps, &c., 
David Libby for brooms, . 
Gilman B. Fogg for keys, . 
Joseph L. Ross for desks, 
S. F. Murry & Co. for chemicals 
Thompson, Bigelow & Brown, 

cards, 
Nichols & Hall for pencils, 
T. R. V. Bradley for tables, 
Jacobs & Co. for paper, . 
A. C. Stockiii for charts, . 
Straw & Lovejoy for clocks, 
Dunlap & Baker for clocks, 
J.V.Sullivan, books & stationery 
Brewer & Tileston for charts. 
Barton & Co. for rugs, 
Wm. Parker, jr., dippers and 

brushes, . . • . 
Knight, Adams & Co. for slates, 
W. W. Colburn for 26 stuffed 

birds, . . . . 

Per-ry & Spalding for maps, 
E. A. Briggs for drawing copies, 
Walworth, Ainswortli & Co. for 

drawing books, . 
Isaac S. Coffin for dippers, 
Fairbanks & Folsom, dippers & 

pails, . . . . . 



. 1186 


74 


16 


00 


44 


74 


1 

20 


90 


2 


41 


65 


00 


20 


50 


2 


01 


300 


50 


4 


00 


12 


32 


G*^ 


60 


5 


00 


7 


00 


12 


80 


16 


00 


36 


25 


V 22 


04 


29 


09 


7 


00 



9 55 
5 40 



25 


00 


20 


00 


58 


73 


11 


52 


2 


75 



1 80 



C. F. Livingston, spelling cards, 
E. F- Higgins for water pot, 
H. M. Bailey for clippers, 
Tlios. Chubbuck for diplomas, . 
Wm. H. Fisk, books & stationery, 
Chas. A. Smith, dusters, bell, &c., 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

By paid A. C. Stockin, for books, , 
Wilson, Hinckle & Co., books, 
J. L. Hammett & Son, for books, 
Manchester P. 0., for postage, . 
Thompson, Bigelow & Co., books. 



books. 



'^5 


50 


1 


25 


9 


45 


34 


50 


103 


11 


14 


75 


ERY. 

165 70 


6 


04 


4 


11 


5 


78 


16 


56 


8 


00 


82 


45 


6 


00 


10 


60 


20 


00 


.25 


00 


34 


56 


' 115 


41 



William Hensliaw, fo 
A. Quimby, 
Lee & Shepherd, 
J. G. Edgerly, 
John L. Sliorey, 
Ginn Brothers, 

E. R. Coburn, 
Brewer & Tileston, 
Walworth, Ainsworth & Co., for 

books, 
Daniel Clark, for Johnston's 

Natural History, 
J. V. Sullivan, for stationery 

F. B. Eaton, " " 
William H. Fisk, 
Knight & Adams, 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



8 28 



By paid John B. Clarke, 
Moore & Peasley, 



15 


50 


18 


22 


46 


98 


40 


90 


o 
O 


38 


ISING. 

1234 


45 


31 


75 



$1,376 87 



1533 47 



331 



C. F. Livingston, 


1142 


50 


Cami»l)ell <fe Hanscom, 


79 


72 


Geo. C. Iloitt, for binding, 


12 


00 

!i!500 42 






K]ytJ\J yj ^ j^ 


CARE OF ROOMS. 




By paid Wm. P. Merrill, 


86 


00 


Mary J. Reid, . 


5 


00 


Clara N. Brown, 


7 


50 


Maria H. Hildretli, . 


20 


90 


Marianna Waite, 


10 


00 


Etta M. George, 


9 


00 


■ Addie M. Chase, 


64 


50 


Alice G. Lord, . 


9 


00 


J. G. Edgerly, . 


2 


50 


Belle B. Corey, 


4 


00 


Olive J. Randall, 


12 


00 


Helen M. Locke, 


8 


00 


N. Amanda Wyman, 


5 


00 


S. Isetta Locke, 


4 


00 


Edward P. Sherbiirn, 


4 


00 


George B. Hadley, 


24 


00 


Sylvester Brown, 


9 


00 


Nellie M. Gate, . 


16 


00 


Charles P. Mordll, . 


24 


00 


D. A. Clifford, . 


6 


00 


William E. Buck, . 


6 


00 


A. Blake, 


58 


00 


Geo. E. Moores, 


192 


00 


Joseph Tuck & Co., . 


147 


00 


Leonard Stratton, 


197 


00 


John A. Barker, 


727 


50 


Volney W. Fairbanks, 


895 


00 

— 12,462 90 



P.S.9 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



By paid David Thayer, Truant 




Officer, 


. $600 00 


Mancliester Gas Light Co., gas, 


37 26 


Manchester P. 0. for postage, 


10 40 


C. H. Hodgman, job team. 


4 75 


J. A. Caverly, " 


4 00 


R, A. Lawrence, " 


7 00 


L. A. Ward, 


12 10 


C. E. Clough, 


8 00 


F. G. Clark for team, 


4 00 


• S. S. James & Bro. for team, 


40 00 


Edwin Kennedy, " 


6 00 


Fogg & James for team for J. J 




Kimball, 


167 00 


Fogg & James for team for J. G 




Edgerly, . 


120 00 


Sullivan Bros, for dippers, 


14 10 


Moore & Feasley, printing cards, 


11 50 


Samuel W. Page, cleaning house 


1 50 


J. J. Abbott for setting glass, 


13 83 


Joel Daniels for setting glass, 


91 


John L. Kennedy, setting glass, 


10 12 


Fairbanks & Folsom for stoves 




pipe, &c., . 


54 34 


Campbell & Hauscom for print 




ing rules, . . . . 


7 25 


E. G, Haynes for repairing 




plastering, . . . . 


20 87 


H. C. Merrill for oil, 


45 


W. H. Elliott for clock, . 


2 50 


John Mooar for repairing clock, 


1 50 


A. C. Wallace for lumber. 


21 16 


George H. Dudley for carpeutei 




work, . . . . 


60 25 



333 



E. G. Richardson, tuning pianos, 
I. S. Whitney, tuning pianos, 
J. M. Sanborn, " " 
Leonard Stratton for setting 

glass, &c., . 
S. F. Murry for chemicals, 
U. S. & Canada Express, . 
J. G. Edgerly, for cash paid for 

sundries, 
Jere. Hodge for pointers, 
D. Tj. Robinson, for cash paid 

for cleaning houses. 
George H. Colby for cash paid 

for cleaning houses, 
Patrick Hickey, cleaning house, 
Whittemore & Co. for cleaning 

vaults, . . . . 
C. C. Webster, cleaning vaults, 
Mary J. Reid, cleaning room, . 
J. F. Dustin for cleaning school 

yard, 

Langdon Simons, rent of piano, 

Barton & Co. for cambric, 

Johnson Brothers for cambric, . 

Jackson & Co., " 

Daniels & Co. for hardware, 

J. B. Varick, " 

Wm. C. Rogers for lock & keys, 

G. B. Fogg for keys, 

H. F. Morse, filling diplomas, . 

J. Q. A. Sargent, 4 chandeliers 

for Lincoln-st. school-house, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas fixtures, 
Chas. Williams for pipe and 

cleaning; stoves, . 



84 50 

31 75 

3 50 

5 72 
3 43 
8 50 

27 02 

12 62 

13 80 



4 


00 


8 


50 


69 


00 


25 


00 


1 


00 


10 


50 


6 


25 


2 


55 


16 


72 


1 


83 


178 


53 


1 


18 


1 


00 


13 


82 


28 


70 


130 


00 


21 


17 



25 65 



534 



B. W. Robinson for repairing 




plastering, 


^7 00 


Joseph Tuck for labor, 


2 00 


Y. W. Fairbanks for labor dur- 




ing vacation, . ' . 


79 05 


AV. W. Colburn for cash paid for 




cabinet specimens. 


21 90 


Geo. H. Colby for repairs, 


7 25 


Geo. E. Moores for labor, . 


3 10 


John A. Barker for labor, 


39 83 


Holton & Sprague for cambric, . 


3 06 



$2,060 24 



TEACHERS SALARIES. 



By paid William W. Colburn, 
Lucretia E. Manahan, 
Mary E. Clongh, 
Emma J. Ela, . 
Alfred S. Hall, . 
Abbie S. McClintock 
Nancy S. Bunton, 
Mintie G. Edgerly, 
Martha N. Mason, 
Annie 0. Heath, 
William E. Buck, 
Mary A. Buzzell, 
Anstrice G. Flanders 
Sarah J. Greene, 
Lizzie S. Campbell, 
Daniel A. Clifford, 
Mary F. Dana, 
Lottie R. Adams, 
Carrie E. Reid, 
Benjamin F. Dame, 
Lizzie H. Patterson 



$2,000 00 
807 60 
800 00 
450 00 
770 00 
360 00 
600 00 
450 00 
500 00 
360 00 

1,500 00 
400 00 
450 00 
393 75 
375 00 

1,500 00 
350 00 
270 00 
450 00 

1,500 00 
350 00 



335 



Julia A. Baker, 
Mary J. Fife, . 
Annette McDoel, 
Eliza J. Young, 
Belle R. Daniels, 
Anna J. Dana, 
Rocilla M. Tuson, 
Allen A. Bennett, 
Martha J. Boyd, 
Addie M. Lear, 
Charles F. Morrill, 
Geo. B. Hadley, 
Sarah B. Hadley, 
Nellie J. Sanderson, 
Mary L. Sleeper, 
Hattie G. Flanders, 
C. Augusta Abbott, 
Hattie S. Tozer, 
Ellen B. Rowell, 
Emma F. Bean, 
Georgianna Dow, 
Mary E. Ireland, 
Annie M. Offutt, 
Abbie E. xlbbott, 
Emma H. Perley, 
Helen M. Morrill, 
Nellie Pearson, 
B. Jennie Campbell, 
Martha W. Hubbard, 
Emma A. Cross, 
Gertrude W. Borden, 
Sarah D. Lord, 
Celia M. Chase, 
Alice G. Lord, 
Clara N. Brown, 



$500 


00 


450 


00 


427 


50 


438 


75 


385 


00 


365 


00 


335 


00 


480 


00 


367 


50 


303 


75 


240 


00 


225 


00 


170 


00 


450 


00 


450 


00 


438 


75 


450 


00 


385 


00 


450 


00 


400 


00 


405 


00 


135 


00 


350 


00 


450 


00 


318 


75 


450 


00 


358 


75 


335 


00 


337 


50 


438 


75 


98 


45 


450 


00 


358 


13 


412 


50 


450 


00 



336 



Ella F. Salisbury, 
Nellie E. Tappaii, 
Kate E. Joy, 
Nellie M. Kate, 
Addie M. Chase, 
Addie A. Marshall, 
George A. Nute, 
Sylvester Brown, 
Mary J. Reid, . 
Maria H. Hildreth, 
Mary B. I^ine, 
Mariauna Waite, 
Etta M. George, 
Cleora E. Bailey, 
Nellie M. Whitney, 
Elvira S. Priou, 
Annie H. Abbott, 
Belle B. Corey, 
Ida F. Gee, 
J. J. Kimball, . 
Charles R. Treat, 
Lizzie P. Gove, 
Josie A. Bosher, 
E. A. Briggs, 
Ara L. Piatt, . 
Estella N. Howlett, 
S. Isetta Locke, 
Augusta S. Downs, 
Olive J. Randall, 
Helen M. Locke, 
Mattie -C lough, 
Cora F. Nichols, 
Addie St. Clair, 
S. Amanda Wyman. 
Jonathan Smith, 



$337 


50 


350 


00 


245 


00 


312 


50 


450 


00 


120 


00 


120 


00 


705 


00 


120 


00 


300 


00 


122 


50 


240 


00 


240 


00 


273 


75 


332 


50 


281 


25 


182 


50 


172 


50 


294 


50 


1,500 


00 


118 


00 


348 


75 


170 


00 


300 


00 


157 


50 


41 


25 


100 


00 


41 


25 


197 


50 


197 


50 


25 


50 


15 


00 


100 


00 


112 


50 


8 


00 



337 

William H. M. Gate, . . 4 00 

Edwartl P. Sherburne, . . 175 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



Fuel, 

Furniture and supplies, 
Books and stationery, 
Printing and advertising, , 
Care of rooms, 
Contingent expenses, 
, Teachers' salaries, . 

Amount, . 
Balance to new account. 



14,867 


30 


1,376 


87 


533 


47 


500 


42 


2,162 


90 


2,060 


24 


36,451 


58 


148,252 


78 


2 


18 



LAND SOLD FROM CITY FARM. 

To amount on hand Jan. 1, 1873, $7,620 17 
Receipts on notes during the year, 1,763 74 



EXPENDITURES. 



By transferred to account of City 

Farm, .... 16,862 58 

Balance to new account, . . 2,521 33 



,451 58 



,254 96 



Dr. 



),383 91 



Cr. 



),383 91 



838 
WATER WORKS. 

To Water Bonds on hand Jan. 1, 

1873, . . . 1101,500 00 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1873, 40,455 51 

Appropriation, . . . .150,000 00 
Receipts for water rents, . . 1,920 53 
Receipts of J. T. Fanning, . 573 61 

Receipts for supplies to laborers, 114 07 
Accrued interest on Water 

Bonds sold, . . * . 193 26 

Accrued interest on State Bonds 

sold, 146 00 



Dr. 



EXPENDITURES. 



-1294,965 98 
Cr. 



By pd. Mayor's drafts in 1873, 1294,609 02 
*Less sum included in acct. for 

1872, 10,450 77 



Mayor's drafts on acct. of 1873, 284,158 25 
Balance to new account, . . 10,807 73 

1294,965 98 

*This item is the balance obtained as follows, aud is found in 
the statement of the Water Works account for 1872, to wit: 

Dec. 31, 1872. Discount on Water Bonds 

sold to date, ^9,047 50 

Coupons paid, 8,811 00 

$17,858 50 
Accrued interest on bonds at sale, . . 7,407 82 



$10,450 77 

This difference of statement results from the closing of Water 
Commissionei's' accounts December 20, while the Treasurer's ac- 
counts close December 31, and the above balance was carried for- 
ward to the draft of .January, 1873. 



339 
SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 

To New Hampshire State Bond, . $1,000 00 
Appropriation, .... 1,000 00 
Annual interest on bond, . • GO 00 



Dr. 



$2,0G0 00 



RESERVED FUND. 

To Appropriation, .... $7,847 37 

Account of interest on taxes, . 3,741 73 

" Reservoirs, . . 1,000 00 

" " Grading for concrete, 1,500 00 

" " Incidental expenses, 1,910 00 

Receipts from State Treasury, 

bal. over estimated revenue, 10,998 61 



Dr. 



,997 71 



EXPENDITURES. 



Cr. 



By Highway District No. 1. 

« u u 2, 

u ii u 4. 

" " " 5, 

" " " 6, 

" " " 8, 

a u u Q 

" " 10, 

tt (( ii ^"J^ 

it a u 1 o 

Valley Cemetery, 
Court House, . 



$225 00 

1,000 00 

180 00 

110 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 GO 

150 00 

80 00 

25 00 

300 00 

200 00 



340 



Fire Alarm Telegraph, 


. 1,000 00 




Paupers off Farm, . 


. 1,000 00 




Commons, 


. 2,000 00 




Piscataquog bridge, . 


78 94 




Granite-street canal bridge, 


. 1,181 24 




Abatement of taxes, . 


670 00 




Printing and stationery, . 


400 00 




Court House, . 


650 00 




Repairs of school-houses, . 


699 23 




Discount on taxes, . 


821 43 




Insurance, 


194 37 




Pine Grove Cemetery, 


350 00 




City teams, 


350 00 




Incidental expenses, 


. 7,000 00 




Watering streets, 


20 00 




Lighting streets, 


60 00 




Granite Bridge, 


150 00 




Sewers and drains, . 


. 1,010 00 




Schools, .... 


150 00 




Amount, .... 


. $20,255 21 




Balance to new account, 


. 6,742 50 






<&0C, QQ7 


71 






1 J- 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 



ist for 1873, 


$25,461 35 


" 1872, 


. 3,568 08 


" 1871, 


. 6,786 41 


" 1870, 


. 7,232 35 


" 1869, 


. 6,646 04 


" 1868, 


. 5,233 85 


" 1867, 


. 6,206 53 



Valuation, Taxes, &c. 



YEAR. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1838 . . 


$555,270 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


$300 


1839 . , 


604,903 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


300 


1840 . . 


946,200 


3,986 56 


772 


2 20 


300 


ISil . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12.952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13.764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


• 1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3.187,720 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


3M0 


1847 . . 


4.488,55: ' 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664.957 


39.712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,.'iOo.()4;^ 


44,97!> 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


18o0 . . 


5.832.' xSO 


48,'.i74 23 


2,^20 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,9 6,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2.907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,2;;7,617 


■62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,83:5,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,S62 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,0.s0 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84.827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,.:.97.786 


96.233 86 


2,935 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1855 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1S6() . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


18'^7 . . 


10,101, .556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9.929,072 


208,78.3 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


2:54,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


l.iO 


1871 . . 


11,.365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 



342 

City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To whom payable. 


When payable. 


Principal. 


July 1 


18.54 


City Bonds. 


July 1 


, 1874 


.^20.000 GO 


Jan. 1 


1856 


" 


Jan. ] 


1880 


10,000 00 


July 1 


1857 


U L:. 


Ju]y 1 


1877 


22,500 00 


July 9 


1858 


Neheraiah Hunt. 


July 9 


1878 


2,400 00 


July 22 


1858 


H il 


July 22 


1878 


1,100 00 


July 1 


1862 


City Bonds. 


July 1 


1882 


22,500 00 


Jan. 1 


1863 


n. i^ 


Ja,u. 1 


1888 


35.000 00 


Oct. 31 


1863 


ii u 


Nov. 1 


1893 


70^000 00 


April 1 


1864 


u c. 


April 1 


1884 


70,000 00 


July 1 


1864 


it u • 


July 1 


1894 


50,000 GO 


April 1 


1865 


u u 


April 1 


1885 


10,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


u u 


Aut;:. 1 


1874 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


u c; 


Aug. 1 


1875 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869- 


U 11 


Aug. 1 


1876 


1,500 GO 


Aug. 1 


1869 


4C a 


Aug. 1 


1877 


1,500 GO 


Aug. 1 


1869 


a u 


Aug. 1 


1878 


1,500 00 


Aug, 1 


1869 


U u 


Aug. 1 


1879 


10,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


u u 


Aug. 1 


1880 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


a u 


Aug. 1 


1881 


10,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


U (( 


Aug. 1 


1882 


1,500 OG 


Aug. 1 


1869 


u u 


Aug. 1 


1883 


5,000 GO 


Aug. 1 


1869 


it . i( 


Aug, 1 


1884 


1,.5G0 OG 


Aug. 1 


1869 


a a 


Aug, 1 


1885 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


u u 


Aug. 1, 


1886 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


a u 


AUA-. 1, 


1887 


3,500 GO 


Jan. ] 


1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan'. 1 


1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1872 


u u 


Jan. 1 


1892 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1872 


i; u 


Jan. 1, 


1897 


100.000 GO 


Jan. 1 


1872 


u a 


Jan. 1 


1902 


100,000 00 



Amount funded debt Jan. 1, 1873, 1762,100 00 
Decrease during the year, . . 1,600 00 



Amount funded debt Jan. 1, 1874, . . $760,500 00 
Amount temporary loan Jan. 1, 

1873, 2,298 57 

Increase during the year, . . 96,120 00 



Amount temporary loan Jan. 1, 

1874, ..... 98,418 57 

Amount interest due, estimated, . 20,000 00 

Outstanding bills due Jan. 1, 1874, 62,998 10 



Total indebtedness Jan. 1, 1874, ■ 1941,916 67 

Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1874, ' 132,803 11 

Notes due the city, . . . 3,163 40 

Interest on same, .... 490 00 

Water bonds unsold, . . . 68,100 00 

State " " ... 29,500 00 

1134,056 61 



Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1874, . . . 807,860 16 
Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1873, . . . 530,680 91 



Increase of indebtedness during the year, $277,179 25 

Attest, JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

City Auditor. 



344 
CITY PROPERTY. 

City Library building, 

Iron Fence on Commons, . 

City Hail and Lot, .... 

City Farm and permanent improvements, 

Stock, tools,' furniture, and provisions at City 
Farm, . . . , . 

Engines, hose and apparatus. 

Engine house and stable, Vine st., 

Reservoirs, . - . . . 

Hearse, houses, tombs, and new cemetery. 

Court House and Lot, 

Common sewers, ^ . . . . 

Safes, furniture and fixtures at City Hall, 

Street lanterns, posts and pipes, . 

Water Works, 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets, 

Ward room and lot, Manchester Street, 

.Ward room and lot. Park Street, 

Engine house and lot. Ward Seven, 

Water pipe, wagon and apparatus for water 
ing streets, 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, 

Gravel lot, Lowell Street, . 
'' Belmont Street, 

" Ward 7 (one-half acre), 

" Bakers ville (one acre). 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, 
Bell Tower, 



$29,000 00 
15,700 00 
60,000 00 
24,000 00 

6,038 34 
48,040 95 
15,900 00 
10,000 00 

4,900 00 
50,000 00 
73,000 00 

3,000 00 

3,000 00 
294,609 02 

3,000 00 

3,000 00 
600 00 

2,300 00 

2,000 00 

50,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,200 00 

50 00 

100 00 

12,000 00 

3,682 14 



8717,120 45 



• 845 
SCHOOL PROPERTr. 

Blodgett-streetscliool-liouseandlot, $3,000 00 

Movable furniture, ma{)S, charts, etc., 150 00 -1-3,150 00 

Bridge-street house and lot, . . 500 00 

Old High school-house and lot, . 6,500 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 200 00 6,700 00 

New High school-house, . . 45,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, charts, 

books and apparatus, . . 2,000 00 47,000 00 

Wilson-Hill house and lot, . . 3,300 00 

Movalde furniture, maps, etc., . 125 00 3,425 00 

Merrimack-strect house and lot, . 15,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 350 00 15,350 00 

Manchester-street house and lot, . 8,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 300. 00 8,300 00 

Park-street house and lot, . . 8,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 400 00 8,400 00 

Franklin-street house and lot, . 18,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 400 00 18,400 00 

Spring-street house and lot, . 14,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 400 00 14,400 00 

Stark house and lot, . . . 3,000 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 200 00 3,200 00 

Bakersville house and lot, . . 3,500 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 75 00 3,575 00 

Gotie's Falls house and lot, . . 3,600 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 100 00 3,700 00 

House and lot near Harvey's, . 2,500 00 

Moval)le furniture, maps, etc., . 50 00 2,550 00 

Hou>e and lot near Clough's mill, . 600 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 50 00 650 00 

Hallsville house and lot, . . 3,500 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 75 00 3,575 00 

Massabesic house and lot, . . 1,400 00 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., . 40 00 1,440 00 



346 



Mosqnito Pond, house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Center-street house and lot, . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
Ash-street house and lot, 
Lincoln-street house and lot. . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
South house and lot, 'Sqnog, . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Amoskeag house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Main-street house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 

Amount of School Property, 
" City Property, 



1,000 00 

50 00 1,050 00 
5,000 00 
125 00 5,125 00 
30,000 00 
50,000 00 

400 00 50,400 00 
2,800 00 

60 00 2,860 00 
3,700 00 
125 00 3,825 00 
12,000 00 

100 00 12,100 00 

249,675 00 
717,120 45 



Total Property, 



966,795 45 



INDEX 



1, 



Abatement of Taxes, 
Alarm Telegi-aph, 
Alarm Boxes and Keys, . 
Amoskeag Falls Bridge, . 
Engine Co. No 
Hose Co., 
Apparatus. Fire, 
Ash-Street School-house, 
Attendance at School, 
Awards iTir land taken for highways 
Bridge, Granite, 

Granite-Street, Iron, 

Amoskeag Falls, 

Piscataquog, 
Buildings, Repairs of 



City Government, 1873, 
1874, 

Library, . 

Hall and Stores, 

Farm, 

Teams, 

Treasurer's Accounts, 
Cemeteries, 
Commons, 
County Tax, 
Course of Study, 
Contingent Expenses, (Sc 
Condition of lieservoirs, 
( 'ourt House, . 
City Property, . 
Debt, City, 

City, payment of, 
Day Police, 
Discount on Taxes, . 
Decoration of Soldiers' gr 



hools), 



aves, 



. 295 

138, 148, 315 

. 158 

. 257 

136, 138, 264 

. 137 

. 135, 145 

. 326 

. 190, 211 

. 317 

. 256 

. 318 

. 257 

. 319 

. 314 



7, 34, 95, 
" 19, 39, 



37, 
13, 36, 



191, 



23 
43 

292 
289 
243 
246 
232 
125 
260 
310 
217 
332 
161 
312 
344 
342 
312 
274 
295 
321 



348 



Expenditures in detail, 
Examinations of candidates for schools, 
Employment of children in the mills, 
E. \y. Iiarrin,i:jton Engine Co. Xo. 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. N( 
Engineer's Department, . 

Beport, . 
Evening Schools, 

Farm, City, 

Finances, .... 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, . 

Fire Apparatus, 

Fence, Iron, 

Fire Department, 

King Steamer No. 1, 
Fires, 1873, 

Firemen's Belief Association, 
Furniture and Supplies, (Schools) 
Goffe's Fails Hose Co., . 
Government, City, lb73, . 
1874, . 
Granite Bridge, , 

Street Canal Bridge, 
Grading for Concrete, 
Highway District Xo. 1, . 

2, . 

3, . 

4, . 

5, . 

6, . 

7, . 

8, . 

9, . 

10, . 

11, . 

12, . 

13, . 
Highways and Bridges, . 

Xew, 

Awards for land taken for 
High School, . 

Hydrants 

Iron fence, 

Inaugural xiddress of Hon. James A. Weston 
Incidental Expenses, 
Insuraijce, . 

Interest, .... 
liisrucLitons to key holders, 
Intermediate School, 
Laud sold from Farm, 
Damage awards, 



, 


, 


241 




, 


197 


, 


, 


190 


136, 


139 


,265 


137, 


Ul 


,267 
137 
135 


• 


188 


,322 


19 


,39 


, 243 


. 5 


,29 


,236 


138, 


148 


,315 
145 
314 


.*15 


,34 


,2(54 


135, 


139 


,269 
142 
149 
328 
137 
23 
44 
256 
318 


. • 




820 
247 
247 
248 
249 
250 
250 
251 
251 
252 
252 
253 
254 
254 




10 


, 38 

25 

317 

18 L 




77, 


151 
314 
25 
282 
313 
310 
159 
182 
337 
317 



849 



Lighting Streets, 
Library, City, . 

Donations to. 
Trustees' Report, 
Keport of Librarian of, 
Loan, Temporary, . 
Location of Alarm Boxes, 
Monument, Soldiers', 
Militia, .... 
Miscellaneous Expeuses of Fire Department, 
Names of Teachers, . 
New School-Houses, 
Night Watch, . 
N. S, Bean Engine Co., No. 4, 
Officers, City, . 
Outstanding Taxes, . 
Overseers of Poor, Report of, 
Order of Exercises in Schools, 
Payment of City Debt, 
Paving Streets, 
Paupers ofi' Farm, 
Pennacook Hose Co., No. 1, 
Pest-House, 
Pine Grove Cemetery, 
Police Department,. 
Printing and Advertising, 
Printing and Stationery, . 
Property, City, 

School, 
Piscataquog Bridge, . 
Reduction of City Debt, . 
Repairs of School-Houses, 

Buildings, 
Reserved Fund, 
Reservoirs, 
Revenue Account, . 
Report, Order to print 28th Annual, 
of Finance Committee, 

Committee on Cemeteries, 

Committee on City Farm, 

Chief Engineer, 

Trustees of City Library, 

Librarian, 

Overseers of Poor, . 

School Committee, . 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Water Commissioners, 

Engineer of Water- Works, 
Salaries of Officers, .... 

Teachers, 
School Satistics, 1873, 
Schools, 



15 



. 280 

7, 34, 292 

. 104 

. 85 

. 101 

. 311 

. 158 

. 39)5 

. 281 

. 268 

. 177 

. 326 

. 272 

136, 140, 266 

23, 43, 27G 

. 34U 

. 91 

. 204 

. 312 

12, 293 

. 241 

136, 140, 267 

18, ,320 

129, 263 

36, 48, 270 

330 

281 

344 

345 

319 

312 

324 

314 

339 

161, 259 

237 



236 
125 

93 
135 

95 
101 

91 
165 
175 

51 

61 
276 
334 
175 
327 



8, 32, 204, 227 



350 



Schools, Evening, 
School Report, . 

Department, . 

Higli, . . . 

Houses, . 

House, Ash Street, 

Superintendent, Report 

Property, 
Studies, Course of, 
Sewers and Drains, 
Soldiers' Monument 
Streets, Lighting, 
Watering, 
Paving, 
State Tax, 
Tax, County, 
Taxes, Abatement of, 

Discount on, 

Summary of, 

Outstanding, 
Temporary Loan, 
Telegraph, Fire Alarm, 
Teams, City, 
Teachers, Names of, 
Salary of, 
Meetings of, 
Truancy, . 
Training School, 
Valuation, Taxes, &c., 
"Valley Cemetery, 
Valedictory of Hon. John 
Water-Works, . 
Watering Streets, 
Water Supply for Fires, 



of. 



P. Newell, 



7,16 



188, 322 
. 165 

163, 225 
. 181 
8, 33, 326 
. 326 
. 175 
. 345 
. 191 
13, 39, 257 
20, 339 
. 280 
. 294 
. 293 
. 309 
. 310 
. 295 
. 295 
. 341 
. 340 
. 311 
188, 148, 315 
. 249 
. 177 
. 334 
. 209 
. 189 
. 182 
. 341 

125, 261 

5 

30, 51, 338 

. 294 

. 147