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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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ANNUAL REPORTS 



THE -Z-E^K, 1875.. 

W£W HAMPSHIRE 





\^ 



THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1875. 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 
AFFAIRS OF^THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, l!^. H. 

JOHN B. CLARKE, PRINTER, 

1S76. 



N 

\ AYS- 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Codncil. 
AN OEDER, authorizing the printing of the Thirtieth Annual Report of the 

Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Okdeeed, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the Joint 
Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are hereby authorized to pro- 
cure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing of seventeen hun- 
dred copies of the Thirtieth Annual Report of the Receipts and Expendi- 
tures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of the Committee on 
Finance, the School Board, Water Commissioner and Superintendent of Wa- 
ter-Works, Engineers of the Fire Department, City Marshal, Overseers of the 
Poor, Trustees, Librarian and Treasurer of the City Library, Committee on 
Cemeteries, and Committee on City Farm, and that the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropi'iation for Printing and Stationery. 

January 4th, 1876. 
In Board op Cojibion Council. Passed. 

JOEL DANIELS, President. 

January 4th, 1876. 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Passed in concurrence. 

ALPHEUS GAY, Mayor. 



MANCHES'TER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 

' . 1875. 



MAYOR. 

HON. ALPHEUS GAY. 



CITY CLERK. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Joel Daniels. 



€LERK OP COMMON COUNCIL. 

Roland C. Rowell. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Henry R. Chamberlin. 



4 

COLLECTOR OP TAXES, 

John Hosley. 



CITY MESSENGER. 



William Stevens, Resigned. 
Timothy Clark, Acting Messenger, 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1— Seth T. Hill. 

Ward 2 — George R. Simmons. 
Ward 3— John D. Bean. 

Ward 4 — John L. Kennedy. 
Ward 5 — John Cashin. 

Ward 6 — John M. Hayes. 

Ward 7— Robert M. Shirley. 



members op common council. 

Ward 1. Ward 4. 

Jonathan Dodge, Henry L. Drew, 

James Patten, Michael Hurley, 

Israel 0. Endicott. Charles H. Caverly. 

Ward 2. Ward 3. 

Thomas W. Lane, Joel Daniels, 

Loring B. Bodwell, William Burke, 

Arthur Dinsmore. Edwin L. Hill. 



Ward 5. Ward 6. 

Martin J. Foley, Patrick Riordon, 

Charles F. Peasley, Simon Dodge, 

Michael Maxwell. Aaron Waldron. 

Ward 7. 

Newell R. Bixby, 
William Bailey, 
Pi\is Brown. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Drew, Waldron and Bo d well ; the 
Mayor and Alderman Hill. 

Accounts. — Alderman Bean and Simmons ; Messrs. Ri- 
ordon, Dinsmore and Caverly. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Kennedy and Shirley ; 
Messrs. Drew, Lane and Burke. 

Public Instruction. — Aldermen Hill and Hayes ; Messrs. 
J. Dodge, Hill and Bailey. 

Streets. — Aldermen Hayes and Kennedy ; Messrs. S. 
Dodge, Patten and Maxwell. 

City Farm. — Aldermen Cashin and Simmons ; Messrs. 
Dinsmore, En^icott and Caverly. 

Sewers and i)r«ws.— Aldermen Shirley and Bean ; Messrs. 
Hill, Foley and Patten. . 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Kennedy and Shir- 
ley ; Messrs, Hurley, Bixby and Peasley, 

Fire Department.— kl&QvmQn Simmons and Bean ; Messrs. 
Lane, Waldron and Endicott. 

Claims. — Aldermen Hayes and Hill; Messrs. Hill, J. 
Dodge and Hurley. 



6 

House of Correction. — Aldermen Casliin and Shirley ; 
Messrs. Peasley, Maxwell and Brown. 

Military 4#'««Vs.— Aldermen Simmons and Hayes ; Messrs. 
Bodwell, Riordon and Foley. 

Lighting /S'^ree^s.—Aldermen Kennedy and Cashin ; Messrs. 
Patten, Caverly and S. Dodge. 

Water- Works. — Aldermen Hill and Bean ; Messrs. Hur- 
ley, Bailey and Drew. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Bean and Shirley. 
Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Hayes and Cashin. 
Licenses. — Aldermen Kennedy and Simmons. 
Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Hill and Bean. 
Setting Trees. — Aldermen Simmons and Hill. 
MarTcet.^MdiQYmQn Shirley and Cashin. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JElection Returns. — Messrs. Peasley, Bixby and Waldron. 
Bills 071 Second Reading. — Messrs. S. Dodge, Bailey and 
Riordon. 

Enrollment. — Messrs. Bodwell, Burke and Bixby. 



ASSESSORS. 



William W. Baker, Chairman. 

Christopher C. Colby, Clerk. 
Christopher C. Colby, Timothy Sullivan, 

Nicholas Nichols, Joseph Bean, 

William B. Johnson, William W. Baker, 

John C. Head. 



7 

ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

John Cayzer, James Hall, 

Henry N. Hall, Thomas Howe. 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR, 

Hon. Alplieus Gay, ex-offi.cio chairman. 

Darwin A. Simons, clerk. 
Sayward J. Young, John McKenna, 

Jeremiah Stickney, Patrick A. Devine, 

Darwin A. Simons, Israel Webster, 

Edwin A. Moulton. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Hon. Alpheus Gay, ex-officio chairman. 

William Little, clerh. 
John W. Severance, Marshall P. Hall, 

John E. Stearns, John P. Newell, 

John J. Sullivan, Lucien B. Clough, 

William F. Byrnes, Nathaniel W. Cumner, 

Samuel P. Jackson, Martin Fitzgerald, 

William Little, Newton H. Wilson, 

John K. McQueston, James P. Walker, 

Joel Daniels, ex-officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Joseph G. Edgerly, 

Josiah G. Dearborn, elected July 2, 1875, 



8 

CITY SOLICITOR. 

John p. Bartlett, resigned, 

David L. Perkins, elected Nov. 2, 1875. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Hon. E. A. Straw, 

Hon. "Wm. P. Newell, Hon. Isaac W. Smith, 

Hon. Samuel N. Bell, Hon. Phinehas Adams, 

Hon. Nathan P. Hunt, Joel Daniels, ex-officio, 

Hon. Alpheus Gay, ex-officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justices. 

'Joseph W. Fellows, resigned June 2, 1875, 
John P. Bartlett, appointed. 

Assistant Justice. 

Newton H. Wilson. 

ClerL 

Koland Rowell, resigned June 7th, 

John B. Mills, appointed June 7th. 

City Marshal. 

Darwin A.. Simons. 



9 

Assistant Marshal. 

Daniel R. Prescott. 

. Captain of the Watch. 

Thomas L. Quimby. 

Da7/ Police. 

Horatio W. Longa, George F. Laird. 

Night Watchmen. 

John C. Colburn, Zadoc B. Wright, 

Eben Carr, Michael Fox, 

William B. Newhall, Ransom W. Bean, 

James Bucklin, Timothy P. Shea, 

Timothy Connor, Hiram Stearns, 

Edward Bonner, Hezekiah H. Noyes,* 
William Esty.f 

Constables. 

Darwin A. Simons, Harrison D. Lord, 

Daniel R. Prescott, Daniel W. Reynolds, 

George W. Nichols, Patrick J. O'Neil, 

Thomas S. Montgomery, Henry Bennett, 

Thomas D. Barnes, Daniel R. White. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Darwin A. Simons, Patrick A. Devine, 

•Richard J. P. Goodwin. 

♦Removed August 3, 1875. tAppointed August 3, 1875. 



10 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Hanson C. Canney. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OP FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Ablion H. Lowell. 

Assistant Engineers. 

Freeman Higgins, Andrew C. Wallace, 

Wilberforce Ireland, Benjamin C. Kendall. 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

Joseph E. Bennett. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 

Ward 1. — Daniel H. Maxfield. 
Ward 2.— George W. Riddle. 

Ward 3. — William C. Knowlton. 

Ward 4. — Edward W. Harrington. 
Ward 5. — Albert Jackson. 
Ward 6. — William Little. 

Ward 7.— Charles K. Walker. 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — William A. Perry. 

Ward 2.— Nathan P. Kidder. 

Ward 3. — Charles H. Stebbins. 

Ward 4. — William H. Gate. 



11 



Ward 5. — George A. Little. 

Ward 6. — Oscar G. Farmer. 

Ward 7. — Fred W. Dearborn. 



Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 
John W, Dickey, 
Charles W. Clement, 
Solon D. Pollard. 

Ward 2. 
Joseph H. Haynes, 
William M. Shepherd, 
George H. Colby. 

Ward 3. 
Frederick B. Balch, 
William Fitzgerald, 
James McClintock. 



Ward 4. 
Charles Chase, 
Hiram Bailey, 
William 11. Kennedy. 

Ward 5. 
Hugh McDonough, 
Hanson C. Canney, 
Thomas Howe. 

Ward 6. 
John P. Young, Jr., 
Joseph Bryson, 
John H. Procter. 



Ward 7. 
Frank W. Avery, 
Charles O'Shaughnessey, 
Andrew H. Baker. 



EEPORT OF CITY MAESHAL 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the 

City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with Sec. B of the Revised 
Ordinance I herewith submit my second annual report of 
the Police Department, for the year ending December 31 ^ 
1875. 

The state of the city for the past year has been compara- 
tively quiet. No serious crime has been committed within 
our midst, while in some sections of our State crime has 
prevailed to an alarming extent. 

Although the number of arrests have been large, it is- 
gratifying to be able to report that no extensive robberies- 
or burglaries have occurred in our city. 

A well-regulated Police force is one of the most import- 
ant branches, and is the strong right arm in local civil gov- 
ernment, and is a guarantee of the supremacy of the laws- 
and the protection of life and property. 

In some sections of our city the officers' beats extend 
over one mile in distance, and it should not be a matter of 
surprise that our officers, whose services are over so long a 
route, are not at the place where crime is committed at 
all times. Occasionally complaint is made that some theft 
has been committed and no officer in sight. It is not often 
that criminals are so bold as to commit crime in the sight 
of an officer. Criminals usually take care to see that no 
officer is near enough to interfere in their work. 



14 



Those who are loudest in complaining think not of the 
constant services rendered night and day by our officers, 
nor of the numerous instances when the officer is on hand 
at the right time. Our officers are exposed to the frequent 
and sudden changes of the weather, and their duties, at 
times, are hazardous, and contending for the right with the 
worst classes in the community they are constantly exposed 
to danger, and oftentimes make many bitter enemies. 

It will be seen by the following statement that less arrests 
have been made during the past year than the year 1874. 

The following is a report of the work done during the 
year by the Police Force : 



Number of males arrested 
Number of females arrested 

Total number of arrests 
Number of lodgers . 
Store doors found open . 

The officers have given the fire alarm eight times 
the year. 

Number of arrests in 1874 
Number of lodgers in 1874 

The cases of arrests were disposed of as follows 
Assault with intent to kill 
Idle and disorderly person 
Stealing fruit . 
Aggravated assault . 
Assault . 
Assault on officer 
Larceny . 

Larceny from person 
Burglary . 
Tramps . 
Bastardy 



. 626 
. 113 

. 739 
. 1125 
. 103 
during 

. 858 
. 1521 

2 

5 

8 

13 

88 

14 

91 

3 

23 

6 

3 



15 



Common fiddler .... 

Attempt to rescue prisoner 

Obtaining money under false pretenses 

Receiving stolen goods 

Gambling ..... 

Discharging firearms in street . 
Noise and brawl .... 

Disturbing religious meeting . 
Common drunkard .... 

Drunk ...... 

Disorderly conduct . . . , 
Selling liquor ..... 

Playing ball in the street Sunday 

Keeping open Sunday 

Truants . 

Vagabond 

Evading car fare 

fornication 

Exposure of person 

Lewdness 

Obscene and profane language . 

Stubborn child .... 

Escaping from House of Correction . 
Driving beyond distance hired 
Defacing buildings .... 

Throwing stones .... 

Obstructing sidewalks 

Stealing a ride .... 

East driving ..... 

Building fire in street without permission 
Surety of the peace .... 

Disorderly house .... 

Adultery 



from 



Tolal arrests 



739 



16 



Cases were disposed of as follows : 
Fined and paid 
Sent to House of Correction 
Sent to Jail 

Sent to House of Reformation 
Bound over 
Discharged 
Appealed 

Sentence suspended 
Sentenced House of Correction at Wilton 
Allowed by Court to leave town 
Sent to House of Correction at Jail . 
Placed on file . ... 

Total 



27r 

158 
36 
16 

103 
43 
11 
36 
36 
5 
13 
5 



739 
dcost 



The following amount has been received for fine a 
in the Police Court, from January 1st, 1875, to January 1st, 
1876, .^2,810.48. 

All of which is most respectfully submitted. 

D. A. SIMONS, Vity Marshal. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDIXG COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To the Cit// Council of the Citi/ of JIanchesfer : 

The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on City Farm 
herewith submit their annual report for the year ending 
December 31st, 1875. 

The following is an inventory and appraisal of the per- 
sonal property at Farm, December 31st, 1875 : 
Live stociv ....... 

Hay and grain ...... 

Carriages, farming implements and other tools 

Produce 

Household furniture and domestic implements 
Provisions and fuel ..... 
Bedding and wearing apparel 
Irons for securing prisoners .... 
Lumber, brick, nails, old iron and lead 
Cash on hand 

Total personal property . . . $7,798 19 
The following are the permanent improvements made on 
Farm during the year, with the estimated values of the 
same : 

Seventy-five rods meadow ditch . . . $50 00 

Stone work and grading for corn barn . . 100 00 



$1,768 


00 


967 


75 


1,671 


55 


875 


75 


675 


50 


6S6 


05 


486 


20 


38 


00 


31 


00 


598 


39 



150 


00 


200 


00 


500 

• 


00 



18 

One hundred and ten rods field ditch . 

Two hundred|rods stone wall 

New building and repairs on old buildings . 

Total value of permanent improvements $1,000 00 
The following is the account of the farm for the year : 
City Farm in account with the City of Manchester : 

Dr. 
To stock on hand, Dec. 31st, 1874, $5,952 20 
To expenditures for 1875, . . 4,978 12 
To interest on farm, ... . 1,00000 



111,930 32 

Cr. 
By stock on hand, Dec. 31st, 1875, $7,199 80 
By cash on hand, Dec. 31st, 1875, 598 39 
By cash paid City Treasurer for 
labor, and for stock and produce 

sold from farm, 1,678 24 

By permanent improvements, . 1,000 00 
By 3516 days' board of prisoners, 

and 2621 days' board of paupers, 1,453 89 

$11,930 32 

Average number of prisoners boarded at Farm per day 
during the year, ...... 9 2-3 

Average number of paupers boarded at Farm per day dur- 
ing the year, 7 1-6 

Average cost per day of board for each prisoner or 

pauper, 23 2-3 cts. 

ALPHEUS GAY, Mayor. 
JOHN H. CASHIN, 
GEO. R. SIMMONS, 
ISRAEL 0. ENDICOTT, 
CHAS. H. CAVERLEY, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1875. 



ALPHEUS GAY, Mayor, 

ex-officio chairman. 

JOEL DANIELS, 

President of the Common Council, ex-officio. 



MEMBERS OP THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Ward 1. — John W. Severance, 

Marshall P. Hall. 
Ward 2. — John E. Stearns, 

John P. Newell. 

Ward 3. — John J. Sullivan, 
Lucien B. Clough. 

Ward 4.— William F. Byrns, 

Nathaniel W. Cumner. 
Ward 5. — Martin Fitzgerald, 

Samuel P. Jackson. 
Ward 6.— William Little, clerk, 

Newton H. Wilson. 
Ward 7. — John K. McQuesten, 

James P. Walker. 

JOSEPH G. EDGERLY, 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



•20 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims. — Messrs. Hall, Cumner, 
Little, Daniels and the Mayor. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Cumner, Hall, Jackson and Clough. 

Repairs, Furniture and Supplies. — Messrs. Jackson, Sev- 
erance and Fitzgerald. 

Text-Books and Apparatus. — Messrs. Clough, Walker and 
Byrns. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Little, Jackson, McQuesten 
and the Mayor. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Newell, Byrns, Sulli- 
van and Clough. 

Trwawc^/.— Messrs. Little, Newell, Wilson and McQuesten. 

Employment of Children iti Manitfacturing Establishments, 
— Messrs. Stearns, Severance, Fitzgerald and Wilson. 

3Iusic. — Messrs. Walker, Stearns and Cumner. 

Draioing. — Messrs. Hall, Sullivan and Newell. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Clough, Hall and Walker. 

Ash Street. — Messrs. Newell, Byrns and Clough. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. Severance, Sullivan and Stearns. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Hall and Fitzgerald. 

Lincoln Street and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Jackson, Wil- 
son and Cumner. 

Litermediate Building.— Messrs. Sullivan and Newell. 

Piscataquog. — Messrs. McQuesten and Walker. 

Manchester Street. — Messrs. Byrns, Little and Fitzgerald. 

Training School. — Messrs. Cumner and JTackson. 

Amoskeag and Blodgett Street, No. 1 Stark. — Messrs. 
Stearns, Severance and McQuesten. 

Bakersville, Goff's Falls, Harvey District, Webster Mills, 
Hallsville, Youngsville and Mosquito Pond.— Messrs. Wil- 
son and Little. 

Evening School.— Messrs. Walker, Hall and Sullivan. 



EEPOET or SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the City Council of the City of 3Ianchester : 

The Board of School Committee respectfully submit their 
Report, as required by law, for the year ending December 
SI, 1875. . 

By an amendment to the city charter, passed by the 
Legislature at the session of 1874, the School Board was 
changed, both in respect to the number of its members, 
and the length of their term of office. By that amend- 
ment the city was divided into seven Wards instead 
of eight, as before, and provision made for the election of 
two members of the School Board from each Ward for the 
first year, one for the term of one year, and the other for 
the term of two years, and, thereafter, for the annual elec- 
tion of one member from each Ward for the term of two 
years. By this arrangement the School Board consists of 
sixteen members, the Mayor and President of the Common 
Council being members ex-officio, as before. To this Board, 
thus constituted, is committed the most sacred and import- 
ant interest of the city, the care of the public schools, and 
the expenditure of the school money. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year, with some 
other items of public and general interest, will be found in 
the following tables : 



22 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES — SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, 1875. 



For Teaching, Balance from 1874 

Amouut appropriated 1875 

Fuel, Balance from 1874 

Appropriated 1875 

Transferred from School H. Ac. 

Reserved Fund 

Care of Rooms, Balance from 1874 

Appropriated 1875 

Transferred from R. Fund 

Furniture & Sup., Balance from 1874 

Appropriated 1875 

Books and Sta., Balance from 1874 

Appropriated 1S75 

Transferred from R. Fund 

Printing and Ad., Balance from 1874 

Appropriated 1875 

Incid. Repairs, Appropriated 1875 

Transferred from R. Fund 

Incidentals, Appropriated 1875 

Transferred from R. Fund 

Truant Officer, Appropriated 1875 

Eve. Schools, Balance from 1874 

Appropriated 1875 

Transferred to another account 

Balance unexpende<l 





Received. 


Expended. 


1,684 74 






38,000 00 


. . 39,684 74 


39,436 08 


10 40 






4,500 00 






500 00 






153 30 


. . 5,163 70 


5,163 70 


34 25 






2,500 00 






2 57 


. . 2,536 82 


2,536 82 


2(1 13 






700 00 


720 13 


706 92 


43 05 






500 00 






43 50 


586 55 


586 55 


4 32 






500 00 


504 32 


242 03 


COO 00 






116 41 


716 41 


716 41 


COO 06 






335 09 


935 09 


935 09 


COO 00 


600 00 


360 00 


240 51 






1,500 00 


.. 1,749 51 


1,126 4S 


$52,610 72 


$51,810 08 
240 OO 






560 64 


.*.'>2.610 72 


$52,610 72 



23 

Whole amount expended by School Committee, . S5l,810 08 

Amount expended by City Council, viz.: 
For rej^airs and improvement of school 

houses, * S9,666 54 

salaries of School Committee, . . 160 00 
salary of Superintendent, . , . 1,800 00 

Sll,626 54 

Whole amount expended by City Council and School 

Committee for all school purposes, . . . $63,436 62 

Whole number of pupils enrolled in day schools, . 3,.519 

Decrease from last year, 205 

Average number belonging to schools, . . . 2,601 

Number attending less than two weeks, . . . 1,018 

Average daily attendance, 2,295 

Average per cent, of attendance, .... 92 

i^umber of persons in the city, of school age (estim'td) 5,200 
Eatio of number belonging to schools to estimated 

number of school age, 48 

Ratio of number l^elonging to schools to whole popu- 
lation (estimated at 25,000), .... 10 
Cost of tuition in day schools per scholar, (based up- 
on average n^imber belonging), .... $15 76 

Cost of incidentals, per scholar, 4 94 

Total cost, per scholar, 20 70 

Cost of tuition in High School, 22 40 

Cost of tuition in Grammar Schools, .... 21 84 

Cost of tuition in Primary and Middle Schools, . . 13 64 
Number of pupils admitted to High School from 

Grammar Schools, 80 

Ratio of number admitted to High School to whole 

number in Grammar Schools, .... 13 
Number of pupils admitted to High School, . . 80 
Number graduating fi'om High School, ... 45 
Whole number of pupils enrolled in High School, . 299 
Whole number of pupils enrolled in Grammar Schools, 818 
Whole number of pupils completing course in Gram- 
mar Schools, 75 

Number of pupils enrolled in Evening Schools on Low- 
ell street, quarter ending December 24, 1875, . 228 
Number enrolled in Evening Schools in 'Squog, . 72 
Average attendance in Evening Schools, Lowell St., 76 
Average attendance in Evening Schools in 'Souog . 41 



24 

Average number belonging in Evening Schools, . 172 

Number of teachers employed in Evening Schools, . 8 

Number of regular teachers employed in day schools. 67 

Average salary per teacher, $564 62 

Average number of pupils per teacher, ... 34 

Number of non-resident pupils, 25 

Whole number of school-buildings, .... 22 

Whole number of school-rooms, ..... 75 

Seating capacity of houses, 3,335 

Value of school property, S280,000 00 

City valuation, 1875, 14,195,102 00 

Total City Tax, 1875, ... ... 315,131 29 

Amount appropriated for schools, exclusive of repairs, 50,000 00 

Ratio of amount appropriated for schools, to total tax, 15 



It will be perceived that the appropriation for fuel is con- 
siderably overdrawn. The explanation is this : the severe 
and protracted cold weather of last winter made it neces- 
sary to purchase, at an advanced price, something like a 
hundred tons of coal in addition to that which had been 
provided for the purpose, and to guard against a similar 
contingency the large amount of four hundred tons was 
purchased for the present season. 

In all free, popular governments, it is universally conceded 
that provision must be made for the general education 
of the people ; for without this there can be no security 
for the intelligent exercise of those powers with which the 
law clothes every citizen, or for the wise administration of 
public affairs, and, therefore, no safeguard for the perpe- 
tuity of the government, and the preservation of civil and 
religious liberty. Hence, there is no object for which the 
people are more willing to be taxed, than for the mainten- 
ance of the public schools. In this matter our own city 
has always pursued a most wise and liberal policy. Ample 
provision is yearly made for the education of all the chil- 



25 

dren, and most parents who have children of the proper 
school age are glad to avail themselves of the privileges 
thus afforded. Where this is wanting the law makes at- 
tendance compulsory, either in the public or parochial 
schools, for a portion of the year, at least. This appears 
to be the settied policy of the State, as expressed in those 
laws which provide ' that the advantages of a common- 
school education shall be furnished to every child' in the 
State. And in order that these advantages may actually 
be made available to every child, every town and city is 
empowered " to make such by-laws as shall compel the at- 
tendance at school of all children between the ages of six 
and sixteen years, who are habitual truants, or who do not 
attend school, and are without any regular and lawful oc- 
cupation." There are, unquestionably, many such children 
in our city, and it is a matter of vital public importance 
that they be placed in school, and not suffered to grow up 
in ignorance and vice. The question arises, by what agency 
can this best be done ? We respectfully suggest that 
some suitable person should be appointed truant officer who 
shall give his whole time to this service while the schools 
are in session, — who shall be under the direction and con- 
trol of the School Board, and shall be required to make a 
daily report of his doings to the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. There is a manifest propriety in this, and we 
believe the public sentiment demands it. In many cities, 
where a different provision to regulate the evil of truancy 
has been tried, it has proved a failure and has been aban- 
doned. * 

In order still further to secure to all children the ad- 
vantages of our common school system, there is a law that, 
" no child under fifteen years of age shall be employed in 
any manufacturing establishment, unless he shall have at- 
tended some public school or private day-school, where in- 
struction was given by a teacher competent to instruct in 



26 

the branches taught in the common schools, at least twelve 
weeks during the preceding year ; or, if under twelve years 
of age, unless he shall have attended school as aforesaid 
at least six months during the preceding year, if the schools 
were in session for that length of time." The overseers 
in the mills, and those having charge of other manufactur- 
ing establishments in the city, have professed a readi- 
ness to coopeuate with the School Board in enforcing a 
compliance with the provisions of this law. There is rea- 
son to fear, however, that many children are thus employed 
without the proper certificate showing that the law has 
been complied with. If a correct enumeration of children 
between the ages of six and sixteen years had been made 
last April, as required by the act of the Legislature, we 
could tell approximately how many children in the city are 
actually deprived of all schooling. 

In order still further to insure the advantages of a com- 
mon-school education to all children, the question is agitated 
in several of the States, and in many towns and cities,, 
whether free text-books should not be furnished to all chil- 
dren in the public schools. In quite a number of places 
the plan has already been successfully adopted, and there 
are strong reasons to recommend its adoption generally. 
Such books could be purchased in large quantities, directly 
of the publishers, at the lowest wholesale prices, and, there- 
fore, at prices but little more than half the retail cost. 
Passing from one child to another, they could be made to 
do service three or four times over. The books could be 
charged directly to the teachers of the several schools, who 
would finally return them to the Superintendent. Where 
the plan has been adopted, it is said, the books are better 
cared for than when owned by the scholars themselves, — 
and that the cost to the public is not more than one-fourth 
the usual amount paid for such books. It also removes the 
inconvenience and delay, whicli often arise from the want 



27 

of books, and takes the burden from those who can ill af- 
ford to purchase them and yet have too much pride of 
character to accept of them as an act of charity. So far 
as either the law or public policy is concerned, free text- 
books could be supplied on the same ground, and for the 
same reasons that school-houses, teachers, apparatus, &c., 
are now furnished. 

But few ordinary repairs have been required during the 
year. The extreme cold weather of last winter, however, 
made it apparent that the arrangements for heating the 
Franklin-street and Lincoln-street houses were entirely in- 
adequate for the purpose. Several times it was found 
necessary to dismiss those schools long before the regular 
hour for closing them. And besides this, the furnaces in 
those buildings were so out of repair that the escaping gas 
rendered the air in the rooms occupied by the children 
unfit to be breathed. These facts being brought to the at- 
tention of the committee of the City Council on Lands 
and Buildings it was decided, and wisely we think, to re- 
place the worn-out furnaces with steam-heating apparatus. 
Though the expense of putting in these improved furnaces 
has been quite large, in the first instance, yet it is confi- 
dently believed that no further considerable outlay of the 
kind will be needed in these houses for many years. 

And here we may be permitted to advert to a matter 
which has been touched upon in former reports. We refer 
to the singular fact that the greater part of the annual ap- 
propriation for the repairs of school-houses is expended 
under the direction of tlie Committee on Lands and Build- 
ings, rather than under the direction of the School Com- 
mittee. "We respectfully suggest to the City Council that 
the whole of this appropriation for repairs be intrusted to 
the School Board. There would seem to be great propriety 
in this, as it must be admitted that the Board have special 
opportunities for knowing what repairs are needed. 



28 

We desire, also, again to call the attention of the City 
Council to the suggestions of former School Boards in re- 
gard to the purchasing of new school-house lots, and the 
enlarging of one or two now owned by the city. We would 
refer you to the particular facts, touching this matter, that 
were stated in last year's Report. 

During the year 1874, John B. Clarke, Esq. offered to 
members of the High school four prizes, amounting in all, 
to forty dollars, — two to the young gentlemen for the best 
declamations, and two to the young ladies for the best 
reading. The same generous offer was made for the pres- 
ent year and accepted by the School Board. These prizes 
were competed for near the close of the Fall term in the 
hall of the Ash-street school-house. The exercises were 
very interesting and of a high order, reflecting great credit 
upon the pupils of the High school, and upon those who 
instructed them. 

Realizing the importance of elocution or the art of read- 
ing and speaking intelligently and forcibly, and desiring, as 
far as possible, to promote this art in the public schools, 
the School Board, near the close of the year, employed 
Prof. Mark Bailey, of Yale College, to give a course of ten 
lectures on elocution to our teachers in order that, through 
them, all our schools might receive the advantages of the 
best instruction that could be afforded in this important, 
but often poorly taught, branch of education. The more 
advanced pupils in the High school were also admitted to 
these lectures. 

Music has been taught in all the schools as heretofore. 
In some of them a very good degree of proficiency has 
been attained. We do not think it would be wise to dis- 
continue the practice of employing an experienced teacher 
in this department. As a source of amusement and recre- 
ation, as a means of discipline and refinement, as tending 
to promote good order and harmony of feeling and man- 



29 

ner, as well as of voice, it cannot be too highly recom- 
mended. 

In this connection we may speak of drawing. In some 
of our schools this has been taught, more or less, for years. 
But the subject is receiving attention now as never before. 
In the best schools of the first nations of Europe it has 
long held a prominent place. The results which those na- 
tions have reached in decorative art, and the perfection to 
which they have carried their manufactures, are due more 
to their early practice in the various departments of draw- 
ing, and to their art and industrial schools and schools of 
design, than to all things else. Indeed, it would seem that 
the time is not far in the future when the question of S'U- 
premacy among nations is to be a question, not of armies 
and of battles, but of art, industry and skilled labor. In 
this country the foundation of this art-education must be 
laid in our common schools, and must begin with drawing. 
In the matter of high art, of refined taste, and of skilled 
labor in its finer and more remunerative forms, we are im- 
measurably behind many of the European nations. "Who- 
ever," says Prof. C. B. Stetson, "attends the Centennial 
Exposition at Philadelphia, will behold the results of such 
(art) education, not only in France, but in other European 
countries, where drawing is made the foundation of all 
manufactures and of all art." 

But in the United States the attention of educators is 
being drawn more and more to this subject. In many 
places a good beginning has been made. The first manu- 
facturing city of New Hampshire cannot afford to be indif- 
ferent to a matter so closely connected with her growth and 
prosperity. Instead, therefore, of excluding drawing from 
our schools, it should be given greater prominence from 
year to year, for in that direction lie our highest material 
interests. In a lecture on this subject, given by Prof. Wal- 
ter Smith before the teachers of the Boston High Schools^ 



30 

his closing words are as follows : " In ten years from the 
Centennial of Independence the United States will take 
rank as an art-producing nation, because the art education, 
which is inevitable, will have then made good taste gene- 
ral and skilled labor common, thus making it possible to 
convert the boundless resources of the country into the re- 
fined expression of industrial wealth." The exhibition of 
drawings and paintings at our High School near the close 
of the last term, every member furnishing one or more spe- 
cimens, was very creditable to the school and gave prom- 
ise of excellent work for the future. 

The Training school is still doing good service. The 
usual number of graduates from the High school have been 
in attendance as sub-teachers without pay. As the term of 
service here is six months, with daily practice in the actual 
work of the school room, under the direction of experi- 
■enced teachers, where the best methods of teaching and 
governing are fully illustrated and explained, it will be seen 
at once what an excellent preparation is here afforded to 
such as desire to fit themselves for teaching. 

The Evening schools have been in session three months, 
commencing the first Monday in October, and closing on 
the twenty-fourth of December. The whole number in at- 
tendance upon these schools has been three hundred ; the 
average number belonging, one hundred seventy-two ; and 
the average attendance, one hundred seventeen. The school 
in the old High school-house has been under the charge of 
Mr. J. B. Mills, and that in 'Squog under the charge of 
Mr, James E. Stone. These Evening schools are proving 
a great blessing to those who cannot conveniently attend 
the day schools. They are to be resumed and will continue 
through the winter. 

There has been an unusual number of changes in the 
corps of teachers during the year. On the first day of Jan- 
uary the resignation of Mr. Dame, master of the Lincoln- 



31 

street Grammar school, was reluctantly accepted, and Mr. 
Sylvester Brown, who had charge of the Grammar school 
in 'Squog was elected for one term in Mr. Dame's place. 
In March, Mr. Dame signifying his willingness again to ac- 
cept the position formerly held by him, was re-instated, and 
Mr. Brown was transferred to the mastership of the Spring- 
street Grammar school. This position he resigned Decem- 
ber 31, to accept a similar one in Quincy, Mass., at an in- 
creased salary and Mr. E. P. Sherburne of Portsmouth, 
has been elected master of the Spring-street school. At 
the beginning of the year Mr. Herbert W. Lull was made 
Principal of the Intermediate school but at the commence- 
ment of the fall term was chosen assistant teacher in the 
High school and Mr. J. J.. Sullivan, a member of the 
School Board, was made Principal of the Intermediate 
school. During the summer vacation Miss Emma A. H. 
Brown resigned her situation as teacher of the Amoskeag 
Grammar school, a position which she had filled with great 
acceptance to the people in that part of the city and to the 
School Board. Miss Etta J. Carley was put in Miss Brown's 
place. One, only, of our teachers has been removed by 
death. Capt. Andrew M. Heath, who early in the year had 
been placed at the head of the Piscataquog Grammar school, 
died at his home in Epsom during the summer vacation. 
Mr. William M. Stevens was elected to the place made va- 
cant by the death of Mr. Heath, 

It will be seen from this rapid sketch tliat there have 
been many changes in our Grammar schools within the 
year, and these changes have occurred just where they are 
ordinarily most injurious. In four out of the six schools 
of this grade there have been one or more changes of prin- 
cipals. No one is to be blamed for this ; it is not a fault, 
but it is a misfortune. We want good teachers, — the best 
we can get, and then we want them permanent. Primary 
school No. 7, in the Lincoln-street house, has been dis- 



32 

continued. The whole number of regular teachers in the 
day schools, at the present time, is sixty-seven. 

In July, Mr. Joseph G. Edgerly closed his services as 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. He had held the 
office continuously for eight years, and had devoted him- 
self intelligently and faithfully to the discharge of its 
duties. He had won the respect of the teachers, and the 
confidence of the public. In no small degree it is owing 
to his judicious management that our schools have im- 
proved from year to year, until, confessedly, they rank 
among the best in the country. Hon. Josiah G. Dearborn 
was elected as Mr. Edgerly's successor. Mr. Dearborn had 
been for many years successfully engaged in teaching, both 
here and in the city of Boston, and has had many oppor- 
tunities for observation. He knows the wants of the 
schools, is familiar with the best methods of instruction, 
and is earnestly devoting himself to the duties of his office. 

A larger number has been in attendance upon our High 
school than for any previous year. This fact indicates the 
growing popularity of the school, and that more of our 
citizens than ever before desire to avail themselves of the 
opportunities here afforded for the thorough education of 
their children. All the advantages of the best academies 
are here furnished free to the youth of our city, thus en- 
abling many parents to give their children a superior edu- 
cation, who could hardly bear the expense of sending them 
away from home for this purpose ; while others are enabled 
to send their boys to college, because the burden of the 
preparatory course falls so lightly upon them. 

From the amount paid for tuition by those attending this 
school, but having no legal residence in the city, the sum 
of three hundred and fifty dollars has been appropriated 
by the Board for the purchase of an excellent telescope, 
and other apparatus needed for the work of the school. 



33 

Considerable inconvenience has heretofore been experi- 
enced in this school from admitting pupils twice a year. 
Hereafter scholars will be admitted from the Grammar 
schools only at the beginning of the Fall term. In all 
grades below the High school promotions will occur twice 
a year, as usual. 

On the whole, our schools have made good progress dur- 
ing the year. Still, they are not perfect ; they are not all 
they can be made to be in some respects^ and in some 
schools there is yet much room for improvement. The 
regularity in attendance, although fair, is not all that 
€Ould be wished. We desire to call the attention of pa- 
rents to this matter. The unnecessary absence of scholars 
is not only an injury to themselves but a positive wrong to 
the schools to which they belong. Wherever the evil ex- 
ists let there be a prompt and an honest endeavor to correct 
it. Parents need also to be continually upon their guard 
never to allow themselves, through a natural but inconsid- 
erate partiality for their children, to take sides against a 
teacher. An injudicious or unjust criticism of a teacher 
may, and often does, do an irreparable injury to the child. 
Instead of fault-fiuding, therefore, let parents cooperate 
with the teachers of their children in every possible way, 
remembering that obedience to properly constituted author- 
ity, whether at home or in the school, is the first as it is 
the most important lesson a child can learn. 

Our teachers, almost without exception, are conscien- 
tiously and successfully devoting themselves to the work 
of their high calling. It is no trifling thing to be the 
teacher and guide of the young. The qualifications de- 
manded for such a position are various in kind, and more 
rare than is generally supposed. Something more than a 
familiarity with the text-books in use or a thorough know-* 
ledge of the studies pursued in any given school is requi- 
site to make a successful teacher. There must be a thor- 



34 

ough knowledge of human nature, unwearied patience, 
tact, invention, refined manners, a pure mind, and, over 
all, enthusiasm, with the power to impart it to others. It 
must also be borne in mind that the true end to be sought 
in the early education of our youth is not so much the 
storing the memory with isolated facts as the gaining of 
ideas ; that it is not so much even the acquisition of know- 
ledge as learning how knowledge is acquired ; tliat it has 
more to do with things than with the names of things, and 
is rather a process of growth from within than of cram- 
ming from without ; that it is, in short, learning how to 
think correctly and independently, how best to use one's 
faculties when he leaves the school of his childhood and 
youth and goes out, self-poised, into the great school of the 
world. They are the best teachers who can best help their 
pupils to such an education. 

Through the wise liberality of our citizens our school- 
houses at the present time afford ample accommodations 
for all our schools. They are generally attractive in ap- 
pearance, thoroughly built, conveniently arranged, and 
well furnished. They are an ornament to the city and a 
standing proof of the enterprise and public spirit of our 
people. 

At a meeting of the School Board, held December 10, 
a special committee was appointed to consider the expedi- 
ency of representing our schools at the Centennial Exhi- 
bition and, if deemed advisable, to ask of the City Coun- 
cil a moderate appropriation for this purpose. Many cities 
as well as States are thus to be represented. It seems fit- 
ting that the first city in New Hampshire should indicate, 
with others, what she has done for the education of her 
youth. With photographs and plans of some of our 
best school-buildings, with a model of the Ash-street house, 
— one of the most unique and best-planned houses tb be 
found in the country, — carefully prepared and sufficiently 



35 

large to be easily understood ; with a description of our 
school system and a brief history of the origin, growth, 
and present condition of the city, and with such other 
matters as could easily be represented, we could make a 
respectable showing and should have no cause to blush 
from a comparison with many cities much older and larger 
than ours. 

J. P. NEWELL, for the Committee. 
Manchester, N. H., Jan. 17, 1876. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester : 

Gentlemen: The position to which I was invited at the 
beginning of the present school year was accepted with a 
deep sense of the responsibilities it imposes. Though its 
duties were in the direct line in which the most of my life- 
work has thus far been done, though "having had such ac- 
quaintance with your schools as several years' experience 
at the head of one of them afforded, and an extended and 
somewhat similar experience in a neighboring city, the du- 
ties of this office appeared no slight task to me. The con- 
fidence and cordiality with which you at first greeted me, 
and have since uniformly extended, have most agreeably 
opened the way for my work. You will readily pardon 
thus much of personality in introducing to you my first 
Eeport. 

The prime and obvious duty upon entering the office was 
to make a survey of the situation, to ascertain what was 
being attempted and what accomplished in our schools.' 
To examine into the programme of studies, to make the ac- 
quaintance of the teachers, observe their methods of work- 
ing, were some of the first things attended to with care. 

In a system of schools so long established, so liberally sup- 
ported by an enterprising community, so well cared for by 
a succession of intelligent committees, it would be strange 
if there was not found, on the whole, a superior state of 
things. On the other hand, perfection in any system of 
graded schools, adapted to meet widely varied wants, where 



38 

so much of the machinery necessarily tends in a mechani- 
cal and routine direction, was not to be expected. Those 
things which are constantly being done and perforce done 
much in the s-ame way, for days and months and years, in- 
evitably run into ruts and grooves. Hence, in such a sys- 
tem, while excellencies may be numerous, defects cannot 
be absent. And, again, to those who hold independent and 
somewhat definite views upon education, based upon prac- 
tical experience and observation, all things do not look 
the same. In a word, our schools seem to be doing very 
well, but not without their faults, and susceptible of im- 
provement. To work towards keeping them doing well, 
holding fast that which is good, is the first point in my 
endeavor, and the second point is, to work carefully and 
steadily to make them do still better. But it is not al- 
ways the loudest and most talked-about reforms in schools, 
more than in other things, that are the wisest. Evils af- 
fecting social and civil organizations, where the feelings 
and prejudices of the people are more or less engaged, are 
usually better overcome by quiet and gradual processes than 
by noisy demonstrations and radical revolutions. What- 
ever improvement, if any, my efforts here may promote, 
will not be marked by any attempted sudden overthrow of 
existing plans, but wrought out, it maybe, by such still and 
formative processes as will least disturb the present work- 
ing and harmony of the schools. The disposition already 
shown by the body of teachers indicates a ready and en- 
tire willingness "upon their part to cooperate in any sug- 
gestions or plans to raise the standard of teaching or 
improve the general efficiency of the schools. The short 
term of my service, thus far, renders it impracticable to pre- 
sent here any summary account of the details needing at- 
tention or any special notice of the different grades of 
schools. But it seems proper that the occasion of this Re- 
port should be availed of to offer to you a few such general 



39 

considerations as are uppermost in my mind and as will 
indicate the scope and direction of my endeavor. These 
will be given rather as hints and suggestions than elaborated 
into any formal essay. 

CONDITION OF OUR SCHOOLS. 

From personal observation and knowledge of the condi- 
tion of our schools I feel justified in saying that for the 
past ten or fifteen years, at least, the schools of Manches- 
ter have not only been equal, if not superior, to any others 
in this State, but have ranked high as compared with any 
in New England. Their efficiency has generally been marked 
by a thoroughness in the elementary or fundamental 
studies. But during this time there has been developed 
in American schools a wider and more varied range in 
the studies pursued by the lower departments and not a 
few " new fangled notions" in methods of teaching, which 
have not all yet received the approval of the best educators. 

The same restless American ambition which marks all 
our enterprises has not passed by our school system. 
While, in one aspect, this is extremely commendable and 
helpful to progress at the same time it introduces a grave 
element of danger to its usefulness. There is such a thing 
as attempting to do too much. All things which make up 
a complete education cannot be accomplished by the public 
schools, nor does it seem advisable for them constantly to 
attempt new things. This straining to embrace all has al- 
ready, to some extent, impaired their usefulness as ele- 
mentary schools, and this tendency, if not restrained, will 
shortly load them down to such a degree as to largely di- 
vert them from their main aim. They will become super- 
ficial and showy rather than thorough and substantial. 
This tendency is not confined to any one locality but is 
widespread if not universal, and although it may not 



40 

apply with especial force to the schools in this city, yet it 
should be watched, shaped and directed. In the quaint re- 
buke of the judge to the lawyer,who over-pressed his new con- 
struction of the law, "that the Court was supposed to know 
something," we have an illustration of the matter discussed. 
In like manner may we not safely assume that wisdom was 
not wholly born with the present generation. Some of the 
old ways 'are still good. This should not be lost sight 
of in grasping forward for the new. As an example at 
hand take the matter of 

PENMANSHIP AND COMPOSITION. 

With all the mechanical rules which have been adopted 
and the new systems introduced, it is very questionable 
whether this art is any better if so well taught at the present 
time as it formerly was. I have frequently seen letters, 
written by elderly persons of average ability, who had no 
advantages but a few months at the district school, which, 
in point of plain, legible penmanship as well as correct 
spelling, clear, easy composition and general elegance of 
appearance, would, I fear, surpass the letters which the 
average graduate of our schools of to-day could produce. 
Good penmanship is certainly one of the fundamental and 
most practical acquirements. Nothing learned at school can 
be more so. And while good spelling can hardly be rated 
as a great credit, poor spelling is surely intolerable. 
And an ability to express one's self in clear, easily under- 
stood language in writing may almost be reckoned as a 
scholar's cardinal virtue. 

Take the matter of 

MORALS AND MANNERS. 

Here we would make no invidious comparisons. But to 
those who are acquainted with the tone of the schools of to- 



41 

day, in these particulars, as compared with even twenty- 
five years ago, it cannot be doubtful _that progress has not 
been made. 

Is there anything taught in the schools from the long 
list of elaborate text-books used that can be of such 
paramount importance to the pupils, or the community, aa 
an inculcation of the principles of virtue and its natural 
accompaniment, respectful and gentle manners ? How 
many statistical facts and ologies we could well dispense 
with in exchange for these. 

Though sin and ignorance are usually rated an insepara- 
ble pair, virtue and intelligence are not always equally 
bound together. Intelligence promotes virtue but does 
not insure it, and that education which at all comes near 
being perfect must be broadened, so as to include in it the 
moral sentiments. Virtue and good morals should be 
taught in all our schools. 

Who has not met " a gentleman of the old school ?" 
How significant is that phrase. A calm self-respect, a pol- 
ished, easy dignity of manner, a regard for authority and 
for superiors, a thoughtful preference for the wishes of 
others, self-constraint, an entire unselfishness — who, that 
has seen these qualities united and exemplified in man or 
woman was not struck with the beauty that can attach to 
behavior ? 

Young America knows too little of this, but nothing is 
more worth knowing. Shall not our schools do something 
to bring back some of the old-fashioned virtues ? 

The work of the schools divides itself, at once, into two 
kinds. 

1. Those things which must be taught and learned. 

2. Those things which may be taught and learned. 

It is a strict obligation that the first class of studies be 
attended to and accomplished. The second-class of studiea 



42 

should receive only the time and attention which remains 
over for them. As in the household we must have bread 
and meat, — we can get along without carpets, and, possibly 
without pianos. Reading, writing and arithmetic, — the 
old three R's, — are indispensable, and if to these we add 
some knowledge of geography and history, and general 
practice in composition, we nearly cover the imperative 
pa,rt of common school education. The other studies must 
be secondary, — more or less special and occasional. 

These considerations are naturally called up in compar- 
ing the past and present of our schools, and they lead to a 
notice of a few more topics. 

DRAWING AND MUSIC 

Are subjects which have lately received large attention in 
the New England schools. The entire absence of them in 
our schools a few years since made it necessary to emplia- 
size their importance upon their first introduction. This, 
we think, has given them a somewhat undue prominence. 
We see no reason why their elements should not generally 
be taught and carried as far as time and occasion permit. 
But should not these subjects be limited? 

The task of making all children artists and musicians 
in the public schools is an impossible one. Nor can the 
average child be brought to a great degree of proficiency. 
A foundation can be laid, enough done to bring out the 
tendencies and tastes of those specially endowed in this 
direction, as well as to give all some training of the voice 
and some facility in the use of the pencil. No word should 
be said in disparagement of these beautiful arts. The 
singing of simple and plain songs in school adds an indis- 
pensable element of cheerfulness — a most useful recrea- 
tion, improving the tone and spirit of all. Drawing, as it 
educates the eye and hand, is as indispensable to the arti- 



43 

san as to the artist. The only caution needed is not to go 
too far into the ornamental and fanciful. Those who 
choose to follow these pleasant paths must pursue them 
outside, and work out for themselves, as individuals, the 
degrees of proficiency to which their talents and energies 
entitle them. For in any well-arranged plan of common 
schools those studies must be kept in their secondary 
place, and not be permitted to crowd out or seriously hinder 
the imperative studies. 

HIGH SCHOOL AND ITS COURSE OF STUDY. 

The old philosopher, when questioned what the youth 
should be taught, replied, " What they will practice when 
they become men." The girls did not then share the ben- 
efits of the ancient education. We should amend the say- 
ing now : " What will be useful to men and women.''^ We 
do not think the world has outgrown the wisdom of this 
reply yet. A system of public schools should provide the 
greatest good for the greatest number. To be sure, there are 
some differences of opinion as to what practical and use- 
ful studies are — which are most so, and in what degree. 
But in a general way it is not hard to draw the line be- 
tween the useful and the ornamental. It is in the High 
school that is encountered the greatest danger of sacrific- 
ing the former to the latter. Not that studies and pur- 
suits which are accomplishments should be ignored, but 
they should not occupy a large place in the public school. 

The High school is the crown of our New England sys- 
tem of education. In its place, as a public school — sup- 
ported by general taxation, and closely connected with 
the Grammar schools — it should retain its common and 
democratic character. It is not meant for an ornamen- 
tal institution for fanciful work. It is the people's col- 
lege, a place for sound, useful, practical instruction, 



44 

rather than for ambitious and high-sounding studies. A 
thorough English course would seem to be its tirst legiti- 
mate aim, embracing so wide a range of general knowledge 
as to graduate tolerably well-informed men and women. 
Scientific studies, upon judiciously chosen subjects, to the 
extent of mastering the elements, and their application to 
practical life, should be somewhat prominent. 

On the question of languages, ancient and modern, there 
is room for discussion. There is no question but a good 
deal of time is spent upon these without adequate returns. 
It is exceedingly doubtful what benefit it can be to give 
the majority of girls and boys a smattering of Latin and 
French, for hardly more can be accomplished, unless it be 
thought fashionable and therefore indispensable. The 
study of French, if the language could be mastered, would 
be an acquisition to those who could afford to give it the 
necessary time. The study of Latin and Greek, while use- 
ful as a necessary preparation for college, to those who will 
pursue them in a thorough and extended course, can hardly 
be regarded as useful and popular studies. It is nothing 
but a superficial knowledge of any of these languages that 
the majority of High-school children ever obtain. Super- 
ficial knowledge of anything is often worse than entire ig- 
norance. It begets an unwarranted confidence and often a 
ridiculous conceit, and is the source of every sort of error. 
Superficial studies make superficial habits, and such habits 
make like character. It was doubtless this the poet had 
in mind when he pronounced " a little learning a danger- 
ous thing." And here, again, enters the consideration, 
are ornamental and fanciful studies, or those which are 
not in the direct line of a plain, substantial education, such 
as make the possessor a more va^luable member of the 
community, to be pursued at the public expense? We 
think they must be classed as luxuries rather than neces- 
sities, and as such, should they not be paid for by those 



45 

who choose to enjoy them ? As an example in point, how 
often is more than half the time of the principal of a High 
school, numbering two or tliree hundred pupils, occupied 
in the ancient languages, preparing five or six boys for 
college ? A bare statement of the matter sufficiently in- 
dicates its inequality and injustice, and suggests the in- 
quiry whether some improvement would not be in order. 

By any order of studies which is at all thorough, and 
division of classes adapted to a moderately-large corps of 
instructors, it would seem best that promotions to the 
High school, and corresponding graduations, should occur 
not oftener than annually. This is in accordance with a 
nearly-universal custom based upon experience. This 
leaves the whole year uninterrupted for the regular school 
work, and seems the more convenient in every view. 

In making these comments it should be clearly under- 
stood that they are general and not meant to reflect upon 
our High school. This school has been for many years 
under the principalship of very able teachers, and stands 
relatively very high, and is only open to such obvious criti- 
cisms as hold against the system, wherever it exists. 

TEACHERS. 

The well-known couplet which pronounces that system 
of government the best which is best administered, is an 
epigrammatic statement of one side of the truth. But it 
puts a just emphasis on the proper and efficient methods of 
doing things which have been laid out and planned to be 
done. In any school system administration holds an equally 
important place. The best contrived and most promis- 
ing plans, on paper, need brains, skill and energy to make 
them successful in practice. The best machinery is often 
that which is simplest. To work up an elaborate and com- 
plex system, with vast details — to set it forth in many and 



46 

high-sounding words — launching it with a flourish, and ex- 
pecting it to educate our children, is the vainest sort of ex- 
pectation. Words are cheap and much talk is often a bore, 
and high sounding discussion of theories diverts from the 
main business in hand. The simplest and plainest terms 
in which a scheme of schools can be defined, made clear and 
intelligible, is the best. And when that is done, its suc- 
cess will depend almost wholly upon the efficiency of the 
teacher. They are the true motive power. Given an incom- 
petent superintendent and an indifferent committee, and 
good teachers and the schools are yet safe. The time-hon- 
ored maxim, "as is the teacher so is the school," is the sum 
of wisdom in this matter. Good teachers cannot produce 
poor schools. It thus becomes of transcendent importance 
always to secure the best qualified and most efficient teach- 
ers ; not instructors, merely, but high-minded men and 
women. Character begets like character, and the influ- 
ence of one good teacher is incalculable. No considerations 
of a mistaken economy, no claims of friendship, or demands 
for local patronage or undue partiality for '.'home talent," 
should ever influence in the choice of inferior teachers. 
Every mistake made in this quarter is vital and lowers the 
tone of the whole body of teachers. It has been said that 
a minister can always tell whether or not he has a call to 
preach by finding out if the people have a call to come and 
hear. Teaching requires genius of its kind no less than 
preaching. A certain class are endowed for it by nature, 
born "apt to teach." They possess tact, and what has been 
called the "divine art of explanation." It is not all those 
who know enough, or have been graduated and trained even, 
or who are ambitious, or compelled to earn a livelihood, who 
can expect to succeed as teachers. A winning disposition 
that enlists the confidence and fixes the affections of the 
pupils is much, but even this sometimes exists without 
other substantial qualifications, and is itself, a quality so 



47 

popular, tliat it may detract attention from real defects. 
If a hi^h standard is to be maintained, merit of candidates 
alone must determine their selection. Let it be under- 
stood that the best will always win the positions, wholly 
regardless of circumstances, and then talented and well-qual- 
ified candidates will not be wanting. Other things being 
equal, — but they must be equal, — home talent may justly be 
preferred. But if it is once understood that location is in 
itself a qualification, and will be weighed, the moral force 
of merit is completely broken down. 

The importance of this subject justifies these remarks. 
They are not intended as a criticism but a caution. The 
tendency alluded to is so insidious, and so many and such 
plausible arguments, well intended, lead so unconsciously 
in this wrong direction, that it seemed wise to consider 
where the direction itself leads. Valuable as is our owa 
Training school to our young ladies and to the city, it 
should be distinctly understood that its graduates hold na 
pre-emption of rights to places in our schools, but must 
prove themselve.s the equals, if not the superiors, of any in 
the State who may be invited to compete for the positions. 

It is, on the whole, with just pride that we can point to 
a corps of faithful and well-qualified teachers in this city. 
The liberal salaries paid, the desirableness of Manchester 
as a place of residence, and its commanding position as 
the first city in the State, combine to centre here the best 
teaching talent. We are frequently called upon to con- 
tribute of our stock to the flourishing cities of a neighbor- 
ing State, who can offer higher prizes thaji we, but we 
have generally been fortunate in keeping up a high stan- 
dard by drawing from our original sources, — one of the 
products of New Hampshire, — able men and women. 

PRIMARY TEACHING. 

The greatest teachers the world has produced have not 
considered it beneath their dignity to teach little children. 



48 

This indicates the importance which the best minds have 
attached to this period in education. The notion that any- 
body can teach a Primary school has been exploded, and 
it is here that we now seek to place the most skillful in- 
structors. " Well begun is half done" applies with spe- 
cial force in a child's education. The first steps are all 
important. Here at the foundation how readily the course 
of the stream is turned one way or another. How easily 
first impressions are gained, — and how lasting their influ- 
ence. 

While in ordinary public Primary schools it has been 
debated whether or not it is best to adopt, in all their full- 
ness, the Kindergarten and object, method plans, of which 
so much has been said and written, these discussions have 
been fruitful of many useful hints and suggestions. The 
live teacher will readily avail himself of these ideas as 
means to interest the children and render the school rou- 
tine less tedious. More progress has been made in meth- 
ods of primary teaching in the past few years than in other 
departments of teaching. But they all dralv more or less 
on the resources and skill of the teacher. With poor 
teachers they avail nothing, and had better not be at- 
tempted by them. 

The mention of improvement in methods leads us to 
say that there is still too much mere 

ROTE TEACHING. 

The prejudice of old habits with those who have long 
taught, the inability to do better of new candidates who 
are minus the gift to teach, the somewhat rigid and com- 
plicated machinery of a graded system, all tend to make 
the work of teaching more or less mechanical. Memoriz- 
ing lessons and reciting them by rote in answer to set 
questions is not wholly gone out of use. The prime fault 



49 

with this method is, that it is not teaching at all, but a 
poor and pernicious substitute for it. Some studies must 
be memorized, it is true, but they need explanation and 
illustration, to be thoroughly understood ; the thought 
needs to be assimilated, that living ideas may be conveyed. 
Words that should be freighted with ideas, are often as 
empty as husks to the pupils who devour them. For in- 
stance, how many dry details of geography and history 
are compaitted to memory, as a lifeless mass of disconnect- 
ed facts — which signify nothing. They are learned with- 
out an intelligent, underlying purpose, learned for the day 
and forgotten to-morrow. This blind exercise, pursued in 
this aimless way, does not even strengthen the faculty of 
memory. On the other hand, it is the chief stimulant to 
the worst of all habits, — the habit of forgetting. So great 
is this evil, that a re-action has set in from some quarters, 
threatening the total disuse of text-books, or the use of 
such only as cannot be used for rote processes. But the 
better opinion seems to be, the right use of the right books, 
going to neither extreme. But another thing, tending to 
perpetuate this evil, is faulty methods of examination. 
And in a system of graded schools no problem is so diffi- 
cult to deal with as that of 

EXAMINATIONS AND PROMOTIONS. 

Much stress is laid upon examinations by many educa- 
tors. They would have them ft-equent and constant, rigid 
and severe. All schools, and classes, and pupils, must be 
tested by a never-varying rule. From these, one would 
think that a system of schools could be examined into a 
state of perfection. In my opinion, nothing can more seri- 
ously hinder and destroy all proper freedom in teaching, 
or more constrain the individual development of the pu- 
pils, and injure the healthy condition of school-work, gen- 

4 



50 

erally, than this sort of examinations. They will extract 
the principle of life and growth from any school, and de- 
base it to the level of a machine or mill. To successfully 
prepare examinations becomes the end of all the work 
done, — teachers and pupils alike, if they would maintain 
their standing, must think of nothing else. 

It also introduces into the school a spirit of unrest and 
anxiety, — a feverish condition which detracts from the ner- 
vous energy and working-power of all concerned. It im- 
plies a wholly wrong notion of the object and end of school- 
life, and narrows its aim, where it should be broadened, — 
working only for the result of to-morrow, instead of for the 
whole of one's after life. 

At a recent meeting of the American Health Association, 
in Baltimore, a paper was read on the increase of nervous 
diseases among school children, which pronounced, very 
strongly, against unwise and undue stimulation in school 
studies, — especially for girls. The sort of examination 
above alluded to, would, doubtless, come under the ban in 
this opinion just named. 

But the right sort of examinations are certainly neces- 
sary, and just as beneficial as the wrong sort are hurtful. 
Nowhere in school-work is so much care and skill needed 
as just here. They should generally be made by topics and 
subjects, and not conformed to any book. They should not 
be made too formal, — and not too frequent. They should 
be framed and shaped, and given under such circum- 
stances as to relieve the pupils from all embarrassment, as 
far as possible, and enable them to do and show their best 
work. And it should be understood that the pupils will 
not alone be judged by the results of any single trial, but 
that the term records — for the careful keeping of which, ac- 
cording to a uniform standard, the teachers should be held 
responsible — will enter largely into all questions of promo- 
tion, or the reverse. 



51 

It ishardly too much to say^ that the method in which exam- 
inations are conducted will determine the quality and amount 
of work done in the schools. 

As an indication of the difference in the two kinds of 
teaching, it is a subject of common remark among wise ob- 
servers, that those who pass the best examinations upon 
entering a High school or a college, are nearly always out- 
stripped and left behind in the course by those who have 
had, as a preparation, less special drill or cramming, but 
more broad and general instruction. 

READING. 

The first subject taught in the Primary school, and often 
the last in the High school, is reading. Its range is wide. 
Beginning with a mere acquaintance with the names of 
words, so to speak, it ends with an ability to express 
thoughts as set forth in words. From the lowest form it 
reaches to the highest and most artistic. In one stage of 
progress or another it engages no small share of the pupil's 
school-hours. It is of the higher form that I would here say 
a word. No one who has listened to fine readings, (and who 
has not ?), but will confess to its wonderful power. It is 
an art as much as that of music, and has a charm for all 
who listen. While all cannot become artistic readers, 
much can easily be done in this direction by intelligent 
teaching, and all without giving any more time than is usu- 
ally devoted to this branch. The liberality of our esteemed 
fellow-citizen, John B. Clarke, Esq., in offering prizes for 
the second time to the High school for excellence in elocu- 
tion, is highly creditable, and indicates the importance 
which the more thoughtful members of our community at- 
tach to this branch of education. Nothing more betrays 
true culture than the manner of using the voice in reading 
and speaking. The gentle voice, which Shakspeare so 



52 

commends hi woman, indicates character. In this connec- 
tion I may be permitted to quote from the last very able 
Report of Superintendent Philbrick of Boston : "Through the 
instrumentality of vocal training, applied to expressive 
reading, a real culture is now very generally diffused among 
the pupils of our schools. The culture is physical, intel- 
lectual, moral and sesthetic, and it is altogether refining and 
elevating. If you have taken an ignorant, rude boy, — a 
veritable ' unlicked cub,' — and drilled him up to the read- 
ing of a classic piece with expression, you have taken out 
of him forever a great deal of his barbarism." But let not 
the proper use of the voice begin or end with reading. Let 
it pervade all conversation, all recitation, or vocal exer- 
cise of whatever kind. It is said the Yankee is recognized 
the world over by the tones of his voice ; that he speaks 
through his nose and not through his mouth. Let the 
training which our schools give correct all this, as they may, 
in time, and in place of coarse, harsh, nasal tones, give our 
children the clear, gentle, musical speech, so excellent and 
so much prized. And here the teacher must be the living 
force, teaching constantly by example. 

Although this Report has already exceeded the length laid 
out for it, there is one other topic about which a few words, 
must be said. 

HEALTH AND VENTILATION. 

Good mental work cannot be accomplished without a 
fair degree of bodily health. While so much is expected 
of our schools, and every device invented to help them, it 
should be seen to that no hindrance comes in their way. 
All the conditions should be made the most favorable. 
Much has been said upon preserving and maintaining the 
health of school children. But as the chief desire is " a 
sound mind in a sound body," and as the former depends- 



53 

for its condition upon the latter, why should not the aim 
be not merely to preserve, but to improve the health and 
strength of the body, as well as to discipline, enlarge and 
inform the mind. But I fear that this is not only not con- 
sidered, but that the negative duty of seeing that the body 
receives no injury is too often neglected. 

The four chief factors contributing to the sum of perfect 
bodily health are, wholesome food, pure air, proper exer- 
cise, and sufficient rest. In this matter our schools should 
be held responsible for two things : 

1. They should impart such elementary physiological 
knowledge, suited to the different grades, as to render the 
pupils well-informed on all the common and familiar prin- 
ciples governing bodily health. They should see to it that 
none of the mistakes made in this connection should have 
the excuse of ignorance. Were this always faithfully done, 
how much suffering and disease could readily be prevented. 
And what, of all that is done in the schools, could be more 
directly practical ? 

2. It should be seen to that, so far as the exercises and 
routine of the schools are concerned, none of these well- 
known principles are violated or disregarded. 

A few years ago gymnastics in school were the fashiona- 
ble thing. This is very well as teaching a proper position 
and carriage of the body, and as giving its different parts 
due expansion and freedom. But hearty, out-door play, in 
pure air, for general exercise, is worth more than all the 
gymnastics ever invented. 

In this age of science and its practical application to the 
arts of life, there is still one problem which remains but 
partially solved. How can rooms occupied by large num- 
bers of persons for a considerable space of time, to whose 
well-being fresh air is constantly necessary, be sufficiently 
supplied with it ? Innumerable devices have been adopted 
for the ventilation of school-rooms, but none of them ap- 
pear yet to be uniformly successful. 



54 

A recent careful scientific investigation, under the di- 
rection of the city Board of Health in Boston, of the actual 
condition of the air in the average school-room of the city, 
during the school-hours in the cold season, where the build- 
ings are certainly as good as any in the country, disclosed 
the fact that in many cases the air was far below the 
proper standard of purity, and in none was it fully up to 
the standard. The school-rooms in this city are probably 
no better N^entilated, to say the least. 

The able Report in which the results of this investiga- 
tion are set forth in detail, is a most valuable contribution 
to school hygiene, and well worthy our attention. It deals 
with facts as determined by exact science, and not with 
theories and speculations, and hence its authority must 
stand unquestioned. In the rooms examined, it states that 
there are a great variety of appliances for ventilation and 
warming, and they included in their survey the oldest and 
the most recently constructed school buildings. The re- 
sult, on the whole, appears to show that no great benefit 
was derived from the special ventilating appliances, and 
the diiference between the older and more modern build- 
ings was not such as would have been expected. 

They say that the working of the ventilators is largely 
subject to the conditions of the weather, and needs con- 
stant and intelligent supervision. The doors and windows, 
in nearly all instances, were largely depended upon, 
for the su|)ply of pure air. In the warm season, therefore, 
through these means, ventilation is -an easy problem ; it is 
only when artificial heat becomes necessary, especially in 
mid-winter, that it becomes so difficult a one. " The ques- 
tion of temperature is intimately related to that of venti- 
lation ; indeed, it is impossible, in this climate, to dis- 
associate the two subjects. The atmosphere must not only 
be pure, but measurably warm, as a condition requisite for 
health, as well as comfort. The temperature which may 



55 

be regarded as a reasonable standard for the warmth of 
school-rooms, must be fixed somewhat arbitrarily, and 
measured by a reliable thermometer. It should range from 
65° to 70° Fahrenheit, When the body is in a state of 
rest it is impossible to work the brain to advantage in a 
temperature much below 65°, and if it is much above 70° 
it becomes depressing." 

The rooms were often found too hot. It calls attention 
to a practice probably not confined to Boston, namely, the 
too sudden cooling off of over-heated rooms, hy widely operied 
windotvs, and says, " If anything is worse than too much 
heat it is a quick transition to the opposite extreme. In 
such cases an inevitable wave of cold, outside air, sweeps 
over the uncovered heads of the children, and a fresh ac- 
cession of cases of bronchitis and pulmonary affections is 
the result." 

It instances a case observed, where, in a few minutes, in 
this manner, the temperature of a room examined was 
lowered 15°, at a very great risk to the health of the occu- 
pants. 

It has been said that a person needs a liberal education 
and a special training in technology, to properly superintend 
the warming of a modern city dwelling ,with all its applian- 
ces for gas-lighting, water-supplying, drainage, heating and 
ventilating. Certain it is, that a knowledge of many prin- 
ciples, and the tact of practical experience, joined with an 
ever-watchful care, are required to surround our school 
children with such favoring conditions of health as will best 
enable them to perform the mental tasks they are expected 
to accomplish. 

CONCLUSION. 

As mentioned at the beginning, the topics here pre- 
sented are rather touched upon than thoroughly discussed, 



56 

and there are still others that would bear naming. The 
views thrown out are intended to show, in a general way, 
how the field of labor appears to me, at my entrance 
upon it. Though much has been accomplished for our 
schools, much yet remains to be done. Though our sys- 
tem is substantially sound and working well, only de- 
voted and unremitting care will maintain the stand- 
ard already attained. But with this alone we must not 
be satisfied, — that standard should be advanced still high- 
er. To this work, while occupying this office, holding it as 
a trust from the people of this city, through you, their im- 
mediate representatives, I shall devote my best energies. 
Under your judicious direction, may my work be fruitful, to 
some extent, of beneficial results. 

J. G. DEARBORN, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
Manchester, Dec. 31, 1875. 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS 



1875. 



HIGH SCHOOL — BEECH STREET. 

Principal — Albert W. Bacheler. 
Assistant — T. W. D. Worthen, 1 term. 

" Herbert W. Lull, 1 term. 

" Lucretia E. Manahan. 

" Lizzie S. Campbell. 

" Emma J. Ela. 

" Mary A. Buzzell. 

" Maria F. Kidder. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL — LOWELL STREET. 

Principal — Herbert W. Lull, 2 terms. 

" J. J. Sullivan, 1 term. 

Assistant — Emma H. Perley. 

TRAINING SCHOOL — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Higher Department. 

Principal — Nancy S. Bunton. 
Assistant — Mintie C. Edgerly. 

Primary Department, 

Principal — Martha N. Mason. 
Assistant — Anna 0. Heath. 



58 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS — FRANKLIN STREET, 

Principal — Daniel A. Clififord. 
Assistant — Annette McDoel. 

" Lottie R. Adams. 

" Carrie E. Reid. 

LINCOLN STREET. 

Principal — Sylvester Brown, 1 term. 

" Benjamin F. Dame, 2 terms. 

Assistant — Julia A. Baker. 

" Mary J. Fife. 

" Isabelle R. Daniels. 

ASH STREET. 

Principal — William E. Buck. 
Assistant — Anstrice G. Flanders. 

« Rocilla M. Tuson. 

" Martha J. Boyd. 

SPRING STREET. 

Principal — Sylvester Brown, 2 terms. 
Assistant — Josie A. Bosher. 
" Mary L. Sleeper. 

PISCATAQUOG — NORTH MAIN STREET. 

Principal — Andrew M. Heath, 2 terms. ' 
" W. M. Stevens, 1 term. 

Assistant — Mary A. Lear. 
" Ella F. Salisbury. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Emma A. H. Brown, 2 terms. 
Etta J. Carley, 1 term. 



59 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. Blodget street — Nellie I. Sanderson. 

2. Ash Street — Mary A. Smith. 

3. Ash Street— Hattie S. Tozer. 

4. Lincoln Street — Anna J. Dana. 

5. Lincoln Street — Mary F. Barnes. 

7. Franklin Street — Hattie G. Flanders. 

8. Franklin Street — C. Augusta Abbott. 

9. Spring Street — Cleora E. Bailey. 
10. Spring Street — Lizzie P. Gove. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. Blodget Street— Ellen B. Rowell. 

2. Manchester Street — Estella N. Howlett. 

3. Ash Street — Georgianna Dow. 

4. Ash Street — Helen M. Morrill. 

5. Lowell Street — Annie M. Offut. 

6. Wilson Hill— Abbie E. Abbott. 

7. Lincoln Street — Emma F. Beane. 

8. Lowell Street — Elvira S. Prior. 

9. Manchester Street — Clara N. Brown. 

10. Manchester Street — Nellie Pearson. 

11. Franklin Street — E. Jennie Campbell. 

12. Franklin Street— Martha W. Hubbard. 

13. Spring Street — Emma A. Cross. 

14. Spring Street — Nellie M. Whitney. 

15. Centre Street — Jennie P. Bailey. 

16. Centre Street — Nellie E. Tappan. 

17. South Main Street — Alice G. Lord. 

18. Manchester Street — Abbie S. McClintock. 

19. Amoskeag — Celia M. Chase. 

20. South Main Street — Sarah D. Lord. 

21. Centre Street — Augusta S. Downs. 



60 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. Stark District — Nellie M. Gate. 

3. Bakersville — Principal, Addie M. Chase. 

Assistant, S. Isetta Locke. 

4. Gofife's Falls — Stella A. Cochrane. 

5. Harvey District — Helen M. Locke, 2 terms. 

Nettie Sawyer, 1 term. 

6. Webster's Mills— Olive J. Randall. 

7. Hallsville — Principal, Maria H. Hildreth. 

Assistant, Mary B. Lane, 1 term. 

8. Youngsville — N. Amanda Wyman, 1 term. 

Ellie A. Gilcreast, 2 terms. 
Mosquito Pond — Lana S. George. 

MUSTC TEACHER. 

Jason J. Kimball. * 



61 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR 
THE PAST YEAR. 



Schools. 


Whole number be 
longing to the 
School. 


o 




2S 




Boys 


'Girls. 


Tot'l. 


^S 


High School 


115 
100 
88 
92 
57 
70 
26 
125 
124 
21 
33 
39 
36 
30 
* 41 
46 
44 
32 
28 
73 
48 
37 
60 
43 
31 
46 
62 
52 
42 
37 
48 
41 
32 
27 
29 

24 
28 
30 
10 
56 
18 
23 
13 
36 
32 
16 


172 

128 
98 

110 
53 
71 
28 
34 

122 
34 
46 
28 
33 
38 
27 
29 
42 
27 
45 
35 
49 
39 
28 
36 
34 
35 
54 
52 
33 
46 
46 
34 
38 
38 
26 

27 
36 
25 
67 
52 
24 
14 
6 
29 
23 
10 


287 
228 
186 
202 
110 
141 
54 
159 
246 
55 
79 
67 
69 
68 
68 
75 
86 
59 
73 
108 
97 
76 
88 
79 
65 
81 
116 
104 
75 
83 
94 
75 
70 
65 
55 

51 
64 
55 
17 
108 
42 
37 
21 
65 
55 
26 


229 
152 
158 
168 
83 
113 
34 
59 
136 
34 
42 
35 
44 
38 
39 
39 
41 
56 
34 
85 
32 
43 
35 
38 
33 
37 
37 
37 
37 
43 
39 
46 
33 
37 
33 

32 
33 
28 
11 
56 
26 
30 
17 
38 

a5 

16 


219 
149 
153 
162 
72 
94 
32 
38 
127 
30 
40 
34 
39 
35 
35 
37 
40 
34 
32 
83 
30 
40 
33 
36 
31 
35 
32 
85 
35 
41 
36 
40 
30 
34 
31 

30 
32 
26 
9 
52 
23 
27 
13 
34 
30 
15 


95 


Franklin-street Grammar School 


98 


Lincoln -street Grammar School 

Ash -street Grammar School 


96 
9& 


Spring-street Grammar School 


87 


Piscataquog Grammar School 


83 


Amoskeag Grammar School 


94 


Intermediate School 


64 


Training School 


93 


Middle School No. 1 


88 


" " " 2 


95 


" " " 3 , 


97 


" " " 4 


89 


" " " 5 


94 


" " " 7 


90 


" " " 8 


95 


" 9 

" " "10 

Primary " " 1 


97 
92 
94 


1( K << 


97 


" " " 3 


80 


" " " 4 


93 


" " " 5 


94 


" " " 6 


94 


" " '• 8 

" " " 9 


93 
93 
86 


" " " 10 


95 


" " " 11 


95 


" " " 12...' 


95 


" " " 13 


92 


" " " 14 


86 


" " " 15 


90 


" " " 16 


91 


" " " 17 


94 


" " " 18 




" " " 19 


93 


" "20 


94 


" , " " 21 

Suburban Si;hool, District No. 1 


93 
86 




. 92 


" " " "4 


88 


" " " " .5 


90 


" " " "6 

" " " " 7 

" " " " 8 


76 
89 
86 


" " " "9 


93 


Total 






2501 


2295 


92 









Note.— The whole number reported from each school, if added together, would 
be more than the whole number in all the schools, as some scholars are reported from 
two or more different schools. The whole number of different pupils attending last 
year was 3519. e, "" 



EEPOET OP THE BOAED OF HEALTH. 



Your Board of Health have devoted much time in the 
past year in looking after this department and the sani- 
tary condition of the city. 

I trust some improvement has been made in this direc- 
tion. 

SMALL-POX. 

This loathsome disease made its appearance in our city 
on the 24th of March, on Manchester Street, in a Canadian 
family. 

Your Board of Health acted promptly on its first discov- 
ery by removing the entire family to the Pest-House. It 
was thought advisable to vaccinate all of the school child- 
ren in the Manchester-Street school that had not received 
the same, this school being the place where the children 
went that belong to the family we had removed to the Pest- 
House. 

Drs. Canney and Tremblay commenced the work, and 
found attending at this school eighty-eight scholars that 
were not protected from small-pox by recent vaccination. 

The new building erected for this purpose in 1874 was 
a place long needed to make patients comfortable with 
this much-dreaded disease. From the 24th of March until 
the 13th day of May twenty patients were treated for 
small pox, three of which proved fatal. 



64 

In addition to this number fifteen persons, members of 
various families where the disease was discovered, were 
also carried to the hospital as a measure for the public 
safety, to prevent contagion. 

The comparatively small number of deaths is believed to 
be due, in a great measure, to the admirable interior ar- 
rangement of the hospital, such as ventilation, the frequent 
change of bed-clothing, diet, and the cleanly condition of 
the rooms. 

Too much praise cannot be rendered to the matron, Miss 
Judith Sherer, who has performed her duties in the most 
faithful manner. Some repairs have been made the present 
season to the buildings, rendered necessary from the hur- 
ried manner of its construction. 

It is deemed necessary by the Board of Health that a 
small building should be erected, as soon as time will per- 
mit, for the purpose of a wash-room, and also as a place 
where the bed-clothing and infected clothing can be thor- 
oughly cleansed, the means now in use for this purpose 
within the hospital being entirely useless and inadequate. 
We would say, in conclusion, that all of the cases of small- 
pox have occurred in families that have recently come from 
Canada. 

A certain proportion of the foreign population are care- 
less about vaccination, and when sick with small-pox con- 
ceal, if possible, the nature of their disease. And to pre- 
vent the spread of this'disease, we would urge every citizen 
to see that all persons in his employ have the protection of 
vaccination. 

CATTLE DISEASE. 

About the first of June parties by the name of Dillon 
and McArtey commenced the sale of Texas cattle in 
Manchester, also herding the same in Bakersville. Soon 



65 

after one of the citizens in that district, W. W. Baker, lost 
one of his cows bj sickness tliat he was unable to account 
for. In a few days another was reported dead, and sick- 
ness continued until seven of the cows died in Bakersville. 
Your Board of Health were satisfied that the disease origi- 
nated from the Texas cattle, and immediately notified 
Messrs. Dillon and McArtev not to import any more into 
the city. 

Your Board of Health invited Drs. How and French to 
be present and assist in a post-mortem examination of one 
of the cases. They were present and Dr. How has kindly 
furnished me an article giving his views of the disease, 
which I furnish in this Report as I received it from him. 

D. A. SIMONS, ) Board 

R. J. P. GOODWIN, V of 
P. A. DEYINE, ) Health. 

To the Board of Health of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemex : — Having been requested to consult with you in 
reference to the cause of the disease destroying the cows of several 
of our citizens in the Bakersville district, and to determine what 
should be doue to prevent the spread of the malady, I respectfully 
submit the folUowing : 

I have not seen any of the cows during their sickness, but have 
taken notes of the symptoms in all the cases from owners or eye- 
witnesses. The symptoms in every case correspond to those of 
what is known as splenic or Texas fever — a scourge which has not 
hitherto appeared in this region, but which has, at times, committed 
ravages among the cattle of the Middle and Western States. 

The cows attacked were taken suddenly sick and grew rapidly 
worse, showing signs of great prostration at the very first onset 
of the disease, their drooping heads, staggering gait and difficult 
breathing indicating some terribly-malignant blood-poison. 

They died in from two to five days fi'om the first manifestation 
of any sickness, and their owners and others were naturally suspi- 
cious that the}^ had been poisoned by some malicious person. 

In company with your Board I saw a 'post-mortem examination 
of one of the worst cases. The blood was found to be disorijan- 



ized, and the spleen, lungs, liver and kidneys deeply congested. 
These are the appearances found after death from splenic fever. 

This disease is peculiar in that its germs either do not attain 
their full development in the Texas steer, or else the Texan is, by 
climatic or some other agency, protected from them. The Texas 
steer is supposed to obtain these germs from the dry grasses of the 
South. They may remain latent in the system while he is feeding 
on the plains of the West, and even when he comes to the Eastern 
States he may apparently be in good health. But yet he is the 
carrier of a deadly germ which, escaping by his breath or dis- 
charges upon the grass, may be taken up by a Northern cow that 
happens to graze along the same road, and undergo so rapid a de- 
velopment in a few days in her system^ as to disorganize her 
blood and destroy her life. 

In its malignancy and in the changes it induces in the system 
this blood-poison resembles that of some of the diseases of man, 
such as black measles, black small-pox and malignant scarlet fever, 
which destroy the blood and engorge the internal organs with it ; 
but there is no infectious disease peculiar to man which exactly 
resembles this in its mode of propagation, although it occurs to me 
that it may be compared to the fungous disease known as the rust, 
which attains one form of its development on the barberry bush 
(and perhaps on some other plant), and the second and most 
deadly one in the blight that destroys the growing wheat. The 
rust has been destroyed by cutting down the barberry bushes, and 
if we would save our stock from contagion we must have the 
Texas cattle killed before they are brought here. 

The frosts of the coming winter will kill all the germs of the dis- 
ease that have been deposited here, and we shall see no more of it 
until there is another importation from the West or South. 

L. B. How, M. D. 

September, 1875. 



EEPOET OF THE CHIEF ENGINEEE. 



Engineer's Office, December 31, 1875. 
jTo His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with the City Ordinances 
for the protection of the city of Manchester from fire, I 
have the honor to herewith submit to your honorable body 
the Annual Report of the condition and affairs of the Man- 
-chester Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 
1875, with a statement of its labors performed during the 
year, and other matters relative to its efficiency. Tliis has 
been a very unfortunate year for promptness in extinguish- 
ing the fires which have occurred, on account, as you will 
notice by the location of the fires, of most of them having 
been in the outskirts of the city, where it has been very 
■difficult to obtain water, and also requiring great exertion 
on the part of the members and teams to get the apparatus 
to the fire in season to accomplish anything in the way of 
extinguishing the flames. 

The effective force of the department consists of 119 
officers and men, and 9 horses, which are divided as follows : 
1 Chief Engineer ; 4 Assistant Enghieers. 
4 Steam Fire Engines — 14 men each and 6 horses, 
1 Hook and Ladder Truck — 30 men and 1 horse. 
1 Horse Hose-Carriage — 15 men and 1 horse. 
1 Four-Wheeled Hand Hose-Carriage — 12 men. 
1 Supply Wa^on — 1 man and 1 horse. , 



68 

2 Two-Wheeled Hose-Carriages, one of which is located at 
P. C. Cheney & Co/s Paper-Mill, at Amoskeag, and the 
other at Goffe's Falls. These carriages are manned hj 
men employed at the works where they are located. 

The department shows an increase of 10 men over the- 
previous year, which is accounted for by the addition of the 
Horse Hose-Carriage and increasing the company of No. 

3 Engine to a full complement of men. 

During the year just ended there have been 29 fires and 
false alarms. Among the most destructive was the burning 
of the Granite Flour Mill at Piscataquog, which was- 
nearly all destroyed before the department could get to it, 
owing to the distance which the apparatus had to be drawn. 
Also, the fires at P. C. Cheney & Co.'s Paper Mill at Amos- 
keag ; and the burning of Col. Waterman Smith's house on 
the hill, where the department labored under great disad- 
vantages, being obliged to force the water through 1800 
feet of hose and up a very steep grade ; and others of a 
lesser magnitude will be found in the list of fires annexed 
hereto. 

It is with pleasure that I am able to report that not a 
member of tlie department has lost his life while in the 
discharge of his duties as fireman, neither has any member 
of the department been injured to any extent during the 
year. 



69 
LOCATION OF HYDRANTS.— East Side of River. 



There are at present 271 hydrants, located as follows : 
Amherst, north-west corner of Vine Street. 
Amherst, opposite south-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Walnut Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Ashland Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Hall Street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Cross Street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Warren Street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Ashland Street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 

Auburn, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Auburn, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Auburn, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Auburn, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Bedford, north-west corner of Granite Street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 Manchester Print Works Corp. 
Bedford, north-west corner of Central Street. 
Beech, north-west corner of Park Street. 
Beech, front of No. 584. 
Birch, north-west corner of Lowell Street, 
Birch, north-west corner of Washington Street. 
Blodgett, front of Primary School-House. 
Blodgett, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Blodgett, north-west corner of Pine Street, 
Blodgett, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Blodgett, north-east corner of Canal Street. ■ 



70 



Bridge, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Bridge, north-east corner of Hobbs Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Bridge, front of No. 26. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Walnut Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Ash Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, north-west corner of Russell Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Linden Street. 
Brook, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Phinehas Adams' loti» 
Brook, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Canal, north-east corner of Depot Street. 
Canal, near old office door to Locomotive Works,. 
Cedar, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Central, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Central, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Central, near gate to Merrimack Square. 
Central, north-west corner of Chestnut Street- 
Central, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Central, north-west corner of Union Street. 



71 

Central, north-west corner of Beech Street. 

Central, north-west corner of Maple Street. 

Central, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 

Central, front of No. 374. 

Central, north-west corner of Wilson Street. 

Chestnut, north-west corner of Lowell Street. 

Chestnut, opposite High Street. 

Chestnut, north-west corner of Pearl Street. 

Chestnut, north-west corner of Orange Street. 

Chestnut, north-west corner of Myrtle Street. 

Chestnut, north-west corner of Prospect Street. 

Concord, opposite Vine Street. 

Concord, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 

Concord, north-west corner of Union Street. 

Concord, north-west corner of Walnut Street. 

Concord, north-west corner of Beech Street. 

Concord, north-west corner of Nashua Street. 

Concord, north-west corner of Maple Street. 

Concord, north-west corner of Old Amherst Street. 

Cove, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Cove, north side, centre of Gasometer Building. 

Dean, north-east corner of Canal Street. 

Depot, 100 feet west of Franklin Street. 

Depot, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

Elm, front of Pisk's Bookstore. 

Franklin, opposite Middle Street, 

Granite, north-east corner of Canal Street. 

Granite, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

Grove, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Green, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

Hanover, front of First Congregational Church. 

Hanover, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 

Hanover, north-west corner of Union Street. 

Hanover, north-west corner Beech Street. 

Hanover, north- *vest corner Maple Street. 



72 

Hanover, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Ashland Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Hall Street. 
Hanover, north- west corner Belmont Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner Beacon Street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Harrison, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Harrison, north-west corner Union Street. 
Hollis, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Hollis, north-east corner Hobbs Street. 
Kidder, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Kidder, north-east corner Hobbs Street. 
Kidder, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Kidder's Court, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Langdon, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Union Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Laurel, near No. 244. 
Laurel, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner Hall Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner Ash Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner South Street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 
Lowell, north-west corner Wilson Road. 
Manchester, front of James Brothers' stable. 
Manchester, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Union Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Manchester, north west corner Maple Street. 



73 

Manchester, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Maple, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Maple, front of No. 530. 
Market, near No. 54 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Market, near 2d back Street west of Elm Street. 
Market, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Mammoth Road, opposite Josiah Sargent's. 
Massabesic, north-west corner Old Falls Road. 
Massabesic, south-west corner Taylor Street. 
Massabesic, near Hallsville School House. 
Massabesic Avenue, near Pumping Station. 
Mechanic, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Mechanic, near 2d back-street west of Elm Street. 
Mechanic, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Merrimack, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Merrimack, near No. Ill Amoskeag Corporation. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Franklin Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Merrimack, opposite gate to Merrimack Square. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Union Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Wilson Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner Hall Street. 
Merrimack, north side, 76 feet west of Belmont Street. 
Middle, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Middle, near No. 67 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Union Street. 



74 

Myrtle, north-west corner Walnut Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Ash Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Orange, opposite Clark Avenue. 
Orange, north-west corner Phie Street. 
Orange, north-west corner Union Street. 
Orange, north-west corner Walnut Street. 
Park, near No. 36. 

Park, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Park, north-west corner Union Street. 
Park, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Park, north-west corner Lincoln Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Clark Avenue. 
Pearl, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Union Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Walnut Street. 
\ Pearl, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner Ash Street, 
Pearl, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Park Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Hanover Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Amherst Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Concord Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Pine, north-west corner High Street. 
Pine, north-west corner Bridge Street. 
Pleasant, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester Corporation. 
Pleasant, north-west corner Franklin Street. 
Pleasant, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Prospect, front of No. 16. 
Prospect, north-west corner Pine Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner Union Street. 
Spring, north-east corner Charles Street. 



75 

Spring, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Spring, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Spruce, near Pine back street. 
Spruce, front of No. 40. 
Spruce, north-west corner Chestnut Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner Union Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner Beech Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner Maple Street. 
Stark, north-east corner Canal Street. 
Stark, near No. 13 Stark Corporation. 
Stark, north-west corner Elm Street. 
State, north-west corner Granite Street. 
State, opposite No. 57 Manchester Corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13 Manchester Corporation.. 
Summer, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Union, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Union, north-west corner High Street. 
Walnut, north-west corner Lowell Street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Water, near No. 38 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Water, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Wilson, north-west corner Park Street. 
Yallej, north-west corner Elm. Street. 
Yalley, north-west corner Willow Street.. 
Young, north-west corner Willow Street. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS IN PISCATAQUOG^ 

A, north-west corner Main Street. 

Bowman, west side, opposite gate to Cemetery. 

Center, north-east corner Main Street. 

Center, east end of school house-lot. 

Clinton, north-west corner Main Street. 

Clinton, north-west corner Dover Street. 

Douglas, north side, front of No. 8 Print Works. 

Douglas, north side eighty feet west of Main Street. 



76 

Douglas, north-west corner West Street. 

Douglas, north-east corner Barr Street. 

Douglas, north-west corner Green Street. 

Douglas, north-west corner Quincy Street. 

Ferry, centre of Ferry and Main Street. 

Oranite, south-west corner River Street. 

Granite, south-west corner Second Street. 

Granite, south-west corner Main Street. 

Granite, south-west corner Dover Street. 

Granite, south-west corner West Street. 

Granite, south-west corner Barr Street. 

Granite, south-east corner Green Street. 

Granite, south side, foot of Quincy Street. 

Main, south-east corner of Walker Street. 

Main, east side, opposite L. Rice's residence. 

Mast, west end of Dewey & Wyman Block. 

Mast, front o!" Stark Block. 

Mast, opposite west side of Bowman Street. 

Mast, opposite Gen. Riddle's house. 

Mast, opposite John C. Smith's house. 

Milford, south-west corner Main Street. 

Milford, south-east corner Bowman Street. 

Milford, south side, foot of back street. 

Piscataquog, north-west corner Main Street. 

Piscataquog, north side, top of hill. 

School, north-west corner Main Street. 

Second, south-west corner Ferry Street. 

Second, north-west corner Walker Street. 

Second, west side, 100 feet north of Railroad. 

Third, south-west corner Ferry Street. 

Walker, north-west corner River Street. 

West, north-west corner Parker Street. 

Hydrants on the east side of river, .... 231 
Hydrants on west side, 40 

Total, 271 



77 

These provide the thickly-settled part of the city with 
an ample supply of water for any ordinary fire, and will be 
sufficient for a long time to come. During the year the 
water-pipes have been extended to Piscataquog, and sup- 
ply a want that has long been felt in that section ; also, 
through several parts of the city, as shown by the report 
of the Water Commissioners ; and with all the extensions 
hydrants have been placed where needed. But I would 
recommend that there be a still further extension of 
water-workSj so as to protect that portion of the city 
known as Bakersville, as they are now practically without 
water for fire purposes. Some two years ago there was a 
reservoir commenced at Bakersville, but owing to some 
difficulty with the land owners it never was completed. I 
would also remind you of the necessity of furnishing some 
supply of water to that section of the city at the north 
end of Elm street, as at the present time there is no water 
except what little runs into Ray Brook, which is very diffi- 
cult of access and has but little in it most of the year. 

And, gentlemen, I would especially call your attention 
to the need of more hose for the department. I would re- 
commend that at least 2,000 feet of leather-hose be bought 
the next year, as at the present time neither the Pennacook 
nor the Massabesic Hose Companies have spare hose enough 
to make up a reel after wetting that which they go to a 
fire with, and it is quite essential that the reels should be 
at all times kept full, as it is impossible to tell when it 
may all be needed. 

I would also recommend that 2,000 feet of linen-hose be 
purchased and kept in re.serve ; in case of a conflagration 
it would doubly repay the outlay, iuid I tliink with the 
present Water- Works in order this amount of hose would 
be of more service to the city than any amount of help 
which might reasonably be expected from outside, as most 
of our hydrants will furnish good streams without the use 
of an engine. 



78 

I would also recommend that the petition asking for 
a hose-carriage, to be drawn by hand, and located at the 
south end, near Elm street, be granted, as there is now a 
very large amount? of combustible material in the various 
work-shops in that section and, as I have before mentioned, 
I think that more hose is what is needed— more than 
anything else in the department. In two instances during 
the year the department has used all of the hose carried 
on the apparatus on this side of the river, and in one of 
the above-mentioned all that is carried by No. 3 Engine of 
Piscataquog, and most of the spare hose in the Houses. 
And in this connection I would say, the city owns a light 
four-wheeled hose-carriage, that is not in use, which would 
answer every purpose for some time to come ; therefore, ' 
the expense could not be great by granting the petition. 

APPARATUS. 

The apparatus of the department is in as good working or- 
der as can be, but allow me in this connection to call your at- 
tention to the Steam Fire Engine No. 1, which has been in 
constant service for sixteen years and must necessarily be 
drawing very near to the time when it will have to be thrown 
out of service. This is the first Steam Fire Engine built by 
the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, and has been a 
very faithful servant for the city. I think it is the oldest en- 
gine in use in the country, and I would recommend that the 
next year a new engine, of a smaller size, be bought and 
placed in her house and she placed on the retired list as a re- 
serve engine, to be used in case of any accident to either of 
the other engines or in case of a large fire where more are 
needed, as the amount to be realized from the sale would 
be very small, and the time may come when it would pay 
good interest to keep her as a reserve. 

The new horse hose-carriage, which has been put into 



79 

service this year, has proved to be a very essential arm of 
service to the department as it can be handled much 
quicker and easier by a horse than by hand. And in this 
connection, gentlemen, allow me to call your attention to 
the propriety of putting another horse hose-carriage in the 
place of No. 3 Engine of Piscataquog, as I think a hose- 
carriage with a permanent horse would be far more effect- 
ive, with the present system of hydrants, than an engine, 
the horses kept at a distance ; and the horse might do the 
street-work in a prescribed section without in any way in- 
terfering with its efficiency. I suppose this proposition 
will meet with opposition. Some may argue that the hy- 
drants are not extended enough to do away with the en- 
gine. One reason why I think a change would be benefi- 
cial is that in almost all cases the engines from this side 
can get to the fire over there as quick as that engine, and if 
the fire is distant from the hydrant the hose carriage which 
I recommend in connection with the engine from this side 
would be of far more service tlian that engine without suf- 
ficient hose to reach the fire, and a horse hose-carriage 
will not require any additional number of men to the de- 
partment. 

During the year the Hook-and-Ladder Truck has been 
arranged so as to be drawn by a horse, furnished by the 
courtesy of His Honor the Mayor, which is something of an 
improvement over being obliged to draw it by hand, as our 
city at the present is altogether too extended to expect men 
to draw the truck to a fire, at a distance, and be of much 
service after getting there. As the old buildings have 
been removed from the lot bought for that purpose, and as 
I suppose it is the intention to build a new stable so as to 
accommodate all of the horses needed for the department at 
that place, I would recommend that the Hook-and-Ladder 
Company ])e reduced from thirty to twenty men, and in so 
doing I would abolish the fire-police, as I tliink the duty be- 



80 

longs to the Police Department, and I would recommend 
that the City Marshal be instructed to detail a given number 
of special police to guard the ropes at all fires where it is 
necessary to have them run, and also to take charge of the 
ruins and other property that may need care, until such time 
as the owners can take possession of the same. And this 
number of men which I propose to take from the Hook-and- 
Ladder Company would be sufficient to man the new hose- 
carriage which has been spoken of before. 

And, gentlemen, I have recommended some radical 
changes, and such as will probably call forth some extrava- 
gant expressions, but as I have been connected with the 
department the last year I can but think that hose and 
hose-carriages are what is the most needed, and by mak- 
ing the changes which I recommend you will not increase 
the expense of membership, but will, on the other hand^ 
decrease, as the expense of a hose-carriage is not as much 
as the expense of an engine. 

BUILDINGS. 

In regard to the buildings for the department that are lo- 
cated on Vine Street, they are not what the most of us had 
wished for. At the beginning of the year it looked as if 
we might have a house to accomodate that part of the de- 
partment located on Vine Street, but for reasons best 
known to you the year has gone by without any progress 
worthy of note. And, gentlemen, I think if you would 
take it into consideration you would see the necessity of 
immediately taking some steps towards covering land 
bought by -the city last year. The tenements occupied by 
the drivers are not what we should want to be obliged ta 
live in, and the stables are almost unfit to keep horses in 
for want of ventilation. And, lastly, in connection with the 
old house, allow me to call your attention to the store-room 



81 

for coal which the engines use. It is located in the extreme 
north-east corner of the cellar and the entrance to it in 
the extreme south-east corner, and between the door and 
store-room are stored all kinds of collections of the Street 
Department. Once during the year we were obliged in 
the night to move carts, plows and lime casks before the 
fuel could be got at, and when it appeared we had a 
large fire to contend with and the engines calling for fuel, 
but by divine Providence, more than by the facilities, was 
the fire stayed. I refer to the fire at the corner of Am- 
herst and Vine Streets. I presume the most of you will 
remember it, and I can but feel it my duty to impress upon 
your honorable body the necessity of making some better 
provisions for this very essential part of the service. It is 
quite an easy matter to build a new school-house ; why not 
try a new engine-house. 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The fire alarm telegraph continues to give entire satis- 
faction as a very important arm of the service, but in con- 
nection with the alarm I think we are apt to think it too 
near perfect. We must remember that it is machinery, 
and like all other, liable to get out of order ; and like a boy 
with a new whistle, instead of keeping it secret he tells 
everybody about it. I think, however, we ought to be satis- 
fied with the working of it during the year. A new bell- 
striker has been placed at the Ash-street school-house, also 
one new box at the corner of Amherst and Belmont Streets. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

The association has been very fortunate during tlie year, 
having been called upon but twice to pay a benefit, once 
to Captain Jahies F. Pherson, of No. 2, who was injured 
the previous year, as given in the last report, and once 

6 



82 

to George H. Porter, of the Hook-and-Ladder Company, 
which was caused by cutting his hand while on fire-duty 
and causing him to be kept from work a few days. The 
whole amount paid as above was $63.00 ; leaving in the 
Merrimack River Savings Bank a surplus of $755.14. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I would most cordially extend to His 
Honor, the Mayor, my thanks for the many personal kind- 
nesses which he has shown me, and for the interest he has 
at all times taken in the work of the department, and to the 
City Councils and Committee of Fire Department, for the 
promptness with which they have given the necessary aid 
to maintain the efficiency of the department ; and to the 
citizens, for the many kindnesses which they are ever will- 
ing to extend to the firemen while in the discharge of their 
duties. And more especially to the Police Department, 
under the efficient management of the Marshal and Assist- 
ant Marshal, for the prompt and effective service which 
they have at all times given to the department. 

The discipline of the department, I can safely say, was 
never better than at the present time ; and to my Assistant 
Engineers, the foremen of the different companies, and all 
of the men in the department, I wish to express my thanks 
for the prompt and faithful response to all duty, and the 
strict obedience to all orders, and I trust that in the re- 
maining short portion of my term of office as Chief En- 
gineer, our city may be spared the visitation of the de- 
vouring element. 

A. H. LOWELL, 

Chief Engineer, M. F. D. 



83 

The following is the estimated value of the property 
now owned by the city in this department : 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO, 1, 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first- class rotary steam engine and hose 

carriage, |1,500 00 

100 feet rubber hose, 200 00 

1500 feet leather hose, 2,000 00 

Firemen's suits, ' 219 00 

Furniture, fixtures, &c. . . . 575 00 



Total amount, . . . . $4,494 00 

FIRE-KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2, 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose 

carriage, |3,250 00 

100 00 
1300 feet leather hose. 
Firemen's suits, . 
Furniture, fixtures, &c., 



Total amount. 



1,500 00 
200 00 
650 00 



i,700 00 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3, 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 

1 second-class plunger-engine and hose carriage, |3,500 00 

200 feet rubber hose, . . . . . 100 00 

1600 feet leather hose, .... 1,924 00 

Firemen's suits, 178 00 

Furniture and fixtures, . . . 517 00 



Total amount, .... |6,219 00 



84 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 4, 



LOCATED ON TINE STEEET. 



1 second-class double-plunger 


engine and hose 






carriage, 


. 


$4,250 00 


60 feet rubber hose. 


. . . 


71 


50 


1100 feet leather hose, 


• . . 


1,650 


00 


Firemen's suits, . 


. • . 


213 


00 


Furniture and fixtures. 


. 


609 


25 


Total amount, 


16,693 


75. 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY, NO. 1, 



LOCATED ON VINE STKEET. 



1 old four-wheeled hose carriage, 
1 four-wheeled horse hose carriage, 
1 horse-sled and reel, 
1050 feet old leather hose, 
750 feet new leather hose, . 
Firemen's suits, . 
Furniture and fixtures, 
1 harness, 

Total amount. 



$200 00 


600 


00 


75 


00 


1,100 


00 


1,600 


00 


309 


00 


343 


00 


100 


00 



t,327 00 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2, 



LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET. 



1 four-wheeled hose carriage, 
1700 feet leather hose, . 
Firemen's suits, . 
Furniture and fixtures, 

Total amount. 



$800 


00 


2,000 


00 


200 


00 


54 


00 



,054 00 



85 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, NO. 1, 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders, . . . $1,500 00 

Firemen's suits, 431 00 

Furniture and fixtures, . . ... 343 00 



Total amount, .... $2,274 00 

gopfe's falls hose company. 



1200 


00 


200 


00 


12 


00 



LOCATED AT DBBRY MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, . 

400 feet linen hose, 

Pipes, (fee, 

Total amount, .... |412 00 

AMOSKEAG HOSE COMPANY. 

LOCATED AT P. C. CHENEY & CO'S PAPEK MILL. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, . . . $200 00 

800 feet leather hose, 400 00 

Pipes, &c., 12 00 



Total amount, . . . . |612 00 

engineers' department. 

1 supply wagon, $150 00 

Suits, . 50 00 

Furniture, &c., . . ... . 100 00 



Total amount, .... $300 00 

FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

At cost, $19,910 00 



86 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag Engine, No. 1, 

Fire-King Engine, No. 2, 

E. W. Harrington, No. 3, 

N. S. Bean, No. 4, 

Pennacook Hose Company, No. 1, 

Massabesic Hose Company, No. 2, 

Hook and Ladder Company, No. 1 

Gofife's Falls Hose Company , . 

Amoskeag Hose Company, 

Engineers' Department, . 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, . 

Total amount. 



$4,494 OO 


5,700 


oa 


6,219 


00 


6,693 


75 


4,327 


00 


3,054. 


00 


2,274 


00 


412 


00 


612 00 


300 


00 


19,910 


oa 



,991 75 



NAMES AND RESIDENCE OF MEMBERS OF THE. 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

A. H. Lowell, Chief Engineer, No. 29 Prospect Street. 
W. Ireland, Clerk, corner Prospect and Union Streets. 

B. C. Kendall, No. 311 Central Street. 
F. Higgins, No. 96 Bridge Street. 

A. C. Wallace, Main Street, Piscataquog. 

AMOSKEAG ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



FOURTEEN MEMBERS. 



George R. Simmons, foreman, Pennacook Street. 

C. M. Morse, assistant foreman, No. 546 Chestnut Street. 

Horace Nichols, engineer, 27 Machine Shop Block. 

Sam C. Lowell, assistant engineer, 5 Machine Shop Block. 

Jas. R. Carr, clerk, 14 Orange Street. 

Geo. W. Butterfield, driver. Engine House, Vine Street. 

John D. Linus, hoseman, 5 Machine Shop Block. 



87 

J. T. Underbill, hoseman, 502 Chestnut Street. 

F. E. Stearns, hoseman, 1417 Elm Street. 

H. H. Glines, hoseman, 5 Machine Shop Block. 
J. A. Barker, hoseman, 28 Market Street. 

E. H. Currier, hoseman, 307 Hanover Street. 
A. D. Scovell, hoseman, 172 Amherst Street. 
W. H. Stearns, hoseman, 182 Merrimack Street. 

FIRE-KING ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

FOURTEEN MEMBERS. 

J. F.. Pherson, foreman, No. 25 Machine Shop Block. 
A. H. Sanborn, assistant foreman, 11 Towne Block. 

A. M. Kenniston, clerk, Parker Street, Piscataquog. 
D. W. Morse, engineer, 1419 Elm Street. 

0. F. Hall, assistant engineer, 42 Machine Shop Block. 

G. W. Cheney, hoseman, 7 Stark Corporation. 

F. W. McKinley, hoseman, 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 
W. B. Heath, hoseman, 192 Amherst Street. 

S. F, Head, hoseman, 165 Merrimack Street. 
C. H. Manley, hoseman, 19 Warren Street. 
Albert Merrill, hoseman, 42 Machine Shop Block. 
F. A. Pherson, hoseman, 25 Machine Shop Block. 
H. S. Miller, hoseman, 11 Ash Street. 
T. M. Conant, driver, Engine House, Yine Street. 

E. W. HARRINGTON ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. — PISCATAQUOG. 

FOURTEEN MEMBERS. 

John Patterson, foreman, Main Street. 

H. Fradd, assistant foreman, Dover Street. 

Wm. Dorian, engineer, Douglas Street. 

J. Dinsmore, assistant engineer, Granite Street. 

J. R. Young, hoseman. Granite Street. 

B. K. Parker, hoseman, Main Street. 

A. 0. Wallace, hoseman, Granite Street. 



E. Young, hoseman, Granite Street. 

C. O'Shaughnessy, hoseman, Granite Street. 

J. Scofield, hoseman, Granite Street. 

J. McDerbey, hoseman. Granite Street. 

George Lear, hoseman. Main Street. 

Kuel Manning, hoseman, Main Street. 

I). Breed, hoseman. Main Street. 

N. S. BEAN ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 4. 

FOUBTEEN MEMBERS. 

W. H. Yickery, foreman, 344 Hanover Street. 

E. S. Whitney, assistant foreman, 91 Pearl Street. 

E. A. Waldron, clerk. Willow Street. 

A. D. Colby, engineer, 44 machine shop block. 

E. E. Sanborn, assistant engineer, 29 Pleasant Street. 

A. B. Gushing, driver, engine-house. Vine Street. 

T. F. Dodge, hoseman, 21 machine shop block. 

C. E. Ham, hoseman, 3 Amoskeag Corporation. 
G. C. Hoyt, hoseman, 334 Pine Street. 

D. M. Rowe, hoseman, 41 Market Street. 
J. Gushing, hoseman, 208 Hanover Street. 

E. G. Abbott, hoseman, 1207 Elm Street. 

C. H. Barrett, hoseman, 23 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Fred. S. Bean, hoseman, 23 Prospect Street. 

PENNACOOK HQSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

FIFTEEN MEMBERS. 

Thomas W. Lane, foreman. Elm Street, corner Appleton. 
C. B. French, assistant foreman, 74 Amoskeag Corp. 
W. R, Sawyer, clerk, 64 Bridge Street. 
J. M. Plaisted. driver. Engine House, Vine Street. 
Albert Maxfield, hoseman, 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 
J. E. Merrill, hoseman, 83 Orange Street. 



89 

H. S. Brown, hoseman, 640 Union Street. 

B. B. Aldrich, hoseman, 392 Manchester Street. 
G. H. Porter, hoseman, 17 Laurel Street. 

W. G. Chase, hoseman, 35 Amoskeag Corporation. 
L. M. Aldrich, hoseman, 338 Central Street. 
A. Gibson, hoseman, 12 Laurel Street. 

C. D. Palmer, hoseman, 340 Park Street. 
W. L. Blenus, hoseman, 153 Hanover Street. 
H.^M. Moody, hoseman, Harrison, corner Pine Street. 

MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

TWELVE MEMBEES. 

H. W. Fisher, foreman, 59 Myrtle Street. 

E. T. Hardy, assistant foreman, 224 Bridge Street. 

P. W. Hannaford, clerk, 256 Lowell Street. 

C. Thompson, steward, Nashua Street. 

C. H. Robinson, hoseman, 74 East High Street. 

H. G. Seaman, hoseman, 16 South Street. 

M. J. Jenkins, hoseman, 26 Nashua Street. 

G. W. Goodwin, hoseman, corner of Wilson and East High 

Street. 
J. H. Boyd, hoseman, 242 Bridge Street. 
J. F. Steward, hoseman, 21 Warren Street. 
A. B. Weeks, hoseman, 76 East High Street. 
W. Seward, hoseman, 18 Nashua Street. 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, NO. 1. 

THIRTY MEMBERS. 

G. W. Bacon, foreman, 45 Stark Corporation. 

J. N. Chase, assistant foreman, 276 Bridge Street. 

G. E. Glines, clerk, 337 Chestnut Street. 

H. P. Young, treasurer, 351 Pine Street. 

C Canfield, steward, 18 Amoskeag Corporation. 



90 

J. Daniels, 32 Ash Street. 

F. A. Senter, 39 Pine Street. 

G. H. Dudley, 153 Laurel Street. 

A. S. Robertson, 301 Chestnut Street. 
E. A. G. Holmes, 228 Manchester Street. 

D. M. K. Phillips, 310 Chestnut Street. 
G. L. Leach, 263 Merrimack Street. 

C. A. Clough, Print-Works Corporation. 

H. H. Cole, 43 Water Street. 

H. French, 107 Chestnut Street. 

C. Harvej, 164 Central Street. 

A. A. Hazelton, 320 Central Street. 

J. J. Levering, 368 Merrimack Street. 

J, Orrill, 320 Central Street. 

J. S. Dennett, 88 Middle Street. 

W. S. Leavitt, 25 Birch Street. 

J. Wilson, 45 Pearl Street. 

L. J. Flint, 207 Bridge Street. 

E. Johnson, 123 Merrimack Street. 
J. B. Nourse, 108 Merrimack Street. 
C. H. Cross, 72 Bridge Street. 

J. B. Kenne, 49 Bridge Street. 
A. J. Robie, 422 Chestnut Street. 
L. R. Ham, 12 Stark Street. 
C. S. Brown, 90 Middle Street. 

DRIVER OF SUPPLY WAGON. 

James Kearine, 68 Concord Street. 



91 
FIRES AND ALARMS. 

During the year 1875 the department has been called 
out twenty-nine times, as follows : 

February 3 — alarm Box 15 ; burnt old mat in woodshed 
Pearl South Back Street. February 23, alarm box 52 ;, 
barn and shed owned by Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany, west side of river ; loss 1500 ; no insurance. 

March 18 — alarm box 16 ; Mrs. Mannehan's house on 
Walnut street ; loss $25, March 18 ; still alarm, Mrs. 
Mannehan's house on Walnut street ; put out by Mas- 
sabesic Hose Company No. 2. March 21, alarm box 17; 
A. Pratt's house on Hanover street ; loss |500 ; insured. 
March 28, alarm box 31 ; P. C. Cheney & Co.'s waste mill^ 
Amoskeag ; loss 12000 ; fully insured. March 28, alarm 
box 4 ; Cronin's stable. Spruce street, north side ; loss 
$300 ; no insurance. 

April 3 — alarm box 71 ; Blodgett's Block, Park street ; 
chip dirt under cellar stairs. April 21, alarm box 3 ; Bean. 
& Higgins' Block, corner of Valley and Willow streets ; 
loss $3,300; insured. April 26, alarm box 6 ; buildings, 
corner Vine and Amherst streets, owned by L. Dowde, D. 
Conner, G. Curtis ; loss $3,000 ; insured. 

May 7 — alarm box 31 ; building owned by Jones of Am- 
oskeag, occupied by H. J. Poor, groceries ; loss $2,800 ; 
insured. May 29, alarm box 27 ; burning of a coat in Gran- 
ite Hall. 

June 2 — alarm box 53 ; burning Granite Flour Mill ; loss 
$25,000 ; insured for $15,000. June 4, alarm box 4 ; burn- 
ing chimney. 

July 4 — alarm box 25 ; burning Waterman Smith's house; 
loss $30,000 ; insured $20,000. July 12, alarm box 7 ; 
straw bed. July 19, W. C. Blodgett's farm buildings ; no 
alarm ; loss $500. July 21, alarm box 31 ; P. C. Cheney 
& Go's waste mill, Amoskeag ; loss $5,000 ; insured $2,300- 



92 

• 

August 9 — alarm box 27 ; woodshed, Amoskeag Corpo- 
ration ; loss $100 ; no insurance. August 21, alarm box 
4 ; car of lime, J. S. Kidder & Co.; loss $100 ; insured. 
August 24, alarm box 13 ; alarm should have been given 
from box 23 ; burning of house and barn on extension of 
Hanover street, two miles from City Hall, did not think it 
•of any use to send department to it as it was all destroyed 
before the department got on the right track of it; loss 
^2,000; insured $1,000. 

October 19 — alarm box 4 ; house of Waterman Smith, 
Bakersville ; loss 1300 ; insured. October 23, alarm box 
21 ; Lon Johnson's house, Park street ; loss $800; insured. 

November 11 — alarm box 18 ; John Lee's house, Merri- 
.mack street ; loss $100 ; insured. 

November 23 — alarm box 8 ; Webster Block, loss $25 ; 
insured. 

November 24 — alarm box 8 ; Amoskeag Wood Block, 
back of Smith & Maynard's Block. 

December 2 — alarm box 7; burning of lounge. Church 
Street. 

December 25 — alarm ; fire in wooden tenement house 
owned by Amoskeag Corporation, near Manchester Loco- 
motive Works. 

December 29 — alarm ; house on Central Street, near 
Belmont Street, owned by Cutter, loss $25 ; insured. 

Total loss during the year 1875, . . $77,275 *00 
Total insurance on property burned, . 51,775 00 

Total loss not covered by insurance, . $25,500 00 



93 

NUMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3 — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson & 
Co.'s Office and Samuel Colby's residence, cor. Elm and 
Young Streets. 

No. 4 — Cor. of Elm and Spruce Streets. Keys at Na- 
tional Hotel and Campbell & Hunt's Drug Store. 

No. 5 — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's Office and 
Hall's Drug Store. 

No. 6 — Engine House, Vine Street. Key at Engine- 
House. 

No. 7— City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. Per- 
ry's Drug Store. 

No. 8 — Elm, foot of Orange Street. Keys at Jones & 
Hardy's Grocery, Josiah Stark's Saloon and Geo. Griffin's. 

No. 9 — Cor. of Elm and Webster Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. S. F. Stanton and Mrs. Rufus Knight. 

No. 12 — Blood's Shop. Keys private. 

No. 18 — Cor. of Brook and Chestnut Streets. Keys at 
residences of Lewis Simons and W. Jencks. 

No. 14 — Cor. of Prospect and Union Streets. Keys at 
residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15 — Cor. of Pearl and Chestnut Streets. Keys at 
residences of Chas. Palmer and A. H. Tyrrell. 

No. 16 — Cor. of Lowell and Union Streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev. J. O'Brien and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 18 — Cor. of Manchester and Maple Streets. Keys 
at residences of H. E. Stevens, Andrew W, Baker and E. 
P. Richardson. 

No. 21- — Cor. of Merrimack and Pine Streets. Keys at 
A. Mallard & Son's Grocery, and residence of J. A. Emer- 
son. 

No. 23 — Cor. of Central and Beech Streets. Keys at 
residences of E. T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 



94 

No. 24 — Cor. of Massabesic and Park Streets. Keys at 
residences of R. W. Flanders and Milton A. Abbott. 

No. 25— Cor. of Hanover and Ashland Streets. Keys at 
residences of S. L. Fogg and Horace Gordon. 

No. 26 — Cor. of Bridge and Russell Streets. Keys at 
McCrillis and Son's Carriage Shop and residence of Joseph 
Tuck. 

No. 27 — Cor. of Elm and Merrimack Streets. Keys at 
Manchester House and Tebbetts Bros.' and Weeks & Cur- 
rier's Drug Stores. 

No. 31 — Amoskeag Village. Keys at Cheney & Co.'s 
Paper Mill and residence of J. M. Varnum. 

No. 32 — Langdon Mills, corner of Canal and Brook 
Streets. Keys at Watch Room and Hoyt & Co.'s Paper 
Mill. 

No. 34 — Mechanics Row. Keys at Watch Room and W. 
W. Hubbard's Office. 

No. 35— Stark Mills. Key at Watch Room. 

No. 36 — Cor. of Amherst and Belmont Streets. Keys at 
residences of Rodney Porter and James L. Campbell. 

No. 41 — Amoskeag Mills. Key at Watch Room. 

No. 42 — Manchester Mills. Key at Watch Room. 

No. 43 — Namaske Mill. Key at Watch Room. 

No. 51— S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s Shop. Keys at S. C. 
Forsaith & Co.'s Office and Freight Depot. 

No. 52 — Barr's Block, Squog. Keys at Barr & Clapp's 
Store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53 — Wallace's Brewery. Keys at Wallace's Brewery 
Office and I. R. Dewey's Store. 

No. 61 — Cor. of Elm and Hancock Streets, Bakersville. 
Keys at residences of M. O'Neil and H. W. Longa. 

No. 62 — Massabesic Street, Hallsville. Key at resi- 
dence of Chas. Chase. 

No. 72 — Cor. of Cedar and Pine Streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of T. Collins and Daniel S. Lehan. 



95 

Also keys in the hands of the regular police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be 
given at 12 1-2 o'clock P. M., precisely, each day, and will 
be denoted by one stroke of the fire bells. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm box, keys to 
"which are in the hands of all regular police, also of the 
persons designated by the card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery or positive infor- 
mation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull the hook down 
•once as far as they can (without jerking), and then let 
go. Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment and if no clicking is heard in 
the box pull again ; if you still hear no clicking go to the 
next nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure the 
box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
<5ause other than an actual fire. Do not give an alarm for 
a chimney fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your 
residence or place of business where the keys are kept, re- 
turn the key to the same ofiicer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of the alarm boxes near 
their property, also the places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in the 
city, and the number of a box will be given four times for an 
alarm. 



96 

8. One stroke of the bells and gongs given by the En- 
gineer in charge during a fire will be the signal to dis- 
charge all companies remaining at their engine-houses. 
Two strokes of the bells and gongs at a fire will be a sig- 
nal for the department to limber up. 

The Engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of 
the bells at any time, and in case of testing the boxes each, 
test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



RULES ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

The following rules were adopted January 20, 1875, with 
which the Fire Department will strictly comply until other- 
wise ordered, and will attend alarms as follows : 

Steamer No. 2 will report tor duty at the first alarm on 
its first and second run ; second alarm on its third run. 

Steamer No. 3 will report for duty at the first alarm to 
boxes 31, 42, 43, 51, 52 and 53 ; second alarm to boxes. 

35 and 41. 

Steamer No. 4 will report for duty at the first alarm out 
its first and second run ; second alarm on its third run. 

Steamers 1, 2 and 4 on the first alarm, will cross the 
river only on the day of their first run ; on the second alarm 
the steamer having its second run will cross. 

Hook and Ladder Truck and Pennacook Hose No. 1, 
will respond to the first alarm in all cases. 

Massabesic Hose No. 2 will respond on first alarm to- 
boxes from 13 to 26 inclusive ; also include boxes 9, 62 and 

36 ; on second alarm will respond to all boxes except 52, 
53 and 61. 

The whole department will respond in all cases on the 
third alarm. 

The companies of the department not called at the first 
alarm, will prepare for a start, and hold themselves in 



97 

readiness for the second and third alarms, [and if not 
needed, one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer 
in charge at the fire, will be the signal for discharge to all 
xjompanies remaining at the houses. 

Two strokes of the bells at a fire, will be the signal to 
limber-up. 



CONDITION OF CISTERNS AND RESERVOIRS. 



No. 



9 
10 
11 
12 

13 
14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
.20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 



Location. 



Elm street, at City Hall 

Elm street, near Smyth's Block 

Gate, Mercantile Block 

Corner Chestnut and Hanover streets 

Haseltine House, Manchester street 

Pine, hetween Manchester and Merrimack streets 

Junction Hanover and Fine streets 

Gate at junction Hanover and Pine streets, feeds Nos. 1, 

6, and 9 

Corner of Pine and Central streets 

Corner Elm and Myrtle streets, (worthless) 

Lowell, near Nashua street 

Gate, junction of Amherst and Chestnut streets, draws oft 

water on Concord Square 

Centre of Tremont Square 

Bridge, head of Birch street 

Corner Chestnut and Orange streets 

Corner Hanover and Union streets 

Corner Laurel and Beech streets, (worthless) 

Corner Walnut and Amherst streets 

Corner Chestnut and Harrison streets 

Gate, Hanover street, feeds No. 5 

Bakersville, (worthless) 

Piscataquog, near Fradd & FoUansbee's store 

Piscataquog, north Steam Mill, 'Squog river 

Piscataquog, Granite street 

Piscataquog, near Bowman Place 

Amoskeag Penstock, P. C. Cheney & Co's yard 

Amherst, corner Hall street 

Merrimack, bet. Hall and Wilson streets, (not reliable) 

Corner Amherst and Hall streets 

Janesville, near J. B. McCrillis & Son's shop 

Gas Works 

Brook, south end Elm street 

Elm back street, on Central street 

Elm back street, on Park street 

Elm back street, on Cedar street 

Amoskeag, near old hotel 

Gate, cor. Hanover and Chestnut sts., feeds Concord Square 

pond, and Reservoir at Smyth's Block 



Ft.In. 

8 2 



1 
1 4 



4 10 

5 



6 5 
6 

7 



6 4 



6 6 

12 






Ft.In. 
5 • 
5 10 
3 

2 6 
5 
5 11 



4 5 

4 



Ft.In. 
None 

12 

None. 

None 

6 

12 
None. 



None. 



None. 
1 8 
3 3 

None. 
None. 



None. 
None. 



ANNUAL REPOET 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



The Board of Water Commissioners herewith submit 
their fourtli annual report for the year ending December 
31, 1875, and therewith the report of the Superintendent, 
showing in detail the expenditures and operations conducted 
under the charge of the Board. The statistics in his re- 
port are so full it is deemed unnecessary to recapitulate 
them. 

January 1, 1876. 

ARETAS BLOOD, ^ 

E. W. HARRINGTON, | 

WM. P. NEWELL, I Water 

A. C. WALLACE, [ Commissioners. 

ALPHEUS GAY, 

JAMES A. WESTON, ^ 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To the Water Commissioners of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen : — Agreeably to the provision of the city ordi- 
nance, the Superintendent respectfully submits the follow- 
ing report. 

The present Superintendent was elected February S7, 
1875, and after looking at the plans and going over the 
work, took charge March 1, 1875. 

Previous to this time the work had been under the 
charge of Col. Fanning, the former engineer. 

Herewith is presented a compiled statement of the ele- 
vation of the water in Massabesic Lake this present year, 
as compared with the height in former years. 

ELEVATION OF WATER IK LAKE MASSABESIC SINCE JUNE 17, 1872. 

June 17, 1872, 1.923 feet above overfall of dam. 



Mays, 


(( 


1.2 


(( 


(( 


July 11, 


cc 


1.95 


(( 


u 


" 15, 


a 


1.59 


(( 


u 


Aug. 20, 


u 


2.079 


(( 


u 


Oct. 11, 


(( 


0.745 


u 


u 


« 15, 


a 


0.757 


(( 


it 


July 2, 


1873, 


, 1.054 


u 


below 


Nov. 11, 


« 


.782 


a 


u 


Juoe 1, 


1874, 


,1.81 


(( 


above 


" 23, 


(( 


1.542 


a 


(( 


July 7, 


u 


1.521 


a 


(( 


« 16, 


u 


2.042 


li 


u 


" 22, 


(( 


1.52 


u 


u 


« 30, 


it 


.834 


(( 


(( 



102 

Aug. 6, 1874, .666 feet above overfall of dam. 
" 26, " .666 " " " " " 



May 1, 


1875 


, .333 


ii 


u 


" 20, 


a 


1.50 


u 


u 


" 31, 


u 


1.31 


a 


u 


June 1, 


(( 


1.26 


u 


u 


" 30, 


u 


1.00 


u 


u 


July 1, 


(( 


0.98 


u 


ii 


" 10, 


u 


0.84 


ii 


u 


" 31, 


u 


0.31 


a 


u 


Aug. 1, 


(; 


0.33 


u 


(( 


" 8, 


(( 


0.29 


u. 


li 


" 25, 


u 


.58 


» 


ll. 


" 31, 


u 


.39 


a 


a 


Sept. 1, 


1875, 


0.37 


li 


a 


" 10, 


u 


0.09 


u 


u 


'•' 16, 


a 


0.01 


u 


u 


" 22, 


u 


0.00 


a 


u 


" 30, 


u 


0.165 


u 


below 


Oct. 1, 


u 


0.15 


u 


a 


" 13, 


u 


0.00 


a 


u 


« 14, 


u 


0.04 


(( 


above 


" 20, 


a 


0.08 


u 


u 


" 31, 


a 


0.13 


u 


a 


Nov. 1, 


(( 


0.17 


11 


(( 


" 15, 


u 


0.40 


(' . 


(( 


" 30, 


a 


0.33 


a 


(( 


Dec. 1, 


(C 


0.37 


u 


u 



CANAL. 

The water was drawn out of the canal June 6, and the 
sides and bottom were found to be in better condition than 
was anticipated. The portion that was out of water, owing 
to the action of frost, was somewhat ragged, but has since 
been sloped. 

Loam has been carted on to the south side and grass-seed 
sown, but in order to get the bank well grassed over it 
should be top-dressed and put in good order. 

The north slope on the north bank washed out in a few 
places, which have been filled in again. This side of the 



103 

canal should be loamed and grassed, and a stone wall built 
next to the pasture. 

There has been a ditch dug and rubbled from the end of 
the canal to the new highway, and a good fence wall built 
on the line. A sewer or culvert is needed, from the 
highway to the brook, and this should be built next sum- 
mer. 

The penstock is in good condition and has needed no re- 
pairs. 

PUMPING STATION. 

This has been under the charge of C. C. Cole, who also 
has had the immediate charge of the canal, dam, reservoir, 
and the lands adjoining, which belong to the city. 

New wheels were put in the first of June, and while the 
work was being done the city was supplied mostly from the 
Amdskeag Company's reservoir, who run their pumps for 
the city two weeks. The wheels were tested by Col. Sam- 
uel Webber, and herewith is presented a statement of the 
tests made : 



104 



Dynamometrical tests made on a Jonval Turbine, working under higli pressure ; 
also, measurements of actual delivery of water from two sets of pumps propelled by- 
said Turbine, constructed for the city of Manchester, N. H., by the Geyelin depart- 
ment of the firm of R. D. Wood & Co., Philadelphia. 





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■B m paSiuqosip aojiSAi jo }08j oiqno 


31.134 

30.993 
30.942 
30.924 
30.924 
30.924 
30.924 
.30.924 
30.924 
30.924 
30.924 


1 

1 




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105 



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to 


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IN 




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106 



The 'past year the city has pumped for the Amoskeag 
Company till the first day of October, except two weeks in 
June. 

On the first of September the gate to the Company's res- 
ervoir was closed, and the water pumped directly into their 
pipe through the month of September. October 1st the 
Company began to run their pumps, and the water was 
shut off from their pipe. A considerable quantity of water 
was wasted in the months of Noveml^er and December on 
account of the leaks on the extensions. 

The following table shows the amount pumped each 
month : 



RECORD OF PUMPING, 1875. 



MONTHS. 



January.. 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . ,. 
September 
October . . , 
November. 
December . 



No. hours' work 
for both p.umps 



681 h. 00 m. 

708 " 00 " 



773 
622 
607 
347 
617 
738 
656 
352 
478 
601 



00 " 
00 " 
40 " 
45 " 
50 " 
10 " 
10 " 
55 " 
10 " 
00 " 



Average 
stroke p'r 
minute. 



15.19 
15.50 
16.03 
16.49 
17.36 
18.03 
18.88 
15.21 
14.50 
14.47 
18.15 
17.81 



Total No. 

strokes 

p'r monili 



620,780 
658,332 
743,550 
611,584 
633,214 
376,352 
700,113 
673,658 
570,994 
306,518 
520,765 
642,163 



Total gallons 

pumped in one 

month. 



Daily ave- 
rage gallons 
pumped. 



37,929,658.00 

40,224,085.20 

45,430,905.00 

37,367,782.40 

38,689,375.4 

22,578,571.2 

41,376,678.3 

39,813,187.8 

33,745,745.4 

18,115,213.8 

30,777,211.5 

37.951,833.3 



1,223,537.30 
1,436,574.5 
1,465,513,00 
1,245,592.75 
1,248,044.37 
1,505,238.15 
1,334,731.56 
■1,284,296.38 
1,124,858.2 
584,361.7 
1,025,907.0 
1,224,252.7 



THE SUPPLY AND FORCE MAIN. 



These are now in good condition ; the most trouble has 
been had with that part of the force main which was laid 
through the Dickey swamp, and if it should again need re- 



107 

pairing it will be necessary to lay over about one hundred 
feet with cast-iron pipe. 

The building of Cohas Avenue will be a great advantage 
in taking care of this part of the pipe, making it easier to 
get at, besides draining the wet places. 

RESERVOIR. 

The reservoir remains in good condition. There ought 
to be a fence built to keep cattle off of the banks, and the 
grounds about should be graded and properly laid down to 
grass. 

The city has built the street south of the reservoir ; the 
one on the east side will probably be built during the year. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

The pipes that were laid previous to this year appear to 
be in good condition at the present time. 

There have been, during the past season, one hundred 
leaks, including those in the main line, which have been 
repaired under the direction of John Conway, Mr. Norman's 
agent. Except in a very few instances frost or some 
defective service pipe was the cause. 

About two hundred feet of pipe on Concord street, above 
Maple, will have to be laid over, on account of cutting dowu 
the grade of the street. 

Nearly five and one-quarter miles of pipe have been laid 
the past year, at the expense of 142,057.22. 

The contract for the work was given to George H. Nor- 
man, he being the lowest bidder, and work was commenced 
the first of A\igust. 

The substance of the contract was that he should lay the 
pipe in " 'Squog," including the cast-iron main from Elm 
across the river, for the sum of -126,500, the city to find 
gates and hydrants. 



108 

Other extensions by the foot were to be made at the fol- 
lowing prices : 

14 inch, $2 50 



12 

10 

6 

4 



1 70 
1 50 

88 
68 



Under his contract the extensions on Elm, Yalley, Wil- 
low, Wilson and Auburn streets were laid. 

It was thought best to extend the pipes on Laurel, Mer- 
rimack, Hanover and Button streets, and they were laid by 
the Jersey City Pipe Co., under another contract. 

There have been many leaks on the new-laid pipe, chiefly 
confined to the 10, 12 and 14 inch, owing to the pipe being 
coated with coal-tar varnish before being coated with ce- 
ment. When it was not coated we have had but few leaks. 
Coating the wrought-iron on cement-lined pipes is a new 
experiment, and is an improvement, for in case the cement 
should get cracked by frost or otherwise, it prevents rust. 
It should, however, be left off at the ends, for it prevents 
tlie cement from adhering to the iron strongly enough at 
the joints. 

On the cast-iron there have been two bursts and four joint 
leaks. 

Total cost Pipe and Fixtures laid and set in Piscataquog in 1875. 

Cost of Pipe, 

Cost of Hydrants, .... 
Gates and Gate Boxes, . 
Carting and Freight, 

Total cost of Pipes and Fixtures laid and set 
on East side in 1875. 

Cost of Pipe, 

Cost of Hydrants .... 
Gates and Gate Boxes, . 
Carting and Freight, 

Total cost Pipes and Fixtures laid and set in 1875, $42,057 22 



S27,735 54 
1,852 00 
1,496 24 


74 37 

'BI^I Tift 1 "i 


t 


Si 0,233 55 
225 00 


414 02 


26 50 

<(fil 800 07 





109 



The length and size of pipe laid in Piscataquog, under 
the contract awarded to George H. Norman, was as follows ; 



Cast Iron 

12 inch pipe... 

Cement 10 in. 

pipe 



€ in. pipe. 
■4 in. pipe. 



3100 
3846 
10583 

1878 



15 
3285 

3850 

10796 

2198 



15 

185 

5 

213 

320 

95 



Cement at 1.70 per foot. . 
Cast-iron at 2.70 per foot. 

Cement at 1.60 per foot. . 

" •' 0.88 " ... . 



0.68 



Cubic yards rock excavated at 4.50 

Cost of extra pipe laid in Piscataquog . 
George H. Norman, bid for " 

Total cost of pipes in Piscataquog. 



$25 50 
370 00 

7 50 

187 44 

217 60 

427 60 



$1,235 54 
26,500 00 



$27,735 54 



Pipes laid on east side of river, (city proper), by George 
H. Norman. 



14 inch, 1830 feet at 2.50 

12 " 821 " " 1.70 

10 " 493 " " 1.50 

6 " 851 " " 0.88 

4 " 550 " " 0.68 



4,575 00 


1,395 70 


739 50 


748 88 


374 00 



Cost of pipe laid by George H. Norman in 1875, 

Pipe laid by Patent Water and Gas Pipe Co. 

6 inch, 2569 feet at 83 cents . . . $2,132 27 
4 " 447 " « 60 " . . . 268 20 



$7,833 08 
$35,568 62 



Total cost of pipe laid in 1875, 



2,400 47 
$37,969 09 



110 



SCHEDULE OF PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID TO DECEMBER 25th, 1875, 
IN PISCATAQUOG. 





Cement lined Pipe, 
length and size of. 


Cast-IronPipe, 

LENGTH & SIZE. 


Gates Set. 


i 




12 in. 


10 in. 


Bin. 


4 in. 


12 in. 


10 in. 


6 in. 


_g 


.9 

o 
5 

5 


a 

CO 

1 

1 
1 
1 

3 

3 

2 

2 
1 
1 

1 

3 

'J 

1 
1 

2 
26 


a' 

1 

2 




A 


15 


3742 


70 

851 
442 
563 
1908 

2484 

10 

1480 

912 

827 

59 
568 

20 
308 
210 


260 

622 
260 

20 
260 
240 

536 


3285 


108 


12 

48 

24 


2 


1 


Barr 




Bowman 

Centre 

Clinton 


I 

?. 


Douglas 


K 


Dover 

Ferry 




Granite. . 

Green 


8 

9: 


Mast 


a 


Milford 


,S 




?. 






River 




Scliool 


T 




3 


Third 


1 


Walker 

"West 


1 
1 


on Cove,2ii and Ferry. 


2 


Total in 'Squog 


15 


3742 


10712 


2198 


3285 


108 


84 


2 


41 



SCHEDULE OF PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID ON EAST SIDE RIVER, 1875. 





Length of cement-lined 
pipe laid, in feet. 


Gates set. 


58 




14 in. 


12 in. 


10 in. 


Bin. 


4 in. 


14 in. 


12 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 






1830 


318 
503 


493 


491 
43 

9 

59 

59 

865 

6.54 

767 

52 

59 

69 

10 

283 


447 
550 


1 


1 

1 


1 

2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 


1 


1 


Central 








Elm 


1 
1" 




1 


Hanover 


i 


Meriimack. 

State 


2 




1 


Vallev 


2: 


Wilson 


1 


Willow 






1 






Total 


1830 


821 


493 


3420 


997 


1 


2 


10 


1 


14 



Ill 

SCHEDULE OF PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID TO DEC. 25, 1875. 



Name of 
Stbeet. 



Cast iron bell 

Force Main 

Force Main 

Supply Main 

Amherst 

Arlington 

Ash 

Ashland.. 

Auburn 

Bedford 

Beech 

Birch 

Blodgett 

Bridge 

Braok, 

Canal 

Cedar 

Central 

Chestnut 

Concord, 

Church 

Dean 

Depot 

Dutton 

Elm 

FraT'.klin 

Granite 

Gove 

Green 

Hanover 

Harrison 

High 

HoUis 

Kidder 

Kidder Court 

Laugdon 

Laurel 

Lowell 

Manchester 

Maple 

Market 

Mechanic 

Merrimack 

Middle 

Myrtle 

Nashua 

North Priv. way . . 

Orange 

Park 

Pearl 

Pine 

Pleasitnt 

Prospect 

Spring 

Spruce 

Stark . . . 

State 

Summer 

Union 

Valley 

Vine 

Walnut 

Wasliington 

Water 

Wilson 

Willow 

Young 

Total on East... 
Bidp of H'vpr.. 



Length & Size of Cement-ltned Pipe. 



20 in. 14inl2in 10 in. Sin. 6 in. 4 in 



1,419.0 
6,751.9 
8,410.0 



200 



835 

5632 

370 



4,458.0 



4055 



318 



3524 



503 



24 



334] 



106] 



1349 



202 
37 



793 
4620 



181 
1527 



1943 



947 
1396 



123 

126 

4513 

1402 

750 

2002 
590 

18 

501 

1518 

3899 

2282 

43 
2812 
4206 
1198 
3308 

60 

29 

35 
21 
191 
59 
59 
5304 
1525 

408 

750 

57 

64 

4062 

45 

4080 

1116 

962 

788 

4929 

768 

2719 

231 

1784 

45 

1699 

877 
1076 
1497 

752 
2376 

874 

877 
59 

651 



702 



736 
10 



283 



1931 
147 



57 



Size Gates. 



550 



l.n:>8 9|7037's4'>0f 1813? 12666 71920 6756 5 7 9 3 22127 i:?l 8'229 



112 



TOTAL ON EAST AND WEST SIDE OF RIVER. 

20 inch cement-lined pipe, 21,038 9 ft. 



14 


U '(( 


12 


1( u 


10 


u u 


8 


(( u 


6 


u a 


4 


U It 



Total feet cement-lined pipe, 

Or 27 miles, 3,738| feet. 



12 inch iron pipe, 

10 " " " 

g it u a 



7,037 
8,415 
5,5551 
12,666 
82,632 
8,954 

146,2981 



3,S25 
108 

84 



20 inch gates, 

14 " 

12 « 

10 " 

8 " 

6 " 

4 « 



Total number of gates, 
Number air valves, 8. 
Number of hydrants, 270. 



ft. 



Total feet iron pipe, 3,477 ft. 



5 

7 
11 

8 

22 

153 

15 



221 



HYDRANTS. 



On account of the severe cold weather' last winter it rCj 
quired constant care and labor to keep them from freezing. 
They were thawed out by the city fire steamer during the 
coldest weather, and other times by hot irons. Thawing by 
steam had a tendency to injure the leather valve in the 
Boston hydrant, and we have had to put new valves into all 
those that had been frozen. There have been set the past 
season fifty-five hydrants, forty in Piscataquog and fifteen 
on the city side of the river, all of which are the Boston. 



113 

Machine Co. but ten ; these are what is called the Perkins 
hydrant, made in Holyoke, Mass.. This kind of a hydrant 
was so well recommended by other cities where they had 
been tried, that it was thought best to put in ten that we 
might judge for ourselves. 

The large Boston machine hydrant that was set on Gran- 
ite street, corner Canal, operated insufficiently, and it was 
taken out and another of the usual pattern put in its place . 
One on the corner of Pine and Amherst was moved on ac- 
count of its beina: too far in the street. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN PISCATAQUOG. 



A, north-west corner Main Street. 

Bowman, west side, opposite gate to Cemetery. 

Center, north-east corner Main Street. 

Center, east end of school-house lot. 

Clinton, north-west corner Main Street. 

Clinton, north-west corner Dover Street. 

Douglas, north side, front of No. 8 Print Works. 

Douglas, north side, eighty feet west of Main Street. 

Douglas, north-west corner West Street. 

Douglas, north-east corner Barr Street. 

Douglas, north-west corner Green Street. 

Douglas, north-west corner Quincy Street. 

Ferry, centre of Ferry and Main Street. 

Granite, south-west corner River Street. 

Granite, south-west corner Second Street. 

Granite, south-west corner Main Street. 

Granite, south-west corner Dover Street. 

Granite, south-west corner West Street. 



114 

Granite, south-west corner Barr Street. 
Granite, south-east corner Green Street. 
Granite, south side, foot X)f Quincy Street. 
Main, south-east corner of Walker Street. 
Main, east side, opposite L. Rice's residence. 
Mast, west end of Dewey & Wyman Block. 
Mast, front of Stark Block. 
Mast, opposite west side of Bowman Street. 
Mast, opposite Gen. Riddle's house. 
Mast, opposite John C. Smith's house. 
Milford, south-west corner Main Street. 
Milford, south-east corner Bowman Street. 
Milford, south side, foot of back street. 
Piscataquog, north-west corner Main Street. 
Piscataquog, north side, top of hill. 
School, north-west corner Main Street. 
Second, south-west corner Ferry Street. 
Second, Jiorth-west corner Walker Street. 
Second, west side, 100 feet north of Railroad. 
Third, south-west corner Ferry Street. 
Walker, north-west corner River Street. 
West, north-west corner Parker Street. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET EAST SIDE OP RIVER. 

Auburn, north-west corner of Union Street. 

Cove, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Cove, north side, centre of Gasometer Building. 

Grove, north-west corner Elm Street. 

Green, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

Hanover, north-west corner Belmont Street. 

Hanover, north-west corner Beacon Street. 

Laurel, north-west corner Hall Street. 

Merrimack, north-west corner Hall Street. 

Merrimack, north side, 76 feet west of Belmont Street. 



115 

Summer, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Yalley, north-west corner Elm Street. 
Valley, north-west corner Willow Street. 
Wilson, north-west corner Park Street. 
Young, north-west corner Willow Street. 

Hydrant on Pine street, north-west corner of Amherst, has 
been removed to Amherst street, north-west corner of Pine. 

GATES. 

The gates that were out of order have been repaired ; 
these frequently show leaks caused by turning out the stuff- 
ing box in opening. More than half of these have been 
packed over and are now in good condition. 

Two have been taken out of the kind made by the Chap- 
man Valve Company and replaced by others. The spin- 
dles were small and broke in trying them. The gates set 
this year are of the Ludlow Pattern ; the number set has 
been 49, as shown by the table. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

The extreme temperature of last winter caused the frost 
io go down to the depth of over five feet in many places, 
•consequently many service pipes froze, and the expense to 
the city in thawing them out was 1685.68. 

Those that have been laid this past season were put un- 
der the cellar wall in all places where it was possible to do so, 
and pains was taken to lay all services at least five feet deep. 

The contract with J. Q. A. Sargent, for laying the ser- 
vice pipes, was continued till the first of January, 1876. 

Tiie number of applications for water, to date, has been 
ten hundred and eighty-three, (1083.) 

Nine hundred and ninety (990) service pipes have been 
laid to December :25, 1875, of diameters, number of size, 
and length, as follows : 



116 



40 1-2 inch diameter. 
786 3-4 " " 



139 


1 


13 


u 


8 


2 


4 


4 



Total leng 


th 


8G0 feet, 


8 inches. 


u u 




21,624 " 


3 


a 


a a 




4,165 " 


4 


u 


u u 




720 " 


11 


u 


u a 




416 " 


3 


(( 


a a 




117 " 





u 



Total length of service pipe in streets 

to Dec. 25,. 1875, . . . 27,904 ft. 5 in. 

Which is equal to 5 miles, 1,505 feet, 5 inches. 

365 service pipes have been put in this year, 62 of which 
were put in at Piscataquog. 

The number, size and length, are as follows : 

5 1-2 inch diameter. Total length 77 feet, 6 inches. 
" " " 7,601 " 1 " 



286 


3-4 " 


61 


1 " 


7 


U " 


6 


2 « 



1,703 
554 
366 



10,302 ft. lin. 



1875, 



Total length laid in 1875, 

Which is equal to 1 mile, 5,022 feet, 1 ijich. 

Total cost of services laid in 1875, $6,525.36. 

Total cost of services laid to December 25, 
$17,396.02. 

Fifty-four applications for water have been canceled. 
Fourteen services have been shut off. Water has not yet 
been let on to twenty. 

Number of water meters, and kind, owned by Water De- 
partment : 



Kind. 


|in. 


5/8 in. 


'^in. 


lln. 


Total. 




1 


1 
76 


11 

1 
45 


3 

1 

21 


15 


Wortliiiif ton,. 


2 




1 


Ball & Fitts 


142 








1 


77 


57 


25 


16(> 



117 

Of this number 149 are in use, leaving 11 on liand. 

The income from the sale of water for the year 1875, 
has been as follows : 

Heceived from water and hydrant rents, less 





abatements, . 


$23,247 05 


a 


fines, .... 


92 59 


u 


letting on water, 


28 00 


a 


metered water rents, 


2,890 17 


u 


rent of meters, . 


457 94 


u 


building purposes. 


122 13 


u 


extra uses of water, . 


40 08 


a 


extra size of service pipe. 


11 04 ' 


u 


labor ou service pipe, 


4 00 


u 


4 lever-handle waste stops. 


9 15 


u 


setting 39 water meters, . 


117 GO 


Total, 


$27,019 15 


Abatement in 1875, 


$127 10 



Construction account for the year 1875. 

Engiueering, 

Tire hydi'ants and valves. 

Distribution pipes, 

Tools and fixtures, 

Meters, boxes and brass connections. 
Superintendence, collecting and repairs. 
Stationery, printing and lithographs. 
Office and incidental expenses. 
Livery and traveling expenses, 
Force and supply main, .... 
Grading and fencing, .... 
Pumping machinery, pump-house, dwelling 

and barn,. . . . 
Pumping expenses and repairs, 
Service pipes, 

Total, ^50,091 80 



$996 58 


4,105 50 


25,137 49 


201 64 


1,184 43 


5,021 76 


339 91 


410 22 


23 50 


8 00 


405 86 


3,632 24 


2,099 31 


6,525 36 



118 



Total construction account to December 31, 1875. 



Land and water rights, .... S30,69S 67 

Dam, canal, penstock and tail race, . 101,198 20 
Pumping machinery, pump-house, dwelling 

and barn, 86,812 20 

Distributing reservoir and fixtures, . 71,542 36 

Force and supply main, .... 88,674 02 

Distribution pipes, 189,238 02 

Fire hydrants and valves, . . . 27,478 61 

Tools and fixtures, 10,561 44 

Boarding and store houses, . . . 919 36 

Koads and culverts, 1,756 75 

Supplies, 550 39 

Engineering, 22,156 19 

Livery and traveling expenses, . . 2,856 64 

Legal expenses, 563 79 

Stationery, printing and lithographs, _ . 3,018 98 

Grading and fencing, .... 9,912 12 

Service pipes, . . . ... . 17,396 02 

Meters, boxes and brass connections, . 5,089 58 

Superintendence, collecting and repairs, . 9,462 53 

Office and incidental expenses, . . 1,333 55 

Pumping expenses and repairs, . . 2,911 48 

Interest, 40,678 51 

Highway expenditures, . . . . . 14,000 53 

Total, $738,809 94 

Tools and material sold, interest transferred, 56,876 62 

Cost of construction to date, . $681,933 32" 



The appropriations by the City Council for construction 
of water-works have been as follows : 



Aug. 


1, 1871, 


Appropriation 


May 


6, 1873, 


a 


July 


21, 1873, 


C( 


Mar. 


17, 1874, 


u 


June 


23, 1875, 


u 



$400,000 00 

60,000 00 

90,000 00 

50,000 00 

40,000 00 
$640,000 GO 



119 

The following amounts have been paid over to the City 
Treasurer and credited to the water- works : 

1872, Supplies and Material sold S578 61 

1873, " " " " . 177 07 
1873, Accrued Interest on Water- 
Bonds sold ... 193 26 

1873, Accrued Interest on State 

Bonds sold ... 146 00 

1873, Water Eents . . . 1,920 53 

1874, Supplies and Material sold . 607 89 
March 17, 1874, Highway expenditures, trans- 
ferred from Water- Works 
account . . . 14,000 53 

March 17, 1874, Interest and Discount, trans- 
ferred from Water- Works 
account . . . 12,347 25 

Sept. 1, 1874, Interest and Discount, trans- 
ferred from Water- Works 
account . . . 22,361 74 

1874, Water and (Hydrant Eents 

from Feb. 1, 1872) . . 30,233 54 
Dec. 29, 1874, Interest transferred . . 4,566 25 
Dec. 18, 1875, 1 Anvil sold ... 15 00 

Sept. 26, 1875, Engine, Crusher, and other 

material . . . 2,089 45 

Water Eents for 1875 . . 27,019 15 

S756,251 27 

Total amount Bills approved 

to Dec, 31, 1775 . . 738,809 94 

Balance on hand . $17,441 33 

The following are the totals of monthly bills to December 
31, 1875. 

1871. To Dec. 31, $1,723 06 

Sl,723 06 

1872. Jan. 23, 6,110 61 

Feb. 24, 1,242 12 

Mar. 23, 517 41 



120 



1873. 



April 27, 
May 25, 
Juue 26, 
July, 22, 
Aug. 24, 
Sept. 21, 
Oct. 26, 
Kov. 23, 
Dec. 21, 

Jan. 25, 
Feb. 22, 
Mar. 22, 
April 26, 
May 24, 
June 21, 
July 26, 
Aug. 23, 
Sept. 27, 
Oct. 25, 
Nov. 22, 
Dec. 20, 



1874. Jan. 24, 
Feb. 21, 
Mar. 21, 
April 25, 
May 23, 
June 27, 
July 25, 
Aug. 22, 
Sept. 26, 
Oct. 24, 
Nov. 21, 
Dec. 26, 

1875. Jan. 23, 
Feb. 27, 
Mar. 27, 
April 24, 
May 24, 



. 1,253 02 


680 84 


. 1,614 75 


. 31,027 43 


. 64,712 07 


. 47,594 24 


. 40,114 27 


, 33,150 29 


. 17,853 61 


. 48,767 24 


601 59 


. 2,661 92 


. 4,706 09 


. 10,530 68 


. 14,624 08 


. 33,426 49 


. 34,213 95 


. 48,338 36 


. 38,207 63 


. 41,382 29 


. 17,148 70 


. 29,975 42 


. 3,626 63 


. 2,577 53 


. 16,934 44 


. 12,844 91 


. 13,867 50 


. 25,097 63 


. 14,609 75 


. 12,527 80 


. 9,074 00 


. 2,534 38 


. 2,845 41 


838 78 


. 1,427 57 


. 1,198 38 


831 69 


. 1,631 82 



S245,870 66 



$294,609 02 



$146,515 40 



121 



June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 


26, 
24, 

21, 
25, 
23, 

27, 
25, 


Respectfully submitt 
CHAS. K. 


2,484 64 

4,151 16 

. 1,719 43 

. 5,247 79 

. 26,649 45 

. 2,738 46 

. 1,172 63 

«i50 091 «^ 




$738,809 

ed, 
WALKER. 

Superintendent. 


94 



Water has been supplied to the following places 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


1 City Hall and offices. 


6 Churches. 


1 City Library. 


6 School-houses. 


3 Banks. 


1 Court-house. 


3 Fire engines. 


2 Hose Companies. 


1 Hook and Ladder. 


1 Opera house. 


5 Hotels. 


1 Convent. 


1 Odd Fellows' building. 


1 Music Hall. 


1 Holly Tree Inn. 


MANUFACTURING 


ESTABLISHMENTS. 


1 Iron foundry. 


1 Brass and copper foundry 


2 Dye houses. 


1 Sash and bUnd shop. 


1 Machine shop. 


3 Breweries. 


2 Patent medicine manuf 'y. 


1 Shoe manufactory. 


3 Clothing manufactories. 


1 Pop-corn manufactory. 


2 Furniture manufactories. 


). Trunk and harness shop. 


1 Harness shop. 




MARKETS. 


4 Fish. 


8 Meat and fish. 


6 Meat. 





122 





OFFICES. 


3 Dentists. 
48 Professional. 


2 Express. 
6 Printing. 




SHOPS. 


12 Barber. 
1 Wheelwright. 
4 Blacksmith. 
1 Carpenter. 


2 Currying. 

1 Plumber. 

1 Steam, gas and water pipe 

1 Soap factory. 




STABLES. 


Ill Private. 


9 Livery. 




SALOONS. 


7 Dining. 
4 Oyster. 


4 Billiard. 
60 Liquor. 




STORES. 


1 Auction. 29 Groceries. 
10 Drug. 1 Meal. 
4 Jewelry. 2 Hardware. 

3 Wholesale Hquor. 7 Boot and shoe. 
1 Pur. 3 Stove. 

1 House furnishing goods. 3 Gents' furnishing goods. 
13 Fancy goods. 2 Book. 

1 Wholesale paper. 1 Leather and shoe finders, 

4 Dry goods. 2 Music. 

2 Candy. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 


1 Band room. 
1 Bleachery. 

1 Laundry. 

3 Drinking fountains. 

2 Ice houses. 

8 Private fire hydrants. 
1 Green house. 


3 Club rooms. 
6 Bakeries. 

6 Stationary engines. 

7 Photographers. 
1 Portable engine. 

270 Public fire hydrants. 
1 Waste washer. 



123 



59 Boarding houses. 
2829 Faucets. 

67 Urinals. 
426 Sill cocks. 

12 Cows. 
357 Horses. 



2218 Families., 
281 Water closets. 
Ill Bath tubs. 
121 Wash tubs. 
309 Washbowls. 



SUPPLIES AND TOOLS BELONGING TO SERVICE DEPARTMENT, 



1 vise. 

1 die plate. 

6 dies, R.& L., from 1-2 to 1 in. 

6 taps, 1-2 to 1 in. R. & L. 

2 bushing 3-1&1-2 for die plate. 
1 pipe cutter, 3 extra cuts. 

1 file, 15 stop covers. 
15 wood boxes. 
1 piece enameled cloth. 

1 piece cotton cloth. 
1-2 can white lead, 

2 coal hods. 

1 wood stove. 

7 meter boxes. 
1 broom. 

1 glass cutter. 

1 meter spanner. 
50 feet rubber 1 inch hose. 
23 iron stop box covers, square. 

1 water pot. 

1 3 cubic feet measure. 

1 platform scales. 

1 6-inch gauge. 

1 20 inch brass spindle. 

3-4 bundle twine for joints. 

1 wood saw. 

2 prick punches. 

1 lot brass nipples. 

2 1-4 stop and waste. 



1 2 inch Ludlow valve. 
1 1 1-2 in. " " 

2 1 in. " " 

1 3-4 in. stop and waste. 
1 3-4 in. corporation stop. 
1 1 in. stop and waste. 
1 1 in. stop. 

1 1-2 in. stop. 

2 1-2 in. corporation stops. 
1 lot pipe fittings. 

1 lot special casting. 
10 hydrant collars. 

4 hydrant caps. 

1 hydrant chain. 

1 stop box. 

2 iron rimmers. 

1 brace for drilling. 
1 iron bar. 
1 ice chisel. 

3 service stop wrenches, 

1 lot old pipe. 
6 stone points. 

5 stone drills. 

2 extension bitts. 

2 1 inch stop and waste. 

5 3-4 inch stop and waste. 
8 hydrant valves. 

3 pairs pipe tongs. 

1 pair blacksmith tongs. 
1 ratchet driller. 



124 



2 meter wrenches. 

4 gate wrenches'. 

1 dozen butts for boxes. 
1 paper 3-4 screws. 
1 alcohol lamp. 
1 heating furnace. 

1 lot iron for thawing. 

2 oil stones. 

1 oil can. 

2 wood clamps. 
1 pair calipers. 
1 3-pole derrick, 
1 chain fall. 

5 shovels. 

picks. 

8 gate wrenches. 
5 hydVant wrenches. 

3 monkey wrenches. 
S special wrenches. 

1 machinist hammer. 

2 snow shovels. 
€ lanterns. 

5 oil cans. 

1 sledge. 

1 pair pinchers. 

1 " long " 

2 plows. 

1 bevel square. 

3 hand saws. 
1 iron saw. 

1 short jointer. 

1 smooth plane. 

1 3-4 inch mortise chisel, 

1 1-2 " " " 

1 trowel. 

2 15 inch gate necks. 



3 drillers. 

1 bit brace. 
1 washer cutter. 
1 wheelbarrow. 
12 cold chisels. 
1 dark lantern. 
1 set pulley block. 

4 screw drivers. 
1 water pail. 

1 door chisel. 

2 nail sets. 

1 mallet. 

2 bench axes. 

2 nail hammers. 

5 brad awls. 

6 plow irons. 
1 iron clamp. 

1 shave. 

2 squai'es. 

1 nail gimlet. 

2 gimlet bits. 

5 gouges, 1-4 to 1 3-4 inch. 
10 bits, 1-4 to 5-8 in. 

1 2 inch auger. 

5 chisels, 1-4 to 1 1-2 in. 
20 moulding tools. 
4 gauges. 

2 iron squares. 
1 hand fine saw. 
1 long jointer. 

1 fore plane. 

1 1 1-2 inch mortise chisel. 

1 5-8 " " 

1 3-8 " " 

4 24 inch gate necks. 

1 22 " " " 



GATES ON HAND. 



2 4 in. Boston Machine Co. spigot. 1 
16" Eddy hub. 1 

5 6 " Ludlow spigots. 1 



4 inch Chapman spigot. 
6 " Ludlow hub. 
6 " Chapman spigot. 



125 

1 6 in. Boston Machine Co. spigot, 

2 10 " Ludlow spigot. 

3 12 " Boston and Maine spigot. 
1 20 •' Boston M. Co. spigot. 



1 8 in. Ludlow bub. 

1 12 " Ludlow spigot. 

1 14 " Boston M, Co. spigot. 



5 hydrants, (Boston Machine Company). 
METERS ON HAND. 



I 3-4 inch Gem. 

II " Wortbington. 
5 5-8 " Ball&ritts. 



1 1-2 inch Gem. 

1 3-4 " Desper. 

2 3-4 " Ball & Fitts. 



INYENTORY OP TOOLS, FIXTURES, ETC., AT PUMPING STATION. 



1 desk. 


1 waste press. 


3 pigs of lead. 


1 box 3-4 inch bolts. 


200 feet 7-8 inch hose. 


1 bit stock. 


5 bits. 


1 hand saw. 


1 wood saw. 


1 square. 


2 water pails. 


2 screw plates, taps and dies. 


3 brooms. 


1 broom brush. 


3 hand dust brushes. 


4 scrub brushes. 


7 oil cans. 


2 axes. 


1 jack screw. 


4 monkey wrenches. 


1 vise. 


1 garden rake. 


5 shovels. 


1 Scotch driller. 


1 1 inch auger. 


5 lanterns. 


1 sprinkler pot. 


1 clock. 


2 planes. 


2 thermometers. 


5 crow bars. 


1 bellows and anvil. 


1 monkey pipe wrench. 


2 common wrenches. 


1 window brush. 


1 ratchet wrench. 


1 hydrant wrench. 


1 gate wrench. 


2 wheelbarrows. 


1 6-pail kettle. 


1 grindstone. 


3 picks. 


1 clothes drier. 


8 ladders. 


3 screen hooks. 


1 brush hook. 


2 stoves. 


2 hods. 


1 sifter. 


1 iron slush bucket. 


4 fork wrenches. 


2 leaf rakes. 



126 



1 pair pliers. 

2 1-2 barrels oil. 

50 lbs. tallow. 

1 hoe. 

6 coal chisels. 
75 lbs. black lead. 

1 bucket. 

1 bench. 

2 levels. 



1 pair portable steps. 
175 lbs. waste. 

1 lot of fuel. 

2 ice chisels. 

3 hammers. 

3 dripping-pans. 
1 screw-driver. 
3 gate keys. 
28 lbs. packing. 



INVENTORY OP FURNITURE, ETC., IN THE OFFICE. 



^ drawing boards. 

1 wardrobe. 

1 transit. 

1 level rod. 

1 copying press. 

1 roll manilla paper. 

1 roll tracing muslin. 

2 drawing tables. 

1 library desk. 

2 waste baskets. 
1 6 foot pole. 

3 stools. 
1 duster. 

1 map of city. 



1 case of drawers. 

2 stoves. 
1 level. 

3 transit rods. 

1 roll mounted paper. 

2 quires drawing paper. 
1 lot of fuel. 

1 bookcase. 

1 table. 

1 12 inch pressure gauge. 

1 bill stamp. 

3 inkstands. 

1 lot of drawings. 

2 tapes. 



INVENTORY OF CONSTRUCTION TOOLS. 



3 full trimmed derricks. 
35 wheelbarrows. 
3 iron rakes. 
L wrought-iron plow. 
7 forks. 

3 dozen handles, 

4 set dog chains. 

1 set blacksmith tools. 
10 pieces Scotcli sewer pipe. 
1 force pump. 
1 bill hook. 
1 clevis and pin. 



1 harrow. 

1 timber roll. 

8 sprinkling pots. 
4 mortar hoes. 

9 dozen picks. 

2 dozen shovels. 

3 stone hammers. 
' 1 anvil. 

2 iron road shovels. 
150 feet hose. 

1 Ko. 5, and 1 No. 3 plow. 

3 grub hoes. 



127 



4 bush scythes. 
2 axes. 

4 cable chains. 
1 set bellows. 
4 water pails. 



3 snaths. 
10 mason hods. 

6 striking hammers. 
28 feet drill steel. 

1 lot lumber. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY LIBRARY 



THE YEAR 1875. 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Council of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith submit their 
twenty-second annual report, to which is appended the 
report of the Treasurer of the Board, showing the expend- 
itures made for books and periodicals ; and also the report 
of the Librarian, which shows the operations of the library 
■during the past year, and its present condition. 

From the latter report it appears that the circulation of 
■books from the library has very considerably increased, the 
whole number taken out being forty-four thousand two 
hundred and seventy-five ; the library having been open 
for that purpose during two hundred and ninety-three days. 

At the commencement of the year the library contained 
■eighteen thousand six hundred and twelve volumes of books 
and pamphlets. Five hundred and forty-five volumes have 
been added during the year, of which, four hundred and 
forty have been purchased, fifteen are donations, and ninety 
are bound volumes of periodicals that have been received 
during the year. 

The number of periodicals regularly received has been 
«ixty-six. 

The total number of books, pamphlets and maps now in 
the library, is nineteen thousand one hundred and fifty- 



132 

seven. A part of these have been laid aside as unfit for 
circulation, on account of defects arising from long use. 
These so laid aside will be replaced as rapidly as dupli- 
cates can be procured. 

Accompanying the report of the Librarian, is a list of 
the donations made to the library, and a similar list of the 
fitles of the books purchased, which the Trustees recom- 
mend be printed as part of this report. 

The expenditures made for books appear by the Treas- 
urer's accounts to have been nine hundred and eighty-eight 
dollars and twenty-six cents, and for periodicals one hun- 
dred and eighty-six dollars and twenty cents, leaving un- 
. expended a balance of twenty-one hundred and ninety- 
three dollars and eighty-seven cents, applicable to the pur- 
chase of books and subscription for periodicals. The 
larger part of this sum will be required to pay for the pur- 
chase of books, to be made about the commencement of 
the year, and the remainder for such purchases as may be 
made from time to time during the year. 

The expenses incident to the support of the library have 
been fifteen hundred and seventy-seven dollars and ninety 
cents, and are in brief as follows : 



Librarian's salary, 
Licidentals, 










$800 00 
72 84 


Gas, 










. 214 92 


Printing, . 
Fuel, 










73 36 

198 92 


Binding, . 










78 8i) 


Re-binding, 










80 .50 


Insurance, 










32 50 


Newspapers, 
Water rates, 










6 00 
20 00 



.,577 90 



133 

Appropriation for books, etc., .... 1,000 00 
Balance, 1,985 34 



,563 24 



The trustees are of the opinion that an appropriation of 
•an amount equal to that made the present year, will be suf- 
ficient to meet the expenditures that are likely to be re- 
quired during the ensuing year. 

January 14, 1876, in Board of Trustees. 
Read and approved, and ordered to be presented to the 
City Council. 

ALPHEUS GAY, 
Mayor, and President ex-officio. 
:NATHAN p. hunt, CUrk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Trustees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board makes the following report 
•of the receipts and expenditures of the funds received by 
the board on account of the City Library for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1875. 

1875. 

Jan. 1. To balance as per last report," . $2,062 33 

July 1. To income of Dean Fund, . . 306 00 

Dec. 31. To appropriation for 1875, . . 1,000 00 



5,368 33 



1875. 

Jan. 22. P'd N. E. News Co., periodicals, . |13 29 

Feb. 12. N. E. News Co., periodicals, . 19 15 

Feb. 15. Lee & Shepard, books, . . 578 32 

Feb. 22. Lee & Shepard, books, . . 179 91 



134 



March 11. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals, 


12 04 


March 18. 


Lee & Shepard, books, 


60 25 


April 


3. 


Lee & Shepard, books. 


18 85 


April 


6. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals, 


13 59 


April 


28. 


Lee & Shepard, books, 


. 116 70 


April 


28. 


Wm. H. Fisk, books, 


2 00 


May 


5. 


Boston Society of Natural History 








periodicals. 


\ 3 50 


May- 


6. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals, 


16 07 


May 


22. 


Lee & Shepard, books, 


32 73 


June 


9. 


N, E. News Co., periodicals. 


14 94 


July 


7. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals, 


12 38 


Aug. 


12. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals. 


17 07 


Sept. 


7. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals. 


15 38 


Oct. 


5. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals, 


16 83 


Nov. 


16. 


Boston Society of Natural History 


) 






periodicals, 


3 00 


Dec. 


6. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals. 


15 37 


Dec. 


7. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals. 


13 59 


Dec. 


31. 


By Balance, 


2,193 87 




$3,368 33 






Respectfully submitted. 








S. N. BELL, 








Treasurer of City 


Library. 



We have examined the above report and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WM. P. NEWELL, 
ALPHEUS GAY, 

Committee of Accounts of City Library. 



I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report. 



135 

of the Trustees of the City Library, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 



January 4, 1876. 



Oity Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

The following is a statement of the workings of the Li- 
brary for the year 1875, and of its present condition. 

The year now closing shows a larger circulation than for 
any previous year since our organization. This record will 
be gratifying to the officers of the Library, and to the pub- 
lic generally, as it thus proves that our institution is appre- 
ciated, and if the privileges here offered are made use of, 
beneficial results will certainly follow as a matter of course. 
The books are well cared for, and but few cases are noted 
where willful mutilation seems to have been intended. 
Quite a number of instances are noticed of the detention 
of books beyond the time allowed by the regulations, hav- 
ing the appearance of but little regard for the- same, but 
in the main, our rules have been complied with. The losses 
from year to year are comparatively nothing. There are 
always a few that cannot be found at each examination, but 
in most cases are accounted for after re-opening. 

The accessions have not been as large as usual, rather 
below the average. This is owing to fewer donations re- 
ceived, as the number purchased from the funds is the 
same as for last year. 

The number of new accounts opened will compare favor- 
ably with previous years, being about the average. A large 



136 

number of old accounts have been opened, of which no 
record is kept. Within the past eight weeks five have been 
renewed which had not been in use for nearly fifteen years. 

The usual interest for reading in the rooms, for books of 
reference, and for the periodicals, is well maintained. I 
think the demands for works on art, on mechanics, on 
the sciences, and perhaps on other important branches, are 
rather on the increase. If statistics of our workings could 
be kept, they would be of great interest. 

The following is a record of the work for the year, with 
some comparison with past years : 

Whole number of volumes at last report, . . 18,612 
Accessions the past year by donations, . 15 

periodicals bound, 90 
purchased, . . 440 



545 



Whole number of volumes at present, . . . 19,157 
comprising maps, . . 16 

pamphlets, . . 1,085 

bound volumes, . . 18,056 

19,157 



Number of periodicals received, .... 66 

by donation, ... 9 

Number of volumes withdrawn the past year, . 6 

Number of volumes withdrawn since organization, 

about • . 500 

Number of volumes replaced since organization, 

• about .• . . . 400 

Number of volumes withdrawn and on file but not 

replaced, 96 

Number of volumes withdrawn and on file and 

replaced, 366 

Number of volumes withdrawn (including those 

lost) not on file, and not replaced, about . 100 



137 



Number of volumes on the shelves, about, 
Number of days open to the public, 
Number of days open for delivery of books, 
Number in circulation during this time. 
Average number per day, . 
Increase of circulation over last year, . 
Increase over any previous year, . 
Number in circulation at calling in, 
Number of cards in constant use. 
Whole number of guarantees received. 
Number received during the year, 
Average per month, .... 
Total number accounts on the books, . . 



18,957 

293 

261 

44,275 

173 

8,224 

2,803 

1,550 

900 

9,766 

486 

40 

4,846 



Amount of cash received for fines and on hand 

Jan. 1, 1875, 1152 31 

Amount received the past year, . . . . 45 72 



$198 03 
. 35 37 



Paid express charges, stationery, postage, etc., 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1876, .... 1162 66 

There are some changes in our management which should 
be made, as they would be productive of more usefulness. 
One is a quiet condition of the rooms. Since the reading- 
room was discontinued several years since, ordinary conver- 
sation has been indulged in by those present as though the 
rooms were intended, in part, for this purpose. This is very 
annoying to those who come here to read, to say nothing of 
us who do the work. Under these circumstances our rooms 
seem to invite those who do not care to come for any real 
usefulness, but simply to while away an hour as best they 
may. If this condition of things were done away with, and 
all who visit us were required to observe strictly our rules 
in this respect, we should be patronized still more, and be 



138 

the means of doing more good. This change can be easily 
made by allowing proper assistance for the issuing of books. 
Under the present arrangement it cannot be done to anj 
degree of completeness. 

Another improvement would be, a record of statistics of 
the workings of the library. At present, owing to other 
duties which must first claim attention, but little can be 
done in this respect. 

The Library has reached that magnitude where one per- 
son should not be expected to perform all the duties re- 
quired for its management. The labors have increased 
considerably since removing to the Library building, even^ 
and with a larger fund to draw from, by at least one-third, 
for the purchase of books, the work in this department 
alone must necessarily increase in the same ratio. 

In order that the rooms may be in suitable condition for 
use, they should be swept often and properly heated. This 
latter requires two fires, and close attention is necessary to 
keep them in order. Then come the regular duties of the 
Library, comprising the delivery of over forty thousand vol- 
umes annually, the covering of at least five thousand, keep- 
ing the accounts with borrowers, a general oversight of the 
rooms, which can be but imperfectly attended to, especially 
during the evening sessions, the shelving, cataloguing, cov- 
ering and numbering of each and every volume received as 
an accession, together with many other duties absolutely 
necessary to be promptly attended to, shows that the duties 
are by no means unimportant. Much that would be useful 
to the officers and to the public generally, as regards the 
management aud general information, must be unattained. 
It is earnestly lioped that the Board will take this subject 
into consideration, and authorize the changes suggested, 
and any other improvements which in their judgment may 
be deemed advisable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. H. MARSHALL, Librarian. 



139 

DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR 

1875. 

By Hon. John Eaton, Washington. 

Report of the Commissioner of Education. 1873. 8vo» 
By A. J. Myer, Esq., Washington. 

Report of the Chief Signal Officer. 1873. 8vo. 
By Capt. C. p. Patterson, Washington. 

Report of the United States Coast Survey. 1871. 4to. 
2 copies. 
By Stockton BA;rES, Esq., Philadelphia. 

Poetical Works of Daniel Bates. 1870. 16mo. 
Dream Life, and other poems. S. Bates. 1872. 16mo. 
By Joseph E. Bennett, Esq., Manchester. (In behalf of 
the city.) 
Geology of N. H. Hitchcock. Yol. 1. 1874. 4to, 
By Joseph B. Sawyer, Esq., Manchester. 

Statistical Information relating to certain Branches of 

Industry in Massachusetts. 1855. 8vo. 
Minutes of the Manchester Lyceum, from October 1^ 
1845 to April 16, 1857. (Manuscript.) 4to. 
By THE Trustees, Fall River, Mass. 

Catalogue of the Public Library of Fall River, Mass.. 
1874. 8vo. 
By THE Trustees, Clinton, Mass. 

Catalogue of the Bigelovv Public Library, Clinton, Mass. 
1874. 8vo. 
By the Trustees op Memorial Hall Library, Andover, 
Mass. 
Memorial Yolume. Record of Andover, Mass., during 
the Rebellion. 1875. 8vo. 
By the Publishers. 

The Boston Almanac. 1837. 24mo. 
By the Publishers, Concord. 

Rules and Practice in the Courts of Common Law and 
Chancery of New Hampshire. 1860. 8vo. 2 copies. 



140 
ACCESSIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR 1875. 

No. Shelf. 

The Housekeeper and Healthkeepcr, Catherine E. 

Beecher. 1874. 12mo 91 227 

Mind and Body ; 'the theories of their Kelations. (In- 
ternational Scientific Series.) Alex. Bain. 1875. l^mo. 38 215 

Animal Locomotion; or Walking, Swimming and Fly- 
ing. (International Scientific Series.) J. B. Petti- 
grew. 1874. 12mo 39 215 

Story of the Earth and Man. J. W. Dawson. 1874. 

12mo 40 215 

A Brief History of Culture. J. S. Hittell. 1875. 12mo. 40 216 

The Principles of Psychology. H. Spencer. 2 vols. 

1873. 12mo 42 216 

Outlines of Cosmic Philosophy, based on the doctrine 

of Evolution. J. Fiske. 2 vols. 1875. 12mo. . 44 216 

Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals. C. 
Darwin. 1873. 12mo 46 216 

History of the Conflict between Eeligion and Science. 
(International Scientific Series.) J. W. Draper. 1875. 
12mo 41 215 

Origin of Civilization and the Primitive Condition of 
Man. J. Lubbock. 1873. 12mo 47 216 

My Life on the Plains, or Personal Experience with the 
Indians. G. A. Custer. 1874. 8vo 47 102 

Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Seas. Jules 

Verne. 1875. 12rao 48 102 

Meridiana; the adventures of three Englishmen and 
three Russians in South Africa. Jules Verne.. 1874. 
12mo 39 114 

Heads and Tails; studies and stories of Pets. "Grace 

Greenwood." Mrs. L. K. Lippincott. 1875. 12mo. . 30 146 

A Foregone CoQclusiou. W. D. Howells. 1875. 12ino. 53 138 

A Passionate Pilgrim and other Tales. II. James, Jr. 
1875. 12mo 54 138 

Homes, and how to make them. A series of letters on 

Architecture. E. C. Gardner. 1875. l2mo. . . 55 138 

Nimrod of the Sea; or the American Whaleman. W. 

M. Davis. 1874. 12mo 43 114 

Campaigning of the Oxus, and the Fall of Khiva. J. A. 

MacGahan. 1874. 8vo 34 64 



1-11 



The Greville Memoirs ; a Journal of the reigns of King 
George IV and King William lY. H. Reeves, ed. 2 
vols. 1875. 12 mo 

Pisher Boys of Pleasant Cove. (Pleasant Cove Series.) 
E. Kellogg. 1874. 16 mo 

Coming Wave. (Yacht Club Series.) " Oliver Optic," 
W. T. Adams. 1875. 16 mo 

ISTursery ^STooniugs. '' Gail Hamilton," Mary A. Dodge. 
1875. 16 mo 

What a Boy! What shall we do with him? What will 
he do with himself? Who is to blame for the conse- 
quences? Julia A. Willis. 1875. 12 mo. . 

The Ugly-Girl Papers : or, Hints for the Toilet. Prom 
"Harper's Bazar." 1875. 16mo. 

In his Hame : a story of the Waldenses seven hundred 
years ago. E. E. Hall. 1875. lC;r.o. 

Our Girls. Dio Lewis. 1874. l2mo. . 

Por Better or Worse : a book for some men and all wo 
men. ''Jennie June." Jennie C. Croly. 1875 
16mo 

Seven Daughters. (Maidenhood Series.) Amanda M 
Douglas. 1875. 16nio 

More Bed-Time Stories. Louise C. Moulton. 1875 
l6mo 

Our Helen. (The Maidenhood Series.) Sophie May 
1875. IGmo 

Wedding Garments: or Bessie Morris' Diary. Mary 
W. McLain. 1875. 16mo 

My Sister Jennie. "Geo. Sand." Madame Dudevant 
1874. 16mo 

My Mother and I. Dinah M. Mulock. (Mrs. G. L 
Craik.) 1874. 12mo 

Malcolm. Geo. McDonald. 1875. 8vo. 

John Worthington's J^Tame. P. L. Benedict. 1875 
8vo 



Lord of Himself. P. H. Underwood. 1874. 12mo. 

Tempest-Tossed. Tlieodore Tilton. 1874. 12mo. 

Ten Old Maids. Juile P. Smith. 1874. 12mo. . 

Progressive Petticoats; or, Dressed to Death. An Au- 
tobiography of a Married Man. R. B. Roosevelt. 
1874. l2mo 



35 


294 


49 


104 


74 


104r 


64 


109 


65 


109 


67 


109 


68 


109 


87 


105 


66 


109 


76 


108 


77 


108 


78 


108 


79 


108 


82 


107 


75 


86 


87 


133 


88 


133 


91 


134 


92 


134 


49 


135 



62 135 



142 



Joseph and his Friend. A story of Pennsylvania. Bay- 
ard Taylor. 1870. 12mo 

Fettered for Life ; or, Lord and Master. A story of to- 
day. LiHie D. Blake. 1874. 12mo. . 

Xatherine Earl. Adeline Trafton. 1875. 12mo. 

Losing to Win. Theo. Davis. 1874. 12mo. 

Sports that Kill. A volume of Addresses. T. DeWitt 
Talmage. 1875. l2mo 

Puddleford Papers ; or, Humors of the West. H. H 
Riley. 1875. 12mo 

Far from the Maddening Crowd. (Leisure Hour series. ^ 
Thos. Hardy. 1874. 16mo ' 

A Pair of Blue Eyes. (Leisure Hour Series.) Thos 
Hardy. 1874. 16mo 

Desperate Remedies. (Leisure Hour Series.) Thos 
Hardy. 1874. 16mo 

John Thompson, and other stories. Louisa Parr. 1874, 
16mo 

Gunnar; a tale of Korse Life. H. H. Boyesen. 1875 
16mo 

Idolatry; a Romance. Julian Hawthorne. 1874. 12mo 

The Flower People. Mrs. H. Mann. 1875. 16mo. 

The Little Lame Prince. Dinah M. Mulock. Mrs 
Geo. L. Craik. 1875. l6mo 

The King of J^o-Land. B. L.'Farjeon. 1875. 8vo. 

Love or Marriage. Wm. Black. 1874. 8vo. 

In Silk Attire. Wm. Black. 1874. 8vo. . 

The Maid of Killeena. Wm. Black. 1875. 8vo. 

Jessie Trim. B. L. Farjeon. 1875. 8vo. . 

The Love that Lived. Mrs. Eiloart. 1875. . 

Historical and Descriptive Narrative of the Mammoth 
Cave of Kentucky. W. S. Forwood. 1870. 12mo 

Prairie and Forest; a description of the Game of North 
America. P. Gillmore. 1874. 12mo, 

Domesticated Trout ; how to breed and grow them. L 
Stone. 1872. 12mo. . . . . 

American Fish Culture; a description of the raising 
and culture of Fish. Thad. JSTorris. 1874. 12mo. 

Brave and Bold; or, The Fortunes of a Factory Boy 
(Bold and Brave Series.) Vol. 1. H. Alger, jr 
1874. 16mo 



63 135 



64 


135 


65 


135 


66 


135 


33 


35 


40 


137 


79 


87 


80 


87 


81 


87 


82 


87 


19 


70 


74 


89 


85 


168 


86 


168 


105 


84 


106 


84 


107 


84 


108 


84 


109 


84 


98 


83 


34 


65 


24 


66 


25 


66 


26 


66 



29 145 



143 

Bagged Dick, or, Street Life in New York. (Bagged 

Dick Series.) Vol.1. H.Alger, jr. 1868. 16rao. . 33 145 

Pame and Fortune ; or, The Progress of Richard Hun- 
ter. (Ragged Dick Series.) Yol. 2. H. Alger, jr. 
1868. 16mo 34 145 

Mark the Match Boy ; or Richard Hunter's Ward. (Rag- 
ged Dick Series.) Vol.3. H.Alger, jr. 1868. 16mo. . 35 145 

Bough and Ready ; or Life among the 'New York N'ews- 
boys. (Ragged Dick Series.) Vol.4. H.Alger, jr. 

1868. 16mo 36 145 

Ben the Luggage Boy ; or Among the Wharves. (Rag- 
ged Dick Series.) Vol.5. H. Alger, jr. 1868. l6mo. 37 145 

Bufus and Rose ; or the Fortunes of Rough and Ready. 
(Ragged Dick Series.) Vol. 6. H. Alger, jr. 1868. 
16mo 38 145 

Tattered Tom; or the Story of a Street Arab. (Tattered 

Tom Series.) Vol. 1, First Series. H.Alger, jr. 187L 39 145 

Paul the Peddler; or the Adventures of a Young Street 
Merchant. (Tattered Tom Series.) Vol. 2, First Se- 
ries. H.Alger, jr. 1871. 16mo 40 145 

Phil the Fiddler ; or the Story of a Young Street Musi- 
cian. (Tattered Tom Series.) Vol. 3, First Series. H. 
Alger, jr. 1871. 16mo 41 145 

Slow and Sure ; or From the Street to the ShojD. (Tattered 
Tom Series.) Vol. 4, First Series. H. Alger, jr. 1871. 
16mo 42 145 

Julius; or the Street Boy out West. (Tattered Tom 
Series.) Vol. 1, Second Series. H. Alger, jr. 1871. 
16mo 43 145 

Luck and Pluck; or 'John Oakley's Inheritance. (Luck 
and Pluck Series.) Vol. 1, First Series. H, Alger, jr. 

1869. 16mo • . 47 145 

Sink or Swim; or Harry Raymond's Resolve. (Luck 

and Pluck Series.) Vol. 2, First Series. H. Alger, jr. 

1869. 16mo 48 145 

Strong and Steady; or Paddle Your Own Canoe. (Luck 

and Pluck Series.) Vol. 3, First Series. H. Alger, jr. 

1869. 16mo 49 146 

Strive and Succeed; or the Progress of Walter Conrad. 

(Luck and Pluck Series.) Vol. 4, First Series. H. 

Alger, jr. 1869. 16mo 50 145 



141 



Try and Trust; or the Story of a Bound Boy. (Luck and 
Pluck Series.) Vol. 1, Second Series. H. Alger, jr 
1869. l6nio 

Bound to Else; or Harry Walton's Motto. (Luck and 
Pluck Series.) Yol. 2, Second Series. H.Alger, jr 
1869. 16mo 

Eisen from the Eauks; or Harry Walton's Success 
(Luck and Pluck Series.) Yol. 3, Second Series. H 
Alger, jr. 1869. 16mo 

Frank's Campaign; or the Farm and the Camp. (Cam^ 
paign Series.) Yol. 1. H.Alger, jr. 1864. 16mo. 

Paul Prescott's Charge. (Campaign Series.) Yol. 2 
H.Alger, jr. 1861. 16mo. .... 

Charlie Codman's Cruise. (Campaign Series.) Yol. 3 
H.Alger, jr. 1861. 16mo 

Hazel Blossoms. J. G. Whittier. 1875. 16mo. . 

Songs of Many Seasons, 1862-74. O. W. Holmes. 1875 
16mo. ......... 

The Legend of Jubal, and other Poems. "Geo. Eliot.' 
Mrs. G-. H. Lewes. 1871. 16mo. 

The Prophet; a Tragedy. (Poem.) Bayard Taylor. 1874 
16mo 

Echoes of the Foot-Hills. Bret Harte. 1875. 16mo. 

After the Ball, and other poems. Nora Perry. (2 cop 
ies.) 1875. l6mo 

Childhood Songs. LucyLarcom. 1875. 16 mo. 

Euins of lost Empires. STsetches of the ruins of Pal- 
myra, liTineveh and Babylon. P. Y. N". Myres. 1875 



8vo. 



Ismailia ; narrative of the expe'dition to Central Africa 
for the suppression of the slave trade. S. W. Baker 
1875. 8 vo 

The Heart of Africa ; travel and adventure in Central 
Africa from 1868 to 1871. G. A. Schweinfurth. 2 
vols. 1874. 8vo 

Coomassie and Magdala; a record of two British cam- 
paigns in Africa. H. M. Stanley. 1874. 8 va. 

Arctic Experiences; containing Capt. G. E.Tyson's won- 
derful drift OM the Ice-floe ; a history of the Polaris ex- 
pedition, etc. Edited by E. Y. Blake. 1874. 8 vo. 

Last Journals of David- Livingstone in Central Africa. 
Edited by H. Waller. 1875. 8 vo 



51 145 



52 145 



53 


145 


55 


145 


56 


145 


57 


145 


87 


9& 


88 


9a 


89 


96 


90 


90 


91 


96 


92 


96 


94 


9(> 



23 52 



37 73 



38 


73 


24 


72: 


25 


72- 


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145 



A Wiuter in Eussia. Theo. Fautier. 1874. 12 mo. 

N'orthern California, Oregon and the Sandwich Islands 
C. NordhoflF. 1874. 8 vo 

Egypt and Iceland in the year 1874. Bayard Taylor 
1874. 12 mo 

Politics for Young Americans. Chas. Nordhoflf. 1875 
12 mo 

The Great Problem; the higher ministry of nature, view 
ed in the light of modern science. J. R. Leifchild 
1872. 12 mo. - 

David, King of Israel ; his life and its lessons, TV. M 
Taylor. 1875. 12mo 

Petrolia ; a brief history of the Pennsylvania coal re- 
gion. A. Cone and W. R. Johns. 1870. 12mo. 

Military Record of civlian appointments in the United 
States army. In two volumes. Guy V.Henry. 1873 
8 vo 



Annals of the Army of the Cumberland ; comprising 
biographies, descriptions of departments, accounts of 
exi^editions, skirmishes and battles. J. Pitch. 1864, 
8 vo 



History of the German Emperors and their contempora 

ries. Elizabeth Peake. 1874. 8 vo. . 
Life of Andrew H. Foote, Rear Admiral United States 

Navy. J. M. Hoppin. 1874. 8 vo. . 
Life of Benjamin Franklin, written by himself. J. Big- 

elow, editor. In three volumes. 1875. 8vo. . 
Biography of Theodore Parker. O. B. Frothingham 

1874. 8vo. . . . 

Journalism in the United States, from 1690 to 1872 

F. Hudson. 1873. 8vo 

Huguenots in France, after the Revocation of the Edict 

of Nantes. S. Smiles. 1874. 8vo. . 
History of Germany from the Earliest Times. C. T 

Lewis. 1874. 8vo 

Comparative Politics; being six lectures read before the 

Royal Institution in 1873; with the unity of History 

and the Rede Lecture. E. A. Freeman. 1874. 8vo 
The Old Regime in Canada. F. Parkman. 1874. 8vo 
The Communistics Societies in the United States, from 

personal visit and observation; including accounts of 

10 



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the Economists, Zoarites, Shakers, and others. Chas. 

N"ordhoff. 1875. 8vo 

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ginson. 1875. 12mo 

Science of Law. (International Scientific Series.) S 

Amos. 1875. 12rao 

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Winchell. 1874. 12mo 

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system. M. Hopkins. 1874. 12mo. 
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12mo 

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1874. 16mo 

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1873. 8vo 

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1874. Svo 

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Atkinson. 1873. l2mo 

The Money Market; an Introduction to Financial 



32 272 

32 247 

42 215 

43 215 

48 216 

49 216 
76 208 

98 210 

99 210 
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147 



Science. (English.) 1873. 16mo 

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8vo. . . . ' 

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Prof. Maelzuer. 3 vols. 1874. 8vo. ... 

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1867. 8vo 

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*Coin Book; containing a history of coinage, a synopsis 
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The Retrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery. W 
Braithwaite. January, 1874. 8vo. . 

The Retrospect of Practical Medicine and Surgery. W 
Braithwaite. January, 1875. 8vo. 

*The Transformation (or metamorphoses) of Insects 
P. M. Duncan. 1875. 8vo 

Encyclopedia of Trees and Shrubs. J. C. Loudon. 1869 
8vo 



Farmers' and Planters' Encyclopedia on RuraF Affairs 
C. W. Johnson. 1869. 8vo. ; . . * . 



29 8 

20 80 

71 99 
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72 91 
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148 



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1874. 8vo 

Quadrature of the Circle; containing demonstrations of 

the error of G-eometers in finding the approximations 
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Our Boys and Girls. 1874. 8vo. 

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Eclectic Magazine. Vol. 63, 2. 1874, 8vo. 

Galaxy. Vol. 18, 2. 1874. 8vo 

Popular Science Monthly. Vol, 5, 2. 1874. 8vo, 



55 202' 

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Edinburgh Review. Vol. 140, 2. 1874. Svo. . 

National Quarterly Review. Vol. 29, 2. 1874. Svo 

National Quarterly Review. Vol. 27, 2. 1873. Svo. 

North American Review. Vol. 118, 1. 1874. Svo. 

North American Review. Vol. 119, 2. 1874. Svo. 

Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. Vol. 116, 2. 1874 
Svo. . , ,' 

Temple Bar. Vol. 42, 3. 1874. Svo. . 
. Once-a-Week. Vol. 13, 1. 1874. Svo. 

American Journal Science and Arts. (Silliman.) 
Vol. 108, 2. 1874. Svo 

Journal Franklin Institute. Vol. 98, 2. 1874. Svo. 

Van Nostrand's Engineering Magazine. Vol. 11, 2 
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Eondon Lancet. 1874. Svo. 

Chambers's Journal. 1874. Svo. . 

Leisure Hour. 1874. Svo 

XTnitarian Review and Religious Magazine. Vol 
1874. Svo 

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1874. Svo 

€ornhill Magazine. Vol. 30, 2. 1874. Svo. 

American Naturalist. Vol. 8. 1874. Svo. . 

Horticulturist. Vol. 29. 1874. Svo. . 

'Official Gazette, United States Patent Office. Vol 
1874. 4to. ... ... 

'Technologist. Vol. 5, 2. 1874. 4to. . 

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chants' Magazine. Vol. 19, 2. 1884. 4to. 

Geometry and Faith; a fragmentary supplement to the 
"Ninth Bridgewater Treatise." Thos. Hill. 1874 
12mo 

3Iammalia; a popular introduction to Natural History 
T. R. Jones. 1874. 12mo 



1,1 



2 2 



6,2 



150 

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16mo 67 109 

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Popular Resorts, and how to reach them. J. B. Bach- 
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Law and the Lady. W. Collins. 1875. l2mo. . . 93 134 

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Eloating City, and the Blockade Runners. Jules Verne. 

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Mistress of the Manse. (Poem.) J. G. Holland. 1875. 

16mo 81 94 

Da Halgan Godspel on Englisc. The Anglo-Saxon ver- 
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Thrope, (ed.) 1842. l2mo 28 28; 



151 



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and Discovery for 1874. A, E. Beacli, (ed.) 8vo. . 

Historic Fields and Mansions of Middlesex. S. A. 
Drake. 1874. 12mo 

Life of his Eoyal Highness, tlie Prince Consort, (Al- 
bert.) Theo. Martin. Yol. 1. 1875. 12mo. . 

Straits of Malacca, Indo-Cliina and China; or, Ten 
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more. 1869. Svo 

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History of Greece. 5 vols. E. Curtius. 1874. l2mo 

Treatise on Anninuities. G. Davies. Svo. . 

Law of Life Insurance. C. J. Bunyon. 1868. Svo. 

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40 


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12mo 

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Master. M. W. Berriman, (ed.) 1864. l2mo. 
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Fox. 1873. 8vo 

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Barnard. 1872. 8vo. . . . 
Treatise on Military Law and the Practice of Courts 

Martial. S. V. Benet. 1868. 8vo. . 
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London: pictorially illustrated. 3 vols. C. Knight 

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Croff. 1871. 4to 

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Wolf. 1874. 4to 

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Indigenous Eaces of the Earth. J. E. Nott and G. R 

Gliddon. 1868. 8vo 

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1857. 4to 

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1848. 4to 

Geological Survey of Michigan. 2 vols. 1873. 4to. 
Geological Survey of Ohio. 3 vols. 1878. 4to. . 
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counties of Arkansas. 1858. 4to. 
Geology of Tennessee. 1869. 8vo. 
Manchester Directory for 1875. No. 12. 8vo. ' . 
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H. Edwards. 1875. 16mo 

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J. H. Newman. 1875. 16mo 

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Woman of Fire: from the French of J. Furbish. 1875 

8vo 



57 202 

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73 203 

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38 C 

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Aileen Ferrers. Susan Morley. 1875. 8vo. 
Hagarene. G. A. Lawrence. 1875. 8vo. . 
In Honor Bound. C, Gibbon. 1875. 8vo. . 
Jack's Sister; or, True to Her Trust. 1875. 8vo. 
Old Middle ton's Money. Mary C. Hay. 1875. Svo. 
Lorna Doone. K. W. Blackmore. 1875. Svo. . 
Hope Meredith. Eliza Tabor. 1875. Svo. . 
Blossoming of an Aloe. Mrs. Hovey. 1875. Svo.. 
Other Peoj)le's Money. E. Gaborian. 1875. Svo. 
At the Sign of the Silver Flagon. B. L. Farjeon. 1S75 
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Mr. Yaughan's Heir. F. L. Benedict. 1875. Svo. 
Taken at the Flood. Mary E. Braddon. 1875. Svo. 
Lost for Love.. Mary E. Braddon. 1875. Svo. . 
A Strange World. Mary E. Braddon. 1875. Svo. 
Valentine and His Brother. Mrs. M. Oliphant, 1875 
8vo 



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The Island of Fire ; a thousand Years of the Old J^Torth 
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The ITotary's Kose. E. About. 1S74. l6mo. . 

Ralph Wilton's Weird. Mrs. Alexander. 1875. 16mo 

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Antony Brade. R. Lowell. 1874. 16mo. . 

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Perfect Love Caste th Out Fear. Katharine S. Wash- 
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The Clandestine Marriage. Eliza A. Dupuy. 1875. 
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Walfried. B. Auerbach. 1S74. l2mo. . . . . 

Alice Brand; a romance of the Capital. A. G. Riddle. 
1875. l2mo 



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155 

Opening a Chestnut Bur. E. P. Roe. 1874. 12mo. . 96 Idl 
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Ko Alternative. Annie Thomas. (Mrs. Pender Cudlif. 

1875. 12mo. '. . 68 13& 

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recent works. 1875. 16mo. . . . ; . 42 13T 
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Wilds of London. (Papers on some of the existing 

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1875. 12mo 81 258 

The Gilded Age. "Mark Twain." (S. L. Clemens.) 

and C. D. Warner. 1874. 8vo. . . . .37 75' 

Sportsman's Club Afloat. H. Castleman. 1875. 16mo. 45 117 
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P. Grant & Co.; or, Partnerships. G. L. Chaney. 

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Hanging of the Crane. H. W.Longfellow. 1875. 16mo. 95 96 
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On Teaching; its ends and means. H. Calderwood. 

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156 



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Svo. . ... . . . . • . 



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40 311 
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34 J 

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61 317 

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158 



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159 



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. climate, etc. G. Stuart. 1865. Svo 

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On the Construction of Iron Roofs. F. Campin. 186S 
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Plattner's Manual of Qualitative and Quantitative Anal- 
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1872. Svo 



. 83 


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. 62 


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. 73 


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. 25 


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. 37 


J 


). 81 


106 


. 82 
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106 


. 49 


15 


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333 



35 313 

36 313 
63 364 

75 369 

89 234 



160 

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Report on Silk and Silk Manufacture, (Universal Expo 

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Notes of a Metallurgical Journey in Europe. J. A 

Church. 1873. 8vo 

N'otices of Mining Machinery and various Mechanical 

Appliances in use, chiefly in the Pacific States and 

Territories. W.P.Blake. 1871. 8vo. 
Physical Technics; or. Practical Instructions for mak- 
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Guide to a course of Quantitative Chemical Analysis 

especially of minerals and furnace products. C. F 

Rammelsburg. 1872. 8vo. .... 

Sub-marine Warfare; offensive and defensive. J. S 

Barnes. 1869. Svo. 

Notes on Screw Propulsion; its rise and progress. W 

M. Walker. 1861. Svo 

Principles and Practice of Embanking Lands from 

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W.Hewson. 1870, Svo 

Method of comparing the Lines, and Draughting Ves 

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Svo 

Theoretical Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. L 

Clark. 1872. Svo 

Nautical Surveying. W. N. Jeffers. 1871. Svo. . 
Science of Cotton Spinning; practically arranged and 

simplified. J. Hyde. Svo 

On Cotton Spinning; a treatise on every essential part 

in the spinning department; the cost of production, 

etc 

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Guide to the use of the Blowpipe. G. W. Plympton. 

1874. l-2mo 

Quartz Operator's Hand-book. P. M. Randall. 1871. 



161 

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Handy Book for the calculation of Strains and Girders, 
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Hand-book for Miuers, Metallurgists and Assayers. J. 
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Treatise on the Metallurgy of Iron. H. Bauerman. 
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Results of an Experimental Inquiry in the mechanical 
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162 



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, 


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8vo. . 


. 47 


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, . 


. 66 


197 


, , 


. 74 


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. 


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Folio. 


. 16 


K 


u 


. 17 


K 


, , 


. 22 


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. 23 


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43 211 



19 324 



EEPOET OF COMMITTEE ON CEMETEEIES. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Council of the City of 

Manchester : 

Gentlemen : — The annual report of the Committee on 
Cemeteries is most respectfully submitted for your consid- 
■eration, as follows: 

THE VALLEY. 

The Sub-Committee on the Valley Cemetery, early in 
the spring, saw the importance of extending the stone ma- 
:sonry on Auburn street to the corner of Pine, a distance of 
•312 feet. A survey, plan and specifications were made by 
Oeorge W. Stevens, Esq., and the contract was awarded to 
L. B. Bodwell & Son, who completed the job in a very sat- 
isfactory manner at an expense of fl,200. 

Late in the season, at the suggestion of the Committee, 
the City Council made a further appropriation, by the trans- 
fer of the necessary funds, to finish the iron fence along the 
•entire north end of the lot. 

The work was done in a substantial manner by A. H. 
Lowell, and the whole north line now presents an appear- 
ance creditable to the city. 

It is to be hoped that the work will meet the approbation 
of the people, and that the fence may be extended from 
year to year, until the grounds shall be fully closed in. 



164 



The receipts and expenditures for the Valley have been 
as follows : 



To balance of account, 
Appropriation, 
Reserve fund, 
Tomb fees, • . 
Lot sold, 



|»433 


72 


2,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


59 


00 


45 


06 



By labor for the care of the grounds and 

for permanent improvements, 3,294 37 
Balance on hand, .... 243 41 



13,537 78 



$3,537 78 

The items of the above expenditures will be found in the 
City Report. . 

E. W. HARRINGTON, ) o , /^ 
R. M. SHIRLEY, ^ Suh-Com. 



PINE GROVE. 

The Committee on Pine Grove Cemetery have employed 
Mr. William C. Chase to care for the grounds and perform 
the labor necessary in keeping lots and walks in order. 

About one hundred lots have been laid out, and graded 
with suitable walks and borders. Sixty-six have been sold 
the past year, bringing to the treasury over seventeen hun- 
dred dollars. Six lots have been bargained for and the 
deeds are in the hands of the treasurer awaiting payment, 
leaving a sufficient number for any probable demand before 
more can be graded another season. 

All lots sold since last May have been at a uniform price 
of 10 cents per foot. 

The increase of expenses in the care of the grounds, in- 
cident to the enlargement of the improved portions, will 
suggest the possible necessity of a still further advance in 



165 

the price, if the permanent improvements begun shall be 
carried forward from the income from the Cemetery without 
appropriations from the city. About seventy-five ever- 
greens have been planted in various parts of the grounds 
at suitable points, and all are flourishing. The committee 
has also encouraged the planting af evergreens and suit- 
able deciduous trees, by lot owners, that may in time su- 
persede the pines which are fatal to all attempts at embel- 
lishment of lots beneath them. 

The iron fence erected three years since, upon the west- 
erly side of the grounds, has been remodeled and reset. It 
has been changed by the addition of a short paling extend- 
ing from the lower rail to some more than half the height 
to the upper rail, thus filling the space more closely, and 
making a better protection to the grounds. 

In resetting, the fence has been run in a straight line 
from the north-west corner toward the gateway, instead of 
on an outward curve as formerly, and upon grades suited 
to the surface of the ground, thus throwing into the high- 
way a few thousand feet of land, giving space for an am- 
ple side-walk, which we trust will meet the approval of the 
public. 

About two hundred feet of new fence of the same pat- 
tern has also been erected upon the northerly line, and the 
committee trust that their work will meet the approval of 
our successors, so that as they have funds in hand, the work 
may be continued year by year, until the grounds shall be 
•entirely inclosed. 

The water introduced three years since has been of great 
use the past season, giving an abundant supply at four dif- 
ferent points within the grounds. 

The condition of the portion used as common ground is 
unsatisfactory, and your committee proposed to improve it 
by such grading as might be best, and the setting of suit- 
.able markers for the graves thereon. 



166 

For that purpose, they contracted for five hundred mar- 
ble slabs of uniform size, to be properly numbered ; but 
the lateness of the season has prevented the commence- 
ment of the work, and vrhat is done in the future will come- 
under the supervision of our successors. 

The details of receipts and expenditures will be found in 
the treasurer's report. 

A. H. DANIELS, ) Com. on 

J. L. KENNEDY, \ Pine Grove 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, ) Cemetery.. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Committee on Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen : — The Treasurer of the Committee on Ceme- 
teries submits the following report for the year ending. 
December 31, 1875 : 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

April 10, 1875. Received of A. C. Wallace, 

for logs, 1465 39 

December 81. Received of John B. Chase for 

47 5-16 cords wood, .... 106 45 

Received for Q6 lots sold, .... 1,718 05 



Total, 12,289 j 89 

Cash paid H. R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, 

as per receipt, $2,289 89 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



January 25, 1875. Received of Mrs. Henry 

T. Foss for lot No. 297, . . . $2 Sd 



167 

Jane 1. Received of J. B. Sawyer from Leon- 
ard Demary for lot No. 240, . . 2 096 

Received of J. B. Sawyer from Leonard De- 
mary, interest, . . . . . 21 25 

Total, ..... $45 06 

Cash paid H. R. Cliamberlin, City Treasurer, 

as per receipt, . ^'' • . . . f 45 06 

All bills paid have passed through ,the Committee on Ac- 
counts and paid by the City Treasurer, and will be found 
in City Report. 

J. F. JAMES, Treas. of Com. 

Manchester, January 3, 1876. 

I certify that I have examined the foregoing accounts of 
Hon. J. F. James, Treasurer, and found them correctly 
cast and properly vouched for. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, (7% Auditor. 

J. L. KENNEDY, ) ,,, 

R. M. SHIRLEY, \ ^^«^^^^^^' 

MICHAEL HURLEY, ) 

NEWELL R. BIXBY, [ Councilmen, 

CHARLES F. PEASLEY, ) 

Hon. JAMES A. WESTON, 

Hon. JACOB F. JAMES, 

Hon. EDWARD W. HARRINGTON, 

Hon. CHAS. H. BARTLETT, 

ALBERT H. DANIELS, 

HOLMES R. PETTEE, 

JOSEPH KIDDER, 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Committee on Cemeteries. 
At a meeting of the Committee on Cemeteries, held at 
the Mayor's Office, January 22, 1876, at which a majority 
of the committee were present, the foregoing reports were 
read and unanimously accepted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, aerk. 



ACCOUNT 



HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, 

CITT TBEASUEEE, 



DECEMBER 31, 1874, TO DECEMBER 31, 1875. 



170 



Dr. 



H. B. Chamherlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



To Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1875, . . . S25,143 85 


Water Bonds unsold, 






. 73,500 GO 


Temporary Loan, 








. 38,000 00 


Savings Bank Tax, . 








. 33,317 m 


Railroad Tax, .... 








. 12,812 79 


Literary Fund, ... 








. 1,615 51 


Insurance Tax, 








830 25 


City Hall and Stores, 








. 2,454 55 


City Farm, .... 








. 1,678 24 


Police Court, .... 








. 4,339 26 


City Scales, .... 








369 81 


Pine Grove Cemetery, 








. 2,289 89 


Valley Cemetery, 








45 06 


Board at State Eeform School, 








. 3,820 33 


City Teams, .... 








. 2,595 46 


Overdrafts, .... 








80 28 


License of Exhibitions and Shows, 








420 00 


Land sold from Farm, 








. 1,385 04 


Dog Licenses, .... 








407 72 


Sewer Licenses, 








. 1,023 00 


Rent of Hearse, 








25 GO 


Interest on Water Bonds, 








93 86 


Tuition, 








435 50 


Interest on Taxes, .... 








907 73 


Rent of Tenements, 








122 00 


Taxes collected, 1865, 








14 15 


1866, 








34 67 


" " 1867, 








22 26 


" " 1868, 








19 95 


" " 1869, 








91 69 


" " 1870, 








70 57 


" " 1871, 








147 37 


" " 1872, 








67 87 


1873, 








215 38 


1874, 








28,403 87 


" " 1875, . . . 








217,653 85 


City Aqueduct, .... 








46 00 


Cost Non-Resident Taxes, 








37 50 


Amount carried forward to page 172, . 




1454,537 95 



171 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1875). 



Cr, 



By Unpaid Bills Jan. 1, 1875, 
Paupers off the Farm, 
City Parm, 
Highway District No. 1, 

u (( (( 2 

(( u a 3 

U U (( K 

« « " 6, 

U (( U g 

U U ii Q 

" " " 10, 

" « " 11, 

" " " 12, 

" " " 13, 

New Highways, 
Granite Bridge, 
Amoskeag Falls Bridge, 
Sewers and Drains, . 
Reservoirs, 
Commons, 
Yalley Cemetery, 
Pine Grove Cemetery, 
Pire Department, 
City Police, 
City Oihcers, • 
Lighting Streets, 
Militia, 

Printing and Stationery, 
Incidental Expenses, 
City Hall Building, . 
City Library, . 
Paving Streets, 
"Watering Streets, 
Discount on Taxes, . 
Abatement on Taxes, 
Interest, . 

Amount carried forward to page 173, 



. $31,761 78 


. 6,766 0» 


. 4,978 12 


313 92 


. 17,874 91 


823 32 


299 25 


611 88 


660 65 


727 44 


516 1» 


389 52 


. 1,058 00 


797 23 


455 50 


136 12 


. 10,073 30 


. 2,353 32 


. 1,535 95 


. 14,390 52 


61 03 


825 52 


. 3,294 37 


. 2,587 06 


. 11,470 75 


. 20,233 29 


. 10,118 07 


. 6,152 49 


700 00 


2,079 04 


10,932 50 


. 1,350 84 


, 2,577 90 


2,822 6a 


930 43 


5,545 12 


1,184 9a 


2,102 00 


$403,890 83 



172 



Dr. 



H. B. Chfmiberlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



&c., 



Amount brought forward from page 170, 
Hydrant Service, 
Water Rent, .... 
Paupers from other Towns, 
County of Hillsborough, . 
Water Commissioners for Crusher, 
Water Commissioners for Anvil, 
D. H. Young, pipe, . 
J. H. White, aid refunded, 
James Collins, aid refunded, . 
John H. Willey, horse, 
John K. Piper, brick, 
A. H. Lowell, hose, . 
Eire Department, table and coal, 
Eent of Ward Room, 
License to Sell, .... 
Work on District No. 2, . 

Manure, 

Tomb Fees, .... 



S454,537 95 
13,095 00 
14,024 15 

4 00 
12 00 

2,089 45 
15 00 
49 40 
20 00 
15 26 
150 00 

5 00 
1 00 

35 00 
12 00 
100 00 
18 00 
15 00 
59 00 



Outlawed Bills, . 

Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1876, 



$484,257 21 

15 00 

. 23,919 26' 



,191 47 



173 



City of Manchester {ending December 31, 1876). 



Gr. 



Amount brought forward from page 171, . $403,890 83 


Coupons, old issue, 


. 19,761 00 


Water- "Works Coupons, . 












32,814 00 


Temporary Loan, 












41,000 00 


Eeduction of City Debt, 












1,500 00 


Court House, . 










. 


1 55 


City Teams, 












6,981 03 


Eepairs of Buildings, 












740 76 


New School-Houses, 












32 86 


Repairs of School-Houses, 












9,633 64 


School Department, 












51,810 08 


Water- Works, , 












50,091 80 


Land Damage, 












3,129 99 


Fire Alarm Telegraph, . 












2,539 25 


Decoration, 












200 80 


G-rading for Concretes, 












1,885 87 


Hydrant Service, 












13,920 00 


Macadamizing Streets, 












5,315 53 


New Hose House, 












330 65 


Concord Square Fence, 












2,401 43 


' Soldiers' Monument, 












3,011 83 


$428,593 03 


Cash in the Treasury Jan. 1, 1876, .... 79,598 44 


$508,191 47 


H. R. CHAMBERLIN, 


City Treasurer. 


Manchester, January 1, 1 


876. 













FINANCE COMMITTEE'S EEPOET. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
certify that we have examined the within account of Henry 
H, Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

During the year 1875 there has been received, (includ- 
ing the balance on hand January 1, 1875,) the sum of four 
hundred eighty-four thousand two hundred fifty-seven dol- 
lars and twentj'-one cents, (484,257.21), and there has 
been paid out during the same time the sum of four hun- 
dred four thousand six hundred fifty-eight dollars and sev- 
enty-seven cents, (404,658.77), leaving in the treasury 
January 1, 1876, the sum of seventy-nine thousand five 
hundred ninety-eight dollars and forty-four cents, (79,598.- 
44). 

H. L. DREW, 
L. B. BODWELL, 
SETH T. HILL, 
ALPHEUS GAY, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPEOPEIATIONS. 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 

To balance from old account, . . $27 50 
Hillsborough County for board of 

inmates at Reform School, . 3,799 19 

Hillsborough County for aid to J. 

C. Whitten and Mrs. Blake, . 12 00 
Town of Hooksett, for aid to Mrs. 

Mary George, .... 4 00 

Horace Pettee, guardian of W. H. 

Bellman, for board at Reform 

School, 21 14 

James H. White, for aid rendered 

him, 20 00 

James Collins, for aid rendered 

him, 15 26 

Appropriation, .... 3,000 00 



By paid N. H. Asylum for board of 

Alfred Craig, . . . $185 52 

N. H. Asylum for board of John 

Connolly, . . . . 162 78 

N. H. Asylum for board of El- 
bridge Gerry, . . . 194 77 

N. H. Asylum, for board of 

Asenath H. White, . . 116 51 



Dr. 



5,899 09 
Cr. 



176 

Reform School, for board of in- 
mates, 4,415 82 

City of Concord, for aid to Rufus 

Atwell, .... 9 50 

Town of Weare for aid to John 

Marsh, . . . . 46 17 

Town of Weare for aid to R. 

Towns' family, . . . 58 16 

A-dams & Lamprey, for grocer- 
ies furnished John Prindable, 18 00 

Adams & Lamprey for groceries 

furnished Mrs. Sarah Seavey, 30 30 

Adams & Lamprey for grocer- 
ies furnished Mrs. Baldwin, . 2 00 

Barr & Clapp, for groceries furn- 
ished Mrs. Jerome Davis, . 16 00 

Barr & Clapp, for groceries furn- 
ished Stephen Spane, . . 13 50 

H. H. Alton, for groceries furn- 
ished Mrs. Mary Welch, . 4 00 

H. H. Alton, for groceries furn- 
ished John Prindable, . . 8 10 

John Fenton,for groceries furn- 
ished Francis Cahill, . . 2 00 

Town of Fremont for aid to I. R. 

Hill, ...... 60 28 

B. P. Burpee, for groceries deliv- 
ered to Thomas Mackin, . 18 00 

Flannigan & Maxwell, for gro- 
ceries delivered to Mrs. Dan- 
iel Healey, . . . . 49 78 

H. B. Putnam, groceries deliv- 
ered to Mrs. J. Foley, . . 42 47 

Muzzy Brothers, groceries deliv- 
ered to Mrs. Mary Welch, . 26 00 



177 

Paid Muzzy Brothers, groceries deliv- 
ered to Cyrus P. Bryant, . 10 00 

Sawyer Brothers, groceries de- 
livered to Mrs. R. Towns, . 4 00 

Ebenezer Hartshorn, groceries 

delivered to Mrs. John Davis, 41 53 

Ebenezer Hartshorn, groceries 

delivered to James Collins, . 11 46 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., groceries 

furnished to Cyrus P. Bryant, ' 20 86 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. Sarah Seavey, 30 57 

J. B. Stowell, for meat deliv- 
ered to Mrs. Sarah Seavey, . 3 54 

Reynolds Brothers, for grocer- 
ies furnished to Robert McMa- 
hon, 3 00 

Reynolds Brothers, for groceries 

furnished Mrs. D. Healy, . 3 59 

John Sweeney, for groceries 

furnished to Robt. McMahon, 122 00 

John Sweeney, for groceries fur- 
nished to Mrs. Fitzgerald, . 18 00 

John Sweeney, for groceries de- 
livered to Mrs. Celia Adams, 22 50 

John Sweeney, for groceries fur- 
nished to Francis Cahill, . 2 50 

John Sweeney, for groceries fur- 
nished to Mrs. Mary Shea, . 72 00 

Hall & Sanborn, for groceries 

delivered to E. C. Webster, . 15 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., for groceries 

delivered to E. C. Webster, . 37 35 

Wilson Brothers, for groceries 
delivered to Mrs. Sarah Sea- 



178 

vey, 4 82 

Horace E. Stevens, for groceries 
delivered to Mrs. Sarah Sea- 
vej, . ' . . . . 8 11 

E. A. Moulton, for groceries de- 
livered to James Collins, . 4 86 

E. A. Moulton, for groceries de- 
livered to L. Wyman, . . 8 62 

E. A. Moulton, for groceries de- 
livered to Mrs. J. Davis, . 65 04 

E. A. Moulton, for groceries de- 
livered to Thomas Foley, . 2 78 

J. M. Chandler & Co., for gro- 
ceries delivered to Timothy 
Quinn, . . . . . 5 00 

J. M. Chandler & Co., for gro- 
ceries delivered to Mary 
Welch, . . . . 7 60 

J. M. Chandler & Co., for gro- 
ceries delivered to Mrs. Sarah 
Seavey, .... 

Moses R. Currier, for groceries 
delivered to Moses Lull, 

J. M. Ri.chardson, for meat de- 
livered to Mrs. Sarah Seavey, 

J. G. Warner, for groceries de- 
livered to Patrick Harmon, . 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., for wood 
delivered to Mrs. Sarah Sea- 
vey, 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., for wood 
delivered to Mrs. Roberts, 

L. B. Bodwell, & Co., for wood 
delivered to Cyrus P. Bryant, 

M. V. B. Kinne, for wood deliv- 



2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


31 


25 


5 


50 


8 


10 



179 

€red to Mrs. Mary Welch, . 15 00 

M. V. B. Kiiine, for wood de- 
livered to Mrs. A. Roberts, . 5 50 

M. V. B. Kiiiae, for wood deliv- 
ered to John Prindable, . 18 00 

W. B. Sargent, for wood deliv- 
ered to Mrs. Sarah Seavey, . 6 25 

E. P. Johnson & Co., for wood 

delivered to C. P. Bryant, . 10 70 

Robert Laing, for wood deliv- 
ered to Mrs. Jerome Davis, . 12 50 

Eobert Laing, for wood deliv- 
ered to Mrs. Celia Adams, . 12 25 

iRobert Laing, for wood deliv- 
ered to D. Healey, . . 54 00 

Robert Laing, for wood deliv- 
ered to Francis Cahill, . . 4 94 

I. R. Dewey, for wood delivered 

to James Collins, . . . 6 93 

I. R. Dewey, for wood delivered 

to Mrs. John Davis, . . 31 88 

George A. Clark, for wood de- 
livered to Mrs. Baldwin, . 2 25 

Oeorge A. Clark, for wood de- 
livered to John Prindable, . 4 00 

W. W. Rogers, for wood deliv- 
ered to Mrs. Sarah Seavey, . 2 00 

Horace H. Young, for wood de- 
livered to Mrs. Sarah Seavey, 12 00 

Horace H. Young, for wood de- 
livered to Timo. Quinn, . 1 00 

Manchester ^Wood Co., for wood 

delivered to Mrs. S. Seavy, . 6 00 

Geo. W. Dodge, for shoes deliv- 
ered to C. P. Bryant, . . 5 50 



180 

Paid John D. Bean, for hat delivered 

to C. P. Bryant, ... 1 3T 

0. P. Frachure, for milk deliv- 
ered to Mrs. John Davis, . 3 51 

Louisa J. Pike, for housework 

for Mrs. John Davis, . . 18 00 

Flora M. Poore, for housework 

for Mrs. John Davis, . . 39 00 

J. Abbott, for money paid Mrs. 

S. A. Haseltine, . . . 20 00 

D. A. Simons, for money paid 

Mrs. S. A. Haseltine, . . 45 00 

D. A. Simons, for railroad fare 

to E. C. Bryant, ... 8 30 

Joseph H. Whittier, for board of 

Mrs. E. Thompson, . . 42 00 

J. L. Taylor, for board of Etta 
Frost, 96 00 

Ephraim Hodgman, for board of 

Mrs. C. E. Otis, ... 700 

City Farm, error in receipt of 

1874, 61 25 

J. N. Rundlett, funeral expense 

of John Marsh, ... 7 00 

Pearson & Wallace, burial of 

William Adams, . . . 24 50 

Patrick A. Devine, burial of Mrs. 

J. O'Brien, . . . . 18 25 

Patrick A. Devine, burial of 

child of Timo. Quinn, . . . 17 50 

Bruce & Carpenter, burial of 

Sarah E. Griffin, . . . 22 00 

M. E. George, paid for removal 
R. Atwell's family from Con- 
cord, 4 50 



181 

Paid M. E. George, for aid to Jennie 
Cooper, .... 

M. E. George, paid for exami- 
nation of case of Ella Tincent, 

M. E. George, paid for wood for 
Celia Adams, 

Canney & Wiley, for medicine, 

Z. Foster Campbell, for medi- 
cine, ..... 

Daniel A. Clifford, for fees for 
serving notices, 

Fogg & J ames, for team to move 
Atwell family to Farm, . 

Amount, . ... 
Balance to new account, 



3 


50 


2 


67 


2 


50 


55 


30 




50 


3 


00 


1 


50 



1,766 09 
133 00 



,899 09 



CITY FARM. 

To Balance from old account, 

George Reed, error in receipt, 

October 8, 1873, . 
George Reed, 

A. C. Wallace, overdraft, . 
J. H. Proctor, for hay sold, 
" " " work, 
" " " beef sold, . 
" " " other produce 
Appropriation from Reserved 
Fund, 



Paid George Reed, salary 3 mos. to 



2,523 44 



61 


25 


53 


80 


4 


23 


58 


00 


. 715 


94 


91 


00 


698 


25 


I 

772 


11 



April 1, 



$125 00 



Dr. 



t,978 12 
Or. 



182 



Paid John H. Proctor, salary 9 mos 


375 00 


" " " beans and rye 


10 00 


" " " drag plank, 


4 40 


" " " keeping oxen 


12 SO 


Daniel H. Maxfield, for damage 




to garden by cattle 1874, 


8 00 


Locke & Demick, groceries, 


134 41 


Horace E. Stevens, " 


59 68 


Sawyer Brothers, " 


20 93 


J. M. Chandler & Co., " 


86 39 


A. M. Eastman, " 


10 26 


Flanders & Young, " 


43^13 


Eager & Robinson, " 


68 90 


Hiram Turner, " 


20 37 


Henry C. Merrill, seeds anc 




groceries. 


35 51 


Adams & Lamprey, groceries, 


50 94 


John M. Stanton, dry goods. 


9 42 


Joseph Ferren, dry goods, 


12 48 


Jackson & Co., " " 


9 89 


J. H. Howard, " " 


4 29 


P. K. Chandler, " 


1 65 


Holton & Sprague, dry goods. 


63 66 


H. & H. R. Pettee, grain and me 


al, 144 50 


J. S. Kidder & Co., " " ' 


165 51 


Ainsworth & Lamb, butter. 


17 33 


James 0. Clark, meat, 


16 30 


S. D. Cass, meat. 




28 00 


R. M. Miller, " 




55 37 


Wra. Boyd, " 




20 70 


E.F.Wilson, " 




23 00 


Jere. L. Fogg, meat. 




50 40 


" " " 2 shotes, 




30 00 


Jos. Cross, patent baker. 




4 00 


John Pond, cabbage plants 


h 


2 oa 



183 



Paid John D. Bean, clothing, . 
Edwin Kennedy, " 
Geo.W. Dodge, boots and shoes, 
. Geo. W. Thayer, " " " 



Sweetser & Hill, shoes, 
D. A. Simons, furniture, . 
Chas. F. Lord, snuff, ink and 

essence, 
Wm. C. Rogers, 2 axes, . 
Pike & Heald, vault ladle, 
Amoskeag Ax Co., axes, 
G. P. Theobald, 2 harnesses 

second-hand, 
Edwin Branch, sleigh, 

" " buffalo and whip, 

" " repairing and oil- 

ing harness, .... 
J. S. Holt, soap, 
R. M. Rollins, mowing machine, 
Amoskeag Maiif. Co., iron and 
iron work, . . . . 
S. C. Porsaith & Co., iron and 
iron work, . . . . 
A. G. Pairbanks, tinning roof, . 
Fairbanks & Polsom, stove and 
repairs, . . . . 

Sullivan Bros., range, 
Daniels & Co., hardware. 
Watts & Holmes, plaster, 
J. B. Yarick, phosphates, seeds, 

paints and hardware, 

Putnam Jenkins, blacksmith 

work, . . . . . 

Kilgore & Porter, blacksmith 

work, 



17 95 

19 84 
23 15 

18 00 
3 00 

40 82 

3 75 
2 50 
1 25 

4 30 

20 00 
42 00 
16 25 

5 75 
44 47 
35 60 

89 59 



35 45 


21 


20 


53 


28 


70 


00 


13 


QQ 


6 


39 


L50 


39 


8 


00 


49 


65 



184 

Paid E. W. Flanders, blacksmith work, 4 45 
Geo. Merriam, blacksmith work, 6 70 

J. P. Woodbury & Co., shoeing 

horse, . . . • . . 1 50 

Wm. E. Hill, shoeing horse, . 8 12 

E. R. Coburn, stationery, . 1 84 

H. B. Mitchell, pruning shears, 5 00 

A. W. Sanborn, making harrow 

and repairing carts, . . 166 50 
Waterman Smith, wagon, cart, 

drag and harrow, . , . 64 00 
H. S. Whitney, repairing pump 

and pipe, .... 
J. M. Harvey, chestnut posts, . 
N. B. Batchelder, for ladders, 
Canney & Wiley, for medicines, 
Patrick A. Devine, burial of 

child of Timothy Quinn, 
Charles Howe, 1 breeding sow, 
J. M. & D. A. Parker, 1 boar, 
pasturing oxen, 
Charles W. E-owell, exchange on 

oxen, ..... 
Mr. Bunker, 1 pair oxen, 
Mr. Drew, 1 pair oxen, 
George Smith, exchange on bull. 
Concord R. R., freight on oxen, 
" " " " drag 

plank, ..... 
Thomas P. Frost, for labor, 
Amos Spofford, " 
Freeman Chatman " 
Robert I. Stevens, " 
Daniel Wright, " 
E. H. Brown, " . 



7 


25 


6 


48 


9 


25 


13 


00 


9 


00 


30 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


125 


00 


242 


50 


252 


00 


20 


00 


10 


80 




29 


75 


00 


25 


00 


7 


00 


23 


00 


61 


00 


12 


00 



185 



Paid Sarah Rollins, for labor 


5 


15 00 


William Eastman, " 


6 00 


C. H. Martin, " 




28 00 


Thomas Collins, " 




7 00 


John Latuch, " 




24 00 


Amos Latuch, " 




84 12 


Thomas Walker, " 




3 75 


Walter Wright, " 




6 25 


John Williams, " 




14 00 


Augustus Proctor, " 




16 00 


Lyman H. Proctor, " 




24 00 


Timothy Connor, " 




6 00 


Byron Leavenworth " 




109 00 


E. S. Young, " 




31 00 


Patrick Freeman, " 




50 00 


George W. Dow, " 




7 00 


Daniel Keefe, " 




3 75 


Barnet Fowler, " 




9 00 


Sylvester Jones, " 




10 00 


" repair of boots, 


4 75 


Raymond & Whitford, for lumber 


30 00 


A. C. Wallace, " 


8 46 


A. Dinsmore, " 


418 80 


Ellis & Patterson, laying out sh 


ed, 2 00 


J. Proctor Young, laying foundj 


i- 


tion for shed. 


40 99 


Follansbee & Theobold, movin 


g 


shed, 


40 00 


Jaoob P. Chase, building shed. 


135 00 


D. H. Young, drain pipe, 


47 35 


Fogg & James, for team, 


6 50 


Asa K. Emery, repairs on build- 




ings, . . . . 


• 


49 36 



t,978 12 



186 
CITY TEAMS. 

To Balance from old account, . 
Received from Highway District 

No. 2, for work, 
new highways, for work 
paving streets, for work, . 
watering streets, for work, 
macadamizing streets, for work, 
grading for concrete walks, 
Amoskeag Falls Bridge, 
sewers and drains, 
commons, . 
Valley, 

repairing school-houses, 
jfire-alarm telegraph, . 
John H. Wiley, for horse, 
H. C. Merrill, overdraft, 
fire department, (transferred), 
reserved fund, (transferred) , 

EXPENDITURES. 



Db, 



11,270 32 

1,697 19 
71 24 
54 14 

231 14 

140 60 

106 95 

9 00 

122 63 

7 92 

7 56 

20 26 

1 89 
150 00 

2 52 
1,500 00 
1,446 18 



,981 03 



Cr. 



By paid Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster, 1352 00 

Augustus Merrill, " 167 50 

James Kearns, " 12 84 

A. B. Gushing, « 340 00 

A. Roby, " 28 88 

T. M. Conant, " 181 00 

John Gushing, " 45 21 

E. P. Johnson & Co., for hay, 41 89 

H. L. Wilson, " 89 27 

John Calef, " 24 54 

A. Smith, for hay, . .• 37 32 

H. F. Lowd, " . . 14 03 



187 



Paid B. W. Nichols, for hay, 
J. Richardson, " 
J. S. Edwards, " 
John P. Moore, for hay, 
Waterman Smith, for hay 
City Farm, for hay, . 

D. H. Dickey, for hay, 
John Dickey, " 

E. W. Bartlett, " . 
George Rowe, " . 
John C. Nichols, for hay, 
George K. Eaton, " 
C. P. Blake, for hay, 
G. Plummer, for straw, . 
James McCauley, for straw, 
Henry C. Merrill, for carrots, 
Watts & Holmes, for grain, 
Drake & Carpenter, for grain, 
Poore & Currier, " 
S. Poor, " 
J. S. Kidder & Co., " 
H. & H. R Pettee, " 
Ira Bailey, for horse, 
Emerson & Porter, 1 pair horses, 
S. L. Fogg, exchange on horse, 
" " " expense buying horses 
Alpheus Gay, expense buying 

horses, . . . . 

Z. Foster Campbell, medicines, 
M. C. Derby, farrier, treatment 

of horses, .... 
C. R. Wood, farrier, treatment 

of horses, . . . . 
Head & Dowst, lumber and work 
Pike & Heald, cleaning stove 



18 37 
31 46 

322 17 

19 91 

22 00 
98 69 

13 86 

14 28 
47 76 

240 01 

69 70 
14 66 
39 32 

5 98 
53 82 
14 72 
76 00 

70 74 
94 14 
43 40 

380 42 
672 09 
300 00 
975 00 
62 00 
41 90 

23 62 
12 83 

109 20 

209 60 
26 85 



188 



Co., grinding 



pipe, . 

Amoskeag Ax 

sled shoes, . . . . 

Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, 

R. B. Waldron, repairing pump, 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., shoeing 
horses, . . . . 

Conway & Elynn, blacksmith 
work, .... 

Wm. H. Hill, shoeing horses, 

John M. Chandler & Co., oil 
salt, soap, sponges, etc., 

Wm. C. Rogers, hay fork, 

Daniels & Co., combs, brushes 
nails, grease, etc., 

Patrick Burke, 

R. W. Langley, rent of stables, 

J. M. Hunt & Co., blacksmith 
work, . . . . . 

Hunt & Lowell, making and re- 
pairing sleds, carts, and shoe- 
ing, 

Vickery & Stevens, lock, . 

W. H. Vickery, locks and keys, 

A. W. Sanborn, making and re- 
pairing carts and sleds, 

C Chenette, repairing carts and 
sledsy . . . . . 

A. H. Lowell, sled shoes, . 

J. L. Kennedy, painting at stable 

Pike & Heald, lantern, 

r. N. McLaren, repairing har- 
nesses, . . . . 

C. F. Dasey, 2 horse collars, . 

Edwin Branch,! pair harnesses, 



85 

1 00 
12 15 

2 00 

141 60 



54 


50 


84 


13 


! 16 


63 




50 


10 


88 


11 


84 


, 10 


00 



9 15 



277 40 
1 15 
1 50 

279 21 



11 


00 


17 


46 


2 


05 


1 


25 


191 


86 


12 


00 


225 


00 



189 



Paid Edwin Branch, for blankets and 

repairs of harnesses, 

B. Frank Fogg, repairing pipe, 

pump, etc., .... 

Thomas A. Lane, repairing pipe, 

Fairbanks & Folsom, repairing 

pipe, 



124 53 

21 51 

60 

60 



1,981 OS 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 1. 



To Balance from old account, 
Appropriation, . 



Paid Chas. W. Row.ell, sup't, . 
Nehemiah Preston, labor, 
Geo. Chapman, labor, 
Mr. Lincoln, labor, . 
Clark & Garland, stone, 
Jas. 0. Clark, labor, 
•Lorenzo D. Scagel, labor, 
Alonzo Wicom, labor, 
J. M. Rowell, labor, 1874, 
Chas. Gamble, labor, 
Nathan Yervill, labor, 
Samuel Hall, gravel, 
Patrick Cummings, labor, 
James Appleton, labor, 
James Farley, labor, 
W. Waldron, labor, . 
A. Fairbanks, labor, 
L. D. Gate, labor. 



159 16 


300 


00 


1172 


11 


14 


00 


3 


00 


o 
O 


00 


9 


00 


30 


37 




75 


2 


00 




38 


2 


62 


7 


12 


'5 


00 


14 


62 


• 13 


50 


14 


62 


2 


25 


7 


50 


4 


50 



Dr. 



1359 1& 
Cr. 



190 



Paid Wm. Campbell, labor, 
Daniels & Co., labor, 

Amount, 

Balance to new account, 



^ 2 


25 


5 


33 


1313 


92 


45 


24 



1359 16 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT, NO. 2. 



Appropriation, 


. 


112,000 00 


Reserved Fund, 


. 


5,856 91 


Received for Work, 


• 


18 00 


paid Wm. S. Evans, Supt., 




360 00 


William S. Evans, for use 


of 




horse and wagon, 1873, 


, 


132 00 


William S. Evans, for use 


of 




horse and wagon, 1874, 


. 


132 00 


I. C. Flanders, Supt., . 


. 


279 00 


I. C. Flanders, for use 


of 




horse and wagon. 


. 


15 75 


Anstrice G. Flanders, for mak- 




ing out pay-rolls. 


. 


24 00 


Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster, 


175 00 


Augustus Merrill, " 




84 50 


Almus B. Cushing, " 




210 50 


Thacher M. Conant, " 




70 17 


James Kearns, " 




546 06 


John Gushing,' " 




230 17 


Augustus Robie, ' " 




141 27 


City Teams, for work, 




1,697 19 


Nathaniel Manning, for work 




of team and teamster, 


. 


178 88 



Dr. 



117,874 91 
Cr. 



191 

Paid Warren Harvey, for work of 

team and teamster, . 
Daniel H. Dickey, for work of 

team and teamster, . 
James M. Dickey, for work of 

team and teamster, . 
Mark E. Harvey, for work of 

team and teamster, . 
James Emerson, for work of 

team and teamster, . 
A. Wells, for work of team 

and teamster, . 
Ephraim S. Harvey, for -vv^ork 

of team and teamster, 
J. Proctor Young, for work of 

team and teamster, . 
Daniel Connor, for work of 

team and teamster, . 
Joseph B. Pierce, for work of 

team and teamster, . 
G. H. Tufts, for work of team 

and teamster, . 
J. L. Smith, for work of team 

and teamster, . 
Charles Cheney, for work of 

team and teamster, , 
Jere. Abbott, for work of team 

and teamster, . 
J. G. Sargent, for work of team 

and teamster, . 
O. A. Tucker, for work of team 

and teamster, . 
A. Bod well & Co., for work of 

team and teamster, . 
A. Bod well & Co., for stone, . 



167 


50 


42 


75 


398 


04 


218 


01 


121 


88 


86 


25 


42 


00 


195 


13 


253 


62 


175 


51 


202 


51 


52 


88 


217 


13 


41 


62 


63 


01 


109 


13 


131 


50 


108 


05 



192 

Paid Bodwell & Harvey, for gravel, 

Ellis & Patterson, for engin- 
eering, .... 

R. W. Flanders, for black- 
smith work, 

Geo. W. Merriam, for black- 
smith work, 

Kilgore & Porter, for black- 
smith work, 

J. F. Woodbury, for black- 
smith work, 

Hunt & Lowell, for blacksmith 
work, .... 

C. M. Stevens, for carting 
tools, .... 

John B. Varick, for tools and 

steel, .... 

Daniels & Co., for tools and 

steel, .... 

Wm. C. Rogers, for tools, 

D. Wells, for lumber, . 
A. Dinsmore, for lumber, 
H. & H. R. Pettee, for lime 

and cement, ... 4 00 

Derry, Welcome & Co., repair- 
ing carts, .... 

Pike & Heald, repairing pipe, 

T, A. Lane, repairing pipe, . 

Amoskeag Ax Co., for hoes. 

Eager & Robinson, salt for 
sidewalk, .... 

Jas. Mitchell, Jr., for gravel, 

Geo. E. Hersey, medical at- 
tendance on man hurt, . 2 00 

John M, Chandler & Co., for 



25 


00 


34 


86 


113 


10 


60 


52 


2 


20 


1 


30 


90 


30 


4 


00 


185 


98 


110 


55 


22 


05 


25 


18 


153 


17 



8 


30 


2 


22 


2 


70 


4 


05 


3. 


75 


32 


00 



193 



oil and powder, . 


. 


. 


9 49 


H. R. Tilton, for gravel, 


24 00 


Alfred Quimby, time books, . 


3 25 


Hackett & Fisher, concreting 




crossings, . 


. 


340 77 


City Farm, for cart. 


. 


80 00 


Jerry Amlott, for labor, . 


30 75 


Wm. Anderson, ' 






105 01 


Nicholas B. Abbott, ' 






27 00 


D. D. Ayer, ' 






17 25 


Edward Bresnalian,' 






169 12 


Patrick Butler, ' 






31 50 


Robert Banett, ' 






3 00 


John Burns, ' 






26 25 


Timothy Buckley, ' 






47 25 


Dennis Bresnalian, ' 






7 50 


Michael Broderick, ' 






38 25 


Barr & Clapp, for la 


bor by A. 




Merrill, 


. . 


38 25 


Edward Barnes, fo 


r labor, 


46 88 


Martin Britton, 


a 


6 00 


James Broderick, 


a 


4 88 


George Burton, 


a 


43 13 


Michael Baker, 


a 


5 63 


Michael Buckley, 


a 


20 63 


Charles Brown, 


(( 


14 25 


Jerry Bresnahan, 


u 


19 88 


William Burke, 


(( 


1 50 


Charles Clarkson, 


(; 


285 00 


George Cota, 


a 


35 00 


Dennis Cornelia, 


ii 


37 13 


John Clary, 


(; 


9 38 


City Farm, 


(( 


56 50 


Joseph Comfort, 


it 


220 51 


Joseph Comfort, 2d. 

13 


a 




59 25 



194 



Paid Wijliam Conway, 


for labor. 


. 39 00 


Jerry Cullity, 




28 50 


Thomas Connor, 




14 25 


John Connor, 




17 25 


Jerry Connor, 




44 90 


Timothy Connor, 




10 63 


■ Lawrence M. Connor, " 


1 88 


Wm. Conner, 


u 


29 50 


Daniel Collins, 


n 


2 25 


Patrick Campbell, 


Ist, for labor 


, 4 50 


Patrick Campbell, 


2nd, " 


4 50 


Patrick Campbell, 


3d, " 


7 50 


Patrick Conway, 


for labor, 


39 00 


Timothy Cronin, 


a 


9 00 


John Calanan, 


(( 


. 138 39 


James Connelly, 


a 


12 00 


Patrick Connell, 


n 


43 88 


Thomas Carrigan, 


a 


21 00 


John Concannon, 


a 


73 89 


Patrick Collins, 


C( 


6 75 


James M. Crombie, " 


35 63 


Charles Crombie, 


li 


3 75 


Harry Clark, 


a 


9 75 


Anthony Crosby, 


a 


17 63 


Patrick Crosby, 


a 


18 38 


Patrick Crosby, 2nd, " 


2 25 


Patrick Coney, 




6 00 


John Cronin, 




20 63 


Jerry Crowley, 




1 13 


John Cahill, 




22 13 


James Callahan, 




21 00 


Patrick Connor, 




4 88 


Frank Chenette, 




57 38 


Hugh Cunningham, " 


12 00 


Patrick CiiUeu, 


(( 


2 25 



195 • 



Paid Bart Doyle, i 


for labor 


82 88 


Fred Dunford, 


a 


6 00 


Daniel Dowd, 


(( 


274 50 


Edmond Doyle, 


u 


12 00 


Patrick Dowd, 


(( 


61 13 


John Dowd, 


u 


58 51 


Michael Donnelley, 


a 


95 26 


William Doland, 


n 


30 38 


•Simon Dodge, 


u 


29 25 


H. H. Dickey, 


u 


20 00 


Ira Davis, 


(( 


8 25 


Noah Downs, 


il 


24 00 


William Delaney, 


a 


5*25 


Jerry Donnovan, 


a 


16 13 


Wm. Dunn, 


(( 


9 75 


John Dwyer, 


(C 


10 50 


Frank Everett, 


(( 


76 13 


Thomas Fitzsimmo 


IS, for labor 


40 13 


Patrick Finn, for labor, . 


48 00 


Lawrence Foley, " 


. 


63 38 


John Fennoff, " 


, 


34 56 


James A. Flanders, 


for labor, 


49 44 


James Fleming, jr. 


a 

• 


18 00 


James Fleming, 


u 


16 13 


John Fittsimmons, 


for labor, 


18 75 


Barney Farry, 


(( 


15 75 


James Freeman, 


(( 


4 50 


Wm. H. Fisk, for time books, 


4 00 


Michael Foley, for labor, 


1 13 


David Finn, " 




1 50 


James Fitzgerald, " 




13 50 


Timothy Flynn, " 




9 00 


Patrick Flynn, " 




9 00 


Peter Griffin, " 




180 50 


Frank Greenwood, 


for labor, . 


148 25 



196 



Paid Michiiol (iroiian, for labor, 

Patrick (Jroi^an, 

C. W. (JaviiV, 

Geo. W. r.ilhcrt, " 

Da..iol Croon, " 

Michael Haley, " 

William llaloy, 

Daniel llaU-y, " 

Charles lluiloy, " 

Daniel Harrington, " 

John Hills, " 

Thomas HoUlen, " 

"AJichacl HolVon, " 

Patrick Harmon, " 

James .Jenniutis, " 

David Joy, " 

J. A. Jarvis, " 

John Ji)yce, " 

Patrick Kearns, " 

Thomas Kelley, " 

Frank Ivelley, " 

James Kelley, " 

Patrick Ivelley, " 

Daniel Iveel'e, " 

Thomas Keefe, " 

Christopher Kecfe, " 

Ehen Knovvlton, for labor, 

Wm. H. Kennedy, " 

Patrick Kennedy, " 

Michael Kenney, " 

F. P. Kimball, 

Lonis Lcflott, " 

John Linnehan, " 

John Larkin, " 

Lawrence Larkin, " 



22 


:>o 


U 


25 


1 


")() 


14 


2.') 


;5 


;ks 


. 9 


7o 


48 


01 


2 


25 


41 


2;-) 


48 


88 



2 50 
G 00 
4 50 



8 


08 


1!) 


18 


1 


50 


15 


75 


18 


00 


278 


00 


100 


51 


25 


88 


10 


18 


29 


08 


23 


08 


41 


()8 


18 


75 


1 


50 


275 


38 


10 


88 


6 


00 


58 


00 


27 


75 


40 


88 


278 


01 


14 


08 



197 



Paid JamoH L/otih, 


for laV>or, 


, 119 25 


Paul Linncville, 


u 


20 25 


Wniiam f^ane, 


(i 


21 00 


Midia';! r>ane, 


t< 


IZ 50 


JAiiKtH Lnc.y, 


i< 


12 00 


John K. LyojiH, 


(t 


U 00 


Thorn'4« Moran, 


«( 


7;^ 51 


Patrick Moran, 


(( 


14 63 


John Mahony, 


(( 


24 25 


Thoina** Mahony, 


(( 


398 25 


MurtagJi Mahoney, 


(i 


181 88 


AugriHtu« Merrill, 


(i 


20 33 


John McCafFry, 


ii 


35 25 


George H. Mr;Kean, 


(( 


39 38 


John Murray, 


(( 


, 114 62 


Garret Murray, 


(i 


9 75 


Michael McGrath, 


(( 


61 01 


JaineH McGraih, 


(( 


21 00 


Jainew McCal>e, 


(( 


13 50 


Lawrerjc^; McCarty, 


(( 


240 25 


John McCarty, 


(( 


7 50 


John McTernan, 


(( 


9 00 


JameH McGovern, 


(( 


247 25 


Edvi-anl McDuffy, 


(( 


1 50 


Andrew MeC'Xik, 


(( 


10 88 


Wm. My X well, 


(( 


53 25 


Jere. Mahanna, 


t( 


18 00 


ThoH. Mahonnay, 


« 


35 25 


Bart. Moriorty, 


(( 


22 88 


John Mullen, 


(( 


68 24 


Jame» Moyau, 


t( 


7 50 


Marcuii Morse, 


(( 


5 25 


Jere. Murphy, 


(( 


27 08 


Daniel Mahoney, 


(( 


28 13 


Jacob Miller, 


(( 


9 00 



198 



1 Michael Mulligan, 


for labor, - 


13 50- 


Henry C. Merrill, 


for salt, 


1 15 


John Nolan, 


for labor. 


70 10 


Charles Newry, 


u 


2 07 


Wm. Nugent, 


u 


6 00 


Wm. O'Neil, 


<; 


. 130 51 


John O'Neil, 


(( 


42 75 


Wm. O'Brien, 


(( 


12 OO 


James Otis, 


(( 


3 00 


D. O'Leary, 


u 


9 38 


Thomas Preston, 


u 


169 50' 


John Punch, 


u 


105 39 


John Prindable, 


il 


176 26 


Eli Perry, 


a ' 


11 63 


Matthew Pettigrew, " 


9 00 


Timothy Quinn, 


il 


50 25 


Edwin Quinley, 


il 


6 75 


Jerry Quinley, 


a 


9 OO 


A. Robie, 


il 


190 09 


Roda Robinson, 


li 


6 00 


Joseph Richards, 


(C 


50 62 


Edward Ryan, 


il 


3 00 


Jerry Reagan, 


li 


46 88 


Michael Reagan, 


a 


, 4 13 


Peter Reynolds, 


(C 


13 51 


Thomas Reynolds, 


a 


3 00 


Daniel Reiley, 


a 


29 25 


Timothy Reiley, 


a 


9 75 


Peter Scanlan, 


il 


133 97 


Loami Searles, 


(( 


232 75 


Quinlan Sullivan, 


li 


67 88 


Patrick Sullivan, 


il 


9 00 


Timo. Sullivan, 


il 


34 50 


Dennis Sullivan, 


11 


21 OO 


Patrick Sheehan, 


(( 


156 01 



199 



Paid Stephen Spaiie, 
Alec Shine, 
M. W. Sargent, 
Thomas Solan, 
Israel Shepherd, 
Alexander Stuart, 
James Silk, 
John Stanton, 
Michael Sheehan, 
William Smith, 
Henry Smith, 
Timothy Twyer, 
Festiis Thornton, 
Charles Varnum, 
James Welch, 
Charles Worthen, 
John Welch, 
John Williams, 



for labor, 



99 38 
79 88 
102 01 
17 25 
52 43 
12 00 

19 50 
9 00 
2 25 

38 63 
6 38 
51 75 
22 88 
27 75 
36 00 
48 50 
31 13 

20 63 



117,874 91 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 



To Appropriation, .... 
Reserved fund, balance account. 



Paid Wm. S. Locke, Sup't, . 
Wm. W. Baker, " 
Mark Ellin wood, for cutting 
bushes, . . . . 

Philip Sullivan, for labor. 
Laborer, " 

A. Remmington, " 
Stephen Sisco, " 



$800 


00 


23 


32 


$173 43 


70 


87 


9 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


2 


25 


7 


50 



Dr. 



1823 32 
Cr. 



200 



Paid for gravel, 


. 


1 10 


Dennis O'Neil, for labor, 


4 50 


John Joyce, 


(( 


2 62 


John White, 


u 


1 50 


A. C. Metcalf, 


« 


75 


J. E. Clough, 


« 


. 138 60 


B. F. Mitchell, 


«c 


85 87 


Frank Emerson, 


(( 


9 00 


Robert Mears, 


u 


75 


John Leonard, 


a 


3 00 


Nutt, 


u 


6 20 


Joseph Brayman, 


a 


3 75 


Nutt Brothers, 


ii 


2 60 


Chas. Ryder, 


n 


18 40 


Wm. Rigby, 


a 


1 50 


James Smith, 


a 


6 00 


John Smith, 


a 


4 50 


John B. Varick, 


• • • 


*30 


Warren J. Tower, 


for labor. 


51 74 


Frank Gilford, 


a 


15 00 


Samuel S. Young, 


a 


30 37 


Charles Sisco, 


li 


22 50 


Nathaniel Baker, 


li 


11 25 


Kadmiel Haselton, 


n 


43 12 


Chas. K, Tucker, 


« 


21 75 


John Danforth, 


(( 


'6 75 


C. C. Webster, 


a 


22 50 


Daniel Patten, 


u 


4 50 


John Maloney, 


a 


1 50 


B. Leavenworth, 


11 


4 50 


John Mclntire, 


a 


6 00 


William Bailey, 


ii 


4 50 


Granville Haselton 


• 


3 00 


Chas. Hobart, 


a 


5 95 


A. Bodwell, for stone, 


10 00 



$823 32 



201 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 4 
To Appropriation, 



Paid James Cheney, Sup't., 
Isaac Whittemore, labor, 
Jona. Aiken, " 

R. N. Whittemore, " 
Moses Fellows, " 

C. C. Webster, " 

John P. Moore, " 

Charles E. Cheney, " 
Frank J. Moore, " 
Byron E. Moore, " 

Amount, 

Balance to new account, 





Dr. 


• 


8300 00 




Cr. 


1140 00 




43 50 




7 50 




16 00 




16 50 




33 50 




33 25 




3 00 




3 00 




3 00 





$299 25 
75 



$300 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 5. 



To Balance from old account. 
Appropriation, . 
Reserved Fund, 



Paid James Young, Sup't, 

Samuel F. Knowles, Sup't, 
Wm. W. Dickey, for labor, 
John Dickey, " 

Samuel Boyce, " 

William Rigby, " 

Frank Robie, " 

James Emerson, " 



$47 10 


500 


00 


75 


00 


$123 43 


151 


90 


151 


16 


18 


92 


1 


67 




67 


47 


54 


7 


95 



Dr. 



$622 10 
Cr. 



202 



Paic E. S. Harvey, for labor, 


1 5(> 


John B. Ellenwood, " 


42 


William and Michael Cahill 




for labor, . . . . 


13 50 


Harvey & Wallace, lumber, 


4 80 


Edward R. Young, for gravel, . 


20 79 


Estate of Rodnia Nutt, " 


30 


Estate of Gilman Harvey, gravel 


17 00 


William P. Merrill, *' . 


2 00 


John B. Varick, tools. 


3 20 


R. W. Flanders, for blacksmith 


I 


work, .... 


1 70 


John B. Silver, labor. 


16 67 


Newell Boyce, " 


6 84 


Joseph Clark, " 


16 67 


Charles H. Young, labor, 


3 34 


Amount, . . . 


1611 88 


Balance to new account, 


. 10 22 







1622 10 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



To Balance from old account, . 


39 69 


Appropriation, . 


. 500 00' 


Reserved fund. 


. 120 96 


Paid Daniel H. Dickey, Supt., 


. $126 74 


Moses Tracy, " 


. 135 40 


Daniels & Co., 


40 


H. E. Dickey, for labor. 


10 50 


S. Dickey, " 


3 75 


William Griffin, " 


10 80 


C. C. Worthen, " 


12 37 



Dr. 



1660 65 



203 



Paid Geo. B. Emerson, labor, 

N. F. Perkins, " 

G. Whittemore, " 

J. 0. Webster, " 

W. S. Stevens, " 

David Dickey, 2d, " 

C. Washburn, " 

I. T. Webster, " 

James Wiley, " 

S. B. Dickey, " 

Geo. Underwood, " 
J. F. Hall, 

J. D. Hall, " 

James M. Webster, " 

0. A. Craig, " 

John Johnson, " 

L. A. Dickey, " 

J. Stark Webster, " 

Orrin R. Dickey, " 

Gilman Clough, " 

J. Currier, " 
John Hosley, stone, 



5 62 
1 50 
5 24 
79 24 
24 35 
47 62 
10 87 
66 37 
28 12 

7 87 
10 13 

8 25 



00 
25 
75 



13 87 
4 70 

15 07 
8 62 
6 00 
2 25 
2 00 



1660 65 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



To Balance from old account, 
Appropriation, . 



Paid Edward F. Jenkins, Supt., 
Israel Webster, " 

A. Dinsmore, for lumber, 
P. C. Bean, for labor,^ 



Dr. 



$24 26 
800 00 


$824 26' 
Cr. 


$69 87 

189 61 

3 14 

27 69 



204 



Paid F. W. George, for labor, 
James Hall, " 

George Hall, " 

F. Harriman, " 
J. B. Huse, " 
N. Johnson, " 
Mr. Kendall, " 
Isaac Huse, " 
B. McGinnis, " 

G. F. Sargent, " 
N. Sleeper, " 
Daniel Cronin, " 
John W. Joy, " 
S., T. Sleeper, " 
John Feihara, " 
Reuben Morgan, " 
McGregor Hall, " 
Wm. P. Scott, " 
Danl. W. Reynolds, labor, 
Frank Reynolds,, " 
Peter 0. Woodman, " 
J. H. Osgood, " 
J. B. Pierce, " 
Fred. Emerson, " 
Willie Emerson, " 
James Howe, " 
Peter Howe, " 
Michael Howe, " 
Moses Lull, " 
Dennis Murphy, " 
John J. Flynn, " 
Byron Stearns, " 
Mr. Brooks, " 
Charles Francis, " 
Thomas Mackin, " 



10 


87 


2 


25 


2 


44 


15 


00 


2 


07 


7 


62 


4 


82 




50 


30 


57 


f) 


94 




75 


14 


12 


7 


87 


1 


75 


121 


50 


28 


50 


47 


69 


21 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


27 


00 


3 


25 


3 


75 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


50 


3 


50 


3 


50 


3 


75 


3 


50 


12 


25 


5 


25 


4 


37 


4 


00 


16 


50 



idJ. S. Page, 
Daniel teefe, 
Mr. Dearborn 


205 
for labor, 

a 

new account, 


3 50 

1 75- 
3 00 


Amount, 
Balance to 


. 1727 4-1 
96 82 







$824 26 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account, . 


$21 83 




Appropriation, .... 


500 00 


1521 83 
Cr. 






By paid Robert I. Stevens, Supt. 


182 00 




A. Dinsmore, for lumber, . 


8 00 




John M. Chandler & Co., for 


' 




powder, .... 


1 20 




Daniels & Co., for shovels, rake 






and hoe, .... 


5 25 




R. W. Flanders, for blacksmith 






work, 


3 15 




Augustus Proctor, for labor, . 


17 50 




Walter Wright, " 


1 75 




Henry Hunter, " 


24 93 




Luther S. Proctor, " 


18 25 




John H. Proctor, " 


3 75 




R. J. Pillsbury, " 


6 12 




Robert Stevens, " 


93 37 




Joseph B. Young, " 


11 ^7 




Frederick Swett, " 


1 75 




Amos Spotford, " 


42 81 




John Haselton-, " 


3 50 




William Reed, " 


6 12 





206 



Paid Nathaniel Southard, for labor, 


3 00 


Lyman Proctor, 


(( 


3 50 


Gilman Reed, 


(( 


34 50 


James P. Eaton, 


(( 


56 50 


Henry Pillsbury, 


(( 


7 00 


Henry Thompson, 


a 


26" 25 


Asa F. Dolloff, 


n 


3 50 


Benj. P. Kimball, 


u 


8 75 


Jere. Garvin, 


(( 


9 62 


Amos Latuch, 


(( 


19 25 


Frank Young, 


(( 


4 50 


E. H. Brown, 


il 


7 00 


El win Orombie, 


(( 


2 00 


Amount, 


1516 19 


Balance to new 


account, 


5 64 


HIGHWAY DISTRIC 


T, NO. 9. 


To Balance from old account, . 


$23 41 


Appropriation, . 


• 


400 00 


By paid Lyman A. Dickey, Supt., . 


37 50 


B. W. Corning, Supt., 


111 81 


A. Dinsmore, for lumber, . 


8 87 


E. V. Corning, 


for labor. 


23 50 


S. L. Corning, 




87 


E. W. Corning, 




11 63 


J. M. Corning, 




7 50 


A. G. Corning, 




6 75 


A. W. Corning, 




12 75 


B. M. Corning, 




17 25 


Sidney A. Dunbar 


» 


10 01 



83 



Dr. 



$423 41 
Cr. 



207 



Paid Frank A. Emery, 


for labor, 


17 01 


George W. George 


'5 


31 75 


John Hatch, 


U 


15 95 


Isaac H. Webster, 


ii 


6 50 


John Silver, 


11 


6 88 


A. Bojce, 


(( 


7 00 


D. F. Boyce, 


(( 


•87 


M. Boyce, 


n 


87 


Albert N. Scott, 


(( 


22 62 


John Hartigan, 


il 


8 63 


George Dunbar, 


n 


3 00 


James Currier, 


(( 


6 75 


Jerome Hatch, 


11 


3 75 


Henry Perkins, 


ii 


9 50 


Amount, 


. $389 52 


Balance to new 


account, 


■ 33 89 







1423 41 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



To Appropriation, . 


11,000 00 


Reserved fund, .... 


58 00 


By paid Samuel Brown, Jr., Supt., . 


$39 75 


A. W. Dickey, Supt. . 


118 50 


A. W. & A. Dickey, for labor, . 


135 13 


John B. Varick, for tools, 


4 40 


R. W. Flanders, for repairing 




tools, 


9 45 


Putnam Jenkin3, for repairing 




tools, 


3 25 



Dr. 



$1,058 00 
Cr. 



208 



A. C. Wallace, for lumber, 

A. Dinsrnore, " 

J. M. Chandler & Co., for pow 

der, .... 
Isaac S. Coffin, for dipper and 

repairing lanterns, 
Barr & Clapp, nails, oil and fuse 
Joseph Gaggin, for labor, 
John C. Head, " 

Geo. Worthley, " 

Eugene Smith, " 

Frank Smith, " 

Eugene McCarty, " 

J. G. Sargent, " 

James Dowd, " 

Munroe Hardy, " 

Patrick Dowd, " 

Jerry Lahey, " 

Chas. A. Rowell, " 

Humphrey Scannell, " 
Watts & Holmes, " 

Godfrey Lorander, " 
A. W. Sawyer, " 

James Lockhead, " 

Patrick Brown, " 

Peter Connor, " 

Thomas Tower, " 

H. T. Barnard, " 

Peter Connor, ' " 

George H. Brown, " 
Adam Dickey, " 

Theodore Taylor, " 

John Garvin, " , 

Joseph Lahey, " 

Edward Dorney, " 



74 31 
20 00 

4 20 

3 05 
17 09 

122 67 



78 
8 
2 



60 

75 

25 

75 

52 50 

42 75 

19 50 

15 00 

19 50 

12 00 

21 75 

7 50 

9 00 



35 
12 



26 62 

4 50 
18 00 
15 00 
40 14 

9 75 
22 12 

5 00 
75 

6 00 
6 00 
6 10 



209 



Paid Charles Moore, for labor, 
Lewis Plant, " 



1 50 
37 50 



.,058 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



To balance from old account, . 


. 1115 07 


Appropriation, 


. 800 00 


George A. Richardson, Supt., 


1543 72 


Wm. K. Cochran, plank, . 


1 56 


George H. Colby, " 


12 75 


Ballou Ayres, labor, 


14 62 


Ezra B. Stearns, labor. 


5 25 


John E. Stearns, " 


7 12 


Gilman R. Stevens, labor, 


56 24 


. James Webber, ' 




34 50 


F. J. Beard, ' 




14 24 


L. D. Colby, ' 




2 25 


Jerry Desmond, ' 




7 50 


John Horrigan, ' 




4 50 


Nicholas Parker, ' 




2 25 


William Colby, ' 




7 87 


Edward Gilbert, ' 




8 oa 


Timothy Horrigan, ' 




4 87 


Lenia Towle, ' 




5 62 


Oliver Stearns, ' 




1 50 


Warren K. Richardsdn, labor, 


7 12 


Clarence Richardson, " 


29 25 


Amos H. Gerry, labor, 


15 00 


William Woodson, " 




8 75 



Db. 



1915 OT 



Cr. 



210 



Paid James Webber, for labor, . 12 75 

Amount, .• . . . 1797 23 
Balance to new account, . 117 84 



$915 07 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



To Appropriation, . 


. 


. $400 00 


Reserved fund. 


• 


75 00 


Paid City Farm, for labor, 


. $159 00 


Benj. Sullivan, " 


. 


3 00 


Sylvester Jones, for labor 


. 28 50 


Patrick Butler, 


a 


3 00 


Jere. L. Fogg, 


u 


32 25 


Wm. Murphy, 


(( 


3 00 


John Riley, 


a 


18 00 


Morris Fitzgerald, 


li 


6 00 


Daniel McCarty, 


li 


13 50 


Amos Latuch, 


u 


42 00 


Lyman A. Procter, 


u 


12 00 


Chas. Chapman, 


(( 


6 75 


William Mills, 


(( 


28 50 


William P. Mills, 


(( 


8 25 


Henry Thompson, 


a 


22 25 


Fred Worthen, 


a 


8 25 


George Young, 


a 


17 50 


— Hood, 


a 


1 50 


John Latuch, 


(( 


27 00 


L. H. Proctor, 


a 


12 25 



Dr. 



1475 00 



Cr. 



211 



Paid William Stockdale, for labor, 

Amount, 

Balance to new account, 



3 00 



$455 50 
19 50 



$475 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 








Dr. 


"To Balance from old account, 


$34 84 




Appropriation, . 


. 200 00 


$234 84 
Cr. 






Paid Jacob F. Jewell, Supt., . 


. $58 37 




William Campbell, labor, . 


54 63 




William Campbell, jr., labor. 


6 75 




Lorenzo Cate, labor, 


3 75 




Sylvester Cate, " 


6 62 




Reuben Morgan, " 


6 00 




Amgunt, .... 


$136 12 




Balance to new account. 


98 72 


$234 84 







NEW HIGHWAYS. 

To Balance from old account, . $170 10 

Overdrafts, . . . . 19 87 

Land damage awards, (transf 'd) 4,750 00 

Appropriation, .... 5,000 00 

Reserved fund, (transferred) . 246 08 



Dr. 



Paid Isaac C. Flanders, Supt., . $174 00 

Isaac C. Flanders, for use of 

horse and wagon, . . 11 25 



$10,186 05 
Or. 



212 

Anstrice G. Flanders, for mak- 
ing out monthly bills, . . 6 00 

Joseph Garland, building Cy- 
press Street, . . . 50 00 

Hunt & Lowell, blacksmith work, 1 9 20 

Daniels & Co., tools, . . 20 84 

R. W. Flanders, repairing tools, 34 33 

Fogg & James, horse hire, . 35 00 

Ellis & Patterson, engineer's ser- 
vices, 199 23 

Young & Dickey, building part 

of Cohas avenue, . . . 270 00 

Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster, . 7 00 

T. M. Conant, teamster, . . 7 60 

A. B. Gushing, teamster, . . 4 00 

John Gushing, teamster, . . ^ 33 10 

City Teams, . . . . 71 24 

J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 

and oil, . . . . 54 94 

Waterman Smith, for building 

Amherst Street, . . .337 08 

Joseph B. Sawyer, engineer's 
services, .... 

D. C. Hutchinson, stone, . 

Lamson & Marden, making and 
repairing tools, 

William Anderson, for labor, . 

Nicholas B. Abbott, " 

Jere. Abbott, " 

W. H. Allen, • 

James Broderick, " 

Andrew Britton, " . 

Michael Broderick, " 

Edward Bachner, " 

Michael Buckley, " 



94 


92 


6 


00 


84 


81 


17 


25 


35 


50 


15 


00 


17 


25 


22 


13 


1 


50 


31 


13 


61 


13 


30 


00 



213 



Paid Charles Brown, 


for labor. 


12 75 


Edward Burns, 




75 


Robert Barrett, 




4 50 


A. Bodwell & Co., 




. 252 50 


Patrick Butler, 




18 38 


Jerry Bresnahan, 




4 50 


Thomas Bagley, 




27 00 


Daniel Connor, 




. 220 51 


Timo. Connor, 




53 26 


Jerry Connor, ' 




80 64 


James M. Crombie, 




60 00 


Lawrence M. Connor, " 


75 


Charles Crombie, 




28 50 


•John G. Coult, 




23 63 


Patrick Crosby, 




50 01 


Daniel Collins, 




75 


Patrick Cooney, 




58 13 


Anthony Crosby, 




. 105 26 


Charles Cheney, 




. 100 13 


City Farm, 




42 25 


Joseph Comfort, 




19 88 


Harry Clark, 




23 63 


Charles Clarkson, 




12 50 


Thomas Harrigan, 




. 10 88 


Thomas Connor, 




6 00 


John Callahan, 




16 88 


Thomas Custallo, 




3 00 


John Connor, 




4 50 


Dennis Connor, 




22 50 


George Cate, 




3 00 


Dennis Cornelia, 




21 00 


Hugh Cunningham, 




10 88 


John Cronan, 




36 75 


William Conway, 




6 00 


€on. Credon, 




6. 00 



214 



Paid Patrick Crosby 2nd, for labor, 18 75 

Jerry Cullity, " . 9 60 

. Gilman Clough, " . 132 00 

John H. Cashin, " . 78 OO 

James Connelly, " . 3 75 

James Currier, " . 38 44 

William Connor, " . 19 50 

A. W. Dickey, « . 16 50 

A. W. & A. Dickey, " .• 22 50 

James Dowd, " . 1 50' 

Patrick Dowd, " . 16 12 

J. M. Dickey, " . 120 76 

Noah Downs, " . 112 13 

Simon Dodge, " . 49 50 

Edward Doyle, " . 4 50 

Patrick Doyle, " . 4 r>0 

William Dunn, " . 4 60 

Michael Donnelly, " . 27 00 

William Doland, " . 33 38 

Daniel H. Dickey, " . 385 11 

H. H. Dickey, " . 13 OO 

Bart Doyle, " . 25 50 

John Dwyer, « . 48 00 

Henry Duncan, " . 16 00 

Sam. Dickey, " . 7 00 

David Dickey, 2nd, " . 92 26 

Timothy Dwyer, " . 6 00 

Frank Everett, " . 31 60 

George Emerson, " . 36 74 

Webster Eaton, " . 5 63 

David Flynn, « . . Ill 76 

Patrick Flynn, " . 39 38 

Edward Flannigan, " . 26 60 

James Foley, " . 4 50 

Martin J. Foley, " . 25 60 



215 



id William Frain, for labor, 


7 50 


Thomas Finnegan, 


u 


28 50 


Patrick Finn, 


u 


6 75 


Barney Farry, 


(( 


55 63 


John Fittsimmons, 


(( 


42 38 


James A. Flanders, 


ii 


117 91 


James Fitzgerald, 


a 


29 26 


Michael Foley, 


ii 


. 109 51 


Lawrence Foley, 


li 


80 63 


Thomas Fittsimmons, 


ii 


9 75 


James Flemming, Jr. 




27 38 


James Fleming, 


(( 


3 75 


Joseph Gaggin, 


u 


15 75 


Peter Griffin, 


a 


50 25 


Patrick Grogan, 


(( 


56 26 


Edmund Gorman,. 


(( 


7 50 


G. W. Gilbert, 


(( 


31 50 


Daniel Green, 


(( 


22 88 


John H. George, 


(( 


8 25 


William Healey, 


(( 


39 76 


Mark E. Harvey, 


u 


174 63 


E. S. Harvey, 


(( 


9 00 


John Haggerty, 


(( 


77 64 


J. B. Harris, 


(( 


3 75 


Warren Harvey, 


(( 


20 00 


Michael Hayes, 


(( 


13 88 


Michael Healey, 


(( 


15 00 


Daniel Healey, 


(( 


13 50 


John Joyce, 


» 


82 14 


James Jennings, 


ii 


7 50 


David Joy, 


a 


2 25 


Wm. Joyce, 


a 


14 25 


Frank P. Kimball, 


a 


. 130 00 


Frank Kelley, 


a 


1 50 


James Kelley, 


a 


6 00 



'216 



Paid Wm. H. Kennedy, 


for labor, 


74 38 


Patrick Kennedy, 


u 


13 51 


Geo. S. McKean, 


ii 


. 232 49 


Daniel Keefe, 


u 


. Ill 01 


Wm. Kennedy,. 


(( 


14 25 


Christopher Keefe, 


(( 


33 00 


Thomas Kelley, 


(( 


37 50 


J. L. Kelley, 


« 


18 00 


Michael Kelley, 


u 


14 63 


Martin Kelley, 


(( 


7 50 


Edward Kenney, 


(( 


21 75 


Edward Keefe, 


« 


29 25 


Patrick Kearns, 


(( 


32 25 


Michael Lane, 


(( 


35 63 


James Lucy, 


(( 


27 38 


Nathan Lovewell, 


n 


2 25 


John Larkin, 


n 


24 00 


John Lynch, 


a 


9 38 


Wm. Lane, 


ii 


58 50 


John Lee, 


(I 


4 50 


Thomas Lee, 


ii 


24 00 


Wm. Lahey, 


u 


5 25 


Jerry Lahey, 


li 


5 25 


Jas. Lockhead, 


u 


6 00 


Jacob Miller, 


(( 


34 88 


• Bart. Moriarty, 


<( 


,18 38 


Michael Mulligan, 


a 


23 63 


Nathaniel Manning, 


ii 


302 20 


Daniel Mahoney, 


li 


33 00 


Michael McGrath, 


ii 


36 75 


Geo. S. McKean, 


a 


190 87 


A. Merrill, 


ii 


47 63 


Garret Murray, 


ii 


12 38 


John Mullen, 


ii 


60 76 


A. McOook, 


ii 


4 50 



217 



Paid Lawrence McCarty, for labor, 

Michael Madden, " 

Joseph Moran, " 

James McGrath, " 

Chas. H. Martin, " 

Patrick Moran, " 

Peter Mclntire, " 

Mark Minton, " 

Michael Murray, " 

Edward McDuffy, " 

James Morgan, " 

James McCabe, " 

Wra. Murphy, * " 

John Murray, " 

Wm. Maxwell, " 

Jerry Mahanna, " 

Samuel Neil, " 

John Nolan, " 

D.O'Leary, " 

Wm. O'Neil, " 

James Otis, " 

Jas. O'Brien, " 

Lewis Plant, " 

L. S. Proctor, " 

John Prindable, " 

John Patch, " 

John Perham, " 

J. B. Pierce, « 

John Punch, " 

Jas. Powers, " 

Edward Phalan, " 

S. W. Page, " 

Matthew Pettigrew, " 
Geo. W. Pinkerton, Jv. " 

Timo. Quinn, " 



3 00 
68 63 
26 25 

7 50 
18 75 

12 38 

13 50 
6 00 
6 00 
3 00 
6 00 

8 63 

14 25 
6 00 
3 00 
6 00 

10 50 
26 25 

9 38 
25 13 

2 25 
16 50 

2 25 
9 00 

3 00 

4 50 
8 00 

153 01 
23 13 

11 63 

29 63 
19 50 
34 50 
45 00 

30 00 



218 



John Quinn, 
Edwin Quimby, 
Jerry Quinley, 
Jerry Regan, 
James Ryan, 
Peter Reynolds, 
Michael Regan, 
Daniel Riley, 
Thomas Reynolds, 
Moses W. Sargent, 
Wm. S. Smith, 
James Silk, 
Henry Smith, 
Loami Searles, 
Michael Sheehan, 
Timo. Sullivan, 
Dennis Sullivan, 
Frederick Stevens, 
Thomas Solon, 
Alec Shine, 
J. L. Smith, 
Morris Salmon, 
Patrick Spane, 
Timothy Shea, 
Michael Sullivan, 
Patrick Sheehan, 
Daniel Sheehan, 
Michael Stewart, 
Daniel Sullivan, 
John Stanton, 
C. H. Spallett, 
Wm. Stevens, 
Israel Sheppard, 
Patrick Sullivan, 
Peter Scanlon, 



r labor, 


16 50 


(( 


21 75 


(( 


13 50 


(( 


44 25 


(( 


24 00 


(( 


27 00 


u 


5 25 


(( 


2 63 


(( 


39 00 


li 


49 63 


n 


6 00 


(C 


74 26 


a 


. 89 26 


a 


4 50 


(( 


99 01 


(( 


70 00 


(( 


9 51 


u 


4 50 


u 


3 00 


(( 


30 00 


(( 


90 


it 


75 


a 


31 13 


(( 


27 00 


(( 


12 00 


« 


7 50 


« 


19 50 


(C 


9 00 


u 


17 63 


a 


ai 13 


u 


2 25 


u 


20 25 


(( 


10 50 


(( 


14 25 


(( 


5 25 



219 



Paid M. M. Sawyer, 


for labor. 


1 88 


G. A. Tucker, 


11 


. 214 38 


Roda Robertson, 


u 


81 32 


Timothy Riley, 


u 


93 76 


James Trembley, 


u 


2 25 


Timothy Twyer, 


ii 


6 00 


John Tiernan, 


a 


6' 38 


Charles Worthen, 


a 


. 150 50 


A. Wells, 


it 


143 26 


John Wilkins, 


11 


21 00 


John Welch, 


a 


17 25 


Thos. Walker, 


u 


13 88 


Thos. Willis, 


(( 


17 63 


Richard Webber, 


(( 


30 00 


Michael Whalan, 


(( 


25 26 


Patrick Sullivan, 


a 


7 50 


John P. Young, 


ii 


109 75 


Edward Young, 


u 


75 


Amount, 


110,073 30 


Balance to new 


account, 


112 75 

(11 186 0^ 






GRANITE BRID 


GE. 






Dr., 


To Balance from old account, . 


1758 14 


Appropriation, . 


. 


500 00 


Reserve fund, bal. 


acct., . 


1,095 18 










Or. 


By paid Chas. Clarkson, for labor, . 


$8 00 


Warren Harvey, 


(( 


22 50 


John Fennof, 


(( 


12 12 


Joseph Welch, 


(( 


4 50 



220 



Paid Frank Greenwood, for labor, 


9 00 


Paul Linneville, " 


4 50 


Edward Bresnahan, " 


6 00 


Joseph Comfort, " 


6 00 


Wm. T. Evans, " 


13 50 


J. L. Tucker, " 


24 75 


R. W. Flanders, for blacksmith 




work, 


11 00 


E. A. G. Holmes, carpenter work. 


402 43 


M. V. B. Kinne, " 


111 87 


Walter Neal,' " 


56 50 


Sullivan Brothers, for tinning, . 


132 21 


John B. Varick, for nails and 




spikes, .... 


83 56 


A. C. Wallace, for lumber, 


573 42 


Albert Sawyer, " 


724 00 


A. Dinsmore, " 


75 00 


Concord railroad, freight on lum- 




ber, 


26 27 


John L. Kennedy, for painting. 


46 19 





AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 



To Balance from old account. 



By paid M. Y. B. Kinne, for clap- 
boards, . . . . 10 84 
Clough & Foster, for plank, . 1,151 83 
A. Dinsmore, " . 26 99 
Concord R. R., freight on plank, 26 28 
A. Bodwell, for hauling plank, 10 00 
Daniels & Co., nails and spikes, 55 75 
Head & Dowst, planking bridge, 109 76 



221 



Wm. T. Evans, for 
Paul Lenneville, 
Charles Clarkson, 
Alec Shine, 
Stephen Spane, 
Wm. Maxwell, 
Wm. Conway, 
Daniel Keefe, 
Warren Harvey, 
William O'Neil, 
Bart Doyle, 
City Team, 
Charles Yarnum, 
John Fenuof, 



Amount, 

Balance to new account, 



labor, 


12 00 


a 


3 00 


u 


8 00 


i% 


6 00 


a 


9 00 


a 


6 00 


a 


15 00 


a 


15 00 


a 


32 50 


a 


6 00 


u 


4 50 


a 


9 00 


u 


15 00 


a 


3 50 



,bob Vc 
139 21 



11,675 16 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Balance from old account, . 
Receipts for sewer licenses. 
Appropriation, . . . . 
D. H. Young, for pipe, 
John Stanton, overdraft, . 
Reserved fund, balance account, 



Paid I. C. Flanders, Sup't, . . $114 00 
I. C. Flanders, for use of horse, 

and wagon, . . . . 22 50 

P. & W. Sargent, brick, . . 672 00 

Simeon Flint, drain pipe, . 1,376 51 



Dr. 



$979 


36 


1,023 


00 


L0,000 


00 


49 


40 


7 


88 


2,330 


88 




$14,390 52 



Cr. 



222 

Nashua Cement Pipe Works, 

for drain pipe, . . . 168 58 
Wm. McPherson, drain pipe, . 208 30 
Temple McQueston, " . 1,142 63 

David H. Young, " . 2,262 .47 

A. H. Lowell, castings, . , 600 42 
J. Hitchcock & Co., 3 traps, . 32 40 
D. C. Hutchinson, stone, . 4 00 

Highway District No. 2, plank, 24 621 
D. Wells, plank, . . .135 66 
A. C. Wallace, plank, . '. 16 29 
J. L. Smith, lumber, . . 20 40 

J. L. Smith, team work, . . 29 25 
Daniels & Co., tools, . . 48 77 
O. W. Merriam, for blacksmith 

work, ..... 9 05 

R. W. Flanders, for blacksmith 

work, 24 55 

J. M. Hunt & Co., for black- 
smith work, . . . . 9 15 
Hunt & Lowell, for blacksmith 

work, ..... 1 60 

Lamson & Harden, sharpening 

tools, 

A. Dinsmore, for lumber, . 
John B. Yarick, for iron, . 
John B. McCrillis & Son, for re- 
pairing tools, 
Henry S. Whitney, for pipe, 
Eben Ferren, " 

Hilas Dickey, for brick, . 
Geo. W. Thayer & Son, for rub- 
ber boots, .... 
Shelters & Lewis, rubber boots, 
Geo. W. Dodge, " 



16 


11 


20 


69 


5 


58 


30 


10 


42 


76 


2 


40 


7 


00 


6 


00 


3 


00 


2 50 



223 



Paid Plumer, Chandler & Co., 


for 




oil suit, 


. 


7 75 


David Thayer, for posts, . 


. 


1 00 


Drake & Carpenter, for cement. 


112 90 


fl. & H. R. Pettee, " 


, 


60 05 


J. S. Kidder & Co., " 


, 


152 80 


J. M. Chandler & Co., for oil. 




powder and fuse, . 




28 36 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., for wood. 


2 75 


Ellis & Patterson, for engineer's 




services, 




196 03 


T. M. Conant, teamster, . 




7 00 


A. B. Cushing, " 




8 00 


•John Cushing, " 




10 11 


Augustus Roby, " 




14 26 


City teams, " 




122 63 


N. B. Abbott, for labor, 




76 50 


Wm. Anderson, " 




60 02 


Patrick Austin, " 




5 63 


Richard Allen, " 




10 88 


James Appleton, " 




1 50 


James Broderick, " 




3 38 


Patrick Butler, " 




63 76 


Michael Buckley, " 




49 88 


George W. Butterfield, tear 


Qster 


4 50 


Michael Baker, for labor. 




6 75 


Geo. H. Brown, " 




4 50 


Wm. Burke, " 




24 38 


Michael Broderick, " 




4 50 


Edward Burns, " 




25 13 


Andrew Britton, " 




80 38 


Charles Brown, " 




5 52 


Jerry Bresnahan, " 


• 


6 75 


Robert Barrett, " 




26 63 


Concord R. R., freight on 


brict 





224 



and pipe, 




475 56- 


James M. Crombie, 


for labor, 


23 13 


J. A. Caverly, for trucking pipe 


4 m 


Orrin Carlton, ' 


( a 


78 50 


Jerry Connor, for labor, 


21 39 


Timo. Connor, 


u 


« 25 


Joseph Comfort, 


a 


71 26 


Thomas Carrigan, 


,u 


3 38 


Joseph Comfort, Jr. 




6 38 


John Callahan, 


a 


13 51 


Harry Clark, 


u 


5 25 


Charles Cheney, 


a 


4 51 


Thomas Costello, 


a ' 


33 76 


Patrick Campbell, 


a 


12 75 


James Connelly, 


a 


13 88 


Martin Clark, 


a 


85 26 


Dennis Cornelia, 


a 


7 88 


Con. Credon, 


u 


17 63 


Wm. Connor, 


(C 


6 75 


Peter Connor, 


a 


4 50 


Wm. Connelly, 


u 


1 50 


Bart. Connor, 


a 


5 63 


John Cronan, 


a 


42 39 


Patrick Crosby, 


C( 


16 69 


Patrick Crosby, 2d. 


li 


14 63 


Edward Carr, 


u 


3 75 


Wm. Connor, 


u 


13 13 


Dennis Connor, 


a 


5 25 


Anthony Crosby, 


u 


37 14 


Patrick Cooney, 


a 


13 88 


Patrick Connor, 


i.i 


7 50 


J. County, 


u 


'7 13 


John Coucannon, 


a 


3 00 


Martin Campbell, 


a 


30 38 


Jerry CuUity, 


u 


1 13 



225 



Lawrence M. Connor 


, for lab or J 


75 


Wm. Conway, 








23 63 


Hugh Cunningham, 






2 63 


John Clary, 








2 63 


John Connelly, 








1 50 


James Cahill, 








,2 25 


Patrick Cumming 


3, 






3 75 


Charles Crombie, 








5 25 


Bart. Doyle, 








51 75 


Henry Duncan, 








6 00 


John Dyer, 








23 26 


Noah Downs, 








27 76 


Patrick Dwyer, 








36 75 


John Dowd, 








6 75 


A. W. Dickey, 








8 00 


A. W. cfe A. Dickey, 






13 00 


Timothy Daley, for labor, 


27 38 


William Dunn, 


ii 


. 


75 


Patrick Doyle, 


a 






27 38 


Edward Doyle, 


a 






6 75 


Timothy Dwyer, 


a 






33 38 


Michael Daley, 


u 






3 00 


Jerry Donnovan, 


u 






1 88 


John Evers, 


u 






16 13 


John Edwards, 


n 






5 25 


Webster Eaton, 


a 






1 13 


Patrick Finn, 


it 






. 339 89 


John Fennof, 


u 






. 168 75 


James Fleming, 


a 




• 


44 26 


James Fleming, ^ 


r-, 


labor 


> 


43 88 


Martin J. Foley, 




(( 


13 56 


Lawrence Foley, 




u 


41 64 


Patrick Flynn, 




u 


11 63 


David Finn, 




(( 


16 13 


Michael Foley, 

15 




u 




5 25 



226 



Paid Michael Fitzgerald, 


for labor, 


67 89 


James A. Flanders, 


a 


18 87 


William Frain, 


a 


26 63 


David Flyiin, 


a 


2 25 


Morris Fitzgerald, 


a 


4 50 


Fogg & James, for 


horse anc 




wagon, 


. 


3 50 


Alplieus Gay, . 


. 


1 75 


Patrick Grogan, fo 


r labor. 


52 14 


Peter Griffin, 


a 


33 38 


Joseph Gaggin, 


a 


6 00 


Daniel Green, 


(( 


11 63 


Edmund Gorman, 


u 


7 50 


Thomas Howe, 


u 


226 13 


William Haley, 


a 


10 13 


Michael Haley, 


u 


60 38 


Michael Hayes, 


(( 


2 63 


Thomas Hefron, 


a 


22 28 


Mark E. Harvey, 


<; 


15 75 


Patrick Harmon, 


(( 


14 63 


Martin Hines, 


u 


2 25 


M. J. Haley, 


(( 


23 25 


James Jennings, 


cc 


49 13 


David Joy, 


(( 


41 26 


John Joyce, 


(( 


53 26 


Patrick Kelley, 


u 


62 27 


John Kenney, 


a ■ 


7 50 


Daniel Keefe, 


a 


35 64 


Frank P. Kimball, 


a 


20 50 


Thomas Kelley, 


a 


31 88 


Wm. H. Kennedy, 


a 


37 50 


Patrick Kennedy, 


a 


1 50 


James Kelley, 


a 


27 38 


James Lyons, 


a 


242 76 


William Lane, 


a 


40 6S 



227 



Paid Barney Looney, for labor, 


30 75 


John Lynch, 


u 


23 25 


George Lattimer, 


a 


11 06 


Paul Lenneville, 


a 


24 75 


John Mahoney, 


a 


409 88 


William Maxwell, 


li 


119 32 


Joseph K. Mitchell, 


a 


2 50 


Jerry Mahoney, 


<( 


98 82 


Murtagh Mahoney, 


a 


39 01 


Lawrence McCarty, 


a 


6 38 


William Murphy, 


a 


74 64 


Garret Murray, 


a 


44 26 


Bart. Moriarty, 


a 


111 94 


George S. McKean, 


li 


67 50 


Michael Morrissey, 


a 


4 50 


Peter Mclntire, 


a 


6 00 


Michael Madden, 


a 


16 13 


John Mullen, 


a 


32 26 


Michael Murphy, 


u 


6 00 


Thomas McGrath, 


u 


32 68 


James Moran, 


a 


5 25 


Nathaniel Manning, 


a 


2 25 


Thomas Moran, 


u 


18 75 


John McCabe, 


a 


4 50 


Michael McGrath, 


a 


39 88 


Charles Moore, 


a 


3 00 


Andrew McCook, 


a 


19 13 


James McGrath, 


a 


27 38 


William McCann, 


u 


30 38 


John Murray, 


u 


27 38 


Mark Minturn, 


u 


27 38 


Augustus Merrill, 


a 


3 75 


Patrick Moran, 


a 


1 50 


Jerry Murphy, 


a 


2 25 


John Nolan, 


(( 


27 38 



228 



Paid Charles Newry, for labor, 


6 00 


Samuel Neil, 


a 


5 25 


William O'Neil, 


(( 


105 76 


Daniel O'Leary, 


a 


25 88 


Bart. O'Connor, 


li 


4 50 


Patrick T. O'Connor, 


a 


1 50 


William O'Brien, 


n 


6 00' 


Lewis Plant, 


u 


1 50 


John Punch, 


ii 


12 76 


S. W. Page, 


ii 


10 13 


Matthew Pettigrew, 


li 


21 88 


Eli Perry, 


n 


1 50 


John Prindable, 


ii 


7 50 


Thomas Preston, 


a 


2 25 


Edwin Quimby, 


it 


31 13 


Jerry Quinley, 


(( 


8 63 


Timo. Quinn, 


li 


23 63 


Peter Reynolds, 


a 


87 39 


Michael Regan, 


ii 


29 25 


John Reardon, 


ii 


55 89 


Augustus Roby, 


it 


61 60 


Timo. Riley, 


u 


9 38 


Roda Robinson, 


ii 


1 50 


Jerry Regan, 


ii 


27 38 


James Ryan, 


a 


3 00 


Peter Scanlan, 


a 


65 88 


Daniel Sullivan, 


a 


15 35 


Loami Searles, 


a 


31 75 


Alec Shine, 


ii 


129 76 


Patrick Sheehan, 


a 


53 26 


Morris Salmon, 


a 


24 76 


John Sullivan, 


(( 


6 75 


Dennis Sullivan, 


(C 


25 13, 


John Stanton, 


a 


27 39 


William S. Smith, 


u 


22 13 



229 



Michael Sheehan, foi 


f labor, . 


41 36 


Henry Smith, 


u 


14 63 


Stephen Spane, 


a 


26 25 


William Snow, 


a 


5 25 


Louis St. John, 


ii 


6 75 


Maurice Sheehan, 


(( 


7 50 


Moses W. Sargent, 


a 


48 00 


James Silk, 


a 


1 88 


Patrick Sullivan, 


n 


4 50 


M. M. Sawyer, 


a 


5 25 


Edward Scribner, 


n 


3 00 


Israel Shepherd, 


a 


1 50 


Jerry Sheehan, 


li 


27 38 


Timo. Sullivan, 


a 


41 00 


Edward Stanton, 


a 


29 25 


Quinlan Sullivan, 


n 


6 38 


G. A. Tufts, 


a 


2 25 


John Tiernan, . 


(C 


30 01 


Festus Thornton, 


it 


3 75 


John Welch, 


ii 


38 25 


Patrick Williams, 


u 


34 15 


Charles E. Worthen, 


11 


65 50 


William A. Welch, 


li 


5 50 


Christopher Wass, 


(( 


7 50 


Edward Young, 


(( 


1 50 


RESERVOIRS 


5. 



To balance from old account, 

Paid Daniels & Co., for lock, 
A. H. Lowell, repairs. 



114,390 52 

Dr. 

$842 10 
Cr. 



m 87 

10 16 



230 



Paid Patrick Finn, for care of reser- 
voirs, ..... 

Amount, .... 
Balance to new account, 



50 00 



161 03 
781 07 



1842 lO- 



COMMONS. 






Dr. 


To balance from old account, . 






$1,357 81 
Or. 


Paid Sullivan Brothers, . 


$3 


30 




Michael Buckley, for labor. 


3 


00 


' 


Charles Brown, " 


1 


13 




John Gushing, " 


4 


33 




Wm. O'Neil,' • " 


3 


00 




Edwin Quimby, " 


3 


00 




Peter Reynolds, " 


3 


00 




Alec Shine, « 


3 


00 




James Ryan, " 


3 


00 




A. Dinsmore, for lumber. 


10 


66 




A. H. Lowell, repairs of settees 


21 


69 




James Jennings, for labor, 


1 


60 




John Lynch, " 


2 


25 




D. H. Dickey, " 


6 


75 




Charles Cheney, " 


11 


25 




Nathaniel Manning, " 


20 


38 




J. M. Dickey, " 


11 


25 




Patrick Finn, " 


10 


00 




William Maxwell, " 


9 


00 




Peter Scanlan, " 


7 


00 




Jerry Mahoney, " 


7 


00 




Geo. W. Butterfield, " 


2 


oa 





231 



Paid John L. Kennedy, 


for painting 


seats, . 


. 


17 51 


D. Haley, for laboi 


? • 


19 00 


E. A. G^ Holmes, 


for repairing 




fence, . 


• 


22 00 


City teams, for work, 


7 92 


James Brothers, for team, 


2 00 


Daniels & Co., . 


, 


1 85 


N. B. Abbott, 


for labor, 


4 00 


' Bart. Doyle, 


a 


3 00 


James Flemming, 


a 


2 25 


James Flemming, 


Jr., " 


•3 00 


John Larkin, 


a 


3 00 


Augustus Merrill, 


(( 


5 25 


J. B. Varick, for n 


ails. 


81 


Wm. H. Kennedy, 


for labor. 


9 50 


James Callahan, 


(( 


2 63 


Wm. Kennedy, 


a 


1 13 


Frank P. Kimball, 


li 


3 00 


Moses W. Sargent, 


a 


2 44 


Murtagh Mahoney, 


a 


5 63 


Augustus Roby, 


a 


92 


Robert Waldron, for laying pipe, 


12 50 


S. C. Forsaith, & 


Co., for pipe 




and labor. 


. 


90 60 


Alexander Stewart 


, for labor, 


1 50 


Frank Everett, 


u 


3 00 


Lawrence Foley, 


(( 


5 63 


Geo. S. McKean, 


a 


■ 9 00 


Thomas Kelley, 


ii 


3 00 


Michael McGrath, 


n 


1 50 


John Callahan, . 


u 


3 75 


Wm. Doland, 


4; 


3 75 


Geo. A. Tufts, 


(( 


7 88 


James Emerson, 


u 


9 m 



232 



Paid J. B. Pierce, for labor, 

J. Q. A. Sargent, for laying ser- 



9 00 



vice pipe for fountains, . 


72 51 


John Concannon, 


for labor, . 


1 50 


John Punch, 


.(( 


1 50 


Dennis Sullivan, 


« 


5 25 


Patrick Grogan, 


a 


6 00 


Anthony Crosby, 


a 


3 00 


Jerry Bresnahan, 


it 


75 


John Cronan, 


a 


2 25 


Geo. W. Gilbert, 


(C 


1 50 


Joseph Corafoft, 


a 


3 00 


Mark E. Harvey, 


a 


.4 50 


Timo. Sullivan, 


a 


1 00 


Patrick Flynn, 


(C 


6 00 


4-. Wells, 


(C 


5 63 


John Mullen, 


(( 


14 50 


Noah Downs, 


Cl 


5 25 


Loami Searles, 


iC 


38 


Bart. Moriarty, 


<( 


4 88 


Festus Thornton, 


4C 


1 50 


Hackett & Fisher, 


for concrete 




walks on Concord Square, 


190 55 


Joseph B. Sawyer, 


for engineer's 




services, 


. 


7 00 


Wm. Connor, 


for labor. 


5 25 


John Dwyer, 


u 


6 00 


John Joyce, 


(( 


6 00 


Daniel Keefe, 


a 


4 88 


Lawrence McCarty, " 


5 25 


Jerry Connor, 


a 


5 25 


John Larkin, 


(( 


. , 5 25 


Jerry Murphy, 


(( 


5 25 


Barney Farcy, 


(( 


3 75 


Charles E.'Worthen, " 


3 00 



233 



Paid Daniel Collins, for labor, 


3 75 




John Fitzsimmons, " 


3 75 




Wm, Anderson, " 


75 




John Prindable, " 


7 50 




Amount, .... 


$825 62 




Balance to new account, 


532 29 


$1,357 81 


" VALLEY." 




Dr. 


To balance from old account, . 


$433 72 




Appropriation, . . . . 


2,000 00 




Keceipts for tomb fees, 


59 00 




Receipts for lots sold. 


45 06 




Reserve fund, (transferred), 


1,000 00 


$3,537 78 










Cr. 



By paid J. F. James, salary as trea- 
surer of committee, . . $10 00 

Lamson & Harden, for drilling 

for fence, . . . . 39 00 

A. H. Lowell, for iron fence, . 1,163 55 

A. Bodwell & Co., for stone base 

to fence, .... 1,273 71 

A. Bodwell & Co., for drilling 

for fence, . . . . 18 00 

Joseph L. Smith, for lumber, . 1 10 

George Holbrook, for repairing 
fence, 77 50 

Geo. W. Stevens, for engineer's 

services, . . . . 80 00 

Warren Harvey, for gravel, . 29 00 



234 



Paid Daniels &, Co., for tools, . 
Daniels & Co., for pump, . 
Pike & Heald, for water pots, 
Benjamin Stevens, for labor, 



David Alden, 
Dennis Sullivan, 
A. T. Stearns, 
Michael Tooney, 

John Gushing, " 

Timothy Sullivan, " 

Patrick Butler, " 

William Murphy, " 

Joseph Comfort, " 

John Callahan, " 

Thomas Carrigan, " 

William Healey, " 

Timothy Quinn, " 

Thomas Kelley, " 

Peter Griffin, " 

Jere. Regan, " 

Michael McGrath, " 

J. B. Pierce, " 
Geo. W. Butterfield, " 

City Teams, " 



for labor, 



3 63 
17 67 

3 36 

115 00 

355 50 

10 87 

6 00 

9 00 

3 83 

4 

5 

5 

5 

4 

4 



00 
25 
25 
25 
50 
50 
6 00 
2 63 

2 63 

6 00 

3 33 
3 00 

15 75 
2 00 

7 56 



Amount, . 

Balance to new account 


$3,294 37 
. 243 41 






PINE GROYE 

To balance from old account, 
Receipt for lumber sold, 
wood sold, 
lots sold. 


CEMETERY. 

11,032 85 
. 465 39 
. 106 45 
. 1,718 05 



5,537 78 



Dr. 



5,322 74 



235 



Paid Jacob F. James, salary as treas- 
urer of committee, . . $25 00 

Jacob F. James, for surveying 
and cash paid, 

William C. Chase, for labor, 

Albert B. Chase, " .. 

Archibald Mclndoe, " . 

A. M. Carswell, lot, 

B. F. Mitchell, breaking out 
paths, .... 

Daniels & Co., tools, 

C. F. Peasley, printing blanks, 
A. Bodwell & Co., 58 stone posts, 
J. L. Kennedy, lettering stakes, 
Thomas A. Lane, work on water- 

pipe, 

John Prince, shade trees, 

Geo. Holbrook, work and lum- 
ber, ..... 

A Dinsmore, lumber, 

A. H. Lowell, iron fence, 

Fogg & James, team, 



Amount, 

Balance to new account. 



Or. 



72 


00 


592 


92 


238 


75 


105 


00 


5 


25 


10 


00 


7 


27 


5 


00 


156 


00 


3 


95 


14 


88 


15 


40 


2-4 


40 


10 


24 


1,297 


00 


4 


00 


!2,587 


06 


735 


68 




■ - 13,322 74 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To balance from old account, . . |881 17 
Appropriation, .... 12,500 00 
Overdraft, . . . . 13 00 

Receipt for old hose sold, . . 1 00 



Dr. 



236 



To receipt for table sold, 

coal sold to water-works, 



15 00 

20 00 



,430 17 



EXPENDITUEES. 



Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Company No. 1. 



Paid Geo. R. Simmons, 
C. Myron Morse, 
Horace Nichols, 
Sam C. Lowell, 
James R. Carr, 
Geo. W. Butterfield, 
John D. Linus, 
Frank E. Stearns, 
J. T. Underhill, 
J. A. Barker, . 
H. H. Glines, . 
E. H. Currier, 
A. D. Scovill, . 
W. H. Stearns, 
Printing, 

Geo. R. Simmons, driver, 
Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, 
John B. Yarick, for axe handles, 

spirits, broom, etc., 
J. M. Chandler & Co., for oil, 

matches and spirits, 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., for coal 

and wood, . . . . 
E. P. Johnson & Co., for coal 

and wood, . . . . 
Warren Harvey, for wood, 
Messrs. Burbank, " 



165 00 
60 00 

105 00 
75 00 
60 00 

110 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 

25 00 
10 00 

26 50. 
45 09' 

3 90 



6 


10 


64 


68 


56 


31 


5 


50 


15 


00 



Cr. 



237 



Paid C. R. Foss, measuring wood, . 


17 


Ed. Bresnahan, sawing wood, . 


10 30 


Jolin Gushing, carrying in fuel. 


83 


Sullivan Bros., exchange on 




stove, 


25 00 


Pike & He aid, repairing torch 




and lantern, .... 


75 


Daniels & Co., hose, rivets and 




spirits. 


11 46 


Hunt & Lowell, for repairs, 


8 50 


George C. Hoitt, blank book, . 


3 75 


A. W. Sanborn, repairs, . 


1 50 


Amoskeag Manf. Co., repairs, . 


33 75 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., tripod, 


1 75 



,280 84 



Mre King Steam Fire Engine Co., No. 2. 



Paid James F. Pherson, 






65 00 


C. A. Swain, . 




30 00 


A. M. Kenniston, 






60 00 


D. W. Morse, . 






105 00 


C. F. Hall, 






75 00 


G. W. Cheney, 






50 00 


F. W. McKinley, . 






50 00 


Augustus Merrill, 






45 83 


W. B. Heath, 






60 00 


A. H. Sanborn, 






bb 00 


S. Frank Head, 






50 00 


C. H. Manly, 






50 00 


Albert Merrill, 






50 00 


F. A. Pherson, 






50 00 


J. W. Batchelder, 






4 17 


T. M. Conant, 






55 00 


H. L. Miller, 






25 00 



238 



Paid for printing, . , . 

Manchester Gas Light Co., for 

gas, 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., for coal and 

wood, ..... 
E. P. Johnson & Co., for coal 

and wood, . - . . 
Messrs. Burbank, for wood, 
Warren Harvey, for wood, 
C. R. Foss, for measuring wood, 
Ed. Bresnahan, for sawing wood 

and carrying in fuel, 
John Cushing, carrying in coal, 
A. W. Sanborn, for repairs, 
M. Y. B. Kinne, for repairing 

chairs, ..... 
Hunt & Lowell, repairing chairs, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany, for repairs, . 
T. M. Conant, for crash, . 
J. M. Chandler & Co., soap and 

matches, 
T. L. Thorpe, for waste, . 
Daniels & Co., duster, hose, etc 
Pike & Heald, for exchange on 

stove, .... 
Pike & Heald, repairs of grate 

pipes, etc., . 
J. B. Varick, for oil, 
H. C. ^Merrill, for oil, matches 

and soap. 
Cairns & Brother, for hats, 
H. A. Winship, for hats, . 
Samuel Eastman & Co., for hose. 



10 00 

75 33 

64 31 

150 81 

15 00 

5 60 

17 

12 30 
83 

1 50 

2 50 

3 25 

43 82 
3 50 

2 10 
18 00 
17 69 

27 21 



5 


55 


5 


63 


4 


10 


45 


40 


6 


00 


4 


00 



.,394 50 



239 



E. W. Sarrington Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 3. 



id John Patterson, 


165 00 


Horatio Fradd, 


70 00 


Wm. Doran, 


. 220 00 


John R. Young, 


75 00 


B. K. Parker, . 


50 00 


John Dinsmore, 


60 00 


Joseph Schofield, 


50 00 


Geo. D. Lear, . 


50 00 


Andrew C. Wallace, jr., . 


50 00 


Edward Young, 


50 00 


Eugene Smith, 


4 12 


John Gildard, . 


8 25 


John McDerby, 


45 88 


R. G. Manning, 


41 75 


D. Breed, 


25 00 


Charles O'Shaughnessy, . 


25 00 


Printing, 


10 00 


Manchester Gas Light Co., gas 


12 15 


Warren Harvey, wood, 


4 00 


Isaac R. Dewey, " 


3 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co., wood anc 




coal, .... 


177 60 


H. Fradd & Co., wood, oil, etc. 


15 45 


A. C. Wallace, wood. 


7 50 


A. C. Wallace, team 1 year, 


175 00 


E. A. Moulton, oil, . 


63 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., repairs. 


24 58 


Amoskeag Manf. Co., " 


22 49 


James P. Walker, . 


1 80 


A. P. Frye, repairs, . 


3 00 


Parker & Gordon, chairs. 


25 20 


J. B. Yarick, rubber hose, 


5 25 


H. A. Winship, hats. 


12 00 



240 



Paid Henrj C. Rano, belts, 



9 80 



.,389 45 



iV. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 4. 



id W. n. Vickery, 


165 00 


E. S. Whitney, 


60 00 


E. A. Waldron, 


60 00 


A. D. Colby, .... 


105 00 . 


E. E. Sanborn, 


75 00 


A. B. Gushing, 


110 00 


W. R. Hatch, .... 


8 34 


T. F. Dodge, .... 


50 00 


C. E. Ham, .... 


50 00 


G. C. Hoyt, . . 


50 00 


D. M. Rowe, . . . " . 


50 00 


J. Gushing, .... 


50 00 


E. G. Abbott, .... 


50 00 


C. H. Barrett, .... 


50 00 


Fred S. Bean, .... 


41 66 


Printing, .... 


10 00 


Manchester Gas Light Go., for 




gas, 


85 56 


E. P. Johnson & Go., for wood 




and coal, .... 


136 33 ' 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., for wood 




and coal, .... 


31 95 


Warren Harvey, for wood, 


5 50 


Messrs. Burbank, for wood, 


15 00 


C. R. Foss, for measuring wood, 


17 


Ed. Bresnahan, for sawing wood 




and carrying in fuel, 


11 30 


John Gushing, for carrying in 




coal, . . . ." . 


84 


Pike & Heald, repairing stoves, 


7 42 



241 



Paid Sullivan Brothers, for repairing 
stoves, 

Edwin Kennedy, for overalls, . 

Edwin Branch, for whip, pole- 
straps, etc., .... 

Daniels & Co., for ladder, hose, 
etc., 

Hunt & Lowell, for chains, 

Amoskeag IVfanufacturing Com- 
pany, for repairs, . 

John B. Varick, for duster, oil, 
spirits, etc., .... 

Gutta Percha Rubber Manufac- 
turing Co., for hose, 

J. M. Chandler & Co., for 
matches and line, . 

T. L. Thorp, for waste, 

Geo. Holbrook, for repairs, 



10 25 

2 00 

12 00 



8 


55 


3 


00 


21 


13 


8 


28 


25 


49 


2 


13 


24 


00 




75 



$1,296 65 



Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 



paid George W. Bacon, 


. 165 00 


Henry L. Miller, 


35 00 


John N. Chase, 


29 17 


Geo. E. Glines, 


60 00 


H. P. Young, 


50 00 


Charles Canfield, 


60 00 


22 men for six months' se 


rvice, 550 00 


23 " " " " 


" . 575 00 


Ed. A. Benton, 


16 64 


Jesse B. Kinne, 


16 64 


Lucerne R. Ham, 


20 83 


Charles H. Cross, 


12 50 


Augustus J. Robie, . 

16 


29 16 



242 



Paid Sanborn Worthen, . 
T. H. Pike, . 
Charles L. Brown, . 
George W. Paige, . 
Fred. French, 
Printing, .... 
Manchester Gas Light Co., for 

gas, .... 
Sullivan Brothers, for repairing 

stove, .... 
Pike & Heald, repairing stove 

and pipe. 
Hunt & Lowell, for repairs, 
French Brothers, " 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., " 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Com 

pany, for repairs, . 
George Holbrook, for repairs, 
Daniels & Co., for shovel, pail 

and brooms, . 
Edwin Kennedy, for 3 prs. over 

alls, .... 
H. C. Merrill, for soap, . 
Edwin Branch, for straps and 

repairs, 
John B. Varrick, for'oil, . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., for wood 
Messrs. Burbank, " 

Warren Harvey, " 

C. R. Foss, for measuring wood, 
Ed. Bresnahan, for sawing and 

carrying in wood, . 



12 50 

8 33 



4 


17 


4 


17 


20 


00 


• 32 


13 


2 


25 


5 


92 


79 


30 


5 


30 


8 


42 


4 


00 


15 


30 



3 62 



3 


00 




37 


21 


10 


1 


13 


16 


00 


15 


00 


5 


50 




17 


11 


30 



243 




Pennacook Hose Co 


No.l. 


^j paid Thomas W. Lane, 




65 00 


Charles B. French, . 




60 00 


Will. R. Sawyer, 




60 00 


John M. Plaisted, 




. 5'87 50 


Albert Maxfield, 




50 00 


Joseph E. Merrill, . 




50 00 


Henry S. Brown, 




50 00 


Bradley B. Aldrich, 




50 00 


George H. Porter, . 




50 00 


Wm. G. Chase, 




50 00 


Lyman M. Aldrich, . 




50 00 


Angus Gibson, 




50 00 


■James G. Knight, 




5 75 


Daniel H. Maxfield, . 




5 75 


Aaron J. Coburn, 




5 75 


Thorndike P. Heath, 




5 75 


Olarence D. Palmer, 




21 00 


Walter L. Blenus, . 




21 00 


Addison Brown, 




5 75 


Wm. H. Cassidy, 




. 5 75 


Herbert M. Moody, . 




15 25 


Printing, . . ... 




10 00 


Manchester Gas Light Cc 


)., for 




gas, .... 




35 93 


J. M. Plaisted, for 1 pr. s 


leets. 


3 77 


Pike & Heald, for stove 


and 




matches, 


. 


19 90 


S. H. Bradley, for bed anc 


ibed- 




ding, .... 


. 


16 00 


Hunt k Low^ell, for body foi 


■ sled. 


62 00 


Edwin Branch, for harnes 


s and 




blanket, 


. 


92 75 


Edwin Branch, for repai 


rs of 




harness. 


. 


38 20 



244 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Com 

pany. for repairs, . 
H. C. Merrill, for brooms and 

matches, . . . 
E. Kennedy, for 6 prs. overalls, 
J. M. Chandler & Co., for soap, 

brooms and oil, . 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., repairs, . 
Wilberforce Ireland, for repairs, 
James Boyd & Sons, 4 discharge 

pipes 

James Boyd & Sons, repairing 

blunderbuss, 
James Brothers, for team, 
L.- B, Bodwell & Co., for wood, 
Warren Hafvey, " 

Messrs. Burl)auk, " 

C. R. Foss, measuring wood, 
Ed. Bresnahan, sawing and car- 
rying in wood, 
John A. Barker, driver, . 
Daniels & Co., whip, duster, 

brush and hose, ... 



128 90' 



2 


15 


6 


OO 


3 


61 


20 


m 


17 


50 



48 00 



6 


00 


3 


OO 


17 


50 


5 


50 


15 


00 




17 


11 


30 


25 


00 


22 


74 



.11,875 



Massahesic Hose Company No. 2. 



By paid Henry W. Fisher, 


. $59 58 


Ephraim T. Hardy, 


55 00 


Parker W. Hannaford, 


55 00 


Charles Tiiompson, 


91 66 


Charles H. Robinson, 


45 83 


Henry J. Seaman, . 


45 83 


Charles E. C lough, . 


8 33 


George W. Goodwin, 


45 83 



245 



Paid Melville J. Jenkins, 


45 83 


John H. Boyd, 


45 83 


Edward S. Moore, . 


37 50 


John F. Seaward, . 


45 83 


Arthur B. Weeks, . 


37 50 


Walter Seaward, 


8 33 


Printinsf, .... 


10 00 


Manchester Gas Light Co., gas. 


3 78 


Hunt & Lowell, for straps. 


50 


James Boyd & Sons, for hose, . 


5 00 


D. Milton Goodwin, stove and 




pipe, 


69 00 


D. Milton Goodwin, for traverse 




runners, .... 


25 00 


George Holbrook, for setting up 




sink, 


1 25 


Randall Page, painting sign, 


25 00 


A. H. Page, engraving badges, 


30 00 


Edwin Kennedy, coats and over- 




alls, ..... 


154 00 


Edwin Branch, belts and repairs. 


24 15 


Daniels & Co., wheel-jack, step- 




ladder, &c., .... 


20 69 


Yickery & Stevens, keys, . 


5 25 


John B. Varick, brush, broom. 




&c., 


1 75 


H. A. Winship, hats. 


73 00 


C. A. Hardy, use of horse. 


8 00 


Hackett & Fisher, laying con- 




crete, 


120 67 


J. Q. A. Sargent, for piping for 




water, 


54 60 


A. Dinsmore, lumber. 


9 55 


D. A. Simons, furniture, . 


42 34 


Pike & Heald, lining tank. 


38 84 



246 

t 

Paid A. W. Sanborn, repairs, . 
H. G. Merrill, soap, 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood, 



9 


00 




48 


39 


34 



.,405 or 



Gaffe's Falls Hose House. 
By paid James Boyd & Sons, hose, $222 OO 

Engineers'' Department and Miscellaneous. 

By paid John B. Clarke, printing 

cards, . \ 
Hill & Co., express. 
Concord R. R. Co., freight, 
Z. Foster Campbell, for arnica, 
Samuel Eastman & Co., hose, 
Manchester Water Works, water, 
L. B. Bodwell k Co., coal, 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing 

extra copies of Report, 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing 

cards and slips, . 
Larkin Sargent, repairing chim- 

nies of Mrs. Mannahan, on 

house, .... 
Charles Williams, jr., 
Daniels & Co., oil cask, rubber 

packing, &c., 
Timothy Cronan, for splitting 

and carrying in wood, . 
Albert J. Crosby, for trucking 

hose, 

Dennis Sullivan, for trucking 

hose, 



51 


75 




25 


5 


74 


1 


00 


24 


50 


57 


76 


8 


00 


30 


00 


14 


50 


1 


85 


3 


OO 


11 


73 


3 


75" 


1 


50 


1 


50 



247 



Paid Ed. Bresnaban, for carrying in 

coal, .... 
Hunt & Lowell, for repairing sup 

ply wagon, . 
James K. Stevens, for wood at 

fire, .... 
George R. Simmons, for repair 

ing and oiling hose, 
M. D. Cole, for hose dressing, 
James Kearns, for driving sup 

ply wagon, . 
Thomas Mahony, helper, . 
Arthur Dinsmore, for use of 209 

feet of plank, at fire, 
A. H. Lowell, cash paid for ex 

press, .... 
A. H. Lowell, " salary. 

Chief Engineer, . 115 00 
Wilberforce Ireland, As- 
sistant Eng. and Cl'k. 90 00 
Benj. C. Kendall, Asst. 

Engineer, 
A. C. Wallace, Asst 

Engineer, 
Freeman Higgins, Asst. 

Engineer, . . 65 00 



65 00 



65 00 



5 00 
13 25 

3 00 

23 25 
110 U 

5 00 
10 00 

2 09 

10 60 



1400 00 



m 46 



RECAPITULATION. 



Paid Amoskeag No. 1, . 
Fire King " 2, . 
E.W. Harrington No. 3, 
N. S. Bean, No. 4, 
Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1, 



^1,280 84 
1,394 50 
1,389 45 
1,296 65 
1,807 25 



248 

Paid Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, 
iNfassabesic " " " 2, 
Goffe's Falls Hose, . 
Miscellaneous, 

Amount, 

Transferred to city teams. 

Balance to new account. 



. 1,875 


53 


, 1,405 


07 


222 


00 


799 


46 


$11,470 75 


, 1,500 


00 


459 


42 




— 113,430 17 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

To balance from old account, . . $72 90 
Appropriation, .... 14,000 00 

Overdraft, .... 7 78 
Receipts of R. Rowell for costs 

and fees, .... 1,257 51 
Receipts of J. B. Mills for costs 

and fees 271 27 

Receipts of D. A. Simons, for costs 

and fines 2,810 48 

Reserved fund, balance account, 1,813 35 



Dr. 



$20,233 29 
Or. 



Paid J. Q. A. Sargent, gas burners, $1 45 
C. A. & F. 0. Higgins, for gas 

burners and globes, . . 2 50 

James Eastman, repairing cell, 6 00 
Cannoy & Wiley, chloride of 

Vniie, 3 25 

Mancliester Gas Light Co., gas, 418 25 

City Hall Bookstore, stationery, 11 42 



249 



Paid William H. Fisk, stationery, . 28 00 

A. Quimby, " . 80 

E. R. Coburn, " . 4 99 

Ryder & Blunt, " . 4 65 

Temple & Farrington," . 18 47 

Roland Rowell, dockets, . . ' 15 75 

T. H. Tuson, printing, . . 1 25 

C. F. Livingston, " . . 25 59 

C. F. Peasley, " . . 41 50 
Wm. E. Moore, " . . 70 00 
Moore & Peasley, " . . 130 00 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing, 270 10 
George 0. Hoitt, blank-books, . 9 50 
Charles R. Foss, wood, . . 2 00 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and 

coal, 174 24 

Dickey, Young & Co., wood and 

coal, 302 99 

H. C. Merrill, oil, ... 1 78 
Geo. E. Hall, comb and brush, . 1 30 
A. M. Eastman, matches, . 1 65 
Horace E. Stevens, pail and can- 
dles, 1 70 

Stearns & Farmer, for oil and 

matches, . . . . 2 79 

Daniels & Co., oil, . . . 21 15 
Sullivan Bros., repairing and 

putting up stoves, . . 12 85 
Manchester Steam Laundry, 

washing, .... 4 00 

Pike & Heald, repairing pipe, . 7 20 

Sanborn & Hovey, dippers, . 1 17 

E. A. G. Holmes, repairs, . 14 97 

D. A. Simons, repairing bed- 
ding, . . . . . " 17 00 



1 


00 


3 


50 


19 


70 


5 


00 


2 


00 


33 


00 


s, . 25 


88 



250 

Paid D. A. Simons, furniture, . . 23 00 

Geo. C. Batchelder, hack to 
bring prisoner, 

Bridget Riley, cleaning, 

Hannah Perkins, " 

Phebe Butler, " 

Ellen Kerrin, " 

Kate Carroll, " 

Brigham & Pratt, crackers, 

R. J. P. Goodwin, medical at- 
tendance, . . . . 14 00 

Leonard French, medical atten- 
dance, . . . . • . 4 00 

George E. Hersey, medical at- 
tendance, .... 

A. C. Osgood, assigned counsel, 

James B. Straw, " " 

George A. Little, " " . 

Jonathan Smith, " " 

, D. P. &D. L. Perkins, assigned 
counsel, .... 

Samuel Upton, assigned counsel, 

James Brothers, team, 

Josepli W. Fellows, salary as jus- 
tice, 1874, . . . . 375 00 

Joseph W. Fellows, salary as jus- 
tice, 18r5, . . . . 630 00 

John P. Bartlett, salary as jus- 
tice, ...... 875 00 

Newton H. Wilson, salary as 

assistant justice, . . . 113 00 

N. P. Hunt, salary as assistant 
justice, . . . . 20 00 

Roland Rowell, salary as clerk, 104 00 

John B. Mills, " " " 162 50 



3 


00 


15 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


3 


00 


11 


75 



251 



Paid D. A. Simons, salary as marshal, 
" " for committing 

prisoners, . . .' . 
D. A. Simons, paid witness fees, 
D. R. Prescott, salary as assis- 
tant marshal, 
D. R. Prescott, provisions furn 

ished travelers, 
D. R. Prescott, cash paid for tele 

grams, etc., 
T. L. Quimby, Capt. of Watch 
H. H, Noyes, watchman, 
W. H. B.Newhall, " 
John C. Colburn, " 
Hiram Stearns, " 
Edward Bonner, " 
James Bucklin, " 
Timo. P. Shea, " 

Zadoc B. Wright, " 
Michael Pox, " 

Timo. Connor, " 

Hansom W. Bean, watchman, 
Eben Carr, " 

H. W. Longa, " 

George F. Laird, " 

William Esty, " 

Chas. W. Barker, for Police ser 

vices, . 
Dennis Dee, for Police services 
Chas. O'Shaughnessy, " 
G. B. Sanford, 
Peter Shiatt, " 

John Gorman, " 

James E. Bailey, " 

Emery P. Littlefield, '< 



950 00 

219 00 
49 73 

775 00 

143 21 



27 


18 


931 


25 


706 


50 


817 


69 


819 


02 


838 


13 


953 


46 


840 


39 


924 


74 


833 


61 


849 


38 


940 


52 


847 


13 


830 


26 


815 


64 


817 


33 


325 


13 


4 


50 


3 


38 


3 


38 


1 


13 


2 


25 


5 


63 


45 


00 


1 


13 



252 



id Henry Bennett, police services 


6-4 13 


David T. Burleigh, 


(( 


73 97 


Isaac R. Dewey, 


(( 


1 13 


John C. Head, 


(( 


1 13 


David Thayer, 


u 


. 122 76 


David Jackson, 


u 


5 63 


James G. Knight, 


(( 


52 42 


E. A. G. Holmes, 


li 


. . 20 26 


E. G. Woodman, 


ii 


1 13 


Henry 0. Hill, 


il. 


3 39 


Thomas Howe, 


il 


57 38 


Gideon Rochette, 


li 


15 76 


J. H. Carpenter, 


u 


2 25 


Jonathan E. Floyd, 


(( 


15 76 


Jacob Clark, 


li 


1 13 


Thomas W, Lane, 


a 


1 13 


Felix Bourgeois, 


a 


6 <6 


John N. Marshall, 


cc 


2 25 


John Waters, 


u 


12 39 


John B. Jenness, 


(( 


1 13 


Thomas Prain, 


u 


10 14 


S. F. Young, 


a 


4 50 


John McDonough, 


(( 


4 50 


Jere. Garvin, 


(( 


2 25 


C. Penigo, 


C( 


2 25 


J. S. Hardy, 


u 


3 38 


T. P. Heath, 


a 


4 51 


John Smith, 


a 


37 70 


H. H. Philbrick, 


a 


2 25 


David Alden, 


a 


121 50 


William Howe, 


(C 


2 25 


W. H. Emery, 


(( 


2 25 


Simon Dodge, 


" '. 


6 75 


John Parker, 


a 


4 51 


Austin Jenkins, 


li 


2 25 



253 



Paid J. I. Whittemore, police services, 5 


64 


Allie Ela, 


1 


18 


Samuel Clark, 




3 


39 


Samuel Gale, * 




11 


25 


Henry 0. Sullivan, 




1 


13 


Ephraim G. Hastings, 




1 


13 


Henry Hammond, * 




1 


13 


Edwin F. Carswell, 




4 


50 


Samuel L. Mitchell, 




■ 2 


25 


Thomas Lynch, 




88 


88 


Frank Groulx, 




1 


13 


Levi L. Aldrich, 




1 


13 


Hiram Ordway, 




2 


25 


Gilman L. Moore, 




2 


25 


Campbell Grison, 




1 


13 


Andrew J. Mayhew, 




2 


25 


Geo. W. Butterfield, ' 




1 


13 


Ransom W. Trickey, 




2 


25 


Albert Story, 




3 


3S 


Timo. Collins, 




3 


38 


Geo. W. Yarnum, ' 




1 


13 


Chas. Ciindeld, 


( 


2 


25 






iifi-^0 ^^R 2<> 




^^yjy^oo M%M 


SALARIES. 






Dr. 


To balance from old account, . . 1867 


19 


Appropriation, .... 10,000 


00 






.*1 ,987 1 (> 




•jrxu,oL» ( x«7 




Ck. 


By paid James A. Weston, Mayor, . 210 


41 


Alpheus Gay, " . 791 


67 


Jofc^epli E. lieiinett, Cit 


y Clerk, 


1,000 


00 



254 



Paid Henry R. Chamberlin, Treas- 
urer, . . . . 
S. B. Putnam, Clerk of Com 

mon Council, 
Roland Rowell, Clerk of Com 

mon Council, 
Wm. Stevens, Messenger, 
Timo. Clark, " 

John Hosley, Collector, 
J. F. Briggs, Solicitor, 
John P. Bartlett, Solicitor, 
Joseph G. Edgerly, Supt. Pub- 
lic Instruction, 
Josiah G. Dearborn, Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, 
Wm. W. Baker, Assessor, 

Wm. B. Johnson, " 
C. C. Colby, 

Nicholas Nichols, " 

Timothy Sullivan, " 
John C. Head, 

Joseph Bean, " 

John Cayzer, " 

Henry N. Hall, " 

James Hall, " 

Thomas Howe, " 

M. 0. Pearson, " 

Geo. H. Colby, " 

Thos. B. Brown, " 

Isaac Whittemore, " 

I. T. Webster, " 

M. P. Sheehan, " 

Albert Jackson, clerk for assess 
ors, .... 

J. Abbott, overseer of poor, 



. 1,000 


00 


L- 

21 


11 


I- 

. lU 


00 


. 171 


78 


. 428 


22 


. 1,000 


00 


50 


00 


16 


66 



1,050 00 

750 00 

482 00 

370 00 

679 00 

381 00 

271 00 

338 00 

105 00 

83 00 

66 00 

81 00 

69 00 

61 00 

45 00 

51 00 

42 00 

42 00 

42 00 

198 00 
6 20 



255 



W. H. Maxwell, overseer of 




poor, .... 


5 20 


M. B. George, overseer of poor. 


15 62 


E. Hartshorn, " " 


5 20 


John Hosley, moderator, 


3 00 


Albert Jackson, " 


3 00 


John N. Bruce, " 


3 00 


Clark Hadley, " 


3 00 


Geo. H. Dudley, " 


3 00 


James F. Pherson, " 


3 00 


Hiram Stearns, " 


3 00 


Chas. H. Osgood, " 


3 00 


Daniel F. Healey, " 


3 00 


Israel 0. Endicott, ward clerk 


5 00 


Daniel W. Lane, " 


5 00 


Martin J. Foley, " 


5 00 


Wm. N. Johnson, " 


5 00 


Oscar G. Farmer, " 


5 00 


David L. Perkins, " 


5 00 


Andrew J. Dow, " 


5 00 


Daniel R, Prescott, " 


5 00 


S. C. Clatur, 


5 00 


George I. Ayer, " 


5 00 


Clarence B. Page, selectman. 


5 00 


Michael Kane, ' 




5 00 


Daniel F. Healey, ' 


' 


5 00 


B. P. Burpee, ' 




5 00 


Thomas Howe, ' 




5 00 


Charles W. Clement, ' 




5 00 


George H. Dodge, ' 




5 00 


John W. Dickey, ' 




5 00 


Henry A. Gage, " 




5 00 


William W. Baker, ' 




5 00 


Francis Moffitt, ' 




o 00 


Henry F. Morse, ' 


[ 


5 00 



256 



Paid Geo. P. James, selectman, 
W. H. Vickery, 
N. T. Polsom, 
F. W. McKinley, " 
H. H. Dickey, 
B. S. Nichols, 


5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 


00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 


Willis P. Fogg, " 
R. J. Lmid, " 


5 

5 


00 
00 


Gustavus M. Sanborn, '' 


5 


00 


Horace Gordon, " 


6 


00 


Amount, ... 
Balance to new account, 


110,118 
. 749 


07 
12 
ilO 867 19 






^^^ \]y A.v»w»^i J.*.^ 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



To balance from old account, . 
Appropriation, . 
Reserved fund, balance account, 



Paid Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, : 
Manchester Gas Light Co., for 

lighting lamps, 
Manchester Gas Light Co., for 
lanterns and setting posts, . 
Manchester Gas Light Co., for 

repairs of lanterns, 
A. H. Lowell, posts and repairs, 
J. W. Bartlett, 1 lantern, 
Concord R. R., freight on lan- 
tern, . . . . . 



$325 


08 


5,500 


00 


327 


41 


^3,283 


00 


1,527 


20 



248 09 

356 14 

378 37 
10 88 

80 



Dr. 



1,152 49 



Cr. 



257 



Paid H. J. Poor, oil. 


11 


71 




H. Stearns, lighting lamps at 








'Skeag, .... 


63 


87 




T. L. Qui nab J, lighting lamps on 








Amoskeag Palls Bridge, 


60 


00 




H. H. Noyes, lighting lamps at 








'Squog, .... 


17 


75 




Pike &, Heald, repairs of lan- 








terns, 


29 


43 




Stearns & Farmer, oil, 


3 


07 




J. M. Chandler & Co., oil, 


2 


25 




Flanders & Young, oil, 


2 


60 




David Perkins, lighting lamps. 


12 


33 




Sullivan Brothers, lamps and 








chimneys, .... 


91 


50 




Chas. H. Caverly, putting up 








street signs, 


13 


75 




Simon Dodge, putting up street 








signs, 


31 


25 




Dustin Marshall, for team used 








by Dodge and Caverly, . 


8 


00 




John C. Nichols, for team, 


2 


50 




James Brothers, " 


2 00 




Fogg k James, " 


7 


00 


$6,152 49 




[ONEB 


LY. 


PRINTING AND STAT] 










Dr. 


To Balance from old account, . 


1461 14 




Appropriation, .... 


2,500 


00 


12,961 14 














Cr. 


Paid Campbell & Hanscom, for print- 








ing and advertising, . . 11,323 08 
n 


. 



258 



Paid Moore & Peasley,- printing, 
Wm. E. Moore, " 

Chas. F. Peasley, " . 
Thomas H, Tuson, printing, 
William H. Annan, " 
C. F. Livingston, '' 

Manchester Post Office, for post 

age, 

Saturday Night Dispatch, for ad 

vertising, 
Rollins &, Kingdon, for advertis 

ing, .... 
William G, Everett, for paper, 
F. B. Eaton, 1 blank-book, 

B. P. Burpee, blank-books fo 
canvassing, . 

Thomas Howe, blank-books for 

canvassing, . 
Temple & Parrington, stationery, 
Tewksbury Bros., stationery, 
George C. Hoitt, books and 

blanks, 
II. R. Chamberlin, stationery 
James R. Swallow, '• 
George H. Newton, pens, 

C. M. Fisher, pens, 
E. R. Coburn,paper and pencils, 
Wm. H. Fisk, books for taxes, 
J. H. Flagg, mucilage, 

City Hall Bookstore, stationery, 

A. Quimby, stationery, 

John Andrew & Son, engraving 

for Report, .... 
Henry W. Herrick, drawing and 

engraving for Report, . 



26 


00 


43 


50 


56 


00 


13 


50 


19 


55 


46 


00 


76 


72 


16 


00 


73 


50 


2 


15 


1 


00 



2 75 

1 25 

26 58 
14 93 

38 00 
2 
3 
3 
2 

34 36 

100 98 

1 

2 

1 



09 
50 
00 
00 



25 
20 
15 



.2 00 



79 50 



259 

Paid E. C. Bailey, advertising non- 
resident taxes, . . . 16 50 



Amount, 

Balance to new account, 


. $2,079 04 
. 882 10 


12,961 14 




41 67 
. 700 00 


MILITIA. 

To Balance from old account, . 
Appropriation, . 


Dr. 



Paid Head Guards to April 17,1875, $100 00 
Haines Rifles, . " " " 100 00 

Amoskcag Veterans to April 17, 



Cr. 



1875, 


100 


00 




Sheridan Guards to April 17, 








1875, 


100 


00 




1st N. H. Battery, Sec. B., to 








April 17, 1875, . 


100 


00 




Straw Rifles, to April 17, 1875, 


100 


00 




Manchester Veterans, to April 








17, 1875, .... 


100 


00 




Amount, . ' . 


1700 


00 




Balance to new account. 


41 


67 


$741 67 




INSES. 




INCIDENTAL EXPE 










Dr. 


To Balance from old account, . . i 


14,494 


22 




Appropriation, . . . . 


8,000 


00 




Overdraft, .... 


2 


30 




— 




— $12,496 52 



260 



By paid Walter Neal for repairing 

city scales, .... 
James Fogg, work on city scales, 
Michael McGrath, work on city 

scales, .... 

Joseph Comfort, work on city 

scales, 

Michael Donnelly, work on city 

scales, ..... 
John Prindable, work on city 
, . _ scales, . ,. 

William Maxwell, work on city 
■ scales, . . . . . 
Patrick Finn, work on city 

scales, . . * . 
Jere. Mahanna, work on city 

scales, . . . • . 
James Lyons, work Qn city 

scales. . . ... 

A. Bodwell, stone for city scales, 
A. Dinsniore, lumber for city 

scales, ...... 

John B. Varick, nails for city 

scales, ..... 
A. L. Oolbiirn, repairing city 

scales, ..... 
Jerome B. Titus, for damage to 

sleigh from defect in highway, 20 75 
Join, Campbell, damage to sleigh 

froui dv'it'^^in higluvuy, . 10 00 

Simeon "]'<■' liietts, damage to 

hor. e l;:.:u defect in highway, 35 00 
William E; Killey, injury from 

defect i' Ajnoskeag Falls 

Bridge, """' r • . . . 175 00 



Cr. 



100 


33 


3 


00 


2 


25 


2 


25 


3 


75 


1 


5a 


3 


00 


4 


5a 


3 


oa 


3 


oa 


37 


00 


41 


55 


3 


21 


35 


29' 



2G1 

Paid Ch as. H. D. Perrigo, injury to 

wife from defect in highway, 300 00 

Wm. C. Parker, for damage to 

sleigh from defect in highway, 20 00 

Thomas Hackett, injury from 

defect in highway, . . 5 00 

Sarah Chaffee, injury from de- 
fect in highway, . ... 84 00 

Orrin B. Cowen, injury from de- 
fect in highway, . . . 288 30 

Mary Otis, injury from defect in 

highway, . . . . 150 00 

Ann Lucy, injury from defect in 

highway, . . . . 75 00 

Frank Chenette, damage to team 

from defect in highway, . 50 00 

J. C. H. Vance, damage to team 

from defect in highway, . 15 00 

M. L. Bradley, damage to team 

from defect in highway, . 6 50 

Levi C. King, injury from defect 

in highway, .... 250 00 

Hannah Richardson, injury from 

defect in highway, . . 75 00 

Michael McCabe, injury to wife 

from defect in highway, . 100 00 

Washington I. Gilbert, injury 

from defect in highway, . 40 00 

Paul Burke, injury from defect 

in highway, .... 150 00 

Sherburne T. Sleeper, damage to 
wagon from defect in high- 
way, 40 00 

A. D. Gooden, damage to wagon 

from defect in highway, . 5 00 



262 

Paid J. W. C. Pickering, injury toT. 
E. Thorpe, by piece of timber 
falling upon him on sidewalk, 875 00 

Holmes R. Pettee, damage to 
premises by changing grade 
of Amherst Street, . . 75 00 

Nancy C. Batchelder, damage to 
premises by changing grade 
of street, . . . . 25 00 

James Cossar, damage to prem- 
ises by changing grade of 
street, 32 00 

First M. E. Society, damage to 
premises by changing grade 
of street, . . . . 50 00 

William T. Fogg, damage to 
premises by changing grade 
of Street, . . . . 75 00 

Eben Clark, damage to premises 

by overflow of sewer, . . 50 00 

Michael Heaney, for damage to 
premises by removing adjoin- 
ing building, . . . 30 00 

Dustin L. Jenkins, damage to 
premises by changing grade 
of street, . . . . 60 00 

Philip H. Pike, damage to prem- 
ises by changing grade of 
street, 30 00 

Ellis & Patterson, for putting 
new highways and sewers up- 
on the maps, . . . 3 00 

Ellis & Patterson, for locating 

Nutt's Pond, . . . 27 50 

Ellis & Patterson, for making 

profiles of streets, . . 13 67 



263 

Paid Ellis & Patterson, for establish- 
ing side-walk grades, . . 40 16 
Ellis & Patterson, for laying out 

streets and making plans, . 457 75 
Joseph E. Bennett, for making 

annual report, . . . 150 00 
Joseph E. Bennett, for use of 

team to serve notices, . . 9 50 

Joseph E. Bennett, for making 

copies in case of Print Works 

vs. City, .... 4 50 

Joseph B, Bennett, for cash paid 

for recording deeds, . . 3 05 

Joseph E. Bennett, for cash paid 

for express, .... 75 

Jere. Hodge, for making bird 

cages, 20 00 

B. Frank Fogg, for repairing 

water pipe, .... 2 10 

D. Milton Goodwin, for dippers 

and chains, . . . . 12 00 
H. G. Connor, medicine for the 

Pest House, .... 3 00 

Henry S. Whitney, for work at 

Pest House, .... 2 50 

Joseph Cross, oven for Pest 

House, 4 00 

Sullivan Brothers, for stove-pipe 

and lamps for Pest House, . 23 32 
Darwin A. Simons, for furniture 
. for Pest House, . . .100 09 
James Brothers, for team to 

Pest House, . . . . 11 00 
J. M. Chandler & Co., groceries 

for Pest House, . . . 23 31 



264 

Paid Daniels & Co., wringer handle 

for Pest House, ... 50 

City Farm, for plowing at Pest 

House, 2 00 

Jackson & Co., for dry goods 

for Pest House, . . . 5 99 

John B. Varick, hard-ware for 

Pest House, .... 7 97 

J. M. Chandler & Co., glass for 

Pest House, .... 65 

Daniel Sanborn, for work at 

Pest House 3 20- 

E. A. G. Holmes, for work at 

Pest House, . , . . 21 15 
Z. F. Campbell, for medicine at 

Pest House, . . . . 32 «5 
Judith Sherer, pasturing cow, . 18 50 
Judith Sherer, for care of small- 
pox patients, . . . 752 01 
Patrick A. Devine, burial of per- 
sons dying of small-pox, . 46 50 
R. J. P. Goodwin, for medical 

care of small-pox patients, . 261 00 
H. C. Canney, medical care of 

small-pox patients, . . 3 00 

0. D. Abbott, for medical care 

of small-pox patients, . . 9 00 

W. W. VVilkins, for medical care 

of small-pox patients, . . 3 00 

George E. Hersey, medical care 

of small-pox patients, . , 3 00 

H. C. Canney, for vaccinating, 18 50 
H. C. Canney and A. L. Trem- 

blay, for vaccinating, . . 66 00 
Frederick Smyth, for lot of land 

on Vine Street, . . . 4,000 00 



265 

Paid Water Works, for water in 
troughs, .... 

J. Q. A. Sargent, for laying pipe 
to troughs, .... 

Thomas A. Lane, for repairing 
pipes to trough, . 

Timo. Clark, for posting health 
notices, .... 

Sampson & Davenport, for five 
copies Manchester Directory, 

John L. Kennedy, for painting 
signs, ..... 
■ James A. Weston, for iise of 
team, two months, 

James A. Weston, cash paid for 
sundries, 

Austin C. Willey, for refresh- 
ments at night, for laborers, 
fair time, .... 

E. A. G. Holmes, for work on 
trough, .... 

E. A. G. Holmes, for work on 
tree boxes, .... 

George H. Dudley, for fitting up 
ward room, .... 

James Howe, for moving settees, 

Charles E. Clough, trucking lum- 
ber to ward room, 
. H. F. W. Little, for damage to 
fence, 

Thomas L. Thorpe, room for 
ward meeting in Ward 6, 

Ezra D. Clark, setting glass in 
No. 5 ward-room, . 

Manchester Gas Light Company, 
for gas for ward-room, . 



16 


85 


58 


26 


12 


11 


3 


00 


10 


00 


F, 


90 


20 


83 


35 


01 


5 


25 


11 


15 


57 


72 


13 


37 


1 


50 


1 


50 


40 


40 


25 


00 


3 


75 


' 


81 



266 

Paid J. Tuck & Co., for washing No. 

3 ward-room, . . . 2 50 

Thomas Howe, for washing No. 

5 ward-room, . . . 5 50 

W. W. Hubbard, for ballot-box 

for ward No. 2, . . . 7 50 

Robert Laing, for wood for ward 

No. 5 room, . . . . 4 50 

Charles R. Foss, wood for ward 
No. 2 room, .... 5 75 

Thomas D. Poole, for repairing 

stamp, ..... 3 00 

Crombie & Proctor, for shade 
trees, 120 00 

George R. Simmons, ' for ex- 
pense of trip to examine en- 
gine houses abroad, . . 14 30 

A. Waldron, for expense of trip 
to examine engine houses 
abroad, .... 

First N. H. Battery, for firing 
salute April 19, 1875, . 

First N. H. Battery, for firing 
salute July 4, 1875, 

John B. McCrillis & Son, for re- 
pairing and storing hearse, . 

John B. McCrillis & Son, var- 
nishing hearse, 

F. N. McLaren, straps for hearse, 

Patten & Jones, for posting no- 
tices, ..... 

John P. Bartlett, for court dock- 
ets, ..... 

John P. Bartlett, as counsel for 

city, , 



15 


50 


33 


60 


32 


60 


7 


50 


25 


00 


1 


50 


5 


00 


4 


25 


253 


00 



267 

Paid J. J. Abbott, painting sign for 
Button street, 

Joseph B. Sawyer, for engineer's 
services, .... 

E. P. Coggsvvell, work done for 
Board of Health, . 

C. C. Colby, for collating un- 
paid taxes, .... 

C. C. Colby, making out tax 
bills for 1875, 

Nicholas Nichols, making out tax 
bills for 1875, . ... 

Nicholas Nichols, collating un- 
paid taxes for 1875, 

W. H. Fisk, for stationery, 

City Hall Booksto)-e, for eyelets, 

Alpheus Gay, for cash paid for 
telegrams, .... 

Daniel Haley, for whitewashing 
tree boxes, .... 

A. B. Webster, irons for tree 
boxes, . . . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber for tree 
boxes, ..... 

Jere. B. Jones, for selling build- 
ings on Vine street, 

A. Dinsmore, lumber for street 
crossings, .... 

Julius Celler, repairing stamp, 

A. L. Davis, plan for engine 

house, 40 00 

Thomas McGrath, for repairing 
old culvert leading from Han- 
over Squai-e to Merrimack Sq. 78 00 

James Brothers, for livery team, 18 00 

Hill & Co., for express, . . 75 



1 


50 


18 


00 


2 


50 


24 


00 


18 


00 


18 


00 


24 


00 


2 


67 


2 


25 


1 


15 


28 


49 


1 


70 


83 


54 


5 


90 


16 


65 


1 


50 



268 

Paid P. A. Hawley, witness fees, case 

Chapman vs. city, . . 1 37 

Samuel H. Martin, witness fees, 

case Cliapman vs. city, . . 1 37 

Joel Daniels, setting glass broken 

by felling tree, . . . 4 00 

John T. Garland, building cul- 
vert at Hallsville, . . 40 00 

O. Jackson, interest on execu- 
tion, ..... 1 50 

Henry C. Merrill, boxes used as 

ballot-boxes, ... 20 

Pogg & James, livery team, . 6 00 

Leonard French, post-mortem 

examination of Mrs. Connor, 5 00 

L. B. How, post-mortem exami- 
nation of Mrs. Connor, . 5 00 

L. B. How, examination of dis- 
eased cattle, . . . 5 00 

B. Frank Fogg, work on troughs, 7 75 



Amount, . . . $10,932 50 
Balance to new account, . 1,564 02 

112,496 52 



CITY HALL AND OFFICES. 



Db. 



To balance from old account, . 


. $766 93 


Overdraft, 


4 20 


Received for old brick sold. 


5 30 


Received for rent of stores. 


. 2,081 25 


Received for rent of hall 


and 


offices, 


. 418 00 



5,225 68 



1216 


00 


206 


25 


24 


95 


11 


00 


11 


37 


6 


04 


8 


24 


4 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


22 


60 


• . 2 


50 



269 



Bj paid Manchester Gas Light Co., 

for gas, .... 

Dickey, Young & Co., fuel, 
L. B. Bodwell, fuel, 
E. P. Johnson, fuel, 
G. F. Robertson, fuel, 
John Hamilton, fuel, 
Manchester Wood Co., fuel, 
James Collins, fuel, 
M. C. Clark, fuel, . 
Hannah Perkins, for cleaning 

offices, .... 

Kate Carroll, cleaning offices, . 
Phebe Butler, - " " . 

James Carroll, for sawing and v^ 

carrying in wood, . . 11 25 

Fardy Conway, for sawing and 

carrying in wood, . .50 

James A. Eastman, whitewash- 
ing, . . . . . 16 50 
Joim L. Kennedy, for repairing 

glass, . . . ... 71 65 

A. M. Eastman, matches, . . . 2 97 

Thomas A. Lane, repairing pipe, 50 

John B. Varick, thermometer, 

brush and punch, . . 3 72 

Daniels & Co., bell- rope, brushes, 

ax, pails, &c., . . . 22 12 
French Bros., repairs on police 

offices, . . . . 25 76 

Geo. Holbrook, repairs, . . 34 97 
Walter Neal, repairs, . . 1 25 

Vickery & Stevens, for repairing 

locks and keys, . . . 6 50 



Cr. 



270 



Paid W. H. Vickery, for keys, 

J. Q. A. Sargent, for repairing 

water-pipes, 
J. Q. A. Sargent, gas fixtures 
and burners, 

C. A. & F. 0. Higgins, burners 
and globes, .... 

M. V, B. Kinne, repairing roof, 
M. V. B. Kinne, table in judge's 
room, . . . . . 
M. V. B. Kinne, desk for com- 
mon council room, 

D. A. Simons, office chair, 

D. A. Simons, furniture for 

school committee room, 
Jos. G. Edgerly, furniture for 

school committee room, 
Sullivan Brothers, for repairing, 

blacking and setting up stove, 
Pike & Heald, repairing water 

pipes and furnace, 
Fairbanks & Folsom, repairing 

furnace, 
T. C. Blake, . 
Water- Works, water, 
•Charles A. Smith, duster and 

spittoon. 
Barton & Co., door mat, . 
Stearns & Farmer, brooms and 

matches, 
Amoskeag Manf 'g Co., cloth for 

awning, 
B. F. Fogg, making frame for 

awning, 
Henry Jillson, making awning. 



2 


35 


44 


25 


27 


46 


11 


00 


2 


40 



25 00 

13 00 
4 00 

14 25 
66 56 
17 75 

114 87 

50 

4 00 

143 00 

8 37 
2 00 

6 25 

24 25 

9 33 

27 72 



271 



Paid J. M. Chandler & Co., for mop 

handle, 
Timo. Clark, cleaning blinds, 
Canney &, Wiley, moth preven 

tive and chamois skin, 
Putney & Co., carpet lining, 
E. A. G. Holmes, repairs, 
S. C. Forsaith, repairing bell 

and bell-frame, 
D. M. Goodwin, 2 tin boxes, 
Jeremiah Stickney, eyelets. 
Straw & Lovejoy, for repairing 

clocks, . . . . . 
John C. Young, repairing roof, 



60 
00 

25 
75 
95 



Amount, 

Balance to new account. 



113 48 

2 50 

25 

27 25 

4 86 

* 

.11,350 84 
. 1,874 84 



13,225 68 



CITY LIBRARY. 

To balance from old account, . . 12,063* 24 
Appropriation, .... 2,500 00 



Paid Chas. H. Marshall, salary as 

librarian, . . . . $800 00 
Annual appropriation for books, 1,000 00 
Manchester Gas Light Co., gas, 214 92 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal, 
Manchester Water-Works, water 
-^tna Insurance Co., premium, 
Wm. H. Fisk, binding. 
Temple & Farrington, binding, 



198 92 
20 00 
32 50 

124 63 

80 92 



Dr. 



$4,563 24 
Cr. 



272 

Paid J. E. Clough, cleaning vault, . 

Campbell & Hansccim, "Union" 
for 1875, . . . . 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing 
library reports, 

George C. Hoitt, blank book, . 

Fairbanks & Folsom, for furnace 
grate, ..... 

Charles F. Livingston, for book 
covers, ..... 

John B. Varick, for one canal 
barrow, .... 

Pike & Heald, for cleaning furn- 
ace, 

Daniels & Co., for rubber chair 
tips, ..... 

N. P. Hunt, for express on Indi- 
ana Geological Report, 



4 


00 


6 


00 


30 


00 


5 


00 


7 


40 


43 


36 


3 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


12 



Amount, . . . $2,577 90 

Balance to new account, . 1,985 34 



PAVING STREETS. 

To balance from old account, $922 99 

Appropriation, .... 5,000 00 



By paid Robert Bunton for 247 yards 

paving blocks, . .^ . $358 15 

P. E. Blanchard, for paving blks. 

delivered 1873, bal. account, 106 75 

C. M. Hubbard & Co., cobbles, . 8 75 



t,563 24 

Dr. 

J,922 99 
Cr. 



273 



Paid John P. Young, for cobbles, 


1 25 


Waterman Smith, " 


10 00 


Jas. Mitchell, Jr., " 


8 00 


C. M. Stevens, " 


15 00 


Henry K. Tilton, for gravel. 


5 00 


William Anderson, for labor. 


75 


Jere. Abbott, " 


38 63 


William Burke, " 


12 00 


Edward Burns, " 


3 38 


Robert Barrett, " 


10 50 


Geo. W. Butterfield, " 


10 00 


George Burton, " 


2 25 


Hackett & Fisher, for concrete 




paving on Concord street, 


1,041 13 


A. B. Gushing, for labor, 


8 50 


T. M. Conant, " 


4 50 


City Teams, " 


54 14 


Lawrence M. Connor, for labor. 


2 25 


Joseph Comfort, " 


13 33 


Charles Cheney, " 


13 50 


Jerry Connor, " 


13 13 


John Concannon, " 


15 38 


John Cushing, " 


2 76 


John Callahan, " 


5 63 


Thomas Connor, " 


9 75 


Anthony Crosby, " 


5 63 


John Connor, " 


8 25 


Patrick Dwyer, " 


37 00 


Michael Donnelly, " 


3 38 


John Dowd, " 


2 63 


James M. Dickey, " 


1 la 


Noah Downs, " 


1 13 


William Doland, " 


75 


Ellis & Patterson, setting grades 


25 50 


Frank Everett, for labor, . 

18 


6 75 



274 



Paid William Frain, 


for labor. 


9 43 


James Eastman, 


(( 


2 63 


Philip Farmer, 


a 


1 50 


Patrick Finn, 


(( 


. 161 01 


Peter Griffin, 


u 


2 25 


Geo. W. Gilbert, 


ii 


75 


Thomas Kelley, 


a 


75 


Patrick Kelley, 


a 


4 50 


William Kennedy, 


a 


5 00 


Thomas Howe, 


(( 


3 00 


William Haley, 


a 


7 51 


Lawrence Larkin, 


a 


38 


James Lyons, 


a 


19 00 


Frank P. Kimball, 


ii 


2 00 


E. S. Harvey, 


a 


40 88 


Mark E. Harvey, 


a 


23 01 


James Jennings, 


a 


6 38 


James Lucy, 


a 


38 


Patrick Moran, 


li 


1 13 


John Mahoney, 


(( 


14 00 


Wm. Maxwell, 


(( 


169 51 


Jerry Mahanna, 


a 


187 2o 


Michael Mulligan, 


a 


38 


. John McCaffrey, 


u 


4 88 


Murty Mahoney, 


a 


1 50 


Bart. Moriarty, 


a 


15 38 


Nathaniel Manning 




4 50 


Michael McGrath, 


a 


6 38 


William O'Neil, 


a 


22 50 


Daniel O'Leary, 


u 


38 


John Prindable, 


it 


1 88 


Eli Perry, 


(( 


4 13 


John Punch, 


(( 


1 88 


Peter Eeynolds, 


(( 


21 75 


Peter Scanlan, 


(( 


125 12 



275 



Loamf Searles, for labor, 

Alec Shine, " 

William S. Smith, " 

Joseph L. Smith, " 

Moses W. Sargent, " 

Quinlan Sullivan, " 

Timo. Quinn, " 

O. A. Tucker, " 
O. H. Tufts, 

John P. Young, " 

Thomas Walker, " 

Chas. E. Worthen, " 

Thomas Tower, " 

Amount of expenditures. 
Highway District No. 2, trans 

ferred, 
Balance to new account, 



1 


50 


■ 3 


75 


2 


63 


13 


50 


11 


25 


11 


25 


3 


38 


1 


13 


15 


86 


4 


50 


9 


00 


2 


00 


3 


38 


. $2,822 60 


. 3,000 


00 


. 100 


39 



15,922 99 



WATERING STREETS. 



Paid A. W. Sanborn, repairing and 

painting cart, . . . $18 85 

Manchester Water-Works, water 400 00 
J. Q. A. Sargent, putting up 

pipe, 112 91 

B. Frank Fogg, repairing pipe, 13 85 



Dr. 



To balance from old account, . 


111 52 




Appropriation, .... 


850 00 


'' 


Overdraft, .... 


18 50 




Reserved fund, balance account, 


50 41 


$930 43 










Cr. 



276 

Paid Lawrence Connor, labor on pipe 
Loami Searles, " " " 

James Lyons, " " " 

Patent Water and Gas Pipe Co 

pipe, .... 
Mark E. Harvey, team, 
Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster, 
T. M. Conant, " 

A. B. Cushing, " , 

John Cushing, " 

City Teams, 



, 29 


89 


1 


50 


6 


00 


2 


62 


2 


25 


47 


00 


28 


00 


25 


00 


11 


42 


. 231 


14 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 



1930 45 



. 


Dr. 


To Appropriation, . 


16,500 OO 


Paid sundry persons, 

Balance to new account,' . 


Cr. 

. $5,545 13 

. 954 87 

fffifi 500 OO 







ABATEMENT OP^TAXES. 

To balance from old account, . 

(1872.) 
Paid Hugh McDonough, paid in Bos- 

cawen, $2 24 

Charles H. Williams, paid in 

Stoddard, .... 2 24 



Dr. 

,217 52 
Cr. 



277 



Paid Onesimer Petit, poor, 


2 24 


Joseph Little, " 


2 24 


(1873.) 




Hugh McDonough, paid in Bos- 




cawen, .... 


2 50 


Chandler M. Potter, paid in 




Ellenburg, N. Y., 


2 50 


Wm. L. George, paid in Web- 




ster, 


2 50 


Geo. W. Griswold, paid in Stod- 




dard, 


2 50 


James B. F. Town, not here, . 


2 60 


John A. Gilbreath, " 


4 48 


(1874.) 




Oeorge H. Thurston, minor, 


2 46 


Albert Ayers, " 


2 46 


Frank Chenette, " 


2 46 


Oeorge Langmaid, " 


2 46 


John Lynch, " 


2 46 


Michael White, " 


2 46 


Robert Lee, " 


2 46 


Daniel Haggerty, paid in Bos- 




ton, 


2 46 


David 0. Webster, poor, . 


2 46 


Aimer D. Gooden, water trough. 


3 00 


Joseph L. Lacasse, taxed wrong. 


4 18 


Michael Moran, over 70, . 


2 46 


Stephen M. D'ow, " " . 


2 46 


M. W. Kendrick, dead, 


2 46 


James Steele, " 


2 46 


James E. Cash, paid in Concord, 


2 46 


C. T. Hackett, no dog. 


1 00 


John Taylor, " . . 


2 00 


■Charles H. Langmaid, no dog. 


1 00 



278 



Paid Daniel Riley, poor, . 


2 46 


William H. Perry, paid in Hen- 




niker, 


2 46 


Geo. F. Heald, not here, . 


2 46 


Edward Hutchins, taxed twice. 


2 46 


Frank Sargent, paid in Weare, 


2 46 


Chas. E. Atkinson, not here, . 


2 46- 


Wm. Harwood, paid in Auburn, 


2 46 


Fred. A. Newell, paid in Wor- 




cester, Mass., 


2 46 


Geo. S. Colby, paid in Amherst, 


2 46 


John Harrington, minor, . 


2 46 


Patrick O'Mara, taxed twice, . 


2 46 


John M. Crawford, no horse, . 


1 72 


M. C. Cowen, dis. soldier. 


2 46 


Christopher Chalk, minor, 


2 46 


John Burpee, " 


2 46 


Edward Cummings, " 


2 46 


Martin Bohan, no dog,. 


1 oa 


E. Davis, taxed twice, 


2 46 


Charles K. Bursiel, paid in Bed- 




ford, 


2 46 


John Burke, paid in Canaan, . 


2 46 


Wm. Young, 2d, poor, 


2 46 


Charles F. Abbott, taxed twice. 


2 46 


Geo. I. Aldrich, minor, . 


2 46 


Augusta A. Hall, has no land, . 


4 92 


Thos. M. Wade, dead. 


2 46 


John Sunbury, " 


2 46 


Chas. E. Ham, paid in Wolfebo- 




lough, 


2 46 


Jonathan P. Gilcreast, paid in 




Londonderry, 


2 46 


Charles Kimball, paid in Hook- 




sett, 


2 46 



279 



Paid Lewis M. Dudley, dead, . 


2 46 


Heirs of Jona. E. Kimball, over- 




taxed, 


12 30 


Peter Peltier, no dog. 


1 00 


J. H. Pierce, dis. soldier, . 


2 46 


Frank Elliott, taxed twice. 


2 46 


John Marunin, paid in New 




Hampton, .... 


2 46 


Frank Dodge, taxed twice. 


2 46 


Nelson Bickford, dis. soldier, . 


2 46 


Wm. Rourke, poor, . 


2 46 


Joseph Stark, taxed twice. 


2 46 


Ruel Mannin, dis. soldier, 


2 46 


Thomas Reynolds, dead, . 


2 46 


Cyrus Whittemore, Jr., paid in 




Hooksett, .... 


2 46 


Gilbert Briggs, paid in Wilmot, 


2 46 


F. Hall Flanders, paid in An- 




dover, 


2 46 


Franklin Hardy, paid in Derry, 


2 46 


Chandler M. Potter, paid in El- 




lenburg, N. Y., 


2 46 


Charles S. Young, paid in Ames- 




bury, Mass., .... 


2 46 


August Hoffman, paid in Law- 




rence, Mass., 


2 46 


WellmanN. George, paid in Bed- 




ford, 


2 46 


John B. Smith, paid in Hillsbo- 




rough, ..... 


2 46 


Benj. F. Merrill, paid in Goflfs- 




town, ..... 


2 46 


Geo. B. McLane, paid in New 




Boston, .... 


2 46 


Philip P. Farmer, over 70, 


2 46 



280 



Paid Nathaniel Herrick, over 70, 
Elizabeth A. Ladd, overtaxed on 

stock, .... 
Wm. W. Hubbard, overtaxed on 

stock, .... 
Charles F. Harvell, insane, 
Elbridge Gerry, '' 

Jas. W. Lathe, dis. soldier, 
Christopher Snell, " 
Thomas Dailej, taxed twice, 
Daniel Adams, " 

Joseph Little, poor, . 
G. H. Northrop, name wrong, 
, George H. Thurston, minor, 
William Quinn, no dog, . 
J. R. Weston, no horse and car- 
riage, .... 
William Sage, overtax, 
Adna B. Roberts, paid in Lon 

donderry, . . . ' 
Thomas H. Cox, paid in Holder 

ness, ..... 
George H. Hall, paid in Bed 

ford, .... 
Wm. R. Sawyer, Jr., paid in 

Francestown, 
Frank F. Boyd, paid in London 

derry, .... 
Frank Dowst, paid in Aliens 

town, .... 
Nathaniel E. Fatten, not here, 
Charles E. Fatten, " 

Cyril E. Lebrun, " 

Samuel A. Cheney, dis. soldier, 
George Patten, minor, 



2 46 



3 69 



24 


60 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


1 


00 


6 


15 


8 


61 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 


2 


46 



281 



Paid John Williams, dis. soldier, 

Thomas Toiiery, " 

Cornelius W. Strain, disabled 
soldier, . . . . 

Moses Greenwood, dead, . 

Freeman R. Gardner, dead, 

George Holmes, " 

John Dickey, poor, . 

Benj. T. F. Fhilbrick, paid in 
Derry, . . . . . 

Daniel J. Jones, paid in War- 
ren, .... 

Joseph Freschl & Co., over tax, 

P.. K. Chandler & Co., 

Waite Brothers, 

Johnson Brothers, 

City Missionary Society, wrong, 

Augusta Wolcott, " 

(1875.) 

Frank Elliot, dis. soldier, 
Cornelius W. Strain, " 
Samuel Cheney, " 

Edward Young, minor, 
Charles E. Plumer, " 
George Taft, " 

iJohn Cassidy, " 

Mason Hoyt, " 

George Graves, " 

Philip Larcotte, "' 

Napoleon Larcotte, " 
James Staples, " 

E. W. Harrington, Jr., minor, 
John Welch, over 70, 
Patrick Lennon, " 



2 46 
2 46 

2 46 
2 46 
2 46 
2 46 
2 46 

2 46 



2 


46 


7 


38 


7 


38 


19 


68 


12 


30 


', 24 


60 


12 


30 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 



282 



Paid Lewis Bedford, poor, 


2 22 


John Murphy, " 


2 22 


David 0. Webster, poor, . 


2 22 


• Peter Mumblo, " 


2 22 


Albert Webster, taxed twice. 


2 22 


George Clark, " 


2 22 


Frank F. Dodge, " 


. 2 22 


Robert Laing, " 


2 22 


Charles Pierce, " 


2 22 


Charles Wood, " 


2 22 


James Burrows, " 


2 22 


Samuel B. Goodwin, dead. 


2 22 


Michael Mahoney, no slut, 


2 00 


Henry M. Leighton, no dog, 


1 00 


Dennis J. Clifford, not here. 


2 22 


Daniel Haggerty, paid in Boston 


2 22 


Frank M. Merrill, paid in Hook 




sett, .... 


2 22 


Joseph Stone, paid in Dedham 


2 22 


Samuel Booth, taxed wrong. 


1 11 


Cyrus Moore, " 


22 20 


John Emerson, " 


6 66 


John Morrison, " 


2 22 


Lorenzo Scagel, water-trough 




1875, .... 


1 50 


Aimer D. Goodwin, water-trougli 




1875, .... 


3 00 


John P. & Edward Young, taxec 




wrong. 


12 21 


John M. Hawkes, over-taxed. 


4 44 


William Reynolds, taxed wrong 


8 88 


John L. Woodman, disabled sol 




dier, .... 


2 22 


Thomas Tonery, disabled sol 


- 


dier, .... 


2 22 



283 



id Frank Reed, paid in Concord, . 


2 22 


Charles Amo, paid in New York, 


2 22 


Wm. W. Wyman, not here, 


2 22 


Franklin Hardy, paid in Derry, 


2 22 


Willie B. Stearns, paid in Wil- 




mot, 


2 22 


Eddie W. Stevens, paid in Bed- 




ford, 


2 22 


John Murphey, no dog. 


1 00 


Samuel Thompson, no horse, . 


2 22 


Julius H. Putnam, paid in Hook- 




sett, . . f . . 


2 22 


Mary Burrows, over-taxed. 


4 44 


Edward Vincent, minor, . 


2 22 


William Pike, « 


2 22 


Charles Gorman, " 


2 22 


James McDonald, " 


2 22 


Geo. H. Harwood, " 


2 22 


James W. Lathe, disabled sol- 




soldier, .... 


2 22 


George B. Sanford, disabled sol- 




dier, 


2 22 


Ezekiel Rand, disabled soldier. 


2 22 


Hugh McDonough, taxed wrong, 


3 22 


William 0. Stevens, no dog. 


1 00 


Z. L. Place, " 


1 00 


Andrew Brymer, " 


1 00 


Albert Snyder, " 


1 00 


Thomas Clark, " 


1 00 


Daniel Murphy, " 


1 00 


Thomas C. Stearns, taxed twice, 


2 22 


Joseph Murphy, " 


2 22 


Joseph G. Putnam, " 


2 22 


Thomas Moore, " 


2 22 


Mark Smith, " 


2 22 



284 



Paid Moses Thompson, taxed twice, 
Thomas Gooley, " 

Jerome B. Harvey, paid in Lon- 
donderry, 
Michael Laughlin, over 70, 
Michael Moran, " 

Thaddeus M. Hanson, " 
Stephen M. Dow, " 

Charles Gould, " 

Edward Newman, " 

Thomas Williams, " 

Marshall Kendrick, dead, 
James Steele, " 

John F. Sundbury, " 
James W. Kimball, paid in Hook 

sett, .... 
William H. Parker, paid in Litch 

field, .... 
William R. Sawyer, paid in Fran 

cestown, ... 
J. Albert Doble, paid in Candia, 
0. L. Frachure, paid in Dunbar- 

ton, .... 
A. W. Bachelder, paid in Pel 

ham, .... 
A. L. Davis, paid in Laconia, 
H. E: Stearns, paid in Bradford 
George W. Nichols, no horse, 
C. F. Lord, taxed wrong, 
Edward B. Richardson, paid in 

Lyndeborough, 
Peter Griffiu, taxed wrong, 
Chas. W. Swift, " 
Charles Stearns, minor, 
Albert Austin, " 



2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 



2 22 

2 22 

2 22 
2 22 

2 22 



2 


22 


2 


22 


», 2 


22 


2 


22 


19 


98 


n 

2 


22 


4 44 


11 


10 


2 


22 


2 


22 



285 



Paid Albert J. Crosby, minor, 


2 22 


Frank W. Chase, " 


2 22 


William Springer, " 


2 22 


A. J. Arnold, " 


2 22 


James McGovern, jr., minor, . 


2 22 


Frederick Daniels, " 


2 22 


William L. Meserve, " 


2 22 


Herman Maynard, " 


2 22 


Simon Clark, " 


2 22 


George Flanders, " 


2 22 


Patrick Lane, " 


2 22 


JohnO'Donnell, " 


2 22 


Joseph Bailey, disabled soldier 


2 22 


William Stevens, no slut. 


2 00 


Joseph 0' Burke, no dog. 


' 1 00 


Mason T. Burbank, " 


1 00 


Lawrence Scanlan, " 


1 00 


William Young, " 


1 00 


Thomas F. Dailey, taxed twice 


9 OO 


C. F. Abbott, " 


2 22 


Joseph G. Colburn, " 


2 22 


John Cochran, " 


2 22 


Thomas (xooley, " 


2 22 


M. V. B. Edgerly, no horse, 


2 22 


C. T. Hackett, no horse, . 


2 22 


Milton S. Leeds, " 


1 64 


Charles'L. Richardson, does not 




own, .... 


'. 15 7o 


Myron D. Cox, dead. 


2 22 


Zelphe Lafayette, not here, 


2 22 


John Donnovan, " 


2 22 


Osgood Page, over 70, 


2 22 


Obadiah Jackson, over 70, 


2 22 


Martin Clark, " 


2 22 


Calvin Andrews, paid in New 


7 


Boston, 


2 22 



286 



Paid George P. Bond, paid in Bed- 
ford, 

Chas. P. Emery, paid in Derry, 

Frank P. Boyd, paid in London- 
derry, .... 

John Hosley, no cow, 

Wm. Morse, not here, 

Richard Allen, no dog, 

B. M. Leavenworth, paid in An 
dover, .... 

John Mullins, dis. soldier, 

Daniel Riley, poor, , . . 

Geo. W. Wadleigh, not here, 

Wm. R. Mahoney, paid in Hook 
sett, .... 

Henry J. Hicks, paid in London 
derry, . . . . 

Isaac Sanborn, wrong, 

Samuel M. Smith, not here, 

Wm. H. Dixon, no dog, . 

Lot No. 86 Central st., wrong, 

Fred. Geary, paid in Brookline 

John Ryan, overtaxed, 

Ann M. Offutt, no money at in 
terest, .... 

George Parker, minor, . 

Frederick Wilson, " 

Frank Pliilbrick, '' 

John McLaughlin, " 

Wm. McLaughlin, " 

Artell Eastman, " " 

Lucien Ham, " 

David Bushway, " 

Frank Thayer, " 

Thomas Lehan, " 



2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 




80 


2 


22 


1 


00 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 



2 22 



■2 


22 


44 40 


2 


22 


1 


00 




98 


2 


22 


13 


37 


222 


00 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


2'2 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 



2 22 



287 



id Nicholas Arnold, maimed, 


2 


22 


Charles Crosby, taxed twice, 


2 


22 


Patrick McCabe, over 70, 


2 


22 


John Welch, " 


2 


22 


Charles W. Fisher, " 


2 


22 


Thomas Cavanagh, " 


2 


22 


Alfred Wright, " 


2 


22 


Geo. C. Hoyt, no dog, 


1 


00 


Samuel C. Amsden, no dog, 


1 


00 


Frank Sargent, paid in Weare 


2 


22 


Edson S. Heath, no dog, . 


1 


00 


Joseph Lyons, paid in Newmar 






ket, .... 


2 


22 


Christopher Snell, dis. soldier. 


2 


22 


Celestien Gardner, poor, . 


. . 2 


22 


Henry Clay, taxed twice. 


2 


22 


Joseph Mullett, not here, . 


2 


22 


Byron Richardson, paid in Hook 






sett, .... 


2 


22 


Charles W. Mead, . 


2 


22 


Timothy McKennie, no dog. 


1 


00 


Heirs of Geo. Seelig, overtaxed 


, 22 


20 


Amount, 


$1,184 93 


Balance to new account, 


32 


59 
m 917 F>'2 






• <jpXyii± 1 O^ 


INTEREST. 








Dr. 


Appropriation, . 


90,000 


00 


Reserved fund, balance account, 


2,443 


49 

192,443 49 



Or. 



Bj Balance from old account, . < 


$37,766 49 


Paid coupons on old issue. 


19,761 00 


" " water bonds. 


32,814 00 


N. H. Fire Ins. Co., . 


143 50 


Estate of N. Hunt, . 


210 00 


Discount on water bonds sold. 


. 1,164 00 


Louisa Wilson, 


30 00 


N. B. Hall, . 


12 00 


Lois A. Lee, . . . 


12 00 


Manchester National Bank, 


. 240 50 


Amoskeag National Bank, 


. 155 00 


Wm. McDonald, 


. 135 00 




«QO /| iq 4Q 







TEMPORARY LOAN. 



To Amount outstanding Jan. 1, 1*875, $5,300 00 



Dr. 



N. H. Fire Ins. Co., . 
Manchester National Bank, 
Amoskeag " " 


. 7,000 00 
. 21,000 00 
. 10,000 00 


H3,300 00 






By paid N. H. Fire Ins. Co., . 
Wm. McDonald, 
Manchester National Bank, 
Amoskeag " " 


. $7,000 00 
. 3,000 00 
. 21,000 00 
. 10,000 00 


Cr. 


Amount, . 

Bal. outstanding Dec. 31, 


. $41,000 00 
'75, 2,300 00 


B43,300 00 



289 

REDUCTION OF CITY DEBT. 

Appropriation, .... 81,500 00 
Balance overdrawn, . . . 19,100 00 

120,600 00 

Cr. 
By balance from old account, . $19,100 00 
Paid on account of Suncook Val- 
ley Railroad loan, . . 1,500 00 

120,600 00 



REPAIRS ON BUILDINGS. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account, . . |187 68 
Court House account, (balance 

transferred), . . . 13 88 

Appropriation, .... 1,000 00 

11,201 56 



By paid John L. Kennedy, for paint- 
ing on Engine House, . 

John L. Kennedy, painting on 
Court House, 

John L. Kennedy, painting on 
Library Building, 

John L. Kennedy, painting on 
pest-house, .... 

Daniels & Co., lantern for Court 
House, .... 

John C. Young, roofing at en- 
gine-house, .... 

J. S. Kidder & Co., lime and ce- 
ment, ..... 

1!) 





Cr, 


$95 58 




17 93 




2 97 




4 50 




1 55 




12 00 




10 30 





290 



Puid B. Frank Fogg, piping at engine- 
house, ..... 

George Holbrook, repairs on en- 
gine-liouse, .... 

George Holbrook, repairs on Li- 
brary building, 

James A. Eastman, mason work 

' on Library building, 

George FI. Dudley, repairs at 
Court House, 

Thomas A. Lane, for repairs at 
Court House, 

James H. Nutt, for repairs at 
Court House, 

James H. Nutt, repairs on en- 
gine house, .... 

Lamson & Marden, for threshold 
and sills at engine house, 

B. W. Robinson, mason work at 
engine house, 

Walter Neal, repairs at engine 
house, .... 

Pike & Heald, for urinal and re- 
pairing pumps and pipes, 

J. Q. A. Sargent, gas fixtures 
for Court House, . 

E. A. G. Holmes, repairs at Li- 
brary, 

Hiram Bailey, repairs at stable, 

Sylvester Parsons, for repairs at 
stable, ... 

J. L. Smith, lumber at stable, . 

A. Dinsmore, lumber at stable, 

John B. Varick, for hardware at 

stable, .... 1 42 



78 


58 


47 


86 


4 


81 


45 


13 


4 


50 


9 


34 


9 


60 


21 


40 


22 


75 


.9 


37 


139 


01 


12 


92 


20 


00 


23 


96 


10 


00 


7 


50 


5 


55 


3 


48 



291 

Paid Sullivan Bros., re-settino; fur- 



. >-jui.ii van -uiuo.j ic-ocLijJiij^ lui- 

naces, 


45 30 


Hook and Ladder Co., blinds and 




paper-hangings, 


25 00 


Elliott & Mason, for rent of hall 




for Hook and Ladder Co., 5 




months, .... 


50 00 


Amount, 


$742 31 


Balance to new account, 


559 25 







.,201 56 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSES AND LOTS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation, . . . . ' . |2,000 00 

Cr. 

By Ash Street School House, bal. ac, $32 86 
Fuel, (transferred), . . .500 00 



Amount. .... $532 86 
Balance to new accfount, . 1,467 14 

^ $2,000 00 



ASH STREET SCHOOL HOUSE. 

Dr. 

To appropriation for new School 

Houses, balance account, . $32 I 

Cr. 

By paid T. A. Lane, for gas pipe, . $9 46 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

for timber and rods, . . 5 15 



292 

Paid James W, Preston, for work on 

bell tower, . . . . 5 50 

Henry S. Whitney, for water 

pipe, 2 00 

W. H. Fisk, for tassels and cord, 10 75 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL HOUSES. 

To balance from old account, . . $108 01 
Appropriation, .... 4,000 00 
Reserved fund, (transferred), . 7,000 00 



132 86^ 



Db, 



■111,108 01 
Cr. 



By paid John L. Kennedy, for paint- 
ing and glazing, . . . $273 70 

Joel Daniels, for painting, 

D. Milton Goodwin, vessel for 
ashes, ..... 

D. Milton Goodwin, for pipe and 
fitting up stoves, . 

John C. Young, for repairing 
roofs, ..... 

A. 0. Wallace, for lumber, 

R. M. Shirley, for lumber and 
work, ..... 

D. A. Simons, for paper-hang- 
ings, 

Austin, Johnson & Co., for fence 
capping, .... 

Robert Donnelly, joiner work, . 

A. H. Lowell, for casHngs, 

A. A. Haselton, for joiner work, 



34 


96 


10 


75 


38 


80 


19 


05 


19 


76 


8 


99 


1 


96 


3 


00 


10 


00 


8 


60 


3 


50 



293 



Paid John B. Varick, for window-line 




and brimstone, 


1 91 


Pike & Heald, for plumbing, 


618 35 


Columbus Wyman, for building 




wall, 


40 25 


•George Worthley, for stone, 


4 00 


A. P. Frje, for eje-bolt, . 


65 


Henry Ingalls, for lumber, and 




work on fence, . ... 


7 00 


Dunlap & Baker, for two years 




care of clock on Lincoln-st. 




school-house. 


80 00 


James A. Eastman, for white- 




washing, .... 


151 01 


J. S. Kidder & Co., for lime and 




cement, . . , ■ . 


40 20 


flackett & Fisher, for concreting 




yards and walks, . 


323 60 


Sullivan Brothers, for moving 




furnaces, .... 


20 00 


George W. Stevens, for archi- 




tectural services on Franklin- 




street school-house. 


30 00 


John Q. A. Sargent, contract for 




steam heating apparatus at 




Lincoln-street and Franklin- 




street school-houses. 


7,012 00 


John Q. A. Sargent, for extra 




work, ..... 


260 38 


Geo. Holbrook, for joiner work, 


591 34 


B. F. Fogg, for piping at Frank- 




lin-street school-house, . 


23 78 


Samuel Brown, for grading, 


5 00 


Joseph Carr, " 


3 00 


George Burton, " 


6 75 



294 



Paid James Hogan, for grading, 
Eli Perry, " 

Murtagh Maboney, " 
William O'Neil, " 
John Prindable, " 
Peter Griffin, " 

James Silk, " 

Edward Bresnahan, " 
A. B. Gushing, " 
John Gushing, " 

City teams, " 

Patrick Harrington, " 
William Burke, " 
Daniel Mahoney, " 
Patrick Sheehan, " 
Patrick Finn, " 

James McCaffry, " 
John Wnkins, " 

Amount, . . . 
Balance to new account, 



11 25 
13 88 
1 50 
38 
3& 
38 
13 
50 
50 
22 



3 
1 
1 
3 
3 

20 26 
3 94 



50 
00 
75 
25 
75 



P9,633 68 
1,474 33 



•111,108 01 



SCHOOLS. 



To balance from old account, . . S21 89 
Received of Jos. C Edgerly, Su- 
perintendent, for tuition, . 435 50 



Dr. 



1457 39 



By reserved fund, (transferred). 



Cr. 
1457 39- 



295 
FUEL. 

To balance from old account, . 
Appropriation, . 
Reserve fund, bal. account. 



-flO 40 

4,500 00 

653 30 



Bj paid L. B. Bod well & Co., f( 


3r 


wood and coal, 


. $4,360 50 


E. P. Johnson & Co., for woe 


)d 


and coal. 


67 75 


Dickey, Young & Co., for woe 


d 


and coal, 


42 28 


Alphonso Boyce, for wood. 


. 325 72 


J. Oscar Webster, " 


. 142 50 


Wm. P. Merrill, " 


45 50 


L. S. Proctor, for wood,' . 


31 00 


N. Preston, " 


46 50 


J. E. Stearns, " 


26 45 


A. C. Wallace, " 


3 00 


Moses Tracy, " 


1 50 


A, Dinsmore, -' 


2 50 


Elvin V. Corning," 


3 00 


Warren Harvey, hauling coal, 


26 25 


J. Tuck & Co., sawing wood, 


14 00 


A. B. Conant, " . 


5 00 


Frank Young, " 


1 50 


Greorge Dickey, " 


14 50 


Jere. Desmond, " 


2 25 


Walter E. Webster, " . 


2 00 



Dr. 



,163 70 



Or. 



$5,163 70 



296 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 

To balance from old account, $20 13 

Appropriation, .... 700 00 



Dr. 



$720 13 



Cr. 



$67 73 



20 


00 


5 


00 


3 


20 


18 


25 


15 


16 


6 


00 




40 


4 


02 



Paid E. R. Coburn, books, pens and 

paper, 

Higgins Brothers, set of draw- 
ing holders, .... 
John B. Varick, 2 doz. pointers, 

" " for shovels and 

screws, 
David Libby, brooms, 
Wm. H. Fisk, rebinding books 
Lucretia E. Mannahan, cash paid 

for drawings, 
Barr & Clapp, oil, 
Canney & Wiley, chemicals, 
F. B. Eaton, ink, pens, paper 

slates, etc., . 
Thomas Chubuck, parchment 

for diplomas, 
Isaac S. Coffin, dippers, . 
Daniels & Co., rope, cord, etc 
Barton & Co., matting, 
Joseph W. Ross, patent ink 

wells, .... 
Nichols & Hall, for pencils. 
City Hall Bookstore, books and 

ribbon, 
Straw & Lovejoy, for clocks, 
J. L. Hammett, orrery, maps 

and crayons, . . . 145 05 



23 35 



200 


00 


1 


50 


5 


68 


14 


10 


4 


17 


9 


00 


1 


70 


6 


00 



297 



id H. B. &. W. 0. Chamberlin, for 




chemicals, .... 


57 85 


Sullivan Brothers, dust-pans, . 


3 84 


Charles A. Smith, bells, dusters, 




brushes, &c.. 


65 88 


Manchester Post Office, postage. 


2 34 


D. M. Goodwin, brushes, brooms. 




&c., 


5 70 


IVm. C. Rogers, thermometers. 


3 75 


Pike & Heald, brushes, dusters 




and dippers. 


17 25 


Amount, .... 


$706 92 


Balance to new account, 


13 21 







$720 13 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account, . 
Appropriation, . 
Reserve fund, balance account, 



By paid Alfred Quimby, for books 
Nichols & Hall, for books, 
Manchester Post Office, for post- 
age, .... 
Brewer & Tileston, for books, 
F. B. Eaton, " 

Tewksbury & Brother, " 
Ginn Brothers, " 

Geo. B. Damon, " 

J. L. Hammett, " 

H. M. Cable, " 



. $43 05 




. 500 00 




43 50 






$586 55 
Cr. 




$9 22 




28 28 




- 

4 24 




29 19 




8 75 




. 105 41 




18 00 




3 60 




7 00 




1 50 





298 

Paid Lee & Shepherd, for books, . 5 40 

Thompson, Brown & Co., for 

books, ..... 
E. R. Coburn, for books, . 
John S. Hayes, " 
J. J. Kimball, " 
John L. Shorey, Nursery, 1 year, 
John A. S. Jacobs, for paper, . 
N. P. Hunt, for envelopes and 

postage, .... 



13 


60 


119 


50 


3 


84 


38 


37 


22 


00 


162 


00 


6 


75 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 

To Balance from old account, . . 4 32 

Appropriation, .... 500 00 



By paid Charles F. Livingston, for 

printing, . . . . $7 25 
Moore & Peasley, for printing, . 9 50 
Wm. E. Moore, " . 16 00 
Campbell & Hanscom, for print- 
ing and advertising, . . 209 28 



Amount, .... $242 03 
Balance to new account, . 262 29 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

Appropriation, .... $600 00 
Reserved fund, bal. account, . 335 09 



$586 5S 

Dr. 

$504 32 
Cr. 



$504 32 

Dr. 

$935 09 



299 



Cr. 



By paid Manchester Water Works, 
for water, 
Manchester Gas ^Light'Co., fo 

gas, .... 
U. S. and Canada Ex. Co., for 

express, 
Hill & Co., for express, 
H. F. Morse, for filling diplomas, 
J. Tuck & Co., for moving fur- 
niture, . . . • . 
J. Tuck & Co., cleaning rooms, 
Manchester Post Office, for post- 
age, .... 
W. H. Vickery, for keys, . 
I. S. Whitney, rent of pianos, 
Baldwin & Batchelder, for rent 

of organ, ... 
J. M. Sanborn, for tuning pianos 
Edwin Kennedy, for use team, 
N. H. Wilson, '♦ 

James Brothers, " 

Fogg & James, " 

J. L. Kennedy, for painting and 

graining, 
J. G. Edgerly," for cash paid, 
J. M." Chandler & Co., for keg 

and faucet, . 
Fairbanks & Folsom, for pail, 
Geo. H. Dudley, for joiner work 
Miss Fox, for cleaning rooms, 
Mary Hackay, " 

V. W. Fairbanks, " 
Maria H. Hildreth, " 
A. B. Conant, " 



$83 00 

85 18 

8 10 

4 60 

31 15 

4 7a 

14 45 

1 50 

2 35 
112 00 

10 00 
13 62 

2 50 

15 00 
24 00 
76 50 

7 00 
35 50 

3 60 
35 

33 63 

3 00 
10 00 
40 50 

4 00 
12 00 



300 



Paid Nellie M. Pearson, for balance 
of salary, .... 
J. M. Caverly, for moving set- 
tees, .... 
Canney & Wiley, for chemicals 
N. S. Clark, for ribbon, . 
Sullivan Brothers, setting up and 

cleaning stoves, . 
H. C. Merrill, for oil. 
Straw & Lovejoy, care of clocks 
Nettie Sawyer, for box crayons 
■J. E. Clough,for cleaning vaults 
Cyrus Warner, " 

A. Dinsmore, for 31 ft. "finish,' 
J. Q. A. Sargent, for blow-pipe 
Higgins Brothers, use of chairs 
Hunt& Lowell, for repairing po 

kers and wheelbarrow, . 
Daniels & Co., for hardware and 

brushes, 
J. B. Yarick, for two wrenches 
Robinson, Stearns & Co., for 

cleaning rooms, . 
Wm. H. Fisk, for screen frames 



32 50 



22 


00 


10 


44 


3 


87 


38 


30 


3 


54 


15 


75 




25 


54 


00 


75 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


50 



8 50 



17 


76 


1 


60 


6 


00 


1 


75 



$935 09 



CARE OF ROOMS. 

To Balance from old account, . . $34 25 

Appropriation, .... 2,500 00 

Reserve fund, balance account, . 2 57 



Dr. 



^2,536 82 



301 



Or- 



By paid Y. W. Fairbanks, 


$870 25 


J. Tuck & Co., 


745 24 


John A. Barker, 


444 50 


A. B. Conant, . 


. 257 50 


Addie M. Chase, 


50 50 


Emma A. H. Brown, 


41 25 


Nellie M. Gate, 


18 78 


Lana S. George, 


18 78 


Stella A. Cochran, . 


18 28 


Winfield S. Hall, . 


15 75 


Helen M. Locke, 


12 50 


Olive J. Randall, 


12 47 


Ellie A. Gilcreast, . 


11 28 


Maria H. Hildreth, . 


9 50 


M. Amanda Wyman, 


7 50 


Henry C. Merrill, for oil. 


2 79 


» 





12,536 82 



INCIDENTAL REPAIBS. 

To Appropriation, . . . 1600 00 

Reserved fund, balance account, 116 41 



By paid John L. Kennedy, setting 

glass and painting, 
Joel Daniels, setting glass and 

painting, .... 
M. O'Dovvd, setting glass and 

painting, .... 
J. N. Bruce, for numbers, 
J. J. Abbott, for lettering, 



105 52 

20 58 

7 10 

39 00 

7 06 



Dr. 



$716 41 
Cr. 



302 

Paid Pike & Heald, repairing stoves, 

pumps and gutters, . . 105 27 

Thomas A. Lane, piping Spring- 
street house for water, . 27 96 

J. Q. A. Sargent, repairing heat- 
ing apparatus, 

George Holbrook, joiner work, 

George H. Dudley, " 

Isaac S. Coffin, stove-pipe, broom 
and labor, .... 

M. J. Kendrick, moving lumber, 

Vickery & Stevens, repairing 
bells, . . . . . 

Straw & Lovejoy, for clock, 

B. W. Robinson, repairing plas- 
tering, .... 

Daniels & Co., hardware, 

J. B. Varick, " 

D. W. & F. P. Reynolds, repair- 
ing underpinning, . . 5 50 

George E. Moore, work in school- 
house yard, .... 3 40 

J. Tuck & Co., cleaning rooms, 2 00 

A. A. Haselton, repairing house 

at dough's Mills, . . 62 96 

H. B. «fe W. 0. Chamberlin, re- 
pairing microscope, . . 3 50 



44 


97 


12 


00 


220 


16 


9 


65 


1 


50 


1 


15 


3 


50 


1 


50 


31 


38 




75 



1716 41 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

Dr. 

To appropriation, .... $600 00 



303 



By paid David Thayer for services 

6 months, . . . . 360 00 
Transferred to reserve fund, . 240 00 



Cr. 



1600 00 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



To Balance from old account, . 
Appropriation, 



By paid Albert W. Bacheller, 
T. W. D. Worthen, . 
Lucretia E. Mannahan, 
Lizzie S. Campbell, 
Emma J. Ela, . 
Maria F. Kidder, 
John J. Sullivan, 
Mary A. Buzzell, 
Herbert W. Lull, 
Emma H, Perley, 
Mintie C. Edgerly, 
Nancy S. Bunton, 
Martha N. Mason, 
Anna 0. Heath, 
Daniel A. Clifford, 
Annette McDoel, 
Lottie R. Adams, 
Carrie E. Reid, 
Benj. F. Dame, 
Julia A. Baker, 
Mary J. Fife, 



. 11,684 


74 


. 38,000 


00 

; 


. 12,000 


00 


. 300 


00 


. 780 


00 


. 442 


50 


. 500 


00 


. 500 


00 


. 300 


00 


. 500 


00 


. 770 


00 


. 450 


00 


. 450 


00 


. 600 


00 


. 500 


00 


. 420 


00 


. 1,500 


00 


. 500 


00 


. 450 


00 


. 450 


00 


. 1,110 


00 


. 500 


00 


. 450 


00 



Dr. 



,684 74 



Cr. 



304 



Paid Belle R. Daniels, 






1435 00 


William E. Buck, . . . 1,500 00 


Anstrice G. Flanders, 




. 500 OO 


Rocilla M. Tuson, 




. 392 50 


Martha J. Boyd, 






. 450 00 


Sylvester Brown, 






. 1,000 OO 


Mary L. Sleeper, 






. 270 00 


Josie A. Bosher, 






. 157 60 


Andrew M. Heath, 






. 460 OO 


Mary A. Lear, 






. 392 50 


Ella F. Salisbury, 






. 429 75 


Emma A. H. Brown, 




. 450 OO 


Nellie I. Sanderson, 




416 25 


Mary A. Smith, 




311 25 


Hattie S. Tozer, 






450 OO 


Mary F. Barnes, 






425 OO 


Hattie G. Flanders, 






450 OO 


C. Augusta Abbott, 






450 OO 


Cleora E. Bailey, 






. 435 OO 


Lizzie P. Gove, 






382 50 


Anna J. Dana, 






224 00 


Ellen B. Rowell, 






371 25 


Estella N. Hewlett, 






375 00 


Georgianna Dow, 






450 OO 


Helen M. Morrill, . 






450 00 


Annie M. Offutt, 






400 00 


Abbie E. Abbott, 






450 00 


Emma F. Beane, 






450 00 


Elvira S. Prior, 






392 50 


Clara N. Brown, 






414 00 


E. J. Campbell, 






392 50 


Martha W. Hubbard, 






450 00 


Emma Cross, 






450 OO 


Nellie M. Whitney, . 






450 00 


Nellie E. Tappan, 






400 OO 



305 



Paid Jennie F. Bailey, 
Alice G. Lord, 
Abbie McClintock, 
Celia M. Chase, 
Sarah D. Lord, 
Augusta S. Downs, 
Nellie M. 'Gate, 
Addie M. Chase, 
S. Izetta Locke, 
Olive J. Randall, 
Stella A. Corcoran, 
Helen M. Locke, 
Maria H. Hildreth, 
Mary B. Lane, 
N. Amanda Wyman, 
Lana S. George, 
Jason J. Kimball, 
Cora F. Nichols, 
Lucy M. Perkins, 
Joseph S. Haines, 
Emma E. Lawrence, 
Emma J. Henry, 
Nellie A[. Pearson, 
Mary F. Dana, 
Thomas Corcoran, 
Ellie A. Gilcreast, 
Medora Weeks, 
Minnie E. Abbott, 
Julia A. Dearborn, 
Francis W. Parker, 
W. M. Stevens, 
Etta J. Carley, 
Sarah J. Greene, 
L. Nettie Sawyer, 
John B. Mills, 



1350 


00 


450 


00 


230 


00 


430 


00 


450 


00 


360 


00 


440 


00 


500 


00 


395 


00 


430 


00 


385 


00 


262 


50 


500 


00 


105 


00 


200 


00 


430 


00 


1,600 


00 


74 


25 


45 


50 


80 


00 


6 


00 


50 


50 


402 


50 


235 


00 


75 


00 


280 


00 


38 


25 


13 


50 


83 


75 


60 


00 


400 


00 


160 


00 


42 


00 


140 


00 


80 


00 



306 



id Annie H. Abbott, 
Prof. Mark Bailey, 


52 50 
208 33 


Amount, 

Balance to new account. 


. $39,436 08 
248 6Q 







,684 74 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account. 
Appropriation, . 



Paid John Q. A. Sargent, for piping 
room, .... 
George H. Dudley, repairs, 
Charles E. Clough, trucking, 
Barr & Clapp, oil, . 
Manchester Gas-Light Co., gas 
Saturday Night Dispatch, adver 

tising, .... 
Campbell & Hanscom, adver 

tising, ... 

J. Tuck & Co., care of rooms, 
Lucy R. Heath, for teaching, 
Emma J. Henry, " 

Thomas D. Luce, " 

Julia A. Dearborn, " 
Estelle N. Howlett, " 
John B. Mills, " 

M. P. Hall, . 
George E. Cochran, teaching, 
Addie A. Stearns, *- 
Jonathan Smith, " 



$249 51 




1,500 00 






$1,749 51 






Cr. 


$16 32 




7 00 




75 




3 45 




39 96 





3 25 

16 00 
82 00 
24 00 
43 75 
45 00 
57 25 
45 00 

126 00 

1 50 

57 00 

41 25 

108 00 



307 



Paid Lucy W. Ferkins, 


teaching. 


15 00 


L. G. G. Beleveau 


5 


60 00 


Eugenia Lord, 


U 


66 50 


Mary Hewlett, 


(( 


3 75 


Annie M. Nichols, 


a 


89 25 


M. A. Lear, 


u 


. 2 25 


Sylvester Brown, 


a 


13 50 


Lizzie J. Brown, 


u 


7 50 


James E. Stone, 


(( 


106 00 


Ella A. Brock, 


(( 


53 00 


Manchester Bill 


Posting Co. 


5 


posting notices, 


• • 


2 25 


Amount, 


11,126 48 


Balance to new 


account. 


. 623 03 







,749 51 



RECAPITULATION. 



Paid for Ash-street school house, 


bal- 




ance of construction account, 


$32 86 


Repairs of School Houses, 




9,633 68 


Fuel, .... 




5,163 70 


Furniture and supplies, . 




706 92 


Books and stationery. 




. 586 55 


Printing and advertising. 




242 03 


Contingent expenses. 




935 09 


Care of rooms. 




2,536 82 


Incidental repairs, . 




. 716 41 


Truant officer. 




. 360 00 


Teachers' salaries, . 




39,436 08 


Evening schools. 




1,126 48 



,476 62 



308 




WATER-WORKS. 




Dr. 


To Receipts for hydrant service, 


113,165 00 


Receipts for water rents, 


13,954 05 


Receipts for portable engine. 




&c., sold, 


2,089 45 


Receipts for anvil sold, 


15 00 


Appropriation, 


40,000 00 




,<j!>fiQ ooQ na> 








Cr. 


Paid January pay roll. 


$1,587 23 


Charles K. Walker, Superin 


- 


tendent's salary, ten months. 


1,000 00 


Charles K. Walker, cash paid, 


115 11 


Arthur E. Stearns, clerk. 


. 1,099 00 


John C. Chase, clerk. 


. 351 00 


J. T. Fanning, engineer, . 


. 654 68 


" " cash paid. 


12 31 


tools. 


20 00 


C. C. Cole, labor, . 


600 00 


" " three lanterns, 


4 50 


George H. Norman, on contraci 


1- 


for piping, . 


25,000 00 


Thomas P. Frost, labor, . 


392 69 


John Houltshouser, labor, 


38 75 


Mr. Moody, " 


4 50 


J. S. Webster, " 


59 62 


James Healey, " 


12 00 


Michael Healey, " 


167 80 


Jerry Healey, " 


18 00 


Albert N. Scott, " 


46 88 


William Griffin, " 


10 50 


William Kauffer, " 


4 00 


Warren M. Kelley, " . 


717 50' 



309 



Paid Frank Truell, for labor, 

George Dunbar, " 

Sidney Dunbar, " 

Robert Donnelly, " 

George Emerson, " 

J.O.Webster, " 

Samuel Brown, Jr., job team, 

Gilman Clough, for team, 

Moses Tracy, for labor, 

S. M. Sonder, " 

John Williams, " 

Patrick Kean, " 

Thomas Solan, " 

E. A. G. Holmes, for making 
counter, .... 

John L. Kennedy, for painting, 

H. S. Whitney, for drain pipe, . 

•C. H. Hodgman & Co., for truck- 
ing, 

H. & H. R. Pettee, for cement, 

J. S. Kidder & Co., 

J. Hodge, lumber for counter, . 

Joseph B. Sa57yer, for engi- 
neer's services, 

Ellis & Patterson, for engineer's 
services, .... 

Lyman W. Colby, photographs 
and drawings, 

Julius Mayer & Co., transferring 
and printing 200 plans of wa- 
ter survey, .... 

D. Milton Goodwin, for waste, . 
Pat. Water & Gas Pipe Co., /or 

repairing pipe, 

E. P. Johnson & Co., for coal, . 



459 


50 


131 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 


33 


00 


13 


25 


5 


00 


136 


87 


41 


56 


150 


00 


58 


50 


17 


63 


17 


63 


94 


88 


89 


03 


155 25 


13 


50 


8 


95 


4 


00 


61 


82 


27 


50 


125 


75 


36 


00 


20 


00 


20 


30 


190 


63 


263 


95 



77 


50' 


5 


50 


267 


65 


59 


25 


20 


70 


7,177 


49 


385 


70 


91 


66 


5 


50 


18 


82 


146 


21 


1,109 


95 



310 

Bodwell & Co., for coal, 

I. R. Dewey, for wood, 

Dickey, Young & Co., for coal, . 

National Meter Co., for 1 meter, 

James Donnelly, " 

John Q. A. Sargent, for laying 
service pipe, etc., . 

John B. Varick, for hardware, . 

Concord Railroad, for freight, . 

Daniels & Co., for tools, . 

S. C. Forsaith & Co., for iron 
and labor, .... 

A. C. Wallace, meter boxes, etc.. 

Union Meter Co., for meters and 
repairs, .... 

Pike & Heald, for iron, pipe and 

labor, 40 45 

J. M, Chandler & Co., for pow- 
der and fuse, . . . 3 55 

John A. Thomas, for thawing 

out service pipe, ... 29 00 

James Brothers, use of team, . 21 00 

Thos. A. Lane, for lot of tools, 85 50 

Thos. A. Lane, for hydrant seats 

and work 228 64 

Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine 
Co. No. 1, for thawing out hy- 
drants, . . . . 50 40' 

Fire-King Steam Fire Engine 
Co., No. 2, for thawing out hy- 
drants, . . . . 10 00- 

N. S. Bean, Steam Fire Engine 
Co. No. 4, for thawing out hy- 
drants, 18 oa 

Manchester Fire Department, for 

coal 20 Oa 



311 



Paid Leonard & Ellis, for machine oil, 129 21 
P. 0. Cheney & Co., for waste, 13 50 
Boston Machine Co., for hy- 
drants and fixtures, . . 1,679 75 
Win. H. Fisk, for stationery, . 23 64 
M. W. Sawyer, for soap, . . 5 62 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing 

Co., for spigots, . . . 1,449 53 
Isaac S. Coffin, for stove and 

gal. bos, . . . . 24 65 
Manchester Locomotive Works, 

for water gauges, etc., . . 184 18 
A. H. Lowell, for gate boxes, 

valves, etc 350 67 

Campbell & Hanscom, for print- 
ing and advertising, . . 118 81 
John B. Clarke, for printing, . 46 70 
Charles F. Livingston, " . 45 38 

Wm. E. Moore, " . 26 00 

Samuel Webber, testing wheels, 265 00 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany, castings and forgings, . 44 91 
R. D. Wood & Co., for pumping 

machinery, .... 2,669 59 
Swain Turbine Manufacturing 
Co., for moving machinery to 
Lowell, . . . . 15 00 

Richard T. Ritchie, 13 lbs. rope, 3 25 

Pattee & Perkins, for hydrants, . 475 00 
A. H. Lowd, for gate boxes, . 96 60 
Mohawk & Hudson Co., for 1 

gate, 28 00 

R. W. Flanders, for repairing 

derrick, . . . . 6 00 



i50,09l 80 



312 

Amount brou^it forward, . $50,091 80 

Overdrawn, Jan. 1, 1875, . 1,590 43 

Balance to new account, . 17,541 27 



169,223 50 



AWARDS FOR LAND TAKEN FOR HIGEIWAYS. 

Dr. 



To balance from old account, . $5,520 15 

Appropriation, .... 5,000 00 



$10,520 15 
Cr. 



By paid Michael McCabe, for land 

taken for Manchester street, 16 25 

Sophronia Young, for land taken 

for Taylor street, . . .100 00 

Concord & Portsmouth Railroad, 

for land taken for Beech st., . 1 00 

Concord Railroad, for land taken 

for Beech street, . . . 30 00 

Manchester & Lawrence Rail- 
road, for land taken for Beech 
street, 20 00 

Waterman Smith, for land taken 

for Beacon street, . . . 212 43 

Amos Haselton, for land taken 

for Cohas Avenue, . . 6 50 

M. V. B. Edgerly, for land taken 

for Concord street, . . 100 00 

Fisher Ames, for land taken for 

High street, . . . . 76 00 

Sarah M. Baker, for land taken 

for Belmont street, . . 84 67 



313 

Paid Wra. P. Rundlett, for land taken 

for Ash east back street, . 22 00 
Chas. K. Walker, for land taken, 102 40 
Jas. P. Walker, for land taken, 102 40 
•Wm. W. Baker, for land taken 

for Elm street, sonth, . . 590 10 
Susan W. Stark, for land taken 

for Maple street, . . .689 92 
Obadiah Jackson, for land taken 

for High street, . . . 454 55 
Obadiah Jackson, for land taken 

for Bridge street, . . . 274 36 
Obadiah Jackson, for land taken 

for Russell street, . . . 97 41 
Julia A. Cutler, for changing 

grade of Amherst and Ashland 

street, 200 00 



Amount, . . . .$3,129 99 
Transferred to new highways, 4,750 00 
Balance to new account, . 2,640 16 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



To balance from old account, . 
Appropriation, ... 
Reserved fund, balance account, 



1355 


62 


1,500 


00 


683 


63 



By paid Gamewell & Co., for striker 

at Ash-street school-house, . 11,250 00 

For gong, .... 150 00 

For alarm-box, . . .250 00 



110,520 15 

Dr. 

^2,539 25 
Cr. 



314 



Paid Charles Williams, jr., call-bell, 
Charles Williams, jr., gong, 
Charles Williams, jr., wire, 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing 

postal cards, 
Charles F. Peasley, for printing 

cards, .... 
Daniels & Co., bits and brace. 
Concord Railroad, for freight, 

A. H. Lowell, for weights, 
" " zincs, . 
" " ladder, 

John L. Kennedy, painting, 
Charles R. Colley, setting glass 

in bell-tower, 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

timber, bolts and brackets, 
S. Forsaith & Co., forging, 
Charles G. Blake, work on bell 

striker, 
James W. Preston, work on bell 

striker and alarm-boxes, 
Sullivan Brothers, wash-tub, 
Manchester Print Works, vitriol, 

B. Frank Fogg, repairing pipe, 
G. W. Goffe, 10 telegraph poles, 
Geo. R. Simmons, for labor, 

[ James Brothers, for team, 
Hunt & Lowell, for staples, 
B. C. Kendall, care of battery 1 

year, 

B. C. Kendall, for team, 
Geo. W. Butterfield, for labor, . 
A. B. Gushing, " 

T. M. Conant, " 



16 20 
16 37 

25 37 

, 2 25 

6 50 
3 64 
1 41> 

41 36 
104 57 

5 80 
24 54. 

10 OO 

14 64 

7 01 

42 30 



59 


24 


1 


25 


125 


00 


2 


05 


20 


00 


28 


75 


2 


00 


1 


75 


300 


00 


1 


90 




50 




50 




60 





315 




Wm. Anderson, 


for labor, 


38 


John Punch, 




7 50 


Peter Griffin, 




6 OO 


John Prindable, 




7 50 


George Burton, 




75 


Thomas Moran, 




75 


City teams, 




1 89 







DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 



To Balance from old account. 
Appropriation, . 



82 60 
200 00 



id Raymond & McLaughlin, team 


•13 00 


Manchester Mills, cloth, . 


37 40 


B. L. Hartshorn, team. 


6 00 


Smyth & Williams, rent of hall 


20 00 


Daniels & Co., rope and nails. 


83 


L. A. Ward, team, . 


8 00 


John B. Clarke, printing, 


5 50 


John M. Chandler, powder, 


15 00 


Charles F. Livingston, printing 




flags, .... 


22 75 


Jere. Hodge, rods and labor, 


19 50 


William Shepherd, team, 


3 00 


Dignam's Band, music, 


51 00 


A. Quimby, music. 


4 32 


1st N. H. Battery, salute, 


4 50 


Amount, . . . . 


$200 80 


Balance to new accountj 


1 80 



Dr. 



1202 60 
Cr. 



1202 60 



316 
GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



To Appropriation, 



Dr. 



Paid Riddle, Bean & Co., for grading 
in front of their building on 
Union street, 
William Anderson, labor, 
Nicholas B. Abbott, " 
D. B. Ayer, " 

William Burke, " 

George Burton, " 

Edward Bresnahan, " 
Timothy Buckley, " 
Patrick Butler, " 

Michael Broderick, " 
Blodgett & Young, setting edge 

stone, .... 
James Broderick, labor, . 
Michael Buckley, " 
Charles Brown, " 
Jere. Bresnahan, " 
Daniel Boyce, " 

George W. Butterfield, labor, 
Edward Burns, labor, 
Michael Baker, " 
Harry Clark, " 
John Callahan, " 
James M. Crombie, labor, 
George Cate, " 

John Cahili, " 

Joseph Comfort, " 

Joseph Comfort, jr., " 
Patrick Campbell, " 



25 


00 


27 


38 


22 


00 


5 


63 


3 


38 


8 


63 


22 


50 


1 


13 


12 


75 


1 


13 



24 00 
3 00 



15 


00 


6 


00 


1 


50 


2 


25 


20 


00 


11 


26 


1 


50 




75 


7 


88 


23 


13 


12 


75 


1 


50 


12 


75 


1 


50 


3 


00 



317 



Paid Patrick Conway, 


for 


labor,. 


3 00 


Lawrence M. Connor, 


a 


1 88 


T. M. Conant, 




u 


19 00 


A. B. Cashing, 




u 


16 00 


City teams, 




a 


106 95 


Charles Cheney, 




a 


68 50 


Daniel Connor, 




a 


21 31 


Charles Cronan, 




a 


1 50 


John Cashing, 




a 


26 31 


Thomas Carrigan, 




a 


6 75 


Jerry Connor, 




(( 


11 63 


John Conca^mon, 




a 


15 01 


Patrick Cooney, 




(( 


75 


John M. Chandler 


& 


Co., pow- 




der and fuse. 


, 


, 


63 20 


James M. Dickey, 


abor,* 


72 25 


Daniel H, Dickey, 






50 63 


Bart, Doyle, 






13 50 


Jere. Donnovan, 






1 50 


Michael Donnelley, 






4 13 


Jolui Dunn, 






1 50 


Ellis & Patterson, engineer's ser 




vices, . 


, 


, 


113 75 


Frank Everett, labor. 


, 


6 75 


James Eastman, " 




, 


1 50 


James Flemming, labor, . 


1 60 


James Flemming, j] 


f., labor. 


10 50 


Patrick Finn, 






32 88 


James Fogg, 






1 50 


James A. Flanders 


5 




95 01 


Peter Griffin, 






29 25 


Patrick Grogan, 






6 00 


Warren Harvey, 






87 50 


Mark E. Harvey, 






82 50 


Head & Dowst, work 


on fence 


8 25 



318 



Paid William Healey, labor, 


38 


Hackett & Fisher, concrete on 




north side of Concord street, 


52 60 


James Jennings, labor, 


1 50 


John L. Kennedy, setting glass 




broken by blasting, 


5 25 


William H. Kennedy, for labor, 


30 00 


Patrick Kelley, " 


4 88 


F. P. Kimball, " 


17 50 


Dimond Kennard, 19 chestnut 




posts, . . . . . 


3 80 


Micliael McGrath, for labor, 


1. is- 


John Larkin, " 


le 88 


John Lynch, " 


4 00 


James Lyons, " 


2 00 


Daniel Mahoney, " 


18 75 


John McCaffry, " 


3 38 


Thomas Moran, " 


1 88 


Lawrence McCarty, " 


12 00 


John Mullen, " 


1 13 


John Murray, " 


13 50 


Andrew McCook, " 


2 63 


James McGrath, " 


30 00 


Bart. Moriarty, " 


75 


James McCabe, " 


75 


Jerry Malianna, " 


24 00 


William Maxwell, " 


21 50 


Nathaniel Manning, " 


13 50 


Augustus Merrill, " 


13 50 


John Nolan, " 


12 00 


Charles Newry, " 


1 50 


William O'Neil, " 


12 75 


Eli Perry, « 


3 38 


John Punch, " 


40 13 


Joseph B. Pierce, " 


6 75 



319 



Paid John Prindable, for labor, • 


2 


63 


Edwin Quimby, 


u 


13 


50 


Roda Robinson, 


u 


8 


25 


Michael Regan, 


a 


2 


63 


James Ryan, 


a 


17 


25 


Peter Reynolds, 


a 


15 


38 


Augustus J. Roby, 


a 


4 


60 


Stephen Spane, 


a 


13 


50 


Joseph L. Smith, 


u 


19 


13 


Alec Shhie, 


u 


10 


50 


Peter Scannell, 


ii 


14 


50 


Loami Searls, 


u 


4 


50 


Israel Shepherd, 


(( 


15 


63 


Patrick Sheehan, 


u 


1 


88 


William Smith, 


ii 


2 


63 


Moses W. Sargent, 


ii 




75 


G. A. Tufts, 


ii 


24 


75 


Chas. E. Worthen, 


ii 


16 


00 


F. Wells, 


ii 


45 


74 


A. Wells, 


(( 


14 


63 


John Welch, 


(( 


10 


75 


Amount, 


11,885 87 


Balance to new account, 


. 114 


13 








flfi-2 000 ftfl 









HYDRANT SERVICE. 



To appropriation, 

By paid Water- Works, for water, 
Balance to new account, . 



$13,920 00 
. 1,580 00 



Dr. 

115,500 00 
Cr. 

115,500 00 



320 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



To balance from old account, 
Appropriation, . 



^1,197 47 
5,000 00 



Dr. 



,197 47 



Cr. 



By paid Manchester -Water Works, 

for stone crusher, . 
Manchester -Water Works, for 

water, .... 
S. C. Porsaith & Co., for repairs 

of engine and crusher, . 
L. B. Bodwell, for fuel, . 
Geo. G. Griffin, for wood, 
D. M. Goodwin, for waste, 
J. M. Chandler & Co., for oil, 
Horace Johnson, for gravel, 
A. Bodwell, for stone, and labor 

of team, 
P. C. Cheney & Co., for waste 
John B. Varick, for tools, 
Daniels & Co., for tools, . 
John G. Coult, for stone, . 
Isaac C. Flanders, Supt., . 
Isaac C. Flanders, for team, 
Jere. Abbott, for labor, 
Wm. Anderson, " 
N. B. Abbott, " . , 

D. D. Ayer, " 

Geo. W. Butterfield, for labor, 
Edward Bresnahan, " 
Jere. Bresnahan, " 
Charles Brown, " 

Michael Buckley, " 



5,089 45 
37 50 

30 18 
53 10 

124 50 

6 70 

43 

40 00 

136 50 

75 

61 14 

31 61 

10 00 
22 50 

11 25 
16 88 

12 75 
18 00 
29 25 
10 50 

8 25 

8 25 
12 00 

9 75 



321 



Jas. Broderick, for labor, 


15 38 


John Callahan, 


(( 


4 60 


Jerry Connor, 


(( 


75 


Jas. M. Crombie, 


« 


26 88 


John Cushlng, 


« 


19 27 


Thos. Carrigan, 


u 


6 06 


Daniel Connor, 


il 


4 50 


Charles Crombie, 


u 


15 75 


John Concannon, 


11 


34 50 


Thos. Callagher, 


(( 


13 50 


Lawrence M. Connor 


> 


5 25 


Anthony Crosby, 


cc • 


4 50 


T. M. Conant, 


(( 


12 00 


A. B. Cashing, 


(( 


12 00 


Joseph Comfort, 


(( 


15 75 


Jos. Comfort, Jr., 


(( 


17 25 


Timothy Connor, 


(( 


12 25 


Hugh Cunningham, 


(( 


38 


City teams, 


(( 


. 140 60 


City Farm, 


(( 


29 75 


Charles Cheney, 


ii 


112 41 


Jerry Cullity, 


a 


9 00 


Daniel Collins, 


u 


30 75 


Jerry Connors, 


il 


28 50 


Thos. Connor, 


u 


18 38 


John Connor, 


u 


1 50 


Simon Dodge, 


(( 


143 50 


H. H. Dickey, 


(( 


. 133 13 


D. H. Dickey, 


(( 


69 75 


Jas. M. Dickey, 


u 


60 63 


Michael Donnelly, 


n 


68 26 


Bart. Doyle, 


it 


16 13 


Wm. Dunn, 


11 


5 63 


Wm. Doland, 


(( 


30 75 


Moses Duford, 

21 


(( 


8 25 



322 



Paid John Dowd, for 


labor. 


3 00 


Frank Everett, 


a 


86 69 


Webster Eaton, 


a 


24 75 


James Emerson, 


(( 


2 25 


James Flemming, 


u 


12 00 


James Flemming, Jr. 




11 25 


James Fitzgerald, 


(( 


9 00 


Thos. Fitzsimmons, 


(( 


11 25 


Thos. Foley, 


u 


4 50 


Jas. A. Flanders, 


« 


75 


Terrance Gillis, 


a 


42 38 


G. W. Gilbert, 


a ■ 


75 


E. S. Harvey, 


a 


55 13 


Mark E. Harvey, 


(( 


. 110 38 


Wm. Healy, 


(( 


20 26 


James Jennings, 


a 


5 63 


J. Jarvies, 


u 


33 76 


William H. Kennedy 


, labor. 


5 00 


Thomas Kelley, 


u 


31 50 


Frank Kelley, 


ii 


24 38 


Patrick Kennedy, 


u 


1 50 


Christopher Keefe, 


u 


41 26 


Patrick Kelley, 


(( 


3 74 


A. H. Lowell, for castings foi 




crusher. 


. 


8 31 


Murtagh Mahoney, for labor, 


5 63 


James Lucy, 


(( 


2 63 


John Larkin, 


(( 


41 26 


William Lane, 


« 


21 00 


William Maxwell, 


ii 


3 00 


Andrew McCook, 


il 


19 88 


Daniel Mahoney, 


ii 


51 38 


James McGovern, 


ii 


6 00 


Patrick Murray, 


ii 


9 75 


Nathaniel Manning, 


ii 


9 00 



323 



Paid Michael Mulligan, for labor, 


2 63 


James McCabe, 


a 


5 25 


Augustus Merrill, 


u 


4 88 


Michael M'Grath, 


(( 


1 50 


George W. Merriam, 


a 


9 06 


John McCaffry, 


a 


75 


Charles Newry, 


a 


8 25 


Daniel O'Leary, 


n 


4 13 


William O'Neal, 


a 


2 25 


James Otis, 


a 


22 50 


Joseph B. Pierce, 


(( 


55 13 


John Punch, 


a 


40 50 


Jolin Prindable, 


a 


2 G3 


Edwin Quimby, 


a 


13 50 


Peter Reynolds, 


a 


18 38 


Michael Regan, 


a 


22 88 


Alexander Stewart, 


a 


6 00 


William Smith, 


a 


1 13 


J. G. Sargent, 


a 


10 13 


■Quinlan Sullivan, 


a 


13 50 


Alec Shine, 


" « 


11 25 


Loami Searles, 


u 


75 


Stephen Spane, 


(C 


1 50 


Daniel Sullivan, 


(( 


29 25 


Dennis Sullivan, 


» 


31 13 


Joseph L. Smith, 


u 


14 63 


Thomas Tremblay, 


ii 


32 25 


John Thompson, 


il 


30 38 


G. A. Tucker, 


u 


10 13 


Geo. A. Tufts, 


u 


68 63 


John Wilkins, 


(( 


84 76 


A. Wells, labor, 


(( 


11 25 


Charles E. Worthen, 


(( 


21 79 


John Welch, 


u 


42 25 


Thomas Walker, 


(( 


4 50 



324 



Paid John P. Young, for labor, 

Amount, 

Balance to new account, 



58 61 



^5,315 53 
881 94 



5,197 4T' 



NEW HOSE HOUSE. 
To balance from old account. 



Paid Asa K. Emery, for extra work 

on building, 
Amoskeag Manuf 'g Co., iron, 
B. Frank Fogg, piping house, 
John L. Kennedy, painting and 

graining, 
D. Milton Goodwin, lamps, 
A. Dinsmore, lumber for fence 
Frank Stickney, work on fence 
J. W. Batchelder, work on fence 
H. G. Seaman, work on fence, 

Amount, 

Balance to reserved fund. 



79 


42 


4 


89 


29 

q 


04 


1 

62 


55 


5 


52 


, 82 


36 


, 31 


25 


33 


12 


2 


50 


. 1330 65 


13 


04 



De. 

1343 6^ 

Or. 



$343 69^ 



CONCORD SQUARE FENCE. 



To balance from old account, 
Appropriation, . 



$852 81 
2,000 00 



Dr. 



$2,852 81 



325 



47 50 
3 52 

42 62 
1 66 



Paid Lamson & Harden, for stone, . $756 25 

Martin Fitzgerald, for fence on north 
side, 1,422 00 

Ellis & Patterson, engineer's ser- 
vices, .... 

A. Dinsmore, lumber for targets 

Clark & Garland, stone, . 

Daniels & Co., nails, 

I. C. Flanders, labor setting 
stone, .... 

William H. Kennedy, labor, 

F. P. Kimball, " 

Chas. E. Worthen, " 

Daniel Collins, " 

John Fittsimmons, " 

Thomas Fittsimmons, " 

Barney Farrey, " 

Amount, 

Balance to new account. 



Cr. 



30 


00 


22 


00 


18 


00 


16 


88 


16 


00 


13 


00 


3 


75 


8 


25 


$2,401 


43 


451 


38 



1,852 81 



SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account, . 
Appropriation, 
Reserve fund, bal. account, 



By paid for Water Bonds, 



. $2,000 00 

1,000 00 

11 83 


$3,011 83 

Or. 
$3,011 83 





326 




STATE TAX. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, .... 


136,428 00^ 


By paid State Treasurer, for Collec- 
tor's receipt, .... 


Cr. 

$36,428 00> 


COUNTY TAX. 


Dr. 


To appropriation, .... 


$18,761 07 


By paid County Treasurer for Collec- 
tor's Receipt, 


Cr. 

$18,761 or 



RESERVED FUND. 

To balance from old account, . . $4,340 39 
Appropriation, .... 24,760 93 
" for schools, trans- 

ferred, bal. account, . . 457 39 
for Truant Officer, transferred 

bal. account, . . .240 00 

for new hose house and appara- 
tus, transferred to bal. ac. . 13 04 



Dr. 



,811 75- 



By account of city teams, transferred, $1 ,446 18 



Fire Alarm Telegraph, 
Valley Cemetery, 
Repairs of school houses, 
City Farm, . 
Granite Bridge, . 



683 63 

1,000 00 

7,000 00 

772 21 

1,095 18. 



Cr. 



327 



lighway District, No. 2, 


trans. 


12,856 91 


" " 3, 


ii 


23 


32 


" " 5, 


u 


75 


00 


" " 6, 


ii 


120 


96 


" " 10, 


ii 


58 


00 


" 12, 


ii 


75 


00 


New highways. 


(( 


246 


08 


Watering streets, 


(( 


50 


41 


Lighting streets, 


(( 


. 327 


41 


Sewers and drains. 


(( 


. 2,330 


88 


Police department, 


(( 


. 1,813 


35 


Soldiers' monument, 


(( 


11 


83 


Fuel, transferred. 


. 


. 153 


30 


Books and' stationery, 


trans 






ferred, . 


. 


43 


50 


Contingent expenses. 


trans 






ferred. 


. 


. 335 


09 


Care of rooms, transferred. 


2 


57 


Incidental repairs, transferred, 


. 116 


41 


Interest transferred, 


• 


. 2,443 


49 


Amount, 


$23,080 71 


Balance to new account, 


. 6,731 


04 








!1R9Q 81 1 T.^i 


• 







LAND SOLD FROM CITY FARM. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account, . 
Received of Charles Williams, 
Thomas Wilson's heirs, . 
Joseph E. Bennett, . 



13,411 


23 


5 


92 


106 


00. 


686 


88 



1,796 27 



328 

LIQUOE AGENCY. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account, . . 1409 49 



TAXES FOR 1875. 



Dr. 



To resident tax assessed, . |314,101 30 
Non-resident tax assessed, 1,855 99 

$315,957 "29 

Cr. 

By abatements, .... $608 72 
Discounts, for early payment, . 5,545 13 
Collections, . . . 266,689 07 
Balance, outstanding, . 43,114 37 

$315,957 29 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

List for 1875, John Hosley, collec- 
tor, .... $43,114 37 

List for 1874, John Hosley, colleo- 

tor, 6,846 31 

List for 1873, William G. Everett, 

collector, .... 4,491 49 

List for 1872, William G. Everett, 

collector, .... 2,892 59 

List for 1871, H. R. Chamberlin, col- 
lector, 6,327 84 

List for 1870, H. R. Chamberlin, col- 
lector, 6,383 70 

List for 1869, H. R. Chamberlin, col- 
lector, 6,466 39 



329 



List for 1868, H. R. Chamberlin, col- 
lector, 5,157 97 



List for 1867, H. R. 

lector, . 
List for 1866, H. R. 

lector, . 
List for 1865, H. R. 

lector, . 
List for 1864, H. R. 

lector, . 
List for 1863, H. R. 

lector, . 
List for 1862, H. R. 

lector, . 
List for 1861, H. R. 

lector, . 
List for 1860, H. R. 

lector, . 
List for 1859, John 

lector, . 



Chamberlin, col- 

. 6,156 79 
Chamberlin, col- 

. 7,691 81 
Chamberlin, col- 

. 4,045 95 
Chamberlin, col- 

. '. 4,145 81 
Chamberlin, col- 

. 2,719 90 
Chamberlin, col- 

.^2,431 18 
Chamberlin, col^ 

. 4,493 43 
Chamberlin, cOl- 

. 2,265 49 
L. Kelley, col- 

. 8,245 76 
1123,876 78 



List of unpaid taxes assessed in 1867 upon stock of in- 
habitants of Manchester, owned in banks of the following 
towns, to wit : 

Pittsfield, $25 56 

Laconia, 21 30 

Portsmouth, . . . ... 21 30 

Derry, 52 82 

$120 78 



330 
Valuation, Taxes, &c. 



TEAR. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Foil Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1838 . . 


$555,270 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


$300 


1839 . . 


604,963 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


300 


1840 . . 


946,200 


3,986 56 


772 


2 20 


300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


.13,584 72) 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,661 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 68 


800' 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


3oa 


1850 . . 


• 5,832,080- 


» 48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


. 54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


24a 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


24u 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,8U4 87 


3,661 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862. . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 60 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


6 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,642,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 



331 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 



To whom Payable. 



When 


Payable. 


Jan. 


1, 1880 


July 
July 
July 
July 
Jan, 


22, 


1877 
1878 
1878 
1882 
1888 


Nov. 




1893 


April 
July 
April 
Aug, 




1884 
1894 
1885 
1876 


Aug. 




1877 


Aug. 




1878 


Aug. 




1879 


Aug. 




1880 


Aug. 




1881 


Aug. 




1882 


Aug. 




1883 


Aug. 




1884 


Aug. 




1885 


Aug. 




1886 


Aug. 




1887 


Jau. 




1887 


Jan. 




1892 


Jan. 




1897 


Jan. 




1902 


July 
July 




, 1890 
1895 



Principal. 



Jan. 1 
July 1 
July 9 
July 22 
July 1 
Jan. 1 
Oct. 31 
April 1 
July 1 
April 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Jan. 
Jan, 
Jan. 
Jan. 
July 
July 



1856 


City 


Bonds, 


1857 


(( 


(( 


1858 


Nehemiah Hunt 


1858 


( 


( a 


1862 


City 


Bonds, 


1863 


u 




1863 


u 




1864 


u 




1864 


a 




1865 


u 




1869 


"• 




1869 


(( 




1869 


(( 




1869 


a 




1869 


a 




1869 


u 




1869 


(; 




1869 


u 




1869 


a 




1869 


u 




1869 


u 




1869 


u 




1872 


Water Bonds, 


1872 


u 


(( 


1872 


u 


u 


1872 


it 


u 


1874 


a 


a 


1874 


a 


(( 



sio,ooo oa 

22,5U0 00 

2,400 00 

1,100 00 

22,500 00 

35,000 00' 

70,000 00' 

70,(i00 OO 

60,000 00 

10,000 00 

1,500 00' 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

10,000 00 

1,500 00 

10,000 00 

1,500 00 

5,000 00' 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

3,500 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 OO 

100,000 00 



52 



Amount of funded debt for Jan. 1, 

1875, . . . . 
Paid during the year, 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 

1876, . . . . 
Amount of temporary loan, Jan. 

1, 1875, .... 
Added during the year, 

Paid during the year, . 

Amount of temporary loan, Jan. 

1, 1876, . 
Interest due, (estimated,) . 
Bills outstanding, Jan. 1, 1876, 

Total indebtedness, Jan. 1 , 1876 
Cash in the treasury, Jan. 1, 1876 
Notes due the City, 
Interest on the same, 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1876, 
" " " 1875, 

Increase of net indebtedness dur- 
ing the year, . 



1939,000 00 
1,500 00 



$5,300 00 
38,000 00 

$43,300 00 
41,000 00 



1937,500 00 







2,800 
20,000 


00 
00 




44 

65 


23,919 


26 


►, $79,598 
. 2,462 


$983,719 


26 


513 


69 


82,574 

$901,144 

893,171 


78 






48 
71 



',972 77 



Attest 



JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 



City Auditor. 



333 
CITY PROPERTY. 



City Library building, 

Permanent inclosure of Commons, . 

City Hall and lot, .... 

City Farm and permanent improvements, 

Stock, ' tools, furniture and provisions at 
City Farm, .... 

Engines, hose and apparatus, . 

Engine house, stable and land. Vine st., 

Hose House and Lot, Maple st., 

Reservoirs, ..... 

Hearse, houses, tombs, and new cemetery 

Court House and lot, 

Common sewers, .... 

Safes, furniture and fixtures at City Hall, 

Street lanterns, posts and pipes. 

Water Works, ..... 

Horses, carts, plows and tools for streets, 

Ward room and lot, Manchester street. 

Ward room and lot. Park street. 

Engine house and lot. Ward Seven, 

Water pipe, wa^on and apparatus for wa 
tering streets, . . . ' . 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad, 

Lot, Lowell street, .... 

Gravel lot, iielmont street. 

Ward 7 (one-half acre), 
Bakersville (one acre), . 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, 

Bell Tower and Bell, 

Valley Cemetery, .... 



129,000 00 
19,200 00 
60,000 00 
25,000 00 

7.199 80 
68,991 75 
19,400 00 

2,300 oa 

10,000 OO' 

4,900 oa 

50,000 00 

91,000 OO 

3,000 00 

3,600 00 

681,933 32 

5,000 OO 

3,000 00 

600 00 

3i,300 00- 

2,000 00- 

50,000 00 

1,500 00 

1.200 00 
50 00 

100 00' 

14,500 00 

2,500 00 

6,000 oa 



.,149,274 87 



334 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



Blodget-street school-house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, charts, 
etc., .... 
Bridge street house and lot, . 
Old High school-house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
New High school-house, 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
books and apparatus, 
Wilson-Hill house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Merrimack-street house and lot. 

Movable ftiruiture, maps, etc., 
Manchester-street house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Park-street house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Franklin-street house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Spring-street house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Stark house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Bakersville house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
•Goffe's Falls house and lot, . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
House and lot near Harvey's, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
House and lot near Clough's mill. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Hallsville house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 



, $3,000 00 




150 00 


83,150 00 




500 00 


. 6,500 00 




200 00 


6,700 00 


. 45,000 00 




'. 2,000 00 


47,000 00 


. 3,300 00 




125 00 


3,425 00 


. 15,000 00 




350 00 


15,350 00 


. 8,000 00 




300 00 


8,300 00 


., 8,000 00 




400 00 


8,400 00 


. 18,000 00 




400 00 


18,400 00 


. 14,000 00 




400 00 


14,400 00 


. 3,000 00 




200 00 


3,200 00 


. 3,500 00 




75 00 


3,575 00 


. 3,600 >00 




100 00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 00 




50 00 


■ 2,550 00 


600 00 




50 00 


650 00 


. 3,500 00 




75 00 


3,575 00 



335- 



Massabesic house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
Mosquito Pond house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
Centre-street house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
Ash-street house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Lincoln-street house and lot, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
South house and lot, 'Squog, 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 
Amoskeag house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc.. 
Main-street house and lot. 

Movable furniture, maps, etc., 



Amount of School Property, 
Amount of City Property, 



. 11,400 00 




40 00 


$1,440 00 


. 1,000 00 




50 00 


1,050 00 


. 5,000 00 




125 00 


5,125 00 


. 58,000 00 




400 00 


58,400 00 


. 50,000 00 




400 00 


50,400 00 


. 2,800 00 




60 00 


2,860 00 


. 3,700 00 




125 00 


3,825 00 


. 12,000 00 




100 00 


12,100 00 



Total Property, 



278,075 00 
1,149,274 87 

^1,427,349 87 



EEPORT OF OYERSEEES OF THE POOR. 



To THE Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester : 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their Annual Report. 

The whole number of families whicli have received mpre 
or less assistance during the past year is twenty-seven, con- 
sisting of sixty-two persons, of which number twenty-three 
families are living in the city ; the remaining four families 
are living in other towns in the State. Four of this num- 
ber have died during the year. 

The whole number of persons at the Almshouse during 
the year is fourteen ; average number for the year, seven 
and one-half. There have been three deaths at the Alms- 
house, two belonging to the city and one to the county of 
Hillsborough.' 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, 

Chairman ex-officio. 
D. A. SIMONS, 

Clerk, 
SAYWARD J. YOUNG, 
JEREMIAH STICKNEY, 
JOHN McKENZIE, 
PATRICK A. DEVINE, 
ISRAEL WEBSTER, 
EDWARD A. MOULTON, 
Overseers of the Poor. 

22 



INDEX 



Abatement of Taxes, 276 

Account of City Treasurer, 1 70 

Alarm Telegraph, 81, 88, 93 

Alarm Boxes and Keys, 93 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge, 220 

Amoskeag Eiigiue Co. No. 1, 83, 86, 236, 247 

Amoskeag Hose Co., 85 

Apparatus, fire, 88 

Ash-Street School-House, 291 

Attendance at School, 61 

Awards for Land taken for Highways,. ... - 312 

Books and Stationery, 297 

Bridge, Granite, 219 

Bridge, Amoskeag, 220 

Buildings, Repairs of, 289 

Board of Health, Report of, 63 

Care of Rooms, 300 

Cemeteries, Report of Committee on, 163 

City Marshal, Report of, 13 

Government 1875, 3 

Library, 271 

Hall and Offices, 268 

Farm 18, 181 

Teams, 186 

Treasurer's Accounts, 1 70 

Property, 333 

Debt, 331 

Payment of, 289 



340 

Commons, 230 

Concord Square fence, 324 

County Tax, 326 

Contingent Expenses, (School) 298 

Condition of Reservoirs and Cisterns 97 

Discount on taxes, 276 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves, • , . . . . 315 

Donations to the City Library, 139 

Drawing in Schools, 29 

E. W. HarriD<;ton Engine Co. No. 3 83, 87, 239, 247 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co., No. 1, 85, 89, 241, 247 

Engineers 86 

Eugineei's Department, 85 

Eugmeer's Report, 67 

Evening Schools, 306 

Farm, City 18,181 

Fire Alarm Telegraph....! 81, 85, 93. 313 

Firemen's Relief Association, 81 

Fire Apparatus, 83 

Fire Department, 235 

Fence on Concord Square, 324 

Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys, location of, - 93 

Fire-King Steamer, No. 2, 83, 87, 237, 247 

Fires, 1875, 91 

Furniture and Supplies, (Schools), 296 

Fuel, 295 

GoftVs Falls Hose Co 85, 246, 248 

Governmeni, City, 1875, ■, 3 

Granite Bridae, 219 

Grading for Concrete,. • 316 

Highway District No, 1, 189 

2 190 

3, 199 

4, 201 



341 

Highway District No. 5, 201 

6 202 

7, 203 

8, e 205 

9 206 

10, , 207 

11 209 

12, 210 

13, 211 

Highways, new, 211 

awards for lands taken for, 312 

High School, 43, 50 

Hydrants 113, 69 

Hydrant Service, 319 

Incidental Expenses, 259 

Repairs, 301 

Interest 287 

Instructions to Key-holders, 95 

Land sold from City Farm,, 327 

Land, damage awards, 312 

Liquor Agency, 327 

Lighting Streets, 256 

Library, City, '. 271 

Donations to, 139 

Trustees' Report, 131 

Librarian's Report, . . 135 

Loan, Temporary, 288 

Location of Alarm Boxes, 93 

Hydrants, '. 69, 113 

Monument, Soldiers' 325 

Militia, 259 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department, 246, 248 

Music in Schools, 28 

Macadamizing streets, 320 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2, 84, 89, 244, 248 



342 

New Hose House and Apparatus, 324 

Names of Teachers, 57 

New School-Houses and Lots, , 291 

N. S. Bean Engine Co. No. 4, 84, 88, 240, 297 

Officers, City 3, 253 

Outstanding Taxes 328 

Overseers of Poor, Report of, 337 

Payment of City Debt, 289 

Paving Streets, 272 

Paupers oif Farm 1 75 

Pennacook Hose Co., No. 1 84, 88, 243, 248 

Pine Grove Cemetery 164, 234 

Police Department, 248 

Printing and Advertising, 298 

Printing and Stationery, 257 

Property, City 333 

School, 334 

Rules Adopted by the Board of Engineers, 96 

Reduction of City Debt, 289 

Repairs of School Houses, 292 

Buildings, ; 289 

Reserved Fund, 326 

Reservoirs, 229, 97 

Report, Order to print 30th Aunual, 2 

of Finance Committee, 1 74 

Committee on City Farm, 78 

Chief Engineer, 67 

City Marshal, 13 

Board of Health, 63 

Trustees of City Library, 131 

Librarian, 135 

Committee on Cemeteries, f. 1 63 

Overseers of Poor 337 

School Committee, 21 



348 

Report Superintendent of Public Instruction, 37 

Water Commissioners, 99 

Superintendent of Water- Works 101 

Salaries of Officers, 253 

Teachers, 303 

Schools, 294 

School Report, 21 

Statistics, 1875, Gl 

Training, 30 

Department, - 19 

Receipts and Expenditures, 22 

Houses and Lots, 291 

Superintendent, Report of, - 37 

Property, ...... 334 

Schools and Teachers, 57 

Evening, 30, 306 

Sewers and Drains, 221 

Soldiers' Monument. 325 

Streets, Lighting, 256 

Macadamizing, 320 

Watering, 275 

Paving, 272 

State Tax - • • • 326 

Tax, County, 326 

Taxes, Abatement of, 276 

Discount on, . . . . « 276 

for 1875, 328 

Outstanding, 328 

Temporary Loan, 288 

Telegraph, Fire Alarm, 81, 85, 93, 313 

Teams, City, 186 

Teachers, Names of, 57 

Salaries of, 303 

Training School, 30 

Truancy, • • 33 

Truant Officer, 302 



344 

Valuation, Taxes, etc., 330 

Valley Cemetery, 163, 233 

Water Works, 308 

V^atering Streets, 275 

Water Commissioner's Report, 99 



w.