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PUBLIC DOCUMENT. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 




ANNUAL REPORTS 



FOR 



THE YEAR 1876. 



m HAMPfi H fRE 



STATE LIBRARY 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1876. 

TOGETHER Willi 

1 

OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 
AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. 

JOHN B. CLARKE, PRINTER, 

1877. 



hi 

1676 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 
AN ORDER, authorizing the printing of the Thirty-First Annual 
Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Man- 
chester. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are hereby 
authorized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of two thousand copies of the Thirty-First Annual 
Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manches- 
ter, including the Reports of the Committee on Finance, the 
School Board, Water Commissioners and Superintendent of Water- 
Works, Engineers of the Fire Department, City Marshal, Over- 
seers of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian and Treasurer of the City 
Library, Committee on Cemeteries, and Committee on City Farm, 
and that the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for 
Printing and Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. January 11, 1877. 
ARTHUR DINSMORE, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. January 11, 1877. 

Passed in concurrence. 

IRA CROSS, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 

1876. 



MAYOR. 

HON. IRA CROSS. 



CITY CLERK. 

ALBERT JACKSON.* 
JOHN P. NEWELL.f 



president of common council. 
Arthur Dinsmore. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Henry R. Chamberlin. 



•Removed April 26. 
t Appointed April 26. 



collector of taxes. 
James Mitchell. 



city messenger. 
Michael Talty.* 
John A. Barker. f 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward 1.— Seth T. Hill. 

Ward 2.— Edwin H. Hobbs. 
Ward 3. — James B. Straw. 

Ward 4. — John L. Kennedy. | 
Noah S. Clark.§ 
Ward 5. — John Lee. 

Ward 6.— William C. Blodgett. 
Ward 7. — Joseph Beddows. 



members of common council. 
Ward 1. Ward .3. 

Israel 0. Endicott, Abram B. Story, 

Andrew J. Dickey, Zebulon F. Campbell, 

Rums Wilkinson. Moses French. 



Ward 2. 
Loring B. Bodwell, 
Arthur Dinsmore, 
Sumner D. Quint. 



♦Removed April 4. 

t Elected April 4. 

t Election contested and seat given to contestants. 

§ Declared elected by Board of Aldermen. 

II Declared elected by Board of Common Council. 



Ward 4. 
Henry L. Drew,$ 
Charles H. Caverly,^ 
Edw'd W. Harrington, jr. ,$ 
James M. Stanton, || 
Horace Stearns, || 
WalterParker.il 



Waed 5. Ward 6. 

Henry N. Hall, Simon Dodge, 

Benjamin P. Burpee, Aaron "Waldron, 

James Sullivan. Daniel F. Healey. 

Ward 7. 

Newell R. Bixby, 
William Bailey, 
Pius Brown. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — Messrs. Story, Wilkinson and Sullivan ; the 
Mayor and Alderman Lee. 

Accounts. — Aldermen Straw and Clark ; Messrs. Dickey, 
Healey and Quint. 

Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Hill and Blodgett ; 
Messrs. Campbell, Brown and Hall. 

Public Instruction. — Aldermen Straw and Beddows ; 
Messrs. Sullivan, Endicott and Parker. 

Streets. — Aldermen Hobbs and Clark ; Messrs. Bodwell, 
Brown and Burpee. 

City Farm. — Aldermen Straw and Blodgett ; Messrs. 
Bixby, Wilkinson and Waldron. 

Sewers and Brains. — Aldermen Hobbs and Lee ; Messrs. 
Quint, Hall and French. 

Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Clark and Bed- 
dows ; Messrs. Dodge, Dickey and Stearns ; Citizens Albert 
H. Daniels, Jacob F. James, Joseph Kidder, Holmes R. 
Pettee, Edward W. Harrington,* Charles H. Bartlett, 
James A. Weston, Sylvanus B. Putnam. 

Fire Department. — Aldermen Hobbs and Blodgett ; 
Messrs. Bodwell, Endicott and Healey. 

* Died July 11, 1876. 



Claims. — Aldermen Hill and Straw ; Messrs. French, 
Burpee and Story. 

House of Correction. — Aldermen Blodgett and Straw ; 
Messrs. Bailey, Stanton and French. 

Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Clark and Lee ; Messrs. 
Bndicott, Dodge and Quint. 

Military Affairs. — Aldermen Beddows and Hill ; Messrs. 
Bailey and Parker. 

Water-Works. — Aldermen Lee and Hobbs ; Messrs. 
Brown, Hall and Waldron. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Enrollment. — Aldermen Hill and Straw. 

Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Beddows and Straw. 

Licenses. — Aldermen Hobbs and Clark. 

3IarshaVs Accounts. — Aldermen Hill and Blodgett. 

Setting Trees. — Aldermen Blodgett and Hobbs. 

Market. — Aldermen Lee and Straw. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Election Returns. — Messrs. Story, Dickey and Dodge. 
Bills on Second Reading. — Healey, Bixby and Bodwell. 
Enrollment. — Messrs. Stearns, Campbell and Wilkinson. 



ASSESSORS. 



Jacob F. James, Chairman. 

Joseph H. Haynes, Clerk. 
Henry W. Powell, Timothy Sullivan, 

Jacob F. James, John Ryan, 

Joseph H. Haynes, William W. Baker, 

Andrew C. Wallace. 



ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 



Horace P. Watts, John P. Moore, 

George H. Colby, Moulton Knowles, 

Isaac Whittemore. 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR. 

Hon. Ira Cross, ex-officio Chairman. 

Sayward J. Young, Clerk. 
Sayward J. Young, John Dealy, 

Jeremiah Stickney, Patrick A. Devine, 

George W. Wilson, Daniel Shehan, 

Edwin A. Moulton. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Hon. Ira Cross, ex-officio Chairman. 

William Little, Clerk. 
George W. Stevens, Marshall P. Hall, 

Joseph Kidder, John P. Newell, 

Isaac L. Heath, Lucien B. Clough, 

William P. Byrns, Nathaniel W. Cumner. 

Samuel P. Jackson, Martin Fitzgerald, 

William Little, Newton H. Wilson, 

Isaac W. Darrah, James P. Walker, 

Arthur Dinsmore, ex-officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Josiah G. Dearborn.* 

♦The Act of the Legislature approved July 18, 1876, repealed the law under which 
Mr. Dearborn was chosen. The office of Superintendent, created by the Act of Julv 
18, 1876, has not been filled. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Jonathan Smith. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Hon. E. A. Straw, 

Hon. Wm. P. Newell, Hon. Isaac W. Smith, 

Hon. Samuel N. Bell, Hon. Moody Currier, 

Hon. Nathan P. Hunt, Arthur Dinsmore, ex-officio. 

Hon. Ira Cross, ex-officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 

John P. Bartlett.* 
Nathan P. Hunt.f 

Assistant Justice. 

Newton H. Wilson .% 
Henry W. Tewksbury.§ 

Clerk. 

John B. Mills. || 
Thomas D. Luce.^f 

City Marshal. 

Darwin A. Simons.** 
William B. Patten. ft 

* Removed July 25. % Removed in July. || Removed Aug. 1. ** Resigned May 2. 
t Appointed July 25. § Appointed in July. "[[Appointed Aug. 1. tt Elected May 10. 



9 

Assista?it Marshal. 

Daniel R. Prescott.* 
Horatio W. Longa.f 

Captain of the Watch. 
David Perkins. 

Day Police. 

Ransom W. Bean. 
John C. Colburn. 

Night Watchmen. 



Eben Carr, 
James Bucklin, 
Thomas Frain, 
Win. H. B. Newhall, 
John F.' Cassidy, 
Charles B. Clarkson, 
Alfred Vincellette, 
Melvin J. Jenkins, 



James E. Bailey, 
Horace P. Marshall, 
Thomas W. Cavanaugh,J 
Michael Marr, 
James F. Dunn, 
Hiram Stearns, 
Z. B. Wright, 
Michael Fox, 



Henry Harmon. 

Truant Officer. 
David Thayer. 

Constables. 

Wm. B. Patten, George W. Nichols, 

H. W. Longa, Harrison D. Lord, 

D. K. White, Groves Brown, 

Sidney R. Hanaford, Myron H. Stone, 

John L. Kennedy. 



* Resigned June 6. 
t Resigned Sept. ^6. 



t Appointed June 6. 



10 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Darwin A. Simons,* William B. Patten, f 

R. J. P. Goodwin, P. A. Devine. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Hanson C. Canney. 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

James F. Pherson. 

Assistant Engineers. 

John Patterson, David H. Young, 

Patrick Sullivan, George H. Dodge. 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

John P. Newell. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 
Ward 1.— Daniel H. Maxfield. 
Ward 2.— George VV. Riddle. 
Ward 3.— Wm. R. Patten. 
Ward 4.— H. P. Watts. 

Ward 5. — Hugh McDonough, 
Ward 6. — Edwin Kennedy. 

Ward 7. — Joseph W. Bean. 

Ward 8.— Charles K. Walker. 

•Resigned June 1. t Appointed June 1. 



11 



Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1.— Perry H. Dow. 

Ward 2.— Nathan P. Kidder. 
Ward 3. — Thomas D. Luce. 
Ward 4.— Walter S. Holt. 

Ward 5. — Michael Callahan. 
Ward 6. — Edwin N. Baker. 
Ward 7.— Frank H. Challis. 

Ward 8. — Frederick W. Dearborn. 



Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 



George W. Bacon, 
Willis P. Fogg, 
Franklin W. McKinley. 



Ward 5. 

John J. Flynn, 
James Briggs, 
Thomas Howe. 



Ward 2. 

Benjamin L. Hartshorn, 
George A. Farmer, 
Hugh Ramsey. 



Ward 6. 

A. D. Gooden, 
George W. Dearborn, 
George H. Dudley. 



Ward 3. 

R. M. Miller, 
T. P. Heath, 
E. M. Slayton. 



Ward 7. 

Augustus Canis, 
Charles H. George, 
William A. Clement. 



Ward 4. 

J. Witter Smith, 
True 0. Furnald, 
John Truesdale. 



Ward 8. 

Charles H. Hodgman, 
Hezekiah H. Noyes, 
Dalton J. Warren. 



12 

Inspectors. 

Ward 1.— John J. Dillon. 

Ward 2. — Joseph H. Haynes. 
Ward 3. — Lemuel James. 

Ward 4. — Harrison D. Lord. 

Ward 5. — Dustin Marshall. 

Ward 6. — Isaac Whittemore. 
Ward 7.— Solon D. Pollard. 
Ward 8.— Horatio Fradd. 



MANCHESTER WATER-WORKS. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



AND THE 



SUPERINTENDENT. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



BOAKD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Water Commissioners' Office, ) 
Manchester, N. H., Jan. 1, 1877. \ 

To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with " An ordinance in re- 
lation to Water- Works " the Board of Water Commission- 
ers herewith present their fifth annual report for the year 
ending December 31, 1876. 

The report of the Superintendent, which is appended 
hereto, furnishes a detailed statement of the receipts and 
expenditures during the year, together with such other in- 
formation as will enable you to have a full understanding 
of the operations and condition of this department. All 
matters required to be reported by the Board are so fully 
stated therein that they have not deemed it necessary to 
repeat them in a separate report. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ALPHEUS GAY, 

WM. P. NEWELL, 

A. C. WALLACE, 

J. Q. A. SARGENT, \ n . er 

JAMES A. WESTON, 

IRA CROSS, 

ARETAS BLOOD, 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Man- 
chester : 
Gentlemen : — The undersigned respectfully submits the 
following report for the year ending December 31, 1876 : 

ELEVATION OP WATER IN MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water in the Lake was the highest March 30. It 
continued to fall from this time till the 18th of October. 
From this date till the end of the year it remained at the 
same height. 

DAMS. 

The dam is in good condition. Slight repairs have been 
made by cementing some of the joints in the lower step- 
ping stones where the cement had been washed out by the 
overfall in high water. 

CANAL. 

The Canal remains about the same as it was last season 
Some repairs have been made on the banks, and a small 
portion on the north side has been loamed and sowed down 
with rye and grass-seed. An attempt was made to draw 
out the water while repairs were being made on the water 
wheels, but as the earth forming the slopes began to slide 
in as the water lowered, it was discontinued. 

The caving in was principally where the brook was be- 
fore the canal was dug. The brook was turned so as to 
2 



18 

run south of the canal and the pump-house. A large quan- 
tity of water runs in this channel in the spring, and has 
washed out a large amount of earth west of the new high- 
way and carried it on to the meadow. In time it would 
fill up the channel of Manter Brook. To prevent this, and 
to save the expense of a culvert, two acres of land have 
been purchased and a new channel dug for the brook. 

PUMPING STATION. 

There has been a fence built on the west side of Cohas 
Avenue, in front of the pumping station, from the stone 
arch bridge south about six hundred feet, at an expense of 
one hundred and forty-one dollars and seventy-one cents. 
($141.71.) 

The brick walls inside of the pump-house, above the gal- 
lery, have been washed down and painted with two coats 
of light railroad paint, and the sides of the windows and 
doors painted a light blue, at an expense of one hundred 
and twenty-one dollars and seventy cents ($121.70). This 
greatly improves the appearance of the walls. 

The pumps have worked well the past year, and are now 
in good order. 

There has been some trouble with steps of the water- 
wheels, and in case they need repair, it is a great deal of 
trouble and expense to get at them, as they sit so low, and 
the damper gates cannot be closed tight enough to keep 
the water out of the pit. 

Mr. C. C. Cole has charge of the pumping station and 
lands adjoining, and gives good satisfaction. 



19 



RECORD OF PUMPING, 1876. 



MONTHS. 



January.. . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September. 

October 

November.. 
December.. 



Totals and average 



No. hours' work 
for both pumps. 



Averag 
stroke p 
minute. 



588 h. 

671 " 
652 " 
494 " 
483 " 
577 " 
688 " 
600 " 
502 " 
654 " 

672 " 
757 " 



10 m. 

50 " 
10 " 
40 " 
00 " 
30 " 
50 " 
30 " 
05 " 
50 " 
10 " 
20 " 



7.442 h. 05 m. 



Total No. 

strokes 

p'r month 



17.73 
15.58 
17.13 
19.25 
20.24 
17.25 
17.69 
17.75 
16.27 
15.68 
15.74 
15.74 



17.13 



Total gallons 

pumped in one 

month. 



G08,023 
667,876 
670,240 
571,312 
586,435 
597,802 
731,664 
039,613 
506,371 
616,071 
634,702 
715,271 



75,456,80 



Daily ave- 
rage gallons 
pumped. 



35,873.357 
39,410,584 
39,544,160 
33,707,408 
34,599,065 
35,270,318 
43,168,176 
37,737,167 
29,875,889 
36,348,189 
37,459,218 
42.195,120 



445.195,120 



1,157,205 
1,358,986 
1,275,618 
1,123,581 / 
1,116,118 
1,175,677 
1,392,522 
1,217,328 
995,863 
1,172,522 
1,248,641 
1,361,322 • 



1,216,380 



The cost of pumping water into the reservoir for the 
year is three dollars and twenty cents ($3.20) per million 
gallons, or about three cents (.03) per million gallons 
pumped one foot high. 

It will be seen by the above table that there is as much 
water used, or wasted, in the winter as in summer. 

There was more water pumped in July than in any other 
month, but we supplied the Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany's reservoir for four and one-half days during this 
time, while they were making repairs. 

It is evident that a large portion of the water-takers let 
it run in cold weather, to prevent freezing. This is against 
the rules, and should be stopped. They can just as well 
turn off the water as to let it run, if their houses are prop- 
erly piped. Wasting water in summer or winter is wrong, 
and no citizen has a legal or moral right to do it. The as- 
sessments of water rates are made on the basis of the ac- 
tual needs of consumers for ordinary uses. Consumers 



20 

pay for this quantity only, and do not pay for what is 
wasted. Yard or street sprinklers are limited to one hour 
each day, but yet many attach them to trees or stakes and 
let them run hours, and frequently all night. 

The rules have been published in the daily papers, but 
have had little or no effect. Those having meters pay for 
what water they use, and are willing to do it ; but they do 
not like to pay more than their neighbors, who sprinkle 
twice as much. The Superintendent would gladly carry 
out any plan which may be devised whereby the waste of 
water can be checked. 

SUPPLY AND FORCE MAIN. 

There have been a few leaks on the force main, and at 
the present time there are two that show on the surface, 
but as they are small and do no damage, it was thought 
best not to mend them at present. It is not advisable to 
drain the water out of the force main unless absolutely nec- 
essary. 

The supply main is in good condition. The number of 
leaks which have occurred on this portion of the pipe is 
eight, all of which have been repaired. 

There are on hand eleven pieces of 20-inch cast-iron pipe 
for use in case anything should happen to either of these 
mains. 

RESERVOIR. 

The grounds about the reservoir have been graded and 
fenced. The fence was built with chestnut posts and pick- 
ets, with pine rails. That part of the post set in the 
ground was dipped in hot coal tar. Length of fence, 2,575 
feet. 

Cost, ' $620 23 

Cost of grading, 234 13 



Total cost at reservoir, .... $854- 36 



21 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 



The pipes laid last year at the lower end of Elm street, 
and in 'Squog, have caused not a little trouble on account 
of the leaks at the joints. In my last report I gave my 
opinion as to the cause, and I have seen no occasion to alter 
it. The cast-iron main from Elm street to Main street in 
'Squog had six leaks. The pipe in the river was examined 
in low water and one small leak found near the western 
shore, in one of the socket joints, which was easily re- 
paired. 

The leaks on the west side of the river number, 285 ; on 
the east side, 150. 

A portion of wrought-iron and cement pipe has been 
taken up and laid with cast-iron, as follows : 

140 feet corner Elm and Park streets. 
48 " " " " Cove " 

90 " " Ferry " Main " 

These places caused so much trouble that it was thought 
best to re-lay them in a permanent manner. For this pur- 
pose cast-iron pipe, with suitable branches, was bought and 
laid. 

Two hundred feet of cement pipe on Merrimack street has 
been lowered on account of cutting down that street west 
of Franklin street. 

There has been laid the past year about two miles of 
cast-iron pipe, more than half of which was 14 and 12-inch. 

Fourteen inch pipe was laid on Elm street from Pearl to 
Adams street — distance 4,502 feet ; 12-inch from the Gas 
Works to River Road in Bakersville, and 12-inch from 
Pearl to Prospect on Beech, making 2,007 feet of 12-inch. 
The other extensions were 6-inch pipe and all cast-iron ; 
but 512 feet laid on Spruce street. 

Connections on Elm were made with the pipes laid on 
Pearl, Orange, Myrtle, Prospect, Harrison, Brook and 



22 

Blodgett streets ; also a 14-inch connection was made with 
the Amoskeag Company's pipe at Brook street. 

The expense of laying the 14-inch pipe on the upper end 
of Elm street was somewhat increased by the ledge cut 
and the extra depth to which the trench had to be excava- 
ted, as the grade of the street established showed from one 
to three feet cut above Sagamore street, making in some 
places nine feet cut. 

The cast-iron pipe was bought of R. D. Wood & Co., 
Philadelphia, at -138. 38 per long ton (2,240), delivered at 
the Manchester station. 

The iron pipe was laid by the day, under the immediate 
charge of John Conway. The joints were made of lead, 
run at one pouring, excepting in a few cases where the 
clay did not hold, and on the 20-inch where it took two 
ladles of lead to make a joint. There has been as much 
gasket and as little lead used as in our judgment would 
make a good joint. 

We have had eight leaks on the extensions, 5 on Elm 
street — 4 lead joints and one wooden plug blew out ; one 
on Prospect street, one on Centre street ; one wooden plug- 
blew out on Brook street, making six joint leaks on the 
two miles that had to be re-calked. 

The cost of laying pipe the past season, including the 
pipe and branches now on hand, is $21,907.23. Hydrants 
and gates, 11,510.34. Total, $23,417.57. 

A settlement was made with George H. Norman January 
1, 1877. The balance due him is $1,315.59. 



23 



SCHEDULE OF PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID AND SET IN 1876. 



Streets. 


Location. 


■-' 2 
J" 
Gin. 


Cast 
Iron. 


Gates. 


0Q 

c 

H 
>> 

a 




Gin. 


8 in. 


12in 


14in 


6 in. 


8 in. 


12in 


14in 








98 

8:37 








1 










i 


Apple ton .... 


100 ft. w. of Elm to Chest. . 
















? 








867 






1 












539 

16 

541 
55 
26 






1 






1 


Blodgett 


To connect 11 in. on Elm. . 






















1 
1 
1 




























i 


Elm 










4527 






2 


i 


Elm . . 


(xas Works to River Road 






1140 












15 
53 
11 
55 
14 
305 






1 
1 










Hollis 


















1 




















Langdon 

Myrtle 












1 








1 
































1 








1 


Pearl 






65 






1 












i 


60 
972 
102 

775 






1 

2 

1 
2 






i 


Prospect 


















5 


















1 




100 ft. w. of Elm to Chest 


512 

512 














2 


Spruce 
















1 




4582 


,,, 


2007 


4527 


17 


1 


1 


2 


19 



Xumber miles iron pipe laid in 1876, 2aio 

Number miles cement-lined pipe laid in 1876, wb 

Total number miles laid in 1876, 2m> 

Cement-lined pipe has been taken up and cast-iron laid 
in its place at the following places : 

Park street, corner Elm, 104 feet 20 inch pipe. 
Elm street, foot of Park, 40 feet 14 inch pipe. 
Depot street, corner Elm, 24 feet 14 inch pipe. 
Main street, corner Eerry, 60 feet 10 inch pipe. 
Ferry street, corner Main, 15 feet 12 inch pipe. 
Clinton street, corner Main, 30 feet 6 inch pipe. 
Elm street, corner Cove, 48 feet 14 inch pipe. 
One 4 inch gate and 4 feet cement-lined pipe taken out on Elm 
corner Depot. 



2J: 



SCHEDULE OF PIPES LAID 


TO DECEMBER 31 


1876. 






Streets. 


Length and size of cement-lined pipe laid. 


Cast-iron pipe laid. 


20 inch. [14 in. 12 in. 


10 in. 


8 in. 


6 in. '4in. 


20in 


14in 


12in8in. 


6 in. 




1419.0 




















F. M. com. joint.. . 
Supply main 








123 
1*6 














8410.0 






24 
































98 
























837 














4513 
1402 

750 
























.... 








































334% 
























2002 

590 

18 

501 

1518 

3899 

2282 

43 

2812 

4200 

1198 

3308 
























202 
37 




















4055 










867 


































.... 










16 












793 


.... 






























539 






200 







4620 
























.... 














...J 






181 
1527 






















1931 








































147 


















• 




60 
29 










55 






811 








"m 




24 
























Elm 




5544 


318 




89 


35 

21 

191 

59 

59 

5304 

1525 




4615 


1140 




?6 






519 










370 




































































IOGV4 
































11 












858 














:::::::::::::: 








408 
750 










53 


































57 

64 

4062 

45 

4080 

1116 


249 
































55 
































3524 




32 


































































962 

788 

768 
2719 














































1043 














Middle 










































14 














57 
























231 
























1784 
45 












305 


Park 


4354.0 












104 


























60 












947 
3195 


1699 
877 
1076 

1497 










65 




































































972 
























102 












752 
2888 
874 
877 

59 
651 

69 


















... ; 
















105 


Stark 


















































































319 












Valley 






503 


























340 
960 
351 
























702 
















































736 




































775 










1349 




10 














"Willow 










550 
























283 
































Total 


20934.9 


6925 


8400 


181334 


12666 


72432 


6752J 104 


4639 


2007 


654023 



25 



SCHEDULE OF PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1876, 
IN PISCATAQUOG. 



Streets. 


Length and Size of Cem- 
ent-Lined Pipe laid. 


Length and Size of Cast- 
iron Pipe laid. 




10 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


12 in. 


10 in. 


6 in. 


A 




70 














260 












851 

442 
533 
1908 


















544 












30 


















622 
























2484 








15 






260 










3682 


10 
M80 

912 

827 




168 












Milford 
















20 
260 
240 


































59 
568 

20 
308 
2J0 


















12 


Third 










48 














West 




536 








Supply Main to 'Squog, on Cove, 




3300 




24 












Total 


3682 


10682 


2198 33nni 


168 


673 











26 



GATES AND HYDRANTS SET TO DECEMBER 31, 1876. 



Streets. 


Gates Set. 


Air 


Hy- 


20 in. 


14 in. 


12 in. 


10 in. 


8 in. 


Gin. 


4 in. 


v'lv's 


dros. 


Force Main 


1 
1 










2 
5 
1 
2 
5 
1 
1 




2 
1 


1 








1 


4 








1 




































Arlington 


















Ash 
















1 






























2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
4 


















1 
1 




2 


3 








5 




Birch 






Blodgett 


















Bridge 










3 


































3 




















4 
7 
3 
3 






8 
11 


Central 










1 
4 
















3 
















8 




































o 






1 








2 






o 












1 

2 






Elm '. 




7 


1 




1 


4 


1 


a 












1 








3 

1 
1 
5 
1 


















































10 


















4 
















Hollis 










2 

T 

4 
5 

5 
3 

•j 
2 
G 
1 
3 








Kidder 














Kidder Court 














































3 




1 








Manchester 








s 


Maple 














■J 















3 














3 
















15 


Middle . 


' 














Myrtle 






7 












1 
































2 
5 
1 
2 
2 

3 

1 

3 
2 

2 
1 
1 
2 






5 


Park 


:; 










2 












1 










1 
6 






7 

c 




















4 
















8 
















1 
















3 


















7 


















3 


















3 


















1 












1 




2 


Vallev 






1 






2 














Walnut 












1 


2 
1 




2 




























2 
it 




2 
















2 


Wilson 








2 








1 


Willow 








1 






Young 














1 




















Total 


4 1 9 


10 1 3 


21 


144 


12 


8 


248 



27 



GATES AND HYDRANTS SET TO DECEMBER 31, 1876, IN PISCATAQUOG. 



Streets. 



Gates Set. 



12 inch. 10 inch. 6 inch. 1 inch. 



Hydr'nts. 



A 

Barr 

Bowman 

Centre 

Clinton 

Douglas 

Dover 

Perr y 

Granite 

Green 

Main 

Mast 

Milfonl 

Piscataquog 

Quiney 

River 

School 

Second 

Third 

Walker 

West 

Main to 'Squog, Cove, Second and 
Ferry 



Total . 



41 



Length of pipe laid of cement-lined and cast-iron of dif- 
ferent sizes, as follows : 



20 inch 


cement-lined pipe 


14 " 


" 


u u 


12 " 


u 


u a 


10 " 


u 


u a 


8 " 


u 


u u 


6 " 


.. 


u u 


4 " 


u 


u u 



Total, . 
Equal to 27iSiir miles. 

20 inch cast-iron pipe, 

ij u u u u 

If) u u u c< 

10 " " " " 



Equal to 2^> miles. 
Total of cement-lined and cast-iron, 30'^r miles. 









20,934.9 ft. 
6,925 " 








8,400 " 

5,495.75. " 

12,666 " 








83,114 " 
8,950 


146,485.65 ft. 


104 ft. 






4,639 " 

5,307 " 

168 " 






65 " 








4,696 " 



14,979 ft. 



28 



HYDRANTS. 



There have been set the past season nineteen (19) hy- 
drants. Six of them are of the Boston Machine Co.'s make, 
and thirteen are the Pattee & Perkins hydrant, of Holyoke, 
Mass. The Pattee & Perkins hydrants set in 'Sqnog were 
in use most of last winter and spring, on account of a great 
number of leaks in that section. They have proved very 
satisfactory and there has been no expenditure for keeping 
them in repair. The trouble with hydrants that have 
leather valves is, that if any little gravel stone or piece of 
cement gets attached to it, it soon drills a hole in the 
leather and causes it to leak, and it costs from three to 
four dollars to take one out and replace it. 

There are now set two hundred and eighty-nine (289) 
hydrants. 

GATES. 

There have been twenty-one (21) gates set the present 
season, eight (8) of the Ludlow, and thirteen (13) of the 
Eddy make. Their size and the streets in which they are 
set will be found in the preceding table. 

The total number set is two hundred and forty-one (241), 
all of which are in good condition. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET 1876. 

Adams Street, north-west corner Elm. 
Appleton, north-west corner Elm. 
Appleton, north-west corner Chestnut. 
Brook, north-west corner Beech. 
Dean, north-west corner Elm. 
Elm, north-west corner Salmon. 
Hollis, north-west corner Elm. 
Langdon, north-west corner Elm. 
Orange, north-west corner Beech. 
Pennacook, north-west corner Elm. 



29 

Prospect, north-west corner Beech. 
Prospect, north-west corner Ash. 
Prospect, north-west corner Maple. 
Prospect, north-west corner Oak. 
Prospect, north-west corner Russell. 
River Road, north-west corner Elm. 
Spruce, north-west corner Lincoln. 
Webster, north-west corner Elm. 
Webster, north-west corner Chestnut. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

The contract with J. Q. A. Sargent for laying service 
pipes expired on the first day of January, 1877. 

The number of applications for water, to date, has been 
thirteen hundred and forty (1,340). 

Twelve hundred and thirty-nine (1,239), service pipes 
have been laid to Dec. 23, 1876, of diameters, number, 
size and length, as follows : 

Total length, 860 feet, 8 inches. 
" " 27,570 " 9 " 

" " 4,553 " 4 " 

" " 720 " 11 " 

u u 45 g u 3 u 

" " 117 " " 



40 


1-2 inch diameter 


,022 


3-4 " 


« 


151 


1 " 


u 


13 


J-4 


U 


9 


2 " 


u 


4 


4 " 


u 



Total length service pipes in streets, . 34,278 ft. 11 in. 
Number miles service pipe in streets to date, 6 2 ^ 



r,!N.!12 
528U ' 



Two hundred and forty-nine (249), service pipes have 
been laid this year, to Dec. 23, 1876. The number, size 
and length are as follows : 

236 3-4 inch diameter. Length, 5,946 feet, 6 inches. 
12 1 " " " 388 " " 

12" " " 40 " u 



Total length laid in 1876, . . . 6,374 feet, 6 in. 

Equal to 1 mile, 1,094 feet, 6 inches. 



30 

Total cost of services laid in 1876, . . $4,040.87 
Total cost of services laid to Dec. 23, 1876, $21,436.89 



Water is shut off from thirty-four (34), services. Four- 
teen services closed for non-payment of bills have been re- 
opened on payment of bills and the fine of two dollars for 
shutting off and letting on again. 

METERS. 

There has been an addition of seventeen meters to those 
of last year, making at the present time (166) one hun- 
dred and sixty-six. The kinds and sizes are as follows : 





% inch. 


s 4 inch. 


1 inch. 


Total. 






9 

52 


3 

20 

1 


12 




iso 
l 


152 




2 








Total 


81 


61 


24 


166 







The income from the sale of water for the year 1876 has 
been as follows : 

Keceived from water and hydrant rents, less 
abatements, . 
" " metered water, 

" " fines, .... 

" " shutting off and letting on 

" " rent of meters, 

" " building purposes, . 

" " setting 21 meters, 

" " extra size of pipe, 

" " labor and | inch stop and waste, 



$32,220 63 


5,698 47 


150 16 


30 00 


607 34 


72 32 


93 00 


3 05 


e, 4 50 



Total, 
Abatements, 



$410 38 



3,879 47 



Classification of accounts for the year 1876 



31 



Superintendence, collecting and repairs, $4,893 00 

Stationery, printing and lithographs, . 222 59 

Office and incidental expenses, . . 349 13 

Pumping expenses and repairs, . . $1,429 68 

Repairs to dam, canal, penstock and reservoir, 143 65 

Running expenses for the year ending Decem- 
ber 23, 1876, 

Service pipes, 4,040 87 

Distribution pipes, 33,903 09 

Fire hydrants and valves, .... 1,510 34 

Pumping machinery, pump-house, dwelling and 

barn, 

Meters, boxes and brass connections, 

Engineering, 

Grading and fencing, .... 

Tools and fixtures, 

Land and water rights. • . 

Total expended on construction ac- 
count in 1876, 

Total expended In 1876, 



5,464 72 



,573 33 



$7,038 05 



124 20 




567 95 




20 00 




973 31 




87 91 




160 00 






41,387 67 



5,425 72 



Classification of accounts to Dec. 23, 1876 



Land and water rights, .... $30,858 67 

Dam, canal, penstock and race, . . 101,198 20 
Pumping machinery, pump-house, dwelling 

and barn, ..... 86,936 40 

Distributing reservoir and fixtures, . 71,542 36 

Force and supply main, .... 88,674 02 

Distribution pipes, ..... 223,141 11 

Fire hydrants and valves, . . . 28,988 95 

Tools and fixtures, 10,649 35 

Boarding and store houses, . . . 919 36 

Roads and culverts, 1,756 75 

Supplies, 550 39 

Engineering, 22,176 19 

Livery and traveling expenses, . . 2,856 64 

Legal expenses, 563 79 



32 

Grading and fencing, .... 10,885 43 

Service pipes, 21,436 89 

Meters, boxes and brass connections, . 5,657 53 

Total construction account to Dec. 23, 

1876, $708,792 03 



Superintendence, collecting and repairs, 
Stationery, printing and lithographs, 
Office and incidental expenses, 
Pumping expenses and repairs, 



$14,355 53 
3,241 57 
1,682 68 
4,341 16 



Repairs to dam, canal, penstock and reservoir, 143 65 

Total of current expenses to Dec. 23, 

1876, $23,764 59 

Interest, $40,678 51 

Highway expenditures, .... 14,000 53 

$54,679 04 



Total amount of bills approved to Dec. 

23, 1876, .... $787,235 66 

Interest,discounts and labor performed on high- 
way transferred, and tools and materials 
sold, $57,227 05 

Total cost to date, not including inter- 
est, $730,008 61 

Interest and discount to Jan. 1, 1877, . . 128,452 51 



Total cost, including interest, . . $858,461 12 

The following amounts have been paid over to the City 
Treasurer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, Supplies and materials sold, $573 61 

1873, " " " " . 
1873, Accrued interest on water- 
bonds sold, 

1873, Accrued interest on State 
bonds sold, 

1873, Water rents, 1873, 

1874, Supplies and materials sold, 
March 17, 1874, Highway expenditures, trans- 
ferred from water-works 
account, .... 14,000 53 



177 07 


193 26 


146 00 


1,920 53 


607 89 



33 



March 17, 1874, Interest and discount, trans- 
ferred from water-works 

account, .... 12,347 25 

Sept. 1, 1874, Interest and discount, trans- 
ferred from water-works 

account, .... 22,361 74 

1874, Water and hydrant rents, . 30,233 54 
Dec. 29, 1874, Interest transferred, . . 4,566 25 
Dec. 18, 1875, 1 anvil sold, ... 15 00 
Sept. 25, 1875, Engine, crusher and other 

material, .... 2,080 45 

1875, Water and hydrant rents, . 27,119 15 
May 20, 1876, 1 derrick sold, . . . 125 00 
May 20, 1876, Rent of derrick, ... 24 00 

1876, Water and hydrant rents, 38,679 47 

Total, .... $ 

Amounts appropriated to Dec. 
23, 1876, 



Total received to date, 
Deduct bills approved to date. 

Balance on hand Dec. 23, 1876, 



$155,179 74 

640,000 00 

•1795,179 74 
787,236 16 

$7,943 58 



Amount of bills approved to date : 



Amount bills approved in 1871, 

" •' '• " 1872, 

'• 1873, 
u i. 1874} 

" '• " '■ 1875, 



$1,723 06 
245,870 66 
294,609 02 
146,515 40 

50,091 80 



Totals of monthly bills in 1876 



Januaiy, 

February, 

March, 

April. 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 



$2,976 32 
3,959 57 
755 87 
781 06 
7,710 02 
1,492 97 
7,174 98 
5,897 68 



34 



Septemb< r, 
October, . 
November, 
December, 



4.721 94 
5,678 71 
5,120 26 
2,156 34 
$48,4.25 72 



Total amount of bills approved to De- 
cember 23, 1870, 



$787,235 CO 



Statement showing the uses of water as supplied to De- 
cember 28, 1876 : 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 

8 Churches. 

School-houses. 

1 Court-house. 

2 Hose companies. 
1 Opera House. 

1 Convent. 
1 Music Hall. 
1 Post Office. 



1 City Hall and offices. 
1 City Library. 

3 Bauks. 

4 Fire engines. 

1 Hook-and-Ladder. 

5 Hotels. 

1 Odd Fellows' building. 
1 Holly Tree Inn. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



1 Iron foundry. 

2 Dye houses. 

1 Machine shop. 

2 Patent medicine manutact'y. 

3 Clothing manufactories. 

2 Furniture manufactories. 
1 Harness shop. 



1 Brass and copper foundry 

1 Sash and blind shop. 

3 Breweries. 

1 Shoe manufactory. 

1 Pop -corn manufactory. 

1 Trunk and harness. 

1 Gas Works. 



5 Fish. 

8 Meat. 



MARKETS. 

3 Meat and fish. 



3 Dentist. 
50 Professional. 



OFFICES. 



2 Express. 
6 Printing. 



35 



SHOPS. 



14 Barber. 


2 Currying. 


1 Wheelwright. 


3 Plumber. 


5 Blacksmith. 


1 Steam, gas and water pipe, 


1 Carpenter. 


1 Soap manufacturing. 




STABLES. 


.28 Private. 


11 Livery. 




SALOONS. 


7 Dining. 


5 Billiard. 


4 Oyster. 


53 Liquor. 




STORES. 


1 Auction. 


1 Tea store. 


10 Drug. 


30 Groceries. 


5 Jewelry. 


1 Meal. 


3 Wholesale liquor. 


3 Hardware. 


] Fur. 


7 Boot and shoe. 


1 House furnishing 


goods. 3 Stove. 


15 Fancy goods. 


3 Gents' furnishing goods. 


1 Wholesale paper. 


2 Book. 


4 Dry goods. 


1 Leather and shoe finders. 


3 Candy. 


2 Music. 


2 Crockery. 


2 Upholstery. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1 Bleachery. 


1 Laundry. 


3 Drinking fountains. 


2 Ice houses. 


9 Private fire hydrants 


1 Greenhouse. 


1 Cigar. 


63 Boarding-houses. 


43 Wash tubs. 



2844 Families. 
35*6 Faucets. 

1 Band room. 

3 Club rooms. 

7 Bakeries. 

7 Stationary engines. 

8 Photographers. 
1 Portable engine. 

289 Fire Hydrants (Public). 



36 



399 Wash bowls. 5 Water trough. 

367 Water closets. 633 Sprinklers. 

65 Urinals. 411 Horses. 
144 Bath tubs. 17 Oxeu and cows. 



Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



GATES, HYDRANTS, METERS, ETC., ON HAND. 

GATES ON HAND. 

1 4 in. Chapman spigot. 2 10 in. Boston Machine Co. 

14" Eddy spigot. spigot. 

3 4" Boston Machine Co. 5 12 " Boston Machine Co. 

spigot. spigot. 

16" Chapman spigot. 1 12 " Ludlow spigot. 

1 6 " Eddy bell. 1 14 " Boston Machine Co. 

16" Ludlow spigot. spigot. 

16" Boston Machine Co: 1 20 " Boston Machine Co. 

spigot. spigot. 
18" Eddy bell. 

HYDRANTS ON HAND. 

1 JSoston Machine Co. 1 Pattee & Perkins. 

METERS ON HAND. 

1 3-4 iu. Desper. 1 1-2 in. Gem. 

2 3-4 " Gem. 8 5-8 " Union Water Meter Co. 
1 1 in. Union Water Meter Co. 1 3-4 " Union Water Meter Co. 

PIPE AND BRANCHES ON HAND. 

■J, r u> ft. 20 in. cast-iron pipe. 2 6 inch plugs. 

63 " 14 ll '• " 1 14 inch plug. 

202 " 12 " " L - 2 24 inch cast-iron domes. 

36 " 8 " " " 2 15 inch cast-iron domes. 

7 " 6 " " •' 2 double 6 on 14 branch. 



37 



6 20 


inch sleeves. 


2 14 


U U 


4 12 


u u 


1 10 


a :i 


6 8 


u 


7 6 


.i a 


114 


" quarter turn 



3 double 6 on 12 branch. 

1 double 6 on 12 branch. 
3 single 12 on 14 branch. 
3 single 6 on 14 branch. 

2 single 6 on 12 branch. 
7 single 6 on 6 branch. 
1 single 8 on 14 branch. 



INVENTORY OF FURNITURE. ETC., IN OFFICE. 



8 drawing boards. 


1 level. 


1 wardrobe. 


3 transit rods. 


1 transit. 


1 roll mounted paper. 


1 level rod. 


2 quires drawing paper. 


1 copying press. 


1 lot fuel. 


1 roll manilla paper. 


1 book-case. 


1 roll tracing muslin. 


1 table. 


2 drawing tables. 


1 12 inch pressure gauge 


1 library desk. 


1 6 inch pressure gauge. 


2 waste, baskets. 


1 bill stamp. 


1 0-foot pole. 


3 ink-stands. 


3 stools- 


1 lot of drawing. 


1 duster. 


1 safe. 


1 map of city. 


1 directory. 


1 map of city (framed). 


1 pair scissors. 


1 bottle ink. 


1 eraser. 


1 case of drawers. 


1 lot of reports. 


1 stove. 





SUPPLIES AND TOOLS BELONGING TO THE SERVICE DEPARTMENT. 



1 sledge hammer. 

6 striking hammers. 

2 stone hammers. 

3 caulking hammers. 
3 handle cold chisels. 

10 caulking tools. 
2 mauls. 

2 chains for hoisting. 
2 3 pole derricks. 
14" " 

2 sets pulley blocks and ropes. 



2 wood clamps. 
1 pair calipers. 

1 chain fall. 

9 wrenches for gates. 
5 hydrant wrenches. 

2 monkey wrenches. 
8 special wrenches. 
1 machine hammer. 
■5 lanterns. 

1 pair punches. 

1 pair long punches. 



38 



(> extra poles for derrick. 

1 furnace and kettle. 
68 lbs. lead. 

1-2 barrel clay. 
22 lbs. gasket. 

2 tool boxes. 

2 iron bars, 6 feet long. 

Q u U r u u 

1 u "4 " t( 



24 picks and handles. 


1 lot old picks. 


6 R.P, shovels (good). 


14 E. P. shovels (poor). 


2 iron snow shovels. 


2 wood snow shovels. 


6 drills, 1 5-8 diam., 4 ft. 4 in 


3 " " " 3 " 9 " 


2 a t< " 4 « 


6 " " " 3 " 


4 '• 1 1-8 " 3 •' 


1 " " " 3 " 9 in. 


4 " 13-8 " 2"9in. 


5 " " " 2 " 6 in. 


2 " " " l"10in. 


1 •' 1 " 2 '• 6 in. 


18 plug drills, 


7 wedges and shims. 


3 spoons. 


2 lead ladles. 


2 bench axes. 


2 nail hammers. 


1 brad -awl. 


1 iron clamp. 


1 shave. 


2 try squares. 


1 gimlet. 


2 gimlet bitts. 


5 gouges, 1-4 to 3-4 inches. 


10 bitts, 1-4 to 5-8. 


1 1-inch auger. 


4 gauges (wood). 


2 iron squares. 



1 wheelbarrow. 
13 cold chisels. 
1 dark lantern. 

4 screw drivers. 
1 water pail. 

1 door chisel. 

2 nail sets. 
1 mallet. 

1 plow and 6 irons. 

3 hand saws. 

1 small back saw. 
1 iron saw. 
1 smoothing plane. 
1 F. plane. 
1 short jointer. 
1 long jointer. 
1 set match planes. 
18 moulding tools, 
mortise chisels, §, £, f, 1, 1£ inch. 

5 chisels (paring k to 1£ inch.) 
1 trowel. 

3 drills for iron. 
1 washer cutter. 
1 vise. 

1 die plate. 

6 die R. & L. from h to 1 inch. 

6 taps R. & L. from k to 1 inch. 

2 bushings I to £, for die plate. 

1 pipe cutter. 

3 extra cutters, 
lflle. 

2 saw files. 

18 large meter boxes. 

7 small meter boxes. 
2 coal hods. 

1 wood stove. 

2 brooms. 

1 glass cutter. 
1 meter spanner. 
50 feet 1 inch rubber hose. 

19 square slop box covers. 
1 watering Dot. 



3D 



1 side packing leather. 
1 long handle spade. 
1 spoon shovel. 
20 hydrant packing. 

6 tamping tools. 

50 hydrant nuts for cap. 

1 iron kettle. 

1 tea-kettle. 

1 1-2 bushel basket. 
11 hydrant covers (wood). 

4 wood stop boxes. 

1 kerosene barrel. 
4() feet 1-1 inch pipe (iron). 

20 " " " " (lead). 
1 iron brand, M. W. W. 

50 feet of wire. 

:> hydrant nuts for rods. 

1 bevel square. 

'.) hydrant rods. 
50 l-"2 inch cap (for services). 

21 stop covers (old). 
10 " " (new). 

1 lot of gate covers. 

1 lot tallow. 

4 lbs. waste. 

1 lot hemp packing* 

7 gate wrenches. 
1-2 paper screws. 

1 lamp. 

1 heating furnace. 

1 lot of iron for furnace. 

2 oil stoves. 
•4 oil cans. 



1 3 cu. ft. measure. 

1 platform scale. 

1 6 inch gauge. 

1 20 inch brass spindle. 

1 14 inch brass spindle. 

5 6 inch brass spindles. 

1 wood saw. 

2 prick punches. 

1 lot brass nipples. 

7 3-4 inch stop and waste. 

1 3-4 inch corp. stop. 

2 1 inch stop and waste. 
Ill inch curb stops. 

1 3-4 inch curb stop. 
1 1-4 inch curb stop. 
1 lot pipe fittings. 

6 collars fpr hydrants. 
4 caps for hydrants. 

1 chain for hydrants. 

2 iron rimmers. 
1 trace ratchet. 
1 ice chisel. 

4 stop wrenches. 

1 lot old pipe. 
6 stone points. 

2 extension bitts. 
15 hydrant valves. 

2 pair pipe tongs. 

1 pair chain tongs. 

1 pair blacksmith's tongs. 

1 ratchet driller. 

2 meter wrenches. 
1 road roller. 



INVENTORY OP TOOLS AT PUMPING STATION. 



1 scoop shovel. 
4 common shovels. 
1 desk. 

1 one-inch auger. 
G lanterns. 



1 pair pliers. 
1 wire cutter. 
1 boat. 
1 set steps. 
Jbbl. oil. 



40 



1 sprinkler pot. 

1 clock. 

2 planes. 

2 thermometers. 
4 crow-bars. 

1 bellows and anvil. 

3 pipe wrenches. 
1 window brush. 
1 gate wrench. 

1 long key. 

1 hydrant wrench. 

2 wheel-barrbws. 
1 five-pail kettle. 

3 picks. 

1 grind-stone. 

1 clothes-dryer. 

2 ladders. 
•2 stoves. 

2 coal-hods. 
1 coal-sifter. 

1 iron slush bucket. 

4 fork wrenches. 

2 screen rakes. 



200 lbs. waste. 
50 lbs. tallow. 
60 lbs. black lead. 

\h cords wood. 
15 tons coal. 

2 ice chisels. 

G cold chisels. 

2 hammers. 

3 drip-pans. 

2 lbs. hemp packing. 
1 draw shave. 
1 basket. 

6 pair rubber boots. 
k bbl. sperm oil. 

1 bench. 

2 levels. 

1 ratchet wrench. 
1 waste press. 

1 Scotch driller. 

2 screw plates, taps and dies. 
1 vise. 

200 ft. 5-inch hose. 



INVENTORY OF CONSTRUCTION TOOLS AT DAM. 



2 full trimmed derricks. 
35 wheel-barrows. 

3 iron rakes. 

1 wrought-iron plow. 

7 forks. 

4 set dog chains. 

1 set blacksmith tools. 
10 pc's Scotch sewer pipe, 
1 force pump. 
1 bill hook. 
1 clevis and pin. 
I harrow. 
1 timber roll. 

8 sprinkler pots. 



4 mortar hoes. 

1 anvil. 

2 iron shovels. 
150 feet hose. 

1 No. 5 and 1 No. 3 plow 

3 grub hoes. 

4 bush scythes. 

2 axes. 

4 cable chains. 
1 set bellows. 
4 water pails. 

3 snaths. 

10 mason's hods. 
1 lot lumber. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER, 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Coun- 
cils : 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with the City Ordinances 
for the government of the Manchester Fire Department, I 
have the honor to submit herewith the following annual 
report of the affairs of the department for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1876, with a statement of its labors dur- 
ing the year, and such other matters pertaining to its 
general management as occur to me. 

This has been a most fortunate year in the small number 
or fires that, have occurred. Seldom, if ever, in the his- 
tory of the city, have the losses caused thereby been so 
small. This is mainly accounted for by the efficiency of 
the department and our ample water supply. 

The following is the effective force of the department at 
present, being the full complement : 
1 Chief Engineer and 4 Assistants. 
4 Steam Fire Engines — 14 men for each and 6 horses. 
1 Hook and Ladder Truck — 30 men and 1 horse. 
1 Hose-Carriage — 15 men and 1 horse. 
1 Four-Wheeled Hand Hose Carriage, 12 men. 
1 Supply Wagon, 1 man and 1 horse. 

1 Four- Wheeled Hand Hose-Carriage. 

2 Two-Wheeled Hose-Carriages, one of which is located 
at P. C. Cheney & Co.'s- Paper Mill, at Amoskeag, and 



-14 

the other at Goffe's Falls. These carriages are manned 

by men employed at the works where they are located 

Some changes have taken place in the membership of 
the department during the year, but the full complement 
of members has been maintained throughout. 

The department has been called out during the year 2o 
times to fires and alarms. I am glad to state that no very 
•destructive fire is to be reported in this number. 

Annexed herewith is a list of alarms, fires, losses, &c. 

I am pleased to state that no member of the department 
has lost his life, nor, with but one exception, met with any 
serious accident in the discharge of his duty during the 
year. 

The following new hydrants have been erected by the 
Board of Water Commissioners during the year : 
Adams street, north-west corner of Elm. 
Appleton street, north-west corner of Elm. 
Appleton street, north-west corner of Chestnut. 
Brook street, north-west corner of Beech. 
Dean street, north-west corner of Elm. 
Elm street, north-west corner of Salmon. 
Hollis street, north-west corner of Elm. 
Langdon street, north-west corner of Elm. 
Orange street, north-west corner of Beech. 
Pennacook street, north-west corner of Elm. 
Prospect street, north-west corner of Beech. 
Prospect street, north-west corner of Ash. 
Prospect street, north-west corner of Maple. 
Prospect street, north west corner of Oak. 
Prospect street, north-west corner of Russell. 
River Road, north-west corner of Elm. 
Spruce street, north-west corner of Lincoln. 
Webster street, north-west corner of Elm. 
Webster street, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

These hydrants, with those previously erected, provide 



45 

the thickly settled part of the city with such ample water 
facilities as to greatly reduce the dangers to be appre- 
hended from fires, and should proportionally decrease the 
risks of fire insurance. The north end of Elm street and 
Bakersville, hitherto exposed from an insufficient supply of 
water, are now comparatively well provided for. . 

I would recommend the purchase of, at least, 2000 feet 
of good hose for contingent use, as the hose now in service 
will not stand the pressure required at times. One thou- 
sand feet was bought during the year, and more would have 
been procured had the appropriations allowed it. 

APPARATUS. 

The apparatus is in perfect working order. During the 
year the Amoskeag No. 1, an old and well-worn machine, 
has been replaced by a new one of superior capacity, which 
has materially added to the efficiency of the department. 

The old four-wheeled hand hose-carriage formerly used 
by the Pennacook Hose Company, and which has been out 
of service several years, I had re-painted and otherwise re- 
paired, and located it at the house of the E. W. Harrington 
Company, in Piscataquog, as the arrangements for horses 
for this engine are such, that in many instances considera- 
ble time must elapse after an alarm is sounded before it 
can be brought to the scene of the fire, and at such times 
the hose-carriage may be made to render very valuable ser- 
vice. 

I would recommend the reduction of the membership of 
the Hook and Ladder Company from the present number, 
30, to one-half that number, and also the addition of a sec- 
ond horse for drawing the truck to fires, as no single horse 
can at all times be depended upon to reach the scene of fire 
as soon as needed. There is no reason why the Hook and 
Ladder truck should not reach a fire nearly as quickly as. 



46 

:an engine, and, with another horse and proper calculation, 
this can be done. Frequently it happens that a ladder is 
the first thing needed at a fire, hence the importance of 
having this matter promptly attended to. 

I would particularly recommend that a hand hose-car- 
riage, with complete accompaniments, be procured and lo- 
cated at the south end of the city, in the vicinity of Park, 
Spruce, Cedar, or Auburn and Elm streets, as many of the 
largest wooden tenement blocks in the city are located in 
that section, aside from the various mechanical and other 
industrial establishments which abound and are continually 
multiplying there. It is a measure of protection that the 
people of that part of the city have a right to expect. The 
membership can be readily enrolled from the employees of 
the several workshops in the neighborhood. This need not 
necessarily entail additional expense to the city if the sug- 
gestion in regard to decreasing the membership of the 
Hook and Ladder Company be carried out. 

BUILDINGS. 

I would unhesitatingly recommend the erection of a new 
•engine house on Vine street, as the present accommoda- 
tions are wholly inadequate for the wants of the depart- 
ment. 

Fl^E ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The fire alarm telegraph is now in good condition. It 
has given entire satisfaction during the year, and has fully 
realised all that its advocates claimed for it. It is a most 
important auxiliary to the fire department. Accidents have 
interfered with its workings several times, but, fortunately, 
•did not- hinder its operation when needed. No material al- 
terations have been made in it during the year. Were I 
to suggest any, it- would be to change the insulators from 
the house-tops, where they are now located, to poles erected 



47 



for the purpose. This change would greatly facilitate the 
discovery of breaks and grounds that may occur, and ena- 
ble the superintendent to readily repair them, as this work 
must be done at night frequently, when it is almost impos- 
sible to gain admittance to the buildings, and dangerous to 
ascend to their roofs. 



FIREMEN S RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

This association, like all else connected with the de- 
partment, has been fortunate during the year, having but 
one call for a benefit from its funds. James R. Carr, a 
member of Amoskeag Engine Company No. 1, was seri- 
ously injured while in the discharge of his duty. This is 
the only , casualty that occurred during the year. 

Secretary's Report. 

Cash on hand December 31, 1875 
Received from Secretary 
Dividend .... 

Total receipts 

Paid for by laws 

Paid for postal cards 

Paid secretary's salary 

Paid James R. Can- 
Balance on hand .... $709 32 



. $755 


14 


17 


00 


34. 


43 


. $806 


57 


$14 50 




1 75 




25 00 




56 00 





97 25 



CONCLUSION. 



In conclusion, I would return my thanks to his Honor, 
the Mayor, for the many courtesies shown me during the 
year : to the several gentlemen of the city government 
with whom my official relations brought me in contact, par- 
ticularly the Committee on Fire Department and the Su- 



48 

perintendent of Streets ; also to the Police Department,, 
for promptness and efficiency at all times, and to the citi- 
zens generally, for the kindly interest they have always 
manifested in the welfare of the department. 

I can heartily commend the discipline of the depart- 
ment, which, I think, was never better, and for which I re- 
turn thanks to my assistant engineers ; to the foremen of 
the several companies, and to each member of same, all of 
whom were prompt to obey all orders ; to each and all of 
whom, in a measure, is due the successful and creditable 
management of the department during the year, and of 
which the citizens of Manchester have just cause to feel 
proud. J. F. PHERSON, 

Chief Engineer Manchester Fire Department. 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1876. 



ALARMS, FIRES, LOSSES, AC, FOR THE YEAR 1876. 

1. — January 13 — alarm box 7 ; chimney burned out on 
Church street. 

2. — January 16 — alarm box 71 ; cottage house at 187 
Central street, owned by Mrs. Connor ; loss, |260 ; fully 
insured. 

3. — January 22 — alarm box 51 ; fire at Lowell's Foun- 
dry ; loss trifling. 

4. — January 26 — alarm box 4 ; chimney burned out on 
Central street ; no damage. 

5. — January 31 — alarm box 5 ; fire on Hanover street, 
between Pine and Union ; no loss. 

6. — February 3 — alarm box 4 ; fire in building owned by 
H. G. Connor and others ; loss, 1141.75 ; insured. 



49 

7.— February 13 — alarm box 5 ; fire in house, 52 Merri- 
mack street, owned by Luther W. Hall ; loss not ascer- 
tained, but in the vicinity of 1200, should judge. 

8. — February 13 — second alarm from same fire, struck 
from box 21 ; no damage. 

9. — February 14 — alarm box 6 ; fire at Pittsfield, N. H. ; 
sent Amoskeag S. F. E. No. 1 and Assistant Engineers Sul- 
livan and Dodge to their relief. 

10. — February 24 — alarm box 8 ; chimney burned out in 
Myrtle block ; no damage. 

11. — April 7 — alarm box 41 ; fire at 102 Amoskeag cor- 
poration : loss, 875 ; insured. 

12. — May 3 — alarm box 4 ; fire in rear of 66 Park 
street, owned by Connor & Dee ; loss, $170 : fully insured. 

13. — May 23 — alarm box 53 ; fire in McDerby & Gar- 
vin's pipe shop, Piscataquog ; loss, $700 ; insured for $410. 

14. — June 10 — alarm box 4 ; fire in house 73 Cedar 
street, owned by B. P. Burpee : loss trifling. 

15. — June 12 — alarm box 6 : fire in barn rear of 191 
Manchester street ; no loss. . 

16. — June 27 — alarm box 62 ; fire in Mammoth Cottage, 
Manchester Center ; struck by lightning. 

17. — July 15 — alarm box 4 ; fire in John Ryan's store, 
Park street rear Elm ; Ryan's loss, $3,000 ; insured for 
$1,500 on stock : damage to building, $620 ; covered by in- 
surance. Loss on Mrs. Cary's buildings adjoining Ryan's, 
$350 ; fully insured. 

18. — July 21 — alarm box 17 ; fire in Wilson Brothers' 
store, corner of Lowell and 1 Maple streets; loss slight, 
amount not ascertained. 

19. — August 6 — alarm box 61; fire in .red house, Ba- 
kersville, owned by Gas Company; loss, $783.50 ; fully in- 
sure']. 

20. — August 28 — alarm box 25 ; fire in Dr. Adams' 
house, 440 Hanover street : loss, $2,000; fully insured. 
4 



50 

21. — August 29 — alarm box 6; fire in peat meadow, 
west of J. P. Eaton's, on Massabesic road ; loss, if any, 
not ascertained. 

22. — September 5 — alarm box 27 ; fire in closet of house 
owned by Lawrence Dowd, on Merrimack street, between 
Elm and Chestnut ; no loss. 

23. — October 14 — alarm box 4 ; fire in Mrs. Cary's barn, 
rear of 45 Park street; loss, $250; insured. Patrick 
Doyle's barn, adjoining, burned ; loss, $300 ; no insurance. 
Rear of John Ryan's building, damage -$81 ; insured. Jer- 
emiah Cronin's barn, rear Spruce street ; damage, $30 ; in- 
sured. 

24. — December 10 — alarm box 6 ; chimney burned out 
in house owned by Lawrence Dowd, Amherst street ; no 
damage. 

25. — December 18 — alarm box 4 ; chimney burned out 
in house, No. 44 Park street ; no damage. 

Total loss during the year 1876 . . $8,961 25 

Total insurance on property burned . . 6,871 25 



Total loss not covered by insurance . . $2,090 00 



NUMBER AND LOCATION OP ALARM BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3 — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson & 
Co.'s Office and Samuel Colby's residence, corner of Elm 
and Young streets. 

No. 4 — Cor. Elm and Spruce streets. Keys at National 
Hotel and Campbell & Hunt's Drug Store. 

No. 5 — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's Office and 
Hall's Drug Store. 



51 

No. 6 — Engine House, Vine street. Key at Engine 
House. 

No. 7— City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. Per- 
ry's Drug Store. 

No. 8 — Elm, foot of Orange street. Keys at Jones & 
Hardy's Grocery, Josiah Stark's Saloon and George Grif- 
fin's. 

No. 9 — Cor. of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. S. F. Stanton and Mr. Connoly, in same 
house. 

No. 12 — Blood's Shop. Keys private. 

No. 13 — Cor. Brook and Chestnut Streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Lewis Simons and W. Jencks. 

No. 14 — Cor. Prospect and Union streets. Keys at res- 
idences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15 — Cor. of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at 
residences of Chas. Palmer and J. Wilson. 

No. 16 — Cor. of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev. J. O'Brien and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 18 — Cor. of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys 
at residences of H. E. Stevens, Andrew W. Baker and E. 
P. Richardson. 

No. 21 — Cor. of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at 
A. Mallard & Son's Grocery, and residence of J. A. Emer- 
son. 

No. 23 — Cor. of Central and Beech streets. Keys at 
residences of E. T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24 — Cor. of Massabesic and Park streets. Keys at 
residences of R. W. Flanders and Milton A. Abbott. 

No. 25 — Cor. of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at 
residences of S. L. Fogg and Horace Gordon. 

No. 26 — Cor. of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at 
McCrillis & Son's Carriage Shop and residence of Joseph 
Tuck. 

No. 27 — Cor. Elm and Merrimack streets. Keys at 



52 

Manchester House and Tebbetts Bros.' and Weeks & Cur- 
rier's Drug Stores. 

No. 31 — Amoskeag Village. Keys at Cheney & Co.'s 
Paper Mill and residence of J. M. "Varnum. 

No. 32 — Langdon Mills, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at Watch Room and Hoyt & Co.'s Paper 
Mill. 

No. 34 — Mechanics Row. Keys at Watch Room and W. 
W. Hubbard's Office. 

No. 35— Stark Mills. Key at Watch Room. 

No. 36 — Cor. of Amherst and Belmont streets. Keys at 
residences of Rodney Porter and James L. Campbell. 

No. 41 — Amoskeag Mills. Key at Watch Room. 

No. 42 — Manchester Mills. Key at Watch Room. 

No. 43 — Namaske Mill. Key at Watch Room. 

No. 51— S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s Shop. Keys at S, C. 
Forsaith & Co.'s Office and Freight Depot. 

No. 52 — Barr's Block, 'Squog. Keys at Barr & Clapp's 
Store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53 — Wallace's Brewery. Keys at Wallace's Brew- 
ery Office and I. R. Dewey's Store. 

No. 61 — Cor. Elm and Hancock streets, Bakersville. 
Keys at residences of M. O'Neil and H. W. Longa. 

No. 62 — Massabesic street, Hallsville. Key at residence 
of Chas. Chase. 

No. 72 — Cor. Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of T. Collins and Daniel S. Lehan. 

Also, keys in the hands of the regular police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given 
at 12 1-2 o'clock p. m., precisely, each day, and will be de- 
noted by one stroke of the fire bells. 



53 

INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AM) CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm box, keys to 
which are in the hands of all regular police, also of the 
persons designated by the card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery or positive informa- 
tion of a fire, will unlock the box, pull the hook down once 
as far as they can (without jerking), and then let go. 
Shut the door and remove the key. 

8. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment and if no clicking is heard in 
the box pull again ; if you still hear no clicking go to the 
next nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure the 
box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
cause other than an actual fire. Do not give an alarm for 
a chimney fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your res- 
idence or place of business where the keys are kept, return 
the keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of the alarm boxes near 
their property, also the places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in the 
city, and the number of a box will be given four times for 
an alarm. 

8. One stroke of the bells and gongs given by the Engi- 
neer in charge during a fire will be the signal to discharge 
all companies remaining at their engine-houses. Two 
strokes of the bells and gongs at a fire will be a signal for 
the department to limber up. 



54 

The Engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of 
the bells at any time, and in case of testing the boxes each 
test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



RULES ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

The following rules were adopted January 10, 1876, with 
which the Fire Department will strictly comply until other- 
wise ordered, and will attend alarms as follows: 

1. Steamer No. 2 will report for duty at the first alarm 
on its first and. second run ; second alarm on its third run. 

2. Steamer No. 3 will report for duty at the first alarm 
to boxes 31, 42, 43, 51, 52 and 53 ; second alarm to boxes 

35 and 41. 

3. Steamer No. 4 will report for duty at the first alarm 
on its first and second run ; second alarm on its third run. 

4. Steamers 1, 2 and 4. on the first alarm, will cross the 
river only on the day of their first run ; on the second 
alarm the steamer having its second run will cross. 

5. Hook and Ladder Truck and Pennacook Hose No. 1 
will respond to the first alarm in all cases. 

6. Massabesic Hose No. 2 will respond on first alarm to 
boxes from 13 to 26 inclusive ; also include boxes 9, 62 and 

36 ; on second alarm will respond to all boxes except 52, 
53 and 61. 

7. At any time when an alarm of fire is struck, the en- 
gine or hose carriage that leaves the house first will have 
the right to lead to the fire. No racing will be allowed, 
nor any passing by each other, except in case of accident, 
under penalty of dismissal of the driver from the depart- 
ment. 

8. The whole department will respond in all cases on 
the third alarm. 



55 

9. The companies of the department not called at the 
first alarm will prepare for a start, and hold themselves in 
readiness for the second and third alarms, and if not 
needed, one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer 
in charge at the fire, will be the signal for discharge to all 
companies remaining at the houses. 

10. Two strokes of the bells at a fire, will be the signal 
to limber-up. 



CONDITION OF CISTERNS AND RESERVOIRS. 



No. i 



Location. 



Ft.In. 

1 Elm street, at City Hall 1 8 2 

•J lElm street, near Smyth's Block ' 5 

3 Gate, Mercantile Block 1 

4 Corner Chestnut and Hanover streets. i 1 4 

5 Haseltine House, Manchester street 8 

6 jPine, iietween Manchester and Merrimack streets 4 10 

7 Junction Hanover and Pine streets \ 5 

8 Gate at junction Hanover and Pine streets, feeds Nos. 1, 

6, and 9 

9 jCorner of Pine and Central streets 6 

10 jCorner Elm and Myrtle streets, (worthless) 

11 iLowell, near Nashua street .2 

12 ;Gate, junction of Amherst and Chestnut streets, draws oft 

water on Concord Square 

13 iCentre of Tremont Square '. ! 

14 Bridge, head of Birch street 6 5 

15 Comer Chestnut and Orange streets ' 6 

16 Corner Hanover and Union streets 

17 jCorner Laurel and Beech streets, (worthless) 

18 jCorner Walnut and Amherst streets 

19 (Discontinued 
20 
21 
22 



Ft.In 
5 2 



Gate, Hanover street, feeds No. 5 

Bakersville, (worthless) . 

Piscataquog, near Fradd & Follansbee's store 

23 Piscataquog, north Steam Mill, 'Squog river 

24 Piscataquog, Granite street 

25 Piscataquog. near Bowman Place 

26 jArnoskeag Penstock, P. C. Cheney & Co's yard 

27 Amherst, corner Hall street .' 

28 |Merrimack, bet. Hall and Wilson streets, (not reliable). 

29 (Corner Amherst and Hall streets 

30 Janesville, near J. B. McCrillis & Son's shop 

31 Gas Works 

32 jBrook, south end Elm street 

33 JElm back street, on Central street 

34 | Elm back street, on Park street 

35 Elm back street, on Cedar street. ... 

36 jAmoskeag. near old hotel 

Gate, cor. Hanover and Chestnut sts., feeds Concord Square 

pond, and Reservoir at Smyth's Block 



6 6 
12 



10 



Ft.In. 
None. 

12 

None. 

None 

6 

12 
None. 



None. 
1 8 
3 3 



None. 



None. 

None. 



None, i 



56 

The following is the estimated value of the property now 
owned by the city in this department : 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED OX VINE STKEET. 

ie and hose 



1 first-class rotary steam engi 
carriage 
100 feet rubber hose . 
1500 feet leather hose . 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture, fixtures, &c 

Total amount 



14,500 00 

200 00 

2,000 00 

219 00 

575 00 

17,494 00 



FIRE-KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose 
carriage 
100 feet rubber hose . 
100 feet rubber hose, rubber-lined 
1300 feet leather hose . 
500 feet new leather hose 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture, fixtures, &c 

Total amount 



£3,250 


00 


100 


00 


80 


00 


1,500 


00 


605 


00 


200 


00 


650 


00 



6,445 00 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQDOG. 

1 second-class plunger engine and hose car- 
riage ...... 

1 4-wheeled hand hose carriage 



13,500 00 
225 00 



57 



200 feet rubber hose . 
1600 feet leather hose . 
100 feet new leather hose . 

Firemen's suits . 

Furniture, fixtures, &c. 

Total amount 



100 00 
1,924 00 
133 00 
178 00 
517 00 

$6,577 00 



N. 8. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine and 
hose carriage 
50 feet rubber hose . 
100 feet rubber-lined hose . 
1100 feet leather hose . 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 



&4,250 


00 


71 


50 


80 


00 


1,550 


00 


213 


00 


609 


25 



$6,773 75 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VIXE STREET. 



1 four-wheeled horse hose carriage 
1 horse sled and reel 
1800 feet leather hose . 
150 feet new leather hose . 
50 feet rubber-lined linen hose . 
Firemen's suits . 
Furniture and fixture- . 
1 harness .... 

Total amount 





$600 00 




75 00 




2,700 00 




199 50 




40 00 




309 00 




343 00 




100 00 



$4,366 50 



58 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 



LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose carriage . 
1700 feet leather hose . 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 



$800 00 

2,000 00 

200 00 

54 00 

153,054 00 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 truck with hooks and ladders 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 



$1,500 00 

431 00 

343 00 

12,274 00 



GOFFE'S PALLS HOSE COMPANY. 



1 two-wheeled hose carriage 
400 feet linen hose 
Pipes, &c. 

Total amount 



$200 00 

200 00 

12 00 

1412 00 



AMOSKEAG HOSE COMPANY, 



LOCATED AT 1". C. CHENETf i CO'S. PAPER .MILLS. 



1 two-wheeled hose carriage 
800 feet leather hose . 
Pipes, &c. . 



$200 00 

400 00 

12 00 



Total amount 



$612 00 



59 



engineers' department. 



1 supply wagon 
Suits 
Furniture, &c. 



Total amount 



$150 00 

50 00 

100 00 

$300 00 



FIRE ALARM TELEGHAPH. 



At cost 



$19,910 00- 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag Engine No. 1 
Fire-King Engine No. 2 
E. W. Harrington Engine No 
N. S. Bean Engine No. 4 
PennacQok Hose No. 1 . 
Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 
Hook and Ladder No. 1 
Goffe's Falls Hose Company 
Amoskeag Hose Company 
Engineers' Department . 
Fire Alarm Telegraph . 

Total amount . 



$7,494 00 

6,445 00 

6,577 00 

6,773 75 

4,366 50 

3,054 00 

2,274 00 

412 00 

612 00 

300 00 

19,910 00 



,218 25 



liO 



NAMES Atft) RESIDENCES OF MEMBERS OF THE 
FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

James F. Pherson, Chief Engineer, No. 25 M.'S. Block. 

John Patterson, Main street, Piscataquog. 

Patrick Sullivan, Elm street. 

David H. Young, corner Bridge and Union streets. 

Geo. H. Dodge, No. 35 M. S. Block. 

FIRE-KING STEAMER COMPANY NO. 2. 

A. H. Sanborn, foreman, Stark block, Elm street. 

G. W. Cheney, assistant foreman, 7 Stark Corporation. 

A. M. Keniston, clerk and treasurer, 1,405 Elm street, 

D. W. Morse, engineer, 1,419 Elm street. 

C. F. Hall, assistant engineer. 42 Machine Shop block. 

F. W. McKinley, 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 

W. B. Heath, 192 Amherst street. 

S. Frank Head, 47 High street. 

C. H. Mauley, 19 Warren street. 

Albert Merrill, 42 Machine Shop block. 

F. A. Pherson, 25 Machine Shop block. 

T. M. Conant, Engine House. Vine street. 

H. L. Miller, 11 Ash street. 

W. E. Gilmore, 1 Stark Corporation. 

AMOSKEAG STEAMER COMPANY NO. 1. 

George R. Simmons, foreman, Pennacook street. 

C. M. Morse, assistant foreman, Myrtle block. 

Horace Nichols, engineer, 27 Machine Shop block. 

Sam C. Lowell, assistant engineer, 5 Machine Shop block. 

A. D. Scovell, clerk, 174 Amherst street. 

George W. Butterfield, driver, Engine House, Vine street. 

James R. Carr, hoseman, 14 Orange street. 



61 

J. D. Linus, hoseman, 5 Machine Shop block. 

J. T. Underbill, hoseman, 66 Stark Corporation. 

F. E. Stearns, hoseman, 456 Park street. 

H. H. Glines, hoseman, 5 Machine Shop block. 

J. A. Barker, hoseman, 28 Market street. 

E. H. Currier, hoseman, 307 Hanover street. 

W. H. Stearns, hoseman, 421 Hanover street. 

E. W. HARRINGTON ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

H. Fradd, foreman, Dover street. 

George D. Sears, assistant foreman, corner Main street. 

Joseph Schofield, clerk, corner Granite and Dover- streets. 

William Doran, engineer, Douglas street. 

John T. Dinsmore, assistant engineer, Dover street. 

John McDerby, hoseman, Granite street. 

Ruel Manning, hoseman, Douglas street. 

Benjamin H. Parker, hoseman, Main street. 

John R. Young, hoseman, Granite street. 

Edward Young, hoseman, Granite street. 

Andrew C. Wallace, jr., hoseman, West street. 

D. Breed, hoseman, Main street. 

Charles O'Shaughnessy, hoseman, Granite street. 

Edward McDerby, hoseman, Water street. 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

Thomas W. Lane, foreman, Elm, corner Appleton street. 
C. D. Palmer, assistant foreman, 345 Central street. 
J. E. Merrill, clerk, 60 Orange street. 
J. M. Plaisted, driver, Engine House, Vine street. 

A. Maxfield, hoseman, 14 Amoskeag Corporation. 
H. S. Brown, hoseman, 640 Union street. 

B. B. Aldrich, hoseman, 392 Manchester street. 
G. H. Porter, hoseman, 331 Chestnut street. 



62 

W. R. Sawyer, hoseman, 255 Spruce street. 

C. B. French, hoseman, 11 Merrimack street. 

W. G. Chase, hoseman, 299 Chestnut street. 

L. M. Aldrich, hoseman, 338 Central street. 

W. L. Blenus, hoseman, 153 Hanover street. 

H. M. Moody, hoseman, Harrison, corner Pine street. 

J. E. Dodge, hoseman, Elm, corner Hanover street. 

N. S. BEAN STEAMER COMPANY NO. 4. 

E. S. Whitney, foreman, No. 8 Machine Shop block. 

C. E. Ham, assistant foreman, 3 Stark street. 

E. G. Abbott, clerk, 1,211 Elm street. 

Fred S. Bean, engineer, 40 Machine Shop block. 

F. A. Aldrich, assistant engineer, 20 Ash street. 

A. B. Cushing, driver, 12 Engine House, Vine street. 
T. F. Dodge, hoseman, 21 Machine Shop Block. 

D. M. Rowe, hoseman, 41 Market street. 
J. Cushing, hoseman, 12 Vine street. 

R. S. Corey, hoseman, 17 Machine Shop block. 
W. H. Dodge, hoseman, 34 Market street. 
J. E. Richards, hoseman, 41 Market street. 
C. H. Bassett, hoseman, 640 Union street. 
A. Nearborn, hoseman, 33 East High street. 

MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

H. W. Fisher, foreman, 59 Myrtle street. 

J. F. Seaward, assistant foreman, 22 Warren street. 

P. W. Hannaford, clerk, 256 Lowell street. 

C. Thompson, steward, Nashua street. 

H. G. Seaman, hoseman, 16 South street. 

G. W. Goodwin, hoseman, cor. Wilson and E. High streets. 
J. H. Boyd, hoseman, 242 Bridge street. 

W. Seaward, hoseman, cor. Nashua and Maple streets. 



63 

J. W. Batchelder, hoseman, 16 South street. 
G. A. Masten, hoseman, 360 Amherst street. 
C. H. Stebbins, hoseman, 108 East High street. 
C. F. Garland, hoseman, Linden street. 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

George W. Bacon, foreman. 45 Stark Corporation, Bridge 

street. 
John N. Chase, assistant foreman, 276 Bridge street. 
Henry French, clerk, 301 Chestnut street. 
H. P. Young, treasurer, 351 Pine street. 
Charles Canfield, steward, 18 Amoskeag Corporation. 
George E. Glines, fireman, 310 Central street. 
A. Q. N. Robertson, fireman. 301 Chestnut street. 
Charles A. Clough, fireman, 2 Print-works Corporation. 
Joel Daniels, fireman, 32 Ash street. 
F. A. Senter, fireman, 39 Pine street. 
E. A. G. Holmes, fireman, 228 Manchester street. 
George H. Dudley, fireman, 153 corner Beecli and Laurel 

street. 
Luther J. Flint, fireman. 207 Bridge street. 
George L. Leach, fireman, 263 Merrimack street. 
D. M. K. Phillips, fireman, 310 Central street. 
H. H. Cole, fireman, 43 Water street. 
W. S. Leavitt, fireman, 403 Pine street. 
James Orrill, fireman, 1,291 Elm street. 
J. B. Nourse, fireman, 108 Merrimack street. 
J. J. Lovering, fireman, 397 Pine street. 
John Wilson, fireman, 45 Pearl street. 
Charles H. Cross, fireman, 72 Bridge street. 
Augustus J. Robie, fireman, 422 Chestnut street. 
Charles L. Brown, fireman, 90 Middle street. 
Charles M. Norton, fireman, 5 Stark street. 



64 

Frank C. Jewell, fireman, 44 Machine Shop block, Amos- 

keag Corporation. 
Samuel Adams, fireman, 1147 Elm street. 
John W. Chase, fireman, 14 Stark Corporation. 
Ralph Pearson, fireman, 6 Laurel street. 
J. H. Gould, fireman, 4 Pearl street. 

DRIVER OF SUPPLY WAGON. 

James Kearns, 68 Concord street. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY LIBRARY 



THE YEAR 1876. 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith submit their 
twenty-third annual report of the affairs and condition of 
the Library, and with it the report made to them by the 
Treasurer of the Board, showing the expenditures made 
for books and periodicals, and the report of the Librarian 
which shows in detail the operation of the library during 
the year, and the condition of the library and other prop- 
erty under his care at the close of the year. 

The trustees are not aware that the operations of the 
library for the past year have developed any new circum- 
stances requiring any special action by the City Councils in 
relation to the conduct of its affairs. 

From the report of the Treasurer it appears that during 
the year the sum of five hundred seventy-eight dollars and 
sixty-nine cents has been expended for the purchase of 
books, and the sum of one hundred seventy-one dollars and 
sixty-two cents for the purchase of periodicals, leaving a 
balance unexpended of two thousand seven hundred forty- 
nine dollars and fifty-six cents. Of this amount one thou- 
sand two hundred and twenty-four dollars belongs to the 



68 

income of the " Dean Fund," which is to be applied to the 
purchase of books, to be placed in an alcove by themselves 
as the " Dean Donation." Of the remainder, the greater 
part will be absorbed by the annual purchase of books usu- 
ally made at the commencement of the year. 

The report of the Librarian shows that the library has 
been open to the public for the delivery of books two hun- 
dred and forty-eight days, during which time the number 
of books taken out was forty -three thousand seven hundred 
and eight, which is five hundred and sixty-seven less than 
the number delivered the previous year. The average 
number delivered per day indicates that, had the library 
been open the usual number of days, the circulation would 
have exceeded that of any previous year. During the year 
just past the library has been open for the delivery of books 
twenty-two days less than the average number of days for 
the preceding five years. 

Sixty- six different periodicals have been regularly re- 
ceived during the year, and whenever the volumes have 
been completed they have been bound and placed upon the 
shelves for circulation. 

At the time of the last annual examination there were 
in the library nineteen thousand one hundred and fifty- 
seven volumes. There have been added during the year- 
twelve hundred and thirty-nine volumes, making the total 
number of books and pamphlets now in the library twenty 
thousand three hundred and ninety-six. Of the additions t 
three hundred and eleven volumes have been purchased, 
eight hundred and forty-nine have been presented, and 
seventy-nine volumes of periodicals bound. 

In the early part of the year the trustees were informed 
by Hon. Moody Currier that, with the approval of the 
Board, he intended to present to the library selections from 
Bohn's standard publications. The otter was thankfully 
accepted by the trustees. Mr. Currier, in carrying out his 



69 

intention, has presented to the library seven hundred and 
one volumes, consisting of selections from Bohirs Stan- 
dard, Classical, Illustrated, Ecclesiastical and Scientific 
Libraries and Harper's Select Library. These volumes, 
after being numbered and entered by the Librarian upon 
his books, have been placed upon the shelves and are here- 
after to be classed in the catalogue as the " Currier Dona- 
tion." To this munificent gift Mr. Currier has added an 
oil painting of himself, which, by direction of the trustees, 
has been suspended upon the walls of the library. In ac- 
knowledgment of the gift of Mr. Currier, the trustees, at 
their last meeting, unanimously adopted the following res- 
olutions, offered by Hon. Isaac W. Smith : 

" Whereas, Hon. Moody Currier has presented to the City Li- 
brary a donation of 701 volumes, consisting of selections from 
Bonn's standard, classical, illustrated, ecclesiastical and scientific 
Libraries, and from Harper's Select Library ; also an oil painting 
of himself : 

Besolvecl, That the thanks of the city are due, and are hereby 
tendered, to Mr. Currier for his muuificent donation. The trus- 
tees hereby recognize the spirit which prompted this liberal gift 
and the judicious taste shown by the donor in the selection of the 
same, and they share with him the hope and expectation that the 
perusal and study of these volumes will contribute materially to 
the moral and intellectual culture of the citizens of Manchester. 
The generations who shall come after us, as they shall look upon 
his features, so faithfully portrayed on canvas, will revere the mem- 
ory of one who, by his wise foresight, furnished the means for pro- 
moting the welfare of the city by ministering to the mental and 
moral improvement of its inhabitants. 

Besolvecl, That said books be known and classed in the catalogue 
as the ' Currier Donation,' and that the portrait of Mr. Currier be 
suspended upon the walls of the Library. 

Resolved, That the clerk transmit a copy of these resolutions to 
Mr. Currier." 

Another valuable donation to the Library. is that of Mrs. 
Herman Foster, who has lately presented bound copies of 



70 

the following newspapers : Manchester Memorial, Manches- 
ter American, American and Messenger, Democrat and Amer- 
ican, and Mirror and Farmer, making a complete chrono- 
logical history of events occurring in our city from 1840 to 
1871 inclusive. The trustees gratefully acknowledge this 
gift, and hope that the example thus set may be followed 
by others of our citizens. 

A full list of all the donations received during the year 
is appended to the Librarian's report, and to the donors the 
trustees, in behalf of the city, tender their thanks. 

The new catalogue, which has been in preparation for 
some time past, is now nearly completed, and the Board 
hope that it may be ready for the printer within a short 
time. The large and unusual accessions to the Library 
during the past year have delayed its completion much be- 
yond the time anticipated. It is thought that the balance 
of funds now on hand will be sufficient to meet the expense 
of its preparation and printing, without any increase of 
appropriation. 

The Librarian, in his report, asks the attention of the 
Board to the propriety of employing an assistant at the li- 
brary, whose services shall be paid from the amount annu- 
ally appropriated by the City Councils for the ordinary ex- 
penses of the library. This being in effect an increase of 
the salary of the librarian, the trustees, in view of the pres- 
ent business depression, when so many persons are out of 
employment, when salaries and the compensation paid for 
labor has been so generally reduced and the cost of living 
lessened, do not deem it wise to recommend the change 
which is asked. 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the li- 
brary, as paid by the City Treasurer, have been sixteen 
hundred thirty-eight dollars and thirty-nine cents. The 
items of these expenditures appear in detail in the annual 
report of the city, and a brief summary of the same is ap- 



71 

pended to the report of the Treasurer of the Board. The 
trustees have endeavored to keep the expenses necessarily 
incurred in the support of the library reduced as low as 
seemed compatible with a proper care of the property en- 
trusted to them, yet the expenses have slightly exceeded 
the amount appropriated. The trustees have no reason to 
suppose that the expenditures of the ensuing year will ex- 
ceed that of the year just past, but they recommend a 
small increase over the amount appropriated last year, to 
enable them to meet the expenditures necessarily incurred 
for the preservation of the vuluable property entrusted to 
them and the promotion of the usefulness of the institution 
to the public. 

February 3, 1877, in Board of Trustees. 
Read and approved, and ordered to be transmitted to the 
City Councils. 

IRA CROSS, 
Mayor, and President ex-officio. 
N. P. HUNT, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board submits the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the Board of the funds 
received by them on account of the City Library, for the 
year ending December 31, 1876 : 

1876. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance as per last report . $2,193 87 

To income of " Dean Donation " . 306 00 

To appropriation for 1876 . . . 1,000 00 

13,499 87 



72 



1876. 
Jan. 12. 
Feb. 7. 
Feb. 18. 
Feb. 29. 
March 7. 
March 9. 
April 4. 

9. 

1. 

6. 

5. 

9. 

7. 

Sept. 16. 
Sept. 28. 



June 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 



Oct. 
Nov. 



10. 

9. 



Nov. 21. 
Dec. 8. 
Dec. 31. 



Paid N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
Lee & Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
E. W. Locke, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
Lee & Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Joseph Leonard, books . 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
By Balance 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



Librarian's salary 

Gas 

Fuel 

Newspapers 

Insurance 

Water rates 

Binding 

Re-binding 

Printing 

Advertising 

Incidentals 



Cr 




. $12 34 


19 


61 


. 135 


10 


. 282 


23 


12 


54 


90 


04 


16 


89 


16 


92 




85 


12 


00 


12 


89 


16 


16 


12 


08 


44 


07 


19 


40 


13 


90 


15 


62 


7 


00 


10 


67 


. 2,749 


56 


$3,499 87 


$800 00 


212 


80 


222 


00 


31 


50 


32 


50 


20 


00 


172 


61 


91 


14 


41 


50 


5 


25 


9 


09 



$1,638 39 



. 


11,985 34 


. 


2,500 00 


. 


$4,485 34 


. $1,000 00 




. 1,638 39 




. 1,816 95 


AM. 485 34 



73- 

RECAPITULATION. 

Balance Dec. 81, 1875 . 
Appropriation for 1876 . 

Total . 

Paid Trustees 
Incidental expenses 
Balance Dec, 31, 1876 . 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. N. BELL, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

We have examined the above report and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

W. P. NEWELL, 
IRA CROSS, 

Committee on Accounts of City Library. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the Trustees of the City Library and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

JOHN P. NEWELL, 

City Auditor. 
January 4, 1877. 



74 
LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

G-entlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

The following is a statement of the workings of the Li- 
brary for the year 1876, and also of its present condition. 

The record of last year showed a larger circulation than 
for any previous year. The record of the present year, 
had the library been open the usual time, would have 
shown an increase over the preceding one,, and conse- 
quently would have been the largest yet recorded. At the 
semi-annual examination in July the library remained 
closed two weeks longer than usual, in order that the vol- 
umes comprising the " Currier Donation," which were re- 
ceived in the early part of the year, might be got in readi- 
ness for the shelves. But for this circumstance the circu-' 
lation would have been the largest by over fifteen hundred 
than for any year previous. 

The valuable donation of Hon. Moody Currier has in- 
creased the accessions to nearly twice the usual number 
received from year to year. In 1872 the donation of Mr. 
Brewer was received, when the accessions exceeded those 
of this year by about four hundred volumes. 

The number of new accounts opened is larger by fifty- 
five than for last year. The regulations for the return of 
books are, with few exceptions, generally complied with. 
The order which should characterize a well-regulated read- 
ing room cannot be maintained under the present arrange- 
ments. Owing to the lack of the proper assistance to 
attend to the issuing of books (there being no provision 
made whatever by the Board for this purpose), it becomes 
absolutely necessary for the librarian to be in constant at- 
tendance on the duties in this department, and when absent 
from the desk, selecting from the shelves the books desired, 
advantage is taken of such absence, and consequently the 
good order so much desired is unattained.. 



75 

The usual degree of interest for works of the standard 
authors in history, art, the sciences, and in other important 
branches, is well maintained. The " Currier Donation " 
being composed mostly of works of this character, quite a 
demand is made from it, but, of course, not to that extent 
as from the " Brewer Donation," which is comprised mostly 
of fiction, although by standard authors in this branch of 
literature. The interest for reading in the rooms remains 
about the same as in the past, but believe it would be 
greatly increased if the suggestions above referred to 
should be carried out. I would not be understood to mean 
that the unquiet condition of the rooms is wholly owing to 
the cause above mentioned, for a part is due to the general 
arrangement of the rooms. This could be remedied by 
covering the floor with a suitable matting, thus destroying 
the noise occasioned by walking from one part of the room 
to another. 

There are a few volumes unaccounted for at this date,, 
which undoubtedly will be returned soon. The losses from 
year to year are very small, rarely happening among books 
of value above those of the juveniles or fiction. 

The following is a statement of the work for the past 
year : 

Whole number of volumes at last report . . 19,157 
Accessions the past year, by periodicals 

bound . 79 

Accessions the past year by purchase . 311 

donation . 849 

1,239 



hole number of volumes at present 
Comprising : 

Maps .... 

Pamphlets 

Bound volumes 


16 

. 1,085 
. 19,295 


20,396 
20.396 



76 

Number volumes on the shelves, about . 20,166 

Number periodicals received ... 66 

Number volumes withdrawn the past year 14 

Number days open to the public . . 282 

Number days open for the delivery of books 248 
Number volumes in circulation during this 

time 43,708 

Average number per day . . . 176 

Largest number issued in any one day . 335 
Increase of circulation over the average for 

the past fifteen years . . . 7,369 
Number in circulation at calling in in De- 
cember 30 1,675 

Number cards in constant use . . . 1,000 

Whole number of guarantees received . 10,307 

Number received the past year . . 541 

Average per month ..... 45 

Total number of accounts on the books . 5,430 

Increase over last year .... 584 

Amount of cash received for fines and on 

hand January 1, 1876 . . . $162 66 

Amount received the past year . . 58 57 



$221 23 



Paid express charges, stationery, postage 

and incidentals .... 55 10 



Balance on hand January 1, 1877 . . $166 13 

In the last report, attention was called, among other 
things, to the fact that the labors in managing the library 
are increasing from year to year. It would seem to be 
but right and just that these labors should be met by such 
assistance as would be sufficient to perform the increasing 
duties, that the public may be the better and more properly 



77 

served. Such being the rule in other departments of the 
city, why should not the same rule apply to the library? 

The Board are well aware, no doubt, that no change has 
been made in the library force from what it was twenty 
years ago. At that time but one attendant was probably 
needed, but now it is quite a different matter. The library 
has increased from ten thousand volumes in 1863, to over 
twenty thousand at the present time, and yet the Board do 
not deem it advisable to increase the force from what it 
was when the library was organized. No one person can 
perform the work of issuing books, even, at the present 
time, not to mention the large amount of work necessary 
to get the books in order for circulation, in a manner that 
would give satisfaction to those who are waiting for them. 
It therefore becomes an absolute necessity for the Libra- 
rian to employ such assistance as is needed, from his own 
meagre salary, that the public may be properly served. 
The above applies more particularly to the issuing of books ; 
when the general work of the library is considered, this ir- 
regularity becomes still more apparent. A small amount 
appropriated for this purpose would be of much benefit to 
the public, and so considered by all frequenters of the li- 
brary. 

It is hoped that the above subject will receive the imme- 
diate attention of the Board, that they may see the neces- 
sity of some action, and order the necessary improvements 
to be at once made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. H. MARSHALL, Librarian. 

December 30, 1876. 



78 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR 

1876. 

By Hon. John Eaton, Washington. 

Report Commissioner of Education. 1875. 8 vo. 
By Hon. Moody Currier, Manchester. 

The " Currier Donation," comprising Bonn's standard, 
classical, illustrated, scientific and ecclesiastical libra- 
ries, and Harper's Select Library. 701 vols. 12 mo. 
By Hon. S. N. Bell, Manchester. 

Memorial Addresses of the Life and Character of Hon. 

Wra. A. Buckingham, of Connecticut. 1875. 8vo. 

Reports of Departments to Congress, 1st session 44th 

Congress. 8vo. 
Birds of the Northwest. Coues. 1874. 8vo. 
Report on the Sea Fisheries of the south coast of New 

England. 1871-72. 8vo. 
Report of the Commissioners of Fish and Fisheries. 

1872-73. 8vo. 
Medical and Anthropological statistics of Provost Mar- 
shal's Bureau. 1875. 2 vols. 4to. 
By Gen. A. J. Myer, Washington. 

Report of the Chief Signal Officer. 1874. 8 vo. 
By Prop B. B. Peirce, Washington. 

Report of Superintendent Coast Survey. 1872. 4to. 
2 copies. 
By G. M. Levette, M. D., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Reports of the Geological Survey of Indiana. Cox. 

1869-74. 5 vols. 8 vo. 
Report Indiana Board of Agriculture. 1869. 8vo. 
By William B. Towne, Esq., Milford. 

Historical Address on the occasion of the Hundredth 
Anniversary of the Congregational Church, Milford, 
N. H. 1874. 8vo. 



79 

By Col. J. T. Fanning, Manchester. 

Manual of the Principal Instruments used in American 
Engineering. 1871. 16mo. 
By Chas. T. Brown, Esq., Manchester. 

Manual of Phonography. Pitman. 1875. 16mo. 
By Board of Regents, Smithsonian Institution. 

Annual Reports of the Board. 1873-74. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Annual Reports of the Board. 1873-74. 2 vols. 8 vo. 
By United States Congress. 

Congressional Documents. 3d Session 42d Congress. 

1872-73. 30 vols. 8vo. 
Congressional Documents' 1st and 2d session 43d Con- 
gress. 1873-75. 85 vols. 8vo. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Council? of the City of 
Manchester : 

Gentlemen : — The Sub-Committee on the Valley Ceme- 
tery herewith submit their report for the year 1876 : 

Soon after the organization of the Committee, impelled 
by declining health, the Chairman of the Sub-Committee, 
Hon. Edward W. Harrington, went to Hot Springs, Ark., 
where he died about the first of July. For many years he 
manifested great interest in the Valley Cemetery. To his 
supervision and direction the city is indebted for many of 
the substantial improvements of the Valley, — especially for 
the stone-work and iron fence on the .north side of the 
grounds. It was the often-expressed wish of the deceased 
that year by year something should be done in the way of 
extending the stone-work and fence, until the grounds 
should be entirely surrounded by the same style of fence as 
that now standing on the north end. The next reach of 
stone-work, extending across the Valley Brook, will be 
somewhat expensive. A survey was made last spring, by 
George W. Stevens, Esq., with reference to putting in a 
dwarf wall. The estimates required so large a sum of 
money to carry the proposed work across the Brook, and 
the appropriation was so small, the Committee did not deem 
it prudent to commence the job during the present year. 
6 



82 



It is hoped, however, that for a few years to come the city 
will annually appropriate three or four thousand dollars, until 
the work shall be fully completed, in accordance with the 
wishes of the late chairman of the sub-committee. Done 
in this way, the expense will not be seriously felt, and when 
the fence is completed it will add much to the looks of the 
grounds, and protect them from the encroachments of vic- 
ious animals and still more vicious men and children. 

During the year, the grounds have been under the direc- 
tion of Mr. A. H. Hartshorn, who seems to have discharged 
his duties in a faithful manner. 

Under the new city ordinance which abolished the office 
of city sexton, the key to the city tomb has been placed in 
charge of Mr. Hartshorn, who has the care of the tomb 
and collects the fees for the use of the same. 

During the year we have built from the north-west cor- 
ner, running south, 300 feet of tight board fence, and 
painted the same with a substantial coat of dark brown 
paint. We have also repaired the roof of the building at 
the main entrance on the north side. The brook has been 
thoroughly cleaned out, the trees trimmed, and the grounds 
generally made tidy in their appearance. We hope the 
work done will meet your approval. 

We show a balance on hand at the end of the year of 
$609^5. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Valley for the year 
have been as follows, viz : 

To balance of account .... $243 41 

Appropriation . 
Stone sold 
Tomb fees 
Lots sold 
Tree sold 



1,000 


00 


4 


70 


78 


50 


108 


66 


1 


05 


11,436 


32 



83 



Cash paid for labor .... 


$497 75 


For city teams 


66 00 


Nutt Brothers 


3 00 


C. R. Colley, 1875 


59 12 


Sullivan Brothers 


16 53 


George Holbrook, fence, &c, 


89 97 


D. H. Young, roofing . 


18 80 


John B. Varick 


3 50 


J.J. Abbott, painting 


25 00 


Gay, Wells & Co., sand, 1875 


, 50 00 




$8°6 67 




r 4pu^\j " • 


Balance on hand 


•1609 65 


JOSEPH KIDDER; | „ , n 
HOLMES R. PETTEE, ! 


PINE GROVE. 





The receipts upon account of the Pine Grove Cemetery 
have been from the sale of lots. Fourteen hundred fifty- 
five dollars and thirty-eight cents has been paid into the 
city treasury, and there are deed's drawn, not delivered, 
amounting to two hundred twenty-eight dollars. 

The principal outlay has been for care of grounds and 
grading new lots. 

The work contemplated last year upon the common 
grounds has been completed this year. The several ranges 
have been graded to one level and a numbered marble 
tablet placed at each grave, giving the whole plat a neat 
appearance and rendering it easy to care for hereafter. 
Much confusion was found to exist in the records of un- 
dertakers who had made interments, and should there be 
occasion to disinter from the other portion, there will be 
difficulty in identifying. The present system, faithfully 
carried out, will save further confusion. 



84 

The permanent iron fence remains as one year ago, no 
addition having been made, as the committee could not see 
that sufficient funds would be 'in the treasury for the pur- 
pose. The low price at which it could be built now is an 
inducement to prepare for an extension early in the spring. 

Five hundred feet of the wooden fence have been re- 
placed with new, and the material of the old, so far as suit- 
able, has been used to repair the remainder of the old, 
which will probably last a few years. 

As the grounds have become more frequented from year 
to year, it has been found desirable to provide better ac- 
commodations at the building. An addition has been 
placed upon the northerly side, thus securing a room for 
fuel and storage, opening from the main room, and provid- 
ing other much needed conveniences for those visiting the 
grounds. 

Upon petition of the Grand Army a plat of ground, upon 
the westerly side of the lot, has been donated by the com- 
mittee, making a large square, and they have caused to be 
removed from the public grounds the bodies of fifteen sol- 
diers, which have been buried from time to time, and 
placed in the Grand Army lot, at the expense of the city. 

The details of receipts and expenditures will be found 
in the report of the City Treasurer. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Committee on Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with the requirements of 
law I herewith present to you a report of all money by me 
received, on account of Cemeteries, for the year ending' 
December 31, 1876 : 



THE VALLEY. 

January 1, 1876. Received of Mrs. H. T. Foss 

balance for lot No. 297 
January 7. Received of Charles A. Heath, for 

lot No. 752£ 

October 28. Received of Charles Fish, for lot 

No. 480 

October 28. Received of Charles Fish, interest 

Cash paid to H. R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, 

PINE GROVE. 

Received of A. Mclndoe, for wood, . . $3 38 

Received for 53 lots sold .... 1,455 38 



$1 


00 


58 


80 


24 


00 


24 


86 


#108 


66 


108 


66 



$1,458 76 
Cash paid H. R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer . 1,458 76 

All bills of expenditures have passed through the Com- 
mittee on Accounts and been paid by the City Treasurer, 
the full details of which will be found elsewhere in the an- 
nual City Report. 

J. F. JAMES, 
Treasurer of Committee on Cemeteries. 

Manchester, Jan. 9, 1877. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the above accounts 
and find them correctly cast aud properly vouched for. 
JOHN P. NEWELL, City Auditor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Manchester : 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nances, I would respectfully submit the following report of 
all cases which have been brought before the Police Court, 
and their results, from January 1st, 1876, to December 31, 

1876 : 



Escaped from House of Correction 

Embezzlement 

Malicious mischief 

Rape 

Aggravated assault 

Assault 

Assault on officer 

Larceny . 

Larceny from person 

Burglary 

Keeping liquor for sale 

Keeping dogs without license 

Rescue of prisoner 

Attempt to ravish 

Truants . 

Stealing a ride 

Gambling 



3 
1 
1 

7 

3 

151 

7 

103 

4 

21 

38 
18 
1 
2 
3 
5 
3 



88 



Night walker . 
Tramps . 
Noise and brawl 
In bathing- 
Common drunkard 
Drunk 

Disorderly conduct 
Selling liquor 
Playing ball in the street 
Keeping open Sunday 
Forging . 

Obstructing officer . 
Vagabond 

Standing in doorway 
Fornication 
Exposure of person 
Lewdness 
Obscene and profane language 
Stubborn child 
Playing cards Sunday 
Permitting gambling 
Defacing buildings . 
Throwing snow balls 
Obstructing sidewalks 
Killing birds . 
Entering sewer without license 
Fast driving 
Bastardy 

Total arrests 



Cases were disposed of as follows 

Fined and paid 

Sent to House of Correction 

Sent to jail .... 



340 
172 

75 



89 



Sent to House of Reformation 

Bound over 

Discharged 

Appealed 

Sentence suspended 

Sentenced House of Correction, Wilton 

Disclosed and discharged by court . 

Allowed by court to leave town 

House Correction at jail . 

Placed on file 

Nol pros' 'd 

Number of males arrested 
Number of females arrested 

Total number of arrests for 1876 

Number of males before police court 
Number of females before police court 

Total number before police court 

Number of lodgers for the year 

Number of fire alarms given by the police 

Number of store doors found open 



11 
94 
21 

5 
27 
36 

1 

3 
51 
77 

1 

957 
174 

1,181 

779 
135 

914 

1,001 

4 

161 



The following amounts have been received for fine and 
cost in the Police Court, as shown on the records in the 
Marshal's office, from January 1, 1876, to December 31 r 

1876: 



From January 1, 1876, to April 1 


. 1421 98 


April 1 to May 3 


. 171 61 


May 3 to May 18 ... 


. 163 74 


May 18 to December 31, 1876 . 


. 2,845 36 



$3,602 69> 
Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM B. PATTEN, City Marshal. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FAKM. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on the City 
farm herewith submit their annual report for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1876. 

The inventory and appraisal of personal property at the 
farm December 30, 1876, is as follows : 

Live stock ...... 

Hay, grain and produce 

Carriages, farming implements and other tools 
Household furniture and domestic implements 
Provisions and fuel .... 

Bedding and wearing apparel . ; 
Iron, lumber, bricks, <fec. . . 

Total 

Cash on hand .... 



11,340 00 


1,264 


13 


ols 1,411 


54 


its 316 


42 


732 


61 


394 


38 


121 


72 


$5,580 


80 


600 


27 



The permanent improvements made on the farm during 
the year are estimated as follows : 



92 

Seventy-five rods field ditch 
One hundred rods stone wall 
Fruit trees and setting the same . 
Alterations and repairs on buildings . 

Total 1684 00 

The account of the farm for the year is as follows : 
City Farm in account with, City of Manchester ; 



$100 00 


200 


00 


150 


00 


234 


00 



To stock Dec. 31, 1875 . . 17,199 80 
Discount on overestimate 1,364 00 



Dr. 



.,835 80 



To cash on hand Dec. 31, 1875 . . 598 39 

To expenditures for 1876 . . . 5,050 03 

To interest on farm .... 1,000 00 



812,484 22 

Cr. 
By stock Dec. 30, 1876 .... $5,580 30 
By cash paid into City Treasury for pro- 
duce sold, labor, etc. . . . 3,122 51 
By cash on hand Deo. SO, 1876 . . 600 27 
By permanent improvements . . 684 00 
By 3,478 days' board of prisoners, 

and 2,331 days' board of paupers . 2,496 64 



.2,484 22 



Average number of prisoners at farm per day during the 
year 9 3-5 

Average number of paupers at farm per day during the 
year ........ 6 2-5 

Average cost per day of board for each prisoner or 

pauper 43 cts. 



93 

The farm from January 1, 1876, to April 1, 1876, was 
under the superintendence of John H. Proctor, Esq. 

On the first day of April, 1876, Mr. Frederick Allen took 
charge of the farm as Superintendent. Mr. Allen being 
unwilling to accept the stock as appraised in December, 
1875, your committee, after a careful review of said ap- 
praisal, deducted $ 1,364 from the total amount. Your 
committee are of the opinion that in the annual appraisal 
of stock during the last five years no sufficient allowance 
has been made for the wear and tear of household furni- 
ture, bedding, carriages and farming implements. 

Three hundred dollars have been expended for manure 
since April 1. 

Some measures should be taken to supply the farm with- 
water, the well dug within a few years having proved a 
failure. It would be more economical and convenient to 
heat the farm house by steam than to continue the present 
expensive system of wood fires. 

The various and manifold duties relating to the manage- 
ment of the Poor Farm and House of Correction have been 
performed during the. past nine months by Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick Allen, to the entire satisfaction of your commit- 
tee. 

IRA CROSS, Mayor. 
JAMES B. STRAW, 
W. C. BLOOGETT, 
N. R. BIXBY, 
AARON WALDRON. 
RUFTJS WILKINSON, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 
January 1, 1877. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of the City of 
Manchester : 
In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report. 

The whole number of persons receiving assistance dur- 
ing the past year is one hundred and seventeen, consisting 
of twenty-four families and twenty-five persons not having 
families, of which number twenty-two families and twenty- 
three persons have a settlement in this city ; the remaining 
two families and two persons have no settlement in city or 
State. 

There have been three deaths. 

The whole number of persons at the Aims-House during 
the past year is twenty eight. There have been two deaths. 
The average number at the Aims-House -during the year is 
six and two-fifths. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

IRA CROSS, Chairman. 
S. J. YOUNG, Clerk. 
JEREMIAH STICKNEY, 
P. A. DEV1NE, 
DANIEL SHEEHAN, 
E. A. MOULTON, 
JOHN DEALY, 
A. B. PAGE, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



A REPORT 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



THE YEAR 1876. 



A RESOLUTION in relation to the report of the public schools 
of the city of Manchester for the year 1876: 

Whereas, the annual report of the board of the school committee 
for the year 1876 has not been furnished, and a vacancy has existed 
in the office of superintendent of public instruction since Sept. 
1876, therefore 

Resolved, by the board of Mayor and Aldermen, if the board of 
common council concur, that Marshall P. Hall. Esq., a member of 
the school board for several years past, be requested to furnish the 
city councils with a report of the public schools of the city of Man- 
chester for the year 1876. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. February 6, 1877. 
Tpa.sspd 

IRA CROSS, Mayor. 

In Board of Common Council. February 6, 1877. 
Passed in concurrence. 

ARTHUR DINSMORE, President. 



REPORT OF SCHOOLS FOR 1876. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

I have received a communication from your honorable 
Boards, requesting me " to furnish the City Councils with 
a Report of the Public Schools of the City of Manchester 
for the year 1876." In compliance with this request, I 
respectfully submit for your examination the following, it 
being substantially the same as the report prepared for the 
School Committee at their request, by vote of record dated 
November 3, 1876. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1876. 



IRA GROSS, Major, 

ex-offioio chairman. 
ARTHUR DINSMORE, 

President of the Common Council, ex-offioio. 



MEMBERS OP THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Ward 1.— Marshall P. Hall, 

George W. Stevens. 
Ward 2.— John P. Newell, 

Joseph Kidder. 
Ward 3. — Lucien B. Clough, 

Isaac L. Heath. 
Ward 4. — Nathaniel W. Cumner, 

William F. Byrns. 
Ward 5.— Martin Fitzgerald, 

Samuel P. Jackson. 
Ward 6, — Newton H. Wilson, 

William Little, clerk. 
Ward 7.— James P. Walker, 

Isaac W. Darrah. 



SUPERINTENDENT OP PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

JOSIAH G. DEARBORN.* 

•Till Sept. 1. Office vacant since. 



REPORT. 



A complete report upon the public schools would embrace 
a detailed account of the work and condition of each 
school in the city. As it is impracticable to give such an 
account at the present time, this report will be confined to 
a statement of the prudential management of the schools, 
and some observations upon the more important matters 
which have received attention from the School Board in the 
past year. 

The following is a tabulated statement of the receipts 
and expenditures of the school department .for the year 
ending Dec. 31, 1876 : 

Teaching. 

Am't Rec'd. Am't Exp'd. 

Balance from 1875 . . . $248.66 

Appropriation, 1876 . . . 37,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund 1,855.20 

139,103.86 $39,103.86 

Fuel. 
Appropriated, 1876 . . . $4,500.00 
Transferred from reserved fund 1,200.00 



Care of Booms. 
Appropriated, 1876 . . . $2,200.00 
Transferred from reserved fund 450.00 



5,700.00 5,315.68 



2,650.00 2,637.94 



104 

Furniture and Supplies. 

Balance from 1875 . . . 813.18 

Appropriated, 1876 . . . 500.00 

Books and Stationery. 
Appropriated, 1876 . . . $500.00 
Overdraft 13.50 

Printing and Advertising. 
Balance from 1875 . . . $202.29 
Appropriated, 1876 . . . 250.00 

Overdraft .... 1.84 

Incidental Eepairs. 

Appropriated, 1876 . . . $600.00 
Transferred from reserved fund 250.00 

Overdraft .... 6.00 

Contingent Expenses. 
Appropriated, 1876 . . . $500.00 
Transferred from reserved fund 250.00 

Evening Schools. 

Balance from 1875 . . . $623.00 
Appropriated, 1876 . . . 800.00 



513.13 422.23 



513.50 512.03 



514.13 345.27 



856.00 968.87 



750.00 849.03 



1,423.03 648.07 



852,023.65 $50,802.98 
Balance unexpended . . 1,220.67 

852,023.65 852,023.65 

STATISTICS. 

"Whole amount expended by School Committee, . 850,802 98 

Amount expended by City Councils, viz.: 
For repairs and improvements of school 

houses and lots .... $5,103 63 
salaries of school committee . . 186 00 
salary of superintendent (6 mos.) . 900 00 

6,188 63 



105 



Whole amount expended by the city for all 

school purposes 

Whole number of pupils enrolled in day schools 
Average number belonging to schools 

Average daily attendance 

Average per cent of attendance .... 
Cost of tuition in day schools per scholar, (based upon 

average number belonging) .... 
Cost of incidentals, per scholar .... 
Number of pupils admitted to High School from 

Grammar schools 

Whole number admitted to High School 
Number graduated from High School 
Average attendance in Evening School 
Number of teachers regularly employed in day schools 
Number of scholars per teacher in High School 
Number of scholars per teacher in Grammar Schools 
Number of scholars per teacher in Middle School 
Number of scholars per teacher in Primary Schools 
Number of scholars per teacher in Suburban Schools 



3,991 61 

4,507 

2,542 

3,379 

93 

$15.39 
4,35 

84 
87 
50 
GO 
74 
34 
33 
43 
40 
22 



Four new schools have been opened, viz. : two on Spring 
street (Grammar grade), one Middle school in 'Squog, and 
one Primary on Manchester street. 

The expenditures have been $1,007.10 less than last 
year, in the aggregate, and less in every item except those 
of fuel, care of rooms, and printing and advertising. The 
latter account was increased by charging to it the cost of 
printing the examination sheets for the Centennial exhibit. 
This amount, together with the cost of a telescope and 
other apparatus, purchased for the High school, should 
have been charged to the " tuition fund," but it was found 
that this had been transferred to another account and was 
not available. 

The cost of fuel and care of rooms are very heavy 
charges upon the school department, and have been annu- 
ally increasing. There has been paid for fuel this year 
the sum of $5,315.68, for heating 75 school rooms, an 



106 

average of $79.87, equal to 8 1-4 tons of coal, or 11 cords 
of hard wood, for each room, at present prices. 

The care of rooms cost $2,637.94, averaging $39.17 per 
room for the year, or about 40 cents per day for each room, 
for the time the schools were in session. The experience 
of the past year led the Board to refer this matter to a 
competent committee for investigation. Now that all the 
buildings are provided with permanent heating apparatus 
the cost of heating should be reduced to the minimum by 
•careful experiments. 

The sum of $5,103.63 has been expended by the Joint 
Committee on Lands and Buildings upon repairs and im- 
provements of houses and grounds. The principal items 
in this account are for grading and concreting at Lincoln 
street, repairing and painting water-closets at the High 
School and Manchester street houses, improving heating 
apparatus at Spring street, fencing lot in Stark district, and 
for granite edge-stone at Ash street. Among the things 
necessary to be done the next year, may be mentioned par- 
ticularly the improving of the water-closets in the building 
at the corner of Merrimack and Union streets and the re- 
moval of the concrete from the yard on Spring street. 

The danger arising from locked doors has been removed 
by substituting for locks and keys such bolts or latches as 
may be moved by the children themselves in case of panic. 

It is a satisfaction to learn that you have provided for the 
purchase of land to enlarge the lot at the corner of Bridge 
and Union streets. The time is not far distant when the 
lower grade schools in the Ash-street house will have to be 
removed, and a building erected on this lot for their accom- 
modation. It is not good policy to put small children in 
buildings with a large number of older pupils. It is done 
for the sake of economy, while the Grammar schools are 
small. These will, in time, require all the room in the 



107 

large buildings, and small houses, conveniently located, 
must be provided for primary schools. 

Intimately connected with the subject of heating is that 
of ventilation. Good ventilation in winter is secured only 
at the expense of fuel. Cold air is to be heated, then al- 
lowed to escape, and the process repeated, continually and 
rapidly. Economy in heating is a simple problem when 
separated from the question of pure air. No one would ob- 
ject to an increased expense for fuel if that would secure 
perfect ventilation. Our later-built school-houses are sup- 
posed to have the most approved arrangements for auto- 
matic ventilation, and yet nothing but an accurate test of 
the actual condition of the air in the rooms when in use 
will show whether they are well ventilated or not. A gen- 
tleman of this city, Dr. John Bell, has lately applied this 
test, — the first, we believe, ever made in our school build- 
ings. He has prepared a paper upon the subject, giving 
the results of experiments conducted with scientific accu- 
racy, and containing much valuable information. The fol- 
lowing extracts are made from it : 

" In the annual report of the Board of Health of the 
city of Boston for the year 1875, among other valuable pa- 
pers is a report on the ventilation of the school-houses of 
that city. The reading of that report induced me to ob- 
tain permission of our School Board to do something of the 
same kind for our own school-houses 

" I have visited twelve rooms in eight school-houses, 
choosing such, so far as I was able to judge, as would pre- 
sent a fair average of the whole. Those in the outskirts of 
the city would not be likely to present a better state of ven- 
tilation than those in the city proper, perhaps not so good. 

" Until within a few years past, the question of ventila- 
tion in rooms containing a large number of persons seems 
to have been considered solely with reference to the amount 
of carbonic acid present in the air, of course including the 



108 

question of temperature. Carbonic acid was regarded as a 
deadly poison of itself. An animal kept in a small and 
confined portion of air soon died, poisoned, as it was 
thought, by the carbonic acid exhaled from its own lungs. 
More recently, however, the views held upon this subject 
have been a good deal modified. It is now thought to be 
rather the deprivation of oxygen than the actively poison- 
ous properties of carbonic acid that causes the death of the 
animal. It is found that death occurs if the air breathed 
contains 17 per cent of oxygen (instead of 21 percent, 
the usual amount), even when the carbonic acid is with- 
drawn as fast as it is produced by its breathing. It is this 
deprivation of oxygen in its natural proportion, together 
with the presence of other matters produced in respiration, 
that causes the deleterious effects of breathing the air of 
badly ventilated rooms 

" The English sanitarians allow 6 parts of carbonic acid 
in 10,000 of air ; the Germans 7 and 8, beyond which the 
ventilation is considered objectionably imperfect. 

" The external air contains about 4 parts of carbonic 
acid in 10,000, while the air expired in ordinary quiet 
breathing contains about 400 parts." 

He then discusses the effects of breathing carbonic acid, 
and continues : 

" Is it, then, a fact that it is of little use to determine the 
proportion of carbonic acid in the air we breathe, because 
there seems to be but a minute increase over that contained 
in the purest air ? Not at all 

" The relative proportion of carbonic acid in the air of 
the school-rooms was the first question to be determined 
in deciding upon the efficiency of their actual ventila- 
tion 

" I think that the results may be trusted as accurate 
within one part iii 20,000. 

" The following table gives the number of parts of car- 



109 



bonic acid in 10,000 parts of air, for each one of the twelve 
school-rooms visited : 



140 parts 


195 


u 


100 




145 


« 


85* 


M 


110 


u 


170 


a 


145 
on?; 


u 


90 


u 


130 


a 


140 


u 


138 


u 



Training School, room No. 1 

« u u a q 

Lincoln-street Grammar School, room No 
u u u u u u 

Manchester-street, (Miss Dearborn) 
Franklin-street Grammar, No. 7 Middle 
Ash-street Grammar, (Miss Morrill) 

" " " room No. 6 

Wilson's Hill Primary 
High School .... 
Lowell-street, No. 5 Primary 
" u Intermediate 2d 

Average 



" Allowing a room like those of the Ash-street school- 
house, containing 9,300 cubic feet of space and 46 pupils, 
each pupil breathing 20 times per minute, and 15 cubic 
inches of air at each respiration. In such a room, if the 
air were not renewed at all during a three hours' session, 
we should have, at the end of this time, 62 parts of car- 
bonic acid in 10,000. As these data are near the actual 
truth, we have the means of determining the state of ven- 
tilation in each room. 

" Instead of the entire air of the room being renewed 31 
times during a half days' session, as it ought to be to keep 
the carbonic acid down to 6 parts in 10,000, the maximum 
of allowable impurity, according to many writers on venti- 
lation, it was renewed as follows : 



Training School, room No. 1 . 

u a u « o 

Lincoln-street Grammar, room No. 4 

« u u u u 1 

Manchester-street, (Miss Dearborn) 
Franklin-street Grammar, No. 7 Middle 







24 times 






21.75 


u 






26 


u 






23.75 


(« 






26.75 


i 






25.50 


u 



* Windows open juat before experiment. 



110 



Ash-street Grammar, (Miss Morrill) 


22.50 times 


" " " No. 6 . 


23.75 " 


Wilson's Hill Primary .... 


20.75 " 


High School 


26.50 " 


Lowell-street, No. 5 primary . 


24.50 " 


" " Intermediate 2d 


24 " 


Average 


24.10 " 



" Another matter, necessarily connected with the sys- 
tem of automatic ventilation, is the temperature of the 
rooms. About 68° Fahrenheit seems to be the point at 
which they ought to be kept. 

" I need not enlarge upon the discomfort and more seri- 
ous objections due to a variation of more than a very few 
degrees, either up or down from this point. Just so long, 
however, as automatic ventilation is depended upon, as it 
is in all our school-houses, this rule will be sinned against. 
When the outside air, either wholly or partly, passes into 
the room to be warmed there, and the outside temperature 
is constantly varying, sometimes 20° or more during a ses- 
sion, the inside temperature must be constantly varying. 
The same state of things is the cause of great difference of 
temperature at the level of the floor, as compared with a 
level of three feet above. Accordingly, in an extreme 
case, the pupils' heads may be in a hot air bath, while their 
feet are in a cold one. The following table will show the 
temperature found in each room at the floor, and again at 
about the level of the pupils' heads : 



Training School, room No. 1. 

U U « li g^ 

Lincoln-street Grammar, room No. 4 

U it u u u i 

Manchester-street, (Miss Dearborn) 
Franklin-street Grammar, No. 7 Middle 
Ash-street Grammar, (Miss Morrill) 
u " u No. 6 . 



Temperature 
at floor. 


At 3 feet 
above floor. 


64.75 


66.25 


74.20 


74.75 


66.25 


70.90 


74.40 


75.20 


60.25 


63.75 


68.90 


69.90 


61.20 


65.70 


68.50 


73.75 



62.90 


68 


65.40 ' 


68.75 


58.85 


70.10 


68.50 


71.15 



111 

Wilson's Hill Primary . . . , 

High School 

Lowell-street, ISTo. 5 Primary 
" " Intermediate 2d 

Average 66.17 69.85 

Average difference between the temperature at the floor and 3 feet 

above floor 3.68° 

Least difference in ditto, Lincoln-street No. 1 . .80 

Greatest " " " Lowell-street No. 5 . 11.25 

After describing minutely the method of conducting the 
experiments, he says : 

" Finally, what is, in short, the condition of ventilation 
in our school-rooms ? Compared with those of Boston, no 
one of our rooms was found in so good a condition as some 
of the Boston rooms, and none in so foul a condition as 
others. The average is neither disgracefully bad, slowly 
or rapidly poisoning our children, as we sometimes hear it 
said ; nor, on the other hand, is it by any means what it 
ought to be. For instance, the Ash-street school-rooms are 
too small ; 200 cubic feet to each pupil is too little ; 300 is 
not at all too much. But I prefer to let the figures speak 
for themselves. But, whatever objectionable points I have 
found in the condition of things, it must be remembered 
that here are no vague impressions or guesses, but facts 
which are not to be impugned. They are not dependent 
upon carelessness or inattention on the part of janitors or 
teachers. They are due, necessarily due, to the badness 
of the combined system of heating and ventilation adopted, 
not only in this city, but everywhere else in this part of the 
world ; where, in fact, owing to our extreme climate, the 
apparatus for these purposes ought to be more efficient than 
in most other parts of the world. The present state of 
things is a vast improvement on that in the old red school- 
house that most of us remember 



112 

" One thing I ought to mention, in simple justice to the 
teachers. The impossibility of properly ventilating their 
rooms by means of the flues designed for that purpose is 
recognized by every one, and, accordingly, they supplement 
it by opening the windows. Whether the air in any par- 
ticular school-room was bad, very bad, or moderately good, 
depended, not on the ventilators, but on whether the win- 
dows had been opened more or less recently. I found all 
the teachers alive to the importance of the subject, and it 
was not due to them that the state of things was not very 
different from what it actually was. 

" I believe that no system of ventilation can be thor- 
oughly efficient which is not based upon having pure air, 
already warmed, driven by a rotary fan, or some similar 
means, into, and again out of, the room." 

Our school-houses are heated and ventilated by different 
methods. Although none of them are effective, doubtless 
improvements might be made. The experiments seem to 
confirm the opinion previously held, that the High School 
building is, all things considered, the best-ventilated house 
in the city. It is the only one heated exclusively by what 
is known as " indirect radiation." The cold air is passed 
over large coils of pipe heated by steam in the basement, 
and after use in the rooms above, is conducted away by the 
system of ventilating flues known as Robinson's. The 
Franklin-street and Lincoln-street houses have both direct 
and indirect radiation. The Spring-street and Ash-street 
have only direct, with radiators and pipes in the rooms, 
and no provision for the admission of pure air, except 
through windows and doors. The brick house in 'Squog is 
the only one now heated by furnaces. The remainder have 
stoves for coal or wood. 

There can be no doubt of the economy of heating large 
buildings by steam, properly managed ; and these experi- 
ments would seem to show the arrangements at the High 



113 

School to be the best for health. It was a great mistake 
that the Ash-street house was not built upon this plan. 
What are the few dollars saved compared with the loss of 
pure air in the ratio of 90 to 14o ? 

Dr. Bell says he doubts if the suburban rooms are in bet- 
ter condition than those in the city ; but it should be re- 
membered that the country boy travels to his school long 
distances, through the clear air and over the breezy hills. 
His lungs are fortified against the impurities of the school 
room, and he grows strong in spite of study. Some of our 
people complain when their children happen to be trans- 
ferred to a school at a greater distance from their homes. 
Such a change is often a blessing in disguise. Better if 
our school buildings were all in the open fields outside the 
city, and the children required to walk miles instead of 
rods. Of all the so-called improvements which we are 
pleased to think give us the advantage over the country 
schools, there is not one we could not well give up to secure 
the out-door exercise enjoyed by the country school chil- 
dren. Perhaps something might be gained in this direc- 
tion by conducting all gymnastics and physical exercises in 
the open air in suitable weather. . 

It is presumed that these experiments were made under 
conditions as nearly uniform in each room as possible. 
The number of scholars would affect the result. A room 
containing sixty-five children would show a greater degree 
of impurity than one containing only thirty-five, provided 
the air was renewed no oftener in one than in the other. 
This suggests the danger to health of increasing the num- 
ber of scholars per teacher. Teachers soon accustom 
themselves to the air of a crowded room, and forget that 
fifty children require more air than thirty. 

The attention of teachers is called to the fact that these 
experiments fix a great responsibility upon them. The 
only means of ventilation is shown to be by windows and 



114 

doors, and these must be used according to the judgment 
of teachers. While it is to be hoped that ventilation may 
be improved by the free use of these means, teachers should 
be warned not to allow currents of cold air to flow directly 
upon children, and thus make the remedy worse than the 
disease. 

HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OF STUDY. 

An important act of the Board was the revision of the 
course of study for the High School. For many years the 
time required to complete study has been three years for 
the English course and four years for the Classical. The 
three years' course in English has now been dropped, and 
two courses substituted, one of two years, and one of four 
years. The wisdom of this change may be apparent from 
the following considerations : 

The range of studies in the Grammar schools is excel- 
lent and practical, so far as it goes, but is hardly sufficient 
for those who can study only English branches. Two years 
more would make them thorough and give an excellent 
common school education. Those of our citizens who feel 
unable to give their children a higher education (and they 
are in the large majority), would generally be glad to keep 
them at study a year or two longer. There has hitherto 
been no provision for this in the public schools. They 
must be content with what the Grammar school furnished 
or begin a course of three years, — ill suited to their needs, 
— in the High school. The two years' course which has 
been supplied is intended to supplement the Grammar 
school studies for the benefit of this class of pupils. The 
studies are the same, with the addition of a few others 
equally useful ; thus practically extending the Grammar 
school course two years. It will be observed that the four 
years' courses coincide with this for the first two years, so 
that if such pupils as we have just mentioned should at 



115 

the end of two years desire to pursue their studies longer, 
they can go on with the higher classes and reap the ad- 
vantages of a full course. On the other hand, should pu- 
pils who had entered the school for the longer courses be 
obliged to leave sooner, they may drop out at the end of 
two years, and yet have spent the time profitably. 

This change has not in the least lowered the standard of 
the High school. The English course of four years is as 
complete as that provided in the best academical institu- 
tions, and the Classical course remains substantially as 
before. It is expected that this arrangement will also 
enable the committee to conduct the school with less ex- 
pense. 

The progress of the High school the past year has been 
satisfactory. Its work has been quiet, but steady, earnest 
and scholarly. The exercises in reading and speaking for 
prizes were pronounced superior to those of previous years. 
The interest and advancement in these useful branches has 
been very marked since the " Mirror prizes " were first 
offered. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

This? school has admitted seven ladies for training, and 
graduated seven, the past year. 

Our city is fortunate in the possession of an institution 
furnishing a home supply of teachers, so economically and 
efficiently. Twenty-eight of its graduates are now perma- 
nent teachers in this city, and as a whole, their superiors 
cannot be found. The training school involves an extra 
expense to the city of 1200 per year, or about $25 for each 
teacher graduating. It is no disparagement of the excel- 
lent purpose|and special work of State Normal schools, to 
express an opinion that our training school turns out at 
this nominal cost, better prepared teachers for our own 
needs, r than the most expensive normal school can furnish. 



110 



THE CENTENNIAL EXHIBIT. 



Early in the year circulars were received from the State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, inviting the School 
Board to contribute towards the exhibit of New Hamp- 
shire in the Educational Department of the International 
Exhibition. As no funds from the regular appropriations 
could be used for this purpose, a special grant from the 
city councils was asked for. Failing in this the Board ap- 
propriated the sum of $350 from money paid for tuition by 
non-resident pupils. With this meagre amount the follow- 
ing exhibit was prepared : 

Eleven bound volumes of students' work from the High 
school. 

Six bound volumes of students' work from Primary and 
Grammar schools. 

Fifty slates of work from Primary schools. 

Four hundred specimens of drawing, from Grammar and 
High schools. 

One volume specimens of penmanship. 

One portfolio of plans of school buildings. 

Five photographic views of school buildings, framed. 

One illustrated chart of school system. 

One framed specimen of school registers and class records. 

One model in wood of Ash-street school building. 

One manuscript volume History of Schools of Manches- 
ter. 

These articles, in number and character, formed a con- 
spicuous part of the State exhibit. The History of Schools 
in Manchester, written by William Little, Esq., of this city, 
is especially mentioned as a valuable contribution, prepared 
with great care, and containing much information (partic- 
ularly on the early schools of the town), nowhere else to 
be found. 

The Centennial Exhibition afforded an opportunity to 



117 

test the claim so often made, that Manchester schools are 
as good as any in the country. The spelling, the penman- 
ship, the drawing, the use of language, the solution of 
problems, the attendance of pupils, the plans and cost of 
school-houses, and all the items of management in public 
instruction in our own city were spread out in competition 
with all the States of the Union and many foreign lands. 
Probably none will be more interested to know the result 
than our young friends the pupils who prepared the work. 
They may be assured that in method, correctness of answer 
and spelling, they suffered nothing by this comparison with 
the rest of the world. The work of our primary schools 
was especially commented on with favor. There was no 
better work there from children under eight years of age, 
than that on the fifty slates covered with writing, figures 
and music, sent from this city. Notice of an award has 
been received from the judges. 

Our deficiencies were in penmanship and drawing. 
There were specimens of penmanship in the Government 
Indian school exhibit, written by boys removed but one de- 
gree from a savage life, as good as anything we had to 
show. Our drawing was fair in individual specimens, but 
lacked the evidence of thorough instruction toward a prac- 
tical end, so apparent in the work of other States. 

There comes, however, a more instructive lesson from 
the great Exhibition. Every New England man who stood 
among the magnificent contributions of natural wealth 
from the Southern and Western States saw more distinctly 
than ever before, our place as a manufacturing district. It 
was evident, too, that other sections of this country are 
successfully manufacturing what were once the exclusive 
products of New England. No lesson of the Centennial is 
plainer than that New England mugt eventually change the 
character of her manufactures from the coarse and plain 
to the finer and richer, requiring more elaborate processes 



118 

and more skill in design, — such goods as have come to us 
from the old world. The center of fine and artistic manu- 
facture has long been in Europe. It is moving westward, 
and naturally belongs in New England. The educational 
lesson in this is, that schools must be adapted to the in- 
struction needed for this changed condition. The exhibits 
of foreign nations revealed many industries unknown to 
us. Their pavilions were filled with goods whose commer- 
cial value depends largely upon their artistic form or de- 
sign. These industries can be transferred to our own 
workshops only when our people shall have been educated 
in industrial art, and have acquired a greater manual skill. 
The Governor of Massachusetts, in his late address to the 
Legislature of that State, referring to the same matter, 
says : 

" In supporting any system of public instruction of uni- 
versal application, apart from high civil and social consid- 
erations, and in addition to the mental development which 
all true education must give, it is important that more and 
more attention be given to the consideration of what part 
that system may be made to serve, in fitting young men 
and young women to properly enter upon the industrial 
career which choice of circumstances will naturally open 
before them. This consideration cannot fail to enforce 
the wisdom of the provisions recently made for instruction 
in drawing in the public schools, in the establishment of 
the Normal Art-School, and the public and corporate pro- 
vision for industrial and technical education. 

If we wish to retain our population of native birth, and 
especially if we wish to sustain that great middle class of 
population, who are neither so rich as to be sordid, nor so 
poor as to become objects of charity, — who engage in the 
activities of life with enthusiasm, — we must multiply their 
industries and increase the means and facilities for success- 
ful individual enterprise. Any State will lose, in the com- 



119 

petitions of modern times, its relative rank in manufactures 
and technical pursuits, unless through improved methods 
it can develop new industries, and introduce into those 
upon which it already relies a higher degree of intellectual 
discipline and of aesthetic taste, and a higher degree also 
of manual skill." 

This is the justification, and the only one, for the teach- 
ing of drawing and the establishment of industrial schools. 

All these considerations apply to us as a manufacturing 
community, and bring home the question whether we are 
doing all that our interests require in this direction. We 
have drawing in the schools, it is true, but it is utterly 
without system or adaptation to industrial ends. It should 
receive attention at once. If need be, some of the time 
and money devoted to music should be applied to bring up 
other branches long neglected. Music has had a special 
teacher for more than fifteen years. Would it suffer by 
alternating in special advantages foi\a time, with drawing, 
penmanship and elocution ? 

This is not a plea for ornamental teaching, but for more 
attention to a subject most practical in all bearings. We 
have a large toiling population, growing more and more 
permanent. It is certain that, in the years to come, the 
vast majority of their children will be born to a heritage of 
labor in these mills and workshops. Let us, then, adapt 
the work of education to their needs. 

THE BIBLE IN THE SCHOOLS. 

In April last, a resolution prohibiting the reading of the 
Bible in the schools was presented to the Board. Subse- 
quently two petitions from citizens, asking its passage, 
were received. Except the argument of the mover of the 
resolution, there was no discussion of this subject by mem- 
bers of the Board. The policy of the majority was to let 
it alone, and this not from any desire to suppress discus- 



120 

sion on either side. A respectful hearing was given to all 
who desired to speak ; yet they believed that their duty 
as school officers was to follow, rather than to direct, public 
opinion upon a subject so delicate and important. It 
touches the deep-seated opinions of men ; it involves the 
sensitive beliefs and prejudices of religious sects. These 
cannot be changed by the vote of a school committee. It 
was unfortunate that the subject was introduced in a man- 
ner calculated to provoke hostility. The mover's argument 
attacked the Bible as a book, and so stirred at once the 
sectarian feeling. This may have been desired by some of 
the petitioners. It is known that such a result is the 
dearest wish of the enemies of the public schools. The 
Board was wise in doing no act to encourage such a spirit. 
The question of the secularization of the schools is re- 
ceiving the attention of the ablest minds in the country, 
and is discussed without attack upon the Bible, or any 
man's religious belief. Let it have such discussion here, 
or none at all. There is no indication that the majority of 
our people now desire this change. There must be more 
time for information ; more opportunity for a display of 
purpose on the part of its advocates, and for removal of 
distrust in the minds of its opponents. There is no au- 
thority conferred upon the School Committee by which the 
reading of the Bible or any other devotional exercise can 
be commanded or enforced. On the other hand, it is clear 
that, by the spirit of the constitution and laws of the State, 
there can be no compulsory exclusion of them. It was in- 
tended that the matter should be left to the judgment and 
consciences of the people in each district. The committee 
may recommend, but their regulations cannot be enforced 
without the common consent of the community. Acting 
upon this view, the subject was indefinitely postponed. 

There is one consideration, however, which stands op- 
posed to this view, and seems to call for immediate action. 



121 

It is well known that some 1,500 children of Catholic par- 
ents are not in the public schools. Every good citizen de- 
plores this, and would willingly make any reasonable con- 
cession to bring them in. It has been repeatedly said that 
this result would follow the removal of the Bible from the 
schools. The mover of this resolution based his argument 
largely upon this assumption. It is urged as a peculiar lo- 
cal reason for secularizing the schools. Probably many of 
the petitioners gave their signatures with this belief. It is 
time this delusion was ended. No act of ours can make 
the public schools acceptable to the Catholic church, ac- 
cording to the declaration of one of its leading organs,, 
which says : 

• " There is no possible programme of common school in- 
struction that the Catholic church can permit her children 
to accept. 

" If the Catholic translation of the books of Holy Writ, 
which is to be found in the homes of all our better edu- 
cated Catholics, were to be dissected by the ablest Catholic 
theologian in the land, and lessons to be taken from it such 
as Catholic mothers read to their children, with all the 
notes and comments of the highest Catholic endorsement, 
— if these admirable lessons, and these alone, — were ruled 
to be read in the public schools, this would not diminish 
the objections Catholics have to letting their children at- 
tend the public schools." 

It is noticeable that those who advocate the removal of 
the Bible from the schools are professedly very desirous 
that morality and virtue shall be taught. So are the friends 
of the Bible. Neither party are doing anything to accom- 
plish this end. Matthew Arnold said : " The Bible is a 
record of the truths most vital to humanity, and is, when 
rightly read, a fountain of moral inspiration, no less than 
a guide to the best philosopby of life." No such use of it 
is now made in the schools. On the other hand, its oppo- 



122 

nents, to be consistent in their zeal for purer morals, should 
give us a better text-book. It were better to have no text- 
books, if they are to be unused. As well insist on provid- 
ing the schools with spelling-books and have no spelling, as 
to keep the Bible or any other book on morals in the 
schools, and yet leave the subject itself untaught. 

Sooner or later we must consider the question, Shall we 
have positive moral teaching in the public schools, con- 
ducted like other studies, with regularity and system ? If 
this discussion might end in the recognition of the neces- 
sity for such teaching, and the adoption of some unsecta- 
rian and practical method, we could all afford to yield our 
partisan positions. The times in which we live are fear- 
fully suggestive of the need of opening somewhere a foun- 
tain that shall purge the foul channels of business, finance 
and politics. The public school is recognized as the great 
educator in citizenship so far as intelligence is concerned ; 
why not in morals as well ? The moral character of the 
man is the fruit of the moral growth of the boy ; to direct 
that growth is to determine the character of the citizen. 
Intelligence is not the sum of good citizenship. Any one 
of our great cities spends more money for education to-day 
than the whole nation spent a century ago. The machinery 
for making intelligent citizens is complete ; the average of 
intelligence rises, while vice and crime rapidly increase. 
It is acknowledged that the greatest danger to our institu- 
tions lies in the great cities, and not so much from their 
illiteracy as from the growing power of unprincipled, de- 
conscienced men. 

One-sixth of the entire vote cast at the last city election 
in Boston was thrown by men who during the year had 
been under arrest for crime ! The State cannot hope to 
reform bad men, but it may save the child from immoral 
development. Our Catholic friends are wrong in their as- 
sertion that immorality is the fruit of the public school 



123 

system, but they are right in their theory that the faithful 
in the church — followers even more loyal to her than to the 
State — are secured in the training of the child. So must 
the State teach for her own safety. This was* no doubt 
contemplated by the founders of the system of public in- 
struction. Good behavior was one of the seven studies 
anciently prescribed by law for the common schools of 
Massachusetts. The founder of the Phillips Exeter Acad- 
emy enunciated the great proposition which should under- 
lie every system of education when he said, " though 
goodness without knowledge is weak and feeble, yet know- 
ledge without goodness is dangerous, and both united form 
the noblest character and lay the surest foundation of use- 
fulness to mankind." 

From many causes, the moral power of the public school 
has declined, until its impress upon character is little more 
than nominal. There is a sentiment that the home, the 
church and the Sunday school are doing this work. The 
poor of great cities have no homes; the church "fails to 
reach the most needy. One organization, and only one, 
can lay its hand upon every child for this purpose, and that 
is the public school. 

OTHER MATTERS. 

New text books on Astronomy, Physiology, and Geology, 
have been adopted for use in the High School, in place of 
outdated treatises. The new Franklin series of Readers 
has been introduced into all the schools. 

A rule has been adopted defining the time and rate of 
increase in teachers' salaries. A small annual increase is 
allowed up to the third year of service. 

The rates of tuition for non-resident pupils have been 
fixed at 62£ cents per week for the High School, and 50 
cents per week for the lower grades. 

A new regulation requires teachers to keep separate re- 



124 

cords of the deportment and scholarship of pupils. Here- 
tofore, the percentage attained by a scholar represented 
an average of both. Now, scholarship will stand upon its 
own merits. 

The State Legislature of last year transferred from the 
School Committee and Board of Aldermen acting jointly, 
to the School Committee alone, the authority to elect a 
Superintendent, define his duties, and fix his compensation. 
On the first attempt to elect under this act, in September, 
repeated ballotings resulted in an equal number of votes 
for each of two candidates, and the office is still vacant. 

Whatever excuse is offered for such a condition of things, 
its effect is none the less damaging to the schools. A de- 
partment of public affairs annually expending a sum nearly 
equal to all the other current city expenses put together, 
must not be allowed to drift without an authorized head. 
With our present custom of electing to the office of school 
committee men who have no time to properly attend to 
their duties, a Superintendent is an indispensable officer. 

At the risk of being considered too progressive, I will sug- 
gest that the election of ladies as members of the Commit- 
tee might result in good to the schools. Such has been the 
effect in other places. 

CONCLUSION. 

The schools are again commended to the watchful care 
of our citizens. For more than two hundred years the 
people of New England have maintained a system of pub- 
lic instruction. So completely have the schools met the 
wants of all classes, that until recently it was rare to hear 
a voice questioning their utility or refusing them support. 
To-day, an organized and determined^ enemy threatens the 
life of the whole free school system. With increase of 
population and a greater diversity of interests, important 
questions have arisen concerning the management of 



125 

schools. It is discovered that they are not always good 
because costly, nor because conducted according to the 
latest plans of the theorists. All such questions are legiti- 
mate subjects of discussion by the people. Misfortune will 
surely come upon that community which loses its interest 
in the cause of education, or ceases to intrust .its schools 
to the care of its ablest and most prudent citizens. 



COURSES OF STUDY IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Revised August, 1876. 
Business Course. — Two Years. 

FIRST YEAR. 

1st Term. — Commercial Arithmetic, English Grammar, Phy- 
sical Geography, Penmanship. 

2d Term. — Algebra, Physical Geography, English Compo- 
sition, Book-keeping (single entry). 

3d Term. — Algebra, Physiology, Review of U. S. History, 
Book-keeping (double entry). 

SECOND YEAR. 

1st Term. — Geometry, Natural Philosophy, General History. 

"2d Term. — Geometry, Natural Philosophy, Political Econ- 
omy. 

3d Term. — Chemistry, English Literature, Science of Gov- 
ernment. 

Rhetorical Exercises and Spelling throughout the course. 

Optional. — Free-hand Drawing and Music, first year ; 
Principles of Perspective Drawing and Music, second year. 



126 

English and French Course. — Four Years. 
First and second years same as Business Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

1st Term.-^- Trigonometry, Chemistry, English Literature. 
2d Term. — Surveying, Natural History, Rhetoric. 
3d Term. — French, Botany, Ancient History. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

1st Term. — French, Botany, Astronomy. 
2d Term. — Geology, Mental Philosophy, French. 
Zd Term. — Moral Philosophy, Reviews of English branches. 
Rhetorical Exercises and Composition throughout the 
course. Music and Drawing optional. 

Classical Course. — Four Years. 

Latin and Greek, with the English branches of the four 
years' course, as far as practicable. 



LIST OF TEACHERS AND JANITORS. 

HIGH SCHOOL — BEECH STREET. 

Salary. 

Principal— Albert W. Bacheler .... $2,000 

Assistant— Herbert W. Lull 1,000 

" Lucretia E. Manahan .... 800 

" Emma J. Ela 500 

" Mary A. Buzzell 500 

" Maria F. Kidder 500 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL — LOWELL STREET. 

Principal — J. Y. Cressey 800 

Assistant — Emma H. Perley .... 450 



127 

TRAINING SCHOOL — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Higher Department. 

Principal — Nancy S. Bunton .... $600 

Assistant — Mintie C. Edgerly .... 450 

Primary Department. 

Principal — Martha N. Mason .... 500 

Assistant — Anna 0. Heath ..... 450 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS — FRANKLIN STREET. 

Principal — Daniel A. Clifford .... 1,500 

Assistant — Annette McDoel ..... 500 

" Lottie R. Adams 450 

" Carrie E. Reid 450 

LINCOLN STREET. 

Principal — Benjamin P. Dame .... 1,500 

Assistant — Julia A. Baker ..... 500 

Mary J. Fife 450 

" Isabelle R. Daniels .... 450 

ASH STREET. 

Principal— William E. Buck .... 1,500 

Assistant — Anstrice G. Flanders .... 500 

" Rocilla M. Tuson .... 400 

" Martha J. Boyd 450 

SPRING STREET. 

Principal — Edward P. Sherburne .... 1,000 

Assistant — Mary L. Sleeper 450 

" Sarah J. Greene ..... 450 

PISCATAQUOG — NORTH MAIN STREET. 

Principal — William M. Stevens .... I,0u0 

Assistant — Mary A. Lear 400 

" Fredrica S. Mitchell .... 850 



128 



AMOSKEAG. 



Etta J. Carlev 



8400 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodget street — Nellie I. Sanderson 

2, Ash street — Mary A. Smith 

3, Ash street — Hattie S. Tozer 

4, Lincoln street — Anna J. Dana . 

5, Lincoln street — Mary F. Barnes 

7, Franklin street — Hattie G. Flanders 

8, Franklin street — C. Augusta Abbott 

9, Spring street — Cleora E. Bailey 

10, Spring street — Lizzie P. Gove 

11, Centre street — Florence McEvoy 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodget street — Ellen B. Rowell 

2, Manchester street — Clara N. Brown 

3, Ash street — Georgianna Dow 

4, Ash street — Helen M. Morrill . 

5, Lowell street — Annie M. Offut . 
■6, Wilson Hill— Abbie E. Abbott . 

7, Lincoln street — Emma F. Beane 

8, Lowell street — Elvira S. Prior . 

9, Manchester street — Julia A. Dearborn 

10, Manchester street — Nellie Pearson 

11, Franklin street — E. Jennie Campbell 

12, Franklin street — Martha W. Hubbard 

13, Spring street — Anne H. Abbott . 

14, Spring street — Nellie M. Whitney 

15, Centre street — Jennie F. Bailey 

16, Centre street — Nellie E. Tappan 

17, South Main street — Alice G. Lord 

19, Amoskeag — Jennie G. Stebbins 

20, South Main street — Sarah D. Lord 

21, Centre street — Augusta S. Downs 



129 



SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District— Nellie M. Cate . 

3, Bakersville — 

Principal, Addie M. Chase 
Assistant, S. Isetta Locke 

4, Goffe's Falls — Georgie A. Nute . 

5, Harvey District — Flora L. Haines 

6, Webster Mills— Olive J. Randall 

7, Hallsville — Maria H. Hildreth . 

8, Youngsville — Nellie L. Marsh . 

9, Mosquito Pond — Lana S. George 



MUSIC TEACHER. 



Jason J. Kimball 



500 
400 
350 
350 
400 
500 
400 
400 



$1200 



JANITORS. 

High School, Ash street and Blodget street. 
Yolney W. Fairbanks $550 

Lincoln street and Merrimack street. 
George W. Hunkins $400 

Franklin street, Spring street and Manchester street. 
John A. Carr $550 

Old High School House, Wilson Hill, 'Squog Grammar 

School, North Main street, and South Main street. 
Tuck & Co 



130 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR 
THE PAST YEAR. 



Schools. 



High School 

Intermediate School 

Training School, Higher Department.. 
Training School, Primary Department. 

Franklin-street Grammar School 

Lincoln-street Grammar School 

Ash -street Grammar School 

Spring-street Grammar School 

Piscataquog Grammar School 

Amoskeag Grammar School 

Middle School No. 1 

» 2 



Primary 



3. 

4. 
5. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10, 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



8. 

9 

in. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 



Suburban School, District No. 1., 
" 3.. 
" " 4.. 
«■ " 5. 
" 6. 
" " 7 
" " 8. 
" 9. 
Total 



Whole number 
belonging to 
the School. 



Boys. Girls. Tot'l 



97 

145 

55 

75 

73 
129 
102 

68 

77 

20 

20 

32 

44 

36 

4! 

36 

39 

51 

49 

41 

62 

oS 

42 
62 

43 
41 
53 
87 
57 
38 
52 
60 
44 
54 
41 
37 
36 
25 
34 
22 
10 
51 
27 
23 
9 
27 
24 
15 
2344 



<U 




,Q 




o 


Ml 


•A 


a 








Ml 


u 












o> 




> 




< 





138 
25 
59 
84 
93 
160 
115 
66 
61 
25 
40 
47 
41 
39 
42 
39 
30 
46 
53 
45 
44 
46 
48 
36 
29 
30 
50 
66 
52 



235 

170 

114 

159 

166 

289 

217 

134 

138 

45 

60 

79 

85 

75 

83 

75 

69 

97 

102 

86 

106 

84 

90 

98 

72 

71 

103 

153 

109 



44 


82 


38 


90 


47 


107 


45 


89 


45 


99 


54 


95 


22 


59 


34 


70 


33 


58 


27 


61 


26 


48 


8 


18 


55 


106 


26 


53 


13 


36 


6 


15 


19 


46 


22 


46 


10 


25 


2- 23 


+.M57 



209 

47 

68 

76 

135 

156 

164 

98 

92 

23 

38 

74 

45 

41 

40 

38 

• 38 

39 

38 

41 

38 

40 

50 

34 

33 

40 

47 

41 

44 

42 

44 

40 

42 

43 

47 

30 

43 

35 

29 

40 

12 

65 

38 

34 

13 

33 

30 

15 

2542 






F 



196 
40 
65 
73 

130 

151 

157 
96 
91 
22 
34 
71 
44 
38 
39 
32 

• 37 
37 
36 
36 
35 
35 
46 
32 
32 
38 
43 
34 
41 
41 
43 
38 
37 
40 
44 
29 
39 
33 
28 
38 
10 
60 
36 
20 
12 
30 
26 
14 

2379 



A BRIEF HISTORY 



SCHOOLS OF MANCHESTER, N. H.', 



FORMERLY 



DERRYFIELD. 
By WILLIAM LITTLE, E.sq. 



SCHOOLS OF MANCHESTER, N. H. 



From 1722, when the first white man came to town, till 
1876, there has been a steady growth of our schools. The 
private school was the germ. These were kept in the 
houses or barns of the settlers, for there were no school- 
houses then. Men paid the teachers out of their own 
pockets, gave the fuel and board, but often long intervals 
elapsed between terms, especially in time of French and 
Indian wars. 

These private schools were often kept at Mr. John Hall's 
at the Centre, where is now the corner of Young and Mas- 
sabesic streets. Scholars went there from all parts of the 
town, it being thought no hardship in those days to go 
three or five miles to school. John Ray and the Starks 
went there from north of Amoskeag Falls ; Goffes, Kidders 
and others, from Goffe's Falls, and McMurphys, Websters, 
and many more from the south and east part of the town. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The first action by the town for the support of schools 
was December 25, 1781. It was then " voted that the 
town hire a school master nine months this year coming." 
There were no school-houses, and the selectmen arranged 
to have the schools kept at farm houses in different parts 
of the town. 



134 

February 12, 1782. there was a town meeting, and the 
third article in the[ warrant was " To see if the town will 
Except the Several Divisions the Selectmen have appointed 
the Scoole to bee kept at." 

" Voted that the Scoole be kept at Enos Webster and att 
Joseph farmers and at Lieut. John Halls and at Joseph Si- 
monds and to be equally divided at each of these places." 

' Enos Webster lived on the river road a mile north of 
Goffe's Falls, near where John Calef lives now. Joseph 
Farmer lived in the old Kidder house which stood near the 
corner of Chestnut and Orange streets ; John Hall was at 
the Centre, and Joseph Simonds lived where Mosquito 
pond school-house, No. 9, now is. Manchester was called 
Derry field then. 

In 1783 the town voted at the annual March meeting 
not to raise any money for schools ; but this vote was re- 
considered and then voted that the town raise nine pounds 
for the use of schools. 

No schools were kept by the town for the next five years, 
but in 1788 the town 

" Voted Nine Pounds to be laid out for a town school 
this year." " Voted that the Selectmen to the Best of 
their Judgement provid Schoolen for the Benefite of the 
town for all the nine pounds." 

In 1791 the State passed a law that each town should 
raise a school tax, and schools have been kept in town from 
that time, every year. For the first ten years $59 was the 
largest sum raised any one year, and then the sum slowly 
grew, till in 1836 1243.13 was raised. The " New Vil- 
lage," now the city of Manchester, was begun that year, 
and in 1837-38 $916.87 was paid for schools. Since that 
time the sum paid for schools each year has had a more 
rapid growth, and in 1875, $39,436.08 was paid teachers 
alone, and the -whole expense of schools that year was 



135 

$63,436.62. The largest amount ever paid for schools and 
school-houses any one year, 1872, was $91,012.31. 

SCHOOL DISTRICTS. 

In 1783, at the annual March meeting, the town voted 
that the " selectmen Divide the town into four Districts 
according to the polls and estate for the school to be kept 
in." October 16, 1783, they reported that they had divided 
the town, Derryfield, " into four Districts for the Benefit of 
schooling there Children." The first district was the up- 
per end of the town, and as far down on the river road as 
John Brown's. He then lived two miles below the present 
City Hall ; the second, south on the river road to Litch- 
field ; the third, the north and east part of the town to 
Chester, now Auburn, and the fourth the southeast part 
next to Londonderry. The district system continued in 
Manchester eighty five years. 

In 1793 there were three districts ; the first about Am- 
oskeag Falls, above and below ; the second at Goffe's Falls, 
and the third the easterly part of the town. In 1808 there 
were five districts, but no record of the bounds was ever 
made on the town books. In 1818 Stark district was cut 
off from No. 1, and called No. 7 ; Goffe's Falls was cut 
from No. 3, and called No. 6 ; and some time after Amos- 
keag Falls district was cut from No. 2, and called No. 8. 

In 1840 the scholars were so many that a new division 
had to be made, and November 2, the selectmen, having 
been authorized at a former meeting, reported that No. 1 
should be Stark district ; No. 2, where city proper now is ; 
No. 3 at Bakersville ; No. 4, Goffe's Falls ; No. 5, Harvey 
District ; No. 6, Wilson Hill ; No 7, Hallsville or Manches- 
ter Centre ; No. 8, Massabesic and present No. 6 or Pump- 
ing Station, and No. 9, Mosquito pond. 

Prior to 1853, No. 6, of 1840 division, was discontinued, 
and part of it went to No. 2, city, and part of it to No. 7, 



136 

Hallsville, and the present No. 6 established. In 1853 
Piscataquog and Amoskeag villages, parts of Bedford and 
Goffstown, were annexed to Manchester, and District No. 
10, 'Squog, and No. 11, Amoskeag made. This division 
continued till 1868, when it was abolished by act of the 
Legislature, and the city assumed control of the schools as 
a whole. The city council appropriates the money for the 
schools, and it is expended under direction of the school 
board. 

SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

The first school-house in town was built in 1785. It 
stood on the north bank of Christo brook and just below 
Amoskeag Falls on the east side of the road to the Centre. 
The men who lived near that place built it with no help 
from the town. It had four roofs, and a door on the south 
side. Within there was an entry about the door in the 
south-east corner, a great stone fire place on the east side, 
the teacher's desk in the north-east corner and seats placed 
on a sloping floor were on the west side. These were in 
two rows, made for fifty pupils ; the girls on the north side 
of the house, the boys on the south, and all sat backs to 
the road. There were no blackboards then ; none in town 
for more than fifty years after. This house cost about sixty 
dollars. It stood by Christo brook till 1798, when another 
was built in its place. In 1842 the New Village took it 
down and erected the third house in that place. The latter 
was burned in 1859, and Blodget street house was at once 
built. 

Two efforts were made in 1787 to raise money to build 
three school-houses. The town voted each down, but in 
1788, March 8, men changed their minds and voted to 
raise three hundred dollars for the purpose of building 
school-houses. 

Agreeably to a motion by Capt. John Goffe the following 
articles were voted : 



137 

"Voted, 1. That each person paying taxes have Liberty 
to work out his School tax or find Materials to build with, 
and shall be allow'd fifty cents per day for a good days 
work, and the Market Prise for Materials found, provided 
said work be done before the Last day of October next. 

" Voted, 2. That the Selectmen appoint a suitable per- 
son to each School House (the Commity shall appoint to 
be built) to Superintend the building of the same and shall 
give him a list of the persons belonging to the same with 
their Taxes who shall allow the persons working or find- 
ing materials the prise for the same and the person having 
the list shall return the same to the Colector by the first 
day of November Who shall allowe the same. 

" Voted, 3. That the persons belonging to the School 
House Built near Esqr. Stark's be allowed their school 
House Tax to finish their school House and repay those 
Who have done more than their proportion in building the 
saim." 

" The House proceeded to the choice of their Committee 
When the following Gentlemen were Chosen, viz. : Samuel 
P. Kidder, John Ray, John Stark, Esqr. ; on Motion being 
made the following Gentlemen were added to the Commit- 
tee, viz. : Capt. John Goffe and Maj. John Webster. 

-'Voted, that 'the Town be Classed in three Classes: 
No. 1, 2 and 3." 

The Committee upon dividing the Classes made the fol- 
lowing report : 

" We, the subscribers, being appointed a Committee to 
determine on the places to build three school-houses in the 
Town of Derryfield : We have accordingly Viewed and 
Determined on said places, viz. : The first to be the school- 
house standing near John Stark's Esqr., and to be finnished 
Where it now stands, and to be called the Federal School 
House. 

" The second school-house to stand on the Highway be- 



138 

tween Capt. Samuel Moor and Enos Webster on the north 
side of the spring that runs Cross the Road, and to be 
called the Union School House. 

" The third school-house to stand on the highway be- 
tween Archibald Grant and Maj. John Webster, to be set 
within six Roods of the spot where the school-House is 
now Frairaed, and to be called the Freedom School House. 
Derryfield, July 7th, 1798. 

JOHN STARK, ^ 

JOHN RAY, 

SAMUEL P. KIDDER, V Committee. 

JOHN WEBSTER, 

JOHN GOFFE, J 

" The Federal School House was framed and put up at 
John Stark's Esqr., who lived in the old Kidder house, cor- 
ner of Chestnut and Orange streets, but was moved down 
to the place by Christo brook, where the first school-house 
in town was built, finnished off and stood there till 1842. 

" The Union School House stood on the east side of the 
road, under the hill, just north of the present water-trough 
at the spring, a mile above Goffsfalls." 

The Freedom School-house stood in the corner of the 
roads, opposite the present Mosquito pond school-house. 

These were cheap houses, costing one 'hundred dollars 
each, and were all built in about the same style. 

In 1808 another school-house was built by Moses Hasel- 
tine, at the Centre, near John Hall's. 

About 1829, a school-house was built in the Stark dis- 
trict, the school in that district having been kept, before 
that time, in Lieut. John Stark's barn and in Amos Kim- 
ball's old house. 

The division of the town, Nov. 2, 1840, into nine dis- 
tricts, necessitated the building of many new school-houses, 
and in 1841, $3,485.82 was spent for that purpose. New 
houses of wood were built this year, in Nos. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 



139 

8 ; several of the same kind in No. 2, city, which were 
placed upon lots hired of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 
or upon lots bought by the city. Other school-houses, of 
more value and durability, have been built as follows : 

The Old High School-house was begun in 1841 and finished 
in 1842. It stands at the corner of Lowell and Chestnut 
streets, and cost about $3,000. The Amoskeag Manufac- 
turing Company gave the lot, and Daniel Clark, E. A. 
Straw and Alonzo Smith were the building committee. 
The house is a plain, brick one, two stories high, 49 feet 
wide, and 62 feet long. 

Janesville School-house was built in 1842, on a lot bought 
of John Hall. 

A small wooden school-house was built at the corner of 
Manchester and Chestnut streets, upon a lot containing 
7,500 square feet, bought of the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company for $500, where the old Intermediate school-house 
now stands. 

May 23, 1844, the city bought a lot at the corner of Mer- 
rimack and Union streets, of the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, for $650, containing 12,600 square feet, and a 
wooden house for two primary schools was built. 

Park-street School-house stands on a lot containing 10,500 
square feet, bought June 23, 1846, of the Amoskeag Man- 
ufacturing Company. It was finished in 1847, brick, two 
stories high, 80 feet long, 52 feet wide. It has four pri- 
mary school-rooms on the first floor, and it is fitted for a 
Grammar school on the second floor. 

In 1847, May 7, the District No. 2 bought a lot at the 
corner of Bridge and Union streets, of the Amoskeag Man- 
ufacturing Company, for $500, and built a wooden house 
for two lower-grade schools. 

Spring -street Grammar School-house was built in 1848. 
The lot on which it stands contains 13,600 square feet, and 
was bought of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company for 



140 

$1,700. The house is two stories high, 80 feet long and 46 
feet wide. There are four primary schools on the first 
floor and a Grammar school on the second. 

The Old Intermediate School-house, at the corner of Chest- 
nut and Manchester streets, was built of brick, in 1853. It 
is valued at $8,000 ; is 48 feet long, 42 feet wide and two 
stories high. Two primary school-rooms are on the first 
floor, two rooms on the second, where the Intermediate 
school was formerly kept, and in the attic is a truant school- 
room. 

Wilson-Hill School-house is at the corner of Manchester 
and Wilson streets. The lot, 16,000 square feet, was bought 
May 4, 1855, of I^uther Aiken, for $625. The house is of 
wood, one story high, 40 feet square, and has two school- 
rooms, one for a primary and one for a middle school. 
Value, $3,300. 

Training School-house is at the corner of Merrimack and 
Union streets, and was built of brick in 1855-56. It is 
two stories high, 68 feet long by 45 feet wide, and has 
four school-rooms ; value, $15,000. 

The Centre-street School-house, at Piscataquog, was built 
in 1856, and is valued at $5,000. 

Main-street School-house, Piscataquog, was built in 1856, 
and is valued at $2,800. 

Franklin- street School-house, built 1857 ; value, $18,000. 

BlodgeU-street School-house, built 1859 ; value, $3,000. 

Massabesic School-house No. 8, built 1860 ; value, $1,400. 

Mosquito-Pond School-house No. 9, built 1860 ; value, 
$1,000. 

Amosheag Grammar School-house No. 11, built 1860 ; 
value, $3,700. 

Bakersville School-house No. 3, built 1863 : value, $3,500. 

Harvey District School-house No. 5, built 1865 ; value, 
$2,500. 

Hallsville School-house No. 7, built 1866 ; value, $3,500. 



141 

High School House, built 1867 ; value, $45,000. 

Piscataquog Grammar School-house No. 10, built 1870 ; 
value, $12,000. 

Goffe's Falls School-house No. 4, built 1870 ; value, 
$3,600. 

Stark District No. 1, built 1871 ; value, $3,000. 

Lincoln-street Grammar School-house, built 1871 ; value, 
$50,000. 

Ash-street Grammar School-house, built 1874 ; value, 
$60,000. 

The old school-house at Amoskeag village was built by 
Goffstowu, and came with the cession of the land to Man- 
chester. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEES. 

For many years after the first public school in 1781, the 
selectmen hired and paid the teachers and built and re- 
paired the school-houses. In 1828, prudential committees* 
were first chosen, and these continued in all the districts 
till 1846, when the city charter was granted by the Legis- 
lature. They called the district meetings, hired and paid 
the teachers, procured the fuel and made small repairs, to 
an amount not exceeding 5 per cent of the school money. 

In 1829 a superintending school committee was first chosen 
by the town. They continued till 1846. Their duties were 
to examine all teachers as to their qualifications to teach, 
give certificates of teacher's competency, without which no 
teacher could draw his pay ; visit the schools, and report 
generally upon their state or condition. 

We have been unable to find the names of but a few of 
the superintending school committees who served previous 
to 1846. We append the few we have found, and also the 
school committee chosen each year since by the wards. 

* At the annual town meeting, held March, 1828, the town chose the following Pru- 
dential Committee : District No. 1, John Ray; No. 2, Samuel Jackson; No. 3, Joseph 
Moor; No. 4, James McQueston; No. 5, John Proctor; No. 6, Daniel Watts; No. 7, 
John Staik, Jr. In 1829 the town voted that the districts choose their Prudential 
Committee. 



142 



1841. 
Samuel D. Bell, 
Joseph M. Kowell, 
Isaac C. Flanders. 

1844. 
W. H. Moore, 
Daniel Clark, 
David P. Perkins, 
Joseph Knowlton. 

1845. 
W. H. Moore, 

B. Brierly, 
H. D. Dexter. 

1846. 
Archibald Stark, 
Nathaniel Wheet, 
Joseph Knowlton, 
Moses Hill, 
James McColley, 
W. W. Brown, 

C. H. Eastman. 

1847. 
Ephraim Stevens, 
J. G. Sherburne, 
Thomas Brown, 
Moses Hill, 
John S. Elliott, 
W. W. Brown, 
C. H. Eastman. 

1848. 
Ephraim Stevens, jr., 
John B. Clarke, 
A. M. Chapin, 
Archelaus Wilson, 
James Hersey, 
W. W. Brown, 
"William Grey. 

1849. 
A. M. Chapin, 
Josiah Crosby, 
Sylvanus Buuton, 
David P. Perkins, 
John S. Elliott, 
J. Y. McQueston. 



1850. 
William G. Means, 
Josiah Crosby, 
Chandler E. Potter, 
David P. Perkins, 
John S. Elliott, 
J. Y. McQueston. 

1851. 
A. M. Chapin, 
Josiah Crosby, 
J. C. Tasker, 
F. B. Eaton, 
A. B. Fuller, 
Amos Abbott. 

1852. 
James O. Adams, 

D. C. Bent, 
J. C. Tasker, 
F. B. Eaton, 
J. E. Bennett, 
C. H. Eastman. 

1853. 
James O. Adams, 
William Grey, 
Sylvanus Bunton, 
Justin Spaulding, 

A. G. Tucker, 
C. H. Eastman. 

1854. 
T. T. Abbott, 
Wm. Sage, 
J. C. Tasker, 
John H. Goodale, 

E. A. Jenks, 
T. P. Sawin, 

B. F. Wallace, 
J. B. Quimby. 

1855. 
Eeuben Dodge, 
H. M. Bacon, 
Jonathan Tenney, 
E. M. Topliffe, 
Benj. Currier, 
S. D. Lord, 
John O. Parker. 



143 



1856. 
Reuben Dodge, 

A. C. Heath, 
Jonathan Tenney. 
J. D. Patterson, 
Benjamin Currier, 
S. D. Lord, 

B. F. Wallace, 

D. P. Currier. 

1857. 
Seth Hill, 
Ephraim Corey, 
William L. Gage, 
J. E. Bennett, 
J. B. Hoitt, 
J. Y. McQueston, 
Geo. A. Bowman, 
Thomas S. Montgomery. 

1858. 
Seth T. Hill, 

E. B. Merrill, 

F. B. Eaton, 
Moses T. Brown, 
J. B. Hoitt, 

J. Y. McQueston, 
George A. Bowman, 
Thomas S. Montgomery. 

1859. 
Seth T. Hill, 
E. B. Merrill, 
Justus D. Watson, 
Amos W. Sargent, 
George H. Hubbard, 
J. Y. McQueston, 
James P. Walker, 
Thomas S. Montgomery. 

1860. 
Seth T. Hill, 
Waterman Smith, 
Justus D. Watson, 
Amos W. Sargent, 
George H. Hubbard, 
James O. Adams, 
B. F. Wallace, resigned, 
S. Webber, vice Wallace, 
Thomas S. Montgomery. 



1861. 
John Hosley, 
Waterman Smith, 
James B. Straw, 
Hiram Hill, 
John Coughlin, 
James O. Adams, 
Samuel Webber, 
Daniel Farmer, jr. 

1862. 
John Hosley, 
Waterman Smith, 
James B. Straw, 
Hiram Hill, 
John Coughlin, 
George Pierce, 
Samuel Webber, 
Daniel Farmer, jr. 

1863. 
Seth T. Hill, 
Waterman Smith, 
Benjamin F. Bowles, 
Holmes R. Pettee, 
William Little, 
George Pierce, 
Samuel Webber, 
Daniel Farmer, jr. 

1864. 
Seth T. Hill, 
Waterman Smith, 
Benjamin F. Bowles, 
Holmes R. Pettee, 
William Little, 
George Pierce, 
Samuel Webber, resigned, 
J. P. Whittle, vice Webber, 
John E. Stearns. 

1865. 
William G. Perry, 
Waterman Smith, 
Benja'min F. Bowles, 
Isaac W. Smith, 
William Little, 
Ignatius T. Webster, 
John M. Ordway, 
John E. Stearns. 



144 



18(56. 
William G. Perry, 
Waterman Smith, 
Benjamin F. Bowles, 
Isaac W. Smith, 
William Little, 
Ignatius T. Webster, 
John M. Ordway, 
Thomas L. Thorpe. 

1867. 
Henry T. Mo watt. 
Waterman Smith, 
Moody Currier, 
George W. Weeks, 
William Little, 
J. Y. McQueston, 
James P. Walker, 
Thomas L. Thorpe. 

1868. 
Henry T. Mowatt. 
Marshall P. Hall, 
Moody Currier, 
George W. Weeks, 
William Little, 
Daniel C. Gould, jr., 
James P. Walker, 
Thomas S. Montgomery. 

1869. 
Henry T. Mowatt, 
Marshall P. Hall, 
Daniel Clark, 
Samuel Upton, 
William Little, 
Elbridge D. Hadley, 
James Dean, 
De Lafayette Robinson. 

1870. 
Henry C. Sanderson, 
Marshall P. Hall, 
Thomas Borden, 
Samuel Upton, 
Patrick A. Devine, 
Ephraim S. Peabody, 
James Dean, 
De Lafayette Robinson. 



1871. 
James A. Weston, ) ex- 
William R. Patten, } officio, 
Henry C. Sanderson, 
Marshall P. Hall, 
Thomas Borden, 
Samuel N. Bell, 
Patrick A. Devine, 
William P. Merrill, 
James Dean, 
De Lafayette Robinson. 

1872. 
Person C. Cheney, 7 ex- 
Edwin Kennedy, } officio, 
Henry C. Sanderson, 
Marshall P. Hall, 
Daniel Clark, 
Samuel Upton, 
Patrick A. Devine, 
Daniel C. Gould, 
James Dean, 
De Lafayette Robinson. 

1873. 
Charles H.Bartlett, resigned* 
John P. Newell vice Bartlett,* 
Charles A. Smith,* 
Henrv E. Burnham, 
Marshall T. Hall, 
Daniel Clark, 
Nathan P. Hunt, 
Frank J. Murray, 
Frank G. Clark, resigned, 
Edwin Kennedy, vice Clark, 
George P. Rockwell, 
George H. Colby. 

1874. 
James A. Weston, > ex- 
Rufus H. Pike, } officio, 
Henry E. Burnham, 
Marshall P. Hall, 
John G. Lane, 
Nathan P. Hunt, 
Frank J. Murray, 
Edwin Kennedy, 
George P. Rockwell, resigned, 
J. K. McQuesten, vice Rock- 
John E. Stearns. [well, 



* Ex-officio. 



145 



1875. 

Alpheus Gay, 7 ex . oMcio 
Joel Daniels, J ex °-* 7lct0 ' 
•John W. Severance, 
Marshall P. Hall, 
John E. Stearns, 
John P. Newell, 
J. J. Sullivan, 
Lucien B. Clough, 
William F. Byrns, 
Nathaniel W. Cumner, 
Samuel P. Jackson, 
Martin Fitzgerald, 
William Little^ 
Newton H. Wilson, 
John K. McQuesten, 
James P. Walker. 



1876. 
Ira Cross, 7 ,,. . 

Arthur DiasmoreJ ea5 -°^ ct0 - 
Marshall P. Hall, 
George W. Stevens, 
John P. Newell, 
Joseph Kidder, 
Lucien B. Clough, 
Isaac L. Heath, 
Nathaniel W. Cumner, 
William F. Byrns, 
Martin Fitzgerald, 
Samuel P. Jackson, 
Newton H. Wilson, 
William Little, 
James P. Walker, 
Isaac W. Darrah. 



By the city charter of 1846, the school committee were 
elected annually, one from each ward, who should perform 
all the duties of the superintending and prudential com- 
mittees. In 1870, an act of the Legislature provided that 
the Mayor and President of the Common Council should 
be members of the school board, ez-offieio, and in 1874 the 
Legislature enacted that the school board should consist 
of the Mayor and President 6f the Common Council and 
two members from each ward, to hold their office two years, 
of whom one shall be elected each year. There are four- 
teen members at present, beside the Mayor and President 
of Common Council. Each has a salary of $10 per year, 
and the clerk of the board gets $25 for his work. 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 

By act of the Legislatnre of 1855 it was* required that 
the boards of Mayor and Aldermen and the School Com- 
mittee should elect, every two years, a Superintendent of 
schools, to hold his office for that length of time. His du- 
ties are to visit the schools, to classify the scholars and 
equalize the attendance upon the different schools. He 
shall advise in cases of discipline and endeavor to raise the 
10 



146 

standard of the schools. He shall attend to all immediate 
repairs needed, purchase temporary supplies of fuel, also 
stationery, blanks, forms and other printed matter, and an- 
nually make a written report to the board. He is to fur- 
nish supplies to the teachers, have the direction of the 
transfer of scholars from one school to another, shall aid 
in the examination of teachers, and have cognizance of all 
cases of truancy. He shall have his office in the School 
Committee room, in the City Hall, and be in his office at 
least one hour each school day. At each monthly meeting 
of the Board he is, required to submit a monthly report in 
writing. 

James 0. Adams was elected in 1855, and held the of- 
fice until 1859. His salary was $500. John W. Ray was 
elected in 1859, and held the office till 1860. His salary 
was $500. James O. Adams was elected again in 1860, 
and held the office till 1867. Salary, 1700. Joseph G. 
Edgerly was elected in 1867, and held the office till 1875. 
Salary, $1,800. Josiah G. Dearborn was elected in 1875. 
Salary, $1,800. 

TEACHERS AND THEIR SALARIES. 

Jonathan Rand was the first teacher in town of whom 
any record can be found. He was paid $8 per month, and 
taught in 1791. Edward Blodgett, Stephen Potter and 
Frederick Hastings taught in 1792 ; William White and 
Peter Severens in 1793 ; John Tufts and Peter Severens 
in 1794 ; John M. Laughlin in 1795 ; Samuel Moor, Jr., in 
1796, 1797, 1798 ; and Samuel Moor, Jr., and Matthew 
Reed in 1799. The highest sum paid per month from 1791 
to 1801, as appears by the selectmen's books, was " to Sam- 
uel Moor, J)-., $12, for keeping school in the lower district 
one month." And for this sum it is highly probable he 
also boarded himself, as it was in his own district. 

^ince 1800 there have been employed in the schools of 



147 

Manchester more than two thousand different teachers. 
We can give the names of but few of them. 

The High School was established in the old High School 
House, at the corner of Lowell and Chestnut 'streets, in 
1845. Masters: 

John W. Ray, 1845 to 1849 ; salary, #500 to $800. 

Amos Hadley, 1849 to 1851 ; salary, $600. 

John P. Newell, 1851 to 1853 ; salary, $600 to $1,000. 

Jonathan Tenney, 1853 to 1854 ; salary, $1,000. 

Samuel Upton, 1854; one term. 

John P. Newell, 1855 to 1862 ; salary, $^00 to $1,100. 

William W. Colbuni, 1862 to 1874 ; "salary, $800 to 
$2,000. 

Albert W. Bacheler, 1874: salary, $2,000. 

Two assistants have been employed in the High School 
all the time, and at the present time there are six. The 
number of pupils in 1845 was 92 ; in 1855 was 120; in 
1865 was 122 ; and in 1875 was 299. 

TJie Park-street Grammar School was first taught in a 
chapel on Concord street, in 1845. It was removed to 
Park street in 1847. Masters : 

A. M. Caverly, 1845 to 1858 : salary, $300 to $500. 

Joseph E. Bennett. 

William A. Webster, 1853 to 1857 ; salary, $600 to $700. 

Thomas Corcoran, 1863 to 1869: salary, $700 to $1,300. 

From 1857 to 1861 the house was idle ; the district then 
gave the Catholics the use of the house free, and they oc- 
cupied it till 1863. It was then used by the city till 1869. 
The Catholics, since that time, have had free use of it. 

The South Grammar School, corner of Franklin and 
Pleasant streets, was opened in 1857, the teachers and 
scholars being transferred from the Park-street Grammar 
building. Masters: 

William A. Webster, 1857 to 1861 ; salary, $1,000. 

Josiah G. Dearborn, 1861 to 1866 ; salary, $900 to 
$1,100. 



148 

Isaac L. Heath, 1866 to 1872; salary, $900 to $1,500. 

Daniel A. Clifford, 1872 ; salary, 11.500. 

Three assistants have been employed, and the number of 
pupils has averaged about 200. 

The North Grammar School, sometimes called the Spring- 
street Grammar school, was opened in 1848. Masters : 

Moses T. Brown, 1848 to 1853. 

Joseph E. Bennett, 1858. 

William H. Ward, 1853 to 1857 ; salary, $700. 

Henry C. Bullard, 1857 to 1865 ; salary, $900 to $1,000. 

0. M. Barrows, 1865 ; salary, $1,000. 

Francis W. Parker, 1865 to 1868 ; salary, $950 to $1,100. 

Jacob Eastman, 1868 to 1869 ; salary, $1,100. 

Elbridge D. Hadley, 1869; salary, $1,100. 

John S. Hayes, 1869 ; salary, $1,500. 

William E. Buck, 1869 to 1874 ; salary, $1,100 to $1,500. 

Sylvester Brown, 1875 to 1876; salary, $1,000. 

Edward P. Sherburne, 1876 ; salary, $1,000. 

There was a short time in 1874 when there was no mas- 
ter at this school. At first and for many years, three as- 
sistants were employed, but for the past two years there has 
been but one. The number of scholars has averaged 175. 

The Lincoln- street, or East Grammar School, was com- 
menced in the new High School House in 1867. At first 
there were two divisions taught by female teachers ; ii> 1868 
another division was added, and in 1869 it was moved to 
the old High School house, a first division added and a 
master employed. In 1871 the school was moved to the 
Lincoln-street house. Masters : 

Lewis H. Dutton, 1869 to 1870 ; salary, $1,300 to $1,500. 

Benjamin P. Dame, 1870 to 1875 ; salary, $1,200 to 
$1,500. 

Sylvester Brown, 1875 ; salary, $1,000. 

Benjamin F. Dame, 1875 ; salary, $1,500. 

Since the school has been at Lincoln street there have 



149 

been three assistants, and the number of pupils has aver- 
aged about 200. 

The Pkcataquog Grammar School was established when 
'Squog village was a part of Bedford, and came to Man- 
chester when that village was annexed to the city in 1853. 
It was taught, at first, by women in the summer and men 
in the winter, till 1858. It was kept in Centre-street house 
till 1874, and then moved 'to Main-street house. Masters: 

James W. Locke, 1858. two terms. 

Joseph B. Bennett, 1858, one term. 

Francis W. Parker, 1859, one term. 

Joseph G. Edgerly, 1859 to 1862. 

Marcia V. McQueston, 1862 to 1863. 

Philinda P. Parker, 1863 to 1867. 

Charles J. Darrah, 1867 to 1868. 

Annette McDoel, 1868 to 1869 ; salary, $500. 

Lorenzo t). Henry, 1869 to 1870 ; salary, $800. 

Harry D. Hadley, 1870 to 1871 ; salary, $720. 

Allen E. Bennett, 1871 to 1873; salary, $750. 

Sylvester Brown, 1873 to 1875; salary, $800. 

Andrew M. Heath, 1875 ; salary, $1,000. 

Wm. M. Stevens, 1875, salary, $1,000. 

Intermediate School. This is an ungraded school, for 
those who cannot attend regularly at graded schools. It 
was kept first at the Museum building; in 1854 in the old 
Intermediate school-house, at corner of Chestnut and Man- 
chester streets, and 1874 it was removed to the old High 
School house. Masters : 

Charles Aldrich, 1854 to 1858 ; salary, $500. 

Josiah G. Dearborn, 1859 ; salary, $500. 

Martin L. Stevens, 1859 to 1861 ; salary, $500 to $600. 

William Harvey, 1861. 

Joseph G. Edgerly, 1861 to 1864 ; salary, 250 to $500. 

Orren C. Moore, 1861. 

Emeline R. Brooks, 1864 ; $200 to $250. 



150 

Joseph G. Edgerly, 1864; salary, $900. 

Wendell P Hood, 1865; salary, $500. 

Iss.iae L. Heath, 1865 to 1866; salary, §600. 

Joseph G. Edgerly, 1866; salary, $600. 

El I. ridge I). Hadley, 1866 ; salary, $600. 

Samuel W. Clark, 1867 ; salary, $800. 

Lewis II. Dutton, 1868 ; salary, $700. 

William E. Buek, 1869; salary, $800. 

Daniel A. Clifford, 1869 to 1872 ; salary, $800 to $1,500. 

Allied S. Hall, 1873 ; salary, $1,100. 

Herbert W. Lull, 1873 to 1875; salary, $600. 

John J. Sullivan, 1875 ; salary, $750. 

There has generally been one assistant at this school, 
sometimes two, and the largest number of scholars ever in 
attendance at one time was about 125. 

The Ash-street Grammar School was opened in 1874, the 
master and many of the pupils being transferred from the 
Spring-street Grammar school. Master: 

William E. Buck, 1874 ; salary, $1,500. 

There are three assistants, and the average number of 
pupils is about 200. 

Music is taught in all the schools. Imri S. Whitney was 
the first music teacher, being elected in 1860, at an annual 
salary of $400. In 1868 J. D. Jones was elected for part 
of the districts, at a weekly salary of $10. Jason J. Kim- 
ball was elected music teacher in 1872. His salary has 
been from $1,200 to $1,600 per annum. 

There are at present forty-five public schools in the city ; 
eight of them suburban. These are taught by 67 teachers, 
and in 1875 there were 3,519 different pupils in the day 
schools. The city owns twenty-two school buildings, which 
contain seventy-five school rooms. Forty weeks constitutes 
the school year, and there are three terms ; two of twelve 
weeks each, and one of sixteen weeks. The schools are 
kept five days each week, the sessions being two and one- 



151 

half hours long in the primary schools, and three hours 
long in all schools above that grade. There are two ses- 
sions each school day. 

Parochial Schools. At the present time the following 
are in active operation : 

1 Grammar school, Park-street school-house ; 2 teachers, 
130 scholars. 

1 Middle school, Park-street school-house ; 2 teachers, 
1 20 scholaars. 

3 Primary schools, Park-street school-house : 3 teachers, 
200 scholars. 

4 schools, corner of Lowell and Birch streets; 4 teach- 
ers, 250 scholars. 

2 schools, vestry St. Joseph's church ; 4 teachers, 200 
scholars. 

4 schools, corner Union and Laurel streets ; 4 teachers, 
250 scholars. These are private schools supported by the 
Roman Catholics. 

Mt. St. Mary's Academy, with a primary department, is 
also supported by the sect. It has eight teachers — nuns — 
and averages about 100 pupils. This school is supported 
by tuitions. 

Training School. This public school was established by 
the city in 1873. Middle and primary scholars attend it. 
In it persons are prepared or trained to teach. These usu- 
ally come from the High School graduates. There are sev- 
eral in attendance all the time, and a permanent supply of 
educated teachers is afforded. Yet no person should be 
elected a teacher simply because a graduate of the training 
school. Merit should determine the choice. 

Evening Schools. There are many pupils in the city 
who cannot attend school in the day-time, and these schools 
were established for them. The first one was begun in 
1854, chiefly by the influence of James O. Adams. Mr. 
Adams was the principal, and had several assistants. For 



152 

soine reason, there were none after that till 1868. Since 
the latter date they have been kept each winter. They 
have been located in the Intermediate house, in the old 
wooden house at the coiner of Bridge and Union streets, 
in the house at the corner of Beech and Concord streets- 
and the old High school-house. In 1873 one was begun at 
Piscataquog, which has since continued. 

These schools commence in the fall and hold four or five 
months through the winter. Each has a master and sev- 
eral assistants. As many as 300 pupils have attended 
these schools in a season. 



153 



EXPENDITURES. 









Other school ex- 




Financial 


No. of schol- 


Salaries of Teach- 


penses and new 


Total expenditure. 


year. 


ars. 


ers. 


houses. 




1846 




$2,722.54 


$1,364.92 


$4,087.46 


1847 


2031 


3,502.13 


6,740.79 


10,242.92 


1848 


1860 


5,683.02 


6,780.39 


12,463.41 


1849 


2115 


6,373.31 


9,687.32 


10,020.63 


1850 


2115 


6,940.09 


9,565.41 


16,505.50 


1851 


1902 


7,299.35 


7,895.57 


15,194.92 


1852 


8308 


8.379.55 


5,089.09 


13,468.64 


1853 


3660 


8,951.10 


11,971.71 


20,922.81 


1854 


3761 


11,360.43 


5,753.17 


17,113.60 


1855 


3760 


13.233.04 


8,442.48 


21,775.52 


1856 


3761 ' 


13,974.23 


20,107.90 


34,082.13. 


1857 


4359 


15,112.13 


20,024.37 


35,136.50 


1858 


3827 


14,645.56 


10,497.86 


25,143.42 


1859 


3097 


' 13,980.64 


9,433.57 


22,414.21 


1860 


3205 


14,666.35 


13,443.28 


28,109.67 


1861 


3309 


15,627.07 


10,395.11 


26,022.34 


1862 


3552 


14,608.58 


7,236.13 


21,846.71 


1863 


4020 


15,309.98 


13,291.73 


28,601.71 


1864 


3960 


16,823.90 • 


11,205.00 


28,028.20 


1865 


4309 


21,101.99 


16,414.90 


37,516.89 


1866 


4525 


24,472.24 


23,509.97 


47,982.21 


1867 


4655 


29,836.87 


34,205.09 


64,041.96 


1868 


4371 


30,567.62 


29,832.50 


60,400.12 


1869 


3500 


34,979.87 


26,345.62 


61,325.49 


1870 


3200 


33,196.82 


32,341.05 


65,537.87 


1871 


3200 


33,831.84 


42,403.97 ' 


76,235.81 


1872 


3500 


35,223.39 


55,788.92 


91,012.31 


1873 


3779 


36,451.58 


46,773.95 


76,492.53 


1874 


4057 


36,815.26 


47,273.43 


84,088.69 


1875 


3819 


39,436.08 


24,000.54 


63,436.62 



The above table shows the number of scholars each year, 
including those in the evening schools, and the annual ex- 
penditures for the public schools of Manchester, since the 
incorporation of the city. 



ACCOUNT 

OF 

HENRY R. OHAMBERUN, 

CITY TREASURER, 

FROM 

DECEMBER 31, 1875, TO DECEMBER 31, 1876. , 



156 



Br. 



H. JR. Chamberlm, Treasurer, in account with the 



To Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1876 . . $79,598 44 


City Bonds issued July 1, 1876 




. 40,000 00 


Savings Bank Tax .... 






34,751 56 


Railroad Tax .... 








12.194 54 


Literary Fund . 








1,583 55 


Insurance Tax . 








796 88 


City Hall and Stores 








1,669 25. 


City Farm .... 








3,122 51 


Police Court .... 








4,760 25 


City Scales 








105 10 


Pine Grove Cemetery 








1,458 76 


Valley Cemetery 








109 71 


County, for Board at Reform S< 


diool, &c. 






5,163 59 


City Teams 








2,606 40 


Overdrafts 








• 78 47 


License of Shows 






• 


180 00 


Land Sold from Farm 








557 00 


Dog Licenses 








817 82 


. Sewer Licenses 








796 60 


Rent of Hearse 








62 50 


Interest on City Bonds 








166 67 


Tuition . 








100 50 


Interest on Taxes 








. 1,039 26 


Rent of Tenements . 








104 00 


• Taxes Collected, 1871 








5 76 


" 1872 








16 37 


" " 1^73 








71 75 


" " 1874 








. ■ 1,278 87 


" •' 1875 








. 34,230 42 


" " 1876 








. 157,093 29 


City Aqueduct . 








36 00 


Cost on Non-Resi'lent Taxes 








42 00 


Hydrant Service 








16,320 00 


Water Rent 








. 22,559 47 


Lumber .... 








44 62 


Tomb Fees 








78 50 


E. M. Topliff, Loam, &c. . 








4 50 


Water-Works for Derrick and use . 






149 00 


Amount carried forward to page la8 


$423,753 91 



157 



<City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1876). 



Or. 



By Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1876 . . . $23,919 26 


Paupers off the Farm 










6,812 72 


City Farm 












5,050 03 


City Teams 












3,994 26 


Highway District No. 1 












342 17 


C< M "2 












14,606 11 


" " 3 












993 82 


u a u 4 












301 40 


u u 5 












569 95 


" « 6 












750 42 


u a a y 












1,123 18 


" " 8 












466 90 


u a u 9 












407 26 


" 10 












1,909 86 


" " " 11 












1,500 14 


a 12 












573 39 


" « 13 












272 04 


New Highways 












3.343 29 


Granite Bridge 












57 07 


Amoskeag Falls Bridge 












C67 60 


Sewers and Drains . 












30,810 61* 


Reservoirs 












264 86 


Commons 












300 62 


Valley Cemetery 












826 67 


Pine Grove Cemetery 












1,525 02 


Fire Department 












. 10,432 88 


City Police 












. 21,556 48 


City Officers 












. 9,426 99 


Lighting Streets 












6,123 81 


Militia 












700 00 


Printing and Stationery 












. 2,044 76 


Incidental Expenses 












9.027 32 


City Hall Building . 












. 1,146 41 


City Library 












2,638 39 


Paving Streets 












1,589 78 


Watering Streets 












1,263 92 


Discount on Taxes . 












. 4,391 07 


Abatement of Taxes 












727 42 


Amount carried forward toJpage 159 


$172,457 88 



158 



Dr. 



H. It. Chamberlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward from page 156 
Hackett & Fisher, loam 
J. Q. A. Sargent, re-setting paving 
I. C. Flanders, pipe, &c. 
Jonathan Smith, witness fees ref'd 
Patent Water and Gas Pipe Co., work 
George W. Stevens, from Centennial Fourth 
Howard Insurance Co. Dividend 
Abbott, Downing & Co. 
J. P. Newell, from District 2 
P.M. Shirley, for stone 
Warren Harvey, harness 
Pent of Ward Room Lot 



Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1877 





$423,753 91 


. 




11 50 




10 20 




1 40 




28 00 




381 69 




8 65 




50 00 




3 50 




4 70 




10 00 




12 00 




$424,277 89 


• 


23,694 99 


$447,972 88 



159 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1876). 



Or. 



Amount brought forward from page 157 
Interest 

Coupons, old issue . 
Coupons of Water Bonds 
Reserved Fund 
Reduction of City Debt 
Repairs of Buildings 
School Houses and Lots 
Repairs of School-Houses 
Water-Works . 
Land Damages 
Fire Alarm Telegraph 
Decoration 
Grading for concrete 
Hydrant Service 
Macadamizing . 
Centennial Exhibition 
Centennial Fourth . 
Tuition 
Teachers . 
Evening Schools 
Fuel 

Incidental Repairs . 
Furniture and Supplies 
Books and Stationery 
Printing and Advertising 
Care of Rooms 
Contingent Expenses 

Cash in the Treasury January 1, 1877 



$172,457 88 

276 00. 

21,594 00 

33,756 00 

8,069 05. 

1,500 00 

835 13 

1,717 00. 

3,386 63. 

48,425 72. 

239 51 

601 62- 

201 80 

1,028 57 

16,605 00 

2,896 16 

307 89 

2,152 03 

300 00, 

39,103 86 

648 07 

5,315 68 

968 87 

422 23. 

512 03 

345 27 

2,637 94 

849 03 



$367,152 97 
. 80,819 91 



$447,972 88 
H. R. CHAMBERED*, 

City Treasurer, 
Man vHestek, -January 1, 1877. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
certify that we have examined the foregoing account of 
Henry R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find the same 
-correctly cast and^supported by proper vouchers. 

A. B. STORY, 
JOHN LEE, 
JAMES SULLIVAN, 
IRA CROSS, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



11 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



PAUPERS OFF FARM. 

To balance from old account . . $133 00 
County of Hillsborough, for board 
of inmates at State Reform 

School 4,952 23 

Support of paupers ... 50 20 

Support of paupers, N. H. Asylum 140 21 

Appropriation .... 2,000 00 



Dr. 





< 


£7,275 64 
Cr. 


By paid N. H. Asylum for board of 






Asenath White 


$133 62 




N. H. Asylum for board of El- 






bridge Gerry 


219 03 




N. H. Asylum for board of John 






Connelly .... 


133 74 




N. H. Asylum for board of C. 






W. Haselton 


148 96 




N. H. Asylum for board of Thos. 






F. Daily .... 


95 13 




N. H. Asylum for board of Brid- 






get Scully .... 


98 60 





164 



State Reform School for board of 
inmates . . 

Flanagan & Maxwell, for grocer- 
ies furnished Mrs. Dan Healy 

G. E. Wilson & Co., for grocer- 
ies furnished Joseph Comfort 

G. E. Wilson & Co., for grocer- 
ies furnished N. Lawrence 

G. E. Wilson & Co., for grocer- 
ies furnished Mary Hoyt 

John Sweeney, for groceries fur- 
nished Robert McMahon 

John Sweeney, for groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Fitzgerald . 

John Sweeney, for groceries fur 
nished Mrs. McCarty . 

John Fenton, for groceries fur 
nished J. M. County 

Locke & Demick, for groceries 
furnished Alec Shine . 

Locke & Demick, for groceries 
furnished Michael Connor 

Locke & Demick, for groceries 
furnished Rody Sanborn 

Locke & Demick, for groceries 
furnished Margaret Scanlan 

J. G. Warner, groceries fur 
nished J. Comfort 

Geo. E. Wilson, for groceries 
furnished B. S. Nichols 

Geo. E. Wilson, for groceries 
furnished Margaret Schannon 

Sawyer Brothers, groceries fur- 
nished Moses Lull 



4,502 64 

21 16 

23 22 
45 00 
14 00 

110 00. 

22 59 
12 00 

6 00 

24 00 
3 00 

21 00 

2 00 
10 00 

3 00 
2 00 
8 02 



165 



E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished to L. Wyman 

Barr & Clapp, groceries furnished 
to Stephen Spain . 

B. P. Burpee, groceries furnished 
to Thos. Mackin . 

John M. Chandler, groceries fur- 
nished to Mrs. Annie Connor 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 
furnished to S. L. Conners 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 
furnished to D. A. Webster 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 
furnished E. C. Webster 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur 
nished to S. L. Corning 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished to Celia Adams . 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries ,fur 
nished E. C. Webster . 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur 
nished Mrs. Hackett 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur 
nished Mrs. D. Healey . 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur 
nished Mrs. J. Reardon 

H. B. Putnam, groceries fur 
nished to Ann Connor . 

H. H. Alton, groceries furnished 
to Thos. Kerrigan 

H. H. Alton, groceries furnished 
to John Bonskin . 

Wilson Bros., groceries furnished 
to Michael Reardon 



87 01 
31 00 
10 00 

1 78 
6 00 

20 22 
20 00 

23 50 

24 29 
59 93 

3 82 
77 90 
80 98 
12 27 

2 05 
5 00 
2 00 



166 

Wilson Bros. , groceries furnished 

to David Galway . . . 18 77 

Wilson Bros., groceries furnished 

Sarah Seavey . . . 2 90 

A. M. Eastman, groceries fur- 
nished Rody Sanborn . . 13 00 

A. M. Eastman, groceries fur- 
nished A. Shine ... 4 00 

M. E. Griffin, groceries furnished 

to Thos. Kerrigan . . 20 07 

H. Gorman, groceries furnished 

A. Shine .... 4 00 

Patrick Cullity, groceries fur- 
nished Maurice Fitzgerald . 34 96 

Patrick Cullity, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Hayes . . 7 00 

Patrick Cullity, groceries fur- 
nished John M'Carty . . 18 00 

Timothy Collins, groceries fur- 
nished Alec Shine . . 22 00 

Timothy Collins, groceries fur- 
nished Timothy McGuire . 5 00 

Thos. Johnson, groceries fur- 
nished Elizabeth Otis . . 4 00 

Lawrence Dowd, groceries fur- 
nished Alec Shine . . 47 24 

Mrs. B. O'Neil, groceries fur- 
nished to Margaret Scanlan . 3 00 

F. G. Barney, groceries furnished 

John Rourke . . . 5 00 

Lawrence Dowd, groceries fur- 
nished James Callahan . 5 00 

Moody & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Benjamin Newman . 10 05 



167 

H. Young, wood furnished Mrs. 

Sweeney . . . . 7 50 

Kinne & Co., wood furnished 

Pat Harmon ... 1 00 

Kinne & Co., wood furnished 

Mrs. Quinn . . . . 16 75 
Robert Laing, wood furnished 

Mrs. Dan Healey . . . 13 50 
C. R. Foss, wood furnished Mrs. 

Tim Quinn .... 2 00 

C. R. Foss, wood furnished Mrs. 

Sarah Seavey . . . 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell, fuel furnished 

Mrs. S. Seavey . . . 5 00 

I. R. Dewey, fuel furnished to L. 

Wynian . . . . 12 00 

Daniel Sheehan, fuel furnished 

Mrs. D. Healey ... 9 00 

Kinne & Co., fuel furnished to 

Sarah Seavey . . . 2 50 

L. B. Bodwell, fuel furnished T. 

Quinn 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell, fuel furnished 

Stephen Spain . . . 3 00 

L. B. Bodwell, fuel furnished 

D. O. Webster ... 5 50 

A. J. Butterfield, fuel furnished 

Margaret Scanlan . . 1 50 

A. J. Butterfield, .fuel furnished 

James Callahan . . . 7 25 

A. J. Butterfield, fuel furnished 

Alec Shine .... 3 50 

George H.Porter, fuel furnished 

James Gallighan . . . 3 75 



168 

J. P. Parker, fuel furnished Mar- 
garet Scanlan 

Geo. W. Clark, fuel furnished 
Susan Young 

Geo. W. Dodge, boots and shoes 
furnished Tim Quinn . 

Geo. W. Dodge, boots and shoes 
furnished Tim Quinn 

Canney & Wiley, for medicines 

P. A. Devine, for coffin, robe and 
burial expenses of Stephen 
Spain 

P. A. Devine, for burial expen- 
ses of child of Alec Shine 

P. A. Devine, for coffin for Mar- 
garet Walker 

P. A. Devine, for funeral expen- 
ses of child of T. Quinn 

D. A. Simons, cash furnished 
Mrs. C. W. Haselton . 

S. J. Young, cash furnished 
Mrs. C. W. Haselton . 

George W. Wilson, expense in 
taking Mrs. Scully to Asylum 

Dr. L. M. French, for examina- 
tion of Mrs. Scully 

D. A. Simons, for postal cards 
and printing for overseers of 
poor ' 9 23 

D. A. Simons, fare and expense 
to Loudon, to move C. W. 
Haselton .... 8 00 

Folsom & Son, clothes for Tim 

Quinn 10 00 



2 


00 


4 


00 


3 


75 


5 


50 


28 


27 


11 


25 


11 


00 


5 


00 


24 


00 


20 00 


60 


00 


7 


00 


3 


00 



169 

Fred. Perry, board of Tim Con- 
nor's child . . . . 40 00 
•C. F. Hastings, board of Mrs. 

A. Quimby .... 5 00 

A. D. Fling, board of Jennie 

Crawford . . . . 12 20 
C. C. Webster, board of D. O. 

Webster . . . . 39 00 
Charles Moore, board of D. O. 

Webster .... 9 00 

O. J. Doble, board of A. T. Ayer 30 00 
Hoyt & Marshall, carrying S. E. 

Elliott to City Farm . 1 00 

Joseph French, boarding Sarah 

Elliott 12 00 



Amount .... $6,812 72 
Balance to new account . 462 92 



17,275 64 



CITY FARM. 



Dr. 



To Appropriation . . . .$1,000 00 

J. H. Proctor, produce sold and 

labor on highways . . . 948 39 

Fred Allen, produce sold and la- 
bor on highways . . . 2,138 12 

County of Hillsborough, board of 

paupers 36 00 

Account of land sold from City 
Farm, transfer to balance . 927 52 



$5,050 03 



170 



Cr. 



Paid Locke & Demick, groceries 
Manchester Tea Co. " 
J. M. Chandler & Co. " 
Sawyer Bros. " 

J. G. Warner, " 

H. C. Merrill, 
Eager & Robinson, " 
Geo. E. Wilson, " 

W. F. Sleeper & Co. " 
R. M. Miller, 
H. B. Putnam, " 

W. W. Whittemore, fish 
Pettee & Whittle, meal 
H. & H. R. Pettee, meal and 

grain . 
J. S. Kidder & Co., meal and 

grain . 
Fairbanks & Folsom, spoons, &c 
Dustin Kendall, lamps and chim 

neys .... 
James Bros., manure 
D. A. Simons, furniture . 
Slide Valve Co.. repairing iron 

bedsteads 

machine 



D. H. Barr, 1 


nowing 


Amos Latuch, 


labor 


J. B. Young, 


" 


E. S. Young, 


u 


L. J. Proctor, 


a 


Amos Spofford, 


u 


John Latuch, 


a 


Peter Trudell, 


a 


Chas. Welch, 


a 


John Mason, 


u 



$25 85 

7 45 

68 11 

39 01 

204 84 

78 84 
93 60 
89 35 

148 38 

79 15 
10 17 

2 65 
135 66 

241 55 



42 


96 


3 


80 


2 


20 


214 


68 


30 


87 


33 


51 


95 


00 


74 


00 


7 


50 


18 


00 


60 


00 


25 


00 


6 


00 


10 


46 


64 


77 


18 


42 



171 



W. S. Nelson, labor 




216 00 


George Young, " 




3 00 


W. J. Chapman, " 




10 25 


Sylvester Jones, " 




16 50 


Eri Harvey, " 




49 20 


L. A. Proctor, " 




10 50 


C. H. Colburn, 




11 00 


A. Dinsraore, feed boxes 




4 50 


J. B. Varick, hardware 




15 36 


Daniels & Co., " 




133 05 


Wm. C. Rogers, " 




135 22 


W. W. Hubbard, lumber 




3 88 


George H. Whitford, lumber 


3 00 


A. C. Wallace, " 


60 


Austin, Johnson & Co., " 


41 90 


J. Stickney, leather, &c. . 


6 33 


Colby Clark, 5 pigs . 


16 00 


G. L. Moore, repairing saws 


2 55 


A. J. Lane, 1 set sleds 


42 00 


J. P. Eaton, pigs 


6 00 


J. H. Proctor, ox cart 


10 00 


J. H. Proctor, fare for H. San- 




born . 


2 00 


J. H. Proctor, 1 harrow . 


10 00 


J. H. Proctor, 2 tie covers 


1 25 


J. H. Proctor, 3 months' salary 




as superintendent 


125 00 


Joseph Cate, 3 bu. seed wheat 


9 00 


J. A. Haselton, shingling shed 


22 00 


H. S. Whitney, repairing pumps 




and pipe . 


31 75 


John B. Clarke, horse 


125 00 


Rufus K. Jones, 7 cords manure 


50 75 


Warren Harvey, exchange on 


L 


horse . 




87 50 



172 



H. H. Esty, harness and halter 


23 25 


0. M. Hubbard, balance on sled 


6 00 


Piper & Hawley, dry goods 


55 02 


Crawford & Anderson, dry goods 


5 12 


Amoskeag Manf. Co., gingham 


14 00 


Amoskeag Manf. Co., stone 


12 00 


F. N. McLaren, halter and blan- 




ket 


2 35 


P. Preston, sawing lumber 


4 55 


J. M. Stanton, men's socks 


1 80 


Barton & Co., dry goods . 


48 97 


N. S. Clark, " ■« 


25 72 


W. H. Cate, boots and shoes 


12 96 


F. C. Dow " " " 


44 00 


Head & Neal " " " 


16 25 


J. L. Fogg, beef and dressing 




hogs 


97 35 


S. D. Cass, meat 


37 97 


Clough & Towle, meat 


3 75 


Canney & Wiley, medicines 


44 14 


A. H. Lowell, casting 


75 


J. C. Nichols & Son, team 


1 00 


Gideon Flanders, ice 


7 83 


A. G. Knox, fruit trees 


88 78 


H. F. Thompson, blacksmith 




work ..... 


26 96 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 




smith work .... 


23 00 


Bunton & Porter, blacksmith 




work 


38 25 


A. B. Webster, blacksmith work 


33 60 


W. H. Hill, blacksmith work . 


3 00 


Temple & Farrington, blank 




book 


35 


J. B. Wood, sawing wood 


6 12 



173 



Brigham & Pratt, crackers 


3 65 


A. W. Sanborn, on wagon 


40 00 


G. R. Vance & Co., tin ware . 


4 23 


Clark M. Bailey " " 


7 48 


6. A. Alger, repairing clock 


1 00 


Temple <fe Farrington, paper 




hangings .... 


6 03 


J. L. Kennedy, painting and 




whitewashing 


17 78. 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., repairing 




cider mill .... 


1 75 


Hiram Turner, 1 barrel soap 


4 00 


Manchester One Price Clothing 




Store, clothing 


4 95 


Plumer, Chandler & Co., . 


52 47 


F. R. French, cow . 


70 00 


C. W. Rowell, 1 pair oxen 


180 00 


J. 0. Clark, oxen and beef 


250 08 


A. F. Fox, 1 hog . 


18 00 


A. F. Fox, barrel and rake 


1 15 


A. Hodgman, 2 sows 


40 00 


Fred Allen, salary . 


375 00 


Fred Allen, for sundries . 


125 20 


M. V. B. Kinne, carpenter work 


10 31 


John H. Pond, cabbage plants . 


3 00 


Greeley & Esty, pole, straps, &c. 


6 25 


CITY TEAMS. 




To Highway District No. 2 . . $1,394 38 


Paving ..... 


3 50 


Reservoir 


10 00 



$5,050 03 



Dr. 



174 



Reserved fund . 

New highways . 

Macadamizing . 

Grading for concrete . 

Sewers and drains 

Amoskeag bridge 

Incidentals 

Appropriation 

Orrin Carlton, overdraft 

Watering streets 

Commons . 

Fire-department 

J. P. Newell, city clerk, cash, work 

done for A. Quimby 
Patent water and gas pipe Co 



125 


75 


92 


44 


172 


75 


129 


75 


310 


78 


10 


47 


59 


74 


1,500 


00 


1 


30 


285 


75 


1 


93 


1,500 


75 


8 


41 


28 


00 



i,635 70 



Cr. 



Paidf J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 
smithing . . . . 68 25 

J. W. M. Hunt & Co., black- 
smithing 

W. H. Hill, blacksmithing 

M. C. Clark, 

Chenette Bros. " 

A. B. Webster, " 

Bunton & Porter, " 

A. B. Webster, dump cart 

Hayes & Barnard, blacksmithing 

J. S. Davis, " 

G. E. Barnard, " 

H. <fe H. R. Pettee, grain and 

meal 276 89„ 

J. S. Kidder & Co., grain and 

meal 326 89 



43 


05 


. 134 


65 


62 


55 


5 


50 


. 112 


15 


2 


95 


. 110 


00 


t, 26 


88 


2 


85 


4 


00 



175 



W. F. Sleeper & Co., grain and 

meal .... 
Samuel Poor, grain and meal 
^Concord Railroad, freight 

F. «N. McLaren, repairs, har 
ness, &c. 

Edwin Branch, repairs, har 

ness, &c. 
Greeley & Esty, repairs, har 

ness, &c. 
J. D. Cate, shoeing horses, &c 
D. R. Leach, hay 
J. B. Jones, " 
J. P. Parkhurst, hay 
Jas. W. Coleman, hay 
David Ordway, " 
Edward Langdell, " 
0. Hinkley, " 

J. W. Moore, 
D. H. Dickey, " 
J. E. Stearns, " 

J. S. Edwards, " 
D. H. Hill, 

G. P. Woodman, straw 
S. Chase, " 
C. H. Watts, " 
•C. €. Moore, " 
fl. L. Flanders, " 
B. Hubbard, " 
W. R. Stockdale, hay 
Albert E. Jones, " 
Orin Carlton, rent of stable 
Manchester Gas Light Co., gas 
G. W. Butterfield, teamster 
T. M. Conant, " 



248 15 
79 05 
11 20 

245 55 

16 35 

24 05 
68 86 
13 64 
83 20 
11 27 
77 50 
11 96 
133 80 
59 97' 
40 02 

38 60 

6 84 

39 10 
15 75 

8 51 
13 50 
15 32 

7 79 

10 92 
23 20 
19 20 

11 96 
5 80 

22 05 
328 50 
327 50 



176 



A. B. Cushing, teamster 
Augustus Robie, " 
James Kearin, " 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
John B. Varick, " 
J. M. Chandler & Co., soap 

sponge, &c. . 
Z. F. Campbell, medicines, <fec. 
Orin Carlton, rent of stable 
W. H. Vickery, key 
Dr. C. B. Wood, treatment of 

horses . 
W. H. Kennedy, oil . 
A. Dinsmore, lumber 
Dr. M. C. Derby, treatment of 

horses .... 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 

B. F. Fogg, piping . 

L. N. Dufrain, repairing pump 
J. F. Conway, repairing cart 
French & Robertson, carpenter 

work . . 
A. W. Sanborn, repairing cart 

&c. 
Joseph Comfort, labor 
John Cushing, " 
Edward Linnehan, " 

Amount 

Balance to new account 



343 


00' 


72 13 


11 


92 


26 


72 


5 43 


8 57 


28 


66 


24 00 




65 


33 


50 


1 


25 


9 


73 


33 


25 


63 


55 


6 


75 


7 


00 


7 


75 



80 63 

12 60 
2 25 

17 75 
1 35 



3,994 26 
1,641 44 



»,635 70 



177 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 1 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account . 


#45 24 




Appropriation .... 


300 00 


$345 24 
Cr. 






Paid 0. W. Rowell, superintendent, 






for labor .... 


$10 00 




R. C. Dustin, superintendent, 






for labor .... 


191 87 




For labor and teams, as per pay 






rolls ..... 


140 30 




Amount .... 


1342 17 t 




Balance to new account 


3 07 


$345 24 




• 



Dr. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No 2. 

To Appropriation . . . $12,000 00 

Amount transferred from Re- 
served Fund 

Sundry persons, for work done . 

Isaac C. Flanders, for work and 
pipe, &c, sold 

Warren Harvey, superintendent, 
for harness sold 

Sewers and Drains, for chestnut 
plank ..... 



Cr. 
Paid I. C. Flanders, superintendent $292 50 

I. C. Flanders, superintendent, 

for teams . . . . 79 60 
12 



2,539 


54 




21 


75 




10 


20 




10 


00 




24 


62 






— $14,606 


11 



178 



A. G. Flanders, making pay roll 

J. W. M. Hunt, blacksmithing 

R. W. Flanders, " 

G. W. Merriam, " 

Bunton & Porter, " 

Fogg & James, teams 

French & Robertson, carpenter 
work .... 

Daniels & Co., hardware . 

John B. Varick, " 

Lamson & Marden, stone chips 

Ellis & Patterson, engineering 

A. W. Sanborn, box and bolt 

W. C. Rogers, hardware . 

W. G. Vickery, keys 

Ryder & Blunt, stationery 

J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 
&c, .... 

Pike & Heald, ladder and re 
pairing' pipe . 

D. ET. Young, lumber 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 
repairing and grinding 5 mat- 
tocks .... 

G. W. Butterfield, teamster 

T. M. Conant, " . 

A. B. dishing, " . 

James Kearns, " . 

Augustus Robie, " . 

Warren Harvey, for teams 

Warren Harvey, superintendent 

Sylvester Reed, teamster . 

J. A. B. Emerson, .teams and 
teamster . 



15 


00 


98 


55 


3 


95 


4 


60 


125 


40 


24 


50 


32 


96. 


131 


19 


13 


87 


10 


50 


23 


94 




65 


22 


85 


2 


35 


3 


25 



5 60 



1 


75 




26 


1 


00 


178 


00 


146 


00 


174 


00 


461 


22 


174 


38 


8 


00 


325 


12 


161 


87 



431 12 



179 

Gideon Flanders, teams and 

teamster . . . . 30 00 

Frank Chennette, team and 

teamster . . . . 26 00 

Charles Cheney, team and team- 
ster 28 00 

Mark Harvey, team and team- 
ster 462 37 

Albert Whittier, team and team- 
ster . . . . . 3 50 

E. S. Harvey, team and team- 
ster . 

J. L. Smith, team and teamster 

Edwin P. Abbott, team and team- 
ster . , . . . 

City Teams, work done . 

Fogg & James, team hire 

J. P. Young, teamster 

A. Dinsmore, team and teamster 

M. & D. F. Boyce, team and 
. teamster .... 

Eben Clark, team and teamster 

R. A. Lawrence, team and team- 
ster ..... 

City Farm, team and teamster . 

J. L. Fogg, team and teamster 

M. V. B. Kinne, lumber . 

L. Searles, 1 dozen hammer han- 
dles 3 00 

For labor of men and teams as 

per pay rolls . . . 7,740 83 



343 


12 


300 


87 


92 


25 


,394 


38 


33 


50 


136 


00 


461 


87 


166 


50 


123 


75 


142 


87 


67 


50 


93 


37 


2 


55 



114,606 11 



180 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 8. 

To Appropriation .... #800 00 
Reserved fund, amount transferred 200 00 



Dr. 









m ,000 


00 


id W. W. Baker, superintendent, 






Ck. 




labor and team 


112 


00 






H. C. Dickey, superintendent, 
labor and team 


132 


00 






For teams and labor of men, as 










per pay rolls 
J. B. Variek, hardware 


732 
13 


32 
69 






Manchester Locomotive Works, 










grate ..... 


1 


72 






D. M. Goodwin, water pail and 










dipper ..... 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 


1 


68 
41 






Amount . 


$993 


82 




Balance to new account . 


6 


18 # 


#1,000 


00 









HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 4. 

To Balance from old account . . 75 

Appropriation .... 300 00 
Reserved fund, amount transfer' d 50 00 



Paid A. Dinsmore, lumber . . 8 40 
James Cheney, superintendent 95 00 
Isaac Whittemore, superintend- 
ent 49 50 



Dr. 

$350 75 
Cr. 



181 

For la' tor and teams, as per pay 

rolls 148 50 



Amount .... $301 40 
Balance to new account . 49 35 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 5. 



To Balance from old account . 
Appropriation . 
Reserved fund, amount transf 'd 



Paid S. F. Knowles, supt., labor . 86 12 
C. N. Harvey, supt., labor and 

team 205 54 

E. R. Young, for gravel . 1 40 

Mrs. R. Nutt, " " . . 70 

C. G. B. Ryder, for gravel . 8 50 

For labor and teams, as per pay 

rolls 248 82 

J. L. Kennedy, painting and let- 
tering guide boards 
A. A. Haselton, 2 guide boards 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
J. B. Yarick, shovel 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 



5 


77 


2 


25 


6 


60 


1 


35 


2 


90 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 6. 
To Appropriation . . . 500 00 



1350 75 





Dr. 


10 22 




500 00 




59 73 






$569 95 



Cit. 



8569 95 



Dr. 



182 

Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . 250 42 







$750 42 
Cr. 


Paid Moses Tracy, superintendent, 






labor ..... 


$97 87 




I. T. Webster, superintendent, 






labor 


212 09 




For labor and teams, as per pay 






rolls ..... 


440 46 


$750 42 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 7. 

Dr. 

To Balance from old account . . $96 82 



Appropriation .... 


800 


00 






Reserved fund, am't transferred 


250 


00 


$1,146 


82 














Cr. 




Paid Israel Webster, superintendent, 










labor ..... 


$88 


12 






P. C. Bean, superintendent, 










labor ..... 


141 


62 






For labor and teams, as per pay 










roll . . 


809 


68 






A. Dinsmore & Co., lumber 


2 


18 






Daniels &■ Co., hardware . 


26 


71 






A. Bodwell, stone 


44 


00 






A. C. Wallace, lumber 


4 


08 






Bunton & Porter, blacksmithing 


6 


79 






Amount ... ' 


H,123 


18 




Balance to new account 


23 


64 


$1,146 


82 



183 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 8. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account . 


$5 64 




Appropriation .... 


500 00 


$505 64 
Cr. 






Paid Robert I. Stevens, superintend- 






ent, labor .... 


$72 50 




George S. Smith, superintendent, 






labor ..... 


38 37 




For labor and teams, as per pay 






rolls ..... 


1352 75 




A. Dinsmore, lumber 


3 28 




Amount .... 


$466 90 




Balance to new account 


38 74 








$505 64 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 9. 



To Balance from old account 
Appropriation . 



$33 89 
400 00 



Paid B. W. Corning 


$52 38 


L. A. Dickey .... 


100 75 


For labor and teams, as per pay 




rolls . ... 


227 43 


A. C. Wallace, for lumber 


22 60 


Gilman Clough, for lumber 


4 10 


Amount .... 


$407 26 


Balance to new account 


26 63 



Dr. 

$433 89 
Cr. 



$433 89 



184 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 10. 

Dr. 

To Appropriation .... $1,000 00 
Reserved fund, amount transferred 900 86 

; $1,909 80 

Cr. 
Paid A. W. Dickey, supt, for labor $91 2o 

Simucl Brown, jr., supt., for 

labor . . ' . . 782 24 

For labor, as per pay rolls . 892 84 
VV. P. Stratton & Son, repairing 

lanterns . . . . 2 50 
J. B. Varick, shovels and pick 

handles . . . . 10 50 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 33 06 

E. G. Haines, pipe . . . 10 90 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 5 90 

A. Bod well, stone . . 30 00 

Barr & Clapp, nails . . . 1 17 

G. W. Riddle, 300 loads of clay 50 00 

$1,909 86 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 11. 

Dr. 
To balance from old account . . $117 84 
Appropriation .... 800 00 
Reserved fund, am't transferred 



Paid George A. Richardson, supt., 
labor ..... 
George A. Farmer, supt., 
For labor, as per pay rolls 
David Wells, for lumber . 



650 00 







$1,567 84 




Cr. 


283 45 




197 50 




952 80 




27 24 





185 

John Page, for lumber 

Benj. Page, " 4 ' 

J. H. Maynard, for lumber 

Amount 

Balance to new account 



13 15 

15 00 
11 00 




$1,500 14 
67 70 


•fl.567 84 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 12. 



To balance from old account . 
Appropriation 
Reserved fund, anvt transferred 



Paid A. Dinsmore, lumber 
City Farm, labor 
For labor and teams, as per pay 
rolls . 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 13. 

To balance from, old account . . $98 72 
Appropriation . . . . 2 00 



'aid Jacob Jewell, superintendent, 




labor ..... 


$38 47 


I. P. Fellows, superintendent, 




labor ..... 


51 00 


For labor and teams, as per pay 




rolls 


182 57 


Amount .... 


$272 04 


Balance to new account 


26 68 



Dr. 



$19 50 




400 00 




153 89 


$573 39 
Cr. 


3 33 


383 17 




186 89 


,«573 39 



Dr. 

$298 72 
Cr. 



$298 72 



186 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 

To Balance from old account . . $112 75 
Appropriation .... 4,000 00 



Paid I. C. Flanders, superintendent $85 00 
I. C. Flanders, team . . 100 50 

John Hosley, stone . . 10 00 

J. W. M. Hunt & Co., black- 
smithing . . . . 5 75 
Daniels & Co., hardware . . 46 87 
J. B. Sawyer, engineer's services 4 50 
Ellis & Patterson, engineers' ser- 
vices . . . . . 76 00 
J. M. Chandler & Co., powder, 

&c 9 28 

Lamson <& Marden, repairing 

tools 38 31 

B. H. Piper & Co., sledge han- 
dles . . 

Concord Railroad, repairs 
A. Bad well, stone . 
True J. Perry, gravel 

C. N. Harve/, stone work and 
grading for bridge in Dist. 5 

J. G. Colt, stone work 
City teams, labor 
Warren Harvey, superintendent 
For labor and teams, as per pay 
rolls ..... 

Amount .... 
Balance to new account 



Dr. 

$4,112 75 
Cr. 





90 


26 


50 


58 


12 


8 


10 


125 


00 


.16 


50 


92 


44 


33 


00 


2,606 


52 


^3,343 


29 


769 


46 




$4,112 75 



187 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 



To balance from old account 


$439 21 


Appropriation .... 


400 00 


Paid City teams, labor 


$10 47 


For labor, as per pay rolls 


43 89 


Geo. Hoi brook, carpenter work 


5 10 


J. B. Varick, hardware 


22 65 


A. Dinsmore, lumber 


320 39 


Concord Railroad, freight 


81 00 


G. J. Campbell, shingling 


174 10 


C. H. Hodgman, teaming 


10 00 


Amount .... 


$667 60 


Balance to new account 


171 61 







Dr. 



$39 21 



Cb. 



$839 21 



GRANITE BRIDGE. 



To Appropriation 
Plank sold 



Paid J. B. Varick, hardware 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
For labor, as per pay rolls . 

Amount 

Balance to new account 



$300 00 
20 00 



$3 


50 


33 


07 


20 


50 


$57 


07 


262 


93 



Dr. 



$320 00 
Cb. 



$320 00 



188 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

To Appropriation . . . 110,000 00 

Special Appropriation . 40,000 00 

Amoskeag Nat. Bank, accrued in- 
terest on bonds . . . 166 67 
Sundry persons, for license to en- 
ter sewers .... 796 60 
County of Hillsborough, sewer 

and drain brick ... 20 25 



Dr. 



$50,983 52 
Cr. 



Paid I. C. Flanders, supt., labor 
Warren Harvey, supt., " 

D. H. Young, drain pipe . 
T. McQuestion, cement pipe 

A. H. Lowell, cesspools, covers 
&c. . . . 

Charles Wells, cesspool stone 

E. G. Haines, drain pipe . 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 
Amoskeag Manf'g Co., pipe 

pumps and waste . 
E. M. Tubbbs, drain pipe 
French & Robertson, carpenter 

work .... 
Drake & Carpenter, cement 
G. W. Thayer & Son, rubber 

boots .... 

B. L. Hartshorn, carting pipe 
Jesse Gault, brick . 
Pettee & Whittle, cement 
Eben Ferren, pipe 
Edward Wyman, damage to block 

while blasting 



193 00 

231 00 

580 90 

51 75 

501 5Q 

3 00 
10,317 10 

79 95 

7 92 
26 40 

96 17 
5 10 

19 25 

105 33 

3,371 65 

185 82 

12 65 

4 00 



189 

Bacr & Clapp . 

Plumer, Chandler & Co., oil suits 

H. & H. R. Pettee, cement 

L. B. Bodwell & Co. 

J. Q. A. Sargent 

J. S. Kidder & Co., cement 

Geo. W. Weeks, rubber boots 

Daniels & Co., hardware . 

Ellis & Patterson, engineering 

services 
Pike & Heald, lantern, lamps, &c 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmith 

work 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
A. Dinsmore, lumber 
John B. Varick, hardware 
W. Harriman, lumber 
W. C. Rogers, hardware . 
J. B. Sawyer, engineering ser 

vices .... 
J. M. Chandler & Co., oil, pow 

der, &c. 
Jere. Stickney, rubber mittens 
For labor of men and teams, as 

per pay rolls 

Amount 

Balance to new account 



1 


50 


9 


50 


1,258 


81 


5 


00 


> 


44 


17 


00 


4 


00 


7a 


13 


145 


50 


7 


98 


11 


55 


231 


30 


124 


61 


15 


19 


22 


20 


27 


25 



152 01 

72 30 
3 00 

12,935 79 



,810 61 
20,172 91 



#50,983 52 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 



$114 13 
1,500 00 



Dr. 



,614 13 



190 



Cr. 



Paid Warren Harvey, supt. 


2 25 


Ellis & Patterson, engineers' ser- 




vices .... 


93 70 


S. A. Felton, building culvert . 


25 00 


City teams, labor 


129 75 


for labor, as per pay rolls . 


728 37 


City Farm, labor 


49 50 


Amount . . . . 


11,028 57 


Balance to new account 


585 56 







11,614 13 



MACADAMIZING. 

Imbalance from old account . . $881 94 
Appropriation .... 5,000 00 



Paid for labor, as per pay rolls . $2,445 24 
Kimball & Gerrish, for tallow . 75 
Wm. Parker, for stone . . 12 00 
Water- Works, water for crusher 22 50 
John B. Varick, hardware . 23 51 
A. Dinsmore, lumber . . 6 53 
Amoskeag Manf'g. Co., repair- 
ing crusher . . . . 11 75 

Amoskeag Manf'g. Co., quarry- 
ing stone . . . . 75 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and 

tallow ... . . . 70 05 

A. Bodwell, stone . . . 23 00 

Daniels & Co., hardware . . 1 50 

W. C. Rogers, " . 6 01 



Dr. 



5,881 94 
Cr. 



191 

Lamsoti & Marden, sharpening 

tools 25 57 

City teams, labor . . .172 75 



Amount .... $2,896 16 
Balance to new account ' . 2,985 78 



Paid A. Dinsmore, lumber . . 25 90 
French & Robertson, carpenter 

work 72 04 

J. J. Abbott, painting fence . 25 00 

A. H. Lowell, castings and labor 20 50 

J. L. Kelly, painting fence . 50 00 

Thos. A. Lane* putting in pipe 1 52 

Labor and^eams, as per pay rolls 105 Q6 



Amount .... $800 62 
Balance to new account . 231 67 



PAVING STREETS. 

To balance from old account . . $100 39 
Appropriation .... 2,000 00 



i,881 94 



COMMONS. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . . $532 29 



Cr. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per 

pay rolls .... $769 09 



132 29 



Dr. 

$2,100 39 
Ob. 



102 



A. Bodvvell, stone 

H i.ckett & Robie, concrete 

Brown & Brown, " 

Ellis & Patterson, engineering 

services . . ' 

Robert Bunton, paving stone 

Amount . 

Balance to new account 





422 


00 










278 


49 










10-4 


15 










3 


00 










13 


05 








■*1 


,589 


78 






510 


61 














#2 


100 


39 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 
J. F. James, lots sold 
H. R. Pettee, tree 
R. M. Shirley, stone . 
Amount received for rent of city 
tomb ..... 



. . 1243 


41 


. 1,000 


00 


. 108 


m 


1 


05 


4 


70 



Paid C. R. Colley, painting fence 
Sullivan Bros., stove and pipe . 
J. B. Varick, shovels 
Geo. Holbrook, building fence . 
Warren Harvey, supt., labor 
J. J. Abbott, painting fence 
D. H. Young, roofing 
Gay, Wells & Co., 500 loads 

sand ..... 
Nutt Brothers, whitewashing 

tomb ..... 
Benjamin Stevens, labor . 



78 50 



59 


12 


16 


53 


3 


50 


89 


97 


11 


25 


25 


00 


15 


80 



50 00 

3 00 
25 50 



Dii. 



*1,436 32 
Cr. 



193 



A. H. Hartshorn, labor 


45(3 50 


E. S. Harvey, teaming 


13 50 


M. & D. F. Boyce, teaming 


13 50 


For labor, as per pay rolls 


43 50 


Amount .... 


$826 67 


Balance to new account 


609 65 


PINE GROVE. 




To Balance from old account . 


$735 68 


Cash received for lots sold 


1,455 38 


" " " wood sold 


3 38 


Paid William Chase, labor 


504 87 


A. Mclndoe, " 


293 25 


A. B." Chase, " . . 


147 50 


Edward Cloiigh, ' : 


18 50 


B. F. Mitchell, " 


4 50 


Fogg & James, teams 


5 00 


Daniels & Co., hardware . 


24 95 


J. F. Ja.ues, laying out lots and 




horse hire 


112 00 


J. W. Poland, trees 


4 50 


B. F. Baker, trees 


15 00 


J. W.Goodel & Co., making and 




blacking letters 


132 00 


M. "V. B. Kinne, building fence 


64 83 


John Prince, Norway spruces . 


26 80 


Concord Railroad, freight 


14 40 


W. Ireland, building extension 




to tool shed 


153 50 


13 





,436 32 



Dr. 



$2,194 44 
Or. 



194 



Pike.& Heald . 


3 42 




Amount 

Balance to new account 


$1,525 02 
. 669 42 


$2,194 44 







LIGHTING STREETS. 

To Appropriation .... $5,500 00 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 623 81 



Paid; Manchester Gas Light Co., gas $3,499 30 
Manchester Gas Light Co., light- 
ing lamps .... 1,678 58 
For signs, lanterns and posts . 376 36 
A. H. Lowell, lamp posts and 

lantern frames . . . 373 40 
T. L. Quimby, lighting Amos- 

keag Falls Bridge . . 45 00 
J. M. Chandler & Co., lamps 

and oil .... 3 90 
Pike and Heald, repairing lan- 
terns, &c. . . . 35 27 
J. K. Stevens, lighting lanterns 10 88 
M. R. Currier, kerosene oil . 9 98 
J. E. Bailey, lighting lamps . 31 96 
S. L. Flancters, oil and wicks . 8 16 
H. Fradd & Co., oil . . . 4 55 
Simon Dodge, lighting street 

lamps 16 53 

David Perkins, lighting street 

lamps 24 14 



Dr. 

3,123 81 
Cr. 



195 

C. J. Thompson, lighting street 

lamps ..... 5 80 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



1,123 81 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account 


882 


10 


Appropriation .... 


1,500 


00 












Cr. 


Paid Campbell & Hanscom, printing 






and advertising . 


$357 


04 


John B. Clarke, printing and 






advertising .... 


1,142 


84 


Saturday Night Dispatch, print- 






ing and advertising 


28 


75 


Rollins & Kingdon, printing and 






advertising .... 


8 


62 


Wm. E. Moore, printing . 


1 


50 


C. F. Livingston, " 


120 


00 


C. P. Peasley, " 


70 


50 


Wm. H. Annan " 


4 


25 


E. C. Bailey, " 


23 


25 


J. Henry Flagg, ink 


4 


63 


Post-Office, stamps . 


56 


57 


J. R. Swallow, ink and stationery 


7 


20 


Temple and Farrington, station- 






ery 


156 


07 


Albert Jackson, postage . 


6 


38 


Thomas Howe, blank books 


1 


50 


E. R. Coburn, stationery . 


18 


61 


George C. Hoitt, books and 






blanks ..... 


27 


30 


Ryder & Blunt, pens 




75 



196 

Thomas W. Lane, stationery 
John P. Newell, " 

John P. Young, jr., " 

Amount 

Balance to new account 



5 12 

3 13 

75 



52,044 76 

337 34 

$2,382 10 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 

Dr. 
To Balance from old account . . $1,580 00 
Appropriation .... 15,000 00 
Reserved fund . . . . 25 00 

$16,605 00 

Cr. 

Paid Water- Works, for water . . $16,605 00 



RESERVOIRS. 
To Balance from old account 

Paid for labor of men and teams, as 

per pay rolls 
Ellis & Patterson, engineering 

services .... 

E. G. Haines, mason work 
H. & H. R. Pettee, cement 
A. H. Lowell, castings and labor 
French & Robertson, carpenter 

work ..... 
Pike & Heald, repairing pipe . 
Patrick Finn, care of reservoirs 

Amount .... 
Balance to new account 





Dr. 

$781 07 




Cr. 


50 A 60 




4 50 

28 50 
58 68 

5 40 




91 43 

75 
25 00 




$264 86 
516J21 


$781 07 



197 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



To Balance from old account 
Appropriation 
Pike & Heald, overdraft 



Dr. 



•$459 42 

13,000 00 

2 55 



■113,461 97 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 



Paid J. S. & M. K. Burbank, wood 
W. Harvey, drawing wood 
Gas Light Co., gas . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
E. Branch, blankets 
A. B. Webster, hook 
J. M. Chandler, oil . 
Plumer, Chandler & Co., jackets 
George R. Simmons, oiling hose 
Sullivan Brothers, coal hod 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

repairing hose carriage 
Company's bill, for services 



I 814 


23 


4 


00 


58 


92 


83 


88 


8 


50 




75 


9 


95 


$ 19 


00 


5 


00 


1 


50 


43 


65 


. 825 


00 



Cr. 



.,074 38 



FIRE KING No. 2. 

Paid J. S. & M.'R. Burbank, wood . 14 24 

Daniels &.Co.,£oil, &c. . . 8 50 

Warren Harvey, drawing wood 4 00 

Gas Light Co., gas . . . 62 95 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal .. 83 88 

J. M. Chandler & Co., potash . 1 77 



Cr. 



19.8 



Amoskeag Manf g. Co., repair 

ing steamer . 
Joel Daniels, painting hats 
A. W. Kenniston, oiling hose 
Pike & Heald, repairing lamps 

&c 

H. C. Sanborn, wood 
Sullivan Bros., grate for stove 
T. M. Conant, sawing and put 

ting in wood 
Company's bill, for services 



. 231 


25 


3 


25 


5 


00 




61 


5 


62 


2 


00 


9 


06 


. 825 


00 



..257 13 



E. W. HARRINGTON S. F. ENGINE CO. No. 3. ' 



Paid Jere. Stickney, repairing hose 
Gas Light Co., gas . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
H. Fradd & Co., oil . 
A. P. Frye, blacksmith work 
R. W. Martin, painting 
Joel Daniels, painting hats 
A. C. Wallace, wood 
Water-Works, use of water 
A. C. Wallace, team 
J. Schofield, oiling hose . 
C. H. Hodgman, teaming 
I. R. Dewey, wood . 
Company's bill, for services 



12 00 
14 85 
55 91 

18 68 
4' 00 

20 00 

3 50 

6 75 

3 00 

150 00 

5 00 
2 75 

6 00 
9 40 



Cr. 



,242 44 



199 



N. S. BEAN S. F. ENGINE CO. No. 4. 



Paid J. S. & M. R. Burbank, for wood 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

repairing hose carriage, &c. 
F. N. McLaren, oiling hose 
Warren Harvey, drawing wood 
Gas Light Co., gas 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
J. M. Chandler & Company, oil, 

matches, &c. 
Joel Daniels, painting hats 
John dishing, oiling hose 
Pike & Heald, rep. smoke stack 
Sullivan Bros., stove, pipe and 

fitting . 
Company's bill, for services 
L. Searles, driver 



14 23 



51 


70 


4 


25 


4 


00 


77 


41 


83 


86 


7 


91 


3 


50 


5 


00 


1 


60 


49 


70 


825 


00 


26 


50 



Cr. 



.,154 66 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER CO. No. 1. 



Paid Daniels & Co., duster 

W. Harvey, drawing wood 

Gas Light Co., gas . 

Elliot & Means, rent of rooms 

Joseph Comfort, sawing wood 

Henry Moulton, ladder 

Joel Daniels 

J. M. Chandler & Co., matches 

French & Robertson, ax handles 

and fitting . 
Company's bill for services 



Cr. 



13 


50 


4 


00 


33 


10 


. 120 


00 


2 


25 


3 


50 


7 


50 




60 



1 05 
1,525 85 



,701 35 



200 



PENNACOOK HOSE CO. No. 1. 



Cr. 



Paid W. Harvey, drawing wood 


$4 00 


Gas Co., gas .... 


81 92 


N. E. Linen Hose Co., hose 


270 00 


J. M. Chandler & Co., oil, 




matches, <fcc. 


6 CO 


E. Branch, repairing and oiling 




harness .... 


8 62 


Joel Daniels, painting hats 


3 75 


M. C. Clark & Co., shoeing 




horses ..... 


6 15 


C. H. Leach, teaming 


2 19 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 




repairing hose carriage 


32 44 


Daniels & Co , hose . 


6 21 


W. L. Blenus, oiling hose and 




putting in coal 


13 00 


Pike and Heald, gilt ball . 


1 50 


Sullhan Bros., stove and pipe . 


47 65 


E. Branch, repairs . 


9 62 


Company's bill for services 


845 00 


J. M. Plaisted, sawing wood 


2 25 


J. M. Plaisted, driver 


600 CO 


W. L. Blenus, " 


23 33 







,914 23 



MASFABESIC HOSE CO. No. 2. 

Paid Daniels & Co., snow shovels . $2 25 

Gas Light Co., gas . . . 10 74 
J. M. Chandler & Co., brooms 

and matches . . . 1 18 

C. A. Hardy, use of horse . 15 00 



Cr. 



201 



\Vater- Works, rent of water 


6 26 


Wm. Boyd, use of horse . 


24 00 


P. W. Hannaford, oiling hose . 


5 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 


26 92 


Sullivan Bros., grate for stove, 




<fec. ..... 


2 00 


J. B. McCrillis & Son., setting 




tire ..... 


3 00 


Company's bill for service 


695 00 







$791 35 



ENGINEERS' DEPARTMEMT AND MISCELLANEOUS. 

Or. 

Paid Hunt & Lowell, repairing lan- 
terns, <fec. .... 

Patrick Finn, care of reservoirs 

Gas Light Co., gas . 

City Teams .... 

Augustus Robie 

G. H. Porter, work on fire alarm 

John Cui-hing, work on coal 

C. F. Pcasley, printing 

Dunlap & Baker, repairing clock 

Daniels & Co., hardware, hose, 

&c 19 77 

James Kearns, services supply 

wagon . . . . 75 00 

Plumer, Chandler & Co., jackets 

and overalls ... 47 75 

W. S. Blenus, putting in coal . 3 00 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing 3 50 

Charles Williams, jr., battery, 

glasses, insulator, <fcc. . _ . 39 32 



$2 


70 


128 


88 


9 


18 




75 




92 


26 


25 


3 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 



202 



A. H. Lowell, zincs . 
Water-Works, use of water 
John B. Clarke, printing . 
C. J. Abbott, care of telegraph 
J. W. Preston, labor on telegraph 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

waste and ax 
fl. A. Winship, fire hats . 
Stearns & George, blue vitriol 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 
Concord Railroad, freight 
French & Robertson, carpenter 

work .... 
Thomas Mahoney, assistant on 

supply wagon 
M. D. Cole, hose dressing 
C. H. Hodgman, paid freight 
Pike tfe Heald, water pot and 

dipper .... 
Belt and Leather Co., 2 bbls 

hose oil ... 

J. Schofield, pumping out reser 

voir .... 
Joel Daniels, painting hats 
W. E. Moore, printing 
French & Robertson, repairing 

chairs . . . . . 

A. B. Cushing, distributing bills 
J. M. Chandler & Co., crash 
S. 8. James & Bro., teams 
Highway District No. 2, shovel 

ing snow from hydrants 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

1 lantern 
J. F. Pherson, chief engineer 



6Q 


00 


58 


26 


13 


00 


50 


00 


85 


94 


7 


00 


9 


00 


46 


62 


13 


00 


1 


45 



7 22 

12 00 

58 78 

3 16 

97 

124 88 



5 


00 


1 


25 


20 


00 


1 


00 


5 


25 


2 


79 



6 00 

15 00 

6 00 

115 00 



203 

Patrick Sullivan, assistant engi- 
neer and clerk 

D. H. Young, assistant engineer 

John Patterson, assistant engi- 
neer . 

George H. Dodge, assistant en- 
gineer . 

Edwin Branch, repairs 

A. B. Cushing, extra allowance 

G. W. Butterfield, extra allow- 
ance . 



90 00 
65 00 

65 00 



65 


00 


4 


25 


5 


00 


5 


00 



$1,297 43 



RECAPITULATION. 



id Amoskeag No. 1 




.$1,074 


38 


Fire King No. 2 




. 1,257 


13 


E. W. Harrington No. 3 




. 1,242 


44 


N. S. Bean No. 4 . 




. 1,154 


66 


Hook and Ladder No. 1 




. 1,701 


35 


Pennacook Hose Co. No. 


1 


. 1,914 


23 


Massabesic Hose Co. No. 


2 


. 791 


35 


Miscellaneous . 


. 


. 1,297 


34 


City teams, for use of 


teams, 




amount transferred 




. 1,500 


00 


Amount 


$11,932 


88 


Balance to new account 


■ 


. 1,529 


09 

$13,461 97 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 
To Appropriation .... 



Dr. 
$1,500*00 



204 



Cr. 



Paid Daniels & Co., alcohol, &c. 


1 82 


C. H. Leach, trucking 


70 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., repairing 




bells 


5 10 


Pike & Heald, zinc . 


70 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 




labor on brackets, &c. . 


16 44 


J. L. Kennedy, painting, <fec. 


5 30 


J. W. Preston, labor on fire 




alarm ..... 


178 87 


Manchester Mills, blue vitriol . 


68 00 


C. F. Peasley, printing 


25 00 


Edward Rogers, repairs . 


9 16 


A. H. Lowell, zinc . 


137 70 


Campbell & Hanscom, printing 


20 50 


Stearns & George, blue vitriol 


92 16 


Gamewell & Co., outside signal 




box case .... 


10 00 


D. H. Young, paid freight 


1 27 


Joel Daniels, setting glass 


3 90 


B. C. Kendall, care of telegraph 


25 00 


Amount .... 


$601 62 


Balance to new account 


898 38 







11,500 00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

To Appropriation . . . $14,000 00 
Receipts from J. B. Mills, for fees 

and costs .... 1,007 50 
Receipts from T. D. Luce, for fees 

and costs .... 321 67 



Dr. 



20/ 



Receipts from D. A. Simons, for 

fees and costs . . . 421 98 
Receipts from Wm. B. Patten, 

for fees and costs . . . 2,845 36 

Dickey, Young & Co., overdraft . 34 28 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., " . 13 00 

Reserved fund, am't transferred 2,912 69 



Paid Canney and Wiley, sundries . $5 65 

D. A. Simons, team, &c. . . 150 84 

D. P. Perkins, attorney fees . 7 00 
Gas Co., gas . . . . 529 62 
W. E. Moore, printing . . 28 00 
J. A. Eastman, mason work . 27 25 

C. F. Peasley, printing . . 30 50 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing 106 81 
Brigham & Pratt, crackers . 26 75 
Sanborn & Hovey, stove . . 4 20 
Fred Allen, laundry work . 5 00 
M. V. B. Kinne, lumber . . 2 41 
John B. Clarke, printing . . 239 68 
John B. Mills, salary as clerk . 175 00 

E. R. Coburn, stationery . . 5 04 
Dickey, Young & Co., fuel . 30 68 
Daniels & Co., oil . . . 31 50 
Kate Carroll, washing . . 3 20 
John B. Varick, door bolt . 25 
Thomas H. Tuson, printing . 75 
Temple & Farrington, blank 

books, &c 65 37 

D. M. Goodwin, chimney . . 2 65 
George C. Hoitt, blank books . 7 25 
W. H. Vickery, key and repair- 
ing locks .... 9 20 



121,556 48 
Cb. 



206 



Dr. L. B. How, services as phy- 
sician ..... 

Dr. L. French, services as phy 
sician .... 

Western Union Telegraph Co. 

H. D. Corliss, feeding prisoners 
and travelers 

P. C. Cheney & Co., waste and 
paper .... 

H. W. Longa, use of team 

S. S. James & Bro., use of team 

Ryder & Blunt, stationery 

A. W. Prescott, laundry work 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

A. H. Paige, badges 

T. L. Quimby. Captain of the 
Watch . 

David Perkins, Captain of the 
Watch .... 

W. H. B. Newhall, watchman 

H. H. Noyes, " 

J. C. Colburn, watchman and 
day police 

H. Stearns, watchman 

Ed. Bonner, " 

Jas. Bucklin, " 

T. P. Shea, " 

Z. B. Wright, " 

Michael Fox, " 

R. W. Bean, watchman and day 
police .... 

Timothy Connor, watchman 

Eben Carr, " 

Wm. Esty, " 

David Alden, " 



3 00 

3 00 

27 55 

52 90 

4 18 
184 50 

1 50 

3 25 

5 50 
119 67 

4 50 

30 00 



905 


76 


608 


61 


70 


87 


632 


25 


492 


74 


283 


26 


650 


24 


248 


93 


849 


37 


858 


37 


847 


13 


289 


13 


629 


99 


240 


75 


115 


88 



207 



A. Vincellette, watchmi, 


11 


444 37 


Wm. R. Farnhara, 


a 




31 50 


Henry Harmon, 


u 




825 75 


Edward Mulcahey, 


a 




192 38 


Gideon Rochette, 


it 




189 01 


James K. Stevens, 


tt 




226 13 


H. W. Longa, watchman and day 




police . 


. 


. 


182 25 


George F. Laird, watch 


man and 




day police 


. 


, 


249 18 


Hiram Ordway, watchman 


172 13 


Charles B. Clarkson, w 


atchman 


517 49 


John McCabe, police services . 


163 11 


H. P. Marshall, watchman 


614 24 


James E. Bailey, 


a 


• 


607 50 


Michael Marr, 


a 


. 


732 33 


Thos. W. Cavanauc 


,h, watchman 


368 43 


James F. Dunn, 




u 


565 87 


John F. Cassidy, 




(( 


503 99 


Thomas Lynch, police 


services 


33 75 


John Smith, 


u 


a 


2 25 


George B. Sanford, 


a 


a 


1 13 


Simon Dodge, 


a 


a 


15 75 


Frank Harvell, 


a 


a 


3 38 


D. T. Burleigh, 


a 


a 


13 50 


Samuel Clark, 


u 


a 


13 50 


Bernard Otis, 


a 


a 


3 93 


Henry Bennett, 


a 


a 


. 329 05 


Frank Groux, 


it 


i. 


3 38 


Jonas Tirrell, 


a 


a 


1 13 


Tim. Collins, 


a 


a 


1 13 


D. W, Bartlett, 


a 


a 


3 38 


E. G. Hastings, 


a 


a 


3 38 


John Cronin, 


a 


u 


.31 50 


0. Desmond, 


a 


a 


10 13 



208 



C. E. Rowe, police services, 
Thomas Train, watchman 
Albert Story, police services 
N. Veasey, 

John Waters, " " 

John Smith, " 
G. W. Minard, " " 

Michael Talty, " " 

Frank Robie, " " 

G. L. Mooer, " u 

J. S. Webster, " 
H. 0. Hill, " " 

J. S. Weeks, " " 

Stephen Homans, police services 
G. W. Hamlin, . "" " 
H. C. Hunton, " " 

Felix Bushway, " " 
Oscar Craig, " " 

J. E. Floyd, " " 

Peter Shiatte, " " 

Ed. Holmes, " " 

D. R. Prescott, salary as assist 
ant marshal 

D. R. Prescott, provisions for 

prisoners 
D. R. Prescott, conveying prison 

ers .... 
D. R. Prescott, cash paid out 
John P. Bartlett, salary as judge 

of police court 
D. A. Simons, salary as marshal 
D. A. Simons, salary as health 

officer . 
W. B. Patten, salary as marshal 
W. B. Patten, cash paid out 



13 


50 


286 


79 


5 


63 


6 


75 


4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


2 


25 


2 


25 


2 


25 


2 


25 


5 


63 


1 


13 


2 


25 


4 


50 


5 


63 


2 


25 


2 


25 


2 


25 



1 13 

8 99 

322 91 

23 00 

12 00 

7 87 

854 16 
311 86 

6 25 
589 40 
133 98. 



209 



H. W. Longa, salary as assistant 

marshal .... 437 75 

N. H. Wilson, assistant judge 

of police court . . . 21 00' 

N. P. Hunt, judge police court . 645 84 

Thos. D. Luce, clerk of police 

court . . . • . . 125 00 

John J. Tower, buttons, belts 

and tassels . . . . 26 85 

T. Jefferson Morrison, profes- 
sional services . . . 2 00 

E.G. Haines, whitewashing lobby 5 00 

Fogg & James, teams . . 11 50 

M. J. Jenkins, team . . 3 00 

W. B. Patten, salary as health 

officer 15 00 

B. G. Woodman, police services 2 24 
Harvey Hill, " " . 10 12 
David Thayer, " " . 8 99 
M. J. Jenkins, night watchman 375 74 
Samuel Amsden, police services 3 37 
S. C. Amsden, " " 5 63 
Pat Riley, " " . 12 38 t 
Dennis Dee, " " . 5 62* 
Jere. Garvin, " " . 2 25 
W. H. Emery, " " . 5 62 
S. L. Mitchell, " " . 66 62 
E. A. G. Holmes, " " . 5 63 
Jere. Murphy, " " . 5 62 
T. P. Badger, " " . 4 50 
E. R. Waldron, " " . 5 62 

C. H. Reed, " " . 6 75 
Orrison Webber, " " . 3 37 
J. E. Dinsmore, " " . 5 62 
J. W. Mears, " " . 3 37 

14 



210 



B. W. Robinson, police services 2 25 
T.P. Heath, " " . 8 99 
N. Baker, 2d, " " . 2 25 
A. J. Mayhew, " " . 7 87 
S. R. Davidson " " . 3 37 
Chas. A. Pierce, " " . 4 50 
J. 0. Whittemore, " " . 3 37 
John A. Barker, " " . 4 50 
James Duffey, " " . 325 12 

C. P. Savory, " ' " . 6 75 
E. G. Gannon, " " . 4 50 
Perry Eaton, " " . 3 37 
Thomas Johnson, " •' . 1 69 



$21,556 48 



SALARIES. 



To Balance from old account 
Appropriation . 



$749 12 
10,000 00 



Dr. 



#10,749 12 



Cb. 



Paid Alpheus Gay, mayor . . $222 22 

Ira Cross, " . . 777 77 

J. E. "Bennett, clerk . . 23 40 

Albert Jackson, clerk . . 356 45 

John P. Newell, " . . 657 30 

H. R. Chamberlin, treasurer . 1,000 00 
Roland Rowell, clerk of common 

council . . • • 22 75 
S. B. Putnam, clerk of common 

council . . . . 77 50 

Timothy Clark, messenger . 37 72 

Michael Talty, " . . 121 47 



211 



John A. Barker, messenger 

John Hosley, collector 

James Mitchell, " 

D. L. Perkins, solicitor 

Jonathan Smith, '* 

J. G. Dearborn, superintendent 

of schools 
W. W. Baker, assessor . 

C. C. Colby, " 
J. C. Head, " • 
Timothy Sullivan, " 
Joseph Bean, " 
Wm. B. Johnson, " 
N. Nicbols, " 
John P. Moore, " 
H. W. Powell, 
Jacob F. James, " 

D. A. Simons, overseer *of poor 
John McKenna, " ' 
S. J. Young, " ' 
J. Stickney, " ' 

E. A. Moulton, " ' 
P. A. Devine, 
Israel Webster, " ' 
Geo. W. Wilson, " 
N. P. Kidder, ward clerk 
W. A. Perry, " " 
Chas. H. Stebbins, ward clerk 
George A. Little, " 
Chas. B. Brown, " 
Wm. H. Cate, " 
J. B. Mills, 
John Ryan, assessor 
H. P. Watts, " . 
Geo. H. Colby, " . 



. 441 


65 


. 568 


50 


. 533 


33 


41 


67 


. 250 


00 


t 

. 1,200 


00 


. 220 


50 


. Ill 


00 


39 


00 


139 


50 


39 


00 


63 


00 


. 246 


00 


45 


00 


. 105 


00 


. 181 


50 


r 75 


00 


25 


00 


29 


17 


29 


17 


25 


00 


29 


17 


25 


00 


18 


75 


5 


00 


5 


00 


k 5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


2 


50 


. 100 


50 


69 


00 


69 


00 



212 



Isaac Whittemore, assessor 

J. H. Hayncs, " 

A. 0. Wallace, " 
Timothy Sullivan, selectman 

F. G. Stark, " 
J. W. Smith, " 
Pat Harrington, " 
Frank E. McKean, " 
N. F. Folsom, " 
C. W. Clement, " 
J. W. Dickey, " 
W. F. Sleeper, " 
S. D. Pollard, " 

G. H. Colby, " 
Fred. B. Balch, " 
Frank W. Avery, " 
Wm. Fitzgerald, " « 
A. H. Barker, " 
Thomas Howe, " 
C. O'Shaughnessy, " 
John P. Young, jr., " 
Wm. H. Kennedy, " 
Hiram Bailey, " 
Oscar G. Farmer, " 
Hiram Simons, " 
Charles Chase, " 
J. H. Haynes, " 
Hugh McDonough, " 
H. G. Connor, " 
John H. Proctor, " 
J. A. Hutchinson, " 
J.J. McCarty, " 
John Cronin, " 
John P. Young, jr., " 
John Laughlin, " 



. 123 00 


. 225 00 


91 50 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 CO 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


7 50 


6 50 


5 00 


2 50 


2 50 


2 50 


2 50 


2 50 



213 



A. J. Pillsbury, selectman . 2 50 

Albert Jackson, moderator . 3 00 

R. J. Donnelly, " . 3 00 

W. C. Knowlton, " . 3 00 

Wm. Little, " . 4 50 

Edson Hill, " . 3 00 
D. H. Maxfield, moderator (two 

years) 6 00 

D. A. Simons, health officer . 25 00 
R. J. P. Goodwin, health officer 25 00 
Joel Daniels, school committee . 10 00 
J. W. Severance, school com- 
mittee 10 00 

J. P. Walker, school committee 10 00 
J. K. McQueston, school com- 
mittee . . . . . 10 00 
J. P. Newell, school committee 10 00 
J. J. Sullivan, " " . 10 00 
William Little, school committee 

and clerk . . . . 35 00 
N. H. Wilson, school committee 10 00 
S. P. Jackson, " " 10 00 
Martin Fitzgerald, school com- 
mittee 10 00 

W. F. Byrns, school committee 10 00 
N. W. Cumner, " " . 10 00 
L. B. Clough, " " . 10 00 
G. E. Stevens, " " . 10 00 
M. P. Hall, " " . 10 00 
A. Gay, " " . 10 00 
H. C. Canney, city physician . 50 00 
Judith Sherer, matron at pest- 
house 91 00 

F. T. E. Richardson, supervisor 4 50 

George H.Dodge, " . 4 50 



214 



Parker H. Houston 


supervisor 


4 50 


W. G H. Dunham, 




4 50 


Frank Harvell, 




4 50 


Freeman Higgins, 




4 50 


C. C. Colby, 




4 50 


D. T. Burleigh, 




4 50 


John M. Chandler, 




4 50 


E. M. Topliff, 




4 50 


John M. Hayes, 




4 50 


A. C. Flanders, 




4 50 


John F. Conway, 




4 50 


D. H. Young, 




4 50 


Charles Chase, 




2 25 


Jos. H. Haynes, inspector 


35 00 


H. D. Lord, 


« 


Q6 25 


J. J. Dillon, 


» 


37 50 


S. D. Pollard, 


M 


35 00 


L. H. James, 


(( 


51 25 


H. Fradd, 


(( 


31 25 


Isaac Whittemore, 


(( 


32 50 


E. G. Haynes, 


U 


35 00 


Amount, 


$9,426 99 


Balance to new a 


ccount, 


1,322 13 







,749 12 



CITY HALL AND OFFICES. 

To Balance from old account, $1,874 84 

Albert Jackson, cash received 

from rent of stores . . 561 75 

John P. Newell, cash received 

from rent of stores . . 1,023 50 



Dr. 



215 



John P. Newell, cash received 

from rent of City Hall . . 84 00 
Balance (overdrawn) . . . 102 32 



Paid Gas Light Co., for gas . . $279 29 

Daniels & Co., pails, brooms, <fcc. 6 66 

D. A. Simons, furniture . . 4 25 

H. S. Hutchins, carpenter work 1 50 

J. S. Holt, soap ... 9 56 

James Carroll, sawing wood . 2 50 

Kate Carroll, cleaning offices . 38 25 

Tim. Clark, cash for sundries . 7 00 

B. F. Fogg, repairing pipes . 19 34 

Dickey, Young & Co., fuel . 124 86 

James Collins, fuel . . . 1 00 

John Dickey, fuel . . . 7 00 

Water- Works, use of water . 143 00 

Christian Society, rep. wood box 5 00 
J. M. Chandler & Co., matches, 

&c 5 19 

Pike & Heald, repairing pipe . 19 22 

John Cronan, carrying in wood 50 

J. Q. A. Sargent, rep. pipes, <fcc. 30 82 

W. H. Vickery, rep. locks, &c. 16 60 

Bridget Riley, cleaning, . . 59 05 

P. C. Cheney & Co., paper . 7 48 

J. Tuck & Co., cleaning carpets 6 50 

Geo. Holbrook, carpenter work 26 32 

J. L. Kennedy, setting glass, &c. 4 32 

Barton & Co., oil cloth . . 6 63 

L. B. Bod well & Co., fuel . 153 55 

T. A. Lane, hose and rep. pipe . 63 76 
J. W. M. Hunt & Co., clamp 

irons for flagstaff . . . 3 50 



13,646 41 
Cr. 



216 



E. G. Haynes, rep. lobby . 
French & Robertson, flagstaff 
John A. Barker, pitch wood 
A. H. Lowell, posts . 
David Libbey, repairing chairs 
Dickey, Young & Co., ice . 
A. M. Eastman, brooms, &c. 
French & Robertson, carpenter 
work .... 

Amount 

Reserved fund, amount trans 
ferred 



15 


50 


29 


65 


4 


23 


2 


89 


. ■ 2 


15 


7 


33 


6 


87 


25 


14 


81,146 41 


. 2,500 


00 



,646 41 



REPAIRS ON BUILDINGS. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account . 
Appropriation . 



Paid B. F. Fogg, repairs on engine- 
house ..... 

Daniels & Co., repairs on Penna- 
cook hose-house 

J. L. Kennedy, painting court 
house ..... 

Henry French, repairing hook- 
and-ladder house . 

Sanborn & Hovey, repairing 
water-closets 

J. L. Kennedy, setting glass . 

J. Q. A. Sargent, piping court- 
house, &c, .... 



1459 25 
500 00 


$959 
Cr. 




$3 25 




13 15 




72 28 




8 05 




2 00 
17 25 





27 55 



217 



R. J. Donnelly, brackets, &c. . 9 85 

L. N. Dufrain, repairing pump 

in stable .... 2 50 

Nutt Bros., mason work . . 125 00 

C.' H. Manley & Co., carpenter 

work 6 95 

Pike & Heald, repairing water- 
closets 47 76 

Fairbanks & Folsom, pipe and 

zinc 22 95 

Joseph Comfort, labor . . 1 50 

S. J. Dascomb, repairs at library 8 00 

George Holbrook, repairs at 

court-house . . . . 67 72 

N. R. Bixby, repairing No. 3 en- 
gine-house ... . . 8 00 

A. Dinsmore, lumber . . 91 20 

J. H. Wales, mason work . 29 64 

H. N. Hall, carpenter work . 114 40 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 82 26 

A. D. Shcrer, work on pest- 
house . . . . . 14 00 

J. C. Young, repairing stable 

and hall . . . . 30 65 

Manley & Kimball, repairing on 

engine-house . . . 4 95 

James Doland, washing engine- 
house 6 00 

French & Robertson, carpenter 

work 13 27 

Mike Buckley, labor . * . 5 00 

Amount .... $835 13 

Balance to new account . 124 12 



1959^25 



218 



CITY LIBRARY. 

To Balance from old account . . $1,985 34 
Appropriation .... 1,000 00 
Reserved fund .... 1,500 00 



Paid C. H. Marshall, librarian 


1800 00 


Temple & Farrington, binding 




books ..... 


265 49 


J. B. Varick, shovels, &c. 


2 10 


Straw & Lovejoy, repairing clock 


2 50 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


9 50 


Gas Light Co., gas . 


212 80 


John B. Clarke, printing and 




advertising .... 


26 75 


John B. Clarke, Daily Mirror 3 




years . . . ... 


18 00 


John B. Clarke, Weekly Mirror 




and Farmer for 3 years . . 


4 50 


Water-Works, use of water 


20 00 


C. F. Peasley, printing 


3 00 


iEtna Insurance Co., insurance 


32 50 


John V. Sullivan, paper . 


1 25 


Campbell & Hanscom, printing 




and advertising . 


14 50 


C. F. Livingston, printing 


11 50 


Dickey, Young & Co., fuel 


212 50 


George Holbrook, carpenter work 


1 50 


Appropriation for books . 


1,000 00 


Amount . . • • < 


12,638 39 


Balance to new account 


1,846 95 



Dr. 



,485 34 



Cr. 



$4,485 34 



219 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

To Balance from old account . . $1,564 02 
Appropriation .... 8,000 00 
H. W. Herrick, overdraft . . 6 00 

Jona. Smith, witness fees re funded 1 49 



Paid Cvrus W. Flanders, damage to 

person . . . . $100 00 
Elsena M. Blanchard, damage to 

person 100 00 

John Lee, damage to laud . 212 50 
Mrs. John N. Chase, damage to 

person . . . . . 75 00 
Lizzie Chamberlain, damage to 

person ..... 459 57 
. Susan Baldwin, damage to per- 
son 500 00 

Mrs. Edward Fagan, damage to 

person . . . . . 75 00 
Mrs. S. T. Sleeper, damage to 

sleigh 20 00 

Mary O'Grady, damage to person 50 00 

Margaret Fallon, on execution . 824 88 

Samuel O. Hall, on execution . 84 70 

Sally George, damage to person 25 00 

James Collins, jr., war bounty . 125 00 

C. A. & C. 0. Murray, damage 50 00 

Mary J. Clement, on execution . 178 75 

P. C. Cheney & Co., paper . 10 40 

Fogg & James, horse hire . 43 25 

J. L. Kennedy, painting scales 10 70 
Ellis & Patterson, engineering 

services . . . . 161 58 



Dr. 



),571 51 
Cr. 



220 

G. A. Ramsdell, prof, services . 48 50 
J. B. Sawyer, engineering ser- 
vices, &c. . . . . 58 05 

D. H. Young, roofing scales and 

piping 12 32 

E. A. G. Holmes, labor on scales 61 90 
J. B. Varick, hardware . . 1 63 
Mrs. G. Emerson, witness fees . 2 00- 
T. B. Brown, 4 days on case 

Print Works vs. City of Man- 
chester . . . . 12 00 

Isaac Whittemore, 6 days on the 

same 18 00 

Caroline K. Virgin, injury to per- 
son . . . . 430 35 

Terrence Gilbert, injury to per- 
son ..... 

R. M. Shirley, use of team 

John M. Hayes, use of team 

Briggs & Huse, prof, services 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, shafts on 
hearse ..... 

Folsom & Son, damage to goods 

Heirs of John Rourke, land 

taken . . . . 31 69 

Sullivan Brothers, use of stove, 

and fittings . . . . 14 15 

Joseph E. Bennett, for making 

city report . . . . 150 00 

D. A. Simons, mattress and re- 
pairing chairs at pest-house 36 25 

T. L. Thorpe, use of room for 

meeting . . . . -5 00 

Caswell <fe Stebbins, fitting ward 

room No. 3 . . . . 15 25 



847 


28 


20 


00 


28 


50 


208 


50 


3 


00 


13 


64 



221 



J. Tuck & Co., preparing ward 

rooms 3 and 7 . . 4 00 
Engine No. 2, pumping water 

from cellar . . . . 60 80 

Water- Works, use of water . 23 75 

H. C. Sullivan, guide-boards . 10 00 

A. Gay, team one year . . 100 00 

A. Gay, cash paid out . . 9 25 

D. M. Goodwin ... 4 50 
[]. D. Tenney, portrait of Gen. 

Stark 100 00 

R. Laing, wood for ward rooms 5 50 
Robinson & Tilton, frame for 

Stark portrait . . .100 00 

C. M. Abbott, bottle mucilage . 25 
Wm. Parker, jr., two cushions 1 50 

D. L. Perkins, professional ser- 
vices . . . . . 11 00 

Canney & Wiley, medicines . 23 28 
W. S. James, amount paid for 

sewer license, (refunded) . 19 20 

Albert Jackson, paid postage . 6 60 
H. W. Herrick, designs for frame 

of Gen. Stark's portrait, &c. 26 75 

J. R. Swallow, Town Officer . 2 50 

E. G. Garmon, taxes refunded 7 20 
U. S. & C. express ... 1 00 
S. S. James & Bros., team . 18 00 
Engine No. 3, pumping out cel- 
lars 47 20 

Engine No. 1, pumping out cel- 
lars 28 80 

Engine No. 4, pumping out cel- 
lars 20 00 



1 


00 


42 


84 


25 


00 


6 


50 



99.9, 



A. W. Dickey, putting up guide- 
boards .... 1 50 

T. Jefferson Morrison, assigned 

council . . . . 2 00 

M. U'Dowd, painting engine 

house No. 3 . . . . 30 00 

D. L. Perkins, extra services as 

city solicitor . . . 30 00 

J. P. Bartlett, professional ser- 
vices 275 00' 

W. J. Desilets, services for as- 
sessors ..... 

Moses Tracy, expenses in suit . 

Walter H. Baker, engineering 
services .... 

John P. Newell, for postage 

John P. Young, jr., ballot-box, 

Ward 6 . . . . 1 00 

Geo. W. Varnum, distributing 
notices ..... 8 00 

Geo. W. Varnum, burying two 

horses ..... 5 55 

George F. Jenkins, copying . 2 00 

W. W. Baker, use of team . 4 00 

J. A. Brown, team . . . 8 00 

H. W. Longa, use of team . 4 50 

Campbell & Hauscom, advertis- 
ing dog notice . . . 7 30 

L. B. How, returning births and 
deaths 6 00 

A. Dinsmore, lumber . . 95 05 

Post-office, postage . . . 4 00 

J. Bailey Moore, labor on revis- 
ion of ordinances . . 125 00 



223 



C. R. Morrison, professional ser- 




vices ..... 


172 55 


E. E. Patch, repairing tree boxes 


37 52 


Dr. L. French, return of births 


11 50 


Jonathan Smith, cash paid for 




witness fees 


5 93 


J. Q. A. Sargent, repairs on 




trough .... 


8 15 


John G. Colt, trees . 


91 75 


Dr. VV. W. Wilkins, return of 




births ; 


8 50 


J. Cellar, ribbon for stamp 


1 50 


A. C. Wallace, lumber for house 




and scales .... 


27 10 


H. C. Dickey, culvert at ceme- 




tery 


25 00 


W. R. Patten, assigned attorney 




for minors .... 


8 00 


0. D. Abbott, return of births . 


11 25 


J. B. Straw, professional ser- 




vices . ... 


20 00 


Lamson & Marden, 12 landmarks 


7 50 


French & Robertson, setting and 




filing saws .... 


4 20 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., lumber . 


6 42 


W. B. Patten, re-filling graves . 


2 00 


A. B. Webster, repairing tree 




boxes ..... 


75 


C. H. Hodgman, team 


6 00 


W. C. Rogers, saw and ax 


4 25 


Judith Sherer, services at pest- 




house ..... 


278 84 


David Thayer, truant officer . 


212 63 


W. B. Johnson, expense to Con- 




cord ..... 


5 00 



143 


84 


5 


00 


35 


00 


3 


00 



224 

0. A. Manning, record of births 2 00 

Wm. McDonald, abatement of 

taxes 137 37 

Mary F. X. Ward, abatement of 
taxes . . . . . 55 17 

Concord Railroad, freight on 

sprinkler . . . . 3 15 

Jonathan Smith, professional ser- 
vices and cash paid out 

C. H. Hodgman, team 

G. E. Hersey, in case of Clem- 
ent vs. City .... 

R. VV. Bean, cash paid for team 

J. B. Sawyer, engineering ser- 
vices 29 40 

French & Robertson, setting and 
fitting drawers 

Atlantic & Pacific Telegraph Co. 

N. B. Abbott, burying dogs 

J. F. James, engineering services 

A. fl. Lowell, drinking fountain 

Fairbanks, Brow & Co., scales 
and weights .... 

Alpheus Gay, witness fees 

S. W. Parsons, " 

H. G. Connor, cash paid A. H. 

Lowell for grate . . . 11 67 

A. W. Sanborn, repairs on car- 
riages 16 80 

J. P. Newell, paid expense on 
Stark portrait 

John A. Barker, sundries 

Geo. A. Crosby, attendance in 
court ..... 

H. W. Longa, use of team 



5 


40 


24 


00 


3 


50 


11 


00 


15 


00 


136 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



4 


75 


4 


00 


30 


00 


6 


00 



225 

C. M. Hubbard, witness fees and 

costs paid out . . . 26 88 

E. G. Haynes, mason work . 5 80 

Geo. H. Dudley, carpenter work 16 81. 

J. .F.James, services in locating 

lines 59 50 

Geo. E. Hersey, services, Rush 
vs. City .... 

John B. Batchelder, damage . 

Win. Shepherd, damage to sleigh 

Joel Daniels, lumber and labor 

Straw & Lovejoy, repairing clocks 

B. L. Hartshorn, removing lum- 
ber ..... 

H. R. Chamberlin, cash paid out 

Jonathan Smith, cash paid for 

witness fees . . . . 15 54 

George Hoag, bank note detec- 
tor . . . . . 1 00 

Joseph H. Haynes, collating 
the unpaid taxes of 1874 and 
1875 48 00 

Dunlap & Baker, cleaning and 

repairing clocks . . . 35 00 

District No. 2, for labor as per 

pay rolls . 703 61 



20 


00 


5 


00 


10 


50 


i 


38 


15 


00 


1 


75 


4 


05 



Amount 


19,027 32 


Balance to new account 


. 544 19 




$9,571 51 



1.-, 



226 



WATER-WORKS. 

To Balance from old account . $17,541 27 
Receipts for water rents and hy- 



Dr. 



drant service 


. 38,879 


47 


Receipts for derrick 


. 125 


00 


Receipts for use of derrick 


24 


00 

$56 5HQ 74. 






Cb. 


Paid D. H. Young, pipe . 


. |18 


75 


Michael Healey, labor 


. 174 


40 


C. C. Cole, 


. 600 


00 


T. P. Frost, " 


. 550 


33 


W. M. Kelly, " 


. 783 


00 


Frank Truel, " 


. 132 


00 


John Williams, " 


31 


50 


Wm. E. Dunbar, " 


40 50 


Gilman Clough, " 


49 


87 


John Talbot, 


. 141 


25 


B. St. Jean, " 


31 


75 


B. Rossiter, " 


12 


81 


Jerry Abbott, " 


14 


69 


James Currier, " 


2 


50 


Thos. Campbell, " 


11 


88 


Maurice P. Emery, " 


155 


62 


Louis Plant, " 


15 


31 


Samuel Brown, jr., " 


107 


88 


Samuel Brown, jr., casting pipe 


198 


75 


Augustine Lesbelle, labor 


14 


69 


Berry side, " 


12 


81 


Ed. Dorney, " 


2 


50 


Peter Bumblebee, " 


11 


56 


James Goggin, " 


15 


31 


Martin Campbell, " 


12 


81 


John Connor, ' " . 


1 


88 



221 



George H. Dunbar, labor . 

Patent W. and G. Pipe Co., for 
pipe and laying the same 

J. Q. A. Sargent, service pipe, 
&c 

T. A. Lane, hydrant and piping 

C. K. Walker, superintendent, 
salary 

E. A. Stearns, clerk 

Temple & Farrington, stationery 
and binding books 

A. H. Lowell, gate boxes, sleeves, 
&c 

Boston Machine Co., gaskets, 
hydrants, &c. 

Fairbanks & Folsom, brooms, 
pails, &c. .... 

Clough & Foster, lumber . 

A. Ml Eastman, oil . 

C. K Walker, cash paid for sun- 
dries ..... 

J. B. Varick, hardware, &c. 

City of Worcester, sleeves 

W. E. Moore, printing 

Pike & Heald, stock and repair- 
ing 23 39 

George H. Norman, on contract 9,454 90 

Union Water Meter Co., meters, 

&c 554 53 

C. C. Cole, boarding men . . 8 00 

John B. Clarke, printing and ad- 
vertising . . . . 55 50 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing 

and advertising . . . 32 75 

C. F. Livingston, printing . 44 00 



15 


75 


2,974 


95 


4,028 


30 


151 


18 


1,200 


00 


1,092 


00 


59 


52 


149 


17 


83 


63 


20 


87 


43 


54 


9 


15 


85 


95 


424 


82 


9 


10 


35 


75 



228 



H. S. Whitney, plumbing, &c. . 49. 05 

I. R. Dewey, wood . . . 15 00 

J. L. Kennedy, painting . . 40 62 

Walworth Mfg. Co., stop cocks 17 35 
American Steam. Gauge Co., 

repairs . . . . 2 00 
J. B. Sawyer, engineering ser- 
vices 20 00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 480 35 

H. & H. R. Pettee, cement . 5 75 

W. P. Stratton, repairing pipe . 1 32 
American Steam Safe Co., steam 

safe 195 00 

R. D. Wood & Co., valves, pipe, 

&c 14,675 51 

Concord Railroad, freight . 2,633 56 
Manchester Locomotive Works, 

bailing water, labor and stock 97 80 

Pattee & Perkins, hydrants . 6 30 

Mowrey & Phillips, lead . . 1,352 02 
Walter Neal, building fence at 

reservoir .... 130 75 

Sewall, Day & Co., jute gasket . 44 04 

C. H. Hodgman, teaming . . 9 00 

Ludlow Valve Co., gate . . 67 50 
Cook, Rymes & Co., forging and 

castings . . . 66 13 

Jere. Hodge, lumber and labor . 12 65 

R.W.Flanders, blacksmith work 243 10 
Deny, Welcome & Co., labor on 

derrick . . . . 17 94 

Gas Light Co 3 65 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood . 138 50 

May & Co., iron ladders . . 3 50 



229 



A. B. Roberts, damage to car- 




riage . 


24 00 


J. M. Chandler & Co., powder, 




&c. .... 


85 43 


G. R. Vance, pails, lanterns, &c. 


8 85 


Conway's men, for labor as per 




pay rolls . 


3,028 36 


A. Wells, labor 


51 00 


M. Emery, labor on canal . 


63 00 


David Dickey, 2d, labor on canal 


9 00 


John Flannagan, " " . 


7 50 


Oscar Webster, " " . 


21 25 


Frank Perkins, " " . 


4 50 


I. T. Webster, labor 


11 62 


George B. Emerson, labor 


14 24 


Wm. Doran, " 


12 80 


J. T. G. Dinsmore, 


12 80 


Frank C. Mitchell, damage to 




team ...... 


20 00 ' 


Martin & Burbank, rubber boots 


21 00 


S. S. James & Bro., team . 


20 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


144 18 


C. C. Cole, 2 3-8 acres of land . 


160 00 


Pettee & Whittle, cement 


3 80 


R. T. Ritchie, 23 lbs. rope 


5 52 


Joseph B. Sawyer, making deec 


3 00 


M. McQuade, kerosene oil 


2 64 


J. S. Kidder & Co., cement 


23 00 


Amoskeag Mfg. Co., bolts and 




lumber 


10 74 


Temple McQuesten, 3 pieces pipe 


3 00 - 


Amount . . . ' 


£48,425 72 


Balance to new account . 


8,144 02 




$56,569 74 



230 



SCHOOLS. 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



Dr. 



To Appropriation .... 8500 00 
Reserved fund (amount trans- 
ferred) .... 348 93 



Amount .... 


-$848 93 


Balance to new account 


10 


Paid H. S. Hutchins, carpet brushes 


118 00 


Daniels & Co., bell, knobs, &c. 


11 42 


J. B. Varick, hardware 


1 48 


Canney & Wiley, alcohol . 


2 25 


Gas Light Co., coal gas . 


86 48 


W. P. Stratton & Son, repairs, 




pipe, &c. .... 


2 18 


Fairbanks & Folsom, repairs, 




stove, pipe, &c. . 


15 58 


R. T. Ritchie, sash cord . 


1 00 


O. J. Randall, cleaning room . 


75 


G. B. Fogg, keys and repairs . 


7 33 


J. A. Caverly, teaming 


22 75 


A. W. Bacheler, bristol board, 




&c. 


3 40 


Barr & Clapp, oil . 


80 


G. W. Hunkins, poker 


1 00 


I. S. Whitney, use of piano 


45 00 


H. W. Herrick, photographing 




building .... 


6 50 


G. M. Norris, poker, repairs, &c. 


3 05 


Straw & Lovejoy, work on clock 


8 00 


M. H. Hildreth, grading . 


75 



#849 03 



Cr. 



231 



Campbell & Hanscom, printing 

and advertising 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor 
Geo. C. Hoitt, record book 
S. P. Jackson, use of team 
J. M. Sanborn, tuning pianos 
Frank N. Young, cleaning vault 
H. F. Morse, filling out diploma 
Geo. Holbrook, furnishing stage 
Smyth & Williams, use of hall 

for school festival 
Oliver Ditson, music for festival 
N. S. Clark, ribbon . 
W. H. Annan, work on coal 
Orlando Young, stone work 
Mary Bowler, cleaning 
L. S. Proctor, labor in No. 8 
Alfred Walker, cleaning and re 

pairing clocks 
Michael Healy, moving settees 
W. H. Vickery, keys 
Fogg & James, teams 
Water-Works, use of water 



15 12 

5 35 

11 00 
34 50 
36 25 

2 00 

27 58 

17 66 

50 00 
44 50 

6 00 
9 00 

12 85 
5 00 

25 00 

5 00 

2 50 

1 60 

17 00 

283 40 



1849 03 



TUITION MONEY. 

To J. G. Dearborn, cash received for 
tuition fees .... 
Reserved fund .... 
Balance to new account 



$100 50 
407 39 
100 00 



Paid A. Clark & Co., for telescope . $300 00 



Dr. 



$607 89 
Cr. 



232 



Centennial Exhibition, balance 

transferred . . . 307 89 



$607 89 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account . . ! 


11,474 33 


Appropriation .... 


2,000 00 


Reserved fund, ani't. transferred 


512 30 


Paid S. V. Noxon, Lehigh coal 


$397 60 


J. L. Kennedy, setting glass and 




painting .... 


261 38 


L. J. Moore .... 


5 00 


Joel Daniels, painting 


33 23 


J. Q. A. Sargent, repairs on 




gauges .... 


7 68 


J. Q. A. Sargent, repairs on fur- 




naces, &c. .... 


679 75 


J. Tuck & Co., setting glass 


2 00 


D. H. Young, repairs 


131 08 


E. E. Patch, building shed 


116 75 


A. Dinsmore, lumber 


285 40 


Daniels & Co., hardware . 


9 78 


Pike & Heald, piping, &c. 


80 78 


« J. J. Abbott, painting 


37 76 


George, H. Dudley, carpenter 




work ..... 


202 82 


Hackett & Robie, concrete 


328 41 


Lamson & Marden, stone work 


5 00 


J. C. Young, repairing slating . 


36 29 


Z. B. Steward, mason work 


171 45 


Joel Daniels, painting 


3 83 



$3,986 63 
Cr. 



233 

B. K. Hoyt, painting . . 9 49 

John H. Maynard, taking down 

and raising bell at Ash-street 

school-house . . . 40 00 

Win. Blake & Co., 1 bell and 

tongue 154 32 

D. M. Goodwin, piping . . 75 03 
A. H. Lowell, iron posts, <fec. . 9 54 

Concord Railroad, freight of bell 4 76 

Labor of men and teams, as per 

pay rolls . . . . 897 50 



13,986 63 



INCIDENTAL REPAIRS. 



To Appropriation .... 
M. V. B. Kinne, overdraft 
Reserved fund, amount transf'd 



Paid George Hoi brook, joiner work 
J. Q. A. Sargent, piping and re- 
pairing .... 
Sullivan Bros., repairing stove 
and pipe .... 
George II. Dudley, joiner work 
W. P. Stratton & Son, pipe and 

repairing pumps . 
J. L. Kennedy, setting glass, &c. 
Paschal Preston, repairing No. 8 
A. Walker, repairing clock 
W. E. Dunbar, setting glass, 

plastering, &c. 
T. A. Lane, piping . 





Dr. 


1600 00 




6 00 




362 87 






$968 87 
Cr. 




25 00 




26 64 




43 95 




205 16 




12 82 . 




49 96 




85 85 




1 00 

V 




7 00 




12 36 





234 

Pike & Heald, repairing pumps, 

pipes, &c. .... 
J. H. Wales, cleaning vaults 
G. B. Fogg, key and repairing 

locks 

Barr & Clapp, hardware . 
W. P. Merrill, repairs 
M. V. B. Kinne, repairing chairs 
J. J. Abbott, painting and setting 

glass ..... 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 
Daniel Healey, whitewashing . 
W. W. Baker, repairing No. 8 

J. Tuck & Co 

J. A. Swasey, blackboards 
Thomas Adderley, grading at 

Hallsville . . . . 1 25 

George E. Moers, setting glass, 



100 


00 




95 


1 


48 


2 


70 


7 


50 


89 


35 


11 


88 


4 


65 


27 


00 


3 


33 


2 


56 


159 


88 



&c 

Joel Daniels, setting glass, &c. 
I. S. Whitney, drum head 
Geo. Dickey, repairing chair . 


4 50 

18 82 

2 50' 

50 


$968 87 




$4,500 00 
1,200 00 


FUEL. 

To Appropriation 

Reserved fund, am't. transferred 


Dr. 

$5,700 00 



Paid W. Harriman, wood . . $42 67 
A. Boyce, " 10 62 

Dickey, Young & Co., fuel . 218 78 



Cr. 



235 



M. V. B. Kinne, wood 


4 00 


W. Harriman, wood 


52 75 


Nehemiah Preston, wood . 


55 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., fuel . 


. 135 15 


J. A. Haselton, fuel . 


25 37 


E. P. Johnson & Co., fuel . 


. 4,470 72 


Clough & Foster, fuel 


50 00 


A. Dinsmore, fuel 


. 219 25 


W. W. Hubbard, fuel 


2 50 


G. W. Hunkins, fuel 


3 25 


Lewis Mitchell, surveying wood 3 62 


J. Tuck & Co. . 


11 00 


Mike Lane 


11 00 


Amount . . 


$5,315 68 


Balance to new account 


. 384 32 







.,700 00 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account . 


$13 21 




Appropriation .... 


500 00 


$513 21 

Cr. 






Paid C. F. Livingston, diplomas 


$43 00 




J. M. Chandler, floor brush and 




< 


brooms .... 


9 00 




C. A. Smith .... 


33 90 




L. Prang & Co., flower stands, 






&c 


13 25 




Sullivan Bros., pails, dipper, &c. 


18 55 




F. B. Eaton, ink 


15 60 




Tewksbury & Bro., paper, pen- 






cils, &c. .... 


46 35 




• E. R. Coburn, stationery . 


71 80 





236 



Goodwin & Dickey, pump 


. 


8 00 


Daniels & Co., wash basins, 




pails, call bells, feather 


dus- 




ters, &c. 


, 


50 22 


George M. Norris, window brush, 




&c 




3 25 


Canney & Wiley, chemicals 


,&e. 


8 29 


A. W. Bacheler, " 




16 67 


Chromo copies . 




5 01 


David Libbey, brooms 




3 00 


Parker & Gordon, chairs 


and 




mats .... 




4 65 


David Thayer, erasers, &c. 




2 00 


H. M. Bailey, dippers 




3 00 


Thomas W. Lane, books . 




30 44 


Higgins Bros., chairs 




5 50 


Charles A. Smith, dusters 


and 




brushes 


• 


30 75 


Amount 


#422 23 


Balance to new account . 




90 98 







$513 21 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account . 


$623 03 


* 


Appropriation . 


800 00 


$1,423 03 










Ca. 


Paid J. B. Mills, teaching 


$190 40 




Ella A. Brock, " 


5 00 




M. E. Lord, 


94 00 




Emma Uenry " 


52 00 




James E. Stone, " 


21 00 




Anna Nichols, " 


106 60 





237 

Thomas D. Luce, teaching , 13 60 
Medora Weeks, " . . 54 00 
J. Tuck & Co., care of rooms . 14 00 
G. E. Moers, " " . 13 50 
Susan S. Coffin, lamps, &c. . 2 60 
John B. Clarke, printing and ad- 
vertising . . . . 62 62 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing 



and advertising 
Gas Light Co., gas . 


7 
9 


50 
75 




M. P. Hall, cash paid for distrib- 








uting bills .... 


1 


50 




Amount .... 


1648 


07 




Balance to new account 


774 


96 


$1,423 03 








PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 

To Balance from old account . . $262 


29 


Dr. 


Appropriation .... 
Fairbanks <fc Folsom, overdraft . 


250 
1 


00 

84 


$514 13 
Cr. 


Paid John B. Clarke 


$182 02 


William E. Moore . 


57 


50 




C. F. Livingston 


39 


75 




Campbell <fc Hanscom 


66 


00 




Amount .... 


$345 


27 




Balance to new account 


168 


86 


ifcAU. IB 



238 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



To Appropriation .... $2,200 00 
Reserved fund, am't. transferred 450 00 



Paid V. W. Fairbanks 
A. B. Conant . 
J. Tuck & Co. 
D. M. Dickey . 
Maria H. Hildreth 
Maria Stearns . 
L. S. George . 
Olive J. Randall, 
G. W. Hunkins 
Nellie M. Cate 
Addie M. Chase 
Daniel Jameson 
George Cochran 
Minnie Stearns 
Ella A. Gilchrist 
Flora L. Haines 
George M. Norris 
George Fox 
Charles P. Ordway 
Carrie Chase . 
Wm. Black 
George E. Moers 
Orville Tulip . 

Amount 

Balance to new account 



$715 


50 


152 


00 


629 


31 


5 


00- 


38 


50' 


16 


00 


22 


58 


23 


09 


338 


65 


16 


54 


38 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


Q6 


00 


13 


60 


11 


95 


412 


47 


4 


14 


12 


50 


4 


14 


7 


70 


91 


70 


6 


57- 



Dr. 



$2,650 00 
Cr. 



$2,637 94 
12 06 



$2,650 00 



239 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To Appropriation . 

Thompson, Brown & Co., over- 
draft .... 



Paid Tewksbury Bros., books, &c. 
E. R. Coburn, u " 

Temple & Farrington, books, &c 
Henry A. Young, " " 

Thompson, Brown & Co., books 

&c 

T. W. Lane, books, &c. . 

Amount 

Balance to new account 



1500 00 
13 50 



. 155 


95 


. 289 


34 


87 


28 


7 


40 


! 19 


80 


52 


26 


. $512 03 


1 


47 



Dr. 



1513 50 
Cr. 



1513 50 



CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

To Tuition Account, balance transf 'd 

Paid Campbell & Hanscom, printing 
Temple & Farrington, paper, 

card-board, &c. 
W. H. Baker, drawing of school- 
house ..... 
G. E. Stevens, cash paid out 
Geo. H. Dudley, model of Ash- 
street school-house 
W. E. Moore, printing 
L. W. Colby, photographs of 
school-houses • • 



-14 50 

40 42 

15 00 
12 97 

175 00 

5 00 

30 00 



Dr. 

$307 89 

Cr. 



240 

Perry H. Dow, drawing on school- 
house . 



25 00 



1307 89 



teachers' salaries. 



Dr. 



To Balance from old account 




. 124 '8 


66 


Appropriation . . . 87,000 


00 


Land sold from City farm, am't 




transferred .... 1,855 


20 






$39 1 03 86 




f 4P O t/ jlvy OU 




Or. 


Paid Albert W. Bacheler . . $2,000 


00 


Lucretia E. Mannahan 




800 


00 


Lizzie S. Campbell . 




287 


50 


Emma J. Ela . 






456 


25 


Maria F. Kidder 






487 


50 


John J. Sullivan 






. 792 


50 


Mary A. Buzzell 






500 


00 


Herbert W. Lull 






800 


00 


Emma H. Perley 






. 450 


00 


Mintie C. Edgerly 






364 


50 


Nancy S. Bunton 






600 


00 


Martha N. Mason 






500 


00 


Anna O. Heath 






450 


00 


Daniel A. Clifford 






. 1,500 


00 


Annette McDoel 






500 


00 


Lottie R. Adams 






. 429 


75 


Carrie E. Reid 






450 


00 


Benj. F. Dame 






1,500 


00 


Julia A. Baker 






500 


00 


Mary J. Fife . 






450 


00 


Daniel Jameson 






156 


00 


Belle R. Daniels 






427 


50 



241 



William E. Buck 
Anstrice G. Flanders 
Rocilla M. Tuson 
Martha J. Boyd 
E. P. Sherburne 
Mary L. Sleeper 
W. M. Stevens 
Mary A Lear . 
Ella F. Salisbury 
Nellie I. Sanderson 
Mary A. Smith 
Hattie S. Tozer 
Mary F. Barnes 
Hattie G. Flanders 
C. Augusta Abbott 
Cleora E. Bailey 
Lizzie P. Gove 
Anna J. Dana . 
Ellen B. Rowell 
Estella N. Howlett 
Georgianna Dow 
Helen M. Morrill 
Annie M. Offutt 
Abbie E. Abbott 
Emma F. Beane 
Elvira S. Prior 
Clara N. Brown 
E. J. Campbell 
Martha W. Hubbard 
Emma Cross 
Nellie M. Whitney 
Nellie E. Tappan 
Maria N. Bowen 
Florence McEvoy 
Jennie F. Bailey 
16 



1,500 


00 


500 


00 


415 


87 


430 


87 


1,000 


00 


435 


37 


1,000 


00 


420 


37 


226 


50 


450 


00 


373 


50 


450 


00 


416 


25 


434 


25 


387 


00 


450 


00 


450 


00 


315 


00 


357 


75 


230 


00 


450 


00 


450 


00 


382 


50 


427 


50 


429 


75 


435 


00 


368 


26 


418 


13 


432 


00 


258 


75 


416 


25 


450 


00 


113 


75 


156 


25 


374 


99 



242 



Alice G. Lord 
Celia M. Chase 
Sarah D. Lord 
Augusta S. Downs 
Nellie M. Cate 
Addie M. Chase 
S. Izetta Locke 
Olive J. Randall 
Helen M. Locke 
Maria H. Hildreth 
Geo. E. Cochrane 
Lana S. George 
Jason J. Kimball 
Flora L. Haines 
Emma J. Henry 
Nellie M. Pearson 
Mary F. Dana . 
Ellie A. Gilcreast 
Medora Weeks 
Julia A. Dearborn 
Etta J. Carley . 
Sarah J. Greene 
Frederica S. Mitchell 
Georgie A. Nute 
Cora M. Dearborn 
M. Eugenia Lord 
Ellen E. McKean 
A. H. Abbott . 
Ida Eaton 
Ella F. Barker . 
Carrie M. Gilmore 
Ellen A. Morrill 
Lilla 0. Cressey 
Mary W. Mitchell 
Mary D. Colburn 



450 00 

411 75 

450 00 

375 62 

450 00 

500 00 

398 75 

380 00 

67 50 

500 00 

165 00 

384 00 

1,320 00 

236 25 

36 00 

433 13 

132 75 

330 00 

34 50 

192 50 

400 (JO 

254 25 

239 75 

236 25 

36 75 

81 50 

9 75 

140 00 

11 25 

32 25 

60 00 

7 50 

48 00 

15 00 

7 50 



243 



Ellen F. Sanborn 


9 


00 




Nellie L. Marsh 


60 


00 








SfcQQ 10Q CA 






<F 


•'ui/jj.vo w 


WATERING STREETS. 












Dr. 


To Appropriation 


$800 00 




Reserved fund . 


463 


92 










$1,263 92 
Or. 


Paid Water-Works, for water . 


$539 50 




J. W. M. Hunt, blacksnrithing 


30 


00 




G. W. Butterfield, teamster 


73 


50 




T. M. Conant, " 


72 


50 




A. B. Cushing, " 


82 


00 




H. S. Reed, 


1 


75 




City teams .... 


285 


75 




Mark Harvey, teamster 


9 


00 




J. A. B. Emerson, teamster 


61 


87 




Dennis Clifford, labor 


3 


00 




French & Robertson, carpentei 








work .... 


4 


00 




B. F. Fogg, labor on pipe 


9 


95 




Pike & Heald, repairing hose 








&c 


22 


41 




A. W. Sanborn, repairing sprin- 








kler .... 


17 


50 




J. Q. A. Sargent, piping . 


45 


69 




Pat Finn, labor 


2 


00 




Jerry Mannahan, labor 


1 


75 




William Maxwell, labor . 


1 


75 





$1,263 92 



244 



CENTENNIAL FOURTH. 

To Reserved fund, (special appro- 
priation) . . . .$2,000 00 
G. W. Stevens, rent of seats, <fec. ' 881 69 



Paid Campbell & Hanscom, printing 

and advertising . 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing 

and advertising . , . 

John B. Clarke, printing and 

advertising . 
Saturday Night Dispatch, print- 
ing and advertising 
French and Robertson, carpenter 

work . 
M. J. Kendrick, job team 
Wm. Shepherd, coaches . 
Ban field, Forristall & Co., fire- 
works . 
Amoskeag S. F. Engine, decor- 
ations ..... 
. N. S. Bean S. F. Engine, decor- 
ations ..... 
Pennacook Hose Co., decorations 
Massabesic Hose Co., " 
Hook and Ladder Co., " 
E. VV. Harrington S. F. Engine, 

decorations . 
French Band, music 
Suncook Cornet Band, music 
Newell's Drum Corps, music 
1st N. H. Battery, saluting 
Haines Rifles, decorations 



$3 00 



147 52 



193 


50 


2 


50 


97 


52 


13 


50 



7 00 



417 00 



5 00 



5 00 



s 5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


. 100 


00 


. 100 


00 


27 


00 


47 


50 


5 


00 



Dr. 



12,381 69 
Cr. 



245 



Sheridan Guards, decorations 
Straw Rifles, " " 

Head Guards, " 

Edwin Branch, flags, &c. . 
Fairbanks & Folsom, pails and 

dipper . . . . 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, decora 

tions .... 
Piper & Hawley, decorations 
J. P. Young, " 

Wm. C. Rogers, " 

Daniels & Co., " 

Bill Posting Co., bill posting 
R. A. Lawrence, team 
Orin Carlton, " 

A. Dinsraore, lumber 
Joel Daniels, decoration . 
Samuel Brown, jr., teams 
Hoyt & Marshall, 

Fogg & James, " 

S. S. James & Co., " 
J. C. Nichols & Son, " 

C. H. Hodgman & Co., team 
J. A. Brown, " 
H. J. Tirrell, 

Concord Railroad, freight 
Pike & Heald 

D. C. James, track expense 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., track ex 

pense .... 
W. H. Annan, printing 
J. Slatterly 
W. E. Moore, printing 

B. L. Hartshorn, teaming 
0. D. Rich, decoration 



00 

00 
00 



61 75 



2 10 



4 


50 


7 


25 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


96 


13 


25 


rr 

t 


00 


5 


75 


49 


39 


5 


00 


15 


00 


7 


00 


19 


00 


6 


00 


12 


00 


25 


00 


30 


00 


6 


00 


37 


80 


5 


75 


3 


87 


2 


50 


6 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


9 


55 


1 


50 



246 



A. G. Fairbanks, decoration • . 10 75 
Frank Crawford, " • . 1 50 
Stearns & Farmer, refreshments 

for schools . . . . 16 89 

Clark's Great Six, decoration . 4 00 

Charles T. Brown, reporting . 11 00 

R. M. Yale, awning for seats . 52 00 

George W. Nichols, decoration 3 50 

B. Frank Fogg, " . 1 75 
G. E. Wilson, refreshments . 19 00 

C. L. Walker, morning parade 17 25 
Manchester post-office, postage 1 25 
Albert Jackson, expense fire- 
works ..... 5 00 

D. W. Fling, care of track . 5 00 

E. M. Tubbs, fire-works expense 52 10 
C. C. Shepard, decoration . 1 00 
Benj. Dodge . . . . 15 00 
L. L. Aldrich, morning parade 25 75 
J. F. Sullivan .... 7 00 
E. W. Sanborn, purses and ex- 
penses of horse trot . . 3 20 

L. H. James, decorations . 9 85 

A. W. Glines, " . 8 98 

John A. Barker, " . 1 50 

James A. Morse, fire-works . 3 00 

Amount .... $2,152 03 

Balance to new account . 229 66 



,381 69 



247 



DECORATION OP SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 

Dr. 
To Balance from old account . . 1 80 

Appropriation .... 200 00 



Paid Manchester Mills, gray worsted 

B. L. Hartshorn, teaming 
George Holbrook, carpenter work 
1st N. H. Batttery, powder, &c. 
Piper & Hawley, flag and cloth 
Win, Shepherd, teams 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 

J. N. Bruce, covering and let- 
tering arches 
Jere. Hodge, rods and sockets 
David A. Page, use of team 
L. L. Aldrich .... 
Frank P. Colby, moving piano . 

C. F. Livingston, flags and print- 
ing 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing 

J. M. Chandler & Co., 3 kegs 

powder .... 



136 


30 


16 


35 


9 


00 


4 


00 


3 


82 


7 


00 


1 


51 


5 


00 


18 


82 


2 


00 


43 


00 


4 


00 


25 


00 


11 


00 


15 


00 



RESERVED FUND. 

To Balance from old account . . $6,731 04 

Appropriation . . . 15,176 33 

Abbott, Downing & Co., discount 

on sprinkler . . . . 50 00 

City Hall and stores . . 2,500 U0 



1201 80 
Cr. 



1201 80 



Dr. 



248 



City liquor agency . . . 409 49 
Lands sold from city farm . 2,500 00 
Interest on taxes . . . 2,500 00 
J. N. Bruce, rent of hearse . 62 50 
J. P. Newell, receipts for dog li- 
censes 817 82 

J. P. Newell, receipts for show 

licenses . . . . 180 00 

J. P. Newell, receipts for aque- 
duct water . . . . 36 00 
J. P. Newell, receipts for south 

city scales . . . 105 10 

J. P. Newell, receipts for rent of 

ward room lot . . . 12 00 
J. P. Newell, receipts for How- 
ard Insurance Co. . . 8 65 
J. P. Newell, receipts for rent of 

tenements .... 104 00 
J. Hosley, receipts on costs non- 
resident taxes . . . 42 00 



Paid Adam Dickey, for stump puller $300 00 
Abbott, Downing & Co., for 

sprinkler .... 550 00 

City library .... 1,500 00 
Special appropriation for July 

4th, 1876 .... 2,000 00 

Care of rooms, (schools) . 450 00 

Incidental repairs, (schools) . 362 87 

Contingent expenses, (schools) 348 93 
Tuition, (schools) . . .407 39 

Fuel, (schools) . . . 1,200 00 

Police 2,912 69 

Watering streets . . . 463 92 



,234 93 
Cr. 



249 



Highway District No. 2 . 




2,539 


54 


« it a Q 




200 


00 


« a a 4 




50 


00 


It u u c 




59 


73 


a a a Q 




250 


42 


a u a 7 




250 


00 


" " " 10 . 




909 


86 


a « u ]^ 




650 


00 


a (( a ^2 




153 


89 


Lighting streets 




623 


81 


Repairs of school-houses . 




512 


30 


Hydrant service 




25 


00 


N. H. Granite Co., stone-work, 






widening Elm street 


• 


1,945 


45 


A. Dinsraore, lumber 




93 


34 


Amoskeag Manufacturing 


Co., 






steam fire engine . 




3,800 


00 


J. Q. A. Sargent, piping . 




22 


80 


J. B. Sawyer, engineering 


ser- 






vices .... 




100 


00 


J. H. Maynard, bridge across 


to 




Cohas brook 




250 


00 


Labor of men and teams, as per 






pay rolls 




1,007 


46 


Amount 


$23,939 40 


Balance to new account 




7,295 


53 

.131 234 93 









SCHOOL-HOUSES AND LOTS. 

To Balance "from old account . $1,467 14 

Repairs of school-houses, amount 

transferred . . . . 600 00 



Dr. 



!,067 14 



250 



Or. 



Paid Martin Fitzgerald, edge stones 
and posts, for Ash-street school 
lot $1,646 00 

John H. Proctor, edge stone . 20 00 

Ellis & Patterson, engineering 

services . . . . 18 00 

Geo. W. Stevens, engineering 

services . . . . 25 00 

Wm. Campbell, drawing gravel 8 00 



Amount 

Balance to new account 


.$1,717 00 
. 350 14 


$ 




MILITIA. 

To Balance from old account . 
Appropriation 


. $41 67 
. 700 00 



52,067 14 



Dr. 



$741 67 



Cr. 



Paid Amoskeag Veterans to April 17, 

1876 $100 00 

1st N. H. Battery ... 100 00 

Straw Rifles . . . . 100 00 

War Veterans . . . 100 00 

Head Guards . . . . 100 00 
Sheridan Guards . . .100 00 

Haines Rifles . . . . 100 00 

Amount .... $700 00 

Balance to new account . 41 67 



$741 67 



251 

REDUCTION OP CITY DEBT. 

Dr. 
To Appropriation .... $1,500 00 
Balance overdrawn in July, 1874 19,100 00 

$20,600 00 

Cr. 

By Balance from old account, over- 
drawn in July, 1874 . $19,100 00 
On account of Suncook Valley 

Railroad loan . . . 1,500 00 

$20,600 00 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Dr. 

To Balance from old account . . $2,300 00 

Cr. 
By Balance to new account . . $2,300 00 



AWARDS FOR LAND TAKEN FOR HIGHWAYS. 

Dr. 
To Balance from old account . . $2,640 16 

Cr. 
Paid Mary Wilson, land taken for 

Wilson street . . . $110 00 
A. Bodwell, stone and laying the 

same 129 51 



Amount 

Balance to new account 



$239 51 
2,400 65 
$2,640 16 



252 



INTEREST. 






Dr. 


To Appropriation 


156,000 50 




Cr. 


Paid Lois A. Lee '. 


. $36 00 


Louisa Wilson 


30 00 


Thomas Cogswell 


. 210 00 


Coupons on water bonds . 


33,756 00 


Coupons on other bonds . 


21,594 00 


Amount 


155,626 00 


Balance to new account 


. 374 50 




$56 000 50 






CONCORD SQUARE 


FENCE. 




Dr. 


To Balance from old account . 


1451 38 




Cr. 


Paid Balance to new account . 


$451 38 


SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 




Dr. 


To Appropriation 


$1,000 00 




Cr. 


Paid Balance to new account . 


$1,000 00 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

To Balance from old account . . $954 87 
Appropriation 6,000 00 



Dr. 



$6,954 87 



253 



Paid sundry persons 

Balance to new account 



^4,391 07 
2,563 80 



Cr. 



1,954 87 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



To Balance from old account 
Appropriation 



Paid Alfred W. Anderson, overvalu- 
ation, 1874 . 
Reuben V. G. Smith, non-resi- 
dent, 1875 . 
Jere. Hodge, taxed wrong, 1875 
J. Brugger & Son, overtaxed, 
' 1875 .... 
George Totman, sick and poor 

1875 .... 
Salem T. Huff, duplicate, 1875 
' Geo. A. Eastman, minor, ' 
Jeremiah Connor, dead, ' 
G. L. Minor, no dog, " 

John Jameson, paid at Hopkin 

ton, 1875 
L. J. Hoag, no dog, 1875 
Thomas L. Cox, paid in Holder 

ness, 1875 
Fred F. Osgood, paid in Auburn 

1875 .... 
John Mahoney, no dog, 1875 
John Drown, paid in California 
1875 .... 



$32 59 
1,000 00 



$4 92 

2 22 
44 40 

111 00 



2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


00 


2 


22 


1 


00 



2 22 

2 22 
2 00 

2 22 



Dr. 

$1,032 59 
Cr. 



254 



John Drown, paid in California 

1874 .... 
Thomas Frain, duplicate, 1875 
James Callahan, taxed wrong 

1875 .... 
Daniel Leary, piad in Newport 

1875 . ' . 
James E. Sutton, no dog, 1875 
Joseph Stark, duplicate, 1875 
Ann M. Clark, taxed wrong 

1875 .... 
John Barr, over 70, 1875 
Fred Blake, minor, 1875 . 
Wm. Stearns, duplicate as Wm 

F., 1875 
John Dickey, duplicate, 1875 
Patrick J. Flynn, minor, 1875 
Robert P. Barrett, wrong name 

1875 . . . . 
Daniel Gerard, duplicate as Ger 

aid, 1875 
George E. Flanders, duplicate 

1875 .... 
Daniel Collins, duplicate, 1875 
Hugh R. Barnard, paid in Bed- 
ford, 1875 . . . . 
Israel Drown, paid in Concord, 

1875 

Lewis C. Mason, paid in Hook- 
sett, 1875 . 
Charles E. Moore, disabled sol- 
dier, 1875 . . . . 
Herman W. Dennett, paid in 

Concord, 1875 
Michael Hanley, over 70, 1875 . 



2 46 
2 22 

2 22 



2 


22 


1 


00 


2 


22 


4 


44 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 





22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 



255 



James Parker, paid in Andover. 
.1875 2 22 

James Kimball, paid in Hook- 
sett, 1875 .... 2 22 

Michael Hanley, over 70, 1875 . 2 22 

Chas. W. Marsh, paid in Gilman- 

ton, 1875 .... 2 22 

Wm. W. Merrill, paid in Goffs- 

town, 1875 .... 2 22 

Nelson Bickford, wrong name, 

1875 2 22 

Prank Roby, paid in Methuen, 

1875 2 22 

Addison W. Tobey, dead, no es- 
tate, 1871 .... 2 46 

Addison W. Tobey, dead, no es- 
tate, 1875 .... 2 22 

Lorenzo D. Cate, no dog, 1875 1 00 

Wm. E. Dunton, pays in Stone- 
ham, 1875 .... 2 22 

Patrick Spane, no dog, 1875 . 1 00 

Patrick Welch, duplicate, 1875 2 22 

Michael Gillis, no dog, 1875 . 1 00 

Horace W. Langley, non-resi- 
dent, 1875 . . . . 2 22 

Albert Barnes, no dog, 1875 . 1 00 

James Richards, pays in Weare, 
1875 2 22 

Josiah F. Langley, minor, 1876 1 62 

Elbridge Gannon, disabled sol- 
dier, 1876 .... 1 62 

Patrick Lannan, over 70, 1876 1 62 

Wm. Cashman, " " . 1 62 

Plumer, Chandler & Co., over- 
taxed, 1875 . . . . 117 66 



256 

Henry B. Sloan, over 70, 1875 2 22 

Geo. W. Pinkerton, no dog, " . 1 00 

Alfred Smith, minor, " . 2 22 
Edward H. Paine, no carriage, 

1875 2 22 

John Tate, disabled soldier, 1875 2 22 
John W. Morse, taxed wrong, 

1875 1 13 

Edward McDerby, wrong name, 

1875 - 2 22 

Michael Welch, disabled soldier, 

1875 2 22 

Philip P. Farmer, over 70, 1875 2 22 

Wm. Whittle, no horse, " . 88 

Thos. Kelty, poor, " . 2 22 

Eugene Sullivan, over 70 " . 2 22 
Augustus Crosbie, name wrong, 

1875 2 22 

George Eisenzimer, paid in 

Hooksett, 1874 ... 2 46 
Frederick A. Wadleigh, minor, 

1875 2 22 

Fred W. Drown, minor, 1875 . 2 22 

Abram Twiss, taxed wrong, 1875 4 44 
Wm. Reynolds, taxed wrong, 

1875 4 44 

Selena Hoag, taxed wrong, 1875 4 44 

Arthur Calef, taxed twice, 1875 2 22 
Wm. H. Venson, taxed twice, 

1875 . . . . . 2 22 

Geo. S. Aldrich, dead, 1875 . 2 22 

Geo. S. Aldrich, '< 1874 . 2 46 

Wm. McKenzie, dead, 1875 . 1 44 
E. G. Gannon, disabled soldier, 

1875 2 22 



257 



Thos. Moran, over 70, 1875 . 


2 22 


John Morrison, taxed wrong, 




1875 


13 32 


Robert Linus, minor, 1875 


2 22 


Joseph Letender, minor, 1875 . 


2 22 


Daniel Harrington, disabled sol- 




dier, 1875 .... 


2 22 


Samuel Brown, over 70, 1875 . 


2 22 


John Kennedy, over 70, 1875, . 


2 22 


John Gibson, taxed twice, 1875 


2 22 


Chas. Howard, taxed twice, 1875 


2 22 


Cyrus Dean, taxed twice, 1875 


2 22 


Richard Streeter, paid in Fran- 




conia, 1875 .... 


2 22 


Bradstraw Streeter, paid in Fran- 




conia, 1875 .... 


2 22 


Hiram Tarbell, paid in Nashua, 




1875 


2 22 


Alden C. Watson, paid in Auburn, 




1875 


2 22 


Wm. T. Reed, paid in Litchfield, 




1875 


2 22 


David A. Page, paid in Goffs- 




town, 1875 .... 


2 22 


Edgar A. Morse, not here, 1875 


2 22 


John Morrison, taxed wrong, 




1875 


2 22 


Cyntbia Kennedy, taxed wrong, 




1875 . . ' . 


6 66 


James Benson, error in taxation, 




1875 


48 84 


Duncan W. Bartlett, not here, 




1874 


2 46 


Julius Lawrence, unable to pay, 




1874 


2 46 


17 





258 



Fred Spiess, dead, 1874 . 


2-46 


George F. Crosby, duplicate, 




1876 .... 


1 62 


C. L. Walker, over-valuation, 




1876 .... 


11 34 


Frank Martin, minor, 1876 


1 62 


Edward Newman, over 70, 1876 


1 62 


Joseph Tebodian, dead, 1876 . 


1 62 


James Evis, minor, 1876 . 


1 62 


Patrick J. Hanley, over seventy. 




1876 . 


1 62 


Willard B. Parker, not here. 




1876 


1 62 


David D. Goodwin, not here, 




1876 


1 62 


Win. LaMay, no dog, 1876 


1 00 


J. W. French, minor, 1876 


1 62 


Mason Hoyt, pays in Canada, 




1876 


1 62 


Jos. H. Price, disabled soldier, 




1876 


1 62 


James White, no dog, 1876 


1 00 


Thos. McCabe, no dog, 1876 . 


1 00 


Henry Wermers, cripple, 1876 


1 62 


John K. Greene, minor, 1876 . 


1 62 


Wm. H. Annan, cripple, 1876 . 


1 62 


Win. Buck, duplicate, 1876 


1 62 


John S. Hoskins, duplicate, 1876 


1 62 


John Tewksbury, duplicate, 1876 


1 62 


Charles Gillis, pays in Nashua, 




1876 


1 62 


Frank P. Johnson, no horse or 




carriage, 1876 


3 24 


James W. Lathe, disabled sol- 




dier, 1876 . 


1 62 



1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


00 


2 


00 


1 


62 



259 

Charles A. Clough, no dog, 1876 
Albert N. Miller, no dog, 1876 . 
Patrick McCabe, over 70, 1876 
James Collins, over 70, 1876 . 
Charles Darrah, pays in Bed- 
ford, 1876 .... 
John McCabe, minor, 1876 
James Byrnes, no dog, 1876 
Moses W. Sargent, no dog, 1876 
Dennis Driscoll, duplicate, 1876 
Luther Frachure, pays in Dun- 
barton, 1876 ... 1 62 
Eugene R. Bailey, pays in Car- 
roll, 1876 .... 
James Pilkins, minor, 1876 
« Isaac C. Flanders, over 70, 1876 
Jeremiah Sullivan, taxed wrong, 

1876 

George A. Clarke, minor. 1870 . 
John Smith, one arm, 1876 
Daniel. Annis, pays in Goffstown, 

1876 1 62 

Henry H. Wheeler, pays in Am- 
herst, 1876 .... 1 62 
W. L. Meserve, pays in Jackson, 

1876 1 62 

Henry J. Hicks, }„aid in London- 
derry, 1876 . . . . 1 62 
Nicholas Garner, no dog, 1876 . 1 00 
James E. Ayer, minor, 1876 . 1 62 
Chas. J. Senter, no horse, 1876 81 
Hiram B. Sloan, no dog, 1875 . 1 00 
Jas. Wiley, over-valuation, 1876 2 43 
Clarence Wilkins, minor, 1876 . 1 62 
Frank H. Taylor, no dog, 1876 1 00 



1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 




97 


1 


62 


1 


62 



260 

Amariah Avery, over-valuation, 

1876 6 48 

Hayes & Co., over-valuation, 
1876 

Robert Heath, no horse, 1876 . 

Elijah Young, over 70, 1876 . 

Edward Knowlton, minor, 1876 

Alonzo Buck, minor, 1876 

Gustave Godfrey, duplicate, 1876 

Wm. T. Stevens, duplicate, 1876 

Charles Trask, dead, 1876 

John H. George, dead, 1876 

Frank B. Batchelder, dead, 1876 

Thomas Barnes, dead, 1876 

Edward Blan chard, duplicate, 
1876 .... 

Henry T. Bond, duplicate, 1876 

Frederick Hertelle, duplicate, 
1876 

Michael Talfey, dead, 1876 

John Sullivan, duplicate, 1876 . 

Arthur Head, minor, 1876 

Martin Campbell, minor, 1876 . 

Walter M. Wilson, sick and 
poor, 1876 .... 

Oliver Le Due, minor, 1876 

Geo. B. Sanford, disabled sol- 
dier, 1876 .... 1 62 

Samuel A. Cheney, disabled sol- 
dier, 1876 . ' . . . 1 62 

Louis Raiche, one arm, 1876 . 1 62 

Joseph Bailey, disabled soldier, 

1876 1 62 

Chas. H. Hastings, duplicate, 

1876 1 62 



24 


30 




97 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 



261 



Merrill W. Higgins, no horse, 






1876 


1 29 




Noah S. Clark, no dog, 1876 


1 00 




Joseph N. Hanaford, no horse, 






1876 . . ... 


1 62 




Edward E. Folsom, duplicate, 






1876 


1 62 




Amount . 


$727 42 




Balance to new account 


305 17 


11,032 59 







LAND SOLD FROM CITY FARM. 

To Balance from old account . . $4,796 27 
Received of sundry persons . 557 00 



By reserved fund, ain't transferred 12,500 00 
City farm . . . . 927 52 

Teachers' salaries . . . 1,855 20 



Dr. 

5,353 27 
Cb. 





Amount 
Balance to 

Appropriation 


new account 


• 


15,282 72 
. 70 55 






To 


STATE 


TAX 





i,353.27 



Dr. 

$36,428 00 



Cr. 
Paid State Treasurer, per collectors' 

receipt $36,428 00 



262 
LIQUOR AGENCY. 
To Balance from old account . 

By reserved fund, balance trans- 
ferred . 



Dr. 

1409 49 

Cr. 

1409 49 



TAXES FOR 1876. 

To resident tax assessed . . 1247,520 99 
Non-resident tax assessed . 1,379 94 



Dr. 





248,900 93 
Cr. 


By collections and discounts . 1209,775 


89 


Balance outstanding . 39,125 


04 

248,900 93 


COUNTY TAX. 


Dr. 


To Appropriation .... 


$20,645 67 




Cr. 


Paid County Treasurer . 


$20,645 67 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

List for 1876, James Mitchell, collec- 
tor ... $39,125 04 

List for 1375, John Hosley, collec- 
tor 8,883 95 



263 



List for 1874, John Hosley, colleo 

tor . . ... 
List for 1873, William G. Everett 

collector 
List for 1872, William G. Everett 

collector . 
List for 1871, H. R. Chamberlin, col 

lector .... 
List for 1870, H. R. Chamberlin, co 

lector .... 
List for 1869, H. R. Chamberlin, co 

lector .... 
List for 1868, H. R. Chamberlin, co 

lector . . » . 
List for 1867, H. R. Chamberlin, co 

lector .... 
List for 1866, H. R. Chamberlin, col 

lector .... 
List for 1865, H. R. Chamberlin, col 

lector .... 
List for 1864, H. R. Chamberlin, col 

lector .... 
List for 1863, H. R. Chamberlin, co 

lector .... 
List for 1862, H. R. Chamberlin, co 

lector .... 
List for 1861, H. R. Chamberlin, col 

. lector .... 
List for 1860, H. R. Chamberlin, col 

lector .... 
List for 1859, John L. Kelley, col 

lector .... 



5,567 44 
4,419 74 
2,876 22 
6,312 08 
6,383 70 
6,466 39 
5,157 97 
6,156 79 
7,691 81 
4,045 95 
4,145 81 
2,719 90 
2,431 18 
4,493 43 
2,265 49 
8,245 76 



4127,388 65 



264 

List of unpaid taxes assessed in 1867 upon stock of in- 
habitants of Manchester, owned in banks of the following 
towns, to wit : 

Pittsfield $25 56 

Laconia . . . . . . 21 30 

Portsmouth 21 30' 

Deny 52 82 

$120 78 



265 
Valuation, Taxes, <fec. 



YEAR. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1838 . . 


$555,270 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


$300 


1881) . . 


604,963 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


300 


1840 . . 


946,20 i 


3,986 56 


772 


2 20 


300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1812 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


800 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13.764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . 


• £187,726 


22,0' >5 95 


1,808 


2 10 


3i 


1847 . . 


4,488,55' » 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,1 '80 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,9 '6,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


• 300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


18G0 . . 


9,644,937 


86,8i>4 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


18(51 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


186-2 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


I860 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


18157 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


1.50 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1878 . . 


12,001,200 


300,7(58 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195.102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 



2G6 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To whom Payable. 


When 


Payable. 


Principal. 


Jan. 1, 1856 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 


1, 1880 


SI 0,000 00 


July 1, 1857 


u a 


July 


1, 


1877 


22,5 00 


July 9, 1858 


Nehemiah Hunt, 


July 


9, 


1878 


2,400 00 


July 22, 1858 


U (( 


July 


22. 


1878 


1,100 00 


July 1, 1862 


City Bonds, 


July 


i! 


1882 


22,500 00 


Jan. 1, 1863 


u a 


Jan. 


l. 


1888 


oo.noO 00 


Oct. 31, 1863 


u u 


Nov. 


i, 


1893 


70,000 00 


April 1, 1864 


u u 


April 


i 


1884 


70,(00 00 


July 1, 1864 


cc u 


July 


i, 


1894 


50,000 00 


April 1, 18(35 


a u 


April 


i, 


1885 


10,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


u u 


Aug. 


i 


1877 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


u a 


Aug. 


i 


1878 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


a u 


Aug. 


i 


1879 


10,0('0 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


a u 


Aug. 


i 


1880 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


a u 


Aug. 


i 


1881 


10,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


a a 


Aug. 


i 


1S82 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


a 4; 


Aug. 


i 


1883 


5,00o 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


a a 


Aug. 


i 


1884 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


u a 


Aug. 


i 


1885 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


u it 


Aug. 


i 


1886 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


il a 


Aug. 


i 


1887 


3,500 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 


i 


, 1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


u u 


Jan. 


i 


, 1892 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


u a 


.Ian. 


i 


, 1897 


100.000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


u u 


Jan. 


i 


, 19 2 


100,000 00 


July 1, 1874 


a u 


July 


i 


, 1890 


100,000 00 


July 1, 1874 


c< u 


July 


i 


, 1895 


100,000 00 


July 1, 1876 


Sewer Bonds. 


July 


i 


, 1878 


8,000 00 


July 1, 1876 


u u 


July 


i 


, 1880 


8,000 00 


July 1, 1876 


a u 


July 


i 


, 1881 


8,000 00 


July 1.1876 


a a 


July 


i 


, 1883 


8,000 00 


July 1,' 1876 


a a 


July 


i 


, 1885 


8,000 00 



267 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 

1876 .... $937,500 00 

Added during the year (sewer loan) 40,000 00 



-1977,500 00 
Paid during the year . . . 1,500 00 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 1877 $976,000 00 

Amount of temporary loan, Jan. 1, 

1877 .... $2,300 00 

Interest due, (estimated) . 21,000 00 

Bills outstanding, Jan. 1, 1877 23,694 99 

$46,994 99 



Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1876 . $1,022,994 99 

Cash in the treasury, Jan. 1, 1877 $80,819 91 
Notes due the city .... 1,957 Q5 
Interest on the same . . . 590 00 

,367 56 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1877 . $939,627 43 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1876 . 901,144 48 



Increase of net indebtedness during 

ing the year .... $38,482 95 

Attest : JOHN P. NEWELL, 

City Auditor. 



268 



CITY PROPERTY. 



City Library building 

Permanent inclosure of Commons 

City Hall and lot ... 

City Farm and permanent improvements 

Stock, tools, furniture and provisions at 

City Farm .... 

Engines, hose and apparatus 
Engine house, stable and land, Vine st. 
Hose House and lot, Maple st. . 
Reservoirs ..... 

Hearse, houses, tombs, and new cemetery 
Court House and lot ... 

Common sewers .... 

Safes, furniture and fixtures at City Hall 
Street lanterns, posts and pipes 
Water- Works ..... 
Horses, carts, plows and tools for streets 
Ward room and lot, Manchester street 
Ward room and lot, Park street 
Engine house and lot, Ward Eight 
Water pipe, wagon and apparatus for water 

ing streets .... 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad 
Lot, Lowell street .... 
Gravel lot, Belmont street 

Ward 8 (one-half acre) . 

Bakersville (one acre) 
Fire Alarm Telegraph, bell tower and bell 
Valley Cemetery 



129,000 00 
19,200 00 
60,000 CO 
25,000 00 

5,580 80 
38,308 25 
19,400 00 

2,300 00 
10,000 00 

4,900 00 

50,000 00 

121,000 00 

3,000 00 

4,100 00 
723,320 99 

5,000 CO 

3,000 00 
600 00 

2,300 00 

2,500 00 

50,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,200 00 

50 00 

100 0O 

19,910 00 

6,000 00 

$'1,207,270 04 



269 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



Blodget-street school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, charts, 
etc. .... 

Bridge-street house and lot 
Old High school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
New High school-house . 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
books and apparatus 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Manchester-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Franklin-street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Stark house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Goffe's Falls house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Harvey's . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Clough's mill 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Hallsville house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 



.$3,000 00 




. 150 00 


$3,150 00 




500 00 


. 6,500 00 




. 200 00 


6,700 00 


.45,000 00 




5, 

. 2,000 00 


47,000 00 


. 3,300 00 




. 125 00 


3,425 00 


.15,000 00 




. 350 00 


15,350 00 


. 8,000 00 




. 300 00 


8,300 00 


. 8,000 00 




. 400 00 


8,400 00 


. 18,000 00 




. 400 00 


18,400 00 


. 14,000 00 




. 400 00 


14,400 00 


. 3,000 00 




. 200 00 


3,200 00 


. 3,500 00 




75 00 


3,575 00 


. 3,600 00 




. 100 00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 00 




50 00 


2,550 00 


. 600 00 




50 00 


650 CO 


. 3,500 00 




75 00 


3,575 00 



270 



Massabesic house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito Pond house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Centre-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
South house and lot, 'Squog 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Main-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Amount of School Property 
Amount of City Property 

Total Property 



11,400 00 

40 00 $1,440 00 
1,000 00 

50 00 1,050 00 
5,000 00 
125 00 5,125 00 
58,000 00 

400 00 58,400 00 
50,000 00 

400 00 50,400 00 
2,800 00 

60 00 2,860 00 
3,700 00 
125 00 3,825 00 
12,000 00 

100 00 12,100 00 

278,075 00 

. 1,207,270 04 

. 11,485,345 04 



INDEX. 



Abatement of Taxes 253 

Account of City Treasurer 156 

Alarm Telegraph . . . . ' . . . .46, 203 

Alarm Boxes and Keys 50 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge 187 

Amoskeag Engine Co. No. 1 56, 197 

Amoskeag Hose Co. 58 

Apparatus, fire 45 

Attendance at School 105, 130 

Awards for Lands taken for Highways . . . . . 251 

Bible in the Schools . . • 119 

Books and Stationery 239 

Bridge, Granite 187 

Bridge, Amoskeag • 187 

Buildings, Repairs of 216 

Care of Rooms 105, 238 

Cemeteries, Report of Committees on 81 

City Marshal, Report of 87 

Government, 1876 3 

Library 67, 218 

Hall and Offices 2 14 

Farm 91, 169 

Teams 173 

Treasurer's Accounts 156 

Property 268 

Debt 266 

Pay.nentof 251 



272 



Centennial Exhibit . 

Centennial 4th of July 

Commons 

Concord Square fence 

County Tax 

Contingent Expenses (School) 

Condition of lleservoirs and Cisterns 

Discount on Taxes . 
Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 
Donations to the City Library 
Drawing in Schools . 

E. AV. Harrington Engine Co. No. 

Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co. No 

Engineers 

Engineer's Department 

Engineer's Report . 

Evening Schools 



Farm, City 

Eire Alarm Telegraph 

Firemen's Itelief Association 

Fire Apparatus 

Fire Department 

Fence on Concord Square 

Fire Alarm Boxes and Keys, location of 

Fire-King Steamer No. 2 

Fires, 1876 

Furniture and Supplies (Schools) 

Fuel 

Goffe's Falls Hose Co. 
Government, City, 1876 . 
Granite Bridge 
Grading for Concrete 

Highway District No. 1 . 

2 . 

3 . 

4 . 

5 . 
•6 . 



116, 239 


. 


244 




191 


. 


252 


. 


262 


. 


230 


• 


55 




252 




247 


1 


38,78 


• 


119 


56, 198 


58, 199 


, 


60 


59, 60, 201 




43 


• 


236 


91, 169 


46, 59, 203 




47 




45 


43,6 


0, 197 




252 




50 


5 


6, 197 




48 




235 




234 




58 




3 




187 




189 




. 177 




177 




180 




. 180 




. 181 




181 



273 

Highway District No. 7 182 

8 183 

9 183 

10 184 

11 184 

12 185 

13 185 

Highways, new 186 

awards for lands taken for 251 

High School 114 

Hydrants .44 

Hydrant Service 196 

Incidental Expenses 219 

Repairs 233 

Interest 252 

Instructions to Key-holders 53 , 

Land sold from City Farm 261 

Land, damage awards 251 

Liquor Agency 262 

Lighting Streets 194 

Library, City 67, 218 

Donations to ...... 68, 78 

Trustees' Report . . . . .67 

Librarian's Report 74 

Treasurer's Report 71 

Loan, Temporary 251 

Location of Alarm Boxes .50 

Hydrants 44 

Monument, Soldiers' 252 

Militia . . . 250 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department .... 201 

Music in Schools 119 

Macadamizing streets 190 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 58, 200 

New Engine House 4b 

Names of Teachers 126 

New School-Houses and Lots 249 

N. S. Bean EDgiue Co. No. 4 57, 199 

Names and residences of members of Fire Department . 60 
18 



274 

Officers, City • 3 

Outstanding Taxes 262 

Overseers of Poor, Report of 95 

Payment of City Debt 251 

Paving Streets 191 

Paupers off Farm 163 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 57, 200 

Pine Grove Cemetery .83, 193 

Police Department 204 

Printing and Advertising .' ... . . . 237 

Printing and Stationery '. . 195 

Property, City 268 

School '. .269 

Rules Adopted by the Board of Engineers .... 54 

Reduction of City Debt 251 

Repairs of School Houses 232 

Buildings 216 

Reserved Fund 247 

Reservoirs 55, 196 

Report, Order to print 31st Annual 2 

of Finance Committtee 160 

Committee on City Farm 91 

Chief Engineer 43 

City Marshal 87 

on Public Schools for 1876 103 

Trustees of City Library 67 

Librarian 74 

Committee on Cemeteries 81 

Overseers of Poor 95 

School Committee 99 

Treasurer of City Library 71 

Resolution relating to report of School Committee . . 98 

Relation of Catholic Church to the Public Schools . . 121 

Report on Superintendent of Public Instruction . . 98, 124 

Water Commissioners 15 

Superintendent of Water- Works .... 17 

Salaries of Officers . . . 210 

Teachers 240, 126 

Schools 230 

Schools, History of 131 



275 

School, High, Course of Study 114, 125 

Report 103 

Statistics, 1876 104, 130 

Training 115 

Department 101 

Receipts and Expenditures . . . 103 

Houses and Lots 249 

Superintendent, Report of . . . * . 98, 124 

Property 269 

Centennial Exhibit 116, 239 

Schools and Teachers 126 

Bible in 119 

School Buildings, Ventilation of 107 

Evening 236 

Sewers and Drains 188 

Soldiers' Monument 252 

Streets, Lighting 194 

Macadamizing . 190 

Watering 243 

Paving 191 

State Tax ' 261 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 124 

Tax, County 262 

Taxes, Abatement of 253 

Discount on 252 

for 1876 262 

Outstanding 262 

Temporary Loan 251 

Telegraph, Fire Alarm 59, 203 

Teams, City 173 

Teachers, Names of 126 

Salaries of 126, 240 

Training School Ho 

Tuition Money 231 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 265 

Valley Cemetery 82, 192 

Water Works ... .226 

Watering Streets 243 

Water Commissioner's Report 15