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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

PUBLIC DOCUMENT. 



ITY OF MANCHESTER, 




ANNUAL REPORTS 



THE YEAR i877. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 
STATE LIBRARY 



THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



City of Manchester 



FISCAL YEAR 



DECEMBER 31, 1877, 

TOGETHER WITH 

OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 

JOHN B. CLARKE, PRINTER. 
1878. 



N 
\fe77 

CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In" Board of Common Cotjn^cil. 
AK OKDER, authorizing tlie printing of the Thirty-Second An- 
nual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of 
Manchester. 

OriDERED, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are hereby, 
authorized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of two thousand copies of the Thirty-second Annual 
Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manches- 
ter, including the Reports of the Committee on Einance, the School 
Board, "Water Commissioners and Superintendent of Water- Works, 
Engineers of the Fire Department, City Marshal, Overseers of the 
Poor, Trustees, Librarian and Treasurer of the City Library, Com- 
mittee on Cemeteries, and Committee on City Farm, and that the 
expense thereof be charged to the approijriation for Printing and 
Stationery. 

Ix Board of Commok Coukcil. January 7, 1878. 
Passed, 

JOHN M. STANTON", President. 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. January 7, 1878. 
Passed in concurrence. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor. 



MAI^CHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT, 

1S77. 



MAYOR. 

IKA CEOSS.^ 
P. A. DEYIjSTE.t 
JOHN L. KELLY.J 



CITY CLE3K. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



president of common council. 
John M, Stanton, 



CLERK OF common COUNCIL. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, 



* Resigned August 21, 1877. 

t Acting mavor from August 21, 1877, to September 4. 1877 

+ Elected September 4, 1877. 



city treasurer. 
Henry R. Chamberlin. 



collector op taxes. 
Seth T. Hill. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

John A. Barker. 



city solicitor. 
Jonathan Smith. 

aldermen. 

Ward 1. — Rufus Wilkinson. 
Ward 2. — John E. Stearns. 

Ward 3. — Levi L. Aldrich. 
Ward 4.— Noah S. Clark. 

Ward 5. — Patrick A. Devine. 
Ward 6. — Edwin Kennedy. 

Ward 7.— John W. Dickey. 

Ward 8. — Joseph Beddows. 



■members op^ common council. 
Ward 1. Ward 5. 

Albert Maxfield. Lyman Batchelder. 

Charles E. Ham. John Twomey. 

Richard A. Lawrence. James Sullivan. 



Wa'Rd 2. 



Ward 6. 



Sumner D. Quint. 
George W. Riddle. 
Ciiauncej B. Littlefield. 

Ward 3. 

Moses French. 
William G. Hoyt. 
Frank L. Gray. 

Ward 4. 

John M, Stanton. 
Walter M. Parker. 
Charles H. Bunton. 



Aimer D. Gooden. 
Thomas L, Thorpe. 
George W. Dearborn. 

Ward 7. 

Timothy W^ Challis. 
Greeley W. Hastings. 
William H. Annis. 

Ward 8. 

Charles H. Hodgman. 
Hubbard H. Huntress. 
Emery P. Littlefield. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Kennedy ; Messrs. 
Riddle, Parker and Sullivan. 

On Aceounis. — Aldermen Devine and Clark ; Messrs. 
Quint, Tliddle and Bunton. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Kennedy and 
Dickey ; Messrs. French, Hastings and Challis. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Aldrich and Stearns ; 
Messrs. Quint, Hoyt and Dearborn. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Clark and Dickey ; Messrs. Hodg- 
man, Riddle and C. B. Littlefield. 

On Oity Farm. — Aldermen Wilkinson and Devine ; 
Messrs. Thorpe, Huntress and Annis. 

On Seivers and Drains. — Aldermen Dickey and Clark ; 
Messrs. Littlefield, Riddle and Hodgman. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Stearns and 
Beddows; Messrs. Lawrence, Ham and Parker; Citizens 



6 

Albert H. Daniels, W. G. Hoyt, H. R. Pettee, James A. 
Weston, Joseph Kidder, J. P. James, C. H. Bartlett, S. B. 
Putnam. 

On Fire Dejjartment. — Aldermen Stearns and Beddows ; 
Messrs. Maxfield, Quint and Gray. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Clark and Devine ; Messrs. 
French, Parker and Hoyt. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Devine and Wilkin- 
son ; Messrs. Huntress, Annis and Thorpe. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Beddows and Wilkin- 
son ; Messrs. Gooden, Emery P. Littlefield and Lawrence. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Aldrich and Devine ; 
Messrs. Challis, Twomey and Ham. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Wilkinson and Aldrich; 
Messrs. Maxfield, Gray and Bunton. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OP MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On JEnrollment. — Aldermen Beddows and Devine. 
On Bills on Second Heading. — Aldermen Kennedy and 
Dickey. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Stearns and Wilkinson. 
On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Beddows and Clark. 
On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Aldrich and Stearns. 
On 3Iarhet. — Aldermen Devine and Aldricli. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OP COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Heturns. — Messrs. Hoyt, Sullivan and E. P. 
Littlefield. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Challis, Ham and 
French. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Parker, Bunton and Twomey. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Hon. Ira Cross, ex-officio Chairman. 
Hon. John L. Kelly, ex-officio Chairman. 
M. P. Hall, Clerh. 



Ward 1. • 

George W. Stevens. 
H. C. Sanderson. 

Ward 2. 

James E. Dodge. 
G. L. Demarest. 

Ward 3. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 
Joseph E. Bennett. 

Ward 4. 

George W. Weeks. 
George M. Park. 

John M. 



Ward 5. 

Samuel P. Jackson, 
C. A. O'Connor. 

Ward 6. 

Henry A. Gage. 
Loring P. Moore. 

Ward 7. 

Marshall P. Hall. 
Ezra Huntington. 

Ward 8. 

Isaac W. Darrah. 
Eugene W. Brigham. 



Stanton, ex officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR. 



Hon. Ira Cross, ex-officio Chairman. 
Moses E. George, Clerk. 

William H. Maxwell. John J. McQuadc. 

George E. Wilson. Peter 0. Woodman. 



Amos B, Page. Sajward J. Young, 

Moses E. George. Edwin A. Moulton. 



ASSESSORS. 



Jacob F. James, Chairman. 
Joseph H. Haynes, Clerk. 

Charles H. Brown. John Rjan. 

Joseph H. Haynes. Ignatius T. Webster, 

Jacob F. James. Henry W. Powell. 

Horace P. Watts. Charles S. Fisher. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



■ Albion H. Lowell, Chief Engineer. 
Thomas W. Lane, Clerk. 

Assistant Engineers. 

A. C. Wallace. Thomas W. Lane. 

B. C. Kendall. Sara C. Lowell. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Aretas Blood. 

John Q. A. Sargent. 
William P. Newell. 
A. C. Wallace. 

Hon. Ira Cross, ex officio. 
Alpheus Gay. 

James A. Weston. 

Samuel N. Bell, Clerk. 



9 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 

Assistant Justice. 

Henry W. Tewksbury. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 

Charles 0. Keniston. 

Assistant Marshal. 

Horatio W. Longa. 

Captain of the Watch. 

Eben Carr. 

Bay Police. 

Ransom W. Bean. 
John C. Colburn. 

Night Watchmen. „ 

James Bucklin. Michael Marr. 

Thomas Frain. James F. Dunn. 
William H. B. Newhall. Hiram Stearns. 

John F. Oassidy. Z. B. Wright. 

0. B, Clarkson. Michael Fox. 

Alfred Yincellette. Henry Harmon. 

Melvin J. Jenkins. Edgar Farrar. 

Horace P. Marshall. James Duffy. 



10 

Truant Officer. 
David Thayer. 

ConBtables. 

William B. Patten. Sidney R. Hanaford. 

C. C. Keniston. Georae W. Hamlin. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

C. C. Keniston. P. A. Devine. 

P. J. P. Goodwin. 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

Nathan P. Kidder. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark. Hon. E. A. Straw. 

Hon. Wm. P. Newell. Hon. Isaac W. Smith. 

Hon. Samuel N. Bell. Hon. Moody Currier. 

Hon. Nathan P. Hunt. John M. Stanton, ex officio. 
Hon. John L. Kelly, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Charles H. Marshall.* 
Mrs. E. H. Davis.f 

*To July 1, 1877. 
jFrom July 1, 1877. 



11 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 

Ward 1.— Daniel H. Maxfield. 
Ward 2. — George H. Stearns. 
Ward 3.— David 0. Furnald. 

Ward 4.— John C. Bickford. 

Ward 5. — Hugh McDonough, 

Ward 6. — Jonathan Y. McQueston. 
Ward 7.— Joseph W. Bean, 

Ward 8.— Charles K. Walker, 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Perry H. Dow. 

Ward 2.— Charles E. Quimby. 
Ward 3.— David F. Clark. 
Ward 4.— Walter S. Holt. 
Ward 0. — John T. Baxter. 

Ward 6.— John F. Chandler. 
Ward T.— Frank H. Challis. 

Ward 8. — Frederick W. Dearborn. 





Selectriien. 


Ward 1. 


Ward 5. 


George W. Bacon. 


John McQuade, 


Willis P. Fogg. 


John F. Flynn. 


Daniel G. Andrews, 


Edward Eagan. 


Ward 2. 


Ward 6. 



Benj. L. Hartshorn. 
Hugh Ramsey. 
George A. Farmer. 



George H. Dudley. 
Albert A. Ainsworth. 
Daniel R. Prescott. 



12 



,Ward 8. 

Thorndike P. Heath. 
Edward M. Slayton. 
Albert J. Nay. 

Ward 4. 

True 0. Furnald. 
John Truesdale. 
Stephen C. Amsden. 



Ward 7. 

George B. Shattuck. 
William A. Clement. 
Charles P. Porter. 

Ward 8. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Isaac S. Coffin. 
Daniel B. Emery. 



Inspectors. 

Ward 1.— John J. Dillon. 

Ward 2. — Joseph H. Haynes. 

Ward 3.— William M. Shepard. 
Ward 4. — Harrison D. Lord. 

Ward 5.— Marshall B. Witters. 
Ward 6. — Isaac Whittemore. 

Ward 7. — Stillman P. Cannon. 
Ward 8. — Horatio Fradd. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON THE CITY FARM. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on the City 
Farm herewith submit their annual report for the year end- 
ing Dec. 31, 1877. 

The following is an inventory and appraisal of the per- 
sonal property at the City Farm made Dec. 29, 1877 : 



Live stock ...... 

Hay, grain and produce .... 

Carriages, farming implements and other tools 
Household furniture and domestic implements 
Provisions and fuel ..... 

Bedding and wearing apparel . 

Lumber, etc. ...... 



Cash on hand .... 
Permanent improvements as follows : 
Building new hen-yard 
Repairs on buildings . . . . 
Ninety rods of stone wall . 
Manure and muck used upon the farm 



11,575 00 

1,408 17 

1,400 10 

583 34 

713 20 

596 00 

28 00 



^6,303 81 


462 65 


. $ 10 00 


8 00 


. 180 00 


. 175 00 



$373 00 



14 

The account of the City Farm for the year 1877 is as fol- 
lows : 

City Farm in Account with the City of dianchester : 

Dr. 

To stock Dec. 31, 1877 85,580 80 

To cash on hand 600 27 

To expenditures for 1877 . ... 3,512 58 
To interest on farm 1,000 00 



110,693 65 
Or. 

By stock Dec. 31, 1877 $ 6,303 81 

By cash paid into City Treasury for produce, 

etc 1,913 47 

By cash on hand ..... 462 65 

By permanent improvements . . . 373 00 

By 3,750 days' board of paupers, 

and 3,044 days' board of prisoners . . 1,610 72 



110,693 65 
Average number of paupers at farm per day during the 

year 10 1-3 

Average number of prisoners at farm per day during the 

year 8 1-4 

Average cost per day for board of each pauper 

or prisoner . . . . . . .23 2-3 cts. 

Your committee are of the opinion that the City Farm 
has been well managed the past year ; that the govern- 
ment of the prisoners has been of such a character as to 
secure a large amount of productive labor from them, and 
thus render the working of the farm less expensive. 

The impression has generally prevailed that Mr. Allen 
was not a practical farmer when he took charge of the farm 
in the spring of 1876, and it is conceded by his friends that 



15 

he has made some mistakes ; yet his experience the past 
two years, purchased at some expense to the city, has, in 
the opinion of your Committee, made him a useful and 
practical man for the place now. 

Mrs. Allen has proved herself a very kind and consider- 
ate woman in the management of the household. Her 
willing hand has in many ways alleviated the various ills 
which beset the poor whom misfortune has placed under 
her immediate charge. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor, 
RUFUS WILKINSON, 
PATRICK A. DEVINE, 
THOMAS L. THORPE, 
H. H. HUNTRESS, 
W. H. ANNIS, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 

Manchester, N. H,, January 1, 1878. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester : 

111 compliance with the ordinance of said city the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present tlie annual report for 
the year 1877. 

The whole number of families which have received as- 
sistance during the past year is twenty-nine, consisting of 
seventy-eight persons, a^l of whom have a settlement in 
this city. Two of the above number have died. 

The wliole number of persons at the Almshouse during 
the year is twenty-six ; average number for the year, ten 
and one-third. 

There have been two deaths at the farm. 
With your permission the Overseers of the Poor wish to 
say that in their opinion it would be for the interest of the 
city if the House of Correction could be abolished and a 
hospital for the sick be established in its stead, or an in- 
sane asylum for the insane belonging to this city. We 
have six persons at the insane asylum at Concord, at a cost 
of nearly twenty-four dollars per week. 
All of which is respectfully submitted, 

JOHN L. KELLY, Chairman ex officio, 
M. E. GEORGE, Clerk, 
WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 
GEORGE E. WILSON, 
S. J. YOUNG, 
H. B. PAGE, 
J. J. McQUADE, 
PETER 0. WOODMAN, 
E. A. MOULTON, 
- Overseers of the Poor. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Mcmchester : 

Gentlemen: — In compliance with the city ordinances 
the Board of Water Commissioners herewith present their 
sixtli annual report, and with it the report of the Superin- 
tendent, which embraces in detail the operations of this 
department for the past year. 

It will be seen that the total income from the works for the 
year ending December 31, 1877, has been forty-three thou- 
sand eight hundred twenty-three dollars and thirty cents, 
(•I4o,823.30), Of this sum seventeen thousand four hun- 
dred and seventy-five dollars (•117,475.00) was for fire 
hydrant service. The expense of maintenance has been 
six thousand seven hundred ninety-three dollars and fifty- 
three cents (•16,793.53), showing the net receipts, thirty- 
seven thousand twenty-nine dollars and seventy-seven cents 
(137,029.77). This is more than six per cent on the 
whole amount of bonds ('$600,000) issued in aid of the 
water- works, and is a gratifying exhibit. 

The receipts have steadily increased since the comple- 
tion of the works, and with the further extension of water- 
pipes and a more general use of the city water, a still 
larger income may be expected without materially increas- 
ing the expenses. 



20 

As a whole the works are in good condition. No more 
serious mishap has occurred during the year than the 
failure of the cast-iron pipe which lies on the bed of the 
Merrimack River and furnishes water to the distribution 
pipes in Piscataquog. The defects have been remedied and 
the pipe is now in good repair, but, to avoid the repetition 
of such serious inconvenience to the citizens of so large a 
portion of the city, a second pipe has been laid across the 
Granite Bridge, thus furnishing a double connection. 

For an account of pipe extensions, the condition of the 
reservoir, pumping machinery, and whatever else pertains 
to this department, the Commissioners desire to refer to 
the extended report of the Superintendent. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ALPHEUS GAY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
J. Q. A. SARGENT, 
JOHN L. KELLY, 
A. C. WALLACE, 
A RET AS BLOOD, 
WILLIAM P. NEWELL, 

Water Commissioners. 
JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk. 
January 1, 1878. 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Man- 
chester. 

Gentlemen : — The undersigned respectfully submits the 
following report ; 

ELEVATION OF THE WATER IN MASSABESIC LAKK. 

The water in the lake was the lowest in the month oi 
February, when the water at the dam was 18 inches below 
the top of the overfall. 

There was water enough to run the pumps and supply 
the city, but none to spare. Having very little rain in the 
fall, the lake did not fill up as usual, and it froze over at 
low-water mark. 

From October, 1876, till March, 1877, the water did not 
run over the overfall. There has been plenty of water 
since and the pond is full at the present time. 

There have been no repairs on the dam, canal, or penstock 
of any amount. 

The culvert that was built in the highway opposite to 
the Clough & Foster house, that carried the water into 
the pond 250 feet above the bridge, became filled up, and 
instead of repairing the culvert it was thought best to put 
in a sewer and take the water which was impure below the 
dam. This was done at a cost of 8337.74. 

The following table shows the amount of rain-fall and 
melted snow in gauge, during the year 1877, as kept by 
Frank T. Hills, Auburn. 



22 



January 2 

" 7 

" 12 
" 15 
" 28 

Total 
Februarj^ 24 
March 2 

a 4 

" 8-9 

" 12 

" 13 

" 14 

« 18 
21 

" 26 

" 27 

" 28 



Total 
April 



6 
17 

19 

20 
21 
29 
30 



Total 




May 




1 

2 


li 




10 


u 




17 


a 




21 


li 


23 


-24 


Total 




June 




6-7 

8 


(( 




10 


a 


15 


-16 


u 




21 


(( 




26 


ii 




29 



1.43 inches 

2.85 ^' 

0.25 " 

0.30 " 

0.05 " 

4.88 " 

0.02 '^ 

73 *^ 

0.23 '' 

1.87 '' 

0.50 " 

0.15 " 

0.50 '' 

0.10' " 

0.25 '' 

0.83 " 

1.67 " 

0.62 " 

7.45 " 

0.50 " 

1.50 " 

0.45 '• 

1.80 '• 

0.75 " 

0.30 " 

0.50 '• 

0.15 '^ 

5.95 " 

0.40 » 

1.00 " 

0.40 " 

0.75 " 

0.15 " 

1.00 " 

3.70 " 

3.00 " 

U.50 " 

0.40 " 

0.64 " 

0.50 " 

0.30 " 

0.25 " 



July 



Total 
Aucrust 



1 

3 
9 
17 
20 
28 
30 



3 

8 

9 

14 

15 
16 
17 

18 
26 
27 
30 
31 



Total . 
September 1 
" 3 
" 17 



Total 
October 



5 
9 
11 
16 
20 
22 
31 



Total . 

November 2 

5 

" 8-9 

" 26 

" 29 

Total . 
December 5 

" 10 



Total .... 5.59 " Total 

Total for the year 1877, 68.70 inches. 



0.58 inches. 

. 0.35 " 

0.40 " 

1,00 " 

0.55 " 

0.55 " 

0.50 " 

3.93 " 

0.25 " 

0.35 " 

0.40 " 

0.38 " 

0.45 " 

0.30 « 

0.50 " 

1.10 " 

2.00 " 

3.00 " 

0.75 " 

0.30 " 

9.78 » 

0.35 " 

0.25 " 

1.00 " 

1.60 " 

6.00 " 

1.50 " 

1 .50 " 

0.75 " 

1.50 " 

1.50 " 

0.40 " 

13.15 " 

1.40 " 

2.50 " 

1.50 " 

4.00 " 

1.60 " 

11.00 '• 

1.00 " 

0.05 " 

J.05 " 



23 



PUMPING STATION. 



There liave been slight repairs on the pumps. Two new 
steps were put under the water-wheels. Having over 40 
feet head, the bearing on the steps is so great that they 
soon vs'Car out. To remedy the difficulty, E. Geylene, the 
maker of the wheels, advised a broader step and also sus- 
pension glass bearings. They have accordingly been pro- 
cured and will be put in as soon as the water gets low 
enough in the tail-race. 

The glass bearings will relieve the weight on the steps 
and, as the maker claims, prevent them from wearing. 

A barn has been built west of the pump-house at a cost 
of 1960.56. This was for the purpose of storing the small 
quantity of hay that may be cut on the land belonging to 
the city and to have a place suitable to keep a cow and a 
horse, which is allowed the engineer who has charge of the 
station. 



RECORD OF PUMPING, 187T. 



MONTHS. 



No. hours' work 
tor both pumps. 



Average 

stroke p'l 

minute. 



Total No. 

strokes 

p'rinonih 



Total gallons 

pumped in one 

month. 



p ally aver- 
age gallons 
pumped. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Totils and average 



830 h. 50 m. 
6G8 " 30 " 



788 ' 
588 ' 
G20 ' 
626 ' 
692 ' 
568 
C.'3 
686 
672 
619 



50 
40 
10 
10 
30 
50 
00 
10 
20 
40 



16.25 
15.50 
15.77 
16.95 
17.13 
16.87 
16.98 
16.56 
16.35 
16.32 
16.27 
16.01 



7,985 h. 40 m. 



16.64 



810,368 
621,544 
746,404 
598,728 
637,368 
634,002 
705,608 
565,528 
611,236 
672,204 
656,526 
711,514 



7.071.0.30 



47,811,712 
36,671,096 
44,037,836 
35,324.752 
37,604,712 
37,406.118 
41,630,872 
33,366,152 
36,062,924 
39,660,036 
38,736,052 
41,979,.326 
470.201. .58S 



1,348,765 
1,309,682 
1,420,575 
1,177,392 
1,213,055 
1,246,871 
1,312,931 
1,076,327 
1,202,097 
1,279,356 
1,291,203 
1,. 3.54,172 



1. "7 1.869 



24 

The cost of pumping water into the reservoir for the 
jear is three dollars and fiftj-nine cents ($3.59) per mill- 
ion gallons pumped 113 feet high. 

THE SUPPLY AND FORCE BIAIN. 

The supply and force main are now in good condition. 
Eight leaks have been repaired. There are three more at 
the present time. 

EESEEVOIR. 

The repairs on the reservoir consist of a few days' work 
in stopping slight leaks in the gate-chambers. The fence 
that surrounds it was painted at a cost of $175.00. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

There have been laid the past season 5,914 feet of cast- 
iron pipe, 186 feet of 14-inch, 683 feet of 12-inch, 1,370 
feet of 8-inch, 3,714 feet of 6-inch, including thirty-nine 
feet on Valley street, relaid on account of sewer. 

The pipe was bought of R. D. Wood & Co., Philadelphia, 
at $32.25 per ton of 2,240 lbs., delivered at Manchester. 

The number of leaks on the cast-iron pipe was thirty; 
wrought-iron and cement-lined, one hundred and fifty-seven. 
The latter were repaired by the contractor till November, 
when the three years expired in which the contract specified 
that the pipe should be kept in repair by the contractor. 
Since then the city has made the necessary repairs. 

The extensions made in 1875 are still under the care of 
the contractor. That portion of the 12-inch main that sup- 
plies 'Squog which lies on the bed of the river has caused 
no little trouble. 

On the morning of January 12 the water stopped run- 
ning to 'Squog, and after a thorough search the trouble was 



25 

found to be in the river-pipe. The ice in the river at that 
time was twelve inches thick, covered with snow, and the 
leak was found by cutting holes in the ice over the line of 
pipe. 

A diver was sent for, and Wm. H. Lloyd of Boston, a 
man of experience in repairing pipe under water, came 
here and made an examination January 14. The pipe was 
found broken off nearly square, forty feet from the east 
shore, in eight feet of water. lie ordered a sleeve 2 feet 
long, made in two parts, to be put together with three- 
fourths bolts, with a thick rubber packing just to fit the 
pipe. This was made as soon as possible, and put on Jan- 
uary 17, when the water was again let on, and 'Squog sup- 
plied with water, after being without it five days. 

March 14 a leak was discovered on the east bank of the 
river, within fifteen feet of the water's edge. This was 
found to be in the spigot end of the pipe close to the bell, 
where a hole was found five inches long and half an inch 
wide. In order to repair it a small coffer-dam was built 
and a sleeve put on, large enough in the middle to cover tlie 
boll. While the proper sleeve was being made, a tempo- 
rary one was put on, but it leaked badly. When this was 
taken off, the action of the water and sand had worn out a 
piece of iron eight square inches, one inch thick, in forty- 
eight hours. After putting on the second sleeve the pipe 
was all right till July 17. This time a leak was discovered 
near the middle of the river, in about six feet of water. 
On examination this proved to bs caused by the blowing 
out of the lead in one of the bell joints. The pipe lay 
with the angle up river, with the spigot end partly out of 
the bell. A hole was washed out under the pipe, that was 
subsequently filled up with stone, requiring twenty cart- 
loads. 

It was evident that to repair the leak the pipe would 



26 

have to be raised up out of water. Rafts would have to be 
built and anchored, which, together with repairing the 
pipe, would take more time than to lay a pipe across the 
Granite Bridge, for which ]>reparation had been made early 
in the spring, by laying the pipe up to the abutments on 
each side of the river, vi^aiting only for the bridge to be 
repaired. This connection was made by laying an 8-inch 
wrought-iron pipe across Granite Bridge,. and water let on 
July 23. In the mean time 'Squog was supplied by letting 
water through the river-pipe once a day for one hour. 

August 22 Mr. George H. Norman, the contractor who 
laid the pipe, sent Capt. John Waters, of Newport, R. I., a 
submarine contractor, to examine the leak, and, if it could 
be repaired under water, to do it. After a thorough exam- 
ination of the pipe across the river, he reported that the 
greater part of it was in good condition, being firmly bedded 
in the sand and showing no leaks of any amount, but that 
the pipe would have to be taken out of the water where 
the break was. The contractor failing to make the repairs, 
your superintendent employed Capt. Waters, who at once 
proceeded with the work. The pipe was raised out of 
water, the joint leaded, and the pipe let down on to the 
river-bed and connected at the flexible joint. 

The experience with the iiver-j)ip8 goes to show that the 
flexible joint is all ] ight, and, if the pipe had been thicker, 
and connected with flange joints with a wood or rubber 
packing, instead of lead joints, it would have been perfect. 
The ])ipe now is in good condition. 

From our own experience and that of other cities it has 
been demonstrated that any and all kinds of pipe are liable 
to leak under 65 or 100 pounds pi-essure, laid anywhere. 
If under water, they do not show till they become so large 
that they ai'c expensive to repair. 

The reason for taking so much space in the report on the 



27 



river-pipe was that the expense lias been greater on this 
part of the distribution pipe than on any other the past 
year. The cost of the repaiis made was -1839.64:, of which 
(jleoige H. Norman paid i;355.19. 

The 14-inch pipe laid under the lower canal by the 
Manchester Print-Works, together with the 8-inch gate, 
has been transferred to the city by the payment of $550. 

The A moskeag Company have laid an 8-inch cast-iron 
pipe on River street, 'Sqiiog, connecting with the city's pipe 
at Granite street, thence north 2400 feet to their store- 
houses, for protection against fire. 

A building has been constructed north of Ferry street 
and east of River street, on land owned by. the Araoskeag 
Company, for a storehouse for tools and special castings. 



SCHEDULE OF PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID AND SET IX 1ST7. 



Streets. 


Cast 
Iron pijjes. 


Gates. 


g 


Location. 




6 in. 


Sin. 


12in 


14in 


6 in. 


Sin. 


12iri 




A 


r 
















Lengthening hydrant main. 
Prospect to Brook 






683 












]{r,)nk 


8 

6 

116 
















910 




186 




3 




1 
1 
















1 


Hpt^ch TOPst . 


Millbrd 


579 
504 
180(1 








1 Extenrteil to H. D. Noves'. 


Park 


460 
















1 










620 














Supply main to 'Squog 












1 

1 


8 


At River St 


3675 


1370 


6S3 


186! 3 


4 


Total length, .5914 ft. 



Number miles cast-iron pipe laid in 1877 .... 1^ 

Number gates set ]S77 8 

Number hydrants set 1877 ....... 8 

The main leading to hydrant, corner Valley, corner Elm, 
was taken up on account of building sewer, and 39 feet of 
cast-iron pipe put in place of cement-lined. 

The main leading to hydrant on Main, corner Walker 



28 

street, was taken up and 6 feet of cast-iron pipe put in 
place of cement-lined. 

Length of pipe laid of cement-lined and cast-iron of dif- 
ferent sizes, as follows : 

20 inch cement-lined pipe 

1^ U U (.1 u 



12 " 




10 " 




8 " 




6 " 




4 " 






Total, . 


Equal to 27'tT,f miles. 


20 inch cast-iron pipe 


14 » 


u (( a 


12 " 


a u u 


10 " 


u a a 


8 " 


a u a 


G « 


i( u u 



20,934.9 ft. 


6,925.0 " 


8,400.0 " 


5,495.75 " 


12,666.0 " 


83,069.0 " 


8,950.0 " 


146,440.65 ft. 


104 ft. 


4,825 " 


6,990 " 


168" 


1,485 « 


8,416 " 



20,938 ft. 
Equal to .3^| miles. 
Total length of cement-lined and cast-iron pipe, 31^4^ miles. 

Number and sizes of gates set to Dec. 22, 1877 : 

20 inch gates 5 

14 " " 9 

12 " " • . . . .18 

10 " " 8 

8 " " 27 

6 " " 173 

4 " " 14 

Total 249 

Number air-valves 8 

Number hydrants . . 297 



29 

HYDRANTS. 

There have been eight hydrants set the past year, made 
by Pettee & Perkins. 

The total number of hydrants now set is two hundred 
and ninety-seven (297). 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1877. 

Harrison Street, north-west corner Beech. 
Hancock, north-west corner River Road. 
Milford, north side, near H. D. Noyes' house. 
Piscataquog, north side, near end of street. 
Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 
Park, north-west corner Cypress. 
Park, north-west corner Milton. . 
Park, north side, near Hall. 

GATES. 

There have been eight gates set the past year. One 12- 
inch Ludlow, one 8-inch Ludlow, two 8-inch Eddy and four 
6-inch Eddy. 

The total number of gates now set is two hundred and 
forty-nine (249). 

There are two Chapman, and one Boston & Machine Co., 
gates that are out of order and will have to be taken out in 
the spring and new ones substituted. All of the rest are 
in good condition. 



30 



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32 

SERVICE PIPE. 

The number of applications for water, to date, has been 
fifteen hundred and thirty-two (1532). 

Fourteen hundred and twenty-nine (1429) service pipes 
have been laid to l^ec. 22, 1877, of diameters, numbers, 
size and length, as follows : 



40 


1-2 


inch d 


iam 


eter. 


L> 


ength, 860 feet, 8 inches! 


1,201 


3-4 










32,188 


» 2 ■ " 


162 


1 










4,793 


" 6 " 


13 


n 










720 


" 11 " 


9 


2 










456 


» 3 " 


4 


4 










117 


" " 



Total length of service pipe in street, . 39,136 feet, 6 inches. 

Number miles service pipe in street, 7^^'j'. 

One hundred and ninety (190) service pipes have been 

laid this year, to Dec. 22, 1877. The number, size and 
length are as follows : 

179 3-4 inch diameter. Length, 4,617.4 feet. 

11 1 " " " 240.2 feet. 



Total length laid in 1877 .... 4,857.6 est 

Total cost of service pipes ... . $ 2,236.01 

Total cost of service pipes to Dec. 22, 1877 . 24,291.51 
The water has not been let on, or is shut off from, thirty- 
seven (37) services. 

METERS. 

There lias been an addition of thirty-seven (37) meters 
to those of last year, making at the present time two hun- 
dred and two (202) meters set. The kind and sizes are as 
follows : 



33 



Kind. 


% inch 


% inch 


1 inch 


Total 




107 


56 
8 


22 
3 
1 
2 


185 




11 




1 


<> 




2 


4 








Total 


108 


66 


28 


202 







Number meters owned by water-works . . . 214 
Number meters on hand . . . . .12 

The income from the sale of water for the year 1877 has 
been as follows : 



Received from water and hydrant rents less 



abatements 


$35,539 51 


" metered water . . . 


7,094 50 


" fines .... 


177 04 


'' shutting off and letting on 


56 00 


" rent of meters 


688 59 


" building purposes 


136 10 


" setting meters 


108 00 


" labor and pipe 


23 56 


Total 


$43,823 30 


Abatements 


42119 



Classification of accounts for the year 1877 : 

Superintendence, collecting and repairs . $4,825 26 

Stationery, printing and lithographs . . 148 17 

Offlce and incidental expenses . . . 81 47 

Pumping expenses and repairs . . . 1,687 86 

Repairs to dam, canal, penstock and reservoir 26 64 

Repairs to buildings 24 13 



-$ 5,054 90 



-$ 1,738 63 



Running expenses for the year ending Decem- 
ber 22, 1877 

Service pipes 

3 



,793 53 



2,854 62 



84 



Distribution pipes 

Fire hydrauts and vaives .... 
Pumping-machinery, i)ump-house, dwelling 

and barn 

Meters, boxes and brass connections 

Grading and fencing 

lloads and culverts 

Total expended on construction ac- 
count in 1877 

Total expended in 1877 . 



9,104 56 
618 00 

960 56 
864 45 
262 83 
327 49 



$14,982 51 



$21,776 04 



Classification of accounts to Dec. 22, 1877 : 



Land and water rights 

Dam, canal, penstock and race . 

Pumping-machinery, pump-house, dwell 

ing and barn 
Distributing reservoir and fixtures 
Force and supply mains 
Distribution pipes 
Fire hydrants and valves . 
Tools and fixtures 
Boarding and storehouses 
Eoads and culverts 
Supplies . ... 
Engineering .... 
Livery and traveling expenses . 
Legal expenses .... 
Grading and fencing . 
Service-pipes .... 
Meters, boxes and brass connections 

Total construction account to 
Dec. 22, 1877 



^ 30,858 67 
101,198 20 

87,896 96 
71,542 36 
88,674 02 
232,245 67 
29,606 95 
10,649 85 

919 36 
2,084 24 

550 89 

22,176 19 

2,856 64 

563 79 

11,148 26 

24,291 51 

6,511 98 



$723,774 54 



Current expenses : 

Superintendence, collecting and repairs $19,180 79 

Stationery, printing and lithographs . 3,339 74 

Office and incidental expenses . . 1,764 15 



35 

Pumping expenses and repairs . . 6,029 02 

Repairs to dam, canal, penstock and reservoir 170 29 
Repairs to buildings . . . . 24 13 

Total current expenses to December 

22, 1877, .... $30,558 12 

Interest $40,678 51 

Highway expenditures .... 14,000 53 

^54,679 04 



Total amount of bills approved to Dec. 

22, 1877, .... $809,011 70 

Interest, discounts and labor performed on high- 
way transferred, and tools and material 
sold, $57,227 05 



Total cost to date, not including inter- 
est, $751,784 65 

Interest and discount to January 1, 1877, $128,452 51 
Interest for 1877, 35,688 00 



" " January 1, 1878, . . . $164,140 51 
Amount paid toward interest, 1877, . . 24,000 00 

$140,140 51 

Total cost, including interest, . $891,925 16 

The following amounts have been paid over to the^City 
Treasurer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, Supplies and materials sold, $573 61 

1873, " " " " , 177 07 
1873, Accrued interest on water 

bonds sold, ... 193 23 
1873, Accrued interest on water 

bonds sold, . . . 146 00 

1873, Water rents, . . . 1,920 53 

1874, Supplies and materials sold, 607 89 
March 17, 1874, Highway expenditures, trans- 
ferred from water-works 
account, .... 14,00053 



36 



March 17, 1874, Interest and discount, trans- 
ferred from water-works 
account, .... 

Sept. 1, 1874, Interest and discount, trans- 
ferred from water-works 



12,347 25 







account, . . . . 


22,361 74 






1874, Water and hydrant rents. 


30,233 54 


Dec. 


20, 


1874, Interest transferred, 


4,566 25 


Dec. 


IS, 


1875, 1 anvil sold. 


15 00 


Sept. 


25, 


1875, Engine, crusher and materi- 








al sold, . . . . 


2,089 45 ■ 






1875, "Water and hydrant rents. 


27,119 15 


May 


20, 


1876, 1 derrick sold. 


125 00 


May 


20, 


1876, Eent of derrick, . 


24 00 


•" 




187o, Water and hydrant rents. 


38,879 47 






1877, 


43,823 30 






Total, . . . . 


^199,203 04 






Amount appropriated to Dec. 








22,1877, . . . . 


640,000 00 



Total received' to date. 
Deduct bills approved to date, 

Amount paid toward interest. 

Balance on hand Dec. 22, 1877, 



1839,203 04 
809,011 70 

$30,192 34 
24,000 00 

$6,191 34 



Amount of bills approved to date 



Amount bills approved in 1871, 

u " _ " " 1872, 

" " ' '• " 1873, 

u ;; a a jgy^^ 

" " " ^'.1875, 

" " " 1876, 



$1,723 06 

245,870 66 

294,609 02 

146,515 40 

50,091 80 

48,425 72 



Totals of monthly bills in 1877 : 

January, 780 95 

February, 594 73 

March, 1,896 57 



37 



April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

iSTovember, 

December, 



Total amount of bills approved 
to December 22, 1877, 



977 97 




3,820 83 




4,063 85 




2,179 95 




1,567 94 




907 05 




1,736 64 




1,747 39 




1,502 27 




c-oj 776 '^'^ 






!?809,011 


70 



Statement showing the uses of water as supphed to 
December 22, 1877 : 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


1 Post-offlce. 


9 Churches. 


1 City Library. 


1 Court-house. 


5 Banks. 


2 Hose-companies. 


5 Hotels. 


4 Fire-engiues. 


1 Masonic building. 


1 Ilook-and-ladder. 


1 Odd Fellows' building 


1 Opera-house. 


1 Holly-tree Inn. 


1 Music Hall. 


1 Hall. 


1 Convent. 





MANUPACTURINCr ESTABLISHMENTS. 



1 Iron foundry. 

2 Dye houses. 

1 Machine shop. 

2 Patent medicine m'nuf'ctories. 

3 Clothing manufactories. 
2 Furniture manufactories. 
2 Harness shops. 

1 Brush shop. 

1 KoU shop. 

1 Soap manufactory. 



1 Brass and copper foundry. 

1 Sash and blind shop. 

3 Breweries. 

1 Shoe manufactory. 

1 Pop-corn manufactory. 

1 Trunk and harness m'ttufctory. 

1 Gas-works. 

2 Slaughter houses. 
1 Grain mill. 



38 





MABKETS. 


5 Fish. 


1 Meat and fish. 


9 Meat. 






OFFICES. 


5 Dentist. 


2 Express. 


55 Professional. 


8 Printing. 


1 Telegraph. 






SHOPS. 


14 Barber. 


2 Currying, 


1 Wheelwright. 


3 Plumber. 


5 Blacksmith. 


3 Steam, gas and water pipe 


1 Carpenter. 


1 Paint. 




STABLES. 


loO Private. 


12 Livery. 


• 


SALOONS. 


7 Dining. 


6 Billiard. 


4 Oyster. 


53 Liquor. 




STORES. 


2 Hair. 


2 Tea. 


2 Auction. 


38 Grocery. 


10 Drug. 


1 Meal. 


6 Jewelry. 


3 Hardware. 


3 Wholesale liquor. 


8 Boot and shoe. 


1 Fur. 


3 Stove. 


1 House furnishing goods. 


3 Gents' furnishing goods. 


15 Fancy goods. 


3 Book. 


1 Wholesale paper. 


1 Leather and shoe finders, 


5 Dry goods. 


2 Music. 


4 Candy. 


2 Upholstery. 


2 Crockery. 


3 Undertakers'. 


1 Battery Building. 


2 Cigar. 



39 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1 Bleachery. 


2 Greenhouses. 


2 Laundries. 


2 Band rooms. 


3 Drinking fountains. 


8 Bakeries. 


2 Ice houses. 


8 Stationary engines. 


8 Pliotographers. 


1 Portable engme. 


297 Tire hydrants (public). 


9 Private hydi-auls. 


3324 Families. 


4183 Faucets. 


66 Boarding-houses. 


4G0 Wash bowls. 


479 Horses. 


203 Wash tubs. 


43 Cows and oxen. 


404 Water-closets. 


745 Sprinklers. 


86 Urinals. 


9 Water troughs. 


163 Bath tubs. 


6 Stand-pipes. 




Respectfully 


submitted, 




CHARLES K. WALKER, 




Superintendent, 



GATES, HYDRANTS, METERS, ETC., ON HAND. 



GATES ON HAND. 



4 in. Eddy spigot. 

4 in. Boston Machine spigot. 

4 in. Chapman spigot. 

6 in. Chapman spigot. 

6 in. Boston Machine spigot. 

6 in. Eddy hub. 



2 6 in. Ludlow spigot. 

2 10 in. Boston Machine spigot. 

3 12 in. Boston Machine spigot. 
1 14 in. Boston Machine spigot. 
1 20 in. Boston Machine spigot. 



HYDRANTS ON HAND. 



1 Boston Machine. 



1 Pettee & Perkins. 







METERS ON HAND. 


1 1-2 in. 


Gem. 


4 5-8 in. Union Water Meter Co, 


3 3-4 in. 


Gem. 


1 3-4 in. " " 


2 3-4 in. 


Desper. 


1 lin. " « 



40 



PIPE AND BRANCHES ON HAND. 



253 ft. 20 inch cast-iron pipe. 
130 ft. 14 inch " " 

166 ft. 12 inch " " 

120 ft. 10 inch " " 

276 ft. 8 inch " " 

448 ft. 6 inch " " 

36 ft. 4 inch " " 

1 14 inch quarter-turn. 
1 double 6 on 14 branch. 
1 double 6 on 12 branch. 

1 double 8 on 8 branch. 
5 single 6 on 6 branch. 
3 single 8 on 14 branch. 

2 single 6 on 12 branch. 

3 single 6 on 14 branch. 
3 single 12 on 14 branch. 



4 6 inch W. plugs. 
3 14 inch plugs. 

2 14 inch sleeves with flanges. 
1 12 inch " " 

1 20 inch " " 

3 12 inch sleeves with flanges, 2 

parts. 
7 20 inch sleeves. 

2 14 inch " 

4 12 inch « 

3 8 inch " 
12 6 inch " 

1 6 inch sleeve for cement-pipe. 
1 10 " " '< 

1260 pounds lead. 
53 pounds gasket. 



INVENTORY OP FURNITURE, ETC., IN OFFICE. 



S drawing boards. 

1 wardrobe. 

1 transit. 

1 level rod. 

1 copjdng press. 

1 roll manilla paper. 

1 roll tracing muslin. 

2 drawing tables. 

1 library desk. 

2 waste baskets. 
1 6-foot pole. 

3 stools. 
1 duster. 

1 map of city. 

1 map of city framed. 

1 bottle ink. 

1 case of drawers. 

1 stove. 



1 level. 

3 transit rods. 

1 roll mounted paper. 

2 quires drawing paper. 
1 lot of book paper. 

1 lot fuel. 

1 bookcase. 

1 table. 

1 12-inch pressure gauge. 

1 6-inch pressure gauge. 

1 bill stamp. 

3 inkstands. 

1 lot of drawings. 

1 safe. 

1 pair scissors. 

1 directory. 

1 eraser. 

1 lot reports. 



41 



SUPPLIES AND TOOLS BELONGING TO SERVICE DEPARTMENT. 



68 pounds rope. 

1 sledge hammer. 

8 striking hammers. 

2 stone hammers. 

1 caulking hammer. 
13 cold chisels. 

8 caulking tools. 

2 mauls. 

2 3 pole derrick. 
1 4 pole derrick. 
100 linen rope. 
1 grub hoe. 
1 piece sheet iron. 
1 piece sheet lead. 
6 extra poles for derrick. 

1 furnace and kettle. 

2 tool boxes. 

2 iron bars, 6 feet long. 
2 iron bars, 5 feet long, 

1 iron bar, 4 feet long. 

2 pick handles. 
1 lot old picks. 

8 R. P. shovels, (good). 
1 S. P. shovel. 
12 R. P. shovels, (poor). 

1 iron snow shovel. 

2 wood snow shovels. 
30 blasting tubes. 

11 drills, 2 feet long. 

4 drills, 2 1-2 feet long. 
4 drills, 3 feet long. 
8 drills, 4 feet long. 

12 wedges and shims. 
4 spoons. 

2 lead ladles. 

2 bench axes. 

4 common axes. 

3 brad awls. 

2 iron clamps. 



2 wood clamps. 
1 pair calipers. 

1 chain fall. 

9 wrenches for gates. 
8 hydrant wrenches. 

2 monkey wrenches. 
8 special wrenches. 

1 machine hammer. 

1 nail hammer. 

1 pair punches. 

1 pair punches (long). 

1 iron wedge. 

1 hand hammer. 

2 wheel-barrows. 
10 dump-barrows. 
13 cold-chisels. 

7 red lanterns. 
1 dark lantern. 
4 lanterns. 
4 screw drivers. 
1 water pail. 

1 door chisel. 

2 nail sets. 
1 mallet. 

1 plow and six irons. 

4 hand saws. 

1 small back saw. 
1 iron saw. 
1 smoothing plane. 
1 F. plane. 
1 short jointer. 
1 long jointer. 
1 set match planes. 
18 moulding tools. 

mortise chisels 3-8 to 1 1-2 
inches. 

5 chisels paring 1-4 to 1 1-2 in. 
1 trowel. 

3 drills for iron. 



42 



1 washer cutter. 


2 vises. 


1 die plate. 


1 side packing leather. 


6 dies, R. & L. from 1-2 to 1 in. 


3 long handle spades. 


6 taps, R. & L. from 1-2 to 1 iu. 


1 spoon shovel. 


2 bushings, 3-4 to 1-2. 


20 hydrant packings. 


1 pipe cutter. 


10 hydrant rubber packings. 


2 extra cutters. 


6 tamping tools. 


2 files. 


45 hydrant nuts for cap. 


26 large meter boxes. 


1 iron kettle. 


4 small meter boxes. 


1 tea kettle. 


2 coal hods. 


1 1-2 bushel basket. 


1 "wood stove. 


U hydrant covers. 


2 brooms. 


2 wood stop boxes. 


1 glass cutter. 


1 kerosene barrel. 


1 meter spanner. 


48 feet 1-4 inch pipe. 


50 feet 1 inch rubber hose. 


1 iron hand M. AY. W. 


17 square stop box covers. 


1 steel " " 


1 watering pot. 


50 feet of wire. 


2 gallons kerosene. , 


1 bevel square. 


5 gallon can. 


5 hydrant rods. 


1-2 gallon sperm oil. 


1 lot gate covers. 


1-2 gallon linseed oil. 


' 10 pounds waste. 


3 pounds red lead. 


1 lot hemp packing. 


1 roll lead pipe for services. 


13 gate wrenches. 


1 roll tin pipe for services. 


1 lamp. 


4 pounds solder. 


1 heating furnace. 


4 solder irons and pot. 


1 lot iron for furnace. 


2 oil stones. 


1 lot of rope. 


4 oil cans 


1 grindstone. 


1 3 cu, ft. measure. 


10 3-4 in. lead connections with 


1 platform scale. 


stop. 


1 6 in. gauge. 


3 1-9 '< " " 


1 20 " " 


6 1 " " " 


1 20 brass spindle. 


8 1 1-4 " " " 


1 14 " 


2 1 1-2 " " " 


18" 


11 1 


5 6" 


695 ft. 1 in. 11. C.pipe. 


1 wood saw. 


376 " 3-4 " " 


2 prick punches. 


10 6 in. clamps 1-2 in. stops. 


1 lot of brass nipples. 


3 6" fronts of clamps 1-2 in. 


2 1 in. stop and waste. 


stops. 



43 



11 1 in st'p & w'ste (for cement 


.) 2 4 in. clamps 1-2 in. stops. 


1 3-4 " " " 


3 14 in. clamps 3-4 in. stops 


61 1 " curt stop. 


2 10 " " 1-2 " " 


1 3-4 " corp " 


2 8" " 3-4 " " 


1 bench and vise. 


6 1" plugs. 


1 wire cutter. 


50 nipple caps- 


5 pairs rubber boots. 


27 1 in. nipples. 


5 new gate covers. 


19 3-4 " 


9 service covers. 


21 1-2 " 


12 3-4 in. brass connections. 


66 3-4x1-2 quarter turns. 


3 lead unions. 


45 1x3-4 " 


4 pounds nails. 


6 1 in. " " 


1 " spikes. 


88 3-4 " " 


1 box for services. 


13 1-2 " " 


1 pair rubber mitts. 


31 1 in. couplings. 


1-4 barrel cement. 


llO 3-4 " " 


4 collars for hydrants. 


20 1-2 " " 


1 chain " " 


40 3-4x1-2 reduced couplings 


2 iron rimmers. 


35 1x3-4 " " 


1 trace ratchet. 


46 1 in. E. & L. couplings. 


1 ice chisel. 


63 3-4 " " " 


8 stop wrenches. 


25 1-2 " " " 


7 stone points. 


2 extension bits. 


3 hydrant valves. 


2 pair pipe tongs. 


1 pair chain tongs. 


1 pair blacksmith tongs. 


1 ratchet driller. 


2 meter wrenches. 


1 road roller. 





INVENTORY OP TOOLS AT PUMPING STATION. 



1 scoop shovel. 

4 common shovels. 
1 desk. 

1 one-inch auger. 

5 lanterns. 

3 monkey wrenches. 

6 pails. 

1 square. 
1 plumb square. 
1 sprinkler pot. 
1 clock. 



1 pair pliers. 

1 wire cutter. 

1 boat. 

1 set steps. 

1 barrel oil. 

1 jack-screw. 

1 brace and 3 bits. 

1 trowel. 

1 wood saw. 

1 hand saw. 

1 iron slush-bucket. 



44 



2 planes. 

2 therniomelers. 

4 crow bars. 

1 bellows and anvil. 

2 pipe wrenches. 
1 window brush. 

1 gate wrench (ratchet) . 
1 long key. 

1 hydrant wrench. 

2 wheelbarrows. 
1 five-pail kettle. 

3 picks. 

1 clothes-dryer. 

2 ladders. 
2 stoves. 

1 coal sifter. 
10 gallons si^erm oil. 

1 bench. 

2 levels. 

1 waste press. 
1 Scotch driller. 



6 fork wrenches. 
2 screen rakes. 
2 axes. 

4 oil cans. 
2 oil tanks. 

200 pounds waste. 
30 pounds tallow. 
50 pounds black lead. 

5 cords wood. 
15 tons coal. 

2 ice chisels. 

6 cold chisels. 

2 hammers. 

3 drip pans. 

6 pounds hemp packing. 

1 draw shave. 

2 screw plates, tap and dies. 
1 vise. 

200 feet 7-8 inch hose. 
100 feet 3-4 inch hose. 



INVENTORY OF CONSTRUCTrON TOOLS AT DAM. 



2 full-trimmed derricks. 

1 iron rake. 

4 set dog chains. 

1 set blacksmith tools. 

6 pieces Scotch sewer pipe. 

1 force pump. 

1 billhook. 

1 clevis and pin. 

1 harrow. 

1 timber roll. 

8 sprinkler pots. 

1 lot lumber. 

1 lot of old iron. 



4 mortar hoes. 

2 iron shovels. 
150 feet hose. 

1 Ko. 5 plow. 

3 grub hoes. 

3 bush scythes and snaths. 

2 axes. 

4 cable chains. 
1 bellows. 

4 water pails. 
10 mason hods. 
1 lot of old shovels. 



TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 



To the City Oouncils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith submit their 
twenty-fourth annual report of the- affairs and condition of 
the Library, and with it the report made to them by the 
Treasurer of the Board, showing the expenditures for books 
and periodicals, and also the report of the Librarian, which 
shows in detail the operations of the Library during the 
year and the condition of the Library and other property 
under the charge of the Librarian, at the close of the year. 

From the report of the Treasurer it appears that during 
the year the sum of eight hundred fifty-nine dollars eighty- 
four cents has been expended for the purchase of books, 
and the sum of one hundred seventy-four dollars sixty-five 
cents for the purchase of periodicals, and three dollars and 
forty cents express charges on books furnished the Library 
under an act of Congress providing for the distribution of 
the public documents of the United States, being a total 
expenditure for these purposes of one thousand thirty- 
seven dollars and eighty-nine cents, and leaving a balance 
of the sums appropriated by the city, unexpended at the 
close of the year, of fourteen hundred eighty-seven dollars 
and sixty-seven cents. 

In addition to these sums the Treasurer has received 



46 

from fines collected by the Librarian from persons failing 
to comply with the rules of the .Library in reference to the 
return of books loaned, the sum of one hundred sixty-four 
dollars thirty-eight cents, and the further sum of thirteen 
dollars paid for books that had been lost. These sums, 
together with the accumulated income of the Dean fund, 
amounting to the sum of fifteen hundred thirty dollars, 
constitute the funds in the hands of the Trustees at the 
end of the fiscal year, applicable to the future increase of 
the Library. It is expected that the larger proportion of 
this sum will be required for the payment for books already 
ordered and for the purchase of additions to the Library, as 
soon as the changes that are needed in the shelving can be 
made, so as to admit of the books to be procured being 
properly catalogued and arranged on the shelves. 

Before the time of the semi-annual examination of the 
Library in July it was deemed for the interest of the Li- 
brary that a change should be made in the Librarian. • 
Mr. Charles H. Marshall, who had acted as Librarian for 
upwards of eleven years, retired from the position, and at 
a meeting of the Trustees in April, 1877, Mrs. Lizzie B. 
Davis was selected to fill the vacancy, who commenced the 
duties of the office on the first of July, 1877. At the same 
time that the change was made in the office of Librarian a 
reduction was made in the compensation paid to that offi- 
cer and the Trustees are in hopes that a further reduction 
in the expenses of the Library may be found to be practi- 
cable. 

The report of the Librarian shows that the Library has 
been open for the delivery of books two hundred and forty- 
eight days, during which time the number of books in cir- 
culation has been forty-nine thousand two hundred and 
seven, an increase of upwards of five thousand over the 
circulation of the preceding year. 



47 

At the annual examination at the end of the last year 
the whole number of volumes in the Library was twenty 
thousand tliree hundred ninety-six. Thirteen hundred and 
seven have been added during the year, of which five hun- 
dred twenty-seven have been purchased, six hundred forty- 
seven have been presented, and one hundred thirty-three 
volumes of periodicals have been bound, making an aggre- 
gate of twenty-one thousand seven hundred and two vol- 
umes now in the Library, including in such number four- 
teen hundred sixty-eight pamphlets and sixteen maps. 

The number of periodicals received during the year has 
been less than usual, occasioned mainly by changes in the 
mode of publication. The deficiency in this class of liter- 
ature will be made good by the substitution of others for 
those that have been dropped or have ceased publication. 

Circumstances not anticipated at the date of the last 
report, have prevented the publication of a new catalogue. 

The preparation of the manuscript having been delayed 
until near the close of the year, it was thought advisable 
to include in it all the works received at the Library to the 
close of the present year. This modification of the plan 
before proposed will require the postponement of the time 
of its publication, but will make it more complete when 
issued. The additions made necessary by this change will 
be completed in a short time, and the catalogue placed in 
the hands of the printer at an early day ; and there seems 
now to be no reason to expect that its completion for use 
at the Library will be deferred later than to the time of the 
next semi-annual examination. 

From inquiries made as to the cost of printing, it is be- 
lieved that the funds already appropriated for this purpose 
and now standing to the credit of the Library will be suffi- 
cient to publish the catalogue in its enlarged form, and but 
little, if any, further appropriation for that purpose will be 
required. 



48 

A list of the books presented to the Library during the 
year will be found annexed to the report of the Librarian, 
and to the persons who have thus aided to increase the 
Library, the thanks of the city are justly due. 

The expenditures for the expenses necessary for the 
operation of the Library as paid by the City Treasurer have 
been fourteen hundred and seventy-seven dollars and forty- 
four cents, and are shown in detail in the report of the 
City Treasurer. 

The Trustees feel confident that the expenditures for the 
ensuing year will not exceed those of the past year, and 
that an appropriation of an amount equal to that made the 
last year will be sufficient to defray the current annual ex- 
penses, and enable them to properly care for and preserve 
the property entrusted to their charge. 

January, 1878, Li Board of Trustees. 

Read and approved, and ordered to be transmitted to the 

City Councils. 

JOHN L. KELLY, 

Mayor, and President ex-officio. 

N. P. HUNT, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Board of Trustees of the City Library: 

The Treasurer of the Board makes the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the Board of the funds 
received by them on account of the City Library. 

1877. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance as per last report . .|2,749 56 

April 10. cash of Librarian, books lost . 11 00 

April 10. " " fines . . 164 31 



49 



June 30. To cash of City Treasurer- 
June 30. " Librarian, fines 
June 30. " " book lost 
Jan. 1. income of Dean fund . 
July 1. income of Dean fund . 



1877. 

Jan. 9. Paid N. E. News Co., periodicals 

Jan. 12, W. G. Colesworth, books . 

Feb. 6. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

Feb. 2L. Sampson, Davenport & Co. 

books 

March 6. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

April 10. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

April 18. Comstock & Cline, books . 

May 8. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

May 16, Journal of Chemistry, peri- 
odicals 

May 18. Lee & Shepard, books 

May 80. Lee & Shepard, books 

June 5. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

June 5. F. B. Eaton, books . 

June 15. Lee & Shepard, books 

June 19. J. G. Jones, express on books 

July 10. N. E. News Co , periodicals 

July 24. Sampson, Davenport & Co 

books 

Aug. 11. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

Aug. 13. F. N. Boxer, books . 

Aug. 23. Sampson, Davenport & Co 

books 

Sept. 13. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

Oct. 16. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

4 



1,000 00 

07 

2 00 

153 00 

158 00 



•14,232 94 


Cr. 


12 41 


4 00 


17 68 


6 00 


12 73 


15 62 


12 00 


. 12 74 


9 50 


. 215 19 


. 170 88 


13 38 


16 5a 


32 35 


3 40 


14 11 


2 00 


12 42 


4 00 


2 00 


13 04 


13 84 



Oct. 


16. 




Boston Soe'y Nat. Hist., 
periodicals . 


3 00 


Nov. 


7. 




N. E. News Co., periodicals 


1164 


Nov. 


8. 




Lee & Shepard, books 


10 10 


Nov. 


10. 




Lock wood, Brooks & Co., books 


3 75 


Nov. 


10. 




J. B. Aldeii, books . 


3 60 


Nov. 


20. 




Lee & Shepard, books 


168 81 


Pec. 


1. 




T. W. Lane, books 


2 00 


Dec. 


3. 




Lee & Shepard, books 


115 75 


Dec. 


12. 




N. E. News Co., periodicals 


12 54 


Dec. 


15. 




Lee & Shepard, books 


90 91 


Dec. 


31. 


By 


balance . . . .' . 


1,665 05 


Dec. 


31. 


By 


income Dean fund 


1,530 00 



$4,232 94 
The expenditures for incidental expenses of the Library 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1877, the items of which ap- 
pear at large in the annual report of the city, are as follows : 
Gas 1201 25 



Fuel 


. 












224 27 


Salary of Librarian 












718 75 


Water 














20 00 


Newspapers 














7 50 


Insurance 














32 50 


Binding . 














128 25 


Re-binding 














34 19 


Printing . 














28 33 


Incidentals 














82 40 






$1,477 44 




RECAPITULATION. 


Balance, Dec. 


31, 1876 11,846 95 


Appropriation 


,1877 . 












2,500 00 



$4,346 95 



51 

Paid Trustees . . . . . $1,000 00 
incidental expenses . . . 1,477 44 

Balance 1,869 51 

14^346 95 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. N. BELL, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

We have examined the above report and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WM. P. NEWELL, 
JOHN L. KELLY, 

Committee on Accounts of City Library. 
January 16, 1878. 

I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the Trustees of the City Library and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 
January 16, 1878. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 

G-entlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

I herewith submit the annual report on the condition of 
the City Library for the year ending December 31, 1877 : 
Whole number of volumes at last report . . 20,396 
Accessions during the year, comprising vol- 
umes purchased .... 527 



62 



Volumes donated 

periodicals bound 

Whole number of volumes at present 
Maps 

Pamphlets 
Bound volumes 



647 
133 



16 

1,468 

20,219 



1,307 
21,703 



21,703 

Number of periodicals regularly received . 52 

Number of days open to the public . . 279 

" " " " for delivery of books . 248 

'' *' volumes in circulation during the time 49,207 
Increase over last year .... 5,499 

Average number per day • . . . . 198 

Largest number issued in any one day . . 425 

Number of cards in constant use . . . 2,000 

Whole number of guarantees received . . 10,799 

Number received during the year . . 490 

Average number of books, etc., used daily iji 

reading-room ..... 80 

Amount of cash received for fines, on hand Jan. 

1, 1877 1166 13 

Amount of cash received for fines, etc., to July 

1,1877 20 53 

Amount paid for express, stationery, etc. . 22 28 

Amount paid to Treasurer of Trustees June 

30, 1877 164 38 

Amount received for fines, etc., from July 1 to 

December 31, 1877 . . . . 15 80 

Amount paid for express, stationery, etc. . 13 08 

Balance on hand January 1, 1878 ... 2 72 

At the semi-annual examination in July a list of 260 
books missing from the shelves was given me by my prede- 
cessor, among which I find, by examining records, 107 are 



53 

Yolumes worn out and not replaced. Eighteen of the others 
have been returned since July 1st. The remaining 135 
are volumes which were lost previous to July 1st. At the 
present examination fifteen are missing, but, being nearly 
all charged to regular patrons they will doubtless be re- 
turned soon after the re-opening of the Library. I cannot, 
therefore, report positively the number actually lost during 
the last six months. 

Respectfully, 

Mrs. E. H. Davis, Librarian. 
December 31, 1877. 



54 

DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR 

1877. 

Hon. B. p. Cilley, Manchester. 

New York Daily Herald. April 10, 1861, to May 12, 

1866. 21 vols. Folio. 
Hon. G. W. Morrison, Manchester. 

New Hampshire Patriot and State Gazette. January, 

1822, to August, 1870, excepting the years 1832-33- 
34_54_55. 21 vols. Folio. 
Mrs. Herman Foster, Manchester. 
Amoskeag Memorial. 1840. 
Manchester Memorial and People's Herald. January to 

June, 1841. 
Manchester Memorial. June, 1841, to August, 1844. 
Manchester American. September, 1844, to June, 1852. 
American and Messenger. June, 1852, to February, 1857. 
Democrat and American. February, 1857, to December, 

1863. 
Dollar Weekly Mirror. January, 1864, to July, 1865. 
Mirror and Farmer. July, 1865, to December, 1871. 12 

vols. Folio. 
Hon. S. N. Bell, Manchester. 

Reports of Commissioner of Patents. 1859-60. 

Report of the U. S. Geological and Geographical Survey 

of the Territories. 1873. 
Report of Secretary of the Treasury. 1876. 
Report of Commissioner of Education. 1876. 
Report on Mechanical Properties of Steel. 
Report concerning the U. S. Life-Saving Service. June, 

1876. 
Report of Superintendent of U. S. Coast Survey. 187 . 
Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of Hon. 

Henry Wilson. 



55 

Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of Hon. 
Andrew Johnson. 

Congressional Directory. 1st Session, 35th Congress, 
and 2d Session, 44th Congress. 2 vols. 

Statistical Atlas of U. S, 3 vols. 4to. 

Congressional Record. 2d Session, 44th Congress. 4 
vols. 4to. 

Congressional Record. 1st and 2d Session, 43d Con- 
gress. 9 vols. 

Congressional Record. 1st Session, 44th Congress. 14 
vols. 

Reports of Smithsonian Institution. 1873, 1875. 
Hon. B. Wadleigh. 

Annual Report, Chief of Bureau of Statistics. 1876-77. 
2 vols. 8vo. 

Annual Report, Chief of Bureau of Internal Commerce. 
1876-77. 1 vol. 

Message, President of United States, with papers relating 
to Foreign Relations, December, 1875. 2 vols. 8vo. 

Report, Secretary of the Navy, and Documents. 1st ses- 
sion, 44th Congress. 2 vols. 8 vo. 2 vols. 8vo. 

Report, Secretary of War, and Documents. 1st session, 
44th Congress. 5 vols. 8vo. 

Report, Committee of Investigation of Chinese Immigra- 
tion. 1877. 1 vol. 8vo. 
U. S. Congress. 

First and Second Sessions. 

Congressional Documents. 1st Session, 43d Congress. 
2 vols. 8vo. First Session, 44th Congress. 51 vols. 8vo. 
Board of Regents, Smithsonian Institute. 

Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge. Vols. 20 and 
21, 4to. 
Hon. John Eaton, Washington. 

Report on Public Libraries of United States. 1 vol. 8vo. 

Report of U. S, Commissioners to Vienna. 4 vols. 8 vo. 



56 

Hon. Ira Cross, Ma3^or, Manchester. 

City Reports. 1846 to 1876 inclusive, excepting 1848, 
1861, and 1872. 9 vols. 8vo. 
Secretary op State. 

Panaphlet Laws of New Hampshire. 15 vols. 
Pamphlet Laws of the United States. 26 vols. 
Town, Provincial, and State Papers, Documents, and 
Records relating to N. H. Vols. 5 to 10 inclusive. 
N, P. Kidder, Esq., City Clerk, Manchester. 

Annual Reports, City of Manchester. 1874-75-76. 
N. H. Law Reports. Vols. 51 to 55 inclusive. 
Arthur B. Stearns, Manchester. 

Annual Reports, Board of Water Commissioners. 1872 

to 1876 inclusive. 
Contracts and Specifications for Manchester Water- 
Works. 10 pamphlets. 
Board op Trustees op N. H. College of Agriculturb. 

Annual Report, June, 1876. 
Hon. a. P. Charles, Seymour, Ind. 

Proceedings, Grand Commandry, Knights Templars, of 

Indiana. 1874 to 1877 inclusive. 
Proceeding.-^, Annual Grand Council, Royal and Select 

Masters, of Indiana. 1873 to 1876 inclusive. 
Proceedings, Grand R. A. Chapter, of Indiana. 1873 to 

1876 inclusive. 
Proceedings, Annual Communication, Grand Lodge, of 
Indiana. 1873 to 1876 inclusive. 
J, C. Chase, Esq., Boston. 

Annual Catalogues, Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy. 1873 to 1877 inclusive. 
Frank S. Sutclifpe, Manchester. 

Catalogue of Dartmouth College. 1876-77. 
Catalogue, of Yale College. 1876-77. 
B. 0. M. DeBeck, Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati School Report. August, 1876. 1 vol. 8vo. 



57 

Lewis AIasquerier, Brooklyn. 

Sociology. 1 vol. 8vo. 
Martin A. Haynes. 

Lake Village Times. 1873 and 1874. 
B. 0. M. DeBeck. 

Report of Common Schools of Cincinnati, Ohio. 1876. 
The Several Boards op Trustees. 

Reports of Watertown, Mass., Public Library. 1874 and 

1875. 
Reports of Woburn, Mass., Library. 1874-77. 
Reports of Fall River, Mass., Public Library. 1874 and 

1875. 
Report of Taunton, Mass., Public Library. 1874. 
Report of Mercantile Library Association of New York. 

1875-76. 
Report of Boston, Mass., Public Library. 1875-76. 
Reports of Peabody Institute, Peabody, Mass. 1873-76. 
Reports of Manchester, Eng., Public Free Libraries. 

1873-76. 
Reports of Lowell, Mass., City Library. 1872-76. 
Report of East St. Louis, Mo., Public Library. 1875-76. 
Report of Brookline, Mass., Public Library. 1876. 
Report of Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 1867-68. 
" " " " " " 1874-76. 

Report of Hartford, Conn., Y. M. Inst. 1874-75. 
Report of Mercantile Library Association, San Francisco, 

Cal. 1874-75. 
Report of Mercantile Library Association, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 1875-76. 
Report of Springfield, Mass., Library Association. 1875- 

76. 
Report of Peabody Institute, Danvers, Mass. 1873-74. 
Report of Quincy, Mass., Public Library. 1874. 
Reports of Dedham, Mass., Public Library. 1874-76. 



Report of Newton, Mass., Free Library. 1876. 
Report of Concord, N. H., Public Library. 1876. 
Reports of Astor Library, of New York. 1871-72-74- 

75-76. 
Report of St. Louis Public School Library. 1874-5. 
Supplement to the Catalogue, Fall River, Mass., Public 

Library. 1875. 
Bulletins of Boston Public Library, Nos. 31-40. 1874-76. 
Catalogue of Worcester County, Mass., Free Institute. 

1874-7. 
Catalogue of Sawyer Free Library, Gloucester, Mass. 
Annual Register of the Rensselaer Institute, Troy, N. Y. 

1874-75. 
Report of Town of Waltham, Mass. 1874-75. 
Catalogue of Nesmith Library, Windham, N. H. 1872. 
Catalogues of Philadelphia Library Co. 1875 and 1876. 
Catalogue of University of Wisconsin. 1876. 
Bulletins of Lawrence, Mass., Public Library. 1874-76; 
Reports of N. H. Asylum for the Insane. 1856, 1869. 
Report of Massachusetts Agricultural College. 1875. 
Report of the Grand Division of Sons of Temperance of 

New Hampshire. 1859-60. 
Proceedings of the New Hampshire Y. M. C. A. 1874. 
Proceedings of New Hampshire Grand Lodge of Good 

Templars. 1876. 
Report of Concord, N. H., Water Commissioners. 1872 

and 1875. 
Catalogues of Pinkerton Academy, Derry, N. H. 1870 

and 1871. 
Report of Concord, N. H. 1869-60. 
Report of N. H. College of Agriculture. 1869. 
Reports of Merrimack County. 1871-73. 
Report of Town of Chichester. 1873-54. 
Catalogue of Mercantile Library of New York. 1876. 



59 

The Publishers. 

Godej's Lady's Book. Vols. 74 and 75. 

Peterson's Magazine. Vols. 41, 42, 47, 62. 

Harper's Magazine. Vols. 46 and 47. 

Arthur's Home Magazine. Vol. 35. 
Bureau of Education, Washington, D. C. 

Circulars of Information. Nos. 1-3. 

Special Report on Libraries in the United States. 
Joel Taylor, Esq. 

Proceedings of U. S. Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows. 
1873. 
Directors. 

Report of Michigan Central R. R. Co. 1858. 

Report of Boston & Maine R. R. 1856. 

Report of Concord R. R. 1875-6. 



Reports of Town of Bedford, N. H. 1845-48. 1852-51. 

1856-57. 1858-62. 1863-64. 1865-68. 1870-72. 

1874-75. 
Samuel A. Green. 

Catalogue of Lawrence Academy, Groton, Mass. 1850. 
The Jubilee Celebration of Lawrence Academy. 1854. 
My Campaigns in America. 1780-81. Wm. DeDeux 

Pouts. 
Memorial in Aid of Lawrence Academy. 1868. 
Annual Report of Boston Dispensary. 
Story of a Farmer's Book. 
School Histories and Some Errors in Them. 
Bibliography of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 
Paul Lunfs Diary in the Revolution. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



To His Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of 
. Manchester : 

Gentlemen : — The Committee on Cemeteries herewith 
submit their report for the year 1877 : 

THE VALLEY. 

The receipts and expenditures for the Valley Cemetery 
for the year 1877 were as follows, viz : 



To balance unexpended previous year 


$609 65 


appropriation .... 


2,000 00 


for use of hearse .... 


66 25 


tomb fees 


72 17 


wood sold 


6 00 


old fence sold .... 


20 75 


265 pounds old iron 


2 65 


Total means 


. 12,777 47 


Expenditures. 





Cash paid G. W. Stevens, for engineering, (old bill) $10 07 

A. H. Hartshorn, labor . . 500 63 

Thomas C. Cheney, labor . . 5 62 

John Prince, trees . . . 3 00 

George Holbrook, repairing fence 60 00 



25 39 


1,482 92 


75 00 


274 38 


340 51 


12,777 47 



62 



Cash paid George Holbrook, repairing bridges 
A. H. Lowell, iron fence 
" " " gate 

■ A. Bodwell, stone 

Cash on hand to balance 



Knowing that the means in the hands of the sub-com- 
mittee, after deducting the ordinary current expenses for 
the year, would be insufficient to construct the fence from 
the northeast corner of the cemetery, on Pine street, across 
the brook, it was thought advisable to leave that portion 
of the fence until a larger appropriation should be made by 
the city. Accordingly, the survey was made on the south 
side of the brook, and proposals received for extending the 
fence from the brow of the hill, along the line of Pine 
street. Including the gate, we have built 602-j^q'^q- feet of 
iron fence, corresponding with that across the north end, 
except that we have dispensed with the solid stone masonry 
that was necessary in that locality. The iron work, how- 
ever, is placed on stone pedestals sufficiently large to give 
the fence ample strength and firmness ; and, as the ground 
is nearly level, it will answer every purpose, it is believed, 
and save quite a large sura of money to the city. 

Another year, the space between the north and south 
sides of the brook should be filled up and the fence 
extended to the south line of the cemetery. As it will 
require considerable grading and some heavy stone ma- 
sonry, in the neighborhood of the brook, in order to com- 
plete the work as it should be done, there should be a 
larger appropriation of money, — perhaps $3,000.00. 

Probably hereafter most of the expenditures in the Val- 
ley must be met by appropriations. Not a great amount 
of means will be realized from the sale of lots. Last year 



63 

none were sold, and, while lots can be obtained at the Pine 
Grove for a nominal sum, most people who wish to purchase 
will go there for them. 

So far as we can learn the views of our citizens, there 
seems to be a very general desire that the fence around the 
Valley should be completed. By putting in 500 or 600 
feet each year, the grounds will, ere long, be surrounded 
by a substantial structure that will require but a small 
annual outlay to keep it in proper repair. A place of great 
natural beauty, it should be kept in such condition as ever 
to be sightly to the eye, and in accord with the tender sen- 
timents which a Christian people should ever cherish for 
the dead. 

During the year Mr. A. H. Hartshorn has had charge of 
the Valley, and, so far as we can learn, has performed his 
duties with strict fidelity to the interests of tlie city, and 
with courtesy to all with whom he has come in contact. 

We show a balance on hand of $340.51. We know of 
only one or two small outstanding bills. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH KIDDER, 
HOLMES R. PETTEE, 
J. F. JAMES, 

Sub- Committee. 

PINE GROVE. 

In addition to the ordinary care of the grounds the past 
season, we have erected on the south line of Grove street, 
on the north line of the cemetery, 483 feet iron fence, of 
the same style and pattern as the fence on the River Road. 
We contracted with Mr. A. H. Lowell for the building of 
the fence at |2.25 per foot, being much less than the cost 
of the same two years ago. We think it will be good 



64 

economy for the City Councils to appropriate the sum of 
two thousand dollars to build a portion of new fence each 
year until the cemetery is entirely enclosed, as the old 
fence is so much decayed as to require considerable ex- 
pense annually to keep it in proper repair. 

In consequence of the general depression of business in 
our city for several years past, the receipts for the sale of 
lots have been much less than was anticipated, which will 
make it necessary for the City Councils to appropriate 
money for the purpose of building a new fence, as it will 
require the labor of one man at least, more than half of 
each year, to keep the walks and grounds in suitable condi- 
tion. 

There have been sold during the last year 43 lots, for the 
sum of 11,054.83, and the' Treasurer has now 18 deeds 
written, the amount of which is $447, the most of which 
we may reasonably expect will be paid to the Treasurer 
within thirty or sixty days. 

Owners of lots have made very many improvements the 
past year by erecting monuments on their lots and curb- 
stones around them, which improvements add very much 
toward ornamenting and beautifying the grounds. 

We have also put in another water tank, making in all 
five different places of distribution, as centrally and equally 
located with reference to the distance of improved lots as 
can conveniently be arranged, all of which furnish water 
enough for all needed purposes. 

We have this year set about 100 rock-maples, trees very 
thrifty and of suitable size to transplant, upon the avenues 
and walks. Whenever there has been sufficient reason to 
remove pine-trees from any lots, we have had either maples, 
elms or Norway spruces to take the places of the pines as 
far as practicable. The continuance of this course a few 
years will change the appearance of the forest very much, 



65 

and be more in accordance with the expressed wislies of 
the owners of lots now occupied. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. J]. DANIELS, 
S. B. PUTNAM, 
W. G. HOYT, 

Sub- Committee. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 

To the Committee on Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen : — I herewith present to you a report of all 
money by me received, on account of cemeteries, for the 
year ending December 31, 1877 : 

PINE GROVE, 

Cash received for 43 lots sold . . . |1,054 83 
Paid H. R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, . 1,054 83 

I have also eighteen deeds of lots written, the total sum 
of which is four hundred and forty-seven dollars, tlie most 
of which we may reasonably expect to receive within thirty 
or sixty days. 

THE VALLEY. 

There have not been any lots sold in the Valley during 
the last year. All money received on account of ceme- 
teries has been paid to the City Treasurer, and all bills 
of expenditures have passed through the Committee on 
Accounts, and then been paid by the City Treasurer, com- 
plete details of which will be found elsewhere in the city 
annual report. 

J. F. JAMES, 
Treasurer of Committee on Cemeteries. 

5 



66 

Manchester, N. H., January 1, 1878. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of J. 
F. James, Treasurer of the Pine-Grove Cemetery, and find 
the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, Oity Auditor. 

At a meeting of the Committee on Cemeteries, held at 
the Mayor's office January 7, 1878, the foregoing reports 
were unanimously "accepted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Clerk of Committee on Cemeteries. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
A. H. DANIELS, 
W. G. HOYT, 
H. R. PETTEE, 
JOSEPH KIDDER, 
J. F. JAMES, 
C. H. BARTLETT, 
Committee on the Valley and Pine Grove. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



0E6ANIZATI0N FOR 1877. 



MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

IRA CROSS, Mayor, ) ^ j^ - nu • 

-JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor, \ ^''■'^''' Chairman. 

JOHN M. STANTON, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 

Ward 1. — George W. Stevens, 2 years. 

Henry C. Sanderson, 1 year. 
Ward 2. — James E. Dodge, 2 years. 

Gerherdus L. Demarest, 1 year. 
Ward 3. — Nathan P. Hunt, 2 years. 

Joseph E. Bennett, 1 year. 
Ward 4. — George W. Weeks, 2 years. 

George M. Park, 1 year. 
Ward 5. — Samuel P. Jackson, 2 years. 

Charles A. O'Connor, 1 year. 
Ward 6. — Loring P. Moore, 2 years. 

Henry A. Gage, 1 year. 
Ward 7.— Marshall P. Hall, 2 years. 

Ezra Huntington, 1 year. 
Ward 8. — Eugene W. Brigham, 2 years. . 

Isaac W. Darrah, 1 year. 

* Since September 4. 



68 

CLERK OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance, Accounts and Claims. — The Mayor, Messrs. 
Weeks, Stanton, Huntington and HalL 

Salaries. — Messrs. Stevens, Demarest and Sanderson. 

Repairs, Furniture and Supplies. — Messrs. Jackson, Ben- 
nett and Stevens. 

Text-Boohs and Apparatus. — Messrs. Hunt, Weeks and 
HalL 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Huntington, the Major, Messrs. 
Brigham and Stanton. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Bennett, Park, Dem- 
arest and Jackson. 

Truancy. — Messrs. Sanderson, O'Connor and Dodge. 

Employment of Children, ^c. — Messrs. Gage, Park and 
Brigham. 

Music. — Messrs. Weeks, Darrah and Bennett. 

Dratving. — Messrs. Hall, Stevens and Dodge. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Hall, Park, Hunt, Bennett and 
Jackson. 

Ash-Street. — Messrs. Hunt, Bennett, Weeks and Dema- 
rest. 

Lincoln-Street. — Messrs. Jackson, Weeks, Park and 
Gage. 

Spring-Street. — Messrs. Stevens, Sanderson, Dodge and 
Hunt. 



69 

Franklin-Street. — Messrs. Hall, Huntington, Moore and 
Brigham. 

Intermediate-Building. — Messrs. Sanderson, O'Connor, 
Dodge and Moore. 

Piscataquog. — Messrs. Darrali, Brigham, Huntington and 
Gage. 

Manchester-Street. — Messrs. O'Connor, Demarest, Dar- 
rali and Stevens. 

Training School. — Messrs. "Weeks, Jackson and Hall. 

Amoskeag, Blodget-Street and Stark-District. — Messrs. 
Demarest, Dodge, Stevens and Bennett. 

Bakersville, Harvey's and Goffe's-Falls. — Messrs. Moore, 
Darrah, Demarest and O'Connor. 

Hallsville, Youngsville, Webster's-Mills and Mosquito- 
Pond. — Messrs. Gage, Jackson, Park and Darrah. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Park, Huntington, and San- 
derson. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester 
We present our annual report for 1877. 



The appropriations to the 


use of the School 


Committee 


and the expenditures for the 


year have been as 


follows : 




Amount appro- 
priated. 


Amount ex- 
pended. 


Teaching 


$38,007 50 138,118 56 


Fuel .... 


4,884 00 


3,456 45 


Care of rooms 


2,212 06 


2,321 58 


Furniture and supplies . 


690 98 


403 99 


Books and stationery 


701 47 


744 09 


Printing and advertising 


. * 668 86 


605 24 


Incidental repairs 


1,328 60 


1,104 87 


Contingent expenses 


600 00 


627 28 


Evening schools 


1,074 96 


913 41 


Balance unexpended 




1,672 96 



149,968 43 $49,968 43 

The cost of the above items, exclusive of 
that of teaching, in 1874, year of highest 
cost, was $14,229 95 

Cost of same in 1877 .... 10,176 91 



$ 4,063 04 



Showing a reduction in three years of . 
or about 28 per cent. 
In connection with this portion of our report we repeat 
a suggestion made in the report for 1874, which has lost 



72 

none of its appositeness by the lapse of time, but the wis- 
dom of which has been proved by complications of account 
and jurisdiction during the past year : 

" We respectfully submit that all appropriations for 
school buildings (except for original construction) should 
be expended by the School Board, and that they should 
present an estimate, annually, to the City Councils, of the 
amount required, as they now do for other purposes. There 
are many difficulties and delays arising from the present 
plan of making repairs by two committees and from two 
appropriations. Our school buildings, upon completion, 
should be turned over to the School Board, to be thereafter 
kept in repair by those who manifestly must know best 
what is required." 

ECONOMy. 

The School Board, having in view the continued strin- 
gency of monetary affairs and the necessity of a rational 
economy, have sought to reduce the cost of the School 
Departiuent wherever it could be done without impairing 
its efficiency. They early considered the propriety of a 
revision of the list of teachers' salaries, and made such a 
'reduction as seemed judicious. The new list went into 
effect at the beginning of the fall term. Besides this, 
wherever by consolidation a teacher could be spared, we 
have reduced the number. So, as reported by the Superin- 
tendent, a vacancy occurring in one of the Piscataquog 
schools, it was found practicable to dispense with one 
teacher. So it was found undesirable to maintain a full 
grammar school in the Spring-Street house, and two 
teachers, one a principal, hq,ve been spared. We deeply 
regret that one effort toward retrenchment was foiled by 
the inability of the City Councils to see the interests of the 
city, financial and economical, in the same light as the 



73 

School Board. Five hundred dollars a year or more are 
wasted by maintaining separate schools in two suburban 
districts, Nos. 6 and 9. The average number belonging 
being respectively but 13 and 15, it is very evident that a 
consolidation would greatly promote the efficiency of teach- 
ing, while it would save the mere waste of funds which 
might be appropriated to better purpose or saved to the 
tax-payers. The consolidation can be effected without seri- 
ous inconvenience to any family, and we hope the next 
year will see it accomplished. 

On the other hand, the Board have not been moved by 
an unreasoning desire merely to save ; but, not willing to 
overcrowd rooms perhaps already too full, or to put upon 
any teacher the care of too great a number of pupils for 
proper teaching or supervision, one new primary school lias 
been opened in the abandoned school-house on Union 
Street. At first it was supposed that the school would be 
but temporary. It is found, however, that the demand 
continues ; and we have been obliged to look upon it as a 
permanent need of the department. In this connection, we 
refer to the views expressed by the Superintendent with 
reference to the further need of school accommodations in 
the north-east part of the city. 

The expenditure for teaching in 1876 was 139,103 86 

in 1877 . 38,118 56 



Reduction $985 30 

The list of teachers' salaries amounted, a 

year ago, to .... . $38,925 

The present list foots up ... 36,400 

Reduction ...... $2,b2o 



74 



STATISTICS. 



1877. 



$48,295 47 



"Whole amount expended by School Com- 
mittee 

Amount expended by City Councils, for 
repairs and improvements of school- 
houses and lots, and salaries of School 
Committee and Superintendent 

Whole amount expended by the city for 
all school purposes 

Whole number of pupils enrolled in day- 
schools, as reported .... 

Average number belonging to schools, as 
reported 

Average daily attendance 

Average per cent of attendance, as calcu- 
lated 

Cost of tuition in day-schools per scholar, 
based upon average number belong- 
ing 

Cost of incidentals, per scholar 

I^umber of pupils admitted to High 
School from grammar schools 

Whole number admitted to High School 

Number graduated from High School 

Average attendance in Evening School 

Number of teachers regularly employed 
in day-schools 

Number of scholars per teacher in High School 
" " " grammar schools 

" " " middle schools 

" " " primary schools 

" " " suburban schools 



4,672* 

2,571t 
2,413 

93 8% 



$14 83 
3 96 

57 
60 
38 



71 



1876. 
$50,802 98 

6,188 63 
•56,991 61 

4,567 



2,542t 
2,379 

93t 



$15 39 
4 35 

84 
87 
60 
60 



30 
37 
38 
41 
29 



74 
34 
33 
43 
40 
22 



*0f this number 1,065 are reckoned a second time, by reason of transfers on account 
of promotion and change of residence. The actual number is 3,607. A proportional 
deduction is required for 1876. 

t Falsely small, because ol an improper method of calculation, hereafter to be cor- 
rected. 

t Fictitiously high ; see second note. 



75 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

Soon after the induction of the present Board into office, 
they proceeded to the election of a Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Instruction, for the term ending July 1, 1878. The 
choice fell upon Mr. William E. Buck, at the time princi- 
pal of the Ash-Street Grammar School, who had been for a 
number of years in the service of the city in this depart- 
ment. Mr. Buck at once entered upon his duties, and has 
proved himself a wise, industrious, and efficient officer. 
His report is appended. It contains suggestions worthy of 
consideration, and, even in an instance as to which our 
views differ, we are glad to spread it before you. 

THE PURPOSE OP THE COMMON SCHOOL. 

Our system aims not so much to aid the coming man 
and woman to earn their living, or to keep house prudently, 
as to promote the intelligence, good order, happiness, and 
prosperity of the new communities. It is not practicable 
to fit pupils for the acquisition of wealth. If one has it 
in him to become a millionaire, he does not need an edu- 
cation. Literary or scientific tastes might be greatly in 
his way. Few have the genius of acquisition. The many 
need the habits of systematic industry and quick observa- 
tion, the ready subordination to wholesome law, the versa- 
tility of mental operation, the* democratic spirit, which 
regular and judicious training in the common school tends 
to foster. What has caused the proverbial acuteness, in- 
genuity, and " faculty " of the Yankee ? The various 
study and energetic administration of the public school for 
generations ; and the more systematic these, the more effi- 
cient. 

We are aware of a delusion into which some fall who 
complain that our schools are impracticable, because they 



76 

do not turn out fully-qnalified mechanics. They are not 
schools of technology, which would necessarily involve a 
large outlay and attempt what parents themselves and the 
various trades ought to do. The schools cannot and ought 
not to relieve parents of all parental responsibility. They 
can prepare youth for the greatly various employments of 
maturer life : they will not find it practicable to teach 
those employments. The course of study in our schools, 
inferior to the High School, ought to be easily completed by 
the age of 14 or 15, when the graduate is young enough to 
learn money-making, and when he is even not yet able to 
choose wisely his life-work. Our system yields its satis- 
factory practical result, if pupils who show a reasonable 
degree of faithfulness are ready for the first principles of 
whatever employment may be chosen by or for them, at the 
same time that they shall not be the slaves of their first 
choice. For the rest, a higher result ought to be anticipa- 
ted, in the broadening views, the better aims, the quickened 
intelligence, of the youth of our city. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

After careful deliberation and provisional experiment, 
we have modified our course of study throughout. In so 
doing, we have sought to make more definite the work of 
the primary schools. We hope for more thorough teach- 
ing and drill, so that pupils who do not continue the course 
may learn something well. It is not possible to over-esti- 
mate the importance of these schools and the work re- 
quired to be done in them. In them is laid the foundation 
of the great superstructure of knowledge. According to 
the soundness and solidity of the foundation are the sound- 
ness and firmness of the building. In these schools it is 
intended that there shall be completed all operations with 
numbers of three places, — addition, subtraction, multiplica- 



77 

tioii and division ; orthography of words in common use ; 
writing with pencils ; reading, according to the capacity of 
the pupils ; geography, orally, in its elements ; drawing of 
geometric forms ; music, in its elements ; with object-les- 
sons, for the culture of habits of observation. If our 
teachers are judicious and faithful, they cannot fail, not 
only to impart such a fund of useful information as the 
pupil can entertain, but suitably to prepare him, after three 
years' drill in the primary schools, for advancement to the 
next grade, — the middle schools. 

In the middle schools all studies are advanced, and 
greater' use made of books, while in the grammar schools 
all ordinary branches are completed, history of the United 
States and book-keeping being introduced. The whole 
course is so graded that it can be accomplished by the 
average mind without difficulty, and no study is required 
out of school, nor is any necessary for the work of these 
schools, save an occasional composition or piece for decla- 
mation. Even in school but little time is required for 
study ; in the middle and primary schools not over two 
hours, and not over two and a quarter in the grammar 
schools, is assigned. The remaining school-hours are de. 
voted to recitation and drill. The course of study is so 
gradual that this small allotment of time is found to suf- 
fice for the daily purposes of the school, and, if pupils are 
engaged with their books at home, save regarding the par- 
ticulars excepted, it is because they choose, and not because 
they are required, to be so. 

Last year, as reported, a change v/as made in the course 
of study for the High School, which, after experiment, has 
been modified. It was the original intent of legislators in 
providing for the free iiigh school, as an appendage of the 
common-school system, to afford such of the children of 
the state as might be able to avail themselves of the oppor- 



78 

tunity, a supplementary education in higher branches of 
study, whether in mathematics or science or language. 
As to the relative value of such studies, there are differ- 
ences of opinion. Whether the community should estab- 
lish schools simply " to fit for college " may be questioned, 
although the city of Boston has for more than a century 
maintained such a school, established when its population 
was much smaller than that of Manchester, with beneficent 
effect upon its grammar-school system. But, when the 
school is established to which this purpose may be incident, 
with little, if any, additional expense, it may very properly 
afford its poor families this resource for such of their sons 
as may be disposed and qualified for college training. Nor 
need any one fear that a large share of our youth are 
seized with a fanatical yearning after a college education. 
Of all the attendants of our schools, only one out of twelve 
• are in the High School, and of those in the High School 
only 15, or one in 13, are studying Greek. Thus only one 
in 150 has taken Greek, whether with an ultimate view 
to college or not. 

The work of our High School is only incidentally, " fit- 
ting for college." Its main purpose is, to furnish a higher 
education to such as are prepared for it and desire it, in 
such branches, substantially, as they choose or their parents 
choose for them. Upon entrance into the High School the 
pupil has the choice of one of three courses : 1. A business 
course of two years ; 2. An English and French course of 
four years ; 3. A classical course of four years. The first 
or shorter course includes Algebra, Physiology, Physical 
Geography, Commercial Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Natural 
History, Geometry, Natural Philosophy, Constitution of the 
United States, Inorganic Chemistry, Political Economy, 
Modern History, Geology, with English Composition and 
Penmanship and reviews of grammar-school studies. For 



79 

those whose circumstances will not permit a longer at- 
tendance at the school, this course is deemed valuable. 
The attentive pupil will have a fund of useful knowledge, 
and his intelligence will be quickened by the variety of 
topics considered, although at no time will his attention be 
required to more than three or four studies at the same 
time. 

The English and French course runs parallel with the 
business course during the two years, save in the last term, 
when Political Economy is dropped for a time, and, instead, 
either Trigonometry or Chemistry is pursued, at the option 
of the pupil. During the third and fourth years, French is 
studied ; Surveying, or Chemistry, at the option of the pu- 
pil ; Astronomy, Rhetoric, General History ; Botany, or 
Practical Surveying, optional ; English History, English 
Literature, Political Economy, with reviews of all gram- 
mar-school studies. 

The classical course provides for Algebra, Physiology, 
Penmanship ; Latin throughout the course, after the first 
term ; Physical Geography, Natural History, Geometry, 
Natural Philosophy, Geology, General History, Astronomy ; 
Greek, through the third and fourth years ; Chemistry, 
Rhetoric ; Botg,ny, or Practical Surveying, optional ; Eng- 
lish Literature, Political Economy. But it is also optional 
whether to take Greek at all, the pupil choosing this course 
being permitted to take French instead ; or he may omit 
both French and Greek and take two English studies in 
lieu of them. In this course, also, all grammar-school 
studies are reviewed ; and in all the courses, music and 
drawing are optional. 

These courses of high-school study, it is believed, will 
secure the ends of academical instruction. They are suffi- 
ciently exacting for the purposes of higher education, and 
elastic enough for all the varying intents of parents as to 



80 



the future of their children. It will be observed that no 
pupil is obliged to study the classics ; nor, even if he 
chooses the classical course, is he obliged to study Greek. 
The two or four years passed in -the High School may be 
full of practical use, whether the youth is to enter college, 
to take up business, or to grace a home with culture and 
refinement. 

BREVITY OF PUPILAGE. 

A great obstacle to the most desirable success of our 
schools in both intellectual and moral respects, is brevity 
and irregularity of attendance. Some act apparently upon 
the fancy that there is magic in a school-house, by which 
ignorance and dullness are instantly changed to knowledge 
and " faculty." Many children enter school only to leave 
it before reaching the middle school ; others, not to reach 
the grammar school ; others, to leave before completing the 
grammar-school course of study. The schools are greatly 
afflicted, also, with absenteeism, several of them showing 
in their reports, made upon a too favorable basis, an aver- 
age attendance of less than 90 per cent. Yet there are, 
no doubt, some who sharply criticise our system as ineffi- 
cient, because defect is seen in the knowledge of ordinary 
branches by irregular or short-time pupils. Our system 
cannot work miracles, but it may justly be judged accord- 
ing to the attainments of those who have attended to the 
course of study with some faithfulness, and completed it. 

GRADED AND UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

The least efficient of our schools are, necessarily, those 
in the suburban districts. If any one labors under the 
delusion that the golden age^of education is to be found in 
the country school of old, and that a graded or city school 



81 

is but a degenerate institution, let him visit the two as he 
can find them in his own citj. We aim to put as well- 
qualified and efficient teachers into our suburban districts 
as into our graded schools. They labor as faithfully, but 
they cannot in the nature of things accomplish as good 
results. The heterogeneous nature of the schools, the 
number of classes, and the consequent brevity of the time 
given to each recitation, all, are obstacles to successful teach- 
ing, which, if not insurmountable, greatly impair the useful- 
ness of the teacher. In our graded schools, the opportunity 
for drill at each stage of intellectual attainment is, of itself, 
a momentous advantage ; and the time given to each reci- 
tation in the city grammar school, compared with tliat 
allowed by the necessities of the country school, itself sug- 
gests the superiority of the former in teaching power. 

The inferiority of country schools in efficiency is further 
manifest in the comparison of attainments when those 
taught in them, removing into our city, enter our graded 
schools. While they appear to have greater maturity of 
mind, developed on the farm by familiar intercourse with 
older persons, their attainments are inferior to those of the 
same age, educated from the beginning in our schools. A 
few, after several months spent in the country school in 
advanced youth, when they have become painfully aware of 
intellectual deficiency, and their judgment has become ma- 
ture, leap to a certain grade of attainment sufficient for 
ordinary purposes ; and these are quoted to show the supe- 
rior quality of education in the country school ! Meanwhile, 
in the matter of general intelligence and the cultivation of 
mental power, they are below the average of our grammar- 
school pupils. The system and drill of the graded school 
have their use ; and, besides the instruction conveyed, they 
serve to educate the whole series of intellectual faculties, 
as they cannot be educated in the ungraded, and therefore 
in a large degree unsystematic, school. 

6 



82 

MORAL INFLUENCES. 

While the rule is retained, which provides for the read- 
ing of the Scriptures at the opening of the schools each 
day, we are thoroughly united in holding that it should not 
be accompanied with note or comment involving any relig- 
ious doctrine whatever, however important it may seem 
to the teacher. The churches represent the religious con- 
victions of the community : the state regards its civil inter- 
ests. The public schools are the creatures of the state, and 
their work is clearly distinct from that of the churches. 
They are for secular education ; and such is the diversity 
of religious ideas among the people, and specifically among 
the parents of pupils attending the schools, that any at- 
tempt in these to urge dogmatics the most sacred, is cer- 
tain to meet with wide disapproval. Such attempts, how- 
ever well-intentioned, would be explicitly condemned by 
us, and a repetition would be deemed cause for removal. 

But on the principles of righteousness, even of a lofty 
morality, we are all agreed ; and these, our teachers are 
enjoined to inculcate. We expect them to be enforced by 
precept and example; and, although specific hours are not 
set apart for the study of them, throughout all courses of 
study, and in all the intercourse of teacher and pupil, they 
may be and ought to be illustrated. First of all, the teacher 
must, himself, of necessity, be just and pure and truthful 
and self-controlled and kind. We know of none who are 
not so ; but it is well to bear in mind, as a fundamental 
fact in education, that the preacher, the parent, the teacher, 
must himself be righteous if he would influence others to 
righteousness. A partial teacher or parent cannot incul- 
cate justice with any power. A disposition to advance or 
degrade a pupil, through favoritism or dislike, would readily 
be recognized by all pupils as unjust ; and no injunctions 



83 

to morality would have influence. He who would make 
men pure must himself be pure ; and we trust that our 
array of teachers affords no examples of dereliction, even 
as to the severer moral virtues. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Among the most useful appendages of our system are 
the evening schools, which aid somewhat those whose needs 
demand their labor during the day. The rule limits pupils 
to those of sixteen years of age or over ; and it is interest- 
ing to see how many of this class avail themselves of the 
privilege. We have found it needful to open, for the pres- 
ent season, not only a school of about one hundred and 
fifty in the building on Lowell Street, but also one of twen- 
ty-eight in the Center-Street school-house in Piscataquog. 
The good done in these schools, while it cannot be com- 
mensurate with the influence of more regular courses in 
the grammar schools, is incalculable. 

PROGRESS. 

Judged by results, our schools show marked progress. 
At the Philadelphia Exposition, the Manchester exhibit 
won the favorable attention of Sir Charles Reed, President 
of the School Board of London, who classifies it as one of 
the seven best of those made by city boards. He specifies, 
as a peculiar excellence, the proficiency of pupils in orthog- 
raphy, — "the result of writing under dictation, and careful 
correction by the pupils." Our Report of last year noted 
a deficiency in penmanship. During the past eighteen 
months there has been a marked improvement in all 
grades. This is evident at once from an inspection of the 
the examination papers of the last term, alongside of the 
bound volumes forwarded to the Centennial Exposition. A 



84 

deficiency in drawing was also noted. In this, also, great 
improvement has been made ; and we hope for more, through 
the systematic course of instruction recently adopted by the 
Board. For its practical use, and not for purposes of mere 
accomplishment, we affirm the importance of this branch of 
instruction. The education of the eye and hand, and their 
control by the will, are needful in every business ; and the 
suggestion may well be borne in mind, whether drawing 
and penmanship, closely allied, may not properly alternate 
with music in the services of a special teacher. 

In connection with the matter of progress, it may be 
suggested that hereafter examination papers be bound in 
volumes from term to term, and preserved, so that a com- 
parison may show the improvement or deterioration of the 
schools in efficiency. 

TEACHERS. 

The general efficiency of our corps of teachers is demon- 
strated, although there are doubtless cases of exception. 
Teachers have ceased to be mere hearers of recitations, and 
become teachers in fact as well as in name. There is more 
use of objects than formerly ; more inculcation of princi- 
ples ; more natural methods of training. It is of the high- 
est importance that knowledge shall be gained in such a 
way that the capacity of attainment shall be enlarged, and 
the faculty stimulated and quickened. Useful as a reason- 
able culture of the memory may be, remembering is not 
the highest power of the human mind. How to think is 
more important. And, in view of the fact that our youth 
are not long to be held in leading-strings, how to learn is 
another desideratum of importance in our teaching. 

In all the excellent work now done by our teachers, they 
can accomplish nothing of more momentous significance 
than the guidance of pupils in their choice of reading mat- 



85 

ter. The floods of trash, and worse than trash, periodically 
served up for boys and girls, witli pictures to excite their 
attention and their passions, warn all those having any 
oversight of youth to persuade them to a right choice. It 
would seem that a proper course of school training, with 
teachers all alert, ought to cultivate such finer tastes, that 
all coarse and corrupting literature would be rejected with 
loathing. A teacher, who has not only been energetic in 
administration and instruction, but has proved himself a 
kind friend to his pupils, may influence them to the read- 
ing of the biographies of the good and noble, and of history 
in its more interesting eras. There are works on scientific 
subjects, now so popularized as to be attractive to youth. 
Let teachers consider themselves as in some respects re- 
sponsiljle for the future of their pupils, and they will wisely 
do what they wisely can to promote a purer literary taste 
among those entrusted to their care. Books will not then 
be chosen for their intoxicating effects, but for their instruct- 
ive or helpful or healthfully entertaining power. 

STUDY AND HEALTH. 

Our schools are sometimes held responsible for effects 
upon health of causes wholly foreign to their work or their 
demands upon pupils. While there may be rare cases of 
such sensitiveness of organization that all drudgery of the 
brain may be harmful, in nearly all instances there is 
nothing detrimental to health in the severest exaction of 
our course of study. It is true, however, that some 
students, or their friends, think they find their studies too 
much for bodily endurance. But it is almost always found 
that the cause of ailment rests in something besides the 
school-work. We recollect an extreme case, which occurred 
in another state. A young lady was the leader of her class 
in the High School, intelligent, promising, ambitious ; but 



86 

was suddenly and fatally stricken with typhoid fever. The 
usual judgment is that her studies were the cause of her 
death. But these did not bear so heavily upon her, on 
account of her aptness, as upon others of her class ; and 
her health had, up to this time, seemed to be vigorous. She 
had, however, been housekeeper as well as student, and, 
her mother having been taken ill, she was her sole nurse. 
Student, housekeeper, nurse, was too much ; and she fell 
beneath the weight of a triple duty. 

It is true, that the student, as the teacher, must not be 
overloaded. There is a limit of endurance. One must 
not be required to do the work of two or three. A student 
requires healthful exercise, and an occupation affording this 
is wholly beneficial. But so much time must not be taken 
as to reduce the quantity of sleep required by normal 
health. "Early to bed" is an excellent motto for the 
student, especially if the rule of the household requires 
the correlative, " early to rise." Late hours are a foe to 
the health of the student and of all youth. 

Another foe is improper and irregular food. No youth 
ought to eat anything between meals. There are sorjie 
attending our schools who take five or six meals a day, — 
breakfast, a lunch of apple or cake at morning recess, din- 
ner, another lunch at afternoon recess, and tea, if indeed 
in tlie evening another lunch is not taken, especially if 
company call in. There is not only no need of this, but it 
is positively hurtful. Physiology teaches the necessity of 
rest for the digestive organs, on peril of dyspepsia, with its 
kindred evils. 

Another cause of ill health in youth is the reading of 
what are known as sensational stories. Every one knows, 
who inspects his own feelings, that such stories excite the 
brain and the whole nervous system, and therefore waste 
the nerve-force. Frequent reading of them, to say nothing 



of moral influences, produces nervous disorders which maj 
root themselves in the physical constitution. Reading for 
recreation ought to be of wholly different character. It 
should be instructive or refining, and the taste for such 
reading, as elsewhere hinted, ought to be developed by our 
teachers. 

There is an evil connected with study, which needs atten- 
tion from School Boards, and from parents as well. We 
allude to myopia, or short-sightedness, now held to be a 
disease of the eye. It would be well if children were 
examined with some reference to tlieir predisposition or 
otherwise to this disease, its causes, and remedy. Certain 
general rules have been suggested whereby it may be stayed, 
if not averted : 1. Secure sufficient light, while direct or 
reflected rays upon the eyes are avoided ; 2. Avoid a stoop- 
ing position and a forward inclination of the head in read- 
ing or studying, and hold the book up ; 3. At brief intervals 
rest the eyes ; 4. Avoid straining the eyes by small or poor 
print ; 5. Cleanse the eyes with soft, pure water both 
morning and evening. 

SUGGESTIONS, 

We are emboldened by recent action of the Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen to ask that no use of X\\q school- 
liouses of the city be permitted, other than that for which 
they were erected,' without the consent of the School Board. 
There are evils connected with the occupancy of school-rooms 
by those not under the control of the regular teacher, which 
we realize more than persons having other official duties. 
Books and apparatus are misplaced or lost, and matter 
upon blackboards intended to be reserved, and so marked, 
is sometimes erased by persons entering or occupying the 
rooms in the evening, or after school hours. While we 
recognize the authority of the City Councils in the premises, 



we suggest that it ought not to be exercised, without the 
concurrent action of this Board. 

Out of some appropriation there ought to be a gradual 
increase of apparatus in our schools of all grades, for aid 
in teaching. The receipts for tuition of non-residents are 
largely devoted to this purpose, which it would be well for 
our Board to keep in view. There ought also to be a supply 
for our grammar schools of books for reading, other than 
those of the prescribed course, which might be of science, 
popularly treated, or of some of the masters of our litera- 
ture. It would interest when the repetition of the regular 
lessons might become monotonous, and would test and 
promote the power of reading intelligently at sight. The 
city should own such books, which might be circulated in 
different schools. 

CONCLUSION. 

We enter upon a new year, conscious of the great respon- 
sibility, financial and moral, resting upon us. The hope 
of the future must rest upon the youth of to-day. The 
destinies of the nation will soon be swayed by new genera- 
tions. The ballot, by which the will of the people is ex- 
pressed, ought to be intelligent and order-loving. Crude 
ideas of political expediency, and the selfish exercise of 
political power, come from a defective education. While a 
broad education does not necessarily 'eradicate a selfish 
spirit, it enables one to comprehend that personal interests 
are largely bound up in the general advantage. Let the 
new generations be so impressed by the genius of our 
educational systems that the issues opening to them shall 
be met with patriotism, with wisdom, and with wholesome 
result. 



SUPERINTENDENT S REPORT, 



G-entlemen of the 31anchester School Board : 

In accordance with a rule of your Honorable Board that 
the Superintendent of Public Instruction in this city must 
prepare a written report on or before Dec. 15, annually, I 
would respectfully submit the following : 

THANKS. 

Permit me, first, to thank you most sincerely for the 
opportunity, offered by my election to the office of superin- 
tendent, for extending my field of usefulness ; and, though 
I have tried to meet the requirements of the position with- 
out assuming any undue personal prominence, I am, never- 
theless, not unmindful of the great honor one may justly 
feel in having committed to his charge the execution of 
such measures as you, who have control of the most 
important interests of the city, may deem wise to direct. 

CONDITION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

During the first weeks of my term of service I visited 
all the schools, and most of them several times each. They 
appeared generally in good condition, so far as the teach- 
ers were responsible for their appearance. 

Among the defects were the lack of a course of study 
that could be followed, an unequal distribution of pupils 



90 

in some parts of the city, — certain schools being overbur- 
dened while others were unduly small, — and a small surplus 
of teachers ; or, to particularize, the schools in the brick 
building at 'Squog were small, — less than twenty-five pupils 
in most of the rooms, and less than twenty in the master's, 
— and at the Centre-Street house, also in '8quog, there were 
three schools where but two were needed, since the brick 
house had need of the surplus of pupils in order to fill up 
its rooms and furnish a supply to close gaps in its classifi- 
cation, which are almost fatal to the proper growth of any 
graded school ; secondly, the primary schools at the Ash- 
Street, Blodget-Street and Manchestei»-Street houses were 
badly crowded ; and, thirdly, the schools at Webster's Mills 
and Mosquito Pond were both small, and so located that 
consolidation seemed advisable, as I then reported. 

To remedy some of these defects, the occasion of Miss 
Nellie E. Tappan's resignation of her position as teacher 
at tlie Centre-Street house in 'Squog was regarded as a fit 
opportunity for dispensing with the services of one teacher 
there; and, accordingly, Miss Ellen E. McKean was given 
temporary charge of Miss Tappan's school for the remain- 
der of the spring term ; and, at the beginning of the fall 
term, the highest grade of primary school at the Centre- 
Street house was transferred to the brick house, and Miss 
Downs, thus relieved of the first grade of primary school 
at the Centre-Street house, was put in charge of the grade 
formerly taught there by Miss Tappan. 

The transfer of Miss Downs' school to the brick house 
affected the schools there favorably, by filling up most of 
the vacant seats and famishing material with which to fill 
some of the gaps in the classification of that school, so that 
it is hoped the 'Squog grammar department may soon find 
it-self supplied with pupils who have had the drill of both 
primary and middle grades. The want of regularly-formed 



91 

middle schools in that locality has been an irregularity in 
our system, which has seriously impaired the efficiency of 
the 'Squog grammar department. It is unfair to expect 
this school to do its own work and supply the work and 
drill of the middle-school grades, and do all in the same 
time allowed other grammar schools for doing only their 
own grade work. The attempt, too, to regulate this school 
at 'iSquog after the four-room plan of the larger grammar 
schools on this side the river, must, for the want of suffi- 
cient population, result at present in very small schools. 
The changes, therefore, made at the opening of the fall term 
liave resulted in placing all pupils belonging to the gram- 
mar department in the two rooms up stairs, without giving 
the master over forty pupils or his first assistant over fifty ; 
and, after this term, there will be two regularly-constituted 
first and second middle schools in the two rooms on the 
lower floor, from which the grammar department may in 
future be supplied with material properly prepared for 
entering upon the grammar-school work. 

The gaps, heretofore existing in the classification of this 
school, have left it during this fall term without any proper 
first division or any first class of the third-division grade ; 
but regular promotions at the end of the term will give for 
the next two terms a second class of the first-division 
grade, a first class of the second-division grade, and a first 
class of the third-division grade, — three classes in all, — in 
the masters room, not exceeding forty-five pupils ; and in 
the room of the first assistant there will be a second class 
of the third-division grade and a first class of the fourth- 
division grade, not exceeding fifty pupils : thus it is seen 
that there will be three gaps in the classification of this 
school during the next two terms ; — the want of a first class 
of tlie first-division grade, a second class of the second- 
division grade, and a second class of the fourth-division 
grade. 



92 

Some in that vicinity will probably be surprised at this, 
and now learn for the first time that gaps in the classifica- 
tion of the 'Squog grammar department have existed ever 
since the organization of that school upon the four-room 
plan. They may now, also, see some of the disadvantages 
under which both teachers and pupils have had to labor, in 
attempting to jump these gaps and make it appear they 
were losing no time in passing from one class to another 
in regular order. 

This extended explanation of the condition of the 
'Squog Grammar School has been given in order that the 
friends of that school may know the true classification of 
the pupils now, as the degree of their advancement is com- 
pared with what is required in the course of study. 

It by no means signifies that a pupil belongs to the first 
division of the grammar grade, because he is in the mas- 
ter's room of this school. There is not yet population 
enough in 'Squog, of the character which completes a 
grammar-school course of study, to supply an average of 
more than ten or a dozen pupils properly fitted for the first- 
division grade ; hence, the master's room, if respectably 
filled at all, must be supplied with pupils of the second- 
division, and, at times, even of the third-division, grade. 

As the population increases, and a greater number of 
pupils enter upon the work of the grammar school, this 
grade can be extended to the rooms down stairs ; but pro- 
vision should then be made for the necessary middle-school 
grades in the Centre-Street house, or else the gaps in the 
classification of the grammar school, which it is proposed 
to fill during the coming year, so far as possible, would 
again occur, greatly to the detriment of that school, and 
afford occasion for unjust criticism upon the work of the 
teacher or the charge of stupidity upon the part of the 
pupil, when in fact both might do all that is possible under 



93 

eircumstances in which middle and grammar school work 
are both undertaken in four years instead of the six years 
allowed in the other schools of the grammar grade. 

The overcrowded condition of the primary schools at the 
Ash-Street and Blodget-Street houses was relieved by the 
formation of a new school at the corner of Bridge and 
Union Streets, under the charge of Miss Emma Henry, a 
graduate of each grade of our schools, including the Train- 
ing School. Her school has been quite full, and it now 
seems that permanent accommodations for about forty pri- 
mary-school pupils are immediately needed in that locality. 

The Manchester-Street primary schools have been relieved 
as much as possible, from time to time, by transfers. There 
has been difficulty, also, in keeping the lowest grade of 
primary school in the training-school department, at the 
corner of Merrimack and Union Streets, within the limits 
of its seating capacity. 

When the pressure is too great for the primary schools 
in the south-east part of the city, other schools may be or- 
ganized in the vacant room at the Lincoln-Street house and 
in the house recently moved to a spot near the French 
Catholic church ; but, for the relief of the primary schools 
in the northern and north-eastern parts of the city, there 
will soon be need of a four-room building at the corner of 
Bridge and Union Streets, where an old primary school- 
house now stands, much out of repair and almost worthless. 
The pressure, too, in the middle schools and grammar 
grades at the Ash-Street house is likely to increase so that 
the whole building will soon be needed for those grades, 
and a new house at the corner of Bridge and Union Streets 
would afford proper accommodations for the Ash-Street pri- 
maries. 

At least two, and probably three, new schools will be a 
necessity in that locality as early as the spring of 1879, and 



94 

I would call the attention of the proper committees to the 
importance of providing suitable rooms for the same. 

The people at Bakersville, also, need extended school ac- 
commodations. The two rooms there are now quite full ; 
and pupils have had to be transferred to the Franklin-Street 
house, on account of the lack of room and the want of 
other privileges at home. The school for the older pupils 
at Bakersville is ungraded, and the classification necessa- 
rily bad. 

I would recommend that your Honorable Board consider 
the justice and propriety of securing additional room there, 
in order that the schools may be better graded and the chil- 
dren in that section provided with means for completing 
the grammar-scliool course of study at home. The head 
teacher now there would be found a worthy principal of the 
scliool; and the additional expense of another assistant, not 
more than three or four hundred dollars a year. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

It is always important in every organized system of 
schools, in which there are several schools of similar grade, 
that all of the same grade should be doing the same work 
at the same time ; and it is particularly necessary in a city 
like ours, — wliere so large a portion of tlie people move, in 
the course of their residence here, from one section of the 
city to another, — in order that pupils may not be embar- 
rassed and delayed in completing the preparatory course of 
their education, when obliged by change of residence to go 
from one school to another of similar grade. Hence, among 
the things which needed immediate attention, I found none 
more pressing or important than a revision of the course of 
study. The course last adopted was published in 1873; 
and it had become practically useless at the expiration of 
Superintendent Edgerly's terni of service, on account of the 



95 

changes in text-books since the publication of tlie course. 
Mr, Edgerly would have revised the course before the open- 
ing of another school-year, had he remained in service. 
My predecessor, however, coming to the position of super- 
intendent, a comparative stranger to the real condition of 
our schools, had need of the whole of his short term of ser- 
vice, for observation, before he could feel sure that the 
changes he might suggest would prove wise. 

The two evils, arising from the want of a course of study 
that could be followed, were the lack of uniformity of work 
in schools of the same grade, and, in some instances, fail- 
ure to do the work appropriate to the grade. Primary 
schools could be named which were attempting the work of 
the middle-school grade ; and there were middle schools 
which were obliged to do primary-school work, because the 
work of that grade was not done in its appropriate place. 

Observations were made during the spring term with 
view to a revision of the course of study, and, after many 
days of labor during the summer vacation, the draft for a 
new course was placed before the special committee on 
courses of study, who criticised, discussed, and revised it. 
By a vote of the Board, this new course was then provision- 
ally adopted for trial this term ; and, as a result, work in 
schools of the same grade is now nearly uniform, and teach- 
ers know the extent and character of the work expected in 
their individual grades. 

Among other objects, that this new course was designed 
to secure, are a utilization of time for study of the more 
practical portions of certain branches ; the greatest possible 
liberty, on the part of teachers, in methods of instruction ; 
opportunity for advancing, more rapidly than their class, 
those pupils whose scholarship and age entitle them to such 
a privilege ; and economy, on the part of parents, in the 
purchase of text-books. 



96 

Of arithmetic there is omitted as useless in the lower 
grades : duodecimals, equation of payments, alligation, the 
progressions, and the unpractical portions of mensuration, — 
all of which may be taken, in the review of arithmetic at 
the High School, by those able to attempt an extended ed- 
ucation. 

It frequently happens that some pupils, on account of 
unusual natural ability, more scholarly habits of study, or 
greater maturity of mind, are so thorough in what they 
once go over, they might advance more rapidly than their 
class if they had opportunity to do so. Therefore, in the 
belief that schools and courses of study are for pupils, and 
not the latter for the former, we have arranged the reviews, 
necessary for most pupils, at such stages in the course of 
study, and so regulated the relation of one part of the course 
to another part, that pupils, who are for any reason prepared 
to advance more rapidly than their class, may, at certain 
places in the course, receive individual promotions and be 
permitted to go on with the next class at other times than 
those arranged for making general promotions. In a word, 
there has been a desire to make the course of study elastic 
enough to meet the wants of all seeking a thorough com- 
mon-school education. 

Teachers, that are at liberty to give instruction orally, can 
frequently do better work in certain branches than when 
obliged to use a text-book : therefore, it is left optional with 
them to instruct with or without the text-book, their best 
work only being demanded; but they 'are required, for the 
sake of uniformity in all schools of the same grade, to fol- 
low the course of study, while instructing orally, so far as to 
teach the substance of what is therein required. They are 
advised to give oral instruction in the lower grades, if 
they can as successfully teach in that way ; because there 
are some parents, represented in those grades, too poor to 



97 

purchase many books, who, we fear, sometimes withdraw 
their children from school rather than have them supplied 
at the expense of the city. But few teachers, however, can 
givfe good oral instruction in more than one branch of study ; 
and, for those who have not been through some regular 
course of professional training, to attempt even that, without 
careful daily 'preparation^ is unwise, and likely to result in 
much unprofitable talk. 

By using two books in arithmetic, geography, and lan- 
guage, money is saved those who are least able to buy 
l)Ooks, for it is they who are of the class that cannot keep 
their children in school longer than to enable them to com- 
plete the work of the middle schools, or the lower divisions 
of the grammar schools, in which these elementary books 
are used ; while, on the other hand, no extra expense is in- 
curred by those who complete the course, for, if they should 
begin it with the larger book, that would in the majority of 
cases be worn out by the time when the smaller book is 
now completed, so they would then have to buy another of 
the larger kind. There is, also, another important reason 
why two books upon these subjects should be used instead 
of one. A book that contains enough for the whole course 
has its elementary portions developed too abruptly for the 
young, who are consequently compelled to go so slow in 
attempting to understand what is beyond their comprehen- 
sion, that no time is left those who quit school early in life 
for acquiring a general notion of the subject treated. 

TEACHERS. 

But, over and above courses of study and the wisest of 
rules and regulations, stands the teacher as of first import- 
ance. The teacher is emphatically the school, that is, the 
%pirit of it ; and far above all ordinary estimate is the ser- 
vice of that teacher whose scholarship, judgment, ability to 



98 

impart instruction successfully, and sound, practical com- 
mon sense render liim a constant benefactor to the school. 
Such, however, is frequently criticised as one lacking 
breadth and comprehensiveness, as one who does not make 
himself felt in society ; and, when the plea is ojffered that 
there is want of time and strength for these more general 
matters, there is frequently a disposition to make light of 
the idea that those wlio are required to teach but six hours 
a day should lack either time or strength for attention to 
the more general interests of the community. It is not 
considered that, on account of certain necessities in a city 
like ours, teachers of the larger schools, at least, should be 
at their buildings a half hour or more before the opening of 
school ; that they are frequently detained half or three-quar- 
ters of an hour after school by interested pupils, voluntarily 
remaining for assistance, to say nothing of extra attention 
that must then be given to some other pupils who have 
been negligent of duty ; and that, on account of the number 
of different studies taught by individual teachers, there is 
need of time out of school-hours for study, thought, and 
arrangement of methods, in order to instruct successfully. 
It is doubtless true that teachers would live longer and en- 
joy life better-, if they went more into society and participated 
in its pleasures; that they would go to their daily labors 
with lighter hearts and more cheerful countenances ; and, in 
some respects, be better fitted for their work. So would the 
business man, doctor, and lawyer, if they should do likewise. 
Their success, however, depends upon attention to their 
vocations : so does the teacher's, and, of all classes most 
thoroughly unfitted by his daily labors for finding needed 
rest and recreation in society, is the teacher. He is already 
exhausted by talk, and needs, most of all, an opportunity to 
keep silent. When our civilization is re-organized, and there 
is no longer necessity for business and professional men to 



99 

compete for place and bend every energy to maintain a high 
standing in their vocations, tlien may we reasonably expect 
teachers will be able to satisfy the public, and allow their 
attention to be divided by other leading interests of the 
community ; but, so long as we demand that they teach 
schools which shall not suffer by comparison with those in 
other places, let us be satisfied if our teachers devote their 
time and strength to the duties for which they are paid, 
remembering that, if teachers divide their attention among 
the various interests of society, or become absorbed by any 
one of them, their schools will suffer correspondingly. Yet 
we would not have teachers confined to the routine work of 
their daily labors, though their employment is probably no 
less narrowing than that of most vocations ; but, strange as 
it may seem to soine, those teachers that are faithful to 
their duties have but very little time for other things. The 
popular notion that teachers have much spare time, because 
the school-sessions are but six hours a day, is very errone- 
ous.. The time necessarily spent at school by our teachers 
cannot average less than six hours a day for teachers of 
primary schools, nor less than seven hours a day for teach- 
ers of other grades ; and, more than this, the teachers of 
the high and grammar schools average at least another 
hour a day in preparing and correcting written exercises, 
given in connection with regular recitations. Most of these 
teachers, who are best in their grade, also want two or three 
hours daily for reading the news of the day, periodicals, 
magazines, and attention to special courses of reading or 
study, with view to improvement in the substance and 
methods of their instruction, — all of which may be consid- 
ered legitimate school-work. 

These facts are mentioned only to disabuse the public 
mind, so far as they may, of a wrong impression in regard 
to the amount of time at the disposal of teachers for things 
other than their regular duties. 



100 

As to the idea sometimes expressed, that teachers should 
be found and employed who are geniuses in the profession, 
it is suggested that the time when one can be said to tower 
above his fellows of any class, business, or profession, thanks 
to the teacher for the education and enlightenment of the 
age, has passed away; and men of every grade, lifted out 
of the ignorance and superstition of the past, cannot and 
do not recognize in every community the superior of their 
particular class. It is quite as reasonable to expect to find 
the genius of this age in statesmanship, philosophy, law, 
medicine, the editor's chair, or the minister's pulpit, here in 
Manchester, as here to look among our teachers for the 
genius of their profession. Nevertheless, may he here be 
found and recognized as such while here, by grant of com- 
pensation worthy of his hire, that we may not have to 
accuse ourselves of inability to discern merit, until a dis- 
tant city has contracted for his labor at a greater price, 
and we are made conscious of his worth only by loss of his 
service. 

Manchester may justly feel proud of her corps of teach- 
ers. Regarded as a whole, it cannot be easily excelled. 
Its proportion of good teachers is unusually large ; yet it 
can hardly be considered a matter of surprise, if, among so 
large a number, a few should be found who do not compare 
favorably with the majority of those doing similar grade 
work, especially since there has not been any re-adjustment 
of positions for many years, other than the filling of vacan- 
cies by the election of new teachers, or the transfer of those 
in service, without regard in all cases to fitness for position. 
It is not wise, sometimes, to transfer a teacher who is doing 
well in one grade to a higher grade, simply because it seems 
a convenient way of filling a vacancy ; nor is it certain that 
a candidate is most suitable for a given position, because 
she happens to have numerous or influential friends. 



101 

SELECTION OF TEACHERS. 

If teachers are selected in accordance with the principle 
that a candidate having the best qualifications for a given 
position shall be chosen, there will in a few years hence be 
no teachers of medium standing in our schools. Adherence 
to this principle would also result in the propriety and 
justice of selecting teachers in most instances from among 
the graduates of our Training School, — citizen candidates 
that have also been through our schools and graduated at 
some other training or normal school that can be regarded 
as the equal of our Training School being given like con- 
sideration, — while tlieir superiors only would be entitled 
to first consideration. If a superior is not found, then, of 
those graduates the one should be elected, who, other things 
being equals has the certificate of priority of date in time of 
graduation. Such a course determined upon for the selec- 
tion of teachers would save the members of the Board 
much annoyance, the graduates of the Training School much 
unnecessary anxiety lest the one having most persistence 
and the greatest number of working friends should be suc- 
cessful ; and the method of choice would likely commend 
itself to all concerned as one most fair and just. It will be 
understood, of course, that it is for the Board to decide 
whether this method shall be practiced ; but all applicants 
may know that it is tlie only method which I can consis- 
tently recommend. 

PARENTAL DUTIES. 

Parents and citizens owe our schools something more 
than means for existence. They should personally inspect 
them frequently, to see that they are answering the end 
for which they have been established, to call the attention 
of the proper officials to discoverable defects, and to encour- 



102 

age and stimulate pupils and teachers, whenever found 
worthy of wholesome praise. We may, it is true, form a 
tolerably correct idea of the skill of a sculptor from the 
form of the statue he produces ; but it should be borne in 
mind that he alone is responsible for the symmetry of his 
work of art ; while, in the formation of the character of the 
child at school, several artists are usually employed in the 
course of his development, each of whom is equally respon- 
sible ; and it is the bounden duty of the parent, who is most 
responsible of all, to know, as far as he may, that his ser- 
vant in the school-room is skilled* in his vocation, and one 
whose work and influence are in harmony with the life and 
teachings of a good home. Nor can the parent be certain 
that he may rightfully censure the teacher, under whose 
charge his child may be, when first he exhibits a weakness 
or irregularity for which the school can properly be held 
responsible, unless he has made himself familiar with the 
work of each preceding teacher, and knows from personal 
observation that the shortcoming of his child is not attribu- 
table to a predecessor, whose failure to understand a case 
of peculiar surroundings is bringing forth blighted fruit 
under a more worthy teacher. 

Let parents feel that there is no necessity for formality 
about visiting schools, no need of any change of dress, if 
they can visit them only in connection with their daily 
labors. The teamster should feel free repeatedly to step 
into the school where he may observe the surroundings 
and work of his child under the direction of the teacher, 
during the few moments his weary horses are resting in 
the street ; men of all classes should feel at liberty to take 
leisure moments that may be snatched from business for 
visiting schools, without any feeling that they are intruding ; 
and ladies may properly visit them in connection with their 
shopping excursions. Frequent short visits will give any 



103 

one a better idea of the real character of a scliool than one 
or two long ones. 

Another important duty of parents, and one that is likely 
to affect unfavorably the morals of their children unless 
given attention, is the propriety of placing their children 
under restraint in respect to the time when they may be 
allowed to leave home for school and the amount of time 
to be granted them for returning from the same. 

The doors of the school-houses are open fifteen minutes 
before the opening of school, and teachers are required to 
be present then and exercise care over pupils, in seeing 
that they enter the house and take seats at once ; but pupils 
are not marked tardy if present at the opening of school, 
and some pupils — chiefly guds from thirteen to sixteen 
years of age — have availed themselves of the time between 
leaving home and the very minute for opening school to 
walk up and down some of our principal streets, most close- 
ly observing those things which tliey should neither see nor 
hear, and making undesirable acquaintances. This has 
been more particularly true of pupils that have attended 
school temptingly near Elm Street, and the habit, once 
formed, has been observed to continue with a few, even 
after school-days have passed. The practice has been 
fraught with most evil in those instances in which pupils 
•have been allowed to leave home for school at pleasure, 
only to spend an hour or more upon the street, morning, 
noon, and night, in pleasant weather. 

Owing to efforts made by teachers, and others concerned, 
this practice has been much checked ; but its existence is 
still sufliciently great and baneful to warrant a call to 
parents for attention to a practice leading to vice, which 
might otherwise unwittingly escape the notice of the best 
of families until too late to remedy the evil. 

The fault is most easily obviated by controlling the time 



104 

for attendance at school from earliest years, that no bad 
hahit in this particular may be allowed to grow up with the 
child. It is not wise to allow children to go early to school, 
even when it is .certain that they go there directly and only 
for purposes of play. In all our large schools there are 
generally some pupils who have scarcely any home train- 
ing, and these are the ones most likely to be early at 
school for purposes of play, which, owing to the ungoverned 
nature of the child and the absence of the teachers, will 
usually be of the roughest sort that may be ventured. 
Safety, then, lies chiefly in giving pupils that can be depend- 
ed iipon for going directly to school only such time as will 
enal)lc them to reach school not earlier than fifteen minutes 
before time for opening it, vrhen the teachers are present ; 
or, in cases of doubt about the child's going directly, an 
allowance of only so much time as will enable it to reach 
school three or four minutes before the time for opening 
the same. Pupils have been known, even in Manchester, 
falsely to represent that they had been detained after school 
by the teacher, in order to get time to walk the streets. 
In such extreme cases, parents may rightfully demand a 
■written statement from the teacher of the time pupils are 
dismissed, whenever those of untrustworthy character are 
detained after school. 

Before leaving this subject, I may say that improprieties 
of the kind alluded to are not confined to either sex, or 
practiced altogether upon any particular street, or are wholly 
incidental to particular schools. They are more or less 
general, but, happily, few in number when compared with the 
aggregate attendance at our schools ; and it would be best 
to make no mention of them, if it were not proper that 
parents should eradicate injurious practices, which are al- 
most wholly within their control, and of which they might 
otherwise remain in ignorance. 



105 

Let no parent that has a child in our schools dismiss 
this subject with the thought that " it can have no possible 
connection with the conduct of my child," unless he is ab- 
solutely certain that his child spends no more time upon 
the street and there forms no other acquaintance than what 
are acceptable to the parent. 

Parents should also inform the teacher whenever they 
have reliable information that the conduct of any pupil is 
secretly exerting an immoral or injurious influence upon 
the school. This information should be given promptly, 
and in person or by private note. Such action is not med- 
dling, but by as much as " the life is more than meat," is 
it more of a duty than to inform a neighbor when his 
house is discovered on fire. 

pupils' reports. 

From the High School and each department of the gram- 
mar schools, there will be sent to the parent or guardian of 
each pupil, as often as twice a term, a report by the teacher, 
to show parents the standing of their children at school, 
with reference to attendance, deportment, and scholarship ; 
and parents are to sign the same as evidence to the teacher 
that the parent has had opportunity to inspect such report. 

From these forms, parents can learn from marks of ab- 
sence, whether pupils are absent without their consent ; from 
marks of tardiness and dismissal, whether they go and 
come directly ; from the deportment mark, what is the 
general course of their conduct ; from marks in scholar- 
ship, with what success they pursue individual studies ; and 
from a comparison of the " Pupil's Average " with the 
" Class Average;" whether his results are below, equal to, 
or above the average of his class. 

A pupil should not be censured for unsatisfactory results 
in scholarship if his deportment mark is ninety-five or 



106 

more, for such a mark would signify that he had done the 
best he was able to do under existing circumstances ; and 
it would be well to consider, before pronouncing lack of 
capacity, whether he has not been embarrassed by absence 
or by an attempt of the teacher to satisfy the parent by ad- 
vancing the pupil, sometime in his course, to a class for 
which he was unfitted. 

PROMOTIONS. 

It is generally best for parents to be satisfied with the 
opinion of those in authority in regard to questions of 
promotion. They should know more about the advisability 
of such than most parents can, and may be presumed to 
be impartial judges. Nevertheless, it is the right and duty 
of the parent to consult such authorities and furnish them 
with facts of peculiar circumstances attending the life of a 
child, whenever it is felt that a mistake has been made 
about its promotion. 

The difference of six months or a year in the time of 
graduation from the grammar school, with those under 
sixteen or seventeen years of age who do not intend to 
take a more extended course of study than that offered by 
the High School, is of no account if such time is gained at 
a sacrifice of good scholarship. Pupils that do not advance 
beyond the grammar grade should be very thorough, and 
acquire a sound common-school education, preparatory to 
the work of life. They should be satisfied with nothing 
less, though, to secure it, they may be obliged to lose two 
or three promotions and remain in this grade till the age 
of eighteen or nineteen. 

Those that go to the High School poorly prepared soon 
become discouraged and drop out, having in reality an ed- 
ucation inferior to that which would have been attained, if 
they had been satisfied to spend the same amount of time 



107 

and effort in the grammar grade, from which they might 
liave graduated with honor, had they been willing there to 
take the extra time needed for their individual circum- 
stances, instead of urging admission, by special vote of the 
Board, to a work for which they soon have to acknowledge 
themselves unequal. These remarks have no reference to 
that class of pupils who ask admission to the High School 
on the ground that they have been in the grammar grade 
an unusual length of time, with a record that shows great 
regularity of attendance and a continuous effort to do the 
best they coiild. All such are deserving of sympathy, and 
may be entitled at the hands of the Board to all the con- 
sideration they ask ; but, in such cases, it is a question 
which their parents must decide, whether, under individ- 
ual circumstances, a higher course of study had best be 
attempted. 

Let all pupils feel, and their parents reflect, that the loss 
of a promotion or two is better than an advance for which 
the pupil is unprepared, even if, as a consequence, he has to 
leave school before the work of the grammar grade is 
completed. In determining questions of promotion, give 
the pupil the benefit of the doubt, but nothing more. More 
than this is as certain failure for the pupil as it is for one 
who cannot swim to attempt to wade across a deep river: 
neither can touch bottom. Far better that the pupil should 
leave school with the fundamental principles thoroughly 
mastered, than that he should pass from grade to grade 
only to come out superfiically trained. The difference is 
aptly illustrated in the race of life, in which it not un fre- 
quently happens that one from the people's college — the 
common school — surpasses another, bearing the insignia of 
the most distinguished university. 



108 

ADMISSION TO HIGH SCHOOL. 

In order to secure the fairest, most impartial, and what 
I think will prove the best information, from which to de- 
cide questions of qualification for admission to the High 
School, I propose to furnish the masters of the grammar 
schools with questions for written examinations of all pu- 
pils of the first-division grade, in each of their several 
studies, twice a term ; and, at the end of the school year, 
we may find the average of the six examinations thus given 
in each study, and from the results we may perceive what 
pupils have attained a satisfactory standing and grant them 
diplomas of graduation accordingly. Those pupils that do 
not attain satisfactory results may be further examined 
orally or be granted leave to try a special examination at 
the close of the long summer vacation, when an examina- 
tion is given non-resident pupils who desire admission to 
our High School under the rules of the Board ; but pupils 
that cannot properly do the regular work for the year 
should not flatter themselves that their deficiencies can 
easily be made up during vacation, though it be long ; nor 
should they be encouraged to attempt it, except in extraor- 
dinary cases. Eight years' experience, as teacher of the 
first-division grade, leads me to conclude that, at least nine- 
tenths of those pupils that are qualified for admission to 
the High School will show as much in the standing repre- 
sented by the aggregate average of the results attained in 
such a series of examinations as is contemplated ; and it 
seems both unnecessary and unjust to subject those that 
have attained a high degree of scholarship by conscientious 
effort and industry throughout the year, to a single, special 
examination, — particularly, when it is well known and gen- 
erally conceded that a single trial is no fair test, because of 
the liability of some, who are best, to fail, on account of 



109 

their over-anxiety and nervousness, superinduced, perhaps, 
by their very faithfuhiess. 

The new plan will require, on an average, but one exam- 
ination in two weeks during the fall term, and two exam- 
inations in three weeks during each of the other terms, 
which surely cannot be considered excessive ; and, as they 
are to take the place of those heretofore given by the mas- 
ters, they will impose upon the pupils no additional work of 
this kind. These examinations will be chiefly confined to 
work indicated in the course of study ; and they will there- 
fore afford a stimulus to tJioroiighness in daily labor, and do 
away with the temptation to cram, which is the special evil 
of the plan of giving a single examination at the end of the 
year. 

CLOSING EXERCISES. 

Worthy pupils, too, should have some more agreeable 
way of closing a nine years' course of study than to swelter 
through a series of examinations in the warm days of June 
or July ; and, though I would not favor a "show," in 
which the faces that have become brazen by looking about 
the school-room are to be put forward to look down an 
audience, I would submit that a public closing exercise, in 
which pupils may feel that they can take part without addi- 
tional expense for dress, may be proper, provided the pupils 
are satisfied to have it so far extemporized from previous 
efforts in regular exercises in composition, recitation, or 
music, that but little special preparation is needed, and none 
which would interfere with the regular order of exercises 
of the school for a longer time than some portions of the 
last one or two days of the term. This much of a public 
exercise may, indeed, be due the graduating class, since 
about one-third of such complete their education in this 
grade. I think, however, it should generally be left with 



110 

the master of the school, as best judge of its interests, to 
decide whether the class may have even the simple exer- 
cises which I have suggested as sufficient. 

NAMING OF SCHOOLS. 

It seems to me that it is time our prominent schools were 
designated in some more appropriate way than by the 
streets upon which they are located ; and the changes 
which might be made that would be appropriate, and con- 
venient to remember on account of their location, would be 
to call the Lincoln-Street School the Lincoln School, the 
Franklin-Street School the Franklin School, the Spring- 
Street School (on the Stark Corporation) the Stark School ; 
while it is suggested that, if the conclusion of the matter 
were left to the first principal of the Ash-Street School, 
that school would be called the Washington School. These 
schools would then all bear national names. 

TRUANCY. 

It seems, from what I learn through the truant-officer and 
the judge of the Police Court, that there is an objection 
to sending a certain class of truants to the State Reform 
School, which practically renders the truant-laws inoperative 
to a certain extent. I would recommend that you investi- 
gate the nature of these cases, and take measures for 
securing such changes in the truant-law as will make it 
possible to send a certain class of truants to the City Farm 
for thirty, sixty, or ninety days, where, under the eye of the 
overseer, they may be made to earn a living until willing 
regularly to attend school. If a considerable number of 
truants should be collected at the Farm, a half-day school 
might be opened there some portions of the year, and habits 
of work and study enforced at much less expense than at 



Ill 

the Reform School, which, however, is not of so much 
importance as tliat the classes represented at the two places 
should be kept separate. 

ECONOMY. 

Though desirous to conduct the department of the super- 
iutendency as economically as possible, I find the expenses 
in some particulars disproportionately great for the portion 
of my term of service which has already expired. The 
expense of publishing the revised course of study for all 
grades of our schools was found necessary ; and the office 
was almost destitute of the greater portion of blank forms 
necessary for properly conducting its business, and without 
diplomas for graduates of the grammar schools, without 
diplomas and cards, also, which are granted pupils for 
punctuality of attendance. In replacing these, no thought 
was given at the time about the financial showing of this 
department for the present year, but attention was given to 
what would prove most economical in the end ; and, after 
consulting the proper sub-committee, to whom you referred 
some of these things, it was found, on investigation, cheapest 
to provide a supply of standard forms sufficient to last three 
or four years. This course is much more economical than 
to obtain annually only such quantities of printed forms as 
may be wanted for the year ; and the result of its adoption 
this year will save the city about two hundred dollars by 
the time the present supply is exhausted. 

By introducing, with our revised course of study, the books 
known as the " Short Course " of Payson, Dunton, and 
Scribner's System of Penmanship in the appropriate grades 
for certain terms, we shall save parents during each fall 
term, as we have done this term, not less than fifty dollars 
in the aggregate, and as much more by the introduction of 
Walter Smith's System of Drawing, which is proving a 



112 

great success, and is far superior in practical results to the 
system formerly used. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

Passing by the question of the propriety of teaching the 
metric system in the grammar schools, the discussion of 
the relative importance of the studies now pursued, criti- 
cism upon methods of instruction, and some other matters 
that I had designed to mention, I will call your attention 
to but one other subject, in this already too lengthy report, 
and that is, the importance of seeking the best information 
from which to determine the practicability of establishing 
an industrial school in our city. It is patent to teachers of 
the higher departments, and likewise obvious to the casual 
observer who frequently visits these grades, that too many 
pupils are there of the class who have no just appreciation 
of the advantages before them ; that, never having been 
obliged " to lend a helping hand " toward the maintenance 
of the family, they have the poorest idea possible of what 
it is to be industrious, thorough, or frugal, as they show 
from their conduct at school, by careless habits, waste of 
time, and indifference to fair attainments. For all of this, 
they or their parents may not be more at fault than the 
system of education, which fails to reach the class of pupils 
whose parents are so situated that they neither have, nor 
can find, suitable employment for the young, the want of 
which is the peculiar curse of most cities. This class of 
pupils is already sufficiently great in the city to warrant 
the necessary outlay for the organization of a school, to 
which many parents would gladly send some of their older 
children, if, in connection with a certain degree of mental 
drill, and the promotion of general intelligence, similar to 
that which is found in most of our schools, their children 
could there also obtain a practical and practiced knowl- 



113 

edge of those industries from which they might soon be- 
come at least self-supporting. 

CONCLUSION. 

Grateful for your individual counsels and assistance, for 
confidence imposed, and for the liberty you have given me 
to manage the internal affairs of the schools chiefly in ac- 
cordance with the dictates of my own judgment, and 
thankful to the teachers for their universal and cheerful 
cooperation in the efforts made to improve the schools, I 
promise you both, and the community also, continued self- 
devotion to the interests of our public schools. 

WM. E. BUCK, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



114 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR 
THE PAST YEAR.* 



Schools. 


Whole Number 
Belonging to 
the School. 


i 
.■a 

6J0 = 

c o 
t-l •—* 


M 

CD'S 


Ms 
^5 




Boys 


Girls 


Tot'l. 


i^ 


High School 


lot 

9G 
56 
72 
90 
102 
104 
71 
102 
2G 
26 
35 
32 
35 
37 
5(! 
3G 
30 
40 
29 
47 
53 
31 
37 
68 
40 
43 
56 
83 
62 
38 
.36 
39 
35 
58 
52 
25 
96 
20 
30 
42 
33 
9 
64 
32 
23 
12 
28 
24 
12 


149 
11 
54 
69 
106 
115 
1(15 
52 
79 
27 
46 
44 
50 
41 
47 
49 
38 
40 
36 
44 
40 
41 
40 
44 
41 
35 
35 
57 
51 
40 
43 
41 
46 
45 
35 
45 
18 
79 
32 
20 
46 
22 
8 
59 
35 
13 
10 
22 
22 
10 


250 
107 

no 

141 
196 
217 
209 
123 
181 
53 
72 
79 
82 
76 
84 
105 
74 
71 
76 
73 
87 
94 
71 
81 
99 
75 
78 
113 
134 
102 
81 
77 
85 
80 
93 
97 
43 
175 
52 
50 
88 
55 
17 
123 
67 
36 
22 
50 
46 
22 


179 
36 
63 
7a 
170 
174 
1G5 
73 
too 
29 
40 
46 
42 
40 
44 
32 
39 
38 
30 
30 
43 
46 
S9 
46 
39 
34 
42 
43 
40 
39 
41 
41 
38 
36 
42 
45 
29 
45 
33 
30 
41 
37 
12 
73 
43 
28 
20 
32 
30 
19 


172 
32 
60 
72 
165 
lt!6 
159 
70 
93 
26 
38 
43 
41 
38 
36 

: 29 

37 
37 
29 
27 
39 
34 
36 
44 
37 
33 
39 
40 
38 
37 
38 
39 
34 
34 
39 
41 
24 
42 
32 
29 
38 
35 
11 
68 
42 
25 
19 
31 
27 
18 


96 


Intermediate School 


89 




95 




96 




97 


Lincoln-Street Grammar School , . .. . 

Ash-Street Grammar School 

Spring-Street Grammar School 


9G 
96 
96 


tPiscataquog Grammar School 


93 
92 


Middle School No. 1 


97 


" " " 2 


94 


" " " 3 


98 


" " " 4 


95 


" " " 5 


86 


" " " 6 


91 


" " '' 7 


92 


" " " 8 


97 


" " " 9 


97 


" " "10 


92 
91 


.< li .1 2 


74 


" " " 3 


8G 


" " " 4 


96 


<' " " 5 


92 




97 


" " " 7 

" " " 8 


94 
93 


" " " 9 


93 


'< " " 10 


95 


" " " U 


93 


" " " 12 


95 


" " " 13 


89 


" " "14 


96 


" " " 15 


92 


'< " " Ifi 


91 


" " " 17 


84 


" " 18 


93 


'< " " 19 


99 


" " "20 


96 


" " " 21 


92 


" " " 22 


93 




92 


" " " " 3 


93 


" " " " 4 


98 ' 


" " " "5 


89 


« " " " 6 


95 


X " " " 7 


96 


" " 8 


90 
95 






Total 


2394 


2278 


1672 


2571 


2413 


93.8 



*This table is made up from the same basis as the similar one for last year; but in 
the total, 4,672, there are many puriils reckoned more than once, on account of trans- 
fers by reason of changes in residence, promotions, etc. By other items of report 
from teachers, it is ascertained there were only 3,007 different pupils la the public 
schools for the year. 

The "Average No. Belonging " is made up from a standard which does not recognize 



115 
LIST OF TEACHERS AND JANITORS. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 1877. 1878. 

Salary. 

Principal.— Albert W. Bacheler . . $2,000 $1,800 

Assistant.— Herbert W. Lull . . 1,000 950 

" Lucretia E. Manahan . 800 750 

" Emma J. Ela . . . 500 475 

" Mary A. Buzzell . . 500 475 

" Maria P. Kidder . . 500 475 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. LOWELL STREET. 

Principal.— J. Y. Cressej . ... 800 800 

Assistant. — Emma H. Perley . . 450 425 

TRAINING SCHOOL. — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Higher Department. 
Principal. — Nancy S. Bunton 
Assistant. — Mintie C. Edgerly . 

Primary Department. 
Principal. — Martha N. Mason 
Assistant. — Anna 0. Heath 



600 


550 


450 


425 


500 


475 


450 


425 


GET.* 




1,500 


1,350 


500 


475 


460 


425 


450 


425 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. — FRANKLIN STREET.* 

Principal. — Edward P. Sherburne 
Assistant. — Annette McDoel 

" Lottie R. Adams 

" Carrie E. Reid 

* Franklin-Street and Spring-Street grammar departments consolidated, and both 
under Mr. Sherburne as principal. 

pupils members of school during temporary absences of more than five consecutive 
days. The effect of this is to render the average number belonging falsely small, and 
the percentage of attendance fictitiously high. The cost of our schools per pui>il, 
based upon the average number belonging, is, therefore, erroneously reckoned too 
high. The School Board has so changed the method of obtaining these items, that in 
future t ley will be correctly represented. 

t Including middle-school classes a portion of the year. 

It may be added, for the benefit of the unimformed, that there is in this city an 
extensive system of Roman-Catholic parochial schools, which accounts for the small 
portion of our population (25,000) in the public schools. 



116 



LINCOLN STREET. 

Principal. — Benjamin F. Dame . 
Assistant. — Julia A. Baker 

" Mary J. Fife . 

" Isabelle R. Daniels . 

ASH STREET. 

Principal. — Daniel A. Clifford . 
Assistant. — Anstrice G. Flanders 

" Rocilla M. Tuson . 

" Martha J. Boyd 

SPRING STREET.* 

Assistant. — Mary L. Sleeper 
" Sarah J. Greene 



1,500 
500 
450 
450 



1,500 
500 
400 
450 

450 
450 



PISCATAQUOG. — NORTH MAIN STREET. 

Principal. — William M. Stevens . 1,000 

Assistant. — Mary A. Lear . . 400 

" Fredrica S. Mitchell . 350 



Etta J. Carley 



AMOSKEAG. 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 



No. 1, Blodget Street. — Nellie I. Sanderson 

2, Ash Street. — Mary A. Smith 

3, Ash Street.— Hattie S. Tozer 

4, Lincoln Street. — Anna J. Dana . 

5, Lincoln Street. — Mary F. Barnes 

7, Franklin Street. — Hattie G. Flanders 

8, Franklin Street. — C. Augusta Abbott 

9, Spring Street. — Cleora E. Bailey 

10, Spring Street. — Lizzie P. Gove 

11, Centre Street. — Florence McEvoy 



450 

450 
450 
450 
400 
450 
450 
450 
450 
450 
350 



1,350 
475 

425 
425 



1,350 
475 
425 
425 



425 
425 



1,000 
425 
375 

450 



425 
425 
425 
425 
425 
425 
425 
425 
425 
350 



* See note on previous page. . 



117 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodget Street.— Ellen B. Rowell 450 425 

2, Manchester Street.— Clara N. Brown 450 425 

3, Ash Street. — Georgianna Dow . 450 425 

4, Ash Street.— Helen M. Morrill . 450 425 

5, Lowell Street.— Annie M. Offutt . 450 425 

6, Wilson Hill.— Abbie E. Abbott . 450 425 

7, Lincoln Street. — Emma P. Beane . 450 425 

8, Lowell Street.— Elvira S. Prior . 400 425 

9, Manchester Street. — Julia A. Dearborn 350 350 

10, Manchester Street. — Nellie Pearson 450 425 

11, Franklin Street.— E. Jennie Campbell 400 425 

12, Franklin Street.— Martha W. Hubbard 450 425 

13, Spring Street.— Annie H. Abbott 350 

14, Spring Street.— Nellie M. Whitney 450 425 

15, Centre Street.— Jennie F. Bailey 375 400 

16, Centre Street.— Nellie E. Tappan* 450 

17, South Main Street.— Alice G. Lord 450 425 

19, Amoskeag. — Jennie G. Stebbins . 350 350 

20, South Main Street.— Sarah D. Lord 450 425 

21, Centre Street. — Augusta S. Downs 450 425 

22, Bridge Street. — Emma J. Henry 

(one term) .... 300 300 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 



No. 1, 


Stark District.— Nellie M. Cate . 


450 


425 


3, 


Bakersville. — 








Principal, Addie M. Chase 


500 


475 




Assistant, S. Isetta Locke 


450 


425 


4, 


Goffe's Falls. — Georgie A. Nute . 


450 


425 


6, 


Harvey District. — Flora L. Haines 


350 




6, 


Webster's Mills.— Olive J. Randall 


400 


400 


T, 


Hallsville.— Maria H. Hildreth . 


500 


475 



* The teacher resigned during the spring term, and the school was discontinued at 
the end of that term. 



118 

8, Youngsville. — Nellie L. Marsh . 400 

9, Mosquito Pond. — Lana S. George 400 400 

MUSIC TEACHER. 

Jason J. Kimball 11^200 

JANITORS. 

High School, Ash Street and Blodget Street. 

Volney W. Fairbanks 650 

Franklin Street, Manchester Street, Liiicoln Street and 
Wilson Hill. 

■John A. Carr 575 

Spring Street and Old High School House. 
James W. Preston . . . . . 350 

Merrimack Street. 

Rufus Lamb ....... 156 

^Squog Schools, consisting of Centre Street, North and South 
Main Street Schools. 

George E. Moore 350 

Note.— There has been a change of teachers for 1878, in the schools for which no 
salary is given for 1878. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Honorable Boards of Mayor and Aldermen and Com- 

tnon Council: 

Pursuant to the requirements of law and custom, I have 
the honor to submit for your consideration my annual report 
of the condition of the Department, embodying in detail an 
account of the duties performed by it during the year just 
passed ; also, an inventory of property belonging to the De- 
partment and the location of the same. You will also find a 
list of the fires and alarms to which the Department has re- 
sponded during the year. This has been a very favorable 
year, and the losses from fire have been very small. 

The Department has been called out for duty during the 
year 82 times. 

Amount of loss, as estimated . '19,345 00 

Amount of insurance . . . 8,945 00 



Amount of loss in excess of insurance $400 00 

APPARATUS. 

The apparatus consists as follows : 

3 Steam Fire Engines, located on Vine Street. 
1 Horse Hose Carriage, located on Vine Street. 
1 Hook and Ladder Truck, on Vine Street. 
1 Horse Hose Sled, on Vine Street. 
1 4-Wheel Hose Carriage. 



120 



1 Steam Fire Engine, at Piscataquog. 

1 4-Wheel Hose Carriage, at Piscataquog. 

1 2-Wheel Hose Carriage, at P. C. Cheney & Co.'s mill 
at Amoskeag, manned by men employed at the works. 

1 2-Wheel Hose Carriage, at Derry Mills, GofFe's Falls, 
manned by men at the mills. 

1 Supply Wagon. 

All of the apparatus is in good working order, the Steamer 
No. 4 having been repaired and newly-painted this year ; 
also the horse hose-carriage newly-varnished ; and, during 
the year, the Board of Engineers bought one of the Bangor 
extension-ladders, which I consider a valuable addition to 
the Department, for a small one, as there were many places 
in this city which it would have been difficult to get at with 
the old ladders. The horses of the Department are all in 
good working order, except the old "white horse" (as he is 
called)' that runs with the hose-carriage on Vine Street. 
He will have to be exchanged for a younger horse before 
long, as he is getting too old for some of the long runs 
which he is obliged to make. 

In the early part of the year I recommended to the Board 
of Engineers that there be a stop-nozzle bought, and tested 
on the hydrants, with a view to overcome the difficulty un- 
der which the Department had labored for a long time. 
They authorized me to order one and give it a trial, which 
I did ; and it gave entire satisfaction. And, since that, 
the Pennacook, Massabesic, and E. W. Harrington Hose 
Companies have each been supplied with them ; and I think 
them a very useful thing with the Department, as the water 
can be controlled at the nozzle, thereby saving a large 
amount of damage that must otherwise occur from the water. 
After getting the nozzles, my attention was called to a re- 
lief-valve, to be used on an engine. In order to use the 
stop-nozzle on them also, I had two of them tested on No. 



121 

4 Engine, in the presence of other members of the Board 
of Engineers; and one of them showed itself so well, that 
the Board authorized me to buy it, and place it on No. 4 
Engine, which I have done. It has been to only one fire 
since it was put on, where we had occasion to use it, and 
then it gave entire satisfaction. And, if it proves itself 
as it now appears, I would recommend that there be one 
bought and placed on No. 1 Engine. 

During the present month there has been a re-organiza- 
tion of the Department, and, I think, it is now fully as effi- 
cient and strong as it was before the change. You are well 
aware that our Hook and Ladder Company has had a large 
surplus of men, especially since the truck is drawn by a 
horse ; and, for quite a number of years past, the chief en- 
gineers have, in their reports, recommended a reduction in 
that company. But, as it was looked upon by them as an 
unpleasant duty to perform (as by so doing it would be 
likely to offend some of the more sensitive portion of the 
Department), it has been left to run along; yet, as some 
one must undertake it, the present Board have undertaken 
and performed that duty ; and, as far as I am able to judge, 
it meets the approval of our citizens, and the following is 
the organization as it now stands : 

1 Chief Engineer. 
4 Assistant Engineers. 
Steam Fire Engine No. 1, — 14 men. 
Steam Fire Engine No. 4, — 14 men. 
Steam Fire Engine No. 2, — as a reserve engine, to be 
used in case of need. 

1 One-Horse Hose Carriage, — 20 men. 

1 Hook and Ladder Truck, — 25 men, drawn by 1 horse. 

1 Supply Wagon, — 2 men. 

1 Horse Hose Sled for the use of Fennacook Hose Co. 

Steam Fire Engine No. 3, at Piscataquog, which responds 



122 

on the first alarm or as soon as the horses that are at work 
on the streets can get to it, to Boxes 52 and 53, and the 
boxes on this side of the river on a third alarm. 

1 Hand Hose Carriage, — 12 men, which is expected to 
be run ahead of the engine, and this company to man the 
third engine, when in use. 

And, if it be thought best to increase the Department any 
more, I would recommend a hand hose-carriage in the 
eastern part of the city, either at the east end of Park 
Street or at Hallsville ; also one near the south end of Elm 
Street or Bakersville ; and, as it will be likely to be but a 
few alarms that will make it necessary to use either of 
them, I would recommend cotton or linen hose, as it is 
much less expensive. 

BUILDINGS. 

During the year there has been erected, on the lot on 
Vine Street, a very substantial building for the accommoda- 
tion of the apparatus located in that section. The building 
is but partially finished at the present time. It is occupied 
by Steam Fire Engine No. 1, also Steam Fire Engine No. 
2 ; and in the same room will be kept the horse hose-car- 
riage for the present, as, by keeping the two in the same 
room, they can both be kept warm by the same stove, which 
will be equal to about four tons of coal saved. This building 
has been built from plans made by Geo. W. Stevens, Esq., 
and built under the direction of a special committee ap- 
pointed for that purpose ; and, when completed, it will be, 
for coh#nience, equal to the best in New England. It has 
been the desire of your committee to make a plain, substan- 
tial building that would be best adapted to the use of the 
Department. When this building was designed, it was 
contemplated to take down the old engine-house and rebuild 
in the same style as the new one, but I think, when the 



123 

present building is completed and occupied, it will be found 
sufficient for all of the Department which it will be pru- 
dent to keep in that place. In regard to the tenements of the 
new house, they are as convenient as can well be made 
in a block of that kind, and are palaces as compared with 
the others. It might be well for the City Government to 
make a small appropriation and complete the company halls 
in the third story ; and, when that is done, I think there will 
not be an occasion for any further outlay for a long time 
on that building. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Immediately upon my assuming the duties of Chief En- 
gineer, I made an examination of all of the signal-boxes, 
and found seven of them that would not start upon pulling 
the boxes. I caused them all to be put in working order, 
and they have all worked since when called upon, but in 
some instances the alarm has not worked properly, although 
there has not been any extra loss occasioned by its not 
working. I presume you will remember there was quite 
an amount of trouble and a great many reports about one 
or two of the bells not striking properly at that time. I 
had an examination made early in the year, and found the 
magnets in two of them badly burned by the lightning the 
year previous and not repaired. I replaced the magnets, 
and they have given general satisfaction since. In July of 
this year there was considerable damage done to it, but all 
the damaged parts were removed. During this month of 
December I have had an examination made of all of the 
parts connected with the telegraph by an expert, and he 
pronounces it all perfect ; but the nature of it is such that it 
requires a constant watchfulness of it. If I were to recom- 
mend any change, it would be to repeat the words of my 
predecessor, and recommend that the wire be taken from 
the roofs of buildings and placed upon poles in the streets. 



124 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I would return my thanks to the different 
mayors for the courtesies which they have shown me.- 
This has been a year of peculiar events. You will remem- 
ber that in the beginning of the year the Board of Engi- 
neers thought best to discharge a member from one of the 
steamer companies, and, owing to the differences of opinion 
as to the rights of them so to do, there has been a friendly 
warfare kept up between a portion of the city government ; 
and, I trust, there have been benefits enough derived from 
that contest to settle the matter without obliging our citi- 
zens to be harassed by anything of the kind again ; and, 
if there is a conflict between the city ordinances and the 
statutes of the state, I would recommend that they be so 
far altered or amended as to agree. 

And, gentlemen, as we have passed through the year 
without anything serious happening, you will please accept 
my thanks for the courtesies which you have shown me 
and the other members of the Department. And I would 
especially thank the Committee on Fixe Department, for 
their willingness to grant that which has been asked for ; 
also, the Police Department, for the promptness that has 
been shown by them at all times and the assistance " ren- 
dered the Department in the discharge of their duties. 

And, gentlemen, I can recommend the Department, as I 
think them in a better condition than they have been be- 
fore, since their new building gives them improved facilities, 
which they have not had before, and the discipline was 
never better than now. 

And I wish, particularly, to return my thanks to those 
who have been my assistants, for the many duties which 
they have performed and their kindness toward me. Also, 
to all of the officers and members of the Department, for 
their willingness to obey all orders and the promptness 



125 

that has boeii shown by them during the past year ; and I 
hope, in the years that are to come, you may be as success- 
ful in competing with that devouring element as you have 
been in the year just past. 

A. H. LOWELL, 
Chief Engineer Manchester Fire Department. 
Manchester, December 31, 1877. 



126 

ALARMS, FIRES, LOSSES, ETC., FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DEC. 31, 1877. 

1. — January 7 ; alarm, Box 4 ; 8.45 p. m. ; chimney burned 
out on Central Street. 

2. — January 19 ; alarm. Box 27; 7.30 p. m.; chimney 
burned out on Laurel Street. 

3. — January 20; alarm. Box 21; 1.15 p.m.; slight fire 
in house on Manchester Street; loss, $25.00; fiilly insured ; 
house owned by S. D. Lord, Esq. ; cause, defective chimney. 

4. — January 25 ; alarm, Box 27; 1.30 a.m.; store south 
end of Elm Street; building owned by the heirs of E. T. 
Stevens; occupied by H. M. Stone; cause unknown; loss, 
$800 ; fully insured. 

5. — January 31 ; alarm. Box 5 ; 11 a. m. ; Riddle's Build- 
ing, corner of Elm and Hanover Streets ; loss on building 
and stocks, $2,000 ; fully insured ; cause unknown. 

6. — February 11 ; alarm. Box 8 ; 6.30 a. m. ; fire in Myr- 
tle Block on Myrtle Street; loss, $100 ; fully insured ; cause 
unknown. 

7. — February 22 ; alarm, Box 7 ; 12.40 a. m. ; fire, corner 
of Concord and Elm Streets ; building owned by the heirs 
of J. G. Cilley ; loss, $100 ; fully insured ; cause unknown. 

8. — March 13 ; alarm. Box 7 ; 8.05 p. m. ; fire in a tene- 
ment-block on Elm Back Street between Bridge and Lowell 
Streets, owned by Kennard and Chadwick ; loss trifling; 
cause, straw bed in a cradle took fire from a stove. 

9. — May 2 ; alarm. Box 4 ; 12.35 a. m. ; fire in a tene- 
ment-house owned by J. W. Fellows, Esq., and John Smith, 
on Spruce Street ; loss, $75 ; fully insured ; cause unknown. 

10. — May 10 ; alarm, Box 6 ; 1.65 a. m. ; fire on Hanover 
Street, Nos. 195 and 197 ; loss mostly caused by water ; 
loss, $100; insured; cause unknown. 

11. — May 15 ; alarm. Box 6 ; 9.48 p. m. ; fire in Dunlap's 



127 

Building, corner of Amherst and Elm Streets, in shoe-store 
of Primeau Bros. ; loss, $300 ; fully insured ; cause un- 
known. 

12. — June 20 ; alarm. Box 6 ; fire in Goffstown, N. H. ; 
Steam Fire Engine No. 2 went up. 

13. — June 29 ; alarm, Box 3 ; 9 a.m.; fire in A. C. Wal- 
lace's boiler-room at south end of Elm Street ; loss trifling ; 
cause, took from boiler-fire. 

14. — July 6 ; alarm. Box 4 ; 7.15 p. m. ; fire on Spruce 
Street in tenement-block owned by G. W. Riddle ; loss, 
$50 ; fully insured ; cause unknown. 

15. — July 21 ; alarm, Box 52 ; 12.30 p. m. ; fire in boiler- 
room, Wallace's brewery ; loss trifling ; cause, took fire 
from boiler-fire. 

16. — July 29 ; alarm. Box 3 ; 8.45 p. m. ; fire in Manches- 
ter Locomotive-Works' Foundry, south end of Elm Street ; 
loss, $50 ; fully insured ; cause, overheated oven. 

17. — August 8 ; alarm, Box 27 ; 9.30 a. m. ; fire in the 
roof of Museum Building on Elm Street ; loss, 13,000 ; fully 
insured ; cause, cigar-stub thrown in a spittoon that was 

filled with sawdust. 

* 

18. — August 17; alarm. Box 27 ; 1.35 a. m. ; fire in 
Granite Block, shoe-store of Mr. Burrows ; loss, $1,500 ; 
fully insured ; cause unknown. 

19. — August 18 ; alarm, Box 6 ; 5.30 p. m. ; to call men 
to pump out cellars. 

20. — September 8 ; alarm. Box 4 ; 8.50 p. m. ; burning of 
an old bed in a cellar, corner of Central and Elm Streets. 

21. — September 19 ; alarm, Box 4 ; 7.50 a. m. ; fire in 
Blodgett & Clark's Block, corner of Spruce and Elm 
Streets ; loss trifling ; cause unknown. 

22. — September 30 ; alarm. Box 5 ; 10.30 a. m. ; fire in 
Masonic Temple on Hanover Street ; millinery-store occu- 
pied by Misses O'Neil and Donahoe; loss, $150 ; fully in- 
sured ; cause, escape of gas from fixtures. 



128 

23. — October 6 ; alarm, Box 21 ; 1.30 p. m. ; fire on 
Manchester Street between Chestnut and Pine Streets ; ten- 
ement owned by D. A. Simons ; loss, $25.00 ; fully insured ; 
cause unknown. 

24. — October 8 ; alarm, Box 4 ; 1.30 p. m. ; fire in a ten- 
ement-house owned by Blodgett & Clark, south end of Elm 
Street ; fire in a closet ; loss trifling. 

25. — October 16 ; alarm. Box 52 ; 2.45 p. m. ; fire on 
Douglas Street, 'Squog ; building owned by John Hoff- 
man ; loss, $325 ; fully insured ; cause unknown. 

26. — October 24 ; alarm. Box 7 ; 11.40 a. m. ; fire in 
small wooden building at the north end of Elm Street, 
owned by E. W. Bartlett, occupied as a baker's shop ; loss, 
$25. 

27. — November 1; alarm, Box 4; 1.20 p. m. ; fire in a 
tenement-house on Cedar Street, owned by Blodgett & 
Clark ; burnt a straw bed ; loss trifling. 

28. — November 18 ; alarm. Box 24 ; 12 P. M. ; fire in 
house on East Spruce Street, owned by True Perry ; loss, 
$200 ; fully insured ; cause, defective chimney. 
^ 29. — December 15 ; alarm. Box 27 ; 6 a. m. ; fire, burning 
out of a chimney in a tenement-house on Merrimack be- 
tween Elm and Chestnut Streets. 

30. — December 18; alarm. Box 62; 5.05 p.m.; fire in 
buildings owned by John Holland, corner of Belmont and 
Valley Streets ; loss, $1,000 ; insured, 



129 

NUMBERS AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at B. P. Johnson & 
Co.'s office and Samuel Colby's residence, corner of Elm 
and Young Streets. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm Streets. Keys at 
National Hotel and L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s office. 

No. 5. — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's office and G-. 
E. Hall's drug-store. 

No. 6. — Engine-house, Vine Street. Keys at engine- 
house. 

No. 7.— City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. 
Perry's drug-store. 

No. 8. — Elm, foot of Orange Street. Keys at Jones & 
Hardy's, Josiah Stark's, and Moses N. Smith's residence. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster Streets. Keys at 
Scott W. Lane's and J. Freeman Clough's. 

No. 12. — Blood's shop. Keys private. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook & Chestnut Streets. Keys at 
residences of W. Jencks and Lewis Simons. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union Streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut Streets. Keys 
at residences of Charles Palmer and John Wilson. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union Streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev. J. O'Brien and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech Streets. Keys 
at residences of W. C. Rogers and H. P. Watts. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple Streets. 
Keys at residences of H. C. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and E. 
P. Richardson. 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine Streets. Keys 
at A. Mallard & Son's grocery and residence of J. A. 
Emerson. 



130 

No. 28, — Corner of Central and Beech Streets. Keys at 
residences of E. T. James and Mrs. J. Stevens, 

No. 2-1. — Corner of Massabesic and Park Streets. Keys 
at residences of D. M. Goodwin and A. D. Goodwin. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland Streets. Keys 
at residences of S. L. Fogg and Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Eussell Streets. Keys 
at McCrillis' carriage-shop and residence of John N. 
Chase. 

No. 27. — Comer of Merrimack and Elm Streets. Keys 
at Manchester House, Tebbetts Bros.' and Weeks & Cur- 
rier's drug-stores. 

No. 31. — Amoskeag Village. Keys at P. C. Cheney & 
Co.'s paper-mill and residence of Capt. J. M. Varnum. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills, corner of Canal and Brook 
Streets. Keys at Hoyt & Co.'s paper-mill and Langdon 
watch-room. 

No. 34. — Mechanics' Row. Keys at watch-room and 
W. W. Hubbard's office. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at Stark watch-room. 

No. 33. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst Streets. Keys 
at residences of J. S. Campbell, Rodney Porter, and A. G. 
Fairbanks. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag New Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 43. — Namaske Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 51.— S. C. Porsaith & Co.'s shop. Keys at S. C. 
Forsaith's office and Lowell's iron-foundry office. 

No. 52. — Barr's Brick Block, 'Squog. Keys at Barr & 
Clapp's store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's brewery. Keys at brewery office 
and I. R. Dewey's store. 

No. 61. — Corner of Elm and Hancock Streets, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at residence of H. W. Longa and M. O'Neil's 
saloon. 



131 

No. 62. — Massabesic Street, Hallsville. Keys at resi- 
dences of Charles Chase and G. W. Dearborn. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine Streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins and Daniel Shehan. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular po- 
lice. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given 
at precisely 12 1-2 p. m., and be denoted by one stroke of 
the fire-bells. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, keys to 
which are in the hands of all regular police, also of per- 
sons designated by a card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go. Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard in 
the box, pull again; if you still hear no clicking, go to the 
next nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch 
the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure the box 
is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no cause 
other than an actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chim- 
ney-fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your res- 
idence or place of business where the keys are kept, return 
the keys to the same officer. 



132 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near 
their property, also, all places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the 
city, and the number of the box will be given four times 
for an alarm. 

8. One stroke of the bells and gongs, given by the En- 
gineer in charge during a fire, will be the signal to dis- 
charge the companies remaining at their houses. Two 
strokes of the bells and gongs will be a signal for the De- 
partment to limber up. 

9. The Engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of 
the bells at any time, and, in case of testing the boxes, each 

^test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS ADOPTED BY THE 
BOARD OF ENGINEERS DEC. 24, 1877. • 

1. Steamer No. 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes; on the days of its second run, it will 
report on the first alarm to Boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 21, 
27, 34, 61, 71 ; on the third alarm to all boxes. 

2. Steamer No. 4 same as above. 

3.' Pennacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

4. Massabesic Hose No. 2 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to Boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 36, 62, 71 ; on the second alarm 
to all boxes except 52, 53, 61. 

6. E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 will report for duty 
on the first alarm to Boxes 42, 43, 51, 52, 53 ; second 
alarm to Boxes 35 and 41. 



133 

6. Hook and Ladder No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

7. Steamer No. 2 to be kept as a reserve engine, to re- 
spond to a third alarm. The horses attached to the engine 
on its first run will return to the house on a second alarm, 
to be held in readiness to respond to a third alarm, and 
the engine will be manned by men appointed for that pur- 
pose and attached to Pennacook Hose and Hook and Ladder 
Companies at all times except when the engine is on duty. 

8. Steamer No. 3 to report for duty on first alarm, or as 
soon as the horses can get to it, to Boxes 52 and 53 ; to 
all other boxes it will report for duty on a third alarm ; 
and when on duty it will be manned by the men who run 
No. 3 Hose Carriage at all other times. 

9. The whole Department will report for duty in all 
cases on the third alarm. 

10. In case of a second alarm from either of the boxes 
on which the horses double on the first engine, they will 
immediately return and get the engine of the second run. 

11. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the en- 
gine or hose-carriage that leaves the house first will have 
the right to lead to the fire. No running by will be al- 
lowed, except in case of accident, under penalty of dis- 
missal of the driver from the Department. 

12. The companies of the Department not called on the 
first alarm wiil prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the Engineer in 
charge, will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 

14. On the first alarm from Boxes 24, 25, 26, 31, 61, 62, 
the horses of the first and second run will double on to 
the engine of its first run. 



134 



CONDITION OF CISTERNS AND RESERVOIRS. 



No. 



Location. 



Elm Street, at City Hall 

Elm Street, near Smyth's Block 

Gate, Mereautile Block 

Ccirner Chestnut and Hanover Streets 

Haseltine House, Manchester Street 

Gate, at junction Hanover and Pine Streets, feeds Nos. 1 

and 9 , 

Corner of Pine and Central Streets 

Corner Elm and Myrtle Streets (worthless) 

Lowell, near Nashua Street 

Gate, junction of Amherst and Chestnut Streets, draws off 

water from Concord Square 

Centre of Tremont Square 

Bridge, head of Birch Street 

Corner Chestnut and Orange Streets 

Corner Hanover and Union Streets 

Corner Laurel and Beech Streets (worthless) 

Gate, Hanover Street, feeds No. 5 

Bakers ville ( worthless) 

Piscataquog, near Fradd & Follansbee's store 

Piscataquog, north steam-mill, 'Squog River 

Piscataquog, Granite Street 

Piscataquog, near Bowman Place 

Amoskeag penstock, near P. C. Cheney & Co.'s mill 

Amherst, corner Hall Street 

Merrimack, bet. Hall and Wilson Streets (not reliable)... . 

Corner Amherst and Hall Streets 

Janesville, near J. B. McCrillis & Son's shop 

Gas-works 

Brook, south end Elm Street 

Elm Back Street, on Central Street 

Elm Back Street, on Park Streeet 

Elm Back Street, on Cedar Street 

Amoskeag, near old hotel 

Gate, cor. of Hanover St., feeds Concord-Square pond and 

reservoir at Smyth's Block 



Ft.In. 

8 2 



6 5 
6 

7 



6 4 



6 6 
12 






Ft.In, 

5 2 
5 10 
3 

2 6 
5 11 



4 5 
4 



Ft.In, 

None, 

12 

None. 

None, 

6 



None, 



None. 
1 8 
3 3 



None, 

None, 



135 



Estimated value of property owned by the city in the 
Department : 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 new first-class double-plunger engine and 
hose-carriage 
100 feet rubber hose . 
1,500 feet leather hose . 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture, fixtures, &c. 

Total amount 

FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 2. 



14,500 00 

200 00 

2,000 00 

219 00 

575 00 

$7,494 00 



LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 



(Kept as a reserve engine.) 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose- 
carriage 13,250 00 

100 feet rubber hose 
100 feet rubber-lined hose 
1,300 feet leather hose . 
500 feet new leather hose 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture, fixtures, &c. 

Total amount .... 86,445 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 



100 


00 


80 


00 


1,500 


00 


665 


00 


200 


00 


650 


00 



LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOO. 



1 second-class single-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $3,500 00 



136 



1 4-wheeied hose-carriage 


225 00 


200 feet rubber hose 


100 00 


1,600 feet leather hose . 


. 1,924 00 


100 feet new leather hose 


133 00 


Firemen's suits 


178 00 


Furniture, fixtures, &c. 


517 00 


Total amount 


. $6,577 00 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 second-class double-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage 
50 feet rubber hose . 
100 feet rubber-lined hose 
1,100 feet leather hose . 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture and fixtures 

Total amount 



14,250 00 


71 


50 


80 


00 


1,550 


00 


213 


00 


609 


25 



,773 75 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 4-wheeled horse hose-carriage 


. $600 00 


1 horse-sled and hose-reel 


75 00 


1,800 feet leather hose . . . . 


. 2,700 00 


150 feet leather hose, new . 


199 50 


50 feet rubber-lined hose . 


40 00 


Firemen's suits . . . . 


309 00 


Furniture, fixtures, &c. 


343 00 


1 harness 


100 00 


Total amount . . . 


. 14,366 50 



137 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 



LOCATED OX MAPLE STREET. 



1 4-wheeled hose-carriage 
1,700 feet leather hose . 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture and fixtures 



I 800 00 

2,000 00 

200 00 

54 00 



n,500 


00 


150 


00 


431 


00 


343 


00 


12,424 


00 



Total amount .... $3,054 00 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STEEET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladder 
1 extension-ladder . 

Firemen's suits 

Furniture, fixtures, &c. . 

Total amount . 

goffe's falls hose carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEBRY MILLS. 

1 2-wheel hose-carriage 
400 feet linen hose .... 
Pipes 

Total amount .... $412 00 
amoskeag hose carriage. 

1 LOCATED AT P. C. CHENEY & CO.'S PAPER-MILL, AMOSKEAG. 



r2oo 00 


200 


00 


12 


00 



1 2-wheel hose-carriage 
800 feet leather hose 
Pipes 

Total amount 



$200 00 

400 00 

12 00 

1612 00 



138 




engineers' department. 




1 supply-wagon .... 


1150 00 


Suits ...... 


50 00 


Furniture ..... 


100 00 


Total amount 


i300 00 


FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 




At cost 


$19,910 00 


RECAPITULATION. 




Araoskeag Steam Fire Engine No. 1 


. $7,494 00 


Fire King Steam Fire Engine No. 2 


6,445 00 


B. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine No. 3 


6,577 00 


N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine No. 4 


6,773 75 


Pennacook Hose No. 1 . 


4,366 50 


Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 


3,054 00 


Hook and Ladder No. 1 ... 


2,424 00 


Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage 


412 00 


Amoskeag Hose Carriage 


612 00 


Engineers' Department .... 


300 00 


Fire-Alarm Telegraph .... 


19,910 00 


Total amount 


$58,368 25 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

A. H. Lowell, chief engineer, No. 29 Prospect Street. 

A. C. Wallace, assistant engineer, Main Street, 'Squog. 

B. C. Kendall, assistant engineer, No. 311 Central Street. 
T. W. Lane, assistant engineer (Clerk of the Board), Elm, 

corner of Appleton Street. 
S. C. Lowell, assistant engineer. No. 5 M. S. Block. 



139 

AMOSKBAG STEABI FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

G. R. Simmons, foreman, Pennacook Street. 

C. M. Morse, assistant foreman, No. 7 Myrtle Street. 

Horace Nichols, engineer. No. 27 M. S. Block. 

H. H. Glines, assistant engineer. No. 5 M. S. Block. 

A. D. Scovell, clerk, No. 300 Manchester Street. 

6. W. Butterfield, steward and driver, engine-house, Vine 

Street. 
John D. Linus, hoseman. No. 5 M. S. Block. 
F. E. Stearns, hoseman. No. 384 Park Street. 
J. T. Underhill, hoseman. 

J. A. Barker, hoseman. No. 28 Amoskeag Corporation. 
E. H. Currier, hoseman. No. 307 Hanover Street. 
W. H. Stearns, hoseman. No. 421 Hanover Street. 
W. A. Butterfield, hoseman, engine-house, Vine Street. 
A. C. Barker, hoseman. No. 455 Maple Street. 

E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 

H. Fradd, foreman, Granite Street. 
George D. Sears, assistant foreman, Dover Street. 
Joseph Schofield, clerk. Granite Street. 
W. Doran, steward, Douglas Street. 
John R. Young, hoseman. Granite Street. 
Andrew C. Wallace, Jr., hoseman. West Street. 
John McDerby, hoseman. Granite Street. 
Ruel Manning, hoseman, Douglas Street. 
C. O'Shaughnessy, hoseman. Granite Street. 
Edward Young, hoseman, Granite Street. 
Edward McDerby, hoseman. Water Street. 
James Hunter, hoseman, Water Street. 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

E. S. Whitney, foreman. No. 58 M. S. Block. 

C. E. Ham, assistant foreman. No. 3 Amoskeag Corporation. 



140 

E. G. Abbott, clerk, No. 1339 Elm Street. 

F. S. Bean, engineer. 

A. B. Gushing, driver. No. 10 Vine Street. 

R. S. Corey, hoseman, No. 17 M. S. Block. 

W. H. Dodge, hoseman. No. 874 Elm Street. 

J. E. Richards, hoseman. No. 41 Amoskeag Corporation. 

A. Nearborn, hoseman. * 

G. W. Bacon, hoseman, No. 45 Stark Corporation. 
C. H. Barrett, hoseman, No. 640 Union Street. 

B. F. Marvin, hoseman. 

J. T. Young, hoseman, Hanover, corner of Milton Street. 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

A. Maxfield, foreman, No. 23 M. S. Block. 

C. D. Palmer, assistant foreman. No. 345 Central Street. 
J. E. Merrill, clerk. No. GO Orange Street. 

J. M. Plaisted, driver, engine-house. Vine Street. 
H. S. Brown, hoseman, No. 640 Union Street. 

B. B. Aldrich, hoseman. No. 175 Hanover Street. 
G. H. Porter, hoseman, No. 331 Chestnut Street. 
W. R. Sawyer, hoseman. No. 2 Main Street, 'Squog. 

C. B. French, hoseman. No. 10 M. S. Block. 
Will G. Chase, hoseman. No. 35 Market Street. 
L. M. Aldrich, hoseman. No. 371 Park Street. 
W. L. Blenus, hoseman. No. 153 Hanover Street. 
J, E. Dodge, hoseman, No. 885 Elm Street. 

Ira P. Smith, hoseman, No. 18 Laurel Street. 
J. H. Alsop, hoseman. No. 37 Stark Corporation. 
G. W. Cheney, hoseman. 

D. W. Morse, hoseman. 
S. F. Head, hoseman. 
C. H. Manly, hoseman. 
Albert Merrill, hoseman. 



141 

MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

H. W. Fisher, foreman, No. 59 Myrtle Street. 

J. F. Seward, assistant foreman. No. 21 Warren Street. 

T. W. Hannaford, clerk, No. 256 Lowell Street. 

O. Thompson, hoseman. No. 35 Nashua Street. 

H. G. Seaman, hoseman, No. 15 South Street. 

G. W. Goodwin, hoseman, corner of Wilson and East High. 

J. H. Boyd, hoseman. No. 242 Bridge Street. 

C. F. Garland, hoseman, Linden Street. 

G. A. Martin, hoseman. No. 360 Amherst Street. 

J. W. Batchelder, hoseman. No. 325 Amherst Street. 

W. Seward, hoseman, No. 522 Maple Street. 

E,. G. Houghton, hoseman. No. 290 Bridge Street. 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

John N. Chase, foreman. No. 276 Bridge Street. 

A. G. N. Robertson, assistant foreman. No. 301 Chestnut 

Street. 
Henry French, clerk, No. 301 Chestnut Street. 
H. P. Young, treasurer. No. 351 Pine Street. 
Charles Canfield, steward, No. 18 Amoskeag Corporation. 
G. E. Glines, fireman. No. 310 Central Street. 

B. A. G. Holmes, fireman, No. 228 Manchester Street. 
G. H. Dudley, fireman. No. 153 Laurel Street. 

L. J. Flint, fireman. No. 207 Bridge Street. 
G. L. Leach, fireman, No. 263 Merrimack Street. 
H. H. Cole, fireman. No. 43 M. S. Block. 
W. S. Leavitt, fireman. 
James Orrill, fireman. No. 342 Park Street. 
•J. B. Nourse, fireman. No. 262 Bridge Street. 
J. J. Lovering, fireman, No. 397 Pine Street. 
J. Wilson, fireman. 

C. H. Cross, fireman. No. 8 Langdon Corporation. 



142 

A. J. Robie, driver, No. 422 Chestnut Street. 

F. C. Jewell, fireman. No. 44 M. S. Block. 

John M. Chase, fireman, No. 53 Stark Corporation. 

Ralph Pearson, fireman, No. 8 Laurel Street. 

J. H. Gould, fireman, No. 17 Globe Building. 

T. T. Hill, fireman. No. 804 Elm Street. 

J. D. Andrews, fireman, No. 142 Merrimack Street. 

A. C. Wiggin, fireman. No. 84 Amoskeag Corporation. 

DRIVER OF SUPPLY WAGON. 

James Kearns, No. 68 Concord Street. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, north-west corner of Vine Street. 
Amherst, opposite south-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Fine Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Walnut Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner, of Lincoln Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Ashland Street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Hall Street. 
Appleton, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Appleton, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Adams, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Cross Street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Warren Street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Ashland Street. 
Ash, front of No. 82. 
Auburn, north-east corner of Canal Street. 



Auburn, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

Auburn Street, front of No. 40. 

Auburn, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 

Bedford, north-west corner of Granite Street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. Corporation. 
Bedford, north-west corner of Central Street. 
Beech, north-west corner of Park Street. 
Beech, front of No. 684. 
Birch, north-west corner of Lowell Street. 
Birch, north-west corner of Washington Street. 
Blodget, front of primary school-house. 
Blodget, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Blodget, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Blodget, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Bridge, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Bridge, north-east corner of Hobbs Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Bridge, front of No. 26. 

Bridge, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Walnut Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Ash Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, north-west corner of Russell Street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Linden Street. 
Brook, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of P. Adams' lot. 
Brook, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Beech Street. 



144 



Canal, north-east corner of Depot Street. 
Canal, near old office door of M. L. W. 
Cedar, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Central, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Central, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Central, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Central, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Central, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack Square. 
Central, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Central, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Central, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 
Central, front of No. 374. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Lowell Street. 
Chestnut, opposite High Street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Pearl Street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Orange Street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Myrtle Street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Prospect Street. 
Concord, opposite Vine Street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Walnut Street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Nashua Street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Concord, north-west corner of old Amherst Street. 



145 

Dean, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Dean, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Depot, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

Elm, front of Fisk's bookstore. 

Elm, north-west corner of Salmon Street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle Street. 

Granite, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Granite, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Granite, east end of Granite Bridge. 

Hanover, front of First Congregational Church. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Ashland Street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Hall Street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Harrison, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Harrison, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Hancock, north-west corner of River Road. 
Harrison, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
HoUis, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
HoUis, north-east corner of Hobbs Street. 
Hollis, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

Kidder, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Kidder, north-east corner of Hobbs Street. 
Kidder, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Kidder Court, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

10 



146 

Langdon, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Langdon, north-west corner of Ehn Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Laurel, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 
Laurel, near No. 244. 

Laurel, north-west corner of Wilson Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner of Ash Street. 
Lowell, north-west corner of South Street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 
Lowell, north-west corner of Wilson Road. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 
Manchester, north-west corner of Wilson Street. 
Maple, north-west corner of Lowell Street. 
Maple, front of No. 530. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm Street. 
Market, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Massabesic, north-west corner of old Falls Road. 
Massabesic, south-east corner of Taylor Street. 
Massabesic Avenue, near pumping-station. 
Mechanic, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Mechanic, near second back street west of Elm Street. 
Mechanic, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Merrimack, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Merrimack, near No. Ill Amoskeag Corporation. 



117 



Merrimack, north-west corner of Franklin Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Merrimack, opposite. gate, Merrimack Square. 
Merrimack, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Merrimack, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Wilson Street. 
Middle, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Middle, near No. 67 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Milford, 'Squog. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner of Walnut Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner of Ash Street. 
Myrtle, north-west corner of Maple Street. 

Orange, opposite Clark's Avenue. 
Orange, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Orange, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Orange, north-west corner of Walni^t Street. 
Orange, north-west corner of Beech Street. 

Park, near No. 36. 

Park, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Park, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Park, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Park, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 
Park, north-west corner of Wilson Street. 
Park, east end. 



148 



Park, east end. 

Pennacook, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Clark's Avenue. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Ash Street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Park Street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Hanover Street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Amherst Street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Concord Street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Lowell Street. 
Pine, north-west corner of High Street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Bridge Street. 
Pleasant, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester Corporation. 
Pleasant, north-west corner of Franklin Street. 
Pleasant, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Pine Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Union Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Ash Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Oak Street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Russell Street. 
Piscataquog, 'Squog. 

River Road, north-west corner of Elm Street. 

Spring, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Spring, north-east corner of Charles Street. 
Spring, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 
Spruce, near Pine Back Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner of Union Street. 



149 

Spruce, north-west corner of Beech Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner of Maple Street. 
Spruce, north-west corner of Lincoln Street. 
Stark, north-east corner of Canal Street. 
Stark, near No. 13 Stark Corporation. 
Stark, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
State, north-west corner of Granite Street. 
State, opposite No. 57 Manchester Corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13 Manchester Corporation. 

Union, north-west corner of Lowell Street. 
Union, north-west corner of High Street. 

Walnut, north-west corner of Lowell Street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Water, near No. 38 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Water, north-west corner of Elm Street. 
Webster, north-west corner of Chestnut Street. 

Total number, 232, which are all in use but the one at 
the pumping-station. 

In addition to the above, there are three private hydrants, 
but available in case of need : 

One at S. C. Porsaith & Co.'s machine-shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at Lowell's iron-foundry. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL, 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of 3fanchester : 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nances, I would respectfully submit the following report of 
all cases which have been brought before the Police^jCourt, 
and their results, from January 1, 1877, to December 31, 

1877: 



Assault with intent to kill 

Aggravated assault 

Assault 

Assault on officer . 

Larceny 

Larceny from person 

Burglary 

Keeping liquor for sale 

House of ill fame 

Noise and brawl . 

Common drunkard 

Drunk . 

Disorderly conduct 

Selling liquor 

Playing ball Sunday 

Playing ball in the street 

Keeping open shop Sunday I" 

Vagabond 



3 

2 

161 
10 

138 

10 

46 

68 

1 

112 
11 

197 
10 
18 
16 
6 
10 
7 



152 



Fornication .... 
Exposure of person 
Stealing a ride 
Stubborn child 
Throwing stones . 
Offering tainted meat 
Defacing buildings 
Breaking school-house . 
Contempt of court 
Breaking glass 
Obstructing sidewalk 
Adultery .... 
Disorderly house . 
Carrying concealed weapons 
Fast driving 
Poisoning dogs 

Obscene and profane language 
Truants .... 

Tramps .... 

Discharging fire-works in street 
Cruelty to animals 
Dogs not muzzled . 



These cases were disposed of as follows : 

Fined and paid 

Sent to House of Correction . 

Sent to jail .... 

Sent to House of Reformation 

Bound over .... 

Discharged .... 

Appealed .... 

Sentence suspended 

Sentenced to House of Correction at Wilton 



153 



Allowed by court to leave town 
House of Correction at jail . 
Placed on file ..... 

Nol pros' d ...... 

Number of males arrested 
Number of females arrested . 

Total number of arrests for 1877 

Number of males before Police Court 
Number of females before Police Court . 

Total number before Police Court 

Number of lodgers for the year 
Number of fire-alarms given by the police 
Number of store-doors found open 
Lost children returned to their friends . 



9 
64 

72 
2 

932 
147 

1,079 

816 
105 

921 

1,289 

11 

156 

33 



The following amounts have been received for fines and 
costs in the Police Court, as shown on the records in the 
Marshal's office, from January 1, 1877, to December 31, 

1877: 



From January 1, 1877, to April 1 
April 1 to June 30 
July 1 to September 30 
October 1 to December 31 



$1,024 50 
1,116 31 
1,129 06 
1,419 99 

$4,689 86 



Total received 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. C. KENISTON, City Marshal. 



ACCOUNT 

OF 

HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, 

CITY TREASURER, 

FROM 

DECEMBER 31, 1876, TO DECEMBER 31, 1877. 



156 



Dr. 



H. B. Chamherlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



To Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1877 
Temporary Loan 
Savings-bank Tax 
Railroad Tax . 
Literary Fund 
Insurance Tax , 
City Hall and Stores 
City Farm 
Police Court . 
City Scales 

Pine-Grove Cemetery 
County, i'oT Board at Reform School 
City Teams 
Overdrafts 
License of Shows 
Land Sold from Farm 
Dog Licenses . 
Sewer Licenses . • 
Rent of Hearse 
Tuition 

Interest on Taxes . 
Rent of Tenements . 
Taxes Collected in 1870 





1871 




1872 




1873 




1874 




1875 




1876 




1877 



City Aqueduct . 

Cost on Non-Resident Taxes 

Water-rent 

Lumber .... 

J. F. Pherson, for Coal . 

Concord Railroad, Paving 

J. Q. A, Sargent, Work and Stone 

Amount carried forward 



157 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1877). 



Cr. 



By Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1877 .... $ 23,694 99 


Paupers oflf the Farm 








8,583 52 


City Farna 












3,512 58 


City Teams 












4,282 56 


Highway District No. 1 












287 84 


u a (c 2 












15,666 69 


u a a 3 












913 83 


u u " 4 . 












347 25 


u u a K 












504 22 


u a u Q 












467 96 


u u « y _ 












918 29 


li 11 u g 












724 09 


u u u g 












614 12 


« u » 10 












1,075 63 


u u u H 












974 62 


" « " 12 












448 28 


" " " 13 












251 98 


New Highways 












2,356 48 


Granite Bridge 












7,915 21 


Amoskeag-Falls Bridge 












57 47 


Sewers and Drains . 












19,942 68 


Reservoirs 












101 08 


Commons . 












289 68 


Valley Cemetery 












2,437 46 


Pine-Grove Cemetery 












2,036 13 


Fire Department 












9,745 74 


City PoUce 












22,412 74 


City Officers . 












10,463 16 


Lighting Streets 












5,883 95 


Militia 












600 00 


Printing and Stationery 












2,197 86 


Incidental Expenses 












9,674 97 


City-Hall Building . 












1,942 74 


City Library 












2,477 44 


Paving Streets . 












. 13,471 04 


"Watering Streets 












1,017 92 


Discount on Taxes . 












5,081 00 


Amount carried forward 


S183,372 70 



158 



Dr. 



H. B. Charnberlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward 
J. C. Ray, Street-Scrapings . . . 
Alvin Pratt, Street-Scrapings . 
John Hayes, Brick and Pipe . 
Gay, "Wells, & Co., Moving Earth . 
J. Mitchell, Jr., Taxes not Committed 
Fire Department, District No. 2 
Benjamin Stevens, Wood 
N. P. Kidder, City Ordinance. 
N. P. Kidder, Setting Tree . 
Fire Department, Shoveling Snow . 
Abatement of Tax Refunded . 
Joseph Comfort, Jr., Old Logs 
County of Hillsborough, License to enter Sewer 
County of Hillsborough, Board of Insane Person 
Reform School, Brick .... 

License to Sell 

Contingent Expenses for District 'No. 2 . 
"Water-works, for Sewers and Drains 
School-houses and Lots for District No. 10 





^432,045 06 




9 00 




2 00 




5 00 




673 30 




3142 




4 50 




6 00 




100 




125 




15 00 




35 71 




5 00 


ver 


90 00 


-son 


60 63 




25 13 




10 00 




7 12 




2 40 




4 87 



Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1878 



$432,934 39 
24,751 68 



$457,686 07 



159 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1877). 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward .... $183,372 70 


Abatement of Taxes 








. 19,320 84 


Interest 








630 00 


Coupons, City Proper 








. 23,069 00 


Coupons, Water Bonds . 








. 35,688 GO 


Eeduction of City Debt . 








. 24,000 00 


Repairs of Buildings 








1,198 86 


School-houses and Lots . 








1,015 87 


State Tax .... 








. 39,724 00 


Eepairs of School-houses 








1,254 13 


"Water-works .... 








21,776 04 


Land Damage .... 








5,632 79 


Fire-alarm Telegraph 








717 87 


Decoration .... 








200 00 


Grading for Concrete 








1,592 70 


Hydrant Service .... 








17,595 00 


Macadamizing .... 








2,280 48 


Centennial Fourth . 








2 00 


Tuition 








53 00 


Teachers 








38,118 56 


Evening Schools 








913 41 


Fuel 








3,456 45 


Incidental Repairs . 




' 




1,104 87 


Furniture and Supplies . 








403 99 


Books and Stationery 








744 09 


Printing and Advertising 








605 24 


Care of Rooms .... 








2,321 58 


Contingent Expenses 




V 




627 28 


Extension of Elm and Pine Streets 








327 54 


New Hose-house 








547 21 


Stone Work, Concord Square . 








354 59 


IsTew Engine-house . 








11,924 88 


i$440,572 97 


Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1878 . . . 17,113 10 


$457,686 07 


H. R. CHAMBERLIN, 


City Treasurer. 


Manchester, January 1, 1878. 











FINANCE COMMITTEE S REPORT. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
certify that we have examined the foregoing account of 
Henrj R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find the same 
correctly cast and supported by proper vouchers. 

GEORGE W. RIDDLE, 
JAMES SULLIVAN, 
EDWIN KENNEDY, 
JOHN L. KELLY, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



To balance from old account . 


. $462 


92 




appropriation 


. 1,500 


00 




County of Hillsborough 








for board of inmates 








at State Reform School 


. 4,006 


56 




support of paupers 


60 


68 




reserved fund 


. 2,304 


97 


$8,835 08 
248 44 


Balance (overdrawn) . 


■ 






$8,583 52 








Cr. 



Paid M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Patrick Murray . . $14 77 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished M. Moran . . 66 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished J. Reardon . . 81 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Celia Adams . . 24 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished P. J. Hanley . . 40 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished John Joyce . . 20 00 



164 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Healy . . 90 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Thomas Kerrigan . 92 50 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Patrick Sullivan 26 00 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished E. Hodgman . . 79 95 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished E. C. Webster . . 34 16 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished Wyman family . 68 14 

Callahan & Whelan, groceries 

furnished Robert McMahon 50 00 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished N. Parker . 41 50 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished Mrs. Lovell . 7 00 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., groceries 

furnished Margaret French . 8 00 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., groceries 

furnished N. Lovewell . 73 14 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. Sarah Seavey 33 00 

B. W. Robinson, groceries fur- 
nished Aleck Shine . . 16 00 

Robinson & Wilbur, groceries 

furnished Aleck Shine . 34 00 

John Sweeney, groceries fur- 
nished Robert McMahon . 90 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 
furnished James Callahan . 51 19 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Aleck Shine . 24 00 



165 

Mary Riordon, groceries fur- 
nished Stephen Spain . 

Barr & Clapp, groceries fur- 
nished Stephen Spain . 

Lawrence Dowd, groceries fur- 
nished James Callahan 

Lawrence Dowd, groceries fur- 
nished Aleck Shine 

Locke & Demick, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Rhoda Sanborn 

M. E. Griffin, groceries fur- 
nished Thomas Kerrigan 

Bridget O'Neil, groceries fur- 
nished Aleck Shine 

Patrick CuUity, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Maurice Fitz- 
gerald .... 

Patrick Cullity, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. John McCarty . 

Stearns & Farmer, groceries 
furnished Mary Sullivan 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Celia Adams . 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Edward Finnell 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished E. C. Webster 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Healy . 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished John Reardon . 

Fisher & Flanders, groceries 
furnished Susan Young 

Moody & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Benj. Newman . 



68 


00 


107 


00 


47 


00 


22 


00 


7 


00 


84 


00 


22 


00 


1? 


00 


57 


00 


3 


00 


12 


00 


9 


00 


30 


as 


30 


00 


27 


00 


4 


00 


5 


00 



166 

J. G. Warner, groceries fur- 
nished Josepli Comfort . 8 00 

Chas. H. G. Foss, groceries 

furnished Rebecca J. Bursiel 4 74 

Joseph Bean, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Sarah Seavey . 9 00 

Fisher & Flanders, groceries 

furnished Mrs. S. Seavey . 1 00 

Mrs. Mary Riordon, groceries 

furnished Stephen Spain . 24 00 

A. M. Eastman, groceries fur- 
nished James Callahan . 6 00 

Brigham & Pratt, bread fur- 
nished Mrs. Thos. Walker . 50 

Chas. J. Esty, wood furnished 
B. Hodgman ... 10 69 

Moses Harrington, wood fur- 
nished N. Lovewell . . 29 75 

Robert Laing, wood furnished 

Ephraim Hodgman . . 7 25 

B. P. Johnson & Co., wood 
furnished James Callahan . 11 60 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished Aleck Shine . 3 86 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

furnished D. 0. Webster . 2 75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

furnished George Wyman . 9 60 

L. B, Bodwell & Co., wood 

furnished Mrs. Sarah Seavey 39 50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

furnished Rebecca J. Bursiel 5 00 

James Madden, wood furnished 

Michael Moran ... 30 00 



167 

James Madden, wood furnished 

Patrick Murray . . . 1 00 

Head & Dowst, wood furnished 

James Callahan ... 3 60 

Head & Dowst, wood furnished 

Aleck Shine ... 3 50 

G. H. Colby, wood furnished 

N. Parker .... 12 00 

G. H. Porter, wood furnished 

James Callahan . . 3 75 

George Fellows, wood furnished 

Catherine McQuade . . 2 00 

J. Butterfield & Son, wood 

furnished Aleck Shine . 3 75 

John N. Foss, wood furnished 

James Callahan ... 4 00 

J. 0. Webster & Co., wood fur- 
nished Aleck Shine . . 3 50 

L. B, Bodwell & Co., wood fur- 
nished Mrs. Sarah Seavey . 4 50 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished county pauper . 4 66 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished James Callahan . 3 62 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished Aleck Shine . 3 50 

S. C. Forsaith & Co., wood fur- 
nished Mrs. Sarah Seavey . 5 25 

Dickey, Young, & Co., coal fur- 
nished E. Hodgman . . 12 00 

Dickey, Young, & Co., coal fur- 
nished Mary Sullivan . . 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

furnished Celia Adams . 2 00 



168 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

John Connolly ... 171 32 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Elbridge Gerry ... 227 14 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Caleb W. Haselton . . 225 90 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Jonathan 0. Hunt . . 186 72 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Asenath H. White . . 141 15 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Michael Gillis ... 60 63 

County of Hillsborough, board 

of Philip Verville . . 158 00 
County of Hillsborough, board 

and clothing John Connolly 

at N. H. Insane Asylum . 141 92. 
County of Hillsborough, board 

and clothing Mrs. Martha 

Dunn at N.H. Insane Asylum 186 50 
County of Hillsborough, board 

and clothing Jonathan 0. 

Hunt at N.H. Insane Asylum 221 14 
State Reform School, board of 

inmates .... 4,283 98 
0. J. Doble, board of A. B. 

Ayer .... 117 00 

Mrs. Frank Miller, board of 

Mrs. C. E. Otis ... 21 00 

H. S. Manning, board and nurs- 
ing Mrs. Jennie Crawford . 5 00 
C. C. Webster, board of D. 0. 

Webster . . . . 156 00 
Orlando Page, board of Mrs. 

Lovell .... 7 60 



169 

Sarah Page, board and care of 

Mrs. Lovell 
Mrs. Mary S. Hnntoon, board 

of Mrs. William Bursiel 
Mrs. Mary S. Huiitoon, board 

of Rebecca J. Bursiel 
Frank Sheatt, board of Abbie 

Calef .... 

Elizabeth Harrison, board of 

Abby Calef 
Mrs. A. F. Ferry, board of child 

of Timothy Connors . 
J. A. Miller, board of Mrs. C. 

E. Otis .... 
Town of Hooksett, board and 

nursing: Jacob Ordway 
Tebbetts Bros., medicines 
M. E. George, cash paid C. W. 

Haselton .... 
M. E. George, team to State 

Reform School . 
J. J. McQuade, railroad ticket 

for Mrs. Maurice Fitzgerald 
D. R. Prescott, care and medi- 
cine for Estella Crawford . 
City of Concord, board and 

nursing Josie A. Rust 
Town of Goffstown, care of 

Geo. L. Bundy . 
Ira Cross, expenses of Charles 

Welch to eye infirmary 
Dr. Leonard French, profes- 
sional services . 
S. J. Young, cash paid out 



20 


00 


6 


06 


16 


26 


45 


00 


2 


50 


39 


00 


4 


00 


47 


00 


46 


84 


60 


00 


o 


00 


2 


25 


10 


80 


26 


50 


16 


18 


5 


00 


3 


00 


13 


41 



170 

J. C. Colburn, for conveying ' 
Michael Gillis to N. H. In- 
sane Asylum ... 2 75 

A. Buxton, railroad tickets to 

Plainfield, Vt. ... 5 65 

John Lee, suit of clothes for 

Fred Mahon ... 4 00 

Thomas Connolly, pants and 

cap for Francis Mahon . 4 50 

McDonald & Cody, boots for 

Aleck Shine ... 3 50 

McDonald & Cody, boots for 

Francis Mahon ... 4 00 

McDonald & Cody, boots for 

Fred Mahon ... 2 00 

Fairbanks & Pearson, burial of 

Rebecca J. Bursiel . . 22 00 

F. L. Wallace & Co., burial of 

Geo. L. Bundy ... 10 75 

Canney & Wiley, medicines . 28 10 

Heath & Son, boots furnished 

D. 0. Webster ... 4 00 

Edwin Kennedy, clothing fur- 
nished D. 0. Webster . 15 50 

Dr. L. Melville French, profes- 
sional services ... 3 00 

John A. Barker, railroad ticket 
for Rose Batchelder and 
daughter .... 5 20 

John A. Barker, railroad ticket 

for Geor2;e A. Francis . 1 50 



5,583 62 



171 
CITY FARM. 



To County of Hillsborough, board 
of county paupers 
Labor done by City Farm 
Frederick Allen, produce sold 
from farm .... 
Appropriation .... 
Balance (overdrawn) . 

Paid W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 
R. M. Miller, 
Wadleigh, Andrews, & Co., 

groceries .... 
Eager & Robinson, groceries . 
J. S. Kidder & Co., grain and 

meal 

Pettee & Whittle, grain and 

meal ..... 
Pettee & Whittle, grain and 

meal .... 

T. A. Lane, cock and fittings . 
Pike & Heald, hardware 
Wm. C. Rogers, 

Daniels & Co., 
Daniels & Merrill, 
John B. Varick, 

H. F. Thompson, blacksmith 

work 2 53 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, black- 
smith work . . . 32 87 



$124 


71 


139 


44 


1,722 


18 


1,000 


00 


526 


25 


$282 71 


28 


84 


220 


31 


29 


43 


201 


33 


1G3 


06 


147 


18 


1 


60 


6 


17 




61 


124 


39 


42 


35 


4 


32 




60 


23 


05 



Dr. 



;,512 58 



172 

H. Abbott & Co., blacksmith 

work .... 1 45 

Derry, Welcome, & Co., black- 
smith work ... 4 55 

Bunton & Porter, blacksmith 

work .... 61 43 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 



smith work 


1 00 


Wm. H. Hill, blacksmith work 


9 24 


(( a (c u 


31 60 


A. B. Webster " " . 


20 84 


E. Branch, repairing harnesses, 




etc 


9 60 


Greeley & Esty, repairing har- 




nesses, etc. 


16 70 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., pulley and 




labor 


1 14 


Plumer, Chandler, & Co., cloth- 




ing . . . 


5 09 


Plumer, Chandler, & Co., cloth- 




ing 


33 29 


J. W. C. Pickering, clothing . 


8 30 


Edwin Kennedy, clothing 


15 15 


Piper & Hawley, dry goods 


2 08 


Waite Bros., " 


58 39 


J. S. Masseck, " 


12 26 


N. S. Clark, 


5 75 


F. C. Dow, boots and shoes . 


39 35 


Head & Ncale, " " 


14 90 


J. Otis Clark, meats 


49 55 


Clougli & Towle, meats . 


12 35 


S. D. Cass, '^ 


14 5Q 


J. M. Chandler & Co., kero- 




sene oil, etc. 


5 52 



173 



D. A. Simons, crockery, etc. . 28 49 

Higgins Bros., merchandise . 52 18 
J. P. Emery, tin-ware, brooms, 

etc 28 59 

H. S. Whitney, pump and pipe 80 25 
Goodwin Bros. & Co., repair- 
ing sleigh .... 2 00 
Sullivan Bros., soap-stone cov- 
ers and repairing stoves . 19 75 
Clark M. Bailey, tin-ware, etc. 16 82 
J. Hodge, lumber ... 2 71 
A. C. Wallace, box and labor 7 20 
G. Flanders, ice ... 10 00 
W. S. Nelson, labor . . 30 33 
" " " . . 318 32 
C. F. Farnum, " . . 42 53 
Leander Jenkins, " . . 5 75 
Wm. Healy, " . . 29 75 
Wm. Stockdale, " . . 9 37 
Gilman Worthen, " . . 2 50 
Paul Belmore, " . . 15 08 
Paul Belmore, Jr., " . . 15 50 
Frank Belmore, " . . 20 00 
JohnBargoin, " . . 16 20 
Joseph Cheney, " . . 4 00 
Joseph Kane, " *. . 6 50 
Henry Rivers, " . . 1 70 • 
Tim Quinn, " . . 2 00 
S. D. Smith, " . . 21 87 
J. Gushing, " . . 3 00 
Jolin H. Pond, cabbage-plants 2 40 
J. E. Bennett, raising chimney 8 00 
S. S. Nelson, pasturing . 37 00 
John Prince, trees ... 3 30 



174 



James McPlierson, bull . 

H. K. Tilton, damage to corn 

from City-Farm cattle 
Warren Harvey, horse-collar 
Hiram Turner, soap 
J. A. Brown, use of boar 
John Cleworth, sleigh 
Michael McCabe, manure 
C. W. Rowell, one pair oxen 
C. W. Rowell, cow and calf 

C. W. Rowell, exchange on 
oxen .... 

G. E. Hall, medicines 

Fred Allen, salary and sundries 

D. Kerwin & Son, pork . 
J. G. Warner, groceries 
Wm. Boyd, celery 
Geo. W. Thayer & Son, shoes 



55 00 

6 00 
2 60 

42 75 

2 50 

35 00 

7 50 
175 00 

65 00 

18 00 
2 38 

505 68 

19 39 
29 22 

40 

8 38 



,512 58 



CITY TEAMS. 

To Amoskeag-Falls Bridge . . $7 50 
District No 2 . . . . 1,299 87 

Extension Elm and Pine Streets 26 75 
Gay, Wells, & Co., moving earth 

from Post-office Block . 573 30 

New highways .... 136 74 

Paving 368 36 

Macadamizing . . . . 54 74 

Grading for concrete . . 147 66 

Watering streets . . . 253 75 

Sewers and drains . . . 55 74 



Dr. 



175 

New engine-house 

Balance from old account 



Paid Pettee & Whittle, grain and 

meal 

J. S. Kidder & Co., grain and 

meal .... 
W. P. Sleeper (fe'Co., grain and 

meal .... 
Drake & Carpenter, grain and 

meal .... 
Samuel Poor, grain and meal 
L. Shelters, hay 
R. Clark, hay . 
I. T. Webster, hay . 
C. W. Cheney, hay 
A. C. Stearns, hay . 
E. Langdell, hay . 
J. J. Perlcy, hay . 
J. Currier, hay 

E. P. Johnson & Co., hay 
A. S. Smith, hay . 

J. Foster & L. B. Clough, trus 

tees, hay 
Ira Moore, hay 
Ira Moore, straw and carrots 
Higgins Bros., straw 

F. P. Hall, hay 
J. Richardson, straw 
S. D. Smith, straw . 
T. W. Sanborn, straw 
H. L. Brown, straw 
L. Mitchell, straw . 
David Hammond, carrots 



b-r 

13 Oi£^^ 

1,641 44 ^^' 

$4,678 85 

Cr. 

479 67 

94 67 

167 12 



100 55 
152 74 
837 65 

12 36 
20 91 
23 95 

19 69 

20 50 

13 62 
■ 22 72 

14 66 
39 04 



; v,/" 



W 



bi 






175 81 
68 68 
34 96 
7 60 
58 08 
25 83 
14 60 
10 30 
10 20 



12 5l/,r/^^^~j 
10 63 



176 



J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 






smithing . . . . 


97 


25 


M. C. Clark & Co., blacksmith- 






ing 


49 


46 


Wm. H. Hill, blacksmitliing . 


59 


97 


A. B. Webster, blacksmithing . 


106 


25 


G. E. Barnard, blacksmithing . 


3 


15 


A. B. Webster, horse-cart 


175 


00 


J, A. Sanborn, blacksmithing 


' 




and repairs 


84 


15 


J. B. Saunders, repairing har- 






nesses .... 


3 


75 


Edwin Branch, repairing har- 






nesses .... 


21 


25 


P. N. McLaren, repairing har- 






nesses .... 


32 


15 


Greeley & Esty, repairing har- 






nesses .... 


62 


85 


Pike & Heald, hardware 


4 


77 


Wm. C, Rogers, hardware 


3 


00 


John B. Varick, hardware 


1 


20 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


2 


18 


Daniel^ & Merrill, hardware . 


1 


10 



French & Robertson, lumber 

and labor . . . . 44 67 

A. C. Wallace, lumber and la- 
bor 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 

A. H. Lowell, leather pad 

C. R. Wood, professional ser- 
vices ..... 

Dr. Derby, professional services 

G. E. Hall, horse ointment 

Z. F. Campbell, medicines 





38 


24 75 


3 


50 


48 


00 


5 


75 


1 


00 


42 


62 



177 

W, W. Hubbard, sawing plank 
George D. Otis & Co., horse 
Concord Railroad, freight 
M. McCabe, rent of stable 
J. M. Chandler, sundries 
T. W. Lane, pass-books , 
James Kearns, teamster . 
A. Robie, teamster . 
L. Searles, teamster 
Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 
A. B. Cushing, teamster 
T. M. Conant, teamster 
H. L. Read, teamster 
James Patten, labor 
John Cushing, labor 
Joseph Verrill, labor 
John Downing, labor 

Amount 

Balance to new account 



1 50 

560 00 

6 60 

47 89 

18 64 

24 

1 75 
41 54 
52 30 

263 50 

305 60 

141 00 

20 11 

2 50 
1 25 

62 
62 

$4,282 5Q 
296 29 



^4,578 85 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 1. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 



Paid R. C. Dustin, superintendent, 
for labor .... 
Daniels & Co., pick 
William Campbell, gravel 

12 



Dr. 



$3 07 




800 00 






$303 07 






Cr. 


122 24 




1 60 




8 00 





178 



For labor and teams, as per 
pay-rolls 



166 10 



Balance to new account 



287 84 
15 23 



1303 07 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 2. 

To appropriation .... $12,000 00 

J. C. Ray, street-scrapings . 9 00 

Alvin Pratt, street-scrapings . 2 00 
Amount transferred from other 

departments . . . 3,000 00 

Joseph Comfort, Jr., old logs . 5 00 
Fire Department, shoveling 

• from hydrants . . . 19 50 

Contingent expenses . . 7 12 

New highway . . . 404 55 

Amount overdrawn . . 466 77 



Dr. 



115,913 94 
Cr. 



Paid Warren Harvey, superintend- 
ent 1366 00 

Wm. T. Evans, superintendent 357 00 
F. H. Redfield, clerical services 40 00 
Bunton «fe Porter,blacksmithing 102 75 
Webster, Murchie, & Cunning- 
ham, blacksmithing . . 19 61 
George W. Merriam, black- 
smithing . . . . 4 70 
A. B. Webster, blacksmithing 30 



179 



J. B. McCrillis & Son, black- 
smithing .... 2 40 
R. W, Flanders, blacksmithing 12 55 
Briggs & Brown, repairing 

pipe 3 00 

W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. . 2 35 

G, H. Hubbard ... 2 50 

S. Hovey, repairing fence . 4 60 

J. A. Caverly, hauling plank . 20 50 

Hill & Co., stable-brooms . 2 75 

Ellis & Patterson, engineering 26 00 

Pettee & Whittle, cement . 3 70 

D. W. Garland, stone . . 28 28 

E. Young, stone . . . 11 00 
A. Bodwell, stone . . . 60 00 
French & Robertson, carpenter 

work ..... 3 35 

S. C. Forsaith & Co., lumber . 21 84 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 38 
Pike & Heald, zincing whiffle- 

tree ..... 1 95 

John B. Yarick, hardware . 24 85 

Daniels & Co., hardware . 14 00 

Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 128 32 

Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 31 98 

City teams .... 1,372 49 

City-Farm team ... 101 75 

Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 167 00 

A. B. Cushing, teamster . . 75 50 

T. M. Conant, teamster . . 68 00 

James Kearns, teamster . . 539 87 

A. Robie, teamster . . . 275 63 

Sylvester Reed, teamster . 196 00 

H. L. Reed, teamster . . 20 99 



180 



Loammi Searles, teamste 


r . 10 00 


Warren Harvey, teams 


327 50 


James Emerson, teams 


82 62 


Rowell & Spaulding, teai 


ns . 71 98 


William Campbell, teams 


3 . 4 00 


A. Wells, teams 


77 62 


Dickey, Young, & Co., te 


ams . 60 75 


Gil. Tucker, teams 


212 37 


George Whitford, teams 


166 67 


E. S. Harvey, teams 


37 50 


Mark Harvey, teams 


13 50 


R. A. Lawrence, teams 


24 75 


Charles Cheney, teams 


300 37 


Wilbur Fisk, teams 


155 37 


J. A. Dickey, teams 


53 00 


M. Dickey, teams . 


101 25 


Bartlett Doyle, teams 


16 50 


Pat. Doyle, teams . 


29 00 


Proctor Young, teams 


75 12 


E. L. Dunham, teams 


72 00 


J. L. Fogg, teams . 


54 00 


J. Abbott, teams 


74 00 


H. D. Beebe, teams 


90 00 


Charles Blanchard, team 


5 . 48 00 


G. D. Woodbury, teams 


66 00 


A. R. Mack, teams 


92 00 


Ed. Burton, teams . 


68 00 


Joseph Brown, teams 


16 00 


J. Perham, oxen 


42 75 


Hutchinson Bros., iron-w 


ork . 3 25 


Bunton & Porter, blacks 


,mith- 


ing . 


5 31 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


1 10 


Head & Dowst, labor 


88 93 



181 



C. F. Hall, labor in stone- 




crusher . . . . 


5 00 


To labor of men as per pay-rolls 


9,006 59 


By new hose-house, amount trans- 




ferred 


47 25 


District No. 11, amount trans- 




ferred . . . . 


200 00 


Amount . . . . 


815,913 91 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$6 18 


appropriation 


800 00 


amount transferred from Centen- 




nial Fourth of July, 1876 


50 00 


amount transferred from reserved 




fund 


35 16 


Balance (overdrawn) 


21 99 




"iftOI^ 




tpyjLO 




Cr 


Paid H. C. Dickey, superintendent 


$174 00 


Edwin Kennedy, stone . 


16 00 


W. Smith, gravel . 


5 00 


Pettee & Whittle, cement 


1 70 


I. G. Howe, blacksmithing 


3 32 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


2 69 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 


2 96 


John B. Varick, hardware 


5 54 


for labor of men and teams as 




per pay-rolls 


680 12 


M. O'Neil, sand . 


22 00 

iftOI Q 



33 



182 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . 


$49 35 




appropriation .... 


300 00 




Amount .... 




1349 35 
Cr. 




Paid Isaac Whittemore, superinten- 






dent 


i!88 25 




Derry Mills, for lumber . 


1 44 




A, 0. Wallace, lumber . 


5 24 




0. C. Webster, marl 


5 00 


» 


Rodney N. Whittemore, lumber 


2 25 




Rodney N. Whittemore, dam- 






age to plow 


3 25 




for labor of men and teams as 






per pay-rolls 


241 82 




Amount .... 


347 25 




Balance to new account 


2 10 


1349 35 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$500 00 




Balance (overdrawn) . 


4 22 


$504 22 










Cr. 


Paid C. N. Harvey, superintendent, 






labor and teams 


290 05 




J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 






and fuse .... 


1 34 




John B. Varick, pick-handles . 


50 





183 



For labor and teams as per pay- 
rolls 212 33 

Amount .... 1504 22 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 
To appropriation . . ... #500 00 



Paid I. T. Webster, superintendent, 
labor and teams 
Nathaniel Manning, lantern . 
for labor and teams as per pay- 
rolls ..... 
Balance to new account 



242 


12 


1 


25 


224 


59 


32 


04 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
transfer, reserved fund 



Paid P. C. Bean, superintendent 
True Perry, gravel 
A. Bodwell, stone . 
A. C. Wallace, plank 
J. Q. A. Sargent, pipe and elbow 88 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 3 99 
For labor and teams as per pay- 
rolls 709 92 

Balance to new account . 5 35 



Dr. 

$500 00 
Cr. 



f^SOO 00 



Dr. 



$23 64 




800 00 




100 00 






$923 64 






Cr. 


$168 00 




6 50 




24 00 




5 00 





3 64 



184 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 

To balance from old account . . $38 74 
appropriation .... 600 00 
reserved fund (amount trans- 
ferred) . . . . 126 05 
Balance (overdrawn) . . 59 30 



Paid Geo. S. Smith, superintendent, 

for labor and teams . . 229 47 

H.F. Thompson, blacksmithing 5 48 

Luther Proctor, stone . . 6 00 
For labor of men and teams as 

per pay-rolls . . . 483 14 



Dr. 



$724 09 
Cr. 



$724 09 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



To balance from old account . 


$26 63 


appropriation . 


400 00 


transfer, reserved fund 


104 08 


Balance (overdrawn) 


83 41 



Paid Lyman A. Dickey, superinten 
dent, labor and teams 

Alphonso Boyce, superinten 
dent, labor and teams 

Goffe Webster, gravel 

Mrs. H. C. Joy, gravel . 

Isaac Webster, gravel 

A. C. Wallace, plank 



$86 95 



129 


59 


5 


64 


1 


96 


11 


76 


18 


00 



Dr. 



$614 12 
Cr. 



185 

For labor and teams as per pay- 
rolls ..... 



360 22 



S614 12 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

To appropriation . . . $1,000 00 

school-house and lots . . 4 87 

Balance (overdrawn) . . 70 76 



Paid Samuel Brown, superintendent, 

labor and teams . , |117 00 

A. Q. Gage, superintendent . 226 50 
Pettee & Whittle, cement . • 1 70 

Drake & Carpenter, cement . 1 70 

John B. Varick, ha-'T -axe . 21 82 

A. C. Wallace, lun- ..■ . . 1 54 
W. E. Butterfield, hay and 

straw .... 4 48 

Wm. L. Mitchell, hay and straw 19 60 

N. B. Hill, hay and straw . 10 95 

W. Moore, hay and straw . 17 60 

Geo. West, hay and straw . 17 86 

P. Eaton, hay and oats . . 61 77 

D. Kerwin & Son, teams . 23 01 

Barr & Clapp, grain and oil . 30 68 

H. Fradd & Co., oil, etc. . 2 90 
Bunton & Porter, blacksmith- 

ing 7 42 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 2 75 

A. P. Frye, blacksmithing . 39 90 
C. O'Shaughenessy, repairing 

waffon, etc. . . . 49 18 



Dr. 



.,075 63 
Cr. 



186 

R. W. Martin, painting . . 2 00 

H. C. Ranno, repairing har- 
nesses . . . - 
C. R. Wood, veterinary surgeon 
J. S. Kidder & Co., grain 
For labor as per pay-rolls 



16 


24 


8 


00 


4 


00 


387 


53 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 

To balance from old account . . $67 70 

appropriation .... 800 00 
transfer. Centennial Fourth of 

July, 1876 . . . . 100 00 

transfer, District' No. 2 . . 200 00 

transfer, reserved fund . . 6 92 



Paid F. D. Hanscom, superinten- 




dent, labor and teams 


$238 00 


D. Wells, lumber . 


79 00 


F. D. Hanscom, posts 


2 90 


Lamson & Mar den, stone chips 


2 00 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


4 50 


For labor of men and teams as 




per pay-rolls 


648 22 


Balance to new account 


200 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 
To][appropriation .... $500 00 



$1,075 63 



Dr. 



$1,174 62 
Or. 



1,174 62 

Dr. 

$500 00 



187 



Paid City Farm, labor and teams 
Wm. Mills, labor and team 
George Young 

Balance to new account 



427 


53 


5 


75 


15 


00 


51 


72 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



To Balance from old account 
Appropriation . 

Balance (overdrawn) , 



Paid Wm. T. Evans, superintendent 
Charles H. Carpenter, land . 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 



Cr. 



1500 00 



Dr. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 

To appropriation . . . . $200 00 
Balance (overdrawn) . 51 98 

1251 98 

Cr. 
Paid J. P. Fellows, superintendent 60 00 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 1 25 
Derrj, Welcome, & Co., black- 
smithing .... 2 60 
For labor and teams as per pay- 
rolls 198 13 

Amount .... 1251 98 



Dr. 



$769 46 




2,000 


00 




189 


64 


$2,959 10 










Cr. 


$36 00 




6 


56 




35 


59 





188 

J. B. Sawyer, engineering 
A. Bodwell, stone . 
Daniel W. Garland, stone 
John Barnes, blacksmithing 
Bunton & Porter, " 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
Pettee & Whittle, cement 
City teams 
For labor and teams as per pay- 
rolls . . . . . 



32 25 

26 00 

6 00 

16 05 

3 30 

44 30 

16 45 

145 99 

2,590 61 



52,959 10 



DAMAGE FOR LAND TAKEN FOR HIGHWAYS. 



To Balance from old account . |2,400 65 

Appropriation .... 3,000 00 

Balance (overdrawn) . . 232 14 



Paid George Clark, land taken for 

Elm Street . . . |2,336 48 

Samuel Hall, land taken for 

Elm Street . . . 989 46 

S. N. Bell .... 168 93 

John J. Bell . . . . 168 93 

Ellen Greeley , . . 455 32 
Heirs of John Stark, land 

taken for Elm Street . . 1,108 36 

Jeremiah Hodge ... 200 00 
Lorenzo D. Colby, land taken 

for Maple Street . . 101 25 

Isaac W. Si^ith et ah. . . 62 81 



Dr. 



,632 79 
Cr. 



189 



Heirs of John S. Elliot, land 
taken on Manchester Street 

John P. Moore, land taken on 
" Clay-pit " road 



16 25 
25 00 



^5,632 79 



WATERING STREETS. 



To Appropriation .... 11,200 00 



Paid Water-works, for water 

J. A. Sanborn & Co., repairing 
carts ..... 

B. F. Fogg, repairing stand- 
pipes • 

T. A. Lane, water-gate and 
labor . . . . . 
Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 
Loammi Searles, " 

A. B. Gushing, " 

H. L. Reed, « 

R,. A. Lawrence, " 

C. F. Hall, labor . 
T. M. Conant, labor 

City teams .... 
Pike & Heald, hardware 



Dr. 







11,200 00 






Cb. 


1475 00 




30 


60 




10 


20 




9 


00 




88 


00 




21 


00 




116 


00 




5 


25 




4 50 




3 


00 




1 


00 




253 


75 
62 





Amount .... |1,017 92 
Balance to new account . 182 08 



$1,200 00 



190 
PAVING STREETS. 

To balance from old account . $510 61 

Concord Railroad, paving near 



Dr. 



depot 


49 43 


Transfers, reserved fund . 


7,722 04 


" macadamizing . 


3,200 00 


" grading for concrete 


600 00 


Appropriation .... 


2,000 00 




'^^\ 09,^ 08 








Cr. 


Paid Robert Bunton, block paving- 




stone 


$3,970 95 


Michael Caliill, cobble paving- 




stone 


4 20 


C. M. Stevens, coljble paving- 




stone .... 


125 48 


D. Gore & Son, setting paving 


1,238 41 


Mrs. Rodnia Nutt, paving-stone 


90 


City Farm, " 


42 69 


C. Francis, " 


18 34 


J. A. Brown, " 


31 15 


F. Hanscom, " 


4 97 


E. Young, " 


87 62 


Peter Richards, " 


11 31 


Edward Wyman, splitting pav- 




ing-stone .... 


152 26 


Chas. Cheney, cobble-paving . 


91 11 


W. K. & C. E. Richardson, cob- 




ble-paving .... 


141 58 


A. H. Huntress, cobble-paving 


26 25 


J. M. Dickey, " " 


4 71 


J. L. Fogg, 


120 44 


E. S. Harvey, 


33 94 



191 



A. K. Mack, " " 


17 


31 




A. Latucb, " " 


87 


52 




J. P. Eaton, 


47 


30 




J. E. Rowell, " " 


17 


53 




Luther S. Proctor, " " 


11 


44 




J. Proctor, " " 


31 


39 




A. Bodwell, flagging 


93 


00 




N. H. Granite Co., flagging 


163 


39 




H. K. Tilton, splitting pavin^ 


; 551 


08 




J. B. Varick, hardware . 


25 


31 




Ellis & Patterson, engineering 


7 


00 




J. McDerby, concrete 


89 


28 




Chamberlin & Brown, concrete 


) 76 


12 




Turner & Bartlett, " 


16 


25 




C. H. Robie, " 


1,105 


59 




John Barnes, blacksmith ing 


21 


08 




Bunton & Porter, " 


8 


62 




R. W. Flanders, " 


5 


60 




A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


8 


29 




J. Hodge, , " 




27 




Barr & Clapp, oil . 


3 


78 




Labor of men and teams, at 


> 






per pay-rolls 


5,105 


47 




John B. Chase, cobble-paving 


J 23 


90 




Mrs. J. P. Eaton, " " 


20 


81 




Dickey, Young, & Co., cobble 


- 






paving 


12 


51 




A. P. Frye, blacksmithing 


12 


95 




Amount . 


^13,669 10 




Balance to new account 


412 


98 








114,082 


08 



192 
LIGHTING STREETS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


15,500 00 




Reserved fund .... 


600 00 


$6,000 00 










Cr. 


Paid Manchester Gas-liglit Co., gas. 


13,371 34 




Manchester Gas-light Co., re- 






pairs 


358 92 




Manchester Gas-light Co., light- 






ing lamps .... 
A. H. Lowell, lamp-posts 


742 69 
190 88 


e^7K 


Pike & Heald, repairing lan- 






terns, etc. .... 


24 24 




H. Fradd & Co., lamng and oil 


6 92 




M. R. Currier, lamps .ad oil . 


37 65 




Adams & Lamprey, J hids and 






oil . . . . 


2 11 




S. L. Flanders, lamps and oil . 


10 13 




Eager & Robinson, lamps and 






oil 


7 26 




C. A. Smith, lamp chimneys 






and wicks .... 


2 16 




Carl E. York, lamp chimneys 






and wicks .... 


69 




Simon Dodge, lighting lamps . 


7 15 




Wm. W. Hall, lighting lamps . 


13 68 




C. G. Thompson, lighting lamps 


8 04 




Wm. H. Huse, lighting lamps 


8 95 




Wm. V. Emerson, lighting 






lamps .... 


11 40 




Sidney A. Farrar, lighting 






lamps .... 


83 75 




Hiram Stearns, lighting lamps 


25 00 





193 



David Perkins, lighting lamps 
E. R. Gilmore, lighting lamps 
J. B. Titus, lighting lamps 
J. B. Titus, repairs 



Balance to new account 



8 


13 


10 


80 


866 


66 


85 


40 


15,883 


95 


116 


05 



),000 00 



GRANITE BRIDGE. 



To balance from old account . 
appropriation . 
J. McDerby, old bridge, plank 
transfer reserved fund 
Balance (overdrawn) . 



Paid Dutton Woods, lumber and la- 
bor .... 
Walter Neal, lumber and labor 
A. C. Wallace, lumber and la 

bor . . 
J. B. Yarick, hardware . 
Daniels & Merrill . 
Pike & Heald, tinning and oil 
A. H. Lowell, washers . 
Bunton & Porter, brackets,etc 
F. M. Heath & Co., painting 
T. B. Brown, measuring paint- 
ing 

W. P. Stratton & Son, tinning 

13 



Dr. 



52 93 

500 00 

5 79 

7,144 74 

1 75 



^2,410 85 
1,147 18 

3,919 11 
64 50 
55 50 
79 89 
5 12 
24 61 
158 91 

1 87 
50 



^915 21 
Or. 



194 

for labor of men and teams as 

per pay-rolls . . . 47 17 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



To balance from old account . 


$20,172 91 


appropriation . . . . 


5,000 00 


sundry persons, license to enter 




sewers . . . . 


884 10 


Warren Harvey, old plank 


20 00 


State Reform School, brick 


25 13 


Water-works, pipe . 


2 40 


Ellis & Patterson (overdraft) . 


3 00 



',915 21 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . 
appropriation .... 


$171 61 
100 00 


$271 61 
Cr. 


Paid Pike & Heald, broom 

for labor and team as per pay- 
rolls 


35 

57 12 


Amount .... 
Balance to new account 


$57 47 
214 14 


$271 61 







Dr. 



.107 54 



195 



Cr. 



Paid Warren Harvey, superinten 
dent .... 
Temple McQueston, cement- 
pipe . . . . 
E. G. Haynes, sewer-pipe 
David H. Young, pipe . 
Gillis, Morrison, & Co., pipe 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
0. J. Sawyer, " 
French & Robertson, lumber 
H. T. Simpson, brick 
Drake & Carpenter, cement 
Pettee & Whittle, " 

J. S. Kidder & Co., " 
Ellis & Patterson, engineering 
A. H. Lowell, cess-pool covers, 

etc 

Concord Railroad, freight on 

brick 

Bunton & Porter, blacksmith- 

ing 

A. P. Frye, blacksmithing 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 
A. B. Webster, " 

J. A. Caverly, hauling pipe . 
William C. Rogers, hardware 
John B. Varick, " 

Daniels & Merrill " 

Pike & Heald " 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 

cess-pool covers . 
J. Slattery, hauling pipe 
C. N. Harvey, hay 



$391 50 



16 


20 


. 2,145 


64 


43 


86 


317 


98 


256 


99 


12 


18 


68 


22 


. 2,649 


53 


76 


00 


. 1,703 


83 


37 10 


r 430 


50 



273 12 



912 57 





75 


8 


75 


37 


95 




50 


59 


65 


1 


76 


122 48 


13 


55 


7 


90 


1 


64 


5 


00 


5 


10 



196 



Manchester Gas-light Co., cast- 






ings, etc., .... 


110 


42 


A. Bodwell, stone . 


24 


37 


J. M. Chandler & Co., oil, etc. 


40 


94 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


4 


92 


Barr & Clapp, powder, etc. . 


3 


28 


J. Conway, sewer-pipe . 


2 


80 


Plumer, Chandler, & Co, oil 






suits 


12 


75 


Geo. W. Thayer & Son, rubber 






boots . . 


15 


50 


F. C. Dow, rubber boots 


17 


00 


G. W, Weeks, rubber boots . 


20 


50 


for labor of men and teams. 






as per pay-rolls . 


10,090 


05 


Balance to new account . 


6,164 


86 


RESERVOIRS 







To balance from old account . . $516 21 



id Geo. Holbrook, lumber 


1 75 


Patrick Finn, labor 


64 00 


Thomas Slavin, labor 


6 25 


A. H. Lowell, iron-work 


29 08 


Balance to new account 


415 13 



26,107 54 



Dr. 



1516 21 
Cr. 



$516 21 



197 



COMMONS. 






Dr. 


To balance from old account . 


$231 


67 




appropriation .... 


200 


00 


1431 67 
Cr. 


• 






Paid P. 0. Woodman, turf . 


21 


50 




C. H. Robie, concrete 


9 


00 




French & Robertson, lumber 








and labor .... 


61 


39 




S. C. Forsaith & Co., repairs on 








fountain .... 


3 


96 




Ellis & Patterson, engineering 


3 


25 




for labor of men and teams as 








per pay-rolls 


190 


58 




Balance to new account 


141 


99 


1431 67 









GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
reserved fund transferred 
Balance (overdrawn) 



Paid J. Hodge, for filling sidewalks 
Ellis & Patterson, engineering 
for labor and teams as per pay- 
rolls ..... 
paving transferred . 



$585 56 


1,000 


00 


211 


76 


395 


38 


75 


00 


103 


97 


1,413 


73 


600 


00 



Dr. 



J,192 70 
Cr. 



5,192 70 



198 
LAND SOLD FROM CITY FARM. 



To balance from old account . 
Received of sundry persons 



Balance to new account 





Dr. 


70 55 




59 59 







$130 14 




Cr. 


130 14 






1130 14 



MACADAMIZING. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$2,985 78 


appropriation .... 


2,000 


00 


Balance (overdrawn) . 


494 


70 

i5 480 48 






Cr. 


Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and 






tallow for crusher 


28 


50 


Manchester Water-works, water 


22 


50 


French & Robertson, filing.saws 




60 


John B. Varick, hardware and 






tallow .... 


70 


96 


Wm. C. Rogers, sledge-handles 


1 


50 


R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 


18 


80 


D. C. Hutchinson & Son, stone 






chips 


47 


50 


Hutchinson Bros., castings and 






labor . . . . . 


117 


62 


A. Bodwell, stone . 


87 


00 


City Farm, stone . 


36 


50 


city teams .... 


41 


24 



199 

for labor and teams, as per 

pay-rolls .... 1,857 76 
paving, amount transferred . 3,200 00 



1,480 48 



WIDENING AND STRAIGHTENING PINE STREET. 

Dr. 



To reserved fund . 



. $327 54 



Paid for labor and teams as per pay- 
rolls $327 54 



1327 54 
Cr. 

1327 54 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



To balance from old account 


1544 19 


appropriation .... 


8,000 00 


S. S. Piper (overdraft) . 


15 00 


Jonathan Smith (overdraft) 


2 28 


Straw &^Lovejoy (overdraft) . 


15 00 


Geo. A. Ramsdell (overdraft) . 


15 50 


reserved fund, amount trans- 




ferred .... 


562 34 


Balance (overdrawn) . 


520 66 


Paid E. A. Jackson, bounty on 




hawk .... 


20 


Elmer Whipple, bounty on 




hawk 


20 



Dr. 



>,674 97 
Cr. 



200 



S. p. Elliott, bounty on hawk 




20 


S. P. Elliott, bounty on foxes 


1 


00 


David Butterfield, bounty on fox 




60 


Arthur Duroscher, bounty on 






fox ..... 




60 


Fred D. Hooper, bounty on 






foxes .... 


1 


60 


CD. Grant, bounty on fox . 




60 


J. Byron Huse, bounty on foxes 


4 


00 


Jonathan Smith, for witness- 






fees, etc 


780 


03 


Morrison & Clark, professional 






services .... 


375 


52 


C. R. Morrison, professional 






services .... 


31 


60 


D. P. & D. L. Perkins, profes- 






sional services . 


3 


00 


Briggs & Huse, professional 






services .... 


278 


00 


J. P. Bartlett, professional ser- 






vices 


23 


00 


Wm. R. Patten, professional 






services .... 


3 


00 


James B. Straw, professional 






services .... 


47 


00 


James B. Straw, making city 






report .... 


150 


00 


Isaac L. Heath, revising ordi- 






nances .... 


225 


00 


C. C. Keniston, burying dead 






dogs, etc 


11 


25 


H. P. Marshall, killing dogs . 


73 


50 


Dana W. King, searching rec- 






ords and copies of deeds 


3 


61 



201 



George W. Varnum, care of 

court-house and repairs . Ill 74 

S. S. Piper, firing salutes . 80 25 

Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 1, 

pumping out cellars . . 6 00 

Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 2, 

pumping out cellars . . 19 20 

Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 3, 

pumping out cellars . . 18 00 

Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 4, 

pumping out cellars . . 24 00 

Joseph H. Haynes, clerical ser- 
vices 64 00 

Melendy & Poor, burying pau- 
pers ..... 43 00 

Head & Dowst, carpenter work 32 40 

David Thayer, sundry services 47 62 

Loammi Searles,buryinghorses, 

etc 13 00 

Henry Bennett, sundry services 46 46 

John L. Kelly, allowance for 

horse, and cash paid out . 36 08 

John G. Colt, trees . . 230 77 

Timothy Clark, execution . 222 28 

Mary Rush, execution . . 328 86 

Samuel Gamble, execution . 219 33 

Catherine Sheehan, damage 

from defective highway . 400 00 

Cyrus W. Flanders, injuries 

caused by falling on sidewalk 400 00 

Betsey C. Tenney ... 300 00 

Ellen M. Bradley, damage to 
person from falling on side- 
walk 125 00 



53 


13 


270 


00 


37 


40 


146 


41 


14 


12 


14 


96 


9 


00 



202 

Manchester Water- works, wa- 
ter 

Judith Sherer, matron at pest- 
house ..... 

Nathan P. Kidder, copying and 
indexing sewer-books, etc. , 

Ira Cross, use of horse, and tel- 
egrams .... 

Geo. Holbrook, carpenter work 

Walter Neal, carpenter work . 

James Fogg, carpenter work . 

Lamson & Marden, cutting 

watering-troughs, etc. . 158 54 

A. Bodwell, stone-work and re- 
moving hay-scales . . 125 90 

Western Union Telegraph Co., 

telegrams .... 89 

French & Robertson, carpenter 
work 

Ellis & Patterson, engineering 

Fogg & James, teams 

S. S. James & Bros., teams . 

J. A. Brown, teams 

C. H. Hodgman, teams . 

Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 

Pike & Heald, hardware 

Daniels & Co., hardware 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc., on 
fountains . . . . 

John A. Barker, use of team . 

Dr. P. A. Stackpole, in case of 
Patterson vs. City 

Dr. Carl H. Horsli, in case of 
Patterson vs. City 



77 


65 


810 


55 


85 


20 


139 


50 


24 


00 


45 


75 


8 


14 


4 


99 


6 


45 


50 


32 


13 


46 


40 


00 


20 


00 



203 



G. A. Ramsdell, transfer, etc., 




in case of Nutt vs. City 


15 50 


Dr. George E. Hersey, expert 




testimony .... 


40 00 


Dr. W. W. Wilkins, profession- 




al services .... 


10 00 


Dr. William Holland, profes- 




sional services 


11 00 


Dr. 0. F. Bonney, return of 




births .... 


6 00 


Dr. Leonard French, return of 


^ 


births .... 


11 25 


Dr. Leonard French, profes- 




sional services 


6 00 


Dr. L. Melville French, return 




of births .... 


11 00 


Dr. J. W. Mooar, return of 




births .... 


2 50 


Dr. L. B. How, return of births 


4 50 


Dr. C. A. Manning, return of 




births .... 


1 75 


Dr. R. J. P. Goodwin, profes- 




sional services 


50 00 


John B. Clarke, printing 


18 50 


T. H. Tuson, printing 


2 50 


C. F. Livingston, printing 


42 75 


First New Hampshire Battery, 




firing salute 


37 50 


Henry F. Morse 


2 50 


Hannah Kearns, expenses to 




Hartford with deaf and dumb 




boy 


8 60 


Webster & Morton, pens 


5 50 


Jacob F. James, engineering . 


11 25 



204 



Henry Just, pens . 


5 00 


Nancy C. Towne, rent 


12 00 


New York Times, advertising . 


5 60 


U. S. & Canada Express Co., 




expressing .... 


8 85 


Patrick Kearns, labor 


2 00 


James Kearns, labor 


2 00 


Joseph Comfort, labor 


2 00 


E. Reynolds & Co., stamp 


5 00 


Sylinda German, washing 


8 30 


labor, setting down trees on 




Elm Street .... 


67 25 


Langdon Simons, clock . 


5 00 


J. Q. A. McQuesten, posting 




health-notices 


IB 00 


N. S. Clark, teams . 


27 25 


C. B. Clarkson, services as in- 




terpreter for assessors 


4 50 


C. R. Colley, painting canal- 




bridge . ... 


37 50 


Charles N. Waite, chemical ex- 




amination of meat 


15 00 


N. & W. R. R,, car-tickets . 


40 70 


B. P. Cilley, professional ser- 




vices 


30 00 


L. J. Gordon, damage to person 


15 75 


Joseph B. Sawyer, engineering 


2 50 


Wm. J. Desilets, witness-fees 


2 28 


Dr. A. D. Smith, return of 




births .... 


2 25 


F. D. Thorpe, dipper and chain 


75 


John N. Baker, repairing and 




regulating clocks 


35 00 


John Hoben, damage to team 




from defective highway 


60 00 



205 

Sampson, Davenport, & Co., ten 
copies directory . 

J. R. Swallow, damage to paper- 
hangings from water . 

Edwin Kennedy, to cash paid 
for raih'oad tickets to Ben- 
nington, Vt. 

P. W. Haseltine, dinners dur- 
ing President's visit . 

George C. Hoitt, canvass cover 
to sewer-book 

A. B. Webster, repairing hearse 

A. D. Gooden, use watering- 
trough .... 

Levi L. Aldrich, expenses to 
Boston, telegraphing, etc. . 

Journal Newspaper Co., adver- 
tising ..... 

H. D. Gordon, music furnished 
at President's reception 

J. M. Stanton, flags, etc., for 
President's reception . 

H. 0. Morse, teams, President's 
reception .... 

J. C. Chase, services in case of 
Clark vs. City 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, storing 
runners for hearse 

E. Laing, wood for wardroom 

D.M. Goodwin, repairing chains 
and dippers at watering- 
troughs .... 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
at wardroom 



20 


00 


47 


00 


179 


35 


147 


00 


2 


00 


2 


20 


3 


00 


10 


25 


3 


37 


53 


00 


7 


18 


32 


00 


17 


80 


5 


50 


5 


50 


1 


50 




25 



206 



Herbert F. Thayer, witness-fees 
W. P. Emerson, piano for 

school . . . . 

Charles T. Brown, transcript 

of case, Nutt vs. City . 
G. G. Mills, damage to person 

from defective highway 
George H. Newton, pens 
Julius Cellers, ribbon for stamp 
Samuel W. Parsons, witness- 
fees 

George H. Dudley, repairs at 

wardroom . 
P. A. Devine, burying child 
Clough & Towle, loss of sheep 

by dogs 

John Lee, team for committees 
B. L, Hartshorn, teaming 
Geo. W. Butterfield, expenses 

to Boston for horse 
Manchester P. 0., wrappers 
A. J. Lane, estimating land 

damage 
Enoch R. 

sessors' room 
P. C. Cheney & Co., manilla 

paper .... 
David Thayer, services as tru 

ant-officer . 
Thomas Pool, repairing hand 

stamp 
Concord Railroad, freight on 

safe 

Hillsborough County, watering- 
trough and stone posts 



Morse, safe for as 



1 


25 


280 


00 


23 


60 


35 


00 


2 


00 


1 


60 



6 00 

7 62 
2 60 

35 00 

30 00 

2 60 

11 65 

84 

16 50 

60 00 
1 05 

49 50 
4 76 
1 05 

33 00 



207 



Charles H. Robie, laying con- 
crete in Concord Square 

Bunton & Porter, labor on tree- 
box irons .... 

Warren Harvey 

Manchester Locomotive "Works, 
labor on boiler . 

S. A. Riddle, searching Bed- 
ford town records 

H. K. Slayton, damage to team 
from defective highway 

Samuel C. French, damage 
caused by defective highway 

T. W. Lane, ink and mucilage 

Jos. B. Sawyer, engineering . 

C. C. Webster 

Wm. H, Whitney, fees and 
costs of Whitney vs. City . 

Michael Haley, damage to team 
from defective highway 

H. B,. Chamberlin,in execution 

B. P. Cogswell, labor 
F. J. Moffitt, labor . 

J. H. Maynard, putting in safe 

Dr. George A. Crosby, profes- 
fessional services 

Sullivan & Decatur, stove fur- 
niture for pest-house . 

labor on hay-scales . 

labor, setting trees . 

J. Hodge, labor and lumber 

C. A. Smith . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
R. W. Bean, killing dogs 



241 86 

2 60 

75 

3 22 

2 00 

22 00 

100 00 
1 25 

70 00 

3 00 

105 88 

7 00 
9 85 



50 
00 
00 



10 00 



3 


05 


132 


35 


60 


12 


12 


05 


1 


55 




45 


6 


00 



208 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 83 94 

Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 

clocks .... 20 00 



FENCING CONCORD SQUARE. 

To balance from old account . . $451 38 



Paid Ellis & Patterson, engineering $24 84 
Lamson & Mar den, cutting and 
setting fence-stone as per 
contract 
to reserved fund transferred 
Balance to new account 



330 


25 


96 


76 




03 



YALLEY CEMETERY. 



To balance from old account . 
reserved fund, transferred 
Benjamin Stevens, wood . 



Paid A. H. Hartshorn, supt., labor 
Thomas C. Cheney, labor 
George Holbrook, lumber and 
labor ..... 
John Prince, trees . 



$609 65 


2,000 


00 


6 


00 


1501 13 


5 


62 


85 


39 


3 


00 



),674 97 



Dr. 

1451 38 
Cr. 



$451 38 



Dr. 



J,615 Qb 
Cr. 



209 . 

A. Bodwell, stone . . . 274 33 
A. H. Low'ell, iron fence and 

gates 1,557 92 

Geo. W. Stevens, engineering 10 07 

Balance to new account . 178 19 



•$2,615 65 



PINEGROVE CEMETERY. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . 


1669 42 


Jacob F. James, lots sold 


1,054 


83 


appropriation . 


1,000 


00 

^9 724- 9.Ft 












Cr. 


Paid William C. Chase, labor 


$502 


60 


A. B. Chase, labor 


62 


00 


. J. E. Clough, labor 


25 


88 


A. Mclndoe, labor . 


64 


00 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


1 


00 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware 


138 


19 


Pike & Heald, hardware 


2 


47 


George How, labor 


4 


00 


J. F. James . . . . 


64 


50 


W. Ireland, lumber and labor 


78 


32 


J. G. Colt, trees 


34 


00 


D. H. Young, pipe . 


5 


60 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


4 


50 


A. II. Lowell, iron fence 


985 


50 


Hunt, Challis, & Gilmore, print- 






ing .... 


4 


50 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


4 


Q5 


T. A. Lane, plumbing 


22 


04 



' 210 

Samuel Poor, painting fence . 17 98 

A. Bodwell, moving stone . 8 40 

G. A. Tufts, labor ... 6 00 

Balance to new account . 688 12 



,724 25 



SALARIES. 



To balance from old account . . $1,322 13 

appropriation .... 8,000 00 

Balance (overdrawn) . . 1,141 03 



Dr. 

110,463 16 
Cr. 



Paid^Ira Cross, major . . . tf 641 50 
John L. Kelly, mayor . . 333 33 
John P. Newell, city clerk . 41 66 
Nathan P. Kidder, city clerk . 958 30 
H. R. Chamberlin, city treas- 
urer . . ■ . . . 1,000 00 
John A. Barker, city messen- 
ger 600. 00 

James Mitchell, Jr., collector . 739 21 

Seth T. IJill, collector . . 400 00 
Wm. E. Buck, superintendent 

of schools .... 1,200 00 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, clerk of 

common council . . . 100 00 
Jonathan Smith, city solicitor . 500 00 
L. Melville French, city physi- 
cian 25 00 

Judith Sherer, matron at pest- 
house . . . . 90 00 



211 



H. G. Caiiiiey, city physician, 

1876 ..'... 50 00 

Joseph Kidder, for performing 
the duties of superintendent 
for one week . . . 31 25 

William Little, clerk of school 
board .... 25 00 

William Little, school commit- 
tee 10 00 

N. H. Wilson, school commit- 
tee 10 00 

Geo. W. Stevens, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

Joseph Kidder, school commit- 
tee 10 00 

John P. Newell, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

N. W. Cumner, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

Wm. F. Byrns, school commit- 
tee 10 00 

James P. Walker, school com- 
mittee . . . . 10 00 

Isaac W. Darrah, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

Lucien B. Clough, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

Isaac L. Heath, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

Arthur Dinsmore, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

Marshall P. Hall, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

Samuel P. Jackson, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 



212 



Martin Fitzgerald, school com 

mittee 
Ira Cross, school committee 
Joliii F. Conway, supervisor 
Freeman Higgins " 
John M. Hayes, " 

Frank Harvell, " 

Wm. G. H. Dunham, super 

visor .... 
Slade S. Piper, supervisor 
Geo. H. Dodge, " 
Frank T. E. Richardson, super 

visor .... 
C. C. Colby, supervisor . 
David T. Burleigh, supervisor 
David H. Young, * " 

Nathan P. Plunt, police justice 
Sayward J. Young, overseer of 

poor ..... 
Sayward J. Young, clerk of 

overseers of poor 
John Dailey, overseer of poor 
Patrick A. Devine, overseer of 

poor ..... 
A. B. Page, overseer of poor 

E. A. Moulton, " " 
Jeremiah Stickney, overseer of 

poor ..... 
Daniel Sheehan, overseer of 

poor . . . . . 
P. A. Devine, health-officer 

F. Allen .... 
Chas. G. Emmons, clerk of 

police court 



10 


00 


10 


00 


4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


9 


00 


4 


60 


4 


50 


4 


60 


r 4 


60 


4 


50 


e 375 


00 



25 00 



50 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


6 


25 


25 


00 



25 00 

25 00 

54 25 
125 00 

55 91 



>13 



H. W. Longa, assistant mar- 
shal .... 

Wra. B. Patten, city marshal 

R. J. P. Goodwin, health-offi 
cer .... 

George W. Riddle, moderator 

Jos. W. Bean, moderator 

Wm. P. Sleeper, " 

F. A. Senter, selectman 

John Morrison, " 

H. C. Canney, 

H. H. Noyes, " 

Thomas Howe, " 

James Briggs, " 

Thos. D. Luce, ward clerk 

Prank H. Challis, " 

Nathan P. Kidder " 

Perry H. Dow, " 

James W. Lathe, " 

Michael Callahan, " 

Horace P. Watts, moderator 

Edward Eagan, selectman 

True 0. Furnald, " 

W. A. Clement, " 

Wm. P. Hubbard, " 

E. M. Slayton, 

Dalton J. Warren, " 

J. J. Flynn, " 

Geo. H. Dudley, " 

Geo. W. Dearborn, " 

Henry P. Morse, " 

Frank W. McKiuley, selectman 

Willis P. Fogg, 

Geo. W. Bacon, 



193 75 

243 75 

25 00 

9 00 

3 00 

3 00 

5 00 

2 50 

5 00 



00 



5 50 



00 
00 
00 



5 00 
5 00 
2 50 
2 50 
5 00 
2 50 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



214 



Hugh Ramsey, selectman 


. 


2 50 


Jolm C. Balch, •' 


5 00 


J. Witter Smith, " 


5 00 


W. S. Pahner, " 


5 00 


Aimer D. Gooden, selectman . 


5 00 


T. P. Heath, " 


5 00 


Chas. H. George, " 


5 00 


Geo. A. Farmer, " 


5 00 


Benj. L. Hartshorn, " 


5 00 


Wm. A. Clement, " 


5 00 


Chas. H. Hodgraan, " 


5 00 


Augustus Canis, " 


5 00 


Jacob P. James, assessor 


216 00 


Horace P. Watts, " . 


93 00 


C. S. Fisher, " 




112 60 


W. W. Baker, 




30 00 


Timothy Sullivan, " 




33 00 


H. W. Powell, 




150 00 


Charles Brown, " 




93 00 


A. C. Wallace, " , 




24 00 


Jos. H. ciaynes, " 




365 00 


John Ryan, " 




147 00 


I. T. Webster, " 




96 00 


Dustin Marshall, assistant as 




scssor 


33 00 


E. G. Haynes, assistant assessoi 


24 00 


Isaac Whittemore, " 


33 00 


John P. Moore, " 


45 00 


Julius E. Wilson, clerk for as 




sessors 


36 00 


Edwin 0. Pearson, clerk for as 




sessors 


80 00 


Nicholas Nichols, clerk foi 




board of assessors 


, 


204 00 



215 



Horatio Pradd, inspector 


30 00 


Lemuel H. James, " 


40 00 


Dustin Marshall, " 


60 00 


Isaac Whittemore " 


82 50 


Solon D. Pollard, " 


30 00 


John J. Dillon, " 


32 50 


Harrison D. Lord, " 


65 00 




*10 -Ifi", IPi 




(lplU,'±UtJ J.U 



RESERVED FUND. 



To balance from old account . 

appropriation .... 
John P. Newell, rent of tene- 
ments .... 
John P. Newell, show-licenses . 
John P. Newell, sewer-licenses . 
John P. Newell, south city scales 
John P. Newell, dog-license 
Albert Jackson, rent of tenements 
Albert Jackson, show-licenses . 
Albert Jackson, south city scales 
Albert Jackson, sewer-licenses . 
Albert Jackson, dog-licenses 
John N. Bruce, rent of hearse . 
John Hayes, old pipe and brick 
James Mitchell, Jr., costs on non- 
resident taxes 
Nathan P. Kidder, show-licenses 
Nathan P. Kidder, rent of tene- 
ments ..... 



Dr. 



$7,295 


53 


15,677 


99 


16 


00 


20 


00 


50 


00 


113 


24 


1 


00 


48 


00 


40 


00 


62 


41 


73 


80 


9 


00 


50 


00 


5- 


00 


50 


50 


398 


00 



84 00 



216 



Xatliau F. Kidder, south city 



scales . . . . . 


135 91 


Nathan P. Kidder, city ordinance 


1 00 


Nathan P. Kidder, setting tree 


1 25 


Nathan P. Kidder, rent of hearse 


16 25 


Nathan P. Kidder, city-aqueduct 




water 


12 00 


Nathan P. Kidder, dog-licenses 


432 86 


Natlian P. Kidder, license to sell 


10 00 


interest on taxes 


1,755 56 


fencing Concord Square . 


96 76 


celebration, 4th of July, 1876 . 


77 66 


Balance (overdrawn) . 


3;924 51 




$30 458 '^S 








Cr. 


Paid Valley Cemetery . 


2,000 00 


Pine-Grove Cemetery 


1,000 00 


widening and straightening 




Pine Street 


327 54 


new engine-house . 


. 4,000 00 


District No. 2 


. 3,000 00 


paving .... 


7,722 04 


District No. 9 . 


104 08 


printing and stationery . 


300 00 


District No. 7 


100 00 


Granite Bridge 


7,144 74 


paupers off the farm 


. 2,304 97 


District No. 3 


35 16 


District No. 8 . . . 


126 05 


District No. 11 


6 92 


repairs of buildings 


22 95 


incidental expenses 


562 34 


new hose-house 


47 21 


erradinsf for concrete 


211 76 



217 

incidental repairs on schools . 280 15 

lighting streets . . . 600 00 

police department . . . Qij2 32 



130,458' 23 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATION FOR THE CELEBRA- 
TION OP FOURTH OF JULY, 1876. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . . -1229 66 

$229 66 

Cr. 
Paid Oren Carlton, teaming 
District No. 3 
District No. 11 
reserved fund 

1229 66 



2 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


77 


66 



NEW ENGINE-HOUSE, VINE STREET. 



To appropriation . 
reserved fund . 
fire department 



Paid Head & Dowst, contractors . 
Geo. W. Stevens, engineering. 
H. T. Simpson, brick 
Natt & W. P. Head 
Concord R. R., freight on brick 
Mark E. Harvey, hauling brick 34 45 







Dr. 


$10,000 00 




4,000 


00 




1,200 


00 






,f 1 t^ 9ac\ HA 




<ff 


/At/jA-tW VV 






Cr. 


9,000 


00 




150 


00 




1,886 


47 




247 


00 




62 


10, 





218 



for labor of men and teams as 
per pay-rolls 
Balance to new account 



148 78 

3,671 25 



fl5,200 00 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . 


$1,846 


95 




appropriation . 


2,500 00 










$4,346 95 














Cr. 


Paid 0. H. Marshall, librarian 


1400 00 




Lizzie B. Davis, librarian 


318 


75 




Temple & Farrington, repairing 








books, printing, etc. 


167 


19 




C. F. Livingston, printing 


46 


60 




Campbell & Hanscom, printing 


35 


33 




John B. Clarke, printing 


7 


50 




L. B. Bodwell & Co.,fueI 


217 


52 




E. P. Johnson & Co., fuel 


6 


75 




Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 


201 


25 




Bridget Riley, labor 


10 


00 




^tna Insurance Co., insurance 


32 


50 




Carl C. Shepard, dusters 


2 


85 




Manchester Water-works, watei 


20 


00 




Straw & Lovejoy , repairing clock 


75 




W. T. Folsom 




40 




T. A. Lane, plumbing 


8 


55 




trustees City Library 


1,000 


00 




J. Q. A. Sargent, plumbing 


1 


00 




J. J. Abbott .... 




50 




Balance to new account 


1,869 


51 


f4,346 95 



219 



REPAIRS OP BUILDINGS. 

To balance from old account . . $124 12 

appropriation .... 1,000 00 

reserved fund transferred . 22 95 

Balance (overdrawn) . . 61 79 



Paid French & Robertson, lumber 

and labor . . . . 36 84 

P. M. Heath & Co., setting glass 11 82 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 75 

G. H. Dudley, lumber and labor 94 53 

J. J. Abbott, painting . . 68 84 

Pike & Heald, repairs . . 24 67 

J. Hodge, lumber ... 52 23 

T. A. Lane, plumbing . . 67 75 

B. P. Fogg, plumbing . . 365 66 
Elliott & Means . . . 120 00 
Dunlap & Baker, hammer on 

clock ..... 14 57 

E. G. Haines .... 4 00 

J. Q. A. Sargent, piping . . 38 35 

W. H. Vickery ... 40 

G. B. Fogg .... 37 

G. W. Varnum ... 62 00 

G. Holbrook, lumber and labor 73 01 

J. J. Bennett, mason work . 10 87 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . 73 25 

G. M. Ford, labor ... 9 50 

Leighton & Murley, labor . 22 10 

R. J. Donnelly, plumbing . 4 05 

Wm. D. Eastman, masonry . 9 00 

C. R. Colley, painting . . 7 37 



Dr. 



L,198 86 
Cr. 



220 

P. 0. Woodman, labor . 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
Joel Daniels, glazing 
J. C. Young . 



3 


00 




6 


85 




2 


00 




15 


08 






— 


$1,198 86 



SOLDIERS' MONUMENT.- 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . . $1,000 00 
appropriation .... 1,000 00 

. $2,000 00 

Or. 
By balance to new account . . $2,000 00 

$2,000 00 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 
To balance from old account . . $2,563 80 
appropriation .... 2,000' 00 
Balance (overdrawn) . 517 20 

$5,081 00 

Cr. 
Paid sundry persons .' . . $5,081 00 

$5,081 00 



MILITIA. 

Dr 

To balance from old account . . $41 67 
appropriation .... 558 33 



$600 00 



221 



Paid Manchester War Veterans 


$100 00 


Section A, 1st N. H. Battery 


100 00 


Amoskeag Veterans 


100 00 


Head Guards . 


100 00 


Straw Rifles . 


100 00 


Slieridan Guards . 


100 00 







Cr. 



$600 00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

To balance from old account . . $337 34 
appropriation .... 1,500 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . 800 00 
Balance (overdrawn) . . 60 52 



Paid 



Dr. 



Hunt, Challis, &, Gilmore, 






printing .... 


14 


00 


Challis & Gilmore, printing . 


28 


75 


Henry H. Everett, printing . 


64 


60 


Hunt & Everett, printing 


3 


50 


Wm. E. Moore, printing 


37 


50 


W. H. Annan, printing . 


11 


62 


Campbell & Hanscom, printing 


123 


41 


John B. Clarke, printing 


1,259 


46 


George C. Hoitt 


19 


50 


Temple & Farrington, printing 


362 


71 


C. F. Livingston, printing 


177 


25 


E. A. Jenks, printing 


25 


00 


Otis S. Eastman, printing 


1 


00 


Manchester post-office 


53 


79 



§2,197 86 
Cr. 



222 



T. W. Lane .... 


14 59 


M. S. Hunt .... 


3 00 


H. R. Chamberlin . 


2 28 


Manchester Bill-Posting Co. . 


1 00 







$2,197 86 



CITY HALL AND OFFICES. 



To Albert Jackson, rent of hall 
" " stores 

John P. Newell, rent of hall 
" " stores 

Nathan P. Kidder, rent of hall 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood . . . . . 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal and 

wood .... 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
"Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
John B. Varick, hardware 
Pike & Heald, repairs and 

hardware . 
Bridget Riley, washing . 
Kate Carroll, washing . 
Hannah Murphy, washing 
Celinda German, washing 
French & Robertson, repairs 



1144 00 

441 75 

8 00 

611 75 

33 00 



" stores 1,460 25 



1185 15 
174 60 

49 50 
4 19 
4 61 

28 43 
31 

72 61 
40 80 
2 70 
1 50 
42 70 
84 33 



Dr. 



J,598 75 
Cr. 



223 



J. Hodge, repairs . 
George Holbrook, repairs 
Xathan P. Kidder, gas-burner 
and shades .. 

F. M. Heath & Co., setting 
glass . • . 

B. F. Fogg, plumbing 
T. A. Lane, plumbing 
W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 

C. H. Wood, painting, . 
Barton & Co., matting and oil 

cloth .... 
J. S. Holt & Co., soap 

D. H. Nash, gas-burners 
Stearns & Farmer, brooms 

G. B. Fogg, repairing locks 
C. G. Colbath, shades and gas 

burners 
John A. Barker, pitchwood 
James Collins, pitchwood 
Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 

clocks 
H. H. Ladd & Co., clock 
P. C. Cheney & Co., paper 
B,. D. Gay, shades for treasur 

er's office 
R. J. Donnelly, plumbing 
George E. Moore, cleaning and 

carpets 
Bennett & Lord, repairing brick 

work .... 
C. A. Smith ... 
Nutt Bros., whitewashing 
A. M. Eastman 



19 42 
5 25 

1 25 



2 


50 


36 


80 


86 


56 


5 


05 




65 


16 


98 


9 


80 


17 


00 


5 


60 


5 


33 


5 


00 




70 




50 


15 


00 


3 


00 


18 


44 


28 


00 


4 


40 



4 00 

3 00 
15 75 
35 00 

4 50 



224 

0. R. Colley, painting . 
D. A. Simons 
Manchester Water-works 
Balance to new account 



8 


83 


3 


55 


939 


95 


553 


69 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To balance from old account . . $1,529 09 

James Pherson, coal . . 1 50 

appropriation .... 13,000 00 



,598 75 



Dit. 



$14,530 59 



Amoskeag Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 1. 

Cr. 

Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas $33 00 

J. M. Chandler & Co., soap and 
matches .... 

H. A. Johnson & Co., oil 

W. L. Blenus, getting in coal . 

Pike & Heald, repairing lantern 

Geo. W. Butterfield, labor 

Geo. R. Simmons, labor 

Daniels & Merrill, sperm oil . 

Plumer, Chandler, & Co., dozen 

overalls .... 21 00 

F. N. McLaren, repairing har- 
nesses .... 4 60 

Ross, Turner, & Co., hose and 

couplings . . . . 92 40 

Webster, Murchie, & Co., re- 
pairing draw-iron . . 1 50 



5 


30 


2 


75 




63 




45 


20 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 



225 

L, B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

A. B. Webster, blacksmithing 

Company's bill for services 



22 00 




1 00 




825 00 






S1.033 13 



Fire King Steam Fire Engine Company No. 2. 

Cr. 
Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
J. M. Chandler & Co., oil, etc. 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
Greeley & Esty 

F. N. McLaren, repairing har- 
nesses .... 
W. L. Blenus, getting in coal . 
H. A. Johnson & Co., oil-polish 
Plamer, Chandler, & Co., jacket 
Daniels & Merrill, oil 
N. S. Clark, crash 
L. Searles, services as driver . 
Company's bill for services 



139 


25 


10 


59 


22 


00 


7 


20 


14 


64 




63 


2 


75 


9 


50 


1 


80 


1 


44 


204 


38 


793 


75 



.,107 83 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine Company|No.^3. 

Cr. 

Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas $15 25 

L. C. Abrahams, floor-brush . 1 05 
A. C. Wallace, use of horses 

and wood .... 215 50 

11. Fradd & Co., oil, etc. . 9 08 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 4 00 



226 

Amoskeag M'f'g Co., pole to 

steamer .... 20 00 

Company's bill for services . 940 00. ■ 



11,204 88 



N. S. Bean Steam Eire Engine Company No. 4. 

Cr. 
Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas $77 00 
J. Stickney, repairing hose, etc. 14 75 

Daniels & Merrill, basket, etc. 4 09 

J. M. Chandler & Co., oil, 

matches, etc. ... 6 50 

H. A. Johnson, oil-polish . 2 75 

W. L. Blenus, getting in coal . 62 

Pike & Heald, lantern-globes . 4 75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 22 00 

Amoskeag M'f'g Co., repairing 

steamer . . . . 36 68 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 

painting .... 141 15 
Daniels & Co., putty and rope 
A. B. Cashing, sundry services 

E. R. Richmond, oil 
Edwin Branch, repairing har- 
nesses .... 

F. N. McLaren, repairing bridle 
T. L. Thorpe, cop waste . 
Thos. C. Basshor, patent relief- 
valve ..... 

Company's bill for services 

$1,316 62 





28 


20 


00 


4 


00 




30 




25 


6 


60 


150 


00 


825 


00 



227 

ExcELSioPw Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, 

Cr. 

Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas |32 25 
J. M. Chandler & Co., oil, etc. 3 39 
Augustus Robie, labor . . 2 00 
Daniels & Co., pails and shovels 2 75 
Daniels & Merrill ... 3 98 
Pike &^ Heald, repairing lan- 
terns, etc. .... 6 60 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and 

coal 21 62 

French & Robertson, carpenter 

work 15 48 

Joseph S. Smith, extension-lad- 
der 150 00 

Patrick Harmon, sawing wood 1 50 
Concord Railroad Corporation, 

freight on ladder . . 3 48 

Company's bill for services . 1,543 07 



Pennacook Hose Company No. 1. 

Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas |31 25 
J. M. Chandler & Co., wicks, 

matches, and brooms . 
Daniels & Merrill, oil, etc. 
French & Robertson, carpenter 

work ..... 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood ..... 



6 


15 


2 


74 




50 


22 


00 



.,786 12 



Cr. 



228 



Pike & Heald, repairing Ian 

terns, globes, etc. 
J. M. Plaisted, driver, and shov 

eling coal . . . ■ 
W. L. Blenus, getting in coal 
Daniels & Merrill, chain, skin 

bands, and hose . 
M. C. Clark, blacksmithing 
Amoskeag M'f'g Co., repairing 

hose-carriage 
H. A. Johnson, oil-polish 
Greeley & Esty, repairing bar 

ness .... 
Edwin Branch, repairing har 

ness .... 
D, A. Simons, chairs, etc. 
A. G. Oatley, nozzle 
F. N. McLaren, repairing bridle 
W. L. Blenus, driving 
Company's bill for services 



3 30 

602' 60 
62 

4 14 

9 48 

44 64 

2 75 

2 65 



1 


25 


36 


25 


15 


00 




25 


28 


31 


845 


00 



11,667 68 



Massabesic Hose Company No. 2. 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
C. A. Smith, duster 
J. B. Varick, hose and coup 

lings .... 
A. G. Oatley, nozzles 
I). A. Simons, chairs 
Pike <fe Heald, lanterns . 
L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 



i $U 00 


3 


60 


8 


00 


30 


00 


24 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 



Cr. 



229 



Daniels & Co., shovel and ax 




handle 


1 50 


T. L. Thorpe, cop waste . 


5 00 


J, Hodge, wood 


2 50 


Wm. Boyd, horse . 


37 00 


Company's bill for services 


695 00 







mS4: 50 



Engineers' Department and Miscellaneous. 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
John B. Clarke, printing 
Manchester Water-works, water 

A. C. Wallace, assist, engineer 
J. F. Pherson, assist, engineer 
Chas. Williams, Jr., wire 
Thos. W. Lane, stationery and 

salary .... 

B. C. Kendall 

James Kearns, supply-wagon . 
James W. Preston, labor 
Thomas Mahoney, service on 
supply-wagon 

C. F. Livingston, printing- 
Joel Daniels, painting and let- 
tering .... 

District No. 2, shoveling snow 

from hydrants 
A. H. Lowell, services as chief 

engineer .... 
A. H. Lowell, cash paid, ex- 
■ press and freight 



Cr. 



145 


75 


38 


24 


81 


99 


65 


00 


10 


83 


16 


50 


92 


00 


140 


00 


50 


00 


18 


00 


20 


00 


6 


50 


1 


75 


4 


50 


115 


00 


16 


25 



230 

Head &Dowst, repairing chairs 1 60 

Sam C. Lowell, assist, engineer 54 17 

Mrs..Josiah Stevens . . 12 00 

A. G. Oatley . . ' . . 15 00 



S804 98 



RECAPITULATION. 



Cb. 



Paid Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. No. 1. 11,033 13 

Fire King S. F. E. Co. No. 2 , 1,107 83 
E. W. Harrington S. F. E. Co. 

No. 3 1,204 88 

N. S. Bean S. F. B. Co. No. 4 . 1,316 62 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. 

No. 1 1,786 12 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 1,657 68 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 834 50 

miscellaneous . . . 804 98 

transferred tonewengine-house 1,200 00 

Balance to new account . 3,584 86 



$14,530 59 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Dk. 
To balance from old account . . $898 38 
Gamewell & Co. (overdraft) . 10 00 



1908 88 
Cr. 



Paid J. W. Preston, repairs . . $37 50 
B.C. Kendall, care of telegraph 225 00 
A. H. Lowell, castings . . 197 75 



231 

Stearns & George, blue vitriol 
Moses G. Crane, magnets, etc. 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany, tripods, etc. 
Pike & Heald, zincs and labor 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
D. B. Varney, hardware 
C. H. Hodgman, trucking 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
S. S. James & Bros., teams 
J. W. Storer, repairs 
Fogg & James, teams 
P. W. Haseltine . 
A. B. Webster 
Concord Railroad Corporation 
Charles Williams, Jr., wire 
John B. Clarke, printing 
L. D. Shaw, marking-machine 
Balance to new account 



137|55 
33' 75 



77 
80 



2 
1 

1 88 
4 19 



00 

75 



16 00 
20 00 

3 00 

4 00 
70 
60 

5 50 
7 25 

10 00 
190 51 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 

To appropriation .... $15,000 00 
Balance (overdrawn) . . 2,595 00 



Paid Manchester Water-works, 'for 

water . . . . ' . 117,595 00 



Dr. 

117,595 00 
Cr. 

117,595 00 



232 



NEW HOSE-HOUSE, NASHUA STREET. 



To appropriation . 

District No. 2 transferred 
reserved fund transferred 



Paid E. E. Patch, carpenter work 
George W. Stevens, architect 
Charles Cheney, team 
Proctor Young, team 
Daniel Dowd, labor 
James Fogg, labor . 
James Prentable, labor . 



Balance to new account 



1500 00 
47 25 

47 21 



. 1496 


09 


15 


00 


12 


00 


11 


00 


O 


75 


5 


62 


3 


75 


$547 


21 


47 


25 



Dr. 



$594 46 
Cr. 



$594 46 



WATER-WORKS. 



To balance from old account 
receipts for water-rents 



Paid John B. Varick, hardware 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 
John Q. A. Sargent, drilling- 
machines, stop-boxes, etc. . 
Newport Manufacturing Com- 
pany, connections, stop-locks, 
etc 



Dr. 



$8,144 02 
43,823 30 


$275 57 
40 Q4 


, Cr. 



387 51 



212 05 



2^3 



Af orris, Tasker, & Co., pipe- 






couplings, nipples, etc.. 


600 


46 


Mowry & Phillips, pig-lead 


437 


06 


Jarechi, Hayes, & Co., service- 






boxes, cocks, etc. 


893 


67 


Pettee & Whittle, cement 


37 


25 


Union Water-Meter Co., water- 






meters, stops, bands, etc. 


1,023 


66 


Manchester Locoraotive Works, 






babbitt-metal, labor, etc. 


101 


50 


Derry, Welcome, & Co., black- 






smithing .... 


51 


65 


R. D. Wood & Co., sleeves, 






pipe, valves, etc. 


3,815 


64 


A. H. Lowell, sleeves, bolts, 






castings, etc. 


159 


10 


Concord Railroad Corporation, 






freight .... 


626 


56 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


119 


57 


Sewers and drains, sewer-pipe 


2 


40 


Charles K. Walker, superin- 






tendent .... 


1,296 


87 


Arthur E. Stearns, clerk 


1,092 


00 


C. C. Cole, services as engineer 






at pumping-station 


600 


00 


J. Frank Wetlierbee, board of 






divers .... 


17 


25 


National Tube Works, pipe- 






couplings and expansion 






joints 


981 


85 


D. Milton Goodwin, blasting- 






tubes, bagging, etc. 


11 


61 


G. R. Vance & Co., lead, etc. 




84 


Boston Machine Co., screws . 


9 


00 



234 

Leonard & Ellis, machine-oil . 

E. A. Johnson & Co., coal and 
wood ..... 

Seaman & Daney, building barn 
at pumping-station 

J. Sticknej, rubber packing and 
cloth 

Sewell, Day, & Co., gasket 
packing .... 

J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 
and fuse .... 

W. E. Desper & Co., water- 
meters .... 

Saranel Brown, Jr., teaming 
pipe 

S. S. James & Bros., teams 

Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 

American Steam Gauge Co., 
repairing counter 

J. Hodge, lumber . 

Eichard T. Ritchie, rope 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, lan- 
terns, etc., .... 

P. W. Dearborn, lumber 

John Waters & Co., repairing 
pipe in river 

Walworth Manufacturing Co., 
stop-cocks, etc 

Mohawk Hudson Manufactur- 
ing Co., hub gates and valves 

J. Roper, plastering 

Fire King Engine Co., pump- 
ing water .... 9 60 



98 


50 


127 


25 


296 


34 


15 


30 


18 


10 


75 


20 


166 


00 


09 


18 


15 


50 


27 


99 


4 


50 


16 


24 


10 


60 


127 


25 


22 


36 


746 


09 


340 


00 


92 


23 


180 


00 


4 


25 



235 



Pattee & Perkins, hydrants 


844 00 


Nashua C. D. P. Works, pipe 




for gate-curbs 


13 77 


John G. Colt, evergreen trees 




at pum ping-station 


9 00 


J. S. Miller, shafts, etc. . 


6 00 


David Dickey, 2d . 


5 00 


"William Cole, labor 


5 50 


A. Wells, teaming . 


8 50 


W. T. Folsom, oil and wicks . 


4 93 


George Dunbar, labor 


75 


City of Lowell 


9 03 


J. J. Abbott, painting reservoir 




fence ..... 


177 33 


George H. Norman, laying pipe 




in 'Squog .... 


1,000 00 


P. C. Cheney & Co., wiping- 




waste 


25 10 


Hutchinson Bros., labor . 


25 60 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 




pany, bolts .... 


2 90 


Wm. H. Floyd, work in water- 




pipe in river 


54 75 


A. D. Gooden, damage to lead 




pipe 


2 25 


Manchester Print- Works, , lay- 




ing water-pipe under the 




canal 


550 00 


J. M. Brown, labor 


5 00 


David T. Burleigh, labor 


8 00 


Webster, Murchie, & Cunning- 




ham, sharpening drills 


5 50 


Drake & Carpenter, cement . 


29 00 


N. Houle, tinning cupola on 




barn at pumping-station 


8 10 



236 



Gilman Clough, labor 
H. S. Whitney, drain-pipe 
A. P. Frye, spikes, bolts, etc 
John Barnes, bolts, etc. . 
C. H. Robie, concreting . 
A. M. Eastman, oil, etc. 
Manchester Mills, lumber 
City of Manchester, drain- pipe 
John B. Clarke, printing 
C. F. Livingston, printing 
Wm. E. Moore, printing 
Challis & Gilmore, printing 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing 
Temple & Farrington, blank- 
books, stationery, etc. 
Frank Talbot, labor 
John Talbot, labor 
Thomas P. Frost, labor . 
Michael Healey, labor 
Warren M. Kelley, labor 
Conway's men for labor, as per 

pay-rolls 
for interest transferred . 
Balance to new account 



19 25 
2 55 



20 
37 
99 

08 



5 
5 

7 
7 

20 00 
109 74 

22 50 

■ 23 70 

7 50 

20 00 

46 75 

27 72 

39 38 

69 38 

138 25 

646 60 

156 00 

3,354 88 

24,000 00 

6,191 28 



$51,967 32 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

To Thos. D. Luce, costs and fines 

police court .... $557 43 
D. A. Simons, costs and fines 

police court .... 171 61 



Dr. 



237 



Wm. B. Patten, costs and lines 

police court .... 
Chas. G. Emmons, costs and fines 

police court . . . ' . 
C. C. Keniston, costs and fines 

police court .... 
John C. Bickford, costs and fines 

police court .... 
appropriation .... 
reserved fund, am't transferred 
Balance (overdrawn) . 



Paid N. P. Hunt, justice 
J. C. Bickford, clerk 
Chas. G. Emmons, clerk 
Wm. B. Patten, marshal 
0. C. Keniston, marshal 
II. W. Longa, assist, marshal 
David Perkins, captain of the 

night watch 
Eben Carr, captain of the night 

watch 
J. F. Cassidy, night watcli 
Wm. H. Newhall, night watch 
James Bucklin, night watch 
Michael Marr, night watch 
Thomas Frain, night watch 
Z. B. Wright, night watch 
Michael Fox, night watch 
James F. Dunn, night watch 
H. P. Marshall, night watch 
Henry Harmon, night watch 
James E. Bailey, night watch 



1,024 


50 




600 


83 




3,665 


36 




684 


64 




14,000 


00 




662 


32 




1,046 


05 






<|ft99 A1 9 TA 




^ 


Cr. 


$1,125 


00 




155 


00 




70 


00 




26 


93 




797 


18 




802 


10 





240 00 

913 13 

848 82 
881 43 

843 19 

1.050 74 

1.051 30 
854 45 
829 68 

844 33 
881 57 
915 19 

22 50 



238 

Chas, B. Clarkson, night watcli 8-17 1-1 
Hiram Stearns, night watch . 852 19 
Alfred Vincelette, night watch 787 52 
Melvin J. Jenkins, night watch 813 91 
James Duify, night watch . 851 61 
Edgar Farrar, night watch . 612 57 
John C. Colburn, day police '. 831 37 
Ransom W. Bean, day police . 831 37 
A. Story, police services . 1 13 
S. F, Benway, police services . 2 25 
Chas. H. Reed, police services 586 69 
Henry Bennett, police s'ervices 96 75 
James E. Bailey, police services 101 25 
S. L. Mitchell, police services . 37 12 
Wm. J. Desilets, police services 91 25 
H. H. Noyes, police services , 92 67 
John A. Barker, police services 2 25 
J. J. Whittemore, police ser- 
vices 21 69 

J. J. Whittemore, police ser- 
vices ..... 
A. J. Mayhew, police services . 
E. G. Garmon, police services . 
Henry 0. Hill, police services . 
T. P. Heath, police services . 
Michael Riley, police services . 
Patrick H. Riley, police services 
Edward Wyman, police services 
Thomas Lynch, police services 
John Underhill, police services 9 00 
Marshall F. Corson, police ser- 
vices 4 50 

Solon Robinson, police services 6 75 

David Thayer, truant-officer . 337 50 



4 


50 


.0 


69 


5 


63 


1 


69 


.2 


94 


1 


69 


4 


60 


1 


12 


1 


13 



239 



Brigham & Pratt, crackers . 36 28 

W. U. Telegraph Co., telegraph- 
ing 38 52 

A. & P. Telegraph Co., tele- 
graphing .... 1 86 

Clement & Barry, washing 

blankets .... 17 10 

H. D. Corliss, meals for prison- 
ers 28 00 

John A. Barker, meals for pris- 
oners 48 10 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing 15 00 

John B. Clarke, printing . 222 37 

Challis & Gilmore, printing . 12 00 

Ilenrj H. Everett, printing . 9 25 

Temple <fe Farrington, blank- 
books, justice and sheriff, etc. 6 22 

Thomas W. Lane, stationery . 8 47 

Thomas D. Luce, professional 

services . . . . 29 09 

Wm. R. Patten, professional 

services . . . . 24 00 

J. P. Bartlett, professional ser- 
vices ..... 6 00 

J. L. Smith, professional ser- 
vices ..... 4 00 

W. &, G. A. Little, professional 

services . . . . 8 00 

H. W. Tewksbury, professional 

services . . . . 46 00 

C. A. O'Connor, professional 

services . . . . 10 00 

H. E. Burnham, professional 

services . . . . . 10 00 



240 

Clark, Bartlett, & Mills, profes- 
sional services ... 2 00 

Lewis W. Clark, professional 

services .... 2 00 

Isaac L. Heath, professional 

services .... 4 00 

A. C. Osgood, professional ser- 
vices ..... 4 00 

N. H. Wilson, professional ser- 
vices ..... 4 00 

L. Melville French, professional 

services .... 50 00 

E. G. Haynes, whitewashing 
lobby ..... 

Z. F. Campbell, soap 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 

S. S. James & Bro., team 

Fogg & James, team 

L. B. Bodwcll & Co., coal 

T. A. Lane, plumbing 

J. S. Masseck, awning-stripes . 

P. C. Cheney & Co., waste 

B. F. Fogg, plumbing 
Daniels & Co., oil . 
Daniels & Merrill, hooks 
Chas. H. Wood, lettering slate 
David Libbey, repairing chairs 
Tebbetts Bros.,'soap 



13 


50 • 


1 


00 


570 


63 


4 


00 


23 


50 


\H 


51 


4 


15 


7 


32 


2 


60 


4 


00 


20 


25 




30 




75 


1 


60 




50 




$22,412 



74 



241 

PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $24,000 00 
balance overdrawn in July, 1874 19,100 00 

$43,100 00 

Cr. 
Paid city bonds of 1857 . . 122,500 00 

Suncook Valley Railroad bonds 1,500 00 
by balance from old account 

overdrawn in July, 1874 . 19,100 00 

,100 00 



STATE TAX. 
To appropriation .... $39,724 00 

Paid state treasurer, per treasurer's 

receipt . . . .$39,724 00 



COUNTY TAX. 

To appropriation .... $22,639 68 

Paid county treasurer, per collect- 
or's receipt . . . $22,639 68 



Dr. 

Cr. 



Dr. 

Cr. 



242 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . . $2,300 00 
Manchester National Bank' . 10,000 00 
H. R. Chamberlin . . . 2,000 00 

114,300 00 

Cr. 

By balance to new account . . $14,300 00 

$14,300 00 



REDUCTION OF CITY DEBT. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $24,000 00 
balance overdrawn, in July, 1874 19,100 00 

$43,100 00 

Cr. 

By balance from old account over- 
drawn in July, 1874 . . $19,100 00 
Suncook Valley Railroad loan . 1,500 00 
city bonds .... 22,500 00 

$43,100 00 



INTEREST. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... $33,000 00 

water-works transferred . . 24,000 00 

balance from old account . 374 50 

Balance (overdrawn) . . 2,012 50 



$59,387 00 



243 



Or. 



Paid Louisa Wilson 
Lois A. Lee . 
Florence M. Cogswell 
Amoskeag National Bank 
Manchester National Bank 
coupons on city bonds 
coupons on water bonds . 



130 00 

24 00 

210 00 

61 00 

305 00 

23,069 00 

35,688 00 



$59,387 00 



SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOL-HOUSES AND LOTS. 







Db. 


To balance from old account . 


. $350 14 




appropriation . 


. 1,000 00 


$1,350 14 






» 




Cr. 


Paid Henry C. Dickey, labor . 


27 00 




Charles Tucker, labor 


6 25 




M. O'Neil, labor . 


6 25 




C. Webster, labor . 


38 49 




True Sprout, labor . 


2 50 




Dexter Wilson, labor 


1 25 




E. Johnson, labor . 


6 00 




W. W. Baker, labor 


2 00 




J. H. Goodwin, labor 


8 43 




Amos Morse, labor 


8 43 




Chas. H. Robie, concreting 


417 40 




John Dowiney, labor 


4 68 




Pat. Pitts, labor . 


7 18 




H. E. Ryder, labor 


4 68 




Richard Lawrence, team 


15 75 





244 



Amoskeag M'f g Co., land 


333 00 


Ira P. Fellows, team 


27 50 


Harry Bailey, labor 


5 00 


H. H. Noyes, labor 


4 50 


Charles Ordway, labor . 


2 00 


William Ritchie, labor . 


2 75 


District No. 10 


4 87 


Lamson & Harden, stone posts 


26 00 


George H. Dudley, carpentei 




work .... 


28 96 


J. L. Smith & Son, flowers 


25 00 


Balance to new account 


334 27 







,350 14 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 



To appropriation . . . *. |2,000 00 
Balance (overdrawn) . . . 102 58 



Paid Geo. H. Dudley, lumber and 
labor 

Geo. M. Ford, lumber and labor 

Bennett & Lord, mason work . 

Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 

R. Laing, labor aud trucking . 

G. R. Vance & Co., iron pipe, 
etc 

D. M. Goodwin, Barstow fur- 
nace and labor . 

J. Hodge, lumber . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 



Dr. 







$2,102 58 
Cr. 


333 


93 




■ 18 


35 




22 


75 




74 


76 




6 


00 





59 30 

231 85 

5 01 

99 30 



245 



Win. Ritchie, mason work 


38 


29 




Nutt Bros., mason work 


154 


88 




Austin, Johnson, & Co., lumbe 


r 29 


68 




Young & Corning, mason work 25 


50 




John C. Young, slating . 


39 


17 




B. K. Hoy t, painting 


23 


79 




J. J. Abbott, painting 


65 


53 




C. R. Collej, painting 


26 


04 




printing and advertising trans 


- 






ferred .... 


200 


00 




incidental repairs . 


448 


45 




books and stationery 


200 


00 


$2,102 58 








teachers' salaries. 












Dr. 


.To appropriation . 


.138,000 00 




overdraft .... 


i 


50 




Balance (overdrawn) . 


111 


06 








jjB??« 118 f;« 






— <f 


/ty^-j-j.*^ fj\j 








Cr. 


Paid A. W. Bacheier . 


. 1,920 


00 




H. W. Lull . 


980 


00 




Lucretia E. Manahan 


780 


00 




Emma J. Ela . 


490 


00 




Mary A. Buzzell 




490 


00 




Maria F. Kidder . 




490 


00 




J. T. Cressey . 




800 


00 




Emma H. Perley • . 




440 


00 




Daniel A. Clifford 


/ . 


1,440 


00 




Annette McDoel 




473 


75 




Lottie R. Adams 




355 


00 




Carrie E. Reid 




440 


00 





246 



B. F. Dame . 


. 1,377 60 


Julia A. Baker 


490 00 


Mary J. Fife . 


423 13 


Belle R. Daniels 


440 00 


Wm. E..Buck. 


450 00 


Anstrice G. Flanders 


490 00 


llocilla M. Tuson . 


440 00 


Martha J. Boyd 


402 81 


E. P. Sherburne 


. 1,295 00 


Mary L. Sleeper 


416 36 


Sarah J. Greene 


440 00 


Medora Weeks 


105 00 


Wm. M. Stevens 


. 1,000 00 


Mary A. Lear 


419 75 


Fredrica S. Mitchell 


376 25 


Etta J. Carley 


425 00 


Nellie I. Sanderson 


440 00 


Mary A. Smith 


425 00 


Hattie S. Tozer 


440 00 


Anna J. Dana 


417 60 


Mary F. Barnes 


383 75 


Hattie G. Flanders 


440 00 


C. Augusta Abbott . 


440 00 


Cleora E. Bailey . 


440 00 


Lizzie P. Gove 


440 00 


Florence McEvoy . 


350 00 


Clara N. Brown 


428 75 


Georgianna Dow 


440 00 


Helen M. Morrill . 


440 00 


Annie M. OfFutt . 


440 00 


Abbie E. Abbott . 


440 00 


Emma F. Beane 


376 25 


Elvira S. Prior 


440 00 


Julia A, Dearborn . 


350 00 



247 



Nellie Pearson 


. 




440 00 


Maria N, Bower 




360 00 


B. Jennie Campbell 




270 00 


Martha W. Hubbard 




440 00 


Annie H. Abbott . 




288 75 


Nellie M. Whitney 






440 00 


Jennie F. Bailey- 






400 00 


Nellie E. Tappan 






222 50 


Alice G. Lord • 






440 00 


Jennie G. Stebbins 






350 00 


Sarah D. Lord 






440 00 


Augusta S. Downs . 






410 00 


Nellie M. Gate 






440 00 


Addie M. Chase 






490 00 


S. Izetta Locke 






440 00 


Georgie A. Nute 






418 75 


Flora L. Haines 






366 25 


Olive J. Randall 






400 00 


Maria H. Hildreth 






75 00 


Nellie L. Marsh 






190 00 


Lana S. George 






400 00 


Nancy S. Bunton . 






580 00 


Mintie C. Edgerly 






440 00 


Martha N. Mason . 






490 00 


Anna C. Heath 






440 00 


Ella F. Barker 






105 00 


Ella F. Sanborn . 






68 25 


Samuel P. Jackson 






50 00 


Emma C. Gee 






290 00 


Mrs. A. M. Heath 






13 50 


Nellie McKean 






45 00 


0. E. Averill . 






37 50 


Emma J. Henry 






195 00 


Etta C. McLaren 






9 75 



248 



Mary F. Dana 


26 25 


Ella F. Salisbury . 


305 00 


Carrie E. Gilmore . 


88 75 


Nellie B. Putnam . . . 


7 50 


Flora M. Senter 


60 00 


Cora M. Dearborn . 


120 00 


Herbert S. Clough . 


160 00 


J. J. Kimball 


1,200 00 


Jessie B. Farmer . 


20 00 







,118 56 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



To appropriation . . . . $600 00 
Balance (overdrawn) . . 27 28 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas $80 75 
District No. 2, labor . . 7 12 
J. Hartigan .... 1 50 
Manchester Water-works, water 179 55 
J. M. Chandler & Co., cop- 
peras, etc 2 70 

I. S. Whitney, rent of pianos . 135 00 
Wm. E. Buck, telegrams, etc., 9 96 
J. M. Sanborn, tuning pianos . 28 50 
M. V. B. Kinne & Co., horse- 
hire 7 15 

S. S. James & Bros., horse-hire 2 25 

Samuel Jackson, horse-hire . 29 50 

M. P. Hall, envelopes . . 1 85 

S.F.Burnham& Co., horse-hire 2 00 



Dr. 

)27 28 
Cr. 



249 

E. S, Ritchie & Sons, chemi- 
cals, etc 15 00 

J. G. Jones, moving settees . 75 

J. A. Caverly, moving settees 1 60. 

N. S. Clark, ribbon for diplomas 6 00 

J. W. Rand, cleaning vaults . 55 00 

S. B. Stearns, filling out diplo- 
mas 3 00 

H. F. Morse, filling out diplo- 
mas 16 70 

Flora B. Smith, cleaning school- 
house ..... 1 00 

Etta J. Carley, cleaning school- 
house 4 50 

F. N. Young, cleaning vault . 1 50 
Piper & Hawley, dry-goods case 40 
N. H. Wilson, team . . 12 50 
N. E. Morrill, team . . 20 00 
J6hn P. Newell, team, . . 1 50 



- $627 28 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



To balance from old account . 
appropriation . 
Higgins Bros, (overdraft) 



Paid Daniels & Co., call-bells, dust- 
ers, and pointers 
J. Stickney, green cloth, etc. . 
Daniels & Merrill, brushes, etc. 
Higgins Bros., dusters and 

floor-mats .... 40 75 



Dr. 



$90 98 

500 00 

16 05 


$607 03 
Cr. 


$20 70 

17 50 

5 55 



250 



J. L. Haminett, charts, etc. 
Sullivan Bros., tin dippers, re 

pairing stove, etc. 
Palmenter & Walker, crayons 
F. B. Eaton, ink . 
George L. Chandler, crayons 
Thomas W. Lane, ink-wells 

ink, etc. 
David Libbey, brooms 
Canney & Wiley, chemicals 
Temple & Farrington, numeral 

frames, call-bells, etc. . 
E. S. Ritchie & Sons, lantern 

spectroscope, etc. 
J. M. Chandler, & Co., baskets 

etc 

W. H. Yickery, repairing hose 

and key 
D. M. Goodwin, wire screen 
Sullivan & Decatur, stove 

blacking 
Charles A. Smith, feather-dust 

ers .... 

Balance to new account 



40 59 



5 


80 


7 


00 


4 


80 


5 


10 


54 


34 


6 


00 


40 


07 


23 


85 


99 


23 


7 


16 




75 


3 


87 



1 50 

19 43 
203 04 



$607 03 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To^balance from old account . 

appropriation .... 
repairs of school-houses, transfer 
Balance (overdrawn) . 


$1 47 
500 00 
200 00 

42 62 



Dr. 



1744 09 



251 



Paid Temple & Farrington, books, 



Cr. 



etc 


•1374 71 


T. W. Lane, books, etc. . 


283 85 


P. B. Eaton, school-books, etc. 


17 53 


L. Prang & Co., manuals, etc. 


56 40 


Tewksbury Bros., writing-paper 


6 10 


George C. Hoitt, binding books 


5 50 


PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 


To balance from old account . 


1168 86 


appropriation .... 


200 00 


repairs of school-houses trans- 




ferred .... 


200 00 


Balance (overdrawn) . 


36 38 



Paid Hunt, Challis, & Gilmore 
George W. Hewes . 
John B. Clarke 
Campbell & Hanscom 
Henry H. Everett . 
C. F. Livingston 
Thomas H. Tuson . 
William E.Moore . 



$1 00 


3 


00 


200 


56 


158 


18 


33 


00 


103 


75 


15 


25 


90 


50 



$744 09 



Dr. 



$605 24 
Cr. 



$605 24 



FUEL. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation 



$384 00 
4,500 00 



Dr. 



^4,884 00 



252 



Or. 



Paid W. W. Hubbard, wood . 


115 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 




wood .... 


2,110 53 


A. Dinsinore, wood 


776 46 


Sherburne D. Smith, wood 


489 43 


E. P. Johnson, charcoal . 


2 70 


D. K. Mack, wood . 


6 00 


Wm. P. Merrill, wood . 


2 25 


J. D. Emery, wood 


3 50 


B. W. Hill, wood . 


7 00 


J. T. Wyman, wood 


19 50 


J. W. Preston, splitting wood 


2 00 


V. W. Fairbanks, sawing woo( 


I 50 


G. W. Hunkins, sawing wooc 


I 1 00 


J. M. Watson, sawing wood 


2 08 


Geo. E. Moores, sawing wood 


2 00 


W. H. Annan, superintending 




weighing of coal . 


16 50 


Balance to new account 


1,427 55 







14,884 00 



INCIDENTAL REPAIRS. 

To appropriation .... 600 00 
repairs of school-houses trans- 
ferred 448 45 

reserved fund transferred . . 280 15 



Paid J. Q. A. Sargent, plumbing . 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 
Wm. P. Stratton & Son, plumb- 
ing 



$139 59 
64 91 

26 53 



Dr. 



11,328 60 
Cr. 



253 



W. K. Cochran, setting glass . 1 05 

Geo. H. Dudley, carpenter 

work ..... 
David Thayer, setting glass, etc. 
Pike <fe Heald, hardware 
Dunlap & Baker, repairing 

clocks .... 

John N. Baker, repairing clocks . 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 
B. Frank Fogg, plumbing 
J. F. Ford, carpenter work 
Geo. Holbrook, carpenter work 
J. J. Abbott, setting glass . 3 88 

Sullivan Bros., repairing stove 1 50 

N. B. Tilton, repairing plaster- 



319 


79 


41 


82 


75 


09 


20 


50 


2 


50 


7 


18 


6 


00 


19 


72 


13 


50 



ing 


1 00 


L. L. Aldrich, repairing clocks 


2 75 


0. B. Elliott, repairing clocks . 


1 25 


J. C. Young, slating 


4 10 


G. B. Fogg, repairing locks 


3 98 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


75 


Geo. E. Moores, sawing wood . 


3 75 


Joel Daniels, setting glass 


11 68 


D. M. Goodwin, stove and re- 




pairing funnel 


99 52 


J. A. Swasey, blackboards 


154 09 


G. R. Vance, repairing funnc' 


1 00 


Z. B. Stuart . . . . 


5 37 


J. L. Kelly, varnish and laboi 


56 55 


Higgins Bros., water-pot, etc. 


11 42 


David Libbey, reseating chair . 


3 00 


W. H. Vickery, keys 


60 


Willie Hall, setting glass 


50 


Balance to new account 


223 73 



$1,328 60 



254 

CARE OF ROOMS. 

To balance from old account . . il2 06 

appropriation , . . . 2,200 00 

Balance (overdrawn) . . 109 62 



Paid Geo. W. Hunkins, janitor . 193 32 

V. W. Fairbanks, janitor . 663 48 

James W. Preston, janitor . 268 03 

John A. Carr, janitor . . 658 90 

Geo. E. Moores, janitor . . 400 04 

Eufus Lamb, janitor . . 117 00 
Chas. P. Ordway, care of Bak- 

ersville school-house . . 61 00 
Olive J. Randall, care of room 

in District No. 6 . . . 16 84 
Wm. J. McGuinness, care of 

Hallsville school-room . 16 00 
Nellie M. Gate, care of school- 
room in Stark District . 16 87 
Elvina Wooderson, care of 

rooms in Amoskeag school . 39 00 
Chas. Brown, care of rooms in 

District No. 4 . . . 4 30 

Willie W. Brown ... 6 54 

Alice Wooderson . . . 26 00 
N. L. Marsh, care of rooms in 

Youngsville District . . 9 00 
Harry H. Glough, janitor in 

District No. 5 . . . 9 00 

John A. Goss, janitor . . 62 16 
M. .H. Hildreth, care of rooms 

in Hallsville District . . 10 00 



Dr. 



$2,321 68 
Cr. 



255 



Orville Tulip, janitor in District 
No. 4 . . . . 

Milton C. Page, janitor in Mos- 
quito-Pond District 

George M. Norris, janitor 

Flora E. Blodgett, janitor in 
District No. 5 

J. Hartigan . 

Geo. B. Wells 

William Dunn 

Nellie M. Gate, care of rooms 
in District No. 1 . 

Dora M. Dickey, care of rooms 
in District No. 5 . 



6 00 



6 00 
10 65 

6 00 

3 63 

6 64 

13 75 



6 58 
5 00 



TUITION. 




Dr. 


To Wm. E. Buck, tuition-fees 


$291 41 


$291 41 










Cr. 


By balance from old account 


$100 00 




Paid J. L. Hammett, skeleton 


45 00 




J. W. SimondSj centennial ser- 






vices 


8 00 




Balance to new account 


138 41 








$291 41 






EVENING SCHOOLS 




Dr. 


To balance from old account . 


$774 96 




appropriation .... 


300 00 


561 (VIA QC 



256 



Cr. 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., 
James Preston, janitor . 
Geo. E. Moores, janitor . 
M. S. Hunt, printing 
John B. Clarke, printing 
John B. Mills, teaching . 
Thos. D. Luce, teaching . 
John W. Perkins, teaching 
M. Eugenia Lord, teaching 
Medora Weeks, teaching 
Annie Nichols, teaching 
Emma Henry, teaching . 
Carrie Gilmore, teaching 
Bertha Dean, teaching . 
Minnie Campbell, teaching 
Minnie Abbott, teaching 
Florence Stone, teaching 
Mary Mitchell, teaching . 
Balance to new account 



gas 



s $46 75 


31 


12 


13 


50 


4 


00 


19 


59 


173 


20 


87 


30 


45 


60 


99 


00 


53 


10 


29 


30 


35 10 


42 


85 


48 


60 


41 


40 


46 


80 


48 


50 


47 


70 


161 


55 



11,074 96 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
abatement refunded . 
Balance (overdrawn) 



Paid Michael Spane, poor, 1871 
Michael Spane, poor, 1872 
Geo. B. McLane, pays in New 
Boston, 1873 



Dr. 



$305 17 




600 


00 




35 


71 




18,379 


96 * 
- $19,320 84 






Cr. 


3 


12 




2 


24 





2 50 



257 



Sylvester C. Fitch, poor and 




dead 


2 46 


Geo. B. McLane, pays in New 




Boston, 1875 


2, 22 


Sylvester C. Fitch, poor, 1875 


2 22 


Adolph Partland, taxed wrong, 




1874 


2 14 


John Carter, paid in California, 




1874 


2 46 


John S. Elliot, taxed wrong. 




1874 


4 42 


John Calef, for watering-trough. 




1874 


9 00 


Rufus W. Lamprey, no stock 




in trade, 1875 


2 22 


Jediah Galacar, over-valuation, 




1875 


8 88 


Franklin-Street Society, 1875 . 


24 42 


Ellen Kerrin, over-valuation, 




1875 . . 


2 08 


Exavior St. Onge, cripple and 




poor, 1875 . . ' . 


2 22 


Nehemiah Preston, over 70, 




1875 


2 22 


Varnum Ela, pays in Hooksett, 




1875 


2 22 


Jos. N. Prescott, over 70, 1875 


2 22 


Frank D. Hanscom, no stock 




in trade, 1875 


11 10 


Frederick F. Osgood, pays in 




Auburn, 1876 


1 62 


Samuel Hill, duplicate, 1876 . 


1 62 


Ezra Tilton, minor, 1876 


1 62 


17 





258 

Elwin P. Hebard, pays in Bos- 
ton, 1876 .... 

Frank H. Johnson, pays in 
Derry, 1876 

Patrick Dowd, disabled soldier, 
1876 

Geo. E. Osgood, pays in Weare, 
1876 

Thos. Johnson, duplicate, 1876 

Frank Donnelly, duplicate, 1876 

John Douglass, minor, 1876 . 

James Orrill, over 70, 1876 . 

Osgood Garland, pays in Hook- 
sett, 1876 .... 

Yarnnm Ela, pays in Hooksett, 
1876 

Clarence C. Ela, pays in Hook- 
sett, 1876 .... 

Lorenzo P. Leslie, pays in Hook- 
sett, 1876 .... 

Chas. W. Piper, no dog, 1^76 . 

Fred L. Lewis, minor, 1876 . 

Wilbur H. Huntress, disabled 

soldier, 1876 ... 1 62 

Lysander W. Wilkins, no dog, 
1876 

Geo. Evans, pays in Derry, 1876 

Hugh R, Barnard, pays in Bed- 
ford, 1876 .... 

Chas. R. Cronn, pays in San- 
bornton, 1876 

Nehemiah Preston, over 70, 

1876 

Alfred Edmunds, 1876 . 



1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


00 


1 


62 



2 


00 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 



259 

Arthur Gleason, 1876 . . 162 

Geo. Lovejoy, 1876 . . 1 62 

Joseph Everett, 1876 . . 1 62 

Wm. Forsaith, name duplicated, 

1876 1 62 

Edward C. Bowers, pays in 

Goffstown, 1876 ... 1 62 

Geo. B. Miner, dead, no assets, 

1876 1 62 

Sidney B. Hadley, dead, no 

assets, 1876 ... 1 62 

Edward F. Hills, dead, no as- 
sets, 1876 .... 1 62 
Harrison D. Lord, no dog, 1876 1 00 
Nathaniel P. Corliss, pays in 

Bedford, 1876 ... 1 62 

Daniel Gove, pays in Wears, 

1876 

Michael Lane, duplicate, 1876 
Chas. Bunton, duplicate, 1876 
owner unknown, taxed wrong, 

1876 

owner unknown, lot wrong, 

1876 

owner unknown, lot next south 

Whidden, 1876 . 
Julius Deschene, duplicate, 

1876 . ... 
Thomas J. Bond, not here in 

April, 1876 
Henry M. Vickery, not here in 

April, 1876 ... 

George G. Blake, no horse, 

1876 



1 


62 


1 


62 


2 


62 


1 


30 


3 


24 


2 


45 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 



260 

John E. Williamson, duplicate, 
1876 

John Hoburn, pays in Hooksett, 
1876 

Edwin C. Merrill, pays in Goifs- 
town, 1876 .... 

Franklin-Street Society, taxed 
wrong, 1876 

Exavior St. Onge, cripple and 
poor, 1876 .... 

Frank Hale, pays in Merri- 
mack, 1876 

Frank 0. Clement, pays in An- 
trim, 1876 .... 

Thomas Brown, pays in Weare, 
1876 

Joseph Murry, duplicate, 1876 

Evan H. Sleeper,duplicate,1876 

Thomas Deary, dead, 1876 

Wm. E. Moore, over- valuation, 

1876 9 72 

Waite Bros., over- valuation, 
• 1876 8 10 

Geo. E. Norris, duplicate, 1876 1 62 

George Flether, no horse here, 

1876 1 62 

Lawrence Ela, pays in Hook- 
sett, 1876 . . . . ' 1 62 

Frank Clay, minor, 1876 . 1 62 

John Shea, 139 Chestnut Street, 

no dog, 1876 ... 1 00 

Peter Donnelly, 43 Spruce 

Street, minor ... 1 62 

James Bohan, no dog, 1876 . 1 00 



1 


62 


3 


08 


1 


62 


19 


44 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 



261 ' 

George Libby, pays in Notting- 
ham, 1876 .... 1 62 

James A. Harney, over-valua- 
tion, 1876 .... 3 24 

John S. Elliot, taxed wrong, 
1876 

Paul Graff, taxed wrong, 1876 

Edward G. Dodge, paid in 
Weare, 1876 

Eugene Schlosser, minor, 1876 

John Thomas, minor, 1876 

Frank Peblerin, poor, 1876 

Charles F. Harvell, not liable, 
1876 

James Reed, duplicate, 1876 . 

Frederick Nelson, minor, 1876 

Frank H. Hitchcock, disabled 
soldier, 1876 

Thomas Kelty, poor, 1876 

John Manahan, duplicate, 1876 

Curtis K. Kendall, no horse, 

1876 

, Edgar R. Kimball, minor,1876 

E. R. Burbank, duplicate, 1876 

Jeremiah Connor, disabled sol- 
dier, 1876 . •. . . 1 62 

George C. Chase, duplicate, 

1876 1 62 

George Connor, duplicate,1876 1 62 

Mary Holt, 1876 ... 8 10 

Sylvester C. Fitch, poor and 

dead, 1876 .... 1 62 

George B. McLane, pays in 
New Boston, 1876 . . 1 62 



L4 


58 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


"62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 




65 


1 


62 


1 


62 



262 

George Fabens, no horse and 
dog, 1876 . . 

Charles Neale, duplicate, 1876 

James W. Kimball, pays in 
Hooksett, 1876 . 

Wm. S. James, over-valuation, 
1876 

Joseph E. Bennett, over-valua- 
tion, 1876 . . . . 

Wm. H. B. Sloan, over-valua- 
tion, 1876 .... 

Ellen Bradley, poor, 1876 

Frank Sunberry, minor, 1876 

James Kerin, duplicate, 1876 . 

Owner unknown, taxed wrong, 
1876 

Heirs of Ebenezer H. Davis, 
over-valuation, 1875 . 

Henry J. Hick, pays in Lon- 
donderry, 1876 . 

George W. Harrington, minor, 
1876 

Hugh Lynch, minor, 1876 

Lawrence Connor, dead, 1876 

Harry Colby, duplicate, 1876 . 

John Kearns, 500 Elm Street, 
no dog, 1876 

Richard Keating, no dog, 1876 

John Kearns, minor, 1876 

Daniel Riley, over 70, 1876 . 

A. J. Young, pays in Auburn, 
1876 

Frank Morrill, pays in Hook- 
sett, 1876 .... 



1 


97 


1 


62 


1 


62 


16 


20 


3 


20 


8 


.10 




81 


1 


62 


1 


62 


2 


11 


24 42 


2 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 



263 

George Spencer, pays in Ban- 
gor, Me., 1876 ... 1 62 

Samuel Truesdale, dead, 1876 1 62 

Samuel Truesdale, no dog, 1876 1 00 

John A. Goss, no dog, 1876 . 1 00 

George A. Clark, minor, 1876 1 62 

Reuben Brown, over 70, 1876 . 1 62 

Isaac D. Palmer, pays in Bos- 
ton, 1876 .... 1 62 

Darwin M. Poore, no carriage, 

1876 1 62 

Emil Brown, minor, 1876 . 1 62 

Elegin Wright, minor, 1876 . 1 62 

Albert L. Hurd, pays in Croy- 
don, 1876 .... 1 62 

Heirs of Ebenezer H. Davis, 
over-valuation, 1876 . 

Alpheus D. Jenne, error, 1876 

Aimer D. Gooden, watering- 
trough, 1876 

Francis J. Moffitt, no dog,1876 

Curtice A. Willey, no dog, 1876 

'Nehemiah Preston, over 70, 

1876 

Bean & Higgins, over-valuation, 
1876 

Chester E. Demick, no money 
at interest, 1876 . 

John Kennedy, over 70, 1876 . 

Charles R. Bailey, no dog, 1876 

Joseph Orrill, over 70, 1876 . 

Nehemiah Preston, over 70, 
1876 

Wm. M. Webster, over 70, 1876 



19 


44 


8 


91 


3 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


62 


32 


40 


26 


86 


1 


58 


1 


00 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 



264 

James Ingalls, duplicate, 1876 
Timothy Murphy, one arm, 1876 
John Sanborn, no dog, 1 876 . 
Charles Mahew, no dogs, 1877 
John Mahoney, no dog, 1877 . 
Patrick Reardon,duplicate,1877 
John Brown, over 70, 1877 • . 
Robert Chatham, error, 1877 . 
Thomas Stewart, no dog, 1877 
Patrick Flynn, minor, 1877 . 
H. M. Tarbell, error, 1877 
Henry J. Clark, no dog, 1877 
Joseph Bailey, disabled soldier, 

1877 

Henry S. McAllister, no dog, 

1877 

Alfred Quimby, over-valuation, 

1877 

Jehill W. Holton,over 70,1877 
Sherman L. Flanders, pays in 

Goffstown, 1877 . 
Carlos C. Babbitt, only one 

horse, 1877 
Alanson P. Marshall, no horse, 

1877 

James Cleworth, sick and poor, 

1877 

John Callahan, over 70, 1877 . 
Charles E. Balch, error, 1877 . 
Daniel L. Stevens, only one 

carriage, 1877 . 
George Springer, minor, 1877 
P. A. Devine, over-valuation, 

1877 7 90 



1 


58 


1 


68 


1 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


1 


68 


1 


68 


1 


68 


1 


00 


1 


68 


7 


90 


1 


00 


1 


68 


1 


00 


11 


86 


1 


68 


1 


68 


1 


58 


1 


26 


1 


68 


1 


58 


47 


40 




79 


1 


58 



265 



Charles A. Smith, over-valua- 




tion 


6 32 


0. Barton & Co., over-valua- 




tion 


86 90 


Wm. H. Perry, pays in Henni- 




ker, 187T . . . . 


1 58 


Wm. Northrop, pays in Massa- 




chusetts, 1877 . 


1 58 


C. B. Littlefield, only one dog, 




1877 


1 00 


Frank S. Bodwell, only one 




horse, 1877 


1 58 


Horace Pettee, no horse, 1877 


1 58 


J. Wilson M. Hunt, over-valu- 




ation, 1877 .... 


1 58 


Calvin D. Carpenter, over-valu- 




ation, 1877 


3 16 


Holton & Sprague, over-valua- 




tion, 1877 .... 


35 71 


George W. Weeks, over-valua- 




tion, 1877 .... 


7 90 


Israel Dow, watering-trough, 




1877 


3 00 


John Calef, watering-trough, 




1877 


3 00 


Alfred Quimby, over-valuation, 




1877 


11 85 


Eugene Way, duplicate, 1877 . 


1 58 


Isaac H. Stacy, no dog, 1877 . 


1 00 


Ferdinand Reidel, over-valua- 




tion, 1877 .... 


1 58 


Alonzo Tarbell, over-valuation. 




1877 


79 


Fred C. Sanborn, pays in Bos- 




ton, 1877 .... 


1 58 



266 

Peter Donnelly, minor, 1877 . 1 58 

Bean & Higgins, over-valuation 
on land and buildings. Elm 
corner Bridge, 1877 . . 31 60 

Herbert Fisher, pays in Massa- 
chusetts, 1877 ... 1 58 , 

Edward Newman, over 70,1877 1 58 

Joseph W. Conant, over 70, 

1877 • 1 58 , 

Elijah Young, over 70, 1877 . 1 58 

Charles H. Marshall, over-val- 
uation, 1877 ... 15 80 

Wm. F. Hubbard, over-valua- 
tion, 1877 .... 1 00 

Charles R. Morrison, over-val- 
uation, 1877 ... 15 80 

Charles W. Cheney, 2d, over- 
valuation, 1877 ... 6 32 

Philip H. Pike, over-valuation, 

1877 7 90 

Hiram Turner, no dog, 1877 . 1 00 

Manchester Mills . . . 18,467 33 

119,320 84 



TAXES FOR 1877. 

Dr. 

To resident taxes assessed . |247,458 46 

non-resident taxes assessed 1,022 89 

1248,481 35 

Cr. 

By collections, abatements, and dis- 
counts ... $211,005 79 

balance outstanding . 37,475 56 

$248,481 35 



267 
OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

List for 1877, Seth T. Hill, collec- 
tor $37,475 56 

List for 1876, James Mitchell, col- 
lector .... 4,415 74 

List for 1875, John Hosley, collec- 
tor 6,106 60 

List for 1874, John Hosley, collec- 
tor 4,921 12 

List for 1873, Wm. G. Everett, col- 
lector .... 4,290 76 

List for 1872, Wm. G. Everett, col- 
lector .... 2,871 74 

List for 1871, H. R. Chamberlin, 

collector . . ' . . 6,287 95 

List for 1870, H. R. Cham'oerlin, 

collector .... 6,372 55 

$71,742 02 



268 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll-Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1838 . . 


S555,270 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


$300 


1839 . . 


604,963 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


300 


1840 . . 


946,200 


3,986 56 


772 


. 2 20 


300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13.764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 63 


2,688 


2 68 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


800 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


800 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


8,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


6 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


» 5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


• 234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


6,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1 77 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 



269 
City Debt. 



Bate of Notes. 



To Whom Payable. 



When Payable. 



Principal. 



Jan. 1 
July 9 
July 22 
July 1 
Jan. 1 
Oct. 31 
April 1 
July 1 
April 1 
Au.o;. 1 
An 



Aug. 1 

Aug. 1 

Aug. 1 

Aug. 1 

Aug 

Aug 

Aug. 1 

Aug 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 



1856 
1858 
1858 
1862 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1865 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1872 
1872 
1872 
1872 
1874 
1874 
1876 
1876 
1876 
1876 
1876 



City Bonds, 
Nehemiah Hunt, 

u a 

City Bonds, 



Water Bonds, 



Sewer Bonds, 



Jan. 1 
July 9 
July 22 
July 1 
Jan. 1 
ISTov. 1 
April 1 
July 1 
April 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug 
Aug 
Aug 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 



1880 
1878 
1878 
1882 
1888 
1893 
1884 
1894 
1885 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1890 
1895 
1878 
1880 
1881 
1883 
1885 



S10,000 00 

2,400 00 

1,100 00 

22,500 00 

35,000 00 

70,000 00 

70,000 00 

50,000 00 

10,000 00 

1,500 00 

10,000 00 

1,500 00 

10,000 00 

1,500 00 

5,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

1,500 00 

8,500 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

100.000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

8,000 00 

8,000 00 

8,000 00 

8,000 00 

8,000 00 



270 

FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debtj Jan. 1, 

1877 .... $976,000 00 
Paid during the year . . . 24,000 00 

Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 1878 1952,000 00 

Amount of temporary loan, Jan. 1, 

1878 114,300 00 ' 

Interest due (estimated) . . 21,000 00 
Bills outstanding, Jan. 1, 1878 . 24,751 68 

,051 68 



Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1878 . $1,012,051 68 

Cash in treasury, Jan. 1, 1878 . |17,113 10 
Notes due the city . . . 1,957 65 

Interest on the same . . . 683 23 

119,753 98 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1878 . $992,297 70 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1877 . 939,627 43 



Increase of net indebtedness during 

the year .... $52,670 27 

Attest, NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



271 

CITY PROPERTY. 

City-Library building $29,000 00 

Permanent inclosure of commons . . 19,200 00 

City Hall and lot 60,000 00 

City Farm and permanent improvements . 25,000 00 
Stock, tools, furniture, and provisions at City 

Farm 6,303 81 

Engines, hose, and apparatus . . . 58,368 25 

Engine-house, stable, and land. Vine Street . 33,000 00 

Hose-house and lot. Maple Street . . 2,300 00 

Hose-house and lot, Nashua Street . . 500 00 

Reservoirs 10,000 00- 

Hearse, houses, tombs, and new cemetery . 4,900 00 

Court-house and lot 50,000 00 

Common sewers 142,000 00 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall . 3,000 00 

Street lanterns, posts and pipes . . . 4,600 00 

Water-works 723,774 54 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets . 5,000 00 
Wardroom and lot, Manchester Street . . 3,000 00 
Wardroom and lot. Park Street ... 600 00 
Engine-house and lot, Ward Eight . . 2,300 00 
Water-pipe, wagons, and apparatus for water- 
ing streets 2,500 00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad . . 50,000 00 

Lot, Lowell Street 1,500 00 

Gravel lot, Belmont Street .... 1,200 00 

Ward Eight (one-half acre) . 50 00 

Bakersville (one acre) . . 100 00 

Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell . 20,000 00 

Valley Cemetery 6,000 00 

$1,264,196 60 



272 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



Blodget-Street school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
etc. .... 

Bridge-Street house and lot 
Old High school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
New High school-house . 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
books, and apparatus 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack-Street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Manchester-Street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-Street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Franklin-Street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-Street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Stark house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Goffe's-Falls house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Harvey's . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Clough's mill 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Hallsville house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 



. $3,000 00 




. 150 00 


13,150 00 




500 00 


. 6,500 00 




. 200 00 


6,700 00 


.45,000 00 




3* 

. 2,000 00 


47,000 00 


. 3,300 00 




. 125 00 


3,425 00 


. 15,000 00 




. 350 00 


15,350 00 


. 8,000 00 




. 300 00 


8,300 00 


. 8,000 00 




. 400 00 


8,400 00 


.18,000 00 




. 400 00 


18,400 00 


. 14,000 00 




. 400 00 


14,400 00 


. 3,000 00 




. 200 00 


3,200 00 


. 3,500 00 




75 00 


3,575 00 


. 3,600 00 




. 100 00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 00 




50 00 


2,550 00 


. 600 00 




50 00 


650 00 


. 3,500 00 




75 00 


3,575 00 



1 



273 



Massabesic house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito-Pond house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Centre-Street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-Street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-Street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
South house and lot, 'Squog . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Main-Street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Amount of school property 
Amount of city property 

Total property 

18 



. 1,400 


00 




40 


00 


1,440 00 


. 1,000 


00 




50 


00 


1,050 00 


. 5,000 


00 




. 125 


00 


5,125 00 


. 58,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


58,400 00 


. 50,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


50,400 00 


. 2,800 


00 




60 


00 


2,860 00 


. 3,700 


00 




. 125 


00 


3,825 00 


. 12,000 


00 




. 100 


00 


12,100 00 


, , 


$278,075 00 


• 


1,264,196 60 


$1,542,271 60 



274 
DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 

[The following account, having been accidentally omitted from its proper place, is 
inserted here.] 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $200 00 



1200 00 

Cr. 
Paid Post 3, G. A. R., by Levi L. 

Aldrich .... |200 00 

1200 00 



INDEX. 



Abatement of Taxes 256 

Account of City Treasurer 156 

Alarm Telegraph 123, 230 

Alarm Boxes and Keys 129 

Amoskeag-Falls Bridge 194 

Amoskeag Engine Co. jSTo. 1 135 

Amoskeag Hose Co 137 

Apparatus, Fire 119 

Attendance at School 114 

Awards for Lands taken for Highways 188 

Books and Stationery 250 

. Bridge, Amoskeag 194 

Bridge, Granite 198 

Buildings, Kepairs of. 219 

Care of Eooms 254 

Cemeteries, Keport of Committee on 61 

City Marshal, Eeport of 151 

Government, 1877 3 

Library 48, 218 

Hall and Offices 222 

Farm 13, 171 

Teams 174 

Treasurer's Accounts 156 

Property 271 

Debt 269 

Payment of 242 

Centennial Fourth of July, 1876 217 

Commons 197 

Concord-Square Fence 208 



276 

County Tax 241 

Contingent Expenses (School) 217, 248 

Condition of Eeservoirs and Cisterns 134 

Discount on Taxes 220 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 274 

Donations to City Library 54 

E. W. Harrington Engine Co. Ko. 3 135 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. JSTo. 1 137 

Engineers '^ 

Engineers' Department 138, 229 

Engineer's Eeport - 119 

Evening Schools 83, 255 

Farm, City 13, 171 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 123, 230 

Fire Apparatus 119 

Fire Department 8, 224 

Fence on Concord Square 208 

Fire-Alarm Boxes and Keysj Location of 129 

Fire King Engine Co. Ko. 2 135 

Fires, 1877 12G 

Furniture and Supplies (Schools) 249 

Fuel 251 

Goflfe's Falls Hose Co 137 

Government, City,, 1877 ■ 3 

Granite Bridge 193 

Grading for Concrete 197 

Highway District No. 1 177 

2 178 

3 181 

4 182 

5 182 

6 183 

7 183 

8 184 

9 184 

10 185 

11 18G 



277 

Highway District Ko. 12 186 

13 187 

Highways, New 187 

Awards for Lands Tal^en for , 188 

Hydrants 142 

Hydrant Service 231 

Incidental Expenses 199 

Kepairs (Schools) 252 

Interest 242 

Instructions to Key-Holders 131 

Land Sold from City Farm 198 

Land-Damage Awards 188 

Lighting Streets 192 

Library, City 48, 51, 218 

Donations to 54 

Trustees' Eeport 45 

* Librarian's Eeport 51 

Treasurer's Report 48 

Loan, Temporary , 242 

Location of Alarm-Boxes 129 

Hydrants 142 

Monument, Soldiers' 220 

Militia • 220 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department 229 

Macadamizing Streets 198 

Massabesic Hose Co. Ko, 2 137 

IN'ew Engine-House 217 

New Hose-House 232 

Names of Teachers 115 

N. S. Bean Engine Co. No. 4 136 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department 138 

Officers, City 367 

Outstanding Taxes 267 

Overseers of Poor, Report of. 17 

Payment of City Debt 242 

Paving Streets 190 

Paupers off Farm 163 



278 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 136 

Payment of Pucded Debt 241 

Pine-Grove Cemetery 63, 209 

Police Department 9, 236 

Printing and Advertising (Schools) 251 

Printing and Stationery 221 

Property, City 271 

• School 272 

Eules adopted by Board of Engineers 132 

Reduction of City Debt 242 

Eepairs of School-Houses 244 

Buildings 219 

Eeserved Pund 215 

Reservoirs 134, 196 

Report, Order to Print 32d Annual 2 

of Finance Committee 160 

Committee on City Farm ^13 

Chief Engineer 119 

City Marshal 152 

Public Schools for 1877 72 

Trustees of City Library 45 

Librarian 51 

Committee on Cemeteries 61 

Overseers of Poor 17 

School Committee 71 

Treasurer of City Library 48 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 21, 89 

Water Commissioners 19 

Sui^erintendent of Water- Works 19 

Salaries of Teachers 115, 245 

Officers 210 

School-Houses and Lots 243 

School Property 272 

Schools and Teachers 67, 115 

Evening 255 

Superintendent of. Report of 21 

Sewers and Drains 194 

Soldiers' Monument 220 

Streets, Lighting 192 

Macadamizin<r 198 



279 

Streets, Watering 189 

Paving 190 

State Tax 241 

Tax, County 241 

State 241 

Taxes, Abatement of. 256 

Discount on 220 

Outstanding 267 

Temporary Loan 242 

Telegraph, Tire- Alarm 123, 230 

Teams, City 174 

Teachers, ISTames of 115 

Salaries of 245 

Tuition 255 

A^aluation, Taxes, Etc 268 

Yalley Cemetery 61, 208 

Water-Works 232 

Watering Streets 189 

Water Commissioners' Report 19 

Widening and Straightening Pine Street 199 



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^^