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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



VfiA P>*^ * 






f 








ANNUAL REPORTS 



THE -STIE^R, 1878. 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1878. 

TOGETHER WITH 

OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY JOHN B. CLARKE 
1879. 



35^,07 

lft7S 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER, authorizing the printing of the Thirty-Third Annual 
Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are hereby, au- 
thorized to procure for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the 
printing of two thousand copies of. the Thirty-Third Annual Report 
of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, includ- 
ing the Reports of the Committee on Finance, the School Board, 
Water Commissioners and Superintendent of Water-Works, Engi- 
neers of the Fire Department, City Marshal, Overseers of the Poor, 
Trustees, Librarian and Treasurer of the City Library, Committee 
on Cemeteries, and Committee on City Farm, and that the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for Printing and Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. December 12, 1878. 
TIMOTHY W. CHALLIS, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. December 12, 1878. 

Passed in concurrence. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT 

1878. 



MAYOR. 

JOHN L. KELLY. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Timothy W. Challis. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Henry R. Chamberlin. 



4 

COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 

Seth T. Hill. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

John A. Barker. 

CITY SOLICITOR. 

William R. Patten. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — Rufus Wilkinson. 
Ward 2. — John E. Stearns. 

Ward 3. — James B. Straw. 
Ward 4. — John M. Stanton. 

Ward 5. — Hugh McDonough. 

Ward 6. — Thomas L. Thorpe. 

Ward 7. — John W. Dickey. 
Ward 8. — Horatio Fradd. 



members of common council. 

Ward 1. Ward 2. 

Albert Maxfield. George W. Riddle. 

Charles E. Ham. Chauncey B. Littlefield. 

Richard A. Lawrence. Wilberforce Ireland. 



Waed 3. 

William G. Hoyt. 
Frank L. Gray. 
John F. Seaward. 

Ward 4. 

John W. Whittle. 
Carl C. Shepard. 
Henry French. , 

Ward 5. 

John Tworney. 
William Starr. 
Lyman Batchelder. 



Ward 6. 
Aimer D. Gooden. 



George W 



David M. 



Dearborn. 
Goodwin. 



Ward 7. 

Timothy W.' Challis. 
Greeley W. Hastings. 
William H. Annis. 

Ward 8. 

Henry C. Tabor. 
Hubbard H. Huntress. 
Emery P. Littlefield. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Straw; Messrs. 
Riddle, Hoyt, and Hastings. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Thorpe and Straw ; Messrs. 
Dearborn, Whittle, and Riddle. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Fradd and 
Dickey ; Messrs. Goodwin, Ham, and Seaward. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Stanton and Thorpe ; 
Messrs. C. B. Littlefield, Shepard and Tabor. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Wilkinson and McDon- 
ough ; Messrs. Huntress, Annis, and French. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Dickey and Stan- 
ton ; Messrs. Gooden, Huntress, and Batchelder. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Stanton and Dickey ; Messrs. 
C. B. Littlefield, Hoyt, and Dearborn. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Stearns and 
Fradd ; Messrs. Lawrence, Gray, and Maxfield. 



6 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Fradd and Stearns ; 
Messrs. Ireland, Ham, and Seaward. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Straw and Stanton; Messrs. 
Whittle, Riddle, and Hoyt. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen McDonough and 
Wilkinson ; Messrs. French, Annis, and Huntress. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Wilkinson and Fradd ; 
Messrs. Gooden, E. P. Littlefield, and Batchelder. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Dickey and Thorpe ; 
Messrs. French, Gray, and Twomey. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Stearns and Straw; 
Messrs. Maxfield, Ireland, and Starr. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Fradd and McDonough. 
On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Thorpe and 
Dickey. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Straw and Wilkinson. 
On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Stanton and Fradd. 
On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Stearns and Wilkinson. 
On Market. — Aldermen McDonough and Stanton. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Messrs. Hastings, Seaward, and 
Starr. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Annis, Shep- 
ard, and Twomey. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. C. B. Littlefield, Tabor, and 
Goodwin. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Hon. John L. Kelly, ex-ofteio Chairman. 
James E. Dodge, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

George W. Stevens. 
H. C. Sanderson. 

Ward 2. 

James E. Dodge. 
G. L. Demarest. 

Ward 3. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 
Charles A. Smith. 

Ward 4. 

George W. Weeks. 
Walter M. Parker. 



Ward 5. 

Samuel P. Jackson. 
Charles A. O'Connor. 

Ward 6. 

Loring P. Moore. 
Henry A. Gage. 

Ward 7. 

Marshall P. Hall. 
Ezra Huntington. 

Ward 8. 

Eugene W. Brigham. 
Louis E Phelps. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Hon. John L. Kelly, ex-officio Chairman. 

Moses E. George, Clerk. 
William H. Maxwell. Daniel Sheehan. 

George E. Wilson. Peter 0. Woodman. 

Amos B. Page. Sayward J. Young. 

Moses E. George. Isaac R. Dewey. 



8 

ASSESSORS. 

Ignatius T. Webster, Chairman. 

Joseph H. Haynes, Clerk. 
Charles H. Brown. John Ryan. 

Joseph H. Haynes. Ignatius T. Webster. 

William M. Shepard. Henry W. Powell. 

Horace P. Watts. Charles S. Fisher. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Albion H. Lowell, Chief Engineer. 
Thomas W. Lane, Clerk. 

Assistant Engineers. 

A. C. Wallace. Thomas W. Lane. 

B. C. Kendall. Sam C. Lowell. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Aretas Blood. John Q. A. Sargent. 

William P. Newell. A. C. Wallace. 

Alpheus Gay. James A. Weston. 

Hon. John L. Kelly, ex officio. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Daniel R. Prescott. Patrick A. Devine. 

Jacob W. Mooar. 



9 

CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

Nathan P. Kidder. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark. Hon. E. A. Straw. 

Hon. Wm. P. Newell, Hon. Isaac W. Smith. 

Hon. Samuel N. Bell. Hon. Moody Currier. 

Hon. Nathan P. Hunt. Hon. John L. Kelly, ex officio. 
Timothy W. Challis, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Mrs. E. H. Davis.* 
Mrs. M. J. Buncher.f 



SUPERINTENDENT OP WATER-WORKS. 

Charles K. Walker. 
Arthur E. Stearns, Clerk. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Justice. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 

Assistant Justice. 
Henry W. Tewksbury. 

* Resigned June 30, 1878. t Elected June 30, 1878. 



10 

Clerk. 

John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 
Daniel R. Prescott. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Horatio W. Longa. 

Captain of the Night Watch. 
Eben Carr. 

Day Police. 

Ransom W. Bean. 
John C. Colburn. 

Night Watchmen. 

John F. Cassidy. Hiram Stearns. 

James Bucklin. Z. B. Wright. 

Thomas Frain. Michael Fox. 

William H. Newhall. Henry Harmon. 

Melvin J. Jenkins. Edgar Farrar. 

Michael Marr. Thomas Reardon. 
James F. Dunn. 

Constables. 

Daniel R. Prescott. H. W. Longa. 

George W. Hamlin. Sidney R. Hanaford. 

Albert N. Brown. Daniel K. White. 



11 

WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 

Ward 1. — Daniel H. Maxfield. 
Ward 2. — George H. Stearns. 
Ward 3. —David 0. Purnald. 
Ward 4.— John C. Bickford. 
Ward 5. — Thomas Howe. 

Ward 6. — George Hoi brook. 

Ward 7. — Timothy W. Challis. 
Ward 8. — Charles K. Walker. 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Perry H. Dow. 

Ward 2. — Charles E. Quimby. 
Ward 3. — D. F. Clark. 

Ward 4. — Walter S. Holt. 
Ward 5. — John T. Baxter. 

Ward 6. — John F. Chandler. 
Ward 7. — Frank H. Challis. 

Ward 8. — James F. Baldwin. 

Selectmen. 

Ward 1. Ward 3. 

George W. Bacon. Amos B. Page. 

Willis P. Fogg. Albert J. Nay. 

Daniel G. Andrews. William Stevens. 

Ward 2. Ward 4. 

Horace C. Paige. Stephen C. Amsden. 

John Prince. Sidney Smith. 

Stephen Palmer. Wesley E. Holt. 



12 



Wakd 5. 

Michael J. Callahan. 
William Howe. 
Michael Connor. 

Ward 6. 

George H. Dudley. 
Daniel R. Prescott. 
A. A. Ainsworth. 



Ward 7. 

George B. Shattuck. 
William A. Clement. 
George B. Smith. 

Ward 8. 

Daniel B. Emery. 
Charles K. Walker. 
Aaron Q. Gage. 



Inspectors of Check Lists. 

Ward 1. — Hiram Forsaith. 

Ward 2. — Joseph H. Haynes. 
Ward 8.— Albert J. Nay. 

Ward 4. — Harrison D. Lord. 
Ward 5. — M. B. Witters. 

Ward 6. — Isaac Whittemore. 

Ward 7. — Solon D. Pollard. 
Ward 8. — H. H. Noyes. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on the Citv 
Farm hereby submit their annual report for the year end- 
ing Dec. 31, 1878. 

The following is an inventory and appraisal of the per- 



and other tools 



sonal property of the City Far 

Live stock 

Hay, grain, and produce 

Carriages, farming implements 

Provisions and fuel 

Bedding and wearing apparel 

Household furniture and domestic implements 

Lumber ....... 

Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1878 . 

Permanent improvements as follows : — 
Building ninety-five rods stone wall 
Clearing land 



m, made Dec. 31, 1878 : — 

£1,439 00 

2,725 75 

1,310 10 

739 57 

576 60 

551 22 

15 00 



$7,357 


24 


452 


60 


190 


00 


150 


00 



$340 00 



14 



The account of the City Farm for the year 1878 is as 



follows : — 

To stock on hand Dec. 31, 1877 
cash on hand Dec. 31, 1877 
expenditures for 1878 
interest on farm 



Dr. 

£6,303 81 

462 65 

3,525 82 

1,000 00 



By stock Dec. 31, 1878 .... 
paid into the treasury for produce, etc. 
cash on hand Dec. 31, 1878 
permanent improvements . 
5,835 days' board of paupers 

$11,292 28 
Average cost per day for board of each pauper or prisoner 



811,292 28 


Cr 




. $7,357 


24 


. 1,747 


51 


452 


60 


340 


00 


. 1,394 


93 



at the farm 



23 9-10 cts. 



It is the opinion of the committee that the City Farm 
has been well managed, and that its productiveness this 
year has been largely above the average ; that the paupers 
have been well cared for, and the labors of the prisoners 
made as remunerative as possible. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor, 

rufus wilkinson, 
hugh Mcdonough, 
william h. ann1s, 
henry french, 

Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 
Manchester, N. H., January 1, 1879. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 

City of Manchester : — 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report for 
the year 1878. 

The whole number of families which have received as- 
sistance off the farm during the past year has been forty- 
eight, consisting of one hundred and seventy-two persons, 
all of whom have a settlement in this city. This is an in- 
crease of nineteen families and sixty-four persons over last 
year. 

Eight of the above number have died. 

The whole number of persons at the almshouse during 
the year has been sixteen, the average number for the year 
being nine and one-fifth. There has been one death at the 
farm. 

The board of overseers are of the opinion that it would 
be for the interest of the city to have a less number of 
prisoners sent to the house of correction, and more paupers 
supported at the farm. 



16 

There are five persons at the insane asylum at Concord, 
a part of whom we think might be supported at the farm 
cheaper than at Concord, and as well, if we had a suitable 
place for them. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Chairman ex officio, 
MOSES E. GEORGE, Clerk, 
WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 
GEORGE E. WILSON, 
S. J. YOUNG, 
DANIEL SHEEHAN, 
AMOS B. PAGE, 
PETER 0. WOODMAN, 
ISAAC R. DEWEY, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS, 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen : — The Board* of Water Commissioners here- 
with present their seventh annual report, embracing the 
customary report of the Superintendent, giving in detail 
the operations of this department during the past year. 

The total income of the works for the year 1878 has 
been forty-eight thousand eight hundred seventy-four dol- 
lars and twenty-six cents ($48,874.20). The expense of 
operating and maintaining the works has been seven thou- 
sand seven hundred forty dollars and twenty-one cents 
(87,740.21), leaving as net receipts, forty-one thousand one 
hundred thirty-four dollars and five cents ($41,134.05). 
Excess of net receipts in 1878 over the net receipts in 1877, 
four thousand one hundred four dollars and twentv-eight 
cents ($4,104.28). 

Xo unusual expenditure has been required the past year 
to maintain the works. Hereafter a somewhat increased 
liability will be incurred, as the guarantee of the contrac- 
tors to keep the pipes in repair lias expired by limitation, 
and the entire care and custody of all the pipes now de- 
volve upon the city. 



20 

The remarks of the Superintendent in his report regard- 
ing watering-troughs, meet the approbation of the Board, 
and your attention is most respectfully called to the subject, 
as the Water Commissioners have no jurisdiction in the 
premises. No doubt is entertained that a more equitable 
and satisfactory system for public fountains can be devised. 

On the third day of December last, Joseph E. Bennett, 
Esq., was appointed Auditor to examine the books and ac- 
counts in the office of the Superintendent, and his report 
is appended hereto, by which it appears that he finds the 
accounts of receipts and deposits have been systematically 
and accurately kept. His suggestions regarding some of 
the less important books in the office, have been adopted. 

It is believed that, as a whole, the works are in excellent 
condition, and no extraordinary expenditure will be .re- 
quired the coming year. The extended report of the Su- 
perintendent furnishes a detailed account of the trans- 
actions of the past year, together with a particular descrip- 
tion of everything pertaining to this department, to which 
the Commissioners desire to refer for further information. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALPHEUS GAY, Chairman, 
JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor, 
A. C. WALLACE, 
WILLIAM P. NEWELL, 
ARETAS BLOOD, 
J. Q. A. SARGENT, 
JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Water Com missioners. 
January 1, 1879. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To (lie Board of Water Commissioners of the City of 

Manchester : — 

Gentlemen : — The animal report of the Superintendent 
of Water-Works, embracing an account of the operations 
during the year 1878, together with a statement of the 
condition of the works at the present time, as required by 
the ordinances of the city, is respectfully submitted. 

Notwithstanding the water in Massabesic Lake was quite 
low during the months of September and October, an ample 
supply was furnished for the use of the city. At all other 
times there has been an abundance. At present the lake 
is full, the result of the November rains. 

No considerable repairs have been required on the dam 
or canal. Seventy-five rods of stone-wall have been built 
on the north side of the canal embankment at a cost of 
$146.88. Some wooden fence has also been built near the 
dam. 

PUMPING STATION. 

The water-wheels and pumps are in good condition, 
never working as well as they have the past year. The 
repairs made early in the spring have proved beneficial and 
permanent. Mr. S. M. Souder, the person who set up the 
pumps in the first instance, had charge of these repairs. 
The work was commenced the 23d day of February and 



99 



finished the 17th day of March. Each wheel was taken 
out of its casing and new steps put under, and each wheel 
hung on suspension bearings. In the mean time the pumps 
were run enough to keep a good supply of water in the 
reservoir. The pumps have been worked by one wheel 
since the repairs, and this runs as well at the present time 
as it did the day it was started after the job was finished. 
Satisfactory tests were made by Joseph B. Sawyer, Esq., 
whose report is appended hereto. 

RECORD OF PUMPING, 1878. 



MONTHS. 



January.. . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November.. 
December . . 



No. hours' work 
for both pumps. 



727 h. 3f)m. 
625 " 20 " 



Totals and average. 



619 
605 
636 
603 
756 
664 
633 
631 
653 
650 



20 
30 
30 
20 
40 
00 
50 
00 
40 
20 



7,807 h. 00 m. 



Average 

stroke p'r 

minute. 



Total No. 

strokes 

p'r month 



16.68 
16.05 
16.'22 
15 37 
15.18 
15.G7 
16.34 
16.35 
15.70 
15.16 
16.14 
16.05 



15.93 



727,996 
602,416 
602,800 
558,830 
589,746 
567,500 
741,812 
651,190 
597,046 
573,958 
633,214 
626,362 



Total gallons 

pumped in one 

month. 



Daily aver- 
age gallons 
pumped. 



.472,870 



45,863,748 
37,952,208 
37,976,400 
35,206.290 
37,153,998 
35,752,500 
46,734,150 
41,024,970 
37,613,898 
36,159,354 
39,892,482 
39,460,806 



470.790.810 



1,489,153 
1,355,436 
1,225,045 
1,173,543 
1,198,516 
1,191,750 
1,507,553 
1,323,386 
1,253,797 
1,166,431 
1,329,739 
1,272,929 



1,289,837 



SUPPLY AND FORCE MAIN. 

There have been seven leaks on the force main and nine 
on the supply main that have been repaired. There are, 
to-day, no leaks on the supply main that show on the sur- 
face, while on the force main there are six. This part of 
the main pipe was laid some of the way in meadow and 
swamp land, which accounts for a greater number of leaks 
on this section. 



23 

RESERVOIR. 

The reservoir proves to be one of the best in New Eng- 
land. The banks stand well and have required no repairs. 
It would be well to top-dress the banks, so as to keep the 
grass roots in good condition to prevent the banks from 
washing. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

There have been laid the past season 6,310 feet of distri- 
bution pipe, at an expense of 15,330.60 ; also, 366 feet of 
1^-inch pipe from Granite street to Piscataquog street on 
Quincy street. This was to supply the parties on Piscata- 
quog street who depend mostly on city water, when repairs 
were made on Main street, south of Ferry. 

The pipe on the bed of the Merrimack River, supplying 
'Squog, has had no repairs, and is believed to be in good 
condition. It will be advisable, however, to have an exami- 
nation next year, for a small leak in this part of the pipe 
may result in serious consequences. 

The pipe across Granite Bridge proves satisfactory. At 
the time it was laid it was thought best not to box it, as 
it would save expense, and be better for the bridge. 'Squog 
was supplied during the coldest weather in January, through 
this pipe alone, which was a good test as to its ever 
freezing. 

The number of leaks the past year was 226. Cement 
pipe, 207 ; cast iron, 19. 

There have been three bursts on the cement pipe, 2 in 
'Squog, caused by lightning, and one on Canal street, with 
no apparent cause. In all these cases the water was shut 
off immediately, thereby preventing any serious damage. 

The responsibility of the contractors, as to care and main- 
tenance of pipes laid by them under the contract for exten- 
sions, ceases January 1, 1879. Consequently the city will 



24 

be obliged to assume the entire charge of the works here- 
after. 

Winding the joints in case of leaks on the cement pipe, 
has been the general method of repairing in this and other 
cities. While there are a good many joints that have been 
wound ever since the water was first let in to the pipes, 
and have never leaked, there are others that have been re- 
wound a number of times. Of late a cast-iron clamp-sleeve 
has been put on over the joint and lead run in and calked 
while the pressure was on. This is more expensive at first, 
but, as it is presumed that it will be permanent, it will be 
cheaper in the end. 

All the repairs and laying of extensions have been under 
the immediate charge of Mr. John Conway, both for the 
city and contractors. His thorough knowledge of the city 
water-works, together with his experience and ability, has 
made his services of great value ; and as he is about to 
sever his connection with this department, preparatory to a 
new field of labor, the Superintendent desires to acknowl- 
edge his indebtedness to him for his valued counsels and 
assistance. 

WATERING-TROUGHS. 

Numerous complaints having been made to the Superin- 
tendent about watering-troughs (a subject which he really 
has nothing to do with), a fair statement regarding the 
matter perhaps would not be out of place. Water-takers 
complain that they have to pay for water in their stables 
and other premises, while others get it for nothing by a pe- 
tition to the city councils for a public watering-trough in 
the street near their premises. There are in this city ten 
public watering-troughs that are supplied by the city water- 
works. The income to the city for these ten troughs 
amounts to 160 a year. At meter rates it would amount to 
at least ($3,000) three thousand dollars a year. 



25 

These troughs are usually made in such shape that water 
may be used not only for legitimate purposes, but for any 
use whatever, and it is a significant fact that this depart- 
ment has been notified in several cases to shut off water 
near these places, because the parties can get their supply 
from the public fountains without paying water rates. 

Under the present system, the waste of water, too, which 
has to be pumped at considerable expense, is very great. 
It is therefore respectfully suggested that the matter com- 
plained of should be remedied by substituting the common 
cast-iron fountains, such as are generally used in other 
cities. 



SCHEDULE OF PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID AND SET IN 1878. 



Streets. 


Length of Cast 
Iron pipe in feet. 


Gates. 


s 

X 


Location. 




4 in. 


6 in. 8 in. 


lOin 


6 in 




Bedford Road 




1386.0 
30.0 
168.5 
198.0 
1032.0 
52H.0 
313.0 
360.0 
13.0 






1 

1 


1 

1 


A St. to H. H. Huntress'. 


C 




























1 


1 












River Road to Brewery. 
















1 




















863.0 






1 


Hugh Ramsey house northward 
Between Bridge and Lowell. 




405.0 
128.0 








5.0 

614.0 

7.0 
















1 


1 




West 










Walnut . . 


268.0 


















1 






Front of A. N. Clapp's house. 
















801.0 


4646.5 


863.0 


1 


4 


6 


Total length, 6.310.5 ft. in 1878. 



Number miles cast-iron pipe laid in 1878 . I' V^V o 5 ' 

Number gates set 1878 ..... 5 

Number hydrants set 1878 .... 6 

One 8-inch gate was removed at blow-off on Lowell 
street, and 4-inch gate set instead. 

One 10-inch gate was changed from Main corner A street, 
to Main north of Milford street. 



26 



One air-valve was taken off on Park, corner Beech. 
The following places are where the cement-lined pipe 
was taken up and cast-iron pipe laid instead : — 





Length in feet. 


Location. 




6 in. 


8 in. 


10 in. 


14 in. 




6 
24 
36 

4 
19 
40 

3 








Corner River. 










Near Main. 














Corner Main. 












State 


























54 




A 


5 






Corner Main. 




22 




46 


Near Depot. 
West of Franklin. 




32 






36 

10 

12 

8 

211 

28 
25 
3 




Corner Ferry. 
Corner Pise.ataquog. 
Corner Walker. 


















Near Mast. 




4 




































173 


22 


333 


100 





Length of pipe laid of cement-lined and cast-iron of dif- 
ferent sizes, as follows : — 

20,934.9 ft. 
6,825.0 " 
8,400.0 « 
5,162.75" 
12,644.0 « 
82,896.0 " 
8,950.0 " 



20 inch 


cement-lined pipe 


14 " 


a 


a a 


12 " 


a 


a a 


10 " 


u 


a a 


8 " 


(( 


a a 


6 " 


a 


a a 


4 " 


a 


u a 



Total 



145,812.65 ft. 



Equal to 27^-f ||f5. m il es 



27 



20 inch cast- 


iron pipe • 


104.0 ft. 


14 " 




a a 


. 4,925.0 " 


12 " 




u a 


. 5,990.0 " 


10 " 




ct u 


501.0 " 


8 " 




a a 


. 2,320.0 " 


6 " 




a a 


. 13,235.5 " 


4 " 


a a a 
Total . 


801.0 " 




. 27,876.5 ft. 


Equal 


to5i£ 


13—5 iti i 1 p <> 
8 milL? - 





Total length of cast-iron and cement-lined pipe, 32±p' 



'52 8 



miles. 



Number of gates set to January 1, 1879 : — 




20 inch 


. 5 


14 » 


9 


12 " 


. 13 


10 " 


9 


8 " 


. 26 


6 " 


. 179 


4 " 


. 15 


Total 


. 2t 6 


Air-valves ....... 


. 7 


Hydrants ....... 


. 303 



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SERVICE PIPES. 

The number of applications for water to date, has been 
sixteen hundred and eighty-one (1,681). 

Fifteen hundred and seventy-one (1,571) service pipes 
have been laid to date, as follows : — 

40 

1.328 

175 

13 

1 



10 

4 



1-2 inch diameter 
3-4 " " 

1 " 
1 1-4" 
1 1-2" 



860 feet, 8 inches. 

35,567 " 2 " 

" 6 « 

11 " 

- 

3 " 

« 



5,075 
720 
57 
466 
117 



Total length of service pipes . . 42,864 feet 6 inches. 

Number miles service pipe in street, 8i 2 2 ^. 

One hundred and forty-two (142) service pipes have been 
laid this year, as follows : — 

127 3-4 inch diameter 3.379 ft. 

13 1 " " 282 " 

111-2" " 57 ki 

12" " 10 " 



Total length laid in 1878 . . . 3,728 ft. 

Cost of service pipes §1,504.44 

Total cost of service pipes to Dec. 31, 1878 . 26,039.85 

METERS. 

There are two hundred and twenty-six (226) meters in 
use at the present time, being an increase of twenty-four 
(24) over last year. 

The numberof meters owned by the works are two hun- 
dred and forty-seven (247). 



31 

The income from the sale of water for the year 1878, has 
been as follows : — 



Received from water and hydrant rent . 


838,225 97 


" 


" water (metered) 


9,286 40 


i. 


" fines .... 


212 82 


m 


" shutting off and letting on 


20 00 


cc 


" rent of meters . 


803 85 


(C 


" building purposes 


83 60 


If 


" setting meters . 


84 00 


u 


" labor and pipe . 


156 62 


u 


" sale of old plow 
Total received to Dec. 28, 187? 


1 00 




848,874 26 




Balance on hand Dec. 22, 1877 
Total .... 


, 6,191 34 




855,065 60 




Abatements, §397 06. 




Expenses for 1878 


$15,773 99 


Amoun 


t paid toward interest 1878 . 


26,000 00 




841,773 99 



Amount on hand Dec. 28. 1878, 



813,291 61 



Classification of accounts for the year' 1878 : — 



Superintendence, collecting, and repairs 
Stationery, printing, and lithographs . 
Office and incidental expenses 



Pumping expenses and repairs . 

Rep's to dam, canal, penstock and reservoir 



Running expenses for 1878 



85,764 44 

200 39 

66 48 


86, 

$1, 




$1,699 90 
9 00 


031 31 




708 90 



>7,740 21 



32 



Service pipes $1,748 34 

Distribution pipes 4,918 81 

Fire hydrants and valves .... 411 79 
Pumping-machinery, pump-house, dwelling, 

and barn 125 34 

Meters, boxes, and brass connections . . 682 62 

Grading and fencing ..... 146 88 



Total expended on construction 1878 


$8,033 78 


Total amount expended in 1878 . 


$15,773 99 


Classification of accounts to Dec. 31, 


1878 : — 


Land and water rights 


$30,858 67 


Dam, canal, penstock and race . 


101,198 20 


Pumping-machinery, pump-house, dwelling 


» 


and barn 


88,022 30 


Distributing reservoir and fixtures 


. 71,542 36 


Force and supply main 


. 88,674 02 


Distribution pipes .... 


237,164 48 


Eire hydrants and valves 


30,018 74 


Tools and fixtures .... 


10,649 35 


Boarding and storehouses . 


919 36 


Roads and culverts .... 


2,084 24 


Supplies 


550 39 


Engineering ....... 


22,176 19 


Livery and traveling expenses . 


2,856 64 


Legal expenses 


563 79 


Grading and fencing .... 


11,295 14 


Service pipes 


26,039 85 


Meters, boxes, and brass connections . 


7,194 60 



Total construction account to 
Dec. 31, 187S .... 



$731,808 32 



Current expenses : — 

Superintendence, collecting, and repairs . $24,945 23 

Stationery, printing, and lithographs . . 3,590 13 

Office and incidental expenses . . . 1,830 63 



Pumping expenses and repairs . . . 7,728 92 
Repairs to dam, canal, penstock, and reser- 
voir 179 29 

Repairs to buildings 24 13 



Total current expenses to Dec. 

31, 1878 $38,298 33 

Interest $40,678 51 

Highway expenditures .... 14,000 53 



$54,679 04 

Total amount of bills approved to 

Dec. 31, 1878 .... $824,785 69 
Interest, discount, and labor performed on 
highway transferred, and tools and ma- 
terials sold $57,600 23 



Total cost to date, not including 
interest $767,185 46 

Interest and discount to Jan. 1, 1878 . $164,140 51 
" for 1878 35,988 00 



Total interest to Dec. 31, 1878, $200,128 51 
Am't p'd toward interest 1877, $24,000 00 
" " " " 1878, 26,000 00 



" " " " 1877, and 1878, $50,000 00 

$150,128 51 
Total cost including interest . $917,313 97 

The following amounts have been paid over to the City 
Treasurer, and credited to the water-works : — 

1872, Supplies aud materials sold, $573 61 

1873, " " " " 177 07 
1873, Accrued interest on water 

L bonds sold I 193 26 



34 





1873, Accrued interest on water 






honds sold 


146 00 




1873, Water rents 


1,920 53 




1874, Supplies and materials sold, 


607 89 


March 17, 1874, Highway expenditures trans. 






from water-works account 


14,000 53 


March 17, 1874, Interest and discount, trans. 






from water- works account 


12,347 25 


Sept, 


1, 1874, Interest and discount, trans. 






from water-works account 


22,361 74 




1874, Water and hydrant rents 


30,233 54 


Dec. 


29, 1874, Interest transferred 


4,566 25 


Dec. 


18, 1875. 1 anvil sold .... 


15 00 


Sept. 


25, 1875, Engine, crusher, and mate- 






rials sold .... 


2,0S9 45 




1875, Water and hydrant rents 


27,119 15 


May 


20, 1876, 1 derrick sold 


125 00 


May 


20, 1876, Rent of derrick . 


24 00 




1876, Water, hydrant rent, etc. 


38,879 47 




1877, " " " " 


43,823 30 




1878, " " " " 


48,873 26 




Cash received for old plow . 
Total 


1 00 




$248,077 30 


Am oi 


mt appropriated to Dec. 31, 1878 . 
Total received to date . 


640,000 00 




$888,077 30 


Dedu 


ct hills approved to date 


824,785 69 




$63,291 61 


Amount paid toward interest in 1877 . 


$24,000 00 


<i 


" " " 1878 . 


26,000 00 




$50,000 00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1878 



$13,291 61 



35 



Amount bills 


approved 


liliAKJjI JJKAJf IS 

in 1871, 


« 


u 


a 


" 1872, 


u 


u 


« 


" 1873, 


a 


tc 


tc 


" 1874, 


u 


t< 


a 


" 1875, 


« 


(I 


(i 


" 1876, 


u 


u 


a 


" 1877, 


(i 


(C 


a 


" 1878, 



SI, 723 06 

245,870 66 

294,609 02 

146,515 40 

50,091 80 

48,425 72 

21,776 04 

15,773 99 



Total amount of bills approved to Dec. 31, 1878, $824,785 69 

Statement showing the uses of water as supplied to Dec. 

31, 1878 : — 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


1 Post-office. 


9 Churches. 


1 City Library. 


1 Court-house. 


5 Banks. 


2 Hose-companies. 


5 Hotels. 


4 Fire-engines. 


1 Masonic block. 


1 Hook-and-ladder. 


1 Odd Fellows' block 


1 Opera-house. 


1 Holly-tree Inn. 


1 Music Hall. 


3 Halls. 


1 Convent. 


10 School-houses. 


1 City Hospital. 


1 Skating-rink. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



1 Iron foundry. 

1 Dye house. 

2 Machine shops. 

2 Patent medicine m'nuf 'ctories 

3 Clothing manufactories. 
2 Furniture manufactories. 
2 Harness shops. 

1 Brush shop. 

1 Poll shop. 

1 Carriage shop. 

1 Soap manufactory. 



1 Brass and copper foundry. 

1 Sash and blind shop. 
3 Breweries. 

2 Shoe shops. 
1 Pop-corn. 

1 Trunk and harness shop. 
1 Gas-works. 

1 Gas-holder. 

2 Slaughter-houses. 
1 Grain mill. 



36 





MARKETS. 


2 Fish. 


5 Meat and fish. 


6 Meat. 






OFFICES. 


5 Dentist. 


2 Express. 


64 Professional. 


5 Printing. 


1 Telegraph. 


1 Coal. 




SHOPS. 


10 Barber. 


2 Currjdng. 


1 Wheelwright. 


2 Plumber. 


6 Blacksmith. 


3 Steam, gas and water pipe 


4 Carpenter. 


1 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 






STABLES. 


143 Private. 


9 Livery. 




SALOONS. 


6 Dining. 


6 Billiard. 


2 Oyster. 


36 Liquor. 




STORES. 


2 Hair. 


2 Tea. 


3 Auction. 


42 Grocery. 


10 Drug. 


1 Meal. 


6 Jewelry. 


3 Hardware. 


3 Wholesale liquor. 


6 Boot and shoe. 


1 Fur. 


3 Stove. 


1 House furnishing goods. 


6 Gents' furnishing goods. 


15 Fancy goods. 


3 Book. 


1 Wholesale paper. 


1 Leather and shoe finders. 


5 Dry goods. 


2 Music. 


4 Candy. 


2 Upholstery. 


1 Crockery. 


3 Undertakers'. 


1 Battery building. 


2 Cigar. 


1 Cloak. 





37 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1 Bleachery. 
3 Laundries. 

3 Drinking fountains. 

2 Ice houses. 

8 Photographers. 
303 Hydrants (public). 
7 Stand-pipes. 
3689 Families. 

67 Boarding-houses. 
4610 Faucets. 
526 Wash bowls. 
474 AVater-closets. 



3 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. 
8 Bakeries. 

8 Stationary engines. 
1 Portable engine. 

9 Private hydrants. 
10 Water-troughs. 

466 Horses. 

31 Cows and oxen. 
203 Wash tubs. 
201 Bath tubs. 

88 Urinals. 



The following is a list of gates, hydrants, meters, tools, 
etc., on hand at the present time : — 



GATES. 

1 4 in. Eddy spigot. 1 

1 4 in. Boston Machine spigot. 1 

1 4 in. Boston Machine out of 1 

order. 

1 4 in. Chapman out of order. 2 

3 6 in. Chapman out of order. 1 

1 6 in. Boston Machine out of 3 
order. 1 

2 6 in. Boston Machine spigot. 1 



6 in. Ludlow spigot. 

6 in. Ludlow hub. 

8 in. Boston Machine out 
of order. 

8 in. Eddy hub. 
10 in. Boston Machine spigot. 
12 in. Boston Machine spigot. 
14 in. Boston Machine spigot. 
20 in. Boston Machine spigot. 



1 Boston Machine. 



HYDRANTS. 

1 Pattee & Perkins. 



4 5-8 in. Union (Piston). 

4 5-8 in. Union (Rotary). 

2 3-4 in. L T nion (Piston). 

1 1 in. Union (Rotary). 



METERS. 

3 

1 
5 
1 



3-4 in. Desper, 
1-2 in. Gem. 
3-4 in. Gem. 
1 in. Gem. 



38 



PIPE AND BRANCHES ON HAND. 



157 ft. 20 inch cast-iron pipe. 
125 ft. 14 inch " 
161 ft. 12 inch " " 

18 ft. 10 inch " " 

531 ft. 8 inch " " 

411 ft. 6 inch " " 

229 ft. 4 inch " " 

6 20 inch sleeves. 

1 20 inch clamp sleeve. 

3 14 inch sleeves. 

2 12 inch sleeves. 

4 12 inch clamp sleeves. 
9 10 inch sleeves. 

6 10 inch cement sleeves. 
2 8 inch sleeves. 
2 8 inch clamp sleeves. 
1 hydrant foot. 



7 6 inch clamp sleeves. 
24 6 inch sleeves. 
1 14 inch quarter turn. 
15 single 6 on 6 branch. 
4 single 6 on 8 branch. 
3 single 6 on 10 branch. 
1 double 6 on 10 branch. 
1 double 6 on 12 branch. 
1 single 6 on 12 branch. 

1 single 6 on 14 branch. 

2 single 12 on 14 branch. 

1 double 6 on 14 branch. 

2 20 inch gate-domes. 

3 15 inch gate-domes. 
3 8 inch cement plugs. 
2 14 inch cement plugs. 



SUPPLIES AND TOOLS BELONGING TO SERVICE DEPARTMENT. 



190 ft. 1-2 inch pipe. 
785 ft. 3-4 inch pipe. 
360 ft. 1 inch pipe. 
36 ft. 1 1-4 inch pipe. 
49 ft. 11-2 inch pipe. 
44 ft. 2 inch pipe. 
1 20 brass spindle. 
1 14 brass spindle. 
1 8 brass spindle. 
1 6 brass spindle. 

4 1-2 inch lead connections. 

5 3-4 inch lead connections. 

10 1 inch lead connections. 

11 3-4 inch for cement pipe. 

4 4 in. clamps with 1-2 in. stop, 



26 " 


u 


c; 


u 


CI 


58 " 


« ' 


It 


(C 


u 


4 10" 


u 


u 


ft 


(( 


5 12" 


u 


u 


u 


u 



2 1 inch for cement pipe. 
115 lbs. solder. 
4 solder coppers and pot. 

6 red lanterns. 

10 common lanterns. 

1 dark lantern. 

2 meter lanterns. 

1 roll lead pipe for thawing out 

service. 
1 roll tin pipe for thawing out 

service. 
1 lot of old 3-4 inch iron pipe. 
45 feet of 5-8 inch pipe. 
30 3-4 nipples, 6 to 12 long. 

7 3-4 inch nipples. 

22 1-2 inch nipples. 

23 3-4 inch T. 

24 1-2 inch T. . 
10 1 inch plugs. 



39 



3 14 in. clamps with 1-2 in. stop 


. 9 


3 14" " " 3-4 " " 


6 


| i; .. .. (( .. i< u 


13 


3 § " « •' '■ " " 


15 


20 1-2 inch couplings. 


3 


15 1-2 inch K. & L. couplings. 


9 


21 1-2 inch quarter turns. 


31 


100 3-4 couplings. 


49 


82 3-4 right and left couplings. 


8 


53 3-4 quarter turns. 


13 


43 3-4 by half quarter turns. 


9 


43 1 inch by 3-4 quarter turns. 


2 


17 1 inch by 3-4 quarter turns. 


12 


7 2x3-4 inch quarter turns. 


1 


15 2 inch couplings. 


11 


17 1 inch couplings. 


8 


46 1 inch R. & L. couplings. 


10 


16 1 inch by 1 1-4 couplings. 


9 


5 1 1-4 inch couplings. 


8 


5 1 1-4 inch R. & L. couplings 


. 2 


4 1 1-4 inch quarter turns. 


1 


17 1 inch nipples. 


2 


1 washer cutter. 


1 


1 die plate. 


2 


6 dies, R. & L. from 1-2 to 1 in, 


2 


6 taps, R. & L. from 1-2 to 1 in. 


, 1 


2 bushings, from 1-2 to 3-4. 


6 


1 pipe cutter. 


2 


1 extra cutter. 


2 


3 files. 


2 


12 large meter boxes. 


1 


10 small meter boxes. 


58 


2 coal hods. 


80 


1 wood stove. 


200 


1 glass cutter. 


25 


1 meter spanner. 


257 


50 feet rubber hose. 


7 


13 square stop box covers. 


1 


1 watering pot. 


1 


1 gallon kerosene. 


1 



3-4 inch plugs. 

1-2 inch plugs. 

3-4x1-2 bushings. 

1x3-4 bushings. 

3-4 inch caps. 

1-2 inch caps 

3-4 inch curb stop. 

1 inch curb stop. 

3-4 inch unions. 

5-8 inch unions. 

3-4 inch nipples. 

1 inch unions. 

3-4 inch soldering nipples. 

1 inch soldering nipple. 
1-2 inch soldering nipples. 
5-8 inch unions. 
1-2 inch cor. stop bent union. 
1-2 inch cor. stop for nipples. 
1-2 in. cor. stop for cast iron. 
3-4 in. cor. stop for cast iron, 
lin. cor. stop for cast'iron. 

2 inch valves, 
lot old picks, 
lead ladles. 

3 pole derricks. 

4 pole derrick, 
poles for derricks, 
set rope falls, 
iron bars 6 feet long, 
iron bars 5 feet long, 
iron bar 4 feet long, 
pounds inch rope, 
pounds gasket, 
pounds lead, 
pounds white lead, 
pounds of 3-4 lead pipe, 
iron pails, 
wooden pail, 
iron jack for drilling, 
"rub hoe. 



40 



1 5 gallon can. 

1-2 gallon sperm oil. 

1-2 gallon linseed oil. 

4 oil cans. 

1 3 cubic feet measure. 

1 6 inch gauge. 

1 platform scale. 

1 2 inch stop and waste. 

1 3-4 inch stop and waste. 

1 wood saw. 

2 prick punches. 

2 vises. 

1 side packing leather. 
1 pair rubber mitts. 
4 collars for hydrants. 
1 spoon shovel. 

3 long handle shovels. 
17 hydrant packings. 

6 tamping tools. 
39 hydrant nuts for caps. 

1 iron kettle. 

1 tea kettle. 

1 one bushel and a half basket. 
11 hydrant covers. 

4 wooden stop boxes. 
1 kerosene barrel. 

1 iron brand M. W. W. 

1 steel brand M. W. W. 
50 feet wire. 

6 hydrant caps. 
25 3-4 bolts for sleeves. 
76 5-8 bolts for sleeves. 
15 gate wrenches. 

9 hydrant wrenches. 

1 lamp. 

1 heating furnace. 

1 lot iron for furnace. 

1 lot rope. 

1 bench. 

1 wire cutter. 



1 roll of enamel cloth. 

2 chains for hydrant. 
2 hydrant wrenches. 

1 hydrant ring. 

2 iron rimmers. 
1 ice chisel. 

8 stop wrenches. 

7 stone points. 

5 hydrant valves. 

1 pair chain tongs. 

3 pairs extension tongs. 

2 pipe wrenches. 

2 meter wrenches. 
2 monkey wrenches. 
1 pair blacksmith tongs. 

1 ratchet driller and 4 drills. 

2 drillers and 7 drills for cement. 

9 special wrenches. 
1 chain pulley. 

1 machine hammer. 

2 nail hammers. 
2 pairs pinchers. 
2 iron wedges. 

1 wheelbarrow. 

10 dump-barrows, old. 

2 furnaces and kettles for melt- 

ing lead. 

2 tool boxes. 

1 paving hammer. 

8 cold chisels. 

3 mauls. 

1 tool chest. 
3 screw-drivers. 
1 Dover chisel. 
5 mortise chisels. 
5 paring chisels. 
10 moulding tools. 
1 plow plane with 6 irons. 
1 set match planes. 
1 long joiuter. 



41 



18 curb stop covers. 
2 new gate covers. 
2 pairs rubber boots. 

6 drills, 4 feet long. 

2 drills, 3 1-2 feet long. 

5 drills, 3 feet long. 

4 drills, 2 1-2 feet long. 
10 drills, 2 feet long. 
4 drill spoons. 

7 wedges, 18 inches long. 
9 plug drills. 

15 wedges and shims. 

1 sledge hammer. 

2 stone hammers. 

3 calking hammers. 

6 striking hammers, 
calking tools. 

15 K.P. shovels, good. 

12 E. P. shovels, not good. 

1 iron snow shovel. 

2 wooden snow shovels. 
20 picks and handles. 



1 short jointer. 
1 fore plane. 

1 smoothing plane. 

2 nail sets. 
1 mallet. 

4 hand-saws. 
1 buck-saw. 
1 iron-saw. 

1 brace and six bits. 

2 extensions. 

1 bevel square. 

2 iron squares. 

1 grindstone. 

2 bench axes. 

4 common axes. 

3 brad awls. 
2 oil stones. 
1 chain. 

40 blasting tubes. 
25 castings for hydrant valves. 
1 draw knife. 



INVENTORY OF FURNITURE, ETC., IN OFFICE. 



8 drawing boards. 

1 wardrobe. 

1 transit. 

1 level rod. 

1 copying press. 

1 roll manilla paper. 

1 roll tracing muslin. 

2 drawing tables. 

1 library desk. 

2 waste baskets. 
1 6-foot pole. 

3 stools. 
1 duster. 

1 map of city. 

1 map of city, framed. 

1 map of New Hampshire. 



1 level. 

3 transit rods. 

1 roll mounted paper. 

2 quires drawing paper. 
1 lot of book paper. 

1 lot of fuel. 

1 book case. 

1 table. 

1 12-inch pressure gauge. 

1 6-inch pressure gauge. 

1 bill stamp. 

3 inkstands. 

1 lot of drawings. 
1 safe. 

1 pair scissors. 
1 cork-screw. 



42 



1 bottle ink. 

1 case of drawers. 

1 stove. 



1 eraser. 

1 lot of reports. 

1 directory. 



INVENTORY OF TOOLS AT PUMPING STATION. 



1 scoop shovel. 

4 common shovels. 
1 desk. 

1 one-inch anger. 

5 lanterns. 

3 monkey wrenches. 

6 pails. 

1 square. 
1 plumb square. 
1 sprinkler pot. 
1 clock. 

1 washer cutter. 

2 planes. 

2 thermometers. 

4 crow bars. 

1 bellows and anvil. 

2 pipe wrenches. 
1 window brush. 

1 gate wrench (ratchet). 
1 long key. 

1 hydrant wrench. 

2 wheelbarrows. 
1 five-pail kettle. 

3 picks. 

1 clothes-dryer. 

2 ladders. 
2 stoves. 

2 coal hods. 
1 coal sifter. 
6 gallons sperm oil. 

1 bench. 

2 levels. 

1 waste press. 

1 Scotch driller. 

2 nozzles. 



1 pair shears. 
1 pair pliers. 
1 wire cutter. 
1 boat. 
1 set steps. 
3-4 barrel oil. 
1 jack screw. 
1 brace and 3 bitts. 
1 trowel. 

1 wood saw. 

2 hand saws. 

1 iron slush bucket. 

1 socket wrench. 
6 fork wreuches. 

2 screen rakes. 
2 axes. 

. 4 oil cans. 

2 oil tanks. 
25 lbs. waste. 
30 lbs. tallow. 
50 lbs. black lead. 

5 cords wood. 
15 tons coal. 

2 ice chisels. 

2 cold chisels. 

2 wood chisels. 

2 hammers. 

3 drip pans. 

1-2 lb. hemp packing. 

1 draw shave. 

2 screw plates, tap and dies. 
1 vise. 

200 ft. 7-8 in. hose. 
100 ft. 3-4 inch hose. 



43 



TOOLS AT THE DAM. 



2 full-trimmed derricks. 
1 iron rake. 

4 set dog chains. 

1 set blacksmith tools. 

6 pieces Scotch sewer pipe. 

1 force pump. 

1 bill hook. 

1 clevis and pin. 

1 harrow. 

1 timber roll. 

8 sprinkler pots. 

1 lot lumber. 

1 lot old iron. 

3 oil barrels. 



4 mortar hoes. 
1 iron shovel. 
150 feet hose. 

1 No. 5 plow. 
3 grub hoes. 

3 bush scythes and snaths. 

2 axes. 

4 cable chains. 
1 bellows. 

4 water pails. 
10 mason hods. 
1 lot of old shovels. 
1 lot of old wheelbarrows. 



Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Charles K. Walker, Esq., Superintendent: — 

I herewith report the result of the test ordered by you, 
of the pumps of the Manchester Water- Works. The test 
was made yesterday. Both pairs of pumps were running, 
and all were driven by one wheel. 

The water delivered into the reservoir was made to flow 
over a wear 5,005 feet in length. The depth of the water on 
the wear was observed by means of a hook gauge once each 
minute for 40 minutes. The flow was quite uniform, no 
single observation of the depth being less than 0.392, and 
none greater than 0.401 feet. The mean of all the obser- 
vations was found to be 0.396, and this was the depth used 
in arriving at the final results given below. 

The motion of the pumps was also observed once a min- 
ute, at the same time as the wear observations. The whole 
number of strokes in 40 minutes was 568, and at no time 
during the test did they vary perceptibly from the mean of 
14.2 strokes per minute. 

Quantity delivered at the reservoir by all 

the pumps in one second . . . 4.087 cub. ft. 
Quantity delivered by all the pumps per 

minute 245.22 " » 

Quantity delivered by one stroke of all the 

pumps ...... 17.269 " " 

Quantity delivered by one stroke of all the 

pumps ...... 129.17 gal. 



46 

This quantity is about 92| per cent of the full capacity 
of the pump cylinders. 

This result exceeds that of Mr. Webber, reported in 
1875, by about 7 T 7 ^ per cent. 

Yours very truly, 

JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Civil Engineer . 
Manchester, N. H., Oct. 25, 1878. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners: — 

Gentlemen : — Agreeably to your instructions, I have 
made a careful examination of the books of account in the 
office of the Superintendent of Water-Works, for the year 
closing December 31, 1878, and, while there are some 
errors in the preliminary minutes from which the accounts 
proper are derived, I find the accounts of receipts and de- 
posits with the City Treasurer full and correctly computed. 

As requested by you, I have, in consultation with the 
Superintendent and his courteous clerk, suggested such 
changes in keeping some of the books as will tend to make 
the records clearer as well as more permanent. 

It is a pleasure here to acknowledge the kindness of Mr. 
Walker, the Superintendent, and Mr. Stearns, his industri- 
ous and obliging clerk, in affording me every facility for 
making this examination. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, Auditor. 

Manchester, Jan. 9, 1879. 



EEPOKT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1878. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor, Ex-officio Chairman. 
TIMOTHY W. CHALLIS, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1. — George W. Stevens, 1 year. 

Henry C. Sanderson, 2 years. 
Ward 2. — James E. Dodge, 1 year. 

Gerherdus L. Demarest, 2 years. 
Ward 3. — Nathan P. Hunt, 1 year. 

Charles A. Smith, 2 years. 
Ward 4. — George W. Weeks, 1 year. 

Walter M. Parker, 2 years. 
Ward 5. — Samuel P. Jackson, 1 year. 

Charles A. O'Connor, 2 years. 
Ward 6. — Loring P. Moore, 1 year. 

Henry A. Gage, 2 years. 
Ward 7. —Marshall P. Hall, 1 year. 

Ezra Huntington, 2 years. 
Ward 8. — Eugene W. Brigham, 1 year. 

Louis E. Phelps, 2 years. 



52 

CLERK OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance, Accounts, and Claims. — The Mayor, Messrs. 
Hall, Huntington, Challis, Weeks, and Dodge. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Stevens, Demarest, Sanderson, Hall, 
and Weeks. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Jackson, 
Hunt, Stevens, Smith, and Challis. 

Text-Books and Apparatus. — Messrs. Hunt, Weeks, 
Moore, and O'Connor. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Huntington, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Brigham, Challis, and Smith. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Demarest, Jackson, 
Hunt, and Parker. 

Truancy. — Messrs. Sanderson, O'Connor, Dodge, and 
Moore. 

Employment of Children, etc. — Messrs. Gage, Parker, 
Brigham, and Phelps. 

Music. — Messrs. Weeks, Sanderson, Moore, and Smith. 

Draiving. — Messrs. Hall, Stevens, Phelps, and Dodge. 

Non-Resident Pupils. — Messrs. Jackson, Gage, Phelps, 
and Moore. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Hall, Hunt, Jackson, Demarest, 
and Parker. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Hunt, Smith, Weeks, 
and Demarest. 



53 

Lincoln Street and Wilson Hi//. — Messrs. Jackson, 
Weeks, Parker, and Gage. 

Spring- Street. — Messrs. Stevens, Sanderson, Hall, and 
Huntington. 

Frank/in Street . — Messrs. Hall, Huntington, Sanderson, 
and Stevens. 

Intermediate Bui/ding. — Messrs. Sanderson, Dodge, 
O'Connor, and Smith. 

Piscataquog. — Messrs. Brigham, Phelps, Huntington, 
and Gage. 

Manchester Street. — Messrs. O'Connor, Dodge, Stevens, 
and Phelps. 

Training School. — Messrs. Weeks, Hall, Jackson, and 
Hunt. 

Amoskeag, Blodget Street, and Stark District. — 
Messrs. Demarest, Stevens, Dodge, and Brigham. 

Bakersville, Harvey's, Goffe's Fa/Is. — Messrs. Moore, 
Demarest, O'Connor, and Phelps. 

Hallsville, Youngsviile, Webster's Mills, and Mosquito 
Pond. — Messrs. Gage, Jackson, Parker, and Dodge. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Huntington, Sanderson, 
Brigham, and Moore. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Manchester, N. H., January 3, 1879. 
To the City Councils : — 

We present our annual report for 1878. 

The appropriations to the use of the school department, 
including balances and transfers, and deducting overdrafts, 
of last year, and the expenditures for the year have been as 
follows : — 



Teaching .... 


135,888 44 135,335 16 


Fuel .... 


3,427 55 


3,357 85 


Care of rooms . 


2,200 00 


2,377 06 


Furniture and supplies 


703 04 


504 68 


Books and stationery 


600 00 


598 88 


Printing and advertising . 


375 00 


417 44 


Incidental repairs 


823 73 


222 92 


Contingent expenses 


752 70 


833 09 


Evening schools 


1,311 55 


1,098 02 


Balance unexpended 




1,336 91 



$46,082 01 146,082 01 



56 



The cost, exclusive of teaching, in 1877 was 


$10,176 91 


In 1878 . 


9,409 94 


A reduction of .... 


$766 97 


The cost of teaching in 1877 was 


$38,118 56 


In 1878 


35,335 16 


A reduction of .... 


$2,783 40 


A total reduction of 


$3,550 37 


STATISTICS. 





Whole amount expended by School Com- 
mittee 

Amount expended by City Councils for 
repairs and improvements of school- 
houses and lots, and salaries of School 
Committee and Superintendent . 

Whole amount expended by the city for 
school purposes 

Whole number of pupils enrolled in day 
schools, as reported* .... 

Average number belonging to schools, as 
reported 

Average daily attendance .... 

Average per cent of attendance, as calcu- 
lated 

Cost of tuition in day schools per scholar, 
based upon average number belonging, 

Cost of incidentals, per scholar . 

Number pupils admitted to High School 
from grammar schools 

Whole number admitted to High School . 

Number graduated from High School 

Average attendance in Evening School . 



1878. 1877. 

1,745 10 $48,448 47 



,015 72 


$3,706 25 


!,760 82 


$52,154 72 


3,515 


3,607 


2,571 
2,348 


2,571 
2,413 



91.3 



93.8 



$13 74 


$14 87 


$3 66 


$3 96 


82 


57 


88 


60 


47 


38 


106 


96 



* See table at the end of the Superintendent's report, and also his comments under 
the head of Attendance. 



57 



Number of teachers 


regularly employed in 






day schools . 




71 




71 


Number of scholars 


per teacher in High School . 


37 


30 


U (( 


M 


grammar schools . 


36 


37 


u U 


<.( 


middle schools 


37 


38 


a tc 


u 


primary schools 


42 


41 


(( u 


U 


suburban schools . 


29 


29 



SUPERINTENDENT. 

In June last, according to law, we proceeded to the 
choice of a Superintendent of Public Instruction, for the 
term of two years from July 1. Mr. William E. Buck 
was unanimously re-elected to the position. He has indus- 
triously, energetically, and efficiently performed the duties 
of his office, and the schools are far the better for his su- 
pervision. We commend the suggestions of his report, 
hereto appended, to our successors in office, and the new 
city government. We may call special attention to his 
references to the practicability of introducing plain sewing 
into some of our schools of lower grade ; and also to his 
suggestion as to future repairs of school-houses. 

TRUANCY. 

The city ordinances provide for the detail of one or more 
special police officers, at the discretion of the city marshal, 
to serve as truant officers, their duty being to report names 
of absentees and truants to the Superintendent, and at his 
request to make complaint to the police court. In the ex- 
ercise of his lawful discretion, the city marshal has for the 
past year omitted the detail he was authorized to make in 
the premises ; believing that the end of the law would be 
best subserved by requiring the whole police force to look af- 
ter truants. It is but just to say that in cases reported to the 
force the members have acted with great promptness and 
efficiency. 



58 

The purpose of the law, however, has not been fulfilled, 
and cannot be, without the whole time during the school 
year of at least one policeman, devoted to the one object. 
The law contemplates, not merely the punishment of truants, 
but the destruction of truancy. There are truants, in the 
eye of the law, who are so by the connivance of parents. 
There is a law for compulsory attendance at school a cer- 
tain portion of the school year ; a law wisely intended for 
the reduction of the mass of shiftlessness and pauperism 
with which society is, or is liable to become, afflicted. The 
" absentees and truants " specified in the city ordinance are 
of two classes : a. Of registered pupils, b. Of non-reg- 
istered youth . Those of the former class are easily discovera- 
ble by the teachers ; those of the latter require the atten- 
tion of an officer whose " beat. " is the whole city. In the 
latter class are those who shun the school-house as if it 
were their worst enemy, who love idleness, and subject 
themselves to all the influences which lead to vice ; and 
those others whose parents would mortgage their whole 
lives for the small pittance derived from mill-labor. The 
truant officer, duly authorized and exclusively employed 
in the work, is needful to look thoroughly after those 
found idling in the street during school hours, inves- 
tigating their excuses, and after youth unlawfully engaged 
in factories. 

We are constrained to believe, that, notwithstanding the 
service performed by the police force during the year now 
closing, the special detail is indispensable ; and as we think 
such an officer ought to be under the control of the School 
Board, though not appointed by them, we urge the modifi- 
cation of the ordinance suggested by us in June last. 



59 

CHANGES. 

For several years the attendance upon the Intermediate 
School has steadily declined. That in the course of its 
history it has proved a useful adjunct of our educational 
system, is undeniable. It has provided for a class, formerly 
more numerous than now, who, by reason of former irregu- 
lar scholastic training, or of infirm health, were unable to 
take the regular courses of study at our graded schools. 
Its necessity has been greatly obviated by the closer and 
easier grading of studies, and by the opportunity given at 
our evening schools. From these or other causes, the de- 
mand became so very limited that early in the year we 
found it needful to dispense with the assistant, and at the 
beginning of the fall term to close the school. No theory 
of past usefulness can justify the continuance of such a 
school, in default of a reasonable number needing its 
service. Should such a number for any term seek its ad- 
vantages, it can be re-opened to meet the demand. 

We have found it practicable to reduce the force of 
teachers at the High School during the year, without im- 
pairing efficiency. The number of assistants is now four. 

As reported by the Superintendent, a considerable in- 
crease in the number of children of the primary grade in 
the Training School sub-district has necessitated the open- 
ing of another school of the lowest grade, in the school- 
house at the corner of Beech and Spruce streets. A like 
overflow in the Manchester-street sub-district has caused 
the establishment of another school of the primary grade, 
which has been held for the last term in an attic room of 
the building on the corner of Manchester and Chestnut 
streets. That room, however, is wholly inadequate, and it 
is proposed, if the need shall be found still to press, to 
utilize for the purpose, one of the disused rooms in the 
Lowell-street building (old High School). Having reduced 



60 

the number of schools to the lowest point consistent with 
efficiency, it is to be expected that that number shall be 
gradually increased with the growth of the population. 

Early in the year we sought once more to consolidate 
snb-districts Nos. 6 and 9, in each of which the attendance 
for the last year has been small, both together in fact as- 
sembling a number of pupils much less than the average 
usually committed to the care of our teachers. Aside from 
questions of economy, a union of the schools would greatly 
add to the efficiency of instruction. It is difficult, in 
classes of two or three, and sometimes of but a single 
pupil, if that may be called, for the time, a " class," to 
maintain a show of interest on the part of pupil or teacher. 
The best results of teaching are obtained, under a judicious 
and competent instructor, by the friction of mind upon 
mind, and the vivacity and interest which numbers in a 
measure excite, just as an orator is stirred and fired by 
many, as he cannot be by few, auditors. The interest of 
pupils is greater in a class of twenty than it can be in 
one of five, and for the best work small schools should be 
consolidated where practicable. But in the case of the two 
districts named, the inhabitants of both so vigorously pro- 
tested against the reform that the city councils failed to co- 
operate, and the school committee were constrained to 
recede from their position. We felt obliged, however, to 
provide, in cases where the average whole number of pupils 
attending school was less than 25, that the maximum sal- 
ary of the teachers should be $-300. We still believe that 
the consolidation of the two districts is advisable, regard- 
ing their own interests alone. And it may be that under 
a statute enacted by the legislature at its last session, our 
successors may be able to reach that desirable end, by pro- 
viding for the daily transportation of the youth from the 
Webster's Mills neighborhood to the school-house near Mos- 



61 

quito Pond. We commend the suggestion to the consider- 
ation of our successors, and of the new city government. 

In connection with this subject we suggest, also, that the 
like transportation be provided for children of the Stark 
district to the Amoskeag school, where there will be found 
ample accommodation. 

The city government having fitted up a room in the attic 
of the High school-house for a chemical and philosophical 
laboratory, we have made a small appropriation for neces- 
sary appurtenances and apparatus. We recommend to our 
successors continued care of this important interest. The 
development of the natural sciences is so marked, and some 
knowledge of them so important, that they are becoming 
indispensable factors of a practical education. The sphere 
of polite learning thus accompanying that of scientific 
training, may illuminate the path of new generations, and 
promote public peace and happiness. 

SALARIES. 

In our earnest desire to meet the laudable demand of a 
reasonable economy in the expenditures of this department 
of public service, we have reviewed, during the year, the 
list of salaries, and carefully considered them in connection 
with the rates paid in other cities, of the same grade as 
ours, for the like service. In one sense the customs of 
other cities are indifferent to us. We are to manage our 
own affairs without reference to the management of other 
municipalities. But we cannot wholly divide ourselves 
from surrounding communities. The rates of compensa- 
tion in the department of public instruction paid in other 
cities, must affect the rates allowed in ours. It is greatly 
important that, for satisfactory service in our schools, such 
compensation shall be allowed as will hold our corps as 
near as may be unchanged. While we need not, therefore, 



62 

pay as generous salaries as the richer cities, our scale must 
not fall too far below the rates of cities similarly situated 
with ours. During the year at least one of our teachers 
doing efficient work has left us, tempted by a higher salary 
than we can afford. Were we still further to reduce our 
scale of payment, the drafts upon our list would be fre- 
quent, and always the more experienced and useful of our 
teachers would be taken from us, to be substituted by inex- 
perience. Besides, there is justice in a reasonably liberal 
remuneration for the service we require of our teachers. 
The business is exhausting, and requires good health and 
steady nerve. Old or infirm men and women are not in 
demand for the position. Those we employ can not engage 
in other avocations. If at one time they seem to be paid 
beyond the average of skilled employment, at another they 
are below it. And the time comes when they ought to 
retire, with some reliance for the days to come reserved 
from the fruits of their active labors. It is true that nearly 
all of our teachers are women, who are supposed to have 
marriage in view as the end of their lives. But we observe 
that not all of them enter upon that state of life, and some 
of them have to bear responsibilities as heavy as most of 
those who are actually heads of families. We require of 
them all a large contribution of their life-force, and draw 
deeply upon their nervous energy. The time has long past 
when the teacher simply sat in his chair, monarch of all 
he surveyed, and listened to recitations, noting down and. 
punishing failures of memory or of attention. We require 
now that he shall be a teacher in fact as well as in name, 
illustrating, instructing, educating. And he ought to be 
fairly rewarded for his service. 

It is, however, to be especially remembered that the state 
of the market has something to do with the regulation of 
prices. We find, by comparison, that our list of salaries is 



63 

lower than in other New-England cities of the same class. 
For particulars see the Superintendent's report. We sub- 
mit that a further reduction would be inequitable and un- 
wise. 

MUSIC AND DRAWING. 

In connection with the appointment of teachers for the 
new year, the subject of the continued employment of a 
special music-teacher was necessarily considered. Music 
has not been taught in our schools as an accomplishment. 
We have not sought to train musicians, as the school sys- 
tem does not contemplate special training in any direction. 
But musical publications are now so numerous that it seems 
as needful to know how to read them as it is to read, let us 
say, novels. Music, besides, has an immediate value in the 
school-room. It has proved a civilizer. Every one who 
remembers the school of the period before the introduction 
of music, and will take the trouble to compare it with that 
of the present time, recognizes the difference. 

" Music has power to soothe the savage breast ; " 

and it serves to quiet the nervous excitability and restrain 
the restlessness of youth. It has been an aid in promot- 
ing the great change of the school atmosphere from that 
which prevailed when was seen — 

" The whining school-boy, with his satchel, 
And shining morning face, creeping like snail 
Unwillingly to school." 

There may be cases of whining and of unwilling creep- 
ing among school-boys of the present time ; but they are 
not characteristic, and are exceedingly rare. 

Music has not been a study in our schools, but an exer- 
cise, accompanied by instruction. It is not allowed to in- 
terfere with what are supposed to be more practical 
branches. But a small share of the time has been allotted 



64 

to it. We have had, for several years, a superintendent 
of music, who has employed the whole school-time in visit- 
ing the schools, calling upon each once in two weeks, lead- 
ing it for the allotted time, observing the progress made 
ad interim under the care of the teachers, marking out the 
course for the next fortnight, and advising the teachers ac- 
cording to circumstances. His duty has been that of 
organization, inspiration, and direction ; regulating, stimu- 
lating, guiding, and toning up the efforts of regular teach- 
ers. 

Mr. Kimball, who has had charge of this department for 
several years, has, we are bound to say, done efficient ser- 
vice. His success is evident in the proficiency of pupils in 
music-reading, and the general excellence of the singing. 
We have doubted the wisdom or real economy of vacating 
the position and trusting entirely to the regular teachers to 
carry on unaided the work he has so well superintended. 
But we equally have been impressed with the need of a 
special instructor in drawing. The same work is neces- 
sary in that branch of school instruction that has been so 
well done in the department of music. The study needs 
organization and proper development, and the regular 
teachers require special superintendence and guidance. To 
provide for such a supervisor of drawing, without large in- 
crease of expenditure, Mr. Kimball has been re-appointed 
teacher?of music, to be employed but three days in each 
week, at a reduction of $400 per annum upon his salary. 
Under the direction of the sub-committee on music, he 
may, in the time allotted, maintain the present efficiency 
of instruction in that science. 

We recommend to our successors the employment of a 
competent instructor in drawing. The practical utility of 
that art, properly developed, is now generally recognized. 
A writer on the general subject, enumerating a few trades, 



65 

with the particular kinds of instruction proper to each, 
finds drawing needful in all but one, namely, dyeing. He 
pronounces it necessary to the following occupations : fres- 
co-painters, silver and gold smiths, engravers and litho- 
graphers, photographers, farmers, boot and shoe makers, 
tailors, button-makers, manufacturers of silk, cotton, 
linen, and woolen cloths, machinists, printers, molders, 
mechanical engineers, masons and carpenters, weavers, 
cabinet-makers and turners, potters, comb-makers, millers, 
basket-makers, glaziers, stucco-plasterers, house-painters, 
gardeners, cotton-printers, tinmen., tile-layers, wagon-build- 
ers, coppersmiths, iron and brass founders. 

While the school cannot specially fit any pupil for a par- 
ticular occupation, or enable him to make direct applica- 
tion of his skill in drawing to special trades, it is true that 
nearly or quite every one may be trained in the elementary 
principles of the art, and become accustomed to the free 
exercise of the hand in geometrical and inventive drawing, 
and even in mechanical or architectural drafts. It would 
be to the great advantage of the community if the new 
generations should become skilled in the use of the crayon 
and the pencil. It would largely promote its material in- 
terests, while it would be another element of progress in 
taste and refinement. 

" THE THREE R'S." 

It was said of old that the proper scope of the public 
school is limited to " the three R's :" Readin', 'Ritin' 
and 'Rithmetic ; and undoubtedly it was supposed that 
thus superior education was excluded. But as intelligence 
makes progress, the view widens. As the purpose of 
reading becomes bettor defined, the mode and spirit of the 
accomplishment are modified. To read, was a very differ- 
ent attainment a hundred years ago, from what it is now. 
5 



6Q 

And what mattered it, if the mass could not read ? Books 
were scarce. It was deemed desirable to read the Bible ; 
but while the words were followed by those who were able, 
the sense was given by a distinct order specially set apart 
for the purpose. Science had no form, and the best liter- 
ary culture was attained but by few. The colleges of the 
day were hardly above the high school or academy of the 
present. Newspapers were not numerous, and were but of 
small circulation. To-day. the land is flooded with litera- 
ture, good, bad, and indifferent ; daily, weekly, monthly, 
quarterly, and casual ; scientific, theological, literary ; for 
children, youth, and adults. The newspaper seeks to meet 
all demands. It too often caters for low appetites, but 
finds it necessary to keep somewhat abreast of the public 
intelligence. A good reader now implies something more 
than a correct pronouncer of words, or sentences. But 
little of our reading is now done orally : we read with our 
minds more than with our tongues. Sense, rather than 
sound, our pupils are to search out. That public reading 
shall be well done, it should be " with due emphasis and 
discretion," although to be pleasing it must be doue with 
suitable inflection and agreeable voice: suggesting one use 
of the music-teacher. But to read, nowadays, to the best 
purpose, requires advanced intelligence. It does not suf- 
fice to pronounce in a company, in a pleasing manner, 
some well-considered piece of greater or less literary excel- 
lence. We are not readers, in the modern meaning, if we 
are able only to get the sense of a bloody, hair-raising- 
story, or of the common news of the day. We must be 
skilled to understand the various revealments of science ; 
the record of its triumphs and of its applications to the 
arts of life ; whatever is published in the English lan- 
guage ; the record of melodious and harmonious sound. 
And so, the first " R " includes, as necessarily preparatory 



67 

to its complete acquirement, Music, Geography, and His- 
tory, with something of Physiology, Physics, Astronomy, 
Chemistry, Botany, Zoology, Geology, Civil Government, 
and Political Economy. These last are in a measure indis- 
pensable to the reader of current politics, that he may 
judge for himself of theories from time to time advanced 
by political leaders. And though ability to read within a 
narrow limit, say for amusement or for information con- 
cerning the more commonplace events of the time, is 
acquired in the grammar school, a high-school course is 
needful to an intelligent knowledge of the more important 
matters recorded in magazines, or deposited in more per- 
manent publications. 

Writing covers more than the mechanical art of copying 
with neatness and grace the words which some one else has 
first noted down. It is more than an ability to make a fair 
bill. It goes beyond framing a letter of business, compli- 
ment or affection. It should include the facility of record- 
ing one's own thoughts, as well as the thoughts of others, 
— English composition : indeed, the improvement of the 
faculty of thought, as well as the culture of the power of 
expression. And here come in the languages, especially 
those which have had to do with the structure of our own 
tongue, Latin' and French, if not Anglo-Saxon. Here, too, 
are found desirable a knowledge of the history of English, 
and an acquaintance with the best literature in that lan- 
guage. Here, again, are found the uses of Grammar and 
Rhetoric, — a knowledge of the best forms of expression. 

Our second " R" leads us into the High School. How 
many regret that while they think some thought, or know 
some fact, which might interest or instruct their fellow- 
men, they do not know how to express themselves, for want 
of the necessary training! There are many "mute 
Miltons," " inglorious " only because they do not know 



68 

how to speak. And whether it belong to this " R," or the 
first, in our schools ought to begin the training of youth to 
express their thoughts properly and promptly upon their 
feet ; readily to write upon the minds of others, with their 
tongues, without the intervention of the pen, their own 
mental product : as the telegraph writes upon the mind of 
the experienced operator through the ear, without the 
intervention of white tape, the message from afar. Draw- 
ing has become an indispensable adjunct of this department 
of school work. It aids in the mechanical operation of 
writing, and is itself a mode of writing — the writing of 
forms. It is often needful, to aid in description or illus- 
tration, when words fail. 

And where is the limit of Arithmetic as a school study ? 
Shall it go only so far that one may calculate the cost of 
articles bought or sold at retail ? Or shall we extend it to 
cover all kinds of wholesale business ? Shall it include 
Book-keeping — the method of recording the financial his- 
tory of a business ? We probably find but one voice in 
reply. Yet it is not the object of our schools specially to 
train book-keepers, more than to train bricklayers, survey- 
ors, engineers, or lawyers. But we discern general value 
in the knowledge and the skill which may be thus applied. 
Let us, however, remember, that the same value may be 
found in studies that do not deal with dollars and cents, 
but may be otherwise applied. Shall our arithmetic be 
permitted to include the measurement of masonry or of 
lumber ? Shall it further concern itself with the contents 
of surfaces and solids — gauging and surveying ? Shall 
it go beyond, and take up the mechanical powers, trian- 
gles and spheres ? We have carried our third " R " into 
the High-School course — through Algebra, Geometry, 
Surveying and Trigonometrj^. There is no reason why the 
common-school system should teach a boy or girl to calcu- 



69 

late the contents of a stone wall, that does not demand 
that he should have the opportunity of learning how 
astronomical calculations are made. He may never become 
an astronomer : he may never become a mason, and we do 
not want all to be masons. We need astronomers, as well 
as masons ; but more than that, we need intelligent citi- 
zens, who may know upon what grounds scientists make 
such wonderful numeral affirmations. 

•* The three R's," then, are no longer completed with 
the old limitations. There is as much need now of the 
wider application, as there was originally of the more re- 
stricted course. Without broader teaching than that which 
is employed in our grammar schools, and necessarily lim- 
ited by the age of the pupils, such a periodical, for instance, 
as the '• Popular Science Monthly," can not be read. That 
is not a publication for specialists, but for general readers. 
Ought we not, in the public interests, to teach youth to read 
it and other works like it ? Ought we not, for the public wel- 
fare, to teach the principles of Civil Government and Political 
Economy, that our youth may be prepared with defenses 
within themselves against the arts of demagogues and sel- 
fish men ? The only ground upon which a public tax for 
popular education can be maintained, is the promotion of 
intelligence for the safety of the ballot and the good order 
of society ; and these are not secured by the elementary 
knowledge obtained in the lower grades of school. They 
now need a training of faculty and a complement of 
knowledge obtained only in the high school. In connec- 
tion with this we make special reference to the remarks of 
the Superintendent upon the subject of vicious literature, 
when treating of the High School. 



70 

THE CONDITION OF OUR SCHOOLS. 

We cordially commend our schools as favorably compar- 
ing with others of similar grades. We think our teachers, 
as a class, constantly improve in efficiency. The grammar 
schools, especially, in which during the past year no change 
has been made by which experience has been substituted by 
inexperience, are more efficient. By the easy gradations 
of the course of study, and particularly by its frequent re- 
views, the best work possible under the circumstances has 
been assured. The mode of examination employed, by 
printed questions at unexpected times, two or more in each 
term, instead of public oral competition, yields not only a 
better test of knowledge, but relieves pupils from special 
preparation, interfering with the regular work of the 
schools, and accompanied by an anxiety both mentally and 
physically harmful. The schools are open to the public, 
who are invited to visit them at any time, and observe the 
character of the teaching employed, and the general atmos- 
phere of the school-room. By the recent policy, company 
days, when teachers and pupils put on their holiday attire, 
and take on unusual airs for exhibition, are suspended. 
But every interested citizen has the opportunity of observ- 
ing their every-day dress and work. He will see orderly 
groups of children and youth, showing general proficiency 
according to their several grades, and busy teachers inter- 
ested, and interesting pupils, in their work. More of this 
visitation ought to be done, by parents and tax-payers. 
They may see for themselves the utility of educational ex- 
penditure, and the usual propriety of school administration, 
while their interest will promote the interest and efficiency 
of those who are serving them in this department of mu- 
nicipal affairs. 

But we are far from intimating, either that our system is 
perfect or that our teaching is the best possible under any 



71 

circumstances. We know that, whatever reforms have 
been accomplished, there is yet great room for improve- 
ment. We claim that progress has been made ; that our 
newer school-houses better answer their purpose ; that bet- 
ter methods of discipline and instruction are superseding 
the old ; that more is done than formerly to cultivate the 
perceptions and rational faculty. Yet we remember that 
our teachers are human, and therefore imperfect in wisdom, 
and often unobservant ; that architects have not yet dis- 
covered the best methods of arranging school-rooms and 
ventilating them : that the school cannot obviate all the 
contrary influences of the street and of some homes : that 
wisdom will not die with this generation, though it may 
be more advanced than that of former days ; that, in fact, 
our teaching is not thorough enough : our school-houses 
not what they should and will be ; the proficiency of many 
pupils not what might be expected from the labor bestowed, 
nor the administration of our schools wholly what we would 
desire ; and that something is left to our successors to im- 
prove upon. We remember, as well, that our homes, our 
other public buildings, our churches, our halls of entertain- 
ment, our railway systems, our state and national and mu- 
nicipal governments, our highways, our manufactures, our 
newspapers, are far from perfect, and in many respects 
widely open to criticism. 

INCONSIDERATE CRITICISM. 

But he is not wise who overlooks the relative excellences 
of our institutions, domestic, public, or industrial, and 
magnifies their imperfections by a critical, rather than a 
sympathetic, view of them. And we deprecate that incon- 
siderate criticism which recognizes nothing good in our 
educational system, and observes it through such a dense 
medium of prejudice or spleen or self-importance or igno- 



72 

ranee, that the light is unequally refracted, and the object 
distorted out of all form and character. Thus, criticism 
of our school-houses would intimate that they are unfit, by 
want of proper ventilation, for the temporary accommoda- 
tion of our youth, and productive of disease. Admitting 
that the ventilation is not as complete as is desirable, it is 
all that science has yet rendered possible, and is better 
than that of any church or public hall in the city ; probably 
better than that of most of its dwelling-houses. And the 
critic himself, after venting his opinion, proceeds, for 
economy of fuel, to shut out of his dwelling-house, as far 
as he may, all possibility of the entrance of fresh air, and, 
perhaps, prepares his child for a social party in a room with 
whose atmosphere that of the school-room is pure as moun- 
tain breezes. If critics will seek and find a practical rem- 
edy for the evil, as discerned in the school-room, but in 
less degree there than in many other places of abode, 
temporary or permanent, he will be a benefactor to society. 
But his selection of the school-room for special criticism, 
and that so intense, accomplishes no good, and if it were 
generally believed, would do great harm. Certainly, the 
destruction and rebuilding of all our school-houses is not 
practicable ; and if accomplished, the new houses, in the 
present status of science and the arts, would probably 
average no better than those destroyed. Being all that we 
have, let us make the best of them, seeking to improve 
them from year to year, as advancing science may suggest. 
Nor is the criticism which suggests that our school-rooms, 
defective as they may be, are generators of disease, con- 
siderate of the facts. A writer speaks of what he calls a 
" school-room headache," as if it were the normal result of 
attendance at school. Examination of two of our gram- 
mar schools shows that : first, but a small minority of pu- 
pils are troubled at all with headaches ; and, second, not 



73 

one pupil in a hundred suffers pain in such a way, trace- 
able to the school-room or to study, or even refers it to 
either. It is true, some others suffer ; but the causes are 
generally neuralgic, catarrhal, or, as we might expect, gas- 
tric. The very few who do suffer from study or from the 
brief confinement of the school-room, need special treat- 
ment. The physician, or the judicious parent, not the 
teacher, the school committee, or the public, should deal 
with the case. Certainly, it would be a grievous wrong to 
the great public to change the whole course of study and 
of administration, to suit the very small number of invalids 
among youth of school age. 

We know that perfection of heating apparatus, as of ven- 
tilation, has not been attained, and that teachers, absorbed 
in their work, are sometimes forgetful of temperature. 
But this is not characteristic, and can probably be matched 
by sextons, janitors of halls, and even householders. It 
may be that, during the winter, colds are occasioned by the 
want of judgment of those in charge of buildings or of 
classes. We have known severe colds, however, to be 
taken outside of the school-room. Why should not the 
complaint be made, rather, of the weather ? Every school- 
room is provided with a thermometer, to which it is the 
habit of teachers to refer. These are instructed to open 
the windows freely at recess, for change of air ; and, as a 
rule, they are not injudicious in reducing the temperature, 
when it has gone beyond the prescribed limit, 70°. It is 
certainly not fair, or for the public good, to make whole- 
sale charges against school administration, for individual 
fault or accident. 

Nor are our schools in any sense convectors of contagion. 
There is less danger of scarlet fever or diphtheria in school 
than out of it. We will not say that either disease has 
never been communicated through neighborhood at school. 



74 

It is both dangerous and foolish to affirm negatives. We 
do say, however, that there are defensive regulations in our 
schools, and none at all in other juvenile gatherings. Our 
teachers are instructed, and are specially prompted, by per- 
sonal care and regard for those at home, to exact obedience, 
to exclude all children of the same family with persons 
affected, until the physician's certificate shall assure them 
thai all danger of contagion is over. The physicians of 
the city are to notify teachers of eases of contagious disease, 
for their information : and children themselves are apt to 
carry the news of infection with great promptness. We 
confidently repeal that children are safer from such peril- 
ous diseases in regular attendance at school, than at their 
usual liberty of movement. 

Another inconsiderate criticism is that which affirms that 
high-school study indisposes our youth for work and leads 
them to desire to live idly, " by their wits." That now and 
then a young man, educated academically, has that grovel- 
ing desire, is not to be denied. What is there in his stud- 
ies to induce it '." The effort of the school is to make him 
industrious: not only to show him the beauties of litera- 
ture, and to give him power of expression and intellectual 
taste, but to teach him the wonders of science and its use- 
ful applications. There is nothing in the course to make 
him idle or low. If he hankers after an easy life, with or 
without the means of supporting it, it is because of home 
and social, and not of school, influences. As matter of 
fact, our youth, graduating from the High School, gener- 
ally go to forms of industry of various kinds. Some are 
at work in our factories, some employed in trade, some 
working at trades, some studying farther on, and a small 
share of them in professional life. Should a few choose 
this, what is the disadvantage to the community ? What 
right have we to hinder ? The intelligence of physicians, 



75 

clergymen, and lawyers contributes to the intelligence of 
the masses. If at any time professional skill is a glut in 
the market, a many-sided education ought to enable the 
man of small income to " turn his hand " to some other 
vocation, for which he may show more aptitude. And, on 
the other hand, a many-sided education makes it easier for 
a mechanic or clerk to adapt his labor to his circumstances. 
The "re-adjustment" of industries, as this or that depart- 
ment is glutted, is a problem pressing upon our communi- 
ties, and only to be solved by a more varied general educa- 
tion. 

Two criticisms balance each other : 1. That the high 
school encourages a division of our youth into classes, the 
rich attending and the poor not able to attend. 2. That 
" the son of a bricklayer or a washer-Avoman " may study 
the branches of learning taught in high schools, and thus 
be " made discontented with his ' rank and station in 
life.' " Both of these objections to the high school can- 
not be true. The former certainly is not. The free high 
school democratizes learning. It is its glory that it places 
on a par the children of the most fortunate and of the 
most humble family of the city. Whatever the " station 
in life," if he has a studious disposition and has proved his 
intellectual aptness, and his parents are disposed to make 
the necessary sacrifices, any pupil may receive the best edu- 
cation the city can furnish. Why should it not be so ? 
What is there in the nature of republican institutions that 
requires any one to be satisfied with his station in life, or 
to maintain it his a day longer than circumstances require ? 
It is to the public interest that all shall have an equal 
chance in the struggle for life, and that the best shall win. 
It is the most beneficent work we can do, as regards the 
welfare of our community, to lift from the dust the masses 
prone. In our natural philosophy class may be some wash- 



76 

er-woman's son, who, there receiving the first intimations 
of the principles of physics, shall become a public bene- 
factor through his inventions ; in the class in chemistry, a 
bricklayer's son, who is to be a great discoverer in the 
realm of nature. It is a good thing if our communities 
recognize intelligence as superior to wealth, and as monop- 
olized by no " station in life." 

CONCLUSION. 

Such as they are, with abundant need of improvement, 
though with abounding points of excellence, we resign our 
charge into other hands. No department of public admin- 
istration is of more importance ; none, we believe, yields 
better or more copious fruit. The investment of the city 
of Manchester in her schools is one making sure returns, in 
an intelligent, orderly community. Our best wishes go 
with those who are to have charge of her interests. May 
their efforts for the further advancement of public educa- 
tion be grandly successful. 

G. L. DEMAREST, 

For the School Committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester: — 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with your rules, I herewith 
respectfully submit the following as my second annual 
report, the same being for the year 1878, and the twenty- 
third of the series of annual reports prepared by the 
Superintendent of Schools : — 

GENERAL CONDITION OP THE SCHOOLS. 

The present condition of the schools, though not 
claimed as perfect, is to me far more satisfactory than that 
of a year ago. There has been more uniformity in the 
amount and character of the work done ; fewer schools 
have failed to meet requirements ; greater earnestness and 
a more thorough discharge of duties have been observed in 
respect to teachers in general ; and better results have been 
attained as the reward of doing less rote work and more 
real teaching, the attempt at which has also greatly 
improved the general spirit of our schools. 

APRIL REPORT. 

As an appropriate introduction to a more special con- 
sideration of some particulars relating to the condition of 
the schools, I repeat some conclusions, supplemented with 
additional statistics which should have a permanent place 



78 

in our school history as rendering more complete the 
annual report for 1877, which 1 presented you at a regular 
meeting of your honorable board on the fifth of last April : 

" During the past few months I have been impressed that 
in some instances there might be a more economical expen- 
diture of that portion of our appropriation allowed for 
teachers' salaries, without, in the least, impairing the 
efficiency of our schools ; and I now feel it my duty to 
make known to you my thoughts in that direction, assured 
that the superior judgment of the eighteen members of the 
school committee will not suffer itself to be misled by my 
statements and inferences. Nor should teachers in schools 
designated feel that any personal reflections are intended. 
My sympathies naturally extend to all of that class, and I 
would make no mention of any conclusions in regard to 
the propriety of reducing the number of our teachers, or 
the salary of any portion of the same, were it not that in 
my present capacity, I am trying, conscientiously, to act in 
accordance with my official oath to subserve the interests of 
the city to the best of my judgment. 

" The total expenditure for teachers* salaries during the 
year 1877 was $38,118.56, and the average number of 
pupils belonging to all the schools was 2,571. These items 
make it appear that the average cost of tuition, per pupil, 
in all our schools, was -$14.87, based upon the item of 
teaching alone. 

" The schools to which I would call your special attention, 
are three small suburban schools and the Intermediate 
School. The school in the Stark District, for the year 
1877, had an average number of twelve pupils, and the 
cost, per pupil, for teaching in that district was $36.67, or 
about two and a half times the average cost, per pupil, for 
all our schools ; at Webster's Mills the cost was $20 per 
pupil, for an average number of twenty pupils ; at Mos- 



79 

quito Pond the cost was $21.05 per pupil, for an average 
number of nineteen pupils ; and at the Intermediate 
the cost was $34.44 per pupil, for an average number of 
thirty-six pupils. 

" Now I would submit that this board may put into each 
of the three small suburban schools a good teacher, who 
would work with enthusiasm, at least one year, at the 
minimum salary of $300 per annum ; and it may be ques- 
tioned whether teachers can be found who would keep up 
great earnestness of work in schools so small for more 
than one or two years. These schools are all important, 
and the citizens of those districts have a right to insist that 
we maintain, for them, schools of high character ; nor 
would I have turned your thoughts in their direction, if I 
had any suspicion that they would be impaired by my sug- 
gestions. 

•• Ordinarily we might not feel that we could always sup- 
ply them with good teachers : but the graduates of our train- 
ing-school have now become so numerous that we should be 
safe in selecting the best of them for these schools, and 
they would go there and so work that they might have 
hope of securing a more lucrative position at the end of the 
year. I would have it understood that they should remain 
a year in these schools before they could be considered can- 
didates for the larger schools ; and I would now take occa- 
sion to recommend that no new teacher be elected to any 
school for more than one term, till the result of such a 
trial has been observed. 

; ' In regard to the Intermediate School, I would say that 
for the past year it has been of such a size and character, 
I have felt that the expense of it has been out of propor- 
tion to its usefulness, when compared with other schools in 
the city. 

" From the first of April, 1877, to the first of January, 



80 

1878, the greatest number of pupils in that school, during 
any month, was thirty-six, for two teachers ; while for the 
same months at GofiVs Falls, and in the higher depart- 
ment of the school at Bakersville, the average, number of 
pupils, in each school, was more than forty, for one teacher. 
I know the Intermediate School is ungraded : but the same 
is true of the other schools with which it is now compared, 
and I have reason to think that without more pupils than 
it had during these months last year — an average of 
twenty-five — it may undoubtedly be so classified that one 
teacher can properly manage it. Indeed, it may be inquired 
why a first-class lady teacher cannot control and as success- 
fully manage it during the spring and fall terms, as that a 
lady should properly conduct the school at Goffe's Falls or 
at Bakersville. with fifteen or more additional pupils. If an 
equally good teacher could be put into the Intermediate 
School, at the salary (§425) paid at Goffe's Falls, she 
might conduct that school alone during the spring and fall 
terms, and remain during the winter as an assistant to a 
male principal, who could be put into the school for the win- 
ter term of three months, at a salary of 875 or 6100 per 
month, and in this way the expense of this school could be 
reduced from $1,225, now paid for teaching, to 6725 or 
1650, according to what might be paid the male teacher per 
month during the winter. There is no lack of applications 
for winter schools from young men who come out of college 
to teach during the winter, many of whom have testimo- 
nials of good success in teaching for one or more terms ; 
and I cannot think it particularly important that the same 
teacher should have the principalship of this school for many 
terms, since the pupils are constantly changing, and the 
assistant would be permanent, under the plan I have sug- 
gested. ■ It cannot, however, be certain that this school will 
be so small or easilv managed for a vear to come ; but, 



81 

though the school in the past has been subject to great 
variation, in respect to numbers and the degree of difficulty 
in its management, I should not have presented another 
plan for conducting it, without, at least, a reasonable assur- 
ance of its success. 

" The changes which I have now suggested, would reduce 
the expense of teaching four schools 8825, to which $150 
more might probably be added for the same. 

" It is for you to decide, in the light of such suggestions 
as I have presented, whether or not these changes can be 
effected without impairing the efficiency of the schools. 

" I presume it is no secret that some members of the board 
have thought for several weeks that the efficiency of the 
High School might not be unfavorably affected if its corps 
of teachers should be reduced by one ; and, because I learn 
that the sub-committee of that school will soon meet to 
consider the advisability of any change there, I would 
recommend that power be granted that committee to act in 
accordance with its convictions, in order to obviate the 
necessity of calling a special meeting of the board before 
the opening of next term. 

" During the past week I have made up a statistical report 
of our schools, as required by law, for the State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, and it occurs to me that you 
should be informed in regard to some errors and omissions 
in the printed report of the school committee for 1877. 
These occurred through some misunderstanding by which 
the proof-sheets were not submitted to the author of that 
report, as they should have been. 

"In the first place, there should be added to $18,295.47, 
the amount reported as expended by the school committee, 
#153, which was expended from the tuition fund, and the 
full amount expended by the committee is thus found to 
be $48,448.17. To this sum add $3,706.25, the amount ex- 
G 



pended by the city councils for repairs and improvements 
of school-houses and lots, and salaries of school committee, 
clerk, and superintendent, and there results 852,154.72 as 
the whole amount expended by the city for all school pur- 
poses for the year 1877. From this latter sum there should 
be deducted 81,903.81, the " Literary Fund " received from 
the State for the support of schools, and also 8291.41, the 
amount of tuition received from non-resident pupils, if we 
would know the amount raised by tax for the support of 
schools for 1877, and there is left 819,899.50, which, as a 
tax, is at the rate of a little less than three and one-fifth 
mills per dollar of the assessed valuation of the city for 
that year. 

" The evening schools were much larger and more suc- 
cessful than usual. The average attendance for 1877 was 
ninety-six as against sixty for 1876, and it is to be regretted 
that the appropriation for these schools is so small for the 
current year. No schools are more important than those 
which furnish means to the adult population for learning to 
read and write. According to the census of 1870, New 
Hampshire had about 10,000 illiterates, or 3.8 per cent of 
her population over ten years of age. The larger portion 
of these arc congregated in our great cities. Shall we open 
to them the door to all secular knowledge, an opportunity 
to learn to read, and make it possible for them to append 
more than a mark to a receipt for services ? " 

teachers' salaries. 

By an act of the school committee since the foregoing 
was presented, the salary of teachers in all suburban schools 
having an average number less than twenty-five for any 
term, has been fixed at the minimum salary of three hun- 
dred dollars per annum, the same to take effect at the open- 
ing of the next school year. 



83 

Tiiis act is certain to affect the salaries paid teachers at 
the Stark District, at Webster's Mills, and at Mosquito 
Pond ; and it is quite likely to apply to teachers' salaries at 
the Harvey District, and at Youngsville, and possibly at 
Hallsville. 

During the past two terms only the minimum salary has 
been "paid teachers at the Stark District, at the Harvey Dis- 
trict, and at Youngsville, because of the employment of 
new teachers in these schools, whose salaries have been 
fixed by a standing rule of the committee, which estab- 
lishes the salary of new teachers for all grades below the 
first division of the grammar schools at three hundred dol- 
lars per annum for the first year's service. 

The three former of the suburban schools last named are 
quite small. For the two years ending December 31, 1878, 
the attendance at these schools has been as follows : At the 
Stark District, the average number of pupils belonging was 
11, 12, 14, 13, 12, 14, for the six respective terms begin- 
ning January, 1877, and the average daily attendance for 
the same terms was 10, 11, 13, 12, 8, 11 ; at the Webster's 
Mills school the average number belonging was 18, 12, 11, 
13, 8, 14, and the average attendance was 17, 11, 10, 11, 
7, 11 ; at the Mosquito-Pond school, the average number 
belonging was 12, 15, 18, 15, 18, 18, and the average daily 
attendance was 11, 13, 15, 15, 16, 13. 

The recent act of the board to reduce the salaries paid 
teachers in these schools, may be considered just when 
their salaries are compared with those paid for teaching 
full schools. There is certainly not half the exhaustion of 
the vital forces occasioned in the management of such 
small schools. It is true that the number of hours daily 
devoted to work in the school-room is the same, and that 
we expect equally good teaching ; but the great strain upon 
the nervous energies of the teacher does not come from 



84 

the process of giving instruction. The act of instructing 
is invigorating, and a pleasure to the true teacher. It is 
the government of a school that taxes the teacher's health, 
patience, and power of endurance ; and the degree of dif- 
ficulty experienced in the control of a school generally 
increases in rather more than geometrical ratio as the num- 
ber of its pupils increases. Hence it is, that in schools, as 
in the army, wherever many are herded together, it be- 
comes necessary, in order to have an efficient organization, 
to secure a head that can successfully organize, control, 
and direct the movements of large numbers. The drill- 
master may have as much knowledge of standard military 
tactics as the general, and drill a squad or company even 
better than he ; but for the government of an army, an 
additional quality is essential, and, to be had, it must be 
paid an extra price. The same, in general, is true of 
schools and teachers. I presume a dozen could be selected 
from the corps of our lady teachers who might successfully 
control and instruct the most difficult grammar school di- 
vision in the city, if it were in a building by itself. So I 
presume it equally true that the same might utterly fail as 
governesses where they are, if they were held solely re- 
sponsible for the conduct of their pupils out of, but about, 
their school-rooms, mingling, as they do, with about three 
hundred other pupils in the same entries and yard, were it 
not for the fact that the pupils know their teachers are 
upheld by the head of the school ; and experience shows 
that for a proper governing head, whether for an army, a 
school, or a factory, the market price must be paid. 

It may be seen from what follows, whether, and to what 
extent, it is customary to grade teachers' salaries according 
to the position occupied, whether our scale of variation is 
exceptional or not, and how our rates compare with those 
paid for similar Avork in the following fifteen cities : Ha- 



85 

verhill, Lewiston, Burlington, Gloucester, Taunton, Bangor, 
Chelsea, Bridgeport, New Bedford, Salem, Springfield, Fall 
River, Lynn, Lawrence, and Portland. This list includes 
all the cities in New England having in 1870 a population 
varying from 13,092, in Haverhill, to 31,413, in Portland. 
The average population of these fifteen cities at that time 
was 21,269, and the population of Manchester at the same 
time was 23,536. 

The maximum salaries now (November, 1878) paid 
teachers in these cities are at the following rates per an- 
num : — 

HIGH SCHOOL. Principal. Sub-Master. 1st Assist. Other Assist. 

Average of the 15 cities, $1,996 $1,231 $797 $618 

Paid at Manchester, 1,800 950 750 475 

Grammar Schools. 
Average of the 15 cities, 1,487 539 476 

Paid at Manchester, 1,350* 475 425f 

Middle or Intermediate Schools.:): 
Average of the 15 cities, 465 

Paid at Manchester, 425 

Primary Schools. 
Average of the 15 cities, 465 

Paid at Manchester, 425 

Suburban Schools. 
Average of the 15 cities, 342 to 476 

Paid at Manchester, 300 to 475 

Music. § 
Average of the cities employing a special teacher, $1,185. 
Paid at Manchester, $1,200. 

* Since reduced to $1,300. 

f Since advanced to $440. 

t In some cities this grade is included in the grammar school, as fifth and sixth 
division'. 

§ Twelve of the fifteen cities employ a special teacher in music, and the average 
salary as given for these is proportioned to five days' work per week, the same be- 
ing the time devoted to music by our special teacher- Since these figures were 
.prepared our music-teacher's salary has been made $800, for which he is to render 
three days' service per week. 



86 

Drawing.^ 

Average of the cities employing a special teacher, #1,104. 
At Manchester, no special teacher. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

The action of the committee, which for the spring term 
reduced the number of teachers to one at the Intermediate 
School, proved to be well advised, for the number of pupils 
there for that term was but fourteen. At the opening of 
the fall term there were only four present, and as the 
school did not increase, at the end of the first week it was 
closed for the remainder of the term. In response to an 
advertisement in our local papers, six have signified a de- 
sire to have the Intermediate School again opened, and 
promise attendance during the coming winter. 

The character of this school seems to have gradually 
changed within a few years. Formerly it was chiefly com- 
posed of young ladies and gentlemen who had good, or 
fair, abilities, but were unable to attend school more than a 
few months a year. Latterly, there have been put into this- 
school, with the former element, those who might properly 
be classed in middle or primary schools, but were some- 
what more advanced in years than the average of those 
grades, and of the ruder sort, disposed to truancy, etc. 

Pupils of this character have been put into the Interme- 
diate School because the school lias been small and the 
pupils were an annoyance to the graded schools. This 
policy, however, has not secured a sufficient number for a 
fair-sized school, and it is closed. A present member of 
the school committee, for many years conversant with the 
character of our population and our schools, thinks the de- 
pletion of the Intermediate School is owing to the changed 

*[ Seven of the fifteen cities employ a special teacher in drawing, and in mos> 
instances he instructs in both day and evening schools and at teachers' meetings. 



87 

character of that portion of our population which now 
leaves school for the mill and the shop, the same obtaining: 
from the evening schools what additional schooling they 
have ; while the element formerly disposed to leave school 
for the mill, no longer finding employment there, now con- 
tinues more generally in the graded schools. 

If this theory is correct, and from recent observations in 
regard to those attempting to attend the evening schools 1 
think it may be, then there are many of school age in the 
mills, and it becomes our duty to see that they attend 
school according to law. 

Section 3, chapter X. of the " Rules of the School Com- 
mittee," is as follows : — 

" The Intermediate School is not regarded as one in the 
regular grade, but is designed to afford special advantages 
to such pupils as shall attend school for less than two terms 
in the year, or such as, from mental or physical inability, 
cannot maintain a fair position in the Grammar or High 
School, or are not easily managed in a middle or primary 
school. Xo pupil shall be admitted to this school who can 
profitably attend the graded schools." 

Pupils of the character referred to in the latter part of 
the section, are not sufficiently numerous to warrant the 
continuance of the Intermediate School : but I doubt not 
there are in our mills and about our streets children enough 
of school age to make a school of the character contem- 
plated by this section, as large as the Intermediate ever 
was in its palmiest days. 

Of other things mentioned in my April report, it may be 
said that the services of one teacher at the High School 
have been dispensed w r ith since the opening of the spring 
term, without apparent detriment to the school ; and funds 
have been obtained for a successful opening of the evening 
schools, by a transfer from the appropriation for fuel, made 



possible by economical expenditures in the department of 
fuel and heating. 

NEW SCHOOLS. 

During the fall term two new schools were opened, one 
at the corner of Spruce and Beech streets, and the other 
on the third floor of the Manchester-street house, at the 
corner of Chestnut street. The former of these is likely 
to be permanent, and possibly the latter will also be found 
a necessity. If so, a more suitable room should be pro- 
vided for it ; and I think investigation would show that 
there are pupils belonging to the Manchester-street schools, 
living north of Hanover street, sufficiently numerous to 
form another school in the old High-School building on 
Lowell street, and I would suggest that the transfer of a 
sufficient number of such pupils to the latter house would 
be the most convenient way of relieving the Manchester- 
street schools, provided both vacant rooms on Lowell street 
are not again needed for the Intermediate School. I seri- 
ously doubt any necessity for the use of more than one 
room for the latter school, if again opened. 

It is somewhat probable that in the spring a new school 
will have to be organized in the Center-street house in 
"Squog, where one was discontinued about a year and a 
half ago. The school population in that vicinity seems to 
have considerably increased since the establishment of the 
German settlement in that locality. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Since 1 became Superintendent, I have given less atten- 
tion to the High School than that of any other grade in 
the city, because I have believed my time could be utilized 
more to the advantage of our public schools by an endeavor 
upon my part to unify and improve the work of the lower 



89 

grade schools, from which by far the larger portion of our 
pupils, enter upon their life-work, and upon which also 
chiefly depends the character of the material of which the 
High School is composed. I have felt the more free to pur- 
sue this course because of a knowledge that the Hiffh 
School was being frequently inspected by a member of Its 
sub-committee, and occasionally by another member of the 
same and by one of the general committee. 

It appears, however, from record, that I have visited this 
school thirty-nine times ; and it affords me pleasure to say 
that the instruction given there may be regarded as of a 
high character, and the recitations usually good. When- 
ever the contrary has been observed of recitation, from 
previous knowledge of the pupils reciting I could not feel 
that the teachers were at fault for the failure of a few. 
In passing judgment upon any school, it is important that 
the critic should know somewhat of the material with 
which the teacher has to do ; nor is it safe to draw hasty 
conclusions from observations made at but few visits. Some 
pupils will not appear even as well as usual, until they be- 
come used to the presence of individual visitors, nor are any 
likely to appear at their best before they come to feel the 
presence of visitors as that of friends. The members of 
our High School, however, are for the most part reliant and 
self-composed, and may be judged from any criterion which 
is fairly applicable to those in similar institutions. 

In regard to the High-School course of study, I will say 
that 1 believe it is the result of an honest endeavor, upon 
the part of the committee who framed it, to satisfy the va- 
ried demands of the community by affording an opportu- 
nity to fit for college, to study French and the higher Eng- 
lish, including the sciences, or to select a partial course in 
any of these departments of study. If the trial has dem- 
onstrated that such an accommodation of the public is not 



00 

properly possible in one high school, then it becomes the 
duty of the school board either to establish another high 
school or to ascertain that a considerable portion of the 
community are agreed as to what the purpose of the one 
high school shall be. 

The severest criticisms upon this school seem to be aimed 
at the amount and manner of classical teaching. One 
would have less in amount, that the teaching may be more 
thorough, even though none be fitted for college ; another 
would have the amount required for admission to college so 
taught that pupils pursuing the classical course at our High 
School may have the drill obtained only at the best classi- 
cal schools in the country, even to the weakening, or ex- 
clusion if necessary, of the business and English courses 
now undertaken, it being held that three such courses as 
are now arranged, cannot all be thoroughly carried forward 
by its present number of teachers. There are some who 
would not have Latin or Greek taught in the High School, 
and others who would not have any public high school. 
Such being the extreme views entertained by respectable 
and intelligent citizens, there can be but one course to pur- 
sue ; and that is for you who are the chosen custodians of 
the public schools to give these different views due consid- 
eration and then to act for the " greatest good of the great- 
est number " of your constituents. The attempt of the 
past few years to popularize our High School by reducing 
to a minimum the amount of time and attention to be 
given the classics has, I think, been the foundation for un- 
favorable comments by those who believe in thorough clas- 
sical training ; but so long as the young men who complete 
this course are able to enter "college and there take the re- 
spectable or high rank certified to by the professors at 
Dartmouth within the past few months, it may be con. 
sidcred that the portion of our community which is enti- 
tled to classical instruction is being fairly treated. 



91 

Our High School compared with others doing similar 
work, is inexpensive, and well worth the cost of it to the 
community for the sole sake of its influence upon our lower 
grade schools. It may also be added to the credit of the 
school, that zeal for knowledge and the necessity of labor to 
secure it, is so exemplified by the example of its corps of 
teachers, that its pupils are not likely to be satisfied with 
dime novels and similar trash so eagerly devoured by those 
who have acquired only the elements of a common-school 
education. 1 cannot believe that one of the twenty-eight 
young men seen at one time on a day of July sitting backed 
by trees on a single common in this city, reading the vilest 
of trash, was a graduate of our high or grammar schools. 
Our " dangerous classes," or at least those most dangerous, 
are no longer of those too ignorant to read. If we would 
win them to the better portion of the community, we must 
educate them above its lower strata. Our greatest lack of 
pupils is in the higher grades of the grammar schools ; 
and these are undoubtedly larger than they would be, had 
we no high school. Our High School may be improved, 
and to this end it is and should be open to fair criticism ; 
but to impair its usefulness is to strike in the head our 
whole system of public schools. ,. 

OTHER SCHOOLS. 

With rare exceptions, all the divisions of our grammar 
schools, as also the middle and primary grades, are uncom- 
monly well taught and deservedly popular. The suburban 
schools are also doing a good work, of which some are 
excellent. Perhaps no school in the city has shown more 
imfrrovemeilt than that in the Harvey District, where for 
the first time in two years, at least, a teacher has been for- 
tunate enough" seemingly to secure a general co-operation of 
the citizens of the district. 



92 

TEACHERS. 

The city has been unfortunate in the loss, as teachers, of 
Mi.so Cleora E. Bailey and Miss Nellie M. Whitney, both 
formerly at the Spring-street School, both of whom had 
also proved themselves superior teachers of the grades in 
which for several years they had been respectively em- 
ployed. Their successors, however, after a term's trial, in 
one instance, and a year's trial in the other, are giving 
promise of success that will be commensurate with their 
experience ; and the wisdom of filling similar vacancies 
from among the number of those showing good work and 
native skill while at the Training School, is again justified. 
A few other changes of teachers have occurred since the 
issue of my last annual report, but I can add nothing more 
important in regard to them than to say it could be readily 
observed that from the start those who have had the ad- 
vantage of our Training-School course, or that of some 
normal or similar school, have without exception shown 
superior teaching ability, which is shown by others only 
after lapse of time, and then only by those of superior 
native talent. Our teachers in general, as I have already 
intimated, are good or excellent ; and the few exceptional 
ones who might be marked at no more than fair, are as 
they are, not so much because of their lack of education 
or skill,..as because of a lack of heartiness in the work, as is 
evinced by their conduct about the school-buildings as well 
as in their rooms. Such are observed by their co-laborers 
as those disposed to stand at the doors or in the entries and 
talk, if by chance they may be at the school-building a few 
moments sooner than required by the rules of the school 
committee, frequently neglecting to be in their own rooms 
till a portion of their pupils are seated; observed by their 
pupils as those in haste to leave the school-building at the 
close of each session ; clothed for the open air, found last 



93 

in the file of their pupils inarching out ; and noted by vis- 
itors as those who lack interest and enthusiasm in then- 
work. Happily for our schools the number of such is 
exceedingly small, and the picture is drawn only for the 
benefit of those with whom the attitude is habitual. Oc- 
casional delays and haste may be excusable, but pupils 
should be taught by example that the school-room is not a 
place to be entered only from necessity. Nor should 
teachers, through inclination to be out of their rooms, 
interrupt other schools in the same building, by unnec- 
essary consultations with other teachers during session 
hours, when pupils are in the rooms. 

It is not a pleasant duty for principals to be obliged even 
occasionally to remind those to whom reference is here 
made, of their place and duties at school ; but they can 
hardly be censured even by those most concerned for men- 
tioning things which unfavorably affect the well-being of 
the schools under their general charge. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The attendance at the public schools during the past 
year has been somewhat interfered with by prevailing dis- 
eases. Diphtheria has been more or less prevalent through- 
out the year, yet of itself has not more seriously affected 
the attendance at the schools in general than more common 
diseases ordinarily do ; but scarlet fever and measles were 
also prevalent during the spring term, which, together with 
the small-pox scare, may have reduced the average daily 
attendance, so that proportionally the average daily attend- 
ance in all our schools for the past year is not so great by 
three as it was for 1877. This may be seen by results 
given in a table at the end of this report, showing the 
attendance for the past year, when compared with similar 
results in 1877, found in last year's report. Last year the 



94 

whole number of different pupils in all our public schools 
was 3,607, and the average daily attendance was 2,418 for 
that year. The number of different pupils in all our 
schools this year is 3,515, and proportionally, as compared 
with last year, we should this year have an average daily 
attendance of 2,351 ; but as the average attendance for this 
year has been only 2,348, we may infer that any unusual 
amount of sickness in the city during the past year has 
reduced the average daily attendance in all our schools by 
three. 

The difference between the percentage * of attendance 
for this year and that of last year is 2.5, and this differ- 
ence is owing chiefly to the changed basis used in deter- 
mining the average number belonging. Heretofore this 
item has been found from a standard which required that 
pupils temporarily absent for more than five consecutive 
days should not be reckoned as members of a school dur- 
ing the period of such absence. By that standard a pupil 
who was sick abed five days had to be marked absent ; but 
one who went away fishing for five and a half days had 
not those days accounted against him as absences, because 
he was not reckoned a member of the school for tlte time 
being, though he had not taken his books away, and it was 
well known that he would return the following week. By 
the requirement of the rules, as amended a year ago for 
the purpose, all pupils are this year reckoned members of 
school, for the several terms, from the day of their en- 
trance to that of their withdrawal, without regard to the 
length of any intermediate absence or the cause of it. 
This method requires that all intermediate absence be 
marked as absence, an arrangement which is manifestly 
just. The membership, or average number belonging, will 

* Found by dividing the average daily attendance by the average number be- 
longing. 



.95 

be greater by this method than by that formerly in vogue, 
and the percentage of attendance correspondingly less. 
Hence it is that the attendance at the schools this year, 
when compared with that of last year, differs in respect to 
the whole number of different pupils enrolled for the year 
by ninety-two, and the percentage of attendance by two 
and five-tenths, while the average number belonging for 
each of the two years happens to be exactly the same. 

The following table will show the liability of our schools 
to increase or decrease, in accordance with the portion of 
our school population which may be out of health, at work 
in the mill or shop, or in attendance at parochial or other 
private schools : — 

TABLE SHOWING THE AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE AT OUR 
SCHOOLS FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS. 



18G9 


1,969 


1874 


2,318 


• 1870 


1,987 


1875 


2.295 


1871 


1,911 


1876 


2,379 


1872 


2,110 


1877 


2,413 


1873 


2,284 


1878 


2,348 



The average daily attendance is taken as a basis of com- 
parison, because it is the only item in our attendance statis- 
tics which, for years past, has been uniformly computed 
from undeviating data. The chief object of this compari- 
son is designed to show that the decrease from last year is 
not exceptional. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

Near the close of my report for last year, as an after 
thought, and without much consideration, I advocated the 



96' 

establishment of an industrial school, as the result of my 
observations during the year, in regard to the lack of 
proper habits of industry among a portion of our more ad- 
vanced pupils. As to the propriety of the establishment 
of such a school, the board of school committee appeared 
to differ from me. While I agree to your statement of the 
general " purpose of the common school," I still think the 
safety of the state, for which alone schools have any claim 
to support by public tax, would be as greatly promoted by 
the establishment, in our larger towns, of schools for the 
purpose of teaching habits of manual industry to the por- 
tion of school population that do not attain it to any de- 
gree from their natural guardians, as by our present 
system of public schools, which are so well adapted to the 
necessities of the majority. Idleness, I believe, leads to 
poverty and crime more frequently than ignorance. Nev- 
ertheless, I am more fully aware than I was a year ago of 
the practical difficulties attending an cngraftment upon our 
common schools of any general system of manual instruc- 
tion, and am inclined to think the need which I believe 
will be found imperative before the close of another quar- 
ter of a century, must be met by special public institutions 
or by local enterprise. 

SEWING. 

There is, however, one form of industrial employment 
which might be taught with advantage to a portion of the 
pupils in our schools. I refer to sewing, which is systemat- 
ically and successfully taught in the public schools of some 
cities. I would advocate its introduction here so far as to 
teach those who come from homes apparently ignorant of 
the art, enough of the use of the needle and thread to ena- 
ble them to- mend their own clothes in a respectable and 
substantial manner. This could, 1 think, be successfully 
done by the regular teacher. 



97 



DRAWING. 



Drawing has been taught in our schools with varying suc- 
cess for several years. About a year ago, Walter Smith's 
system of Industrial Drawing was introduced, and Miss 
Manahan, first assistant teacher in our High School, was 
employed to give our teachers a few special lessons in the 
new system. At the close of these lessons it was observed 
that a portion had to a good degree comprehended the prin- 
ciples of this system, and more recent observations have 
shown that these are presenting the subject to their pupils 
with considerable success. All the teachers were greatly 
benefited by those few lessons, and they have manifested 
great zeal in teaching the new system to their pupils, and 
have met with all the success that could reasonably be ex- 
pected of those who as a whole have had so little assistance 
in properly preparing themselves for the work. 

Miss Manahan, who has chief charge of drawing at the 
High School, and has so notably distinguished herself in 
that department there, highly compliments the better prep- 
aration in drawing of the last class entering from the 
grammar schools. If, however, we would rival in this art 
cities of even less size than ours in our sister State of Mas- 
sachusetts, or would have drawing taught in our lower 
grade schools chiefly through a proper development of the 
principles of the system now in use, rather than by imita- 
tion, we should have a good special teacher in drawing, to 
take full charge of this department of instruction and af- 
ford our teachers all needed assistance. It would be un- 
wise, in my opinion, to employ any such special teacher 
who is not a master of the art and of the system in use. Our 
teachers in general, and several in particular, have knowl- 
edge enough of both to be disgusted with any instruction 
which is not first-class in this department. 
7 



08 



ADMISSION TO HIGH SCHOOL. 



The method of admitting pupils from the grammar 
schools to the High School, as set forth in my last annual 
report, has been strictly followed ; and with gratifying 
success, because the class admitted is acknowledged, aftera 
term's service in the High School, to be as well prepared as 
the average of classes admitted there, and because but few 
pupils, comparatively, had to be subjected to a special ex- 
amination at the end of the year. As there is no disposi- 
tion to get up any hot-house rivalry between our gramma: - 
schools, I deem it unnecessary to add any extended details 
in regard to the number admitted from the respective 
schools or to give the standing of their classes or of indi- 
vidual members of the same, for the conditions under which 
they begin the work of a year are liable to vary so that re- 
sults in these particulars cannot be justly compared year by 
year. It may be said, however, for once that the aggregate 
average of each of the first divisions of the larger grammar 
schools, which alone took the six examinations in each 
study submitted by the Superintendent during the year, dif- 
fered from one another by less than one-half of one per 
cent. Such a result shows, I think, the possibility of hav- 
ing answers in written work marked by different persons, 
as these were by the masters of the several schools, with 
great uniformity when specific instructions for this purpose 
are given to all alike. 

SCHOOL-HOUSE AGENT. 

I would advise, since you are in future to have entire 
■control of funds set apart for the repair of school-houses, 
that this board elect, or appoint, annually, some suitable 
person to have the entire management and undivided 
responsibility of repairs upon school-houses. I think, if 
this course is pursued, as at Springfield, Mass., our houses 



90 

and the furniture pertaining to the same would receive 
better care, and that the amount of funds allowed for this 
purpose would be more prudently and economically 
expended. Such an agent should have some familiarity 
with the needs of a school, be a man of judgment, and 
receive a fair compensation for his services. His accounts 
should be fully and carefully kept, and at the end of the 
year, or oftener, they should be audited by the standing 
committee on repairs, furniture, and supplies. 

READING. 

Our schools are constantly in need of new and fresh 
reading matter. The regular reading-book soon becomes 
familiar and monotonous to the more apt pupils. They get 
the general ideas of the several pieces, and are ever after 
careless about the language, frequently substituting that of 
their own. I think the general purchase of all text-books 
by the city of doubtful utility ; but I have no doubt that 
both for the good of our schools and for the pecuniary 
advantage of our citizens, it would be better to have frhe city 
own all reading-books used in the schools. As a matter of 
justice, too, it is as proper that books of a certain class 
should be bought for all, as well as a considerable portion 
of our school population, and we have to purchase by far 
more reading-books for those claiming our charity than 
those of any other kind. Then, since they are so greatly 
needed to be under our control, why not purchase for all ? 
This plan is adopted in several places with the following 
results : a great saving of expense in the aggregate, because 
books can be bought of publishers by towns or cities at 
greatest discounts ; greater variety of entertaining and in- 
structive reading matter for the schools, because there can 
be purchased readers of different series, or books of 
biography, travel, history, and geography. These books 



100 

can then be changed about among the schools, so that 
pupils may be supplied with fresh reading matter as often 
as necessary ; and pupils would be quickened to read for 
the purpose of gaining information, and thus learn more 
readily the true object of this exercise, which not unfre- 
quently is regarded merely as an exercise for going through 
the ceremony of pronouncing words. Hence arises what 
is commonly known as the " school tone," and the lack of 
expression in attempts at reading. 

CONCLUSION. 

To the retiring members of this board, I would express 
sincere regret that we are to be deprived of the counsels 
and assistance of those, who, through long familiarity with 
schools, have directly benefited our schools by personal vis- 
itation and labor, or in the committee room have devised or 
advocated measures for their improvement ; and to all I 
would extend thanks for the enjoyment and advantage of 
your friendly advice and superior judgment. 

If there is any dependence upon the assurance personally 
expressed by numerous representatives of nearly eve-ry class 
of our population, then our schools are giving excellent 
satisfaction to the great masses of our people who are 
directly represented by pupilage in the schools ; yet they 
are not above criticism, and we should ever give respectful 
consideration to comments made in good faith for the pur- 
pose of improving our public schools. 

WM. E. BUCK. 
Dec. 31, 1878. 



101 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR 
THE PAST YEAR. 



Schools. 


Whole Number 
Belonging to 
the Schools.* 


« 

o be 

23 
> 
< 


Q c 

2s 


« o 

MB 

s| 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Tofl. 


&< 


High School 


73 
42 
47 
87 
89 
98 
85 
34 
62 
17 
17 
22 
20 
23 
26 
21 
20 
25 
21 
17 
3t 
38 
30 
25 
20 
34 
32 
19 
59 
26 
40 
29 
28 
42 
25 
47 
30 
18 
92 
29 
29 
25 
17 
11 
59 
28 
15 
8 
19 
17 
15 


117 
8 
48 
78 
93 
112 
102 
35 
37 
18 
26 
27 
30 
24 
21 
27 
19 
22 
22 
23 
23 
37 
24 
33 
25 
18 
33 
21 
52 
32 
12 
26 
26 
37 
27 
45 
22 
9 
86 
30 
28 
16 
12 
8 
53 
31 
15 
12 
17 
23 
10 


190 
50 
95 
165 
182 
210 
187 
69 
99 
35 
43 
49 
50 
47 
47 
48 
39 
47 
43 
40 
54 
75 
54 
58 
45 
52 
65 
40 
111 
58 
52 
55 
54 
79 
52 
92 
52 
27 
178 
59 
57 
41 
29 
19 
112 
59 
30 
20 
36 
40 
25 


185 
24 
70 
99 
150 
178 
160 
57 
72 
32 
37 
45 
42 
34 
41 
36 
33 
35 

35 
37 
42 
39 
37 
44 
41 
36 
34 
58 
42 
42 
43 
42 
41 
37 
49 
47 
26 
50 
36 
39 
32 
44 
13 
72 
42 
23 
12 
28 
24 
17 


179 
21 
64 
88 
144 
169 
152 
52 
66 
29 
34 
41 
39 
32 
38 
31 
29 
33 
34 
32 
32 
37 
33 
31 
38 
35 
35 
31 
53 
38 
37 
39 
39 
36 
32 
44 
43 
24 
43 
33 
35 
27 
42 
10 
63 
40 
20 
10 
26 
20 
15 


97 




88 




91 
89 




96 




95 

95 




91 




91 
91 


Middle School No. 1 


92 


t. (< o 


91 


" " « 3 


93 


>* « 4 :..:..:: ::::::: 


94 


' 5 


93 


" 6 


86 


« 7 


88 


" 8 


94 


" " " 9 


91 


" " •' 10 


93 


" 11 


86 




89 


.. 2 


85 




84 


•• 4 


87 




85 




97 




91 




92 


9 


90 


« 10 


88 


" " " U 


SI 




9S 


■" " " 13 


88 


" " 14 


86 


" " 15 


90 


'• 16 


91 


•• 17 


90 


" " " 18 


86 


" 19 


93 


•• 20 


90 


" " " 21 


84 


" " " 22? 


95 




77 


" " 3 


88 


" " " «« 4 


95 


" " " " 5 


87 


" " " "6 


83 




93 


" •' " "8.... 


83 


" •' " " 9 


88 








1783 


1732 


3515 


2571 


2348 


91.3 



* Exclusive of those received, by promotion or transfer, from other public schools in 
the city. 

t Open two terms; closed during the fall term. 

X In existence during the fall term only. 

Jgg^ See " Attendance," page 93. 

It may be added, for the benefit of the uninformed, that there is in this city an ex- 
tensive system of Roman-Catholic parochial schools, which accounts for the small por- 
tion of our population (28,000) in the public schools. 



LIST OF TEACHERS AND JANITORS. 



HIGH SCHOOL, — BEECH STREET. 

Principal. — Albert W. Bacheler. 
Assistant. — Herbert W. Lull. 

Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Emma J. Ela. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL, LOWELL STREET. 

Principal. — J. Y. Cresscy. 

TRAINING SCHOOL, MERRIMACK STREET. 

Higher Department. 
Principal. — Nancy S. Bunton. 
Assistant. — Mintie C. Edgerly. 

Primary Department. 
Principal. — Martha N. Mason. 
Assistant. — Jessie B. Farmer. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL, — FRANKLIN STREET.* 

Principal. — Edward P. Sherburne. 
Assistant. — Annette McDoel. 

Lottie R. Adams. 

Carrie E. Reid. 

* Frankiin-street and Spring-street grammar departments consolidated, a»d both 
under Mr. Sherburne as principal. 



104 

L N. LN -STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal. — Benjamin F. Dame. 
As-is:;;::t. — Julia A. Baker. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

ASH-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal. — Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistant. — Anstrice G. Flanders. 
eflli M. Tuson. 
Sarah J. Greene. 

7 .117 RAMMAR 5CE 

Assistant. — Mary L. Sleeper. 
Anna 0. Heath. 

PISCaTa . . — : ?.TH MAIS" SH 

Principal. — William M. Steven?. 
A?» -- - — Mary A. Lear. 

am-: SKI 
tta J. Carley. 

MIDDLE - :: 

1, Blodget Street. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 

- Ash Street. — Mary A. Smith. 
• . A- 31 L — Hi:::e S. Tc 

-. Lincoln Street. — Anna J. Dana. 
Lincoln Street. — Carrie M. Gilmore. 

- . N" ; rtn n St rect — Florence M I 

". Franklin Sta set — Hattie G. Flanders. 

' ■-- ■ -- 



I ' 

ranklin Street — A _±sta Abbott. 
- _..... Street — Clara G. .. 
Spring Street. — lizzie ?. Gore. 
11, North Main Sfa — Fredri: - ::bell. 

PEDLART SCHOOLS 

V . : . Street — Ellen B. Bo~ 

-. Manchester Street — Clara X. Brown. 

, Asl 5b set — Georgianna Dow. 
- Ash Street. — Helen M. Morrill. 
5, Lowell Street — E "Prior. 

Wfla on Hill. — A ie E. Abbott. 

7 . Lin : >ln Street. — Emma F. Beane. 

8, Lowell Street. — Florence L. SI 

, Maud stei Street — Julia A- Dearborn. 
1 . Manchester Sti — Nellie Pearson. 

11. Franklin Street. — E. Jennie Campbell. 

12, Franklin Street. — H '". Hubbard. 
S] Street — EUa F. Sanborn. 

" -. - ^Tiir- — N- Qic II Whitn 

- Street — Jennie F. E - 
"::—" — A . -:; •> 1 -^tis. 
17, £ . " - Main Street — AG - : rd. 
IS. Manchester Street — Maria V. Bowi 

Ameskeag. — Jennie - Sti 
_ , Sc Main Street. — Sarah P. L 
23 . Street — Emma J. Henry. 

- GBRA3 3CHC 

K St ^District — Helen G. Kimball. 

ikei sriHe : — 
Principal. Addie M. Chas 
A^>:s:ar.:. 5. Iseti 



106 

4. Gorle's Falls. — Georgie A. Xute. 

•5, Harvey District. — Mary W. Mitchell. 

6, Webster's Mills. — Olive J. Randall. 

7, Hallsville. —Maria H. Hildreth. 

8, Youngsville. — Susie G. Woodman. 
■ '. Mosqirito Pond. — Lana S. George. 

MUSIC TEACHEE. 

Jason J. Kimball. 

jan:: Ets. 

Hig School, Ash Si 1 _ Street, and Bloel 

Sin 

John S. Avery. 

Franklin Street, Manchester Street. Lincoln Street, ltd 

Wilson Hill. 

John A. Carr. 

Spring S -t. and old High School H 
James "VT. Preston. 

Merrii • Sir 

Rnfus Lamb. 

N 05" Schools, consisting of Center Street. _Y 
'h Main Street Schools. 
i 3eorge E. Moore. 



REPORT 



CITY SOLICITOR 



Ti His Honor the Mayor, and the City Councils or' 

Manchester : — 

I am aware that heretofore no report has been submitted 
to you by the law department of the city government. 
Numerous requests from members of your body and citi- 
zens generally have induced me to depart from the usual 
custom. 

I assumed the duties of the office of City Solicitor on 
the 2Sth day of May last, and found the following actions. 
in which the city was a party, then pending on the law 
term docket : — 

1. Charles K. Walker vs. City. Appeal from asse?;* 
ment of land damages. Judgment has been rendered for 
the city. 

2. John D. Bean and Lawrence Dowd vs. The Mayor. 
Aldermen, and Common Council of Manchester. Action 
relating to the opening of a highway across Concord 
square. Case dismissed at June term. 

3. Charles H. Yarney vs. City. Case reserved at 
January trial term. 1^T>. See No. 23. 



108 

4. Michael Lavory vs. City. Case reserved at Janu- 
aiy trial term, 1878. New trial ordered. 

5. Loammi Searles vs. City. Agreed case. Judgment 
for plaintiff. 

On the Hillsborough County docket at the September 
trial term there were the following actions : — 

6. Sherburn T. Sleeper vs. City. Action for damages 
to team. Neither party. 

7. Mary A. Gould vs. City. Action for injuries to 
person. Not disposed of. 

8. James P. Walker vs. City. Action for land dam- 
ages in laying out highway. Judgment for plaintiff. One 
cent damages ; same as awarded by aldermen. Clerk of 
court, commissioner to tax costs. Hearing to be had in 
January next. 

9. Charles K. "Walker vs. City. Same as No. 8. 

10. Wm, Whittle vs. City. In this action the water- 
works are the real defendants. Not disposed of. 

11. Catharine Crane vs. City. Action for damages to 
person caused by slipping on the ice on Hanover street. 
This action was referred to Hon. J. E. Sargent and a hear- 
ing thereon has been had. Report in favor of plaintiff for 
$100 damages. 

1'2. Cornelius Crane et ux. vs. City. Trial has been 
had before Hon. J. E. Sargent, and it has been agreed that 
the action shall be entered " neither party " at the next 
term. 

13. E. Jennie Moulton vs. City. Action for personal 
injuries caused by slipping on the ice on Laurel street. 
Trial last September term. Verdict for plaintiff, 81,000. 

14. Emma A. White vs. City. Action for injuries to 
person caused by slipping on the sidewalk on Pine street. 
September term. 1878, judgment by agreement for the sum 
of $1,756. 



109 

15. Patrick McBride vs. City. Action for injuries to 
person. Not disposed of. 

16. Ann Shehan vs. City. Action for damages to per- 
son. Not disposed of. 

17. Wm. White vs. City, See Xo. 14. September term, 
1878, judgment by agreement for $1,744. 

18. Catharine McGuinness vs. City. Action for dama- 
ges to person. Xot disposed of. 

19. John McGuinness vs. City. Xot disposed of. 

In 18 and 19, the water-works contractor is the real de- 
fendant. 

20. Sophia T. Jones vs. City. Action for damages to 
person. Xot disposed of. 

21. Loammi Searles vs. City. See Xo. 5. 

22. Mary A. Clement vs. City. Action for injuries to 
person. Trial has been had in the above action, and the 
jury found a verdict for the plaintiff, in the sum of SI 00. 
The action has been brought forward for review at the re- 
quest of plaintiff. 

23. Charles H. Yarney vs. City. Trial January term. 
1878. Verdict against City for $3,000 damages, and costs. 
Case reserved. Ordered, June law term, " that there be 
judgment on the verdict."' The judgment has been satis- 
fied, and I have brought an action against Alfred Quimby 
to recover the amount paid. 

28J. Leonard Rowe vs. City. Xot disposed of. 

24. Michael Lavory vs. City. See Xo. 4. 

25. James H. Xutt vs. City. Sept. term, 1878. Neither 
party. 

26. Luther Pattee vs. City. Appeal from the assess- 
ment of damages by mayor and aldermen. Judgment for 
plaintiff, Sept. term, 1878. 

27. James G. Sturgis vs. City. Action for injuries to 
person. Xot disposed of. 



110 

28. Catharine McKean vs. City. Action for injuries to 
person, caused by slipping on ice on Bridge street. Not 
disposed of. 

29. Miriam W. Francis vs. City. Action for injuries 
caused by defect in street. Not disposed of. 

30. City of Manchester vs. County of Hillsborough. 
Not disposed of. 

31. Petition of S. B. Stearns and others, for straight- 
ening and widening Amherst street. There has been a 
hearing on the above petition. Report adverse to the peti- 
tioners. 

32. Willard C. Offutt vs. City. Petition for discontin- 
uance of highway. There has been a hearing, and by 
agreement the petition is to be granted, the petitioner to 
pay costs. 

33. Charles R. Morrison vs. City. Petition for abate- 
ment of taxes for the year 1877. Case agreed and now 
pending. 

34. J. S. Patterson vs. City. Action for injuries to 
person. This action is in the Strafford County Court. 
Trial Sept. term, 1877. Yerdict for plaintiff, $2,700. 
Motion for new trial granted. This action will probably be 
settled by compromise without further trial. 

The following suits against the city have been com- 
menced since May 28, 1878 : — 

35. Charles R. Morrison vs. City. Petition for abate- 
ment of taxes, 1878. See No. 33. 

36. David S. McKay vs. City. Action for injuries to 
person. Not disposed of. 

37. Gracia Labric vs. City. Suit for services at pest- 
house. Not disposed of. 

38. Idella A. Martin vs. City. Petition for assessment 
of damages. Referred to county commissioners. 

39. James Curtis vs. City. This action is for injury to 



Ill 

horse caused by defective highway, and is the only action 
against the city returnable at the next term of court. The 
water-works contractor will be summoned to defend. 

The above detailed statement shows, that since May 28, 
1878, actions Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 
IT, 21, 23, 25, 26, 31, 32, and 34, in the above schedule, 
have been disposed of, or will be early in the January term, 
leaving twenty actions surviving. In the above actions, 
Messrs. Sulloway & Topliff were retained, before my elec- 
tion, as associate counsel with the solicitor in Nos. 4, 6, 7, 
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 22, 24, and 25 ; James B. Straw, Esq., 
in No. 1 ; Morrison <fc Hiland and J. P. Bartlett, Esq., by 
the Water-Works, in Xos. 10, 18, and 19; Hon. G. Y. 
Sawyer and Frank Hiland, Esq., in Nos. 3 and 23, by A. 
Quimby, party in interest ; Frank Hobbs, Esq., in No. 34. 
Jonathan Smith, Esq., my predecessor, upon his retirement 
from office, was retained, I am informed, by His Honor the 
Mayor, in Nos. 3, 4, 7, 11, 12, 14, 17, 22, 23, 24, and 25. 
In a single action there has been retained, at my request, 
Gen. A. F. Stevens, who assisted me ill No. 13, in which 
there was an actual trial. I think the experience of all at- 
torneys will sustain me in the statement that it is absolutely 
necessary to have two attorneys in every important case 
where there is an actual trial. I deem it unnecessary to 
call your attention to the foregoing schedule to remind you 
of the large number of actions that have been brought 
against the city for the recovery of damages to the person, 
caused by defective highways. 

To remedy this increasing evil, I introduced, in the last 
legislature, and procured the passage of, a bill providing 
that every person sustaining injuries from defective high- 
ways should, within ten days, file his claim, setting forth 
under oath the full particulars thereof, and that no action 
should be brought except in the county where the accident 



112 

occurred. Bills to repeal the law relating to such dam- 
ages, and to limit the amount to be recovered, were intro- 
duced and defeated. 

An examination of the City Treasurer's report will show 
the amount which the city has paid out during the past 
year, on account of actions settled or verdicts recovered. 
The sum has been unusually large. The largest sum is in 
the suit of Charles H. Yarney, and, as I have already 
stated, an action has been brought to recover the sum paid. 
Large sums were paid in the settlement of the White suits, 
but I have yet to find the person who believes, after a full 
examination of the facts, that the city would have fared 
better if they had insisted upon a trial. The Patterson 
suit was tried in another county, under circumstances very 
unfavorable to the city, a thing which will not again hap- 
pen while the law already referred to remains upon the 
statute book. The cases now pending will be pressed to 
an early trial, and no compromise will be made with par- 
ties, under any circumstances, unless, upon a careful inves- 
tigation, I shall become convinced that the pecuniary 
interests of the city demand it. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM R. PATTEX, 

City Solicitor.. 

December 26. 1878. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

The Trustees of the City Library present herewith their 
twenty-fifth annual report of the condition of the librarv, 
and, accompanying the same, the report of the treasurer of 
the board, showing the expenditures for books and period- 
icals, and the reports of the librarian relating to the opera- 
tion of the library during the year, and the condition of 
the library and other property under the charge of the li 
brarian at the close of the year. 

The report of the treasurer shows that there has been 
expended for the purchase of books the sum of nine hun- 
dred seventeen dollars sixteen cents, and for the purchase 
and subscription to periodicals the sum of one hundred 
sixty-one dollars and twenty-one cents, being a total ex 
penditure for the increase of the library of ten hundred 
seventy-eight dollars forty cents, and leaving, of the sums 
appropriated by the city for this purpose, including the sums 
received for fines and for books lost, a balance unexpended 
of fifteen hundred eighty-seven dollars forty-nine cents. 
These sums, together with the income of the Dean do- 
S 



114 

nation, constitute the funds available for the future in- 
crease of the library, and to replace the books lost r so 
much defaced as to be unsuitable for further use. 

These expenditures have been somewhat larger the past 
year than for several rears previous. The completion of 
the catalogue will furnish to the trustees the means better 
to determine what works it may be deemed desirable to 
purchase, and they will thereby be enabled more satisfac- 
torily to expend the balance now remaining applicable for 
the purchase of books and periodicals. 

Early in June, the trustees were informed that Mrs. 
Davis, who had performed the duties of librarian for the 
vear preceding, to the general acceptance of the public, 
desired to resign the position, to take effect on the first of 
July : and at a meeting held on the 8th of June, her resig- 
nation was accepted and Mrs. Mary J. Buncher was elected 
to fill the vacancy, who entered upon the duties of the of- 
fice on the first of July. 

The report of Mrs. Davis as librarian to June 30, and 
of Mrs. Buncher for the remainder of the year, shows that 
the library has been open for the delivery of books two 
hundred forty-one days, during which time there have been 
taken from the library for use, fifty-one thousand and 
ninetv-five volumes, an increase of nearly two thousand 
over the circulation of the preceding year. 

The report of last year shows the number of volumes 
then in the library to have been twenty-one thousand 
seven hundred and two. Since that time, there have been 
added, by purchase three hundred eighty-eight, by donation 
three hundred twenty-nine, and ninety-two volumes of pe- 
riodicals have been bound, making the number of bound 
volumes in the library twenty thousand nine hundred and 
sixty-seven, and the total number, including maps and 
pamphlets, twenty-two thousand five hundred and eighteen. 



115 

The librarian's report contains a list of the donations 
to the library, of which one hundred sixty-five volumes, 
consisting of works in the French, Spanish, Portuguese, 
and German languages, were presented by Hon. Moody 
Currier. To him, and to the others who have aided in the 
increase of the library, the trustees present the thanks of 
the city. 

The manuscript of the catalogue, which had been in 
preparation for several years, was so far completed that 
arrangements were made early in the spring to commence 
the printing, which was completed during the month of 
July. 

This catalogue contains the titles of the books from N 
8,763 to No. 21,705 inclusive, it containing those added to 
the library from July 30, 1862, to December 31, 1877, in- 
clusive, and is arranged alphabetically, under the names of 
the authors, and the different titles to which it seemed 
probable reference might be made, and also under the gen- 
eral subject, and with cross references to related subjects. 

The catalogue, making a volume of four hundred nine- 
teen pages, was prepared by Hon. N. P. Hunt, one of the 
trustees, and was printed under the direction of John B. 
Clarke, by whom special efforts were made, both in the 
proof-reading and printing, to ensure accuracy and as much 
freedom from error as was practicable. 

The modifications suggested in the last report, as being 
in contemplation, have increased the cost of the compila- 
tion and printing, but the trustees believe the increased 
value thus given to it more than compensates the addi- 
tional cost, the total amount of which was twenty-five hun- 
dred five dollars thirty-one cents. 

The trustees have directed that such number of copies 
as were required, should be placed in the library for use 
there, and that copies might be sold to persons desiring 



116 

them at the price of one dollar, this being substantially 
the cost of the same. 

From this source the librarian has received thirty-four 
dollars ; and this amount, with one dollar twenty cents re- 
ceived for copies of the old catalogue, has been paid to the 
treasurer of the board. 

The library had been originally heated by furnaces placed 
in the basement. These had, by the constant and severe 
usage to which they had been necessarily subjected, become 
unsuited for the purpose, and an application was therefore 
made to the city councils to provide some more satisfactory 
mode of warming the building. 

The committee on lands and buildings, to whom the 
matter was referred, after careful examination determined 
to remove the furnaces and to substitute steam-heating ap- 
paratus. Contracts were accordingly made with Thomas 
A. Lane, to furnish such boiler and apparatus as were re- 
quired by the plans and specifications, deemed suitable by 
the committee, and during the early part of December the 
requisite changes were made and the apparatus placed in 
operation. 

The work was done to the acceptance of the committee, 
and so far as it has been tried, has given entire satisfac- 
tion. 

By this change in the manner of heating the building, it 
is expected that a considerable annual saving will be made 
in the amount of fuel heretofore required. 

The expenditures for the incidental charges of the year, 
including the preparation and printing of the catalogue, 
have been thirty-eight hundred sixty-five dollars and thirty- 
one cents. The details of these expenditures, the bills for 
which have been paid by the City Treasurer, appear at 
large in the annual report of the city. 

The trustees are not aware of any circumstance that 



117 

will increase the expenses of the next year beyond those of 
the last, and they believe that an appropriation of an 
amount equal to that appropriated for the ordinary expen- 
ses of the past year, will be sufficient for the ensuing year. 

January 4, 1879. In board of trustees, read and ap- 
proved, and ordered to be transmitted to the city councils. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor 

N. P. HUNT, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library: — 

The treasurer of the board makes the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds 
received by them on account of the City Library. 



1878. 
Jan. 



July 


1. 


Dec. 


31. 


187! 


3. 


Jan. 


10. 




19. 


Feb. 


5. 


March 


16. 




18. 


April 


9. 


May 


10. 




20. 




28. 



To balance as per last report . 
To appropriation for purchase of 

books .... 
To income of Dean fund 
To income of Dean fund 
To cash for book lost 



Paid N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & She par d, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee & Shepard, books, . 
N. H. Historical Society, book 



Dr 




03,195 


05 


1,000 


00 


153 


00 


153 


00 




84 


14,501 


89 


Cr 




15 


22 


261 


77 


10 


29 


12 


38 


128 


44 


19 


16 


11 


54 


29 


28 


2 


00 



119 



June 11. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

13. Lee k Shepard, books 

28. Boston Society of Natural His 

tory, periodicals 

July 9. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

Aug. 6. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

29. Lee & Shepard, books 
•Sept. 10. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

10. Addison Van Name, books 

11. J. B. Sawtelle, books 
17. Lee & Shepard, books 

Oct. 5. Lee & Shepard, books 

8. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

Nov. 5. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

30. Lee & Shepard, books 
Dec. 10. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

16. Amer. Asso. of Science, books 

26. Lee & Shepard, books 

31. By balance of appropriation. . 
31. By income Dean fund 



£1,501 89 

The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library 
for the year ending Dec. 31, 1878, the items of which ap- 
pear at large in the annual report of the city, are as follows : 

Gas . 

Incidentals.' 
Printing . 
Water rates 
Salary of librarian 
Binding 
Re-binding. 
Insurance . 



13 


84 


90 


77 


3 50 


12 


83 


11 


55 


97 


18 


14 


94 


13 


50 


o 


80 


44 


36 


. 133 


03 


11 


73 


10 


74 


33 


47 


13 


52 


23 


00 


57 


56 


. 1,587 


49 


. 1,836 


00 



... 7 


$208 50 




53 51 




62 


43 




20 


00 




600 


00 




142 


04 




37 


25 


m 


32 


50 



120 



Fuel 

Catalogue 


. 203 56 
. 2,505 31 


RECAPITULATION. 

Balance, Dee. 81, 1877 . 
Appropriation, 1878 ..... 

Transfer 

Overdraft 


$3,865 10 

.$1,869 51 

. 2,500 00 

. 415 59 

80 00 


Paid trustees for purchase of books, etc. . 
Incidental expenses 


$4,865 10 

. $1,000 00 
. 3,865 10 



$4,865 10 
Respectfully submitted, 

S. N. BELL, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 

January 3, 1879. 
We have examined the above report and find the same* 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOHN L. KELLY. 
WM. P. NEWELL, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 

January 3, 1879. 
I certify that 1 have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the trustees of the City Library and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Manchester, July 1, 
To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : - 
The following statement shows the condition of 
Library for the six months ending July 1, 1878 : — 
Whole number of volumes at last annual report . 
Accessions for six months : — 

Purchases ..... 233 
Donations ..... 130 
Bound periodicals .... 40 



1878. 

the City 

21,703 



Whole number of volumes at present : — 




Maps ..... 


16 


Pamphlets .... 


. 1,524 


Bound volumes 


. 20,566 



Number of days the library has been open for the 

delivery of books 
Volumes in circulation during this time 
Average number per day 
Largest number any one day 
Number of guarantees received . 
Number taken during last six months . 
Amount of cash received for fines, etc. 
Amount paid for fines, etc. . 
On hand July 1, 1878 .... 
Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. E. H. DAVIS, Lib 



40' 



22,106 

118 

28,577 

242 

540 

11,050 

251 

$11 64 

9 14 

2 50 

r avian-. 



DONATIONS TO THf] LIBRARY 

From January 1 to July 1, 1878. 



Am. Unitarian Association. 

Volume of Sermons, by Rev. James Walker. 
Bernard Tauchintz. 

English catalogue of books. 
The Committee. 

Centennial History of Fall River. 
Hon. Thomas A. Doyle, Providence, R. I. 

Ceremonies at unvailing monument to Roger Williams 
at Providence. 
Hon. John A. Russell, San Francisco. 

San Francisco City Reports. 
Hon. A. B. Thompson, Secretary of State. 

N. H. Legislative Reports. 
Capt. T. W. Challis, Manchester. 

Proceedings of G. A. R. 
Hon. E. H. Rollins, Washington, I). C. 

Congressional Documents. 
U. S. Congress. 

52 volumes Public Documents. 
U. S. Treasury Department. 

Report of Life-Saving Service. 
Swedenborg Publishing Society. 

Compendium of Swedenborg's Writings. 



123 

Hon. B. P. Cilley, Manchester. 

Report of Amoskeag Veterans, 1851 to 1859. 

Sketch of Military Career of Gen. Enoch Poor. 
Hoeace G. Whittier, Lake Village. 

Proceedings Grand Lodge I. 0. of G. T. 
Wm. E. Moore, Manchester. 

Proceedings Grand Lodge K. of P. 
C. F. Livingston, Manchester. 

Proceedings N. H. Printers' Association. 
Hon. N. P. Hunt, Manchester. 

Report, Chief of Detective Force of Mass. 

Report, Hillsborough County Commissioners. 
Hon. S. X. Bell, Manchester. 

Nashua School Report. 

Report, Board of Directors, M. & L. R. R. 

Report, Board of Directors, B. C. & M. R. R. 

Report, Concord R. R. Corporation. 
Hon. John Kimball, Concord, N. H. 

Inaugural Address of Hon. John Kimball. 
N. P. Kidder, City Clerk. 

[naugural Address of Hon. John L. Kelly. 
Henry Whittemore, Supt. 

Westboro' School Report. 
E. Errell, W. Springfield. 

West Springfield Town Report. 
Hon. Wm. H. Hackett, Portsmouth. 

Catalogue of the Rice Free Library, Kittery, Me. 
From the Several Boards of Trustees or Librarians. 

Library Reports and Catalogues of Boston, Lawrence, 
Lowell, Worcester, Fall River, Springfield, Newton, 
Lynn, Woburn, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Man- 
chester, England. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees: — 

I respectfully submit to your consideration the following 
report of the condition of the library during the last six 
months, ending December 31, 1878 : — 

Whole number of volumes indicated in the acces- 
sion book, June 30, 1878 .... 22,100 

Accessions during the six months : — 

Purchased 155 

Donated 199 

Periodicals bound .... 52 



"Whole number of volumes at present : — 
Maps ...... 

Pamphlets . 

Bound volumes .... 



16 
1,535 

20,967 



406 



22,518 



Periodicals regularly received 

I >ays open to the public 

Days open for delivery of books . 

Volumes in circulation during the time 

Average per day ..... 

Largest number any one day 



48 
140 
123 
21,730 
177 
386 



125 



. 1,200 


11,249 


198 


3,449 


2o 


14 


. $2 50 


. 22 04 


. 17 90 


. 6 64 


78: — 


. $34 00 


. 1 20 


84 



Cards in constant use, about .... 
Whole number of guarantees received . 
Given during the six months 

Whole number of books, magazines, etc., used in the 
reading-room ..... 

Average per day 

Persons using books on deposit 

Amount of cash received for fines, on hand July 1, 
1878 

Amount received from July 1 to Dec. 31, 1878 

Amount paid for express, stationery, etc. 

Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1878 . 

Amount paid to treasurer of trustees, Dec. 31, 187 
For 34 new catalogues, at $1.00 . 
For 2 old catalogues, at .60 . 
For 1 book lost, .84 . 



$36 04 

I have endeavored to make a thorough examination of 
the entire list of books contained [in the library ; also the 
lists of missing books previous to July 1, 1878, and as far 
as possible ascertain the number of missing volumes during 
the last six months. Delinquents have been notified, and 
the usual means employed to secure the return of books ; 
but I regret to say there are still out, some thirty or forty 
volumes. Many of the missing books at the last examina- 
tion have been returned, and I doubt not upon the re-open- 
ing of the library, many, if not all, will come in. It is to 
be regretted that so many enjoying the privileges of a free 
library, are not willing to conform to its regulations by a 
prompt return of their books when due. 
Respectfully, 

MRS. M. J. BUNCHER, Librarian. 
December 31, 1878. 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY 

From July 1 to December 31, 1878. 



Hon. Moody Currier, Manchester. 

One hundred and sixty-five volumes in foreign lan- 
guages, — French, 119; Spanish and Portuguese, 
24 ; German, 22. 
Hon. James F. Briggs, Manchester. 

Report of the U. S. Commissioner of Fish and Fish- 
eries, part 4, for 1875 and 1876. 

Papers relating to the Foreign Relations of the United 
States, with the Annual Message of the President,. 
Dec. 3, 1877. 

Report of the Secretary of the Navy, 1877. 

Report of the Secretary of War, vol. 4, 1876-77. 

Report of the Secretary of War on the Operations of 
the Department for the Fiscal Year ending June 30, 
1877, vol. 2, part 1. 

Report of the Secretary of War, vol. 2, part 2. 

Annual Report of the Secretary of the Interior on the 
Operations of the Department for the Fiscal Year 
ending June 30, 1877. 

Message of the President of the United States to the 
two Houses of Congress at the Commencement of 
the Second Session of the Fortv-fiftli Congress, 1877- 



127 

Henry Thomas Darnton, Esq., Ex-Mayor of Ashton- 
under-Lyne, England. 

History of the Reformed Church. From the press of 
Jean Remy (French), in 1580. 
Nicholson File Company, Providence, R. I. 

A Treatise on Files and Rasps. Descriptive and Il- 
lustrated. 1878. 
E. Steiger, New York. 

The New Year Book of Education for 1878. 
W. H. Doolittle, Acting Commissioner of Patents. 

Annual Report of the Commissioners of Patents, 1870 
and 1877. 
Hon. S. N. Bell, Manchester. 

Annual Report of Commissioners of Patents, 1877. 
Centennial Oration delivered at Brookline. N. II., 
Sept. 8, 1869, by J. B. Sawtelle. 
N. P. Hunt, Esq., Manchester. 

Appleton's Journal of Literature and Art. 2 vols. 
From No. 1 to No. 20. April 3 to December 25, 
1869. 
The Dartmouth. Published by the Students of Dart- 
mouth College. 2 vols. 1868. 
The New England Odd-Fellow. From June, 1874, to 

June, 1875. 2 vols. 
The Twenty-second and Twenty-third Annual Reports 
of the Board of Directors of the St. Louis Public 
Schools, for the years 1877 and 1878. 
Mary A. Little, Librarian. 

Catalogue of the Manufacturers' and Mechanics' Li- 
brary Association, Lewiston, Me. Incorporated in 
1861. 
James P. Lane, Secretary. 

Catalogue of Rodgers Free Library, Bristol, R. I., 1878. 
Dedication Exercises of Free Library, Bristol. R. I.,. 
1878. 



128 

George W. Weeks, Esq. 

Nos. 1 and 2 Supplement to Catalogue of Bigelow Free 
Library, Clinton, Mass. 1876 and 1878. 
Committee of Cobden Club. 

Financial Reform Almanack for 1878. 
William Eice, Librarian. 

Report of the City Library Association of Springfield, 
Mass. 1878. 
From the Several Boards of Trustees. 

The Twenty-sixth Annual Report to the Council of the 
City of Manchester, England, on the working of the 
Free Library. 1877 and 1878. 
The Fifty-seventh Annual Report of the Board of 
Directors of the Mercantile Library Association of 
the City of New York. 1877 and 1878. 
The Eighteenth Annual Report of the Trustees of the 

Fall River Public Library. 1878. 
The Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the Trustees of 
the Boston Public Library. 1878. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : — 

Once more the duty devolves upon me to submit for your 
consideration my annual report, accompanied with infor- 
mation of an official character, giving in detail a statement 
of the condition of the several branches of the Fire De- 
partment under my control for the past year ; also, a de- 
tailed account of the number of fires, the losses as esti- 
mated, and the insurance on the same, during the last year ; 
also, the condition of the apparatus at the present time. 
You will see, by a comparison of the annexed figures 
showing the losses from 1870 up to the present time, that 
this has been a very fortunate year for the real estate own- 
ers of Manchester, notwithstanding the oft-repeated warn- 
ing of one of our local dailies to keep your property well 
insured. 



130 

Number of fires in 1871, 27 ; loss, $ 17,300 

1872,18; " 14,000 

" " 1873, 35 ; " 16,000 

" " 1874, 25 ; " 21,000 

" 1875, 29 ; " 77,275 

" 1876, 25 ; " 8,961 

" 1877, 32 ; " 9,344 

" 1878, 22 ; " 4,925 

Insurance .... 4,575 



Amount of loss in excess of insurance $350 

EXPENSES. 

The appropriation for the year 1877 was $13,000. Bal- 
ance carried to the year 1878, $3,584.85. When the ap- 
propriation was being made for the year 1878, the Finance 
Committee notified me to meet them and see if the appropri- 
ation as they had made it up could be changed. They had 
appropriated $7,000 against $13,000 the year before. I told 
them I thought the expenses could be paid for 85,000, if 
there was not to be any transfer made to city teams, and 
the committee made the reduction ; but I find, for reasons 
best known to themselves, the city councils have thought 
best to make a transfer from the reserve fund to the fire 
department of $1,500, which leaves a balance of $1,123.05 
to be transferred to the city teams ; whereas, if the city 
teams had been left out, as they were the year before, the ex- 
penses of the department would have been $8,961.90 against 
$9,745.74 the year before, notwithstanding we have had an 
unexpected outlay in being obliged to rebuild No. 2 hose- 
carriage, also the hook-and-ladder truck, which amounted 
to $334.49^ making the actual expense of running the de- 
partment, $8,627.41. 



131 



APPARATUS. 



3 Steam Fire Engines, located on Vine street. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, located on Vine street. 

1 Hook and Ladder Truck, located on Vine street. 
• 1 Horse Hose Sled, located on Vine street. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, on Vine street, drawn by either 
men or horse. 

1 Steam Fire Engine, Piscataquog. 

1 4-Wheel Hose Carriage, Piscataquog. 

1 2- Wheel Hose Carriage, at P. C. Cheney & Co.'s paper 
mill, Amoskeag, manned by men employed at the works. 

1 2-Wheel Hose Carriage, Deny mills, Goffe's Falls, 
manned by men at the mills. 

1 Supply Wagon, A'ine street. 

All of the apparatus is in good condition except Steamer 
No. 4, which is in the shop having a new boiler to replace 
that which was considered unsafe to rely upon. This year 
has been one that has required an unusual amount of re- 
pairs. During the year the Massabesic Hose Carriage No. 
2 has had a new set of wheels and axles put under it ; also, 
a pair of shafts, in order to make it better adapted to be 
drawn by a horse ; and I think that the carriage, at the 
present time, is full as good as any new one that could be 
bought, and it will not be necessary to make another out- 
lay for a long time, unless some accident should befall it. 
Also, the Hook and Ladder Truck has been repaired to the 
extent of new wheels and axles ; there has also been at- 
tached to it a pole, in order to adapt it to a pair of horses, 
instead of one horse as heretofore. Until this season the 
truck has been drawn by one horse, but the construction of 
it was such that it was found to be more than one horse 
could handle, and through the courtesy of the superintend- 
ent of District No. 2 the department has been furnished 



132 

with a pair of horses. The other apparatus is all in good 
repair, and when the repairs are completed on the Bean 
engine, the city will virtually have two new steam engines, 
as the Amoskeag is nearly a new engine, and unless some- 
thing more than usual shall happen the expense of repairs 
must be small for some time to come. "When I made my 
last report, the department, under its present organization, 
had only existed a part of a month, and there were some 
doubts in the minds of some citizens as to the ability of 
the department, as it now exists, to guard the city against 
the fires that might occur ; but, gentlemen, I will leave you 
to draw your own conclusions, after comparing the losses 
with the previous years. As the department is now organ- 
ized it consists of the following members : — 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

Steam Fire Engine No. 1, — 14 men. 

Steam Fire Engine No. 4, — 14 men. 

Steam Fire Engine No. 2, — as a reserve engine. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, — 20 men. 

1 Hook and Ladder Truck, — 25 men. 

1 Horse or Hand Hose Carriage, — men. 

1 Horse Hose Sled for use of No. 1 Hose Company. 

1 4-Wheeled Hose Carriage, — 12 men, Piscatarmog. 
Steam Fire Engine No. 3, — reserve. 

2 2-Wheeled Hose Carriages, one at P. C. Cheney & Co.'s 
mill, Amoskeag, the other at Dcrry mills, Goffe's Falls. 

BUILDINGS. 

The buildings which are occupied by the department be- 
ing under the control of a committee, 1 have not had any. 
thing to do with them, but so far as I know they are all in 
good repair and meet the requirements of the department 



well, except the one occupied by the Hook and Ladder 
Truck on Vine street. In substituting the new wheels it 
was found necessary to make the carriage a little wider, 
and the door is altogether too narrow to allow the carriage 
to pass unless it runs almost perfectly straight, and you 
are well aware that in the midst of an alarm of fire there 
is liable to be considerable excitement. I have several 
times called the attention of the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings to the fact, but for reasons best known to them- 
selves they have not thought best to make the change. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

This still proves to be a very essential part of the de- 
partment, and has given but xery little trouble this year, 
aside from that caused by the lightning last summer, and I 
think has been very satisfactorily cared for, and to the 
satisfaction of all, except perhaps some newspaper re- 
porters and perhaps the woman who wanted to use the 
clothes-line last spring. I have just had an examination 
made of all the boxes, and find them all in order, but each 
year increases the necessity of removing the wire from the 
top of buildings and placing it on poles in the streets, 

CONCLUSION. 

Ln conclusion, I would return my thanks to His Honor 
the Mayor, for the courtesies shown me during the year ; 
also to the several gentlemen of the City Government 
with whom my official duties have called me in contact, 
and especially the Committee on Fire Department. Gen- 
tlemen, you are well aware that when I entered upon the 
duties of Chief Engineer, there was quite a difference in 
opinions as to the judgment shown in the reduction and 
re-organization of the department. It has been tried now 
for a year, and you can judge for yourselves, and by re- 



134 

ferring to the table of losses before given, -whether the city 
lias suffered any loss thereby ; and, gentlemen, as the depart- 
ment is all harmonious at the present time, I think the fear 
that was at one time entertained by some of our citizens 
that the department was to be completely demoralized to 
please me, must, by this time, have entirely passed by ; and 
as I have other business that requires my attention, and 
knowing there are many that are better qualified to fill the 
position which I occupy in the department, upon the 
acceptance of this report you will please accept my resigna- 
tion, to take effect as soon as it is convenient for you to 
elect some one to fill the position, as I shall, under no con- 
sideration, consent to be a candidate for re-election. And 
to those who have been associated with me as Assistant 
Engineers, I desire to especially return my thanks, as I am 
well aware that a huge part of the success of the depart- 
ment during the year has been through their aid and 
counsel. 

Also to the foremen and all of the members of the de- 
partment, for the promptness and willingness which they 
have shown in discharging all the duties which they have 
been called upon to perform during the year ; and, gentle- 
men. I trust you may be as successful under the directions 
thers as you have been under those associated with you 
the past year. 

And. gentlemen, I should neglect my duty if I failed to 
return my thanks to the City Marshal and all other officers 
under him for the willing assistance which they have at. all 
time- given the department. 

And last, but not least, to the Superintendents of Streets 
in Districts Xos. 2 and 10 for that willing disposition which 
they have manifested at all times to promote the efficiency 
of the department. 

A. H. LOWELL, 

Chief Engineer Manchester Fire Department. 



135 



ALARMS, FIRES, LOSSES, ETC.. FOR YEAR 1878. 

I. — January 4 : 4.10 p. >i. ; Box 21 ; fire in a shed and 
barn owned by T. McGrath ; occupied by Kimball and Har- 
vey ; Merrimack back street, between Chestnut and Pine 
streets : loss 8100 ; fully insured. 

2. — January 29 : 9.50 p. m. ; Box G : fire in Central 
block, over D. A. Plumer's store ; owned by S. X. Bell: 
loss $25 : fully insured; cause unknown. 

3. — February 1; 7.35 p. m. : Box 21; fire in Bap1 si 
■church, corner of Merrimack and Pine streets ; loss slight : 
•cause, overheated stove-pipe. 

4. — February 18 ; 7.55 p. >r. : Box 23 ; fire in house 23 s 
Park street ; owned by Deacon Gage : loss 81.000 ; fully 
insured ; cause unknown. 

5. — February 25 : 11.55 p. m. : Box 4; fire in stable 
owned by Daniel Connor : Elm back street near Park ; loss 
810 : fully insured : cause unknown. 

6. — February 27 : 10.40 a. m. ; Box 62 : house and barn 
known as Mammoth Cottage; loss 81.100: fully insured : 
cause unknown. 

7. — April 23 : 11.40 a. m. : fire in stable owned by John 
Davis, near High School house ; loss trifling : cause un- 
known. 

8. — May 10 : 2.15 a. m. ; Box 4 ; fire in a privy back of 
Daniel Connor's block on Elm street, near Spruce ; loss 
trifling : cause unknown. 

9. — May 20 : 11.20 p. m. ; Box 4 ; fire in Burns' block. 
Spruce street : cause unknown : loss trifling. 

10. — May 22 ; 2.07 p. m. ; Box 32 ; fire in a shed back 
of Amoskeag Ax shop : cause unknown ; loss trifling. 

II. — June 9 : 9.10 p. >i. ; Box 5 : fire in tenement block. 
Amoskeag corporation ; loss 8200 : insured : cause burning 
out of chimney. 



136 

12. — June 28: 9.45 a. m. ; Box 41, Amoskeag yard : 
alarm given without orders from the agent, and the agent 
did not want the department to take any part ; for that rea- 
son I sent them home, and I did not estimate or make any 
inquiries about the loss. 

13. — July 1 : 8.45 p. m. : Box 53 ; slight fire in Bald- 
win's bobbin-shop. 'Squog : extinguished without the aid of 
the department. 

14. — July 3 : 9.45 p. m. ; Box 51 : fire in oil shed owned 
by Barr & Clapp, south of Lowell's iron foundn : cause 
unknown : loss $75. 

15. — July 3 : 11.55 p. m. : Box 4 : fire in T. L. Thorpe's 
storehouse, south end of Elm street : loss $2,000 : insured 
for 81..900 : cause unknown. 

16. — September 6; 12.55 a. m. : Box 61; fire, barn 
owned by Waterman Smith in Bakersville; loss $300 ; 
cause unknown. 

17. — October 1 ; 12.45 p. m. : Box 72: burning out of 
chimney, corner of Pine and Central streets. 

18. October 7 : 6 a. m. : Box 4 ; fire in bake-shop, south 
end of Elm street. 570 : no 1"--. 

19. — November 4; 6 a. m. ; Box 14; slight fire in the 
attic of block corner of Orange and Union street- : cause 
unknown. 

20. — November 8 ; 2.55 r. m. ; Box 8; fire, not! 
given from Jones & Hardy's store. 

21. — December 6:11a.m.; Box 36 : boiling over of a 
tar kettle on Wilson street : women on Belmont street saw 
the smoke, got excited, and gave the alarm from Bo:: 36. 

22. — December 14 ; 1.10 a. m. ; Box 6 ; fire in the at- 
tic of tenement-house owned by Stark corporation, corner 
of Vine and Concord streets : loss -9125. 



13' 



NUMBERS AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson & 
Co.'s office and Samuel Colby's residence, corner of Elm 
and Young streets. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
National Hotel and L. B. Bodwell <fe Co.'s office. 

No. 5. — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's office and 
O. E. Hall's drug-store. 

No. G. — Engine-house. Vine street. Keys at engine- 
house. 

No. 7.— City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. 
Ferry's drug-store. 

No. 8. — Elm, foot of Orange street. Keys at Jones & 
Hardy's, Josiah Stark's, and Moses N. Smith's residence. 

No. !>. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
Scott W. Lane's and J. Freeman dough's. 

No. 12. — Blood's shop. Keys private. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at 
residences of W. Jencks and Lewis Simons. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of Charles Palmer and John Wilson. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev. J. O'Brien and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of W. C. Rogers and H. P. Watts. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of H. C. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and E. P. 
Richardson. 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. Mallard <fc Son's grocery and residence of J. A. Em- 
erson. 



138 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of E. T. James and Mrs J. Stevens. 

No. 24. — Corner of Massabesic and Park streets. Keys 
at residences of D. M. Goodwin and A. D. Goodwin. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Asliland streets. 
Keys at residences of S. L. Fogg and Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis' carriage-shop and residence of JohnN. Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Manchester House, Tebbetts Bros.' and "Weeks & Cur- 
rier's drug-stores. 

No. 31. — Amoskeag Village. Keys at P. C. Cheney <fc 
Co.'s paper-mill and residence of Capt. J. M. Varnum. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at Hoyt & Co.'s paper-mill and Langdon 
watch-room. 

No. 34. — Mechanics' Row. Keys at watch-room and "W. 
W. Hubbard's office. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at Stark watch-room. 

No. 36. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys 
at residences of J. S. Campbell, Rodney Porter, and A. G. 
Fairbanks. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag New Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 43. — Namaske Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 51. — S. C. Forsaith & Co.*s shop. Keys at S. C. 
Forsaith's office and Lowell's iron-foundry office. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Barr <fc 
Clapp's store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's brewery. Keys at brewery office 
and I. R. Dewey's store. 

No. 61. — Corner of Elm and Hancock streets, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at residence of II. "W. Longa and M. O'Neil's 
saloon. 



139 

No. 62. — Massabesic street, Ilallsville. Keys at resi- 
dences of Charles Chase and G. W. Dearborn. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins and Daniel Shehan. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular po- 
lice. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given 
at precisely 12.] P. m., and be denoted by one stroke of the 
fire-bells. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be im- 
mediately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, keys to 
which are in the hands of all regular police, also of persons 
designated by a card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go. Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard in 
the box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the 
next nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure the 
box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
cause other than an actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a 
chimney-fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your res- 
idence or place of business where the keys are kept, return 
the keys to the same officer. 



140 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near 
their property, also all places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the 
city, and the number of the box "will be given four times 
for an alarm. 

8. One stroke of the bells and gongs, given by the en- 
gineer in charge during a fire, will be the signal to dis- 
charge the companies remaining at their houses. Two 
strokes of the bells and gongs will be a signal for the de- 
partment to limber up. 

9. The engineers reserve! lie right to give one stroke of 
the bells at any time, and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells 



RULES AND REGULATIONS ADOPTED BY THE 
BOARD OF ENGINEERS DEC. 24, 1877. 

1. Steamer No. 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes ; on the days of its second run, it will 
report on the first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 21, 
27, 34, 51, 71 ; on the third alarm to all boxes. 

2. Steamer No. 4 same as above. 

3. Pennacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

4. Massabesic Hose No. 2 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 36, 62, 71 ; on the second alarm, 
to all boxes except 52, 53, 61. 

5. E. "W. Harrington Hose No. 3 will report for duty on 
the first alarm to boxes 42, 43, 51, 52, 53 ; second alarm 
to boxes 35 and 41. 



141 

6. Hook and Ladder No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

7. Steamer No. 2 to be kept as a reserve engine, to re- 
spond to a third alarm. The horses attached to the engine 
on its first rim will return to the house on a second alarm, 
to be held in readiness to respond to a third alarm, and the 
engine will be manned by men appointed for that purpose 
and attached to Pennacook Hose and Hook and Ladder 
Companies at all times except when the engine is on duty. 

8. Steamer No. 3 to report for duty on first alarm, or 
as soon as the horses can get to it, to boxes 52 and 53 ; to 
all other boxes it will report for duty on a third alarm ; 
and when on duty it will be manned by the men who run 
No. 3 Hose Carriage at all other times. 

9. The whole department will report for duty in all 
cases on the third alarm. 

10. In case of a second alarm from either of the boxes 
on which the horses double on the first engine, they will 
immediately return and get the engine of the second run. 

11. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the en- 
gine or hose-carriage that leaves the house first will have 
the right to lead to the fire. No running by will be al- 
lowed, except in case of accident, under penalty of dis- 
missal of the driver from the department. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer in 
charge, will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 

14. On the first alarm from boxes 24, 25, 26, 31, 61, 
62, the horses of the first and second run will double on 
to the ena-ine of its first run. 



142 



CONDITION OF CISTERNS AND RESERVOIRS. 



No. 



Location. 



.Ft.In 

Elm Street, at City Hall ! 8 2 

Elm Street, near Smyth's Block 5 

Gate, Mercantile Block 1 

Corner Chestnut and Hanover Streets 1 4 

Haseltine House, Manchester Street | 8 

Gate, at junction Hanover and Pine Streets, feeds Nos. 1 

and 9 

Corner of Pine and Central Streets 6 

Corner Elm and Myrtle Streets (worthless) ; 

Lowell, near Nashua Street I 2 

Gate, junction of Amherst and Chestnut Streets, draws oftl 

water from Concord Square 

Centre of Tremont Square 

Bridge, head of Birch Street 6 

Corner Chestnut and Orange Streets 6 

Corner Hanover ami Union Streets 

Corner Laurel and Beech Streets ( worthless) 

Gate, 'Hanover Street, feeds No. 5 

Bakersville (worthless).. J 

Piscataquog, near Fradd & Follansbee's store : 6 

Piscataquog, north steam-mill, 'Squog River ' 

Piscataquog, Granite Street I 6 

Piscataquog, near Bowman Place [12 

Amoskeag penstock, near P. C. Cheney & Co.'s mill 

Amherst, corner Hall Street 

Merrimack, bet. Hall and Wilson Streets (not reliable).. 

Corner Amherst and Hall Streets 

Janesville, near J. B. McCrillis & Son's shop 

Gas-works 

Brook, south end Elm Street 

Elm Back Street, on Central Street 

Elm Back Street, on Park Streeet 

Elm Back Street, on Cedar Street 

Amoskeag, near old hotel 

Gate, cor. of Hanover St., feeds Concord-Square pond and 

reservoir at Smyth's Block 



33 

— £ 



Ft.In 
5 2 
5 10 
3 

2 6 
5 11 



4 5 
4 



Ft.In. 
None. 

None. 
None. 
6 



None.! l 



None, l 
18 1 
3 1 



None 
None, 



143 



Estimated value of property owned by the city in the 
Fire Department : — 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON T VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose- 
carriage -$4,500 00 

100 feet rubber hose 200 00 

1,500 feet leather hose 1,500 00 

Firemen's suits ..... 200 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including harnesses 500 00 



Total amount 



86,900 00 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 2. 

LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 first-class double plunger engine and hose- 
carriage . 



13,000 00 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class single-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage ->o,000 00 

1 4-wheeled hose-carriage . . . 225 00 

200 feet rubber hose 100 00 

1,700 feet leather hose 1,700 00 

Firemen's suits 175 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including harnesses 517 00 



Total amount 



15,717 00 



144 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 4. 

LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine and 
hose-carriage .... 
50 feet rubber hose .... 
1.100 feet leather hose . . . 

Firemen's suits .... 
Furniture and fixtures, including 1 pair 
harnesses ..... 



Total amount 



$3,500 00 

75 00 

1,100 00 

213 00 

600 00 

. $5,488 00 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 

1 4-wheeled horse hose-carriage 
1 horse hose sled and reel 
2,000 feet leather hose .... 
Firemen's suits .... 

Furniture and fixtures, including 1 harness 

Total amount 



. $600 


00 


75 


00 


. 2,000 


00 


300 


00 


5 400 


00 


. $3,375 00 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET. 

1 4-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $600 00 

1,700 feet leather hose 1,700 00 

Firemen's suits 200 00 

Furniture and fixtures .... 54 00 



Total amount 



5,554 00 



145 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladder . . . $1,500 00 

1 extension ladder 150 00 

Firemen's suits . . . . 400 00 

Furniture and fixtures .... 340 00 



Total amount .... $2,390 00 

SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 supply wagon and boxes . . . 150 00 

SPARE HOSE. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

2,500 feet in store-room $2,500 00 

ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 



6 fire hats 


.... 


$25 00 


Furniture 


. . . « « 


100 00 




$125 00 




FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 




At cost 


• • • • * 


. $19,910 00 



GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT DERRY MILLS. 

1 2-wheeled hose-carriage . 
400 feet linen hose . . . 

2 hose pipes 

Total amount .... $412 00 
10 



, $200 00 


200 


00 


12 


00 



146 



AMOSKEAG HOSE CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT P. C. CHENEY & CO.'S PAPEP.-MII.L. 

1 2-wheeled hose-carriage . 
800 feet leather hose .... 

2 hose pipes ..... 

Total amount 



1200 GO 


400 


00 


12 


00 



•$612 00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine No. 1 

Fire King Steam Fire Engine No. 2 

E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine Xo 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Xo. 4 

Pennacook Hose Xo. 1 . 

Massabesic Hose Xo. 2 . 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. Xo. 1 

Supply Wagon 

Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage 

Amoskeag Hose Carriage 

Engineers' Department . 

Fire Alarm 

Store Room . 

Total amount 



. *o\900 


00 


. 3,000 


00 


. ' 5,717 


00' 


. 5,488 


00 


. 3,375 


00 


. 2.554 


00 


. 2,390 


00 


150 


00 


412 


00 


612 


00 


125 


00 


. 19.910 


00 


. 2,500 


00 


.$5.3,133 


oo 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

A. H. Lowell, chief engineer, 29 Prospect street. 

A. C. Wallace, assistant engineer, Main street, 'Squog. 

B. C. Kendall, assistant engineer, 311 Central street. 

T. W. Lane, assistant engineer and clerk,* Elm, corner of 

Appleton street. 
S. C. Lowell, assistant engineer, 5 Machine-shop block. 



147 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

George R. Simmons, foreman, Pennacook street. 

A. D. Scovell, assistant foreman, 800 Manchester street. 

Horace Nichols, engineer, 61 Stark corporation. 

H. H. Glines, assistant engineer, 6 Machine-shop block. 

W. A. Butterfielcl, clerk, engine-house, Vine street. 

G. W. Butterfielcl, driver, engine-house, Vine street. 

F. E. Stearns, hoseman, 488 Park street. 
J. A. Barker, hoseman, 28 Market street. 

J. T. Underhill, hoseman, 54 Stark corporation. 
E. H. Currier, hoseman, 307 Hanover street. 
"W. H. Stearns, hoseman, 421 Hanover street. 
A. C. Barker, hoseman, 455 Maple street. 
P. C. Lane, hoseman, 31 Machine-shop block. 
J. R. Carr, hoseman, 14 Orange street. 

N. S. BEAN STEAM EIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

E. S. Whitney, foreman, 43 Walnut street. 

C. E. Ham, assistant foreman, 44 Machine-shop block. 

E. G. Abbott, clerk, 58 Bridge street. 

P. S. Bean, engineer, 43 Walnut street. 

T. F. Dodge, assistant engineer, 91 Orange street. 

A. B. Cushing, driver, engine-house, Vine street. 

R. S. Corey, hoseman, 17 Machine-shop block. 

C. H. Barrett, hoseman, 20 Machine-shop block. 

A. Nearborn, hoseman, corner of Jane and East High 

streets. 

G. W. Bacon, hoseman, 45 Stark corporation. 

B. F. Marvin, hoseman, 357 Manchester street. 
J. Martin, hoseman, 22 Machine-shop block. 
A. Merrill, hoseman, 43 Walnut street. 

/ 



148 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

A. Maxfield, foreman, 23 Machine-shop block. 

C. I). Palmer, assistant foreman, 847 Central street. 

J. E. Merrill, clerk, 60 Orange street. 

J. M. Plaisted, driver, engine-house. 

G. H. Porter, hoseman, 331 Chestnut street. 

W. R. Sawyer, hoseman, 206 Main street, 'Squog. 

C. B. French, hoseman, 10 Machine-shop block. 
W. G. Chase, hoseman, 35 Amoskeag corporation. 
L. M. Aldrich, hoseman, 375 Park street. 

W. L. Blenus, hoseman, 153 Hanover street. 

J. E. Dodge, hoseman, 885 Elm street. 

J. H. Alsop, hoseman, 37 Stark corporation. 

D. W. Morse, hoseman, 1419 Elm street. 

G. W. Cheney, hoseman, 7 Stark corporation. 

D. A. Webb, hoseman, 18 Machine-shop block. 

G. A. Sackett, hoseman, engine-house, Vine street. 

E. A. Durgin, hoseman, 153 Hanover street. 

S. A. Hill, hoseman, 91 Amoskeag corporation. 

F. E. Summers, hoseman, 9 Stark block. 

E. A. Waldron, hoseman, 642 Union street. 

MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

H. W. Fisher, foreman, 59 Myrtle street. 

J. F. Seaward, assistant foreman, 21 Warren street. 

H. G. Seaman, clerk, 14 South street. 

Walter Seaward, hoseman, 18 Nashua street. 

C. Thompson, hoseman, 35 Nashua street. 

G. W. Goodwin, hoseman, corner Wilson and East High 

streets. 
J. W. Batchelder, hoseman, Nashua street. 
G. A. Martin, hoseman, 360 Amherst street. 
C F. Garland, hoseman, 28 Linden street. 
H. G. Houghton, hbseman, 290 Bridge street. 
W. S. McLeod, hoseman, 28 Warren street. 



149 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

John N. Chase, foreman, 276 Bridge street. 

A. L. N. Robertson, assistant foreman, 256 Lowell street. 

Henry French, clerk, 801 Chestnut street. 

H. P. Young, treasurer, 351 Pine street. 

C. Canfield, steward, 18 Amoskeag corporation. 

G. E. Glines, fireman, 310 Central street. 

E. A. G. Holmes, fireman, 228 Manchester street. 

G. H. Dudley, fireman, 153 Laurel street. 

L. J. Flint, fireman, 207 Bridge street. 

H. H. Cole, fireman, 48 Machine-shop block. 

W. S. Leavitt, fireman, 403 Pine street. 

J. Orrill, fireman, 371 Central street. 

J. B. Nourse, fireman, 262 Bridge street. 

J. J. Lovering, fireman, 137 Amherst street. 

J. Wilson, fireman, 530 Chestnut street. 

C. H. Cross, fireman, 8 Langdon corporation. 
Ralph Pearsons, fireman, 6 Laurel street. 

J. H. Gould, fireman, 19 Amherst street. 

P. P. Hill, fireman, 134 Elm street. 

J. D. Andrews, fireman, 165 Merrimack street. 

A. C. Wiggin, fireman, 48 Amoskeag corporation. 

D. Breed, fireman, 186 Merrimack street. 
J. W. Chase, fireman, 14 Stark corporation. 
G. W. Jones, fireman, 1075 Elm street. 

E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE COMPANY NO. 3, 

H. Fradd, foreman, 123 Dover street. 

R. Manning, assistant foreman, 95 Douglas street. 

J. Hunter, clerk, 93 Water street. 

William Doran, steward, 97 Parker street. 

J. McDerby, foreman of hose, 503 Granite street. 

J. Schofield, hoseman, 392 Granite street. 

J. R. Young, hoseman, 273 Main street. 



150 

A. C. Wallace, jr., hoseraan, 81 Parker street. 

E. Young, hoseman, 273 Main street. 

E. McDerby, hoseman, 145 Water street. 

C. O'Shaughnessy, hoseman, 486 Granite street. 

Thomas O'Dowd, hoseman, 270 Main street. 

DRIVER OP SUPPLY WAGON. 

Dennis Sullivan. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, north-west corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, south-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Union street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Walnut street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, north-west corner of Hall street. 
Appleton, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Adams, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, north-west corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 

Auburn, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Aul turn, north-east corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Auburn, north-west corner of Union street. 



151 

Bedford, north-west corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. Corporation. 
Bedford, north-west corner of Central street. 
Beech, north-west corner of Park street. 
Beech, front of No. 584. 
Bird), north-west corner of Lowell street. 
Birch, north-west corner of Washington street. 
Blodget, front of primary school-house. 
Biodget, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Blodget, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Blodget, north-west corner of Union street. 
Bridge, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Bridge, north-east corner of Hobbs street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Bridge, front of No. 20. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Union street. 
Bridge, nroth-west corner of Walnut street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Beech street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, north-west corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, north-west corner of Linden street. 
Brook, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Brook, north-west corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Union street. 
Brook, north-west corner of Beech street. 
■Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
•Canal, near office door of M. L. W. 
■Cedar, north-cast corner of Canal street. 



152 

Cedar, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Union street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Central, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Central, north-west corner of Canal street. 
Central, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Central, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Central, north-west corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, north-west corner of Beech street. 
Central, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Central, north-west corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, front of No. 374. 
Central, north-west corner of Wilson street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Lowell street. 
Chestnut, opposite High street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Pearl street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Orange street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Myrtle street. 
Chestnut, north-west corner of Prospect street. 
Concord, opposite Vine street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Union street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Walnut street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Beech street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Nashua street. 
Concord, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Concord-, north-west corner of old Amherst street. 
Dean, north-east corner of Canal street. 



153 

Dean, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Depot, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Depot, west of Franklin street. 
Elm, front of Fisk's bookstore. 
Elm, north-west corner of Salmon street. 
Elm, north-west corner of Cove street. 
Franklin, opposite Middle street. 
Granite, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Granite, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Granite, east end of Granite Bridge. 
Green, corner of Elm street. 
Hanover, front of First Congregational Church. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Union street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Beech street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Lincoln street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Ashland street 
Hanover, north-west corner of Hall street. 
Hanover, north-west corner of Belmont street, 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, north-west corner of Chestnut street 
Harrison, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Harrison, north-west corner of Union street. 
Harrison, north-west corner of Beech street. 
Hancock, north-west corner of River road. 
Hollis, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Hollis, north-east corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Kidder, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Kidder, north-east corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Kidder court, north-west corner of Elm street. 



154 

Langdon, north-west corner of Elm street. 

Langdon, north-east corner of Canal street. 

Laurel, north-west corner of Pine street. 

Laurel, north-west corner of Union street. 

Laurel, north-west corner of Beech street. 

Laurel, north-west corner of Maple street. 

Laurel, north-west corner of Lincoln street. 

Laurel, near Xo. 244. 

Laurel, north-west corner of "Wilson street. 

Laurel, near Belmont. 

Lowell, north-west corner of Beech street. 

Lowell, north-west corner of Ash street. 

Lowell, north-west corner of South street. 

Lowell, front of Xo. 276. 

Lowell, north-west corner of Wilson road. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 

Manchester, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 

Manchester, north-west corner of Pine street. 

Manchester, north-west corner of Union street. 

Manchester, north-west corner of Beech street. 

Manchester, north-west corner of Maple street. 

Manchester, north-west corner of Lincoln street. 

Manchester, north-west corner of Wilson street. 

Maple, north-west corner of Lowell street. 

Maple, front of Xo. 530. 

Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Market, north-west corner of Elm street. 

Massabesic, north-west corner of old Falls road. 

Massabesic, south-east corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mammoth road. 

Mechanic, north-east corner of Canal street. 



155 

Mechanic, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanic, north-west corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, north-east corner of Canal street. 

Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Franklin street. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of PJlm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Pine street. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Union street. 

Merrimack, north-west comer of Beech street. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Maple street. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Lincoln street. 

Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Wilson street. 

Merrimack, north-west corner of Hall street. 

Merrimack, near Belmont street. 

Middle, north-east corner of Canal street. 

Middle, near 67 Amoskeag corporation. 

Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 

Myrtle, north-west corner of Pine street. 

Myrtle, north-west corner of Union street. 

Myrtle, north-west corner of Walnut street. 

Myrtle, north-west corner of Beech street. 

Myrtle, north-west corner of Ash street. 

Myrtle, north-west corner of Maple street. 

Myrtle, north-west corner of Oak street. 

Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 

Orange, north-west corner of Pine street. 

Orange, north-west corner of Union street. 

Orange, north-west corner of Walnut street. 

Orange, north-west corner of Beech street. 

Park, near No. 36. 

Park, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 



156 

Park, north-west corner of Union street. 
Park, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Park, north-west corner of Lincoln street. 
Park, north-west corner of Wilson street. 
Park, east end. 

Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Union street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Pearl, north-west corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pine, north-west corner of Park street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Concord street. 
Pine, north-west corner, of Lowell street. 
Pine, north-west corner of High street. 
Pine, north-west corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, north-west corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, north-west corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Union street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, north-west corner of Russell street. 
River road, north-west of Elm street. 
Spring, north-east corner of Canal street. 
Spring, north-west corner of Charles street. 
Spring, north-west corner of Elm street. 



157 

Spruce, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 

Spruce, north-west corner of Pine back street. 

Spruce, north-west corner of Union street. 

Spruce, north-west corner of Beech street. 

Spruce, north-west corner of Maple street. 

Spruce, north-west corner of Lincoln street. 

Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 

Stark, north-east corner of Canal street. 

Stark, near 13 Stark corporation. 

Stark, north-west corner of Elm street. 

State, north-west corner of Granite street. 

State, opposite 57 Manchester corporation. 

State, opposite 13 Manchester corporation. 

State, corner of Central street. 

Summer, corner of Elm street. 

Union, north-west corner of Lowell street. 

Union, north-west corner of High street. 

Valley, corner of Elm street. 

Valley, corner of Willow street. 

Walnut, north-west corner of Lowell street. 

Walnut, opposite No. 79. 

Water, near 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, north-west corner of Elm street. 

Webster, north-west corner of Chestnut street. 

Webster, corner of Elm street. 

W T ilson, corner of Park street. 

Young, corner of Elm street. 



158 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS IN 'SQUOG. 

A, corner of Main street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress'. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Clinton, corner of Dover street. 
Clinton, corner of Main street. 
Center, corner of Main street. 
Center, opposite school-house. 
Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 
Douglas, corner of Green street. 
Douglas, corner of Barr street. 
Douglas, corner of West street. 
Douglas, corner of Main street. 
Douglas, east of Main street. 
Ferry, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Quincy street. 
Granite, corner of Green street. 
Granite, corner of Barr street. 
Granite, corner of West street. 
Granite, corner of Dover street. 
Granite, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Second street. 
Granite, corner of River street. 
Main, opposite Rice's house. 
Main, corner of Walker street. 
Mast, corner of Main street. 
Mast, corner of Bowman street. 
Mast, between Bowman and Main streets. 
Mast, opposite J. Smith's house. 
Milford, corner of Main street. 
Milford, corner of Bowman street. 
Piscataquog, corner of Main street. 



159 

School, corner of Main street. 
School, corner of Walker street. 
School, corner of Ferry street. 
Third, corner of Ferry street. 
Walker, corner of River road. 
Walker* corner of Parker street. 

In addition to the above, there are three private hydrants 
that are available in case of need : — 

One at S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s machine shop. 
One at Lowell's iron foundry. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
Making 303 in all. 



REPORT 



COMMITTEE OX CEMETERIES. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and City Councils of t/ie City 
of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen : — The Committee on Cemeteries herewith 
submit their report for the year 1878 : — 

THE VALLEY. 

The Committee on Cemeteries, early in the season, au- 
thorized the sub-committee to contract for the erection of 
a suitable building in the cemetery, for the convenience and 
accommodation of the superintendent of the grounds and 
all others who may have occasion to be there, especially in 
cold and stormy weather. "We contracted with Mr. J. H. 
Marnard to erect the building, which is now completed in 
a thorough and substantial manner. The building is 
14x17, cottage style, with roof slated, the cost of which is 
8366, all finished in every particular. Mr. Maynard ful- 
filled the agreement in every detail, using the best of ma- 
terials and performing the labor in a workmanlike manner, 
to the entire satisfaction of the committee. The absolute 
necessity for such or a similar building in this cemetery, 
has been long felt, and we feel quite confident that many 
of our fellow-citizens who have suffered considerable incon- 
11 



162 

venience in years past for the need of such accommoda- 
tions, will fully appreciate, even at this late day, the result 
now accomplished. We have not built any new fence this 
year, as only $ 1,000 was appropriated for the Valley, and 
about one-half that sum is required to pay the superintend- 
ent and to keep the grounds in respectable condition, and 
the erection of the building already referred to elsewhere 
did not leave us funds enough to build many feet of fence. 
We are clearly of the opinion that the sum of $2,000 
ought to be appropriated the present year, $1,500 of which 
for the erection of iron fence, in pattern and finish about 
the same as the fence now built on Tine street. 

The committee had some reason to expect that not less 
than $1,500 would be annually appropriated by the city 
councils until the grounds should be entirely inclosed by an 
iron fence. A very large number of our people are deeply 
interested in this sacred place of the dead. Within its in- 
closure are the mortal remains of so many of the nearest 
and dearest to us here, and at no distant period in the future 
to be the final resting-place of many here among the living 
to-day, that any apparent neglect to properly protect and 
care for this place brings sadness and sorrow to many 
hearts. We earnestly hope that our successors will be fur- 
nished with at least the sum herein named, for iron fence 
the present year. There has been received $91. GO for two 
lots sold during the year. 

It appears to us that the sum expended for the bank wall 
on the south line of Auburn street and the north line of 
the cemetery, should not be charged to the cemetery. This 
grade is so established, and the excavation made to such 
depth, that the cost of the wall exceeds the cost of the 
fence upon it. The grade on the north side of Valley 
street and south line of the cemetery, is such as will require 
a bank wall nearly as expensive as the wall on Auburn 



163 



street. We trust that our city councils will give this mat- 
ter a careful consideration. We employed again Mr. A. H. 
Hartshorn to superintend the grounds, who has, we are 
happy to bear testimony, performed the duties of his posi- 
tion quite satisfactorily to us. Mr. Hartshorn has done 
most of the work in keeping the walks and avenues in ex- 
cellent condition, and but very few days of outside labor 
has been done during the year. 

The demand for burial lots in the Valley for the last ten 
years has been very limited indeed. There are now six- 
teen lots graded and for sale, belonging to the city. Most 
of these lots are situate on the west of the brook, between 
the brook and foot of the hill. Some more lots can be laid 
out upon the hillsides whenever there is any demand for 
them. Respectfully submitted, 

HOLMES R. PETTEE. 

J. F. JAMES, 

A. H. DANIELS, 

Sub-Comr/iittee on the Valley. 

PINE GROVE. 

The following presents the financial statement of the 
operations at the Pine Grove for the year 1878, viz. : — 
Cash balance unexpended previous year . . £688 12 
Cash received from sale of lots (47) . . 974 22 



Expenditure! 

Permanent improvements 

Care of grounds 

Tools . 

Drawing logs . 

Treasurer's bill 

Cash on hand to balance 



11,662 


34 


. ?247 


69 


352 


68 


10 


21 


6 


50 


57 


5" 


987 


76 


11,662 


34 



164 

From the above showing it appears there is nearly one 
thousand dollars of an unexpended balance in the treasury. 
But, while this is true, it is proper to say that late in the 
season the committee contracted with Mr. A. H. Lowell to 
put in about 150 feet of iron fence, and a gate correspond- 
ing with that at the Valley. This work is now in progress, 
and will be completed at an early day in the spring. The 
•cost will be towards four hundred dollars, and the amount 
should really be deducted from the balance in the treasury, 
to show the correct state of the finances. With this de- 
duction the surplus would be about the same as last year. 

Every year adds to the importance and value of the Pine 
Grove. It is there that nearly all the sales of lots now 
take place ; and it is believed the interments largely ex- 
ceed those at the Valley. The owners of lots, also, are 
taking a deeper interest in having them graded and fitted 
up in a tasteful manner. Each year they are expending 
more money for handsome stone-work, costly monuments, 
and other adornments for this sacred place, and they very 
■.naturally ask that the iron fence shall be extended until ul- 
timately the grounds shall be inclosed in a proper manner. 
The wooden fence is in very dilapidated condition, and 
there is an earnest desire that it should give place to an 
iron structure, at least upon the northern and western sides. 
To do this gradually, and carry out other needed improve- 
ments, without absorbing all the funds derived from the 
sale of lots, the committee would urge the city councils to 
make an annual appropriation of one thousand dollars, un- 
til the work is completed. 

During the year, Mr. James has laid out lots to meet the 
public demand, and most of these have been graded ready 
for use. Some of , the main avenues, where necessity re- 
quired something to be done, have been graded and other- 
wise improved. A few of the unsightly pine trees have 



165 

been removed at the request of parties owning lots, and 
their places supplied with maples and elms. We believe it 
should be the policy gradually to take away the pines, the 
foliage of which is so destructive to grasses and flowers,, 
until few, if any, shall be left to work injury to trees, shrub- 
bery, and plants that are more beautiful to the eye, and in 
better accord with the taste of those anxious to beautify and 
make more attractive the resting-place of the dead. 

The grounds during the past year have remained under 
the charge of Mr. William C. Chase. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH KIDDER, 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 
J. B. CHASE, 

Sub-Committee Pine Grove- 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Committee on Cemeteries : — 

Gentlemen : — As your treasurer, I submit to you the 
following report for the year ending December 31, 1878 : — 

PINE-GROVE CEMETERY. 

To cash received for 47 lots .... $974 22 
By cash paid H. R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer 974 22 

I now have twenty-six deeds of lots that are not paid 
for, the amount of which is $528.55. I think that most of 
these deeds will be taken within the present year. I am 
clearly of the opinion that some further order of the com- 
mittee should be adopted which will require a more prompt 
payment for these lots. 

THE VALLEY. 

To cash received of John A. Barker for lot No. 

753.} $48 40 

To cash received of Charles W. Paige for lot No. 

COS} 43 20 



$91 60 
By cash paid H. R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer $91 60 

All money received on account of the cemeteries has 
been paid to the City Treasurer, and all bills of expendi- 



167 

tures have been paid by the City Treasurer, full details of 
which will be found in the city annual report. All of 
which is respectfully submitted. 

J. F. JAMES, 
Treasurer of Committee on Cemeteries. 



Manchester, N. H., January 1, 1879. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
J. F. James, treasurer of the cemeteries, for the year 
ending December 31, 1878, and find the same correctly cast 
and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



At a meeting of the Committee on Cemeteries, held at 
the Mayor's office January 4, 1879, the foregoing reports 
were unanimously accepted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Clerk of Committee on Cemeteries. 



ACCOUNT 

OF 

HENRY R CHAMBEELIN, 

CITY TBEASUREB, 

FROM 

December 31, 1877, to December 31, 1878. 



170 



Dr. 



Henry B. Chamberlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



To Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1878 . . . $17,113 10 


Temporary Loan 






66,000 00 


Savings-bank Tax .... 








27,271 50 


Railroad Tax .... 








. 12,374 51 


Literary Fund .... 








. 1,334 59 


Insurance Tax .... 








755 25 


City Hall and Stores 








. 1,825 00 


City Farm .... 








. 1,722 23 


Police Court .... 








. 4,352 96 


City Scales .... 








322 78 


Fine-Grove Cemetery 








974 22 


County, for Board at State Reform 


Scho 


Dl 




. 3,332 45 


County for Railroad Tickets, etc. . 








19 73 


City Teams .... 








. 2,350 60 


Overdrafts .... 








427 61 


License of Shows .... 








370 00 


Land Sold from Farm 








. 1,099 68 


Dog Licenses .... 








664 50 


Sewer Licenses 








376 45 


Rent of Learse 








32 50 


Tuition 








402 05 


Interest on Taxes . 








858 68 


Rent of Tenements 








175 75 


Taxes collected on List of 1870 








14 42 


" J871 








24 13 


« « " 1872 








4 48 


" •• " 1873 








2 50 


" •« " 1874 








219 59 


" 1875 








212 95 


" -• '< 1876 








372 36 


" " " 1877 








. 31,777 32 


« « " 1878 








. 204,000 45 


City Aqueduct .... 








31 00 


Cost on Non-Resident Taxes . 








31 81 


AVater Rent .... 








. 48,873 26 


Lumber 








5 00 


Valley Cemetery 








115 00 


Amount carried forward 


$429,840 47 



171 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1878) . 



O 



By Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1878 $24,751 68 


Paupers off the Farm 










. 7,908 65 


City Farm 












. 3,525 82 


City Teams 












. 3,534 92 


Highway District No. 1 . 












190 63 


u a a 9 












. 11,010 49 


" " " 3 












740 10 


u <( a. 4 












159 28 


it •• a k 
o 












458 47 


« 6 












289 99 


" 7 












718 06 


'" " 8 












395 70 


" " 9 












299 18 


" 10 












. 1,103 45 


" " 11 












. 1,535 63 


" a 12 












215 09 


" " 13 












143 93 


New Highways 












. 1,531 88 


Granite Bridge 












31 50 


Amoskeag-Falls Bridge 












47 01 


Sewers and Drains . 












3,928 07 


Reservoirs 












85 69 


Commons 












54 63 


Valley Cemetery 












464 23 


Pine-Grove Cemetery 












861 93 


Fire Department 












. 8,998 30 


City Police 












. 18,198 76 


City Officers 












. 10,214 33 


Lighting Streets 












4,735 53 


Militia .... 












600 00 


Printing and Stationery . 












1,291 57 


Incidental Expenses 












19,183 50 


City-Hall Building . 












. 2,040 89 


City Library 












4,865 10 


Paving Streets . 












. 2,779 46 


Watering Streets 












1,574 53 


Discount on Taxes . 












5,853 00 


Amount carried forward 


$144,320 98 



172 



Dr. 



Henry It. Chamberlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward . 

Tomb Fees 

A. H. Lowell, Harness and Hose . 

T. L. Thorpe, Old Iron .... 

Water Works, for Akron Pipe 

Jonathan Smith, Refunded 

X. P. Kidder, Pent of Ward Room 

X. P. Kidder, Brick .... 

S. T. Hill, Taxes not Assessed 

Bonds and Interest of Soldiers' Monument 

M. E. George, Refunded by Pauper 

C. K. Walker, Plow .... 
X. P. Kidder, Old Boiler Sold 

D. F. Clark, Admr., Board of Thos. F. Dailey 

Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1879 



$429,840 47 
70 17 
25 00 
16 20 
109 74 
36 54 
12 00 
14 70 
6 22 
5,364 39 
25 00 
1 00 
40 00 
74 26 

$435,635 69 
. 23,329 73 



$458,965 42 



173 



City of Manchester {ending December 31, 1878). 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward . . . $144,320 98 


Abatement of Taxes 






990 28 


Interest .... 










. 1,689 82 


Coupons, City Proper 










19,925 00 


Coupons, Water Bonds . 










. 35,988 00 


Eeduction of City Debt . 










13,000 00 


Repairs of Buildings 










. 2,754 08 


School-houses and Lots . 










339 80 


State Tax .... 










S9,724 00 


Repairs of School-houses 










. 1,970 92 


"Water-works 










. 15,773 99 


Land Damage . 


. 








1,482 68 


Fire-alarm Telegraph 










979 71 


Decoration .... 










400 02 


Grading for Concrete 










1,940 65 


Hydrant Service 










18,060 00 


Macadamizing .... 










633 83 


Tuition .... 










118 39 


New Hose-house 










82 25 


New Engine-house . 










8,117 81 


Teachers .... 










. 35,335 66 


Evening Schools 










1,098 42 


Fuel 










2,449 55 


Incidental Repairs . 










222 92 


Furniture and Supplies . 










515 93 


Printing and Advertising 










382 56 


Books and Stationeiy 










556 26 


Care of Rooms . 










2,267 54 


Contingent Expenses 










806 31 


Temporary Loan 










. 78,400 00 


Court-house . ' . 










841 27 


Soldiers' Monument 










3,005 38 




$434,174 01 


Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1879 .... 


24,791 41 


$458,965 42 


HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, 


City Treasurer. 


Manchester, January 1, 1879. 













FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
certify that we have examined the foregoing account of 
Henry R. Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find the same 
correctly cast and supported by proper vouchers. 
GEORGE W. RIDDLE, 
GREELEY W. HASTINGS. 
JAMES B. STRAW, 
JOHN L. KELLY, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

To balance from old account . $14,300 00 
Merrimack River Savings 

Bank .... 10,000 00 

Manchester Savings Bank . 8,000 00 

Amoskeag Savings Bank . 10,000 00 

Manchester National Bank . 10,000 00 

Second National Bank . . 8,000 00 

H. R. Chamberlin . . 15,000 00 

R. N. Whittemore . . . 5,000 00 



Dr. 



$80,300 00 
Or. 



Paid Merrimack River Savings 

Bank .... $10,000 00 

Manchester Savings Bank . 8,000 00 

Amoskeag Savings Bank . 10,000 00 

Manchester National Bank . 20,000 00 

Second National Bank . 8,000 00 

H. R. Chamberlin . . 17,000 00 

R, N. Whittemore . . 5,000 00 

Lois A. Lee 400 00 

By balance to new account . . 1,900 00 



880,300 00 



12 



178 



INTEREST. 

To appropriation . . . $32,688 00 
Water-works, am't transferred 26,000 00 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 4,000 00 



By balance overdrawn in 1877 


. $2,012 50 


Paid Amoskeag National Bank 


502 50 


Manchester National Bank 


191 88 


Second National Bank 


64 78 


Merrimack River Savings 




Bank . 


305 00 


Manchester Savings Bank 


294 00 


R. N. Whittemore 


72 50 


Lois A. Lee 


19 80 


Louisa Wilson . 


30 00 


Heirs of N. Hunt 


209 36 


Coupons on city bonds 


19,925 00 


Coupons on water bonds 


. 35,988 00 


By balance to new account . 


3,072 68 







Dr. 



162,688 00 
Cr. 



162,688 00 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 

To appropriation .... 83,000 00 
County of Hillsborough for 
board of inmates at reform 
school .... 3,332 4-3 

Railroad tickets furnished coun- 
ty paupers . . . . 11 30 
Aid furnished Joseph Garland . 8 37 



Dr. 



179 

M. E. George, am't refunded . 25 00 

D. F. Clark, administrator, for 
board furnished T. F. Dailey 
at insane asylum . . . 74 26 

.$6,451 44 

Balance (overdrawn) . . 1,705 65 

$8,157 09 

Cr. 
By balance overdrawn in 1877 . $248 44 
Paid Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished M. Kelly ... 9 00 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished John Joyce . . 21 00 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Peter Scanlan . . 18 00 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished John Reardon . . 33 00 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Robert McMahon . 28 00 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Thomas Kerrigan . 21 00 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Patrick Fox . 19 00 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. P. J. Hanley . 51 00 

Daniel Shehan, groceries fur- 
nished Celia Adams 20 41 

John J. Shea, groceries fur- 
nished William Horan . 20 00 j 

John J. Shea, groceries fur- { 

nished Timothy Sullivan . 40 00 

John J. Shea, groceries fur- 
nished Peter Scanlan . . 24 00 



180 

John J. Shea, groceries fur- 
nished Robert McMahon . 40 00 

John J. Shea, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Healy . . 78 00 

John J. Shea, groceries fur- 
nished Thomas Kerrigan . 30 00 

John J. Shea, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Patrick Fox . 25 00 

John J. Shea, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. John Reardon . 20 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished John Joyce . . 25 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Thomas Kerrigan . 25 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Healy . 28 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. P. Sullivan . 24 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished Celia Adams . . 12 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished J. Reardon . . 27 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished J. McCarty . . 13 84 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished P. J. Hanley . 24 00 

M. McQuade, groceries fur- 
nished P. Harrison . 8 00 

A. Mallard & Son, groceries 
-furnished Aleck Shine . 15 00 

A. Mallard & Son, groceries 

furnished Jane Mason . 1 34 

(Callahan & Whclan, groceries 

furnished Robert McMahon 40 00 



181 

Fisher & Flanders, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Sarah Seavey 

Fisher & Garland, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Sarah Seavey 

Fisher & Garland, groceries 
furnished Mrs. A. B. Dakin 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished N. Parker 

Geo. E. Wilson & Co., gro- 
ceries furnished Mrs. Sarah 
Seavey .... 

Barr & Clapp, groceries fur- 
nished W. W. Whittemore . 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished E. Hodgman . 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished Mrs. M. Kelly 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co.. grocer- 
ies furnished Mrs. Moran . 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries furnished small-pox 
patient .... 

Adams & Lamprey, grocer- 
ies furnished Aleck Shine 

Adams & Lamprey, grocer- 
ies furnished James Calla 
han ..... 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 
furnished Thomas Doherty 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished James Duffy . 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished Wyman family 



14 


03 


40 


28 


2 


50 


48 


00 


3 


00 


74 


16 


30 


49 


30 


00 


6 


50 


1 


78 


8 


00 


27 


00 


77 


50 


19 


00 


24 


75 



182 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished children of P. Sul- 
livan .... 5 00 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished James Callahan . 27 00 

O. D. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. T. Bresnehan . 5 00 

O. D. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished James Callahan . 8 00 

O. D. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished James Duffy . . 10 00 

O. D. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Isabella Royce 9 00 

B. P. Burpee, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. John Rhodes . 10 93 

Putnam & Brown, groceries 

furnished Nicholas Parker 2 00 

Brigham & Pratt, crackers 
furnished Mrs. T. Bresnehan 2 00 

Michael Kearns, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Harrison . 8 00 

Mrs. Mary Reardon, groceries 

furnished Stephen Spain . 82 90 

Joseph Bean, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Sarah Seavey . 3 00 

H. E. Stevens, groceries fur- 
nished E. C. Cross . . 2 50 

H. E. Stevens, groceries fur- 
nished Catherine Adams . 1 00 

H. E. Stevens, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. T. Bresnehan 5 25 

F. G. Barney & Co., groceries 
furnished Aleck Shine . 29 25 

Dewey & Wyman, groceries 

furnished Sarah Wyman . 77 48 



183 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished John Joyce 

A. M. Eastman, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. T. Bresnehan . 

Dewey & Wyman, groceries 
furnished N. Cory 

Moody <fe Bartlett, groceries 
furnished David Shannon . 

Stearns <fe Farmer, groceries 
furnished children of Patrick 
Sullivan . . •■'... 

Stearns & Farmer, groceries 
furnished Mary Riley 

Stearns & Farmer, groceries 
furnished Thomas O'Connor 

Stearns <fe Farmer, groceries 
furnished J. Knights . 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished E. Hodgman . 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished S. L. Corning 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished Maria Garland 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished Celia Adams . 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Fitzgerald 

Len A. McKean,'groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Rhodes . 

S. L. Flanders, groceries fur- 
nished Joseph Bean . 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Harrison 

Stearns &, Farmer, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Mumford . 



25 


00 


33 


53 


1 


54 


4 


00 


20 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


o 
O 


25 


on 
OO 


58 


10 


54 


•> 


62 


o 


60 


20 


00 


11 


99 


5 


00 


16 


00 


2 


00 



184 

Michael Kearns, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Rhodes . 6 00 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished Aleck Shine . 5 00 

J. J. Shea, groceries furnished 

John Murphy . . . 5 00' 

J. J. Shea, groceries furnished 

Mrs. M. Shallory . . 5 00 

J. J. Shea, groceries furnished 

David McKay ... 5 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished John Joyce . . 5 00 

Michael Kearns, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Rhodes . . 6 00 

A. Mallard & Son, groceries 

furnished Patrick Regan . 8 00 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished Aleck Shine . . 5 00- 

Stearns <fe Farmer, groceries 

furnished Mrs. John Logue 2 00 

Stearns <fc Farmer, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Wineford . 2 0O 

G. H. Porter, wood furnished 

children of Pat. Sullivan . 5 G5- 

G. H. Porter, wood furnished 
Aleck Shine ... 10 50 

G. H. Porter, wood furnished 

Mrs. T. Bresnehan . . 10 00 

G. H. Porter, wood furnished 

Thomas Doherty . . 5 25 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished Thomas Doherty 5 62 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished Aleck Shine . 7 80* 



185 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished James Callahan . 7 87 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished Mrs. Sarah Seavey 1 75 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished Mrs. T. Bresnehan 5 31 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal fur- 
nished Mrs. A. B. Ayer . 1 25 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal fur- 
nished children of Patrick 
Sullivan .... 1 87 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., woodfur- 

nished Mrs. Sarah Seavey . 25 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood fur- 
nished Celia Adams . . 4 24 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood fur- 
nished children of P. Sulli- 
van 2 50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood fur- 
nished James Callahan . 2 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood fur- 
nished Aleck Shine . . 2 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Reardon . 6 00 

Dickey, Young & Co., coal fur- 
nished E. Hodgman . . 21 46 

Dickey, Young & Co., coal fur- 
nished children of P. Sulli- 
van 3 50 

Dickey, Young & Co., coal fur- 
nished Mrs. Moulton . . 3 75 

Dickey, Young & Co., wood 
and coal furnished Maria 
Garland .... 5 75 



186 

James F. Wyman, coal fur- 
nished Mrs. Sarah "Wyman . 1 00 

S. C. Forsaith & Co., wood fur- 
nished Mrs. Sarah Seavey . 2 50 

Sylvanus Brown, wood fur- 
nished Mrs. Sarah Wyman . 1 50 

Charles Esty, wood furnished 

Mrs. Sarah Seavey . 6 00 

Horace Young, wood furnished 

E. Hodgman ... C 00 

J. O. Ingalls & Co., wood fur- 
nished Mrs. Sarah Seavey . 2 50 

G. H. Porter, wood furnished 

Mrs. Sarah Seavey . . 3 50 

G. H. Porter, wood furnished 

Patrick Regan ... 3 75 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of John Connolly . . 274 93 

X. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Martha J. Dunn . . 252 86 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Elbridge Gerry . . 223 41 

X. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of C. W. Haselton . . 222 27 

X. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Jonathan O. Hunt . . 133 55 

X. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Aseneth H. White . . 152 89 

X. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Bridget Scully . . 51 68 

State Reform School, board of 

inmates .... 3,795 75 

Mrs. M. M. Prescott, board of 

Eben Foss .... 81 00 



187 



C. C. Webster, board of D. O 
Webster 

Mrs. 0. J. Doble, board of Mrs 

Anna B. Ayer . 
Mrs. Joseph Senter, board of 

Joseph Senter . 
Mrs. Mary G. Emerson, board 

of Walter D. Emerson 
Mrs. Sarah Page, board of 

Mrs. Lovell 
J. Howard, board of John 

Gammell . 
Sarah Goodhue, board of Mrs 

H. Dunbar 
M. E. George, examining rec 

ords .... 
M. E. George, cash paid C. W 

Haselton . 
John A. Barker, cash paid for 

transportation of paupers 
A. B. Page, expenses to Con 

cord with insane person 
John B. Clarke, printing 

D. Shehan, transportation of 
P. Fox to Lowell, Mass. 

Nathan P. Kidder, transpor- 
tation of Clara Favor to New 
London . 

William Shepard, care of deaf 
and dumb person 

J. J. Abbott, setting glass at 
Mrs. Sarah Seavey's . 

S. Saunders, repairing house of 
Mrs. Sarah Seavev 



108 00 
94 00 
20 00 
30 00 
3 33 
10 00 
10 00 
19 12 
08 00 
28 87 

6 cO 

7 25 



2 25 

1 50 

4 03 

2 58 



188 

George W. Weeks, boots for 
children of P. Sullivan 

George W. Dodge, shoes for 
child of Timothy Quinn 

W. G. Kimball, professional 
services .... 

Leonard French, professional 
services .... 

George D. Towne, professional 
services .... 

Town of Bedford . 

Tebbetts Bros., medicines 

John A. Wiley, medicines 

Melendy & Poor, coffin and bu- 
rial of child found in canal 

J. N. Bruce, burying Julia I. 
Davis .... 

F. L. Wallace & Co., burying 
Lene Bell Finch 

P. A. Devine, burying P. Fox 

P. A. Devine, burying child of 
P. Fox .... 

P. A. Devine, burying John 
Reardon .... 

P. A. Devine, burying J. 
Rhodes .... 

P. A. Devine, burying child of 
P. Harrison 

J. G. Sturgis, professional ser- 
vices ..... 

County of Hillsborough 

Emil Custer, professional ser- 
vices ..... 

Peter 0. Woodman, expenses 
to Nashua .... 



3 


25 




80 


40 


00 


13 


00 


20 


00 


13 


00 


73 


90 


3 


45 


6 


00 


14 


00 


18 


00 


21 


00 


14 


00 


21 


00 


20 


00 


12 


00 


61 


00 


13 


89 


71 


25 


5 


50 



189 

E. G. Haynes, plastering rooms 
for Mrs. Seavey . . 6 13 



CITY FARM. 



To appropriation . . . $1,000 00 

Frederick Allen, produce sold 
from farm .... 
Pettee & Whittle, overdraft 
Reserved fund, am't transferred. 
Balance (overdrawn) . 



By balance from 1877 account 
Paid H. Fradd, groceries 

Eager & Rand, groceries 
J. G. Warner & Co., groceries 
IT. F. Davis & Co., groceries . 
W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 
R. M. Miller, groceries . 
Drake <fe Carpenter, grain 
J. S. Kidder & Co., grain 
Baldwin & Tabor, grain . 
Pettee & Whittle, grain . 
John B. Varick, hardware 
Pike & Heald, hardware and 

repairs .... 6 92 

Wm. C. Rogers, hardware and 

phosphates, seeds, etc. . 64 05 

Daniels & Merrill, hardware, 

seeds, Stockbridge manures, 

etc 128 74 



1,722 


23 


25 


28 


500 


00 


804 


56 


$526 


25 


31 


60 


27 


04 


236 


13 


5 


15 


76 


09 


128 


83 


2 


75 


2 


23 


31 


43 


617 


07 


11 


71 



1,157 09 



Dr. 



$4,052 07 
Cr. 



190 



Win. H. Hill, blacksmitliing 
J. F. Woodbury & Co., black 

smithing . 
Bunton & Porter, iron worl 

and blacksmithing 
A. B. Webster, iron work and 

blacksmithing 
D. H. Barr, iron work . 
Chas. A. Smith, crockery, etc 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
Goodwin Bros. & Co., repair 

ing cart, etc. 
Fairbanks & Pearson 
Plumer, Chandler, & Co., cloth 

ing .... 
Plumer & Holton, clothing 
Mitchell <fc Heath, boots and 

shoes .... 
F. C. Dow, boots and shoes 
Head & Neale, repairing boots 
Geo. W. Thayer & Son, rubber 

boots .... 
J. W. C. Pickering, clothing 
J. iS. Holt & Co., soap . 
Chas. Coburn, swill 
W. H. Coburn, swill 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair 

ing cart and iron work 
Robinson & Stearns, meats 
J. L. Fogg, meats . 
Clough <fc Towle, meats . 
Ira P. Emery & Co., tin and 

iron ware . 
Geo. E. Hall, medicines 



15 65 

15 25 
54 17 



10 


90 


13 


30 


11 


42 


10 


11 


11 


50 


19 


00 


10 


93 


29 


61 


9 


40 


45 


55 


1 


15 


6 


00 


19 


70 


7 


94 


18 


00 


65 


00 


6 


50 


13 


Q5 


43 


32 


8 


50 


31 


78 


Q 


40 



191 



Tebbetts Bros., medicines 
A. F. Perry, medicines . 
Edwin Branch, repairing har 

ness and horse-clothing 
N. S. Clark, dry goods . 
J. S. Masseck, dry goods 
Temple <fe Farrington, curtain 

fixtures, etc. 
William Stevens, tobacco 
Manchester Locomotive Works 

iron castings 
S. Hovey, brick, etc. 
Robert B. Neal, making cider 
G. R. R. Corporation, freight 
Thomas T. Drake, pasturing 
Thos. W. Emerson & Co., seeds 
WhittemoreBros., seeds 
Chas. E. Bursiel, cow 
.Smith & Barnard, threshing 

wheat 
D. C. Whittemore, professional 

services 
Carl C. Shepard, crockery 
F. A. Fox & Co., filing saws 
Wm. Mills, fresh fish 
J. 0. Webster & Co., filing 

saws .... 
R. M. Rollins, horse-rake teeth 
(x. F. Bosher & Co., coffee 
Nashua Bedding Co., quilts 

etc 

Edwin Kennedy, clothing 
D. M. Goodwin, boiler, etc. 
Wm. Graves, ladders 



io 



26 01 



35 


75 


62 


70 


55 


41 


2 


94 


26 


00 


5 


70 


3 


35 


4 


00 




25 


15 


00 


9 


90 


q 


75 


50 


00 



12 75 



6 


50 


4 


60 


1 


35 


1 


00 


1 


35 


1 


80 


5 


46 


16 


50 


3 


67 


21 


75 


4 


37 



192 



P.. 0. Woodman, labor . 


8 00 


J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 


1 47 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., repairing 




plow . 


1 00 


T. R. Hubbard, seeds, etc. 


4 62 


John Chandler, labor 


12 67 


Sophia Harvey, labor 


10 00 


Annie Conner, labor 


10 00 


Mary A. Murphy, labor . 


30 50 


Leander Jenkins, labor . 


77 20 


W. S. Nelson, labor 


59 50 


Wm. K. Stockdale, labor 


99 05 


S.'D. Smith, labor . 


38 51 


Frederick Allen, paid forlaboi 


211 68 


Frederick Allen, salary a 


5 


superintendent . 


500 00 


Ban* & Clapp, groceries . 


27 27 


J. Otis Clark, meats 


59 03 


H. C. Ranno, repairing har 




ness .... 


4 55 


John W. Atwood . 


23 50 


Silas Fierce & Co. . 


10 13 


CITY TEA} 


IS. 


To balance from old account . 


. $296 29 


Appropriation . 


300 00 


Pettee & Whittle, overdraft 


48 05 


Fire Department, amount trans 


i- 


ferred .... 


. 1,039-92 


District No. 2 . 


. 1,112 17 


New highways . 


33 50 



[,052 07 



Dr. 



193 



Grading for concrete 






349 


94 


District Xo. 10 






QQ 


00 


Incidental expenses . 






125 


87 


Watering streets 






472 


37 


Macadamizing streets 






39 


50 


Paving streets . 






32 


00 


New engine-house 






2 


00 


Amoskeag-Falls Bridge 






8 


25 


Sewers and drains . 






43 


31 


•City teams 






63 


75 


Contingent expenses 






2 


00 








M 034 Q9 






^P^jX/O^t C-j 








Cr. 


Paid I. T. Webster, hay 




$1 


90 


James Lord, straw 




5 


85 


Wm. McQueston, straw . 




18 


25 


William Moore, hay 




40 


51 


E. P. Johnson & Co., hay 




125 


38 


P. A. Eaton, oats . 




2 


70 


P. H. Dickey, hay 




23 


47 


E. F. Hanson, hay 




7 


80 


Eaton & Whittemore, hay 




50 


63 


T. L. Colby . 




5 


52 


D. C. Whittemore, hay . 




29 


87 


J. C. Nichols & Son, hay 




89 


33 


E. Langdell, hay . 




62 


96 


Leonard Shelters, hay . 




225 


63 


W. F. Sleeper & Co., oats 




10 


92 


J. S. Kidder & Co., grain 


and 






meal .... 




09 


SI 


H. Fradd & Co., grain 


and 






meal .... 




67 


56 


Barr <fe Clapp, grain and meal 




18 


Samuel Poor, grain and meal 


37 


17 


13 











194 

Baldwin & Tabor, grain and 

meal . . . . 57 89 

Drake & Carpenter, grain and 
meal 109 85- 

W. H. Martyn & Son, grain 
and meal . . . . 54 63. 

Pettee & Whittle, grain and 
meal 421 61 

Bunton & Porter, blacksmith- 

ing 2 50* 

C. O'Shaughnessy, blacksmith- 
ing 

A. B. Webster, blacksmithing 

R. W. Flanders, " 

M. C. Clark, 

Clark, Andrews <fc Co. " 

.I.F. Woodbury & Co. " 

Wm. IT. Hill, 

Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 

John B. Varick, " 

Pike & Heald, 

Wm. C. Rogers, " 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 

H. C. Ranno, repairs, harness, 
etc 

John Esty, repairs,harness,etc. 

Edwin Branch, repairs, har- 
ness, etc. .... 59 15 

J. A. Sanborn & Co., repairs 

of carts, etc. . . . 181 29 

Z. F. Campbell, medicine . 25 50 

Geo. E. Hall, " .11 6a 

M. C. Derby, professional ser- 
vices .... 39 75 



6 


70 


10 


05 


10 


75 


7 


26 


29 


53 


78 


50 


76 


51 


3 


05 


4 


95 


1 


32 


10 


23 


20 


50 


12 


83 


82 


70 



195 

B. Frank Fogg, repairs . 
J. M. Chandler, salt, etc. 
City teams 
Wilbur Fisk, hay . 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor 
M. McCabe, rent of stable 
I. P. Scollay, harness dressing 

and soap . 
E. G. Stratton, professional 

services 
I. R. Simmons, gray horse 

C. R. R. Corp., freight on horse 
J. A. Caverly, trucking 
Thos. W. Lane, blank books 
C. F. Hall, teamster 
A. Robie, " 
.James Kearns," 
Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 
A. B. Cushing, 
T. M. Conant, 



6 04 

2 50 
63 75 
31 89 

3 13 
31 25 

3 00 



8 


00 




300 


00 




6 


00 




4 


25 




1 


55 




24 


00 




92 


60 




23 


49 




308 


24 




315 


74 




109 


37 


$4,034 92 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 



To balance from old account . 
Appropriation . 



Paid R. C. Dustin, superintendent, 
for labor and team 
Benjamin Stevens, superintend- 
ent, for labor and team 
Labor of men and teams 
By balance to new account 



115 23 
250 00 



#20 50 



46 


25 


123 


88 


74 60 



Dr. 

$265 23 
Cr. 



#205 23 



196 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 

To appropriation .... #10,000 00 
T. L. Thorpe, old iron . . 16 20 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 1,600 00 



Pn. 



By balance from old account . . ¥466 77 
Taid Win, T. Evans, superintendent, 

for labor .... 485 75 
Warren Harvey, superintend- 
ent, for labor and teams . 591 25 
Wra. C. Rogers, hardware . 38 12 
Daniels i\: Merrill, hardware . 38 30 
John B. Varick, hardware . 57 79 
C. M. Hubbard ... 5 50 
Pike & Heald, repairs . . 08 
Bunton & Porter, blacksmith- 

ing 13 25 

J. F. Wilbur, blacksmithing . 2 95 

A. B. Webster, blacksmithing 38 12 

Henry Thomas, blacksmithing 30 35 
J. T. Garland, wedges and 

shims .... 2 50 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor 2 28 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . .. 35 09 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 17 00 
W. H. Vickcry, keys . . 35 
»Geo. Holbrook, filing saws, etc. 1 85 
French & Robertson, filing- 
saws ..... 75 



111,616 20 
Cr. 



197 



John B. Clarke, printing 
Wm. II. Rankin, sand . 


15 75 
3 40 




II. E. Stevens, salt 


4 50 




Eager & Rand, salt 


1 90 




Cyrus P. Savory, stone-work . 


9 00 




J. A. Caverly, trucking 


3 60 




.1. M. Chandler & Co., pow- 
der, etc 


59 63 




City Farm, stone 


81 00 




City teams .... 


1,129 05 




T. M. Conant, teamster . 


68 31 




IT. S. Reed, teamster 


157 50 




A. B. Cushing, teamster 


29 75 




A. Robie, teamster 


272 02 




.1. Kearns, teamster 


451 99 




Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 


44 99 




J. A. Emerson, team and team- 






ster ..... 


258 00 




R. A. Lawrence, team and 






teamster . . ' . 


326 00 




E. S. Harvey, team and team- 






ster ..... 


280 00 




J. L. Fogg, team and teamster 


24 00 




Mark Harvey, team and team- 






ster ..... 


188 00 




A. Wells, team and teamster 


103 00 




A. R. Mack, team and team- 






ster 


32 00 




Fogg & James, teams . 


14 75 




Labor of men and teams 


6,096 04 




By balance to new account 


138 94 

111,616 


20 



108 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT 


NO. 3. 


To appropriation .... 


$750 00 


Reserved fund, amount trans- 




ferred 


50 00 


By balance from old account . 


$21 99 


Paid Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 


4 12 


John B. Varick " 


86 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 


7 80 


B. F. Mitchell, gravel . 


45 00 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


5 23 


R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 




ing 


7 50 


Wm. Sutcliffe, blacksmithing 


3 30 


H. C. Dickey, superintendent 


90 00 


Charles W. Barker, superin- 




tendent .... 


245 50 


Labor of men and teams 


331 29 


By balance to new account 


37 91 







Dr. 



1800 00 
Cr. 



$800 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 

To balance from old account . . $2 10 
Appropriation .... 250 00 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 7 18 



Paid Isaac Whittemore, superin- 
tendent . 



$7 50 



Dr. 



$259 28 
Cr. 



199 



C. C. Webster 


38 56 


J. M. <fe D. A. Parker, lumber. 


56 30 


Labor of men and teams 


56 17 


John B. Varick, hardware 


75 


By reserved fund, amount trans- 




ferred .... 


100 00 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 

To appropriation .... $450 00 
Old plank sold .... 5 00 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred .... 7 69 



By -balance overdrawn in 1877 


14 22 


Paid John B. Varick, hardware 


1 62 


R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 


5 10 


C. N. Harvey, superintendent 


10 25 


C. A. Pierce, " 


144 00 


C. N. Harvey, lumber . 


20 65 


G. B. Fogg, powder 


1 25 


Labor of men and teams 


275 60 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT 


NO. 6. 


To balance from old account 


832 04 


Appropriation .... 


400 00 



•1259 28 



Dr. 



■$462 69 
Cr. 



1462 69 

Dr. 

#432 04 



200 

Paid John B. Varick, hardware 

I. T. Webster, superintendent 
David Dickey, 2d, 
Labor and teams . 

By balance to new account 





45 


18 


08 


122 


87 


248 


59 


42 


05 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 

To balance from old account . . $5' 35 
Appropriation .... 700 00 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred ..... 12 71 



Paid Bun ton <fe Porter, blacksmith- 




ing 


12 50 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 


HO so 


Robert Hall, gravel 


28 40 


J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 




and fuse .... 


1 09 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., lumber 


2 40 


A. Bod well, stone . 


16 00 


P. C. Bean, superintendent . 


40 00 


Francis P. Sargent, " 


96 25 


Labor and teams . • 


521 12 



Cr. 



1432 04 



Dr. 



-1718 06- 
Cr._ 



-1U718 OS 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 

"o appropriation .... -$450 00 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 50 00 



Dr. 



#500 00> 



201 

By balance overdrawn in 1877 
Taid Geo. S. Smith, superintendent 
Harrison M. Clough, " 
Labor of men and teams . 
By balance to new account 



#59 


30 


52 


53 


83 


32 


259 


85 


45 


00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 
To appropriation .... #450 00 



By balance overdrawn in 1877 
Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

Alphonzo Boyce, superintend- 
ent . 

Labor of men and teams 
Bv balance to new account 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



To appropriation . 

George West, overdraft 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . 



By balance overdrawn in 1877 
Paid A. Q. Gage, superintendent 
W. Moore, hay 
P. A. Eaton, oats . 



Cb. 



$500 00 



Dr. 



#83 41 
15 33 


#450 00 
Cr. 


144 94 

138 91 

67 41 


fcLRfl 00 



Dr. 



#900 


00 








3 


97 








300 


00 












». 


,203 
Cr. 


9T 


#70 


76 








297 


00 








14 


96 








11 


00 









202 



J. C. Head, hay 
Charles K. Walker, hay 


10 
25 


80 
71 




Barr <fc Clapp, grain 

W. H. Martyn & Son, grain 

Pettee <fc Whittle, cement 


16 

29 

1 


05 
35 
50 




Dr. Derby, professional ser 
vices .... 


2 


00 




Pius Brown, carpenter-work 
Head <fc Dowst, lumber . 


9 

33 


75 
75 




A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


63 


10 




S. C. Forsaith & Co., repair- 
ing hub 
A. H. Lowell, sled-shoes, etc 


28 


40 
03 




John McDerby, stone 


22 


00 




Bunton <fc Porter, blacksmith- 
ing .... 


6 


25 




Edwin Brancli, horse-blankets 


9 


50 




A. P. Frye, blacksmithing 
John B. Varick, hardware 


22 

22 


25 

84 




Adams Gowan, stone 


22 


00 




R. W. Martin, repairs . 

City team 

Labor of men and teams 


12 

42 

401 


00 
00 
21 




3y balance to new account 


29 


76 


203 97 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 
Reserved fund . 



1200 00 
550 00 
800 00 



Dr. 



$1,550 00 



203 



Or. 



Paid Frank D. Hanscom, superin- 
tendent .... 
David Wells, lumber 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., lumber . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
Barnard & Howie, iron work . 
Daniel Farmer, for services as 
superintendent prior to May 
15, 1877 . 
John Garland, building culvert 
John Garland, extra services 
Henry Thomas, blacksmithing 
Oilman R. Stevens, stone 
George H. Colby, lumber 
S. L. Flanders, nails 
Labor and teams . 
Bv balance to new account 



508 


11 


27 


96 


21 


60 


11 


90 


4 


55 


1 


50 


116 


63 


175 


00 


84 


37 


4 


16 


12 


50 


6 


00 


o 


26 


609 


09 


14 


37 



$1,550 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



To balance from old account . 


$51 72 


Appropriation . 


350 00 


Paid City Farm, labor and teams 


. $£02 29 


J. J. Adams, stone-work 


2 50 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


7 80 


Wm. Mills, labor . 


2 50 


By balance to new account 


186 63 



Dr. 



$401 72 
Cr. 



$401 72 



204 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 

To appropriation .... #150 00 
Reserved fund . . . . 100 00 



Paid Wm. Campbell, superintendent $35 87 

Mrs. A. J. Fellows, gravel . 2 00 

Labor and teams . . . 158 04 

By balance to new account . . 54 09 



Dr. 

1250 00 
Cr. 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

\> appropriation .... #800 00 

J. A. Flanders, overdraft . . 7 75 

Reserved fund .... 1,000 00 

Balance (overdrawn) . 3 00 



1250 00 



I IR. 



-11,810 75 
Cr. 



Paid Warren Harvey, superintend- 
ent, labor and teams . . -1223 75 

D. W. and J. T. Garland, cov- 
ering-stone ... 60 00 

Warren Harvey, for grading 
" Clay-pit road " and extra 
services . . . . 100 00 

Bonney & Waite, covering- 
stone ..... 

Lamson & Marden, stone-work 

H. G. Farrington, use of stump 
. puller and team . 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 



12 


£0 


18 


50 


10 


25 


6 


36 



205 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . 65 26 

City teams .... 23 50 

Labor and teams . . . 1,290 63 



11,810 75 



DAMAGE FOR LAND TAKEN FOR HIGHWAYS. 

Dr. 



To appropriation .... 1800 00 
Reserved fund .... 978 57 



#1,778 57 
Cb. 



fey balance (overdrawn in 1877) . $232 14 
Paid Thomas Bowler, land taken for 

Beech street ... 20 00 

J. Q. A. Sargent, land taken 
for widening and straighten- 
ing Manchester street . 16 25 

George W. Thompson, land 

taken for Beech street . 900 00 

Stark heirs, land taken for 

Beech street ... 150 00 

Manchester and Lawrence R.R. 

land taken for Beech street 50 00 

Amoskeag Savings Bank, land 
taken for the extension of 
Chestnut street ... 200 00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 
land taken for Chestnut 
street across Concord square 100 00 

Heirs of John G. Brown, land 
taken for southern extension 
of Beech street . . . 46 43 

Byjoalance to new account . . 63 75 



.,778 57 



206 



WATERING STREETS. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 
Reserved fund . 



Paid Warren Harvey, superintend 
ent, teams . 

Manchester Water-works 

J. A. Sanborn & Co., water 
ing-cart 

J. A. Sanborn & Co., repairing 
watering-cart 

Pike & Heald, repairs . 

J. Q. A. Sargent . 

H. Fradd 

T. M. Conant, teamster . 

Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 

A. B. dishing, teamster 

A. Q. Gage, teamster 

S. H. Reed, teamster 

A. Robie, teamster 

City teams 
By balance to new account 



1182 08 
800 00 
600 00 



132 00 
578 00 

150 00 



Dr. 



$1,582 08 



Cr. 



1 


55 




3 


12 




4 


12 




9 


00 




r 

o 


25 




86 


25 




90 


37 




83 


00 




52 


50 




6 


00 




473 


37 




7 


55 


11,582 08 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

To balance from old account . . $116 05 
Appropriation .... 5,500 00 



Dr. 



85.616 05 



•207 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., for 

gas 13,333 85 

Manchester Gas-light Co., for 
street lanterns, etc. . 

A. H. Lowell, lamp posts, 
frames, etc. 

Pike & Heald, lanterns, wicks, 
etc 

J. B. Titus, lighting lamps 

J. B. Titus, glass and settting 

[. R. Dewey, lighting lamps, 
glass and setting, oil, wicks, 
etc. ..... 

Dewey & Wyman, oil, glass, 
wicks, etc. .... 

M. R. Currier, oil, chimneys, 
and wicks .... 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., oil, chim- 
neys, and oil can 

Eager & Rand, oil . 

S. L. Flanders, oil, globes, 

wicks, etc. . . . 10 01 

H. Fradd & Co., oil, globes, 

wicks, etc. .... 4 76 

Carl E. York, oil . . . 3 78 

Campbell & Hanscom, adver- 
tising proposals for lighting 
streets .... 7 87 

By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . 600 00 
By balance to new account . . 280 52 



Co. 



50 


50 


40 


55 


20 


25 


433 


33 


19 


20 


762 


56 


26 


75 


17 


32 





25 


1 


95 



$5,616 05 



208 



PAYING STREETS. 



To balance from old account . 


$412 


98 


Appropriation .... 


1,000 


00 


Reserved fund .... 


1,366 


48 


Paid John H. Proctor, cobble paving 


*33 


96 


E. S. Harvey, cobble paving . 


20 


86 


C. C. Webster, cobble paving . 


21 


61 


Charles Cheney, cobble paving 


50 


OS 


John Hosley, sand . 


7 


50 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 






sand ..... 


30 


60 


S. C. Forsaith 




50 


John B. Yarick, hardware 


17 


88 


Bonney & Waite, edge-stone . 


20 


10 


A. Bodwell, edge-stone . 


3 


00 


George P. Atwell, stone-work 


8 


00 


E. G. Haynes, mason-work . 


3 


75 


Turner & Mitchell, concrete . 


103 


27 


Charles H. Robie, concrete 


473 


22 


Chamberlin & Brown, concrete 


11 


25 


J. McDerby & Son, concrete . 


40 


41 


Bartlett & Laing, concrete 


30 


94 


R. Laing, concrete 


29 


20 


Labor of men and teams 


1,867 


33 



Dr. 



$2,779 46 
Cr. 



$2,779 46 



209 
MACADAMIZING. 



Dr. 



'To appropriation .... 


$1,000 


00 




Reserved fund, am't transferred 


151 4 










$1,151 47 














Cu. 


Paid Manchester Water-works, for 








water .... 


$37 50 




F. D. Beebe, stone for crusher 


8 


00 




C. M. Hubbard, stone for 








crusher .... 


15 


00 




C S. Smith, stone for crusher 


6 


00 




J. L. Fogg, stone for crusher . 


23 


00 




J. Stickney, repairing belt 


3 


00 




Hutchinson Bros., repairs on 








crusher .... 


10 


30 




John B. Varick, oil, tallow, etc. 


7 


20 




D. M. Goodwin, waste . 




60 




R. A. Young, filing saws 




65 




T. A. Lane, steam-hose, etc. . 


3 


65 




L. B. Bod well & Co., coal- 








screen and wood 


33 


50 




J.E. Rowell, wood 


16 


00 




A. H. Lowell, grates for 








crusher .... 


3 


12 




Labor of men and teams 


961 


01 




By balance to new account 


22 


94 


$1,151 4T 




CRETI 


■\ 


GRADING FOR CON 










Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$350 C 




Reserved fund .... 


1,000 


00 




Balance (overdrawn) 


986 


03 


$2,336 03 



14 



210 

By balance from old account . 
Paid Ellis & Patterson, engineering 
C. E. Cox, filling grade . 

C. M. Hubbard, filling grade . 

D. W. & J. T. Garland, stone 
Labor of men and teams 



•1-395 


38 


108 


75 


3 


00 


5 


00 


30 


00 


1,793 


90 



Or.. 



12,336 0^ 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



To balance from old account . 
Appropriation . 
Sundry persons, licenses to en- 
ter sewers 
John B. Varick, overdraft 
A. C. Wallace, overdraft . 
Pettee & Whittle, overdraft 
H. W. Clapp, overdraft 
Drake & Carpenter, overdraft 
Manchester Water-works, sewer 

pipe .... 
Nathan P. Kidder, brick sold 
Reserved fund, amount trans 
ferred .... 



Paid Lewis & AVillett, sewer-pipe 
E. G. Haynes, sewer-pipe 
D. H. Young, sewer-pipe 
H. W. Clapp, sewer caps and 

traps .... 
Arthur Staples, sewer-pipe 



Di 



. .|6,16-4 54 




. 1,000 


00 




376 


45 




10 


04 




8 


12 




1 


50 




7 


00 




16 


50 




109 


74 




14 


70 




. 2,600 


00 






,f 1 O QAS ZQk 




T 


;iu ) uvu "*' 






Cr. 


. $404 




. 1,083 


70 




50 


60 




i 

45 


81 




196 


56 





211 

Pettee & Whittle, cement . 81 45 

J. S. Kidder <fe Co., cement . 17 85 

Drake & Carpenter, cement . 12 15 

John B. Varick, hardware . 10 41 

Pike & Heald, lanterns, oil, 

etc 6 37 

J. Q. A. Sargent ... 1 00 

A. H. Lowell, sewer-traps, 

cesspool-covers, etc. . . 121 69 

Ellis & Patterson, engineering 6Q 75 

Barr & Clapp, lanterns, oil, 

etc 21 76 

H. Fradcl & Co., oil and oil- 
cans ..... 6 77 

J. M. Chandler & Co., oil 1 00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 13 53 

J. Hodge, lumber ... 26 55 

Plumer & Holton, oil suit and 

rubber coat ... 8 25 

George W. Weeks, rubber 
boots .... 

Geo. W. Dodge, rubber boots . 

C. O'Shaughnesse} 7 , box for 

Pipe 

H. T. Simpson, brick 
Concord R. R. Corporation, 

freight on brick . 

D. M. Goodwin, rope 

E. Young, mason-work . 
John Garland, stone 
Bunton & Porter, blacksmith- 

ing 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 
ins: ..... 



2 


90 


2 


75 


1 


70 


157 


50 


12 


90 


1 


50 


5 


00 


15 


00 


8 


70 


12 


94 



212 

Wilbur & Dickey, blacksmith 

ing . 
Nutt Bros., mason-work 
District No. 10, stone 
W. P. Stratton & Son 
Labor of men and teams 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . 



6 


11 






o 



75 






40 


50 






2 


50 






1,478 


10 






G,380 


52 








— $10 


308 


59 



GRANITE BRIDGE. 



To appropriation 



By balance (overdrawn in 1877) . 
Paid W. P. Stratton & Son, tinning 

Labor of men and teams 
By balance to new account 



$50 00 



Dr. 





$50 00 
Cb. 


$1 75 




1 00 




30 50 




16 75 






SfeAfl 00 



AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 

Paid Walter Neal, carpenter-work . 

Labor of men and teams 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 
By balance to new account 



Vr. 



$214 14 

50 00 


$264 14 
Or. 


$9 03 
37 98 


150 00 
07 13 


ft-va 11 



213 



COMMONS. 




To balance from old account . 


$141 99 


Appropriation .... 


100 00 


Reserved fund, amount trans- 




ferred ..... 


3 50 



Dr. 



1245 49 



Cr. 



Faid French & Robertson, lumber 

and labor . 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor ..... 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor . 
H. Gordon, lumber and labor 
Fettee & Whittle, cement 
A .Waldron, labor on fountains 
Fike & Heald, brass sprinkler 

and labor . 
T. A. Lane, labor on fountain 
D. R. Prescott, posting boards 

and ordinances on commons 
Amos Morse, labor 
L. Searles, labor . 
J. M. Haines, labor 
J. A. Heath, labor 
C. F. Savory, stone-work 
By reserved fund, amount trans 

ferrcd . 



#11 37 



2 60 
1 00 

1 70 

2 04 

3 00 

2 00 

4 15 

8 75 

4 37 

5 00 
4 37 

3 50 

190 86 



1245 49 



214 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$8,000 


00 


Taxes collected not on list 


31 


42 


Taxes collected not on list 


6 


22 


Jonathan Smith, overdraft 


50 


73 


Jonathan Smith, overdraft 


36 


54 


Reserved fund .... 


2,000 


00 


Balance overdrawn 


10,933 


25 

$21 058 16 






ffl^-L^V'-Zw 1U 






Ob. 


By balance from old account . 


$520 6 


Reserved fund, amount trans- 






ferred .... 


1,354 


00 


Paid Emma A. White, damage to 






person .... 


1,756 


17 


E. J. Moulton, damage to per- 






son ..... 


1,080 


97 


Wra. White, on execution 


1,744 


17 


Charles H. Yarney, damage 






to person .... 


3,224 


99 


Joseph T. Patterson, costs in 






case Patterson vs. city of 






Manchester 


101 


17 


R. N. Whittemore. damage to 






horse .... 


50 


00 


Ellen Eagan .... 


475 


00 


George Stark, damage to wood- 






land near city farm, on ac- 






count of fire 


340 


00 


Chas. E. Cox, damage to horse 


6 


00 


J. A. Bigelow 


15 


00 


S. D. Lord, on execution, Nutt 






vs. City .... 


277 


55 



2^ 

Martha M. Hall, on execution 138 96 

Joseph Putnam, on execution 2 17 

Sarah M. Stevens, damage to 

person .... 250 00 

Harriet S. Halcomb, on execu- 
tion 533 84 

P. M. Scruton, damage to horse 60 17 

L. Searles, on execution . 129 67 

Cross «fe Burnham, professional 

services . . . . 24 00 

Jonathan Smith, witness fees, 

etc 298 65 

Wm. R. Patten, witness fees, 
ere 

A. F. Stevens, professional 
services .... 

P. F. Healy, summoning wit- 
nesses, etc. 

Daniel L. Stevens, summoning 
witnesses, etc. . 

J. C. Bickford, summoning 
witnesses, etc. . 

S. R. Hanal'ord, summoning 
witnesses, etc. . 

H. D. Lord, summoning wit- 
nesses, etc. 

Seth T. Hill, witness fees 

Margaret Fallon . 

E. Printable, damage to premi- 
ses from water-works . . 321 25 

Joseph Kidder, claim for ser- 
vices as superintendent of 
schools .... 680 75 

Wm. B. Bullard, damage to 

land 15 00 



00 


86 


35 


00 


36 


54 


1 


62 


15 


00 


17 


62 


5 


22 


3 


75 


22 


67 



11 


25 


10 


00' 


10 


00 


70 


00' 


80 


54 


521 


42 


159 


30 



Q OO- 



216 

Joseph E. Bennett, damage to 
team ..... 

Sawyer & Gillis, damage to 
team ..... 

Clark & Co., damage from 
sewer .... 

S. T. Sleeper, damage to horse 

D. C. Whittemore, claim 

Judith Shcrcr, matron at pest- 
house .... 

Xathan P. Kidder, preparing 
City Report, etc. 

IT. R. Chamberlin, expenses to 
Concord, stamps, etc. 

J. F. Woodbury, iron work for 

watering-trough . . 3 50 

Fairbanks & Pearson, burying 
pauper .... 20 00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing hearse .... 6 60 

P. A. Devine, burying small- 
pox patients . . . 104 00 

R. W. Flanders, bridge irons, 

etc 10 50* 

Manchester P. O., stamps . 14 00 

A. Henry Lowell, fencing mon- 
ument square . . . 625 00 

A. G. Stevens, running street 

lines, etc. .... 5 00' 

J. B. Sawyer, running street 

lines, etc. .... 117 17 

J. F. James, running street 
lines, etc. . . . . 16 00- 

Ellis & Patterson, running st. 
lines, etc 670 00 



217 



C. X. Harvey, lumber 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

J. Hodge, lumber . 

Wilson Gray, work on tree- 
boxes .... 

G. H. Dudley, lumber and la- 
bor ..... 

French <fe Robertson, lumber 
and labor .... 

Moses French, lumber and la- 
bor ..... 

George Holbrook, lumber and 
labor .... 

William G. Westover, lumber 
and labor .... 

L. N. Westover, lumber and 
labor .... 

John B. Clarke, printing 

Temple & Farrington, books 
and printing 

Wilson, Mooar & Co., blank 
books, ink, etc. . 

T. W. Lane, blank books, ink, 

etc 8 60 

Livingston <fe Kimball, print- 
ing ..... 4 80 

N. S. Clark .... 25 

A. Bodwell, stone, excavating 

earth, and labor . . 119 70 

Lamson & Marden, land-mark 

stone .... 75 

William P. Stratton & Son, 

plumbing . . . . 2 75 



43 


48 


18 


00 


178 


84 


134 


62 


12 


00 


19 


37 


3 


70 


5 


12 


45 


96 


25 


80 


o 


75 


183 


63 


177 


02 


o 

a 


90 



218 



Barton & Co., matting, etc. 
S. S. James & Bro., teams 
Fogg & James, teams . 

C. H. Hodgman, teams 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
Pike & Heald, pipe and plumb- 
ing .... 

J. S. Paige, cash paid out foi 

lock and keys 
T. A. Lane, repairing pipe, etc 

A. H. Lowell, bank wall and 
castings 

P. P. Proctor 

J. < v >. A. Sargent, grate an 

labor 
J. 31. Crawford, clerical sc: 

vices 
J. B. Varick, hardware 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
W. C. Rogers, hardware 
George R. Vance, dippers and 

chain 
George R. Vance, hardware 

D. M. Goodwin, iron pipe, etc 
R. J. Donnelly, plumbing 

B. Frank Fogg, plumbing 

S. C. Forsaith & Co., lumber 

E. Wason 

R. W. Bean, killing dogs 
Warren Thompson 
B. L. Hartshorn, trucking, etc 
J. M. Stanton, clearing brusl 

at Stark burying-ground 
City Farm, team . 



79 11 
12 85 
53 25 
10 00 

6 00 

9 97 



27 


27 


70 


00 


2 


00 



16 50 



6 


75 


6 


63 


1 


25 


4 


55 


1 


00 


2 


00 


12 


95 


2 


01 


5 


09 


o 


76 




50 


3 


00 


5 


00 


8 


65 


25 


00 


4 


00 



219 

B. P. Burpee, witness fees . 1 25 
L. Melville French, vaccinat- 
ing, etc. .... 

J. W. Mooar, vaccinating, etc. 

A. D. Smith, return of births 

W. W. Wilkins, return of 
births .... 

Leonard French, return of 
births .... 

A. EL Crosby, professional ser- 
vices .... 

J. G. Sturgis, professional ser- 
vices .... 

Geo. A. Crosby, professional 
services .... 

Seth T. Hill, printing non-res- 
ident taxes 

Luther Pattee, professional ser- 
vices .... 

L. Melville French, profes- 
sional services . 

Luther Pattee, execution 

C. P. Gage, professional ser- 
vices .... 25 00 

G. Kimball, professional ser- 
vices .... 

Joel Daniels, painting . 

J. F. Knowles 

Francis Roy, services at pest- 
house .... 

Chas. Clark, services at pest- 
house .... 

Julia Pichette, services at pest- 
house .... 



312 


00 


383 


25 


1 


25 


6 


50 


14 


25 


25 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


24 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


129 


67 



50 


00 


5 


50 


3 


50 


90 


00 


27 


00 


15 


90 



220 

H. J. Clark, bedding for pest- 
house .... 14 50 

Manchester Water-works, wa- 
ter for watering-troughs 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 

H. K. Emery, bounty on hawk 

M. B. Flanders, bounty on 
hawks .... 

J. R. Swallow, bounty on hawk 

Alfred Walker, bounty on 
hawk .... 

Frank Robie, bounty on hawks 

E. H. Kelsey, bounty on fox . 
C. B. Littlefield, bounty on fox 
Fred Jewell, bounty on fox . 

F. Robie, bounty on fox 

C. Warner, bounty on foxes . 
Ira A. Moore, bounty on foxes 
J. B. Huse, bounty on foxes . 
0. L. Kendall, bounty on foxes 
John L. Kelly, use of team . 
Lyman Batchelder,use of team 
J. A. Barker, use of team 

D. Thayer, truant officer 
S. W. Parsons, referee services 

E. R. Coburn, referee services 
J. H. Maynard, referee ser- 
vices .... 

J. H. Haynes, collecting sta- 
tistics for tax commission . 

Elliott & Means, rent of rooms 
for Hook and Ladder Co. . 

G. W. Varnum, janitor at 
court-house 



02 


03 


O 


00 




20 




40 




20 




on 




60 




50 




50 




50 




50 


1 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


1 


50 


.24 


00 


5 


00 


11 


25 


29 


25 


5 


00 


5 


00 



00 



7 


50 


80 


00 


160 


50 



221 

J. H. Haynes, collating un- 
paid taxes ... 20 00 
J. H. Haynes, taking census . 40 50 
I. Whittemore, taking census 27 00 
H. H. Noyes, taking census . 13 50 
I>. K. White, taking census . 31 50 
Hiram Forsaith, taking census 15 00 
S. D. To-Hard, taking census . 13 50 
Win, M. Shepard, taking cen- 
sus ....... 35 75 

M. B. Witters, taking census 27 00 

H. D. Lord, taking census . 31 50 
T. D. Foole, repairing hand 

stamp .... 1 50 

(r. H. Porter, sawing wood at 

ward-room ... 1 00 
P. A. Devine, horse hire . 4 26 
C. T. Brown, reporting Put- 
nam vs. City . 20 00 
C. A. Smith, duster for court- 
house ..... 3 00 

C. B. Littlefield, team for com- 
mittees .... 25 00 

J. D. Andrews & Co., ballot- 
box for Ward 4 . . 3 50 
J. Celler, ribbon for stamp . 1 75 

D. P. Plurner, services in case 

Sleeper vs. City . . 4 70 

J. F. Chandler, horse hire . 7 50 

C. H. Wood, painting signs . 80 

R. Laing, wood for ward-room 3 00 
Adams & Lamprey, soap for 

pest-house ... 2 50 
J. Q. A. McQueston, posting 

health notices ... 12 00 



16 


00 


4 50 


100 


00 


o 


25 


55 


00 


35 


00 



222 

P. Libbey, washing-machine 
and wringer for pest-house 

A. J. Knight, labor on tree- 
boxes .... 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 
rent of land for wood stand 

M. Prout, glass broken by 1st 
N. H. Battery, while firing 
salute 4th of July 

N. B. Tilton, whitewashing 
tree-boxes .... 

J. N. Baker, care of tower 
clocks .... 

C. O'Shaughnessey, making- 
tank to wash hose, and iron- 
work .... 41 45 

Morrill, Wason & Johnson, 
laying out Chestnut street 
across Concord square 

J. B. Sanborn, copy Pamphlet 
Laws .... 

P. R. Prescott, team to pest- 
house .... 

N. L. Chamberlain, stamp 
ribbon .... 

C. R. Noyes, distributing health 
notices .... 

N. W. Graves, labor for pest- 
house .... 

W. B. Abbott, painting house 
numbers .... 

W. J. Pesilets, taking census . 

C- J. Abbott, telegrams 

l<t N. H. Battery, firing sa- 
lute July 4, 1878 . . 36 65 



82 


84 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


6 


00 


28 


00 


85 


56 


3 


38 


1 


45 



20 


00 


5 


00 


24 


22 


1 


25 


7 


40 


3 


75 



223 

A. D. Stark, use of Smyth's 
Hall Decoration day . 

J. N. Bruce, painting 

J. B. Hall, medicines for pest- 
house .... 

J. Stickney, rubber cloth for 
pest-house .... 

Hattie Clark, clothes used at 
pest-house .... 

A. J. Wright, official directory 

C. H. Uhlig, rebate on sewer 

license .... 7 50 

Andrew Thompson, damage to 
crops by extension of Beech 
street .... 7 00 

Pennacook Hose Co., pumping 
out cellars ... 5 00 

Hannah Kearns, fare to Hart- 
ford and return with deaf 
and dumb boy ... 8 60 

A. B. Thompson, certified copy 
of amendments to city 
charter .... 

.T. W. Carpenter, jr., ink 

Robert Bunton, use of derrick 

E. F. Hanson, repairing water- 
ing-troughs 

X. S. Clark, horse hire for 
committees 

I). B,. Prescott, burying nui- 
sances .... 

L. L. Aldrich, expenses of 
committee on soldiers' mon- 
ument to Boston, Mass. . 12 75 



9 


00 




75 


30 


00 


2 


25 


25 


50 


o 


62 



224 



Higgins Bros., crockery for 

pest-house . 
Labor of men and teams 



1 37 
834 47 



$21,058 16 



TINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



To balance from old account 
J. F. James, lots sold 



-1688 12 
974 22 



Paid Wm, C. Chase, labor 


$506 53 


A. B. Chase, " 


152 70 


Charles Gillis, " 


2 87 


Samuel Poor, " 


4 00 


James Farrar, " 


3 25 


Jas. E. Clough, " 


33 62 


C. F. Morrill '& Co. 


3 00 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 


10 21. 


A. C. Wallace, chestnut stakes 


4 50 


Thomas Adams, trees . 


25 00 


Temple & Farrington, record 




book ..... 


6 00 


J. F. James, engineering, etc. 


57 50 


A. Bodwell, stone posts 


21 25 


Henry J. Plumer, hauling logs 


6 50 


Benjamin F. Mitchell, team . 


10 00 


S. B. Putnam, making record 




of lots .... 


15 00 


By ^balance to new account 


800 41 



Dr. 



$1,662 34 
Cr. 



$1,662 34 



225 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



To balance from old account . 

Appropriation .... 
A. H. Hartshorn, tomb fees, etc. 
J. F. James, lots sold 



Paid A. H. Hartshorn, superintend 
ent, labor . 
David True, labor . 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
Walter Arthur, labor 
A. H. Lowell, pipe and labor 
J. F. James, engineering 
Wm. W. Ireland, " 
J. Gr. Johnson 

By balance to new account 



1178 19 

1,000 00 

93 57 

91 60 



. $401 


90 


13 


75 


1 


65 


11 


87 


3 


06 


20 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


899 


13 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Dr. 



$1,363 36 
Cr. 



$1,363 36 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . 


. 


$3,580 35 


A. H. Lowell, old harness 


and 




hose .... 


. 


25 00 


D. A. Simons, overdraft . 


. 


16 00 


Reserved fund . 




1,500 00 


Appropriation . 


• 


5,000 00 

$10,121 35 



n 



$39 


50 


15 


00 


208 


00 


8 


To 



226 



Amoskeag Steam Fjre Engine Company Xo. 1. 

Ob. 

Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 

Horace Bailey, services as 
driver .... 

George W. Butterfield, ser- 
vices as driver . 

Plumer <fc Holton, overalls 

Pike & Heald, repairs, lantern- 
globes, etc. ... 28 Oo 

Daniels & Merrill, oil and hard- 
ware ..... 

W. C. Smith, collar-hooks 

J. Esty, repairing harness, etc. 

Xancy C. TWne, rent of rooms 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., matches 
and soap .... 

L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 

J. M. Chandler A: Co., match- 
es, oil, etc. 

Company's bill for services 



13 68 




50 




11 95 




15 00 




3 00 




50 08 




42 




825 00 






ftl.218 9-3 



Fire King Steam Fire Engine Company Xo. 2. 

Cb. 

Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas ^19 50 
Pike & Heald, lantern-globes, 

etc 

Daniels & Merrill, horse-brush 
Manchester Locomotive Works 

castings and labor 
Loammi Searles, driver . 
L. B. Bod well & Co.. coal 

$162 77 



1 


08 


o 


50 


87 


75 


98 


00 


8 


94 



$42 75 



14 85 



227 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire Engine Company No. 3. 

Cr. 
Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
A. P. Frye, repairs on hose- 
carriage .... 
H. Fradd & Co., oil, matches, 

etc 

L. C. Abrahams, steel brush 

A. C. Wallace, wood 

T. L. Thorpe, waste 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

Company's bill for services 

$810 63 



11 


98 


1 


05 


4 


75 


5 


00 


20 


25 


710 


00 



65 50 

208 00 

21 00 

2 93 

21 09 



N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Company No. 4. 

Cr. 
Faid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 

A. B. dishing, services as 
driver .... 

H. S. Reed, services as driver 

A. B. Webster, snap-hooks, etc. 

Pike <fc Heald, repairs, lan- 
tern-globes, etc. . 

Daniels & Merrill, puller- 
blocks, etc. 

W. C. Smith, collar-hooks 

J. N. Baker, repairing clock . 

F. N. McLaren, repairing har- 
ness ..... 

J. Boyd & Sons, leather pipes, 
etc. ..... 

J. M. Chandler <fc Co., match- 
es, oilj etc. 



5 


32 




50 


1 


25 


1 


25 


8 


00' 


7 


54 



228 

L. B. Bod well & Co., coal . 63 37 

Company's bill for services . 825 00 



Pennacook Hose Company No. 1. 



Cr. 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
J.M.Plaisted, services as driver 
A. A. Puffer, services as driver 
Phnner & Holton, overalls and 

reefers 
Pike & Heald, repairs, etc. 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs 

etc. .... 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
Manchester Locomotive Works 

repairs 

O.E.Barnard, repairing chains 
W. C. Smith, collar-hooks 
Edwin Branch, repairing har 

ness .... 
J. Est j, repairing harness 
F. N. McLaren, repairing har 

ness .... 
H. A. Winship- . 
J. H. Wiggin, matches . 
J. M. Chandler & Co., oil, etc 
L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 
Company's bill for services 



$34 75 

600 00 

21 25 

28 50 

25 20 

8 75 
10 01 

2 50 

1 00 

50 

50 
5 40 

25 

1 50 

2 00 
1 50 

26 98 
1,059 03 



229 



Massabesic Hose Company No. 2. 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
James Kearns, services as dri- 
ver 

J. B. Varick, chamois skin 
Pike & Heald, repairs, etc. . 
J. B. McCrillis <fe Son, repairs, 
etc. ..... 

Goodwin Bros. & Co., repair- 
ing chains .... 

W. C. Smith, collar-hooks 
Win. Boyd, use of horses 
Fisher <fc Flanders . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
Fisher & Garland, spittoons, 

matches, etc. 
Company's bill for services . 



#38 75 

50 00 
1 00 
1 38 

194 80 



1 


25 




50 


5 


00 


3 


44 


32 


50 


5 


00 


695 


00 



Cr. 



$1,028 62 



Excelsior Hook and Ladder Company No. 1. 

Cr. 

Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
J. A. Sanborn & Co., repairs 
Pike & Heald, repairs, etc. 
J.B. McCrillis <fc Son, repairs 

etc. .... 
Daniels & Merrill, hose and 

couplings . 
L. B. Bodwell <fe Co., coal 
J. M. Chandler & Co., oil 

matches, etc. 
Company's bill for services 



25 
12 00 
4 47 

149 99 

6 20 
45 85 

80 
#1,266 67 



.522 23 



230 



Engineers' Department and 


Miscellaneous. 




Cr 


Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 


$29 25 


Manchester Water-works, for 




water .... 


536 52 


Thomas Mahoney, services on 




supply wagon 


3 33 


D. W. Morse, labor 


2 60 


George W. Simmons, labor . 


25 50 


J. B. McCrillis & Son . 


37 25 


John B. Clarke, printing 


11 75 


J. Stickney, repairing hose . 


50 80 


Massabesic Hose Company, 




testing hose 


9 60 


E. W. Harrington Hose Com- 




pany, testing hose 


16 00 


L. Searles, moving coal . 


3 12 


T. W. Lane .... 


2 65 


P. N. Heath & Co. 


75 


A. H. Lowell, chief engineer . 


115 00 


B. C. Kendall, assistant engi- 




neer ..... 


65 00 


A. C. Wallace, assistant engi- 




neer 


65 00 


.^am C. Lowell, assistant en- 




gineer .... 


65 00 


Thomas W. Lane, assistant 




engineer and clerk of the 




board .... 


90 00 


A. H. Lowell, exprcssage and 




freight .... 


9 96 


Fogg & James, teams . 


2 00 


D. E. Sullivan, driver for sup- 




ply wagon .... 


27 00 



231 

J. F. Sullivan, services on sup- 
ply wagon . . . . 16 67 



-11,184 75 



Recapitulation. 



Paid Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. No. 1. $1,218 93 

Fire King S. F. E. Co. No. 2. 162 77 
E. W. Harrington S. F. E. Co. 

No. 3 .... 810 63 

N. S. Bean S. F. E. Co. No. 4 1,240 75 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 1,829 62 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 1,028 62 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 . 1,522 23 

Miscellaneous . . . 1,184 75 

By city teams (amount transferred) 1,039 92 

Balance to new account . . 83 13 



$10,121 35 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . 


$190 51 






Appropriation .... 


600 


00 






Balance (overdrawn") 


189 


20 


$9 


79 71 








Cr. 


Paid James W. Preston, care of 










telegraph .... 


$300 


00 






James W. Preston, lightning- 










arresters .... 


5 


00 






Tristram Berry, labor 


16 


50 






Howe & French, blue vitriol . 


91 


13 






Head & Dowst, lumber and 










labor ..... 




60 







232 

A. H. Lowell, zincs . . 377 60 

J. W. Stover, Hill jars and 

hangers . . . . 15 00 

Daniels & Merrill, tacks, wire, 
etc. ..... 6 31 

Pike & Heald, iron pails and 
plumbing .... 

A. B. Webster, iron work 

Charles Williams, jr., Kerite 
wire, etc. .... 

.Stearns & George, blue vitriol 

Temple & Farrington, frames 

John B. Clarke, printing 

Campbell & Hanscom, print- 
ing 

James R. Carr, glass and set- 
ting 3 96 

S. S. James & Bro., teams . 8 00 

C. H. flodgman, trucking . 2 50 

J. A. Wiley, chemicals . . 50 



o 
O 


24 


o 


55 


33 


62 


89 


50 


10 


00 


12 


90 



80 



LAND SOLD FROM CITY FARM. 

To balance from old account . . $130 14 
Received of sundry persons . 1,099 68 



$979 71 



Dr. 

11,229 82 

Cr. 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred $1,229 82 

#1,229 82 



203 

HYDRANT SERVICE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... -117,600 00 

Reserved fund .... 3,055 00 

120,655 00 

Cr. 

By balance from old account . . #2,595 00 
Paid Manchester Water-works for 

water 18,060 00 

$20,655 00 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $2,200 00 

Reserved fund . . . . 3,500 00 

Balance (overdrawn) . . 670 20 

$6,370 20 

Cr. 
Paid sundry persons . . . $5,853 00 
Bv balance from old account . . 517 20 

$6,370 20 



RESERVOIRS. 

To balance from old account . . $415 13 



Dr. 

$415 13 
Cr. 



Paid French <fe Robertson, lumber 

and labor .... $7 11 

A. H. Lowell, reservoir cov- 
ers, etc 14 71 

Pat. Finn, labor ... 55 37 



234 






Peter Scanlan, labor 


2 25 


Bartlett Doyle, labor 


1 25 


Win. Frain, labor . 


1 25 


John Joyce, labor . 


1 25 


J. Prindable, labor 


2 50 


By reserved fund, amount trans- 




ferred ..... 


300 00 


Balance to new account 


29 44 







#415 13 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Dr. 



o John C. Bickford, costs and fines 




police court .... 


$1,703 39 


C. C. Keniston. costs and fines 




police court .... 


354 45 


D. R. Prescott, costs and fines 




police court .... 


2,295 12 


Appropriation .... 


12,500 00 


Balance (overdrawn) 


2,391 85 




»1QO,|j 01 




'Ip J. t/j-^TT^ OX 




Cb. 



By balance from old account . . ->1,046 05 
Paid Nathan P. Hunt, justice . 1,125 00 

H. W. Tewksbury, special jus- 
tice ..... 

J. C. Bickford, clerk 

C. C. Keniston, marshal 

D. R. Prescott, marshal . 
H. "W. Longa, assistant mar- 
shal ..... 

Eben Carr, captain night 
watch .... 



20 


00 


237 


20 


30b' 


81 


851 


45 


843 


25 


854 


13 



235 



J. F. Cassidy, night watch 


765 01 


M. J. Jenkins, 


a 


759 13 


J. Bucklin, 


It 


766 38 


T. Frain, 


a 


803 75 


M. Marr, 


tl 


765 75 


Z. B. Wright, 


a 


772 64 


M. Fox, 


il 


747 25 


J. F. Dunn, 


a 


770 38 


H. P. Marshall. 


a 


211 88 


C. B. Clarkson, 


a 


208 51 


A. Vincelette, 


a 


20 25 


J. Duffy, 


a 


39 38 


H. Stearns, 


i. 


759 38 


H. Harmon, 


a 


803 38 


W. H. Xewhall. 


a 


758 75 


E. Farrar, 


a 


772 50 


T. Reardon. 


a 


747 26 


W. Gray, 


a 


170 25 


J. C. Colburn, day po 


ice 


755 00 


R. W. Bean, 




759 50 


G. "W. Yarnuin, police 


service;- 


2 00 


J. I. Whittemore, 


a 


1 00 


G. W. Hamlin, 


a 


1 00 


H. H. Noyes, 


a 


127 00 


C. E. Crombie, 


a 


2 00 


A. J. Ma whew, 


a 


4 00 


W. J. Desilets, 


it 


13 15 


C. H. Reed, 


a 


183 75 


J. E. Bailey, 


a 


251 25 


Archie Hill, 


a 


2 00 


J. H. Stevens, 


a 


1 00 


C. Chenette, 


a 


2 00 


E. G. "Woodman, 


a 


1 00 


H. Snyder, 


a 


1 00 



236 



G.A.Bailey, " 

H. Lemkic, " 

J. Flynn, " 

C. O'Shaughnessey, " 
S. L. Mitchell, 
A. N. Brown, " 

L. A. Ward, 
P. Riley, 
T. P. Heath, 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
Challis & Gilmore, printing 
F. H. Challis & Co., " 
John B. Clarke, 
Livingston & Kimball," 
Wm. E. Moore, " 

Temple & Farrington, station 

ery and printing 
T. W. Lane, card-rack holdc 
Wilson, Mooar & Co. 
W. U. Tel. Co., telegrams 
F. 0. Clement, washing blan 

kets .... 
A. F. Clement, washing blan 

kets .... 
Brigham & Pratt, crackers 
Wm. C. Rogers, oil, etc. 
David Thayer, truant officer 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
Thorpe & Marshall, plates and 

spoons 
P. C. Cheney & Co., waste 
Stearns & Farmer, wicking 
Manchester Post-office, stamps 
Parker & Co., chairs 



1 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


17 


00 


38 


00 


4 


00 


6 


00 


1 


00 


7 


00 


513 


36 


12 


00 


108 40 


77 


75 


6 


00 


11 


50 


23 


60 




20 


4 


32 


18 


47 



13 



GO 



7 


80 


25 


67 


12 


00 


25 


50 


24 


26 




96 


4 


80 




25 


5 


00 


9 


00 



237 

J. A. Barker, meals for lodgers 

and prisoners . . . 67 90 

G. F. Bosher & Co., bedding . 11 35 

John Foster, professional ser- 
vices ..... 4 00 
Isaac L. Heath, professional 

services .... 00 

Wm. R. Patten, professional 

services .... 6 00 

W. <fc G. A. Little, professional 

services .... 2 00 

J. M. Knowles, professional 

services .... 2 00 

J. P. Bartlett, professional 

services .... 4 00 

H. E. Burnham, professional 

services .... 6 00 

Thomas D. Lnce, professional 

services .... 8 00 

J. H. Andrews, professional 

services .... 2 00 

Fogg <fe James, teams . . 11 00 



$19,244 81 



CITY HALL AND OFFICES. 

To balance from old account . . $553 69 
Rent of stores and hall . . 1,825 00 
Balance (overdrawn) . . 62 20 



Paid Manchester Water-works, for 

water .... $947 20 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 180 32 



Dp.. 



$2,440 89 
Cr. 



238 

Hutchinson Bros., iron bed- 
stands for lobby . . 156 00 

John B. Varick, rope and pul- 
ley . . . . . 9 07 

Daniels <fc Merrill, hardware . 9 50 

J. A. Thomas, plumbing . 5 25 

R. J. Donnelly, " . 1 00 

B. F. Fogg, " . 5 17 

Thomas A. Lane, gas burners 

and fittings ... 43 46 

Pike & Heald, hardware, stove, 
etc 

Dickey, Young & Co., ice 

Dickey, Young & Co., coal 

L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 

Stearns & Farmer, brooms and 
brushes .... 

II. O. Cotton & Co., carpenter- 
work .... 

George H. Dudley, carpenter- 
work ..... 

S. P. Chase, carpenter-work . 

Henry French, carpenter-work 

French & Robertson, carpen- 
ter-work .... 

Celinda German, washing 

J. A. Barker, pitch wood 

"W. H. Yickery, locks and keys 

Temple & Farrington, wall-pa- 
per and shades . 

J. A. Johnson, patent filters 

Thomas Connor, repairing 

chairs . . . . 1 25 



(39 


04 


11 


50 


8 


94 


120 


44 


155 


08 


5 


45 


Q 

• > 


00 


26 


61 


3 


00 


Q 

•J 


51 


20 


71 


104 


85 


1 


20 


9 


15 


40 


81 


4 


00 






239 






By 



J. S. Holt, soap 


9 


40 


Charles A. Smith, duster 


o 


87 


Barton & Co., rope and cam 


\ 




matting 


27 


26 


Higgins Bros., rattan chair 


5 


00 


J. S. Masseck, awning-cloth . 


13 


73 


F. L. Balcom, ladder 


2 


25 


Griggs Bros., gas-burners 


o 


25 


Mrs. J. A. Barker, making 






awning 


9 


00 


E. G. Haynes, mason-work 


1 


00 


A. M. Eastman, matches, etc. 


5 


50 


P. C. Cheney & Co., paper 


4 


80 


C. H. Wood, painting . 


3 


75 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


2 


57 


reserved fund (amount trans- 






ferred) . 


400 


00 









12,440 89 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

To appropriation .... #1,200 00 
Reserved fund . . . . 700 00 



By balance from old account . . $60 52 
Paid John B. Clarke, printing . 740 41 
Campbell & Hanscom, print- 
ing 101 02 

Everett & Aldrich, printing . 141 25 
Livingston & Kimball, print- 
ing ..... 124 75 
Wm. E. Moore, printing . 8 00 



De 



$1,900 00 

Cb. 



240 



Temple <fc Farrington, print- 
ing 127 18 

Seth T. Hill, advertising non- 
resident taxes . . . 25 00 
T. H. Tuson, printing . 
F. H. Challis & Co., printing 
A. J. Hoyt, printing 
T. W. Lane, printing 
Geo. C. Hoitt 
J. A. Barker 

Manchester Post-office, stamps 
By reserved fund (amount transfer- 
red) 

By balance to new account 



o 


50 


4 


00 


1 


25 


7 


72 


2 


50 


1 


49 


4 


50 


450 


00 


97 


91 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

To appropriation .... $800 00 
Reserved fund (amount trans- 
ferred) 



Paid F. M. Heath <fc Co., painting 
Wm. B. Abbott, painting 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
C. R. Colley, painting . 
G. H. Dudley, lumber and la- 
bor ..... 
French & Robertson, lumber 
and labor .... 
J. D. Andrews & Co., lumber 
and labor .... 



$1,900 00 



Dr. 



2,005 87 






$2,805 87 
Cr. 




3 20 




1 75 




104 17 




117 6Q 




33 93 




296 02 




1 25 





241 



Head & Dowst, lumber and la- 




bor 


32 49 


H. 0. Cotton <fe Co., lumber 




and labor 


28 06 


John F. Seaward, lumber and 




labor .... 


132 68 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber and la- 




bor ..... 


71 81 


Moses French, lumber and la- 




bor ..... 


29 46 


Wm. G. Westover, lumber and 




labor .... 


43 09 


R. J. Donnelly, plumbing 


11 97 


B. Frank Fogg, plumbing- 


78 64 


Pike & Heald, plumbing 


39 85 


Bennett & Lord, plastering. 




etc. ..... 


148 47 


H. Nutt & Co., plastering, etc. 


9 36 


Nutt Bros., plastering, etc. 


21 95 


E. G. Haynes, plastering, etc. 


26 55 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 


35 


John B. Varick, hardware 


15 82 


Geo. W. Stevens . 


5 00 


Samuel Cooper ... 


18 00 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


7 80 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


10 80 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


5 08 


A. B. Webster, bolts 


3 10 


A. H. Lowell, castings . 


40 59 


J. C. Young, slating roofs 


10 50 


T. A. Lane, plumbing . 


5 3a 


Wm. Ritchie, mason-work 


14 95 


Second National Bank . 


116 36 


10 





242 

Carl C. Shepard, wall-paper, 

etc . 28 00 

Temple & Farrington, wall-pa- 
per, etc. . . . . 12 63 

W. H. Viekery, keys for en- 



gine-house . . 


9 
•J 


50 




D. M. Goodwin 


60 


26 




<C. O'Shaughnessey, iron-work 


25 


64 




Lamson & Harden, stone-work 


9 


53 




T. A. Lane, furnishing and 








setting boiler at city library, 
•etc. ..... 


1,113 


89 




John B. Clarke, printing 


7 


03 




J. Q. A. Sargent, plumbing . 
By balance (overdrawn in 1877) . 


7 
51 


56 

79 


$2,805 87 








CITY LIBRARY. 






T© balance from old account . 


$1,869 


51 


Dr. 


Appropriation .... 
Reserved fund .... 


2,000 
915 


00 
59 




Balance (overdrawn) 


80 


00 


$4,865 10 








Paid Lizzie B. Davis, librarian 


$300 00 


Cit. 


M. J. Buncher, librarian 


302 


00 




Manchester Water-works, for 








water .... 


20 


00 




'.Manchester Gas-light Co., for 








gas 


208 


50 




!L. IB. Bodwell <fe Co., coal 


203 


56 




Thomas A. Lane, gas-fitting . 


3 


55 





243 



Livingston & Kimball, printing 62 43 
John B. Clarke, printing cata- 
logue 1,475 31 

Temple & Farrington, printing 

and binding . . . 214 04 
N. P. Hunt, stamps and ex- 
penses . . . . 11 21 
N. P. Hunt, preparing cata- 
logue .... 1,000 00 
H. D. Turner, reseating chair 75 
vEtna Insurance Co., insurance 32 50 
Wm. J. Kendall, moving books 2 25 
A. F. Eaton, moving books . 6 75 
F. C. Livingston, moving books 16 50 
S. N. Bell .... 2 00 
Straw <fe Lovejoy, repairing 

clock 3 00 

George Holbrook ... 75 

Trustees of city library . . 1,000 00 



To appropriation 



Amoskeag Veterans 
Sheridan Guards 
Head Guards 
Straw Rifles . 
First N. H. Battery 







MILITIA. 




• 


8600 00 


Veterans 


#100 00 


\ns 


100 00 


. 


100 00 


. . 


100 00 


. . 


100 00 


r y 


100 00 



,865 10 



Dr. 



1600 00 
Cr. 



1600 00 



244 

STATE TAX. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . .139,724 00 

$39,724 00' 

Cr.' 
Paid S. A. Carter, State Treasurer $39,724 00 

$ 39,724 00' 



COUNTY TAX. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $30,872 30 

$30,872 30' 

Cr. 
Paid Isaac L. Heath, County Treas- 
urer . . . " . .-$30,872 30 

$30,872 30 



SOLDIERS' MONUMENT. 

To balance from old account . . $2,000 00 

Appropriation .... 10,000 00 

Bonds invested for monument . 5,364 39 



Paid Lamson & Marden, stone . $136 00 
H. W. Herrick, professional 

services . . . . 56 00 

Ellis & Patterson, engineering 15 00 

C. H. Reed, police services . 96 00 

Warren Harvey, putting in 

foundation and moving stone 739 00 



Dr. 

,364 39 

Cr. 



245 



Warren Harvey 
George Keller, architect 
Campbell So Hanscom, print- 
ing 

John B. Clarke, printing 
Johnson & Wilson, cement . 
Pettee <fe Whittle, cement 
John Jackson, laying concrete 
J. H. Nutt <fe Co., labor and 
materials . 

E. G. Hayncs, labor and mate- 
rials . 

^Committee on dedication, sta- 
tionery 
John Conway, concreting 
First N. H. Battery, firing sa 

lute .... 
A. C. Wallace, use of lumber 

for staging 
John B. Varick, rope 
Samuel Cooper, telegrams 
H. V. Twiss . 
Thomas Keefe, lighting Ian 

tern .... 
J. C. Nichols & Son, team 
Robert Ellin & Co., carving 

models 
Levi L. Aldrich, expenses of 

committee to New York 
J. B. Clarke, stamps, etc. 
Everett & Aldrich, printing 
•Concord R. R. Corporation 

freight on cement 

F. H. Challis <fc Co., printing 



27 


56 


600 


00 


60 


89 


8 


65 


84 


00 


220 


55 


78 


90 



241 82 

11 52 

6 75 
138 00 

14 55 



10 


00 


1 


05 


1 


71 


8 


70 


18 


00 


6 


00 



75 00 



27 


00 


10 


18 


24 


75 


27 


60 


5 


75 



246 



Piper & Hawley, cloth, etc. . 
Wheeler & Wilson Manufact- 



11 16' 





uring Co., stitching . 


2 


6-4 




E. Parker French . 


8 


00 




Thorp & Marshall, lead box . 


2 


00 




French & Robertson, carpenter 








work ..... 


38 


37 




Walter Neal, carpenter work . 


55 


99 




Head & Dowst, carpenter work 


6 


97 




Manchester Water-works for 








water .... 


98 


20 




For labor .... 


31 


62 


By 


balance to new account . 


14,359 


01 

117,364 39 




ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 










Dr. 


To 


appropriation .... 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 


#1,000 


00 




ferred ..... 


18,379 


96 

■ fc1 Q 379 9rt 






rjrii/jO i u v\j}' 








Cr. 


By 


balance (overdrawn in 1877) 


118,379 


96 




Eliphalet Dustin, 1870 . 


3 


27 




" 1871 . 


3 


12 




" " 1872 . 


2 


24 




" k < 1873 . 


2 


50 




» 1874 . 


o 


46 




Eleazer Badger, poor, 1874 


2 


22 




John Peasley, dead, 1874 . 


2 


22 




Geo. J. Moore, paid in Missouri, 








1874 


2 


46 




Geo. L. Bundy, dead, 1874 


o 


46^ 



247 



Francis Carlton, over TO, 1874 . 
Delwyn Breed, pays in Weare, 

1874 . . 
Thos. Cronell, dead, 1874 . 
Daniel P. Currier, poor, 1874 
Joseph Welcome, 1874 
Godfrey Messier, dead, no as 

sets, 1875 
Joseph Welcome, 1875 
Daniel P. Currier, poor, 1875 
James L. House, dead, 1875 
Thomas Cronell, dead, 1875 
Delwyn Breed, pays in Weare 

1875 . . 

Geo. P. Rockwell, dead, 1875 
Bcnj. S. Lyford, paid in Weare 

1875 "... 
Conner & Simons, error, 1875 
Lra Bryant, one arm, 1875 
Frank Crawford, cripple, 1875 
Israel Dow, watering -trough 

1875 . . . . 
Eleazer Badger, poor, 1875 
John Peasley, dead, 1875 . 
David F. Miller, over-valuation 

1875 .... 
Henry M. Vickery, wrong name 

1875 . . : 
Joseph B. Clark, 1876 
Timothy Murphy, one arm, 1876 
Ceo. W. Gardner, paid in New 

York, 1876 . 
John Peasley, dead, 1876 . 
Louis Bedford, dead, 1876 



2 46 






46 


2 


46. 


2 


46 


2 


46 


-> 
o 


32 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


•) 


O "> 


o 


22 


2 


02 


.i 


22 


1 


69 


2 


22 


2 


22 





00 


2 


22 


•) 


22 



17 76 



2 


22 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 



3 


00 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


58 


1 


00 



248 



Eleazer Badger, poor, 1876 . 1 62 

Wm. Carnaghan, gone to old 

country, 1876 ... 1 62 

Clias. Bonner, disabled soldier, 
1876 1 62 

Israel Dow, watering-trough, 
1876 

Edwin Scribner, dead, 1876 

Daniel P. Currier, poor, 1876 . 

Thomas Cronell, dead, 1876 

Joseph B. Unruh, over 70, 1876. . 

Evan 11. Peck, pays in Acworth, 
1876 . 

Daniel S. Adams, duplicate, 1877 

Richard Horan, no dog, 1877 . 

Louis N. Dufrain, over-valuation, 

1877 1 58 

Geo. A. Shields, paid in Hook- 
sett, 1877 ... 

Jas. A. French, duplicate, 1877 

Michael Kelley, dead, 1877 

Dennis McCarty, over 70, 1877 . 

Chas. A. Trefethen, no horse or 
carriage, 1877 

Fred'k Bean, duplicate, 1877 . 

Jonathan Mead, duplicate, 1877 

John Sanborn, cripple, 1877 

Geo. A. Farmer, duplicate, 1877 

Nicholas Stuber, no dog, 1877 . 

Henry A. Gage, over-valuation, 
1877 

James Cossar, over-valuation, 
1877 

Amos H. Sanborn, pays in Au- 
burn, 1877 .... 



1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


61 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


00 


4 


74 


•2 


37 


1 


58 



249 



Andrew Momblow, over TO, 1877 
Charles A. Hennessey, pays in 

Laconia, 1877 
Douglass Green, no dog, 1877 
S. W. Bartlett, over 70, 1877 
Geo. T. Bailey, pays in Hills- 
borough, 1877 . 
Alonzo Taplin, tax wrong, 1877 
Geo. W. Durgin, pays in New- 
market, 1877 
Louis Bobeau, duplicate, 1877 
Peter Pare, over 70, 1877 
Timothy Bresnehan, dead, 1877 
James White, over 70, 1877 
Patrick Nutley, no dog, 1877 
George S. Clough, no horse 

1877 .... 
Eliphalet C. Yarney, dead 

1877 . . . ' . 
Michael Dubois, over 70, 1877 
Irving H. Peck, pays in Ac- 
worth, 1877 
Olin W. Page, no dog, 1877 
Stephen Homans, no dog, 1877 
Bart. McManaman, cripple 

1877 .... 
Henry Parker, poor, 1877 . 
Campbell & Roby, duplicate 

1877 .... 
Moody & Co., over-valuation 

1877 .... 
Joseph Lanier, no stock in 

trade, 1877 
Louis Bedford, dead, 1877 



1 58 



1 


58 


1 


00 


1 


58 


1 


58 


2 


37 


2 


37 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


00 



1 2(3 



1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


58 


1 


58 


23 


70 


7 


38 




79 


1 


58 



250 

Orlando D.urant, dead, 1877 - 1 58 
Fred Fisher, pays in Weare, 

1877 

Win. R. Mitchell, error, 1877 
Jona. T. Stevens, poor, 1877 . 
Aldcn Peasley, dead, 1877 
Alfred McKithin, no such man, 

1877 

George Hill, duplicate, 1877 . 
George Mclntire, poor, 1877 . 
Israel Doble, no dog, 1877 
Charles Nolan, no dog, 1877 . 
Webster A. Cross, dead, 1877 
Edwin Scribner, dead, 1877 . 
Arthur A. Abbott, pays in 

Wilton, 1877 
Louis Blondin, non est, 1877 . 
John Coleman, dead, 1877 
Daniel P. Currier, poor, 1877 
Walter D. Emerson, dead, 1877 
Oliver G. Hunt, dead, 1877 . 
Alonzo D. Hutchinson, poor, 

1877 1 58 

George R. Jackson, pays in 

Londonderry, 1877 . . 1 58 

Woodbury Wyman, disabled 

soldier," 1877 ... 1 58 

Eben Reynolds, minor, 1877 . 1 58 

Sherburn L. Corning, deaf and 

dumb, 1877 ... 1 58 

John Conner, dead, 1877 . 1 58 

Arthur A. Head, pays in Hook- 
sett, 1877 . . . . 1 58 
James L. House, dead, 1877 . 1 58 



1 


58 


2 


63 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 



251 



Thomas Cronell, dead, 1877 . 


1 


58 


•John Chenette, dead, 1877 


1 


58 


Walter Cody, disabled soldier, 






1877 ..... 


1 


58 


Charles Conner, minor, 1877 


1 


58 


Thomas Syms, dead, 1877 . 


1 


58 


Joseph B. Unruh, over 70, 






1877 


1 


58 


James Duff, duplicate, 1877 . 


1 


58 


James Duff, dead, 1877 


1 


58 


Walter McKean, pays in 






Nashua, 1877 . 


1 


58 


Arthur Devine, duplicate, 1 877 


1 


58 


Jerome B. Harvey, pays in 






Londonderry, 1877 . 


1 


58 


William Harwood, pays in 






Auburn, 1877 . 


1 


5& 


Thomas Harvey, duplicate, 






1877 


1 


58 


Owner unknown, duplicate, 






1877 


7 


90 


Charles B. Foster, no stock in 






trade, 1877 


1 


10 


Thos. Clark, duplicate, 1877 . 


1 


58 


Charles X. Emery, dead, 1877 


1 


58 


Ira Merrill, pays in Dunbarton, 






1877 .."... 


1 


58 


Norman Burns, minor, 1877 . 


1 


58 


James E. Sutton, not here, 






1877 


1 


58 


Chas. B. Foster, minor, 1877 


1 


58 


Charles ITilig, no such man, 






1877 


1 


58- 


Win, George, sick and poor, 






1877 . " . 


1 


58 



252 



Maria X. George, over-valua- 




tion, 1877 . " . 


3 16 


Nathaniel Perkins, tax wrong, 




1877 


1 58 


John B. Flint, pays in Wilton, 




1877 . . 


1 58 


Patrick Sullivan, not here. 




1877 


1 58 


Benjamin Currier, over 70, 




1877 


1 58 


Wm. H. Yickery, no dog, 1877 


1 00 


Volney Rounsvell, only $300 




at interest, 1877 


4 71 


Frank W. Elliott, disabled sol- 




dier. 1877 .... 


1 58 


Hugh Ramsay, no horse and 




cart, 1877 .... 


1 00 


Augustus Graff, duplicate, 




1877 


1 58 


Wm. P. Newell, over 70, 1877 


1 58 


Edward Francis, pays in Con- 




cord, 1877 


1 58 


James Miskella, dead, 1877 . 


1 58 


Allen Dean, minor, 1877 


1 58 


Clarence K. Mitchell, minor. 




1877 


1 58 


Frank M. Barton, minor, 1877 


1 58 


Noah Kenniston, over 70, 1877 


1 58 


Robert R. Moore, dead, 1877 


1 58 


Walter F. Drew, in California, 




1877 


1 58 


James Duff, dead, 1877 


3 16 


Francis Adams, sick and poor, 




1877 .... 


1 58 



253 



Hosea E. Sturtevant, dead, 

1877 7 82 

Cornelius Callahan, sick and 

poor, 1877 ... 1 58 

Eben Foss, dead, 1877 . 1 58 

Eleazer Badger, poor, 1877 . 1 58 

Charles F. Worthen, not here, 

1877 1 58 

Florence Hearn, duplicate, 

1877 1 58 

Charles Bonner, disabled sol- 
dier, 1877 .... 1 58 

Henry Heap, not here, 1877 . 1 58 

Win. Douglass, minor, 1877 . 1 58 

Joseph A. Dolber, pa) r s in 

Candia, 1877 . . . • 158 

Eugene Pare, minor, 1877 . 1 58 

John P. Kelliher, not here, 

1877 1 58 

Wm. P. Burke, no dog, 1877 1 00 

Henry M. Yickery, wrong 

name, 1877 ... 1 58 

Daniel Dussault, minor, 1877 1 58 

George L. Bates, disabled sol- 
dier, 1877 .... 1 58 

Albert L. Rockwell, pays in 

Hancock, 1877 ... 1 58 

Michael McGuinness, dead, 

1877 1 58 

Louisa Wiggin, no dog, 1877 1 00 

Chas. Duckler, minor, 1877 . 1 58 

Levi P. Walthers, minor, 1877 158 

Joseph Maston, duplicate, 1877 1 58 

James Martin, duplicate, 1877 1 58 



254 

Amos Sargent, dead, 1877 . 1 58 
Reuben S. Brown, over 70, 

1877 1 58 

George E. Barnard, pays in 

Dunbarton, 1877 . 1 58 
John Morrison, over-valuation, 

1877 6 32 

Joseph B. Clark, taxed wrong, 

1877 .... 1 58 

James Prout, minor, 1877 . 1 58 

Chas. Hickey, minor, 1877 . 1 58 

Orlando H. Young, dead, 1877 1 58 

Amie Grenicr, minor, 1877 . 1 58 

John H. Webster, minor, 1877 1 58 

Daniel Deardon, dead, 1877 . 1 58 
A. D. Gooden,watering-trough, 

1877 . . . ' . 3 00 
Charles C. Moore, dead, 1877 1 58 
Chas. H. Gamble, blind, 1877 1 58 
Byron C. "Worthen, not here, 

1877 1 58 

Jeremiah Cully, pays in Bed- 
ford, 1878 . 1 74 

S. W. Barlow, no dog, 1S78 . 1 00 

Jefferson Knowles, dead, 1878 1 74 

Wm. O. Stevens, pays in Bos- 
ton, 1878 .... 1 74 

Samuel H. liunnells, dead, 
1878 1 74 

Francis Adams, sick and poor, 

1878 .... 1 74 
Murty Shea, dead, 1878 . 1 74 
Cornelius Callahan, sick and 

poor, 1878 ... 1 74 



255 

Eligin C. Wright, pays in 

Washington, 1878 . 1 74 

Gamaliel Fish, over-valuation, 
1878 .... 

Joseph Warren, dead, 1878 . 

John Peaslev, dead, 1878 

Eleazer Badger, sick and poor, 
1878 . ' . 

Joseph Goggin, over 70, 1878 

Geo. L. Bates, disabled soldier, 
1878 .... 

Lawrence Conner, no dog, 
1878 .... 

Charles Bonner, disabled sol- 
dier, 1878 

B. F. Page, over-valuation, 
1878 

Oscar M. Titus, over-valuation, 
1878 .... 

Maria George, over-valuation, 
1878 .... 

Joseph L. Dow, no dog, 1878 

Lewis P. Burroughs, over-val- 
uation, 1878 

Hannah B. Huntress, over-val- 
uation, 1878 

Joseph T. Smith & Son, over- 
valuation, 1878 

Amoskeag Ax Co., over-valua- 
tion, 1878 

Amos Spofford, over-valuation, 
1878 .... 

Wm. Sutcliffe, over-valuation, 
1878 .... 



1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


00 


1 


74 


5 


22 


1 


74 


6 


96 


1 


00 


3 


48 


5 


22 


4 


35 


69 


60 


5 


22 


4 


69 



256 



Israel Dow, watering-trough, 






1878 .... 


o 
o 


00 


John Sargent, minor, 1878 


1 


74 


Josiah T. Langley, paid in Ep- 






som, 1878 


1 


74 


Richard Murphy, minor, 1878 


1 


74 


Abner Carter, no dog, 1878 . 


1 


00 


Frank Morgan, duplicate, 1878 


1 


74 


Marstin L. Brown, duplicate, 






1878 .... 


1 


74 


Oliver C. Woods, cripple, 1878 


1 


74 


B. P. Putney, over-valuation, 






1878 . 


8 


70 


John H. Huckins, no horse, 






1878 .... 




52 


A. J. Lane, assignee, error, 






1878 . 


6 


96 


Thomas W. Lane, over-valua- 






tion, 1878 


8 


70 


E. R. Coburn, over-valuation, 






1878 .... 


8 


70 


Charles W. Bailey, no horse, 






1878 . 


1 


oo 


Rufus W. Berry, horse and 






carriage taken to Epsom, 






1878 . 


2 


78 


Henry H. Esty, one dog too 






many, 1878 


1 


00 


John C. Young, only one dog, 






1878 . . 


1 


00 


Edward McLaughlin, no slut, 






1878 . ' . 


2 


00 


Wm..O. Stevens, paid in Bos- 






ton, 1878 .... 


1 


74 



257 



•James White, over 70, 1878 . 1 74 

Squire Gregson, no cow, 1878 63 

Benjamin K. Parker, no slut, 

1878 .... 2 00 

Aimer D. Gooden, watering- 
trough, 1878 . . . 3 00 

James Fogg, over 70, 1878 . 1 74 

James Reid, jr., no dog, 1878 1 00 

Herbert Fisher, pays in Weare, 

1878 . . . . 1 74 

Walter McConnell, pays in 

Weare, 1878 . 1 74 

Wm. Stearns, taxed wrong, 

1878 .... 26 10 

Albert Groux, minor, 1878 . 1 70 

Mrs. John Campbell, over-val- 
uation, 1878 ... 8 70 

Robert Elliot, over 70, 1878 . 1 74 

Wm. H. Huntress, disabled 

soldier, 1878 ... 1 74 

Washington Conant, over 70, 

1878 .... 1 74 

€olumbus Wyman, over 70, 

1878 .... 1 74 

Frederick Pohlman, over 70, 

1878 .... 1 74 

James Hunter, over 70, 1878 1 74 

Patrick Shehan, duplicate, 

1878 .... 1 74 

Wm. P. Newell, over 70, 1878 1 74 

James Tebbetts, minor, 1878 1 74 

C. B. Littlefield, no dog, 1878 1 00 

Albert C. Benton, minor, 1878 1 74 

17 



258 

John Orrill, error in valuation, 
1878 .... 

Maurice Foley, no dog, 1878 

SamuelN. Bell, over-valuation, 
1878 . 

Frank P. Reynolds, duplicate, 
1878 .... 

Edward Mulcaliy, error in val- 
uation, 1878 

Warren Wyman, cripple, 1878 

Hiram Simons, over 70, 1878 

Michael McLaughlin, over 70, 
1878 .... 

Josiah H. Stark, over-valua- 
tion, 1878 

Lawrence Dowd, same dog to 
D. Connor, 1878 . ' . 

Marston L. Brown, over-valu- 
ation, 1878 

Joseph R. Weston, over-valua- 
tion, 1878 

Pettee & Whittle, over-valua- 
tion, 1878 

Robert M. Shirley, over 70, 
1878 .... 

Levi Robinson, no horse, 1878 

Warren J. Tower, no horse, 

1878 .... 139 

George B. Chandler, error in 

bank stock, 1878 . . 93 96 

John N. Chase, no dog, 1878 1 00 

Joseph Gillis, minor, 1878 . 1 74 

Charles Hickey, minor, 1878 1 74 

Geo. Smith, duplicate, 1878 1 74 



6 


09 


1 


00 


4 


35 


1 


74 


13 


92 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


o 
•J 


48 


1 


00 


1 


74 


17 


40 


26 


10 


1 


74 




70 



259 

Geo. C. Smith, duplicate, 
1878 .... 

Edson Hill, over 70, 1878 . 

Michael P. Burke, left before 
April 1,1878 . 

Wm. Dolber, dead, 1878 

Andrew C. Wiggin, pays in 
Stratham, 1878 

Daniel Deardon, dead, 1878 

John Bushway, wrong name, 
1878 '. 

Daniel Tarbox, pays in Low- 
ell, 1878 . ■ ' . 

Eliza Creighton, over-valua- 
tion, 1878 

Charles H. Gamble, blind, 
1878 .... 

John Harrington, no dog, 1878 

Thomas S. Frost, duplicate, 
1878 .... 

Charles Dunklee, minor, 1878 

Christian Irion, no dog, 1878 

Charles H. Buzzell, sick and 
poor, 1878 

Frank W. Nichols, cripple, 
1878 . . . ' . 

Hiram Plumer, pays in Dan- 
ville, 1878 

Charles C. Moore, dead, 1878 

Thomas T. Morse, pays in 

Deny, 1878 ... 1 74 

Wm. Thompson, duplicate, 
1878 .... 1 74 

Frank C. Harvey, no dog, 1878 1 00 



1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


4 


35 


1 


74 


1 


00 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


00 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 



260 



Heirs of E. W. Harrington, 




over-valuation, 1878 . 


52 20 


Frank Groux, over-valuation, 




1878 .... 


54 81 


Charles B. Wing-ate, over-valu- 




ation, 1878 


1 25 


Balance to new account 


9 72 




%1 Q Q7Q q« 




<JP J. V « O 1 »_ ' CO 



TAXES FOR 1878. 

Dr. 

To resident taxes assessed . $277,701 32 
Non-resident taxes assessed 1,078 30 

1278,782 62 

Cr. 

By collections, abatements, and 

discounts . . .$234,872 75 

Balance outstanding . . 43,909 87 

$278,782 62 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

List for 1877, Setli T. Hill, collec- 
tor $5,698 24 

List for 1876, James Mitchell, col- 
lector 4,043 38 

List for 1875, John Hosley, collec- 
tor . . . * . . 4,893 {J') 

iList for 1874, John Hosley, collec- 
tor . . . . . 4,701 53 

List for 1873, Wm. G. Everett, col- 
lector 4,288 26 



261 

List for 1872, Win. G. Everett, col- 
lector 2,867 28 

List for 1871, H. R. Chamberlin, 

collector .... 0,263 82 

List for 1870, TT. R. Chamberlin, 

collector .... 6,358 13 

|39,H4 21 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... 18,000 00 
Reserved fund .... 3,355 36 

111,355 36 



Cr. 



By balance from old account . . $1,141 03 

Paid John L. Kelly, mayor . . 1,000 00 

Nathan P. Kidder, city clerk . 925 00 

II. R. Chamberlin, city treas- 
urer 1,000 00 

Jonathan Smith, city solicitor 295 83 

Wm. R. Patten, city solicitor 128 33 

Seth T. Hill, collector . . 1,065 67 

Wm. E. Buck, superintendent 

of schools .... 1,500 00 

John A. Barker, city messen- 
ger ..... 577 50 

L. Melville French, city physi- 
cian 75 00 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, clerk of 

common council . . 100 00 

John L. Kelly, school commit- 
tee 20 00 



262 



M. P. Hall, clerk of school 



committee .... 


25 00 


M. P. Hall, school committe . 


20 00 


€. A. O'Connor, school com- 




mittee .... 


20 00 


H. C. Sanderson, school com- 




mittee .... 


20 00 


Joseph E. Bennett, school com- 




mittee .... 


10 00 


Loring P. Moore, school com- 




mittee .... 


20 00 


G. L. Demarest, school com- 




mittee .... 


20 00 


John M. Stanton, school com- 




mittee .... 


10 00 


N. P. Hunt, school committee 


20 00 


I. W. Darrah, " " 


10 00 


J. E. Dodge, " " 


20 00 


J. E. Dodge, clerk of school 




committee .... 


25 00 


<t. M. Park, school committee 


10 00 


H. A. Gage, " 


20 00 


Ezra Huntington, school com- 




mittee .... 


20 00 


Geo. W. Weeks, school com- 




mittee .... 


20 00 


Geo. W. Stevens, school com- 




mittee .... 


20 00 


Samuel P. Jackson, school 




committee .... 


20 00 


E. W. Brigham, school com- 




mittee .... 


20 00 


T. W. Challis, school commit- 




tee ..... 


10 00 



203 



C. A. Smith, school committee 
Walter M. Parker, school com- 
mittee .... 

L. E. Phelps, school commit- 
tee 

Moses E. George, clerk of over- 
seers of poor 

Moses E. George, overseer of 
poor 

J. J. McQuade, overseer of poor 

P. 0. Woodman, " 

E. A. Moulton, " " 

S. J. Young, 

W.H.Maxwell, " 

•Geo. E. Wilson, " " 

A. B. Page, 

I. R. Dewey, 

Daniel Sheehan " 

R. J. P. Goodwin, health officer 

P. A. Devine, " " 

•C. C. Keniston, " " 

D. R. Prescott, " 
Joseph II. Haynes, inspector 
M. B. Witters/ " 

H. D. Lord, 

I. Whittemore, 

Solon D. Pollard, " 

H. Fradd, " 

Wm. M. Shepard, " 

J. J. Dillon, 
A. J. Nay, " 

II. H. Xoyes, " 
J. H. Haynes, assessor . 
J. F. James. " 



10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


18 


75 


174 


62 


96 


50 


132 


87 


78 


13 


76 


13 


33 


75 


65 


00 


46 


25 


54 


50 


34 


88 


244 


00 


39 


00 



264 



H. W. Powell, assessor . 

Wm. M. Shepard 

I. Whittemore, 

Chas. H. Brown, 

I. T. Webster, 

C. S. Fisher, 

H. P. Watts, 

John Ryan, 

Nicholas Nichols, clerk for as 

sessors 
J. M. Crawford, clerk for as 

sessors 
Geo. Holbrook, supervisor 
J. M. Chandler, 
Abial C. Flanders, " 

E. P. Cogswell, 

B. L. Hartshorn, " 
Wm. G. H. Dunham, " 
J. M. Hayes, " 

C. C. Colby, 

D. T. Burleigh, 

F. T. E. Richardson, " 
S. S. Piper, 

E. G. Haynes, " 
Charles Chase, " 
Geo. H. Dodge, " 
J. F. Conway, 

D. W. Morse, " 

M. O'Dowd, 

Hugh McDonough, moderator 

D. H. Maxfield, 

J. W. Bean, 

C. K.-Walker, 

T. W. Challis, 



108 00 

57 50 

60 00 

106 50 

105 50 

116 50 

108 50 

83 00 

92 50- 



180 


00- 


4 


50- 


13 


50 


9 


00 


4 


50 


9 


00 


9 


00 


5 


62 


9 


00 


9 


00' 


9 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00' 


9 


00' 


9 


00 


13 


50- 


4 


50 


4 


50 


9 
O 


00 


6 


00 


3 


00 


9 


00 


3 


00- 



26.: 



J. C. Biekford, moderator 


G 00 


D. 0. Furnald, 


a 




6 00 


J. Y. McQueston, 


a 




3 00 


E. N. Baker, ward clerk 


5 00 


P. II. Dow, " 


i 




10 00 


P. W. Dearborn, ' 


tvard clerk 


■20 00 


D. F. Clark, 


a 




10 00 


F. H. Challis, 


a 




10 00 


J. T. Barter, 


a 




5 00 


S. B. Stearns, 


a 




5 00 


J. F. Chandler, 


a 




5 00 


W. S. Holt, 


a 




10 -00 


C. E. Quimby, 


a 




5 00 


Geo. B. Shattuck, 


selectman 


10 00 


Geo. W. Bacon, 




(4 


10 00 


I). R. Prescott, 




u 


o 00 


W. P. Fogg, 




a 


10 00 


D. G. Andrews, 




a 


10 oo 


Hugh Ramsey, 




a 


5 00 


Geo. A. Farmer, 




a 


5 00 


Geo. H. Dudley, 




a 


5 00 


Charles P. Porter 




a 


5 00 


B. L. Hartshorn, 




a 


5 00 


T. P. Heath, 




a 


5 00 


Win. A. Clement 




" 


10 00 


S. C. Amsden, 




a 


10 00 


A. J. Nay, 




u 


5 00 


J. Truesdale, 




Li 


10 00 


L. E. Phelps, 




a 


5 00 


T. 0. Furnald, 




a 


10 00 


Dustin Marshall, 




a 


5 00 


E. M. Slayton, 




a 


5 00 


D. B. Emery, 




a 


5 00 


I. S. Coffin, 




a 


5 00 



26G 



A. A. Ainsworth, selectman 


5 00 


J. Prince, " 


5 00 


J. J. Flynn, " 

Edward Eagan, " 
Geo. B. Smith, " 


5 00 
5 00 
5 00 


Sidney Smith, " 
W. E. Holt, 


5 00 
5 00 


Stephen Palmer, " 


5 00 

•fin 3 r iT sf? 







NEW HOSE-HOUSE. 



To balance from old account . 


$47 25 


Appropriation .... 


100 00 


Paid J. Hodge, lumber . 


$49 54 


Bennett & Lord, plastering . 


13 00 


J. F. Seaward, lumber and labor 


7 78 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


11 93 


Br reserved fund (amount trans- 




ferred) .... 


65 00 







Dr. 



$147 25 
Cr. 



-1147 25 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS 1 GRAVES. 



To appropriation .... $200 00 
Sundry persons (overdraft) . 200 02 



Paid James M. Cummings 

Everett & Aldrich, printing 



$210 00 
59 10 



Dr. 

$400 02 

Cr. 



207 



Batchelder & Stokes, drum 
corps .... 

B. L. Hartshorn, team . 

William Freeman, team 

Wm. Shepherd, team 

I. S. Whitney, moving piano . 

J. Hodge, flag-staffs 

P. W. Haseltine, board of C. 
J. Richards 

H. D. Gordon, band 

Manchester Mills, white wors- 
ted goods .... 

Wm. C. Rogers, nails . 



12 


00 


5 


00 


1 


50 


6 


00 


3 


00 


15 


75 


3 


37 


45 


00 


38 


55 




75 



1400 02 



WATER-WORKS. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


#6,191 


28 


Receipts for water-rents . 


48,874 


26 

*55 065 54 












Cr. 


Paid Chas. K. Walker, superintend- 






ent 


11,298 


37 


Arthur E. Stearns, clerk 


1,038 


33 


C. C. Cole, engineer at pump- 






in g-station 


600 


00 


R. D. Wood &.Co., sleeves, 






pipe, valves, etc. 


3,581 


93 


Union Water Meter Co., water- 






meters, stops, etc. 


847 


15 


Walworth Manufacturing Co., 






stops, nipples, etc. 


107 


43 


Thos. A. Lane, valves, etc. . 


59 


61 



268 

Temple & Farrington, station- 
ery 51 54 

John B. Clarke, printing . 76 00 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing 69 10 

Mo wry & Phillips, pig lead . 355 65 
Gillis, Morrison & Co., pipe, 
etc. . . . . . . 417 12 

J. M. Chandler <fc Co., powder, 
etc. ..... 

C. R. R. Corp., freight . 
Manchester Locomotive Works, 
babbitt-metal, pipe, labor, 

etc 

E. W. Harrington S. F. E. Co. 
John B. Varick, rubber-drill, 

railroad color, etc. 
Pike & Heald, lead pipe, etc. 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood .... 91 80 

Derry, Welcome & Co., black- 
smithing .... 59 19 
A. H. Lowell, iron castings . 67 56 
Drake & Carpenter, cement . 31 10 
Jarechi, Hayes & Co., stop- 
boxes, curb-stops, etc. . 433 90 
J. Stickney, rubber cloth and 

leather .... 22 03 

Sewall, Day & Co., coil gaskets 19 96 

Leonard & Ellis, machine oil . 47 50 

Pattee & Perkins, hydrants . 230 00 
Richard T. Ritchie, rope . 20 72 

J. S. Kidder & Co., cement . 28 35 

J. B. Sawyer, engineering . 42 45 



7 


39 


744 


00 


310 


46 


9 


15 


117 


68 


19 


34 


06 


07 



209 



Boston Lead Co., lead pipe 

Dickey, Young & Co., coal 

Rowell & Spalding, wood 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 

J. A. Brown, team 

F. M. Heath & Co., painting 

barn at pumping-station 
Alexander Xason, labor on 

screens 
Austin, Johnson & Co., lum 

ber, etc. 
P. C. Cheney & Co., wiping 

waste .... 
Wm. W. Hubbard, lumber, etc 

E. A. G. Holmes, labor, bolts 
and lumber 

Geo. B. Emerson, laying stone 

wall .... 
Henry Fisk, labor on curb-stoj 

F. W. Dearborn, lumber 
John Hoyt & Co., old canvas 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor 
S. S. James & Bro., 

N. L. Chamberlain, ribbon for 

stamp 
J. F. Wetherbee, board of 

Mr. Souder while repairing 

wheels at pumping-station 
A. Wells, trucking 
D. Sullivan, trucking 
Barr & Clapp, powder and fuse 
S. Hovey, lanterns and spit- 
toons . 
City of "Worcester, sleeves and 

bolts 



42 


79 


128 


68 


4 


40 


11 


25 


O 

O 


00 


1G 


16 


9 


00 


35 


21 


15 


60 


9 


08 



6 24 

131 25 

2 00 

10 18 

1 60 

2 80 
14 00 

1 50 



25 00 
57 00 



50 



5 75 



13 34 



270 



E. F. Hanson, blacksmithing . 

John Barnes, blacksmithing . 

J. Welcome & Co., " 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing 
Co., valves 

Morris, Tasker & Co., corp- 
stops . 

Boston Machine Co., rubber 

gaskets . 
Mohawk and Hudson Manufac- 
turing Company, hub valves 

D. M. Goodwin 
Charles Chase 
W. P. Stratton 
Fogg & James, teams . 

E. It. Coburn 
Conway's men for labor 

By interest (amount transferred) 
Balance to new account . 



43 

35 

80 



70 88 



8 40 



6 25 



s 67 


90 


7 


42 


10 


00 


2 


50 


12 


50 


3 


40 


. 4,156 


12 


. 26,000 


00 


. 13,291 


55 



155,065 54 



RESERVED FUND. 



To sewers and drains (amount trans- 
ferred) .... 

Temporary loan (amount trans- 
ferred) 

New highways 

Court-house . 

Lighting streets 

Amoskeag-Falls Bridge . 

Commons 

Reservoirs 



•16,380 52 



. 49,300 


00 


89 


23 


8 


73 


600 


00 


150 


00 


190 


86 


300 


00 



Dr. 



271 

City Hall and offices . . 400 00 
Printing and stationery . . 450 00 
Land sold from farm . . 1,229 82 
New hose-house and apparatus 65 00* 
Interest on taxes . . . 941 68 
Incidental expenses . . 1,354 00 
City teams . . . . 500 00 
Highway district No. 4 . . 100 00 
Highway district No. 6 . . 100 00 
Nathan P. Kidder, city aque- 
duct water .... 31 00 
Nathan P. Kidder, rent of 

ward-room . . . . 12 00 
Nathan P. Kidder, south city 

scales . . . . 271 28 
Nathan P. Kidder, north city 

scales .... 51 50 
Nathan P. Kidder, rent of ten- 
ements . . . . 175 75 
Nathan P. Kidder, rent of 

hearse . . . . 32 50 
Nathan P. Kidder, show licen- 
ses 370 00 

Nathan P. Kidder, dog licenses 664 50 
Nathan P. Kidder, old boiler 

sold 40 00 

Seth T. Hill, costs on non-resi- 
dent taxes .... 31 81 



By balance (overdrawn in 1877) . $3,924 51 

Reduction of city debt . . 7,100 00 

Discount on taxes . . . 3,500 00 

Hydrant service . . . 3,055 00 



13,840 18 
Or. 



272 



City library 


. 1,915 


59 


Interest .... 


. 4,000 


00 


Sewers and drains . 


2,600 


00 


Repairs of buildings 


1,005 


87 


Grading for concrete 


1,000 


00 


New engine-bouse 


946 


56 


Watering streets 


600 


00 


District No. 11 


800 


00 


New highways . 


1,000 


00 


Printing and stationery 


700 


00 


Incidental expenses . 


2,000 


00 


Repairs of school-houses . 


673 


50 


City officers' salaries 


3,355 


36 


Land damage . 


978 


57 


Fire department 


1,500 


00 


District No. 2 . 


1,600 


00 


District No. 3 . 


50 


00 


District No. 4 . 


7 


18 


District No. 5 . 


7 


69 


District No. 7 . 


12 


71 


District No. 8 . 


50 


00 


District No. 10 


300 


00 


District No. 13 


100 


00 


Paving streets . 


1,366 


48 


Macadamizing streets 


151 


47 


Court-house . 


450 


00 


City Farm . 


500 


00 


Furniture and supplies 


200 


00 


School-houses and lots 


5 


53 


Commons 


3 


50 


Abatement of taxes . 


18,379 


96 


Balance to new account . 




70 

#63,840 18 



273 



NEW ENGINE-HOUSE. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 
Reserved fund . 



Paid Head & Dowst, contractors 
Natt & W. F. Head, brick 
Concord R. R. Corporation, 
freight .... 
George W. Stevens, architect 
A. H. Lowell, iron castings . 
J. F. Ford, plumbing 
T. A. Lane, plumbing 
Dickey, Young & Co. 
City team 
T. M. Conant 
T. Connor . 
J. disking 
C. W. CavanauQ-h . 



8,671 

3,500 



25 
00 
946 56 



$7,244 86 
57 00 

19 80 
250 00 

27 82 
360 00 
112 58 

28 50 



2 00 
1 50 
6 25 
6 25 
1 25 



Dr. 



1,117 81 

Cr. 



,117 81 



COURT-HOUSE. 



To appropriation . 
Reserved fund . 



Paid J. J. Bennett, brick and labor 
Manchester Locomotive Works 
boiler and fixtures 
18 



Dr. 



$400 00 
450 00 


$850 00 




$119 25 


Cr. 


487 16 





274 



B. Frank Fogg, materials and 

labor, setting boiler . . 234 86 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . 8 78 



SCHOOLS. 

SCHOOL-HOUSES AND LOTS. 

To balance from old account . . $334 27 
Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . 5 53 



Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . . $11 84 
L. X. Westover, lumber and 

labor 6 94 

George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor .... 18 40 
Wilson Gray, carpenter-work 15 75 
W. W. Baker, " . 7 00 
French & Robertson, ' ; . 11 30 
H. C. Dickey, trees . 15 00 
Thorp <fc Marshall, pump . 8 50 
JEdward Barr, sinking well . 44 27 
<C. R. Colley, painting . . 3 18 
B. K. Hoyt, painting . 8 53 
K3. A. Pierce, cleaning well . 1 50 
Wm. N. Cbamberlin, concret- 
ing yard . . . . 09 19 
Turner <fc Mitchell, concreting 

yard 14 00 



m oo 



Dr. 

1339 r 80 
Cr. 



ZiO 



A. H. Lowell, post caps 


and 




labor 




16 70 


Wm, C. Rogers, hardware 




7 95 


Edward Wyman, labor . 




3 00 


Geo. E. Moore, labor 




3 00 


V. W. Fairbanks, labor . 




2 25 


Labor of sundry persons 




41 50 







$339 80 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 
Reserved fund 



Paid Wilson Gray, carpenter-work . 

G. M. Ford, carpenter-work . 

J. F. Seaward, carpenter-work 

George H. Dudley, carpenter- 
work ..... 

George Holbrook, carpenter- 
work ..... 

W. W. Baker, carpenter-work 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber 

Amos Morse, labor 

W. S. Chamberlain, insurance 

C. H. Young, plastering, etc. 

E. G. Haynes, plastering, etc. 

Leighton & Co., plastering, etc. 

Bennett & Lord, plastering, 
etc 



•f 1,400 00 








673 


50 












12 


073 


50 






Cr 


16 


62 








10 


50 








166 


91 









297 04 



1 


00 


15 


75 


30 


98 


64 


60 


55 


38 


5 


00 


100 


00 


3 


25 


9 


97 


20 


00 



90 55 



276 

J. J. Bennett, plastering, etc 

B. W. Robinson, plastering 
etc 

C. II. Robinson, plastering 
etc. .... 

Daniel Haley, plastering, etc 
Joseph Dainey, brass work, etc 

D. M. Goodwin, line and laboi 
Wra. C. Rogers, nails 

Bike *fc Heald, furnace, roof 

ing-tin, etc. 
J. F. Ford, plumbing 
J. Q. A. Sargent, plumbing 
T. A. Lane, plumbing . 
Joel Daniels, painting . 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
A. Bodwell, stone threshold 
C. M. Whiting, hanging paper 
Celinda German, washing- 
George W. Stevens, engineer 

ing .... 
By balance from old account . 



10 99 



20 50 



26 


61 


21 


00 


16 


00 


4 


05 




40 


60 


49 


28 


39 


2 


88 


575 


57 


64 50 


216 


09 


1 


50 


16 


30 


12 


20 


5 


00 


102 


58 




12.073 50 



FUEL. 



To balance from old account . -^1,427 55 

To appropriation .... 2,000 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., overdraft 16 70 



By evening schools, amount trans- 
ferred .... 1500 00 
Printing and advertising, amount 

transferred . . . 75 00 



Dr. 



#3,444 25 
Cr. 



277 



Contingent expenses, amount 

transferred . . . 250 00 
Books and stationery, amount 

transferred . . . 100 00 

Paid S. D. Smith, wood . . 194 84 

A. C. Wallace, wood . 6 50 

F. M. Connor, wood . . 4 25 

Dickey, Young <fe Co., coal . 1,328 38 

L. B. Bod well & Co., coal . 874 33 

Geo. E. Moore, sawing wood 3 75 

J. K. McQueston, wood . 37 50 

Balance to new account . . 69 70 



5,444 25 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



To balance from old account 
J. M. Chandler, overdraft 
J. Stickney, overdraft 
Appropriation, overdraft . 
Reserved fund (amount trans- 
ferred) .... 



Paid W. H. Yickery, key 

J. Galacar, dust-brushes 
Higgins Bros., door-mats and 
brooms .... 
J. L. Hammett, erasers, maps, 

etc 

Herman Foster, brushes 

N. S. Clark, ribbon 

J. B. Richards &■ Co., diplomas 



9 01 



77 65 



50 
97 



Dr. 



1203 04 

2 50 

8 75 

300 00 




200 00 


$714 29 
Cr. 


25 
3 00 



60 00 



278 



P. B. Brooks & Co., ink 


4 00 


C. A. Smith, dusters 


26 99 


D. M. Goodwin, brooms 


2 00- 


S. E. Butterfield, step-ladder 


9£ 


Thos. Cliubbuck, diplomas 


2G 75 


Ginn & Heath, globe 


24 25 


Temple & Farrington 


1 20 


Carl C. Shepard, duster 


3 00 


Pike & Heald, dippers, ash- 




barrels, etc. 


22 99" 


Daniels & Merrill, brushes, 




dusters, etc. 


- 17 36 


John B. Yarick, axes, hooks, 




padlock, etc. 


4 87 


P. C. Cheney & Co., paper 


1 20 


E. R. Coburn 


20 45 


Parker & Co. ... 


2 50 


J. A. Cline & Co., maps 


200 00 


By balance to new account . • . 


198 36 



#714 29' 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



Pp.. 



To appropriation . 

Fuel (amount transferred) 



By balance from old account . 
Paid Temple & Farrington, books 
etc 

A. Quimby, books, etc. 

Thos. W. Lane, books, etc. 

P. C- Cheney & Co., paper 

Geo. C. Hoitt, book-binding 



. #500 00 




100 00 






#600 00 






Cr. 


#42 62 




187 57 




1 60 




330 61 




2 90 




11 50 





279 



E. R. Coburn, books, paper, 




etc 


15 38 


P. B. Eaton, books, paper, etc. 


6 09 


E. Steiger .... 


61 


By balance to new account 


1 12 







$600 005 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To appropriation . 


$300 00 


Fuel (amount transferred) 


75 00 


Everett & Aldrich, overdraft 


1 50 


Teachers' salaries (ain't trans- 




ferred) . 


42 44 


By balance from old account . 


$36 38 


Paid John B. Clarke . 


235 94 


Campbell & Hanscom . 


116 62 


Everett & Aldrich 


11 00 


Livingston & Kimball . 


11 25 


Thomas H. Tnson 


7 75 







Dk- 



$418 94 
Cr. 



$418 94 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



To appropriation .... 


$500 00 


Fuel, amount transferred . 


250 00 


J. M. Chandler & Co., overdraft 


2 70 


C. F. Hay nes, overdraft . 


50 


Teachers' salaries, amount trans- 




ferred 


80 39 



Dr. 



•f&33 59 



280 



Cr. 



By balance from old account . 
Paid Manchester Gas-light Co.. gas 
Manchester Water-works fo 

water. 
John B. Varick, twine and 

tacks .... 
Win. C. Rogers, floor-brushes 

padlock, etc. 
I. S. Whitney, piano rent 
Canney & Wiley, chemicals 
George E. Hall, chemicals 
W. H. Annan, weighing coal 
Higgins Bros., use of chairs 
T. W. Lane, use of horse 
J. A. Caverly, trucking . 
Bascom & Mead, trucking 
Temple <fe Farrington 
Thorp <fc Marshall, cleaning 

stoves, etc. 
M. P. Hall, cash paid out 
N. T. Cottelle, tuning and re 

pairing pianos . 
S. S. James & Bro., teams 
H. A. Gage, use of team 
J. E. Bennett, use of team 
Fogg & James, teams 
J. M. Sanborn, tuning pianos 
W. H. Vickery, repairing lock 

etc. .... 
G. H. Dudley, carpenter-work 
H. F. Morse, filling out diplo- 
mas . 
Charles Cheney, hauling coal . 



$27 28 
73 75 

339 05 

65 



4 


65 


63 


00 


18 


21 


2 


74 


9 


00 


12 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 


2 


50 


4 


43 


2 


50 


9 


50 


7 


50 


3 


00 


5 


00 


9 


50 


6 


00 


1 


55 


14 


62 


15 


10 


67 


50 



281 



W. E. Buck, teams, ink, etc. . 


33 65 


Samuel Jackson, team . 


26 75 


George E. Moore, lumber and 




labor ..... 


1 75 


J. S. Avery, glass and putty . 


1 35 


Susie G. Woodman, cleaning 




school-house 


1 00 


Maria H. Hildreth, cleaning 




school-house 


1 50 


E. B. Dunbar 


2 25 


Charles P. Ordway, sawing 




wood ..... 


1 00 


J. T. Robinson, stuffing birds 


15 00 


D. H. Dickey, cleaning vaults 


30 00 


T. A. Lane, plumbing . 


1 10 


W. P. Stratton & Son . 


50 


L. M. French, fumigating 




school-house 


3 00 


C. F. Haynes, tuning piano 


1 50 


F. N. Young, cleaning vault . 


1 50 


Hill & Place, cleaning vault . 


2 00 


G. M. Ford, glazing 


60 


J. F. Woodbury, fire-poker 


75 


City team and men, getting in 




coal 


6 86 





CARE OF ROOMS. 



To appropriation .... §2,200 00 
Teachers' salaries, amount trans- 
ferred 177 06 



#833 51+ 



Dr. 



$2,377 06 



282 



Cr. 



By balance from old account . 


$109 52 


Paid J. A. Can- 


582 SO 


J. S. Avery . 


566 56 


G. E. Moore . 


350 04 


J. W. Preston 


350 04 


Rufus Lamb . 


163 50 


Charles P. Ordway 


49 50 


Charles Brown 


10 17 


0. J. Randall 


16 64 


Wm, J. McGuinness 


25 00 


Helen G. Kimball . 


10 64 


Esther G. Wells . 


3 96 


Susie G. Woodman 


10 64 


M. W. Mitchell . 


5 70 


V. W. Fairbanks . 


7 90 


Alice Wooderson . 


40 40 


H. S. Clough . 


17 00 


Nellie M. Cate 


6 00 


Lana S. George 


12 47 


Elvina Woodeson . 


24 00 


Dora M. Dickey 


1 64 


Belle Fox 


6 47 


Foster H. Nutt 


6 47 


■ 





*2.377 06 



INCIDENTAL REPAIRS. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 



•1223 73 
600 00 



Dr. 



$823 73 



O Q 

Si bo 



Paid David Thayer, .setting glass, 

etc #17 25 

Manchester Locomotive Works 

labor on boiler, etc. . . 5 50 

Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 
clocks ..... 

J. N. Baker, repairing clocks 

(). B. Elliott, repairing clocks 

G. A. Alger, repairing clock . 

G. E. Moore, repairing clocks 

M. B. White, pattern for globe 

Thomas A. Lane, brass fit- 
tings, pipe, etc. . 

Joel Daniels, glazing 

Pike & Ileald, repairing stoves, 
mats, etc. .... 

Daniels & Merrill, paper-bas- 
kets, floor-brushes, etc. 

G. R. Vance & Co., cleaning 
and blacking stoves, etc. 

J. J. Bennett, mason-work and 
stock ..... 

Charles H. Young, repairing 
desk, locks, etc. ... 40" 

George H. Dudley, carpenter- 
work ..... 

W. G. Westover, repairing 
table 

P. Brown, lumber, hooks, and 
labor ..... 

D. M. Goodwin 
By balance to new account 



Cr. 



2 


50 


11 


25 


2 


75 


1 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


11 


84 




85 


22 


20- 


17 


33 


9 


35 


8 


75- 



100 


74 


1 


00 


2 


85 




69 


600 


81 



23 73 



284 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



To balance from old account . 
Appropriation . 
Fuel (amount transferred) 



Paid Thomas D. Luce, teaching 
C. E. Cochran, teaching 
Carrie Gilmore, teaching 
Clara B. Fogg, teaching- 
Mary W. Mitchell, teaching- 
John W. Perkins, teaching 
Bertha Dean, teaching . 
Hattie Emerson, teaching 
Clara E. Woods, teaching- 
Frank Livingston, teaching 
Medora Weeks, teaching- 
Minnie Campbell, teaching 
Fannie Moulton, teaching 
Louisa Quint, teaching- 
Minnie Abbott, teaching- 
John B. Mills, teaching- 
Nellie B. Putnam, teaching- 
Flora Senter, teaching 
M. Eugenia Lord, teaching 
Florence Stone, teaching 
Campbell & Hanscom, printing 
John B. Clarke, printing 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
Geo. E. Moore, janitor . 
J. W. Preston, janitor . 
Barr & Clapp, oil and wicks 

By balance t6 new account 



. 1161 55 


650 


00 


500 


00 


. 1105 


00 


26 


40 


7 


00 


4 


50 


36 


80 


32 


40 


38 


70 


57 


00 


19 


80 


59 


40 


43 


20 


50 


40 


48 


60 


44 


10 


50 


40 


153 


00 


45 


90 


10 


80 


97 


00 


1 


80 


>• 13 


50 


13 


50 


i 61 


75 


25 


50 


40 


50 


11 


47 


213 


13 



Pp.. 



$1,311 55 



Cr. 



$1,311 55 



285 



TEACHERS SALARIES. 








Dr. 


To appropriation . 


•"$36,000 


oa 

*3fi 000 On 






'flT'JUjVVv/ W 






Cr. 


Paid A. W. Bachelor . 


. #1,800 


00 


II. W. Lull . 


050 


00 


Lucretia E. Manalian 


787 


50 


Emma J. Ela 


475 


00 


Mary A. Buzzell 


427 


50 


Maria F. Kidder . 


142 


50 


.1. Y. Cressy 


402 


00 


Emma H. Perley . 


127 


50 


E. P. Sherburne . 


1,350 


00 


Annette McDoel . 


344 


38 


Lottie R. Adams . 


425 


00 


C. E. Reid . 


425 


00 


Mary L. Sleeper 


425 


00 


Anna 0. Heath 


425 


00 


D. A. Clifford 


1,350 


00 


A. G. Flanders 


439 


37 


Sara J. Greene 


425 


00 


R. M. Tuson 


425 


00 


B. F. Dame 


1,350 


00 


Julia A. Baker 


475 


00 


Mary J. Fife 


255 


00 


Belle R. Daniels . 


425 


00 


Mary F. Barnes 


425 


00 


Nancy S. Bunton . 


522 


50 


M. N. Mason 


475 


00 


M. C. Edgerly 


382 


50 


Jessie B. Farmer . 


300 


00 


Nellie I. Sanderson 


425 


00 


Mary A. Smith 


425 


00 



286 



Hattie S. Tozer 
Anna J. Dana 
Carrie M. Gilmore 
Florence McEvoy 
Hattie G. Flanders 
€. A. Abbott 
C. E. Bailey 
Lizzie P. Gove 
F. S. Mitchell 
E. F. Salisbury 
Georgie Dow 
Helen M. Morrill 
E. S. Prior . 
A. E. Abbott 
E. F. Beane . 
Florence L. Stone 
Julia A. Dearborn 
Nellie Pearson 
E. J. Campbell 
M. W. Hubbard 
Ella F. Sanborn 
Nellie M. Whitney 
.Jennie F. Bailey 
Augusta S. Downs 
Maria N. Bower 
Jennie G. Stebbins 
Emma J. Henry 
W. M. Stevens 
Mary A. Lear 
Etta J. Carley 
Addie M. Chase 
Izetta Locke . 
Georgie A. Nute 
M. H. Hildreth 



425 


00 


425 


00 


300 


00 


360 


00 


425 


00 


425 


00 


127 


50 


425 


00 


405 


00 


297 


50 


425 


00 


425 


00 


425 


00 


399 


50 


425 


00 


300 


00 


360 


00 


425 


00 


425 


00 


233 


78 


305 


00 


255 


00 


425 


00 


425 


00 


360 


00 


350 


00 


317 


50 


1,000 


00 


425 


00 


425 


00 


332 


50 


425 


00 


425 


00 


285 


00 



287 



II. S. Clougli 
A . G. Lord . 
S. D. Lord . 
0. J. Randall 
M. E. Lord . 
Lana S. George 
George W. Savory 
Ella F. Barker 
J.J. Kimball 
Nellie M. Cate 
Susie A. Crosby 
Clara G. Fogg 
Clara N. Brown 
Lilla 0. Cressy 
C. R. Dustin . 
Susie G. Woodman 
Ellen E. McKean . 
Mary W. Mitchell 
Helen G. Kimball 
A. Minnie Campbell 
Cora M. Dearborn 
Gertrude H. Brooks 
Nellie B. Putnam 
G. L. Robertson 
Emma L. Stokes 
F. A. Nichols 
M. E. Sylvester 
Lizzie O'Reilley 
Mary R. Fuller 
Clara E. Woods 
By balance from old account 

Care of rooms (amount trans 
f erred .... 



120 00 
425 00 
127 50 
400 00 

12 50 
400 00 
120 00 

90 00 
1,200 00 
127 50 
126 25 
210 00 
297 50 

90 00 
142 50 
210 00 
210 00 
210 00 
210 00 
6 25 
105 00 

13 25 
30 00 

123 75 

120 00 

117 75 

120 00 

88 50 

30 00 

33 38 

111 06 

177 06 



288 

Printing and advertising (am't 

transferred) .... 42 44 

Contingent expenses (amount 



transferred) . 


80 39 




Balance to new account . 


253 39 

1 


36,000 00 


TUITION. 






To balance from old account . 


1138 41 


Dr. 


Wm. E. Buck, tuition fees 


273 75 




Joseph Kidder, ; ' 


128 30 


$540 46 



Paid H. B. & W. O. Chamberlain . #18 12 
E. S. Ritchie & Sons, chemi- 
cals, etc. . 
Goodnow & Wightman, engine 
James E. Dodge, extra ser- 
vices .... 
Balance to new account . 



15 


27 


35 


00 


50 


00 


422 


07 



Cr. 



$540 46 



289 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll-Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1838 . . 


$555,270 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


$30() 


1839 . . 


604,963 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


3CH i 


1840 . . 


946,200 


3,986 56 


772 


2 20 


300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2.745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2.907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


24i> 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


24i > 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


24i> 


1S65 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1S66 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11^365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


187 2 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12.716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14.195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . 


15,005,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 



19 



290 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1. 


1879 


9 10,000 00 


Jan. 1 


, 1856 


u 11 


Jan. 1 


1880 


10,000 00 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


« a 


Aug. 1 


1880 


1,500 00 


July 1 


, 1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1 


1880 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


1881 


10,000 00 


July 1 


, 1876 


Sewer bonds, 


July 1 


1881 


8,000 00 


July 1 


,1862 


City Bonds, 


July 1 


1882 


22,500 00 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


it a 


Aug. 1 


1882 


1,500 00 


July 1 


,1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1 


1883 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1 


. 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


1883 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


a u 


Aug. 1 


1884 


1,600 00 


April 1 


, 1864 


u u 


April 1 


1884 


70,000 00 


April 1 


, 1865 


u a 


April 1 


1885 


10,000 00 


July 1 


, 1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1 


1885 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


1885 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


K U 


Aug. 1 


1886 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


a cl 


Aug. 1 


1887 


3,500 00 


Jan. 1 


,1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan . 1 


1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


,1863 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


1888 


35,000 00 


July 1 


,1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1890 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


,1872 


u u 


Jan. 1 


1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31 


,1863 


City Bonds, 


Nov. 1 


, 1893 


70,000 00 


July 1 


,1864 


u u 


July 1 


, 1894 


50,000 00 


July 1 


,1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


1895 


100,000 00 


Jan. • 1 


,1872 


l( u 


Jan. 1 


1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


, 1872 


u u 


Jan. 1 


1902 


100,000 00 



291 



FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 

1878 .... 1952,000 00 
Paid during the year . . 13,000 00 
Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 

1879 .... 1939,000 00 
Amount of temporary loan Jan. 

1, 1879 .... $1,900 00 

Interest due, estimated . . 20,500 00 

Bills outstanding, Jan. 1, 1879 23,329 73 



45,729 73 

Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1879 1984,729 73 

Cash in treasury, Jan. 1, 1879 $24,791 41 
Notes due the city . . . 1,301 35 

Interest on same . . . 600 00 

26,692 76 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1879 $958,036 97 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1878 992,297 70 



Decrease of net indebtedness 

during the year . . $34,260 73 

Attest, NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



292 



CITY PROPERTY. 



City-Library building .... 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
City Hall and lot ... . 
City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, and provisions at City 

Farm ..... 

Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Engine-house, stable, and land, Vine street 
Hose-house and lot, Maple street 
Hose-house and lot, Nashua street 
Reservoirs ...... 

Hearse, houses, tombs, and new cemetery 

Court-house and lot 

Common sewers ..... 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall 
Street lanterns, posts and pipes . 
Water-works ..... 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets 
Ward-room and lot, Manchester street . 
Ward-room and lot, Park street . 
Engine-house and lot, Ward Eight 
Water-pipe, wagons, and apparatus for water 

ing streets .... 
Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad 
Lot, Lowell street 
Gravel lot, Belmont street . 
Gravel lot, Ward Eight (one-half acre) 
Gravel lot, Bakersville (one acre) 
Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Valley Cemetery .... 



. . $30,000 


00 


19,200 


00 


60,000 


00. 


25,000 


00 


y 

9,000 


00 


38,000 


00 


41,000 


00 


2,500 


00 


500 


00 


10,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


51,000 


00 


. 145,000 


00 


3,000 


00 


4,800 


00 


. 731,808 


28 


5,000 


00 


3,000 


00 


600 


00 


2,300 


00 


2,500 


00 


50,000 


00 


1,500 


00 


1,200 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


20,000 


00 


6,000 


00 



■*1, 268,058 28 



293 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



Blodget-street school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
etc. .... 

Bridge-street house and lot 
Old High school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
New High school-house . 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
books, and apparatus 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Manchester-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Franklin-street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Stark house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Goffe's-Falls house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Harvey's . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Clough's mill 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 



.-$3,000 00 






3 ? 
. 150 00 


$3,150 


00 




500 


00 


. 6,500 00 






. 200 00 


6,700 


00 


.45,000 00 






. 2,000 00 


47,000 


00 


. 3,300 00 






. 125 O'O 


3,425 


00 


. 15,000 00 






. 350 00 


15,350 


00 


. 8,000 00 






. 300 00 


8,300 


00 


. 8,000 00 






. 400 00 


8,400 


00 


. 18,000 00 






. 400 00 


18,400 


00 


. 14,000 00 






. 400 00 


14,400 


00 


. 3,000 00 






. 200 00 


3,200 


00 


. 3,500 00 






75 00 


3,575 


00 


. 3,600 00 






. 100 00 


3,700 


00 


. 2,500 00 






50 00 


2,550 


00 


. 600 00 






50 00 


650 


00 



294 



Hallsville house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Massabesic house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito-Pond house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Center-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
South house and lot, 'Squog . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Main-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Amount of school property 
Amount of city property 

Total property 



. 3,500 


00 




75 


00 


3,575 00 


. 1,400 


00 




40 


00 


1,440 00 


. 1,000 


00 




50 


00 


1,050 00 


. 5,000 


00 




. 125 


00 


5,125 00 


. 58,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


58,400 00 


. 50,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


50,400 00 


. 2,800 


00 




60 


00 


2,860 00 


. 3,700 


00 




. 125 


00 


3,825 00 


. 12,000 


00 




. 100 


00 


12,100 00 


# # 


1278,075 00- 


* 


1,268,058 28 


$1,546,133 28 



INDEX. 



Abatement of Taxes 246 

Account of City Treasurer 170 

Ahum Telegraph 231 

.Alarm-Boxes and Keys 137 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge . . . . ,. . . .212 

Amoskeag Engine Co. ~No. 1 143. 226 

Amoskeag Hose Co. 146 

Apparatus, Fire . . 131 

Attendance at School 56, 93 

Awards for Land taken for Highways 205 

Books and Stationery 27S 

Bridge, Amoskeag 212 

Bridge, Granite 212 

Buildings, Repairs of 240 

Care of Rooms 281 

Cemeteries, Report of Committee on 161 

City Government, 1878 3 

Library 114, 242 

Hall and Offices 237 

Farm 13, 189 

Solicitor, Report of ' . 107 

Teams 192 

Treasurer's Accounts . . . . . . . 170 

Property 292 

Debt 290 

Payment of 291 

Commons 213 



290 

County Tax 244 

Court-House 273 

Contingent Expenses 279 

Condition of Reservoirs and Cisterns 142 

Discount on Taxes 233 

Decoration of Soldiers 1 Graves 266 

Debt, Funded 291 

Donations to City Library 123 

E. W. Harrington Engine Co. No. 3 ... 143, 227 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 . . . . 145, 229 

Engineers 146 

Engineers' Department . 230 

Engineer's Report 129 

Evening Schools 284 

Farm, City 189 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 133, 231 

Fire Apparatus 131, 143 

Fire Department 225 

Fire- Alarm Boxes and Keys, Location of ... . 137 

Fire King Engine Co. No. 2 143, 226 

Fires, 1878 135 

Furniture and Supplies 277 

Fuel 276 

Gofte's Falls Hose Co 145 

Government, City, 1878 3 

Granite Bridge 212 

(rrading for Concrete 209 

Highway District No. 1 195 

2 . . . .196 

3 198 

4 198 

5 199 

6 199 

7 200 

8 200 

9 .201 



297 

Highway District No. 10 201 

11 202 

12 203 

13 204 

Highways, New 204 

Awards for Lands taken for 205 

Hydrants 150 

Hydrant Service .233 

Incidental Expenses 214 

Incidental Eepairs (Schools) ....... 282 

Interest 178 

Instructions to Key-Holders 139 

Land Sold from City Farm 232 

Land Damage Awards 205 

Lighting Streets ......... 206 

Library, City • . . ' . , 114, 242 

Donations to 123 

Trustees' Report 114 

Librarian's Report 121, 124 

Treasurer's Report 118 

Loan, Temporar}' 177 

Location of Alarm-Boxes ....... 137 

Location of Hydrants 150 

Monument, Soldiers" 244 

Militia 243 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department .... 230 

Macadamizing streets 209 

Massabesic Hose Company No. 2 144, 220 

New Engine-House 273 

New Hose-House 266 

Names of Teachers . . .103 

N. S. Bean Engine Company No. 4 . . . . 144, 227 
Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department . 147 

Officers, City 3 

Outstanding Taxes 260 

Overseers of Poor, Report of 15 



298 

Paving Streets 208 

Paupers off Farm 178 

Pennacook Hose Company !N"o. 1 144, 228 

Payment of Funded Debt 291 

Pine-Grove Cemetery 224 

Police Department 234 

Printing and Advertising (Schools) 270 

I'rintiug and Stationery 239 

Property, City 292 

Property, School 293 

Rules adopted by Board of Engineers 140 

Repairs of School-Houses . 275 

Repairs of Buildings 240 

Reserved Fund 270 

Reservoirs , 142, 233 

Report, Order to print Thirty-third Annual .... 2 

lu port of City Solicitor 107 

Finance Committee 174 

Committee on City Farm 13 

Chief Engineer 129 

Public Schools for 1878 51 

Trustees of City Library 113 

Librarian 121 

Committee on Cemeteries 161 

Overseers of Poor 15 

School Committee 55 

Treasurer of City Library 118 

Superintendent of Public Instruction ... 77 

Water Commissioners 19 

Superintendent of Water-Works .... 21 

Salaries of Teachers 285 

Salaries of Officers 261 

School-Houses and Lots 274 

School Property 293 

Schools, Evening . 284 

Sewers and Drains 210 

Soldiers' Monument 244 

Streets, Lighting 206 

Macadamizing 209 



299 

Streets, Watering, 206 

Paving 208 

State Tax 244 

Tax, County 244 

Tax, State 244 

Taxes, Abatement of 246 

Discount on . 233 

Outstanding 260 

Temporary Loan . 177 

Telegraph, Fire-Alarm 231 

Teams, City 192 

Teachers, Names of . 103 

Teachers, Salaries of 285 

Tuition 288 

Valuation, Taxes, etc. 289 

Valley Cemetery 225 

Water-Works 267 

Watering Streets 206 

Water Commissioners' Report .19