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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

AMMUJiL REPORTS 



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1881 . 



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THIRTY-FIFTH AiNxNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



FOE THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1880, 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 

PRINTED BY JOHN B. CLARKE 

1881 . 



3S2.07 
\&&0 



CITY OF MAKCHESTEl!. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN OEDEE, authorizing the printiiii? of the Thirty-Fifth Annual 
Report of the Receipts and Exi)en{lilures of the City of Man- 
chester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
tlie Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they are hereby, 
authorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of two thousand copies of the Thirty-Fifth Annual 
Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manches- 
ter, including the Reports of the Committee on Finance, the 
School Board, Water Commissioners and Superintendent of Water- 
Works, Engineers of the Fire Department, City Marshal, Overseers 
of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian and Treasurer of tlie City Library, 
Committee on Cemeteries, «nd Committee on City Farm, and that 
the expense ttiereof be chai'ged to the appropriation for Printing 
and Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. December 21, 1880. 
Passed. 

JOHN W. WHITTLE, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. December 21, 1880. 
Passed in concurrence. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor. 



MANCHESTEK 

CITY GOVERiMMENT 

1880. 



MAYOR. 

JOHN L. KELLY. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



PRESIDENT OP COMMON COUNCIL. 

JOHN W. WHITTLE 



CLERK OP COMMON COUNCIL. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 



CITY TREASURER. 

HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN. 



4 

CITY SOLICITOR. 

WILLIAM R. PATTEN 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — Richard A. Lawrence. 

Ward 2. — Benjamin L. Hartshorn. 
Ward 3. — Joseph P. Kennard. 
Ward 4. — John M. Stanton.* 

Ward 4. — John H, Maynard.f 
Wai"d 5. — John Cavanaugh. 

Ward 6. — Thomas L. Thorpe. 

Ward 7. — Greeley W. Hastings. 
Ward 8. — Horatio Fradd. 



members of common council. 

Ward 1. Ward 2. 

Timothy A. Pearson. Wilberforce Ireland. 

Nahum B. Dickey. John F. Clough. 

Daniel G. Andrews. John A. Wiley. 

* Resigned, f Elected to fill vacancy. 



Ward 3. 



Ward 4. 



John F. Seaward. 
Arthur E. Clarke. 
William M. Shepard. 

Ward 5. 

Leonard Reynolds. 
Edward McLaughlin. 
William Starr. 

Ward 7. 

Uriah A. Carswell. 
George B. Smith. 
Geome K. Brock. 



John W. Whittle. 
Carl C. Shepard. 
John A. McCrillis. 

Ward 6. 

Sherburn D. Cass. 
Charles W. Eager. 
Robert Laing. 

Ward 8. 

William W. Weber. 
Charles H. Hodgman. 
John C. Littlefield. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Kennard ; 
Messrs. Ireland, Clarke, and McCrillis. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Thorpe and Hartshorn ; 
Messrs. C. C. Shepard, Eager, and Carswell. 

On Lanu's and Buildings. — Aldermen Fradd and Hast- 
ings ; Messrs. McCrillis, Seaward, and Wiley. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Stanton and Harts- 
horn ; Messrs. William M. Shepard, Dickey, and McLaugh- 
lin. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Lawrence and Cavanaugh ; 
Messrs. Eager, Brock, and Starr. 

On Setvers and Drains. — Aldermen Kennard and Stan- 
ton ; Messrs. Pearson, C. C. Shepard, and Hodgman. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Stanton and Kennard ; Messrs. 
Hodgman, C. C. Shepard, and Pearson. 



6 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Fradd and 
Hastings ; Messrs. Cass, Smith, and Clough. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Hastings and Fradd ; 
Messrs. Clarke, Seaward, and Brock. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Stanton and Thorpe; Messrs. 
William M. Shepard, Ireland, and Carswell. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Cavanaugh and 
Kennard ; Messrs. Starr, Brock, and Eager. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Lawrence and Harts- 
horn ; Messrs. Wile}', Reynolds, and Weber. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Hastings and Lawrence ; 
Messrs. Andrews, Weber, and Laing. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Hartshorn and Hast- 
ings ; Messrs. Littlefield, Smith, and Hodgman. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OP MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Fradd and Cavanaugh. 
On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Thorpe and 
Hastings. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Kennard and Lawrence. 

On MarshaVs Accounts. — Aldermen Stanton and Fradd. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Lawrence and Hartshorn. 

On Market. — Aldermen Cavanaugh and Thorpe. 

On Special Police. — xlldermen Lawrence and Stanton. 



STAINING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Messrs. Laing, Andrews, and 
Cass. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Clough, Mc- 
Laughlin, and Littlefield. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Reynolds, Dickey, and Little- 
field. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 
Horatio W. Longa. 

Assistant Marshal. 
William B. Patten. 

Captain of the Night Watch. 
David Perkins. 

Day Police. 

Randall W. Bean. 
John C. Colburn. 



Night Watchmen. 



John F. Cassidy. 
James Bucklin. 
Thomas Frain. 
William H. B. Newhall. 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 
Michael Marr. 
Thomas R. Northrup. 



Hiram Stearns. 
Z. B. Wright. 
Michael Fox. 
Henry Harmon. 
Edgar Farrar. 
James F. Dunn. 
Ira P. Fellows. 



Constables. 

Benjamin T. Rounds. Charles R. Noyes. 

Charles H. Reed. Sidney R. Hanaford. 

Albert Story. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Hon. John L. Kelly, ex-officio Chairman. 
James E. Dodge, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Henry C. Sanderson. 
Charles F. Everett. 

Ward 3. 

William A. Webster. 
Daniel Clark. 



Ward 2. 

James E. Dodge. 
Benjamin C. Dean. 

Ward 4. 

George W. Weeks. 
Walter M. Parker. 



Ward 5. 

Charles A. O'Connor. 
Denis F. O'Connor. 

Ward 7. 

Ezra Huntington. 
Marshall P. Hall. 



Ward 6. 

Abial C. Flanders. 
Brackett B. Weeks. 

Ward 8. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Eugene W. Brigham. 



superintendent op public instruction. 
William E. Buck. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Hon. John L. Kelly, ex-officio Chairman. 
Moses E. George, Clerk. 
William H. Maxwell. Daniel Sheehan. 

George H. Colby. Robert Hall. 

Charles G. B. Ryder. Sayward J. Young. 

Moses E. George. Isaac R. Dewey. 



ASSESSORS. 



Charles S. Fisher, Chairman. 
Joseph H. Haynes, Clerk. 
Charles H. Brown. Michael Cavanaugh. 

Joseph H. Haynes. Jonathan Y. McQueston. 

David 0. Furnald. Henry W. Powell. 

Horace P. Watts. Charles S. Fisher. 



INSPECTORS OP CHECK-LISTS. 

Joseph H. Haynes, Chairman. 
Harrison D. Lord, Clerk. 
Hiram Forsaith. John J. Flynn. 

Joseph H. Haynes. Isaac Whittemore. 

Albert J. Nay. David Farmer. 

Harrison D. Lord. Hezekiah H, Noyes. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 
Sam C. Lowell, Clerk. 



10 

Assistant Engineers. 

Andrew C. Wallace. Sam C. Lowell. 

Benjamin C. Kendall. Orin E Kimball. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Alplieus Ga}^ P^'esident. 
James A. Weston, Clerk. 
Eben James. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

William P. Newell. Andrew C. Wallace. 

Alpheus Gay. James A. Weston. 



BOARD OP HEALTH. 



George D. Towne. Patrick A. Devine. 

L. H. Lamprey. 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

Nathan P. Kidder. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Charles K. Walker. 
Arthur E. Stearns, Clerk. 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Hon. Daniel Clark. Hon. E. A. Straw. 

Hon. William P. Newell. Hon. Isaac W. Smith. 



11 

Hon. Nathan P. Hunt. Hon. Moody Currier. 

Hon. Lucien B. Clougli. 
Hon. John L. Kelly, ex officio. 
John W. Whittle, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 



Mrs. M. J. Buncher. 



WARD OFFICERS. 



Moderators. 



Ward 1. — Daniel H. Maxfield. 
Ward 2. — George H. Stearns. 
Ward 3. — David 0. Furnald. 

Ward 4. — Jeremiah D. Jones. 
Ward 5. — Roger G. Sullivan, 
Ward 6. — George Holbrook. 

Ward 7. — Abner J. Sanborn. 

Ward 8. — Charles K. Walker. 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Henry S. Perry. 

Ward 2. — Charles E. Quimby. 
Ward 3. — Charles F. Garland. 
Ward 4. — Stephen B. Stearns. 
Ward 5. — John Cahill. 

Ward 6. — George E. Glines. 
Ward 7.— Frank H. Challis. 

Ward 8. — James F. Baldwin. 



12 



Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 

Oliver J. Butman. 
Charles Atherton. 
Frederick Knowltou. 

Ward 3. 

William Stevens. 
Frederick 0. McPherson. 
Samuel Thompson. 

Ward 5. 

Thomas O'Connor. 
John B. McTiernan. 
John Willis. 

Ward 7. 

Elbridge G. Woodman. 
George B. Smith. 
Frank W. Favor. 



Ward 2. 

Horace C. Paige. 
John Prince. 
Stephen Palmer. 

Ward 4. 

Ralph Pearson. 
Sidney Smith. 
Wesley E. Holt. 

Ward 6. 

George H. Dudley. 
Edwin N. Baker. 
William G. Westover. 

Ward 8. 

Daniel B. Emery. 
Thomas N. Bond. 
Aaron Q. Gage. 



MAYOR KELLY'S 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS. 



MAYOE KELLY'S YALEDICTORY ADDEESS. 



Gentlemen of the Outgoing City Councils. 

As it is usual, at the close of the municipal year, for the 
retiring mayor to pay his respects to his city associates in 
office, I thought I would avail myself of this last opportunity 
of reviewing, in the light of truth, some of our doings 
while in office, and suggest some thoughts as to the future 
which may be of use to the incoming city councils. 

The joint standing committee on finance, in December, 
1879, made up the appropriations for the past year, under 
the approval of the city councils. In doing this, being 
guided by a desire to make the taxes as light as possible, 
they made the mistake of appropriating too little for many 
important interests, and, as a consequence, many appropria- 
tions are overdrawn at the close of the year, and the bal- 
ance financially will not be as favorable as the year before. 
In every instance these expenditures have been for works 
of a permanent character ; though I must say that some 
of the committees liaving charge of these expenditures did 
not seem to be governed by the requirements of the laws 
and ordinances of the city, to keep within the appropria- 
tions. In justice to the several committees I can say, that, 
except in one or two instances, they have worked under the 
direction of the city councils. 



16 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



The expenditures for sewers and drains on the east side 
of Elm street liave l)een large, yet the committee has been 
guided in this work by the positive needs of the public. 
The same can be said of paving, grading for concrete, macad- 
amizing, new highways and commons. The demands for 
the coming year for sewers and drains will be large, from 
the fact that many of the old sewers, built in the infancy 
of the city, by the grading down of our streets are brought 
so near the surface of the ground as to render them useless 
for drainage purposes. The future health of our city will 
require special attention to sewers in the future. 

Ten thousand dollars wei'C appropriated for the building 
of sewers and drains on the west side of Elm street, for the 
purpose of draining the buildings on Elm back street be- 
tween Spring and Market streets, rendered necessary from 
the fact that the old sewer, laid years ago, fails to do the 
work, and also to tap the main sewer on Elm at Market and 
Central streets, on its way down Franklin and Granite 
streets to the river, to avoid the overflow of Elm-street 
sewer on the occasion of heavy showers or protracted rains, 
which has often occasioned damage from the flooding of 
cellars and basements. 

This work has been successfully accomplished, and an- 
other sewer, for the drainage of the new Opera-house build- 
ing, has been laid, connecting with the sewer on Market 
street, by the order of the city councils. The whole expense 
of this work, including the work and material furnished by 
the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, in running the 
sewer under the canals on Granite street, was $11,093.62. 

STREETS. 

By order of the court, Pennacook street has been widened 
and graded from Elm to Chestnut streets, at a cost of 
nearly $2,000. 



17 

The substantial stone butments, either side and imme- 
diately west of Amoskeag bridge, built the past season by 
D. W. Garland at $269 per perch, are permanent improve- 
ments, which were demanded in order to give greater 
security to tlie road-bed, and safety to public travel. The 
whole expense, including the iron railing, was a fraction 
less than 15,000. 

The taking-out the middle partition of Granite bridge, 
which at the time excited comment, the utility and safety 
of which were very much doubted, has been accomplished, 
and to all appearance it is as secure as it was before the 
change was made, rendering it vastly more commodious 
for public travel. A majority of the committee on streets 
contracted with Dutton Wood to make the change for 
11.200. 

I would suggest to the incoming city councils to make 
some arrangement with the directors of the liorse-railroad, 
by which the two railroad tracks be moved farther north, 
tlms enabling two carriage ways to be secured on the south 
side of the bridge without troubling the railroad track. 
This would enable the railroad officials to scrape the snow 
from the tracks without disturbing the snow-bed on the 
south side during winter. For more particular information 
on streets in district No. 2, I would refer you to the report 
of Superintendent Harvey, and City Engineer Stevens, 
which will accompany the city report. 

The superintendent of district No. 2, Warren Harvey, is 
entitled to much credit for tlie improved condition of our 
streets, together with the large amount of work executed 
on sewers and drains, paving, macadamizing, grading for 
concrete, new highways and commons, under the direction 
of the several committees, as ordered by the city councils. 
His good judgment in the selection of workmen, coupled 
with his superior executive ability, as displayed in all the 



18 

diversified works submitted to his charge and successfully 
carried out during the three years of my administration, is 
deserving of notice at my hand. I believe his continuance 
in charge of said district as superintendent would subserve 
the best interests of the city. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The fire department, whose unrivaled excellence is the 
boast of our citizens, needs no commendation from me. 
The report of the board of engineers will accompany the 
city report. 

OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Our puljlic schools are in a flourishing condition : and I 
am glad to know that a large majority of the members of 
the old school board have been returned, giving the assur- 
ance, that, with the willing labors of our faithful superin- 
tendent, our schools in the future, as the past, will meet 
the cordial approval of parents and citizens. The retiring 
members, Messrs. Weeks, Sanderson, and Brigham, were 
faithful co-workers with the old school board in advancing 
the standing of our schools. 

A new primary brick school-house was erected on the 
corner of Spruce and Beech streets, the past season, by 
Councilman Wilberforce Ireland, wlio was the lowest bid- 
der, under the superintendence of the chairman of the 
building committee, George W. Weeks. It contains four 
rooms, and cost, with the furniture, $6,000. 

An appropriation of #12.000 has been made for the build- 
ing of a semi-primary and grammar school-house, north of 
the Fair Ground, to meet the growing wants of that sec- 
tion, where small children are compelled to walk a long 
distance for the privilege of occupying crowded rooms. 

A new primary school-house will soon be needed on the 
west side of the river, where a village is already staked 



19 

out, and a new church is being erected, on the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company's land, west of the old road lead- 
ing from 'Squog to 'Skeag. As soon as the new bridge is 
completed, this miniature village will, no doubt, begin to be 
dotted over with dwellings, and occupied by operatives and 
others, whose children will need increased facilities for 
schooling, 

CITY TREASURER, 

Thirty years ago I was a member of the board of common 
council from ward six ; then, as now, there was a vacancy 
in the office of city treasurer. The present esteemed treas- 
urer, who from disability retires when his successor is ap- 
pointed, then occupied a small furnishing store in the 
quarters now occupied by the treasurer and collector, I 
had often stepped in and traded with him, and was im- 
pressed with his affable manner, his honest ways, his steady 
habits, and his close attention to business, and I thought 
him a fit person to become treasurer of this young city. 
This thought so impressed me that I could not resist the 
impulse to inquire of him if he would not like the position. 
I learned fi-om him that he would, though he thought any 
attempt on his part would end in failure. I gladly offered 
my services, and spent parts of two days in visiting the 
members of the city councils, and presenting to them, in 
my feeble way, his fitness for the office. At a meeting 
soon after, in convention of the two boards, Henry R. 
Chamberlin was elected city treasurer. This, fellow-citi- 
zens, I look back upon as one of the happiest triumphs of 
my life ; that I was thus able to serve a friend, and render 
such lasting service to the city of my adoption, in securing 
for it, for thirty years, a public officer who has, year after 
year, for that long period, disbursed thousands upon thou- 
sands of the public funds, in exchange for countless 



20 

vouchers, and not lost or misappropriated one cent. Out 
of respect to this faithful servant, the city councils instructed 
the mnyor to procure a suitable picture of Mr. Chamberliu, 
and have it suspended upon the wall of the treasurer's 
office; there, as a talisman, to admonish all future treas- 
urers of the city to be like him, courteous to all, and scru- 
pulously honest in the discharge of his manifold duties to 
the city and the public. It devolves on the incoming city 
councils to elect his successor. 

The quarters of the city treasurer and collector are too 
small for the proper discharge of their duties. Sensible of 
this fact, an effort was made the past year to take two of 
the adjacent stores and enlarge their quarters, and furnish 
more needed room for the police. In the board of alder- 
men a motion was made to refer this matter to a special 
committee of the two boards under instructions to make an 
examination, with the aid of the city engineer, as to plans of 
actuation and cost, and report at a subsequent meeting. A 
very wise member offered an amendment, to substitute for 
" special committee " the committee on " lands and build- 
ings," stating, in justification, that any other disposition of 
it would be an insult to the latter committee. The mem- 
bers of the board of aldermen thought this point well 
taken, for they voted with alacrity to accept the amend- 
ment, and the " joint standing committee on lands and 
buildings " were placed in charge of the business. 

( It is needless to say that one member of that commit- 
tee occupies one of these stores, where he dispenses drugs 
and medicines, and &c. might be included — as the &c. is a 
specialty of his business.) 

The committee never made a report. 

Thus, gentlemen, it is apparent that the city has not been 
able to avail itself of the use of its own property, when 
absolutelv needed for the convenience of its officers and 



21 

the public, because of the iuflueuce brought to bear upon 
the city councils to advance the private interests of an 
individual rather than that of the city. 

THE NEW BRIDGE. 

The committee on finance, presuming the contract for 
the building of the new bridge would be carried out, and 
the work completed at the time specified, held a meeting 
last September under direction of the city councils, and 
made arrangements for a special loan of 1160,000 — by in- 
viting all the banks in the city to offer bids for the loan to 
the city of $15,000 per month for four months, commenc- 
ing October 1 and ending January 1, 1881, all made pay- 
able on the 1st day of April, 1881. Only two of the banks 
responded, — the Second National and the Manchester Na- 
tional. The loan was awarded to the latter bank, which 
was for the first note of 115,000, for six months, issued 
October 1, at 4 per cent ; the other three notes for the 
same amount each, issued the 1st of November, December, 
and January, at 5 per cent. The $7,000 paid to the city 
by the Amoskeag and Stark Manufacturing Companies was 
the first payment made to Mr. Douglass, agent of the Cor- 
rugated Metal Company, and subsequently two other notes 
of $15,000 each were paid said agent, making in all $37,- 
000, all paid on the certificate of the city engineer. On 
the 1st day of December, the third note for $15,000 was 
given the bank, and a check of deposit returned to the 
treasurer for that amount. On the 21st of December, Mr. 
Douglass, agent of said company, came to me with a certif- 
icate from the engineer, stating that $10,000 was now due 
the Bridge Company. I had been down and examined the 
work on the bridge and the material on hand, and learned 
that the bridge on the lower level would be completed by 
the middle of January, and that all the material for the 



22 

upper bridge, save about -$1,000 worth, was on hand. With 
this knowledge of the bridge and material, I took the en- 
gineer's certificate to the city solicitor and inquired what 
my duty was. He recommended the payment of the ilO,- 
000, and I did so, and on the 1st of January, 1881, as per 
agreement with the bank, the last note for S15,000 was 
given, and that amount is now in the hands of the city 
treasurer, making in all $20,000 payable to the agent of 
the Bridge Company when the bridge shall be completed 
and accepted by a committee of the city councils. It is 
understood that these four notes will have to be canceled 
on the 1st of April, by the issuing of bonds. 

I have no further report to make, or suggestions to offer, 
touching the new bridge. The woik was to be completed 
by the first day of January, 1881, though no forfeiture was 
required if not completed at that time. 

For all desirable information I would respectfully refer 
you to the bridge committee. They have made no report 
since the day of their appointment. Yet it is barely pos- 
sible they may be induced to report to the incoming city 
councils ; that is, if their official functions as special com- 
mittee have not departed with the expiration of their 
term of service as members of the outgoing city councils. 
Possibly the city solicitor, \tho holds over until his succes- 
sor is appointed, and who was one of the numerous attor- 
neys for this bridge committee when the legality of their 
acts was questioned by the citizens' committee, could define 
their legal status at this time. 

To avoid all doubt on this question, perhaps it would be 
well for the incoming city councils to appoint this old 
bridge committee a citizens' coumiittee to take charge of 
the work to its final completioii, though I should question 
the propriety of paying them anything for their services, 



23 

for the reason that they have cost the city too much 
already. 

CITY FARM. 

The city farm, under the skillful management of Fred- 
erick Allen, the superintendent, is becoming very produc- 
tive. He is converting the waste places into thrifty grass 
fields ; the stones which have so long encumbered the 
ground are being built into enduring walls. Indeed, every- 
thing al)out the place has a fresh and thrifty look, so much 
so as to awaken favoi'able comment from all persons who 
examine it. 

On taking an account of stock this fall, the committee 
found that the products of the soil last year exceeded by 
over '$500 the yield of the year before. The paujiers are 
well fed, housed, and clothed, under the kind and motherly 
management of Mrs. Allen. 

A large number of criminals on short sentences are sent 
up almost daily, of both sexes. Many of these are so ener- 
vated with alcoholic drink as to become a bill of expense. 
Many others, though strong and robust, require so much 
watching to keep them at work, and from running away, 
as to be of little profit. A very few of these criminals a 
little more than pay their board. 

Mr. Allen is worthy of much commendation for the in- 
telligence, industry, and thrift manifested in the manage- 
ment of the farm, in making it so productive, mostly with 
this class of labor. His familiarity with his responsible 
duties would make it very difficult to fill his place. Any 
change would, in my opinion, be a misfortune to the city, 
and to the dependent poor. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

At the earnest request of the trustees of the city library, 
$8,000 has been appropriated for the enlargement of the 



24 

library building, rendered necessary to find place for a 
large number of books, wbich, owing to their crowded con- 
dition, cannot at present be used for reading purposes; 
and also to accommodate the new books which are required 
to be purchased each year. It is the purpose of the trust- 
ees to have constructed in the proposed enlargement a read- 
ing-room, for the examination of a class of scientific and 
other costly books which cannot be taken from the lilirary 
building. 

AMORY MANUFACTURINCx COMPANY. 

A large manufacturing corporation, called " The Amory 
Manufacturing Company," has been establislied within the 
past two years, with an expenditure of nearly a million of 
dollars in the erection of a spacious mill, with its machinery 
and out-buildings. It is named after the Hon. William 
Amory, the distinguislied financier who has been treasurer 
of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company and Land and 
Water Power Company for over forty years. Mr. Amory 
has contributed more than all other persons, with the aid 
of ex-Gov. E. A. Straw, in making Manchester what she 
is to-day, — the queen manufacturing city of this State. 

When Col. Thomas L. Livermore. agent of the Amos- 
keag Manufacturing Company, in May, 1879, requested the 
city councils to abate the taxes for ten years on any manu- 
facturing establishment which may be erected and put in 
operation in this city within two years, the whole city coun- 
cils favored it. And I think the outgoing city councils 
should have the credit of largely increasing our industries 
and our population by facilitating by their votes the estab- 
lishment of the " Amory Manufacturing Company" in our 
midst. 

COLLECTOR. 

It is usual, after two years' service, to retii^e the old and 
elect a new collector of taxes. The unexampled success 



26 

of the present collector, George E. Morrill, in collecting 
the taxes, old and new, compels me to suggest a departure 
from that old custom, and his election again this year to 
that important office. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

I desire to call your attention again, before retiring from 
office, to the police department. I vetoed the appointment 
of the present city marshal, because he would not even try 
to enforce the prohibitory law ; and he has served the past 
year by Adrtue of the law permitting him to hold over until 
his successor is appointed, — an anomalous position for a 
public officer, whose duty it is faithfully to execute the laws. 
I confess that in many respects the city marshal is an effi- 
cient officer, yet he has no heart in the work of suppressing 
liquor shops, and in this respect he seems to have answered 
the wishes of a majority of tlie board of aldermen, who, by 
forcing him on me as the head of the police, possibly were 
not aware that they virtually licensed every dram shop in 
this city to continue in the business of manufacturing pau- 
pers and criminals, and they did not consider that by so 
doing they had broken down all the safeguards erected by 
the prohibitory law for the safety of society ; and as a con- 
sequence of this state of things, all who are engaged in 
selling intoxicating liquors in this city do it openly and 
freely as though it were a lawful business. 

The records of the police court are replete with evidence 
that dram shops with all tlieir attendant evils are not on 
the decrease. The city marshal's office is often visited 
week-day mornings by anxious wives and mothers in quest 
of erring husbands or sons or daughters, who have been 
arrested in or about these dens of iniquity, where adulter- 
ated liquors have been sold to them, for the purpose, too 
often, of robbery or prostitution, then turned into the street 



26 

to be arrested by the police, and the next morning ar- 
raigned for drunkenness and fined or imprisoned, while the 
rum-seller goes free to continue liis hellish work. On the 
14th day of November a great haul was made ; fourteen 
young men and women were arrested in and about these 
rum-traps, for drunkenness and noise and brawl. Ten of 
these were sent to board with Allen over the hill, and the 
remainder paid their fines. One of the officers who made 
the arrest testified that about midnight he heard a whistle 
at the entrance of a saloon, where were arrested one man 
and three women wlio were disturbing the peace of the 
rum-seller by loud talk. In the course of the trial the poor 
victims were asked by tlie judge if they desired to testify. 
One of the girls, whose age was not over sixteen years, 
stated under oath that the saloon-keeper had drugged the 
liquor she and her associates drank, and they were scolding 
him for it wlien arrested. It appears that this fiend, after 
poisoning his customers with adulterated liquor^ which ex* 
cited their wrath, whistled to the police to take away his 
troublesome customers ; they were disturbing his equanim- 
ity, interfering with his business, which he thought legiti- 
mate, as he had purchased a beer license of the revenue 
officer, under which he defrauded the United States gov- 
ernment !)y selling distilled liquors. The police came to 
tlie rescue at once, leaving him free to pursue his wicked 
traffic. It seems from this transaction that the chief re- 
sults of the labors of some of our police are to protect 
rum-sellers in their hellish work by arresting all disturbers 
of the peace in and about their premises. The police judge, 
no doubt impressed with this thought, remarked as he left 
the court-room after having ground out fourteen victims of 
misplaced confidence, "Such holes ought to be broken up." 
Sure enough, two days after, the saloon-keeper where these 
four persons were arrested, was arraigned for selling liquor 



27 

contrary to law. He pleaded gnilty, and was fined i50 
with costs. This arrest was contrary to precedent, and I 
thank Judge Hunt for his timely remark, causing the ar- 
rest of one of the many rum-sellers at whose dens these 
fourteen persons were arrested. Hardly a night passes 
without the arrest of from two to five persons for drunken- 
ness or other offenses occasioned by the sale of intoxicat- 
ing liquors. 

Free rum and open bars, permitted by tin city marshal, 
cause three-quarters of all the crime and poverty in our 
midst ; and in this the city marshal has not alone been at 
fault. He has seen behind him a board of aldermen on 
whom he could rely with perfect confidence, if he did not 
enforce the law, and was not certain how it would be with 
him had he attempted to enforce it. I know, from one 
year's experience as city marshal, twenty years ago, about 
what can l»e accomplished in this work. Then the law was 
less stringent, and the courts and the jurors not so liable to 
convict as now ; and yet, with the aid of a heroic assistant 
marshal, Justin Spear, and a supporting police, I was en- 
abled to force the sale of liquor from open into hidden 
places, and drive many out of the business. So intent was 
I in striving to enforce the hiw, and save young persons 
from exposure to the evils of intemperance, that considera- 
tions of self were forgotten. I labored conscientiously and 
earnestly to obey my oath of ofltice and enforce the laws of 
the city and State, and hence gave no thought to myself or 
the future. In this moment of partial success, with the 
prospect of final triumph over the enemy, the timid parti- 
san cry was raised that I was destroying the party, and the 
leaders resolved that a more prudent officer must succeed 
me ; and a more prudent one did succeed me, for in one 
month after my retirement to private life, in the spring of 
1861, open bars bespoke the triumph of rum-sellers, many 



28 

of whom, I am told, reaped a golden harvest out of the 
people during the rebellion. I lost sight of the new danger 
to which the people were exposed by this avalanche of 
tippling shops, from the greater danger to the Union in the 
attempted secession of many Southern States ; and under 
orders from the adjutant-general, I enlisted two companies 
in this city for the First Regiment New Hampshire Volun- 
teers, and, commanding one, went South, and served four 
years and eight months to help suppress the great rebellion 
against the life of the nation. I then returned to this city, 
voiceless and debilitated from sickness and exposure, only 
to find the city marshal treading the same old beaten path, 
arresting the poor drunkards and allowing the authors of 
their debasement to go free. I found then, as now, the 
spinal columns of a majority of the board of aldermen as 
limber as a tallow rag. Then, as now, they could look after 
the material interests of the city, but could do nothing to 
advance the public morals by electing and instructing a 
city marshal to remove, in obedience to his oath of office 
and the law, a slow poison which was eating out the vitals 
of a large portion of the people. The city fathers have 
seemed blinded to the fact that free rum was a disgrace to 
the city ; that it besotted the brain and diseased the muscle 
and bone of the young men and women who were made 
victims of intemperance, many of whom otherwise would 
have grown up temperate and industrious citizens, adding 
wealth instead of poverty to the city and State, and filling 
places of lionor and trust instead of poor-houses and 
prisons. 

DRUGGED LIQUORS. 

I would not leave the impression that I believe adulterated 
or drugged liquors are sold in all the saloons in this city. 
Some half a dozen or more of them are termed respectable, 
and I confess that they are respectable in comparison to the 



29 

numerous vile dens where adulterated liquors are sold, too 
often, for the purpose of robbery or prostitution. And yet in 
these places called res|)ectable, in many cases the first in- 
itiatory steps are taken by respectable young men which 
soon prepare them to become the willing patrons of the 
vilest class of dram and prostitution shops. 

I would here say that the prohibitory law, unenforced, is 
a snare and curse in any community, for it is free rum and 
open bars, as in this city to-day. If these are to continue 
in the future as in the past in our midst, then I, for one, 
say, let us petition the legislature to give us a local-option 
license law, in which, with the consent of a majority of our 
citizens, a license may be granted to the respectable dealers, 
who shall be bound, under heavy penalty, to keep and sell 
only pure liquors to adult and sober persons. With a heavy 
fee for each license a large fund could be raised to pay the 
expense of paupers and criminals they would manufacture, 
and lessen, somewhat, this heavy Inirdcn upon tax-payers. 

I know there is a valid objection to this, that it is licens- 
ing a wrong ; yet it is a wrong which in Massachusetts is 
justified on the ground that it takes the place of a greater 
wrong ; which is, the free sale of adulterated liquors under 
the prohibitory law unenforced, while under a license law 
the sale of liquor can be governed and restrained. I learn 
from ofificial authority, that, in Lawrence, Mass., where 
liquors are sold under a license law, a revenue of $43,000 
was raised last year, three-quarters of which go to the city, 
and one-quarter to the State, while diunkenness is thought 
to be less frequent than undei- the prohibitory law unen- 
forced. 

I honestly believe tliat the prohibitory law, if enfoi'ced 
by a resolute city marshal, would close up our open bars, 
and drive the sale of liquor into such dark places as to 
make it unprofitable to attempt its sale. This being done, 



30 

then the hundreds of rum-sellers who are now living on 
the scanty earnings of the poor, and robbing their children 
of bread, would have to engage in some other business or 
leave the city, and we should cease to be the bar-room for 
the surrounding towns, and a blessing would reach them as 
well as us. The responsibility of our demoralized condi- 
tion on the temperance question does not rest with me. I 
wish I could say the same of a majority of the boards of 
aldermen, including the present one, since the city was 
chartered. The mayor alone can do nothing to stay this 
alarming evil. It is only the board of mayor and alder- 
men who appoints and can compel the city marshal to 
obey his oath of office, and enforce the laws of the city and 
the State. I hope, in the name of humanity, that an end 
will soon come to this exhibition of open bars and free 
rum, under the unenforced prohibitory laws, I wish I had 
a penetrating voice, so I should not be compelled to present 
to the incoming city councils, through the borrowed voice 
of our courteous and efficient city clerk, the earnest plead- 
ings of our temperate. Christian, and loyal citizens, that the 
law for the suppression of the evils of intemperance may 
be legally enforced. They look to you, honorable mayor- 
elect, and to you, gentlemen aldermen, now fresh from the 
people, to help them, and I earnestly hope that they will 
not look in vain. Elect a city marshal with a back-bone, 
and strengthen it by your willing support, and you can 
have demonstrated to you, in one year, the merits of the 
prohibitory law under an honest effort for its enforcement 
in this city. Should it fail under this trial to lessen the 
evils of intemperance, then I have but little hope that we 
can better our condition by its attempted enforcement in 
the future, and I, for one, would go in for a local-option 
license law, and raise a revcime from the fees of licenses 
which shall support the paupers created under it. 



MAYOR PUTNAM'S 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



MAYOR PUTNAM'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS, 



Grentlemen of the Citij Councils. 

I assume the duties of the office of mayor of the city of 
Manchester, to which the people have called me, with the 
full sense of the responsibilities of the position, and a dis- 
position to give to the discharge of its duties all the ability 
I possess, relying for assistance upon your good judgment 
and regard for the best interests of all the people whose 
agents we are. 

Our city is rapidly growing in wealth and population, 
and this development makes necessary many new measures 
to provide for immediate and prospective wants. We have 
the foundations of a large city, and these are in the main 
sufficient for to-day, but they must be extended and per- 
fected as the city grows. 

The past year has been one of great prosperity. Most 
branches of business have been remunerative, and all those 
wishing to work have easily found employment. The pros- 
pect for a continuance of this state of affairs is good for 
some time to come. In view of this prospect, I think it 
will be well -to so direct the city affairs that we shall be 
paying a part of our city debt, which can be done in such 
a manner that it will not be burdensome to the people. I 
would recommend that a certain sum be laid aside every 
year as a sinking fund to be used in extinguishing the 



34 

present debt. At any rate, the debt should not be allowed 
to increase. The appropriations which have ah-eady been 
made should cover everything for which they were intend- 
ed, and no transfer made from one department to another. 
While not wishing to pursue a narrow policy in regard to 
our expenditures, yet at the same time we sliould so govern 
ourselves that no money will l)e spent that tlie public good 
does not absolutely requii-e, and the aifairs of the city shall 
be managed as careful business men would conduct their 
own. 

CITY FIXANCES. 

From the city treasurer, I obtain the following statement 
in regard to the city finances : — 

Am't funded debt, Jan. 1, 1880 1929,100.00 
Paid during the year . . 19,600.00 



Am't of funded debt, Jan. 1, 1881 . . ■*909,500.00 

Temporary loan, Jan. 1, 1881 . 115,000.00 
Interest due. estimated . . 20,000.00 
Bills outstanding . . ,. 35,593.73 

100.593.73 



Total indebtedness Jan. 1, 1881 . . $1,010,093.73 
Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1881 . $26,552.33 
Notes due the city . . . 463.44 

Interest on the same . . 305.00 

27,320.77 



Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1881 . . $982,772.96 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1880 . . ■ 935,659.46 



Increase during the past year , . . $47,113.50 

When we consider that the assessed valuation of the city 
is $19,000,000, and the total indebtedness $900,000, in round 



35 

numbers, of which $600,000 is in water bonds which are 
now nearly self-sustaining, we have reason to feel satisfied 
with our financial standing. 

SCHOOLS. 

The superintendent of schools and the school board will 
place before you their respective reports, which will indi- 
cate the wants of this department far better than I can. 
From what I can learn, I judge that our schools maintain 
the high standard for which they have heretofore been 
noted. Tlie whole number of scholars attending our public 
schools during the past year has been 4,186. The amount 
of money spent in this department $')2,75(), making (aside 
from interest on the cost of the buildings) an average of 
$12 per scholar. In our common schools lie the founda- 
tion of our future greatness and the stability of our gov- 
ernment, so that we cannot afford to be parsimonious in 
our appropriations for them. Yet we should not go to ex- 
tremes, whereby money would be spent without receiving 
an equivalent. Our school buildings, though insufficient 
for our wants, are generally in good repair, so that there 
will be no need of any special appropriation. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

During the past year there have been taken from the city 
library sixty-four thousand three hundred and seventy-eight 
books, which large number shows the great good that is 
derived from this beneficial institution. When the present 
library building was built, the future wants of our gi-owing 
city were not sufficiently taken into consideration. There 
are now twenty-four thousand two hundred and eighty-one 
volumes, and the number is constantly increasing. The 
interest on the Dean fund, which was given to the city for 
the purchase of books, now amounts to twenty-seven hun- 



36 

dred dollars, and there is no room for the books which 
should be purchased with this sum. During the past year, 
the city councils appointed a committee to confer with the 
trustees of the library, to see what means could be de- 
vised whereby more room could l)e obtained for library 
purposes and a reading-room. As yet, no plans have been 
matured to luring about the change. This is a subject to 
which your attention will be called, and whatever can be 
done to extend the usefulness of this institution will, I am 
sure, be received with satisfaction by the people. 

CITY HALL BUILDING. 

While speaking of public buildings, I have a suggestion 
to make which I think is worthy of your consideration, 
and that of our citizens. It is well known that the City 
Hall building is inadequate to the wants of the city. It is 
very inconvenient for the purposes for which it is now used, 
not furnishing sufficient accommodations for the different 
departments. It is well known that in the near future 
larger and better accommodations will have to be furnished. 
Considering that the present building and its ten thousand 
feet of land, situated as it is in the very center of the 
city, could be sold at a price that would nearly cover all the 
expense of procuring a lot in a more desirable location and 
erecting a building that would furnish accommodations for 
all the different departments, this is a subject, I think, that 
is well worthy of serious thought and perhaps of decided 
action. 

COMMONS. 

We have in our city several commons, given by the 
Amoskeag Corporation, with the provision that they sliould 
be fenced and properly cared for. These conditions have 
been complied with only to a certain degree. These com- 



37 

mons might be made ornaments to the city, but as they now 
are they fall far short of the purpose for which they were 
intended. If the grounds were properly graded, the walks 
kept in good condition, with evergreens planted along their 
borders, and the grass kept cut, tliey would present a far dif- 
ferent appearance from that they now do. These improve- 
ments could be made at very little expense, and the results 
would more than compensate for the expenditure. 

CEMETERIES. 

In regard to cemeteries. Pine Grove and Valley, I have 
not sufficiently inforjned myself 'to make any suggestions. 
The available lots in the Valley have mostly been disposed 
of, so there is but little revenue derived from their sale. 
The iron fence has been mostly completed on the east side. 
There will have to be made an appropriation for its com- 
pletion. The Pine Grove Has been greatly improved with- 
in the past few years. Water has been introduced very 
generally over the grounds, new avenues opened, unsightly 
trees cut down and ornamental ones put in their places, so 
that the grounds now present a very pleasing appearance. 
I would suggest that a certain amount of the money derived 
from the sale of lots be laid aside every year to constitute 
a fund, the interest of which could be applied to keeping 
the grounds in good condition. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE POOR. 

To this department I have given some attention. In a 
city the size of ours there will always be some that will 
require charitable aid to keep them from suffering. The 
manner of the distribution of these charities is one worthy 
serious consideration. There are two classes of those who 
apply for aid ; those who are deserving, whose misfortunes 
came upon them by no fault of theirs, and those who are 



38 

not ; and it requires a person of discrimination to detect 
the difference in order not to be imposed upon. The 
former class should certainly receive relief, the latter be 
placed at work and made to earn an honest living. The 
system of helping " off the farm." more than for a limited 
period, as in case of sickness, is a questionable policy. I 
think that if there was one person elected to perform the 
duties of the office of overseer of the poor, who would de- 
vote his time to its duties, the poor would be better cared 
for, and at a saving of expense to the city. The house at 
the city farm, as it now is, is a disgrace to the city, and 
does not answer the purpose for which it was intended. It 
is neither convenient nor comfortable. It is sadly out of 
repair. Some repairs will have to be made in order to 
make it tenantable until the city can build one that will 
meet the wants. 

In looking over the expenditures of last year I find that 
there has been paid out of the treasury $1,536.88 for the 
support of insane paupers at the State insane asylum. 
From personal observation and inquiry I find that the most 
of them are harmless and incurable, and could be taken 
care of just as well at our city farm. I would recommend 
that an addition be made to the city-farm house for their 
accommodation, which can be done at a small expenditure. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

On this subject there is little to say except in commenda- 
tion of the manner in which its affairs have been managed. 
This city has just reason to feel proud of its efficient fire 
organization. It will compare favorably with any in New 
England in its equipment and the general good character 
of the men of whom it is composed. During the past year 
the city has been very free from any serious conflagration ; 
and composed, as it is, mostly of wooden structures, this is 



39 

owing in a great measure to the promptness with which 
the department has responded to the alarms. The whole 
number of fires during the year has been ten ; the amount 
of property destroyed, <|>9,699. Of this amount 16,004 was 
covered by insurance, which makes a very fine exhibit, 
considering the amount of taxable property. When we 
consider the extended territory covered by the city, and its 
very rapid growth, it seems as though there was a demand 
for an increase in this department. There is a large sec- 
tion built over in the southeast part of the city that is very 
poorly protected against the ravages of fire. 

Now that water has been very generally introduced, and 
hydrants placed at every needed point, would it hot be well 
to have a hose-carriage located in that section, or at least 
procure a lot of land for future use while such can be ob- 
tained ? While speaking of this department, I would call 
your attention to the small jjay given to the chief engineer. 
It is a very responsible position, having, as he does, the 
general control of its material, held responsible for its ever 
being in good condition, taking mucii time to see that it is 
so, and, in case of fire, held to account for good judgment 
used in the extinguishing of the same. Firemen should be 
well paid, so that we can secure the services of reliable 
men, those that feel the trust reposed in them, thereby 
giving the public the assurance that property is safe while 
intrusted to their keeping, 

POLICE. 

During the past year our city has been quite free from 
any serious disturbances other than usually occur in a place 
of this size. The officers have been active in making ar- 
rests of those who have committed c)-imes,and bringing them 
to justice. Great caution should be used in the selection 
of those officers who are at the head of this department, 



40 

and the men who constitute the police force. They should 
be men of good character, self-possessed, and temperate, 
persons that will feel the responsibility intrusted to them. 
They watch while others sleep, and to their care are intrusted 
the peace and safety of our city. While speaking of this 
department I would say that there are some places in our 
city that are as " plague spots " on our reputation as law- 
abiding and moral people, that are the nurseries of crime 
and poverty, and should be broken up, and the offenders 
brought to justice and suffer the penalties the law pre- 
scribes. 

MILITARY. 

The enrolled volunteer militia of our city keeps up to its 
former high standing. It is composed, at the present time, 
of one hundred and eighty-eight men and twelve officers, 
and one section of liglit battery of thirty-four men and two 
officers. Besides these, there are three companies of volun- 
teers not enrolled, making a total of three hundred and 
fifty-three. Due encouragement should be given to this 
important branch of our government, as we have seen, in 
times past, its usefulness. In time of peace it is well to 
be prepared for any emergency that may arise. These 
companies serve to form a nucleus, around which, in a 
short time, a body of citizen soldiers can be gathered, upon 
whom we can always depend in time of need. In the com- 
position of these companies there are many veteran soldiers 
of the late war who deserve our gratitude for deeds done 
in the past, and I would give to them all the encourage- 
ment that they deserve. 

HIGHWAYS. 

During the past year, in district No. 2, there has been 
the usual amount of money expended on repairs, the 
building of new streets, the extending of paving on Elm 



41 

street, and the macadamizing of others ; and the work has 
been thoroughly done. The macadamizing of our streets 
is a subject worthy of your attention. Those streets that 
have thus been reluiilt have worn well and given good sat- 
isfaction, it being much cheaper than paving, presenting a 
far smoother surface, and, considering its durability, should 
be adopted as far as practicable. While speaking on this 
subject, I think it would be well to remove the stone-crusher 
to some locality near the city farm, from whence comes 
our supply of stone, and to utilize the labor of prisoners 
that are sent to the farm, thereby making them work, so 
that they may be made a source of revenue rather than a 
burden to the people. 

To every one having occasion to ride through our subur- 
ban districts, it is ap])arent that there has been but a small 
amount of money appropriated for repairs, or that the 
money in many instances has been misspent, or not used 
in a judicious manner. The money appropriated for 
these districts should be used in the early part of the 
season, and not late in the summer or fall, as is fre- 
quently done ; for when thus spent it is virtually thrown 
away. Hereafter it should be required to be used early. 
Too much care cannot be used in the selection of those per- 
sons to whom are intrusted these expenditures of money 
for highways. The calls for opening up of new streets in 
a city like ours, which is constantly extending its territory, 
are numerous, k^ome of those called for are needed, while 
many of them the public good does not require ; conse- 
quently, much caution should be used in their being laid 
out. 

Before leaving the subject of highways, I make this sug- 
gestion in regard to district No. 2, that the superintendent 
should be required to devote his whole time to the duties 
pertaining to the office, as it is one of the most important in 



42 

the city. He has the disbursement of a large amount of 
money, and, if strict attention is not given to its expendi- 
ture, large sums can be squandered. 

BOARD OP HEALTH. 

This is a subject of vital importance to the well-being of 
every person in the city. The functions of that office, as 
they are now performed, do not meet the requirements. 
The board of health now consists of three persons, whose 
duties are to see that there are no nuisances allowed to 
breed disease, and look after the general sanitary condition 
of our city. It cannot bo expected that these persons 
should give much time to that subject, and perform tlie 
often unpleasant duties devolving on them, for the small 
pittance which they now receive. It has been a query with 
me whether it would not be better to have one person ap- 
pointed to that important office, clothed with sufficient 
authority to act in all cases, with a sufficient remuneration 
so that it would secure a capable officer who would give 
time and attendance to the performance of its duties. Our 
sewers as now constructed are nurseries of disease. I have 
not given this subject tiiat study that will warrant me to 
make suggestions for the remedies required. 

SEWERS. 

Our system of sewerage appears to me to be very defec- 
tive. It is one of the most important matters that will 
demand your attention. The health of the city in a great 
measure depends on your deliberations. Our rapid growth 
has caused our sewers to be largely extended, in order to 
meet the demands. Since the introduction of water much 
refuse matter has been emptied into them ; and, running 
as many of them do, at a dead level through our streets, 
there emits from every opening an odious gas that poisons 



43 

the very air we breathe. Situated as our city is, on a hill- 
side, with a river running along its whole front, there is no 
reason why the sewage should not be emptied into that 
stream from east to west, down a steep descent, rather than 
through the whole length of the city from north to south. 
I have made some inquiry relative to the relieving of the 
Elm-street sewer, which frequently overflows, thereby caus- 
ing much damage, by tapping it at Bridge street, thereby 
taking all the water east of Elm and north of Bridge street 
to the river, the distance being 1,500 feet, the estimated 
cost of which is 'f5,6o0. 

In conclusion, allow me to express the hope that we shall 
all do what we can to promote good morals in Manchester. 
A city government cannot compel its constituents to be 
sober and prosperous, but it can and should see to it that 
they are not subjected to illegal temptations to become dis- 
solute, vicious, and poor. Ours is a manufacturing city, 
and many young people of both sexes come to it in search 
of employment, whose futures depend in a great degree 
upon the influences by which they are surrounded. There 
are among us too many dens of iniquity into which such 
fall, and whatever we can do to decrease their number 
should be done.. My experience during the past four years 
in relieving the poor shows me that most of the poverty 
and much of the crime, with which we are compelled to 
deal, have their cause in intemperance ; and, while we can- 
not hope to do away with this evil, we can at least make 
the excuse for it in Manchester less than it is now, trusting 
that He who presides over us will give us wisdom, so that 
we shall administer the affairs of this city with justice, and 
make such laws as will be for the good of all. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Mayor ^ and City Councils of Manchester. 

The Board of Health of this city take this method of 
bringing to your notice the defects of the city relative to 
its health, as suggested to them during the past year, hop- 
ing thereby that you may find occasion to correct faults 
which bear directly or indirectly upon the public health. 

One of the greatest difficulties experienced by the Board 
has been to protect the back streets from being defiled. 
The city teams have done their scheduled duty creditably, 
yet it has been impossible to prevent offal, aslies, etc., from 
being thrown and remaining in the street, much to the dis- 
couragement of well-disposed persons who took pains to 
confine their waste products as the ordinance directs. 

However much these decaying products may influence 
the health of the city, a still greater nuisance demanded 
the attention of the Board, and often puzzled them as to 
the best methods of procedure. 

Manchester has become of sufficient age and size to suf- 
fer from the errors of judgment, in sanitary matters, of her 
forefathers. Especially is this true in relation to her 
vaults. Hundreds of vaults are illegally constructed, both 



46 

as to material used, and size ; and many others are defec- 
tive in some way. Many of them are open enough about 
the bottom and sides to allow the escape of liquids to the 
surrounding soil ; thereby impregnating poisonous miasm, 
whose increase will certainly make itself manifest in time. 

Generally, wlien one is ordered to be cleaned by the 
owner, it is but partially done, perhaps but one load re- 
moved, the balance remaining as an increased source of 
danger. Owners of property are not wholly to blame for 
this. Men are employed to clean a vault, — receive per- 
mission from the proper authorities, and to facilitate their 
loading, after taking such as convenient, make up their 
load from adjoining vaults which they have no permission 
to open. Again, many of the teams are not properly 
equipped, and as darkness covers many of their deficien- 
cies, it is very difficult to arraign a driver, much to the dis- 
gust of the citizens along the line of travel. 

The location of privies, according to the ordinance upon 
that subject, has been a query of considerable moment to 
the Board during the past year. Some have been ordered 
repaired, some removed, but the most of them which have 
come under observation which were not considered partic- 
ularly bad, have been neglected, owing to the magnitude of 
the duties devolving upon such steps. However, the ordi- 
nance should be rigidly enforced. 

Several complaints were made in the vicinity of the 
Manchester-street school, and, after careful investigation, 
it was concluded the principal source of the imisance came 
from the school privies. 

Several of the privies connected with the public schools 
are not properly built, and it may assist in renovating them 
to bring to notice, at this time, a plan devised by the city 
engineer of Boston, which might be followed with advan- 
tage also by tenement-property owners, or wherever large 



47 

numbers of careless or unmanageable persons are to use 
the same privy, or series of privies. 

His plan is for a large vault or receptacle, made of brick 
and cement, with an egg-shaped bottom, pointing toward 
one end, to which is attached a pipe leading to a sewer. 
About two feet of water is holden in the bottom of the 
vault, which once a day can be evacuated into the drain- 
pipe, thereby slushing the vault. They are economical, 
and require but little attention. 

Of the present system of sewerage we are unable to 
make many suggestions at this time. It is a problem, 
owing to its importance, worthy your most careful consid- 
eration. It is certain, however, that our sewerage fur- 
nishes direct transportation over town for disease, and it is 
very probable that much of the sickness prevalent at the 
North End, from which the South End has been compara- 
tively free, is due to this cause, on account of prevailing 
southerly winds of the past season, and also that the stench 
from sewage had more direct ingress to the homes in the 
former locality. 

The Board liave seen fit to have a few traps placed in 
certain localities by the street commissioner, and more 
would have been used had they been at their disposal. 

In conclusion, the Board would respectfully call your 
attention to the meager remuneration received by the 
Board of Health for the necessary amount of services ren- 
dered, ieeling sure that your judgment will remedy this 
defect in so important an office. 

GEORGE D. TOWNE, 
P. A. DEVINE, 
LYMAN H. LAMPREY, 
Board of Health of City of Manchester. 



REPOET 



OF THE 



BOAED OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



EEPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester. 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners here- 
with present their ninth annual report, together with the 
customary reports of the Superintendent and Auditor, fur- 
nishing in detail an account of the operations of this de- 
partment during the year ending Dec. ol, 1880. 

The total income of the water-works for this period has 
been fil'ty-seven thousand six hundred fifty-five dollars and 
twenty-five cents ($57,655.25). The expense of operating 
and maintaining the works has been ten thousand two hun- 
dred eighty-two dollars and six cents (-$10,282.06), leaving 
as net receipts, forty-seven thousand three hundred seventy- 
three dollars and nineteen cents ($47,373.19). Excess of 
net receipts in 1880 over those of 1879 is five thousand 
eight hundred twenty-six dollars and twenty-seven cents 
($5,826.27). 

A further expenditure has been made, mainly for the 
extension of distribution pipes, service pipes, etc., and not 
properly chargeable as running expenses, to the amount of 
three thousand five hundred' eighty-eight dollars and forty- 
eight cents ($3,588.48). 



52 

In consequence of the small amount of rain-fall during 
the past two years, great inconvenience has been experi- 
enced in many places in New England, and at the begin- 
ning of the present winter there were serious apprehensions 
that Massabesic Lake would not afford an adequate supply 
of water for the wants of the city. To make the vast stor- 
age in the lake available, the work of deepening the chan- 
nel of the outlet was entered upon with vigor, and in a few 
weeks such progress was made that the pumps have since 
been able to furnish the customary supply. Unless the 
present shall prove an exception to all previous winters, no 
further work in this direction will be required. 

As a whole the water- works are in a very satisfactory 
condition, and the commissioners have no recommendation 
to make beyond the suggestions contained in their last 
annual report. 

The details of the operations of this department are given 
in the accompanying report of the Superintendent with such 
minuteness that it is not deemed necessary to repeat them 
here, preferring that his report to the Board shall be con- 
sidered as a part of this to the city councils. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, Chairman, 
JOHN L. KELLY, Mai/or, 
WM. P. NEWELL, 
* E. T. JAMES, 
A. C. WALLACE, 
E. H. HOBBS, 
JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Water Commissioners. 
Manchester, January 1, 1881. 



SUPEEI]^TENDEKT'S EEPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners of the City of 

Manchester. 

Gentlemen, — The report of the Superintendent for the 
year endhig Dec. 31, 1880, is herewith respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water in Massabesic Lake is lower at the present 
time than it has ever been since the water-works were built. 

The water was highest in the month of February, and 
continued to be at an average height till June, when it fell 
five inches. It continued to fall a little more than seven 
inches each month till November, when it fell only two and 
a half inches. The water on the first of this month was so 
low that it would not run out of the lake fast enough to 
keep the pond full that supplies the canal and pumps, and 
in consequence the water-power was so reduced that the 
pumps could only be run nine hours per day, and only nine 
strokes per minute, instead of fifteen, which is about the 
average. 

It was evident that the pumps could not keep up the sup- 
ply in the reservoir, and on the eleventh day of November 
that portion of the city on the west side of Wilson street 
was supplied from the reservoir of the Amoskeag Manufac- 
turing Company twenty-four hours. This was the first time 



54 

for four years that they have been called upon for assist- 
ance for any length of time. While repairing leaks on the 
supply main, water has been used from their reservoir from 
one to three hours, and the water thus taken was returned 
to their reservoir the same day. 

It was about this time that orders came from your Honor- 
able Board to clear out the outlet of the lake by removing 
any loose stones or earth that should appear to hinder the 
free passage of the water. 

To make the matter plain as to the amount of work done 
it will be necessary to describe this stream. 

Its length, from the lake to the lower pond, is about 
eighteen hundred feet. For one-half this distance there 
are two channels, forming an island of about five acres 
when the water is low. At this time the water was very 
low, and the channels on either side of the island did not 
show more than seven inches full. 

On the twelfth day of November the work on the brook 
commenced on the westerly channel. It was widened 
somewhat, and all loose stones and some ledge taken out. 
This work was continued to the lake. The effect of this 
was to let down a little more water, but not enough to keep 
the pumps running. On the twenty-second day of Novem- 
ber the work of lowering the channel was begun on the 
east side of the island, and was continued till the 18th of 
December. The stream was lowered al)0ut one foot, so that 
the whole lake could be drawn down to this extent. Since 
that time the pumps have furnished the usual supply of 
water to the city. The water fell during the month of De- 
cember two and one-half inches. 

DAM, CANAL, AND PENSTOCK. 

The repairs on these the past year have been light. A 
few loads of earth have been spread on the south bank of 



55 

the canal, where a small portion of the earth had settled 
by reason of the low state of the water. 

What was reported last year as a leak in the penstock 
proves to be surface water. 

PUMPING STATION. 

The pumps continue to work well, and everything con- 
nected with the pumping station is in the very best condi- 
tion . 

From the 11th of November to the 18th of December, the 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company assisted in keeping the 
city supplied with water at different times, in all ten days 
and three hours. 

RECORD OP PUMPING IN 1880. 



No. hours' work 
for both pumps. 



Average 

stroke p'r 

minute. 



Total No. 

strokes 

p'r month 



Total gallons 

pumped in one 

month. 



Daily aver- 
age gallons 
pumped. 



January 635 h. 



February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July.. 

August 

September.. 
October . . . . 
November . . 
December. . 



Totals and average 



611 ' 

625' 

583' 

641' 

660 ' 

694' 

712 

738' 

697 ' 

565 

737 



20 m. 
10" 
10" 
10" 
10" 
50 " 
00 " 
50" 
10 " 
20 " 
50 " 
50 " 



15.31 
14.98 
15.84 
16.12 
16.11 
15.70 
15.71 
15.45 
14.55 
12.46 
9.32 
12.08 



7,902 " 50 " 



14.47 



583,922 
548,302 
594,402 
564,080 
618,960 
620,314 
655,240 
660,752 
644,530 
521,562 
316,256 
534,882 



6,863,202 



36,787,086 
34,543,026 
37,447,326 
35,537,040 
38,994,480 
39,079,782 
41,280,120 
41,627,376 
40,605,390 
32,858,406 
19,924,128 
33,697,566 



1,186,680 
1,191,138 
1,207,978 
1,184,568 
1,257,886 
1,302,659 
1,331,617 
1,342,818 
1,353,513 
1,059,948 
664,137 
1,087,018 



432,381,726 



1,180,930 



Cost of raising one million gallons into reservoir, $3.19. 



66 

FORCE AND SUPPLY MAINS. 

These have caused less trouble and expense the past year 
on account of leaks, than ever before. 

There are bad places in both, and, although they may. not 
cause any serious trouble for a number of years, every 
preparation should be made to overcome any difficulty that 
would arise in case a bad break should occur in either of 
these mains. 

Your attention was called last year to a part of a new 
supply main on Valley street, and I would still recommend 
it to your Honorable Board for a careful consideration. 

RESERVOIR. 

The reservoir remains in the same condition as last year. 
Four bags of superphosphate have been sown on the banks 
to keep the grass in good condition. 

The street east of the reservoir has been graded, which 
makes it more convenient for public travel and improves 
the looks of the grounds about the reservoir. 

Tlie expense of grading and draining this street was 
$110. Add to this the top-dressing of the banks, and it 
makes $130 expended on the grounds in and about the res- 
ervoir. 

The water in the reservoir has been very low during 
November and tlie first of December ; it having been only 
nine to twelve feet in depth, instead of eighteen or twenty, 
which is about the average. On the 31st of December, 
1880, it was seventeen feet deep. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

The number of feet of pipe laid the past season is 1,192, 
at an expense of $894. 

The number of leaks on cement pipe is one hundred and 
thirty, cast-iron twenty-one. 



67 



The pipe has burst in nine different places, eight east of 
Elm street, and one in 'Squog, all on six and four inch 
cement pipe. All but one of the bursts occurred in the 
day-time, and the water was shut off before doing any 
damage. 

There have been a little more than half as many joint- 
leaks as last year, and these in most cases had been wound, 
showing that they had leaked before. They have all been 
repaired with cast-iron sleeves and a lead point. 

The following places are where cemoit-lined pipe was 
taken up and cast-iron pipe laid instead : — 



Length in feet. 



4 in. 6 in. 10 in 



Locations. 



Amherst . . . 

Brook 

Cedar 

Chestnut. . . . 

Hanover 

Hanover 

Main 

Main 

Mast Road . . 

Pleasant 

Pleasant 

Second 

Spruce 

State 

Washington 



Corner Walnut. 

Corner Elm. 

Two hundred feet east of Elm. 

Corner Park. 

Front of Opera House. 

Corner Lincoln. 

Corner Douglas. 

Corner Winter. 

Corner Bowman. 

Corner Canal. 

Corner Franklin. 

Corner Walker. 

Two hundred feet east of Elm. 

North End. 

Corner Elm. 



58 





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Summer 

Union 

Valley 

Vine 

Walnut 


Water 

Webster 

Wilson 

Willow 

Young 

A 

Barr 

Bedford Road 

Bowman 


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60 



SCHEDULE OF PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID AND SET IN 1880. 

Cedar street, 82 feet 6 inch cast-iron, east of Union. 
Central street, 132 " 6 " " " west of Elm. 
Hollis street, 120 " 6 " " " east L. W. office. 
Webster street, 858 " 6 " " " east of Chestnut. 



Total, 



1,192 



Two hydrants were set on Webster street, one corner 
Pine and one corner Union street. 

Length of pipe laid of cement-lined and cast-iron of dif- 
ferent sizes, and gates, as follows : — 



20 ir 
14 
12 
10 

8 
6 
4 



ch 



Cement-lined pipe. 

•20,934.9 ft. 

6,825. " 

8,400. " 
5,101.75" 

12,644. " 

82,653.6 " 

8,935. " 

145,494.15 ft. 



Cast-iron. 


Gates 


104 ft. 5 


4,925 ' 


10 


6,002 ' 


14 


562 ' 


9 


2,346 ' 


26 


16,237 ' 


178 


989 ' 


15 



81,165 ft. 



257 



27^|||-^-^ miles cement-lined pipe. 
5|||| miles cast-iron pipe. 

33^|||-^-^ miles of cast-iron and cement-lined pipe to 
Dec. 31, 1880. 

257 Gates. 
307 Hydrants. 
7 Air-valves. 

The number of applications for water to date, has been 
nineteen hundred and thirty-six (1,936). Eighteen hun- 



61 



dred and seven (1,807) service pipes have been laid to 
date, as follows : — 

inch diameter . . 860 feet, 8 inches. 



40 


1-2 


1,548 


3-4 


185 


1 


16 


1 1-4 


1 


11-2 


12 


2 


5 


4 



41,070 

5,360 

829 

57 

470 

136 



Total length of service pipes, 48,784 feet, 1 inch. 

Number miles service pipe in street, S-g^lf^. 

One hundred and thirty-one service pipes have been laid 
this year, as follows : — 

123 3-4 inch diameter . . 8,078.7 feet. 

5 1" " 

1 1 1-4 " 
12" " 

14" " 



There are two hundred and eighty (280) meters in use 
at the present time. 

The income from the sale of water for the year 1880 has 
been as follows : — 

Received from water and hydrant 



128.3 


a 


83.0 


a 


4.0 


a 


19.0 


a 


3,263.0 feet. 



rent 




$42 


,095 96 


Received from water (metered) 


13 


,810 90 


a u 


fines 




210 39 


(( li 


rent of meters 




983 44 


u a 


building purposes 




79 50 


(( u 


setting meters 




84 00 



62 



Received from labor and pipe 


131 06 


" " hay on Mills' and 


« 


Neal's meadow . 


10 00 


" " transit, level, table. 




etc. 


250 00 


Total .... 


157,655 25 


Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1879, 14,518 35 




$72,173 60 


Abatements, 186.05. 




Expenses for 1880 


$13,870 54 


Amount paid toward interest 


35,000 00 




48,870 54 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1880, $23,303 06 

Classification of accounts for the year 1880 : — 

Superintendence, collecting, and re- 
pairs .... 
Stationery, printing, etc. 
Office and incidental expenses 

Pumping expenses and repairs 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 
reservoir 



Running expenses for 1880 

Service pipes 
Distribution pipes . 
Fire hydrant and valves 
Land and water rights . 



. $7,004 


83 






147 


11 






383 


26 


$7,535 








20 


. $1,380 46 






. 1,366 


40 


2,746 






i 


86 




^0,282 


06 


. $1,520 


22 






359 


32 






124 


24 






700 


00 







63 



Meters, boxes, and fittings 
Roads and culverts 

Total expended on construc- 
tion, 1880 



Total amount expended in 1880, 



775 45 
109 25 



3,588 48 
113,870 54 



Classification of accounts to Dec. 31, 1880 : — 



Land and water rights . 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 

Pumping machinery, pump-house 

dwelling, etc. 
Distributing i-eservoir and fixtures 
Force and supply mains 
Distribution pipes 
Fire hydrants and valves 
Tools and fixtures 
Boarding and store houses 
Roads and culverts 
Supplies 
Engineering . 

Livery and traveling expenses 
Legal expenses 
Grading and fencing 
Service pipes 
Meters, boxes, and fixtures 

Total construction account 
to Dec. 31, 1880 . 



131,558 
101,198 

88,493 

71,542 

88,674 

245,465 

30,274 

10,649 

919 

2,193 

550 

22,176 

2,856 

563 

11,349 

28,767 

8,483 



67 
20 

96 
36 
02 
83 
23 
35 
36 
49 
39 
19 
64 
79 
62 
71 
17 



1745,716 98 



Current expenses : — 

Superintendence, collecting, and re- 
pairs $40,703 06 

Stationery, printing, etc. . . 3,891 52 



64 



Office and incidental expenses . 3,345 63 

Pumping expenses and repairs . 10,373 35 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 

reservoir .... 1,608 70 

Repairs to buildings . . . 254 48 



Total current expenses to 

Dec. 31, 1880 . . . 1.60,176 64 

Interest 140,678 51 

Highway expenditures . . . 14,000 53 



$54,679 04 

Total amount of bills ap- 
proved to Dec. 31, 1880 . §860,572 m 
Interest, discount, and labor performed on high- 
way transferred, and tools and materials 
sold 58,379 16 



Total cost not including interest . 1802,193 50 
Interest and discount to Dec, 31, 

1879 .... 8236,212 51 

Interest for 1880 .... 36,207 00 



Total interest and discount 

to Dec. 31, 1880 . . 1272,419 51 

Amount paid toward interest in 

1877 $24,000 00 

Amount paid toward interest in 

1878 26,000 00 

Amount paid toward interest in 

1879 30,000 00 

Amount paid toward interest in 

1880 35,000 00 



$115,000 00 



65 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water- works : — 

1872, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 1573 61 

1873, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 177 07 

1873, accrued interest on 

water bonds sold . 193 26 

1873, accrued interest on 

state bonds sold . 146 00 

1873, water rents . . 1,920 53 

1874, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 607 89 

March 12, 1874, highway expendi- 
tures trans, from 
water account . 14,000 53 

March 17, 1874, interest and dis- 
count trans, from 
water account . 12,347 25 

Sept. 1, 1874, interest and dis- 
count trans, from 
water account . 22,361 74 

1874, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 30,233 54 

Dec. 29, 1874, interest transferred 4,566 25 

Dec. 18, 1875, 1 anvil sold . . 15 00 
Sept. 25, 1876, engine, crusher, 

and material sold . 2,089 45 

1875, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 27,119 15 

May 20, 1876, derrick sold . . 125 00 

May 20, 1876, rent of derrick . 24 00 

1876, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 38,879 47 . 

5 



66 



1877, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 43,823 30 

1878, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 48,873 26 

1878, old plow sold . 1 00 

1879, derrick sold . . 75 00 

1879, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 53,068 17 

1880, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 57,395 25 

sale of grass . . . 10 00 

level, transit, etc. . . 250 00 



Total §5358,875 72 

Amount appropriated to Dec. 31, 1880 . . 640,000 00 



Total received to date . . . .1998,875 72 
Deduct bills approved to date .... 860,572 66 



$138,303 06 
Amount paid toward interest to Dec. 31, 18>^0 115,000 00 



Balance on hand Dec. 81, 1880 . . $23,303 06 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



AUDITOE^S EEPOET. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the City 
of Manchester. 

Gentlemen, — I hereby certify that I have examined the 
books of account in the office of Superintendent of Water- 
Works, for the year ending December 31, 1880, and find 
them correct. They show the total receipts for the year to 
be fifty-seven thousand six hundred fifty-five dollars and 
twenty-five cents ($57,655.25), and appropriate vouchers 
show that that sum has been paid to the City Treasurer. 
Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

Auditor. 
Manchester, Jan. 13, 1881. 



68 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 

Statement showing the uses of water as supplied to 
Dec. 31,1880: — 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 


1 Jail. 


1 Orphanage. 


9 Churches. 


1 Post-office. 


1 Court-house. 


1 City Library. 


2 Hose-companies. 


5 Banks. 


4 Fire-engines. 


5 Hotels. 


1 Hook-and-ladder. 


1 Masonic Hall. 


2 Opera-houses. 


1 Odd Fellows' Hall. 


1 Music Hall. 


1 Holly-tree Inn. 


1 Convent. 


3 Halls. 


1 City Hospital. 


14 School-houses. 


1 Old Ladies' Home. 


1 Skating-rink. 


1 Soldiers' Monument. 


1 Battery-building. 


MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 


1 Iron foundry. 


1 Brass and copper foundry 


2 Dye-houses. 


2 Sash and blind shops. 


2 Machine-shops. 


4 Breweries. 


6 Clothing-manufactori 


es, 2 Shoe-shops. 


1 Harness-shop. 


1 Pop-corn. 


1 Brush-shop. 


1 Gas-works. 


1 Roll-shop. 


2 Slaughter-houses. 


1 Carriage-shop. 


1 Soap-manufactory. 




MARKETS. 


4 Fish. 


6 Meat and fish. 


2 Meat. 






OFFICES. 


6 Dentists. 


2 Express. 


1 Telephone. 


5 Printing. 



69 



1 Telegraph. 
1 Gas. 



15 Barber. 

1 Wheelwright. 
7 Blacksmith. 

2 Carpenter. 
1 Tinsmith. 



1 Coal. 



SHOPS. 



2 Currying. 

4 Plumber, gas and water 

pipe. 
6 Paint. 
1 Gunsmith. 



STABLES. 

182 Private. 6 Livery. 

1 Horse-railroad stable. 

SALOONS. 



8 Dining. 




39 Liquor. 


3 Billiard. 








STORES. 


4 Auction. 




54 Grocery. 


14 Drug. 




2 Meal. 


6 Jewelry. 




3 Hardware. 


1 Fur. 




12 Boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing 


goods. 


6 Stove. 


15 Fancy goods. 




10 Gents' furnishing goods. 


1 Wholesale paper. 




6 Book. 


12 Dry goods. 




1 Leather and shoe finders, 


4 Candy. 




2 Music. 


1 Crockery. 




1 Upholstery. 


1 Cloak. 




4 Undertakers. 


8 Millinery. 




4 Cigar. 


1 Tea. 




1 Sewing-machine. 


2 Furniture. 




1 Feather-cleaner. 




MISCELLANEOUS. 


1 Club-room. 




3 Greenhouses. 



70 



2 Bleacheries. 

7 Laundries. 
2 Ice-houses. 

8 Photographers. 

4318 Families. 

6Q Boarding-houses. 
6347 Faucets. 

695 Wash-bowls. 

674 Water-closets. 

220 Wash-tubs. 

256 Bath-tubs. 



1 Band-room. 

7 Bakeries. 

I Waste. 

FIXTURES. 

95 Urinals. 
307 Fire hydrants. 
8 Stand-pipes. 

II Water-troughs. 
562 Horses. 

29 Cattle. 



71 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 



PIPE. 

641 ft. 14 in. pipe. 
240 ft. 12 in. flange pipe. 
1063 ft. 8 in. pipe. 
4 in. pipe. 



757 ft. 20 in. pipe. 

856 ft. 12 in. pipe. 
1764 ft. 10 in. pipe. 
2160 ft. 6 in. pipe. 504 ft 

31| ft. 8 in. wrought-iron pipe. 

BRANCHES. 

1 double 6 on 14. 1 double 6 on 12. 

6 double 6 on 10. 1 double 10 on 12. 

1 double 8 on 8 1 double 4 on 6. 



2 single 12 on 14. 
1 single 6 on 14. 

3 single 6 on 8. 

1 single 12 on 12. 

2 single 6 on 20. 



1 4 in. Eddy spigot. 

1 6 in. Ludlow spigot. 

2 8 in. Boston Machine 
spigot (out of order), 

1 10 in. Boston 
spigot. 



1 single 6 on 12. 

2 single 6 on 10. 
4 single 6 on 6. 
2 single 6 on 14. 



GATES. 

1 6 in. Eddy hub. 

3 6 in. Boston Machine spigot 

(out of order). 
1 8 in. Eddy hub. 

Boston Machine 



Machine 2 12 in 

spigot. 



1 8 in. 1-4 bend. 

1 12 in. 1-8 bend. 

2 hydrants. 



BENDS. 

5 6 inch 1-8 bend. 

1 8 X 12 in. reducer. 

HYDRANTS. 

2 hydrant foot pieces. 



72 



SUPPLIES AND TOOLS ON HAND AT COURT-HOUSE. 



35 ft. 2 inch pipe. 

47 It. 1 1-2 inch pipe. 
376 ft. 1 1-4 inch pipe. 
883 ft. 3-4 inch pipe. 

90 ft. 1-2 inch pipe. 

45 ft. 1-4 inch pipe. 

12 stop boxes. 

16 2 inch couplings. 
71 1-4 inch couplings. 

6 1-4 in. couplings R. <fe L. 
29 3-4 inch couplings. 
42 1 in. couplings R. & L. 
10 1 1-4 X 1 in. couplings. 
76 3-4 inch couplings. 
83 3-4 in. couplings R. & L. 
32 i-2 inch couplings. 

24 1-2 inch couplings. 

4 3-4 X 1-2 in. couplings. 
9 2 inch ells. 

6 1 1-2 inch ells. 

25 1 X 3-4 inch ells. 

5 1 inch ells. 
21 3-4 inch ells. 

23 3-4 X 1-2 inch ells. 

17 1-2 inch ells. 

6 1 1-2 X 1 inch old lead 
connections. 

6 1 X 3-4 inch old lead 
connections. 
27 3-4 inch new lead con- 
nections. 

5 1 X 3-4 inch new lead 
connections. 



3 14 inch cement plugs. 
2 12 inch cast-iron plugs. 
1 20 inch gate-dome. 

1 15 inch gate-dome. 

2 10 inch gate-dome. 

7 1 inch Corp. stops (for 
cast-irori pipe). 

19 3-4 inch corp. stops (for 
cast-iron pipe). 

45 1-2 in. Corp. stops (for 
cast-iron pipe). 

20 1-2 in. soldering cocks 
(cast-iron pipe). 

3 1 inch solder unions. 
15 3-4 inch solder unions. 

9 1-2 in. nipples (for con- 
nections). 

3 1-2 inch unions. 
6 solder nipples. 

21 1 inch solder nipples. 
83 3-4 inch solder nipples. 

108 1-2 inch unions (for con- 
nections). 
44 1 inch curb stops. 
49 3-4 inch curb stops. 

4 1 inch unions (for me- 
ters). 

12 3-4 inch unions (for me- 
ters) . 
27 1-2 inch unions (for me- 
ters) . 
3 1 inch meter nipples. 
7 3-4 inch meter nipples. 



73 



2 11-4x1 inch new lead 


17 1-2 inch union nuts. 


connections. 


1 1 1-2 in. union brass cock 


1 1 inch new lead connec- 


1 1 1-2 inch union. 


tion. 


1 1 inch brass union. 


11x3-4 inch new lead 


2 3-4 inch stop and waste. 


connection. 


1 2 inch Chapman valve. 


1 3-4 X 1-2 inch new lead 


1 1-2 inch Chapman valve 


connection. 


1 1 inch Chapman valve. 


6 1 inch crosses. 


159 brass meter nuts. 


12 3-4 inch crosses. 


6 balls of wicking. 


17 3-4 inch dies. 


30 1-2 inch washers. 


22 1-2 inch dies. 


1 20 inch brass spindle. 


12 1x3-4 inch dies. 


1 14 inch brass spindle. 


7 2 inch nipples. 


8 6 inch brass spindles. 


7 1 1-2 inch nipples. 


3 solder coppers and pot. 


6 1 1-4 inch nipples. 


5 red lanterns. 


17 1 inch nipples. 


6 common lanterns. 


54 3-4 inch nipples. 


1 dark lantern. 


46 1-2 inch nipples. 


2 meter lanterns. 


82 3-4 inch nipples. 


1 reflector lantern. 


13 1-2 inch nipples. 


1 coil tin pipe. 


3 1 1-2 inch iron unions. 


1 coil lead pipe. 


3 1 1-4 inch iron unions. 


165 pounds 3-4 inch pipe. 


8 1 inch iron unions. 


133 pounds 1 1-4 inch pipe. 


7 8-4 inch iron unions. 


1 washer cutter. 


7 1-2 inch iron unions. 


1 die plate. 


56 3-4 inch caps. 


6 dies R. <fe L. 1-2 to 1 in. 


6 1-2 inch caps. 


6 taps R. & L. 1-2 to 1 inch, 


2 1 1-2 X 1 1-4 in. bushings. 


2 bushings 1-2 to 3-4 inch, 


2 11-4x1 inch bushings. 


2 pipe cutters. 


8 1 X 3-4 inch bushings. 


1 die plate, 4 bushings. 


25 3-4 X 1-2 inch bushings. 


5 dies 1-2 to 1-8 inch. 


82 6 in. clamps 1-2 in. stop. 


3 files. 


7 8 in. clamps 3-4 in. stop. 


1 coal hod. 



74 



5 8 in. clamps 1-2 in. stop. 

5 6 in. clamps 3-4 in. stop. 

1 12 in. clamp 3-4 in. stop. 

5 12 in. clamps 1-2 in. stop. 
1 foreplane. 

1 smoothing plane. 

1 mallet. 

2 hand saws. 
2 buck saws. 
1 iron saw. 

1 brace and 5 bits. 

1 extension bit. 

1 bevel square. 

2 iron squares. 

1 grindstone. 

2 axes. 

1 oil stone. 

1 long cable chain. 

25 blasting tubes. 
32 R. P. shovels. 

1 iron snow-shovel. 

2 wooden shovels. 

26 picks and handles. 

3 drills, 4 ft. 4 in. long. 
2 4 feet drills. 

1 drill, 3 ft. 9 in. long. 

2 drills, 3 feet long. 

6 drills, 2 ft. 6 in. long. 
2 drills, 2 ft. 8 in. long. 
6 drills, 2 feet long. 

5 drills, 1 ft. 8 in. long. 

6 plug drills, 8 feet long. 
2 set blocks. 

6 iron bars. 



17 large meter boxes. 
13 small meter boxes. 
1 wood stove. 

1 glass cutter. 

2 gallons kerosene oil. 

7 square-top box covers. 

4 2 quart oil-cans. 
2 quarts sperm oil. 

1 3 feet cubic measure. 

1 platibrm scale. 

2 wood saws. 
2 vises. 

1-2 side leather. 

1 pair rubber mitts. 

2 collars for hydrants. 
1 spoon shovel. 

5 long shovels. 

6 hydrant nuts. 
6 tamping tools. 

6 hydrant packings. 
1 iron kettle. 
1 bushel basket. 

6 hydrant covers. 

1 iron brand, M. W. W. 
1 steel stamp, M. W. W. 

7 hydrant caps. 
15 gate wrenches. 

8 hydrant wrenches. 

1 wheelbarrow. 

2 furnaces and kettles. 

2 tool boxes. 

3 paving hammers. 
6 cold chisels. 

1 3 gallon can. 



76 



190 pounds gasket. 
1477 pounds pig lead. 
16 iron pails. 
1 iron jack for drilling. 

1 sledge hammer. 

3 calking hammers. 
8 striking hammers. 

8 calking tools. 

9 6 in. brass curb covers. 
12 gate covers. 

5 barrels pipe clay. 

4 20 in. sleeves (clamp). 
9 14 in. sleeves (clamp). 

2 14 inch solid sleeves. 

8 12 in. sleeves (clamp), 

5 10 in. sleeves (clamp). 

4 10 inch solid sleeves. 

8 8 inch sleeves (clamp). 

1 8 inch solid sleeve. 

5 6 in. sleeves (clamp). 

6 6 inch solid sleeves. 
4 4 incli solid sleeves. 

2 6 inch caps. 
1 iron rake. 

1 cap and stop cock for 

hydrant. 
1 lot wood packings. 
1 lot meter packings. 

7 torches. 

1 bench block. 

1 foot lathe and tools. 

1 hydrant brush. 

1 pair tongs for hydrant. 

6 spoons for drilling. 



1 large furnace and irons. 

1 lot rope. 

1 bench. 

1 wire cutter. 

1 roll of enamel cloth. 

1 chain for hydrants. 

3 hydrant wrenches. 

1 hydrant ring for rods. 

2 iron rimraers. 
1 ice chisel. 

7 stop wrenches. 
10 hydrant valves (iron). 

1 pair chain tongs. 

4 pairs extension tongs. 

2 pipe wrenches. 

2 meter wrenches. 

4 monkey wrenches. 

1 pair blacksmith tongs. 

2 ratchet drillers and 6 
drills. 

2 drill machines and tools. 

1 chain pulley. 

1 machine hammer. 

1 nail hammer. 

2 iron wedges. 
1 draw knife. 

1 lot of old picks. 

2 pole derricks and 3 poles. 
6 cold chisels for cast iron. 
2 mauls. 

1 tool chest. 

2 screw drivers. 

5 mortise chisels. 
10 moulding tools. 



76 



9 hydrant boxes. 
15 hydrant rods. 

3 paint pails. 

5 pounds nails. 

2 chains. 

1-2 cord wood. 

4 large paint brushes. 
1 painter's dust brush. 
1 stop-cock punch. 

1 meter tank with gauge. 
38 pounds waste. 
11 pounds hemp packing. 

1 shop desk. 

1 iron sink. 

2 gross No. 9 screws. • 
1 hose nozzle. 

1 ladder. 
150 3-4 inch bolts. 



1 long and short jointer. 
1 set derrick irons. 
60 1-2 inch bolts. 
1 iron stand for furnace. 

1 die wrench. 

2 hydrant packing wrenches 
5 cans of Royal Enamel. 

1 stone-hammer. 

1 keg F. F. powder. 

1 reel of fuse. 

1 anvil. 

1 anvil stake and chisel. 

1 pair stone hooks. 

1 stone chain. 

1 lot coal. 

2 bars round iron. 
2 wedges. 



METERS. 



6 5-8 in. Union rotary. 

1 3-4 in. Union rotary. 

4 5-8 in. Union piston. 

1 1 in. Union piston. 

2 8-4 in. Union piston. 



2 1 in. Desper. 

1 3-4 in. Desper. 

1 3-4 in. Worthington. 

9 5-8 in. Gem. 

1 3-4 in. Gem. 



INVENTORY OP FURNITURE, ETC., IN OFFICE. 



6 drawing boards. 
1 wardrobe. 
1 copying press. 
1 roll tracing-paper. 
1 drawing table. 

1 library desk. 

2 waste baskets. 



1 book-case. 

1 table. 

1 twelve in. pressure-gauge. 

1 six in. pressure-gauge. 

1 bill stamp. 

3 inkstands. 

1 lot drawings. 



77 



1 six-foot pole. 

3 stools. 

1 duster. 

1 map of city. 

1 map of city, framed. 

1 map of New Hampshire. 

1 roll mounted paper. 

2 quires drawing paper. 
1 lot of book paper. 

1 lot of fuel. 



1 plan Massabesic Lake. 

1 safe. 

1 pair scissors. 

1 cork-screw. 

1 bottle ink. 

1 case drawers. 

1 stove. 

2 erasers. 

1 lot reports. 
1 directory. 



INVENTORY OP TOOLS AT THE PUMPING STATION. 



1 scoop-shovel. 

4 common shovels. 
1 desk. 

1 one-inch auger. 

5 lanterns. 

3 monkey-wrenches. 
1 square. 

1 plumb square. 
1 sprinkler-pot. 
1 clock. 

1 washer cutter. 

2 planes. 

2 thermometers. 

4 crow-bars. 

1 bellows and anvil. 

2 pipe wrenches. 
1 window brush. 
1 gate wrench. 

1 long key. 

1 hydrant wrench. 

2 wheelbarrows. 
1 five-pail kettle. 



2 axes. 

4 oil cans. 

. 2 oil tanks. 
100 pounds waste. 

12 pounds tallow. 

60 pounds black lead. 

5 cords wood. 
1'? tons coal. 

2 ice chisels. 
2 cold chisels. 
2 wood chisels. 

2 hammers. 

3 drip pans. 

6 pounds hemp packing. 

1 draw shave. 

2 screw plates, tap and dies 
1 vise. 

200 feet 7-8 in. hose. 
100 feet 3-4 in. hose. 

1 iron rake. 

2 set dog chains. 

1 set blacksmith's tools. 



78 



3 picks. 

1 clothes drier. 

2 ladders. 
2 stoves. 

2 coal hods. 

1 coal sifter. 

2 gallons sperm oil. 

1 bench. 

2 levels. 

1 waste press. 

1 Scotch driller. 

2 nozzles. 

1 pair shears. 

1 pair pliers, 

1 wire cutter. 

1 boat. 

1 set steps. 

1-2 barrel oil. 

1 jack screw. 

1 brace and six bits. 

1 trowel. 

2 wood saws. 
2 hand saws. 

1 iron slush bucket. 

1 socket wrench. 
6 fork wrenches. 

2 screen rakes. 



2 pieces Scotch sewer pipe. 
1 force pump. 

1 bill hook. 
1 clevis and pin. 
1 harrow. 
1 timber roll. 
4 sprinkling pots. 
1 lot lumber. 
1 lot old iron. 

3 oil barrels. 

4 mortar hoes. 
1 iron shovel. 

150 feet hose. 

1 No. plow. 
3 grub hoes. 

3 bush scythes and snaths. 

2 axes. 

1 bellows. 

4 water-pails. 
10 mason hods. 

1 lot of old wheelbarrows. 

1 lot of old shovels. 

1 20-inch gate. 

1 set blocks and fall. 

1 bench brush. 

1 broom brush. 

1 broom. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



REPORT 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



To His Honor the Mayor, the Aldermen, mid the Common 
Council of the City of Manchester. 

Gentlemen, — The Committee on Cemeteries, in compli- 
ance with law, herewith submit their annual report of their 
doings for the year 18S0. At the annual meeting of the 
committee we appointed two sub-committees, consisting of 
three members each, whom we authorized to take entire 
charge of the Valley and Pine Grove Cemeteries during 
the year. We herewith present the reports of said sub- 
committees for a statement in detail of their proceedings 
pertaining to said cemeteries respectively, together with the 
annual report of the treasurer of the committee. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Committee on Valley Cemetery would present 
the following statement for 1880 : — 

At a meeting of the general committee early in the 
spring, it was voted to authorize your committee to intro- 
duce city water into the Valley at a cost not exceeding two 
hundred dollars. After receiving proposals from the va- 



82 



rious plumbers of the city, the contract was awarded to 
Messrs. J. S. Bacheler & Co., their price being the lowest. 
The water was taken from Willow street into the southwest 
corner of the grounds, up the first avenue two hundred and 
twenty-six feet, thence north and east until it was brought 
to Cemetery Cottage, the whole distance being one thousand 
feet. There are four discharge pipes with self-closing fau- 
cets. One-inch pipe was used for the first six Imndred feet, 
and the remaining four hundred feet three-fourths inch, 
thus affording an abundant supply of fresh water on the 
east and south sides of the Valley, giving lot-owners an 
opportunity to beautify and adorn their grounds. 



Cash balance reported last year 


166 15 


Tomb fees, 1879-80 


116 50 


Appropriation .... 


. 1,000 00 


Transfer 


. 1,500 00 




$2,682 65 


Expenditures. 




Care of grounds .... 


. 1494 92 


New fence ..... 


. 1,105 00 


Introduction of water 


204 35 


Incidentals ..... 


48 62 


Cash on hand 


829 76 



$2,682 65 

Later in the season a transfer of $1,500 was made, in- 
creasing the funds of the committee in order tliat the usual 
amount of fence could be built. Immediately a contract was 
made with Mr. A. H. Lowell for 365 feet of iron fence at 
$2.75 per foot. The stone posts were also furnished and 
set by Mr. Lowell. 



83 



The lateness of the season has prevented the full comple- 
tion of the work, and the sum of S52.50 will be due him 
when his contract is finished. 

Mr. A. H. Hartshorn has had the care of the grounds, as 
usual. 

Thus your committee have endeavored to meet the de- 
mands of the Valley as best they could with the means at 
their disposal. 

H. R. PETTEE, 
A. H. DANIELS, 
J. F. JAMES, 

tSub- Committee. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Committee on Pine Grove Cemetery, as usual, 
submit a brief report of the operations of the year, viz. : — 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand as per last report . . . $779 87 

Appropriation ...... 1,000 00 

For wood, etc. 538 16 

Receipts from sales of lots .... 1,294 89 



Expenditures. 

A. H. Lowell for iron fence as per contract 
Grading ...... 

Other permanent improvements 
Care of grounds, including winter service 
Jacob F. James, surveys and laying out lots 
Joseph B. Sawyer, plan of cemetery 
Incidentals ...... 

Cash on hand to balance .... 



13,612 92 


$1,581 


00 


. ~ 272 


60 


219 


21 


580 


87 


83 


15 


20 


50 


25 


27 


830 


32 



,612 92 



84 

From the foregoing summary it will be seen that more 
than five-sevenths of the expenditures during the past 
year have been for permanent improvements. Of this 
sum nearly sixteen hundred dollars were applied in the 
erection of an iron gateway and the extension of the 
iron fence on the west and northern sides of the grounds. 
In all we have liuilt, during the season, six hundred and 
sixty feet of fence. 

During the year about one hundred lots have been laid 
out, in size and locality to meet the public wants. The 
demand for lots is increasing yearly, and frOm present indi- 
cations it will not be a great while before the most eligible 
will be secured by parties who cannot obtain what they 
desire in the Valley Cemetery. Within a year or two there 
have been many calls for lots lying in the northeasterly 
direction from the tool-house. The location is certainly 
desirable, and when purchasers, with the necessary means, 
shall have expended their money liberally in fitting them 
up, with an eye to permanency and taste, this part of Pine 
Grove will become one of the most attractive localities in 
the entire grounds. 

The tiers of lots in the northwest corner, which were 
originally laid out and appropriated to common interments, 
are now nearly all occupied, and cannot be increased with- 
out trenching upon the large and valuable lots in the vicin- 
ity. In this extremity, and to meet the wishes of many 
who take a deep interest in the Pine Grove Cemetery, the 
committee, after much consultation on the subject, caused 
the space in the southeast corner of the grounds to be set 
aside for common interments, and laid out lots accordingly. 
Some of these lots are already occupied. 

Notwithstanding the great drouth of the year, there has 
been a fair supply of water from the running spring on the 
side-hill, east of the old road. Of the elm and maple trees 



85 

that have been set out during the past two or three years, 
but very few have been lost. The superintendent has kept 
them well watered, and as a result they have lived even in 
the dry and sandy soil, and made good growth. 

In this connection it is proper to say that there is a grow- 
ing feeling, not only against pine trees in cemeteries, but 
against all shade trees. The shade, in connection with the 
juices and coloring matter that come from the leaves, soon 
destroys the beauty of stone and marble and renders the 
finest works of art unsightly, if not repulsive, to the eye of 
correct taste. Where this subject has received proper at- 
tention, trees are prohibited in cemeteries ; while shrub- 
bery, rose-bushes, and flowers are substituted in great 
abundance. It is worth while to consider whether this new 
policy in the management of grounds appropriated to the 
dead should not find favor and adoption among the people 
of our own city. 

During the year the owners of lots have taken a deep 
interest in their adornment. Many fine specimens of work 
have been added, reflecting credit on the taste and skill of 
the proprietors and artisans. 

In closing we repeat the suggestion heretofore made, that 
the receipts for the sale of lots should not be expended for 
current expenses ; but kept, in some degree at least, intact 
for the future care and protection of the grounds. Current 
expenses should be paid from annual appropriations. 
Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH KIDDER, 
S. B. PUTNAM, 
J. B. CHASE, 

buh- Committee. 



TEEASUEER^S EEPOET. 



To the Oommittee on Cemeteries. 

Gentlemen. — I herewith submit to you my seventh an- 
nual report of all money received and paid during the year 
ending December 31, 1880, on account of the cemeteries. 
I have paid to the city treasurer all the money I have 
received, and all the bills of expenditures have passed 
through the committee on accounts, and been paid by said 
city treasurer, an account of which will be found in detail 
elsewhere in the financial city report for the year 1880. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Received cash for fifty-five lots sold in Pine 

Grove Cemetery, year ending Dec. 31, 1880. |1,294 89 
Cash paid H. R. Chamberlin, city treasurer . 1,294 89 

I now have in my hands twenty-eight deeds of lots sold, 
some of which should have been paid for more than two and 
three years ago. I shall make earnest efforts to collect the 
pay for these lots. 

There have not been sold any lots in the Valley Cemetery 

during the past year. 

J. F. JAMES, 

Treasurer. 
December 31, 1880. 



Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1880. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of the 
treasurer of the Pine Grove Cemetery, on pages 92, 93, and 
94, and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched 
to the amount of 81,294.89. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



HORATIO FRADD, Chairman, 
S. B. PUTNAM, Clerk, 
J. F. JAMES. Treasurer, 
J. B. CHASE, 
HOLMES R. PETTEE, 
CHAS. E. BALCH, 
A. H. DANIELS, 
JOSEPH KIDDER, 

Committee on Cemeteries. 



EEPOET 

OF THE 

TKUSTEES OF THE CEMETEEY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester. 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund, ap- 
pointed by virtue of an ordinance passed Aug. 6, 1879, have 
the honor to present herewith their first annual report, as 
required by said ordinance. 

They met on the thirtieth day of September last, and 
organized by the choice of James A. Weston, chairman, 
and Nathan P. Kidder, clerk. Up to the present time 
only one donation has come into their hands. This has 
been invested, as far as possible, as will be seen by the 
accompanying statement of the treasurer. 

The trustees have reason to believe that this fund, now 
so insignificant in amount, is soon to be materially in- 
creased ; and eventually, when its object and the provis- 
ions relating to its management are better known and 
understood, it will become a large and important auxiliary 
in the government of our cemeteries. 
Respectfully submitted. 

JAMBS A. WESTON, Chairman, 
JOHN L. KELLY, 
P. C. CHENEY, 

Trustees of the Cemetery Fund. 
Jan. 1, 1881. 



EEPOET 



CITY SOLICITOE. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester. 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor herewith to submit the 
annual report of the law department of the city govern- 
ment. 

The following actions are now pending in the supreme 
court of Hillsborough County : — 

1. — David S. McKay vs. the City. 

The plaintiff claims damages to the amount of jfive thou- 
sand dollars, on account of injuries received Feb. 22, 1878, 
by falling into a cellar-way on Spruce street. 

2. — Frank Clement vs. the City. 

This action is brought to recover damages for personal 
injuries, caused, as plaintiff claims, by being thrown from 
his sled on account of defect in highway near the " Blue 
Store" in Piscataquog. Damages claimed, $1,000. 

3. — Catherine Cunningham vs. the City. 

The plaintiff claims that she sustained a severe injury to 
her ankle by falling on the sidewalk in front of No. 91 
Central street. Damages claimed, $1,000, 



92 
4. — George A. Crosby vs. the City. 

This is an action to recover damages for injuries to 
plaintiff's carriage received while crossing the horse-rail- 
road track March 10, 1879. 

In this action the railroad has been summoned to appear 
and defend. Damages claimed, $1,000. 

5. — James Connelly vs. the City. 

The plaintiff claims that he slipped upon the ice on Elm 

street Nov. 4, 1879, and sustained severe injuries to his 
arm. Damages claimed, $2,000. 

6. — Ann Shehan vs. the City. 

Action to recover damages for injuries to person caused 
by slipping on the ice Jan. 1, 1877, opposite Front's block 
on Central street. This cause was tried at the last Janu- 
ary term, and a verdict rendered for the city, and is now 
brought forward for review. Damages claimed, $500. 

7. — Hans J. Rosenberg vs. thp: City. 

Claim for injuries to person caused by falling through 
the sidewalk into an excavation in front of the building of 
the late Isaac Riddle, on Lowell street. Damages claimed, 

$4,000. 

8. — John Conway vs. the City. 

Action for damages for injuries to person caused by fall- 
ing into cellar-way on Manchester street opposite Straw 
block. 

This action has been tried before Hon. William M. Chase 
of Concord, and will be disposed of early in the next term 
of court. Hannah F. Straw has been notified to appear 
and defend. Damages claimed, $100. 



93 

9. — Sarah F. McQurstion vs. the City. 

This is an action of trespass to recover damages for the 
removal of stone from the side of the street in front of her 
land, near the city reservoir, and, as she claims, tearing 
down and carrying away a portion of her wall. 

The action has been tried before Hon. William L. Foster, 
and a report will be snbmitted at the January term of court. 
Damages claimed, -flUO. 

10. — Daniel K. Mack vs. the City. 

This is a petition for assessment of damages caused by 
improvements in the street in front of plaintiff's residence. 

Tlie cause has been referred to the county commissioners 
(William T. Parker being appointed by the court to act in 
the place of H. B. Putnam). Two days have been appointed 
for a hearing, but for good reasons it has not yet been heard 
but will be soon. 

11. — City op Manchester vs. County op Hillsborough. 

This is a claim of the city against the county for repairs 
made to the court-room, and the question of the liability 
of the county has been transferred to the law term of the 
supreme court, and will probably be determined at the 
March term of said court. 

12. — Fbanklin-street Society vs. the City. 

This is a petition for the abatement of taxes. The action 
has been transferred for the determination of the question 
of the constitutionality of the law of 1879 taxing church 
property. A decision will not be reached until March 
next. 

13. — Manchester Mills vs. the City. 

This is a petition for the abatement of taxes, the corpora- 



94 

tion claiming that their property has been largely over- 
valued by the assessors. 

14. — George G. Griffin vs. the CiTr. 

This action, mentioned in my last report, is the only suit 
pending in any other county than Hillsborough. 

As the courts in that county have been holden by a jus- 
tice resident in Manchester, no progress has been made 
during the year. 

15. — Daniel Farmer vs. the City. 

Tins is an action to recover damages for flowage of plain- 
tifFs land by water from the street, and is the only action 
returnable at the January term of court. 

At the date of my last report there were pending twenty- 
four actions. Thirteen of those cases have been disposed 
of in the following manner. In the suits, Patrick Mc- 
Bride, Annie Shehan, Catherine McGuinness, John Mc- 
Guinness, and Michael Lavery vs. the City, there were jury 
trials at the last January term of court, and in each case 
a verdict favorable to the city was obtained. The suits of 
Charles R. Morrison, William Whittle, and Sophia T. 
Jones were entered " neither party." The suits of Mary 
A. Gould, Timothy Hayes, Samuel Hayes, Idella A. Mar- 
tin, and David A. Bunton were referred, and, as will be 
seen by the city treasurer's report, small sums were 
allowed against the city, amounting in all to less than a 
thousand dollars. 

The action brought by the City vs. Alfred Quimby, to 
recover the amount paid in the action Varney vs. the City, 
has been pressed to a successful termination, and Novem- 
ber 1st the defendant paid the execution, amounting to 
13,632.57, which I have paid into the city treasury. 



95 

Your attention will probably be called, in reading the 
city treasurer's report, to the payment, during the past 
year, to Messrs. Sulloway and Toplitf, of a bill amounting 
to more than a thousand dollars for legal services. To 
prevent any misapprehension, and in justice to myself, I 
consider it my duty to make this explanation. Their 
bill was for services rendered during the past five years^ 
and every item was for services rendered in cases where 
they were retained before I was elected city solicitor. 

Upon examining this and my previous reports, you will 
observe that a very large majority of the suits against the 
city are brought to recover damages for personal injuries 
caused by defective streets ; it seems to me that the police- 
men in all parts of the city should be specially instructed to 
promptly report to the mayor any defect or obstruction 
upon their respective beats, as often the timely expendi- 
ture of a few dollars would save an after expense of hun- 
dreds or thousands. During the time I have been your 
solicitor, I have attended nearly every meeting of the joint 
standing committee on claims, and my advice has always 
been to promptly adjust all claims which were just and 
equitable, and fight all others to the bitter end ; and I am 
happy to say that the committee has always fully agreed 
with me and acted accordingly. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM R. PATTEN, 

City Solicitor. 
Ma^jchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1880. 



R E P O E T 



OF THE 



TEUSTEES OE THE CITY LIBRARY. 



AISTNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester. 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith submit their 
twenty-seventh animal report of the affairs of the library, 
to which is appended the report of the treasurer of the 
board, showing the expenditures made for books and peri- 
odicals, and also the report of the librarian, which shows 
in detail the operation of the library during the past year 
and the condition of the library and other property under 
her charge at the close of the year. 

From the report of the treasurer it appears that there 
has been expended for the purchase of books the sum of 
fourteen hundred thirty-four dollars and eighty-two cents, 
and for the purchase of periodicals the sum of one hundred 
and fifty-six dollars and four cents, being a total expendi- 
ture for these purposes of fifteen hundred and ninety dol- 
lars and eighty-six cents, and leaving a balance in the 
hands of the treasurer at the close of the year of seven 
hundred and twenty-five dollars and sixty-three cents. 

Of the amount expended for the purchase of books, one 
hundred and sixteen dollars and sixty-nine cents were paid 
for books to replace those that had become so worn and 



100 

defaced as no longer to be fit for use, and consequently 
withdrawn from circulation. 

The balance above indicated, together with the accumu- 
lated income of the Dean fund, which now amounts to the 
sum of twenty-six hundred and forty-two dollars and sixty- 
seven cents, constitutes the funds now in the hands of the 
trustees applicable for the purchase of books for the in- 
crease of the library. 

The report of the librarian shows that the library has 
been open to the public three hundred and one days, and 
for the delivery of books two hundred and sixty-six days, 
during which latter time the number of books in circula- 
tion has been forty-five thousand one hundred and nine, an 
average of one hundred and seventy per day. In addition 
to the above number delivered for general circulation, seven 
thousand one hundred and twenty-eight books and maga- 
zines have been used in the reading-room, making the total 
number delivered during the year fifty-two thousand two 
hundred and thirty-seven. Of this number only eighteen 
are reported missing at tlie close of the year. There is 
no reason to doubt that most of these will eventually be 
returned to the library. The circulation of books for the 
past year has been considerably less than that of the year 
previous, the decrease doubtless being due, as the librarian 
suggests, to the adoption of the new system of delivering 
books, and to the requirement of the trustees that new 
guarantees be filed by all persons taking books from the 
library. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the 
last report was twenty-three thousand six hundred and 
seven. During the year there have been added by pur- 
chase five hundred and thirty-four volumes, by donation 
one hundred and forty-five, and ninety volumes of periodi- 
cals have been bound, making tJie number of bound vol- 



101 

umes now in the library twenty-two thousand seven hun- 
dred and fifty-eiglit, and the total number, including maps 
and pamphlets, twenty-four thousand three hundred and 
seventy-six. Fifty-five different periodicals have been reg- 
ularly received at the library during the year, and as soon 
as the volumes have become complete they have been 
bound and placed in general circulation. 

During the year ninety-one volumes have been with- 
drawn from circulation, having become so worn and de- 
faced from constant use as to be unfit for further service. 
Of this number and of those withdrawn from circulation in 
previous years for the same cause, one hundred and thirty- 
three have been replaced. It is thg intention of the trus- 
tees to supply the others as fast as they can be obtained, 
but many of them having been published some time ago 
are now out of print and not to be found on sale. 

Accompanying the report of the librarian is a list of books 
presented to the liln-ary daring the year ; and to those who 
have thus aided in the increase of the library, the trustees, 
in behalf of the city, tender their thanks. 

Early in the present year the trustees were notified by 
the executors of the will of the late David R. Leach of a 
bequest to the library of an oil portrait of the late Richard 
H. Ayer. In behalf of the city the trustees accepted the 
portrait, and directed that it be suspended upon the walls 
of the library. 

In their last report the trustees called attention to the 
inadequate accommodation afforded by the present library 
building for the accessions made to the library from time 
to time, and recommended that some action be taken by 
the city councils to meet the requirements of the library by 
an addition to or a change of the present building. 

The trustees were notified in the early part of the year 
that a resolution had been passed by the city councils 



102 

instructing the committee on lands and buildings, in con- 
junction with the trustees of the citj library, to procure 
plans and estimates for such change or addition to the 
library building as might be deemed necessary to accom- 
modate the increase of the library. A committee was 
chosen from the trustees to act with the committee on 
lands and buildings, and at a meeting of both committees 
the city engineer was employed to prepare the necessary 
plans and estimates. Near the close of the year the city 
engineer submitted a plan with estimates of costs for an 
addition to the present building, but the proposed addition 
did not meet the approval of the committee, and he was 
instructed to furnish another plan which is expected to be 
ready at an early day. At the request of the trustees the 
city councils have appropriated the sum of eight thousand 
dollars for the proposed addition, which will undoubtedly 
be sufficient for the purpose intended. 

The printing of the new supplement to the catalogue, 
containing the titles of the accessions to the library for the 
year 1879, has been finished, and the trustees have di- 
rected that a sufficient number of copies should be placed 
in the library for use there, and that copies might be sold 
to such persons as might desire them at cost. 

During the year the trustees became convinced that the 
method of delivering and charging books heretofore in use, 
was not adequate to the demands of the present size and 
circulation of the library, and the proper accommodation 
of the public. The regulation confining patrons to certain 
days, and allowing books to be exchanged but once a week, 
was a frequent cause of complaint. Then, too, the method 
of ascertaining what books were detained beyond the time 
limited in the regulations involved more time and labor 
than could be devoted to the object by the librarian consis- 
tent with the performance of her other duties. The trus- 



103 

tees, desiring to furnish the public with the best facilities for 
the use of the library, after examining the methods in use 
in other public libraries, abolished the old system, and 
adopted, with a few modifications, the slip system. The 
change went into operation after the semi-annual examina- 
tion of the library in July last. The system being new to 
the librarian as well as to the patrons of the library, 
there was a little friction at first in its operation, but as 
they became more familiar with its methods, this soon dis- 
appeared. We have no doubt that the public will be 
pleased with the new plan, for its simplicity and accommo- 
dation, and value it accordingly. So far as the trustees are 
aware, the change has proved entirely satisfactory. 

Taking advantage of the opportunity afforded by the 
change made, the trustees required new guarantees to be 
furnished by every one making use of the library. Many 
of the old guarantees that had been filed under the regula- 
tions were of doubtful value as security for the return of 
books, not a few of the guarantors having died, and many 
others having removed from the city. Indeed, some of the 
guarantees had not been changed since the establishment 
of the library, a period of twenty-six years. The librarian 
reports the number of new guarantees furnished in the last 
six months, since the change was made, as sixteen hundred 
and fifty-four. 

During the last half of the year Mr. Fred C. Foote lias 
been employed by the trustees as assistant to the librarian. 
More lucrative employment being offered, Mr. Foote, near 
the close of the year, tendered his resignation, the same to 
take effect December 31, which was accepted by the trus- 
tees. The vacancy thus occasioned has not yet been filled. 

The trustees desire to express their continued apprecia- 
tion and approval of the labors of the librarian, Mrs. M. J. 
Buncher, who has discharged the duties pertaining to her 



104 

office with the same fidelity as heretofore, and to the entire 
satisfaction of the public and the trustees. 

The expenses of the library for the coming year will 
probably be somewhat in excess of those of previous years, 
but the increased appropriation, already made by the city 
councils, will probably be sufficient to properly care for and 
preserve the valuable property intrusted to the trustees. 

In board of trustees, January 24, 1881, read and ap- 
proved, and ordered to be transmitted to the city councils. 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor. 
N. P. HUNT, Clerh. 



TEEASUEEE^S EEPOET. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library. 

The treasurer of the board makes the following report of 
the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds 
received by them on account of the City Library : — 



1880. 




Dr. 


Jan. 1. 


To balance of appropriation, etc., as 






per last report 


11,253 79 




cash of M. J. Buncher, balance 






of fines 


25 00 




cash of M. J. Buncher, catalogues 






sold 


34 20 




cash of M. J. Buncher, for books 






lost 


3 50 




appropriation for 1880 for pur- 






chase of books 


1,000 00 




balance of income of Dean fund . 


2,142 00 




income of Dean fund 


153 00 


July 2. 


income of Dean fund 

interest on accumulation of Dean 


153 00 




fund to July 1, 1880 


194 67 



.$4,959 16 



106 



1880. 



Cr. 



Jan. B. 

6. 

Feb. 10. 

17. 

March 5. 

Q 



April 



10. 
25. 

2. 
3. 
5. 

5. 

27, 
6. 

18. 

18. 
4. 

28. 
2. 

7. 
10. 

7. 
13. 

24. 

. 6. 

30. 

J., 

25. 
29. 



Nov. 8. 

9. 

10. 



May 

June 
July 

Aug. 

Sept. 
Oct. 



Paid Geo. H. Poller & Co., books 
N, E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Geo. H. Polley & Co.. books 
Lee and Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co.. periodicals 
Lee and Shepard, books 
Geo. H. Polley <fe Co.. books 
Lee and Shepard. books 
N. E. News Co.. periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee and Shepard, books 
Geo. H. Polley & Co., books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee and Shepard. books 
Lee and Shepard, books 
N. E. News Co.. periodicals 
"W. T. Stevens, books 
Geo. H. Polley & Co., books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee and Shepard, books 
Lee and Shepard, books 
Geo. H. Polley & Co.. period! 

cals . . . • 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee and Shepard. books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
J. A. Cline & Co., books 
Geo. H. Polley & Co., books 
J. N. McClintock. books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lee and Shepard, books 



3 $o6 


00 


10 


58 


13 


43 


11 


00 


87 


11 


12 


40 


85 


82 


12 


00 


138 


49 


4 


00 


10 


50 


84 


13 


24 


00 


10 


49 


60 


24 


54 


59 


14 46 


15 


00 


10 


00 


10 


52 


132 


91 


60 


14 


12 


00 


12 


79 


11 


61 


111 


16 


10 


90 


12 


00 


9 


00 


2 


00 


12 


35 


. . 26 


36 



107 



12. Everett Fletcher, books . 

22. Lee and Shepard, books 

30. Lee and Shepard, books 
Dec. 6. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

9. Lee and Shepard, books 

31. By balance of appropriation, etc. 
By income of Dean fund 



348 


00 


31 


87 


39 


58 


10 


01 


23 


92 


725 


63 


. 2,642 


67 



t,959 16 



The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the 
library for the year ending December 31, 1880, the items 
of which appear in detail in the annual report of the city, 
are as follows : — 

Gas 

Services of librarian 

Services of assistant to librarian 

Binding 

B.e-binding 

Insurance 

Fuel 

Water 

Printing 

Incidentals 



RECAPITULATION. 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1879 . 
Appropriation for 1880 . 
Transfer ...... 



$178 


40 


600 


00 


98 


25 


112 


08 


76 


12 


32 


50 


271 


15 


35 


00 


115 


50 


111 


23 


11,630 


23 


mo 


22 


. 2,500 


00 


100 


00 



J,660 22 



108 

Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000 00 
Incidental expenses . . . 1,630 23 
Balance, Dec. 31, 1880 ... 29 99 

82,660 22 

Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 



December 31, 1880. 
We have examined the above report and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOHN L. KELLY, 
WM. P. NEWELL, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 31, 1880. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of 
receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the treasurer of the trustees of the City Library, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBEAEIAN'S REPOET. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees. 

I respectfully submit to you the annual report of the con- 
dition of the library during the year ending December 31, 

1880 : — 



Whole number of volumes Dec. 31, 1879 . 

Accessions during the year : — 

By purchase .... 534 

Donated .... 145 

Periodicals bound ... 90 



Whole number of volumes at present : — 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets .... 1,603 

Bound volumes . . . 22,758 



Number of periodicals and papers regularly re- 
ceived ..... 
Number of days open to the public . 
Days open for the delivery of books 
Volumes in circulation during the time 
Average per day .... 
Largest number any one day, March 27 
Number of guarantees received the first six 
months ....... 



23,607 



769 



24,376 

55 
301 
266 
45,109 
170 
430 

202 



110 

Number received the last six months on the 

new books 1,654 

Whole number of books, magazines, etc., used 

in the reading-room ..... 7,128 

Average per day 24 

Number of persons using books on deposit . 16 

Number of postals sent for books overdue . 233 

Worn-out books and laid aside ... 91 

Replaced books ...... 133 

Number of worn-out books yet to be replaced . 100 

Number of books repaired at bindery . . 273 
Repaired and covered in the library the last 

six months . . . . . . 1,618 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1879 . . $25 00 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1880 60 78 



Amount paid for express, station- 
ery, and other incidental ex- 
penses 140 50 

Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . . 25 00 



$85 78 



65 50 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31. 1880 $20 28 

Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1879, for cata- 
logues sold and books lost . . . $37 70 
Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1880: — 
For 22 new catalogues at $1.00 . $22 00 
For 1 old catalogue at 60 cents 60 
For 2 lost books . • . . 2 04 



25 97 



$63 67 
37 70 


$25 97 
20 28 



111 

Waste paper . . . . . 1 38 

Paid N. P, Hunt, treasurer 



Balance received for fines 

Total balance on hand Dec. 31, 1880 . $46 25 

The number of books issued during the year is less by 
about eight thousand than last year. This is due to the 
change in our method of delivery, and to the fact of doing 
away with the old guarantees, and requiring each patron 
to bring a new voucher or renewing of the old. This 
change has necessarily caused an interruption in the circu- 
lation, but its acceptance by the public has been most 
cheerful, and the almost invariable expression has been one 
of satisfaction. We would add our own appreciation of it. 
Although it lias brought much additional work, it is more 
systematic and removes the cause for anxiety concerning 
books overdue, as it enables us at a glance to see the slip 
representing every absent book. 

At the July examination there were eighteen missing 
books ; seven of them have come in, leaving eleven still 
out. Of this number three are religious books, one his- 
tory, one phonography, one fiction, and five juvenile. 
Three lost books are yet to be paid for. 

The examination of the last six months has been made 
with the books in circulation, as with the new system of 
delivery came the new arrangement of closing the library 
but once a year. This method of examination was entirely 
new to us, and was made with much anxiety for the result. 
We have endeavored to make it a thorough one, but at 
present there are six books not yet accounted for. Four 



112 

of them are of the Brewer donation. All are books that 
have been in constant circulation (and in size are 16mo). 
They will doubtless come in. 

We have not been sanguine enough to Ijelieve we could 
go through the first six months of an entirely new system 
without blunders and some losses ; therefore we congratu- 
late ourselves that so few have been made, and shall hope 
to become so familiar with its working as to meet the 
expectations of the board of trustees, of an almost perfect 
system. 

We cannot say there has been any visible decrease in 
the call for works of fiction, but I would mention, as 
worthy of special notice, the steady increase in the demand 
for works of art, science, history, and travels, and the grati- 
fication expressed by the patrons for the liberal supply of 
such books the past year. 

Very respectfully, 

M. J. BUNCHER, 

Librarian. 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1880. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY 

From January 1, 1880, to December 31, 1880. 



A. B. Thompson, Secretary of State of New Hampshire. 
Three volumes, viz. : — 

Reports to the Legislature, June session, 1879. 

Jmirnal of Senate and House, June session, 1879. 

New Hampshire Laws, passed in June session, 1879. 
Hon. James F. Briggs, M. C. 

Thirty-three volumes of Congressional Documents, viz. : — 

Nine volumes of the Congressional Record of the first 
and second sessions, Kjth Congress. 

Twenty-four volumes, containing the President's Mes- 
sages and Reports of the Heads of Departments, 
viz. : — 

Report of the Secretary of the Interior of the Geology 
of the High Plateau of Utah (with atlas), J. W. 
Powell in charge. 

United States Geological and Geographical Survey of 
the Territories, P. V. Hayden in charge. 

Message and Documents of the 3d Session, 45th Con- 
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Annual Message of the President, Dec. 1, 1879, and 
Papers relating to the Foreign Relations of the 
United States. 

Message of the President at the commencement of the 



114 

2d Session of the 4<3tli Congress, with reports of 

Departments. 
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United States. 
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Report of the Secretary of the Navy at the beginning 

of the 2d Session of the 46th Congress. 
Report of the Fish Commissioner for 1877. 
Report of the Postmaster-General at the beginning of 

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Report of the Attorney-General of the United States 

for tlie year 1878. 
Report of the Silver Commission, Vol. 2, 1879. 
Finance Report for 1878. 
Report of the Committee on Coinage, Weights, and 

Measures, 1879. 
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Smithsonian Report for 1878. 
Official Gazetteer of the United States Patent Office for 

the year 1880. 
Department of the Interior, Washington, D. C. 
Tenth and Eleventh Annual Reports of the Geological 

Survey of the Territories for the years 1876 and 

1877, F. V. Hayden, Geologist, in charge. 
First, Second, and Third Annual Reports of the Geo- 
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G. K. Gilbert, 1879. 
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By J. W. Powell, 1879. 



115 

Report of the Superintendent of the United States 
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Annual Report of the Life-saving Service of tlie United 
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Bulletins 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, of the United States Ento- 
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Bulletins 1, 2, 3, and 4, of volume 4, 1878, and 1, 2, 
and 3, of volume 5, 1879, of the United States Geo- 
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Volume 2 of the Official Register of the United States, 
June, 1879. 

Finance Report for the year 1878. 

Annual Report of the Attorney-General of the United 
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Bureau of Education Circulars, Nos. 5 and 6 of 1879, 
and Nos. 2 and 3, 1880. 
George M. Wheeler, Capt. of Engineers, U.S. A., Wash- 
ington. 

Topographical Atlas of the Explorations and Surveys 
west of the 100th meridian. 1875. 
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Volume 22 of Contributions to Knowledge. 

Volumes 16 and 17 of Miscellaneous Collections. 

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Animal Report for the year 1879. Pamphlet. 
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First Annual Report of the Department of Statistics 
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116 

Hon. Moody Currier, Manchester, N. H. 

" Early Poems," ]2mo. 
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Glints from over the Water, 8vo. 
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Address delivered at the Centennial Celebration of the 
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Historical Sketch and Roll of Honor of the 4th Regi- 
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The Itemizer Illustrated Almanac for 1880. Pam- 
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The Rising Faith, volume 1. 1880. 
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Springfield Republican for the year 1878. Folio. 
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117 

City of Manchester. 

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118 

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119 

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REPOET 



CHIEF ENGINEER OE THE EIEE DEPARTMENT. 



EEPOET 



CHIEF ENGINEEK OF THE FIEE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineers' Office, 
Manchester, December 31, 1880. 

To Sis Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils. 

In compliance with sect. 5, chap. 8 of the " Laws and 
Ordinances " of the city, I herewith submit the annual 
report of the Fire Department for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1880, together with an inventory of the property 
connected therewith, and a statement of the fires, alarms, 
losses, etc. 

The city has been very fortunate during the year just 
closed, in regard to visitation by fire, and, while the depart- 
ment has been called out twenty-four times, the losses, as 
will be seen by figures accompanying this report, liave been 
very slight. Nine of the alarms have been either needless 
" chimney alarms," or from other small causes not requir- 
ing the aid of the department in the extinguishment of 
them. 

the apparatus 

is in excellent condition, with the exception of the hose- 
carriage of the Pennacooks, which was nearly demolished 



124 

by an accident at the canal-bridge, while on its way to a 
fire on Milford street in Piscataquog, on the afternoon of 
December 11. Since that time, however, Aretas Blood, 
Esq., of the Manchester Locomotive- Works, has kindly 
loaned the department another carriage (so that its effi- 
ciency has not been impaired thereby), while making one 
for permanent use. At the time of this accident the 
Steamer N. S. Bean No. 4. which was closely following, 
also collided with the bridge and damaged that steamer to 
the extent of 1257.75. The driver, A. B. Gushing, showed 
remarkable presence of mind at this time in the guidance 
of his horses so that there was no loss of life, though he 
was himself severely injured. This accident was the result 
of gross carelessness on the part of the employes of the Con- 
cord Railroad at tiie depot crossing, and no blame can be 
attached to either of the drivers. 

I desire to call the attention of the city councils to the 
utter disregard of the railroad officials at this crossing, to 
accommodation, convenience, or eights of the Fire Depart- 
ment in case of alarms. For this fire, we took five dif- 
ferent pieces of the apparatus across the track, every one of 
which was detained by passing trains which could and 
ought to have been stopped to let them pass. 

The apparatus now in use consists of — 

3 Steam Fire Engines, located on Vine street. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, located on Vine street. 

1 Horse Hose Sled, located on Vine street. 

1 Hook and Ladder Truck, located on Vine street. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, located on Maple street. 

1 Steam Fire Engine, located in Piscataquog. 

1 4- Wheel Hose Carriage, located in Piscataquog. 

1 Supply Wagon, located on Vine street. 

1 2-Wheel Hose Carriage, at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper- 
mill, Amoskeag, manned by men employed at the works. 



125 

1 2-Wheel Hose Carriage, Derrj mills, Goffe's Falls 
manned by men at the mills. 

At this writing the Manchester Locomotive- Works have 
nearly completed a one-horse hose-carriage to take the 
place of the Peiinacook's which was so badly damaged, and 
before this report appears in printed form it will be finished 
and in active service. I would recommend that the old 
one, as soon as repaired, be placed at 'Squog, thus estab- 
lishing a horse hose-carriage there. If this arrangement 
is carried into effect, they can respond to more boxes on 
this side of the river than at present, and made more effi- 
cient thereby. The four-wheeled hand carriage now used 
by them could be placed in the southeastern section of the 
city, as suggested by His Honor, Mayor Putnam, in his 
inaugural address. I would further suggest the purchase 
of another horse hose-carriage, fully supplied with hose, 
to be run as a " reserve " by the Pennacook Hose Com- 
pany, in case of need. Our city is constantly extending 
its limits, and these additions should be made at an early 
date, as in case of a large fire they would be much needed. 
While our department is well equipped, I do not think it 
has becH enlarged in proportion to the increased risks by 
the extension of the city limits. 

THE BUILDINGS 

occupied by the department ai-e not under the control of 
the Board of Engineers, although, as stated in my previous 
report, I believe it would be more convenient to have them 
so ; still the committee on lands and buildings have been 
very willing to make the necessary repairs, and to them I 
desire to express my tbanks. 

The upper story of the Vine-street engine-house has 
been finished oif. and each of the three companies now 
has two rooms connected by folding doors. 



126 

I would again recommend, as a much-needed improve- 
ment, the heating of this building by steam, and the 
placing in each of the hose-towers coils of pipe to dry the 
hose in cold weather, which now it is nearly impossible to 
do. Hose hanging in these towers the present season has 
frozen instead of drying. They should also be better ven- 
tilated in summer, as the dampness arising from the cellars 
prevents their drying readily. Thus, summer or winter, 
they are of but little avail for the purposes designed, and I 
believe the introduction of steam into this building would 
not only be beneficial but economical. 

The North End bell-tower was strengthened at its foun- 
dation the past summer, and now requires immediate atten- 
tion about the roof. Snow and rain invariably find their 
way to the electric machinery of the bell-striker, and mate- 
rially interfere with the workings of the alarm. This is 
very detrimental to the machinery, which, from its nicety 
of construction, requires the utmost care and cleanliness. 

A stable has been attached to the engine-house in 
'Squog, that ihe city horses of that district may be kept in 
close proximity to the apparatus. 

A statute law requires the doors of all public buildings 
to open outward. Notwithstanding this, many have been 
erected in this city with doors opening inward. Whether 
this law would apply to tenement blocks or not may be a 
question, but there are several of both whose doors should 
be changed, as well as fire escapes attached to the build- 
ings as a matter of safety in case of fire. There are a 
number of these blocks in which should a fire cut off the 
entrance, it would be impossible for the occupants to 
escape without the aid of ladders, and even with their use 
all could not in case of a large fire. 



127 



ANNUAL PARADE. 

Early in the year the city councils established, by an 
addition to the ordinances, an annual parade of this depart- 
ment, and appropriated the sum of three hundred dollars 
for the same. Li accordance therewith, Friday, October 8, 
was the day appointed for the first one, which consisted of 
a line of march through some of the principal streets, after 
which a collation was served in the City Hall. The Board 
regret exceedingly that the amount of the appropriation 
was so small that so few of our real-estate owners could be 
invited. I have no doubt those who witnessed the parade 
will consider the money well expended, and I feel confident 
its annual occurrence will be beneficial to the discipline of 
the department. 

DEFECTIVE CHIMNEYS 

still hold the " front rank" in causes of fires and alarms, 
and greater care should 1)e exercised in their construction. 
In a majority of the buildings put up in our midst the 
chimney is the most slighted part, wliile it should receive 
the greatest attention. There should be a building ordi- 
nance, requiring all chinmeys to l»e plastered on the out- 
side. Many are of the opinion they should be plastered 
inside; and while this may for a time be a benefit, experi- 
ence shows that the chemical action of the smoke and 
creosote removes it. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH 

has another year proved its usefulness by its speedy notifi- 
cation of fires and their locations. It has responded promptly 
and accurately to all its calls, and has met with but few ac- 
cidents. On Sunday, June 20, during a heavy shower, 
the wires were struck by lightning and melted off in two 
places, — one on No. 1 circuit, in the gong at the Amoskeag 



128 

machine-shop, and the other in the striking apparatus at 
the store of John N. Baker. 

These were repaired as soon as found. In addition to 
this accident, the lines have been interfered with and 
broken by irresponsible building movers, who have plied 
their vocation in defiance of an ordinance requiring them 
to give bonds to the city. I trust the incoming city coun- 
cils will not allow this order of things to exist. 

The telegraph during the year has been under the super- 
vision of Mr. Tristam Berry, who has given much care and 
attention to it. 

I have had all the fire-alarm boxes tested quarterly, — 
the last test just being completed, and find them in perfect 
working order. An additional box. No. 45, has been or- 
dered, and is daily expected, to be placed at the Amory 
Mills counting-room. The wires are already run and will 
be attached as soon as the box arrives. This is the only 
addition made during the year to this branch of the de- 
partment. 

ORGANIZATION. 

As the department is now organized, it consists of one 
hundred and two members, divided as follows : — 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 1, — 14 men. 

Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 4, — 14 men. 

1 Horse Hose Co., — 20 men. 

1 Horse Hose Co., — 12 men. 

1 Hook and Ladder Co., — 25 men. 

1 4-Wheel Hose Co., — 12 men, Piscataquog. 



129 

THE HOSE 

of the department has recently been increased by the pur- 
chase of a thousand feet of oak-tanned leather hose of Sam- 
uel Eastman & Co., of Concord, and with additional hose- 
carriages there should be still more purchased the coming 
year. There can be no fears of getting this branch over- 
stocked. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

This association, composed wholly of active members of 
the Fire Department, was chartered Feb. 4, 187-3, and has 
given aid on several occasions to such of its members as 
have been so unfortunate as to get injured "■ in going to, 
working at, or returning from a fire." It has had no severe 
drafts upon its treasury the past year. Its fund has been 
increased during the year by a donation of one hundred 
dollars from the New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company 
(twenty-five dollars of which was paid to Fred E. Summers, 
as per request of the company), and twenty-five dollars 
from William L. Killey, Esq., Agent of Langdon Manufac- 
turing Company. I commend this association to the favor- 
able consideration of our citizens. 

CONCLUSION, 

While this board have endeavored to conduct the affairs 
of their department economically, and keep within the 
bounds of the appropriations as far as possible, they have 
deemed efficiency the first consideration in the guidance of 
their official actions, and they believe this will be the opin- 
ion of your honorable body, and that you will fully approve 
of their endeavors to keep the department up to its present 
high standard. I cannot close this report without return- 
ing my sincere thanks to the Assistant Engineers for the 
valuable assistance and cordial support they have at all 

9 



130 

times rendered ; also to his Honor the Mayor and members 
of the city councils ; to City Marshal Longa, Capt. Perkins 
of the night watch, and the police under their charge, who 
have been ready to render valuable assistance in protecting 
property at fires, and have prevented many needless alarms ; 
to Warren Harvey and A. Q. Gage, superintendents of 
streets in district Nos. 2 and 1.0, for the support and co-op- 
eration they have given in regard to the use of horses un- 
der their charge ; to the foremen of the several companies 
and the men under them, for courtesies shown, and their 
willingness in the discharge of their several duties. I 
take pleasure in testifying to the ability, faithfulness, and 
efficiency of the members of the department, and trust they 
will receive such attention from the city councils as will 
make them as efficient in the future as they have been here- 
tofore. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOS. W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Manchester Fire Department. 



131 
ALARMS, FIRES, LOSSES, ETC., FOR THE YEAR 1880. 

1. — Monday, February 9, 3.35 p.m.; Box 7 ; burning 
chimney in house owned by Miss Fanny Riddle, 98 Lowell 
street. 

2. — Wednesday, February 18, 7.30 a. m. ; Box 4 ; fire 
in clothes-closet in tenement occupied by Ovide Gendron, 
in Blodgett and Clark's block, No. 555 Elm street ; extin- 
guished without aid of department ; damage very slight ; 
cause, tobacco pipe. 

3. — Wednesday, March 24, 7.10 p. m. ; Box 52 ; burn- 
ing chimney in house owned and occupied by Alfred Robie 
on Dover street, 'Squog. 

4. — Saturday, March 27, 12.40 a. m. ; fire in basement 
of Blodgett and Clark's block. No. 12 Cedar street, under 
tenement occupied by Patrick Birdy ; damage, $204 ; fully 
insured ; cause unknown. 

5. — Tuesday, April 20, 8.20 a. m. ; Box 3 ; fire in house 
occupied by James Kane on Valley street, and owned by 
Sarah Shanley ; damage, i25 ; fully insured ; cause, over- 
heated stove. 

6. — Wednesday, May 19, 2.25 a.m.; Box 32 ; fire in 
lumber shed of the Langdon Manufacturing Company, sit- 
uated on Brook street west of Elm ; damage, $250 ; no in- 
surance ; cause, incendiary. 

7. — Friday, May 21, 12.57 p. m. ; Box 9 ; fire in woods 
at junction of Union street and Hooksett road ; no damage ; 
cause, set by boys. 

8. — Saturday, July 10, 6.50 p. m. ; Box 71 ; burning 
straw and feathers in attic at No. 56 East Spruce street, in 
tenement occupied by Bartholomew Bresnehan ; no dam- 
age ; cause unknown. 

9. — Wednesday, August 11, 1.50 a. m. ; Box 71 ; alarm 
caused by burning box of straw on steps of tenement occu- 



132 

pied by Mrs. Gibling, No. 115 Cedar street ; no damage ; 
cause unknown. 

10. — Sunday, August 29, 10 p. m. ; Box 7 ; fire in sta- 
ble of Charles H. Simpson, on Lowell street ; no damage ; 
cause, explosion of kerosene lamp. 

11. — Friday, September 24, 2.20 p. m. ; Box 4 ; fire in 
building owned by M. Fitzgerald, and occupied by Joseph 
Gauthier, situated on Cedar street, near Elm. This com- 
municated to tenement house, east, owned by W. C. Blod- 
gett, and occupied by Margaret Lyons and Charles C. Mc- 
Carty, which was somewhat damaged, as was also stable, 
south, owned by Kimball heirs and John H. Maynard. 
This latter building was but very little damaged ; damage, 
$750 ; insured for -^250; cause unknown. 

12. — Sunday, September 26, 3.30 a. m. ; still alarm; 
from fire of Friday, 24th, to extinguish fire kindled in rub- 
bish. 

13. — Monday, September 27, 1.03 p. m.; Box 24 ; fire in 
house owned by William McAuliffe, on east Laurel street 
about a mile and a quarter from Central Fire Station ; dam- 
age, $1,300 ; insurance, |500 ; cause, children playing with 
matches. 

14. — Monday, October 11, 1.40 a. m. ; Box 27 ; fire was 
first discovered in a wood-shed in the rear of No. 189 Han- 
over street, and burning this, communicated with house 
owned by George K. Haines and occupied by M. W. Harvey 
and A. M. Scarlet on Hanover street, thence to three-story 
house on back street ovrned by Frederick Smyth, and occu- 
pied by Lucy Buckley, Mrs. King and Mrs. Riley, and from 
thence to large four-story double house, owned by Jonathan 
Fairbanks, Frederick Smyth, and C. K. Kendall, and oc- 
cupied by C. K. Kendall, Mrs. Armstrong, L. N. Dufrain, 
E. M. Blanchard, A. A.- Amlaw, Rose Walton, Mrs. J. S. 
York, Sarah F. Dunbar, H. L. Livingstone, James Perrigo, 



133 

and J. F. Sullivan ; loss, 13,975 ; insurance, $2,825 ; cause, 
incendiary. 

15. — Monday, October 18, 11.15 p. m. ; Box 27 ; fire in 
Granite block, Elm street ; originated from some cause un- 
known in closet under front stairs ; loss, $1,750 ; insur- 
ance, $1,650. 

16. — Wednesday, October 27, 6.30 p. m. ; Box 4; burn- 
ing chimney at Nos. 4-1 and 46 Park street. 

17. — Monday, November 8, 10.15 P. M. ; Box 21; 
small fire in shed in rear of No. 178 Manchester street, 
owned by L. A. Bartlett ; no damage ; cause, ashes. 

18. — Saturday, November 20, 5 P. M. ; Box 26 ; burning 
chimney of house of G. B. N. Dow, 28 Russell street. 

19. — Sunday, November 28, 12.50 a. m. ; Box 53 ; fire 
in house owned by Jonathan B. Moore, on Main street, 
'Squog, and occupied by him, and H, N. Chadbourne ; loss, 
$150 ; fully insured ; cause, defective chimney. 

20. — Saturday, December 4, 3.45 P. m. ; Box 8 ; feather- 
bed in block owned by Joseph B. Clark, on Orange street ; 
damage, $25 ; no insurance. 

21. — Saturday, December 11, 3.35 p. m. ; Box 53 ; fire 
in house owned by George W. Riddle and occupied by 
James Lockhead, on Milford street, 'Squog ; loss, $750 ; 
insurance, $400 ; cause, defective chimney. 

22. — Thursday, December 23, 4.45 a. m. ; fire in tene- 
ment in Barr & Clapp's block, 'Squog, occupied by a 
French family ; damage to building and Barr & Clapp's 
stock, $400 ; fully insured ; cause, ashes. 

23. — Tuesday, December 28, 5 a.m.; Box 7 ; fire in 
grocery store of S. 0. Hall, 1204 Elm street ; loss, $200 ; 
fully insured ; cause unknown. 

24. — Wednesday, December 29, 8.45 p. m. ; Box 51; 
fire in iron foundry of A. H. Lowell, which caught from a 
flask ; loss, $2,195.66 ; fully insured. 



134 

It will be seen by the foregoing that the losses 

for the year amount to . . . .$11,924 66 

Amount insured . . . . . . 8,799 66 



Total loss uncovered by insurance . . 13,125 00 



136 

NUMBERS AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson & 
Co.'s office and Samuel Colby's residence, corner of Elm 
and Young streets. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
National Hotel and L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s office. 

No. 5. — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's office and 
G. E. Hall's drug-store. 

No. 6. — Engine-house, Vine street. Keys at engine- 
house. 

No. 7. — City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. 
Perry's drug-store. 

No. 8. — Elm, foot of Orange street. Keys at Chandler 
& Tewksbury's store, and Charles G. Hastings's residence. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
George E. Flanders's and J. Freeman Clough's. 

No. 12. — Blood's shop. Keys at office. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Jencks, Lewis Simons, and E. L. Bry- 
ant. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residence of John Wilson and H. B. Sawyer's store. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev, Thomas D. Kealy and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of H. P. Watts and Daniel Connor. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and E. 
P. Richardson. 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 



1B6 

at Jeremiah D. Jones's grocery and residence of J. A. Em- 
erson. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beecli streets. Keys 
at residences of E. T. James and Mrs. J. Stevens. 

No. 24. — Corner of Massahesic and Park streets. Keys 
at residences of D. M. Goodwin, A. D. Gooden, and Nicho- 
las Hopkins. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys 
at residences of S. L. Fogg and Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-shop and residence of John N. Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Manchester House, Tebbetts Bros.' and Weeks & Cur- 
rier's drug-stores. 

No. 31. — Amoskeag Village. Keys at P. C. Cheney 
Co.'s paper-mill and residence of Cajit. J. M. Varnum. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at Hoyt <fe Co.'s paper-mill and Langdon 
watch-room. 

No. 34. — Mechanics' Row. Keys at watch-room and 
W. W. Hubbard's office. 

No. 36. — Stark Mills. Keys at Stark watch-room. 

No. 36. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys 
at residences of John P. Lord, H. M. Tarbell, and A. G. 
Fairbanks. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag New Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 43 — Namaske Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 46. — Araory Mill, corner Bridge and Canal streets. 
Keys at watch-room and A. J. Mayhew's, 51 Stark corpor- 
ation, corner of Canal and Bridge streets. 

No. 61. — S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s shop. Keys at S. C. 
Forsaith's office and Lowell's iron-foundry office. 



137 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Barr & 
Clapp's store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's brewery. Keys at brewery office 
and Barnard & Huskie's store. 

No. 61. — Corner of Elm and Hancock streets, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at residence of H. W. Longa and M. Howlett's 
saloon. 

No. 62. — Massabesic street, Hallsville. Keys at resi- 
dences of Charles Chase and G. W. Dearborn. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins and Daniel Shehan. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given 
at precisely 12.30 p. m., and be denoted by one stroke of 
the fire-bells. 



138 
INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, keys to 
which are in the hands of all regular police, also of persons 
designated by a card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go. Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to remain 
by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard in the 
box, pull again ; if you still liear no clicking, go to the next 
nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure the 
box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
cause other than an actual fire. Don't give an alarm for 

A CHIMNEY-FIRE. 

0. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you chayige your resi- 
de7ice or place of business where the keys are kept, return the 
keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their 
property, also all places where the keys are kept. Be sure 
the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the 
city, and the number of the box will be given four times 
for an alarm. 

8. One stroke of the bells and gongs, given by the en- 
gineer in charge during a fire, will be the signal to dis- 
charge the companies remaining at their houses. Two 
strokes of the bells and gongs will be a signal for the de- 
partment to limber up. 



139 

9. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of 
the bells at any time, and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

One stroke on the fire-bells at 11.45 dismisses primary 
schools for the remainder of the day, and followed by an- 
other in 15 seconds, dismisses the middle schools. 



140 

RULES AND REGULATIONS ADOPTED BY THE 
BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

1. Steamer No. 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes ; on the days of its second run, it will 
report on the first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 21, 
27, 34, 51, 71. 

2. Steamer No. 4, same as above. 

3. Pennacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

4. Massabesic Hose No. 2 will report for duty on the 
first dlarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 21 , 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 36, 62, 71 ; on the second alarm, 
to all boxes except 52, 53, 61. 

5. E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 will report for duty on 
the first alarm to boxes 42, 43, 51, 52, 53 ; second alarm 
to boxes 35, 41, and 45. 

6. Hook and Ladder No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

7. Steamer No. 2 to be kept as a reserve engine, to re- 
spond to a third alarm. The horses attached to the engine 
on its first run will return to the house on a second alarm, 
to be held in readiness to respond to a third alarm, and the 
engine will be manned by men appointed for that purpose 
and attached to Pennacook Hose and Hook and Ladder 
Companies at all times except wlien the engine is on duty. 

8. Steamer No. 3 to report for duty on first alarm, or as 
soon as the horses can get to it, to boxes 52 and 53 ; to all 
other boxes it will report for duty on a third alarm ; and 
when on duty it will be manned by the men who run No. 3 
Hose Carriage at all other times. 

9. The whole department will report for duty in all 
cases on the third alarm. 

10. In case of a second alarm from either of the boxes 
on which the horses double on the first engine, they will 



141 

immediately return and get the engine of the second run. 

11. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the en- 
gine or hose-carriage that leaves the house first will have 
the right to lead to the fire. No running-by will be al- 
lowed, except in case of accident, under penalty of dismissal 
of the driver from the department. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer in charge, 
will be the signal for discharge to all companies remaining 
at the houses. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 

14. On the first alarm from boxes 24, 25, 26, 31, 61, 62, 
the horses of the first and second run will double on to the 
engine of its first run. 



142 
ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose- 
carriage S4,500 00 

100 feet 3 inch leather hose . . . . 140 00 

1,200 feet 2^ inch leather hose . . . 1,200 00 

Firemen's suits 200 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses ...... 500 00 



Total amount .... $6,540 00 

FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 first,class double-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage 12,750 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class single-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage 12,800 00 

1 four-wheeled hose-carriage . . . 225 00 

200 feet rubber hose 100 00 

1,850 feet leather hose 1,850 00 

Firemen's suits ..... 175 00 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 517 00 



Total amount .... $5,667 00 

The above includes the property of E. W. Harrington 
Hose No. 3. 



143 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine and 
hose-carriage 
50 feet rubber hose 
1,000 feet leather hose 
Firemen's suits 
Furniture and fixtu 
harnesses . 



es, including one pair 



13,500 00 

75 00 

1,000 00 

240 00 

600 00 



Total amount 



.■ $5,415 00 



PENNACOOK HOSE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage 
1 horse hose sled and reel 

2,200 feet leather hose 

Firemen'^ suits . . . •. 
Furniture and fixtures, including 2 har- 
nesses ...... 

Total amount . . . , 



$600 00 

75 00 

2,200 00 

300 00 

440 00 
^3,615 00 



MASSABESIC HOSE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage 
1,500 feet leather hose . 
300 feet new leather hose 
Furniture and fixtures . 
Firemen's suits 

Total amount 



$600 00 
1,500 00 

375 00 
60 00 

200 00 

^2,735 00 



144 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders 
1 Bangor extension ladder 

Firemen's suits 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 



$1,600 00 

150 00 

400 00 

340 00 

$2,390 00 



SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 



1 supply wagon and boxes 



$150 00 



SPARE HOSE. 

AT ENGINE-HOUSE, VINE STREET. 



1,000 feet hose in store-room . 
700 feet new hose .... 

Old hose (worthless for fire purposes) 



ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 



$1,000 00 

854 00 

50 00 

$1,904 00 



6 fire hats 


$9 00 


Furniture 


100 00 


Total amount 


. $109 00 


FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 




At cost 


.$19,910 00 


Ladders and tools .... 


30 00 


Extra poles and wire 


50 00 



Total amount 



$19,990 00 



145 





GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE CARRIAGE. 








LOCATED AT DERRY MILLS. 






1 


two-wheeled hose-carriage 


1200 


00 


400 


feet linen hose 


200 


00 


2 


hose-pipes 

Total amount 


12 


00 




1412 


00 



AMOSKEAG HOSE CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT P. C. CHENEY CO.'S PAPER-MILL. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage 

800 feet leather hose ..... 

2 hose-pipes ...... 

Total amount 

RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Engine No. 1 

Fire King Engine No. 2 . 

E. W. Harrington Steam Engine No. 3 

N. S. Bean Steam Engine No. 4 

Pennacook Hose No. 1 . 

Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 

E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3, included with 

E. W. H. S. F. E. No. 3. 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder No. 1 
Supply Wagon 

Store-room .... 
Engineers' Department . 
Fire Alarm .... 
Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage 
Amoskeag Hose Carriage 



10 



f200 


00 


400 


00 


12 


00 



1612 00 



^6,540 00 
2,750 00 
5,667 00 
5,415 00 
3,615 00 
2.735 00 



2,390 00 

150 00 

1,904 00 

109 00 

19,990 00 

412 00 

612 00 

852,289 00 



146 

NAMES AND RBSIDEXCES OF THE MEMBERS OP 
THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Name. 


Rank. | Occupation. 


Residence. 




Chief 


Bookseller 

Lumber Dealer 

Master Mechanic 


1937 Elm St. 






313 Granite St. 


Benjamin C. Kendall 




311 Central St. 


Asst. and Clerk 


5 Machine-Shop Blk 


Orin E. Kimball 


Tanner and Currier . . 









AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


George R. Simmons 


Foreman ... 

Asst. Foreman 


Asst. Supt. Streets . . . 
City Messenger 


82 Pennacook St. 
28 Market St. 




61 Stark Corp. 
Stark Block. 


Henry H. Glinea 


Asst. Engineer 

Clerk 




,1 


31 Market St. 


George W. Butterfield. .. 






28 Vine St. 






389 Park St. 






Manufacturer 


58 Stark Corp. 
Hanover cor. Maple. 
421 Hanover St. 




11 


Wm. Henry Stearns 


n 




„ 




494 Pine St 




,1 




31 M. S. B. 




,1 




14 Orange St. 
6 M. S. B. 




„ 













147 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


Eugene S. Whitney 

Charles E. Ham 






101 Orange St. 
44 M S B 


Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 




Ed^ar G. Abbott 


Machinist 








101 Orange St. 
91 Orange St. 
20 Vine St 


Thomas F. Dodge 

Almus B. Gushing 

William H. Dodge 

George W. Bacon 

Alfred Nearborn 


Asst. Engineer 


I. 




Hoseman 


Manufacturer 


874 Elm St. 
45 Stark Corp. 
Cor. E. High & Jane. 
22 M S B 


„ 




,1 











101 Orange St. 
82 Laurel St 


John A. Ankarloo 




n 


Clerk 


1441 Elm St 


Frank E. Emery 


^1 




23 Nashua St 









PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


Albert Maxfield 




Belt Maker 


23 M S B 


Clarence D. Palmer 

Joseph E. Merrill 

Walter L. Blenus 


Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 


Marble Worker 

Currier 


347 Central St. 
60 Orange St. 
26 Vine St 




George H. Porter 

Will R. Sawyer 

John M. Plaisted 






277 Laurel St 








„ 


Boot and Shoe Dealer 




Charles B. French 




10 M S B 


Will G. Chase 


Photographer 


69C Elm St 


Lyman M. Aldrich 

Joseph H. Alsop 




375 Park St 




Card Grinder 


37 Stark Corp. 
1419 Elm St. 
58 Orange St. 
35 M S B 




George W. Cheney 

Gilbert A. Sackett 










Edwin A. Durgin 

Samuel A. Hill 




133 Hanover St. 
Pr. Wks. Bl. 'Squog. 
640 Union St. 












Edwin E. Weeks 






Albert A. Puffer 








Charles W. Brown 




nierk 


640 Union St 









148 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on Majjle Street. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Henry W. Fisher 

John F. Seaward 

Henry G. Seaman . 

Walter Seaward 

George W. Goodwin 

John H. Boyd 

Revilo G. Houghton 

Joseph W. Batchelder. . . 

Charles F. Garland 

William S. McLeod 

Simeon R. Stearns 

Alphonzo E. Foster 



Foreman 

Asst. Foreman. 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Mechanic. ... 
Carpenter . . . 

Teamster 

Wheelwright, 

Gi'ocer 

Gas Fitter... 
Carpenter 

Grainer 

Machinist 

Carpenter — 



59 Myrtle St. 
27 Warren St. 
14 South St. 
19 Warren St. 
Wilson cor. E. High. 
242 Bridge St. 
288 Bridge St. 
413 Pine St. 
548 Maple St. 
6G Nashua St. 
63 Arlington St. 
45 M. S. B. 



E. W. HAREINGTON HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Clinton Street, 'Squog. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Horatio Fradd 

John T. G. Dinsmore.... 

Thomas O'Dowd . 

William Doran 

John McDerby 

Ruel G. Manning 

Joseph Schofield 

Edward McDerby 

Andrew C. Wallace, Jr. . . 

James Hunter 

Edward Flanagan. . . 

Robert McFarland 



Foreman 

Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 

Steward 

Hoseman 



Grocer 

Carpenter 

Tinsmith 

Machinist 

Roofer 

Carpenter 

Wool Sorter 

Roofer 

Lumber Surveyor 

Dresser 

Carpenter 

Cooper 



123 Dover St. 
139 " " 

lis '• " 

219 Douglas St. 
503 Granite St. 
95 Douglas St. 
392 Granite St. 
145 Winter St. 
81 Parker St. 
147 Winter St. 
107 Douglas St. 
79 Parker St. 



149 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. L 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



John N. Chase i Foreman 

John Wilson Asst. Foreman . 

Ralph Pearson , Clerk 

Hiram Young ■ Treasurer 

Augustus J. Robie I Driver 

George E. Glines ! Fireman 

Edward A. G. Holmes.. 

George H. Dudley 

Luther J. Flint 

Harrison H. Cole 

Winfield S. Leavitt 

James Orrill 

Jesse B. Nourse 

Charles H. Cross 

Joseph H. Gould 

Josiah D. Andrews 

Andrew C. Wiggin 

Dillwyn Breed 

John W. Chase 

George M. Jones 

MiloB. Wilson 

Samuel F. Adams 

Roscoe Dyer 

Warren Harvey 

Sanborn T. Worthen. . . 



Overseer 

Carpenter 

Box Maker. . . 

Slater 

Teamster 

Machinist 

Carpenter . . . 

Barber 

Teamster 

Overseer 

Mechanic 

Carpenter . . . 

Mason 

Belt Maker . . 
Card Grinder 

Gardener 

Mason 

Expressman . 

Machinist 

Supt. Streets. 
Carpenter.... 



276 Bridge St. 
530 Chestnut St. 
297 Chestnut St. 
33 Dutton St. 
8 Vine St. 
301 Central St. 
224 Manchester St. 
159 Laurel St. 
41 Pearl St. 
43 Water St. 
16 Orange St. 
60 Prospect St. 
262 Bridge St. 

8 Langdon Corp. 
78 Lowell St. 

142 Merrimack St. 
874 Elm St. 
335 Chestnut St. 
90 Orange St. 
1074 Elm St. 
46 Market St. 
2004 Elm St. 

9 Amoskeag Corp, 
474 Hanover St. 
81 Bridge St. 







SUPPLY 


WAGON. 




Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 

1 


Residence. 




Driver 




83 Amherst St. 











150 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Adams, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 
Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 
Beech, front of No. 584. 
Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 
Blodget, front of primary school-house. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 



151 



Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ehn street. 
Bridge, front of No. 26. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Wahiut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Ehn street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near office door of M. L. W. 
Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Central, northwest corner of Canal street. 
Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 



152 

Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Central, northwest corner of Union street. 

Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 

Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Central, front of No. 374. 

Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Chestnut, opposite High street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 

Concord, opposite Vine street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Nashua street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, west of Franklin street. 

Elm, front of Fisk bookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 



153 



Green, corner of Elm street. 
Hanover, front of First Congregational Church. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 
Hancock, near Brewery. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, northwe.st corner of Elm street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near No. 244. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 



151 

Laurel, near Belmont. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 

Lowell, front of No. 276. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Maple, front of No. 530. 

Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mammoth road. 

Mechanic, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Mechanic, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanic, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Fine street. 



165 



Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street, 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincohi street. 

Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Merrimack, near Belmont street. 

Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Middle, near 67 Amoskeag corporation. 

Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 

Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Park, near No. 36. 

Park, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Park, northwest corner of Union street. 

Park, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Park, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Park, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Park, east end. 

Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 

Pearl, corner of Beech street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 



156 



Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pine, northwest corner of Park street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
River road, northwest of Elm street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near 13 Stark corporation. 



157 



Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 

State, northwest corner of Granite street. 

State, opposite 57 Manchester corporation. 

State, opposite 13 Manchester corporation. 

State, corner of Central street. 

Summer, corner of Elm street. 

Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Union, northwest corner of High street. 

Valley, corner of Elm street. 

Yalley, corner of Willow street. 

Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Walnut, opposite No. 79. 

Water, near 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Webster, corner of Elm street. 

Webster, corner of Adams street. 

Webster, corner of Union street. 

Wilson, corner of Park street. 

Young, corner of Elm street. 



158 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS IN 'SQUOG. 

A, corner of Main street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Clinton, corner of Dover street. 
Clinton, corner of Main street. 
Center, corner of Main street. 
Center, opposite school-house. 
Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 
Douglas, corner of Green street. 
Douglas, corner of Barr street. 
Douglas, corner of West street. 
Douglas, corner of Main street. 
Douglas, east of Main street. 
Ferry, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Quincy street. 
Granite, corner of Green street. 
Granite, corner of Barr street. 
Granite, corner of West street. 
Granite, corner of Dover street. 
Granite, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Second street. 
Granite, corner of River street. 
Main, opposite Rice's house. 
Mast, corner of Main street. 
Mast, corner of Bowman street. 
Mast, between Bowman and Main streets. 
Mast, opposite J. Smith's house. 
Milford, corner of Main street. 
Milford, corner of Bowman street. 
Piscataquog, corner of Main street. 
School, corner of Main street. 
School, corner of Walker street. 



159 

School, corner of Ferry street. 
Third, corner of Ferry street. 
Walker, corner of River road. 
Walker, corner of Third street. 
Walker, corner of Parker street. 
Walker, near corner of Main. 

In addition to the above, there are three private hydrants 
that are available in case of need : — 

One at S. 0. Forsaith & Co.'s machine-shop. 
One at Lowell's iron foundry. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
Making; 307 in all. 



EEPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



11 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1880. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor, ex officio, chairman. 
JOHN W. WHITTLE, 

President of the Common Comicil, ex officio. 

Ward 1. — Henry C. Sanderson, No. 1 M. S. B. 

Charles F. Everett, 54 Stark corporation. 
Ward 2. — Gerherdus L. Demarest, 54 Blodget street. 

Benjamin C. Dean, Myrtle street, cor. Ash. 
Ward 3. — William A. Webster, 581 Union street. 

Daniel Clark, Lowell street, corner Pine. 
Ward 4. — George W. Weeks, 172 Amherst street. 

Walter M. Parker, Hanover, cor. Chestnut. 
Ward 5. — Charles A. O'Connor, Haseltine House. 

Denis F. O'Connor, 173 Central street. 
Ward 6. — Abial C. Flanders, 308 Park street. 

Brackett B. Weeks, 382 Central street. 
Ward 7. — Ezra Huntington, 13 M. P. W. corporation. 

Marshall P. Hall,54 Amoskeag corporation. 
Ward 8. — Louis E. Phelps, 220 Granite street (P.). 

Eugene W. Brigham, 47 Bowman st. (P.). 



164 

CLERK OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance, Accounts^ and Claims. — The Mayor, Messrs. 
Huntington, Whittle, G. W. Weeks. Hall, Parker. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Phelps, Clark, Sanderson, B. B. 
Weeks, Huntington. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Sanderson, 
G. W. Weeks, Flanders, Dean, D. F. O'Connor. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Huntington, the Mayor, 
Whittle, Parker, Everett, Flanders, Phelps. 

Sanitary. — Messrs. Webster, Demarest, Brigham, San- 
derson, Everett. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Clark, Webster, Par- 
ker, Dean, C. A. O'Connor. 

Text-Books and Apparatus. — Messrs. Dean, Demarest, 
G. W. Weeks, C. A. O'Connor, Clark. 

Emptloyment of Children and Truancy. — Messrs. B. B. 
Weeks, Everett, Webster, Phelps, Parker. 

Music. — Messrs. G. W, Weeks, Brigham, Flanders, D. F. 
O'Connor. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Brigham, D. F. O'Connor, 
Demarest, B. B. Weeks. 

Non-Besident Pupils. — Messrs. Brigham, Hall, Everett, 
D. F. O'Connor, Flanders. 



165 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 



High School. — Messrs. Clark, Dean, Parker, C. A. 
O'Connor, Hall, Demarest, 6. W. Weeks. 

Ash Street. — Messrs. Dean, Webster, C. A. O'Connor, 
B. B. Weeks, Phelps. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. G. W. Weeks, Flanders, Hunt- 
ington, D. F. O'Connor, Clark. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. Sanderson, Everett, Demarest, 
Flanders, Parker. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Huntington, Hall, Phelps, 
Sanderson, Clark. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Webster, Parker, Everett, C. A. 
O'Connor, Brigham. 

Manchester Street. — Messrs. C. A. O'Connor, Everett, 
Dean, G. W. Weeks, Brigham. 

Wilson Hill and Bridge Street. — Messrs. Everett, Brig- 
ham, Phelps, B. B. Weeks, Flanders. 

Training School and Spruce Street. — Messrs. Hall, G. W. 
Weeks, Clark, Dean, Huntington. 

Piscataquog School. — Messrs. Phelps, Brigham, Hunt- 
ington, B. B. Weeks, D. F. O'Connor. 

Center Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Brigham, 
Sanderson, Phelps, B. B. Weeks, Demarest. 

Amoskeag-, Blodget Street., and Stark District. — Messrs. 
Demarest, Parker, D. F. O'Connor, Dean, Everett. 

Bakersville and Hallsville. — Messrs. Flanders, Hall, 
Webster, C. A. O'Connor, Demarest. 

Goffe's Falls and Harveg District. — Messrs. Parker, 
Clark, G. W. Weeks, D. F. O'Connor, Sanderson. 

Mosquito Pond, Webster^s Mills, and Youngsville. — 
Messrs. B. B. Weeks, Sanderson, Hall, Webster, Parker. 

Evening School. — Messrs. D. F. O'Connor, Huntington 
Flanders, Hall, Demarest. 



In Board of School Committee, 
December 31, 1880. 

The Superintendent read his annual report to the committee, 
and it was accepted. 

The Clerk read the annual report prepared by him at the request 
of the Board. 

Voted, That the report be accepted, and adopted as the report of 
the Board, and that it be transmitted to the City Councils, together 
with the report of the Superintendent. 

M. P. HALL. Clerk. 



EEPOET 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable City Councils. 

Gentlemen, — In presenting the annual report for 1880, 
the School Committee are gratified by the evidences of suc- 
cess in the management of the public schools the past year. 
There have been an increased enrollment of pupils and great 
regularity of attendance ; teachers and scholars have well 
accomplished their allotted work ; the school accommoda- 
tions of the city have been enlarged and improved ; and 
the cost of maintaining the schools has not exceeded the 
sum set apart for their use. 

The following statistics are presented : — 

1880. 1879. 

Whole amount expended by School Com- 
mittee, including repairs . . . $50,051 64 S46,144 39 

Amount expended by City Councils for 
salaries of School Committee and 
Superintendent 1,780 00 1,733 33 

For new school-house .... 6,000 00 

Whole amount expended by the city for 

school purposes 57,831 64 47,877 72 

Whole number of pupils enrolled in day 

schools . . . . . . 4,136 3,798 



168 

Average number belonging to schools . 2,970 2,859 

Average daily attendance . . . 2,727 2,648 

Average per cent of attendance . . 92 92.6 

Cost of tuition in day schools per scholar, 
based upon average number belong- 
ing $12 33 S12 16 

Cost of incidentals per scholar * . . 4 16 4 55 

Total cost per scholar .... 16 49 15 71 

Total cost per scholar, based upon whole 

number enrolled .... 11 24 12 15 

Number of pupils graduated from gram- 
mar schools 

From suburban schools . . , , 

Number of pui^ils admitted to High 
School from grammar schools . 

Whole number admitted to High School 

Number graduated from High School 

Average attendance in Evening School . 

Number of teachers regularly employed 
in day schools ..... 

Number of scholars per teacher in High 
School . . . . . . 

Number of scholars i^er teacher in gram- 
mar schools 

Number of scholars per teacher in middle 
schools 

Number of scholars per teacher in pri- 
mary schools 

Number of scholars per teacher in subur- 
ban schools 

* Based upon amount expended by the committee, exclusive of teaching and 
evening schools. 



75 


77 








61 


52 


69 


56 


38 


48 


91 


125 


79 


74 


37 


39 


37 


37 


38 


36 


44 


45 


23 


26 



169 



TABLE OP RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Teachers' salaries 
Repairs . 
Fuel 

Care of rooms . 
Jdontiiigent expenses 
Books and stationery- 
Printing and advertising 
Furniture and supplies 



Evening schools 



Appropriation. 


Expended. 


. 138,500 00 


136,628 60 


5,175 05 


5,038 10 


3,004 54 


2,889 75 


2,500 00 


2,239 73 


1,075 00 


974 86 


600 00 


440 09 


450 00 


400 38 


1,077 25 


383 08 


/ 


148,994 59 


. 11,987 77 


1,057 05 



Balance unexpended 



154,369 61 150,051 64 
4,317 97 



$54,369 61 154,369 61 



Amount of tuition fund expended . . . $144 35 
Amount of tuition fund on hand . . . 453 73 
The total amount of our expenditure exceeds that of last 
year $3,907.25. This is almost wholly in the item of re- 
pairs, there being also a small excess in salaries and con- 
tingent expenses. The cost per scholar is, 

For teaching $12 33 

Incidentals 4 16 



Total $16 49 

This is the cost based on the " average number of schol- 
ars belonging" to the schools ; taking the whole number 
enrolled, the average cost is $11.84. 

No one of the several items of appropriation for schools 
has been overdrawn, and we close the year with a balance 



170 



of $4,317.97. Of this, the sum of $3,876.00, instead of 
being placed to the credit of the schools for next year, has 
been transferred to the city '• Reserved Fund," thence, as 
we understand, to go to pay deficits in other departments. 
By this operation, the School Department fails to receive 
proper credit for economical management, and must call 
for larger appropriations next year than would otherwise* 
have been necessary. 

As a matter of interest, the cost of the schools last year 
is compared with the cost in each year of the last decade, 
in the following table, which gives the average number of 
pupils, the cost per pupil, the city valuation and tax. and 
the school tax in mills, upon each dollar of valuation : — 



Year. 



Average 

No. 
pupils. 


Cost of 
Schools. 


2,129 


842,000 


2,080 


42,900 


2,278 


47.900 


2,450 


47,300 


2,463 


47,500 


2,501 


51,800 


t 2,542 


50,100 


2,513 


47,900 


2,571 


44,900 


2,859 


46,200 


2,970 


48,945 



IZ^l ! ^^-«-- 



City Tax. 



School Tax 
in mills. 



1870. 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 



S19 45 

20 62 

21 03 
19 34 

19 28 

20 71 
19 70 
18 78 
17 46 

15 71 

16 49 



$10,710,252 
11,365,162 
11,542,632 
12,001,200 
12,716,892 
14,195,102 
15,309,348 
15,605,718 
15,912,234 
17,482,132 
17,825,116 



$234,047 
236,632 
259,196 
300,768 
312,835 
315,131 
248,900 
246,573 
276,873 
264,406 
264,491 



.0011 
.0037 
.0041 
.0039 
.0037 
.0036 
.0032 
.0030 
.0028 
.0026 
.0027 



In the ten years the amount expended for schools has 
increased seven thousand dollars, and the rate of taxation 
has steadily decreased from 4.1 mills to 2.8 mills. The 
increase in school expenses has been much less than is 
generally supposed. Manchester, with a population of 
thirty-five thousand, is carrying on her schools upon the 
scale of expense of a city of twenty-five thousand. 



171 

An unusually large amount of work has been done in the 
repair and improvement of school buildings. The commit- 
tee having this in charge furnish the following specification 
of work, and the cost : — 

At Lincoln-street, — the old out-houses have 
been removed, water-closets of the most 
approved form, with city water, introduced 
into the basement, the interior walls whit- 
ened, etc 11,100 00 

At the Training-School, — the basement exca- 
vated, water-closets removed, furnaces in 
place of stoves, new floors throughout the 
building, new blackboards of slate, new 
fence about the lot $1,900 00 

At Franklin-street, — new fence about the lot, 
repairs of walks and blackboards, white- 
washing, etc 1275 00 

At High School, — new book-cases, painting, 

repairs of fence, etc. .... il2o 00 

At Spring-street and Ash-street, — painting and 

general repairs . . . . . $125 00 

At Goff'e's Falls, — lot graded and fenced, house 

repaired 1335 00 

At District No. 6, — new shed and fence . $100 00 

In Piscataquog, — repairs of furnaces and black- 
boards, painting, etc. .... $235 00 

At Beech-street, — new fence and concrete 

walks $190 00 



172 



General repairs as follows : — 

Lowell-street 
Amoskeag 
Blodget-street 
Wilson Hill 
Center-street 
District No. 5 
District No. 8 
District No. 9 
Hallsville 



$25 00 
$12 00 
$12 00 
$[2 00 
.f50 00 
110 00 
110 00 
$50 00 
il5 00 



The changes made in the Lincoln-street and Training- 
School buildings will add much to the comfort and con- 
venience of pupils, and are permanent improvements, such 
as will lessen the future cost of maintenance and repairs. 
Another change is needed in these and other large school- 
buildings. The cloak-rooms should be on the same floor 
with the school-rooms, so as to avoid the extra flight of 
stairs now necessary, where the basement is used for this 
purpose. 

The committee on repairs have given much time and 
personal supervision to this work, and, as a consequence, 
they make an excellent showing for the money expended. 

At the close of last year the Board found the increase of 
pupils in the southern part of the city so great as to de- 
mand an urgent call for an appropriation for a new build- 
ing. The amount asked for was granted, and, under the 
direction of a special committee, the work was commenced 
in April and completed in July. The building is located 
on the lot of land purchased by the city for school pur- 
poses, some years since, at the corner of Beech and Spruce 
streets. The building is of brick, with slated roof; the base- 
ment fitted for the use of pupils in stormy weather, and fur- 
nished with city water. There are four school-rooms, twen- 



173 

ty-five by thirty-oue feet in size, with ample hall and pas- 
sage-ways ; the stairs are divided into two short flights, with 
wide landings ; the rooms are ventilated by special flues ; 
each room is furnished with single desks and folding-seats 
of improved pattern, and slate blackboards. The black- 
boards are the first of the kind ever used in the city. 
They are of solid Vermont slate, three-eigliths of an inch 
thick, and are placed directly against the studding of the 
walls. They cost twenty-five cents per square foot, — not 
much above the cost of lathing, plastering, and cover- 
ing the same space with the usual blackboard coating. 
They are practically indestructible. Two rooms in the 
Training-School building have also been furnished with 
them, and their use has been so satisfactory that the com- 
mittee would recommend that slate blackboards be sup- 
plied to other buildings as fast as the old boards wear out. 
The whole cost of the new building was six thousand dol- 
lars. It was built in the most economical manner. Not a 
dollar was spent for ornament, as the exterior plainly tes- 
tifies, yet no school-building in the city has pleasanter or 
better adapted rooms for the use of primary schools. 

The school which had been kept in the old house on tiie 
lot was transferred to the new building in September, and 
also a school from the Manchester-street house. Imme- 
diately upon the opening of these schools a third was 
needed, and a few weeks later a fourth. The building is 
now full, and extra seats will have to be put in to accom- 
modate the pupils asking admittance. Thus we have 
relieved the pressure for room in that part of the city only 
temporarily. 

Anticipating the necessity for greater school accommo- 
dations at the north end of the city, the Board directed a 
special committee to select a lot in that section. They 
reported the site at the corner of Webster and Chestnut 



174 

streets, as the best for the purpose. We suggest that 
when the purchase is made a lot be secured large enough 
for the uses of a grammar school, when necessary. 

The new house which it is expected will be built on this 
lot the coming year, should have accommodations for sev- 
eral schools ; for, as was the case at the Beech-street house, 
more room will probal)ly be needed than is now antici- 
pated. The coming year promises to be one of growth and 
prosperity in our city, and it is not unlikely that new 
school-rooms will be required on the west side of the river, 
and perhaps at the south end. If the next Board should 
succeed in getting into the schools several hundred chil- 
dren now in the streets, as we hope it may do, the city 
will be again straitened for school accommodations. 

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 

In the year 1875 an act was passed by the legislature 
requiring the assessors of this city to make an annual 
enumeration of children of school age, and report the same 
to the school committee. For some reason they have never 
been able to obtain a " fair count." Their return, in any 
one year, of the whole number of persons between the ages 
of five and fifteen, has never equaled the number enrolled 
in the schools. This enumeration has been useless to the 
School Board, as a means of determining the absenteeism 
of the schools. This year we have obtained an abstract 
from the official enumeration made by the United States 
census officers, and we are now able to present a statement 
of the attendance and non-attendance, which is substantially 
correct. 



176 



NUMBER OF CHILDREN BETWEEN THE AGES OF FIVE AND FIFTEEN YEARS 
WHO ATTENDED SCHOOL IN THIS CITY WITHIN THE YEAR ENDING JULY 
1, 1880. 





American. 


French. 


Irish. 


German. 


English. 


Scotch. 


Swedes. 


Danes. 


Totals. 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
g 


223 
295 
513 
388 
773 
474 
126 
361 


34 
12 
195 
267 
203 
22 
19 
73 


3 

10 
38 
54 


2 
2 

4 










259 


11 
6 
3 


3 

1 






326 


2 




727 
700 




19 


5 
2 






1,054 




4 
1 

4 






502 


7 
8 


1 


2 
21 


2 
8 






151 




3 


470 








3,153 


825 


106 


31 


48 


21 


2 


3 


4,189 



NUMBER OF CHILDREN BETWEEN THE AGES OP FIVE AND FIFTEEN YEARS 
WHO DID NOT ATTEND SCHOOL WITHIN THE YEAR ENDING JULY 1, 1880. 



•a 


American. 


French. 


Irish. 


German. 


English. 


Scotch. 


Swedes. 


Totals. 


1 


33 
37 

158 
69 

164 
36 
11 
45 


7 

3 

144 

261 

161 

2 

12 

40 






3 

1 
2 
3 






43 


O 








1 
1 


42 


3 


2 
31 
26 






307 


4 


3 




367 


5 


4 


R 


• 


361 


Q 








38 


7 












23 


g 




5 








90 
















553 


630 


59. 


8 


13 j 6 


2 


1,271 



The first table gives the attendance in all the schools of 
the city, public and private. The numbers under the head 
" American," include children born in this country, though 
of foreign parentage. 

Some instructive facts are gathered from this return. 
For instance, the most numerous of foreign-born children 



176 

are of French parentage, numbering 1,465. The ward hav- 
ing the largest attendance at school is ward five ; the 
smallest, ward seven. The largest attendance in propor- 
tion to the whole number is in ward two ; the smallest, in 
ward four. 

In the second table, the whole number who had not 
attended school within the year ending July 1, 1880, is given 
as 1,271 ; or, in other words, during that year, one in every 
four of the children of the city, of school age, received no 
instruction in any school, public or private ; and if the pub- 
lic schools alone are considered, one child in six was not 
registered in them. This is not a creditable record. 

The yearly growth of our city in population since 1870 
has been at an average rate of 1,000 persons, and in wealth 
three-quarters of a million of dollars ; while the increase 
of pupils in the public schools has averaged less than 100. 
We have only about 800 more scholars in 1880 than we had 
in 1870. The increase due to our growth in population is 
at least 1,800. 

We have spent large sums of money in the education of 
such scholars as have attended school ; but the best test 
of progress in public education is found in success in 
reaching the masses, not in great expenditures for the few. 

Doubtless this result is partially due to the fact that the 
increase in our population is largely of foreigners who do 
not appreciate the advantages of an education for their 
children. Had all of the two thousand families who have 
moved into the city during the last ten years been Ameri- 
cans, the result would have been quite different. But this 
does not lessen the responsibility of the city. If the new-come 
citizens do not send their children to school willingly, then 
they must be compelled. It is the dictate alike of justice 
and political wisdom to give their children the benefits of 
the common school. The parents have not much in com- 



177 

moil with us ; they will not readily adopt our institutions ; 
many of them will return to their old homes. But thousands 
of their children have come to stay. They soon forget their 
birtliplace. They rapidly learn our language and customs, 
and will soon become citizens. 

The appointment of a suitable person to secure a better 
attendance in the schools has been constantly urged by the 
School Board. We trust it will be among the first acts of 
the new city government to appoint such an officer, or to 
delegate to the School Committee the authority to appoint. 

Any consideration of the matter of school attendance 
involves the '" mill question." Since the influx of laborers 
from the Canadas, the enforcement of the compulsory 
school laws presents some perplexing problems. 

The French immigrant brings his children with him, — 
a good many of them. He intends that every one of them 
shall work in the factory if possible. Every one of them 
must contribute to the support of the family, or to the sav- 
ings which he hopes sometime to carry back to Canada. 
The common school is a new revelation to him ; he cannot 
understand why three months' earnings of his children every 
year should be taken from him, and he rebels against such 
a plan. He will defeat it if lie can. If falsehood or any 
sharp practice will circumvent this Yankee notion, he will 
not hesitate to use it. Not only will he do this himself, but 
the child is taught to do the same. Our Superintendent, 
in his official dealing with this question, meets almost daily 
with instances of unblushing deception in children and 
parents, determined, if possible, to cheat him out of a few 
days in reckoning the required tliree months' schooling. 

Nothing but the stern demand of the law — the impossi- 
bility of obtaining work without a certificate — secures any 
education whatever for these children. Under the opera- 

12 



178 

tion of the law there are many cases of hardship. It 
seems to be easier to obtain employment for children than 
for adults, and it happens that many families live wholly 
upon the earnings of children. Occasionally it appears that 
the daily bread of several persons depends upon the wages 
of a single boy or girl under twelve years of age. In such 
a case an appeal is made to the school authorities to allow 
the child to work continuously. The law has no provision 
for such cases. The child is sent to school, and perhaps 
the parents call upon the city for support. Whereupon 
some one declares that the public schools are encouraging 
pauperism. We do not discuss the causes which bring 
families into such necessity, nor consider the question of 
wages, nor the reasons for the unusual demand for child 
labor ; but we say emphatically that upon the question of 
three months' schooling for every child, black or white, 
bond or free, there must be no compromise. Happily the 
extreme case we have named is infrequent ; but we have to 
contend constantly against the unwillingness of this class 
of our citizens to send their children to school. Once ad- 
mit that the child laborer may, under any circumstances, 
be kept at work continuously, and the number of parents 
who would shiftlessly live upon ihe earnings of young chil- 
dren would rapidly increase, and we should begin to rear 
a generation of sallow-faced imbeciles, such as fill the fac- 
tories of the old world. This would be the sure way to 
encourage pauperism. 

We would not be understood as disparaging the indus- 
trious habits of any people. Nothing better can happen to 
a boy or girl thau to be brought up to work. Americans, 
in the cities particularly, by their neglect to instruct their 
children in manual labor, are fast giving over to foreigners 
the best places in the useful trades, and all the profits of 
skilled labor. Our ancestors, in whose characters we find 



179 

so much to admire, were not tender of their children in this 
matter. Tliey, too, were obliged to task their children for 
the support of their families ; but, unlike the people who are 
now coming among us in such numbers, they prized learn. 
ing. Out of their laborious lives they found time for the 
school. From their scanty earnings they spared a willing 
tax for education, Their intelligence, thus combined with 
industry, has given to New England her strength and inde- 
pendence. If we as a people expect to retain these, we 
must continue the same means. One of the first lessons 
to be learned by the new citizen is this : the common school 
is a necessary and an inevitable institution of his adopted 
country. 

SCHOOL TIME. 

By a new arrangement of terms and vacations the school 
year has been shortened one week. With the usual allow- 
ances at Thanksgiving and Fast days, the schools will now be 
in session thirty-seven and one-half weeks in the year in- 
stead of forty. We have no doubt this will meet the ap- 
proval of citizens. Many believe a still greater reduction 
would do no harm. 

The Board has also reduced the time of the afternoon 
session in the higher grades one hour during the months of 
November, December, and January. After arranging the 
course of study to meet these changes, we do not anticipate 
any loss to the pupils in their studies. More holidays will 
do our children good. Our school work partakes too much 
of the restlessness and hurry which characterize our busi. 
ness life. Let us relieve the tedium of daily work by fre- 
quent rests and diversions. In some of the Western cities 
a sensible and beautiful custom has been introduced for this 
purpose. The schools celebrate the birthdays of eminent 
Americans, — poets, authors, and statesmen. On days set 



180 

apart for the purpose, selections from our national litera- 
ture and history are read and spoken. By such exercises 
the patriotic spirit is aroused and moral good is attained. 
It would be especially appropriate to adopt a similar custom 
in New England, whose history bears such wealth of great 
deeds and noble lives. 

In April last tlie Board elected a special teacher in draw- 
ing. The time had come for some action in regard to this 
study, — to abolish it or to secure thorough instruction. 
The value of drawing as a practical branch is now generally 
acknowledged. It is taught in the public schools of every 
considerable town in the country. In ail schemes for in- 
dustrial training it has a prominent place. The lessons in 
drawing in our schools form the only instruction directly 
relating to any trade or manual occupation. It is the one 
study that hints of the work-shop. If one study were 
named as likely to be added to the proverbial and indis- 
pensable three R's, it would be drawing. And yet this is the 
one branch in which new teachers are never examined, and 
most of our older teachers were never instructed in it. It 
was to prepare all the teachers to give the best instruction 
that Miss Mary K. Webster was employed as a special 
teacher. This lady has devoted her whole time in school 
hours to supervision of pupils' work, besides giving a course 
of lessons to the teachers in the evening. Her instruction 
is intelligent and thorough, laying a true foundation in 
the lower grades for more advanced work, whether in pic- 
torial or mechanical applications of the art. The regular 
teachers should soon be able to continue the instruction 
successfully without the aid of a special teacher. The 
employment of such teachers in any branch ought to be 
regarded as a temporary expedient. Examination and com- 
petency in every study taught in the schools should be re- 
quired of every regular teacher. There can be little doubt 



181 

tliat if the School Board would hereafter elect only such 
teachers as passed examination in music, the special in- 
struction in that branch would be unnecessary. Possibly 
the instruction would not be so thorough as that of special 
teachers. It would, however, stand on an equal footing 
with other branches. 

The proficiency of our schools in the science of music is 
something remarkable. In the j^rimary schools pupils are 
perfectly acquainted with all the characters of written mu- 
sic, and read it readily. In the grammar and high schools 
the scholars easily execute quite difficult compositions. 
This is what might be expected from constant drill under 
a skilled master. Of the manner in which music is taught 
in the schools nothing but praise can be said. Still, one 
criticism is often heard. It is this : the children do not 
generally sing out of school, notwithstanding their great 
knowledge of music. All this teaching in the schools does 
not seem to develop in our young people a hearty enjoy- 
ment of music in the home and social circle, but rather the 
reverse. Our older leaders in music affirm that fewer per- 
sons sing now than before music was taught in the schools. 
A few may become professional musicians, and possibly all 
may have a critical taste for the artistic rendering of music, 
but certainly this is not the object ol teaching in the public 
schools. It ought to develop the " folk-song " among the 
people. The children should sing gladly and naturally, 
just as they give expressions to life in other ways. This 
matter is referred to as a fact of observation, without any 
attempt to explain it. 

TEACHERS. 

The city has tliis year lost two excellent male teachers. 
Mr. Lull, the popular and now much-missed sub-master of 
the High School, is successfully managing the High School 



182 

in Milford, Mass. Mr. Stevens, late master of the Piscata- 
quog Grammar School, holds a similar position in Quincy, 
Mass., the town which has lately had the distinction of ex- 
hibiting the model schools of the country. The Training 
School has been deprived of the services of Mrs. Mason, the 
principal of its primary department, for more than half of 
the year, on account of ill-health, which was largely induced 
by the great labor and intense earnestness she had for so 
many years given to her school. Miss Tozer, of Ash-street 
Middle School No. 3, and Miss Mitchell, of the Piscataquog 
Primary School No. 11, botli of them teachers of long expe- 
rience and great success, and Miss Fuller, of the Spring- 
street Primary School No. 26, more recently elected, but 
equally successful, have resigned witliin the year. Six new 
teachers have been elected : Messrs. Hopkins and Sutcliffe 
as masters, and Misses Bertha L. Dean, Belle M. Kelly, 
Carrie I. Stevens, and Lizzie J. West, as primary and mid- 
dle school teachers. All of these ladies were graduates of 
the Training School. In regard to the value of this school 
as a source of supply of teachers, we call attention to the 
remarks of the superintendent on the subject in his report. 

At the anrmal election all the old teachers were retained. 
Some of them are not such teachers as the Board could 
wish, but they have faithfully discharged their duty accord- 
ing to their ideas of teaching, and to this they owe their 
re-election. Our teachers are all very faithful to the duties 
demanded of them, but in their tact and skill and in love 
of their work there is an infinite difference. Some might 
be named so lacking in these essentials as to have an unen- 
viable reputation among the children, who dread the time 
when promotion will luring them to such teacher's room ; 
and both scholar and parent rejoice when that particular 
grade is finally passed. 

It is not the custom with committees generally to inquire 



183 

very closely into the qualification of applicants, except in 
scholarship. What is the spirit and temper of these per- 
sons who desire to teach, what evidence liave we that 
they comprehend the true work of teaching, are questions 
not often asked in the examination room. Difficult as 
it may be to answer them, the attempt should be uiade. 
Oui- method of choosing teachers (and ours is the one in 
general use) is faulty. We grant certificates for an indefi- 
nite time, and elect without trial or conditions. The suc- 
cessful candidate begins to teach, or rather begins to ex- 
periment, and, though the result be a poor teacher, slie is 
re-elected year after year. There should be more careful 
examination ; the first certificate granted should be for a 
short time, — subsequent ones to be based upon success in 
teaching ; and no beginner, however brilliant or promising 
should be set at work in these schools except for a limited 
time named in such trial certificate. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The evening schools have been in session as usual. The 
attendance this fall has been very small, owing in part, no 
doubt, to the distractions of the political campaign. The 
number of persons seeking instruction outside of the i-egu_ 
lar graded schools seems to be diminishing. A few years 
ago we had a flourishing '* Intermediate School" composed 
of such persons. For a long time there have been no appli- 
cants who could not l)e accommodated in the graded schools. 

PRIZP]-SPBAKING. 

Tlie first annual competition in speaking and reading for 
the Clarke prizes in elocution took place in January. The 
inauguration of this interesting exercise was very success- 
ful. The pupils representing the several schools acquitted 



184 

themselves well, and the large attendance of our citizens 
indicated a general interest in the subject. A considerable 
sum was realized, which was placed at interest in the name 
of the committee, in accordance with the plan of the foun- 
der of the prizes. 

STUDIES. 

The Superintendent, in his report, presents the course of 
study as arranged for the coming year. An examination 
of this will show what the schools are doing in the different 
grades below the High School. 

The High School continues in excellent condition. The 
principal is a teacher of the highest rank in his profession. 
His own teaching is thorough and conscientious ; his di- 
rection of the work under his supervision is careful and 
judicious. 

From non-resident pupils in this and other schools we 
have collected a tuition fund of over six hundred dollars. 
This lias been used in part in furnishing to the High School 
needed books and apparatus. The Board was also glad to 
accept the donation of a valuable microscope from Mrs. W. 
W. Brown for use in this school. The High School is now 
well supplied with appliances for practical teaching. Sug- 
gestions have been made for a change in the course of 
study. At present there are three distinct courses, with 
one or two optional studies. We find the tendency in other 
cities is toward making all high-school studies optional. 
The proposed changes liere would give an arrangement 
equivalent to five distinct courses. There would seem to 
be no better way to meet the public demand for more prac- 
tical results in high-school instruction than to allow the 
largest freedom in choice of studies. This would also meet 
the objection that the High School does not fit pupils for 
practical occupations. A young man desiring to become 



185 

a chemist or manul'acturer might have liberty to pursue a 
preparatory coui-se of study sijecially for that purpose. As 
the school is, it is regarded as one of the best preparatory 
schools in New England. We only wish that pupils better 
realized the great privileges they enjoy tbere, and would 
make the best use of them. 

In June the Board re-elected Mr. William E. Buck super- 
intendent for the ensuing two years. He continues to 
administer the atfairs of his office with ability and faith- 
fulness. The constantly increasing labor attending the 
proper execurion of school laws (duties which belong to a 
truant officer) encroach upon the time he would be glad to 
devote to the school-room. We want in our scliools the 
best methods of teaching and the best efforts of the teacher. 
It is the duty of the Superintendent to secure these for us. 
Since his first election to this office Mr. Buck has worked 
faithfully to secure these ends. We feel sure that he has 
much more to bring to us for the improvement of our 
schools. 

The schools of ^Manchester are, probably, not greatly bet- 
ter nor worse than the average public schools. Tlie public- 
school sy stein, of which our schools are a part, notwith- 
standing the sharp attacks made upon it, was never more 
firmly rooted in the regard of the people than to-day. No 
political party dares to leave out of its platform of princi- 
ples a pledge to sup])ort the conmion school. Of all the 
plans adopted by governments for fostering education, ours 
is the broadest and most successful. In many other coun- 
tries there are systems of general education, but they are 
purely governmental, and intended to make learning sub- 
servient to the ruling powers. They are able to boast that 
their whole people can read, write, and cipher, but must 
admit that they smother or crush out the aspirations ot 
their youth. Their systems force the young to attend 



186 

school, not for their own advantage, but for the advantage 
of the government and its hereditary class. The highest 
honors are reserved for a few. The youth of humble ori- 
gin has few incentives for acquiring an education. How 
different is tlie case here. Our children are taught that 
education is its own reward ; that to the humblest the high- 
est political preferment and individual success are possible, if 
they will make themselves capable and worthy. The work 
the public school has done, and is doing, to perpetuate the 
American idea of political equality is incalculable. Every 
public school is a little republic in itself, — a miniature 
copy of the nation, — made up of all natiorialities, living 
and learning together, every day asserting the principle 
that all men are created free and equal. Every school- 
room I'epeats the words of the constitution : " No title of 
nobility shall be granted by the United Slates." That 
peculiar sentiment which animated the people of this coun- 
try from the first, viz., the desire to have their children 
" get on " in the world, the desire to give them a better ed- 
ucation than they themselves had, is handed down from 
generation to generation through the public school. 

Our system of grades in school, by which the children 
constantly move forward as a reward of eifort, is a type of 
the national life, as well as of the possibilities in the future 
beyond the school-room. In such a city as Manchester, 
where the scliools are so mixed in their membership, it is 
impossible to overestimate the power of the school to unify 
the population and make the coming citizen enterprising 
and self-reliant. The children of foreign parents, forced, 
it may be, to attend school, become the possessors of an 
inheritance better than money, and better tlian was ever 
dreamed of by their fathers. This is the reason why we 
want all our schools free, and why we are opposed to de- 
nominational or class schools of any description. And this 



187 

is the reason, too, why all the children must be gathered 
in, — willingly, if may be ; forcibly, if necessary. 

Such a system cannot be a failure. The structure which 
we build upon it may be, and sometimes is. poorly con- 
structed, but we shall build better and better. We vshall 
do better things for the health of our children, providing 
for physical development as well as mental growth ; we 
shall do better things for their conduct, teaching them how 
to live pure and honest lives ; we shall devise better courses 
of study and better methods of discipline for the practical 
duties of life. Here in Manchester we have builded as 
wisely as others ; and to-day we do not know why the four 
thousand children in the public schools of the city are not 
as fortunately situated as the children of any city in any 
land. The great majority of them are healthy and happy ; 
according to their ability they are rapidly gaining much 
useful knowledge and the skill to acquire more. They are 
every day taught, so far as their school goes, to be orderly, 
obedient, and industrious. And if they are so fortunate as 
to have homes in which the same lessons are enforced, if 
their parents are wise enough to direct them to some defi- 
nite aim in life and to guide them safely through the peril- 
ous ways which lie outside the school, then they cannot fail 
to become successful men and women. 

MARSHALL P. HALL, 

For the Committee. 

Manchester, Dec. 31, 1880. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester. 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with jour rules, requiring 
an annual report from the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, I herewith respectfully submit the following as my 
fourth report, the same being for the year 1880, and the 
twenty-fifth of its series : — 

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS. 

During the year now so rapidly drawing to a close, the 
primary schools have shown greatest improvement ; and 
that, too, in the matter of reading, the most important 
branch of study there taught. This improvement has been 
chiefly due, I think, to the introduction of Monroe's Read- 
ing Charts in schools of second primary grade, and to the 
supply of supplementary reading afforded all primary classes. 
Teachers have found, in the directions accompanying the 
charts, and in the notes to Appleton's and Monroe's Read- 
ers, suggestions which, accompanied by hints from the 
Superintendent, have provoked a spirit of inquiry and inves- 
tigation on the part of teachers, several of whom have been 
thus led to make practical application of the better meth- 
ods of teaching reading, and all of whom perseveringly 
attempting which have met with commendable success ; 



190 

and among the number of these are found, for the most 
part, the younger portion of our corps of primary-school 
teachers. 

To make more effectual and complete the reform at- 
tempted in the endeavor made to secure naturalness of 
expression in early attempts at reading, when proper notions 
in regard to expression are most easily cultivated and when 
fixed habits in regard to the same are chiefly formed, there 
is need that each school of primary grade be supplied with 
two or three sets of books for supplementary reading. 
Before making use of a book little children should master 
the words of a First Reader, under tlie skillful direction of 
a teacher who should first teach the meaning of its words 
by object illustration, and then their forms upon the black- 
board, from which the pupils should learn the words by 
copying them repeatedly upon their slates ; then would the 
children thus taught be delighted when upon taking the 
reader they there rediscover old friends under a new form 
of sufficient resemblance to be readily recognized ; and 
they would enthusiastically proceed to tell the simple sto- 
ries found, instead of halting, stumbling, and blundering 
over meaningless words. So when they have completed a 
First Reader and become so familiar with its pieces that 
they are no longer interested in them, they need not a 
reader of more difficult words over which to stumble till 
they have lost the habit of correct expression and become 
stupefied to the spirit of true reading ; they need, instead 
of a Second Reader, more reading of the grade of a First 
Reader containing other stories, to keep their interest 
alive, clothed in a new but simple dress, to enlarge their 
vocabulary of words, that they may thus be prepared to 
treat a Second Reader after the manner of their treatment 
of the First Reader, to read it. In a similar way there 
ought to be opportunity afforded our pupils to take inter- 



191 

mediate steps between second and third and third and 
fourth readers. To attain this end there should be will- 
ingness, I think, upon the part of the school Committee, 
annually to a])propriate a portion of the tuition fund, re- 
ceived for the instruction of non-resident pupils, for the 
purpose of securing the necessary amount of supplementary 
reading. This form of reading may also be profitably ex- 
tended to the higher grades of grammar schools, in the 
shape of judicious selections trom standard authors ,(of 
which several excellent books have recently been published), 
for the purpose of affording pupils some acquaintance with 
the best composers, thereby winning them to a love of that 
beauty and purity of style and goodness of sentiment which 
will cause them voluntarily to reject the demoralizing forms 
of literature now so abundant. The question may properly 
arise here, I think, whether the committee cannot do even 
more to stem the tide of baneful influence exerted by the 
circulation of vicious literature so prevalent in our midst, 
by entreaty with those who probably thoughtlessly deal in 
it through self-interest, by law as has been attempted else- 
where, or at least Vjy preparing a catalogue of the better 
portion of the works found in the city library, suitable for 
youth, which list shall be freely offered to the youth of the 
city. Certain it is that at no distant day the " mental in- 
toxication " now drawn from the corrupt forms of cheap lit- 
erature, if continued, will be so apparent in its ruinous effects 
that the dispensers will he ranked as no better than those 
who otherwise foster material for swelling the hordes of 
the criminal classes, and the interests of society will de- 
mand laws for protection against a foe now insidiously 
penetrating its most cherished treasures ; and if those hav- 
ing, in part, the charge of those treasures can do anything 
for their protection, it should be regarded a privilege to 
exercise the right and the power. Teachers have done, 



192 

and are doing, much to cultivate the tastes of their pupils 
for the higher and better class of literature. One school,* 
at least, has quite a number of good books and magazines 
which, obtained chiefly through the efforts of the principal, 
are systematically and fairly loaned to the pupils under his 
direction. Appropriate supplementary reading and a cata- 
logue of the good and suitable books which a city library 
should atford, supplied schools by the committee, would 
afford teacliers great and material aid in their endeavors to 
encourage and assist pupils to acquire ability for making 
judicious selections for profitable reading. Incidentally, it 
might be here hinted that wealthy citizens desirous of 
making public donations for the good of the rising genera- 
tion could find ample opportimity in tlie establishment of 
libraries in our public schools. 

Pardoning these digressions, permit me to mention 
another way in which I think our primary schools might 
be improved, and that is, in furnishing them material with 
whicli arithmetic and oral instruction might be illustrated 
by the use of objects. This should do for the latter studies 
what the charts and their accompaniments are doing for 
the improvement of reading. 

In regard to the middle schools, it may be said that the 
pupils of French descent appear to be gradually taking pos- 
session. Of the thirteen schools of this grade, four will 
already average more tlian halt of their whole number of 
that nationality ; and of the thirty-one primary schools, 
eleven contain an average of more than three-fourths of 
their whole number of the same nationality. Reading in the 
middle grades, as a consequence of the influx of tongues 
as yet partially strange to our language, is not so good as 
formerly ; but it is hoped that pupils who have had the ben- 
efit of the better instruction given in primary grades dur- 
* The Ash-strcet School. 



193 

ing the past year may be found, on entering the middle 
grades, to be in a better condition for undertaking the 
course of reading there prescribed. Otherwise, I think 
that in those schools consisting largely of children who 
elsewhere use a foreign language, it would be better to use 
readers containing simpler matter, because the class of 
children to whom reference is made ought not to be kept in 
primary grades, since they are quite competent to do the 
other work of the middle schools ; and, as was remarked 
in a former report, they excel in arithmetic, penmanship, 
and drawing. The French children who attend the middle 
schools with any great degree of regularity obtain a fair 
knowledge of our language and of the other studies there 
taught ; but by far the larger portion attend only three 
months of a year, and too many of these for the chief 
purpose of simply becoming legally entitled to the priv- 
ilege of employment in the mills. Their invasion of the 
middle schools, however, shows one of two things, — either 
that instruction better adapted to their condition has of late 
been given in the primary schools, which has resulted 
in a greater advancement for the same age, or that this 
element of our population is becoming more stable and 
designs citizenship. Probably both implications are true, 
and we may see, in a few years hence, another advance 
which shall make their presence recognizable in the gram- 
mar schools. 

The latter schools have continued the even tenor of their 
way, and for the most part well done the work expected of 
them. These schools in their several departments are 
chiefly in charge of experienced and competent teachers, 
who, like the better portion of teachers in other grades, 
daily do solid work. Personal industry, continuity and 
regularity of school work, however, are in no one class ot 
our teachers more highly exemplified as a whole than by 

13 



194 

the teachers of the High School. If indolent pupils be 
discovered in the latter school, it cannot be that they are 
such through lack of example or precept on the part of 
their instructors ; and it is but just to add that my observa- 
tion is, that within the past two years there has been great 
improvement in the morale of the school with respect to in- 
dustry and application to study on the part of its pupils. 
Occasionally we hear unfavorable comments in regard 
to the conduct of pupils belonging to the higher grades 
of schools, upon the streets and in other public places, 
characterized as boisterous and uncivil, or at least as un- 
gentlemanly. But to what extent the schools are justly 
answerable for a lack of the amenities of life on the part 
of their pupils is certainly an open question ; and it is 
equally certain that they are not wholly responsible, for it 
is not in the nature of things to expect or believe that all 
are taught them at home. The experience of those having 
most to do with the control of children is, that, like colts 
and volcanoes, their natural inclinations, or bent, restrained 
or pent up for the time being, break forth with redoubled 
energy when those restraints are removed ; and no one 
more than the teacher regrets, when he has succeeded in 
keeping a rude and boisterous pupil within the bounds of 
decency through a school session, that such a pupil, when 
released from the portals of the school-house, should hoot 
in the yard, make use of nicknames upon the street, and 
uncivilly salute his superiors at the post-office. Yet it is 
fair to consider that the character of the government of a 
school and the manner and habits of its teachers have 
some influence in removing or perpetuating ill-bred man- 
ners ; and teachers of ail grades should therefore see that 
by indiscretions upon their part they do not lay themselves 
open to an opportunity for a charge of treating their pupils 
in a way unbecoming a gentleman or a lady. 



195 

TEACHERS. 

The greater my ol)servation in, and the more extended 
my experience with, schools, the more certain do I feel 
that, of all things the committee can do for the schools, 
there is no one thing under their control that can so greatly 
improve them as that the committee avail themselves of 
every safeguard to enable them to secure the right teacher 
for the right place. While I have several times intimated 
that of the elementary schools there is a larger proportion 
of good teachers in the grammar grades as a whole, it is 
equally true that there are those in both middle and pri- 
mary grades just as good for their places as the best in any 
of our schools. 

During the present year three good teachers have with- 
drawn from the city schools : at the close of the spring 
term, Miss Habtie S. Tozer, teacher of Middle School No. 
3 ; William M. Stevens, master of Piscataquog Grammar 
School ; and Herbert W. Lull, sub-master of the High 
school. The position of the latter was most difficult to 
fill, both on account of its nature and the high appreciation 
Mr. Lull had come to have of its needs and duties. Choice 
for the position was finally made of Mr. George I. Hop- 
kins, then principal of the Nantucket, Mass., High School. 
The mastership of the Piscataquog Grammar School was 
given to Mr. Frank S. Sutcliffe, a graduate of our schools 
and of the last class at Dartmouth College. Miss Tozer's 
place was filled by the election of Miss Bertha L. Dean, who 
was also a graduate of our schools, including the Training 
School, and one who had rendered acceptable service as a 
substitute. It is hoped that the efforts made to have the 
situations worthily filled will result in no disappointment, 
and that the committee may be inspired anew during the 
coming year to secure the best teacher possible for every 



196 

vacancy that may occur. Near the close of the fall term 
Miss May R. Fuller also resigned her position as teacher 
of Primary School No. 26, and Miss Carrie I. Stevens was 
elected to fill the vacancy ; and after the close of that term 
Miss Frederica S. Mitchell resigned her position as teacher 
of Middle School No. 11, and the vacancy has been filled 
by the election of Miss Lizzie A. Burns. 

SUGGESTED CHANGES. 

The plan of admitting pupils to the High School but 
once a year, undoubtedly better for that school, makes it 
necessary to leave room somewhere in the grades below, 
during the first half of the school year, for the accommo- 
dation of those pupils who are advanced at the time of the 
first semi-annual promotions in those grades. Heretofore, 
spare room for that purpose has been left in first divisions, 
or masters' rooms, of the grammar schools : and the small 
number, which has not usually more than half-filled those 
rooms for the first part of the year, has caused some of the 
committee to feel that the heads of those schools should in 
some way have their rooms filled, if for no other reason, to 
relieve the overcrowded condition of the rooms in grades 
below. 

A way of doing this, to which I can see no serious objec- 
tion, would be as follows : At the end of the spring term, 
■when admissions are made to the High School, admit to 
each of the rooms in the elementary schools two classes 
from the rooms next below, and thus fill the several rooms 
permanently for the year, except that the lowest primary 
grades during the fall and winter would contain but two 
classes, or from thirty to thirty-five pupils, where room 
would be left for the usual influx of a sufficient number to 
form another class in the spring. Correct impressions on 



197 

the part of pupils in regard to promotions could easily be ef- 
fected by designating the classes by the letters of the alpha- 
bet, continuously, through all grades, as follows : the two 
classes of first divisions as A and B ; second divisions, C 
and D ; third divisions, E and F ; fourth divisions, G and 
H ; first middle schools, I and J ; second middle schools, 
K and L ; the three classes of first primary schools as 
M, N, and ; and those of second primary schools as 
P, Q, and R. Now at the end of the spring term, 
when promotions are made, under the present system 
all in classes A and B whose work for the year has been 
satisfactory, and others of those classes who at the open- 
ing of the fall term have been found able to pass sat- 
isfactory examinations, have been admitted to the High 
School. Practically, this has taken from the grammar 
schools nearly all of classes A and B at the end of each 
year, as it was designed should be done by the last arrange- 
ment of the course of study in designating the work of 
those classes (and as there seemed necessity for doing 
when admissions to the High School were limited to once a 
year), in order to leave room in the elementary schools, so 
that the semi-annual promotions there required could be 
properly made, and room be afforded for the admission of 
new pupils in second primary schools. Therefore, when at 
the end of the spring term classes A and B are passed for 
graduation, the custom has been to promote class C to the 
position and work of class B, there thus being in the mas- 
ter's room but one class during the first part of the year. 
At that time class D becomes class C ; class E, class D ; 
and so on down the list of classes ; while the beginners at 
the opening of the fall term are organized as class R. 
Then at the time of the first semi-annual promotions, class 
B has come to the position and work of class A, class C of 
class B, class D of class C, and so on. 



198 

My suggestion, then, for having the rooms of highest 
grade in the grammar schools filled at the opening of the 
fall term, differs from the present arrangement only in 
anticipating by five months a change of room for the sec- 
ond class in each division, by advancing the same to the 
room of next higher grade at the close of the spring term. 
Thus, classes B and A being passed for graduation, D and 
C would become C and B and find places in the master's 
room ; F and E would become E and D. and be placed in 
the room of next lower grade, and so on to the lowest ; 
then, without change of pupils to another room at the end 
of five months, promotions would be made by allowing class 
B to take up the work of class A ; class C, that of class B ; 
class D, that of class C ; and so on through the list of 
classes, pupils thus finding their promotions made solely 
dependent on the character of the work accomplished and 
to be undertaken, without regard to the room in which 
they may have been placed. There would result, it seems 
to me, at least four advantages from this arrangement: 
First, all those pupils who could have hope at the opening 
of the year of entering the High School at the end thereof 
would be in the master's room a full year, instead of about 
half of them, as under the present arrangement, remaining 
there only a part of the year : second, the several teachers 
of all grades except those of lowest primary would for the 
first part of the year have the range of the work of the 
class next below that of what has hitherto been regarded 
as their special grade ; indeed, they would have the priv- 
ilege of doing the last class work preparatory to the admis- 
sion of pupils to what teachers might regard as their 
especial grade, and thus they might be caused to feel, that, 
in part, they prepare them for that grade, which arrange- 
ment, I think, would result in broadening the teachers and 
causing them better to appreciate the relation of their own 



199 

work to that of the grade next higher ; third, lowest pri- 
mary schools would be relieved, at least for the first half 
of the year, of the overcrowded condition which they gen- 
erally experience, and it is those schools which should be 
least in numbers because in them most individual work is 
needed ; fourth, the best use of writing and drawing books 
would be attained, and the use of two different numbers of 
drawing books in each of the several rooms, otherwise 
necessary the last half of the year, would be avoided. 

The present arrangement of leaving first divisions with 
but one class during the first part of the year, aside from 
simply affording room so that promotions in the elemen- 
tary schools could be made at the middle of the year with- 
out then advancing pupils to the High School, was effected 
for the purpose of providing opportunity, if possible, for 
masters, during that part of the year at least, to become 
familiar with the internal work of the few grades under 
their special charge ; but in practice it is found that oppor- 
tunity cannot be wisely had for this purpose, unless mas- 
ters are provided with means for placing suitable persons 
in temporary charge of their rooms while they are absent. 
I, therefore, beg to submit, for your consideration, whether 
the master of a large school should not have an influence 
difierent from that of teacher of forty pupils and chief of 
police over the other schools in his building ; whether he 
should not have direct charge of all the schools in his build- 
ing and, it may be, of others in the district that feed them ; 
in short, whether he sliould not exercise his influence and 
capacity as teacher in this larger sphere, and become ac- 
quainted with the operations of the mind in the different 
stages represented in these various grades, that he may 
better direct the training of those committed to his care. 
The time is ripe for a higher order of teaching ; and in a 
city so large as this, where many of the schools are isolated, 



200 

and several of them are collected in a number of different 
buildings which have no head teacher, the Superintendent 
feels that to secure best or even good methods of teaching 
in all our schools, there is need in those schools which 
have ofl&cial heads that the principals should become famil- 
iar with the plans of the Superintendent for the general 
improvement of the schools, and have power to see that 
those plans are faithfully carried out in the schools of their 
several buildings. This mode of supervising the schools 
is felt necessary and is in common practice throughout the 
country in all cities, so far as I am acquainted with them, 
of the size of ours, and in many much smaller places, 
indeed, as a rule, wherever the best schools are found. 

Allow me a suggestion for the improvement of the qual- 
ity of scholastic material afforded the High School, and I 
will close the recommendatory portion of my report. By 
observing the work of those who have entered the High 
School for the last two or three years, I find that pupils 
admitted on the basis of work satisfactorily done during 
the previous year (a work which in fact exhibits the results 
of work done for several years) have, in general, also done 
the work of the High School in a manner satisfactory to 
their teachers and creditable to themselves ; while, on the 
other hand, that those pupils from first divisions of gram- 
mar schools, the work of whom for the year was not satis- 
factory, though they were able at the close of vacation to 
pass a satisfactory examination in grammar-school studies 
and have therefore been admitted to the High School, have, 
in the main, constituted the weak element of that school 
and have not been able to reap for themselves its best advan- 
tages. I attribute this unfavorable condition, first, to the 
fact that the examinations are passed as a result of cram- 
ming through the long vacation; and, second, that prolonged 
application then, on the heels of exertions for the previous 



201 

year, so far exhausts the energies of pupils to whom refer- 
ence is made, that they have no strength during the suc- 
ceeding year for vitalizing what attainments they may 
have. The practice heretofore pursued has been followed 
for the purpose of realizing, if possible, the ambitions of 
parents and pupils ; but, since it is demonstrated by trial 
that it is not for the advantage of either, and can result 
only in disappointment to both, I recommend that pupils 
whose work in first divisions of grammar schools is found 
unsatisfactory at the end of the school year shall not be 
allowed examination trial for admission to the High School 
at the close of the summer vacation. It may also be under- 
stood, that, since the committee did not inaugurate the 
practice, the Superintendent will not repeat it, unless di- 
rected to do so by the committee. 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Since there is no public record of our Training School. I 
feel that even for the information of committees it will be 
well to submit the following : The school was first organ- 
ized experimentally in the year 1869, the " Higher Depart- 
ment" (of middle school grade) under the charge of Miss 
Nancy S. Bunton as teacher, in the Merrimack-street 
school-house at the corner of Union street ; and the " Pri- 
mary Department" under the charge of Miss Helen M. 
Morrill as teacher, in the Manchester-street school-house at 
the corner of Chestnut street. The design of the school was 
primarily to afford means for supplying the city schools 
with teachers who should be somewhat acquainted with our 
system of schools, and to provide for a better class of sub- 
stitute work than that which of necessity was being chiefly 
done by raw graduates of the High School, who, it may be 
remarked, were soon found to be given permanent situations 
as teachers, and to attain greater success as such than those 



202 

of experience whom the salaries here paid would attract 
from abroad. So. largely through Supt. Edgerly's instru- 
mentality, as it appears, the school was started as before 
mentioned. Later, the primary department of the school 
was transferred to the Merrimack-street house and placed 
in charge of Mrs. Martha N. Mason as teacher. The 
school was soon re-organized with Miss Bunton as principal, 
and Miss Mintie C. Edgerly as assistant, of the higher 
department ; Mrs. Mason as principal, and Miss Anna 0. 
Heath as assistant, of the primary department. On the 
transfer of Miss Heath to the grammar-school corps of 
teachers, about two years ago, Miss Elvira S. Prior was 
made assistant in the primary department of the Training 
School. During the past year, very much to the regret of 
the school authorities, as well as to that of the friends and 
patrons of the school, Mrs. Mason, the efficient and 
esteemed principal of the primary department, has been 
obliged to be absent many months on account of ill health. 
Her school, in the mean time, at different portions of the 
year has been taught by Misses Nellie M. James and Lizzie 
A. Burns, recent graduates of the school, who have done 
good service as teachers, but could not reasonably be 
required to train sub-teachers. 

In order to show to what extent the school has realized 
•the object for which it was established, its membership is 
subjoined, and, so far as known, the subsequent relation of 
its members to our public schools is indicated. At first 
there was no fixed period during which sub-teachers were 
required to remain in the school, and many of them were 
soon called away to serve as substitutes or as permanent 
teachers in the public schools. 

The following is a list of those who served for different 
periods of time in the primary department, while located 
in the Manchester-street house : Addie A. Marshall *, Alice 



203 

G.|Lord t,''Nel]ie jTappan *, Ida Gee *, Martha N. Mason f, 
Mary P.^ Barnes f, Ella F. Salisbury f, Celia Chase*, Ger- 
trude Borden*, Putnam, Bartlett, and 

Emma P. Beane f (12). 

The following served in the Merrimack-street house, in 
the early history of the school, for short and varying peri- 
ods of time : Eliza I. Young*, Kate W. Osgood*, Clara E. 
Davis *, Isabella G. Mack*, Mary A. Buzzellf, A. Lizzie 
Tolles *, Nellie Cheney *, Nellie Pearson f, Susan Page $, 
Emma H. Perley*, Hattie B. Childs, Isabelle R. Daniels f, 
Ella Whitney*, Anna 0. Heath f, Lizzie H. Patterson*, 
Anna J. Dana f, Kate Joy *, Annie M. Offutt *, Nellie Tap- 
pan*, Julia D. Marston*, Emma M. Bennett, Ida P. Gee *, 
Addie M. Lear f, Martha J. Boyd *, and Rocilla M. Tuson f 
(25). 

When the school was permanently organized, it was pro- 
vided that sub-teachers should serve six months — three 
weeks in each of the four grades, and twelve weeks in the 
grade of their choice — before being considered 

GRADUATES OF THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The following is a complete list of such graduates, as 
shown by the records of the school : Martha E. Clough, 
Augusta S. Downs t, Estella N. Hewlett*, Minnie C. Ab- 
bott t, Jennie P. Bailey f, Mary A. Smith f, Annie M. Nich- 
ols ij:, Medora Weeks*, Etta J. Carley f, Lucy W. Perkins, 
Emma J. Henry *, Emma E. Lawrence, Jennie G. Steb- 
binsf, M. Eugenia Lord |, Cora M. Dearborn f, Ella P. 
Sanborn f, Flora M. Senter f, Florence McEvoy f, Nellie M. 
Dennett, Ella P. Barker, Carrie M. Gilmoref, Ida R. 
Eaton, Ellen A. Morrill, Lilla 0. Cressy, Clara E. Woods f, 
Emma C. Gee, Nellie B. Putnam f, Clara G. Fogg f, Jessie 
B. Farmer*, Bertha L. Dean f, Mary W. Mitchell f, Belle 
M. Kelly f, Clara J. Garland, Susan G. Woodman f, Mary 



204 

E. Sylvester f , Fannie D. Moulton f , Gertrude H. Brooks, 
Florence A. Nichols |, Louisa R. Quint f , Emma L. Stokes f, 
May R. Fuller *, Emma W. Mitchell, Myra P. Richardson $, 
Lizzie J. Westf, Lizzie A. Burns f, Emma S. Sanborn J, 
Hattie L. Johnson, Annie W. Fatten, Nellie M. James, 
Nettie 0. Woodman, Lenora C. Gilford |, Carrie I. Ste- 
vens f (52), 

The foregoing order does not indicate the relative times 
of graduation, but the order of entrance to the school. 
The first fifteen were frequently called upon to do substitute 
work in the schools, and the order of their times of gradu- 
ation was consequently made to vary much from that of 
their entrance ; and the order of graduation with others 
was interfered with by sickness and other causes. 

There were several others who entered the Training 
School undoubtedly for the purpose of graduation ; but 
most of those entering prior to those named in the list of 
graduates were called away before they had completed the 
course, to fill positions as teachers here or elsewhere, and 
others voluntarily withdrew for reasons of their own. The 
following comprises a list of both these classes, and of all 
those who not heretofore named have entered the school, 
the last four being present members : Annie H. Abbott *, 
Elvira S. Prior f, Belle B. Corey *, Josie A. Bosher *, Cleora 
E. Bailey*, Ara A. Piatt*, Olive J. Randall f, Helen M. 
Locke *, Sarah M. Hadlej, Izetta S. Locke f, Julia A. Dear- 
born*, Etta C. McLaren, Nellie M. Brown, Olive A. Rowef, 
Ella J. Trickey, Jennie Spence, Josie H. Martin, Mary E. 
Bunton, Kate M. Follansbee, Georgie A. Wyman (20). 

It thus appears that of the one hundred and seven dif- 
ferent members of the Training School, seventy-one have 
been regularly employed as teachers in our day schools, 

* Afterwards regularly emploj-ed in the day schools. 

t Now regularly employed in "the day schools. 

t Afterwards regularly employed in the evening schools. 



205 

and of this number forty-one are now thus in the service 
of the city, comprising four-sevenths of our present corps 
of lady teachers. Add to this the fact that nearly all sub- 
stitute work in our schools is done by graduates of the 
Training School, and it will be seen how great an influence 
this school is exerting over the school system of the city. 
If, as we believe to be true, the character of a school is 
chiefly dependent upon the character of its teacher, and it 
continues to be the policy of the School Committee, through 
either necessity or expediency, to employ home talent as 
the teaching force of our schools, then surely ought we to 
cherish the Training School, and afford it every facility for 
enabling it to meet and sustain the character whicli its 
name implies. 

CONCLUDING REMARKS. 

It is to be greatly regretted, I think, that parents and 
citizens do not more generally visit the public schools. 
This remark does not arise from any unusual negligence 
in this particular, but observation and a knowledge of the 
facts in nearly all instances in which any are forward to 
point out defects in the schools will bear me out in the 
statement that unfavorable criticism of the schools and of 
their management usually comes from those who know 
comparatively nothing about them from personal investiga- 
tion. While minor defects may be acknowledged, and the 
highest degree of attainment in the purpose of the public 
school to prepare the children of this generation for the 
highest type of citizenship in the next cannot be positively 
claimed, yet the most casual visitor, not in search of a 
fault for fostering a preconceived prejudice, would be 
strongly impressed, if not ready to acknowledge, that there 
is in our schools at least an honest and earnest endeavor to 
meet the demand of the times as it is understood, by lead- 



206 

ing educators, that the interests of citizenship can best be 
met by the public schools. 

The objector, in general principles, is confident that music 
or drawing, or both, that object lessons or oral instruction 
and physical exercises have no place in the public schools, 
that all " new fangled notions " of improved methods of 
teaching are a " humbug" ; in a word, that, however great 
have been the improvements in other departments during 
the last half century, in schools there has been no improve- 
ment, that ''school-keeping" is just as good as school- 
teaching. The reasonable portion of this class of objectors 
may yet recognize, as in other things, that, after all, those 
leading educators the world over who have devoted their 
lives to a study of the science of education and its relation 
to life, and to popular education and its relation to the 
State, may know as much, and presumably more, about 
what the schools should be, than those who but occasionally 
give the matter serious thought. However, the schools 
being " of the people, by the people, and for the people," it 
may be regarded a good sign that there are those disposed 
to give them public criticism ; and any fair discussion of 
their defects can but result for the common good. In order 
that our citizens may see to what extent the work required 
of the schools is substantial, and in accord with the pro- 
prieties and essentials of pul)lic education as advocated by 
leading educators of the present time, and that it may be 
seen wliat portion of the time is allowed for the pursuit of 
the several studies prescribed, I append to this report the 
" Course of Study " adopted for the elementary schools, 
togetlier with indications of the amount of time allowed for 
opening exercises, physical exercises, and recesses. The 
course, however, is not assumed to be a model for other 
places, for it has been found necessary to modify in some 
particulars a form which under other circumstances it 



207 

would be more satisfactory to present. Every place of the 

size of Manchester has peculiarities which more or less 

affect the character of its public schools ; and it is the part 

of wisdom to recognize them and adapt the means to the 

end of accomplishing, as far as possible, the greatest good 

for the greatest number. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WM. E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 
December, 1880. 



208 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR 
THE YEAR 1880. 



Schools. 



6 . 



Whole No. 
Belonging.* 



GlELS. 



^s 



o£ 






Higb School... . 

Franklin-Street Grammar School. 
Lincoln-Street Grammar School.. 

Ash-Street Grammar School 

Spring-Street Grammar School 

Piscataquog Grammar School 

Amoskeag Grammar School 



Totals . 



Middle School No. 



" " " 9.. 

" " " 10.. 

'< " '• 11.. 

Training Department. 



Totals 



Primarv School No. 1. 
' " " 2. 

" " 3. 

" 4. 



6.. 

7.. 

8.. 

9.. 
10.. 
11.. 
12.. 
1.3.. 
14.. 
15.. 
16,. 
17.. 
18 . 
19.. 
20.. 
21t. 



" 23.. 
" 24.. 
" 25.. 
" 26.. 
" 27$. 
" 28t. 
" 29§. 
" 30|. 



Bakersville. . 
Training Department 

Totals 



248 

256 
311 
271 
121 
130 
57 



65 
71 

77 
72 
67 
93 
86 
71 
78 
75 
76 
104 



77 

99 

72 

72 

90 

89 

81 

105 

115 

118 

105 

75 

84 

75 

103 

80 

62 

142 

60 

94 

45 

83 

94 

101 

83 

116 

101 

87 

47 

38 

71 

151 



90 
107 

96 

43 
.50 

23 



409 

15 

26 
27 
27 
22 
28 
35 
31 
35 
28 
22 
51 



S3 
151 
109 
47 
58 
19 



183 

144 
181 
170 
63 
79 
32 



467 

25 

28 
18 
24 
23 
27 
24 
24 
24 
18 
29 
33 



297 

31 
33 
34 
20 
32 
43 
22 
30 
37 
37 
31 
29 
50 
26 
34 
20 
19 
62 
36 
30 
12 
32 
35 
29 
33 
26 
21 
31 
14 

35 
64 



669 

35 
41 
44 
40 
35 
43 
40 
41 
29 
42 
37 
63 



490 

44 
43 
38 
44 
43 
45 
51 
48 
43 
48 
50 
41 
49 
40 
44 
45 
28 
47 
36 
45 
41 
40 
46 
48 
51 
44 
44 
50 
37 
33 
43 
91 



988 1440 



178 

139 
173 
160 
58 
73 
29 



632 

33 
39 
42 
37 
31 
39 
36 
39 
26 
37 
33 
58 



450 

39 
39 
33 
41 
39 
43 
48 
43 
39 
45 
46 
38 
43 
36 
39 
41 
25 
43 
33 
40 
37 
36 
41 
44 
46 
39 
40 
44 
30 
31 
37 
84 

1302 



209 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR THE 
TEAR 1880. — Continued. 





)LS. 


a 

SI 


Whole No. 
Belonging.* 






=i 


SCHOC 


Boys. 


GlELS. 


"1 


Suburban School, Dis 


fcrictNo. 1 

' " 3 


12 
60 
70 
30 
30 
48 
40 
29 


9 
30 
36 
15 
10 
21 
18 
11 

150 


2 
17 
32 
14 
11 
16 
20 
13 


7 
37 
49 
16 
13 
30 
20 
16 


6t 
33 
46 
12 
11 
27 
16 
14 


90.9 
88.3 
94.5 
75.5 
85.0 
90.0 
83.3 
80.5 




' " 4 




' '' 5 




' " 6 




' " 7 




' " 8 




" 9 






Totals 


125 


188 


165 


87.0 








2166 


1970 


2970 


2727 


92.0 





* Exclusive of those received, by promotion or transfer, from other schools in the city. 

t Open during the spring term only. 

t In existence during the spring and fall terms. 

§ In existence during the fall term only. 

It may be added, for the benefit of the uninformed, that there is in this city an ex- 
tensive system of Romaii-Oatholic parochial schools, which accounts in part for the 
small portion of our population (33,000) in the public schools. 



LIST OF TEACHERS AND JANITORS. 

HIGH SCHOOL, — BEECH STREET. 

Principal. — Albert W. Bacheler. 
Assistant. — G. I. Hopkins. 

Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Emma J. Ela. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 



TRAINING SCHOOL, — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Higher Department. 

Principal. — Nancy S. Bunton. 
Assistant. — Mintie C. Edgerly. 

14 



210 

Primary Department. 

Principal. — Martha N. Mason. 
Assistant. — Elvira S. Prior. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL, — FRANKLIN STREET. 

Principal. — Edward P. Sherburne. 
Assistant. — Clara G. Fogg. 

Lottie R. Adams. 

Carrie B. Reid, 

LINCOLN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal. — Benjamin F. Dame. 
Assistant. — Julia A. Baker. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

ASH-STREET GRAMMARJSCHOOL. 

Principal. — Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistant. — Anstrice G. Flanders. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

Sarah J. Green. 

SPRING-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Mary L. Sleeper. 
Anna 0. Heath. 

PISCATAQUOG, NORTH MAIN STREET. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistant. — Mary A. Lear. 

Amoskeag. 
Etta J. Carley. 



211 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 



No. 1. Blodget street. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 

2, Ash Street. — Mary A. Smith. 

3, Ash Street. — Bertha L. Dean. 

4, Lincoln Street. — Anna J. Dana. 

5, Lincoln Street. — Carrie M. Gilmore. 

6, North Main Street. — Florence McEvoy. 

7, Franklin Street. — Hattie G. Flanders. 

8, Franklin Street. — C. Augusta Abbott. 

9, Spring Street. — Fannie D. Moulton. 

10, Spring Street. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

11, North Main Street. — Frederica S. Mitchell. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodget Street. — Ella F. Salisbury. 

2, Manchester Street. — Clara N. Brown. 

3, Ash Street. — Georgianna Dow. 

4, Ash Street. — Helen M. Morrill. 

5, Lowell Street. — Florence L. Stone. 

6, Wilson Hill. — Abbie E. Abbott. 

7, Lincoln Street. — Emma F. Beane. 

8, Lowell Street. — Nellie B. Putnam. 

9, Manchester Street. — Ida J. Bartlett. 

10, Manchester Street. — Nellie Pearson. 

11, Franklin Street. — E. Jennie Campbell. 

12, Franklin Street. —Martha W. Hubbard. 

13, Spring Street. — Lucia E. Esty. 

14, Spring Street. — Emma L. Stokes. 

15, Center Street. — Jennie F. Bailey. 

16, Center Street. — Augusta S. Downs, 

17, South Main Street. — Alice G. Lord. 

18, Manchester Street. — Maria N. Bower. 

19, Amoskeag. — Jennie G. Stebbins. 

20, South Main Street. — Ellen E. McKean. 



212 

21, Bridge Street. — Discontinued. 

22, Beech Street. — Florence A. Nichols. 

23, Lowell Street. — Flora M. Senter. 

24, Lowell Street. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

25, Center Street. — Clara E. Woods. 

26, Spring Street. — Carrie 1. Stevens. 

27, Beech Street. — Cora M. Dearborn. 

28, Center Street. — Belle M. Kelley. 

29, Beech Street. — Louisa R. Quint. 

30, Beech Street. — Lizzie J. West. 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. — Susie A. Crosby. _ 

3, Bakers ville. — 

Principal, Addie M. Chase. 
Assistant, S. Izetta Locke. 

4, Goffe's Falls. — Georgia A. Nute. 

5, Harvey District. — Mary W. Mitchell. 

6, Webster's Mills. — Olive J. Randall. 

7, Hallsville. — Mary E. Sylvester. 

8, Youngsville. — Susie G. Woodman. 

9, Mosquito Fond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

MUSIC TEACHER. 

Jason J. Kimball, three days per week. 

DRAWING TEACHER. 

Mary K. Webster. 

JANITORS. 

High School^ Ash Street^ Bridge Street, and Blodget Street. 
John S. Avery. 



213 

Franklin Street^ Mayicliester Street^ Lincoln Street, and 
Wilson Hill. 

John A. Carr. 

Spring" Street, and old High-School House. 
George W. Varnum. 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 
Rufus Lamb. 

^Squog Schools, consisting of Center Street, North and South 
Main Street Schools. 

D. H. Morgan. 



214 



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COURSE OF STUDY. 



(Text-books to which reference is made in parentheses are for the use of 
teachers only. From these they are to derive such assistance as they can utilize 
in perfecting methods of instruction.) 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS TO TEACHERS OP ALL GRADES, WHICH 
SHOULD BE CAREFULLY READ EVERY TERM. 

First. Follow the course of study closely, modified only 
by directions herein after given, in order that pupils may 
not find themselves retarded in their progress when trans- 
ferred from one school to another of the same grade. 

Second. Let there be much oral instruction (not to be 
confounded with superfluous talk) in all grades, particu- 
larly in those below grammar grades ; and if you can teach 
in these lower grades the studies of your grade as well or 
better orally, then do not require pupils to purchase books, 
though you are to follow the substance of the matter 
INDICATED IN THE COURSE — for the sako of Uniformity 
throughout all our schools of the same grade. In all oral 
instruction, follow these principles : 1. — Never tell a pupil 
what you could make him tell you. 2. — Never give a 
piece of information without asking for it again. 3. — Nev- 
er use a hard word if an easy one will convey your mean- 
ing. 4. — If a hard word must be used, let it be accompa- 
nied with an explanatory circumlocution, (Teachers are 
referred to Sheldon's Manual of Elementary Instruction, 
pp. 14-16, for the true principles of teaching, as well as to 



216 

other parts of the volume referring to special matters of 
instruction.) 

Third. Reviews. — The course provides frequently for 
reviews. These should not only be made at the precise 
points indicated, but briefly daily, when found needful. 
Teachers must use judgment as to necessity and thorough- 
ness. A few test questions will determine the necessity. 
If not found needful, time ought not to be wasted in re- 
view ; if needful, it should be repeated until all weak places 
become strong. Especially should the teaching be thor- 
ough, that teachers following may not be compelled to spend 
time in repairing the work of their predecessors. It may 
seem in some instances that classes might go further, but 
thoroughness is of more importance. 

Fourth. See to it that no pupils are allowed to sit idle, 
without anything to do ; give all work, and keep them busy. 

Fifth. No ivork is allowed TO ' BE arranged which will 
oblige pupils below the o-rammar school grades to prepare any 
lessons or exercises out of school hours, or at home ; and noth- 
ing of the kind, unless it may be composition or declamation, 
should be required of grammar school pupils at home. 

Sixth. Let all work be thorough ; and the spare time? 
that may be found for some of the more ready classes of 
pupils, be utilized in reviewing those parts of the work of 
the previous grade which appear to have passed from 
memory, as well as the more difficult parts of your own 
grade work. 

Seventh. Teachers must not anticipate the books of a 
next higher class, by introducing them before pupils are 
promoted. 

MORALS AND MANNERS. —Too much attention can- 
not be given to morals and manners. They are of first im- 
vortance. " As is the child, so is the man." Inculcate 
at every proper opportunity honesty, truthfulness, gentleness, 



217 

cleanliness, respect for the aged and superiors, duty to par 
ents, chastity, charity, temperance, modesty, and every 
kindred virtue. 



Ungraded schools will follow the course as closely as prac- 
ticable, having as few classes in the school as possible. 

g^^" Let it he understood that reference to the pages of 
text-books used, a concise plan for indicating topics to be 
studied, does not imply that teachers are to use those books 
in a slavish or illiberal manner ; on the other hand, it is 
conceded that the teacher should be superior to the text- 
book, and that he ought to discriminate essentials and em- 
phasize the teaching of them. Unimportant notes and re- 
marks, tables of comparative weights and measures, other 
things having no practical bearing upon any probable future 
conduct of the pupils, and things designed especially for the 
erudite, may be safely omitted in schools below the grade of 
the High School. A very difficult problem in arithmetic, not 
solvable by any member of a class, had best be omitted until 
inductive processes of teaching shall develop the ability to 
solve it at a later stage of the pupils' course. 



READING AND SPELLING. 

To read well is readily to perceive through the eye the 
thoughts expressed by figures, writing, print, or other sym- 
bols. Each representative word, therefore, should be to the 
reader the embodiment of an idea. Hence, by object illus- 
tration or other means, first develop the idea or thought ; 
then make apparent its proper visible form, the word or 
sentence. Good reading, as applied to oral expression, 
consists in effectively conveying by sound the ideas ex- 
pressed by written symbols so that the thought may be 



218 

clearly, correctly, and readily apprehended by another. 
Hence proceed slowly and give pupils time to compre- 
hend the meaning before requiring them to attempt its ut 
terance. 

Tlie true order in teaching reading to pupils of any 
grade is as follows : the idea, or thought ; its sign, or writ- 
ten symbol ; utterance, or oral expression. The effective- 
ness of the latter, oral expression, is chiefly dependent 
upon pronunciation. — including correct and distinct enunci- 
ation, — upon inflection, emphasis, force, gesture, and the 
quality of the voice. Hence, as soon as the confidence of 
primary pupils is obtained, correct all attempts at talking 
with the teeth closed, and so arrange position of what 
they are required to read that they will not depress the chin 
in uttering it. The greatest care should be exercised, when 
pupils first make use of the Reader, to teach them how to 
hold the book so that an improper position will not inter- 
fere with pure and easy vocalization. 

Teachers of every grade should see that pupils do not 
read or recite in indistinct tones, with teeth closed, or in a 
stooping posture with chin depressed. No one thing con- 
nected with the intelligence of a school is more likely to 
give visitors an unfavorable impression of it than inability 
upon their part to understand what is said by pupils who 
mouth and swallow their tones. Only constant vigilance 
can overcome the defect when once it has become a habit. 
Greatest responsibility, therefore, rests upon teachers of the 
lower grades, where inattention to the defect permits it to 
become a habit. 

Spelling in primary grades is designed to be taught un- 
consciously, by requiring pupils to copy, in writing, the 
greater part of what they read ; and teachers of these 
grades should therefore be very watchful of the forms (or- 
thography) of the words which their pupils thus reproduce. 



219 

In middle and grammar schools the nse of the spelling-book 
is retained, but it is designed to have the recitations chiefly 
in writing. In middle schools the spelling exercise may 
be upon slates or paper, as suggested in the foot note under 
the form submitted for an " Order of Exercises." Alter- 
nate recitations in the middle grades, however, might be 
orally made, as exercises designed chiefly to promote cor- 
rect pronunciation and distinct articulation ; but in gram- 
mar grades spelling exercises should be almost exclusively 
in writing, and the results should be returned neatly written 
in blank books prepared for the purpose. 

CLASS R. — During the first few weeks of the child's 
attendance at school, the teacher should gain the confidence 
of the pupil, by conversational exercises in regard to familiar 
objects, — animals, pictures, sports ; things perceived by the 
senses ; articles of clothing or furniture ; stories, to be re- 
told by the pupil, etc. (See "Oral Instruction.") 

When confidence has been gained and the pupil becomes 
free to express his thoughts and feelings, then reading from 
the blackboard should be commenced. Use script letters. 
The meaning of words is first to be taught by the use of ob- 
jects, pictures, drawings, actions, stories, etc. ; then the visi- 
ble signs (written words) are to be placed upon the board ; 
lastly, the oral signs (pronounced words) are to be given. 
Sentences may be illustrated in a similar way ; and prepo- 
sitions, conjunctions, and other meaningless words should 
be taught in phrases or sentences. Pupils should never 
be permitted to read aloud, until the meaning is clear to 
their minds. Naturalness of expression is thus attained. 

The work of this class is to master the words (or so many 
of them as the class is competent to do) of Monroe's Chart, 
taught according to the method before described. Spelling is 
to be learned from exercises in " Language," which see. 

CLASS Q. — Read the Chart and Chart Primer, from 



220 

which pupils are to learn the printed forms of words whose 
sound and meaning have been learned. 

Spelling as for previous class. 

CLASS P. — The Franklin First Reader. All new 
words of each lesson for reading should be taught from the 
blackboard, their meaning being first developed as directed 
for " Class R." Test the result of the development by re- 
quiring pupils to show the proper use of the words in sen- 
tences of their own invention. 

Spelling as for •" Class R.'' 

CLASS 0. — The Franklin First Reader completed, or 
reviewed, and two or three readers of the grade of the First 
Reader taught, and spelling also, as directed for '• Class P." 

CLASS N. — The Franklin Second Reader, taught, and 
spelling also, as directed for the previous class. Add, also^ 
the telling of the story after it has been read. 

CLASS M. — The Franklin Second Reader completed, 
or reviewed, and two or three readers of the grade of the 
Second Reader taught, and spelling also, as directed for 
the previous class. 

CLASS L. — The Franklin Third Reader,* and Worces- 
ter's New Pronouncing Speller f from page 7 to page 34. 

CLASS K. — The Franklin Third Reader,* completed. 
Supplementary reading of a similar grade. Worcester's 
New Pronouncing Speller f from page 3-4 to page 59. 

CLASS J. — The Franklin Fourth Reader,* and Wor- 
cester's New Pronouncing Speller f from page 59 to page 85. 

CLASS I. — The Franklin Fourth Reader,* completed. 
Supplementary reading of a similar grade. Worcester's 
New Pronouncing Speller f from page So to page 111. 

CLASSES H and G. — The Franklin Litermediate Read- 
er, J and Worcester's New Pronouncing Speller f from page 
111 to page 145. 

* Taught a> directed for " Class P." Add, also, the repetition (from mem- 
ory) of the essentials of what has been road. 



221 

CLASSES F and E. — The Franklin Intermediate Read- 
er,^ and Worcester's New Pronouncing Speller f from page 
145 to page 177. 

CLASSES D and C. — The Franklin Fifth Reader,| and 
Worcester's New Pronouncing Speller,f reviewed, from page 
7 to page 111. 

CLASSES B and A. —The Franklin Fifth Reader,^ and 
Worcester's New Pronouncing Speller, f reviewed, from page 
111 to page 177. 



PENMANSHIP. 

Penmanship, as designated in the following, is to be un- 
derstood as having reference to drill exercises in writing. 
It is of utmost importance that, at the very outset, pupils 
be required to assume correct positions and maintain the 
same throughout every exercise. If pupils are thus prop- 
erly started and held thereto throughout the work of four 
or five of tlie lower grades, they will never fall into the 
loose haliits with which teachers in the higher grades are 
frequently compelled almost uselessly to contend. Teach 
the principles of the system of penmanship used only so 
far as consistent with the advancement of the pupils. Re- 
quire pupils, in all written work, to use long pencils or 
long pen handles. Insist upon the greatest possible exact- 
ness, until pupils have attained a nearly perfect form for 
every letter in the language. Do not allow a Slovenish or 
careless style of penmanship in any ivritten ivork, but en- 
courage and foster a spirit of improvement in this very 
important branch of study. Otherwise, there will be great 

t When brought along by incoming classes. 

t The easier selections. See N. B. 

i[ The more difficult selections. See N. B. 

N. B. It is designed that considerable supplementary reading shall also be 
afforded these classes. Classes H, G, F, and E are to read from Barnes' 
United States History twice a week. 



222 

waste of effort in special drill exercises, and no great prog- 
ress in the art of writing attained. Much other writing*, 
at first learned by imitation from the blackboard (see 
"Language"), is also to be well done in carrying out 
plans for language exercises, written spellings, composi- 
tions, etc. 

The copy-books to be used are those known as Payson, 
Dunton and Scribner's. 

CLASS R. — Upon slates, the letter i; and if great ex- 
actness be attained in that, then the letter u. 

CLASS Q. — Upon slates, — u,n, w, in order, only so 
far as well-nigh perfect forms are attained. 

CLASS P. — Upon slates, — w, rr, v, iv. 

CLASS 0. — Upon slates, — perfect in order, o, a, c, e. 

CLASS N. — Upon slates, — i, p^ d, q, r, s. 

CLASS M. — Upon slates, — I, b, h, k,f,j, g-, i/, z. 

CLASSES L and K. — September to February, copy- 
book No. 2 of the "Short Course;" February to July, 
No. 21- of the " Short Course." 

CLASSES J and I. — September to February, copy-book 
No. 3 of the " Short Course ; " February to July, No. 4 of 
the " Short Course." 

CLASSES H and C — September to February, copy- 
book No. 3 of the Full Course ; February to July, No, 3 of 
the Full Course. 

CLASSES F and E. — September to February, copy- 
book No. 4 of the Full Course ; February to July, No. 4 of 
the Full Course. 

CLASSES D and C. — September to February, copy- 
book No. o of the Full Course ; February to July, No. 6 
of the Full Course. 

CLASSES B and A. — September to February, copy- 
book No. 7, or No. 10, of the Full Course, as the master 
may elect ; February to July, at the direction of the master. 



223 
ARITHMETIC. 

Begin instruction in arithmetic with the use of olvjects, 
and, by much repetition, drill thoroughly every point 
made; then pass to a drill in written numbers, at first 
with concrete, afterwards with abstract. Teach principles 
by an orderly development of them before requiring defini- 
tions. 

There should be much practice in fundamental opera- 
tions, to secure accuracy and rapidity in arithmetical 
calculation. Much use should be made, above primary 
grades, of the arithmetical charts, in giving brief, rapid 
exercises in mental arithmetic ; the Putnam Drill Cards 
and books of problems will also afford material aid in re- 
view lessons. 

CLASS R. — 4., Full knowledge of four, taught by 
use of objects in accordance with the " Grube System." 
(For details, see " Swett's Methods of Teaching," Chapter 
II., Part III. Reference is also made to Small's (Grube) 
Number Cards and Parker's " Quincy Course of Study.'") 

CLASS Q. — 10. F^^l^ knowledge of ten, taught as 
directed for previous class. 

CLASS P. — 20, F^ill knowledge of Uventy, taught 
as directed for previous classes. Roman numerals to XX. 

CLASS 0. — 50 ^^^^ ^^^^^ fundamental operations, 
according to the " Grube System," taught as directed for 
previous classes. Roman numerals to L. 

CLASS N. — iEtevie'Wa Ro^iiison's Shorter Course, 
First Book in Arithmetic, from page 11 to page 54. 
Roman numerals reviewed. 

CLASS M. — 100. ^'^^^ ''^^^"«t Book," from page 
54 to page 78. Review the same. Roman numerals to C. 

CLASS L. — Multiplication Table, reviewed. Robin- 



224 

son's Shorter Course, First Book in Arithmetic^ from page 
78 to page 113. Review the same. 

CLASS K. — The "First Book," from page 105 to page 
128. Review the same, then review from page 54. 

CLASS J. — Robinson's Shorter Course, First Book in 
Arithmetic, from page 140 to page 169, omitting pages 147, 
148, 149 last l, first half of 150, 161 last i, 156 last i, 157 
last 1, 159 last i, 160 last i, 162 last i, 164 last ^, and 
168 last 1. Review the same, then review from page 105. 

CLASS I. — Greenleaf s New Practical Arithmetic, from 
page 7 to page 63. Review the same. Spare time of this 
class may be utilized in doinu,' supplementary work at 
direction of teacher. 

Colburn's Intellectual Arithmetic, from page 19 to page 
37. Review the same. 

CLASS H. — Greenleaf's New Practical Arithmetic, from 
page 63 to page 94. Review the same, then advance from 
page 94. 

Colburn's Intellectual Arithmetic, from page 37 to page 
46. Review from page 26. 

CLASS Gr. — Greenleaf's New Practical Arithmetic, 
from page 94 to page 144. Review the same. Spare time 
on essentials of this grade work. 

Colburn's Intellectual Arithmetic, from page 46 to page 
63. Review the same. 

CLASS P. — Greenleaf's New Practical Arithmetic, 
from page 144 to page 188. Review the same. 

Colburn's Intellectual Arithmetic, from page 63 to page 
84. Review the same. 

CLASS E. — Greenleaf's New Practical Arithmetic, from 
page 127 to page 144 in review ; then from page 188 to 
page 203. Review the advance. Spare time on essentials 
of this grade work. 

Colburn's Intellectual Arithmetic, from page 84 to page 
98. Review from page 75. 



225 

CLASS D. — Greenleafs New Practical Arithmetic, 
from page 203 to page 230. Review from page 188 to 
page 230. 

Colburn's Intellectual Arithmetic, from page 98 to page 
121. Review the same. 

CLASS C. — Greenleafs, from page 94 to page 127, in 
review ; then advance from page 230 to page 266, omitting 
pages 243 to 249, and 253 to 260, inclusive. Spare time 
on essentials of this grade work. 

Colburn's, from page 121 to page 131. Review from 
page 108. 

CLASS B. — Greenleafs New Practical Arithmetic, from 
page 266 to page 284, page 296, and from page 311 to page 
321. Review the same. Spare time* from page 323, arti- 
cle 462. 

Colburn's Intellectual Arithmetic, from page 130 to page 
144. Review the same. 

CLASS A. — Greenleafs, reviewed from page 7, omitting 
as indicated for previous classes. (See also, for supple- 
mentary work, pages 333 to 361.) 

Colburn's, review of all difficult parts of the book. 



ORAL INSTRUCTION. 

Purpose, — in lowest classes to assist in gaining the con- 
fidence of pupils and to promote freedom of expression ; in 
all classes to cultivate the power of accurate observation and 
therefrom to evoke personal and experimental knowledge 
of the things observed. Telling is not teaching ; instead of 
attempting to cram the mind with facts, call into active ex- 
ercise the thinking powers of the child ; secure and hold 
his attention by illustrating with objects, drawings, and 

* Pupils entei'ing iipon the work of this class in the winter will utilize 
spare time in reviewing essentials from page 7 to page 266, instead of ad- 
vancing from page 323. 
15 



226 

pictures, the subjects taught. Require all information 
given to be repeated orally ; and by pupils suflficiently 
advanced let the repetitions Ije in writing, clearly and defi- 
nitely expressed. Intelligence thus developed and habits 
of attention secured will afford the pupil material aid in 
acquiring a knowledge of the other branches of study. 
Though given without the visible aid of text-books, the 
instruction afforded should be the result of careful, ex- 
tended, and systematic preparation on the part of the 
teacher. 

CLASS R. — Familiar talks in regard to objects around a 
child's home, as : cat, dog, horse, mouse, fly, chair, broom, 
clock, lamp, knife, apple, potato, peach, sugar, bread, etc. 

CLASS Q. — Conversational studies of familiar plants, 
with roots, stem, branches, and leaves. Primary colors 
also taught. 

CLASS P. — Consideration of less familiar objects — 
plants, animals, and things ; to distinguish form, color, 
and prominent qualities. Leading secondary colors taught. 

( Teachers may find illustrations of the foregoing in 
Sheldon's Elementary Instruction, pages 299 to 390, and 
in Sheldon's Lessons on Objects.) 

CLASS 0. — Instruction in regard to the school-room, 
the building, and the play-grounds, preparatory to the study 
of geography. (Follow, essentially, Swett's Methods of 
Teaching, page 239, Sect. III., First Steps. Also, Guyot's 
Elementary Geography, page 8, Sect. III., Parts 1, 2 and 
3. 1^°" Observe the Note to Teachers, at the beginning of 
the latter section.) 

CLASS N. — Local geography. (Follow Swett's Methods 
of Teaching, page 240 or 242, Sect. III., Part II. 
or Part III., as adapted. Also, Guyot's Elementary Geog- 
raphy, page 11, Sect. III.. Parts 4 and 5 ; so also Sect. 
II. of the Elementary Geography. Observe notes to 
teachers.) 



227 

CLASS M'. — Local geography. (Follow essentials 
of Gujot's Elementary Geography, pages 4 and 5, Sect. 
IV., and a few of the moi^e common definitions found in 
Sect. V.) 

CLASS L. — Principal occupations of city life named 
and described. Articles of domestic commerce. Plants, 
from May to November. (Selections from Hooker's Child's 
Book of Nature, Part I., pages 13 to 67.) Animals, from 
November to May. (Selections from Hooker's Child's Book 
of Nature. Part IL. pages 7 to 91. Also, Harper's First 
Lessons in Natural History and Language, Parts I. and II. 
See " Language." ) 

CLASS K. — Same as that of '-Class L," in review. 
(Greater proficiency in the descriptions expected. See 
" Language.") 

CLASS J. — Principal occupations of country life named 
and described. Articles of foreign commerce. Plants, 
from May to November. ( Selections from Hooker's Child's 
Book of Nature, Part I., pages 67 to 121.) Animals, from 
November to May. (Selections from Hooker's Child's Book 
of Nature, Part II. , pages 91 to 171. Also, Harper's First 
Lessons in Natural History and Language, Parts III. and 
IV. See " Language.") 

CLASS I. — Same as that of " Class J," in review. 
(Greater proficiency in the descriptions expected. See 
" Language.") 



LANGUAGE. 

In primary and middle grades teachers should give chiel 
attention to the formation of correct habits of expression. 
Pupils should be taught, at the outset and through all 
grades, to correct all faulty expressions of their own and of 
their classmates. Exercises in making sentences, varied 



228 

to suit the age and advancement of pupils, should also be 
kept up through all grades. The power of doing is supe- 
rior to and more practical than that of undoing, and syn- 
thesis should therefore be given a much larger place than 
analysis in the language course : but in the higher grades 
of grammar schools, where there is presumed to be suffi- 
cient maturit}^ of mind for its comprehension, technical 
grammar is introduced, and in the highest grade a six 
months' drill in analysis and parsing is contemplated, for 
the purpose of training the judgment and affording a basis 
for the future intelligent criticism of language, or for a 
more advanced course of study in its structure. At least 
two declamations, or recitations, and two written exercises, 
or compositions, to be recited or read before the school, are 
required from each pupil, every term (six a year), in all 
grammar grades. Suitable selections of poetry* are to be 
memorized by each pupil throughout the course, in all 
classes : and in all classes above those of primary grade 
there should be frequent exercises in paraphrasing selec- 
tions of both poetry and prose. 

CLASS R. — Pupils are to copy upon their slates, from 
the board, in script, the names of the objects about which 
they read, as well as the phrases in regard to the same. 
Observe the terminal mark. 

CLASS Q. — Pupils are to copy upon their slates in 
script, what they read. Observe use of letters and punc- 
tuation. (Teachers of this class and the next may obtain 
many useful hints from Nos. 1 and 2 of Greene's Graded 

* Teachers may find suitable selections of poetiy, in " Literature for Little 
Folks," published by Sower, Potts & Co. ; in '' Peaslee's Graded Selections for 
Memorizing," by Van Antwerp, Braug & Co. ; and in "Eliot's Poetry for 
Cliildren," by George A. Smith. Valuable suggestions may also be found 
in the " Introduction," " Preface," or " Notes " to these books. Doubtless 
any of our booksellers would procure the books for those ordering them. 

Teachers will confer a favor by sending to the Superintendent the titles of 
other good books of poetry for children. 



229 

Languaere Blanks. See inside of their covers, so also Parts 
I. and II. of his " Thought and Expression.") 

CLASS P. — Pupils are to copy upon their slates, in 
script, selected sentences which the}^ read, or all they read, 
from the board, cliart or reader. Observe use of letters 
and punctuation. 

CLASS 0. — Same as for " Class P." (Teachers of this 
class and the next two may obtain many useful hints from 
Nos. 2 and 3 of Greene's Graded Language Blanks. See 
inside of their covers, so also Parts II. and III. of his 
" Thought and Expression.") 

CLASS N. — Pupils are to write, from memory, abstracts 
of paragraphs read in their readers, and of others read to 
them by the teacher from other readers or books of similar 
grade.- Observe use of letters and punctuation. 

CLASS M. — Pupils are to write abstracts of simple 
stories told or read them by the teacher. Observe use of 
letters and punctuation. 

Note. — The language exercises arranged for the foregoing classes are 
made subservient to their reading exercises. Those arranged for the next 
four classes are made subservient to oral lessons, which, in the order of daily- 
exercises, may immediately precede the exercises in language. 

CLASS L. — Subjects of oral instruction described in 
writing. Suggest short sentences and teach paragraphing. 
Special attention to the use of letters and punctuation. (For 
system of punctuation, see Swinton's New Language Les- 
sons. Continue work of" Class M." Teachers of this class 
and the next may obtain useful hints from Nos. 1 and 2 of 
Stickney's Child's Book of Language.) 

CLASS K. — Same as for " Class L," in review. En- 
courage pupils to use longer sentences, and insist upon 
greater accuracy in the use of language. 

CLASS J. — Subjects of oral instruction described in 
writing. Suggest conciseness and elegance of expression. 
Special attention to use of letters and punctuation. (For 
system of punctuation, see Swinton's New Language Les- 



230 

sons. Teach the names of the different kinds of sentences. 
Continue work of " Class M." Teachers of this class and 
the next may obtain useful hints from Xos. 3 and 4 of Stick- 
ney's Child's Book of Language.) 

CLASS I. — Same as for -'Class J," in review. Great 
accuracy in the use of language should be attained. 

CLASS H. — Swinton's Language Primer, from page 
1 to page 23. Review the same. For supplementary mat- 
ter see work for Class M, which in this class may also be 
applied to geography or to selections from Part III. of 
Hooker's Child's Book of Nature. (Two lessons a week.) 

CLASS G. — Swinton's Language Primer, from page 23 
to page 58. Review the same. For supplementary mat- 
ter see work for Class M, which in this class may also be 
applied to geography or to selections from Part IIL of 
Hooker's Child's Book of Nature. (Two lessons a week.) 

CLASS P. — Swinton's Language Primer, from page rt8 
to page 85. Review the same. Spare time on Section 
IV. (Two le.ssons a week.) 

CLASS E. — Swinton's NewiLanguage Lessons, from page 
21 to page 56. Review essentials. (Two lessons a week.) 

CLASS D. — Swinton's New Language Lessons, from 
page 56 to page 116. Review the same. Spare time from 
page 21. 

CLASS C. — Swinton's New Language Lessons, from 
page 116 to page 15-i. Review the same. Spare time from 
end of last review of "Class D." (Three lessons a week.) 

CLASS B. — Swinton's New Language Lessons, from 
page 151 to page 193. Review essentials of ^^ hole hook, 
dwelling particularly upon test exercises pertaining to the 
structure of the language. 

CLASS A. — Exercises from the Reader. Explanation 
of subject-matter. Thorough drill in analysis and parsing 
of selections from the same. Tone up weak points in 
grammar. 



231 
GEOGRAPHY. 

The study of geography should be made as practicable 
as possible by reference to well-known places and things ; 
follow, in order, the place and vicinity of home and school, 
town or city, county, state, country, continent, and world. 
At the proper stage, home and foreign markets may be 
considered, routes of travel, and newspaper reports of lead- 
ing commercial transactions discussed and explained. 

(Teachers are referred to " Swett's Methods of Teaching," 
Chapter III., Part III., as matter largely indicative of es- 
sentials, — if judgment is exercised to select the portions 
adapted to the grade taught, — and from which much use- 
ful assistance may be obtained.) 

CLASS L. — Guyot's Elementary Geography, from page 
1 to page 30. Review the same where needful. 

CLASS K. — The Elementary, from page 30 to page 49. 
Review the same. 

CLASS J. — Guyot's Elementary Geography, from page 
49 to page 77. Review the same. 

CLASS I. — The Elementary, completed from page 77, 
the advance with map questions to be studied, the descrip- 
tive portions of the countries studied to be read, talked 
about, and made the subjects for written exercises. Then 
review essentials of the whole book. 

CLASS H. — Guyot's New Intermediate Geography, 
from page 1 to page 34, pupils being required only to read 
Chapters XIV., XV., XVII., and XVIII. , on pages 8, 9, 
etc., teachers explaining their meaning. Review the same. 

CLASS G. — The Intermediate, from page 34 to page 
68. Review the same. Spare time on essentials from 
page 1. 

CLASS F. — Guyot's New Intermediate Geography, 
from page 58 to page 97, pupils being required only to 



232 

read and write abstracts about the " Countries of Africa " 
and the " Colonies of Australia. " Review the same. 

CLASS E. — The Intermediate, reviewed from page 1 
to page 58. (Then take History.) 

CLASS C. — Guyot's New Intermediate Geography, 
reviewed from page 58 to page 97. (Two lessons a week.) 

CLASSES A and B. — Guyot's New Intermediate 
Geography, reviewed. (After History is completed.) 



HISTORY. 

History should be made interesting by historical and 
biographical sketches ; pupils should be encouraged to con- 
sult different authorities, to give important items from 
such, and they should make recitations in their otvn lan- 
guage ; all places spoken of or referred to should be found 
upon maps, and many of them located in recitation. 
Attention should be called to leading events of the present 
as affording material for future history. 

CLASS E. — After finishing geography, this class is to 
take Barnes' United States History from page 9 to page — . 
Topics to be learned are found on pages 9 to 14|- ; 19 to 
271 ; 28 to 29^ ; 30 to 31^ ; 321 to 33i ; 351 to 41 ; 46, 
consecutively, to — . Review the same. * 

CLASS D. — Barnes' United States History, from page 
45 to page 144. Review the same. * 

CLASS C. — Barnes' United States History, from page 
147 to page 210. Review the same,* then review essen- 
tials from page 9 to page 147. (Four lessons a week.) 

CLASS B. — Barnes' United States History, from page 
213 to page 299. Review the same, * then review essen- 
tials from page 147 to page 210. (Then Geography.) 

CLASS A. — Barnes' United States History, reviewed. * 
(Then Geography.) 

* It is designed to publish a list of the topics or events which should be es- 
pecially and thoroughly mastered. 



233 
DRAWING. 

Instruction upon slates should include lines, simple com- 
binations of lines to form common figures in plane geome- 
try, and the elementary principles of symmetry and repe- 
tition in the arrangement of lines and forms for design. 
No geometric definition of lines or forms should be required 
until the pupil has entered " Class 0." 

In First Primary, Second Middle, and First Middle 
Schools, pupils should be drilled in the definitions of the 
geometric forms drawn, and in all terms used in relation to 
them. Light but bold lines, carefully drawn, should be in- 
sisted upon. No haste should be allowed in the drawing 
of a figure. In Grammar Schools the work may be done 
more rapidly, and a better finish required, no ragged lines 
being allowed to stand. Geometric work should be accu- 
rately done with rule and compasses. 

Pupils should be instructed how to put their compasses in 
good working order, and should be made to keep them so. 
All object drawing must be from the objects themselves, in 
no case from a blackboard copy. Throughout the course, 
all spaces left for designs must be filled with designs origi- 
nated by the pupil. 

The books to be used are the American Text-books of 
Art Education, revised edition, by Prof. Walter Smith. 

CLASSES R, Q, P. — Upon slates, the work indicated 
in the plan and suggestions of Prof. Smith's Scheme for 
Primary Drawing. 

CLASSES 0, N, M. — September to February, book No. 
1 ; February to July, No. 2.* 

CLASSES L and K. — September to February, book 
No. 3 ; February to July, No. 4.t 

* Class P promoted to the work of Class 0, February 1, will use slates 
during this period. 

t Incoming Class M will use No. 2 during this period. 



234 

CLASSES J and I. — September to February, book No. 
5 ; February to July, No. 64 

CLASSES H and G. — September to February, book 
No. 7 ; February to July, No. 8.^ 

CLASSES F and E. — September to February, book No. 
9 ; February to July, No. 10.** 

CLASSES D and C. — September to February, book 
No. 11 ; February to July, No. 12. ff 

CLASSES B and A. — September to February, book 
No. 13 ; February to July, No. 14.|J 



MUSIC 



Win an interest in this art l)y making it attractive, and 
causing the pupils to realize how greatly it will add to their 
profit and pleasure ; have all participate ; cultivate pure, 
soft tones, and avoid noisy singing ; much use of the charts. 

CLASSES R. Q, P. — Practice the five-note exercises 
softly, paying particular attention to a good quality of tone. 
Gain the attention of the pupils by singing some easy mel- 
ody for them to imitate ; at the same time require a proper 
position for singing. Avoid all noisy singing. Teach the 
different kinds of notes, with scale names, pitch names, 
and syllables ; also, the divisions of time into short, equal 
portions. Cultivate the ear and eye to the same with exer- 
cises on the blackboard. If the teacher finds the class 
prepared to advance, proceed with the work. 

CLASSES 0, N, M.— Continue the practice of the 
scales. Sing the scale names, pitch names, and syllables. 
Give particular attention to a correct pitch, as it is the 

llncominiT Class K will use No. 4 durinj? this period. 
if Incoraing Class I will use No. 6 during this period. 
** Incoming Class G will use No. 8 duriug this period. 
It Incoming Class E will use No. 10 during this period. 
II Incoming Class C willuse Nu. 12 during this period. 



235 

foundation of music. Introduce solfeggios with scale names, 
as, — 1, 3, 5, 8, 3, 2, 6, 5, 7, 4, 2. 1. Practice from tlie 
chart in connection with exercises on the blackboard. In- 
troduce the different kinds of notes, and their correspond- 
ing rests. Practice phrasing, and right management of the 
breath. This class will go as far as the key of G ; and as 
far as the key of D, if found practicable . 

CLASSES L and K. — Practice the scales daily. Explain 
the extension of the upper and lower scale. Practice two- 
part songs. Teach the different kinds of measure, with the 
proper accent. Practice the scales in thirds, and alternate 
the practice with the girls and boys. Teach all the notes 
and their corresponding rests. Give much care and atten- 
tion to the quality of tone, correct position. l)reathing and 
phrasing. Introduce the chromatic scale. Require all the 
pupils to beat the time. This grade will do necessary re- 
viewing, and then advance to the key of E, if found prac- 
ticable. 

CLASSES J and I. — Continue short exercises with 
reviews. Practice the scales daily ; also, the chromatic 
scales, ascending and descending. Introduce chromatic 
intervals by singing simple exercises. Teach the marks of 
expression, as p, pp, -<: cres. =- dim., f, ff, etc. Practice 
some familiar tune by pointing it out upon the chart in all 
the different keys. This grade will go through the trans- 
position of nine different keys, or as many of them as may 
be found practicable. 

CLASSES H and G. — Review the transposition in all 
the keys. Teach the different intervals ; as, prime, 2d, 3d, 
4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and octave. Teach the major and minor 
thirds, perfect 5th, and diminished 5th. Review the marks 
of expression. 

CLASSES F and E. — Continue the practice in Chart 
No. 8, and review the work of the previous grade. This 



236 

class is expected to under-tand the triads of the different 
degrees of the scale, and to go as far as the key of D in 
chord practice. 

CLASSES D and C. — These classes will unite with 
those of the first division and practice together when it is 
found practicable. The work will consist of singing three- 
part songs, practice of the triad, in all the keys, major and 
minor. Study the harmony of the common chords, and 
the chord of the 7th, and of the tonic, sub-dominant, and 
dominant. Introduce the terms indicating the different 
movements in music, as Adagio, Andante, Allegro, Alle- 
gretto, Agito, ad libitum. Review all the previous work of 
all grades as often as possible. 

CLASSES B and A. — Same as for classes D and C. 



JSrOTIOE. 



The several forms of " Order of Exercises," herewith 
submitted, are to be regarded as suggestive of the work to 
be daily done by the respective classes, and indicative of the 
practical assignment of the relative amount of time to be 
bestowed upon the several studies pursued. It is not de- 
signed, however, to require teachers to follow these precise 
forms, unless they prefer to adopt them. The several orders 
are arranged for a total of twenty-five hours per week ; 
but during the portions of the year when the schools are in 
session thirty hours per week, teachers can distribute the 
extra five hours, at their discretion, upon studies most in 
need of the time. 

In regard to exercises in declamation and composition, 
it may be suggested that by dividing a school into three 
sections (a, h, and c) for such exercises, and requiring 
declamations of one half and compo.-iitions of the other 
half of each section, pupils would be required to participate 
in the exercises o:ily once in three weeks, and teachers 
would weekly have for examination the compositions of but 
one-sixth of their respective schools. Besides, the time 
needed for the weekly recitation of a section will not then 
often be more than an hour, or an hour and a half. 



238 



Order of Exercises for Classes A and B. 



A. M. 




CLASS. 


9. 


Opening Exercises, 


. All. 12 


9.12 


Music, .... 


. All. 18 


9.25 


Reading, 


A or B. 85 


10. 


History, 


B.* 30 


10.80 


Recess, 


. All, 15 


10.50 


Arithmetic, . 


. A. 35 


11.25 


Arithmetic, . . . 


B. do 


p. M. 




CLASS. 


2. 


Written Spelling, 


. All. 10 


2.10 


Drawing or Penmanship,! 


. All. 30 


2.'10 


History, 


. A. 20 


3. 


Recess, 


. All. 10 


3.10 


Language, 


. B. 25 


3.35 


Language, 


. A. 25 



Order of Exercises for Classes C and D. 



A. M. 




CLASS. 


9. 


Opening Exercises, 


. All. 12 


9.12 


Music, ..... 


. All. 13 


9.25 


Reading, .... 


. D. 35 


10. 


Arithmetic, .... 


. C. 30 


10.30 


Recess, .... 


. All. 15 


10.50 


Arithmetic, .... 


D. 30 


11.20 


Written Spelling, . 


. All. 10 


11.30 


Drawing or Penmanship,! 


30 



* The order of recitations should be transposed, so that those of " Class 
A " will take the place of those of " Class B," whenever " Class B " has the 
time for " Reading." 

t Drawing three times a week and penmanship twice a week. 

N. B. During the weeks selected for exerci.^es in declamation and compo- 
sition, time may be had for the same by omitting recitations in reading and 
language ou the day appointed for rhetorical exercises. 



239 



p. M. 

2. 

2.20 

2.40 

o. 

3.10 

3.35 



CLASS. 



Reading, 

History, 

History, 

Recess, 

Language, 

Language, 



c. 


20 


D. 


20 


0. 


20 


111. 


10 


D. 


25 


C. 


25 



Order of Exercises for Classes E and F or G and H. 



A. M. 




CLASS. 


9. 


Opening Exercises, 


. All. 15 


9.15 


Reading, 


EorG. 25 


9.40 


Arithmetic, . 


F or H. 25 


10.05 


Drawing, 


. All. 25 


10.30 


Recess, 


. All. 15 


10.50 


Arithmetic, . 


E or G. 25 


11.15 


Geography, . 


ForH. 25 


11.40 


Language,* . 


\ E or F. I ^Q 
I G or H. ( -^ 


p. M. 




CLASS. 


2. 


Reading, 


ForH. 35 


2.35 


Geography, . 


E or G. 25 


3. 


Recess, 


. All. 10 


3.10 


Music, .... 


. All. 13 


3.23 


Written Spelling, . 


. All. 12 


3.35 


Penmanship . 


. All. 25 



* Language omitted on day of lesson by special teacher in drawing. During 
other weeks time for exercises in declamation and composition may be had by 
omitting the exercise in language and a recitation in reading, on the day 
elected for rhetorical exercises. 



240 



Order of Exercises for Classes I and J or K and L. 



A. M. 




CLASS. 


9. 


Opening Exercises, 


. All. 


8 


9.08 


Reading and Spelling,* . 


I or K. 


32 


9.40 


Geography, . . . . 


J or L. 


20 


10. 


Physical Exercises, 


. All. 


6 


10.06 


Arithmetic, . . . . 


I or K. 


24 


10.30 


Recess, . . . . 


. All. 


15 


10.60 


Arithmetic, . 


J or L. 


20 


11.10 


Drawing, 


. All. 


20 


11.30 


Oral Instruction, . 


. All. 


12 


11.42 


Language, 


. All. 


18 


p. M. 




CLASS. 


2. 


Geograpliy, . 


I or K. 


20 


2.20 


Reading and Spelling,* . 


J or L. 


40 


3. 


Recess, 


. All. 


10 


3.10 


Music, .... 


. All. 


12 


3.22 


Penmanship, 


. All. 


18 


3.40 


Spelling, 


I or K. 


10 


3.50 


Spelling, 


J or L. 


10 



Order of Exercises^for Classes M, N, and 0. 



A. M. 

. 9. 
9.06 
9.26 
9.46 



CLASS. 



All. 


6 


0. 


20 


N. 


20 


All. 


6 



Opening Exercises, 
Reading and Spelling, . 
Reading and Spelling . 
Physical Exercises, 

* The spelling exercise should be first given, and consist of five words 
selected from a reasonable number to be learned from the reading lesson. The 
five, at time of recitation, should be written upon slates and corrected by pu- 
pils of the class under the direction of the teacher, after an exchange of slates ; 
or, the words might be written upon paper and passed to the teacher for cor- 
rection, at her discretion, which might determine an alternate use of both 
methods — slates for one class and paper for the other, and vice versa the next 
day. Pupils of this age should not stand longer thau half of the time allowed 
for the recitation in reading. 



241 



A. M. 




CLASS. 


9.52 


Reading and Spelling, . 


. M. 


20 


10.12 


Drawing, 


. All. 


18 


10.30 


Recess, 


. All. 


15 


10.50 


Arithmetic, ..... 


. 0. 


20 


11.10 


Arithmetic, 


N. 


18 


11.28 


Music, 


. All. 


12 


11.40 


Arithmetic, ..... 


. M. 


20 


p. M. 




CLASS. 


2. 


Reading and Spelling, . 


0. 


20 


2.20 


Reading and Spelling, . 


. N. 


20 


2.40 


Physical Exercises, 


. All. 


6 


2.46 


Oral instruction,* . . . 0, 


N, or M. 


14 


8. 


Recess, • . . . . 


. All. 


10 


3.10 


Miscellaneous, .... 


. All. 


10 


3.20 


Reading and Spelling, . 


. M. 


20 


3.40 


Penmanship, .... 


. All. 


20 



Order of Exercises for Classes P, Q, and R. 



A. M. 




CLASS. 


9. 


Opening Exercises, 


. All. 6 


9.06 


Reading, 


Div. a. of R. 10 


9.16 


Reading, . . . . 


Div. h. of R. 10 


9.26 


Reading, 


Div. c. of R. 10 


9.36 


Physical Exercises, 


. All. 6 


9.42 


Reading, 


Div. a. of Q. 12 


9.54 


Reading, . . . . 


Div. h. of Q. 12 


10.06 


Music, .... 


. All. 6 


10.12 


Reading, . . . . 


P. 18 


10.30 


Recess. 


. All. 15 



* Each class two lessons a week. Time may be had for the same by giving one 
class an exercise once a week at the time provided for an exercise in penman- 
ship. 

16 



242 



A. M. 






CLASS. 


10.60 


Arithmetic, . 


Div. 


a. of R 


6 


10.56 


Arithmetic, . 


Div 


h. of R 


6 


11.02 


Arithmetic, . 


Div. 


a. of Q 


8 


11.10 


Arithmetic, . 


Div 


h. of Q 


8 


11.18 


Arithmetic, . 


. , 


P. 


17 


11.36 


Physical Exercises, 


. 


. All. 


5 


11.40 


Oral Instruction,* . 


R 


Q, or P. 


10 


11.50 


Penmanship, 


• 


. All. 


10 


p. M. 






CLASS. 


2. 


Music, .... 


, 


. All. 


6 


2.06 


Drawing, 




. All. 


12 


2.18 


Reading, 


Div. 


a, of R. 


10 


2.28 


Reading, . . . . 


Div. 


h. of R. 


10 


2.38 


Reading, . . . . 


Div. 


c. of R. 


10 


2.48 


Reading, . . . . 


Div. 


a. of Q. 


12 


3. 


Recess, 




. All. 


10 


3.10 


Miscellaneous, 




. All. 


10 


3.20 


Reading, 


Div. 


b. of Q. 


12 


3.32 


Reading, . . . . 


. 


P. 


l8 


3.60 


Penmanship, 




. All. 


10 



* Each class two lessons a week, and all classes together once a week. Time 
may be had for the same, by giving one class an exercise at the time provided 
for an exercise in penmanship ; and time may be had for the general exercise 
by substititiing such exercise in place of an exercise of " Class P" in read- 
ing once a week. 



EEPOET 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY EAEM. 



To the City Councils of the Qity of Manchester. 

The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on the City- 
Farm hereby submit the annual report for the year ending 
Dec. 31,1880: — 



, and other tools 



Live stock 

Hay, grain, and produce . 

Carriages, farming implements, 

Bedding and wearing apparel 

Provisions and fuel . 

Household furniture and domestic implements 

Lumber, iron, and brick .... 



^15572 00 

2,598 60 

2,003 50 

530 53 

534 62 

703 10 

18 00 





17,960 35 


Improvements : — 




25 M. shingles, at 84.50, on barn . 


. $112 50 


Laying the same .... 


50 00 


Repairing roof .... 


5 00 


Repairing milk-room 


50 00 


Building blacksmith-shop 


50 00 


Labor and lumber on hay-scales 


38 00 



•$305 50 



244 

The account of the City Farm for the year 1880 is as fol- 
lows : — 

Dr. 
Stock on hand Dec. 31, 1879 . . 86,630 91 
Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1879 . . 808 67 
Expenditures for the year 1880 . 4,675 79 
Interest on farm .... 1,000 00 

113,115 37 

Cr. 
Stock on hand Dec. 31, 1880 . . 17,960 35 
Paid into city treasury for produce 1,974 91 
Cash on hand and bills receivable . 766 55 
Permanent improvements . . 305 50 
Number days' board, paupers, 4,188 
Number days' board, prisoners, 2,513 



6,701 2,108 06 

113,115 37 

Average cost of board per day . . .31 4-10 cts. 

Average number of paupers per day . . 11.47 

Average number of prisoners per day . . 6.88 

Your committee are of the opinion that Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen are worthy of much credit for the judicious manage- 
ment of the City Farm and House of Correction the past 
year. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Mayor, 
R. A. LAWRENCE, 
JOHN CAVANAUGH, 
CHAS. W. EAGER, 
GEO. K. BROCK, 
WILLIAM STARR, 

Committee on the City Farm. 
December 31, 1880. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor ^ Aldermen^ and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester. 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the over- 
seers of the poor herewith present their annual report for 
the year 1880. 

The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the past year has 
been forty-five, consisting of one hundred and sixty-three 
persons, all of whom have a settlement in this city. 
Three of the above number have died. 
The whole number of persons at the City Farm during 
the year has been seventeen, the average number for the 
year being eleven and one-half. 

There has been no death at the farm the last year. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN L. KELLY, Chairman ex officio, 
MOSES E. GEORGE, Clerk, 
WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 
GEORGE H. COLBY, 
CHARLES G. B. RYDER, 
DANIEL SHEEHAN, 
ROBERT HALL, 
JOHN W. DICKEY, 
ISAAC R. DEWEY, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



EEPOET 



CITY CIVIL ENGINEER. 



To the City Councils of Manchester. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith respectfully submit my report 
for the year 1880, being the second year of this depart- 
ment. 

The expenses have been as follows : — 

For salaries .... $1,539 00 
stationery and printing . 41 59 



traveling .... 


69 


50 




fuel and gas 


12 


10 




new instruments and re- 








pairs .... 


43 


41 




records .... 


170 


50 


11,876 10 








For expense on new bridge ac- 








count .... 


. 




$20 39 


instruments and drawing 








paper from Water-works 








department 


. 




$250 00 



248 
For expense on Soldiers' Monument : — 



painting cover 


$12 


27 




11 globes 


59 


75 




stone-work, and cleaning 








stone 


26 


50 




12 sprinklers, and com- 








pleting lion's head 


12 


50 




cutting grass 


5 


50 




fence, and fitting cover . 


8 


20 




water .... 


20 


00 




gas ... . 


37 


60 


1182 32 
^62,289.10 


it of bills approved by me 


. 





of which 147,055.06 was on account of new bridge. 

In the above account the item for records, of -1)170.50, was 
paid for maps, books, and field notes pertaining to civil en- 
gineering and surveying in this city, which were made by 
Messrs. Ellis & Patterson and George H. Allen, and which 
were authorized to be purchased by the Committee on 
Accounts. 

In the account for soldiers' monument, the expense for 
globes was made necessary on account of the globes being 
broken by the heat of the gas-lights, from the burners being 
placed so high as to suddenly heat a portion of the glass 
globes when a larger portion was cold. I have had the 
burners lowered six inches, and no trouble from breakage 
has since occurred. The sprinklers were put on last 
Memorial Day, thus saving water, and giving a better 
appearance to the jets. One of the lion's heads was left 
unfinished when the monument came under my charge, and 
I have had this head completed without expense to the city 
other than the expressage from New York, it being taken 
to that city by the contractor of the monument Ijronze 
work. 



249 

The amount of work which has been done the past year 
in the several highway districts is as follows : — 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 
MALACHI F. DODGE, Superintendent. 

The River road near Clark's ledge has been filled and 
graveled, and on the same road, north of the State Reform 
School, the sandy hollow has been filled and graveled for 
about twenty-five rods, and in other places the road has 
been graveled, in all about sixty rods. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. — (City Proper.) 
WARREN HARVEY, Superintendent. 

BLOCK PAVING. 

North end of Elm street, Myrtle, south side, to Prospect, 
south side, 972 square yards. 

At south end of Elm street, from north side of Auburn to 
north side of Grove street, 2,044 square yards. 

South half of Granite street between the lower canal 
bridge and Granite bridge, 666 square yards. Total 
amount 3,682 square yards, and there are left on hand, of 
paving blocks, about 188 square yards. 

COBBLE PAVING. 

On sides of above block paving, on Depot street from 
Elm to Franklin, on Elm east back street from Manchester 
to Hanover, and 50 feet north of Hanover, and in gutters 
on macadamized streets, 4,933 square yards. 

MACADAMIZING. 

Concord street, east side of Vine to east side of Chestnut. 

Chestnut street, north side of Concord to north side of 

Lowell, with two stone crossings on Lowell, and east edge- 



250 

stone set from Concord street to the back street. Total 
amount of macadamizing, 1,472 square yards. 

GRADED AND GRAVELED. 

Myrtle street, Oak to Russell, and Russell from Myrtle to 
Bridge street. 

Blodget street, 350 feet east of Elm. 

Pennacook street. Elm to Chestnut, with heavy fill for 
300 feet, with a strong capped railing, 600 feet long, of two- 
inch plank, on Elm and Pennacook streets, at a cost of 
$1,905.38. 

Dean and Hollis streets, from Elm to the back street. 

West Central street, Franklin to Canal street, north gutter 
paved with concrete ; walk 8 feet wide, on north side, and 
west sidewalk of Franklin street graded from West Cen- 
tral to Pleasant street. 

Central street, Beacon to Cass, and Cass (a new street 
laid out this year) from Central to Park, with the stone 
culvert 21 feet square, under Park street, extended 70 feet 
under Cass street. 

Bridge street. Elm to Church. 

Orange street, 400 feet east of Elm. 

Belmont street, Lowell to Concord, and Lowell at Bel- 
mont, with stone culvert 1^ feet square and 100 feet long 
under south gutter and Belmont street. 

Appleton street. Chestnut to Elm. 

Union street, Hanover to Amherst, with concrete walk 
on east side and four concrete crossings at Hanover and 
Amherst streets. 

Brook street. Union to Beech. 

Elm street. Cemetery brook to Merrill street. ' 

Valley street, Elm to Willow, and Willow from Young 
to Merrill streets. 



251 

Beech street, west back street from Harrison to Brook. 
West Bridge street, between upper and lower canal 
bridges. 

GRAVELED. 

Nashua street, Maple to Bridge, and across from Bridge 
to Pearl street. 

Prospect street, Beech to Oak. 

West Salmon street. River road nearly to Elm, with 
north sidewalk graded from Elm street to east entrance 
to ex-Gov. Smyth's grounds. 

North River road. West Salmon to Clarke. 

Walnut street, Harrison to Brook. 

Park street, Hall to Beacon, and Cass to Mammoth road. 

GRADING FOR SIDEWALKS. 

3,300 feet, or 2,840 square yards. 

STREET CROSSINGS. 

Thirteen stone for streets, 3 for back streets, 15 concrete 
for streets, 2 for back streets, edgestones at 18 sidewalk 
corners. 

PARK SQUARE. 

This square was graded at an expense of 1199.87, and 
the pond on Merrimack Square cleared of sand at east end 
at an expense of $37.40. 

HANOVER SQUARE. 

The sidewalk on Union street was raised to a uniform 
grade from Hanover to Amherst street, and the west end 
of the square filled to that grade with a gentle slope to the 
westerly end of the pond, and a new concrete walk laid 



252 



across the northwest corner. At the east end of the square 
a new concrete walk was laid on Beech street, and the con- 
crete walk across the square from the southwest corner to 
near the middle of the east side of the square has been top- 
dressed, and a new concrete branch walk from it to the 
northeast corner was laid, and the square graded from this 
new walk towards the east end of the pond.. This grading 
was not completed before cold weather, on account of other 
work more pressing. 



CONCRETING. 

Walks in streets 

Walks in Hanover square . 

Street crossings .... 

Total .... 

Top-dressing walk in Hanover square 
Top-dressing street-crossings 



937 square yards. 
332 square yards. 
395 square yards. 

1,664 square yards. 

505 square yards. 
38 squai'e yards. 



643 square yards. 
27 square yards. 



Total .... 
Repairing street-crossings . 

The stone-crusher has been removed from the northeast 
corner of Beech and Spruce streets to the '' city yard " on 
Franklin street, and thoroughly repaired. 

Trees have been set out on many of the streets, school- 
house lots, and public squares, and 17 gas-light posts have 
been put up in different parts of the city, making the whole 
number at the present time, 349 gas, 28 oil. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



There have been laid during the year, of Akron pipe, 1 ,471 
feet of 24-inch in Granite and Franklin streets ; 1,499 feet 
of 18-inch in Franklin and Market streets : 804 feet of 15- 



253 

inch in Central and Elm east back streets, and Market and 
Hanover streets ; 3,752 feet of 12-inch in Cedar north back 
street east of Pine, Cedar south back street east of Union, Park 
south back street east of Beech to Wilson, Park north back 
street across Wilson, Elm west back street north of Market 
to Spring, and for cesspool branches and connections of side 
drains ; 142 feet of 6-inch and 632 feet of 8-inch for cess- 
pool branches and side drain connections, and 2 feet of 
4-inch for branch drain ; 132,000 bricks for Granite-street 
sewer between lower-canal bridge and Merrimack riv- 
er, and manholes and cesspools ; oO perches of stone- 
work in lower-canal wall and at outlet at river, and 90 feet 
of cast-iron pipe in Granite-street sewer, 3 feet diameter 
under lower canal, with 18-inch branch on north side, 29 
feet from west wall. 

There have been built 4 manholes and 18 cesspools ; 7 cess- 
pools relocated, and 2 discontinued. 

The sewer in Granite and Franklin streets, with two 
overflows connecting with Elm-street sewer, recommended 
by me in mv last annual report, was decided upon by the 
Committee on Sewers, March 24, and the sewer built during 
the summer and fall. The portion between lower canal and 
Granite bridge, of brick, 3 feet interior diameter, and 8 
inches thick, with three wings or pilings of brick 12 inches 
thick, extending into the solid earth on each side and bot- 
tom of the trench, their tops being one foot above the level 
of the water in the lower canal ; around these wings or pil- 
ings the earth was securely puddled with gravel from the 
city lot on Lowell street. 

The iron pipe under the canal was put in by the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company, at the city's expense, they pre- 
ferring to do that work and be responsible for its safety. 
An 18-inch branch was made in this pipe at the expense of 
the company, for their convenience in making repairs in 



254 

the canal. This pipe is 90 feet long in 1 2 feet lengths with 
sockets, and -| inch thick, and cost, laid, $1,520.34. 

In Elm west back street the old cement sewer from Mar- 
ket to Spring street was taken up and found to be Worthless 
(except 100 feet). This was replaced by a 12-inch Akron 
pipe laid from 2 to 4 feet lower, and connecting with the 
Market-street branch of the Granite and Franklin street 
sewer. 

A sewer was ordered by the committee to be laid in Cen- 
tral south back street from Elm east back street to Union 
street, and another in Canal street from the Granite street 
sewer to connect with the sewer in Franklin street at Au- 
burn street, and cut off the Franklin street sewer below 
Auburn street. On account of not being able to get pipe 
as fast as wanted, these two sewers were not laid before cold 
weather. 

The necessity for the last-named sewer is on account of 
the filling in, by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, of 
Franklin street at the outlet of the Franklin-street sewer. 
This sewer has been temporarily extended with plank to 
the outside of the embankment, but this outlet must be 
discontinued, as the company must grade their land here 
in 1881. 

DISTRICT XO. 3. — (Bakersville.) 
ISAAC G. HOWE, Superintendent. 

On the South River road from Elm street to Baker street 
the lines were relocated, some of the fences built on these 
lines, and center bound stones put in at the center of Elm 
street and at the angle on the north line of Adams street, 
and an iron bolt at the north line of Baker street. 

This road has been graded and graveled from Elm to 
Baker street, with the south gutter paved from Elm to op- 



255 

posite Adams street, and the north gutter paved from Ehn 
street to Hancock street, with two concrete crossings be- 
tween Elm and Hancock streets, and one across Elm street 
on the north side of the River road ; the south sidewalk 
graded from Elm street to the school-house lot, and the 
north sidewalk graded from Elm to Hancock street. 

The amount of sidewalk grading, 1,267 square yards ; 
the amount of gutter paving, 622 square yards ; the amount 
of concrete crossing, 91 square yards. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

A new cesspool was put in on south side, and a branch 
drain from the north cesspool nearly opposite. A new cess- 
pool was put in near the watering-trough, and the branch 
extended to it. The two cesspools in Elm street near the 
River road were rebuilt. 

Amount of Akron pipe used : 10 feet of 4-inch, 54 feet of 
8-inch, and 8 feet of 12-inch. 

The River road was also graded and graveled south of 
the brook near the tannery, and on " Howlett's Hill," 
north of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Baker street, graded and graveled from Elm street to 
the Nutt road, and Nutt road for one-fourth of a mile south 
of Baker street. Calef road south of John B. Clarke's 
farm graded and graveled. 

DISTRICT NO. 10. — (PiscATAQUOG.) 
AARON Q. GAGE, Superintendknt. 

BLOCK PAVING. 

West side of Main street from Manchester and North 
Weare Railroad to Winter street, 289 square yards. Block 
paving relaid in Main street at both ends of the bridge and 
north of Mast street, 304 square yards. 



266 



STREETS GRADED. 



Winter street, 350 feet, with paved gutters on both sides. 
The stone wall seventy-three feet long, four feet high, on 
edge of sidewalk in front of house of Mrs. Weaver, being 
dangerous for travel, was removed to the north line of 
street, and the sidewalk lowered to the proper grade. 

Center and South River streets graded 375 feet, with 
paved gutter 50 feet. 

Walker street from South River to Second street graded 
with sidewalk, and 100 feet of paved gutter on south 
side. 

Bowman street from the cemetery to Mast street was 
widened on the west side by the Mayor and Aldermen, 
June 19, to include within the street lines a water-pipe 
which was laid through private land to clear a ledge. This 
street was graded and the west gutter paved 150 feet, and 
sidewalk graded and fence removed to a new line at the 
city's expense. 

Milford street, east of the Catholic cemetery, for 1,405 
feet was relocated by the Mayor and Aldermen, June 19, 
and graded, and both gutters paved 650 feet. Stone bounds 
were put in from Main street to the cemetery, on center and 
sides of this street. 

Goffstown road graded for three-fourths of a mile, and 
east end of Wilkins street graded at the junction with 
Goffstown road. 

The amount of cobble paving in gutters, 1,864 square 
yards. The amount of grading for concrete, 805 feet in 
length, or 537 square yards. 

SEWERS. 

The Walker-street sewer was extended from Third street 
to a small pond near Main street, with 520 feet of 12-inch 



257 

Akron pipe. This pond having no outlet had become dan- 
gerous to the health of people living in its vicinity. 

A cesspool was put in at the southwest corner of Main 
and Mast streets, with a branch of 22 feet of 8-inch pipe 
to Main-street sewer. Also, one was put in at the south- 
west corner of Mast and Bowman streets, with a branch of 
36 feet of 8-inch pipe to a sewer in Mast street. 

DISTRICT NO. 11. (Amoskeag.) 
LORENZO D. COLBY, Superintendent. 

The street from Amoskeag Falls bridge to Main street 
has been graded, with sidewalks on both sides, the south 
walk concreted for ooO feet from bridge, and the roadway 
cobble-paved for 180 feet from bridge. A retaining wall on 
the south side, CoO feet long, and one on the north side, 150 
feet long, were built, and a strong gas-pipe railing with two 
rails was put upon both walls their entire length, and se- 
curely connected with the bridge. The expense of these 
walls was 14,688.87, and the railing, -^208.50. Daniel W. 
Garland being the contractor for the walls, and Thomas A. 
Lane for the railings. The amount of concrete sidewalk was 
250 square yards, and cobble-paving, 520 square yards. 
Main street from the " Eddy," one-fourth mile southward, 
graded and graveled, and the Dunbarton road near the 
" gravel pits " was graded by cutting nearly six feet a por- 
tion of the distance, and graded. 

BRIDGES. 

REPAIRS OF BRIDGES. 

The west pier of the Amoskeag Falls bridge, being much 
exposed to the action of ice and logs coming over the dam 
of the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company near by, had 

17 



258 

some of its cut-water stones thrown out of place. These 
stones were replaced, and two large iron straps securely 
fastened to them and the adjoining stones which remained 
firm. The expense of this work was -$20.74. This bridge 
was replanked with three-inch Northern hard-pine plank, 
laid diagonally, and will need further repairs nest year. 

GRANITE BRIDGE. 

The middle truss, extending some 3| feet above the floor, 
and making two narrow roadways less than twelve feet 
wide, was cut down to a level with the floor, thus making 
one wide roadway of about 26 feet. A contract was made, 
by the committee on streets, with Button Wood, the well- 
known railroad-bridge builder, for S!l,200 for doing the 
work complete. 

WEST BRIDGE STREET EXTENSION. 

In September, 1879, a petition numerously signed w^as 
presented to the city councils, asking for the laying out of 
Bridge street from the " intersection of the center line of 
Bridge street with the center line of Canal street, thence 
in a westerly direction, to a stake standing on the westerly 
side of Merrimack River ; " and October 22 the committee 
on streets reported in favor of granting the petition. As 
the building of this street necessitated the building of a 
river bridge and bridges over the upper and|lower canals, 
a decision by the councils was not readily arrived at. 
December 19 the street was laid out by the mayor and 
aldermen, in accordance with the petition, 50^ ^feet wide, 
having 20 feet southerly and 30 feet northerly of the line 
named in the petition. As there have since been|doubts 
expressed in regard to the location of the stake on the west- 
erly side of the river, on account of there being a stake on 



259 

the west bank of the river and another near the center of 
the road at the top of the hill, a petition was presented, in 
Noveml)er last, to the city councils, for laying out a street 
from the river bank to the " old turnpike " leading from 
Concord to Boston, and December 7. 1880, the former line 
was extended by the mayor and aldermen from the west 
abutment of the river bridge to a stone near the center of 
the old turnpike, to be 50 feet wide from the river bridge 
abutment to the River-street bridge abutment, having 20 
feet southerly and 30 feet northerly of said line, and from 
the street bridge abutment to the old turnpike to be 60 
feet wide, having 25 feet southerly and 35 feet northerly of 
said line. 

Having laid out the street, the question of the grade of 
the bridges and the kind wanted was next in order, and, 
January 27, I submitted plans and estimates for bridges 
upon three ditferent grades, called the " low level," the 
" middle level," and the "high level," the low level cross- 
ing the Concord Railroad at grade (as designed also for 
the middle and high level), and continuing with a descend- 
ing grade to the river bridge, and crossing the river at a 
proper height above high water, and ascending the hill on 
the west side of the river at a grade of .8 feet in 100 feet ; 
the middle-level grade continuing, as above, from the Con- 
cord Railroad to the lower-canal bridge, and then rising on 
trestle-work to the top of the trusses of river bridge (thus 
making an upper and under floor, or " deck and through " 
river bridge), and continuing with trestle-work and a bridge 
over River street, and an embankment to the old turn- 
pike." The high level commences on the former grades, 
at the rear gate into the Stark Mills yard, and, rising over 
the lower canal and over the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company's railroad track, — the usual height above track, — 
and descending from thence to the above height for middle 



260 

level of the river bridge, and continuing on the middle level 
grade to the old turnpike. February 11, the city coun- 
cils voted to build the bridges on the luiddle level, 50 feet 
wide, and to raise •150,000 therefor, and chose Joseph F. 
Kennard, Benjamin L. Hartshorn, Charles H. Hodgman, 
Charles W. Eager, and Daniel G. Andrews bridge com- 
mittee. 

Proposals were soon advertised for. to be received March 
81, when sis proposals for iron and two for wooden river 
brido:es, with the approaches, and for two iron canal 
bridges, were received, as also nine bids for the stone-work 
for the same, the bids ranging from -117,000, for the river 
bridge alone, of wood, to •'r^62,700 for the iron. As there 
was much variation in the proposals offered, it was pro- 
posed tliat the committee examine bridges built by three of 
the companies represented, whose pi'oposals were favorably 
considered, and the committee, in company with the three 
brido-e agents and the city engineer, visited seventeen 
bridges, of which twelve were iron, and erected in New 
Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts. On their return, 
Friday, April 16, the committee decided to accept the pro- 
posal of the Corrugated Metal Company of East Berlin, 
Qoj^iTi.^ — three of their bridges being among the number 
visited, — and awarded them the contract at 857,000, 
150,000 to be paid by the city, and 17,000 by the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company and the Stark Mills, these compa- 
nies having previously agreed to contribute that amount 
towards the bridge. 

The style of bridge selected is the " Douglas patent para- 
bolic arch," a style almost unknown in this country, but 
used in the largest truss bridges in Europe, — in England, 
near Plymouth, in the two main spans of 445 feet each, 
near Hamburg, Germany, in the three main spans of 325 
feet each, and over the Rhine, near Mayence, of 32 spans, 4 



261 

of which are 345 feet. The canal bridges were to be of iron, 
the upper canal 53|- feet span, the lower canal 51|^ feet 
span, to be 50 feet extreme width, with one roadway and 
two sidewalks 6 feet in the clear, each ; the river bridge 
to be a " deck and through " of 3 spans, with an upper 
roadway 37 feet wide, and two sidewalks 6 feet wide, and 
a lower roadway 18 feet wide, without sidewalks, the lower 
roadway only to be built at present, and the iron work only 
ready for the upper roadway and walks and railings. No 
approaches were intended to be built, in this contract. 

The concluding of this contract caused quite a commo- 
tion among our citizens, and an injunction was served the 
next day upon the committee restraining them from exe- 
cuting the contract. A citizens' meeting was called, and 
held May 8, at which resolutions were passed censuring 
the action of the committee, and a citizens' committee 
was chosen to confer with the city councils to prevent the 
bridge committee from proceeding with the work. No 
conference was held between the parties, and upon the 
bridge company offering to give up their contract provid- 
ing the city would contract with them for their bridge, 
upon some other plan which would be acceptable to the 
courts, the city councils voted to make the bridge 40 feet 
wide, and to raise 860,000 therefor, so that the river 
bridge and approaches could be made complete, which 
with the 87,000 contribution by the corporations was ac- 
ceptable to the court, provided the 17,000 was first paid 
into the city treasury, which was immediately done, and 
June 16 the work was allowed to go on. June 17, a new 
contract was made with the bridge company, and the 
work commenced in earnest. 

In the contract it was stipulated that the work should be 
done to the acceptance of the city engineer, or such engi- 
neer or engineers as may be associated with him, and as the 



262 

corporations wished for information in regard to the 
strength and durability of the river bridge, the city coun- 
cils voted to authorize the bridge committee to employ 
experts at the city's expense. When the working drawings 
were completed, they were referred, with the contract and 
specifications, to Mr. E. S. Philbrick, civil engineer of Bos- 
ton, who reported favorably upon them to the attorney of 
the corporations, and suggested two slight changes, which, 
with some changes prepared by me, have been made. 

July 3, a contract was made by the bridge company with 
Martin Fitzgerald for the stone cutting for the two river 
bridge piers, and, July 5, the contract for furnishing and 
laying all of the stone within sixty days therefrom was 
awarded to Alpheus Bodwell, both contractors being resi- 
dents well known in this city. July 12, at 5 p. m., the 
first stone was laid at the northeast corner of the west 
abutment of the river bridge. August 10, commenced lay- 
ing cut stone on the west pier, which was completed Sep- 
tember 25. August 19, commenced laying cut stone on 
the east pier, and completed September 24. The cut stone 
work of these piers rests on a base of uncoursed gran- 
ite of large size, laid in strong cement mortar on the bed 
rock of the river. This base course for the west pier is 54 
feet long, 11 feet wide, and averages 15 inches high. 
For the east pier it is 541 feet long, 12 feet wide at the 
bottom, and 9^ feet at top, and averages 41 feet high. 
The cut stone work for both piers is 8 feet, 8 inches thick 
at bottom, 5 feet at the top or coping course, and 51 feet 
long at bottom on center line, and 37 feet on coping, and 
20 feet 2 inches high for east pier, and 201 feet high for 
west pier. The cut-water or nose of the piers is right- 
angled on the plan, and has a batter of 6 inches per foot on 
the edge, and the batter of the sides and down-stream end 
is 1 inch per foot. 



263 

In the east pier there are 8 courses of 2 feet, 2 courses 
of 1^ feet, and a coping course of 1 foot. In the west pier, 
which is less exposed to the force of the current, there are 
3 courses of 2 feet, 9 courses of 1^ feet, and a coping course 
1 foot. The coping course extends across the pier, the end 
stones being 4 by -5 feet, weighing nearly two tons each. 
The upper course of the cut-water is in one stone H feet 
thick, and weighing nearly two and one-half tons. The 
cut-water stone are securely cramped to each other and to 
the first header in the body of the pier, with wrought-iron 
cramps 1^ inches diameter. The west abutment is 19 feet 
high, and rests on the " hard-pan " bed of the river. The 
east abutment is the river wall, built liy the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company some years since, but raised 3 
feet to the proper grade. 

The iron superstructure consists of four trusses,-— the 
inner ones being 20 feet between centers., having a clear 
roadway of 18 feet, and the outer ones f:'< feet distance 
between centers therefrom. Into the space between these 
inner and outer trusses is placed the sway l)racing, which, 
with the sway bracing between the iron floor beams, pre- 
vents lateral motion of the bridge. The trusses are made 
with an arched upper chord formed of two channel bars 
(10-inch for inner, and 8-inch for outer trusses) set edge- 
wise, and connected together with heavy plate-iron firmly 
riveted to the bars at their tops and with heavy iron straps 
at their bottoms, all forming a continuous arch to each 
span. This upper chord is attached to the center on 
height of the wrought-iron end-posts with an iron pin 31 
inches diameter for inner, and 2| inches for outer trusses. 
To this pin is also connected the lower chord bars, being four 
bars 4 by 1-^^ inches for inner, and two bars 3^ by | inches for 
outer trusses, forming an inverted arch corresponding in 
curve to that of the upper chord, and thus preventing tlie 



264 

end-posts from spreading at the connecting pins. These 
pins are 136 feet, d'^ inches apart between centers in each 
truss, and this distance is divided into ten panels of 13 
feet, 7| inches each, by posts formed of two 5-inch channel 
bars in each truss, which connect at the upper and lower 
chords with wrought-iron pins, and extend above the upper 
chords a sufficient height to receive the upper floor beams, 
which are of plate-iron 2 feet wide in the center, and 
stiffened with angle-iron, and are 40 feet long. The dis- 
tance in height between the upper and lower chords in the 
center is 20 feet, and from the top of the lower floor to the 
top of the upper floor is 28^ feet. The lower (iron) floor 
beams are suspended from the lower chord pins of the 
inner truss by 1^-inch square rods. Between the top and 
bottom of the posts of tlie inner trusses, and at the tops of 
the posts of the outer trusses, are level chords, connecting 
with pins to all of the posts, and preventing the spreading 
of the tops and bottoms of the end-posts. Also, between 
the posts there is diagonal bracing of round rods of 
wrought-iron of different sizes, depending upon their 
location. 

This bridge, as now built, covering two spans from the 
east end, has a skew of 12| degrees from a right angle with 
the course of the river and the abutments and piers, and 
will be in three equal spans of 134 feet clear each, and 411 
feet between abutments. From the west end of the bridge 
to River street the upper roadway is to be carried on 
wrought-iron trestle-work, with posts formed of channel 
bars latticed together, set 16 by 16 feet apart between cen- 
ters, and securely braced horizontally and vertically. Over 
River street is to be a bridge of the usual height (required 
for railroads) above the corporation track in the street. 
From the east end of the river bridge is to be a wrought- 
iron trestle 375 feet long (built same as at the west end of 



265 

the bridge), to the old lock wall which has been raised to 
the established grade, thus making a continuous floor 930 
feet long and 40 feet wide. This floor is to l)e divided into 
two sidewalks 6 feet wide in the clear, each, with a strong, 
ornamental wrought-iron railing 3^ feet high on the outer 
edge, firmly secured to the wrought-iron beams of the floor. 
The sidewalks are separated from the roadway (which is 
26 feet wide) by a timber wheel-guard 8 inches high, and 
raised 2 inches above the floor to allow the water to run 
off. This floor is to be lighted at night by fourteen single 
gas-lights in ornamental lamp-posts and lanterns selected 
by the committee on lighting streets, and to be furnished 
by James S. Bacheler of this city ; the posts, lanterns, 
pipes and fixtures to be paid for by the city, the bridge 
company to put up the posts forming part of the railing to 
accommodate their work, without expense to the city. 

The two canal bridges have been erected but not com- 
pleted, and have been in use for travel since October 15. 
The upper-canal bridge has a span of 53| feet clear, and 
the lower-canal 51^ feet, and 56^ and 54^ feet between 
centers of end pins. 

The trusses are of similar design to the river-bridge 
trusses, and are placed 23 feet, 10 inches between centers, 
making a clear roadway uf 22 feet, 8 inches, with two side- 
walks 7 feet clear width, each. 

The floors of all bridges and trestle-work, in roadways, 

3 inches thick, spruce, in one course ; in sidewalks, 2 
inches thick. Roadway floor joist, bridges, 3 by 12 ; trestles 

4 by 14, spruce, set 2 feet between centers. Sidewalk floor 
joist, 2 by 12, set 2 feet between centers. 

A report of the tests of four chord bars from the river 
bridge is herewith inserted. 



266 



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267 

The above bars were measured into seven sections of 
twenty inches each, with elongations at the breaking strain, 
as follows : — 



Bars. 


1 
Inches. 


2 
Inches. 


3 

Inches. 


4 

Inches. 


5 
Inches. 


6 
Inches. 


7 
Inches. 


1 


21.04 
21.98 
22.76 
22.24 


21.22* 
21.96 
22.40 
22.19 


21.03 

21.88 
22.07 
22.12 


21.02 
22.19* 
22.11 
22.09 


21.02 
21.95 
22.24 
22.19 


21.02 
21.97 
22.80 

22.22 


21 04 


2 


22.09 

23.35* 

21.98 


3 


4 





* Denotes the section in which fracture took place. 
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS. 

During the past year, as in 1879, 1 have found the same 
difficulty in properly locating lines of streets and highways, 
on account of the removal of bounds, or the loss of, or of 
not liaving any permanent, original bounds by which lines 
can be reestablished. 

In two cases, one on the South River road in Bakersville, 
and the other on Milford street, Piscataquog, not having 
any originally established starting-point, I have relocated 
the lines, making the road and street fifty feet wide, and 
setting stone bounds on the center and side lines. 

In establishing grades, there has been but little opposi- 
tion, and I have been obliged, as in 1879, to depart from the 
grades shown on the drawings which I received when ac- 
cepting my office, and which have no official signature upon 
them, to prevent unnecessary damage and save expense to 
the city. 

In the construction of street crossings there has been 
some objection made by citizens. The system adopted is 
that in use in most of the cities of this country and Europe, 
and would find favor in this city if the crossings through- 
out the city were constructed alike. 



268 

NUMBERING STREETS. 

On account of the numbering in use here not agreeing 
with the ordinance, and in Piscataquog the line from which 
numbering began being indefinite, I made a report to the 
city councils, last spring, by request of the committee on 
streets, and the matter was referred to the committee on 
lands and buildings, who reported to the councils an amend- 
ment to the ordinance, which made the initial line of num- 
bering, Elm and Baker streets on the east side of the river, 
and the river and Granite street on the west side, all 
streets crossing these lines with the same name to have 
the prefix west or south, as the case may be, excepting 
Dover and West streets in Piscataquog (which extend but 
a short distance south of Granite street), whose numbers 
begin at their south ends, and their names have no prefix. 
By this ordinance sixty numbers were changed in Piscata- 
quog, and three hundred new numbers put up in the city 
proper. 

There is another question of importance to the city, 
which is fewer highway districts, and consequently less 
difference in the cost and manner of doing work upon the 
highways. The work in Piscataquog and Amoskeag having 
been thoroughly done as far as expenses would allow, there 
remain only the highways outside of the thickly settled por- 
tions of these districts which require much expense, and 
these two districts could be consolidated with advantage to 
the city. There are twenty miles of roads and streets in 
these two districts, of which more than one-half is in good 
condition. The same can be said of other districts in regard 
to the advantage of consolidation. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

But little troul)le has been caused by stoppage of sewers 
the past year, by storms or otherwise, and the small quan- 



269 

tity of rain has caused no overflow of sewers. Some at- 
tention has been paid to ventilation, but not as much as is 
needed. Sewer-enterers should be required, under a penalty, 
to notify the superintendent of streets, or some competent 
authority connected with the street department, of the 
time they are about to open streets for the purpose of mak- 
ing connection with sewers, or the connections should by 
all means be made under proper authority paid by the 
city. 

LANDS AND BUILDINGS. 

In addition to my duties as civil engineer, I have made 
drawings for a new school-building, with specifications and 
contracts for this and for finishing the third story of the 
engine-house on Vine street, the proposed new battery 
building, and an annex to the city library building, and 
been called by the committee on repairs of the School Board 
to advise in regard to the changes which have been made 
in the Lincoln-street school-house as suggested by me. 

In addition to this work, I have made a report to the U. 
S. census department in regard to the civil engineering de- 
partment of this city, and which is as follows : — 

REPORT TO GEORGE E. WARING, JR., CENSUS 
OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 

STREETS. 

Total length in city proper, fifty-five miles ; in suburbs, 
seventy miles ; total, one hundred and twenty-five miles. 

Paved with : — 

1. Cobble-stones, 1,310 feet length, full width of road- 
way, 4,315 square yards. 



270 

2. Stone blocks, 9,185 feet length, — 28,758 square yards. 
Cobble-paving sides, 22,320 square yards. 

3. Asphalt, or other composition, 520 feet length, — 1,445 
square yards. 

4. Broken stone macadamizing, 10,742 feet, — 32,110 
square yards. Of this, with cobble-paved gutters, 5,621 
feet, — 4,996 square yards. 

5. Wood, none. 

6. Gravel, about forty miles in city proper, and fifty 
miles in suburbs ; total, ninety miles. 

Cost per yard of each as nearly as it may be estimated ? 

Cobble stone, 56 cents in 1880 ; stone blocks, $2.00 in 
1880 ; asphalt, $1.50 in 1874-1875. 

Broken stone, macadamizing, 45 cents in 1880 ; gravel, 20 
cents in 1880. 

Cost of keeping each in good repair ? 

Macadamizing has been used only about five years ; the 
first stone being broken by hand, now needs reconstructing 
entirely. The later work needs scarcely any repairs. 
Stone-block and cobble paving has not cost fifty cents 
per yard in fifteen years for repairs, when not disturbed for 
gas or water pipes or sewers. 

Relative facility with which each is kept clean ? 

Nearly equal expense per yard. We used " O'Neil's pa- 
tent street sweeper " on paved streets in 1880. 

Paved, macadamized, and some graveled streets watered 
by water-cart at the city's expense, by superintendent of 
streets. 

Quality and permanent economy of each ? 

Stone-block and cobble-stone necessary on business streets 
with heavy teaming. Macadamized for light teaming and 
graveled for carriages have proved about equally econom- 
ical. 



271 

Kind and character of sidewalks ? 

Twelve hundred feet length, brick, — 1,500 yards. One 
hundred and seventy feet stone, — 300 yards ; and twenty- 
four and one-half miles or 93,600 square yards. Scrim- 
shaws' patent concrete. 

Kind and character of gutters on paved and macadamized 
streets ? 

Cobble-stone paved gutters usually four feet wide. On 
other streets and roads, of the same material as the road- 
way. Crossings on paved streets of split stone. On other 
streets, concrete as for sidewalk with heavier bed-stone. 

Degree and manner of tree planting ? 

Trees set on sides of streets, usually six inches outside 
of edge-stone or sidewalk line on nearly all streets. 

Construction and repair of streets, by contract or day, 
with annual cost ? 

Construction and repair of streets by day work ; mate- 
rials occasionally by contract. Annual cost of repairs of 
streets in city proper averages $2,000 ; of roads in suburbs, 
15,500. 

Sewers 8.7 miles from six inches to four feet, nine 
inches diameter, of which two and one-half miles are 12-inch 
pipe. Akron pipe is considered best. 

Does your experience indicate a preference for contract 
or day work? 

Day work. This city being in a transition state, in lately 
constructing water-works, gas-works, and sewers our expe- 
rience has been that day work is cheaper and requires less 
careful superintendence. 

Do you use steam stone-crusher or roller ? If so, with 
what effect ? 

We use Blake's stone-crusher, run by steam. We run 
a two-horse iron road-roller on macadamized streets with 
good effect. 



272 



HORSE-RAILROAD. 



Total length, two and one-fourth miles, of which one 
mile is double track, three feet gauge. Total number of 
cars, eight, four daily ; horses, twenty-eight, twenty-six 
daily ; men employed, eleven ; passengers carried during 
the year, 306,975, or 25,581 per month. Rate of fare, five 
cents; twenty-five tickets for $1.00. 

WATER-WORKS. 

Total cost, $742,000. 

Natural head or pumping, and amount of pressure in 
either case ? 

Pump into reservoir one hundred and ten feet ; average 
in the city, 150 feet head. 

If pumping, what system ? 

Water-power. 

State average, greatest, and least amount pumped per 
diem. 

Average, 1,246,913 gallons ; greatest pumped, 2,000,000 
gallons. 

Average cost of raising one million gallons one foot high, 
^iVo cents. Yearly cost of maintenance aside from cost 
of pumping, $9,000. Yearly income from water rates, 
$53,000. 

Are water-meters used ? 

Yes. 

If yes, what kind, and to wliat extent, and how have 
they been found to affect the consumption of water ? 

Two hundred and fifty-one, made in Worcester, Mass., 
by the Union Meter Co. Save the consumption of water. 

GAS-WORKS. 

Are the gas-works owned by the city ? 
No. 



273 

What is the daily average production ? 
One hundred and fifty thousand cubic feet. 
What is the charge per one thousand feet ? 
Two dollars. 

What is the number of lamps ? 
Three hundred and forty-nine gas, twenty-eight oil. 
What income from meter rates ? 
Received ■197,450 for gas by meter register in 1879. 
Lamps lighted by city lamplighter, on contract, for il,500 
per year. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

What buildings are owned or occupied by the city for 
municipal purposes, wholly or in part ? 

City hall, for city offices, police station, bank, and four 
stores ; court-house, for city offices and State courts ; city 
library of 25.000 volumes ; two steam fire engine houses, 
for four steamers ; one hose-house and First N. H. Battery 
building and two ward-rooms. 

What is the cost of municipal buildings belonging to the 
city? 

One hundred sixty-three thousand five hundred dollars. 

State cost of city hall separately ? If city and county 
buildings are owned in common, so state and give cost of 
the city's portion. 

City hall, 150,000 ; court-house, 140,000 ; city library, 
SyO,000 ; engine and hose houses, 140,000 ; battery build- 
ing, $2,500 ; two ward-room buildings, $1,000. The court- 
house is owned by the city, and a portion rented to the 
county for court purposes. 

(Signed) A. G. STEVENS, 

City Engineer. 
Manchester, N. H. 
18 



274 



CONCLUSION, 



To the mayor, aldermen, and common council, and all 
committees thereof with whom I have been connected the 
past year, and to the highway superintendents and work, 
men of districts Nos. 2, 10, 11, I return my sincere thanks 
for their ready cooperation in suggestions I have made. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

A. G. STEVENS, 

City Engineer. 
Manchester, January 1, 1881. 



AOOOUlvrT 



HENHY R. GHAMBERLIN, 

CITY TREASURER. 



December 31, 1879, to December 31, 1880. 



276 



Dr, 



Henry B. Chamherlin, Treasurer, in accovnt with the 



To Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1880 


. $35,406 34 


Temporary Loan . 


. 


95,000 00 


Savings-bank Tax . 






32,474 73 


Railroad Tax 






11,669 87 


Insurance Tax 






778 50 


Literary Fund 






1,567 32 


City Hall and Stores 






1,393 00 


City Farm 






1,959 91 


City Scales 






220 00 


Police Court . 






4,912 22 


Pine Grove Cemetery 


• • • 




1,333 05 


Board of Inmates at State Refori 


n School . 


2,705 12 


City Teams . 




* 


2,910 62 


Overdrafts 






69 41 


Licenses of Shows 






270 00 


Dog Licenses 






503 58 


Sewer Licenses 






830 85 


Tuition . 






259 38 


Interest on Taxes . 






726 07 


Pent of Tenements 






233 75 


Taxes collected on List of 1873 




4 50 


.( kk li 


1874 




127 86 


a u ii 


1875 




242 97 


u u « 


1876 




440 12 


a u a 


1877 




360 02 


u a a 


1878 




741 60 


a ti «' 


1879 




27,632 81 


a a (( 


1880 




. 195,056 23 


City Aqueduct 


. 




10 00 


Water Rent . 


. 




. 57,655 25 


Lumber . 


. 




3 00 


Land sold from Farm 


. 




220 46 


Tomb fees 






116 50 


Warren Harvey, Land < 


m Hanover street 


1,119 71 


Amoskeag and Stark Co 


rporations, for new Bridge 


7,000 00 


Alfred Quimby, Judgm 


3nt 


3,632 57 


J, A. Carr, Siftings 


d forward 


4 54 


Amount carrie 


8489,591 36 



277 



City of Manchester {ending December 31, 1880), 



Cr. 



By Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1880 .... $24,907 15 


Paupers off the Farm 








6,980 88 


City Farm 










4,675 79 


City Teams . 










4,475 72 


Highway District No. 1 










193 80 


u u u 2 










. 10,984 60 


(( a u 3 










773 67 


i« a " 4 










224 42 


" " " 5 










410 09 


u u u g 










387 59 


(( u u y 










981 79 


u u u g 










552 84 


u u u g 










430 56 


" " " 10 










1,842 30 


(C U 14 -^-^ 










2,633 05 


" " " 12 










324 11 


a " " 13 










139 40 


New Highways 










3,482 30 


Granite Bridge 










79 80 


Amoskeag Falls Bridge 










1,246 32 


Bridge Street Bridge 










. 47,000 00 


Commons 










1,578 40 


Sewers and Drains 










19,919 40 


Valley Cemetery . 










1,852 89 


Pine Grove Cemetery . 










2,782 60 


Fire Department . 










10,437 15 


Police Department 










19,072 50 


City Officers . 










11,802 34 


Lighting Streets . 










5,362 36 


Militia 










600 00 


Printing and Stationery 










1,688 30 


Incidental Expenses 










17,366 89 


City Hall Building 










3,187 84 


City Library . 










2,632 26 


Paving Streets 










11,664 51 


"Watering Streets . 










2,024 46 


Discount on Taxes 










5,974 77 


Amount carried forw 


'^ard 








$230,672 85 



278 



Br. 



Henry B. Chamherlin, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward 
J. S. Holt. Pasturing Cows . 
Warren Harvey, Freight on Horse 
Manchester Gas-Light Company, Paving 
Board of Health, Cleaning Vaults 
A. Q. Gage, Plank and Old Scraper 
J- C. Ray, Stone Fountain 
John Knights, one-half barrel of Flour 
J. L. Kelly, City Water at High School 
J. H. Whittier, board of Eliza Thompson 
Rent ©f Ward Room .... 

Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1881 





S489,591 36 




15 00 




4 50 




70 86 




50 00 




7 00 




1 00 




3 25 




1 00 




30 00 




12 00 


• 


S489,785 97 
. 85,693 73 


525,379 70 



279 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1880). 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward . . . $230,672 85 


Abatement of Taxes 






2,622 40 


Coupons, City Proper . 










18,889 00 


Coupons, Water Bonds . 










. 36,207 00 


Interest 










1,924 44 


Eeduction of City Debt 










19,600 00 


Kepairs of Buildings 










1,058 20 


School-houses and Lots 










6,000 00 


State Tax 










41,060 00 


Repairs of School-houses 










5,016 57 


Water-works 










13,870 54 


Land Damages 










597 25 


Fire-alarm Telegraph . 










845 45 


Decoration Day 










200 00 


Grading for Concrete 










4,212 23 


Hydrant Service 










18,330 00 


Macadamizing 










2,269 02 


Firemen's Parade . 










262 00 


Temporary Loan . 










60,000 00 


Tuition 










144 85 


Teachers 










36,628 60 


Evening Schools . 










1,058 05 


Fuel .... 










2,899 75 


Incidental Repairs 










21 63 


Furniture and Supplies 










383 08 


Printing and Advertising 










400 38 


Books and Stationery . 










440 09 


Care of Rooms 










2,239 73 


Contingent Expenses 










974 86 




$498,827 37 


Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1881 


26,652 33 


525,379 70 


HENRY R. CHAMBERLIN, 


City Treasurer. 


Manchestee, January 1, 1881. 













riisrA]sroE committee^s eeport. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
certify that we have examined the foregoing account of 
Henry R, Chamberlin, City Treasurer, and find the same 
correctly cast and supported by proper vouchers. 

ARTHUR E. CLARKE, 
J. F. KENNARD, 
JOHN L. KELLY. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 



To Amoskeag National Bank . 
People's Savings Bank 
Merrimack River Savings Bank 
Manchester National Bank 
Second National Bank 
Amoskeag Savings Bank . 
City National Bank . 
Isaac Fitts 
Manchester Savings Bank 



15,000 00 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

25,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

25,000 00 



Dr. 



195,000 00 



Cr. 



Paid Manchester National Bank 
City National Bank 
Second National Bank . 
Amoskeag National Bank 
People's Savings Bank . 
Merrimack River Savings 

Bank 
Amoskeag Savings Bank 

By balance to new account 



115,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 

45,000 00 



895,000 00 



284 



INTEREST 




Dr. 


To appropriation . 


122,000 


00 


Water-works, am't transferred . 


35,000 


00 


balance overdrawn . 


1,455 


50 

Sfi58 455 5ft 






■ tJpUOjTttJtJ OKI 






Cr. 


By balance overdrawn in 1879 


il,435 


06 


Paid Amoskeag Savings Bank 


25 


00 


Merrimack River Savings 






Bank 


305 


00 


Manchester Savings Bank 


420 


42 


People's Savings Bank . 


152 


50 


Manchester National Bank 


330 


00 


City National Bank 


25 


00 


Amoskeag National Bank 


152 


50 


Second National Bank . 


52 


50 


Isaac Fitts 


203 


33 


E. G. Shattuck 


1 


94 


Charles E. Balch . 


256 


25 


coupons, city proper 


18,889 


00 


coupons, water bonds 


. 36,207 


00 

il58 455 5ft 









INTEREST ON TAXES. 

To George E. Morrill, collector . $1,077 27 



By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 1978 31 

balance to new account . . 98 96 



Dr. 

$1,077 27 
Cr. 

$1,077 27 



285 
PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



To appropriation .... 


14,000 00 


County of Hillsborough, support 




of county paupers . 


2,705 12 


John Knight .... 


3 25 


balance overdrawn . 


2,053 60 



By balance overdrawn in 1879 . 11,781 09 
Paid Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. T. Mackin . 160 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Laughlin . 72 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. P. Fox . . 61 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Healy . 72 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Robert McMahon . 59 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Reardon . 48 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. T. Sullivan . 74 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished John Murphy . . 43 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Michael Kelley . 10 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. Logue . 8 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished John Doherty . 45 00 



Dr. 



,761 97 
Cr. 



286 



Paid W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. Fitzgerald . 49 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished David McKay . 50 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Thomas Horrigan 4 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. Carrigan . 28 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Joseph B. Pierce 83 12 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Kate Cronin . 11 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 
furnished Mrs. Mary Scant- 
Ian 4 00 

Michael Kearns, groceries fur- 
nished P. J. Handley . 64 00 

Michael Kearns, groceries fur- 
nished Ellen Rhodes . . 48 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs J. Joice . . 60 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. M. Shanley . 48 00 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished Michael Kelley . 50 00 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished Alexander Shine . 10 98 

E, A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished T. Connor . . 19 50 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished George H.Batchelder 8 00 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Day . . 2 00 



287 

Paid E. A. Moiilton, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Fitzgerald . 5 00 

E. A. Moulton, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. McCarty . 1 50 
* Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Doherty . 49 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Mary Fitzgerald . 10 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 
' furnished Nellie Logue . 1 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Thomas Riley . 12 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Thomas Connor . 2 20 

Mary Reardon, groceries fur- 
nished Stephen Spain . 32 00 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished Pyam Hovey . . 8 79 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished Joseph B. Fierce . 5 15 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished S. L. Corning . 8 00 

Hardy & Futnam, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Douglass 
Hunter .... 23 81 

Hardy & Futnam, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Sarah Wy- 
man ..... 31 68 

J. C. Fifield & Son, milk fur- 
nished Nathan Love well . 13 86 

Brigham & Pratt, bread fur- 
nished Nathan Lovewell . 23 09 

Brigham & Pratt, bread fur- 
nished Thomas Connor . 1 00 



288 



Paid P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. P. Harrison . 59 00 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Cyprian Gillette 17 18 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Hunter . 12 68 

L. F. Putnam, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Hunter . 24 05 

Sawyer & Woodbury, groceries 

furnished Ellen Mullen . 4 00 

J. M. Chandler & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished Alexander Gay 5 00 

Poore & Eowell, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Bresnehan . 3 00 

John Collins, groceries fur- 
nished P. J. Handley . 6 00 

M. E. Griffin, groceries fur- 
nished P. J. Handley . 4 00 

Barnard & Huskie, groceries 

furnished Mrs. D. Hunter . 33 22 

Barnard & Huskie, groceries 

furnished Eben Foss . . 12 00 

M. M. Prescott, board of Eben 
T. Foss .... 60 00 

Mrs. 0. J. Doble, board of 

Anna B. Ayer ... 72 00 

Franklin Webster, board of D. 

0. Webster ... 56 00 

George C. Batchelder, board 

of George C. Batchelder . 118 00 

Women's Aid Society, board 

of Mrs. Joseph H. Brooks . 15 00 

Women's Aid Society, board 

of Mrs. Bryant E. Crawford 15 00 



289 



Paid Sylvester C. Parsons, board of 

Frank C. Pillsbury . . 48 00 

M. E. George, cash paid out . 72 00 

I. R. Dewey, cash paid out . 2 50 

State Reform School, board of 

inmates .... 3,081 64 

George H. Porter, wood deliv- 
ered to Mary Maynard . 1 50 

George H. Porter, wood deliv- 
ered to Mrs. Doherty . 7 50 

George H. Porter, wood deliv- 
ered to Alec. Shine . . 6 00 

George H. Porter, wood fur- . 
nished George H. Batchel- 
der . . " . . . 6 75 

George H. Porter, wood fur- 
nished Thomas Connor . 6 00 

George H. Porter, wood fur- 
nished Mrs. Fitzgerald . 7 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

furnished Maynard . , -3 37 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal fur- 
nished Mrs. Moulton . 48 50 

Moses Harrington, wood fur- 
nished Mrs. Day . . 3 00 

S. Brown, wood furnished Mrs. 

D. Hunter ... 14 37 

Balch & Buxton, wood fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Hunter . 5 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

furnished Mrs. Doherty . 1 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal fur- 
nished Mrs. D. McKay . 8 30 

19 



290 



Paid L. B. Bod well & Co., coal fur- 
nished Mrs. Day 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

furnished Kate Cronin 
L. B. Bodwell, & Co., wood 

furnished Mrs. Scanlan 
A. C. Wallace, wood furnished 

Mrs. D. Hunter 
F. C. Dow, boots . 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of John Connolly . 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of Martha J. Dunn 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of Elbridge Gerry 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of John J. Murray 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of John Welch 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of Ellison Towne . 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of Patrick Cronin 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of Samuel S. Gale 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of Asenath H. 

White . . . . 144 07 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

and care of Lillian C. Locke 9 71 

Barr & Clapp, cloth for Eben 

Foss 4 15 

City of Nashua . . . 63 30 

Robert Hall .... 3 00 



8 


00 


5 


50 


1 


00 


1 


25 


3 


25 


231 


42 


220 


48 


220 


78 


224 


04 


147 


24 


127 


01 


118 


61 


93 


52 



291 

Paid F. C. Dow, boots furnished 

Mrs. Bishop . . . 1 75 

I. R. Dewey, expense taking 

insane person to Concord . 2 50 

John B. Clarke, printing . 7 50 

Plumer & Holton, undercloth- 
ing furnished Nathan Love- 
well 2 93 

J. L. Kelly .... 4 00 

George Kimball, car-fare to 

Lawrence, Mass. . . 80 

Tebbetts Bros., medicine fur- 
nished Joseph B. Pierce 

C. B. Littleiield, medicines . 

Weeks & Currier, medicines . 

L. K. MeaiJ, medicines . 

Z. F. Campbell, medicines 

J. A. Wiley, medicines . 

C. F. Bonney, professional ser- 
vices ..... 

D. P. Campbell, professional 
services .... 

Concord Railroad, for trans- 
portation of Mrs. Susan Frost 

and two children to New 

Haven. Conn. ... 7 95 

C. W. Styles, removing Mrs. 

Crawford to hospital . . 1 00 

P. A. Devine, burying Thomas 

Carrigan .... 15 00 

P. A. Devine, burying Michael 

Kelley . . . . 15 00 

P. A. Devine, burying son of 

Michael Kelley ... 5 00 



5 


73 


1 


50 


1 


40 


28 


85 


11 


98 


14 


82 


6 


00 


22 


50 



292 



Paid A. G. Monette, burying Cyp- 
rian Gillette 

A. G. Monette, burying Peter 
Hebert .... 

M. E, George, searching rec- 
ords 

Nell Dorrity, fare to Tilton . 

C. P. Kelliher, fare to Rociies- 
ter ..... 

Frank Hawley and wife, fare 
to Suncook 

Kate Carrigan, fare to Law- 
rence, Mass. 



14 Ou 

12 00 

9 85 
1 20 

1 50 

TO 

85 



■S8,761 97 



CITY FARM. 

To appropriation .... .|1,500 00 

F. Allen, produce sold . . 1,959 91 

J. S. Holt, pasturing cattle . 15 00 

board of Eliza A. Thompson . 30 00 

balance to new account . . 1.170 88 



Paid Frederick Allen, supt. . 
Frederick Allen, labor . 
Pettee & Whittle, grain 
Charles T. Allen & Co.. gro- 
ceries .... 
Eager & Rand, groceries 
George E Wilson, groceries . 
J. G. Warner & Co., groceries 



•f(325 00 
529 06 
636 52 

465 52 

106 50 

19 45 

87 25 



Dr. 



'M,675 79 
Cr. 



293 



Paid Carl E. York, groceries 


8 04 


George H. Stearns, groceries . 


23 57 


Wason. Pierce, & Co., tobacco 


21 70 


Silas Pierce & Co., tobacco . 


21 29 


George F. Bosher & Co., gro- 




ceries .... 


60 00 


E. M. Slaytoii, butter . 


81 21 


J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 




and potash 


5 10 


J. M. Chandler & Co., gro- 




ceries .... 


23 92 


Hannah Connor, labor . 


117 50 


William C. Rogers, hardware, 




seeds, etc. 


139 37 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware. 




seeds, etc. 


68 01 


J. B. Varick, hardware 


81 80 


Goodwin Bros. & Co., repair- 




ing cart .... 


22 00 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


23 48 


A. B. Webster, iron-work 


4 15 


Thomas A. Lane, plumbing . 


53 


J. A. Wiley, medicines 


29 15 


J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith- 




i"g 


44 08 


William H. Hill, blacksmith- 




ing 


90 


H. F. Thompson, blacksmith- 




ing 


3 50 


J. S. Masseck, dry goods 


52 27 


N. S. Clark, dry goods . 


66 97 


Barton <fe Co , dry goods 


5 35 


A. H. Weston, dry goods 


9 97 


Piper & Hawley, dry goods . 


13 70 



294 



Paid Piper, Hawley, & Co., dry 
goods .... 
Plumer & Holton, clothing . 
G. Flanders, ice . 


45 01 
20 85 
17 55 


J. S. Kidder & Co., cement . 


4 80 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing carts .... 
Edwin Branch, horse-blanket . 
H. C. Ranno, harnesses, etc. 


78 77 

3 50 

70 45 


Ezra W. Kimball, repairing 
harness, etc. 


19 67 


J. Stickney, leather, etc. 
Carl C. Shepard, crockery 
I. P. Emery, tin ware, brooms, 
etc. ..... 


3 45 

7 78 

43 15 


Clough & Towle, meats . 

D. Kerwin & Son, ground bone, 


63 45 


meats, etc. 


77 84 


F. C. Dow, boots and shoes . 


48 05 


Mitchell & Heath, boots and 




shoes .... 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 


18 40 
IT 49 


W. S. Heselton, wood-wagon . 


77 00 


Austin, Johnson, & Co., lum- 




ber 


6 90 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


45 59 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 

J. Hodge, lumber . 

Graves & Sherer, making cider 


2 52 

8 55 

14 00 


J. H. Maynard, shingles 

R. M. RolHns, horse-rake teeth 


117 50 

1 50 


D. A. Simons, mattresses, etc. 


32 46 


William A. Rundlett, making 
cider .... 


6 21 



i95 



Paid J. J. Abbott, paints . . 3 63 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap . . 21 00 
Leonard French, professional 

services .... 2 00 
George D. Towne, professional 

services .... 1 85 

James E. Knox, trees . . 35 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 21 00 

Samuel Neal, pair steers . 95 00 

Warren B. French, four steers 150 00 

Thomas G. Worthley, barley . 8 00 

J. P. Whidden & Son, pump . ' 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 9 58 

H. W. Herrick, cow . . 35 00 
Smith & Barnard, threshing 

grain . . . . 15 48 
Fairbanks, Brown, & Co., re- 
pairing scales . . . 10 50 
Fairbanks & Pearson, burying 

paupers . . . . 18 50 



t,675 79 



CITY TEAMS. 



Dr. 



To District No. 2 . 
new highways . 
grading for concrete 
sewers and drains . 
District No. 10 
incidental 
macadamizing . 
watering streets 



11,237 75 
28 50 

233 12 
85 50 

216 00 
60 00 
51 25 

773 75 



296 



To paving streets .... 189 75 

A. Q. Gage, old harnesess sold . 35 00 

Warren Harvey, freight on horse 4 50 

balance to new account . . 2,795 09 



By balance overdrawn in 1879 . $1,234 49 
Paid Pettee & Whittle, grain and 

feed 755 32 

H. Fradd &, Co., grain and 

feed 217 10 

W. H. Marty n & Son, grain 

and feed .... 39 35 
Baldwin & Tabor, grain and 

feed 12 54 

Barr & Clapp, grain and feed 38 08 

Wm. Moore, hay . . . 104 50 

N. P. Sleeper, hay . . 26 25 

E. P. Johnson & Co , hay . 316 75 

D. D. Smith, hay ... 10 05 

C. M. Watts, straw . . 30 69 

D. H. Barr, straw . . 4 15 
C. L. Davis, straw . . 3 55 
James How, hay . . . 14 59 
H. L. Wilson, hay . . 11 17 
J. L. Perley, hay ... 10 66 
0. Hinkley, hay ... 124 22 
L. Shelters, hay . . . 23 70 
Joseph Tirrell, hay . . 33 15 

E. B. Bartlett, hay . . 21 23 
E. Landell, hay ... 17 95 
James Lord, hay ... 4 82 
Clinton Tirrell, hay . . 12 50 



15,710 21 
Cr. 



297 



Paid George Barnard, hay 
C. G. Hodgdon, hay 
H. & H. R. Pettee, straw 
Daniel Farmer, hay 

E. Bursiel, straw . 

H. W. McQueston, straw 
Ira A. Moore, carrots 
Wm. H. Hill, blacksmithin 
J. H. Cram, blacksmithing 
J. P. Woodbury & Co., black 

smithing . 
J. A. McCrillis & Son, repair 

ing carts, etc. 
J A. Sanborn & Co., repairing 

carts, etc. ... 
John Barnes, blacksmithing 

etc. .... 

F. N. McLaren, repairing har 
ness .... 

Edwin Branch, repairing har 

ness .... 
Ezra W. Kimball, repairing 

harnesses . 
H. C. Ranno, repairing har 

nesses 
H. C. Ranno, liarnesses 
J. A. Wiley, medicines . 
Chas. T. Newman, medicines 
Z. F. Campbell, medicines 
Geo. E. Hall, medicines 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 



22 


20 


11 


39 


10 


54 


46 


89 


2 


19 


11 


06 


9 


82 


i2 


49 


162 


06 


69 


85 


598 


57 


72 


75 


10 


10 



2 30 



10 75 



183 87 



79 


68 


100 


00 


7 


85 


7 


30 


47 


69 




80 


10 


60 


17 


71 


1 


76 


1 


97 



298 



Paid J. Stickney, horse-cover, etc. 


9 48 


S. S. James, teams 


23 00 


C. D. Welch, team horses 


350 00 


Concord Railroad corporation, 




freight on horses 


9 00 


J. M. Chandler & Co., soap. 




salt, etc 


8 86 


J. Alexander, professional ser- 




vices ..... 


3 00 


Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 


301 87 


A. B. Gushing, teamster 


259 00 


A. Robie, teamster 


119 25 


Frank Dustin, teamster 


36 00 


Dennis Clifford, teamster 


11 25 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO 1. 



1,710 21 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . 


120 84 




appropriation .... 


250 00 


1270 84 
Cr. 






Paid Benjamin Stevens, superintend- 






ent ..... 


19 10 




Malachi F. Dodge, superintend- 






ent . . . . • 


121 21 




labor of men and teams 


63 49 




By balance to new account 


77 04 





$270 84 



299 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 

balance to new account 



110,000 00 
984 60 



Paid Warren Harvey, superintend- 
ent 

J. B. Varick, hardware 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 
C. F. Langley, blacksmithing 
J. Welcome, blacksmithing . 
P. W. Dickey, blacksmithing 
Lamson & Marden,blacksmith- 

ing . 
Abbott Downing Co., street 

sweeper 
Abbott Downing Co., street 

broom . . 
J. M. Chandler & Co., sperm 

oil, etc. 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
Thomas W. Lane, stationery 
Daniel Garland, stove . 
Lamson & Marden, blacksmith- 
ing .... 
J. A. B. Emerson, gravel 
L. N. Dufrain, lead pipe, etc 
Concord Railroad corporation, 
freight 



110,984 60 



Cr. 



1787 


00 


38 


66 


184 


90 


24 


44 




70 


19 


49 


1 


96 


323 


65 



22 50 



5 


78 


4 


30 


10 


92 


2 


33 


4 


60 


15 


00 


7 


07 


61 


25 


6 


00 



1 35 



300 



Paid H. E. Stevens, salt 
Geo. H. Stearns, salt 
L. A. & P. W. Dickey, black 

smithing . 
James Kennard, gravel 
Pike & Heald, hardware 
W. H. Vickery, keys 
A. B. Gushing, teamster 
A. Robie, teamster 
J. Kearns, teamster 
Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 
city teams 
labor of men and teams 



3 


00 


3 


41 


19 


72 


80 


67 


1 


12 


1 


05 


38 


25 


63 


00 


477 


00 


r 19 


50 


. 11,149 


25 


. 7,606 


73 

110,984 60 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



To appropriation . 

balance to new account 



Paid I. G. Howe, superintendent 
Pettee & Whittle, cement 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
A. H. Lowell, cesspool cover 
A. Bod well, stone steps . 
labor of men and teams . 



; $700 00 


73 


67 


. $491 


49 


4 


20 


7 


35 


2 


25 


9 


50 


258 


88 



Dr. 



1773 67 



Or. 



$773 67 



301 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



To appropriation . 

balance to new account 



Paid C. C. Webster, superintendent 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
Lewis Simons, lumber . 
labor of men and teams 
reserved fund 



. $250 


00 


24 


42 


t 191 


62 




48 




70 


34 76 


96 


86 


50 


00 



Dr. 



1274 42 



Or. 



274 42 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 



To appropriation . 

balance to new account 



Paid C. A. Pierce, superintendent 
A. A. Hazelton, superintendent 
J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
L. A. & P. W. Dickey, black 

smitliing . 
labor of men and teams 



.1400 00 
10 09 



$31 


00 


t 265 


74 


r 5 


00 


4 


45 


1 


00 


102 


90 



Dr. 



1410 09 



Cr. 



1410 09 



802 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 6. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... 1400 00 

Cr. 



Paid David Dickey, 2d, superintend- 






ent 


171 56 




Daniel H. Dickey, superintend- 






ent 


39 00 




J. S. Bacheler, iron-work 


24 17 




William C. Rogers, hardware 


7 02 




J. B. Varick, hardware . 


5 75 




labor of men and teams 


240 09 




balance to new account . 


12 41 


1400 00 






HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$650 00 




reserved fund .... 


400 00 


$1,050 00 



Cr. 



Paid F. P. Sargent, superintendent $21 00 
P. 0. Woodman, superintend- 
ent 

Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 
Charles Bunton, blacksmithing 
Owen Sweeney, blacksmithing 
Robert Stevens, stone . 
labor of men and teams 



167 


75 


14 


83 


1 


50 


14 


48 


11 


25 


819 


24 



$1,050 00 



303 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



To appropriation .... $450 00 
reserved fund . . . . 150 00 



Paid H. M. Clough, superintendent . $5 00 

R. I. Stevens, superintendent . 70 00 

J. B. Yarick, hardware . . 10 63 

labor of men and teams . . 46-4: 51 
J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 

and fuse .... 2 70 

By balance to new account . . 47 16 



Dr. 



$600 00 



Cr. 



1600 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9 
To appropriation 



Paid Alphonzo Boyce, superintendent 
J. B. Varick, hardware, 
labor of men and teams 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
W. H. Vickery, powder 

By balance to new account 





Dr. 




$450 00 




Or. 


$254 00 




3 32 




141 34 




30 10 




1 80 




19 44 


ziAO on 



304 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



To appropriation 
old plank sold 
reserved fund 



Paid A. Q. Gage, superintendent 
Manchester Mills, cinders 
Natt & W. P. Head, brick 
F. C. Dow, gum boots 
Concord Railroad corporation, 

freight on brick . . . 3 00 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 
smithing ... 1 25 
John B. Varick, hardware 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 
William C. Rogers, hardware . 
A. H. Lowell, iron-work . 

C. Bunton, blacksmithing 
Barr & Clapp, oil, etc. 
George W. Riddle, gravel 
Plumer & Holton, gum coat 
Thomas W. Lane, time books . 
Temple & Farrington, time 

books ..... 
A. Bodwell, stone . 
James Kennard, sand and cobbles 

D. B. Eastman, brick 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
labor of men and teams . 

By balance to new account 





Dr. 


1900 00 




7 00 




!f950 00 






1,857 00 






Cr. 


$222 00 




25 00 




27 00 




7 75 





14 


85 


8 


80 


40 


83 


14 


19 


4 


70 


3 


66 


17 


40 


5 


00 


1 


55 


1 


62 


22 


75 


> 1 


50 


10 


80 


37 


65 


8 


47 


1,356 


53 


14 


70 



.,857 00 



305 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



To appropriation .... 


$700 00 


reserved fund .... 


2,000 00 


Paid F. D. Hanscom, superintendent 


122 50 


L. D. Colby, superintendent . 


630 11 


Lewis Rice, stone 


5 00 


S. h. Flanders, hardware 


6 62 


J. B. Varick, hardware . 


4 60 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware 


2 00 


H. H. Fuller, posts . 


5 00 


Joseph Greenwood, blacksmith- 




iiig 


1 76 


D. Wells, lumber . 


46 08 


A. G. Stevens, stone 


3 00 


Lamson and Marden, black- 




smithing .... 


2 13 


Henry Thomas & Co., flagging 


73 10 


labor of men and teams . 


1,831 86 


By balance to new account 


Q6 95 







Dr. 



12,700 00 



Cr. 



$2,700 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



$250 00 
74 11 



20 



Dr. 



$324 11 



806 

Paid Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
T. A. Lane, plumbing . 
city farm, labor 



$4 


45 


3 


41 


316 


25 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 
To appropriation .... il50 00 



Paid Eben Carr. superintendent 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
Daniels <k Merrill, hardware . 
labor of men and teams 
J. M. Chandler & Co., powder 
and fuse .... 

By balance to new account 



144 


00 


2 


25 


1 


25 


90 


02 


1 


88 


10 


60 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



Paid Daniel Garland, covering stone 
A. Bodwell, covering stone . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 
labor of men and teams 



$500 


00 


2,982 


30 


132 


00 


36 


00 


55 


05 




20 


3,359 


05 



Cr. 

1324 11 

Dr. 

1150 00 
Cr. 



.fl50 00 

Dr. 

3,482 30 
Cr. 



5,482 30 



307 
LAND DAMAGE. 

To appropriation .... |500 00 
reserved fund . . . , 97 25 



Paid S D. Cass .... .$506 00 
E. W. Brigham ... 75 00 

John Collins ... 16 25 



WATERING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $1,200 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 824 46 



Paid Manchester Water-works,water §625 00 
Pike & Heald, labor on sprin- 
kler 31 78 

J. A. Sanborn & Co., labor on 

sprinkler .... 45 75 
Knight & Seaward, labor on 

sprinkler .... 5 18 

Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 146 25 

A. B. Cashing, teamster . I47 75 

A Robie, teamster . . HO 25 

A. Q. Gage, teamster . . 100 00 

Geo.' Maxfield, teamster . 30 75 

Adam McGarvin, teamster . 8 00 
city teams .... 



Dr. 

1597 25 
Cr. 

1597 25 

Dr. 

$2,024 46 
Cr. 



i 16 ^o 



•12,024 46 



308 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 

Manchester Gas Co., repairs, 
etc. ..... 

I. R, Dewey, lamplighter 
A. H. Lowell, lamp-posts, etc. 
Wm. C. Rogers, glass, etc. 
Daniels & Merrill, glass 
John B. Clarke, printing 
Thorp & Marshall, repairing 
lanterns .... 

D. M. Goodwin, repairing lan- 
terns .... 

Jewell & Garfield, painting 
lamp-posts 
By reserved fund .... 



$5,500 00 
112 36 



5,949 60 



310 


46 


1,700 


04 


231 


47 


26 


55 


9 


75 


4 


50 


2 


10 


41 


64 


86 


25 


250 


00 



Dr. 



15,612 36 
Cr. 



i,612 86 



PAVING STREETS. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . 


$15 00 


appropriation . 


. 3,000 00 


Manchester Gas Co. 


70 86 


Charles Griffin, overdraft . 


29 37 


reserved fund . 


. 8,000 00 


balance overdrawn . 


549-28 




-111,664 51 



309 



Cr. 



Paid Robert Bunton, block paving . 


$5,387 50 


J. McDerby & Son, paving- 




stone, sand, etc. 


140 75 


John Brown, laying concrete 


9 50 


C. Patterson, blacksmithing . 


29 54 


Concord Railroad corporation, 




freight .... 


40 50 


A. Bodwell, flagging 


105 50 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., labor 




and stone .... 


89 00 


M. A. Abbott 


3 00 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 


4 15 


J. B. Varick, hardware 


2 30 


J. Brown .... 


9 50 


C. H. Robie, concreting 


184 03 


J. B. Clarke, paving stone 


16 50 


Daniel Farmer, paving stone . 


30-75 


N. A Sleeper, paving stone 


20 00 


James Kennard, paving stone 


15 00 


John Goggin, paving stone 


14 00 


Lewis Rice, paving stone 


5 00 


Chas. A. Bailey, flagging 


387 00 


T. L. Thorpe 


10 00 


labor of men and teams 


5,160 99 







111,664 51 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



To appropriation 
reserved fund 
balance overdrawn 



$1,000 00 

1,250 00 

19 02 



Dr. 



^2,269 02 



310 



Cr. 



Paid J. A. B Emerson, gravel 
B. H. Chase, repairing belt 
Manchester Water-works, wa 

ter .... 
J. H. Maynard, lumber and 

labor 
Daniel Garland, stone . 
John N. Garland, wood 
M. V. B. Garland, wood 
Kimball & Gerrish, tallow 
James Kennard, stone . 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., labor on 

crusher 
Lamsou & Marden, stone chip 
J. B. Varick, hardware 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
J. B. McCrillis & Son . 
Hutchinson Bros., labor on 

crusher, etc. 
Oliver Downing, grease 
Pike & Heald, plumbing 
Thos. A. Lane, plumbing 
labor of men and teams 



W 17 

18 08 

30 00 



274 


30 


43 


00 


18 


87 


31 


30 


3 


64 


94 


25 


4 


80 


32 


72 


23 


85 


36 


35 


19 


20 


844 


53 


7 


50 


25 


46 


47 


28 


1,209 


72 



5,269 02 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



12,000 00 
2,212 23 



Dr. 



,212 23 



311 



Paid C. H. Robie .... 


$682 33 


William Laundry, stone. 


4 00 


J. A. B. Emerson, sand . 


71 75 


Concord R. R. Corp., freight . 


18 00 


labor of men and teams . 


3,436 15 







Cr. 



84,212 23 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$2,000 


00 




sewer licenses .... 


830 


35 




balance overdrawn . 


5,178 


92 


$8,009 27 














Cr. 


Paid E. G. Haynes, sewer-pipes 


$5,041 


54 




A. H. Lowell, cesspool covers . 


91 


40 




Pettee & Whittle, lime and 








cement .... 


44 


66 




D. H. Young, sewer-pipe 


7 


00 




J. B. Varick, hardware . 


46 


38 




Daniels & Merrill, hardware 


77 


47 




William C. Rogers, hardware 


1 


00 




T. L. Thorpe .... 


1 


48 




Knight & Seaward, lumber 








and labor .... 


19 


52 




Concord R. R. Corp., freight 








on brick .... 


33 


00 




H. Pradd & Co., lantern and 








K. oil . . . . 


9 


05 




S. C. Forsaith & Co., drilling 


1 


25 





312 



Paid G. W. Thayer & Son, rubber 

boots ..... 
McDonald & Cody, rubber 

boots ..... 
Plaisted & Haines, rubber 

boots ..... 
W. Ireland, brick and plank . 
J. M. Chandler & Co., kerosene 

oil 

Pike & Heald, lantern, etc. 
labor of men and teams 
Barr & Clapp, powder, fuse, 

etc 4 92 

Plumer & Holton, cape and 

suits ..... 
J. Stickney, rubber mittens . 
Derry & Co., repairing tools . 
G. W. Thayer & Son, rubber 

boots .... 

B. F. Porter, filing saws 
J. S. Kidder & Co., cement . 



16 


25 


15 


00 


6 


50 


29 


22 


1 


55 


28 


73 


2,423 


51 



D 


50 


1 


35 


29 


05 


3 


75 


9 40 


60 


80 



^,009 27 



SEWERS WEST SIDE OF ELM STREET. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $10,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 1,910 13 

$11,910 13 

Cr. 
Paid Pettee & Whittle, cement . $556 75 
Concord R. R. Corp., freight 

on brick .... 86 80 



318 



Paid W, F. Laiigley, blacksmithiiig 
Manchester Print-works, re- 
pairing lumber sheds . 
Daniel Garland, use of derrick 
John T. Garland use of derrick 
J. Stickney .... 
A. Bodwell, stone . 
Derry & Co , blacksmithing . 
E. G. Haynes, sewer pipe 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
labor of men and teams 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

labor and materials . 
Natt & W. F. Head, brick . 



13 15 



6 


00 


51 


00 


12 


00 


3 


50 


53 


87 


19 


50 


1,227 


90 


381 


89 


7,113 


40 


1,520 


37 


864 


00 




— 111,910 13 



AMOSKEAG BRIDGE. 



To appropriation . 

B. L. Hartshorn, old plank 
balance overdrawn . 



Paid Geo. Holbrook, carpenter work 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Concord R. R. Corp., freight 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
L. A. Clough, lumber 
William Laundry, labor . 
labor of men and teams 
Head & Dowst, lumber . 



. 1100 


00 


3 


00 


. 1,143 


32 


i 1139 


58 


3 


25 


12 


00 


6 


69 


18 


04 


984 


62 


20 


70 


60 


48 




96 



Dr. 



.,246 32 
Cr. 



,246 32 



314 








GRANITE BRIDGE. 












Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$100 00 










$100 00 
Cr. 








Paid L. A. Clough, lumber 


179 80 




By reserved fund, .... 


20 


00 




balance to new acccount . 




20 


$100 00 


COMMONS. 






Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


1200 


00 




balance overdrawn . 


3,378 


40 


$1,578 40 














Cr. 


Paid C. H. Robie, concreting walks 


$353 


27 




Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 


9 


68 




A. C. Wallace, seats for com- 








mons 


50 


00 




George Holbrook, lumber and 








labor 


42 


11 




Head & Dowst, lumber and 








labor 




96 




First Congregational Society, 








filling for Hanover square . 


19 


16 




J. A. B. Emerson, filling 


324 


83 




G. Albert Knox, trees . 


300 


00 




Manchester Water- works, water 


60 


00 




labor of men and teams . 


418 


39 


<ffi1 .^78 4n 



315 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



Db. 



To appropriation . 


115,000 00 


Board of Health, cleaning vaults 50 


00 


J. C. Ray, old stone fountain 


1 


00 


A. Quimby, judgment 


. 3,632 


57 


Hugh McDonough overdraft 


30 


00 


S. S. James & Bro., overdraft 


5 


00 


balance overdrawn 


. 5,669 


39 
gftoi 387 96 






~ ^y^J^.»tJ\^ • t/\J 






Cr. 


Balance overdrawn in 1879 . 


. 17,021 


07 


Paid Idella A. Martin, execution 


230 


60 


Leonard Ro we, execution 


187 


00 


Timothy Hayes, execution 


174 


61 


S. J. Hayes, execution . 


119 


61 


D. A. Buuton, execution 


468 


38 


Mary A. Gould, execution 


161 


97 


N. B. Tilton, claim for bounty 


150 


00 


John Conway, claim 


30 


00 


Thomas McLeod, claim 


25 


00 


Hugh Donahoe, claim . 


30 


00 


George Keller, claim 


100 


00 


Women's Aid Society 


60 


85 


Sarah S. Reynolds, claim 


13 


49 


Michael McCormick, claim 


200 


00 


Manchester P. 0., stamps 


41 


74 


J. A. Weston, land 


10 


00 


Water-works, water 


90 


36 


Gas. Co., gas 


40 


80 


George E. Glines . 


2 


50 


C. C. Shepard, globes for Sol- 






diers' Monument, postage, e 


fcc. 94 


05 



316 

Paid Robinson & Stearns . . 219 60 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

rent of hay and wood stand 300 00 

Judith Sherer, matron of pest- 
house . . . . 270 00 

N, P. Kidder, making City 

Report .... 150 00 

N. P. Kidder, Lowell Direc- 
tory, etc. .... 8 65 

C. W, Eager, expenses to East 
Berlin, Conn., telegrams, 
etc 30 65 

C. W. Eager ... 4 75 

George H. Allen, maps and 
records for city engineer's 
office .... 185 50 

C. R. Colley & Co., painting 
guide-posts ... 7 50 

D. W. Garland, walls on north 
and south sides of street at 
west end of Amoskeag 

bridge . . . . 4,68 S 67 

Watertown Arsenal, testing 

iron for bridge . . . 34 67 

H. B. Moulton, cleaning vaults 80 00 

F. W. Chamberlin, labor in 

treasurer's office . . 312 00 

E. S. Philbrick, engineering 

services .... 300 00 
J. A. Barker, use of team for 

committees . . . 39 25 

J. A. Barker, care of boiler . 91 50 
C. N. Waite, chemical analysis 

of water .... 15 00 



317 

Paid Larason & Marden, stone-work 

for fountain . . - 67 26 

T. A. Lane, plumbing . . 3 38 

A. G. Stevens, horse-car fares, 

etc 51 65 

T. W. Lane, stationery . . 3 15 

Sulloway & Topliff, profes- 
sional services . . . 1,180 95 

D. A. Bunton, damage to house 

from blasting . . . 12 00 

Jonathan Smith, professional 

services . . . • 73 00 

David Cross, professional ser- 
vices . - ... 179 00 

William R. Patten, witness 

fees, etc 171 22 

H. R. Chamberlin . . 4 23 

C. E. Noyes, bounty on hawk 20 

Walter Sherer, bounty on 

hawk .... 20 

E. R. Hill, bounty on hawk . 20 
P. Donalioe, bounty on hawk . 20 
H. M. Young, bounty on hawks 1 00 
R. Garmon, bounty on hawk . 20 
Orlando Page, bounty on 

hawks .... 40 

I. M. Corning, bounty on hawk 20 

H. W. Corning, bounty on hawk 20 

B. M. Corning, bounty on hawk 20 
Woods & Patterson, repairs 

on Granite bridge . . 1,200 00 
Fire King E. Co., pumping out 

cellars .... 29 20 



318 



Paid J. T. Hulme, clerical sei-vices 
P. D. Harrison, clerical ser- 
vices .... 
J. J. Bennett, mason work 
J. T. Belden, repairing chairs 
Celinda German, claim . 
Allen Bros., dating-stamp 
Geo. P. Atwell, stone work 
U. S. & Canada Express Co. 
T. Berry, lumber and labor 
S. B. Putnam, use of team 
Piper, Hawley, & Co. . 
Higgins Bros., earth closet 
Geo. D. Towne, expenses to 
Concord with insane person 
Manchester Water-works, sur- 
veying instruments 
A. H. Lowell, castings . 
Charles Brown 
Lewis Simons, lumber . 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
S. B. Putnam, auditing collect 

or's accounts 
E. G. W^oodman, burying nui 

sauces 
A. Bodwell, stone-work . 
Wm. B. Abbott, painting 
Albert Story, posting warrants 

etc 

W^ A. Carpenter, clerical ser 

vices . . . • 
G. Albert Knox, trees . 
Barr & Clapp, hardware 
Forbes Lithograph Co. . 



2 00 



5 


00 


15 


62 


s 4 


85 


30 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


16 


bO 


7 


■ >0 


15 


00 


1 


57 


20 


00 



2 25 

250 00 
7 07 

11 00 

12 44 

4 08 

25 00 

1 00 
27 25 
10 16 

2 24 

1 50 
678 50 

9 85 
22 50 



319 



Paid Daniels & Merrill, hardware , 

D. M. Goodwin, labor at court 
house 

William Laundry, drilling- 
holes for fountain 

George E. Glines, stationery 

W. P. Stratton & Son, chains 
water-dippers, etc. 

S. Fifield, carpet-sweeper for 
court-house 

N. S. Clark . 

P. W. Peckham, bill-file 

0. R. CoUey & Co., painting 
Charles Francis, burying nui 

sauces ... 
Forbes Lithograph Co. 
K. F. Fitz, copying pad 

1. L. Heath, professional ser 
vices 

Buff & Berger, surveying in 

struments ... 
George E. Morrill 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 

engineer's office 
Geo. H. Porter, wood for ward 

room 
Levi L. Aldrich 
W. H. Annan, stationery 
B. W. Thomas 
D. H. Morgan 
P. A. Devine, labor at ward 

room 
G. H. Dudley, labor at ward 

room 



12 


41 


5 


F>Q 


9 


00 


1 


15 



1 7( 



1 


25 


13 


22 


1 


00 


12 


27 


10 


00 


146 


94 


2 


00 



3 00 

39 35 

4 12 

12 75 



1 


00 


26 


87 


4 


69 




35 


5 


00 


6 


60 


22 


43 



320 



Paid William Holland, return of 
births .... 

L. B. How, return of births . 
J. W. Mooar, return of births 
0. D. Abbott, return of births 
W. W. Wilkins, return of 
births .... 

W. W. Wilkins, professional 

services 
Fogg & James, teams 
C. H. Hodgman & Co., teams 
C. C. Perry, teams 
James Bros., teams 

C. H. Simpson, teams . 
J. A. Brown, teams 
Cavanaugh Bros., teams 

D. J. Warren, teaming 
J. L. Kelly, use of team 
J. A. Barker, use of team 
J. L. Kelly . 
D. K. White 
J. Cavanaugh, cushions for 

court-house 
Peter Milon, painting . 
Joel Daniels, painting . 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
W. H. B. Newhall 
T. A. Lane, iron fence, labor 

on monument, etc. 
James S. Bacheler, fountain 
James S. Bacheler, plumbing 
Pike & Heald, plumbing 
J. A. Barker, care of boiler 
J. B. McCrillis, iron-work 



1 75 
10 00 

4 00 
14 75 

rr r 



20 


00 


7 


00 


3 30 


50 


2 


50 


36 


00 


5 


00 


57 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


132 


00 


6 


00 




50 


7 


60 


2 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


3 


t)0 




50 


231 


61 


460 


00 


34 


17 


18 


64 


25 


00 


9 


30 



321 



Paid Pennacook Hose Co., pumping 
out cellars 

E. W. Harrington Hose Co., 
pumping out cellars . 

T. W. Lane, stationery . 
George E. Morrill . 

F. H. Challis & Co.. printing 
"W. P. Stratton & Son, dippers, 

etc 

Journal Newspaper Co., adver- 
tising 
"William B. Abbott, painting 
Republican Press Association 

advertising 
John B. Clarke, printing 
Temple & Farrington, printing 

blank-books, etc. 
J. M. Crawford, clerical ser 

vices .... 
J. H. Maynard, luml^er and 

laljor 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor 

W. Ireland, lumber and labor 
George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor 
N. R. Bixby, lumber and labor 
A. C. Wallace 
C. M. Dodge, return of births 
L. M. French, return of births 
L. French, return of births 

21 



13 80 

28 20 
2 17 
2 34 
1 75 

1 25 



1-1 


(32 


8 


82 


18 


00 


297 


69 


121 


46 


30 


00 



148 89 

6 10 

6 50 

65 24 

1 53 

.14 30 

124 87 

155 58 

6 00 

16 50 

10 50 



.322 



Paid Chas. R. Tucker . 


16 87 


U. S. & Canada Express Co. . 


25 


A. B. Eaton, frame and por- 




trait of Col. Chamberlin 


35 00 


1st N. H. Battery, firing salute 




July 4, 1880 . 


72 00 


B. L. Hartshorn, labor at ward- 




room .... 


6 55 


Jeremiah Mahoney, stone-work 


16 00 


H. McDonough & Co., labor 




at ward-room 


10 00 


P. W. Follansbee & Son, mov- 




ing ward-room . 


30 00 


D. C. Whittemore, claim 


140 00 


First Regiment Baud 


100 00 


Geo. D. Towne 


22 10 


Daniel Healy, whitewashing 




tree-boxes .... 


35 76 


J. M. Crawford, clerical ser- 




vices ..... 


10 00 


Wm. B. Patten, . 


9 40 


E. G. Haynes. 


34 75 


J. Downing, cleaning vault . 


4 00 


J. C. Snow, burying nuisances 


2 00 


Pettee & Whittle, cement 


4 25 


C. H. Reed, services as detect- 




ive ..... 


105 00 


J. M. Crawford, clerical ser- 




vices .... 


22 50 


J. A. Buneher, care of boiler 




at City Library . 


51 61 


Geo. W. Yarnum, janitor at 




court-house 


106 95 


P. C. Cheney Co., paper 


5 25 



323 

Paid, Clias. Buntoii, blacksmithing 3 35 

Derry & Co., blacksmithing . 15 50 

J. F. Gillis, ink-well . . 1 00 

R. Morrison .... 5 00 
Western Union Telegraph Co., 

telegrams .... 1 00 
J. N. Baker, care of clocks . 40 75 
H. D. Lord .... 15 00 
P. Brown, carpenter work . 1 25 
D. M. Goodwin 50 
David Perkins, burying nui- 
sance .... 
labor of men and teams, grad- 
ing Park Common . . 199 87 
labor of men and teams . 453 85 
A. G. Stevens, expenses of 
committee on new bridge to 
Watertown, etc. . . 34 77 



50 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 


tJW 1 






Dr, 


To balance from old account . 


. $779 87 




appropriation . 


. 1,000 00 




Wm. Cj Chase, lumber sold 


38 16 




J. F. James, lots sold 


. 1,794 89 


fi19. 



Cr. 



Paid Wm. C. Chase, superintending 

labor .... $521 49 

A. B. Chase, labor . . 279 48 

James E. Clough, labor . 10 00 



324 



Paid Thomas Adams, labor . 
Emerson Campbell, labor 
Charles C lough, labor 
Cyrus A. Brown, labor 
Joseph Pushier, labor 
I. G. Howe, labor 
Charles Bignall, labor 
Charles Moore, labor 
Natt & W. F. Head, brick 

headstones 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
Daniels & Merrill. a>es. hoes 

etc. . 
A. R. Brown, stone 
A. H. Lowell, iron fence 
J. F. James, surveying, and 

salary as treasurer 
Joseph B. Sawyer, surveying 
Livingston & Kimball, printing 
By balance to new account 



12 


50 


12 


50 


5 


25 


42 


50 


58 


75 


47 


90 


2 


30 


2 


00 


68 


01 


7 


50 


7 


77 


10 


00 



1,581 00 



83 15 
20 50 
10 00 

830 32 



■$3,612 92 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



To balance from old account . 


^6Q 15 


appropriation .... 


1,000 00 


A. H Hartshorn, tomb fees 


116 50 


reserved fund, amount transfer- 




red ..... 


1,500 00 



Dr. 



J,682 65 



325 

Paid A, H. Hartshorn, superintend- 
ent ..... 

A. B. Smith, planting beds . 

James S. Bacheler, contract 
work .... 

Manchester Water-works 

Pike & Heald, hardware, etc. 

Daniels & Merrill, hose 

J. H. Maynard 

A. H. Lowell, iron fence 
By balance to new account 



•f494 


92 


8 


00 


204 


35 


9 


25 


18 


19 


4 


58 


8 


60 


1,105 


00 


829 


76 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $10,000 00 

J. M. Chandler & Co., overdraft 2 21 

Pike & Heald, overdraft . . 2 83 

balance overdrawn . . . 932 11 



-139 


60 


217 


00 


3 


20 


56 


27 


4 


00 



Or. 



J,682 65 



Dr. 



,987 15 



Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 1. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 

George W. Butte rfield, driver 
H. F. Davis & Co., soap and 
matches .... 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 
George H. Porter, wood 



Cr. 



326 



Paid Daniels & Merrill, block and 

oil 

D. M. Goodwin, waste . 
MancbesterLocomotive Works, 

resetting tires, etc. 
Pike & Heald, repairing stove 
T. A. Lane, repairing hose 
C. H. Hodgman & Co., freight 

on hose .... 
T. Berry, repairing chairs 
Baldwin & Tabor, shavings . 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 
J. P. ScoUay & Co., polishing 

oil 

Company's bill for services 



2 


05 




4 


50 




36 


75 




1 


40 
83 

55 




3 


25 




1 


00 




6 


87 




2 


00 




825 


00 


81.203 77 



N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 4. 



Cr. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$36 60 


A. B. Gushing, driver . 


217 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 


44 42 


George H. Porter, wood 


4 00 


Edwin Branch, blankets 


16 00 


Ezra W. Kimball, pole-straps 


2 00 


J. M. Chandler & Co., crash, 




matches, etc. 


5 86 


A. B. Webster, whiffletree 




hook 


25 


C. A. Smith, duster 


2 50 


Pike & Heald, brick, lantern- 




lamp, etc. .... 


2 32 



327 



id T. Berry, repairing chairs 


2 


00 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 






ing 




68 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 


1 


00 


J. N. Baker, repairing clock . 


1 


00 


J. P. Scollay & Co., polishing 






oil 


2 


00 


Company's bill for services . 


825 


00 









Pennacook Hose Company No. 1. 

Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas . i33 20 

J. M. Plaisted, driver . . 325 00 

Walter L. Blenus, driver . 275 00 

A. A. Puffer, driver . . 13 50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 47 84 

George H. Porter, wood . 4 00 
F. N. McLaren, repairing 

blankets, etc. ... 74 
Ezra W, Kimball, harness, 

repairs, etc. . . . 48 10 
Ezra W. Kimball, repairing 

harness .... 2 70 
J. B. McCrillis <fe Son, iron- 
work .... 5 50 
Wm. C. Rogers, window-brush 1 25 
Daniels & Merrill, oil, etc. . 1 99 
Manchester Locomotive W'ks., 

repairs on carriage . . 11 20 
J. M. Chandler & Co., soap, 

matches, etc. ... 3 52 



.,162 63 



Cr. 



328 



Paid D. M. Goodwin, waste, match- 






safe, etc 


5 


85 


D. M. Goodwin, oil-can 




38 


Plumer & Holton, reefer 


8 


00 


W. 0. Smith, hose hitches . 


24 


80 


T. Berry, repairing chairs 


o 
O 


00 


D. M. Goodwin, dust-pan, 






brush, etc. 


1 


45 


Weston & Hill, crash 


3 


08 


Plumer & Holton, fire-jackets 


25 


50 


J. M. Chandler& Co., matches. 






oil, etc 


o 
o 


21 


Pike & Heald, repairing water- 






Pipe 




50 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 




10 


J. P. Scollay & Co., polishing 






oil 


2 


00 


Company's bill for services 


1,040 


85 









Massabesic Hose Company No. 2. 



lid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


26 80 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 


34 38 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron- 




work .... 


6 75 


Pike & Heald, grate 


1 08 


Walter Seaward, driver 


75 00 


J, P. Scollay & Co., polishing- 




oil 


2 00 


Company's bill for services 


695 00 



11,892 26 



Cb. 



$841 01 



329 



E. W. Harrington Hose Company No. 3. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
H. Fradd & Co., oil, soaps, etc 
J. P. ScoUay & Co.. polishing 

oil . ' . 
Company's bill for services 
A. Q. Gage, driver 
J. N. Baker, repairing clock 



fll 


40 


62 


50 


6 


00 


2 


00 


710 


00 


75 


00 


1 


25 



Cr. 



$868 15 



Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
Pike & Heald, pails, brooms, 

etc. ..... 

Pike & Heald, hall stove 
William C. Rogers, fire ax 
J. B. Varick, fire axes . 
T. A. Lane, hose and repairs 

on hose .... 
A. J. Robie, extra services as 

driver .... 

George H. Stearns, matches, 

oil, etc. .... 
James R. Carr, painting truck, 

etc. ..... 

J. A. Sanborn & Co., repairing 

pole 



880 


00 


60 


00 


4 


25 


34 


50 


2 


00 


5 


67 


18 


24 


75 


00 


1 


27 





50 



Cr. 



7o 



330 



Paid Head ct Dowst, lumber and 




labor 


7 43 


T. Berry, repairing chairs 


2 40 


George H. Stearns, soap . 


1 00 


J. P. Scollay &. Co., polishing 




oil 


2 00 


Company's bill for services 


1,303 05 







11,550 06 



Engineers' Department and Miscellaneous. 



Paid Manchester Water-works,water 
J. Stickney, repairing hose 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron- 
work .... 
William C. Rogers, hardware 
Manchester Locomotive Works 

repairing No. 3 S. F. E. 
J. B. Clarke, printing 

C. H. Leach, trucking 

D. M. Goodwin, coal-hod 

A. H. Lowell, iron-work 
Boston Belting Co., suction 

hose .... 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
George H. Porter, wood 

B. F. Haley, three dies . 

G. H. Hodgman & Co., truck 
ing .... 

T. Berry, examining buildings 
and distributing rules 

Pike & Heald, labor on supply 
wagon 



Cr. 



1889 


20 


36 


67 


19 


10 


3 


26 


1 


02 


33 


00 


2 


00 




75 


2 


83 


33 


17 


2 


40 


4 


00 


50 


00 



2 45 



22 50 



2 35 



331 

Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas . 18 20 

Dennis Sullivan, services on 

supply wagon . . . 48 00 

D. Sullivan, helper on supply 

wagon .... 5 00 

James R. Carr, painting and 

lettering .... 2 25 

Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 88 

T. W. Lane, cash paid for tel- 
egrams, express, etc. . 9 60 

S. 0. Eastman & Co., hose and 
ladder straps 

S. C. Eastman & Co., hose 

Thomas W. Lane, chief engi- 
neer . . . . 

A. C. Wallace, assistant engi- 
neer ..... 

B. C. Kendall, assistant engi- 
neer ..... 

0. E. Kimball, assistant engi- 
neer ..... 

Sam C. Lowell, assistant engi- 
neer ..... 

Sam C. Lowell, clerk for engi- 
neers .... 



32 


00 


1,298 


64 


115 


00 


65 


00 


65 


00 


65 


00 


65 


00 


25 


00 



Recapitulation. 



Paid Amoskeag S. F-. E. Co. No. 1 . 11,203 77 
N. S. Bean S. F. E. Co. No. 4 . 1,162 63 
Pennacook Hose No. 1 . . 1,892 26 



1,919 27 



Cb. 



332 



Paid Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 


841 01 


E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 . 


868 15 


Excelsior Hook and Ladder 




No. 1 


1,550 06 


Miscellaneous 


2,919 27 


Reserved fund 


500 00 




ctm non ic 


m.'± \j ^w 1 J.I/ 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



To appropriation .... 


$800 00 


Balance overdrawn . 


45 45 


Paid Tristram Berry, superintendent 


$300 00 


Tristram Berry, cash paid for 




teams .... 


7 00 


A. H. Lowell, zinc 


275 00 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 




ing 


7 13 


C. E. Clough, trucking, . 


50 


S. F. Adams, trucking . 


5 25 


William T. Smith . 


121 41 


Benjamin C. Kendall, labor . 


10 00 


James R. Carr, painting boxes 


11 11 


M. G. Crane & Co., magnets. 




keys, etc. .... 


15 05 


Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 


48 


William C. Rogers, hardware 


" i2 


Pike & Heald, plumbing 


67 


John B. Clarke, printing 


1 50 



Dr. 



1845 45 



Cr. 



833 



id M. Kearns, labor . 


1 00 


Manchester Gas Company, gas 


40 


Charles Williams, batteries . 


7 50 


A. B. Webster, iron-work 


75 


George F. Maxfield, labor 


1 25 


Stearns & George . 


3 75 


John Kelley, labor . . . 


1 00 


Thomas A. Lane, pipe . 


1 58 


Dennis Sullivan, trucking 


8 70 


Concord R. R. Corp., freight 


1 71 


L. G. Tillotson & Co., blue 




vitriol . . • . 


28 97 


J. C. Clifford, labor 


1 00 


Manchester Locomotive Works, 




repairs .... 


50 


J. Hodge .... 


60 


W. P. Stratton & Son, plumb- 




ing 


50 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


1 76 


• A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


4 60 


Amoskeag Jlanufacturing Co., 




steel spring 


1 90 


Peter Ducherme 


1 15 


George W. Goodwin, iron chairs 


4 00 


George H. Porter, trucking . 


1 50 


L. A. & P. W. Dickey, roof 




brackets .... 


3 00 


J. D. Murphy, labor 


1 00 


Knight & Seaward, labor and 




lumber .... 


3 06 


J. L. Bradford, labor 


50 


L. B. Harris, sheathing spikes 


1 15 



S845 45 



334 

HYDRANT SERVICE. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . .$18,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 330 00 

118,330 00 

Cr. 
Paid Manchester Water-works,water 118,330 00 

118,330 00 



RESERVOIRS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $100 00 

$100 00 



By reserved fund 150 00 

balance to new account . . 50 00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



To balance from old account . 


$337 08 


appropriation . 


13,000 00 


J. C. Bickford, costs and fees 


1,804 33 


H. W. Longa, costs and fines 


3,107 89 


balance overdrawn . 


823 20 



Cr. 



$100 00 



Dr. 



,072 50 



336 



Cr. 



Paid^Nathan P. Hunt, judge . 

H. W. Tewksbury, assistant 

justice 
J. C. Bickford, clerk 
H. W. Longa, city marshal 
H. W. Longa, witness fees, etc 
William B. Patten, assistant 

marshal 
David Perkins, captain night 

watch 
Hiram Stearns, night watch 

man .... 
J. F. Cassidy, night watchman 
M. J. Jenkins, night watchman 
J. Bucklin, night watchman . 
T. Frain, night watchman 
M. Marr, night watchman 
Z. B. Wright, night watchman 
M. Fox, night watchman 
J. F. Dunn, night watchman . 

D. Stevens, night watchman . 
I. P. Fellows, night watchman 
W. H.B.Newhall, night watch- 
man . . . . . 

H. Harmon, night watchman 

E. Farrar, night watchman 

T. R. Northrup, night watch- 
man . . . . . 
P. Cannon, night watchman . 
H. S. Reed, night watchman . 
J. C. Colburn, day police 
R. W. Bean, day police . 
C. H. Reed, special police 



$1,200 00 

14 00 
400 00 
855 00 
318 32 

700 00 

831 39 



735 


00 


728 


00 


709 


00 


720 


00 


763 


•00 


30 


00 


745 


00 


725 


00 


524 


00 


526 


00 


746 


00 


794 


00 


777 


00 


757 


00 


737 


00 


714 


00 


711 


00 


729 


00 


737 


00 


20 


00 



336 



Paid C. Quimby, special police 
John CaiT, special police 
J. Waters, special police 

A. M. Rowell, special police . 

D. T. Burleigh, special police 

E. Harrington, special police 

B. W. Robinson, special police 
M. Faulkner, special police . 
G. N. Goodwin, special police 
G. W. Minard, special police 
E. H. A. Holmes, special police 
A. Helie, special police . 

J. I. Whittemore, special po- 
lice .... 
T. P. Heath, special police 
H. J. Tirrell, special police 
R. Leggett, special police 
J. M. Watson, special police 
E. G. Woodman, special police 
E. H. Holmes, special police 
H. H. Noyes, special police 
E. A. G. Holmes, special police 
G. A. Bailey, special police 
S. L. Mitchell, special police 
M. Marr, special police . 
G. W. Varnum, special police 

C. O'Shaughnessey, special 
police 

J. E. Bailey, special police 
S. P. Chase, special police 
A. Hill, special police . 
G. Rochette, special police 
Joseph Shiney, special police 



1 00 

3 00 

2 00 
9 00 
6 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 

2 00 
11 00 

5 00 

9 00 

4 00 
8 O'J 

14 00 
1 00 

5 00 

3 00 
14 UO 
41 00 

6 00 
1 00 

68 00 

392 00 

1 00 

1 00 
26 00 

2 00 

4 00 
94 00 

4 00 



337 



Paid Benjamin Hutchinson, special 

police .... 16 00 

E. P. Whidden, special police 6 00 
C H. Simpson, teams . . 3 75 
Fogg & James, teams . . 4 50 
Cavanaugli Bros., teams . 8 00 
J. A. Brown, teams . . 6 00 
James Bros., teams . . 28 75 
T. W. Lane, record book . 5 50 
T. W. Lane, stationery . . . 3 50 
Brigliam & Pratt, crackers . 9 24 
J. A. Barker, meals for pris- 
oners and lodgers . . 79 80 

Mrs. C. M. Towne, meals for 

prisoners and lodgers . 32 20 

Burnham & Co., teams . . 4 00 

Manchester Gas Co., gas . 465 00 

W. U. Tel. Co., telegrams . 18 90 

F. H. Challis & Co., printing 176 45 
John B. Clarke, printing . 52 12 
Thomas W. Lane, ink . . 75 
Livingston & Kimball, printing 8 25 
George A. Little, professional 

vservices .... 2 00 

C. A. O'Connor, professional 

services .... 2 00 

Sulloway & Topliff, profes- 
sional services ... 8 00 

I. L. Heath, professional ser- 
vices ..... 56 00 

J. E. Dodge, professional ser- 
vices ..... 2 00 

Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 4 50 

22 



338 



Paid Manchester Steam Laundry, 
washing blankets 
W. W. Owen, washing blan- 
kets .... 
Evans & Co., coat buttons 
Mooar & Co., stationery 
George C. Hoitt, binding dock 

ets . 
A. H. Paige, police badge 
Mrs. N. Pare, meals and lodg 

ings . . . ■ . 
Piper & Hawley, blankets 
J. A. Wiley, sponges, etc. 



3 83 



2 


00 




30 


00 




3 


12 




1 


50 




4 


50 




3 


00 




30 


00 




2 


65 






819,072 


50 



CITY HALL AND OFFICES. 



To rent of stores . 
rent of hall 
balance, overdrawn 



Balance overdrawn in 1879 . 

Paid Manchester Water-works 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Celinda German, washing 
N. S. Clark, boxes 
J. S. Masseck, awning . 
Barton & Co., matting, etc 
Piper, Hawley, & Co., awning 
Mrs. J. A. Barker, making 
awnings . . . . 



Dr. 



. $1,389 00 




4 00 




. 2,954 16 






14,347 16 
Cr. 




. $1,159 32 




. 1,426 40 




171 20 




. 115 70 




75 




11 28 




13 39 




? 17 06 





15 00 



339 



Paid^J. A. Barker, cash paid help, 

putting up awnings . 
James S. Bacheler, plumbing 
T. A. Lane, plumbing . 
Pike & Heald, plumbing 
Stearns & Farmer, brooms 

matches, etc. 
George H. Stearns, brooms 

matches, etc. 
W. Ireland, carpenter work 
Daniels & Merrill, oil and 

hardware . 
J. C. Young, repairing roof 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 
D. A. Simons, office chairs 

matting, etc. 
George H. Dudley, carpenter 

work .... 
Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 
J. J. Bennett, mason work 
J. A. Wiley, mutton tallow 

sponges, etc. 
J. J. Abbott painting 
C. A. Smith, duster, etc. 
James R. Carr, painting 
C. H. Wood, painting signs 
W. H. Vickery, keys 
Straw & Lovejoy^ repairing 

clocks 
Knight & Seaward, carpenter 

work .... 
A. G. Rankin, hanging wall 

paper 



1 00 

1 02 

125 82 

114 45 

1 85 



6 


88 


2 


62 


21 


01 


3 


65 


325 


78 


308 


14 



61 69 



6 


10 


5 


18 


11 


67 


1 


79 


3 


40 


5 


90 


50 


06 


37 


00 


1 


30 


45 


25 


1 


90 


12 


00 



340 



Paid J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 

Parker & Gordon, chairs for 

council-room 
Charles Bnnton, iron-work 
Parker & Gordon, chair cush- 
ions . . . . . 
C. H. Wood, varnishing chairs 
G. A. Algor, cleaning carpets 
A. M. Eastman, matches, etc. 
P. C. Cheney Co., paper 
Adams & Ciiase, insect powder 



9 00 



216 


00 


9 


15 


1 


60 


.') 


50 


3 


25 


7 


70 


10 


90 


o 


00 



$4,347 16 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



To appropriation . 
reserved fund . 



11,200 00 
500 00 



Paid John B. Clarke . 


il,436 29 


Thomas W. Lane . 


20 42 


Manchester Post office . 


27 69 


F. H. Challis & Co. 


16 47 


Hutchjns, Riedell, & Co. 


84 75 


Temple &, Farrington 


34 73 


T. H. Tuson . 


5 25 


Livingston & Kimball . 


8 00 


Everett Bros. 


44 50 


D. B. Brooks & Co. 


2 00 


J. Q Bradish 


7 20 


Nathan P. Kidder 


1 00 


By balance to new account 


11 70 



Dr. 



,700 00 
Cr. 



11,700 00 



341 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



Paid William C. Rogers, hardware 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 
A. B. Webster, iron-work 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
Joel Daniels, painting . 
James R. Carr, painting- 
James S. Bacheler, plumbing 
W. P. Stratton & Son. plumb 

ing . 
E. G. Haynes, whitewashing 
George Holbrook, carpenter 

work 
Knight <fe Seaward, carpenter 

work .... 
J. F. Seaward, carpenter work 
J. Ho'dge, carpenter work 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
Tristram Berry, carpente 

work 
Carl C. Shepard, wall-paper 
J: McDerby & Son 
George A. Jewell . 
L. N. Dufrain, repairing pump 
N. B. Tilton, mason work 
Bennett & Lord, mason work 



11,000 


00 


108 


20 


12 


17 




48 


2 


13 


21 


04 


2 


50 


30 


47 


1 


75 


82 


25 


14 


17 


21 


90 


17 


90 



30 06 



166 


01 


96 


83 


23 


14 


177 


78 


4 


50 


83 


42 


17 


70 


34 


50 


5 


00 


5 


50 


2 


10 



Dr. 



.,108 20 
Or. 



J42 



Paid Win. H. Vickery, repairing 
lock .... 
Wm. F. starkweather, paint 

iiig .... 
J. C. Young, slating 
D. McArthur, lumber <fe laboi 
Henry Pisk, plumbing . 
J. J. Bennett, mason work 
Manchester Mills, felting 
Barton & Co., carpet, etc. 
Thorp & Marshall, plumbing 
Pike & Heald, plumbing 

By reserved fund, am't transferred 



g 

1 


20 






29 


1-2 






22 


57 






r 6 


08 






41 


84 






3 


62 






25 


56 






64 


25 






2 


85 






8 


81 






d 50 


00 










.*1,108 


20 



CITY LIBRARY. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
reserved fund . 



Paid M. J. Buncher, librarian 

M. J. Buncher, repairing lock 
F. C. Foote, assistant librarian 
Manchester Water-w'ks, water 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Temple & Farrington, binding 

books, etc. 
N. P. Hunt, cash paid out 
B. P. Johnson & Co., coal 



mo 22 


2,500 


00 


100 


00 


1600 00 


1 


25 


98 


25 


35 


00 


178 


40 


276 


20 


10 


06 



Db. 



$2,660 22 



Cr. 



92 74 



843 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 


178 


41 


Livingston & Kimball, printing- 


112 


15 


John B. Clarke, printing 


13 


50 


Knight & Seaward, carpenter 






work .... 


1 


30 


iEtna Ins. Co., insurance 


32 


50 


Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 






clock .... 


2 


50 


trustees of City Library 


1,000 


00 


By balance to new account 


27 


96 


MILITIA. 







To appropriation 



1600 00 



id Amoskeag Veterans 


. -flOO 00 


Sheridan Guards . 


100 00 


First N. H. Battery 


100 00 


Head Guards 


100 00 


Manchester War Veterans 


100 00 


Straw Rifles . 


100 00 







$2,660 22 



Dr. 



1600 00 
Cr. 



$600 00 



BRIDGE-STREET BRIDGES. 

To Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. . $5,000 00 
Stark Manufacturing Co. . . 2,000 00 
appropriation .... 60,000 00 



Dr. 



$67,000 00 



544 



Paid Corrugated Metal Co. 
By balance to new account 



Cb. 



147,000 00 
, 20,000 00 



$67,000 00 



PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 



To balance from old account . . $100 00 
appropriation . . , . 19,500 00 



Paid city bonds .... S^l 0,000 00 
sewer bonds .... 8,000 00 
Suncook Valley R. R. bonds . 1,600 00 



Dr. 

819,600 00 
Cr. 

119,600 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



By balance from old account . 
Arthur Bose, dead, 1874 . 
Tbomas Moran, over 70, 1874 
Patrick Giblin, dead, 1874 
Patrick Giblin, no dog, 1874 
J, McCluskey, poor, 1874 . 



Dr. 



. $1,000 


00 




. 1,622 


43 


$2,622 43 










Cr. 


$0 


03 




2 


46 




2 


46 




2 


46 




1 


00 




2 


46 





?A5 



By Murtay Kilday. dead. 1874 
Timothy D alley, poor, 1874 
Dennis Dailey, poor, 1874 
Fardy Conway, poor. 1874 
James S. Colby, poor, 1874 
P. W. Follansbee, no dog, 1874 
Edson C. Miller, poor, 1874 
Henry Hayes, poor, 1874 . 
Michael McNalley, poor, 1874 
P. W. Follansbee, no dog, 1875 
J. F. Chandler, gone West, 1875 
Fardy Conway, poor, 1875 
Timothy Dailey, poor, 1875 
Dennis Dailey, poor, 1875 
George B. Brown, error, 1875 
Daniel Callahan, gone West 

1875 .... 
John McCluskey, poor, 1875 
Cornelius Moriarty, 1875 . 
^Murtay Kilday, dead, 1875 
Selwin B. Abbott, dead, 1875 
Adam Lorey, dead, 1875 . 
Edson E. Miller, poor, 1875 
Raymond & McLaughlin, over 

valuation. 1875 
David F. Miller, over-valuation 

1875 .... 
Horace Ci-andall, poor, 1876 
Hoyt & Marshall, over-valuation 

1876 .... 
Dennis Dowd, left city, 1876 
James Hayes, dead, 1876 
James McCabe, duplicate, 1876 
John McCluskey, poor, 1876 



2 46 
2 46 
2 46 

2 46 
46 

1 00 

3 46 

2 46 
2 46 

1 00 

2 22 
2 22 
2 22 
2 22 
5 90 

4 22 
2 22 

2 22 

2 22 
2 22 

2 22 

2 22 

18 04 



68 


82 




97 


8 


97 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 


1 


62 



346 



By Murtay Kilday, dead, 1876 
Martin O'Brien, minor, 1876 
John Booth, poor, 1876 
F. S. FoUansbee, minor, 1876 
Fardy Conway, poor, 1876 
Dennis Dailey, poor, 1876 
0. G- Hunt, dead, 1876 . 
John F. Gallagher, poor, 1876 
Leander Morency, over 70, 1876 
John Badger, left city, 1876 
Henry Hayes, poor, 1876 
Peter O'Malley, poor, 1876 
Leander Morency over 70, 187 
James Broderick, poor, 1877 
Timothy Buckley, poor, 1877 
Geo. F. Call, poor, 1877 . 
Patrick Council, poor, 1877 
Fardy Conway, poor, 1877 
Patrick Cummings, left city 

1877 .... 
Dennis Dailey, poor. 1877 
Timothy Dailey, poor, 1877 
Chas. G. Emerson, duplicate 

1877 .... 
Patrick Dowd, error, 1877 
Dennis Dowd, left city, 1877 
Alex. Greenwood, left city, 1877 
Frederick H. Saunders, pays 

in Hooksett, 1877 . 
James Hayes, dead, 1877 . 
Murtay Kilday, dead, 1877 
James Pixley, minor, 1877 
Geo. C. Clough, non compos, 1877 



1 62 

2 62 



62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 

58 
58 
b% 
5S 
58 



1 dS 

1 58 
1 58 



1 58 

42 

1 5S 

1 5S 

1 58 
1 58 
1 58 
1 58 
1 58 



347 



By Henry J. Hicks, paid in London 
derry, 1877 ... 
John Horrigan, sick, 1877 
Fred S. Sloan, minor, 1877 
Cornelius Moriarty, disabled sol 

dier, 1877 
James McCabe, disabled soldier 

1877 .... 
John McCluskey, poor, 1877 
John Morey, over 70, 1877 
John O'Brien, minor, 1877 
D. B. Ayer, ran away, 1877 
James B. Scott, no horse, 1877 
William Aust, left city, 1877 
Henry Hayes, poor, 1877 . 
Peter O'Malley, poor, 1877 
John O'Reilly, over 70, 1878 
Isaac Durbin, poor, 1878 . 
D. B. Ayer, ran away, 1878 
Murtay Kilday, dead, 1878 
Charles A. McKelvie,dead, 1878 
Fred'k McKithen, left city, 1878 
John B. McLane, left city, 1878 
John Morey, over 70, 1878 
Albert Murray, left city, 1878 . 
Cornelius Moriarty, disabled sol- 
dier, 1878 . . . . 
James McCabe, disabled soldier, 

1878 

John McCluskey, poor, 1878 
John Murray, dead, 1878 . 
James Pixley, minor, 1878 
Charles Molyneaux, poor, 1878 



2 58 
1 58 
1 58 

1 58 



1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


26 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


58 


1 


74 


1 


74 


2 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 



1 74 

1 74 
1 74 
1 74 
1 74 
1 74 



348 



By George C. Clough, non compos, 
1878 .... 
John Piper, duplicate, 1878 
Daniel Callahan, gone West,1878 
John Horrigan, sick, 1878 
Joseph Normandie, dead, 1878 
Albert F. Nelson, disabled sol- 
dier, 1878 . 
Dennis Dowd, left state, 1878 
This P. Dozois, transient resi 

dence, 1878 . 
Frank Fish, left state, 1878 
Maurice Fitzgerald, poor. 1878 
John Glavin, transient resi 

dence, 1878 . 
Patrick Giblin, dead, 1878 
William H. Gleason, left, 1878 
Alex. Greenwood, Canada, 1878 
John Greer, pays in Goffstown, 
1878 . . . . . 
Patrick Healy, gone, 1878 
John Healy, sick and poor, 1878 
Joseph B. Harris, left state, 1878 
James Keating, left state, 1878 
Thomas Baldwin, no slut, 1878 . 
Frederick H. Saunders, pays in 

Hooksett, 1878 . 
James Hayes, dead. 1878 . 
Lyman Jackson, over 70, 1878 . 
James Jennings, sick and poor, 

1878 

William E. Moore, over-valua- 
tion, 1878 . . . . 



1 74 

1 74 

2 74 

2 74 
1 74 



74 
64 



1 74 
1 74 
1 74 

1 74 
1 74 
1 74 
1 74 

1 74 
1 74 

1 74 
1 74 

1 74 

2 00 

1 74 
1 74 
1 74 

1 74 

6 09 



849 

By Moore & Fellows, over-valua- 
tion, 1878 .... 6 09 

Gustavus D. Parker, no horse, 
1878 ..... 

George Stevens, no dog, 1S78 . 

Jeremiah Connor, disabled sol- 
dier, 1878 .... 
. Leander Morency, over 70, 1878 

John Booth, poor, 1878 . 

Daniel Bradley, transient resi- 
dence, 1878 .... 

James Broderick, poor, 1878 

Timothy Buckley, poor, 1878 . 

George P. Call, poor, 1878 

Ambrose Carrigan, minor, 1878 

J. P. Chandler, gone West, 1878 

Patrick Council, poor, 1878 

Pardy Conway, poor, 1878 

Patrick Cummings, transient 

residence, 1878 ... 1 74 

Joseph Curin, transient resi- 
dence, 1878 .... 1 74 

Joseph Curin, 2d, transient 
residence, 1878 ... 

Dennis Dailey, poor, 1878 

Timothy Dailey, poor, 1878 

Lawrence Connor, poor, 1878 . 

Selwin B. Abbott, dead, 1878 . 

William Aust, left city, 1878 . 

John Badger, left city, 1878 

Walter M. Lynch, pays in Mil- 
ford, 1878 .... 

John Dennis Jr., pays in Hook- 
sett, 1878 .... 





69 


1 


00 


1 


74 


1 


74 


3 


61 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 



1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 



3.^0 



re SI 



resi 



resi 



By Patrick Haggerty, over 70, 1878 
Peter O'Malley, poor, 1878 
James Plurapton, poor, 1878 
Henry Hayes, poor, 1878 . 
David S. McKay, poor, 1878 
Jeremiah Sullivan, poor, 1878 
James F. Conway, minor, 1879 
Selwin B. Abbott, dead. 1879 
Clarence M. Abe, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
Frank Adams, transient 

dence, 1879 . 
Joseph Alger, transient 

dence, 1878 . 
Henry Auger, transient 

dence, 1879 . 
Charles R. Armstrong, transient 

residence, 1879 
William Ashworth, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
Louis Asselynn, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
Peter Audette, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
William Aust, left city, 1879 
Joseph Austin, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
Frank W. Aurill, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
John Badger, left city, 1879 
Hugh Baker, transient residence 

1879 .... 
John D. Hale, no dog, 1879 



1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


74 


1 


50 


1 


50 



1 50 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



1 50 

1 50 
1 50 

1 50 
1 00 



351 

By Joseph Auger, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

David S. McKay, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Henry Hayes, poor, 1879 . . 1 50 

Peter O'Malley, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Patrick Haggerty, over 70, 1879 1 50 

Alfred Gagnon, gone to Canada, 

1879 . . . • . 1 50 

John Dennis, Jr., pays in Hook- 
sett, 1879 .... 

Jerome Laverty, minor, 1879 . 

Michael McDonough, duplicate, 
1879 

James Plumpton, poor, 1879 . 

Joseph Normandie, dead, 1879 . 

Thomas S. Foot, error, 1879 . 

John B. Hall, over-valuation, 

1879 7 50 

Thomas Osgood, pays in Auburn. 
1879 

Samuel Gray, error, 1879 

Jeremiah McCarthy, over 70, 
1879 

John Horrigan, sick and poor, 
1879 

Daniel Callahan, gone West, 
1879 

Mrs. D. Callahan, gone West, 
1879 

Henry H. Esty, only one dog, 
1879 

Joseph Berry, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


6 


00 



1 


50 


1 


35 


1 


50 


1 


50 


2 


50 




51 


1 


00 


1 


50 



352 

By George W. Burnham, over TO, 

1879 1 50 

William D. Wyinan, transient 

residence, 1879 ... 3 36 

Ezra Huntington, error, 1879 . 7 '0 

Joseph Eagan, minor, 1879 . 1 50 

John Piper, duplicate, 1879 . 1 50 

Patrick Lynch, pays in Lowell, 

1879 1 50 

John D. Emery, over-valuation, 
1879 

Joseph Beddows, error, 1879 

Oscar D. Abbott, over-valuation 
on note, 1879 

Jeremiah Breen, jtransient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Andrew J. Dow, over-valuation, 
1879 

George C. Clough, non compos^ 
1879 

Arthur 0. Phelan, transient res- 
idence, 1879 

Patrick Mara, duplicate, 1879 . 

Charles Molyneaux, poor, 1879 . 

Thomas Lawrence, minor, 1879 

Thomas Leach, transient res- 
idence, 1879 .... 

Ledie Leblanc, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Emanuel Leblanc, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Joseph Leberte, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 



6 


00 


3 


15 


52 


50 


1 


50 


4 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



353 



By David Lee, transient residence, 
1879 

Gustave Left, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Arthur Lefevre, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 

Ferdinand Leger, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

Louis Lemire, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Benjamin Senter, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Peter Lesure, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Louis Letendre, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . • 

John Letendre, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Henry Lewis, minor, 1879 

Prank H. Libbey, paid in Hook- 
sett, 1879 .... 1 60 

John Loomis, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Peter Louportail, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Labain Noe, transient residence, 
1879 

James Lucy, poor, 1879 . 

Camille Lucier, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Allen Lunt, transient residence, 
1879 

Frank Lyman, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

23 





50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 





50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 



354 

By Patrick Lynch, minor, 1879 . 1 50 

Messie Machette, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

John Madden, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

James Mason, minor, 1879 . 1 50 

John Mahoney, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Francis Manaman, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 1 50 

A. B. Manchester, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

David Manchester, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 .... 1 50 

Thomas Manning, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Cyprian Manseau. transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Aloft Manville, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Thomas Mara, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Benjamin Marchant, transient 

residence, 1879 ... 1 50 

Peter Marcotte, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Gilbert Marcoux, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . ' . 1 50 

Thomas Marsier, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Joseph Marshall, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 1 50 

Charles 'Marston, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 1 50 

Eusebe Martelle, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 



By Fred Martelle, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

James Martin, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Antoine Martelle. transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Thomas Martin, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 

Charles Mason, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 . . " . 

Joseph Maurin, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Samuel McCauley, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

John McClure, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

John McCluskej, poor, 1879 

Andrew McComb, over 70, 1879 

Joseph McCool, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Edward McCoy, gone, 1879 

Michael McDonald, duplicate, 
1879 

Edward McDonald, no dog, 1879 

Charles R. McDonald, transient 
residence, 1879 

Peter McEon, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

John McGa'w, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Dennis McGinnis, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

John Mclntire, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 





50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




00 




fO 




50 




50 




50 




50 



356 

By Charles A. MeKelvie, dead, 1879 

Frederick McKitheii, gone, 1879 

John B. McLane, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Patrick McLaughlin, transient 
residence, 1879 

James McLaughlin, transient 
residence, 1879 

John McMahon, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 .... 

John Mara, transient residence, 
1879 

Austin Mara, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

John McNulty, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 .... 

Joseph M. Shea, over 70, 1879 . 

Frank McYicker, jail-bird, 1879 

Antoiue Melaaceon, transiejit 
residence, 1879 

Raphael Melanceon, transient 
residence, 1879 

Adolph Melanceon, transient 
residence, 1879 

Albert Merrill, sick, 1879 

Edward F. Miller, no dug, 1879 

Robert Mills, transient resi- 
dence, 1^79 .... 

Joseph Mills, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Philip Marcouler, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Arthur Marcouler, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


2 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



35i 



By Michael Mitchen, transient resi- 






dence, 1S79 .... 




50 


Anthony Mitchell, transient resi- 






dence, 1870 .... 




50 


Camille Mochin, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Peter Moran, transient residence. 






1879 




50 


George Morency, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


John Morey, over 70, 1879 




50 


John Johnson, over 70, 1879 . 




50 


Cornelius Moriarty, disabled sol- 






dier, 1879 .... 




50 


Philip Morris, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Joseph Morrisette, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 . 




50 


William Morse, duplicate. 1879 




50 


Michael Mullen, disabled soldier. 






1879 




50 


John Murray, dead, 1879 . 




50 


Albert Murray, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Thomas Murren, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Joseph Narsole, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Ovid Nault, transient residence, 






1879 




50 


Peter Nealley, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Albert F. Nelson, disabled sol- 






dier, 1879 .... 




50 



858 

By Elihu Wilder, no dog, 1879 

Charles Nasoii, duplicate, 1879 

Charles Douglas, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Johnson & Bartlett, over-valua- 
ation, 1879 .... 

William A. Fairbanks, duplicate, 
1879 

James McCabe, disabled soldier, 
1879 

George B. Sanford, disabled sol- 
dier, 1879 .... 

Edward K. McKean, paid in 
Bedford, 1879 

Michael Kearns, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Edward Kegiom, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

George Kehoe, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 

Michael Kelliher, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Thomas Kelley, gone, 1879 

Martin Kelley, in state-prison, 
1879 

John Kelley, minor, 1879 . 

Frank H. Kendall, cripple, 1879 

Thomas Kenney, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Terrance Kennedy, transient 
residence, 1879 

James Kerrin, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 



2 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


6 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



359 



By James Kirwiii, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Murtay Kilday, dead, 1879 . 1 50 

Michael Kilroy, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 .'.0 

Valentine King, over 70, 1879 . 1 50 

Henry Klopenger, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Charles Klutzman, transient 
residence, 1879 

Joseph H. Knowlton, dead, 1879 

Hall and 'Knowlton, transient 
residence, 1879 

Joseph Lahore, transient resi- 
dence, i.879 .... 

Joseph Labonty, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Wathelde Labonty,transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Zoel Lahore, transient residence, 
1879 

Louis Lahore, transient resi- 
dence, 18.79 .... 

Michael Labreache, transient 
residence, 1879 . . . 

Antoine Labris, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Louis LaDuc, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

John Lafleur, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Etienne Lafore, transient resi 
dence, 1879 .... 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 



860 



By Samuel Laford, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Adolphe Lafond, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Joseph Lafrance, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


George Lahey, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Pollock Lamere, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Joseph Lawrence, duplicate, 






1879 


1" 


50 


Lyman H. Lamprey, disabled 






soldier, 1879 


1 


50 


Eli Langlois, transient residence, 






1879 


1 


50 


John Larkin, sick, 1879 . 


1 


50 


Daniel Larock, poor, 1879 


1 


50 


John Larose, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 . 


1 


50 


Peter Satoun, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Bomberdt Lauman, transient 






residence, 1879 


1 


50 


Antoine Burner, in Canada, 1879 


1 


50 


Edward Buswell, minor, 1879 . 


1 


50 


Patrick Ryan, not found. 1879 . 


1 


50 


Christopher Chenette, not found, 






1879 


1 


50 


Whiting R. Call, not found, 1879 


1 


50 


George F. Call, poor. 1879 


1 


50 


Charles F. Carr, ran away, 1879 


1 


50 


Ambrose Carrigan, minor, 1879 


1 


50 


Leon Carter, poor, 1879 . 


1 


50 



861 



By James Casey, poor, 1879 . 


1 50 


Patrick Casey, transient resi- 




dence. 1879 .... 


1 50 


Z. Chaltry, transient residence, 




1879 


1 50 


Ephraim Deraens, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


Anthony Genoe. duplicate, 1879 


1 50 


E. M. Bryant, pays elsewhere, 




1879 


1 50 


Fred J Daniels, duplicate, 1879 


1 50 


Dennis Cronin, poor, 1879 


1 50 


Jere. Lyons, poor, 1879 . 


1 50 


Henry W. Dockhara, pays in 




Auburn, 1879 


1 50 


Peter W. Follansbee, pays in 




Concord, 1879 


1 50 


Moses E. Sanborn, sick, 1879 . 


1 50 


Otis C. George, pays in Weare, 




1879 


1 50 


Eugene S. Lynch, error, 1879 . 


75 


Lefrom Guenore, dead, 1879 


1 50 


Joseph Champagne, transient 




residence, 1879 


1 50 


John F. Chandler, gone West, 




1879 


1 50 


Charles Chase, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


Samuel Cheney, disabled soldier, 




1879 


1 50 


Edward Chevalier, transient res- 




idence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


Douglas Clifford, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 



862 

Bj Louis Clow, transient residence, 

1879 1 50 

Jerry Clutier, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 
Michael Chone, left city, 1879 . 1 50 
William Collins, left city, 1879 . 1 50 
George Coleman, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 
Charles Comfort, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 
Patrick Connell, poor. 1879 
Thomas. Connolly, left city, 1879 
Theodore Conreau, transient res- 
idence, 1879 .... 
Michael Connor, left city, 1879 . 
Joseph Connor, poor, 1879 
Wholpley Connor, transient res- 
idence, 1879 .... 
Lawrence Connor, poor, 1879 . 
Thomas Connor, not found, 1879 
Micliael Conroy, not found, 1879 
Thomas Conway, not found, 1879 
Fardy Conway, poor, 1879 
George E. Cook, ran away, 1879 
Edward Cook, not found, 1879 . 
Henry Cooper, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 
Guttlor Cormier, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 
Anthony Cate, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 
Eli Cate, transient residence, 

1879 

Delphin Coateau, dead, 1879 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


O 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



368 

By Patrick Coyne, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Henry Crandall. transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . , 

Peter Crapeau, transient resi- 
dence, 18T9 .... 

Cornelius Cronin, left city, 1879 

Patrick Cronin, poor. 1879 

Edward Cronin, minor, 1879 

Patrick Cummings, transient 
residence, 1879 

James Cunningham, transient 
residence, 1879 . 

Nelson Currier, transient res- 
idence, 1879 

Joseph Currier, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Joseph Currier, 2d, transient 
residence. 1879 

Emer Cushane, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Dennis Dailey, poor, 1879 

Timothy Dailey, poor, 1879 

Joseph C. Davis, transient resi- 
dence, lb79 .... 

Joseph Day, dead, 1879 . 

Westley Debec, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Frank Delong, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Louis Denyon, transient resi- 
dence, 1871: .... 

John Depond, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 





60 




60 




60 




60 




60 




60 




60 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




60 




50 




50 




60 




60 




50 




50 




50 


1 


60 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



364 

By David Derby, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Joseph H. Desselle, transient 
residence, 1879 

Jeremiah Dexter, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Edward Dillingham, transient 
residence, 1879 

John Diolette, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Daniel Donahoe, disabled sol- 
dier, 1879 

Bartholomew Donovan, left city, 
1879 

Jerry Donovan, left city, 1879 . 

John Davis, duplicate, 1879 

Frank Dowst, horse owned by 

firm, 1879 .... 1 05 

Michael O'Neil, in Massachu- 
setts, 1879 .... 

Thomas Holan, duplicate, 1879 

Charles Gagnon,over 70, 1879 . 

Frank H. Johnson, paid in Der- 
ry, 1879 . ' . 

Levi H. Caldwell, over-valua- 
tion, 1879 .... 

Mrs. Cyrus W. Wallace, over-val- 
uation, 1879 .... 
George Connor, over-valuation, 

1879 

Charles G. Emmons, paid in 

Bristol, 1879 
Abel G. Rankin, no dog, 1879 . 
John Booth, poor, 1879 



1 


50 


1 


89 


1 


50 


1 


50 


7 


50 


7 


50 


7 


28 


3 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


1 


50 



365 

By Charles Bartlett, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

John Deschenes, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Edward Lemoire, minor, 1879 . 1 50 

Patrick Flynn, dead, 1879 . 1 50 

Ephraira Demers, transient resi- 
dence, 1S79 . . . . 45 

Robert H. Wilson, paid in Mis- 
sissippi, 1879 ... 1 60 

Moses Duford, no horse or cow, 

1879 1 95 

Dominique Doucet, transient res- 
idence, 1879 

Mary Huse, over-valuation, 1879 

George Doucet, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Joseph Douglass, dead, 1879 

David Douman, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Michael Downing, poor, 1879 . 

Dennis Dowd, left city, 1879 

Frank Doyle, poor, 1879 . 

This P. Dozois, left state, 1879 

Camille Ducherme, transient res- 
idence, 1879 

Christopher Dudley, transient 
residence, 1879 

Frank Doolittle, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

Owen Duffey, sick and poor, 1879 

Andrew J. Duffey, poor, 1879 . 

Onesime Dufrain, transient, 

residence, 1879 ... 1 50 



1 


50 


12 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



366 



By Napoleon Dumas, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Leonard Dumas, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Louis Duteau, transient resi- 
dence ..... 

Eugene Duford, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Alljert Dufond, transient resi- 
dence., 1879 .... 

Joseph Depuis, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Joseph Depuis, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Daniel Dussault, cripple, 1879 . 

Joseph Eager, out of state, 1879 

Thomas Elliott, poor, 1879 

Stephen Emery, disabled soldier, 
1879 . . . • . 

Joseph Erroll, over 70, 1879 

Peter Fadden, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

William Farr, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Michael Farrell, 2d, paid in Bos- 
ton, 1879 .... 

Thomas Farrington, transient 
residence, 1879 

James Farrow, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

James Farnum, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Chas. Fifield, paid in Deerfield, 
1879 





50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 



367 

By William Finley, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Thomas Finnigan, poor. 1879 . 1 50 

Lonis Fisher, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Morris Fitzgerald, old and poor, 
1879 

Michael Fitzgerald, poor, 1879 . 

William h. Brown, duplicate, 
1879 

John Flaherty, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Phineas Flanders, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 ... 

Jerry Flanders, paid in Chester, 
1879 

John A. Flanders, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Frank Fish, left city, 1879 

Thomas Flynn, transient resi- 
dence, 1879, ... 1 50 

Harvey Flynn, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Thomas Foley, poor, 1879, 

Michael Foley, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Gottfried Fonier, duplicate, 1879 

Isaac Foofour, transient, resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Joseph Foucher, transient, resi- 
dence, 1879 ... 
Frank A. Fox, paid in Auburn, 
1879 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



1 


60 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



368 

By John Frain, transient residence, 
1«79 

George Francis, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Benjamin Freeman, paid in 
Mass., 1879 . . . . 

James Freeman, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Alvin T. French, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Edward Frost, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Nicholas Forney, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Remi Gagnon, transient resi- 
dence, 1»79 .... 

Alfred Gagnon, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Elzea Gamache, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Patrick Gannon, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Edward Gardner, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Thomas Garon, dead, 1879 

Charles Gates, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Alfred Gelinas, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

Raphael Gelinas, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

Francis Gerard, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Victor Gerard, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 




• 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



369 



By Victor Gerard, 2d, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Patrick Giblin, dead, 1879 


1 


50 


Cremore Gilraau, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Wallace Gilman, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Adter Gend, transient residence, 






1879 


1 


50 


Louis Geguire, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


John Glavin, transient residence, 






1879 


1 


50 


William H. Gleason, left state, 






1879 


1 


50 


Damon Gagnon, duplicate, 1879 


1 


oO 


John Gagnon, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Joseph Goudreault, transient 






residence, 1879 


1 


50 


Calixter Gouin, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Frank Gagnon, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


John Gorman, poor, 1879 . 


1 


50 


Algior Gouin, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Mallard D. Gove, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 


1 


50 


Noel Gouin, transient residence. 






1879 


1 


50 


Martin Grady, disabled soldier, 






1879 . " . 


1 


50 


24 







870 



By Louis Gralil, transient residence, 

1879 1 50 

Charles Grandworth, poor, 1879 1 50 

Frank Graves, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . • . . 1 50 

Samuel Graves, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Charles W. Green, minor, 1879 1 50 

Harvey Green, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

John Greenwood, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Alex. Green, transient residence, 

1879 . . . . 1 50 

John Greer, paid in Goffstown, 

1879 1 50 

Joseph Gregory, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Exavier Grenier, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Margaret Griffin, no slut, 1879 . 2 00 

Joseph Guinard, transient resi- 1 50 

dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Frank Groux, dead, 1879 . . 1 89 

Albert Groux, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Joseph Groux, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

David Guay, transient residence, 

1879 1 50 

Theophole Guimond, transient 

residence, 1879 ... 1 50 

Charles S. Hadley, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Patrick Haley, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

John Haley, poor, 1879 . . 1 50 



371 



By William Haley, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Antoine Hall, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 1 50 

James Hamel, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Daniel Hamilton, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 .... 1 50 

Calvin D. Hamilton, transient 

residence. 1879 ... 1 50 

H. Hamlin, transient residence, 

1879 1 50 

Charles Hardy, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Joseph B. Harris, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 .... 1 50 

Peter Harris, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Michael Hart, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Abram Hawks, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Brabtus Haselton, duplicate, 1879 1 50 

Richard Grunier, left state, 1879 1 50 

Albion Grunier, left state, 1879 1 50 

Dustin Kendall, over 70, 1879 . 1 50 

James Hayes, dead, 1879 . . 1 50 

Patrick Haughey, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Stephen Healy, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 .... 1 50 

PeterG. Kendall, left state, 1879 1 50 

John Hennessey, disabled sol- 
dier, 1879 . . . . 1 50 



372 

By William H. Hicks, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

William L. Hildreth, transient 
residence, 1879 
, Robert Hill, transient residence, 
1879 

Fred Hichman, dead, 1879 

Michael Hoburn, sick and poor, 
1879 

Thomas Horan, poor, 1879 

John Horridge, dead, 1879 

John How, duplicate, 1 879 

Charles F. Hoyt, poor, 1879 

James Huse, transient residence, 
1879 

Lyman Jackson, over 70, 1879 . 

John Jacques, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

James Janelle, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

Peter Jenck, transient residence, 
1879 

James Jennings, poor, 1879 

Adolph G. Johnson, left state, 
1879 

Joseph Juno, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Louis Joyal, transient residence, 
1879 

William Esty, over-valuation, 
1879 

William Fitzgerald, old and poor, 
1879 

Robert P. Murray, no slut, 1879 



1 


oO 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


;0 


1 


50 


3 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 



By Thomas Finnegau, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Benjamin Callan, retaxed to 

owner unknown, 1879 . . 60 

Samuel 0. Hall, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Annette B. Hall, burned out, 

1879 12 13 

Granville Heselton, over-valua- 
tion, 1879 .... 

Anson Minard, duplicate, 1879 . 

Joseph Boulaie, duplicate, 1879 

Jeremiah Bouchei-, duplicate. 
1879 

Horace Bugbee, paid in Gilford, 
1879 ..... 

James Lattimer, sick and poor, 
1879 

Joseph Jordan, minor, 1879 

Joseph Champaign, no horse, 

1879 60 

Cornelius Callahan, sick and 
poor, 1879 .... 

John G. Campbell, over 70, 1879 

William Carney, insane, 1879 . 

Dennis Carrigan, minor. 1879 . 

John Tarpey, minor, 1879 

John Rourke, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Donohue & O'Neil, duplicate, 
1879 

Louis Boudette, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 

Peter Coette, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 



3 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 





50 




50 




50 




50 




50 


1 


50 


15 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 



37-1 

By Julian Coette, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

Frank Hickock, disabled sol- 
dier, 1879 .... 1 50 

William Dillon, pays in Bedford, 

1879 1 50 

Patrick Congdon, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Dennis Morgan, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 1 50 

Peter Burbank, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

S. F. Dearborn, duplicate, 1879 

Daniel Darling, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Patrick Harrington, error, 1879 

George H. Chandler, pays in 
Boscawen, 1879 . 

Daniel Salmer, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Henry P. 0. Day, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Coleman Devine, dead, 1879 

William Burns, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Charles M. Gardner, dead, 1879 

John Masey, transient residence, 
1879 

Michael Dailey, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Charles F. Gerrish, paid in Bos- 
ton, 1879 .... 

John P. Flyng, no slut, 1879 . 

Eugene F. Lynch, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 



1 


50 


6 


24 




50 




30 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 


2 


00 



S76 



By "William G. Simons, no horse 

1879 .... 
Patrick Costello, no horse, 1879 
Isaac Durbin, poor, 1879 . 
John O'Reilly, over 70, 1879 
M. J. McDonald, no dog-. 1879 
John Drew, duplicate, 1879 
Joseph Howard, poor, 1879 
D. B. Ayer, ran away, 1879 
James A. Folsom, no dog, 1879 
A. J. Moody, duplicate, 1879 
Jeremiah A. Sargent, over-valu 

ation, 1879 . 
Ferdinand Leger, no dog, 1879 
Joel Labose, no dog, 1879 
Joseph S. Murby, no dog, 1879 
Fred McKithen, no dog, 1879 
Michael Murray, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
Michael Hebert, no hogs, 1879 
Aaron Pixley, poor, 1879 . 
Patrick O'Brien, not found, 1879 
James O'Brien, not found, 1879 
Jerry O'Connor, not found, 1879 
Peter O'Malley, over 70, 1870 . 
George E. Osgood, gone, 1879 . 
Florance B. Sullivan, duplicate, 

1879 

Dana Page, transient residence, 

1879 

Orrin L. Page, sick, 1879 
Thomas Paine, dead, 1879 
George Paradis, in Canada, 1879 
Joseph Paris, in Canada, 1S79 . 



50 
75 
60 
50 
00 
50 
50 



2 50 
1 00 
1 50 



6 94 
1 00 

1 00 

2 00 
1 00 



50 
27 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



1 50 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



376 



By George H. Parker, transient res- 




idence, 1879 


1 50 


W. S. Parker, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


William Parr, only one leg. 


1 50 


1879 . . \ . . 


1 50 


Elbridge Paul, gone, 1870 


1 50 


George Pecker, paid in Milford, 




1879 


1 50 


Abraham Pepin, poor, 1879 


1 50 


Joseph Parker, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


William L. Perry, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


Seraphine Perry, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


N. J. Peyton, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


Philip Philbut, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


Anson Phillips, transient resi- 




dence, 1879 .... 


1 50 


Edmond Pickard, transient resi- 




dence. 1879 .... 


1 50 


Euclid Piquette, minor, 1879 . 


1 50 


Joseph B. Pierce, poor, 1879 . 


3 85 


Fred H. Putnam, gone, 1879 . 


1 50 


Joseph Pole, gone, 1879 . 


1 50 


Austin Palaquin, gone, 1879 


1 50 


James Policy, gone, 1879 . 


1 50 


Frank Pomeroy, in Canada. 1879 


1 50 


Treat Potter, dead, 1S79 . 


4 50 


Alexander Pollard, transient 




residence, 1879 . 


1 50 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


60 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



377 

By Delano Prescott, gone, 1879 

Moses Pressey, over 70, 1879 . 

Louis Provencher, in Canada, 
1879 

John Provost, minor, 1879 

Solomon Parger, gone, 1879 

Michel Pushee, gone, 1879 

Ransom S. Quimby, gone, 1879 

Eugene Ramsey, gone, 1879 

Mark Rand, paid in Warner, 

1879 1 50 

Louis Rand, transient residence, 

1879 1 50 

John Ready, dead, 1879 . . 1 50 

Thomas Reagan, disabled sol- 
dier, 1879 . . . . 1 50 

John Reardon, disabled soldier, 
1879 

Michael Reardon, sick, 1879 

Louis E. Regrency, transient 
residence, 1879 

William Remie, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Edward Rhodes, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 
Edward G. Rhodes, transient 
residence, 1879 

George Richards, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 
Peter Richards, sick, 1879 
Clarence Richardson, duplicate, 

1879 

Joseph Ritchie, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 



1 


50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 



378 



By Peter Rivard, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 
Elenon Robarge, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 
Charles Roberts, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 . . . . 
Herbert F. Roberts, minor, 1879 
Hugh Robinson, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . 
Gilbert Robitard, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 
Francis Robitaille, over 70, 1879 
Charles Rochette, in Canada, 

1879 

Sargent M. Rockwell, minor, 

1879 .... 
Henry Liogers, gone, 1879 
Joseph Rose, gone, 1879 . 
Joseph J. Ross, gone, 1879 
Joseph Rosseau, gone, 1879 
Hermann Roth, in Germany, 

1879 .... 
Daniel Rouville, blind, 1879 
Thad Russell, gone, 1879 . 
Joseph Rourke, dead, 1879 
John Rourke, in jail, 1879 
James Runnells, transient resi 

dence. 1879 . 
Eli Rushford, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
Amos L. Russell, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
Ami Sanborn, no dog, 1879 
John H. Saunders, poor, 1879 



1 50 

1 50 

1 50 
1 50 

1 50 

1 50 
1 50 

1 50 





1 50 




1 50 




1 50 




1 50 




1 50 




1 50 




1 50 




1 50 




1 50 




1 50 


i- 


1 50 


i- 


1 50 


i- 


1 50 




2 00 




1 50 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


2 


00 



379 

By Samuel Levigny, in Canada, 1879 1 50 

Cyrus P. Savory, gone, 1879 . 1 50 

Gregory Savory, poor, 1879 . 1 50 

Orriii Sawyer, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 1 50 

Isaac Sawyer, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Peter Scanlan, poor, 1879 

Murtay Scanlan, minor, 1879 . 

Richard Scharsmidt, gone, 1879 

George W. Brown, poor, 1879 . 

Frederick Otis, duplicate, 1879 

John 0. Sullivan, state-prison, 
1879 

Morrison L. Sanborn, gone, 1879 

John Orrill, no dog, 1879 . 

Horace Segoin, transient resi- 
dence. 1879 .... 1 50 

Joseph Shambo, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Thomas Shea, dead, 1879 . 

Michael Shea, duplicate, 1879 . 

Wm. Rourke, in Massachusetts, 
1879 

John Shea, over 70,1879 . 

Jerry Shehan, disabled soldier, 
1879 

Joseph Sheridan, gone, 1879 

John Shehan, poor, 1879 . 

Philip Shields, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Chas. Shirley, pays in Hooksett, 
1879 

Joseph Shorts, in Canada, 1879. 



1 


50 


2 


64 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



380 



By Tlieo. Shortslins, in Canada 

1879 .... 
F. H. Sibler, gone, 1879 . 
John Silver, lives in Hooksett 

1879 .... 
Joseph Silver, lives in Hooksett 

1879 .... 
Chas. Simons, in jail, 1879 
Ah Sin, in China, 1879 . 
Wm. F. Slack, gone, 1879 
John Slattery. poor, 1879 . 
Fred J. Stockwell, duplicate 

1879 .... 
Ths. Slavin, gone, 1879 . 
Jonathan Sleeper, poor, 1879 
Hugh Smith, gone, 1879 . 
Gid. W. Smith, gone, 1879 
Geo. C. W. Smith, gone, 1879 
Frank A. Smith, pays in Exe 

ter, 1879 
Jefferson Smith, feeble mind 

1879 .... 
James E. Smith, transient resi 

dence, 1879 . 
Patrick Spane, over 70, 1879 
Frank Starr, transient residence 

1879 .... 
Horace S. Stevens, duplicate 

1879 .... 
Frank Stevens, duplicate, 1879 
James Stewart, gone, 1879 
Michael Stewart, gone, 1879 
Peter St. John, gone, 1879 
Alex. St. John, in jail, 1879 



1 50 
1 50 

1 50 





50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 



1 50 

1 50 

1 50 

1 50 
1 50 

1 50 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



381 

By Chas. St. Lawrence, transient 

residence, 1879 ... 1 50 

Levi Stock well, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 
Cyril Stokes, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 
Napoleon Stone, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 
Peter St. Ours, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 
Moses St. Peter, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 
John A. Strait, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 . . . . 1 50 
Cornelius Sullivan, dead, 1879 . 1 50 
Daniel Sullivan, gone, 1879 . 1 50 
John Sullivan, gone, 1879 . 1 50 
Tudor Sunday, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 
Harvey W. Simonds, transient 

residence, 1879 ... 1 50 

A. J. Tabor, transient residence, 

1879 1 50 

Alex. Taggart, paid in Bedford, 

1879 1 50 

Horace Taplin, gone, 1879 . 1 50 

Joseph Taylor, gone, 1879 . 1 50 

Telliophor Tellier, gone, 1879 . 1 50 

Andrew Thayer, gone, 1879 . 1 50 

Welcome Thayer, gone, 1879 . 1 50 

John A. Thomas, gone, 1879 . 1 50 

Andrew Thompson, gone West, 

1879 1 50 



382 

By Warren Thompson, gone West, 
1879 

Festus Thornton, sick, 1879 

Wm. Fowle, gone, 1879 . 

John Tracy, in jail in Massachu- 
setts, 1879 .... 

Louis A. Trudeau, gone, 1879 . 

Wm. Trudeau, in Canada, 1879 

Felix Tachette, poor, 1879 

Arthur Turcotte, minor, 1879 . 

Xavier Turcotte, gone West, 
1879 

Hiram Turner, 2d, minor, 1879 

Edward Wallace, poor, 1879 

Louis P. Walthers, gone, 1879 . 

Henry M. Warden, gone, 1^79 . 

Nancy Wardman, no dog, 1879 

Peter Washburn, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 1 50 

James Waters, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Joseph S. Weeks, dead, 1879 . 

Michael Wells, in Canada, 1879 

Thomas Welch, in Canada, 1879 

Fred Wells, in Canada, 1879 . 

Edgar Weymouth, transient res- 
idence, 1879 . 

John Welcott, poor, 1879 . 

Frank Wilfret, gone, 1879 

Wm. Wilson, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Nathaniel Williams, transient 
residence, 1879 





50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




00 





50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 




50 



383 



Jackson Urse, transient' resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Alfred Wooden, poor, 1879 




50 


Oliver Wort, transient residence, 






1879 




50 


William Wjman, dead beat,1879 




50 


Daniel Young, gone to England, 






1879 




50 


Arthur Hebert, dead, 1879 




50 


Edward Rouen, gone, 1879 




50 


Russell Saunders, paid in Pitts- 






field, 1879 .... 




50 


Felix Roseneau, duplicate, 1879 




50 


Michael Conteau, duplicate, 1879 




50 


Jeremiah Callahan, duplicate, 






1879 




50 


Louis Labonty, minor, 1879 




50 


Frederick Junte, pays in Lowell, 






1879 


1 


50 


Joseph Poor, illegal tax, 1879 . 


23 


25 


Wm. E. Moore, over-valuation, 






1879 


5 


25 


Patrick Dowd, over- valuation. 






1879 




42 


Moore & Fellows, over-valuation, 






1879 . 


5 


25 


Gustavus D. Parker, no horse, 






1879 




75 


John A.Thomas, duplicate, 1879 


1 


50 


John Shea, duplicate, 1879 


1 


50 


Edgar E. Weymouth, duplicate, 






1879 


2 


00 


Horace F. Philbrick, minor, 1879 


1 


50 



384 

By Chas. H. Lindsey, paid in Nash- 
ua, 1879 .... 

Joseph P. Felt, over 70, 1879 . 

Jeremiah Connor, disabled sol- 
dier, 1879 .... 

Leander Morency, over 70,1879 

Wm. Breakley, minor, 1879 

M. Boynton, transient residence, 
1879 

Daniel Bradley, not found, 1879 

Louis Branconier, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Thomas Brennan, poor, 1879 . 

Jeremiah Bresnehan, gone, 1879 

Lewis Breer, transient residence, 
1879 

James Broderick, poor, 1879 . 

Frank T. Brown, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

John Brown, left city, 1879 

Alexander Brunette, transient 
residence, 1879 

Willard Buck, poor, 1879 . 

Timothy Buckley, pour, 1879 . 

Gregory Budae, poor, 1879 

William Buggy, in California, 
1879 

Remmie Burson, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Charles Borroughs, duplicate, 
1879 

Lucien Burtea, transient resi- 
dence, 1878 . . . . 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


60 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



385 



Sy Charles Borrono, sick and poor, 






IST*^* 




50 


Charles Borroughs, transient resi- 






dence. 1879 .... 




50 


Henry F. Carey, moved in March, 






1879 




50 


William Farrell. poor, 1879 




50 


Chas. Foster, paid in Bedford, 






1879 




50 


Charles W. Folsom, minor, 1879 




50 


Charles G. Emerson, duplicate, 






1879 




50 


Joseph Barry, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Alfred Barry, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Geoffrey Brettelle, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Charles Batchelder, transient 






residence, 18 9 




50 


Emil Baume, transient residence, 






1879 




50 


Anton Bayer, transient residence. 






1879 




50 


Louis Beducan, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Luban Bebeau, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




60 


Joseph Bellfleur, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Thomas Bentley, transient resi- 






dence, 1879 .... 




50 


Fill man Berrabe, poor, 1879 




50 


25 







38t) 

By Paul Beltes, transient residence, 
1879 

William Biby, transient resi- 
dence, ISTU .... 

Charles Bisbee, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Theophole Blanchette, transient 
residence, 1879 

Octave Blanchette, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Eustaff Bonneseau. transient resi- 
dence, ls79 . 

John Bowers, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Jeremiah Bourneval, not found, 
1879 

Alphonzo Boyd, transient resi- 
dence, 1879 .... 

Israel Dow, watering-trough, 
1879,1880 . . . . 

A. D. Gooden, watering-trough, 
1880 

Chas. S. Miville, pays in Pem- 
broke, 1880 .... 

John A. Farrell, over-valuation, 
1880 

Ephraim K. Rowell, use of wa- 
tering-trough, 1880 

Elijah M. Topliff, over-valuation, 
1880 

Frank H. Hardy, minor, 1880 . 

Ah Sin, duplicate, 1880 

May Blow, duplicate, 1880, 

John fl. Andrews, no dog, 1880 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 
1 
1 


50 
50 
50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


2 


50 


1 


50 


6 


00 


3 


00 


1 


48 


7 


40 


3 


00 


3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


70 
48 

48 
48 
00 



387 

By H. A. Greeiilief & Co., over- 
valuation, 18S0 

E. S. Whitney, duplicate, 1880 . 

Joseph Valley, no dog, 1880 

Patrick Welch, no cow, 1880 . 

Hoyt & James, over-valuation, 
1880 

John Hamilton, error in return. 
1880 

John P. Aukerloo, over-valua- 
tion, 1880 .... 

Hardy & Putnam, over-valuation, 
1880 

Henry Wheeler, error in return, 
1880 

J. S. Masseck, over-valuation, 
1880 

Chas. B. Wingate, over-valua- 
tion, 1880 .... 

James F. Smith, over-valuation, 
1880 ..... 

Joseph Gaggin, over 70, 1880 . 

Napoleon Monette, no slut, 1880 

William Whitmore. paid in Cor- 
nish, 1880 . 

John Kennard, over-valuation, 
1880 

Kennard Bros., on Stark block, 
over-valuation, 1880 

John E. Richards, error, 1880 . 

Lucy P. Rice, over-valuation, 
1880 

William Hayes, over-valuation, 
1880 



2 


96 


1 


48 


1 


00 




24 


29 60 


14 


80 


10 


36 


11 


84 


23 


68 


11 


84 


5 


18 


5 


18 


1 


48 


2 


00 


1 


48 


7 


40 


44 


40 


32 


56 


4 


44 


4 


44 



388 



By Charles F. Sprague. over-valua- 
tion, 1880 .... 
Philip St. Cyr, duplicate, 1880 . 
Carter Tinkham, not here April 
1, 1880 . . . . 

Frank Porter, paid in Auburn. 

1880 

Frank B. Foster, duplicate, 1880 
John Sanborn, no dog, 1880 
Ira P. Emery & Co., duplicate, 

1880 

Richard Arnold, Stark corpora- 
tion, duplicate, 1»80 
Ricliard Arnold, Manchester 

street, over 7U, 18^0 
Michael Fitzgerald, minor, 1880 
Leander Morency, over 70, 1880 
Albert G. Dole, over 70, 1880 
William P. Burpee, paid in 

Goffstown, 1880 . 
George H. Chandler, paid in 

Concord. 1880 
James Benson, Jr., error, 1880 
Jason Weston, over-valuation 

1880 

Herbert Giddings, minor, 1880 
Herbert Giddings, duplicate 

1880 .... 
Heirs of D. R. Leach, duplicate 

1880 .... 
George W. Whittier, duplicate 

1880 .... 
Jeremiah Connolly, over 70 
1880 .... 



3-t 78 
89 

1 48 



1 


48 


1 


48 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


48 


1 


48 


1 


48 


1 


48 


1 


4s 



1 48 



1 


48 


14 


80 


5 


92 


1 


48 


28 


08 


414 


40 


22 


20 


1 


48 



389 



By Jacob Leonhardt, minor, 1880 . 1 48 

Levi Coburn,paid in New York, 

1880 1 48 

Rudolph Fisette, duplicate, 1880 1 48 

Lewis Melvin, paid in Weare, 

1880 1 48 

George Morgan, no dog, 1880 . 1 00 

Edward White, paid in Ver- 
mont, 1880 .... 1 48 

Charles A. Walker, paid in Bed- 
ford, 1880 .... 1 48 

Albert Montgomery, paid in 

Hopkinton, 1880 ... 1 48 

Sargent M. Rockwell, minor, 

1880 1 48 

Barney Prescott, paid in Hook- 
sett, 1880 .... 1 48 

Charles A. Hutchinson, dupli- 
cate, 1880 . . . . 1 48 

Chester C. Young, minor, 1880 1 48 

Clarence D. Parker, no horse, 

1880 ..... 1 18 

Nathaniel George, watering- 
trough, 1880 ... 3 00 

Frank A. Dockham, no horse, 

1880 89 

Heirs of James Stockdale, burned 

out, 1880 .... 8 99 

James Burke, minor, 1880 . 1 48 

Cornelius Hartnett, dead, 1880 1 48 

Abby C. Piper, over-valuation, 

1880 5 18 

John Holland, over 70, 1880 . 1 48 

August Dubec, minor, 1880 . 1 48 



390 



By George B. Shattuck, no horse, 
April 1, 1880 
Fred S. Newhall, paid in Massa- 

cliusetts, 1880 
Frank Dustin, minor, l>i80 
John Dennis, Jr., paid in Hook- 
sett, 1880 . . . . 
Alfred Gagnon, gone to Canada. 
1880 . . . . . 
Patrick Haggerty, over 70, 1880 
Nelson Duval, minor, 1880 
John B. Handly. duplicate, 1880 
James Jennings, over 70, 1880 . 
Feder Plant, minor, 1880 
Chester C. Young, minor, 1880 
Waldo W. Foss. paid in Hook- 
sett, 1880 . 
Peter O'Mallej, poor, 1880 
James Plumpton, poor, 1880 
Henry Hayes, poor, 1880 . 
David S. McKay, poor, 1880 
Michael McNalley. poor, 1880 
Dallas Montgomery, dead, 1880 



89 

48 
48 



1 48 



48 
48 
48 
48 

48 
48 
48 

48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 



2 96 



2,622 43 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



15,000 00 

974 77 



By George B. Morrill, collector . $5,974 77 



Dr. 

^5,974 77 
Cr. 

^5,974 77 



391 
STATE TAX. 



To appropriation . 

balance overdrawn . 



,724 00 
. 1,336 00 



Paid S. A. Carter, state treasurer .141,060 00 



Dr. 

$41,060 00 

Cr. 
141,060 00 



COUNTY TAX. 



To appropriation .... $39,360 98 
reserved fund, am't transferred 154 20 



Paid E. P. Richardson, county treas- 
urer $39,1.^4 20 

By balance overdrawn in 1879 . 365 98 



Dr. 

139,520 18 
Cr. 

39,520 18 



List for 1870 

" 1871 

" 1872 

" 1873 

" 1874 

" 1875 

" 1876 

" 1877 

" 1878 

" 1879 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

16,358 13 
6,260 70 
2,811 93 
4,217 51 
4,347 69 
4,325 61 
3,104 45 
3,115 15 
4,067 87 
799 39 



,408 48 



392 
TAXES FOR 1880. 

Dr. 

To resident taxes assessed . . $264,491 17 
non-resident taxes assessed . 1,018 85 

$265,510 02 

Cr. 
By collections, abatements, and 

discounts . . . .$240,185 20 
balance outstanding . . 25,324 82 

$265,510 02 



SALARIES OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $10,000 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred . 2,000 00 

$12,000 00 

Cr. 



aid J. L. Kelly, mayor 


$1,000 00 


H. R. Chamberlin, treasurer . 


1,000 00 


N. P. Kidder, city clerk 


900 00 


William R. Patten, city solic- 




itor 


500 00 


George E. Morrill, collector . 


1,405 56 


A. G. Stevens, engineer 


1,000 00 


J. A. Barker, messenger 


570 00 


William E. Buck, superintend- 




ent of public instruction 


1,600 00 


S. B. Putnam, clerk of com- 




mon council 


100 00 


J. Fred Stanton, assistant en- 




gineer .... 


361 15 



89^ 



Paid H. W. Home, ass't engineer . 

M. E. Geoi'ge, clerk of over- 
seers of poor 

J. L. Kelly, chairman of over- 
seers of poor 

Micliael Cavanaugh, assessor 

C. S. Fisher, " . 

H. P. Watts, " . 

C. H. Brown, " . 
J. H. Haynes, " . 
J. Y. McQueston, " 

D. 0. Furnald, " 

H. W. Powell, " . 

J. P. Moore, ass't assessor 

Isaac Whittemore, assistant 
assessor .... 

N. Nichols, clerk for assessors 

J. M. Crawford, clerk for as- 
sessors .... 

William G. Everett, clerk for 
assessors . 

S. B. Putnam 

R. G. Sullivan, moderator 

D. H. Maxfield, " 

C. K. Walker, " 
A. J. Sanborn, " 
J, D. Jones, " 

D. 0. Furnald, " 
George H. Stearns, " 
C. F. Garland, ward clerk 

E. N. Baker, 
C. E. Quimby, " 
George E. Glines, " 

F. H. Challis, 



173 50 



60 00 



25 


00 


107 


50 


266 


87 


115 


00 


125 


00 


438 


00 


17 


50 


130 


00 


123 


75 


47 


50 


57 


50 


202 


50 



85 00 



10 


00 


2 


50 


6 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


3 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


7 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 



394 



Paid John Cahill. ward clerk 
J. F. Baldwin, " 
J. E. Dodge, " 

S. B. Stearns, " 
Samuel Thompson, selectman 

D. B. Emery, " 
H. 0. Paige, 

E. G. Woodman, " 
A. Q. Gage, 

Stephen Palmer, " 

Samuel Clark, " 

John Prince, " 

George B. Smith, " 

J. B. McTiernan, " 

Thomas O'Connor, " 

Thomas N. Bond, " 

John Willis, " 

F. 0. McPherson, " 
William G. Westover " 
W. E. Holt, 

Sidney Smith, " 

Samuel Clark, *' 

Ralph Pearson, •' 

J. E. Dodge, clerk of school 

board 
M. P. Hail, clerk of school 

board ... 

George D. Towne, city physi 

cian .... 
J. W. Mooar, health officer 
P. A. Devine, health officer 
Judith Sherer, matron at pest 

house 
Isaac Whittemore, inspector 



10 00 
6 00 

5 00 
10 00 

6 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

6 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 

5 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 
10 00 

5 00 
10 00 

25 00 

75 00 

50 00 
•lb 00 
25 00 

90 00 
45 00 



395 



Paid Hiram Forsaith, inspector . 66 25 

J. J. Flynn, " . 67 60 

H. H. Noyes, " . 38 25 

J. H. Haynes, " . 119 25 

A. J. Nay, " . 84 51 

David Farmer, " . 40 50 

H. D. Lord, clerk for inspectors 113 75 
A. J. Sanborn, clerk for in- 
spectors .... 4 50 
J. L. Kelly, school committee, 

ex officio . . . . 10 00 
J. W. Whittle, school commit- 
tee, ex officio . . . 10 00 
E. W. Brigham, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 
L. E. Phelps, school commit- 
tee 10 00 

M. P. Hall, school committee 10 00 

George W. Weeks, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 
W. M. Parker, school commit- 10 00 
tee 10 00 

C. A. O'Connor, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

D. F. O'Connor, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

A. C. Flanders, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 

B. B. Weeks, school commit- 
tee 10 00 

E. Huntington, school commit- 
tee 10 00 

William A. Webster, school 

committee . . . 10 00 



396 



Paid Daniel Clark, school commit- 
tee . 
Charles F. Everett, school com- 
mittee . . . . 
H. C. Sanderson, school com- 
mittee . . . . 
Benjamin C. Dean, school com- 
mittee . . . . 
G. L. Demarest, school com- 
mittee . . . . 
Daniel Sheehan. overseer of 
poor ..... 
I. R. Dewey, overseer of poor 
George H. Colby, overseer of 
poor ..... 
C. G, B. Ryder, overseer of 
poor ..... 
Robert Hall, overseer of poor 
M. E. George, overseer of poor 
J. W. Dickey, overseer of poor 
William H. Maxwell, overseer 
of poor .... 
Charles W. Quimby, super- 
visor .... 
W. C. Hodgman, supervisor 
William D. Ladd, supervisor 
C. C. Colby, supervisor . 
Charles Chase, supervisor 
Freeman Higgins, supervisor 
S. S. Piper, supervisor . 
F. T, E. Richardson, supervisor 
Roland Rowell, supervisor 
John Hosley, supervisor 



10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 



25 00 

25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 

25 00 



4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


r 4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 



39' 



Paid George E. Morrill, supervisor 

D. H. Young, supervisor 
By balance to new account 



4 00 
4 00 

197 6Q 



$12,000 00 



FIREMEN'S PARADE. 



Paid Fletcher & Rojce, caterers 


1162 00 


First Regiment Band, music . 


50 00 


Batchelder & Stokes' drum 




corps .... 


10 00 


Tristram Berry, labor . 


2 50 


John B. Clarke, printing 


5 75 


William Shepherd, teams 


4 00 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., teams 


8 00 


Cavanaugh Bros., teams 


4 00 


J. A. Brown, teams 


2 00 


James Bros., teams 


4 00 


J. C. Nichols & Son, teams . 


8 00 


T. W. Lane .... 


1 75 







Or. 



$262 00 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 



To appropriation 



1200 00 



Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R. .S200 00 



Dr. 

1200 00 
Cr. 

1200 00 



398 

SCHOOL-HOUSES AND LOTS. 

Dr 

To appropriation .... $200 00 



1200 00 

Or. 
By reserved fund, am't transferred $200 00 

1200 00 



STARK-MONUMENT SQUARE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... 1200 00 



$200 00 

Or. 

By balance to new account . . $200 00 

$200 00 



LAND SOLD FROM CITY FARM. 

Dr. 

To J. R. Hanson .... $220 46 

$220 46 

Cr. 

By reserved fund, am't transferred $220 46 

$220 46 



WOMEN'S AID AND RELIEF HOSPITAL. 

Dr. 

To reserved fund, am't transferred $300 00 

1300 00 



399 



By balance to new account 



i300 00 



Cr. 



1300 00 



WATER-WORKS. 

To balance from old account . . 114,518 29 
C. K. Walker, water rent . 57,6^5 25 
J. L. Kelly, water used at High 
School 1 00 



By interest, am't transferred . 

labor of men and teams . 

Charles K. Walker, superintend- 
ent . . . . . 

Arthur E. Stearns, clerk . 

C. 0. Cole, superintendent at 
pumping-station . 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 
bolts, clamps, etc. 

Concord Railroad Corporation, 
freight . . . . . 

John B. Varick, hardware 

William C. Rogers, hardware . 

Daniels & Merrill, hardware 

J. M. Dupuy, blacksmithing 

Pike & Heald, plumbing . 

Hutchins, Riedell, & Co., print- 
ing 

Union Publishing Co., printing 



Dr. 



$72,174 54 
Cr. 



135,000 00 
5,549 17 

1,270 72 
1,000 00 

602 65 

338 61 



54 


23 


158 


85 


14 


25 


140 


84 


1 


80 


14 


23 


12 


50 


52 


00 



400 



By John B. Clarke, printing . 
W. E & E. B. Dunbar . 
Temple & Farrington, station 

ery .... 
E. R. Coburn, stationery . 
A. H. Lowell, service boxes, etc 
J. A. Brown, teams . 
T. A. Lane, plumbing 
Town of Auburn, land tax 
Hutchinson Brothers 
J). M. Goodwin, hardware 
Derry & Co., blacksmi thing 
J. Stickney, leather, etc. . 
J, S. Kidder & Co., cement 
Mowry & Phillips, lead and sol 

der .... 
A. B. Webster . 
W. W. Hawkes, bands and 

clamps .... 
Union Water-meter Co., water- 
meters, etc. . 
R. D. Wood & Co., pipes, valves 

etc 

A. M. Morton & Co., couplings 

nipples, etc. . 
Boston Lead Co , lead 
Jarechi, Hays & Co., curb-stops 
Waite, Williams & Co., oil 
Holder & Herrick. lead 
W. E. Desper & Co., couplings 

etc. .... 
Boston Machine Co., frost-jack 

ets . . • . 
Leonard & Ellis, oil . 



42 


75 


5 


48 


15 


00 


10 


08 


214 


66 


9 


00 


28 


01 


6 


76 


1 


05 


63 


28 


22 


72 


16 


76 


51 


20 


157 


87 


6 


82 


121 


53 


965 


00 


236 


34 


142 


28 


62 


86 


87 


07 


50 


50 


105 


94 



9 00 

15 00 
35 63 



401 



By Walworth Manufacturing Co., 

locks 
Morris, Tasker, & Co., nipples 

ells, etc. 
Thomas Cunningham & Son 

enamel .... 
Richard Pattee, hydrant 
George Woodman & Co., tarred 

pipe 
J. C. Woodman, repairing road 

at reservoir . 
M. V. B. Garland, wood 
Hillsborough county, heating 

commissioner's office 
D. F. Mahoney, lumber 

C. M. Brown, fruit-trees . 
Lewis Simons, lumber 
George C. Hoitt, books 
J. N. Baker, clock . 
N. P. Hunt, drawing deeds 
J. M. & D. A. Parker, lumber 
George Emerson, sawdust 
William Neal, land in Auburn 
Fire King Engine Co. 
J. Hodge, lumber 
J. B. Jones 
William Mills, land . 

D. P. Cressey . 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
S. W. Dunbar, wood 
J. E. Bennett, auditor 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
J. B. Sawyer, surveying 
Owen Sweeney 

26 



108 57 
11 81 

4 65 

105 00 

169 36 



96 


25 


2 


08 


6 


00 


45 


35 


12 


00 


3 


50 


7 


50 


23 


00 


4 


00 


28 


00 


2 


50 


400 


00 


10 


80 


6 


58 


1 


00 


300 


00 


",' 


12 


232 


29 


4 


00 


60 


00 


26 


08 


215 


12 


4 


06 



402 



By Barr & Clapp . 




3 


14 


Fletcher & Rojce, dinners 


8 


00 


Warren Harvey, team 


3 


00 


P. C. Cheney Co., paper . 


13 


85 


James Bros., teams . 


5 


00 


J. A. Brown, teams 




24 


00 


J. L. Kelly 




24 


00 


E. H. Hobbs . 




i) 


00 


William P. Newell 




30 


00 


A. C. Wallace . 




24 


00 


J. Q. A. Sargent 




3 


00 


E. T. James 




27 


00 


J. A. Weston . 




80 


00 


Alpheus Gay . 




36 


00 


balance to new account 


23,304 


00 

<f670 174 KA 








' tlP 1 ^i 5 X 1 t: OTt 



RESERVED FUND. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 




$13 00 


appropriation . 




10,000 00 


rent of tenements 




233 75 


show licenses . 




270 00 


south city scales 




220 00 


aqueduct water 




10 00 


rent of ward-room . 




12 00 


dog licenses 




503 58 


lighting streets, am't transferrec 


250 00 


District No. 4, am't transferrec 


50 00 


Granite bridge . 


20 00 


reservoirs . . . . 


50 00 


Fire Department 




500 00 



403 



To repairs of buildings . 
fuel .... 
furniture and supplies 
books and stationery- 
printing and advertising 
teachers' salaries 
evening schools 
school-houses and lots 
care of rooms . 
land sold from city farm 
incidental repairs 
interest on taxes 
balance to new account 



50 00 

124 00 

677 00 

150 00 

25 00 

1,700 00 
750 00 
200 00 
150 00 
220 46 
300 00 
978 31 

$444 35 



By Valley Cemetery 


$1,500 00 


Pine Grove Cemetery 


500 00 


District No. 7 


400 00 


" No. 8 . . 


150 00 


No. 10 


950 00 


No. 11 


$2,000 00 


paving .... 


8,000 00 


printing and stationery 


500 00 


City Library . 


100 00 


county tax 


154 20 


city officers' salaries 


2,000 00 


macadamizing . . . 


1,250 00 


land damage . 


97 25 


Women's Aid and Relief hospita 


I 300 00 



$17,901 45 



Cr. 



$17,901 45 



404 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
balance overdrawn . 



Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
W. W. Hubbard, lumber 

A. J. Sawyer 
George Holbrook . 
George H. Dudley, lumber and 

labor 
J, C. Young, repairing roofs 
William H. Vickery, repairing 

locks, etc. 
Thorp & Marshall, stove-pipe 

etc. .... 
W. P. Stratton & Son . 
T. A. Lane, plumbing . 

B. W. Robinson, mason work 
Pike & Heald, furnace, plumb 

ing, etc. 

C. H. Robie, concreting 
J.J. Abbott, painting . 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Henry Thomas, stone-work 
J. H. White & Co., labor on 

furnaces 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., lumber 
A. H. Lowell, iron castings 



-1596 


58 


4,000 


00 


419 


99 


1514 


81 


2:^ 


02 


S^ 


(34 


27 


52 




75 


982 


93 


7 


35 



11 82 



7 


85 


72 


10 


473 


05 


888 


61 


100 


35 


402 


03 


14 


80 


59 


85 


145 


50 


6 


50 


77 


04 


7 


49 



$5,016 57 
Cr. 



31 


05 


65 


00 


83 


20 


5 


41 



405 



Paid P. W. Follansbee, moving 

buildings . . . 55 00 

Fairhaven M. & M. Slate Co., 

blacicboai-ds ... 61 82 

N. E. School Furnishing Co.. 

erasers, etc. . . . 16 00 

E. G. Haynes. sewer-pipe and 
labor .... 

Sloan & Sullivan, painting 

Robinson <fe Carpenter, laying 
cement in cellar at Training 
School .... 

Joel Daniels, painting . 

Warren Harvey, labor and 

teams .... 21 75 

J. H. Maynard, lumber and la- 
bor 16 58 

James Bros., teams . . 2 00 

C. H. Hodgman, teaming . 12 10 

D. M. Goodwin, repairing 
stove-pipe, etc. ... 13 74 

George W. Stevens, engineer- 

i'lg 

James Cheney, labor and team 

Ransom Flanders, labor 

Bennett & Lord, mason work 

J, J. Bennett, mason work 

J. G. Young, slating 

J. S. Bachelor, labor 

W. F, Folsora, repairing stoves, 

etc. ..... 

W. Ireland, carpenter work . 
L. N. Westover, carpenter 

work .... 



30 


00 


31 


50 


22 


75 


2 


25 


1 


87 


80 


40 




75 


14 


91 


9 


00 


25 


78 



5,016 57 



406 
FUEL. 

To appropriation .... |3,000 00 
J. A. Carr. screenings sold . 4 54 

balance overdrawn . . . 19 21 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 

Rowell & Burns, wood . 

Warren Harvey, putting in 
coal ..... 

D. H. Morgan, putting in coal 

S. A. Dunbar, sawing wood . 

V. W. Currier, sawing wood . 

S. D. Glidden. sawing wood . 

W. H. Annan, taking weight 

of coal .... 

By reserved fund, am't transferred 



$2,150 


43 


650 


07 


19 


75 


2 


00 


4 


50 


3 


30 


62 


20 


7 


50 


124 


00 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 

To balance from old account . . $77 25 
appropriation .... 1,000 00 



Paid Pike & Heald, brushes, brooms, 

etc $68 01 

C. P. Trickey, crayons . . 10 00 

J. B. Yarick, hardware . . 7 65 

Daniels & Merrill, hardware . 34 48 



Dr. 

,023 75 
Or. 



1,023 75 



Dr. 

11,077 25 
Or. 



407 



Paid N. E. School Furniture Co. 
desks, erasers, etc. 
W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 
P. 0. Clieney Co. . 

D. J. Warren, teaming . 
L. A. Ward, teaming 
G. B. Fogg . 
W. E. Buck, freight 
Ginn & Heath, music charts 
J. L. Hammett 

E. R. Coburn 
Thomas W. Lane . 
Charles A. Smith . 
W. B. Morgan 
Gordon & Tobey . 

By reserved fund, amount trans 
ferred 
balance to new account 



148 


30 


2 


70 


8 


00 


1 


50 




50 




75 


3 


70 


14 


70 


35 


25 


13 


20 


19 


03 


3 


27 


3 


00 


14 


04 


677 


00 


17 


17 




11,077 25 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To appropriation 



Paid E. R. Coburn 

Temple & Farrington 

N. E. School Furniture Co. 

Thomas W. Lane . 

By reserved fund . 

balance to new account 



$600 00 



$89 


70 


125 


23 


3 


60 


221 


56 


150 


00 


9 


91 



Dr. 



$600 00 



Cr. 



$600 00 



408 
PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 

To appropriation .... $460 00 



Paid John B. Clarke . 

Hutchins, Riedell,<fe Co. 
Livingston & Kimball 

By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . . 
balance to new account 



$298 


13 


57 


25 


45 


00 


25 


00 


24 


62 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

To appropriation .... $900 00 
evening schools, amount trans- 
ferred .... 175 00 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas . $66 60 

Manchester Water-works, water 352 80 
N. T. Cottelle, repairing pianos, 

tuning, etc 32 50 

William E. Buck, use of horse 

and carriage ... 59 00 

J. T. Robinson, preserving birds 8 36 

T. A. Lane, wrenches . . 30 

D. H. Dickey, cleaning vaults . 50 00 
T. W. Lane, drawing pencils, 

ink, etc 167 17 



Dr. 

$450 00 
Cr. 



$450 00 

Dr. 

1,075 00 
Cr. 



409 



Paid A. A. Hazelton, cleaning vault 


3 00 


Pike & Heald, door-mats 


8 25 


Charles F. Sprague, ribbon 


7 16 


D. H. Morgan, putting in coal . 


75 


C. H. Wilkins, lettering diplomas 


19 75 


Charles P. Ordway, cleaning 




water-closet 


1 50 


Thorp & Marshall . 


6 54 


Sumner Fifield, Japanese sweep- 




ers ..... 


3 75 


Everett Bros 


2 00 


William D. Moody, . 


1 25 


J. M. Crawford, clerical work 




for superintendent 


20 00 


Straw and Lovejoy, repairing 




clock 


1 50 


D. M. Goodwin, repairing stove- 




pipe 


16 00 


J. N. Baker, repairing clock . 


1 25 


S. G. Woodman 


1 50 


Daniels & Merrill, call-bells. 




etc 


2 94 


D. A. Simons .... 


13 50 


F. W. Dearborn, tuning pianos 


3 00 


J. M. Sanborn, tuning pianos . 


5 25 


Hartford Ins. Co., insurance on 




boilers .... 


100 00 


W. 0. Folsom .... 


4 00 


Weeks & Currier, chemicals . 


10 06 


M. P. Hall, stamps, postal cards. 




etc 


2 12 


I. S. Whitney, tuning pipes 


1 00 


J. B. Varick, hardware . 


3 86 



410 



Paid George C. Hoitt, binding books 3 20 

By balance to new account . . 100 11 



.,075 00 



CARE OF ROOMS. 









Dr. 


To appropriation 


. 12,600 


00 


12,500 00 
Cr. 








Paid J. A. Carr 


. i581 


00 




J. S. Avery . . . . 


582 


67 




D. H. Morgan . 


356 


08 




George W. Varnum 


350 


04 




Rufus Lamb . 


209 


16 




Charles P. Ordway . 


30 


00 




Willie McGuinness . 


16 


00 




Susie Crosby . 


9 


84 




Edward McColley . 


10 


47 




0. J. Randall . 


16 


11 




S. G. Woodman 


10 


00 




Alice Wooderson 


41 


25 




E. G. Wells . 


6 


00 




Mabel B. Emery 


3 


96 




M. B. Flanders 


6 


00 




Foster H. Nutt 


4 


51 




Lester C. Paige 


6 


64 




By reserved fund, amouiit trans 








ferred .... 


. 150 


00 




balance to new account 


. 110 


27 


.«ffi9 Ron on 



411 
INCIDENTAL REPAIRS. 



To appropriation 



. 1600 00 



Paid A. H. Lowell, grate, etc. . 

Bennett & Lord, mason work . 
B. W. Robinson, mason work . 
Fairbanks and Folsom, labor on 
stoves ..... 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred ..... 
balance to new account 



$3 58 

10 65 

4 00 

3 40 

300 00 
278 47 



Dr. 

$600 00 
Cr. 



$600 00 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 



Paid Charles E. Cochran 
F. C. Livingston 
J. B. Mills . 
Minnie Campbell . 
Minnie Abbott 
Hattie E. Emerson 
Emma A. Sanborn 
M. E. Lord . 
J. E. Richardson . 
Lizzie A. Burns 



. 


. $787 77 


. 1,200 00 


. $128 60 




106 75 




135 80 




87 30 




28 80 




98 00 




24 30 




87 00 




61 20 




90 



Dr. 



$1,987 77 
Cr. 



412 



Paid Phebe C. McGuire 


50 40 


Lenora C. Gilford 


46 80 


Nellie M. James . 


49 50 


Gertrude H. Brooks 


49 50 


D. H. Morgan, janitor . 


21 00 


George W. Yarnum, janitor 


31 15 


George E, Mores, janitor 


6 00 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


21 20 


John B. Clarke, printing 


8 43 


Everett Brothers, printing 


3 50 


Thomas W. Lane . 


42 


Chas. A. Smith, lamps . 


11 55 


By reserved fund, am't transferrec 


750 00 


contingent expenses, amount 




transferred . 


175 00 


balance to new account 


i 7^ 







.,987 77 



TEACHERS' SALARIES 
To appropriation . 



Paid A. W. Bacheler 
H. W. Lull . 
G. I. Hopkins 
L. E. Manahan 
E. J. Ela 
M. A. Buzzell 
Nancy S. Bunton 
Mintie C. Edgerly 
M. N. Mason 







Dr. 


$38,500 00 

4 


^38,500 00 




s 






Cr. 


$1,800 00 
720 00 




400 


00 




750 


00 




475 


00 




475 


00 




453 


75 




425 


00 




285 


00 





413 



Paid E. S. Prior . 






425 00 


E. P. Sherburne 






1,800 00 


Clara G. Fogg 






475 00 


Lottie R. Adams 






440 00 


Carrie E. Reid 






440 00 


B. F. Dame . 






1,300 00 


Julia A. Baker 






475 00 


M. J. Fife . 






440 00 


Belle R. Daniels 






440 00 


Mary F. Barnes 






428 00 


D. A. Clifford 






1,300 00 


A. G. Flanders 






475 00 


R. M. Tuson 






440 00 


S. J. Green . 






440 00 


Mary L. Sleeper . 






440 00 


Anna 0. Heath 






440 00 


W. M. Stevens 






600 00 


F. S. Sutcliffe, 






320 00 


Mary A. Lear 






424 00 


Etta J. Carley 






374 00 


N. I. Sanderson 






425 00 


M. A. Smith . 






425 00 


H. S. Tozer . 






233 75 


A. J. Downs . 






127 50 


CM. Gilmore 






375 00 


F. McEvoy . 






425 00 


H. G. Flai^ders 






382 50 


C. A. Abbott . 






425 00 


F. D. Moulton 






415 00 


L. P. Gove . 






297 50 


F. S. Mitchell 






340 00 


E. F. Salisbury 






425 00 


C. N. Brown . 






297 50 


G. Dow 






425 00 



414 



id H. M. Morrill 






425 00 


F. L. Stone . 






375 00 


A. E. Abbott . 






425 00 


E. F. Beane . 






425 00 


N. B. Putnam 






325 00 


S. J. Bartlett 






307 50 


N, Pearson . 






425 00 


E. J. Campbell 






425 00 


M. W. Hubbard 






412 25 


L. E. Esty . 






317 50 


E. L. Stokes . 






337 50 


J. F. Bailey . 






425 00 


A. L. Downs . 






85 00 


A. S. Downs . 






255 00 


M. N. Bower . 






425 00 


J. G. Stebbins 






425 00 


A. G. Lord . 






425 00 


E. E. McKean 






343 88 


Louisa R. Quint 






228 25 


F. Nichols . 






325 00 


F. M. Senter . 






315 00 


Ella F. Sanborn 






385 00 


C. E. Woods . 






425 00 


M. R. Fuller . 






236 25 


C. M. Dearborn 






240 75 


Susie A. Crosby 






310 00 


A. M. Chase . 






475 00 


Lizzie A. Burns 






190 00 


G. A. Nute . 






425 00 


0. J. Randall 






425 00 


M. E. Sylvester 






845 00 


S. G. Woodman . 






360 00 


0. A. Rowe . 






300 00 


A. J. Dana . 






382 00 



415 



Paid M. W. Mitchell . 


. 


360 


00 




B. L. Dean . 




220 


50 




Izetta S. Locke 




297 50 




Mary K. Webster 




414 


99 




J. J. Kimball 




720 


00 




Emma L. Sanborn 




60 


00 




L. J. West . 




147 


00 




B. M. Kelley 




210 


00 




Emma S. Sanborn . 




1 


50 




Nellie M, James . 




39 


75 




C. I. Stevens 




100 


50 




A. W. Patten 




42 


00 




H. G. Flanders 




42 


50 




L. C. Gilford 




11 


88 




By reserved fund, amount trans- 








ferred 


1,700 


00 




balance to new account 


171 


40 








,f RS i^nf\ nn 






<jr 


JZJK-iyj\J\J \J\J 


TUITION. 






Dr. 


To balance from old account . 


$338 


70 




William E. Buck, tuition . 


. 259 


38 


S598 08 
Cr. 








Paid E. R. Coburn, charts 


1130 00 




E. S. Ritchie & Sons, gyro 








scope 


14 


35 




By balance to new accoi 


mt 


453 


73 


.«AQ8 n« 



416 
NEW SCHOOL-HOUSE. 









Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


16,000 


00 


16,000 00 














Or, 


Paid W. Ireland, contractor . 


84,868 


87 




George H. Dudley, putting in 








furniture .... 


36 


25 




Warren Harvey, grading 


71 


25 




Concord R. R. Corp., freight . 


55 


01 




Pike & Heald, stoves, pipe, etc. 


202 


41 




C. H. Robie, concreting 


38 


43 




D. H. Young, laying sewer- 








pipe . . . . 


16 


50 




D. H. Yarnum 


22 


00 




C. H. Hodgman, trucking 


o 


00 




N. E. School-Furnishing Co., 








desks, tables, and chairs 


' 438 


39 




Fairhaven Marble and Slate 








Co., blackboards 


141 


14 




John B. Clarke.; adv. proposals 


6 


75 




George W. Weeks, expenses 








as special committee . 


60 


00 




E. W. Brigham, expenses as 








special committee 


20 


00 




M. P. Hall, expenses as special 








committee .... 


20 


00 


iffifi non n(\ 



417 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll-Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1838 . . 


8555,270 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


$300 


1839 . . 


604,963 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


300 


1840 . . 


946,200 


3,986 56 


772 


2 20 


300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500.049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


800 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,8u4 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891.250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10.205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365.162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,9> 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1880 . . 


17.735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 



27 



418 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


Aug. 1, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


1881 


10,000 GO 


July 1, 1876 


Sewer bonds. 


July 1 


, 1881 


8,000 00 


July 1,1862 


City Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1882 


22,500 00 


Aug. 1. 1869 


li. u 


Aug. 1 


1882 


1,600 00 


July 1,1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1883 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1. 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


1883 


5,00U 00 


Aus. 1, 1869 


a li 


Aug. 1 


1884 


1,500 00 


April 1, 1864 


U li 


April 1 


, 1884 


70,000 00 


April ], 1865 


u a 


April 1 


1885 


10,000 00 


July 1, 1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1 


1885 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


1885 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


u u 


Aug. 1 


1886 


5,000 00 


Aus:. 1. 1869 


u u 


Aug. 1 


1887 


3,500 00 


JarT. 1, 1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1863 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


1888 


35,000 00 


July 1, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


1890 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


u u 


Jan. 1 


1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31,1863 


City Bonds, 


Nov. 1 


1893 


70,000 00 


July 1, 1864 


u u 


July 1 


1894 


60,000 00 


July 1,1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


1895 


100.000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


u 


Jan. 1 


1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


u 


Jan. 1 


1902 


100,000 00 



419 






FUNDED DEBT. 




Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 
1880 

Paid daring the year . 

Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 
1881 

Amount of temporary loan, Jan. 
1,1881 .... 
Interest due, estimated 
Bills outstanding- 


1929,100 
• 19,600 


00 

00 

.«ionQ r;nn nn 


145,000 00 
20,000 00 
35,593 73 




#26,552 
463 
305 


^a. v/ v^tyi-'t^ It-/ 


Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1881 . 
Cash in treasury, Jan. 1, 1881 . 
Notes due the city 
Interest on same 


il,010,093 73 

33 

44 

00 

iffi27 3'>0 77 






^^ 1 ^0^\J 1 1 


Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1881 . 
Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1880 . 


1982,772 96 
935,659 46 


Increase of net indebtedness dur- 
ing the year 


147,113 5(> 



Attest: NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

Cit^ Auditor. 



420 



CITY PROPERTY. 

City-Library building .... 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
City Hall and lot .... 
City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, and provisions at City 

Farm ...... 

Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Engine-house, stable, and land, Vine street 
Hose-house and lot, Maple street 
Hose-house and lot, Nashua street 
Reservoirs ...... 

Houses, tombs, and new cemetery 

Court-house and lot . 

Common sewers ..... 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall 
Street lanterns, posts and pipes . 
Water-works .... 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets 
Ward-room and lot, Manchester street . 
Ward-room and lot, Park street . 
Engine-house and lot, Ward Eight 
Water-pipe, wagons, and apparatus for water 

ing streets ..... 
Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad 
Lot, Lowell street .... 
Gravel lot, Belmont street . 
Gravel lot. Ward Eight (one-half acre) 
Gravel lot, Bakersville (one acre) 
Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Valley Cemetery «... 



$30,000 00 
19,200 00 
60,000 00 
26,000 00 

6,631 00 

52,739 00 

41,000 00 

2,500 00 

500 00 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 

51,000 00 

160,000 00 

3,000 00 

4,800 00 

742,128 50 

5,000 00 

3,000 00 

600 00 

2,300 00 

2,500 00 

50,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,200 00 

50 00 

100 00 

20,000 00 

6,000 00 



.,306,748 50 



421 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



Blodiret-street school-house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
etc. .... 

Bridge-street house and lot 
Old High school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
New High school-house . 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
books, and apparatus 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Movable furniture, maos, etc. 
Merri mack-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mancliester-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Franklin-street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Stark house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Goffe's-Palls house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Harvey's . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Clough's mill 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

House and lot corner Beech and 

Spruce streets .... 



13,000 00 

160 00 

6.500 00 

200 00 

45,000 00 

2,000 00 

3,800 00 

125 00 

15,000 00 

350 00 

8,000 00 

300 00 

8,000 00 

400 00 

18,000 00 

400 00 

14,000 00 

400 00 

3,000 00 

200 00 

3,500 00 

75 00 

3,600 00 

100 00 

2,500 00 

50 00 

600 00 

50 00 

6,000 00 



^3,150 00 
500 00 

6,700 00 



47,000 00 
3,425 00 

15,350 00 
8,300 00 
8,400 00 

18,400 00 

14,400 00 
3,200 00 
3,575 00 
3,700 00 
2,550 00 
650 00 



422 



Hallsville house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Massabesic house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito-Pond house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Center-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
South house and lot, 'Squog . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Main-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Amount of school property 
Amoujit of city property 



3,500 00 

75 00 3,575 00 
1,400 00 

40 00 1,440 00 
1,000 00 

50 00 1,050 00 
5,000 00 
125 00 5,125 00 
58,000 00 

400 00 58,400 00 
50,000 00 

400 00 50,400 00 
2,800 00 

60 00 2,860 00 
3,700 00 

125 00 3,825 00 
12,000 00 
. 100 00 12,100 00 



■$284,075 00 
1,306,748 50 



Total property 



$1,590,823 50 



INDEX. 



INDEX. 



Abatemeut of Taxes 344 

Account of City Treasurer 276 

Alarm-Boxes and Keys ^^^ 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge ^^^ 

Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. No. 1 142,325 

Apparatus, Fire ^^^ 

Attendance at School • 208 

Awards for Land taken for Highways 307 

Address, Inaugural, of Mayor Putnam 31 

Books and Stationery ^^' 

Bridge, Amoskeag '^^^ 

Bridge, Granite 314 

Buildings, Repairs of 341 

Care of Rooms ^^^ 

Cemeteries, Report of Committee on ^'^ 

City Government, 1880 3 

Library '-* 

Hall and Offices • • • • 338 

Farm 292 

Solicitor, Report of ^'■ 



Teams . 



295 



Treasurer's Accounts 276 

Property ^20 

Debt..:. 418 

Payment of 344 

Commons ^ 

County Tax • 391 

Contingent Expenses ^^^^ 



426 

Discount on Taxes 390 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 397 

Debt, Funded 419 

Donations to City Library 113 

E. W. Harrington Hose Co. No. 3 142, 329 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 144, 329 

Engineers' Deijartmeut 330 

Engineer's Report 123 

Evening Schools 411 

Farm, City 292 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 144, 332 

Fire Apparatus 124 

Fire Department 325 

Fire-Alarm Boxes and Ke5fs, Location of. 135 

Fires, 1880 131 

Furniture and Supplies 406 

Fuel ; 406 

Government, Cit}^, 1880 3 

Granite Bridge 314 

Grading for Concrete .... 310 

Highway District No. 1 298 

2 299 

3 300 

4 301 

5 301 

6 302 

7 302 

8 303 

9 303 

10 304 

11 305 

12 305 

13 306 

Highways, new 306 

Awards for Lauds taken for 307 

Hydrants 150 

Hydrant Service 334 



427 

lucidental Expenses 315 

Incidental Repairs (Schools) -ill 

Interest 284 

Instructions to Key-Holders 138 

Interest on Taxes 284 

Laud Damage, Awards 307 

Lighting Streets 308 

Library, City 342 

Donations to 113 

Trustees' Report. 99 

Librarian's Report 109 

Treasurer's Report 105 

Loan, Temporary 283 

Location of Alarm-Boxes 135 

Location .of Hydrants 150 

Militia 343 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department 330 

Macadamizing Streets 309 

Massabesic Hose Company 'No. 2 143, 328 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Company No. 4 143, 326 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department 146 

New School-house 416 

Officers, City 3 

Outstanding Taxes 391 

Overseers of Poor, Report of. 245 

Paving Streets 308 

Paupers off the Farm 285 

Penuacook Hose Company No. 1 143, 327 

Payment of Funded Debt 344 

Pine Grove Cemetery 323 

Police Department 334 

Printing and Advertising 408 

Stationery 340 

Property, City 420 

School 421 

Repairs of School-houses 404 

Buildings 341 



428 

R« served Fund 402 

Reservoirs 334 

Report of City Solicitor 91 

Finance Committee 280 

Committee on City Farm 243 

Chief Engineer 123 

Public Schools for 1880 163 

Trustees of City Library 99 

Librarian ©f City Library 109 

Committee on Cemeteries 8i 

Overseers of the Poor 245 

School Committee ] 62 

Treasurer of City Library 105 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 189 

Water Commissioners 51 

Superintendent of Water- Works 53 

City Engineer 247 

Board of Health 45 

Trustees of Cemetery Funds 89 

Salaries of Teachers 412 

Officers 392 

School-houses and Lots 398 

School Property 421 

Schools, Evening 411 

Sewers and Drains 311 

Streets, Lighting 308 

Macadamizing 308 

Watering 307 

Paving 308 

State Tax 391 

Tax, County 391 

State 391 

Taxes, Abatement of. 344 

Discount on 390 

Outstanding 391 

Temporary Loan 283 

Telegraph, Fire-Alarm 144, 332 

Teams, City 295 

Teachers, Salaries of 412 

Tuition 415 



429 

Valedictory of Mayor Kelly 13 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 417 

Valley Cemetery 324 

Water-Works 51, 399 

Watering Streets 307 

Water Commissioners' Keport 51 

Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospital 398 



f