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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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PUBLIC DOCUMENT. 



CITY3LMANCHESTER 




ANNUAL REPORTS 



-FOR- 



THE YEAR 1881 



MWITOFSTM? 
STATE LIBRARY 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City of Manchester 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 1881, 



TOGETHER WITH 



Other Annual Reports and Papers Relating to the 
Affairs of the City. 




MANCHESTER, K. H.: 

JOHN B. CLARKE, PRINTER 

1882. 



N 

•^52-07 

f6A 



CITY OF MANCHESTEH. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to priut the Thirty-Sixth Annual Report of the* 
Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are, 
authorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of the Thirty-Sixth Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, the School Board and 
Superintendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water-Works, 
Water Commissioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Mar- 
shal, Overseers of the Poor, Trustees, LiHjrarian, and Treasurer ot' 
City Library, Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on City Farm, City Physician, City Solicitor, and City Engi- 
neer, the expense thereof to be charged to the Appropriation for 
Printing and Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. January 3, 1882. 

Passed. 

WM. J. HOYT, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. January 3, 1882. 

Passed in concurrence. 

II. B. PUTNAM, Mayor. 



MANCHESTEK 

CITY GOVERNMENT, 

1881. 



MAYOR. 

Hon. HORACE B. PUTNAM. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

WILLIAM J. HOYT. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JAMES A. FRACKER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLYANUS B. PUTNAM. 



• 4 . 

COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

WILLIAM R. PATTEN. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

JAMES M. COLLITY. 



ALDERMEN, 



Ward 1, — Elijah Chandler. 

Ward 2. — George H. Stearns. 
Ward 3. — Aretas Blood. 

Ward 4. — John H. Maynard. 
Ward 5. — Thomas F. Glancy. 
Ward 6. —John Hosley. 

Ward 7. — Timothy W. Challis. 

Ward 8. — Andrew C. Wallace. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

Perkins C. Lane. 
William A. Perry. 
Charles F. Morrill. 

Ward 3. 

James SutclifFe. 
Samuel Thompson. 
George Whitford. 

Ward 5. 

John F. Conway. 
Martin J. Foley. 
Michael McDonoiigh. 

Ward 7. 

Samuel Lunt. 
George B. Smith. 
David Farmer. 



Ward 2. 

Darwin M. Poore. 
John F. Clough. 
William J. Hoyt. 

Ward 4. 

Samuel F. Curtis. 
Robert Heath. 
Orrin D. Carpenter. 

Ward 6. 

Thomas Johnson. 
George H. Dudley. 
James S. Bachelor. 

Ward 8. 

James F. Baldwin. 
Frank Schnauder. 
Henry C. Ranno. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor, and Alderman Blood ; 
Messrs. Morrill, Curtis, and Johnson. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Hosley and Challis ; Messrs. 
Smith, Poore, and Morrill. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Challis and May- 
nard ; Messrs. Heath, Carpenter, and Dudley. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Blood and Chandler ; 
Messrs. Curtis, Baldwin, and Sutcliffe. 



6 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Maynard and Hosley ; 
Messrs. Perry, Lunt, and Bacheler. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Wallace and 
Stearns ; Messrs. Carpenter, Clough, and Perry. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Stearns and Wallace ; Messrs. 
Perry, Clough, and Carpenter. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Challis and Maynard; Messrs. 
Sutcliffe, Johnson, and Poore. 

On Commons and Cemet ries. — Aldermen Challis and 
Hosley ; Messrs. Thompson, Smith, and Ranno. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Wallace and Chan- 
dler ; Messrs. Bacheler, Lane, and Heath. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Glancy and 
Stearns; Messrs. Lunt, Foley, and Thompson. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldonnon Stearns and Glancy ; 
Messrs. Whitford, Farmer, and Schnauder. 

On Water- W^rks. — Aldermen Blood and Maynard ; 
Messrs. Whitford, Baldwin, and Conway. 

On Military Affairs. — Al^QvmQw Challis and Chandler ; 
Messrs. Lane, Dudley, and McDonough. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Blood and Stearns. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Hosley and 
Chandler. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Challis and Maynard. 

On MarsliaVs Accounts. — Aldermen Wallace and Chan- 
dler. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Stearns and Challis. 

On Market. — Aldermen Glancy and Wallace. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Challis, Hosley, and 
Stearns. 



i 

STANDING COMMITTKKS IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Messrs. Thompson, Whitford, 
and Lunt. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Clough, Bald- 
win, and Lane. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Smith, Ranno, and Morrill. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Associate Justice of Police Court. 
Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 
Alfred D. Stark. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Horatio W. Longa. 

Captain of the Night Watch. 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 

Day Police. 

John C. Colburn. 
Randall W. Bean. 



Night Watchmen. 



John F. Cassidj. 
James Buckliii. 
Thomas Frain. 
William H. B. Newhall. 
Michael Marr. 
Hiram Stearns. 
Zadoc B. Wright. 
Edgar Farrar. 



James F. Dunn. 
Ira P. Fellows. 
Philip Reischer. 
Francis Bourrassau. 
Gideon Pochette. 
Charles H. Reed. 
Lafayette Tebbetts. 
Eben Carr. 



Consiahles. 

William A. Carpenter. Joseph B. Maynard. 

George W. Hamlin. Isaac F. Sawyer. 

Charles R. Noyes. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



I-'on. Horace B. Putnam, ex-officio Chairman. 
Marshall P. Hall, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Charles F. Everett. 
Frank T. E. Richardson. 

Ward o. 

Daniel Clark. 
William A. Webster. 

Ward 5. 

Denis F. O'Connor. 
Charles A. O'Connor. 



Ward 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
Gerherdus L. Demarest. 

Ward 4. 

Walter M. Parker. 
John T. Fanning. 

Ward 6. 

Abial C. Flanders. 
Brackett B. Weeks. 



Ward 7. Ward 8. 

Marshall P. Hall. Louis E. Phelps. 

Ezra Huntington. Douglas Mitchell. 

William J. Hoyt, ex officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Hon. H. B. Putnam, ex-offieio Chairman. 
* Moses E. George, Clerk. 
t William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 

William H. Maxwell. George F. Sheehan. 

George H. Colby. Robert Hall. 

C. G. B. Ryder. Elbridge G. Woodman. 

* Moses E. George. Israel B. Farnum. 

t Horace Gordon. 

* Died. t Elected to fill vacancy. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex officio. 
James A. Weston, Clerk. 

Alpheus Gay. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

Ebcn T. James. Andrew C. Wallace. 

James A. Weston. William P. Newell. 



10 



ASSESSORS. 



Charles S. Fisher, Chairman. 

David 0. Furnald, Clerk. 
Charles H. Brown. John Ryan. 

Joseph H. Haynes. Ira W. Moore. 

David 0. Furnald. Henry W. Powell. 

George W. Weeks. Charles S. Fisher. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Jpseph H. Haynes. Chairman. 

Harrison D. Lord, Clerk. 
Hiram Forsaith. John J. Flynn. 

Joseph H. Haynes. Isaac Whittemore. 

David 0. Furnald. David Farmer. 

Harrison D. Lord. Charles S. Fisher. 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Isaac W. Smith. 

William P. Newell. Moody Currier. 

Daniel Clark. Lucien B. Clough. 

Ezekiel A. Straw. 

Horace B. Putnam, ex officio. 

William J. Hoyt, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Alfred D. Stark. Lyman H. Lamprey. 

Patrick A. Devine. 



11 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 
Sam C. Lowell, Clerk. 

Assistant Engineers. 

Andrew C. Wallace. Sam C. Lowell. 

Benjamin C. Kendall. Orin E. Kimball. 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

Nathan P. Kidder. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER- WORKS. 

Charles K. Walker. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators, 



Ward 1.— Daniel H. Maxfield. 
Ward 2. — George M. True. 
Ward 3. — James B. Straw. 

Ward 4. — John M. Crawford. 
Ward 5. — James Dolan, Jr. 
Ward 6. — George Holbrook. 

Ward 7. — Timothy W. Challis. 
Ward 8. — Charles K. Walker. 



12 



Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Charles H. Butman. 
Ward 2. — Louis C. Merrill. 

Ward 3. — Alexander H. Olzendam. 
Ward 4.— Waldo E. Gilmore. 
Ward 5. — Nicholas J. Whalen. 
Ward 6. — George E. Glines. 

Ward 7. — Frank H. Redfield. 
Ward 8. — William McElroy. 



Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 

Jonathan T. Underhill. 
Charles E. Ham. 
Charles D. Wheeler. 

Ward 3. 

David Thayer. 
Simeon R. Stearns. 
George H. Kuowlton. 

Ward 5. 

John B. McTiernan. 
James McLaughlin. 
John Bryson. 

Ward 7. 

Elbridge G. Woodman. 
Samuel Clark. 
James Lightbody. 



Ward 2. 



Horace C. Paige. 
John Frince. 
George W. Yarnum. 

Ward 4. 

Ralph Pearson. 
Sylvanus B. Putnam. 
Charles H. Uhlig. 

Ward 6. 

Edwin N. Baker. 
Richard E. Davis. 
Clarence M. Edgerly. 

Ward 8. 

Herman Rittner. 
Charles C. Tinkham. 
Hervey Stratton. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM, 



REPOET 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To the City Councils of the City of Maricheste?- : — 

The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on the City 
Farm hereby submit the annual report for the year ending 
Dec. 31,1881: — 
Live stock .... 
Hay, grain, and produce 
Furniture, farming implements, and othei 
Bedding and wearing apparel 
Provisions and fuel 
Household furniture 
Other articles 



Amount of stock, 1880 
Amount of stock, 1881 



Cash paid out 
Interest on farm 



. 


11,029 00 


. . 


2,156 91 


[ other tools 


1,712 10 


. 


533 40 


. • . 


276 35 


• . . 


486 00 


. 


423 43 




$6,617 19 


i7,848 35 




6,617 19 




$1,-231 16 




4,745 69 




1,000 00 


<k(\ Q7fi «.^ 



16 

Cash paid in .... f2,484 45 

Bills receivable .... 499 85 

By labor 498 88 

Number days' board prisoners and 

paupers, 8,576 .... 3,493 67 



;,976 85 



Average cost of board per day, 40 3-5 cents. 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor. 
J. H. MAYNARD, 
JOHN HOSLEY, 
SAMUEL LUNT, 
J. S. BACHELER, 

Joint Standing Committee on City Farm, 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT 



CITY SOLICTTOR 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester^ — 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to transmit herewith the 
annual report of the Law Department of the city govern- 
ment. 

The following actions are now pending in the supreme 
court of Hillsborough county : — 

1. — Catharine Cunningham vs. the City. 

This action is brought to recover damages for injuries 
which the plaintiff claims to have received by falling on 
the sidewalk in front of No. 91 Central street. Damages 
claimed, $1,000. 

2. — Simon Clark, Admr. of Wm. Clark, t^s. the City. 

This action is brought to recover damages for the death 
of William Clark, a lad three or four years of age, who fell 
into an unused reservoir of the city, situate at the corner of 
West and Douglas streets. 

The question as to the liability of the city is now pend- 
ing in the law term of the supreme court, and will be de- 
termined in March. Damages claimed, 110,000. 



20 

3. — Hans J. Rosenberg vs. the City. 

The plaintiff alleges that he fell into an unused well in 
the sidewalk on Lowell street, in front of the residence of 
Fannie E. A. Riddle. Damages claimed, M,000. 

■i. —Daniel Farmer vs. the City. 

This action was brought to recover damages to the plain- 
tiff's land, caused l)y flowage of water from the street. 

5. — Edward G. Sanborn, Admr of Mary J. Anderson, 
vs. THE City. 

The plaintiff alleges that Mary J. Anderson, on or about 
the :^6th day of January, 1881, slipped and fell, and received 
such severe injuries that from the effects thereof she died. 
Damages claimed, ^$5,000. 

6. — Sarah A. Davis vs. the City. 

The plaintiff claims that on or about the 10th day of 
February, 1881. she fell on the sidewalk and received severe 
injuries. Damages claime'l. to, 000. 

7. — Thb City vs. County of Hillsborough. 

This action is still pending in the law term, and will 
probably be determined in March. 

8. — S. N. Bell vs. the City. 

This is a petition for the assessment of damages to land 
caused by laying out a highway. 

There were pending, at the date of my last report, fifteen 
actions in which the city was a party. Of these, eleven 
have been disposed of as follows : — 

David S. MjcKay vs. the City, and George A. Crosby vs. 
the City, were tried by tiie jury at the January term, 1881, 



21 

and a verdict for the city obtained in each suit. James 
Connelly vs. the City, and Ann Sliehan vs. the City, were 
dismissed. Franklin-street Society vs. the City, and Man- 
chester Mills vs. the City, and George G. Griffin vs. the 
City, were entered " neither party," by agreement of coun- 
sel. In the action of Daniel K. Mack vs. the City, the 
county commissioners awarded the plaintiff iloO. The 
actions of Frank Clement and John Conway were compro- 
mised by the payment of a less sum than it would cost to 
try them. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM R. PATTEN, 

Citi/ Solicitor. 
Manchester, N^. H., January 1, 1882. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY PHYSKJIAN 



REPORT 



CTTT PHYSICIAN 



To the Honorahle Mayor and the City Councils : — 

I respectfully submit the following report of the duties 
intrusted to my charge during the past year. It is not less 
a matter of interest to the city than a pleasure to myself 
to be able to state that the condition of the city's poor has 
beeii exceptionally good. I have made such visits to the 
city farm as have been required, and liave to report but 
one death, viz., of a female inmate, from consumption ; 
one death of a woman receiving city aid occurred from 
typhoid fever at the Women's Aid Society Hospital ; one 
case of infanticide was reported, — making in all three 
deaths that came to my notice officially during the year. 

I have made visits to one hundred or one hundred and 
fifty of the city's poor outside the public institutions men- 
tioned above, and am happy to state that not a single death 
has occurred, which is a noteworthy fact, considering that 
a majority of these people are more likely to be afflicted, 
living, as they do, in the thickly settled quarters. 

As you are aware, the inmates at the city farm are a class 
of people suffering from infirmities or disabilities, and I 



26 

assure jou that their wants have been fuUj supplied by 
those having them in charge. The recent repairs and im- 
provements at the institution will add greatly to the health 
of the inmates. I would, recommend as a matter of clean- 
liness, thereby promoting health, that a suitable bath-room 
be added. 

We have reason to rejoice that the city has been free 
from any of the contagious or infectious diseases which 
have prevailed in neighboring cities. The past year has 
been remarkable for the absence of diphtheria and typhoid 
fever,. and not a single case of small-pux has occurred. I 
recommend as one safeguard, in the event of a visit from 
sraall-pox, that the city authorities call the attention 
of parents of school-children to tlie safety of vaccina- 
tion. Such action has just been taken hy the Portsmouth 
authorities. 

The alarm experienced by citizens late in the fall from 
scarlet fever almost developed into a>' scare " Such alarm 
was in part unnecessary, as the disease was principally 
confined to two families, one of whom lost three children 
within two weeks, and the other had two cliildren afflicted. 
There were never more than ten cases of scarlet fever at 

4 

one time. 

1 would speak of certain defects in the |)olice-station for 
the proper attendance of prisoners or unfortunates who 
have been brought in by the police, and who are suffering 
from sickness or injuries. There are no conveniences what- 
ever for the proper attendance of such persons, and the 
care which they need cannot be supplied. In the absence 
of a city hospital, I would recommend that a suitable hos- 
pital ward be fitted up in the police-station. 

In concluding my report, 1 will refer to the good work 
performed by the Board of irlealth in putting a stop to the 
night odors which have heretofore been the cause of great 



27 

complaint. I am happy to say that we shall no longer be 

afflicted with the abominable stenches arising from sewers 

in some localities. We should feel grateful for the sanitary 

condition of our city, and should neglect no measure which 

would preserve its present healthful ness. 

Respectfully yours, 

JAMES M. COLLITY, 

City Physician, 
MANCHEST^:R, N. H., January 1, 1882. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



EEPOET 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineers' Office, 
Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1881. 
To His Honor the Mayor^ and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : — 

In compliance with section 5 of chapter 8 of the '' Laws 
and Ordinances " of the city, I herewith submit the annual 
report of the Manchester Fire Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1881, also an inventory of the prop- 
erty of the department, and a statement of alarms, fires, 
losses, insurance, etc. 

While last year was considered a favorable one for the 
city in regard to fires, the one just closed has been most 
remarkable for a city of its size, and the losses have been 
lighter than for many years previous. During the year 
there have been only twelve alarms, two of which were 
from burning chimneys. 

ORGANIZATION. 

As the department is at present organized, it consists 
of one hundred and two members, divided as follows : — 
1 Chief Engineer. 



32 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

2 Steam Fire Engine Companies, — 14 men each. 

1 Horse Hose Company, — 20 men. 

2 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 
1 Hook and Ladder Company, — 25 men. 

THE APPARATUS, 

which is all in good repair and serviceable condition, is lo- 
cated as follows, and consists of — 

*4 Steam Fire Engines, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Sled, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Hook and Ladder Truck, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Supply Wagon, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Maple and East High sts. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, on Clinton street, 'Squog. 

1 2 Wheeled Hose Carriage at the P. C. Cheney Com- 
pany's paper-works, Amoskeag, manned by men at works. 

1 2-Wheeled Hose Carriage, Deny mills, Gotfe's Falls, 
manned by men at the mills. 

The continued and rapid extension of the city limits 
makes it imperative that more hose companies should be 
established. I would recommend that a new horse hose- 
carriage be procured, and a company of twelve men organ- 
ized to run it, and located in the southeastern portion of the 
city proper. I am informed, by Supt. Harvey of district 
No. 2, that the horse of such a company could be used to 
good advantage upon the streets during the day, within 
certain limits, so as to be accessible in case of alarms, thus 
being beneficial to the street department, while the Fire De- 
partment would be materially strengthened. 

*Two of which are in reserve. 



33 



THE BUILDINGS 



occupied by the department have undergone various 
needed repairs. The engine-house in Piscataquog has been 
shingled ; at the '' north-end " tower, the bell has been 
raised, and the roof, as well as the room below containing the 
mechanical apparatus of the striker, has been much im- 
proved, while the central station is now heated by steam, 
with coils of pipe in its towers to facilitate the drying of 
hose, and the old part of the engine-house thoroughly re- 
paired inside. A convenient office for the Board of Engi- 
neers (with a battery-room for fire-alarm adjoining) has 
also been fitted up and furnished, in the quarters formerly 
occupied by Fennacook Hose Company No. 1. 

DEFECTIVE CHIMNEYS 

are still the cause of many disastrous fires, and will con- 
tinue to be as long as so little attention is paid to their 
construction ; though parties erecting buildings, and con- 
tractors in most cases, have willingly complied with article 
11 of the " Regulations of the Board of Engineers," since 
its adoption, which is as follows : — 

"Art. 11. — No person shall erect a chimney or flue which 
shall not be thoroughly plastered on the inside and outside, 
nor be built less than three feet above the ridge-pole." 

In several cases during the year I have called the atten- 
tion of parties who were building, to this article, and it has 
proved beneficial in such cases. In this connection I can- 
not refrain from again alluding to the importance of an 

INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS, 

whose duty it should be to carefully examine the erection 
and alteration of all buildings, and the construction of 



34 

chimneys therein, and thus prevent so many " fire-traps " 
going up in onr city, that constantly increase the fire risks. 
The infiequeiicy of fires the past year ought not to make 
us unmindful of our duty looking to the safer protection of 
the future of our city. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

Thr second annual parade of this department occurred 
on Friday, Octoher 7, and I have no doubt that such mem- 
bers of the City Councils as particijiated in the event, as 
well as citizens generally, believe it is not an unwise ex-. 
penditure, bringing the department, as it does, into more 
social relations with our citizens. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH, 

an indispensable adjunct to every efficient fire department, 
has worked faitlifully during the year, and given prompt 
lesponse to all calls made upon it. During the month of 
July the circuits were rearranged by Mr. Edwin Rogers, of 
>lo.^es G. Crane & Co., Boston, Mass., New England agents 
for the '' Ganiewell Fire Alarm," and wires run centering 
at the new headquarters on Vine street, and on the 6th of 
July tbe battery tiansferred from the City Hall to the 
central station. A new three-circuit-barred switch has 
taken the place of the old one, and a ground galvanometer 
been added. 

Mr. Tristram Berry has continued in charge of the 
alarm, and has given his usual careful attention to its work- 
ings. No new boxes have been added since the one men- 
tioned in my last report as having been ordered at that 
lime, though the extension of the city limits will soon ne- 
cessitate locating others. I would suggest, as an addition 
the coming year, that a bell be placed on the school-house 



85 



to he erected on Webster street, and a striker attached. 
From its location an alarm conld be heard at Amoskeag, as 
well as in the northern section of the city, 



THE HOSE 

of the department has received no new additions during 
the year, but for the coming year should be materially 
increased. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

This association was incorporated February 4, 1873, and 
its benefits have been felt by some of its unfortunate mem- 
bers on several occasions. Any active member of the 
department is entitled to membership on the payment of 
one dollar. During the year its funds have been increased 
by liberal donations from Hon. Moody Currier, Col. George 
W. Riddle, Hon. Jacob F. James, and Hon. George B. 
Chandler. Death has entered its ranks, and on the 26th 
day of November took from our number Frank E. Emery, 
a member of N. S. Dean 8. P. E. No. 4. During his last 
illness he was cared for by the association, and at his fu- 
ncial the entire department was in attendance. 

The funds of the association are as follows : — 

Cash in treasury February 8, 1881 
Cash received for memberships 
Donated by Hon. Moody Currier 
Donated by Col. George W. Riddle . 
Donated by Hon. Jacob F. James 
Donated by Hon. George B. Chandler 



To cash paid out .... 

Leaving balance now in treasury of $1,010.62 



. 1798.62 


10.00 


100.00 


100.00 


50.00 


50.00 


$1,108.62 


98.00 



36 

While tlie association does notr desire to appear in the 
light of heggars, it is very grateful for such contributions 
as our lil)eral-hearted citizens feel disposed to give. 

TELEPHONE WIRES. 

The innumerable number of wires running in all direc- 
tions from the Telephone Exchange is fast becoming a seri- 
ous matter, and early attention should be given it, as has 
been done by many cities in this and other countries. The 
city councils of Liverpool decided that '-the danger and in- 
convenience caused by the net-work of telephone V)ire>\ were 
likely to prove a nuisance,'' and have instituted steps to rem- 
edy the evil While the system is of great convenience 
to the pul)lic as a means of communication, the construction 
ot its wires should be of such a nature as not to impede 
the working of tlie Fire Department in the discharge of its 
duties. The matter can be remedied, in a measure, by al- 
lowing none of the wires in ihe business section of the 
city to be put less than forty leet from the ground. 

THE PROTECTIVE DP]PARTMENT. 

This is an important and valuable branch of the fire ser- 
vice in many of our sistei- cities, and one long needed here. 
It has been agitated at ditferent times, and I trust that 
ste})S will soon be inaugurated lor the establishing of one 
in connection with tliis departnjent. 

CONCLUSION. 

During the summer, upon invitation of Charles D. 
McDuffie, Esq., agent of the Manchester Mills, the Board 
of Engineers inspected the hydrants and other facilities of 
this corporation for the extinguishment of fires, its fire- 
escapes, etc., and were shown the practical workings of the 



" Automatic Fire Extinguishers," which lie has placed in 
nearly all the rooms of the corporation under his charge. 
This is a wise precaution, and one which, if put to practi- 
cal test, I have no doubt will do effectual service. 

I desire to express my sincere thanks to my eflficient 
associate engineers, for their able and cordial support, and 
their valuable counsel in all matters pertaining to the good 
of the department and its effective workings ; to his Hon- 
or Mayor Putnam and members of the City Councils, who 
so willingly, by their official acts, have contributed to the 
needs and comforts of the department ; to City Marshal 
A. D. Stark and Captain Jenkins of the night watch, and 
the members of the police force under their charge, for 
their assistance in all times of need ; to Warren Harvey 
and F. S. Worthen, superintendents of districts Nos. 2 and 
10, lor their willing arrangements in regard to horses under 
their charge ; and last, but not least, to the foremen and 
members of the several companies, for the faithful perform- 
ance of their duties, and their uniform alacrity in obeying all 
orders. It is gratifying to be able to say that entire harmony 
exists between the companies of the department I believe 
we have as efficient a department as any of its size, simi- 
larly organized, and have no doubt it will receive such at- 
tention at your hands as its demands merit. 
Respectfully submitted. 

THOS. W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Manchester Fire Depaj-tment. 



38 



ALARMS, FIRES, LOSSES, ETC., FOR 1881. 

1. — Tuesday, January 11, at 8.15 a. m. ; Box LS ; slight 
fire in a closet of the tenement occupied by Peter Douclier, 
in Washington block on Pearl street; extinguislied by 
Assistant Engineer Kimball, with a few pails of water ; 
insurance paid, ^25 ; cause, matches. 

2. — Friday, January 21, at 7.05 p. M. ; Box 5 ; alarm 
from burning chimney in block owned by Isaac Huse at 
corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets. 

3. — Friday, January 28, at 8.20 p. m. ; Box 21 ; alarm 
from burning chimney in tenement occupied by John Stokes 
at 107 Manchester street. 

4. — Friday, February 11, at 10.30 p. M. ; Box 23; 
small fire in school-house connected with Mount St. Mary's 
Convent, on corner of Laurel and Beech streets; damage, 
$?20 ; no insurance ; cause, carelessness with ashes. 

5. — Tuesday, March 22, at 4.40 p. m. ; Box4 ; fire in 
rear of •' Archway " on Central street, in tenement block 
occupied Mrs. Mary ^IcLaughlin (in whose tenement the 
fire caught), Joseph Henri, Louti Ambroge, and Matthew 
Tafe. and owned by Aimer D. Gooden ; loss, i75 ; no in- 
surance; cause, defective chimney. 

6. — Monday, March 28, at 12.50 p. m. ; Box 51 ; fire in 
small wooden building on Auburn street, corner of Franklin, 
owned by Eugene W. Brigham, and occupied by Silas A. 
Felton for the manufacture of brooms ; loss on building, 
$50 ; on stock and machineiy, i300 ; no insurance ; cause, 
overheated stove. 

7. — Tuesday, April 26, at 6.45 a. m. ; Box 5; a fire 
was discovered in the rooms occupied by Mrs. ^lary A. 
Woodward and Miss Susie Curtis, in the third stoiy of 
Clough's Block, on Manchester stieet. The fiie started 
while the occupants were at breaklast, and it obtained 



39 

considerable headway before being discovered. The flames 
spread through the partitions and communicated to the hall 
above occupied by the society of St. Jean Baptiste, and ne- 
cessitated putting considerable water into the building, tlius 
damaging rooms in second story occupied by Add. Hutch- 
inson, who was considerably damaged by water, as was the 
office of Oilman Clough & Son, on same floor. On the first 
floor was the grocery store of Oeorge E. Prime and saloon of 
John Specht, while in the basement the office of Bennett & 
Lord, masons, and eating saloon of Dan Davis; slightly dam- 
aged. The losses are estimated as follows : Oilman Clough on 
building, $1,704, fully insured ; Mrs. Woodward and Miss 
Curtis, #800, no insurance ; Add. Hutchinson, #400, no in- 
surance ; St. Jean Baptiste Society, #132, fully insured ; 
George E. Prime, #100, fully insured; John Specht, #10, 
fully insured ; Bennett & Lord and Dan Davis, #25, no in- 
surance. Cause, unknown. 

8. — Saturday, June 25, at 12.40 a. m. ; Box 4 ; slight 
fire in basement of wooden building in rear of 41 Cedar 
street, owned by John Butler ; extinguished with a few 
pails of water, with slight damage ; cause, incendiary. 

9. — Wednesday, October 5, at 10.10 p. m. ; Box 24 ; 
fire in cottage house owned by Mrs. William Mara, situated 
on Merrimack street, Wilson Hill, and occupied by Chailes 
Wilson, who lost most of his household goods ; loss, Mrs. 
Mara, #300, insured #200 ; Mr. Wilson, #400, no insurance ; 
cause, defective chimney. 

10. —Thursday, October 20, at 12.10 p. m. ; Box 21 ; 
fire in tenement block owned by D. A. Simons and estate 
of E. W. Bartlett, at No. 182 Manchester street, and occu- 
pied by " Ham " Morse and Maggie Connor ; loss, #20 ; 
fully insured ; cause, pipe-smoking in bed. 

11. — Friday, November 25, at 1.06 a.m. ; Box 18 ; fire 
was discovered iu the barn connected with cottage house at 



. 40 

388 Merrimack street, owned by Mead, Mason, <fe Co., and 
occupied by Homer E. Slack. The barn, shed, and L of 
the house were consumed, and the main part of the house 
considerably damaged. The two-story house just east, 
owned by same parties, and occupied by George Morgan, 
was somewhat damaged. This fire obtained considerable 
headway before an alarm was sounded. Loss, Mead, Mason, 
& Co., $1,800, insured for $1,400; Homer E. Slack, 
$2,500, insured for 12,000. Cause unknown. 

12. — Wednesday, November 30, at 4.15 p. m. ; fire in 
L of two-story wooden building, owned by Garrett Mur- 
ray, at corner of Central and Chestnut streets, and occu- 
pied by James Harris ; extinguished with a few pails of 
water ; damage, ilO ; fully insured ; cause, defective 
chimney. 

RECAPITULATION. 

From the foregoing record it will be seen that 
the aggregate losses for the year 1881 have 
been $8,171 00 

On which there was insurance of . . . 5,601 00 



Leaving total uncovered by insurance . $2,570 00 



41 



NUMBERS AND LOCATION OP ALARM-BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson & 
Co.'s office and Samuel Colby's residence, corner of Elm 
and Young streets. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
National Hotel and L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s office. 

No. 5. — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's office and 
G. E. Hall's drug-store. 

No. 6. — Engine-house, Vine street. Keys at engine- 
house. 

No 7. — City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. 
Perry' drug-store. 

No. 8. — Elm, foot of Orange street. Key at Chandler 
& Tewksbury's store. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys 
at H. D. Corliss's, George E. Flanders's, and J. Freeman 
Clough's. 

No. 12. — Blood's shop. Keys at office. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Jencks, Lewis Simons, and E. L. Bry- 
ant. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residence of Sanborn T. Worthcn, 530 Chestnut street, 
and H. B. Sawyer's store. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev. Dennis M. Bradley and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of H. P. Watts and Daniel Connor. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and 
William Perkins. 



42 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. D. Smitirs drug-store and residence of J. A. Em- 
erson. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of E T. James and xMrs. Josiali Stevens. 

No. 24. — Corner of Massabesic and Park streets. Keys 
at residences of D. M. Goodwin, A. D. Gooden, and Nicho- 
las Hopkins. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Asliland streets. Keys 
at residences of S. L. Fogg, Horace Gordon, and Horace 
Stearns. 

No. 26. — Corner of^Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-sliop and residence of John N. Cliase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Manclicster House, Tebbetts Brothers' and Weeks & 
Currier's drug-store. 

No. ;">!. — Amoskeag Village. Keys at P. C. Cheney 
Co.'s paper-mill and residence of Capt. J. M. Varnum. 

No. 32. — Laiigdon Mills, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at Hoyt & Co.'s paper-mill and Langdon 
watch-room. 

^ No 34. — Mechanics' Row. Keys at watch-room and 
W. W. Hubbard's office. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at Stark watch-room. 

No. 36. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys 
at residences of John P. Lord, H. M. Tarbell, and A. G. 

Fairbanks. 

» 

No. 41. — Amoskeag New Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room.' 

No. 43. — Namaske Mills. Keys at watch room. 

No. 45. — Amory Mill counting-room. Keys at watch- 
room and A. J. Mayhew's, 51 Stark corporation, corner of 
Canal and Bridge streets. 



43 

No. 51. — S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s shop. Keys at S. C. 
Forsaith's office rsiid Lowell's iron-foundry office. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Sqiiog. Keys at Allen N. 
Clapp's store and Merrimack EFoiise. 

No. 53. — Wallace's brewery. Keys at brewery office 
and Barnard & Huskie's store. 

No. Gl. — Corner of Elm and Hancock streets, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at residence of H. W. Longa and M. Howlett's 
saloon. 

No. 62. — Massabesic street, Hallsville. Keys at resi- 
dences of Charles C. Chase and G. W. Dearborn. 

No. 72. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins and Daniel Sheehan. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given 
at precisely 12.'30 p. m., irom John N. Baker's jewelry store, 
and be denoted by one stroke of the fire-bells. 



44 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discoverv of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately commiinica^^ed to the ii en rest alarm-box. keys to 
which are in the hands of all regular police, also of persons 
designated by a card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discoverv of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go. Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to remain 
by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard in the 
box, pull again : if you still hear no clicking, go to the 
next nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure the 
box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
cause other than an actual fire. Don't give an alarm for 

A CHIMNEY-FIRE. 

0. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your resi- 
dence or place of husmess where the keys are kept, return the 
keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their 
property, also all places where the keys are kept. Be sure 
the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the 
city, and the number ot the box will be given four times 
for an alarm. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of 
the bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



45 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 



One stroke of the fire-bells closes the primary schools. 
and two strokes closes all the schools, for the hall-day upon 
which they may be given, at «.15 a.m. for the forenoon, 
and 1.15 p m. for the afternoon. 



46 



RULES AND REGULATIONS ADOPTED BY THE 
BOARD OP ENGINEERS. 

1. Steamer No. 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes ; on the days of its second run, it 
will report on the first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 
21, 27, 34, 45, .■)!, 71. 

2. Steamer No. 4, same as above. 

3. Pennacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

4. Massabesic Hose No. 2 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16. 17, 
18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 36, 62, 71 ; on the second alarm, 
to all boxes except 52, 53, 61. 

5. E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 will report for duty on 
the first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 27, 42, 43,51, 52, 53 ; sec- 
ond alarm, to boxes 35, 41, and 15. 

6. Hook and Ladder No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

7. Steamer No. 2 to be kept as a reserve engine, to 
respond to a third alarm. The horses attached to the 
engine on its first run will return to the house on a second 
alarm, to be held in readiness to respond to a third alarm ; 
and the enojine will be manned by men appointed for that 
purpose and attached to Pennacook Hose and Hook and 
Ladder companies at all times except when the engine is 
on duty. 

8. Steamer No. 3 will also be kept as a reserve engine, 
to be used in case of need. 

9. The whole department will report for duty in all 
cases on the third alarm. 

10. In case of a second alarm from either of the boxes 
on which the horses double on the first engine, they will 
immediately return and get the engine of the second run. 



47 

11. At any time when an alarm of fire is p:iven, the 
engine or hose-carriage that leaves the house first will have 
the right to lead to the fire. No running hy will be al- 
lowed, except in case of accident, under penalty of dis 
missal of the diiver from the dcpaitment. 

12. The companies of the dcpai-tment not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the hells aiid gongs, by the engineer in 
charge, will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses. 

18. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 

U. On the first alarm from boxes 24, 25, 26, 31, 61, 62, 
the horses of the second run will double on ilie engine of 
its first run. 



48 
ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose- 
carriage . . . . . . $4,500 00 

100 feet o inch leather hose . . . . 140 00 

1,400 feet 2 1-4 inch leather hose . . . 1,400 00 

Firemen's suits 200 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 500 00 



Total amount .... $6,740 00 

FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose- 
carriage 12,750 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class single-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $2,750 00 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $3,500 00 

50 feet rubber hose . . . . . 75 00 

1,800 feet leather hose 1,800 00 

Firemen's suits 240 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including one pair 

harnesses . . . . . . 600 00 



Total amount .... $6,215 00 



49 



PENNACOOK HOSE NO 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 foiir-wbeclcd horse liose-carriage . 
1 horse hose sled and reel 
2,500 feet leather hose . . . . . 
Firemen's suits . . . . . 

Furniture and fixtures, including 2 har- 
nesses ...... 

Total amount . . . . 

MASSABESIC HOSE NO 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . 
1,800 feet leather hose . 

Furniture and fixtures . 
Firemen's suits 

Total amount 



1650 00 

75 00 

2,500 00 

300 00 

440 00 

$3,965 00 



1600 00 

1,800 00 

60 00 

200 00 

12,660 00 



E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE NO 3. 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . 

1,800 feet leather hose 

Firemen's suits . . . . . 

Furniture and fixtures, including harness 

Total amount . . . . 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders 
1 Bangor extension ladder 

Firemen's suits 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 

4 



$650 00 

1,800 00 

175 00 

200 00 

$2,825 00 



. $1,500 


00 


150 


00 


450 


00 


340 


00 


. $2,440 00 



50 

SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

1 supply wagon and boxes . . . 1160 00 

SPARE HOSE. 

AT ENGINE-HOUSE, VINE STREET. 



000 


feet of hose in store-room 

Old hose (worthless for fire purposes) 


. 81,000 00 
25 00 




Total amount 


. 81,025 00 




ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 




5 


fire-hats 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 


87 50 
125 00 




. 8132 50 




FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 






At cost 

Ladders and tools .... 
Extra poles and wire 

Total amount 


.820,045 00 
30 00 
55 00 




.820,130 00 




GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE CARRIAGE. 




1 

400 

2 


LOCATED AT DERRY MILLS. 

two-wheeled hose-carriage 
feet linen hose . . . 
hose-pipes . . . . 


. 8200 00 

200 00 

12 00 



Total amount .... 8412 00 

AMOSKEAG HOSE CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT P. C. CHENEY CO.'S PAPER-MILL. 

1 two-wheeled liose-carriage 
300 feet leather hose .... 

2 hose-pipes ..... 

Total amount .... 8362 00 



8200 


00 


150 


00 


12 


00 



51 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Engine No. 1 

Fire King Engine No. 2 . 

E. W. Harrington Steam Engine No. 3 

N. S. Bean Steam Engine No. 4 

Pennacook Hose No. 1 

Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 

E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder No. 1 

Supply Wagon 

Store-room 

Engineers' Department . 

Fire Alarm 

Gotfe's Falls Hose Carriage 

Amoskeag Hose Carriage 

Total amount 



$6,740 00 


2,750 


00 


2,750 


00 


6,215 


00 


3,965 


00 


2,660 


00 


2,825 


00 


2,440 


00 


160 


00 


1,025 


00 


132 


50 


. 20,130 


00 


• 412 


00 


362 


00 


,^b2,b6Q 


50 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 




Chief 


Bookseller 


1937 Elm St. 


Andrew C. Wallace 

Benjamin C. Kendall. . . 


Assistant 

Assistant 


Lumber Dealer 

Master Mechanic 


313 Granite St. 
311 Central St. 


Assistant and Clerk 


5 Machine-Shop Blk. 


Orin E.Kimball 


Tanner and Currier.. . 







AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


John A. Barker 

Jonathan T. Underbill. . 






28 Market St. 


Assistant Foreman. 


Manufacturer 


54 Stark Corp. 


Henry H. Glines 

George R. Simmons 




Machinist 


Stark Block. 


Assistant Engineer. 


Asst. Supt. Streets. . 


82 Pennacook St. 


Will A. Butterfield 

George W. Butterfield . . 

Frank E. Stearns 

Edward H. Currier 

Artemas C. Barker 

James R. Carr 


Clerk 




31 Market St. 






28 Vine St. 




Painter .... 


389 Park St 






Hanover cor. Maple. 
494 Pine St. 


,^ 




(( 


Painter 


14 Orange St. 
Stark Block. 


,, 




Henry T. Stevens 

Charles F. McCoy 

John B. Hall 


^^ 


Clerk 


102 Myrtle St. 
5 M S B 


^^ 




,. 




79 Walnut St. 











N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4 
House on Vine 8trett. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Eugene S. Whitney 

Charles E. Ham 


Foreman 


Machinist 


101 Orange St. 
44 M. S. B. 


As?-t. Foreman 


Carpenter 


Edgar G. Abbott 

Fred S. Bean 


Clerk 


Machinist 


543 Chestnut St. 
101 Orange St. 
91 Orange St. 
20 Vine St 


Engineer 




Thomas F. Dodge 

Almus B. Gushing 

William H. Dodge 


Asst. Engineer 


,j 




Hoseman 


Manufacturer 


874 Elm St. 


George W, Bacon 

Alfred Nearborn 


" 


Carpenter 


45 Stark Corp. 

Cor. E. High & Jane. 

22 M S B 







John Martin 






Albert Merrill 






101 Orange St. 
82 Laurel St. 












Clerk 


1441 Elm St. 


John W. Chase 


ji 


Manufacturer 












54 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 




Rank. Occupation. 


Residence. 


Albert Maxfield 






23 M. S. B. 


Clarence D. Palmer 


Asst. 


Foreman Marble Worker 


347 Central St. 


Joseph E. Merrill 

Walter L. Blenus 


Clerl 


I .... Currier 


85 Walnut St 


Driv 


3r Teamster 


2G Vine St. 


George H. Porter 


Hose 


1 
man Carpenter 


277 Laurel St. 


.TnVin M PlniistprJ 




... . Boot and Shoe Deafer 


1083 Elm St 


Charles B. French 

Will G. Chase 




.... Carpenter . 


10 M S B 




Photographer 

Carpenter 


COG Ehn St. 


Lyman M. Aldrlch 

Joseph H. Alsop 




375 Park St 




Card Grinder 


287 So. Main St. (P.) 
1419 Elm St 




Machinist 


George W. Cheney 

Gilbert A Sackett 






1352 Elm St 




Weaver 


35 M S B 


Edwin A. Durgin 

RottiiiaI a Hill 




.... Machinist 


• 133 Hanover St 


^ 


Carpenter 


Pr. Wks. Bl.,'Squog. 
502 Manchester St. 


Edwin E. Weeks 




Machinist 


Albert A. Puffer 




Teamster .... . 


544 Chestnut St. 


Charles W. Brown 


» 


Clerk 


640 Union St. 


Mnrfiti W 'Fnrd 




Molder 


140 Bridge St. 
334 Pine St. 


.Tnhn v. Chasp 




.... Carpenter 









35 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on Maple Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 

( 


Occupation. 


Residence. 










Revilo G. Houghton .... 

Henry G. Seaman 

Walter Seaward 


Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 


Gas Fitter 


288 Bridge St. 
14 South St 


Carpenter . 


Driver 


Teamster 


19 Warren St 


Joseph W. Batchelder. . 
William S. McLeod 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


413 Pine St 




Grainer 


66 Nashua St 


Simeon R. Stearns.. 





Machinist 


63 Arlington St. 
45 M S B 


Alphonso E. Foster 

George W. Seaward 

Henry H. Willcox 

Joseph C. Omey.. 

Parker W. Hannaford . 


Carpenter . ... 




Machinist 


19 Warren St 




Plumber... 

Carpenter . . . 


195 Hanover St. 
39 Opera Block. 
356 Lowell St 






Carpenter • 











E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Clinton Street, ''Squog. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


Horatio Fradd 


Foreman 


Grocer 


fi4 Tinvpr Sf 


JohnT. G. Dinsmore... 
Thomas O'Dowd 


Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 

Steward 


Carpenter 


48 Dover St. 
69 Dover St. 


William Doran 




226 Douglas St. 


John McDerby 


Hoseman .... 


Roofer 








53 Douglas St. 
39*^ Granite St 


Joseph Schofleld 

Edward McDerby 

Andrew C. Wallace, Jr. . 
Edward Flanagan 


^^ 


Wool Sorter 


,. 


Roofer 


145 Winter St 


,. 


Lumber Surveyor .... 


81 Parker St 


(( 


5 M. P. W. 


Robert McFarland.. .... 


Cooper 

Engraver • 


81 Parker St 


John Patterson 


., 


10 Main St 






■ 





66 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1, 

ffouse on Vine Street. 



^Namb. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


John N. Chase 


Foreman 


Overseer 




John Wilson 


Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 


2G8 Bridge St. 

12 M. S. B. 

310 Central St. 

33 Dutton St. 

8 Vine St. 

224 Manchester St. 

159 Laurel St. 

16 Pearl St. 

43 Water St. 

8 Weeks' Block. 

60 Prospect St. 

Union cor. Appleton. 

8 Langdon Corp. 

142 Merrimack St. 

335 Chestnut St. 
1074 Elm St. 
530 Chestnut St. 
295 Lowell St. 
13 Amoskeag Corp. 
474 Hanover St. 
530 Chestnut St. 
Cor. Amh'st& Maple 
422 Chestnut St. 
Elm cor. Lowell. 
142 Merrimack St. 


George E. Glines 


Machinist 


Hiram Young , 


Treasurer 


Slater 


Augustus J. Robie 


Driver 




Edward A, G. Holmes. . 


Fireman 


Carpenter 


George H. Dudley 


(( 


Luther J. Flint 




,, 


Harrison H. Cole 


,, 


Winfield S. Leavitt 


(( 


Barber 


James Orrill 


u 


Jesse B. Nourse 


„ 




Charles H. Cross 


„ 


Overseer 


Andrew C. Wiggiu 


« 


Mason 

Belt Mftkpr 


Dillwyn Breed 


„ 


George M. Jones 


(( 


Gardener 


Milo B. Wilson 


^^ 


Mason 


Samuel F. Adams 


J, 


Expressman 


Koscoe Dyer 


(( 


MafViinicf 


Warren Harvey 




Supt. Streets 


Sanborn T. Worthen. . . . 


Carpenter . 

Currier 


Herbert B. Bryant 


,, 


William J. Perrigo 


« 


Currier 


Joseph H. Gould 


,s 




Josiah D. Andrews 


t< 






1 





57 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, soutliwest corner of Chestnnt street. 
Amherst, nortliwcst corner of Pine street. 
Amlierst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Wabuit street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, nortliwest corner of Lincohi street. 
Amlierst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 

Auburn, northwest corner ot Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P W. corporation. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 
Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 
Beech, front of No. 584. 
Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 
Blodget, front of primary school-house. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, front of No. 26. 



58 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Wahmt street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. . 
Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest coiner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near ofiEice door of M. L. W. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, northwest coiner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Central, northwest corner of Ma{)le street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, front of No. 874. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Chestnut, opposite High street. 



59 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 

Concord, opposite Yine street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Cliestnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Nashua street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Depot, west of Franklin street. 

Elm, front of Fisk bookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Green, corner of Elm street. 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near Brewery. 

Hanover, front of First Congregational Church. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 



60 

tJaiiover, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Union street, 
Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder, northeast- corner of Canal street, 
Kidder, northeast corner of Hol)bs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Ehn street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner oC Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner ot Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near No. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Laurel, near Belmont. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 



,61 

Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Manchch^ter, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Manchester, nortliwest corner of Lincohi street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Manch< ster, northwest corner of flail street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Maple, iront of No. 530. 

Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second hack street west of Elm street. 

Market, northwest corner ot Elm street. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mammoth road. 

Mechanic, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Mechanic, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanic, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 

]^Ierrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Merrimack, near No. 861!. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Merrimack, near Belmont street. 

Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Middle, near 67 Amoskeag corporation. 

Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 



62 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Beecli street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 
Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Park, near No. 36. 

Park, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Park, northwest corner Union street. 
Park, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Park, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Park, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Park, east end. 

Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union'street. ■ 
Pine, northwest corner of Park street. 
Pine, nortliwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High sti'eet. 



68 



Pine, northwest corner of Bridf^e street. 
Pleasant, noithcast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Cliestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
River road, noi-thwest of Elm street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
S|)ruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, between^ Chestnut and Elm streets. . 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near 13 Stark corporation. 
Stai'k, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite 67 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite 13 ^lanchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 
Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Union, northwest corner of Fligh street. 



64 

Valley, corner of Elm. street. 

Valley, corner of Willow street. 

Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Walnut, opposite No. 79. 

W' ater, near 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Webster, northwest .corner of Chestnut street. 

Webster, corner of Elm street. 

Webster, cornei- of Adams street. 

Webster, corner of Union street. 

West Adams, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Appleton. northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Auburn, north-east corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Hol)bs street. 

W^est Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

W^est Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 

W^est Central, northwest corner of Canal street. 

West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Hm street. 

West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Wilson, corner of Park street. 

Young, corner of Elm street. 



65 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS IN 'SQUOG. 

A, corner of South Main street. 

Bedford road, near Huntress's. 

Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 

C street, corner of Bedford road. 

Clinton, corner of Dover street. 

Clinton, corner of South Main street. 

Center, corner of South Main street. 

Center, opposite school-house. 

Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 

Douglas, -corner of Green street. 

Douglas, corner of Barr street. 

Douglas, corner of West street. 

Douglas, corner of Main street. 

Douglas, east of Main street. 

Ferry, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Quincy street. 

Granite, corner of Green street. 

Granite, corner of Barr street. 

Granite, corner of West street. 

Granite, corner of Dover street. 

Granite, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Second street. 

Granite, corner of River street. 

Main, opposite Rice's house. 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 

Mast, opposite J. Smith's house. 

McGregor, opposite "Reed" House. 

Milford, corner of South Main street. 

Milford, corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 



School, corner of Main street. 
School, corner of Walker street. 
School, corner of Ferry street. 
Sullivan, corner of Main street. 
Third, corner of Ferry street. 
Walker, corner of River road. 
Walker, corner of Third street. 
Walker, corner of Parker street. 
Walker, near corner of South Main street. 
Wayne, near corner of Main street. 
Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 
Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Main, at Robinson & Stearns's Works. 
Main, near brick school-house. 
Main, corner of Goffstown road. 
Main, opposite John E. Stearns's. 
Main, near Hiram Stearns's. 
Mill, near Paper-mill. 
Mill, corner of Main street. 
Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are three private hydrants 
that are available in case of need : — 

One at S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s machine-shop. 
One at Lowell's iron foundry. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
Making 329 in all. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



EEPOET 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the Oity Oouncils of the City of Manchester, — 

Gentlemen: — In compliance with the ordinance estab- 
lishing water-works, the Board of Water Commissioners 
have the honor to present herewith their tenth annual 
report, together with the customary report of the Superin- 
tendent, furnishing in detail an account of the operations 
of this department during the year ending December 
31, 1881. 

The total income of the water-works for this period has 
been sixty thousand two hundred fifteen dollars and sixty- 
two cents ($>60,215.62) ; the ordinary expense of operating 
and maintaining the w^orks has been nine thousand four 
hundred thirty-four dollars and nine cents (19,434. 09j, 
leaving as net receipts fifty tliousand seven hundred eighty- 
one dollars and fifty-three cents (150,781.53). This is an 
excess of net receipts in 1881 over those of 1880 of three 
thousaird four hundred eight dollars, and thirty-four cents 
(13,408.84). 

A further expenditure has been made, mainly for the 
extension of distribution pipes, service pipes, hydrants, 
meters, and land, not properly chargeable as current ex- 



70 

penses, to the amount of twenty-eight thousand one hun- 
dred twenty-four dollars and thirty-nine cents (#28,124.39), 
the larger items being for land bordering on Massabesic 
lake, and for extending a main pipe from Piscataquog to 
Amoskeag village. 

The serious apprehensions that existed one year ago, 
that the lake, in consequence of the small amount of rain- 
fall the two previous years, would not furnish an adequate 
supply of water for the use of the city, prompted the board 
to take such precautions that our citizens need have no 
fears of a recurrence of such a state of things in the future. 

For the operations of this department more in detail, the 
commissioners desire to refer to the accompanying report 
of the Superintendent as a part of this report. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEuS GAY, Chairman, 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor/ 

E. T. JAMES, 

A. C. WALLACE, 

WM. P. NEWELL, 

E. H. HOBBS, 

JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Water Commissioners. 
Manchester, N. H., January 2, 1882. 



ISTJPEEII^TEI^DEJ^T^S REPOET. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Man- 
chester^ — 
Gentlemen : — The undersigned respectfully submits his 

annual report for the year 1881. 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

There has been plenty of water in Massabesic lake since 
February 9. At that time the water was two feet, six and 
three-fourths inches below the top of the dam at the head 
of the canal, whicli is the lowest point that the water has 
reached since the water-works were built. 

The lowering of the channel at the outlet last year let 
down water enough to run the pumps and supply the city, 
so that serious trouble was prevented. The measurements 
taken at that time, when there was no water running in 
from the brooks and no evaporation (the lake being frozen 
over), showed that it took three inches of water per month 
to run the pumps and supply the city. These facts prove 
that the loss of water is principally from evaporation, 
which, in the hottest days of summer, is one-half inch per 
day. The arrangements tliat your Honorable Board have 
made will prevent any danger from being short of water 
hereafter. 

In relation to any impurities that might get into Massa- 
besic lake, the Superintendent has not been able to find 



72 

any that would affect the water in the least. There are no 
tanneries or factories on the borders or on any streams that 
run in. The city owns the land on the shore more than 
one-half a mile each side of the outlet, and it would take a 
large amount of filth to get through a half-mile of deep 
water to make it perceptible. It is a well-known fact that 
there is no body of water of its size, outside of a wilder- 
ness, tliat is freer from contamination by objectionable mat- 
ter than Massabesic lake. 

Lands bordering on the lake have been purchased of 
several individuals who desired to dispose of their property, 
at a total cost of i6,790. 

Of these, about thirty-two acres, lying between tlie out- 
let and the Island Pond property, were conveyed to the city 
by J. L. Fogg, for 15640. Two other pieces of land, situ- 
ated in Auburn, were bought of George G. Griffin. One 
piece comprises about one and a quarter miles in length of 
the shore of the lake, — the width varj'ing from twenty- 
five to two hundred feet. The other is located at Grifhn's 
mills, and includes the land on which the mills and mill- 
pond are situated. The price paid for both lots was i5,000. 
Another lot, with buildings thereon, was purchased of Hugh 
B. Cochran, for the mm of #1,15(;. This is situated in 
Sucker Village, on the main inlet to the lake, and contains 
twenty-five acres, more or less. • 

DAM, CANAL, AND PENSTOCK. 

There have been some repairs on the canal banks, and on 
the road that runs along beside it. A shed has been built 
at the head of the penstock, to protect the men while 
cleaning the screens in cold weather, and to keep the snow 
off of the gate-covers so that, in case of accident at the 
pump-house, they could be got at readily. 



73 



PUMPING STATION. 



The pump and everything connected with this establish- 
ment is in good condition. 

In the month of June there was a crack discovered in 
one of the valve chambers, caused by some defect in the 
casting. This caused no little anxiety for fear that it 
would grow larger by the continual pounding of the pumps. 
But it was repaired in such a workmanlike manner that it 
stands to-day as good as new. 

RECORD OF PUMPING, 1881. 



MONTHS. 



No. hours' work 
for both pumps 



Average 
strokes p'r 
minute. 



Total No. 

strokes p'r 

minute. 



Total gallons 

pumped ija one 

montii. 



Daily aver- 
age gallons 
pumped. 



January . . 
February . 
Match . . . . 
April .... 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December., 



Totals and average. 



841 h. 
744 " 
624 " 
532 " 
561 " 
512 " 
003 " 
644 " 
576 '• 
590 " 
554 " 
539 " 



13.02 
13.72 
15.45 
15.86 
16.34 
16.64 
16.44 
16.18 
16.06 
15.42 
15.76 
16.81 



7,326 h. 



15.64 



657,172 

I 
612,318 I 

578,990 I 

507,204 ■ 

550,900 I 

511,242 ' 

595,012 

626,178 

565,556 

556,766 

524,608 

545,518 



6,831,584 



41,401,836 
38,576,034 
36,476,370 
31,957,632 
34,710,480 
32,208,246 
37,485,756 
59,449,214 
35,030,028 
35,076,258 
33,550,304 
34,367,634 

430.889,792 



1,335,543 
1,377,715 
1,176,657 
1,065,254 
1,119,693 
1,073,608 
1,209,218 
1,272,555 
1,187,607 
1,131,492 
1,118,343 
1,108,633 



1,180,520 



It will be seen by the number, of gallons pumped, as re- 
ported, that the daily average is about the same now as it 
was five years ago, although there are four miles more of 
distribution pipe, and nearly double the amount of money 
collected for water rents. This may be accounted for, per- 
haps, by there being less leaks, or not so many fires ; at any 



74 



rate, such is 


the fact. 


average 


: — 




For the 


year 


1876 


(( a 




1877 


44 4b 




1878 ■ . 


44 44 




1879 


44 44 




1880 


a 44 




1881 



The following has been the daily 



Gallons. 

1,216,380 
1,271,869 
1.289,837 
1,246,913 
1,180,930 
1,180,520 



SUPPLY AND FORCE MAIN. 

These remain in about the same condition as last year. 
There lias been about the same number of leaks, and the 
places where trouble was anticipated hold out, and may for 
sometime longer. As there is but one supply and force 
main, it will be well to be prepared for trouble that might 
arise in case of a bad break. 

RESERVOIR. ^ 

There has been no labor or money expended on the res- 
ervoir the past year. Sliglit repairs on the highway east, 
are all that has been done about the premises. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

The number of feet of pipe laid the past season is 
17,703, about 3i miles, at an expense of 122,460. Of this, 
$17,294 has been expended on the Amoskeag extension. 
This was laid with a ten-inch cast-iron pipe from the brick 
school-house in Piscataquog to the road in Amoskeag that 
leads to Goffstown Center, a distance of 7,768 feet; thence 
with an eight-inch pipe nearly to Black brook, a distance 
of 1,^67 feet. 

Your Honorable Board last j^ear ordered the superin- 
tendent to make a survey and estimate of three different 
lines to Amoskeag. The line which was adopted and laid 



was the one that was estimated to cost the most ; but the 
building that has been done this last summer, and the 
water taken on this line, are proof that there was no mistake 
made in laying the pipe on the route that was selected. 

PIPE AND FIXTURES LAID IN 1881. 





Length and size in feet laid. 


Gates set. 


10 

1 




12 in. 


10 in. 


8 in. 


6 in. 


12 in. 


10 in. 


8 in. 6 in. 




Amoskeag I'oad 




i 1 ' 1 
2,922 14 10 1 




2 


1 
1 


1 


1 








1 
36 9 


1 










516 






2 


Cedar 








450 

660 

32 

175 












Central 
















I 






1,094 


1 .nfi7 






1 




3 


HoUis 












Lowell. 


315 


i 


1 








1 


Main 


3,752 














t*^ 




815 
993 
800 
445 
200 
278 
1,490 
260 








2 















2 


1 


Milford . . . 




j 








1 


Mill 




i 








1 


2 


Myrtle 














Pearl 














1 


Pennacook 












1 


3 


Riddle 














River 






253 












Sullivan 






59 

80 

478 






1 
1 
1 


1 


Varnum 




1 








1 


Wayne 


































315 


7,768 


1,870 


7,750 


1 


3 


4 


8 


21 



^ilM i^iles of pipe laid in 1881. 
16 gates set in 1881. 
21 hydrants set in 1881. 



76 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1881. 

Amoskeag road near slaughter-house. 
Amory, northwest corner of Main street. 
Beauport, northwest corner of Main street. 
Beauport, northwest cornpr of Wayne street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Front, near Flanders's store. 
Front, near John Stearns's residence. 
Front, near L. Proctor's residence. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Mcp-regor, front of Reed liouse. 
Milford, near Mrs. C. Price's residence. 
Mill, northeast corner of Front street. 
Mill, northwest corner of Third street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Sullivan, northwest corner of Main street. 
Varnuni, northeast corner of Front street. 

The pipe tliat was taken up on tlie east side of the ^!er- 
rimack river one year ago last summer, has been laid over 
aiid connected with thicker pipe, and four more flexible 
joints put in, the distance being one hundred and eight 
feet. These flexible joints are made by the Boston Ma- 
chine Conijjany, and are the same as were laid in the first 
instance, with the exception that tliey connect to the pipe 
with a flange joint and a wooden packing instead of lead. 

This line of pipe is in good condition, with the exception 
of three small leaks in some of the lead joints. It may 



require the services of a diver to calk these ; hut it will 
answer as a reserve, if any thing should happen to the 
Granite-street line. It was tliought best to put ofl^ the 
repairs till another summer. 

The following places are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken up and cast-iron pipe laid instead : — 



Auburn 

Canal 

Cedar 

Concord 

Douglas 

Granite 

Laurel 

Merrimack. . . 

Pearl 

Quincy 

River 

Walnut 

West Bridge. 
Winter 



Length in feet. 



in. 6 in. ! 4 in. 



25 



25 



7 

16 
6 

7 

8^ 

8i 



7 
172 

7 



Locations. 



62i 186 



Between Pine and Chestnut. 

Corner Wesl Bridge. 

Between Pine and Chestnut. 

Corner of Chestnut. 

Near hydrant, corner Main. 

Corner Canal. 

Opposite No. 62. 

Corner of Pine. 

Cor. Pine & between Chestnut & Elm. 

Corner Granite. 

South of Walker. 

Corner Pearl 

Corner Canal. 

Opposite Stevens's house. 



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81 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES 


LAID AND SET TO 


DATE. 


Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron. 


Gates 


20 inch 


20,984.9 ft. 


104. ft. 


5 


14 - 


6,825. " 


4,925. " 


10 


12 - 


8,400. '' 


6,317. " 


15 


10 " 


5,074.75 " 


8,330. " 


12 


8 '^ 


12,568. '^ 


4,297. ^' 


30 


6 ^' 


82,591. " 


24,049.5 '' 


186 


4 '' 


8J49. '' 


1,175. '' 


15 




145,137.65 ft. 


49,197.5 ft. 


278 



27^111^-^ miles of cement-lined pipe. 
^-{^-g-Q- miles of cast-iroii pipe. 

^^"Illo" i^^^^^s of cement-lined and cast-iron pipe. 

273 Gates 
328 Hydrants. 
7 Air-valves. 

The number of applications for water to -date has been 
twenty-one hundred and thirty-three (2,183). 

One hundred and eighty-seven (187) service pipes have 
been laid this year, as follows : — 

170 3-4 inch diameter . . 4,259.2 feet. 

12 1 u u ^ 387 4 u 

3 1 1-4 " '' . . 84.5 " 

2 2 u ;; ^ ^ 50.0 " 



Total length of service pipes, 4,781.1 feet. 

Nineteen hundred and ninety-four (1,994) service pipes 
have been laid to date, as follows : — 

40 1-2 inch diameter . . 860.7 feet. 
1,718 3-4 " '^ . . 45,329.6 " 

197 1 '' 'i . . 5,747.7 " 



82 



19 


1 1-4 inch diameter 


913.9 feet. 


1 


1 1-2 " ' 


57.0 " 


14 


2 " " 


520.3 'V 


5 


4 u u 


136.0 " 



Total length of service pipe, 53,562.2 feet. 
Number miles' service pipe in street, 10 ^^%^^ • 
The income from the sale of water for 1881 has been as 
follows : — 



Recei\ 


-ed for water and hydrant 








rent . . . . . 


144,116 


18 




Recei\ 


'ed for water (metered) 


14,455 


50 




(; 


" fines .... 


223 


99 




i. 


'' rent of meters . 


1,099 


48 






'' setting meters . 


120 


00 




a 


" building purposes 


105 


60 




4( 


" labor and pipe . 


33 


87 




ii 


" hay on Mill's meadow 


10 


00 




a 


'• derrick 


50 


00 




'i 


from G. G. Griffin . 
Total 


1 


00 








i60,-:15 


62 




Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1880, 


23,303 


06 



3,518 68 



Abatements. i$118.34. 

Expenses for 1881 

Amount paid toward interest 



537.558 48 
38.000 00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 188 



•i^75,558 48 
'.^7,960 20 



83 



Classification of accounts for 1881 : — 

Superintendence, collecting, and re- 
pairs fT,426 93 

Stationery, printing, etc. . . 149 75 

Office and incidental expenses . 332 60 



Pumping expenses and repairs . $1,487 68 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 

reservoir . . . • 37 13 



Running expenses for 1881 

Service pipes 

Distribution pipes 

Fire hydrants and valves 

Land and water rights . 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 

Meters and fittings 



$2,376 79 

15,813 66 

1,487 12 

6,790 00 

182 61 

1,474 21 



Total expended on construc- 
tion in 1881 . 



$7,909 28 



.,524 81 
1,434 09 



128,124 39 



Total expended in 1881 . $37,558 48 

Classification of accounts to Dec. 31, 1881 : — 

Land and water rights . . . $38,348 67 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races . 101,380 81 
Pumping machinery, pump-house, 

and buildings, . ' . . . 88,493 96 

Distributing reservoir and fixtures . 71,542 36 

Force and supply main . . . 88,674 02 

Distribution pipes . . .261,27*9 49 

Fire hydrants and valves . . 31,761 35 



84 



Tools and fixtures . 


. 


.fl0,649 


35 


Boarding and store houses 


. 


919 


36 


Roads and culverts 


. 


2,193 


49 


Supplies 


, 


550 


39 


Engineering 




22,176 


19 


Livery and traveMno^ expenses 


2,85B 


64 


Legal expenses 


. 


563 


79 


Grading and fencing 


. 


11,3-19 


62 


Service pipes 


. 


31,144 


50 


Meters and fixtures 


account 


9,9r.7 


38 


Total construction 






to Dec. 31, 1881 






•^773,841 37 



Current expenses : — 

Superintendence, collecting, and 
repairs ..... 
Stationery, printing, etc. 
Office and incidental expenses 
Pumping expenses and repairs 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 
reservoir . . . . 
Repairs to buildings 

Total current expenses to 
Dec. 31, 1881. 
Interest . . . . . 
Highway expenditures 



^48,129 99 

4,041 2/ 

3,678 13 

11,861 03 

1,645 83 
254 48 



!3?69,610- 73 



140,678 51 
14,000 53 



154,679 04 



Total amount of bills ap- 
proved -to Dec. 31, 1881 . 



1898,131 14 



85 

Interest, discount, and labor on 
highway transferred, and tools 
and materials sold . . §58,594 03 

Current expenses to Dec. 31.1881 . 69,610 73 

.fl28,204 76 

Total cost, not including int. 1769,926 38 
Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1880 .... 1272,419 51 

Interest for 1881 .... 37,383 00 



Total interest and discount 

to Dec. 31, 1881 . . $309,802 51 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31, 1880 . 8115,000 00 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31,1881 . . . 38,000 00 



Total .... 1153,000 00 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works: — 

1872, supplies and mate- 
rials sold 

1873, supplies and mate- 
rials sold 

1873, accrued interest on 

water bonds sold 
1873, accrued interest on 

state bonds sold 

1873, water rents . 

1874, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 607 89 



1573 61 


177 


07 


193 


26 


146 


00 


1,920 


53 



March 12, 1874, highway expendi- 
tures, trans, from 
water account 814,000 53 

March 17, 1874, interest and dis- 
count trans, from 
water account 12,347 25 

Sept. 1, 1874, interest and dis- 
count trans, from 
water account . 22,361 74 

1874, water and hydrant 





rent, etc. 


30,233 54 


Dec. 29, 


, 1874, interest transferred 


4,566 25 


Dec. 18, 


, 1875, 1 anvil sold . 


15 00 


Sept. 25 


, 1875, engine, crusher. 






and material sold . 


2,089 45 




1875, water and hydrant 






rent, etc. 


27,119 15 


May 20, 


1876, derrick sold 


125 00 


May 20, 


1876, rent of derrick . 
1876, water and hydrant 


24 00 




rent, etc. 


38.879 47 




1877, water and hydrant 






rent, etc. 


43,823 30 




1878, water and hydrant 






rent, etc. 


48,873 26 




1878, old plow sold 


1 00 




1879, derrick sold . 


75 00 




1879, water and hydrant 






rent, etc. 


53,068 17 




1880, water and hydrant 






rent, etc. 


57,395 25 




sale of grass . 


10 00 




level, transit, etc. . 


250 00 



87 



1881, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . *60,154 62 

sale of grass . . . 10 00 

sale of derrick . . 50 00 

received of G. G. Griffin 1 00 



Total .... .1419,091 34 

Amount appropriated to Dec. 31, 1881 . . 640,000 00 



Total received to date . . 81,059,091 34 

Deduct bills approved to date . . 898,131 14 



8160,960 20 
Amount paid toward interest . . . 153,000 00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1881 . . 87,960 20 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



88 
USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 




2 Cemeteries. 


11 Churches. 




1 Orphanage. 


1 Court-house. 




1 Post-office. 


2 Hose- companies. 




1 City Library. 


4 Fire-engines. 




5 Banks. 


1 Hook-and-ladder. 




5 Hotels. 


2 Opera-houses. 




1 Masonic Hall. 


1 Music Hall. 




1 Odd Fellows' Hall. 


1 Convent. 




1 Holly-tree Inn. 


1 City Hospital. 




8 Halls. 


1 Old Ladies' Home. 




18 School-houses. 


1 Solders' Monument. 




1 Battery-building. 


MANUFACTURING 


ESTABLISHMENTS. 


1 Iron foundry. 




2 Sash and blind shops 


2 Dye-houses. 




2 Breweries. 


2 Machine-shops. 




2 Shoe-shops. 


6 Clothing manufactories. 


1 Pop-corn. 


3 Harness-shops. 




1 Gas-works. 


1 Brush-shop. 




3 Slaughter-houses. 


2 Carriage-shops. 




1 Soap manufactory. 


2 Cigar-shops. ' 




1 Needle manufactory. 


1 Brass and copper foundry 






MARKETS. 


4 Fish. 




1 Meat (wholesale). 


10 Meat and fish. 








STABLES. 


226 Private. 




9 Livery. 


1 Horse-railroad. 









' 89 




OFFICES. 


6 Dentists. 


5 Printing. 


1 Telplione. 


1 Gas. 


1 Telegraph. 


3 Coal. 


2 Express. 






SHOPS. 


20 Barber. 


2 Currying. 


1 Wheelwright. 


4 Plumber and gas and wa- 


6 Blacksmith. 


ter pipe. 


3 Carpenter. 


5 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 


1 Gunsmitk. 




STORES. 


4 Auction. 


57 Grocery. 


19 Drug. 


2 Meal. 


6 Jewelry. 


3 Hardware. 


1 Fur. 


20 Boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing goods. 8 Stove. 


20 Fancy goods. 


11 Gents' furnishing goods. 


1 Wholesale paper. 


6 Book. 


2 Wholesale produce. 


1 Leather and shoe finders. 


12 Dry goods. 


3 Music. 


4 Candy. 


3 Upholstery. 


1 Crockery. 


4 Undertakers. 


1 Cloak. 


4 Cigar. 


10 Millinery. 


5 Sewing-machine. 


2 Tea. 


1 Feather-cleaner. 


2 Furniture. 






SALOONS. 


7 Dining. 


50 Liquor. 


6 Billiard. 





90 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



1 Club-room. 

2 Bleacheries. 
9 Laundries. 

2 Ice-houses. 

8 Photographers. 



3 Greenhouses. 
1 Band-room. 
11 Bakeries. 
1 Waste. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 



4477 Families. 

76 Boarding-houses. 
5511 Faucets. 

806 Wash bowls. 

805 Water-closets. 

222 Wash-tubs. 

256 Bath-tubs. 



100 Urinals. 
1046 Sill cocks. 
328 Fire hydrants. 

9 Stand pipes. 
13 Water-troughs. 
737 Horses. 
33 Cattle. 



91 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 

PIPE. 



757 ft. 20 in. pipe. 
540 ft. 12 in. pipe. 
804 ft. 10 in. pipe. 
360 ft. 6 in. pipe. 



641 ft. 14 in. pipe. 
156 ft. 12 in. 'flange pipe. 
1470 ft. 8 in. pipe. 
300 ft. 4 in. pipe. 



31 J ft. 8 in. wrought-iron pipe. 



1 double 6 on 6. 
1 double 6 on 14. 
1 double 6 on 10. 

1 double 6 on 8. 

2 single 12 on 14. 

2 single 6 on 14. 

3 single 6 on 8. 

1 single 12 on 12. 



1 4 in. Eddy spigot. 

2 10 in. Ludlow hubs. 
1 8 in. Ludlow hub. 



1 8 in. 1-4 bend. 
1 12 in. 1-8 bend. 

1 4 in. 1-4 bend. 

6 20 in. solid sleeves. 

2 14 in. solid sleeves. 
2 10 in. solid sleeves. 

2 6 in. solid sleeves. 
1 4 in. solid sleeve. 

3 20 in. clamp sleeves. 



BRANCHES. 

1 double 6 on 12. 
1 double 10 on 12. 

1 double 4 on 6. 

2 single 6 on 20. 

4 single 6 on 10, • 
6 single 6 on 6. 

3 single 6 on 14. 

GATES. 

9 6 in. Ludlow hubs. 
1 12 in. Boston Machine Co. 
spigot. 

BENDS. 

5 6 in. 1-8 bend. 

I 8 X 12 in. reducer. 

3 14 in. clamp sleeves. 

4 12 in. clamp sleeves. 
3 10 in. clamp sleeves. 

II 8 in. clamp sleeves. 
7 6 in. clamp sleeves. 
2 hydrant foot pieces. 



92 



SUPPLIES AND TOOLS ON HAND AT COURT-HOUSE. 



1800 ft. inch pipe. 

130 ft, 2 inch pipe. 
1800 ft. 3-4 inch pipe. 
90 ft. 1-2 inch pipe. 
45 ft. 1-4 inch pipe. 
15 2 inch couplings. 
41 1 inch couplings R. & L. 

4 1 1-4 X 1 inch couplings. 
76 3-4 inch couplings. 
83 3-4 inch couplings R.&L. 
30 1-2 inch couplings. 
26 1-2 iji. couplings R .& L. 
10 3-4 X 1-2 in. couplings. 

3 2 inch ells. 

3 1 1-2 tnch ells. 
13 1 X 3-4 inch ells. 
17 1 inch ells. 
32 3-4 inch ells. 
44 3-4 X 1-2 inch ells. 
52 1-2 inch ells. 

3 1 1-2 X 1 inch old lead 
connections. 
4 3-4 inch dies. 
2 1-2 inch dies. 
8 2 inch nipples. 

2 1 1-4 inch nipples. 
6 1 inch nipples. 

179 3-4 inch nipples. 
40 1-2 inch nipples. 

3 1 1-2 inch iron unions. 
3 1 1-4 inch iron unions. 

' 6 1 inch iron unions. 



3 14 inch cement plugs. 
2 12 inch cast-iron plugs. 

1 20 inch gate-dome. 

4 15 inch gate-dome. 

2 10 inch gate-dome. 

3 1 inch Corp. stops (for 

cast-iron pipe). 
12 3-4 inch corp. stops (for 

cast-iron pipe) 
36 1-2 inch corp. stops (for 
cast-iron pipe). 

17 1-2 inch soldering cocks 
(cement pipe). 

bQ 1-2 inch nipples (for con- 
nections). 

52 1 inch solder nipples. 

33 3-4 inch solder nipples. 

29 1 inch curb stops. 

1 1 1-4 stop and waste. 

3 1 1-4 soldering nipples. 
6 1 inch crosses. 

12 3-4 inch crosses. 
21 1-2 inch union nuts. 

1 1 inch brass union. 

2 3-4 inch stop and waste. 
1 1 inch Chapman valve. 

116 brass meter nuts. 

4 balls of wicking. 

30 1-2 inch washers. 

1 20 inch brass spindle. 
1 14 inch brass spindle. 

3 6 inch brass spindles. 



93 



9 3-4 iiicli iron unions. 

7 1-2 inch iron unions. 
52 3-4 inch caps. 
20 1 X 3-4 inch bushings. 
22 3-4 X 1-2 incli bushings. 
27 6 in. clamps 1-2 in. stop. 

7 8 in. clamps 3-4 in. stop. 

4 8 in, clamps 3-4 in. stop 

(new style). 
1 washer cutter. 

1 die plate. 
18 dies R. & L. 1-2 to 1 in. 

6 taps R. & L. 1-2 to 1 in. 

2 bushings 1-8 to 3-4 inch. 

2 pipe cutters. 
1 die plate, 4 bushings. 

5 dies 1-2 to 1-8 inch. 

3 files. 

1 coal hod. 

6 14 in. clamps 3-4 in. stop. 
5 14 in. clamps 1-2 in. stop. 

2 4 in. clamps 3-4 in. stop. 

2 4 in. clamps 1-2 in. stop. 

4 clamps without stop 

cocks. 

8 in. clamps 1-2 in. stop. 

5 8 in. clamps 3-4 in. stop. 

1 12 in. clamp 3-4 in. stop. 
1 12 in. clamp 3-4 in. stop. 

3 12 in. clamps 1-2 in. stop. 
1 foreplane. 
1 smoothing plane. 

1 mallet. 

2 hand saws. 



5 solder coppers and pot. 

5 red lanterns. 

6 common lanterns. 

1 dark lantern. 

2 meter lanterns. 
1 reflector lantern. 
1 coil tin pipe. 

1 coil lead pipe. 
250 pounds -4 inch pipe. 
123 pounds 1 1-4 inch pipe. 
3 drills, 4 ft. 2in. long. 

2 drills, 3 feet long. 
5 drills, 2 ft. 6 in. long. 

5 drills, 2 feet long. 
8 drills, 1 ft. 8 in. long. 

6 plug drills, 8 in. long. 

2 sets blocks. 

3 iron bars. 
5 large meter boxes. 

4 small meter boxes. 
1 wood stove. 

1 glass cutter. 

2 gallons kerosene oil. 

5 square-top box covers. 
4 2 quart oil cans. 
2 quarts sperm oil. 
1 3 feet cubic measure. 

1 platform scale. 

2 wood saws. 
2 vises. 
1-2 side leather. 

1 pair rubber mitts. 

2 collars for hydrants. 
1 spoon shovel. 



94 



1 buck saw. 

1 iron saw. 

1 brace and 5 bits. 

1 extension bit. 

1 bevel square. 

1 iron square. 

1 grindstone. 

1 ax. 

1 oil stone. 

1 long cable chain. 
25 blasting tubes. 
17 R. P. shovels. 

I iron snow-shovel. 
31 picks and handles. 

1 3 gallon can. 

86 pounds gasket. 
1700 pounds pig lead. 

16 iron pails. 
1 iron jack for drilling. 

1 sledge hammer. 

3 calking hammers. 

7 striking hammers. 

8 calking tools. 
25 gate covers. 

3 barrels pipe clay. 

3 20 in. sleeves (clamp) 

2 14 in. sleeves (clamp) 

2 14 in. solid sleeves. 

4 12 in. sleeves (clamp) 

3 10 in. sleeves (clamp), 
2 10 in. solid sleeves. 

II 8 in sleeves (clamp). 
1 8 in. solid sleeve. 

7 6 in. sleeves (clamp). 



5 long shovels. 
100 hydrant nuts. 

6 tamping tools. 

21 hydrant packings. 
1 iron kettle. 
1 bushel basket. 

6 hydrant covers. 

1 iron brand, M. W. W. 

1 steel stamp, M. W. W. 

7 hydrant caps. 
15 gate wrenches. 

2 furnaces and kettles. 
2 tool boxes. 

2 paving hammers. 

6 cold chisels 

1 large furnace and irons. 

1 lot rope. 

1 bench. 

1 roll of enamel cloth. 

1 chain for hydrant. 

6 hydrant wrenches. 

1 hydrant ring for rods. 

2 iron rimmers. 
1 ice chisel. 

7 stop wrenches. 

, 10 hydrant valves (iron). 

1 pair chain tongs. 

3 pair extension tongs. 

2 pipe wrenches. 

2 meter wrenches. 

4 monkey wrenches. 

1 pair blacksmith tongs. 

2 ratchet drillers and 6 drills 
2 drill machines and tools. 



95 



2 6 ill. solid sleeves. 
1 4 in. solid sleeve. 
1 6 inch cap. 

1 iron rake. 

1 cap and stop-cock for 

hydrant. 
1 lot meter packings. 
7 torches. 
1 bench block. 
1 foot-lathe and tools. 
1 hydrant brnsh. 

1 pair tongs for hydrant. 
5 spoons for drilling. 

9 hydrant boxes. 
15 hydrant rods. 

3 paint pails. 

2 chains. 

1-2 cord wood. 

4 large paint brushes. 
1 painter's dust brush. 
1 vstop-cock punch. 

1 meter tank with gauge. 
11 pounds hemp packing. 
1 shop desk. 

1 iron sink. 

2 gross No. 9 screws. 
1 hose nozzle. 



1 chain pulley. 

1 machine hammer. 

1 nail hammer. 

2 iron wedges. 
1 draw knife. 

1 lot of old picks. 

8 pole derricks and 3 poles. 
6 cold chisels for cast-iron. 

2 mauls. 

1 tool chest. 

2 screw drivers. 
5 mortise chisels. 

10 molding tools. 

1 ladder. 
150 3-4 inch bolts. 

1 long and short jointer. 

1 set derrick irons. 
60 1-2 inch bolts. 

1 die wrench. 

2 hydrant packing wrenches. 
5 cans of Royal Enamel. 

1 anvil. 

1 anvil stake and chisel. 
1 pair stone hooks. 
1 stone chain. 

1 lot coal. 

2 wedges. 



METERS. 



2 5-8 in. Union rotary. 
2 3 4 in. Union rotary. 

5 5-8 in. Union piston. 

6 3-4 in. Union piston. 
2 1 in. Desper. 



1 3-4 in. Desper. 
1 3-4 in. Worth ington. 
9 5-8 in. Gem. 
1 3-4 in. Gem. 



96 



INVENTORY OF FURN 

6 drawing boards. 
1 wardrobe. 
1 copying press. 
1 roll tracing paper. 
1 drawing table. 

1 library desk. 

2 waste baskets. 
1 six-foot pole. 

3 stools. 
1 duster. 

1 map of city. 

1 map of city, framed. 

1 map of New Hampshire. 

1 roll mounted paper. 

2 quires drawing paper. 
1 lot of book paper. 

1 lot of fuel. 



ITURE, ETC., IN OFFICE. 

1 book-case. 

1 table. 

1 12 in. pressure-gauge. 

1 6 in. pressure-gauge. 

1 bill stamp. 

3 inkstands. 

1 lot drawings. 

1 plan Massabesic lake. 

1 safe. 

1 pair scissors. 

1 cork-screw. 

1 bottle ink. 

1 case drawers. 

1 stove. 

2 erasers. 

1 lot reports. 
1 directory. 



INVENTORY OF TOOLS AT THE PUMPING STATION. 



1 scoop-shovel. 

4 common shovels. 
1 desk. 

1 one-inch auger. 

5 lanterns. 

3 monkey-wrenches. 
1 square. 
1 plumb square. 
1 sprinkler-pot. 
1 clock. 

1 washer cutter. 

2 planes. 

2 thermometers. 



^l axes. 

4 oil cans. 
2 oil tanks. 

25 pounds waste. 
12 pounds tallow. 
50 pounds black lead. 

5 cords wood. 
18 tons coal. 

2 ice chisels. 
2 cold chisels. 
2 wood chisels. 

2 hammers. 

3 drip pans. 



97 



4 crow-bars. 

1 bellows and anvil. 

2 pipe wrenches. 
1 window brush. 
1 gate wrench. 

1 long key. 
1 hydrant wrench. 
1 wheelbarrow. 
1 five-pail kettle. 

3 picks. 

1 clothes drier. 

2 ladders. 
2 stoves. 

2 coal hods. 

1 coal sifter. 

2 gallons sperm oil. 

1 bench 

2 levels. 

1 waste press. 

1 Scotch driller. 

2 nozzles. 

1 pair shears. 

1 pair pliers. 

1 wire cutter. 

1 boat. 

1 set steps. 

1-2 barrel oil. 

1 jack screw. 

1 brace and six bits. 

1 trowel. 

2 wood saws. 
2 hand saws. 

1 iron slush bucket. 

7 



6 pounds hemp packing. 

1 draw shave. 

2 screw plates, taps and dies 
1 vise. 

200 feet 7-8 in. hose. 
100 feet 3-4 in. hose. 

1 iron rake. 

2 set dog chains. 

1 set blacksmith's tools. 

1 bushel basket. 

2 pieces Scotch sewer pipe. 
1 force pump. 

' 1 bill hook. 

1 clevis and pin. 
1 harrow. 
1 timber roll. 
4 sprinkling pots. 
1 lot lumber. 
1 lot old iron. 

3 oil barrels. 

4 mortar hoes. 
1 iron shovel. 

150 feet hose. 

1 No. 5 plow. 
3 grub hoes. 

3 bush scythes and snaths. 

2 axes. 

1 bellows. 

4 water-pails. 
10 mason hods. 

1 lot of old wheelbarrows. 
1 lot of old shovels. 
1 20-inch gate. 



98 



1 socket wrench. 
6 fork wrenches. 

2 screen rakes. 

1 10 in. arbor for babbitting. 
1 flash-board hook. 



1 set blocks and fall. 
1 bench brush. 
1 broom brush. 
1 broom. 



REPORT 

OF THE it 

TECSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



AI^NUAL EEPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith submit their 
twenty-eighth annual report of the affairs and condition of 
the library, and, with it, the report made to them by the 
treasurer of the board, showing. the expenditures made for 
books and periodicals, and also the report of the librarian, 
which shows in detail the operation of the library during 
the past year, and the condition of the library and other 
property under her charge at the close of the year. 

From the report of the treasurer, it appears that during 
the year there has been expended for the purchase of 
books the sum of eight hundred forty-two dollars and 
twenty-four cents, and for the purchase of periodicals the 
sum of one hundred sixty-two dollars and twenty-five cents, 
being a total expenditure, for these two purposes, of one 
thousand four dollars and forty-nine cents, and leaving 
a balance in the hands of the treasurer at the close of the 
year of seven hundred sixty-seven dollars and thirty-nine 
cents. Besides the usual appropriation from the city, the 
treasurer has received from the librarian, on account of 
fines collected from persons failing to comply with the 



102 

regulations of the libraiy in regard to the return of books, 
the sum of twenty dollars and twenty-eight cents, and the 
further sum of twenty-five dollars and ninety-seven cents, 
received from sale of catalogues and in payment of books 
that had been lost. The })alance above indicated, together 
with the accumulated income of the Dean fund, which now 
amounts to the sum of three thousand eighty-two dol- 
lars and eleven cents, constitutes the funds in the hands of 
the trustees at the end of the fiscal year, applicable for the 
purchase of books for the increase of the library. 

The report of the librarian shows that the library has 
been open to the public two hundred and fifty days, and for 
the delivery of books two hundred and thirty-six days, dur- 
ing which latter time the number of books in circulation 
has been thirty-eight thousand one hundred and twenty-two. 
In addition to this number delivered for general circulation, 
four thousand nine hundred and sixteen books and maga- 
zines have been used at the leading-room at the library, 
making the total number delivered during the year forty- 
three thousand and thirty-eight. The circulation of books 
for the past year has been considerably less than that of 
several previous years, the decrease being due to the fact 
that the trustees were compelled to close the library while 
the work upon the addition to the library building was in 
progress. The library was closed on the eighth of October, 
and remained closed till the end of the year. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the 
last report was twenty-four thousand three hundred and 
seventy-six. There have been added during the year, by 
purchase, three hundred and forty volumes ; by donation, 
two hundred and fifty-three volumes ; and seventy-one vol- 
umes of periodicals have been bound, making the number 
of bound volumes now in the library twenty-three thousand 
three hundred and seventy-four, and the total number, 



103 

including maps and pamphlets, twenty-five thousand and 
forty volumes. 

Fifty-three different periodicals have been regularly 
received at the library during the year ; and, as fast as the 
volumes have been completed, they have been bound and 
placed upon the shelves for general circulation. 

Sixty-five volumes have been withdrawn from circulation 
during the year, having become so worn and defaced by 
constant use as to be no longer fit for service. 

A list of the books presented to this library during the 
year will be found annexed to the report of tiie librarian ; 
and to those who have so substantially manifested their inter- 
est in the prosperity of the library and aided in its increase, 
the trustees, in behalf of the city, tender their thanks. 

The expenditures for the incidental charges of the library 
for the year have been sixteen hundred ninety-five dollars 
and forty-eight cents. The details of these expenditures, 
the bills for which have been paid by the city treasurer, 
may be found at length in the annual report of the city. 
The balance of three hundred thirty-four dollars and 
fifty-one cents of cash on hand at the close of the year, is 
due in part to the fact that the supply of fuel for the year 
ensuing has not yet been purchased on account of contem- 
plated changes in the construction of the present coal-bins. 

Mention was made in the last report of the trustees, that 
the committee on lands and buildings, in conjunction with 
the trustees of the library, were authorized to procure 
plans and estimates for an addition to the library building. 
During the early part of the year, a plan for said addition, 
prepared by A. G. Stevens, Esq., in accordance with the 
instructions of such committee, was adopted. The city 
councils, without delay, voted to build the proposed addition 
according to the plan that had been adopted, and author- 
ized the same committee to contract with competent 






104 

persons for its erection. Proposals were invited througli 
advertisements in the daily papers, and the contract finally 
awarded to Wilbcrforce Ireland, Esq. Shortly after work 
was commenced upon the building, the trustees, in order to 
preserve the property and books in the library from loss or 
damage, were compelled to close the library, and it has not 
yet been reopened. The trustees regret that the public 
have for so long a period been deprived of the use and ad- 
vantages of the library, but hope that the increased facili- 
ties that will accrue when the addition is finished, will more 
tha I compensate for the temporary deprivation. 

The work upon tlie addition has now so far advanced 
that the library will be again opened for the delivery of 
books at an early day. 

The vacancy. caused by the resignation of Mr. Fred C. 
Foote, the assistant to the librarian, has l)een filled by the 
trustees, by the appointment of Mr. George W. Cook, who 
entered upon the discharge of his duties in the early part of 
the year. 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, the efficient librarian, has continued 
to discharge the duties pertaining'to her office with fidelity 
and to the approval of the board, and, so far as we are 
aware, to the satisfaction of the public. 

January 20, 1882. 
In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered to 
be signed by the cliairman and clerk of the board, and 
transmitted to the city councils. 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor. 
N. P. HUNT, Clerk. 



TEE AS USER'S REPOET. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : — 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds 
received by them on account of the City Library : — 

1881. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation, etc., as 

per last report . . . f 725 63 
March 18. cash of Mrs. M. J. Buncher for 

fines 20 28 

cash of Mrs. M. J. Buncher, cat- 
alogues, etc. . . . 25 97 
July 6. appropriation for 1881 for pur- 

cliase of books . 
Jan. 1. balance of income 

of Dean fund 
income of Dean fund 
July 1. income of Dean fund 

interest on accumu 
lation of income . 
interest on accumu- 
lation of income . 



14,853 99 



• 


1,000 00 


i2,642 67 
153 00 
153 00 




73 84 




59 60 


$3,082 11 





106 






1881. 




Cr. 


Jan. 


11. 


PaidN. E. News Co., periodicals 


$14 43 




22. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


54 79 


Feb. 


8. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


13 18 




14. 


George W. Wing, books 


36 50 




18. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


136 10 




24. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


86 48 


Marcl 


I 4. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


11 39 




8. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


30 37 




18. 


Geo. H. Policy & Co., period! 






. 


cals .... 


12 00 


April 


8. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


10 49 


May 


5. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


12 01 




12. 


Lee & Sliepard, books . 


89 02 




21. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


32 81 


June 


o 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


. ' 13 41 




6. 


Geo. H. PoUey & Co., books . 


20 00 




13. 


Boston Society Nat. History 


10 00 




29. 


H. H. Everett, books 


8 33 


July 


7. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals . 


9 57 


Aug. 


2. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


61 46 




10. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


12 98 


Sept. 


6. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


11 25 


Oct. 


4. 


George H. Hubbard, books 


1 00 




5. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


9 29 


Nov. 


8. 


• N. E. News Co., periodicals 


11 69 




15. 


Geo. H. Policy & Co., books 


190 00 


Dec. 


6. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


10 56 




9. 


Lee & Shepard, books 


95 38 




31. 


By balance of appropriation . 


767 39 






income of Dean fund 


3,082 11 




$4,853 99 



107 

The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library 
for the year ending December 31, 18(S1, the items -of which 
will be found in detail in the annual report of the city, are 
as follows : — 



Services of librarian 






1600 00 


Services of assistant librarian 






235 50 


Gas 






218 18 


Binding 






82 44 


Rebinding .... 






128 90 


Insurance .... 






82 50 


Fuel 






221 04 


Water 






5 00 


Printing and advertising 






97 24 


Incidentals .... 






74 68 




11,695 48 



RECAPITULATION. 



Balance Dec. 31, 1880 . 
Appropriation for 1881 . 



829 99 
3,000 00 



Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000 00 
Incidental expenses . . . 1,695 48 
Balance Dec. 31, 1881 ... 334 51 



$3,029 99 



$3,029 99 



Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 



108 

December 31, 1881. 
We have examined the above report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

H. B. PUTNAM, 
WM. P. NEWELL, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 31, 1881. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the treasurer of the trustees of the City Library, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBKAEIAN^S EEPOET. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : — 

1 respectfully submit to you the annual report of the con- 
dition of the library during the year ending December 31, 

1881. 

Whole number of volumes Dec. 81, 1880 . 24,376 

Accessions during the year : — 

By purchase ..... 340 

Donated .268 

Periodicals bound . . . .71 



Whole number of volumes at present : 
Maps ..... 
Pamphlets .... 
Bound volumes 



Number of periodicals and papers regularly re 

ceived ..... 
Number of days open to the public . 
Days open for delivery of books 
Volumes in circulation during the time 
Average per day .... 
Largest number any one day, March 5 



. 16 


UU'± 


1,650 




23,374 






25 040 


larly re- 


^ukJ ,V^\/ 


. 


53 


. 


250 


. 


236 


, 


38,122 


, , 


161.53 


. 


460 



no 



Whole number of books, magazines, etc., used 
in the library ..... 

Average per day . 

Number of guarantees received 

Whole number received since the new registra 
tion, July 31, 1880 

Number of persons using books on deposit 

Postals sent for books overdue 

Number of worn-out books, and taken from the 
shelves ...... 

Replaced books ..... 

Number of books repaired at bindery 

Repaired and covered in the library 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1880 . 
AmouQt received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1881 



4,916 

19.7 

843 



2,497 
9 

380 



65 

8 

439 

4,072 

820 28 
59 30 



Amount paid for express, station- 
ery, and other incidental ex- 
penses ..... 

Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 



$45 48 
20 28 



$19 58 



!5 76 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1881 



813 82 



Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1880, for cata- 
logues sold and books lost, and waste paper 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1881 : 
For 3 new catalogues at $1.00 . |3 00 



For 11 new cataloojues at 75 cents 



8 25 



$37 70 



$0 70 
2 60 


$14 45 




. 


$52 15 
37 70 


. 


$14 45 
13 82 



111 

For 2 old catalogues at 35 cents 
For 3 lost books 



Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 

Balance received for fines 

Total balance on hand Dec. 31, 1881 . $28 27 

It will be observed that the foregoing report shows a con- 
siderable decrease in the circulation of books the past year, 
but the cause must be generally understood, not only by the 
members of the board, but also by the public. The first 
six months of the year was in advance of any preceding 
six months, showing a circulation of 26,920 books, but the 
disturbed condition of the library the last half of the year 
(being closed on the 8th of October for repairs) explains 
the reduction in figures. The same will be seen in the use 
of the reading-room. There are other causes that might 
be mentioned for this decrease, viz.: the increased number 
visiting the reading-rooms of the Y. M. C. Association, or, 
as has been suggested by the librarian of a neighboring 
city for the same condition, " the improvement in busi- 
ness giving employment to many who would otherwise 
spend their time in these resorts." 

Of the missing books of last year (1880), six have been 
returned', one lost, paid for. Three of the missing books, 
at the examination in 1879, have come in, and one lost, paid 
for. At the present examination there are but eight books 
missing, viz. : one history, one travels (French), one art, 
four fiction, and one juvenile ; one book lost, and paid for 



112 

by the guarantor. The number of missing books for the past 
year is much smaller than at any annual examination since 
I have been in charge, and proves very conclusively the 
improvement of the new system of delivery over the old. 

The number of books repaired at bindery is in excess 
of previous years. They were mostly juvenile books, fiction, 
and travels, in constant use. The largest proportion of 
them were old books, but many of the new ones are so 
poorly bound tliat they require repairing before the covers 
are hardly soiled, and it seems better economy to repair 
them before the loose leaves are allowed to slip out and 
render the books as useless as worn-out ones. 

In closing, I desire to express my belief, that, notwith- 
standing the interruptions, the year just closed shows as 
steady an increase in interest and real progress as any pre- 
ceding it ; and I do cordially express my appreciation of 
the faithful and efficient services of my assistant, George 
W. Cook, and my grateful acknowledgments to the treas- 
urer of the Board of Trustees for his kind and considerate 
assistance. 

Respectfully, 

M. J. BUNCHER, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY 

From January 1, 1881, to December 31, 1881. 



Hon. Moody Currier, Manchester, N. H. 
Thirty-nine volumes, viz. : — 

Six volumes of Neander's History of the Christian Re- 
ligion. Translated from the German by Joseph 
Torrey, Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philos- 
ophy in the University of Vermont. 
Fourteen volumes of the Works of St. Augustine. A new 
translation, comprising, viz. : — 

The City of God. 

Writings in connection with the Donatist Controversy. 

The Anti-Pelagian Works of St. Augustine. 

Writings in connection with the Manichaean Heresy. 

Letters of St. Augustine. 

On the Trinity. 

Harmony of the Evangelists, and the Sermon on the 
Mount. 

On Christian Doctrine. The Enchiridion. 

On Catechising, and on Faith and the Creed. 

Lectures or Tractates on the Gospel of St. John. 
Nineteen volumes of the Ante-Nicene Christian Library, 
comprising, viz. : — 

Tlie Apostolic Fathers. 

Tatian, Theophilus, and the Clementine Recognitions. 

9 



114 

The Refutations of all Heresies. By Hippolytus. 

The Five Books of Tertullianus against Marcion. 

The Writings of Irenaeas. 

The Writings of Origen. 

The Writings of Tertullian. 

The Writings of Clement of Alexandria. 

The Writings of Methodius, Alexander of Lycopolis, 
and Peter of Alexandria, etc. 

Apocryphal Gospels, Acts and Revelations. 

The Clementine Homilies. The Apostolical Consti- 
tution. 

The Seven Books of Arnobius Adversus Gentes. 

The Works of Gregory Thaumaturgus, Dionysius of 
Alexandria, and Archelaus. 

The Works of Lactantius, together with the Testa- 
ments of the Twelve Patriarchs, and Fragments of 
the Second and Third Centuries. 

Liturgies and other Documents of the Ante-Nicene 
Period. 
Mrs. Herman Foster, Manchester, N. H. 

Seventeen volumes of bound newspapers, viz. : — 

Nine volumes of the Independent Chronicle and Bos- 
ton Patriot (semi-weekly), from the year 1826 to 
July 31, 1839. 

Three volumes of the Boston Courier (semi-weekly), 
from July 20, 1835, to February 18, 1841. 

Five volumes of the semi-weekly Advertiser, Independ- 
ent Chronicle, Boston Patriot, Columbian Sentinel, 
New England Palladium, and Commercial Gazette, 
united, from June 10, 1840, to December 29, 1819. 
George W. Riddle, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Sixteen bound volumes of State Reports on Agriculture, 
Horticulture, etc., viz: 



115 

Transactions of the Michigan State Agricultural Soci- 
ety, with Reports of County Agricultural Societies, 
for the years 1849, 1850, 1851, 1853, and 1854. 

Transactions of the Illinois State Agricultural Society, 
with Reports from County Agricultural Societies 
and kindred Associations, for the years 1867-68. 

Transactions of the Auricultural Societies of Massa- 
cliusetts for the year 1848. 

Seventh Annual Report of the Board of Agriculture 
of the State of Ohio for the year 1852. 

First and Second Annual Report of the Indiana State 
Board of Agriculture for the years 1852-53. 

Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Soci- 
ety for the years 1877-78, 

Transactions of the New England Society. First An- 
nual Exhibition at Springfield, Mass., Sept. 6, 7, 8, 
and 9, 1864, with address from Gov. John A. An- 
drew of Mass. 

Transactions of the Vermont Dairymen's Association 
in 18159-70. 

Proceedings of the Third Session of the American 
Poiiiological Society, and Fifth Meeting of this Na- 
tional Association held on the 13th, 14th, and 15th 
of Sept., 1854. 

Centennial edition of the Fourth Annual Report of the 
State Board of Agriculture to the Legislature of the 
State of Kansas for the year 1875. 

In addition to the above sixteen volumes are twenty- 
five bound volumes, duplicates, and two hundred 
pamphlets not yet selected. 
Little, Brown, & Co., Publishers, Boston. 

Public Hygiene in America. By Henry I. Bowditch, 
M. D. 12mo. 



116 

D. Appleton & Co., New York, Publishers. 

Progress and Poverty. By Henry George. 1881. 12mo. 
Unknown Source. 

The Credit Mobilier of America. Its Origin and His 
tory. 1881. 12mo. 
Sampson, Davenport, & Co., Boston, Publishers. 

Manchester Directory for 1880. 8vo. 
W. Heron, Jr., Manchester, N. H. 

Gaskell's 'Compendium of Forms. 4to. 
Rev. C. W. Wallace, Manchester, N. H. 

The Centennial Celebration of the Settlement of Ban- 
gor, Me. 1869. 8vo. 
New Jersey State Library. 

New Jersey Archives. First series. Vol. 1, 1631-1687. 
Vol. 2, 1687-1703. 8vo. 
H. B. Putnam, Mayor, Manchester, N. H. 

Sixty-Third Annual Report of the Trustees of the New 
York State Library for the year 1880. 8vo. 
J. W. Patterson, Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
Thirty-Fifth Annual Report upon the Public Schools 
of New Hampshire, June session, 1881. 8vo. 
Unknown Source. 

A General Index to the, Contents of Fourteen Popular 
Treatises on Natural Philosophy. 8vo. 
J. W. Underbill, President of the Board of Education. 
Fifty-First Annual Report of the Common Schools of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 1880. 8vo. 
Joseph B. Walker, Concord, N. H. 

A Meiijoriai Sketch of the Life and Character of Eze- 
kiel Webster Diamond, late Professor of General 
and Agricultural Chemistry in the New Hampshire 
College of Agriculture. 1877. Pamphlet. 



117 

COBDEN Club, London, England. 

History of the Free Trade Movement in England. 
By Augustus Mongredien. 16mo. 

Free Trade and Tariffs. By John Flagg, M. P. 
Pamphlet. 

Imports, Exports, and the French Treaty. By J. R. 
Crdss, Esq., M. P. Pamphlet. 

The French Treaty and Reciprocity. By Right Hon. 
Joseph Chamberlain, M. P. Pamphlet. 

The Reciprocity Craze. By George W. Medley. 
Pamphlet. 
J. P. Whitney, Buffalo, N. Y. 

California and Colonization. 1879. Pamphlet. • 
C. F. Livingston, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Proceedings of the Twelfth and Thirteenth Annual 
Meetings of the New Hampshire Press Association, 
held at Concord, N. H., January 17, 1879, and Jan- 
uary 19, 1880. 

Daily Springfield Republican for the year 1877. 
The Historical Association, Lowell, Mass. 

Contributions of the Old Residents of that City. Vol. 
IL, No. 1. 1880. Pamphlet. 
Hon. Harry Bingham, Littleton, N. H. 

The Centennial Address, delivered at Littleton, N. H., 
July 4, 1876. Pamphlet. 

Memorial Day Address, delivered before Marshall 
Sanders Post, No. 48 G. A. R., Littleton, N. H., 
May 31, 1880. Pamphlet. 

An Address delivered before the Alumni of Dartmouth 
College, Hanover, N. H., June 23, 1880. 
Thomas H Dodge, Esq., Worcester, Mass. 

The Jubilee Sabbath of Piedmont Church, Wor- 
cester, June 5, 1881. 



118 

Frederick H. Hedge, Jr., Librarian. 

Ninth Annual Report of the Board of Trustees and 

Librarian of the Free Public Library, Lawrence, 

Mass., for the year 1880. Pamphlet. 
Bulletins 30, 31, 32, and 33 of the Lawrence Public 

Library. 
Miss Mary A. Bean, Librarian. 

Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Trustees and 

Librarian of the Public Library, Brookline, Mass., 

for the year 1880. Pamphlet. 
Miss Carrie Worthen, Librarian. 

Tenth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Public 

Library of Melrose, Mass., for the year 1880. 
From the Several Librarians or Boards of Trustees. 
Twenty-first Annual Report of the Directors of the 

Free Public Library, Worcester. Mass., for 1880. 
Eleventh Annual Catalogue of the Worcester County 

Free Institute of Industrial Science for 1881. Pam- 
phlet. 
Third Report of the Librarian of the Public Library, 

Providence, R. I., for the year 1880. Pamphlet. 
Annual Report of the Public Library, Fall River, 

Mass., for the year 1880. Pamphlet. 
Twenty-fourth Annual Report of tlie Committee and 

Librarian of the Public Library, Woburn, Mass., 

March 1, 1881, and Bulletin of Accessions for 1880. 
Annual Report of the Trustees of the Fiee Library, 

Newton, Mass., for the year 1880. 
Annual Reports of the Directors of the City Library 

of the City' of Lowell, Mass., for the years 1879-80. 
Seventh Annual Report of the Directors of the Bige- 

low Free Library, Clinton, Mass., for the year 1880. 

Pamphlet. 



119 

Third Supplement to Catalogue of the Bigelow Free 
Library, Clinton, Mass. 1H80. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report of the Town Officers of Peterborough,- 
N. H., for the year 1880. Pamphlet. 

Third Annual Report of the Trustees of the Public 
Library of the City of Milwaukee, for the year end- 
ing Oct. 1, 1880 ; and Fourth Annual Report, end- 
ing Oct. 1, 1881. Pamphlet. 

Ninth Annual Report of the Board of Directors of the 
Chicago Public Library for the year ending June, 
1881. Pamphlet. 

Fourteenth Annual Report of the Provost to the Trus- 
tees of the Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 1881. 
Pamphlet. 

Sixteenth Annual Report of the Board of Directors of 
the Mercantile Library Association, City of New 
York. April, 1881. Pamphlet. 

Thirty-second Annual Report of the Trustees of the 
Astor Library, City of New York. Jan , 1881. 
Pamphlet. 

Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Mercantile Li- 
brary Association of San Francisco, Cal., for 1880. 

Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Council of the 
City of Manchester, England, on the Working of the 
Public Free Libraries. 1879-80. Pamphlet. 

Twenty-ninth Report for 1880-81. Pamphlet. 

Twenty-ninth Annual Report of the Boston Public 
Library for the year ending April 30, 1881 ; and 
Bulletins 9, 10, 11, and 12, Vol. IV., 1881. 

Bulletins of the Library Company, Philadelphia. New 
Series. No. 7. Pamphlet. 

Bulletins Nos. 12 and 13 of the Public School Library, 
St. Louis, Mo. 1880-81. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report of the School Committee of the Town 
of Peabody, Mass., for the year 1880. Pamphlet. 



120 

Borough of Swansea, Wales. 

Sixth Annual Report of the Public Library Associa- 
tion. 1879-70. Pamphlet. 
Seventh Annual Report of the Public Library and 
Gallery of Art. 1880-81. Pamphlet. 
E. M. Bowman, City Clerk, Nashua. 

Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Municipal Gov- 
ernment of the City of Nashua, N. H., for the year 
■ 1880. 
Hon. James F. Briggs, M. C. 

Report of the Silver Commission. Vol. I. 1876. 8vo. 
Report of Agriculture for the year 1879. 8vo. 
The American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac for 
the year 1884. First Edition. 8vo. 
United States Congress. 

Eighty-five volumes of Public Documents. 
Departments, Washington, D. C. 

Annual Report of Commissioner of Patents for the 

years 1879 and 1880. 8vo. 
Finance Report for 1880. 8vo, 
United States Coast Survey for 1877. 4to. 
Annual Report of the U. S. Life-Saving Service for 

1880. 8vo. 
Alphabetical List of Patentees and Inventions, July to 
December, inclusive, 1880 ; January to June, inclu- 
sive, 1881. 
United States Geological and Geographical Survey of 
the Territories (F. V. Hayden, Geologist-in- Charge), 
containing History of the North American Pinni- 
peds. 8vo. 
Second Report of the United States Entomological 
Commission for the years 1878-79. Relating to the 
Rocky Mountain Locust and the Western Cricket 
8vo. 



121 

Bulletin No. 6 of the U. S. Entomological Commission. 

Report of the United States Geological Survey of the 
Territories, F. V. Uayden, Geologist-in-Charge. 
Vol. XII. Containing the History of the Water 
Rhizopods of North America. By Prof. Leidy, M. D. 
4to. 1879. 

Bulletin 4 of Vol. Y., 1879, and 1 and 2 of Vol. VI., 
1880, of the United States Geological and Geograph- 
ical Survey of the Territories. 
Bureau of Education. 

Report of the Commissioner of Education for the year 
1879. 8vo. 

Circulars of Information, Nos. 4, 5, 6, and 7 of 1880, 
and Nos. 1, 2, and 3, 1881. 
Also pamphlets, — 

Literary Aids, The Discipline of the School, Education 
and Crime, etc. 
Smithsonian Institute. 

Bureau of Ethnology, J. W. Powell, Director. Intro- 
duction to the Study of Indian Languages. With 
Words, Phrases, and Sentences to be Collected. 
By J. W. Powell. 1880. 4to. 

Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institute for the 
year 1879. 8vo. 

Volume 23 of Contributions to Knowledge. 4to. 

Volumes 18, 19, 20, and 21 of Miscellaneous Collec- 
tions. 



REPOKT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1881, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

HORACE B. PUTNAM, Mayor, ex-officio Chairman. 

WILLIAM J. HOYT, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 

Ward 1.— Charles F. Everett, 54 Stark corporation. 

Frank T. E. Richardson, 49 M. S. B. 
Ward 2.— Benjamin C. Dean, Myrtle street, cor. Ash. 

Gerherdus L. Demarest, 54 Blodget street. 
Ward 3. — Daniel Clark, Lowell street, cor. Pine. 

William A. Webster, 581 Union street. 
Ward 4. — Walter M. Parker, Hanover, cor. Cliestnut. 

John T. Fanning, 360 Manchester street. 
Ward 5. — Denis F. O'Connor, 173 Central street. 

Charles A. O'Connor, Chandler House. 
Ward 6.— Abial C. Flanders, 308 Park street. 

Brackett B. Weeks, 382 Central street. 
Ward 7.— Marshall P. Hall, 54 Amoskeag corporation. 

Ezra Huntington, 13 M. P. W. corporation. 
Ward 8.— Louis E. Phelps, 220 Granite street (P.). 

Douglas Mitchell, 220 Granite street (P.). 



126 

CLERK OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. Accounts^ and Claims. — The Mayor, Messrs. 
Huntington, Hoyt, Fanning, Hall, Parker, Mitchell. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Phelps, Clark, Webster, Weeks, 
Huntington. 

Repairs^ Furniture, and Sujjplies. — Messrs. Flanders, 
Dean, Fanning, D. F. O'Connor, Parker. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Huntington, the Mayor, 
Fanning, Flanders, Phelps, Clark, Hoyt. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Webster, Clark, Par- 
ker, Dean, C. A. O'Connor. 

Text-Books and Apparatus. — Messrs. Dean, C. A. O'Con- 
nor, Weeks, Demarest, Clark. 

Employment of Children and Truancy. — Messrs. Mitch- 
ell, Webster, Everett, Richardson, Demarest. 

3Iusic. — Messrs. Richardson, D. F. O'Connor, Weeks, 
Flanders, Mitchell. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Mitchell, Demarest, Phelps, 
Fanning. 

Non-Resident Pupils. — Messrs. Weeks, Everett, Flan- 
ders, D. F. O'Connor, Richardson. 

Course of Study. — Messrs.' Demarest, Hall, Webster, 
C. A. O'Connor, Parker. 

Sanitary. — Messrs. Webster, Clark, Dean, Demarest, 
Fanning. 



I 



127 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School— Messvs. Clark, Dean, Parker, C. A. 
O'Connor, Hall, Webster, D.emarest. 

Ash Street. — Messrs. Dean, Webster, Deniarest, Phelps, 
C. A. O'Connor. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Demarest, Flanders, Weeks, 
Fanning, Clark. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. Everett, Parker, Flanders, 
Huntington, Demarest. 

Franklin Street.— Messrs. Huntington, Hall, Phelps,- 
Clark, Richardson. 

Lowell Street.— Messrs. Webster, C. A. O^Connor, 
Mitchell, Everett, Fanning. 

3Ianchester Street.-^UQSsvs. C. A. O'Connor, Weeks, 
Dean, D. F. O'Connor, Everett. 

Wihon Hill and Bridge Street. — Messrs. Parker, Fan- 
ning. Weeks, Phelps, Flanders. 

Training School. — Messrs. Hall, Clark, Dean, Elunting- 
ton, D. F. O'Connor. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Webster, D. F. O'Connor, Rich- 
ardson, Hall, Mitchell. 

Fiscataquog Grammar. — Messrs. Phelps, Mitchell, D. F. 
O'Connor, Weeks, Huntington. 

Center Street and South Main Street — Messrs. Mitch- 
ell, Phelps, Demarest, Flanders, Fanning. 

Amoskeag, Blodget Street, and Stark District. — Messrs. 
Richardson, Everett, Parker, Mitchell, Dean. 

Bakersville and Hallsville.— Messrs. Flanders, Hall, 
Webster, C. A, O'Connor, Phelps. 

aoffe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Weeks, 
Clark, D. F. O'Connor, Fanning, Richardson. 

Mosquito Fond, Webster s Mills, and Younssville. — 
Messrs. Fanning, Richardson, Everett, Parker, Webster. 

FJvening Schools.^ Messrs. D. F. O'Connor, Huntington, 
Flanders, Demarest, Hall. 



In Board of School Committee, 
January 6, 1882. 
The Superintendent read his annual report to the School Committee. 
Voted, That the report be accepted. 

The Clerk read the annual report which he had prepared at the re- 
quest of the Board. 

Voted, That the report be accepted, and adopted as the report of 
the Board, and that it be transmitted to the City Councils, together 
with the report of the Superintendent. 

Attest : 

M. P. HALL, Clerk. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citij Councils^ — 

Gkntlemi:n: — The School Committee present their an- 
nual report for the year 1881. 

Tl\e public schools have been in session one hundred and 
ei<ihty-fi\e days, or thirty-seven weeks of five days each. 
The number of schools at the beginning of the year was 
seventy-two ; at the close of the year, seventy, — one pri- 
mary sciiool on Spruce street, and another on Manchester 
street, having been closed at the beginning of the fall term, 
on account of the withdrawal of pupils to be placed in the 
French parochial schools. The number of teachers em- 
ployed at the beginning of the year was seventy- six ; at 
the close of the year, seventy-four. Six teachers have re- 
signed their places ; namely, Mrs. Mason, and Misses 
Green, Campbell, Stone, Chase, and Hubbard. They were 
all successful teachers and long in service, four of them 
hiving taught more than ten years each, in this city. The 
following-named new teachers have been appointed : Misses 
Webster, Gilford, Patten, James, and Gee. All of these 
except Miss Webster are graduates of the Training School. 



1^50 

The whole number of scholars enrolled in the day schools 
wa^ 4.235. The average number belonging was 2.858. j 
The average daily attendance was 2,602. The average jDer- 7 
centage of attendance, 91. The whole number enrolled was/ 
only 99 more than in 1880. The average number belang- J 
ing was 112 less, and the average attendance was 125 less. * 
The falling off took place in the last term of the year, and 
was occasioned almost wholly by the closing of the schools 
before mentioned. At the close of the year the whole num- 
ber lielonging to the schools bad probably been restored, 
more scholars having been placed in schools through 
the efforts of the truant officer than were withdrawn at 
the beginning of the fall term. There are four hundred or 
more children in the French schools ; so that the total 
number in all the schools of the city, public and private, 
has probably been increased three hundred during the past 
year. 

The usual promotions have been made from grade to 
grade. The number of pupils who completed the gram- 
mar-school course was sixty-two ; number of these who 
passed into the High School, fifty-four; whole number ad- 
mitted to the High, sixty-one ; number of graduates from 
High School, thirty-nine. The largest average attendance 
in one room was forty-six, at Goffe's Falls ; the smallest, 
five, in the Stark District. The average attendance at Web- 
ster's Mills was twelve, and at Mosquito Pond, fourteen. 
The Board would recommend that the two schools last 
named be consolidated ; and the school at Stark District 
ought not to be continued longer with the present number 
of scholars. 

A table giving the particulars of attendance in the sev- 
eral schools will be found at the end of this report. 



131 



EVENING SCHOOLS 



have been in session about the same number of months as 
usual. The attendance has been irregular, particularly at 
the Spring-street house, and rather unsatisfactory in its re- 
sults. A large number of youth find their way into these 
schools who make no profitable use of their time. It has 
been suggested that a new plan be adopted which has been 
found successful in the city of Worcester. A small deposit 
of money is required as a guarantee of the faithful attend- 
ance and deportment of the pupil, to be returned at the 
end of the term. 

The demand for more school room at the north end of 
the city is increasing. Plans for the erection of a 

NEW SCHOOL-HOUSE ON WEBSTER STREET 

were adopted in the month of September, and the founda- 
tion of a building has been put in. The amount already 
expended, including the cost of the lot, is about four thous- 
and seven hundred dollars. The following description of 
the proposed new building is furnished by' Mr. Fanning 
the architect : — 

'' The complete plan of this school-building is arranged 
for eight school-rooms, to con tain* forty-eight desks in each 
room. The central section is forty-nine by fifty-eight feet 
on the ground, and contains four school-rooms, two on the 
first and two on the second floor, and four hat and cloak 
rooms, and teachers' closets. On each side of the main 
building is a wing, thirty-six by forty-four feet in plan, two 
stories high, and containing a school-room on each floor, 
and the stairways. A basement extends under the entire 
building. It is proposed to build only the central section 
of the building and one set of stairways at present, but 



132 

arrange for the addition of the wings when they shall be 
required. The rooms in the central section of the build- 
ing will be separated by a partition containing slides, so 
that they may be used together for general exercises, and 
these rooms have also more than the usual length to adapt 
them for assembly purposes, avoiding the necessity of an 
additional story for an assembly hall in the building. The 
clothes-rooms are placed on the same floors as the school- 
rooms, so as to avoid the use of stairs as far as possible. 
The arrangements for light, ventilation, and heating have 
been carefully studied, and it is believed that all the rooms 
will be convenient and cheerful. There will be two fronts 
to the building, facing Chestnut and Pine streets respec- 
tively. The facades, although plain, will be quite pleasing 
and imposing when the building is complete, with the addi- 
tion of the wings." 

The Board have recommended the selling of the house 
and lot at Bakersville, on account of the undesirable loca- 
tion, and the building of a new house on a larger and more 
eligible lot. They have also recommended the purchase of 
additional land adjoining the north Wain-street lot in 
'^quog. The increase of population on the west side of 
the river is greater than in any other section of the city. 
The Superintendent reports that more school room will be 
urgently needed there at the opening of the spring term. 
There has been no enlargement of school accommodations 
in that section of the city for many years. The Board 
hopes to see both of these plans accomplished. 

VARIOUS REPAIRS 

have been made upon the school-buildings, costing in the 
aggregate 14,959.72. Of this amount, $1,600 was spent 
for the extensive repairs upon the Lowell-street building, 
known as the old High-School house. The house has been 



133 

greatly improved. The crooked flights of stairs at the 
ends of the building were removed, and a broad hall and 
staircase placed in the center of the building, allowing the 
four school-rooms to receive light on three sides, and im- 
proving their ventilation. This building originally cost 
only 12,700. After adding the cost of remodeling, it is 
still the least expensive, as well as the oldest, school-house 
in the city. 

Valuable improvements have been made in the High- 
School building. The former unsightly privies have been 
replaced by water-closets with modern arrangements. The 
plumbing and carpentry cost 1974.57. New floors of 
Georgia pine have been laid in the Training-School build- 
ing, and other repairs made, costing $254. At Lincoln- 
street, alterations in the steam-heating apparatus, and 
repairs of the fence, cost SI 26 ; at Franklin-street, repairs 
of stairs and changes in boiler, 1215.74; at Spring-street, 
gas-piping for evening schools, and repairs of water-closet, 
$105.45. New fences at Manchester-street, $142.75 ; 
Spruce-street, $205; Blodget-street, $85.90; north Main 
street, $147. At South-Main-street, concrete walks, and 
repairs upon steps and shed, $159.86 ; at Center-street, 
drain-pipes and painting, inside and out, $250 ; Amoskeag, 
new fence, and introduction of city water, $186.60 ; and 
minor repairs, costing less than $100 each, on the following- 
named buildings: Ash-street, Goffe's Falls, Harvey Dis- 
trict, HalLsville, Mosquito Pond, Stark District, Webster's 
Mills, and Wilson Hill. The committee on repairs have 
estimated that $5,000 ought to be spent upon the buildings 
the coming year, to keep them in proper repair, and to 
make some needed changes. The roof of the High-School 
building needs extensive repairs. The basement of the 
Spring-street house should be excavated, in order that the 
steam-heating apparatus may be safely managed. The 



134 

outer wood-work upon several of the buildings is decaying, 
and needs paint to protect it from the weather. 

The committee have recommended that the lecture hall 
at the High School be fitted with seats and desks, and used 
as a study-room. Recitations can then be carried on in the 
different rooms in the building, without interrupting study. 
Aside from the advantages of the change in the work of 
the school, the new sittings will conduce to the comfort 
and health of the pupils. The old seats are uncomfortably 
small and low for the use of the older pupils of the school. 

COST OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The expenditures of the School Committee for the year 
have been as follows : — 

For instruction . ...... 837,50340 

ihcidental'expenses .... 13,225 22 



$50,728 62 

We close the year with an unexpended balance of 
12,739.75. A detailed statement of expenditures will be 
found appended to this report. 

The expenses have been #1,734.03 more than last year. 
Of this amount, %S1 1.80 was for teaching, and $859.23 for 
incidentals. Additional teachers have been employed, and 
the cost for janitors' services and fuel has correspondingly 
increased. 

The schools have been supplied with tables, blocks, and 
models, for object teaching and drawing, and a large 
amount of supplementary reading. These are permanent 
supplies, and their cost ought not to be reckoned in the 
running expenses of the schools, although it has largely 
increased the incidental expenses of the year. 

The average cost per scholar, based upon the whole num- 
ber enrolled, is $11.98, against $11.84 in 1880. It is 



135 



customary to base the cost per scholar upon the average 
number belonging to the schools. The large falling off in 
attendance in the last half, of the year reduced the ratio 
of average number belonging to wliole number enrolled 
much below that of last year, and the average cost upon 
this basis is therefore increased, being 113.12 for teaching, 
and 14.63 for incidentals, a total of $11. lb per scholar, 
against il6.49 for 1880. Several schools in the city proper 
and in the suburban districts have been very small. So 
long as we are obliged to support such schools as those at 
Mosquito Pond, Webster's Mills, and Stark District, 
paying full salaries for the instruction of from five to 
twelve scholars, the average cost will necessarily be high. 
The total cost of public instruction in this city for the 
last year, including salaries of superintendent, committee, 
and truant officer, was f 54,125. 12. The city has received 
its share of the state literary fund, amounting to $1,870.50, 
and in tuition fees from non-resident pupils, ^-296.80. De- 
ducting this from the total expenses, we have 8')1,957.82, 
as the net amount paid by the city for the support of the 
schools. This is two and eight-tenths mills upon each dol- 
lar of the assessed valuation. The average cost in one 
hundred and fifty-six cities and towns in the United States 
having seven thousand five hundred inhabitants and up- 
wards, as shown by the last report of the Commissioner of 
Education at Washington, is six and four-tenths mills. 

It has repeatedly been shown that the public-school ex- 
penses of Manchester are low, andhave not increased with 
the growth of our population and the increase in cost of 
other departments of the city. Our teachers' salaries are 
lower, and our incidental expenses are less, than in most 
towns of the same population. The tax-payer who is dis- 
posed to charge the schools with extravagance should be 
reminded of these facts. It should be remembered, also, to 



136 

what extent the public-school tax is reduced on account of 
the large number of scholars in private schools. If all the 
children of the city were instructed at the public expense, 
as they have an undoubted right to be, the city would be 
obliged to hire fifty new teacliers, build twelve new school- 
houses of four rooms each, at an expense of at least one 
hundred thousand dollars, and pay an increase of twenty- 
five thousand dollars in the annual running expenses of 
the schools. 

The board have contemplated certain measures for the 
new year which might increase the expenses of the schools 
to the extent of one thousand dollars to fifteen hundred 
dollars. A new teacher is imperatively needed in the High 
School. Since the cutting off of an hour's time each day, 
it is impossible for the present corps of teachers to give 
thorough instruction in the time permitted for recitations. 
Even before the reduction in time, a great defect in the 
High School was lack of thoroughness, arising from tlie 
same cause. 

The increase of appropriation for 1882, asked for by the 
committee to cover the increase of salaries and the pay of 
new teachers, is no more than the balance now on hand. 
The committee believe the recommendations they have 
made for the coming year to be necessary for the efficiency 
of the schools. They know the })eople desire the schools 
to be kept at the highest standard of usefulness, and will 
favor liberal appropriations for that purpose. At the 
annual election of teachers, the board voted a slight 

INCREASE IN THE SALARIES 

of all teachers except the following: the sub-master and 
first assistant at the High School, first assistants in gram- 
mar schools, the teacher at Goffe's Falls, and the special 
teachers in music and drawing. 



137 

This increase restores the salaries to about the same 
rates as paid before tlie reduction in 1877. They were cut 
down then because times were hard and the cost of living 
low. A reversal of these conditions is a valid reason for 
the increase. There are always men in the community 
who begrudge the teacher his wages. The school-grum- 
bler, like the school-master, is always ''abroad." He figures 
how much teachers get per hour and minute, until the habit 
becomes chronic. But with all his figuring he has never 
explained how good teachers can be hired in his own town 
for less wages than other towns are willing to pay ; nor has 
he ever shown why teachers, whom he acknowledges ought 
to be as well prepared for their work as thejawyer or physi- 
cian for theirs, must grow in usefulness and strive to excel, 
and yet not expect the reward given to success in other 
callings. Wisdom never grows old ; and the quaint words 
written upon this subject by Roger Ascham, three hun- 
dred years ago, though often used in illustration, will bear 
repeating here. He said: — 

"It is a pity, that commonly more care is had, yea, and 
that among very wise men, to find out rather a cunning 
man for their horse than a cunning man for their chil- 
dren. They say nay in word, but they do so in deed : for 
to one they will gladly give a stipend of two hundred 
crowns by the year, and loth to offer the other two hundred 
shillings. God that sitteth in Heaven, laugheth their choice 
to scorn, and rewardeth their liberality as it should: for he 
suffereth them to have tame and well ordered horses, but 
wild and unfortunate children, and, therefore, in the end 
they find more pleasure in their horse than comfort in 
their children." 



138 
In the year just ended, several educational 

MEASURES OF GENERAL INTEREST 

were adopted, both in the State and city. Perhaps the 
most important of these was the amendment to the state 
law, regulating tlie employment of children, which went 
into effect January 1, 1882. All. children of school age 
are now placed in four classes : First, those under ten years 
of age, who cannot be employed at all in any manufactur- 
ing establishment ; second, those between ten and twelve, 
who may work in vacations only, and must attend school 
the whole time it is kept in the town where they live; 
third, those between twelve and fourteen, who may work 
six months, and must attend school six months; fourth, 
those between fourteen and sixteen, who may work nine 
months, and must attend school three months. In addi- 
tion, every child under sixteen must now be able to read 
and write before obtaining employment, except in vaca- 
tions. . This intelligence test is a new feature in educational 
laws. New Hampshire being the second State in the Union 
to adopt it. The plain intent of the amendment is to apply 
some test of the practical value of the three months' or six 
months' schooling required by the other provisions of the 
law. In its spirit the law is no less wise than bold and 
progressive. If it were enforced, illiteracy would be ex- 
tinguished in our manufacturing towns. It has serious 
defects, however. . It fails to say that the reading and writ- 
ing shall be in the English language. 

Our Fiench fellow-citizens insist that such an interpretation 
will work hardship to them by denying employment to their 
children who cannot speak English, although proficient in 
their own tongue. While the Board has interpreted the 
law to mean the English language, it is not supposed that 
it intends to deny employment to children who have had 



139 



no opportunity to learn the language. It would be absurd 

to apply the test unless the child had attended a reasonal)le 

time in some school where English was taught. Children 

who are so near the age of sixteen as to leave no time for 

learning English ought to be exempted. The French 

children are very quick, and in the public schools have 

usually learned to read and write English in a few months' 

time. Unless English was intended, the enactment of the 

law was unnecessary, because all children would learn to 

read and write that language if permitted to do so. And 

here arises another and more important consideration. 

The French people have established schools of their own. 

Naturally they wish to teach the French language. If the 

test of intelligence is to be in English, these schools will 

not answer the demand of the law. Is not this the real 

point at issue ? Will it not have to be determined whether 

a school teaching French or any other foreign language 

exclusively, is a '' private or public school" in the meanmg 

of the law ? 

The statute requires attendance " in a school where m- 

struction is given by a teacher competent to instruct in the 
branches taught in common schools." It would be a palpa- 
ble violation of the spirit, if not the letter, of our school 
laws, to teach a foreign language exclusively in a public 
school ; and when a system of private schools assumes the 
functions of the public schools, the same rule ought to ap- 
ply. This Board gives one broad interpretation to this and 
to all our school laws, namely : that their- object is to place 
the children of all nationalities upon the same footing ; to 
break down all barriers between them ; to help them to un- 
derstand each other and the institutions and laws under 
which they live. In securing this great end there need be 
no misunderstandings. The subject has been referred to a 
special committee of this Board, who doubtless will report 



140 

a plan by which the law may be enforced without hardship, 
and still accomplish the desired good. 

It would be better if the laws were so amended that all 
children between the ages of twelve and sixteen were re- 
garded as one class and allowed to work half the time, and 
then, on attaining the age of sixteen, be required to pass 
the test of readiuo: and writiiiff. 

The school reports of previous years have devoted much 
space to the matter of 



TRUANCY. 



At the beginning of the year the subject still forced itself 
tipon the attention of the Board. The number of scholars 
growing up without schooling was rapidly increasing, and 
the task of enforcing attendance becoming more difficult. 
Twenty years ago, our people, with rare exceptions, gladly 
sent their children to school, and compulsory laws were 
unknown and unnecessary. Occasionally a scholar played 
truant. AVhen the efforts of teacher and parents failed to 
keep him in school, he became a truant under the law, and 
as a last resort was arrested for the offense. Truancy of 
this kind was a criminal matter, and its management be- 
longed to the police department. With the changes in our 
population, the matter has put on an aspect entirely new. 
Truancy per se has not increased, absenteeism has. Hun- 
dreds of parents among us are entirely indifferent to the 
education of their children. The child who is out of school 
because his paients do not or will not send him, is not a 
criminal. If he becomes a vagrant, or is kept at work 
without schooling, the parent or employer is the offender, 
and is amenable to the law. It is better to go after the 
child kindly than to coerce ; better to persuade than to 
fine the parent. The right dealing with absenteeism has 
become a purely educational question. For this reason the 



141 

help of the police department is no longer necessary. The 
management of the matter rightfully belongs to tlie scliool 
authorities. Acting upon tliis view, after repeated failure 
of other plans, the Board applied to the legislature for au- 
thority to appoint a suitable officer and to define his duties. 
An act was drafted, applying to this city only ; but so ap- 
parent was the wisdom as well as the need of the proposed 
change, that a general law was passed, giving all commit- 
tees in the State the same powers. 

This Board immediatel}' appointed Mr Samuel Brooks 
as truant officer, and gave him charge of all matters relat- 
ing to truancy. He is also authorized to issue certificates 
for employment in the mills, and is required to see that all 
employment laws are enfoiced. lie has shown great fitness 
for the position. The following abstract from his daily re- 
ports to the Superintendent, for the last four months, 
shows what he has accomplished, so far as figures can ex- 
plain the peculiar work of such an officer: — 

Number of children found uj)on streets in school- 
hours 446 

Number of absentees i-eported by teachers . 262 

Number of these reported voluntarily returned to 

school . . . . . . .71 

Number of these caused to attend school . . 176 

Number placed in school not attending before . . 208 

Number of children found in mills employed without 

certificate . . . . • . .175 

Number discharged from mills . . . . 201 

Number temporarily confined in police station ... 6 
Number visits to parents ..... 418 

The issuing of certificates for employment of children in 
the mills, and attending to their discharge, will require a 
large portion of the officer's time, in vacations as well as iu 



142 

school-time. It is gratifying to the friends of education, 
that the city has at last provided for a just and successful 
dealing with the matter of truancy. To doubt the expe- 
diency of continually employing a truant officer in a manu- 
facturing city of thirty-five thousand inhabitants, would 
indicate ignorance of the facts of truancy, or indifference 
to a great evil. 

In August, the Board completed the revision of its rules 
and the regulations for the public schools. Two changes 
only are of interest to the public, — the 



and a reduction of school hours. 

All teachers hereafter chosen are to serve on trial for 
twelve weeks, at least, before election. This is believed to 
be the true way to obtain good teachers. Actual practice in 
the school-room is the best test of competency. A competi- 
tive examination reveals but little of the ability of the 
candidate. Within the past year, a teacher who ranked 
highest in such an examination has proved a failure ; and 
one who was lowest in the list is now one of the best pri- 
mary-school teachers in the city. The choosing of good 
teachers is beset with all the difficulties of the civil-service 
reform. The absurdity of relying upon a competitive 
examination alone is apparent in both. When an examina- 
tion has shown that an applicant knows as much of the 
branches to be taught as the pupil is expected to learn, 
an actual trial in the school-room may be trusted to tell the 
rest. This has been illustrated in our Training School. 
Teachers" have been examined before and after serving in 
that school. These examinations showed scholarship, and 
nothing else. The real test of ability to teach was in the 
school-room. 



143 

The rule providing for semi-annual examinations in 
March and November will be of interest to those desiring 
to teach in our city. 

By vote of the Board in April, the 

SCHOOL TIME WAS REDUCED 

from six hours to five hours in the middle and grammar 
schools, and, by the adoption of tlie new rules in June, the 
same reduction was made in the High School. The hour 
taken from the school time each day amounts to a week 
and a half in a year. According to the present schedule, 
the schools will be in session about thirty-seven weeks of 
twenty-five hours each. In the last five years, there has 
been a reduction of school time in this city, in hours and 
number of weeks, amounting to four and one-half weeks. 
The average actual time now given to study and recitation 
is four hours and twenty minutes each day. 

While referring to this subject, we note the interesting 
historical fact that, one hundred years ago, a school was 
kept in Manchester (then Derryfield), the same numl)er of 
weeks as in 1881. The first school vote recorded in Decem- 
ber, 1781, was as follows : " Voted, that the town hire a 
schoolmaster nine months this year coming." 

HEALTH OP PUPILS. 

So far as hours affect the health of pupils, the reduction 
will be a great gain, if our teachers do not attempt to do in 
five hours what was done in six. Five hours of worry over 
hard lessons and harassing recitations are worse than six 
hours of natural study. The health of pupils suffers as 
much from incompetency of teachers in this respect, as from 
any other cause. The success of the celebrated Quincy 
schools is due to the fact that their methods are natural. 
A visit to the schools there, finds the children more active, 



144 

and apparently more stimulated, than the pupils of ordinary 
schools ; but there is an entire absence of fret and anxiety. 
The children are completely interested in their lessons, be- 
cause the teacher teaches^ and does not drive them to im- 
possible tasks. They go out from the school happy and 
unburdened, to enter into their play with zest, and to sleep 
well at night. The Quincy system is simply a discovery of 
some of the principles of mental development established by 
the Almighty when He made the human mind, but which 
have been hid from wise and prudent committees and 
teachers, and revealed unto babes. 

The responsibility of the School Committee for the health 
of pupils is summed up in three things, — well ventilated 
school-rooms, a reasonable course of study, and co'mpetent 
teachers. Over against these, are exercise, food, dress, and 
sleep, to say nothing of companionships, amusements, and 
reading, each tenfold more potent than the school for or 
against health, and all depending upon the good sense of 
parents or guardians. Reduce scliool-hours to the mini- 
mum, and the majority of the children of large cities would 
still lack bodily vigor. Boys and girls bred in the country, 
accustomed to the open air and trained to labor, have 
always been coming down from the hills and carrying off 
ihQ prizes of the city, and probably will continue to do so. 
It has been said that "the great city is the grave of the 
physique of the race." With equal truth it might be said 
that the grave is prepared during school life ; not because 
of too much study, but by the neglect of physical training, 
both in and out of school. 

Upon the plea of injury to health, the practice of sending 
to the parents upon a card a record of scholarship and de- 
portment was discontinued at the end of the summer term. 
It was charged that the use of these cards produced a hurt- 
ful stimulus among the pupils, by comparison of their 



145 

relative standing in the different classes. At the request of 
many parents the plan has been restored. It was to be ex- 
pected that parents who took an interest in the schools 
would reluctantly give up a plan by which they were kept 
constantly informed of the regular attendance jind progress 
of their children. A healthy rivalry among scholars is 
always desirable. Emulation is the main-spring of all suc- 
cess in life. Without it teachers would accomplish little. 
Still it is a dangerous thing in the hands of some of our 
teachers. A modified form of card will be adopted, in- 
tended to avoid danger hereafter, from a system which can 
do no harm except when improperly used. 

In this connection we refer to a kind of emulation that 
has l)een introduced into the schools of France and other 
foreign countries, called the 

SCHOOL SAVINGS BANK. 

The children are encouraged to save money. The teach- 
ers receive the penny savings of the scholars to a certain 
amount, which is then deposited in the town savings bank. 
This is a species of " cramming " which ought to commend 
itself to tbe Yankee people, unless they have lost their tra- 
ditional love of money. The encouragement to save natu- 
rally stimulates to earn, and this plan is probably the best 
yet devised to secure habits of industry and economy 
among the children of cities. It has never been tried in 
America, but there seems to be no reason why it should 
not succeed. 

NEW TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The reorganization of the Training School, which the 
Board has just adopted, is a measure of the highest im- 
portance to the future welfare of our schools. The new 

10 



146 

plan provides for the training of teachers for all grades 
below the high school. All teachers admitted will be re- 
quired to take a course of study in methods of teaching. 
The old Training School was a practice school only. Nine- 
tenths of those admitted were graduates of our High School. 
They have become teachers without any special study. 
They have copied what they saw in the Training School, 
good or bad. Such training is evidently very imperfect. 
The new school is expected to give thorough training in 
study and practice. It will furnish a home normal school 
for the young women of our city who desire to teach, and 
the city will have a home supply of teachers equal to the 
best. The old Training School did an admiral)le work. 
It was narrow in scope and imperfect in methods, yet 
nothing connected with our school system has yielded 
more profitable and practical results. While the Board 
hope that the new school may be of still greater service to 
the city, they do not disparage the work of Miss Bunton 
and her associate teachers. They did not attempt, nor 
were they required, to give normal instruction. They have 
accomplished all that was demanded of them, and their 
services deserve a grateful recognition. 

That would be an incomplete record which only recited 
the results of a single year, and took no note of the far- 
reaching and lasting 

RESULTS OF EDUCATION. 

Education means more tlian statistics can reveal. The 
late President 'Garfield, speaking out of his own great 
knowledge of education, said that its three great objects 
were ^' conscience, intelligence, and patriotism." He put 
conscience first, and thoughtful men know that he was 
right. Book intelligence has been exalted until arithmetic 
stands for honesty, and smartness for honor. The times 



147 

call for education in practical manliness, — manliness that 
includes industry, honesty, temperance, purity, and rever- 
ence. There are parents who are asking why it is that 
boys come out of the schools with no taste for a literature 
better than a dime novel, no aspirations above a cigar or a 
pistol ; no disposition to earn their own living ; no ambi- 
tion to make tlie most of tliemj-elves in life. What price, 
it is asked, would be too great to pay for teachers to whom 
they can trust their children to be made manly as well as 
learned. In our school system the teacher is becoming 
more and more a power to give the child " conscience, in- 
telligence, and patriotism." By the time school life is 
ended it is generally forever settled whether the coming 
manhood shall be noble and aspiring, or degenerate and 
worthless. The stream cannot rise above its fountain. 
The school-boy will have his model in the •teacher ; the 
character of the teacher depends upon the standard set by 
the men who choose him, and they are the choice of the 
people. The history of our city records an unfailing inter- 
est in our schools. Let us hope it will continue unabated. 
May their interests always be intrusted to citizens compe- 
tent and willing to give to public education the attention 
which its importance demands. 

MARSHALL P. HALL, 

For the School Committee. 
Manchester, Dec. 31, 1881. 



1 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester^ — 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with your rules, requiring 
an annual report from the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, I herewith respectfully submit the following as my 
fifth report, the same being for the year 1881, and the 
twenty-sixth of its series : — 

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS. 

The general condition of the schools cannot be truth- 
fully said to be greatly different from that of a year ago. 
Whatever of progress has been made is chiefly the result 
of that healthy growth which comes from a faithful dis- 
charge of daily duties, well performed, by those most di- 
rectly connected with the schools ; and the number of our 
teachers who have contributed to such a result is sufficiently 
large to warrant the belief that there has been some prog- 
ress, an attainment of some higher standard for the schools 
as a whole. An advanced standard in a few schools has, 
indeed, been quite perceptible : and an observance of the 
study, patience, and perseverance which have brought about 
the improved condition of certain schools has afforded me 
the greatest pleasure of the year. It is difficult to discuss 
the character of schools apart from their teachers ; for the 
saying is as true as trite, that '• as is the teacher so is the 



149 

school." So it comes to pass tliat Manchester has excellent 
and good schools, chiefly because she has excellent and 
good teachers ; likewise, not to put it too harshly, she has 
some quite ordinary schools, because she has some quite 
ordinary teachers. 

Comparisons of the fitness of teachers, by casual observ- 
ers, are frequently quite unjust. It very often happens that 
a sort of brusqueness in a teacher's ways is mistaken for 
smartiiess, thai tact in management is mistaken for faculty 
to teach, and that necessary delay to correct the errors and 
make up the deficiencies of a predecessor is mistakenly re- 
garded as a failure properly to advance. It does not 
follow because a teacher has grown somewhat old in 
the service, that such a one is therefore necessarily more 
antiquated in methods of teaching, is more largely lacking 
a knowledge of human nature and the operations of 
the mind, or is less likely to exercise a fair degree of 
judgment in the management of a school, than a younger 
person who lias a better, perhaps because a later, training. 
General rules have their exceptions in this matter, as well 
as in others ; and I think that by the work performed and 
the results attained, thoroughly known and understood, 
should individual teachers alone be judged. Nor in a 
graded system of schools like ours can the work of a 
teacher always be iiituitively understood. It is not infre. 
quently a matter for investigation, ii' one would know it- 
The real results are not always apparent, nor are the ap- 
parent ones always real. In one building the momentum 
given a class by one or two uncommonly strong teachers 
may carry that class through the next grade commendably 
well ; indeed, so that, though the teacher of that grade be 
weak, the class, when compared with otliers of the same 
grade, does not for the time appear to suffer. Yet in an- 
other building a really strong teacher in the same grade as 



150 

that of the weak teacher, to whom reference has just been 
made, may appear to be the inferior, because it is not seen 
that such a one is embarrassed by tlie short-comino^s of, 
it may be, one, two, or three predecessors. Hence in a 
graded system of schools, where the work of a teaclier is 
largely affected, in most instances, by the work of one or 
more predecessors, it is frequently necessary, in order to 
understand the real efficiency of the teacher, that the non- 
professional observer should critically note the work of that 
teacher for several terms ; and that, too, in connection with 
an observance of the work done b^ predecessors, and an 
attainment of a knowledoe of the material of which the 
several classes may. in the meantime, be composed. It is 
not designed to intimate, however, that the ordinary ob- 
server may not very soon distinguish between a decidedly 
good and a decidedly poor teacher: but wlien a teacher is 
expected to accomplish a certain amount of work in a speci- 
fied time, and is held accountable for the result of that 
work, then it is important that he who would judge of that 
work and its results should know whetlier or not the teacher 
concerned has first to make up the deficiencies of one or 
more weak teachers. 

In general, it may be said that teachers belong to one of 
two classes, — some to the class of those who attain so much 
of the semblance of the true teacher that they go through 
a certain routine, best characterized as an order of exer- 
cises, which seems to be thought necessary during five 
hours a day, with but little apparent thouglit of the rela- 
tion the work of one day has to that of another, or of the 
relation the training of their pupils has to the work of life ; 
others, earnest souls in whatever they undertake, belong to 
the class of those who so thoroughly devote themselves to 
an attempt to do their whole duty that they are soon in love 
with the work for its own sake, finding that they are delving 



151 

in mines of unsurpassed richness and excellence, which 
are limited only by the possibilities of the human mind. 
In the former class, we find those teachers who feel that 
they are but a wheel in the great machinery of our schools, 
and that simple weakness upon their part will not work 
greater injury than to throw the strain upon another. In 
the latter class, save the very few who are born to teach, 
we find our good teachers, those who recognize no ma- 
chinery, who act as though they personally expected to be 
held accountable for the character of the training of the 
children under their charge. These two classes also have 
their exceptions. The former contains an occasional par- 
tial success ; and the latter, an occasional partial or com- 
plete failure. The teacher whose chief thought is in other 
directions than that of school, may yet while about the work 
of the school-room exhibit so much of tact and judgment 
in conducting the work of a school as to blind the super- 
ficial observer to the teacher's neglect properly to prepare, 
his daily work, and to his consequent defects in methods of 
instruction ; while, on the other hand, one whose heart is 
enthusiastically in the work may have so little tact, judg- 
ment, and power to impress, or control, that most excellent 
aspirations and fine abilities to instruct prove com[)ar- 
atively worthless in such a one for the office of teacher. 
It therefore requires more than an ordinary knowledge of 
the characteristics of the true teacher always to enable one 
justly to discriminate between those teachers who are ap- 
parently good and those who are really so ; and tliis is 
especially true, for reasons already given, in attempting to 
pass judgment upon teachers working in a graded system 
of schools. 

From these considerations, I am led to point out two 
ways in which I think the real merits of individual teachers 
might be so palpably evident that there could be scarcely 



152 

two opinions in regard to their usefulness. The first of 
these ways is not, in some other places, any longer an ex- 
periment, but a successful experience. I refer to what is 
known as the " departmental system " of instruction. This 
system is based upon the modern idea of a division of la- 
bor for the purpose of securing more perfect results in its 
several departments. My grandfather, though professedly 
a farmer, constructed his own carts and sleds, made his own 
barrels, and shod both his horse and' his family. The mod- 
ern farmer has better carts, sleds, barrels, and shoes, be- 
cause they are made by specialists. Departmental instruc- 
tion is the work of a specialist. It consists in requiring a 
teacher to devote himself to the work of giving instruction 
in some one subject, or kindred subjects, as, for example, 
in reading ; while another teacher instructs the classes in 
arithmetic, another in penmanship and drawing, another in 
grammar, and so on to the end of the list of studies re- 
quired to be taught in a given school. This system of in- 
struction's in vogue in our High School, as well as in most 
other schools designed to furnish secondary instruction ; 
and I do not see why the plan would not be advantageous 
to a well organized grammar school, properly officered. At 
any rate, it would so locate individual responsibility among 
teachers that any part not well performed could be unmis- 
takably charged to the account of the proper delinquent. 
As, however, the departmental system of instruction is not 
advocated by leading educators for schools of lowest grade, 
I will proceed to unfold my second plan for making appar- 
ent to all concerned the comparative, if not renl, merits of 
individual teachers in a system of graded schools. Neither 
is this second plan original with myself; but for the 'want 
of a name, I will characterize it as the '' consecutive sys- 
tem," since it consists of a teacher's following up the work 
of classes for two or more years. To apply the consecutive 



1.^3 

system to those of our schools below the high-school 
grade, I should advise that primary teachers accompany 
classes through the work of tlie first three years, that mid- 
dle-school teachers accompany classes through the work of 
the two years assigned the two middle-school grades, and 
that the lady assistants in the grammar schools accompany 
classes through the work of the first three years in the 
grammar-school grades. I would make the divisions in 
this way, because I presume that our teachers, in general, 
are in those grades, classed as primary, middle, and gram- 
mar, for whicli they have most taste by reason of the na- 
ture of the studies in the respective grades, or by reason of 
the age of the children thus represented. Under such an 
arrangement a pupil would have but four different teachers, 
including the master of the grammar school, before he 
should be ready for the high school; while under our 
present arrangement the pupil has no less than eight differ- 
ent teachers before completing the grammar-school course. 
Now I think it should be evident to every one that there is 
more or less loss of time and teaching power involved in 
every change a teacher experiences in the reception of new 
classes, for of necessity it takes several weeks, often months, 
for a teacher to acquire a fall knowledge of all the individ- 
ual peculiarities of a class of fifteen or twenty pupils ; and 
it is only when a full and free acquaintance is mutually es- 
tablished between the teacher and the pupil that both can 
work to greatest advantage. Then, too, the teacher, aware 
that she is to have charge of the same classes for two or 
three years, and will have the privilege of directing their 
work through the whole of one of the three distinctive 
periods into which our elementary schools are divided, the 
teacher, I say, under these circumstances will attain a more 
comprehensive view of the science of teaching, for she will 
more fullv realize the relation of the work through several 



154 



classes; and, as often as over the ground, slie will apply 
her art with increased effect. Moreover, the satisfaction the 
true teacher would experience in witnessing for so long a 
period the development and growth of her pupils should, I 
think, make her desirous of embracing the opportunity to 
try the experiment ; and any teachers who may feel they 
aj-e not fully appreciated, as well as those who are conscious 
of their powers, if afforded a chance to test the '•' consecu- 
tive system" of instruction, would have an opportunity to 
show what tliey could do under favorable circumstances. 

At this point I shall make the two following recommen- 
dations : First, that pupils be transferred from one room to 
another but once a y( ar, in accordance with the plan and 
for the reasons which were suggested in my annual report 
last year, the time of transfer being at the opening of the 
fall term, and the chief reasons, that the rooms of the mas- 
ters of the grammar schools may be filled throughout the 
year, and that there may be relief for the crowded condition 
of the lowest-gi-ade primary schools during the fall term ; 
second, I recommend, for the purpose of infusing more inter- 
est into the schools, and for the sake of affording the com- 
mittee an opportunity to observe the merits of the different 
systems of instruction, that the departmental system of in- 
struction and the consecutive system be both introduced into 
the schools during the coming year. I do not advise a whole- 
sale introduction of either of these systems of instruction 
at once ; but I think that both, one in each school, might 
be successfully tried in two of our large grammar schools. 
One of these schools, I believe, is quite favorably organized 
for the introduction of the departmental system of instruc- 
tion, and one of fhe others is equally well adapted to the 
introduction of the consecutive system. The consecutive 
system might also be tried in one or two other schools of 



lower grade, under the direction of the committee on 
studies, and at their discretion. 

Before passing from these general considerations, it may 
he well to add, that within the past year there has been 
placed in the schools a revised course of study, which con- 
templates rational or "natural" methods of instruction ; 
and this course has been supplemented by aids for object 
illustration in the shape of material for practice, wliere 
needed, to show the significance of linear, dry, and liquid 
measures. Blocks for illustrating numerical combinations 
have also been furnished teachers of lowest primary grade, 
and the lower grades have been supplied with considerable 
fresh matter for supplementary reading. Teachers in gen- 
eral have had a limited supply of Swett's and of Sheldon's 
manuals, designed especially for the aid of teachers; 
models for drawing geometrical forms from objects have 
l)eeii placed in the more advanced grades, and drawing 
manuals in the lower grades ; and Prang's Natural History 
series, and liis plates for illustrating the trades and occupa- 
tions, have been placed in the middle schools. The revised 
course of study, thus supplemented hy aids in teaching, has 
been worked more or less successfully in proportion to the 
degree in which teachers have comprehended its scope, and 
exhibited geuius and effort to carry out its requirements. 
In these respects there has been considerable difference, as 
might be expected ; but it may be said that some have 
made much progress, and that some others appear to have 
been laying foundations which, if perseveringly built upon, 
should also improve other of the lower-grade schools, — the 
grades for which the changes made in the course were de- 
signed chiefly to affect. 

There is still opportunity for much further progress in 
many of them ; and I think a great good could easily be 
accomplished by affording those teachers who wish to study 



156 

the better methods of teaching certain subjects an oppor- 
tunity to witness the better class of work done in our 
schools, and, when desired, in other places. This would 
be one of the best ways of assisting those who most need, 
and who should therefore most wish, to improve. The 
arrangement could be readily effected by allowing teachers 
who would avail themselves of such opportunities for im- 
provement leave of absence for that purpose, without reduc- 
tion of salary. This could be done, and their schools con- 
tinued, without expense to the city, because competent 
sub-teachers could be furnished from the Training School 
to supply the schools vacated ; and an advantage would 
also thus accrue to such sub-teachers, by affording them 
occasional practice in assuming the entire charge of a 
school. 

In this connection I would also recommend that the city 
furnish substitutes for schools when teachers visit other 
schools, as at present allowed to do under the school regu- 
lations. My reason for this recommendation is, that by 
closing the schools upon such occasions, there are about a 
dozen days during each term, or more than seven weeks in 
the year, when the efforts of the truant officer are largely 
nullified. Upon such days many pupils inclined to truancy 
ascertain, through acquaintances in the school to be closed 
for a day, when the pupils of that school are to be dis- 
missed, and they tlien take occasion to absent themselves 
from their own schools; but, when confronted upon the 
streets by the officer, they boldly claim to be members of 
the school which is dismissed, nor is it possible for him to 
determine to the contrary before such pupils would again 
voluntarily be in school. Substitutes could also be supplied 
from the Training School for this purpose, without expense 
to the city, by properly specifying the conditions of entrance 
upon that school. 



I 



157 



THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 



In my report a year ago I gave a very full history of 
what has been our Training School ; and from the records 
it now appears that there have been one hundred and fif- 
teen different members of that school, that fifty-four of 
these completed the required term of service and received 
certificates accordingly, and that forty- four of our present 
corps of lady teachers were once enrolled as members of 
the Training School. This school has also supplied the 
city with efficient substitutes for several years, and for this 
service alone it has returned a full -equivalent for what 
little extra expense it has cost our citizens. The school, 
since its organization, has been under the chief manage- 
ment of Miss Nancy S. Bunton as principal ; and I think 
that she is entitled to much credit for a faithful perform- 
ance of what has been required of her, and that for 
long and efficient service she is entitled to favorable con- 
sideration. 

It is now proposed to transfer the department for the 
training ot teachers to the Franklin-street School, where 
its field for practice may be extended to the grammar 
grades ; and, at the same time, it is designed to enlarge 
the sphere of this department and make it more like those 
professional schools which other cities have found to be of 
great utility, as being both the best and the most econom- 
ical means of supplying the public schools of a city with 
the better grade of teachers, by affording citizen pupils an 
opportunity properly to prepare themselves at home for 
efficient work in the schools. Since the training depart- 
ment is, therefore, to be devoted exclusively to a study of 
the science oi teaching and to a practice of its art, I recom- 
mend that examinations for admission to the school shall in 
future be sufficiently exhaustive, in mere matter of common- 
school subjects, to warrant, if such examinations are 



158 

satisfactorily passed, the granting of certificates to teach ; 
then, when any are needed to do substitute work for teach- 
ers who may be allowed to visit schools for official improve- 
ment, or as now allowed to do under the rules, the sub- 
teachers in tlie Training School could be employed for 
the purpose, and, while they would thus be making 
the city some return for their instruction, they would 
at the same time have opportunity for occasional prac- 
tice of that kind which would be useful in affording them 
the entire charge of a school for the time being. Be- 
sides, when through the Training School, they would 
not again need to be subjected to au examination in 
matter ; nor, if their training-school work should be closely 
observed, would they at the end of their course need to be 
examined in methods, and thus one examination would 
suffice where heretofore two have been required. More- 
over, by this plan candidates would know, before giving 
their time for training-school work, whether they could 
obtain a certificate of qualification, and the committee 
would know whether applicants for admission to the Train- 
ing School had sufficient knowledge of matter to enable 
them to enter upon the work of that school with advantage 
to themselves and profit to the city. 

teachers' examinations. 

Your attention is next invited to the matter of teachers' 
examinations. The form of such should, in my judgment, 
be both written and oral ; written, in part, because exact- 
ness of knowledge in some departments is essential, and 
its attainment, or the lack of it, should be clearly discov- 
ered ; oral, in part, that the disposition, temperament, gen- 
eral information, culture, judgment, tact, and originality of 
tlie candidate may be discovered, as far as possible, and 
given due consideration. In the selection of a teacher it 



169^ 

is as important that the general cliaractciistics of tlie 
candidate should be taken into account, as that a precise 
standard of scholarship should be required, though tl e 
latter must be had to an extent sufficient to meet tlie needs 
of the position to be filled. The necessary literary qualifi- 
cations may be best ascertained by written tests, as well as 
general notions in regard to the theory and practice of teacli. 
ing; but the methods which an applicant would u>e in 
teaching certain subjects can be best understood fiom an 
oral interview. For teachers' situations in our elementary 
schools it has been customary to examine candidates only 
in the subjects taught in those grades; and, in making up 
an account of the written results, to reckon the several 
studies as of equal importance in estimating the avera<ie 
of them all, from which average as a basis, certificates h;ive 
usually been awarded. I beg leave to suggest that those 
subjects which are chiefly matters of memory should not 
be regarded as of the same importance as those of logic; 
and that, in determining whether applicants should have 
certificates, those studies which are taught in but few 
grades should not have the same weight as those taught in 
all. Under the custom of regarding all studies of equal 
importance and allowing one hundred credits for each, it 
appears that in the case of an applicant who in exami- 
nation might attain 45 in arithmetic, 55 in grammar, 95 in 
spelling, 80 in geography, and 75 in history, there would be 
an average of 70, which, if taken as an iuflexil)le standard, 
would entitle the candidate to a certificate ; and yet, in 
such a case, with fair questions, no certificate should be 
awarded, for there is evidence of the applicant's beii g 
lamentably weak in two of the most important branches 
taught in the schools. Such apparent weakness, u{)on fur- 
ther investigation found to be real, should de[)rive the 
applicant of a certificate, even though such weakness had 



160 

existed in but one study of so great importance. Now at 
this same examination another candidate might attain the 
following: 75 in arithmetic, 70 in grammar, 70 in spelling, 
75 in geography, and 60 in history, which would likewise 
afford an average of 70 ; and, in this instance, so far as 
the written results should determine the matter, it would 
seem that a certificate might be granted. The averages 
are the same in either case ; but in the former, as manifest 
from the credits in spelling, geography, and history, there 
is presumptive evidence of a good memory. In the latter 
case, from the credits as a whole, there is testimony of a 
fair memory; and, from the credits in arithmetic and 
grammar, there is evidence of general discipline and good 
reasoning faculties. So I am led to say, as I have for sx)me 
time thought, that in a matter of this kind it would be better 
to make no general average ; but best for the examiners to 
pass separately upon the results of the individual members 
in the list of those examined, from an inspection of the 
standing in each subject with reference to its importance 
and also from those standings regarded in a general way as 
a whole ; and thus award to the several applicants the cer- 
tificates to which they are justly entitled, so far as those 
certificates are to be granted upon the results of the writ- 
ten work alone. I might here add, for the information of 
the general committee, that this is what was practically 
done by the committee on examination of teachers, in 
passing upon the candidates recently examined. No basis 
of percentage was inflexibly fixed, from which to award 
certificates, and I believe that all were fairly treated and 
received all that could be justly claimed. 

ADMISSIONS TO THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Conclusions of the kind just enunciated have been con- 
firmed from the experience of the past five years in deter- 



161 

mining admissions to the High School. It was found, during 
the first and second years, that some pupils admitted to the 
High School upon what was thought to be a sufficiently 
high average could do comparatively nothing with the High- 
School studies. By a reexamination of the grammar-school 
percentages, it was found that in such instances the high 
average had been attained in consequence of high standing 
in the memory studies, notwithstanding there was great 
weakness in those studies which call for a larger exercise of 
the reasoning faculties. Since then, by exercising more 
care in the inspection of a pupil's standing in individual 
studies, there has been an improvement in the material of 
the classes afforded the High School. Nevertheless, it is 
thought proper to add that it has not been considered just 
to exclude from the High School those who for constitu- 
tional reasons have not been able to attain a high standard 
in arithmetic or grammar, as such might reap many advan- 
tages from some lines of study in the High School ; and 
that only those deficient chiefly through their own neglect 
have been asked to remain in the grammar school an extra 
year. 

During the years of my superintendency I have furnished 
nearly all the examination questions that have been used 
in the first divisions of the grammar schools. Consequently 
the questions have been uniform, and the results have been 
marked from a uniform scale arranged for each set by my- 
self. From an average of some ten or a dozen such exami- 
nations, with several different classes, in each of the studies 
there taught, I think it may be safely assumed that the 
strength in teaching power as exhibited in those divisions 
is now pretty well understood ; and I therefore recom- 
mend, for the purpose of affording the superintendent 
more time for doing other work which in his judgment 
11 



162 

would be of greater usefulness to the schools as a whole, 
that he may be excused from preparing regular examina- 
tions for the first divisions, and that pupils in future may 
be admitted to the High School from the grammar, and 
such receive their diplomas of graduation, upon the recom- 
mendations of the grammar masters, such action, however, 
not debarring first-division pupils who may feel aggrieved 
at the master's decision from taking a final examination 
from the superintendent, who shall report the results to the 
proper committee. Of all persons, the master of a gram- 
mar school, who has the direct charge of its highest-grade 
pupils for a year, should best know who of them are properly 
fitted for the High School ; and I believe a knowledge of the 
fact that those whom he might recommend would be ad- 
mitted without further question would have a most excel- 
lent effect upon his entire school. Besides, the master has 
no motive for recommending any who may not have prop- 
erly completed the work of the grammar school. He cer- 
tainly would not want inefficient pupils, admitted to the 
High School upon his recommendation, there prove his 
incapacity to judge of their fitness for its higher work. 
Students are admitted at Dartmouth from our High .^'chool 
upon the recommendation of the master. For the same 
reasons, why should not the pupils recommended by the 
masters of our grammar schools be admitted to the High, 
and thus save, so far as possible, the more worthy pupils the 
strain of special examinations ': First-division pupils not 
intending to enter the High School, who cannot be recom- 
mended by the master to be as good scholars as those 
recommended for the High School, should be required to 
pass satisfactory final examinations before being granted 
diplomas of grammar-school graduation. 



163 



REPORTS. 



From the action of the committee within the past year, 
it is evident there are decided differences of opinion in 
regard to the advisability of pupils' being regularly furnished 
with reports of their work for the inspection of parents. 
Some contend that parents should have such informa- 
tion, and that as a whole there is more of good than evil 
resulting from the use of the reports ; while others con- 
sider that the stress put upon slight differences in the 
percentages attained is provocative of jealousies and anxie- 
ties among pupils, that are unnecessary and pernicious. I 
therefore think that by the use of letters upon the form of 
report used, the desired information in regard to the de- 
portment and scholarship standing of pupils can be as well 
indicated, and slight differences in percentages be thus ig- 
nored. The school records can be kept from a knowledge of 
the pupils, as they have been for the past few months, and in 
transferring to the pupil's report the significance of his per- 
centages, letters can be used as follows : X, for extra ; E, 
for excellent ; G, for good : F, for fair ; I, for indifferent ; 
P, for poor ; and FF. lor different degrees of failure Since 
you have lately decided that the reports shall be issued, I 
recommend that you make clear whether the results to be 
reported shall be derived from w^ritten examinations or 
daily recitations, or both, or whether it shall be optional 
with teachers to do as they please in the matter. 

SCHOOL ORGANIZATION. 

In my first annual report I recommended that our schools 
be known by some other name than by that of the street 
upon which they happen to be located, and I then suggested 
historic names ; but large donations to our city library and 



164 

generous gifts to our High School by one of our leading 
citizens, who has also somewhat distinguished himself in a 
literary way, remind me that in other cities schools are 
named in honor of their prominent citizens ; and that, as 
there is a large school in the immediate vicinity of tlie 
residence of the gentleman to whom reference has been 
made, Manchester might in this way give public recog- 
nition of her appreciation of those who honor her public 
institutions. 

There is also another improvement which I would recom- 
mend in the published form of our organization, and that 
is, to publish under one head the names of all teachers in 
the same building, with an indication of the grade of 
school taught by each. 

CONCLUSION. 

Though the true province of the report of a superintend- 
ent is to afford the committee information in regard to 
the schools and to make such recommendations for their 
welfare as he may deem beneficial, it is understood that 
such oJScials frequently take occasion, at the opportunity 
offered in an annual report, indirectly to convey to the pub- 
lic their opinions in regard to some of the great educational 
topics of the day ; but as opinions of that kind would reach 
a larger constituency through the public press, I will for 
once, at least, refrain from assuming that the tax-payers 
are willing to pay for the publication of opinions with which 
they might not altogether agree ; and, in conclusion, 1 ex- 
tend to our citizens in general, and to parents in particu- 
lar, another cordial invitation to visit tiie public schools, 
that they may there see, in a way that will enable them to 
know, whether those schools are properly supplementing the 
work of the family, and enable them better to understand 



165 



how to give the schools such cooperation as will enable 
them best to enhance the welfare of the children under 

their charge. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WM. E. BUCK, Superintendent. 



166 

TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR 
THE YEAR 1^81. 



Schools. 



High School 

Franklin-Street Grammar School. 
Lincoln-Street Grammar School.. 

Ash-Street Grammar School 

Spring-Street Grammar School 

Piscataquog Grammar School 

Amoskeag Grammar School 



Totals . 



Middle School No. 1. 

u 2. 

" " 3. 

" " " 4. 

" " <' 5. 

« " '< 6. 

« .< <. j^_ 

t< « « 9 

" u U iQ 

" " " 11. 



Training Department. 



Primary School No. 1. 



Bakersville. 
Training Department. 

Totals 



• ot 

' 10 

' n 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 . . 

21, Discontinued. 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27t ; 

28..- 

29 

30 



6 . 
o t- 



253 

244 
322 
286 
111 
149 
52 



90 
(;4 
70 
71 
53 
89 
82 
58 
78 
61 
80 
120 



94 
95 

'78 
74 
93 
90 
87 
84 
80 

145 

108 
89 
87 
87 

113 
93 
67 

125 
68 
91 

77 
98 
84 
64 
77 
79 

104 
92 
86 
81 

173 



Whole No 
Belonging.* 



Boys. 



GlELS. 



90 



100 
96 
41 
46 
19 



397 

26 
29 
20 
31 
23 
33 
33 
19 
33 
17 
29 
55 



348 

45 
24 
37 
26 
36 
40 
22 
36 
29 
55 
56 
40 
41 
28 
24 
21 
27 
64 
24 
46 

37 
53 
60 
36 
39 
30 
48 
39 
31 
38 
84 

1216 



91 
124 
92 

47 
78 
27 

459 

33 
20 
25 
18 
13 
28 
27 
25 
27 
12 
18 
39 






285 

42 
31 
40 
28 
23 
4« 
35 
38 
30 
38 
48 
36 
27 
30 
28 
25 
19 
52 



174 

146 
176 
170 
62 
74 
36 



604 

42 
45 
42 
41 
32 
46 
43 
34 
39 
28 
36 
59 



487 

46 
36 
40 
41 
40 
44 
50 
41 
42 
42 
50 



41 
45 
47 
49 
36 
40 
39 
46 

37 
39 
38 
48 
38 
37 
44 
38 
37 
47 



1350 



■ (13 "B 

fcX)C 



171 

140 
109 
161 
58 
68 
31 



627 

38 
34 
39 
37 
29 
43 
38 
32 
35 
25 
33 
52 



435 



33 
34 
34 
44 
35 
32 
40 
36 
32 
42 
76 



<srz 

X 5J 



Q 



95.8 
93.8 
94.5 
93.5 
91.9 
86.1 



94.4 

90.5 
75.5 
92.8 
90.2 
90 6 
93.5 
88.4 
94.1 
89.8 
92.5 
91.7 
88.7 



84.8 

88.9 

81.6 

90. 

90.8 

88.6 

90. 

90.2 

92.8 

95.2 

90. 

91.3 

92.6 

91.1 

93.6 

87.7 

88.8 

90. 

89.7 

84.8 



88.5 
89.5 
91.6 
92.1 
86.5 
91.6 
94.7 
86.5 
89.4 
89.0 



89.5 



167 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR THE 
YEAR ISSl, — Coniimied. 







1 


Whole No. 
Belonging.* 


ti 

1* 


n 

< 


•si 

9 fri 


Schools. 


Boys. 


GlELS. 


II 


Suburban School, District No 


. 1 

3 


9 
58 
71 
25 
27 
50 
43 
16 


6 
30 
39 
12 
13 
25 
15 

9 


3 

20 
32 
11 
10 
21 
20 
6 


5 
38 
49 
13 
15 
26 
21 
16 


5 

32 
46 
11 
12 
22 
17 
14 


100. 

84.2 


(( (( (( " 


4 


94.5 




5 

6 


84.6 
80. 


(( (( << " 


7 


84.6 


<t i« << << 


8 

9 


80.9 
85. 








Totals 


149 


123 


183 


159 


86.8 




2200 
2166 


2035 
1970 


2858 
2970 


2602 
2727 


91.0 




92.0 







* Exclusive of those received, by promotion or transfer, from other schools in the city. 

t In existence during the spring and fall terms only. 

It may be added, for the benefit of the uninformed, that there is in this city an ex- 
tensive system of Roman-Catholic parochial schools, whicli accounts in part for th© 
comparatively small portion of our population (35,000) in the public .schools. 



LIST OF TEACHERS AND JANITORS, 



HIGH SCHOOL, — BEECH STREET. 

Principal. — Albert W. Bacheler. 
Assistant. — G. I. Hopkins. 

Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Emma J. Ela. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

TRAINING SCHOOL, — MERRIMACK STREET. 

Higher Department. 

Principal. — Nancy S. Bunton. 
Assistant. — Mintie C. Edgerly. 

Primary Department. 
Principal. — Nellie M. James, one term. 

E. Jennie Campbell, one term. 

Ida J. Bartlett, one term. 
Assistant. — Elvira S. Prior. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL, — FRANKLIN STREET. 

Principal. — Edward P. Sherburne. 
Assistant. — Clara G. Fogg. 

Lottie R. Adams. 

Carrie E. Reid. 



169 

LINCOLN-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal. — Benjamiir F. Dame. 
Assistant. — Julia A. Baker. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

ASH-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Principal. — Daniel A. Cliiford. 
Assistant. — Anstrice G. Flanders. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

Sarah J. Greene, two terras. 

Annie A. Webster, one terra. 

SPRINCx-STREET GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Mary L. Sleeper. 
Anna 0. Heath. 

PISCATAQUOG, — NORTH MAIN STREET. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistant. — Mary A. Lear, two terras. 

Cora M. Dearborn, one term. 



Etta J. Carley. 



AMOSKEAG. 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS. 



No. 1, Blodget Street. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 

2, Ash Street. — Mary A. Smith. 

3, Ash Street. — Bertha L. Dean. 

4, Lincoln Street. — Anna J. Dana. 

5, Lincoln Street. — Carrie M. Gilmore. 



170 

No. 6, North Main Street. — Florence McEvoy. 

7, Franklin Street. — Hattie G. Flanders. 

8, Franklin Street. — C. Augustus Abbott. 

9, Spring Street.- — Fannie D. Moulton. 

10, Spring Street. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

11, North Main Street- — Lizzie A. Burns. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Blodget Street. — Ella F. Salisbury. 

2, Manchester Street. — Clara N. Brown. 

3, Ash Street. — Georgianna Dow. 

4, Ash Street. — Helen M. Morrill. 

5, Lowell Street. — Florence L. Stone, two terms. 

Ella F. Sanborn, one term. 

6, Wilson Hill, — Abbie E. Abbott, two terms. 

Nancy P. Flint, one term. 

7, Lincoln Street. — Emma F. Beane.. 

8, Lowell Street. — Nellie B. Putnam. 

9, Manchester Street. — Ida J. Bartlett, two terms. 

Discontinued, fall term. 

10, Manchester Street. ^- Nellie Pearson. 

11, Franklin Street. — E. Jennie Campbell, one term. 

Lenora C. Gilford, two terms. 

12, Franklin Street. — Martha W. Hubbard, one term. 

Nellie M. James, two terms. 

13, Spring Street, — Lucia E. Esty. 

14, Spring Street. — Emma L. Stokes. 

15, Center Street. — Jennie F. Bailey. 

16, Center Street. — Augustus S. Downs. 

17, South Main Street. — Alice G. Lord. 

18, Manchester Street. — Maria N. Bower. 

19, Amoskeag. — Jennie G. Stebbens. 

20, South Main Street. — Ellen E. McKean. 



in 

No. 21, Bridge Street. — Discontinued. 

22, Beech Street. — Florence A. Nichols. 

23, Lowell Street. — Flora M. Senter. 

24^ Lowell Street. — Ella F. Sanborn, two terms. 
Mary E. Sylvester, 1 term. 

25, Center Street. — Clara E. Woods. 

26, Spring Street. — Carrie 1. Stevens. 

2l\ Beech Street. — Cora M. Dearborn, two terms. 
Discontinued, fall term. 

28, Center Street. — Belle M. Kelley. 

29, Beech Street. — Louisa R. Quint. 

30, Beech Street. — Lizzie J. West. 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, stark District. — Susie A. Crosby. 

3, Bakersville. — 

Principal, Addie M. Chase, one term. 
Emma C. Gee, two terms. 
Assistant, S. Izetta Locke. 

4, Goffe's Falls. — Georgie A. Nute. 

6, Harvey District.— Mary W. Mitchell. 

6, Webster's Mills. — Olive J. Randall, two terms. 

Susie G. Woodman, one term, 

7, Hallsville. — Mary E. Sylvester, two terms. 

Annie W. Patten, one term. 

8, Youngsville. — Susie G. Woodman, two terms. 

Olive J. Randall, one term. 

9, Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

MUSIC TEACHER. 

Jason J. Kimball, three days per week. 

DRAWING TEACHER. 

Mary K. Webster. 



172 

JANITORS. 

High School^ Ash Street^ Bridge Street^ and Blodget Street . 
John S. Avery. 

Franklin Street, Manchester Street, Lincoln Street, and 
Wilson Hill. 

John A. Carr. 

Spring Street, and old High-School House. 
George W. Yarnum. 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 
Rufus Lamb. 

^Squog Schools, consisting of Qenter Street, Worth and South 
Main Street Schools. 

D. H. Morgan. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITT CIYIL ENGINEER 



REPORT 



CITY CIVIL ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils, — 

Sirs : — In making this, my first annual report, it being 
the third annual report of the City Engineer, it will not 
perhaps be out of place to make a brief statement of the 
condition in which I found the office when I took posses- 
sion, Jan. 12., 1881, and a comparison of the expenditures 
for the three years. 

From April 9, 1879 to Jan. 1, 1880 . . 11,022 50 

Jan. 1, 1880 to Jan. 1, 1881 . . . 2,146 49 

I am obliged to take the above items Irom the city report, 
as there has never been any record kept in the office, of 
the expenditures for this department, and numerous bills 
came in after I took possession, which leads me to believe 
that the account for 1880 should be much larger 

The expenses from Jan. 12 to Dec. 31, 1881, are as 
follows : — 

Salary of City Engineer and assistants . . il.561 60 
Horse-hire and car-fares ..... 80 84 

Stakes 1^ ^1 

Drawiiig instruments and material ... 97 39 



176 



12: on cover 



829 35 

7 60 

25 29 



fl,819 08 



$1 


08 


11 


55 


1 


00 


3 


50 


6 


00 


6 


90 



36 66 
25 00 



Repairs of instruments . . i 
Gas ...... 

Fuel and incidentals expenses 

Total . 

EXPENSES FOR SOLDIERS' MONUMENT 

Repairs of fence 
Repairs of leak in valve . 
Repairs of sprinklers 
Cutting grass . 
Cleaning lamps for the year 
Removing, repairing, and putti 
Gas .... 

Water .... 

Total 891 69 

Two globes have been broken this year, but no new ones 
were bought, as there was a supply on hand. 

At the beginning of the year, the city government de- 
cided that tlie City Engineer had no right to occupy a room 
in the court-house, accordingly one of the halls in the old 
part of the engine-house was fitted up for that purpose. 
Thisjiadtobe furnished with entirely new furniture, as 
there was nothing in the old ofhce belonging to the city. 
The expense of this removal is not included in the expense 
of running the office. The new quarters are more conven- 
ient, and accessible to the work, than the old, but are not 
light enough, there being only one window. Some action 
must be taken to furnish more light, as stormy days we are 
obliged to burn gas nearly all the time. 

The amount of work on the ditferent highway districts is 
as follows : — 



177 
DISTRICT NO. 1. 

GEORGE F. HAMBLETT, Surveyor. 

Five rods turiipiking, River road. 

Fifteen rods turiipiking, Elm street near D. Ready's. 

Seventy-five rods turnpiking, Elm-street extension. . 

One stone culvert, Elm-street extension. 

Fence built near George H. Clark's. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

WARREN HARVEY, Superintendent. 
BLOCK PAVING. 

Elm street, north line of Green to north 

line Short street . . • 2,004 square yards. 

Hanover south back street east of Elm 

back street .... 120.5 sqr. yards. 



Total block paving 

COBBLE PAVING. 

Elm street, Grove to Short street 

Elm east back street, Hanover to 
Amherst . . • • • 

Elm cast back street, south of Man- 
chester . . . 

Hanover north back street . 

West Central street gutters . 

Park street at school-house . 

Total cobble paving . . . 
Total paving .... 
Amount on hand in city yard 

12 



2,124.5 sqr. yards. 

2,004 square yards. 

428 square yards. 

190 square yards. 

389 square yards. 

428 square yards. 

89 square yards. 

3,528 square yards. 

5,652.5 square yards. 

16 square yards. 



178 



MACADAMIZING, NEW. 

Lowell street, Chestnut to Walnut 4,042 square yards. 
West Central street. Elm to Frank- 
lin 635 square yards. 



Total, new 



4,677 square yards. 



TOP-DRESSING. 

Hanover street, Chestnut to Maple street 
Park street, Pine to Wilson street . 
Granite street. Canal to Elm street 

Total top-dressing 



1,990 feet. 

2,832 feet. 

783 feet. 



5,605 feet. 



GRAVELED. 

Appleton street, Elm to Chestnut street . 
Amherst street. Vine to Union street 
Amherst street, Maple to Ashland street 
Arlington street, Maple to Ashland street 
Beech street, Hanover to Manchester street 
Concord street, Chestnut to Maple street 
Hanover street. Maple street to Mammoth road 
Hall street, Central to Laurel street 
Lincoln street. Park to Spruce street 
Lowell street, Hall to Highland street 
Pine street, Hanover to Bridge street 
Park street, Elm to Chestnut street 
Park street, Wilson to Cypress street 
Pearl street, Russell to Linden street 
Spruce street. Elm to Chestnut street 
Union street, Clarke street to Hooksett road 



558 feet. 
1,150 feet. 
1,120 feet. 
1,350 feet. 

220 feet. 
1,990 feet. 
5,227 feet. 

210 feet. 

220 feet. 
1.810 feet. 
1,420 feet. 

570 feet. 
2,222 feet. 

400 feet. 

570 feet. 
1,900 feet. 



179 

Union street, Amherst to Lowell street 
Valley street, Elm to Willow street 



Total . 



GRADED AND GRAVELED. 



610 feet. 


220 feet. 


21,767 feet. 


270 feet. 


446 feet. 


480 feet. 


450 feet. 



Maple street, Hanover to Amherst street 
Sagamore street, Pine to Union street . 
Linden street ..... 

Warren street. Bridge to Pearl street 

Total 1,646 feet. 

GRADED, NOT GRAVELED. 

Belmont street, Merrimack to Central street . 470 feet. 

Clarke street, 417 feet. 

Willow street, Valley to Merrill street . . 220 feet. 



Total 1,107 feet. 

Total graded and graveled .... 24,520 feet. 
Equal to four and two-thirds miles. 

All other main streets have been repaired. Appleton 
street, Chestnut to Union, has been partly graded. 

The grade of Elm street at Ray bro9k has been raised 
five feet, requiring 2,593 cubic yards of filling. The re- 
taining-wall on the east side has been raised five feet and 
extended, a new one built on the west side, the two requir- 
ing 720.2 perches of stone. 

By this improvement the valley at Ray brook has been 
nearly filled, and the street increased in width from about 
thirty feet to fifty feet. 

The excavation required for the paving at the south end 
of Elm street was 5,345 cubic yards, which was used in 
filling the hollow at the foot of Valley street. 



180 



There have been put in four stone, and thirty-seven con- 
crete, crossings. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

Bridge street, from Merrimack river to lower 

canal, 3881 feet of 31 feet circular brick sewer . 81,391 

Bridge street, between canals and to center Canal 

street, 196.5 feet of 3-feet circular brick sewer 37,610 

Bridge street, from center Canal street to Elm 

street, 761 feet 2' 8" x 4' egg-shape brick sewer 108,828 

Bridge street, under canals. 187 J feet 3-feet circular 
iron pipe, besides two manholes and brick piling 
west of upper canal, requiring about . . 3,000 



Total amount of brick 
Total length of sewer, 1,533^ feet. 

AKRON PIPE SEWEES. 

Olive street, 15 inch 

Canal and Auburn streets, 12 inch . 

Cedar south back street, 12 inch 

Elm west back street, 12 inch 

Harrison street, 12 inch 

Manchester south back street. 12 inch 

Spruce south back street, 12 inch . 

Beech east back street, 10 inch 

Concord street, 10 inch . 

Cross street, 10 inch 

Hazel street, 10 inch ... 

Nashua street, 10 inch . 

Olive street, 10 inch 

Wilson street, 10 inch . 



. 230,824 



302 feet. 

933 feet. 

684 feet. 

913 feet. 

909 feet. 
1,215 feet. 

637 feet. 

285 feet. 

380 feet. 

350 feet. 

370 feet. 

1,2:^0 feet. 

30 feet. 

260 feet. 



8,498 feet. 



181 

Hanover south back street, 1 2-111011 Portland, 
relaid 150 feet. 



Total 8,648 feet. 

Catcli-basins built, 37. 

Some sewers ordered by the committee have not been 
built, owing to the delay in getting pipe until late in the 
season, when the pressure of other work necessitated their 
postponement. 

CONCRETING. 

Cross-walks . . . . • 787.4 square yards. 

Walk in Concord square relaid . 220.0 square yards. 

Top-dressing .... 84.7 square yards. 

Walks in and around school-yards . 542.9 square yards. 
Repairs to^ walks necessitated by 

city work 177.9 square yards. 

Total 1,812.9 square yards. 

I have kept no account of concrete walka laid by indi- 
viduals. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Hazel street, Harrison to Brook street. 
Spruce street, from Wilson street to old Falls road. 
Appleton street, from Chestnut to Union street. 
Sagamore street, from Pine to Union street. 
Prospect street, from Linden street to Derry old line. 
Olive street, Amherst to Concord street. 

MCGREGOR BRIDGE. 

The stone-work for raising and extending McGregor- 
bridge trestle was done by the laborers, under the direction 



182 

of the superiatendent of district No. 2. The amount of 
stone required for this work was 526.4 perches, and 64.7 feet 
of coping, wliich was purchased rough, and dressed by the 
city laborers. There remain to be put in 27 perches of para- 
pet walls at the lower deck of the canal bridge, and end ot 
trestle, not included in the above. 

DISTRICT No. 3. 

HENRY C. DICKEY, Surveyor. 

No report of work done. 

The old Smith's Ferry road, from the Merrimack river to 
the River road at Pine Grove Cemetery, which was sur- 
veyed by Mr. Stevens, has been relocated by me, plan 
made, and stone bounds set at all the angles, in the center 
of the street. This road is two rods wide, and I find that 
the fences on the north side are in the street from three to 
ten feet, and one building, belonging to Major Ingham, is 
also in the street. 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

C. C. WEBSTER, Surveyor. 
GRADED. 

One-half mile, location not stated. 

Derry hill, at Goffe's Falls. 

Cohas hill, and from Cohas hill to Bakersville line. 

There have been used in general repairs, in addition to 
the above, 500 loads ot gravel. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 

CHARLES A. PIERCE, Surveyor. 

No report. 



183 
DISTRICT NO. 6. 

I. T. WEBSTER, Surveyor. 

Turn piked, 1^ miles. 
Graded, 1| miles. 
Built, 2 new culverts ; rebuilt, 8. 

The abutments of the bridge across the water-works road 
have been raised 2^ feet, and the uecessary fill made. 
1,400 feet of railing have been built. 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 

HENRY S. HORTON, Surveyor. 

No report. 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 

JEREMIAH GARVIN, Surveyor. 

In this district are 9.^ miles of road, of which 2 miles 
have been graveled, 1 mile turnpiked, besides the cutting 
of brush, and general repairs. 

NEW HIGHWAY. 

Proctor road, from Lake Shore road to lake. 
DISTRICT NO. 9. 

J. J. GARMON, Surveyor. 

In this district there has been expended 1403.02. I 
have no report of the nature of the work. A gravel bank 
of If acres has been purchased this year. 



184 
DISTRICT NO. 10. 

FRED. S. WORTHEN, Superintendent. 
PAVING. 



Granite street, blocks relaid 
Granite street, cobble relaid 
Gutters in various places . 

Total . 



946 square yards. 
296 square yards. 
640 square yards. 



1,882 square yards. 



448 feet 


406 feet 


368 feet 


51 feet 


96 feet 



1,369 feet. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

Parker street, 12-inch Akron . 

Parker street, 10-inch Akron . 

Douglas and Green streets, 10-inch Akron 

Mast street, 15-inch Akron 

Drains in various locations 

Total 

Catch-basins, IS. 
Stone crossings, 1 . 
Concrete crossings, 5. 

GRADING. 

West Bridge street has been graded, gutters paved, and 
sidewalks graveled. A large portion of this street, which 
was excavated last year, had to be refilled to bring it to 
grade. 

Main street, graded from Douglas to West Bridge street, 
sidewalks filled from 2 to 4 feet ahnost the entire length. 

Winter street, graded and gutters paved. 

Green street, graded. 

West street, graveled. 

B street, graded. 



185 

North and South Main street school-yards, graded. 

There has also been an unusual amount of graveling tor 
concrete walks, as nearly all were built in low places. 

Total amount of grading, 9,143 cubic yards. 

In addition to the above, Parker street has been partially 
graded, probably l.UOO yards. This will have- to be com- 
pleted next year. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Parker street, from Main street to the Manchester & 
North Weare Railroad. 

GRANITE BRIDGE. 

During one of our heavy rains, the first of October, the 
retaining-wall on the south side of Granite street, at the 
west end of Granite bridge, was partly washed out, and the 
foundation so badly weakened that it was necessary to re- 
build the whole. Upon removing the old wall it was found 
to consist of rough cobble-stones, very poorly laid, without 
any foundation, and very thin. A new wall was built upon 
a rubble foundation, 12 inches thick and 12 feet wide. 
The new wall was 10 feet wide at the base, 3^ feet at the 
top, and an average of 19 feet in height. 

Total amount of stone, 122.0 perches of old, and 74.6 
perches of new. 

The excavation and back filling were under the direction 
of Mr. Fred S. Worthen, superintendent of this district. 

The paving in Granite street at this place has not been 
relaid, owing to the lateness of the season. 

CONCRETE. 

Crossings 1^^-^ square yards. 

Walks in and around school-yards . 5o3.12 square yards. 



Total 671.82 square yards. 



186 
DISTRICT NO. 11. 

JAMES E. BAILEY, Surveyok. 
MACADAMIZING. 



Eddy hill 1.014 square yards. 

West end of Amoskeag bridge . . 1,139 square yards. 



Total . . . . . 2,153 square yards. 
Paving, 11.3 square yards. 

Drain for watering-trough, 857 feet, 4-inch Akron pipe. 
A stone watering-trough has been erected on Front 
street, near the old hotel building. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 

^ FREDERICK ALLEX, Surveyor. 

There has been no special work in this district. The 
usual general repairs have been carefully attended to. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 

JOSEPH P. FELLOWS, Surveyor. 

No report. 

Although the office has been in existence two years, I 
found it sadly deficient in many of the essentials of such 
an office. The plans and profiles belonging to the city had 
never been arranged in any order ; there was no index, or 
catalogue of plans ; the field and record books had not 
been indexed. This neglect was the cause of an immense 
amount of labor, as no information could be obtained with- 
out examining each and every plan separately and reading 
every page of the record-books, it sometimes requiring 
days to get together a very small amount of information of 
any particular work. 



187 



The instruments belonging to tlie city were a transit and 
level, taken from tlie water-works, which had been badly 
used! and at that time were unfit for service. They had 
to be entirely overhauled, recentered, etc., at an expense of 
twenty-five dollars. There was one level-rod which had 
been split its entire length, and mended. It will do for 
rough work, but for fine work, which must be done next 
year, it will be necessary to have a new one. There were 
also one four-rod chain, purchased at an expense of $12.60, 
which has never been used, and might be exchanged for 
other supplies ; one filty-feet chain, which should never be 
used in the city proper; and one set of chaining-pins. 
There were no tapes, plumbs, or drawing-instruments,— 
three very important articles. 

I have purchased, and now have belonging to the city, in 
addition to the above, one one-hundred-feet steel tape, and 
two plumbs, also one set of dividers, one spring-bow pen, one 
spring-bow pencil, one drawing-pen, two needle-points, one 
two-feet, one one-foot, and one six-inch triangular scale, 
and six curves. These, in addition to my own private 
property, which I have furnished freely for the use of the 
city, were sufficient for the use ot two men in the office. 
It will be necessary for the city to furnish a large additional 
supply of instruments at an early date, as no engineer can 
aff"ord to furnish, with the present salary, four or five hun- 
dred dollars' worth of drawing and surveying instruments, 
as has been done by Mr. Stevens and myself. 

As the office of city engineer is yet in its infancy, the 
public have a very indefinite idea of the amount of work 
required of the engineer, and, for the information of such 
as care to read and post themselves, I will make the following 
statement of the work done in this office : — 

The City Engineer is subject to the call of the mayor, 
all committees of the city government, and every citizen 



188 

who desires to build a house, fence, or sidewalk : and there 
are daily calls for street lines and grades, work which will 
require from one half-day to one week to perform. O'f 
such orders, there have been, this year, 450 since March 
1 ; also, loO different jobs of setting grades for sewers and 
paving, not included in the above. 

There have been made, of profiles. 47,061 feet, equal to 
8^^ miles. 

Sidewalk grades set, 21,154 feet, equal to 4 miles. 

Gutter grades set, 2,813 feet. 

Grades for cutting and filling streets, 3,488 feet. 

Grades for macadamizing, 1,416 feet. 

Street numbers assigned, 120. 

Lots laid out at Pine Grove Cemetery, 112. 

Many street lines have been given, but no measurements 
taken, besides special surveys, and other work with com- 
mittees, etc., that cannot be classed as above. 

PLANS AND PROFILES. 

There were in the office, Jan. 1, 1881, the following: — 
226 plans of streets and lands. 

87 tracings of Amoskeag company's lands. 
138 profiles of streets and sewers. 

o rolls of bridge plans. 
100 maps. 

2 books of street numbers. 
Of these plans, many of them are old and made on poor 
paper, have received hard usage, and are so badly torn as 
to be nearly worthless. It will be necessary to copy them 
on mounted paper, so as to preserve them. The tracings 
are all on very thin tracing-paper, and unfit for common 
use, and will have to be copied in the same manner. 



189 

There have been made, this year, the followhig plans and 
profiles : — 

Hanover street, from Elm to Union, showing all build- 
ings on both sides of the street, also fixing street lines, 
plan . 

Clarke street, plan and profile. 
Appleton street, plan and profile. 

Elm street, Webster to Clarke street, plan and profile. 
Square bounded by Franklin, West Cedar, Canal, and 
Granite streets, fixing street lines ; also, back street, — plan. 
Webster street, plan and profile. 
Sagamore street, Pine to Union, plan and profile 
Amherst street, Pine to Union,. plan and profile. 
Hazel street, plan and profile. 

Spruce-street extension, Wilson to old Falls road, plan 
and profile. 

Concord street. Beech to Arlington, plan and profile. 
B street, plan and profile. 

Hanover north back street. Elm to Chestnut, plan and 
profile. 

Parker street, plan and profile. 

Hanover south back street. Elm to Chestnut, plan and 
profile. 

Milford street, plan and profile. 

Elm west back street. West Bridge to Dean, plan and 
profile. 

Manchester street, Lincoln to Hall, plan and profile. 
Prospect-street extension. Linden street easterly, plan 
and profile. 

Belmont street, Hanover to Massabesic, plan and profile. 
Canal street, Granite to West Auburn, plan and profile 
for sewer. 

West Auburn street, Canal to Franklin, plan and profile 
for sewer. 



190 

Manchester south back street, Union to Maple, plan and 
profile for sewer. 

West Bridge street, Elm to River, plan and profile for 
sewer. 

Main street. Granite to D. Farmer's, profile for water- 
works. 

McGregor street, profile for water- works. 

Beech east back street, Amherst to Concord, profile for 
sewer. 

Elm-street extension, profile for turnpiking. 

Coburn land, known as assessors' plan. Copy. 

Proposed changes at McGregor bridge. 

Proposed changes at MpGregor bridge. Copy from J. B. 
Sawyer. 

Improvements at city-farm buildings. 

Furnishing of city treasurer's office. 

Concord-square improvements. 

Lots at Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Gravel bank bought for district No. 9. 

Douglas and West streets, suit of Clark vs. City. 

Fifty sheets for street-numbering books. 

Totals plans completed, 88. 

PLANS UNDER WAY BUT PARTIALLY COMPLETED. 

Nashua street, for fixing sidewalk grade, plan and profile. 

Nashua street, for sewer, plan and profile. 

Cedar south back street. Union to Maple, sewer, plan 
and profile. 

Quincy street, plan and profile. 

Douglas street, plan and profile. 

Green street, plan and profile. 

Elm east back street, Banover to Amherst, plan and 
profile. 



191 

\' alley Cemetery improvements. 

Olive street, profile for sewer. 

Cross street, profile for sewer. 

Maple street, Hanover to Lowell, plan and profile. 

A street, plan and profile. 

C street, plan and profile. 

Lowell street. Chestnut to Walnut, plan and profile. 

Harrison street, Walnut to Russell, sewer, plan and 
profile. 

Smith's Ferry road, from River road to river, plan. 

Spruce south back street, Union to Maple, plan and pro- 
file, sewer. 

Total under way, 17. 

There is also under way a plan of the square bounded 
by Hanover, Beacon, Spruce, and Wilson streets, for the 
purpose of fixing the street lines, the survey for which is 
but partially completed. 

GRADES AND STREET LINES. 

The old profiles of streets in the city simply show the 
center lines, and are of no value for sidewalk grades, as 
they show nothing of the condition of the sidewalks, which 
in many cases vary two or three feet from the center 
grades. I have introduced the custom in use in the city of 
Boston, of making the plan of the street in the center of 
the sheet, showing the fences and the buildings as they act- 
ually exist on the ground, and the street lines as they are 
finally established. On the sides of the sheet are the pro- 
files of the corresponding sides of the street, showing the 
elevations of the sidewalks, fences, and fronts of the houses, 
as they actually exist, together with the grades of each 
sidewalk as they are finally established. 

In years past, it has been the custom for an engineer, 
employed by the day, to set grades for walks and fences. 



192 

These grades, not being legally established, there was 
nothing to compel the abutters to follow them, and in many 
cases they were changed, either by the abutter himself, or 
the mayor, committee on streets, or superintendent, any 
one of whom could legally do so. Of these changes we 
have no records, and the result of it, together with employ- 
ing different engineers, has been to get the grades of the 
city in a very confused state. In order to remedy this evil, 
I caused to be passed, early in the season, an ordinance 
fixing the manner of establishing the grades, and prevent- 
ing any person's changing the grade so established except 
by vote of the city government. In order that this ordi- 
nance may be successfully carried out, it will be necessary 
to . make new profiles of all the streets, in the manner 
shown auove. After this is once done, and the grades of 
every street established by vote of the city government, 
and all work in the future done in accordance with those 
grades, we shall hope to see the present irregularities of 
surface and the many stumbling-blocks in our sidewalks 
gradually removed, and we shall no longer hear the old 
complaint of our citizens, that they cannot get the grade 
twice alike. 

STREET LINES. 

It is necessary to call the attention of this city govern- 
ment to the condition of the street lines. Our records 
refer to plans, stone monuments, and stakes. These stakes 
have been destroyed by time ; the stone monuments were 
many of them imaginary, having no existence except on 
paper, of the few that were set, most of them have been 
removed, or displaced by the numerous excavations to 
which our streets have been subjected, for sewerage, gas, and 
water, so that at present there are scarcely a dozen that are 
reliable, and those not in any way connected. The older 



19a 

parts of the cit}^ were laid out by the Amoskeag company. 
Their plans show the measurements from street to street, 
and it would seem that with these plans we could easily lo- 
cate our street lines, but just here we meet our greatest diffi- 
culty : the first streets were laid out by the United States 
standard measure, but in after years it was found that 
many errors had crept into the work, and in order to give 
every man bis due amount of land a new measure was 
adopted. | of an inch in 25 feet, or 1^ inches per 100 feet, 
longer than the standard, which has ever since been used ; 
but, unfortunately, no record was kept of tlie time when this 
change was made, or of what streets were laid out by one 
measure and what by the other. 

Then as we pass off from the company's land, we find 
the streets and squares were laid out by other surveyors, 
who used chains or linen tapes of unknown lengths, as 
these measures are constantly increasing in length by use. 
Again, there is one portion«of the city east of the company's 
land which has no connection, on the plans, with the com- 
pany's plans, so that we do not know the distance from the 
company's east street to the first street beyond their line. 
I know of streets in the city that are not within five feet of 
where the plans say they should be. Other streets which 
the records say are straight and continuous, have offsets of 
ten feet after passing the company's east line. 

I can see no other way to straighten out this matter ex- 
cept to make a complete and accurate survey and plans of 
the entire city, and locate the street lines, by reference to 
other plans and deeds, as nearly as possible in their origi- 
nal position. With these surveys and plans, they will be 
permanently fixed, and this evil, which is productive of more 
law-suits than any other one thing, will cease to exist. 

The sooner the city government takes hold of this mat- 
ter of street lines and grade, the better it will be for the 

13 



, 194 

citizens ; and it can be done cheaper now than it can years 
hence. I have endeavored to make a beginning in this 
work, but it is impossible to attend to the current work 
and this special work at the same time, with the force now 
employed in this office. I would suggest that a special ap- 
propriation be made, and a party of three put on for this 
work, that it may be done up before the matter becomes 
more serious than it is. 

STREETS. 

We are constantly hearing complaints of the condition 
of our streets and sidewalks. This will always be the case 
so long as our citizens are required to build their sidewalks 
at their own expense, or go without. The city of Man- 
chester is years behind the times in this matter, as in many 
others. Chapter 78 of the General Laws gives the city 
the right to build the sidewalks, and then charge the abut- 
ters with one-half the expense. *Thi8 custom of the city's 
building the sidewalks is almost universal ; yet we are behind 
even our sister city of Concord, which adopted the law in 
1879. Our sidewalks, particularly the brick ones on Elpa 
street, are a disgrace to the city and unsafe for travelers, 
as has been illustrated several times this year and in years 
past. Enough has been paid as damages for bodily iiiju- 
ries to have given us good sidewalks in every part of the 
city. One case alone, not counting the expense of court, 
would have given us two miles of concrete sidewalk. It is 
argued that the tax-payers will not submit to it. I claim 
that there is not a tax-payer in the city, but would rather 
his fifty or one hundred dollars should be spent for a good 
sidewalk — that he, in common with the general public, 
can enjoy — than be paid for broken bones. 

Another exceedingly dangerous and unsightly feature of 
our streets is the stone guard-posts at the corners. Car- 



195 

riages and sleighs, particularly the latter, when the snow is 
deep, are repeatedly smashed upon them ; and they may 
some day cost a life, should a team become unmanageable 
and the occupants thrown against one. These should be 
removed and circular curbs put in their place. I am 
pleased to find that circular curbs are coming into use, and 
I hope to see them more generally adopted. But we are 
making one mistake in this matter ; instead of availing 
ourselves of the experience of older cities, and commenc- 
ing at the point they have reached, we are commencing 
where they did, and shall have to travel over the long road 
of time and experience that they have gone before. I refer 
to the using of small curves of two-feet radius. In Boston 
these are all being taken out and larger ones put in. In 
this city, where our sidewalks are nearly uniformly eight feet 
wide, curbs of eight-feet radius should be used, giving three 
and one-half feet more room for teams at each corner of 
our narrow streets, and five and one-half feet at each side of 
the streets joining Elm street. 

A word in regard to the maintenance of our roadways, 
which need special attention in a city that has so little pav- 
ing and macadamizing. One great mistake made, is the 
constant putting on of material and never taking any off: 
for instance, twelve inches of gravel are put on a roadway ; 
this in a few years wears down about four inches, when the 
surface becomes rough and dangerous, then another coating 
of twelve inches is put on. The result is, that our streets 
are constantly filling up ; in a short time our paved side- 
walks become buried, and the engineer going to set a grade 
finds the old walk too low, raises the grade, makes a step 
in the walk, and then follow the usual vexatious and ex- 
pensive law-suits for grade damage, etc. This is all wrong : 
after a grade has once been established, no top-dressing 
should be put on without grade being set, and the road-bed 



196 

prepared, by excavating, to receive the proper thickness of 
gravel. I desire to call the attention of the committee on 
streets particularly to this point. 

I find that our graveled streets are never rolled except 
by the ordinary street traffic. If they should be thoroughly 
rolled and compacted, first, with the two-ton iron roller 
which the city now owns, then, with a six-ton granite roller 
so constructed that it can be loaded to twelve tons, the in- 
creased life of the road would more than pay for the extra 
labor. 

MACADAMIZING. 

I do not think enough attention is given in this city to 
this branch of road-making. If properly constructed, I 
think this is the best pavement for a city like Manchester. 
There are two kinds of broken-stone roads, — the Telford, 
consisting of broken stone upon a foundation of blocks 
carefully laid by hand, like block paving ; the Macadam, 
consisting of layers of broken stone of different sizes, the 
largest at the bottom, but without a paved foundation. The 
second is what we need in our dry, sandy soil. This year 
the city has tried to do too much work with the money at 
its command ; and, although the streets so prepared are 
much better to-day than they were before, I do not think 
they will wear long enough to pay. In our dry soil it does 
not require much preparation for the foundation ; but one 
of the important features in the construction of a good 
^'acadam road is sadly neglected here, that is, the rolling. 
The first course should be about four inches thick, of stone 
of from 1^ to 2 inches in diameter, then carefully rolled, 
first, with the two-ton roller, and the weight gradually in- 
creased ; if the weather is dry, the surface should be kept 
moist by sprinkling ; after this has become compact, an- 
other course four to six inches thick should be put on and 



• 197 

treated in the same manner, but finished with a heavier 
roller ; then the top-dressing of one inch of fine screened 
gravel should be put on, and rolled with a twelve-ton roller. 
During all this rolling, men should be constantly employed 
in raking in the ruts, leveling l)unches, and removing such 
loose stones as may work to the surface. The final rolling 
should be continued until the heavy roller no longer makes 
a wave before it. 

After a Macadam road has been constructed, great care 
should be observed in its maintenance : the surface should 
be swept at least once a week, and kept perfectly free from 
dust and mud,— the two worst enemies of a Macadam road. 
The city last year purchased a sweeper, but I have never 
seen it in use except on Elm street. There is as much 
need of it on the few macadamized streets. When a rut 
begins to form, if taken at once, a shovel full of broken 
stone spread over it will soon make it as good as new ; if 
the break becomes large, let the edges be loosened up with 
a pick, the large stones removed, and a few loads of broken 
stone spread over it, and rolled. When the entire surface 
becomes worn and broken, as was the case with Park street, 
this year, let it be picked up, the larger stones that have 
worked to the surface broken with cracking-hammers, the 
whole then carefully rolled, and a new top-dressing put on ; 
but, if properly cared for, this last would not be necessary 
for many years. 

A good substitute for a Macadam road is coarse gravel 
spread on the street about twelve inches thick, the larger 
stones then cracked with the sledge, and then the whole 
gone over carefully and cracked with the long-handled 
cracking-hammers, such as are used in other cities, until 
no stone over two inches in diameter is left, this being 
carefully rolled and compacted, then covered with one inch 
of good screened binding gravel. 



198 



SEWERS. 



In discussing this subject, I can but repeat what my 
predecessor has already said in his report for 1879 ; that, 
although as favorably situated as any city in the world for 
good drainage, yet we are but poorly supplied with this 
essential element for the preservation of the life and 
health of our citizens. One of the great defects of our 
system of sewerage is, that the sewers are laid too near the 
surface of the ground, and of too flat grades for the work 
they are required to do. These were well enough when all 
that was required was to carry sink water ; but in these days 
of water-works, and the attendant comforts which always 
follow the introduction of water, — bath-rooms, and water- 
closets, — it is necessary to lay the sewers on a grade steep 
enough to carry away any solid matter tliat may find its 
way into them, and deep enough to drain all cellars. A 
great part of the appropriation for sewers is expended in 
relaying .old ones. Thib year the sewer in Manchester 
south back street, from Union to Maple, was relaid. The 
old pipe was but three feet below the surface, and filled 
with sediment Irom two inches deep to the full diameter of 
the pipe. 

It was also necessary to lower the sewer in the rear of 
Bosher's block, in order to drain his cellar. The sewer in 
Spruce south back street, which was built last year from 
Union street lialf-way to Beech street, was extended this 
year nearly to Maple street. On opening this sewer to 
make the connection, three inches of sediment were found 
in the bottom, owing to its flat grade. 

Care has not been taken in years past, in the proper 
graduation of the sizes of the sewers: for instance, a 
twelve-inch sewer has been laid in a level section, with a 
grade of four inches per hundred feet, then extended up 



ll:»9 

hill, on a grade of four feet per hundred, the same size as 
below. In consequence of the steep grade's deliverhig its 
contents much faster than the flat pipe can take care of it, 
the sewage backs up into the arms and floods the cellars. 
Again, our sewers are not properly ventilated, and become 
filled with gas, leaving no room for water. This matter of 
ventilation should be looked into, and more generally ap- 
plied in this city. Although I have had all manhole covers 
made this year with perforations to aid the escape of gas, 
this alone is not sufficient, unless more manholes are built. 
A system of periodical flushing would materially aid in 
cleansing sewers of flat grade. I have endeavored this year 
to give all sewers a grade steep enough to make them self- 
cleansing, although in three cases I was unable to do so, on 
account of the sewers with which they connected being so 
near the surface ; these were the Spruce south back street, 
Park south back street, and Douglas street. In my en- 
deavors to find an outlet f^r the Douglas-street sewer, I 
found that the whole system of sewerage in 'Squog lies so 
near the surface that cellars cannot be drained, and so flat 
that water-closet excrement cannot be carried in them. 
Tiie sewers of 'Squug will have to be entirely relaid before 
many years. I would suggest to the committee on sewers 
that George E. Waring, or some other expert sanitary en- 
gineer, be employed to look over our entire system of sew- 
erage, and advise some systematic system of procedure. 

This matter of drainage is one that should be attended 
to immediately, some system adopted, and the appropria- 
tion for sewers used in carrying out that system, instead of 
putting in sewers here and there indiscriminately, as they 
are asked for by difl^erent petitioners ; then in time all will 
be accommodated, and in a much more satisfactory manner 
than they possibly can be by the present system. 



200 

I wish to call your attention to two sewers which should 
be built soon. — one in Elm street from Harrison to Clarke 
street, and a new one the entire length of Bridge street to 
intercept tiie sewage north of that street, and turn it into 
the new sewer built this year. 

CATCH-BASINS. 

Many of our catch-basins are a public nuisance, emitting 
odors so powerful as to take a man's breath as he passes 
by. There has been some talk, but not much action, in 
regard to this matter. The catch-basins are but poorly 
trapped, and not .sealed at all, particularly in a dry time. 
The sewer gas then passes freely into the basin, and is de- 
livered full strength into the nostrils of the passing people. 
This can be remedied by keeping the outlet of the basin 
constantly sealed with a water-trap. In the hot and dry 
seasons, when these things are most offensive, let care be 
taken that they are so sealed, and, if need be, let water be 
turned into them from the hydrants often enough to keep 
up with the evaporation. They should be carefully cleaned 
out at least four times a year. With these cleansings and 
plenty of water, we could pass along Elm, Hanover, and 
Manchester streets, without fear of contagion. 

I desire to recommend to the committee a different kind 
of catch-basin from what is in use here. It is what is 
known as the '• Providence catch-basin," it having been 
used by that city many years ; it was adopted by the city 
X)f Boston about six years ago. It is a simple, plain, brick 
well, without any partitions, with a circular opening of six 
or eight inches' diameter, in tlie side, for the arm ; this 
outlet is closed witli an iron cover shaped something like 
a flour-scoop, covering the outlet and projecting four inches 
below, the edges of this cover resting ugainst the brick- 
work and the face about six inches from it, leaving a hori- 



201 



zontal opening under the outlet, between the cover and the 
brick-work, six by ten inches ; this cover is liinged to an 
iron plate, 4 in. by 8 in. by ^ in., and takes the place of the 
mortar between two bricks. The advantage of this basin, 
besides being cheaper, is that the cover to the outlet can 
be raised, and the plain sides of the basin thoroughly 
cleansed of such matter as is liable to collect and decay. 
By keeping the bottom of this cover always under water, a 
perfectly sealed trap is secured. I cannot say too much of 
the importance of water in our cesspools, and I wish to 
impress it upon the^ minds of the committee that the 
remedy for this nuisance is simple and easily tried. 

We have been troubled this year, as in years past, with 
the grates of catch-basins becoming covered with mud, 
leaves, sticks, etc., thus preventing the water entering dur- 
ing a heavy rain. It being necessary to put a catch-basin 
in the rear of the Opera block, I tried the experiment of 
having the gutter in the center of the street, as is necessary 
in our twenty-feet streets, with the catch-basin under the 
sidewalk and the entrance cut into the curb-stone, instead 
of being in the middle of the street, with a flat grate. I 
found by this experiment that the gutter could be turned 
into this side basin without materially injuring the surface 
of the street for a driveway. Being assured of the success 
of this experiment, I recommended that no more catch- 
basins with grates be used, but that in places where there 
was no curb, a piece long enough to reach across, the basin 
be set, and the entrance to the basin cut therein, which 
recommendation was unanimously adopted. 

CEMETERIES. • 

At the Valley Cemetery a new avenue has been built on 
the east side, across the ravine and parallel with Pine 
street, the stone arch over Cemetery brook having been ex- 



202 

tended tweiitj-eight feet west, with wing walls on the north 
and south sides. One-half of the lot conveyed to tlie city 
by D. W. Fling was taken to make the connection with the 
old avenue parallel with Pine street. An avenue has 
also been constructed from the new one to the lower level 
of the ravine. There were used in the construction of 
these avenues 452.3 perches of stone and 3,370 yards of 
earth. The object of this work was to make a connection 
between the northwest and southeast sections of the ceme- 
tery, for teams. 

At the Pine Grove, a new plat, bounded by Laurel and 
Floral avenues, has been laid out into lots, according to the 
Forest-Hill, or what is known as the •' lawn, " system, cer- 
tain restrictions placed upon them, and the price increased 
to an amount sufficient to insure their receiving perpetual 
care from the city. There are one hundred and seven of 
these lots, varying in size from fifteen to twenty-two feet 
square. 

Much needs to be done in our cemeteries, in years to 
come, towards beautifying and adorning them. Nothing 
has been done to render them pleasing and attractive to 
the eye. In other cities it is the custom to have in their 
cemeteries as many attractive features as possible, in the 
shape of flower-beds, ponds, fountains, arbors, and shaded 
paths ; in fact, landscape gardening is carried to perfection 
in the principal cemeteries at the present time. Nothing 
is lost by the addition of these features, for lots adjoining 
them can be sold for a higher price, sufficient to pay for the 
small amount of land reserved. 

COMMONS. 

The only work of importance on our commons this year i 
has been the filling of the old pond on Concord square, " 
raising the grade of a portion of the same square, also of 



208 

one of the cross-walks, and the erection of a new fountain 
in place of the old pond. I would say of the basin of this 
fountain, that it was made the size that the manufacturers 
called for in their description, but it is not by any means 
large enough for the place. 

BRIDGES. 

The new brids'e, at the foot of Bridge street, has been 
completed this year. Last year the piers and abutments 
were built, the canal bridges partially completed, sufficiently 
to be used, and the iron- work in place on two spans. The 
remainder of the iron- work, and the stone-work for the 
east trestle, were completed August 10, 1881. At its c nn- 
plotion the city government voted to name it McGregor 
bridge. August 12, the city government and invited guests 
inspected the bridge, and a committee, consisting of the 
City Engineer, Hon. N. S. Bean, Mr. Charles Hutchinson, 
and Col. J. T. Faning, civil engineer, were appointed to 
make a thorough examination and test ot the bridge, to 
ascertain if the terms of the contract had been complied 
with. Four days were spent in this examination ; the 
workmanship and the quality of the iron were carefully ex- 
amined and thoroughly tested. August 17 , a strain test was 
made by loading the bridge with teams, hauling an aggre- 
gate load of 53.8 tons. Seven tests were made in various 
ways, calculated to subject the bridge to as severe strains 
as will be likely ^o come upon it at any future time. These 
tests and examinations were in the main satisfactory to the 
committee. A more full account can be found in the re- 
port made to the city government by this committee. A 
copy of the diagrams taken in various places upon the 
bridge during the testing, accompanies that report. The 
original diagrams can be seen at any time at the City 
Engineer's office. 



204 

Many of the citizens being dissatisfied with the grade of 
the east trestle, as built, and the Stark corporation desiring 
it to be raised in order to give them access to their new 
buildings on the lower level, the city government decided 
to make the change. For this work the Stark corporation 
pays I'o.OOO, the Amoskeag purchased the bridge across 
the lower canal for S2,000, and the city agrees to pay the 
balance. The change consists of a new double-deck bridge 
across the lower canal, with two driveways on the lower 
deck, separated by the center truss of the bridge. The 
end of the trestle has been raised 9^ feet, and is to be ex- 
tended to the upper deck of the canal bridge, and a new trestle 
from the east end of the canal bridge, fifty feet east. In 
order to give a driveway from Canal street to the lower 
level, the Amory corporation allowed eleven feet of their 
land to be used for that purpose, which, with the five feet 
of unoccupied street land, gives a sixteen-feet passage-way 
at the north side of the trestle abutment. The stone-work 
consisted of raising the piers upon which the trestle rested 
to the required height, building nine additional piers, tak- 
ing down the old lock wall and the two walls of the lower 
canal, building an abutment at the east end of the new 
trestle. 40 feet long and 14 feet high, and a retaining-wall 
from the north end of the abutment, 64.7 feet east, to sep- 
arate the higher and lower grades. This stone-work is all 
completed, so far as it can be done until the iron is in 
place. There is some delay with this work, owing to the 
scarcity of iron, and the inability of the company to get 
their orders filled ; for this delay they are not to blame. 

AMOSKEAG BRIDGE, 

This bridge has been thoroughly overhauled and re- 
paired. A few timbers were badly decayed, and the brac- 
ing, which was simply spiked in place, had in many places 



205 

worked loose. The east end had also settled badly, owing 
to the decaying timbers. This has been raised, new tim- 
bers put in where decayed or broken, the entire bracing 
respiked, the exterior painted, and the interior white- 
washed. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

This not properly coming under the City Engineer's 
duties, all that I have done is to make plans for the im- 
provements at the city-farm buildings, the furnishing of the 
City Engineer's new office, and the refitting and refurnish- 
ing of the city treasurer's new office. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES, 



EEPOET 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES 



To His Honor the Mayor, and City Councils of the City of 

Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Committee on Cemeteries present 
their annual report. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

As all committees into whose hands trusts are imposed, 
are required to render an annual statement, the Sub-Com- 
mittee on the Valley Cemetery would most respectfully 
submit the following for the year 1881 : — 

The first work of your committee was the selection of a 
superintendent of the grounds. Mr. F. B. Balch, a well 
known citizen, was appointed, and has filled the position to 
the acceptance of your committee, and, we trust, to the 
satisfaction of all who have required his services. 

A driveway connecting the east and west sides of the 
Valley has for a long time been needed, and, as additional 
appropriations were granted, it was decided that the con- 
templated enterprise should be accomplished this season. 
Accordingly, proposals from different parties were received 
for the stone-work and grading for the road-bed. Messrs. 

14 



210 



D. W. Garland and J. A. B. Emerson's bid being the low- 
est, the contract was awarded to them. 

The filling was very generously given by Col. T. L. Liv- 
ermore from the company's land on the south of the Val~ 
•ley, effecting a great saving of time and expense to the city, 
for which we return our most hearty thanks. The work is 
now completed, and all who have examined it pronounce it 
well worth the expenditure. The introduction of city water, 
last season, on the east side met with such universal favor 
that it has been put in on the west side, affording free use 
of the samd to all except where it was introduced into pri- 
vate lots, when a small tax is required. 

Thus work is being done year by year to beautify and 
adorn the grounds, wii;h such appropriations as are granted. 
For the coming seasoti we wouM recommend that the sum 
of three thousand dollars be allowed, in order that the iron 
fence on the east side may be completed, and to continue 
the work, so far as possible, on the south or Willow-street 
side, in order that the grounds may, as speedily as possible, 
be properly inclosed. The financial statement for the year 
is as follows : — 



Balance on hand Jan 

Appropriation 

Lot sold 

Tomb fees and water 



Receipts. 

1881 



rent 



Reserved fund, amount transferred 



Expenditures, 
Care of grounds .... 
D. W. Garland, stone-work . 
Manchester Water-works, water 



S829 


76 


1,500 


00 


28 


50 


119 


00 


570 


96 


^3,048 


22 


^533 Qb 


1,192 54 


32 


25 



!11 



D. H. Varnum, teaming 

D. W. Fling, lot . 

J. B. Varick, hardware . 

Thomas A. Lane, iron pipes, etc. 

H. H. Iluntress, plants . 

J. A. B. Emerson, grading . 

Daniel Healj, whitewashing tomb 

A. H. Lowell, resetting posts 

J. B. Clarke, printing . 

F. S. Bodwcll, stone and labor 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 



129 25 


51 


00 




75 


300 


97 


7 


00 


750 


78 


1 


50 


30 


00 


3 


75 


64 


00 


47 


78 



13,048 22 

HOLMES R PETTEE, 
WILLIAM G. HOYT, 
CHARLES E. BALCH, 

Sub- Committee. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Committee onPme Grove Cemetery respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1881 : — 

Receipts. 

Cash on hand, as per last report . . • f 830 32 

Appropriation .....•• ^00 00 

Receipts from sale of lots and wood . . . 1,205 22 

Lumber sold 80 00 

12,615 54 
Expenditures. 

Salary of superintendent . . . . • ^604 71 

J. F. James, salary as treas., and laying out lots 79 37 

Palmer & Garmon, grave numbers . . • 112 00 



212 



Grading lots and avenues, and graveling . . -$592 44 

S. P. Moody, cutting wood and lumber . . 26 66 

Incidental expenses ..... 70 97 

Cash on hand . . . . . . . 1,129 39 



12,615 54 
During the year a large amount of grading and gravel- 
ing has been done upon the main avenues, which has tend- 
ed to make the driveways more attractive, and generally 
improved the grounds. We would recommend that the 
work be continued until all the leading avenues adjacent 
to the improved lots are thoroughly graveled. 

A plot of ground northeast of the tool-house, comprising 
about one and three-fourths acres divided into one hundred 
and seven lots, has been laid out on the " landscape lawn " 
plan, which is being adopted in many of the finest ceme- 
teries in the country. This plan was fully considered by 
the committee, and adopted after consulting with many of 
our citizens interested in the Pine Grove, and it is believed 
will meet the wishes of all who desire this cemetery kept 
up, in some degree at least, to modern ideas of beauty and 
attractiveness. 

The general features of this plan are set forth and em- 
bodied in the following resolutions, adopted at a full meet- 
ing of the committee on cemeteries, November 10, 1881 : — 

" Whereas, the idea has been expressed that the feature 
known as the ^' landscape lawn" plan, embodying modern 
ideas and tastes, should be introduced into the Pine Grove 
Cemetery in some specified locality, and lots sold in such 
locality upon such conditions as will secure greater uni- 
formity, care, and permanence in fitting up and maintaining 
the lots and surroundings ; and 

" Whereas, this committee have given the subject such 
consideration and investigation as lead them to believe 



213 

that the proposition carried out would give a greater va- 
riety to the grounds, and tend to enhance the beauty and 
attractiveness of the cemetery ; therefore, 
• " Resolved^ That the section of land bounded on the west, 
south, and east by Laurel avenue, and on the north by Flo- 
ral avenue, be laid out on the above named plan ; and that 
the price of the lots, including fitting up (estimated to cost 
about ten cents per square foot), be fixed at twenty cents 
per square foot, with an endowment or donation made to 
the city of at least forty cents per square foot, the income 
of which is to be applied for their perpetual care and pres- 
ervation ; and that the sale of such lots be conditioned as 
set forth in the following form of deed, which the treasurer 
of the committee is hereby authorized to execute in behalf 
of the city of Manchester, as follows, to wit : " — 

The following are the conditions and limitations of the 
deed : — 

" First, That the said lot of land shall not be used for any 
other purpose than as a place of burial for the dead ; and 
no tomb shall be erected or constructed on said lot ; and 
no trees within the lot or border shall be cut down or de- 
stroyed without the consent of the committee having charge 
of said ground. 

" Second, That said lot of land shall be graded, sodded, 
suitable landmarks of stone erected, and the number there- 
of legibly and permanently marked on the premises by the 
committee ; and no work shall at any time be done upon or 
around said lot by other persons than the proper servants 
of the said city of Manchester, except by consent of the 
committee in charge of the ground. 

'' Third, That no fence, curbing, hedge, or landmark, other 
than corner posts set by the committee, shall be placed 
upon or around said lot ; no headstone exceeding tw^o feet 
and six inches in height from the ground shall be erected 



214 

except by vote of the committee ; and no monuments, struct- 
ures, or inscriptions shall be placed therein without the 
approval of the committee. 

" Fourth, That if any monument or effigy, or any struct- 
ure whatever, or any inscription be placed in or upon the 
said land, which shall be determined by the major part of 
the said committee for the time being to be offensive or im- 
proper, the said committee, or the major part of them, 
shall have the right, and it shall be their duty, to enter 
upon said land and remove the said offensive or improper 
object or objects. 

" Fifth, That if any trees or shrubs situated in said lot of 
land shall, by means of their roots, branches, or otherwise, 
become detrimental to said lot, or to the adjacent lots or 
avenues, or dangerous or inconvenient, it shall be the duty 
of the said committee for the time being, and they shall 
have the right, to enter into said lot and remove the said 
trees and shrubs, or such parts thereof as are thus detri- 
mental, dangerous, or inconvenient. 

" And said city of Manchester, in consideration of the 

further sum of dollars, to them paid by the grantee, 

the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, does further 

covenant to and with said grantee heirs and 

assigns, that they will forever apply the income or interest 
thereof as follows : First, to keep in suitable and good re- 
pair and preservation the lot hereby conveyed, and monu- 
ments, tomb, trees, shrubbery, and soil thereon ; second, 
to suffer the surplus, if any, of such income or interest to 
accumulate for such time as the trustees of the cemetery 
funds may deem expedient, or, in their discretion, to apply 
the same surplus, or any part thereof, from time to time, to 
ornamenting and preserving the grounds of the cemetery, 
agreeable to an ordinance of the city, entitled ' An ordi- 
nance in relation to cemeteries,' passed Aug. 5, 1879." 



215 

A section of ground in the southwest portion of the 
cemetery has been cleared of the wood and timber, pre 
paratory to grading, and will be ready early in the coming- 
season. This section will comprise many eligible and de- 
sirable lots, and will undoubtedly be readily sold. 

No shade trees have been set during the past year. 
Owing to the damaging effect upon stone and marble, 
caused by the coloring matter coming from the leaves of 
shade trees, and from the liability of the roots to displace, 
and thereby injure, the stone-work inclosing lots, there is a 
serious objection to trees in such close proximity to any 
burial lot as in any way to injure or impair the beautiful 
works of art which the owners have erected at so much 
cost. While shade trees give variety, and add to the beauty 
and attractiveness of the grounds, and especially where 
the soil is as dry and sandy as that of this cemetery, yet 
the setting of these trees should be in such localities upon 
the grounds as to avoid the objections referred to. 

Believing in the importance of providing by the present 
generation, who are the most interested in the lots now 
being disposed of, for a suitable fund for the care and pro- 
tection of these lots in the future, we earnestly recommend 
that some portion, if not all, of the money received for the 
sale of these lots, be set apart as a permanent fund for this 
purpose. 

In conclusion, we would express the hope that our suc- 
cessors may adopt a liberal policy in the general improve- 
ment of the grounds, in order to keep pace with the beau- 
tiful and substantial improvements being made from year 

to vear by owners of lots. 

^ ^ JOSEPH L. STEVENS, 

A. H. DANIELS, 

A. W. QUINT, 

Suh- Committee, 
December 31, 1881. 



TEEASUEEE^S EEPOET. 



To the Committee on Cemeteries : — 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with the requirements of 
law, as your treasurer, I herewith submit to you my eighth 
annual report of all money by me received on account of 
cemeteries, for the year ending December 31, 1881. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

To cash received for fifty-three lots sold . . ^1,205 22 
By cash paid city treasurer, as per receipts . 11,205 22 

I have twenty-three deeds written ready for delivery, the 
total sum of which is about four hundred dollars. 

THE VALLEY. 

To cash received of Mrs. Ada H. Dodge, for 
1421 square feet of land at 20 cents per 
foot. . . . . . . . 128 50 

cash received Chas. Wingate, for tomb rent, 31 00 



Total receipts f59 50 

By cash paid city treasurer, as per receipts . 159 50 

All money received on account of cemeteries has, as 
usual, been paid to the city treasurer, and all bills of ex- 
penditures have been paid by the city treasurer, having been 



217 

submitted to the committee on accounts for examination. 
I desire to. improve this opportunity to call the attention of 
the committee to the propriety of creating a permanent fund 
of ten thousand dollars or more, to be taken from the re- 
ceipts of lots sold in Pine Grove Cemetery — say one thous- 
and dollars each year — until a sum, the interest on which 
will be sufficient to keep the grounds in respectable order, 
is raised. If it is considered advisable to provide for such 
a sum, it will be wise to do so before many more lots are 

sold. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. F. JAMES, Treasurer. 
December 29, 1881. 



Manchester, N. H., Dec. 29, 1881. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of the 
treasurer of the Pine Grove and Valley cemeteries, on 
pages 96, 97, and 98, and pages 78 and 79, respectively, 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched, to 
the amount of 81,264.72. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



I consider it my duty to report here the Gale fund. 
This consists of the sum of three hundred dollars, de- 
posited in the Amoskeag Savings Bank by the executors of 
the will of the late Mrs. Dr. Gale, which will requests the 
treasurer of the Valley Cemetery to expend the annual 
interest on the same for the purpose of keeping both lots 
and tombs of the late Dr. A. G. Gale and Hon. R. H. Ayer 



218 

in suitable condition. In obedience to the provisions of 
said will, I had two coats of paint put upon the fences 
of both lots, in July last. 

To interest accumulated July 26, 1881 . . |38 95 
By paid J. J. Abbott, for painting fences (two 

coats) ....... 18 00 



Balance $20 95 

J. F. JAMES, Treasurer. 



TIMOTHY W. CHALLIS, Chairman, 

SYLYANUS B. PUTNAM, Clerk, 

J. F. JAMES, Treasurer, 

H. R. PETTEE, 

W. G. HOYT, 

CHAS. E. BALCH, 

J. L. STEYENS, 

A. H. DANIELS, 

A. W. QUINT, 

Committee on Cemeteries. 



EEPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen: — In presenting the second annual report 
of the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund, there is little to be 
said in addition to what was embraced in the report of 
last year. Since that time no additional funds have been 
placed in the custody of the trustees ; but by the action of 
the committee on cemeteries, by which a section of the 
Pine Grove Cemetery is to be improved on the 'Mandscape 
lawn" plan, and the lots embraced therein are to be 
endowed, it is expected that within the coming year a con- 
siderable sum will be accumulated for the perpetual main- 
tenance of such lots. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. WESTON, 
P. 0. CHENEY, 
H. B. PUTNAM, 
Trustees of the Cemetery Fund, 
January 2, 1882, 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



KEPOET 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 

of Manchester : — 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report for 
the year 1881. 

The whole number of families tliat has received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the past year has 
been thirty-two, consisting of one hundred and sixty per- 
sons, all of whom have a settlement in this city. 

Three of the above number have died during the year. 

The whole number of persons at the City Farm during 
the year has been thirty-one, the average number for the 
year being twelve and seventy-three one-hundredths. 

There has been one death at the farm during the year. 

During the past year there, has been a large addition 
made to the city-farm house, whereby those needing city 
charity can be conveniently provided for. New rooms 
have been fitted up with entire new furniture, and steam 
introduced into every room. This department is entirely 
separate from the criminal ward, so that those who may 
have occasion to go there will not feel that they are sent 



224 

there for any crime. It is very desirable that all paupers 
off the farm should at once make application to their ward 
overseer of the poor to be admitted. By so doing the ex- 
penses of the city may be greatly reduced, and the poor 
will receive much better care. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

H. B. PUTNAM, Chairman ex officio^ 
WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Clerk, Ward 1, 
GEORGE H. COLBY, Ward 2, 
CHARLES G. B. RYDER, Ward 3, 
HORACE GORDON, Ward 4, 
GEORGE F. SHEEHAN, Ward 5, 
ROBERT HALL, Ward 6, 
ELBRIDGE G. WOODMAN, Ward 7, 
ISRAEL B. FARNUM, Ward 8. 

Overseers of the Poor. 



^^OOOTJnSTT 

OF 

Stlvanus B. Putnam, 

OITT TREASURER, 

From December 31, 1880, to December 81, 1881. 



16 



226 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



To Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1881 
Temporary Loan . 
Bonds sold 

Interest on bonds sold 
Insurance Tax 
Kailroad Tax 
Savings-bank Tax . 
Literary Fund 
Board of Inmates at State Reform School 
City Farm 
City Teams . 
Highway District No. 1 
u 2 

New Highway 

Lighting Streets 

Macadamizing 

Sewers and Drains 

Bridge-street sewer 

Incidental expenses 

Old Hearse sold 

Rent of Ward Room 

Pine Grove Cemetery 

Valley Cemetery* . 

Police Department 

City Hall 

City Officers' Salaries 

Water Rent . 

Fuel 

Philip Pruman, rent of land 

Dog Licenses 

Aqueduct Water 

Interest on Taxes . 

Tuition . 

Cost on Non-Resident Taxes 

Taxes collected on List of 187o 
u u u 1374 



Amount carried forward 



S26,552 33 


76,000 GO 


60,000 00 


84 45 


780 38 


12,830 45 


37,124 88 


1,870 50 


4,021 86 


2,504 88 


2,492 09 


1 25 


1 25 


8 20 


25 00 


26 06 


337 07 


1,005 30 


383 84 


60 57 


75 00 


24 00 


1,285 22 


147 50 


9,543 49 


2,494 04 


7 50 


60,215 62 


12 56 


1 00 


542 25 


15 00 


683 10 


341 92 


42 00 


1 67 


101 07 


S300,643 30 



227 



City of Manchester {ending December 31, 1881). 



Cr. 



By Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1881 
Temporary Loan . 
Keduction of City Debt 
Interest paid . 
Coupons, City Proper 
Coupons, Water Bonds 
Paupers off the Farm 
City Farm 
City Teams . 
Highway District No. 1 

a u a 3 

K a u ^ 

u u a 5 



a u u XO 

u u a 11 

a « u 13 

New Highways 
Land Damages 
Watering Streets . 
Lighting Streets 
Paving Streets 
Macadamizing 
Grading for Concrete 
Sewers and Drains 
Bridge-street Sewer 
Granite Bridge 
Amoskeag Falls Bridge 
McGregor Bridge . 
Commons 

Incidental Expenses 
Pine Grove Cemetery 

Amount carried forward 



S35,693 73 


12,000 00 


16,400 00 


2,089 17 


16,779 00 


311383 00 


7,662 77 


9,131 54 


4,570 50 


229 71 


11,156 45 


959 40 


257 77 


485 83 


997 65 


582 90 


392 55 


490 38 


1,251 33 


969 99 


203 77 


204 81 


2,777 24 


920 76 


1,979 15 


5,323 99 


8,306 75 


2,871 37 


3,903 97 


9,621 71 


13,929 41 


458 44 


1,361 34 


20,000 00 


392 30 


20,018 74 


1,486 15 


$361,043 58 



228 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 





Amount brought forward 


Taxes collected on 


List of 


1875 


C( 


« 


(( 


1876 


a 


a 


a 


1877 


u 


u 


ii 


1878 


u 


u 


u 


1879 


(( 


(( 


C( 


1880 


(( 


u 


ti 


1881 


Show Licenses 


, 


, 


Rent of Tenements 


. 


, 


City Scales . 


. 


. 



Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1882 



S300,643 30 
205 45 

78 28 
185 78 
324 75 
435 49 
30,159 30 
268,774 67 
578 00 
260 50 
178 81 

$601,824 33 
31,312 63 



$633,136 96 



229 



City of Manchester {ending December 31, 1881). 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward . . . $361,043 68 


By VaDey Cemetery 






3,048 32 


Fire Department . . ' . 








14,042 77 


• Fire-alarm Telegraph . 








1,049 48 


Police Department 








20,116 76 


City Hall 








6,115 44 


Hydrant Service .... 








19,3i0 00 


Printing and Stationery 








1,360 52 


Repairs of Buildings 








4,988 38 


City Library 








2,695 48 


Women's Aid Society . 








700 00 


Militia 








500 00 


Abatement of Taxes 








2,762 22 


Discount on Taxes 








7,399 15 


State Tax 








41,060 00 


City Officers' Salaries . 








10,923 59 


Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 








200 00 


Firemen's Parade . 








288 84 


Annex to City Library . 








3,355 17 


New School-house 








4,724 30 


Water- works 








37,558 48 


Repairs of School-houses 








4,959 72 


Fuel . . . . 








3,036 26 


Furniture and Supplies 








745 24 


Books and Stationery . 








599 89 


Printing and Advertising 








566 05 


Contingent Expenses . 








823 17 


Care of Rooms 








2,494 89 


Evening Schools . 








1,374 75 


Teachers' Salaries . 








37,503 40 


Truant Officer 








187 50 


Reservoirs .... 








4 90 




$594,548 15 


Cash in the Treasury^ January 1, 1882 . . 38,588 81 


S683,13G 96 


SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 








Citi 


/ Treasurer. 



Ma2<chestee, Jauuary 1, 1882. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
certify that we have examined the foregoing account of S. 
B. Putnam, city treasurer, and find the same correctly cast 
and supported by proper vouchers. 

CHARLES F. MORRILL, 
ARETAS BLOOD, 
SAMUEL F. CURTIS. 
THOMAS JOHNSON, 
H. B. PUTNAM, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 



REVENUE ACCOUNT, 



ACCOUNTS OF ArPROPRIATlONS. 



TEMPORARY LOAN 



To balance frqm old account . . f 45, 000 00 
Manchester Savings Bank . 45,000 00 

Mechanics' Savings Bank . 5,000 00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 10,000 00 
Amoskeag National Bank . 10,000 00 

Merchants National Bank . 5,000 00 



Dr 



-5^120,000 00 
Cr. 



Paid Manchester Savings Bank . 155,000 00 

Amoskeag Savings Bank . 5,000 00 

Mechanics' Savings Bank . 10,000 00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 15,000 00 

Manchester National Bank . 5,000 00 

Amoskeag National Bank . 10,000 00 

Merchants National Bank . 10,000 00 

Isaac Fitts .... 10,000 00 



-8120,000 00 



234 








INTEREST 


^ 




Dr. 


To appropriation . 


•$20,000 


UO 




water-works, am't transferred 


. 38,000 


00 




Charles E. Balch 


16 


67 




First National Bank . 


21 


12 




Second National Bank 


12 


22 




Amoskeag National Bank . 


22 


22 




Merchants National Bank 


12 


22 








jfli.^S r^^A A^ 






— c 


l^t^V-^^vywT; -if.f 


- 






Cr. 


Paid C. E. Balch . 


.i;193 


75 




Merchants National Bank 


169 


.86 




Amoskeag National Bank 


64 


58 




Manchester National Bank 


7o 


70 




Manchester Savings Bank 


892 


07 




Amoskeag Savings Bank 


163 


89 




Merrimack River Savings Bant 


: 199 


73 




Mechanics' Savings Bank 


217 


09 




Isaac Pitts 


112 


50 




coupons, city proper 


16,779 


00 




coupons, water bonds 


37,883 


00 




Bj balance on hand 


. 1,838 


28 








_ ,«js8 HQzl A^ 






C 


JKfKJ-fK/ijrZ ^LKJ 



INTEREST ON TAXES. 



To George E. Morrill, collector 



Dr. 

$782 06 



By balance on hand 



Cr. 

1782 06 



285 
PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



To appropriation .... $4,000 00 
county of Hillsborough, support 

of county paupers . . . 4,021 86 

reserved fund .... 278 69 



Paid Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Michael Kelley . $64 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Sullivan . 96 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Reardon . 48 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. P. Fox . . 72 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Healy . . 72 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. T. Mackin . 10 00 

.Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Robert Manahan . 5 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Loughlin . 6 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished John Murphy . . 8 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished David McKay . . 4 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Robert McMahon . 50 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished P. J. Hanley . . 66 00 



Dr. 



•- $8,300 66 
Cr. 



236 



Paid B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. M. Shaiiley . $48 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Joice . . 60 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. M. Fitzgerald . 28 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Junier . . 12 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Edward Burrines . o 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mr. Tobert . . 5 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Doherty . 27 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Johu Murphy . 7 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Thomas Connor . 8 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished P. Scanlan . . 4 43 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Jerry Cronin 5 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Timothy McQuinn 3 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Rhoades . 2 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Mary Fitzgerald . 1 50 

Michael Kenney, groceries fur- 
nished Johanna Harrison . 56 99 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished xMrs. J. Loughlin . 66 00 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Harrison . . 5 00 



287 



Paid M. E. Griffin, groceries fur- 
nished Ann Mackin . . 850 00 

M. E Oriffin, groceries fur- 
nished Walter Lynch . . 32 00 

M. E. Griffin, groceries fur- 
nished J. Doherty . . 2 00 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished L. B. Mott . . 3 00 

M. R. Currier, groceries fur- 
nished Pyam Hovey . . 40 78 

H. P. Davis & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Fitts . . 1 50 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Cyprian Gillette . 14 01 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Douglass Hunter 37 76 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished Joseph Pierce 51 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished John Doherty 9 50 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished B. Fitzgerald . 4 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished D. McKay . 6 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies furnished Dan'l Reynolds 2 00 

Barnard & Huskie, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Douglass Hun- 
ter 52 76 

A. G. Pratt, groceries furnished 

Louis Rushlow ... 19 50 

Town of Merrimack, groceries 

furnished Joseph Pierce . 3 00 



238 



fur 



Paid Michael Kearns, groceries fur- 
nished P. J. Handle J . 

Michael Kearns, groceries fur 
nished Ellen Rhoades . 

0. J. Balch, groceries furnished 
Mrs. Gillette 

0. J. Balch, groceries furnished 
Mrs. Douglass Hunter 

Barr & Clapp, groceries 
nished Daniel Mitchell 

Barr & Clapp, groceries fur 
nished Eben Foss 

Eager & Rand, groceries fur 
nished Helen Rhoades 

Eager & Rand, groceries fur 
nished Kate Cronin 

John Fenton & Co., groceries 
furnished John Doherty 

Poore & Rowell, groceries fur- 
nished Hiram 0. Hodge 

1. G. Rowell, groceries fur- 
nished George H. Young 

Geo. H. Stearns, groceries fur- 
nished Hiram 0. Hodge 

Geo. H. Stearns, groceries fur 
nished John Lane 

Geo. H. Stearns, groceries fur 
nished Mr. Leonard . 

L. A. McKean, groceries fur 
nished Ellen Rhoades . 

Smith & Pratt, groceries fur 
nished Mrs. Fitzgerald 

Brigham & Pratt, bread fur 
nished Thomas Connor 



$6 00 
6 89 
3 00 

10 41 

5 00" 

6 00 
25 18 

11 00 
13 00 
11 00 
13 00 

3 85 
2 00 

1 50 

2 61 

1 50 

2 00 



289 



Paid E. E. Pillsbury, board and care 

of family .... -186 00 

Geo. C. Batchelder, board and 
care of Geo. H. Batchelder 
and family .... 

0. J. Doble, board and care ol 
Anna B. Ayer 

Mrs. S. B. Davis, board and 
care of Joseph Bellefleur 

Mrs. M. M. Prescott, board and 
care of Eben Foss 

Town of Lancaster, board and 
care of Benson Joy 

Town of Newmarket 

C. C. Colby, board of Alice P. 
Nutt 

Sarah A. Heselton, support of 
family .... 

Lucie M. Clark, care of Alice 
P. Nutt .... 

Sarah E. Maybe w, care of 
Henry C. Young. 

Mrs. Patrick Ford, washing for 
Henry C. Young and wife . 

Susan A. Crooker, watching 
with Henry C. Young and 
wife 

Mrs. Bonett, work for H. C. 
Young and family 

Mrs. Leonard Jenkins, watch- 
ing with Henry C. Young 
and wife .... 

Town of Candia, care of Luther 
Harrington .... 



43 


00 


72 


00 


52 


07 


*6 


00 


23 


50 


18 


00 


33 


32 


7 


00 


48 


00 


2. 


50 


5 


55 


37 


50 


4 


00 


7 


87 


8 


00 



240 

Paid Delia Fifield,care of Henry C, 

Young's family . . . f 7 30 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal fur- 
nished Mrs. Moulton . . 30 25 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal fur- 
nished James Callahan . 10 60 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood fur- 
nished Hiram 0. Hodge . 18 75 

James , F. Wyman, coal fur- 
nished Mfs. D. Hunter . 5 6Q 

Rowell & Burns, wood fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Cronin . 4 00 

James W. Kimball, wood fur- 
nished Mrs Doherty . . 3 50 

James W. Kimball, wood fur- 
nished Timothy McQuinn . 2 00 

A. Mclndoe, wood furnished 

Mrs. Mackin . . . • 2 00 

M. y. B. Garland, wood fur- 
nished S. B. Mott . . 1 00 

George H. Porter, wood fur- 
nished Mrs. Doherty . . 2 00 

A. C. Wallace, wood lurnished 

Mrs. D. Hunter ... 3 00 

G. M. Story, wood furnished 

Mrs. D. Hunter ... 3 75 

S. Brown, wood furnished Mrs. 

D. Hunter . . . . 2 25 

J. Baldwin & Co., wood fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Hunter . 5 75 

L. S. Proctor, wood furnished 

Pyam Hovey ... 6 00 

J. Mclndoe, wood furnished 

Mrs. David McKay . . 2 25 



241 

Paid State Reform School, board of 

inmates .... 13,817 52 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

John Connolly ... 229 62 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Martha J. Dunn ... 224 81 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Elbridge Gerry . . . 226 Q6 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

John J. Murray ... 242 68 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

John Welch " . . . 126 37 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Patrick Cronin ... 220 24 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Asenath H. White . . 140 59 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

S. S. Gale .... 54 12 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Ellison Towne ... 12 10 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Charles Croghan . . 15 91 

S. G. Reed, board of Willard 

A. Reed .... 19 39 

Town of Candia, clothing for 

Luther Harrington . ' . 23 15 

Town of Groton, care of Mrs. 

F. Page .... 5 00 

Dr. D. P. Campbell, profes- 
sional services ... 1 50 
Dr. J. A. Jackson, professional 

services . . . . 60 00 

Robert Hall, cash paid for med- 
icine for Joseph B. Pierce . 4 50 

16 



242 



Paid C. G. B. Ryder, cash paid Eras- 

tus Nichols . 
I. R. Dewey, use of team 
M. E. George, cash paid Mrs 

C. W. Heselton . 
Wm. H. Maxwell, postage and 

stationery . 
Lewis K. Mead, medicine 
Tebbetts Bros., medicine 
Tebbetts Bros., medicine for 

Alice P. Nutt . 
P. A. Devine, burial of Mrs 

Bridget Fitzgerald 
F. 0. Dow, boots and shoes 
Fairbanks & Pearson 
A. G. Monette, burial of Mrs 

Cyprian Gillette . 
Piper, Hawley, & Co., clothing 



86 00 

1 50 

5 00 

2 00 
52 30 
23 02 

3 49 

14 00 

4 75 
37 00 

14 00 



for Henry C. Young's family 


5 25 


John B. Clarke, printing 


5 50 


James Bros , team . 


1 25 


Geo. E. Morrill, tax of C. S. 




Prescott .... 


1 51 


By balance to new account 


737 78 


CITY FARM. 




To appropriation .... 


85,500 00 


F. Allen, produce sold 


2,484 45 


J. S. Holt, pasturing cow 


11 00 


Barton & Co., overdraft . 


50 



;,300 33 



Dr. 



243 



To Ezra W. Kimball, overdraft 


18 93 


reserved fund .... 


1,868 13 




i9 873 01 




Cr. 


PaidF. Allen, superintendent 


1500 00 


F. Allen, labor 


543 31 


Chas. T. Allen & Co., groceries 


481 76 


Geo. H. Stearns, groceries 


139 03 


Eager & Rand, groceries 


8 58 


Poore & Rowell, groceries 


50 02 


J. G. Warner, groceries . 


63 03 


L. B. Harris, use of telephone 


35 80 


Pettee & Whittle, grain . 


588 87 


Samuel Cooper, grain 


128 46 


D. Kerwin & Son, soap . 


17 60 


L. Shelters, butter . 


8 19 


R. G. Sullivan, tobacco . 


16 80 


J. A. Sanborn & Co., repairing 




teams . . . . 


32 50 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


4 04 


Wm. H. Hill, blacksmithing 


1 25 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 


s 


smithing 


46 22 


Goodwin Bros., repairing teams 


23 35 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 




ing teams . 


80 65 


Daniels & Co., hardware, ferti 


- 


lizers, etc. . 


108 63 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware, fer 


- 


tilizers, etc. 


44 64 


J. B. Yarick, hardware, ferti 


- 


lizers, etc. . 


6d 50 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


130 24 



244 



Paid Wason, Pierce, & Co., tobacco 
Silas Pierce & Co., molasses, 

etc. .... 
D. A. Simons, furnishing goods 

D. A. Simons, furniture . 
Ezra W. Kimball, horse clothing 
J. P. Finn & Co., painting 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

W. Ireland, lumber and labor 
J. H. Maynard, lumber and 

labor .... 
J. S. Masseck, dry goods 
Waite Bros., dry goods . 
N. S. Clark, dry goods . 
Weston & Hill, dry goods 
Piper, Hawley, & Co., dry goods 
Plumer & Holton, clothing 
Temple & Farrington, wall 

paper .... 

B. W. Robinson & Co., mason 
work .... 

E. M. Slayton , butter, beans, etc 
B. F. Porter, filing saws . 
Cyrus Dean, repairing clocks 
Barr & Clapp, kerosene oil 
A. N. Clapp, kerosene oil 
Carl E. York, sugar and oil 
Manchester Locomotive-works 

sled shoes . 
Thomas A. Lane, old pipe 
A. Royal, swill 
Geo. F. Bosher & Co., soap 

matches, etc. 



7 00 



37 


96 


50 


82 


252 


78 


33 


76 


404 


79 


230 


90 


32 


16 


41 


97 


2,625 


92 


17 


74 




50 


26 


06 


72 


48 


103 


87 


49 


83 



59 bc> 



194 


48 


45 


47 


2 


20 


3 


50 


8 


28 


6 


27 


2 


88 


11 


80 




86 


5 


70 



7 32 



245 



Paid P. W. Follansbee & Son, mov- 




ing building 


$150 00 


Geo. F. Hanson, blacksmithing 


3 00 


G. H. Roby, concreting . 


3 00 


Wm. G. Hoyt, manure . 


13 50 


A. H. Lowell, iron castings 


6 74 


Mitchell & Heath, shoes 


25 15 


H. F. Thompson, blacksmithing 


5 40 


Clough & Towle, pork and lard 


35 55 


N. B. Hull, 2d, potatoes . 


14 00 


I. P. Emery <fe Co., tin ware . 


41 99 


Concord Railroad corporation, 




freight . . . . 


1 24 


J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 


11 54 


Wm. Stevens, tobacco 


2 16 


R. G. Sullivan, tobacco . 


22 57 


James S. Bacheler, putting in 




boilers, etc. 


1,145 25 


James S. Bacheler, plumbing . 


118 19 


Geo. H. Dorr . . . . 


3 72 


J. E. Knox, pasturing cattle 


40 00 


P. Bannon, making cider 


5 10 


J. M. Crombie, labor on well . 


28 12 


By balance to new account . 


741 47 


CITY TEAM 


S. 


To L. B. Harris, labor . 


14 00 


0. D. Carpenter, labor 


1 50 


Warren Harvey, horse 


50 00 


District No. 2 . 


1,418 61 



19,873 01 



Dr. 



246 



To District No. 10 
sewers and drains 
grading for concrete 
watering streets 
macadamizing . 
incidental expenses 
paving 

new highways . 
reserved fund . 



Paid J. A. Brown, hay . 
0. Hinkley, hay 
L. Shelters, hay 
E. Langley, hay 
E. P. Johnson & Co., hay 
E. B. Bartlett, hay . 
James Warren, hay 
J. M. Miller, hay . 
Rufus Martin, hay . 
W. Cochran, hay 
L. N. Barnard, hay 
M. Boyington, hay . 
P. Boyington, hay . 
George A. Tufts, straw 
S. R. Corning, hay . 
N. Preston, straw . 
Samuel Cooper, grain 
Pettee & Whittle, grain 
H. Fradd & Co., grain 
A. N. Clapp, grain . 
W. H. Marty n & Son, grain 
D. Wadsworth, carrots . 



8192 


75 


1 


00 


174 


50 


411 


24 


32 


50 


40 


75 


136 


24 


29 


00 


2,078 


41 




<Jfi4. ^70 AO 




Cr. 


150 


55 


90 


78 


■ 69 


56 


98 


04 


397 


29 


22 


78 


11 


.'5 


192 


57 


31 


81 


19 


25 


13 


80 


9 bQ 


18 


35 


11 


83 


. 9 


50 


5 


94 


211 


07 


642 


69 


75 


75 


17 


37 


30 


62 


21 


09 



247 



id J. H. Cram, blacksmithiiig 


$U1 76 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 




smithing . . . . 


37 75 


D. F. Cressey, repairing teams 


6 50 


John Barnes, repairing teams . 


36 69 


J. A. Sanborn &. Co., repair- 




ing teams . . . . 


36 55 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 




ing teams, etc. . 


1,070 18 


J. B. Yarick, hoof ointment . 


2 38 


Pike & Heald, cap for hubs, etc. 


2 70 


Daniels & Co., stable broom, etc. 


1 30 


Ezra W. Kimball, repairing 




harness . • . . 


214 52 


T. F. Burnham, professional 




services 


8 00 


John Barnes, blacksmithing . 


8 20 


H. C. Ranno, harness 


75 00 


H. C. Ranno, repairing harness 


20 04 


F. N. McLaren, repairing har- 




ness 


1 00 


Manchester Tea Co., salt 


1 32 


J. Truesdale & Son, horse- 




blankets . . . . 


4 50 


city farm, hay 


29 37 


S. P. ScoUey & Co., castile 




soap, etc . 


16 97 


Waite Bros. . 


4 23 


G. E. Hall, medicine 


12 42 


J. J. Abbott, paint . 


11 81 


George H. Stearns, salt, etc. 


3 95 


A. N. Clapp, flannel 


38 


E. M. Slayton 


7 30 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


12 04 



248 



Paid Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 


8264 75 




A. Robie, teamster . 


105 73 




Dennis Clifford, teamster 


18 75 




A. B. Gushing, teamster . 


247 86 




Walter Seaward, teamster 


71 99 


14,570 50 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . ... 
Eddie Stewart . 



Paid Malachi F. Dodge, superinten- 
dent 

Geo. F. Hamlet,superintendent 
labor of men and teams . 



1250 00 




1 25 






$251 25 
Cr. 




128 00 




86 00 




137 25 


.«9A1 9A 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 

To appropriation . . . .$10,000 00 
Kimball & Gerrish, old barrels . 1 25 

reserved fund . . . . 1,155 20 



Dr. 

$11,156 45 
Cr. 



Paid Warren Harvey ,superintendent 8676 50 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 231 35 



249 



Paid J. B. Varick, hardware 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
P. W. Dickey & Co., black- 
smithing . . . . 
C. Patterson, blacksmithing . 

C. F. Langley, blacksmithing . 
F. Ricard & Son, blacksmithing 
Derry <fe Co., blacksmithing . 
Lamson & Marden, blacksmith- 
ing 

W. E. & E. B. Dunbar, black- 
smithing 
W. H. Yickery, keys 
Goodwin Bros., lumber 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber 
James Baldwin & Co., lumber 
Pike & Heald, repairing street- 
sweeper 

Daniel W. Garland, stone 
Robert Heath . 

B. F. Porter, filing saws . 

D. Clifford, teamster 
city teams 

A. B. Gushing, teamster . 
A. Robie, teamster . 
Geo. W, Butterfield, teamster 
James Kearns, teamster . 
Walter Seaward, teamster 
Frank Dustin, teamster . 
labor of men and teams . 



$6 66 


14 


00 


34 


05 


2 


18 


6 


83 


42 


63 



38 86 



10 94 



95 
35 
15 



10 04 



47 

92 



1 02 

18 00 



00 
10 



2 
5 

360 25 

1,346 61 

37 12 

174 74 

42 00 

432 00 

142 50 

162 75 

7,344 48 



-111,156 45 



260 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



To appropriation .... 


$700 00 


reserved fund .... 


259 40 


Paid I. G. Howe, superintendent . 


-S39 19 


H. C. Dickey, superintendent . 


333 86 


W. C. Rogers, hardware 


17 00 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


16 


John Barnes, blacksmithing . 


9 50 


H. H. Currier & Son, concreting 


4 00 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


11 bQ 


Robert Laing, stone steps 


2 00 


Joseph Johnson, stone . 


1 75 


labor of men and teams . 


540 38 







Dr. 



1959 40 



Cr. 



1959 40 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



To appropriation 
reserved fund 



Paid C. C. Webster, superintendent 
J. B. Yarick, hardware . 
labor of men and teams . 



1250 00 


7 


77 


$128 


04 


4 


90 


124 


88 



Dr. 



$257 77 



Cr. 



$257 77 



251 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 



To appropriation 
reserved fund 



Paid A. A. Hazelton, superintendent 
C. A. Pierce, superintendent . 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
F. Ricard & Son, blacksmithing 
labor of men and teams . 



1400 00 


85 


83 


171 


69 


168 


50 


21 


04 




40 


2 


20 


222 


00 



Dr. 



1485 83 



Cr. 



8485 83 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



To appropriation . . 


$400 00 


J. H. Maynard, overdraft 


8 20 


reserved fund .... 


589 46 


Paid D. H. Dickey, superintendent 


132 00 


I. T. Webster, superintendent 


145 08 


J. B. Yarick, hardware . 


28 18 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 


5 90 


J. H. Maynard, lumber . 


8 20 


0. Sweeney, blacksmithing 


15 00 


labor of men and teams . 


763 80 



Dr. 



$997 66 



Cr. 



$997 66 



252 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



Paid R. I. Stevens, superintendent . 124 00 
Jeremiah Garvin, superintend- 
ent 

labor of men and teams . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 

By balance on hand 



108 


00 


259 


95 




60 


57 


45 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


1650 00 


8650 00 
Cr. 


• 




Paid P. 0. Woodman, superintend- 






ent 


$18 00 




H. A. Horton, superintendent 


124 95 




Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 


18 15 




A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


12 79 


• 


labor of men and teams . 


409 01 




By balance on hand 


67 10 


$650 00 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT 


NO. 8. 


Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$450 00 


$450 00 



Cr. 



$450 00 



253 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



To appropriation . 
reserved fund . 



Paid Alphonso Boyce, superintend 
ent .... 
J. J. Garmon 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
L. A. Dickey, repairing tools 
P. W. Follansbee, lumber 
labor of men and teams 



. 1450 00 


40 


38 


$43 00 


135 


50 


7 


48 


2 


50 


2 


86 


3 


60 


295 


44 



Dr. 



$490 38 



Cr. 



f490 38 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 10. 



To appropriation . 
reserved fund . 



Paid F. S. Worthen, superintendent 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
John Barnes, blacksmithing 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
A. N. Clapp, nails, powder, etc 



Dr. 



. 11,000 00 




251 33 






11251 33 
Cr. 




t 188 00 




77 64 




6 30 




12 00 




37 04 




47 20 




3. 4 96 





254 



PaidD. F. Cressej & Co., black- 
smithing .... $6 44 
H. Fradd & Co., grain . . 6 40 
Plumer & Holton, oil coats, etc. 5 12 
F. S. Bodwell, stone . . 51 25 
Geo. H. Stearns, can and oil . 1 05 
Temple & Farrington, time- 
book 1 30 

John Brown, paving-stone and 



sand 


6 25 




Jas. Baldwin & Co., grain, etc. 


12 35 




Pettee & Whittle, cement 


14 40 




George W. Riddle, stone and 






sand 


22 25 




labor of men and teams . 


851 38 


11,251 33 




NO. 11. 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 
reserV'ed fund 


1700 00 
269 99 


1969 99 
Cr. 


■ 




Paid L. D. Colby, superintendent . 
J. E. Bailey, superintendent . 
D. Wells, lumber . 


69 61 
233 63 

20 00 




L. D. Colby, oak plank and 
labor 


4 00 




J. B. Clarke, paving-stone 
P. C. Cheney Co., sharpening 
drills 


1 25 
70 





255 



Paid Burpee, Hamilton, & Co., ax 81 50 

Daniels & Co., hardware . 6 98 

labor of men and teams . . 63*2 32 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 
To appropriation .... 1250 00 



Paid city-farm labor . . . 1203 77 
By balance on hand ... 46 23 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 



To appropriation .... S150 00 
reserved fund . . . . 54 81 



Paid Bben Carr, superintendent . 18 00 
J. P. Fellows, superintendent 6 00 
Fellows & Goodwin, black- 
smithing .... 1 80 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 85 
labor of men and teams . 188 16 



1969 99 



Dr. 

8250 00 
Cr. 

8250 00 



Dr. 

8204 81 
Cr. 



8204 81 



256 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



To appropriation . 
C. G. B. Ryder 
reserved fund . 



Paid John Barnes, blacksmithing . 
M. V. B. Garland, building 
north extension of Elm st. . 
Moses Plant, building exten- 
sion of Prospect street 
D. W. Garland, covering stone 
John Perham, building exten 

sion of Taylor street . 
A. N. Clapp, powder, fuse, etc, 
J. B. Yarick, hardware . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
labor of men and teams 



11, 


000 


00 




25 


00 


1, 


752 


24 



$27 '28 



150 00 



165 


00 


J 102 


67 


41 


75 


5 


69 


2 


70 


1 


70 


. 2,280 


45 



Dr. 



!,777 24 



Or. 



I 



12,777 24 



LAND DAMAGES. 



To appropriation 
reserved fund 



Paid 0. H. Colburn, Laurel street 
E. D. L. Parker, Parker st. . 



1500 
420 


00 
76 


140 
489 


16 

00 



Dr. 



$920 76 
Cr. 



257 

Paid E. T. Baldwin, Prospect st. . 1140 00 

Isaac Huse, Proctor road . 1 00 

Wm. E. Buck, Prospect street 248 60 

L. S. Proctor, Proctor road . 1 00 

Henry Duncan, Proctor road, 1 00 



WATERING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $2,000 00 



Paid Manchester Water-works,water 


1719 25 


Thomas A. Lane, repairs of 




stand, pipes, etc. - . 


22 72 


J. A. Sanborn & Co., repairs 




on sprinkler 


7 10 


Pike &• Heald, repairs on 




sprinkler .... 


40 00 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs 




on sprinkler 


30 70 


D. F. Cressey & Co., repairs on 




sprinkler 


3 50 


city teams .... 


411 24 


Geo. W. Butterfield, teamster 


121 50 


A. B. Cushing, teamster 


125 24 


Mark Harvey, team 


536 00 


R. W. Martin, storing cart . 


5 00 


By balance on hand 


17 35 



S920 76 



Dr. 

5,000 00 
Cr. 



12,000 00 



17 



258 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

To appropriation . . . . 15,000 00 
Edward Jewell, damage to lamp- 
post 26 06 

reserved fund .... 297 93 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$2,948 40 


Manchester Gas Co., lanterns, 




etc 


262 31 


I. R. Dewey, lamplighter 


1,809 24 


A. H. Lowell, lamp- posts, 




frames, etc. 


200 43 


Wm. C. Rogers, glass . 


29 95 


D. M. Goodwin, repairs 


45 01 


Pike & Heald, repairs . 


35 


I. W. Thatcher, repairs . 


15 05 


Brock & Driscoll, repairs 


9 50 


H. H. Currier 


1 50 


C. A. Smith, oil lamps . 


2 25 







Dr. 



85,323 99 



Cr. 



15,323 99 



PAYING STREETS. 



To appropriation 
reserved fund 



14,000 00 
4,303 25 



Paid Chas. H. Robie, concreting . $1,218 41 
Chas. A. Bailey, paving-stone 2,649 01 



Dr. 

$8,303 25 
Cr. 



259 



Paid Chas. A. Bailey, flagging 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
John Barnes, blacksmithing 
Samuel Brown, Jr. 
C. C. Webster, stone 
A. N. Clapp, lanterns and oil 
A. G. Fairbanks, stone . 
Daniel W. Garland, flagging 
James Kennard, stone . 
labor of men and teams 



3 


85 


2 


75 


3 


00 


31 


40 


61 


00 


I, 2 


10 


1 


75 


41 


00 


87 


50 


. 4,134 


68 



88,303 25 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... 12,000 00 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

crushing stone 
Joseph Suver, overdraft . 
reserved fund . 



PaidjManchester Water-works,water 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Derry & Co., blacksmithing . 
George P. Atwell, stone chips, 
M. V. B. Garland, wood for 
crusher .... 
W. E. &. E. B. Dunbar . 
Hutchinson Bros., repairs on 

crusher . . . . 118 44 



335 


82 


' 1 


25 


534 


30 


$30 00 


37 


93 


4 35 


84 


00 


9 


50 


48 


24 


2 


27 



Dr, 



12,871 37 



Cr. 



260 



id Thomas A. Lane, repairs 


on 




crusher 


. 


$6 80 


labor of men and teams 


. 


2,508 84 


Horace Willey, stone 


. 


10 80 


Samuel Hall, stone 




10 20 







12,871 37 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



To appropriation . 


iB,000 00 


reserved fund . 


903 97 


Paid George H. Stearns, salt 


$2 53 


D. W. Garland, stone . 


88 55 


C. A. Bailey, stone 


31 50 


Palmer & Garmon, stone 


5 11 


M. Fitzgerald; cutting stone 


1 62 


J. B. Varick, hardware . 


8 84 


F. Ricard &Son,blacksmithing 


19 62 


labor of men and teams 


3,746 20 







Dr. 



;,903 97 



Cr. 



13,903 97 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



To appropriation . 

sundry persons, sewer licenses 
reserved fund . 



15,000 00 
1,005 30 
41 



3,960 



Dr. 



S9,965 71 



261 



Or, 



Paid B. W. Robinson & Co., sewer 
pipe . . . . 
E. G. Haynes, sewer pipe 

A. H. Lowell, cesspool covers 
Pettee & Whittle, cement 
Goodwin Bros., hubs 
J. Stickne3% rubber mittens 

B. F. Porter, filing saws 
George H. Stearns, oil-meal 
Pike & Heald, lanterns, etc. 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Daniels & Merrill, hardware 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
A C. Wallace, lumber . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber 
P. W. Dickey & Co., black- 
smithing .... 

Henry N. Stone, pump and hose 
Geo. W. Thayer & Son, rubber 
. boots . . . . • 
Plaisted & Haines, rubber boots 
Geo. W. Weeks, rubber boots . 
A. N. Clapp, pails, etc. . 
Flint & Cass, lumber 
Hill & Co., express 
T. L. Thorpe, waste 
labor of men and teams . 
Plumer & Holton, oil suits 
C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 
ing sewer pipe . 
H. Fradd & Co., oil and lan- 
terns . . . . • 
A. B. Smith, building sewer . 



$4,355 23 

678 70 

104 87 

231 65 

75 

1 50 

6 80 

1 55 

26 81 

13 61 

32 

60 28 

38 05 

8 94 

6 13 

80 50 

2 50 
31 25 

3 40 
3 87 

23 67 

1 75 

2 15 
4,193 77 

10 50 

2 50 

3 36 
71 30 



$9,965 71 



262 



BRIDGE-STREET SEWER. 

To appropriation . . . .$10,000 00 
Patrick Kelley, overdraft . . 1 24 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. . 382 60 
reserved fund .... 3,545 57 



Dr. 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 




iron pipe, labor, etc. . 


13,708 39 


B. W. Robinson & Co., mason- 




work .... 


622 45 


Concord Railroad, freight on 




brick .... 


265 09 


Ricard & Son, repairing tools 


40 08 


Plaisted & Haines, rubber boots 


24 75 


G. W. Thayer & Son, rubber 




boots .... 


15 00 


Flint & Cass, lumber 


32 00 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber 


10 91 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


276 29 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 


4 93 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


27 67 


J. B. Varick, hardware . 


50 


Drake & Carpenter, cement 


879 60 


Pettee & Whittle, cement 


9 45 


D. W. Garland, stone 


27 00 


Wm. Starr • . 


1 05 


S. F. Adams, trucking . 


7 00 


labor of men and teams . 


5,206 00 


Natt & W. F. Head, brick 


. 1,771 25 



$13,929 41 



Cr. 



$13,929 41 



263 






GRANITE BRIDGE. 




'■ 




Dr. 


To appropriation . 


$600 00 


1600 00 
Cr. 






Paid AC. Wallace, lumber . 


1310 53 




John Barnes, bolts, etc. 


8 90 




Geo. Holbrook, lumber and la- 






bor 


8 70 




Walter Neal, lumber and labor 


90 75 




R. W. Martin, painting . 


2 25 




J. B. Yarick, hardware . 


13 25 




A. N. Clapp, bolts and nails . 


56 




Charles Bunton, bolts 


23 50 




By balance on hand . 


141 56 


1600 00 


AMOSKEAG FALLS BRIDGE. 








Dr. . 


To appropriation . . • 


1100 00 




reserved fund . . ^ 


1,261 34 


81,361 34 
Or. 






Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber 


8616 47 




Geo. Holbrook, lumber and 






labor .... 


21 97 




Walter Neal, lumber and labor 


345 53 




Daniels & Co., hardware 


102' 21 




J. B. Varick, hardware . 


76 88 




George H. Stearns 


75 





264 



Paid James R. Carr, painting 


188 03 




Dexter L. Wilson, painting . 


40 69 




W. H. Tibbetts, painting 


33 75 




Orin A. Stolker, painting 


45 06 


$1,361 34 






COMMONS. 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$200 00 




reserved fund . 


192 30 


1392 30 
Cr. 






Paid G. F. Bosher & Co., lawn- 






mower .... 


$18 00 




T. A. Lane, plumbing . 


25 




J. S. Bacheler, plumbing 


71 11 




J. B. Yarick, hardware 


6 -75 




Geo. Holbrook, lumber and 






labor 


6 60 




labor of men and teams 


289 59 


1392 30 







REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . • . 15,000 00 
incidental repairs, amount trans- 
ferred 278 47 

balance overdrawn . . . 101 24 

15,379 71 



265 



Or. 



Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


$307 12 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


195 54 


W. W. Hubbard, lumber 


171 29 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


130 47 


J. H. Maynard, lumber . 


3 30 


Austin, Johnson, & Co., lumber 


13 44 


Geo. H. Dudley, carpenter- 




work 


891 20 


Geo. Holbrook, carpenter-work 


182 67 


L. N. Westover, carpenter- 




work 


24 75 


Weathers & Co., stone-work . 


15 00 


Daniel W.Garland, stone-work 


14 44 


E. G. Haynes, sewer pipe 


22 42 


B. W. Robinson & Co., mason- 




work . 


362 84 


J. J. Abbott, painting. 


476 01 


Sloan & Sullivan, painting . 


104 50 


J. L. Kennedy, painting 


31 89 


Joel Daniels, painting . 


141 43 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


91 08 


J. B. Yarick, hardware . 


46 85 


Pike & Heald, plumbing 


73 52 


Pike & Heald, mats, urinals, 




etc. 


57 .'4 


Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 


234 83 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., lumber 


126 87 


Jas. S. Bacheler, boiler, plumb- 




ing, etc 


404 87' 


A. H. Lowell, iron-work 


48 76 


James Briggs, repairing stoves 


9 25 


J. F. Libbey, paper-hanging . 


3 69 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

lumber . . . . 
J. T. Fanning, prof I services 
W. H. Vickery, keys 
Dustin Marshall, team . 
Dennis Landry, stone-work 
Chas. Dealy, stone-work 
John Levill, stone-work . 
J. Bennett, glazing 
L.Ward, trucking 
H. J. Tirrell, trucking . 
Oilman Ellinwood, team 
Moses Tracy, stone-work 
Harvey Goodwin, lathing 
J. C. Young, repairing roofs 
Chas. H. Robie, concreting 
J. A. B. Emerson, teaming 
D. H. Morgan, labor 
R. D. Gay, wall-paper . 
Drake & Carpenter, cement 

and lime 
N. E. School Furniture Com 

pany, furniture . 
Concord Railroad Corporation 

freight 
By balance overdrawn in 1880 



1326 


22 


25 


00 


4 


50 


4 


50 


26 


00 


12 


00 


9 


00 


1 


05 


2 


25 


10 


00 


1 


00 


15 


00 


13 


T5 


102 


68 


30 


00 


13 


00 


5 


00 


4 


68 



39 92 

109 17 

19 43 
419 99 



s379 71 



NEW SCHOOL-HOUSE ON WEBSTER STREET. 

' Dr. 



To appropriation 



.112,000 00 



112,000 00 



267 



Cr. 



Paid Amoskeag M'f'g Co., land 
H. T. Simpson & Son, brick 
D. W. Garland, putting in foun- 
dation 
John B. Clarke, printing 

By balance to new account 



S3,202 20 
1,000 00 

486 75 
35 35 

7,275 70 



$12,000 GO 



FUEL. 



To appropriation .... 


$3,300 00 


L. B. Bodwell, overdraft . 


12 56 


Paid Rowell & Burns, wood . 


113 15 


Moore & Preston, coal . 


550 88 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


2,340 47 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 




and coal .... 


38 47 


Moses Tracy, sawing wood, etc. 


4 55 


G. W. Varnum, sawing wood. 




etc 


1 65 


C. E. Clough, trucking . 


1 75 


W. H. Annan, weighing coal . 


9 75 


Samuel Jewett, sawing wood . 


59 63 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


i5 96 


By balance overdrawn in 1880 


19 21 


balance to new account 


257 09 



Dr. 



13,312 56 
Cr. 



,312 56 



268 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


11,000 00 


balance from old account 


17 17 




1^1 017 17 




ypXjVJ. 1 X 1 




Cr. 


Paid Daniels & Co., floor-brushes 




call-bells, etc. . 


178 43 


E. S. Ritchie & Sons, electric 




machines, etc. 


55 35 


N. E. School Furnishing Co. 




maps, etc. 


75 15 


Parker & Gordon, furniture 


13 30 


Thorp & Marshall 


1 40 


J. N. Baker, repairing clocks 


20 95 


Gordon & Tobey, tassels, cord 




etc 


[ 4 37 


Higgins Bros., chairs, etc. 


17 83 


W. W. Hubbard, drawing-mod 




els, etc. 


22 50 


H. P. Young, mounting ani- 




mals .... 


2 00 


D. Appleton & Co., charts 


8 00 


A. N. Clapp, hardware . 


3 18 


Barr & Clapp 


5 12 


L. H. Josselyn, tables and desk 


18 75 


I. W. Thatcher, mop-wash 


60 


C. P. Trickey, crayons . 


1 00 


Daniels & Co., thermometers 




etc 


6 18 


Charles A. Smith, dusters 


32 13 


Pike & Heald 


62 90 


A. W. Bacheler 


22 12 



269 



Paid George H. Dudley 

Temple & Parrington 

J. B. Clarke . 

Boston School Supply Co 

L. Prang & Co. 

Wm. H. Vickery 

J. Hodge 

S. C. Forsaith & Co. 

E. R. Coburn 

Thomas W. Lane 

J. B. Varick . 

R. D. Oay . 

Thomas A. Lane 
By balance to new account 



$15 


37 


59 


82 


52 


80 


11 


04 


6 


20 


2 


85 


1 


90 


6 


95 


31 


75 


90 


75 




85 


9 


00 


4 


70 


271 


93 



11,017 17 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To appropriation . 

balance from old account . 



Paid Thomas W. Lane . 
Temple & Farrington 
L. Prang & Co. . 

A. C. Stock! n 

B. R. Coburn 
Robert S. Davis & Co. 
William Ware & Co. 

C. P. Trickey 
Thompson, Brown, & Co 
P. C. Cheney Co. . 



1600 


00 


9 


91 


1177 


35 


95 


07 


75 


68 


34 


30 


62 


81 


58 


00 


42 


00 


1 


32 


13 


75 


1 


50 



Dr. 



8609 91 



Cb 



270 



Paid Knight, Adams, &, Co. 

George C. Hoitt 

George A. Smith & Co. 
By balance to new account 



17 


54 


1 


00 


29 


57 


10 


02 



1609 91 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To appropriation . 

balance from old account 



Paid John B. Clarke . 

Union Publishing Co. 

Livingston <fe Kimball 

H. H. Everett 

Alfred Mudge & Son 
By balance to new account 



1700 00 


24 


62 


1427 55 


75 


50 


. 38 


75 


12 


50 


11 


75 


158 


57 



Dr. 



^724 62 



Cr. 



1724 62 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



To appropriation . 

balance from old account 
water-works 



1900 00 

100 14 

1 00 



Dr. 



11,001 14 



271 



Cr. 



Paid Manchester Water-works, water 
W. E. Buck, use of team, 1880 
W. E. Buck, use of team, 1881 
W. E. Buck . 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 

C. H. Wilkins, lettering diplo 
mas . 

B. P. Dennis, tuning piano 

D. B. Hennessey, tuning pianos 
J. S. Masseck 
N. S. Clark, ribbon 
Challis & Campbell, printing 
Hartford Boiler Inspector and 

Insurance Co. . 

J. N. Baker, repairing clocks 

George H. Dudley, making 
frames . . . . 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., repair- 
ing pokers 

Fitzpatrick & Boudreau, print- 
ing 

Class of 1881, removing and 
replacing desks, slides, etc. 

Daniels & Co., hardware 

C. C. Webster, trucking 
J. Garvin, cleaning vault 

A. Stone, washing windows . 
James Brothers, team . 
F. T. E. Richardson 
Union Publishing Co., printing 
By balance to new account 



8389 65 

30 25 

90 oO 

6 01 

68 66 

20 05 

3 00 

10 00 

13 06 

9 92 

3 00 

100 00 
9 60 

6 90 





75 


14 


00 


25 


00 




32 


10 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


50 


4 


50 


177 


97 



11,001 14 



272 
TUITION. 

To Wm. E. Buck, tuition fees . $341 92 

balance from old account . . 453 73 



By balance to new account . . $795 65 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

To appropriation . . . $600 00 



Paid Samuel Brooks . . . $187 50 
Balance to new account . . 412 50 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



To appropriation .... $2,600 00 
balance from old account . . 110 27 



Dr. 

$795 65 
Cr. 

$795 65 

Dr. 

$600 00 
Cr. 

$600 00 

Dr. 

$2,710 27 
Cr. 



Paid J. S. Avery .... $574 92 

J. A. Carr . . . . 599 60 

G. W. Varnum ... 349 87 

D. H. Morgan ... 350 17 



273 



Paid Rufus Lamb . 


$249 96 


Charles P. Ordway 


107 00 


Hiram Brown 


16 25 


Lewis H. Dickey . 


10 47 


Willie Woodeson . 


87 10 


Sidney A. Dunbar 


14 00 


Harry C. Garvin . 


16 14 


Edgar M. Carr 


12 06 


Susie A. Crosby 


5 92 


Willie McGuinness 


2 55 


Flora E. Blodgett . 


6 65 


Susie G. Woodman 


5 66 


Ethie M. Knowles 


5 25 


Alvin Bean . 


9 00 


Edward Gillis 


6 00 


Samuel E. Paige . 


3 50 


M. B. Flanders 


9 00 


George Parker 


26 00 


Charles Shaughnessey . 


8 25 


A. B. Campbell . 


6 00 


J. H. Gaines 


75 


Oliver Merrill 


6 75 


Mary E. Dickey 


6 17 


By balance to new account 


. ■ 215 38 







'12,710 27 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



To appropriation . 

balance from old account 
balance overdrawn . " 



11,000 00 

.4 72 

370 03 



Dr. 



1,374 75 



18 



274 



Cr. 



Paid John B. Mills 

Charles E. Cochran 
F. C. Livingston . 
H. F. Roedelsperger 
M. Engenia Lord . 
M. A. Campbell 
Phoebe A. Maguire 
Hattie Emerson 
Nellie M. James . 
Lenora C. Gilford 
Josie L. Richardson 
, Mary J. Tynan 
Gertrude H. Brooks 
Helen F. Wetherbee 
Emma W. Mitchell 
Fannie Sanborn 
Nina D. Annis 
Delle E. Haynes . 
Kate M. Follansbee 
G. W. Yarnum. janitor 
D. H. Morgan, janitor 
Hutchins,Riedell,& Co., print 

ing . 
J. B. Clarke, printing 
T. W. Lane . 
Union Publishing Co. 
Charles A. Smith, side lamps 
A. N. Clapp, oil, matches, etc 
Barr & Clapp, " " 

Manchester Gas Light Co., gas 
Frank D. Thorp, reflectors, 

lamps, etc. 



fl40 00 


147 


00 


114 ao 


25 


00 


100 


00 


94 


50 


8o 


50 


41 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


68 


40 


54 


00 


18 


00 


27 


90 


54 


00 


19 


80 


34 


20 


60 


00 



53 10 
46 29 
31 50 



18 00 

41 43 

6 01 

20 00 
6 00 

6 77 

7 92 
33 16 

2 67 



$1,374 75 



275 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


. 139,000 00 


balance from old account . 


171 


40 

$k^U 171 4-0 






llP0i7,± i X '±\J 






Cr. 


Paid Albert W. Bacheler 


. 11,800 00 


George I. Hopkins 


. 1,000 


00 


Lucretia E. Manahan . 


750 


00 


Emma J. Ela 


475 


00 


Mary A. Buzzell . 


475 


00 


Edward P. Sherburne . 


. 1,300 


00 


Clara G. Fogg 


475 


00 


Lottie R. Adams . 


440 


00 


Carrie E. Reid 


440 


00 


Mary L. Sleeper . 


463 


13 


Annie 0. Heath . 


429 


00 


B. F. Dame . 


1,300 


00 


Julia A. Baker 


475 


00 


Mary J. Fife . 


440 


00 


Belle R. Daniels . 


440 


00 


Mary F. Barnes 


440 


00 


Daniel A. Clifford . 


1,300 


00 


Anstrice G. Flanders 


475 


00 


Sarah J. Greene . 


264 


00 


Rocilla M. Tuson . 


440 


00 


Frank S. Sutcliffe . 


800 


00 


Mary A. Lear 


264 


00 


Etta J. Carley 


440 


00 


Nancy S. Bunton . 


550 


00 


Mintie C. Edgerly . 


403 


75 


Elvira S. Prior . . , 


445 


00 



276 



Paid Nellie M. James . 


$273 00 


Ella F. Salisbury . 


350 62 


Clara N. Brown . 


414 38 


Georgianna Dow . 


4^5 00 


Helen M. Morrill . 


425 00 


Florence L. Stone . 


255 00 


Abbie E. Abbott . 


297 50 


Emma F. Beane . 


403 75 


Nellie B. Putnam . 


375 00 


Ida J. Bartlett 


390 00 


Nellie Pearson 


425 00 


E. Jennie Campbell 


270 00 


Martha W. Hubbard 


150 88 


Lucia E. Esty 


300 00 


Emma L. Stokes ... 


395 00 


Jennie F. Bailey . 


425 00 


Augusta S. Downs 


425 00 


Alice G. Lord 


382 50 


Maria N. Bower . 


425 00 


Jennie G. Stebbins 


382 50 


Ellen E. McKean . 


420 00 


Florence A. Nichols 


365 63 


Flora M. Senter . 


355 00 


Ella F. Sanborn . 


425 00 


Clara E. Woods . 


375 00 


Carrie I. Stevens . 


307 50 


Cora M. Dearborn . 


360 00 


Belle M. Kelley . 


375 00 


Lizzie J. West 


405 00 


Nellie I. Sanderson 


403 75 


Mary A. Smith 


425 00 


Bertha L. Dean 


325 00 


Anna J. Dana 


278 37 


Carrie M. Gilmore 


414 38 



277 



Paid Florence McEvoy . 
Hattie G. Flanders 
C. Augusta Abbott 
Fannie D. Moulton 
Lizzie P. Gove 
Lizzie A. Burns 
Addie M. Chase 
S. Izetta Locke 
Georgie A. Nute 
Mary W. Mitchell 
Olive J. Randall 
Mary E. Sylvester 
Olive A. Rowe 
Susie G. Woodman 
Louisa R. Quint 
F. M. Kelley . 
Susie A. Crosby 
Gertrude H. Brooks 
Annie W. Patten 
Ella F. Sanborn 
F. L. Perry . 
Lenora C. Gilford 
Emma C. Gee 
Susie G. Woodman 
Nancy P. Flint 
Annie A. Webster 
Delia E. Haynes 
J. J. Kimball 
Mary K. Webster 

By balance to new account 



f425 


00 


425 


00 


403 


75 


355 


00 


340 


01 


347 


50 


118 


75 


425 


00 


475 


00 


410 


00 


425 


00 


395 


00 


325 


00 


410 


00 


345 


00 


10 


00 


345 


00 


143 


50 


168 


75 


625 


00 


45 


00 


210 


00 


297 


50 


98 


75 


75 


00 


170 


00 


9 


00 


800 


00 


591 


00 


1,668 


00 



,171 40 



278 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


.112,000 00 


balance from old account . 


197 66 


A. J. Sanborn, overdraft . 


7 50 




oi'io onn 1 f» 








Or. 


Paid J. L. Kelly, mayor 


$11 00 


H. B. Putnam, mayor . 


989 00 


N. P. Kidder, city clerk 


900 00 


H. R. Chamberlin, city treas- 




urer .... 


19 37 


S. B. Putnam, city treasurer 


988 96 


Wm. R. Patten, city solicitor . 


500 00 


Geo. E. Morrill, tax collector . 


1,400 66 


J. A. Barker, city messenger . 


570 00 


A. G. Stevens, city engineer . 


86 33 


Geo. H. Allen, city engineer , 


968 00 


Wm. E. Buck, superintendent 




of schools . . . . 


1,500 00 


James A. Fracker, clerk o 


f 


common council 


91 67 


Geo. D. Towne,city physician 


25 00 


Geo. D. Towne, health officer 


25 00 


P. A. Devine, " '^ 


25 00 


L. H. Lamprey " " 


25 00 


C. S. Fisher, assessor . 


330 00 


D. 0. Furnald, " 


273 60 


H. W. Powell, " 


167 50 


Geo. W. Weeks " 


188 75 


John J. Ryan, " 


135 00 


J. H. Haynes, " 


195 00 


C. H. Brown. " 


155 00 



279 



Paid Ira W. Moore, assessor . 

Wm. B. Johnson, assistant as 

sessor 
John P. Moore, assistant as- 
sessor 
Isaac Whittemore, assistant 

assessor 
J. Y. McQueston, assistant as 

sessor 
Alfred Gagnon, assistant as 

sessor 
Nicholas Nichols, clerk of as 

sessors 
S. S. Perry, clerk of assessors 
A. C. Flanders, inspector of 

check-lists . 

E. G. Haynes, inspector o 
check-lists . 

J. F. Conway, inspector o 

check-lists . 
Michael Kane, inspector of 

check-lists . 
Geo. Holbrook, moderator 
T. W. Challis, 
Henry S. Perry, ward clerk 
J. F. Baldwin, " " 
Geo. E. Glines, *' 
L. C. Merrill, 

F. H. Redfield, 
Oliver J. Butman, selectman 
R. E. Davis, 

Daniel B. Emery, " 

C. M. Edgerly, " 

Wm. G. Westover, " 



. $161 


25 


»- 

7 


50 


60 

4- 


00 


t 

57 


50 


- 

22 


50 


5- 

22 


00 


5- 

212 


50 


100 


00 



4 00 



4 00 



4 00 



4 


50 


9 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


7 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



280 



Paid E. G. Woodman, selectman . 


15 00 


A. Q. Gage, 


5 00 


E. N. Baker, " 


5 00 


Thomas N'. Bond, 


5 00 


H. C. Paige, '• 


5 00 


Frederick Knowlton, " 


5 00 


Samuel Clark, " 


5 00 


George H. Dudley, " 


10 00 


J. Lightbody, 


5 00 


Charles Atherton, " 


5 00 


John Willis, " 


5 00 


William Stevens, " 


10 00 


M. E. George, overseer of the 




poor 


37 50 


H. B. Putnam, chairman, over- 




seers of the poor 


25 00 


E. G. Woodman, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Horace Gordon, overseer of 




the poor .... 


12 50 


Geo. H. Colby, overseer of the 




poor 


25 00 


C. G. .B. Ryder, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


I. B. Farnum, overseer of the 




poor 


25 00 


Robert Hall, overseer of the 




poor 


25 00 


Geo. F. Sheehan, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Wm. H. Maxwell, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Wni. H. Maxwell, clerk of 




overseers of the poor . 


25 00 



281 



Paid H. B. Putnam, e.x-officio school 

committee . 
Wm. J. Hoyt, ex-officio school 

committer . 
J. T. Fanning, school commit 

tee . 

A. C. Flanders, school commit- 
tee . . . . 

L. E. Phelps, school commit- 
tee . 

Ezra Huntington, school com 
mittee . . • 

G. L. Demarest, school com 
mittee 

C. A. O'Connor, school com 
mittee 

D. Mitchell, school committee 
B.C. Dean, school committee 
Wm. A. Webster, school com 

mittee 

M. P. Hall, school committee 

M. P, Hall, clerk of school 
committee . 

Charles F. Everett, school com 
mittee 

F. T. E. Richardson, school 
committee . 

W. M. Parker, school commit- 
tee . 

B. B. Weeks, school committee 
D. F. O'Connor, school com- 
mittee . . . . 

Daniel Clark, school committee 



$10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


1< 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



10 00 

10 00 
10 00 

10 00 
10 00 



By balance on hand 



. 11,281 57 



112,205 16 



282 



CITY LIBRARY. 



To appropriation .... 


83,000 00 


balance from old account . 


27 96 


police department 


2 03 


Paid M. J. Buncher, librarian 


1600 00 


Geo. W. Cook, ass't librarian . 


211 50 


Jennie Spence, ass't librarian . 


24 00 


P. C. Cheney Co., paper 


6 96 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


218 18 


Manchester Water-works,water 


5 00 


Temple & Farrington, binding 




books, etc 


241 84 


Livingston & Kimball, printing 


101 34 


John B. Clarke, printing 


20 62 


Union Publishing Co., printing . 


12 50 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 


129 04 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


82 00 


jEtna Insurance Co.,i-nsurance 


32 50 


Rowell & Burns, wood . 


10 00 


trustees of city library . 


• 1,000 00 


By balance to new account 


334 51 







Dr. 



f3,029 99 



Cr. 



13,029 99 



CITY LIBRARY ANNEX. 



To appropriation 



,000 00 



Dr. 



18,000 00 



283 



Paid A. G. Stevens, architect . $100 00 
W. Ireland, contractor . . 3,000 00 
labor of men and teams . 229 97 
J. B. Clarke, advertising pro- 
posals .... 25 20 

By balance to new account . . 4,644 83 



Or. 



$8,000 00 



SINKING FUND. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . $20,000 00 



820,000 00 

Cr. 
By reserved fund . . . $20,000 00 

$20,000 00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

To appropriation . . . • $22,500 00 
To Board of Health, for cleaning 

vaults . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., overdraft 
Piper, Hawley, & Co., overdraft 
old hearse sold .... 
James Brothers, overdraft 
Boston & Maine R. R., overdraft 
Concord Railroad, overdraft 



Dr. 



30 


00 


6 


75 


16 


22 


75 


00 


2 


00 


1 


80 


3 


80 




$22,635 57 



284 



Cb. 



Paid Geo. S. Henry, damage to per- 
son ..... 

J. F. Guyer, damage to person 

Octave Lefebvro, damage to 
person 

Frank Clement, damage to 
person .... 

Almira Goodhue, damage to 
person . ... 

J. W. Rand, damage to sheep . 

S. T. Soper, damage to horse . 

Sarah F. McQuestion, claim . 

J. E. Stearns 

J. A. Barker, running boilers 

Dr. G- A. Crosby, professional 
services 

L. B. How, return of births 

0. D. Abbott, " 

L. M. French, " 

J. W. Mooar, " 

C. M. Dodge, " 

J. P. Walker, " 

Leonard French," 

W. W. Wilkins, " 

J. A. Jackson, " 

J. W. Manning, trees . 

Judith Sherer, matron at pest- 
house . . . . 

Manchester post-office, stamps 

Elvin V. Corning, bounty on 
hawk . . . . 

E. P. Jenkins, bounty on hawk 

H. M. Young, " '' . 



8325 00 
623 55 

35 00 

80 00 



50 


00 


40 


00 


104 


00 


54 57 


230 


00 


102 


14 


3 


00 


7 


25 


10 


75 


10 


25 


5 


25 


8 


00 


4 


25 


13 


75 


6 


25 


7 


25 


58 


50 


360 


00 


6 


48 




20 




20 




20 



285 



Paid Eddie Burke, bounty on hawk 
B. F. Gardner, " " . 

H. P. Young, '' " . 

D. K. Mack, execution . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Pike & Heald, plumbing 
A. H. Lowell, iron- work and 
fountain .... 
Pettee & Whittle, cement 
Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
James S. Bacheler, lamp-posts 

for bridge, etc. . 
D. M. Goodwin', dippers and 
chains . . . . 
Joseph Johnson, stone-work . 
W. H. Vickery . 
William Landry, stone-work . 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
Geo. H. Allen, cash paid for 

repairs of instruments 
Geo. H. Allen, incidental ex- 
penses . . . . 
H. F. Morse, auditing accounts 
John P. Young, assistant en- 
gineer 
Fred Hardy . 
Charles H. Gage, rodman 
Wm. D. Hunter, " 
Benj. D. Batchelder, '^ 
C. H. Home, 
Charles E. Copp, " 
W. D. Wright, " 

Elmer W. Stearns, " 



10 


20 




20 




20 


213 


04 


10 


12 


67 


80 


335 


30 


35 


05 


450 


05 



577 52 

6 25 
20 60 

2 25 
94 37 

1 95 
25 

30 01 

53 03 
10 00 

206 00 
1 50 
89 25 
60 00 
79 25 
64 00 
36 50 
12 00 
46 50 



286 

Paid W. H. Bennett, rodman 
Geo. W. Varnum, " 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
A. J. Sawyer, " 
J. Hodge, '• 

J. H. Maynard, lumber and 

labor ..... 
E. A. G. Holmes, lumber and 

labor ..... 
George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor.- .... 
George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor ..... 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor ..... 
W. Ireland, lumber and labor 
Thomas W. Lane, blank-books, 

etc 15 71 

Temple & Farrington, blank- 
books, etc. .... 
John B. Clarke, printing 
C. L. Fitzpatrick, printing 
Republican Press Association, 

printing .... 
Union Publishing Co., printing 
H. H. Everett, printing 
Livingston & Kimball, printing 
Challis & Eastman, printing . 
Challis & Campbell, printing . 
Harley, Robbie, & Vadnais, 

cloth for decorating city hall 
Frank P. Colby, distributing 

tax bills .... 



12 00 


16 


00 


72 


37 


8 


o6 


1 


55 


392 


40 


18 


00 


51 


38 


122 


26 




58 


18 


28 



206 


50 


269 


98 


2 


00 


17 


75 


126 


00 


12 


50 


2 


50 


17 


95 


12 


50 


3 


60 


1 


80 



287 

Paid Harley, Robbie, & Vadnais, 

cloth for decorating city hall f 86 49 

Weston & Hill ... 16 

Piper, Hawley, & Co., cloth for 

pest-house .... 32 44 

1). K. White, serving notices, 

etc 12 00 

Manchester Water-works, wa- 
ter for watering-troughs . 118 86 

Samuel Cooper, professional 
services .... 

Manchester Gas Co., gas 

Wm. Shepherd, team 

E. T. James, teams 

Cavanaugh Bros., teams 

J. C. Nichols & Son, teams . 

J. A. Brown, teams 

C. H. Hodgman k Co., teams 

C. C. Perry, teams 

James Brothers, teams . 

C. M. Stevens, team 

Hook and Ladder Co., deco- 
rating city hall . 

C. E. Clough 

D. W. Garland, wall at Kay 

brool^ .... 1,836 44 

D. W. Garland, stone at engine 
house . . . . 16 50 

D. W. Garland,coping for Con- 
cord-square fountain . . 50 50 

D. W. Garland, stone for Mc- 
Gregor bridge . . . 1,487 00 

Wm. R. Patten, witness fees, 
etc 142 94 



36 


25 


44 


08 


4 


00 


60 


50 


25 


50 


22 


00 


39 


00 


28 


25 


33 


00 


bb 


50 


1 


50 


24 


00 


2 


00 



288 



Paid C. C. Harriman, grading east 

Spruce street . . . #110 00 

H. B. Putnam, allowance for 

team 132 00 

Lamson & Harden, repairs of 

tools, stone, etc. . . 46 83 

N. P. Kidder, making city re- 
port, etc 153 68 

D. C. Whittemore ... 20 00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

rent of hay and wood stand 100 00 

S. G. Rowell .... 11 25 

Western Union Telegraph Co., 
telegrams . . . . 79 

Wm. Landry, stone-work, Mc- 
Gregor bridge . 

J. J. Abbott, painting . 

L. N. Dufrain, repairs on pump 

R. W. Bean, taking insane per- 
son to asylum . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

W. H. Laskey, elastic bands . 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 

Ellen Kerrin .... 

J. B. Unruh, numbering 
houses .... 

D. B. Brooks & Co., ink 

P. A. Devine,burying nuisances 

Patrick Finn, burying nui- 
sances .... 

Geo. D. Towne, professional 
services .... 

C. H. Reed, professional ser- 
vices ..... 



147 


87 




50 


1 


50 


2 


00 


8 


11 


1 


15 


17 


28 


10 


00 


3 


50 




75 


1 


00 


6 


25 


12 


25 


56 


00 



289 

Paid P. 0. Woodman, painting sign $1 25 

Sampson, Davenport, & Co., 

directories .... 12 00 

Thomas Adams, elm trees . 18 75 

Chas. E. Rowe, stone-work . 32 29 

R. D. Gay, paper-hangings . 1 05 

Robert Heath, expenses to Bos- 
ton for committee . , 5 65 

Fairbanks & Pearson, removmg 
body 

J. C. Ray, labor on Elm street 

U. S. & C. Express Co. 

D. F. Cressey & Co., black- 
smithing .... 

Tristam Berry, carpenter-work 

S. B. Putnam, auditing collec- 
tor's accounts 

John Prince, trees, 

A. Bodwell, stone . 

J. A. Brown, stone and stone- 
work at Granite bridge . 436 50 

Eagle Odorless Apparatus Co., 
odorless excavator, etc. 

Geo. E. Mores, mowing square 

James Wilkin s . ' . 

J. McDerby, repairing roof of 
engine-house 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight 

Concord Railroad, freight 

P. C. Cheney Co., paper 

E. S. Elliott & Co., labor on 
Bridge-street bridge . 

T. W. Challis 

19 



5 


00 


5 


00 




15 


9 


88 


1 


15 


25 


00 


48 


00 


90 


36 



,000 


00 


3 


50 


3 


00 


2 


00 


1 


80 


3 


80 




68 


36 


00 


3 


50 



290 

Paid Adams & Lamprey, goods for 
pest-bouse 

Daniel Healy, whitewashing 
tree-boxes 

Seliuda German, labor on en- 
gine-house 

D. P. & D. L. Perkins, pro- 
fessional services 

F. S. Bodwell, watering- 
trough .... 

J. T. Fanning, examination of 
McGregor bridge 

N. S. Bean, examination of 
McGregor bridge 

Chas. H. Hutchinson, exami- 
nation of McGregor bridge 

Edw. S. Philbrick, examina- 
tion of McGregor bridge 

Aretas Blood, abatement of 
tax ..... 

Wm. H. Newhall, labor at 
Amoskeag Cemetery . 

Daniel W. Trow, road-ma- 
chine .... 

Chas. N. Wait, examination 
of cement .... 

Isaac H. Webster, laud in Dis- 
trict No. 9 . . . 

Pennacook Hose Co., labor at 
dump .... 

Fire King Co., pumping out 
cellars 

Manchester P. 0., stamps 



$2 


10 


38 


25 


1 


50 


12 


00 


100 


00 


50 00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


50 


00 


31 


24 


25 


50 


200 


00 


5 


00 


75 


00 


11 


20 


15 


40 


5 


06 



291 

Paid H. S. Whitney, over-payment 

of poll-tax .... $2 94 

Drake & Carpenter, cement . 5 65 

1st N. H. Battery, firing sa- 
lutes ... . . 92 47 

1st Regt. Band, services Sept. 

27, 1881 .... 66 00 

Kennedy's Drum Corps, ser- 
vices Sept. 27, 1881 . . 10 00 

J. N. Bruce, decorating mon- 
ument .... 6 00 

G. A. R. Quartet, services 

Sept. 27, 1881 ... 10 00 

French Band, services Sept. 

27, 1881 .... 50 00 

J. A. Sanborn & Co., re- 
pairing team . . . 3 75 

Geo. E. Glines ... 5 00 

L. B. Bod well & Co., wood for 

city engineer's office . . 15 50 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 6 16 

Pettee & Whittle, cement . 154 40 

Corrugated Metal Co., ext. ser- 
vices on McGregor bridge 1,678 94 

Thos. D. Poole, ribbon for 

stamp .... 1 50 

Manchester Novelty Co., dat- 

ing-stamp .... 4 50 

Labor of men and teams . 2,699 60 

J. A. Barker, care of library 

boiler .... 13 00 

Jas. O'Grady, decorating city 

hall 4 00 



292 

Paid John Welch, decorating city 

hall 12 00 

Helen Hill, decorating city 

hall 1 25 

Wm. H. Morrill, decorating 

city hall .... 5 00 

M. Fitzgerald, stone-work on 
fountain .... 

Timothy Shea, cleaning vaults 

D. Wadsworth, board of pris- 
oners .... 

James S. Bacheler, plumbing . 

Pike & Heald, plumbing 

Daniels & Co., hardware 

I. R. Dewey, cleaning monu- 
ment globes 

W. L. Blenus 

S. B. Putnam . . . 

Drake & Carpenter, cement . 

city-farm team, labor at pest- 
house .... 3 00 

Nathaniel George, use of wa- 
tering-trough ... 3 00 

D. H. Morgan, labor on fence 4 00 

Manchester Steam Laundry, 

washing cloth ... 3 00 

Hiram Simons, abatement of 

tax ..... 76 

reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . 2,616 83 



113 


21 


4 


00 


22 


00 


99 


14 


6 


09 


2 


13 


6 


00 


2 


40 


6 


89 


11 


65 



-$22,635 57 



293 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 

balance from old account . 
lots sold . . . . 
Wm. C. Chase, lumber sold 



Paid Wm. C. Chase, supterintendent 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent 
Wm. C- Chase, labor 
A. B. Chase, " 

C. C. Webster, '' 
1. G. Howe, " 
John Madden, " 
Paul Champagne, " 
John Mulhern, " 
Fred Heath, " 
M. Greenwood, " 
A. Fushier, " 
S. P. Moody, " 
Frank Emerson, " 
Eugene Verrett, " 
Palmer & Garmon, grave 

numbers 
Henry Fisk, plumbing 
J. F. James, salary as treas 

urer . 
J. F. James, engineering ser 

vices 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
A. H. Daniels, expenses of 

committee to Boston 



1500 00 


830 


32 


1,205 


22 


80 


00 




*9 fii 5 54 




~ 'IT .J • I J J. ' >> O ^ 

Cr. 


$U6 75 


467 


96 


277 


25 


74 


15 


126 


38 


26 


60 


5 


00 


12 


50 


12 


50 


1 


25 


13 


13 


27 


50 


26 


66 


4 


00 


12 


18 


112 


00 


1 


93 



25 00 

54 37 
47 44 

15 15 



294 



Paid Pike & Heald, roofing tin, 

etc 14 83 

Temple & Farrington, blank- 
books .... 1 62 

By balance to new account . 1,129 39 



$2,615 64 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



Db. 



To appropriation . 


$1,500 00 


balance from old account . 


829 


76 


lot sold .... 


28 


50 


tomb fees 


106 


00 


water rent 


13 


00 


reserved fund . 


570 


96 

^3 048 22 












Cb. 


Paid A. H. Hartshorn, superintend 






ent .... 


115 


50 


F. B. Balch, superintendent 


458 


15 


D. W. Garland, stone-work 


1,192 


54 


Manchester water-works,watei 


32 


25 


Benj. Stevens, labor 


30 


00 


S. B. Duke, labor . 


30 


00 


D. H. Yarnum, teaming 


29 


25 


D. W. Fling, lot . 


51 


00 


J. B. Yarick, hardware . 


3 


75 


Thos. A. Lane, iron pipe, etc 


300 


97 


H. H. Huntress, plants . 


7 


00 


J. A. B. Emerson, grading 


750 


78 


Daniel Healy, whitewashing 


c 

5 




tomb . . . . 


1 


50 



295 



Paid A. H. Lowell, resetting stone 




posts .... 


$30 00 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


B 75 


F. S. Bod well, stone and labor 


64 00 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


47 78 





,048 22 



DECORATION OP SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... f 200 00 

^200 00 

'Cr. 
Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R. $200 00 

1200 00 



STARK-MONUMENT SQUARE. 

Dr. 
To balance from old account . . $200 00 

8200 00 

Cr. 
By balance to new account . . $200 00 

$200 00 



WOMEN'S AID AND RELIEF SOCIETY HOSPITAL. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . • . . . $300 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 400 00 

$700 00 



296 



Paid treasurer of hospital 



00 



FIREMEN'S PARADE. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



To appropriation 
reserved fund 



112,000 00 
2,042 77 



Or. 

8700 00 







Dr. 


appropriation . 


1300 00 


$300 00 
Cr. 






id First Regiment Band 


60 00 




George Fletcher, caterer 


180 75 




C. H. Hodgman & Co., team 


10 00 




William Shepherd, team 


4 00 




James Bros., team . 


5 00 




E. T. James, team . 


5 00 




Cavanaugh Bros., team . 


5 00 




J. A. Brown, team . 


. 10 00 




J. B. Clarke, printing 


5 00 




T. W. Lane, stationery . 


4 09 




balance on hand 


•11 16 


1300 00 







Dr. 



814,042 77 



297 



Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 1. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Geo. W. Bntterfield, driver 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal aud 

wood 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
H. H. Stearns, matches, oil 

etc 

Daniels & Co., hardware 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
Pike & Heald, flue-brush 
James S. Bacheler, hose, noz 

zle, etc. 
James Baldwin, shavings 
George R. Simmons, labor 
H. H. Glines, labor 
Manchester Locomotive-works 

repairs 
Company's bill for services 



$42 82 
217 00 

64 14 





2 


45 
20 
97 
35 




10 


85 




1 


00 




1 


20 




2 


40 


> 


7 


95 


1,1 


-5 


00 



Cr. 



11,612 76 



N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 4. 



id Manchester Gas Co., gas 


147 52 


A. B. Gushing, driver . 


217 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 




wood .... 


61 76 


E. p. Johnson & Co., coal 


126 42 


Geo. H. Stearns, matches, oil, 




etc 


5 73 



Cr. 



298 



Paid 



Peter Dncherme, repairing 




harness .... 


12 50 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


3. 80 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 


35 


Dennis Clifford, driver . 


23 00 


J. H. Wiggin & Co., barrels . 


75 


Manchester Locomotive-works, 




repairs .... 


257 75 


Company's bill for services . 


1,135 00 





,881 58 



• Pennacook Hose Company No. 1. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
W. L. Bleiius, driver 
Frank Dustin, driver 
L. B. Bod well & Co., wood and 

coal .... 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
Ezra W. Kimball, repairing 

harness 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
Pike & Heald, wash-bowl 

matches, etc. 
James S. Bachelor, hose 
D. M. Goodwin, brooms 
Manchester Locomotive-works 

new carriage 
Manchester Locomotive-works 

repairs 
Company's bill for services . 



Cr. 



856 


38 


600 


00 


21 


00 


5Q 


14 


126 


42 


'l 


55 


4 


92 


5 


29 


2 


40 


6 


50 


1 


00 



650 00 



4 00 
1,532 50 



$3,074 10 



299 



Massabbsic Hose Company No. 2. 



Cb. 



id Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$25 12 


Walter Seaward, driver . 


50 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and 




coal 


69 71 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs 




on carriage 


1 25 


W. Q. Sargent, matches,oil,etc. 


2 88 


Joel Daniels, painting hats . 


8 50 


Rowell & Burns, coal 


34 00 


Company's bill for services : 


986 50 




$1 177 96 







E. W. Harkington Hose Company No. 3. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


140 92 


John Dowd, driver 


197 55 


Charles Blood, driver . 


24 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 




and coal .... 


b5 75 


Moore & Preston, coal . 


35 00 


Ezra W. Kimball, blankets, 




tugs, etc. 


13 50 


E. N. Fogg, duster 


2 37 


H. C. Ranno, repairing har- 




ness 


8 70 


H. C. Ranno, repairing har- 




ness 


45 00 


J. B. Varick, hose 


7 00 


J. McLoughlin, carrying in 




coal 


1 50 



Cb. 



300 



id Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 


85 97 


W. C. Smith, saddle pieces, etc. 


6 50 


H. Fradd & Co., oil, soap. 




brooms, etc. 


1 56 


Manchester Locomotive-works, 




repairs .... 


594 02 


Company's bill for services 


1,002 50 





$2,041 84 



Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


33 44 


A. J. Robie, driver 


50 00 


M. B. Wilson, driver 


1 00 


Frank Dustin, driver 


7 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 




and coal .... 


54 04 


Moore & Preston, wood . 


9 00 


Geo. H. Stearns, matches 


2 25 


J. B. Varick, hardware 


' 00 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 




ing carriage 


9 25 


J. A. Sanborn, repairing car- 




riage 


4 00 


Pike & Heald, pipe, and set- 




ting up stove 


1 15 


T. A. Lane, repairing hose, etc. 


55 


A. H. Weston, firemen's coats 


::25 00 


Company's bill for services . 


1,892 50 



Or. 



$2,292 18 



1948 


37 


13 


14 


13 


40 


5 


75 


40 


70 


1 


73 


"7 


40 



301 
Engineers' Department and Miscellaneous. 

Paid Manchester Water- works, water 

Manchester Gas Co., gas 

Manchester Locomotive-works 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
^ J. Stickney, repairing hose . 

Pike & Head, lantern-wicks, 
etc. ..... 

Daniels & Co., keys 

Peter Sheehan, shoveling out 

hydrants .... 3 75 

Thomas O'Connor, shoveling 

out hydrants . . . 3 75 

J. R. Carr, repairs on bell 
tower .... 

John Barnes, neck-yokes, etc. 

Brock & Dri^^coU, hardware . 

John B. Clarke, printing 

P. W. Dickey <fe Co., iron-work 

W. U. Telegraph Co., tele- 
grams .... 50 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, fil- 
ters, etc. . 

J. G. Jones, trucking . 

Tristam Berry, labor 

T. W. Lane, stationery . 

Plumer & Helton, overalls 

Weston & Hill, carpets 

Manchester Locomotive-works, 

labor, etc. .... 45 09 

Parker & Gordon, chairs for 

engineer's room . . . 36 00 

W. H. Vickery, keys . . 1 10 



Cr. 



5 


30 


3 


00 


2 


40 


23 


75 




65 



4 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


8 


53 


12 


00 


61 


11 



802 



id James S. Bacheler, repairing 


• 


hose ..... 


$2 91 


Thomas W. Lane, chief en- 




gineer .... 


300 00 


A. C. Wallace, assistant en- 




gineer .... 


100 00 


B. C. Kendall, assistant en- 




gineer .... 


100 00 


0. E. Kimball, assistant en- 




gineer .... 


100 00 


Sam C. Lowell, assistant en- 




gineer .... 


100 00 


Sam C. Lowell, clerk of 




board .... 


25 00 





$1,962 35 



Recapitulation. 
Paid Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. No. 1 1,612 76 
N. S. Bean S. F. E. Co. No. 4 1,881 58 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 3,074 10 
Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 1,177 96 
E. W. Harrington Hose Co. 

No. 3 .... 2,041 84 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder 

Co. No. 1 . . . . 2,292 18 
Miscellaneous . . . 1,962 35 

114,042 77 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... |1,000 00 
reserved fund .... 49 48 

$1,049 48 



803 



Or. 



Paid Tristam Berry, superintend- 
ent ..... 
A. H. Lowell, zinc 
Thomas W. Lane, use of team, 

telegrams, etc. . 
0. H, Hodgman & Co., trucking 
C. Dame, trucking 
James Brothers, teams . 
M. G. Crane & Co., signal box 
M. G. Crane & Co., switch box 
M. G. Crane & Co., moving 

apparatus . • . 
Stearns & George, battery-jars, 

wire, etc. . 
Wm. T. Smith, blue vitriol 
Wm. C. Rogers, wire, vise, etc. 
Daniels <fe Co., wire and cement 
W. E. & E. B. Dunbar, iron 

work .... 
P. W. Dickey & Co., iron-work 
Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 
Pike & Heald, plumbing- 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 
James S. Bacheler, plumbing 
William Shepherd . 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
G. W. Goodwin, iron-work 
B. C. Kendall, labor 
John B. Clarke, printing 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

iron-work . 
W. H. Vickery, iron-work 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 



mho 


00 


155 


15 


18 


65 


8 


98 


1 


50 


10 


00 


125 


00 


35 


00 



67 50 



120 


18 


28 


Qi) 


D 1 


46 




70 


I 22 


00 




70 


15 


86 


8 


89 


1 


06 


9 


50 


2 


95 


7 


00 


10 


00 


17 


40 


11 


00 


6 


00 




78 



304 



id L. B. Harris . 


SI 96 


C. B. Littlefield . 


1 25 


Charles A. Puffer, labor 


2 50 


Peter Vassier, labor 


7 50 


Concord Railroad, freight 


1 5Q 




<jt>i 01Q A9, 







POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 

J. C. Bickford, fees and costs 
A. D. Stark, fines and costs 



Paid N. P. Hunt, judge . 

I. L. Heath, assistant justice . 
J. C. Bickford, clerk 
H. VV. Longa, city marshal . 
A. D. Stark, city marshal 
A. D. Stark, witness fees, etc. 
W. B. Patten, assistant mar- 
shal .... 
H. W. Longa,assistant marshal 
David Perkins, captain night- 
watch .... 27 00 
M. J. Jenkins, captain night- 
watch . . . . 840 36 
H. Stearns, night watchman 737 00 
J. P. Cassidy, '' '• . 728 00 
J. Bucklin, " " . 730 00 
T. Frai!i- '^ '' . 782 50 
P. Cannon, " " . 24 00 



$14,000 


00 




1,791 


40 




7,762 


09 






^■ 


^3,543 49 




<9^ 






Cr. 


11,314 00 




fS 


00 




475 


00 




36 


00 




817 


43 




487 


63 




15 


65 




703 


47 





305 



Paid Z. B. Wright, ni 


ght watchman 8596 50 


M. Fox, 




i 


20 00 


H. S. Reed, 




' 


24 00 


I. P. Fellows, ' 






770 00 


W. H. Newhall, ' 






734 50 


H. Harmon, ' 






28 00 


E. Farrar, ' 






752 00 


T. R. Northrup, ' 






24 00 


J. F. Dunn, ' 






728 50 


D. Stevens, ' 






24 00 


M. Marr, 






753 50 


E. Carr. ' 






712 50 


L. Tebbetts, 






717 00 


C. H. Reed, 






675 00 


F. Bourrassau, ' 






728 50 


G. Rochette, ' 






611 00 


P. Reischer, ' 






703 00 


J. C. Colburn, day police 


670 00 


R. W. Bean, day police 


670 00 


E. G. Woodman, special police 


) 2 00 


G. W. Minard, " " 


15 00 


E. H, Holmes, 


289 50 


J. M. Watson, " " 


13 00 


Leander P. Ash, " " 


1 50 


J. H. Tirrell, '' '' . 


40 00 


J. M. Twombly, " 


2 00 


Henry Bennett, " " 


77 50 


Peter Gosselin, " " 


1 00 


Willis Sanborn, 


1 00 


G. W. Varnum, 


6 00 


C. E. Copp, '' " . 


269 00 


S. L. Mitchell, 


94 00 


Archie Hill, 


34 00 


John Dunn, 


a 


a 


54 50 



20 



306 



id T. R. Northrup, special police 


5 $5 00 


Harvey Hill, " 


U ' 


40 00 


J. E. Bailey, 


ii 


42 00 


M. A. Clark, 


u 


1 00 


H. C. Cunningham, " 


u 


4 00 


C. D. Emerson, " 


u 


6 00 


George Goodwin, " 


(fc 


5 00 


D. C. Jackson, " 


u 


43 00 


E. A. G. Holmes, " 


u 


10 50 


S. P. Chase, 


ii 


5 00 


P. Riley, 


a 


7 00 


R. A. Challis, 


a 


5 00 


C. O'Sliaughnessey, " 


a 


3 00 


J. A. Carr, " 


a 


5 00 


F. H. Warren, 


,i 


49 00 


S. Amsden, " 


a 


2 00 


H. C. Sleeper, " 


i: 


5 00 


M. L. Brown, " 


u 


2 00 


A. Rowell, 


( . 


15" 50 


L. M. Gould, 


u 


4 00 


T. P. Heath. 


u 


15 00 


Benj. Hutchinson, " 


u 


9 00 


M. C. Brown, '• 


a 


2 00 


S. C. Gould, 


a 


2 00 


N. Baker, 


a 


4 00 


Brigham & Pratt, crackers . 


20 85 


L B. Harris, telephone 


. 


112 65 


Granite Htate Telephone 


Co., 




telephone . 


. 


12 00 


J. A. Barker, meals for lodgers 




and prisoners 




75 90 


Daniel Davis, meals for lodgers 




and prisoners 


, 


13 50 


W. U. Telegraph Co., telegrams 


5 26 51 



307 



Paid D. Evans & Co., buttons 


|<30 00 


Thomas W. Lane, ink and sta- 




tionery .... 


8 60 


Livingston & Kimball, printing 


2 50 


H. H. Everett, 


2 50 


J. B. Clarke, '• . 


37 25 


Temple & Farrington, station- 




ery, blank-books, etc. . 


29 05 


I. Blake .... 


4 00 


Challis & Eastman, printing . 


141 35 


Challis & Campbell, printing . 


29 90 


C. H. Simpson, teams . 


6 00 


J. A. Brown, " 


5 00 


E. T. James, '' 


47 75 


James Bros., '* 


41 75 


J. P. Bartlett, professional ser- 




vices 


4 00 


J. B. Pattee, professional ser- 




vices 


2 00 


J. H. Andrews, professional 




services .... 


2 00 


William Little, professional 




services .... 


2 00 


C. E. Cochran, professional 




services .... 


2 00 


Burnham & McAllister, pro- 




fessional services 


6 12 


M. J. Healy, professional ser- 




vices ..... 


2 12 


Clougli & Clark, professional 




services .... 


2 00 


Thomas D. Luce, professional 




services .... 


4 00 


VV. W. Owen, washing blankets 


2 00 



308 



Paid Daniels & Co., oit etc. . 

Pike & Heald, lantern, matches, 

etc. . 
Tristam Berry, graining chairs 
Tristam Berry, repairing chairs 
Parker & Gordon, office chairs 
C. M. Dodge, professional ser- 
vices . . . - . 
Eagle Odorless Apparatus Co., 

deodorizer . 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
C. H. Hodgman, trucking 
city library . 
By balance to new account 



.$12 00 



95 

22 
fO 
50 



3 00 



3 


25 


484 


60 


2 


00 


2 


03 


. 3,424 


70 




123,543 49 



CITY HALL AND OFFICES. 



To C. At Smith, overdraft 
rent of stores and hall 
J. S. Paine, overdraft 
0. D. Carpenter, old desk 
Mrs. R. A. Lawrence, old desk 
reserved fund . 



Paid Manchester Water-works,water 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Daniels & Co , hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
B. P. Fogg & Co., plumbing 



Dr. 



$0 95 




. 2,407 09 




. • 82 00 




1 00 




3 00 




. 2,758 74 






15,252 78 






Or. 


r m,938 20 




168 24 




38 11 




4 27 




90 




70 03 





309 



Paid Thomas A. Lane, plumbing . 


Ill 07 


James S. Bacheler, " 


78 62 


Pike&FIeald, "•' . 


99 33 


J. F. Ford, 


39 43 


A. C. WaUace, lumber . 


43 34 


Walter Neal, lumber and labor 


200 31 


E. A. G. Holmes, labor . 


10 00 


Geo. H. Dudley, labor . 


5 27 


Wm. G. Westover, lumber and 




labor 


4 00 


George Holbrook, lumber and 




labor 


21 53 


Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 




clocks .... 


32 00 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


117 63 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


6 00 


Wooton Desk Manufacturing 




Co., desks .... 


95 70 


Higgins Brothers, chairs 


35 25 


J. S Paine, furniture . 


341 38 


Lawrence, Wilde, & Co., fur- 




niture for council-room 


252 00 


Concord Railroad corporation, 




freight 


8 15 


S. German, washing floors 


132 90 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


465 70 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 


147 19 


Rowell & Burns, coal . 


130 75 


P. C. Cheney Co., waste and 




paper . . 


10 10 


C. A. Smith, duster and cuspa- 




dores . . . . 


9 87 


C. H. Hodgman& Co., trucking 


5 00 


Weston & Hill, carpeting, etc. 


145 24 



310 



Paid J. A. Barker, freight on mat- 
ting .... 
Barton & Co., matting . 
Fred M. Dow 
Piper, Hawley, & Co., cotton 

cambric, and crape . 
R. D. Gay,cord,wall-paper,etc 
W. H. Vickery, keys 

B. W. Robinson & Co., mason 
work .... 

George H. Stearns, brooms 

matches, etc. 
Concord Raih'oad corporation 

freight 
J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 
Belt and Leather Strap Co. 

gas- regulator 
A. M. Eastman, matches 
J. L. Wentworth, cleaning 

carpet 
Hutchinson Brothers, work on 

clock .... 
D. A. Simons, chairs 
J.J. Abbott, painting . 
L. W. Sanborn, whitewashing 
A. H. Lowell, sash-weights 

C. H. Wood, painting sign 
U. S. & Canada Express 
James R. Carr, painting and 

glazing 
Joel Daniels, painting, etc. 
Peter Milon, painting radiator 
J. N. Bruce . . . . 
Geo. E. Mores, cleaning carpet 



10 


50 


89 


89 


3 


00 


36 


88 


6 


65 


3 


75 


10 


25 


6 


08 


6 


40 


10 


00 


30 


00 


5 


50 



1 75 



1 


45 


9 


00 


169 


38 


8 


25 


1 


71 


3 


75 


1 


25 


12 


54 


16 


90 


4 


00 


4 


00 


1 


00 



311 



Paid Fellows & Goodwin, iron-work S4 10 

By balance to new account . . 137 34 



$5,252 78 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



To appropriation 
reserved fund 



Paid John B. Clarke 

F. H. Challis & Co. 
H. H. Everett 
Challis & Eastman 
Livingston & Kimball 
Union Publishing Co. 
Thomas W. Lane . 
Temple & Farrington 
Manchester post-office 
N. P. Kidder, pens 



$1,200 00 
160 52 



1899 12 


31 


00 


33 


00 


5 


50 


65 


63 


202 


25 


3 


75 


68 


15 


46 


12 


6 


00 



Dr. 

,360 52 
Or. 



$1,360 52 



WATER-WORKS. 

To balance from old account . . $23,304 00 
C. K. Walker, water rent . 60,215 62 



Dr. 



$83,519 62 



312 



Cr. 



By interest, amount transferred 
contingent expenses, amount 
transferred . 
Paid labor of men and teams . 

Chas. K. Walker, superintend 

ent .... 
Arthur E. Stearns, clerk 

C. C. Cole, superintendent at 
pumping station . 

J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
A. H. Lowell, service boxes, etc 
A. B. Webster, blacksmitliing 
Derry & Co., blacksmithing 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., black 

smithing 
George R. Vance & Co., iron 

pails 
E. P. Johnson <fe Co., coal 
Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, etc, 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
Hutchinson Bros., blacksmith 

ing, etc. 
J. J. Abbott, paint . 
J. Stick ney. rubber mitts 
J. Stickncy, rubber mat, etc. 
J. S. Kidder & Co., cement 
Drake &, Carpenter, cement 
Pettee & Whittle, cement 
Manchester Locomotive-works, 
sleeves, castings, etc. 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 



138,000 00 


1 


00 


6,857 


63 


1,279 


78 


1,000 


00 


• 600 


00 


159 


92 


1 


50 


36 


70 


365 


00 


13 


40 


2 


10 



2 75 



15 


00 


210 


54 


70 


58 


35 


77 


94 


34 


4 


95 


4 


00 


7 


33 


33 


60 


7 


40 


51 


38 


339 


84 


12 


25 



313 



Paid Concord Railroad corporation, 
freight . . . . 
J. W. Kimball, wood 
James Brothers, teams . 
E. T. James, teams 
J. A. Brown, team 

C. H. Hodgman & Co., team 
Geo. H. Stearns, oil, etc. 
John Barnes, blacksmithing . 
Fletcher & Royce, lunch, and 

use of steamboat at Massa- 
besic lake . 

D. J. Mahoney, lumber . 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
Larose & Marchand, lumber 

and labor . 
P. C. Cheney Co., paper 
Hugh B, Cochran, land . 
Pike & Heald, hardware 
Joseph Goodwin, lathing and 

plastering . 
Temple & Farrington, station 

ery, etc. ... 
Geo. C. Hoitt, blank-books 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 
W. E. Moore, printing . 
D. B. Varney, brass-work 
J. M. & D. A. Parker, wood 
J. B. Sawyer, engineering 
William Connelly, damage to 

cellar .... 
Sawyer & Woodbury, damage 

to cellar 
Geo. G. Griffin, land in Auburn 



,311 


22 


65 


25 


14 


50 


10 


50 


5 


00 


1 


00 


8 


64 


8 


45 


30 


00 


139 


22 


20 


39 


49 


00 


32 


40 


,150 


00 


16 


87 



26 00 



44 65 

4 00 
126 75 



00 
95 



59 50 
55 50 

4 00 

20 00 
5,000 00 



314 



Paid Joseph E. Bennett, auditing 
accounts 

Charles W. Farmer, oil, salt 
etc. .... 

H. W. Hawkes, bands, cocks 
etc 

Jarechi, Hayes, & Co., stop- 
cocks 

George Woodman & Co., pipe, 
nipples, etc. 

Leonard & Ellis, machine oil 

H. J. Devitt. torch-holders, etc 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing 
Co., hub-gates, etc. 

Union Water-Meter Co., wa- 
ter-meters . 

R. D. Wood & C, cast-iron 
pipe .... 

Mowry & Phillips, pig-lead 

Boston Lead Manufacturing 
Co., lead pipe, etc. 

Richard Pattee, hydrants 

Boston Machine Co.. bell-gates 

Sewall & Day, manilla, etc. 

Walworth Manufacturing Co 

Samuel May & Co. 

town of Auburn, taxes . 

Ward Hurley, corp. stops 

Henry N. Stone, pump, hose, 
etc 

H. B. Putnam, ex-officio water 
commissioner 

J. A. Weston, water commis 
sioner 



$57 00 

2 20 

183 00 

85 52 

759 85 
74 26 
29 80 

642 96 

1,548 92 

11,444 31 
1,120 05 

58 39 

660 00 

2.m 50 

69 80 

82 48 

2 84 

6 91 

22 50 

79 00 

21 00 

'95 00 



315 



Paid A. C. Wallace, water commis- 
sioner .... f39 00 

Alpheus Gay, water commis- 
sioner . . . . 39 00 

Wm. P. Newell, water commis- 
sioner .... 21 00 

E. H. ITobbs, water commis- 
sioner . . . . 12 00 

E. T. James, water commis- 
sioner .... 

C. N. & M. E. Harvey, lumber 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

A. B- Emerson, teaming der- 
rick ..... 

George Whitford, wood . 

A. M. Eastman, oil, wicks, etc. 
J. L. Fogg, land . 
Jeremiah Cronin, damage to 

cellar .... 

S. Brown .... 

B. Bresnehan 
By balance on hand 



21 


00 


1 


76 


6 


40 


2 


50 


5 


50- 


5 


25 


640 


00 


10 


00 


21 


00 


4 


00 


$i,mo 


14 




883,519 62 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $20,000 00 

$20,000 00 

Cb. 
Paid Manchester Water-works,water $19,320 00 
By balance on hand ... 680 00 

$20,000 00 



316 
RESERVOIRS. 

To balance on old account . . f 50 00 



Dr. 

150 00 
Cr. 



Paid A. H. Lowell, reservoir cover, 

etc 14 90 

By balance to new account . . 45 10 





DINGS. 


•^fj \j \j\j 


REPAIRS OF BUIL 




. 




Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


13,500 00 




reserved fund .... 


1,488 38 


14,988 38 










Cr. 


Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


$55 97 




J. Hodge, lumber 


85 68 




A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


30 44 




W. W. Hubbard, lumber 


27. 92 




George H. Dudley, carpenter- 






work . . . 


251 13 




George Holbrook, carpenter- 






work .... 


57 45 




J. H. Maynard, carpenter- 






work .... 


229 48 




N. R. Bixby, carpenter-work 


169 25 




John Oarlton, carpenter-work 


1,128 81 




Walter Neal, carpenter-work 


7 13 




S. G. Polsom, carpenter-work 


12 00 




P. Brown, carpenter-work . 


34 75 





317 



Paid T. Berry, carpenter-work 

James S. Bacheler, plumbing, 

etc. ..... 

James S. Bacheler, boiler, etc., 

at engine-bouse . 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 
W. H. Vickery, keys 
James R. Carr, painting 
J. J. Abbott " 

C. R.Colley&Co.,'^ . 
J. P. Finn & Co., " 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. V a rick, hardware 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
P. W. Dickey & Co., iron-work 
Temple & Farrington, wall- 
paper, etc. 

B. W. Robinson & Co., masoii- 
work ..... 
Bennett & Lord, mason-work 
Pike & Heald, plumbing 
B. F. Fogg & Co., plumbing . 
J. C. Young, roofing 
Drake & Carpenter, cement . 

D. H. Morgan, setting glass, 
etc 

Eli Richards, plastering 

Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. No. 1., 
furniture . . 

Pennacook Hose, No. 1, fur- 
niture . . . . 

N. S. Bean S. F. E. Co. No. 4, 
furniture . . . . 

A. N. Clapp, hardware . 



fll 


25 


140 


00 


1,312 


45 


48 


33 




40 


175 


74 


73 


12 


9 


79 


43 


65 


12 


83 


30 


50 


<•) 


40 


3 


35 



48 ;7 



460 


74 


2 


80 


44 


72 


8 


95 


270 


34 


21 


04 


1 


96 


1 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


4 


55 



318 



Paid Henry Fisk, plumbing . 


$18 41 


D. A. Simons, wall paper 


6 80 


R. D. Gay, wall-paper . 


4 68 


T. W.Challis, expenses to Bos- 




ton for committee 


3 50 


J. A. Sanborn & Co., iron- 




work 


1 50 


J. T. Fanning, professional ser- 




vices ..... 


20 00 


Wm. M. Butterfield, profes- 




sional services . 


45 00 


MILITIA. 




To appropriation 


■1600 00 



Paid Straw Rifles . 

Sheridan Guards . 
Head Guards 
First N. H. Battery 
Manchester War Veterans 

By balance on hand 



. flOO 00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 



14,988 88 



Dr. 



8600 00 



Cr. 



1600 00 



BRIDGE-STREET BRIDGES. 



To balance from old account 



$20,000 00 



Dr. 



$20,000 00 



319 

Cr. 
Paid Corrugated Metal Co. . .120,000 00 

120,000 00 



PAYMENT OP FUNDED DEBT. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... 118,000 00 

118,000 00 

Cr. 
Paid Suncook Valley R. R. bonds . |8,400 00 
sewer bonds .... 8,000 00 
By balance to new account . . 1,600 00 

818,000 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $2,000 00 

error 2 48 

reserved fund .... 759 74 

$2,762 22 

Cr. 
Paid sundry persons . . . $2,762 22 

$2,762 22 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $6,000 00 
reserved fund .... 1,399 15 

$T,399 15 



320 



Paid Geo. E. Morrill, collector . f7,399 15 



Cr. 



f7,399 15 



STATE TAX. 



To appropriation . 
balance account 



.$41,000 00 
60 00 



$41,060 00 



Cr. 



Paid S. A. Carter, state treasurer . 141,060 00 



141.060 00 



COUNTY TAX. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 



.139,000 00 



$39,000 00 



Cr. 



Paid E. P. Richardson, county 

treasurer . . . .831,323 37 
By balance on hand . . . 7,676 63 



$39,000 00 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

List for 1871 .... $6,260 70 



1872 

1873 
1874 
1875 



2,811 93 
4.215 84 
4,246 62 
4,120 16 



321 



[^ist for 1876 


. f3,026 17 


1877 


. 2,929 37 


1878 


. 3,149 27 


1879 


. 1,011 00 


1880 


. 1,896 83 







133,167 89 



TAXES FOR 1881. 



To resident taxes assessed 
non-resident taxes assessed 



By collections 
abatements 
discounts . 
balance outstanding 



Dr. 



1316,462 


26 






1,376 


45 










1317,838 


71 












Or 




8291,587 


46 






1,111 


43 






7,399 


15 






17,740 


67 










$317,838 


71 



RESERVED FUND. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


$10,000 


00 


show licenses . 


578 


00 


rent of tenements . 


260 


50 


south city scales 


178 


81 


rent of ward-room . 


24 


00 


rent of land 


1 


00 


costs non-resident taxes . 


42 


00 


aqueduct water 


15 


00 


dog licenses 


$542 


25 


sinking fund, amount transferrec 


1 20,000 


00 


incidental expenses . 


2,616 


83 • 
— $34,258 39 



21 



322 



Cr. 



By Women's Aid and Relief hospital 
paupers off the farm 
city farm . 
city teams 
Highway District No. 2 

4 
5 



9 
10 
11 





































u 






u 



new highways . 
land damage 
lighting streets 
paving streets . 
Amoskeag Falls hrid 
sewers and drains 



o;e 



commons . 
Valley Cemetery 
fire department 
city hall . 
printing and stationery 
repairs of buildings 
fire-alarm telegraph . 
abatement of taxes . 
discount on taxes 
grading for concrete 
macadamizing . 
Bridge-street sewer . 
balance on hand 



.$400 


00 




278 


69 




1,868 


13 




2,078 


41 




1,155 


20 




259 


40 




7 


77 




85 


88 




589 


46 




40 


38 




251 


33 




269 


99 




54 


81 




1,752 


24 




420 


76 




297 


93 




4,308 


^5 




1,261 


34 




3,960 


41 




192 


30 




570 


96 




2,042 


77 




2,758 


74 




160 


52 




1,488 


38 




49 


48 




759 


74 




1,399 


15 




$903 


97 




534 


30 




3,547 


57 




915 


18 






— $34,258 


39 



323 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls 

1 


Poll-Tax. 


r ^ — 

jVal. of Poll. 


1838 . . 


$555,270 


$2,235 49 


244 


$1 66 


1 ■■ 

$300 


1839 . . 


604,963 


3,029 84 


427 


2 14 


! 300 


1840 . . 


946,201) 


3,986 56 


! 772 


2 20 


300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


j 892 


3 49 


' 300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


i 300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


3O0 


1847 . . 


4,488,55' • 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,91)6,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,515 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . .. 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5.911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


loo 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,9^*0 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1S77 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17.943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


1 76 


100 



324 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


July 1, 1862 


City Bonds, 


July 1, 1882 


22,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1S69 


u a 


Aug. 1, 1882 


1,500 00 


July 1, 1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1, 1883 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1, 1883 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


ii u 


Au?. 1, 1884 


1,500 00 


Aprill, 1864 


U ii 


April 1, 1884 


70,000 00 


April 1, 1865 


u u 


April 1, 1885 


10,000 00 


July 1, 1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1, 1.885 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1, 1885 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


u u 


Aug. 1, 1886 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


u a 


Aug. 1, 1887 


3,500 00 


Jan. 1,1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 1, 1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1863 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 1, 1888 


35,000 00 


July 1, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1, 1890 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


a a 


Jan. 1, 1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31, 1863 


City Bonds, 


ISTov. 1, 1893 


70,000 00 


July 1, 1864 


tc -u 


July , 1, 1894 


50,000 00 


July 1,1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1, 1895 


100.000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


■ u 


Jan. 1, 1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


u 


! Jan. 1, 1902 


100,000 00 


July 1, 1881 


Bridge Bonds, 


July 1, 1911 


60,000 00 



325 

FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 

1881 .... .$909,500 00 
Added during year, bridge bonds 60,000 00 

1969,500 00 

Paid during the year . . . 16,400 00 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 

1882 . . . .... 1953,100 00 

Interest due, estimated . . 20,000 00 

Bills outstanding . . . 31,312 63 



Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1882 . 11,004,412 63 

Cash in treasury, Jan. 1, 1882 . $38,588 81 
Notes due the city ... 220 78 

Interest on the same . . . 52 22 

138,861 81 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1882 . 965,550 82 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1881 . $982,772 96 



Decrease of net indebtedness dur- 
ing the year . . . $17,222 14 



326 



CITY PROPERTY. 

City-Library building .... 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
City Hall and lot ... . 

City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, and provisions at city 

farm ...... 

^Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Engine-house, stable, and land, Vine street 
Hose-house and lot, Maple street 
Hose- house and lot, Nashua street 
Reservoirs ...... 

Houses, tombs, and new cemetery 

Court-house and lot . 

Common sewers ..... 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at city hall 
Street lanterns, posts and pipes . 
Water-works . . . . 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets 
Ward-room and lot, Manchester street . 
Ward-room and lot. Park street . 
Engine-house and lot, ward eight 
Water-pipe, wagons, and apparatus for water 

ing streets . 
Stock in vSuncook Ydlley Railroad 
Lot, Lowell street . . . 
Gravel lot, Belmont street . 
Gravel lot, ward eight (one-half acre) 
Gravel lot, Bakersville (one acre) 
Gravel lot, District No. 8 . . . 
Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Yalley Cemetery .... 



. $30,000 


00 


19,200 


00 


60,000 


00 


26,000 


00 


6,517 


19 


52,566 


50 


41,000 


00 


2,500 


00 


500 


00 


10,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


51,000 


00 


. '180,000 


00 


3,000 


00 


5,300 


00 


. 769,926 


38 


5,000 


00 


3,000 


00 


600 


00 


2,300 


00 


2,500 


00 


50,000 


00 


1,500 


00 


1,200 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


150 


00 


20,000 


00 


6,000 


00 


$1,354,910 07 



327 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 

Blodget-street school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
etc. .... 

Bl-idge-street house and lot 
Old High school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
New High school-house . 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
books, and apparatus 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Manchester-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Franklin-street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Stark house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Gofife's-Falls house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Harvey's . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Clough's mill 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot corner Beech and 
Spruce streets . 



. $3,000 


00 




.' 150 


00 


83,150 00 
.500 00 


. 6,500 


00 




. 200 


00 


6,700 00 


. 45,000 


00 




. 2,000 


00 


47,000 00 


. 3,300 


00 




. 125 


00 


3,425 00 


. 15,(J00 


00 




. 350 


00 


15,350 00 


. 8,000 


00 




. 300 


00 


8,300 00 


. 8,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


8,400 00 


. 18,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


18,400 00 


. 14,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


14,400 00 


. 3,000 


00 




. 200 


00 


3,200 00 


. 3,500 


00 




75 


00 


3,575 00 


. 3,600 


00 




100 


00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 


00 




50 


00 


2,550 00 


. 600 


00 




50 

3 


00 


650 00 


1 




6,000 00 



328 



Hallsville house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Massabesic house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito-Pond house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Center-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
South house and lot, 'Squog . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Main-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 

Amount of school property 
Amount of city property 

Total property 



. $3,500 00 




75 00 


$3,575 00 


. 1,400 00 




40 00 


1,440 00 


. 1,000 00 




50 00 


1,050 00 


. 5,000 00 




. 125 00 


5,125 00 


. 58,000 00 




. 400 00 


58,400 00 


. 50,000 00 




. 400 00 


50,400 00 


. 2,800 -00 




60 00 


2,860 00 


. 3,700 00 




. 125 00 


3,825 00 


. 12,000 00 




. 100 00 


12,100 00 


$284,075 00 


1,354,910 07 


$1,638,985 07 



329 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1882. 



Interest 


. 


. 


Interest 


on land 


. 


Paupers 


off the farm . 


City farm . 




Scavenger teams 




Highway 


' district No. 1 


u 




" 2 


4C 




'' 3 


a 




u 4 


(( 




- 5 


a 




" 6 


u 




u 7 


a 




^' 8 


u 




" 9 


a 




" 10 


li 




'' 11 


u 




u 12 


u 




" 13 



New highways 

Damage for land taken for highways 

Watering streets . 

Lighting streets . 

Paving streets . 

Macadamizing streets 

Grading for concrete 

Sewers and drains 

Bridges 

Commons 

Incidental expenses 

Pine Grove cemetery 

Valley cemetery 

Fire department 

Fire-alarm telegraph 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



§20,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,500 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 

300 00 
10,000 00 

600 00 

300 00 

400 00 

400 

650 

550 

450 
1,000 

700 

250 00 

150 00 
2,000 00 
1,000 00 
2,000 00 
5,500 00 
2,000 00 
2,500 00 
3,000 00 
15,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,500 00 
20,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
15,000 00 
1,000 00 



330 



Police department 


. 






. $12,000 00 


Hydrant service 


. 




. 20,000 00 


Printing and stationery 






1,500 00 


Repairs of buildings . 






1,500 00 


City library 


. 




3,000 00 


Militia .... 






800 00 


Payment of funded debt 






24,000 00 


Abatement of taxes 






2,500 00 


Discount on taxes 






6,500 00 


State tax .... 






41,060 00 


County tax 






32.000 00 


City officers' salaries . 






12,000 00 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 






200 00 


Firemen's parade 






300 00 


Annex to city library . 






1,500 00 


New school-house, Webster street 






2,000 00 


New school-house, Bakersville 






5,000 00 


Reserved fund .... 






10,000 00 


Repairs on school-houses 








3,000 00 


Fuel .... 








3,000 00 


Furniture and supplies 








500 00 


Books and stationery . 








500 00 


Printing and advertising 








500 00 


Contingent expenses . 








500 00 


Care of rooms 








2,600 00 


Evening schools . 








1,000 00 


Teachers' salaries 








39,000 00 


Truant officer . 300 00 


Battery building and ward-r 


oom, 


ward 


four 


8,000 00 



INDEX. 



Abateineut of Taxes , 319 

Account (4' City Treasurer 226 

Alarm-Boxes and Keys , 41 

Amoskeag Falls Bridge . . 263 

Amoskeag S. F. E. Company JS'o.'l .48, 297 

Apparatus, Fire 32 

Appropriations for 1882 , 329 

Attendance at School 166 

Books and Stationery 269 

Bridge, Amoskeag 263 

Granite 263 

Bridge-Street Bridges 318 

Sewer 262 

Care of Rooms 272 

Cemeteries, Report of Committee on , 209 

City Government, 1881 .• 3 

Civil Engineer, Report of 175 

Debt 324 

Farm 242 

Hall and Offices , . . . 308 

Library 282 

Library Annex., 1 282 

Physician, report of. 25 

Property 326 

Solicilor, Report of 19 

Teams 245 

Treasurer's Account 226 

Chief Engineer, report of. 31 



332 

Commons * 264 

County Tax 320 

Contingent Expenses 270 

Discount on Taxes 319 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 295 

Debt, Funded 325 

Donations to City Library 113 

Engineers' Department 301 

E. W. Harrington Hose Company No. 3 49, 299 

Excelsior Howk and Ladder Co., No. 1 . . 49, 300 

Evening Schools 273 

Farm, City 242 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 34, 302 

Boxes and Keys, Location of 41 

Fire Apparatus : 32 

Department 296 

Department, Rules and Regulations of 46 

Firemen's Relief Association 35 

Firemen's Parade 296 

Fires, 1881 38 

Fuel 267 

Government, City, 1881 3 

Grading for Concrete. 260 

Granite Bridge 263 

Highway District No. 1 177, 248 

No. 2 177, 248 

No. 3 182,250 

No. 4 , 182, 250 

No. 5 182,251 

• No. 6 183,251 

No. 7 183, 252 

No. 8 183,252 

No. 9 183,253 

No. 10 184,253 

Nell ..186,254 

No. 12 186,255 

No. 13 186, 255 



333 

Tligliways. ^ew 256 

Awards for Lands taken for 256 

Hydrant service 315 

Hydrants, Location of 57 

Location of, set in 1881 76 

Incidental Expenses 283 

Instructions to Key-Holders 44 

Interest 234 

Interest on Taxes 234 

Land Damage Awards 256 

Library, City 282 

Donations to 113 

Librarian's Report 109 

Treasurer's Report 105 

Trustee's Report 101 

Loan, Temporary 233 

Militia 318 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department 301 

Macadamizing streets 259 

Massabesic Hose Company N'o. 2 49, 299 

N. S. Bean Fire Engine Company No. 4 .48, 297 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department 52 

New School-house on Webster Street 266 

Officers, City 3 

Outstanding Taxes 320 

Overseers of Poor, Report of i . . . 223 

Paving Streets 258 

Paupers off the City Farm 235 

Payment of Funded Debt 319 

Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 , 49, 298 

Pine Grove Cemetery 211, 293 

Police Department 304 

Printing and Advertising 270 

Stationery 311 

Property, City 326 

School 327 



884 

Repairs of School-houses 264 

BuiliUngs 361 

Reserved Fund 321 

Reservoirs •••• 816 

Report of City Civil Engineer 175 

Chief Engineer 31 

City Physician 25 

City Solicitor 19 

Coram ittee on Cemeteries 209 

Committee on City Farm 15 

Finance Committee 230 

Librarian of City Library ... 109 

Overseers of the Poor 223 

Public Schools for 1881 125 

School Committee 129 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 148 

Superintendent of AVater- Works 71 

Treasurer of City Library 105 

Trustees of City Library 101 

Trustees of Cemetery Funds .. 219 

Water Commissioners 69 

Salaries of Teachers 275 

Officers 278 

Schools, Evening 273 

School Property 327 

Sewers and Drains 260 

Sinking Fund ' • . . . 283 

Stark-Monument Square 295 

Streets, Lighting 258 

Macadamizing o 259 

Paving 258 

Watering 257 

State Tax 320 

Tax, County 320 

State 320 

Taxes, Abatement of 319 

Discount on . . . 319 

For 188 1 321 

Outstanding 320 



335 

Temporary Loan 283 

Telegraph, Fire-Alarm 34, 302 

Teachers, Salaries of 275 

Truant Officer 272 

Tuition 272 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 323 

Valley Cemetery 294 

Water- Works 311 

Watering Streets 257 

Water Commissioners, Report of. 69 

Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospital 294