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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City of Manchester 



FOK THE 



Fiscal Year Ending December si, 1882, 



TOGETHER WITH 



Other Annual Reports and Papers Relating 
to the Affairs of the City. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 

JOHN B, CLARKE, PRINTER. 
1883. 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City of Manchester 



Fiscal Year Ending December ?i, 



y> iuu ^' 



TOGETIIEK WITH 



Other Annual Reports and ^apers Relating 
to the Affairs of the City. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 

JOHN B, CLARKE, PRINTER, 



M 

3SZ.67 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 
AN ORDER to print the Thirty-Seventh Annual Report of the 
Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are, 
authorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of the Thirty-Seventh Annual Report of the Receipts 
and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports 
of the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, the School Board and 
Superintendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water- Works, Water 
Commissioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Marshal, Over- 
seers of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian, and Treasurer of City 
Library, Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Committee on 
City Farm, City Physician, City Solicitor, and City Engineer, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the Appropriation for Printing 
and Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. December 29, 1882. 

Passed. 

WM. J. HOYT, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. December 29, 1882. 

Passed in concurrence. 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor. 



MAYOR PUTNAM'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : — 

Having again been called, by the suffrages of my fellow- 
citizens, to fill the chief executive office of the city, I feel 
the responsibilities that it imposes on me. I am well aware 
that the burden is not light, and that the people will hold 
both you and me accountable for the trust committed to 
our care. We are, for the time being, the servants of the 
people, elected to govern and administer the affairs of this 
city according to oaths taken and with what wisdom and 
knowledge have been given to us. For my part, whatever 
ability I possess shall be used with an honest purpose to be 
governed by the principle of justice towards all without fear 
or favor, and I shall endeavor to advance the best interests 
of the city. Relying on you, gentlemen, for counsel, I en- 
ter upon its duties without any misgivings for the future. 

City affairs should be managed as careful business men 
manage their own. We are but agents, and shall be held 
to a strict account for the well-being of the city during our 
term of office. The policy that should govern us should 
be a liberal one towards all those enterprises that the city 
requires in order to make it a desirable place in which to 
live, to keep up with the progressive spirit of the age, and 
give security to all persons living within the law. Yet one 
thing should be kept constantly in view, that no extrava- 
gance enter into our deliberations ; for, be it remembered, 



IV 

the money we spend is not our own. In regard to the ap- 
propriations I would say, let them be sufficiently large to 
cover emergencies which we cannot now foresee. Of late 
our appropriations have been less than in former years ; 
last year they were smaller than ten years ago. It is a 
short-sighted policy to curtail appropriations when our city 
is fast growing in wealth and population, and constantly 
extending over a larger area. 

FINANCE. 

The finances are in a very satisfactory condition. When 
we consider that the assessed valuation is 820,000,000, and 
the debt $1,000,000, two-thirds of which are invested in 
water bonds which are fast becoming self-supporting, we 
have but little cause for alarm. In my last address I rec- 
ommended the establishment of a sinking fund for the 
liquidation of the water bonds when they become due, but 
it failed to become a law. Had such a measure been 
adopted when the bonds were issued, and a small amount 
of money laid by every year, the first 8100,000 could have 
been taken up at maturity and none have suffered much 
thereby. During the highly prosperous period that has 
passed, it would have been a wise policy to have made 
provision for years less fortunate, which in all probability 
will come. 

A detailed account of the city finances will be found in 
the treasurer's report. 

POLICE. 

During the past two years, our city, considering the num- 
ber of its inhabitants, has been quite free from noise and 
tumult, and few cases of breaking and entering have oc- 
curred. The officers have shown commendable zeal in ar- 
resting those who have transgressed the law and bringing 



them to the bar of justice. There cannot be too much 
discrimination used in selecting men to compose the police. 
They should be temperate men, men that will command 
respect, and are not addicted to the vices which they are 
bound by their oaths to suppress. I am well aware that 
the policeman's life is one of danger, and one in which he 
has to decide quickly in emergencies that may arise. Per- 
haps he sometimes errs in judgment ; but he is human, and 
I shall always give him my support until I am thoroughly 
convinced that he is in the wrong. There is one custom, 
in vogue for many years, that I think should not be tol- 
erated, viz., officers' receiving presents from persons doing 
business on their patrol. They are paid by the city for 
protecting the property of all those who are doing a legiti- 
mate business, and when they receive a present from those 
who are not, they place themselves under obligations which 
might in some instances prevent them from performing 
their duty as fearlessly as they otherwise would. 

Our city is fast increasing in population and its area con- 
stantly extending, yet we have no more policemen than we 
had ten years ago when the population aud wealth were 
not two-thirds what they are to-day ; and for better pro- 
tection of property and security against fire I would recom- 
mend that the police force be increased. 

Here I would say a word to the police department. Be 
faithful to the trusts confided to you ; realize the importance 
of your position and the responsibility that rests upon you ; 
respect yourselves : if you do not, others will not respect 
you ; be vigilant in the performance of your official duties, 
and be courteous to those who need your assistance and 
advice. By observing these rules and paying strict atten- 
tion to the business of your office, you will win for your- 
selves the respect of an intelligent community, and, per- 
chance, longer tenure of official life. 



VI 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



During the past two years our city has been free from 
any serious conflagrations. The whole number of fires and 
alarms for 1882 was twenty-nine ; amount of loss, 115,440 ; 
amount of insurance, $10,715 ; total amount of damage, 
$4,725. 

This is a very remarkable record for a place of the size 
of Manchester. I do not propose to speak at length of the 
excellence of our fire department, for that is patent to 
every one. It is a department in which every citizen feels 
a just pride ; and as long as our city deals justly by it, and 
the same high standard of character is required to gain a 
membership, so long will it continue to be what it is. 

During the past year a hose-house has been located on 
Park street, and is now ready for occupancy, being first- 
class in all its appointments. In the near future another 
will have to be located in the north part of the city. Last 
year a lot was purchased on Sagamore street, containing 
10,000 feet of land, which would be a very desirable loca- 
tion on which to build, as that section is already thickly 
inhabited, and is far removed from the central department 
on Vine street. Eight years ago the appropriation for the 
fire department was larger than last year; and it looks as 
though too much money was appropriated then or not 
enough now. This is a department in which a parsimo- 
nious policy cannot be indulged, neither is it required by the 
city. The appropriations should not be so small that prop- 
erty-owners need feel insecure because of a fire department 
insufficient for emergencies. While speaking on this sub- 
ject, there is one thing to which I would call your atten- 
tion. Every year there is held, in some of the large cities 
of this country, a convention of fire engineers and repre- 
sentatives of fire insurance companies, for the purpose of 



Vll 

discussing matters connected with this service, from which 
discussions much valuable information is obtained. I think 
it would be well to have our city represented on these 
occasions. 

CITY FARM. 

During the last administration many improvements were 
made in the city-farm buildings. The most important was 
a large addition to the farm-house for the better accommo- 
dation of the unfortunate poor who are obliged to seek an 
asylum at this institution. A steam boiler has been put 
in, and the whole establishment heated therewith, which 
adds much to the comfort of its occupants and greatly 
reduces the risk of fire. Provision has been made for 
the care of insane patients that are city charges, who have 
formerly been supported at the asylum at Concord. Cases 
of mild insanity can be treated here as well as to send them 
elsewhere at a large expense. I have not examined the 
superintendent's report for the past year, but presume it 
to be the same as those of previous ones. I am convinced 
that with good management the expenses at this institution 
can be reduced so that it would not cost the city 12.75 per 
week for every pauper and criminal sent there. As far as 
dollars and cents are concerned, it would be cheaper to 
board the paupers at a good boarding-house, and send 
the prisoners to the house of correction at the jail, with 
board at $2.50 per week. But there is no need of that 
arrangement ; for with a farm as good as that, in close 
proximity to the city, where the labor is chiefly done by 
criminals, enriched as it is by all the products of the city 
stables, it can be made nearly self-supporting. To do this 
requires a superintendent who has ability, combined with 
energy of character and good business talent, and whose 
whole time should be devoted to the work. Persons con- 



Vlll 



nected with institutions like this, where the poor and the 
criminal alike are sent, should possess feelings of human- 
ity for the unfortunate, and firmness tempered with justice 
for the criminal class. Many improvements have been 
made on the farm in past years in bringing waste land to 
cultivation ; but much remains yet to be done in order to 
bring it up to that high standard that is required. 

It would be well that the wood be cut off on the west 
side of the road, and the land be put into tillage. This, 
I think, would be far preferable to having it remain the 
unsightly place it now is, covered with underbrush and 
stagnant pools. 

SEWERS. 

This city is admirably situated for drainage, and there 
is no reason why our system of sewerage cannot be made 
perfect, and so constructed that it may be conducive to the 
health and comfort of the people. 

One step was taken in the right direction last year when 
the large sewer was built down Bridge street, it having a 
direct outlet into the river, taking all the drainage of the 
north part of the city. Complaints are frequently made 
of the gases arising from our cess-pools. How this is to 
be obviated remain* to be seen. Various kinds of traps 
have been used, but none have yet proved successful ; and 
the only way yet devised to overcome this nuisance is to 
erect stand-pipes, connected with the sewers, and carried 
above the buildings, through which the gases may escape. 
In many sections, sewers that were built in the early days 
of city-made pipe have become entirely worthless by having 
been broken and filled up. Others were laid near the top 
of the ground, for surface drainage only. These must be 
relaid with pipe of better material, and to greater depth. 

Massabesic water having been generally introduced, the 



IX 

call for new sewers is increasing, and as a sanitary meas- 
ure it is very important that they should be built in all 
locations wherever required. 

TEMPERANCE. 

Upon this subject I shall be brief, though it is one that 
concerns all those who have the well-being of society at 
heart, and who take an interest in whatever tends to elevate 
the human race. Intemperance has existed from the earli- 
est period of which we have any record down to the pres- 
ent time. This is one of the evils which has not been 
eradicated as the world has grown more enlightened. How 
it is to be stopped is a problem not yet solved. Legislative 
enactments have been powerless for its suppression ; and 
the only way that 1 can see to stop the evil is to make 
the practice of drinking as odious as possible, and to 
place necessary restraints upon the traffic. We do not 
think the sale of liquors can be stopped entirely, any more 
than other crimes ; but such laws and restrictions should 
be placed upon it that it can be confined within reasonable 
bounds. 

It is a very easy thing for professed temperance people 
to find fault with the city government for failing to shut up 
shops where liquor is sold. Last year an effort was made 
to break up some of the worst dens, and to keep all others 
within proper restrictions, and with good results ; yet what 
aid did the movement receive from those who ought to 
have given it their moral support ? Not a church in the 
city raised its voice in its behalf, or gave any encourage- 
ment to the officers of the law. What was the consequence 
of this action on the part of the city ? The city marshal 
— the best Manchester ever had — was dropped because of 
the faithful discharge of his duty, and the people apparently 
acquiesced. 



HOSPITAL. 

I doubt if there is a city in New England as populous as 
Manchester that has not a hospital supported by its munici- 
pality. Here there are no provisions made whereby the 
indigent sick can be cared for and receive medical treat- 
ment at the expense of the public. In the absence of such 
an institution, the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 
generously gave, a few years since, the use of a building 
belonging to said corporation, for hospital purposes. There 
were found enough kind and noble-hearted ladies to take 
charge of this enterprise, and under whose judicious man- 
agement it has remained up to the present time. Thus 
was laid the foundation of what is known as the Women's 
Aid Hospital, which is now a corporate body. From a 
small beginning it has grown to be one of our most useful 
and permanent institutions. It has been supported by 
funds given by the various corporations, and from the 
purses of some of our liberal citizens. I have had occasion, 
from personal observation, to know that it has been the 
means of doing a great amount of good by relieving the 
distress of those who have received its benefits, and who 
otherwise must have suffered from want of care. The city 
for a few years past has donated annually the sum of a few 
hundred dollars towards its support. This gratuity I would 
recommend be continued during the present administra- 
tion, and increased if in your judgment it be advisable. 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

Your attention will be called to the subject of lighting 
our streets, and it deserves serious consideration. That 
our city is now very imperfectly lighted, none will deny. 
Whether the electric light has yet been brought to that 
state of perfection that it can be used for general purposes 



XI 

on the scare of economy, remains to be demonstrated. 
That it is the coming light, there can be but little doubt ; 
and can it be shown our citizens that the expense of light- 
ing our streets with electricity would be but a few thousand 
dollars a year in excess of what it is now, the system wiil 
undoubtedly be adopted. I would advise that the street- 
lamps be kept burning until one or two o'clock a. m. I 
make this recommendation for two reasons : first, as a 
safe-guard against accidents ; secondly, as a means of secu- 
rity against house-breaking, and for a more perfect police 
protection. I have had an interview with the superintend- 
ent of the Gas Company, to ascertain if a reduction can- 
not be made in the price of gas if more is used, and with 
very favorable results. 

STREETS. 

This department is one of the most important of any in 
the city on account of the large amount of money appro- 
priated, much of which can be squandered without strict 
attention is given to its judicious expenditure by the super- 
intendent. I would recommend the passage of an ordi- 
nance prohibiting the superintendent of streets from em- 
ploying his own teams on the streets, or his engaging in 
any other business that would occupy his time, which 
should be devoted to the interests of the city. 

As a general thing our streets are in good condition, 
considering the amount of money expended. There was 
not so much money appropriated for the street department 
last year as in former years. The streets which have been 
macadamized and paved have worn well and given good 
satisfaction. I would recommend that the usual amount 
of money be spent for the same purpose the coming year. 

Here I will say a word respecting our sidewalks. It is 
a fact patent to every one, that the walks on some of our 



Xll 



main thoroughfares are in a very bad condition. The 
question is, how shall they be improved ? The abutters 
say they are not obliged to keep them in order, for the 
walks are a part of the street, and they pay taxes to keep 
them in repair. On the other hand, the city contends that 
the abutters put them down for their own convenience and 
those who occupy their buildings. During the last year 
heavy claims for damages because of injuries received on 
account of defects in sidewalks have been presented to the 
city for payment. If these actions are maintained and 
the city is held responsible, the quicker the evil is reme- 
died the better for all concerned. The roads in the subur- 
ban districts are in better condition than for years. Yet 
they are not what they should be. or what the public 
require. 

It should be borne in mind that in some districts good 
material for grade purposes cannot be obtained. If there 
is one thing which the general public require more than 
another, it is good roads ; and money spent in keeping 
them in good repair is one of the items about which tax- 
payers seldom complain. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

During the past administration an annex has been built 
to the city-library building, of the same height and cor- 
responding architecture, which now gives ample room, and 
will meet the wants of the people for many years to come. 
The library now contains 26,025 volumes ; books that have 
been selected with care for the reading public. This insti- 
tution deserves the fostering care of the city, and money 
judiciously spent for its enlargement will have the approval 
of our citizens. 

Last year the city engineer was instructed to establish 



Xlll 

grades on many of the old streets and on all of the new. 
This work has been nearly completed ; and, had this system 
been adopted in the earlier years of our city, much trouble 
and litigation would have been prevented. I would recom- 
mend that this work be continued 

I would speak at length of the board of health, but as I 
did so in my last address, shall only briefly refer to it now. 
I would recommend that a board be chosen of three per- 
sons, one of whom should be clerk, invested with full 
powers to act in all cases, whose pay should be sufficiently 
large to enable him to devote the necessary time to his 
office ; the other two members to be advisers, to meet at such 
times as required and be paid for time actually spent. Not 
much can be expected of the board as now constituted, 
for the reason that the small pittance given them does 
not pay for the time spent, to say nothing of the ill will 
acquired if they faithfully perform their duties. 

Not having given that time required to our public 
schools to speak understandingly of them in detail, I will 
only say that they continue to keep up the high standard 
which they have maintained in past years. The superin- 
tendent will lay before you in his report the general 
information required. 

CONCLUSION. 

Thus briefly have I indicated some of the most impor- 
tant measures that will demand your attention. This I 
have done in as concise a manner as possible. I have a 
right to expect your hearty co-operation in every effort of 
mine to successfully carry out each measure that shall be for 
the good of the city. With your support I shall go forward 
with courage, determined that 
influence I may have, shall be freely given. 



XIV 

Let no narrow policy govern our actions, but ever bear 
in mind our official trust and accountability. Let there 
be harmony of action in the several branches of our gov- 
ernment, and each vie with the other in making this 
administration a successful one. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT, 

1882. 



MAYOR. 

Hon. HORACE B. PUTNAM. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

WILLIAM J. HOYT. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JAMES A. FRACKER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 



4 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

WILLIAM R. PATTEN. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

JAMES M. COLLITY. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — Elijah Chandler. 

Ward 2. — George H. Stearns. 
Ward 3. — Aretas Blood. 

Ward 4. — John H. Maynard. 
Ward 5. — Thomas F. Glancy. 
Ward 6. — John Hosley. 

Ward 7. — Timothy W. Challis. 
Ward 8. — Andrew C. Wallace. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

Perkins C. Lane. 
William A. Perry. 
Charles F. Morrill. 

Ward 3. 

James Sutcliffe. 
Samuel Thompson. 
George Whitford. 

Ward 5. 

John F. Conway. 
Martin J. Foley. 
Michael McDonough. 

Ward 7. 

Samuel Lunt. 
George B. Smith. 
David Farmer. 



Ward 2. 

Darwin M. Poore. 
John F. Ciough. 
William J. Hoyt. 

Ward 4. 

Samuel F. Curtis. 
Robert Heath. 
Orrin D. Carpenter. 

Ward 6. 

Thomas Johnson. 
George H. Dudley. 
James S. Bacheler. 

Ward 8. 

James F. Baldwin. 
Frank Schnauder. 
Henry C. Ranno. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor, and Alderman Blood ; 
Messrs. Morrill, Curtis, and Johnson. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Hosley and Challis ; Messrs. 
Smith, Poore, and Morrill. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Challis and May- 
nard ; Messrs. Heath, Carpenter, and Dudley. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Blood and Chandler ; 
Messrs. Curtis, Baldwin, and Sutcliffe. 



On City Farm.. — Aldermen Maynard and Hosley ; 
Messrs. Perry, Lunt, and Bacheler. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Wallace and 
Stearns ; Messrs. Carpenter, Clough, and Perry. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Stearns and Wallace ; Messrs. 
Perry, Clough, and Carpenter. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Challis and Maynard; Messrs. 
Sutcliffe, Johnson, and Poore. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Challis and 
Hosley ; Messrs. Thompson. Smith, and Ranno. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Wallace and Chan- 
dler; Messrs. Bacheler, Lane, and Heath. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Glancy and 
Stearns ; Messrs. Lunt, Foley, and Thompson. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Stearns and Glancy; 
Messrs. Whitford, Farmer, and Schnauder. 

On Water- Works. — Aldermen Blood and Maynard ; 
Messrs. Whitford, Baldwin, and Conway. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Challis and Chandler ; 
Messrs. Lane, Dudley, and McDonough. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Blood and Stearns. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Hosley and 
Chandler. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Challis and Maynard. 

On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Wallace and Chan- 
dler. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Stearns and Challis. 

On Market. — Aldermen Glancy and Wallace. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Challis, Hosley, and 
Stearns. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Messrs. Thompson, Whitford, 
and Lunt. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Clough, Bald- 
win, and Lane. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Smith, Ranno, and Morrill. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Associate Justice of Police Court. 
Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 
Alfred D. Stark. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Horatio W. Longa. 

Captain of the Night Watch. 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 

Day Police. 

John C. Colburn. 
Randall W. Bean. 



Night Watchmen 



John F. Cassidy. 
James Bucklin. 
Thomas Frain. 
William H. B. Newhall. 
Michael Marr. 
Hiram Stearns. 
Zadock B. Wright. 
Edgar Farrar 
Jeremiah Murphy. 



James F. Dunn. 
Ira P. Fellows. 
Philip Re is die r. 
Francis Bourrassau. 
Gideon Rochette. 
Charles H. Reed. 
Lafayette Tebbetts. 
Eben Carr. 
Charles S. Brown. 



Constables. 

William A. Carpenter. Joseph B. Maynard. 

George W. Hamlin. Isaac F. Sawyer. 

Charles R. Noyes. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex-officio Chairman. 
Marshall P. Hall, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Charles F. Everett. 
Frank T. E. Richardson. 



Ward 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
Gerherdus L. Demarest. 



Ward 3. 

Daniel Clark. 
William A. Webster. 



Ward 4. 

Walter M. Parker. 
John T. Fanning. 



Ward 5. 

Denis F. O'Connor. 
Charles A. O'Connor. 



Ward 6. 

Abial C. Flanders. 
Brackett B. Weeks. 



Ward 7. Ward 8. 

Marshall P. Hall. Louis E. Phelps. 

Ezra Huntington. Douglas Mitchell. 

William J. Hoyt, ex officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Hon. H. B. Putnam, ex-officio Chairman. 
William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 

William H. Maxwell. George F. Sheehan. 

George H. Colby. Robert Hall. 

C. G. B. Ryder. Elbridge G. Woodman. 

Horace Gordon. Israel B. Farnum. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex officio. 
James A. Weston, Qlerk. 

Alpheus Gay. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

Eben T. James. Andrew C. Wallace. 

James A. Weston. William P. Newell. 



ASSESSORS. 



Charles S. Fisher, Chairman. 
David 0. Furnald, Clerk. 

Charles H. Brown. John Ryan. 



10 



Joseph H. Haynes. Ira W. Moore. 

David 0. Furnald. Henry W. Powell. 

George W. Weeks. Charles S. Fisher. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Joseph H. Haynes, Chairman. 
Harrison D. Lord, Clerk. 

Hiram Forsaith. John J. Flynn. 

Joseph H. Haynes. Isaac Whittemore, 

David 0. Furnald. David Farmer. 

Harrison D. Lord. Charles S. Fisher. 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Isaac W. Smith. 

William P. Newell. Moody Currier. 

Daniel Clark. Lucien B. Ciough. 

Ezekiel A. Straw. 

Horace B. Putnam, ex officio. 
William J. Hoyt. ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Alfred D. Stark. Lyman H. Lamprey. 

Patrick A. Devine. 



11 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 
Sam C. Lowell, Clerk. 

Assistant Engineers. 

Andrew C. Wallace. Sam C. Lowell. 

Benjamin 0. Kendall. Orin E. Kimball. 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

Nathan P. Kidder. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Charles K. Walker. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 



Ward 1. — Daniel H. Maxfield. 
Ward 2. — George M. True. 
Ward 3. — James B. Straw. 

Ward 4. — John M. Crawford. 
Ward 5. — James Dolan, Jr. 
Ward 6. — George Holbrook. 

Ward 7. — Timothy W. Challis 
Ward 8. — Charles K. Walker 



12 



Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Charles H. Butman. 
Ward 2. — Louis C. Merrill. 

Ward 3. — Alexander H. Olzendam. 
Ward 4. — Waldo E. Gilmore. 
Ward 5. — Nicholas J. Whalen. 
Ward 6. — George E. Glines. 

Ward 7. — Frank H. Redfield. 
Ward 8. ~ William McElroy 

Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 

Jonathan T. Underbill. 
Charles E. Ham. 
Charles D. Wheeler. 



Ward 2. 

Horace C. Paige. 
John Prince. 
George W. Yarnum. 



Ward 3, 



Ward 4. 



David Thayer. 
Simeon R. Stearns. 
George H. Knowlton. 



Ralph Pearson. 
Sylvanus B. Putnam. 
Charles H. Uhlig. 



Ward 5. 

John B. McTiernan. 
James McLaughlin. 
John Bryson. 



Ward 6. 

Edwin N. Baker. 
Richard E. Davis. 
Clarence M. Edgerly 



Ward 7. 

Elbridge G. Woodman, 
Samuel Clark. 
James Lightljody. 



Ward 8. 

Herman Rittner. 
Charles C. Tinkham. 
Hervev Stratton. 



REPORT 



BOAHD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — In compliance with the ordinance estab- 
lishing water-works, the Board of Water Commissioners 
have the honor to present herewith their eleventh annual 
report, together with the customary report of the superin- 
tendent, which furnishes, in detail, an account of the oper- 
ations of this department during the year ending December 
31, 1882. 

The total income of the water-works for this period has 
been sixty-seven thousand six hundred thirty dollars and 
thirteen cents ($67,630.13) ; the ordinary current expense 
of operating and maintaining the works has been eleven 
thousand five hundred and five dollars and ninety-seven 
cents ($11,505.97), leaving, as net receipts, fifty-six thou- 
sand one hundred twenty-four dollars and sixteen cents 
($56,124.16). This is an excess of net receipts in 1882 
over those of 1881 of five thousand three hundred forty- 
two dollars and sixty-three cents ($5,342.63). 

As a whole, the water-works are in a very satisfactory 
condition. Massabesic Lake is furnishing an abundance of 
pure water, both for power and city supply. The wrought 



16 

iron and cement pipes have given less trouble by way of 
leaks than in any year since their construction. The pump- 
ing machinery continues to perform its duty admirably, 
and the revenue derived is larger than the most sanguine 
dared predict at their inception. It is now only necessary 
to keep the works already constructed in good order and 
repair, increasing their capacity only as fast as demanded 
by the increased consumption of water, to continue indefi- 
nitely the great blessings now enjoyed by our citizens from 
one of the finest systems of water supply in the country. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, Chairman, 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor, 

WM. P. NEWELL, * 

A. C. WALLACE, 

E. T. JAMES, 

E. H. HOBBS, 

JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1883. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Water Commissioners of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen. — As required by an ordinance of the city, 
I herewith present my annual report for the year 1882. 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

Notwithstanding the dry season, there has been an abun- 
dance of water in the lake, it being twenty-two inches 
higher December 31, 1882. than it was in December. 
1880, at the time the channel was lowered at the outlet. 
Having plenty of water the past year, it is fair to assume 
that there will be a sufficient quantity in the future to run 
the pumps and supply the city, if it is not wasted. 

The wasting of water is a hard matter to control here, ajs 
well as in other cities. Many of the takers have the idea 
that all of the water in the lake is available. They are not 
aware that five feet is all we have under control, and it 
takes seven gallons to get one into the reservoir. 
The citizens of Manchester are supplied with the very 
best of water, and the rates are as low as in any other city 
where the water is pumped, and, if they use just what they 
pay for, and no more, there will never be a water famine. 

2 



DAM, CANAL, AND PENSTOCK. 

At the dam. each side of the over-fall, there has been 
coping-stone laid on the bank walls, and an iron fence 
built ; also a new iron railing on the bridge, and at the 
head of the canal. Total cost, $818.40. 

A portion of the canal bank on the south side, near the 
head of the penstock, slid into the water. This has been 
repaired, and the canal banks now are in good condition. 

PUMPING STATION. 

The pumps are in good running order. The valve- 
chamber that was repaired last year cracked in another 
place, and a new one was ordered. The casting was made 
in Philadelphia, by R. D. Wood & Co., and was set in the 
place of the old one in the month of April. The work was 
in charge of Henry Dare, agent of R. D. Wood & Co ., and 
the change was made in six days in a satisfactory manner. 

As all machinery is liable to get out of order, it would 
be well to make some arrangements for another set of 
pumps. There could be another set attached to the spare 
wheel, with nearly as much capacity as the two now in use, 
and could be used in case of accident or when making 
epairs. While there is no doubt about the supply of 
water, it would be well to bear in mind that it will always 
have to be pumped. 



19 



RECORD OF PUMPING IN 1882. 



MONTHS. 


No. hours' work f Av f r a ^ e 
for both pumps. ^^ 


Total No. 

strokes 
per month 


Total gallons 

pumped in one 

month. 


Daily aver- 
age gallons 
pumped. 




644 h. 

555 " 

557 " 30 m. 

509 " 40 " 

544 " 20 " 

599 " 10 " 

670 " 

817 " 10 " 

649 " 20 " 


16 26 
16.22 
15.50 
16.53 
16.70 
16.46 
16.55 
16.04 
15.45 
15.57 
14.79 
15.70 


628,552 
540,072 
533,878 
505,501 
545,186 
591,688 
665,364 
786,662 
602,144 
542,924 
509,920 
580,412 


39,598,776 
34,024,536 
33,634,314 
31,850,363 
34,346,718 
37,276,344 
41,917,932 
49,559,706 
37,935,072 
34,204,212 
32,024,960 
36,565,956 


1,277,380 
1,215,162 
1,084,978 
1,0G1,678 
1,107,960 
1,242,544 
1,352,191 
1,598,700 
1,264 502 


February 

March 


April 

May 


July 

August ... 


October 

November 

December 


578 " 40 " 
722 " 
616 " 


1,103,168 
1,067,499 
1,179,547 


Totals and average. 7462 h. 50 m. 


15.98 


7,032,303 


442,938,889 


1,213,531 



SUPPLY AND FORCE MAINS. 



The supply and force mains have been kept in repair with 
as little expense as any previous year. 

At the Cemetery brook hear the corner of Massabesic and 
Park streets, the supply main sustains the greatest pres- 
sure east of Union street, and is laid under the brook where 
it would be impossible to repair it in high water. To guard 
against a break that might happen at this place, 307 feet of 
cast-iron pipe were laid over the stone culvert and so left 
that it can be connected with the cement pipe each side of 
the brook in twenty-four hours. 

In order to do this, the grade of the street had to be 
raised and the culvert lengthened, the expense of which 
the water-works department paid one half, amounting to 
$500 ; the cost of laying the cast-iron pipe was 81,200, 
making the total cost $1,700. 



20 



RESERVOIR. 



The wood- work at the gate-house has been painted, and 
a fence built from the highway to the top of the embank- 
ment inclosing the old roadway, that was used to draw up 
the earth and stone to build the banks. 

This gives the public an opportunity to drive from the 
main road to the top of the reservoir embankment. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

The amount of water-pipe laid the past season is 8,872 
feet, — a little more than one and a half miles, at an ex- 
pense of -$8,857. 

These extensions have been laid on twenty-two different 
streets, and in all cases, except when it was necessary to 
give a better supply to hydrants, the residents have agreed to 
take water enough so that the receipts would at least be 
equal to the interest on the cost of laying the pipe. 

There were laid on Bridge street, on the west side of the 
river, 580 feet of eight-inch pipe, making a connection with 
the Stark-corporation pipe, which was supplied before from 
the Amoskeag Company's line that runs up River street 
from Granite. The city furnished the material and made 
the connection on McGregor street, the Stark corporation 
doing the rest of the work. This gives both corporations a 
better supply for their hydrants, and the benefit which the 
city derives is, that the section north of the brick school- 
house to Amoskeag will be supplied when repairs are being 
made on Main street south of this point. 

The pipe which crosses the Merrimack on the bed of the 
river near the weir, a portion of which was laid over a year 
ago last summer, remains in good condition. There were 
three leaks in the lead joints of the pipe first laid, which 
were repaired in low water last summer, so that this line of 
pipe is now in good order. There have been 282 feet of 



21 



twelve-inch cast-iron pipe laid on Elm street from Cole 
street under the Manchester & Lawrence Railroad track 
in place or' the cement. This was necessary in conse- 
quence of making the street wider by the railroad bridge. 

PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID IN 1882. 





Length in feet laid. 


Gates set. 


a 

a 
■— 

r: 

> 






12 in. 


10 in. 


8 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


12 in. 


10 in. 


8 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


Location. 






4 




















Blow-off at Bel- 
mont street. 

Main to McGreg- 
or. 

Chest, to Union. 

Amherst to Low- 
ell. 
North to Salmon. 

Wayne to Amo- 
ry- 

Milford south- 
ward. 

McGregor east- 
ward to Co's P. 

Hydrant set. 

Dutton to Bel- 
mont. 

Concord south- 
ward. 

Canal to Elm. 

Brook southward 

Cor. Ashland. 

Elm to Bay. 

To Amory. 

To Russell. 

Oak to Linden. 

12-in. main pipe 

northward. 
Pine eastward. 

Lincoln eastw'd. 

Elm westward. 






435 










1 














840 












2 






663 








1 








Bay 






507 
500 








1 


































373 










1 










580 








1 










9 

1560 












1 
3 


















2 












147 
















700 












1 


Hazel 








260 














17 
336 








North 






9 




1 










1 






150 










Myrtle 






208 
677 

12 
203 
120 

58 














1 


Pearl 


























504 










1 








































Valley 




















11 


Walnut 


















1 


























353 


667 J 


1669 


5403 


780 1 


1 


2 


4 


2 


Total No. feet, 

8,872. 



If Iff miles laid in 1882. 



22 



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26 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1882. 



Appleton corner Pine. 
Appleton corner Union. 
Center corner River. 
Concord corner Ashland. 
Concord corner Hall. 
Concord corner Belmont. 
Granite corner Franklin. 
North corner Bay. 
Myrtle corner Russell. 
Pearl corner Russell. 
Pearl corner Linden. 



The following places are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken up and cast-iron pipe laid instead : — 



Streets. 


Length in feet. 


Location. 




20 in. 


12 in. 


10 in. 8 in. 6 in. 


4 in. 














8 
13 


S 

15 

'44 

18 

7 


Opposite Auburn block. 

Corner Depot. 

Corner Merrimack. 

Lawrence R. R. crossing. 

Corner Main. 

Corner Wilson. 

Corner Bowman. 

Corner Chestnut. 

Corner Belmont. 

Opposite No. 142. 

Opposite Nos. 70, 10, and 194. 

Opposite No. 62. 

Corner Valley. 

Corner Hanover. 

Opposite No. 114. 

Opposite No. 100. 

Near Elm. 






















Elm 




28v 














■"« 








4 




12 
16 

"8* 

8 


Milford - 


















307 




24 




Pearl 






















Willow 










Wilson 






15 






Walnut 








West 


















.... 














307 282 


43 


.... 110 


92 


Total number of feet, 834. 



27 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID AND SET TO DATE. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20 inch 


20,627.90 ft. 
6,825.00 " 
8,118.00 " 
5,031.75 ft. 
12,563.00 " 
82,481.00 " 
8,657.00 " 


411.00 ft. 
4,925.00 " 
6,952.00 " 
9,040.00 " 
5,966.00 " 
29,562.50 " 
2,047.00 " 


5 
10 




16 




13 




32 




188 




17 








144,303.65 ft. 


58,903.50 ft. 


281 



27.33 miles of cement-lined pipe. 
11.156 " " cast-iron pipe. 



38.486 



cement and cast-iron pipe. 



281 gates. 
339 hydrants. 
7 air-valves. 



METERS. 



There have been set during the year 67 meters, making 
the number now in use 371. 

The sale of water by meter measurement is as fair for 
both the city and taker as has yet been devised. It would 
be too expensive to set them at every service pipe, for a 
large portion would not use water enough to pay for read- 
ing the register once a month and making the repairs. It 
is plain to be seen, in dry weather, that the lawns look the 
greenest where there are no meters, nevertheless the cost of 
water is less than a cent a barrel by measurement. It is 
probable, too, that meters do not register all the water that 
passes through them, and in such eases the consumer gets 
the advantage ; but he will not be convinced that such is 
the fact, if there is a leak in his service pipe. The super- 



28 



intendent has never been able to find a hose attached to 
a tree, and the water running all night, where there was a 
meter set ! 

The number of applications for water to date has been 
twenty-two hundred and seventy (2,270). 

One hundred and thirty-three (133) service pipes have 
been laid this year, as follows : — 

1,622.6 feet. 

1,527.4 " 

275.0 " 

16.0 " 

52.0 " 

36.0 « 



8 | 


inch 


diameter . 


1 


a 


a 


1 1J 

2 2 


a 

ii 
u 


a 
a 

a 


1 4 


ii 


a 



3,529.0 feet. 



Length of service pipe 

Twenty-one hundred and twenty-seven (2,127) service 
pipes have been laid to date, as follows : — 

40 I inch diameter .... 860.7 feet. 
1,786 | " ".... 46,952.2 



257 1 
20 1| 

2 n 

16 2 
6 4 



7,275.1 

1,188.9 

73.0 

572.3 

172.0 



Total length of service pipe . . 57,094.2 feet. 
Number of miles of service pipe . . 10.831 

The income from the sale of water for 1882 has been as 
follows : — 

Received for water by rate . . $46,933 06 
" " " " meters . 18,565 05 



fines 



197 49 



29 



" rent of meters . . 81,333 64 

" " setting meters . . 198 00 

" " building purposes . 146 65 

" u labor and pipe . . 29 87 

" " hay on Mill's meadow 10 00 

" from G. G. Griffin . 1 00 
•' " Jas. Baldwin & Co. 

(main for hyd'nt use) 175 00 
from L. B. Bodwell & Co. 

(use of derrick) . 15 00 
wt from Goodhue & Birnie 

(12 ft. 14 in. pipe) . 24 37 
" from Mr. Webster (for 

plank) , 1 00 



Total 867,630 13 

Abatements. $153.30 

Current expenses for 1882 . . 811,505 97 

Expended for construction . . 14,596 38 

Paid interest .... 38,000 00 



864,102 35 

Balance receipts over expenditures . $3,5-27 78 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1881 . . . 7,960 20 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1882 . . $11,487 98 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1882. 

Superintendence, collection and re- 
pairs €9,327 37 

Stationery, printing, etc., . . 49 38 

Office and incidental expenses . 235 91 

89,612 66 



30 



Pumping expenses . . . 81,813 35 
Repairs to dams, canals, races and 

reservoir ' . . . 57 88 

Repairs to buildings ... 22 08 









11,893 


31 


Running expenses for 1882 


$11,505 


97 


Service pipes 


81,336 


01 






Distribution pipes . 


10,35S 


34 






Fire hydrants and valves 


61S 


\ 16 






Meters and fittings 


. 1,307 


6S 






Dam, canal, penstock, and races 


U 


! 35 






Fencing .... 


96£ 


84 






Total expended on con- 








struction in 1882 . 


: 


e 


814,596 


38 


Total expended in 1882 


$26,102 


35 


CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS 


TO DEC. 


31. 


1882. 




Land and water rights 


$38,348 


67 






Dam, canal, penstock, and races . 


101,399 


16 






Pumping machinery, pump-house, 










and buildings 


88,493 


96 






Distributing reservoir and fixtures 


71,542 


36 






Force and supply mains 


88,674 


02 






Distribution pipes 


271,637 


83 






Fire hydrants and valves 


32,373 


51 






Tools and fixtures 


10,649 


35 






Boarding and store houses . 


919 


36 






Roads and culverts 


2,193 


49 






Supplies . 


550 


39 






Engineering . 


22,176 


19 







31 



Livery and traveling expenses 


#2,856 64 


Legal expenses .... 


563 79 


Grading and fencing . 


12,313 46 


Service pipes . 


32,180 51 


Meters and fixtures 


11,265 06 


Total construction account 




to Dec. 31, 1882 . 


• 


Current expenses : — 




Superintendence, collecting and re- 




pairs . 


157,457 36 


Stationery, printing, etc. 


4,090 65 


Office and incidental expenses 


3,914 04 


Pumping expenses and repairs 


13,674 38 


Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 




reservoir . 


1,703 71 


Repairs to buildings . 


276 56 



1788,437 75 



Current expenses to Dec. 

31, 1882 ..... $81,116 70 

Interest 840,678 51 

Highway expenditures . . 14,000 53 

$54,679 04 



Total amount of bills ap- 
proved to date .... $924,233 49 
Interest, discount, and labor per- 
formed on highway, trans., 
and tools and materials sold $59,048 27 
Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1882 81,116 70 

$140,164 97 



Total cost, not including int. 

and current expenses . . . $784,068 52 



32 



Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1881 .... #309,802 51 
Interest for 1882 . . . 36,099 00 



Total interest and discount 

to Dec. 31, 1882 .... 1345,90151 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31, 1881 . . $153,000 00 
Amount of interest paid in 1882 . 38,000 00 

Total 8191,000 00 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works : — 

1872, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . $573 61 

1873, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 177 07 

1873, accrued interest on 

water bonds sold . 193 26 

1873, accrued interest on 

state bonds sold . 146 00 

1873, water rents . . 1,920 53 

1874, supplies and mete- 
rials sold . . 607 89 

March 12, 1874, highway expendi- 
tures, trans, from 
water account . 14,000 53 

March 17, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account . 12,347 25 

Sept. 1, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account . 22,361 74 



33 



1874, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . .830,233 54 

Dec. 29, 1874, interest transferred 4,566 25 
Dec. 18, 1875, 1 anvil sold . 15 00 

Sept. 25, 1875, engine, crusher, 



and material sold . 


2,089 45 


1875, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


27,119 15 


May 20, 1876, derrick sold . 


125 00 


May 20, 1876, rent of derrick . 


24 00 


1876, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


38,879 47 


1877, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


43,823 30 


1878, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


48,873 26 


1878, old plow sold 


1 00 


1879, derrick sold . 


75 00 


1879, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


53,068 17 


1880, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


57,395 25 


sale of grass . 


10 00 


level, transit, etc. . 


250 00 


1881, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


60,154 62 


sale of grass . 


10 00 


sale of derrick 


50 00 


received of G. G. Griffin 


1 00 


1882, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


67,403 76 


received of G. G. Griffin 


1 00 


received of James Bald- 




win & Co. 


175 00 



34 



received for sale of grass $ 10 00 
received of Goodhue & 

Birnie 
received for old plank . 
received for use of derrick 



Total received for water, etc. 
Amount appropriated to date 



24 


37 




1 


00 




15 


00 






$486,721 


47 


, 


640,000 


00 



Total received to date . . $1,126,721 47 

Amount of bills approved to date . . 924,233 49 



8202,487 98 
Amount paid toward interest . . 191,000 00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1882 . $11,487 98 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 
January 1, 1883. 



35 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 
11 Churches. 
1 Court-house. 
4 Hose-companies. 
4 Fire-engines. 

1 Hook-and-ladder. 

2 Opera-houses. 
1 Music Hall. 

1 Convent. 

1 City Hospital. 

1 Old Ladies' Home. 

1 Soldiers' Monument. 

1 Turner Hall. 



2 Cemeteries. 
1 Orphanage. 
1 Post-office. 

1 City Library. 

5 Banks. 

5 Hotels. 

1 Masonic Hall. 

1 Odd Fellows' Hall. 

1 Holly-tree Inn. 

3 Halls. 

20 School-houses. 
1 Battery Building. 



MAUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



1 Silver-plating. 

1 Iron foundry. 

2 Dye-houses. 

2 Machine-shops, 

6 Clothing manufactories. 

3 Harness-shops. 

1 Brush-shop. 

2 Carriage-shops. 

4 Cigar. 

1 Brass and copper foundry, 
1 Locomotive-works, 



2 Sash and blind shops 
2 Breweries. 

2 Shoe-shops. 
1 Pop-corn. 

1 Gas-works. 

3 Slaughter-houses. 
1 Soap manufactory. 

1 Needle manufactory. 
1 Beer-bottling. 
1 Book-bindery. 



MARKETS, 



4 Fish. 

9 Meat and fish. 



Meat (wholesale). 



36 



STABLES. 



229 Private. 


14 Livery. 


1 Horse-railroad. 






OFFICES. 


6 Dentists. 


7 Printing. 


1 Telephone. 


1 Gas. 


1 Telegraph. 


3 Coal. 


2 Express. 






SHOPS. 


20 Barber. 


2 Currying. 


1 Wheelwright. 


1 Plumber and gas and wa- 


6 Blacksmith. 


ter pipe. 


5 Carpenter. 


8 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 


1 Gunsmith. 




STORES. 


4 Auction. 


69 Grocery. 


19 Drug. 


4 Meal. 


7 Jewelry. 


3 Hardware. 


1 Fur. 


18 boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing goods. 8 Stove. 


21 Fancy goods. 


15 Gents' furnishing-goods. 


1 Wholesale paper. 


10 Book, 


5 Wholesale produce. 


1 Leather and shoe finders. 


15 Dry goods. 


3 Music. 


10 Candy. 


3 Upholstery. 


1 Crockery. 


5 Undertakers. 


1 Cloak. 


6 Cigar. 


15 Millinery. 


5 Sewing-machine. 


2 Tea. 


1 Feather-cleaner. 


2 Furniture. 





37 



9 Dining. 
6 Billiard, 



4 Club-rooms. 
2 Bleacher ies. 

8 Laundries. 
2 Ice-houses. 

9 Photographers, 



SALOONS. 

61 Liquor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



5091 Families. 

70 Boarding-houses 
6287 Faucets. 

878 Wash-bowls. 

895 Water-closets. 

231 Wash-tubs. 

275 Bath-tubs. 



3 Greenhouses. 
1 Band-room. 
11 Bakeries. 
1 Waste. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

93 Urinals. 
1133 Sill cocks. 
339 Fire hydrants. 
9 Stand pipes. 
15 Water-troughs. 
883 Horses. 
37 Cattle. 



38 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 

PIPE. 



450 ft. 20 in. pipe. 

972 ft. 12 in. pipe. 

132 ft. 10 in. pipe. 

2400 ft. 6 in. pipe. 



1 double 6 on 6. 
1 double 6 on 14. 
10 double 6 on 10. 
1 double 6 on 8. 
1 single 12 on 14. 

1 single 6 on 8. 

2 single 10 on 10. 
2 single 4 on 4. 

2 single 4 on 6. 



1 4 in. Eddy spigot. 
4 6 in. Ludlow hub. 



624 ft. 14 in. pipe. 
156 ft. 12 in. flange pipe. 
2196 ft. 8 in. pipe. 
31| ft. 8 in. wrought iron pipe. 

BRANCHES. 

4 double 6 on 12, 
1 double 4 on 6. 

1 double 10 on 20. 

2 single 6 on 20. 

5 single 6 on 10. 
5 single 6 on 6. 

3 single 6 on 14. 
3 single 6 on 12. 
1 single 8 on 8. 

GATES. 

3 6 in. Ludlow spigot. 



BENDS, SLEEVES, AND PLUGS. 



8 in. 1-4 bend. 
12 in. 1-8 bend. 
4 in. 1-4 bend. 
6 in. 1-8 bend. 
20 in. solid sleeves. 
14 in. solid sleeves. 
10 in. solid sleeves. 
6 in. solid sleeves. 



7 14 in. clamp sleeves. 
5 12 in. clamp sleeves. 

8 10 in. clamp sleeves. 
7 8 in. clamp sleeves. 

10 6 in. clamp sleeves. 

2 8 in. x 6 in. reducer. 

3 14 in. cement plugs. 

3 10 in. cast-iron plugs. 



14 4 in. solid sleeves. 

6 20 in. clamp sleeves. 

1 12 in. whole sleeve. 

2 8 in. whole sleeves, 

437 feet inch pipe. 

75 feet 2 inch pipe. 
110 feet 3-4 inch pipe. 
1200 pounds pig lead. 



7 6 in. cast-iron plugs. 
4 6 in. wooden plugs. 
1 8 in. wooden plug. 



10 5-8 in. Union rotary. 
9 5-8 in. piston. 
2 1 inch piston. 
1 3-4 in. Desper. 



METERS. 

1 1 inch Union rotary. 
10 3-4 in. piston. 

1 3-4 in. Crown. 

2 1 inch Desper. 



INVENTORY OF TOOLS AT THE PUMPING STATION. 



1 scoop-shovel. 

4 common shovels. 
1 desk. 

1 one-inch auger. 

5 lanterns 

3 monkey-wrenches. 
1 square. 
1 plumb square. 
1 sprinkler-pot. 
1 clock. 

1 washer-cutter. 

2 planes. 

2 thermometers. 
1 lawn-mower. 

1 socket wrench. 

6 fork wrenches. 

2 screen wrenches. 



4 oil cans. 
2 oil tanks. 

300 pounds waste. 
40 pounds tallow. 
30 pounds black lead. 

5 cords wood. 
14 tons coal. 

2 ice chisels. 
2 cold chisels. 
2 wood chisels. 

2 hammers. 

3 drip-pans. 

1 two-inch auger. 
1 ten-inch arbor for babbit- 
ing. 
1 flash-board hook. 
1 broom. 



40 



4 crow-bars. 

1 bellows and anvil. 

2 pipe wrenches. 
1 window brush. 
1 gate wrench. 

1 long key. 
1 hydrant wrench. 
1 wheelbarrow. 
1 five-pail kettle. 

3 picks. 

1 clothes-drier. 

2 ladders. 
2 stoves. 

2 coal hods. 

1 coal-sifter. 

2 gallons sperm oil. 

1 bench. 

2 levels. 

1 waste press. 

1 Scotch driller. 

2 nozzles 

1 pair shears. 

1 pair pliers. 

1 wire-cutter. 

1 boat. 

1 set steps. 

1 1-4 barrels oil. 

1 jack-screw. 

1 brace and six bits. 

1 trowel. 

2 wood saws. 
2 handsaws. 

1 iron slush-bucket. 

2 axes. 



1 set blocks and falls. 
6 pounds hemp packing. 

1 draw shave. 

2 screw plates, taps and 

dies. 
1 vise. 
200 feet 7-8 inch hose. 

1 iron rake. 

2 set dog chains. 

1 set blacksmith's tools. 

1 bushel basket. 

2 pieces Scotch sewer pipe. 
1 force pump 

1 bill hook. 
1 clevis and pin. 
1 harrow. 
1 timber roll. 

4 sprinkling-pots. 
1 lot lumber. 

1 lot old iron. 

5 oil barrels. 
4 mortar hoes. 
1 iron shovel. 

150 feet hose. 

1 No. 5 plow. 

3 grub-hoes. 

3 bush-scythes and snaths. 

2 axes. 

1 bellows. 
10 mason hods. 
1 lot of old wheelbarrows. 
1 lot of old shovels. 
1 20-inch gate. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the 
City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — I hereby certify that I have examined the 
accounts of the receipts in the office of Superintendent of 
Water- Works for the years ending Dec. 31, 1881, and 
Dec. 30, 1882, and find them correctly computed, and 
amounting, for the year 1881, to 160,215.62, and for the 
year 1882, to $67,630.13 ; and for having paid said 
amounts to the City Treasurer, he holds the certificates of 
the City Clerk. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

Auditor. 
January 27, 1883. 



WATER BOARD FOR 1883. 



Alpheus Gay, President, term expires January 1, 1887. 
James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires January 1, 1885. 
Horace B. Putnam, Mayor, term expires January 1, 1885. 
William P. Newell, term expires January 1, 1884. 
Eben T. James, term expires January 1, 1886. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January 1, 1888. 
E. H. Hobbs, term expires January 1, 1889. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 
Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY SOLICITOR. 



EEPOET 



CITY SOLICITOR 



To the, City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — I would respectfully submit for jour con- 
sideration the annual report of the Law Department of the 
city government for the past year- 
There are now pending in the supreme court of Hills- 
borough county the following actions : — 

1. — Simeon Clark, Admr. op Wm. Clark, vs. the City. 

At the last January term of the court, this action was 
marked for the jury and a jury impaneled to try the same ; 
the court being of the opinion that there were certain ques- 
tions of law involved that would sooner or later have to be 
transferred to the law term, a case was reserved, and at the 
June term a decision rendered in favor of the city. At 
the last September term the plaintiff, through his counsel, 
asked leave to amend his writ, and the question of his right 
so to do has been sent to the law term, and will probably 
be decided in March next. 

2. — Hans J. Rosenbury vs. the City. 
The plaintiff in this suit, having removed from the state, 



46 

at the last term of court, upon my motion, a new indorser 
was to be furnished prior to December 16, 1882. No indorser 
having been furnished, a non-suit will undoubtedly be or- 
dered at the January term. 

3. — Daniel Farmer vs. the City. 

This action at the last May term was referred by mutual 
consent ; but owing to the sickness of the plaintiff has not 
yet been tried. 

4. — Sarah A. Davis vs. the City. 

This action was tried in January, 1882, and a verdict of 
two thousand dollars returned in favor of the plaintiff. On 
account of the introduction of certain evidence, which the 
defendant's counsel excepted to, a case was reserved, which 
will probably be determined in March next. 

5. — Kate Tooher vs. the City. 

This action was entered at the last May term. The 
plaintiff claims damages on account of falling into a cellar- 
way on Birch street. Damages claimed, $3,000. 

6. — John B. Clarke vs. the City. 

The plaintiff claims that, while driving on Main street in 
January last, his sleigh, coming in contract with the track 
of the horse-railroad, was overturned, and, by reason of 
being thrown therefrom, severe personal injuries were in- 
curred. The railroad has been summoned to appear and 
defend, and counsel has been retained by it. The action 
will probably be tried at the ensuing term. Damages 
claimed, 82,000. 

7. — Adeline J. Geoffroy vs. the City. 
The plaintiff alleges that on the first day of June, 1882 



47 

owing to a defect in the sidewalk in front of Wells' block, 
she fell and received severe bodily injuries. Damages 
claimed. 

8. — Eliza Creighton vs. the City. 

This is an appeal from the award of the mayor and alder- 
men for damages caused to the plaintiff by reason of rais- 
ing the grade on Elm street, opposite her residence. This 
action will soon be tried before the county commissioners. 

9. — Manchester vs. County of Hillsborough. 

The condition of this action remains the same as it was 
at my last report. It is still pending in the court, and 
awaiting the decision of the full bench. Briefs have been 
furnished by the county solicitor and myself. 

10. — James A. Weston vs. the City. 

The plaintiff claims an abatement of his tax by reason 
of the assessors' having taxed certain national bank shares, 
which he, the plaintiff, claims are exempt from taxation 
under the provisions of the General Laws. A case has been 
agreed to by the plaintiff's counsel and myself, and will 
probably be decided at the next law term. 

11. — Marcus P.Norton, Trustee and Assignee, etc., 
and Benjamin Richardson vs. the City. 

This suit is now pending in the U. S. circuit court, it 
having been entered at the last October term. The case 
has been so thoroughly discussed in the public press that I 
deem it unnecessary to give a history of it in this report. 
It is brought to recover damages for an alleged infringe- 
ment of certain patent rights, and the damages claimed are 
>,000. This suit will be vigorously contested ; although 



48 

it would not be prudent to make public the steps which 
have already been taken in preparation for a defense. I can 
assure you that every thing possible will be done to defeat 
the plaintiffs in their unjust and exorbitant demands. 

The present Committee on Claims have had thirty-seven 
meetings during their term of office. I think I have been 
present at all of their meetings, with one exception. 

Upon my suggestion, the efficient chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Claims prepared and presented to the city coun- 
cils a joint resolution (which was passed), empowering and 
instructing the mayor to cause an immediate investigation 
to be made of the circumstances attending all accidents 
happening on any highway or street, and I have no doubt 
that many hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars have been 
saved because of such action. 

During the past year I have had but little to do in the 
police department, as the long experience of City Mar- 
shal Longa rendered any assistance on my part unneces- 
sary, except in a few instances. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM R. PATTEN. 

City Solicitor. 

Manchester, N. H., Jtin. 1, 1883. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



AlSTISrUAL EEPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

In accordance with the regulations, the Trustees of the 
City Library herewith submit their twenty-ninth annual 
report of the affairs of the library, and, in connection with 
it, present the report made to them by the treasurer of the 
board of the expenditures made from the funds placed 
under their control, and also the report of the librarian, 
which shows in detail the operations of the library during 
the past year, and the condition of the library and other 
property under her charge at the close of the year. 

It is a source of gratification to the trustees to be able to 
report to the city councils the continued prosperity of the 
library, and that the constantly increasing use of the more 
valuable and standard works contained in it evinces the 
public appreciation of its utility, and its importance as a 
means of information and study. 

As will be seen by the report of the treasurer, there has 
been expended the past year, for the purchase of books, the 
sum of twelve hundred dollars and ninety-seven cents, and 
for the purchase of periodicals the sum of one hundred 
sixty-two dollars and eighty-one cents, making a total 



52 

expenditure for both these purposes of thirteen hundred 
sixty -three dollars and seventy-eight cents, leaving a bal- 
ance in the hands of the treasurer at the close of the year 
of four hundred thirty-four dollars and twenty-one cents. 
Of the amount expended for the purchase of books, ninety- 
five dollars and fifty-three cents were paid for books to 
replace those that from long and constant service had 
become so worn as to necessitate their withdrawal from 
circulation. 

The balance above indicated, together with the accumu- 
lated income of the Dean fund, which now amounts to the 
sum of three thousand seven hundred forty-six dollars and 
fifty-eight cents, constitutes the funds in the hands of the 
trustees at the end of the year available for the future 
increase of the library. 

The report of the librarian shows that the library has 
been open for the delivery of books two hundred and 
eighty-nine days, during which time the number of books 
in circulation has been forty-one thousand seven hundred 
and eighty-eight. In addition to this number delivered for 
general circulation, four thousand seven hundred and 
seventy books and magazines have been delivered for use 
in the reading-room at the library, making the total num- 
ber delivered during the year forty-six thousand five hun- 
dred and fifty-eight. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of 
the last report was twenty-five thousand and forty. During 
the year there have been added five hundred and thirty- 
six volumes by purchase, three hundred and thirty-seven 
volumes by donation, and one hundred and one volumes 
of periodicals have been bound, making the number of 
bound volumes in the library at the present time twenty- 
four thousand two hundred and sixty-eight, and the total 



53 

number, including maps and pamphlets, twenty-six thou- 
sand and fourteen. 

Seventy-two volumes have been withdrawn from circula- 
tion during the year, because so worn by constant use as to 
be no longer fit for service. Of this number, and of those 
withdrawn from circulation in former years for the same 
cause, one hundred and nine have been replaced. Many of 
the books retired from circulation were published some 
time ago, and are now out of print, and the trustees find 
no little difficulty in obtaining them, but have no doubt 
that in time most of them may be procured. 

Fifty-six different periodicals have been regularly re- 
ceived at the library during the year, a number somewhat 
less than usual, occasioned mainly by reason of several 
periodicals heretofore received having ceased publication. 
This deficiency it is the intention of the trustees to supply 
by the substitution of other periodicals for those that have 
been discontinued. 

Donations of books have been made to the library by a 
number of persons, a list of whom, and of the works pre- 
sented, will be found annexed to the report of the librarian ; 
and to those who have thus manifested their interest in the 
prosperity of the library, the trustees, in behalf of the city, 
extend their thanks. 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the 
library for the year have been two thousand one hundred 
fifteen dollars and seventy-two cents. The details of these 
expenditures, the bills for which have been paid through 
the office of the city treasurer, may be found at length in 
the annual report of the city. 

A. more lucrative position having been offered Mr. George 
W. Cook, who had been employed as an assistant to the 
librarian, he tendered his resignation, the same to take 
effect April 19. The resignation was accepted, and the 



54 

vacancy thus occasioned was immediately filled by the 
employment of Mr. George W. Burleigh. 

The library was re-opened January 23, the trustees not 
feeling justified in depriving the public longer of its use, 
although at that date the addition to the library building 
was far from complete. Every precaution was taken to 
prevent loss or injury while work upon the addition was in 
progress. The addition was ready for use about the first 
of June, and upon its occupation it was found necessary to 
re-arrange all the books in the library, in order to give 
space in each department for future accessions and at the 
same time preserve the present classification. Though 
attended with some difficulty, being undertaken while the 
library was open to the public and the books in circulation, 
the work was cheerfully performed by the librarian and 
her assistant without additional compensation. 

The completion of the addition to the library building 
will afford to the trustees the opportunity they have long 
desired, of making purchases of books from the accumu- 
lated income of the Dean fund. It has been decided by 
the trustees to place the books purchased with this fund in 
alcoves by themselves in the library, to be designated as 
the purchase of the Dean fund. In selecting the books for 
this new department, in view of the life-long business 
relations of the donor with the important industries of this 
city, it will be the aim of the trustees to make purchases of 
the more valuable scientific and technical publications, 
thereby bringing within the reach of the reader and 
student works which private collections do not and cannot 
contain, and which otherwise would not be accessible to 
the public at large. 

The trustees are under obligations to the officers and 
members of the city councils with whom they have been 
brought in connection in the management of the affairs of 



55 

the library, for the courtesy and consideration with which 
their suggestions in relation to the operation of the library, 
and the construction of the addition to the library building, 
have been received and carried out. 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher has discharged the duties of li- 
brarian for the past year with the same fidelity as hereto- 
fore, and to the satisfaction of the trustees. 

January 22, 1883. 
In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered 
to be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, 
and transmitted to the city councils. 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor. 
N. P. HUNT, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : — 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following re- 
port of the receipts and expenditures by the board of the 
funds received by them on account of the City Library : — 



1882 


. 








Dr. 


Jan. 


1. 


To balance of appropriatioi: 


i,etc. 


,as 








per last report 


. 


. 


$767 39 


Feb. 


17. 


cash of I. W. Smith for book 


. 


2 33 


July 


3. 


appropriation for 1882 


for pur- 








chase of books 


. 


. 


1,000 00 


Nov. 


28. 


cash of Mrs. M. J. Buncher, bal- 








ance of fines 


. 


. 


13 82 






cash of Mrs. M. J. Buncher for 








catalogues . 


. 


. 


14 45 


Jan. 


1. 


balance of income of 












Dean fund . . $c 


5,082 


11 








income of Dean fund 


153 


00 




July 


1. 


income of Dean fund 
interest on accumula- 


153 


00 








tion of income . 


68 


60 








interest on accumula- 












tion of income 


67 


62 








interest on accumula- 












tion of income 


222 


25 


$3,746 58 









i,544 57 



57 



1882. 




Cr. 


Jan. 


2. 


Paid Lee & Shepard, books . 


83 42 




4. 


Little, Brown, & Co., books 


190 00 




6. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


13 03 




25. 


S. Hayward, books, 


6 50 




25. 


J. N. McClintock, books 


2 00 




27. 


J. A. Vrooman, periodicals 


5 00 


Feb. 


7. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


13 Q5 




11. 


Boston Society Nat. History 








periodicals 


3 10 




11. 


Charles A. Bemis, books 


3 85 




11. 


H. L. Reed, books 


13 00 




13. 


Q. P. Index, books 


5 00 




25. 


Legget Brothers, books 


19 00 


March 10. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


10 18 




10. 


Boston Society Nat. History 








periodicals 


3 50 




27. 


Little, Brown, & Co., books 


3 75 


April 


5. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals . 


13 05 




13. 


Geo. H. Polley & Co., peri 








odicals 


12 00 


May 


4. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


12 41 




19. 


Geo. H. Polley & Co., books 


29 25 


June 


5. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals 


10 34 




7. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


54 12 




14. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


48 78 




15. 


H. L. Reed, books 


4 50 




23. 


Lee & Shepard, books . 


96 28 




28. 


Little, Brown, & Co., books 


4 75 


July 


7. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals . 


10 65 


Aug. 


4. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals . 


11 85 


Sept. 


5. 


N. E. News Co., periodicals . 


10 01 




14. 


Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 








books . 


128 64 



58 



Sept. 16. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 
Oct. 4. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

7. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 

14. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 

20. J. N. McClintock, books 
Nov. 6. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

10. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 
18. Little, Brown, & Co., books 

21. T. W. Lane, books 

22. Sullivan Brothers & Libbie 

books 
Dec. 4. Little, Brown, & Co., books 

4. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 

5. N. E. News Co., periodicals 

15. Temple & Farrington, books 

16. Clara A. Lynn, books . 
21. Little, Brown, & Co., books 
21. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co 

books 
31. By balance of appropriation, etc. 
income of Dean fund 



183 57 
13 32 

17 46 



27 


71 


2 


00 


10 


26 


56 


93 


208 


00 


3 


70 


18 


02 


7 


50 


120 


59 


10 


46 


5 


00 


1 


17 


3 


75 


32 


73 


434 


21 


3,746 


58 



$5,544 57 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library 
for the year ending December 31, 1882, the items of which 
will be found at length in the annual report of the city, are 
as follows : — 



59 



Services of librarian 








$600 00 


Services of assistant to librarian 






290 25 


Fuel 






581 51 


Gas .... 








197 82 


Binding .... 








95 91 


Re-binding 








65 69 


Covers, and printing same 








70 85 


Insurance 








32 50 


Printing trustee's report 








11 00 


Water .... 








26 25 


Incidentals .... 








143 94 




$2,115 72 


RECAPITULATION. 


Balance Dec. 31, 1881 $334 51 


Appropriation for 1882 3,000 00 



Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000 00 
Incidental expenses . . . 2,115 72 

Balance due Dec. 31, 1882 . . 218 79 



$3,334 51 



$3,334 51 



Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 

Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 



60 



December 30, 1882. 
We have examined the above report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

WM. P. NEWELL, 
H. B. PUTNAM, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 30, 1882. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of 
receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing re- 
port of the treasurer of the trustees of the City Library, 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : — 




I respectfully submit the annual report 


of the condition 


of the library during the year ending 


December 31, 


1882 : — 




Whole number of volumes Dec. 31, 1881 


25,040 


Accessions during the year : — 




By purchase .... 


536 


Donated .... 


337 


Periodicals bound . 


101 

974 



Whole number of volumes at present : — 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets . . . . 1,730 

Bound volumes . . . 24,268 



26,014 



Number of periodicals and papers regularly re- 
ceived ....... 5Q 

Number of days open to the public . . . 289 

Days open for delivery of books . . . 289 

Volumes in circulation during the time . . 41,788 

Average per day ...... 144.59 

Largest number any one day, March 11 . . 397 
Whole number of books, magazines, etc., used 

in the library . . . . . . 4,770 

Average per day ...... 16.5 



62 



Number of guarantees received 

Whole number since the new registration 

Number of persons using books on deposit 

Postals sent for books overdue 

Number of worn-out books and taken from the 

shelves ...... 

Replaced books during the year 
Number of books repaired at bindery 
Repaired and covered in the library 
Number of books found, missing at previous ex 

animations ..... 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 81, 1881 . 
Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1882 



Amount paid for express, station- 
ery, and other incidental ex- 
penses ..... 

Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . 



852 80 
13 82 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1882 . 
Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1881, for cata- 
logues sold, books lost, and waste paper . 
Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1882 : 
For 23 new catalogues at 75 cents . $17 25 
For 3 old catalogues at 35 cents . 1 05 
For 38 supplements at 10 cents . 3 80 

One book injured . . . . 88 



962 

3,459 

8 

353 



72" 


109 


373 


8,921 


10 


813 82 


73 73 



887 o5 



me 62 

$20 93 
$14 45 



Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 



$22 98 

$37 43 
14 45 



$22 98 



63 
Balance received for fines .... $20 93 



Total balance on hand . . . . $43 91 

In presenting the foregoing report for your acceptance, 
it is with a sincere hope that you will bear in mind the rev- 
olution through which the library has passed during the 
closing year, and, if the general result falls a little short of 
previous years, allow this to largely account for it. 

The library was re-opened on the 23d of January, before 
the completion of the annex, and was necessarily in a dis- 
turbed and somewhat exposed condition, but every care was 
taken to preserve the books from injury and loss. Toward 
the close of May, when the new addition was ready for use, 
it was thought best to re-arrange the entire library, revers- 
ing the shelf numbers and leaving spaces in each depart- 
ment for new books. This necessitated the moving of 
every volume, and as the closing of the library was thought 
inadvisable, the work was done with the books in circula- 
tion, requirmg many weeks of steady, careful work. Each 
volume was thoroughly dusted, and the shelves made clean. 
In short, the interior of the building (as far as possible) 
received an entire renovation. Thousands of books were 
re-covered and many repaired. A number of missing books 
came to light, having been misplaced or hidden behind 
other volumes. Both the summer and present examinations 
have been made with the books in circulation. We have 
endeavored to make them thorough and satisfactory, but 
cannot feel the confidence in this method of examination 
as when the books are called in, at least once a year. The 
volumes missing at the summer examination have all come 
in except five ; those are small books and of small value. 
The number at the present examination is eight ; they are 
books in constant circulation, and I do not report them as 



64 

lost because I believe they will probably come in. Ten 
volumes missing at the several examinations of 1879, 1880, 
and 1881 are again on the shelves. 

There is nothing of special importance in addition to the 
above, regarding the work of the library the past year. 
Every thing has moved on with its usual harmony, and, judg- 
ing from the many testimonials received, there have been 
an increasing interest and appreciation of the value of its 
privileges, not only as a source of pleasure but of real profit, 
in the valuable accessions made from year to year, especially 
in works of art, history, and science. 

Respectfully submitted . 

M. J. BUNCHER, Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY 

From January 1, 1881, to December 31, 1882. 



Woman's Temperance Union, Manchester, N. H. 

Twenty-seven volumes on the Subject of Temperance. 
The Swedenborg Printing and Publishing Society, New 
York. 

The Swedenborg Library. 12 Vols. 16mo. Giving his 
system of Theology. 
Hon. Moody Currier, Manchester N. H. 

Six volumes, to complete the sets of " Neander's Church 
History " and works of St. Augustine. 
Mrs. Gardner Brewer, Boston, Mass. 

Annals of Kings Chapel, Vol. 1. 8vo. 
James S. McDonald, State Librarian, New Jersey. 

Volumes 3 and 4 of the New Jersey Archives. 8vo. 
Mrs. Hattie A. Silver, San Francisco, Cal., formerly of 
Manchester. 

Gardner's Cabinet Cyclopedia. 3 Vols. 12mo. 
Cooper's Naval History of the U. S. 2 Vols. 8vo. 
Macaulay's History of England. 2 Vols. 8vo. 
Alison's History of Europe. 1 Vol. 8vo. 
McCulloch's Universal Gazetteer and Thiers' French 
Revolution, unbound. 

5 



66 

S. C Gould, Manchester, N. H. 

Nine volumes, Register and Farmer's Almanac, from 

1871 to 1881, completing the set. 
New Hampshire Animal Register for 1863. 
Mrs. Wm. Hooper, Manchester, N. H. 

Vol. 131 North American Review, and other mis- 
cellaneous pamphlets. 
Mr. George Livermore, Manchester, N. H. 

Volumes 31 and 35 (with supplement) of Scientific 
American, 1876, and twenty-four miscellaneous 
pamphlets. 
Mr. Charles F. Livingston, Manchester, N. H. 

Directory (with map) of the City of Holyoke, Mass. 
Springfield Republican for the year 1881. 
One volume of bound pamphlets. 8vo. 
Proprietors, Manchester, N. H. 

Echo des Canadiens, Vols. 2 and 3, 1881 and 1882. 
Mrs. E. P. Stone, Manchester, N. H. 
Seven volumes of ancient dates, viz. : — 

The Pleasing Library, published in 1801. 12mo. 
The Psalms of David, published in 1803. 12mo. 
A View of Religions. By Hannah Adams. Without 
date, but dedicated to John Adams, Vice-President 
of the United States. 12mo. Others of later date. 
Mrs. M. J. Buncher, Manchester, N. H. 

Two volumes Wonders of Creation, published in 1807. 
Beauties of the Bible, published in 1822. 
Frederick Morley, compiler. 

Michigan and Its Resources. 1882. 8vo. 
Richard J. Everett, Esq., Boston. 

Is Consumption Contagious? By H. C. Clapp, M. D. 
12mo. 
S. 0. Eastman, Concord, N. H. 

Memorial of George Gilman Fogg. Pamphlet. 



67 

Hon. James W. Patterson, Concord, N. H. 

Thirty-sixth Annual Report of the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction in New Hampshire. 8vo. 
Rev. G. T. Ridlon, author, Manchester, N. H. 

History of the Early Settlers of Maine. 12mo. 
Genealogy of the Burbank and Burbanck families in 
the United States. Pamphlet. 
Alfred Gilman, Esq., Lowell, Mass. 

Contribution of Old Residents' Historical Association, 
Lowell. Nos. 1, 2, and 3 of Vol. 1, and No. 2 of 
Vol 2. 
Godfrey Morse, LL. D., author. 

Memoirs of John Plummer Healey, LL. D., late City 
Solicitor of Boston, Mass. 
William F. Poole, Esq., Librarian, Chicago. 

Progress of Library Architecture. By Wm. F. Poole, 

Esq. 
Tenth Annual Report of the Public Library, Chicago. 
Edward T. Caswell, M. D., Providence, R.I. 
Reform in Medical Education. Pamphlet. 
S. D. Lord, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Evolution in Relation to Agriculture. Pamphlet. 
J. T. Fanning, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Report of the Water Supply for New York aad other 
Cities of the Hudson Valley, 1881. By J. T. Fan- 
ning, Esq. 
Cobden Club, London, Eng. 

The A B C of Free Trade. By Edward N. Buxton. 

Pamphlet. 
England under Free Trade. By George W. Medley. 

Pamphlet. 
Pleas for Protection. By Augustus Mongredien. 

Pamphlet. 
Financial Reform Almanack for 1882. 8vo. 



68 

Wm. Kite, Librarian, Germantown, Penn. 

An Address on the evils of demoralizing literature and 

art. Pamphlet. 
Annual Report of the Friends' Free Library and Read- 
ing-room, Germantown Penn., 1881. Pamphlet. 
Mrs. Saunders, Librarian, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Catalogue of the Pawtucket Free Library, 1882. 
Arthur VV. Tyler, Librarian. 

Reports of the Public Library, Indianapolis, Ind., for 
two years, ending June, 1881. Pamphlet. 
Wm. H. Stinson, Esq., Dunbarton, N. H. 

Proceedings of the eighth annual session of the New 
Hampshire State Grange, 1881. Pamphlet. 
Hon. H. B. Putnam, Mayor, Manchester, N. H. 

Annual Report of the Commissioners of Hillsborough 
county, for 1881. Pamphlet. 
E. M. Bowman, Esq., City Clerk, Nashua, N. H. 

Twenty-ninth Municipal Report of the City of Nashua, 
for 1881. 12mo. 
George W. Riddle, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Centennial Newspaper Exhibition, 1876, giving a com- 
plete list of newspaper publishers in America. By 
George P. Rowell, N. Y. 
National Trotting Association " Blue Book," contain- 
ing an official list of persons and horses under pen- 
alty. April 30, 1878. Pamphlet. 
Unknown. 

The Inaugural Address of Samuel Abbott Green, May- 
or of Boston, January 2, 1882. Pamphlet. 
Minnesota. Its Resources and Progress. Pamphlet. 
The Ballot. Dangers from its Perversion. 
The Gladstone Pamphlet. The Vatican Decrees in 
their Bearing on Civil Allegiance, by Right Hon. 



69 

E. W. Gladstone. Answer by Archbishop Manning, 
and English views on the reply. 
From the Several Librarians or Boards of Trustees. 

Twenty-ninth Annual Report of the Mercantile Library 
Association, San Francisco, for 1881. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report of the Public Library of Cincinnati, 0., 
for the year ending June, 1881. Pamphlet. 

Fifty-second Annual Report of the Board of Educa- 
tion in Cincinnati, 0., 1881. 8vo. 

Fourth Report of the Providence Free Library, Provi- 
dence, R. I. 1881. Pamphlet. 

Twenty-second Annual Report of the Free Public 
Library, Worcester, Mass. 1881. Pamphlet. 

Thirtieth Annual Report of the Peabody Institute, 
Peabody, Mass. 1881. Pamphlet. 

Fifteenth Annual Report of the Peabody Institute, 
Baltimore, Md. June 1, 1882. Pamphlet. 

Report of the Library Association, Springfield, Mass. 
1881-82. Pamphlet. 

Tenth Annual Report of the Free Public Library, Law- 
rence, Mass , and Bulletin No. 34. 

Twenty-ninth Annual Report of the Free Library of 
Biookline, Mass. 1881. Pamphlet. 

Eighth Annual Report of the Bigelow Free Library, 
Clinton, Mass. 1881. Pamphlet. 

Sixty-first Annual Report of the Mercantile Library 
Association, New York City. 1881. Pamphlet. 

Thirtieth Annual Report of Boston Public Library, 
year ending April, 1882, and Bulletins Nos. 1, 2, 3, 
and 4. Yol. 5. Pamphlets. 

Annual Report of the City Library, Lowell, Mass., for 
1881. Pamphlet. 

Report of the Free Library, Concord, N. H., for 1881. 
Pamphlet. 



70 

Eleventh Annual Report of the Public Library, Mel- 
rose, Mass. 

Report of the Free Library, Newton, Mass., for 1881. 

Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Public Library at 
Woburn, Mass. 1881. Pamphlet. 

Report of the Nesmith Library, Windham, N. H. 1881. 

Annual Report of the Town Officers of Peterborough, 
N. H., for the year 1881. Pamphlet. 

Thirty-third Annual Report of the Woman's Medical 
College of Pennsylvania. 1882. Pamphlet. 

Bulletins Nos. 8 and 9 of the Library Company, Phila- 
delphia. New series. July, 1882. Pamphlet. 

Bulletin No. IT of the Public School Library of St. 
Louis, Mo. 1881. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of 
the City of Manchester, N. H., for 1881. 
State of New Hampshire. Seven volumes, viz. : — 

Annual Reports of the Legislature for the years 
1880, 1881. 8vo. 

Journals of New Hampshire Senate and House, for the 
years 1873. 1874, 1875, 1876, and 1881. 8vo. 
Hon. James F. Briggs, M. C. 

Nineteen volumes Congressional Documents, viz. : — 

First Annual Report of the United States Entomo- 
logical Commission. 1877. 8vo. 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture. 
1880. 8vo. 

Message and Documents, 1880-81, 3d session, 46th 
Congress, edited by Ben: Perley Poore. 8vo. 

Reports of the Secretary of War, 2d Session, 46th 
Congress. Vols. 1, 2, 3, and 4, and Parts 1, 2, and 
3 of Vol. 2. 1879. 8vo. 

Report on Commercial Relations of the United States. 
Vols. 1 and 2. 1879. 8ve. 



71 

Smithsonian Reports for 1879-80. 8vo. 

Report of the Secretary of War, 3d Session, 46th Con- 
gress. Vol. 1. 

Report of the Secretary of the Interior. Vols. 1 and 2. 
1880-81. 

Report of the Secretary of the Navy for 1880-81. 8vo. 

Reports of the Postmaster-General. 1879, 80-81. 

Report of the Attorney-General. 1880-81. 
Also nine maps, viz. : — 

Bay and Harbor of New York. 

Atlantic Coast. 

Coast Chart No. 4, Penobscot Bay. 

Coast Chart No. 8, From Wells to Cape Ann. 

Coast Charts Nos. 9 and 10, Massachusetts Bay. 

Salem Harbor. 

Portsmouth Harbor. 

Mount Desert Island. 

Coast Chart No. 77, Tampa Bay, Florida. 
Departments, Washington D. C. 

Annual Report of the United States Life-saving Ser- 
vice for the year ending June 30, 1881. 8vo. 

Report of the Superintendent of the United States 
Coast Survey for the year 1879. 4to. 

Report of the Chief Signal Officer for 1879. 4to. 

Official Register of the United States. Yols. 1 and 2. 
1881. Legislative, Executive, and Judicial. 

List of Congressional documents from the 20th to the 
46th Congress, inclusive. 8vo. 

Contribution to North American Ethnology. Yols. 3 
and 4. 4to. 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents for the 
year 1881. 8vo. 

Alphabetical list of Patentees, July — December, 1881. 
8vo. January — June, 1882. 



72 

Circulars of Information of the Bureau of Education, 
Nos. 4, 5, and 6, 1881. No. 1, 1882. Pamphlets. 
Smithsonian Institute, Washington. 
Annual Report for 1880. 8vo. 

First Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology, by 
J. W. Powell, director. 1881. 4to. 
Librarian War Department, Washington. 

Alphabetical Catalogue of the War Department Li- 
brary, including Law Library, Authors and Subjects. 
1882. 8vo. 
From United States Congress. 

Forty-two volumes of Public Documents. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY ENGINEER. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils: — 

Sirs, — Please to accept the following as my second annual 
report of the work done in the City Engineer's office, and in 
the several highway districts of the city of Manchester. 

The expenses for the year 1882 are as follows: — 

For salary of city engineer and as- 
sistants 

drawing instruments and mate- 
rials .... 

repairs of instruments 

horse-hire and car-fares . 

incidental expenses 

gas .... 



Expense on soldiers' monument 
For cleaning lamps for the year 
removing, repairing, and put 

ting on cover 
gas .... 

water .... 



. $1,983 50 


123 


15 


29 


10 


147 


84 


19 


05 


11 


52 


$9 00 


2 


00 


25 


02 


25 


00 



2,314 16 



$61 02 



76 

Additional surveying instruments have been purchased 
so as to give us a complete set ; also drawing instruments 
sufficient for two workmen. I have furnished at my own 
expense, this year, one complete set of surveying instru- 
ments, transit, level, etc., the same as last year, as I have 
kept two, and sometimes three, parties in the field. Of the 
item of repairs, twenty-one dollars was caused by a careless 
teamster's running over a transit at the corner of Park and 
Massabesic streets ; it will require about thirty dollars more 
to make the instrument as good as before, as the circle was 
injured, and could only be replaced by having a new one 
made in Washington. By using great care, fair work can 
be done with it as it is. 

The amount of the work done in the office this year is as 
follows : — 

Total number of orders for surveys, — street lines and 
grades, — 417. 

Total number of orders for paving and sewers, 261. 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 35,236 feet, 
equal to 6.67 miles. 

As these profiles show three lines through each street, 
the actual work is equal to 20 miles of levels every 50 feet 
or less. 

Levels for sewer profiles, 15,839 feet, equal to 3 miles. 

Levels for profiles in Tine Grove Cemetery, 2,180 feet, 
equal to .41 mile. 

Surveys of streets and street lines, 62,509 feet, equal to 
11.8 miles. 

Street lines given, 28,865 feet, equal to 5.5 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks . .... 31.021 feet 

Grades set for macadamizing .... 1,353 " 

Grades set for cutting and filling streets . . 3,650 " 

Grades set for horse-railroad, Bridge street . 2,283 " 



77 

Grades set for walks, Pine Grove Cemetery, 

(reset three times; 2,300 feet 

Grades set for gutters ..... 3,627 u 

Grades set for paving 1,120 " 



Total grades set 45,354 feet 

Whole number miles of grades set, 8.6. 

Street numbers assigned, 704. 

Lots laid out at Pine Grove Cemetery, 80 ; also three tiers 
single graves sufficient for three years' use. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Valley street, Elm to Massabesic street. 7 plans. 

Myrtle street, Oak to Deny old line. 

Main street, Granite to McGregor street. 2 plans. 

Lowell street, Chestnut to Walnut street. 

Gore street, Union to Oak street. 

Beech street, Orange to Gore street. 

Laurel street, Chestnut to Pine street. 

Auburn street, Franklin to Canal street. 

Manchester street, Hall to Milton street. 

Depot street, Franklin to Canal street. 

Olive street, Amherst to Concord street. 

Massabesic street, Park to Belmont street. 

Fourth street, W r alker to Manchester & North Weare 
Railroad. 

West Webster street, Elm street to River road. 

Orange street, Oak to Linden street. 

McGregor street, Main to Main street. 2 plans not 
completed. 

Total sidewalk plans and profiles, 24. 



78 



SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 



Bridge and Russell streets, Cross to Myrtle street. 

Birch street, Lowell to Bridge street. 

Cedar south back street, Union to Maple street. 

Center street. River to Third street. 

Central south back street. Elm east back to Union street. 

Church and Bridge south back street, Lowell to Birch 
street. 

Cross street, Bridge to Pearl street. 

Elm street, Harrison to Sagamore street. 

Elm east back street. Sagamore to Webster street. 

Harrison street, Beech to Russell street. 

Hazel street, Harrison to Brook street. 

Lowell and Maple streets, Concord to Ashland street. 

Main street. Granite to McGregor street. 2 plans. 

Manchester street, Lincoln to Milton street. 3 plans. 

Maple street, Nashua to Pearl street. 2 plans. 

Merrimack street, Wilson, west 350 feet. 

Nashua and Olive streets, Amherst to Bridge street. 

Park south and Pine east back streets, Cedar to Union 
street. 

Pine street and Pennacook north back street, Pennacook 
south back to Union street. 

Prospect street, Union to Russell street. 2 plans. 

River street, Ferry to Center street. 

River street, Ferry to North Weare Railroad. 

Sagamore street, Elm to Elm east back street. 

Spruce south back street, Union to Maple street. 

Union east back street, Harrison to Pennacook north 
back street. 

Walnut east back street, Harrison to Brook. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 31. 



79 



MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 



Elm street, bridge over Manchester & Lawrence Railroad. 
2 plans. 

Manchester street, location of Porter accident. 

Canal street, location of the Mrs. Julia Joy accident. 

Main street, location of the John B. Clarke accident. 

Vine street, plans for extension of city stable. 2 plans. 

New city yard. 

Depot, Franklin, Canal, and Granite streets, square 
bounded by. 

Valley Cemetery, new avenue. Plan and profile. 

Smith's Ferry road. 

Hall street, Hanover to Bridge street. Plan for fixing 
street lines. 

Cemetery brook, at junction of Spruce and Massabesic 
streets. 

Land purchased of J. A. Poor for District No. 3. 

Baker street, River road to Nutt road. 

Massabesic hose-house and cottage. 

Plans and elevations of sheds at city yard. 

New school lot, Bakersville. 

Chestnut street, Webster to Clarke street. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, lots corner Highland and Ever- 
green avenues. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, south of Netherland and east of 
Linnet avenues. 

Boynton road, Main street, nearly to Bedford line. 

Streets on Kidder land, near the reservoir. 

Numbering plans, ten sheets. 

WORKING PLANS NOT RETAINED IN OFFICE. 

Park street, hose-house and cottage. 
Pine Grove Cemetery, landscape plat. 



80 

Soldiers' Monument, base for iron fence. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, Col. Quimby's lot. 

Merrimack square, sections of iron fence and gate-posts. 

OLD PLANS COPIED. 

Hall and Candia roads, lots of Robert Hall. 

Lots bounded by Granite and Main streets, Manchester 
& North Weare Railroad and the river. 

Milford street, Riddle land. 

Harvey and Porter roads, proposed location. 

High street, location of a portion. 2 plans. 

Pearl street extension, Maple to Ashland street. 

Amherst street extension, Hall to Highland street. 

Main street extension, Granite to Bedford line. 

Lots north of Webster street between River road and 
Union street. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 48. 

Total plans made, 103. 

Although these plans have been made, the lettering and 
figures necessary to maxe them permanent records have 
not yet been put on ; this will require some weeks' work 
the coming winter. 

The sewer map in this office, and the sewer-book in the 
city clerk's office, have been brought up to January 1, 1881. 
The city clerk's record of new highways, in which sketches 
are made to accompany the records, has been brought to 
the same date. The two maps of Pine Grove Cemetery 
have been brought to January 1, 1882, as nearly as it is in 
my power to do so. 

STREET NUMBERING. 

The street numbering has been carefully looked over and 
brought to date. I found this, like many other things, badly 



81 



mixed : the plans and books had not been kept up to date ; 
many numbers had been assigned by letter-carriers and 
other unauthorized persons, and of course were wrong; 
while in some places I found the old numbers in use pre- 
vious to the adoption of the present system, still on. 



GRADES. 

The following grades have been established 
last two years, in accordance with the new ordi: 

Auburn street, Franklin to Canal street 
Apple ton street, Elm to Union street 
B street, A to C street . 
Belmont street, Hanover to Massabesic street 
Clarke street, Elm to River road . 
Concord street. Beech to Ashland street 
Elm street, Webster to Clarke street 
Elm W. B. street, Bridge to Dean street 
Fourth street, Walker to M. & N. W. R. R. 
Olive street, Amherst to Concord street 
Orange street, Oak to Linden street 
Parker street, Main street to M. & N. W. R. E 
Prospect street, Linden to Deny old line 
Spruce street, Wilson to old Falls road . 
Hazel street, Harrison to Brook street . 
Hanover south back street, Elm east back 

to Chestnut street .... 
Hanover north back street, Elm east back 

to Chestnut street .... 
Lowell street, Chestnut to Walnut street 
Manchester street, Lincoln to Milton street 
Massabesic street, Park to Belmont street 
Milford street, Main to old Bedford road 
Main street, Granite to McGregor street 



during the 
lance : — 

220 feet. 
1,450 

325 
1.030 

450 
1,820 
1,250 
1,035 

225 

340 

870 

785 

540 
1,050 

430 

485 

485 
1,130 
1,780 

770 
2,260 
2,250 



. 1,220 feet 


492 " 


. 7,635 " 


. 1,455 « 


750 " 


. 32,532 feet 



82 

Myrtle street, Oak to Derry old line 
Sagamore street, Pine to Union street . 
Valley street, Elm to Massabesic street 
Webster street, Elm to Union street 
West Webster street, Elm to River road 

Total grades established 
No. of miles of grade established, 6.16. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Highways laid out this year are as follows : — 

Fourth street, from Walker south to N. W. R. R. 

Webster street, from Union street to Smyth road. 

Auburn street, from Union to Beech street. 

Rowell street, from Elm street to River road. 

Sagamore street, from Elm to Bay street. 

Thayer street, from Elm street to River road. 

Bay street, from Sagamore to Webster street. 

Salmon street, from Elm to Chestnut street. 

Gore street, from Union to Oak street. 

Ash street, from Brook to Gore street. 

Beech street, from Brook to Gore street. 

Maple street, from Brook to Gore street. 

Ray street, from Webster to Ray brook. 

Street east of Geo. H. Hubbard's. 

Wilson street, from Park street to Concord and Ports- 
mouth Railroad. 

Chestnut street, Webster to Clarke street, discontinued 
and relaid. 

Orange street, from Russell to Linden street. 

Boynton road, from Main street, south. 

I desire to call attention to various streets upon which the 
city has expended large sums of money for sewers, side- 
walks, grading, etc., although the streets are not public 



83 

highways. Second street is not a public highway from 
Granite to Ferry street, yet the street has been filled four 
feet, and grade damage paid. Ash and Beech streets are 
not public between Prospect and Brook streets. Maple 
street is private from Bridge to Brook ; so is Hall street 
south of Hanover, and Valley from Elm to Pine street. As 
these streets are practically public, and will soon become so 
from occupation, it is advisable for the city to take some 
action in regard to them, in order to preserve the records 
and guard against difficulties in the future. 

MERE STONES. 

There has been so much current work the past year that 
it has taken all the time of myself and assistants to keep 
it up, so that I have been unable to set any mere stones ; 
but the necessary data for all the new highways and a few 
of the old ones have been obtained, and are shown on the 
plans. The Amoskeag Company has set stones for the fair- 
ground streets. I have made a location of all the Com- 
pany's street lines that I have found, in order to preserve 
the original. 

NEW STREETS BUILT. 

Valley street has been built twenty feet wide from Pine 
to Belmont street. It should have been built full width, and 
that will probably be called for soon. Massabesic street, 
from Park to Belmont, has been widened to fifty feet, grade 
raised two and one-half feet, culvert extended, cobble gutter 
put in on each side, and sidewalk with iron guard-rail on 
southwest side. Myrtle street, from Russell to Linden, has 
had a retaining-wall built on the north side, containing 
112| perch, and the street graded about 42 feet in width. 
It will be necessary to build a retaining-wall on the south 
side, and grade out to 50 feet in width, whenever the Com- 



84 

pany's lots are sold. Elm street at the bridge has been 
widened, filled and graveled about 150 feet each way from 
the bridge. This street being the principal highway to the 
Pine Grove Cemetery, and a road over which the travel is 
increasing every year, it should be widened to its full width, 
graveled, and sidewalk built at an early day. 

STREETS TO BE BUILT. 

Hanover street at the J. P. Eaton place should be built 
on its proper line ; for, when the abutters set their fences on 
the north line of the street as established, they will come 
about in the middle of the present traveled track. The 
abutters on the south side are occupying from six to forty 
feet of the street. It will probably be necessary to do 
something the coming year, as Mr. Paige will claim the 
land belonging to him. Spruce street, although laid out to 
the Hall road, has 900 feet at its east end fenced in and 
used as mowing. In Merrimack street at the east end, a 
house stands in the center of the street. 

Your attention will be called this year to the extension 
of Lincoln street to Bridge street. This will eventually 
have to be done, and can be built cheaper now than at any 
future time. If extended at all, it should be in a straight 
line with the present street. 



8;") 



SEWERS BUILT. 



Streets. 



Location. 



Material. 



Size in 
inches. 



Length 
in feet. 



Elm 

Main (P.) 

Sagamore 

Salmon 

Elm east back 

Central south back 

Central south back 

Elm east back 

Pine and Penuacook n. back. 

Prospect 

Walnut east back 

Spruce south back 

Union east back 

Church and Bridge so. back 
Church and Bridge so. back 

Union east back 

Birch 

Bridge 

Center (P.) 

Lowell 

Lincoln 

Maple 

Maple 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Merrimack 

River (P.) 

River (P.) 

Russell 

Park south back 

Park south back 



Harrison to Sagamore 

Granite to Schuyler 

Elm to Elm east back 

Elm east back street to Bay. .. . 

Sagamore to Salmon 

Elm east back to Chestnut 

Chestnut to Union 

Salmon to near Websier 

Pennacook south back to Union. 

Union to T. Dunlap's 

Harrison to Brook 

Beech to Maple 

Harrison to Pennacook 

Lowell to Birch , 

Lowell to Birch 

Harrison to Pennacook 

Lowell to Washington 

Nashua to Russell , 

River to Third 

Maple to Jane 

Central s. b. and Park to Park s. b 

Nashua to Pearl 

Concord to Lowell , 

Lincoln to Wilson 

Wilson to Hall 

Hall to Belmont 

Wilson, west 

Ferry to Center 

Ferry south to Railroad 

Bridge to Pearl 

Pine to Union (140 feet relaid).. . 
Pine to Union 



Br 



Akron 



20x30 
17x26 
15 
15 
15 
15 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



17,777 



86 



Total length of sewers, equal to 3.37 miles. 
Manholes built, 17. 
Catch-basins, 87. 



SEWERS ORDERED BUT -NOT BUILT. 



Streets. 


Location. 


Material. 


Size in 
inches. 


Length 
in feet. 






Brick. 
Akron. 

u 


17x26 
10 
10 
10 


9G1 






380 






633 






499 









The Nashua-street sewer has been overloaded, as a large 
area is being drained into it temporarily, until the proposed 
sewer through Bridge street is built. This should be done 
right away to relieve Nashua street. There is trouble with 
the Union and Amherst street sewer. If what I am told in 
regard to its construction at the junction of Hanover and 
Union street is true, a very little expense will remove the 
difficulty ; this must be investigated early in the spring. 
We have met with the usual difficulties this year of finding 
sewers too high to make connections. A large part of the 
appropriation has been expended in rebuilding old sewers, 
as has been the case in years past. It was desired to drain 
two estates on Central south back street, and one on Park 
south back street near Union. This could only be done by 
commencing from Elm east back street and running up 
1,200 feet, although there were sewers on all sides. 

The management of our sewer system, if we can call it a 
system, is wrong from beginning to end. A man wants a 
sewer, so he gets a petition started, and. as it costs nothing 
to sign it, all the neighborhood put their names down, and 
talk about it, and the city government is impressed with the 
urgent necessity of the sewer, and naturally supposes that 



87 

the petitioners will contribute towards the expense by pay- 
ing the usual connection fee of thirty cents per foot front- 
age ; so the petition is granted, and from five hundred to 
one thousand dollars expended in the construction of the 
sewer ; and then, when all is done, none will enter, the 
city gets no return, and the sewer lies idle. As an illus- 
tration of this, a very urgent petition was sent in for a 
sewer in Manchester street between Hall and Wilson 
streets ; it was signed by all the abutters, there was a great 
panic in the neighborhood, and it was represented to the 
city government that they were all dying with diphtheria. 
The sewer was put in ; but in the meantime the petitioners 
learned that they must pay fifteen or more dollars entrance 
fee before entering the sewer. This knowledge effectually 
cured their diphtheria, and there was no further call for 
sewers from them. To-day that 450 feet of pipe lies as 
dry and clean as it was the hour it was put in the trench, 
there being no connections, not even a catch-basin arm. 

This method of assessing thirty cents per foot front should 
be abolished, and every abutter assessed a certain amount 
for every square foot of land drained, thus making the area 
the basis instead of the frontage, and then compel every 
man to connect his buildings with the sewer, there being, 
of course, no charge for the connection. Another way will 
be to retain the present frontage basis, but make the as- 
sessment upon every one alike, at the same time requiring 
them to use the sewer. This would be the present system 
under a new name ; for, instead of charging one man for 
connecting his house with the sewer, we make an assess- 
ment upon all directly for the construction of the sewer. 

Another difficulty with our sewers is the carelessness and 
inefficiency of the licensed sewer-enterers of years past. 
For a number of years there was trouble with the Elm- 
street sewer at Straw block ; a careful investigation dis- 



88 

closed the fact that the pipe from Granite block was run 
entirely through the old Elin-street sewer and connected 
with the new, thus making a dam of about eighteen inches 
in the middle of the sewer. In another case, a six-inch pipe 
was found projecting six inches into a twelve-inch sewer. 
In nearly every case it is found that where Y's are not used 
the connecting pipes are not broken to fit the opening of 
the sewer, but are slid in so as to project from one to six 
inches into the sewer. These places form stops for the 
solid material, which, rapidly accumulating, soon com- 
pletely blocks the sewer. This whole matter should be 
placed in the hands of a competent inspector appointed by 
the city, and it should be his business to see that all con- 
nections are properly made, and no licensed enterer, or 
any other, allowed to make connections without the in- 
spector's being present and directing the work. The au- 
thority in the present system of sewerage is divided be- 
tween the city clerk, superintendent of streets, and city 
engineer. The city clerk issues the licenses, but in regard 
to frontage he is obliged to rely upon the statement of the 
applicant, as he cannot run out to measure every time, and 
so is very liable to be imposed upon, and grant a license for 
too small a fee. This whole matter should be in the hands 
of one person, either the city engineer or a competent per- 
son connected with his department, thus relieving the city 
clerk, and leaving for the superintendent of streets only the 
actual manual labor of construction ; for the reason that 
from the frequent changes to which we are accustomed 
here, we are liable to get a man for superintendent who is 
entirely unfamiliar with this subject. I would, therefore, 
like to recommend to the new committee on sewers that 
they give the subject careful consideration, and see if some 
arrangement cannot be made that will improve our sewer- 
age, and be more beneficial for the city than the present. 



89 

It is also necessary that a large number of manholes should 
be built ; many sewers have been connected directly with 
other sewers, and large areas covered with a network of 
sewers are without manholes. It is advisable that there 
should be either a manhole or a lamphole at every angle 
in a sewer ; also, where there is an abrupt change of grade, 
to enable the superintendent to inspect the sewers, and 
cleanse the same whenever it becomes necessary. He often 
receives complaints that the city sewer is plugged up, and 
after several days' labor and great expense digging and try- 
ing to locate the trouble, it is found to be in the private 
drain, which belongs to the owner to repair. If the sewer 
had been properly constructed with manholes and lamp- 
holes, by dropping a lantern into the lamphole a man in 
the manhole could easily see if the sewer was clear ; if clear, 
there would be no expense ; if blocked, instead of spending 
several days to dig it up, it could be cleaned by means of a 
hose or other suitable flushing apparatus. A very fine 
arrangement for cleansing sewers has been introduced into 
New Haven by Mr. C. E. Fowler, city engineer, which he 
calls the " ball flushing," a description of which is given in 
his report for 1881. By this means the cost of cleansing 
sewers for the year 1881 was $57.42 per mile. As many 
of our flat-grade sewers are not self-cleansing, an arrange- 
ment of this kind would be a very profitable investment for 
the city. 

CATCH-BASINS. 

There has been a great deal of talk, but not much work, 
in regard to improving our catch-basins. I can only call 
your attention to my report for 1881, and say that this is a 
matter which should be attended to at once. 



90 



BRIDGES. 



The work of raising the east approach of McGregor 
bridge, which was commenced last fall, was completed 
ready for the railing March 9. Owing to the delay in get- 
ting the rail, and the repairs in progress on the Stark 
building, I have been unable to get the rail all in position 
until this month, and have not got it painted at all ; this 
must be attended to at once to prevent rusting. 

The Elm-street bridge across the railroad near the gas- 
works has been rebuilt this year, the Concord Railroad do- 
ing the wood-work and rebuilding a portion of the old 
abutment, which was unsafe, the city furnishing the new 
stone-work and grading the street. The driveway has been 
widened from 22J feet to 30 feet, and a sidewalk of 4| feet 
in width built on the east side ; also, 344 feet of gas-pipe 
railing on the sides of the approaches. 

BATH-HOUSES. 

At the meeting of the city government in May, I was 
instructed to visit Boston, examine the bath-houses there, 
and present plans and estimate of cost for a similar bath- 
house here. My estimate was 81,000. For particulars see 
my report at that time. I see by the report by the city en- 
gineer of New Haven, that a bath-house was built there by 
contract, with a tank 20 by 30 feet, and 5 feet deep, for 
1447. 

CEMETERIES. 

At the Valley Cemetery, a cobble gutter has been paved 
along the northeasterly side of the avenue built across the 
brook last year. The grade of this avenue at the foot of the 
hill has been raised some four feet, requiring 1,002^ cubic 
yards' filling. A new board fence has been built 1,023£ feet in 
length, on the west side, and additional water-pipes put in. 



91 

The heavy shower about September 23 caused some serious 
damage, by washing out the water-pipe trenches and the 
new avenue. 

At the Pine Grove Cemetery, the plat of ground that was 
laid out last year according to the Forest Hill or " Lawn " 
plan has been graded and nearly completed this year. The 
depression on the north side has been filled, requiring 
2,000 cubic yards of sand. The entire surface of the plat 
has been covered to a depth of twelve inches with gravel, 
and nine inches with loam. There was a slight delay in 
the spring in removing the trees, and again in the summer 
when the drouth was at its height I deemed it advisable 
to suspend the work for a short time. Through these de- 
lays we were unable to sow any seed until late in the season ; 
about half of the plat was sown, but our first long rain com- 
ing on just after, a large part of the seed was washed out. 
It will be necessary to sow this over when the other half is 
sown in the spring. Although the plat is not yet completed, 
lots enough have been sold to more than cover the cost of 
building, so that the remainder can be considered as the 
fund for perpetual care. This work has required my con- 
stant attention this year. The grading was of such a 
nature that it was impossible to keep the stakes in place, 
necessitating the laying out, and relaying out of the work 
several times. Some changes were made in the paths after 
the work commenced, which required a new plan ; as now 
planned there will be 108 lots, of which 76 are staked out. 
Plans have been made for lots, and the ground cleared 
ready for grading in the spring, of the section bounded by 
Netherland, Woodside, Manchester, and Linnet avenues. It 
is proposed to lay out all the new lots in such a manner that 
they can be kept in lawn form, although the lots will not be 
graveled and top-dressed by the city ; nor the perpetual- 
care fund required, except on the plat graded this year. 



92 

Any lot in any part of the cemetery will receive perpetual 
care whenever the owner makes the required deposit. The 
water supply for this cemetery is not sufficient to keep a 
lawn in proper condition, and some action should be taken 
in regard to introducing city water at an early date. The 
cemetery has been much improved this year by graveling 
the avenues ; still greater improvement could be made by 
paving gutters, now that the city has plenty of cobble-stones 
in the gravel bank adjoining ; also by putting in a few catch- 
basins in the low places, connected with blind drains, to 
collect the surface water and allow it to soak away in the 
ground, instead of covering the lots and standing as it does 
now in the low lands. 

A word in regard to the general arrangement of matters 
here. There are many duplicate names of avenues and 
paths that should be changed ; for example, Chessom ave- 
nue, Chessom path Xo. 1, and on to Chessom path No. 4 ; 
Myrtle path No. 1, Myrtle path No. 2, Water-pipe path, etc. 
The numbering of lots is also badly mixed. Previous to 
last year the map shows 1,158 lots, numbered from 1 to 
1,908, with 34 half-numbers, leaving 784 numbers not 
in use. This should be straightened out as much as possi- 
ble, the half-numbers abolished, and the surplus numbering 
utilized so that the highest number will tell the exact num- 
ber of lots in the cemetery. This, I am aware, will be diffi- 
cult, yet it can be done. There are many places in the 
cemetery where the lots have not been laid out to the sur- 
rounding avenues, leaving large areas that might be laid 
out and sold, thus keeping the grounds cleared up before 
commencing in a new section. The paths and avenues 
should have their names posted on suitable signs at the 
corners. 



93 



LANDS AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



I have made plans for an addition to the city stable, Vine 
street, 25 by 37 feet, of brick, which has been built, furnish- 
ing five new stalls with room for five more that can be built 
at any time ; plans for the stable of the Park-street hose- 
house, and ground plan for the cottage connected with it, 
also a plan for the cottage at the Massabesic hose-house, 
which was not adopted ; plan for all the improvements at 
the new city yard, between Depot and Granite streets, 
where there have been built 8 sheds 10 by 12 1 feet open 
front for the storage of sewer pipe, 10 open front sheds 9 by 
20 feet for carts and sleds, and 3 closed sheds 10 by 20 feet 
for general storage. The stone-crusher has been set in per- 
manent position on a solid stone foundation, a suitable build- 
ing erected over it with rooms for engine, fuel, and a small 
office. A pit for receiving the crushed stone 50 by 35 
feet, inclosed on three sides by a granite retaining-wall, 
and the bottom heavily concreted, has also been built ; curb 
has been set and concrete walk laid from Franklin to Canal 
back street on both Granite and Depot streets. 

The total area of the land purchased is 44,656 feet, a 
portion of which, 100 feet deep extending from Depot to 
Granite street on Franklin, has been set apart as a wood- 
stand. The city scales have been removed to this lot, and 
more commodious quarters erected for the weigher, and 
suitable hitching-posts and railings erected for the accom- 
modation of persons using the yard. The other more im. 
portant buildings were in the hands of professional 
architects. 

The amount of land purchased on Elm street, Bakersville, 
for the new school-house is 38, 976- 1 square feet. 

The work in the various highway districts has been as 
follows : — 



94 
DISTRICT NO. 1. 

MALACHI F. DODGE, Surveyor. 

600 rods turnpiked at north end of the district. 

26 water-bars built and repaired. 

94 loads of gravel put on River road. 

70 loads of gravel put on Elm street. 

100 feet plank culvert 12 by 12 inches, at Mr. Powers's. 

20 rods stone culvert 18 by 24 inches, at Industrial 
school. 

The road has been widened and straightened at Industrial 
school. 

Went over the district several times removing all the 
cobbles. 

In a part of the above work Mr. Dodge has received lib- 
eral assistance from Mr. Ray, superintendent of State farm. 

Our highways would be much improved, if more of the 
surveyors would follow Mr. Dodge's example and remove 
the cobbles from the roads. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

WARREN HARVEY, Superintendent. 
BLOCK PAVING. 

Elm street, from south line of Prospect to 

north line of Harrison .... 1,272.40 yards* 
Canal street from Depot to Granite street . 482.70 " 
Manchester street, between Chestnut and 

Elm 293.33 " 



Total block paving .... 2,048.43 yards. 

Block paving was commenced on Manchester street west 
of Chestnut street, but not completed. 



95 



COBBLE PAVING. 

Elm street, Prospect to Harrison street 
Canal street, Depot to Granite street . 
Depot street, Canal across Franklin street . 
Bridge street, Elm to west back street 
Chestnut street, Merrimack to Hanover, 

gutters ....... 

Chestnut street, Lowell to Pearl street, 

gutters ....... 

Granite street, Franklin to Canal street, 

gutters ....... 



814.8 


sq. yds 


501.0 


u 


979.4 


a 


60.7 


a. 



376.0 



582.2 « 



644.4 



Total cobble paving 



. 3,964.5 



MACADAMIZING. 

Chestnut street, Merrimack to Hanover 

street 1,193.1 sq. yds. 

Chestnut street, Lowell to Pearl street . 2,276.4 " 
Granite street, Franklin to Canal . . 1,290.7 " 



Total macadamizing 



. 4,760.2 sq. yds. 



On Granite street there was no material removed, but 
the top-crossing was as heavy as new work would have 
been, so I have classed it as such. 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Clarke street, Elm street to River road 
Hazel street, Harrison to Brook street 
Salmon street, Canal to Elm street . 
Lincoln street, Park to Spruce street 
Maple street, Park to Spruce street . 
Spruce street, Maple to Lincoln street 





416 


feet 




380 


a 




746 


a 




220 


a 




220 


a 




. 550 


u 



96 



GRAVELED, AND GUTTERS CLEARED. 

Manchester street, Chestnut to Beech street 
Chestnut street, Merrimack to Central street 
Laurel street, Chestnut to Union street 
Lowell street, Walnut to Nashua street 
Pine street, Hanover to Spruce street 
Jane street, Lowell to East High street 

GRADED AND GRAVELED 

Bridge street, Elm to Maple street . 
Maple street, Lowell to Concord street 
Maple street, Bridge to Pearl street . 
Arlington street, Maple, east . 
Appleton street, Chestnut to Pine street 
Union street, Harrison to Brook street 



1,350 feet. 
450 " 
810 " 
720 " 

1,556 " 
370 " 



2,555 feet. 
270 " 
261 " 
200 " 
362 " 
380 " 



GRADED AND NOT GRAVELED. 



Park street, Wilson to Massabesic street 
Beech street, Myrtle to Harrison street 
Olive street, partly graded, about 



370 feet. 
490 " 
200 " 



12,876 feet. 
Equal to 2.44 miles. 

All other main streets have been repaired and gutters 
cleared. 

The following sidewalks have been filled where the fill- 
ing averages from 3 to 4 feet : — 

Pine street, Harrison to Brook, west side . 
Brook street, Fine to Union, south side . 
Maple street, Bridge to Pearl, east side . 
Arlington, west end, both sides, 150 feet each 
Pearl street, east of Maple 



380 feet. 
446 " 
275 " 
300 " 
150 " 



97 



Sagamore street, east of Pine, north side, 195 

feet, south side 100 feet . . . .295 feet. 
Myrtle and Russell streets, at Dr. Dodge's . 440 " 
Amherst street, Olive to Beech back street . 240 " 

2,526 feet. 

Sidewalks have been graded in all other places where 
concrete has been put in. 

CROSSINGS. 

Stone, 12. Concrete, new, 34. Top-dressed, IS. 



CONCRETE. 






Crossings, new . 


. 936.86 


sq. yds 


Crossings, top-dressed . 


. 362.39 




Sidewalks repaired 


71.70 




Sidewalks, city yard 


. 388.84 




City yard ..... 


. 265.60 




Blood's shop .... 


. 202.75 




City hall 


. 135.60 




City library . . . . 


27.50 




Driveway, Henry Chandler's 


94.50 




Total concrete . 


. 2,485.74 


sq. yds 


SEWERS AND DR 


AJNS. 




Brick, 20 by 30 . 


. 1,196 feet 


Akron, 15-inch 


. 1,228 " 


Akron, 12-inch 


. 6,089 " 


Akron, 10-inch 


. 5,982 " 


Akron, 8-inch 




48 " 




14,543 feet 



Equal to 2.75 miles. 

Catch-basins, 61. Man-holes, 12. (See sewers.) 



98 
DISTRICT NO. 3. 

EDWARD N. BAKER, Surveyor. 

A new bridge on Elm street across the Lawrence Rail- 
road has been built, and street widened. An iron rail of 344 
feet, and a wooden one of 544 feet, put up. (See bridges.) 

Calef road for 160 rods has been widened, turnpiked, and 
graveled, and an 18 by 30 inches stone culvert 35 feet long 
built. 

Hancock street for 27 rods graveled, a cobble gutter 
paved 3 feet wide, and a stone culvert 18 by 30 inches 
built. 

Nutt road partially repaired, but not sufficiently to meet 
the demands of the heavy travel over it. 

Elm street, at the new school lot, has been widened to 
100 feet by removing the sand bank on the west side. 

All the roads of the district have been turnpiked twice, 
and repaired as well as possible under the circumstances. 

The yards of Messrs. Rowell and Gilford, on the Calef 
road, have been graded to the grade of the street, and side- 
walks made in front of them. 

Smith's Ferry road turnpiked and partially fixed ; there 
is still room for improvement. The sewer in the River 
road has also been cleared and repaired. 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

C C. WEBSTER, Surveyor. 

Graded the road from GofYe's Falls to Litchfield town line. 
Graveled about 50 rods at the south end of the district, six 
inches deep. Repaired the Derry-hill road. Replanked 
the bridge at Goffe's Falls. One culvert 50 feet long of 12- 
inch Akron pipe, north of Whittemore's. Changed the road- 
bed and turnpiked about 12 rods at J. P. Moore's ; and all 
general repairs. 



99 
DISTRICT NO. 5. 

CHARLES A. PIERCE, Surveyor. 

Graveled 1 mile. 
Turnpiked one-fourth mile. 
Culverts, 2. 
Bridges replanked, 2. 
Bushes cut, 2 miles. 

Cobbles raked out and road patched where needed, over 
the entire 13 miles of the district. 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 

I. T. WEBSTER, Surveyor. 

No report. 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 

HENRY S. HORTON, Surveyor. 

Massabesic street, widened, graded, and graveled 700 feet. 
Belmont street, graded and graveled . . . 500 " 
Jewett street, graveled ..... 150 "■ 
Taylor street, graveled 1,900 "■ 



Total . . . ... . .3,250 feet. 

Massabesic street, culvert extended and wing walls built. 
Massabesic street, gutters paved . . . 570 yards. 
Massabesic street, 15" drain pipe culvert . 160 feet. 

Massabesic street, iron railing . . . 308 " 
Massabesic street, wood railing . . . 600 " 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 

JEREMIAH GARVIN, Surveyor. 

Graveled 1 mile, turnpiked 1.5 miles. 

General repairs and removing rocks from road, extended 
culvert and put railing on Proctor road, and cutting brush 
where needed. 



100 

This district has 10 miles of road, and the appropriation 
is about one-half what it should be to make roads suitable 
for the heavy teaming, and increasing amount of light 
travel to and from the various lake resorts and adjoining 
towns. 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 

J. J. GARMON, Surveyor. 

Graveled U miles, built 4 new stone culverts, each 
15' X 2' X 8'C re-laid one 25' X 3' X 8", one with stone 
sides and wood cover, 20' X 2' X 2', besides general re- 
pairs. The bridge near the pumping station on the new 
road is dangerous, and should be protected with an iron 
rail of about 150 feet in length. 

The bridge over the Cohas brook was repaired this year. 
It would have been better if it had not been touched ; for 
the excavation having loosened the old crust of the road, 
the bridge and abutment have settled several inches, and 
the -bridge is in worse condition than it was in the first 
place. 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 

FRED S. WORTHEN, Superintendent. 

Sewers, Main street, brick, 17 X 26 . . 1,535 feet. 
Sewers, River and Center streets, Akron, 10" 1,699 " 



Total 3 5 234 feet. 

General repairs of streets, where needed. 

Concrete crossings, new .... 166.60 yards 
Concrete crossings, top-dressed . . . 17.00 " 
Concrete sidewalks, new .... 60.53 " 

Concrete sidewalks, top-dressed . . . 119.73 " 



Total concrete . . 363.86 yards 



101 



STREET. 



Grading. 



in. feet. 



Center, 
yds. 



Concrete. 



S. walk, 
lin. feet. 



Paving. 



Brow, 
in. feet. 



Gutter, 
lin. feet. 



Center, 
yds. 



Ret. wall, 
perches. 



Bowman 




Center 


663.0 


Clinton 


170.0 


Dover, Douglas, 
and Weststs... 


300.0 




125.0 






Fourth 


111.0 


Granite 


122.0 


Green 


205.0 


Main 


145.0 


Milford 


2,250.0 
180.0 


Parker 


River 






293.5 
100.0 


Walker 


West 


684.0 




112.0 


Main st. school.. 




5,460.5 



444.00 
100.00 



370.40 
441.00 
426.00 

3.585.00 

462.25 

125.00 



243 
170 



125 



111 
122 



125 



SO 



100 
644 
112 



5,953.65 



2,132= 
1,421.3 
sq. yds. 



513 
170 

240 
125 

111 

122 

145 



100 
100 
744 
112 



2,762= 

614 
sq. yds. 



373 
170 

173 
125 

111 
122 



280 



100 
220 
112 



1,786= 
595.3 
sq. yds. 



267 



26 



DISTRICT NO. 11. 

JAMES E. BAILEY, Surveyor. 

Macadamizing ..... 2,752 square yards 
Gutter paving 
Sidewalk grading 
Cobble edgestone 
Black-brook bridge replanked 



125 

400 cubic yards 

700 feet 

20' X 30' 



102 



430 feet posts and rails at Farmer's meadow. 
1 catch-basin north side of Bridge street, 100 feet of con- 
crete. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 

FREDERICK ALLEN, Surveyor. 

General repairs carefully attended to. 
DISTRICT NO. 13. 

JOSEPH P. FELLOWS, Surveyor. 

There are but two miles in this district, of which one and 
one-fourth miles have 6een graveled and top-dressed with 
stone chips, and general repairs on the remainder. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

Last year I stated in my report that Manchester was 
following in the footsteps, yet a long ways in the rear, of 
older cities. In proof of the statement, allow me to copy a 
few extracts from a letter I received from Mr. Charles E. 
Fowler, city engineer of New Haven, Conn., to whom I sent 
one of my reports in return for one previously received 
from him. 

" Office of Board of Public Works, ) 
New Haven, Conn., April 7, 1882. J 

" George H. Allen, City Civil Engineer, Manchester, N. H.: 
" Dear Sir, — I acknowledge the receipt, with thanks, of 
a copy of your report for 1881. 

" I have read the report over with considerable interest, 
and judging by it I should think that your city was in a 
bad way concerning its public work. What I mean by that 
is, that there appears to be a serious lack of system in the 
construction of works and the keeping of a proper record of 
them. Unless your suggestions are heeded by the city 



103 

government, the citizens will have occasion to regret the 
neglect at no distant time in the future. It is a miserable 
way of doing public work, piecemeal. A perfect system of 
what is best should be adopted in the case of sewerage, pav- 
ing, grades, etc., and then all work carried out in strict 
compliance thereto. Our city has suffered largely from a 
lack of system, but it turned over a new leaf about ten 
years ago, to its very great advantage. 

" We now have the reputation of having one of the best 
sewerage systems in this country : our streets are in good 
condition, excellent pavements, and, according to the Na- 
tional Board of Health, we have the smallest death rate of 
any seaport city of our size in the world ; and this is due very 
largely to the system of sewerage and other improvements, 
and the manner in which they are executed and main- 

" Somewhat in reference to two points in your report 
1 may say, that our circular curb corners are cut with a 
radius of 6 feet ; sometimes where the angle is acute we use 
a radius of 12, 15, or 18 feet. The traps of our catch-basins 
provide for a water-seal of 14 inches in depth, which gives 
considerable margin for evaporation. 

" Respectfully yours, 

Charles E. Fowler, 

City Engineer." 

I hope Mr. Fowler will pardon the liberty I have taken 
with his letter, being, as he is, an entire stranger to me, but 
his remarks bear so closely upon the condition of affairs 
here that I could not refrain from giving it to the public. 

But little improvement has been made this year in regard 
to the grading and graveling of streets. In looking over 
the streets I find some have been raised two feet or more 
above the sidewalks and crossings. On Manchester street a 



104 

crossing nearly as good as new, and at the proper grade, 
was raised about one foot to fit the center of the street, 
which had been filled loo high, instead of putting the sur- 
face where it ought to be. When the street is properly 
graded this will have to be relaid where it was before, and 
before that time, as the street wears away, the danger from 
the too high crossing will be even greater than it was pre- 
viously from being too low. A change of grade on Park 
street three years ago made it necessary to cut that portion 
from Wilson to Massabesic street. This is still one foot 
too high. 

SIDEWALKS. 

I can only repeat that the city should take the laying of 
sidewalks into its own hands, as the General Laws give it 
the right to do so, and charge one-half the expense to the 
abutters. Section 4 of chapter 15 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances should be changed. It now reads, 4 ' All sidewalks in 
Elm street in the city shall be laid sixteen feet wide, and 
on all other streets, eight feet wide ; and the inclination 
from the outer edge thereof shall not exceed one-half an 
inch to the foot." 

As our streets vary from twenty to sixty feet in width, a 
glance will show the absurdity of the above inflexible rule. 
For example, put two eight-feet sidewalks in a twenty-feet 
street, and four feet will be left. There should be uniform- 
ity in the construction of all streets ; it should not be ob- 
tained by making all sidewalks of the same width, but by 
making them proportional to the width of the street. I 
should amend Sect. 4 by striking out all between the words 
" sidewalk " and " inclination," and inserting, " in the city 
shall be one-sixth the width of the street." This will make 
our walks on Elm street 16 feet, and on 50-feet streets 8 
feet, on 20-feet streets 3 feet, as now built; 40-feet. 
streets will be 7 feet, and 60-feet streets, 10 feet. The 



105 

sidewalk on the south side of Bridge street between Canal 
and Elm streets, should be rebuilt and brought out to its 
proper width to correspond with the new bridge and the 
walks on the north side. I think if the city government 
should lay the case before the Stark corporation, they would 
not hesitate to build a new and suitable walk. 

PAVING. 

This work can be greatly improved, and the paving wear 
much smoother, if greater care is taken with the work. 
The parties employed by the city being old men, who have 
done the work for years, I find it hard to teach them new 
ideas. The main things to observe are : first, a more care- 
ful selection of the stone ; second, more care in the maul- 
ing of them. If a stone is loose and has a tendency to 
settle lower than the surrounding ones, take it out and put 
sand under it sufficient to bring it even with the rest, 
when driven solidly to place, instead of driving the rest 
solid, and skipping that particular stone ; then the covering 
should be good screened gravel, so that it will pack closely 
and solidly between the stones. The use of coarse gravel, 
with pebbles as large as the end of a man's finger drop- 
ping in between the stones, effectually prevents a solid pack- 
ing, and the continual jar upon the pavement, wearing away 
the pebbles, causes the blocks to tip and settle, soon leaving 
us the rough and uneven pavement which we now have. 

MACADAMIZING. 

We have streets filled with broken stone, but nowhere 
else will you find a macadamized street covered with large, 
sharp-broken stone lying around loose, forming conven- 
ient missiles for school-boys, and others of a belligerent dis- 
position. In Boston, when a street is macadamized, it is 
as smooth as a concrete pavement : the reason is, because 



106 

they use graduated sizes of stone and roll it more. In 
regard to rolling, I can but repeat what I said last year. 
The only expense we need to go to for the assorted stone, 
now that the crusher is permanently located and has every 
convenience for working, is to get a revolving screen and 
attach to the crusher, this screen to be made so as to sepa- 
rate the stone into four different sizes ; then by finishing 
with the fine stone, and finally covering the whole with a 
thin sprinkling of stone dust, you will have a road hard 
and smooth, and free from the unsightly and dangerous 
missiles which we now see lying around. 

In conclusion. I must say that the small force in the 
office in 1881 left me, at the end of the year, a long ways 
behind with my work. I was obliged to do just as little 
field and office work on any particular job as I could get 
along with for the immediate work on hand. I expected 
to be able to catch up a little with the office work in the 
winter ; but the current work, such as raising the McGregor 
bridge trestle, preparing for the Elm-street bridge, and 
straightening out the street numbering, made that impos- 
sible. This winter finds me with the office work nearly 
two years behind. I have succeeded in finishing the field 
work left over from 1881, with the exception of one survey 
on Wilson Hill, which was called for first eight years ago, 
was commenced last year, and must be completed next 
spring I shall be obliged to keep my entire force busy all 
winter, and even then shall have hardly time to finish my 
office work before spring opens. 

The increased expenditure for this year is caused in 
part by having an extra assistant, and in part by extra 
horse-hire on account of the Pine Grove Cemetery work. 
Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY PHYSICIAN 



To the Honorable Mayor and the City Councils : — 

In presenting my report for the year just closed, I must 
congratulate the city on its excellent sanitary condition. 
The general health of the city during the year has been re- 
markably good. Typhoid fever has been prevalent, but diph- 
theria has been the exception rather than the rule. During 
the summer, a slight epidemic occurred among the infant 
children of the poorer classes, principally those of French 
Canadian parents, who either preferred to dispense with 
medical advice, or were too poor to employ a physician. 

Scarlet fever was more prevalent this year than last, but 
the type was of a milder character. The cause of the fever 
in almost every case could be traced to a lack of proper 
precaution in the public schools. There are no cases at 
present. 

The small-pox scare in January and February caused 
considerable excitement ; but the prompt measures taken in 
anticipation of its appearance undoubtedly prevented a visit 
of the terrible scourge. Other cities and towns in the state 
had cases, but owing to the thoroughness with which vacci- 
nation was performed in Manchester, the city did not have 
a single case. 



110 

In my capacity as city physician I personally vaccinated 
about 1,500 persons, principally school children, while phy- 
sicians employed by the various corporations vaccinated 
such of the operatives as had not undergone the operation 
for a number of years. It is probable that at least 10,000 
persons were vaccinated in Manchester during the excite- 
ment. 

Quite frequently a report was current that a case of 
small-pox had occurred, but upon personal investigation it 
invariably proved to be a case of another disease. That 
the work of vaccination was thoroughly performed is evi- 
dent from the fact that Manchester did not have a single 
case of the dread disease. The health of the city paupers, 
both at the farm and outside, during the year has been good, 
although more sickness has occurred this year than last. I 
have personally visited between 150 and 200 of the city 
poor, and given medical advice. The number of deaths at 
the city farm was five, being either persons who were of 
advanced age, or suffering from an incurable disease which 
had been contracted before admission to the farm. The 
treatment of the poor by Superintendent Allen and wife 
has been kind and efficient, and the inmates could not have 
had better care than they have received. The plan of pro- 
viding for the insane at the city farm, under the present 
arrangement, is decidedly a failure. Owing to the lack of 
a proper place for the separation of the mild and violent 
cases, ail of the insane are obliged to mingle, much to the 
detriment of their health, and giving no opportunity for the 
treatment of their mental disorders, while their noise and 
tumult seriously affect the health and comfort of the 
inmates who are in the other departments. Three cases 
have been sent from the city farm to the asylum at Concord, 
where all have died. I would recommend that a separate 
building be erected for the accommodation of the insane, to 



Ill 

be divided into suitable wards, and that proper amusements 
be furnished. In my last report I recommended that better 
accommodations be provided at the police station for such 
unfortunates as might, through accident or indiscretion, 
come under the care of the officers. Since then a padded 
cell has been fitted up, and an ambulance provided, supply- 
ing wants which had long been needed. Regarding the 
ambulance, I would recommend that it be kept at the engine- 
house, or some other convenient place, where the expense 
of keeping would be small, and where it would be ready at 
a moment's call. 

I would also recommend that an appropriation be made 
which would secure to the city the privilege of having a 
single bed at the hospital of the Women's Aid Society. 
Under the present arrangements, a permit must first be ob- 
tained from the society before a patient can be admitted to 
the hospital. This, in a case of accident or casualty, often 
causes a delay which imperils a patient's life. A good 
illustration may be seen by recalling the fire in Crosby's 
block, where persons jumped from five-story windows at 
midnight, and were picked up unconscious and with broken 
limbs, to be carried hither and thither, increasing their 
suffering and putting their lives in jeopardy. I therefore 
recommend that the city not only secure a private bed at 
the Women's Aid Hospital, but also that an arrangement 
be made so that a patient can be admitted at once, without 
first experiencing delay in obtaining a permit. 

I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully yours, 

JAS. M. COLLITY, 

City Physician. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1880. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

HORACE B. PUTNAM, Mayor, ex-officio Chairman. 
WILLIAM J. HOYT, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1. — Charles F. Everett, 54 Stark corporation. 

Frank T. E. Richardson, 49 M. S. B. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean, Myrtle street, cor. Ash. 

Gerherdus L. Demarest, 54 Blodget street. 
Ward 3. — Daniel Clark,* Lowell street, cor. Pine. 

William A. Webster, 581 Union street. 
Ward 4. — Walter M. Parker, Hanover, cor. Chestnut. 

John T. Fanning, 360 Manchester street. 
Ward 5. — Denis F. O'Connor, 173 Central street. 

Charles A. O'Connor, Chandler House. 
Ward 6. — Abial C. Flanders, 308 Park street. 

Brackett B. Weeks, 382 Central street. 
Ward 7. — Marshall P. Hall, 54 Amoskeag corp. 

Ezra Huntington, 13 M. P. W. corporation. 
Ward 8. — Louis E. Phelps, 220 Granite street (P.). 

Douglas Mitchell, 220 Granite street (P.). 

* Resigned, and Henry H. Hu9e was elected to fill the vacancy. 



116 

CLERK OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. Huntington, Hoyt, Fan- 
ning, Hall, Parker, Mitchell. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Phelps, Clark, Webster, Weeks, 
Huntington. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Flanders, 
Dean, Fanning, D. F. O'Connor, Parker. 

Fuel and Heating. — Messrs. Huntington, the Mayor, 
Fanning, Flanders, Phelps, Clark, Hoyt. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Webster, Clark, Par- 
ker, Dean, C. A. O'Connor. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, C. 
A. O'Connor, Weeks, Demarest, Clark. 

Music. — Messrs. Richardson, D. F. O'Connor, Weeks, 
Flanders, Mitchell. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Mitchell, Demarest, Phelps, 
Fanning. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Mitchell, Webster, Everett, Rich- 
ardson, Demarest. 

Sanitary. — Messrs. Webster, Clark, Dean, Demarest, 
Fanning. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Clark, Dean, Parker, C. A. 
O'Connor, Hall, Webster, Demarest. 

Ash Street. — Messrs. Dean, Webster, Demarest, Phelps, 
C. A. O'Connor. 



117 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Demarest, Flanders, Weeks, 
Fanning, Clark. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. Everett, Parker, Flanders, Hunt- 
ington, Demarest. 

Franklin Street and Training School. — Messrs. Hunting- 
ton, Hall, Phelps, Clark, Richardson. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Webster, C. A. O'Connor, Mitch- 
ell, Everett, Fanning. 

Manchester Street. — Messrs. C. A. O'Connor, Weeks, 
Dean, D. F. O'Connor, Everett. 

Wilson Hill and Bridge Street. — Messrs. Parker, Fan- 
ning, Weeks, Phelps, Flanders. 

Merrimack Street. — Messrs. Hall, Clark, Dean, Hunting- 
ton, D. F. O'Connor. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Webster, D. F. O'Connor, Rich- 
ardson, Hall, Mitchell. 

Piscataquog Grammar. — Messrs. Phelps, Mitchell, D. F. 
O'Connor, Weeks, Huntington. 

Center Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Mitchell, 
Phelps, Demarest, Flanders, Fanning. 

Amoskeag, Blodget Street, and Stark District. — Messrs. 
Richardson, Everett, Parker, Mitchell, Dean. 

Bakersville and Hallsville. — Messrs. Flanders, Hall, 
Webster, C. A. O'Connor, Phelps. 

Goffers Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Weeks, 
Clark, D. F. O'Connor, Fanning, Richardson. 

Mosquito Pond, Webster's Mills, and Youngsville. — 
Messrs. Fanning, Richardson, Everett, Parker, Webster. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. D. F. O'Connor, Huntington, 
Flanders, Demarest, Hall. 



In Board of School Committee, 
January 1, 1883. 
It was Voted, that the report of the Clerk be accepted and adopted 
as the report of the Board, and that the same be transmitted to the City- 
Councils, together with that of the Superintendent. 
A true copy of the record, 
Attest : 

MARSHALL P. HALL. Clerk. 



EEPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the City Councils : — 

Gentlemen, — The Board of School Committee respect- 
fully present their report for the year ending December 31, 
1882, under the following heads : Statistical Information, 
Finances, Improvement and Extension of School Accom- 
modations, Attendance and Truancy, Condition of Schools, 
Teachers. 



STATISTICS. 
I. 

Population of the city (U. S. census of 1880) 
" estimated for 1882 . 

School population (census of 1880), 5 to 15 years 

Number days in school year 
Number days schools were taught 
Number of school buildings 
Number of school-rooms 
Number of sittings for pupils 

II. 

Number of male teachers in High School 
Number of female teachers in High School 



32,458 
37,000 

5,460 

195 

182 
24 

81 
3,645 



120 



Number of male teachers in grammar schools 
Number of female teachers in grammar schools 
Number of female teachers in primary schools 
Number of female teachers in suburban schools 

Total 

Total enrollment of pupils .... 
Average number of pupils belonging to schools 
Average dailj attendance .... 
Percentage of attendance .... 
Average enrollment per teacher . 
Average daily attendance per teacher 

Number of non-resident pupils in attendance : - 
In High School .... 
In grammar schools 
In primary schools 
In suburban schools 



4 
12 
45 
11 

78 

4,095 

2,957 

2,712 

91.7 

52.5 

35.0 

6 
11 



8 



Rates of tuition paid by non-resident pupils per week : — 
In High School ..... 
In grammar and lower grades 
In suburban ..... 



.621 

.50 

.25 

72 



Number of pupils graduated from grammar schools 

Number of pupils admitted to High School : — 

From grammar schools .... 53 

From suburban schools .... 4 

Number of pupils graduated from High School . 53 

Average number of teachers employed in evening schools : 
Spring street (males 1, females 9) . 10 

Center street (males 1, females 3) . 4 

Average attendance in evening schools since Oct. 1, 1882 : 
Spring street (boys 67, girls 43) . . 110 

Center street (boys 24, girls 30) . . 54 



121 



Oldest male pupil, Spring street ... 40 years. 

Oldest male pupil, Center street ... 35 years. 

Youngest male pupil, Spring street . . 14 years. 

Youngest male pupil, Center street . . 16 years. 

Oldest female pupil, Spring street . . 25 years. 

Oldest female pupil, Center street . . 32 years. 

Youngest female pupil, Spring street . . 12 years. 

Youngest female pupil, Center street . . 14 years. 

Nationality of pupils in evening schools : — 

Americans (Spring st.), 81 (Center st.), 32 Total 113 

" " 62 

44 " 115 

25 " 34 

25 " 118 

" 2 " 2 



Swedes 


" 62 


French 


71 


Germans 


9 


Irish 


93 


Scotch 





Number unable 


to read 


schools : — 




Spring 


street 


Center 


street 



read or write on entering evening 



III. 

Salary paid Superintendent 

clerk of School Committee . 
School Committee (18 members, at 

110 each) .... 
High-School principal . 
male assistant 
female assistants 
grammar-school principals . 

assistants 
primary-school teachers, female 
Training-School principal 

sub-teachers, per mo 
suburban-school teachers, female 



6 
5 

$1,500 
$100 

$180 
$2,000 
$1,200 

$500-$800 
,000-81,350 

$460-$475 

$350-$450 

$1,000 

$10-$20 
$300-$475 



122 



FINANCES 


• 




INCOME. 






Balances from 1881 


• 


. $2,758 96 


Appropriations, 1882 : — 






For books and stationery- 


$500 


00 


contingent expenses 




500 


00 


care of rooms . 




. 2,600 


00 


fuel 




3,000 


00 


furniture and supplies 




500 


00 


printing and advertising 




500 


00 


repairs . 




3,000 


00 


salaries .... 


39,000 


00 




$49,600 


00 


evening schools 


. 1,000 


00 

$50 600 00 






<wO\J jUUU \J\J 






$53,358 96 


Special appropriation for Spring st. 


repairs 


. 2,500 00 




$55,858 96 


Overdrafts, 1881 . 


ions . 


471 27 


Net amount from appropriat 


.155,387 68 


From state literary fund 


• 


. 2,059 88 


tuition non-resident pupils 


, , 


207 37 


Total income 1882 


. 57,654 94 


EXPENDITURES. — DAI 


' SCHOOLS 




For books and stationery- 


. 


. $515 42 


care of rooms . 


. 


. 2,574 33 


contingent expenses 


. 


959 95 


fuel. 


. 


. 


. 3,090 75 



123 



For furniture and supplies 

printing and advertising . 

repairs (ordinary) .... 

salaries of teachers .... 

Total expense of day schools 
Total expense of evening schools . 

Expended by School Committee for or 
dinary expenses of schools 
Expended by School Committee for extraordi 
nary repairs ..... 

Total expended by School Committee 
Balance unexpended 

Amount expended by city councils for Webster 

street house ...... 

Amount expended by city councils for Bakers 

ville house . . . . 
Amount expended by city councils for No. Main 

street house ..... 
Cost for teaching per pupil in day schools, based 

on average number belonging . 
Cost of incidentals per pupil . 
Total cost per scholar .... 
Total cost of scholar, based on whole number 

enrolled ...... 



11,111 53 

462 56 

1,709 16 

39,755 69 



150,189 39 
1,414 92 


$51,604 
.4,187 


31 

85 



i5,792 16 

1,862 78 



110,500 00 

2,500 00 

4,800 00 

13 44 

3 53 

16 97 



12 25 

819,175,408 00 



2 T V mills 



Taxable property of the city . 

Tax for school purposes .... 

The total cost of the schools is about 8500 less than 
last year. The total cost per scholar is 80.78 less. 

The following list of the text-books used in each grade of 
our schools, with the retail price of each annexed, will be 
found useful to parents : — 



124 



COST OF SCHOOL BOOKS. 



LOWE Li PRIMARY. 

FIRST YEAR AND A HALF. 

Slate $0.25 

Franklin 1st Reader .25 



S0.50 



HIGHER PRIMARY. 

SECOND YEAR AND A HALF. 

Franklin 2d Reader $0.35 

Robinson's (Fish) First 

Book in Arithmetic. . . . .35 

3 Drawing B'ks (Smith's) 

(1 each six months). . . . .36 



$1.06 



LOWER MIDDLE. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Franklin 3d Reader $0.50 

Harrington's Speller 25 

Gnyot's Elementary Ge- 
ography .65 

2 Penmanship Copy B'ks, 

Nos. 2, 2 1-2..... 18 

2 Drawing-books, Nos. 3 

and 4 24 

Intermediate Music Read- 
er 60 



S2.42 



HIGHER MIDDLE. 

FIFTH YEAR. 

Franklin 4th Reader $0.60 

Franklin Written Arith- 
metic 100 

2 Writing-books, Nos. 3 

and 4 18 

2 Drawing-books, Nos. 5 

and 6 32 



$1.20 



Total cost of books to 
reach Grammar school 



FOURTH DIVISION. 



$5.18 
GRAMMAR. 



Franklin Intermediate 

Reader $0.65 

Guyot's New Intermedi- 
ate Geography 1.20 

Barnes's U. S. History . . 1.20 

Language Primer 40 

2 Writing-books, No. 3 

(full course) .24 

2 Drawing-books, Nos. 7 

and 8 40 



$4.09 



THIRD DIVISION.— GRAMMAR. 

Swinton's New Language 
Lessons $0.50 

2 Writing-books, No. 4.. .24 

2 Drawing-books, Nos. 9 

and 10 40 





$1.14 


SECOND DIVISION. 


—GRAMMAR. 


Franklin 5th Reader.. . 
2 Writing-books, Nos 

and 6.1 

2 Drawing-books, Nos. 

and 13 


.. $1.10 
5 

.24 
12 

.40 


Fourth Music Reader . 


.90 
$2.64 


FIRST DIVISION.- 


-GRAMMAR. 


2 Writing-books, No. 

or 10 

2 Drawing-books, No». 

and 13 


7 
. . $0.24 
12 

.40 



Total cost of books for 
Grammar-school course 

HIGH SCHOOL. 
English and French Course. 

FIRST YEAR. 



$0.64 



$.51 



Algebra, Bradbur\ r 's .... 

Physiology, Dalton's 

Physical Geography, Guy- 
ot's 

Book-keeping, Meservy's 
Book-keeping (blanks). .. 
Book-keeping, Double En- 
try 



$1.15 
1.25 



.95 
.90 



.90 



$6.95 



D YEAR. 

S.. . 



Geometrj-, Bradbury 

Physics, Avery's. . " 

Civil Government, An- 
drews's 

Ancient Histoiy, Thal- 
hiemer's 

Modern History, Swin- 
ton's 

Zoology, Hooker's 1.20 



$0.85 
1.40 

1.20 

1.85 

160 



Total cost for Business 
course 



$8.10 



$15.05 



125 



THIRD YEAR. 

Chemistry, Avery's $1.40 

French, Duffett's method 1.35 

English History, Green's 1.75 

Botany, Wood's 2.00 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Rhetoric, Hill's $1.40 

Astronomy, Lockyer's. . . 1.40 
American and English 

Literature 1-50 

Geology, Dana's 1.30 

English Literature, Col- 
lier's 1.50 

Political Economy, Cham- 

plin's 1.00 

Total cost for English 
and French course. . . 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Classical Course. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Algebra, Bradbury's $1.15 

Latin Grammar, Allen and 

Greenough's 140 

Latin Lessons, Jones's. . . 1.00 

Physiology, Dalton's 1.25 

Physical Geography, Guy- 

ot's " 1.80 

SECOND YEAR. 

Geometry, Bradbury's... $0.85 

Physics," Avery's 1.40 

Caesar and Cicero 1.60 

Latin Composition, Jones's 1-00 

Zoology, Hooker's 1.20 

THIRD YEAR. 

History of Greece, Smith's $1.20 

French, Duffett's method. 1.35 

History of Rome 1.20 

English History, Green's 1.75 

Virgil, Searing's 1.85 

or Greenough's, $1.50 

Cost, if Chemistry is taken 
in place of History 
(Avery's Chemistry, $1.40) $4.60 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Rhetoric, Hill's $1.40 

American and English 

Literature 1.50 

English Literature. Col- 
lier's ' 1.50 

Horace, Chase and Stu- 
art's 1.35 



$6.50 



.10 



$29.65 



i.60 



.05 



$7.35 



$5.75 



$25.75 
$23.00 



$6.60 



$7.70 



Total cost for Classi- 
cal course 

or 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

College Preparatory Course 

FIRST YEAR. 

Same as Classical course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Geometry, Bradbury's... $0.85 

Caesar and Cicero 1.60 

Latin Composition, Jones's 1.00 
Greek Grammar, Good- 
win's 1.70 

Greek Lesson's, White's. 1.35 
Ancient Geography, 

Mitchell's 1.20 

THIRD YEAR. 

History of Greece, Smith's $1.20 

Virgil, Searing's 1.85 

or Greenough's, $1.50. 

Anabasis, Goodwin's Read- 
er 1.70 

Greek Prose Composition. , 1.00 

History «f Rome, Leigh- 
ton's 120 

English History, Green's. 1.75 

$8.70 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Homer, Iliad, Sedgwick 

and Keep's $1.30 

Algebra, Wentworth's. . . 1.60 

Horace, Chase and Stew- 
art's 1.35 

Geometry, Wentworth's.. 1.20 

5.45 

Total cost for College 

course $28.45 

RECAPITULATION. 

Cost for Primary and Middle 

schools " $5.18 

Cost for Grammar schools 8.51 

Total to reach High school . . $13.69 

COST FOR HIGH SCHOOL. 

Business course (same as first 
two vears in English and 

French course) $15.05 

English and French course. . . . 29.65 

Classical course $23.00 or 25.75 

College course 28.45 

(Optional), Drawing books, 
" " material, 
" Music Reader 1.15 



126 

IMPROVEMENT AND EXTENSION OF SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

There are now nine school-rooms vacant, as follows : One 
on Bridge street, one on Lowell street, two on Manchester 
street, two on Beech street, one on Spring street, one on 
Lincoln street, and one at Wilson Hill. The three last 
named have been unoccupied for a considerable time ; the 
others have been vacated this year, — that on Bridge street 
by the transfer of pupils incident to the opening of the new 
house on Webster street, and those on Lowell street, Man- 
chester street, and Beech street, by the withdrawal of 
French children. Four new rooms have been opened, — 
two on Webster street, and two in 'Squog, — leaving two 
more unoccupied rooms than at the beginning of the year. 

In addition to the building of the W T ebster-street house, 
the extension to the brick house on Main street, and the 
foundation for the new house at Bakersville, all of which 
were provided for by special appropriation, and done un- 
der the superintendence of a committee from the city 
councils, the School Committee have conducted extensive 
repairs and improvements upon the older buildings. By a 
remarkable similarity, not to say stupidity, of architectural 
design, three of the larger school-houses were built with 
the rooms for the children in the rear, and the airiest and 
sunniest parts of the buildings were given up to stairs and 
entries. With the belief that light and air are indispen- 
sable to the school-room, the committee have set about 
remodeling these buildings. The Lowell-street house was 
changed last year, as described in the last report. This 
year the Spring-street house has been similarly altered and 
improved. The stairways have been set to one side, and 
two school-rooms brought out into the light and air on the 
south side of the building. The same thing ought to be 
done with the Franklin-street house. The best part of that 



127 

building, the whole west front, facing an open square, and 
during the better part of the day receiving unobstructed 
light and sunshine, is used for clothes-rooms. Four rooms 
in the building have no direct sunlight. By slight changes 
in the interior arrangements, two well lighted rooms may 
be added to this building, and the whole improved in con- 
venience, lighting, and ventilation. 

So rapid has been the increase of population on the west 
side of the river, that the extension to the Main-street 
house is insufficient to accommodate the pupils. Another 
room is already needed, and the committee recommend the 
erection of another wing to the same building the coming 
season. The large number of buildings erected west of 
McGregor bridge indicates that a school building will be 
needed in that vicinity, and it would be wise to secure a lot 
there at no distant day. 

In addition to the alterations in the Spring-street house 
already mentioned, the whole basement has been exca- 
vated and new steam-heating apparatus put in. Steam- 
heating apparatus has also been placed in the North-Main- 
street house. The Lincoln-street house and fence have 
been painted, the Ash-street house painted outside, water 
introduced on the upper floors at Franklin street, the re- 
seating of the lecture-room at the High School completed, 
and a new well dug at the Harvey-District house. Every 
school building owned by the city has received some needed 
repairs, and all are now in excellent condition. The esti- 
mated amount expended upon each house is shown below : 

Spring-street, alterations ..... $3,565 91 
Spring-street, new boiler, steam and water piping 615 82 

Lincoln-street 396 89 

Ash-street . . . . • • 251 71 
Franklin-street 130 62 



128 



High School . 
Harvey District 
South-Main-street 
North- Main-street 
Center-street . 
Amoskeag 
Blodget-street . 
Lowell-street . 
Manchester-street 
Merrimack-street 
Beech-street 
Wilson Hill 
Stark District 
Youngsville 
Bakers ville 
Webster's Mills 
Goffe's Falls . 



All of these repairs, excepting those at Spring street, have 
been done within the original appropriations, under the 
close inspection of the committee on repairs, and, as they 
believe, with great economy. 



8164 16 


154 


78 


54 


61 


85 


24 


41 


52 


39 


74 


34 50 


41 


50 


39 


18 


41 


18 


34 


15 


28 


74 


28 


31 


37 


84 


34 


15 


26 


74 


42 


60 



ATTENDANCE AND TRUANCY. 

It appears by the Truant Officer's report that 642 cases 
of absence have been reported to him by teachers, — 333 
from city schools, and 309 from parochial schools. Of 
these, 98 returned without the officer's services. To inves- 
tigate the remaining cases, he made 914 visits to parents : 
66 absentees were found sick ; 39 were without suitable 
clothing, and were excused for a time ; and 579 were sent 
to school. He has found 408 persons of school age upon 
the streets during school hours, and has placed in the 
schools 265 not enrolled in any school. Forty-one ha- 



129 

bitual truants were temporarily confined at the city hall, 
some for a few hours, and a few over night, with the knowl- 
edge of their parents. Of the apparently incorrigible cases, 
7 were brought before the court ; 5 were fined, 2 were sent 
to the State Industrial School, and 2 left the state. The 
officer has granted 681 certificates to children to obtain 
work in the mills. The average age of those certificated is 
13 years. Sixty-two applicants for certificates could neither 
read nor write ; 47 of these were of French parentage. The 
number reported discharged from the mills is 381, of whom 
72 per cent entered parochial schools. About 50 per cent 
of all cases of absence reported to the officer from city 
schools were of Irish or French parentage. 

The number of pupils enrolled in private schools in the 
city is about 3,200. The average attendance is as follows : 

In Irish parochial schools ..... 1,475 

In French parochial schools ..... 555 

In French private schools ..... 102 

In American private schools . . . . 46 

Total 2,178 

These figures show that the truant officer has worked 
industriously, faithfully, and intelligently. He has nearly 
■extinguished truancy in its worst forms, and reduced the 
ratio of absenteeism to the whole number in the schools 
more than 6 per cent during the year. He has full knowl- 
edge of the children employed in mills, and illegal employ- 
ment has practically ceased. The Superintendent refers in 
his report to other interesting facts relating to attendance 
in city schools. 

CONDITION OF SCHOOLS. 

The schools of primary grade are entitled to the first 
mention for efficiency and improvement. In Manchester, 



130 

as elsewhere, primary schools receive the largest share of 
attention. The beginnings of mind-work are intensely 
interesting, and new methods of teaching generally find 
their field of experiment in the primary school. Not all 
the new departures have been admitted into our schools. 
Our Superintendent and committees have generally been 
progressive in investigation, but conservative in adoption of 
new things, selecting such as have been found valuable by 
trial elsewhere. It is sometimes necessary to stand be- 
tween the public treasury and the claims of reformers, even 
when made in the sacred name of education. 

One who can recall the prevailing method of " keeping ' y 
the primary school twenty years 'ago will see in our best 
schools to-day abundant evidence of progress in the art of 
interesting pupils and imparting instruction, in the appli- 
ances of the school-room, and in the quickened interest of 
the children. Indeed, it will not be necessary to draw upon 
the memory ; we still have schools of the antiquarian pat- 
tern with which to compare the latest and best. 

The grammar schools are successfully doing their pecu- 
liar work, intermediate between the highest and lowest. 
They are emphatically the *' common " school of the city, 
finishing the education of about eighty per cent of all the 
pupils who enter our schools, and exerting an immense 
influence upon the intelligence of the community. 

The High School in all its history has never been more 
steadily prosperous and efficient than during the period of 
the present mastership. Of its work the principal says : 
" If there is any one thing that the High School feels, it is 
a want of age in its pupils, and that means, in a majority 
of cases, a want of ability to grasp the subjects which the 
course of study. forces upon them ; " and he urges the con- 
sideration of some plan to secure greater maturity in the 
pupil, physically and mentally, before entering the High 



131 

School- He also calls attention to the need of systematic 
physical culture in that school. In the absence of any thing 
better, he suggests the value of music as a physical exer- 
cise, and would require all pupils to take part in it. Of 
the one hundred and seventy-eight pupils now in attend- 
ance, all but twenty-eight choose the exercise voluntarily. 

The Training School has been fully organized upon the 
plan indicated in the last report. For a full understanding 
of that plan and the results expected of it, you are referred 
to the report of the Superintendent. We call attention 
here only to the matter of the expense of the new plan. 
The principal of the school receives 11.000 per annum. 
She has charge of four rooms, and takes the place of four 
teachers at 8150 each. The young ladies who are receiv- 
ing instruction in the school, and those assisting the p: in- 
cipal, will be paid in all $760 per year, so that a first-class 
training school has been established without expense to the 
city. Miss Sprague, the lady selected to manage this 
school, came to us highly recommended for her ability and 
success in training teachers. She has education, tact, and 
common sense. She will be likely to put into the school 
what is best in all new methods, without being a servile 
imitator of any. 

In a general survey of our schools it is gratifying to 
make a report so favorable. No city within our knowledge 
has a superintendent more zealous and punctilious in duty, 
teachers more intelligent or more faithful, a system of 
classification and studies more elaborate or more exacting 
Our schools have an excellent reputation abroad; superin- 
tendents and committees visit them for observation, and 
our best teachers continue to have " calls." We can boast 
that our schools teach as much and as well as schools teach 
anywhere. Our children are worked as hard, and know as 
much, as children in Boston or in San Francisco. In short, 



132 

the schools fill the full measure of the system to which they 
belong. If they are faulty, we must look to the system 
itself. 

Long experience in school affairs suggests reform in the 
following directions: First, the introduction of manual 
training. At the age of five or six years, just at the time 
when manual dexterity is naturally and easily acquired, 
most children are placed in school and denied every oppor- 
tunity for acquiring it, except in play. For ten years or 
more the hand lies untrained in school, save in a little 
writing and drawing, while the head has incessant work. 
In this respect all schools, public and private, are alike ; 
the only choice is brain work or idleness. And the idle 
boy sometimes has the advantage ; his brain rests, and his 
body gets exercise. In earlier days, before machinery had 
displaced handicraft and killed the apprentice system, 
there was an opportunity, sooner or later, to develop dex- 
terity of hand. Now, few parents have manual occupation 
for their children, or know where to look for it, This con- 
dition of things is a great misfortune. It means an im- 
mense waste of power, and material loss to the individual 
and the community. It means a gradual destruction of 
Yankee ingenuity, and puts off the day when the hand can 
begin to earn bread and create wealth. The changes in 
Society and in business which have swept away the old 
condition of things will be permanent. Manufacturers 
and employers cannot afford to train apprentices. The 
question arises, can the schools do it ? Public sentiment 
strongly favors the attempt. As usual, the theorists have 
come to the front with magnificent schemes for turning all 
the schools into workshops, and all the children into 
mechanics, — schemes altogether too elaborate and expen- 
sive for any city to adopt. Such institutions as the Boston 
School of Technology, for instance, are high above the needs, 



133 

as well as the reach, of common-school education. They 
differ from the college only in name. Every one of their 
graduates expects to be a boss of workmen, and not a work- 
man himself. If any system of manual instruction becomes 
a public institution, it must be a simple adjunct of the 
grammar and high schools as they now exist, requiring no 
expensive buildings and machinery, and no costly material 
to be spoiled. It must be based upon the theory that a 
few mechanical motions and manipulations underlie skill 
in all trades and the use of all tools, just as the mental 
teaching of our schools underlies popular intelligence. 
When a plan commending itself to practical men is adopted, 
the people will welcome and approve it. It would develop 
physical strength, prepare for earning a living, and add 
dignity to labor as correlative to study. Alternate work 
and study have brought just these results in institutions of 
a grade higher than our high schools. It is practicable for 
lower grades. In practical Manchester is a good place to 
try the experiment. Begin with sewing in the primary 
schools, and develop the plan until we have a course of 
ten op twelve hours' drill each week, parallel with the 
present grammar course, and a two years' course for the 
High School. 

Second, the school system should give more liberty to 
the teacher. It happens that children are born with differ- 
ing capacities for learning. Their homes differ in intelli- 
gence and helpfulness. In the schools they need individual 
treatment. We may gauge the course of study never so 
accurately to what we call the " average capacity," still 
some will need extra assistance and encouragement. A 
few days' absence, some distraction of mind for a period, 
and they must lose valuable lessons or fall hopelessly 
behind. Every teacher has noticed the aid which some 
children get in their homes from books and papers and 



134 

intelligent conversation, while others have only the dry 
text-book and the teacher's aid. If a conscientious teacher 
wants to help these less favored scholars over the hard 
places, there is no time for it. The " C " class and the 
" X " class must be run on schedule time. The child may 
be kept after school when he is hungry and impatient, and 
the teacher is neglecting some other red-tape requirement, 
but this does not meet the scholar's real needs. The high- 
est form of teaching is that which regards the scholars as 
individuals, and not in classes. The nearer the personal 
contact of teacher and pupil, the greater the power over 
mind and character. Our system dwarfs both these sources 
of strength. It is a strong argument for the " depart- 
mental " and " consecutive " systems of instruction recom- 
mended by our Superintendent in his report of last year, 
that they would give greater scope to the teacher's individ- 
uality over individual scholars. 

Third, the system may be strengthened on its moral 
side. An opportunity for this is presented by instructing 
pupils on the true nature and effects of alcohol and tobacco. 
The use of tobacco by boys is increasing at an alarming 
rate, and rum is still their greatest enemy. However men 
may defend their own intemperate habits, or deny the 
injurious effects of stimulants and narcotics upon the adult 
health, few will be found who do not wish their children 
to escape the consequences of their use. Since science 
demonstrates that alcohol is a poison as clearly as it proves 
a proposition in geometry, and since experience and exper- 
iment prove that the use of tobacco in youth will induce 
nervous disease and arrest the development of body and 
brain, these facts may claim a place beside the multiplica- 
tion table as a necessary part of education. The United 
States government, after a series of experiments, has for- 
bidden the use of tobacco in any form by boys training for 



135 

the army or navy. The legislature of Vermont has just 
enacted that this kind of instruction be given in all the 
schools of that state. It is a most hopeful sign for the 
cause of temperance that public sentiment is demanding 
that the public school be made a vehicle of correct and 
wide-spread knowledge of these evils. In some states, laws 
forbid liquor shops within the same square with a school- 
house. One of our large school buildings has seven within 
five hundred feet of it, and some of them are especially 
calculated to attract the young. Surely public sentiment 
will sustain the authorities in an attempt to protect our 
boys and girls from dangers so great and menacing. 

TEACHERS. 

Miss Emma C. Gee, Miss Mary A. Lear, and Miss Lizzie 
J. West, teachers in the employment of the city at the 
beginning of the present year, have died. They were all 
graduates of our Training School. They were young, and 
hud but just begun lives full of promise when cut down by 
death. It is proper to record their worth in this place. 

It is also fitting to mention the decease of ,Miss C. 
Augusta Gile, formerly first assistant in the High School. 
Probably no other graduate of our city schools has achieved 
a more brilliant scholarship. In her devotion to duty and 
in her high purposes in life, she was a model teacher. 
Many citizens, once her pupils, gratefully recall the power 
of her cultured mind and graceful womanhood. 

Since the last report, five teachers have resigned, — 
Misses Bartlett, Prior, Salisbury, Dana, and Webster. Six 
were displaced at the recent annual election. The others 
have been re-elected, in most instances for one year. The 
vexed questions of their competency and tenure of office 
now fall to our successors. We commend to the attention 
of the incoming board the rule made by this committee, 



136 

but not put in force, which requires new teachers to serve 
twelve weeks or more on probation. Let them adopt this and 
courageously enforce it. It is the only way to secure good 
teachers. Then let them make another rule: that no 
teacher who has served more than one year shall be dis- 
missed without notice. Would it not also be well to change 
the time of annual election to the end of the summer term, 
thus giving discharged teachers time to find new situations 
in the long vacation? Teaching is a business by which 
intelligent and honorable men and women earn a living. 
No school board, when deciding that they no longer want a 
teacher, have a right to prejudice that teacher's chances for 
employment elsewhere. In dealing with the question of 
removal, it is well to remember that while teachers are 
legally the employes of the school committee, they are 
really the servants of the people. The discerning public 
understands the teacher's labors and responsibilities. It 
honors the teacher's calling. It will not sanction a care- 
less and trifling treatment of their interests. Public opin- 
ion declares that the parents whose children are under the 
care of a,teacher are, to say the least, equally competent to 
judge of her worth with the committee-man who has not 
visited her school in a year's time. The summary dismissal 
of teachers of good character and long service, who have 
never had a suspicion that their services were not satisfac- 
tory, is a refinement of injustice which the people will not 
approve. On the other hand, the public demand in the 
choice of new teachers will be very critical. Young-lady 
candidates for primary schools must not think a head full 
of Pestalozzi and normal methods will commend them to 
fathers and mothers unless they also have genuine sympa- 
thy with the heart of childhood, and enough of motherly 
common sense to know a child's needs ; nor can a man of 
the most brilliant scholarship expect to remain long as a 



137 

teacher of youth in our high and grammar schools unless 
his character bears the stamp of clean manhood. 

Much of the difficulty surrounding this subject arises 
from a divided responsibility. Here, again, our city system 
is at fault. Under our state laws, towns choose two school 
committees, superintending and prudential. Their duties 
and powers are distinct. Botb are elected with reference 
to fitness for their respective duties. Cities are allowed to 
vest the powers of both these committees in one body. 
That body then delegates a part of its duties to, and divides 
its responsibility with, a superintendent. Nominally, the 
choice of teachers and supervision of the schools is in the 
hands of the superintendent and that part of the committee 
competent to assist him. Practically it is not so. Teach- 
ers are chosen and discharged against the judgment of 
those who know most, by the votes of those who know least, 
of the needs of the schools. 

The question is submitted for the consideration of our 
citizens, whether it would not be for the interest of the 
schools to change the School Committee from a parliamen- 
tary body to a board of directors, who shall choose a super- 
intendent who shall superintend. 

In conclusion, we repeat the, trite but ever- valuable 
advice to parents and citizens — Know your schools. Year 
by year the teachers record fewer visits. More and more 
the schools are left to themselves. Unless the bond of 
sympathy between the home and the school is kept strong, 
teachers will become mere hirelings, and the greatest and 
best of our public institutions will lose its power. 

MARSHALL P. HALL, 

For the Committee. 

Manchester, Dec. 30, 1882. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with your rules, requiring 
an annual report from the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, I herewith respectfully submit the following as my 
sixth report, the same being for the year 1882, and the 
twenty-seventh of its series : — 

ATTENDANCE. 

By comparing the results found in the attendance table 
for this year with similar ones for last year, it will appear 
that the whole number of different pupils enrolled is one 
hundred and forty less than the number a year ago ; but 
that the average number belonging and the average daily 
attendance are each about one hundred greater than the 
same items for last year. These results, opposite in their 
nature, the former affecting the attendance negatively and 
the latter positively, show that those children who have 
not been withdrawn from our schools belong to that pupil- 
age which has constituted the more permanent membership 
and been most regular in attendance. Doubtless, too, the 
more stringent law in regard to the employment of chil- 
dren in manufacturing establishments has operated to 
make the membership of a certain class of pupils more 
stable, and the efforts of an efficient truant officer have also 



139 

helped to increase the regularity of attendance at some 
schools. 

The school at Amoskeag is properly no longer classed as 
a grammar school, and, though allowance he made for the 
difference in the classification of that school for this year, 
the attendance table will reveal as facts that the high and 
grammar schools are slightly smaller than last year in 
respect to all the essential items of tabulation, that the 
middle and suburban schools are correspondingly greater, 
and that the gains and losses first mentioned have there- 
fore chiefly affected the attendance at the primary schools. 

NUMBER AND SIZE OF SCHOOLS. 

There is really not so much difference in the number of 
schools classed as middle and primary as would at first 
appear from a comparison of the attendance tables of last 
year and this. The grades designated a year age under 
the head of ''Training Department," comprised two middle 
and two primary schools. So there were then in all thir- 
teen schools of middle grade and thirty-two of primary 
grade ; but two of the latter were closed a part of the year, 
and there was therefore an average of only thirty-one pri- 
mary schools. This year there have been fourteen middle 
and thirty-four primary schools ; but six of the latter have 
been in existence for only such portions of the year as 
would make them equivalent to but three schools, hence 
the average for this year is also thirty-one primaries. 

One middle school in the Merrimack-street house was 
discontinued this year, but it was counterbalanced by 
another of that grade organized in 'Squog ; and the middle 
school established on Webster street may be balanced 
against the discontinued extra division at Lincoln street. 
The apparent increase of primaries has been offset by the 
discontinuance of others in different localities. 



140 

The conclusion then is, that for the accommodation of 
an increase this year of one hundred pupils in the average 
number belonging and average daily attendance, there have 
really been no more schools than there were last year. 

The small schools in the city proper, and those likely so 
to continue, are the two highest divisions in each of the 
grammar schools on Franklin street and Spring street, the 
higher middle school on Spring street, and the mixed mid- 
dle and grammar, as well as the mixed primary, on Web- 
ster street. The two latter, however, are a necessity, for 
the pupils composing them cannot be accommodated in 
other schools reasonably near their homes, and these schools 
would still be small though the pupils in the Stark District 
were transferred thither; but by putting three small classes 
in a room, as of necessity has had to be done in the two 
upper divisions of the Main-street school, the three higher 
grades at Spring street could be consolidated into two 
schools of average size. 

Two of the suburban schools have nearly doubled their 
daily average attendance since last year, in the Stark 
District the average daily attendance has been eight as 
against five a year ago, and in the Youngsville district it 
has been thirty-one in place of seventeen for last year. Of 
the other suburban schools, that in the Mosquito-Pond dis- 
trict has had an average daily attendance of but sixteen, 
and those at Harvey District and Webster's Mills have each 
averaged only twelve. 

CONDITION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The High School, as a whole, lias done better work than 
last year. Those then belonging to the corps of instructors 
have put forth their best efforts ; and better results have 
been obtained, partly in consequence of the improved form 
of organization whereby greater quiet has been secured for 



141 

pupils at study and the undivided attention of teachers for 
those at recitation. The corps of instructors has also heen 
increased and strengthened by one who had proved herself 
both faithful and efficient in every school placed under her 
charge. 

Of the grammar schools, the Ash-street and Main-street 
have had a slightly increased attendance, while the others 
are but little depleted. The Main-street school is grad- 
ually gaining numbers for the higher classes ; and after the 
first of February next it will have three divisions instead of 
two. There will also be fewer gaps in its classification. 

There are sixteen teachers in the five largest elementary 
schools who do grammar-school work, and the greater part 
of them possess good judgment and tact, are devoted to the 
interests of their pupils and uniformly have good schools. 
The past year has been no exception, and pupils admitted 
to the High School for the first time upon the recommen- 
dation of the grammar masters are acknowledged by the 
teachers of the High School to be as well prepared for ad- 
vanced work as those heretofore admitted by examination. 
The greatest improvement made in the middle schools 
has been in the teaching of language. Pupils are daily 
accustomed to reproduce in writing the substance of inform- 
ation obtained as a result of the oral instruction which they 
receive, chiefly in regard to animals, plants, and occupa- 
tions. Kindly criticism of the efforts made by the children 
in writing such abstracts develops their powers of obser- 
vation, memory, and facility of expression ; and it likewise 
gradually leads them to a better technical use of the 
language. 

In primary schools more stress has this year been put 
upon the teaching of number, and considerable progress 
has been made in an attempt to comprehend and teach the 
development of numbers in accordance with the Grube sys- 



142 

tern. To second the efforts of teachers in this direction^ 
and to economize their time for better purposes than that 
of endless writing upon the blackboard, I trust the com- 
mittee will supply all the lower primary schools with 
Parker's Arithmetical Charts. 

Finally, in regard to the condition of our schools, I may 
say that I believe the schools of Manchester will compare 
most favorably with those of any city of its size whose 
population is as diversified and unstable. 

TEACHERS. 

The attainment of so high a standard is largely due to 
the efficiency and skill of those better teachers who com- 
prise three-quarters or more of our corps of instructors, and 
to the fact that all have labored faithfully to perform their 
official duties. 

The number of our teachers who have received the ben- 
efit of normal-school instruction is exceedingly small, but 
it is fair and just to say that out of a long and successlul 
experience many of them have acquired what not even a 
normal school could furnish a beginner, while a few have 
apparently repeated, in the main, the ways of management 
and the methods of instruction pursued by them during the 
first week of their official experience. As much might be 
said, with equal truth, of the less efficient portion of the 
same number of persons engaged in any other vocation. 
But the position of the teacher is so peculiar, his influence 
so far reaching and transcendent, that of all offices that of 
teacher should he most efficiently filled ; and without a 
good teacher, whatever be the other appliances at hand, no 
first-class school can be had. 

Though the material of which many of our lower-grade 
schools is composed is of a most mixed nature, it is never- 
theless true that the character and progress of schools do 



143 

not so much depend upon the nationality of the pupils com- 
posing them as upon the fitness and efficiency of the 
teachers in charge. The truth of this assertion would be 
made evident to any competent person who might critically 
observe the schools in our midst, or test the results therein 
attained. It is true, however, that, other things being 
equal, those schools should be found best the pupilage of 
which is composed most largely of children who, " native 
here and to the manner born," have good homes and good 
home training. An indifferent school composed chiefly of 
such pupils appears doubly bad when placed beside an 
excellent one composed of pupils who, gathered " from the 
four quarters of the earth," find their homes out of school 
hours chiefly in the public street. How great the short- 
coming of the teacher of such a school as the former ! How 
far beyond praise the successful efforts of the teacher of 
such as the latter ! 

If we would have our schools rank with those few places 
that are trying to excel all others, we should be as particu- 
lar as they to see that every vacancy is supplied with the 
very best attainable teacher, and at least be assured that 
every new one obtained is a good teacher. A corps of 
teachers can most easily be made good, and kept so, by 
admitting to it only those who are thoroughly competent. 
I am therefore led to urge that the committee change their 
plan of selecting new teachers, either by the appointment 
of a special committee on " teachers and their positions," 
with full powers, or by vesting in a single individual the 
membership of each sub-committee having in special charge 
the interests of certain schools, including, as at present, the 
nomination of their teachers. Of the two, I should recom- 
mend the former plan, but think the latter would be an 
improvement upon our present one. 

The method of nominating teachers now in practice here 



144 

is, I think, such as was common in most other New Eng- 
land cities a few years since ; but better ways now prevail 
in those places where greatest care is exercised to secure 
the best teachers, and I trust our committee will avail 
itself of such means of making a wise selection of teachers 
as the weight of experience has proved best. 

For the salaries here paid, we are not likely to obtain 
better teachers for most positions than our own schools will 
afford ; and, indeed, within a few years they have furnished 
some of our best teachers. I therefore think the committee 
wise in undertaking to make our 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

for teachers a more strictly professional school, in which 
the graduates of our High School, and other competent 
candidates, may attain some knowledge of the science of 
teaching, as well as practice of its art. I esteem the com- 
mittee especially fortunate in having secured Miss Sarah E. 
Sprague as principal of the Training School. Though she 
has acted in that capacity but one term, it is evident that 
she brought to the school, in addition to a thorough knowl- 
edge of and much experience in the business of training 
classes of teachers, tact, talent, sound judgment, and great 
skill in handling both pupils and sub-teachers, so that while 
the former are making progress as great as the best in 
similar grades of our schools, the latter have been inspired 
with an enthusiastic professional spirit, whose awakening 
and resultant diligent researches after those things which 
most conspire to make the true teacher are not likely to 
cease when they shall have attained the rank of teachers. 

It may be justly said, too. that the eleven sub-teachers 
now in the Training School all give fair promise of ability 
to become efficient teachers, if assigned to grades to which 
they may be found best adapted. If future classes of sub- 



145 

teachers shall be found as scholarly and otherwise compe- 
tent as the present one, the committee should have no 
trouble in rilling future vacancies in teachers' positions, by 
selections from graduates of the Training School, in a way 
that should prove satisfactory to themselves and beneficial 
to the schools. Permit me, therefore, to urge that, in order 
to encourage the best element in our midst to enter the 
Training School, the committee establish a rule that quali- 
fications of candidates for teaching being equal, graduates 
of the Training School shall have the preference when 
teachers are selected for permanent positions. 

The following outline will indicate, in a general way, the 

COURSE OF STUDY 

undertaken by the sub-teachers in the Training School. 
This includes a careful consideration of the best methods 
of instructing pupils in reading, spelling, penmanship, 
arithmetic, geography, language, color, form, size, weight, 
place, elements of physiology, and elements of natural 
science (considering especially plants and animals). The 
work in methods of instruction is accompanied by lessons 
in school economy, school organization and school man- 
agement receiving particular attention. 

It may be well to explain that the subject of place is 
divided into three parts, viz., position, direction, and dis- 
tance, and lessons on these topics are designed to prepare 
the children to use the geography as a text-book. 

The members of the training class spend one hour of 
each day with the principal, receiving instruction in the 
best ways of teaching the subjects already indicated, criti- 
cisms upon their work with the children, suggestions as to 
the duties of the succeeding day, etc. 

From time to time, lessons for criticism are given by 
10 



146 

members of the training class, in accordance with the fol- 
lowing plan : The principal assigns a lesson for the class to 
prepare to teach, no one knowing which member of the 
class will be called upon to act as teacher. At the time 
appointed the principal selects a teacher and two or three 
critics from the members of the class, leaving the remain- 
der to serve as pupils and receive the lesson. 

After the lesson is given, criticisms are called for. The 
critics give their criticisms, both favorable and adverse, 
with their reasons for the same. These are supplemented 
by other members of the class, and, finally, the principal 
reviews the lesson, accepting or rejecting the criticisms 
made, as the case may require, adding other criticisms 
when necessary. 

No other plan seems so well adapted to illustrate to 
the whole class the pernicious etfects of faulty questioning, 
insufficient preparation, mannerisms, and kindred evils on 
the part of a teacher. 

Neither is there any other way known to me by which 
young teachers can so quickly be made to understand and 
appreciate the difference between good and poor work in 
teaching except to have these trial lessons given to chil- 
dren, and this can not always be arranged for conveniently. 

Besides the lectures and lessons already described, the 
principal and members of the training class go over various 
manuals of instruction together, discussing methods therein 
given, the principal explaining parts not well understood. 

In response to a request for additional apparatus and 
books for the Training School, the School Committee 
promptly voted money for that purpose. 

The following is a list of the works at present composing 
the Training-School library : — 

Set of Johnson's Encyclopedias. 8 vols. 



147 

Worcester's Unabridged Dictionary. 

Methods of Teaching-, by Jno. Swett. 

School Economy, by Wickersham. 

Science ol Education, by Alexander Bain. 

Education, by Herbert Spencer. 

Theory and Practice of Teaching, by David Page. 

History of Pedagogy, Kindergarten Culture, by W. N- 
Hailman. 

Attention, how to Secure and Retain, Mistakes in 
Teaching, by J. L. Hughes. 

Talks with Teachers, by A. D. Mayo. 

Manual of Elementary Instruction, Lessons on Objects, 
by E. A. Sheldon. 

How to Teach, by Kiddle, Harrison, Calkins. 

Object Lessons, by C. N. Calkins. 

Elementary Lessons in English, by Mrs. N. L. Knox. 

Normal Training, by Russell. 

Common School Education, by James Currie. 

Household Education, by Harriet Martineau. 

Sex in Education, Building a Brain, by Dr. E. H. Clarke. 

First Book in Botany, by Youmans. 

Book of Nature, by Dr. W. Hooker. 

School Management, by J. Baldwin. 

Life of Horace Mann, by Mrs. Mary Mann. 

Reports of Horace Mann. 2 Vols. 

Lectures on Teaching, by J. G. Fitch. 

On Teaching, by Calderwood. 

Life of Pestalozzi, by Prof. H. Krusi. 

New England Journal of Education, Primary Teacher, 
Public School, Good Times, by New England Publishing 
Company. 

With the nucleus now established, and the expenditure 
of a small sum of money each year to buy more books, it 



148 

will not be long before a valuable library of professional 
books will be owned by this school. 

Regular reading of the books and periodicals in the lib- 
rary is required of the members of the training class, and 
forms an essential feature in their preparation for teaching. 

It is proper here to add that the Training School, em- 
bracing a lower and a higher middle and a lower and a 
higher primary grade,* was re-organized upon its present 
general plan in the four lower rooms of the Franklin-street 
School, at the opening of last spring term, and placed in 
charge of Miss Clara A. Amies as principal. Miss Amies 
was found to be a lady of good education and much culture. 
She was experienced and skillful in normal methods of 
teaching. She had greater taste, however, for work with 
advanced pupils, and resigned, at the end of the term, to 
accept a more tempting position in a young ladies' seminary 
in a distant state. 

The establishment of the Training School upon a profes- 
sional basis may be regarded as the most important act of 
your administration of school affairs. Among 

OTHER MEASURES 

effected by you, for the good of the schools, may be men- 
tioned the reduction of the afternoon sessions of the schools 
from three hours to two ; a better arrangement in the form 
•of the manual of school " organization ; " the establishment 
of fire-alarm signals for closing schools in very bad weather ; 
the experiment of admitting grammar-school pupils to the 
High School upon the recommendation of the grammar 
masters ; the appointment of teachers upon trial for one 
term before final election ; a liberal allowance of matter 
for supplementary reading in the schools, as well as a gen- 
erous supply of maps, globes, cyclopedias, other books of 

* These four grades cover the first five years of school work. 



149 

reference, and varied forms of illustrative apparatus ; ex- 
tended and much needed improvements of school-houses, 
as well as of the arrangements for heating them ; a revision 
of the " Course of Study," as well as of the "Rules and 
Regulations" for the government of the schools; and the 
appointment of a truant officer. 

Emphasis is given in the revised course of study to the 
most important branches taught in our schools, arithmetic 
and language. The study of arithmetic is confined to its 
more practical applications. There is omitted in the ele- 
mentary schools the consideration of duodecimals, multi- 
plication and division of compound numbers, the metric 
system, equation of payments, alligation, the progressions, 
and the unpractical portions of mensuration, with the de- 
sign of having the more important of these subjects taught 
later in the school course, when pupils have gr< ater matu- 
rity of mind for their comprehension. By this means more 
time is available in the elementary schools for the study of 
language, and the essentials of other branches usually 
taught in common schools. Language is here spoken of in 
that broad sense which includes reading and spelling, as 
well as all other forms of written and oral expression. 

The change made in the course of study, whereby it is 
provided that promotions shall be made at the end of each 
five months' work, has proved salutary in relieving the 
schools of that pressure which formerly caused teachers to 
feel that as much must be accomplished in the first four 
months of the year as during the last six. By this same 
change, the other advantages mentioned in my report of 
1879 (page 45) are also attained. 

There is, however, one change which I recommend to be 
ma<ie in the course. The attempt to teach spelling solely 
by copying the written forms of words, during the first 
three years of the child's attendance at school, has here, as 



150 

elsewhere, proved at least a partial failure. The arrange- 
ment does very well for the first year, and the introduction 
of the spelling-book at the opening of the fourth year is 
sufficiently early ; but during the second and third years I 
think there should be much oral spelling of words found in 
the reading lessons, as well as of many other words in com- 
mon use by the children composing the classes of these 
years. The preparation of their spelling exercises, how- 
ever, may well continue to be made in writing. With the 
concurrence of the committee, I propose to inaugurate the 
change mentioned during next term. 

SUPPLEMENTARY READING. 

The extended use of matter for supplementary reading 
in the schools has proved highly satisfactory. I have been 
especially gratified in observing, from recent special exami- 
nations, the improved condition of the classes in general, 
in respect to reading. This improvement is doubtless 
largely due in primary schools to the improved methods of 
teaching reading to beginners, but even in these lower 
grades supplementary reading is as useful as in any. It 
fixes in the minds of beginners the vocabulary which is be- 
ing taught them, for the form of their supplementary read- 
ing is confined to an expression of thoughts kindred in 
meaning to those already entertained. This expression, 
too, is chiefly made by the use of the same words as those 
which clothe thoughts previously considered in regular 
lessons, the words, however, being variously arranged. By 
this means the pupil is better taught the significance of the 
words he uses, and he is naturally led to give them expres- 
sion according to their importance in other combinations. 

In higher primary classes, the form of matter for supple- 
mentary reading consists of selections containing new sto- 
ries, chiefly expressed in words with which the pupils are 



151 

already familiar. Such reading not only increases their 
interest in the study, but it affords them opportunity to 
read with that naturalness which is attained only by facility 
of expression. Being thus encouraged, and feeling that 
they can " read right off as grown people do," they make 
much progress. 

With middle-school and lower grammar classes supple- 
mentary reading comprises matter containing less familiar 
words, to enlarge the vocabulary of pupils and to teach 
them how to discover the meaning of words from their 
context. Care, however, must be exercised to see that the 
subject-matter for this class of pupils, as well as that for all 
others, is not beyond their comprehension. 

With advanced grammar classes some of the higher 
forms of literature may be profitably used, as well as ele- 
mentary treatises upon the natural sciences, for the pur- 
pose of habituating pupils to inspect the text of what they 
read so as to elicit therefrom its whole thought. Such 
reading as this may properly supplement ordinary fifth or 
sixth readers. 

Reading matter, used as suggested for the various classes 
of pupils, supplements not only the school readers, as such, 
but also the efforts of the teacher to promote the intelli- 
gence of the pupil by logical processes of arousing his men- 
tal activities. Supplementary reading is also a powerful 
auxiliary in the work of instruction in language. It affords 
the younger children variety of form and material, and 
for the older ones it may be so arranged and handled as to 
create a love for the study of works that would result in a 
limited course in literature, which would be more likely 
than anything else in his elementary studies to determine 
a pupil to seek a higher, or liberal, education. 

This wider range of reading matter in the schools also 
affords food for the development of the general information 



152 

of pupils; and, by a more diversified presentation of the 
various phases of life, it increases the opportunities of the 
teacher for casually imparting moral instruction, and the 
giving of such instruction incidentally all teachers of expe- 
rience know to be the best method of teaching morality in 
the public school, aside from the example of an upright 
life by the teacher. 

Supplementary reading also imparts freshness to reading 
exercises. No author can put into an ordinary book, form- 
ing any one of his series of readers, any thing like all the 
gems of thought or desirable selections known to him and 
adapted to a certain age. Hence by using several school 
readers by different authors, appropriate to any age of 
younger pupils, there are obtained the best selections, 
adapted to that age, known to several authors ; and there 
may therefore be obtained from this source as pleasing and 
as instructive a variety of reading matter as our language 
affords. 

A small number of readers may be made to do a great 
amount of service, by changing them about among the 
schools; and, if kept from pupils except at times of reci- 
tation, they will last many terms. Moreover, books 
designed for supplementary reading should be so kept from 
pupils for other than economic reasons. If pupils are 
allowed to take the books to their desks, they soon cease to 
afford fresh matter ; and half the object of their use in 
arousing constant and renewed interest in the reading les- 
son is soon lost. Teachers realize this from their knowl- 
edge of the way in which their own interest is renewed 
when new readers are introduced into the schools, after the 
selections of the old text-books have become stale from 
much repetition. 

How many adults could read and reread, over and over 
again, as pupils are frequently required to do in school, the 



153 

average selections of the school reader, not only without 
losing their interest, but without returning to the work in 
evident disgust ? What then might not be said of the feel- 
ings of children who are compelled time after time, and 
again term after term, to reread lessons which they justly 
regard as tasks ? But introduce supplementary reading 
whose vocabulary is of the grade of the text-book proper to 
be used, and it will be like putting oil upon troubled 
waters ; night becomes day, and smiles succeed frowns. 

The primary object of teaching people to read is to enable 
them readily to discover ideas as represented upon the 
printed page ; secondarily, to enable them to reproduce and 
express these ideas intelligently and naturally : and, finally, 
to enable them to give such expression in the most effective 
and pleasing manner. Supplementary reading in schools 
is more or less helpful in securing all of these points ; and, 
wherever used, its results in respect to the first and second 
points named are sufficiently evident to establish its utility 
and determine its continuance. As the first and second 
points are fundamental to the attainment of the third, and 
as supplementary reading is the best-known book assist- 
ance in enabling the pupil quickly to apprehend thoughts 
represented in print, and then to express those thoughts 
intelligently and naturally, a place for its exercise in the 
schools is unimpeachable. 

In my report of two years years ago I also expressed the 
belief that the results of such reading in the schools would 
save many a child from the wretched life engendered by a 
perusal of the miserable trash which is thrown broadcast 
over the country in the form of cheap reading, by so culti- 
vating the taste of pupils for the higher forms of literature 
that they would no longer be satisfied with that which is 
low and demoralizing. Should such results prove true, 
even to a limited extent, the cost of supplementary reading 



154 

supplied our schools would prove a most profitable invest- 
ment. 

To secure so desirable an end. great care mast be exer- 
cised in the choice of books to be used for the purpose ; 
and during the latter portion of the common-school period, 
when pupils have acquired an extended vocabulary, I think 
the reading should be limited to one or two good books,, or 
their equivalent in a few standard selections, which should 
be thoroughly read, and so discussed and treated as to en- 
able pupils to carry from school into life both the ability 
and the inclination to obtain from books only that which is 
good, and of that the greatest possible amount. 

Our schools for the past year or two have been fairly sup- 
plied with good books for supplementary reading, and I 
repeat that their use has proved highly beneficial ; but 
some of these books have become badly worn and will soon 
need to be replaced, and it is hoped future committees will 
provide the means for continuing the work so well begun. 

In this connection I think it well again to suggest that it 
would be wise for the city to purchase all the readers used 
in her schools. By this means a few sets of several series 
could be purchased, and by changing them about among 
the schools the advantages of books now used for supple- 
mentary reading could be had' without additional expense. 
Besides, readers purchased by the city at wholesale could 
be obtained comparatively cheap, and the patrons of our 
schools would have their expenses for text-books materially 
lessened. The free use of readers to all pupils in the city 
schools is granted at Portland, Me., and the same has been 
practiced for seven or eight years at Grand Rapids, Mich. 
I am also informed by the superintendents in these cities 
that the practice has proved highly satisfactory. 



15; 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 



It may be observed that the more important recommenda" 
tions made in this report are that another plan be adopted 
for the selection of teachers, that a rule be established 
whereby, other things being equal, graduates of the 
Training School shall have the preference when teachers 
are to be appointed,* and that the free use of readers be 
supplied all the pupils in our public schools. f 

I also call the attention of the committee to other impor- 
tant recommendations made in former reports, and for the 
reasons therein stated, as follows : First, applicants for 
admission to the Training School should be required to pass, 
before being admitted to that school, a satisfactory exami- 
nation upon the matter of common-school studies, so that 
it may be certain they have the requisite scholarship, and 
that upon graduation, which should be allowed only on 
condition that while members of the Training School they 
show fitness to teach, they need be examined only upon 
the theory and practice of teaching. £ Second, substitutes 
should be furnished schools whenever regular teachers are 
absent for the purpose of visiting other schools. § Third, 
masters of the grammar schools should become conversant 
with the details of school work for all grades ; and they 
should then be given supervision, under the school authori- 
ties as directed by the course of study and advised by the 
Superintendent, of all schools in their respective build- 
ings, being each allowed an assistant for the purpose of 
enabling them properly to execute such supervision, — a 
thing which they cannot well do under the present form of 
organization, even in the various divisions of their grammar 
departments. || 

* Report of 1877, p. 37. t Report of 1878, p. 51. 

X Report of 1879, p. 31 ; and Report of 1SS1, p. 35. 

§ Report of 1881, p. 34. II Report of 1880, p. 39. 



156 

I shall now speak only with reference to my first recom- 
mendation. I have suggested that there be a change in 
our plan of selecting teachers, because to me the present 
way seems ill advised ; and upon consultation with other 
superintendents of greater and more varied experience I 
find our present practice, though once quite common, now 
disapproved in strongest terms. It is usually argued that 
under a responsibility so divided the care requisite to ascer- 
tain the merits of respective candidates is not usually exer- 
cised. It is also held as unbusinesslike to have so many 
centers virtually controlling the appointment of employes 
who should feel themselves held responsible to the general 
committee as one whole, which is found to be the case 
when all teachers obtain their positions through the same 
standing committee. 

Besides, what interest is so vital to the welfare of the 
schools as the character of their teachers? 11, then, a 
standing committee can best manage, for all the schools, 
such matters as repairs and supplies, text-books and appa- 
ratus, fuel and heating, and finance, why not a similar 
committee for teachers and their positions ? Not more than 
one committee can, to best advantage, survey the whole 
field of labor in which a large corps of teachers are engaged, 
discriminate in regard to the value of their efforts in par- 
ticular localities, and then bring about such changes in the 
teaching force as will best subserve the interests of all the 
schools. 

With a standing committee for the selection and exami- 
nation of teachers, sub-committees could be continued as 
visiting committees, power being vested in the chairman of 
each to make such temporary arrangements for his respec- 
tive schools as is now provided by " the Rules of the Com- 
mittee." This last suggestion is made merely to facilitate 
any need of action in behalf of a school under ordinary cir- 



157 

cumstances, it being understood that the chairman would 
consult his full sub-committee in all extraordinary cases. 

CONCLUSION. 

The public-school system of this country, though justly 
considered the chief source of her strength and the greatest 
object of her pride, has but recently taken root in a large 
section of her territory. It has taken two hundred years 
for this system to gain the respect and confidence of the 
whole people. Now, however, the public schools are 
rooted in the hearts of the people north and south, as 
well as east and west ; and, like the stanch oak of two 
centuries' growth, they readily withstand the sharp attacks 
made upon them from any quarter. 

The common schools will never lose the confidence of 
the American people. Inconsiderate assaults can no more 
uproot them than a flurry of wind the oak ; but true criti- 
cism may well continue to perform the office of the pruning- 
knife. 

Our own schools are the product of many years' growth ; 
and, unlike " the barren fig-tree," they have extended their 
branches throughout the community and borne rich fruit. 
In their management, under your direction, I have endeav- 
ored to carry out the understood will of a majority of the 
committee. I have tried to ieep within the limits of the 
regulations prescribed for the government of the Superin- 
tendent, though they have sometimes been felt to be 
unnecessarily restraining. I have revealed the greatest 
weaknesses of the schools to members of the committee only. 
I have tried to strengthen them chiefly by an effort to have 
every vacancy in the corps of teachers filled by choice of the 
best available candidate. I have not thought it wise to try 
to cause the removal of any teacher in the uncertainty of 
having the vacancy filled by a superior. 



158 

Finally, gentlemen, if, through undue jealousy for the 
welfare of the schools, I have sometimes seemed to urge 
a course other than what any of you have most wished 7 
I thank you for your forbearance, and only ask that you 
accord me honesty of purpose in attempting to perform the 
duties of my office in accordance with my official oath. 
Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 
December 29, 1882. 



159 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR 
THE YEAR 1882. 



Schools. 



6 . 



Whole No. 
Belonging. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



G c 



<3 



"a 



High School. 



Franklin-street Grammar School. 
Lincoln-street Grammar School. .. 

Ash-street Grammar School 

Spring-street Grammar School 

Piscataquog Grammar School 



Totals 




idclle School No. 1 




2 


U (( .. 


3 


(< « a 


4 


tt M « 


5 


<< ft ft 


6 


(< tt a 


1% 


tt « C 

If tt f 


u 

9 

10 

11 


ft s< u 


12|| 


Totals 


13 

m 


rimary School No. 1 




21F 


it f< 4 


3 


tt « < 


4 


ft f f ( 


5 


ft ft J 


6 


it tt f 


7 ... 

S 


tt ! 


9, Discontinued 

10 


tt tt < 


11$ 


tt tt t 


i2i 


tt it < 


13 

14 


tt tt < 


15 


a tt < 


16 


tt tt i 


17 


<t tt < 


18 


tt tt t 


19 


{< »< l 


20 

21** 


ft u < 


22 


tt tt i 


' 231T 


it tt < 


24 

25 


it tt t 


' 26 



233 

246 

254 
326 
108 
109 



83 
66 
89 

90 
81 
83 
88 
93 

98 
89 
76 
84 
81 
97 

140 
81 

119 
63 
94 
37 
59 
75 
83 

156 

145 



S3 



27, Discontinued. 



357 

31 
23 
25 
27 
37 
25 
25 
32 
35 
26 
29 
31 
23 
1 

370 

43 
28 
39 
34 
37 
33 
26 
32 

48 
43 
25 
36 
26 
27 
35 
22 
60 
28 
39 

29 I 
37 ! 
54 I 
42 
32 ! 



95 

87 
96 
108 
38 
63 



392 

22 
30 
23 
27 
21 
25 
39 
24 
24 
22 
17 
17 
22 
2 

315 

43 
28 
40 
25 
25 
44 
39 
40 

29 
39 
29 
34 
27 
29 
34 
26 
57 
29 
50 
2 
27 
37 
16 
30 
17 



142 
167 
176 
57 
76 



618 

43 
41 
41 
45 
48 
40 
43 
43 
47 
29 
38 
33 
37 
25 



13G 
157 
166 
54 

72 



585 

40 
37 
37 
41 
45 
37 
39 
40 
43 
27 
35 
31 
34 
24 



95.7 
93.1 
94.3 
94.7 
94.7 



94.7 

93.0 
90.2 
90.2 
91.1 
93.7 
92.5 
90.6 
93.0 
91.5 
93.0 
92.1 
94.9 
91.9 
96.0 

92.2 

88.4 
93.7 
86.0 
93.3 
90.0 
94.8 
93.9 
87.0 

80.4 
89.7 
92.7 
92.8 
89.6 
89.4 
92.3 
90.7 
89.4 
88.1 
88.8 
90.6 
87.1 
90.7 
87.7 
87.2 
92.7 



160 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR THE 
YEAR 1882, — Continued. 



Whole No. 
Belonging. ^ 



Boys. 



Girls. 



8. 2 



- S 

a S 

»<* 

5 >» 



Primary School No. 28. 
" 29. 



Bakersville. 
Totals. 



' 30tt- 
« 31||.. 
; 32 .. 
' 33H.. 
• 34$t. 
' 35§.. 



Suburban School, District No. 1. 

" 21 

" " " " 3. 

« « a 4 

" 5. 



Totals 

Aggregate totals 

Aggregate totals for 1881 . 



97 
71 
35 
96 
114 
93 
67 
23 
81 



1102 

9 

20 
33 
33 
12 

7 
21 
28 
11 

174 

2086 

2200 



1025 



182 



2009 
2035 



1371 



243 



2957 
2858 



1234 

8 
34 
35 
41 
12 
12 
25 
31 
16 



2712 
2602 



92.7 
87.1 
87.5 
89.6 
88.6 
90.0 
96.6 
90.5 



90.0 

89.1 
85.0 
92.1 
95.3 

92.0 
85.7 
86.2 
81.6 
84.2 



88.1 
91.7 
91.0 



* Exclusive of those received, by promotion or transfer, from other schools in the city. 

t Heretofore classed as a grammar school; though not graded as such, and as much 
suburban as "No. 3" at Bakersville. 

J The schools at Franklin street, now organized as a training school for teachers. 

|| The schools formerly constituting the Training School, "No. 31 Primary" then being Of 
middle grade. 

§ New school on Webster street, and in existence during the fall term only. 

IT Closed near the opening of the fall term. 

**Iu existence during the spring term only. 

tt In existence during the winter term only. 

++In existence during the spring and fall terms only. 

It may be added, for the benefit of the uninformed, that there is in this city an extensive 
system of Roman Catholic parochial schools, which accounts in part for the comparatively 
small portion of our population (36,500) in the public schools. 



161 



LIST OF TEACHERS AND JANITORS. 

HIGH SCHOOL, — BEECH STREET. 

Principal. — Albert W. Bacheler. 
Assistants. — George I. Hopkins. 

Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Emma J. Ela. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

Rocilla M. Tuson, two terms. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Edward P. Sherburne. 
Assistants. — Clara G. Fogg. 

Lottie R. Adams. 

Carrie E. Reid. 

First Floor. — Loiver Grades* 

No. 8 Middle. — C. Augusta Abbott, two terms. 
7 Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders, two terms. 
12 Primary. — Nellie M. James, one term. 
11 Primary. — Lenora C. Gilford, one term. 

SPRING-STREET SQHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Mary L. Sleeper. 
Annie 0. Heath. 
No. 9 Middle. — Fannie D. Moulton. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

No. 10 Middle. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

*Organized as a training school at the opening of the second term. See report of the 
Superintendent. 



162 

No. 14 Primary. — Emma L. Stokes. 
13 Primary. — Lucia E. Esty. 
26 Primary. — Carrie I. Stevens. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Benjamin F. Dame. 
Assistants. — Julia A. Baker. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

No. 5 Middle. — Mary F. Barnes. 

4 Middle. — Anna J. Dana, one term. 

Carrie M. Gilmore, two terms. 
7 Primary. — Emma F. Beane. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Daniel A. Clifford. 
Assistants. — Anstrice G. Flanders. 

Rocilla M. Tuson, one term. 

Annie A. Webster. 

Bertha L. Dean, two terms. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. - 

No. 3 Middle. — Bertha L. Dean, one term. 
Mary A. Smith, one term. 
C. Augusta Abbott, one term. 

2 Middle. — Mary A. Smith, one term. 

Carrie M. Gilmore, one term. 
Hattie G. Flanders, one term. 
4 Primary. — Helen M. Morrill. 

3 Primary. — Georgianna Dow. 



163 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

First Floor. 

No. 13 Middle. — Mary A. Smith, one term. 
35 Primary. — Louisa R. Quint, one term. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOLS. 

First Floor. 
No. 1 Primary. — Ella F. Salisbury. 

Second Floor. 
No. 1 Middle. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 

BRIDGE-STREET SCHOOL (CORNER UNION). 

Emma M. Rowley, one term. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT). 

First Floor. 

No. 8 Primary. — Nellie B. Putnam. 

23 Primary. — Flora M. Senter, two terms. 

Second Floor. 

No. 24 Primary. — Mary E. Sylvester. 
5 Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

MANCHESTER-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT), 

First Floor. 

No. 18 Primary. — Maria N. Bower. 
10 Primary, — Nellie Pearson. 

Second Floor. 

No. 2. Primary. — Clara N. Brown, two terms. 
9 Primary. — Discontinued. 



164 



MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER UNION.) 

First Floor. 

No. 33 Primary. — Ida J. Bartlett, one term. 

Lenora C. Gilford, two terms. 
32 Primary. — Elvira S. Prior, one term. 
Nellie M. James, two terms 

Second Floor. 

No. 31 Primary. — Mintie C. Edgerly. 
12 Middle. — Nancy S. Bunton. 

WILSON HILL. 

No. 6 Primary. — Abbie E. Abbott. 

BEECH-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER SPRUCE). 

First Floor. 

No. 22 Primary. — Florence A. Nichols. 

29 Primary. — Louisa R. Quint, two terms. 
Emma M. Rowley, one term. 

Second Floor. 

No 30 Primary. — Lizzie J. West, one term. 
27 Primary. — Discontinued. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistants. — Cora M. Dearborn. 

Lizzie A. Burns, one term. 

Second Floor. 
No. 11 Middle. — Lizzie A. Burns, two terms. 



Florence McEvoy, one term. 



16o 



No. 6 Middle. — Florence McEvoy, two terms. 
Ellen E. McKean, one term. 
34 Primary. — Josephine H. Martin, one term. 

CENTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

First Floor. 

No. 25 Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 
28 Primary. — Belle M. Kelley. 

Second Floor. 

No. 15 Primary. — Jennie F. Bailey. 

16 Primary. — Augusta S. Downs. 

SOUTH-MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

First Floor. 

No. 20 Primary. — Ellen E. McKean, two terms. 
Delle E. Haines, one term. 

17 Primary. — Alice G. Lord. 

Second Floor. 
Overflow. — Delle E. Haines, one term. 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. — Susie A. Crosby, one term. 

Nina D. Annis, two terms. 

2, Amoskeag. — Etta J. Carley. 
19 Primary. — Jennie G. Stebbins. 

3, Bakersville. — Emma C. Gee, one term. 

Phebe A. McGuire, two terms. 
36 Primary. — S. Izetta Locke. 

4, Goffe's Falls. — Georgie A. Nute. 

5, Harvey District. — Mary W. Mitchell. 

6, Webster's Mills. — Susie G. Woodman. 



166 

No. 7, Hallsville. — Annie W. Patten. 

8, Youngsville. — Olive J. Randall. 

9, Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. — Jason J. Kimball, three days per week. 
Drawing. — Mary K. Webster, two terms. 

JANITORS. 

High School, Ash Street, Bridge Street, and Blodget Street. 
John S. Avery. 

Franklin Street, Manchester Street, Lincoln Street, and 
Wilson Hill. 

John A. Carr. 

Spring Street and old High-School House. 
George W. Yarnum. 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 
Rufus Lamb. 

' Squog Schools, Consisting of Center Street, Main and 
South-Main Street Schools. 

D. H. Morgan. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



EEPOET 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineers' Office, 
Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1882. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : — 

In compliance with section 5 of chapter 8 of the Laws 
and Ordinances of the city, I herewith submit the annual 
report of the Manchester Fire Department for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1882, giving amount of property con- 
nected therewith, as well as the fires and alarms to which 
the department has responded. 

Another year has passed, and while our city is enlarging 
its borders, thus adding to its fire risks, it has been free 
from any very severe conflagration. 

There have been twenty-nine alarms, two of which were 
for fires out of the city (Derry and Suncook), to each of 
which portions of the department responded, as well as to 
Raymond (for which no general alarm was sounded). The 
two latter places, however, were not reached in season to 
be of any avail, but at Derry one steamer and a squad of 
men did effectual service. 

The most serious affair pertaining to the department the 
past year was at the fire in Museum building, on the even- 



170 

ing of June 26, at which time was created an uncalled for 
panic that resulted in several persons jumping from the 
third and fourth stories to the pavements below, injuring 
them severely. Had they remained in their rooms until 
ladders could have been erected, all could have been brought 
out in safety ; or, had the building been provided with suit- 
able fire-escapes, no such disaster need to have occurred. 
And here let me state that there is hardly a building within 
our city limits, aside from some of our mills, properly pro- 
vided with such escapes. This disaster, as well as many of 
a more serious nature in other cities, should lead to the 
enactment of a law for the better protection of the lives of 
the inmates of large buildings. 

ORGANIZATION, 

As -the department is at present organized, it consists of 
one hundred and two members, divided as follows : — 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

2 Steam Fire Engine Companies, — 14 men each. 

1 Horse Hose Company, — 20 men. 

2 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 
1 Hook and Ladder Company, — 25 men. 

A lot of land at the corner of Park and Massabesic streets 
has been purchased, a hose-house fitted up, and a cottage 
house built thereon ready for occupancy, and by early spring 
it is hoped to have a horse hose-carriage, with a company 
of twelve men, located at that place. It is a much needed 
addition, and one that will be fully appreciated by our citi- 
zens, especially those residing in that immediate locality. 

THE APPARATUS 

is in good repair and serviceable condition, though I 



171 

would recommend the early attention of the city councils 
to the exchange of the present Hook and Ladder Truck 
for a much stronger one. The one now in use, which was 
originally built to run by hand, is not strong enough to 
meet the strain made upon one drawn by a pair of horses, 
loaded as heavily as this must necessarily be to meet the 
demands of a department for a city of this size. 

The wheels of the supply wagon are also too light for the 
requirements of such a service, and a new wagon ought to 
supply its place. 

The apparatus at present is located as follows, and con- 
sists of — 

*4 Steam Fire Engines, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Sled, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Hook and Ladder Truck, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Supply Wagon, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, cor. Maple and East High sts. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, on Clinton street, 'Squog. 

1 2-wheeled Hose Carriage at the P. C. Cheney Com- 
pany's paper-works, Amoskeag, manned by men at works. 

1 2-wheeled Hose Carriage, Derry mills, Goffe's Falls, 
manned by men at the mills. 

Another change which the city councils might well con- 
sider is the discontinuance of the " jumper" attached to 
the rear of the steamers, and the substitution therefor of 
a two-wheeled horse hose-carriage, to be run in connection 
with the steamers. This would require another horse to 
each steamer company. This suggestion may seem rather 
metropolitan, but as it is a change that must be made 
sooner or later to increase the efficiency of the department, 
its consideration may be worthy of note. 

* Two of which are in reserve. 



172 

It would be well to look to the establishment of another 
hose company in the near future, to be located in the 
northeastern section of the city. 

THE BUILDINGS 

occupied by the department could be more satisfactorily 
cared for, if they were under the supervision of the Board 
of Engineers. As they now are, it is often a tedious un- 
dertaking, and not always a pleasant one, to get the neces- 
sary repairs made. The engineers are better acquainted 
with the needs pertaining thereto than those not so directly 
interested. 

A PROTECTIVE DEPARTMENT 

is an important adjunct to any fire department, — is one 
that has often been alluded to, and which would be of 
great service in protecting property from damage by water, 
and I hope it will ere long receive suitable recognition 
here. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The third annual parade of this department occurred on 
Wednesday, September 13, at which time the u William 
Chase Steam Fire Engine Co. Xo. 1," of Salem, Mass., with 
their mayor and other invited guests, were on a visit to 
this city, and, by invitation, joined in the parade. The 
continuance of this parade serves to keep the several com- 
panies harmonious and better acquainted with one another. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

This has received the constant and careful attention it 
requires, and its need is more and more appreciated each 
year. It has been established since September, 1872, and 
each year has been required to perform additional labor. 
Soon there should be added to the circuit a new box, located 



173 

in the fast-growing settlement at the west end of the 
McGregor bridge ; also a striker on the Webster-street 
school-house, connected with the bell recently transferred 
from the central fire station. 

A much-needed addition to the fire alarm is " indica- 
tors " for the different engine-houses, thus enabling the 
drivers to get the location of fires more correctly than by 
counting, which, in the confusion of " hitching up," they 
are liable to get incorrectly. 

There is no doubt but that, before many years, the 
whole system will have to be re-arranged and the wires re- 
run. At present there are but three circuits, and as the 
city limits are rapidly extending, much new wire will have 
to be run, thereby overloading the battery. Five or more 
circuits should be established to meet the growing demands. 

THE HOSE 

of the department was thoroughly tested during the sum- 
mer, and such as would not stand a pressure of 120 pounds 
was condemned. That now in use is in good serviceable 
condition. 

THE FIREMEN'S RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

This association has had but few drafts upon its treasury 
during the past year, nor has the amount of its funds been 
increased by any liberal donations as in the preceding year. 
Its treasury is still open to receive such donations from the 
generous public as it may feel disposed to make. 

Its present funds are as follows : — 

Cash on hand February 14, 1882 . . . $1,056 99 
By cash paid out 71 nO 



Balance now in treasury . . . $985 49 



174 



TELEPHONE WIRES. 



This subject was referred to in my last year's report, and 
the present location and arrangement ol the wires are no 
better than then, and are as liable at any time to retard the 
prompt workings of the department. 

Although the mayor and aldermen passed an order that 
the wires should be at least thirty-five feet from the ground 
(on Elm east and west back streets), no change has been 
made, and they are many feet lower than the required 
height. 

CONCLUSION. 

One of the worst features connected in any way with the 
department is the arrangement of taking nearly all of the 
horses from the stables, after a storm, to break out the 
roads. It is a very unwise proceeding, for, at such times, 
should an alarm sound, all the horses should be at hand to 
assist in getting the apparatus quickly to a fire. It is true 
the streets must be broken out, but it is easier obtaining 
horses for street service than for fire duty. Our past good 
luck in respect to alarms at such times may not always con. 
tinue, and " an ounce of prevention " may save many 
thousand dollars. 

I desire to express my thanks to his Honor Mayor Put- 
nam for his courtesy to me and the interest he has at all 
times taken in the well-being of the department ; to the 
members of the city councils, who, by their official acts, 
have ever had its interest in view ; to the efficient Assistant 
Engineers for the support and counsel they have so cheer- 
fully rendered ; to the city marshal, assistant marshal, 
captain of the night watch, and the entire police force 
under their charge, who have not only rendered assistance 
at fires, but have prevented many by extinguishing them in 
their early stages; to the superintendents of streets in 



175 

Districts Nos. 2 and 10 for their courtesy in the assign- 
ment of horses; and, finally, to the officers and men for 
their prompt, active, and efficient services in times of need. 
The standing of the several companies comprising this 
department is too well known by our citizens to require any 
comment at my hands. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOS. W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Manchester Fire Department. 



176 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, ETC., FROM 



Day of Week. Day of Month. 



Hour. 



Thursday. . . 

Sunday 

Thursday. .. 

Sunday 

Tuesday 
Thursday . . . 
Wednesday . 
Tuesday 
Wednesday . 
Saturday.. . 
Wednesday . 
Monday . . . 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Saturday.... 
Saturday — 

Tuesday 

"Wednesday. 

Sunday 

Wednesday . 
Wednesday . 
Thursday. .. 

Sunday 

Sunday 

Monday 

Wednesday . 

Friday 

Sunday 

Saturday.. . 
Sunday 



January 19. 

January 22. 

January 26. 

January 29. 

February 14. 

March 16. 

May 3. 



May 
May 
June 
June 
June 
July 
August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
October 9. 
October 11. 
October 11. 
October 12. 
October 15. 
November 12, 
November 13, 
November 29, 
December 1 
December 3 
December 9 
December 17, 



8.57 P. m. 

5.45 p. m. 
10.30 p. m. 

9.20 a. m. 
11.50 p. m. 

8.47 p. m. 

2 P. M. 

4.25 p. m. 

4 A. M. 

11.30 p. m. 
2.10 p. M. 
11.40 p. m. 

11.10 A. M. 

2.20 p. m. 
3.40 p. m. 
5.40 p. m. 
1.20 A. M. 
4.20 p. m. 

1 A. M. 

1.30 A. M. 
10.40 A. M. 
11.25 A. M. 

8.52 p. m. 
4.30 A. m. 
7.15 p. m. 
9.25 A. M. 
10.20 p. m. 
6.10 p. m. 
2.50 p. m. 
2.30 a. m. 



Box. 



15 

4 

4 

4 

7 

7 

15 
52 

9 

4 

4 
27 
53 

4 

6 

31 

23 

61 

Still. 

6 
71 
21 
32 
25 

6 

5 
53 

4 
52 

4 



Location. 



50 Pearl street 

Park, near Elm 

607 Elm street 

Corner of Park and Elm 

Elliot & Means' block 

Church street 

Washington block, Pearl street. 

102 Fourth street 

17 West Webster street. 

Granite street 

164 Chestnut street 

752 Elm street 

Bank 'Squog river 

Cedar, corner of Elm street 

Derry Depot 

Amoskeag 

Spruce street, east extension 

Nutt road 

Epping 

Suncook 

East Spruce street 

Rear 71 Hanover street 

Canal street, corner of Langdon. 

Candia road. 

377 Chestnut street 

12 Stark Corporation 

Milford street, 'Squog 

Rear of 21 Central street 

Main street, 'Squog 

Elm street 



17 r 



JANUARY 1, 1882, TO DECEMBER 31, 1882. 



Description. 


Owners. 


Occupant. 


In closet, Washington blk 


Sawyer, Ainsworth, & Co 


Louis Girard 


Chimney 




Store, brick block 




Patrick McDonough 


Fire in trunk. ... 


John H. Mavnard 




Elliot & Means 


F. D. Thorp 


Chimney 




Third story, tenement blk. 


Sawyer, Ainsworth, & Co 




Cottage house 






Two-story house and barn. 




J. E. Towle &G. E. Flanders. 
C. H. Hill & Co 


Flour and grain store 


Charles H. Hill & Co 




Fred G. Stark 


( Miss Durgin & Lawrence 
\ Foley. 

Mrs. Catherine Crosby... . 
James Baldwin & Co 

( Margaret Lyons & Peter 
( Dailey. 


Four-story brick block 

Wooden store-house 


Dr. E. Custer and Horace Pettee. 


Barn and two cottages 


J. H. Maynard, Blodgett & Clark. 




P. C. Cheney Paper Co 

True J. Perry 


P. C. Cheney Paper Co 

P. C. Young & Mrs. Barnet. 


Cottage house and barn . . . 
Brush fire 




















Shavings in shed 


J. F. Parker 




Hay in freight-car 


T. L. Livermore 




House and barn 


H. &. H. R. Pettee. 


Nathan A. Sleeper 


Tenement block 


Isaac Huse 


Tenement block 


Stark Mills. 




Green-house 


F. &. Worthen & Son 




Tenement block 


Mrs. M. A. Wallace . 


Francis Terrie & J. Gavin. . . 


Feather bed 


Thomas Gorman 


Drug-store 













12 



178 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, ETC., — Continued. 



Day of Week. 


Damage. 


Insurance- 


Amount 
uncovered 


Cause. 


Remarks. 


Thursday 


None. 






Smoking in bed 


Exting'ed with pails. 


Sunday 


















Thursday 


$10.00 


$10.00 




O rerheated flue 


Exting'ed with pails. 


Sunday 


None. 






Unknown 




Tuesday 

Thursday 


None 








Exting'ed with pails. 
















Wednesday... • 


30.00 


30.00 




Probably smoking. . 




Tuesday 


50.00 


50.00 












Wednesday . . . 


3,300.00 


2,500.00 


800.00 


Unknown 




Saturday 

Wednesday . . . 


5 000.00 


4 500.00 


500.00 






50 00 


50.00 




| Overheated chim- 
1 ney. 




Monday 


2,500.00 


1,500.00 


1,000.00 


( Overturning kero- 
( sene lamp. 




Tuesday 


None. 






Fire crackers 


Exting'ed with pails. 


Tuesday 

Saturday 


800.00 


300.00 


500.00 


j Children playing 
\ with matches. 


( Cottages but little 
} damaged. 
( Sent Steamer No. 2, 
( and detail of men. 






Saturday 


500.00 


None. 


criA «n ( Spontaneous com- 
500 - 00 ! J bustion. 




Tuesday 


1,000.00 


500.00 


500.00 


Unknown 




Wednesday . - 


None. 
















Sunday 

Wednesday . . . 








• 


| Sent Steamer No. 2, 
\ and detail of men. 
| Sent Steamer No. 2, 
( and detail of men. 










Wednesday . . . 












- 






Thursday. ... 

Sunday 

Sunday 










Exting'ed with pails. 


50 00 


N 


50.00 






1,800.00 


1,000.00 


800.00 


Unknown 


Without city limits. 


Monday 


10.00 


None. 


10.00 


( Overturning kero- 
| sene lamp. 




Wednesday . . . 


25.00 


None. 


25.00 


Sparks from stove. . 




Friday 


None. 






Defective flue 


1 Extinguished with 
( garden hose. 


Sunday 

Saturday 

Sunday 


150 00 


150 00 








Slight. 
200.00 










200.00 




i Overheated chim- 
\ ney. 






$15,475.00 


$10,790.00 


$4,685.00 





179 



NUMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson & 
Co.'s office and Samuel Colby's residence, corner of Elm 
and Young streets. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
Granite Hotel and L. B. Bod well & Co.'s office. 

No. 5. — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's office and 
G. E. Hall's drug-store. 

No. 6. — Engine-house, Vine street. Keys at engine- 
house. 

No. 7. — City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. 
Perry's drug-store. 

No. 8. — Elm, foot of Orange street. Keys at Wilson's 
drug-store and residence of Moses N. Smith, No. 1299 
Elm street. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of H. D. Corliss and J. Freeman dough. 

No. 12. — Blood's shop. Keys at office. 

No. 18. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Jencks, Lewis Simons, and E. L. Bryant. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residence of Sanborn T. Worthen, 530 Chestnut street, 
and Sawyer & Smith's store, No. 60 Pearl street. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev. Dennis M. Bradley and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys 
at residences of H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William 
Perkins. 



180 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. D. Smith's drug-store and residence of Mrs. J. A. 
Emerson. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of E. T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. — Corner of Massabesic and Park streets. Keys 
at residences of D. M. Goodwin and Nicholas Hopkins, and 
Atherton & Benton's store. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys 
at residences of S. L. Fogg, Horace Gordon, and Horace 
Stearns. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-shop and residence of John N. 
Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Manchester House, Tebbetts Brothers' and Weeks & 
Currier's drug-store. 

No. 31. — Amoskeag Village. Keys at P. C. Cheney 
Co.'s paper-mill and residence of Capt. J. M. Varnum. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at Hoyt & Co.'s paper-mill and Langdon 
watch-room. 

No. 34. — Mechanics' Row. Keys at watch-room and 
W. W. Hubbard's office. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at Stark watch-room. 

No. 36. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. 
Keys at residences of John P. Lord, H. M. Tarbell, and 
A. G. Fairbanks. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag New Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch room. 

No. 43. — Namaske Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 45. — Amory Mill counting-room. Keys at watch- 
room and A. J. Mayhew's, 51 Stark corporation, corner of 
Canal and Bridge streets. 



181 

No. 51. — S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s shop. Keys at freight 
depot, S. C. Forsaith's office, and Lowell's iron-foundry- 
office. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Allen N. 
Clapp's store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's brewery. Keys at brewery office 
and Newell & Co.'s store. 

No. 61. — Corner of Elm and Hancock streets, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at residence of H. W. Longa and M. Howlett's 
saloon. 

No. 62. — Massabesic street, Hallsville. Keys at resi- 
dence of Charles C. Chase and G. W. Dearborn. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins and Daniel Sheehan. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given 
at precisely 12.30 p. m., from John N. Baker's jewelry store, 
and will be denoted by one stroke of the fire-bells. 



182 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, keys to 
which are in the hands of all regular police, also of persons 
designated by a card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go. Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to remain 
by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard in the 
box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the next 
nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure the 
box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
cause other than an actual fire. Don't give an alarm for 

A CHIMNEY-FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your resi- 
dence or place of busi?iess where the keys are kept, return the 
keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their 
property, also all places where the keys are kept. Be sure 
the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the 
city, and the number of the box will be given four times 
for an alarm. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of 
the bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



183 



SCHOOL SIGNAL. 



One stroke of the fire-bell closes the primary schools, 
and two strokes closes all the schools for the half-day upon 
which they may be given, at 8.15 a. m. for the forenoon, 
and 1.15 p. m. for the afternoon. 



184 



RULES AND REGULATIONS ADOPTED BY THE 
BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

1. Steamer No. 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes ; on the days of its second run, it will 
report on the first alarm to boxes 3. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 21, 
27, 34, 45, 51, 71. 

2. Steamer No. 4, same as above. 

3. Pennacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

4. Massabesic Hose No. 2 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 36, 62, 71 ; on the second alarm,' 
to all boxes except 52, 53, 61. 

5. E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 will report for duty on 
the first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 27, 42, 43, 51, 52, 53 ; sec- 
ond alarm, to boxes 35, 41, and for an alarm from box 45, 
report to west end of McGregor bridge, and await orders. 

6. Hook and Ladder No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

7. Steamer No. 2 to be kept as a reserve engine, to 
respond to a third alarm. The horses attached to the 
engine on its first run will return to the house on a second 
alarm, to be held in readiness to respond to a third alarm ; 
and the engine will be manned by men appointed for that 
purpose and attached to Pennacook Hose and Hook and 
Ladder companies at all times except when the engine is 
on duty. 

8. Steamer No. 3 will also be kept as a reserve engine, 
to be used in case of need. 

9. The whole department will report for duty in all 
cases on the third alarm. 

10. In case of a second alarm from either of the boxes 



185 

on which the horses double on the first engine, they will 
immediately return and get the engine of the second run. 

11. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the 
engine or hose-carriage that leaves the house first will have 
the right to lead to the fire. No running by will be al- 
lowed, EXCEPT IN CASE OP ACCIDENT, UNDER PENALTY OF 
DISMISSAL OP THE DRIVER PROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer in 
charge, will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses. 

18. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 

14. On the first alarm from boxes 24, 25, 26, 31, 61, 62, 
the horses of the second run will double on the engine of 
its first run. 



186 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIEE ENGINE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose- 
carriage $4,500 00 

100 feet 3 inch leather hose .... 140 00 

1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch leather hose . . . 1,000 00 

500 feet 2 1-4 inch fabric hose . . . 450 00 

Firemen's suits 250 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 500 00 



Total amount .... $6,840 00 

FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose- 
carriage $2,750 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class single-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $2,750 00 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $3,500 00 

50 feet rubber hose 75 00 

1,500 feet leather hose 1,500 00 

Firemen's suits 240 00 



187 



Furniture and fixtures, including one pair 

harnesses $500 00 



Total amount 



. $5,815 00 



PENNACOOK HOSE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . 

1 horse hose sled and reel 

2,500 feet leather hose ..... 

Firemen's suits ..... 

Furniture and fixtures, including two 

harnesses ...... 

Total amount . . . 



$650 00 


75 


00 


2,500 


00 


300 


00 


440 


00 



$3,965 00 



MASSABESIC HOSE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage 
1,600 feet leather hose . 

Furniture and fixtures . 
Firemen's suits 

Total amount 



$600 00 

1,600 00 

60 00 

200 00 

^2,460 00 



E. W. HARKINGTON HOSE NO. 3. 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $650 00 

1,800 feet leather hose 1,800 00 

Firemen's suits ..... 175 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including harness 200 00 

Total amount .... f 2,825 00 



188 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders 
1 Bangor extension ladder 

Firemen's suits 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 



11,500 00 
150 00 
450 00 
340 00 



$2,440 00 



SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 



1 supply wagon and boxes 



$125 00 



SPARE HOSE. 

AT ENGINE-HOUSE, VINE STREET. 

1,000 feet of hose in store-room . . . $1,000 00 

1,500 feet of new hose in store-room . . 1,800 00 

Old hose (worthless for fire purposes) . 40 00 

Total amount .... $2,840 00 

ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 

5 fire-hats 17 50 

Furniture and fixtures . . . . 125 00 

Total amount .... $132 50 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

At cost $20,045 00 

Ladders and tools 30 00 

Extra poles and wire .... 40 00 



Total amount 



$20,115 00 



189 



GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT DERRY MILLS. 



1 two-wheeled hose-carriage 
400 feet linen hose 

2 hose-pipes 

Total amount 



$200 00 


200 


00 


12 


00 



$412 00 



AMOSKEAG HOSE-CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT P. C. CHENEY CO.'S PAPER-MILL. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage 
300 feet leather hose . 

2 hose-pipes ...... 

Total amount . 



$200 


00 


150 


00 


12 


00 



$362 00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Engine No. 1 

Fire King Engine No. 2 . 

E. W. Harrington Steam Engine No. 3 

N. S. Bean Steam Engine No. 4 

Pennacook Hose No. 1 . 

Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 

E W. Harrington Hose No. 3 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder No. 

Supply Wagon 

Store-room 

Engineers' Department . 

Fire Alarm 

Goffe's F;ills Hose Carriage 

Amoskeag Hose Carriage 

Total amount 



$6,840 00 


2,750 


00 


2,750 00 


5,815 


00 


3,965 


00 


2,460 


00 


2,825 


00 


2,440 


00 


125 


00 


2,840 


00 


132 


50 


20,115 


00 


412 


00 


362 


00 


$53,831 50 



190 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 








1937 Elm St 


Andrew C . Wallace 

Benjamin C. Kendall . . . 
Sam C. Lowell 


Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant and Clei-k 


Lumber Dealer 

Master Mechanic 


313 Granite St. 
311 Central St. 
5 Machine-Shop Blk. 
17 Harrison St. 


Orin E. Kimball 


Wool and L'ther Deal'r 





AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 






City Messenger 

Manufacturer 


39 Market St 


Jonathan T. Underbill. . . 


Assistant Foreman.. 


20 Stark St. 


Will A. Butterfield 

Henry H. Glines 

George R. Simmons 


Clerk 


< ( 








13 Mechanic St. 
S2 Pennacook St. 


Assistant Engineer. 


Asst. Supt. Streets... . 


George W. Butterfield. . . 


Driver ... 


Teamster 


28 Vine St. 




Hoseman 




3S9 Park St. 


Artemas C. Barker 


Currier 


494 Pine St. 




„ 




14 Orange St. 








Henry T. Stevens 

Charles F. McCoy 


(4 


Clerk 


102 Myrtle St. 
5 M. S. B. 


, 4 


Mechanic 


John B. Hall 






79 Walnut St. 


Joseph H. Gould 


" 




20 Stark St. 







191 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


Eugene S. Whitney 






101 Orange St. 
44 M. S. B. 


Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 




Edgar G. Abbott 




543 Chestnut St. 






101 Orange St. 
545 Chestnut St. 


Thomas F. Dodge 


Asst. Engineer 


u 




20 Vine St. 


Alnius B. Cushing 

William H. Dodge 

George W. Bacon 










Manufacturer 


874 Elm St. 




45 Stark Corp. 
Cor. E. High & Jane. 
22 M. S. B. 


















101 Orange. 

240 Merrimack St. 






Manufacturer 






10 Nashua St. 











192 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 

Albert Maxfield 

Clarence D. Palmer 

Joseph E. Merrill 

Walter L. Blenus 

George H.Porter 

John M. Plaisted 

Will G. Chase 

Lyman M. Aldrich 

Joseph H. Alsop 

Daniel W. Morse 

George W. Cheney 

Gilbert A. Sackett ...... 

Edwin A. Durgin 

Samuel A. Hill 

Edwin E. Weeks 

Albert A. Puffer 

Charles W. Brown 

Martin W. Ford 

John E. Chase 

Henry B. Porter 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Asst. Foreman. 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation. 

Belt Maker 

Marble Worker 

Currier 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Boot and Shoe Dealer 

Photographer 

Carpenter 

Manufacturer 

Machinist 

Weaver 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Clerk 

Molder 

Carpenter 

Teamster 



Residence. 



23 M. S. B. 
347 Central St. 
85 Walnut St. 
26 Vine St. 
277 Laurel St. 
1083 Elm St. 
696 Elm St. 
375 Park St. 
1357 Elm St. 
1419 Elm St. 
1348 Elm St. 
35 M. S. B. 
44 Manchester Corp. 
50 Douglas St. (P.) 
50 Amoskeag Corp. 
544 Chestnut St. 
18 Hazel St. 
546 Chestnut St. 
35 M. S. B. 
Hanover, c. Beacon. 



193 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on Maple Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


John F. Seaward 


Foreman 




27 Warren St. 
288 Bridge St. 


Revilo G. Houghton 


Asst. Foreman 


Gas Fitter 


Parker W. Hannaford . 


Clerk .... 






Walter Seaward 






Maple St. 
14 South St. 
413 Pine St. 
66 Nashua St. 
63 Arlington St. 
45 M. S. B. 
19 Warren St. 
195 Hanover St. 


Henry G. Seaman 






Joseph W. Batchelder. . . 






William S. McLeod 






Simeon R. Stearns 






Alphonso E. Foster 






George W. Seaward 






Henry H. Wilcox 




Plumber 


Albert E. Batchelder.... 






313 Amherst St. 









E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Clinton Street, ' Squog. 



Name. 



Horatio Fradd 

John T. G. Dinsmore. . 

Joseph Schofield 

William Doran 

John McDerby , 

Ruel G. Manning 

Edward McDerby 

Andrew C. Wallace, Jr.. 

Edward Flanagan 

Robert McFarland 

John Patterson 

William McCombie 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 

Steward 

Hoseman 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Grocer 



64 Dover St. 



Carpenter j 48 Dover St. 

Wool Sorter 392 Granite St. 

Machinist 60 Parker St. 

Roofer 503 Granite St. 



53 Douglas St. 
155 Winter St. 



Carpenter 

Roofer 

Lumber Surveyor 79 Parker St 

Carpenter 21 Central St. 

Cooper 

Engraver 

Laborer 



81 Parker St. 

Cor. Sec. & Cent. St. 

161 Winter St. 



13 



194 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 

Warren Harvey 

James Orrill 

George E. Glines 

Augustus J. Robie 

Charles N. Denyon 

John N. Chase 

John Wilson 

Hiram P. Young 

Edward A. G. Holmes . 

George H. Dudley 

Luther J. Flint 

Harrison H. Cole 

Winfield S. Leavitt.... 

Jesse B. Nourse 

Charles H. Cross 

Andrew C. Wiggin . . . 

Dillwyn Breed 

George M. Jones 

Milo B. Wilson. . 

Samuel F. Adams 

Roscoe Dyer 

Sanborn T. Worthen.. 
Josiah D. Andrews . . . 
Jerome J. Lovering. .. 
Oscar P. Stone 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Foreman 

Asst. Foreman 

Clerk 

Treasurer 

Driver 

Fireman 



Supt. of Streets. 

Barber 

Machinist 
Teamster 



Overseer . 
Carpenter 
Slater . . . 
Carpenter 



Teamster 

Overseer . . . 

Mason 

Belt Maker . 
Gardener 

Mason 

Expressman 
Machinist . 
Carpenter . 



Grocer 



474 Hanover St. 
60 Prospect St. 
310 Central St. 
30 Brook St. 
8 Vine St. 
268 Bridge St. 
12 M. S. B. 
33 Dutton St. 
224 Manchester St. 
159 Laurel St. 
4 Dutton St. 
Main & McGregor. 
8 Weeks' Block. 
Union cor. Appleton 
8 Langdon Corp. 
142 Merrimack St. 
335 Chestnut St. 
1051 Elm St. 
2 Senter's Block. 
295 Chestnut St. 
29 Amoskeag Corp. 
530 Chestnut St. 
373 Hanover St. 
7S Amoskeag Corp. 
307 Chestnut St. 



195 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton. northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 
Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 
Beech, front of No. 584. 
Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 
Blodget, front of primary-school house. 
Blodget. northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 



196 



Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, front of No. 26. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near office door of M. L. W. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, front of No. 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Flail street. 



197 



Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Chestnut, opposite High street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 

Concord, opposite Vine street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Nashua street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Depot, west of Franklin street. 

Elm, front of Fisk bookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, near Franklin street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near brewery. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 



198 



Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street, 
Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near No. 244. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Laurel, near Belmont. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 



199 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street.' 
Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, northwest comer of Chestnut street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Maple, front of No. 530. 
Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 
Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Massabesic, northwest corner of old Falls road. 
Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 
Massabesic avenue. 
Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 
Mammoth road. 

Mechanic, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Mechanic, near second back street west of Elm street. 
Mechanic, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 



200 



Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Merrimack, near Belmont street. 
Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Middle, near 67 Amoskeag corporation. 
Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 
North, northwest corner of Bay street. 
Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 
Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Park, near No. 36. 

Park, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Park, northwest corner of Union street. 
Park, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Park, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Park, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Park, east end. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 



201 



Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Park street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near 85 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
River road, north of Webster street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 



202 



Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 

Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Stark, near 13 Stark corporation. 

Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 

State, northwest corner of Granite street. 

State, opposite 57 Manchester corporation. 

State, opposite 13 Manchester corporation. 

State, corner of West Central street. 

Summer, corner of Elm street. 

Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Union, northwest corner of High street. 

Valley, corner of Elm street. 

Valley, corner of Willow street. 

Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Walnut, opposite No. 79. 

Water, near 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Webster, corner of Adams street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 

Webster, northeast corner of River road. 

West Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 



203 



West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Wilson, corner of Park street. 
Young, corner of Elm street. 

PISCATAQUOG. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery, 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Clinton, corner of Dover street. 
Clinton, corner of South Main street. 
Center, corner of South Main street. 
Center opposite school-house. 
Center, corner River street. 
Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 
Douglas, corner of Green street. 
Douglas, corner of Barr street. 
Douglas, corner of West street. 
Douglas, corner of Main street. 
Douglas, east of Main street. 
Ferry, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Quincy street. 
Granite, corner of Green street. 
Granite, corner of Barr street, 
Granite, corner of West street. 
Granite, corner of Dover street. 
Granite, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Second street. 
Granite, corner of River street. 
Main, opposite Rice's house. 
Mast, corner of South Main street. 



204 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

McGregor, opposite "Reed" house. 

Milford, corner of South Main street. 

Milford, corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 

School, corner of Main street. 

School, corner of Walker street. 

School, corner of Ferry street. 

Sullivan, corner of Main street. 

Third, corner of Ferry street. 

Walker, corner of River road. 

Walker, corner of Third street. 

Walker, corner of Parker street. 

Walker, near corner of South Main street. 

Wayne, near corner of Main street. 

Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 

Winter, corner of South Main street. 

A3IOSKEAG. 

Main, at Robinson & Stearns's works. 
Main, near brick school-house. 
Main, corner of Goffstown road. 
Main, opposite John E. Stearns's. 
Main, near Hiram Stearns's. 
Mill, near paper-mill. 
Mill, corner of Main street. 
Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are three private hydrants 
that are available in case of need : — 

One at S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s machine-shop. 
One at Lowell's iron foundry. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
Making 340 in all. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



BEPOET 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester : — 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report for 
the year 1882. 

The whole number of families that have received more or 
less assistance off the farm during the past year has been 
thirty-four, consisting of eighty-nine persons, all of whom 
have a settlement in this city. 

The overseers of the poor disbursed for paupers off the 
farm from the several wards of the city, as follows : — 



Ward number one 


125 00 


Ward number two 


84 00 


Ward number three 


111 00 


Ward number four 


187 13 


Ward number five 


. 1,240 08 


Ward number six 


263 32 


Ward number seven 


72 00 


Ward number eight 


146 00 



1,128 53 



208 

The overseers of the poor have disbursed the New Hamp- 
shire Insane Asylum and State Industrial School, and for 
paupers off the farm that live in other towns in this state, 
and who have settlement in this city, as follows : — 

State Industrial School for board of 

inmates, 1882 . . . . $239 00 
New Hampshire Insane Asylum for 

board of inmates, 1882 . . 69145 
Lewis K. Mead for medicine, to 

June, 1882 .... 8-4 47 

Temple & Farrington for blanks, 

stationery, and postage stamps, 

for 1883 18 33 

Town of Lancaster for support of 

Benson Joy for 1881-1882 . . 145 66 
Town of Loudon for support of Sarah 

A. Heselton for 1882 ... 10 00 

11,188 91 



The overseers of the poor have disbursed for paupers off 
the farm that have no settlement in this city, as follows : — 

State Industrial School for board of 
inmates (charged to county of 
Hillsborough) . . . . $2,477 07 

Charged to David Nutt for support 
of his abandoned wife, medicine, 
doctor, and board (suit entered) . 311 50 

Charged to town of Bath for support 
of Mrs. Paige (to be recovered by 
suit) 54 00 



209 



Charged to town of Bath for legal 

notice seryecl on town officers . $3 24 



12,845 81 



All of which is respectfully submitted. 

H. JB. PUTNAM, Chairman ex-officio, 
WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Clerk, Ward 1. 
GEORGE H. COLBY, Ward 2, 
JAMES SUTCLIFFE, Ward 3, 
HORACE GORDON, Ward 4, 
GEO. F. SHEEHAN, Ward 5, 
ROBERT HALL, Ward 6, 
ELBRIDGE G. WOODMAN, Ward 7, 
I. B. FARNUM, Ward 8, 

Overseers of the Poor. 

14 



REPORT 

OF THE 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM, 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on the City 
Farm herewith present their annual report for the year 
ending Dec 31, 1882: — 

Live stock $1,234 50 



Hay, grain, and produce . 
Carriages and farming implements . 
Household furniture 


. 1,989 03 

. 1,752 25 

787 30 


Provisions and fuel .... 


801 29 


Bedding and wearing apparel . 
Miscellaneous 


ms 82 

34 00 




17,267 19 


Expenses of farm . 

Receipts ....... 


. 15,464 57 

. 2,281 87 



Bills receivable 



13,182 70 
101 97 



$3,080 73 



214 
Interest on farm 11,000 00 



$4,080 73 
Difference in stock 750 02 



$3,330 71 
Permanent improvements .... 580 00 



Cost of board of paupers and prisoners . . $2,750 71 

JOHN HOSLEY, 
JOHN H. MAYNARD, 
SAMUEL LU-NT, 
JAMES S. BACHELER, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



EEPOET 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES 



To the City Government of Manchester, N. H. : — 

Gentlemen, — In obedience to the requirements of law, 
the Committee on the Valley and Pine Grove cemeteries 
herewith present their annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1882. There are quite a number of ceme- 
teries and burial grounds within the city limits ; the pres- 
ervation an 1 care of them all are matters of deep and 
abiding interest to all our people. Though but few of the 
cemeteries and burial grounds are under any supervision 
of the city councils, yet all these silent places of the dead 
must ever be objects of special and sacred regard of our 
citizens generally. At the beginning of the year we ap- 
pointed a sub-committee of three each for the Valley and 
Pine Grove cemeteries, granting them full power to employ 
superintendents and to make all such arrangements as in 
their opinion were expedient for the proper care, preserva- 
tion, and improvements of the grounds. We annex to this 
the respective reports of the sub-committee, both of which 
contain all the details in regard to both cemeteries. 



218 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



The Sub-Committee of the Valley Cemetery respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1882 : — 

Owing to the continued interruption of the superintend- 
ent by persons seeking information concerning the location 
of lots, and contracting for the care of the same with labor 
required, it was deemed expedient to engage the superin- 
tendent for the year, thus securing his services at a much 
less sum per day than he had been previously paid. The 
extra labor required of the superintendent necessitated the 
employing of an assistant during a portion of the season. 
It is now the duty of the superintendent to attend to the 
digging of all graves, care for all lots, also to collect all 
revenues accruing from the grounds, reporting the same to 
the sub-committee monthly (for an account of which see 
financial statement). The new road-way has been improved 
so that carriages now pass to all parts of the grounds with 
comparative ease. The " cottage " has been moved to a 
more desirable location, an even exchange of lots being 
made. The building has been remodeled, the changes 
made making it much more convenient. A board fence 
has been built and painted, which extends across the west 
side of the grounds. The bridges have been repaired and 
also painted, much improving the general appearance. The 
main water-pipe proving insufficient, new pipe has been 
substituted, the old being sold, and relaid where such piping 
could be used. Additional pipe has also been laid to meet 
the numerous demands, so that water is now available to 
nearly all parts of the Valley. The building of the usual 
amount of iron fence has been dispensed with, owing to the 
limited appropriations the past year. 

We trust that a sufficient sum will be appropriated the 



219 



coming year to meet the current expenses, and also to 
completely inclose the grounds with suitable fencing. 

Mr. F. B. Balch, the acceptable superintendent of the 
previous year, was retained, giving to the committee and 
all who required his services the usual degree of satisfac- 
tion. 



Receipts. 

Appropriations 

Wood sold 

Water rent . 

Digging graves 

Tomb fees 

Care of lots . 

Amount transferred from reserve fund 



Expenditures. 



Care of grounds . 

Manchester Water- Works 

Warren Harvey, teaming 

James Emerson, grading 

George Whitford, sand 

L. B. Bod well & Co., canvas 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 

Pike & Heald, pipe and labor 

Daniels & Co. 

John B. Yarick 

J. J. Abbott . 

P. W. Follansbee & Son 

Palmer & Garmon 

J. R. Carr, painting 



11,000 00 


104 


88 


69 


75 


83 


00 


58 


50 


156 


75 


880 


93 


$2,353 


81 


1667 


79 


52 


40 


49 65 


231 


74 


62 


50 


8 


25 


444 


01 


478 54 



1 20 
21 20 

7 53 

25 00 

75 07 

133 60 



220 



Henry Fisk ..... 


$81 33 


Balance to new account 


14 00 




$2,353 81 


Respectfully submitted 




HOLMES 


R. PETTEE, 


WM. G. 


HOYT, 


JOSEPH KIDDER, 


Committee on 


Valley Cemetery. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

The Committee on Pine Grove Cemetery offer the fol- 
lowing report of their doings for the year 1882 : — 

The grounds have been under the care of Mr. B. A. 
Stearns, whose efficiency deserves favorable mention. As 
the area of improved lots increases, the labor and care in- 
crease in corresponding proportion, consequently a larger 
amount of work has been done than in any year before. 

We have continued the graveling of the avenues and 
walks, and following the same course for a very few years 
longer, the drives will all have been put in a fine condition. 
The purchase of several acres of excellent gravel upon the 
east of the Calef road, by the city, has materially reduced 
the cost the past year. 

Several fine monuments have been completed, which adds 
greatly to the appearance and attraction of the grounds, 
and we have endeavored to care for all the surroundings of 
such monuments, so far as the city was responsible for 
them, that we might show a harmonious whole. 

The plat of ground appropriated last year for improve- 
ment under a plan somewhat new to our cemeteries, known 
as the " landscape lawn " plan, has been nearly completed. 
Thus far we have our anticipations more than realized, and 



221 

we are satisfied that when fully perfected, and put to its 
uses, it will fully meet the approval of our citizens. This 
work has been done in connection with the other work of 
the cemetery, and no strict account has been kept of the 
cost of preparing this section, but we estimate it to be 
about fifteen hundred dollars. The drouth so far interfered 
with its completion that the final location of the bounds of 
lots, as fixed by the engineer, has been postponed until 
spring, consequently no deeds have been given of any lots, 
and no money has been received from that source. Lots 
have been selected by individuals, which will be conveyed 
by deed as early in the spring as suitable bounds can be 
fixed, and the payments for those already thus selected 
will amount to about $ 3,000. 

The rule adopted by the Committee on Cemeteries re- 
quiring undertakers to give all orders for the digging of 
graves to the superintendent of the grounds, botli at the 
Valley and Pine Grove cemeteries, we are of opinion has 
been of marked advantage. It has brought the work to be 
done to the one who is responsible for the care of the 
grounds, and as a consequence the prompt removal of the 
surplus earth has been secured, and the good appearance 
of the grounds promoted. It has also brought some money 
into the treasury from which to pay the labor, which, when 
not engaged in this particular duty, has been employed in 
other work upon the grounds, and we think it wise to con- 
tinue this rule in the future. 

We are not unmindful of the fact that the area of the 
present grounds is steadily being taken for burial purposes, 
and not many years will elapse before what now constitutes 
the Pine Grove Cemetery will all have been appropriated, 
and we must look elsewhere for suitable grounds for this 
purpose. The present time offers an opportunity to secure 
a suitable addition sufficient for many years to come, at a 



222 



cost much lower than we may be able to secure it if it is 
delayed much longer, and we respectfully invite the atten- 
tion of the city councils to this subject. 

The financial statement for the year is as follows : — 

Receipts. 
Balance to account of Pine Grove Cemetery 



from year 1881 

Appropriation ...... 

From sale of lots 

Interest collected on unpaid deeds 

Sale of logs, wood, and undertakers' fees 


11,129 39 
1,500 00 
1,167 16 

30 22 
577 26 


Expenditures. 

The amount expended has been 
Balance on hand December 30, 1882 


$4,404 03 

13,557 84 
846 19 



$4,404 03 

A detailed account of the expenditures may be found in 
the report of the city treasurer. 

A. H. DANIELS, 
CHAS. E. BALCH, 
Committee on Pine Grove Cemetery, 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Committee on Cemeteries : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit to you my tenth annual 
report of all money which I have received on account of 
the cemeteries for the year ending December 31, 1882. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 




cash received for 52 lots sold . 
interest 
logs sold 


. 11,167 16 

30 22 

127 38 



$1,324 76 
By cash paid city treasurer . . . . 1,324 76 

Mr. B. A. Stearns, superintendent of Pine Grove Ceme- 
tery, has paid the city treasurer during the year $449.88, 
which sum did not pass through my hands, and was received 
for wood sold and for digging graves, which sum, added to 
the above, is $1,774.64, paid to city treasurer during year. 

I have twenty-one deeds written and ready for delivery, 
for which about $180 will be received, I have good rea- 
son to expect that more than one-half these deeds will be 
delivered and paid for prior to April next. All the money 
which I have received on account of cemeteries I have 
paid to the city treasurer ; and all the bills of expenditures 
have been paid by the city treasurer. All the vouchers and 
details will be found elsewhere in the city report for 1882. 

You will pardon me for again earnestly calling your at- 



224 

tention to the wisdom and propriety of creating a perma- 
nent fund sufficiently large, so that the interest upon which 
will keep the grounds, in good condition hereafter, at a time 
when but a small sum will be realized from the sale of lots. 
There have been no lots sold in the " Valley" during the 
year, nor any money received by me on account thereof. 

J. F. JAMES, 
Treasurer of Committee on Cemeteries. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
Jacob F. James, treasurer of the Pine Grove Cemetery, 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched to 
the amount of 11,774.64, including 8449.88 paid by B. A. 
Stearns, superintendent. 

N. P. KIDDER, 
City Auditor. 



TIMOTHY W. CHALLIS, Chairman, 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, Clerk, 

J. F. JAMES, Treasurer, 

JOHN HOSLEY, 

SAMUEL THOMPSON, 

GEO. B. SMITH, 

HENRY C. RANNO, 

A. H. DANIELS, 

J. A. WESTON, 

J. L. STEVENS, 

WM. G. HOYT, 

JOSEPH KIDDER, 

HOLMES R. PETTEE, 

CHAS. E. BALCH, 

J. B. CHASE, 

A. W. QUINT, 

Committee on Cemeteries. 



EEPOET 



TRUSTEES OE THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund have 
the honor to present herewith their third annual report. 
In consequence of ciscumstances beyond their control, the 
committee on cemeteries were unable to complete the lots, 
referred to in our last annual report, ready for sale till late 
in the season. As a result, no funds have been received 
from this source, as was anticipated, nor has the fund been 
increased from any quarter during the year. There are 
good reasons for believing that a considerable sum will be 
placed in the hands of the trustees the coming year. 
Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. WESTON, Chairman, 
P. C. CHENEY, 
H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor, 
Trustees of the Cemetery Fund. 
January 1, 1883. 

15 



AOOOU1TT 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, 

CITY TREASURER, 

From December 31, 1881, to December 31, 1882. 



228 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account tilth the 



com 



To Cash in the Treasury, January 1, 1882 

Temporary Loan 

Insurance Tax 

Railroad Tax 

Savings-bank Tax ..... 

Literary Fund 

Board of Inmates at State Reform School 

City Farm 

City Teams 

Stark Mills 

Sewer Licenses 

N. Michey, overdraft, S. & D. 

B. L. & C. R, R., labor on bridge 
Champion Iron Fence Co., freight ret. 

mons) ...... 

Weston & Hill, overdraft, incidental expenses 

S. Hovey, overdraft, incidental expenses 

Freeman Higgins, land sold . 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

E. W. Perkins, land sold 

George S. Clough, use of city excavator 

Frank P. Colby, old lumber . 

N. C. Hunt, old lumber 

CD. Welch, land sold .... 

Pine Grove Cemetery .... 

Valley Cemetery ..... 

S. C. Forsaith & Co., old hose-carriage 

C. H. Rogers, overdraft, Fire Department 
Police Department .... 
A. C. Osgood, overdraft, Police Department 

City Hall 

H. T. Simpson & Son, overdraft, Webster 

school-house 

John H. Maynard, for brick, Webster-street school 

house 

Wooden Watering-trough sold 

Amount carried forward 



street 



$38,588 81 

136,000 00 

784 87 

12,704 59 

41,948 89 

2,059 88 

3,141 89 

2,281 97 

2,536 25 

3,097 25 



$260,213 77 



229 



City of Manchester {ending December 31, 1882). 



Cr. 



By Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1882 .... $31,312 63 


Temporary Loan . 










. 85,000 00 


Payment of Funded Debt 










25,600 00 


Interest .... 










2,921 64 


Coupons, City Bonds 










19,622 00 


Coupons, Water Bonds 












36,099 00 


Paupers off the Farm 












6,245 67 


City Farm 












5,464 57 


City Teams . 












6,393 91 


Highway District No. 1 










325 82 


a u a 2 










8,138 34 


a u a g 










983 10 


u u a 4 










299 77 


U U U F. 










418 59 


U U U Q 










490 17 


It U 44 y 










655 42 


" « 8 










785 67 


t< a » n 










554 84 


" " " 10 










1,204 53 


" « " 11 










796 45 


" " '" 12 










218 25 


a U u 13 










247 67 


New Highways 










4,685 31 


Land Damages 












316 83 


Watering Streets . 












2,329 77 


Lighting Streets 












5^935 30 


Paving Streets 












8,517 20 


Macadamizing 








. 




3,505 31 


Grading for Concrete 












7,703 14 


Sewers and Drains 












24,148 13 


Scavenger Team . 












3,842 99 


Bridges .... 












1,676 40 


Commons 












1,319 96 


Incidental Expenses 












49,812 42 


Pine Grove Cemetery . 












3,557 84 


Valley Cemetery . 












2,339 81 


Fire Department . 












15,576 50 


Amount carried forward . 


$369,044 95 



230 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward 
To Aqueduct Water . 

P. Pruman, rent of land 
Rent of Ward Room 
Carl E. York, wire netting 
Water- Works 
Brock & Driscoll, overdraft, repairs school-houses 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., overdraft, fuel 
Interest on Taxes . 
Tuition .... 
Show Licenses 
Rent of Tenements 
City Scales 
O. D. Carpenter 

Taxes collected on List of 1874 

Taxes collected on List of 1875 

« " 1876 

« « « 1877 

" " " 1878 

" " " 1879 

'< " " 1880 

u u u 1881 

« « « 1882 

W. H. Maxwell, overdraft, P. off F 
Dog Licenses .... 

Cost on Non-Resident Taxes 

Unpaid Bills, December 30, 1882 . 



$260,213 77 


10 00 


1 00 


12 00 


6 00 


67,630 13 


3 75 


8 00 


414 90 


213 37 


204 00 


273 00 


25 00 


8 00 


19 99 


30 50 


14 58 


57 92 


58 59 


38 47 


117 60 


17,027 98 


269,156 63 


17 00 


563 00 


22 00 



.147 18 
27,151 43 



$643,298 61 



231 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1881), 



Cr. 



By 



Amount brought forward 
Fire-alarm Telegraph 
Police Department 
City Hall . 

Hydrant Service 

Printing and Stationery 

Repairs of Buildings 

City Library . 

Women's Aid Society 

Militia . 

Abatement of Taxes 

Discount on Taxes 

State Tax 

City Officers' Salaries 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 

Firemen's Parade . 

Annex to City Library 

New School-house, Webster-street 

New School-house, Bakersville 

Water-works 

Repairs of School-houses 

Fuel .... 

Furniture and Supplies 

Books and Stationery . 

Printing and Advertising 

Contingent Expenses 

Care of Rooms 

Evening Schools . 

Teachers' Salaries . 

Truant Officer 

Reservoirs 

Stark Monument Square 

Tuition .... 

Battery Building and Ward Room 



Cash in the Treasury December 31, 1882 



69,044*95 


669 69 


20,806 03 


4,267 17 


20,070 00 


1,564 89 


1,349 86 


3,115 72 


400 00 


800 00 


2,172 07 


7,351 59 


41,060 00 


11,960 79 


200 00 


356 00 


6,133 79 


11,506 68 


2,494 87 


26,102 35 


6,599 52 


3,090 75 


1,111 53 


515 42 


462 56 


959 95 


2,574 33 


1,414 92 


39,755 69 


750 00 


2 04 


70 14 


222 57 


7,005 37 



$595,961 24 
$47,337 37 

$643,298 61 



Manchester, January 12, 1883. 



SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

City Treasurer. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the account of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, city treasurer for the year eighteen 
hundred eighty-two, and find the same to be correct and 
properly vouched for. 

CHARLES F. MORRILL, 
S. F. CURTIS, 
H. B. PUTNAM, 
THOMAS JOHNSON, 
ARETAS BLOOD, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 
Manchester, U. H., January 12, 1883. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



TEMPORARY 


LOAN. 




Dr. 


To Manchester Savings Bank 


$45,000 


00 




Mechanics Savings Bank 


10,000 


00 




Guaranty Savings Bank 


10,000 


00 




Amoskeag Savings Bank 


20,000 


00 




Merrimack River Savings Bank 


20,000 


00 




Amoskeag National Bank 


5,000 


00 




Second National Bank . 


15,000 


00 




Merchants National Bank 


10,000 


00 




Charles Brown 


1,000 


00 


0136,000 00 














Cr. 


Paid Manchester Savings Bank . 


120,000 


00 




Mechanics Savings Bank 


10,000 


00 




Guaranty Savings Bank 


10,000 


00 




Amoskeag Savings Bank 


15,000 


00 




Merrimack River Savings 








Bank . 


15,000 


00 




Amoskeag National Bank . 


5,000 


00 




Second National Bank 


5,000 


00 




Merchants National Bank . 


5,000 


00 




By balance to new account . 


51,000 


00 








$136,000 00 



236 



INTEREST. 

To appropriation . . . 820,000 00 

water-works, am't transferred 38,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . 642 64 



Paid Mechanics Savings Bank 
Manchester Savings Bank 
Guaranty Savings Bank 
Aruoskeag Savings Bank 
Merrimack River Savings 

Bank 
Amoskeag National Bank 
Second National Bank 
Merchants National Bank 
coupons, city proper 
coupons, water bonds . 



Dr. 





$58,642 64 




Cr. 


. $150 00 




. 1,050 69 




145 83 




522 91 




390 97 




62 50 




407 08 




191 66 




. 19,622 00 




. 36,099 00 






158,642 64 



INTEREST ON TAXES. 

To Geo. E. Morrill, collector . $414 90 



By reserved fund, am't transferred $316 16 
By balance on hand . . . 98 74 



Dr. 

$414 90 
Cr. 

$414 90 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



To balance from old account 



$737 7 



Dr. 



237 



To appropriation . . . $3,500 00 
county of Hillsborough, board 

of inmates of reform school 3,141 89 

W. H. Maxwell ... 17 00 



Paid Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Mrs. P. Sullivan $69 18 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Michael Kelley 72 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Mrs. J. Bohan . 66 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Mrs. J. Shanley 66 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Martin Whalen 40 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

for Mrs. David McKay . 48 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Mrs. J. Reardon 48 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Mrs. P. Fox . 30 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Mrs. D Haley . 18 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 
furnished Mrs. M. Fitz- 
gerald .... 25 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries 
furnished Mrs. P. Dono- 
van ... 10 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. M. Shanley . 48 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished P. J. Hanley . 61 00 



$7,396 67 
Cr. 



23^ 



Paid B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Robert McMahon $60 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Joice . 15 00 

Win. F. Sleeper & Co . gro- 
ceries furnished Joseph Dear- 
born 40 77 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries furnished Joseph 
Pierce .... 48 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co.. gro- 
ceries furnished Mrs. J. 
Joice 48 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries furnished Pyam Hovey 99 

B. F. Page, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Douglas Hunter 19 68 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Laughlin . 71 87 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Fitzgerald . 1 50 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Levi M. Green 11 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished James Callahan 12 00 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Geo. Chap- 
man ..... 12 50 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Alfred Tur- 
cotte 97 45 

Griffin Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Ann Mackin 60 00 



239 



Paid M. E. Griffin, groceries fur- 
nished Walter Lynch . Ill 00 

Michael Kenney, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Johanna Har- 
rison .... 60 00 

A. G. Pratt, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Rushlow . 34 00 

Currier & Johnson, groceries 

furnished Pyam Hovey . 55 93 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries 
furnished Mrs. Douglas 
Hunter .... 49 11 

Gauvreau & Morency, gro- 
ceries furnished Mrs. Al- 
fred Turcotte ... 40 55 

Barnard & Huskie, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Douglas 
Hunter .... 5 56 

Eager & Rand, groceries 

furnished Helen Rhodes . 33 70 

Geo. C. Lord, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Geo. Chapman 5 00 

Frank M. Forsaith, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Doherty . 9 00 

A. M. Eastman, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Doherty . 3 00 

A. M. Eastman, groceries 

furnished Mr. Stevens . 3 00 

Josiah Taylor & Son, gro- 
ceries furnished Bridget 
Gilbert .... 10 00 

N. C. Garland, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Douglas Hunter 53 13 



240 

Paid C. W. Farmer, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Wm. Stevens . 

Geo. H. Stearns, groceries 
furnished John Leard 

J. G. Cate, groceries furnished 
Mrs. Douglas Hunter 

H. E. Stevens, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Ellen Sullivan 

I. G. Rowell, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Patrick Green 

Geo. W. Wilson, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Mary Green 

Hardy & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. H. Gilbert 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Green 

Bartlett & Thompson, gro- 
ceries furnished Louis Rush- 
low ..... 

Mrs. 0. J. Doble, board of 
Anna B. Ayer . 

Geo. C. Batchelder, board 
of Geo. H. Batchelder and 
family .... 

Ellen E. Pillsbury, board of 
family .... 

Wm. F. Chase, board of 
Thomas Chase . 

Mrs. S. B. Davis, board of 
Joseph Bellefleur 

C. C. Colby, board of Alice 
P. Nutt . 

Mrs. Volney T. Simmons, 
board of family . 



$8 


00 


3 


50 


10 


27 


32 


00 


7 


00 


12 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


72 


00 


144 


00 


72 


00 


53 


00 


29 


80 


57 


12 


23 


00 



241 



Paid Town of Lancaster, support 

of Benson Joy . 
Mrs. Harvey, care of Mrs. 

J. White .... 
A. H. Paige, care of Mrs. 

Henry Paige 
A. Mclndoe, wood for Mrs. 

N. Laine .... 
A. Mclndoe, wood for P. J. 

Hanley .... 
A. Mclndoe, wood for Mrs. 
, P. Sullivan 
A. Mclndoe, wood for David 

S. McKay .... 
A. Mclndoe, wood for Johu 

Consodine 
Rowell & Burns, wood for 

Mrs. Stevens 
Rowell & Burns, wood for 

Mrs. Callahan . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

and coal for Mrs. Alfred 

Turcotte .... 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for James Callahan . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for David McKay 
E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

for James Callahan 
E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

for Mrs. Fitzgerald 
S. Brown, wood for Mrs. 

Douglas Hunter 

16 



>75 


13 


12 


33 


54 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


16 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


28 


00 


4 


00 


6 


74 


2 


13 


2 


00 


6 


25 



242 



Paid J. W. Kimball, wood for 

James Dearborn . . |2 50 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Mrs. 

Douglas Hunter . 2 00 

Preston & Moore, wood for 

Mrs. Gilbert ... 2 00 

Moore & Preston, wood for 

Thomas Connor . . 4 00 

L. S. Proctor, wood for Pyam 

Hovey . . . . 18 00 

L. S. Proctor, wood for 

Joseph Dearborn . . 9 00 

State Industrial School, board 

of inmates . . . 2,716 07 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Willard A. Reed . 93 79 

N. EL Insane Asylum, board 

of John Connelly . . 42 99 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Martha J. Dunn . . 28 10 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Elbridge Gerry . . 108 20 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of John J. Murray . . 212 62 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Patrick Cronin . . 58 43 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Asenath H White . 76 98 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Lysander G. Wilkins 45 12 

N H. Insane Asylum, board 

of Michael Gillis . 94 81 

Town of Lancaster, support of 

Benson Joy . . . 70 53 



243 



Paid Dr. Geo. C. Hoitt, profes- 




sional services . 


13 00 


Dr. Geo. D. Towne, profes- 




sional services 


6 00 


Dr. N. P. Taplin, profes- 




sional services 


12 00 


Tebbetts Bros., medicine 


38 22 


Lewis K. Mead, medicine 


165 85 


James Bros., teams 


4 00 


C. C. Perry, teams 


2 00 


William Freeman 


3 00 


J. Stickney, rubber cushion . 


2 50 


Edwin Kennedy, clothing for 




Joseph Dearborn 


2 00 


Mitchell & Heath, boots and 




rubbers for Alice P. Nutt . 


3 50 


John N. Bruce, undertaker . 


37 00 


Pearson & Wallace, under- 




taker .... 


29 00 


A. G. Monette, undertaker . 


24 00 


Wm. H. Maxwell, railroad 




tickets for paupers 


42 00 


E. G. Woodman, cash paid 




out ..... 


24 20 


C. H. Reed, removing insane 




paupers .... 


9 50' 


Temple & Farrington, print- 




ing 


18 33 


W. B. Blandin, serving legal 




notices .... 


3 24 


By balance to new account 


1,151 00 



87,396 67 



244 



CITY FARM. 




To balance from old account . 


$741 47 


appropriation 


3,000 00 


Frederick Allen, produce sold . 


2,261 04 


C. C. Chase, hay 


20 93 



Dr. 



Paid Frederick Allen, superintend- 
ent . . 
Frederick Allen, labor . 
Charles F. Allen & Co., gro 

ceries 
D. M. Poore, groceries . 
Geo. H. Stearns, groceries 
Hardy & Co., groceries 
J. G. Warner, groceries 
Eager & Rand, groceries 
Fitzpatrick & Adams, gro 

ceries 
Pettee & Whittle, grain . 
Fettee & Adams, grain . 
Samuel Cooper, grain 
C. H. Hill & Co., grain . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, re 

pairing carts 
Jas. S. Bachelder, plumbing 
J. F. Woodbury, blacksmithing 
W. H. Hill, blacksmithing 
Fellows & Co., blacksmithing 



1500 00 

667 90 

418 11 

23 07 

145 61 

168 79 

3 11 
20 07 

4 98 
219*48 
,549 31 
149 93 

6 00 

62 48 
126 04 

63 47 

52 43 

151 82 

42 85 

1 25 

1 25 



16,023 44 
Cr. 



245 



id Bunton & Wilbur, black- 




smithing .... 


$7 10 


Pike & Heald, plumbing 


30 94 


T. A. Lane, plumbing . 


9 50 


J. S. Masseck, dry goods 


28 70 


N. S. Clark, dry goods . 


18 98 


Piper, Hawley, & Co., dry 




goods .... 


47 96 


Plumer & Holton, clothing . 


38 86 


Manchester 0. P. C. Co., 




clothing .... 


41 14 


Bishop & Brother, ladder, etc. 


9 40 


Clark & Johnson, use of oxen 


10 00 


Geo. S. Clough & Co., meats 


31 66 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


22 95 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber 


16 35 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


102 45 


J. H. Maynard, lumber . 


90 h7 


Brigham & Pratt, crackers . 


25 39 


Smith & Bly, crackers . 


6 11 


B. L. & C. R. R., freight 


5 82 


F. P. Woodbury, making 




cider .... 


3 42 


Ezra W. Kimball, repairing 




harness .... 


39 42 


C. L. Moulton, professional 




services .... 


4 50 


Mitchell & Heath, boots and 




shoes .... 


32 35 


F. C. Dow, boots and shoes . 


30 45 


H. H Duncklee, swill . 


50 00 


J. P. Finn & Co., painting 


1 88 


J. J. Abbott, painting 


8 29 


R. G. Sullivan, tobacco . 


49 29 



246 



Paid J. Stickney, rubber cloth, etc 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
Granite State Telephone Co. 
E. M. Slay ton, butter . 

D. A. Simons, furniture, etc. 
Ira P. Emery & Co., tin ware 

etc 

Natt & Wm. F. Head, brick 
Temple & Parrington, room 

paper, etc. . 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., coppei 

pump 
P. A. Devine, undertaker 
J. S. Holt & Co., soap, etc. 
J. F. Conway, making sled 

body .... 

E. T. James, team 
Elmer Laird, labor 

Wm. D. Eastman, whitewash 

ing . 
D. D. Brainard, washing-ma 

chine 
A. Royal, swill 
Pearson & Wallace, under 

taker 
T. B. Eastman, swill 
R. B. Neal, drag plank . 
Geo. S. Smith, oats 
J. Clark, oxen . 
A. F. Perry, medicines . 
Samuel F. Adams, manure 
U. S. & C. express 
John Perham, labor 
Henry G. Clark, labor . 



$9 


25 


444 


80 


oo 


75 


87 


00 


39 


77 


29 


28 


42 


00 



4 24 



2 


25 


15 


00 


38 


24 


13 


85 


3 


00 


16 


77 



3 00 

10 50 

23 85 

16 00 

11 66 
2 00 

67 09 

180 00 

14 09 

16 50 

2 10 

24 00 

3 00 



247 



Paid H. A. Horton, onion seed 
Stark Mills, wooden tub . 
Wm. Neal, labor on well 
J. M. Crombie, labor on well 
Anna Sweatt, heifer 
Gideon Flanders, ice 
Geo. C. Hoitt, professional 

services 
R. M. Rollins 
J. C. Nichols & Son 
B. W. Robinson & Co., Akron 



pipe, 



etc. 



D. Kerwin & Son, soap . 
Manchester Axe Co., repairing 

tools 
A. H. Weston, clothing . 
Manchester 0. P. Clothing Co 
By balance to new account . 



#2 00 

5 00 

8 75 

7 50 

20 50 

12 98 

3 00 
15 50 

1 50 

50 07 

4 20 

2 85 
23 30 
12 40 

558 87 









CITY TEAMS. 


To District No. 2 . 


$371 00 


District No. 10 . 




58 50 


incidental expenses . 




16 50 


grading for concrete 




270 87 


new highways . 




25 50 


paving 




78 50 


scavenger teams 




966 00 


watering streets 




600 75 


sewers and drains 




23 63 


Geo. O. Theobold, horses and 




collars ..... 


125 00 


reserved fund, am't trans 


ferrec 


1 3,857 66 



1,023 44 



Dr. 



$6,393 91 



248 



Cr. 



Paid J. Q. Perley,hay . 


$33 69 


A. T. Peckham & Son, hay 


250 50 


City Farm, hay 


155 53 


0. Hinckley, hay . 


128 78 


E. P. Johnson & Co., hay 


402 39 


J. N. Rundlett, hay 


4 19 


Geo. Foster estate, hay . 


120 80 


W. C. Parker, hay 


97 46 


F. P. Felch, hay . 


24 78 


D. H. Cochran, hay 


29 94 


H. M. Manahan, straw . 


17 20 


J. N. Hill, hay . 


22 54 


Mary Cressey, straw 


3 69 


J. C. Nichols & Son, straw 


13 68 


N. P. Kidder, straw 


40 54 


F. D. Hanscom, straw . 


41 17 


J. F.Woodbury, blacksmithing 


79 25 


Parker & Son, carrots . 


15 40 


J. H. Cram, carrots 


149 75 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


6 84 


Samuel Cooper, grain 


889 48 


Pettee & Adams " 


340 15 


Pettee & Whittle " 


79 90 


H. Fradd & Co. " 


98 44 


G. H. Stearns, brooms, salt,etc. 


3 55 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


13 56 


Wm. C. Rogers " 


40 


Z. F.Campbell, horse medicine 


30 70 


Wm. F. Bowles & Co., horses 


375 00 


C. D. Welch, horses 


550 00 


H. S. Plumer, horse 


:?50 00 


A. C. Wallace, horse 


150 00 



24 9 



Paid Ezra W. Kimball, harness and 
repairs . 
H. C. Ranno, repairing harness 

D. S. Ames, collars, etc. 
J. B.McCrillis & Son, carts, etc 
Sanborn Carriage Co., repair 

ing carts . 
J. F. Conway, repairing carts 
Weston & Hill, flannel . 

B. L. & C. R. R., freight on 
horses 

E. T. James, boarding horse 

C. L. Moulton, professional 
services 

James Bros., professional ser 

vices .... 
A. N. Clapp, pitch-fork, etc. 
Pike & Heald 
Wm. H. Vickery, keys . 

D. F. Cressey, repairs on carl 

F. G. Stark, pasturing horse 
L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing 
J. P. Scolley & Co., harness 

soap, etc. 
Geo W. Butterfield, teamster 
A. B. Cushing, teamster 
A. Robie, teamster 
Walter Seaward, teamster 
Charles M. Denyon, teamster 
Eben Harvey, teamster . 
Geo. H. Porter, teamster 
Charles Rodgers, teamster 
Jerry Lane, teamster 



§290 


29 


30 


03 


44 


25 


610 


62 


2 


85 


4 


50 


1 


88 


7 


65 


1 


00 



15 00 



10 


00 


1 


80 


2 


49 


1 


75 


5 


85 


4 


00 


6 


50 


16 


30 


298 


49 


262 


87 


06 


25 


141 


75 


74 


99 


7 


00 


16 


50 


31 


50 


28 


50 



$6,393 91 



250 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 

reserved fund, am't transferred 


$300 
25 


00 

82 


$325 82 
Cr. 








Paid G. F. Hamlet, superintendent 


$49 


50 




M. F. Dodge, superintendent . 


79 


23 




M. F. Dodge, gravel 

for labor of men and teams 


11 
183 


90 
49 




Daniels & Co., hardware 


1 


70 


$325 82 




0T NO. 


2. 


HIGHWAY DISTRI 


Dr. 


To appropriation . 
Stark Mills, sand 


$10,000 00 

97 25 

4m 007 o^ 








' 








Cr. 


Paid Daniels & Co., hardware 


$214 


v>o 




J. B. Yarick, hardware . 


22 


55 




Wm. C. Rogers . 


11 


75 




Warren Harvey, superin 
tendent 


792 


00 




L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing 
Geo. H. Stearns, salt, pails etc 


16 

6 


36 
52 




W. H. Yickey, keys 
T. A. Lane, plumbing . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


2 

1 

4 


70 
71 
15 
73 




Abbot-Downing Co., Sunpee 


i 






broom 


40 


00 




Pike & Heald, plumbing 


3 


35 





251 



Paid Deny & Co., blacksuaithing 

R. M. Flanders, blacksmithing 

B. L. & C. R. R., freight 
Geo. Whitford, filling . 
A. H. Lowell, iron casting 
Daniel Healy, whitewashing 
W. E. & E. B. Dunbar, repair 

ing wagon 
A. B Cashing, teamster 
A. Robie, teamster 
F. Dnstin, teamster 
Charles Rogers, teamster 
Walter Seaward, teamster 
Geo. Seaward, teamster 
Charles Denyon, teamster. 

C. E. Clough, scraping snow 
Geo. H. Stearns, kerosene 

oil, etc. 
for labor of men and teams 
By reserved fund, am't transferred 



$23 


34 


r 5 


79 




25 


3 


20 




75 


14 


60 


1 


00 


10 


50 


17 


25 


12 


75 


27 


00 


25 


50 


36 


00 


118 


87 


3 


50 


3 


56 


. 6,718 


34 


I 1,958 


91 




$10,097 25 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 

To appropriation . . . 1600 00 

reserved fund, am't transferred 383 10 



Paid Henry C. Dickey, superin- 
tendent .... $66 00 
Edwin N. Baker, superin- 
tendent .... 152 50 
Head & Dowst, lumber . . 2 53 



Dr. 

$983 10 
Cr. 



252 



Paid Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 
A. H. Lowell, blacksmithing 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
Wm. Landry, stone-work 
Jonas J. Adams, stone-work 
for labor of men and teams 



125 


71 


1 


80 




32 


6 


93 


2 


50 


19 


63 


2 


25 


702 


93 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 

To appropriation .... 1300 00 



Paid C. C. Webster, superintendent 
C. C. Webster, gravel . 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
for labor of men and teams . 

By balance on hand 



1983 10 



Dr. 





$300 00 
Cr. 


$60 49 




30 00 




60 




208 68 




23 






&2fin nn 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 

To appropriation .... $400 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 18 59 



Paid C. A. Pierce, superintendent . $71 00 
J. B. Yarick, hardware . 2 40 

for labor of men and teams . 345 19 



Dr. 

$418 59 
Cr. 

$418 59 



253 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 

To appropriation .... $400 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 90 17 



Paid I. T. Webster, superintendent 


$55 69 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


6 05 


for labor of men and teams . 


428 43 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT 


NO. 7. 


To appropriation .... 


$650 00 


balance overdrawn . 


5 42 


Paid H. A. Horton, superintendent 


$72 00 


James S. Bacheler, plumbing 


3 94 


J. B. Varick, hardware 


3 99 


Daniels & Co., hardware, 


2 50 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


3 33 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


1 75 


J. W. Watson, blacksmithing . 


23 59 


Atherton & Benton, lantern 




and oil ... 


85 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


20 23 


for labor of men and teams . 


523 24 



Dr. 

$490 17 
Cr. 

$490 17 

Dr. 

$655 42 
Cr. 



$655 42 



254 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 

To appropriation .... $550 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 235 67 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 

To appropriation .... $450 00 
reserved fund, ain't transferred 104 84 



Paid J. J. Garmon. superintendent $191 00 
labor of men and teams . 363 84 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

To appropriation .... $1,000 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 204 53 



Dr. 







$785 6T 
Cb. 


Paid Jeremiah Garvin, superintend- 






ent 


$85 40 




Bunton & Wilbur, blacksmith- 






ing 


1 25 




Daniels & Co., hardware 


14 38 




for labor of men and teams . 


684 64 









$785 67 



Dr. 

$554 84 
Or. 

$554 84 

Dr. 

1,204 53 
Or. 



Paid Fred S. Worthen, superintend- 
ent $254 00 



255 

Paid William C. Rogers, hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

C. 0. Shaughnessey, carpen- 
ter-work . 

Pettee & Adams, cement 
John Barnes, blacksmithing 

D. F. Cressey & Co., black 
smithing 

A. N. Clapp, nails, powder, etc 
Frederick C 

boots 
Stephen Austin, repairing 

snow-plow 
D. EL Morgan, carpenter-work 
Warren Harvey, use of horse 
George F. Hanson, blacksmith- 
ing 

A. Bodwell & Son, stone 
George W. Goffe, drag plank 
for labor of men and teams . 



Dow, rubber 



114 61 

7 15 

30 64 

7 50 
29 70 
56 94 

5 75 

6 98 

3 75 

6 40 
1 00 
5 00 

1 75 
15 00 

4 00 
754 36 



$1,204 53 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 

To appropriation .... $700 00 
reserved fund, ain't transferred 96 45 



Paid J. E. Bailey, superintendent . 8218 13 
George H. Stearns, kerosene 

oil 30 

George I. Ayer, spruce plank 4 80 



Dr. 

796 45 
Cr. 



256 



Paid D. Wells, plank . 


$25 64 




L. N. George, lumber 


27 62 




Daniels <fe Co., hardware 


7 02 




S. L. Flanders, spikes . 


2 00 




B. W. Robinson & Co., mason 






work .... 


14 79 




for labor of men and teams . 


496 15 


$796 45 




NO. 12. 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$250 00 


$250 00 
Cr. 






Paid City Farm, labor . 


$206 25 




A. Bodwell, stone . 


12 00 




By balance on hand 


31 75 


8250 00 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $150 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 97 67 

$247 67 

Cr. 



Paid Fellows & Co., blacksmithing 3 50 

for labor of men and teams . 244 17 



$247 67 



257 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 



$2,000 00 



reserved fund, am't transferred 2,685 31 







Or. 


Paid Proctor Bros., building exten 






sion of Proctor road . 


. $459 00 




Moses Plante, building exten 






sion of Beech street . 


127 50 




Joseph A. Brown, building ex 






tension of Valley street 


1,053 94 




Joseph A. Brown, stone 


10 50 




Head & Dowst, lumber . 


1 13 




W. S. Baker, whitewasniug 


3 00 




Warren Harvey, stone . 


224 88 




J. B. Varick, hardware . 


41 




Daniels & Co., hardware 


13 53 




T. A. Lane, iron railing, etc. . 


154 67 




Atherton & Benton, kerosene 






oil 


12 


' 


for labor of men and teams . 


2,636 63 


$4,685 31 




GE. 


LAND DAMA 








Dr. 


To appropriation . 


$1,000 00 





Paid Annie F. Searles, land taken 
on Webster street 
Mary J. Merrill, land taken on 
Webster street . 

17 



$98 33 
1 00 



$1,000 00 
Cr. 



258 



Paid John J. Dillon, land taken on 
Webster street . 
C. M. Stevens 
By reserved fund, ain't transferred 



$42 50 
175 00 
683 17 



WATERING STRE 

To appropriation . 



reserved fund, am't transferred 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair 
ing water-carts . 

Manchester Water-works, wa- 
ter 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repair 
ing cart, etc. 

Pike & Heald, repairing cart 

Thomas A. Lane, stand pipes 
etc 

J. B. Clarke, printing . 

Samuel Brown, Jr., watering 
streets 

George W. Butterfield, team 
ster . 

A. B. Cushing, teamster 

City teams 

Mark Harvey, team 

Warren Harvey, team . 

Charles M. Denyon, teamster 

Charles Rogers, teamster 



. $2,000 00 
329 77 



#58 


08 


720 


00 


9 


10 


10 


65 


36 


21 


5 


62 



82 00 



130 


87 


127' 


87 


600 


75 


460 


12 


9 


00 


54 


00 


25 


50 



,000 00 



Dr. 



,329 77 



Cr. 



^2,329 77 



259 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $5,500 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 435 30 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas . $2,990 34 

Manchester Gas Co., for lan- 
terns, etc. . . . . 355 38 

I. R. Dewey, lighting lamps . 2,148 04 

Wm. C. Rogers, glass . 

A. H. Lowell, lamp-posts 

Thomas A. Lane, globes, 
cocks, etc. .... 

Edward N. Fogg, lanterns 
and lamps .... 

Brock & Driscoll, repairing 
lanterns .... 



38 


00 


350 


00 


21 


74 


8 


45 


23 


35 



PAYING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $2,000 00 
balance overdraw 7 !! . . . 6,517 20 



Paid Charles A. Bailey, block pav- 
ing 12,457 14 

Charles A. Bailey, flagging . 803 52 

Lamson & Marden, flagging . 167 72 

Charles H. Robie, concreting . 1,424 48 

J M. Nutt, cobble paving . 1 50 

C. C. Webster, cobble paring . 49 50 



Dr. 

$5,935 30 
Cr. 



&>5,935 30 

Dr. 

£8,517 20 
Cr. 



260 



Paid N. A. Sleeper, cobble paving . $22 50 
S. P. Worthley, cobble paving 27 75 

R. A. Lawrence, cobble paving 5 25 

H. S. Plumer, cobble paving 19 75 

Daniel Butterfield, cobble 

paving .... 28 50 

Benjamin Plummer, cobble 
paving .... 
James Fullerton, cobble paving- 
James Dearborn, cobble 
paving .... 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 
Derry & Co., blacksmithing . 
Lamson & Marden, black- 
smithing .... 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 
Pike & Heald, lanterns, etc. . 
for labor of men and teams . 



1 


00 


27 


00 


5 


00 




40 


4 


90 


5 


38 


15 


70 


4 


56 


3,445 


65 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $2,500 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 1,005 31 



Paid J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing . 
Hutchinson Bros., repairing 

crusher .... 
Lamson & Marden, stone 
chips .... 



$45 


07 


18 


49 


18 


35 


190 


63 


21 


00 



$8,517 20 

Dr. 

$3,505 31 
Or. 



261 



Paid M. R. Garland, wood for 

crusher .... $26 41 

Manchester Water-works, wa- 
ter .... 30 00 

J. C. Young & Co , roofing 
for crusher . . . 67 21 

D. W. Garland & Co., loading 
stone .... 

D. W. Garland, wood . 

L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing . 

Pike & Heald, plumbing 

Kimball & Gerrish, tallow for 
crusher .... 

Samuel Cooper, teaming stone 

H. Willey, stone . 

Samuel Hall, stone chips 

James Kennard, stone chips . 

James 0. Clark, stone chips . 

for labor of men and teams . 



22 


75 


r 


64 


4 


10 


1 


80 


2 


40 


2 


80 


3 


80 


4 


05 


97 


75 


8 


10 


2,932 


96 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

To appropriation .... $3,000 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 4,703 14 



;,505 31 



Dr. 







$7,703 14 






Cr. 


Paid Lamson and Marden, flagging 






stone .... 


1660 42 




Charles A. Bailey, flagging 






stone ..... 


140 30 




J. B. Varick, hardware . 


9 10 




Warren Harvey, stone . 


3 50 





262 



Paid J. A. B. Emerson, sand . . $5 00 

Head & Dowst, lumber . . 57 88 

for labor of men and teams . 6,826 94 



87,703 14 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $15,000 00 



sewer licenses .... 


1,186 


20 


N. Mickey, overdraft 


2 


50 


balance overdrawn . 


7,959 4 






$24 1 48 1 3 












Cr. 


Paid Thomas A. Lane, sewer pipe . 


$2,973 


62 


E. G. Haynes, sewer pipe 


170 


71 


B. W. Robinson & Co., 






sewer pipe .... 


3,500 


56 


A. H. Lowell, iron-work 


284 


52 


B. L. & C. R, R., freight on 






brick ..... 


211 


50 


A. N. Clapp, powder, fuse, 






nails, etc. 


15 


04 


Lamson & Marden, black- 






smithing .... 


25 


88 


H. Fradd & Co., kerosene 






oil, shoVels, etc. 


17 


95 


D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing . 


31 


23 


J. Welcome, blacksmithing . 


2 


45 


Furnald & Burbank, rubber 






boots .... 


16 


25 


Plaisted & Haines, rubber 






boots .... 


49 


00 


Pike & Heald. lanterns, 






wicks, etc. 


28 


35 



263 



tid Stephen Perry, blacksmithing 


187 93 


Stephen Austin, blacksmithing 


19 65 


Win. C. Rogers, hardware 


110 21 


J. B. Varick, hardware . 


51 34 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


83 03 


L. J. Flint, carpenter-work . 


9 30 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber 


13 48 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


283 44 


Pettee & Whittle, cement 


39 00 


Fettee & Adams, cement 


756 85 


Drake & Carpenter, cement 


483 45 


Natt & W. F. Head, brick . 


1,750 00 


T. L. Thorpe, waste 


3 57 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


6 78 


Henry N. Stone, sewer-pump 




etc 


65 40 


S. Hovey, torches, etc. . 


3 04 


Derry & Co., blacksmithing . 


16 88 


D. F. Cressey & Co., black 




smithing . 


3 74 


J. Stick ney, rubber mittens 


15 00 


Thorp & Avery, torch-han 




dies etc. . 


1 57 


Brock & Driscoll, iron scoop 


1 50 


Samuel Brown, teaming 


25 00 


J. A. B. Emerson, mortar sane 


L 20 00 


A. Bodwell & Son, stone 


100 80 


Plumer, Holton, & Co., oil 




cloth suit . 


9 50 


E. Hartshorn, sand 


5 85 


L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing 


8 45 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, black 




smithing . 


1 85 


B. F. Porter, filing saws 


5 30 



264 
Paid Chas. O'Shaughnessey, black- 



smithing . 


16 85 




George H. Stearns, oil, etc. . 


4 51 




Warren Harvey, stone . 


2 10 




for labor of men and teams . 


12,825 60 


$24,148 13 






BRIDGES. 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


11,000 00 




B. L. & C. R. R., labor on Elm- 






street bridge 


14 37 




reserved fund, am't transferred 


662 08 


$1,676 40 










Or. 


Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


$364 22 




J. H. Maynard, lumber . 


34 60 




P. Brown, labor and lumber . 


26 55 




Head & Dowst, lumber . 


59 80 




N. R. Bixby, lumber 


12 00 




George Whitferd, teaming 






lumber .... 


2 00 




for labor of men and teams . 


1,177 23 


$1,676 40 






COMMONS. 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


11,500 00 




Champion iron fence (overdraft) 


12 42 


$1,512 42 



Cr. 
Paid Wm. P. Scott, labor . . $400 18 
James S. Bacheler, plumbing 43 90 



265 



Paid Daniels & Co., hardware 


121 72 


J. B. Varick, hardware . 


20 40 


A. H. Lowell, iron-work 


28 63 


Lamson & Marden, labor 


10 95 


James Bros., teams 


4 00 


Hill & Co., expressage . 


1 15 


B. L. & C. R. R., freight 


14 47 


Peter Milon, painting fence 


20 00 


Champion Iron Fence Co. 




iron fence . 


235 00 


Manchester Water-works, wa 




ter .... 


50 00 


Fellows & Co., irons for lad 




ders .... 


2 00 


S. Derry, blacksmithing 


75 


Calvin Richardson, labor 


3 75 


Tristam Berry, labor 


3 00 


John Perham, labor 


14 75 


Henry Parker, labor 


11 60 


Charles Bamford, labor . 


71 62 


James Johnson, labor 


11 25 


L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing . 


5 85 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


2 50 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber 


3 87 


George Holbrook, lumber 


41 39 


Thorp & Avery, pails, etc. 


2 85 


R. G. Chase & Co., shrubs 


125 00 


J. G. Abbott, painting . 


10 08 


for labor of men and teams . 


159 61 


By reserved fund, am't transferrec 


192 15 



$1,512 42 



266 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 



?3,000 00 



Brock & Driscoll, overdraft 


O 


75 




reserved fund, ani't transferred . 


2,500 


00 




teachers' salaries, amount trans- 








ferred ..... 


100 


00 




tuition ..... 


700 


00 




balance overdrawn 


397 


01 


$6,700 76 
Cr. 








id Head & Dowst, repairing Spring 








street school-house 


$3,118 


78 




George Holbrook, lumber and 








labor . . 


930 


41 




George H. Dudley, lumber and 








labor ..... 


36 


75 




T. A. Lane, piping, etc., Spring 








street school-house 


595 


04 




T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 


38 


74 




Jas. S. Bacheler, plumbing, etc. 


191 


22 




J. J. Abbott, painting . 


$626 66 




Cogswell & Demick, painting 


35 


20 




Warren Harvey, stone . 


26 


25 




J. B. Varick, hardware . 


10 


20 




Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. . 


175 


16 




T. A. Lane, plumbing . 




50 




Carpenter & Baker, whitewash- 








ing 


121 


75 




A. H. Lowell, iron castings . 


49 


28 




Charles M. Norton 


6 


50 




Thorp & Avery, iron pipe, etc. 


20 


29 




F. W. Avery 


7 


37 




G. W. Varnum, extra labor . 


31 


00 





267 



Paid D. H. Morgan, extra labor 

A. D. Smith, labor on annunci 
ator .... 

J. C. Young & Co., repairing 
roof .... 

G. R. Vance & Co., Russia 
pipe, etc. . 

B. W. Robinson, Akron pipe 
etc 

J. J. Bennett, mason-work 

B. L. & C. railroad, freight 
Wm. H. Vickery, keys . 
Jerome Redding & Co., bells 

batteries, etc. 
D. H. Young, drain-pipe, etc 
Brock & Driscoll, labor on 

stoves 
W. P. Stratton & Son, repair 

ing pumps, etc. . 
D. M. Goodwin, repairing 

stoves 
J. S. Avery, setting glass 
James Doland, plastering 
Chase Bros., wood pump 
A. N. Clapp, glass 
J. A. B. Emerson, excavating 

Spruce- street school-house 
J. T. Fanning, professional 

services 

C. A. Pierce, labor on well 
powder, etc. 

By balance overdrawn in 1881 



$20 00 

4 50 

18 51 

4 00 

42 53 

3 75 
35 52 

80 

50 00 
11 22 

3 75 

2 25 

14 75 

2 35 

8 00 

6 00 

33 

140 00 

75 00 

132 16 
101 24 



$6,700 76 



268 
FUEL. 

To balance from old account . . S25 7 09 
appropriation .... 8,000 00 
L. B. Bod well & Co., overdraft 8 00 



Paid L. B. Bod well & Co., coal and 




wood ..... 


$2,528 64 


Moore & Preston, coal and 




wood . 


406 47 


C. B. Littlefield, wood . 


75 14 


C. C. Riddle, sawing wood 


27 7-5 


C. A. Pierce, sawing wood 


3 50 


G. W. Varnum, sawing wood 


1 50 


W. H. Annan, weighing coal 


4 50 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


11 25 


Union Pub. Co., printing 


25 00 


Eugene M. Carr, sawing wood 


6 00 


J. P. Buswell, shavings . 


1 00 


By balance on hand 


174 34 


FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 


To balance from old account . 


$271 93 


appropriation .... 


500 00 


reserved fund, am't transferred 


500 00 



Paid Temple & Farrington, ba- 
rometer, map fixtures, etc., $21 00 
L N. Westover, pine tables, 

etc 19 50 



Dr. 



$3,265 09* 
Cr. 



$3,265 09 
Dr. 

$1,271 9a 
Cr. 



269 



Paid Edward N. Fogg, feather dust- 
ers, etc. .... 

J. N. Baker, repairing clocks 

J. B. Varick, hose, brush, etc. 

Daniels & Co., thermometers, 
dusters, etc. 

Pike & Heald, brushes, brooms 
door-mats, etc. . 

Buffalo Hardware Co., desks, 
etc. ..... 

Ezra W. Kimball, dusters 

L. J. Marcy, sciopticon, etc. . 

C. R. R., freight . 
G. A. Smith & Co., black- 
boards, maps, etc. 

N. E. School Furniture Com- 
pany, table, dusters, etc. 

H. B. & W. 0. Chamberlain, 
scales, etc. 

P. C. Cheney Co., paper 

D. A. Simons, dusters . 
J. Stick n ey .... 
A. H. Hazeltine & Co. . 
Boston School Supply Com- 
pany, map .... 3 60 

R. D. Gay, shades, etc. . 6 00 

E. R. Coburn & Co., crayons, 

pencils, paper, etc. . . 51 41 

A. N. Clapp, thermometer, etc. 70 

J. F. Gordon, curtains, etc. . 7 56 

C. E. Clough, moving furniture 4 00 

Horace Gordon, curtains, etc. 24 36 

Manchester Locomotive Works 

tube-cleaner, etc. . 3 50 



83 70 


22 


12 


15 


76 


71 


33 


102 


66 


502 


35 


2 


25 


63 


50 


4 


05 


76 


33 


34 


75 


32 


00 


2 


90 


3 


20 


6 


50 


9 


00 



270 



Paid R. D. Gay . 
By balance on hand 



117 
160 



50 
40 



81,271 9B 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To balance from old account . 

appropriation .... 
teachers' salaries, amount trans- 
ferred .... 



Paid Thomas W .Lane .. 

Temple & Farrington 

E. R. Coburn & Co. 

D. Appleton & Co. 

R. S. Davis & Co. . 

W. P. Coburn 

Goodman & Gorman 

L. Prang & Co. 

M. P. Hall . 
By balance on hand 



$10 02 


500 


00 


100 


00 


1326 


77 


36 


02 


33 


26 


72 


00 


9 


00 


15 


97 


1 


50 



19 50 

1 40 

94 60 



Dr. 



1610 02 
Cr. 



$610 02 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To balance from old account . 
appropriation . 



Paid John B. Clarke 
H. H. Everett 
Union Publishing Company 



$158 57 


500 


00 


$337 


91 


25 


25 


45 


75 



Dr. 



$658 57 
Cr. 



271 



Paid Challis & Campbell 


$3 15 




Alfred Mudge & Son 


27 00 




Livingston & Kimball . 


23 50 




By balance on hand 


196 01 


1658 57 







CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

To balance from old account . . 8177 97 
appropriation .... 500 00 
teachers' salaries, amount trans- 
ferred 300 00 



$418 


75 


57 


60 


4 


65 



Paid Manchester Water- works,water 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
E. S. Ritchie & Sons . 
J. N. Baker, repairing clocks, 

etc 45 12 

Wm. E. Buck, use of horse 

and carriage 
B. F. Dennis, tuning pianos . 
James Bros., teams 
E. T. James, teams 
J. G. Jones, trucking . 
L. A. Ward, trucking . 
D. M. Goodwin 
Eliza J. Woodeson, cleaning 

school-house 
H. P. Young, mounting birds 
Weeks &, Currier, chemicals, 

etc. ..... 

N. S. Clark, ribbon, etc. 



118 


50 


13 


50 


10 


00 


12 


50 


4 


50 


3 


00 


12 


38 


7 


50 


2 


00 


18 


40 


13 


33 



Dr. 



1977 97 
Cr. 



272 



Paid Wm. 0. Folsom, tuning pianos, 

etc 86 75 

Brock & Driscoll, cleaning out 

stoves, etc. ... 3 75 

S. A. Dunbar, cleaning out 

chimney .... 75 

Wm. H. Vickery, keys, re- 
pairing lock. etc. . 4 97 

J. M. Sanborn, tuning pianos 3 75 

Manchester Novelty Co., rub- 
ber stamp .... 3 50 

C. H. Wilkins, lettering diplo- 
mas 27 30 

J. B. Varick, disinfectant . 70 

C. C. Webster, cleaning vault 8 00 

F. W. Batchelder, use of piano, 

etc 8 00 

C. H. Kimball, tuning pianos 3 00 
A. Clark & Sons, repairing 

telescope .... 8 00 

Opera House Company, use of 

Opera House ... 30 00 

D. R. Prescott ... 1 50 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspec- 
tor and Insurance Co. . 100 00 

D. H. Morgan, handle for flue 

cleaner .... 75 

G. R. Vance & Co., cleaning 
stove-pipe, etc. . 

J. A. Caverly, trucking . 
Jones's express, trucking 
By balance to new account . 



1 


75 


4 


25 


1 


50 


18 


02 



1977 97 



273 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



To balance from old account . 


1215 38 


appropriation . 


2,600 00 


Paid John S. Avery, janitor . 


$624 96 


John A. Carr, janitor . 


625 00 


D. H. Morgan, janitor . 


383 44 


G. W. Varnum, janitor . 


350 06 


Charles P. Ordway, janitor . 


87 00 


Charles M. Norton, janitor 


50 00 


James Watts, janitor 


248 97 


S. A. Duifbar, janitor 


19 00 


Rufus Lamb, janitor 


4 69 


Burton H. Young, janitor 


27 00 


Anna 0. Proctor, janitor 


15 08 


Mary E. Dickey, janitor 


4 00 


Edward McColley, janitor 


6 14 


Oliver Merrill, janitor . 


8 25 


Emma Miller 


23 70 


Susie A. Crosby, janitor 


1 25 


Mary W. Mitchell, janitor 


6 90 


Hiram C. Brown, janitor 


5 50 


Edgar M. Carr, janitor . 


5 12 


Willie Woodeson, janitor 


22 00 


Maggie Linen, janitor . 


17 25 


Lewis E. Dickey, janitor 


11 67 


Augusta R. Nutt, janitor 


5 40 


Eugene Proctor, janitor 


5 50 


Frank Tulip . 


4 47 


George N. Parker, janitor 


12 00 


By balance on hand . > 


24L 05 



Dr. 



!,815 38 
Cr. 



?2,815 38 



18 



274 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

To appropriation .... #1,00000 
teachers' salaries, amount trans- 
ferred 500 00 

balance overdrawn . . . 284 95 



Paid John B. Mills 

Charles E. Cochran 
F. C. Livingston . 
Kate M. Follansbee 
Josie H. Richardson 
Delle E. Haines 
M. A. Campbell 
M. Eugenia Lord 
Mary A. Tynan 
Emma Mitchell 
Kittie J. Ferren 
Walter Gibson 
Edith M. Stebbins 
Mary E. Bun ton 
Lizzie D. Hartford 
Fannie M. Kelley 
M. A. Knowlton 
Susie H. Frame 
Fannie L. Sanborn 
Georgie A. Wyman 
Annie L. Prescott 
Ella Hope 
Hattie E. Daniels 
Nora F. Kennard 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
D. H. Morgan, janitor . 



Dr. 



142 00 


190 


00 


132 


00 


113 


30 


94 


50 


60 00 


27 


00 


85 


00 


45 


90 


34 


20 


45 


90 


2 


70 


49 


50 


48 


50 


29 


70 


49 


50 


49 


50 


29 


70 


49 


50 


17 


10 



5 40 

11 70 

2 70 

9 90 

45 18 

37 50 



$1,784 95 
Cr. 



275 

Paid G. W. Varnum, janitor . 
John B. Clarke, printing 
Henry H. Everett, printing . 
Union Pub Co., printing 
A. N. Clapp, kerosene oil, 
wicks, etc. 

By balance from old account . 



$36 00 


20 


81 


4 


00 


27 


50 


14 


93 


370 


03 



$1,784 95 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 
appropriations . 
balance overdrawn 



Paid Albert W. Bachelei 
G. I. Hopkins 
L. E. Manahan 
M. A. Buzzell 
E. J. Ela . 

E. P. Sherburne 
C.G.Fogg . 
L. R. Adams 

C. E. Reid . 

D. A. Clifford 
A. G. Flanders 
R. M. Tuson 
Annie A. Webster 

F. S. Sutcliffe 
CM. Dearborn 
Mary L. Sleeper 
A. O. Heath . 



$1,668 00 


39,000 


00 


87 


69 




$40 755 fiQ 




<JPt:v, 1 OO \JV 




Cr. 


$2,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


750 


00 


500 


00 


500 


00 


1,350 


00 


475 


00 


460 


00 


460 


00 


1,350 


00 


475 


00 


442 


00 


460 


00 


1,000 


00 


304 


00 


461 


94 


460 


00 



276 



id C. N. Brown . 


$356 50 


Georgia Dow . 


450 00 


H. M. Morrill 


450 00 


Ella E. Sanborn . 


450 00 


A. E. Abbott 


427 50 


Nellie B. Putnam . 


450 00 


Nellie Pearson 


450 00 


L. C. Gilford 


367 50 


Nellie M. James . 


375 00 


E. L. Stokes . 


450 00 


Jennie F. Bailey . 


450 00 


Augusta L. Downs 


450 00 


Alice G. Lord 


270 00 


M. N. Bower . 


450 00 


Jennie G. Stebbins 


270 00 


Mary A. Smith 


371 25 


Bertha L. Dean 


439 00 


Florence McEvoy . 


450 00 


H. G. Flanders 


450 00 


0. A. Abbott 


450 00 


Fannie D. Moulton 


430 00 


L. P. Gove . 


450 00 


Lizzie A. Burns 


392 50 


N. S. Bunton 


475 00 


M. C. Edgerly 


450 00 


Ellen E. McKean . 


450 00 


Flora M. Senter . 


440 00 


M. E. Sylvester . 


450 00 


Clara E. Woods . 


450 00 


Carrie I. Stevens . 


400 00 


E. S. Prior . 


135 00 


Ida J. Bartlett 


135 00 


Susie A. Crosby . 


112 50 


Etta J. Carley 


460 00 



277 



id Emma C. Gee 


$138 00 


Izetta S. Locke 


450 00 


Georgia A. Nute . 


475 00 


S. G. Woodman . 


425 00 


Olive J. Randall . 


425 00 


Olive A. Rowe 


365 63 


J.J.Kimball 


800 00 


M. W. Mitchell . 


425 00 


B. F. Dame . 


1,350 00 


Julia A. Baker 


444 13 


Mary F. Barnes . 


451 25 


Mary J. Fife . 


460 00 


Belle R. Daniels . 


460 00 


Ella F. Salisbury . 


109 00 


Carrie Gilmore 


450 00 


E. F. Beane . 


450 00 


N. I. Sanderson 


405 00 


Louisa R. Quint . 


420 00 


Florence A. Nichols 


450 00 


Lizzie J. West 


75 00 


Belle M. Kelley . 


450 00 


Lucia E. Estey 


430 00 


C. A. Armes . 


240 00 


Anna J. Dana 


145 62 


Annie W. Patten . 


350 00 


M. K. Webster . 


360 00 


Nettie C. Woodman 


30 00 


Nina D. Annis 


266 50 


Gertrude H. Brooks 


263 75 


Emma M. Rowley . 


263 75 


Delle E. Haines . 


310 00 


Phoebe A. McGuire 


230 00 


EvaF. Tuson 


88 25 


Kate M. Follansbee 


115 37 



278 



id Mary E. Bunton . 


. 


1118 75 


Helen F. Wetherbee 


. , 


73 75 


Josie H. Martin . 


. . 


196 00 


C. E. Cochran 




1 50 


Nancy P. Flint 


. 


10 00 


Edith M. Stebbins . 


, 


120 00 


Kittie J. Ferren . 


. , 


86 25 


Georgia A. Wyman 


. , 


53 75 


Fannie M. Kelley . 


. 


10 00 


Sarah E. Sprague . 


. 


400 00 


Fannie L Sanborn 


. , 


25 00 


Mary G. Tynan . 


. . 


73 50 


M. W. Hubbard . 


. , 


15 00 


Ella Hope 




14 75 


Emma W. Mitchell 


. m 


7 50 


W. F Bracket* . 




24 00 


for books and stationery, 




amount transferred 


. 


100 00 


for contingent expenses, 




amount transferred 


. 


300 00 


for evening schools, 


amount 




transferred 


. 


500 00 


for repaiis ^f school-houses, 




amount transferred 


. . 


100 00 



$40,755 69 



TUITION. 

To balance from old account . . $795 6o 
Wm. E. Buck, tuition fees . 213 37 



Dr. 



81,009 02 



279 



Paid N. E. Publishing Co., school- 




books, etc. 


$18 40 


A. C. Stockin,school-books,etc. 


14 29 


Willard Small, for school- 




books, etc. 


43 09 


L. H. Marvel, school-books,etc. 


23 94 


N. E. School Furniture Co. . 


25 80 


Thompson, Brown, & Co., 




school-books, etc. 


12 00 


E. K. Dunbar & Co., cyclo- 




pedia .... 


45 00 


Thos. VV. Lane, school-books . 


15 00 


C. Stearns, school-books 


14 85 


for repairs on school-houses, 




amount transferred . 


700 00 


E. R. Coburn & Co., school- 




books .... 


10 20 


By balance on hand 


8b' 45 



Or. 









OOL-HC 




WEBSTER-STREET 


SCH 


)U£ 


To balance from old account . 




17,275 


70 


appropriation . 




. 


2,000 


00 


H. T. Simpson & Son, 


over- 


draft 


1,000 


00 


J. H. Maynard, brick 


sold 




75 


00 


balance over-drawn . 


• 


• 


1,155 


98 



11,009 02 



Dr. 



111,506 68 

Cr. 



Paid A. F Cate, contractor . 

M. Fitzgerald, cut stone-work . 
Wm. Landry, setting under- 
pinning . 



$6,990 96 
837 00 

81 06 



280 



Paid B. W. Robinson & Co., hand- 






ling brick, etc. . 


$105 54 


Buffalo Hardware Co., desks . 


342 


52 


B. L. & C. R. R., freight on 






brick .... 


296 


13 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 






ing 


3 


75 


Drake & Carpenter, faced 






brick and cement 


196 


20 


J. T. Fanning, architect 


457 


41 


Lamson & Marden, labor 


4 


50 


C. H. Leach, trucking . 


1 


00 


H. T. Simpson & Son, brick . 


1,736 


22 


N. E. School Furniture Co., 






slate boards 


18 


16 


Brock & Driscoll, moving 






stoves, etc. 


9 


50 


J. B. Varick, weather-vane . 


18 


00 


Geo. H. Dudley, lumber and 






labor .... 


20 


79 


Jas. S. Bacheler, pipe and 






plumbing .... 


68 


07 


J. H. Maynard, setting bell . 


30 


00 


George Whitford, grading 






school-house yard 


110 


25 


F. Allen, drawing brick 


84 


00 


Yarnum & Beebe, drawing 






brick .... 


18 


00 


J. A. B. Emerson, drawing 






brick .... 


67 


62 


Warren Harvey, drawing 






brick .... 


10 


00 

111,506 68 



281 



BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 

0. D. Carpenter, wood sold 



Paid Frank A. Tenney, land . 
J. T. Fanning, architect 
George Whitford, teaming 
0. D. Carpenter, grading 
Warren Harvey, stone founda 

tion .... 
labor of men and teams . 

By balance on hand 



. 85,000 00 


8 


00 


. 81,000 


00 


150 


00 


91 


12 


9 


00 


. 1,199 


00 


45 


75 


. 2,513 


13 



TRUANT OFFICER. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
balance overdrawn . 



8412 50 

300 00 

37 50 



Paid Samuel Brooks, truant officer 8750 00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



To appropriation . . . 828,000 00 

Stark Manufacturing Company, 

on account of bridge . . 3,000 00 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany, on account of bridge . 2,000 00 



85,008 00 
Cr. 



85,008 00 

Dr. 

8750 00 
Cr. 

8750 00 
Dr. 



282 



To Weston & Hill, overdraft . . SO 16 

S. Hovey, overdraft ... 75 

H. B. Putnam, land sold . . 150 00 

E. W. Perkins, land sold . . 100 00 
George S. Clough, use of exca- 
vator ... . 18 00 

F. P. Colby, lumber ... 13 75 
N. C. Hunt, lumber ... 75 00 
C. D. Welch, land sold . . 252 37 
balance overdrawn . . . 16,202 39 



Paid Julia Reardon, damage to per- 
son $100 00 

William M. Webster, damage 

to person . . . . 100 00 

Bridget Rodgers, damage to 

person . . .200 00 

Adeline Geoffroy, damage to 
person . . . . 175 00 

Julius Gendron, damage to 
person . . . . 200 00 

Heirs of Mary J. Anderson, 

damage to person . . 250 00 

Catherine Cunningham, dam- 
age to person . . . 700 17 

Delina Allison, damage to per- 
son 150 00 

Apphia P. Maynard, damage 

to person . . . . 300 00 

Margaret S. Dallas, damage to 

person .... 150 00 

J. D. Hall, bounty . . 150 00 

Charles E. French, oounty . 150 00 



849,812 42 
Cr. 



283 



Paid C. C. Webster, damage 


to 




sheep 




$15 00 


Engene F. Wilson, damage 


to 




sheep 




13 50 


A. M. Wheeler, damage 


to 




team 


. 


11 85 


Thomas McLeod, damage 


to 




horse 


. 


50 00 


George H. Porter, damage 


to 




team 


. 


50 00 



Thomas N. Allen, damage to 

team ..... 
Alvin Raymond, damage to 

team .... 

William Glover, claim . 
E. D. L. Parker, execution 
J. G. Eaton, et al., execution 
Ellen G. Carvelle, execution . 
S. N. Bell, execution 
Buffalo Hardware Co., desks 

for Main-street school-house 
R. M. Shirley, stone-work 
Cogswell & Dimick, painting 
Joseph A. Poor, land 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
J. H. Maynard, lumber and 

labor .... 

John Bryson, lumber and labor 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor 
Robertson & Haselton, lumber 

and labor . 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
W. W. Hubbard, lumber 



00 



20 00 

91 76 

708 68 

14 14 

372 13 

193 75 



50 00 
70 37 

622 63 
4 32 

780 43 
8 50 

131 67 

42 00 
1,652 71 

51 90 



284 



Paid A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . $348 67 
J. Hodge, lumber and labor . 216 99 
Robertson & Haselton, lumber 

and labor . . . . 22 61 

George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor .... 199 31 

George H. Dudley, lumber 

and labor . . . . 72 51 

D. H. Morgan, lumber and 

labor .... 5 00 

J. F. Seaward, lumber and 

labor . . . . 183 34 

J. F. Seaward, building addi- 
tion to North-Main-street 
school-house 
L. M. Aid rich, lumber and 
labor .... 

N. R. Bixby, lumber and labor 
W. Ireland, building cottage 

on Park street . 
Andrews & Rief, building cot- 
tage on Maple street . 
Alpheus Gay, building barn on 

Park street 
Walter Neal, lumber and labor 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Manchester Gas Co., edge- 
stone .... 
F. 0. Clement, printed labels 
D. K. White, taking census . 
H. D. Lord, taking census 
Fred W. Cheney, taking cen- 
sus 54 46 



4,223 


00 


2 


75 


135 


00 


1,700 


00 


1,300 


00 


368 


94 


35 


70 


41 


58 


70 


88 


5 


62 


116 


88 


126 


00 



285 



id Daniel F. Healy, taking cen- 




sus ..... 


$160 44 


J. M. Crawford, taking census 


148 48 


Isaac Whittemore, taking cen- 




sus ..... 


78 30 


F. 0. Clement, taking census 


69 52 


George E. Glines, paper, post- 




age, etc. . ... 


5 00 


Joseph Dubois, interpreter for 




census-takers 


36 00 


L. D. Goodwin, interpreter for 




census-takers 


36 00 


Ferdinand Riedel, interpreter 




for census-takers 


4 00 


Patrick Finn, burying nui- 




sances .... 


6 00 


George Whitford, trucking . 


77 85 


C. E. Clough, trucking . 


2 50 


J. G. Jones, trucking . 


3 75 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 




ing 


5 25 


C. H. Simpson, teams . 


6 50 


Cavanaugh Bros., teams 


44 00 


George W. Reed, teams 


3 00 


C. C. Perry, teams 


41 00 


James Bros., teams 


103 50 


E. T. James, teams 


141 25 


William Stearns, coal for hay- 




scales .... 


4 00 


G. W. Varnum 


4 00 


Luther Pattee, professional 




services .... 


25 00 


Wilkins & Collity, professional 




services .... 


100 00 



286 



Paid L. B. How, professional ser- 
vices 125 00 

George A. Crosby, professional 

services .... 30 00 

W. W. Pillsbury, professional 

services .... 3 00 

J. M. Collity, professional ser- 
vices 59 00 

W.J. Sleeper, vaccinating per- 
sons 162 00 

Sturgis & Dodge, professional 

services . . . . 50 00 

J. M. Collity, vaccinating per- 
sons ..... 742 50 

W. W. Wilkins, return of 

births and deaths . . 4 00 

James Sullivan, return of 

births and deaths . . 41 00 

O. D. Abbott, return of births 

and deaths ... 8 25 

H. de W. Carvelle, return of 

births and deaths . . 5 00 

L. Pattee, return of births and 

deaths .... 3 50 

CM. Dodge, return of births 

and deaths ... 7 00 

L. B. How, return of births 

and deaths ... 3 50 

John Ferguson, return of births 

and deaths . . . 18 50 

J. W. Mooar, return of births 

and deaths ... 6 50 

William A. Webster, return of 

births and deaths . . 1 50 



287 



Paid L. M. French, return of births 

and deaths . . . $11 00 

Anna M. Twiss, return of 

births and deaths . . 25 

Char k* s F. George, return of 

births and deaths . . 25 

C. F. Bonney, return of births 

and deaths 
L. French, return of births 

and deaths 
M. Richard, return of births 

and deaths 
J. A. Jackson, return of births 

and deaths 
J. P. Walker, return of births 

and deaths 
Emil Custer, return of births 

and deaths 
J. L. Robinson, return of 

births .... 

G. E. Roy, return of births . 
J.W. D. MacDonald, return of 

births .... 

Temple & Farrington, books 

and stationery . 
Temple & Farrington, books 

and stationery . 
Thomas \V. Lane, books and 

stationery .... 
Thomas W. Lane, books and 

stationery .... 
Union Publishing Company, 

printing . . v 



2 


75 


16 


75 


12 


25 


5 


25 


2 


75 


2 


50 


5 


50 


2 


75 


19 


00 


303 


97 


2 


88 


13 


16 


4 


70 


103 


37 



288 



Paid Republican Press Association 

printing 
H. H. Everett, printing . 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 
Sampson, Davenport, & Co. 

directories 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
P. H. Redfield, making re 



turns, etc. 



water 



black 



Pike & Heald, piping 

ing-troughs, etc. 
Palmer & Garmon, 

smithing . 
James S. Bacheler, plumb 

ing, etc. 
L. C. Morrill, stationery, etc 
Thorp & Avery, tin 
J. G. Greer, stone-work, etc. 
W. H. Vickery, sealing 

weights, etc. for city . 
Manchester Water-works, wa 

ter .... 
A. H. Lowell, iron-work 
Drake & Carpenter, cement 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, ambu 

lance 
Pike & Heald, stove-bolts 
Derry & Co., iron-work . 
Bunton & Wilbur, iron-work 
Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 

and labor . 
Warren Harvey, stone . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 



m so 


3 


50 


233 


79 


1 


50 


213 


38 


1 


30 


155 


58 



8 69 

225 79 

1 75 

2 50 
8 00 

5 10 



54 


94 


307 


43 


15 


15 


75 


00 




72 


72 


70 


1 


00 


19 


60 


6 


00 


98 


97 


8 


50 



289 



id Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 


$23 34 


J. M. Crawford, clerical labor 


38 


13 


Wm. Caldwell, bounty on 






crows .... 




90 


Levi Caldwell, bounty on 






crows .... 




30 


A. J. Peaslee, bounty on crows 




20 


F. A. Emery, bounty on crows 




20 


Wm. Burlingame, bounty on 






crows .... 




20 


J. Adams, bounty on crows . 




20 


J. L. Stickney, bounty on 






crows .... 




40 


J. Page, bounty on crow 




10 


J. C. Snow, bounty on crows . 




90 


Alfred Welcome, bounty on 






crow ..... 




10 


L. R. Cross, bounty on crows . 




30 


Thomas Lane, bounty on 






crow ..... 




10 


F. A. Barton, bounty on crow 




10 


Warren Davis, bounty on 






crows .... 


1 


00 


Harry E. Clay, bounty on 






crow ..... 




10 


Benjamin T. Rounds, bounty 






on crow .... 




10 


George Lamper, bounty on 






crow ..... 




10 


E. 0. Foss, watering-troughs . 


418 


00 


John R. Stokes, stone-work . 


411 


75 


Wm. Landry, stone and work 


1,169 


65 


D. W. Garland & Co., stone 






and work .... 


690 


51 



L9 



27 


35 


281 


67 


162 


95 


8,182 


82 


1 


50 



290 



Paid Charles E. Rowe, stone-work . 844 50 

Lamson & Harden, black- 
smithing .... 

J. A. Brown, stone-work 

Warren Harvey, stone-work . 

Corrugated Hetal Company, 
extension HcGregor bridge 

Stephen Gardner . 

N. P. Kidder, making city 

report . . . . 150 00 

N. P. Kidder, making return 
of births, marriages, and 
deaths . . . . 529 90 

D. W. King, recording deeds 2 60 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

land 2,215 73 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

rent of wood-stand . . 100 00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

lumber and stone . . 84 20 

J J. Abbott, painting . . 71 86 

C. R. Colley & Co., painting . 378 17 

C. H. Reed, professional 

services . . . . 94 00 

P. W. Follansbee & Son. mov- 
ing buildings ... 300 00 

J. A. Barker, care of boiler at 

city library ... 113 50 

George H. Allen, surveying- 
instruments, etc., . . 112 85 

George H. Allen, horse-car 

tickets, etc. . . . 14 20 

George C. Vickery, services 

as assistant engineer . . 380 00 



291 
Paid Wm. D. Hunter, rod-man for 



engineer .... 


1281 


00 


H. W. Home, rod-man for 






engineer .... 


304 


00 


Manchester Locomotive Works 






iron- work .... 


53 


28 


James S. Bacheler, steam-pip- 






ing, etc 


760 


00 


Allen D. Eastman . 


18 


50 


Hutchinson Bros., repairing 






lawn-mower 


23 


40 


Wyman & Gray, painting 






fence .... 


40 


00 


0. D. Carpenter, mason-work 


8 


50 


D. M. Goodwin, stove, 






pipe, etc. .... 


28 


60 


Bennett & Lord, plastering . 


31 


75 


Hills & Sherer, painting pest- 






house .... 


120 


95 


B. W. Robinson & Co., mason- 






work ..... 


609 


51 


Wm. McElroy, making re- 






turns, etc. .... 


1 


35 


B. L. & C. R. R., freight 


28 


34 


Manchester Mills, use of 






derrick .... 


25 


00 


Manchester Locomotive Works 






steel boilers 


1,075 


00 


Manchester Locomotive Works 






labor .... 


20 


00 


Wm. R. Patten, witness- 






fees, etc. .... 


84 


97 


Manchester Water-works, wa- 






ter 


83 


47 



292 



Paid A. M. Wheeler, land . 

H. B. Putnam, allowance for 

horse-hire, etc. . 
George S. Clough & Co., 

cleaning vaults . 
Judith Sherer, matron at 

pest-house .... 
I. R. Dewey, care of lamps at 

soldiers' monument . 
Stephen Gardner, care of 

boiler at engine-house 
J. T. Fanning, plan and speci- 
fications for North-Mai n- 

street school-house 
Charles H. Robie, concreting 
Drake & Carpenter, cement 
J. F. James, professional ser 

vices 
Fire King, reserve company 

pumping out cellars . 
A. F. Stevens, professional 

services 
A. Quimby, stationery . 
J. F. Gillis, stationery . 
John McEvoy, labor on exca 

vator 
E. P. Johnson & Co., straw 
Brock & Driscoll, stove 

pipe, etc. . 
Adams & Lamprey, lamps, etc 

at pest-house 
Weston & Hill . 
S. Hovey, dippers and chains 
J. F. Gordon 



167 


91 


149 


50 


75 


00 


360 


00 


9 


00 


57 


50 


75 


00 


36 


27 


19 


35 


7 


00 


30 


20 


100 


00 


1 


10 




85 


4 


00 


7 


48 



12 05 

1 20 
16 

1 50 

8 75 



293 



Paid City Farm, labor ... 84 00 

D. M. Goodwin, dippers, etc. . 7 38 

P. A. Devine, burying nui- 
sances .... 2 50 
D. W. King, recording deeds 1 00 

D. R. Prescott, cash paid 
witnesses, etc. . . . 24 12 

Mead, Mason, & Co., land on 

Granite street . . . 4,340 43 

J. N. Baker, care of school- 
clocks '. 70 00 

Howe Novelty Manufacturing 

Co., house-numbers . . 15 25 

H. D. Gordon, chairs . 7 00 

J. B. Unruh, numbering 

houses .... 2 90 

Pettee & Whipple, cement . 21 54 

Fairbanks, Brown, & Co., 

repairing scales ... 5 50 

Hale & Whittemore, picture- 
frames for ex-mayors . . 57 75 

Tristam Berry, posting ordi- 
nances .... 2 00 

G. W. Varnum, labor, ordi- 
nances .... 

L. A. Proctor, shade trees 

Pettee & Adams, cement 

H. W. Herrick, painting por- 
traits of ex-mayors 

E. A. Straw, stone-roller 
J. 0. Young & Co., roofing . 
Henry Parker, labor 
Charles E. Crombie, shade 

trees 58 75 



6 


25 


12 


75 


9 


40 


32 


00 


15 


00 


67 


73 


17 


75 



294 



Paid Manchester P. 0., stamps 

George A. Alger, repairing 

clock .... 
Edward Bowen, labor . 
W. H. Laskey, rubber bands 

etc 

George F. Bosher & Co.. sell 

ing land, etc. 
Hills & Sherer, painting 

C. W. Butler, wall-paper 
N. A. Sleeper, labor 
Samuel Brown, storage of road 

builder 
H. T. Simpson & Son, brick 
J. C. Young & Co.. roofing 

D. R. Prescott, serving no- 
tices, etc. .... 

L. M. Aldrich, carpenter-work 

Win. H. Newhall, labor in 
Amoskeag cemetery . 

P. Finn, burying nuisances . 

George W. Yarnum, distribut- 
ing health notices 

Daniel Healy, whitewashing 
tree-boxes .... 

C. H. Reed, professional ser- 
vices ..... 

T. F. Collins, interpreter for 
census-takers 

George H. Stearns, brooms . 

Henry Parker, labor 

John Burns, overpayment of 
tax ..... 

A. Rivard, overpayment of tax 



81 00 

1 00 
19 50 

50 



30 


00 


22 


52 


7 


20 


3 


00 


2 


00 


204 


00 


201 


00 


12 


66 


10 


88 


10 


12 


7 


50 


10 


00 


41 


27 


26 


00 


30 


00 




65 


5 


50 


2 


32 


1 


76 



295 

Paid Win Shepherd, care of Den- 
nis Murphy 
J. C. Young & Co., roofing . 
Buff & Berger, repairing of 
transit .... 
Amoskeag M'fg Co., brick . 
Robert A. Ray, on account of 

Knibbs' suit 
I. T. Webster, repairing wa- 
tering-trough 
Fairbanks, Brown, & Co., re- 
pairing city scales 
Clough & Clark, professional 
services .... 
U. S. & Canada Express 
J. C. Young, roofing 
Sulloway, Topliff, & O'Connor, 

professional services . 
D. W. King, recording deeds 
J. M. Plaisted, labor 
George E. Morrill, delivering 
tax bills .... 
Weston & Hill 

Western Union Telegraph Co., 
telegrams .... 
J. E. Chase, pumping out cel- 
lars ..... 
George H. Allen, repairs on 

instruments, etc. 

George Whitford, teaming 

Sarah S. Reynolds, abatement 

of taxes .... 

J. W. Fellows, professional 

services . . . . 



$1 


00 


60 


00 


•20 


50 


1 


60 


714 


29 


4 


70 


61 


95 


6 


00 




15 


49 


25 


244 


25 


2 


^6 


1 


60 


42 


50 


5 


23 


2 


23 


1 


60 


13 


98 


11 


50 


37 


08 


23 


84 



296 



Paid Adams & Lamprey, brooms 

C. C. Chase, stone 

G. R. Vance & Co., dippers 

D. B. Brooks & Co., ink 
Waldo E. Gilmore, making re 

turns, etc. . 
David Thayer, labor 
Edward N. Fogg, lamps, oil 

etc 

D. C. Whittemore . 

S. B. Putnam, expenses to 

Concord, N. H. . 
for labor of men and teams 



$1 12 

25 00 

50 

75 

2 75 

2 00 

2 48 
20 00 

1 00 

982 88 











rERY. 




VALLEY 


CEME 




To appropriation 
wood sold 










. 11,000 00 
104 88 


water rent 










69 


75 


digging graves 
tomb fees . 










83 
58 


00 
50 


care of lots 










156 


75 


reserved fund, i 


im't 


tra 


is 


ferrec 


i 880 


93 



149,812 42 



Dr. 



Paid F. B. Balch, superintendent . I486 54 
Benj. Stevens, superintendent 5 00 
F. H. Colby, labor . . 161 25 
Manchester Water-works, wa- 
ter 52 40 

Warren Harvey, teaming, etc. 49 Qb 

James Emerson, grading . 231 74 



!,353 81 
Cr. 



297 



Paid George Whitford, sand . 

L. B. Bod well & Co., canvas 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber 

Pike & Heald, pipe, valves 

labor, etc. . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
P. W. Follansbee & Son,mov 

ing building 
Palmer & Garmon, resetting 

grave-stones 
J. R. Can*, painting 
Henry Fisk, pipe, urinal, and 

labor .... 
John M. Evans & Co., labor 
Warren Harvey, labor . 
By balance to new account 



$62 


50 


8 


25 


444 


01 


478 


54 


1 


20 


21 


20 


7 


53 



25 00 



75 


07 


133 


60 


81 


33 


11 


00 


4 


00 


14 


00 



$2,353 81 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



To balance from old account . 
appropriation . 
lots sold .... 
lumber sold 

B. A. Stearns, digging graves 
B. A. Stearns . 



Paid B. A. Stearns, superintendent $650 75 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 109 90 
Fellows & Co., blacksmithing 16 50 



. $1,129 39 


. 1/.00 


00 


. 1,297 


38 


302 


92 


114 


00 


60 


34 



Dr. 



$4,404 03 
Cr. 



298 



Paid Temple & Farrington, books 
and stationery . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

J. Hodge, lumber . 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 

J. F. James, treasurer, post- 
age, etc. .... 

Pike & Heald, plumbing 

George H. Allen, expenses to 
Boston, Mass. 

C. H. Leach, trucking . 

Manchester Gas. Co., iron safe 

Palmer & Gannon, grave-num- 
bers ..... 

J. J. Abbott, painting . 

balance to new account 

labor of men and teams 



$40 


16 


19 


14 


11 


57 


35 


02 


25 


80 


3 


04 


4 


00 


3 


00 


30 


00 


32 


00 


4 


50 


846 


19 


2,572 


46 



$4,404 03 



FIRE DEPxVRTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $15,000 00 
S. C. Forsaith & Co., old hose- 
carriage .... 50 00 
Charles H. Rogers, overdraft . 42 00 
reserved fund, ain't transferred 484 50 



Dr. 



$15,576 50 



Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 1. 

Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas . $46 98 

George W. Butterfield, driver 216 00 
Chas. H Rogers, extra driver 21 00 



Cr. 



299 



Paid T. A. Lane, hose ... il 24 
E. W. Kimball, repairing har- 
ness, etc. .... 8 63 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 1 75 
Tristam Berry, pulley-rope, 

etc. . . • • 3 50 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

and coal .... 105 94 

Geo C. Hoyt, wood . 75 

John Garland, wood . 2 57 

Boston Belting Company, hose 15 68 

Company's bill for services . 1,147 00 



$1,571 04 



N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 4. 

Or. 
Paid Manchester Gas Co. gas . 848 60 

A. B. Cushing, driver . . 198 00 

Jerry Lane, driver . . 18 00 

Chas. H. Rogers, extra driver 21 00 

A. J. Morse, extra driver . 5 00 

Geo. H. Stearns, oil, matches, 
etc. ..... 5 80 

Manchester Locomotive Wk's, 
repairing tank ... 2 50 

E. W. Kimball, repairing har- 
ness, etc. . 

Daniels & Co., hardware 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood and 
coal .... 

Geo. C. Hoyt, wood 

John Garland, wood 

Company's bill for services 

$1,567 42 



12 


74 


1 


93 


i 

105 


94 




75 


2 


56 


1,144 


60 



iOO 



Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1. 



Or. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Walter L. Blenus, driver 
George H. Porter, extra driver 
J. M. Plaisted, extra driver 
George H. Stearns, matches 

oil, etc. 
C. B. Littlefield. sponge and 

castor oil . 
Manchester Locomotive W'ks 

repairing hose-carriage 
E. W. Kimball, lead harness 

etc 

Manchester One-Price Cloth 

ing Co., blanket 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Fellows <fc Co., iron- work 
Tri stain Berry, repairing chairs 
Edward N. Fogg, duster 
E. P. Johnson <£; Co , coal 
L.'B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood .... 
Company's bill for services 



$QQ 06 

600 00 

18 00 

1 00 

3 9,3 

95 

15 00 

34 10 



6 


00 




L 


76 




2 


15 




1 


50 




2 


50 




32 


12 




102 


95 




1,561 


80 


12,449 84 



Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Walter Seaward, driver . 
George H. Porter, driver 
E. W. Kimball, repairing har- 
ness, etc. . 
H. C. Ranno, harness, etc. 



$27 


54 


73 


25 


16 


50 


2 


90 


51 


25 



Cr. 



301 



Paid Daniels & Co., hardware 

Edward N. Fogg, cuspidores . 
W. C. Smith, hose-cart hitches 
Geo. C. Lord, matches, etc. . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 
Samuel Eastman & Co.. span- 
ners . 
Company's bill for services 



$4 25 

3 00 

12 50 

63 

30 41 



12 00 

1,007 00 



,241 23 



$34 


20 


374 


00 


7 


50 


7 


75 


11 


00 



3 00 



E. W. Harrington Hose Company No. 3. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
J. T. O'Dowd, driver . 
Arthur Dow, extra driver 
T. A. Lane, hose, and repair- 
ing steam-gauge 
E. W. Kimball, blankets, etc. 
Edwin E. Weeks, cleaning 

flues and steamer 
Thomas F. Dodge, labor on 

steamer . 
M. W. Ford, labor on steamer 
H. Fradd & Co., matches, 

brooms, etc. 
Rowell & Burns, coal 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 
A. C. Wallace, wood 
H. C. Ranno, repairing har- 
ness, etc. . 
Barton & Co., crash 
Company's bill for services 



00 
00 



2 

26 zo 
40 00 



75 

9.1 



50 
50 

85 



iZ 

1,002 20 



Cr. 



11,533 22 



302 



162 


46 


166 


50 


7 


00 


21 


00 


12 


50 



Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Charles Denyon, driver . 
John Clifford, extra driver 
Charles H. Rogers, extra 

driver 
A. J. Robie, driver 
George H. Stearns, matches 

oil, etc. 
Manchester Locomotive W'ks. 

repairing gong, etc. . 
T. A. Lane, hose, repairing 

lantern, etc. 
E. W. Kimball, repairing har 

ness, etc. . 
H. C. Ranno, ring halter, etc 
P. Ducherme, repairing bridles 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing carriage 
Edward N. Fogg, duster 
Moore & Preston, wood 
L. B. Bodwell, wood and coal 
Company's bill for services . 



Cr. 



91 



11 50 



7 93 



3 


95 


6 


50 


1 


75 


14 


67 


2 


00 


9 


50 


102 


95 


1,930 


00 



12,361 15 



Engineers Department and Miscellaneous. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 

Manchester Water-works, water 
Littlefield & Smith, muriate 

of ammonia 
W. L. Blenus, labor on hose . 



$0 72 
791 37 

3 33 
5 25 



Cr. 



303 



Paid Weston & Hill, rug, mat, 
crash, etc. .... 

Manchester Locomotive Wk's., 
repairing hose couplings 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing supply wagon 

James Butler, shoveling out 
hydrants .... 

Charles Griffin, shoveling out 
hydrants .... 

J. Sullivan, shoveling out hy- 
drants .... 

J. Downing, shoveling out hy- 
drants .... 

C. M. Spinney, shoveling out 
hydrants .... 

M. L. Donahoe, scrubbing- 
brushes .... 

Manchester One Price Cloth- 
ing Co., reefers . 

W. C. Rogers, hardware 

Daniels & Co., hardware 

W. H. Vickery, keys 

Tristam Berry, repairing hose 

Edward N. Fogg, cuspidores . 

C. H. Hodgman & Son, truck- 
ing 1 00 

Stephen Gardner, care of boiler 
at engine-house . . 

J. B. Clarke, printing . 

T. W. Lane, stationery . 

Boston, Lowell, and Concord 
Railroad, freight 

J. Stickney, repairing hose 



813 


62 


12 


00 


4 


25 


1 


25 


6 


25 


2 


50 


2 


50 


1 


25 


5 


00 


153 


00 




12 


4 


91 




50 


7 


50 


1 


50 



201 


50 


22 


25 


10 


80 


4 


66 


7 


25 



304 



Paid Granite State Telephone Co. . $1 20 

Dennis Sullivan, running sup- 
ply wagon .... 41 00 
Samuel Eastman & Co., hose 2,290 90 
Samuel Eastman & Co., re- 
pairing hose . . . 18 00 
American Fire Hose Co., 

Jacket Am. Coup. . . 450 00 
J. P. Scollay & Co., polish . 2 00 

T. W. Lane, salary as chief 

engineer .... 300 00 

A. C. Wallace, salary as as- 
sistant engineer . . 100 00 

B. C. Kendall, salary as assist- 
ant engineer . . . 100 00 

O. E, Kimball, salary as assist- 
ant engineer . . . 100 00 
Sam C. Lowell, salary as as- 
sistant engineer . . 100 00 
Sam C. Lowell, clerk of board 25 00 
W. L. Blenus, repairing hose 3 00 
Pike & Heald, plumbing . 3 19 
Plume r, Holton, & Co., over- 
alls 37 50 

F. M. Forsaith ... 2 85 

D. M. Goodwin ... 13 69 



Recapitulation. 

Paid Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. No. 1 $1,571 04 

N. S. Bean S. F. E. Co. No. 4 1,567 42 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 2.449 84 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 1,241 23 



$4,852 60 



305 

Paid E. W. Harrington Hose Co. 

No. 3 . . . . $1,533 22 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder 

Co. No. 1 . . . . 2,361 15 
Engineers' department and 

miscellaneous . . . 4,852 60 

$15,576 50 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

To appropriation .... $1,00000 



Paid Tristam Berry, superintendent $300 00 
Tristam Berry, moving poles 2 25 
Wm. T. Smith, blue vitriol . 135 13 
A. H. Lowell, zincs . . 129 30 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 10 08 
Pike & Heald, lantern, etc. . 1 87 
Thomas A. Lane, hair felting 96 
James Bros., team . 1 00 
Dennis Sullivan, trucking . 2 65 
C. H. Hodgman &Co., truck- 
ing ..... 1 00 
Boston, Lowell, and Concord 

Railroad, freight . 4 89 

John Leville, labor . 2 25 

Rhody Carroll, labor . 2 25 

John Kelly, labor ... 2 25 

Michael Sheehan, labor . 2 25 
Stearns & George, Kerite wire, 

etc 18 00 

20 



Dr. 

,000 00 
Cr. 



306 



Paid Edwin Rogers, Kerite wire, 
etc. .... 

James Bros., teams 

James Baldwin & Co.. tele 
graph-pins 

J. B. Clarke, printing . 

Bunton & Wilbur, iron-work 

Thomas W. Lane, team . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 
By reserved fund, am't transferred 



o 
o 


50 


12 


50 


6 


00 


8 


35 


3 


00 


1 


16 


4 


05 


d 330 


31 



11,000 00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



To balance from old account . 

appropriation .... 
H. W. Longa, fines and costs . 
J. C. Bickford, fees and costs 
A. C. Osgood, overdraft . 



Paid N. P. Hunt, judge of police 
court . 

I. L. Heath, assistant justice 
of police court . 

A. C. Osgood, assistant jus- 
tice of police court . 

J. C. Bickford, clerk of police 
court .... 

A. D. Stark, city marshal 

A. D. Stark, witness fees, etc. 

H. W. Longa, city marshal . 



13,421 70 

12,000 00 

5,426 73 

2,204 63 

2 12 



Dr. 



823,058 18 
Or. 



11,500 00 

66 00 

4 24 

600 00 
68 15 
61 49 

783 40 



307 

Paid H. VV. Longa, assistant mar- 
shal ..... 

H. W. Longa, witness fees,etc. 

M. J. Jenkins, assistant mar- 
shal 

M. J. Jenkins, captain of 
night watch 

Edgar Farrar, captain of night- 
watch .... 

Eben Carr, night watchman . 

Hiram Stearns, night watch- 
man ..... 

J. F. Cassidy, night watchman 

James Bucklin, night watch- 
man ..... 

Thomas Frain, night watch- 
man . 

Ira P. Fellows, night watch- 
man ..... 

Wm. H. Newhall, night watch- 
man ..... 

E. Farrar, night watchman . 

James F. Dunn, night watch- 
man ..... 

Michael Marr, night watchman 

Lafayette Tebbetts, night 
watchman .... 

Charles H. Reed, night watch- 
man ..... 

Francis Bourrassau, night 
watchman .... 

Gideon Rochette, night watch- 
man ..... 



158 


33 


410 


06 


555 


72 


166 


50 


628 


76 


737 


00 


750 


00 


753 


00 


736 


00 


867 


00 


791 


00 


771 


00 


194 


00 


754 


00 


379 


00 


736 


00 


738 


00 


760 


00 


710 


00 



308 

Paid Philip Reischer, night watch- 
man ..... 

Zadoc B. Wright, night watch- 
man ..... 

Leroy M. Streeter, night 
watchman 

Charles S. Brown, night watch- 
man ..... 

Jeremiah Murphy, night 
watchman .... 

John C. Colburn, day police . 

Randall W. Bean, day police . 

Harvey H. Hill, special police 

Frank Warren, special police . 

Archibald Hill, special police 

David C.Jackson,special police 

John Dunn, special police 

Charles Burke, special police . 

Sylvester Laroche, special 
police .... 

Joseph Goodwin, special police 

E. G. Woodman, special police 

Edward H. Holmes, special 

police .... 20 00 

Jeremiah Murphy, special po- 
lice . . . • • 279 00 

Moses Tremblay, special police 70 00 

Samuel L. Mitchell, special 

police .... 87 00 

John Waters, special police . 1 00 

Michael Fox, special police . 195 00 

Walter Wright, special police 6 00 

CD. Emerson, special police 3 00 

Geo. W. Minard, special police 320 00 



$740 


00 


26 


00 


520 


00 


539 


00 


343 


00 


778 


00 


788 


00 


8 


00 


2 


00 


27 


00 


9 


00 


84 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


99 


00 

AA 



309 



id John Carr, special police 


1118 00 


L. M. Gould, special police 


2 00 


Chas.W Quimby .special police 


2 00 


B. N. Wilson, special police . 


41 00 


Fred Wilson, special police . 


10 00 


Thomas R. Northrup, special 




police .... 


1 00 


Jas. E. Bailey, special police . 


16 00 


C. D. Wells, special police 


4 00 


E. A. G. Holmes, special police 


4 00 


S. P. Chase, special police 


2 00 


A. B. Mack, special police 


1 00 


J. H. Groux"; special police . 


4 00 


W. D. Jillson, special police . 


3 00 


G. W. Woodman, special police 


2 00 


Geo. Harwood, special police 


2 00 


A. M. Rowell, special police . 


5 00 


B. A. Stearns, special police . 


2 00 


Joseph Fellows, special police 


2*00 


Charles O'Shaughnessey, spe- 




cial police .... 


2 00 


C. E. Cochran, professional 




services .... 


2 00 


N. H. Wilson, professional 




services .... 


2 00 


D. P. & D. L. Perkins, pro- 




fessional services 


8 00 


Temple & Farrington, station- 




ery 


3 78 


Thomas W. Lane, stationery . 


13 10 


W. H. Vickery, keys 


2 25 


Challis & Campbell, printing 


112 30 


John B. Clarke, printing 


35 45 


Livingston & Kimball, printing 


5 25 



310 



Paid D. Evans & Co., vest buttons 


120 00 


P. C. Cheney Co. . 


4 


71 


Granite State Telephone Co. . 


100 


05 


Western Union Telegraph Co., 






telegrams .... 


13 


46 


Daniel Davis, meals for lodg- 






ers and prisoners 


229 


55 


Brigham & Pratt, crackers 


17 


06 


Smith k Bly, crackers . 


6 


00 


Cavanaugh Bros., team . 


1 


00 


J. A. Brown, teams 


2 


50 


E. T. James, teams 


37 


50 


James Bros., teams 


37 


25 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


351 


42 


H. D. Gordon, chairs 


9 


72 


Pike & Heald, dippers, etc. . 


11 


03 


Dr. 0. D. Abbott, professional 






services .... 


3 


00 


C. M. Dodge, professional ser- 






vices ..... 


7 


00 


Sturgis & Dodge, professional 






services .... 


2 


00 


C. H. Wood, lettering slates . 


1 


00 


Frank Eaton, matches . 


6 


00 


A. J. Young, team 


2 


00 


By balance to new account . 


2,252 


15 

$23 058 1 ft 








CITY HALL. 






* 


Dr. 


To balance from old account . 


8137 


34 


rents ..... 


2,192 


85 


balance overdrawn . 


1,936 


98 

0fc4 9fi7 17 



311 



Or. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$201 24 


Manchester Water-works, wa- 




ter 


2,347 80 


Celinda German 


126 10 


Fellows & Co., iron-work 


5 90 


W. H. Yickery, keys. etc. 


21 00 


James S. Bacheler, plumbing, 




etc. . . ■ . 


81 59 


Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 


5 32 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


17 57 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 


44 07 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


22 53 


J. H. Maynard 


5 50 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber 


4 61 


A. C Wallace, lumber . 


1 55 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber and 




labor ..... 


12 60 


E. A. G. Holmes, lumber and 




labor ..... 


157 88 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 




labor ..... 


8 54 


Walter Neal, lumber and labor 


24 46 


Geo. H. Dudley, lumber and 




labor ..... 


53 39 


J. B. Varick, hardware, etc. . 


10 54 


Daniels & Co., hardware, oil, 




etc 


35 74 


J. L. Kelly, painting 


58 29 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


25 68 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


480 52 


L. B. Bod well & Co., coal and 




wood ..... 


135 68 


H. D. Gordon, chairs 


39 72 



312 



Paid Geo. EL Stearns, brooms, etc. $6 13 

Temple & Farrington, cord, 

twine, etc. ... 2 87 

Granite State Telephone Co. . 9 00 

Weston & Hill, matting, etc. . 18 95 

J. L. Wentworth, cleaning 

carpets .... 4 75 

Straw & Lovejoy. repairing 



clocks .... 


23 


25 


Mrs. Bancroft, labor 




75 


Mrs I. Morse, labor 


1 


25 


Edward N. Fogg, duster 


9 


00 


C. W. Butler, material and 






labor on cells . 


115 


12 


D. A. Simons, umbrella-stand 






etc 


9 


00 


A. M. Eastman, matches, oil, 






etc 


4 


20 


Sanborn Carriage Co., wheel- 






barrow .... 


1 


75 


E. P. Richardson . 


10 


00 


T. L. Thorpe, waste, etc. 


5 


52 


C. H. Wood, painting signs, etc. 


16 


90 


C. W. Butler, window-shades 






etc 


24 


00 


J. C. Young & Co., repairing 






roof ..... 


10 


34 


A. H. Paige, numbers for 






desks .... 


1 


80 


J. A. Baker, key tags, etc. 


2 


00 


J. B. Barnes, key tags . 




75 


B. W. Robinson & Co. mason 






work .... 


25 


65 



313 



Paid Hale & Whittemore, picture- 
frames . 

H. L. Donahue, scrubbing- ma- 
chine . 

M. J. Kendrick, trucking 

J. E. Keofe, matches 

Weeks & Currier, borax 

D. D. Fennoyer & Co. paint- 
ing roof . 

Horace Gordon 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 



$4 50 



2 


00 


1 


25 


6 


00 


1 


40 


19 


72 


1 


00 


7 


50 



14,267 17 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

To appropriation . . . $1,500 00 

reserved fund, am't transferred 64 89 



id John B Clarke 


-$980 11 


Challis & Campbell 


69 37 


Union Publishing Co. 


318 80 


Temple & Farrington 


81 99 


H. H. Everett 


44 50 


T. W. Lane . 


9 54 


S. B. Putnam 


3 65 


Manchester Post-Office . 


33 93 


J. F. Gordon 


5 95 


J. Q Bradish 


6 25 


W. E. Moore 


4 50 


W. P. Coburn 


1 80 


Livingston & Kimball 


4 50 



Dr. 



81,564 89 
Cr. 



11,564 89 



314 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



To appropriation . 



,500 00 



Paid J. H. Maynard, lumber and 




labor . . . • 


1121 63 


W. Ireland, lumber and labor 


245 00 


George H. Dudley, lumber and 




labor .... 


8 17 


George Holbrook. lumber and 




labor .... 


24 40 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


6 25 


William W. Hubbard, lumber 


47 20 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


12 61 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and la- 




bor ..... 


4 80 


Tristam Berry, carpenter-work 


3 75 


D. H. Morgan, carpenter- work 


2 50 


J. B. Varick, hardware 


80 12 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


50 


Pettee & Whittle, cement 


10 50 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


49 60 


James R. Carr, painting, etc. 


64 68 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


42 40 


J. L. Kelly, painting 


22 92 


James S. Bacheler, radiators, 




etc. ..... 


297 00 


James S. Bacheler, plumbing, 




etc. ..... 


68 92 


B. F. Fogg & Co., plumbing, etc 


6 96 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


73 50 


Thomas A. Lane, plumbing, 




etc. ..... 


52 82 



Dr. 



11,500 00 
Cr. 



315 



Paid A. N. Clapp, hardware . 


10 


63 




W. H. Vickery, repairing lock 




35 




R. D. Gay. room-paper, etc. . 


14 


75 




J. T. Fanning, professional 








services .... 


5 


00 




Bunton & Wilbur, iron-work . 


4 


25 




Goodwin Bros., lumber". 


19 


61 




B. W. Robinson & Co., mason 








work ..... 


8 


37 




J. C. Young, repairing roof . 


5 


90 




Temple & Farrington, paper 


4 


80 




for labor of men and teams 


39 


97 




reserved fund, ain't transferred 


150 


14 


#1,500 00 




r 




CITY LIBRARY 










Dr. 


To balance from old account . 


$334 51 




appropriation .... 


3,000 


00 





,334 51 
Or. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas . $197 82 
Manchester Water- works, wa- 
ter 26 25 

M. J. Buncher, librarian . 600 00 

M. J. Buncher, cleaning 

shelves, floors, etc. . . 49 68 

George W. Burleigh, assistant 

librarian . . . . 166 50 
George W. Cook, assistant 

librarian .... 123 75 
Temple & Farrington, binding 

books, etc. ... 212 53 



316 



Paid Livingston & Kimball, printing 1106 05 
J. B. Clarke, printing . . 11 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood 537 96 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal and 

wood 43 55 

Fellows & Co., iron poker and 

bolts 1 00 

L. B. Clough, insurance . 32 50 

Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 

clock 3 00 

trustees, appropriation for 



new books . 


1,000 00 


N. P. Hunt, postage 


4 13 


By balance to new account 


218 89 


MILITIA. 




To appropriation . 


1800 00 


Paid Amoskeag Veterans 


1100 00 


Head Guards 


100 00 


Manchester Cadets 


100 00 


Manchester War Veterans 


100 00 


First N. H. Battery 


100 00 


City Guards . 


100 00 


Sheridan Guards . 


100 00 


First Regiment, headquarters 


100 00 



!,334 51 



Dr. 



$800 00 



Cr. 



8800 00 



317 

PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Dr. 
To balance from old account . . #1,600 00 
appropriation .... 21,000 00 

$25,600 00 

Cr. 
Paid Suncook Valley R. R. bonds . 83,100 00 
city bonds .... 22,500 00 

#25,600 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... #2.500 00 

#2,500 00 

Cr. 
Paid sundry persons . . . #2,172 07 
By reserved fund, am't transferred 327 93 

#2,500 00 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... #6,500 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 851 59 

#7,351 59 

Cr. 
Paid George E. Morrill, collector . #7,351 59 

#7,351 59 



318 

STATE TAX. 

Dr. 

841,060 00 

Cr. 
Paid S. A. Carter, state treasurer . 141,060 00 

141,060 00 



To appropriation . 



,060 00 



COUNTY TAX. 



To appropriation . 



832,000 00 



Dr. 

*2,000 00 
Cr. 



Paid E. P. Richardson, county 

treasurer .... $31,323 37 
reserved fund, am't transferred 676 «>3 







$32,000 00 


OUTSTANDING TAXES. 




List for 1874 


. $4,226 


63 


" 1875 


. 4,089 


66 


« 1876 


. 3,011 


59 


" 1877 


. 2,871 


18 


" 1878 


. 3,090 


68 


1879 


972 


53 


" 1880 


. 1,279 


23 


« 1881 


. 1,377 


48 

$20,918 98 



319 



TAXES FOR 1882. 

To resident taxes assessed . $311,226 84 
non-resident taxes assessed . 1,446 98 



Dr. 



$312,673 82 
Cr. 



By collections . . . $292,551 15 

abatements . . . 577 26 

discounts . . . 7,351 59 

balance uncollected . . 12.193 82 



$312,673 82 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 



.2,000 00 







$12 


,000 00 
Cr. 


Paid H. B. Putnam, mayor . 


$1,000 00 




N. P. Kidder, city clerk 


900 


00 




S. B. Putnam, city treasurer . 


1,000 


00 




S. B. Putnam 


25 


00 




George H. Allen, city engineer 


1,000 


00 




William E. Buck, superintend- 








ent of schools . 


1,500 


00 




William R. Patten, city solic- 








itor ..... 


500 


00 




J. A. Barker, city messenger 


635 


00 




J. A. Fracker, clerk of com- 








mon council 


100 


00 




George E. Morrill, collector of 








taxes .... 


1,329 


36 




D. H. Maxfield, moderator . 


6 


00 




James Dolan, Jr. " 


7 


50 





320 



id George M. True, moderator . 


$6 00 


James B. Straw, 


u 


6 00 


T. W. Challis, 


u 


3 00 


N. J. Whalen, ward clerk 


12 50 


Chas. H. Butman, ward clerk 


10 00 


Waldo E. Gilmore, 




10 00 


Frank H. Redfield, 




5 00 


William McElroy, 




10 00 


George E. Glines, 




5 00 


L. C. Merrill, 




5 00 


A. H. Olzendam, 


" 


11 00 


Hervey Stratton, selectman 


10 00 


H. C. Paige, 


u 


5 00 


J. B. McTiernan, 


a 


5 00 


James McLaughlin, 


a 


5 00 


John Prince. 


a 


10 00 


John Bryson, 


a 


5 00 


George W. Varnum, 


a 


10 00 


Charles C. Tinkham. 


c. 


10 00 


Herman Rittner, 


a 


10 00 


S. B. Putnam, 


a 


10 00 


E. G. Woodman, 


a 


5 00 


Samuel Clark, 


u 


5 00 


James Lightbody, 


a 


5 00 


Ralph Pearson, 


a 


10 00 


J. B. McTiernan, 


a 


7 50 


James McLaughlin, 


(.<. 


7 50 


J. Bryson, 


a 


7 50 


S. R. Stearns, 


a 


10 00 


R. E. Davis, 


a 


5 00 


C. M. Edgerly, 


u 


5 00 


Edwin N. Baker, 


u 


5 00 


C. H. Uhlig, 


u 


10 00 


C. S. Fisher, assessor . 


379 50 



321 



Paid D. 0. Furnald, assessor 


1302 50 


Ira W. Moore, " 


173 75 


John Ryan, " 


222 50 


George W. Weeks, assessor . 


237 50 


Joseph H. Haynes, " 


295 00 


Charles H. Brown, " 


150 00 


H. W. Powell, 


145 00 


J. P. Moore, assistant assessor 


70 00 


E. C. Bryant, " 


40 00 


Isaac Whittemore, " 


72 50 


Reed P. Silver, 


42 50 


Callixte Lor, " 


5 00 


Michael Gilbert, interpreter 




for assessors 


10 00 


T. F. Collins, interpreter for 




assessors .... 


10 00 


S. S. Perry, clerk for assessors 


11*2 50 


N. Nichols, clerk for assessors 


225 00 


H. H. Noyes, inspector of 




check-lists .... 


15 75 


David Farmer, inspector of 




check-lists 


54 00 


J. J. Flynn, inspector of check- 




lists ..... 


67 50 


J. H. Haynes, inspector of 




check-lists r . 


113 62 


C. S. Fisher, inspector of 




check-lists 


23 62 


D. 0. Furnald, inspector of 




check-lists 


45 00 


Isaac Whittemore, inspector 




of check-lists 


46 13 


C. H. Warren, inspector of 




check-lists 


54 00 


21 





322 



Paid M. J. Heal/, supervisor of 

check-list .... 
Wm. D. Ladd, supervisor of 

check-list .... 
Wm. C. Hodgman, supervisor 

of check-list 
J. Cavanaugh, supervisor of 

check-list .... 

B. L. Hartshorn, supervisor 
of check-list 

John Dowst, supervisor of 
check-list . 

Charles W. Quirnby, super- 
visor of check-list 

J. F. Pherson, supervisor of 
check-list .... 

F. T. E. Richardson, super- 
visor of check-list 

D. M. Goodwin, supervisor of 
check-list .... 

L. S. Proctor, supervisor of 
check-list .... 

C. C. Colby, supervisor of 
check-list .... 

S. S. Piper, supervisor of 
check-list .... 

J. C. Balch, supervisor of 
check-list .... 

J. M. Collity, city physician . 

C. G. B. Ryder, overseer of 

the poor .... 14 58 

Wm. H. Maxwell, clerk of 

overseers of the poor . . 25 00 

A. D. Stark, health officer . 25 00 



112 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


12 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


50 


00 



Paid L. H. Lamprey, health officer 

P. A. Devine, health officer . 

H. W. Longa, health officer . 

H. B. Putnam, ex-officio school 
committee .... 

W. J. Hoyt, ex-officio school 
committee .... 

Charles F. Everett, school 
committee .... 

M. P. Hall, school committee . 

M. P. Hall, clerk of school 
committee 

Douglas Mitchell, school com- 
mittee .... 

B. B. Weeks, school com- 
mittee .... 

Wm. A. Webster, school com- 
mittee .... 

J. T. Fanning, school com- 
mittee .... 

Walter M. Parker, school 
committee .... 

D. F. O'Connor, school com- 
mittee .... 

Ezra Huntington, school com- 
mittee .... 

L. E. Phelps, school com- 
mittee .... 

C. A. O'Connor, school com- 
mittee .... 

A. C. Flanders, school com- 
mittee .... 

F. T. E. Richardson, school 
committee .... 



$50 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



9Q I 



'aid Daniel Clark, school com- 






mittee .... 


83 33 




H. H. Huse, school committee 


6 67 




Benjamin C. Dean, school 






committee .... 


10 00 


v 


G. L. Demarest, school com- 






mittee . . 


10 00 




George H. Colby, overseer of 






the poor .... 


25 00 




James Sutcliffe, overseer of 






the poor .... 


8 48 




Horace Gordon, overseer of 






the poor .... 


25 00 




George F. Sheehan, overseer 






of the poor 


25 00 




Robert Hall, overseer of the 






poor . . . 


25 00 




E. G. Woodman, overseer of 






the poor .... 


25 00 




I. B. Farnum, overseer of the 






poor 


25 00 




W. H. Maxwell, overseer of 






the poor .... 


25 00 




W. H. Maxwell, clerk of 






overseers of the poor . 


25 00 




By balance on hand 


39 21 




81 

lDE. 


2,000 00 


FIREMEN'S PAR^ 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$300 00 




balance overdrawn . 


56 00 


$356 00 



325 

Or, 

Paid George Fletcher, caterer 

First Regiment Band . 
John B. Clarke, printing 
Cavanaugh Bros., teams 
T. W. Lane, postage, etc. 

$356 00 



. 1205 


00 


80 


00 


7 


50 


60 


00 


3 


50 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS 1 GRAVES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . §200 00 

$200 00 

Cr. 
Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A.R. 200 00 

8200 00 



WOMEN'S-AID-SOCIETY HOSFITAL. 

Dr. 
To reserved fund, am't transferred 1400 00 

$400 00 

Cr. 
Paid Mrs. Aretas Blood, treasurer $400 00 

$400 00 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $20,000 00 
balance overdrawn , . . 70 00 

$20,070 00 

Cr. 
Paid Manchester Water-works . $20,070 00 

$20,070 00 



126 



STARK-MONUMEXT SQUARE. 



To balance from old account . 



Paid James S. Bacheler & Co., re 
pairing fence 
Wyman & Gray, painting 
for lab^r of men and teams 

By balance to new account 



$200 00 



Dr. 

1200 00 
Cr. 



$5 00 

52 6c> 

12 49 

129 86 















WATER- 


-WORKS. 




To balance from old account 


. 17 


,960 


14 


water rents 


• 


. 67 


,630 


13 



$200 00 

Dr. 

$75,590 27 
Cr. 



By interest, amount transferred . $38,000 00 
Paid Charles K. Walker, superin- 
tendent . . . . 1,567 47 
Arthur E. Stearns, clerk . 1,000 00 
C. C. Cole, superintendent at 

pumping-station . . 658 31 

J. L. Kennedy, painting . 82 52 

Hutchinson Bros., blacksmith- 

ing, etc 276 97 

T. A. Lane, valves, plumbing, 

etc 12 99 

John F. Ford, lathe . . 25 00 

Bunton & Wilbur, blacksmith- 
ing 8 80 



327 



Paid C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck 
ing . 
J. W. Kimball, wood, etc. 

D. J. Mahoney, lumber . 

J. M. & D. A. Parker, lumber 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
Head & Dowst, lumber . 
Pettee & Whittle, cement 
Pettee <fc Adams, cement 

A. H. Lowell, stop-boxes, iron 
fittings, etc. 

Temple & Farrington, station 
ery 

E. R. Coburn, stationery 
Thomas W. Lane, stationery 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 
Union Publishing Co., printing 
ManohesterLocomotive Works, 

bolts, posts, etc. 
Bunton & Wilbur, blacksmith 

ing .... 
John Barnes, blacksmithing 
L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing 

B. L. & C. R. R. 5 freight 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Brock & Driscoll, hardware 
Wyman & Gray, painting 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
Granite State Telephone Co. 

C. H. Wood, painting sign 
town of Auburn, taxes . 
Joseph Goodwin, labor . 



17 50 
77 75 
120 17 
26 40 
28 23 

1 89 
49 25 
48 50 

188 90 

2 83 
6 44 

2 60 

30 27 

6 25 

489 48 

1 45 

5 30 
39 66 

1,402 45 

180 52 

43 93 

11 00 

35 00 

142 00 

42 98 

24 50 

4 50 

6 51 
38 00 



328 



Paid C. M. Hubbard, trucking 


$25 00 


F. W. Elliott, boarding men . 


15 75 


A. M. Eastman, kerosene oil . 


1 00 


George Whitford, wood . 


6 00 


C. H. Robie, concreting 


20 89 


Leonard Colby, boat 


60 00 


H. N. Stone, valve rubbers, etc. 


5 95 


E. A. G. Holmes, lumber and 




labor ..... 


11 34 


Cyrus Whittemore, Jr., mason 




work 


14 55 


C. M. Sprague 


13 12 


Wm. Shepherd 


2 00 


J. Stickney, rubber mitts, 




leather, etc. 


5 94 


P. C. Cheney Co., wiping waste 


5 90 


C. G. B. Ryder, damage from 




water .... 


10 00 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. . 


5 35 


Allen N. Clapp, lead and salt 


1 14 


E. T. James, teams 


20 50 


Geo. C. Hoitt, binding book . 


4 00 


C. E. Clough, teaming . 


2 00 


Geo. R. Vance & Co., setting 




up stove, etc. . 


1 90 


J. H. & P. Cunningham, iron- 




work ..... 


18 00 


Davis & Farnum M'f'g Co., 




iron castings 


12 99 


James M. Webster, stone 


15 5b 


Fletcher & Co., meals . 


25 00 


Gilman Clough 


32 13 


Mowry & Phillips, pig-lead 


561 62 


Wm. Treadway, dating-stamp 


13 50 



329 



Paid S. D. Wood & Co., valve chests 


1188 10 


Leonard & Ellis, valvoline oil . 


76 50 


Stutts & Mansur, corp. stops, 




nipples, etc. 


140 87 


Gloucester Iron Co., iron pipe 


8,940 49 


Union Water Meter Co., wa- 




ter meters .... 


1,278 90 


Waite, Williams, & Co., oil . 


37 13 


Jarechi, Hayes, & Co., stop- 




cocks, etc. 


188 90 


Sumner & Goodwin, nipples, 




valves, etc. 


325 72 


R. Pattee & Co., hydrants 


495 00 


Boston Machine Co., bell gates 


58 85 


Continental Water Meter Co., 




repairing meters 


8 75 


H. J. Devitt, blacksmithing . 


1 05 


Ward & Hurley, locks, bands, 




etc. ..... 


56 75 


Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 




jute packing 


17 37 


N. Danny, building fence 


54 00 


Boston Lead Manufacturing 




Co., lead pipe . 


54 26 


National Meter Co., meters . 


140 00 


Ludlow Valve Manufacturing 




Co., valves 


2 12 


labor of men and teams 


5,828 40 


J. A. Weston, water commis- 




sioner .... 


71 00 


Alpheus Gay, water commis- 




sioner .... 


33 00 


E. H. Hobbs, water commis- 




sioner .... 


18 00 



330 



Paid E. T. James water commis- 



sioner .... 


124 00 


fl. B. Putnam, water commis- 




sioner .... 


18 00 


Wm. P. Newell, water com- 




missioner .... 


24 00 


A. C. Wallace, water commis- 




sioner .... 


21 00 


By balance to new account 


11,487 92 




^7^ *W0 °7 




■ '4P 1 O yO <0\J £ \ 


RESERVED FUND. 




Dr. 


To appropriation .... 110,000 00 


rent of tenements . 


273 00 


show licenses .... 


204 00 


aqueduct water 


10 00 


rent of ward-room lot 


12.00 


P. Pruman, rent of land • 


1 00 


Carl E. York, wire netting 


6 00 


wooden watering-trough . 


3 00 


costs of non-resident taxes 


22 00 


south city scales 


25 00 


dog licenses .... 


563 00 


interest on taxes, amount trans- 




ferred ..... 


316 16 


highway district No. 2, amount 




transferred .... 


1,958 91 


land damage, am't transferred 


683 17 


commons, amount transferred . 


192 15 


repairs of buildings, amount 




transferred .... 


150 14 


fire-alarm telegraph, amount 




transferred .... 


330 31 



331 



To abatement 


of taxes, amount 






transferred . 


1327 


93 


county tax, 


amount transferred 


676 


63 


balance . 


• 


605 


21 

$16 859 61 














Cr. 


By District No. 


1 


$25 


82 


44 No. 


8 




383 


10 


" No. 


5 




18 


59 


No. 


6 




90 


17 


No. 


8 




235 


67 


No. 


9 




104 


84 


No. 


10 




204 


53 


No. 


11 




96 


45 


No. 


13 




97 


67 


new highways . 




2,685 


31 


watering streets 




329 


77 


lighting streets 




435 


30 


bridges . 


. 




662 


03 


Pine Grove 


Cemetery 




880 


93 


fire department 




484 


50 


printing and stationery 




64 


89 


macadamizing . 




1,005 


31 


grading lor 


concrete 




4,703 


14 


discount on 


taxes 




851 


59 


furniture and supplies 




500 


00 


repairing school-houses J 


2,500 


00 


Women's- Aid-Society hospital 


400 


00 










116,359 61 



332 

ANNEX TO CITY LIBRARY. 

To balance from old account . . $ 4,644 83 
appropriation .... 1,500 00 



Dr. 

16,144 83 

Cr. 



Paid W. Ireland, contractor . . #3,956 25 
Head & Dowst, making book- 
cases, etc. .... 942 77 
Head & Dowst, step-ladders . 40 00 

John Gannon, Jr., painting . 16 89 

W. S. Henry & Son, frescoing 387 00 
J. J. Abbott, painting . . 133 73 

T. A. Lane, brackets, burners, 

etc 239 72 

Pike & Heald, plumbing . 45 57 

B. F. Fogg & Co., steam pip- 
ing, etc. . . . . 314 28 
B. W. Robinson & Co., mason 
work .... 

A. H. Lowell, iron-work 
J. O. Hunt, labor, . 
Manchester Mills, hair felting 
By balance on hand 



2 


00 




45 


00 




3 


38 




7 , 


,20 




11 


04 


16,144 83 



BATTERY BUILDING AND WARD-ROOM NO. 4. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... 18,000 00 



18,000 0O 
Or. 



Paid Alpheus Gay, contractor . 85,000 00 
J. T. Fanning, architect . 150 00 



333 



Paid Union Publishing Company, 




printing .... 


$20 25 


Lamson & Marden, cut stone- 




work . . . . 


1,446 00 


James S. Bacheler 


79 40 


for labor of men and teams, 




excavating 


309 72 


By balance to .new acconnt . 


994 63 







INTEREST ON LAND. 
To appropriation .... 3,000 00 



$8,000 00 

Dr. 

$3,000 00 



Cr. 
By balance to new account . . $3,000 00 

$3,000 00 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 

To appropriation .... $2,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 1,842 99 



id James Kearns, teamster 


. $469 50 


A. J. Morse, teamster . 


153 00 


Dennis Clifford, teamster 


256 50 


Charles Denyon, teamster 


45 00 


City teams 


. 1,038 00 


George Seaward, teamster 


45 00 


for labor of men 


. 1,835 99 



Dr. 

:,842 99 
Cr. 



$3,842 99 



334 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll-Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1839 . . 


$604,963 


$3,029 84 ! 


427 


$2 14 


$300 


1840 . . 


946,200 


3,986 56 


772 


2 20 


300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 i 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,43').524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 1 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2.544,780 


19,246 27 1 


1.561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1.808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664.057 


39.712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 ! 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2.745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2.907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8.237,617 


62.022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855- . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10.259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81.368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,037 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343.254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84.827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365.162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12.716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,9o0 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


1 76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673 82 


7,831 


1 62 


100 



335 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


July 1,1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1883 


$8,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


1883 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1, 18G9 


u u 


Aug. 1 


, 1884 


1,500 00 


April 1, 1864 


CI 44 


April 1 


, 1884 


70,000 00 


April 1, 1865 


44 44 


April 1 


1885 


10,000 00 


July 1, 1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1 


1885 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


City Honcls, 


Aug. 1 


1885 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


44 44 


Aug. 1 


1886 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1, 1869 


44 44 


Aug. 1 


1887 


3,500 00 


Jau. 1, 1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1863 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


1888 


35,000 00 


July 1, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


1890 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


44 44 


Jan. 1 


1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31, 1863 


City Bonds, 


Nov. 1 


1893 


70,000 00 


July 1, 1864 


44 44 


July 1 


1894 


50,000 00 


July 1, 1874 


Water Bonds. 


July 1 


1895 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


44 44 


Jan. 1 


1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


44 44 


Jan. 1 


1902 


100,000 00 


July 1, 1881 


Bridge Bonds, 


July 1 


1911 


60,000 00 



336 

FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 

1882 .... 
Paid during the year . 

Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 

1883 .... 

Interest due, estimated 
Bills outstanding 

Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1883 

Cash in treasury, Jan. 1, 1883 
Notes due the city 
Interest on the same . 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1883 
Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1882 

Decrease of net indebtedness dur 
ing the year 



$953,100 
. 25,600 


00 

00 






$927,500 


00 


. 20,000 
. 27,151 


00 
43 

$47,151 


43 




$974,651 43 


$47,337 

220 

6b 


37 

78 
48 


63 



$927,027 80 
965,550 82 



$38,523 02 



337 



CITY PROPERTY. 

City-Library building .... 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
City Hall and lot ... . 
City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, and provisions at city 

farm . 
Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Engine-house, stable, and land, Vine street 
Hose-house and lot, Maple street 
Hose-house and lot, Park street . 
Hose-house and lot, Nashua street 
Reservoirs ...... 

Houses, tombs, and new cemetery 

Court-house and lot . 

Common sewers ..... 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at city hall 
Street lanterns, posts, and pipes . 
Water-works ..... 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets 
Ward-room and lot, Manchester street . 
Ward-room and lot, Park street . 
Engine-house and lot, ward eight 
Water-pipe, wagons, and apparatus for water 

ing streets ..... 
Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad 
Lot, Lowell street .... 
Gravel lot, Belmont street . 
Gravel lot, Sagamore street 
Gravel lot, ward eight (one-half acre) 
Gravel lot, Bakersville (one acre) 
Gravel lot, Bakersville 
Gravel lot, District No. 8 . 
Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Valley Cemetery .... 



. 130,000 00 


19,200 


00 


60,000 


00 


26,000 


00 


f 

6,517 


19 


52,566 


50 


43,000 


00 


2,500 


00 


6,000 


00 


500 


00 


10,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


51,000 


00 


. 200,000 


00 


3,000 


00 


5,300 


00 


. 784,068 


52 


5,000 


00 


10,000 


00 


600 


00 


2,300 


00 


2,500 


00 


50,000 


00 


1,500 


00 


1,200 


00 


800 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


600 


00 


150 


00 


20,000 


00 


6,000 


00 


$1,405,452 21 



338 



SCHOOL PROPERTY. 

Blodget-street school-house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, charts, 
etc. .... 

Bridge-street house and lot 
Old High School-House and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
New High School-House . 

Movable furniture, maps, charts 
books, and apparatus 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Manchester-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house aud lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Franklin-street house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Stark house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Goffe's-Falls house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Harvey's . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot near Clough's mill 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
House and lot corner Beech am 
Spruce streets . 



.13,000 00 




. 150 


00 


83,150 00 
500 00 


. 6,500 


00 




. 200 


00 


6,700 00 


. 45,000 


00 




. 2,000 


00 


47,000 00 


. 3,300 


00 




. 125 


00 


3,425 00 


. 15,000 


00 




. 350 


00 


15,350 00 


. 8,000 


00 




. 300. 


00 


8,30Q 00 


. 8,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


'8,400 00 


. 18,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


18,400 00 


. 14,000 


00 




. 400 


00 


14,400 00 


. 3,000 


00 




. 200 


00 


3,200 00 


. 3,500 


00 




75 


00 


3,575 00 


. 3,600 


00 




. 100 


00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 


00 




50 


00 


2,550 00 


. 600 


00 




50 


00 


650 00 


1 




6,000 00 



839 



Hallsville house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Massabesic house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito-Pond house and lot . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Center-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
South house and lot, 'Squog . 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Main-street house and lot 

Movable furniture, maps, etc. 
Webster-street house and lot . 

Amount of school property 
Amount of city property 

Total property 



. $3,500 00 




75 00 


13,575 00 


. 1,400 00 




40 00 


1,440 00 


. 1,000 00 




50 00 


1,050 00 


. 5,000 00 




. 125 00 


5,125 00 


. 58,000 00 




. 400 00 


58,400 00 


. 50,000 00 




. 400 00 


50,400 00 


. 2,800 00 




60 00 


2,860 00 


. 3,700 00 




. 125 00 


3,825 00 


. 17,000 00 




. 100 00 


17,100 00 




21,000 00 


1310,075 00 


1,405,452 21 


$1,715,527 21 



340 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1883, 



Interest 












. $20,000 00 


Paupers off the farm . 








3,500 00 


City farm . 








2,500 00 


City teams . 








3,000 00 


Highway district No. 1 








300 00 


" " "2 








10,000 00 


a u 


< 3 








600 00 


a a < 


' 4 








400 00 


a tw 


' 5 








400 00 


a a 


< 6 








400 00 


i< a 


< 7 








TOO 00 


u a 


< 8 








650 00 


u a 


< 9 








500 00 


a u 


' 10 








1,300 00 


a u 


4 11 








700 00 


u a 


" 12 








250 00 


a u 


" 13 








200 00 


New highways 








2,500 00 


Land damage 










1,000 00 


Watering streets . 










2,000 00 


Lighting streets . 










7,000 00 


Paving streets 










2,000 00 


Bridges 










2,500 00 


Sewers and Drains 










20,000 00 


Commons . 










1,500 00 


Pine Grove Cemetery . 










5,000 00 


Valley Cemetery . 










2,000 00 


Truant officer 










700 00 


Fire department . 










18,000 00 


Police department 










13,000 00 


City hall and offices 










2,000 00 


Printing and static 


)ner 


V 








1,500 00 



341 



Repairs of buildings 

City library 

Fire-alarm telegraph 

Militia 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Abatement of taxes 

Discount on taxes 

Incidental expenses 

State tax 

County tax . 

Schools 

Land . 

Interest on land 

Bakers ville school-house 

Firemen's parade 

City officers' salaries 

Grading for concrete 

Reserved fund 

Macadamizing streets 

Hydrant service . 

Payment of funded debt 

Battery building . 

Scavenger teams . 

Total 



11,800 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

800 00 

200 00 

2,500 00 

7,000 00 

35,000 00 

41,060 00 

32,000 00 

54,200 00 

10,000 00 

3,000 00 

5,000 00 

350 00 

12,000 00 

3,000 00 

10,000 00 

2,500 00 

20,000 00 

13,000 00 

2,000 00 

3,000 00 

$387,510 00 



INDEX. 



Abatement of Taxes 317 

Account of City Treasurer 228 

Accounts of Appropriations 235 

Alarm-Boxes and Keys w 179 

Amoskeag S. F. E. Company N®. 1 . . . . 190, 298 

Apparatus, Fire 186 

Appropriations for 1883 340 

Attendance at School 128 

Battery Building and Ward-Room No. 4 332 

Books and Stationery • • • • 270 

Bridges 264 

Care of Booms . . . 273 

Cemeteries, Report of Committee on 217 

City Government, 1882 3 

Civil Engineer, Report of. 75 

Debt 335 

Farm 244 

Hall 310 

Library 315 

Library Annex 332 

Physician, Report of. 109 

Property 337 

Solicitor, Report of. 45 

Teams 247 

Treasurer's Account 228 

Chief Engineer, Report of 169 

Commons 264 

County Tax 318 

Contingent Expenses 271 



344 

Discount on Taxes = 317 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 325 

Debt, Funded 336 

Donations to City Library 65 

Engineers 1 Department 302 

E. W. Harrington Hose Company No. 3 193, 301 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 172, 302 

Evening Schools 274 

Farm. City , - 244 

Fire- Alarm Telegraph 194, 305 

Boxes and Keys, Location of 179 

Fire Apparatus 186 

Department 298 

Department, Rules and Regulations of 184 

Firemen's Parade 324 

Fires, 1882 176 

Fuel 268 

Furniture and Supplies 268 

Government, City, 1882 3 

Grading for Concrete 261 

Highway District No. 1 250 

No. 2 250 

No. 3 251 

No. 4 252 

No. 5 252 

No. 6 253 

No. 7 253 

No. 8 254 

No. 9 254 

No. 10 254 

No. 11 255 

No. 12 256 

No. 13 256 

Highways, New .... 257 

Awards for Lands taken for 257 

Hydrant Service 325 

Hydrants, Location of 195 



345 

Incidental Expenses 281 

Instructions to Key-Holders ! 182 

Interest 236 

Interest on Taxes 236 

Land Damage Awards 257 

Library, City 315 

Donations to 65 

Librarian's Eeport 61 

Treasurer's Report , 56 

Trustees' Report 51 

List of Teachers and Janitors 161 

Loan, Temporary 235 

Macadamizing Streets 260 

Massabesic Hose Company No. 2 193, 300 

Mayor Putnam's Inaugural Address iii 

Militia 316 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department 302 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department 190 

New School-house on Webster street 279 

at Bakersville 281 

N. S. Bean Fire Engine Company No. 4 191, 299 

Officers, City 3 

Outstanding Taxes , 318 

Overseers of Poor, Report of , 207 

Paupers off the City Farm 236 

Paving Streets 259 

Payment of Funded Debt 317 

Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 192, 300 

Pine Grove Cemetery 220, 297 

Police Department 306 

Printing and Advertising 270 

Stationery 313 

Property, City 337 

School • 338 

Repairs of School-houses 266 

Buildings 314 



346 

Report of Chief Engineer. . .' 169 

City Civil Engineer 75 

City Physician 109 

City Solicitor 45 

Committee on Cemeteries 217 

Committee on City Farm 213 

Committee on Finance 232 

Librarian of City Library 61 

Overseers of the Poor 207 

School Committee 119 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 138 

Superintendent of Water- Works 17 

Treasurer of City Library 56 

Trustees of City Library 51 

Trustees of Cemetery Funds ■. . , 225 

Water Commissioners 15 

Reserved Fund 330 

Salaries of Officers ... 319 

Teachers 275 

Scavenger Teams 333 

School Department 115 

School Property 338 

Schools, Evening 274 

Sewers and Drains 262 

Stark-Monument Square 326 

State Tax 318 

Streets, Lighting 259 

Macadamizing 260 

Paviug 259 

Watering 258 

Tax, County 318 

Taxes, Abatement of 317 

Discount on 317 

For 1882 319 

Outstanding 318 

Teachers, Salaries of 275 

Telegraph, Fire-Alarm 172, 305 

Temporary Loan 235 



347 

Truant Officer 281 

Tuition 278 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 334 

Valley Cemetery 218, 296 

Water Board for 1883 '. 42 

Water Commissioners, Keport of. 15 

Water-Works 326 

Watering Streets 258 

Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospital 325