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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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! City of Manchester 1 




ANNUAL REPORTS 



nimilllllllUllllllllllllllllllllilllllilllllllllllllll 



HilAMPSHlBE il 

uuuuiuimmuiimimmiinillllllll II 

STATT LIBRARY 



THIRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



City of Manchester, 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1883, 



TOGETHER WITH 



Other Annual Reports and Papers Relating 
to the Affairs of the City. 




MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

JOHN B. CLARKE, PRINTER 

1884. 



Kf 
ZSZ01 

■ 1663 

CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Thirty-Eighth Annual Eeport of the 
Keceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are, 
authorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of the Thirty-Eighth Annual Report of the Receipts 
and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports 
of the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, the School Board 
and Superintendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water-Works, 
Water Commissioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Marshal, 
Overseers of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian, and Treasurer of City 
Library, Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Committee on 
City Farm, City Physician, City Solicitor, and City Engineer, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the Appropriation for Printing 
and Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. February 5, 1884. 

Passed. 

J. A. McCRILLIS, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. February 5, 1884. 

Passed in concurrence. 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT, 

1883. 



MAYOR. 

Hon. HORACE B. PUTNAM. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JOHN A. McCRILLIS. 



CLERK OP COMMON COUNCIL. 

JAMES A. FRACKER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLVANUS JB. PUTNAM. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXE8. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

WILLIAM R. PATTEN. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

JAMES M. COLLITY. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — Charles H. G. Foss. 
Ward 2. — John F. Clough. 

Ward 3. — Samuel Thompson. 
W r ard 4. — Edward P. Johnson. 
Ward 5. — Leonard P. Reynolds. 
Ward 6. — Thomas L. Thorpe. 
Ward 7. — Horace P. Simpson. 
Ward 8. — Frank A. Cadwell. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

Henry^S. Perry. 
George W. Cheney. 
Stillraan P. Cannon. 

Ward 3. 

Alexander H. Olzendam. 
Abraham G. Grenier. 
Eugene S. Whitney. 

Ward 5. 

John Bryson, Jr. 
Simon McCarthy. 
John Griffin. 

Ward 7. 

Samuel Lunt. 
Henry W. Randall. 
Abner J. Sanborn. 



Ward 2. 

George M. True. 
Henry W. Fisher. 
Charles E. Stearns. 

Ward 4. 

Stephen B. Stearns. 
John A. McCrillis. 
Alpheus Bodwell. 

Ward 6. 

Albert A. Ainsworth. 
George W. Prescott. 
Henry A. Horton. 

Ward 8. 

Edward H. Doherty. 
Ferdinand Riedel. 
Frank 0. Clement. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor, and Alderman Thorpe ; 
Messrs. S. B. Stearns, Lunt, and Ainsworth. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Thompson and Cadwell ; 
Messrs. Olzendam, Cheney, and S. B. Stearns. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Foss and Clough ; Messrs. True, 
Randall, and Prescott. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Simpson and Thorpe; Messrs. 
Sanborn, Olzendam, and Fisher. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Thorpe and Simp- 
son ; Messrs. Fisher, Olzendam, and Sanborn. 



6 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Clough and Cadwell ; 
Messrs. Whitney, McCarthy, and Riedel. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Johnson and 
Simpson ; Messrs. Perry, Randall, and Bryson. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Foss and Thompson ; 
Messrs. Cheney, Horton, and Whitney. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Clough and 
Foss ; Messrs. Ainsworth, Cannon, and Perry. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Cadwell and John- 
son : Messrs. Prescott, Grenier, and True. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Johnson and Thorpe; 
Messrs. Charles E. Stearns, Doherty, and Bodwell. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Clough and Johnson ; 
Messrs. Lunt, Cannon, and Horton. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Reynolds and Cad- 
well ; Messrs. Prescott, Doherty, and Griffin. 

On Military Affairs.. — Aldermen Thompson and 
Clough ; Messrs. Bodwell, Riedel, and Griffin. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OP MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Foss and Cadwell. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Simpson and 
Thompson. 

On Market. — Aldermen Thompson and Reynolds. 

On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Clough and Rey- 
nolds. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Cadwell and Johnson. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Thorpe and Reynolds. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Simpson and Clough. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Messrs. Charles E. Stearns, 
Griffin, and Clement. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Grenier, Clem- 
ent, and McCarthy. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Horton, Bryson, and Charles 
E. Stearns. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Assistant Justice of Police Court. 
Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Eben Carr. 

Captain of the Night Watch. 
Edgar Farrar. 

Dag Police. 

John C. Colburn. 
Randall W. Bean. 
Charles H. Reed. 



Night Watchmen. 



John F. Cassidy. 
James Bucklin. 
Thomas Frain. 
William H. B. Newhall. 
Michael Marr. 
Hiram Stearns. 
Jeremiah Murphy. 
James F. Dunn. 



Ira P. Fellows. 
Philip Reischer. 
Francis Bourrassau. 
Gideon Rochette. 
Lafayette Tebbetts. 
Charles S. Brown. 
Henry Harmon. 
Leroy M. Streeter. 



Michael Fox. 

Constables. 

William A. Carpenter. Joseph B. Maynard. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex officio Chairman. 
Frank T. E. Richardson, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Frank T. E. Richardson. 
Perry H. Dow. 

Ward 3. 

Henry H. Huse. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Ward 5. 

Thomas F. Collins. 
Charles A. O'Connor. 



Ward 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 

Ward 4. 

John T. Fanning. 
Samuel D. Lord. 

Ward 6. 

D. Milton Goodwin.* 
Jacob J. Abbott. 



'' Elected to fill vacancy caused by resignation of Brackett B. Weeks. 



Ward 7. Ward 8. 

George D. Towne. Lewis E. Phelps. 

Edwin F. Jones. Douglas Mitchell. 

John A. McCrillis, ex officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Hon. Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 
• Hon. James A. Weston, Clerk. 
William P. Newell. Alpheus Gay. 

James A. Weston. Andrew C. Wallace. 

Eben T. James. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex officio. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex-officio Chairman. 

William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 
William H. Maxwell. Daniel Sheehan. 

John E. Stearns. Robert Hall.* 

James Sutcliffe. P. 0. Woodman. f 

Horace Gordon. Elbridge G. Woodman. 

William Weber. 

*Died. t Elected to fill vacancy. 



10 



ASSESSORS. 



George W. Weeks, Chairman. 

David 0. Furnald, Clerk. 
Charles H. Brown. Patrick A. Devine. 

Joseph H. Haynes. John P. Moore. 

David 0. Furnald. Henry W. Powell. 

George W. Weeks. Pius Brown. 



INSPECTORS OP CHECK-LISTS. 

Joseph H. Haynes, Chairman. 

Harrison D. Lord, Clerk. 
Charles W. Warren. Maurice Fitzgerald. 

Joseph H. Haynes. Isaac Whittemore. 

David 0. Furnald. Solon D. Pollard. 

Harrison D. Lord. Charles C. Tinkham. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 
Benjamin C. Kendall, Clerk. 

Assistant Engineers. 

Orrin E. Kimball. Benjamin C. Kendall. 

James F. Pherson. Frank Hutchinson.* 

A. C. Wallace.! 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Melvin J. Jenkins. Patrick A. Devine. 

Lyman H. Lamprey. 

* Resigned. t Elected to fill vacancy. 



11 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Isaac W. Smith. 

William P. Newell. Moody Currier. 

Daniel Clark. Lucien B. Clough. 

Thomas L. Livermore. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex officio. 

John A. McCriliis, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher. 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

Nathan P. Kidder. 

SUPERINTENDENT OP WATER- WORKS. 

Charles K. Walker. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 



Ward 1. —Daniel H. Maxfield. 
Ward 2. — George M. True. 
Ward 3. — James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — John M. Crawford. 
Ward 5. — John F. Sullivan. 
Ward 6. — George Holbrook. 

Ward 7. — Timothy W. Challis. 
Ward 8. — Charles K. Walker. 



12 



Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Abial W. Eastman. 
Ward 2. — Harry E. Webster. 
Ward 3. — Frank W. Garland. 
Ward 4. — Waldo E. Gilmore. 
Ward 5. — John F. Bohan. 

Ward 6. — William H. Dixon. 
Ward 7. — Charles A. Smith. 
Ward 8. —Fred W. Ranno. 

Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 

George C. Kemp. 
George W. Bacon. 
Henry S. Perry. 



Ward 2. 

George H. Colby. 
James R. Carr. 
Joseph P. Fellows. 



Ward 3. 

David Thayer. 
Benjamin F. Garland. 
Emerson Moultou. 



Ward 4. 

Peleg D. Harrison. 
Charles F. Garland. 
Charles H. Uhlig. 



Ward 5. 

John J. Sheehan. 
Daniel J. Ahern. 
Patrick Kelley. 

Ward 7. 

Elbridge G. Woodman. 
Oscar Perkins. 
Zara B. Sawyer. 



Ward 6. 

Edwin N". Baker. 
George E. Glines. 
George M. Bean. 

Ward 8. 

Frank J. Smith. 
Walter S. Chamberlain. 
Herman Rittner. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



COMMISSIONERS FOR 1884. 



Alpheus Gay, President, term expires January 1, 1887. 
James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires January 1, 1885. 
Horace B. Putnam, Mayor, term expires January 1, 1885. 
William P. Newell, term expires January 1, 1890. 
Eben T. James, term expires January 1, 1886. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January 1, 1888. 
E. H. Hobbs, term expires January 1, 1889. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 



EEPOBT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners here- 
with present their twelfth annual report, covering the an- 
nual report of the superintendent to this board, which 
contains in detail a statement of the operations of this 
department of the city service for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1883. 

A brief review of the workings of this enterprise may be 
of interest at this time, about ten years having elapsed 
since the substantial completion of the works. With this 
view, the following table has been prepared, exhibiting the 
annual gross income, the ordinary expense of operating 
and maintaining the works, and the net receipts ; also the 
number of gallons of water pumped for the same periods, 
and the number of service pipes at the close of each year : 



16 



TEAR. 



No. gallons 
pumped. 



No. ser- 
vice pipes, 



Gross income. 



Expenses. 



1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 



194,000,934 


625 


424,000,247 


990 


445,195,120 


1,239 


470,291,588 


1,429 


470,790,810 


1,571 


455.094,062 


1,676 


432,381,726 


1,807 


430,889,792 


1,994 


442,938,889 


2,127 


442,116,612 


2,294 



$17,233.54 
27,119.15 
38,879.47 
43,823.30 
48,874.26 
53,143.17 
57,655.25 
60,215.62 
67,630.13 
73,458.20 



$5,252.94 
7,902.70 
7,038.05 
6,793.53 
7,740.21 

11,596.25 

10,282.06 
9,434.09 

11,505.97 
9,938.92 



Net income. 



$11,980.60 
19,216.45 
31,841.42 
37,029.77 
41,134.05 
41,546.92 
47,373.19 
50,781.53 
56,124.16 
63,519.28 



In explanation of the disproportion of the number of gal- 
lons pumped in 1874 and 1875 as compared with other 
years, it may be said that for a portion of the former year 
the water was supplied from the reservoir of the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company, and during the first nine months 
of the latter year the reverse was true, the Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Company having been supplied by the city. 

It may also be stated that for the first few years the fill, 
ing of the reservoir and pipes, the frequent trials and ex. 
periments with fire hydrants and otherwise, together with 
the leaky condition of some of the pipes, required a large 
amount of water. Then, too, there were few meters, and 
the luxury of running water under a head prompted takers 
to make a very free use of their hydrants and faucets until 
the novelty had worn off. 

It is believed that the minimum has now been reached in 
the amount of water required for all purposes ; for, by al- 
lowing the population within reach of the distribution to 
be thirty-five thousand, it appears that only about thirty-five 
gallons, or a little more than a barrel of water, per day, is 
furnished to each inhabitant on the average. This is an 



17 

unusually small amount as compared with the consumption 
in other cities, and is the least amount that can reasonably 
be expected here. It may, therefore, be taken for granted 
that the normal condition of the works has been attained 
as regards the amount of water consumed in proportion to 
the inhabitants, as well as in other respects, and, barring 
accidents, that the future will be a repetition of the expe- 
rience of the past few years. 

Most of the distribution pipes were kept in repair by the 
contractor until 1879. This accounts for the largely in- 
creased expense after that time. 

As a whole, the foregoing exhibit must prove a source of 
gratification to the early advocates of measures " to intro- 
duce an abundant supply of pure water into the city of Man- 
chester." The wisdom of the selection of the source of 
supply is no longer questioned, and no exception can justly 
be taken, either to the quantity or quality of the Massabe 
sic water, nor to the general plan adopted by which it was 
introduced ; while the result, in a financial aspect, is far 
more favorable than the most ardent friends of the under- 
taking dared hope. 

This " great blessing " long ago ceased to be a charge 
upon the tax-payers, and is most appreciated by those who 
are familiar with the rare advantages supplied by nature, 
which have been utilized so successfully for the benefit of 
present and future generations. It remains for those in 
charge of this valuable property to maintain and protect it 
with vigilant care, and to guard, as far as may be, against 
accidents that would deprive the citizens of its use. To 
this end your commissioners believe the time has arrived 
when provision should be made looking to the construction 
of a second main pipe, first laying a pipe from Elm to Mas- 
sabesic street through Valley street, and later on to extend 
it to the reservoir, and finally to the pumping station. 



18 

Many applications are annually made for the extension of 
distribution pipes. To meet these cases the reasonable 
rule adopted by the managers of most other water-works 
has been applied here ; that is, pipes are extended wher- 
ever the income from water rates will be equal to six per 
cent on the cost of laying them. This action appears to 
have given general satisfaction. For further details as to 
the operations of the works, your commissioners desire to 
refer to the accompanying report of the superintendent. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, President, 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor, 

WILLIAM P. NEWELL, 

A. C. WALLACE, 

E. T. JAMES, 

E. H. HOBBS, 

JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1884. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners of. the City of 
Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — In compliance with the ordinances of the 
city, the annual report of your Superintendent for the year 
ending December 31, 1883, is herewith respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

There has been an abundance of water in the lake the 
past year, notwithstanding there have been two dry seasons 
in succession. While other cities in New England have 
suffered for the want of water, Manchester has had a good 
supply of the very best quality. 

If any further evidence were necessary, these dry seasons 
have made it conclusive that those in charge of the con- 
struction of the works made a wise choice when the Mas- 
besic Lake was determined upon as the source of supply. 

One piece of land bordering on the lake has been bought 
of Hidden Brown, of Auburn village, the past year, con- 
taining about three acres. 

DAM, CANAL, AND PENSTOCK. 

No repairs have been required on the dam, canal, or pen- 
stock, during the year. A few loads of stone and earth 
have been put back of the wall, opposite the Gilman 
Clough place, and the fence just below the dam has been 
whitewashed. 



20 



PUMPING STATION. 



No repairs have been made on the pumps or the machin- 
ery connected therewith the past year. The water-wheel 
with the suspension glass bearing still runs both pumps, 
and has for five years past, without any repairs. 

It is somewhat remarkable that machinery of this kind 
should run a whole year and pump 442,000,000 gallons 
without any repairs, but such is the fact. 

Every thing about the works is in good order at the 
present time. 



RECORD OF PUMPING IN 1S83. 



MONTHS. 



No. hours' work 
for both pumps. 



Average 
stroke per 
minute. 



Total No. ITotal No. gallons 
strokes ' pumped in one 
per uionth month. 



Daily aver- 
age gallons 
pumped. 



January • • • 
February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October . . 
November 
December 



Totals and average . 



659 h. 
590 " 

639 " 
540 " 
553 " 
606 " 
633 " 
693 " 
665 " 
595 " 
575 " 

640 " 



40 



15.80 
16.24 
16.12 
16.26 
16.27 
16.18 
16.38 
16.05 
15.30 
15.15 
14.94 
15.42 



7391 



52 



15.84 



628,030 
574,896 
618,956 
527,032 
530,744 
588,242 
623,088 
667,776 
611,072 
539,238 
516,284 
592,446 



7,017,804 



39,565,890 
36,218,448 
38,994,2-28 
33,203,016 
33,436,872 
37,059,246 
39,249,504 
42,009,88S 
38,497,536 
33,971,994 
32,525,892 
37.324,098 



1,276.319 
1.293.516 
1,257,878 
1,106,767 
1,078.609 
1,268,641 
1,266,113 
1.357,093 
1,283,251 
1,095,878 
1,084,196 
1,204,003 



442,116,612 



1,211,278 



RESERVOIR. 



The only work required about the reservoir has been 
done at the gate-house, and this was a trivial matter of 
putting on a storm-door and repairing the old one. 



21 



SUPPLY AND FORCE MAIN. 



The supply and force main hold good. Few repairs on 
joints have been made, and there have been no bursts that 
made it necessary to take out any portion of the pipes. 
Excepting one burst hole, the pipes look well when they have 
been uncovered. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

The amount of water-pipe laid in the year 1883 is 7,070 
feet, about one mile and a third, at an expense of $7,814- 
These extensions have been laid on seventeen different 
streets, and have ended where the income would not pay 
the interest on the cost of laying. 

There have been no more leaks this year than last, and 
those that have occurred, in most cases were bursts or old- 
wound joints. There has been but one case where a break 
has done any considerable damage the past year. This was 
in the winter, and the ground was frozen so deep that the 
water was forced into a cellar through a service-pipe ditch. 
One of the ball and socket joints of the river pipe got broken 
by the shifting of the sand on the east shore of the river- 
A new one was put in, and the pipe is now in good order. 

Since the sewer was discharged into the river just above 
the water-pipe, it has washed out a quarter of an acre of 
land or more. This has caused what little trouble we have 
had in this portion of the pipe for the last three years, and 
all has been done in winter, the ice throwing the current 
of warm sewer water against the river bank, which is a 
sandy loam, and it cuts it away very fast. The bank was 
rubbled this last summer three rods above the pipe, and if it 
holds this winter, it can be extended north to the mouth of 
the sewer, and made permanent ; otherwise, a break-water 
will have to be built one hundred feet in length, straight 
out into the river, to carry the sewer water farther out into 
the stream. 



99 



As a whole, the pipes seem to be in good order ; but as 
bursts are likely to be more frequent than they formerly 
were, it requires more care and watching to prevent damage 



PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID IN 1883. 



Streets. 



Length in feet laid. 


Gates set. 


3 

s 

- 

= 


12 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


12 in. 1 6 in. 

1 


4 in. 



Location. 



Amherst 

Auburn 

Bath 

Baker 

Beech 

Beauport 

Bennington. . 

Bridge 

Cedar 

Dover 

Elm 

Goffstown rd. 

Mill 

McGregor . . . 

Marion 

Nashua 

Pine 

Putnam 

Shasta 

Spruce 

West 



1,205 



360 
404 
223 

60 



461 
48 

832 



1,076 

141 

1,151 

16 



755 
36 
58 
96 



1,281 5,717 72 



72 



13 



2 11 



Hall to Belmont. 

Beech, eastward. 

Third to Second. 

Elm, westward. 

To Auburn. 

Putnam to Sulli- 
van. 
Main, westward. 

Linden to Hall. 

Corner Pine. 

Corner Granite. 

Cor. River road to 
Baker. 

Front street west- 
ward. 

Third, eastward. 

Putnam to Amorj 

McGregor, west- 
ward. 
Lowell southward 

Webster, south- 
ward. 

Beauport, west- 
ward. 

Elm, westward. 

East of Lincoln. 
Corner Granite. 



inn miles laid in 1883. 



•52 80 



23 



The following places are where ceaient-liiied pipe was 
taken up and cast-iron pipe laid instead : — 



Streets. 


Length in feet. 


Location. 




10 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 








8 


7 
7 
7 









100 ft. north of Hanover St. 






Opposite No. "215. 










10 
8 
21.5 








Opposite old reservoir. 










8 








8.5 

8 

6 






Pearl 






Opposite No. 142. 






West 




36 

8 
















8 
8 


Opp D.Stevens' residence. 
















8 


86 


65 


Total length 159 feet. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1883. 



Amherst corner Belmont. 
Baker corner Elm. 
Bath corner Second. 
Bennington corner Main. 
Bridge corner Ashland. 
Bridge corner Hall. 
Goffstown road. 
Goffstown road. 
Mill. 

Putnam corner Beauport. 
Shasta corner Elm. 



24 



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28 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DATE. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 




20,627.9 


411.00 


5 


14 inch diameter 


6.S25.0 


4,925.00 


10 


12 inch diameter 


8,118.0 


8,233.00 


17 




5,023.75 


9,048.00 


13 




12,663.0 


5,966.00 


32 




82,395.0 


35,365.05 


201 




8,592.0 


2,184.00 


19 




144,144.65 


66,132.5 


297 



27.30 miles of cement-lined pipe. 
12.525 " " cast-iron pipe. 



39.825 " " cast-iron and cement-lined pipe. 

297 gates. 
350 hydrants. 
7 air-valves. 

METERS. 

There have been set during the year thirty-one (31) 
meters, making the number now in use four hundred and 
four (404). 

The number of applicants for water to date has been two 
thousand four hundred and forty. 

One hundred and sixty-seven (167) service pipes have 
been laid this year, as follows : — 

1 | inch diameter ..... 45.0 feet 

153 1 " " 4,006.2 " 

13 2 " " 206.4 " 



Length of service pipe 



4,257.6 feet 



29 



Two three-quarter inch service pipes fifty and one-half 
feet in length have been relaid with inch pipe sixty-five feet 
in length. 

Twenty-two hundred and ninety-four service pipes (2,294) 
have been laid to date as follows : — 



40 ^ inch diameter 


860.7 feet 


1,785 £ " " . 


. 46,946.7 " 


412 1 " « . 


. 11,346.3 " 


H " " • • • 


. 1,188.9 " 


H " " • • • 


73.0 " 


19 2 " " . 


778.7 " 


6 4" " . 


172.0 " 


Total length of service pipe 


. 61,366.3 feet 


Number of miles of service pipe 


. 11.622 



The income from the sale of water for 1883 has been as 
follows : — 



Received for water by rate . 


149,358 


24 




' " " " meter 


21,951 


55 




' " fines . . . . 


208 


04 




' " rent of meters . 


1,479 


65 




' " setting meters . 


105 


00 




' " building purposes 


314 


65 




' " labor and pipe . 


20 


07 




' " hay on Mill's meadow . 


10 


00 




i a a a N ea i' s meadow 


10 


00 




of G. G. Griffin . 


1 


00 


Total .... 


■ 


$73,458 20 


Ab 


atements, $268.49. 







30 



Current expenses for 1883 . . $9,938 92 
Expended for construction . . 10,669 18 
Interest on bonds .... 38,000 00 

Total expended .... $58,608 10 

Receipts over expenditures . . $14,850 10 

Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1882 . . 11,487 98 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1883 . $26,338 08 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1883. 

Superintendence, collection, and re- 



pairs ..... 


$7,840 58 




Stationery, printing, etc. 


129 57 




Office and incidental expenses 


589 22 


$8,559 37 






Pumping expenses 


$1,275 71 




Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 






reservoir .... 


67 04 




Repairs to buildings 


36 80 


$1,379 55 




. . 


Running expenses for 1883 . 


$9,938 92 


Service pipes .... 


$2,510 13 




Distribution pipes .... 


5,696 30 




Fire-hydrants and valves 


1,024 83 




Meters and fittings 


1,112 62 




Fencing 


30 04 




Land and water rights . 


295 26 




Expended on construction in 






1883 .... 


. 1 

. 3 


^10,669 18 


Total expended in 1883 


<20,608 10- 



31 



Land and water rights . 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 

Pumping machinery, pump-house 

and buildings 
Distributing reservoir and fixtures 
Force and supply main 
Distribution pipes . 
Fire-hydrants and valves 
Tools and fixtures 
Boarding and store houses 
Roads and culverts 
Supplies 
Engineering . 

Livery and traveling expenses 
Legal expenses 
Grading and fencing 
Service pipes 
Meters and fixtures 



,643 93 
101,399 16 

88,493 96 

71,542 36 

88,674 02 

277,334 13 

33,398 34 

10,649 35 

919 36 

2,193 49 

550 39 

22,176 19 

2,856 64 

563 79 

12,343 50 

^34,990 64 

12,377 68 



Total construction account 
to Dec. 31, 1883 . 

Current expenses : — 

Superintendence, collecting, and re- 
pairs .... 
Stationery, printing, etc 
Office and incidental expenses 
Pumping expenses and repairs 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 

reservoir 
Repairs to buildings 

Current expenses to Dec 
"31,1883. 



1799,106 93 



. $65,297 


94 


. 4,220 


22 


. 4,503 


26 


. 14,950 


09 


. 1,770 


75 


313 


36 







$91,055 62 



32 



Interest $40,678 51 

Highway expenditures . . . 14,000 53 



$54,679 04 



Total amount of bills ap- 
proved to date .... 1944,841 59 

Interest, discount and labor per- 
formed on highway, trans., and 
tools and materials sold . . $59,194 34 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1883 91,055 62 

$150,249 96 



Total cost, not including in- 
terest and current expenses . $794,591 63 
Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1882 .... $345,901 51 
Interest for 1883 .... 36,168 00 



Total interest and discount 
to Dec 31, 1883 . . . $382,069 51 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31, 1882 . . $191,000 00 

Amount of interest paid in 1883 . 38,000 00 



$229,000 00 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works : — 

1872, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . $573 61 

1873, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 177 07 

1873, accrued interest 

on water bonds sold 193 26 



33 



1873, accrued interest 

on state bonds sold $146 00 

1873, water rents . 1,920 53 

1874, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 607 89 

March 12, 1874, highway expendi- 
tures, trans, from 
water account. 14,000 53 

March 17, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account. 12,347 25 

Sept. 1, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account . 22,361 74 

1874, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 30,233 54 
Dec. 29, 1874, interest trans- 
ferred . . . 4,566 25 
Dec. 18, 1875, 1 anvil sold . 15 00 

Sept. 25, 1875, engine, crusher, 

and material sold . 2,089 45 

1875, water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 

May 20, 1876, derrick sold 
May 20, 1876, rent of derrick . 

1876, water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 

1877, water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 

1878, water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 

1878, old plow sold 



27,119 


15 


125 


00 


24 


00 


38,879 


47 


43,823 


30 


48,873 


26 


1 


00 



34 



1879, derrick sold . 175 00 

1879, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 53,068 17 

1880, water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 

sale of grass 
level, transit, etc. 

1881, water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 

sale of grass 
sale of derrick 
received of G. G. Griffin 

1882, water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 

received of G. G. Griffin 

received of James Bald- 
win & Co. . . 175 00 

received from the sale 

of grass . . 10 00 

received from Goodhue 

& Birnie . 21 37 

received for old plank . 1 00 

received for use of der- 
rick ... 15 00 

1883, received of G. G. 

Griffin ... 1 00 

received from sale of 

grass ... 20 00 

water and hydrant rent, 

etc. . . . 73,437 20 



57,395 


25 


10 


00 


250 


00 


60,164 


62 


10 


00 


50 


00 


1 


00 


67,403 


76 


1 


00 



Total received for water, etc. . 1560,179 67 



35 

Amount appropriated to date . . . 1640,000 00 



Total received to date . . . 81,200,179 67 
Amount of bills approved to date . . 944,841 59 



$255,338 08 
Amount paid toward interest . . . 229,000 00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1883 . $26,338 08 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



36 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


2 


Cemeteries. 


12 Churches. 
1 Court-house. 


1 
1 


Orphanage. 
Post-office. 


4 Hose-companies. 
4 Fire-engines. 
1 Hook-and-ladder 


1 

5 
5 


City Library. 

Banks. 

Hotels. 


2 Opera-houses. 
1 Music Hall. 


1 
1 


Masonic Hall. 
Odd Fellows' Hall 


1 Convent. 

1 City Hospital. 

1 Old Ladies' Home. 


1 

3 

22 


Holly-tree Inn. 

Halls. 

School-houses. 


1 Soldiers 1 Monument. 


1 


Battery Building. 


1 Turner Hall. 


1 


Skating Rink. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



1 Silver-plating. 

1 Iron foundry. 

2 Dye-houses. 

2 Machine-shops. 

6 Clothing manufactories. 

3 Harness-shops. 
1 Brush-shop. 

3 Carriage-shops. 

4 Cigar. 

1 Brass and copper foundry, 
1 Locomotive-works. 



2 Sash and blind shops. 

2 Breweries. 

2 Shoe-shops. 

1 Pop-corn. 

1 Gas-works. 

4 Slaughter-houses. 

1 Soap manufactory. 

1 Needle manufactory. 

1 Beer-bottling. 

1 Book-bindery. 



4 Fish. 

9 Meat and fish. 



MARKETS. 

2 Meat (wholesale). 



37 





STABLES. 


406 Private. 




14 Livery. 


1 Horse-railroad. 








OFFICES. 


6 Dentists. 




7 Printing. 


1 Telephone. 




1 Gas. 


1 Telegraph. 




3 Coal. 


2 Express. 








SHOPS. 


20 Barber. 




2 Currying. 


1 Wheelwright. 




5 Plumber and gas and 


6 Blacksmith. 




water pipe. 


5 Carpenter. 




8 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 




1 Gunsmith. 




STORES. 


4 Auction. 




71 Grocery. 


19 Drug. 




5 Meal. 


8 Jewelry. 




3 Hardware. 


1 Fur. 




18 Boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing goods. 


8 Stove. 


21 Fancy goods. 




15 Gents' furnishing goods, 


1 Wholesale paper. 




10 Book. 


5 Wholesale produce. 




1 Leather and shoe finders 


15 Dry goods. 




3 Music. 


10 Candy. 




3 Upholstery. 


1 Crockery. 




5 Undertakers. 


1 Cloak. 




5 Sewing-machine. 


15 Millinery. 




1 Feather-cleaner. 


2 Tea. 




2 Furniture. 



38 



9 Dining. 
6 Billiard. 



SALOONS. 

65 Liquor. 



4 Club-rooms. 
2 Bleacheries. 

8 Laundries. 
2 Ice-houses. 

9 Photographers. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

3 Greenhouses. 
1 Band-room. 
12 Bakeries. 
1 Waste. 



5383 Families. 

77 Boarding-houses 
6665 Faucets. 

936 Wash-bowls. 
1058 Water-closets. 

255 Wash-tubs. 

303 Bath-tubs. 



WATER FIXTURES. ETC. 

118 Urinals. 
1300 Sill cocks. 
349 Fire hydrants. 
22 Stand pipes. 
16 Water-troughs. 
1096 Horses. 
44 Cattle. 



39 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 



BENDS, 


SLEEVES, AND PLUGS. 


1 8 in. 1-4 bend. 


6 20 in. clamp sleeves. 


1 12 in. 1-8 bend. 


4 12 in. clamp sleeves. 


1 4 in. 1-4 bend. 


5 10 in. clamp sleeves. 


3 6 in. 1-8 bend. 


10 8 in. clamp sleeves. 


6 20 in. solid sleeves. 


1 8 in. x 6 in. reducer. 


7 14 in. solid sleeves. 


2 12 in. x 6 in. reducer, 


11 6 in. solid sleeves. 


2 6 in. x 4 in. reducer. 


4 12 in. solid sleeves. 


2 14 in. cement plugs. 


6 4 in. solid sleeves. 


2 10 in. cast-iron plugs. 



2 14 in. clamp sleeves. 
1193 feet inch pipe. 
330 feet 2 inch pipe. 
636 feet 3-4 inch pipe. 
600 pounds of lead. 



PIPE. 



450 ft. 20 in. pipe. 
348 ft. 12 in. pipe. 
720 ft. 10 in. pipe. 
240 ft. 6 in. pipe. 
400 ft. 4 in. pipe. 



600 ft. 14 in. pipe. 
156 ft. 12 in. flange pipe. 
2196 ft. 8 in. pipe. 

31 J ft. 8 in.wrought-ironpipe. 



2 double 6 on 6. 
1 double 6 on 14. 
9 double 6 on 10. 
1 double 6 on 8. 
1 single 12 on 14. 

1 single 6 on 8. 

2 single 10 on 10. 



BRANCHES. 

1 double 6 on 12. 
1 double 4 on 6. 

1 double 10 on 20. 

2 single 6 on 20. 
5 single 6 on 10. 
9 single 6 on 6. 

3 single 6 on 14. 



40 



2 single 4 on 4. 
5 single 4 on 6. 



2 6 in. Ludlow hub. 
4 4 in. Ludlow hub. 



3 single 6 on 12. 
1 single 8 on 8. 

GATES. 

3 6 in. Ludlow spigot. 



INVENTORY OF TOOLS AT THE PUMPING STATION. 



1 scoop-shovel. 

4 common shovels. 
1 desk. 

1 one-inch auger. 

5 lanterns. 

3 monkey-wrenches. 
1 square. 

1 plumb square. 
1 sprinkler-pot. 
1 clock. 

1 washer-cutter. 

2 planes. 

1 thermometer. 
1 lawn-mower. 

1 socket wrench. 

6 fork wrenches. 

2 screen rakes. 

4 crow-bars. 

1 bellows and anvil. 

2 pipe wrenches. 
1 window brush. 
1 gate wrench. 

1 long key. 
1 hydrant wrench. 
1 wheelbarrow. 
1 five-pail kettle. 



2 axes. 
4 oil cans. 

2 oil tanks. 
100 pounds waste. 

20 pounds black lead. 

3 cords wood. 
14 tons coal. 

2 ice chisels. 
2 cold chisels. 
2 wood chisels. 

2 hammers. 

3 drip-pans. 

1 two-inch auger. 
1 ten-inch arbor for babbit- 
ing. 
1 flash-board hook. 
1 broom. 

1 set blocks and falls. 
6 pounds hemp packings. 

1 draw shave. 

2 screw plates, taps and 

dies. 

1 vise. 

200 feet 7-8 inch hose. 

2 set dog chains. 

1 set blacksmith's tools. 



41 



3 picks. 

1 clothes-drier. 

2 ladders. 
2 stoves. 

2 coal-hods. 

1 coal sifter. 

2 gallons sperm oil. 

1 bench. 

2 levels. 

1 waste press. 

1 Scotch driller. 

2 nozzles. 

1 pair shears. 

1 pair pliers. 

1 wire-cutter. 

1 boat. 

1 set steps. 

1 1-4 barrels oil. 

1 jack-screw. 

1 brace and six bits. 

1 trowel. 

2 wood-saws. 
2 handsaws. 

1 iron slush-bucket. 



1 bushel basket. 

2 pieces Scotch sewer pipe. 
1 force pump. 

1 bill hook. 
1 clevis and pin. 
1 harrow. 
1 timber roll. 

4 sprinkling-pots. 
1 lot lumber. 

1 lot old iron. 

5 oil barrels. 

4 mortar hoes. 
1 iron shovel. 
150 feet hose. 

1 No. 5 plow. 

3 grub-hoes. 

3 bush-scythes and snaths. 

2 axes. 

1 bellows. 
10 mason hods. 
1 lot of old wheelbarrows. 
1 lot of old shovels. 
1 20-inch gate. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the 
City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — I hereby certify that I have examined the 
accounts of receipts, in the office of Superintendent of 
Water- Works in this city, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1883, 
and find them correct, the amount of receipts being $73,. 
458.20, and he holds appropriate vouchers for having paid 
that sum to the city treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOSEPH E. BENNETT, 

Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 



ANNUAL EEPOET 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

In accordance with the provisions of the contract under 
which the City Library was established and organized, the 
trustees submit herewith their thirtieth annual report of 
the affairs of the library, together with the report made to 
them by the treasurer of the board, of the expenditures 
made by him in behalf of the board from the funds placed 
under their control, and the report of the librarian, which 
gives in detail the statistics and operations of the library 
for the past year, and the condition of the library and other 
property under her care at the close of the year. 

From the report of the librarian it appears that the li- 
brary has been open for the delivery of books three hundred 
and seven days, during which period the number of books 
delivered for home use has been fifty-three thousand nine 
hundred and forty-eight. In addition to this number deliv- 
ered for general circulation, four thousand three hundred 
and eighty books and magazines have been delivered for 
use in the reading-room at the library, making the total 
number delivered during the year fifty-eight thousand three 
hundred and twenty-eight, an average of nearly one hun- 
dred and ninety per day. The circulation of books for 
home use during the past year has increased more than 



46 

twelve thousand over that of the year preceding, and has 
exceeded that of any other year since the library was 
established. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the 
last report was twenty-six thousand and fourteen. During 
the year there have been added, by purchase five hundred 
and twenty-seven volumes, by donation two hundred and 
ninety-three volumes, and one hundred and one volumes 
of periodicals have been bound, making the number of 
bound volumes in the library at the present time twenty- 
five thousand and thirty-one, and the total number, includ- 
ing maps and pamphlets, twenty-six thousand nine hundred 
and thirty-five. 

Thirty-five volumes have been taken from the shelves 
and withdrawn from circulation, having become worn out 
and unfit for further use. Of this number, and of those 
withdrawn from circulation in previous years for the same 
reason, sixteen have been replaced. The others will be 
replaced as soon as the trustees are able to procure them. 
. Sixty different periodicals have been regularly received 
at the library, and as fast as the volumes have been com- 
pleted they have been bound and placed upon the shelves 
for general distribution. 

As will be seen by reference to the report of the treas- 
urer, there has been expended during the year for the pur- 
chase of books the sum of eleven hundred and ninety-eight 
dollars and sixty-five cents, and for the purchase of peri- 
odicals the sum of one hundred and sixty-eight dollars and 
ninety-nine cents, making a total expenditure for these 
purposes of thirteen hundred and sixty-seven dollars and 
sixty-four cents. Of the amount expended for the purchase 
of books, the sum of two hundred and ninety-one dollars 
and twenty-six cents was taken from the income of the 
Dean fund and used for the purchase of books for that de- 



47 

partment of the library. The balance in the hands of the 
treasurer at the end of the year of the amount appropriated 
by the city councils for the purchase of books was four hun- 
dred and one dollars and seventy-four cents. The accumu- 
lated income of the Dean fund now amounts to three thou- 
sand nine hundred and fifteen dollars and eighteen cents. 
This sum, together with the balance above indicated, con- 
stitutes the funds in the hands of the trustees available at 
the close of the year for the further increase of the library. 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the 
library for the past year have been one thousand six hun- 
dred and twenty-eight dollars and eighteen cents. The 
items of these expenditures — the bills for which have been 
paid through the office of the city treasurer after approval 
by the trustees — may be found in the annual report of the 
city. The bill for the year's supply of fuel, amounting to 
two hundred and sixty-seven dollars and twenty cents, 
which was purchased for the library by a committee of the 
city councils, was not presented to the trustees for approval 
until too late to be included in the expenses of the year. 

Annexed to the report of the librarian will be found a 
list of books presented to the library during the year, and 
the names of the persons presenting them. To those who 
in so substantial a manner have aided in the increase of 
the library, the trustees return the thanks of the city. 

At the commencement of the year the Hon. William P. 
Newell, who had faithfully served as one of the committee 
on accounts of the board of trustees ever since the library 
was established, asked to be relieved from further service 
on account of ill health. The board greatly regretted Mr. 
Newell's retirement, and reluctantly accepted his resigna- 
tion. In appreciation of his long and satisfactory service, 
the following resolution was unanimously adopted by the 
board : — 



48 

Besolved, That the thanks of the trustees be tendered to Mr. 
Newell for the punctual and efficient manner in which he has dis- 
charged his duties as one of the committee on accounts of the board 
of trustees from the organization of the library to the present time, 
a period of more than twenty-eight years. 

Hon. L. B. Clough was elected to fill the vacancy on the 
committee occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Newell. 

For a number of years past the books in the library have 
been insured only in the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars. 
In view of the increased value of the library from yearly 
accessions, the trustees considered this amount inadequate 
for the proper protection of the interests of the public, and 
accordingly caused the insurance to be increased to the 
sum often thousand dollars. 

In accordance with the plan that has been suggested in 
previous reports, the trustees have commenced the purchase 
of books from the accumulation of the Dean fund. Eighty- 
nine volumes have been purchased the past year at a cost 
of two hundred ninety-one dollars and twenty-six cents. 
These books have been placed in alcoves by themselves, 
and will be distinguished as the" Dean Fund Purchase." It 
is the intention of the trustees to make accessions to this 
department of the more valuable mechanical, scientific, 
and technical works, as they may from time to time be 
published. 

To enable a library to exert its greatest influence, it is 
essential that the public should be informed what books are 
upon its shelves, and for this purpose a good catalogue is 
necessary. It is now nearly seven years since the last cata- 
logue was published, and during that time more than five 
thousand volumes have been added to the library. Much 
time is lost and annoyance occasioned, both to patrons and 
librarian, for the lack of such information as should be 
readily obtained from a catalogue. An index catalogue of 



49 



the accessions made since 1877 is one of the greatest needs 
of the library at the present time, but without a special ap- 
propriation the trustees cannot arrange for the preparation 
and printing of such a catalogue as would be desirable, as 
the annual appropriations barely meet the incidental ex- 
penses of the library. The trustees would respectfully rec- 
ommend that the city councils appropriate a sum sufficient 
to cover the expense of preparing and printing a supple- 
ment to the present catalogue, which should contain the 
accessions made to the library from 1877 to the present 
time. 

During the past year no special work has been under- 
taken at the library beyqnd the usual routine, and no cir- 
cumstance has occurred to interfere with the harmonious 
operation of the library. 

The librarian, Mrs. M. J. Buneher, has continued to dis- 
charge the duties of her position with fidelity and to the 
satisfaction of the board. 

The trustees desire to return their acknowledgments to 
the members of the city councils, with whom the manage- 
ment of the affairs of the library have brought them in con- 
tact, for the courtesy and consideration with which their 
suggestions for improvements at the library have been 
received and carried out. 

January 19, 1884. 
In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered to 
be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and 
transmitted to the city councils. 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor. 
N. P. HUNT, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : — 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following ac- 
count of the receipts and expenditures by the board of the 
funds received on account of the City Library : — 



1883. 




Dr. 


Jan. 


1. 


To balance of appropriation . 


$434 21 


June 


20. 


cash of Mrs. M. J. Buncher, bal- 








ance of fines 


20 93 






cash of Mrs. M. J. Buncher, for 








catalogues sold 


22 98 


July 


3. 


appropriation for 1883 for books 


1,000 00 


Jan. 


1. 


balance of income of 

Dean fund . . $3,746 58 
income of Dean fund 153 00 




July 


3. 


income of Dean fund 153 00 

interest on accumula- 
tion of income . 74 38 

interest on accumula- 
tion of income . 79 48 


$4,206 44 







1,684 56 



51 



1883. 


Jan. 


1. 




5. 




18. 




23 


Feb. 


6 




12 


March 


1 




1 




5 


April 


7 




12 




IT 




17 



May 



14. 



23. 

25. 

June 4. 

5. 

9. 

22. 

27. 
28. 

July 3. 



Paid Lockwood, Brooks, & Co., 

books . 
N. E. News Co., periodicals . 
James Anglim, books . 
G. F. Bosher & Co., books . 
N. E. News Co., periodicals . 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co , 

books , 
Soule & Bugbee. periodicals 
W. H. Stevenson, periodicals 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
. , N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co 

books 
L. R. Hamersly & Co, books 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co., 

books 
Little, Brown, & Co., books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
George H. Polley & Co., pe 

riodicals . 
Lee & Shepard, books . 
Little, Brown, & Co., books 
J. E. Miller, books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Boston Society of Natural His 

tory, periodicals 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books . 
0. Hinckley, books 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 
L. A. Morrison, books . 



Cr. 

$49 19 

12 07 

15 00 

5 30 

10 52 

34 75 
5 00 
5 10 
9 24 

14 75 

104 67 
5 00 

8 75 
5 50 

15 49 

12 00 

9 00 
14 85 

5 00 
12 06 

3 00 

19 06 
10 00 

19 90 
3 35 



62 



July 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Oct, 



Nov 



6. 
18. 
24. 
26. 

2. 



4. 

6. 

4. 

5. 
11. 

27. 

6. 

8. 
26. 



17. 

17. 

Dec. 4. 

4. 

11. 

14. 

31. 



Paid N. E. News Co., periodicals . 
Sarah M. Burnham, books . 
Little, Brown, & Co., books 
W. T. Stevens, books . 
Little, Brown, & Co. for 

Dean fund purchase, books 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co., 

books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co 

books 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown, & Co., books 
Little, Brown, <fe Co., books 
J. B. Sanborn, books 
N. E. New. 1 - Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown, & Co., books 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 
Thos. W. Lane, books . 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 
Thos. W. Lane, books . 
N. E. News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown, & Co., books 
Lockwood, Brooks, & Co. 

books 
Chas. Scribner's Sons, books 
By balance of appropriation, etc. 
income of Dean fund 



$14 08 
4 00 
4 25 
2 75 

291 26 



.81 


66 


10 


77 


40 


32 


10 


57 


20 


00 


3 


50 


5 


00 


12 


10 


20 


00 


56 


41 


4 


00 


11 


81 



70 44 



37 


84 


4 


50 


10 


43 


20 


00 


28 


42 


96 


00 


401 


74 


3,915 


18 



$5,684 56 



53 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library 
for the year ending December 31, 1883, the items of which 
may be found at length in the annual report of the city, are 
as follows : — 

Services of librarian 

Services of assistant to librarian 

Gas 

Binding . 

Re-binding 

Insurance 

Water . 

Fuel 

Printing . 

Incidentals 



RECAPITULATION. 

Balance Dec. 31, 1882 . 
Appropriation for 1883 



8624 99 


234 


75 


266 


22 


95 


76 


139 


64 


94 


15 


21 


00 


17 


13 


55 


20 


79 


34 


81,628 


18 


8218 


75 


3,000 


00 



Paid trustees for purchase of books 81,000 00 
Incidental expenses . . . 1,628 18 

Balance Dec. 31, 1883 . . .590 57 



1,218 75 



1,218 75 



Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 



54 

December 31, 1883. 
We have examined the above report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

L. B. CLOUGH, 
H. B. PUTNAM, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 31, 1883. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the treasurer of the trustees of the City Library, and find 
the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

N. P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : — 

I respectfully submit the annual report of the condition 
of the library during the year ending December 31, 1883 : 

Whole number of volumes, Dec. 31, 1882 . . 26,014 

Accessions during the year : — 

By purchase .... 527 

Donated 293 

Periodicals .... 101 

921 



Whole number of volumes at present : — 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets .... 1,788 

Bound volumes . . . 25,131 



26,935 



Number of periodicals and papers regularly re- 
ceived ....... 60 

Number of days open to the public . . . 307 

Days open for delivery of books . . . 307 
Number of volumes in circulation during the 

year 53,948 

Average per day ...... 176 

Largest number in any one day, Feb. 17 . . 470 

Largest number any one month, March . . 6,030 



56 



Whole number of books, magazines, etc., used 

in the library 4,380 

Average per day ...... 14 

Number of guarantees received during the year 775 

Whole number since new registration . . 4,234 

Number of cards used on deposit ... 10 

Number of cards held for fines ... 12 

Postals sent for books overdue .... 377 

Number of books taken from the shelves unfit 

for use ....... 35 

Books lost or injured, and paid for ... 5 

Books replaced during the year ... 16 

Number repaired at the bindery . . . 310 

Repaired and covered in the library . . 4,096 

Books returned, missing last year ... 2 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1882 . . $20 93 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1883 92 20 

1113 13 

Amount paid for express, stationery 
and other incidental expenses . 
Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1883 



Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1882, for 
catalogues and supplements sold, and one 
book injured and paid for ... $22 98 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1883 : 

For 21 new catalogues at 75 cents . $15 75 
For 56 supplements at 10 cents . 5 60 



137 13 
20 93 


$58 06 




• 


$55 07 



57 



$4 08 
4 00 


•$29 43 




. 


$52 41 
22 98 


. 


$29 43 
55 07 



Five books lost or injured 
Waste paper sold 



Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 

Balance received for fines 

Total balance on hand .... $84 50 

The foregoing statistics give substantially the work of 
the library during the past year, as no special work has 
been accomplished beyond the regular routine of duties. 

At the close of the last report the library contained 
twenty-four thousand two hundred and sixty-eight volumes, 
one thousand seven hundred and thirty pamphlets, and six- 
teen maps. The accessions during the year were eight 
hundred and sixty-three volumes and fifty-eight pamphlets, 
five hundred and twenty-seven volumes by purchase, of 
which number eighty-nine volumes was the first purchase 
from the " Dean Fund," and it is to be known as " the Dean 
Donation ; " one hundred and one periodicals and papers 
bound, and two hundred and ninety-three were gifts from 
various sources, making the total number added nine hun- 
dred and twenty-one. 

The number of books withdrawn from the shelves, unfit 
for use, is much smaller than preceding years ; also the 
number repaired at the bindery is less. It is gratifying to 
believe there is a growing improvement in the manner of 
using the books by the patrons of the library. 

Sixty periodicals and papers are regularly received. The 
" Manchester Weekly Times" has been discontinued, and 
the " American Law Review," " Central Law Journal," 



58 

"The Science," " The Critic, 1 ' and " Lippincott's Maga- 
zine" have been added to the list. 

The circulation, compared with last year, shows an in- 
crease of several thousand volumes. The proportion of 
fiction read is about the same as in previous years, but 
there is a very perceptible growth in the class of better 
readers. 

No marked change in the use of the reading-room has 
occurred, except a slight decrease in the number of books 
delivered. It has been as actively used for purposes of 
reference by the members of our schools and others seeking 
information, but the class of readers who come for recrea- 
tion has been somewhat less. The cause may be attributed, 
I think, to the pleasant reading-rooms of the Y. M. C. and 
Y. W. C. associations. 

At the semi-annual examination in July there were eight 
volumes missing. Three have since come in. Of the re- 
mainder only one was of much value. At the present ex- 
amination there are seven volumes yet to come in. Some 
are doubtful, but not yet reported as lost. Of this number 
all but three are fiction and juvenile. Two volumes miss- 
ing last year have returned. 

Our thanks are due the Hon. James F. Briggs, through 
whose agency and kindness we have received a large num- 
ber of the United States government publications during 
the past year ; also to many other donors of valuable books 
and pamphlets. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my grateful apprecia- 
tion of the uniform kindness of the board of trustees, and 
thanks to the treasurer for his kind assistance in many 
ways during the year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

M. J. BUNCHER, Librmian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY 

From January 1 to December 31, 1883. 



Judge C. W. Stanley, Manchester, N. H. 
Twelve volumes, viz. : — 

Kinne's Compendium of Law. 11 Vols. 8vo. 
The Principles of Natural and Political Law. 1 Vol. 
S. C. Gould, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 
Twelve volumes, viz. : — 
Proceedings of the Right Worthy Grand Lodge of the 

United States of the I. 0. 0. F. 1872-78. 5 

Vols. 8vo. 
Proceedings of the Sovereign Grand Lodge of the 

I. O. 0. F. 1880-82. 2 Vols. 8vo. 
Journal of Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of 

Free and Accepted Masons of the State of New 

Hampshire. 1870-76. 4 Vols. 8vo. 
Notes and Queries. Vol. 1. By S. C. and L. M. 

Gould. 
Report of State Librarian of New Hampshire for the 

year 1882. Pamphlet. And many other valuable 

pamphlets. 
C. F. Livingston, Manchester, N. H. 

Printers' Circular. Vols. 5, 6, 7, and 8. 8vo. 

Springfield Republican for 1882. 

Constitution and Regulations of the Grand Lodge of 

Masons of New Hampshire. 8vo. 



60 

Proceedings ol the New Hampshire Press Association, 
fourteenth and fifteenth annual meetings. Pam- 
phlets. 
Ascension-Tide Service for Knights Templars. 
Pamphlet. 
John B. Clarke, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 
Successful New Hampshire Men. 8vo. 
Manchester Directory for the year 1882. 8vo. John 
B. Clarke, Esq., publisher. 
Grand Encampment of New Hampshire. 

Journal of Proceedings of the Grand Encampment of 
the I. 0. 0. F. of New Hampshire. Vol. 1. 1845- 
82. 8vo. Hon. Joseph Kidder, Scribe. 
Grand Lodge of New Hampshire. 

Journal of Proceedings of the R. W. Grand Lodge of 
New Hampshire. 1844-81. 8vo. 2 Vols. Hon. 
Joseph Kidder, Scribe. 
N. P. Kidder. Esq., City Clerk. • 

New Hampshire Town Papers. Vol. 12. 8vo. 
New Hampshire Law Report. Vol. 58. 8vo. 
Thirty-seventh Annual Report of the receipts and ex- 
penditures of the City of Manchester for the year 
1882. Svo. 
State of New Hampshire. 

New Hampshire Town Papers. Vol. 11. 1680-1800. 
Svo. 
Hon. Peter Cooper, New York. 

Ideas for a Science of Good Government. By Hon. 
Feter Cooper. 8vo. 
James S. McDonald, State Librarian, N. J. 

New Jersey Archives. Vols. 5, 6, and 7. 1720-51. 
8vo. 
Charles Cowley, Esq., Lowell, Mass. 

Leaves from a Lawyer's Life Afloat and Ashore. By 
Charles Cowley, Esq. 12mo. 



61 

F. F. Ayer, Esq., Lowell. 

Reminiscences of James C. Ayer, of Lowell, and town 
of Aver. 8vo. 
C. R. Morrison, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Proofs of the Resurrection of Christ, from a Lawyer's 
Standpoint. By C. R. Morrison. 12mo. 
Thomas R. Hazzard, Esq., Vancluse, R. I. 

Miscellaneous Essays and Letters. 16mo. 
C. M. Tolman. 

Epitome. 1885. Published by the Sophomore class of 
Lehigh University, Penn. 8vo. 
Mechanics' Institute, Cincinnati. 

Scientific Proceedings, Vol. 2. 1883. 
The International Tract and Missionary Society, Lan- 
caster, Mass. 6 Vols., viz. : — 

Thoughts on the Revelation. 16mo. 
Thoughts on Daniel. 16mo. 
The spirit of Prophecy. 8 Vols. 16mo. 
Life of William Miller. 16mo. 
Board of Education, Cincinnati. 

Fifty-Third Annual Report of the Public Schools of 
Cincinnati. 1882. 8vo. 
Public Library, Fall River, Mass. 

Library Catalogue. 1882. 8vo. 
Public Library, Lawrence, Mass. 

Supplement to Catalogue, 1878-1883. 8vo. 
William Sims, Esq. 

Third Biennial Report of the Kansas State Board of 
Agriculture, for the years 1881, 1882. 8vo. 
Dartmouth College. 

The Dartmouth. Vol. 4. 1882. 8vo. 
Historical Association, Lowell, Mass. 
" Contributions of Old Residents " to the City of Lowell. 
Nos. 3 and 4, completing Vol. 2. Pamphlet. 



62 

Boston Public Library. 

Bulletins Nos. 5,6, and 7, completing Vol. 5. 1883. 
E. M. Bowman, City Clerk, Nashua, N. H. 

Thirtieth Annual Report of the receipts and expendi- 
tures of the City of Nashua for 1882. 12mo. 
Concord, N. H. 

Thirteenth Annual Report of receipts and expendi- 
tures of the City of Concord. 1882. Pamphlet. 
Hon. H. B. Putnam, Mayor, Manchester, N. H. 

Annual Report of the County Commissioners. Pamph. 
Inaugural Address to the City Government, January 
2, 1883. Pamphlet. 
Wm. H. Stinson, Secretary. 

Ninth Annual Report of the New Hampshire State 
Grange, Dec. 19 and 20, 1882. Pamphlet. 
George E. Jenks, Esq., compiler. 

New Hampshire Census Statistics. 1880. Pamphlet. 
GeorCxE W. McGowan, author. 

City of Bridgeton, N. J., its location, attractions, and 
industries. Pamphlet. 
E. J. Ponnell, New York, author. 

Slavery and Protection. A historical review and ap- 
peal to the workshop and farm. Pamphlet. 
Cobden Club, London. 

Financial Reform Almanac for 1883. 8vo. 
The Publishers. 

The Universalist Quarterly for the year 1883. J. B. 
Thayer, editor. 
The Publishers. 

Real Estate Review for the year 1883. Folio. 
Proprietaires. 

Echo des Canadiens for the year 1883. Folio. 
The Publishers. 

The Manchester Guardian for the year 1883. Folio. 



63 

Alfred E. Whitaker, Librarian. 

Annual Reports of the Free Public Library of San 

Francisco, Cal., for the year ending June 30,1881, 

1882, and 1883. Pamphlet. 
Jonathan Tenny, Librarian. 

Report of the Young Men's Association for Mutual 

Improvement, Albany, N. Y. 1882. Pamphlet. 
From the several Librarians or Boards of Trustees. 
Report of the City Library Association of Springfield, 

Mass. 1882-83. Pamphlet. 
Report of the Free Library, Brookline, Mass. 1882. 

Pamphlet. 
Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the Public Library, 

Woburn, Mass. 1882. Pamphlet. 
Twenty-third Annual Report of the Free Library, 

Worcester, Mass. 1882. Pamphlet. 
Annual Report of the Free Library, Newton, Mass. 

1882. Pamphlet. 
Twenty-first Annual Report of the Peabody Institute, 

Peabody, Mass. 1882. Pamphlet. 
Annual Report of the Public Library in Melrose, Mass. 

1882. Pamphlet. 
Ninth Annual Report of the Bigelow Free Library, 

Clinton, Mass. 1882. Pamphlet. 
Thirty-first Annual Report of the Public Library, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 
Seventh and Eighth Annual Reports of the town of 

Abington, Mass., 1881 and 1882, including Library 

Reports and Catalogues. 
Report of the Friends' Free Library, Germantown, 

Penn., and Catalogue. Pamphlets. 
Sixteenth Annual Report of the Peabody Institute, 

Baltimore, Md. 1882-83. Pamphlet. 
Fifth Annual Report of the Public Library, Milwaukee, 

Wis. 1882. Pamphlet. 



64 

Eleventh Annual Report of the Chicago Public Li- 
brary. June, 1883. Pamphlet. 

Thirteenth Annual Report of the Mercantile Library 
Association of San Francisco, Cal. 1882. Pamphlet. 

Fifth Report of the Public Library of Providence, R. I. 
1S82. Pamphlet. 

Twenty-fifth Annual Report of the Brooklyn Library, 
N. Y. March, 1883. 

Thirty-fourth Annual Report of the Astor Library, 
N. Y., for 1882. Pamphlet. 

Sixty-second Annual Report of the Mercantile Library 
Association, N. Y. City. 1882-83. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report of the Public Library, Bridgeport, Conn. 
July, 1883. Pamphlet. 

Eighth Annual Report of the Public Library, and Gal- 
lery of Art Committee, Borough of Swansea, Wales. 
1881-82. Pamphlet. 

Thirtieth and Thirty-first Annual Reports of the Free 
Public Libraries of Manchester, Eng. for the years 
1881-82 and 1882-83. Pamphlet. 

Thirty-Fourth Annual Announcement of the Woman's 
Medical College, Philadelphia. May, 1883. Pamphlet. 

Bulletin No. 10 (new series) of the Library Company, 
Philadelphia. Jan., 1883. 

Annual Report of the Lowell City Library for the year 
1882. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report of the Town of Windham, N. H., in 
eluding Report of the Nesmith Library for 1882. 
Pamphlet. 

Fifteenth Annual Report of the Newmarket Manufac- 
turing Company. Pamphlet. 
Judge N. P. Hunt, Manchester, N. EL 

Six pamphlets, viz. : The Inaugural Addresses of 
Hon. P. C. Cheney, Hon. Frederick Smyth, Hon. 



65 

E. W. Harrington, and Hon. I. W. Smith, the sev- 
eral Mayors of the City of Manchester, N. H. 
Hon. James A. Weston, Manchester, N. H. 

Inaugural Addresses as Mayor of the City, in the years 
1869, 1870, 1871, and 1872. Four pamphlets. 
Hon. C. H. Bartlett, Manchester, N. H. 

Inaugural Address as Mayor of the City, Jan. 6, 1873. 
Pamphlet. 
Henry H. Everett, publisher. 

The Manchester Weekly Times for the year 1882. 
Folio. 
Hon. James F. Briggs. 

Twenty-nine volumes of Congressional Documents, 
viz. : Reports of Heads of Departments, 1882-3. 8vo. 

Eighteen volumes of the Congressional Record, 3d 
Session, 46th Congress, and 1st Session, 47th Con- 
gress. 4to. 

Seven volumes, viz. : War of the Rebellion, Official 
Record of the Union and Confederate Armies. 8vo. 

Three volumes Consular Reports, Nos. 1, 2, and 3, 
1880-81. 8vo. 1 Vol. 

American Ephemeras and Nautical Almanac for the 
year 1886. 4to. 1 Vol. 

The Production of Gold and Silver in the United 
States in 1882. Report of Horatio C. Burchard, 
Director of the Mint. 8vo. 

Report on Forestry, by the Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture, George B. Loring, 1882. 8vo. 

Report of the Smithsonian Institute, 1881. 8vo. 
Smithsonian Institute, Washington. 

Six volumes, viz. : Smithsonian Collections, Nos. 22, 
23, 24,25,26, and 27. 8vo. 
Hon. Horatio C. Burchard, Director. 

5 



66 

Annual Reports of the United States Mint for the years 

1880, 1881, and 1882. 8vo. 
Bureau of Education, Washington. 

Answers to Inquiries about the United States Bureau 

of Education. Its Work and History. 
Illiteracy and its Social, Political, and Industrial Ef- 
fects. By Hon John Eaton, U. S. Commissioner of 

Education. Pamphlet. 
Circulars of Information. Nos. 2, 3, 5, and 6, 1882, 

and 2 and 3, 1883. Pamphlets. 
Interior Department, Washington. 

Compendium of the Tenth Census. June 1, 1880. 2 

Vols. 8vo. 
Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents for 

the year 1882. 8vo. 
Report regarding the Publication and Distribution of 

Public Documents. 
Treasury Department. 

Reports of the Superintendent of the United States 

Coastand Geodetic Survey for the years 1880,1881. 

2 Vols. 4to. 
War Department. 

Annual Reports of the Chief Signal Officer for the 

years 1880, 1881. 2" vols. 8vo. 
Hon. H. B. Hazen, Chief Signal Officer. 

Professional Papers of the Signal Service, No. 2, viz., 

Isothermal Lines of the United States. 1871, 1880. 

4to. Pamphlet. 
United States Congress. 

Forty-three volumes of Executive Documents of past 

Congresses, to fill imperfect sets. 
Thirty-five volumes Public Documents of the 46th and 

47th Congresses. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY ENGINEER. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : — 

Sirs, — I have the pleasure of presenting my third annual 
report of the work done in the City Engineer's office, and 
in the several highway districts of the city of Manchester, 
during the past year. 

The expenses of the office for the year 1883 are as fol- 
lows : — 

For salary of city engineer and as- 
sistants .... 12,257 50 
drawing materials and supplies 81 04 

4 index, 1 record, and 2 bench 

books .... 
repairs of instruments 
horse-hire and car-fare . 
stakes .... 
records of highways copied 
incidental expenses 



Expense on soldiers' monument 
For fifteen new globes . 

gas .... 
water .... 



46 


00 


18 


50 


140 


36 


28 


00 


20 


00 


13 


87 


9 


00 


• __ 




$78 00 


24 


30 


50 


00 



5,614 27 



1152 30 



70 

The increased expense this year is owing in part to an 
increase of the pay of assistants, and in part to being 
obliged to keep them all winter, owing to the press of office 
work ; also the third and seventh items are articles that 
should have been purchased the first year of the existence 
of the office. 

The globes for the soldiers' monument having been all 
broken, I was obliged to purchase a new set, but as there 
was great difficulty in getting them to fit, it taking three 
months to get the first order filled, I thought it best to get 
another, in order to prevent future trouble. 

The amount of work done in the office this year is as 
follows : — 

Total number of orders for surveys, — street lines and 
grades, — 488. 

Total number of orders for paving and sewer, 180. 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 26,036 feet, 
equal to 5 miles. 

These profiles having three lines of levels through each 
street, makes this work equal to 15 miles of levels every 50 
feet or less. 

Levels for sewer profiles, 11,324 feet, equal to 2.14 miles. 

Levels for profiles in Pine Grove Cemetery, 2,101 feet, 
equal to .4 miles. 

Survey of streets and street lines, 143,266.84 feet, equal 
to 27.13 miles. 

Street lines given, 85,979 feet, equal to 16.5 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks 35,666 feet 

Grades set for macadamizing .... 2,093 " 
Grades set for cutting and filling streets . . 3,705 " 
Grades set for Pine Grove Cemetery walks and 

avenues 2,000 " 

Grades set for Valley Cemetery walks and lots 597 " 



71 



Grade set for Park-square grading . 
Grades for walks in various commons 
Grades set for grading Bakersville school lot 
Grades set for grading Webster-street school lot 
Grades set for gutters .... 
Grades set for paving .... 



2,170 feet 

759 
1,000 

300 
4,348 

958 



Total grades set . . . . . 53,596 feet 
Whole number of miles of grades set, 10.15. 

Street numbers assigned, 150. 

Lots laid out in Pine Grove Cemetery, 108. 

Lots laid out in Valley Cemetery, 6. 

Fifty-one of these lots are a relocation of old lots, and 
required twice the labor that it would to lay out new lots ; 
for in each case all the surrounding land had to be sur- 
veyed, in order to be sure that every man had his land. 

There have been several extensive surveys made this 
year, as follows : — 

Nutt road, from Amoskeag Company's soutli line to 
south line of fair grounds, survey and street lines located. 
Wilson Hill, south of Hanover street and east of Wilson 
street. Gravel bank in District No. 7. New cemetery at 
Amoskeag. Land of Mrs. Gilford at Bakersville, by order 
of committee on streets. Pine Grove Cemetery extension; 
this required the location of thirty-nine lines from old 
deeds, nearly all through woods, and, owing to the varia 
tion of needle and careless deeds, some of the lines had" 
to be run two or three times, in order to get every thing 
correct. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

A street, Main to B street. 

Ash street, Myrtle to Gore street. 

Auburn street, Beech to Pine street. 



72 

Bay street, Sagamore to North street. 
Bay street, North to Webster street.- 
Bridge street, Elm to Canal street. 
C street, Boynton road to B street. 
Central street, Elm to Chestnut street. 
Chestnut street, Pearl to Prospect street. 
Chestnut street, Prospect to Brook street. # 
Elm street, Blodget to Salmon street. 
Elm street, Salmon to Webster street. 
Elm street, Lowell to Washington street, east side only. 
Hubbard street, Hanover to Amherst street. 
Maple street, Hanover to Lowell street. 
Maple street, Hanover to Gore street. 
Nashua street, Concord to Bridge street. 
Pine street, Pennacook to Sagamore street. 
Pine street, Sagamore to Webster street. 
Parker street, West to Winter street. 
Prospect street, east of Derry old line. 
Bay street, Webster street to Ray brook. 
Rowell street, Elm street to River road. 
Sagamore street, Elm to Bay street. 
Salmon street, Elm street to Christian brook. 
Thayer street, Elm street to River road. 
Washington street. Elm to Birch street. 
Wayne street, McGregor to Beauport west back street. 
Wilson street, Park to Green street. 
Wilson street, Green street to Concord & Portsmouth 
Railroad. 

Nutt road, Young street to Nutt's pond. Profile only. 
Beauport street, Wayne to Amory street. 
Total plans and profiles, 32. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Salmon street, Elm east back street to Christian brook. 
Parker street, Main street to North Weare Railroad. 



73 

Myrtle street, Russell to Oak street. 

Concord street, Nashua to Maple street. 

Wilson and Laurel south back street, west of Wilson 
street. 

Quincy, Green, and Douglas streets. 

Elm west back street, Bridge to Dean street. 

Maple street, Pearl to Myrtle street. 

Bridge street, Russell to Ashland street. 

Map of 'Squog south of Douglas street, showing all 
sewers. 

Derry and Concord streets, Amherst to Ashland street. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 11. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Auburn street, Beech to Maple street. 

Ash-street extension, between Lowell, Nashua, Concord, 
and Beech streets. 

Hancock street, River road to Concord Railroad. 

Hancock street, proposed extension, River road to Calef 
road. 

Main street, Mast to Milford street, for J. B. Clarke suit. 

Map of west side of river, from Granite to Wayne street, 
copied from Amoskeag Company's plan. 

Map of west side of river, from Wayne street to the 
eddy, copied from Amoskeag Company's plan. 

Massabesic street, Park street to Mammoth road. 

Orange street, Elm to Clark's avenue. Plan and profile 
for suit. 

Orange street, Elm to Clark's avenue. Plan for suit, 
tracing. 

Park square, proposed stone- work. 

Park square, working plans for stone-work. 2 plans. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, new plan of lawn as changed. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, proposed extension. 



74 

Piscataquog-river bridge, truss. 

Streets in square bounded by Webster, Chestnut, Saga- 
more, and Elm streets. 

Union street, stone arch proposed for Cemetery brook. 
Webster, street extension from Union to Maple street. 
Webster-street school lot, location of trees and walks. 
Land of E. A. Straw for Pine Grove extension. 

Wilson Hill — plan of following streets: — 
Hanover, Wilson to Beacon street. 
Manchester, Wilson to Beacon street. 
Merrimack, Wilson to Beacon street. 
Laurel, Wilson to Beacon street. 
Central, Wilson to Beacon street. 
Park, Wilson to Beacon street. 
Wilson, Hanover to Park street. 
Hall, Hanover to Park street. 
Belmont, Hanover to Park street. 
Milton, Hanover to Park street. 
Beacon, Hanover to Park street. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Amory street, McGregor to Beauport street. 

Beauport street, Temple to Amory street. 

Main street, Sullivan to McGregor street. North end. 

Ray street, Webster to Ray brook. 

Wayne street, McGregor to Beauport west back street. 

OLD PLANS COPIED. 

Bakersville, Towlesville, and Hallsville school lots copied 
on one plan. 

Belmont street, Merrimack street to Young road. 

Central street, extension to Hall street, two plans copied 
on one sheet. 

Elm street extension, River road to Baker street. 



75 

Granite street, Main to Quincy street. 

Map of part of Hallsville, between C. &. P. R. R., Mam- 
moth and Young road, and Belmont street. 

Nutt's pond. 

Winter street, Main to 'Squog river, two plans on one 
sheet. 

These were old plans on poor paper, and badly worn, 
making it necessary to copy them in order to preserve 
them. The originals will be kept on file for reference, 
should the copies ever be disputed. 

WORKING PLANS THAT ARE TO BE COPIED. 

Lots in Pine Grove Cemetery. 2 plans. 

Profile of Nctherland avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Profile of Crocus avenue. Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Profile of Columbine avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Profile of part of Chessom avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Profile of part of Linnet avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Profile of part of Woodside avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Plan of Amoskeag new cemetery. 

Elm street, paving, Harrison to Brook street. 

Nutt road, grading. Profile. 

Bakersville school lot, grading. 

WORKING PLANS NOT KEPT IN THE OFFICE. 

Union-street culvert across Cemeterv brook. 
'Squog-bridge truss, tracing. 
Park-square, stone-work, 3 tracings of plans. 
Birch street, location of Kate Tooher accident. 
Elm street, location of Eliza Creighton suit. 2 plans. 
Ash-street extension, outline plan. 
Park square, profiles of walks in and around square. 7 
profiles. 

Elm street, Pennacook to Webster street. Profile. 



76 

Pine street, Auburn to Valley street, for iron fence. 

Winter-street sewer. Profile. 

Valley Cemetery, Joseph E. Bennett's lot. 

Valley Cemetery, C. H. Horr's lot. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 69. 

Total number of plans made, 112. 

During the last winter forty-eight old plans were mounted 
on cloth for their better preservation. Of the plans that 
were not completed January 1, 1882, 118 of them have 
been lettered and completed. But there are still remaining 
75 plans to be lettered, and the figures put on in order to 
make them perfect records. 

There are also in the office field notes of a large number 
of surveys made this year, from which plans will be made 
this winter. In addition to the above work there has been 
an index-book made containing an alphabetical index of all 
levels taken and grades set, so far as the city has records, 
from 1868 to December 31, 1882 ; also another index- 
book containing all transit surveys from 1868 to December 
31, 1882 ; also an alphabetical index of all plans in the 
office ; and a catalogue numerically arranged of all plans ; 
when this is brought to date it will show at a glance the 
number of plans in the office, and the order in which they 
were made. 

The sewer maps in this office, and the sewer-book in the 
city clerk's office, have been brought up to December 31, 
1882. Plans of all highways laid out in 1882 have been 
made in the city clerk's book of records. 

GRADES ESTABLISHED. 

The following grades have been established during the 
year : — 

A street, Main to B street .... 814 feet. 
Ash street, Myrtle to Gore street . . . 980 " 



77 



Auburn street, Beech to Pine street 

Bay street, Sagamore to Webster street . 

Beech street, Orange to Gore street 

Bridge street, Elm to Canal street . 

C street, Boynton road to B street . 

Central street, Elm to Chestnut street . 

Chestnut street, Pearl to Brook street . 

Elm street, east side, Lowell to Washington 
street ....... 

Elm street, Blodget to Webster street 

Gore street, Union to Oak street . 

Hubbard street, Hanover to Amherst street 

Maple street, Hanover to Lowell street . 

Maple street, Harrison to Gore street 

Nashua street, Concord to Bridge street . 

Pine street, Pennacook to Webster street 

Prospect street, east of Derry old line 

Ray street, Webster street to Ray brook . 

Rowell street, Elm street to River road . 

Sagamore street, Elm to Bay street 

Salmon street, Elm street to Christian brook 

Thayer street, Elm street to River road . 

Washington street, Elm to Birch street . 

Wilson street, Park street to Concord & Ports- 
mouth Railroad ..... 

Grades established this year, 4.38 miles. 

NEW HIGHWAYS. 

The following highways have been laid out this year : 
Amory street, McGregor to Beauport street . 50 feet wide. 
Ash street, Lowell to Concord street . . 50 " " 
Beauport street, Amory to Wayne street . 50 " " 
Baker street, River road to Calef road . . 49£ " " 



990 feet 


. 1,527 


u 


. 1,510 


tt 


. 660 


a 


680 


u 


. 570 


a 


. 1,450 


u 


i 

. 185 


a 


. 2.025 


a 


. 1,580 


u 


. 320 


u 


. 945 


tl 


. 700 


t< 


. 1,155 


cc 


. 1,810 


a 


. 443 


a 


. 530 


a 


222 


u 


. 261 


a 


. 770 


a 


. 413 


u 


. 300 


c< 


3- 

. 2,400 


a 


23,140 feet 



78 



Jewett street, Young road to Cilley road . 50 feet wide. 

Main street, McGregor to McGregor street . 50 " " 
Myrtle street, Ashland street to Chester old 

line 50 " " 

Orange street, Russell street to Chester old 

line 50 " " 

Parker street, Parker to Winter street . . 40 " " 

Pine street, Pennacook to Webster street . 50 " " 

Shasta street, Elm street to River road . 50 " " 

Wayne street, McGregor to Beauport street . 50 " " 

Last year in my report I called attention to a few streets 
that had been considered as public, yet have never been 
legally laid out. This year I have made a complete list of 
all streets within the limits of the city proper that have 
never been laid out legally. The following is the list: — 

Ash street, Prospect to Brook street. 

Beech street, Myrtle to Brook street. 

Belmont street, a portion near Park street. No record. 

Brook street, no part of it is public. 

Cross street, no part of it. 

Douglas street, very uncertain, description not identified. 

Fourth street, School to Walker street. 

Gore street, Oak to Russell street. 

Hall street, Hanover to Park street. 

Lincoln street, Park to Spruce street. 

Maple street, Harrison to Brook street. 

Massabesic street, Park street to Amoskeag Co.'s line. 

Oak street, Harrison to Gore street. 

River street, no part of it. 

Russell street, Myrtle to Harrison street. 

Second street, Granite to Ferry street. 

Taylor street, Massabesic street to the angle. 

Patten street, School to Ferry street. 



79 

Union street, Park street, south. 

Valley street, Elm to Pine street. 

Walnut street, Prospect to Harrison street. 

Wilson street, Laurel to Hanover street. 

Winter street, about 400 feet at the west end. 

Of these streets, it will be seen that a large portion of 
them are short strips lying between two parts of the same 
street that have been legally laid out. Some action should 
be taken in regard to these streets, in order that they may 
go on record, and the street line and grades established. It 
is true that most of them will become public in a few years 
by occupation, but in this case the street lines will be fixed 
by the existing fences. On many of the streets the fences 
are very irregular, and in many cases the abutters have 
fenced in a part of what was originally intended for the 
street. If the city at any time desires to straighten the lines 
and make the streets of proper width, they can only do so 
by paying the abutters damages for land taken ; whereas, if 
the streets are made public before abutters have acquired a 
right by undisturbed possession of the inclosed lands, the 
city will save this expense. 

STREET NAMES CHANGED. 

Cross street, to Nashua street. 
Center street, to School street. 
Second street, to Shirley street. 
Third street, to Patten street. 

NEW HIGHWAYS BUILT. 

Auburn street, Union to Beech, turnpiked not graded. 
Beech street, Brook to Gore, partly built. 
Gore street, partly built. 

Hanover street, east of Wilson Hill, widened fifteen feet. 
Parker street, commenced last year, completed this. 
Pine street, Pennacook to Webster, commenced and cul- 
vert built. 



80 



Proctor road, Hanover street to C. & P. R. R., turnpiked. 

Maple street, Brook to Gore street, graded. 

Walnut street, Brook to Gore street, graded. 

Nutt road, from Portsmouth Railroad to south end of 
fair grounds, hills cut down, and street widened from fif- 
teen to thirty feet. In order to make the fill at the C. & 
P. R. R., Shasta street was cut down and built ready for 
graveling, from Union to Beech street. 

Rowell street, Elm street to River road. 

SEWERS BUILT. 



Location. 



Size in 
inches. 



Length 
in feet. 



Bridge, West 

McGregor 

Main (P.) 

Nutt road 

Shasta 

Wayne (P.) 

Chestnut west back. 

Concord 

Concord 

Concord north back. 

Derry 

Elm east back 

Elm east back 

Gore 

Harrison 

Main (P.) 

Main (P.) 

Mast (P.) 

Park south back. 
Spruce south back . . . 
W r ayne 



Beech 

Beech east back 

Birch 

Bridge 

City Hall 

Dover(P.) 

Lowell 

Manchester south back. 

Maple 

Mast (P.) 

Mast (P.) 

Myrtle 

River (P.) 

Russell 

Spruce south back 

Union 

Walnut east back 

Winter (P.) 

Mast (P.) 



McGregor bridge to McGregor st. 

Bridge to Wayne street 

Schuyler to Putnam street 

Near Fair Ground 

Near River road 

McGregor to Main street 

Park south back to Spruce street 

Derry to Ashland street 

Olive to Maple, re-l'd in p. 10 in. 

Pine to Union street, re-laid 

Amherst to Concord 

South of Webster 

Cedar to Park south back 

Union east back to Beech 

Walnut e. b'k to Beech do. re Id 

Wayne to Putnam 

Wayne to Amory 

Near Baldwin's shop 

Elm e. back to Chestnut w. back 

East of Maple 

Main to Beauport 

At Webster's Spring 

North of Harrison 

North of Harrison 

Washington to Bridge 

Russell to Hall 



Granite to Douglas 

Jane to Wilson road 

At Lincoln 

Pearl, northerly 

Across Goffstown road . 
At George Wilkins's. . 
Russell to Oak 

Near Ferry, re-laid 

Pearl to Myrtle 

East of Maple 

Concord, northerly. . . . 

Gore to Brook 

Main to street 

At Mr. Martin's house. 



Akron. 



15 


309 


15 


704 


15 


862 


15 


100 


15 


50 


15 


268 


12 


150 


12 


473 


12 


396 


12 


222 


12 


441 


12 


430 


12 


413 


12 


400 


12 


230 


12 


480 


12 


554 


12 


64 


12 


350 


12 


396 


12 


415 


12 


40 


10 


150 


10 


180 


10 


120 


10 


1,355 


10 


50 


10 


310 


10 


200 


10 


90 


10 


133 


10 


40 


10 


25 


10 


345 


10 


100 


10 


630 


10 


271 


10 


50 


10 


293 


10 


1,277 


4 


75 



13,432 



81 



Total 15-inch Akron pipe .... 2,293 feet. 

Total 12-inch Akron pipe .... 5,445 " 

Total 10-inch Akron pipe .... 5,619 " 
Total 4-inch Akron pipe .... 75 " 

Total length of sewers for year, 13,432 feet = 2.54 miles. 

Number of catch-basins built, 74. 

Number of manholes built, 16. 

SEWERS ORDERED BUT NOT BUILT. 



Streets. 


Location. 


Material. 


Size in Length 
inches, r in feet. 


Pearl 




Akron. 


10 
10 
10 


250 






425 




Walker street to X. W. R. R. . . 


250 




925 



It is unnecessary for me to repeat what I have already 
said in regard to the sewerage of this city. I can only say, 
that, so far as the system itself is concerned, there has been 
no improvement or change. Any one desiring to look fur- 
ther into the matter is referred to my reports for 1881 
and 1882. But it is my desire to call your attention to a 
few facts that have come to my knowledge the past year to 
show once more the necessity of putting our sewerage into 
competent hands. On Douglas street there is a twelve-inch 
Akron sewer flowing east, and a ten-inch Akron sewer flow- 
ing west ; these unite at West street, and empty into a fif- 
teen-inch Akron pipe. This fifteen-inch pipe goes through 
West street to the south line of Granite street, where it 
forms a junction with a nine-inch cement pipe from north 
of Douglas street. These two then empty into a twelve-inch 
pipe, and at Clinton street the twelve-inch pipe empties into 
a nine-inch pipe ; i. e., the nine-inch pipe is the outlet for 
the fifteen-inch and nine-inch pipes united. In this case, 

6 



82 

owing to the great difference in grade, the nine-inch pipe 
will carry all that the twelve-inch will take into it. At the 
same time, a ten-inch pipe put in place of the nine-inch and 
fifteen-inch will more than fill the twelve-inch into which 
they empty. Had this work been in the hands of a compe- 
tent superintendent, a mixture of this kind would never 
have been made. 

During the past year the city has been unfortunate in its 
sewer construction, having had a large amount of ledge to 
deal with. This is the main cause of the shrinkage in the 
number of feet laid this year compared with last. On 
Bridge street, west side of river, there were about one hun- 
dred feet in length by six feet average depth of ledge ; on 
McGregor street there were about one hundred and fifty feet, 
with an average depth of four feet ; greatest ledge cutting 
in any one place, twelve feet. This was an unusually hard 
and expensive piece of work. The stone was uncommonly 
rough to work, being of an irregular, curly strata, without 
face or seam, and at the same time confined in a narrow 
trench. In the construction of this McGregor-street sewer 
a great mistake was made, which will in a few years make 
bad work. On account of the ledge the grade of the sewer 
was raised two and a half feet, contrary to the orders of the 
committee and directions of the engineer. This raising 
made it necessary to flatten the grade very much, in order 
to be low enough to drain cellars that must be connected 
with it This flattening will materially diminish the rapid- 
ity with which the sewer will discharge its contents. The 
branch sewers that are to be connected with this one will 
be one fifteen-inch and two ten-inch, and will have a grade 
of six feet per hundred. In our heavy showers these will 
fill the main sewer, which has a grade of only six-tenths of 
a foot in one hundred feet, much more rapidly than it can 
empty itself through the proper outlets, and the result will 



83 

be that the sewage will set back through all the connections 
made, flooding cellars and overflowing the streets through 
the catch-basins. 

In company with the committee on sewers I paid a visit 
to Lowell this summer. I was told that it used to be the 
custom there to dodge around every way to avoid a little 
expense : if a boulder was met they would turn around it ; 
if a ledge, the grade would be raised, just the same as has 
always been done here. In consequence of these irregu- 
larities the sewers were defective, and caused a great deal 
of labor and expense to keep them clear, so that in the end 
these cheap ways cost double what it would have cost to do 
the work right in the first place. You will admit that we 
have had a very similar experience. A few years ago they 
formed a resolution in Lowell that they would stop this 
boys' play, and do things as they should be ; and now, no 
matter what obstructions are met, they are all removed, 
and the line and grade kept straight and uniform. They 
have also made a rule not to allow any pipe laid on a grade 
less than one foot per hundred. It would be economy if 
Manchester would adopt similar resolutions. 

CATCH-BASINS. 

Nothing has been done this year to improve the old 
catch-basins. Superintendent Patten introduced a grate in 
place of the wooden covers formerly used where the basin 
entrance was through the curb ; this combines the grate 
and curb entrance, and works well. The curbs used the 
first of the season were not cut with large enough entrance ; 
the last lot was better. 

In Lowell, all catch-basins are very carefully made, the 
walls being eight inches thick, and all spaces thoroughly 
filled ; the inside face is then coated with cement, and 
great pains taken to make it thoroughly smooth, so as not 



84 

to furnish any place of deposit for decaying vegetable mat- 
ter. As I have said in previous reports, greater care should 
be taken to preserve a perfect water seal for the catch-ba- 
sins in a dry time by filling them occasionally from the 
hydrants. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

A tract of land containing four and three-fourths acres 
has been purchased of F. D. Hanscom for an addition to 
the Amoskeag Cemetery. This tract of land, being cleared 
and lying nearly level, will only require the expense of 
turnpiking and graveling the avenues to make very hand- 
some grounds, if proper care is taken of them afterwards. 
Heretofore the Amoskeag Cemetery has been free, so that 
there has been no committee or superintendent to look 
after it, although Mr. Newhall has acted as superintendent, 
and looked after the grounds free of expense to the city. 
Since the new grounds have been purchased it will be neces- 
sary to hire a superintendent to look after them, and a 
committee appointed to have the general management of 
them ; also a treasurer to receive the money and make out 
the deeds. On account of the non-existence of any of these 
offices, I have not staked out any lots on the new grounds, 
although they were repeatedly called for early in the sea- 
son. A plan has been prepared, showing the proposed ave- 
nues, and a section laid out into one hundred and two lots 
of various sizes, varying from ten to twenty feet square. 
This comprises about one-fourth of the area of the new 
purchase. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

As the general work will be fully reported by the com- 
mittee in charge, I will only speak of the work that has 
been under my direction by the order of the committee. 
One hundred and eight lots have been laid out this year, 



85 

and the areas of one hundred and fifty-five lots computed, 
part in the lawn, part south of Netherland avenue between 
Highland and Linnet avenues. This section has been very 
nicely graded, graveled, and loamed by the superintendent. 
This will also be kept in lawn form subject to the same re- 
strictions as the other, omitting the perpetual care fund, 
unless parties especially desire it. As it is now, it makes 
one of the finest tracts in the cemetery. The section at 
the southeast corner of Chessom and Highland avenues, 
which has been an unsightly and ever dangerous place, has 
been filled up, requiring about seven hundred and fifty cubic 
yards of earth ; at the same time Highland avenue has 
been filled in its lowest part, and Chessom avenue cut down 
at its highest part, thereby making it very much less dan- 
gerous driving around -the corner. The lots of Mrs. Rich- 
ardson and Mr. Peter Farmer were at the same time graded 
down to conform with the change ; in fact, the change of 
the grade of this section was made mainly at Mr. Farmer's 
request. The superintendent has also set one hundred and 
eighty stone bounds on the lawn, and fifty bricks for num- 
bers for lots lately laid out, and graveled 1,810 feet of ave- 
nues. I am under standing orders from the committee to 
give the lines and grades of all paths and avenues where 
owners contemplate improvements, and to do what I can to 
straighten out existing irregularities and make the grounds 
more presentable. I have done what I could, and have suc- 
ceeded very well in some places ; but the work will not be 
a success so long as the committee permit any man who 
can get a contract to set curbing to do just as he sees fit 
without consulting any one. Parties buy an irregular 
shaped lot, and, desiring to put in curbing, they look at 
their lot and find that it is not square. Those who insist 
upon curbing at the present time are also so far behind the 
times that they think that every angle of the stone-work 



86 

must be a right angle. Many of them will say, " Exchange 
is no robbery ; I will take a foot of that path, and give the 
city a foot at this corner of the avenue." Others will not 
take any from the paths or avenues, but will throw oft 
twelve or eighteen inches at one corner. Now the result 
is, in walking through a three-feet path you will all at once 
fall over a stone post setting ten or twelve inches into the 
path ; or, looking along the line ot an avenue, it will look 
very much like the serrated edge of a splitting-saw. Other 
persons having a square lot will, for the sake of cheapness, 
employ unskilled workmen, who go to the lot, pull up the 
bounds and set the stone where they wish, always manag- 
ing to get a part of one or more paths. 

These are not imaginary sketches; everyone of them 
has occurred in Pine Grove Cemetery this year. I con- 
sider the paths and avenues in the cemetery as much public 
property as any other highway, and should be as carefully 
preserved. I may give lines, the superintendent may or- 
der the work to conform to the lines, but we are both pow- 
erless unless backed by the committee. If the committee 
would issue notices that all persons putting'curbing around 
their lots should conform to the lines of paths and avenues, 
and requiring all stone-cutters to set the curb upon the lines 
and nowhere else, then post the notices in the cemetery 
and in all stone-sheds where such work is done, and ask 
the stone-cutters to call the attention of such of their 
customers as wanted such work done, I think all such 
difficulties would soon be overcome, and the lot owners 
easily convinced of the greater beauty of the grounds and 
consequent increased value of their lots. I wish to say 
here that stone-curbing is obselete. In other places there is 
more taken out throughout every year now than is put in. 

In accordance with ihe order to purchase an addition to 
the cemetery on the north side, I was instructed to make a 



87 

survey of the lands of William S. Locke, E. C. Howlett, 
heirs of E. A. Straw, heirs of Benjamin Mitchell, and Wa- 
terman Smith, as far north as the proposed Mitchell street. 
This work has been done with the following result : — 

Land of W. S. Locke, 6 acres, 100 rods, and 123 \ square 
feet ; heirs of Benjamin Mitchell, one piece of 2 acres, 104 
rods, 76^ square feet ; second piece, 46 rods, 85 square feet ; 
third, 6 acres, 106 rods, 211^ square feet ; E. C. Howlett, 
10 acres, 6 rods, 149 square feet ; heirs of E. A. Straw, 14 
acres, 10 rods, 52 square feet; Waterman Smith, south of 
Mitchell street, 2 acres, 14 rods, 90 feet, — making a total 
area south of Mitchell street of 44 acres, 74 rods, 192i feet. 

The area of the proposed Mitchell street through land of 
Waterman Smith, 1 acre, 14 rods, 35 feet; land of Mitchell 
heirs, 134 rods, 112 feet ; total area of Mitchell street, 1 
acre, 148 rods, 147 feet. 

Amount of Waterman Smith's land north of Mitchell 
street, 2 acres, 152 rods, 231 feet. 

Total area surveyed, 47 acres, 50 rods, 76 feet. 

This survey required the careful location of thirty-nine 
lines from old and imperfect deeds, and mostly through 
woods and underbrush. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

On the Pine-street side, a retaining-wall has been built 
from Auburn street 237 feet south ; also an iron fence 342 
feet in length, and the sidewalk graded. On Valley street 
an iron fence has been built the entire width of the lot, 060 
feet, the brush cut, old wooden fence removed, the side- 
walk in the street cut down, and the lots in the cemetery 
terraced and turfed. The avenue running parallel to Valley 
street has been cut down on the summit eighteen inches, 
and the lots graded down accordingly. 



STREETS AND STREET LINES. 

In my report for 1881, I made a statement in regard to 
the encroachments upon the streets and the difficulty of 
finding the street lines. My attention has been particularly 
called to this matter this year. That portion of the city 
lying between Wilson and Beacon streets from Hanover to 
Park street is a place where it has been impossible to give 
street lines from any record of streets or plans of lots in 
existence. A complete survey and plan have been made, 
and the street lines fixed thereon ,to fit the ground, to the 
best of my ability. Whenever I could bring the street with- 
in the ground now occupied by conforming strictly to plans 
and deeds, I have done so ; but in a large part of the dis- 
trict I have had to disregard all existing plans, in order to 
bring the streets upon the present reservations. For exam- 
ple, take the section between Merrimack and Laurel streets : 
The distance between these streets from Wilson to Hall 
street is five feet too great ; and from Hall to Beacon street 
ten feet greater than is calledfor by either deeds or plans 
of lots. Between Milton and Beacon streets on south side 
of Laurel street, the plans call for 258 feet, the deeds for 
255 feet, there are actually inclosed 267 fee<\ The street 
lines, as I have fixed them, are 260 feet apart. Park street 
west of old Falls road through the Amoskeag Company's 
land is fifty feet wide, east of said road forty feet wide ; but 
the two parts of the street do not come together. In the 
north line there is an offset to the north of fifteen feet ; in 
the south line there is an offset to the north of twenty-five 
feet. This survey has been under way three years, being 
taken up whenever there was a half-day's leisure in the 
current work. All that is now needed is for the board of. 
aldermen to accept the work. 

On Merrimack street between Pine and Union streets, 



89 



south side, opposite the Second Baptist church, I had occa- 
sion to fix the street line, and found the fences two and a 
half feet into the street. On other streets I found buildings 
in the streets. On one where a suit is pending in regard 
to a street line, there are two lines that have been used by 
different surveyors, being only two inches apart, but the 
two inches will win or lose the case. I am getting these 
lines into shape as fast as possible ; but being obliged to do 
it as part of the current work, and being scattered here and 
there wherever parties happen to want a line, it is not only 
slow work but very unsatisfactory, there being no connec- 
tion between the surveys. It would be economy if the city 
would make an appropriation sufficient to put a party of 
three into the field and make an accurate survey of all the 
older portion of the city, and have the lines determined in 
the same manner as has been done on Wilson Hill. It 
would be economy in this way: At present it takes from 
half a day to a week to fiud the street line for parties about 
to build ; if the lines were all fixed on plans, the same 
work could have been done in an hour or so, and conse- 
quentljr the current work of the office could be done with 
less help. 

BRIDGES. 

McGregor bridge and its approaches have been concreted, 
requiring 2,656.7 square yards. The bridge across the 
'Squog river, Main street, has been thoroughly over- 
hauled, the trusses straightened into position, the necessary 
repairs made, and a new truss placed under the center of 
the bridge, making it now perfectly safe. It has also been 
concreted, requiring 159 yards. The bridge on Wilson 
street has also been raised five feet. The east abutment 
of the bridge across Black brook, near the Goffstown line, 
having begun to fall in, it was deemed advisable to rebuild 



90 

it. This work has been done, and the bridge put in a good 
condition. 

LANDS AND BUILDINGS. 

I have done but little in this department this year, the 
new school-house buildings having been in other hands. 
All that I have looked after is the embankment wall around 
the Park-street hose-house, the grading of the Bakersville 
school lot, the partial grading of the Webster-street school 
lot, the survey of one acre of land purchased of George Por- 
ter for a gravel bank in District No. 7, and the repairs 
made in the city engineer's office. The office has been en- 
larged by the removal of two partitions, and other repairs 
made, thereby giving us more working space and much bet- 
ter light ; and my thanks are due to this committee for the 
very generous manner in which my requests were granted. 

MACADAMIZING. 

The macadamizing this year has been the same as usual, 
trying to cover too much ground with the money. This 
method of doing the work will in a few years prove an ex- 
pensive economy ; but no improvement can be made with- 
out the expenditure of a little money to buy a screen for 
the crusher, and for heavier rollers. The screen is neces- 
sary in order to separate the stone into different sizes ; then 
by spreading these different sizes in layers, largest at the 
bottom and fine on top, and giving the whole a thorough 
rolling with a fifteen-ton steam-roller, the result will be 
a much smoother, harder surface,- and one that will wear 
four times as long as any that has been laid here yet. A 
comparison of streets built where a screen and steam-roller 
arc used would very soon convince you of the advisability of 
a change. I had an opportunity to purchase a steam-roller 
this summer that had been used only three weeks, and was 



91 

as good as new, at a saving of $1,200. This chance may 
still be open, and I hope the city government will consider 
the matter. This steam-roller will answer for several pur- 
poses. It has an attachment by which it can be used as 
an engine to run the crusher. The engine the city now 
uses never was large enough ; was second hand when pur- 
chased, and is nearly worn out, costing a large amount each 
year to keep it in repair. The roller would take its place. 
There is also an attachment of picks to put upon the wheels 
of the roller, that by running it over the streets that need 
picking and repairing will do the work of twenty men on an 
earth road, or of forty men on streets that have been cov- 
ered with broken stone. The streets where this material 
was first used are beginning to be badly worn, and soon 
must be built over. This machine is the only one that can 
do it as it should be done. 

PAVING. 

There has been an improvement in the manner of laying 
the pavement this year, as much greater care has been 
taken in assorting the stone, and making each course of uni- 
form thickness ; also in using a finer gravel for covering, 
making the filling between courses more solid. The square 
at the junction of Elm and Langdon streets, by the request 
of the mayor, was filled with a concrete of tar, pitch, and 
sand between the courses. The result of the experiment of 
course cannot be told at present. In many cities, and par- 
ticularly in Cleveland, it is the custom to use asphaltum. 
This is, without doubt, the best packing where the pave- 
ments can remain undisturbed ; but in a city like this, 
where the streets are continually being torn up for gas, 
water, and sewer connections and repairs, the difficulty in 
raising the pavements and getting them into place again, 
together with the additional cost, will more than counter- 
balance the advantage derived. 



92 



SIDEWALKS. 

A good work has been accomplished through the efforts 
of the mayor in getting some of the uneven sidewalks on 
Elm street relaid. Still more can be done if he will turn 
his attention to side streets, and cause some of the many 
encroachments in the shape of fences, steps, areas, and 
railings to be removed. 

WEATHER RECORD. 

In December, 1882, at the request of the mayor, a 
weather record-book was commenced. Thermometer read- 
ings, direction of the wind, and state of the weather have 
been taken three times a day and recorded. As there were 
no barometer readings, and the work is designed especially 
for the use of the city government in certain cases, I will 
not make any report. 

The work in the various highway districts during the 
year is as follows : — 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Orison Webber, Surveyor (6 months). 

Turnpiked, 12 rods. 

Graveled, 20 rods. 

One water-bar at Mr. Chad wick's. 

Rowell street, partly built. 

General repairs where needed. 

C. E. Quimby, Surveyor (6 months). 

General repairs. 
Rowell street, completed. 

92 feet, 2' X 2' stone culvert. 18 feet of 6" Akron cul- 
vert. 



93 



DISTRICT NO. 2. 

James Patten, Superintendent. 

block paving. 

Manchester street, west of Chestnut . 
Elm street, from Harrison to Langdon, full 

width, and Langdon to Sagamore, 3 feet 

each side of horse railroad track . 
Washington street, Elm to Church . 

Total block paving .... 

Manchester-street paving was commenced in the fall of 
1882, and completed early this spring. 

Elm-street paving was done by the city from Harrison to 
Brook street, and from Brook street to Sagamore the stone 
was furnished by the city, and the work by the Horse-Rail- 
road Company. 



322.0 


sq 


yds 


1,522.3 




u 


282.0 


sq 


u 


2,126.3 


yds 



COBBLE PAVING. 

Auburn street, Franklin to Canal 
Auburn street, Elm to Canal, gutter . 
Bridge street, Elm to Canal, gutter . 
Central street, Elm to Chestnut, gutters 
Central street, Chestnut to Union 
Chestnut street, Pearl to Prospect . 
Elm street, Harrison to Langdon 
Manchester street, Maple to Lincoln 
West Webster street, at Nathan Parker's 



92,2.0 sq. yds. 

101.0 

295.0 

507 

297.0 

661.0 

337.4 

273.6 

139.0 



Total cobble paving 



3,533.0 sq. yds. 



94 



MACADAMIZING. 



Chestnut street, Pearl to Prospect street 
Central street, Elm to Chestnut street 
Bridge street, Elm to Canal street . 

Total macadamizing 

STREETS GRAVELED. 

Amherst street, Union to Belmont street 
Beech street, Hanover to Auburn street 
Birch street, Bridge to Lowell street 
Cedar street, Pine to Union street . 
Central street, Franklin to Canal street 
Central street, Chestnut to Union street 
Chestnut street, Harrison to Pennacook 
Maple street, Arlington to Myrtle street 
Maple street, Bridge to Lowell street 
Myrtle street, Maple to Russell street 
Nashua street, Bridge to Lowell street 
Oak street, Harrison to Pearl street 
Pearl street, Elm to Union street . 
Pennacook street, Chestnut to Pine street 
Pine street, Auburn to Young street 
Salmon street, Elm street to River road 
Spruce street, Pine to Union street 
Union street, Brook street to Hooksett road 
Wilson street, south of Park street . 



GRADED AND GRAVELED. 

Concord street, Derry to Ashland street . 
Wilson road, Concord to Lowell street . 
Webster street, Elm to Union street 



2,647.6 sq. yds. 
1,773.3 " 
2,493.3 " 



street 



6,914.2 sq. yds. 



3,221 feet. 

2,096 " 

428 - 

450 " 

835 " 

810 " 

875 » 

671 " 

700 " 

750 " 

783 " 

1,071 " 

1,423 « 

312 " 

1,855 " 

745 " 

450 « 

1,530 " 

1,500 » 



20,505 feet. 

362 feet. 
300 ' k 
776 " 



95 



GRADED AND NOT GRAVELED. 



200 feet. 


300 


a 


1,600 


a 



Hanover street, east of Wilson Hill 

Wilson street, south of Park street 

Smyth road ....... 

24,043 feet. 
Equal to 4.56 miles. 

Concord street from Wilson road to Ashland street re- 
quired about 450 cubic yards of filling. Hanover street 
east of Wilson Hill required 200 feet of retaining-wall, 50 
feet of culvert, and 900 cubic yards of filling. Wilson street 
south of Park, the bridge was raised and a filling of 260 
cubic yards made. The grading of the northern extension 
of Pine street has been commenced, and a culvert contain- 
ing 275 perches of stone built. 

A culvert across Union street at Cemetery brook, con- 
taining 329 perche8,was built by Warren Harvey, contrac- 
tor. Sidewalks have been graded in all places where con- 
crete pavement has been laid. 



CROSSINGS. 






Stone, 4. Concrete, new, 35. Top-dressed, 23. 


CONCRETE. 




Crossings, new 


. 1,220.08 sq. i 


Crossings, top-dressed . 






709.50 


Sidewalks repaired 






463.33 


Battery building . 






74.56 


Massabesic hose-house . 






126.80 


Blodget-street school yard 






189.51 


Concord square . 






. 279.40 


Park-street hose-house . 






. 151.57 


Merrimack square, new 






. 565.50 


Merrimack square, top-dresst 


id 




. 149.00 



yds. 



96 



McGregor bridge 4,098.00 sq. yds. 

Vine-street engine-house . . . 96.60 " 
Webster-street school-yard . . . 267.30 " 



Total concrete .... 8,391.15 sq. yds. 
Curb-stone set, 3,800 feet. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Akron pipe, 12 inch ..... 3,901 feet. 
Akron pipe, 10 inch ..... 3,522 " 



7,423 feet. 



Equal to 1.5 miles. 

Eight-inch pipe used for catch-basin arms, not counted. 

Catch-basins, 44. Manholes, 7. (See sewers.) 

In addition to the street work of the district, Park square 
has been about two-thirds graded, but was not completed 
on account of the ground freezing up ; and 500 cubic yards 
of sediment were taken out of Hanover pond. 

DISTRICT No. 3. 

Edwin N. Baker, Surveyor. 

The River road at Baker brook was widened 18 feet by 
filling the old drive through the brook and building a stone 
culvert, 2x2 opening, 18 feet long, and a sidewalk of 600 
yards ; also widened opposite E. L. Kennedy's land by fill- 
ing an old ditch. Elm street graded from Shasta street to 
railroad bridge, and all culverts lengthened. Baker street 
widened and straightened from River road to Calef road, 
and all fences set back to new line. The River road at 
the south end of the district straightened by cutting away 
a hill. All culverts properly cleaned and repaired. Shasta 
street, Elm street to River road, partly graded ; the street 
fenced both sides ; 50 feet of 15-inch Akron pipe culvert 
built. 



97 

Bakersville school lot graded, covered with clay, and 400 
loads of loam taken from Shasta street put on, and the lot 
sown with grass seed. 

All general repairs carefully attended to. 

Nutt road widened, graded and graveled. This last work 
was done by contract. 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

R. N. Whittemore, Surveyor. 

Graveled, 125 rods. 

Road-bed, from the Webster place south three-fourths of 
a mile, widened, requiring in some places a fill of 12 feet in 
depth and 15 feet in width, and using 1,500 cubic yards 
of earth. A wooden rail built the entire length. One stone 
watering- trough at Webster's spring, requiring 40 feet of 12- 
inch Akron pipe. Culvert bridge at Cheney brook, abut- 
ments relaid and bridge planked. The hill at Mr. Fox's 
cut down two feet. Road widened and straightened the 
length of Whittemore's farm. 

The hill at Little Cohas brook graded down four feet, 
and road-bed widened from 12 feet to 80 feet. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 

W. W. Dickey, Surveyor. 

Graveled, 198 rods. 
Turnpiked, 108 rods. 
Culverts, 2. 
Bridges replanked, 2. 

Brushes cut along sides of road, 6 miles. Roads kept 
free from cobbles, and general repairs made where needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 
Daniel H. Dickey, Surveyor. 
No report. 



98 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 
Chables Francis, Surveyor. 

Graded and graveled, 152 rods. 

1 stone culvert, 2' X 1' X 82'. 

1 stone culvert, 2' X 1.5' X 54 feet. 

Drains taken up and cleaned, 80 feet. 

Gutter and sidewalks, 30 rods. 

Massabesic-street fences put on street line from Belmont 
street to C. & P. R. R., 35 rods. 

Brush cut. cobbles removed, and general repairs made 
where needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Eugene F. Wilson, Surveyor. 

graded. 

Hanover and Park street extension, east from junction. 

Two short streets east and west of Robert Stevens's. 

New street built by L. Proctor, southeast of Hanover. 

The hill at school-house in Youngsville. 

The hill at Charles Brown's place. 

The hill by E. F. Wilson's. 

A part of Bridge street. 

Five culverts rebuilt. One-fourth mile bushes cut. * 

General repairs where needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Jabez J. Garmon, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked, 3-1 of a mile. 

Graveled, 1 mile. 

Bushes cut, 3 miles. 

Culvert on Blodgett road, 16"x20", extended 10 feet. 

Culvert on Old Derry road, l'x 1', extended 12 feet. 



99 



Grading, about 20 cubic yards. 

General repairs. 

Mr. Garmon reports that most of the highways are too 
narrow, and suggests that more money is needed t» make 
them of proper width. 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 

William N. Chamberlain, Superintendent. 

paving. 

Cobble each side H. R. R. from Mast to Milford 

406.7 sq. yds. 



street . 
Cobble gutters 



1,253.9 



Total cobble 



CONCRETE. 



One crossing, new 
Three crossings, top-dressed 
Hose-house walk, top-dressed 
'Squog-river bridge 



Total concrete 



GRADING. 



Beawport street 

Main-street walks 

Milford street widening 

Goffstown road 

Wilkin street 

School and Shirley streets 

Total grading . . 2,877.5 cu. yds. 

The above does not include Parker street, which has been 
graded, and graveled from Main street to Parker avenue, 
retaining-walls and sidewalks built, and gutters put in. 



1,660.6 sq. ; 


yds. 


40.0 sq.; 


yds 


. 68.3 " 




. 57.6 " 




. 253.3 " 




. 419.2 sq. 


yds 


. 60.0 cu. 


yds 


. 90.0 




. 100.0 




1,000.0 




1,000.0 




. 627.5 





100 



This piece of work has been finished in the most thorough 
and workmanlike manner of any new street that has been 
built for several years. 
Curb-stone set, 64 feet. 



RETAINING-WALLS. 



Parker street 
Main street 
Mast street 

Total 



FENCING. 



Iron railing, Parker street 
Iron railing, Main street . 
Iron railing, Milford street 
Wood railing, Milford street 
Wood railing, Mast street 
Wood railing, Putnam street 
Wood railing, River road 

Total fencing 



8EWER8. 



31.0 perches. 
6.2 " 
30.0 



67.2 perches. 



144 feet. 
67 
6 
150 

80 

75 

100 



622 f«et. 



Akron, 15 inch . 
Akron, 12 inch . 
Akron, 10 inch . 
Akron, 4 inch . 



Total sewers 5,819 feet. 

Eight-inch pipe used for catch-basin arms, not counted. 
Catch-basins built, 30. 



2,143 


feet 


1,504 


a 


2,097 


a 


75 


a 



Manholos built, 10. 



101 

DISTRICT NO. 11. 
James E. Bailey, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked, 1 1-2 miles. 

Macadamized, 3,276 square yards. 

Graveled, 2,978 square yards. 

Black-brook bridge abutment, 53 3-4 perches. 

Farmer bridge re-planked, 44'xl6'. 

General repairs attended to. 

One stone culvert, 48'x2'x2'. 

Eight water-bars built of broken stone. 

The macadam, so called, of this district is simply a cov- 
ering of stone chips placed in the roadway instead of gravel, 
the road-bed not being prepared in any way, nor the sur- 
face rolled except by the usual traffic. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Jeremiah Garvin, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked, Hooksett road . ... 1 1-4 miles. 

Graveled 1-2 " 

Bushes cut 2 " 

General repairs. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 

John S. Campbell, Surveyor. 
No report. 

I hope before many years to see all these highway dis- 
tricts done away with, and the whole city under one super- 
intendent, who shall be governed by the city government, 
committee, or commissioners appointed for this purpose. I 
believe that the work can be done better and more economi- 
cally in this than in any other way. For the one superin- 
tendent will naturally have his men divided into gangs each 



102 

of which will be familiar with a certain class of work ; for 
instance, one gang will be pavers, one sewer-layers, one 
graders, one gravelers, etc. Each gang can be sent to any 
part of the city where their special work is needed, and can 
do it better and more quickly than green men can. 
Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT 



Joint Standing Committee on Claims. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : — 

Owing to the severe and protracted illness of Capt. 
William R. Patten, city solicitor for the past year, very 
little has been done in the matter of the trial of suits 
against the city. 

The following actions are now pending in the supreme 
court for the county of Hillsborough, the greater part of 
which will be disposed of at the March term, 1884, of said 
court : — 

Simon Clark, Admr., vs. City of Manchester. 

William Clark, aged three years and nine months, on 
the 27th of September, 1879, fell into the reservoir on 
Douglas street and was drowned, and this suit was brought 
by Simon Clark, Admr., to recover damages. 

Sarah Davis vs. City of Manchester. 

This action was tried at the January term, 1882, of the 
supreme court, and a verdict for $2,000 was returned in 
favor of the plaintiff. 

Exceptions were taken by the defendant's counsel, and 
the case was reserved. At the December law term, 1882, 
the verdict was set aside, and a new trial will undoubtedly 



106 

be had at the next March term. Able counsel have been 
retained by the city and new evidence discovered, and the 
defendants go to trial confidently expecting a favorable 
verdict. 

Adeline Geoffrey vs. City of Manchester. 

This is a suit brought to recover damages on account of 
falling, caused by defective highway. The accident oc- 
curred in June, 1882, in front of Wells' block on Elm 
street. Damages claimed, $1,000. 

At the last term of said court the following cases were 
entered against the city and continued until the March 
term : — 

M. L. Clementine Gagnon vs. City of Manchester. 

This suit is brought to recover $1,000 damages for per- 
sonal injuries caused by falling on Bridge street. 

Mary Frain vs. City of Manchester. 

Claim for $ 1,000 damages on account of personal injuries 
caused by falling on Chestnut street. 

Dolphus Benoit vs. City of Manchester. 

Claim for damages caused by falling on Elm street. 

Mary Carney vs. City of Manchester. 

Claim for $1,000 damages. Injury to person caused by 
falling on Manchester street opposite the Battery building. 

The following cases were entered at the January and May 
terms, 1883, and continued to the March term, 1884, on ac- 
count of the inability of the solicitor to be in attendance : — 

Hannah Burpee vs. City of Manchester. 

Suit brought to recover damages on account of personal 
injuries caused by falling on Hanover street, February 15, 

1882. 



107 

Mary A. Patten vs. City of Manchester. 

Suit brought to recover $2,000 damages, for injury to 
person caused by falling on Elm street near Xo. 1245, 
February 14, 1882. 

Caroline M. Davis vs. City of Manchester. 

This is a suit brought to recover damages for injury to 
person caused by falling on sidewalk. 

Timothy Carr vs. City of Manchester. 

Suit brought to recover $2,000 damages caused by chang- 
ing grade on Cedar street so that water flowed into plain- 
tiff's cellar. 

Margaret Kenney vs. City of Manchester. 

Suit brought to recover damages for personal injuries 
caused by being thrown from team, the same being over- 
turned by catching in horse-railroad track. 

Annie H. Kenney vs. City of Manchester. 

Suit for damages caused at the same time and place as 
preceding case. 

Benjamin F. Merrill vs. City of Manchester. 

Suit for damages for personal injuries and damage to 
team at the same time and place as last two 'cases. 

T. M. Conant vs. City of Manchester. 

Suit brought to recover balance of pay for work in 1878. 
The amount claimed is $601.50. 

During the past year the suit of Marcus P. Norton and 
assignee, etc., and Benjamin Richardson vs. the city of 
Manchester has been disposed of by the trial of a test case 
in the United States circuit court, which case was decided 
in favor of the defendant, and this suit against the city of 
Manchester was carried no further. 



108 

The solicitor, Capt. W. R. Patten, personally attended 
and assisted in the trial of the test case at Portsmouth. 

The suit of John B. Clarke vs. the City, for #2,000 dam- 
ages caused by coming in contact with the horse-railroad 
track at a point claimed to have been defective, has been 
dropped, a settlement having been made by Col. Clarke and 
ex-Gov. Smyth on behalf of the horse-railroad. 

The joint standing committee on claims have held 
twenty-four meetings during the year, and taken action on 
the following claims : — 

John W. Driscoll. 

Claim for $54.85 damages on account of personal injuries 
received by falling on the north side of Bridge street. Mr. 
Driscoll failing to file notice of claim within the prescribed 
time was given leave to withdraw. Upm petition to the 
supreme court he was given leave to file claim, which he 
has done, and brought suit returnable at the March term 
of said court. 

Clementine Gagnon. 

Claim $1,000 damages for falling on Bridge street. 

Upon a hearing before the committee, she was given 
leave to withdraw her claim. 

Suit was brought in this case, and entered September 
ber term, 1883. 

George P. Atwell. 

Claim for $321, for work on soldiers' monument. 
Given leave to withdraw, claim being previously paid. 

J. B. Ellinwood. 

Claim for $200, for injuries received by falling on Han- 
over street. 
Claim allowed. 



109 

Catherine Hayes. 

Claim $2,000, for injuries received by falling on Park 
street. 

Given leave to withdraw. 

Thomas S. Hartford. 

Claim 1350 damages, for injuries received by falling on 
Elm street, corner Central. 
Given leave to withdraw. 

Isaac A. Wyman. 

Claim of $1,500, for damages received by falling on Elm 
street. 

Allowed f 110, in full. 

Ellen Gilmartin. 

Claim $500. Injuries received by falling on south side 
of Spruce street. 

Mary Frain. 

Claim $1,000 damages, for falling on Chestnut street. 
Given leave to withdraw. 

Suit was brought on above claim, and entered September 
term, 1883, supreme court. 

John M. Ryan. 

Claim 81,000 damages, falling on Chestnut street. 
Leave given to withdraw claim. 

P. C. Ahearn. 

Claim $20, for damage to sleigh caused by obstruction in 
Lowell back street. 

Given leave to withdraw. 



110 

George F. Robie. 

Claim $2,000. Injuries received by falling on Elm street 
front of city hall. 

Given leave to withdraw. 

D. W. Batchelder. 

Claim 815, for damage to sleigh. 
Allowed $15. 

S. T. Hill. 

Claim $185.70, balance due over settlement of account 
as tax collector for 1877 and 1878. 

This claim was submitted to a board of arbitrators, con- 
sisting of Daniel W. Lane, David F. Clark, and Harrison 
D. Lord, and several hearings have been had. In Decem- 
ber last a majority report was made to the city government, 
which was in favor of the city. Unless this report is ac- 
cepted by Mr. Hill, it will be returned to the supreme court 
and judgment issued thereon. 

Mary Carney. 

Claim $1,000. Injury caused by falling on Manchester 
street. 

Given leave to withdraw. 

Suit has been brought on this claim entered in supreme 
court, September term, 1883. 

Mary E. Tewksbdry. 

Claim $500, damages received by falling on Market street. 

Allowed $100. 

Hannah Gorman. 

Claim $2,000. Injuries received by falling on Hanover 
street. 

Given leave to withdraw. 



Ill 

Dr. James G. Sturgis. 

Claim 1100, for damage to carriage. 
Allowed $50. 

Mary Walsh. 

Claim $200. Injury to person by falling on Park street 
near Chestnut. 
Allowed $100. 

Dr. James Sullivan. 

Claim for professional services rendered at the fire of 
June 27, 1882. 
Allowed $15. 

Flora J. Browne. 

Claim for damages received by falling on Union street 
at head of High. 

Given leave to withdraw. 

Henry W. Clark. 

Claim for $150 bounty. 
Allowed. 

George W. Newell & Co. 

Claim $21.90 damages to team, horse being frightened 
by blasting in 'Squog. 
Given leave to withdraw. 

Sarah E. Swett. 

Claim for damages, falling on Hanover street. 
Allowed $150. 

Noah B. Reed. 

Damage to horse. 

Given leave to withdraw. 



112 

Henry Brooks. 

Damages claimed on account of falling into canal on 
Bridge street. 

Given leave to withdraw. 

Samuel W. Dunbar. 

Claim $100 damages to horse caused by falling into a 
cess-pool. 

Allowed 1100. 

J. W. CONANT. 

Claim for damages on account of falling on Center street 
in 1879. 

Allowed $350. 

In all claims brought before this committee we have 
striven to give all sides a fair and impartial hearing. We 
have never considered whether the city could evade by 
legal technicalities or money power the payment of any of 
these claims, but we have in each and every case sought to 
do justice regardless of parties. 

We have been greatly assisted in our duties by the able 
efforts of Officer Charles H. Reed. The concise and reli- 
able reports which he has made to us have facilitated our 
investigations, and aided us very materially in forming our 
decisions. 

CHARLES H. G. FOSS; 
J. F. CLOUGH, 
GEORGE W. PRESCOTT. 
GEORGE M. TRUE, 
H. W. RANDALL, 
Joint /Standing Committee on Claims. 






REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



OKGAJNIZATIOK" FOE 1883. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



HORACE B. PUTNAM, Mayor, ex-officio Chairman. 
JOHN A. McCRILLIS, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 

Ward 1. — Frank T. E. Richardson, Perry pi. Dow. 

Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean, William C. Clarke. 

Ward 3. — Henry H. Huse, Nathan P. Hunt. 

Ward 4. — JohnT. Fanning, Samuel^D.'Lord. 

Ward 5. — Charles A. O'Connor, Thomas F. Collins. 

Ward 6. — D. Milton Goodwin, Jacob C. Abbott. 

Ward 7. — George D. Towne, Edwin F. Jones. 

Ward 8. — Louis E. Phelps, Douglas Mitchell. 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD. 

HENRY H. HUSE. 

CLERK OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

FRANK T. E. RICHARDSON. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 



116 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

HORATIO W. LONGA. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. Lord, McCrillis, Fanning, 
Richardson. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Phelps. Huse, Goodwin. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Dow, Fan- 
ning, Goodwin. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Dow, Fanning, Mitchell. 

Music. — Messrs. Richardson, Huse, Lord. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Huse, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Abbott, Phelps, McCrillis. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Mitchell, Collins, Towne. 

Sanitary. — Messrs. Towne, O'Connor, Jones. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Fanning, Huse, Dean, Hunt, 
O'Connor. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Fanning, Goodwin, Lord. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. Richardson, Jones, Dow. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Towne, Collins, Abbott. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Lord, Jones, Abbott. 

Manchester Street. — Messrs. O'Connor, Richardson, 
Huse. 

Training School, Merrimack Street, and Wilson Hill. — 
Messrs. Hunt, Huse, Phelps. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Mitchell, Richardson. 

Piscataquog Grammar. — Messrs. Phelps, Mitchell, Dean. 



117 

Center and South-Main Streets. — Messrs. Mitchell, 
Phelps, Dow. 

Amoskeag, Blodg-et Street, Webster Street, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. Clarke, Jones, Lord. 

BaJcersville and Hallsville. — Messrs. Dow, O'Connor, 
Abbott. 

G-offe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Goodwin, 
Towne, O'Connor. 

Mosquito Pond, Webster' 's Mills, and Youngsville. — 
Messrs. Abbott, Goodwin, Towne. 

Evening- Schools. — Messrs. Jones, Clarke, Collins. 



BEPOBT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the City Councils : — 

Gentlemen, — The Board of School Committee respect- 
fully present their report for the year ending December 31, 
1883, as follows : — 

Three thousand pupils and three hundred and twenty- 
five thousand dollars' worth of school property have re- 
ceived the attention of the School Committee during the 
past year. No epidemic has prevented regular sessions in 
any school, with one exception, in the suburban school at 
Hallsville. In this single exception a committee of exam- 
ining physicians found no cause for the origin of the few 
cases of diphtheritic sore throat and diphtheria, in or about 
the school building. 

No serious loss or accident has happened to the school 
property during the year. The committee has held regu- 
lar monthly sessions during the year, and has had occasion 
to hold five special sessions. 

The general method of training pursued in the several 
departments of our school system has continued, as wisely 
arranged by our immediate predecessors, and the credit- 
able results attained in the year now ending is certainly a 
matter of gratulation. 



120 

The arrangement of terms and vacations in the year 
1883 has been : — 

Winter term, 11 1-2 weeks, Jan. 3 to March 23. (3 weeks 
vacation.) 

Spring term, 11 weeks, April 16, to June 29. (10 weeks 
vacation.) 

Fall term, 15 weeks, Sept. 10 to Dec. 21. (2 weeks 
vacation.) 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The Training-School department in our city school system 
was established several years since, with wise forethought, 
to supplement already accomplished work in systematizing 
courses of study by further systematizing methods of 
instruction. 

Our corps of primary teachers is now recruited chiefly 
from among graduates of our Training School, and it is the 
intention of the sub-committee of the Training School, that 
the teachers entering into the works of our primary grades 
from the training class shall come possessed of all the ad- 
vantages that skilled training can give. 

We are already receiving benefits from the early training 
in this department, and they are gradually becoming more 
and more far-reaching in good results, as the system of 
teaching becomes more and more harmonious through the 
progressive stages from the primary to the high school 
grades. 

We are confident that this line of preparatory work is theo- 
retically in the right direction, and that the good practical 
results already attained warrant us in extending our hearty 
sympathy and support to training-school work as the best 
initiative to systematic and harmonious progress in all 
classes nucleizing in the high school. 



121 

At the opening of the fall term of the present year the 
Training School was transferred from the Franklin-street 
building to the school-house on the corner of Merrimack 
and Union streets, where it has superior facilities for its 
line of work. 

The principal of the Training School, assisted by the train- 
ing class, is now performing regular school work that would 
otherwise require four regular teachers. 

GRADED SCHOOLS. 

There have been ten resignations during the year. It is 
a matter of regret to lose even a small per cent of those 
who have been faithful and successful workers. 

The loss of an efficient principal from the Ash-street 
house, and the transfer of the Training School to the Merri- 
mack-street building, made advisable the change of posi- 
tions of several teachers during the year, to restore equili- 
brium of school work thereby disturbed, as will appear by 
the list of teachers hereto appended. 

All the primary, middle, and grammar grades are now 
working successfully under the general supervision of our 
faithful and indefatigable superintendent. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

A comparison of the courses of high-school studies in the 
leading schools of New England and the Middle States 
shows that there is a great similarity in their plans of work. 
In this general plan we may claim a place for our school 
in the front rank, and we do claim that the work accom- 
plished here has been quite successful. There is, never- 
theless, a muttering of discontent respecting a portion of 
the results of high-school work in the older cities, and we 
are aware that it finds echo to some extent in our city. 

As a rule, we find that those most familiar with our High 
School, and who visit oftenest the classes, are those who 



122 

commend most freely the methods practiced and results 
achieved there. 

We have at present a high school that can stand well 
the test of comparison with the best class of high schools 
in American cities, and our graduates who have subsequently 
taken examinations for higher academic studies have 
generally been found well prepared. 

While our High School has been graduating a large num- 
ber of pupils well fitted to pursue collegiate studies in the 
ancient classics, the sub-committee has thought it advisable 
to draw the attention of a larger share of the talent there 
developing from Platonian to modern philosophy, to the 
claims of skilled artisanship, and to the value of the appli- 
cation of mental training to practical business life. 

It is in this line that wealth is chiefly created in mecbani- 
cal centers, and through this line Manchester has had its 
great prosperity ; and in this line there is now the bright- 
est outlook ahead for the majority of youths that have tal- 
ent, energy, and ambition. 

To this -end the committee, with the valuable assistance 
of the superintendent, has prepared a new course of study 
for the High School, which is herewith submitted for the 
information of the city councils and the general public. 
The new course presents : — 

First, a carefully prepared line of study for a thorough 
English education for two, three, or four years' attendance, 
according to the time given. 

Second, a carefully prepared line of study for those desir- 
ing to prepare themselves in our own public schools for 
future skilled artisanship, or for entering technical schools 
for advanced studies, and includes enough of the French 
language to give the students command of writings of the 
nation which has taken the lead in theoretical knowledge 
and technical skill. 



123 

Third, a combined English ani Latin course. 

Fourth, a carefully prepared line of classical study for 
those desiring to pursue advanced academic studies in the 
college of our State or elsewhere. 

The courses of study here presented are carefully culled 
foundation materials, upon which each pupil of the High 
School is to build his future mental structure, but the weak- 
ness or solidity of each foundation will depend upon the 
disposition and efforts of the pupil under the guiding hand 
and inspiring influence of his teacher. 

In the arrangement of the courses there have been first 
considered the needs of those whose pupilary studies are to 
close with their high-school graduation, but the courses are 
none the less good preparatory work for those who will fol- 
low studious inclinations to any practical or theoretical 
ends, or even to the most refined limits of culture ; and the 
courses are intended to be in harmony with the theory that 
a loving study of the mateiial forces and wonderful perfec- 
tions fashioned by the Great Author develops a high order, 
of both wisdom and culture, as the loving study of his spir- 
itual teachings develops the highest order of goodness. 

PUBLIC EXERCISES. 

The fourth annual elocutionary contest for the Clarke 
prizes occurred in Smyth's hall, January 24, 1883, on 
which occasion the following-named eminent persons acted 
as a board of judg< s : — 

Rev. Josiah G. Davis, D. D., of Amherst, N. H. ; Rev. 
C. F. P. Bancroft of Andover, Mass. ; Hon. Daniel Bar- 
nard of Franklin, N. H. ; Hon. John D. Lyman of Exeter, 
N. H. 

The prizes offered were $13, $11, -$9, and $7 to the best 
four speakers in the order of their merit, and $5 each to the 
most meritorious of the remaining contestants from the four 



124 

schools represented, one prize to each school, making the 
total amount of prizes offered $60. 

The High School, Lincoln, Franklin, and Ash-street 
schools were represented by four contestants each. 

The first prizes of the two series were awarded to Mr. 
John F. Robinson of the High School and Miss Blanche C. 
Sargent of the Lincoln School, respectively. 

The High School received the first and third prizes of 
the first series, and the third prize of the second series. 

The Lincoln School received the first prize of the second 
series. 

The Ash-street School received the second of the first, 
and the second of the second series of prizes. 

The Franklin School received the fourth prize of each 
series. 

The high and grammar schools gave unitedly, in Smyth's 
hall, a musical festival at the close of the spring term, un- 
der the direction of the special teacher of music. This fes- 
tival, with a chorus of four hundred and fifty voices, took 
the place of the usual school exhibitions in the high and 
grammar school buildings. The program of nineteen selec- 
tions introduced a wide variety of styles of vocal music, and 
its successful execution displayed a very fair proficiency in 
the various renderings. 

The graduating exercises of the Higli-School class of '83 
occurred at the close of the spring term, June 28, in the 
Manchester Opera House, before a large audience, who ex- 
pressed freely their appreciation of the meritorious efforts 
of the graduates. 

These special exercises of the year have rarely been 
equaled in merit by the public efforts of our pupils. 

SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The city has twenty-five school buildings, and one addi- 
tional building at Bakersville now just finished at a cost of 



125 



about eleven thousand dollars. In these buildings there 
are eighty-nine school-rooms and five halls. 

During the fall term seventy teachers and one special 
teacher of music were employed, and the special teacher of 
drawing completed his course during the same period. We 
have had two principal and thirteen assistant teachers in 
the evening schools. 

The attendance in the public schools during the year has 
been : — 



Whole Number 
of different pupils 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Average 

No. 

Belonging. 



Average 
Daily 

Attendance. 



Per cent of 

Daily 
Attendance. 



High 

Grammar .. . 

Middle 

Primary 
Suburban . . 

Totals 



72 

374 

328 

1105 

182 



97 
402 
334 
976 
192 



159 

677 
526 
1249 
237 



153 

637 

479 

1135 

208 



96.2 
94.1 
91.1 
90.9 
87.8 



9-2.0 



126 



ANNUAL STATISTICS OF PUBLIC SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 





° 2 

. U 


Whole Number Be- 
longing. 


s 

3 -i 
'3> 

Be § 


< 

'S • 

QS 

2 a 


a . 

o a 

te -a 

a! a 

is 


10 X 

Bo 
t8 O 

•9 JS 

a v 
5 Be 
* a 

?i 


9 « 

o — 
u o 
<« o 

•OJ3 
a> « 

fa 


a 

o 

V O 
«•§ 

= m 

OS J! 

o 

(Si 


J3 
. o 

ft 




Boys. 


Girls. 




1870 










1987 
1911 
2110 
2284 
2318 
2295 
2379 
2413 
2348 
2648 
2727 
2602 
2712 
12612 




























































































1875 


















1876 










93.8 
91.3 
92.6 
92.0 
91.0 
91.7 
91 4 










1877 


3607 
3515 
3798 
4136 
4235 
4095 
4062 


1840 
17S3 
1924 
2166 
2200 
2086 
2061 


1767 
1732 
1874 
1970 
2035 
2009 
2001 


2 71 
2571 
2859 
2970 
2858 
2957 
2848 


96 
106 
145 

91 
110 
164 
103 


76 
89 

77 
75 
62 
72 
97 


38 
47 
48 
38 
39 
53 
27 


70 


1878 

1879 

1880 


70 
71 

77 


1881 


75 


1882 

1883 


73 
71 







The number of pupils enrolled in the public schools is 
4,0b2. 

The average attendance during the year in private schools 
has been : — 

In Irish parochial schools .... 1,475 

In French parochial schools .... 450 

In French private schools .... 120 

In American private schools .... 50 



DRAWING. 



More substantial progress has been made in drawing by 
the pupils during the present year than in any previous 



127 

year, and the majority of the teachers have entered more 
heartily into the work than heretofore. This branch of 
school work has become one of the most important essen- 
tials, and is more appreciated as its object and scope be- 
come better known. As a language, it finds daily use in 
all the activities and culture of the higher civilization, from 
the bench of the skillful mechanic to the easel of the artist, 
and often covers a field that oral language might never 
reach. Without drawing, our most valuable machines 
would never have been perfected ; without drawing, the 
exalted conception of the Sistine Madonna would never 
have been expressed for the delight of many generations ; 
nay, more, without the disciplined training by aid of the 
pencil, the conception would have been impossible ; with- 
out the technical application of drawing and artistic culture, 
our Manchester mills might long ago have glutted the mar- 
ket with sheetings and jeans instead of enlarging their 
market and enlarging the profits by varying and beautify- 
ing their productions. The structures, machinery, and 
manufactures most admired in every city are those that 
present results of the most skillful draughting. 

The committee on drawing of the year 1882, appreciat- 
ing the value of this branch of school work, believed the 
time had then come to place the exercise in the immediate 
care and under the immediate responsibility of the regular 
teachers, and presented at a special meeting of the school 
committee their carefully considered plan tending to this 
end, with the hope and belief that valuable advantages 
would accrue to the schools, and that there would also re- 
sult a considerable saving in annual expense for a special 
teacher. 

Their plan of a special course of preparation of the teach- 
ers for this work, suggested as the most prompt and eco- 
nomical way of accomplishing the desired change, was 



128 

heartily approved and inaugurated, and it has been the 
duty of the present year to supervise the work of complet- 
ing the change. 

The course of training given the teachers,and such pupils 
as desired to attend, was similar to that given teachers who 
take certificates from the Massachusetts Normal Art School 
at Boston, and the lectures and examinations were con- 
ducted by Mr. W. F. Brackett, an instructor and one of 
the board of examiners in the Massachusetts Normal Art 
School. 

The course has occupied the Saturdays of the school 
weeks during nearly a year, closing on the 24th of Novem- 
ber, 1883. 

The committee on drawing of the present year report that 
they have supervised the special course and have examined 
the work of each teacher from time to time with much 
interest. 

The earliest work of the special course not only devel- 
oped plainly where there had been previous incompetency 
in drawing and lack of interest in this branch of education, 
but gave gratifying evidence to the committee that some of 
the teachers had previously prepared themselves with care 
for the work. A few of the teachers were fully prepared 
when the course commenced to make any drawings and 
pass the examinations required to take the certificate. 

It became necessary for the committee to excuse a few 
teachers from attendance on account of ill health and High- 
School teachers were excused also 

The commendable interest of a large number of our 
teachers in the drawing exercises was shown in their care- 
ful and persistent work through the course, and their suc- 
cessful completion of all the drawings and examinations 
included in the course, and it was with regret that the com- 
mittee observed that generally the ones who failed to per- 



129 



severe in the course were the same who had been most 
ineompetent at its inauguration, and needed most its 
training. 

The standing committee on drawing report that they 
have granted certificates of satisfactory completion of all 
drawings and examinations, as follows : — 

DRAWING CERTIFICATES. 

Primary and Middle School Certificates. 



Nancy S. Bun ton. 
Jennie F. Bailey. 
Augusta S. Downs. 
Delia E. Haines. 
Alice G. Lord. 
Olive A. Rowe. 
Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Helen F. Wetherbee. 
Susie G. Woodman. 

Grammar 

C. Augusta Abbott. 
Mary F. Barnes. 
Mary E. Bunton. 
Etta J. Carley. 
Bertha L. Dean. 
Lucia E. Esty. 
Mary L. Gage. 
Ella Hope. 
Grace Mitchell. 
Cora F. Sanborn. 
Mary A. Smith. 



Gertrude H. Brooks, 
Nellie M. James. 
Carrie M. Gilmore. 
S. Izetta Locke. 
Mary W. Mitchell. 
Flora M. Senter. 
Carrie I. Stearns. 
Clara E. Woods. 

School Certificates. 

Nettie F. Ainsworth. 
Maria N. Bower. 
Ella F. Barker. 
Cora M. Dearborn. 
Belle R. Daniels. 
Susie H. Frame. 
Annie 0. Heath. 
Fannie D. Moulton. 
Emma M. Rowley. 
Ella F. Sanborn. 



180 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Two evening schools have held regular sessions since the 
15th of October. 

The school in the Spring-street building has had one 
principal and eight assistant teachers, while the school in 
the Center-street building has had one principal and five 
assistant teachers. 

A large majority of the attendants at the evening schools 
are earnest pupils, who appreciate the opportunities thus 
given. 

The present evening schools cover a hitherto unreached 
field of work among adults, in imparting the rudiments of 
an English education. 

The importance of this work must not be overlooked, 
nor the schools fail of hearty support. 

The average attendance in the evening schools has been : 

In October, boys, 101 ; girls, 69 ; total, 170 
November, « 88; " 69; " 157 
December, " 75; " 56; " 131 



458 



The nationalities of the pupils have been : — 

Americans . . . . 62, or 15 per cent. 

. 99, " 23 " 



Irish 
Germans 
Freneh 
Swedes 



58, " 14 

134, " 32 

68, " 16 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 



This is a subject so important and far-reaching that the 
writer approaches it with regret that its discussion must be 
quite limited in this report. 

The financial standing of our city does and must depend 



131 

largely upon the acquirements and improved quality of pro- 
ductions of its skilled artisans here employed, and so long 
as our schools fail to furnish abundantly the best talent re- 
quired, our great educational need will continue to be the 
training of young men in expert mechanics, processes, and 
arts. To this end we must prepare a goodly share of our 
graduating pupils to reason, to investigate, to originate, to 
become familiar with qualities of natural products and their 
common uses, to become familiar with tht forces of nature 
and the. laws of mechanics. 

When boys have been first trained to systematic thought 
and accurate observation, the time required for acquire- 
ment of the skillful use of tools and machines by them is 
very much shortened, and the young mechanics, working 
brains and hands in unison, will soon outrank the older 
mechanics whose brains shrink from activity, and the prod- 
ucts of their labor will have enhanced value from the assist- 
ance of their reasoning powers. 

Those shops and mills where active brains have influence 
will be prepared with newly originated attractions, new im- 
provements, and new processes for the market before it is 
overglutted with their older productions. 

One result of the gradual failure of the apprenticeship 
system, which produced our best mechanics of twenty and 
more years ago, is the dividing of our modern mechanics 
more perceptibly into two classes, which may be distin- 
guished as those who think and those who toil. The enthu- 
siastic thinkers who thus ennoble their work are uniformly 
cheerful and industrious, while unthougbtful toil broods 
discontent. 

It is a pity to let any ot our pupils go out of our schools 
and beyond their helpful influence until their brains have 
received sufficient stimulus from perception and knowledge, 
and sufficient impetus, to prevent them from tending to a 



132 

kind of torpor and machine-like routine under the influence 
of daily labor ; yet many bright youths do of necessity drop 
out of the schools before they are mentally prepared to 
accomplish good work in their struggles for a livelihood. 

There are many of these last that might be materially 
aided in evening classes specially adapted to their needs, 
where they might be taught all that comes within the prov- 
ince of the class-room pertaining to mechanics, the nature 
and uses of material, the applications of mechanical powers, 
and their interest awakened to the best methods of accom- 
plishing ordinary mechanical and technical results. 

The present course of drawing in the public schools is 
admirable preliminary work for such technical and indus- 
trial classes, and the skill already acquired in drawing 
would thus be given practical application and its value 
demonstrated. 

The writer is not yet prepared to advocate the introduc- 
tion of mechanical tools into any portion of our regular 
school work, as is in practice to some extent in several 
cities, nor to curtail the present line of mental development ; 
but he believes the city may accomplish great educational 
good for a part of our pupils, at least, with a very mod- 
erate expenditure of money in the direcion thus out- 
lined. This work, he believes, should be supplementary to 
the regular school work, and would be especially helpful to 
those who are unable to avail themselves of the advantages 
of the High School. 

If technical education is thus offered to the graduates of 
the grammar schools at the outset, it will soon awaken in- 
terest and anticipations in lower grades, and in time ad- 
vance to give assistance to high-school graduates such as 
they now have to seek elsewhere. 

Leading educators, recognizing that the financial stand- 
ing of a nation among nations is exalted or debased as the 



133 

skill of its artisans and agriculturists is elevated or de- 
pressed, are agitating the question of technical and indus- 
trial education. 

Attention may be called, though not for the purpose of 
imitation, to the progress made abroad in combining work- 
shop with regular instruction in the special schools in Ger- 
man states, and in the French cities of Paris, Rheims, 
Lyons, Rouen, Lille, Douai, Nismes, St. Etienne, and 
Amiens. One hundred industrial art classes were reported 
in Paris alone, two years since. 

In 1881, the English government sent a commission 
through France to investigate the progress in this indus- 
trial line, and note its valuable features. 

The influence of this training in the products competi- 
tion of our nation with nations of Europe is deeper and 
broader than the tariff influence now puzzling political 
economists, and through superiority in this industrial line 
and skillful handling of our natural products lies our only 
safe path toward international free trade, so long as our 
scale of industrial wages remains in advance of the Euro- 
pean rates. 

The School of Technology in Boston, the Stevens Insti- 
tute in Hoboken, the Polytechnic School in Troy, the Co- 
lumbia School of Mines in New York City, and scientific 
departments of our leading colleges have anticipated, for 
pupils of abundant means, the wants in this line, in its 
advanced stages, but not for the mass of pupils. 

The system, if rightly directed in a line giving mental 
preparation and manual dexterity in general industrial 
work, so that the brain will be fertile in resources and the 
hand skillful in execution when set to a practical task, can- 
not too soon permeate our grammar and intermediate 
schools. Then, when our youths and girls go to their re- 
spective manual occupations, the use of the tools placed 



134 

in their hands will be quickly acquired and expert skill 
quickly attained, and they will be in the best preparatory 
condition to turn the gross materials under their hands into 
gold, by infusion of brain and soul and by skillful touch. 

Special schools are experimenting with the system of 
parallel industrial and intermediate school instruction in 
several American cities, — notably in New York, under the 
direction of Prof. Felix Adler ; in Philadelphia, under the 
direction of Prof. Chas. G. Leland ; and in St. Louis, under 
the direction of Prof. C. M. Woodward ; and Chicago has 
just completed an elegant structure for a like use, under 
private auspices. 

The question of evening industrial classes, supplemen- 
tary to the regular day classes, is commended for earnest 
consideration in our city, where in the midst of turbines, 
stationary steam-engines, shops and mills scarcely equaled 
elsewhere in the world in magnitude, and in the midst of a 
multitude of machines performing complex and various 
operations, we ought also to develop, more than heretofore, 
from our own school graduates, the highest skill and intel- 
lectual power which these shops and mills require, and a 
breadth of mechanical genius that shall redound to the 
honor and profit of our city. 

FINANCES. 

The income in the year 1883 has been : — 

Appropriation by city councils . . . $54,200 00 

Balance of appropriations from 1882 . . 114 77 

From materials sold ..... 51 92 

From tuition of non-resident pupils . . 262 57 



#54,629 26 
The expenditures in the year 1883 have been 53,505 70 



The balance on hand . . . . $1,123 56 



135 



The sub-divisions of the appropriations for 1S83 and 
transfers were as follows : — 



Sum avail- 
able from 
appropri- 
ation. 



Increase 
by trans- 
fer. 



Decrease 
by trans- 
fer. 



Balance. Expended. ■ ™™£ m 



«,«, iqo 7S | $400.00 | 

4>dj,iao.ici 10000 ) 

682.04' 500.00 
2,986.09 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery. . . . 

Care of rooms 

Contingent expenses. . . . 

Fuel j 3,411.54 

Furniture and supplies ! 1,630.38 
Printing and advertising 

Repairs 

Evening schools 

Tuition 



$400.00 
100.00 



901.43 



781.62 
3,589.78 



725.00 



300.00 



1,193.08 227169) 



262.57; 



725.00 1 
300.00 j 

500.00 
90.00 



227.69 



$54,629 26 $2,342.69 



$2,342.69 



S39,090. 73 $39,579.49 
782.04 725.62 
2,886.09! 2,868.47 
1,626.43; 1,462.37 
2.386.54! 2,225.75 
1,130.38 888.34 



691.62 
3,S89.78 



544.54 
3,736.23 
1,510.77 1,474.89 
34 88 



$54,629. 26 $53,505. 70 



$111.24 
56.42 
17.62 
164.06 
160.79 
242.04 
147.08 
153.55 
35.88 
34.88 



$1,123.56 



The estimates of school expenses for the year 1884 are as 
follows : — 
Teachers' salaries 840,000 00 



Books and stationery 

Care of rooms . 

Contingent expenses 

Fuel 

Furniture and supplies 

Printing and advertising 

Repairs 

Evening schools 



350 00 

3,000 00 

1,250 00 

3,400 00 

1,300 00 

650 00 

4,000 00 

1,500 00 



855,450 00 

The appropriation for schools for the year 1884, by the 
city councils, is 854,000, a reduction of 81,450 from the 
estimate. 



136 



Making pro-rata deductions of -$1,450, and adding the 
balances remaining in the account of 1883, the sums avail- 
able for 1884 are : — 



Discount. 



Remainder. 



Balance of 
1883 Acct. 



Available. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery 

Care of rooms 

Contingent expenses 

Fuel 

Furniture and supplies. . 
Printing and advertising 

Repairs 

Evening schools 

Tuition 



81,046.00 
9.15 
78.45 
32.G8 
88.91 
33.99 
17.00 
104.00 
39.22 



$38,954.00 
340.85 
2,921.55 
1,217.32 
3,311.09 
1,2G6.01 
033.00 
3,895.40 
1,460.78 



$111.24 
56.42 
17.62 
164.06 
160.79 
242.04 
147.08 
153.55 
35.88 
34.88 



$1,450.00 



$54,000.00 $1,123.56 



$39,065.24 

397.27 

2,939.17 

1,381.38 

3,471.88 

1,508 05 

780.08 

4,048.95 

1,496.66 

34.88 



$55,123.56 



ANNUAL STATISTICS OF COST OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



Average 
No. pupils 



Cost of 
Schools. 



Cost per City _.. „ 

Scholar. Valuation. Clty laXl 



School tax. 



1870. 

1871 

1872. 

1873 

1874 

1875. 

1876 

1877. 

1878 

1879. 

1880. 

1881. 

1882 

1883 



2129 
2080 
2278 
2450 
2463 
2501 
2543 
2513 
2571 
2859 
2970 
2858 
2957 
2848 



$42,000 
42,900 
47,900 
47,300 
47,500 
51,800 
50,100 
47,900 
44,900 
46,200 
48,945 
50,729 
51,604 
53,525 



$19.45 
20.62 
21.03 
19.34 
19.28 
20.71 
19.70 
18.78 
17.46 
15.71 
16.49 
17.70 
17.45 
18.79 



$10,710,252 
11,365,162 
11,542,632 
12,001,200 
12,716,SP2 
14.195,102 
15,309,348 
15,605,718 
15,912,234 
17,482,132 
17,825,116 
17,943,308 
19,175,408 
20,055,986 



$234,047 
230,632 
259,196 
300,768 
312,835 
315,131 
248,900 
240,573 
276,873 
264,406 
264,491 
316,462 
312,673 
332,741 



$ .0041 
.0037 
.0041 
.0039 
.0037 
.0036 
.0032 
.0030 
.0028 
.0026 
.0027 
.0028 
.0026 
.0026 



137 



REPAIRS. 



There has been a marked improvement of our school 
facilities since the opening of the present decade. A new 
building has been built on Webster street, projected to con- 
tain, when complete, six school-rooms and a hall ; a new 
building is ready for occupancy on south Elm street, with 
four school-rooms and a hall. The north Main-street 
school-house has been enlarged by the addition of two 
school-rooms. The interiors of the Lowell-street and Spring- 
street school-houses have been rebuilt, changing them from 
dark and gloomy quarters to sunny, cheerful, and conven- 
ient school buildings, and a large study-room has been pre- 
pared in the high-school building. 

The line of improvement has been continued the present 
year by painting the exteriors of a considerable number of 
the school buildings, by enlarging and painting the hall- 
ways in the high-school house, reflooring a basement in 
the Franklin- street house, reseating the Youngsville house, 
etc. 

Some repairs or improvements have been required in 
each school building, and some of the buildings have been 
so long in use as to require relatively considerable outlay 
each year ; yet the aggregate cost of repairs during the 
year just closing has scarcely exceeded one-tenth of one per 
cent on the valuation of the school buildings. The shellac 
and varnish finish of wood-work and furniture in nearly all 
our school buildings has been sadly neglected of late years, 
with the deceptive view of economizing expenditure, and 
must now receive attention as soon as possible. 

New desks for pupils are desired in many of the school- 
rooms, and the policy of the renewal of the furniture in one 
or two rooms each year should be adopted, commencing in 
those rooms where renewal is most needed. 



138 



One or two additional school-rooms are needed at present 
in West Manchester. 

The sanitary arrangements connected with several school 
buildings are considered by the committee on repairs to be 
faulty, and it is their desire that objectionable fixtures shall 
be replaced by apparatus less jeopardizing to the health of 
the pupils, and they suggest that a special appropriation 
ought to be made for this purpose. 

TRUANCY. 

The following summary of the monthly reports of the 
truant officer indicates a portion of the work of that officer 
during the year for both city and parochial schools, so far 
as it can be reduced to statistical form : — 



City Schools. 



Parochial 
Schools. 



Absentees reported from , 

Number voluntarily returned to 

Number reported caused to attend 

Number found sick and unable to attend school 

Number otherwise unavoidably detained 

Number not found at all for 

Number unaccounted for 

Truants not enrolled found on streets 

Number of truants caused to. attend 

Number of school age found on streets in school hours. . 

Number of parents visited 

Number of truants temporarily confined at city hall 

Number of employment certificates granted 

Number brought before the court 4 

Number fined 3 

Number sent to reformatory schools- 1 



286 


300 


26 


16 


239 


230 





o 


5 






18 


23 



























139 



APPENDIX. 



Following the Superintendent's report will be found an 
inventory of school houses and furniture, some compara- 
tive statistics of schools in the state selected from the last 
report of the State Superintendent of Instruction, the new 
high-school course of study, and some extracts from the 
General Laws of the state which it is the duty of the School 
Committee to present to the public. 

J. T. FANNING, 

For the Committee. 

December 31, 1883. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with your rules, requiring 
an annual report from the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, I herewith respectfully submit the following as my 
seventh report, the same being for the year 1883, and the 
twenty-eighth of its series : — 

ORGANIZATION. 

During the past year six teachers have been employed in 
the High School. There has been an average of seventeen 
grammar-school divisions, twelve middle schools, thirty 
primary, and nine ungraded suburban. This is equivalent 
to seventy-four distinct scho®ls of a single room each ; but 
the average number of regular teachers necessary, and em- 
ployed, has been only seventy-one. because the principal of 
the Training School has charge of the four rooms constitut- 
ing that school. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The whole number of pupils is thirty-three less than it 
was a year ago, and the average number of teachers em- 
ployed is two less. The fioajting population seems to have 
been less stable than usual ; for, though the whole number 
of pupils is only thirty-three less than that of a year ago, 
the average number belonging is less by one hundred and 
nine. The average daily attendance, however, has not been 
reduced disproportionately, and the per cent of attendance 
maintains its usual high standard. 



141 

In connection with this subject I deem it proper to call 
the attention of the committee to the questionable practice 
of awarding cards and diplomas to individual pupils for 
attending every half-day of a term, or of the year, without 
being tardy. 

The practice has prevailed many years, and as long ago 
as 1868 the names of those attaining perfect attendance for 
a term or a year were published in the annual report. This, 
however, was not long continued ; and less and less atten- 
tion has gradually been given to the matter. Indeed, there 
is not now any uniform call for them from teachers, and 
pupils entitled thereto have not all manifested sufficient 
interest to ask their teachers for them. Teachers occa- 
sionally acknowledge that pupils have attended school for 
the sake of obtaining term cards, when they were not fit 
subjects for the school-room ; and I am confident that any 
encouragement from teachers to stimulate pupils to an effort 
to attend school regularly simply for the sake of obtaining 
the cards has been the exception and not the rule. Cer- 
tainly no stress has been exerted in this direction by 
myself. Nevertheless, the success of efforts to obtain 
these cards and diplomas made in former terms by older 
brothers and sisters, the annual award of upwards of two 
hundred diplomas for perfect attendance during a year, 
and the usual quota of several hundred cards" awarded for 
perfect attendance during each term, — all combine to incite 
many to an attempt to secure them. 

If, without jeopardizing their health, all could be equally 
successful, there would be comparatively little harm ; but 
this is impossible, and hundreds every term fail through no 
fault of theirs. Many of these then become discouraged, 
not having been actuated by the highest of motives, and 
doubtless some are afterwards less regular in attendance 
than they would have been under ordinary circumstances. 



142 

Adding to this the fact that a few, for the purpose of ob- 
taining these cards, insist upon attending school when they 
are unfitted for its work, I think there is sufficient reason 
for discontinuing the practice of awarding cards and diplo- 
mas for perfect attendance ; nor do I think the per cent 
of attendance upon our schools would now be materially- 
lowered thereby. 

I, therefore, recommend that at the opening of next 
term pupils all be notified that the practice of awarding 
term cards and diplomas for punctuality of attendance will 
be discontinued at the end of next spring term. 

I deem such notice of their discontinuance but fair to 
those who through their efforts last term secured the first 
of a series of three term cards that would entitle them to a 
diploma for a year's perfect attendance next July. By such 
an arrangement no others can, in the future, enter upon an 
effort to secure a term card in the hope of thereby securing 
a yearly diploma, while the committee will have kept faith 
with those who have succeeded, some for one term and 
others for two terms, under an arrangement which pupils 
had reason to expect would be continued, — at least suf- 
ficiently long to make it possible for them to obtain a yearly 
diploma. 

CONDITION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The general condition of the schools for the past year 
has been good. Teachers have all been conscientious and 
earnest in attempting faithfully to discharge their individ- 
ual duties, and any noticeable differences in their efficiency 
may be truthfully attributed to differences in ability rather 
than to any disposition to neglect their respective duties. 

The city, I believe, has never had a smaller proportion 
of ordinary teachers enrolled in its corps, nor a larger pro- 
portion so well adapted to their several positions as now. 
Hence the work of no year has ever been better done. 



143 

A great compliment was paid our schools a few weeks 
since by a school man, who, after spending two days in vis- 
iting them, said to me : " The striking feature of your 
schools is that the pupils, even in lowest classes, all the 
time seem to have something arranged for them to do 
which so pleases them, and which they are so eager to do, 
that I see but little government on the part of teachers, 
and yet scarcely any inclination to idleness or mischief on 
the part of pupils." This, certainly, is a high realization 
of the best means of government on the part of our 
teachers. 

As foreshadowed in my report at the close of last year, 
oral spelling has this year been re-instated in the primary 
schools, and it has generally been successfully taught ; and 
that, too, in most primaries in a way that has been attractive 
to the pupils. 

My next special effort in behalf of these schools will be 
to improve their penmanship. Considerable improvement 
in this particular has already been made, but they have not 
yet attained the high standard in penmanship which I deem 
possible. I shall, early in the coming year, bring this mat- 
ter to the attention of the committee, and-I trust they will 
be prepared to grant the materials necessary for the accom- 
plishment of the desired improvement. 

LANGUAGE. 

Upon the revision of the course of study for the elemen- 
tary schools in 1880, occasion was taken for making a 
change in the teaching of language. 

It had been charged generally throughout the country, 
that though pupils in the schools could rapidly analyze long 
and intricate sentences, and glibly parse the words of the 
same, they could not, it was said, write an ordinary letter 
or other simple production without revealing themselves 



144 

lamentably ignorant of correct - spelling, of a proper use of 
large and small letters, of punctuation and other marks 
used in written matter, and of paragraphing, spacing, etc. 

School officials were obliged to acknowledge the charge 
too true ; and in common with others, though we did not 
go to the extreme reported in some places of taking the 
grammar entirely out of the schools, we did recognize that 
for those who could not obtain more than an average com- 
mon-school education, it was better that pupils should go 
out into life able to make a good use of language, rather 
than that they should have acquired skill only to criticise it. 
Our course of study was then modified for the purpose of 
affording greater opportunity to teach a better use of both 
spoken and written language. The elementary grammar, 
however, was retained, in the belief that it would afford 
enough of the technics and principles of our language, if 
taught as designed, to equip the grammar-school graduate 
with a criterion from which he might in future determine 
for himself the correctness of the use of ordinary English. 

Not until near the close of last term did I make any 
systematic test of the results of this changed form of teach- 
ing language in our schools. As an inspection of fair sam- 
ples of the results will best advise you and the public in 
regard to the degree of success thus far attained, a few 
papers may be found in the appendix of this report, to 
which I also refer for other interesting matter. 

HIGH-SCHOOL COURSE OF STUDY. 

The course of study for the High School has been the 
object of considerable criticism, as being directed too largely 
to the study of the ancient languages. Being called upon 
early in the fall term to suggest such changes in this course 
as might be deemed best to meet the varied interests of 
those patronizing our High School, I have devoted many 



145 

hours to the subject, and recently presented the draft of a 
new course for the inspection of the sub-committee of the 
school, to wh om the matter had been referred. 

This course is thought to embrace the essentials of two 
drafts submitted by the president of the board and by the 
chairman of the high-school sub-committee, respectively, 
as well as my own ideas of the needs of our citizens. 

The draft as submitted contemplates, first, a two, three, 
or four years' English course, in which no foreign language 
is introduced. This course is designed to be especially 
strong in the study of the English language, mathematics, 
and natural and political sciences, arranged with a view 
of affording opportunity to those in attendance for the 
shorter periods of time to study the more important por- 
tions of the subjects named in the course. 

It may here be said that this course is regarded as a 
natural continuation of the studies pursued in the ele- 
mentary schools, between which and them there is no 
greater step than between the different grades of the lower 
schools. I believe, too, that a knowledge of the studies 
embraced in the first two years of the proposed high- 
school course is as important to the average citizen of to- 
day as were the studies in the elementary schools a quarter 
of a century ago to the people of that time. 

Since this draft for our high-school course of study was 
prepared, I have learned that the studies named in its 
English course are almost identical with those school 
studies arranged for the new, large, and fully equipped 
Manual Training School at Chicago. If our English course 
in the High School could be supplemented by evening in- 
struction in shop-work, similar to that to be done in the 
new Chicago school, our pupils could obtain a broad prepa- 
ration that would fit them for successfully entering upon any 
one of many trades. They would also thereby have their 
10 



146 

attention turned to the consideration of those industrial 
pursuits whose followers become producers. 

The other lines of study in the new draft for a high- 
school course of study are largely based upon the English 
course, already described, and embrace, first, a scientific 
course of either three or four year*, in which the subjects 
are so arranged that five-sixths of the time shall be devoted 
to English studies and the remaining sixth to French ; 
secondly, there is provided a classical course of either 
three or fou* 1 years, three-fourths of its time being 
devoted to English studies and one-fourth to Latin, or, if 
Latin and French both be taken in this course, then seven- 
twelfths of the time are to be given to English studies and 
five-twelfths only to both Latin and French ; lastly, a col- 
lege preparatory course of four years is offered, in which 
four-ninths of the time are to be given to studies in English 
and five-ninths to Latin and Greek. 

The arrangement of this latter course is so made, first, 
because some who enter upon it witli the full intention of 
going to college will never go there ; secondly, because of 
the belief that it is not the province of a public school to 
teach more of the ancient languages than may be necessary 
to fit citizen-pupils for the colleges in their own state. 

Further, it is proposed that no pupils shall be allowed to 
enter upon any other than the English course in the High 
School without first producing a written request for such 
privilege from their parents or guardians, who shall specify 
which one of the other courses is desired for the pupil in 
whose behalf the request is made. Thus it is hoped that 
none will be allowed to enter upon the study of foreign or 
ancient languages without a due consideration of their rela- 
tion to the expected work of life. 

The new draft for a high-school course of study also con- 
templates that there shall be general exercises every Wed- 



147 

nesday wholly in English, embracing spelling, elocutionary 
drill, reading, penmanship, music, English authors, rhetori- 
cal exercises, and the geography of New Hampshire. 

In estimating the portions of time herein before indicated 
to be the proportions devoted to the study of English in the 
several courses, consideration was given only to the work of 
the regular courses for the other four days of the week ; 
hence the comparative amount of time devoted to the study 
of English is considerably greater than the given estimates, 
all of the Wednesday exercises being in English. 

ADMISSION TO THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Oar method of admitting pupils to the High School, a 
subject which is proving the source of considerable trouble 
in some other places, has again demonstrated the wisdom 
of the plan, by its efficiency and the satisfaction afforded. 

This plan, in brief, is the admission of pupils from the 
grammar schools upon the recommendation of the several 
grammar masters, the average results of the scholastic at- 
tainment of their respective pupils, as recorded for the 
year, being taken as a basis for judgment. 

We are, however, having trouble from an overcrowded 
condition of the higher divisions of the grammar schools, 
resulting from the fact that promotions are made twice a 
year in the elementary schools, and only once a year from 
them to the High School. 

Relief, I think, can best be had by admitting to the High 
School twice a year, those entering the first of February 
taking a special course* until the following July, after 
which they should enter upon one of the regular courses. 

* Comprising preliminary training in algebra, exercises in English composition, and 
oral instruction in physics. 



148 



GRAMMAR MASTERS. 



As I have intimated in former reports, I do not feel that 
the full power and scope of the influence and ability of the 
grammar master is realized in our city. He is here simply 
a supervisor of the general conduct of the pupils and schools 
in his building, and instructor only of the classes in the 
room of the most advanced grade. His higher office is pre- 
sumably as a superior instructor, and his influence in this 
more important relation should be felt by every pupil in his 
building. Otherwise it will never be felt by a large major- 
ity of those under his general control, only a compara- 
tively small portion of them ever reaching the first-division 
grade. 

The best service of the grammar master can be obtained 
only by giving him an additional assistant teacher, to take 
charge of his room and hear recitations while he is at work 
with other classes, which should be at least half of the time. 
" But," says the objector, " that is too expensive ; and, be- 
sides, I don't believe in giving the master an assistant to 
do his work. 1 ' Neither do I. 

But what are the facts in regard to the case in hand ? I 
answer as follows : First. It is proposed, after a little obser- 
vation to ascertain in what direction help is most needed, 
that the grammar master shall do earnest work with every 
class in his building. This does not mean an easier part 
for him, but a far more difficult. He will need to study 
and prepare as never before, if he would present to his 
assistants examples of the best methods in teaching, and 
maintain with their pupils a conviction of superiority be- 
coming his position. Should he do his duty in this en- 
larged sphere of his office, he would richly deserve all the 
additional increase of salary he now asks. It would, in- 
deed, be difficult adequately to compensate all the service 
that is anticipated by this plan. It has broad moral as well 



149 

as intellectual relations, by reason of the closer contact 
which the master would have with all his pupils, whereby 
he would better understand and be better able to direct 
their motives. 

Secondly. The course of study for the elementary schools 
is all covered by the work of the various grades found in 
our large grammar schools. Now the head of every such 
school should be familiar with the work as a whole, as well 
as in the relation of its parts, and have authority so to 
direct that the greatest good of the greatest number would 
be most highly subserved. Were this the case, to the 
extent that he could come in almost daily contact with the 
work of the several classes, not only would essentials be 
more likely to be emphasized, but individual pupils could 
here and there along in the course be selected for double 
promotions, or gain time by advancement at other times 
than those of regular promotion, without cramming or other 
undue strain. This is possible, because the course of study 
is made, as it must be, for the average child and with some 
regard to what the average teacher can do. But how great 
is the difference in children, ! and how marked the differ- 
ence in the attention they receive at home ! and yet no one 
should hazard double promotions for any, unless he grasps 
the work as a whole and in all its relations, nor unless he 
comes in sufficiently close contact with the daily work of 
the pupil to be sure that he can be irregularly advanced 
without harm. This, then, is a good which the grammar 
master could wisely do for numerous pupils in their course 
through the elementary schools, — a course which he could 
profitably shorten for some if he had his sphere of useful- 
ness and action enlarged as I have described. Other gains 
likely to ensue from the encouragement of advancing 
pupils as rapidly as carefully watched conditions might 
admit, would be the longer continuance in school of some, 



150 

and an increase in the number of those entering upon the 
work of the higher grades. 

In the light of the foregoing reasons, I ask whether the 
greater good of the greater number would not be so pro- 
moted by such a course of procedure as to prove itself wise 
economy and dwindle into insignificance its additional 
expense? Again, I ask if the suggestion of placing an im- 
mediate director over the interests of an institution 'con- 
taining so many departments so peculiarly related to one 
another as those of our larger schools is not founded on 
sound business principles ? How infinitely more vital are 
their interests than those of a mill ; but over it and its de- 
partments are found the agent, superintendent, and over- 
seer, nor would dividends be expected therefrom with less 
supervision. 

There are no subjects connected with the well-being of 
our schools that I regard worthy of more careful consid- 
eration than that just discussed, and the purpose of the 
Training School. It would seem that the latter was estab- 
lished after sufficient deliberation, had been in existence 
sufficiently long, and with results sufficiently satisfactory, 
to warrant its continuance without further question ; yet 
fearing its position and work are not altogether understood, 
I here give it further consideration than I otherwise should. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The Training School has now been conducted for an en- 
tire year under the direction of a single responsible head, 
without the employment of any other regular teacher. 
Miss Sarah E Sprague has been its efficient principal; and 
I deem the committee justified in advancing her salary to 
an amount sufficient to retain her services, notwithstanding 
the sharp competition of other cities to secure them, — at- 
tempts which, doubtless, would have been successful if this 



151 

lady had not become interested to see our plan of organi- 
zation completely established. This plan, in brief, is as 
follows : — 

Four schools, embracing both primary and middle grades, 
are used for schools of practice, and are taught by the 
members of the training class with the assistance of the 
principal. 

The duties of the principal are the same as those of the 
head teacher in any other building, with the addition of 
such other duties as her position as a training teacher 
entails. 

The duties of the sub-teachers are of a twofold charac- 
ter, being those of both pupil and teacher. As pupils, they 
regularly receive instruction from the principal in methods 
of teaching, school economy, the philosophy of education, 
and the like; and they are held accountable, the same as 
other pupils, for the careful preparation of lessons assigned 
and for the faithful performance of all work connected with 
the course of study marked out for the training class. As 
teachers, they instruct the various classes placed under 
their charge, in accordance with directions received from 
the principal, and they render such assistance in carrying 
on the other work of the school as the principal may deem 
advisable. 

During the first six months that the young ladies spend 
in the Training School, there is hut little actual teaching 
required of them. During the second half of their first 
year in the school, they receive ten dollars per month ; 
while during the third and last six months of their connec- 
tion with the Training School they are paid twenty dollars 
per month. 

As the increase of salary would seem to indicate, more 
responsibility is at this time placed upon the sub-teachers. 
The seniors are given full charge of the rooms during the 



152 

first half of the forenoon sessions, the principal being then 
occupied with recitations of the new members. For that 
portion of the day after the forenoon recess, they are 
assisted by the junior members of the training class, and by 
the principal, who, passing from room to room, suggests, 
advises, or teaches, as may seem most necessary. 

At the close of each day the seniors are called together 
by the principal, who criticises their work for the day, 
advises changes when needed, answers queries, and lays 
out future work. 

We thus have a training school, upon the most approved 
plan, at very small expense. The teaching force for the 
four rooms comprising the Training School would regu- 
larly cost eighteen hundred dollars a year, at maximum 
salaries, while the Training School for the past year has 
cost but nineteen hundred dollars for teaching service. 
This includes the monthly stipend allowed the sub-teachers 
during the part of their term when actual teaching service 
is rendered. The difference between these two sums, or 
one hundred dollars, is the additional cost to the city of an 
excellent training school for the past year. 

In return, we have had from the membership of this 
school many days of satisfactory substitute work in the 
schools at large. Of the nine sub-teachers in the school at 
the opening of the year, one has been given temporary 
charge of two different schools for the whole of two terms 
and the greater part of another ; a second has been tempo- 
rarily employed in one school during two entire terms ; a 
third was given a permanent teacher's position at the open- 
ing of the spring term ; and a fourth has already been 
elected to a permanent position, her term of service to 
begin with the opening of next term. Of the other five, 
but one has as yet completed the course ; and there is, 
therefore, only one graduate of this school now available 
for substitute work or a permanent position. 



153 

During the current year, the lessons and lectures 
described in my last report have been continued, various 
manuals of instruction have been carefully studied, and 
greater time and attention given to professional reading. A 
few new features have been introduced for the sake of 
adding to the interest and thoroughness of the work. 
Among those which have been found most efficient are the 
query-box, the conducting of class recitations from care- 
fully prepared questions, and debating at regular intervals 
questions which have vital influence upon school manage- 
ment. 

The query-box receives from sub-teachers, during the 
week, questions which they have prepared from a careful 
observation in regard to practical points of school manage- 
ment or methods of teaching. At the close of the week, 
one of their number opens the box and answers the queries 
in the presence of the class, who are at liberty, immedi- 
ately afterwards, to question one another and the principal 
upon the topics under consideration. The latter finally 
commends or corrects the answers given to the queries, as 
occasion may require. 

The exercise in which the sub-teachers from time to time 
hear their own classmates recite a lesson assigned to all 
furnishes a pleasing variety to the work, and also promotes 
thoroughness and self-reliance upon the part of the one 
called upon to act as teacher. At the close of such a reci- 
tation general criticisms are made by both sub-teachers and 
principal. 

The debates were introduced in the fourth month, after 
the training class had gained some knowledge of the 
philosophy underlying methods of instruction and school 
management. The purpose of these debates is manifold. 
They have already promoted a broader idea of professional 
work in the class, and a more careful reading of educa- 



154 

tional works for arguments to be used in the debates. The 
young ladies have also made a good degree of improvement 
in their use of language in extemporaneous speaking, and 
they are steadily gaining the dignity and self-reliance 
which must accompany all successful work in the school- 
room. 

The sub-teachers are thus receiving a training for which 
many, under like favorable circumstances, would be glad 
to pay reasonable tuition. It would, therefore, seem that 
there can be no lack of candidates for admission to the 
school, especially since the committee have enacted that 
11 qualifications being equal, preference shall be given to 
graduates of the Manchester Training School " whenever 
teachers are to be selected for permanent positions. 

The transfer of the Training School from Franklin street 
to its old quarters on Merrimack street was a gain in most 
respects, though a disadvantage in others. The class 
gained a recitation-room for the exclusive use of themselves 
and the principal of the school, in place of using a room 
which had been occupied all day by children and in no way 
suited to their needs, as was the case last year. The build- 
ing now used contains no other schools, hence there can be 
no clashing of interests. The school-rooms are larger and 
not so crowded as those at Franklin-street ; they are also 
better lighted and ventilated. On the other hand, it was a 
manifest disadvantage to have a new set of children to deal 
with, instead of continuing the methods of instruction and 
discipline with children who had already been accustomed 
to them, though the schools upon Merrimack street had 
been under excellent discipline and well instructed. 

In this connection it seems proper to name the additions 
to the Training-School library. They are : Johnson's Nat- 
ural History, two volumes ; and one copy each of Talks on 
Teaching, by Col. F. W. Parker; Duties of Women, by 



155 

Frances Power Cable ; Infant and Early Education, by 
Carrie ; School Management, by Joseph Landon ; Outlines 
of Educational Doctrine, by Prof. W. H. Payne. These, in 
addition to the list named in the report for last year, show 
the library to contain some of the most valuable works for 
teachers published in this country and Great Britain. 

The training school is an essential part of the public- 
school system of every large city not containing a normal 
school. This is particularly true of those paying their 
teachers less salaries than good normal-school graduates 
command, for the following reasons: First. All large cities 
are in constant need of substitute teachers, and sufficient 
suitable ones can be had in such cities as ours only from 
the membership of a city training school and its graduates. 
Even the accomplished high-school graduate is an incom- 
petent substitute ; and the lower the grade of school, the 
greater her incompetency. It requires one who has been 
skillfully trained for the purpose, or one who has acquired 
an equivalent by experience, to teach a modern primary 
school well. The amount of substitute work in the course 
of a year is great ; and the schools would become seriously 
embarrassed through the lack of a sufficient number of 
available substitute teachers, or by the employment of those 
poorly prepared for the work. 

Secondly. For the salaries here paid, we must depend 
for teachers chiefly upon those who can live at home. 
Those willing to come here from other places, at our prices, 
do not as a rule (and a former superintendent observed the 
same) do as well in teaching our schools as the better por- 
tion of our high-school graduates who have been through 
all our grades of school and are somewhat conversant witli 
the general system Hence we must either train such, or 
allow the schools to suffer the consequences of their experi- 
ments until they shall have acquired the necessary knowl- 



156 

edge and skill. If put into the primary school, as such 
beginners usually are, they generally make the saddest of 
work, even when honestly striving to do their best. They 
have neither the maturity nor training " to understand 
what they are doing, to say nothing of their inability to do 
much that they really appreciate." The fault is not theirs ; 
it is in the mistaken economy which so often places the 
untrained teacher in the school-room rather than to meet 
the expense of the training. 

A distinguished writer has recently said : " What the 
schools need, just now, is a race of teachers who will take 
their stand at the center and tell us how to do the everlast- 
ing commonplace things that lie at the base of human life, 
by methods more natural, swift, sweet, and radical ; how to 
teach the ordinary child, in a shorter time and with less 
friction, to read and write and spell, and put his thoughts 
on paper, and handle numbers, and have a realizing sense 
of nature, the world he lives in, and some of the good 
things that people have done in it, — this is the problem of 
the common school." 

This problem is not likely to be solved by teachers who 
have no knowledge of the philosophy of methods. They 
can but faintly recall the forms used by their teachers a 
decade earlier, and certain it is that there have been great 
changes for the better within the last ten years, in the 
methods of teaching every grade of school. But these 
methods are better only when directed by an ability corre- 
spondingly better, and this must be acquired by the novice 
at the expense of the children upon whom her experiments 
are made, unless she first has the training that can be 
obtained from the tuition of an expert in methods. 

That the opinions and arguments herewith advanced are 
such as obtain in cities whose schools have the highest rep- 
utation for real worth is clearly shown by the yearly estab- 



157 

lishment of schools for the especial training of teachers. 
Among those cities in which such schools have been organ- 
ized within the past few months, at a greater expense than 
Manchester permits, may be cited Columbus, Ohio, St. Paul 
and New Haven. 

The leading educational journal of the country, in one of 
its editorials, says: " We add our deliberate conviction, that 
no city of considerable size can now expect to keep step 
witli the educational life of the country, that does not pro- 
vide itself with a thorough system for the training of the 
majority of its teachers, in theory and practice, under the 
eye of an expert, in the most approved methods of 
instruction." 

This conviction I heartily indorse, and recommend to the 
thoughtful consideration of the guardians and patrons of 
our public schools. 

CHANGES OP TEACHERS. 

From an inspection of the list of teachers found in the 
appendix, it will be seen that there have been numerous 
changes during the current year. Six are there marked as 
having resigned. Two others, who resigned so early in the 
year that their names do not appear in the list, are Miss 
Clara G. Fogg, first assistant at the Franklin-street School, 
and Daniel A. Clifford, principal of the Ash-street School. 
Miss Anstrice G. Flanders, first assistant at the Ash-street 
School, also resigned at the close of the fall term. These 
were all good teachers. The last two had been in the em- 
ploy of the city about fifteen years, and rendered efficient 
and satisfactory service. They both excelled particularly 
as teachers of language. At the close of the year Miss 
Mintie C. Edgerly, who has also rendered the city valuable 
service for many years, tenders her resignation, on account 
of ill health. 



158 

Numerous transfers were also made at the close of the 
spring term, and they, too, are made apparent in the 
appended list of teachers. 

To fill the places made vacant by resignations and trans- 
fers, the following have for the first time been employed as 
teachers during one or more terms: Fred G. Baldwin and 
Mary E. Bunton, in grammar grades; Kittie J. Ferren, in 
the lower middle grade ; Mary G. Tynan, Eva F. Tuson, 
Kate M. Follansbee, and Georgie A. Wyman, in primary 
grades ; Ariana S. Dudley, Josie H. Richardson, and Ad- 
die C. Prescott, in suburban schools ; and Win. F. Gibson, 
for one term in the High School. 

MANUAL TRAINING. 

Without claiming to be a discover, I may truthfully 
assert that prior to writing my first annual school report, 
in 1877, I had not heard of any attempt or advocacy of an 
engraftment of manual training upon the public school ; 
and what I then wrote was said as the result of my per- 
sonal observation and many years' experience as teacher in 
the higher grades of public schools. I quote therefrom as 
follows : — 

" It is patent to teachers of the higher departments, and 
likewise obvious to the casual observer who frequently 
visits these grades, that too many pupils are there of the 
class who have no just appreciation of the advantages before 
them ; that, never having been obliged ' to lend a helping 
hand ' toward the maintenance of the family, they have 
the poorest' idea possible of what it is to be industrious, 
thorough, or frugal, as they show from their conduct at 
school, by careless habits, waste of time, and indifference to 
fair attainments. For all of this, they or their parents may 
not be more at fault than the system of education which 
fails to reach this class of pupils." 



159 

My accompanying remedial suggestion I soon learned to 
be too expensive to be practicable as a part of our city 
school system, though it is now being tried in the system 
of some of the great cities. There has since, also, seemed 
to be a realization, all over the country, of the educational 
value of manual training. Less expensive forms of it have 
been devised, so that several of the larger cities are attempt- 
ing its introduction in their schools. It may be well that 
Manchester should now await the results of the trial in the 
great cities, which are better able to bear the expense of 
experiments. We may thus be taught, and saved the ex- 
pense of the lesson, that those pupils who cannot be 
brought to exercise the full strength of their mental facul- 
ties by means of the ordinary school appliances cannot be 
led to such an exercise of them through a more direct 
application of mind to matter, as would be required in the 
attempt through a manipulation of the hand to produce in 
material substance the conceptions of the brain. For one, 
however, I shall not only be disappointed if manual train- 
ing in the school does not prove highly beneficial to that 
element in whose behalf it was particularly conceived, but 
also surprised if nearly all boys in the grades where it may 
be introduced do not claim the privilege of its exercise. 
While the chief benefit of manual training in the school is 
likely to be in the interests of those who could not other- 
wise be so well incited to put forth their best endeavor, I 
do not hesitate to predict that the class in no need of incite- 
ment to further endeavor will be so fascinated by the reve- 
lations unfolded in learning the dextrous use of tools that 
they will derive therefrom, to some extent, the recreation 
of which this latter class usually stand so much in need, 
and thereby probably be led to avoid the more dangerous 
forms of pastime which beset the young in large cities. In 
this view manual training becomes an important factor in 



160 

moral training ; and who that has experienced the disci- 
plinary influence of an acquired skillful use of tools can 
doubt its moral power ? 

In this connection, permit me to quote a few lines from 
my report of 1878 : — 

" I think the safety of the state, for which alone schools 
have any claim to support by public tax, would be as greatly 
promoted by the establishment, in our larger towns, of 
schools for the purpose of teaching habits of manual indus- 
try to the portion of school population that do not attain it 
in any degree from their natural guardians, as by our 
present system of public schools, which are so well adapted 
to the necessities of the majority. Idleness, I believe, leads 
to poverty and crime more frequently than ignorance. I 
am more fully aware than I was a year ago of the practical 
difficulties attending an engraftment upon our common 
schools of any general system of manual instruction, but I 
am inclined to think its need, which I believe will be found 
imperative before the close of another quarter of a century, 
must be met by special public institutions or by local enter- 
prise." 

Less than a quarter of that "quarter of a century " has 
elapsed, and yet even in the public school are now taught 
the elements of a " general system of manual instruction ;" 
while the " need " of the latter is already felt and being 
rapidly " met by special public institutions or by local 
enterprise." What more worthy subject invites the atten- 
tion and investigation of some wealthy and benevolent citi- 
zen who may be desirous of bestowing upon his city some 
creditable public benefaction ? 

I will not, at this time, argue the merits of manual train- 
ing in the school, nor will I introduce the arguments, 
favorable and adverse, of those who have given the subject 
most attention ; but I will, instead, refer those interested 



161 

in a further consideration of the subject to the papers and 
discussions proclaimed before the American Institute of 
Instruction and the National Teachers' Association at Sara- 
toga, July 13, 1882 ; to a pamphlet entitled " Manual Edu- 
cation in Public Schools," by ex-Superintendent L. H. Mar- 
vel, editor and publisher of Good Times, Boston, and to the 
numerous authorities cited in Mr. Marvel's pamphlet ; to 
leaflets descriptive of the work accomplished in the D wight 
School at Boston ; and to pamphlets upon the subject 
issued by the U. S. Commissioner of Education, as well as 
to the New England Journal of Education, Boston, and 
Education, a bi-monthly magazine issued by the publishers 
of the Journal. 

Manchester now has in the higher grades of her schools 
a less number of pupils who fail to appreciate and properly 
utilize the advantages of the schools than she had six years 
ago, while the aggregate number in these grades is about 
the same. These facts, since the aggregate number in all 
the schools is about three hundred greater, indicate that 
those who are indifferent to the higher attainments afforded 
by the high and grammar schools do not sufficiently con- 
tinue their attendance to reach these grades. It would, 
therefore, now seem that the chief service of manual train- 
ing in pur schools would be its tendency to prolong the 
pupilage of those who permanently withdraw from the 
schools before reaching the higher grammar grades ; but, 
as the withdrawals are chiefly from the primary and middle 
schools, and by an element largely and peculiarly affecting 
many of these lower grades, 1 think a change might be 
effected which would be of greater benefit to our population 
as a whole than the immediate introduction of manual 
training in our schools, while the advantages of an indus- 
trial education would be as largely attained without any 
additional expense to the city, 
li 



162 

I refer to the plan, which has been successfully practiced 
in some other places, of having those pupils who are annu- 
ally employed about half the year in manufacturing estab- 
lishments attend school half of each school-day, their em- 
ployment in such establishments being allowed during the 
other half of the day. There are two or three ways by 
which such an arrangement can be worked, and I shall be 
glad to present them whenever the committee may be ready 
to give its attention to the matter. I earnestly urge that 
you may early give the subject your attention for the fol- 
lowing reasons, quoted from my report of 1879 : — 

" First, there would be effected in a measure, for that 
portion of our school population most in need of it, a reali- 
zation of that ideal training which combines study and 
labor ; second, the influence of the school would be con- 
stantly exerted upon the child operative, and his learning 
made more certain and progressive ; third, such an arrange- 
ment would be in the interests of humanity, providing, as 
it would, some release from the continual strain of bearing- 
exacting responsibility during more hours daily than the 
physical powers of children can successfully long endure." 
It might also be added, that under the most approved form 
of regulating such employment, the pupil employes would 
each receive the benefit of one-half of every holiday, whether 
exceptional or of the regular vacations. 

Thus, it seems to me, you may so arrange that the por- 
tion of our pupils most in need of an immediate industrial 
education may obtain it, not only without expense to the 
city, but with direct and positive advantage to themselves 
and their parents. The advantage, too, would not be lim- 
ited to its immediate effects, for the pupilage of this class 
would be prolonged, as of necessity they would first have 
to attain the scholastic attainments required by law before 
they could be constantly employed. With this extended 



163 

length of pupilage would come an increase of years and a 
consequent greater maturity of mind, whose aspirations, it 
would be expected, should lead this class of pupils more 
largely to enter upon and longer pursue the studies of the 
grammar schools. 

MUSIC. 

In former reports I have sufficiently expressed my opin- 
ion of the advantages of music in the schools, as well as 
my high appreciation of the work performed by Prof. J. J. 
Kimball, our present special instructor ; and though I feel 
the importance of considerable instruction in music. I 
regard that the amount and degree of it in the public school 
should be made secondary to the instruction required in 
other branches and auxiliary thereto. I would, therefore, 
require that the instruction in music should be so limited 
that it could not encroach upon the time that should be de- 
voted to the studies which are more important to the greater 
part of our pupils. 

At the opening of the fall term, the committee directed 
that the special teacher of music should devote his three 
days per week to instruction in the high and grammar 
schools exclusively. These grades have consequently been 
receiving about two hours' drill in music weekly, including 
the lessons of the regular teachers. Notwithstanding this, 
the " Course of Study " contemplates that only one hour 
per week shall be devoted to music in the elementary 
schools. By reference to their time-table it may also be 
seen, that two hours per week is about the maximum 
amount of time that can be devoted weekly to the recita- 
tions of each class in the most important studies taught in 
these grades. The time being thus limited, an additional 
hour devoted to music means so much less than the marked 
time for the other studies ; so two hours per week for 



164 

music may be more time than is devoted to the recitations 
of a class for the week in arithmetic, language, reading, or 
some other study regarded as one of the more essential 
studies of the common school. If the present plan of teach- 
ing music is to be continued, I think teachers should be 
instructed particularly in regard to which of the other 
studies, and to what extent, they are to devote less than 
the indicated amount of time. 

In the High School, too, it has heretofore been custo- 
mary, during two weeks out of every three, to devote an 
hour less per week to drill exercises in music. There are 
six teachers in this school ; and the additional hour devoted 
to music means six recitations less per week, for two-thirds 
of the time, in the other studies of this school, if the recita- 
tions can be so arranged as to economize all the time. 

Besides, to my mind, the plan of confining the instruc- 
tion of the special teacher to the higher grades is wrong in 
principle. So continued, it would be like employing a 
special teacher to unfoli the best methods of teaching 
mathematics in the schools and then directing him to confine 
his efforts to the most advanced classes, without regard to 
the first principles of the subject. One with scarcely any 
knowledge of music can soon become competent to teach it 
in the higher grades, sufficiently well for the purpose of 
the public school, if it first be thoroughly taught in the 
lower grades ; so I would confine the instruction of the 
special teacher in music to the primary and middle schools, 
if he is to be limited to either the higher or the lower 
oracles. I also regard that the duties of the teachers of 
the lower grades are quite as onerous, and that they are 
therefore as much entitled to the assistance afforded byvthe 
special instructor. Great harm has not yet been done by 
the plan under which the special teacher has been directed 
to work during the past term, and I know it was regarded 



165 

as experimental ; but it has been in operation sufficiently 
long to convince me that it is not so well for the schools, 
generally, as the former plans, under which the special 
teacher in music visited all of the schools. 

Theoretically, I do not favor the employment of a special 
teacher of any subject for all of the schools ; but the results 
of the many years' special instruction in music afforded our 
schools are such that I concur in the wisdom of its continu- 
ance, satisfied, as I am, that its protraction is in accord 
with the wishes of the patrons of the schools, generally, and 
not opposed by those who most largely contribute to its 
expense. Such instruction, however much the statement 
may be regarded as a low estimate of the utility of music in 
the schools, largely promotes good feeling ; and in propor- 
tion to the high degree of art attained in its presentation and 
acquisition it becomes an efficient means of school dis- 
cipline. 

I therefore recommend that its advantages be given to 
the schools in general, by a return to one of the former 
plans for governing the work of the special teacher in 
music, unless a better can be devised.* 

teachers' association. 

Early in the year the public-school teachers organized a 
voluntary teachers' association, for mutual improvement. 
During the first term, however, there were only two meet- 
ings. February 20, an organization was effected ; and 
March 19 there were presented admirable "Class Exercises 
in Reading" and in " Vocal Drill," under the direction of 
Nellie M. James and Prof. B. F. Dame. 

The following is the program arranged for the spring 
term, and successfully carried out by those to whom parts 
were assigned : April 23, — Lecture, by Rev. Henry Powers, 

* The special teacher has since been directed to instruct all the schools in the city 
proper, once in two weeks. 



166 

upon " Some of the Essentials of a Common-School Educa- 
tion." May 7, — Essay, illustrated by specimens of class 
work, by Miss Nancy S. Bunion, " How the English Lan- 
guage should be taught in Primary and Middle Schools ;" 
" How it should be taught in Grammar Schools," by 
Edward P. Sherburne ; and " How it should be taught in the 
High School," by Miss Lucretia E. Manahan. May 21, — 
" How to employ Pupils not at Recitation in the Primary 
School," by Misses Lenora C. Gilford and Emma L. Stokes ; 
and " How shall we create Enthusiasm in the lowest 
quarter of the Class ?" by Albert W. Bacheler. June 4, — 
" School Recesses," by Miss Mary A Smith and Fred C. 
Baldwin, and " Waste of Time in the School-room," by Miss 
Mary F. Barnes. 

In the fall the association met first for re-organization. 
Upon the expressed wish of some teachers that the meet- 
ings might be less numerous during the progress of the 
special lessons in drawing, the executive committee ac- 
cordingly arranged for but one more meeting during the 
year. At that, " Percentage" was treated by George I. 
Hopkins. 

The several parts at each of the meetings were per- 
formed in a manner highly creditable to those participating, 
and with much profit to all ; and it is confidently hoped the 
association will continue its good work during the coming 
year. 

CONCLUSION, 

In conclusion, I feel inclined to suggest the adoption of a 
plan in operation in some places in the great West, where 
many of New England's most advanced ideas chiefly pre- 
vail, — carried there by the most enterprising of her popula- 
tion, and improved upon by opportunities afforded in re- 
organizing old systems. The custom to which I refer is, that 



167 

of having " Visiting Committees " selected by the School 
Board from among the ladies and gentlemen of the com- 
munity at large and appointed for the purpose of inspecting 
the schools and reporting their views in regard to the 
nature and success of the work attempted therein. 

You have this year made far more numerous visits to the 
schools than former committees have averaged for several 
years, but there has been no perceptible increase of visits 
by our citizens, who for the most part attend only when 
invited to witness some special exercise. It therefore 
occurs to me that a fair number of citizens selected from 
among the patrons of the several schools, and invited to 
give certain schools their special attention, would prove as 
effectual a means as any for awakening an interest that 
might speedily develop from a special to a general one, 
and greatly redound to the lasting well-being of our 
schools. 

T finally thank you, gentlemen of the committee, for 
your general courtesy, and for every special consideration 
extended. 

WM. E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



171 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS .FOR 
THE YEAR 1883. 



Schools. 



&•= 







14 




Whole No. 


x> 




Belonging.* 


S 


P a 




If 












O M 








bjog 


bcc 






<s5 


CB a> 


Boys. 


Girls. 


»& 








£M 


>< 






<! 


< 






High School 

Franklin-street Grammar School. 
Lincoln-street Grammar School. . . 

Ash-street Grammar School 

Spring-street Grammar School. . . . 

Piscjitaquog Grammar School 

Webster -street Grammar Schoolf . . . 



Totals 



Middle School No. If. 



9.. 
10t. 
11.. 
121! 
13t. 
14*., 



Totals. 



Primary School No. 1. . 

" 2$. 

" 3.. 

" 4.. 

" 5.. 

" 6.. 

" 7.. 



8, Discontinued. 

9, Discontinued 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16. 

17 

18 

19 

20 , 

21, Discontinued. 

22 

23, Discontinued. 

24 

25 

26 

27, Discontinued. 



209 
232 
259 

60 
141 

35 



63 
78 

102 
99 
94 
79 
83 

101 
91 
80 
78 



65 
92 
75 
98 
104 
94 



73 

100 
83 
93 
84 

110 
98 
89 
79 



93 

130 



101 
90 
83 
19 
64 
17 



374 



43 
37 
40 
37 
31 
27 
32 
30 
34 
33 
43 

30 

58 
51 
55 



97 

78 
97 
118 
25 
71 
13 



334 

25 
23 
47 
15 
25 
43 
37 



159 


153 


149 


142 


160 


149 


195 


183 


34 


32 


113 


107 


26 


24 


677 


637 


38 


33 


42 


39 


47 


44 


47 


44 


52 


46 


43 


38 


45 


41 


44 


40 


46 


42 


40 


37 


36 


33 


46 


42 


526 


479 


40 


37 


31 


29 


42 


36 


42 


38 


38 


34 


46 


42 


52 


49 


32 


29 


46 


41 


43 


39 


46 


41 


46 


43 


51 


46 


50 


45 


43 


41 


32 


29 


41 


37 


43 


38 


34 


30 


43 


38 


48 


43 


43 


41 



96.2 

95.3 
93.1 
93.8 
94.1 
94.7 
92.3 

94.1 



86.8 
93.8 
93.0 
93.0 
90.4 
88.4 
91.1 
90.9 
91.1 
92.5 
91.7 

91. i 

91.1 

92.5 
93.5 
80.9 
90.5 
89.5 
91.3 
94.2 



90.6 
89.1 
90.7 
90.4 
93.5 
90.2 
90.0 
95.3 
92.6 
90.2 
88.4 



88.4 
89.6 
95.3 



172 



TABLE SHOWING THE ATTENDANCE AT THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS FOR THE 
TEAR 1883, — Continued. 



Schools. 



zi 



Whole No. 
Belonging.' 1 



GlELS. 



If! 



~ — 

Si 

B«Ve 

Q 



Primary School No. 28.. 
29., 



Bakersvil 



' 30, Discontinued. 

' 31|| 

' 32|| 

' 33|| 

' 34 

' 35 



Totals. 



Ungraded. 
Suburban School, District No. 1. 



Totals 

Aggregate totals, 1883 . 
Aggregate totals, 1882 . 



87 
96 
110 

82 



45 
37 

42 
39 
30 
43 

311 

42 



1105 



182 
20G1 
2086 



192 
2001 
2009 



237 



2848 
2957 



43 
35 

37 
35 
34 
39 

28 
38 



1135 



2612 
2712 



95.5 
94.5 

88.1 
89.7 
87.2 
90.7 
93.3 
90.5 



90.9 



90.0 
90.5 
90.0 
92.8 
82.4 
76.9 
84.6 
88.3 
88.1 



87.8 
91.4 
917 



* Exclusive of those received, by promotion rr transfer, from other schools in the city. 

t The higher grade at Webster-street is marked "Grammar, and Middle No. 13," upon 
the " School Organization ;" but here it is classed as wholly of the grammar grade, and the 
number of its pupils of middle grade is offset by the number of pupils of grammar grade 
belonging to Middle School No. 10. This seems to be as equitable an indication of the num- 
ber of pupils belonging to the respective grades as can well be made. 

+ To effect an adjustment similar to that made for mixed grammar and middle grades, as 
mentioned in the foregoing note, the mixed middle and primary schools Nos. 1 and 35 are 
classed as primaries ; while No. 14, also mixed, is classed as a middle school. 

The latter has been in existence but two terms, — spring and fall. No. 1 Middle, which 
has been chiefly primary during the past year, and is likely to be altogtther such in future, 
is here classed as No. 2 Primary, in place of the one of that number formerly on Manchester 
street, but discontinued more than a year ago. 

|| The schools constituting the Training School at the end of the year. 






173 
LIST OF TEACHERS AND JANITORS. 

HIGH SCHOOL, BEECH STREET. 

Principal. — Albert W. Bacheler. 
Assistants. — George I. Hopkins. 

Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Emma J. Ela. two terms.* 

William F. Gibson, one term. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades', 
Principal. — Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. — Lenora C. Gilford. 

Lottie R. Adams. 

Carrie E. Reid. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades.^ 
No. 8 Middle. — C. Augusta Abbott, one term. 
7 Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders, one term. 

12 Primary. — Nellie M. James, one term. 
11 Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn, one term. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 
Grammar. — Annie 0. Heath. 
Grammar, and Middle No. 10. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 
No. 9. Middle. — Fannie D. Moulton. 

14 Primary. — Emma L. Stokes, two terms. 
Nellie I. Sanderson, one term. 

13 Primary. — Lucia E. Esty. 

26 Primary. — Carrie I. Stevens. 

* Resigned. 

t Constituted the Training School during the first two terms of the year, — Sarah E. 
Sprague, principal. See note on page 176. 



174 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — G-rammar Grades. 

Principal. — Benjamin F. Dame. 

Assistants. — Emma S. Sanborn, two terms.* 

Annie W. Patten, one term. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

No. 5 Middle. — Mary F. Barnes. 
4 Middle. — Carrie M. Gilmore. 
7 Primary. — Eva F. Tuson. 
29 Primary. — Emma M. Rowley. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Edward P. Sherburne. 
Assistants. — Anstrice G. Flanders, two terms. 

Mary E. Bunton, three terms. f 

Annie A. Webster. 

Bertha L. Dean 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

No. 3 Middle. — C. Augusta Abbott, two terms. 
Nancy S. Bunton, one term. 

2 Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders, two terms. 

Kittie J. Ferren, one term. J 
4 Primary. — Helen M. Morrill, two terms. 
Emma L. Stokes, one term. 

3 Primary. — Georgianna Dow, two terms. 

Helen F. Wetherbee, one term. 

* Resigned. 

t Two terms, extra division on third floor ; nearly one term, substitute for Miss Flanders. 

% Substitute for Mintie C. Edtterly, elected. 



175 



MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistants. — Cora M. Dearborn. 

Lizzie A. Burns, two terms. 
No. 11 Middle. — Lizzie A. Burns, one term. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

No. 11 Middle. — Florence McEvoy, two terms.*" 

6 Middle. — Ellen E. McKean. 
Primary, and Middle No. 14. — Flora M. Senter,two terms. f 
34 Primary. — Josephine H. Martin. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

First Floor. 

Grammar, and Middle No. 13. — Mary A. Smith. 
Middle, and Primary No. 35. — Louisa R. Quint, one term.J 

Maria N. Bower, two terms. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOLS. 

First Floor. 

No. 1 Primary. — Gertrude H. Brooks, two terms. 
Florence A. Nichols, one term. 

Second Floor. 

Primary, and Middle No. 1. — Nellie I. Sanderson, two 

terms. . 
Gertrude H. Brooks, one 
term. 

* Resigned. 

t One of these terms on second floor at South-Main-street. 

t Resigned. 



176 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT). 

Second Floor. 

No. 24 Primary. — Mary E. Sylvester, two terms.* 
Nina D. Annis, one term. 
5 Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn, two terms. 
Helen M. Morrill, one term. 

MANCHESTER-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT). 

First Floor. 

No. 10 Primary. — Mary G. Tynan. 

18 Primary. — Maria N. Bower, one term. 

Georgia A. Wyman, two terms. 

MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOLSf (CORNER UNION). 

First Floor. 

No. 33 Primary. — Helen F. Wetherbee, two terms. 
32 Primary. — Nellie M. James, two terms. 

Second Floor. 

No. 31 Primary. — Mintie C. Edgerly, one term. 
Clara N. Brown, one term.J 
12 Middle. — Nancy S. Bunton, two terms. 

WILSON HILL. 

No. 6 Primary. — Kate M. Follansbee. 

BEECH-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER SPRUCE). 

First Floor. 

No. 22 Primary. — Florence A. Nichols, two terms. 
Georgianna Dow, one term. 

* Resigned. 

t Constituted the Training School luring the third term of the year. See note on page 173 . 

$ Substituted for Miss Bdgerly. 






177 

CENTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

First Floor. 

No. 25 Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 
28 Primary. — Belle M. Kelley. 

Second Floor. 

No. 15 Primary. — Jennie F Bailey. 
16 Primary. — Augusta S. Downs. 

SOUTH-MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

First Floor. 

No. 17 Primary. — Alice G. Lord. 
20 Primary. — Delle E. Haines. 

SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. — Nina D. Annis, two terms. 

Josie H. Richardson, one term. 

2, Amoskeag. — Etta J. Carley. 

" Jennie G. Stebbins, No. 19 Primary. 

3, Bakersville. — Ariana S. Dudley, one term.* 

Nettie C. Woodman, two terms. 
S. Izetta Locke, Primary. 

4, Goffe's Falls. — Georgie A. Nute. 

5, Harvey District. — Mary W. Mitchell. 

6, Webster's Mills. — Susie G. Woodman. 

7, Hallsville. — Annie W. Patten, two terms. 

Addie C. Prescott, one term. 

8, Youngsville. — Olive J. Randall. 

9, Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. — Jason J. Kimball, three days per week. 

* Resigned. 

12 



MEMBERS OF THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Kittie J. Ferrenf, Mary E. Bunton*, Georgie A. WymanJ 
Edith M. Stebbins*, Fannie L. Sanbornf, Ella Hopef, Mary 
L. Gage*, Nettie F. Ainsworth*, Susie H. Frame, Bessie 
M. Hall*, Lelia A. Brooks*, Martha E. Sanborn*, Alta C. 
M. Willand*, Genevieve L. Whittenf , Annie L. Prescottf. 

JANITORS. 

Webster Street and Blodget Street. 

Charles M. Norton. 

High School, Ash Street, Bridge Street, and Wilson Hill. 

John S. Avery. 

Franklin Street, Manchester Street, and Lincoln Street. 

William Stevens. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. 

George W. Varnum. 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 

James Watts. 

Piscataquog Schools, consisting of Center Street, Main and 
South Main Street. 

D. H. Morgan. 

* Certificated for grammar and lower grades. 
t Certificated for middle and primary grades. 
t Certificated for primary grades. 



180 





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Latin. 
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THIRD YEAR. 

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French. 

Astronomy. 


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182 



It is designed that every pupil shall have three of the foregoing studies each term, and 
four recitations a week in each study, Wednesday of each week being a day for general 
e xercises. 

Trigonometry and Surveying, French and Latin, as well as Greek and other studies 
necessary for admission to college, are elective. Pupils can pursue no other course than 
the English, except upon the written request of their parents or guardians, who shall 
Bpecify which one of the other courses is desired for the pupil in whose behalf the request 
is made. 

Provision is made for a course of two years in French, three years in Latin, or four j'ears 
in Latin and nearly three in Greek for chose proparing for college. 

Drill exercises are to be required weekly, for all, throughout the course, as follows: In 
Spelling, Elocution, and Reading, every term; in Penmanship, during the first four terms 
to be followed by practice obtained in two terms at Book-keeping; in Music (by those 
choosing it), every term; and an exercise in studying English one hour and a half weekly 
will be required for six terms, to connect the study of Grammar and Rhetoric with the 
work finally to be done in English Authors. Geography of New Hampshire is also to be 
taken one hour weekly for two terms. One hour and a half is to be devoted weekly to 
usual rhetorical exercises. All the exercises named in this paragraph are to be taken on 
Wednesdays. 

Music and Drawing are optional, under certain restrictions. The time-table will afford 
further details. 



183 

LANGUAGE. 

The following exercises were given within the year, for 
the chief purpose of ascertaining what facility and correct- 
ness pupils had acquired in the use of language. 

The first and second exercises also indicate, to some 
extent, the power of pupils to gather ideas from silent 
reading. 

FIRST DIVISION OF GRAMMAR GRADE. — EIGHT- 
YEARS PUPILS. 

Pupils were allowed about six minutes for reading silently 
the following narrative. They then immediately wrote it 
from memory, and were allowed about an hour for the 
writing. 

" Cyrus, the Persian prince, had many masters, who 
endeavored to teach him every thing that was good ; and he 
was educated with several little boys about his own age. 
He was a boy of a very good disposition, and a humane 
temper ; but even in his youthful games he showed a 
strong desire to command, and other boys used to make 
him their king. One evening, his father asked him what 
he had done or learned that day. ' Sir,' said Cyrus, ' I 
was punished to-day for deciding unjustly.' — ' How so ?' 
said his father. — ; There were two boys,' said Cyrus,' one 
of whom was a great, and the other a little, boy. Now, 
it happened that the little boy had a coat that was much 
too big for him, but the great boy had one that scarcely 
reached below his middle, and was too tight for him in 
every part. The great boy proposed to the little boy to 
change coats with him ; " because then," said he, " we 
shall be both exactly fitted, for your coat is as much too 
big for you, as mine is too little for me." The little boy 
would not consent to the proposal ; upon which the great 



184 

boy took his coat away by force, and gave his own to the 
little boy in exchange. While they were disputing upon 
this subject, I chanced to pass by, and they agreed to make 
ine judge of the affair. But I decided that the little boy 
should keep the little coat, and the great boy the great 
one. for which judgment my master puhished me.' — ' Why 
so?' said Cyrus s father, 'was not the little coat most 
proper for the little boy, and the large coat for the great 
boy ?' — ' Yes, sir,' answered Cyrus, ' but my master told 
me I was not made judge to examine which coat best fitted 
either of the boys, but to decide whether it was just that 
the great boy should take away the coat of the little one 
against his consent ; and therefore I decided unjustly, and 
deserved to be punished.' " 

It is proper here to say that, in all the exercises, pupils 
were required to write at once with pen and ink and 
return their first draft, no copies being allowed. 

Below may be found the best paper marked " A." and 
an average paper marked " B," from eacli of our three 
grammar schools having a first division. The schools are 
respectively designated by the numbers 1, 2, 3. 

The difference in the form of the given " subjects " may 
be explained by the fact that pupils were told to select 
such a title, for their several pieces, as might seem most 
suitable. 

(1 A.) 

Unjust Judgment. 

" Cyrus, the Persian prince, had many masters, who 
endeavored to teach him everything that was good, and he 
was educated with several other little boys about his own 
age. 

He was of a good disposition, and a humane temper; 
but even in his youthful games, he showed a strong desire 



185 

to command, and other boys used to make him their king. 

One day, his father asked him what he had done that 
day. ' Sir,' said Cyrus, ' I was punished to-day for decid- 
ing unjustly.' — ' How so V asked his father. ' Two boys,' 
answered Cyrus, ' one a great, and the other a little, boy, 
met each other. Now, it so happened that the little boy 
had on a coat that was much too large, and hung loosely 
upon him, while the great boy had on one that came only 
to his middle, and was tight in every part. Noting this, 
the great boy proposed to change with the other, " because," 
he said, " your coat is as much too large for you as mine is 
small for me." But the little boy would not consent to 
this, whereupon, the great boy took away the large coat by 
force from the little boy, and gave him his small one in 
return. I chanced to pass by as they were arguing, and they 
agreed to leave the matter to me. But 1 judged that the 
little boy should keep the small, and the great boy the 
large, coat, and therefore I was punished.' 

1 But why ? ' asked his father, ' was it not proper that the 
great boy should have the large coat, and the little boy the 
small one ? ' 

' My master told me,' answered Cyrus, ' that I was not 
made judge to examine about tbe size of the coats, but 
whether it was right for the great boy to take the little 
boy's coat without his consent. I judged unjustly, and so 
deserved to be punished ?' " 

(2 A.) 
The Prince's Decision. 

Cyrus, the Persian Prince, had a great many masters, 
who tried to teach him all that was good. 

Cyrus had a good disposition, and a humane temper. 
One evening the boy's father asked him what he had done 
or learned that day. " Sir," said Cyrus, " My master 



186 

punished me for deciding unjustly. 1 ' " How so ?" inquired 
his father. 

" It happened, that a little boy had a coat, that was much 
too large for him and that a great boy had one that was 
very small for him. The great boy wanted the little one 
to exchange coats, ' For then,' said he, ' We shall be 
exactly fitted, for your coat is as much too large for you, as 
mine is small for me.' The little boy would not consent to 
this and the great boy took the coat away from him by 
force. 

I happened to pass by just then, and they consented to 
leave it to me ; but I decided that the little boy should keep 
the little coat, and that the great boy should keep the large 
coat, for which decision my master punished me." 

" But why," asked his father, " Was it not proper that 
the little boy should have the little coat, and that the great 
boy should have the large one "? 

" Yes," said Cyrus, " But my master said I was not to 
judge, which of the coats fitted either of the boys the best, 
but whether it was right for the great boy to take the little 
boy's coat away from him without his consent, and so I 
deserved punishment" 

(3 A.) 

An Anecdote of Cyrus, the Persian Prince. 

Cyrus the Persian prince, had many masters who 
endeavored to teach him every-thing that was good. He 
had a very good disposition and a humane temper, and in 
his youth he showed a strong desire to command, and in 
the games which he played when a boy the others would 
make him their chief. One evening his father asked him 
what he had done or learned that day. ' Sir.' said Cyrus, 
I was punished to-day for deciding unjustly, why was that 
asked his father. 



187 

There were two boys, said Cyrus, — a great one and a little 
one, the little boy had a coat on that was very much to 
large for him, and the great boy's coat was to tight for him* 
in every way, and meeting the little boy, he asked him to 
change coats with him for said he we shall be just fitted, 
but the little boy would not consent to the proposal and 
the great boy took it away from him by force. While they 
were disputing I chanced to pass along and they agreed to 
make me their judge, and I decided that the great boy 
should keep the great coat and the little boy should keep 
the little coat, well said his father, is it not proper that the 
great boy needed the great coat and the little boy the little 
coat. My master told me, — said Cyrus ; that I was not 
made to judge wether the coats fitted them but wether the 
great boy did right in taking away the coat against the little 
boy's consent, and I decided wrong and deserved to be 
punished. 

(1 B.) 

Cyrus, the Unjust Prince. 

Cyrus, a Persian prince, had many masters who tried 
to teach him everything that was right. He had many 
small boys, of his own age, who were taught right the 
same as himself. One evening, his father asked him what 
he had done to please somebody, and he answered, 
" Father, I have acted unjust." " Why, so," asked his 
father. " Two boys were standing by, one was a large 
and the other a small, boy. The larger one had on a coat 
that was very much to small for him, and the smaller one 
had one that was very much too large for him. Said the 
larger boy to the smaller, — v ' Let us change coats for 
mine is as much too small for me as yours is too large for 
you." The smaller boy did not wish to, so the larger 
boy one pulled it off from him, and put it onto himself, 



188 

and left the smaller boy the smaller coat. Just at that 
momeht, I passed by, and they decided to make me judge 
over this affair, and therefore asked me which coat I 
thought each ought to have. I said, — "I should think 
that the smaller boy should have the smaller coat, and the 
larger boy the larger one. When I arrived home my 
masters told me that I should not have judged which boy 
should have which coat, but if it was right for the larger 
boy to snatch the smaller boy's coat from him and not ask 
for him to consent. So as I have explained I have done 
unjust to-day. 

(2B.) 

A Quick Decision. 

" Cyrus," a Persian Prince, had a great many masters 
who wanted to make him good, he was well educated and 
went to school with many little boys of his age. 

He had a good disposition, and a humane temper, but 
when he was at play, he liked to command and the little 
boys always made him king. 

One evening his father asked, " Cyrus," " what have 
you learned or done to-day ?" 

" Father," said Cyrus, " I was punished for a decision," 
which I made. 

" Well," said his father, " what is it that you decided 
about V 

" Father," said Cyrus, " as I was going along I saw two 
boys." " One was a very large boy, and the other was 
very small." 

" The small boy had a coat on, that was to large for 
him," and, *' the large boy, a coat on that was very tight 
for him." 

The large boy wanted the small boy to exchange coats 
as they would fit better. 



189 

The little boy refused to do so, but the large boy forced 
the coat from him. 

When the two boys saw me coming along they wanted 
me to judge which coats each one ought to have. 

I then said, the little boy should have the small coat and 
the large boy, the large coat. 

The master saw me and I was punished for it. 

He said I was not to say which boy should have the coat, 
but to see which one did right in the dispute. 

(SB.) 

Cyrus's Decision. 

There was a young Persian prince named Cyrus, who 
had many masters, and they all endeavored to teach him 
everything that was great and good. When in play with 
his companions, he was noticed to have a strong desire to 
command, and they generally made him ' king.' ' Well ' 
said his father to him one evening ' what have you learned 
to day that is just and good ?' 

' Sir ' — replied Cyrus '- 1 have been severely punished by 
my master for deciding unjustly " " What for ?" asked his 
father. " Well it happened thus ' replied Cyrus. 

' There are two boys, one a large boy and the other a 
small boy. They each have two coats, but the small boy's 
coat is quite too large for him, and the large boy's coat is 
too small and tight for him. These boys both met one day 
and the large boy proposed that they should exchange coats. 
The other boy did not want to do this when the large one 
took his coat by force from him. 

' I chanced to be passing by when they were engaged in 
this discussion, and was called upon by them to act as 
judge and decide what they should do. I decided that the 
large boy should have the large coat, and the small boy the 



190 

small coat. " Why was that not just ?" asked his father ? 
Well said Cyrus my master said that I was not to act as 
judge for any one who would take a boy's coat by force 
from and that I had decided unjustly so he punished me.' 



HIGHER MIDDLE SCHOOLS.— FIVE-YEARS PUPILS. 

The exercise for these schools was, in general, conducted 
in a manner similar to that just described. The modifica- 
tions, however, may be seen from the material furnished 
pupils, as follows : — 

The Deer Family. 

(Pupils are to retain these papers but ten minutes, and during this 
time they are not to be allowed to do any writing. 

Pupils will therefore fix their attention upon what is here said in 
print, so they can soon rewrite the facts quite fully.) 

The deer family includes many species. They are all 
harmless and timid, always seeking safety in flight rather 
than in defense. 

All the males of this family, and the females of the rein- 
deer species, have horns, — many of them long and branch- 
ing. Deer are noted for beauty of form, speed, and acute- 
ness of hearing. 

The body and legs are long and slender : the ears are 
quite large and can be turned forward or backward with 
equal facility : the eyes are full and bright : the feet are 
cloven. In winter, the body is covered with long, shaggy, 
grayish hair, which it sheds in early summer ; and a new 
growth of fine, short, reddish-brown hair soon appears. This 
family is found in every continent except Australia, and 
differs from all other families of ruminants in one particu- 
lar, — that of shedding its horns, or antlers, as they are 



191 

called, annually, new ones soon appearing and attaining 
their full size in three months. 

The horns, while growing, are covered with a thick, vel- 
vety skin, containing many veins, which are rilled with 
material for their growth. The growth of the horns is 
checked by the formation of rings of bone at their base. 
This obstructs the veins that convey the horn material ; 
the velvety skin then dries and falls off without pain, leav- 
ing on the horns long deep grooves that show plainly where 
the veins were located. 

The food of this family, living in cold climates, is twigs 
and buds of shrubs, moss and lichens ; and of those inhab- 
iting warm regions, grass, leaves of trees and of pond 
lilies. The usual weight of a full sized deer is about two 
hundred pounds. 

Its flesh, called venison, is considered a great delicacy 
and commands a high price in the market. From its skin 
is obtained a kind of soft leather, called buckskin. This is 
much used for gentlemen's gloves. From its horns, knife- 
handles, caue-heads and buttons are made. 

* Questions on the Deer. 

(Having looked over the article on " The Deer Family," you are now 
asked to write a description similar to that which you have just read, 
for the chief purpose of showing how well you have learned to use 
language. 

These questions are allowed you merely to assist the memory in 
recalling the description. A continuous story is wanted.) 

1. What animal is the subject of this lesson ? 

2. What do you know of its disposition ? 

3. When pursued, what will it do ? 

4. Which sex invariably has horns ? 

5. In what species do all have horns ? 

*To the Teacher. — Pupils are not to have these questions until the papers containing 
the description have been taken from them. 



192 

6. For what are deer noted ? 

7. Where are they found ? 

8. Describe their bodies, legs, feet, ears, eyes. 

9. What is usually their color in winter ? in summer ? 

10. In what particular does this family differ from all other 

families of ruminants ? 

11. In what time do the horns attain full size and length ? 

12. With what are the horns covered while growing ? 

13. W T hy do they stop growing ? 

14. How often do the horns fall off? 

15. What may be seen on the surface of the horns ? 

16. What is the food of deer ? 

17. What is its usual weight? 

18. What is its flesh called ? 

19. What use is made of its skin ? flesh ? horns ? 

The following result is the best from one of the 
schools : — 

The Deer Family. 

The deer family includes many species, all are very timid 
and take safty in flight rather than defence. Deer are 
noted for their beauty, their speed and their acuteness of 
hearing. All the males, and the females of the reindeer, 
have horns ; their horns are usually long and branching. 
This family is found in all the continents except Australia. 
Their bodies and legs are long and slender, their feet are 
cloven, their ears are large and can be turned back or 
forward with equal facility, their eyes are large and promi- 
nent. In winter they are covered with long shaggy hair 
which they shed in early summer, then a fine reddish 
brown hair grows out. The deer differs from other rumi- 
nants in one way, they shed their horns annualy. While 
growing the horns are covered with a thick velvety skin in 
which are many veins which contain the horn material. 



193 

The growth of the horn is checked by a formation of rings 
of bone at the base. This obstructs the veins, the velvetty 
skin then dries up and falls off without pain, leaving on the 
surface of the horn long deep grooves showing plainly 
where the veins were located. The food of those inhab- 
iting cold countries is grass, buds of shrubs, moss, and 
lichens, those inhabiting warm countries is leaves of trees, 
grass, and pond lilies. The usual weight of a full grown 
deer is about two hundred pounds. The flesh is called 
venison and is considered a great delicacy and commands a 
high price in the market. Out of its skin is made a soft 
kind of leather called buckskin and is much used for gentle- 
men's gloves ; its horns are made into knife-handles, cane- 
heads, and buttons, ect. 

The following is an average result from another of the 
schools : — 

The Deer Family. 

The subject of this lesson is the deer family. The deer 
has a very gentle disposition and will flee for safety. The 
male always has horns. The rein-deer always has horns. 
The deer is noted for its quick smell, quick hearing, and 
beauty of shape. The deer is found in all continents except 
Australia. Their bodies are long and slender, their legs 
are long and slender also. Their feet are cloven, their ears 
are long can be draw backward and forward, its eyes are 
large and full. 

Their usual color in winter is a shaggy grayish color 
and in summer it is red. They are different from other 
ruminants because they shed their horns. They attain full 
length and size in about three months. The horns are 
covered with a soft velvety skin while growing. They stop 
growing when they get their growth. They fall off once a 
year. Deep grooves may be seen where the veins were 

13 



194 

located. The food of the deer in warm climates is moss, 
lichens and twigs, in cold climates they eat leaves of trees 
and pond lilies. Its usual weight is two hundred pounds. 
Its flesh is called venison. The use of its skin is to make 
buckskin gloves ; its flesh is used for food and is sold at 
market at a high price ; the horns are used to make cane- 
heads, knife-handles, and buttons. 

LOWER MIDDLE SCHOOLS. — FOUR-YEARS PUPILS. 
(Same grade as the last year primary in most places.) 

In this exercise, teachers gave such oral instruction in 
regard to the " Cow " as they could in fifteen or twenty 
minutes. The pupils then immediately reproduced in 
writing the substance of what was taught. 

The following result is the best from one of the schools : — 

The Cow. 

The cow is called herbivorous because she eats grass. 

She has four stomachs ; her food goes down in one and 
is moistened, then it goes into the second one and is 
rounded up into little balls. It then goes up into her mouth 
again and she chews it. Then it soes down in her third 
one, then in her fourth stomach and is digested. 

The cow is very useful. We make buttons and combs 
out of her horns, and put her hair into mortar and make 
glue of her hoofs. 

She gives us butter, milk and cheese. 

Her hoofs are split and we call them cloven hoofs, inside 
her hoofs she has got two toes. 

She is very slow in her movements. 

Some people paint the cow's head because her eyes are so 
pretty. 

All animals that chew their cuds are called ruminants. 



195 

The cow has no upper teeth in front, but eight under 
ones, and she has six back ones in both gums. 

The following is an average result from another of the 
schools : — 

The Cow. 

The cow belongs to the hollow-horned order of Rumi- 
nants, or Cud-chewing animals. The cow is from six to 
seven feet long, the cow's tail is long and bushy. I think 
it is bushy because it is to brush of the insects that trouble 
her. The cow has no front teeth on the upper jaw, but she 
has some side teeth and they are called the grinding teeth. 
When she eats she strikes her upper jaw with her lower teeth. 
The cow has a large stout body ; her head is large and 
long ; her legs are stout ; her eyes are pretty, large and 
brown. The flesh supplies us with beef for food, her skin 
gives us hides for boots and shoes, her feet gives us glew ; 
her homes gives us combs, buttons and knife handles. 
There is a kind of a cow called the " grunting cow," she 
lives in Asia. The cow is more useful than the horse. The 
cow eats grass and hay. I like the cow, don't you ? 



196 



INVENTORY OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

High-School house and lot . . $50,000 00 
Furniture, charts, maps, books, 



and apparatus 
Franklin-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Lincoln-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Ash-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
North- Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc . 
Webster-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Blodget-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Bridge-street house and lot . 
Lowell-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. * 
Manchester-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Merrimack-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Beech-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Center-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
South-Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 



2,000 00152,000 00 
18,000 00 

400 00 18,400 00 
15,000 00 

400 00 15,400 00 
50,000 00 

400 00 50,400 00 
58,000 00 

400 00 58,400 00 
17,000 00 

600 00 17,600 00 
16,000 00 

350 00 16,350 00 
3,500 00 
150 00 3,650 00 
900 00 900 00 
7,000 00 

400 00 7,400 00 
8,500 00 
300 00 8,800 00 
15,000 00 

550 00 15,550 00 
3,300 00 



100 00 
7,000 00 

350 00 
5,000 00 

425 00 
2,800 00 

200 00 



3,400 00 
7,350 00 
5,425 00 
3,000 00 



197 



Bakersville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Stark-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Goffe's-Falls house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Harvey-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Webster-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Hallsville house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Youngsville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. . 
Mosquito-Pond-Dist. house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house and lot 



$13,000 


00 




600 


00113,600 00 


3,000 


00 




150 


00 


3,150 00 


3,700 


00 




125 


00 


3,825 00 


3,600 


00 




100 


00 


3,700 00 


2,500 


00 




125 


00 


2,625 00 


600 


00 




50 


00 


650 00 


3,500 


00 




125 


00 


3,625 00 


1,400 


00 




125 


00 


1,525 00 


1,200 


00 




100 


00 


1,300 00 


8,500 


00 


8,500 00 



126,525 00 



198 



COUNTY STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS 



Belknap. Carroll. 



Cheshire. 



Towns having organized schools 

Different public schools 

Graded schools 

Town and district high schools 

Boys attending school two weeks or more . 
Girls attending school two weeks or more. 
Average attendance of all the scholars 



Ratio of average attendance to the whole number.. 
Number reported attending private schools, not reg 

istered in public schools 

Number reported between the ages of five and 

fifteen, not attending any school 

Selectmen's enumeration between \ * 

five and fifteen years J q-.-i. 



Number pursuing higher branches 

Male teachers 

Female teachers 

Number of school-houses 

Built during the year 

Estimated value of buildings, sites, and furniture. 

Estimated value of apparatus 

Town taxes 

District taxes 

Literary from the state 

Local funds 

Railroad tax 

Dog tax 

Contributed in board, fuel, and money 

Entire amount of revenue 

New buildings 



Permanent repairs 

Miscellaneous expenses, ordinary repairs, fuel, 
care, etc 



Teachers' salaries 
Superintendence. . 



Total expended 

Average cost per scholar, miscellaneous expenses 
and teachers' salaries : 



11 
154 
22 
2 
1,669 
1,548 
2,420.69 
.752 
153 
126 
329 
334 
390 
20 
172 
127 
1 
$82,450.00 
1,035.00 
17,816.52 
3,611.37 
1,330.65 
388.42 
400.41 
411.41 
290.94 
24,294.72 
880.00 
1,060.94 
1,517.28 
17,178.26 
667.50 
22,347.41 
5.86 



18 
200 
8 
1 
1,979 
1,705 
2,462.00 
.668 
37 
95 
1,168 
1,157 
446 
64 
189 
181 
1 
$63,675 00 
990.85 
16,651.83 
3,114.61 
2,748.48 
796.84 
23.95 
528.13 
651.44 
24,515.28 



1,276.45 

1,533.22 

18,312.46 

676.95 

23,123.64 

5.36 



23 

270 
57 
9 
3,082 
2,853 
4,246.04 
.717 
104 
193 
1,641 
1,508 
913 
47 
322 
224 
1 
$233,086.95 
3,675.00 
48,928.67 
8,883.64 
4,659.87 
945.97 
86.63 
811.47 
230.30 
62,546.55 
2,451.00 
5,268.71 
4,017.18 
41,188.60 
1,208.25 
57,760.72 
6.56 



199 



IN NEW HAMPSHIRE, 1882. 



Coos. 

1 


Grafton. 


ElilUboro'. Merrimack 


Rocking- 
ham. 


Stratford. Sullivan. 


Totals. 


21 


39 


31 


27 


37 


13 


15 


235 


197 


418 


445 


354 


271 


204 


200 


2,713 


12 


43 


130 


67 


63 


68 


16 


486 


3 


6 


9 


4 


7 


5 


4 


50 


2,131 


4,065 


6,773 


4,204 


4.425 


3,090 


1,905 


33,323 


1,960 


3,934 


6,376 


4,146 


4,213 


3,030 


1,766 


31,531 


3,167.74 


4,850.55 


8,720.05 


6,154.56 


6,326.42 


4,875.09 


2,847.40 


46,070.54 


.789 


.606 


.663 


.606 


.732 


.796 


.778 




64 


100 


3,216 


260 


459 


102 


111 


4,606 


202 


335 


276 


406 


465 


782 


198 


3,078 


390 


1,255 


967 


946 


503 


364 


554 


8,117 


338 


881 


936 


823 


831 


555 


288 


7,651 


538 


2,382 


1,495 


789 


2,894 


1,824 


868 


12,539 


29 


69 


52 


45 


64 


38 


32 


460 


221 


504 




426 


309 


218 


225 


3,090 


146 


367 


294 


308 


243 


147 


172 


2,209 


9 

$55,875.00 


4 

$ 
203,297.00 


4 

$ 
707,041.08 


2 
331,285.00 


$ 
202,385.00 


1 
$ 
338,925.00 


2 
$ 
73,965.00 


25 

s 

2,351,985.03 


764.50 


2,888.00 


15,509.75 


5,963.00 


5,978.50 


3,392.00 


1,395.00 


41,591.64 


18,313.23 


41,084.23 


135,403.19 


56,452.86 


67,927.81 


46,165.81 


20,556.20 


469,300 45 


3,016.05 


2,114.31 


20,635.42 


22,737.03 


5,987 50 


17,065.00 


4,425.36 


91,590.29 


2,577.32 


3,688.61 


5.659.50 


3,535 58 


4,154 55 


5,001.27 


1,728.09 


33,083.92 


239.39 


10,136.56 


1,669.51 


1,519.07 


1,220.19 


50.00 


335.06 


17,251 01 


596.78 


921.61 


310.86 


542 58 


1,029.74 


1,844.78 


34.76 


5,972.10 


327.36 


937.52 


1,612.88 


901.74 


1,011.94 


451 . 46 


278.94 


7,072.85 


1,051.25 


2,687.87 


958.84 


1,435.37 


375.28 


153 30 


867.52 


7,870.43 


26,121.38 


61,570.71 


166,250.20 


87,124 23 


81,707.01 


70,731 . 62 


28,225.93 


633,042.63 


3,294.04 


1,649.00 


22,647.70 


901.25 


543.93 


1,631.00 


1,155.57 


35,153.49 


977.51 


2,457 0C 


9,793.75 


4,675.67 


5,776.00 


6,515.00 


907.70 


38,708.86 


1,032.23 


5,170.08 


23,267.74 


8,847.07 


7,187.64 


5,450.89 


1,844.78 


38,927.11 


19,122.36 


42,532.74 


102,280.03 


59.018.59 


59,640.87 


50,371.92 


20,706.31 


430,352. 14 


640.51 


1,436.10 


4,526.19 


3,085 96 


1,258.55 


625.50 


745 81 


14,871.32 


26,035.93 


57,934.98 


162,694.77 


84,143.45 


76,473.57 


69,623.13 


25,749.38 


605,887.04 


5.45 


5.54 


8.33 


7.09 6.7S 

1 


7.89 


5.4S 





200 



EXTRACTS FROM STATE LAWS. 

Our state law requires that the school committee shall 
call the attention of parents, guardians, masters, and others 
to section 14, chapter 91 of the General Laws of New 
Hampshire. The section is here quoted for that purpose : 

i4 Sect. 14. Every parent, guardian, master, or other per- 
son having the custody, contro 1 , or charge of any child 
between the ages of eight and fourteen years, residing in 
any school district in which a public school is annually 
taught for the period of twelve weeks or more within two 
miles by the nearest traveled road from his residence, shall 
cause such child to attend such public school for twelve 
weeks at least in every year, six weeks at least of which 
attendance shall be consecutive, unless such child shall be 
excused from such attendance by the school committee of 
the town, or the board of education of such district, upon its 
being shown to their satisfaction that the physical or men- 
tal condition of such child was such as to prevent his attend- 
ance at school for the period required, or that such child 
was instructed in a private school or at home for at least 
twelve weeks during the year, in the branches of education 
required to be taught in the public schools, or, having 
acquired those branches, in other more advanced studies." 

Sections 11, 12, and 13 of chapter 91 of the General 
Laws of New Hampshire, as amended by an act approved 
August 9, 1881, read as follows : — 

" Sect. 11. No child under sixteen years of age shall be 
employed in any manufacturing establishment, unless he 
has attended some public school, or private day school 
where instruction was given by a teacher competent to 
instruct in the branches taught in the common schools, at 



201 

least twelve weeks during the year preceding ; and no child 
under said age shall be so employed except in vacation of 
the school in the district in which he resides, who cannot 
write legibly and read fluently in readers of the grade usu- 
ally classed as third readers. 

44 Sect. 12. No child under the age of fourteen years shall 
be employed as aforesaid unless he has attended school as 
aforesaid at least six months during the year preceding, or 
has attended the school of the district in which he dwelt 
the whole time it was kept during the year ; and no child 
under twelve years of age shall be so employed unless he 
has attended the school of the district in which he dwelt 
the whole time it was kept during the year preceding. 

44 Sect. 13. The owner, agent, or superintendent of any 
manufacturing establishment, or any person connected 
therewith, who shall employ in such establishment any 
child under the age of sixteen years, without a certificate 
signed by a majority of the school committee of the town or 
city in which the child resides, or by such person or per- 
sons as they may designate for the purpose, that such child 
has attended school, as required by sections eleven and 
twelve of this chapter, shall be fined not exceeding twenty 
dollars for each offense." 

ENCOURAGEMENT OF LITERATURE. 

Extract from the Constitution of New Hampshire : — 

Art. 83. 4t Knowledge and learning generally diffused 
through a community being essential to the preservation of 
a free government, and spreading the opportunities and 
advantages of education through the various parts of the 
country being highly conducive to promote this' end, it shall 
be the duty of the legislators and magistrates, in all future 
periods of this government, to cherish the interests of litera- 
ture and the sciences, and all seminaries and public schools, 



202 

to encourage private and public institutions, rewards, and 
immunities for the promotion of agriculture, arts, sciences, 
commerce, trades, manufactures, and natural history of the 
country ; to countenance and inculcate the principles of 
humanity and general benevolence, public and private 
charity, industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, 
sincerity, sobriety, and all social affections and generous 
sentiments among the people." 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



EEPOET 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 






Engineers' Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1883. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : — 



In compliance with section 5 of chapter 8 of the Laws 
and Ordinances of the city, I herewith submit the annual 
report of the Manchester Fire Department for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1883, giving amount of property con- 
nected therewith, as well as the fires and alarms to which 
the department has responded. 

During the year just closed there have been only thirteen 
alarms, four of which needed no assistance from the depart- 
ment, thus leaving but nine actual fires, and none of those 
of a very severe nature, as figures in the table'of fires, etc., 
will indicate. The last few years have been exceptional 
ones as to freedom from losses by fire in our city, and 
while the year 1883 has been more disastrous to insurance 
companies throughout the country than for many years, it 
has been the most favorable to Manchester infthat respect. 

Considering the inflammable material of which a large 
majority of our buildings are composed, andj the careless 
manner in which many of them are put together, the infre- 
quency of fires in our midst is remarkable. 



206 



ORGANIZATION. 



The present organization of the department includes one 
hundred and fourteen members, as follows : — 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

2 Steam Fire Engine Companies, — 14 men each. 
1 Horse Hose Company, — 20 men. 

3 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 
1 Hook and Ladder Company, — 25 men. 

In addition to the above is one hand-hose company of 20 
volunteers, not under pay. 

THE APPARATUS, 

with but one or two exceptions, was never in better condi- 
tion. The supply wagon is much too light for the service 
required of it, and 1 would suggest the transfer of the 
wagon known as " City No. 1 " to this department, to take 
the place of the one in present use. 

The hose carriage spoken of in my last report has been 
purchased, and a company of twelve men organized and 
put into service on the first of July. This company is 
located on Park street, corner of Massabesic, and is known 
as " Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4." 

A new carriage has been supplied the Massabesic Hose 
Co. No. 2, and their old one transferred to Amoskeag vil- 
lage, where it is to be used as a hand carriage for that 
immediate section. It is manned by a volunteer company 
of active young men of that vicinity who, I have no doubt, 
will render efficient service when occasion requires. 

The N. S. Bean Steamer No. 4. has just been supplied 
with a set of new wheels, and also been thoroughly painted. 



207 

The apparatus, as at present located, consists of — 

*4 Steam Fire Engines, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Sled, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Hook and Ladder Truck, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Supply Wagou. at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Maple and East High sts. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, on Clinton street, 'Squog. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Park and Massabesic sts. 

1 Hand Hose Carriage, at junction of Old Falls road and 
Front street, 'Skeag. 

1 2-wheeled Hose Carriage, Deny Mills, Goffe's Falls, 
manned by men at the mills. 

THE BUILDINGS 

occupied by the department require some improvements. 
The greatest need is the change of location of the horses of 
the Hook and Ladder Company. It is not only inconven- 
ient but dangerous to run the horses out of the stalls as 
at present arranged. With no great expense I think the 
stable might be remodeled, and the horses stand facing 
the truck. This would also necessitate changing over or 
widening the front doors of their house. 

Another much needed improvement is the construction 
of troughs in the hose and steamer houses, for the purpose 
of washing hose. 

THE HOSE. 

All the leather hose has been oiled the past season, at 
the same time tested, and is now in good condition. 

SWINGING HARNESSES. 

A pair of the '" Berry Patent Swinging Fire Harnesses " are 
now on trial by the Amoskeag Steamer Company, and have 

•Two of which are in reserve. 



208 



thus far proved all that is claimed for them. They are in gen- 
eral use in most of the larger cities, and I am of the opinion 
it is but a question of time (and that a short time) that 
they will be adopted and supplied the department. They 
are a great relief to the horses while standing in the stable, 
and are expeditious in hitching up. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The fourth annual parade occurred on Friday, October 
12, with the usual exercise-'. By its occurrence it gives the 
citizens a chance to see the material upon which they rely 
for safety in case of fires. 

DEATH 

has entered our ranks and taken from among us our 
esteemed and faithful member, 



WILL A. BUTTERFIELD, 
Clerk of Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. Xo. 1. 



Born ra Manchester, April 23, 1858, 

Died May 12, 1883, 

Aged 25 years and 19 days. 



His funeral, which occurred Monday. May 14. was attended 
by the entire department. 

CAUSES OF FIRE. 

No year passes without the origin of many fires being set 
down as " unknown," and in a majority of cases the cause 
may be attributed to " carelessness with ashes." It is sur- 
prising to what an extent ashes are kept in wooden barrels, 



209 

boxes, and the like. Another, and probably a greater, 
cause, is defective chimneys. Too much care cannot be 
taken in respect to these matters. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

This important branch has performed its duties in a relia- 
ble manner, and has received careful attention. The severe 
lightning during the summer months did considerable dam- 
age, at one time burning off the wires in eight places. 
Repairs in each case were commenced as soon as the storm 
would permit, and the lines shortly put in order. 

During the year a striker has been attached to the bell 
on the Webster-street school-house, an alarm-box (No. 54) 
has been located at the corner of Wayne and Main streets 
in 'Squog, and indicators placed in each of the companies' 
houses. There is need of other alarm-boxes in different 
localities, but before many more additions are made to any 
of the circuits, the whole system should be re-arranged. 
This is a matter the city councils might well consider. 

THE FIREMEN'S RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

While the demands on the treasury of this association 
have not been very large this >ear, still the funds are be- 
coming less ; and as they are used for the relief of its 
members who are " injured while at, going to, or return- 
ing from a fire," it is hoped our citizens will not let it 
lack for means. 

There was in the treasury at the last annual 

meeting in February ..... $1,030 74 
Cash received for membership .... 1 00 

$1,031 74 
Cash paid out 161 00 

Balance now in treasury . . . $870 74 

14 



210 



CONCLUSION. 



It seems useless to again mention the matter pertaining 
to the arrangement of the horses of the department ; still 
I cannot close this report without calling the attention of 
the city councils to it. A certain limit should be estab- 
lished beyond which none of the horses used for fire pur- 
poses should be taken for work upon the streets. 

The hose companies in the eastern sections of the city 
were established so that in cases of fire in their vicinity aid 
might be near at hand, and yet the horses of these two 
companies are, during many of the working hours, farther 
away than the ones on duty at the central station. Then 
again, the Hook and Ladder horses are often too far from 
their house to reach a fire as soon as they should. Ladders 
are frequently among the first things needed at a fire ; thus, 
while there is but one company of this kind in our depart- 
ment, a pair of horses should either be in the stable all the 
time, or in close proximity to it, in case of an alarm. I 
earnestly hope this will receive your immediate attention. 

In closing, I desire to express my thanks to his Honor 
Mayor Putnam, for the interest he has at all times mani- 
fested in the welfare of the department ; to the committee 
on fire department, and other members of the city councils ; 
to the efficient assistant engineers upon whose wisdom and 
judgment I have so much relied, as well as for the valuable 
assistance they have at all times rendered ; to the city 
marshal, assistant city marshal, and the entire police force, 
who have used their best endeavors to extinguish incipient 
fires and prevent needless alarms, and last, but not least, to 
the officers and members of the different companies for the 
promptness and zeal which have ever characterized them. 
Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Manchester Fire Department. 



211 



TABLE 

SHOWING NUMBER OF ALARMS FROM EACH BOX SINCE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM 

WAS ESTABLISHED, EXCEPT FROM SEPT., 1872, TO JAN., 1873, WHEN NO 

RECORD WAS KEPT. 



Box. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883. 


TotaL 


3 ... . 




1 


1 




2 






1 






1 


& 


4 


6 


6 


4 


7 


7 


5 


4 


4 


2 


8 




5* 


5 




6 




2 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 




15 


6 


4 


1 


1 


4 


4 


2 


2 






3 


2 


2a 


7 


7 




2 


1 


3 




2 


3 




2 


1 


21 


8 


2 




2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 








9> 


9 
















1 




1 




2 


12 


























13 


1 




1 


















2 


14 












1 












1 


15 






1 








1 




1 


2 




5 


16 


1 




1 


















2 


17 






1 


1 
















2 


18 






1 








1 




1 






3 


21 


3 




1 




2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


15 


23 












1 






1 


1 




3 


24 






1 








2 


1 


1 




1 


7 


25 






1 














i 




3 


26 


1 












i 


1 








3 


27 




2 


2 




5 






2 




l 




13 


31 






3 














l 




4 


32 












1 




1 




l 




3 


34 


2 


1 






















3 


35 
























1 


1 


36 














i 












1 


41 










1 




l 












2 


42 


1 
























1 


43 




























45 




























51 


1 


1 






1 




l 


l 


1 


i 




3 


io 


52 


4 


3 


1 




2 






2 




2 


2 


16 


53 


2 


1 


1 


1 




l 




2 




1 




9 


54 


























61 




1 




1 




l 


l 






2 


i 


7 


62 




2 




1 


1 


l 


l 










6 


71 


.. 




i 


1 




l 


3 


2 




i 




9 




35 


25 


26 


25 


30 


• 21 


22 


23 


n 


29 


13 


260 






3 still. 






1 still. 




1 still. 


1 still. 


1 still. 




7 still. 



212 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, ETC., FROM 



Location. 



Description. 



Sunday. • .. 
Wednesday. 

Monday 

Sunday 

Monday 
Monday . . . 
Wednesday. 
Wednesday 
Friday... . 
Saturday. 
Thursday 
Monday . 
Tuesday. 



Jan. 14 
April 18 
July 30. 
Aug. 12. 
Sept. 17. 
Sept. 17. 
Sept. 19. 
Oct. 24.. 
Nov. 23. 
Dec. 1 . . 
Dec. 6.. 
Dec. 10. 
Dec. 11. 



12.15 P. M. 
3.15 " 

10.50 " 
4.20 A. M. 
2.45 " 
2.55 P. M. 
7.55 " 
1.30 " 
1.35 A. M. 

12.25 '• 

11.42 P. M. 
3.23 " 
9.47 " 



6 70 Concord street. 



Union, cor. Laurel. 



Two-story house 

Mt. St. Mary's Convent.. 
Livery stable 



Parker street, 'Squog.. 

53 Winter street, 'Squog Two-story house 

Railroad yard Kerosene oil shed 

380 Central street ,Cottage house. . . 

Railroad yard 'Kerosene-oil shed 



River road 

6 Rear Xo. 57 Amherst St.. 
35 '60 Canal street Brick block 

7 Basement Chandler bl'ck Brick block 



Bakersville school-house. 
Shed 



South Elm street . 
Railroad yard 



Machine-shop . 
Oil on cars.. . . 



213 



JANUARY 1, 1883, TO DECEMBER 1, 1883. 











o 
c 






Owned by. 


Occupied 
by. 


s 
tao 

CS 

5 
Q 


a 
a 


o jj 
< 


Cause. 


Remarks. 


Mrs. John 

Kelley . . . 

Catholic So- 

Thornas L. 

Thorpe — 
Henry J. 

Hatch.. .. 
A.N. Clapp. 

Nicholas 
Steuber . . . 

Dudley & 
Co 

City 


C.L. Fitzpat- 

rick.. .. | $10.00 
Sisters of 

Mercy. ... Slight. 

H. E. SlackJ$2,800.00 
Henry J. 1 

Hatch .. 500.00 
Store-house. I 400.00 


$10.00 

2,200.00 
300.00 


$600 

200 
400 


Burning chimney.. 
Overheated flue. . . 


Extin g uishe d 
with pails. 

Extin g ui sh ed 
with pails. 






John Robbie 
W. J. Dud- 
ley, agent. 


800.00 

75.00 
None. 


800 00 
75.00 




Defective chimney 

Incendiary 

Smoke fr. furnace. 


No fire. 


C. H. Brad-jPeter Le- 
Stark Corp.jUnoccupied. 


None. 

$480.50 


480.50 




Defective chimney police. 


Chandler 

Bros 

H u tchinson 

A.N.Clapp& 
Concord R.R 


C.W.Batler 

& Co 

H u tchinson 

A.N. Clapp. 


1,125.00 
125.00 
410.00 


1,125.00 
125.00 
350.00 


60 


From furnace 






$6,725.50 


$5,465.50 


$1,260 







214 



NUMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson & 
Co.'s office, and Samuel Colby's residence, corner of Elm 
and Young streets. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
Granite Hotel and L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s office. 

No. 5. — City Hall. Keys at City Marshal's office and 
G. E. Hall's drug-store. 

No. 6. — Engine-house, Vine street. Keys at engine- 
house. 

No. 7.— City Hotel. Keys at City Hotel and A. F. 
Perry's drug-store. 

No. 8. — Elm, foot of Orange street. Keys at Wilson's 
drug-store and residence of Moses N. Smith, No. 1299 Elm 
street. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of H. D. Corliss and J. Freeman Clough. 

No. 12. — Blood's shop. Keys at office. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Jencks, Lewis Simons, and John F. 
Woodbury. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residence of Sanborn T. Worthen, 530 Chestnut street, 
and Wm. H. Hunt's grocery store, No. 60 Pearl street. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Rev. Dennis M. Bradley and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18 — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys 
at residences of H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William 
Perkins. 



215 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. D. Smith's drug-store and residence of Mrs. J. A. 
Emerson. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of E. T. James and Mrs Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. — Corner of Massabesic and Park streets. Keys 
at residences of D. M. Goodwin and Nicholas Hopkins, and 
Benton Bros.' store. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys 
at residences of S. L. Fogg, Horace Gordon, and Horace 
Stearns. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-shop and residence of John N. 
Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Merrimack and Eim streets. Keys at 
Manchester House, Tebbetts' Brothers, and E. H. Curriers 
drug-store. 

No. 31. — Amoskeag Village. Keys at P. C. Cheney 
Co.'s paper-mill and residence of Capt. J. M. Varnum. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at Hoyt & Co.'s paper-mill and Langdon 
watch-room. 

No. 34. — Mechanics' Row. Keys at watch-room and 
W. W. Hubbard's office. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at Stark watch-room. 

No 36. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys 
at residences of John P. Lord, H. M. Tarbell, and A. G. 
Fairbanks. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 43. — Namaske Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 45. — Armory Mill counting-room. Keys at watch- 
room and A. J. Mayhew's, 51 Stark corporation, corner of 
Canal and Bridge streets. 



216 

No. 51. — S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s shops. Keys at freight 
depot, S. C. Forsaith's office, and Lowell's iron-foundry 
office. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Allen N. 
Clapp's store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's brewery. Keys at brewery office 
and residence of I. R. Dewey. 

No. 54. — Corner of Wayne and Main streets, 'Squog. 
Keys at residences of Napoleon Duford and Julius 
Foucher. 

No. 61. — Corner of Elm and Hancock streets, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at residence of B. F. Merrill and John 
Crenan's saloon. 

No. 62. — Massabesic street, Hallsville. Keys at resi- 
dences of Charles C. Chase and G. W. Dearborn. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins and Daniel Sheehan. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given 
at precisely 12.30 p. m., from Dunlap & Baker's jewelry 
store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the fire-bells. 



217 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, keys to 
which are in the hands of all regular police, also of per- 
sons at the corner or nearest houses, as designated by a 
card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to remain 
by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard in the 
box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the 
next nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure the 
box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
cause other than an actual fire. Don't give an alarm 

FOR A CHIMNEY-FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your 
residence or place of business, ivhere the keys are kept, return 
the keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their 
property, also all places where the keys are kept. Be sure 
the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-bells in the 
city, and the number of the box will be given four times 
for an alarm. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of 
the bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



218 



SCHOOL SIGNAL. 



Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, to close 
the primary schools ; and, to close all the schools, two im- 
mediate strokes, and after a lapse of four seconds two more 
immediate strokes, — the time of striking the bells being at 
8.05 a. m., for closing the schools during the forenoon, and 
at 1.15 p. m., for closing them during the afternoon. 



219 



RULES AND REGULATIONS IN REGARD TO RE- 
SPONDING TO ALARMS, ADOPTED BY THE 
BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

1. Steamer No. 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes ; on the days of its second run, it will 
report on the first alarm to boxes 4, 7, 8, 15, 27, 35, 41, 
42, 45, 51 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3. 5, 6, 12, 13, 16, 
17, 21, 23, 26, 32, 34, 43, 52, 53, 71 ; on third alarm, to 
all boxes. 

2. Steamer No. 4, same as above. 

3. On the first alarm from boxes 9, 24, 25, 26, 31, 36, 
54, 61, 62, the steamer horses of the second run will double 
on the engine of its first run, and on the arrival at the fire 
the second-run horses will return to their house, and in 
case of an alarm from any box the company will immedi- 
ately respond with their engine. 

4. Pennacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on the first 
alarm to all boxes. 

5. Massabesic Hose No. 2 will report for duty on the first 
alarm to boxes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 
24, 25, 26, 27, 35, 36, 41, 42, 51 ; on the second alarm, to 
boxes 3, 12, 23, 31, 32, 34, 43, 45, 62, 71 ; on the third 
alarm, to all boxes. 

6. E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 will report for duty on 
the first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 27, 35, 41, 42, 43, 51, 52, 
53, 54 ; on second alarm, to boxes 7, 12, 31, 32 ; on third 
alarm, to all boxes. On first alarm from box 45, repair to 
west end of McGregor bridge and await orders, or cross on 
second alarm. 

7. Merrimack Hose No. 4 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 15, 17. 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 27, 
35, 36, 41, 42, 51, 61, 62, 71 ; on second alarm, to boxes 8, 



220 

12, 16, 26, 32, 34, 43, 45, 52, 53 ; on third alarm, to all 
boxes. 

8. Hook and Ladder No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

9. Steamer No. 2 to be kept as a reserve engine, to 
respond to a third alarm. The horses attached to the 
engine on its first run will return to the house on a second 
alarm, to be held in readiness to respond to a third alarm ; 
and the engine will be manned by men detailed for that 
purpose and attached to Pennacook Hose and Hook and 
Ladder companies at all times, except when the engine is 
on duty. 

10. Steamer No. 3 will also be kept as a reserve engine, 
to be used in case of need on third alarm. 

11. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the en- 
gine, hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will 
have the right to lead to the fire. No running by will be 

ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER PENALTY OF 
DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start, and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer in 
charge, will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses ; or, in case that one blow is not 
struck within thirty minutes, companies may consider 
themselves dismissed, except the drivers, who will remain 
in the houses with their horses until the two blows to limber 
up are given. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those at 
a fire to limber up. 



221 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROFERTY. 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose 

carriage $4,500 00 

100 feet 3 inch leather hose . . . . 140 00 
1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch fabric hose ... 900 00 
Firemen's suits ..... 250 00 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 500 00 



Total amount .... 16,290 00 

FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose- 
carriage $2,750 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class single-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $2,750 00 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $3,500 00 

50 feet rubber hose 75 00 

1,500 feet leather hose 1,500 00 

Firemen's suits 240 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 500 00 



Total amount .... $5,815 00 



222 



PENNACOOK HOSE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $650 00 

1 horse hose sled and reel ... 75 00 

2,700 feet leather hose 2,700 00 

Firemen's suits 300 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including two 

harnesses ...... 440 00 

Total amount ..... $4,165 00 

MASSABESIC HOSE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $700 00 

1,700 feet leather hose 1,700 00 

Furniture and fixtures .... 60 00 

Firemen's suits 175 00 



Total amount .... $2,635 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE NO. 3. 

LOCATED AT PISCATAQUOG. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $650 00 

2,100 feet leather hose 2,100 00 

Firemen's suits 175 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including harness 200 00 

Total amount .... $3,125 00 

MERRIMACK HOSE NO 4. 

LOCATED ON PARK STREET, CORNER MASSABESIC. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-earriage . . $700 00 

1,700 feet leather hose 1,700 00 

Firemen's suits 126 00 

Furniture and fixtures .... 100 00 



Total amount 



$2,626 00 



223 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders . . . $1,500 00 

1 Bangor extension ladder . . . 150 00 

Firemen's suits 400 00 

Furniture and fixtures,including harnesses 340 00 



Total amount .... $2,390 00 

SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

1 supply wagon and boxes . . . 1100 00 

SPARE HOSE. 

AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

900 feet leather hose 11,035 00 

ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 

5 fire-hats 17 50 

Furniture and fixtures . . . . 125 00 



Total amount 


. $132 50 


FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 




At cost (including additions) . 


. $21,500 00 


Ladders and tools .... 


30 00 


Extra poles and wire 


25 00 



Total amount .... $21,555 00 

INDEPENDENT HOSE CO. 

LOCATED CORNER OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET, 'SKEAG. 

1 four-wheeled hose-carriage 
800 feet leu the r hose .... 

2 hose-pipes 

Total amount .... $1,030 00 



$400 


00 


600 


00 


30 


00 



224 



GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT DERKY MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage . . . $100 00 
400 feet linen hose 200 00 

2 hose-pipes . . . . . . 12 00 



Total amount 

RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Engine Xo. 1 

Fire King Engine No. 2 

E. W. Harrington Steam Engine No. 3 

N. S. Bean Steam Engine No. 4 

Pennacook Hose No 1 . 

Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 

E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 

Merrimack Hose No. 4 . 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder No. 

Supply Wagon 

Store-room .... 

Engineers' Department . 

Fire Alarm .... 

Independent Hose at Amoskeag 

Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage . 



$312 00 

$6,290 00 

2,750 00 

2,750 00 

5,815 00 

4,165 00 

2,635 00 

3,125 00 

2,626 00 

2,390 00 

100 00 

1,035 00 

132 00 

21,555 00 

1,030 00 

312 00 



Total amount 



$56,710 00 



225 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 




Chief 




1937 Elm St 








313 Granite St. (P.) 
311 Central St. 
25 M. S B 


Benjamin C. Kendall... 


Assistant and clerk. 


Orrin E. Kimball 




Wool andL'th'rDeal'r 


17 Harrison St. 







AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 

James R. Carr 

Jonathan T. Underhill. . 

Henry T. Stevens 

Henry H. Glines 

George R. Simmons 

George W. Butterfield 

Frank E. Stearns 

Artemas C. Barker 

John E. Wilson ....... 

Charles F. McCoy 

John B. Hall 

Joseph H. Gould 

John H. Stone 

Thomas J. Wyatt 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Foreman Painter 

Assistant Foreman. Manufacturer. 

Clerk Clerk 

Engineer Machinist 

Assistant Engineer. Mechanic 

Driver Teamster 

Hoseman j Painter 

" i Currier 



Mechanic. 
Mechanic 
Druggist . 
Dresser . . . 
Painter 
Machinist. 



1405 Elm St. 
20 Stark St. 
102 Myrtle St. 
13 Mechanic St. 
82 Pennacook St. 
28 Vine St. 
389 Park St. 
494 Pine St. 

13 Mechanic St. 
5 M. S. B. 

166 Concord St. 
1S7 Merrimack St. 
27 Clark's Ave. 

14 M. S. B. 



15 



226 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 

Eugene S. Whitney 
Edgar G. Abbott. . . 

John Martin 

Fred S. Bean 

Thomas F. Dodge. . 

Jeremiah Lane 

Almub B. Cushing.. 
Charles E. Ham . . . 
William H. Dodge. 
George W. Bacon . . 

Alfred Nearborn 

Albert Merrill 

John W. Chase 

George C. Hoyt 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman. 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Supt. Electric Light. . . 96 Bridge St. 
Machinist 543 Chestnut St. 

22 M. S. B. 

96 Bridge St. 

545 Chestnut St. 

Teamster ' 20 Vine St. 

" i 141 Laurel St. 

Carpenter ' 44 M. S. B. 

Fireman ! 847 Elm St. 

Carpenter | 65 Stark Corp. 

" Cor. E. High & Jane 

Machinist 96 Bridge St. 

Painter 240 Merrimack St. 

Mason 10 Nashua St. 



227 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 




Assistant Foreman . 
Clerk 




23 M. S. B. 


Clarence D. Palmer 

J oseph E. Merrill 




347 Central St. 
92 Walnut St. 






2G Vine St. 








277 Laurel St 


Will G. Chase " 




217 Central St 


Lyman M. Aldrich. ... 






375 Park St. 






59 Douglas St. (P.) 
1419 Elm St 




Gilbert A. Sackett 






1348 Elm St 






53 Amoskeag Corp. 








Samuel A. Hill 






50 Douglas St. (P.) 
50 Amoskeag Corp. 


Edwin E. Weeks ..:.... 






Albert A. Puffer 




Clerk 






16 Hazel St. 


Martin W. Ford 






David G. Mills 










50 Douglas St. (P.) 
10 M. S B 

















228 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on Maple Street, cor. East High. 



Name. 



Rank. 

Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation 

Carpenter 

Gas Fitter 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Grainer 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Plumber 

Carpenter 



Residence. 



John F. Seaward. . . 
Revilo G. Houghton 
Parker W. Hannaford 
Walter Seaward.. 
Henry G. Seaman 
Joseph W. Batchelder 
William S. McLeod. . 
Simeon R. Stearns. . 
Alphonso E. Foster. 
George W. Seaward 
Henry H. Wilcox. . . 
Albert E. Batchelder 



27 Warren St. 
288 Bridge St. 
256 Lowell St. 
520 Maple St. 
14 South St. 
520 Maple St. 
66 Nashua St. 
63 Arlington St. 
270 Bridge St. 
19 Warren St. 
195 Hanover St. 
520 Maple St. 



E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Clinton Street, ' Squog. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation, 


Residence. 








64 Dover St. 








48 Dover St. 




Clerk 




352 Granite St. 


John T. O'Dowd 






Clinton St. 








60 Parker St. 








503 Douglas St. 
50 Douglas St. 
145 Winter St. 








Edward Mc Derby 


„ 




,, 




79 Parker St. 




„ 


21 School St. 


<• 


45 School St. 




«« 




161 Winter St. 






p 





229 

MERRIMACK HOSE COMPANY NO. 4. 

House on Park Street, corner Massabesic. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 








302 Laurel St. 




Assistant Foreman. 
Clerk 




196 Laurel St. 












286 Laurel St. 


Charles F. Garland 




464 Amherst St. 

474 Central St. 






286 Laurel St. 




„ 






George H. Wheeler. . . . 


u 




n 










Clerk 


417 Pine St. 



230 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 










Assistant Foreman. 
Clerk 




60 Prospect St. 
310 Central. 


George E. Glines 

Winfield S. Leavitt 








8 Weeks' Block. 


Charles M. Denyou 






8 Vine St. 






268 Bridge St. 
12 M. S. B 






Hiram P. Young 




33 Dutton St 


,, 








(1 




159 Laurel St. 


(( 


1( 


4 Dutton St. 




i, 


,, 


37 M. S. B. 




<( 




Union cor.Appleton 
8 Langdon Corp. 
7 Crosby Block. 
335 Chestnut St. 




(( 




Andrew C. Wiggin .... 
Dillwyn Breed 


(( 




„ 


Belt Maker 


1( 


Gardener 


1051 Elm St. 


" 


542 Chestnut St. 






295 Chestnut St. 




ii 




29 Amoskeag Corp. 
530 Chestnut St. 


,, 




(l 








(( 


1( 


78 Amoskeag Corp. 
307 Chestnut St. 




ii 








8 Laurel St. 







231 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest comer of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Baker, corner of Elm street. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 
Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 
Beech, front of No. 581. 
Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 



232 

Blodget, front of primary school-house. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, front of No. 26. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Bridge, corner Ashland street. 
Bridge, corner Hall street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near office door of M. L. W. 
Cedar, front of No. 86. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 



233 



Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street: 
Central, front of No. 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Chestnut, opposite High street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 
Concord, opposite Vine street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Nashua street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Depot, west of Franklin street. 
Elm, front of Fisk bookstore. 
Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 
Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 
Franklin, opposite Middle street. 
Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Granite, near Franklin street. 
Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 



234 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 
Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 
Hancock, near brewery. 
Hanover, front of Opera House. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hollis, northeast; corner of Canal street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near No. 244. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 



235 



Laurel, near Belmont. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 

Lowell, front of No. 276. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Maple, northwest comer of Lowell street. 

Maple, front of No. 530. 

Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm st. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mammoth road. 

Mechanics', northeast corner of Canal street. 

Mechanics', near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanics', northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 



286 



Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Merrimack, near Belmont street. 
Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Middle, near 67 Amoskeag corporation. 
Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 
North, northwest corner of Bay street. 
Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 
Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Park, near No. 36. 

Park, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Park, northwest corner of Union street. 
Park, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Park, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Park, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Park, east end. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 



237 



Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Park street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
River road, north of Webster street. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 



238 



Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest comer of Granite street. 
State, opposite 57 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite 13 Manchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 
Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Union, northwest corner of High street. 
Valley, corner of Elm street. 
Valley, corner of Willow street. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Water, near 38 Amoskeag corporation. 
Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Webster, corner of Adams street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 
Webster, northeast corner of River road. 
West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 



239 



West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Wilson, corner of Park street. 
Young, corner of Elm street. 

PISCATAQUOG. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
Bath, corner of Shirley street. 
Bennington, corner of Main street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Clinton, corner of Dover street. 
Clinton, corner of South Main street. 
School, corner of South Main street. 
School, opposite school-house. 
School, corner River street. 
Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 
Douglas, corner of Green street. 
Douglas, corner of Barr street. 
Douglas, corner of West street. 
Douglas, corner of Main street. 
Douglas, east of Main street. 
Ferry, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Quincy street. 
Granite, corner of Green street. 
Granite, corner of Barr street. 



240 



Granite, corner of West street. 
Granite, corner of Dover street. 
Granite, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Shirley street. 
Granite, corner of River street. 
Main, opposite Rice's house. 
Mast, corner of South Main street. 
Mast, corner of Bowman street. 
Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 
Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 
McGregor, opposite " Reed " house. 
Milford, southwest corner of South]Main street.. 
Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 
Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 
Patten, corner of Ferry street. 
Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 
Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 
Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry street. 
Sullivan, corner of Main street. 
Temple, corner of Main street- 
walker, corner of Rivet road. 
Walker, corner of Patten street. 
Walker, corner of Parker street. 
Walker, near corner of South Main street. 
1 Wayne, near corner of Main street. 
Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 
Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Goffstown road. 

Goffstown road. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter- works. 

Main, near brick school-house. 

Main, corner of Goffstown road. 



241 

Main, opposite John E. Stearns's. 
Main, near Hiram Stearns's. 
Mill, near paper-mill. 
Mill, corner of Main street. 
Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are four private hydrants 
that are available in case of need : — 

One at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s machine-shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at A. H. Lowell's iron foundry. 

Making 351 in all. 

16 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester : — 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report for 
the year 1883: — 

The whole number of paupers supported at the city farm 
during the year has been forty-one ; the number sent from 
the city farm to the county farm, owing to a change in the 
law, has been fourteen. One of the above number died 
during the year. 

The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been 
fifty-eight, consisting of one hundred and sixteen persons, 
all of whom had a settlement in this city. Four of the 
above number died during the year. The whole number at 
the insane asylum during the year has been five persons, 
at a cost of four dollars per week for each person, besides 
clothing destroyed. The whole number of persons at the 
State Industrial School, chargeable to the city, has been five, 
at a cost of one dollar and fifty cents per week for each 
person. The overseers of the poor have assisted the 



246 



paupers off the farm from the several wards of the city as 
follows : — 



Ward number one 






$6 02 


Ward number two 






41 00 


Ward number three 






230 48 


Ward number four 






177 14 


Ward number five 






737 60 


Ward number six . 






226 37 


Ward number seven . . 






61 56 


Ward number eight 






170 71 



$1,650 88 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 



Industrial School, for board of inmates $2,218 02 
Insane Asylum, for board of inmates . 715 25 
Geo. H. Ellinwood, for board of 

Blanchard child . . . . 86 28 

Adams & Lamprey, and others, for 

support of Judith McGrath . . 30 99 
For support of Sarah A. Heselton . 10 00 
Town of Lancaster, for support of Ben- 
son Joy . . . . . . 43 06 

J. M. Collity, M. D., for professional 

services . . . . . . 30 00 

Temple & Farrington, for blanks and 

stationery, etc. . . . . 3 50 



1,137 10 



,787 98 



CASH RECEIVED AND PAID TO CITY TREASURER. 

County of Hillsborough, for board of 

inmates of Industrial School . . $1,863 38 

City of Concord, for support of Blanch- 
ard boy 86 28 



247 

Town of Groton, for support of Judith 

McGrath $30 99 

County of Hillsborough, for support of 

Mrs. Paige 54 00 

12,034 65 

Total cost of paupers off the farm dur- 
ing the year .... $2,753 33 

The amount paid for medicine for paupers off the farm 
during the year 1882 was 1155.06. The amount paid for 
medicine during the year 1883 was $28.23. This amount 
is included in the amount charged to the several wards of 
the city. 

We will only say that this amount was saved during the 
year 1883 by close attention to the duties of our office. 

In the city physician's report for 1882, he says " that 
three cases of insane persons were sent from the city farm 
to the insane asylum at Concord, where all have died." 
This statement we know to be false. Only two were re- 
turned, out of five which were taken from there. All are 
still alive, and one is improving. 

All of which is' respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Clerk, Ward 1, 
JOHN E. STEARNS, Ward 2, 
JAMES SUTCLIFFE, Ward 3, 
HORACE GORDON, Ward 4, 
DANIEL SHEEHAN, Ward 5, 
PETER O. WOODMAN, Ward 6, 
ELBRIDGE G. WOODMAN, Ward 7, 
WILLIAM WEBER, Ward 8, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



BEPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To the City Councils of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen. — The Joint Standing Committee on the 
City Farm, in making their annual report for the year end- 
ing - December 31, 1883, take great pleasure in being able 
to make so favorable a report of the good management of 
the institution. 

During the past year a change has been made in super- 
ntendents. The city has been very fortunate in securing 
the services of Mr. Jeremiah Garvin, who is a practical 
farmer and a good business man. He has given his whole 
time to his official duties, with the best results to the city. 
He assumed charge of the institution under adverse cir- 
cumstances, but has been very successful in the manage- 
ment of its affairs. 

Mr. Garvin thought that a milk route could be made 
profitable and pay most of the expenses of the institution. 
This committee felt willing to try the experiment, and have 
been much pleased with the result. Not only has it been a 
source of revenue, but by using the hay on the premises 
the farm can be kept up to a higher state of cultivation. 

Many permanent improvements have been made during 
the past year. A stable and carriage-house have been built, 
which had long been needed. In the early fall the wells on 



252 

the farm became dry so that all the water used had to be 
carted from ponds at a distance. A new well was sunk 
just west of the house, fifteen feet in width and thirty feet 
in depth ; when the well was stoned up it contained twen- 
ty four feet of water, and it has averaged sixteen feet ever 
since. A new wind-mill was erected, forcing the water to 
the reservoir on the Lowell-street hill, through a two-inch 
pipe. Thence it runs to the house and barn, having at the 
s ame time sufficient head to be used for fire purposes. 

The crops have been very good, as follows : 75 tons of 
hay, 700 bushels of potatoes, 287 bushels of shelled corn, 
372 bushels of oats; also milk sold, amounting to $1,262 
since April 1. 

While speaking of the management of the farm we shall 
not forget to do justice to the matron, Mrs. Garvin. She 
has performed her part in the internal management of the 
institution in a very acceptable manner. Her uniform 
kindness to those placed under her charge has won for her 
the respect and good will of all. 

In places like this, where are gathered the young, the old, 
the sick, and the criminal, an energetic person, and one 
possessing much patience is needed, and Mrs. Garvin pos- 
sesses these qualifications. The committee bear willing 
testimony to the neatness and good order which pervade 
this institution, both indoors and out. 

We cordially invite our citizens to visit the farm and 
judge for themselves as to the manner in which it is carried 
on, and its general appearance. 



253 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS 



expenses of farm . 
Interest on farm 

Total expenses 
Total receipts . 



Bills receivable 



Difference in stock . 



Permanent improvements 

Total cost of paupers and criminals 



16,551 13 
1,000 00 

$7,551 13 
2,268 23 

$5,282 90 
270 92 

$5,011 98 
2,521 66 

$2,490 32 
852 15 

$1,638 17 



Number of weeks' board after March 1, 1883, 1,475 

Total cost, $1,638.17, divided by 1,475, gives $1.11 per 
per week. 

J. F. CLOUGH, 
E. P. JOHNSON, 
SAMUEL LUNT, 
S. P. CANNON, 
H. A. HORTON, 
Committee on City Farm. 






REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



.REPORT 



COMMITTEE OX CEMETERIES. 



To His Honor the JIayor, and City Councils of the City of 
Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Committee on the Valley and Pine 
Grove Cemeteries herewith present their annual report for 
the year ending December 31, 1883, the important details of 
which will be found in the sub-committees* and treasurer's 
reports. 

VALLEY CEMETERY 

Annual statement of the work accomplished at the Valley 
Cemetery for the year 1883 : — 

Your committee have but little to report aside from the 
fact that the grounds are now inclosed with suitable fenc- 
ing : on three sides by an iron fence, nearly one thousand 
feet having been added the past year, the high wooden fence 
on the west and unrepaired side being perfectly satisfactory 
for the present. An additional amount of water-pipe has 
been laid, and now water is easily obtained for nearly every 
lot. The introduction of city water has added much to 
the beauty and general appearance of the Valley. The 
water rents have been placed at the reasonable sum of 
$ 1.50 per year for each lot, and even at this price proves a 
valuable investment for the city. Your committee are 

17 



258 



gratified that the grounds are beginning to assume an ap- 
pearance more in keeping with the growing demands of our 
city, and hereafter a portion of the annual appropriation 
can be devoted to the improving and adorning of the 
grounds. 

The expenditures have been unusually large on account 
of the completion of the iron fence, which incurred addi- 
tional outlay for grading, foundation-wall, and turfing, and 
although necessarily expensive it is a decided improvement. 
The whole expense amounts to $-1,209.85, for winch no 
provision need be made in the future. Your committee rec- 
ommend that a concrete walk be laid on the east and south 
sides of the Valley, both for the convenience of the citizens 
and adornment of the grounds. Mr. F. B. Balch has been 
retained as superintendent, proving himself an acceptable 
person for the position. For receipts and expenditures, see 
the financial statement. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance old aecount . . . 814 00 

Appropriation .... 2,000 00 

Water rents, digging graves, etc. . 549 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid F. B. Balch, superintendent . 8598 53 

S. B. Duke, labor ... 207 50 

John B. Variek, hardware . 9 94 

Manchester water-works . . 128 80 

A. H. Lowell, iron fence . 3,155 02 

S. M. Nutt, paving stone, etc. . 38 00 

J. S. Harriman, loam . . 23 00 

H. L. Bartlett, receipt-book . • 2 50 

Marsh & Co., grading . . 150 00 



82,563 00 



259 



Paid Varnum & Co., grading, etc, . 


$45 95 


J. S. Bacheler, iron pipe 


36 00 


Thorp & Avery 


3 90 


C. C. Webster, turf 


66 15 


Warren Harvey, stone-work 


731 22 


J. Hodge .... 


1 83 


Ezra W. Kimball . 


3 50 



$5,201 84 
Respectfully submitted. 

HOLMES R. PETTEE, 
WM. G. HOYT, 
JOSEPH KIDDER, 
Committee on Valley Cemetery. 



PINE GROYE CEMETERY. 

The undersigned, your committee for the Pine Grove 
Cemetery, report that we have cared for the grounds by 
the services of Mr. B. A. Stearns as superintendent, and 
Mr. Charles Griffin, both having been employed through 
the year. Other labor has been employed as needed. 

The walks and avenues have been preserved, and the 
graveling of the avenues extended about two thousand feet. 
The grades of the avenues in some places have been changed 
so that they can be driven over with greater ease and safe- 
ty, at the same time the contiguous lots have been improved 
thereby. 

A portion of the grounds in the easterly part has been 
graded and laid out as a lawn. All lots sold upon this plat 
have been restricted to the same conditions as the lots upon 
" Landscape Lawn," but the city assumes no responsibility 
for future care excepting through the voluntary deposit of 
money therefor with the trustees for such funds, appointed 



260 

under an ordinance of the city passed in 1879. The price 
at which these lots have been sold is fifteen cents per foot. 

The experience of the year has confirmed our satisfaction 
with the rule adopted some two years since, for having the 
digging of ail graves under the charge and responsibility of 
the superintendent. 

It seems to secure a full knowledge of all burials taking 
place in the grounds, so that proper records can be kept, as 
we believe they have been the past two years ; also, the 
money received for this work goes into the treasury for the 
general uses of the cemetery. 

The city engineer, in that part of his report relating to 
this cemetery, calls attention to certain irregularities upon 
the part of lot owners in the grading of their lots, and in 
improperly changing the lines when setting stone posts and 
curbings, making encroachments upon the walks, thus 
greatly injuring the symmetry and harmony of the whole ; 
and he suggests that the committee take such action as 
will, in the future, prevent all such irregularities. 

The cemetery has suffered for the past two seasons from 
an insufficient supply of water. From the fountain upon 
the hill east of the grounds a fair supply was drawn, 
sufficient for most needs, up to 1881. Since then the 
drouth has been so severe that the supply has been less 
than formerly, while the territory requiring water has more 
than doubled since those pipes were laid. A larger supply 
is urgently needed, and demanded by lot owners, while we 
shall be unable to meet properly the obligation which we 
have assumed, to care for lots, without it ; and we urge upon 
the committee the consideration of this question, and the 
early adoption of such measures as shall result in meeting 
this necessity. 

The city has acquired by purchase a large portion of the 
tract between the present boundaries upon the north and 



261 

Mitchell street, which, when laid out as a cemetery and 
annexed to the present grounds, will come under the care 
of the committee. 

For a detailed statement of receipts and expenditures, 
reference may be had to the report of the treasurer. 

A. H. DANIELS, 
CHAS. E. BALCH. 

Committee on Pine Grove Cemetery. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Committee on Cemeteries : — 

Gentlemen, — In obedience to the requirements of law, 
I herewith present to you my eleventh annual report of all 
the money received during the year ending December 31, 
1883, on account of cemeteries : — 



PINE GROVE. 








To cash received for 75 lots sold 


$l 


,738 


38 


for 5 lawn lots sold 




285 


91 


for interest on deeds out- 








standing .... 




38 


62 


of A. C. Wallace, for logs 




108 


62 


of B. A. Stearns, for digging 








graves and labor for owners 








of lots .... 




581 


97 



Total receipts .... 12,753 50 
Paid S. B. Putnam, city treasurer, as per 

receipts . . . . . . $2,753 50 

I have twenty-two deeds executed, ready for delivery, 
amounting to about $180, and four deeds of lawn lots to 
the amount of $735. 

For the trustees of the cemetery fund : — 

To cash received of the estate of Charles 

Osbrey, for lot No. 2101 . . . . $70 11 

To cash received of Mrs. H. G. Conner, for lot 

No. 2066 158 12 



263 



To cash received of Phinehas Adams, for lots 
Nos. 2061,2062, 2063 . . . . 



1343 60 



Total receipts .... $571 83 
Paid S. B. Putnam, treasurer for said trustees, 

as per receipts ...... $571 83 

All money received on account of cemeteries has, as 
usual, been paid to the city treasurer, and ail bills of 
expenditures have been paid by said treasurer, having been 
submitted to the committee on accounts for examination. 
No sales of lots in the " Valley " have been made during 
the last year. 

This being my last report, I have thought it advisable to 
state very briefly the amount of money received during the 
eleven years ending December 31, 1883, and the number of 
deeds written during the same time : — 



Cash received in 



Paid trustees fund 



1873 


11,796 


83 


1874 


1,661 


55 


1875 


2,289 


89 


1876 


1,458 


76 


1877 


1,054 


83 


1878 


974 


22 


1879 


1,053 


11 


1880 


1,294 


89 


1881 


1,205 


22 


1882 


1,324 


76 


1883 


2,753 


50 




116,867 


56 


. 


571 


83 
- $17,439 39 



264 



Cash received in 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 


. 


1873 


$960 80 




1874 


144 25 




1875 


45 06 




1876 


108 66 




1878 


91 60 




1879 
1881 


50 00 
59 50 


$1,459 37 






receipts 


. . i 


818,898 76 



Deeds written, 636. 
Average amount per year, $1,718. 
Average deeds per year, 57 T 9 T . 
Average pay to treasurer, $53.50. 

J. F. JAMES, 
Treasurer of Committee. 



265 

I hereby certify that I have examined the acccounts of 
Hon. Jacob F. James, treasurer of the Pine Grove Cemetery, 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched to 
the amount of 12,753.50. 

N. P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



JOHN F. CLOUGH, Chairman, 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, Clerk, 
J. F. JAMES, Treasurer, 
CHARLES H. G. FOSS, 
ALBERT A. AINSWORTH, 
STILMAN P. CANNON, 
HENRY S. PERRY, 
ALBERT H. DANIELS, 
HOLMES R. PETTEE, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
JOSEPH L. STEVENS, 
CHAS. E. BALCH, 
WM. G. HOYT, 
JOHN B. CHASE, 
JOSEPH KIDDER, 
A. W. QUINT, 

Committee on Cemeteries. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund have 
the honor to present herewith their fourth annual report, 
accompanied by the report of their treasurer, giving in 
detail the amount of funds received from different sources 
to the present time. 

The city councils have issued bonds bearing interest at 
the rate of five per cent per annum, to be used only in con- 
nection with this fund, thereby furnishing a safe invest- 
ment for any sums of money that may be donated in 
conformity with the ordinance creating this board, and 
greatly facilitating the labors of the trustees in this regard. 
As funds are received they can now be invested at once in 
the bonds of the city of Manchester, without loss of interest. 
A convenient plan by which parties can place funds in 
trust for the care of lots in the various cemeteries of the 
city in perpetuity may now be considered as fairly inaugu- 
rated, and the trustees believe that the opportunity thus 
afforded will be appreciated by our citizens, and that many 
will avail themselves of its advantages. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. WESTON, Chairman, 

P. C. CHENEY, 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor, 

Trustees of the Cemetery Fund. 

January 1, 1884. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you a statement of 
the funds received up to December 31, 1883 : — 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

James Hall $200 00 

Geo. W. Bailey, estate ... 500 00 

Interest .... 

PINE GROVE CEMEl 

Mrs. H. G. Conner 
Chas. Osbrey estate 
Phinehas Adams . 



SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer. 

Manchester, N. H., January 1, 1884. 





1700 00 
12*45 


RY. 

8158 12 




TO 11 




343 60 






$571 83 



ACCOUNT 

OF 

Sylvanus B. Putnam- 

CITY TREASURER, 

From December 31, 1882, to December 31, 1883. 



270 



Dr. 



THE TREASURER OF THE 

Charges himself with Receipts from the following Sources, and 



To Cash on hand, January 1, 1883 .... $47,337 37 


Temporary Loan . 








140,000 00 


Insurance Tax 








1,517 25 


Railroad Tax 








16.177 40 


Savings-bank Tax .... 








44,102 73 


Literary Fund 








2,281 23 


Board of Paupers off Farm . 








2,134 07 


City Farm .... 








986 62 


City Teams .... 








3,925 13 


District No. 8, overdraft 








7 08 


Paving, overdraft .... 








1,450 00 


Sewer and Drain Licenses- 








1,452 05 


Commons, W. P. Scott 








40 00 


" A. H. Lowell 








50 20 


" J. Perhani 








8 00 


Repairs on School-Houses 








23 92 


E. W. Perkins, land sold 








112 55 


G. F. Bosher & Co., old buildings 








164 25 


T. A. Lane, overdraft, incidental 


3 






5 56 


Pine Grove Cemetery 








2,753 50 


Valley Cemetery . 








549 00 


Fire Department . 








140 97 


Fire-Alai m Telegraph . 








20 30 


Police Department 








5,774 51 


City Hall . . 








2,100 75 


Hutchinson Bros., old boiler 








28 00 


Tuition 








176 12 


Show Licenses .... 








250 00 


Rent of Tenements 








273 00 


Water-Works .... 








73,458 20 


Interest on Taxes 








340 94 


Cost on Non-Resident Taxes 








9 00 


Taxes collected on List of 1874 








22 68 


Taxes collected on List of 1875 . 








36 75 


" « " 1876 . 








24 35 


" « u 1877 . 








25 41 


Amount carried forward 


$347,758 89 



271 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, N. H., 

Credits himself with Payment of the following Expenditures: 



Cr. 



By Unpaid Bills, January 1, 1883 
Temporary Loan . 
Coupons, Water Bonds 
Coupons, City Bonds 
Interest . 

Paupers off the Farm 
City Farm 
City Teams . 
Highway District No. 1 
u u i< 2 

" tk " 3 

u it u 4 

It It it K 

U II II 6 

U (4 tt <7 

ii n i« § 

" « " 9 

" " " 10 

ii ii ii n 

ie it it in 

u u 13 

New Highways 
Land Damages 
Watering Streets . 
Lighting Streets 
Paving Streets 
Macadamizing 
Grading for Concrete 
Sewers and Drains 
Scavenger Teams . 
Bridges . 
Commons 

Incidental Expenses 
Pine Grove Cemetery 
Valley Cemetery . 
Fire Department . 
Fire-Alarm Telegraph 

Amount carried forward 



$27,151 43 

121,000 00 

36,168 00 

18,509 00 

3,454 68 

4,898 73 

6,194 01 

8,251 25 

245 13 

10,239 39 

1,516 25 

612 75 

385-08 

217 74 

817 97 

1,005 06 

524 22 

1,756 43 

1,118 18 

261 55 

178 54 

10,132 20 

1,456 58 

3,950 47 

8,594 15 

8,409 08 

5,653 56 

3,386 37 

21,190 01 

3,944 26 

4,374 29 

2,316 85 

33,455 90 

4,284 49 

5,201 84 

17,106 12 

939 74 

$378,901 30 



272 



THE TREASURER OF THE 

Dr. Charges himself with Receipts from the following Sources, and 



Amount brought forward 


. $347,758 89 


Taxes collected on 


List of 1878 . 


43 25 


u « 


" 1879 . 


23 00 


l< ' u 


" 1880 . 


23 04 


u u 


" 1881 . 


45 95 


ic tc 


1882 . 


11,329 28 


u ic 


1883 . 


. 287,650 33 


Dog Licenses 


• > • • 


490 83 




$647,364 57 


Unpaid Bills, December 31, 1883 . 


32,885 67 



,250 24 



273 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, N. H., . 

Credits himself with Payment of the following Expenditures : 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward . . . $378,901 30 


By Police Department 






23,580 68 


City Hall 










7,686 28 


Hydrant Service . ' . 










20,700 00 


Printing and Stationery 










1,088 74 


Repairs of Buildings 










2,795 07 


City Library . 










2,628 18 


Women's Aid Hospital . 










400 00 


Militia .... 










800 00 


Payment of Funded Debt 










13,000 00 


Abatement of Taxes 


• 








3,323 71 


Discount on Taxes 










7,693 46 


State Tax .... 










41,060 00 


City Officers' Salaries 










11,419 12 


Decoration of Soldiers' Grave 


s 








200 00 


Firemen's Parade . 










327 20 


Repairs of School-Houses 










3,736 23 


Fuel .... 










2,225 75 


Furniture and Supplies 










888 34 


Books and Stationery . 










725 62 


Printing and Advertising 










544 54 


Contingent Expenses 










1,462 37 


Care of Rooms 










2,868 47 


Evening Schools . 










1,474 89 


Teachers' Salaries . 










39,579 49 


Truant Officer 










812 50 


Reservoirs .... 










1 82 


New School-House, Bakersville . 








12,511 62 


Battery Building and Ward Room 








4,441 94 


Interest on land .... 








3,093 16 


Water-works .... 








20,608 10 


Celebration, July 4, 1883 






• 


2,000 00 




$612,578 58 


Cash in the Treasury, Decern 


ber l 


!1,18 


83 . 


• 


67,671 66 



18 



),250 24 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

City Treasurer. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the account of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, city treasurer for the year eighteen 
hundred eighty-three, and find the same to be correct and 
properly vouched for. 

S. B. STEARNS, 
SAMUEL LUNT, 
A. A. AINSWORTH, 
THOMAS L. THORPE, 
H. B. PUTNAM, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 

Manchester, January 9, 1884. 



. REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



INTEREST. 

To appropriation . . . .120,000 00 
water-works, amount transferred 38,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 131 98 



Dr. 



id Amoskeag Savings Bank 


$766 


— i 
96 


$58,131 98 
Cr. 


Manchester Savings Bank 


1,802 


06 




Mechanics Savings Bank 


90 


27 




Merrimack River Savings Bank 


90 


27 




Guaranty Savings Bank . 


85 


41 




Manchester National Bank 


14 


58 




Second National Bank . 


3 


34 




Amoskeag National Bank 


572 


92 




Charles Brown 


29 


17 




coupons, water 

coupons, city .... 


36,168 
18,509 


00 

00 

i 


6£G 1 Q1 QQ 






tyu i_> , j. o j. au 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 

To balance from old account . . $ 1,151 00 

appropriation .... 3,500 00 
county of Hillsborough, board of 

inmates of Reform School . 1,986 71 



Dr. 



278 

To L. B. Bodwell & Co., overdraft . $2 37 

W. H. Maxwell ... 144 99 

balance 113 66 



Paid Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. T. Sullivan . $98 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered David McKay . .' 20 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. J. Bohan . . 56 47 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Michael Kelley . 6 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Martin Whalen . 5 00 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. J. Reardon . 37 98 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. Fitzgerald . 58 13 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. McGrath . . 9 48 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. Turcott . . 113 75 

Daniel Sheehan, groceries de- 
livered Walter Lynch . . 25 54 

William Weber, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. Turcotte . . 24 25 

William Weber, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. Hunter . . 132 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries delivered Jos. Pierce . 16 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries delivered Mrs. Sarah 
Shanley .... 16 00 



>,898 73 
Cr. 



279 



Paid Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries delivered Joseph Dear- 
born 116 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries delivered Pjam Hovey 15 55 

G. W. Wilson, groceries deliv- 
ered L. D. Scagel . . 6^00 

G. W. Wilson, groceries deliv- 
ered Jerry Burke . . 4J)0 

G. W. Wilson, groceries deliv- 
ered Mrs. Mary Fitzgerald . 25 00 

G. W. Wilson, groceries deliv- 
ered Mrs. Mary Green . 36 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries deliv- 
ered Mrs. McKeon . . 15"00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries deliv- 
ered P. J. Haodley . • 67 75 

B. Bresnehan, groceries deliv- 
ered Robert McMahon . 19 65 

B. Bresnehan, groceries deliv- 
ered Mrs. Shanley . • 15 62 

Bartlett & Thompson, groceries 

delivered Jerry Burke . 2 00 

Bartlett & Thompson, groceries 

delivered Thomas Connor . 12 00 

Bartlett & Thompson, groceries 

delivered L. D. Scagel . 31 00 

S. L. Flanders, groceries de- 
livered Mrs. Geo. H. Smith . 4 00 

P. Harrington, groceries deliv- 
ered Jerry Burke . 2 00 

P. Harrington, groceries deliv- 
ered Mrs. J. Laughlin . . 86 00 



280 

Paid P. Harrington, groceries deliv- 
ered . .•• 
Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

delivered Mary McGovern . 
Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

delivered Judith McGrath . 
Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

delivered Mrs.HannahWood- 

man ..... 
Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

delivered Mary Doherty 
Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

delivered L. M. Green 
Currier & Johnson, groceries 

delivered Pyam Hovey 
Josiah Taylor & Son, groceries 

delivered Ellen Donovan . 
Josiah Taylor & Son, groceries 

delivered Abbie Bailey 

A. M. Eastman, groceries deliv- 
ered Mrs. F. P. Forsaith 

Griffin Bros., groceries deliv- 
ered Mrs. Anne Mackine 

D. M. Poore, groceries deliv- 
ered Hannah Talty 

Eager & Rand, groceries deliv- 
ered Helen Rhodes. 

B. F. Page, groceries delivered 
Mrs. Douglas Hunter 

Benton Brothers, groceries de- 
livered Joseph Dearborn 

G. H. Stearns, groceries deliv- 
ered Maurice Fitzgerald 

Esther Hardy 



18 


00 


2 


91 


10 


20 




70 


25 


18 


4 


00 


27 


44 


1 


45 


4 


00 


7 


56 


15 


00 


5 


02 


12 


00 


13 


46 


1 


34 


8 


36 


37 


00 



281 



Paid Mrs. 0. J. Doble, board of Anna 

B. Ayer . . . . $54 00 
Geo. H. Batchelder, board of 

Geo. C. Batchelder . . 108 00 
Wm. C. Chase, board of Thom- 
as Chase . . . . 45 00 
Mrs. H. O'Brien, board of Jo- 
seph O'Neal . . . 55 00 
Geo. H. Ellinwood, board of 

Geo. Blanchard . . . 86 28 

Sarah A. Heselton ... 10 00 

State Industrial School, board 

of inmates .■ . . 2,218 02 

N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

John J. Murray ... 234 04 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Michael Gillis . . . 186 25 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Asenath H. White . . 211 36 
N. H. Insane Asylum, board of 

Dudley P. Emerson . . 83 60 

N. H Insane Asylum, board of 

Willard A. Reed . 54 82 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 

Mrs. D. S. McKay . . 13 86 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 

Mrs. Timothy Sullivan . 4 75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 

Judith McGrath ... 4 50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 

Ellen Rhodes . . . 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 

Jerry Cronin ... 4 75 



282 

PaidL. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 

L M. Green 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal for 

Mrs. Doherty 
Luther Proctor, wood for Jo- 
seph Dearborn . 
Matthew McGinnis, wood for 

L. M. Green 
Luther Proctor, wood for Pyam 

Hovey .... 

A. Mclndoe, wood for Jerry 

Cullity .... 

A. Mclndoe, wood for Patrick 

Cousodine .... 
Moore & Preston, wood for L. 

Scagel .... 

Moore & Preston, wood for 

Thomas Connor . 
J. J. Flynn, wood for Johanna 

Woodman .... 
A. G. Whitten, wood for L. D. 

Scagel .... 
Isaac Lefebre, wood for L. Sca- 
gel 

H. K. Mallard, wood for Pyam 

Hovey .... 

Geo. Whitford, wood for Mary 

Doherty .... 
Emanuel Eisman, wood for 

Julia Gaudes 
James Baldwin & Co., wood for 

Judith McGrath . 
M. V. B. Garland, wood . 



$4 50 


9 


38 


12 


00 


o 


00 


15 


00 


4 


00 


12 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


2 


00 




^0 


14 


00 


5 


00 


2 


75 


1 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 



283 



Paid Samuel Neal, wood for Mary 

Doherty .... $2 00 

Geo. E. Hall, medicines . . 10 40 

L. K. Mead, medicines . . 89 97 

J. S. Heath & Co., medicines . 80 

J. B. Hall, medicines . . 30 
James M. Collity, professional 

services . . . . 30 00 
Exin Burlingame ... 20 00 
Purnald & Burbank, shoes . 1 25 
C. M. Thompson, shoes . 1 25 
Temple & Farrington, printing 5 50 
P. O. Woodman, funeral ex- 
penses of Joseph Dearborn 3 34 
Robert Hall .... 4 50 
Pearson & Wallace . . 15 00 
P. A. Devine .... 30 00 
town of Lancaster, care of 

Benson Joy . . . 43 06 

Edward McDuffie ... 3 00 
H. K. Fuller, milk for Judith 

McGrath .... 81 
James Bros. .... 1 00 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred .... 2.000 00 



,898 73 



CITY FARM. 

To balance from old account . . $558 87 

appropriation .... 2,500 00 

F. Allen, produce sold . . 385 22 

Wingate & Gould, overdraft . 7 85 



Dr. 



284 



To H. B. Moulton estate, use of bull $8 00 

J. Garvin, produce sold > . 585 55 
balance overdrawn . . . 2,148 52 



Paid Frederick Allen, supt., salary. $90 33 

Frederick Allen, labor . . 117 53 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 144 60 

Geo. H. Stearns, groceries . 50 93 

P. C. Flanders & Co., fish . 42 66 

Smith & Ely, crackers . . 14 90 

Bartlett& Thompson, groceries 97 22 

E. M. Slayton, butter . . 127 82 

A. G. Grenier, groceries . 17 00 

Chas. T. Allen & Co., groceries 46 25 

Hardy & Co., groceries . . 70 29 

Bartlett & Colburn, groceries . 3 70 

M. R. Currier, groceries . 2 00 

Sawyer & Smith, groceries . 13 80 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 5 74 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., groceries 83 06 

Carl E. York, groceries . 33 26 

Colburn & Cate, crackers . 8 42 

Pettee & Adams, grain . . 465 39 

Samuel Cooper, grain . . 328 90 

Drake & Carpenter, flour, etc. 248 45 

VVm. C. Rogers, hardware, etc. 101 18 

J. B. Varick, hardware, etc. . 66 52 

Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. . 108 26 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. . 34 71 

J. S. Bacheler, plumbing, etc.. 57 63 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, etc.. 3 37 
G. R. Vance & Co., repairing 

washing-machine . 4 40 



1,194 01 
Cr. 



285 



Paid L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing 
Wm. H. Hill, horseshoeing 
J. H. Cram, horseshoeing 
J. F. Woodbury, horseshoeing 
H. H. Dunckley, swill . 
D. Kerwin & Son, soap, etc. 
Geo. S. Clough & Co. lard, etc 
Robinson & Stearns, meats 
Clarke & Johnson, meats 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

bricks 
George W. Rief, lumber and 

labor .... 
P. Brown, lumber and labor 
Hawlcy & Barnard, dry goods 
Weston & Hill, dry goods 
Piper & Hawley, dry goods 
N. S. Clark, dry goods . 
H. M Tarbell, dry goods 
Waite Bros , dry goods . 

D. A. Simons, crockery, etc 
Plumer, Holton & Co., clothing 
M. 0. P. Clothing Co., clothing 
Geo. E. Mitchell, clothing 

H. M. Moody, clothing . 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, wagon, 

sleigh, etc. 
G. S. Telephone Co. i 
Mitchell & Heath, boots and 

shoes . . . 



m 


96 


19 


25 


31 


00 


4 


25 


25 


00 


12 


90 


11 


01 


257 


87 


17 


04 


38 


43 


198 


82 


82 


09 



51 67 



279 


24 


120 


21 


67 


42 


65 


54 


6 


88 


30 


32 


2 


50 


27 


69 


13 


00 


15 


25 


7 


25 


14 


65 


11 


52 


39 


19 


148 


73 


45 


00 



16 55 



286 



Paid Wingate & Gould, boots and 




shoes 


$20 10 


Furnald <fe Burbank, shoes 


2 50 


McDonald & Cody, shoes 


3 75 


Geo. H. Hubbard, tobacco 


30 84 


• R. G. Sullivan, tobacco . 


23 98 


J. Smith & Son, horseshoeing 


10 95 


J. Y. McQueston & Co., exten- 




sion table .... 


11 00 


H. D. Gordon, iron bedsteads . 


22 80 


H. Gordon, wall-paper 


4 98 


Higgins Bros., iron bedsteads, 




etc 


198 54 


Concord R. R. corp., freight . 


6 27 


F. X. McLaren, repairing har- 




ness, etc. .... 


10 95 


E. W. Kimball, repairing har- 




ness, etc. .... 


22 37 


C. W. H. Moulton, ladder and 




hooks ..... 


9 50 


L. K. Mead, medicines . 


3 95 


A. F. Perry, medicines . 


9 36 


Geo. E Hall, medicines . 


6 75 


C. B. Littlefield, medicines 


2 25 


C. H. Wood, painting signs 


3 00 


Wm. B. Abbott, painting 


341 67 


James R. Carr, painting . 


23 12 


J. J. Abbott, paint . 


40 


I. P. Emery & Co., tin ware . 


23 15 


Temple & Farrington, blank- 




books, etc. .... 


26 61 


J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 


24 12 


Wingate & Gould, shoes 


14 85 


C. M. Bailey, tin ware, etc. 


23 56 



287 



Paid Sweet & Stearns, brackets, etc. 


$20 20 


Sturgis & Dodge, professional 




services . 


7 50 


A. A. Moore, lightning-rods . 


121 00 


Richardson Manufacturing Co. 




manure-spreader. 


100 00 


T. B. Everett & Co. 


35 00 


David Rumrill, refrigerator 


111 00 


L. N. Dufrain, repairing pump, 




etc 


4 00 


B. F. Porter, filing saws . 


1 30 


R. M. Rollins, mowing-machine 


125 00 


C. W. Cheney, one cow . 


40 00 


Bennett & Lord, mason- work 


4 00 


Moses C. Eastman, soap . 


3 36 


J. Garvin, cow, harness, etc. 


63 50 


J. B. Pattee . 


10 00 


F. Simpkins, manure 


5 00 


Michael Lane, use of boar 


3 00 


George S Smith, cows . 


300 00 


G. H. Dorr, sink, pails, etc. 


4 00 


H. J. Marsh, pasturing . 


1 50 


J. Perham, plowing 


7 50 


Daniel Connor 


4 00 


P. C. Cheney Co., paper . 


1 28 


C. W. Rowell, cows 


120 00 


T. A. Barker, swill 


75 00 


Gideon Flanders, ice 


45 00 


A. Bodwell &, Son, stone 


12 00 


F. F. Dearborn, pasturing 


25 00 



>,194 01 



288 








CITY TEAMS. 












Dr. 


To appropriation . 


13,000 


00 




District No. 2 


925 


50 




District No. 10 


137 


88 




grading for concrete 


370 


75 




scavenger teams 


976 


00 




repairs of buildings 


27 


50 




sewers and drains . 


213 


25 




new highways 


156 


50 




watering streets 


851 


25 




paving .... 


68 


00 




macadamizing 


131 


25 




incidental expenses 


1 


00 




commons 


36 


00 




Wm. N. Chamberlain, manure 








sold .... 


10 


00 




balance overdrawn . 


. 1,346 


37 


18,251 25 














Cr. 


PaidE. P. Johnson, hay 


11,035 


75 




E. S. Whitney, hay 


199 


50 




Wilbur Fisk, carrots 


38 


80 




C. H. Tirrell, straw 


16 


02 




H. H. Young, straw 


rr 

i 


11 




H. S. Plumer, straw 


9 


72 




C. N. Harvey, straw 


25 


60 




Amos Chadwick, straw . 


11 


76 




J. M. Randlett, straw 


9 


49 




J. L. Fogg, straw . 


11 


45 




Samuel Cooper, grain 


464 


57 




Pettee & Adams, grain . 


539 


45 




H. Fradd & Co., grain . 


350 


77 





289 



Paid J. Stickney, neat's-foot oil 


$0 


80 


J. Stickney, horse-cover, etc. . 


14 


00 


Frank Hutchinson, wagon 


' 100 


00 


Stephen Austin, blacksmithing 


7 


00 


D. P. Cressey, blacksmithing . 


52 


16 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, carts 






and repairs 


1,716 


09 


John Barnes, blacksmithing . 


6 


10 


Wm. H. Hill, horseshoeing 


42 


11 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., horse- 






shoeing .... 


98 


95 


J. H. Cram, horseshoeing 


133 


50 


H. C. Ranno, harness and re- 






pairs . . 


163 


35 


D. S. Ames, harness and re- 






pairs ..... 


44 


85 


Ezra W. Kimball, harness and 






repairs .... 


280 


36 


Daniels & Co., stable brooms, 






etc. ..... 


o 
O 


46 


Charles D. Welch, horses 


700 


00 


Simmons & Jobert, horses 


950 


00 


F. S. Worthen, horse 


235 


00 


George H. Stearns, oil . 




50 


Weston & Hill, flannel . 





50 


A. N. Clapp, corn and salt 


1 


75 


Concord Railroad, freight on 






horses .... 


15 


30 


S. F. Burnham, professional 






services .... 


7 


50 


Dr. J. Alexander, professional 






services .... 


24 


10 


C. L. Moulton, professional ser- 






vices 


3 


00 


19 







290 



PaidS. F. Burnham, professional 

services .... 16 50 

J. B. Hall, liniment, horse 

medicine, etc. . . . 36 44 

Charles T. Newman, liniment, 

horse medicine, etc. . . 25 67 

Z. F. Campbell, liniment, horse 

medicine, etc. 
A. J. Sawyer . 
W. N. Chamberlain, express to 

Boston 
D. Kerwin & Son, Castile soap 
G. W. Butterfield, driver 
Jeremiah Lane, driver 
Charles Denyou, driver . 
Walter Seaward, driver . 
George Seaward, driver . 
C. H. Rogers, driver 
P. C. Young . . 
J. Taylor & Son, oil, salt, etc. 



15 


02 


3 


00 


> 

6 


00 


) 5 


25 


292 


25 


277 


50 


81 


75 


76 


50 


1 


50 


96 


75 


1 


00 


3 


75 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

To Charles Brown . . . . $1,000 00 

Manchester National Bank . 5,000 00 

Merchants National Bank . . • 5,000 00 

Second National Bank . . 10,000 00 

Amoskeag National Bank . . 15,000 00 

Amoskeag Savings Bank . . 45,000 00 

Guaranty Savings Bank . . 5,000 00 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 15,000 00 

Manchester Savings Bank . . 80,000 00 

Mechanics Savings Bank . . 10,000 00 



!,251 25 



Dr. 



$191,000 00 



291 



Paid Charles Brown 

Manchester National Bank 
Merchants National Bank 
Second National Bank . 
Manchester Savings Bank 
Mechanics Savings Bank 
Merrimack River Savings Bank 
Guaranty Savings Bank . 
Amoskeag Savings Bank 

By balance .... 



Cr. 



$1,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

40,000 00 

10,000 00 

15,000 00 

5,000 00 

30,000 00 

70,000 00 



-1191,000 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 



To appropriation 



PaidM. F. Dodge, superintendent . 
Orison Webber, superintendent 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
for labor of men and teams 

By balance on hand 



8300 00 



110 50 


44 


70 


2 


95 


3 


10 


183 


88 


54 


87 



Dr. 

.$300 00 
' Cr. 



$300 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 



To appropriation . 
H. W. Leach, sand 
balance overdrawn 



$10,000 00 

20 25 

219 14 



Dr. 



-$10,239 39 



292 



Cr. 



Paid James Patten, superintendent 


$607 75 


Warren Harvey, superintendent 


170 59 


W. C. Rogers. shovels,picks,etc. 


185 01 


John B. Varick, shovels, picks, 




etc. . . . • . 


78 36 


Daniels & Co. shovels, picks, 




etc. 


78 85 


J. Stickney, oil-hats, etc. 


3 80 


J. Bryson, painting 


19 03 


J. J. Abbott, paint . 


4 28 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber 


16 49 


Head & Dowst, brick 


56 00 


L. J. Flint, carpenter-work 


3 62 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


7 13 


Welch & Culliney, repairing 




tools, etc. .... 


15 85 


Welch & Smith, repairing 




tools, etc. .... 


87 95 


R. W. Flanders, repairing 




tools, etc. .... 


76 36 


L. A. Dickey, repairing tools, 




etc. ..... 


43 74 


Stephen Derry, repairing tools, 




etc. ..... 


5 15 


Lamson & Marden, repairing 




tools, etc. .... 


57 61 


Joseph Boisvert, repairing tools, 




etc 


75 


Derry & Co., repairing tools . 


5 15 


Geo. H. Stearns, oil, salt, etc. 


6 80 


George C. Lord, oatmeal 


3 30 


A. H. Lowell, castings . 


5 49 


T. W. Lane, time-books, etc. . 


6 44 



293 



PaidWm. H. Vickery, keys . 
C. H. Robie, concreting . 
Concord R. R. corp., freight 
C. A. Bailey, stone 
Frank M. Forsaith, brooms 
Goodwin Bros., lumber . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 
Abbot-Downing Co., chain for 

street-sweeper 
Abbot-Downing Co., refilling 

street-broom, etc. 
G. H. Dorr, desk . 
Temple & Farrington, blank 

books .... 
B. F. Porter, filing saws . 
T. L. Thorpe ... 
city-farm labor . . . 
for labor of men and teams 



$0 45 

78 42 

25 

94 25 

1 00 

2 75 
2 00 

10 00 





32 


25 








10 


00 








9 


00 








9 


80 








1 


50 








61 


00 






8, 


381 


32 










$10 


239 


39 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 

To appropriation .... $600 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . '916 25 



Paid Ed. N. Baker, superintendent 
L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing . 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 



$269 00 

8 20 

11 14 

1 00 

1 63 



Dr. 



1,516 25 
Cr. 



294 

Paid James Baldwin & Co., lumber 
Head & Dowst, lumber . 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
for labor of men and teams 



$3 00 




31 20 




1 60 




1,189 48 






11,516 25 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 
To appropriation .... $400 00 



PaidC. A. Pierce, superintendent . 
S. F. Knowles, " 

W. W. Dickey, " 

for labor of men and teams 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Joseph Boisvert, blacksmithing 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

By balance on hand 



$39 50 


17 


63 


113 


00 


190 


70 


1 


25 


1 


70 


1 


05 


20 


25 


14 


92 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$400 00 




balance overdrawn . 


212 75 


$612 75 
Cr. 






Paid C. C. Webster, superintendent 


$20 86 




R. N. Whittemore, " 


401 00 




for labor of men and teams . • 


190 89 


$612 75 







Cr. 

$400 00 
Cr. 



$400 00 



295 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



To appropriation 



1400 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



1700 00 
117 97 



Paid H. A. Horton, superintendent 


$23 00 


Charles Francis, " 


10 L 50 


J. J. Abbott, paint . 


63 


J. B. Varick, hardware . 


11 99 


Atherton & Benton, salt, etc. . 


1 34 


Thomas A. Lane, Akron pipe . 


40 


John Garland, stone 


12 00 


for labor of men and teams 


667 11 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT 


NO. 8. 


To appropriation .... 


1600 00 


Daniels & Co., overdraft . 


7 08 


balance overdrawn . 


347 98 



Dr. 







$400 00 
Cr. 


Paid I. T. Webster, superintendent 


$4 81 




D. H. Dickey, " 


58 00 




labor of men and teams . 


154 93 




By balance on hand 


182 26 


1400 00 


« 





Dr. 

$817 97 
Cr. 



$817 97 



Dr. 



$1,005 06 



296 



Paid J. Garvin, superintendent . $2 80 

E. F. Wilson, superintendent . 6 75 
Henry Thompson, blacksmith- 

ing ..... 6 45 

Daniels & Co., hardware . 30 42 

Joshua Page, blacksmithing . 8 70 

S. G. Reed, gravel ... 4 40 

for labor of men and teams . 946 04 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 

To appropriation .... $500 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 24 22 



Paid J. J. Gannon, superintendent $210 00 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 3 12 

Daniels & Co., plow . . 11 00 

L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing . 2 45 

for labor of men and teams . 297 65 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

To appropriation .... $1,300 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 456 43 



Paid F. S. Worthen, superintendent $146 00 
Wm. N. Chamberlain u . 102 00 
J. B. Varick, hardware . . 100 94 



Cr. 



$1,005 06 

Dr. 

$524 22 
Cr. 



$524 22 

Dr. 

1,756 43 
Or. 



297 



Paid Daniels & Co., hardware 


13 00 


W. C. Rogers, hardware 


60 


A. N. Clapp, hardware . 


2 89 


T. A. Lane, iron pipe, etc. 


12 24 


Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. 


103 00 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


50 73 


Stephen Austin, blacksmithing 


; 6 05 


John Barnes, blacksmithing 


5 00 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


8 65 


F. E. Scheer, stone 


9 00 


D. F. Cressey & Co., black 




smithing 


7 39 


J. G. Holbrook, stone 


21 00 


Daniel Butterfield, stone 


9 75 


C. O'Shaughnessey, stone 


3 10 


Geo. W. Goffe, poles 


10 00 


James Baldwin & Co., plank 


11 60 


James Kennard, sand 


4 40 


for labor of men and teams 


81,129 09 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



To appropriation . 
balance 



Paid Jas. E. Bailey, superintendent 
Manchester Axe Co., black- 
smithing .... 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Joseph Boisvert, blacksmithing 
for labor of men and teams 



$700 00 

418 18 



$474 51 


1 


90 


4 


40 




80 


636 


57 



.,756 43 



Dr. 

.,118 18 
Cr. 



.,118 18 



298 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $250 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 11 55 

$261 55 

Cr. 
Paid city farm, for labor . . $261 55 

$261 55 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT 


NO. 13. 


Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$200 00 


$200 00 
Cr. 






Paid J. P. Fellows, superintendent 


$6 00 




J. H. Campbell, " 


27 00 




E. C. Tilton, stone . 


3 93 




labor of men and teams . 


141 61 




By balance on hand 


21 46 


$200 00 







NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $2,500 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred . 7,632 20 

$10,132 20 

Cr. 
Paid Harriet M. Davis, land . . $4,800 00 

Joseph A. Brown, building Jew- 

ett street . . . . 224 00 



299 

Paid John Proctor, building Proc- 
tor road .... 
Head & Dowst, lumber . 
J. H. Maynard, lumber and 
labor ..... 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber 
D. H. Morgan, carpenter-work 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 
J. B. Yarick, hardware . 
Warren Harvey, covering stone 
Wm. Landry, stone-work 
Dennis Landry, use of derrick 
M. F. Dodge, gravel 
for labor of men and teams 



•$225 


00 


36 


48 


84 


27 


44 


94 


12 


50 


o 


10 


3 


00 


12 


00 


110 


67 


10 


00 


18 


70 


4,547 


54 




■ $10,132 20 



LAND DAMAGES. 

To appropriation .... 11,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 456 58 



Paid H. H. Young, Jewett street . $200 00 Cr. 

Abbie M. Wheeler, Shasta 

street .... 

Harriet A. Moulton, Milford 

street .... 

Timothy Collins, Proctor road 

C. M. Downs, Laurel street 

11,456 58 



$200 


00 


833 


33 


300 


00 


100 


00 


23 


25 



Dr. 



,456 58 



WATERING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $2,000 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred .... 1,950 47 



Dr. 



$3,950 47 



300 



Cb. 



Paid Pike & Heald, plumbing 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 
Manchester Water-works, water 
J. B. McCrillis & Sou, water-cart 
J. B. McCrillis Son, repairing 
water-carts .... 
for labor of men and teams 



$15 


95 


10 


05 


1,370 


00 


525 


00 


167 


97 


1,861 


50 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



To appropriation .... 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred ..... 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas, etc. 
Manchester Electric Light Co 
A. H. Lowell, lamp posts 

frames, etc. 
J. B. Varick, glass, etc. . 
Win. C. Rogers, glass, etc. 
James S. Bacheler, repairs, etc 
T. A. Lane, repairs, etc. 
Brock & Driscoll, repairs, etc 
Pike & Heald, repairs, etc. 
J. B. Clarke, printing 
Ed. N. Fogg, oil lamps, etc 
J. Hayes & Co. 
F. S. Worthen, lighting lamps 

etc 

I. R. Dewey, lighting lamps, etc 



$7,000 00' 
1,594 15 



., $3,800 


84 


., 1,735 


78 


178 


73 


35 


92 


37 


50 


5. 74 


25 


10 


59 


48 


15 


3 


60 


4 


68 


1 


30 


7 


00 


s 

. 2,221 


27 


). 431 


54 



!,950 47 



Dr. 



,594 15 
Cr. 



$8,594 15 



$2,000 00 
1,450 00 




. 4,959 08 


$8,409 08 






Cr. 



301 
PAVING STREETS. 



To appropriation . 

C. A. Bailey, overdraft 
reserved fund, amount trans 
ferred . 



Paid Charles A. Bailey, block pav- 
ing $4,029 55 

Charles H. Robie, concrete 

crossings, etc. 
R A. Lawrence, cobble paving 
F. W. McKinlcy, cobble paving 
Adam Gowing, cobble paving 
C. C. Harriman, cobble paving 
H. D. Beebe, cobble paving 
C. H. Simpson, cobble paving . 
H. A. Horton, cobble paving 
J. Nutt, cobble paving . 
J. H. Coburn, cobble paving 
for labor of men and teams 



1,320 


04 


5 


62 


10 


00 


4 


00 


7 


25 


52 


50 


113 


50 


24 


00 


39 


00 


31 


50 


2,772 


12 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $2,500 00 
reserved fund, amount transferred 3,153 56 



Dr. 



Paid Manchester Water-works,water $30 00 
Hutchinson Bros , repairs on 

stone-crusher . . . 635 89 



!,409 08 



Dr. 

$5,653 56 
Cr. 



302 



Paid J. B. Varick, hardware . 


113 28 


Moore & Preston, wood . 


6 00 


James Briggs, repairing pipe 


25 


T. L. Thorpe . 


1 00 


C. A. Bailey, nibble 


95 00 


Burns & Poor, wood 


11 50 


George Whitford, stone . 


252 00 


H. A. Horton, stone 


22 00 


Joseph Tirrell, stone 


67 00 


James Fullerton, stone . 


67 00 


Charles H. Simpson, stone 


100 00 


I. N. Plumer, stone 


4 00 


J. H. Giddings, stone 


18 00 


E. C. Emerson, stone 


1 00 


Daniel Buttcrfield, stone 


88 00 


Luther Campbell, stone . 


26 00 


S. P. Worthley, stone 


48 00 


W. Campbell, stone 


3 00 


S. P. Adams, stone 


15 00 


D. G. Andrews, stone 


'8 00 


Mrs. L. A. Willey, stone 


20 50 


Henry Porter, stone 


8 00 


J. H. Coburn, stone 


173 00 


C. M. Stevens, stone 


7 00 


H. D. Beebe, stone 


32 50 


A. S. Plumer, stone 


39 00 


William Landry, stone . 


2 50 


M. J. Turner, stone 


44 00 


James Nutt, stone . 


40 00 


J. Perham, stone 


8 00 


J. L. Fogg, stone . 


57 00 


George Thompson, stone 


25 00 


Sumner Cumner, stone . 


8 00 



303 



Paid J. Garland, stone . 

James Kennard, stone . 
for labor of men and teams 



$40 00 

25 25 

3,611 89 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

To appropriation .... $3,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 386 37 



PaidC. H. Robie, concreting . . $62 79 
Pettee & Adams, lime . 65 

for labor of men and teams . 3,322 93 



SEWER AND DRAINS. 



To appropriation . 

sundry persons, sewer licences 



PaidF. B. Potter, sewer pipe . 
Concord Railroad, freight 
Drake & Carpenter, cement 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
H. Fradd & Co., kerosene oil 

oatmeal, etc. 
A. N. Clapp, powder, fuse, etc 
C. E. Haines, rubber boots 
W. H. Cate, rubber boots 



$5,653 56 

Dr. 

$3,386 37 
Cr. 

$3,386 37 
Dr. 



. $20,000 


00 


. 1,452 


05 




$21 45^ 0*1 




yp^j-.Tc/^ yju 




Cr. 


. $7,653 


39 


70 


20 


133 


75 


218 


05 


15 


69 


15 


49 


4 


00 


7 


50 



304 



Paid T. L. Thorpe, paper bags 

F. H. Auger, rubber boots 
Fur n aid & Burbank, rubber 

boots 
McDonald & Cody,rubber boots 

G. W. Thayer & Son, rubber 
boots .... 

John Cayzer, rubber boots 
A. H. Lowell, iron castings,etc 
T. A. Lane, iron pipe, plumb 

ing, etc. 
Pike & Heald, lanterns, etc. 
J. Taylor & Son, oil 
Jas. Briggs, blasting tubes, etc 
D. F. Cressey, blacksmi thing- 
Welch & Culliney, blacksmith 

ing, etc. 
J. B. Varick, hardware, pow 

der, fuse, etc. 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
Head & Dowst, lumber . 
A. Bodwell & Son, stone 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co 

iron castings, etc. 
J. Stickney, oil suits, etc. 
Natt & W. F. Head, brick 
J. B. Clarke, printing 
Manchester Mills,use of derrick 
Bennett & Lord, mason-work 
for labor of men and men 
By balance on hand 



$9 56 
4 00 

7 00 
10 50 

19 50 

24 50 

495 10 

224 '53 

14 92 

6 50 

18 47 
99 67 

17 70 



259 


18 




65 


4 


82 


100 


00 


18 


80 


157 


50 


16 


15 


10 


00 


126 


00 


10 


62 


108 


00 


17 


50 


11,299 


77 


262 


04 




121,452 05 



305 



BRIDGES. 

To appropriation . 

reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . 



Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
Head & Dowst, lumber 
Walter Neal, labor . 
E. A. G. Holmes, labor 
J. B. Yarick, hardware 
D. P. Cressey & Co., black 

smithing 
Irad Poor, lumber . 
D. Wells, lumber . 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc 
Nelson W. Page, trucking lum- 
ber . 
, D. H. Morgan, repairing bridge 
Pius Brown, " " 

S. L. Flanders, nails, etc. 
Hutchinson Brothers, black- 
smithing 
A. N. Clapp, spikes 
George H. Colby, stone 
C. H. Robie, concreting 
J. Bryson, Jr., painting 
for labor of men and teams 



20 



$2,500 00 
1,874 29 



•$2,384 


85 


14 


30 


14 


69 


642 


74 


353 


11 


194 


34 


34 


62 


47 


00 


16 


56 


44 


39 


1 


50 


2 


00 


5 


50 


5 


04 


11 


85 




24 


18 


00 


159 


05 


39 


54 


384 


97 



Dr. 



14,374 29 
Or. 



1,374 29 



306 



COMMONS. 

To appropriation .... §1,500 00 
Wm. P. Scott, hay sold . . 40 00 
A. H. Lowell, old iron . 50 20 
J. Perham, overdraft . . 8 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . ' . . . 718 65 



PaidWm. P. Scott, superintendent 


1412 55 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor 


19 44 


Daniels & Co., hardware, paint, 




etc. ..... 


48 77 


J. B. Varick, hardware, . 


5 90 


A. H. Lowell, castings and 




labor ..... 


111 62 


C. H. Robie, concreting . 


380 20 


Manchester Water-works, water 


25 00 


James S. Bacheler . 


1 25 


Wm. Sutcliffe, blacksmithing . 


1 30 


Seth P. Campbell, maple trees 


23 00 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 




castings .... 


$5 77 


J. B. Clarke, printing 


23 95 


J. J. Abbott, paint . 


63 


Champion Iron Fence Co., fence 




gates ..... 


234 00 


C. H. Hodgman& Co., trucking 


1 50 


B., L., & C. R. R., freight 


8 65 


for labor of men and teams 


1,013 32 



Dr. 



$2,316 85 
Cr. 



5,316 85 



307 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


135,000 


00 


E. W. Perkins, land sold 


112 


55 


T. A. Lane, overdraft 


5 


56 
$35,118 11 

Cr. 


Paid Eliza Creighton, execution 


$446 


30 


Daniel Farmer, " 


83 


54 


J. A. Weston, " 


37 


07 


Kate Tooher, " 


442 


23 


D. Kerwin & Son, damage to 






team ..... 


36 


25 


Samuel W. Dunbar, damage to 






team ..... 


25 


00 


Sarah E. Swett, injury to person 


150 


00 


J. B. Ellinwood, " 


200 


00 


Isaac E. Wyman, " " 


110 


00 


F. F. Hall, damage to wagon . 


11 


50 


D. W. Batchelder, damage to 






team ..... 


15 


00 


A. VVicom, damage to team 


5 


00 


J. G. Sturgis, " " 


50 


00 


Mary A. Walsh, injury to person 


100 


00 


Mrs. Tewksbury, " " 


100 


00 


Eri P. Twitchell, bounty 


150 


00 


Henry W. Clarke, bounty 


150 


00 


Wm. B. Abbott, painting guide- 






boards .... 


20 


29 


Peter Craven, painting . 


3 


12 


A. D. Sherer " 


29 


50 


Sullivan & Sloan, " 


4 


50 


Joel Daniels, " 


6 


61 



308 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber . 


1579 44 


A. C. Wallace, " 


237 76 


A. J. Sawyer, " 


5 76 


D. H. Morgan, carpenter-work 


34 75 


Irad Poor, cedar posts and 




lumber .... 


83 28 


George W. Rief, lumber and 




labor ..... 


2,200 40 


George Holbrook, lumber and 




labor ..... 


238 88 


Alpheus Gay, lumber and 




labor ..... 


63 64 


J. H. Maynard, lumber and 




labor ..... 


8 80 


Mead, Mason, & Co., lumber 




and labor .... 


531 36 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 




labor ..... 


51 12 


. Robertson & Haselton, sign- 




boards .... 


4 90 


John B. Clarke, printing 


143 16 


Union Pub. Co., printing 


344 30 


Livingston & Kimball, printing 


60 15 


Temple & Farrington, blank- 




books, etc. 


269 16 


Manchester Water-works,water 


194 77 


N. P. Kidder, making city 




report .... 


150 00 


H. I. Rowell, bounty on crows 


70 


Eddie A. Moore. " " 


80 


Morris Lamprey, " " 


50 


Levi Caldwell, " , " 


70 


H. M. Young, " " 


40 


Willie Burlingame," " 


1 10 



309 



Paid J. Emerson, bounty on crows 
H. Lovering, " " 

Leroy McDonald, " " 

Mary F. Adams, " " 

W. B. French, " " 

Rodney W.Abbott/' " 

Robert A. Ray, Manchester's 

assessment in Knibbs valve 

suit ..... 
Win. Holland, return of births 

and deaths .... 
Leonard French, return of 

births and deaths 
C. F. Bonney, return of births 

and deaths .... 
M. Richard, return of births 

and deaths .... 
W. W. Wilkins, return of births 

and deaths .... 
Charles F. George, return of 

births and deaths 
J. D. Lovering, return of births 

and deaths . . . 25 

E. A. Lanouette, return of 

births and deaths . . 20 25 

W. J. Sleeper, return of births 

and deaths .... 175 

William A. Webster, return of 

births and deaths . . 75 

C. B. Sturtevant, return of 

births and deaths . . 25 

J. W. D. MacDonald, return of 

births and deaths . . 25 75 

George D. Towne, return of 

births and deaths . 1 50 



$0 


10 




10 




40 




50 




10 




40 


5,714 


28 


1 


25 


12 


25 


4 


00 


17 


75 


5 


00 


1 


00 



310 



Paid D. S. Adams, return of births 

and deaths .... $8 50 

H. de W. Carvelle, return of 

births and deaths . . 3 25 

J. A. Jackson, return of births 

and deaths .... 10 50 

J. W. Mooar, return of births 

and deaths .... 4 50 

J. H. Mills, return of births 

and deaths .... 1 25 

O. D. Abbott, return of births 

and deaths .... 6 50 

Sturgis & Dodge, return of 

births and deaths . . 13 75 

Einil Custer, return of births 

and deaths . . . . 1 75 

Charles Corey, return of births 

and deaths ..... 25 

G. A. Lacerte, return of births 

and deaths .... 50 

A. D. Smith, return of births 

and deaths .... 3 00 

Thomas Wheat, return of births 

and deaths .... 1 50 

N. P. Taplin, return [of births 

and deaths .... 75 

C. M. Styles, return of births 

and deaths .... 8 25 

Luther Pafetee, return of births 

and deaths .... 1 75 

John Ferguson, return of births 

and deaths .... 24 50 

James Sullivan, return of births 

and deaths .... 66 25 



Ill 


00 


6 


25 


121 


00 


35 


00 


266 


50 



311 



Paid L. M. French, return of births 
and deaths .... 

J. L. Robinson, return of births 
and deaths .... 

J. A. Barker, care of boiler at 
city library .... 

J. N. Baker, care of clocks 

C. H. Robie, concreting . 

J. F. James, perambulating 

town lines . . . . 59 28 

T. A. Lane, setting stand-pipes, 

pipe, etc. . . • . 291 15 

Charles E. Cochran, profes- 
sional services . . . 14 26 

James S. Bacheler, plumbing, 

etc 27 43 

F. O. Dewey & Sons, globes, 
etc 

Daniels & Co., hardware 

J. B. Yarick, hardware . 

Thorp & Avery, furnace, etc. . 

Hutchinson Bros., land damage 

Hutchinson Bros., iron- work . 

Brock & Driscoll, tin dippers, 
etc. ..... 

A. H. Lovell, castings 

S. C. Forsaith & Co., kindling 
wood ..... 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. . 

James Briggs, plumbing 

Fellows & Co., blacksmithing . 

R. W. Flanders, 

Manning & Houghton, repair- 
ing water-troughs . 3 20 



41 


50 


25 


12 


23 


67 


429 


66 


321 


15 


14 


47 


1 


00 


15 


54 


1 


15 


14 


68 


1 


50 


i 


55 


4 


75 



312 



Paid C. H. Simpson, teams . 




$340 00 


James Bros., " 




158 25 


J. C.Nichols & Son," 




60 00 


Cavanaugh Bros., " 




129 75 


E. T. James, " 




84 00 


C. C. Perry, " 




71 00 


George W. Reed, " 




. 6 00 


H. E. Slack, 




6 00 


J. F. Fox & Co., " 




2 00 


George L. Huntoon," 




30 00 


Wm, J. Freeman, " 




10 00 


George W. Reed, " 




17 00 


Joseph A. Brown, " 




20 00 


Wm. Tread way, dating-stamp 


9 30 


Warren Harvey, stone-work . 


1,032 50 


William Landry, stone-work . 


534 75 


A. Bod well & Son, stone 


300 00 


Charles A. Bailey, stone . 


187 00 


Pettee & Adams, lime 


3 60 


Carpenter & Pippin, mason- 




work ..... 


21 29 


B. W. Robinson, mason-work . 


4 25 


Timothy Sullivan, burying 




nuisances .... 


3 00 


W. H. Bennett, assistant city 




engineer .... 


436 00 


H. W. Home, rod man for 




engineer .... 


350 50 


W. D. Hunter, rodman for 




engineer .... 


332 00 


George H." Allen, repairs of 




instruments, etc. 


55 38 


Judith Sherer, matron at pest- 




house . . . 




360 00 






313 



Paid William R. Patten, witness 




fees, etc. .... 


1107 93 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


64 02 


Concord Railroad, freight 


61 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co., wood and 




coal ..... 


9 35 


C. H. Reed, services in claim 




cases ..... 


173 00 


W. H. Maxwell . V . 


15 00 


N. P. Kidder, making return of 




births, marriages and deaths, 




etc. . 


508 80 


E. J. Williams, repairing slate 




on roofs .... 


9 50 


J. C. Young, repairing slate on 




roofs ..... 


5 15 


George W. Cheney, expenses to 




Boston for committee . 


5 00 


T. W. Lane, General Laws, etc. 


5 50 


J. A. Brown, labor on Nutt road 


418 76 


I. Blake, cleaning vaults 


9 00 


William Treadway, repairing 




dating stamp 


1 50 


A. F. Stevens, professional ser- 




vices ..... 


141 00 


T. A. Barker, entertainment of 




Gov. Butler, Gov. Hale, and 




party ..... 


250 00 


F. S. Worthen, repairing 




barrels for excavator . 


18 00 


J. M. Nutt, gravel for Nutt road 


52 30 


M. V. B. Edgerly, land . 


2,025 00 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 




cotton ties .... 


27 08 



148 


00 


13 


50 


150 


00 


2 


64 


2 


00 


O 


00 


78 


10 


64 


84 



314 



Paid Barton & Co., oil-cloth . . 122 75 

T. A. Barker, dinner for visit- 
ing committees from Lowell 
and Lawrence . . 50 00 

Walter M. Parker, illegal tax 

paid in 1882 ... 72 29 

Charles E. Balch, illegal tax 
paid in 1882 . . 

L. Searles, burying nuisances . 

George Porter, land 

Weston & Hill, matting . 

Clough & Clark, professional 
services .... 

H. D. Gordon, chestnut table . 

George Thompson, trees . 

J. J. Bennett, mason-work 

Adams & Lamprey, brooms for 

pest-house .... 1 40 

G. F. Bosher & Co., profes- 
sional services ... 1.3 25 

D. C. Wliittemore, allowance 

on highway ... 20 00 

F. O. Dewey & Son, street 

globes . . . . 36 50 

Wm. W. Ireland, plan for barn 

at city tarm, etc. . . 22 00 

L. M. French, professional ser- 
vices ..... 
James Baldwin & Co., sawdust 
George E. Morrill, use of team 
P. W. Follansbee & Son, mov- 
ing battery building 

E. J. Williams, tar roofing 
D. W. King, recording deeds . 



10 


00 




40 


35 


00 


100 


00 


116 


35 


1 


33 



315 



Paid Sampson, Davenport, & Co., 

directories . 
Belknap & Co., dating-stamp 
Drake & Carpenter, lime and 

cement 
Celinda Germain, washing 

school-houses 
Weston & Hill, cotton 
D. P. Brooks & Co., ink 
George A. Ramsdell 
Estes & Lauriat > 
George A. Alger, illegal tax 
J. M. Crawford, clerical services 
G. A. R., armory rent 
D. R. Prescott, witness fees, etc 
Adams & Lamprey, oil-can 
Granite State Telephone Co. 
James Sullivan, professional 

services 
J. J. Garmon, setting up guide 

boards 

George E. Morrill, use of team 
James A. Weston, illegal tax 

C. W. Stanley, illegal tax 

D. W. Lane, illegal tax . 

W. H. Newhall, labor at Amos 

keag Cemetery . 
A. J. Lane 

N. P. Kidder, expressage 
Sampson, Davenport, & Co 

directories . 
S. B. Putnam, auditing collect 

or's account 
A. G. Dole, land 



$6 00 

15 15 

16 80 

32 70 

10 07 

75 

15 00 

16 00 
4 23 

25 00 

100 00 

13 92 

1 75 

10 00 

16 50 



6 


50 


9 


00 


639 


90 


19 


02 


36 


02 


9 


12 


3 


00 


4 


30 



7 00 

25 00 
960 00 



10 


00 


67 


00 


10 


00 




54 


5 


00 


23 


60 


15 


40 



316 



Paid Loammi Searles, burying nui- 
sances . . . . no oo 

H. P. Simpson, expenses to 
Boston and Concord . 

George Thompson, trees . 

William H. Maxwell 

Western Union Telegraph Co., 
telegrams .... 

Manchester post-office, stamps 

county commissioners 

A. N. Clapp, oil-barrels . 

James Patten, expenses to Bos- 
ton and Concord ... 6 00 

Abbot-Downing Co., watering- 
cart 525 00 

G. W. Varnum, distributing 

health notices . . . 17 50 

Daniel Healy, whitewashing 

tree-boxes, etc. . . . 51 89 

H. P. Simpson, expenses to 

Portsmouth ... 6 00 

E. P. Johnson, expenses pur- 
chasing coal ... 6 00 

Dr. James Sullivan, profes- 
sional services . . . 15 00 

H. H. Sanderson, storing exca- 
vator ..... 3 00 

Edwin Rogers, fire-alarm indi- 
cators, wire, etc. . . . 1,359 30 

F. D. Hanscom, land . . 3,000 00 
W. H. Newhall, moving fence, 

etc. 9 00 

H. P. Simpson, expenses to 

Boston .... 6 00 



317 



Paid E. P. Johnson, expenses to 






Boston .... 


16 


00 


F. J. Martin, illegal tas. . 


1 


69 


Louis Burgeois, illegal tax 


2 


00 


George E. Morrill, distributing 






tax bills .... 


48 


50 


Eddie M. Carr, cleaning vaults 


o 
O 


00 


J. T. Fanning, professional ser- 






vices ..... 


270 


00 


H. B. Putnam, allowance for 






horse-hire and incidental ex- 






penses . . . 


132 


00 


Dr. J. M. Collity, professional 






services .... 


115 


00 


D. W. King, recording deed . 




65 


S. A. Riddle, searching town 






records ... 


5 


00 


S. B. Putnam, expenses to Con- 






cord ..... 


1 


50 


Nathaniel Baker 


5 


00 


Elliott Manufacturing Co., 






house numbers 


16 


50 


Concord Railroad, freight 




60 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


3 


33 


D. K. White, milk inspector's 






instruments 


16 


16 


Brigg & Huse, professional ser- 






vices ..... 


25 


00 


for labor of men and teams 


1,214 


66 


By balance on hand 


1,662 


21 



135,118 11 



318 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

To balance from old account . . $'846 19 

appropriation .... 5,000 00 

J. F. James, lots sold . . 2,408 04 
J. F. James, digging graves and 

grading lots . . . 345 46 



Paid B. A. Stearns, superintendent #727 00 

Oliver Mitchell, loam . . 159 50 

A. H. Lowell, iron-work . . 19 27 

J. Hodge, lumber . . . 25 43 

Daniels & Co., hardware . 91 89 
Temple & Farrington, record 

book, stationery, etc. . . 44 71 
Livingston & Kimball, printing 19 00 
L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing . 12 30 
Milo Smith, lot 26 00 
J. F. James, treasurer, and sta- 
tionery .... 26 15 
G. A. Smith & W. H. Tyler . 26 00 
G. F. Bosher & Co., plants . 8 00 
Lamson & Marden, land-marks 245 00 
F. N. McLaren, harness and 

coffin straps . . . 32 55 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 7 50 

J. T. Beaoh, horse-cart . . 100 00 

T. A. Lane, iron pipe, etc. . 5 02 

Pike & Heald, hardware, etc. . 25 06 

William S. Locke, land . . 925 00 

for labor of men and teams . 1,759 11 

By balance to new account . . 4,315 20 



Dr. 



5,599 69 

Cr. 



$8,599 69 



319 








VALLEY CEMETERY. 












Dr. 


To balance from old account . 


$14 C 




appropriation . 


. 2,000 


00 




H. R. Pettee, water, digging 


• 




• 


graves, etc. . 


549 


00 




balance overdrawn . 


2,638 


84 


$5,201 84 














Cr. 


Paid F. B. Balch, superintendent 


•$598 


53 




S. B. Duke, labor . 


207 


50 




J. B. Varick, hardware, etc. 


9 


94 




Manchester Water-works, watei 


128 


80 




A. H. Lowell, iron fence . 


3,155 


02 




Jas. M. Nutt, paving-stone, etc 


38 


00 




J. S. H am man, loam 


23 


00 




H. L. Bartlett, receipt-book 


* 2 


50 




Marsh & Co., labor 


150 


00 




Varnum & Co., labor 


45 


95 




Jas. S. Bacheler, iron pipe, etc 


36 


00 




Thorp & Avery, sprinkler 


3 


90 




C. C. Webster, turf 


66 


15 




Warren Harvey, stone-work, et( 


; 731 


22 




J. Hodge, lumber . 


1 


83 




Ezra W. Kimball, coffin strap* 


\ 3 


50 


$5,201 84 









FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



To appropriation 


.$18,000 00 


old hose sold 


6 00 


J. B. Varick, overdraft 


1 94 


W. A. Brown . 


133 03 



Dr. 



,140 97 



320 



Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 1. Cr. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 




$60 12 


George W. Butterfield, driver . 


216 50 


Manchester Locomotive-works, 




repairing hose couplings 




6 50 


Daniels & Co., hardware 




4 61 


Geo. H. Stearns, matches 




50 


Ed. N. Fogg, illuminator 




42 


J. T. Underhill, wood . 




15 16 


Boston Belting Co., hose 




16 00. 


C. H. Hodgman, trucking 


and 




freight 




50 


A. H. Lowell, castings . 




3 76 


D. S. Ames, harness 




112 00 


Company's bill for services 




1,135 00 


N. S. Bean Steam Fire 


Engine Co. No. 


Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


. 


173 44 


Jeremiah Lane, driver . 


, 


216 50 


Sylvester Cate, sub-driver 


. 


10 00 


Daniels & Co., hardware . 


. 


2 27 


George H. Stearns, matches, 




oil, soap, etc. 


. 


2 64 


E. W. Kimball, repairing 


iiar- 




ness .... 


. 


2 50 


D. S. Ames, whip . 


. 


2 25 


Ed. N. Fogg, duster 


. 


2 50 


J. T. Underhill, wood . 


. 


15 15 


pay-roll of Company 


• 


1,135 00 



11,571 07' 



$1,462 25- 



321 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$74 16 


Walter L. Blenus, driver 


655 50 


Geo. H. Seaward, sub-driver . 


10 00 


Manchester Locomotive-works, 




repairing hose-carriage 


14 00 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


6 27 


George H. Stearns, lantern, 




matches, and oil 


2 75 


Manchester One Price Clothing 




Co., reefers 


51 00 


E. P. Johnson, wood 


4 50 


Thomas Dunlap, clock 


4 88 


William C. Rogers, vise . . ' 


6 00 


D. A. Simons 


5 22 


pay-roll of Company 


1,538 75 







Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2. 



Paid Manchester Gas Company 


$37 44 


Walter Seaward, driver . 


110 00 


Manchester Locomotive-works, 




hose-carriage 


700 00 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron- 




work . 


7 25 


D. S. Ames, whip . 


2 25 


Moore & Preston, coal 


16 00 


Geo. C. Lord,matches,soap,etc. 


2 18 


Daniels & Co., carriage-jack . 


1 50 


pay-roll of Company 


995 00 



Cb. 



$2,373 03 



Cb. 



.,871 62 



2] 



322 
E. W. Harrington Hose Co. No. 3. 

Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 

John T. O'Dowd, driver . 

Manchester Locomotive- works, 
sink-block, springs, etc. 

Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 

Daniels & Co., hardware 

J. B. Varick, varnish brush,etc. 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, paint- 
ing, etc. .... 

H. C. Ranno, repairing harness 

Manchester One Price Clothing 
Co., reefers. 

E. P. Johnson, coal 

H. Fradd & Co., matches, 

brooms, etc. ... 3 96 

D. F. Cressey, repairing chairs, 
etc 4 15 

A. C. Wallace, wood . 2 00 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repair- 
ing chairs, etc. ... 2 00 

Tristam Berry, repairing 

chairs, etc. .... 2 62 

pay-roll of Company . . 995 00 



mi 


80 


240 


25 


11 


72 


2 


08 


2 


50 


3 


88 


3 


50 


4 


30 


102 


00 


29 


60 



Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4. 

Paid Manchester Gas Co , gas . 89 72 

Charles Rogers, driver . . 40 00 
Manchester Locomotive- works, 

hose-carriage . . . 700 00 



Cr. 



,447 36 



Cr. 



323 



Paid Pike & Heald, brooms, pails, 

etc. .... 
Wm. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
T. A. Lane, hose, etc. 
Samuel Eastman &, Co., noz 

zles, spanners, etc. 
E. W. Kimball, belts 
Manchester One-Price Clothing 

Co., blanket 
Cumner & Co., reefers . 
Plumer, lTolton,& Co.? overalls 
Edward N. Fogg, cuspidores 

duster, etc. . 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

hydrant wrenches 
E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 
Temple & Farrington, shades 

fixtures, etc. 
Thomas Dunlap, clock . 
American Steam Gauge Co. 

nozzles 
T. W. Lane, record-book and 

stationery . 
pay-roll of Company 



$2 


82 


1 


45 


9 


23 


10 


60 


71 


00 


13 


75 


6 


00 


126 


00 


18 


00 



8 25 

8 00 
6 00 

5 41 

4 87 

17 50 

2 65 
497 50 



,559 25 



Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 

Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas . $61 92 

Charles N. Denyou, driver . 219 00 

Sylvester Cate, sub-driver . 15 00 

J. B. Nourse, sub-driver . 5 00 



Cr. 



324 



Paid Daniels & Co., hardware 

Geo. H. Stearns, oil and soap 
S. F. Adams, moving ladders 
E P. Johnson, wood 
Sanborn Carriage Co., repair 

ing truck . 
James R. Carr, paint and labor 
Manchester Locomotive-works 
pay- roll of Company 



$7 


67 


. 


39 


5 


50 


4 


50 


6 


00 


2 


50 


i 12 


00 


1,930 


00 



$2,269 48 



Engineers' Department and Miscellaneous. 



Paid Manchester Water-works,water 
Manchester Locomotive-works, 

hose-pipe stick, etc. 
William C. Rogers, hardware 
Daniels & Co , " 

T. A. Lane, plumbing 
Stephen Gardner, care of en 

gine-house boiler 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing supply-wagon 
Samuel Eastman & Co., hose 
Edward N. Fogg, lamp . 
Concord Railroad, freight 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
J. B. Clarke, printing 
Temple & Farrington, molding 

cord, etc. 

E. P. Johnson, coal 

J. P. Scollay & Co., polish, oil, 

etc 



$761 82 

13 00 
4 40 

10 62 
1 71 

188 75 



3 


48 


1,810 


45 




35 


1 


08 


65 


05 


41 30 


4 


85 


210 


32 



UB. 



3 05 



325 



Paid W. A. Wood & Co., oil, . . $49 63 

American Fire Hose Co., hose, 
etc 450 00 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 8 55 

George A. Davis, oiling and 

repairing hose ... 22 50 

George R. Simmons, labor on 

Fire King .... 2 50 

Charles Griffin, clearing snow 

from hydrants ... 9 45 

T. C. Dame, clearing snow 

from hydrants ... 3 00 

Dennis Sullivan, driving sup- 
ply-wagon . . . . 60 50 

D. A. Simons . . . . 20 00 
Pike & Heald . . . 51 61 
T. A. Lane .... 2 14 

E. W. Kimball ... 5 10 
T. W. Lane, chief engineer . 300 00 
T. W. Lane, stationery . . 16 85 

A. C. Wallace, assistant en- 
gineer . . . . 100 00 

O. E. Kimball, assistant en- 
gineer .... 100 00 

B. C. Kendall, assistant en- 
gineer and clerk . . . 125 00 

J. F. Pherson, assistant en- 
gineer . . . . 100 00 



84,552 06 



326 

Recapitulation. 

FaidAmoskeagS. F. E. Co. No. 1 $1,571 07 
N. S. Bean, S. F. E. Co. No. 2 1,462 25 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 2,373 03 
Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 1,871 62 
E. W. Harrington Hose Co. 

No. 3 1,447 36 

Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4 . 1,559 25 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder 

No. 1 . . . ; . 2,269 48 
Engineers' department and 

miscellaneous . . . 4,552 06 
reserved fund . . . 1,034 85 

-118,140 97 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

To appropriation .... 11,000 00 
Worcester & Nashua Railroad, 

overdraft 
Thorp & Avery, overdraft 



Paid Tristam Berry, superintendent 
Tristam Berry, extra services . 
J. T. Garland, stone 
William T. Smith, blue vitriol 
Warren Harvey, chestnut poles 
Edwin Rogers, fire-alarm box, 
etc. ..*... 
Welch & Culliney, iron-work . 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 



Br 



66 




19 64 






$1,020 30 






Cr. 


•$300 00 




6 50 




7 20 




70 33 




26 25 




241 44 




.5 50 




7-2 





327 



Paid Peter Ducharme, strap . 


11 50 




T. A. Lane, plumbing 


3 25 




C. B. Littlefield, chemicals 


3 41 




L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing 


9 50 




Charles Williams, Kerite win 


i 9 00 




Pike & Heald, solder 


3 17 




J. B. Clarke, printing 


75 




A. H. Lowell, zincs 


142 40 




Charles L. Bly . . 


8 50 




William C. Rogers, hardware 


7 82 




Daniels & Co., hardware 


1 67 




A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


4 15 




A. B. dishing, trucking 


12 00 




C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 






ing, etc. 


2 88 




Dennis Sullivan, trucking 


3 25 




J. C. Snow, trucking 


1 75 




Charles Lougee, labor 


15 00 




George A. Davis, labor . 


7 50 




Charles P. Herbert, labor 


3 50 




H. B. Porter, labor 


1 13 




Tristam Dame, labor 


1 87 




Concord Railroad, freight 


3 64 




Worcester & Nashua Rail- 






road, freight 


66 




T. W. Lane, use of teams 


8 50 




James Brothers, teams . 


12 50 




B. C. Kendall, labor 


12 50 




Balance on hand . 


80 56 






$ 1,020 


30 



328 

HYDRANT SERVICE. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . ' . $20,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 700 00 

120,700 00 

Cr. 
Paid Manchester Water-works,water $20,700 00 

120,700 00 



RESERVOIR. 

To balance on hand ... $43 06 



Paid W. C. Rogers, hardware 

Tristain Berry, labor 
By balance to new account 



$0 


82 


1 


00 


41 


24 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



To balance from old account . 


$2,252 15 


appropriation . 


13,000 00 


J. C. Bickford, costs . 


1,127 47 


M. J. Jenkins, fines . 


4,622 31 


Florence Sullivan, overdraft 


22 00 


Western Union Telegraph Co., 




overdraft 


2 23 


Smith & Bly, overdraft 


50 


balance overdrawn . 


2,554 02 



Dr. 

$43 06 
Cr. 



$43 06 



Dr. 



J3,580 68 



329 



Cr. 



Paid N. P. Hunt, judge . 


. $1,500 00 


I. L. Heath, associate justice 


44 00 


J. C. Bickford, clerk 


601 00 


H. W. Longa, marshal . 


23 80 


M. J. Jenkins, marshal . 


. 1,256 71 


Eben Can*, assistant marshal 


683 90 


Edgar Farrar, captain nigh 


t 


watch .... 


852 76 


Eben Carr, night watch 


35 00 


Hiram Stearns, " 


755 00 


J. F. Cassidy, " 


776 00 


James Bucklin, " 


758 00 


Thomas Frain, " 


833 00 


Ira P. Fellows, " 


823 00 


Wm. H. Newhall, " 


625 00 


J. F. Dunn, " 


778 00 


Lafayette Tebbetts," 


761 00 


Francis Bourrassau," 


764 00 


Gideon Rochette, " 


452 00 


Philip Reischer, " 


763 00 


C. H. Reed, " 


705 00 


Charles S. Brown, " 


729 00 


Leroy M. Streeter, " 


763 00 


Jeremiah Murphy, " 


804 00 


Michael Fox, " 


758 00 


Henry Harmon, " 


755 00 


Michael Marr, " 


464 00 


John C. Colburn, day police . 


749 00 


R. W. Bean, " 


752 00 


Geo. W. Minard, special police 


243 00 


Timothy P. Shea, " 


757 00 


B. N. Wilson, " 


449 00 


Hosea Twombly, " 


126 00 



330 



Paid B. W. Stearns, special police 


$5 00 


George W. Varnum, 


a 


3 00 


E G. Woodman, 


a 


13 00 


Samuel L. Mitchell, 


a 


108 00 


C. F. Hoyt, 


a 


7 00 


M. L. Brown, 


it 


1 00 


L. Searles, 


a 


5 00 


N. J. Tuck, 


a 


255 00 


Jules Faucher, 


a 


81 00 


Wm. Stevens, 


a 


6 00 


Abraham Rowell, 


a 


7 00 


E. A. G. Holmes, 


a 


5 00 


D. E. Harriman, 


u 


12 00 


Charles D. Wells, 


u 


15 00 


S. P. Chase, 


a 


11 00 


Wm. Hill, 


a 


11 00 


Nahum Ward, 


a 


38 00 


C. D. Emerson, 


u 


5 00 


J. H. Terrill, 


U 


27 00 


H. C. Sleeper, 


u 


4 00 


D. C. Jackson, 


a 


20 00 


L. M. Connor, 


u 


39 00 


T. P. Heath, 


a 


6 00 


G. W. Goodwin, 


tc 


4 00 


P. H. Riley, 


u 


18 00 


W. E. Westover, 


u 


5 00 


C. W. Arnold, 


(C 


14 00 


Timothy Connor, 


a 


4 00 


R. A. Challis, 


a 


2 00 


George Howard, 


a 


4 00 


S. D. Smith, 


a 


7 00 


Florence Sullivan, 


a 


218 00 


A. B. Page, 


£< 


4 00 


Alcide Helie, 


(( 


14 00 



331 



Paid W. H. Emery, special police 


$8 00 


F. H. Bolton, " 


6 00 


H. C. Sleeper, " 


10 00 


J. H. Proctor, 


6 00 


Edward Wyman, " 


8 00 


R. McFarland, " 


6 00 


A. Felch, " 


1 00 


H. H. Philbrick, " 


4 00 


George W. Paige, " 


6 00 


H. Cunningham, " 


4 00 


J. K. Rhodes, " 


22 00 


D. K. White, 


8 00 


J.E.Bailey, " 


205 00 


C. B. Hildreth, professional 




services . 


30 00 


Jos. W. Fellows, special justice 


2 12 


C. A. Sulloway, professional 




services . 


2 00 


J. P. Bartlctt, professional ser- 




vices . 


10 00 


E. F. Jones, professional ser- 




vices .... 


4 00 


John Foster, professional ser 




vices .... 


2 00 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


381 96 


Granite State Telephone Co. 


99 00 


James Bros., teams 


3 50 


H. E. Slack, teams . 


3 50 


C. H. Simpson, teams 


29 25 


E. T. James, teams 


47 25 


J. F. Moore, team . 


2 00 


Daniel Davis, meals for pris- 




oners . 


225 30 


Mrs. J. Clement 


2 00 



229 



Paid Challis & Campbell, printing . $63 10 
Campbell & Williams, printing 8 75 

John B. Clarke, printing . 49 37 

H. H. Everett, printing . . 5 50 

Temple & Farrington, blank- 
books, etc. .... 9 66 
T. W. Lane, blank-books, etc. 33 40 
W. P. Cobnrn, stationery . 3 00 
George C. Hoitt, binding dock- 
ets, etc. .... 2 75 
Western Union Telegraph Co., 

telegrams . . . . 29 97 

G. W. Bonnie, professional 

services .... 5 00 

Edward N. Fogg ... 5 55 

James Briggs . . . . 1 50 

M. J. Jenkins ... 32 99 

R. J. P. Goodwin, professional 

services .... 1 50 

William H. Vickery, repairing 
badges .... 

Smith & Bly, crackers • . 

C. H. Wood, lettering lanterns 
Daniels & Co., lanterns . 
Geo. H. Stearns, oil-can and oil 
Weston & Hill, blankets . 
Stephen Derrv 
A. H. Paige, badges 

D. Evans & Co., coat buttons . 
Manchester Steam Laundry, 

washing; blankets 





50 






16 


00 






; 1 


20 






7 


74 

90 






18 


00 






4 


00 






8 


75 






12 


50 






4 


00 








m 


23,580 


68 



38J 



CITY HALL. 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


12,000 00 




rents ..... 


2,100 75 




City Library, coal 


267 20 




reserved fund, amount trans- 






ferred ..... 


2,000 00 




balance overdrawn . 


1,318 33 


$7,686 2 










Cr. 


Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$185 91 




Manchester Water-works, water 


1,901 20 




Temple & Farrington, wall- 






paper, etc. .... 


33 13 




Celinda Germain, scrubbing 






floors ..... 


130 80 




Weston & Hill, rope matting,etc 


88 53 




Barton & Co., carpeting, etc. . 


81 10 




W. H. Vickery, keys 


2 10 




W. W. Hubbard, lumber 


122 70 




J. Hodge, lumber . 


21*50 




Head & Dowst, lumber . 


132 34 




George H. Dudley, carpenter- 






work, etc. .... 


298 10 




Tristram Berry, carpenter-work 


3 75 




Walter Neal, carpenter-work . 


13 90 




Geo. Holbrook, carpenter-work, 






etc. ..... 


13 15 




L. M. Aldrich, carpenter-work, 






etc 


27 78 




H. D. Gordon, furniture . 


97 61 




Higgins Bros., rep. furniture . 


3 65 




D. A. Simons, towel-rack 


25. 





334 



Paid J. B. Souther & Co., desks 
James S. Bacheler, gas fittings, 

etc. .... 
T. A. Lane, gas fittings, etc. 
Pike & Heald, gas-regulator 

plumbing, etc. 
Hutchinson Bros., plumbing 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. Varick. hardware . 
A. H. Lowell, iron castings, etc 
J. Bryson, Jr., painting . 
James R. Carr, painting 
C. H. Wood, painting and 

graining 
J.J. Abbott, paper hanging, etc 
Granite State Telephone Co. 
George H. Stearns, brooms 

matches, etc. 
Bennett & Led, plastering, etc 
A. Reed, plastering 
Ed. N. Fogg, cuspidores, etc. 
E. P. Johnson & Co. coal 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 
Rowell & Burns, wood . 
J. Albert Walker, coal . 
Concord Railroad, freight 
C. W. Butler, wall-paper, etc 
Mrs. M. P. Barker, making 

awning 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
W. H. Davis, maps . 
J. S. Holt <fe Co., soap 
J. L. Wentworth, cleaning car 

pets, etc. 



127 00 

77 75 
15 15 

143 06 
11 00 
31 13 
9 71 
. 20 76 
60 13 
17 30 

173 47 
59 54 

66 75 

10 37 
152 80 

11 70 
4 98 

165 44 

3 88 

2 78 

2,643 91 

505 05 

30 00 



50 

75 
00 
50 



4 75 



335 



Paid Clark M. Bailey, paper . 


$1 12 


A. A. Moore, repairing light- 




ning-rods .... 


27 00 


Otis Whitten, labor 


7 00 


J. Stiekney, rubber tubing 


99 


H. J. Clark, trucking coal 


200 00 


Trefethen & Moore, repairing 




clock ..... 


1 00 


Gideon Flanders, ice 


10 75 


P. C. Cheney Co., paper . 


7 40 


T. L. Thorpe, paper 


4 33 







$7,686 28 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



To appropriation 



11,500 00 



Paid John B. Clarke 


. $883 89 


Campbell and Williams 


7 00 


Challis & Campbell 


- 45 12 


H. H. Everett 


36 50 


Kendall & Ladd 


2 25 


Novelty Advertising Co. 


2 50 


T. H. Tuson . 


3 00 


Manchester post-office 


81 32 


Temple & Farrington 


8 88 


J. F. Gillis . 


50 


T. W. Lane . 


11 78 


A. Cook . 


2 00 


Livingston & Kimball 


4 00 


reserved fund, amount 


trans- 


ferred . 


411 26 



Dr. 

-$1,500 00 
Cit. 



$1,500 00 



336 
REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

To appropriation .... $1,800 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . . 995 07 



Paid A. J. Sawyer, lumber 

A. C. Wallace, " 

Austin, Johnson, & Co., lumber 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
Head & Dowst, lumber and labor 
J. F. Seaward, lumber . 
G. H. Dudley, lumber and labor 
Tristam Berry, labor 
George Holbrook, lumber and 
labor ..... 
E. A. G. Holmes, labor . 
Geo. W. Rief, lumber and labor 
L. M. Aldrich, labor , . 

B. F. Fogg, plumbing, etc. ' . 
Jas. S. Bacheler, plumbing, etc. 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. . 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware 

J. B. Varick, hardware . 
Carpenter & Pippin, mason- 
work . 
James Dolan, mason-work 

C. H. Robinson, mason-work 
B. W. Robinson, mason- work . 
Bennett & Lord, mason-work . 



14 


82 


142 


97 


39 


15 


25 


93 


660 


45 


3 


37 


19 


45 


15 


00- 


97 


91 


136 


00 


553 


65 


o 


82- 


12 


20 


39 


04 


52 


89 


127 


59 


10 


07 


11 


50 


34 


68 


4 


50 


13 


50 


7 


00 


5 


50 


2 


05 



Dr. 



!,795 07 
Cr. 



337 



Paid James R. Carr, painting . 


$95 63 


J. Bryson, Jr., painting . 


67 94 


J. J. Abbott, painting 


12 00 


H. Stratton, plumbing, etc. 


12 70 


G. R. Vance & Co. 


11 34 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


14 00 


D. F. Cressey & Co., bolts, etc. 


5 99 


Temple & Farrington, screens, 




etc. . 


4 07 


Wm. F. Starkweather, paper 




hanging .... 


3 00 


Goodwin Bros., lumber . 


32 57 


Drake & Carpenter, cement 


5 10 


J. C. Young & Co., repairing 




roof . . . . ; 


6 01 


Manchester Locomotive-works, 




grate castings 


37 10 


A. N. Clapp, hardware . 


6 53 


S. R. Gayton, door-checks 


11 00 


A. H. Lowell, iron-work 


2 87 


R. D. Gay, roll paper, etc. 


28 14 


for labor of men and teams 


417 01 







CITY LIBRARY, 

To balance from old account . . $218 79 
appropriation .... 3,000 00 



Paid M. J. Buncher, librarian . $633 56 
George W. Burleigh, assistant 
librarian .... 234 75 

22 



S2,795 07 



Dr. 

1,218 79 
Cr. 



338 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 

Temple & Farrington, rebind- 

ing books, etc. 
Livingston & Kimball, printing 
Burns & Poore, wood, 
E. P. Johnson, wood 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 
T. A. Lane, gas fittings . 
Manchester Water-works, water 
L. B. Clough, insurance . 
Daniels & Co., lock 
John B. Clarke, printing 
George Holbrook, labor . 
Trustees of City Library 
N. P. Hunt, stationery, postage, 
etc. . 
By City Hall for coal, amount trans- 
ferred ..... 
balance to new account 



38 
25 



$266 23 

281 45 
51 20 

2 50 
13 35 

1 

1 

21 00 
94 15 

1 10 

11 00 

3 00 
1,000 00 

12 37 

267 20 
323 41 



1,218 79 



MILITIA. 



To appropriation 



Paid Amoskeag Veterans 

Headquarters First Regt. N. G 
Head Guards 
Sheridan Guards 
City Guards . 
First N. H. Battery 
Manchester War Veterai 
Manchester Cadets . 



$800 00 



$100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



Dr. 

$800 00 
Or. 



$800 00 



339 

PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... 113,000 00 

$13,000 00 

Or. 

Paid Suncook Valley R. R. bonds . $5,000 00 

sewer bonds .... 8,000 00 

$13,000 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $2,500 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 823 71 

$3,323 71 

Cr. 
Paid sundry persons . . . $3,323 71 

$3,323 71 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $7,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 693 46 

$7,693 46 

Cr. 
Paid George E. Morrill, collector . $7,693 46 

$7,693 46 



STATE TAX. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . .$41,060 00 

$41,060 00 

Cr. 
Paid S. A. Carter, state treasurer . $41,060 00 

$41,060 00 



340 
COUNTY TAX. 



To appropriation 



132,000 00 



Paid county treasurer . . .$31,323 37 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred ..... 676 63 



Dr. 

$32,000 00 
Or. 



OUTST^ 






^AXES. 


$32,000 00 


LNDING 1 




ist for 1874 . . . $4,203 


95 


1875 








4,052 


91 


1876 








2,987 


24 


1877 








2,845 


77 


1878 








3,047 


43 


1879 








949 


53 


1880 








1,256 


19 


1881 








1,331 


53 


1882 








1,171 


56 








$20,846 11 



TAXES FOR 1883. 



Dr. 



To resident taxes 


$331,579 12 


non-resident taxes . 


1,162 60 




$332,741 72 




Cr. 


By collections 


$309,501 16 


abatements 


1,779 08 


discounts 


7,693 46 


balance uncollected 


13,768 02 




$332,741 72 



341 
FIREMEN'S PARADE. 

To appropriation .... $350 00 



Paid First Regiment Band 
Cavanaugh Bros., teams . 
George Fletcher, caterer 
Sheridan Guards Drum Corps . 
T. W. Lane, stationery, post- 
age, etc. .... 
J. B. Clarke, printing 

By balance on hand 



$53 


00 


50 


00 


193 


50 


13 


00 


5 


95 


11 


75 


22 


80 



Dr. 

$350 00 
Cr. 



$350 00 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $200 00 

$200 00 



Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R. $200 00 



Cr. 

$200 00 

Dr. 

-$10,000 00 

Cr. 
By reserved fund, am't transferred $10,000 00 

$10,000 00 



LAND. 
To appropriation .... $10,000 00 



$42 



WOMEN'S AID HOSPITAL. 



To appropriation 



. 8400 00 



Paid Mrs. Aretas Blood, treasurer . 8400 00 



Dr. 

8400 00 
Or. 

8400 00 



WATER-WORKS. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 
water rents 



By interest, amount transferred 
Paid Charles K. Walker, superin- 
tendent 
A. E. Stearns, clerk 

C. C. Cole, superintendent a 
pumping station . 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 
J. Hodge, 

D. J. Mahoney, " 
J. H. Maynard, " 
Union Pub. Co., printing, 
John B. Clarke, " 
T. H. Tuson, " 
Temple <fc Farrington, sta 

tionery 
Manchester Locomotive-works 

sleeves, bolts, etc. 
S. C. Forsaiih <fc Co., wood 



811,487 


92 


73,458 


20 




#84 Q4fi 1 9 




Cr. 


838,000 


00 


1,543 


70 


1,150 


oo 


700 


00 


5 


12 


11 


30 


46 


33 


23 


25 


19 


75 


56 


50 


47 


05 



269 
1 



29 
15 



343 



Paid A. H. Lowell, boxes, etc. 
Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 
Pike <fc Heald, iron pipes, etc 
Thomas A. Lane, boiler, etc. 
L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing 
John B. Varick, hardware 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Concord Railroad, freight 
Boston, Lowell, & Concord 

Railroad, freight . 
Rowell & Burns, coal and wood 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
Granite State Telephone Co. 
George H. Stearns, oil 

matches, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, lime and ce 

ment . 
Joseph Goodwin, labor . 
C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck 

ing . 
E. T. James, teams 
James Bros., teams 
Leonard & Ellis, machine oil 
National Meter Co., meters, etc 
Union Water-Meter Co., me 

ters, etc. 
Eddy Valve Co. 
Mowry & Phillips, pig lead 
Stults & Mansur, nipples, etc 
R. Pattee <fc Co., hydrants 
George Woodman & Co., 

tarred pipe, etc.. 
Waite, Williams, & Co., engine 

oil . ' . 



$388 


17 


7 


39 


19 


30 


414 


80 


53 


03 


181 


00 


46 


51 


672 


59 


i 


07 


15 


50 


59 


73 


42 


50 



19 13 



60 


25 


28 


00 


3 


00 


57 


00 


4 


00 


37 


50 


457 


68 


810 


85 


10 


00 


405 


72 


152 


26 


372 


99 



60 21 



58 53 



344 



Paid J. S. Paine, furniture for office 


162 


25 


Sewall & Day Cordage Co., jute 






packing, etc. 


24 


48 


Sumner & Goodwin, En. pipe, 






etc. ..... 


769 


32 


Gloucester Iron-works, iron 






pipe .. . . 


4,023 


79 


Ludlow Valve Manufacturing 






Co., hub gates, etc. 


461 


25 


Boston Machine Manufacturing 






Co., flange ball joints . 


59 


00 


Boston Lead Manufacturing Co. 






lead 


49 


89 


Jarechi, Hayes <fe Co. stop-cocks 


120 


50 


Albert Mallard, building aque- 






duct 


100 


00 


Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 






clock ..... 


1 


00 


George Fletcher 


25 


00 


town of Auburn, taxes . 


9 


23 


Hidden Brown, land 


125 


00 


Joseph E. Bennett, auditing 






accounts .... 


120 


00 


George C. Hoitt, binding day- 






book . 


4 


00 


W. L. Roper, whitewashing 






walls of puraping-station 


4 


00 


A. Pollard, teaming 


5 


40 


McDougall Bros., wood . 


9 


00 


Ward Hurley Corp., stops and 






bands .... 


168 


88 


Charles H. Robie, concreting . 


29 


17 


Brock & Driscoll, galvanized 






pails, etc. .... 


9 


70 



545 



id J. J. Abbott, paint . . 


SI 48 


A. M. Eastman, oil, matches, 




etc 


3 30 


J. Stickney, rubber mitts, leath- 




er, etc. .... 


12 39 


William P. Newell, water com- 




missioner .... 


24 00 


Gil man Clough, timber . 


2 54 


E. T. James, water commis- 




sioner ..... 


27 00 


Henry N. Stone 


2 85 


for labor of men and teams 


5,876 26 


H. B. Putnam, water commis- 




sioner .... 


24 00 


E. H. Hobbs, water commis- 




sioner .... 


15 00 


Alpheus Gay, water commis- 




sioner .... 


24 00 


James A. Weston, water com- 




missioner and clerk 


74' 00 


A. C. Wallace, water commis- 




sioner .... 


24 00 


balance to new account . 


26,338 02 




ffiQ/l Ot.lR 19 


"")"" -"•- 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $12,000 00 



Paid H. B. Putnam, mayor . 
N. P. Kidder, city clerk . 
S. B. Putnam, city treasurer 
J. A. Barker, city messenger 





- $12 


,000 

Cr. 


00 


$1,266 


Q6 






900 


00 






1,000 


00 






700 


00 







346 



aid George H. Allen, city engineer 


11,000 00 


William R Patten, city solicitoi 


250 00 


George E. Morrill, tax collectoi 


• 1,314 69 


William E. Buck, superin- 




tendent of schools 


1,575 00 


James A. Fracker, clerk com 




mon council 


100 00 


H. W. Powell, assessor . 


120 00 


C. S. Fisher, 


237 50 


J. H. Haynes, " 


205 00 


C. H. Brown, " 


162 50 


D. 0. Furnald, " 


351 65 


P. A. Devine, 


132 50 


Pius Brown, " 


107 50 


George W. Weeks, assessor 


412 57 


J. P. Moore, assistant assessor 


186 50 


M. Gilbert, " " 


23 75 


George H. Dudley, assistant as- 




sessor 


42 50 


R. P. Silver, assistant assessor 


30 00 


Isaac Whittemore, ,, 


45 00 


Arthur Bertrand, assistant as 




sessor 


12 00 


N. Nichols, clerk for assessors 


230 00 


Robert Hall, overseer of the 




poor . 


6 25 


P. 0. Woodman, overseer of the 




poor . 


18 75 


Daniel Sheehan, overseer of the 




poor . 


25 00 


J. E. Stearns, overseer of the 




poor . 


25 00 


James Sutcliffe, overseer of the 




poor 


25 00 



347 



Paid Horace Gordon, overseer of the 




poor 


$25 00 


William Weber, overseer of the 




poor ..... 


25 00 


E. G. Woodman, overseer of the 




poor ..... 


25 00 


H. B. Putnam, ez-officio over- 




seer of the poor . 


25 00 


William H. Maxwell, overseer 




of the poor .... 


25 00 


William H. Maxwell, clerk of 




overseers of the poor . 


50 00 


Dr. James M. Collity, city- 




physician .... 


150 00 


D. H. Young, supervisor 


4 00 


L. H. Lamprey, member of 




Board of Health . 


25 00 


H. D. Lord, clerk inspectors 




of check-lists 


140 00 


J. C. Bickford, moderator 


3 00 


T. W. Challis, 


3 00 


George Holbrook, " 


3 00 


J. B. Straw, " 


3 00 


F. W. Garland, ward clerk 


5 00 


Charles A. Smith, " 


5 00 


Abial W. Eastman, " 


5 00 


E. A. McQueston, " 


5 30 


H. E. Webster, " 


5 00 


William H. Dixon, " 


2 50 


Henry S. Perry, " 


5 00 


Oscar F. Perkins, selectman . 


5 00 


Emerson Moulton, " 


5 00 


George M. Bean, " 


5 00 


George C. Kemp, " 


5' 00 



348 



Paid George W. Bacon, selectman 
David Thayer, " 

J. T. Underbill, " 

Charles E. Ham, 
George W. Bacon, " 

E. G. Woodman, " 
Charles F. Garland, " 
Zara B. Sawyer, " 
Edward N. Baker, " 
Benjamin F. Garland, " 
Emerson Moulton, " 
George E. Glines, " 
Henry S. Perry, " 
H. B. Putnam, ex-officio school 

committee . 

F. T. E. Richardson, clerk of 
school committee 

F. T. E. Richardson, school 

committee . . 
P. H. Dow, school committee 
B. C. Dean, school committee 
William C. Clarke, school 

committee . 
H. H. Huse, school committee 
N. P. Hunt, school committee 
J. T. Fanning, school com- 
mittee . 
S. D. Lord, school committee . 
Charles A. O'Connor, school 

committee . 
T. F. Collins, school committee 
B. B. Weeks, school committee 
D. M. Goodwin, school com- 
mittee . 



So 00 
10 00 
5 00 
10 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 

100 00 



10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 



5 00 



349 



Paid J. J. Abbott, school committee -$10 00 
George D. Towne, school com- 
mittee .... 10 00 
E. F. Jones, school committee 10 00 
L. E. Phelps, school committee 10 00 
Douglas Mitchell, school com- 
mittee . . . . 10 00 
J. A. McCrillis, ex-officio school 

committee . . . . 10 00 

By balance on hand . . . 580 88 



$12,000 0O 



RESERVED FUND. 



To appropriation . 

costs non-resident taxes 
rent of tenements 
show licenses . 
George F. Bosher & Co 

buildings sold 
dog licenses 
interest on taxes 
paupers off farm • . 
incidental expenses . 
fire department 
printing and stationery 
county tax 
land 
interest on land 



old 



110,000 


00 


9 


00 


273 


00 


250 


00 


164 


25 


490 


83 


245- 


78 


2,000 


00 


1,662 


21 


1,034 


85 


411 


26 


676 


63 


10,000 


00 


2,906 


84 



Dr. 



,124 65. 



350 



Cr. 



By District No. 3 . 

Fourth of July celebration 

new highways . 

Women's Aid Society hospital 

watering streets 

lighting streets 

paving streets . 

macadamizing streets 

commons 

bridges .... 

city hall . 

repairs of buildings . 

scavenger teams 

balance on hand 



$916 25 

2,000 00 

7,632 20 

400 00 

1,950 47 

1,594 15 

4,959 08 

3,153 56 

718 65 

1,874 29 

2,000 00 

995 07 

944 26 

986 67 



,124 65 



BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
balance overdrawn . 



Paid Natt & W. F. Head, brick 
Head & Dowst, contractors 
Concord Railroad, freight 
George W. Stevens, architect . 
Lamson &. Marden, stone- work 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal and 

express . 
H. C. Dickey loam . 



$2,513 


13 


5,000 


00 


4,998 


49 


12,017 


45 


8,559 


76 


251 


68 


275 


00 


19 


07 


12 


54 


16 


50 



Dr. 



12,511 62 
Cr. 



351 



Paid Daniels & Co., hardware . II 25 

J. B. Varick, shovels, etc. . 13 78 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. . 42 22 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . * 44 94 
Standard School-Furniture Co., 

furniture .... 534 88 

J. G. Jones, trucking . 1 50 

for labor of men and teams . 721 05 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

To appropriation .... $700 00 
balance overdrawn . . .. 112 50 



Paid Samuel Brooks . . . $627 50 
H. W. Lonea . . . . 185 00 



BATTERY BUILDING. 

To balance from old account . . $994 63 
appropriation .... 2,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 1,447 31 



$12,511 62 

Dr. 

$812 50 
Or. 

$812 50 
Dr. 



Paid Alpheus Gay, contractor . $4,132 36 

Thorp & Avery, wire netting, 

etc 9 75 



1,441 94 

Cr. 



352 



Paid James S. Bacheler, gas fixtures, 

etc 

Merrill & Laird, mason- work . 
George W. Stevens, architect . 



$99 40 

25 4S 

175 00 



INTEREST ON LAND. 

To balance from old account . . $3,000 00 
appropriation .... 3,000 00 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co , $3,093 16 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . ' . . . 2,906 84 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 

To appropriation .... $3,000 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 



ferred 



944 26 



Paid James Kearns, teamster 


$468 00 


A. Morse, teamster 


261 50 


John O'Dowd, teamster . 


54 75 


A. Gowing, teamster 


4 00 


Walter Seaward, teamster 


198 00 


city teams 


981 50 


for labor of men 


. 1,976 51 



$4,441 94 

Dr. 

$6,000 00 
Cr. 

$6,000 00 
Dr. 



!,944 26 
Cr. 



$3,944 26 



353 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$3,537 


86 




A. H. Lowell, old iron 


23 


92 




Hutchinson Bros., old iron 


28 


00 




fuel, amount transferred . 


300 


00 


$3,889 78 
Cr. 








Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


$15 


30 




W. W. Hubbard, " 


52 


50 




A. J. Sawyer, " 


47 


29 




J. Hodge, " 


200 


48 




George Holbrook, lumber and 








labor ..... 


1,474 


94 




D. H. Morgan, carpenter-work 


67 


03 




James R. Carr, painting . 


164 


00 




Sullivan & Sloan, " 


100 


00 




William B. Abbott " 


120 


35 




Joel Daniels " 




40 




J. J. Abbott " 


309 


33 




Manchester Locomotive-works, 








castings, etc. 


12 


70 




T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 


128 


17 




Pike & Heald, hardware, plumb- 









ing, etc. .... 


211 


84 




Carpenter & Pippin, mason- 








work ..... 


127 


60 




B. W. Robinson & Co., mason- 








work ..... 


47 


70 




B. W. Robinson, mason-work . 


13 


75 




Bennett & Lord, mason-work . 


34 


70 




0. D. Carpenter & Co., mason- 








work ..... 


29 


25 




23 









354 



Paid Daniels & Co., hardware 


10 90 


William C. Rogers, hardware . 


51 


J. B. Varick, hardware . 


18 89 


G. R. Vance & Co., galvanized 




iron, etc. .... 


26 20 


A. H. Lowell, castings 


14 14 


J. C. Young, repairing roof . 


13 65 


Albert A. Moore, repairing 




lightning-rods 


40 00 


Thorp & Avery, repairing 




stoves, etc. 


18 10 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., fire- 




poker . 


2 50 


Avery Bros., Russia pipe, etc. 


21 83 


James S. Bacheler, plumbing . 


2 32 


H. Stratton, plumbing 


2 35 


E. J. Williams, repairing roof 


413 76 


James Watts .... 


1 50 


A. X. Clapp .... 


25 


H. C. Dickey .... 


2 00 


By balance on hand 


153 55 


• 



!,889 78 



To appropriation 



FUEL. 



Paid E. P. Johnson, coal and wood 
Moore & Preston, " 

S. C. Forsaith & Co. " 
Burns & Poore, " 

Brown & Bolton, sawing wood 



1,411 54 



Dr. 



1 


$3,411 54 
Cr. 


$217 28 




492 41 




2 00 




5 00 




7 70 





355 



Paid Brock & Driscoll, waste . 
S. D. Glidden, sawing wood 
H. Webber, 
D. H. Morgan, " 

A. N. Clapp, ax-handles . 
J. B. Varick, sieve 
G. W. Tarnum, sawing wood 
District No. 10, getting in coal 

etc. .... 
J. Hodge, wood 
Lester C. Paige, sawing wood 

etc. .... 
Larry Hearne, sawing wood 
City Hall, coal 

J. H. Proctor, sawing wood, etc 
D. C. Smith, getting in wood 
A. E. Eastman 
repairs of school-houses, amount 

transferred . . * 

contingent expenses, amount 

transferred . 
By balance on hand 



SI 


10 


35 


87 


4 


67 


14 


00 




30 


1 


00 




75 


9 


00 


2 


75 


8 


00 


5 


62 


1,402 


80 


10 


00 


2 


00 


3 


50 



300 00 

725 00 
160 79 



$3,411 54 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 
To appropriation .... $1,630 38 



PaidH. D. Gordon, furniture . $24 25 
Horace Gordon, cloth, fixtures, 

etc. . . . . . 38 95 

Higgins Bros., furniture, etc. . 13 32 



Dr. 

•$1,630 38 
Cr. 



$22 


50 


29 


38 


o 



95 


90 


31 


9 


00 



356 



Paid D. A. Simons, dusters, etc. 

C. W. Clark, desks, etc. 

Avery Bros., copper tubes, etc. 

Prang Educational Co., black- 
boards, etc. 

Trefethen & Moore, clocks, 

Pike & Heald, door-mats, dip- 
pers, etc. . . . . 87. 71 

E. R. Coburn & Co., paper, 

ink, etc. . . . . 35 04 

T. W. Lane, books, pencils, etc. 109 48 

Temple & Farrington, books, 

pencils, etc. . . . 36 69 

Daniels &, Co., floor-brushes, 

hardware, etc. . . . 78 89 

J. B. Varick, rubber hose, etc. 10 32 

W. H. Yickerj, repairing locks, 8 50 

Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor & 

Co., dictionaries ... 16 50 

Standard School Furnishing 
Co., desks .... 

R. D. Gay, window shades, etc. 

Thompson. Brown & Co., books 

P. Rogez, books . 

Ginn, Heath & Co., music 
charts .... 

George H. Stearns, brooms, etc. 

J. Stickney, repairing gas-bag, 

etc 2 25 

Edward N. Fogg, pitcher, 

duster, etc. ... 6 84 

J. G. Jones, trucking, etc. . 2 21 

J. B. Smith, electric bells . 36 00 



33 


00 


11 


00 


4 


67 


10 


80 


6 


30 


5 


35 



357 



Paid Sarah E. Sprague, color appa- 




ratus ..... 


$4 35 


Willard Small, books 


2 56 


L. P. Gee, molding table 


5 00 


N. S. Clark, ribbon 


6 50 


A. N. Clapp, rope . 


12 


J. H. Wiggin & Co., soap 


16 


G. R. Vance & Co. 


75 


Thomas Dunlap 


6 12 


J. A. Crosby .... 


10 00 


John Ferguson 


10 00 


Manchester Water- works,water 


65 75 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


8 82 


William E. Buck, use of team 


35 00 


By balance on hand 


242 04 





,630 38 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To appropriation .... $682 04 
furniture and supplies, amount 

transferred . . . . 500 00 



Dr. 







$1,182 04 






Cr. 


Paid E. R. Coburn & Co. 


878 75 




Thomas W. Lane . 


220 50 




Temple & Farrington 


60 22 




Hill & Co. . 


3 80 




Clark & Maynard . 


18 00 




Eimer & Amend 


89 02 




Louis H. Marvel 


4 50 




Robert S. Davis & Co. 


8 10 




Frost &, Adams 


55 26 





358 



Paid Boston School Supply Co. 


1100 00 


C. H. Prescott 


18^00 


Prang Educational Ca. 


69 47 


By teachers' salaries, amount trans- 




ferred ..... 


400 00 


balance on hand 


56 42 







PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To appropriation . 



Paid Livingston & Kimball 
John B. Clarke 
Campbell & Williams 
Challis & Campbell 
Union Publishing Co. 
J. O. Bur bank 
Alfred Mudge & Son 
BE. H. Everett 

By evening schools, amount 
ferred 
balance on hand 



trans 



$781 62 



$20 


25 


439 


49 


2 


75 


5 


50 


51 


00 


1 


55 


10 


00 


14 


00 


90 


00 


147 


08 



,182 04 



Dr. 

i781 62 
Ce. 



8781 62 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



To appropriation . 

fuel, amount transferred 



$901 43 
725 00 



Dr. 



11,626 43 



359 



Cr. 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 

Manchester Water-works, water 
J. C. Snow, sawdust, etc. 
James Bros., team . 
E. T. James, teams, 
C. H. Simpson, team 

C. E. Clough, moving settees 
B. F. Dennis, tuning pianos 
William E. Buck, use of teams 
Clarke & Dixon, repairing clock 
Manchester Opera House Co . 
Eastman's Orchestra 

A. N. Clapp, brooms, soap, etc 
J. N. Baker, repairing clocks . 
Thomas Chubbuck, diplomas . 
Tristram Berry, repairing.light- 

ning rods . 
Weeks & Currier, chemicals, 

etc. . 
E. G. Richardson, tuning pianos 

D. A Simons, use of chairs 
Sarah E. Sprague, moving fur- 

niture 4 etc. .... 

Harley, Robbie & Yadnais, rib- 
bon. . 

Trefethen & Moore, repairing 
clocks . 

Charles T. Cragin, engraving 

J. S. Holt & Co , soap 

William H. Viekery, keys, etc. 

F.W. Batchelder, tuning pianos 

L. E. Phelps, expenses of sub- 
committee . 



00 

00 



153 46 

783 20 

2 00 

75 

11 50 
o 

2 

34 00 
67 00 

12 15 
30 00 
17 50 

6 00 

1 25 

200 00 

00 



92 


63 


3 


00 


4 


00 


2 


50 


1 


80 


2 


50 


22 


20 


4 


36 


1 


65 


8 


00 



30 34 



360 



Paid N. P. Hunt, expenses of sub- 






committee .... 


$30 


34 


H. H. Huse, expenses of sub- 






committee .... 


30 


34 


By balance on hand 


164 


06 









$1,626 43 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 



$2,986 09 









$2,986 09 






Cr. 


Paid J. A. Carr, janitor 


20 


25 


John S. Avery " 


602 


08 


William Stevens, janitor . 


593 


17 


D. S. Morgan, " 


450 


00 


George W. Varnum, janitor 


358 


04 


C. M. Norton, < 




252 


88 


James Watts, ' 




249 


96 


Lewis H. Dickey, ' 




6 


00 


H. C. Dickey, * ' 




86 


00 


Charles P. Ordway ' 




36 


00 


Josie Cazavaint, ' 




39 


40 


H. I. Rowell, 




6 


96 


Annie O. Proctor, ' 




11 


64 


D. S. Dunbar, ' 




14 


50 


Frank Tulip, ' 




10 


28 


Thomas P. Hearn, ' 




6 


00 


S. A. Dunbar, ' 




5 


80 


Fred L. Peaslee, ' 




5 


81 


Lena Miller, ' 




12 


30 


Anna Horrigan, * 




12 


00 



361 



Paid Fred H. Robinson, janitor 


$12 00 


Oliver Merrill, " 


8 70 


Emma Pollard, " 


1 50 


Eddie M. Carr, " 


2 00 


Mary W. Mitchell, " 


7 00 


Burton H. Young, " 


23 00 


Mary E. Dickey, " 


5 50 


James Rowell, " 


9 00 


0. J. Randall, " 


2 25 


Mrs. Williamson, . 


2 00 


Mrs. B. Mulhern 


50 


Addie L. Prescott . 


2 00 


A. E. Eastman 


8 00 


A. G. Barr . 


3 00 


Mary Fellows 


2 00 


Avery Bros , waste 


45 


J. B. Varick, garden rake 


50 


By teachers' salaries, amount trans- 




ferred .... 


100 00 


balance on hand 


17 62 







$2,986 09 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



To appropriation .... 
tuition, amount transferred 
printing and advertising am't 
transferred . 



Paid F. C. Livingston, teacher 
Charles E. Cochran, " 
Susie H. Frame, " 



Dr. 



11,193 


08 






• 227 


69 






90 


00 










$1,510 


77 










Cr 




$217 


80 






240 


20 






50 


40 







362 



Paid Annie L. Prescott, teacher 
M. H. Searle, 
H. Alma Fracker, " 

Hattie E. Daniels, " 

Alta C. Willand, " 

A. Minnie Campbell, " 
Lelia A. Brooks, " 

Bessie M. Hall, " 

Fannie L. Sanborn, " 
Nettie F. Ainsworth, " 
Nellie Pearson, " 

Genevieve L. Whitten, " 
Fannie L. Kelley, " 

M. Eugenia Lord, " 

Josie H. Richardson, " 
Edith M. Stebbins, " 
Kittie J. Ferren, " 

Phebe A. McGuire, " 
Helen F. Wetherbee, " 
Mary E. Bunton, " 

D. H. Morgan, janitor 
G. W. Varnum, janitor . 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
A. N. Clapp, lamps, oil, etc. 
F. P. Colby, posting bills 

By balance on hand 



45 00 
49 50 
40 50 
48 60 
29 70 
36 00 
17 10 



50 


40 


63 


90 


49 


50 


49 


00 


50 


40 


57 


70 


35 


00 


-65 


00 


55 


80 


36 


00 


7 


00 


9 


90 


20 


70 


28 


50 


26 


75 


71 


64 


17 


90 


5 


00 


35 


88 



.,510 77 



363 
TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

To appropriation .... $39,190 73 

books and stationery, amount 

transferred .... 400 00 

care of rooms, amount trans- 
ferred .... 100 00 



Dr. 









$39,690 73 


Cr. 


Paid A. W. Bacheler . . . $2,000 00 


George I. Hopkins 






. 1,200 00 


L. E. Manahan 






800 00 


E. J. Ela 






300 00 


M. A. Buzzell 






500 00 


R, M. Tuson . 






500 00 


L. C. Gilford . 






451 25 


L. R. Adams . 






460 00 


C. E. Reid . 






460 00 


A. O. Heath . 






418 00 


L. P. Gove . 






467 50 


F. D. Moulton 






450 00 


E. L. Stokes . 






450 00 


L. E. Esty . 






450 00 


C. I. Stevens . 






450 00 


B. F. Dame . 






1,350 00 


E. S. Sanborn 




, 


279 00 


Mary J. Fife . 






460 00 


I. R. Daniels . 






460 00 


M. F. Barnes . 






450 00 


CM. Gilmore 






450 00 


Eva F. Tuson 






350 00 


E. P. Sherburne 






1,350 00 


A. G. Flanders 






285 00 



364 



Paid Annie A. Webster 

B. L. Dean . 

C. A. Abbott . 
H. G. Flanders 
H. M. Morrill 
Georgianna Dow 
Mary A. Smith 
L. R. Quint . 
G. H. Brooks . 
N. I. Sanderson 
N. B. Putnam 
M. E. Sylvester 
Ella F. Sanborn 
M. N. Bower . 
M. G. Tynan . 
H. F. Wetherbee 
L. C. Gilford . 
N. M. James . 
M. C. Edgerly 
N. S. Bunton . 
K. M. Follansbee 
Florence Nichols 

E. M. Rowley 

F. S. Sutcliffe 
C. M. Dearborn 
L. A. Burns . 
Florence McEvoy 
Ellen E. McKean 
Josie A. Martin 

C. E. Woods 
B. M. Kelley . 
J. F. Bailey . 
A. S. Downs . 

D. E. Haines . 



460 00 
460 00 
405 00 
450 00 
436 25 
450 00 
467 50 
135 00 
450 00 
450 00 

45 00 
236 25 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
342 50 

20 00 
420 00 

45 00 
475 00 
355 00 
450 00 
375 00 
925 00 
460 00 
457 00 
270 00 
450 00 
385 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
495 00 
450 00 



365 



Paid A. G. Lord . 






$360 00 


N. D. Annis . 






352 50 


E. J. Carley . ' . 






476 00 


J. G. Stebbins 






450 00 


P. A. McGuire 






45 00 


S. I. Locke 






433 12 


G. A. Nute . 






239 87 


M. W. Mitchell 






435 00 


S. G. Woodman 






435 00 


A. W. Patten 






348 75 


0. J. Randall 






429 75 


0. A. Rowe . 






435 00 


S. E. Sprague 






1,120 00 


K. J. Ferren . 






403 00 


M. E. Bunton 






360 50 


Ella Hope 






155 25 


E. M. Stebbins 






109 00 


G. A. Wyman 






299 00 


F. L. Sanborn 






110 50 


J. J. Kimball 






800 00 


W. F. Brackett 






324 00 


Flora M. Senter 






450 00 


0. S. Dudley . 






95 00 


D. A. Clifford 






101 25 


N. F. Ains worth 






119 50 


S. H. Frame . 






113 00 


M. L. Gage 






119 25 


Nellie Pearson 






25 00 


J. G. Dearborn 






135 00 


F. C. Baldwin 




- 


830 00 


C. N. Brown . 






225 00 


Cora Sanborn 






35 00 


F. C. Livingston 






11 00 


N. C. Woodman 






307 50 



366 



PaidF. M. Kellej . 


. . 35 25 


S. I. Green . 


15 00 


A. C. Prescott 


180 00 


L. C. Brooks . 


28 50 


Will F. Gibson 


169 00 


Josie Richardson 


158 75 


By balance on hand 


111 24 




839,690 73 



INVENTORY OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

High-School house and lot . .$50,000 00 

Furniture, charts, maps, books, 
and apparatus 
Franklin-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
North-Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Webster-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Blodget-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Bridge-street house and lot 
Lowell-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Manchester-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 



2,000 00-152,000 


00 


18,000 00 






400 00 


18,400 


00 


15,000 00 






400 00 


15,400 


00 


50,000 00 






400 00 


50,400 


00 


58,000 00 






400 00 


58,400 


00 


17,000 00 






600 00 


17,600 


00 


16,000 00 






350 00 


16,350 


00 


3,500 00 






150 00 


3,650 


00 


900 00 


900 


00 


7,000 00 






400 00 


7,400 


00 


' 8,500 00 






300 00 


8,800 


00 



367 



Merrimack-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Wilson-Hill bouse and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Beech-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Center-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
South-Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Furniture, maps. etc. 
Stark-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Goffe's-Falls house and'lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Harvey-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Webster-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Hallsville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Y oungsville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito-Pond-Dist. house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house and lot 



15,000 


00 






550 


00 


15,550 


00 


3,300 


00 






100 


00 


3,400 


00 


7.000 


00 






350 


00 


7,350 


00 


5,000 


00 






425 


00 


5,425 


00 


2,800 


00 






200 


00 


3,000 


00 


113,000 00 






600 


00 113,600 


00 


3,000 


00 






150 


00 


3,150 


00 


3,700 


00 






125 


00 


3,825 


00 


3,600 


00 






100 


00 


3,700 


00 


2,500 


00 






125 


00 


2,625 


00 


600 


00 






50 


00 


650- 


00 


3,500 


00 






125 


00 


3,625 


00 


1,400 


00 






125 


00 


1,525 


00 


1,200 


00 






100 


00 


1,300 


00 


8,500 


00 

46' 
tJt>t 


8,500 


00 




526,525 


00 



368 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll-Tax. 


Val, of Poll. 


1840 . . 


$946,200 


$3,986 56 


772 


$2 20 


$300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


, 71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 08 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


' 3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


. 96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 07 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1S80 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


1 76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673 82 


7,831 


1 62 


100 


1883 . . 


20,055,986 


332,741 72 


7,944 


1 65 


100 



369 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 



To Whom Payable. 



When Payable. 



Principal. 



Aug. 


1 


1869 


April 
April 
July 
Aug. 


1 
1 
1 

1 


1864 
1865 
1876 
1869 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


Aug. 


1 


1869 


Jau. 


1 


1872 


Jau. 


1 


1863 


July 
Jan. 


1 
1 


1874 
1872 


Oct. 


31 


1863 


July 
July 
Jan. 


1 
1 
1 


1864 
1874 
1872 


Jau. 


1 


1872 


July 


1 


1881 



City Bonds, 

a cc 

a cc 

Sewer Bonds, 

City Bonds, 
c< t. 

u cc 

Water Bonds, 
City Bouds, 
Water Bonds, 

Cc cc 

City Bonds, 
u cc 

Water Bonds. 

cc cc 

c< cc 

Bridge Bonds, 



Aug. 1 


1884 ! 


April 1 
April 1 
July 1 
Aug. 1 


1884 
1885 
1885 
1885 


Aug. 1 


1886 


Aug. 1 


1887 


Jan. 1 


1887 


Jan. 1 


1888 


July .1 
Jan. 1 


1890 
1892 


Nov. 1 


1893 


July 1 
July 1 
Jau . 1 


1894 
1895 
1897 


Jan. 1 


1902 


July 1 


1911 



1,500 00 

70,000 00 

10,000 00 

8,000 00 

1,500 00 

5,000 00 

3,500 00 

100,000 00 

35,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

70,<)00 00 

50,000 00 

100.000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

60,000 00 



•24 



370 

FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 

1883 .... $927,500 00 
Paid during the year . . . 13,000 00 



Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 

1884 1914,500 00 

Interest due, estimated . . 20,000 00 

Bills outstanding . . . 32,885 67 



$52,885 67 
Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1884 . $967,385 67 

Cash in treasury, Jan. 1, 1884 . $67,671 66 
Notes due the city . . . 228 70 

Interest on the same . . . 79 80 

$67,980 16 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1884 . $899,405 51 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1883 . 927,027 80 



Decrease of net indebtedness dur- 
ing the year . . . $27,622 29 



371 



CITY PROPERTY. 

City-Library building .... 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
City Hall and lot ... 
City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, etc., at city farm 
Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Engine-house, stable, and land, Vine street 
Hose-house and lot, Maple street 
Hose-house and lot, Park street . 
Hose-house and lot, Nashua street 
Houses, tombs, and new cemetery 
Court-house and lot . 
Common sewers ..... 
Safes, furniture, and fixtures at city hall 
Street lanterns, posts, and pipes . 
Water-works ..... 
Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets 
Ward-room and lot, Manchester street . 
Ward-room and lot, Park street . 
Engine-house and lot, ward eight 
Water-pipe, wagons, etc., for watering streets 
Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad 
Lot, Lowell street .... 
Gravel lot, Belmont street . 
Gravel lot. Sagamore street 
Gravel lot, ward eight (one-half acre) 
Gravel lot, Bakersville (one acre) 
Gravel lot, Bakersville 
Gravel lot, District No. 8 . . 
Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Valley Cemetery .... 



. $30,000 


00 


19,200 


00 


60,000 


00 


30,000 


00 


8,000 


00 


52,566 


50 


43,000 


00 


2,500 


00 


6,000 


00 


500 


00 


5,000 


00 


51,000 


00 


. 220,000 


00 


3,000 


00 


6,300 


00 


. 794,591 


63 


5,000 


00 


10,000 


00 


600 


00 


2,300 


00 


3 2,500 


00 


50,000 


•00 


1,500 


00 


1,200 


00 


800 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


600 


00 


150 


00 


20,000 


00 


9,000 


00 


81. 435. 458 


13 



Amount of school property 
Total property . 



326,525 00 

$1,761,983 13 



372 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1884. 



Interest 












. $20,000 00 


Paupers off the farm . 








3,000 00 


City farm 








2,500 00 


City teams . 








4,500 00 


Highway district No. 1 








300 00 


a a i 


2 








11,000 00 


a a i 


3 








700 00 


a a i 


4 








400 00 


.. a i 


5 








400 00 


It 44 4 


• 6 








400 00 


44 44 4 


7 








900 00 


It u t 


' 8 








650 00 


lli 41 t 

44 it i 


9 
■ 10 








500 00 
1,600 00 


a u 4 


11 








1,000 00 


44 44 4 


12 








300 00 


44 44 4 


13 








200 00 


New highways 








7,000 00 


Land damages 










1,250 00 


Watering streets . 










3,500 00 


Lighting streets .• 










8,500 00 


Paving streets 










6,000 00 


Bridges 










3,500 00 


Sewers and drains 










20,000 00 


Commons . 










3,500 00 


Pine Grove cemetery 










7,000 00 


Valley cemetery . 










2,000 00 


Truant officer 










700 00 


Fire department . 










20,000 00 


Police department 










17,000 00 


City Hall and offices 










2,000 00 


Printing and statio 


nery 










1,500 00 



373 



Repairs of buildings 

City library . 

Fire-alarm telegraph 

Militia 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Abatement of taxes 

Discount on taxes 

Incidental expenses 

State tax 

County tax . 

Schools 

Land . 

Interest on land 

New school-house 

Firemen's parade 

City officers' salaries 

Grading for concrete 

Reserved fund 

Macadamizing streets 

Hydrant service . 

Payment of funded debt 

Battery building 

Scavenger teams 



$1,800 00 

3,000 00 

1,500 00 

800 00 

200 00 

2,500 00 

7,000 00 

35,000 00 

41,000 00 

33,000 00 

54,000 00 

1,200 00 

3,000 00 

6,000 00 

300 00 

12,000 00 

•3,000 00 

10,000 00 

5,000 00 

20,000 00 

30,000 00 

2,000 00 

3,500 00 



Total 



$425,600 00 



INDEX. 



Abatement of Taxes 339 

Account of City Treasurer 270 

Accounts of Appropriations 277 

Alarm-Boxes and Keys 214 

Amoskeag S. F. E. Company No. 1 221,320 

Appropriations for 1884 372 

Appendix to reports of School Committee and Superintend- 
ent 171 

Attendance at School 171 

Bakersville School-house 350 

Battery Building 351 

Books and Stationery 357, 

Bridges 305 

Care of Rooms 360 

Cemeteries, Report of Committee on 257 

Treasurer 262 

Trustees of Funds 266 

City Government, 1883 3 

Civil Engineer, Report of 69 

Debt 369 

Farm 283 

* Hall 333 

Library 337 

Property 371 

Teams 288 

Treasurer's Account 270 

Commons 306 

County Tax 340 

Contingent Expenses 358 

Discount on Taxes 339 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 341 



376 

Debt, Funded 370 

Donations to City Library 59 

Engineers' Department 324 

E. W. Harriugtou Hose Company No. 3 222, 322 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 223, 323 

Evening Schools 130, 361 

Farm, City 283 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 209, 326 

Boxes and Keys, Location of 214 

Fire Apparatus 221 

Department 319 

Department, Eules and Eegulations of 219 

Firemen's Parade 208, 341 

Fires, 1883 212 

Fuel 354 

Furniture and Supplies 355 

Government, City, 1883 3 

Grading for Concrete 303 

Highway District No. 1 291 

No. 2 * 291 

No. 3 293 

No. 4 294 

No. 5 294 

No. 6 295 

No. 7 295 

No. 8.. 295 

No. 9 296 

No. 10 296 

No. 11 297 

No. 12 298 

No. 13 298 

Highways, New 298 

Hydrant Service 328 

Hydrants, Location of 231 

Incidental Expenses 307 

Instructions to Key-Holders 217 

Interest 277 



377 

Interest on Land 352 

Inventory of School-houses 366 

Land 341 

Land Damages 299 

Library, City 337 

Donations to 59 

Librarian's lleport 55 

Treasurer's Report 50 

Trustees' Report 45 

List of Teachers and Janitors 173 

Loan, Temporary 290 

Militia 338 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department 324 

Macadamizing Streets 301 

Massabesic Hose Company No. 2 222,321 

Merrimack Hose Company No. 4 222, 322 

N. S. Bean Fire Engine Company No. 4 221, 320 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department 225 

Officers, City 3 

Outstanding Taxes 340 

Overseers of Poor, Report of 245 

Paving Streets 301 

Paupers off the City Farm 277 

Payment of Funded Debt 339 

Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 222, 321 

Pine Grove Cemetery 259, 318 

Police Department 328 

Printing and Advertising 358 

Stationery 335 

Property, City 371 

Repairs of School-houses 353 

Buildings 336 

Report of Chief Engineer '. 205 

City Civil Engineer 69 



A 



378 

Report of Committee on Cemeteries 257 

Committee on City Farm 251 

Committee on Finance 274 

Joint Stauding Committee on Claims 105 

Librarian of City Library , 55 

Overseers of the Poor 245 

Public Schools for 1883 115 

School Committee 119 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 140 

Superintendent of Water- Works 19 

Treasurer of City Library « 50 

Trustees of City Library 45 

Trustees of Cemetery Funds 266 

Water Commissioners 15 

Reserved Fund 349 

Reservoir 328 

Salaries of Officers t 345 

Teachers 363 

Scavenger Teams 352 

School Department 115 

Training 120, 150 

High, course of study of 180 

Schools, Evening 130, 361 

Sewers and Drains 303 

Streets, Lighting 300 

Macadamizing 301 

Paving 301 

Watering 299 

State Tax 339 

Tax, County 340 

Taxes, Abatement, of 339 

Discount on 339 

For 1883 340 

Outstanding 340 

Temporary Loan 290 

Telegraph, Fire- Alarm 209, 326 

Teachers, Salaries of 363 

Truant Officer 351 



/■ 



379 



Valuation, Taxes, etc 368 

Valley Cemetery 257, 319 

Water Commissioners for 1884 14 

Report of 15 

Water-Works 342 

Watering Streets • 299 

Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospital 342 



i