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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"



V A } I 



«5 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



City of Manchester, 



FOR THE 



. Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1884, 



TOGETHER WITH 



Other Annual Reports and Papers Relating 
to the Affairs of the City. 




MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY JOHN B. CLARKE 
1885. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
STATE LIBRARY 



2>l 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board op Common Council. 
AN ORDER to print the Thirty-Ninth Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
.Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are, 
authorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, 
the printing of the Thirty-Ninth Annual Report of the Receipts 
and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports 
of the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, the School Board 
and Superintendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water- Works, 
Water Commissioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Marshal, 
Overseers of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian, and Treasurer of City 
Library, Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Committee on 
City Farm, City Physician, City Solicitor, and City Engineer, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the Appropriation for Printing 
and Stationery. 

In Board oe Common Council. January 14, 1885. 

Passed. 

GEORGE M. TRUE, President. 

In Board op Mayor and Aldermen. January 14, 1885. 

Passed in concurrence. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS, Mayor. 




MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT, 

1884. 



MAYOR. 

Hon. HORACE P>. PUTNAM. 



CITY CLERK. 

v NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JOHN A. McCRILLrs. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JAMES A. FRACKER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLYANUS B. PUTNAM. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

GEORGE W. PRESCOTT. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

GEORGE W. BOURNE.* 
EDWARD 0. PEARSON, f 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — Charles H. G. Foss. 
Ward 2. — John F. Clough. 

Ward 3. — Samuel Thompson. 
Ward 4. — Edward P. Johnson. 
Ward 5. — Leonard P. Reynolds. 
Ward 6. — Thomas L. Thorpe. 
Ward 7. — Horace P. Simpson. 
Ward 8. — Frank A. Cadwell. 

* Resigned July 1, 1884. t Elected to fill vacancy, July 1, 1884. 



members of common council. 
Ward 1. Ward 2. 



Henry S. Perry. 
George W. Cheney. 
Stillman P. Cannon. 

Ward 3. 

Alexander H. Olzendam. 
Abraham G. Grenier. 
Eugene S. Whitney. 

Ward 5. 

John Bryson, Jr. 
Simon McCarthy. 
John Griffin. 

Ward 7. 

Samuel Lunt. 
Henry W. Randall. 
Abner J. Sanborn. 



George M. True. 
Henry W. Fisher. 
Charles E. Stearns. 

Ward 4. 

Stephen B. Stearns. 
John A. McCrillis. 
Alpheus Bodwell. 

Ward 6. 

Albert A. Ainsworth. 
George W. Prescott. 
Henry A. Horton. 

Ward 8. 

Edward H. Doherty. 
Ferdinand Riedel. 
Frank 0. Clement. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor, and Alderman Thorpe ; 
Messrs. S. B. Stearns, Lunt, and Ainsworth. 

On. Accounts. — Aldermen Thompson and Cadwell; 
Messrs. Olzendam, Cheney, and S. B. Stearns. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Foss and Clough ; Messrs. 
True, Randall, and Prescott. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Simpson and Thorpe; Messrs. 
Sanborn, Olzendam, and Fisher. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Thorpe and Simp- 
son ; Messrs. Fisher, Olzendam, and Sanborn. 



6 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Clough and Gadwell ; 
Messrs. Whitney, McCarthy, and Riedel. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Johnson and 
Simpson; Messrs. Perry, Randall, and Bryson. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Foss and Thompson ; 
Messrs. Cheney, Horton, and Whitney. 

On Common* and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Clough and 
Foss; Messrs. Ainsworth, Cannon, and Perry. 

On Piddle Instruction. — Aldermen Cadwell and John- 
son ; Messrs. Preseott, Grenier, and True. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Johnson and Thorpe; 
Messrs. Charles E. Stearns, Doherty, and Bodwell. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Clough and Johnson; 
Messrs. Lunt, Cannon, and Horton. 

On House of < orrection. — Aldermen Reynolds and Cad- 
well ; Messrs. Preseott, Doherty, and Griffin. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Thompson and 
Clough; Messrs. Bodwell, Riedel, and Griffin. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Foss and Cadwell. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Simpson and 
Thompson. 

On Market. — Aldermen Thompson and Reynolds. 

On MarshaVs Accounts. — Aldermen Clough and Rey- 
nolds. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Cadwell and Johnson. - 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Thorpe and Reynolds. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Simpson and Clough. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returiis. — Messrs. Charles E. Stearns, 
Griffin, and Clement. 

On Bills on Sedond Reading. — Messrs. Grenier, Clement, 
and McCarthy. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Horton, Bryson, and Charles 
E. Stearns. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Assistant Justice of Police Court. 
Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal, 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 

Assistant Marshal: 
Eben Carr. 

Captain of the Night Watch. 
Edgar Farrar. 

Day Police. 

John C. Colbnrn. 
Randall W. Bean. 
Charles H. Reed. 



Night Watchmen. 



John F. Cassidy. 
James Bucklin. 
Thomas Frain. 
William II. B. Xewhall. 
Michael Marr. 
Hiram Stearns. 
Jeremiah Murphy. 
James F. Dunn. 



Ira P. Fellows. 
Philip Reischer. 
Francis Bourrassau. 
Gideon Rochette. 
Lafayette Tehbetts. 
Charles S. Brown. 
Henry Harmon. 
Lerov M. Streeter. 



Michael Fox. 

Constables. 
William A. Carpenter. Joseph B. Maynard. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex-offirio Chairman. 
Frank T. E. Richardson, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Frank T. E. Richardson. 
Perry II. Dow. 

Ward 3. 

Henry II. Huse. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Ward 5. 

Thomas F. Collins. 
Charles A. O'Connor. 



Ward 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
William G. Clarke. 

Ward 4. 

John T. Fanning. 
Samuel D. Lord. 

Ward 6. 

D. Milton Goodwin. 
Jacob J. Abbott. 



Ward 7. Ward 8. 

George D. Towne. Louis E. Phelps. 

Edwin F. Jones. Douglas Mitchell. 

John A. McCrillis, ex officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Hon. Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 

Hon. James A. Weston, Clerk. 
William P. Newell. Alpheus Gay. 

James A. Weston. Andrew C. Wallace. 

Eben T. James. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex officio. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex-ojfieio Chairman. 

William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 
William H. Maxwell. Daniel Sheehan.* 

John E. Stearns. P. A. Devine.f 

James Sutcliffe. P. O. Woodman. 

Horace Gordon. Elbridge G. Woodman. 

William. Weber. 

* Died. t Elected to fill vacancy. 



10 



ASSESSORS. 



George W. "Weeks, Chairman. 

David O. Furnald, Clerk. 
Charles H. Brown. Patrick A. Devine. 

Joseph H. Haynes. John P. Moore. 

David O. Furnald. Henry W. Powell. 

George W. Weeks. Pius Brown. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Joseph H. Haynes, Chairman. 

Harrison D. Lord, Clerk. 
Charles W. Warren. Maurice Fitzgerald. 

Joseph H. Haynes. fsaac Whittemore. 

David O. Furnald. Solon D. Pollard. 

Harrison D. Lord. Charles C. Tinkham. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer* 
Fred S. Bean, Clerk. 

Assistant Engineers. 

Orrin E. Kimball. Ruel G. Manning. 

James F. Pherson. Fred S. Bean. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Melvin J. Jenkins. Patrick A. Devine. 

Lyman H. Lamprey. 



11 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Isaac W. Smith. 

"William P. Newell. Moody Currier. 

Daniel Clark. Lucien B. Clough. 

Thomas L. Livermore. 

Hon. Horace B. Putnam, ex officio. 

John A. McCrillis, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher 



CITY AUDITOR AND REGISTRAR. 

Nathan P. Kidder. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Charles K. Walker. 



WARD OFFICERS. 



Moderators. 



Ward 1. — Daniel H. Maxlield. 
Ward 2. r— George M. True. 
Ward 3. — James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Hiram Hill. 

Ward 5. — John F. Sullivan. 
Ward 6. — George Holbrook. 

Ward 7. — Timothy W. Challis. 
Ward 8. — Charles K. Walker. 



12 



Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Abial W. Eastman. 
Ward 2. — Harry E. Webster. 
Ward 3. — Frank W. Garland. 
Ward 4. — Waldo E. Gilmore. 
Ward 5.— John F. Bohan. 

Ward 6. — William H. Dixon. 
Ward 7. — Charles A. Smith. 
Ward 8. — Fred W. Ranno. 

Selectmen, 



Ward 1. 

George C. Kemp. 
George W. Bacon. 
Henry S. Ferry. 



Ward 2. 

George H. Colby. 
James It. Can*. 
Joseph P. Fellows. 



Ward ?>. 

David Thayer. 
Benjamin F. Garland. 
Emerson Monlton. 



Ward 4. 

Peleg D. Harrison. 
Charles F. Garland. 
Charles II. Uhlia:. 



Ward 5. 

John J. Sheehan. 
Daniel J. Ahern. 
Patrick Kelley. 

Ward 7. 

Elbridge G. Woodman. 
Oscar Perkins. 
Zara B. Sawyer. 



Ward 6. 

Edwin K Baker. 
George E. Glines. 
George M. Bean. 

Ward 8. 

Frank J. Smith. 
Walter S. Chamberlain. 
Herman Kittner. 



MAYOR PUTNAM'S 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS. 



It has been customary, in years past, for the retiring 
executive to give an account of his stewardship, to show 

the people how the money has been expended, and what 
has been done during his administration. In doing this 
I shall be as brief as possible, taking up some of the 
most important points from January 1, 1881, to Decem- 
ber, 1884. 

The total debt, January 1, 1881, was $982,772; the 
total debt for 1885 was $991,200; increase in four years. 
$9,428; increase of city property in four years, $235,0(30. 
The assessed valuation in 1880 was $17,735,990 ; the as- 
sessed valuation in 1884 was $20,613,032; increase in 
four years, $2,877,042. The population in 1880 was 33,000 ; 
the population in 1884 was 38,000. These figures show 
a larger gain in valuation and population than in any 
four years for a long period of time. 

THE CITY'S GROWTH. 

A large per cent of this increase has been on the west 
side of the river. The construction ot McGregor bridge 
opened up a large territory for building purposes. Four 
years ago there were not ten houses where now stands the 
village of McGregorville ; not a street, save the old River 
road, was laid out or built. Anv one visitino- that village 
to-day and seeing its network of streets, under all of 
which runs a good sewer, can form some idea of the 
amount of labor necessary to build them, as well as the 



16 

expense thereof. A more perfect system of sewerage is 
not to be found elsewhere in the city. The increase of 
taxable property will more than repay the interest on the 
cost of the bridge and the permanent improvements which 
have been made. 

MCGREGOR BRIDGE. 

McGregor bridge was mostly built under the preceding 
city government, and was one of the best investments 
ever made by the city, as subsequent events have shown. 
In the early spring of 1881 it was found not to answer all 
the purposes for which it was designed. From the east 
river wall to the east abutment of the bridge there was a 
depression of nine feet and six inches. One of the corpo- 
rations, which had its coal-bins and store-houses on the 
west side of the river, could not utilize it. A consulta- 
tion was held with two of the manufacturing companies 
most interested in having it raised, which resulted in 
their paying $5,000 as their part of the expenses. The 
work was contracted for $9,000, the city paying the bal- 
ance and building the abutments, total cost to the city 
being about $5,000. There is now a commodious drive- 
way under its entire length, and the bridge as it now 
stands is a credit to the city. 

streets. 

During the last four years seven miles and two rods of 
streets have been built ; and in the same time have been 
laid 48,119 feet of Akron pipe and 4,264 feet of brick 
sewers, making a total of 9 95-100 miles; also 18,563 
square yards of cobble, and 7,500 square vards of block 
paving ; 32,439 square yards of streets have been macad- 
amized, and 23,852 yards of concrete laid. During the 
past two years there has been a large amount of work 



17 

done on the streets, and they have been kept in good 
condition. Superintendent Patten, having had no other 
business to take his attention, has given his whole time 
to the duties of his office, and with good results to the 
city. 

Last year a petition signed by numerous citizens rep- 
resenting a very large amount of taxable property was 
presented to the city government, asking that Ash street 
might be extended from Lowell to Concord street, which 
petition the city granted. To do this, land was purchased 
on which were many unsightly buildings, which have 
been removed. By laying out this street the city acquired 
the back street, twenty feet in width and two hundred 
and seventy feet in length, which has been added to the 
high-school lot. Ash street now extends to Amherst 
street. The expense attending this extension was $7,000. 

CITY YARD. 

When I took the oath of office, it was to serve the city 
to the best of my ability, and to faithfully perform all the 
duties intrusted to me with what judgment I possessed. 
I clearly saw that in order to carry out those views money 
would have to be expended, for the city was sadly in need 
of many improvements which could not be much longer 
deferred. One of the first that seemed to be needed was 
a lk city yard,*' where all city property could be safely 
'stored, combining at the same time a hay and wood stand. 
We were tenants-at-will on the land then used, and liable 
to removal at any time. In casting about for a location 
the present lot was found the most desirable, as no avail- 
able one could be purchased except at the lower end of 
Elm street, which would be too far removed. By a vote 
of the city government, authority was given to buy the 
piece of land now occupied. The Amoskeag Manufac- 



18 

turing Company showed their accustomed liberality by 
offering the land at the reduced price of sixty-five cents 
per foot. The lot contains 44,656 square feet, amounting 
to $29,026.40, of which the city paid $3,250, leaving the 
sum of $25,776.40, for which the city gave its note. 

In this yard the stone-crusher is located, and all pipe, 
cement, and other material which the city uses are kept. 
Sheds have been built in which to house city carts and 
eleds. The lot is surrounded by public streets and near 
the depot. If the city wishes to dispose of it, customers 
can be found to take it off her hands at an advanced price. 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS. 

Many of our public buildings were badly out of repair 
and there was great need of more school accommodations. 
During the past four years land has been purchased on 
Webster street, and on Elm street at Bakersville, and 
commodious school-houses built ; also an additional piece 
of land adjoining the Main-street school-house bought 
and a wing added, which, with the other addition now 
being erected, will give good grounds and sufficient ac- 
commodations for some time to come. The old high and 
Spring-street houses have been remodeled, virtually mak- 
ing new buildings of them. A new section has been built 
for the Hook and Ladder truck on Vine street, and the 
city stable extended to the back street ; a hose-house, to- 
gether with dwelling and stable, on Park street, first-class 
in all its appointments, and a dwelling-house to connect 
with the Massabesic hose-house. 

A wing nearly as large as the main building has been 
erected to the city library and shelving put in, giving 
ample and needed room. This is one of the institutions 
that should be well cared for by the city, as furnishing 



19 

an important means of education, and tending towards 
the general intelligence of the community. The ward- 
• room or battery building completes the list of those built 
and finished during the past four years. 

Two more hose-carriages have been added to the fire 
department. Steam-boilers have been put into the en- 
gine-house on Vine street, also at the city farm, the 
Spring-street school-house, the Main-street school-house, 
and all these buildings piped. 

BRIDGES. 

During the past four years Granite bridge has been 
replanked three times and McGregor bridge twice. 
Owing to the large amount of travel the planking soon 
wears out. It costs $1,200 to plank McGregor bridge. 
This was found to be very expensive, and as a matter of 
economy it was thought best to give it a coating of con- 
crete, costing $1,920, which will last many years, at the 
same time giving a very fine road-bed. 

An iron bridge has been built over the canal on Gran- 
ite street, the old structure being very unsafe for travel. 
This bridge was strengthened and then put over the North 
Weare Railroad on Parker street. 

Three truss bridges have been built over the Cohas 
brook, one near the outlet of Massabesic, the others on 
the Derry and Mammoth roads. The bridges removed 
were in a bad condition, the abutments of one being de- 
cayed logs, and the others of stone, badly constructed and 
caving in. These were all replaced by heavy stone abut- 
ments. The bridges in the city, save the Amoskeag, 
which needs replanking, are now in good condition. 

BRIDGE-STREET SEWER. 

For many years, after heavy showers the water flooded 
the Elm-street sewer, causing it to back into the basement 



20 

of stores, for which, in many instances, the city has had 
to pay damages. Early in the spring of 1881 a three and 
one-half foot sewer was commenced, and built from the 
river up Bridge to Elm street, tapping the main sewer., 
at an expense of $13,000. Since that sewer was built, no 
damage has occurred by back water. When this sewer 
is extended east to Nashua street, taking all the sewage 
north of Bridge street, we shall have as perfect a system 
as we eau need. 

SUITS. 

In 1882 a suit was brought against the city of Man- 
chester by Marc is Morton for the sum of f 90,000, for 
using a valve on our steam-engines on which he claimed 
a patent. Similar suits were brought against other cities 
in this state at the same time. A proposition was made 
and agreed upon to have all combine to defend them- 
selves from these suits, each paying pro rata according to 
the number of engines used. These suits were brought 
in the United States court. Able counsel was procured 
to defend the case, and every one knows that patent law- 
suits are expensive. The case was prepared with great 
care, and argued on the part of the defense with great 
ability. This city obtained a clear verdict, settling the 
case, as far as New Hampshire cities are concerned, for 
all time. Manchester's share in this suit was $0,428.28. 
Here I will return thanks, in behalf of the city, to Col. 
T. L. Livermore, ;tgent of the Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Company, for a complete model of a steam fire-engine 
made at its works, free of expense, showing the work- 
ings of the valve, which model was used at this trial. 

While speaking of lawsuits I will here say that there 
have been, during the past three years, many claims made 
against the city for injuries claimed to be received by fall- 



21 

ing on the sidewalk. A large proportion of these had no 
merit whatever, and the committee on claims have used 
good judgment in giving such leave to withdraw. I found 
it was necessary to have evidence and facts pertaining to 
these claims taken as soon as the accident occurred. 
Consequently I detailed Officer C. II. Reed to examine 
the localities and get all evidence as soon as possible after 
the accident, and it has been the means of saving to the 
city hundreds of dollars. 

COMMONS AND CEMETERIES. 

In 1882 I communicated with the agent of the Anios- 
keag Manufacturing Company, asking that a piece of 
land known as " Park Common " might be deeded to the 
city. This communication was laid before the directors, 
and they, with much generosity, granted the request, with 
the proviso that the city should put an edge-stone around 
the same, which has been done at an expense of $2,220. 
The ground has been graded at quite an expense, and 
concrete walks laid. 

In former years the various commons of the city were 
used for farming purposes, the grass being cut during 
the summer by any one who would do it for the grass 
itself. During the past two administrations they have 
been closely shaven by a lawn-mower, presenting a fine 
appearance. Electric lights have been placed on them, 
rendering travel safe, which was not the case in former 
years. 

The lots in the Pine Grove Cemetery are fast being 
taken, and it was thought advisable to buy land for its 
extension while it could be procured. Under the statutes 
no land can be doomed for such a purpose within a radius 
of twenty rods of a dwelling-house. Consequently author-? 
itv was obtained, and twenty and two-thirds acres were 



• 22 

purchased, costing $3,900. All grade and loam used by 
said cemetery had previously been bought by the load, 
making it quite expensive to till and grade the paths. A 
lot of land on the east side, containing two acres, was 
obtained at a small outlay, which will furnish sufficient 
material for the cemetery, and also for streets in district 
~No. 3, tor many years to come. There were but very few 
available lots to be had in the cemetery at Amoskeag- 
A lot of land adjoining, containing four and three-fourths 
acres, on wmich were a house and a good set of outbuild- 
ings, was offered for $3,000. The city readily made the 
purchase, and now has very fine grounds, which have long 
been needed. 

CITY FARM. 

When I made my first visit to the city farm, in 1881, I 
was surprised to find the buildings in a dilapidated condi- 
tion, such as would be no credit to a farmer of ordinary 
means. The unfortunate poor virtually shared the same 
quarters with the criminals, with very little to make life 
enjoyable. An addition of thirty feet was built adjoining 
the main house, the old part being moved back, and is 
now used for criminals. This addition was finished into 
rooms and heated by steam. Jfow, those who are obliged 
to seek the charity of the city can have a comfortable 
home, and many conveniences which they did not have 
before. 

A new earriage-house, stable, sheds, ice-house, and silo 
have been built. The buildings are now all in first-el ass 
condition and are a credit to the city. A large well was 
dug one year ago, in which there have been not less than 
ten feet of good water at any time. This water is forced 
to the reservoir on the hill, running from there to the 
house and barn, having a good head that can be utilized 



23 . 

in case of fire. The farm is being brought to a high state 
of cultivation, and will soon be self-sustaining. . 

Here I will bear willing testimony to the superintend- 
ent and matron, Mr. and Mrs. Garvin, for their faithful- 
ness and care in looking after their respective charges 
and the success that has crowned their efforts. 

POLICE STATION. 

For years the police headquarters and lock-up have 
been a disgrace to the city, and the larger proportion of 
our citizens has demanded that a change be made. The 
old accommodations are ill-adapted to the wants of our 
growing city, and enough money has been expended in 
times past in altering them to have built a new one. In 
the early spring of this year the central part of the city 
w T as looked over to see if a lot could be obtained. None 
could be bought without paying too large a price. It 
appeared probable that the old school-house on the corner 
of Manchester and Chestnut streets could be utilized, as it 
was not needed for a school. I consulted the agent of the 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company to see if it could not 
be redeeded to the city for police purposes. He used his 
influence with the company and had it conveyed to the 
city. The building was badly out of repair, and but two 
rooms w r ere used for schools. The city authorized the 
Mayor and the committee on lands and buildings to make 
such alterations in the building as were needed for a 
police station. Plans were drawn up to see if it could be 
changed to serve as a station, court-room, and lock-up. 
These were submitted to the committee, and it was found 
that the building could not be so used, it being too small 
and not suited to the required needs. It was then decided 
to take it down and use the old material in the construc- 
tion of a new building. After visiting stations in an 



24 

adjoining state, a plan was devised comprising all the 
improvements we had seen, so that we have a building 
which is superior to them all. There are some features 
in this which will receive the commendation of all who 
have any interest in the cause of humanity. 

Every person who goes to a police station for lodgings 
is not a confirmed tramp or a vagabond, and there is no 
reason why he should be locked in cells with criminals. 
Many come to a city like this in a destitute condition, not 
having money to pay for accommodations elsewhere, and 
such can have comfortable quarters. Another feature is 
the hospital-room. Heretofore there has been no place 
to which an injured person could be taken and temporary 
aid given. 

The building meets every known want of the present, 
and, we think, those of the future. Considering its cost, 
its accommodations, its general appearance, and the bad 
condition of the old lock-up which this replaces, there are 
but very few people who will not be glad it has been 
built. 

CONCLUSION. 

Thus, in as brief a manner as possible, have I touched 
upon some of the most important topics that have received 
attention during the past four years. 

Here I will return my thanks to the gentlemen who 
have been associated with me, for their assistance in les- 
sening many burdens, and for the promptitude in attend- 
ing to their official duties. 

It is not to be supposed that during all this time we 
should not have made some mistakes, or that all should 
be pleased with official acts. As a general thing it is not 
the heavy tax-payers, or that large progressive element 
which we fortunately have among us, that find fault with 



25 

the expenditure of money for which an equivalent is re- 
ceived. We have in this cit} r , as in places elsewhere, a 
set of chronic grumblers who live on wisdom past ; who 
have no idea of the wants of a growing city, and think 
the expenses should be no larger now than twenty years 
ago, when it was not half its present size. These, if they 
could have their way, would build a Chinese wall around 
the city to prevent people from coming in or going out. 
Since I have had the honor to be executive officer of 
the city I have endeavored to pursue a liberal policy, not 
an expensive one, and have sought to keep the city in all 
its departments up to a high standard, such as becomes 
the most enterprising and thriving city of the state. 



MAYOR STEARNS'S 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



(fditlanrn of the City Councils : — 

In entering upon the discharge of the duties of the 
position in which I have been placed by my fellow-citi- 
zens, — a place which has often been tilled by men of the 
highest ability in the administration of public affairs, some 
of whom have received the highest honors from the peo- 
ple of the state, — as I contemplate the difficulties and 
trials inseparably connected with the work which has 
been assigned me, I am profoundly impressed with the 
weight of the responsibilities which I have assumed, and 
am tempted to fear that I may fail to justify the conti- 
dence reposed in me, and act my part in a manner which 
at all times shall result in the highest good of the people 
of the city. In the midst of these doubts and misgivings, 
I am, however, sustained by the conviction that whatever 
may be my errors of judgment, I shall not be found want- 
ing in watchfulness and sincere devotion to the public 
welfare. I am, moreover, cheered by the assurance that 
I am to be associated, in the various departments of the 
city government, with gentlemen upon whom 1 can confi- 
dently rely for counsel and encouragement at all times 
and under all circumstances. 

We are assembled to inaugurate the fortieth municipal 
government of the city, a charter having been granted by 
the legislature of 1846. Twenty-one of the citizens 



30 

have held the office of mayor, and all but five, includ- 
ing the first two, are still living. During all these years 
the people have been represented in the various depart- 
ments of the government by some of the wisest and 
most trusted citizens, and the generations of to-day 
are enjoying the fruits of their well directed labors in 
inaugurating and completing the great public enterprises 
which contribute so much to the convenience, the com- 
fort, and pleasure of all. In looking back to the work of 
our predecessors in the management of public affairs, it is 
gratifying to find so much to approve and so little to 
condemn. As we follow in their footsteps in carrying on 
the work which called forth their best faculties and ener- 
gies, let us hope that, while we endeavor to avoid their 
errors, we may profit by their wisdom and experience. 

We commence our labors as the servants of the people 
at a time of depression in the great business affairs of the 
country, and for this reason, among others, it behooves us 
to move with caution and prudence in the appropriation 
and disbursement of the public funds, and to bear in mind 
the embarrassing circumstances by which many of the 
tax-payers of the city may be surrounded. While the 
business of our city has been curtailed to some degree 
during the present crisis, it is a subject for congratulation 
that our great manufacturing industries, upon which the 
welfare of the city largely depends, have been so managed 
that the people have suffered but little as compared with 
those of many other cities and towns in various sections 
of the country. 

Gentlemen, I now invite your attention to a brief sur- 
vey of the condition of the public affairs of the city at the 
present time, and also to a few suggestions in relation 
to some of the most important matters which will come 
before us for consideration. 



31 



FINANCE. 



I find by the books of the city treasurer that the condi- 
tion of the finances the first day of January, 1885, was 
as follows : — 

Total amount of funded debt . $845,200.00 

Interest due, estimated . . 20,000.00 

Temporary loan . . . 119,000.00 
Due Amoskeag Company tor 

land 25,776.40 

Outstanding bills . . . 54,163.00 

Total indebtedness Jan. 1,1885 $1,064,139.40 

Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1885 . 63,719.30 



Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1885. . . $1,000,420.10 

It will be observed by the foregoing statement that the 
unpaid bills, notes, and interest amount to nearly $219,000, 
and that the cash on hand to meet these bills amounts to 
less than $64,000, which leaves a balance of more than 
$155,000 to be provided for. I would recommend the 
funding of this floating debt, for which bonds can be 
issued. 

It will be necessary to make provision for a temporary 
loan for the purpose of raising money to pay the ordinary 
expenses until the first of July next, when the taxes 
which will be assessed in April will become due. It is 
highly important that the expenses of the government 
should not be allowed to overrun the appropriations, 
and thus add to the debt of the city. 

It appears by the books of the city collector that the 
total amount of unpaid taxes on the tax list of 1884 is 
$15,146, which is within about four per cent of the total 
amount assessed. 



32 



WATER-WORKS. 



, The water-works of the city, which have been built and 
in operation for a period of ten years, have more than 
realized the highest hopes and expectations of the citi- 
zens who projected that most important enterprise. The 
works, whieh from the first have been placed entirely 
in charge of some of the most trusted of our eitizens, have 
been so well managed that the income has been more 
than sufficient to pay the interest of the water bonds and 
the expense of putting in twenty-three and a half miles of 
additional distributing pipes. The original cost of. the 
works was SHOO, 000, and the cost of the extension of the 
pipes during the past ten years has amounted to the sum 
of |223,000. The total length of distributing pij.es laid 
down up to the present time is forty-three and a half miles, 
and the total number of hydrants is 369. 

There is reason to fear that the purity of the water at 
the source of supply may, in time, be much impaired by 
tilth whieh is liable to be discharged into the lake from 
outhouses connected with the cottages located upon its 
shores. It is hoped that some steps may be taken to pre- 
vent any serious consequences to our citizens on this 
account. 

STREETS. 

One of the most important subjects in which all our 
people, and especially the tax-payers, are deeply inter- 
ested, is that of keeping the public thoroughfares at all 
times in a perfectly safe condition. To effect this object 
the superintendents of streets and surveyors of highways 
should be men of sound judgment and experience. It 
therefore becomes a very important duty on the part of 
the city councils to select the very best men for these 
responsible positions. In these times, when the city is 



33 

often called upon to pay heavy damages for injuries 
alleged to have been received by people in passing through 
the public avenues, the city authorities ought at all times 
to be able to demonstrate that if such accidents are received 
at all, it is <m account of no carelessness, or neglect on the 
part of the officers having them in charge. 

A steam road-roller is greatly needed, as it is impossible 
to construct a good macadamized street without the aid 
of one. 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

The cost of lighting our streets during the last year was 
about |11,000, against $5,500 three years ago. A very 
large portion of this increased expense is owing to the 
introduction of the electric lights, which cost the sum of 
$4,092 per year. I would suggest that it may be for the 
interests of the city to employ the Gas Company to take 
the entire charge of the lighting and repairing of all the 
street lamps. 

BRIDGES. 

All the bridges are in good condition except Amoskeag 
and Granite bridges, which will require new planking 
the present year. The replanking of the bridges across 
the Merrimack river once in two years, which has be- 
come necessary in consequence of the extensive travel 
over those thoroughfares, has been a heavy item of ex- 
pense to the city. Last year the new McGregor bridge 
was covered by concrete, with the view of protecting the 
planks from speedy destruction by the passage of vehicles 
over them. If the experiment proves successful, a great 
saving will be effected. 

The expense of this department the past year was 
about §10,000. 



34 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



A large appropriation will be necessary for the con- 
struction of our sewers and drains. I would suggest that 
an appropriation be made, sufficient for the building of a 
sewer to drain the* north end of the city, as recommended 
by the committee on sewers and drains of the last city gov- 
ernment. It is proposed that this sewer shall commence at 
the junction of Webster and Union streets, and extend 
through Webster street to the River road, and down that 
thoroughfare to Bridge street, where a connection will 
be made with the Bridge-street sewer, which enters the 
river under McGregor bridge. The north section of the 
city is rapidly increasing in population, and a sewer in 
that quarter is imperatively necessary. It is also neces- 
sary to extend the Bridge-street sewer east from Elm to 
Nashua street, for the purpose of relieving the Nashua- 
street sewer. An appropriation of $20,000 will probably 
be needed for this department. 

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The fire department continues to maintain its well 
earned reputation of being among the very best in 
the country, both in equipment and the character and 
efficiency of its members. The board of engineers, the 
officers of companies, and the firemen have worked in 
the most perfect harmony, and in a manner to secure the 
confidence and esteem of the people of the city. The 
steam fire-engines and other apparatus are in excellent 
condition, and there seems to be but little room for im- 
provement in this department. 

I am informed by the chief engineer that the boxes 
connected with the fire-alarm-telegraph system have 
become worn out, after being in use for ten years, and 



35 

need reconstruction. Xew wires must also be procured 
to replace those now in use, for the same reason. I would 
recommend, when this is done, that private fire-alarm sig- 
nals be introduced into the large school buildings, so that 
in case of tire in any one of them the department may be 
called out without delay. The expediency of securing a fur- 
ther protection of these buildings, as well as the lives of 
the pupils, in the manner proposed, would seem to be obvi. 
OU8, when it is remembered that there is no insurance 
upon the school property of the city. 

The appropriation in this department for 1884 was 
£20,000. I invite your attention to the excellent report 
of the chief engineer. 

CLAIMS UPON THE CITY. 

I learn, by the report of the city solicitor, that there 
are now pending fourteen claims for damages against the 
city, for injuries sustained on the streets and sidewalks, 
amounting in the aggregate to the sum of $50,000. The 
most of these have been referred to the coming March 
term of the supreme court. 

PUBLIC PARK. 

I will now invite you to consider the question as to 
whether the interests of the people will be best promoted 
by taking immediate steps to provide a public park. If 
a park is ever to be provided at all, it is clear that the 
longer any action looking to the attainment of that result 
the more difficult and expensive it will be. The lands 
owned by the Amoskeag Company, lying in the vicinity 
of Rock Rimmon, and including that spot, are in all 
respects adapted to all the purposes of a public park. 
It has been thought that satisfactory arrangements for 
the purchase of these lands may be made with the 



36 

Amoskeag Company, which from the first has. exhibited a 
spirit of great liberality in giving its aid and support 
to all measures which tend to promote the health and 
happiness of the people of the city. 

COMMONS. 

The commons, which are one of the leading attractions 
of our city, have been well cared for during the past few 
years. Many important improvements have been made 
and a considerable amount of money has been expended, 
so that no great outlay will be required for some time 
to come. 

CEMETERIES. 

The cemeteries have been much improved during 
the past year and are now in excellent condition. Dur- 
ing the past year the Pine drove Cemetery has been 
enlarged by the addition of about, twenty acres of land 
at a cost of $3',090. The cost of the improvements at 
this cemetery has amounted to $9,251. The board of 
trustees of the cemeteries recommend the building of a 
new receiving-tomb, the old tomb being too small to meet 
the wants of the public. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

This institution, under the judicious management of the 
board of trustees and the librarian, continues to realize 
the wishes and hopes of its founders in promoting the 
improvement and enjoyment of the people. The library 
has, from time to time, received liberal donations of books 
from citizens who have been identified with the growth 
and prosperity of our city. It would be a great advan- 
tage to many of our people if a public reading-room were 
established in connection with the library. The library 
now consists of 27,870 volumes. 



37 



THE SCHOOLS. 



The people of our city, throughout its entire history, 
have spared no pains or expense in seeking to provide the 
best advantages for the education of their children. At 
the present time our school buildings, in beauty and con- 
venience, are unsurpassed by any which can he found in 
any of the cities of the country of equal size ; and there 
are the best reasons for claiming that our teachers, in char- 
acter and ability, are at least equal to those who are em- 
ployed in those cities and towns which are the most for- 
tunate in this respect. With all our advances in the 
management of our schools, it is claimed by many who 
are regarded as authorities in this matter that there is 
still room for much improvement. 

In view of the fact that only a small number of the 
pupils in the schools desire a more complete education in 
the colleges or higher seminaries, with the design of 
entering the learned professions, it becomes a matter of 
great importance that the larger class should occupy the 
first place in the care and regard of the teachers and others 
upon whom are placed all the responsibilities pertaining to 
this subject. 
Total number of pupils in the schools during 

the past year was ..... 3,918 

Average number 2,872 

Total expense of schools $53,477 

Cost per scholar 18.62 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The protection of the people and the preservation of 
the peace and order of the city are among the most diffi- 
cult duties the municipal authorities are called upon to 
perform. 



38 

The affairs of this department appear to have been very 
creditably managed for the past year or two, and the city 
has not been afflicted on account of the commission of 
any of the great capital crimes on the part of any person 
residing in onr jurisdiction. 

Inasmuch as the best men as to character and fitness 
are required to perform the duty of keeping the peace 
in a successful manner, it becomes a matter of much 
consequence that none should be appointed but such 
as arc temperate and free from all vices of whatever name 
or character. While they should be men of firmness and 
courage, they should be vigilant and discreet, They 
should also be aide to control their temper under provo- 
cation, and to treat suspected prisoners who are under 
arrest with civility and kindness. It is hoped that those 
having the appointment of these officers will exercise 
great care and discrimination in the discharge of that 
duty. 

Among the most common of the less flagrant offenses, 
drunkenness continues to take the lead. It cannot be 
denied that the sin of intemperance is the source of a vast 
amount of suffering, not only to the victims themselves 
but to their families and friends and the community at 
large. How to overthrow or mitigate the evil is a ques- 
tion of very serious importance. From the experiences of 
the past, it appears useless to hope for a thorough and 
lasting reform in this direction until a strong and ardent 
moral sentiment is awakened among the people of all 
classes, and more especially among the educated,- the 
refined, the wealthy, and the influential. How can we 
expect to reform the lower classes, so called, so long as 
the habit of drinking intoxicating liquors prevails to a 
very large extent among those in the higher walks of life 
who give tone and character to society, and even among 



39 

those who assist in framing and administering the laws ? 
I shall at all times most heartily cooperate with you in 
the support ot all measures that may seem to be the most 
judicious and practicable for the preservation of the peace 
and order of the city, and best calculated to promote a 
reform of the evil of intemperance. 

A new police station has been erected on the corner of 
Manchester and Chestnut streets, and will be ready for 
Occupancy in the course of a few weeks. The building is 
located in a comparatively retired spot, and altogether 
superior to the old station in the City-Hall building. It 
contains all the accommodations needed for the police 
department and the police court. In regard to the exact 
cost of the building I am not informed, as the bills are 
mostly charged to incidental expenses. I would respect- 
fully suggest that hereafter, when a new building is to be 
erected or any other enterprise is undertaken, a special 
appropriation be made for this purpose and a separate 
account opened, so that the citizens have an opportunity 
to know at once the exact amount of money expended. 

The total amount expended in the police department 
the past year was about $26,000. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

I wish to refer to the urgent demand that more strin- 
gent measures should be taken for the better preservation 
of the health of our citizens. It has long been felt that 
it is not enough to pass ordinanees requiring the people 
to keep their premises free from all nuisances and offen- 
sive substances calculated to generate disease, unless the 
laws upon this subject are strictly enforced. In spite of 
all that has been done in the way of calling the attention 
of the people to the ordinance upon the subject, the air in 
many of the back streets in the very heart of the city dur- 



40 

ing the summer months has often been polluted by decay- 
ing vegetable and animal substances and tilth lying in 
uncleansed outhouses. As a consequence, there has been 
a very much larger rate of mortality among children from 
cholera infantum in such localities than in those sections 
where the laws of health in this respect have been ob- 
served. In view of the probability that the country may 
be scourged by Asiatic cholera during the present year, it 
becomes our duty to act promptly in this matter. I 
would suggest that a police officer or some other reliable 
person be appointed to make daily inspection in back 
streets and by-ways, ami vigorously prosecute all offend- 
ers against the law. 

In this connection I desire to call your attention to the 
question as to whether the public good requires that a 
public hospital should be established here without fur- 
ther delay. The people of other cities in the country, 
some of which have much less pretension upon the score 
of wealth and population, have long enjoyed the benefits 
of institutions of this character. It must be apparent to 
all that a large proportion of our adult population consists 
of people who are without family and near friends to care 
for them in case of sickness or accident, ami that it is 
almost impossible to afford them proper accommodations 
in boarding-houses and crowded tenements, without caus- 
ing great trouble and inconvenience to all concerned. 
Under these oircumstances it seems strange that the influ- 
ential, the wealthy, the public-spirited, and benevolent 
citizens in our midst, who have the best reasons to feel 
proud of our city in most other respects, have not before 
this demanded, in the name of justice and humanity, to 
say nothing of the interests and good name of our city, 
that a public hospital should lie established. It should be 
borne in mind that all the expense for board, nursing, and 



41 

attendance of patients need not necessarily be paid from 
the city treasury, as there will always be a large number 
of persons of means who will be glad to avail themselves 
of the superior advantages afforded in a well conducted 
hospital. 

It is by no means necessary that a very large and ex- 
pensive structure be erected, or that mere embellishment 
should be taken into consideration. There is no doubt 
that a plain and substantial building, containing all neces- 
sary accommodations for hospital purposes, of sufficient 
capacity to meet the present demands of the city, can be 
provided and furnished for a sum ranging from $15,000 
to $20,000. Additional buildings may be erected from 
time to time as they may be needed. A part of the city 
farm situated near the top of Wilson Hill would afford 
one of the best locations for an institution of this kind. 

It maybe said that the "Elliot Hospital, " which is to be 
established at no distant day, will meet all the wants of 
the people in this regard. To this it may be replied that 
the will of the late Mrs. Elliot expressly stipulates that 
none but Protestants can share the benefits of the insti- 
tution founded by her liberality ; so that a large proportion 
of our people who are equally entitled to the consideration 
and charity of the public in case of misfortune will be 
left to shift for themselves, unless the city authorities take 
some action in this matter. 

CITY FARM. 

The buildings of the city farm are now in good condi- 
tion, and well adapted to the convenience and comfort of 
the worthy poor of the city who are so unfortunate as to 
be without homes of their own, and also for the confine- 
ment of prisoners sentenced by the police court for drunk- 
enness. The farm consists of about 185 acres of very 



42 

excellent land in close proximity to the city, and there 
appears to be no reason why, in ordinary years, the insti- 
tivtion should not be self-supporting. The cost to the 
city for making improvements and sustaining the institu- 
tion, during the past year, amounted to the sum of 
$12,026.88. 

CONCLUSION. 

The government of the city is now intrusted to our 
hands, and the great public interests to which I have 
referred are placed in our charge and keeping. We are 
the representatives and servants of the whole people, and 
have taken a solemn obligation to protect them in their 
persons and property, and to manage their public affairs 
with the strictest fidelity, and to the full extent of our 
ability. For the proper discharge of this important duty 
all the members of the government are equally respon- 
sible, and every one should at all times exercise the same 
care and devotion to the public good as if the entire result 
depended upon his individual efforts. It therefore be- 
hooves every one to make a special study of the condition 
and wants of this municipality, and all measures upon 
which he will be called upon to act should be thoughtfully 
examined and considered. 

It is hoped that every member of the government will 
feel that nothing but the most urgent necessity should 
prevent his prompt attendance upon all of the meetings 
of the departments and committees to which he belongs, 
and thus prevent all delays and embarrassments which 
would otherwise follow. 

Let all our official acts be above board and open to the 
inspection and criticism of every citizen, and let us resolve 
to perform our duties with the strictest impartiality, and 
without discrimination in favor of any class or individual, 



43 

whether they occupy the highest or the lowest position in 
the social scale. 

In our intercourse with one another let us cultivate a 
spirit of respect and good-will, and let our official rela- 
tions at all times be characterized by courtesy and mutual 
forbearance. And now let us consecrate our best facul- 
ties and powers to the service of the people, and seek for 
the inspiration of Divine Wisdom to aid and assist in 
every hour of difficulty and doubt, so that in surrendering 
the trusts which have been committed to our care we may 
have the approbation of our own consciences, and the sat- 
isfaction of knowing that we have done all in our power 
to perpetuate the fair fame and to promote the prosperity 
of our city. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



WATER BOARD FOR 1885. 



Alpheus Gay, President, term expires January 1, 1887. 
James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires January 1, 1891. 
George H. Stearns, Mayor, term expires January 1, 1887. 
William P. Newell, term expires January 1, 1890. 
Eben T. James, term expires January 1, 1886. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January 1, 1888. 
E. H. Hobbs, term expires January 1, 1889. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Charles C. Cole, Engineer at Pumping Station.. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners 
herewith present their thirteenth animal report, together 
with the report of the superintendent to this hoard, for 
the year ending December 31, 1884. 

The total income of the water-works for this period 
has heen seventy-five thousand live hundred eighty dollars 
and eight cents ($75,580.08) ; the ordinary current ex- 
pense of operating and maintaining the works has heen 
ten thousand eight hundred seventy-eight dollars and 
thirty-seven cents ($10,878.37), leaving, as net receipts, 
sixty-four thousand seven hundred one dollars and seven- 
one cents ($64,701.71). This is an excess of net receipts 
in 1884 over those of 1883 of one thousand one hundred 
eighty-two dollars and forty-three cents ($1,182.43). 

The water-works are answering the purpose for which 
they were constructed in a satisfactory manner. The 
revenue has heen constantly increasing, and to such an 
extent that the commissioners have felt warranted in re- 
ducing the rates for public tire-hydrants from sixty dollars 
($60.00) to fifty dollars ($50.00) per annum, each. Other 
reductions are in contemplation, and will be carried into 
effect as soon as it shall appear that the interests of all 
concerned will be promoted thereby. 



48 

The details of the operations of this department are so 
fully given in the accompanying report of the superin- 
tendent that it is not deemed necessary to repeat them 
here, preferring that his report to the board shall be 
considered as a part of this to the city councils. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALI'IiEUS GAY, Chairman, 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor, 

WILLIAM P. NEWELL, 

A. C. WALLACE, 

E. T. JAMES, 

E. II. HOBBS, 

JAMES A. WESTOX, Clerk, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1885. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Water Commissioners of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to present herewith 
the annual report of the Superintendent for the year 
ending December 31, 1884. 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water in the lake was higher in the spring than 
usual, it being thirty-four and one-half inches above the 
dam in the month of March. 

This fall the water has been low, nearly at the same 
height as it was when the channel was cut down. At 
that time, Xovember 27, 1880, it measured twenty-live 
inches below the dam. The present season at the same 
date, twenty-three inches. December 31, 1880, the water 
was twenty-seven and one-half inches below the dam, 
December 31, 1884, twenty and one-half inches below, 
making seven inches more water now than at that time. 

The suit brought by the town of Auburn in December, 
1882, against the city of Manchester for alleged damage 
to the highway at Severance's beach by high water, has 
been amicably adjusted. 

No repairs have been required on the dam, canal, pen- 
stock or reservoir during the year. 

PUMPING STATION. 

The repairs at the pumping station amount to about 
$300. The shafting on one side was taken out and 



50 



repaired by Hutchinson Brothers and replaced. Both of 
the water-wheels were stopped in October by eels filling 
up the buckets. Xew step for one wheel and new teeth 
for the bevel gear were bought, but not put in. It was 
thought best to have them on hand as the ones now in use 
show signs of wearing. Such other repairs were made 
to the buildings and machinery as were deemed necessary 
to keep the property in first-class condition, and a new 
stove was placed in the wheel-pit. Both wheels have 
been required to run the pumps for the last three months, 
on account of the low stage of water. 



MONTHS. 



No. houi 


s' work 


for both 


pumpB. 


676 h. 




557 " 


50 m. 


617 " 


20 " 


599" 


50 " 


640" 


40 " 


707 " 


20 " 


783" 


30 " 


729" 


20 " 


719 " 


30 " 


653" 




595" 


10 " 


701" 


50 " 



Average 

stroke per 

minute. 



Total No. Total No. gallons 
strokes j pumped in one 
per month; month. 



Daily aver- 
age gallons 
pumped. 



January . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May . . . 

June 

July 

August — 
September 
October. . 
November 
December 



Totals and average 



7,981 b. 20 m. 



16.34 
16.00 
16.70 
15.55 
15.93 
16.23 
15.91 
15.32 
14.82 
15.03 
15.46 
14.91 

15.60 



662 732 
535,506 
581,364 
558,032 
614,930 
688,814 
748,074 
670,538 
638,932 
588,908 
561,140 
627,884 



7,476,844 



41.752,116 
33,736,878 
36,625,302 
35,156,016 
38,740,590 
43,395,282 
47,128,562 
42,243,894 
40,252,716 
37,101,204 
35,357,820 
39,556,692 



471,041,072 



1,346,843 
1,205,004 
1,181,461 
1,171,867 
1,249,696 
1,446,509 
1,520,276 
1,362,706 
1,341,757 
1,196,813 
1,178,394 
1,276,022 



1,284,265 



It will be seen by the foregoing that the amount of 
water pumped in 1884 is more than the average for the 
four years previous. The increase is in the months of 
May, June, and July, and in these months 19,000,000 
gallons more water were pumped than in 1883 in the 



51 

same months. It is evident that this extra amount was 
nearly all pumped for the Amoskeag Company. They 
were repairing their reservoir at this time, and getting 
their supply by pumping directly into their pipes ; but on 
Sundays, when the canal was drawn oft', and at other 
times when repairs were necessary, the}* were supplied 
by the city. 

FORCE AND SUPPLY MAIN. 

There have been more leaks in the force and supply 
main than last season, but not bad ones. When the new 
supply main in Valley street is fully completed and con- 
nected with the present one near the Mammoth road, the 
danger of any serious trouble by a bad break will have 
ended, as well as the inconvenience to the water-takers 
living on higher land than the Amoskeag Company's 
reservoir, for the reason that our supply is from the last 
named source whenever it becomes necessary to shut off 
the main pipe in order to make repairs. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

The water pipe extended in the year 1884 was laid in 
the following streets: . Auburn, Adams, Ashland, Baker, 
Beech, Bay, Bath, Calef road, Clarke, East High, Elm, 
Gore, Monroe, Marion, McGregor, Mast road, Orange, 
Pennacook, Parker, Putnam, north River road, Shasta, 
Union, and Valley streets, making twenty-tour different 
streets. The amount laid was 19,639 feet, a little over 
three and two-third miles, at an expense of §24,500. 
Ledge was encountered on Mast road and Union street, 
and a small amount on the Calef road. The pipe laid on 
Valley street is the beginning of another supply main, 
and it is the intention to continue it another year as far 
as the Hallsville school-house on Massabesic street. It is 



52 

now laid from Elm street to within three hundred feet of 
Taylor street. It is twelve-inch pipe from Elm to Beech 
street, fourteen-inch from Beech to Wilson street, and 
the remainder is twenty-inch, which will be the size to 
be continued. The distance laid to date from Elm street 
is 6,415 feet, and the amount laid the past year is 5,912 
feet, at an expense of $10,000. 

We have had about the same number of leaks during 
the year as usual, and five bursts where cement pipe was 
taken out and repaired with cast-iron. The principal 
damage done was on Cedar street, where the water filled 
up three cellars, and in one a small portion of the cellar 
wall fell in. The damage was settled for soon after to 
the satisfaction of the tenants and the owners of the 
property. 

The pipe in the river holds good. The rubbling done 
on the east bank prevented the washing of the sand from 
under the pipe, and more rubble was put on last spring. 

The following places are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken out and cast-iron laid instead : — 

Cedar, 8 feet of 6 inches, near No. 174. 
Center, 8 feet of 6 inches, opposite Eanno's shop. 
Hanover, 8 feet of 6 inches, opposite post-office. 
Manchester, 8 feet of 6 inches, opposite No. 140. 
Manchester, 8 feet of 6 inches, opposite No. 15. 
Winter, 8 feet of 6 inches. 



53 



PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID IN 1881. 



Streets. 


Length in feet laid. 


Gates Set. 


1 

i 

j§ ; Location. 

a 
3 


20ie 


14ir 


l'.'ii 


lOir 


8iu.6in.4in 


14ii 


12ir 


lOii 


8 in 


.6 in 


4 in. 














31£ 












1 


1 












692 










1 
















262 
102 
1598 
102 










































ward. 
























2 




































316 










1 








1 . 
2 


i ward . 










2056 


8 
645 


1S00 






























2 


tery. 






750 


















j road. 












296 

36 

10 

1367 

375 

8 

144 

1083 

1215 












1 
1 






High, East 












































ward. 

1 McGregor, west- 
ward. 

1 To J. N. Pres- 
























1 


























cott's house. 
1 To J. P. Brock's 


























house. 
1 Hydrant branch 












































2 North to- J. O. 
























1 




Clark's. 














500 










west end of St. 
East to Dudley 
block. 














20 
56 

600 
409 
27 

3679 


























y 










1 




. Main, westward. 


















































Beech. 


Valley ... 


1330 
1330 


1923 

2673 


1593 
909 






2300 


1 
1 


1 

2 






2 
12 


3 2! 


northward. 




692 5 


2056 


1 




i 



Number miles of pipe laid in 1884, 3.72. 



54 



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58 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1884. 

Auburn, corner Franklin. 

Adams, corner Main. 

Baker, corner Calef road. 

Baker, corner Nutt road. 

Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 

Clarke, corner Elm. 

Gore, corner Beech. 

High, corner Ashland. 

Marion, corner McGregor. 

Mast road, near J. U. Prescott's. 

Mast road, near J. P. Brock's. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

Orange, corner Ash. 

Orange, corner Maple. 

Orange, corner Oak. 

Orange, corner Russell. 

Putnam, corner Main. 

River road, near J. 0. Clark's. 

River road, near Mrs. John Kelley's. 

Shasta, corner Beech. 

Valley, corner Beech. 

Valley, corner Wilson. 

Valley, corner Belmont. 

HYDRANTS TAKEN OUT. 

Concord, corner Nashua. 

Depot, near Head & Dowst's stable. 



59 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DATE. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 




20,627.90 


1,741.0 


5 




6,825.00 


7,598.0 


11 




8,118.00 


10,142.0 


19 


10 inch diameter 


5,023.75 


9,740.0 


14 




12,563.00 


8,022.0 


32 




82,347.00 


44,092.5 


213 




8,592.00 


4,484.0 


22 




144,096.65 


85,819.5 


316 



27.291 miles cement-lined pipe. 
16.254 " east-iron pipe. 



43.545 miles cast-iron and cement-lined pipe. 

316 gates. 
371 hydrants. 
7 air-valves. 

METERS. 

There have been set, during the year, forty-five (45) me- 
ters, making in all four hundred forty-six (446). 

The number ot applications for water to date have been 
twenty-six hundred and twenty-five (2,625). 

SERVICE PIPES. 

One hundred and eighty-two (182) service pipes have 
been laid this year, as follows : — 

180 1 inch diameter 4,383.7 feet 

2 2" " 16.5 " 



Length of service pipe laid, 1884 . . 4,400.2 feet 

Twenty-four hundred and seventy-six (2,476) service 
pipes have been laid to date, as follows : — 



60 



40 1 


inch 


diameter 


1,785 f 


a 


44 


592 1 


u 


44 


20 11 


44 


44 


2 11 


44 


44 


31 2 


44 


44 


6 4 


44 


44 



860.7 feet 

46,946.7 

15,730.0 

1,188.9 

73.0 

795.2 

172.0 



Total length of service pipe .. . 65,766.5 feet 
Number of miles of service pipe . . 12.46. 

The income from the sale of water for 1884 has been as 
follows : — 

Received for water by rate . 

44 44 44 me ter 

". " rent of meters . 

" " tines . 

" tw setting meters . 

" " building purposes 

" " labor and pipe sold 

" " stone 

" " hay on Xeal meadow 

" of G. G. Griffin 

Total .... 

Abatements, $188.60. 

Current expenses for 1884 
Construction expenses for 1884 
Retained bv the city 



$53,074 07 

20,017 80 

1,311 95 

231 96 

117 00 

195 10 

616 20 

5 00 

10 00 

1 00 



$75,580 08 



$10,878 37 
25,882 36 
38,000 00 



.Total expended . 

Receipts over expenditures 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1883 



874,760 73 

$819 35 
26,338 08 



$27,157 43 



61 



CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1884. 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs . . . , . . $8,052 07 

Stationery and printing . . 196 16 

Office and incidental expenses . 571 61 



Pumping expenses 
Repairs to buildings 



$2,054 18 
4 35 



$8,819 84 
$2,058 53 



Running expenses for 1884 


. $10,878 37 


Service pipes . 


$2,270 39 


Distribution pipes 


21J13 34 


Fire-hydrants and valves 


1,464 07 


Meters and fittings 


1,034 56 


Expended on construction, 




1884 . 


. $25,882 36 



Total expended in 1884 

Land and water rights . 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 

Pumping machinery, pump-house 

and buildings. 
Distributing reservoir and fixtures 
Force and supply main 
Distribution pipes . 
Fire-hydrants and valves 
Tools and fixtures 
Boarding and store houses 
Roads and culverts 
Supplies 

Engineering . . , 
Livery and traveling expenses 



$36,760 73 



,643 93 
101,399 16 

88,493 96 

71,542 36 

88,674 02 

298,447 47 

34,862 41 

10,649 35 

919 36 

2,193 49 

550 39 

22,176 19 

2,856 64 



62 



Legal expenses .... $563 79 

Grading and fencing . . . 12,343 50 

Service pipes .... 37,261 03 

Meters and fixtures . . . 13,412 24 



Total construction account 

to Dec. 31, 1884 .... $824,989 29 

Current expenses : — 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs ..... $73,350 01 
Stationery, printing, etc. . . " 4,416 38 
Office and incidental expenses . 5,074 87 
Pumping expenses and repairs . 17,004 27 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 

reservoir .... 1,770 75 

Repairs to buildings . . . 317 71 

Current expenses to Dec. 

31, 1884 $101,933 99 

Interest $40,678 51 

Highway expenditures . . . 14,000 53 

$54,679 04 



Total amount of bills ap- 
proved to date .... $981,602 32 

Interest, discount and labor per 
formed on highway, trans., 
and tools and materials sold . $59,943 54 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1884 101,933 99 

$161,877 53 



Total cost, not including in- 
terest and current expenses . $819,724 79 



63 



Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1883 .... $382,069 51 
Interest for 1884 .... 35,808 00 



Total interest and discount 

to Dec. 31,1884 . . . $417,877 51 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31, 1883 . . . $229,000 00 
Amount used by city in 1884 . 38,000 00 



$573 


61 


177 


07 


193 


26 


140 


00 


1,920 


53 



$267,000 00 

The following amounts have heen paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works : — 
1872,supplies and mate- 
rials sold 
1873,supplies and mate- 
rials sold 
accrued interest on 
water bonds sold . 
accrued interest on 

state bonds sold 
water rents 
1874, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 607 89 
March 12, 1874, highway expendi- 
tures, trans, from 
water account . 14,000 53 
March 17, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account . 12,347 25 
Sept. 1, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account . 22,361 74 
1874,water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 30,233 54 



64 



Dec. 29, 1874, interest trans- 
ferred . . . $4,566 25 
Dec. 18, 1875, 1 anvil sold . 15 00 

Sept. 25, 1875, engine, crusher, 

and material sold . 2,089 45 
18 75, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 27,119 15 
May 20, 1876, derrick sold . 125 00 
May 20, 1876, rent of derrick . . 24 00 
1876,water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 38,879 47 
1877,water and hydrant 

rent, etc . . 43,823 30 
1878,water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 48,873 26 
old plow sold . . 1 00 

1879, derrick sold . 75 00 

water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 53,068 17 
1880,water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 57,395 25 
sale of grass . . 10 00 

'level, transit, etc. . 250 00 
1881, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 60,164 62 
sale of grass . . 10 00 

sale of derrick . . 50 00 

received of G. G. 

Griffin ... 1 00 

1882,water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 67,403 76 
received of G. G. 

Griffin ... 1 00 



65 



1882, received of James 
Baldwin & Co. 

received from the sale 
of grass 

received from Good- 
hue & Birnie 

received for old plank 

received for use of 
derrick . 

1883, received of G. G. 
Griffin . 

received from sale of 

grass 
water and hydrant 

rent, etc. 

1884, received of G. G. 
Griffin . 

received for stone 
received from sale of 

grass 
received from pipe 

sold and labor 
received for water 

and hydrant rent . 74,947 88 



$175 


00 


10 


00 


24 


37 


1 


00 


15 


00 


1 


00 


20 


00 


73,437 


20 


1 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


616 


20 



Total received for water, etc. . $635,759 75 

Amount appropriated to date . . 640,000 00 

Total received to date . . $1,275,759 75 

Amount of hills approved to date . 981,602 32 

$294,157 43 



66 

Amount transferred toward inter- 
est, etc $267,000 00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1884 . $27,157 43 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES K WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



67 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


2 Cemeteries. 


12 Churches. 
1 Court-house. 


1 Orphanage. 
1 Post-office. 


4 Hose-companies. 
4 Fire-engines. 


1 City Library. 
5 Banks. 


1 Hook-arid-ladder. 


4 Hotels. 


2 Opera-houses. 


1 Masonic Hall. 


1 Music Hall. 


1 Odd Fellows' Hall. 


1 Convent. 


1 Holly-Tree Inn. 


1 City Hospital. 

1 Old Ladies' Home. 


3 Halls. 
22 School-houses. 


1 Soldiers' Monument. 


1 Battery Building. 


1 Turner Hall. 


1 Skating Rink. 


MANUFACTURING 


ESTALISHMENTS. 


1 Silver-plating. 

1 Iron foundry. 

2 Dye-houses. 

2 Machine-shops. 

6 Clothing manufactories. 


2 Sash and blind shops, 

1 Brewery. 

2 Shoe-shops. 
1 Pop-corn. 

1 Gas-works. 


4 Harness-shops. 
1 Brush-shop. 

3 Carriage-shops. 

4 Cigar. 

1 Brass and copper foundry 
1 Locomotive-works. 


4 Slaughter-houses. 
1 Soap manufactory. 
1 Needle manufactory. 
1 Beer-bottling. 
, 1 Book-bindery. 


MARKETS. 


4 Fish. 

9 Meat and fish. 


2 Meat (wholesale). 



466 Private. 

1 Horse-railroad. 



6 Dentists. 
1 Telephone. 

1 Telegraph. 

2 Express. 



22 Barber. 
1 Wheelwright. 
7 Blacksmith. 
5 Carpenter. 
1 Tinsmith. 



68 

STABLES. 

14 Livery. 



OFFICES. 



7 Printing. 

1 (las. 
3 Coal. 



SHOPS. 



2 Currying. 

4 Plumber and gas and 

water pipe. 
8 Paint. 
1 Gunsmith. 



STOKES. 



4 Auction. 
20 Drug. 
9 Jewelrv. 
1 Fur. 



71 Grocery. 

5 Meal. 

3 Hardware. 

18 Boot and shoe. 



2 House-furnishing goods. 8 Stove. 



21 Fancy goods. 

1 Wholesale paper. 

5 Wholesale produce. 
15 Dry goods. 
12 Candy. 

1 Cloak. 

15 Millinery. 

2 Tea. 

2 Furniture. 



15 Gents' furnishing goods. 
10 Book. 

1 Leather and shoe-finders. 

3 Music. 

3 Upholstery. 

5 Undertakers. 

5 Sewing-machine. 

1 Feather-cleaner. 



69 



9 Dining. 
6 Billiard. 

4 Club-rooms. 
2 Bleacheries. 

8 Laundries. 
2 Ice-houses. 

9 Photographers. 



SALOONS. 

65 Liquor, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



3 Greenhouses. 
1 Band-room. 
12 Bakeries. 
1 Waste. 



6298 Families. 

96 Boarding-houses 

7236 Faucets. 

982 Wash-bowls. 

1133 Water-closets. 

287 Wash-tubs. 

348 Bath-tubs. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

114 Urinals. 
1350 Sill-cocks. 
371 Fire-hydrants. 
24 Stand-pipes. 
16 Water-troughs. 
1186 Horses. 
52 Cattle. 



70 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 



2 double 6 on 20. 
5 double 6 on 12. 
2 double 6 on 8. 
8 double 6 on 10. 
2 double 4 on 6. 
4 single 6 on 12. 
2 single 6 on 14. 



1 14 in. x 12 in. 

2 12 in. x 6 in. 



BRANCHES. 

2 single 6 on (3. 
2 single 10 on 10. 

4 single 6 on 20. 

5 single 6 on 10. 
2 single 8 on 8. 

1 single 12 on 14. 
4 single 6 on 4. 

REDUCERS. 

1 6 in. x 4 in. 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 



5 20 in. 




6 14 in. 


1 12 in. 




1 10 in. 


14 6 in. 




4 4 in. 




CLAMP 


SLEEVES. 


2 20 in. 




7 14 in 


4 12 in. 




3 10 in 


8 8 in. 




6 6 in. 


.3 4 in. 








BENDS. 



1 6 in. 1-4 bend. 
4 6 in. 1-16 bend. 
1 12 in. 1-8 bend. 



4 6 in. 1-8 bend. 
1 14 in. 1-8 bend. 



192 ft. 20 in. pipe. 
204 ft. 12 in. pipe. 



PIPE. 



348 ft. 14 in. pipe. 
160 ft. 10 in. pipe. 



71 



120 ft. 8 in. pipe. 

768 ft. 4 in. pipe. 
1834 ft. 1 in. pipe. 
4200 lbs. lead. 



1 20 in. Boston machine. 
4 4 in. Ludlow hub. 
3 12 in. cast-iron x>lugs. 



372 ft. 6 in. pipe. 
278 ft. 2 in. pipe. 
893 ft. 3-4 in. pipe. 
'500 lbs. lead pipe. 



GATES. 



2 6 in. Ludlow spigot. 

3 6 in. Boston machine hub 
7 cast-iron gate domes. 



INVENTORY OF TOOLS 


AT THE PUMPING STATION. 


1 scoop-shovel. 


2 


axes. 


4 common shovels. 


4 


oil-cans. 


1 desk. 


2 


oil-tanks. 


1 one-inch auger. 


100 


pounds waste. 


5 lanterns. 


10 


pounds black lead. 


3 monkey-wrenches. 


1 


cord wood. 


1 square. 


14 


tons coal. 


1 plumb square. 


2 


ice-chisels. 


1 sprinkler-pot. 


2 


cold chisels. 


1 clock. 


2 


wood-chisels. 


1 washer-cutter. 


2 


han liners. 


2 planes. 


3 


drip-pans. 


1 thermometer. 


1 


two-inch auger. 


1' lawn-mower. 


1 


ten-inch arbor for babbit- 


1 socket-wrench. 




ing. 


6 fork wrenches. 


1 


flash-board hook. 


2 screen-rakes. 


1 


broom. 


4 crow-liars. 


2 


sets blocks and falls. 


1 bellows and anvil. 


6 


pounds hemp packings. 


2 pipe-wrenches. 


1 


draw shave. 


1 window-brush, 


2 


screw plates, taps and 


1 gate-wrench. 




dies. 


1 Ions; key. 


1 


vise. 



72 



1 hydrant wrench. 


200 


feet 7-8 inch hose. 


1 wheelbarrow. 


2 


set dog-chains. 


1 five-pail kettle. 


1 


set blacksmith's tools. 


3 picks. 


1 


bushel basket. 


1 clothes-dryer. 


2 


pieces Scotch sewer-pipe. 


2 ladders. 


1 


force pump. 


2 stoves. 


1 


bill-hook. 


3 coal -hods. 


1 


clevis and pin. 


1 coal-sifter. 


1 


harrow. 


2 gallons sperm oil. 


1 


timber-roll. 


1 bench. 


4 


sprinkling-pots. 


2 levels. 


1 


lot lumber. 


1 waste-press. 


1 


lot old iron. 


1 Scotch driller. 


5 


oil barrels. 


2 nozzles. 


4 


mortar hoes. 


1 pair shears. 


1 


iron shovel. 


1 pair pliers. 


150 


feet hose. 


1 wire-cutter. 


1 


No. 5 plow. 


1 boat. 


3 


grub-hoes. 


1 set steps. 


3 


bush-scythes and snaths. 


1 1-4 barrels oil. 


2 


axes. 


1 jack-screw. 


1 


bellows, on the island at 


1 brace and six bits. 




dam. 


1 trowel. 


10 


mason-hods. 


2 wood-saws. 


1 


lot of old wheelbarrows. 


2 hand-saws. 


1 


lot of old shovels. 


1 iron slnsh-bncket. 


1 


20-inch gate. 


2 sets of gate screws ( 


brass), with mats and cases for the 



same. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith respectfully 
present their thirty -first annual report of the affairs of the 
library, together with the report made to them by the 
treasurer of the board, showing the expenditures made by 
him in behalf of the board from the funds placed under 
their control, and the report of the librarian, which sets 
forth in detail the statistics and operations of the library 
and other property under her charge at the close of the 
year. 

By an examination of the report of the treasurer it will 
be seen that there has been expended during the year, for 
the purchase of books, the sum of one thousand and 
seventy-one dollars and sixty -three cents, and for the 
purchase of periodicals the sum of one-hundred and eighty- 
six dollars and sixteen cents, making a total expenditure 
for these purposes of twelve hundred and lifty-seven 
dollars and seventy-nine cents. Of the amount expended 
for the purchase of books, the sum of three hundred and 
one dollars and ten cents was taken from the income of the 
Dean fund and used for the purchase of additional books 
for that department of the library. 



74 

The balance in the hands of the treasurer at the close 
of the year of the amount appropriated by the city 
councils for the purchase of books was five hundred and 
twenty-nine dollars and fifty-five cents. The balance ot 
the income ot the Dean fund, with the accumulated inter- 
est thereon, amounted to four thousand and eighty-one 
dollars and sixty-seven cents. This sum, together with 
the balance above indicated, constitutes the funds in the 
hands of the trustees, available at the close of the year for 
the future increase of the library. 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the 
library for the past year have been twenty-five hundred 
dollars and seventy-seven cents. The details of these 
expenditures — the bills for which have been paid by the 
city treasurer on the approval ot the trustees — will be 
found in the annual report of the city. The item for fuel 
is apparently large, but in reality is the amount expended 
for two years* supply, which was purchased and placed in 
the library building by a committee of the city councils, 
the bills for the same having been presented to the trustees 
and paid in the months of January and December of the 
past year. 

From the report of the librarian it appears that the 
library has been open for the delivery of books three 
hundred and six days, during which period the number of 
books delivered for home use was fifty thousand nine 
hundred and fourteen. In addition to this number deliv- 
ered for general circulation, five thousand eight hundred 
and forty-eight books and magazines have been delivered 
tor use in the reading-room at the library, making the 
total number delivered during the year fifty-six thousand 
seven hundred and sixty-two, an average of one hun- 
dred and eighty-five per day. As compared with the 
circulation of the previous year, which was the largest 
since the establishment of the library, the circulation 



75 

for home use appears to Lave decreased a little over 
three thousand, while the number of hooks and magazines 
delivered for use at the reading-room shows an increase 
of fourteen hundred and sixty-eight. This decrease in the 
circulation of hooks for home use, which was principally 
in the last six months of the year, the librarian thinks may 
have been occasioned by the interest taken by the people 
in the recent presidential election. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the 
last report was twenty-six thousand nine hundred and 
thirty-five. During the year there have heen added, hf 
purchase five hundred and fifty-four volumes, by donation 
two hundred and eighty-seven volumes, and ninety-one 
periodicals have heen bound, making the number of 
hound volumes in the library at the present time twenty- 
five thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven, and the total 
number, including maps and pamphlets, twenty-seven 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven. 

Sixty-seven different periodicals have heen regularly 
received at the library, and as the volumes have heen 
completed they have heen hound and placed upon the 
shelves for general circulation. The number of hooks 
worn out and withdrawn from circulation the past year 
was sixty-five. Of this number, and of those retired from 
circulation in former years for like reason, eighty-six have 
heen replaced. Others will he replaced as soon as it is 
possible for the trustees to secure them. 

Following the report of the librarian will he found a 
list of the hooks presented to the library during the year, 
together with the names of the persons presenting them. 
Among those who have made contributions to the library 
during the past year the trustees are under special obliga- 
tion to James L. Campbell, Esq., of Lowell, Mass., hut 
formerly a resident of this city, who not only generously 
presented to the <-ity library six complete volumes of the 



76 

tk Union Democrat " for the years 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, 
1855 and 1862, but also placed at the disposal of the 
trustees all the files of that paper in his possession, for the 
purpose of supplying any missing numbers in the files of 
the library. The trustees accepted the liberal offer of 
Mr. Campbell, and the library is now in possession of a 
complete tile of the " Union Democrat " from the com- 
mencement of its publication, which will prove of great 
value, not only for reference, but also as a record of events 
that have occurred in the city and state for the past thirty- 
three years. To all who have so generously aided in the 
increase and usefulness of the library, the trustees return 
the thanks of the city. 

In furtherance of the plan outlined in previous reports 
the trustees have continued the purchase of books from 
the accumulation of the Dean fund. During the year 
ninety-nine volumes of valuable mechanical and scientific 
works have been purchased at a cost of three hundred and 
one dollars and ten cents, and placed in the alcoves 
designated as the " Dean Fund Purchase.'' The trustees 
feel that they cannot too often direct the attention of the 
public to the special works on mechanical and scientific 
subjects contained in this department of the library, that 
the citizens may avail themselves of the opportunities 
there presented for practical knowledge and research. 

At a meeting of the trustees held in the early part of 
the year the following resolution was passed : — 

Resolved, That the treasurer be authorized to solicit, for the pur- 
pose of preservation at the library rooms, contributions of portraits of 
persons who were prominent in establishing and managing the old 
athenaeum, or who were benefactors of that organization; also por- 
traits of persons who have been identified with the city library as 
organizers, managers, or benefactors, and also portraits of prominent 
residents of the city. 

In pursuance of this authority the treasurer of the board 
has consulted with the families of a number of deceased 



77 

residents, and the encouragement received warrants the 
trustees in stating that the portraits of several deceased 
citizens who have been connected with the management 
of the library will be placed in the library rooms. 

The trustees feel -the necessity of again calling the 
attention of the city councils to the urgent need of the 
library for a catalogue of recent additions. The last 
catalogue, which was published in the early part of 1878, 
contained the titles of books which had been added to the 
library to December 31, 1877. Since the publication of 
this catalogue more than six thousand volumes have been 
added to the library. The public sutier much annoyance 
and loss of time from the lack of information which could 
be obtained from a proper catalogue. Xo library can 
exert its best influence, or fully accomplish its design, 
unless the public has the means of knowing what books 
are contained in its rooms. It is idle for the trustees to 
purchase books from year to year and place them upon 
the shelves of the library, expecting the public to read 
them, unless proper facilities are also supplied, from which 
a knowledge <>f such accessions can be obtamed. We do 
not think that, if an appropriation were made for this 
purpose at the present time, the catalogue could be com- 
piled and printed in less time than a year. 

The annual appropriation made by the city councils 
for the library has been barely sufficient to meet the 
incidental expenses, and without a special appropriation 
the trustees cannot arrange for the compilation and print- 
ing of such a catalogue as would meet the needs of the 
library. The trustees earnestly commend to the early 
consideration of the members of the city councils whether 
the influence and usefulness of an institution of so much 
importance to the tax-payers as the library, which interests 
and instructs every class and age in the community, ought 
not to be encouraged by a proper regard for its require- 



78 

ments, rather than abridged by an illiberal policy on the 
part of the city councils. We would respectfully suggest 
that, if in the opinion of the members of the city councils 
the conditions of the finances of the city would not war- 
rant an appropriation sufficient to cover the entire expense 
bf compilation and printing of such a catalogue as would 
be desirable of the books added to the library since 
December 31, 1877, an appropriation might be made the 
present year to meet the cost of compilation, and the 
cost of panting might be provided for by an appropriation 
next year. 

The trustees are not aware that any circumstance has 
occurred during the past year to disturb the harmonious 
operation of the library. The librarian, Mrs. M. J. 
Buncher, has fulfilled the duties of her position with the 
same fidelity as heretofore, and to the satisfaction of 
the board. 

Owing to the increased expense in heating and lighting 
the library, occasioned by the recent addition to the library 
building, and the additional compensation paid to the 
librarian and her assistant, the trustees are under the 
necessity of asking for a small increase of the usual 
appropriation to meet the incidental expenses of the 
library. 

The trustees desire to return their acknowledgments 
to the members of the city councils and other officers of 
the city with whom they have been brought in contact in 
the management of the affairs of the library, for their 
courtesy in all matters relating to its operation. 

January 17, 1884. 

In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered 
to be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and 
transmitted to the city councils. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS, Mayor. 

K P. HUNT, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : — 

The Treasurer of the Board makes the following report 
of the receipts and expenditures by the hoard of the 
funds received on account of the city library : — 

1884. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation . . $401 74 
March 3. Mrs. M. J. Buncher, balance of 

fines ' 55 07 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, for cata- 
logues sold . 
July 18. appropriation for 1884 for books 

Jan. 1. . balance of income of 
Dean fund . . ! 
income of Dean fund 
July 1. income of Dean fund 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income 75 85 
interest on accumu- 
lation of income 85 74 



. 


29 43 


>r books 


1,000 00 


,915 18 




153 00 




153 00 





$4,382 77 

$5,869 01 

1884. Cr. 

Jan. 5. Paid K E. News Co., periodicals . $11 96 
5. Little, Brown, & Co., books . 20 00 



Jan. 


23. 


Feb. 


5. 




5. 




8. 




12. 




16. 




20. 




27. 


Marc 


h 3, 




4. 




7. 




11. 




15. 


April 


4. 




29. 


May 


5. 


June 


2. 




5. 




13. 




18. 




24. 


July 


5. 




14. 


Aug. 


5. 




9. 


Sept. 


1. 




10. 




10. 




10. 


Oct, 


4. 



80 



Taid Geo. H. Polley & Co., period- 
icals . 

N. E. News Co., periodicals . 

Little, Brown, & Co., books . 

Soule & Bugbee, periodicals . 

Little, Brown, & Co., books . 

W. II. Stevenson, periodicals 

Temple & Farrington, books 

Boston Society Natural His- 
tory, periodicals 

Mrs. M. J. Buncber, books . 

N. E. News Co., periodicals . 

Lockwood, Brooks, & Co., 
books .... 

Little, Brown, & Co., books 

Lockwood, Brooks, & Co., 
books .... 

N. E. News Co., periodicals . 

Little, 6rown, & Co., books . 

N. E. News Co., periodicals . 

C. E.Bradley, books . 

X. E. News Co., periodicals 

J. E. Miller, books, 

Geo. W. Tyron, Jr., books . 

Little, Brown, & Co., books. 

N. E. Xews Co., periodicals . 

Charles Scribner's Sons,books 

N. E. Xews Co., periodicals . 

Estes <S: Lauriat, books 

Estes & Lauriat, books 

X. E. Xews Co., periodicals . 

Temple & Farrington, books 

Temple & Farrington, books 

N. E. Xews Co., periodicals 



$12 


00 


12 


32 


20 


00 


5 


00 


3 


75 


5 


08 


2 


25 


7 


00 


o 




50 


10 


66 


26 


52 


30 


00 


80 


52 


20 


72 


4 


25 


11 


18 


4 


25 


15 


35 


4 


75 


5 


00 


3 


50 


11 


30 


6 


00 


11 


^ 


83 


9* 


8 


00 


14 


08 


10 


00 


16 


50 


9 


78 



81 

Oct. 8. Paid Estes & Lauriat, books . $60 50 

24. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co., 

books .... 

Nov. 4. N. E. News Co., periodicals . 

6. Thos. N. Dountney, books 

29. Cleaves, Macdonald, & Co., 

books .... 

Dec. 1. Cleaves, MacDonald, & Co., 

books .... 

1. Cleaves, MacDonald, & Co., 

books .... 

3. N. E. News Co., periodicals . 

3. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co., 

books .... 

3. Little, Brown, & Co., for Dean 

Fund Purchase, books 
3. Little, Brown, & Co., for Dean 

Fund Purchase, books 

12. Lockwood, Brooks, & Co., 

books .... 

13. Cleaves, MacDonald, & Co., 

books .... 

13. Cleaves, MacDonald, & Co., 

books .... 

15. Little, Brown, & Co., books . 

16. Little, Brown, & Co., books . 
31. By balance of appropriation, etc., 
31. balance of income of Dean fund 4,081 67 

$5,869 01 



32 


80 


11 


37 


2 


00 


166 


30 


30 


80 


37 


90 


16 


80 


2 


34 


291 


61 


9 


49 


21 


18 


62 


70 


15 


61 


1 


88 


3 


75 


529 


55 


4,081 


67 



82 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library 
for the year ending December 31, 1884, the items of 
which will be found at length in the annual report of the 
city, are as follows : — 

Services of librarian . . . $800 00 

Services of assistant to librarian 

Gas 

Binding . 

Re-binding 

Insurance 

Fuel 

Water . 

Printing . 

Newspapers . 

Incidentals 

$2,500 77 

RECAPITULATION. 



294 


50 


297 


96 


97 


33 


151 


76 


100 


00 


500 


44 


31 


50 


46 


25 


76 


50 


104 


53 



Balance Dec. 31, 1883 . 
Appropriation for 1884 . 



Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000 00 
Incidental expenses . . . 2,500 77 
Balance Dec. 31, 1884 ... 89 84 



$590 61 
3,000 00 

;3,590 61 



53,590 61 



Respectfully submitted. 

N. P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 



83 

December 31, 1884. 
We have examined the above report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

L. B. CLOUGH, 
H. B. PUTNAM, 

Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 31, 1884. 
I certity that I have examined the several items of re- 
ceipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing report 
of the treasurer of the city library, and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

JS T . P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : — 

I respectfully submit the annual report of the City 
Library, showing the work of the year ending December 
31, 1884. 

Whole number of volumes, Dec. 31, 1883 . 26,935 

Accessions during the year : — 

By purchase .... 554 

Donated .... 287 

Periodicals bound ... 91 

932 



Whole number of volumes 

Maps 

Pamphlets 
Bound volumes 


at 


Pi 


•esent : 


16 

1,884 
25,967 



Number of periodicals and papers regularly 
received ...... 

Number of days open to the public 

Days open for delivery of books 

Number of volumes in circulation during the 
jear 

Average per day . - . 

Largest number in any one day, March 1 

Largest number in any one month, March 



27,867 

67 
306 
306 

50,914 

166.3 

445 

5,529 



86 



Number of books, magazines, etc., used in the 
library ...... 

Average per day ..... 

Number of guarantees received during the year 

Whole number since new registration 

Number of cards used on deposit . 

Number of cards held for fines 

Postals sent for books overdue 

Number of books taken from the shelves unfit 

for use, including bound magazines 
Books replaced during the year 
Number lost or injured and paid for 

Not paid for 

Number of volumes repaired at bindery 
Repaired and covered in the library 
Books missing last year returned . 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1883 . 
Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1884 



Amount paid for express, station- 
ery, and other incidental ex- 
penses . 

Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . 



$48 65 
55 07 



5,848 

19.1 

613 

4,847 

12 

8 

449 

65 

86 

5 

1 

491 

3,654 

2 

$55 07 
90 56 



$145 63 



$103 72 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1884 $41 91 



Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1883, for 
catalogues and supplements sold, and for 
lost or injured books and waste paper 



$29 43 



87 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1884: 

For 4 new catalogues at 75 cents . $3 00 

For 1 old catalogue at 35 cents . 35 

For 32 supplements at 10 cents . 3 20 

Six books, lost or injured . . . 5 25 



$11 80 



$41 


23 


29 


43 


$11 so 


41 


91 



Paid X. P. Hunt, treasurer . 

Balance received for tines 

Total balance on hand . . . $53 71 

The work of the last year has been so uniform with the 
preceding one, little can be said additional. No special 
work has been done beyond the usual duties belonging to 
a library of steady growth, bringing from year to year 
increasing responsibilities, as well as increasing interest 
and desire to accomplish as far as possible the best results. 

The accession of purchased books is somewhat larger 
than the last year, and the selections from time to time 
have met with general approbation. Ninety-nine volumes 
of the five hundred and fifty-four purchased, were from the 
"Dean fund," and comprise many valuable books in the 
different branches of the mechanic arts. The donations 
number about the same as last year, and many of them 
are valuable accessions. Our thanks are specially due to 
the honorable gentlemen who represent our state in con- 
gress, for the many favors received through their courtesy. 

The number of periodicals and papers regularly re- 
ceived has been somewhat increased, not by purchase 



88 

(except "Harper's Young Folks"), but by donations, for 
which our sincere thanks are due. 

The number of worn-out books withdrawn from circu- 
lation is about double that of last year, and the number 
repaired at the bindery much greater. A little more care 
on the part of the borrowers of books would save a great 
deal of trouble and expense, as it is not the reading of the 
books that injures them, but the careless handling, espe- 
cially in turning down the leaves and pressing them open 
to the extent of breaking the thread of the binding, there- 
by making it necessary to send them to the bindery before 
being otherwise defaced. 

The circulation of the year shows a decrease of about 
three thousand volumes, principally in the last six months. 
The excitement incident to a presidential election may 
reasonably be supposed to show its effect in the matter of 
reading, outside the topic of general interest, and may be 
one natural cause for the decrease. 

The numbers show an increase of fifteen hundred 
books, periodicals, etc., used in the reading-room, with 
the usual proportion seeking information in the different 
branches of study. 

At the close of the July examination there were three 
missing books. One has returned ; one (being an old 
book) replaced ; the remaining one (fiction), also an old 
book. At the present examination there are six volumes 
missing, — four fictu >n, one history, one periodical. There is 
little doubt but that they will yet come in. Five volumes 
have been lost or destroyed by persons holding them, and 
paid for. One is not yet paid for. One book missing 
in 1883 has returned. 

The sale of catalogues the last year has been very light. 
Many are unwilling to pay the price for a catalogue not 



89 

containing books added the last six years, and others do 
not feel able to do so. There is a constant desire ex- 
pressed for a new catalogue, as the supplement in its 
present form is very unsatisfactory to the public. 

In closing the above report I can only add my usual 
testimony to the kind consideration of the board of trus- 
tees, and my appreciation, especially for the cheerful 
assistance given by the treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted. 

M. J. BOTCHER, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 

From January 1 to December 31, 1884. 



Hon. II. W. Blair, M. C. 

Medical and Surgical History of the War. Part 3, 
Vol. 2. 1883. 4to. 
Hon. James F. Briggs. 

Official Record of the Union and Confederate Armies. 
Vol. 10, Part 2 ; Vol. 11, Parts 1 and 2. 3 Vols. 
8vo. 
Report of the Commissioner of Education for the 

year 1881. 8vo. 
Message and Documents, 2d Session, 47th Congress, 
. 1882-83. 8vo. 
Hon. Austin F. Pike, M. C. 

Seven volumes Memorial Adresses, viz. : — 
Life and Character of James A. Garfield, William 
M. Lowe, Robert M. A. Hawk, Benjamin H. Hill, 
Evarts W. Farr, Godlon S. Orth, and Michael P. 
O'Connor. 8vo. 
Speeches of Senators Sherman and Mahone on the 
Alleged Election Outrages in Virginia and Mis- 
sissippi. Pamphlets. 
Hon. A. B. Thompson, Secretary of the State of New 
Hampshire. 

Journal of the New Hampshire Senate and House 
for the year 1883. 8vo. 



92 

Annual Reports of the State of New Hampshire for 

the year 1883. 8vo. 
Laws of the State of New Hampshire passed at the 
June Session, 1883. 8vo. 3 Vols. 
Hon. Charles Francis Adams, Jr., Boston, Mass. 

A College Fetich. An Address before the Harvard 
Chapter of the Fraternity of the Phi Beta Kappa. 
By Charles Francis Adams, Jr. June, 1883. 8vo. 
Rev. G. T. Ridlon, Manchester, 

History of the Ancient Ryedales and their Descend- 
ants in Normandy, Great Britain, Ireland, and 
America* from 860 to 1884. 8vo. 
Charles W. Temple, Manchester. 

The Decorator and Furnisher. Vols. 1 and 2. Octo- 
ber, 1882, September, 1883. Folio. 
Business Directories for the years 1876, 1877, 1878, 

1879, and 1884. 24vo. 
New Hampshire Register and Farmers' Almanac, for 
the years 1882, 1883, and 1884. 24ino. 
George L. Harrison, LL. D., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Legislation on Insanity, viz., Lunacy Laws in the 
United States, England, and other Countries. By 
George L. Harrison, LL. 1). 1884. 8vo. 
Charles E. Slocum, M. D., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Short History of the Slocums, Slocumbs, and Slo- 
combs of America. By Charles E. Slocum, M. D. 
1883. 8vo. 
Clarence M. Tolmam. 

The Epitome of '86. Lehigh LTniversity, Bethle- 
hem, Penn. 8vo. 
Albert P. Charles, Esq., Seymore, Ind. 

Memorialia of the Class of '64 in Dartmouth College. 
Compiled by John C. Webster. 1884. 8vo. 



93 

G. A. Gaskell, author. 

How to Write for the Press. 1884. 12mo. 
Charles F. Livingston, Manchester. 

The Springfield Republican for the year 1883. Folio. 
Printer's Circular for the year 1883. Vol. 18. 
Proceedings of the New Hampshire Press Associa- 
tion, 1881, 1882, and 1884. Pamphlets. 
Brown's Type Setting and Distributing Machinery 

and Art of Printing. Pamphlet. 
And other miscellaneous pamphlets. 
S. C. Gould, Manchester. 

Notes and Queries. Vol. 2. 1884. 8vo. 
Fifteen volumes miscellaneous books of early dates, 
and thirty-three pamphlets. 
Dr. R. J. P. Goodwin, Manchester. 

Circular No. 3. Surgical Cases in the United States 
Army from 1865 to 1871. 4to. 
George C. Gilmore, Esq., Manchester. 

Three copies of the Manual of the New Hampshire 
Senate from 1784 to 1885. 16mo. 
A. J. Nay, Manchester. 

Obituary Addresses on the Death of the Hon. Henry 
Clay and the Hon. William R. King. 2 Vols. 
12mo. 
J. A. Watson, Esq., Secretary. 

Annual Report of the State Board of Health of New 
Hampshire, April, 1884. 8vo. 
J. W. Fellows, Esq., Manchester. 

Biographical Sketch of the Class of 1858, Dartmouth 
College. Pamphlet. 
Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer, Manchester. 

Reports of the Fire Department for the last six years. 
Six pamphlets. 



94 

James L. Campbell, Lowell, Mass. 

Six volumes of the Union Democrat for the years 
1851, 1852, 1853, 1854, 1855, and 1862, to com- 
plete the set from its first publication. Folio. 
From the Several Publishers. 

The Universalist Quarterly, Boston, for the year 
1884. T. B. Thayer, editor. 12m<>. 

The Dartmouth. Published by the college students, 
Hanover, N. H. For the year 1884. 4to. 

The Illustrated Record, Vol. 1. Published by the 
Rev. W. A. Loyne, Manchester, X. H. 1884. 
Folio. 

La Justice. G. Tonnancour, publisher, Manchester, 
N. II. For the year 1884. Folio. 

The Weekly Budget. Kendall & Ladd, publishers, 
For the year 1883. Folio. 

Good Health. A Journal of Hygiene. For the year 
1884. Published at Oakland, Cal. 8vo. 

The Signs of the Times. Published by the Inter- 
national Tract Society, Oakland, Gal. For the 
year 1884. Folio. 
Historical Association, Lowell, Mass. 

" Contributions of the Old Residents." No. 1, Vol. 3. 
September, 1884. Pamphlet. 
Prof. Waterhouse, St. Louis, Mo. 

Resources of Missouri. By Prof. Waterhouse. 

Advantages of Educated Labor. By Prof. Water- 
house. 

Jute Culture and the Importance of the Industry. 
Three pamphlets. 
M. P. Hall, Esq., Manchester. 

Map of New Hampshire. Published in 1836 by J. 
R. Goodno, Boston. 



95 

Woman's Temperance Union, Manchester. 

The Medical Temperance Journal for the year 1884. 

12mo. 
Tenth Annual Session of the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union of New Hampshire. 1883. 
Pamphlet. 
Shaker Village, Canterbury. 

The " Manifesto" for the year 1884. Published by 
the " United Societies." 12mo. 
William H. Stinson, Esq., Dunbarton. 

Journal of Proceedings of the New Hampshire State 
Grange, December 18, 19, and 20, 1883. Pamph- 
let. 
Albert A. Pope, Esq., Boston, Mass. 

What ! and Why ! Some Common Questions An- 
swered. 1884. 16mo. 
Bostonian Society, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings of the Society at the annual meeting, 
January 8, 1884. Pamphlet. 
J. C. Gilson, Esq., Superintendent. 

Thirteenth Annual Report of the Public Schools of 
the City of Oakland, Cal., for the year 1883. 
Pamphlet. 
Unknown. 

Annual Report of Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion in the State of New Hampshire, June 1884. 
12mo. 
Fifty-fourth Annual Report of the Board of Educa- 
tion, Cincinnati, O. 1883-84. 8vo. 
Wages and Tariffs. An Address before the Brook- 
lyn Revenue Reform Club, by E. J. Donnell, May, 
1884. Pamphlet. 
Address of Carl Schurz at Brooklyn, N. Y., August 
5, 1884. Pamphlet. 



96 

First Annual Report of the Denver Chamber of Com- 
merce and Board of Trade. 1883. Pamphlet. 

Suggestions on Library Architecture, American and 
Foreign. By J. L. Smithmeyer, Washington, D. C. 
Pamphlet. 
Sawyer Free Library, Gloucester, Mass. 

Outline of History, and Dedication of the Library, 
July 1, 1884. 8vo. 
From the Several Librarians or Boards of Trustees. 

Astor Library, IS". Y., Thirty-fifth Annual Report, 
for the year 1883. Pamphlet. 

Boston Public Library, Thirty-second Annual Re- 
port, year ending April, 1884. Pamphlet. Bulle- 
tins JSTos. 1, 2, and 3. Vol. 5. 1884. 

Brooklyn, N". Y., Public Library, Twenty-sixth An- 
nual Report, 1883-84. Pamphlet. 

Brookline, Mass., Public Library, Twenty-seventh 
Annual Report. 1883. Pamphlet. 

Bigelow Free Library, Clinton, Mass., Tenth Annual 
Report, 1883. Pamphlet. 

Cambridge, Mass., Public Library, Report for the 
year 1883. Pamphlet, 

Cincinnati O., Public Library, Annual Reports for 
years ending June 30, 1882 and 1884. Pamphlets. 

Cleveland, O., Public Library, Sixteenth Annual 
Report, year ending August 31, 1884. Pamphlet. 

Chicago, 111., Twelfth Annual Report of Public 
Library, year ending June, 1884. Pamphlet. 

Fall River, Mass., Public Library, Reports for the 
years 1873, 1881, and 1883. Three pamphlets. 

Friends' Free Library, Germantown, Phil., Annual 
Report for 1883. Pamphlet. 

Handsworth Public Library, Handsworth, County of 
Stratford, England, Report of Committee, year 
ending March, 1884. Pamphlet. 



97 

Lowell, Mass., City Library, Report for the year 

1883. Pamphlet. 
Lawrence, Mass., Free Library, Reports for the years. 

1882 and 1883. Two pamphlets. 

Mercantile Library Association, X. Y., Sixty-third 
Annual Report. 1883-84. Pamphlet. 

Mercantile Library Association, San Francisco, Cal., 
Thirty-first Annual Report, 1883. Pamphlet. 

Manchester, England, Thirty-second Annual Report 
of the Public Free Libraries. 1883-84. Pamphlet. 

Melrose, Mass., Thirteenth Annual Report of the 
Public Library. 1883. Pamphlet. 

Newton, Mass., Free Library, Annual Report for the 
year 1883. Pamphlet, 

Nashua, N. H., Catalogue of City Library. 1884. 

Xesmith Free Library, Windham, X. H., Report for 
the year 1883. Pamphlet. 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md., Seventeenth An- 
nual Report, year ending June, 1884. Pamphlet. 

Peabody Institute, Peabody, Mass., Annual Report 
for the year 1883. Pamphlet. 

Providence, R. L, Public Library, Sixth Annual Re- 
port. 1883. Pamphlet. 

Philadelphia Library Co.'s Bulletins, Nos. 12 and 13, 
January and July. 

Springfield, Mass., City Library Association, Annua 
Report for year ending May 5, 1884. Pamphlet, 

Swansea, Wales, Ninth Annual Report of the Public 
Library and Gallery of Art, 1882-83. Pamphlet, 

Worcester, Mass., Free Public Library, Twenty- 
fourth Annual Report, 1883. Pamphlet, 

Woburn, Mass., Free Public Library, Seventh An- 
nual Report for the year ending March 1, 1884. 
Pamphlet. 



98 

Treasury Department, Washington, I). C. 

Report of the Superintendent of the United States 
Coast and Geodetic Survey for the years 1882 and 
1883. 2 Vols. 4to. 

Report of the Finance for the year 1888. 8vo. 

Report of the Operations of the United States Life- 
saving Service for the year ending June 30, 

. 1883. 8vo. 
Interior Department. 

Official Gazette of the United States Patent, Office, 
for the year 1884. Svo. 

Alphabetical List of Patentees. 18S3-S4. 8vo. 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents for 
the year 1883. 4to. 

Tenth Census of the United States. Vols. 1, 2, and 
3. 4to. 
War Department. 

Alphabetical List of Additions made to the War De- 
partment Library from June. 1882. 
Bureau of Education. 

(Circulars of Information : No. 5, 1<S73: Nos. 3 and 4, 
1883; Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and :>, 1884. Pamphlets. 

Reports of the Commissioner for the years 1880, 
1882, 1883. Three volumes. 8vo. 

Preliminary Circular respecting the Exhibition of 
Education at the World's Industrial and Cotton 
Centennial Exposition, December 1, 1884. 

Education in Italy and Greece. Pamphlet. 
United States Conor ess. 

Forty-live volumes of Public Documents of the For- 
ty-sixth and Forty-seventh Congresses. 

Forty-seven volumes of the Forty-sixth, Forty-sev- 
enth, and Forty-eighth Congresses, including the 
Tenth Census of the United States. Six vol- 
umes. 4to. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : — 

Sirs, — In accordance with the usual custom, I here- 
with present the following as a correct report of the work 
in the City Engineer's office, and the several highway dis- 
tricts of the city, for the year ending December 31, 1884. 

Expenses of the office for the year 1884 : — 

Salary of city engineer and assist- 
ants . . - . . . . $2,490 56 

Supplies for office .... 101 51 

Repairs of instruments . . 60 52 

Teams and car-fares to June 1 . 54 18 

Teams after June 1 (horse-shoeing) 8 25 

Stakes ...... 15 00 

Postage on account of bridge . 86 

Cleaning office .... 9 38 

Gas • 8 50 

Total $2,748 76 

Expenses for soldiers' monument : 

Repairs and covering . . . $14 45 

Water 50 00 

Gas 24 80 

Total $89 25 



102 



The slight increase in expense is due to the necessity 
of having an extra rodnian in the early part of the season 
to meet the demands for lines and grades for parties about 
to build, and to do the work required in the various cem- 
eteries. 

The amount of work done in the office during the year 
is as follows : — 

Number of orders for surveys, street lines and 

grades 731 

Number of orders tor sewer and paving grades 141 

Total number of orders . . . 872 

Levels for protiles for establishing grades, 24,855 feet, 
equal to 4.71 miles. 
These profiles have three lines of levels 

through the street, making a total distance 

actually leveled of .... 
Levels for sewer and other center protiles 
Profiles of avenues, Pine Grove Cemetery 
Profiles of avenues, Valley Cemetery . 
Profiles of walks in Park square 

Total 

Equal to 19.93 miles. 

Surveys for streets and street lines 
Surveys in Pine Grove Cemetery 
Surveys in Valley Cemetery 

Total surveys .... 
Equal to 19.2 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground . 
Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove Cem 
etery 



. 74,565 feet 


. 26,871 " 


1,586 " 


750 " 


1,450 " 


. 105,222 feet 


. 88,250 feet 


7,015 " 


5,960 " 


. 101,225 feet 


. 69,845 feet 


- 

. 15,395 " 



103 



88,460 feet 


36,226 feet 


1,558 


a 


9,241 


a 


S,5S5 


u 


1,240 


a 


1,600 


u 


4,289 


u 


3,875 


u 


611 


u 


1,615 


a 



68,340 feet 



Lines of lots and avenues. Valley Cemetery 3,220 feet 

Total length of lines marked on 
ground ...... 

Equal to 16 3-4 miles. 

(.•trades set for sidewalks .... 

Grades set for macadamizing 

Grades set for grading streets 

Grades set for gutters .... 

Grades set for Park-square grading . 

Grades set for Park-square curb 

Grades for avenues, Pine Grove Cemetery > 

Grades of lots, Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Grades of avenues, Valley Cemetery . 

Grades of lots, Valley Cemetery 

Total length of grade set 
Equal to 12.94 miles. 

Batters set for stone-work of the following buildings: 

J. C. Hoyt's house, corner Concord and Olive streets. 

Poliee station, set twice. 

Addition to Main-street school-house, set twice'. 

Granite-street bridge at the canal, both abutments. 

Parker-street bridge, both abutments set twice. 

City farm, hatters for silo. 

Derry-road bridge over Cohas brook, both abutments. 

Mammoth-road bridge over Cohas brook, both abut- 
ments ; also measurements and estimates for changes 
proposed in the Excelsior Hook and Ladder room. 

Lots laid out in Pine Grove Cemetery, 86. 

Lots laid out in Valley Cemetery, 17. 

The above are all a relocation of old lots, and require 
more work than new lots would. 

Xew lots laid out in Amoskeag Cemetery, 9(i. 



104 

Lots relaid on account of change of plan, 34. 

Street numbers assigned and put on, 539. 

This includes that part of the west side ot the river that 
was built previous to March 1, 1884. I find that many 
of the old painted numbers are peeling, and have been 
obliged to replace many of them. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Cedar street. Chestnut to Pine street. 

Central street, Franklin to Canal street. 

Chestnut street, Park to Auburn street. 

High street, Wilson road to Ashland street. 

Main street, McGregor street to McGregor street. 2 
plans. 

McGregor street, Main street to Main street. 2 plans. 

.Myrtle street, Linden street to Chester old line. 

Gld Derry road, near Cohas brook. 

Orange street, Elm street to Chestnut street. 

Grange street, Linden street to Chester old line. 

Park street, Chestnut street to Pine street. 

Parker street, Main street to railroad bridge. 

Pine street, Park street to Young road. 3 plans. 

Shasta street, Elm street to River road. 

Webster street, Union street to Smyth road. 5 plans. 

Merrimack-square walk, from northwest corner to 
southeast corner. 

Total sidewalk [dans and profiles, 24. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Amherst street, Ashland street to Hall street. 
Beech east back street, Harrison to Brook street. 
Beech east back street, Brook street to Gore street. 
Bridge street, Merrimack river to McGregor street. 
Bridge street, Hall street to Ashland street. 



105 

Concord north back street, Pine street to Union street. 

Dover street, Granite street to Doug-las street. 

Elm east back street, Cedar street to Spruce north back 
street. • 

Gore street, Union east back street to Beech street. 

Gore street, Beech street to Oak street. 

Main street, Putnam street to Amory street. 

Pearl street, Ash street to Beech street. 

Pearl street, Maple street to Nashua street. 

Pine street, Harrison street to Brook street. 

McGregor street, Bridge street to Wayne street. 

Park south back and Chestnut west back streets, from 
Elm east back street to Spruce street. 

Spruce south back street, Maple street to Lincoln street. 

Walnut east back street, Gore street to Brook street. 

Wayne street, McGregor street to Beauport east back 
street. 

Winter street, Main street to Parker street. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 20. 

PROFILES WITHOUT PLANS. 

Greenbush avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery. 
Highland avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery. 
Avenue in Valley Cemetery. 
Boynton road, A street to Bedford line. 
Walks in Park square. 3 profiles. 
Total single profiles, 7. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Parker-street bridge abutments. 
Granite-street bridge, plan and profile. 
Design for a stone arch and gateway at Pine Grove 
Cemetery. 

Lots in Pine Grove Cemetery south of Auburn path. 



106 

Part of Pine Grove Cemetery south of Locust and east 
of Willow avenues. 

Land of E. I). L. Parker, copied from J. B. Sawyer's 
plan. 

Land of E. W. Brigham, copied from J. B. Sawyer's 
plan. 

Jewett street, Young road to Cilley road. 

Amoskeag Cemetery, finished plan. 

Amoskeag Cemetery as changed by trustees. 

Amoskeag Company's line, Manchester to Park street. 
3 plans. 

Design for bridge over Cohas brook. 

Designs for Tremont-square fountain basin. 3 plans. 

TremOnt square, showing walks. 

Main-street school-house addition, foundation plan. 

Valley Cemetery, designs for receiving vault. 

Old I Look and Ladder house, proposed changes. 2 
plans. 

Sketch for a new Llookand Ladder house. 

Merrimack square, design for a stone bridge. 

Boynton road, A street to -Bedford line. 

North River road, from Mr. Wheeler's to Mr. Dodge's. 

James Hall road, Hanover street to Park street. 

Union street, Hooksett road to Clarke street. 

Pearl street, Linden street to Mammoth road. 

John Hall farm; north of Bridge, east of Ashland 
street (copy). 

Pine Grove Cemetery, southern section. 

Winter street as located by J. B. Sawyer (copy). 

Part of Wilson Hill hounded by Hanover, Beacon, 
Park, and Wilson streets. 

This last is a finished copy of the working plan made 
last year, and is in itself equivalent to 11 plans. 



107 



NUMBERING PLANS. 



McGregor street. Main to Main street. 
Pine street, Pennacook street to Webster street. 
Nashua street, Bridge street to Pearl street. 
Orange street, Oak street to Ashland street. 
Milton street, Park street to Concord street. 
Ash street, Amherst street to Gore street. 

OLD PLANS COPIED. 

Kennard road, Smyth road to Mammoth road. 
Bridge street, Maple to Russell street. 
Ash east back street extension to Lowell street. 
District Xo. 1 school lot. 

WORKING PLANS NOT KEPT IN OFFICE. 

Amoskeag Company's line, Manchester to Park street. 
3 tracings. 

Auburn street, profile of both sides. 

Amoskeag Cemetery, proposed changes. 

Vine street, paving grades. 

Main-street school-house additions, for contractors. 

Granite-street bridge, plan and profile. 8 copies for 
contractors. 

Parker-street proposed bridge, for contractors. 

Merrimack square, plan and profile of proposed walk, 
for contractors. 

Cohas-brook bridge. 3 copies for contractors. 

Tremont-square fountain basin, for contractors. 

Profile of Greenbush avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery, 
for superintendent. 

Profile of Highland avenue, Pine Grove Cemetery, for 
superintendent. 

Section south of Locust and east of Willow avenues, 
Tine Grove Cemetery, for superintendent. 



108 

• 

Pine Grove Cemetery, flower-beds at gate. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, tracing of new gateway, for 
committee. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, copy of maps, for committee. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, plan of new purchase, for com- 
mittee. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, copy of map showing water pipe. 

Orange street, Elm to Chestnut street, for city solicitor. 

Old Bakersville school lot, for Bosher k Co. 

Amoskeag Cemetery, for superintendent. 

John Hall farm, north of Bridge, east of Ashland 
street (tracing). 

Map of Valley Cemetery, showing water pipe. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 77. 

Total plans made, 128. 

I have also made several small plans of cemetery lots 
for parties desiring to put in curl) ; also a few small 
sketches for the treasurer of the hoard of trustees. Twelve 
old plans have been mounted on cloth for their better 
preservation. 

The two largest pieces of work done in the office this 
year are the map of Valley Cemetery, and the map of 
Wilson Hill section, south of Hanover street and east of 
Wilson street. 

Plans of all new highways laid out up to December 31, 
1883, have been made in the city clerk's book of records. 

All sewers laid up to the same date have been drawn in 
the city clerk's book of sewers, and on the sewer map in 
the oflice. An accurate plan of the entire new section west 
of the Merrimack river has been platted into the city 
clerk's sewer-book, and on the sewer map in this office. 

Surveys have also been made for about forty (40) plans 
and profiles of new highways and sewers. These plans 
will be made up during the winter. 



109 



The index and catalogue of plans have been brought 
lip to April 1, 1884, and the indices to the level-books 
and transit-books to January 1, 1884. The baek office work 
remains the same as hist year, showing that this year's 
work has been kept up clean, or practically so. If there 
are no calls for large plans this winter, as was the case last 
winter, a large portion of this back work can be finished. 

(4RADES ESTABLISHED. 

The following grades have been established during the 
year: — 

Amory street, McGregor to Beauport street 
Beauport street, Amory to Wayne street 
Cedar street, Chestnut to Pine street 
Central street, Franklin to Canal street 
Chestnut street, Park to Auburn street . 
High street, Ashland street to Wilson road 
Laurel street, Chestnut to Pine street . 
Main street, McGregor to McGregor street 
McGregor street, Main to Main street . 
Orange street, Elm to Chestnut street . 
Park street, Chestnut to Pine street 
Parker street, Winter to R. R. bridge . 
Pine street, Young road to Park street . 
Shasta street, Elm street to River road . 
Wayne street, McGregor to Beauport street 
Webster street, Union street to Smyth road 

Total 

Equal to 3.35 miles. 

The following highways have been laid out this year : 
Beauport street, Wayne to Sullivan street . 50 feet wide. 
Marion street, McGregor to Main street . 50 " " 
Patten street, N". W. R. R. to Squog river . 50 " " 



. 950 feet. 


. 650 


u 


. 310 


a 


. 560 


a 


. 761 


a 


. 460 


u 


. 312 


u 


. 1,800 


a 


. 2,120 


a 


. 565 


a. 


. 310 


a 


. 288 


it 


. 2,698 


a 


. 632 


,i 


. 721 


a 


. 4,568 


a 


17,705 feet 



110 

Pearl street, Linden to old Bridge street . 50 feet wide. 
Putnam street, Main to Beauport street . 50 " " 
River road, north, R. Wheeler's to M. 
Dodge's 50 " " 

Union street, llooksett road to Clarke street 50 " " 

The attention of the city government was called to 
certain short pieces of highways that are not public, never 
having been laid out in a legal manner, although the city 
takes all care of them. The board of mayor and aldermen 
visited the various localities, and voted to lav them out; 
but, as uo hearing had been called, and no notice posted, 
the laying out could not be legally recorded. I would 
suggest that this matter be attended to at once, as most of 
these lie between sections of the same streets that are 
already laid out. For a complete list see my report of 
last year. 

NEW HIGHWAYS BUILT. 

Aniory street. Main to Beauport street. 

Ash street, Concord to Lowell street. 

Ash street, Prospect to Harrison street. 

* Auburn street, Beech to Maple street, partly built. 

Beauport street, Wayne to Sullivan street. 

Fourth street. Walker to Railroad. 

Gore street, Union to Ashland street, partly built. 

Pine street, llooksett road to Webster street. 

Putnam street, Main to Beauport street. 

Ray street, Webster street to Ray brook. 

Salmon street, Elm to Chestnut street. 

Shasta street, Elm street to River road, partly built. 

Wayne street, Main to Beauport street. 

Webster street, Union street to llooksett road. 

Nutt road, additional widening and grading. 

*This is not a public highway. 



Ill 

SEWERS BUILT. 



Street. 



Location. 



Material . 



Size in 
inches. 



Length 
in feet. 



Auburn 

Mast road 

Amherst 

Amory 

Beech 

Cedar south back 

Central south back 

Gore 

Hanover 

Mast road 

McGregor 

Pine 

West 

West 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Arlington 

Arlington 

Ashland 

Beauport 

Beech east back 

Beech east back 

Belmont 

Chestnut west back 

High 

Jane 

Lincoln 

Lowell north back 

Lowell north back ... . 

Lowell 

Main 

Maple 

Orange 

Pearl i . . 

Pearl 

Pine 

South 

Union east back street 

City Farm 

Pine 

Maple 



Between Beech and Maple Akron. 

Near Baldwin's 

Ashland, ea»terly 

McGregor street to Main street 

Cedar street to Cedar south back st. 

West of Maple street 

East of Wilson 

East of Beech street 

East of Wilson street 

Near Baldwin's shop 

From Wayne street, south 

Harrison to Brook street 

From Parker street north 

From Douglas street north ! 

Hall street to Belmont street 

Near George Wilkins's 

Nashua street, easterly 

Maple street, easterly 

Lowell street to High street 

Wayne street to Amory street 

North of Harrison street 

Gore street, southerly 

Amherst street to Lowell street 

North of Cedar street 

Maple street to Jane street 

High street, southerly 

Hanover street, southerly 

From Church street, easterly 

From Birch street, easterly 

West of Ashland street 

Amory street to Monmouth street. 

South of Cedar street 

Russell street to Oak street 

Maple st i eet, easterly 

From Ash street, westerly 

From Prospect street, south 

High street to Lowell street. 

Pennacook street to Sagamore st . . 



Near Prospect street . 
Near Cedar street 



15 


60 


15 


190 


12 


328 


12 


440 


12 


140 


12 


250 


12 


227 


12 


145 


12 


423 


12 


40 


12 


278 


12 


416 


12 


173 


12 


294 


10 


345 


10 


93 


10 


99 


10 


208 


10 


309 


10 


506 


10 


217 


10 


101 


10 


454 


10 


91 


10 


438 


10 


300 


10 


142 


10 


80 


10 


129 


10 


222 


10 


312 


10 


140 


10 


344 


10 


403 


10 


173 


10 


123 


10 


242 


10 


262 


8 


200 


8 


52 


8 


65 



9,454 



Total 15-ineh Akron pipe . . . . 250 feet 

Total 12-inch Akron pipe .... 3,154 " 

Total 10-inch Akron pipe .... 5,733 " 

Total 8-inch Akron pipe . . . .317 " 

Total length of sewers for the year . 9,454 feet 

Equal to 1.79 miles. 

Number of catch-basins built, 74. 
Number of manholes built, 6. 



112 



SEWERS ORDERED BUT NOT BUILT. 



Street. 



Location. 



Material. 


Size in 
inches. 


Akron. 


15 


" 


12 


" 


10 


" 


10 


" 


10 


" 


10 




10 



Length 
in feet. 



Main 

A. 

Auiory 

Bridge 

Merrimack 
Nashua . . . 
Pearl 



Milford street to A street 

Main street to B street 

Main street to Beauport street 

Maple street to Nashua street 

Present terminus east to Belmont st 
Present terminus north to Pearl st.. 
Nashua street to Oak street 



921 
808 
401 
400 
500 
80 
160 

3,270 



Of the above, the Bridge-street sewer has been super; 
seded by the Arlington-street sewer from Maple east, and 
the Nashua and Pearl street sewers by the Pearl-street 
'sewer east of Maple street. 

The subject of sewers has been frequently discussed in 
these reports, and but little more can be said. Each year 
demonstrates more fully the mistakes previously made by 
laying the sewer so near the surface. Experience proves 
that in every case where a sewer has been put in less than 
eight feet in depth that it is difficult and sometimes im- 
possible to drain buildings that have introduced all mod- 
ern improvements. Until recently it was the custom to 
drain sinks only, into the sewers, without any attempt to 
drain below the cellars, so the shallow sewers answered 
every purpose. With the introduction of water came the 
necessity of draining below the cellar bottom. A few 
years ao;o it was a rare occurrence to find a cellar of more 
than six feet in depth ; but with the more general intro- 
duction of furnaces, steam-b.oilers, etc., the tendency is 
towards deeper cellars, and at the present time more new 
ones are built eight feet in depth than there are six ; and 



113 

as a natural consequence sewers need to be correspond- 
ingly deeper. This year the minimum depth has been 
eight feet. The grades of two sewers were changed by 
the superintendent without my consent, and in conse- 
quence of this change each will have to be relaid when the 
sewers are extended, as they probably will be next year. 

There are three sewers that should be built right away, 
and a beginning should be made on them the coming 
year. The first is the brick main through Bridge street, 
commencing at Elm street, and designed to take all sew- 
age from Bridge street north to Salmon street. The sec- 
tion between Salmon street and the south line of Webster 
street is designed to be drained into Salmon street, then 
through Elm east back street and Sagamore street to Elm 
street, thence through Elm and Bridge to the river. 

The second sewer needed is to drain the section north 
of Webster street, The most direct way to drain this 
section is by means of a main sewer through Webster 
street to the river ; but this is impossible at the present 
time, because the Amoskeag Company have extended their 
pipes from their pumping station to a point above the 
dam. A large proportion of the mills are dependent 
upon this supply for drinking and sanitary purposes; and 
at times a large part of the northern section of the city is 
dependent upon the company's generosity for its water 
supply. The company very naturally object to fouling 
the river with sewage at this point. 

Another way would be to commence at Bridge street 
and relay the Elm-street sewer larger and at a greater 
depth. The present sewer, as now laid to Salmon street, 
is not large enough. This would be a very expensive 
work, but would have the advantage of keeping within a 
public highway. 

Another plan, and the one which the committee on 



114 

sewers voted to recommend, is to commence at Canal and 
Bridge streets, lav a three-feet brick sewer through Canal 
street and a part of the River road to Webster street, then 
a two-feet brick sewer through Webster street to Union 
street. Canal street is a private way, belonging to the 
Amoskeag Company; but the agent, Col. Liverniore, has 
given the city permission to use the street for this purpose 
if they desire. Should this sewer be built, the Elm street 
sewer can be relieved from any sudden rush of storm 
water by means of overflow sewers connecting with the 
larger one through the cross streets; and at the same 
time These overflow sewers will serve to drain the build- 
ings that may be erected upon these streets. At the time 
the Bridge-street sewer was built my estimate for the size 
of that portion on the fiat between Canal street and the 
river necessary to drain as far north as Webster street 
only, was four feet diameter: but one member of the com- 
mittee ordered the iron pipe east for the canals three and 
a half feet diameter, consequently all the rest of the sewer 
had to be reduced a corresponding six inches. Turning 
this extra territory into it may at some future time cause 
a little trouble, but I do not anticipate anything serious. 

The third sewer, and the only one that has been ordered 
by the city government, is through Main street from Mil- 
ford to A street, and through A to I> street. This sewer 
is very much needed, as the citizens have no means of 
drainage: the surface water of the streets flows over pri- 
vate land, and has in times past caused considerable dam- 
age. This work will necessitate the relaying of about 250 
feet of the present Main-street sewer, and will be quite 
expensive as this portion is through the ledge. 

MANHOLES. 

Tn highway district No. 2 no manholes have been built 
this year. This is a very serious mistake. Every sewer 



115 

should at least commence and end with a manhole; and 
if the distance is great, or there are numerous changes of 
grade, intermediate ones should be put in ; but as I had 
no authority to compel the superintendent to do this 
work, none of it has been done. In District No. 10 every 
sewer has been begun and ended with a manhole, and as 
many more have been built as was necessary. 

Many people who have no knowledge of sewerage 
think a manhole is a useless expense, but I have known 
the city to expend three or four times the value of a man- 
hole in digging at random to find where the sewer was 
obstructed, saving nothing about the damage to the streets 
which these excavations cause to the sewer by being fre- 
quently broken into to see if they were anywhere near 
the obstruction. That section west of McGregor bridge 
has been well supplied with manholes, and I am willing to 
guarantee that those streets will never have to be dug up 
to tind or remove any sewer obstruction, unless the pipe 
itself should be actually crushed in, and even then the 
break can be so accurately located that one excavation 
will suffice to make the repairs, instead of the live or six- 
trial pits such as I have seen dug in other places before 
the break could be found. It would be a saving in future 
expense if the city would set aside a portion of the sewer 
appropriation for the purpose of building manholes at 
every point where one sewer connects with another : cover 
these manholes with perforated covers, and the carrying 
capacity of the present sewers would be increased nearly 
one-half, When there is but little water running in the 
pipes, the rest of the space is of course filled with air; if 
there is a sudden rush of surface water into the sewers 
on account of a heavy shower, the air will be compressed 
in the pipe until it can be slowly forced out at the outlet: 
in cases where several sewers connect with a main, cham- 



116 

bers of compressed air will be formed, and the flow of 
sewage retarded until this can be forced out ; as the air 
in the small house-drains is more easily forced than in 
the larger pipe, the sewage naturally flows back into the 
houses until the main channel is cleared. With perfo- 
rated covered manholes this air would soon be expelled, 
and the sewer free to perform the service required. 

CATCH-BASINS. 

Of these, all that I need to add to what I have already 
said, is to suggest that they be made deeper below the 
outlet, as sand is frequently washed into them to such an 
extent as to completely cover the outlet. 

COMMONS. 

The grading of Park square has been completed ; a 
stone curb placed around it about 1,600 feet in length, 8 
inches wide by 18 inches in depth, showing 15 inches 
on the outside and 12 inches on the inside. Concrete 
walks have been made on the two diagonals, and through 
the middle in the line of Spruce street. The walks all 
around the outside have been graded, but not paved. 

On Tremont square a fountain-basin has been com- 
menced, but about that time we had such cold nights that 
the cement would freeze, then crumble, and so spoil the 
whole thing ;' it was therefore deemed advisable to sus- 
pend operations. The basin is designed to be circular, of 
twenty-two feet inside diameter; the border to be of 
granite basins, to be tilled with plants, making a rustic 
flowering border, which will be much handsomer, and cost 
less, than the usual style of cut curb. 

CEMETERIES. 

Early in the year the committee on commons and cem- 
eteries instructed the city solicitor and myself to make an 



117 

investigation of the laws and methods of government of 
cemeteries in other cities, and report to them for the pur- 
pose of aiding them in framing laws for our own ceme- 
teries. The work was attended to, and for a more 
complete account see the report of the city solicitor. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Trustees, Councilman Henry S. Perry, chairman, Hon. 
James A. Weston, and John E. Stearns. 

Ninety-six lots have been staked out in this cemetery. 
The original plan was designed to have two gateways, 
but the trustees afterwards decided that one was sufficient. 
This change made it necessary to restake thirty-four lots, 
substituting an avenue for a walk on part of the east side. 
The grounds should now be graded, and the avenues and 
walks turnpiked and graveled. All the grading that the 
lots require can be done with loam. The land has no 
soil, and in a dry season is merely a sandy plain. It 
would lie advisable to put on two or three inches of 
gravel or clay, roll it well, then put on from six to eight 
inches of loam. But one lot has been sold yet, so far as I 
know, although T am informed that there are several par- 
ties desiring lots there if the grounds were only tixed up 
and put into the market. The city water already reaches 
to within 300 or 400 feet of the cemetery. This should be 
extended into the grounds without delay. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Trustees, Alderman C. H. G. Foss, chairman, Council- 
man A. A. Ainsworth, Messrs. George C. Gilmore, B.W. 
Hill, and D. 0. Furnald. 

A tracing of the map of this cemetery has been made 
for the superintendent to hang in his office, and all water 
pipes have been shown on this tracing. The water 



118 

supply has been extended through the southern portion of 
the cemetery. For this purpose 906 feet of two-inch 
pipe, 220 feet of one-inch, and 13 feet of one-half inch 
pipe, making a total of 1,139 feet of tar-coated pipe used. 
A portion of Chestnut avenue has been cut down two 
feet, and a portioli of Willow avenue graded and filled. 
Chestnut avenue had been gradually filled up until the 
curbing of one lot was nearly buried. Willow avenue 
was a low place, where the water stood in a wet season 
with no means of drainage. These were the reasons for 
the change of grade. The sharp knoll on Manchester 
avenue, near the Odd Fellows' lot has also been cut 
down. 

Lines and grades have been given for seventeen old 
lots that were to be improved by the owners. A new 
location of Gov. Smyth's lot has been made, so that the 
lines conform more nearly to the proper lines of the ave- 
nues, and the grades fixed for the lot. The public ground 
at the south end of the cemetery, and a portion of the 
public ground at the Auburn-street entrance of the ceme- 
tery, have been graded. It is designed to bring this into 
the lawn form. 

There is a section on each side of Public avenue, be- 
tween Pine-street entrance and the office, that could be 
very easily graded into a lawn, which would greatly im- 
prove the appearance of the grounds, as many of the lots 
are neglected at present and in bad shape, the owners 
being dead or moved away. I would suggest that the 
board of trustees consider this matter the coming season. 

Plans and estimates have been made for a new receiv- 
ing vault. The present vault is not large enough to 
accommodate the increased demand made upon it during 
the winter months, and has no conveniences. If one of 
the iirst boxes put in is wanted, all the others have to be 



110 

taken down and moved before this can be obtained, The 
new plan is for a room 44 by 24 feet, inside dimensions, 
with arched roof, all to he made of brick. The vault is 
designed to accommodate 112 bodies arranged in four 
tiers. The interior is divided into compartments by an 
iron-lattice frame-work. Each compartment is 7 feet long 
by 20 inches high by 30 inches wide. By this arrange- 
ment any body can be removed without disturbing any 
other. Estimates were made for one vault to be entirely 
underground, and another to be in the form of a brick 
building, entirely above ground. The ground plan and 
interior design made would answer for either: but the 
brick building would of necessity be higher posted, so 
that eight tiers, or 224 bodies, could be accommodated. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Trustees, Alderman J. P. Clough, chairman, Council- 
man S. P. Cannon, Messrs. II. IT. Iluse, G. P. Whitman, 
and J. L. Stevens. 

A large amount of work has been done at the cem- 
etery this year. Early in the season an order was given 
to make an accurate survey of the cemetery, as there 
are four plans in existence, no two of which are 
alike, and not one like the ground. This work was 
commenced, but there were so many calls for lot lines and 
grades, in accordance with the orders of the trustees that 
no lot should be improved without first getting the true 
lines and grades, that hut little progress was made. The 
hoard of aldermen having at this time ordered that all 
such work should be charged to the cemetery appropria- 
tion, it was deemed advisable to suspend operations for 
this year. This work should be continued, an accurate 
plan made, then certain sections that are now apparently 
waste land could he divided up into lots and sold. Then 



120 

after those spaces are tilled out there should he an entire 
renumbering of the lots, as was suggested in one of my 
previous reports, so arranged that the highest number 
would show the exact number of lots laid out. 

Water Supply. — The first work of the board of trustees 
was to get the city water into the cemetery. This was done 
by the Water Company extending their main from Elm 
street through Baker street and Calef road to where Elm- 
wood avenue extended would strike the Calef road. With- 
in the cemetery the service consists of 3,924 feet of 3-inch. 
and 4,226 feet of 2-inch, tar-lined pipe, making in all 8,150 
feet of piping. There were also set 75 hydrants, and all 
the old drinking fountains were connected. The hydrants 
could have been arrangadin a much better manner in that 
sandy soil by having a small cast-iron box set over the end 
of the pipe, with a cast-iron cover. This would serve to 
keep all sand, dust, and grit out of the threads and valves, 
also at the same time add very much to the appearance. 

Drainage. — A system of blind drainage has been 
established by the building of five catch-basins in the 
lowest places. These basins were first made eight feet 
deep and four feet in diameter, then filled in five feet deep 
with loose cobble-stone ; above this is built a brick basin 
two feet square inside and three feet deep, covered with a 
cast-iron grate with two-inch square meshes. These 
are built as an experiment, and worked well with the 
heavy thunder showers in the autumn ; it remains to be 
seen whether they will answer the purpose for a winter 
thaw, although there is no doubt but that they will in a 
great measure prevent the water from covering so many 
lots as in the past. This was not an original idea, but 
was borrowed from Forest Hill Cemetery. Should these 
prove successful, others ought to be built. 

Avenues Graded. — Cypress avenue (formerly Green- 



121 

bush) has been graded by cutting: the top of the hill near 
Garden path, and tilling- at the bottom, in order to carry 
the water to the new catch-basins. The greatest cut is 
twenty inches, and greatest till, twelve inches. The sur- 
plus material was used where tilling was necessary in low 
places in the cemetery. The grade has been established 
for the whole length of this avenue. Grade has also been 
established for the whole length of Oakland (formerly 
Highland) avenue. Stakes showing grade have been set 
from Spruce (formerly Evergreen) to Locust (formerly 
Linnet) avenue. Nearly all the other avenues have been 
graveled, and those joining the above partly graded to 
conform to the change in grade. Fir avenue has also 
been built. 

Lawn Sections. — The following sections have been 
surveyed, the lots accurately located, and grades estab- 
lished for the purpose of converting them into lawns : 

1st, bounded by Oakland, Pine, and Poplar avenues. 
This has been graded, and the lots, seventeen in number, 
have been relaid out. The average depth of till was three 
feet, containing about 550 cubic yards. 

2d, bounded by Cypress avenue, Fern, Wildey, and 
Acorn paths. On this the stakes have been set but no 
work done. 

3d, bounded by Oakland and Locust avenues and 
Autumn path. This has been surveyed, but no grade 
stakes set. It has been partly filled. 

4th, bounded by Cypress and Aspen avenues, St. John 
and Ash paths. On this section the grade has been set, 
but the lots have not been surveyed, and no work has 
been done. 

5th, the low place east of St. John path, between Ash 
path and Magnolia avenue, has been filled, graveled, and 
loanied. There were no lots in this section, so that all I 



122 

have been required to do here was to give the lines of 
avenues and paths, and set grade. This nil varied from 
nothing to four feet, or an average of about three feet, 
requiring about 700 cubic yards. 

6th, the section bounded by Cypress, Locust, and Fir 
avenues graveled and loamed about one foot in depth. 

Work for Lot Owners. — Lines have been given for 
fifty-four old lots and grades set for forty-five old lots, 
where the owners desired to make improvements by 
curbing or turfing. 

Additional Surveys. — The section south of Locust and 
east of Oakland avenue has been surveyed, and a portion 
staked out as a proposed new public ground. Three tiers 
of public lots have been staked out in the ground by the 
fence in the southeast corner. A lot has been laid out at 
the southwest corner of Locust and Chestnut avenues, 
which will average 58 feet by 88 feet, for the Swedish 
society. The section north of the entrance at the north- 
west corner of the cemetery has been partially surveyed. 
Fifteen plans have been made for the cemetery. (See list 
of plans.) 

Genera/ Remarks. — The above is only a report of that 
part of the work with which I have been connected. The 
board of trustees will of course make a detailed report of 
all work. In accordance with the order of the trustees 
requiring all lot-owners to get the line and grade of their 
lots before doing any work, I have endeavored to 
straighten out the existing irregularities, care being taken 
to give every man his land according to his deed, and if 
it became necessary to give any lot a few inches of land 
in order to make a path of uniform width, or to take out 
an unsightly jog, I have not hesitated to do it. I believe 
it has not been necessary in any case to infringe upon a 
lot in order to shape a path. A great difficulty in this 



123 

cemetery is the variety of lot grades existing therein. 
Early in the season it was proposed to cross-section the 
entire cemetery and make a topographical map of the same. 
This should he done with the new portion, and the 
avenues and lots all laid on paper before anything else is 
done. "With the old portion I think that a better plan 
would he to make a profile of all the avenues and the 
main paths, and the grades established thereon; then let 
the trustees specify at what height above these grades the 
lots shall he built. These heights would of course vary 
in different localities ; those sections where the majority ot 
lots are already built up into high mounds would neces- 
sarily be higher than some other sections where the lots 
are low. This suggestion of course only applies to such 
of the older portions of the cemetery where the owners 
ohject to lawns and desire curbs. In all new work this 
mound-building will of course he prohibited. 

BRIDGES. 

A new iron bridge has been built on Granite street 
over the canal, in place of the old one, for the purpose of 
removing the center truss. This bridge was built by the 
Berlin Iron Bridge Company, of East Berlin, Conn. It 
is 56 feet span on centers ; one roadway 87 feet clear, and 
two walks each six feet wide; and is designed for alive 
load of 100 pounds per square foot. The depth of girder 
is 40 inches. Complete detail plans of the bridge are on 
file in this office. It was designed at first to relay the 
water-pipe on the south side of the roadway, and entirely 
free from the bridge; but the Water Company at the last 
moment refusing to do this, and the corporation refusing 
to allow any portion of the bridge to be below the 
water pipe, it became necessary to raise the entire bridge 
above the pipes. This made a change in the proposed 



124 

grade of two feet at the east end and one foot at the west 
end. The bridge and a portion of the highway each side 
have heen concreted: 

Parker-street Bridge. — Two trusses of the old Granite- 
street bridge were taken to the Parker-street crossing of 
the North Weare Railroad, and were erected there. As 
there was no sway bracing or any connection whatever 
between the trusses in the old bridge, except the floor 
timbers, it was deemed advisable to strengthen it by means 
of live plate girders twenty-four inches in depth. This 
bridge is 53 feet clear span, with a 22-feet roadway and 
two 7-feet walks. The principal expense of this bridge 
was the large amount of stone-work rendered necessary by 
reason of the state law requiring seventeen feet clear 
over the rails. 

Derry-road Bridge. — The bridge over the Cohas brook 
on the old Deny road near the H. C. Joy place was found 
to be so badly decayed as to be unsafe. It was also built 
so low, and the channel of the brook so narrow, that at 
times of high water the brido-e was submerged. Last 
spring the roadway was fifteen inches under water. A 
new three-panel truss bridge has been built of 32-feet 
clear span, and roadway twenty feet wide. These old 
abutments were logs, and projected into the stream, 
greatly interfering with the water-course. New stone 
abutments were built, the channel widened eight feet. 
the bridge raised three and one-half feet, and the road 
graded up. This will prevent the brook overflowing the 
highway in the spring. 

Mamrrioth-road Bridge. — The bridge over Cohas brook, 
just south of the Joy place, and west of the Derry-road 
bridge above described, was also found to be badly 
decayed, and the abutments, which were of rough stone, 
were falling in. The same plan used for the Derry-road 



125 



bridge was used for this. The water channel, widened 
eight feet, hut the grade of stone-work was not raised. 

Amoskeag Bridge. — When the ice went out in the spring 
two large stones were carried away from the west pier. 
These have been replaced and anchored with iron straps. 

Granite Bridge. — While replacing some broken plank 
on this bridge, it was found that the floor timbers were so 
badly decayed that they would not hold a spike. This 
bridge must be thoroughly examined in the spring, and 
will probably need extensive repairs. 

McGregor Bridge. — This bridge has been thoroughly 
examined and carefully adjusted by the builders, this year, 
and the whole structure well painted. 

Merrimack-square Bridge. — A design has been made 
tor a stone arch bridge across Merrimack-square pond, 
the total length to be one hundred feet, divided into three 
spans, width ten feet clear, or twelve feet over all. I 
think such a bridge can be built cheaper than an iron one, 
and at the same time it would be more appropriate to the 
place, it being so near to the soldiers' monument, which 
is of granite. 

WEATHER RECORD. 

A record has been made three times a day of the ther- 
mometer readings, direction of the wind, and state of the 
weather. As this is a public record, a detailed statement 
is unnecessary. 

UNION-STREET CULVERT. 

The culvert built last year was found to be too small 
for the work required, and had to be rebuilt according to 
the original design, — an arch with ten feet clear span, — 
only changing this design from an arch of fifty feet in 
length with parapet walls to one one hundred and thirty 
feet in length without parapets. 



126 



HIGHWAY DISTRICTS. 

There has been some confusion in regard to the boun- 
daries of highway districts during the past year. The 
lines between districts Hos. 3 and 5, also between Xos. 3 
and 7, are somewhat uncertain. Considerable work has 
been done by the surveyor of District No. 7 in District 
Xo. 3. 

There are certain sections where a new division would 
lie advisable. A small portion of Taylor street comes 
into the Bakersville district, besides nearly all of the Cilley 
road. In winter time the surveyor of No. 7 is obliged to 
break out some three-fourths of a mile in District No. 3, or 
else make back tracks and go a long roundabout journey 
to reach the next point in bis district that needs plow- 
ing out. So much of Taylor street as is in District No. 3, 
and that portion of the Cilley road east of Taylor street, 
should lie annexed to District Xo. 7. 

District Xo. 6 controls all but a very few rods of the 
Dickey road, about one-half of the Webster road, and 
about one-half of Cohas avenue. The remaining portions 
are in District Xo. !». For convenience in breaking out 
the roads during the winter, these should all be put into 
District Xo. 6. District Xo. !» will then have more miles 
of roads than Xo. l>. The lines of all the highway districts 
should be definitely fixed, and bounds set on every road, 
which would effectually prevent any further mistakes ; or, 
what is better still, to consolidate all into one district, as 
recommended in my last report. 

HIGHWAYS IN GENERAL. 

I find many of the highways in the outer districts are 
narrow and dangerous. On some of them it is impossible 
for two teams to pass ; some on account of brush growing 
so close to the traveled track, and others on account of 



127 

the way they are turnpiked by inexperienced surveyors, 
digging 1 deep ditches along the side of the road and piling 
the material in a ridge through the center. I have found 
places that ought to he good roads actually made danger- 
ous from this cause alone. 

There is also a deficiency in sign-boards and names of 
roads and streets. I find that the mile-posts need to he 
renumbered. There are mile-posts on nearly every high- 
way leading out of the city, and the figures on many have 
been obliterated. The proper remedy for this would he 
to cut the figures upon the stone and then paint the cut. 
These three matters should receive the immediate atten- 
tion of the incoming city government. 

In Springfield, Mass., a road-builder like the one now 
owned by the city is used to scrape out the gutters during 
the winter. This could he profitably done here, as it 
would remove the snow from the gutters, and at the same 
time level it in the center of the street where it is needed. 

soldiers' monument. 

In the spring, letters were received by Gov. Weston 
from Mr. Keller, the designer of the soldiers' monument, 
stating that by an oversight his name was not put upon 
the monument, although the bronze-workers' names were 
on, and asking to have his name cut on the plinth, and 
he would pay the hill. These letters were handed to me 
by Gov. Weston, and I referred them to the mayor and 
aldermen. Xo action has yet been taken in the matter. 
It is but just to Mr. Keller that his request should be 
granted, as it is the custom throughout the country to put 
the designer's name on the monuments. 

TEAM. 

In the spring I made the city an offer to furnish a team 
if they would keep it. This offer was not accepted until 



128 

June 3. I had the team one month previous to that date, 
used it every day for the city, for which they paid me 
$32.00. The total cost for horse-hire and. car-fares pre- 
vious to that date, including the above, was $54.18. From 
June 4 to December 31 the cost actually charged to the 
office is $8.25, to which should be added the cost of keep- 
ing, estimated by the superintendent of streets to be $1.25 
per week, or $37.50 to January 1. Had the teams been 
hired, as heretofore, the cost would have been $315, mak- 
ing a saving to the city of $26*. >. 25. 

The following work has been done in the highway dis- 
tricts during the year : — 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

C. E. Quimby, Surveyor. 

No report. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

James Patten, Superintendent. 

Block paving, Elm street, 380.2 yards. This is a nar- 
row strip two feet wide, outside of the rails of the horse- 
railroad track north of Pennacook street. The city 
furnished the stone, and the company did the work. 

COBBLE PAVING. 

Cedar street, between Union and Beech . 66.7 yds. 

Bridge street, east of Russell street . . 733.3 " 

Chestnut street, Prospect to Harrison street 73.3 " 

Central street, Franklin to Canal street . 374.0 •' 



Total cobble paving .... 1,247.3 yds. 

MACADAMIZING. 

Chestnut street, Prospect to Harrison street, 684.5 sq. yds 



129 



Central street, Franklin to Canal street . 1,583.3 sq. yds. 
Elm street (one-half), Salmon to North 

street 1,991.1 " 



Total macadamizing 



4,258.9 sq. yds. 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Central street, Chestnut street to Pine street 
Cedar street, Pine street to Maple street 
Spruce street, Beech street to Maple street 
Central street, Beech street to Lincoln street 
Merrimack street, Union street to Maple 
Maple street, Park street to Hanover street 
Amherst street, Ashland to Belmont street 
Hall street, Manchester to Hanover street 
Bridge street, Russell street to Hall street 
Arlington street, Russell street to Maple 

street 

Pearl street, Russell street to Maple street 
Orange street, Russell street to Union street 
Oak street, Pearl street to Myrtle street 



GRADED AND GRAVELED. 

Spruce street, Pine street to Beech street 
Manchester street, Beech street to Hall street 
Linden street, Bridge street to Orange street 
Orange street, Russell street to Linden street 

(new) 

Beech street, Brook street to Gore street 

(new) 

Ray street, Webster street to Ray brook 
Appleton street, Chestnut street to Union 

street 

9 



310 feet. 

1,240 " 

600 " 

1,200 " 

1,140 " 

1,186 " 

920 " 

220 " 

1,220 " 

680 " 

700 " 

1,800 " 

531 " 



11,747 feet 



990 feet. 

2,400 " 

800 " 

420 " 

270 " 

500 " 

776 " 



130 

Monroe street, Elm street, westerly . . 150 feet. 

Salmon street, Elm street to Chestnut street 566 " 
Pine street, Hooksett road to Webster street 

(new) 1,291 " 

Ash street, Lowell street to Concord street 

(new) 270 " 

Maple street, Lowell street to Concord street 270 " 



8,703 feet. 



600 feet. 


600 " 


600 " 


1,800 feet. 



GRADED BUT NOT GRAVELED. 

Auburn street, Beech street to Maple street 
(new) ....... 

Auburn north back street, Beech street to 
Maple street ...... 

Webster street, Union street to Hooksett road 
(new) ....... 



Total, 22,250 teet, equal to 4.21 miles. 

Some of the street grading has been heavy work, as is 

shown by the following figures, one cubic yard being 

equivalent to one load : — 

Pine street, near Hooksett road 

Cedar street, between Pine and Beech, 
sidewalk ...... 

Auburn street, between Beech and Ma- 
ple streets ...... 

Auburn north back street, between 
Beech and Maple streets . 

Cedar street, between Beech and Maple 
streets ...... 

Chestnut street, at Ray brook 

Monroe street, west of Elm street 



8,838 


cu 


• yds 


179 




a 


741 




u 


170 




a 


60 




a 


253 




a 


250 




a 



131 

Park-square walks, on outside . . 479 cu. yds. 

Ash-street extension .... 1,000 " 

Granite street ....*. 370 " 



Total 12,340 cu. yds. 

In addition to the above, about one-half of Park square 
has been graded ; also the high-school yard from Concord 
to Lowell street, twenty-one feet in width. The grading 
for concrete has taken two teams two-thirds of the season. 



RETAINING WALLS. 



Cedar street, west of Beech .... 40 perch. 
Auburn street, between Beech and Maple 

streets ....... 66 " 



Total . . . . . . .106 perch. 

Coping on Maple street, 130 feet. 



RAILING. 



Railing set on Pine street .... 615 feet. 
Maple and Lowell street .... 153 " 



Total . . . . . . .768 feet. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

15-inch Akron pipe .... 

12-inch Akron pipe .... 

10-inch Akron pipe .... 

8-inch Akron pipe .... 

6,928 feet. 
Equal to 1.31 miles. (See sewers.) 

Not including eight-inch pipe used for catch-basin 
arms. 



60 feet 


1,929 


a 


4,822 


a 


117 


a 



132 



PIPE IN YARD. 



550 feet of 10 inch. 
450 feet of 8 inch. 

25 y branches 10" x 8". 



30 feet of 24 inch. 
105 feet of 15 inch. 
1,875 feet of 12 inch. 

35 y branches 15" x 8" 
75 y branches 12" x 8".. 

New catch-basins, 57. 
Curb-stone set, 2,631 feet. 



CROSSINGS. 

Stone, 4. Concrete, new, 42. Top-dressed, 13. 



Crossings, new 


^VXV^I\ 


1.1 1.. 




1,369.10 sq. 


yds 


Crossings top-dressed . 








314.73 < 




Sidewalks repaired 








315.80 < 




Lowell-street school 








129.65 ' 




High school . 








581.71 ' 




Spring-street school 








978.82 ' 




Franklin-street school 








141.87 ' 




Battery building . 








313.40 < 




Park square . 








1,439.00 ' 




Vine street . 








. 1,438.00 ' 




J. C. Hoyt's house 








136.80 < 




Police station 








335.88 < 




Granite street and bridge 






1,707.70 ' 




Total . 


9,202.46 sq. 


yds 



The following work has been done by contract : — 
Chestnut street at Ray brook, retaining wall, 60 perch. 
Hanover street at Mr. Avery's, coping, 78 feet. 



133 

The ledge in the sidewalk of Bridge and Beech streets 
at northwest corner blasted out. 

Union-street culvert, new stone . . . 517 perch. 
Old stone relaid 270 " 

DISTRICT BTO. 3. 
Edwin ~N. Baker, Surveyor. 

The Nutt road from Concord & Portsmouth Railroad 
to the etid of the district was widened 18 feet for a dis- 
tance of 4,000 feet, and partially graveled ; a ditch dug 
on the east side 800 feet in length. 

On the Calef road, the culvert near the hospital has 
been lengthened with 15-inch pipe, and a fill made 3 feet 
in depth by 150 feet in length. The whole road has been 
partially graveled. 

Beech street, two wooden culverts have been replaced 
by 12-inch Akron pipe, blasted and removed all the 
large stones, partially graveled the whole length. 

Young road has been partially graded. 

River road has been carefully repaired. 

Shasta street, partly graded. 

The Calef road and Baker street were badly damaged 
by the laying of the water pipe. Both roads were repaired 
and rolled, but it will take time to settle them. 

The brush has been cut on both sides of the roads for 
a width of eight feet from the sides of the traveled track, 
and nearly ten miles in length. 

The sidewalk on Elm street in front of the school-house 
and C. D. Welch's house has been graded and concreted 
eight feet in width. 

A concrete crossing across Shasta street. 

The school-yard terraced and turfed. 

All culverts and drains cleaned and repaired. 



134 
DISTRICT NO. 4. 

R. N. Whittemore, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked and graveled one and one-half miles, using 
six hundred loads of gravel. 

Built two new culverts and repaired one. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 
William W. Dickey, Surveyor. 

Graveled, 166 rods. 

Turnpiked, 186 rods. 

Road near John AVilley's widened and filled 2 1-2 feet, 
150 feet in length. Built retaining wall on north side, 
containing 25 perches of stone. 

Harvey's-mill road graded and retaining wall built, 
containing 20 perches of stone. 

Road near Fair Grounds widened to 50 feet, 36 rods in 
length. 

Replanked one bridge, new, 22 feet by 32 feet. 

Replanked one bridge, new, 9 feet by 18 feet. 

Put up 150 feet of railing, and set 19 posts for the same. 

Repaired railing on bridges across Cohas brook near 
P. Flanders's and Harvey's mill. 

Laid 50 feet 15-inch pipe, and 100 feet of 6-inch pipe. 

Lengthened two culverts 10 feet each, and one culvert 
15 feet. 

Built two new stone culverts and relaid two others. 

Built two new plank culverts. 

Cut three miles of bushes. 

Raked out the stones three times. 

And all other necessary repairs. 



135 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 
Daniel II. Dickey, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked, 158 rods. 

Graveled, 559 rods. 

Built one culvert 50 feet long, 18 inches square open- 
ing; also two culverts 16 feet long with 12 inches square 
opening. Cohas avenue was badly washed out by a 
heavy shower in the spring, making it necessary to put 
in 25 rods of cobble gutter, grade up the shoulder of the 
road, and pave it with cobble-stone. Near the pumping 
station a distance of 15 rods was widened 6 feet. 

The Island Pond road, opposite Mr. Mallard's, was 
widened for a distance of 31 rods by building a stone wall 
in the gutter and filling the same 6 feet in width and 3 
feet in depth, requiring 341 cubic yards of earth, and then 
graveled it. 

Bushes cut, roads kept free from cobbles, and general 
repairs made where needed. 

The Island Pond road and Lake Shore road are very 
narrow. The walls should be set back and the roads 
widened and straightened. By so doing a great expense 
can be saved in breaking out the drifts in winter ; at 
the same time quite a large amount of gravel could be 
obtained. At present there is no gravel in the district, 
and all used has to be drawn from District No. 9, an aver- 
age distance of about two miles, making a great addition 
to the cost of doing the work. The value of the gravel 
alone would more than pay the land damage. 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 

t Peter 0. Woodman, Surveyor. 

traveled. 

Old Falls road 100 feet. 

Spruce street, east of old Falls road . . 300 " 



136 



Taylor street, Massabesic street to Young 
road ........ 

Young road, Taylor street to Jewett street . 
Jewett street, Young road to Cilley street . 
Cilley road, from Jewett street, east 
Jewett street, near P. 0. Woodman's . * . 

Total . 
Equal to 1.1 miles. 



TURNPIKING. 



Taylor street 
Jewett street 

Total . 



GRADING. 



1,700 


feet 


1,400 


U 


1,430 


a 


600 


u 


300 


a 



5,830 feet. 



400 feet 


. 1,000 


a 


. 1,400 feet 


30 cu. 


yds. 


50 ' 




50 ' 




. 520 < 




. 1,630 ' 




. 150 ' 




2,430 cu. 


yds. 



Spruce street, total amount of filling 
Massabesic street, total amount of tilling 
Young road widened for 400 feet 
Jewett street ..... 
Cilley road ..... 

Belmont street . . • 

Total 

STONE CULVERTS. 



Taylor street, 1' x 1' x 15. 

Taylor street, 1' x V x 9'. 

Young road, 1' x V x 15'. 

Young road, 1' x 1' x 20'. 

The above culverts are for gutters. 

Taylor street, l^-' x \\' x 6'. Old one lengthened. 

Taylor street, V x 1' x 35'. 

Taylor street, l'xl'x 25'. 

Jewett street, 2' x 1^' x 30'. 

Jewett street, T x 1^-' x 25'. 



137 

Jewett street, 2' x 2' x 6'. Old one lengthened. 

Cilley road, 1£' x 1|' x 25'. 

Cilley road, l^' x 1\' x 27'. Belongs to District No. 3. 

Spruce street, culvert repaired. 

Belmont street, retaining wall, 50 perches. 

Belmont street, 6 ft. of 12" Akron pipe. 

Massabesic street, two catch-basins built. 

Gutters cleaned \ mile. 

DISTRICT NO 8. 
John H. Proctor, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked, 1\ miles. 

Graveled, 50 rods. 

Lake Shore road widened 25 feet by setting back 40 
rods of stone wall. Proctor road widened 20 feet by set- 
ting back 30 rods of stone wall. At junction of these two 
roads the walls have been set back and corners rounded. 

Hanover-street road at Park street widened 20 feet for 
50 feet, and filled 1\ feet, equal to 56 yards. 

Hanover-street road at Humphrey's brook widened 8 
feet, 100 feet long by 4 feet deep, equal to 115 yards. 
Hanover-street' road near Eaton's, rock blasted 60 feet by 
4 feet by 4 feet, equal to 38 perches. Proctor-road exten- 
sion, blasted rock equal to 54 perches. 

Blasting done in several places throughout the district. 

Three new stone culverts, each 1\' x 1-|-' x 22 feet, 

Nine old stone culverts lengthened, varying from 3 feet 
to 12 feet. 

One hundred feet of railing set. Brush cut for 2 miles. 
General repairs where needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 
Jabez J. Garmon, Surveyor. 
Turnpiked and graveled, 45 rods. 



138 



Graded and graveled, 78 rods, containing 2,383 cubic 
yards. 

One stone culvert, 1' x 1' x 14', new. 

One stone culvert, 14" x 16" x 24', relaid. 

At new bridges, 372 feet of railing and 64 posts. 
Also, general repairs. 

Two new bridges over Colias brook. (See bridges.) 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 

William N. Chamberlin, Surveyor. 

Cobble gutter paving, 1,749 square yards. 
Curbstone set, 760 feet. 

CONCRETE. 

Eleven new crossings 

New sidewalks ..-..! 

Total concrete 

GRADING. 

North Main street school-yard . 

Fourth street 

Shirley street 

Aniory north back street 

Patten street, at railroad 

Parker-street bridge . 

Bedford road 

Sidewalks . 

Parker-street, abutment excavations 



Total 



GRADED AND GRAVELED. 



Aniory street, Main to Beauport street 
Wayne street, Main to Beauport street 



318 sq. 


yds. 


1,354 


t 


1,672 sq. 


yds. 


150 cu. 


yds. 


450 ' 




75 ' 




150 ' 




100 ' 




237 ' 




1,620 < 




903 ' 




981 ' 




4,666 cu. 


yds. 


301 


feet. 


301 


u 



139 

Putnam street, Main to Beauport street 
Beauport street, Wayne to Sullivan street 



301 feet. 

962 " 



Total 



1,865 feet. 



AVOODEN RAILING SET. 



Boynton road at brook 


900 feet. 


Goffstown road .... 


. 140 " 


River road ..... 


170 " 


Total wooden railing . 


. 1,210 feet. 


Parker-street iron railing 


40 " 


Total fencing 


. 1,250 feet. 


SEWERS. 




Akron, 15 inch .... 


190 feet. 


Akron, 12 inch .... 


. 1,318 " 


Akron, 10 inch .... 


818 " 



Total 



2,326 feet. 



Eight-inch pipe used for catch-basins not counted. 
Catch-basins built, 17. 
Manholes, 6. (See sewers.) 

DISTRICT NO. 11. 

James E. Bailey, Surveyor. 

Cobble paving, 279 square yards. 

Macadamizing, 1,177 square yards. 

One culvert 66 feet long, 46 perches of stone. 

Curb-stone set, 1,234 feet, 

Graveled, 3 miles. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 



Jeremiah Garvin, Surveyor. 
Turnpiked Robert Neal road 



1-4 mile. 



140 



Graveled ....... 1 mile. 

One stone culvert. 

Cut down one hill two and one-half feet, using the 
earth to fill hollows. General repairs, such as picking 
out rocks and repairing. Water-bars have been carefully 
attended to. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 
John H. Campbell, Surveyor. 
No report. 

There has been a gradual increase in the demand for 
the work of the city engineer each year, in 1884 there 
being one-third more calls than in 1883. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my thanks to Messrs. 
E. H. Hobbs and Perry H. Dow, engineers of the Amos- 
keag Corporation, and to Mr. Joseph B. Sawyer, civil 
engineer, for valuable information furnished and plans 
loaned for copying. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT 



EEPOET 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineers' Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, K II., December 31, 1884. 

Yo His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : — 

In compliance with the lawn and ordinances of the city 
I herewith submit briefly the annual report of the Fire 
Department for the year just closed. 

The department has fully maintained its efficiency, and 
has responded to thirty box-alarmSi 

The aggregate loss has been $31,340.60, which lias been 
partially covered by insurance to the amount of 25,095.60, 
leaving the net loss $6,24.">. 

It has been the aim of the Board of Engineers to give 
the city the best tire service they could with the means at 
their disposal, although they find themselves crippled in 
many instances. In the matter of horses, they have but 
little or no control over them except in eases of fire. 
Many times in the course of the winter, during deep and 
heavy snows, the horses are used in breaking roads when 
the}' should be in the stables to assist in getting the 
apparatus to the fire in ease of an alarm ; even after their 
return from plowing they are usually so fatigued as to 
be of little avail in case their services are needed. 



144 

I hope the coming year arrangements will be made so 
that the horses assigned to Hose Companies Nos. 2 and 4 
will be kept in on alternate days, thus giving the eastern 
portion of the city better protection in cases of fire. As 
arranged at present, both horses are required to work upon 
the streets every week-day, so that if a fire occurs in their 
respective districts the horses are, a majority of the work- 
ing hours, farther from the fire than are those at the 
central fire station. 

These companies were located in the different sections' 
for immediate response to alarms in their vicinity ; but, 
with the horses as now used, the property gets but little 
protection from them in the early stages of a fire. 

Another evil is the working of the horses of the Hook 
and Ladder Truck on many occasions a mile or more from 
their house. The truck is a piece of the fire apparatus 
that is often wanted at the beginning of a fire. We shall 
never have a well equipped fire department as long as the 
horses are used as at present. 

While we have but one company of this kind in our 
department, there should be one pair of horses with driver 
on duty at the house all the time. I would not advise 
keeping the same pair for this duty all the time, Jmt 
would recommend that two pairs of horses be assigned for 
duty on the truck, and work alternate dates upon the 
streets. No city of the size of this has so few permanent 
firemen as ours, and while we have at present an efficient 
department, we should take all possible steps to advance 
its proficiency. 

A PROTECTIVE CORPS 

is much needed, and in most, if not all, cities where one 
is organized, it is maintained by the insurance companies, 
and I think from the amount of risks carried, and the 



145 

Baving in losses it would be to them, they can well afford 
to equip and maintain one here. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The present organization of the department includes 
one hundred and fourteen members, as follows: — 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

2 Steam Fire Engine Companies, — 14 men each. 
1 Horse Hose Company, — 20 men. 

3 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 

I Hook and Ladder Company, — 25 men. 

In addition to tin' above is one hand-hose company of 
20 volunteers, not under pay. 

THE APPARATUS 

has been improved the present year by the purchase of a 
new and very substantial supply wagon, better fitted for 
the requirements of the department than the old one, at a 
cost of $275. 

A new hook-and-ladder truck has been contracted for, 
to be delivered about the first of April next. It is to be 
fully equipped, and when in service it is the design of the 
board to use the present one as a reserve truck. 

The apparatus, as at present located, consists of — 

* 3 Steam Fire Engines, at Central Fire Station. 

I I Steam Fire Engine, corner Massabesic and Hall sts. 
1 Horse Hose Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Sled, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Hook and Ladder Truck, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Supply Wagon, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Maple and East High sts. 

* One reserve engine. t Reserve engine. 



146 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, on Clinton street, 'Squog. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Park and Massabesic sts. 

1 Hand Hose Carriage, at junction of Old Falls road 
and Front street, 'Skeag. 

1 2-wheeled Hose Carriage, Deny Mills, Goffe's Falls, 
manned by men at the mills. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

During the year a section has been added to the central 
station for the accommodation of the Hook and Ladder 
Company, so that the horses now face the truck. The 
engineer's office and battery-room, which were located in 
the part torn down to make room for the addition, have 
been removed to the south end of the old building. 

I would recommend that the tenement formerly occu- 
pied by the driver of the Hook and Ladder Company be 
fitted up with beds similar to stations in many other cities, 
where a few of our firemen could sleep. Often during 
the year it is necessary to keep extra men on duty, as in 
winter after heavy snows, for the purpose of "doubling 
up," as well as on the eve of and during Fourth of July, 
and accommodations should be furnished for such emer- 
gencies. The city would be much benefited thereby, as 
some of the firemen would be ready to respond at once 
with the apparatus. 

The house of the E. W. Harrington Hose Co. No. 3, in 
'Squog, is now the most poorly arranged of any we have, 
as well as poorly located. As radical changes are needed 
in the present one, I would suggest that a lot be procured 
near the Main-street grammar school building. From 
that location the company could respond to an alarm from 
McGregorville, or west of Main street, without climbing 
the hill, and could easily respond to any south of its 
present location, while a greater proportion of 'Squog 



147 

village would be better protected than now. I hope the 
incoming city government will take immediate steps 
towards such a change. 

The steam piping in the houses at the central station 
has never worked properly. It requires, in the coldest 
weather, from fifteen to eighteen pounds of steam to cir- 
culate through the pipes, and even with that pressure it is 
impossible to keep the pipes free from condensed water. 
The boiler requires as constant watching as one of high 
pressure. I have no doubt money enough could be saved 
in fuel in two seasons to pay for putting it in good shape, 
when, with three or four pounds of steam, better results 
and more comfort could be obtained. 

OBSTRUCTING HYDRANTS. 

Some of our citizens often thoughtlessly obstruct our 
fire-hydrants, either by hitching teams to them, unload- 
ing wood, lumber, and other articles in front and around 
them, or, particularly in winter, by shoveling snow from 
the walks, many times covering them entirely over. If 
they would but for a moment think of the delay that 
might occur in case of fire to their premises, I have no 
doubt they would take especial pains to remedy the evil, 
and see they were at all times free from obstructions and 
ready for immediate use. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH 

has generally given satisfaction. It has required a great 
deal of care and attention to keep it in working order, 
and while perfection even in the fire-alarm telegraph is 
impossible, still there has been no confusion in any box 
alarm during the year. The linemen of other companies 
have, however, caused some annoyance several times, by 
earelessly dragging their wires across ours, thus causing 
strokes upon our fire-bells. 



148 

I would urgently recommend a special appropriation of 

six thousand dollars ($6,000) the coming year for the pur- 
pose of remodeling the system, putting the three circuits 
into six, and exchanging the three-circuit repeater for one 
of eight circuits, so that two additional circuits may here- 
after be added at comparatively little expense: The 
ahove amount, 1 think, will cover the cost, including six 
new boxes, its well as the changing over of the inside 
work of our present ones, so as to comprise all the latest 
improvements of the "Gamewell System." 

SWINGING HARNESSES. 

At the time my report was submitted a year ago, we 
had on trial a pair of " The Berry Swinging Harnesses." 
Since then they have been purchased for both steamer 
companies, as well as for Hose Companies Nos. 2, 3, and 
4, and the Hook and Ladder Company. 

firemen's relief association. 

I have so many times called the attention of our citi- 
zens to the objects of this association that the mere men- 
tion that the amount in its treasury is growing less year 
by year will induce our liberal citizens to contribute to 
so good a cause. 

The following is a statement of its funds : — 

Amount in treasury at the annual 

meeting of February 12, 1884 . $870 74 

Cash received for membership . 19 00 

Cash received from Frank Hutch- 
inson, salary as assistant en- 
gineer one month ... 8 38 

(/ash received, interest on deposits 

to October 1, 1884 . . . 43 27 

_ $941 34 



149 



CONTRA. 



Cash paid for postals and printing 8*2 00 

Cash paid for secretary's salary . 25 00 
Cash paid Ruel G. Maiming for 

injuries received at Hill's tire . 53 50 



$80 50 



Balance in treasury .... $860 84 

CONCLUSION. 

In closing this report 1 wish to extend my thanks to 
his Honor Mayor Putnam and members of the city gov- 
ernment who have labored for the good of the depart- 
ment ; to City Marshal Jenkins and the police force under 
his charge, for aid and assistance in times of fire, as well 
as at our annual parade; to the efficient Assistant Engi- 
neers for their many courtesies, and to whom I am much 
indebted for valuable counsel ; and to the officers and 
members of the several companies for the promptness 
with which they have always responded to alarms, and 
the willingness with which they have performed the duties 
required of them. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LA^ T E, 
Chief Engineer Manchester Fire Department. 



150 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, ETC., FROM 



Day of Week. Day of Month. 



Location. 



Thursday. .. 
Saturday . . . 
Tuesday 

Friday 

Saturday . . . 
Saturday . . . 

Sunday 

Thursday. .. 
Monday .... 
Thursday. .. 
Tuesday .... 
Monday . . . 
Thursday. .. 
Wednesday. . 

Friday 

Friday 

Tuesday .... 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Wednesday.. 
Monday 

Friday 

Saturday.... 
Wednesday.. 
Thursday. . . 

Friday 

Saturday . .. 
Saturday... . 



January 3. 

January 5. 

January 22. 

February 8. 

February 9. 

February 16. 

February 24. 

Marcli 6. 



March 

March 

April 

April 

April 

May 

July 

July 

July 

July 

August 

August 

August 

October 

October 

October 

October 

November 5. 

November 13. 

November 21. 

December 13. 

December 20. 



2.15 p. m. 
10.38 p. m. 

7.47 P. M. 
12.58 p. m. 

2.22 a. m. 

1.02 A. M. 
1.14 p. M. 
5.12 A. m. 

7.50 p. m. 
9.24 p. M. 
4.39 p. m. 
7.29 p. m. 

10.08 A. M. 

8.03 p. m. 
2.43 P. M. 
9.24 p. m. 
3.22 p. M. 
4.12 p. m. 
2.03 p. M. 

10.18 A. M. 
2.18 p. m. 
8.56 p. m. 
8.06 A. m. 
4.11 p. M. 
2.45 a. m. 
7.32 P. M. 

1.51 A. M. 
4.11 p. M. 
6.11 p. M. 
9.55 P. m. 



31 

6 
27 

8 
52 
52 
23 
15 
51 

6 
32 
71 
13 
51 
15 
21 
20 
71 

4 
71 
51 
21 
17 
53 
51 
53 
27 
52 



Amoskeag Village 

Mechanic street. 

Corner Elm and Central streets. . . . 

15 Myrtle street 

Mast road, 'Squog 

Main street, 'Squog 

267 Park street 

Corner Pearl and Chestnut streets. 

3 Print-Works corp 

965 Elm street 

Salmon street 

180 Park street 

Blodget street 

South Elm street 

Rear 70 Pearl street 

12 Central street 

55 Nashua street 

193 Park street 

77 Park street 

Cedar street 

Auburn street 

Manchester street 

236 Amherst street 

Old Mast road 

Cedar street 

353 South Main street 

790 Elm street 

464 Granite street 

859 Elm street 

1 Kidder street 



151 



JANUARY 1, 1884, TO DECEMBER 31, 1884. 



Description. 



Owned by. 



Occupied by. 



Waste mill 

Commission store 

Boarding-house 

Brick block 

Dry-house 

Pipe and repair shop. . . . 

Two-story dwelling 

Two-story dwelling 

Wood-shed 

Brick block 

Brie k dwelling 

Cottage house 

School-house 

Foundry 

Barn 

Tenement block 

Cottage house 

Two-story dwelling 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Boiler-room 

Lumber and wood-sheds 

Cottage house 

House and barn 

Flouring-mill , 

Dwelling-house 

Shoe-store 

Tenement block 

Merchants' Exchange.. 
Tenement block , 



P. C. Cheney Co 

Kennard Brothers 

M. Prout 

Hoyt & James 

James Baldwin & Co 

E. F. Scheer 

A. 6. Monette 

D. K. Mack 

Manchester Print- Works. . . . 

Thomas Dunlap 

Frederick Smyth 

Estate of William Plumer.. . 

City 

Hutchinson Brothers 

W. A. Green 

Mr. Hall 

Hiram Brown 

Bridget Bartlett 

Estate of William Plumer. . . 

George Whitf ord 

S. C. Forsaith & Co 

J.H.Maynard and Mrs. H.C. Joy 

B.P.Cilley 

George W. Wilkins 

C. H. Hill&Co 

Estate of Eugene Bowman. . . . 

Brown, Straw, & Brown 

Mrs. Folsom and Mrs. Tolman 

Daniel Clark 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.. . . 



P. C. Cheney Co 

George W. Morgan. . . . 

W. D. Ladd 

Mary Miller. (Room.). 
James Baldwin & Co.. 

L. Wolf. 

A. G. Monette 

Mrs. H. M.Ford 



Amoskeag Clothing Co 

Frederick Smyth 

Mrs. Brown 

Schools 

Hutchinson Brothers 

Cyrus Burpee 

Joseph Lacasse 

W. G. Smith 

Sullivan Eelley 

Pat'k Stewart & Jas. Dowd 

Several families 

S. C. Forsaith& Co 

J. H. Maynard 

B.P.Cilley 

George W. Wilkins 

C.H.Hill &Co 

Daniel L. Mitchell 

George H. Wilson 

Freeman Young and others. 

Club-room 

Mrs. John Mahar 



150 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, ETC., FROM 



Day of Week. 



Thursday. . 
Saturday . 
Tuesday . . . 

Friday 

Saturday . . 
Saturday . . 
Sunday. ... 
Thursday. . 
Monday . . . 
Thursday. . 
Tuesday . . . 
Monday . . 
Thursday. . 
Wednesday 

Friday 

Friday 

Tuesday . . . 

Friday 

Tuesday . . . 
Saturday . . . 
Sunday. .. . 
Wednesday 
Monday . . . 

Friday 

Saturday... 
Wednesday 
Thursday. . 

Friday 

Saturday . , 
Saturday... 



Day of Month. 



January 3. 

January 5. 

January 22. 

February 8. 

February 9. 

February 16. 

February 24. 

March 6. 



March 

March 

April 

April 

April 

May 

July 

July 

July 

July 

August 

August 

August 

October 

October 

October 

October 

November 5. 

November 13. 

November 21. 

December 13, 

December 20. 



2.15 p. m. 
10.38 p. m. 

7.47 P. M. 
12.58 p. m. 

2.22 a. m. 

1.02 A. M. 
1.14 p. M. 
5.12 a. H. 

7.50 p. m. 
9.24 p. m. 
4.39 p. m. 
7.29 p. m. 

10.08 A. M. 

8.03 p. m. 
2.43 p. m. 
9.24 p. m . 
3.22 p. M. 
4.12 p. m. 
2.03 p. m. 

10.18 A. M. 
2.18 p. m. 
8.56 p. m. 
8.06 a. m. 
4.11 p. M. 
2.45 a. m. 
7.32 p. M. 

1.51 A. M. 
4.11 p. M. 

6.11 P. M. 

9.55 p. m. 



Box. 



31 

6 
27 

8 
52 
52 
23 
15 
51 

6 
32 
71 
13 
51 
15 
21 
2C 
71 

4 
71 
51 
21 
17 
53 
51 
53 
27 
52 

5 



Location. 



Amoskeag Village 

Mechanic street 

Corner Elm and Central streets. . . . 

15 Myrtle street 

Mast road, 'Squog 

Main street, 'Squog 

267 Park street 

Corner Pearl and Chestnut streets. 

3 Print-Works corp 

965 Elm street 

Salmon street 

180 Park street 

Blodget street 

South Elm street 

Rear 70 Pearl street 

12 Central street 

55 Nashua street 

193 Park street 

77 Park street 

Cedar street 

Auburn street 

Manchester street 

236 Amherst street 

Old Mast road 

Cedar street 

353 South Main street 

790 Elm street 

464 Granite street 

859 Elm street 

1 Kidder street 



151 



JANUARY 1, 1884, TO DECEMBER 31, 1884. 



Description. 



Owned by. 



Occupied by. 



Waste mill 

Commission store 

Boarding-house 

Brick block 

Dry-house 

Pipe and repair Bhop 

Two-story dwelling 

Two-story dwelling 

Wood-shed 

Brick block 

Brick dwelling 

Cottage house 

School-house 

Foundry 

Barn 

Tenement block 

Cottage house 

Two-story dwelling 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Boiler-room 

Lumber and wood-sheds. . 

Cottage house 

House and barn 

Flouring-mill 

Dwelling-house 

Shoe-store 

Tenement block 

Merchants' Exchange.. . . 
Tenement block 



P. C. Cheney Co 

Kennard Brothers 

M. Prout 

Hoyt & James 

James Baldwin & Co 

E. F. Scheer 

A. G-. Monette 

D. K. Mack 

Manchester Print-Works. . . . 

Thomas Dunlap 

Frederick Smyth 

Estate of William Plumer . . . 

City 

Hutchinson Brothers 

W. A. Green 

Mr. Hall 

Hiram Brown 

Bridget Bartlett 

Estate of William Plumer... 

George Whitford 

S. C. Forsaith & Co 

J.H.Maynard and Mrs. H.C. Joy 

B.P.Citley 

George W. Wilkins 

C.H. Hill&Co 

Estate of Eugene Bowman 

Brown, Straw, & Brown 

Mrs. Folsom and Mrs. Tolman. . 

Daniel Clark 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co.. . . 



P. C. Cheney Co 

George W. Morgan 

W.D.Ladd 

Mary Miller. (Room.). 
James Baldwin & Co.. 

L. Wolf. 

A. G. Monette 

Mrs. H. M. Ford 



Amoskeag Clothing Co 

Frederick Smyth 

Mrs. Brown 

Schools 

Hutchinson Brothers 

Cyrus Burpee 

Joseph Lacasse 

W. G. Smith 

Sullivan Kelley 

Pat'k Stewart & Jas. Dowd 

Several families 

S. C. Forsaith & Co 

J. H. Maynard 

B. P. Cilley 

George W. Wilkins 

C.H.Hill &Co 

Daniel L. Mitchell 

George H. Wilson 

Freeman Young and others . 

Club-room 

Mrs. John Mahar 



152 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, ETC., — Continued. 



Day of Week. 


Damage. 


Insurance. 


Uncovered 
by Ins. 


Cause. 


Remarks. 




$200.00 
1,300.00 




$200.00 
300.00 






$1,000.00 




Burning chimney. 


Saturday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Thursday 

Tuesday 

Thursday 

Wednesday. . . . 

Friday 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Tuesday 


100.00 
1,200.00 
50.00 
Slight. 

25.00 
None. 
7,305.00 
None. 
None. 

10.00 
None. 

198.60 
Slight. 

150.00 
None. 
None. 


100.00 






1,200.00 






50.00 






Defective chimney. 




25.00 










7,305.00 












Burning chimney. 










10.00 








Light from chimney 
Smoking in bed 




198.60 












150.00 








1 Extinguish'd with 
( pails. 






Playing with matches 






Burning chimney. 


Wednesday... . 
Saturday 


20.00 

200.00 

None. 

3,800.00 

13,407.00 


20.00 
125.00 






75.00 




1 Extinguished with 
( grenades. 


2,000.00 
11,462.00 


1,800.00 
1,945.00 








Thursday.. . . 
Saturday.. . . 


3,000.00 
300.00 
25.00 
50.00 


2,435.00 

300.00 

25.00 

50.00 


565.00 














Burning chimney. 














$31,340.60 


$25,095.60 


$6,245.00 





TABLE 

SHOWING NUMBER OF ALARMS FROM EACH BOX SINCE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM 

WAS ESTABLISHED, EXCEPT FROM SEPT., 1872, TO JAN., 1873, WHEN NO 

RECORD WAS KEPT. 



Box. 


1873 


1874 


1875. 


1876 1877 


1878. 


1879 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1883 


1884. 


Total. 


3 


| 


1 1 




2 






1 






1 




6 


4 


6 


6 4 


7 


7 


5 


4 


4 


2 


8 




i 


54 


5 




6 


2 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 




1 


16 


6 . 


4 


1 


1 


4 


4 


2 


2 






3 


2 


2 


25 


7 


7 




2 


1 


3 




2 


3 




2 


1 




21 


8 


2 




2 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 








2 


11 


9 
















1 




i 






2 


12 
























.. 




13 


i 




i 


















1 


3 


14 












i 














1 


15 






i 








i 




i 


2 




2 


7 


16 


i 




i 




















2 


17 






l 


i 
















i 


3 


18 






l 








i 




i 








3 


21 


3 




l 


i 


2 


2 


l 


i 


2 


i 




2 


17 


23 












1 






1 


l 




1 


3 


24 






i 








2 


i 


1 




i 




7 


25 






l 


i 












i 






3 


26 


i 














i 








i 


4 


27 




2 


2 




5 






2 




i 




2 


15 


31 






3 














l 




1 


5 


32 












i 




i 




l 




1 


4 


34 


2 


i 






















3 


35 






















l 




1 


36 












i 














1 


41: 












l 














2 


42 


i 
























1 


43 




























45 




























51 


i 


i 








i 




i 


i 




3 


'4 


14 


52 


i 4 


3 


1 




2 






2 




2 


2 


3 


19 


53 


! 2 


1 


1 


i 




i 




2 




1 




2 


11 


54 




























61 




i 




i 




i 


i 






2 


i 




7 


62 


•• 


2 




l 


i 


i 


i 












6 


71 






i 


l 




l 


3 


2 




i 




3 


12 




7T 


25 


26 


25 


30 


21 


22 


23 


n 


29 


13 


30 


290 








3 still. 






1 still. 




1 still. 


1 still. 


1 still. 




1 still. 


8 still. 



156 

No. 45. — Amory Mill counting-room. Keys at watch- 
room and A. J. Mayhew's, 51 Stark corporation, corner 
of Canal and Bridge streets. 

No. 51. — 8. C Forsaith & Co.'s shops. Keys at freight 
depot, S. C. Forsaith's office, and Lowell's iron foundry 
office. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Allen 
N. Clapp's store and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's steam-mill. Keys at the office 
and residence of I. R. Dewey. 

No. 54. — Corner of Wayne and Main streets, 'Squog. 
Keys at residences of Napoleon Duford and Julius 
Foucher. 

No. 61. — Corner of Elm and Hancock streets, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at residence of B. F. Merrill, John Crenan's 
saloon, and Carney, Lynch, & Co.'s brewery. 

No. 62. — Massabesic street, Hallsville. Keys at resi- 
dences of Charles C. Chase and G. W. Dearborn. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. 
Smith, and Daniel F. Healy. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be 
given at precisely 12.30 p. m., from Thomas Dunlap's 
jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the 
lire-bells. 



157 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND 

CITIZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a lire, notice should be 
immediately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, 
keys to which are in the hands of all regular police, also 
of persons at the corner or nearest houses, as designated 
by a card on each box. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a tire, or posi- 
tive information of a tire, will unlock the box, pull down 
the hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and 
then let go. Shut the door and remove the key. 

3. All persons giving tire-alarms are requested to 
remain by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard 
in the box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to 
the next nearest box and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal tor a tire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Be sure 
the box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm for no 
cause other than an actual tire. Don't give an alarm for 

A CHIMNEY-FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. //' you change //our 
residence or place of business, where tin keys ore kept, return 

tin: keys to th( sunn officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested 
to inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near 
their property, also all places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire-hells in 
the city, and the number of the box will be given four 
times for an alarm. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke 



158 

of the bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, to 
close the primary schools ; and, to close all the schools, 
two immediate strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds 
two more immediate strokes, — the time of striking the 
bells being at 8.05 a. m., for closing the schools during the 
forenoon, and at 1.15 p. m., for closing them during the 
afternoon. 



159 



RULES AND REGULATIONS IX REGARD TO 

RESPONDING TO ALARMS, ADOPTED BY 

THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

1. Steamer No. 1 will report for duty, on the days of 
its first run to all boxes ; on the days of its second run, it 
will report on the first alarm to boxes 4, 7, 8, 15, 27, 35, 
41, 42, 45, 51 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 5, 6, 12, 13, 
16, 17, 21, 23, 26, 32, 34, 43, 52, 53, 71 ; on third alarm, 
to all boxes. 

2. Steamer No. 4, same as above. 

3. On the first alarm from boxes 9, 24, 25, 26, 31, 36, 
54, 61, 62, the steamer horses of the second run will 
double on to the engine of its first run, and on the arrival 
at the fire the second-run horses will return to their 
house, and in case of an alarm from any box the company 
will immediately respond with their engine. 

4. Pennacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to all boxes. 

5. Massabesic Hose No. 2 will report for duty on the 
first alarm to boxes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 
21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 35, 36, 41,42, 51 ; on the second alarm, 
to boxes 3, 12, 23, 31, 32, 34, 43, 45, 62, 71 ; on the third 
alarm, to all boxes. 

6. E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 will report for duty on 
the first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 27, 35, 41, 42, 43, 51, 52, 
53, 54 ; on second alarm, to boxes 7, 12, 31, 32; on third 
alarm, to all boxes. On first alarm from box 45, repair to 
west end of McGregor bridge and await orders, or cross 
on second alarm. 

7. Merrimack Hose No. 4 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 15, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 27, 
35, 36, 41, 42, 51, 61, 62, 71 ; on second alarm, to boxes 



160 

8, 12, 16, 26, 32, 34, 43, 45, 52, 53 ; on third alarm, to all 
boxes; 

8. Hook and Ladder Xo. 1 will report for duty on tire 
first alarm to all boxes. 

9. Steamer No. 2 to be kept as a reserve engine, to 
respond to a third alarm. The horses attached to the 
engine on its first run will return to the house on a second 
alarm, to be in readiness to respond to a third alarm ; and 
the engine will be manned by men detailed for that 
purpose and attached to J'ennacook Hose and Hook and 
Ladder companies at all times, except when the engine is 
on duty. 

10. Steamer Xo. 3 to be kept as a reserve engine, to 
be used in case of need on third alarm. 

11. At any time when an alarm of lire is given, the 
engine, hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first 
will have the right to lead to the tire. No RUNNING By 

WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDEB 
PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FBOM THE DEPABT- 
MENT. 

12. The companies of the department not called on 
the first alarm will prepare for a start, and hold them- 
selves in readiness tor a second or third alarm; and if not 
needed, one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer 
in charge, will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses ; or, in case this one blow is not 
struck within thirty minutes, companies may consider 
themselves dismissed, except the drivers, who will remain 
in the houses with their horses until the two blows to 
limber up are given. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 



161 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose 

carriage $4,500 00 

100 feet three-inch leather hose . . . 140 00 

1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch fabric hose . . . 900 00 

Firemen's suits 200 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 400 00 



Total amount $6,140 00 

FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 first-class double-plunger engine and hose 

carriage $2,750 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON PARK STREET, CORNER MAS8ABESIC. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class single-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $2,750 00 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage ..... $3,500 00 

50 feet rubber hose 75 00 

1,100 feet leather hose 1,000 00 

Firemen's suits 200 00 



162 



Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses $400 00 



Total amount .... $5,175 00 

PENNACOOK HOSE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $650 00 

1 horse hose sled and reel . . . 50 00 

3,100 feet leather hose 3,100 00 

Firemen's suits 250 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 400 00 



Total amount $4,450 00 

MASSABESIC HOSE NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $700 00 

1,700 feet leather hose 1,750 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses ...... 60 00 

Firemen's suits . . . . . 175 00 



Total amount .... $2,685 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON CLINTON STREET, PISCATAQUOG. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $650 00 

2,100 feet leather hose 2,100 00 

Firemen's suits ..... 150 00 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 200 00 



Total amount .... $3,100 00 



163 

MERRIMACK HOSE NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON PARK STREET, CORNER MASSABESIC. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $700 00 

1,700 feet leather hose 1,700 00 

Firemen's suits . ... . . 120 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including harness 125 00 



Total amount .... $2,645 00 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders . . $1,500 00 
1 Bangor extension ladder • . . 150 00 

Firemen's suits 350 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses '. 340 00 



Total amount .... $2,340 00 

SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

1 supply wagon with boxes and engineers' 

lanterns $312 00 



SPARE HOSE. 

AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

950 feet leather hose $1,092 50 

ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 

5 fire-hats $7 50 

Furniture and fixtures . . . . 125 00 



Total amount $132 50 



164 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

At cost (including additions) . . $21,625 00 

Ladders and tools . . . . . . 25 00 

Extra poles and wire .... 20 00 

Total amount ... $21 ,670 00 



INDEPENDENT HOSE CO. 

LOCATED CORNER OLD FALLS ROAD AKD FRONT STREET, 'SKEAG. 



1 four-wheeled hose-carriage 



1,200 feet leather hose .... 
2 hose-pipes ..... 

Total amount 

GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT DERRY MILLS. 

1 two- wheeled hose-carriage 

400 feet linen hose .... 

2 hose-pipes ..... 

Total amount 

RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Engine No. 1 

Fire King Engine No. 2 . 

E. AV. Harrington Steam Engine No. 3 

1ST. S. Bean Steam Engine No. 4 . 

Pennacook Hose No. 1 . 

Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 

E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 

Merrimack Hose No. 4 . 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder No. 1 . 



. $400 


00 


900 


00 


30 


00 



$1,330 00 



. $100 


00 


150 


00 


12 


00 



$262 00 



£6,140 00 
2,750 00 
2,750 00 
5,175 00 
4,450 00 
2,685 00 
3,100 00 
2,645 00 
2,340 00 



165 



Supply Wagon 


. $312 00 


Store-room 


. 1,092 50 


Engineers' Department . 


132 60 


Fire Alarm . . . 


. 21,670 00 


Independent Hose at Amoskeag 


. 1,330 00 


Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage 


262 00 


Total amount 


$56,834 00 



166 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS 
OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



n 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane.. . 
Orrin E. Kimball... 
James F. Pherson. . 
Rue] G. Manning. . . 


Chief 




1937 Elm St. 







Wool andLe'th'rDeal'r 




s 




25 M. S. B. 


4 






60 Douglas St. (P.) 
96 Bridge St. 


5 


Assistant and clerk 









AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO.' 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



n 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


6 


Charles F. McCoy . 
Frank E. Stearns . . 
George R. Simmons 
Henry H. Glines.. . 
Geo. W. Butterfield 
Art em as C. Barker. 
Joseph H. Gould . . . 

John H. Stone 

Thomas J. Wyatt . . 
George E. Cassidy.. 
Frank B. Marston . 
Woodbury Davison. 
Henry A. Boone . . . 






1405 Elm St. 


7 
8 
9 


Assistant Foreman. 
Clerk 




5 M. S. B. 




389 Park St. 


Assistant Engineer. 






10 








28 Vine St. 


12 






494 Pine St. 


13 








14 


M 




27 Orange St. 
14 M. S. B. 


15 






16 


it 




45 Spring St. 
11 M. S. B. 


17 

18 


if 




(( 




785 Union St. 


19 


it 




19 M. S. B. 







167 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 

Supt. Electric Light- 
Machinist 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Fireman 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Electrician 



Residence. 



Eugene S. Whitney 
Edgar G. Abbott. . . 

John Martin 

Thomas F. Dodge. . 

Jeremiah Lane 

Almus B. Cushing . 

Charles E. Ham 

William H. Dodge . 
George W. Bacon . . 
Alfred Nearborn.. . . 

Albert Merrill 

Eugene W. Elkins. 
Frank A. Pherson.. 
George N. Burpee. . 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Assistant Engineer 

Driver , 

Hoseman 



9G Bridge St. 
543 Chestnut St. 
624 Main St. 
545 Chestnut St. 
20 Vine St. 
86 Park St. 
44 M. S. B. 
530 Chestnut St. 
65 Stark Corp. 
Cor.E. High & Jane 
96 Bridge St. 
530 Chestnut St. 
36 Amoskeag Corp. 
99 Bridge St. 



168 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House on Vine Sti-eet. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 

Belt-Maker 

Marble- Worker . . . 

Currier 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Photographer 

Carpenter 

Manufacturer... . 

Machinist 

u 

Weaver 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Railroad Employe 

Clerk 

Molder 

Carpenter 



Residence. 



Albert Maxfield.... 
Clarence D. Palmer 
Joseph E. Merrill.. 
Walter L. Blenus . . 
George H. Porter . . 

Will G. Chase 

Lyman M. Aldrich. 
Joseph H. Alsop... . 
Daniel W. Morse . . 
George W. Cheney . 
Gilbert A. Sackett. . 
Edwin A. Durgin. . 

Samuel A. Hill 

Edwin E. Weeks. .. 
Albert A. Puffer . . . 
Charles W. Brown . 
Martin W. Ford.... 

David G. Mills 

Charles B. French . 
John E. Sanborn . . 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Driver , 

Hoseman 



23 M. S. B. 
347 Central St. 
92 Walnut St. 
26 Vine St. 
277 Laurel St. 
217 Central St. 
375 Park St. 
64 Douglas St. (P.) 
1419 Elm St. 
1348 Elm St. 
53 Amoskeag Corp. 
44 Manchester " 
50 Douglas St. (P.) 
50 Amoskeag Corp. 
544 Chestnut St. 
16 Hazel St. 
546 Chestnut St. 
Parker St. (P.) 
18 M. S. B. 
274 Laurel St. 



169 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on Maple Street, cor. East High. 



pa 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. , 


Residence. 


64 

65 


John F. Seaward . . . 
Revilo G. Houghton 
Park'rW.Hannaford 

Walter Seaward 

Henry G. Seaman. . 
Jos. W. Batchelder. 
WilliamS. McLeod. 
Alphonso £. Foster. 
George W. Seaward. 
Albert E. Batchelder 

Daniel W. Clark . . . 








Assistant Foreman 
Clerk 


Gas-Fitter 


288 Bridge St. 
256 Lowell St. 


56 




57 




521 Maple St. 
14 South St. 


f>ft 






59 


(t 




521 Maple St. 
40 Arlington St. 
43 Nashua St. 


60 






6° 


(t 




63 


ii 




409 Pine St. 


64 


ii 


77 Blodget St. 
27 South St. 


65 




61 


ii 




232 East High. 







E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Clinton Street, 'Squog. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 

Grocer 

Carpenter 

Wool-Sorter 

Teamster 

Machinist 

Roofer 

Machinist 

Lumber-Surveyor 

Carpenter 

Engraver 

Carpenter 

Saloon-Keeper . . . 



Residence. 



Horatio Fradd. 
John T.G.Dinsmore 
Joseph Schofield . 
John T. O'Dowd. 
William Doran . . 
John McDerby. . . 
Edward McDerby 
A. C. Wallace, Jr 
Edward Flanagan 
John Patterson . . 
William McCombie 
John Walsh 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Driver 

Steward 

Hoseman 



64 Dover St. 
48 Dover St. 
392 Granite St. 
Clinton St. 
62 Parker St. 
503 Granite St. 
151 Winter St. 
79 Parker St. 
21 Central St. 
45 School St. 
161 Winter St. 
166 S. Main St. 



170 



MERKIMACK HOSE COMPANY NO. 4. 

House on Park Street, corner Massabesic. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


78 
79 
82 
81 
86 
87 
84 
85 
88 
89 
83 
80 


George B. Forsaith . 
Louis N. Dufrain . . 

Charles H. Rogers.. 






196 Laurel St. 






474 Central St. 


















479 Central St. 


George H. Wheeler. 
Charles H. Colburn. 
William P. Emerson 
Lucien P. Nichols . . 
Parker R. Brown. . . 
James W. Lathe.. . . 
Warren F. Wheeler. 












286 Laurel St. 






286 Laurel St. 






302 Laurel St. 






286 Laurel St. 






302 Laurel St. 















171 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Namb. 

Milo B. Wilson. . . 
Jerome J. Lovering 

Oscar P. Stone 

Winfield S. Leavitt. 
Charles M. Denyou. 

Warren Harvey 

James Orrill 

George E. Glines. . . 

John N. Chase 

John Wilson 

Hiram P. Young. . . 
George H. Dudley.. 
Ed. A. G. Holmes.. 

Luther J. Flint 

Harrison H. Cole. . . 
Jesse B. Nourse... . 
Charles H. Cross . . . 

Dillwyn Breed 

George M. Jones. . . 
Samuel F. Adams.. 

Roscoe Dyer 

Sanborn T.Worthen 
Ralph Pearsons .... 
George W. Rief . . . 
A. L. N. Robertson 



Rank. 

Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Treasurer 

Driver 

Fireman 



Occupation. 

Mason 

Carpenter 

Meat & Fish dealer 

Mechanic 

Teamster 

Contractor 

Barber 

Machinist 

Overseer 

Carpenter 

Slater 

Carpenter 

Overseer 

Belt-Maker 

Gardener 

Expressman 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Box-Maker 

Carpenter 



Residence. 



90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

107 



542 Chestnut St. 
78 Merrimack St. 
326 Granite St. 
939 Elm St. 
18 Vine St. 
474 Hanover St. 
60 Prospect St. 
310 Central St. 
276 Bridge St. 
12 M. S. B. 
33 Dutton St. 
159 Laurel St. 
224 Manchester St. 
4 Dutton St. 
37 M. S. B. 
Union cor.Appleton 
8 Langdon Corp. 
335 Chestnut St. 
1068 Elm St. 
295 Lowell St. 
45 W. Merrimack. 
Corey's blk.,Maple. 
8 Laurel St. 
East High St. 
493 Pine St. 



172 

INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 

House, corner Old Falls road and Main Street, Amosheag. 



Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 




Fore 
Assi 
Cler 
Stev 
Tret 






Shoe Shop Blk. (A.) 
"Brick Store "(A.) 
Front St. (A.) 
Second St. (A). 
Front St. (A.) 
Front St. (A.) 
98 Bridge St. 
Mill St. (A.) 
Second St. (A.) 
Mill St. (A.) 
Second St. (A.) 




stant Foreman. . . 
k 




George L. Stearns 


Clerk 










D.Lafayette Robinson 
Frank W. Cheney 














Alvah R. Mack 






John Doherty 

Elmer E. Pettengill . . 




















Clerk 


Front St. 


George C. Harwood.. . 










Front St. 


Will H. Maxwell 






Front St. 










(i 


Front St. 




Front St. 













173 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, corner of Franklin street. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Baker, corner of Elm street. 
Baker, corner of Calef road. 
Baker, corner of Nutt road. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 
Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 



174 



Beech, front of No. 584. 
Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 
Blodget, front of primary school-house. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, front of No. 26. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Bridge, corner of Ashland street. 
Bridge, corner of Hall street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near office door of M. L. W. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 



175 



Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Central, northwest corner of Union street. 

Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 

Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Central, front of No. 374. 

Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Chestnut, opposite High street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 

Clarke, corner of Elm street. 

Concord, opposite Vine street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Elm, front of Fisk hookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Gore, corner of Beech street. 



176 



Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. • 
Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Granite, near Franklin street. 
Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 
Grove, corner of Elm street. 
Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 
Hancock, near brewery. 
Hanover, front of Opera House. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 13. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 
High, corner of Ashland street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel , northwest corner of Union street. 



177 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Laurel, near No. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Laurel, near Belmont. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 

Lowell, front of No. 276. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Central street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Maple, front of No. 530. 

Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mammoth road. 

Mechanics, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Mechanics, near second back street west of Elm street. 

12 



178 



Mechanics, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Merrimack, near Belmont street. 
Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Middle, near 67 Amoskeag corporation. 
Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. ■ 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 
North, northwest corner of Bay street. 
North, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 
Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Orange, corner of Ash street. 
Orange, corner of Maple street. 
Orange, corner of Oak street. 



179 

Orange, corner of Russell street. 
Park, near No. 86. 

Park, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Park, northwest corner of Union street. 
Park, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Park, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Park, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Park, east end. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Park street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 



180 



Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
River road, north of Webster street. 
River road, near Mrs. John Kelley's. 
River road, near J. Otis Clark's. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 
Shasta, corner of Beech street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite 57 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite 13 Manchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 
Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Union, northwest corner of High street. 
Valley, corner of Elm street. 
Valley, corner of Willow street. 
Valley, corner of Beech street. 
Valley, corner of Wilson street. 



181 

Valley, corner of Belmont street. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Water, near 38 Amoskeag corporation. 
Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Webster, corner of Adams street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 
Webster, northeast corner of River road. 
West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Wilson, corner of Park street. 
Young, corner of Elm street. 

PISCATAQUOG. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
Adams, corner of Main street. 
Bath, corner of Shirley street. 
Bennington, corner of Main street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 



182 



Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 

C street, corner of Bedford road. 

Clinton, corner of Dover street, 

Clinton, corner of South Main street. 

School, corner of South Main street. 

School, opposite school-house. 

School, corner River street. 

Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 

Douglas, corner of Green street. 

Douglas, corner of Barr street. 

Douglas, corner of West street. 

Douglas, corner of Main street. 

Douglas, east of Main street. 

Ferry, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Quincy street. 

Granite, corner of Green street. 

Granite, corner of Barr street. 

Granite, corner of West street. 

Granite, corner of Dover street, 

Granite, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Shirley street. 

Granite, corner of River street, 

Main, opposite the Rice house. 

Marion, corner of McGregor street, 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street, 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets*. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's. 

Mast, near J. X. Prescott's. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite " Reed " house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main street. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 



183 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 
Patten, corner of Ferry street. 
Putnam, corner of Main street. 
Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 
Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 
Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry street. 
Sullivan, corner of Main street. 
Temple, corner of Main street. 
"Walker, corner of River road. 
Walker, corner of Patten street. 
Walker, corner of Parker street. 
Walker, near corner of South Main street. 
Wayne, near corner of Main street. 
Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 
Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Goffstown road. 

Gofistown road. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 

Main, near brick school-house. 

Main, corner of Gofistown road. 

Main, opposite John E. Stearns's. 

Main, near Hiram Stearns's. 

Mill, near paper-mill. 

Mill, corner of Main street. 

Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are four private hy- 
drants that are available in case of need : — 

One at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith & Co.'s machine-shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at A. H. Lowell's iron foundry. 

Making 371 in all. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1884. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

HORACE B. Putnam, Major, ex-officio Chairman. 
JOHN A. McCRILLIS, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1. — * Frank T. E. Richardson, 

Perry H. Dow. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Bean, 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3. — Henry H. Huse, 

Nathan P. Hunt. 
Ward 4. — John T. Fanning, 

Samuel D. Lord. 
Ward 5. — Charles A. O'Connor, 

Thomas F. Collins. 
Ward 6. — B. Milton Goodwin, 

Jacob J. Abbott. 
Ward 7. — George B. Towne, 

Edwin F. Jones. 
Ward 8. — Louis E. Phelps, 

Douglas Mitchell. 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD. 

HEXRY H. HUSE. 

♦Resigned March, 1884, and C. H. Manning elected in April as mem- 
ber from Ward 1. 



188 

CLERK OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

*FRAKK T. E. RICHARDSON. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

HORATIO W. LONGA. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. Lord, McCrillis, 
Fanning, Jones. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Phelps, Hnse, Goodwin. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Dow, Fan- 
ning, Goodwin. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Dow, Fanning, Mitchell. 

Music. - — Messrs. Lord, Hnse, Manning. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Hnse, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Abbott, Phelps, McCrillis. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Mitchell, Collins, Towne. 

Sanitary. — Messrs. Towne, O'Connor, Jones. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Fanning, Dean, Hunt, O'Con- 
nor, Huse. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, Clarke. 
Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Fanning, Goodwin, Lord. 
Spring Street. — Messrs. Manning, Jones, Dow. 
Franklin Street. — Messrs. Towne, Collins, Abbott. 

* Resigned March, 1884, and Edwin F. Jones elected March 7, as clerk. 



189 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Lord, Jones, Abbott. 

Manchester Street. — Messrs. O'Connor, Manning, Huse. 

Training School (Merrimack Street) and Wilson Hill. — 
Messrs. Hunt, Huse, Phelps. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Mitchell, Manning. 

Piscataquog Grammar. — Messrs. Phelps, Mitchell, 
Dean. 

Center and South-Main Streets. — Messrs. Mitchell, Phelps, 
Dow. 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. Clarke, Jones, Lord. 

Bakersville and Hallsville. — Messrs. Dow, Abbott, 
O'Connor. 

Gojfe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Goodwin, 
Towne, O'Connor. 

Mosquito Pond, Webster's Mills, and Youngsville. — 
Messrs. Abbott, Goodwin, Towne. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Jones, Clarke, Collins. 



In Board of School Committee, 
January 2, 1885. 

The Superintendent read his annual report to the committee, and 
it was accepted. 

Charles H. Manning read the annual report prepared by him at 
the request of the Board. 

Voted, That the report be accepted, and adopted as the report of 
the Board, and that it be transmitted to the City Councils, together 
with the report of the Superintendent. 

EDWIN F. JONES, Clerk. 



REPOKT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the City Councils : — 

Gentlemen, — The School Committee would respect- 
fully tender the following report for the year ending 
December 31, 1884: — 

The past school year has been marked by few changes 
in the schools, which for the most part have kept on the 
even tenor of their way, each school doing well the part 
assigned in the education and elevation of the children of 
our city. 

The first change of importance was late in the spring 
term, when on account of your decision to use the Man- 
chester-street school-house for other purposes, the two 
primary schools were transferred to the Lowell-street 
house, and one has since been discontinued. 

Owing to the rapid increase of population in "West 
Manchester, when the fall term opened the school accom- 
modation proved insufficient, and after providing for as 
many as possible by opening a new school in the attic of 
the South-Main-street house, it was found necessary to 
send quite a number of the pupils across to the Franklin- 
street school. When the new rooms at the Main-street 
house are completed, it is proposed to transfer the school 
from the attic of the South-Main-street house. Should 



192 

the growth of that part of the city continue as rapid as 
for the last two years, the building of a new house will 
soon be imperative. 

At the same time, the beginning of the fall term, a 
new school was opened in the Webster-street house, to 
accommodate the increased number of pupils in that part 
of the city. 

From February to July there was a temporary school 
in the third story of the Ash-street house, to accommo- 
date a number of the pupils of the first division, for whom 
there was no room down stairs. During the spring term 
there was a temporary school at Wilson Hill. 

N"o accident, lire, or epidemic has occurred during the 
year to interfere with the regular school routine. The 
primary grades were closed several times on account of 
inclement weather, it being considered imprudent to ex- 
pose the small children at such times. 

The school calendar for 1884 was as follows : — 

Winter term, 11 weeks, January 7 to March 21. Vaca- 
tion, 3 weeks, March 21 to April 14. 

Spring term, 11 weeks, April 14 to June 27. Vacation, 
11 weeks, June 27 to September 15. 

Fall term, 14 weeks, September 15 to December 19. 
Vacation, 2 weeks, December 19 to January 5, 1885. 

With the exception of the gradual change to the new 
course of study in the High School, the courses and 
methods 'pursued have been substantially the same as 
before. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The work of this school, though of necessity somewhat 
interrupted during the year by change of principals, has 
maintained its usual excellence, and no one who gives 



193 

the system pursued a careful and candid examination can 
be otherwise than impressed with its utility. The fact of 
a person having graduated with even the highest distinc- 
tion from our High School, does not imply capacity 
for governing or for imparting knowledge to others. 
The purpose of the Training School, then, is, as its 
name implies, to instruct in methods of instruction and 
school government, and the work of its ex-members and 
graduates in our schools is sufficient proof for any one 
of the utility of the school. 

As a supply for substitute teachers, it is of great assist- 
ance both to the superintendent and the sub-committees 
of the various schools, who, without this source to draw 
on in cases of emergency, would sometimes have to dis- 
miss a school for a day or more. 

GRADED SCHOOLS. 

There have been some changes of teachers in these 
schools during the year, the full details of which will be 
given in the report of the Superintendent. 

The chief cause of regret is the loss of the very efficient 
principal of the Ash-street school, who for the short time 
he was at the head of this school had fully sustained the 
reputation established as the principal of the Franklin- 
street school. 

In these schools the average number of pupils to each 
teacher is about forty, and as the actual time allotted to 
recitations is little over four hours per diem, the time the 
teacher can devote to each pupil is about six minutes per 
day, and when this is divided by at least three studies, it 
leaves two minutes per pupil per study. The tendency 
of this is to change what should be an instructor into a 
mere hearer of recitations, for it is evident there is not 
time for both methods or a fair combination of both. If 

13 



194 

recitation is put aside for instruction, the bright, atten- 
tive, and interested pupils benefit by it, while the inatten- 
tive and indolent suffer accordingly. It should be put 
within our power to reduce the number of pupils per 
teacher by increasing the number of the latter. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

In this school the new course of studies is now in good 
working order, with very gratifying results, and we think 
with decided benefit to the school, taken as a whole. 

The general tendency of high schools is to sacrifice 
other things in favor of fitting a few to enter college ; and 
while such as elect a college course should have every 
facility, it is our intention that the school shall be con- 
ducted for the good of the greatest number. The sub- 
committee of the school were unsuccessful in their 
attempts during the summer to secure for it a fit perma- 
nent principal. Under the circumstances, it was deemed 
best to employ Mr. T. D. Adams as a temporary principal. 
This arrangement has continued through the fall term, 
but the school will be opened for the winter term under 
the principalship of Mr. E. E, Goodwin, and in his charge 
we expect the school to be second to none. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The regular evening schools at the Spring-street and 
Center (W. M.) street buildings have been continued. 
The term which began in October, 1883, was continued 
till the first of April, and the fall term began November 
10. The schools have been well attended, and form a 
very valuable department in our school system. They 
reach a class of the community which the other schools 
cannot assist, and they merit even more attention and 
encouragement than they have received in the past. The 



195 

pupils are mainly of foreign birth, some of the older ones 
being* well educated in their own languages, and their de- 
sire is principally to become acquainted with the English 
language. The branches taught, therefore, are neces- 
sarily of a rudimentary nature. Reading, writing, spell- 
ing, and arithmetic constitute the principal studies ; but 
in both schools there are classes in history, grammar, and 
geography. 

The scholars are all of the working class, most of them 
being employed in the mills, and attend the schools for 
the sole purpose of improving themselves, and their work 
is, naturally, earnest and sincere. The results are good, 
and compare most favorably with the progress made in 
the day schools. The teachers have nearly all taught for 
a series of terms, and are to be credited with efficient and 
faithful service. With these schools in session, there is 
no excuse for any portion of our people to remain unable 
to both read and write the English language readily. 

Spring-Street School. 

The greatest number of teachers employed at one time 
was 10 ; the average number of teachers, 6. The whole 
number of pupils attending one week or more, 149 ; aver- 
age attendance through the year, 55. Males constitute 
66 per cent; females, 34 per cent. The average age, — 
males, 20 ; females, 17. Nationalities, — Irish, 41 per cent • 
French, 30 per cent; Swedes, 20 per cent; Germans, 6 
per cent ; and Americans, 3 per cent. 

Center-Street School. 

The greatest number of teachers employed was 6 ; the 
average number, 4. The greatest number of pupils at- 
tending one week or more, 101 ; the average attendance 
through the year, 40. Males constitute 60 per cent; 



196 

females, 40 per cent. The average age of males, 20 ; of 
females, 18. Nationalities, — Americans, 26 per cent; 
Germans, 23 percent; French, 20 percent; Irish, 26 per 
cent; Scotch, 5 per cent. 

Total expenses for the year, $1,252.38. 

Owing to the character of the branches taught, and the 
shortness of the sessions, the number of pupils for whom 
one teacher is sufficient is quite small, but it is found by 
experience that the average number is about nine, as will 
be seen from the above statistics. 

PUBLIC EXERCISES. 

On Thursday evening, January 31, the fifth annual 
elocutionary contest for the Clarke prizes took place at 
Smyth's Hall. Ex.-Gov. Benjamin F. Prescott, of Ep- 
ping, Mrs. Isaac N. "Blodgett, of Franklin, Hon. Chester 
B. Jordan, of Lancaster, Mrs. Sarah Neal Harris, of 
Concord, and Hon.- Thomas Cogswell, of Gilmanton, 
kindly acted as aboard of judges. The prizes were eight 
in number, amounting to |60, the first four, given in order 
of merit, being respectively $13, $11, $9, and $7, with 
four equal prizes of $5 each, one to the best in each 
school exclusive of those receiving one of the first four 
prizes. The entire program was very well executed, and 
reflected much credit, not only on the speakers, but on 
their trainers. The first four prizes were awarded in the 
following order : Tom Fames Morse, third division Ash- 
street Grammar School ; Minnie E. Littlefield, High 
School ; Blanche C. Sargent, Lincoln-street Grammar 
School; George M. Goodwin, Lincoln -street Grammar 
School. 

The four equal prizes were won by Thomas C. Bald- 
win, High School ; Mamie J. Walsh, Franklin-street 
school ; Bertha Tower, Ash-street school ; and Nat. W. 
Colby, Lincoln-street school. 



197 

The receipts from these five contests have created a 
fund, the income of which, as originally planned by Mr. 
John B. Clarke, the founder, is now sufficient to pay the 
prizes, and he suggests that the income from future con- 
tests be used to supply the school with text-books on 
elocution and other works kindred to the general object. 

About the 22d of February public exercises in reading 
and declamation were held at all the grammar schools, 
and were well attended by the parents and friends of 
the pupils, who as a general thing take by far too little 
interest in what their children are doing at school. 

The graduating exercises at the High School on June 27 
were of a very simple character, consisting of recitation 
in the branches pursued by the graduating class, opportu- 
nity being given any one present to . ask questions, after 
which the diplomas were presented with a few well chosen 
words by the chairman of the sub-committee, Mr. H. H 
Huse. 



198 



SCHOOL ACCOMMODATION. 



The twenty-five school buildings now in use will, on 
the completion of the new wing of the Main-street house, 
afford ample accommodation. 

The average number of teachers employed has been 
seventy-two, and the attendance, as shown by the follow- 
ing table, a slight improvement on that of last year, both 
as to average number and percentage of daily attendance. 



Schools. 



Whole Number 
of different pupils. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Average 

Mo. 

Belonging. 



Average 

Daily 

Attendance. 



Per cent of 

Daily 
Attendance. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Suburban 

Totals (for 1884)... 
Totals (for 1883)... 



65 

329 

335 

1,029 

166 



1,924 
2,061 



107 
372 
349 
997 
169 



1,994 
2,001 



162 
645 
572 
1,312 
241 



156 
607 
522 
1,200 
215 



96.6 
94.1 
91.3 
91.4 

89.2 



2,872 
2,848 



2,645 
2,612 



92.1 
91.4 



There are enrolled in the parochial and private schools 
in the city about three thousand pupils, or about three- 
sevenths of the school population. 



199 



TRUANCY. 



The following table gives the results of the work of the 
truant officer for the year : — 







City Schools. 


Parochial 
Schools. 






234 
51 
106 


173 






40 






82 




55 
39 












15 


3 




15 

130 












87 


172 


No. of school age found on street during school hours 


532 

932 

16 

501 

3 








Number of truants temporarily confined at city hall 






















3 
40 






Number applying for certificates who could notreac 













Of the last number, twenty-eight were French or of 
French parentage, and their average age thirteen arid a 
half years, the remaining twelve being of Irish and 
American parentage, and their average age thirteen 
years. 

REPAIRS. 

At all the school-houses, during the summer vacation, 
the interior walls were whitewashed or tinted, the furni- 
ture was put in thorough repair, and in most of the 



200 

houses it was scraped and varnished, and in several of the 
larger houses the inside blinds were painted or var- 
nished. A floor was laid in the north half of the base- 
ment of the Franklin-street house. All the blackboards 
were put in thorough order, and such repairs and changes 
in the heating apparatus as were considered necessary 
were made. At the opening of the fall term it was a 
matter of general remark that the school-houses had never 
presented a neater and more cheerful appearance. 

The other members of the sub-committee on repairs 
being out of town most of the summer on private busi- 
ness, the whole of this work devolved on Mr. Dow, and 
much credit is due him for the energy and discretion 
displayed. 

During the coming summer vacation the basement of 
the Spring-street house should be arranged similarly to 
those of the other houses, to serve as a play-room at 
recess for the pupils during stormy and inclement 
weather. The exterior wood-work of the high school and 
Franklin-street houses should be painted, and several 
new fences built. 

FINANCES. 

The income for the year 1884 has been : — 

Appropriations by city councils . . . $54,000 00 

Balance of appropriations for 1883 . . 1,088 68 

Returned from overdraft for fuel and heating 1 92 

Balance of tuition account for 1883 . . 34 88 

From tuition of non-resident pupils for 1884 199 75 



$55,325 23 

Expenditures for the year 1884 . . . 53,477 10 



Balance on hand .... $1,848 13 



201 



The sub-division of the funds for 1884 is as follows : — 



•So 00 



M 



Salaries of teachers $38,954.00 

Books and stationery 340.85 

Care of rooms I 2,921.55 

Contingent expenses j 1,217.23 

Fuel . 3,311.09 

Furniture and supplies , ..I 1,260.01 



Printing and advertising. . 

Repairs 

Evening schools 

Tuition 



63300 
3,895.40 
1,460.78 

199.75 



$111.24 
56.42 
17.62 
164.06 
*162.71 
242.04 
147.08 
153.55 
35.88 
34.88 



065.24 
397.27 
939.17 
381.38 
473.80 
508.05 
780.08 
,048.95 
496.66 
234.63 



$54,199.65 $1,125.48 $55,325.23 $53,477.10 $2,677.14 $829.01 



$39,592.42 

396.86 
3,019.16 

985.36 
1,844.00 
1,508.01 

450.78 
4,270.79 
1,252.38 

157.34 



$527.18 



$0.41 



77.99 



396.02 

1,629.80 

.04 

329.30 



221.84 



244.28 
77.29 



♦Including $1.92 returned from an overdraft in 1883. 

Amount of sundry balances . 
Amount of sundry deficits 



$2,677 14 
829 01 



Net balance on hand .... $1,848 13 
It has been customary heretofore to get your authority 
to transfer from one appropriation to another, so as to 
remove the deficiencies ; but as you have held no meeting 
the latter part of this month, we were unable to obtain 
such authority. 

If from the total expenditure of $53,477.10, the amount 
received from the state literary fund, $2,386.72, and the 
amount received from tuition of non-resident pupils, 
$199.75, be deducted, there remains the net sum of 
$50,890.63 as the cost of the schools to the tax-payers of 
the city. 



202 



The annexed table gives the statistics on this subject 
for the last fourteen years : — 

ANNUAL STATISTICS OF COST OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



Average 
No. pupils 



Cost of 
Schools. 



Cost per 
Scholar. 



City 
Valuation. 



City Tax. 



School tax 



1870 . 
1871 
1872, 
1873, 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 



2129 
2080 
2278 
2450 
2463 
2501 
2543 
2513 
2571 
2859 
2970 
2858 
2957 
2848 
2872 



$42,000 
42,900 
47,900 
47,300 
47,500 
51,800 
50,100 
47,900 
44,900 
46,200 
48,945 
50,729 
51,604 
53,525 
53,477 



$19.45 
20.62 
21.03 
19.34 
19.28 
20.71 
19.70 
18.78 
17.46 
15.71 
16.49 
17.70 
17.45 
18.79 
18.62 



$10,710,252 
11,365,162 
11,542,632 
12,001,200 
12,716,892 
14,195,102 
15,309,348 
15,605,718 
15,912,234 
17,482,132 
17,825,116 
17,943,308 
19,175,408 
20,055,986 
20,613,032 



$234,047 
236,632 
259,196 
300,768 
312,835 
315,131 
248,900 
246,573 
276,873 
264,406 
264,491 
316,462 
312,673 
332,741 
360,732 



$ .0041 
.0037 
.0041 
.0039 
.0037 
.0036 
.0032 
.0030 
.0028 
.0026 
.0027 
.0028 
.0026 
.0026 
.0024 



The estimate of school expenses for 1885 are as follows : 

Teachers 1 salaries $41,000 00 

Books and stationery 300 00 

Care of rooms 3,200 00 

Contingent expenses ..... 800 00 

Fuel 3,500 00 

Furniture and supplies ..... 800 00 

Printing and advertising .... 500 00 

Repairs 3,500 00 

Evening schools 1,400 00 



$55,000 00 



203 

In conclusion we would say, that we feel we leave the 
schools at this, the close of our term of office, in excellent 
condition. A bright, intelligent set of pupils, led by an 
interested and highly educated corps of teachers, who in 
turn are supervised by an energetic, capable, and pains- 
taking superintendent, make our public schools one of 
the chief ornaments of our city. 

CHARLES H. MANNING, 

For the Committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with your rules, requiring 
an annual report from the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, I herewith respectfully submit the following 
as my eighth report, the same being for the year 1884, 
and the twenty-ninth of its series : — 

ORGANIZATION. 

During the past year five teachers have been employed 
in the High School. There has been an average of sixteen 
grammar-school divisions, fourteen middle schools, thirty- 
one primary, and nine ungraded suburban. This is 
equivalent to seventy-five distinct schools of a single room 
each ; but the average number of regular teachers neces- 
sary, and employed, has been only seventy-two, because 
the principal of the Training School has charge of the 
four rooms constituting that school. The whole number 
of different teachers employed, however, has been seventy- 
eight. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

The elementary schools comprise all grades below that 
of the High School. It is in these schools that a " com- 
mon-school" education is afforded the future citizen; and 
by as much as they succeed or fail in providing and 
enforcing a training that will enable the rising genera- 



205 

tion successfully to battle with the vicissitudes of life, to 
comprehend the nature of our government, and become 
law-abiding and useful men in the state, by that much 
will the common schools be justly pronounced a success 
or a failure. 

Our elementary schools constitute no ignoble part of 
the great system of public instruction which the state 
designs to furnish every one of her children ; and stoical 
indeed must be the heart of him who can frequently visit 
these schools and not feel inspired properly to provide for, 
and effectually to promote, the interests of the assembled 
hosts, who with beaming countenances, active brains, and 
nimble lingers gladly respond, in general, to the direc- 
tive power of the competent and skillful teacher. ISTor 
can such a visitor fail to admire the magnificent results 
attained under such a teacher. Would that all teachers 
were as good as the best ! Let us not, however, bemoan 
the impossible, but congratulate ourselves, the rather, 
that we have so many teachers who are good. 

More than half of the entire enrollment of pupils, 
about fifty-two per cent of it, has been made in the 
primaiw schools alone ; seventeen per cent of it in the 
middle schools, eighteen per cent of it in the grammar 
schools, nine per cent of it in the suburban schools, and 
four per cent of it in the High School. 

I have felt, as superintendent, and, in the absence of 
any specific instructions to the contrary I have tried so 
to order my work, that I should exercise the greater part 
of my labor and efforts for the "greatest good of the 
greatest number ; " and the more especially have I felt 
that I should do this, since the "greatest number" exists 
where should be laid a foundation upon which it will be 
possible to erect an educational monument. Nevertheless, 
I have given other grades than the primary a larger share 



206 

of my time than usual ; and by reason of changes in its 
course of study, and a change in its mastership, I have 
given proportionally a still greater amount of my atten- 
tion to the interests of the High School. 

The elementary schools, as a whole, may be said to be 
in excellent condition. Slight modifications in the treat- 
ment of reading and spelling, I think, can be wisely made 
in the primary schools ; and in those classes studying 
written arithmetic I recommend the introduction of a 
distinctive " Mental Arithmetic." 

Pupils in all such classes need much more practice in the 
fundamental operations with numbers ; and in applied 
problems the pupil can frequently be led to the discovery 
of the principles underlying a proper solution, if the 
principles involved are not made obscure to him by the 
use of numbers so large that they distract his reasoning 
faculties. Hence the mental arithmetic is often of great 
utility in preparing a class for entering upon the study of 
subjects embracing new principles. The book last used 
for this purpose did not prove satisfactory; partly because 
it was not sufficiently extended, and partly because the 
order distributing its parts for use in the schools was made 
with too little regard to the character of the subjects 
assigned the different grades. There has lately been 
published, however, a mental arithmetic, edited by the 
authors of the written arithmetic now here in use, which, 
I feel, would admirably meet the needs of our schools ; 
and I recommend its adoption. 

I hold the opinion that the best use of a mental 
arithmetic can be attained by the chief study of it at 
times of recitation. Pupils usually waste the greater part 
of the time allowed for the preparation of lessons in this 
study. The easier problems they do not actually think 
out to a proper conclusion, but depend upon their ability 



207 

to solve them readily enough at recitation. The problems 
whose solutions are so difficult that they are unsatisfied 
with the results obtained, they soon pass over and forget, 
in the hope that some classmate will be privileged to 
tackle them at recitation. My observation is, that, as a 
rule, not more than one-third of a class properly prepares 
the whole of an assigned lesson in mental arithmetic. I 
would, therefore, have this study considerably varied, to 
awaken and hold the interest, and the work in it chiefly 
performed at the time of recitation, an exceptional course 
being pursued only with the more advanced classes. 

From recent conferences with teachers, my understand- 
ing is that they are substantially agreed with me in regard 
to the desirability of introducing a special book for use in 
oral arithmetical exercises, and arithmetic at sight, and 
that they concur in the belief that such a use of the mental 
arithmetic as I have delineated to them can be made once 
a week, not only without material reduction in the 
amount that should be performed in the written arith- 
metic but with much advantage to the study of arithmetic, 
considered in its entirety. 

I therefore trust the committee may soon favorably 
consider my recommendation, and largely leave the use 
of the book allowed for the purpose of affording oral arith- 
metical exercises in the elementary schools to the discretion of 
the superintendent, in order that it may be introduced 
in a way that shall be workable by classes that have 
not had enough of such special drill, and that it may be 
finally assigned as best adapted to the various grades in 
which it should be used. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

The status of the High School is a matter of deep 
concern to all our citizens ; and justly so, for the efficiency 



208 

of any system of public schools is largely dependent 
upon the character of its high school. The whole system 
culminates in the high school, the establishment of which 
in various places has over and over again proved the one 
thing needful to uplift and afford the proper inspiration 
to all the lower grades. Its influence is reflex. The 
Secretary of the National Educational League of England 
says : — 

" Experience has proved that elementary education 
flourishes most where the provision for higher education 
is most ample. If the elementary schools of Germany 
are the best in the world, it is owing in a great measure to 
the fact that the higher schools are accessible to all classes. 
In England not only have the aims of the elementary 
classes been low and narrow, but an impassable gulf has 
separated the people's schools from the higher schools of 
the country. In the United States the common schools 
have always produced the best results where the means of 
higher education have been most plentiful. Educational 
improvement works from the top downward, and not 
from the bottom upward ; and the common school is 
always feeble where high schools, academies, and colleges 
are wanting." 

The influence of our High School upon all other grades 
is greatly intensified by the fact that for years a large 
majority of their teachers have been selected from the 
graduates of the High School. Ot the seventy-eight 
different teachers employed in the public schools the past 
year, fifty-one are graduates of our city High School. " As 
is the teacher, so is the school." JS"ow it goes without saying 
that these fifty-one teachers had chiefly developed by 
their course of high-school instruction that broader train- 
ing which has proved the principal source of both that 



209 

technical knowledge and that psychological development 
which have been the chief elements of their success in 
teaching. The High School, then, is exerting the most 
potent of all influences upon the lower grades, for it has 
been impliedly shown that " as a center of interest and 
influence it stimulates in them a healthful ambition for 
thoroughness as the condition of admission and promo- 
tion ; " and by actual count it appears that a large majority 
of the elementary schools are being directly taught by 
the graduates of the High School. 

Permit me to quote the earnest words of two dis- 
tinguished educators in regard to the utility of the public 
high school considered merely with reference to its own 
peculiar work : — 

" The high school accomplishes a most important work 
in discovering and. developing what otherwise would continue 
latent talent. A scholar does not really know what is in 
him, what he can be, till he reaches the harder studies 
and sharper rivalry of the high school. Many a bright 
but honest and discouraged boy has been made conscious 
of his powers, and the assurance that he can do has 
become the parent of the purpose that he will do. Many 
gifted minds thus roused to higher life ultimately fill 
positions of great usefulness whose talents would other- 
wise have been buried in obscurity. Those who have 
risen to be the benefactors of the race have come as often 
from humble cottages as from princely palaces. Indeed, 
history proves that from the industrious classes has arisen 
by far the greatest part of the energy, talent, and genius 
that has enriched the world. Says Dr. Leonard Bacon, 
' It is for the interest of the state that no talent which 
God gives to any child should be lost. If a poor boy, the 
child of a dependent widow, or an unfortunate immigrant, 
has any extraordinary talent which being developed 



210 

would add to the wealth and welfare of the state, and if 
that talent, for want of opportunity to discover itself, is 
lost, like a gem in the unfathomed caves of ocean, the 
state is the loser.' 

" The wealth of a state consists of its men, in its 
treasures of mind. True men are worth more to it than 
money. The man who rears a large family of well trained 
children renders a greater service to the state than the 
millionaire who leaves untold wealth to unknown heirs. 
IsTo city can afford to be without a high school. Liberal 
and wise expenditures for education always prove profit- 
able investments. It has been well said, ' Taxes raised for 
purposes of education are like vapors which rise, only to 
descend again in fertilizing showers, to bless and beautify 
the land.' Though apparently the work of to-day, the 
high school is really laying the foundations of the social 
fabric for coming generations. 

"However close the sympathies of high schools maybe 
with colleges, their sympathies should be still closer with 
the general public, for the great majority of their scholars 
are preparing, not for college, but practical callings upon 
which they will enter on leaving the high school. There 
should therefore be provided two courses of study, — one 
full and complete for those who evince the fit taste and 
talent therefor, and another designed for those who can 
take but a partial course. 

"It is a serious mistake to encourage all in these 
schools to study Latin or Greek. So far from disparaging 
classical culture, I hold that there is no substitute for it in 
a full course of study. But with the certainty of prema- 
ture graduation of the majority who enter high schools, 
I strongly condemn the practice of merely beginning the 
ancient classics or any modern language, when the pupils' 
circumstances and settled plans permit only so brief con- 



211 

tinuance in school that this smattering of a new language 
is gained at the expense of more essential and practical 
learning. This common error is due to the ambition both 
of scholars and teachers, the one aspiring prematurely 
to pursue high-sounding studies, and the other eager to 
swell their classes in the classics, as if the reputation of 
their schools was to be measured by the number of their 
students in Latin and Greek. Sometimes a graduate 
fresh from college, well up in the classics, eloquent on the 
advantages of their study and ambitious to be a classical 
teacher, makes a whole school giddy with dreams of 
Latin lore." — B. G. Northroj), when Secretary of Connect- 
icut State Board of Education. 

" Our systems of education not only do not overeducate 
the children of the people, but they scarcely equal the 
most urgent demands of society. Every day it happens 
that society suffers by the incompetence of persons in 
places of directive power ; every day it suffers by reason 
of the inability of the human laborer to readjust himself 
to the rapidly moving tide of productive industry that 
makes his vocation no longer needed. More general 
culture — the elevation of all minds to the plane of gener- 
alization, of thinking-activity instead of mere imagination 
and conventional opining — is what is required. 

" The demand for educated directive power is on the 
increase, by reason of the fact that machinery is taking 
the place of mere hand-labor ; and as a result, a grade of 
intelligence is necessary that can understand and manage 
complicated labor-saving contrivances. 

" If a town sends its own native-born youth into the 
subordinate positions, and hires at a higher rate of wages 
the directive skill which is needed to lay out and super- 
vise their work, it will find itself obliged to pay a much 



212 

higher sum for the supervisory work than would suffice 
to train its own population for the purpose." — W. T. 
Harris, when Superintendent of Schools at St. Louis. 

There are several reasons why the High School should 
be made as efficient as possible. The highest standard of 
attainment is demanded : first, because of the very exist- 
ence of the school at considerable cost of money, and at 
a still more valuable expenditure of an immense number 
of the precious hours of youth ; second, because of the 
broad and correct training that it should afford its mem- 
bers, whereby they may be induced to carry into their 
chosen life-work those characteristics of thought, investi- 
gation, and intelligent action, which, actuated by pure 
and high motives, evolve the highest type of manhood ; 
and third, because of the character and extent of its 
influence upon the other schools of the city, and its 
equally important influence upon the moral training and 
character of its individual graduates who so soon enter 
upon the active duties of pronounced citizenship. 

You made a commendable beginning in an effort to 
improve the High School when last year you entered 
upon a revision of its course of study. 

I do not undervalue the study of Latin. I regard it as 
the strongest of languages, its grammar the most scientific 
and exact; and, indeed, I believe the study of it might be 
commenced with profit at a much earlier age than usual. 
For teaching the principles of grammar I think the study of 
Latin unsurpassed ; and, in the hands of a competent and 
skillful teacher, the Latin might properly be the first 
grammar taught, while the material which the Latin 
language affords could be wisely used in the continued 
teaching of the use of English, through written transla- 
tions of Latin. Such a combined method of early teach- 



213 

ing the principles of grammar and the use of our mother 
tongue would require at least five or six years ; but for 
pupils trained in the use of English through the nine 
years' course of our elementary schools, it would seem 
that a three years' course in Latin should be sufficient, 
except for those intending to take a college course. 
Three years are certainly sufficient time for pupils of high- 
school age to acquire a good knowledge of the structure 
of the Latin language, time enough for securing the ad- 
vantages of the discipline of the drill in its study, which 
if continued would be of but little advantage to those not 
designing to take a college course, and all the time neces- 
sary for those who would make Latin available as a means 
for a better understanding of English. 

I therefore feel that by the revised outline of high- 
school work you have made its classical course more 
sensible by limiting the study of Latin to a period of 
three years. More time is thus made available for the 
study of standard English authors and the sciences by 
pupils who choose the classical course. 

The college preparatory course is mainly devoted to 
Latin, Greek, and mathematics, — Latin being studied 
four years, Greek and mathematics each three years. This 
course is substantially the same as heretofore ; and being 
of sufficient breadth to meet the requirements for admis- 
sion to the one college of our own state, it should satisfy 
the very small portion of the community patronizing a 
college preparatory course. 

The English course is made especially strong, and 
properly given first place. It is also the basis of the sci- 
entific and classical courses. The scientific differs from 
the English course only by the substitution of French 
for one study in English during the second two years of 
the course. 



214 

There were one hundred and sixty-seven pupils in the 
High School at the commencement of the fall term, 
classed as follows : — 

Class. Course of Study. Number. 



English. 


Scientific. 


Classical. 


College. 




Fourth-year, * 





19 


1 


20 


Third-year, 


2 


25 
15 
~32~ 


4 

7 


31 


Second-year, 
First-year, 


35 
24 


57 
56 


Not strictly classified, 






3 



Total No. of Pupils, 167 

As the English and scientific courses are the same 
during the first and second years, pupils are not required 
to signify whether they will continue the English course 
or enter upon the scientific until the opening of the third 
year; and, likewise, since the classical and college courses 
are identical during the first year, pupils need not signify 
whether they will continue the classical course or pursue 
the college preparatory until the opening of the second 
year. 

From the table of classification it is seen that of the 
twenty in the fourth-year (or " Senior ") class there are 
none in the English or scientific courses, and but one in 
the college course. It should be stated, however, that up 
to the opening of the fall term there were four of the 
present senior class in the college course, and the other 
sixteen were all in the classical course. Hence all had 
studied Latin three years, and under the old course of 

* Senior class. 



215 

study (the one which they have been following) they 
would regularly pursue Latin another year. But, as the 
study of Latin is continued only three years under the 
classical division of the revised course of study, permis- 
sion was given those in the classical course to make choice 
between the work for the fourth year as presented in the 
old course and the new course, or to combine the two. 
The design was to afford opportunity to take several 
studies in English instead of pursuing Latin a fourth 
year. 

Pupils were provided with copies of the courses of 
study, and given a half-day for reflection and consultation 
with parents. At the end thereof, without advice or 
suggestion from any school authorities, all but two re- 
ported a desire to drop Latin and take studies in English 
instead. This would seem to indicate that a three years' 
course in Latin, for those not proposing to take a college 
course, is deemed sufficient by a large majority of the 
parents of the pupils in the present senior classical class. 

All but one of the four in the senior college-class signi- 
fied that they were not intending to enter any college, 
and expressed a desire to drop Greek and take an English 
study instead; and one of these desired to drop Latin, 
also, that he might take still another study in English. 
Permission was granted upon its appearing that the 
college class had also held the matter under advisement 
for a half-day. There are, therefore, but five of the 
twenty in the senior class studying Latin for a fourth 
year, and only one of these expects to enter college. She 
alone constitutes the senior college-class, taking both 
Latin and Greek ; but a distinct class organization for pur- 
poses of recitation for her alone has been avoided during 
the past term. 

The additional English studies which a portion or all of 



216 

the senior class are thus permitted to take during the last 
year of their course, are a review of arithmetic, algebra, 
and geometry (devoting one term to each) ; also, during 
the fall term, rhetoric and astronomy ; during the winter 
term, English literature and civil government ; during the 
spring term, English literature (continued) and botany. 

From the classification table it is also seen that only 
two of the third-year class and none of the fourth-year 
class are left of those who originally entered upon the 
English course. Fourteen, of the sixteen in the English 
division last spring, graduated in June, upon completion 
of a two years' course ; and the other two are pursuing 
the scientific course, but a distinct class organization is 
not necessary for their accommodation. All in the Eng- 
lish division of what is now the fourth-year class graduated 
in June, 1883, upon completion of a two years' course. 

It is hoped that the English side of the revised course 
of study will prove so satisfactory that pupils will, in 
future, continue that course through four years. Of the 
fifty-nine pursuing this course, it is learned that twenty 
now intend to continue it more than two years. This is a 
good beginning in the right direction, and augurs well 
for a more extended pursuit of the English course in 
future. Moreover, the scholastic standing of those now 
in the English course compares favorably with that of 
those in the other courses. 

Having set forth the relation of the High School to the 
other schools of the city and its influence upon them ? 
having (by quotation) presented the utility of the school 
per se, and having given somewhat in detail a view of its 
classification, and hinted at the satisfaction manifested 
toward the new course of study, I now proceed to suggest 
some other measures for the improvement of the High 
School. 



217 

It being understood that the first requisite is now at- 
tained in the procurement of a permanent and suitable 
principal, I add that, in my judgment, the corps of in- 
structors should be further strengthened by the addition 
of another teacher. The change of the school sessions 
from six to five hours per day necessitated a shortening 
.of the afternoon recitation periods from sixty to forty 
minutes each. This time is too short for the most profit- 
able conduct of recitations with classes of the size, and 
with subjects of the character and importance, of those 
in the Hio-h School. The full time of another teacher 
would be required in order to atford an hour for each 
recitation. By closer observation of the work of the 
school I am finally forced to the conclusion that it is not 
wise economy to employ less than six teachers in the High 
School. Indeed, I am of the opinion that seven could be 
worked to good advantage. Six are needed for the proper 
conduct of the recitations; and with the aid of a seventh, 
one could be spared each hour to take charge of the 
assembly-room, and render individual assistance to any 
there at study and in need of it. This room could then 
be kept quiet for study, as was designed when it was 
seated with individual desks. With less than seven 
teachers, and with one hour for each recitation, the prin- 
cipal must both take charge of the assembly-room and 
conduct his recitations there, not only to his own disad- 
vantage as an instructor, but also to a disturbance of the 
quiet of those there seated for study. 

A further element of strength should be obtained from 
the character of the additional teacher sought. An at- 
tempt to make the school strong upon the side of its 
English course will prove futile unless that side of the 
course be largely in charge of as good teaching talent as 
any other part of the course. The work of the master 



218 

should be felt in some study of every part of the course, 
but his direct teaching ability and power cannot be exer- 
cised in more than one-fifth of the daily recitations. It 
would therefore be well to increase the corps of teachers 
by one who has had special success in teaching the lead- 
ing branches found upon the English side of the high- 
school course of study, unless the master and sub-master 
are given charge of the principal English studies and the 
additional assistant chiefly teaches the foreign languages; 
and the services of an expert are desirable in such subjects 
as penmanship, book-keeping, elocutionary drill, and 
reading, these having been made part of our high-school 
curriculum. 

The next improvement I have to suggest is a change in 
the location of the chemical laboratory. It is improperly 
placed in the attic of the high-school building. It can 
be reached only by the ascent of an uncommonly long 
flight of stairs from the second floor, and by a long walk 
across the attic floor, the entire length of the building to 
its south end. Much valuable time is worse than wasted 
in passing thereto, and the exhaustion consequent upon 
the ascent of two long flights of stairs is so great that 
several minutes must elapse before the class can be in a 
proper condition for work, to say nothing of the evil 
effects upon the physical organization of the weaker 
portion of the class membership. These evil effects con- 
stitute the chief objection to the present location of the 
laboratory, though the one first named is sufliciently great 
to justify an expenditure necessary to effect a proper 
change of its position. 

I recommend that a new laboratory be constructed 
in the rear of the high-school building, to be entered 
from the floor upon which are the lower school rooms. 
Whether this can be wisely and economically done by 



219 

adding a second story to the structure now there, is a mat- 
ter for investigation by proper sanitary and architectural 
authority. 

Observation of the ingenuity displayed by the sub- 
master in economically constructing and repairing appa- 
ratus used in chemical and philosophical experiments 
convinces me of the utility to be derived from a small 
work-room, which he suggests might be finished in con- 
nection with a new laboratory. 

From experience in discerning, developing, and util- 
izing mechanical talent found in several members of his 
classes, the sub-master further suggests that such a room 
would prove profitable to the city and to many of the 
high-school pupils. At my request he has kindly put his 
thoughts upon this subject in writing, and I quote as 
follows : — 

" I believe enough of manual training could thus be 
given at the High School to foster a higher appreciation 
of the value and dignity of intelligent labor, and the 
worth and respectability of laboring men. A boy who 
sees nothing in manual labor but brute force will gener- 
ally despise both the labor and the laborer. With the 
acquisition of skill in himself, however, come the ability 
and willingness to recognize skill in his fellows ; and 
when once he begins to appreciate skill in handicraft, he 
will begin to regard the skillful workman with sympathy 
and respect. I believe, too, it would help pupils to choose 
their occupations more wisely and pursue them more 
successfully, and thus tend to prevent those serious errors 
which often occur in such choosing, and which often prove 
fatal to the fondest hopes of both parent and child. 

" Again, I feel very sure that it would be a direct help 
to the entire school and save expense to the city, by 
affording means for constructing much of the apparatus 



220 

needed in the study of physics at but a trifle above the 
cost of the material, while at the same time it would 
afford unusual opportunities for the successful study of 
the mechanical powers. I believe, too, that it would in 
no degree detract from interest in other studies, but 
stimulate and increase that interest. It would be a direct 
and positive help in mathematics, physics, mechanics, and 
chemistry, and could be made to supplement most admi- 
rably the work in drawing. In short, I believe that 
manual training, methodically taught, and associated as 
it would be with mental culture, is intellectually and 
morally wholesome ; and that the grand result would be 
an increasing interest in manufacturing pursuits, more 
intelligent mechanics, more successful manufacturers, 
better lawyers and teachers, more skillful physicians, and 
last, but not least, more useful citizens." 

THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Having begun a history of the Training School in my 
report of 1880, and having in subsequent reports given 
details of its work, I shall in this one say but little more 
than what may be necessary to chronicle additional facts 
in the history of the school to the present time. 

The school was continued during the first two terms of 
the present year under the principalship of Miss Sarah 
E. Sprague, who completed her sixth term of service on 
the twenty-seventh of June. Miss Sprague was given 
charge of the school in 1882, when an attempt was made 
to give the school a more distinctive character for the 
professional training of teachers. Her efforts were highly 
successful, as delineated in my report of last year ; and 
the result of the work of those young lady teachers who 
had the benefit of a course of instruction under her 
direction, and have since been employed in our schools, 
has been uncommonly good for an initial experience. 



221 

The fame of Miss Sprague as a normal instructor had 
become widely known, and she resigned to accept an offer 
from a distant state to enter a broader field of service. 

The school was begun in the fall under the principal- 
ship of Miss Eleanor E. Jones, a graduate of the Oswego 
Normal School. Miss Jones was experienced in the kind 
of work to which she was here invited, and she is mani- 
festly a lady who has received a good education and 
excellent training. 

Her term of service here, however, was short. Before 
a thoroughly mutual acquaintance between herself and all 
connected with the schools under her charge could be 
matured, she was suddenly called home to western jSTew 
York, on account of the serious illness of a near rela- 
tive ; and it is now certain that her continued services are 
needed there, and that she could not return. 

Graduates of the Training School. 

Following is a list of those who have graduated at the 
Training School since 1880, and the list is therefore a 
continuation of the one which may be found in my report 
for that year. 

The two lists combined form a complete record of the 
graduates of the Training School since its organization 
in 1869. 

Those here named are arranged in the order of their 
dates of graduation : — 

1881-1884. 

Josie H. Martin.* Eva F. Tuson.f 

Mary E. Bunton.f Kittle Ferren.f 

Kate M. Follansbee.f Edith M. Stebbins.f 

Georgia A. Wyman.f Fannie L. Sanborn. J 

Nina D. Annis.f Mary L. Gage.f 

* Afterwards regularly employed in the day schools. 

t Now regularly employed in the day schools. 

X Afterwards regularly employed in the evening schools. 



999 



Lizzie D. Hartford. | Ella Hope.f 

Helen M. Wetherbee.t Nettie F. Ainsworth.f 
Susie H. Frame. f (15.) 

From List of 1880. 

Of those graduates named in the list given in my 
report of 1880, the following have since been assigned 
regular teachers'* positions in our day schools : — 

Ella F. Barker. Annie W. Patten. 

Emma C. Gee. Nellie M. James. 

Gertrude H. Brooks. Nettie C. Woodman. 

Emma S. Sanborn. Lenora C. Gilford. (8.) 

The following have also been enrolled as members of 
the school since 1880 : — 

Florence G. Bartlett. Genevieve L. Whitten. 

Susie E. Greenwood. Alia C. WUhnd. 

Annie L. Prescott, Carrie A. F. Bartlett, 

Leila A. Brooks. Nina B. Croning. 

Bessie M. Mall. May J. Hickey. 

Mattie E. Sanborn. May J. Nutt. (12.) 

Miss Florence Bartlett soon withdrew to engage in 
other employment. Miss Greenwood was a non-resident, 
and only remained about twenty weeks, having then real- 
ized the special purpose for which she came. Miss Pres- 
cott was obliged to leave on account of ill-health. ' The 
other nine are now members of the school, and the five 
of these whose names are italicized are " seniors," and will 
graduate on the thirtieth of January next. 

Summary of Essential Facts. 

Whole number enrolled in Training School since 

its organization in 1869 134 

t Now regularly employed in the day schools. 

t Afterwards regularly employed in the evening schools. 



223 

Number of the above who have been regularly 

employed as teachers in the city day schools . 92 

Number of others regularly employed as teachers 

in the city evening schools . . . 8 

Total number of members regularly employed as 

teachers in city schools ..... 100 

Total number of graduates ..... 67 

Number of graduates not ever regularly employed 

in city schools ....... 8 

Number called upon to teach in city schools before 

graduation ....... 41 

Number of different lady teachers regularly em- 
ployed in the city day schools in 1884 . . 70 

Number of the above who had previously been 

members of the Training School ... 48 

Number of graduates now available for permanent 

teachers' positions ...... 1 

Facts in Regard to the Cost. 

Average annual expense for teaching during 

the five years prior to 1882 * . . . $1,875 00 
Average annual expense for teaching during 

the three years since 1881 . . . . 1,818 00 
In 1877, under the former plan of organization, 

the cost for teaching was .... 2,000 00 
In 1883, under the present plan of organization 

the cost for teaching was . . . . 1,900 00 

The last two items are given for years of greatest cost 
for teaching, under each plan of organization. 

The number of days' service for which substitute teach- 
ers are needed, has averaged about two hundred a year, 
and during the past term but one graduate of the Train- 
ing School has been available for such work. Of the 

* The organization of the school was then changed to the present plan. 



224 

fourteen graduated during the last two years, she, indeed, 
is the only one left without a permanent position, while 
it appears, from statistics given, that forty-one per cent of the 
membership who afterwards joined our corps of teachers 
were called out to enter the service before they could 
complete the course of training-school instruction. 

This shows, certainly, that the Training School is not 
overdoing its work. The city absolutely needs at hand, 
all the time available for substitute work, six or eight 
graduates of the Training School, or other young ladies 
of equivalent scholastic standing and familiarity with the 
work of our schools. It frequently happens that two or 
three such are needed for substitute work upon the same 
day, and occasionally five or six are so needed. Five 
graduate next month, but more than that number will be 
needed for our schools before the close of another year, 
if the call for such equals the annual average. 

Those who are familiar with the work of our teachers 
know that its average character, as performed by the sixty- 
nine per cent of the membership of the Training School 
this year enrolled in our corps of teachers, is far superior 
to the average character of the work performed by the 
balance of the corps, though the service rendered by 
individuals of that balance is not excelled by any, and in 
some instances rarely equaled. 

I have been familiar with the work of the Training 
School for nearly eight years. During the first five of 
these years, as it had previously been for seven years, it 
was under the general charge of Miss Nancy S. Bunton, 
with Mrs. Martha 1ST. Mason as principal of the primary 
department. The several grades in the building were 
indeed model schools, fit places for young ladies to observe 
a high type of work, where they also had the benefit of 
the wisest counsel and the most friendly criticism that 



225 

these excellent teachers were able to give, and the results, 
both immediate and remote, have redounded to the last- 
ing good of our schools. 

Late in 1881 the committee determined upon a differ- 
ent form of organization for the Training School. It 
was designed to add to the observation and practice, pre- 
viously required, a course of study in the principles, and 
their application, of normal methods of instruction. The 
design was progressive ; but I had some misgivings as to 
the results, because of the attempt to conduct the school 
upon this broader plan without additional expense, and 
because of the difficulty involved in securing a principal 
who would be properly qualified to give normal instruc- 
tion and exemplify the characteristics of a first-class man- 
ager and instructor, not only of various grades of school 
but also of sub-teachers. 

The attempt, however, was successful, and the school 
for two years prior to September was all that could be 
expected. The change of teachers at the opening of the 
fall term, and another change with the opening of next 
term, are disturbances that prove injurious ; but such 
changes are liable to occur under any form of organiza- 
tion, and are no more detrimental than was the unavoid- 
able withdrawal of Mrs. Mason under the former plan. 

The future of the school depends upon the character 
and ability of its principal. Its future, too, distinctively 
as a training school, will doubtless again come under 
discussion, as is customary with every new organization 
of the committee ; but before hastily concluding adversely 
it will be well to consider that its organization was con- 
templated and held under advisement by some of our ablest 
citizens then upon the school committee, for one or two 
years before its establishment, that it has existed for fif- 
teen years with the support of every committee during 

15 



226 

that time, which is evidence that its results have, in the 
opinion of these several committees, justified the continu- 
ance of the school for this long period. 

It matters not to me, personally, other than as a good 
citizen desiring the prosperity of the schools, whether the 
Training School be continued or discontinued ; but, as 
the executive official of the school committee, I find that 
my experience and observations agree with those of other 
superintendents in regard to the utility of a city training 
school. I have read somewhat extensively the reports of 
committees and superintendents from other places hav- 
ing training schools; but I refrain from contemplated 
quotations, since they would, in the main, be repetitions 
only of the desirable experiences and results here realized. 

OBITUARY. 

Died, in Boston, August 23, 1884, Mrs. Martha N. 
Mason, of consumption. 

Mrs. Mason was for several years the very efficient 
principal of the primary department of our city Training 
School. She was a woman of exceptionally good quali- 
ties, and engaged in her work all the noble traits of char- 
acter which so highly distinguished her. By her excellent 
judgment and determined earnestness in a high purpose, 
she won the affectionate good-will of both sub-teachers 
and pupils ; by her great tact and enthusiasm, she inspired 
all to rouse themselves to their best efforts ; and by ac- 
knowledged skill in her vocation, she commanded the 
respect and confidence of pupils, parents, and school 
authorities. 

TEACHERS. 

The following indicates changes in teachers during the 
year : — 



227 



Teachers. 

Emma M. Rowley. 
A. W. Bacheler. 
E. P. Sherburne. 
Sarah E. Sprague. 
Josie H. Martin. 
Josie H. Richardson. 
Jennie G. Stebbins. 
T. D. Adams. 
Eleanor E. Jones. 



Date of effect 
of resignation. 

March 28. 



June 27. 
June 27. 
June 27. 
June 27. 
Nov. 10. 



Expiration of 
term of service. 



June 27. 



December 19. 
December 19. 



Teachers. 



Date of begin- 
ning service. 



Teachers. 



Transferred. 



Gage. 



Mary L 
Ella Hope. 
T. D. Adams. 
J. W. Stetson. 
E. E. Jones. 
S. H. Frame. 
Ella F. Barker. 
JST.F.Ainsworth 



Kate M. Follansbee. 
Mary A. Smith. 
Maria !N". Bower. 
Carrie I. Stevens. 
Belle M. Kelley. 
Mary W. Mitchell. 
Mary G. Tynan. 



Apr 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept. 
Sept, 15 
Sept. 15 
Nov. 10 



14. 
15. 
15. 
15. 



Feb. 4, 
April 14, 
Sept. 15, 
Sept. 15. 
Sept. 15. 
Sept. 15. 
Sept. 15. 
Sept. 18. 

The positions occupied by the foregoing teachers, as 
well as those of all others, may be seen in detail from an 
inspection of the list of teachers given in connection with 
the statistical table following this report. 

Our corps of teachers, it is believed, will compare favor- 
ably with any other equally large. As indicative of its 
presumed scholastic standing, it may be said that of the 
seventy-eight different teachers employed during the past 
year five are college graduates, fifty-one are graduates of 
the Manchester High School, and eighteen others com- 
pleted equivalent courses of study in other higher institu- 
tions of learning. Of the seventy different lady teachers 
employed, forty-two are graduates of the Manchester 



228 

Training School, six others were members of it but were 
called upon to teach in the schools before they could 
graduate, and seven others were members of normal 
schools, six of whom graduated. 

About the usual annual quota of our corps of teachers 
has been invited .elsewhere. Visiting inspectors some- 
how seem to know where to go for as good as any we 
have in their respective grades ; and this year Miss Rowley 
was given a position at Somerville, Mass., Miss Sprague 
was selected as assistant to the superintendent of public 
instruction for the state of Minnesota, Mr. Bacheler was 
elected master of the High School at Gloucester, Mass., 
and Mr. Sherburne, master ot the leading grammar 
school at Brookline, Mass. 

It is thought that for some • years past several of our 
better teachers have been the more willing to give heed 
to opportunities to go elsewhere, if, indeed, they have not 
sought such, through the fright produced by the annual 
election of teachers ; and others have intimated that they 
would be like-minded were they so situated that they 
could afford it. To some it has seemed that little indis- 
cretions or errors happening but a short time before the 
election of teachers, mistakes which at other times, it is 
alleged, would soon be forgotten, have caused a lack of 
unanimity in the reelection of some teachers that has 
created a feeling of uneasiness, which to a certain extent 
has pervaded the whole corps. If this be true, it is evident 
that we cannot be getting the best results from the efforts 
of our teachers, for in such a state of mind they naturally 
become so much concerned lest they unwittingly incur 
the displeasure of some in authority that they cannot 
give their exclusive attention to the attainment of the 
best possible results for their schools. This is said upon 
the understanding that they fear the dissatisfaction which 



229 

may be expressed through failure of their election, or by 
a bare choice, is more liable to arise on account of some 
casual error than because of their general course, or of 
any lack in their ability as instructors. 

The disturbed state of feeling to which reference has 
been made, originated, it is said, three or four years ago 
when several teachers failed of an election. Their treat- 
ment was too summary, though it doubtless proved for 
the good of a few schools. Teachers, however, are en- 
titled to consideration, as well as schools ; and any who 
may not be found altogether satisfactory can frequently 
be placed in positions for which, indeed, they may have 
once shown special fitness, but from which they may have 
been moved along, without solicitation on their part, to 
grades to which they were not adapted, as a matter of 
convenience in reorganizing the schools in a certain 
building. Such should be given particular consideration 
and accorded another trial. Hence I regard the course 
pursued by you a year ago much the wiser, when not 
entirely satisfied with the work of a few teachers you 
made several transfers. The results have, in general, 
proved quite as beneficial as those derived from the other 
course of procedure, and more salutary, for your policy 
has to some extent allayed the misgivings of teachers lest 
any found somewhat unsatisfactory might not have fur- 
ther trial. 

Your prudence in this matter I regard as especially 
discreet ; because, when transfers are made to effect an 
adjustment of teachers to places which they can best fill, 
none are publicly singled out as unsatisfactory in former 
positions, since it then usually becomes necessary to 
transfer some as good as any, in order to make room for 
those whom the committee hope to become equally good 
in new positions. 



230 

But since all future committees may not follow so wise 
a policy, since more or less of the members of every 
committee for the past eight years, at least, have, to my 
certain knowledge, pronounced the annual election of 
teachers a " farce," and the more especially since teach- 
ers can do their best work only when serving under a 
feeling of security in their positions so long as their 
labors shall be satisfactory to those in authority who best 
know the results of their efforts and are most competent 
to determine their value, why not abolish the annual 
election of teachers, decree that those now rendering 
satisfactory service shall continue in their present posi- 
tions unlimitedly, and when vacancies occur, or are made, 
then fill them by appointments that shall be regarded as, 
more or less permanent according to the character and 
value of the service rendered, but unlimited as to time ?* 

I think of but one objection that can arise in the minds 
of airy, and that is the apparent lack of opportunity 
to get entirely rid of an unsatisfactory teacher ; but by 
whose mistake is such allowed to get into the corps ? 
Certainly not by that of the teacher in question, and may 
she not therefore be entitled to deliverance in a way that 
will not especially prejudice her chances for usefulness 
with others who might consider, and under other circum- 
stances find, her more than the equal of those by them 
usually employed ? That she should be so set free can- 
not be regarded as otherwise than both reasonable and 
right. JSTow that a form of release which would be alike 
honorable to the committee and in accord with fair 
treatment to teachers is perfectly feasible, I suggest that 
in future, whenever a teacher's efforts are not satisfactory, 
the sub-committee, directly through its chairman or indi- 

* Since the above was written, a bill has been introduced into the Massa- 
chusetts legislature which is designed to enable towns or cities, at their 
option, to dispense with the periodical election of school teachers and 
superintendents. 



231 

rectly through the superintendent, should seek a confer- 
ence with the teacher and inform such of any deficiency, 
point out the remedy if possible, and furnish all the 
assistance that can he afforded. If this course is effectual, 
well and good; but if not, and there is no reasonable 
hope of gain by a transfer, then let such teacher under- 
stand that a vacancy in the position will be expected 
within certain reasonable limitations of time. Since, 
however, our corps of teachers has been pretty thoroughly 
recast within the past few years, and is now generally 
in a very satisfactory condition, it is believed that even 
the course of action here outlined would only rarely be 
found necessary. 

FIRE-ALARM SIGNALS. 

In order to give greater publicity to the manner of 
using the signals for closing the schools in bad weather, 
the following regulations are here introduced : — 

"To close the primary schools,* two strokes with fifteen seconds 
hetween them. 

To close all the schools,* two immediate strokes and after a 
lapse of fifteen seconds tioo more immediate strokes. 

The times for striking the bells are at 8.05 A. M., for closing 
schools during the forenoon, and at 1.15 p. M., for closing them 
during the afternoon. 

Janitors are directed not to ring the school bells on any half-day 
for which the four signals may be given for closing all the schools. 

Teachers should keep their pupils informed in regard to the 
foregoing regulations, and suggest to them that they listen for 
signals at the times named, whenever the weather and traveling are 
very bad. 

If at any time pupils should appear at a school through failure 
to hear or understand attempted signals for closing the schools in 
bad weather, teachers who may be present are directed to care for 
them as their interests most demand ; but, if a session be held, 
other pupils who fail to attend are not to be marked absent." 

Occasion is here taken to suggest to parents that it is 
expected they will depend chiefly upon their own judg- 

* Except suburban. 



232 

ments in regard to the advisability of the attendance of 
their children in had weather, as at other times. 

The school authorities cannot make any regulations 
which will apply with equal propriety to the attendance 
of children unequally prepared in respect to suitable 
clothing and varying degrees of health, or unequally 
accommodated by sidewalks varying in condition chiefly 
according to their locality. 

Besides, the best of regulations are liable to fail of ope- 
ration even in most critical times, by reason of accident 
or some untoward circumstance ; nor is sufficient wisdom 
given any one person always to determine the weather 
even for three-quarters of an hour beforehand. Then, 
too, there will generally be a diversity of opinion in 
regard to conditions which should warrant the closing of 
the schools in unfavorable weather. 

Hence, while the signals will continue to be given 
under the direction of such wisdom as experience seems 
to dictate for the interests of the majority, there will be 
seen, from foregoing considerations, the propriety of ex- 
pecting parents to regulate the attendance of their own 
children, in accordance with circumstances affecting indi- 
vidual cases; 

SCHOOL MANAGEMENT. 

Under the head of school management I had designed 
to say much ; but an examination of the limitations of 
the laws under which our schools must be governed 
* makes it apparent that most of my contemplated sug- 
gestions would be useless. 

To indicate changes in the laws for the purpose ot 
securing an improved management of the schools I shall 
leave to more legal minds ; for, after all the plans I can 
devise, with considerable reflection upon the probable 



233 

results of their practical operation, I am forced to the 
conclusion that, after all that can be done, the good stand- 
ing and success of the schools will chiefly depend upon 
the extent to which the men under whose direction the 
schools may be placed, will repress the influence of their 
personal notions and prejudices, become informed of the 
actual condition of the schools, and consult only for their 
best interests. 

Hence, since the essential interests of the s chools are 
virtually determined by the conclusions of the respective 
standing and sub- committees to which those interests are 
usually referred, I feel that I cannot better advise than 
suggest that such committees should be composed of those 
most likely to harmonize in an earnest purpose to accom- 
plish the greatest possible good. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I sincerely thank you for a more liberal 
form of the rules under which the superintendent is 
required to serve ; and I also desire to express regret at 
the withdrawal from the board of so many who have 
sought conscientiously to serve the best interests of the 
city. 

¥M. E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 
December 31, 1884. 



234 



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ORGANIZATION FOR 1885. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS, Mayor, ex-officio Chairman, 
GEORGE M. TRUE, 

President of the Common Council, ex-officio. 
Ward 1. — Albe C. Heath, 

Charles EL Manning. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean, 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3. — Nathan P. Hunt, 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Samuel D. Lord, 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
Ward 5. — Charles A. O'Connor, 

Thomas F. Collins. 
Ward 6. — Jacob J. Abbott, 

William H. Huse. 
Ward 7. — Edwin F. Jones, 

Frank B. Potter. 
Ward 8. — Josiah G. Dearborn, 

Timothy J. Howard. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWIN F. JONES. 



240 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

¥M. E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. "W. Clarke, True, 
Dodge, Jones. 

Salaries. — Messrs. O'Connor, Jones, Abbott. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, 
Potter, Howard. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Bean, 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Dearborn, Huse, Heath. 

Music. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, Dearborn. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
True, Manning, W. C. Clarke. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. ~W. 
Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Collins, Potter, Heath. 

Health. — Messrs. Abbott, O'Connor, Howard. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, O'Connor, 
S. W. Clarke, Hunt. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Lord, Abbott, S. W. Clarke. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. O'Connor, Heath, Manning. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Dodge, Jones, Collins. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Heath, Jones, Dearborn. 



241 

Training School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodge. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Heath, Huse. 
West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. S. "W. Clarke, 
Manning, Howard. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Dearborn, 
Lord, Heath. 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Lord, Dodge. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Abbott, O'Connor, and Potter. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Huse, Potter, 
Dearborn. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Howard, 
Huse, Abbott. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Potter, 
Howard, Abbott. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Jones, "W. C. Clarke, Col- 
lins. 

16 



242 



LIST OF TEACHERS. 

Giving the Name, School, and Grade of School, 
high school. beech street. 

Master. — Edward R. Goodwin. 
Sub-Master. — George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. — Lueretia E. Manahan. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. — Lenora C. Gilford. 

Lottie R. Adams. 

Carrie E. Reid. 

First Floor. - — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — C. Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. — Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

SPRING— STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Annie 0. Heath (3d division, and first class of 4th). 
Lizzie P. Gove (second class of 4th division, and 
Higher Middle). 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. — Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 



243 

Lower Primary. — Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. — Belle M. Kelley. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Fred W. Shattuck. 
Assistants. — Annie W. Patten. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Mary F. Barnes. 
Lower Middle. — Carrie M. Gilmore. 
Higher Primary. — Eva F. Tuson. 
Lower Primary. — Kate M. Follansbee. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — J. Walter Stetson. 
Assistants. — Annie A. Webster. 

Mary E. Bunton. 

Bertha L. Dean. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Nancy S. Bunton. 
Lower Middle. — Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. — Emma L. Stokes. 
Lower Primary. — Helen F. Wetherbee. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistant. — Cora M. Dearborn. 
Higher Middle. — Mary L. Gage. 



244 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. — Ellen E. McKean. 
Lower Middle. — Nettie F. Ainsworth. 
Higher Primary. — Flora M. Senter. 
Mixed Primary. — Nettie C. Woodman. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Mixed Grammar. — Mary A. Smith. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. — Maria N. Bower. 
Mixed Primary. — Carrie I. Stevens. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary, — Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Florence A. Nichols. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT). 

Second Floor. 

Higher Primary. — Helen M. Morrill. 

First Floor. 

Mixed Primary. — Georgia A. Wyman. 
Lower Primary. — Nina D. Annis. 

MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER UNION). 

Training School. 

Principal. — Olive Adele Evers. 

A lower middle school, a higher and two lower primary 
schools, embracing first four years of school work. Prin- 
cipal is assisted by members of Training Class. 



245 

WILSON HILL. 

Lower Primary. — Ella Hope. 

BEECH-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER SPRUCE). 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Georgianna Dow. 

SCHOOL-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 

Mixed Primary. — Augusta S. Downs. 
Lower Primary. — Jennie F. Bailey. 

First Floor. 

Lower Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 
Lower Primary. — Mary W. Mitchell. 

SOUTH-MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Higher Primary. — Alice G. Lord. 
Lower Primary. — Delle E. Haines. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. — Susie H. Frame. 

2, Amoskeag. — Etta J. Carley. 
Mixed Primary. — Mary G. Tynan. 

3, Bakersville. — Lizzie A. Burns. 
Higher Primary. — S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. — Edith M. Stebbins. 

4, Goffe's Falls. — Georgie A. ISTute. 

5, Harvey District. — Ella F. Barker. 

6, Webster's Mills. — Susie G. Woodman. 

7, Hallsville. — Addie C. Prescott. 

8, Youngsville. — Olive J. Randall. 

9, Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

SPECIAL TEACHER. 

Music — J. J. Kimball. 



246 



CERTIFICATED AND RESIDENT GRADUATES OF THE TRAINING 

SCHOOL NOT PERMANENTLY EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, 

IN THE ORDER OF THEIR DATES OF GRADUATION. 

f Fannie L. Sanborn. 

* Bessie M. Hall. 

* Alta C. Willand. 
*Lelia A. Brooks. 

* Martha E. Sanborn. 

f G-enevieve L. "Whitten. 

OTHERS NOT HERE EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, WHO HAVE 
CERTIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION. 

Maud Bell, Fannie L. Perry, Fannie E. Smith, Etta C. 
McLaren, Martha T. Learnard, Lizzie M. McAffee, 
Hattie J. Hoyt, and "William F. Gibson. All certificated 
for grammar and lower grades. 

Helen W. Poor, Susan C. Eastman, Belle F. Small, 
Hattie M. Ellis, Hattie E. Merrill, and Alithea M. Hutch- 
ins. Certificated for middle and primary grades. 

MEMBERS OF TRAINING SCHOOL, FEBRUARY, 1885. 

May F. Nutt,f May J. Hickey,f Nina B. Croning,f 
Carrie A. F. Bartlett.* 

JANITORS. 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, and Amoskeag. 

Charles M. Norton. 

High School, Ash Street, Bridge Street, and Wilson Hill. 

John S. Avery. 

Franklin Street and Lincoln Street. 

William Stevens. 

* Certificated for grammar and lower grades, 
t Certificated for middle and primary grades. 



247 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. 

George "W. Varney. 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 

James "Watts. 

Piscataquog Schools [Main Street, School Street, and South 
Main Street). 

D. H. Morgan. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey. 

CALENDAR, 1885. 

"Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 5, closes 
March 27. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 13, closes 
June 26. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 7, closes 
December 11. Vacation of three weeks. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY SOLICITOR. 



EEPOET 



CITY SOLICITOR 



Jo His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : — 

Your Solicitor herewith submits his annual report for 
the year 1884. 

In assuming the duties of the office at the beginning of 
the year, the law matters in which the city was interested 
were found to be in a more or less complicated condition, 
owing to the long illness of my predecessor. It was 
necessary to collect the papers and documents pertaining 
to the office under difficulties, on account of the absence 
from the city, by reason of illness at that time, of the 
retiring solicitor. 

These papers were collected and properly filed, and 
have since been kept at my office for the reference of 
proper city officials. During the year I have attended 
every meeting and investigation held by the joint stand- 
ing committee on claims. Fifteen meetings were held, 
and individually, and with the committee, I have investi- 
gated eight claims. 

The total sum of claims filed, where amounts were 
stated, was $10,895 ; the amount allowed by the commit- 
tee was $200. 



252 



Stringent rules were adopted and maintained by the 
committee, relative to the admission of claims not filed 
in strict accordance with the statute. 

The following is a synopsis of all claims coming before 
the committee : — 

George E. Mitchell, damage to stock by leakage in 
water pipe over his store in City Hall building. Al- 
lowed $60. 

D. C. Whittemore, damage to horse and sleigh on 
North Main street, $25. Given leave to withdraw. 

Amherst Emery, $500, for injuries by falling on Am- 
herst street, February 11. Given leave to withdraw. Suit 
has since been brought. 

Catharine O'Grady, $400, for injuries by falling on 
Water street, January 18. Given leave to withdraw. 

Agnes McComb, $100, for injuries by falling on Cen- 
tral street, January 29. Allowed $25. 

Elton Harrington, $300, for injuries by falling on Elm 
street, February 9. Given leave to withdraw. 

Timothy Mahoney, $200, for injuries by falling on Elm 
street, January 13. Given leave to withdraw. 

Mary McCook, $300, for injuries by falling on Pine 
street, December 27, 1883. Given leave to withdraw. 

John Shea, $2,000 for injuries received by falling on 
Bridge street, opposite block owned by Joseph R. Wes- 
ton and the Connor heirs. The alleged defect was an 
insecure bulkhead in the sidewalk. Given leave to with- 
draw. Suit has been brought, and the owners have been 
notified by the city to appear and defend. 

Patrick Kelley, $500, for injuries by falling on Elm 
street, January 9. Given leave to withdraw. 

Bartholomew Bresnehan, $50, for injuries to person 
and team, occasioned by collision with an ash heap in 
Park back street. Given leave to withdraw. 



253 

William T. Morgan, damage to team by reason of a 
washout on Franklin street, March 24. Allowed $25. 

John Cremmen, $500, for injuries by falling on Elm 
street. Given leave to withdraw. Suit has been brought. 

Emma Beauvais, $5,000, for injuries by falling on 
Manchester street, and on Hanover street opposite the 
residence of Dr. E. Custer on February 11. Given leave 
to withdraw. Suit has been brought. 

Mrs. M. J. James, injuries by falling on Lowell street, 
January 28. Alderman Foss, chairman of the committee, 
and your solicitor conferred with representatives of Mrs. 
James, but no settlement could be agreed upon, and she 
was given leave to withdraw. Suit has since been 
brought. 

George B. Brown, $200, for injuries to horse on Gore 
street, May 8. Given leave to withdraw. 

Miller & Clarkson, $50, damage to horse and harness 
on Gore street, May 8. Given leave to withdraw. 

Oscar B. Laport, $400, damages to laundry caused by 
backing up of water in sewer, in freshet, March 27. Given 
leave to withdraw, and suit has since been brought. 

Arrah W. Prescott, $20, for damages to team on Web- 
ster-street extension, January 28. Allowed $20. 

Willie E. Prescott, $40, for injuries to person by being 
thrown from a team on Webster-street extension, January 
28. Allowed $40. 

Albert F. Davis, $25, for damage to sleigh on Mam- 
moth road, March 3. Given leave to withdraw by reason 
of defect in notice. Upon petition to the supreme court 
he was given leave to file a new notice, and after a hearing 
upon new notice was given leave to withdraw. 

Barbara Murray and Bridget Consodine filed claims 
for injuries, but failing to appear before the committee 
after repeated notifications, they were given leave to 
withdraw. 



254 

Dr. C. M. Dodge, claim for grading street near his 
residence. Sent back to board of aldermen for reference 
to committee on streets. 

James B. Scott, injuries received by breaking of bridge 
over Cohas brook, on Nutt road, August 14. Given leave 
to withdraw. Suit has since been brought. 

C. H. Flagg, $125, for damage to horse and carriage by 
breaking of bridge over Cohas brook, August 14. Al- 
lowed $50. 

J. W. Reed & Son, $50, for injury to horse by falling 
into cesspool opposite Barr & Clapp's block. Allowed 



Thomas Franker, $25, for damage to wagon on Park 
street. Given leave to withdraw. 

John W. ISToyes and Helen A. F. Cochrane, injuries to 
persons and damage to team on Park street. They failed 
to appear before the committee after due notice, and 
were given leave to withdraw. Suits have since been 
brought. 

Thomas Hamilton claimed damages for personal injuries 
sustained by falling on sidewalk. Failing to appear after 
notice, given leave to withdraw. 

Eliza Sykes, personal injuries received September 9, on 
Hooksett road, occasioned by front wheel of wagon 
becoming entangled in telegraph wire. Damages claimed, 
$3,000. No hearing has yet been had on this claim. 

Thomas Jones, damage to furniture by backing up of 
water in sewer at time of freshet, March 27. Hearing 
begun, and continued for action by the new board. 

At the March term, 1884, of the supreme court, there 
were eighteen cases pending against the city, and two 
petitions for assessment of damages for real estate taken 
for highways. 

These cases were as follows : — 



255 

Simon Clark, Admr., v. Manchester. 

William Clark, aged three years and nine months, on 
the 27th of September, 1879, fell into a reservoir on 
Douglas street and was drowned. Suit was brought 
by Simon Clark, as administrator, to recover damages. 
Action still pending. 

Sarah A. Davis v. Manchester. 

This action was tried at the January term, 1882, and a 
verdict of $2,000 for plaintiff was rendered. Exceptions 
were taken by the counsel for defendant, and case re- 
served. At December law term verdict was set aside and 
new trial granted. Able counsel, engaged previous to 
the present incumbent assuming the office, conducted the 
case for the city, with the assistance of your solicitor. 
Yerdict for 1,988, rendered against the city. 

Adaline J. Geoffroy v. Manchester. 

Settlement was made for $1,200 before coming to trial. 

Hannah Burpee v. Manchester. 

Case prepared for trial, when plaintiff withdrew, and 
judgment was rendered for defendant. 

Mary A. Patten v. Manchester. 

Tried by the court, and plaintiff was non-suited. 

Caroline M. Davis v. Manchester. 

Tried by jury. Verdict for defendant. 

Timothy Carr v. Manchester. 

Tried by court, and damages awarded plaintiff. 

Annie Kenney v. Manchester. 

Margaret Kenney v. Manchester. 

Benjamin F. Merrill v. Manchester. 



256 

Suits brought to recover damages alleged to have been 
occasioned by the horse-railroad. These suits have been 
assumed by horse-railroad company, and disposed of by 
them. 

Thatcher M. Conant v. Manchester. 

This action was brought at the May term, 1883, of the 
supreme court, to recover a balance claimed to be due 
plaintiff for labor in 1878. Trial by court, and judgment 
rendered for plaintiff. 

John M. Ryan v. Manchester. 

Action brought to recover damages for personal inju- 
ries. Judgment for defendant by agreement. 

M. L. Clementine Gagnon v. Manchester. 

Action to recover damages for personal injuries. Still 
pending. 

DOLPHAS BENNOIT V. MANCHESTER. 

Action to recover damages for personal injuries alleged 
to have been caused by defect in highway near corner of 
Elm and Central streets. Trial at March term, resulting 
in a disagreement of the jury. Still pending. 

Mary Carney v. Manchester. 

Action to recover damages for personal injuries. Trial 
by court. Judgment for the city. 

Mary Frain v. Manchester. 

Action to recover damages for personal injuries. Trial 
by jury, resulting in a disagreement. Still pending. 

Upon the session's docket were the two following 
cases : — 



257 

Trustees of N. H. Industrial School v. Manchester. 

For an assessment of damages for land on Elm street 
taken for highway. A hearing was had before the county 
commissioners. 

Eleanor B. Gilford v. Manchester. 

For an assessment of damages for land taken for high- 
way. 

Upon a hearing by the commissioners, the sum of $200 
was awarded, from which award the plaintiff has appealed 
to the supreme court for a jury trial. 

The two following cases have been brought by the city 
during the past year : — 

Manchester v. William P. Richardson. 

This action is brought to recover the sum of $442.23, 
being the amount of a judgment obtained by Kate 
Tooher for injuries received by falling in front of Rich- 
ardson's block on Birch street. Still pending. 

Manchester v. David H. ISTutt. 

To recover $347.87, cash paid out by overseers of the 
poor for support of defendant's wife. Still pending. 

At the September term, 1884, the following suits for 
personal injuries were entered, and are still pending : — 

Emma Beauvais v.. Manchester. 
John Cremmen v. Manchester. 
Amherst Emery v. Manchester. 
John Shea v. Manchester. 
Hannah Gorman v. Manchester. 
John W. Noyes v. Manchester. 
n 



258 

Helen A. F. Cochrane v. Manchester. 

Mrs. M. J. James v. Manchester. 

At the same term suits were brought by : — 

Julius Herman v. Manchester. 

For alleged damage to building on Central street by 
the digging of a ditch, by the city, in such a manner as 
to cause the underpinning of said building to settle and 
crack. Still pending. 

Oscar B. Laport v. Manchester. 

For damage to laundry by backing of water in sewer. 
Still pending. 

At this term a petition for an injunction and mandamus 
was filed by 

"The City of Manchester, 

Henry S. Perry, ^ Sub-trustees 

„ -rrr o James A. Weston, > of the 

Calvin W. Stevens v. I Jqhn e ^^^ J Am?g Cem# 

Frank D. Hanscom, 
Orrison Webber. 

The petitioner, Calvin W.Stevens, sets out that for four 
years last past he has owned and occupied a dwelling- 
house situated at a distance of twenty-one rods from the 
Amoskeag Cemetery, that in August, 1883, the city pur- 
chased of Frank D. Hanscom land for addition to the 
cemetery, that this addition brought the burial lots within 
four rods of said dwelling-house, and that in August, 
1884, Arthur 0. Webber was buried in the parcel pur- 
chased of Hanscom, and within sixteen rods of Stevens's 
house ; and prays that the said defendants be enjoined 
against any use of said parcel, within twenty roda of said 
dwelling-house, as a cemetery, and that they be com- 
manded to remove the dead body of said Webber beyond 



259 

the limits of twenty rods of said dwelling-house. Defend- 
ants have filed a general demurrer, and the questions 
arising on the demurrer have been reserved. 

A suit was brought by John W. Driscoll to recover 
damages for personal injuries received on Bridge street, 
caused by alleged defective highway, but was dropped 
before entry. 

A suit was brought in Rockingham county, in 1879, by 
the Town of Auburn v. the City of Manchester, for damage 
to highway alleged to have been caused by the raising 
of the water in Lake Massabesic by reason of the city 
water-works' dam at the outlet of the lake. Able counsel 
was engaged by the board of water commissioners for 
the water-works, and your solicitor acted for the city. 
A very careful preparation for trial was made, a greater 
part of two weeks being so occupied ; but, before coming 
to trial, a proposition for settlement was made and ac- 
cepted, the parties agreeing to divide the expense of rub- 
bling the section of road claimed to have been damaged, 
and each pay their own costs of suit. 

A number of city cases remaining upon the docket 
would probably have been disposed of at the September 
term but for the death of Judge Clinton W. Stanley, 
which made it necessary to continue cases that at the 
time of his death were marked for trial. 

Owing to the large amount of contract work that has 
been done for the city in the past year, a considerable 
portion of the solicitor's time has been occupied in draw- 
ing the agreements and other necessary papers. 

In January, 1884, I was instructed to act with the city 
engineer in preparing an ordinance regarding the care 
and control of the cemeteries. ■ After visiting Lowell and 
Boston and examining their ordinances and methods, and 
getting valuable information from the officials having in 



260 

charge their cemeteries, a satisfactory ordinance was drawn 
and subsequently accepted. 

I have attended every session of the police court when 
it was necessary for counsel to act for the prosecution of 
criminal matters, and have given legal opinions when 
called upon by officials in the various departments of the 
city government. 

The business of the office has greatly increased during 
the past few years, and the disposition of the large num- 
ber of cases now pending in the courts, with the other 
duties incumbent upon the solicitor, require a great deal 
of work that cannot be stated in detail, and is sufficient 
to fully, and profitably to the city, occupy the entire time 
and attention of the officer. 

In conclusion, I desire to acknowledge my indebtedness 
to the various officials of the city for the uniformly kindly 
services and ready assistance which they have rendered 
me in the performance of my duties. 

Respectfully presented. 

GEORGE W. PRESCOTT. 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Members of the City Councils 

of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — In presenting their annual report for 
the year ending December 31, 1884, your committee take 
much pleasure in being able to record continued good 
management and the completion of many needed im- 
provements. 

Beginning at the first of the year, an ice-house with a 
capacity of seventy-five tons was erected and filled with 
ice from Stevens' pond. The total cost of the construc- 
tion of this house was only a little more than double the 
expense incurred for ice the previous summer. 

Up to February of the present year a small flock of 
poultry had been kept in an old carriage-house. At this 
time a new and commodious hen-house was built, and 
the number of fowls increased and the strain improved. 

Previous to this year the facilities for draining the sew- 
age from the house were wholly inadequate. As early 
in the spring as the weather would permit, two hundred 
and twenty-five feet of eight-inch pipe were laid, and a cis- 
tern with a capacity of six hundred barrels was put in 
to receive this sewage, which has since been utilized for 
fertilizing purposes. Upon the completion of the spring 



264 

work a two-hundred-ton silo was put in, which was fin- 
ished in August. In connection with the silo, a store- 
house 74 x 75 feet was erected upon the south side. 

During last winter a considerable amount of work was 
accomplished in clearing the brush and fallen trees from 
the meadow east of the house. 

The time not required for work upon land already 
under cultivation, was utilized in clearing and stocking 
down some five acres of land on Bridge street. Some 
two hundred feet of ditching have been put in, and a vast 
amount of work accomplished in improving fences and 
walls, which were badly in need of repairs. One hun- 
dred and fifty choice fruit trees have been set out during 
the year, which are in a flourishing condition and bid 
fair to be a source of revenue in the near future. 

Owing to the excessive drouth of the previous year the 
hay crop is not as large as usual ; the other crops, how- 
ever, show a large increase over any preceding year. 
There were raised 800 bushels of potatoes, 525 bushels of 
corn upon five acres, 7 tons of oat fodder, 85 bushels of 
turnips, 250 head of cabbage, 45 bushels of carrots, 25 
bushels of onions, 30 bushels of pop-corn, 30 bushels of 
beans, 1 ton of squashes and pumpkins, 80 barrels of 
apples, and 135 tons of ensilage, the latter from seven 
acres. An exhibit of corn shown at the New England 
Fair was awarded first premium. 

During the year there has been a marked improvement 
in the live stock. The receipts from the sale of milk 
amounted to $2,350.03, against $1,268.21 in 1883. 

At the time of the prevalence of the hog cholera, last 
spring, about twent}^ choice pigs of the Chester variety 
were lost. The Chester boar and the pair of heavy draft 
horses exhibited at the New England Fair received first 
premiums. 



265 



In conclusion, it is but just to award the highest praise 
to the efficient management, careful oversight, and faith- 
ful services of the superintendent, Mr. Jeremiah Garvin, 
and in this connection we would not forget the most 
acceptable manner in which Mrs. Garvin has conducted 
the internal affairs of the institution. At the beginning 
of Mr. Garvin's administration, at the suggestion of 
Mayor Putnam, a new system of book-keeping, similar to 
that in use at the county farm, was adopted. The books 
have been in charge of Mr. E. J. Garvin, and present a 
uniformly neat and business-like appearance. 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. 



Total expense of farm 
Interest . 



Total receipts . 



Bills receivable 



Difference in stock . 



Permanent improvements 



•$2,135 32 
Paid city treasurer and charged to account . 370 50 



.$11,026 88 
. 1,000 00 


$12,026 88 
. 3,670 90 


$8,355 98 
408 49 


$7,947 49 
. 3,217 85 


$4,729 64 
. 2,594 32 



$1,764 82 



266 

Total number of weeks' board of paupers and prisoners, 
1,673. 

Average cost per week per capita, one dollar, five cents 
and twelve twenty-fifths. 

J. F. CLOTTGH, 
E. P. JOHNSON, 
SAMUEL LTOT, 
S. P. CA^ON, 
H. A. HORTON, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



Jo the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester : — 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the 
Overseers of the Poor herewith present their annual re- 
port for the year 1884. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the City 
Farm during the year has been thirty-four, at a cost of 
one dollar and six cents per week for each pauper. 

The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been 
forty, consisting of one hundred and twenty-five persons, 
all of whom had a settlement in this city. Four of the 
number died during the year. The whole number sup- 
ported at the Insane Asylum for the first six months of 
the year has been three, at a cost of four dollars per week 
for each person. During the last six months of the year 
those three insane persons were removed from the asylum 
to the county farm, where they are supported at a cost of 
two dollars per week for each person. Two of this num- 
ber have been supported at the asylum during the past 
six years, and are incurable. The whole number of per- 
sons at the State Industrial School, chargeable to the city, 
has been five, at a cost of one dollar and fifty cents per 
week for each person. 



270 



The overseers of the poor have assisted the paupers ofi 
the farm from the several wards of the city, as follows : — 

"Ward number one . . . . $13 00 



"Ward number two 
Ward number three 
Ward number four 
Ward number five 
Ward number six 
Ward number seven 
Ward number eight 



54 00 

154 96 

45 13 

695 58 

185 72 

00 

175 50 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 


Industrial School .... 


$2,119 27 


Insane Asylum .... 


265 17 


County of Hillsborough 


146 80 


Towns, Londonderry and Lancaster 


99 71 


Blanks and stationery 


10 31 


Medicine, police station . 


4 05 



$1,323 89 



Cash received from county of Hillsborough 



$2,645 31 

$3,969 20 
1,824 87 

$2,144 33 



Total cost for the year 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Clerk, Ward 1, 
JOHN E. STEARNS, Ward 2, 
JAMES SUTCLIFFE, Ward 3, 
HORACE GORDON, Ward 4, 
PATRICK A. DEVINE, Ward 5, 
PETER O. WOODMAN, Ward 6, 
ELBRIDGE G. WOODMAN, Ward 7, 
WILLIAM WEBER, Ward 8, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



REPORT 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



REPORT 

OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and City Councils of the 

City of Manchester: — 

Gentlemen, — The trustees beg leave to report that they 
organized according to the provisions of the new city- 
ordinance relating to cemeteries, and they herewith sub- 
mit the reports of the Sub-Trustees, who have been 
charged with the sole care and management of their 
respective cemeteries, and of the Treasurer, each of 
which reports has received the approval of the full 
board. 

SYLVANLJS B. PUTNAM, 

Sec'y of Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of the Valley Cemetery respect- 
fully submit the following report for the year 1884 : — 



RECEIPTS. 


To appropriation . 


. $2,000 00 


tomb fees 


71 00 


water rents 


130 00 


opening graves 


135 50 


sale of lots 


115 40 


care of lots 


258 00 



18 



$2,709 90 



274 



EXPENDITURES. 


Paid F. B. Balch, superintendent 


. $609 75 


S. B. Duke, labor 


231 50 


A. F. Hall, labor . 


188 70 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


64 41 


John B. Varick, hardware 


26 94 


William C. Rogers, hardware 


i 11 50 


John H. Maynard, repairs . 


15 55 


Head & Dowst, repairs 


7 01 


L. M. Aldrich, repairs . 


3 35 


C. H. "Wood, painting . 


2 75 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


76 


William B. Abbott, painting 


59 88 


Pettee & Adams . 


8 35 


H. W. Home 


20 10 


James Nutt . 


17 00 


D. A. Simons 


1 60 


S. B. Putnam 


4 00 


T. H. Tuson, printing . 


4 50 


Horace Stearns 


20 00 


Jacob F. James . 


6 00 


W. H. Bennett . 


9 00 


W. D. Hunter 


5 25 


Frank Dickey- 


37 50 


George Whitford, teaming 


284 92 


A. H. Lowell, fountains 


221 86 


Thomas A. Lane, pipe anc 


L 


labor .... 


267 85 


water commissioners 


102 90 


F. S. Wort-hen, trees . 


38 85 


21 individuals, as per bills 


120 58 


By balance on hand Dec. 31, 1884 


317 54 



$2,709 90 



275 

During the year Mr. F. B. Balch, the superintendent, 
has, under the direction of the trustees, made many im- 
provements, having laid 202 feet of one-inch and 906 
feet of two-inch water pipe, so that water is now available 
in nearly all parts of the valley, besides having laid 200 
feet of eight-inch drainage pipe, with three catch-basins, to 
carry off the surplus water that accumulated in many 
places in the spring to the depth of several feet, and put in 
nine iron drinking-fountains, graded the public grounds, 
reset the head-stones on a line, graveled the paths, re- 
moved many of the old iron fences that had become un- 
sightly, cut out many of the old trees and replaced them 
with young maples, and has performed his duties with 
strict fidelity to the interests of the city, and with courtesy 
to all with whom he has come in contact. 

And in conclusion your trustees desire to call your 
attention to the necessity of having a new receiving tomb, 
the old one being inadequate to accommodate the public, 
many having to use private tombs in wdiich to tempora- 
rily deposit their dead: 

Submitted to full board January 27, and approved. 

C. H. G. FOSS, 

A. A. AINSWORTH, 
GEO. C. GELMORE, 

D. 0. FURSTALD, 

B. W. HELL, 
Sub-Trustees on Valley Cemetery. 



276 

PIXE GROVE CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of Pine Grove Cemetery beg leave to 
submit the following annual report for the year 1884 : — 

The attention of the sub-trustees, upon their appoint- 
ment, was immediately called to the imperative necessity 
of an unfailing water supply, without which all efforts 
toward beautifying and adorning the grounds would be 
utterly futile. The water commissioners, with commend- 
able enterprise and zeal, extended their water pipes down 
the Calef road to the east entrance of the cemetery, and 
from that point, the sub-trustees laid distributing pipes 
through the main avenues, and to such points as, in their 
judgment, stood most in need of an immediate supply of 
water. 

Although the water was not available for use until 
about the middle of August, yet its effect upon the lots 
where it was used was very marked, and fully demon- 
strated the wisdom of the outlay. The interest of lot- 
owners, who have heretofore labored in vain to beautify 
their lots, has revived, and the sub-trustees are assured 
that the coming season will show a degree of improvement 
in the general appearance of the cemetery unprecedented 
in its history, and that the investment will prove a profit- 
able one pecuniarily. 

The total expenditure for the introduction of water 
thus far amounts to S4.138.20. A further expenditure 
will be needed to extend the water-works to all parts of 
the cemetery where lot-owners require it ; and for this 
purpose an appropriation of at least $500 is asked. 

Another permanent and much needed improvement 
has been inaugurated by the sub-trustees in the erection 
of an addition to the old tool-house, which is now ap- 
proaching completion. The plans and specifications for 



277 

the new building were furnished by Wm. M. Butterfield, 
architect, the contract for its construction was awarded 
to John F. Seaward, the price being $922, exclusive 
of foundation and chimney, no part of which has yet been 
paid. The old building, which had become entirely in- 
adequate to the wants of the cemetery, and afforded no 
conveniences for the public, has been utilized as an L to 
the new part under construction, and the whole structure, 
instead of being unsightly and repulsive, as was the 
former apology for a building, will be attractive in ap- 
pearance, convenient, and sufficiently spacious for the 
needs of the superintendent, and an inviting and com- 
fortable resort for those whose business or pleasure calls 
them to the Pine Grove Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees desire to supply the superintendent's 
office with suitable desks and furniture, and with a safe 
of sufficient capacity to receive and preserve the records, 
books, vouchers, plans, and other papers of value, for 
which there have never been adequate facilities ; to furnish 
the waiting-room and ladies' apartment for the comfort 
and convenience of the public, and to tastefully lay out 
and beautify the grounds about the building. The unex- 
pended balance of the appropriation of last year in the 
hands of the treasurer will be sufficient to answer the 
claim of the contractor for the amount due him, and an 
appropriation of $500 will enable the committee to per- 
fect their plans and add to the cemetery a tasteful and 
serviceable improvement, which they are confident will 
be appreciated by the patrons of the cemetery, and which 
will aid materially its future growth and development. 

During the year the sub-trustees have expended upon 
the iron fence which surrounds a portion of the cemetery 
the sum of $405.67. Of this amount the sum of 367.08 



278 

was paid for gates, iron posts, circles, and labor in the 
construction of a new main entrance on the west side. 

The unfavorable comments and numerous complaints 
respecting the old gates, their insufficiency in size and 
strength for the extensive travel at that point, together 
with their fractured and generally dilapidated condition, 
made this improvement necessary, and forced the commit- 
tee to defer other expenditures, which should be made for 
the protection of the old lot and in inclosing the recent 
purchases, until further provision was made therefor. 

The sum of $31.69 was paid for painting the fence, and 
$6.90 for incidental repairs. The avenue from the main en- 
trance, running easterly across the lot, has been extended 
to the Calef road, and the old gates, which were removed 
from the main entrance, have been placed in position on 
the east end of this avenue. 

In the immediate future this will be an important ap- 
proach to the grounds, and the attention of the trustees 
and of the city government is called to the demand for 
an iron fence upon the east line of the cemetery. The 
present growth of the cemetery is on this side ; it em- 
braces some of the finest lots and locations in the yard, 
and the projected work of the coming season will bring 
into the market large and otherwise desirable areas of 
land, graded and laid out into lots and lawns. The only 
drawback to a rapid sale of these lots is the miserable old 
rail fence which disgraces the city upon that side of the 
cemetery, and which should be replaced by a substantial 
iron fence like that on the west side and a portion of the 
north end. 

Purchases were made in 1883, by the city, of two lots of 
land lying north of the old cemetery, containing in all 
nearly twenty-one acres. The larger of the two lots has 
been paid for the current year out of the unexpended 



279 

balance of last year's appropriation, the amount so ex- 
pended being $3,090. 

■ This land will soon be required for burials, and it is of 
the utmost importance that the early work upon this land 
should not be done at hap-hazard, without design or an 
intelligent conception of the natural beauties with which 
the lot is endowed to a remarkable degree. The commit- 
tee have recently taken the advice of W. H. Manning, a 
skillful landscape-gardener and architect, who has exam- 
ined the location, and sketches of his plans and designs 
have received the approval of the committee. To carry 
out the work proposed, to perfect plans, lay out the new 
lot, clear and build the avenues, will require at least $300. 
The new lot should also be fenced, and the sub-trustees 
suggest the discontinuance of the street now open across 
the north end of the old lot, and the removal of the iron 
fence therefrom to the west and north of the new lot ; the 
rest may as well be inclosed with a wooden fence, which 
can be cheaply constructed from lumber on the lot. A 
sufficient appropriation for this purpose, and for the con- 
struction of an iron fence on a portion of the east line of 
the old lot, is respectfully desired. During the year the 
sub-trustees have paid for labor and salary of the super- 
intendent, Byron A. Stearns, the sum of $3,073.96. 

Much extra labor has been required in consequence 
of the introduction of city water, principally on account 
of the destruction of the avenues where the water pipes 
were laid. It became necessary to regravel all these 
avenues, and as the work of regrading could better and 
more economically be done at this time, where it was re- 
quired, five of the principal avenues were cut down from 
one to four feet on the high ground, and filled in low 
places. The general appearance of the grounds is by thia 
means much improved, and the value of adjoining lota 
enhanced thereby. 



280 

A plot of land south of " Hillside Lawn," in one of 
the most desirable positions, heretofore useless for burial 
places and detractive to the general beauty of the locality, 
has been cleared, the stumps of the large pines pulled out, 
over four hundred loads of gravel and loam put upon it, 
and it is now ready to be laid into lots as desirable as any 
in the cemetery, and put upon the market. About an 
acre and a half of land at the south end of the lot has 
been cleared and graded, and will be ready for sale early 
in the spring. Several low plots on the east side have 
been raised by carting in hundreds of loads of gravel and 
loam, and have been given a value for lots where before 
the land was unavailable. This work should be continued 
the coming year, and a sufficient amount of desirable 
territory be laid out to answer the demand for burial lots 
in this cemetery. But few new lots have been laid out 
the past year, and there is a great scarcity of salable lots 
from which to select. 

The committee are of the opinion that $2,500 will be 
required for labor and salaries the coming year. 

A contract has been made by the sub-trustees with a 
society of Swedes organized for that purpose, by which a 
lawn plot is to be set apart to their uses, and burials be 
guaranteed to them therein for five dollars per burial. 
The committee are under obligations to properly prepare 
this lawn for the purposes for which it is designed and 
already laid out, and they estimate that $150 will be re- 
quired therefor. 

The plot of land set apart for a public burial ground, 
where seven hundred and fifty interments have been 
made, has become filled, and a new " Public Ground " 
has been decided upon, but not fully laid out, at the south 
end of the cemetery. 



281 

The committee are of the opinion that due respect 
to the unfortunates who are compelled to make use of 
this obscure place for the burial of their dead, demands 
that the lot should be thoroughly laid out, graded, and 
properly cared for, and they estimate that not less than 
$200 will put it into creditable condition and procure the 
necessary headstones for use during the year. 

Many persons of limited means, unable to purchase a 
lot, who now feel compelled to bury their dead in the 
public ground, would gladly pay a fair compensation for 
a single grave, which they might own and control as other 
lots are held. The committee, early in the year, had this 
matter under consideration, and were unanimous in the 
opinion that a lawn should be prepared for this purpose, 
to be known as " Pilgrim Lawn," and an article was 
inserted in the new By-Laws (page 10), imposing condi- 
tions upon which single graves may be purchased therein. 
Lack of funds and time has thus far prevented the con- 
summation of this very desirable improvement, and the 
committee hope that this matter may not be forgotten 
in the coming appropriation. $150 will be required for 
this lawn. 

During the past year considerable progress has been 
made toward beautifying and adorning the cemetery. 
Plots of ground which could not be made available for 
burial lots on account of their size, location, or shape 
have been graded, loamed, and set out with flowers and 
shrubbery, or covered with sward. The efforts in this 
direction have been systematically prosecuted under the 
skillful direction of W. H. Manning, and if the plan 
adopted is fostered by appropriations sufficient to secure 
some progress each year, a degree of attractiveness and 
beauty will speedily result, sufficient to more than com- 
pensate for the required outlay. 



282 

The expenditures this year in this direction have 
amounted to $125.49 for trees, shrubs, and flowers, and 
$33 for three stone vases. The committee have inclosed 
a plot upon the new purchase, and prepared it for a 
nursery in which to place small trees, shrubs, and ever- 
greens, which can be obtained at a low price, and grow 
them for ornamental purposes as they may be required, 
at a less price than they could otherwise be furnished. 
To stock this nursery, and provide the trees, shrubs, 
and flowers which it will be desirable to use in the cem- 
etery the coming season, will require an appropriation of 
at least $200. 

The insufficiency of water supply in the past has been 
not less an obstacle to the development of the cemetery, 
than the impossibility of obtaining an adequate supply of 
suitable loam with which to grade the lots and floral plots. 
What little has heretofore been procurable has been 
largely obtained from the light, sandy land in that neigh- 
borhood, possessing but little fertility, and being an im- 
provement in color only, over the sandy soil of the Pine 
Grove. Feeling that water alone could not make such 
soil productive, and that the willingness of lot-owners to 
aid the committee in their efforts to place the Pine Grove 
on a footing with the best of the many beautiful ceme- 
teries of New England would be unavailing without an 
unfailing supply of material, they purchased of the 
Stark Mills a large lot of excellent loam, nearly three 
hundred and fifty loads of which have already been de- 
livered at the cemetery. The committee regard it a piece 
of extreme good fortune to secure this for the benefit of 
lot-owners and the city, and as most of it will eventually 
be sold for the improvement of lots, the income will 
nearly balance the expenditure which will be required for 
this item. The bill for this loam will be between seven 



283 

and eight hundred dollars, and should be provided for in 
the year's appropriations. The superintendent has sup- 
plemented this supply with one hundred and twenty-five 
loads of rich muck, taken from the pond on the " Straw 
lot " and drawn to the cemetery for future use in grading 
for lots and beds. 

It will be the part of economy to continue this, as the 
muck, after sufficient exposure, will be valuable, and the 
pond from which it is taken will be gradually improved 
and fitted for the ornamentation of the new grounds. 
Two hundred dollars is believed to be a sufficient sum 
for this purpose. 

Not least among the improvements of the year, is the 
introduction of " catch-basins " in places where heretofore 
water has been retained in wet times, sometimes to the 
depth of over two feet. Five of these catch-basins have 
been built the present year as an experiment, and their 
marked efficiency fully warrants an expenditure for drain- 
age by this means the coming season. 

During the year the sub-trustees have caused the re- 
moval of one hedge and one iron fence, the only remain- 
ing relics of that doubtful taste which formerly tolerated 
such evidences of exclusiveness, and now the only barrier 
to a restoration of harmony and uniformity of grade, and 
a banishment of the gloomy and neglected appearance of 
the older portions of the cemetery, is the existence of so 
many granite curbings, of all varieties, patterns, grades, 
and shapes, often rendered more conspicuous and objec- 
tionable by the utter neglect of the lot within. The 
newer portions of the cemetery, which have been taste- 
fully laid out, with uniform grades and well cropped, 
open lawns, present a strong and pleasing contrast to the 
irregular and inharmonious fortifications of stone once 
thought to be desirable, but which an improved public 



284 

taste is fast driving from the leading cemeteries. The 
committee regret that a few even yet persist in barri- 
cading their lots with granite boulders ; but they are en- 
couraged in their efforts to promote the interests of the 
Pine Grove, by the noticeable improvement in public 
taste, and the ready preference which is given to lawn 
lots and to regrading old lots upon a similar plan. Lots 
adjoining these stone dungeons are unsalable, and happily 
the tendencies and growth of the public judgment are 
averse to them. 

The work of the committee and of the officers and 
employes has been greatly facilitated by the adoption of 
by-laws and rules and regulations, which have been 
printed, with other valuable information, in pamphlet 
form, and distributed to the lot-owners. 

The report of the Pine Grove committee of last year 
called attention to " irregularities on the part of lot-own- 
ers in the grading of their lots, improperly changing the 
lines, making encroachments upon the walks," etc., etc., 
a fact which had been none too strongly characterized by 
the city engineer in his report of the same year, and one 
which calls out the outspoken condemnation, often vigor- 
ously expressed, of every one who witnesses the evil results 
of their depredations. The matter thus referred to us has 
received the vigorous treatment it deserved, and ought ear- 
lier to have had meted out to it, by the enactment and en- 
forcement of Art. 1 of the new " Rules and Regulations," 
which, in substance, provides that no other person than 
the proprietor himself shall perform any work upon a lot 
without a written permit from the superintendent, under 
whose supervision and control the work shall be per- 
formed. No further trouble has been experienced in this 
direction, and it is believed that the matter referred to us 
by our predecessors has been successfully dealt with, 



285 

although the means employed have made food for grum- 
blers, who would be exceedingly unhappy if they were 
without something to find fault with. 

As will be seen by an examination of the by-laws, the 
avenues have been renamed, and the paths soon will be 
also. It is desirable that the names should be indicated 
upon the avenues and paths, that the public may be able 
to find the localities they desire, and the sub-trustees rec- 
ommend that this be done the coming year. 

The burials in the Pine Grove Cemetery already exceed 
all others, and the ratio is largely increasing. 

If there is necessity for greater receiving-tomb facilities, 
as suggested in the inaugural address of his Honor the 
Mayor, it must be apparent that the necessity is local at 
the Pine Grove, where, with the greatest number of in- 
terments, and with all its elements of growth, no tomb 
whatever is at the disposal of its lot-owners. Throughout 
the entire winter graves are dug through the frozen earth 
and burials made with great inconvenience and hardship, 
because no other means of caring for their dead is pro- 
vided, unless they leave them in another cemetery, where 
they feel they have no interest or claim, and from which 
they must go through the ordeal of another funeral 
almost, before the remains are finally at rest in the family 
cemetery and lot. The committee ask the board of trus- 
tees to concur with them in the opinion that a new 
receiving tomb shall be built at the Pine Grove, and in 
recommending to the city government an appropriation 
of $1,000, which in our opinion will be amply sufficient 
for that purpose. 

The sub-trustees have held a regular meeting every 
month since their appointment, and seven special meet- 
ings have also been held, besides many informal meetings 
at the cemetery. 



286 

They believe the work of the superintendent and of his 
employes has been faithfully and well performed, and 
they especially commend Mr. Stearns for his fidelity, his 
courtesy, and his ability. He has accomplished a vast 
amount of work in a thoroughly acceptable manner, and 
has been obedient to the dictation of the sub-trustees, who 
alone are responsible for his acts, and are willing to be 
accountable for what he has done by their direction. 

During the year forty deeds have been deliv- 
ered and paid for, the amount received 
thereby being $1,162 42 

Fifteen deeds have been written for lots sold 

during year, not paid for, amounting to . 477 83 



Making sales for the year 

amounting to . . . $1,640 25 

The Sup't has received for interments . . 326 00 

work on lots . 336 50 



A total of which amounts to . . $662 50 



"Which more than pays his salary of $1.75 per day for 
the year, and an amount considerably in excess of former 
years, for the same item. 

Besides this, he has cut and sold from the grounds 
trees which were condemned by the sub-trustees, for which 
he has received $112 28- And there is still due for wood 
sold, $35. 

He has negotiated all the sales of lots, and has received 
in advance deposits on these sales $339, which, with sun- 
dry small items amounting to $16.25, makes a total of 
§1,150.03 received by the superintendent. 

No. lots regraded during the year . . ( . 103 

catch-basins built ..... 5 



287 



monuments erected ..... 2 
hedges and iron fences removed ... 2 
lots unsold on " Hillside Lawn," where a de- 
posit of twice the price of the lot is required 97 
lots for sale, with lawn restrictions . . 16 
ordinary lots for sale ..... 12 
loads of loam and muck on hand . . . 300 
interments during the year . . . .193 
removals during the year .... 10 
Average No. of men employed per month . . 8 

Whole E"o. lots in yard 1,305 

sold 1,180 

deeds recorded .... 959 

lots sold of which there is no record . 221 

The following summary of receipts and expenditures 
for the year 1884 may perhaps be serviceable to the trus- 
tees, or instructive to the public, in the manner in which it 
is here presented : — 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1884 . $4,315 20 

Appropriation, 1884, . . . 7,000 00 
Sale of lots by Sup't $339.00 

by treasurer, $823.42 1,162 42 
Interments and work on lots . 662 50 
Balance of Superintendent's collec- 
tions 107 43 

Total received by treasurer $13,247 55 



EXPENDITURES. 



Real estate . 
Water-works 
Additions to fence 
Tool-house . 



$3,090 00 

4,138 20 

405 67 

233 05 



Total permanent investments $7,860 92 



288 



CURRENT EXPENSES. 

Labor and superintendent's salary $3,073 96 
Materials, tools, etc., used in ceme- 
tery 450 60 

Use of team . . . . 223 00 

City engineer and assistants . 144 32 

Trees, shrubs, and flowers . . 125 49 

Printing, stationery, and postage . 70 79 

Water used since September 1 36 50 

Miscellaneous expenses . . 86 07 



Total running expenses 

Total investments and expenses 



1,210 73 



.2,077 65 



Balance on hand Jan. 1, 1885 $1,169 90 

The following summary of estimates for appropriations 
of 1885 is respectfully urged upon the attention of the 
trustees, with the request that they will give it their in- 
dorsement and approval, and forward it to the city gov- 
ernment for their consideration and action : — 



ESTIMATES FOR 1885. 

CURRENT EXPENSES. 



Salary of Sup't, and for labor 
Material and tools 


. $2,500 00 
350 00 


Expended 
in 1884. 

$3,073 96 
450 60 


Printing, stationery, and postage 
Surveying on old lot . 
Use of teams at cemetery 
Trees, shrubs, and flowers . 


50 00 
100 00 
250 00 
200 00 


70 79 
144 32 
223 00 
125 49 


Water rates .... 


50 00 


36 50 


Miscellaneous expenses 
Clerk hire .... 


150 00 
25 00 


86 07 



!,675 00 $4,210 73 



289 



PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS. 







Expended 
In 1884. 


Extending iron fence on old and 






new lots ..... 


$1,000 C 


Completing tool-house and fur- 






nishing ..... 


500 


00 


Loam purchased and partly deliv- 






ered ...... 


750 


00 


Extension of water-works to lots . 


500 


00 


Receiving tomb .... 


1,000 


00 


Laying out Straw lot, and building 






avenues ..... 


300 


00 


Digging and carting muck for 






Straw lot 


200 


00 


Extension of drainage by catch- 






basins 


150 


00 


Laying out new " Public Grounds " 


200 


00 


Laying out " Pilgrim Lawn " 


150 


00 


Laying out Swede lot . 


150 


00 


Procuring and placing guide-boards 


100 


00 



Total for permanent investment $5,000 00 $7,866 92 
Total for current expenses . 3,675 00 4,210 73 



Total estimate for 1885 
Deduct probable net income 



8,675 00 $12,077 65 
1,800 00 1,824 92 



Amount of appropriation . $6,875 00 $7,000 00 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN F. CLOUGH, 
S. P. CANNON, 
HENRY H. HUSE, 
G.»P. WHITMAN, 
J. L. STEVENS, 

Sub-Trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 

19 



290 



AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of the Amoskeag Cemetery ask leave 
to report : — 

Very little has been done in this cemetery the past 
year. The fence separating the old portion of the ceme- 
tery from the new has been removed to the south side of 
the new part. Ninety-six lots have been staked out. 
The city councils made a special appropriation of three 
hundred dollars for this cemetery. Of this amount, fif- 
teen dollars and seventy-six cents has been paid for stak- 
ing lots. This is all that has been used of the appropria- 
tion. 

A claim against the city made by Calvin W. Stevens, 
for damage to his property by enlarging this cemetery, 
has delayed the committee somewhat. 

The committee recommend that city water be intro- 
duced into this cemetery the coming season, and a gate- 
way erected at the main entrance. 

Appropriation .... $300 00 

Expended 15 76 

Balance on hand . . $284 24 



HENRY S. PERRY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
JOHN E. STEARNS, 

Sub- Trustees Amoskeag Cemetery. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual re- 
port of the money received by me during the year ending 
December 31, 1884, on account of cemeteries : — 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 


Number of lots sold, 33. 




To cash received for the same 


. $932 16 


interest 


3 30 


of J. F. James 


226 96 


of B. A. Stearns 


769 93 


Total 




VALLEY CEMET 


ERY. 


Number of lots sold, 3. 




To cash received for the same 


$113 00 


interest 


2 40 


of H. R. Pettee 


28 50 


F. B. Balch 


566 00 


Total .... 





$1,932 35 



$709 90 

On May 29, 1884, I received from my predecessor, 
Hon. J. F. James, seventeen deeds, a small advance pay- 
ment having been made on each. The balance due on 
two of these has been paid and the deeds delivered. I 
have written, executed, and have ready for delivery four- 
teen deeds on which there have been partial payments 
made, all of which I consider as good, as also are those 



292 

which I received from my predecessor. I have notified 
in every case where I could get the address of those hav- 
ing contracted for lots, and the time has expired in which 
they were to take a deed in accordance with the agree- 
ment which they signed when they bargained for the lot. 
Some of these have attended to the matter at once, while 
others have taken no notice whatever of my request. 
All money received by me has been turned into the city 
treasury, for which I have the proper vouchers from the 
city clerk. 

A detailed account of the expenditures may be found 
elsewhere. 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 



Manchester, K H., Feb. 4, 1885. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer of the Cemeteries, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



EEPOBT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

G-entlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund have 
the honor to present their fifth annual report, and with it 
a statement of the treasurer, showing the present finan- 
cial condition of this trust. Thus far the accumulation 
of interest has not been sufficient to enable the trustees 
to accomplish much in the way of improvements to the 
lots, for the care of which donations have been made, nor 
could anything be done at all satisfactory in the light soil 
of our cemeteries without a free use of water. As the 
funds at their command increase, and with facilities now 
afforded by a general distribution of water from the city 
water-works, it is hoped that such improvements can be 
made as will be satisfactory to the parties most interested. 
In this connection, the trustees desire to suggest to per- 
sons donating money for this purpose, that it is well to 
remember that in time something more may be required 
than the mere ordinary care of the lots. Accidents are 
liable to occur from falling trees and from other causes, 
marble in this climate disintegrates and sometimes falls 
from its own weight, and granite structures frequently 
become displaced. For these reasons a fund should be 
allowed to accumulate with which to repair such dam- 



294 

ages, or to replace ruined structures. In the opinion of 
the trustees, two hundred dollars is the minimum sum 
that will produce sufficient means tc properly care for an 
ordinary lot of the usual size, and in cases where the lots 
are large, or have expensive improvements in marble or 
granite, a much larger sum is necessary. 

The favor with which this plan is being regarded by 
the proprietors of lots gives encouragement that at no 
distant time work will be furnished ^sufficient to employ a 
landscape gardener throughout the season, when it is 
hoped that better and more satisfactory results will be 
realized. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES A. "WESTON", Chairman, 

P. C. CHENEY, 

H. B. PUTNAM, Mayor, 

Trustees of the Cemetery Fund. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the second 
annual report of the funds received up to December 31, 

1884: — 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand, as per last report . . $700 00 

Received during the year from 

Thomas C. Shepherd's estate . 
Mrs. Emeline MoNab . 
Harris J. Poor .... 

Total .... 

Interest on hand, as per last report 
Interest received since last report . 

Total .... 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand, as per last report . . $571 83 

Received during the year from 

Thomas S. Foote . . . $146 56 
B. F. Martin . . . . 121 42 

$267 98 

Total .... $839 81 



$300 00 




100 00 




100 00 






$500 00 






$1,200 00 


$12 45 




18 75 






$31 20 



296 
Interest received since last report . . $15 75 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Gilman Riddle (permanent fund) . . . $200 00 
Interest . . . . . . . . 2 50 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer, 



ACCOU NT 

OP 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

CITY TREASURER, 

From December 31, 1883, to December 31, 1884. 



298 



Br. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, lreaturer, in account with the 



To cash on hand January 1, 1884 .... $67,671 66 


Temporary loan 








209,000 00 


Insurance tax .... 








1,516 50 


Railroad tax .... 








16,728 49 


Savings-bank tax 








46,834 49 


Literary fund .... 








2,386 72 


Board of paupers off the farm . 








1,832 67 


City Farm .... 








399 18 


City teams .... 








4,253 00 


Sewers and drains licenses 








1,548 60 


Commons, A. H. Lowell, old iro 


a 






1 20 


Commons, overdraft . . 








2 50 


Freeman Higgins, land sold 








517 92 


Louis D. Goodwin, overdraft 








25 00 


J. B. Varick Co., overdraft 








3 90 


A. J. Sawyer, overdraft . 








44 94 


L. K. Mead, overdraft 








1 75 


Samuel Neal, old brick 








4 00 


Incidental expenses, overdraft 








188 50 


T. A. Lane, overdraft 








20 


William C. Rogers, overdraft 








11 85 


Pine Grove Cemetery 








1,932 35 


Valley Cemetery 








709 90 


Daniels & Co., overdraft, F. D. 








1 85 


Police department 








3,947 26 


City Hall 








3,762 28 


Water-works . 








75,580 08 


Trustees cemetery fund, bonds s 


old 






2,200 00 


D. K. White, milk licenses 








125 00 


N. P. Kidder, old iron 








77 20 


G. F. Bosher & Co., land sold 








100 00 


Kimball & Gerrish, land sold 








1,245 00 


Rent ward-room 








12 00 


Dog licenses 








884 00 


Daniels & Co., overdraft . 








1 92 


Tuition .... 








199 75 


Show licenses . 








271 00 


Rent of tenements . 








766 71 


City scales 








112 00 


Taxes collected on list of 1874 








3 49 


Amount carried forward . 


. $444,904 86 



299 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1884). 



Or. 



By unpaid bills January 1 
Temporary loan 
Coupons, water bonds 
Coupons, city bonds 
Interest . 
Paupers off farm 
City Farm 
City teams 
Highway district No 



1884 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 



New highways 
Land damage . 
Watering streets 
Lighting streets 
Paving streets . 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete 
Sewers and drains . 
Commons 
Bridges . 

Incidental expenses . 
Pine Grove Cemetery 
Valley Cemetery 
Amoskeag Cemetery 
Fire department 
Fire-alarm telegraph 
Firemen's parade 
Hydrant service 
Police department . 



$32,885 67 

160,000 00 

35,808 00 

15,539 00 

2,154 54 

3,852 

9,518 

5,884 

278 

10,165 

1,229 56 

439 01 

415 

582 

859 

620 

496 

2,389 38 

1,087 87 

267 

. 221 

10,299 

1,171 

4,494 

10,473 

8,032 

4,216 22 

3,519 63 

15,043 41 

4,822 34 

9,463 38 

56,397 22 

12,077 65 

2,392 36 

15 76 

17,832 25 

943 61 

345 66 

20,737 50 

26,080 73 



24 

63 
19 
38 
42 



97 
56 
90 
14 
23 



36 
86 
02 
15 
53 
35 
74 



Amount carried forward 



$493,054 42 



300 
Dr. Sylvanut B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward . . . $444,904 86 


To taxes collected on list of 1875 . 






1 00 


it a ( 


• 1876 . 






5 83 


<( « < 


1877 . 






28 98 


<( it ( 


1 1878 . 
« 1879 . 






7 22 
4 00 


a a t 


1 1880 . 






1 48 


it <( < 


' 1881 . 






1 76 


a tt < 


< 1882 . 






32 13 


« U l 


1 1883 .. 






12,728 81 


(( u t 


1884 . ' . 






311,613 50 


Interest on taxei 


• • • 






299 57 


Amoskeag Manufact 


uring Co. 






248 79 






$769,877 93 


Unpaid bills Decemi: 


er 31, 1884 


45,824 44 




$815,702 37 



301 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1884.) 



Or. 



Amount brought forward . . . $493,054 42 


By City Hall .... 






7,096 69 


Printing and stationery . 








1,998 47 


Repairs of buildings 








2,897 89 


City Library .... 








3,233 57 


Militia .... 








800 00 


Payment of funded debt . 








71,500 00 


Abatement of taxes . 








3,098 91 


Discount on taxes . 








8,261 29 


State tax . . 








48,404 00 


City officers' salaries . 








14,142 91 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 








200 00 


Stark Monument square . 








4 00 


Women's Aid Society 








400 00 


Water-works . 








36,760 73 


Repairs of school -bouses . 








4,270 79 


Fuel 








1,844 00 


Furniture and supplies 








1,508 01 


Books and stationery 








396 86 


Printing and advertising . 








450 78 


Contingent expenses 








985 36 


Care of rooms . 








3,019 16 


Evening schools 








1,242 38 


Teachers' salaries 








39,592 42 


Tuition .... 








157 34 


Truant officer . 








750 00 


Scavenger teams 








4,366 51 


Interest on hand 








1,546 58 




$751,983 07 


Cash on hand December 31, 1884 . . 


. 63,719 30 


$815,702 37 



SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

City Treasurer. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the account 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, City Treasurer for the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-four, and find the same to be 
correct and properly vouched tor. 

S. B. STEARNS, 
H. B. PUTNAM, 
A. A. AmSWORTH, 
SAMUEL LTJOT, 

Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 

Manchester, N. H., January 5, 1885. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



INTEREST 


i 


Dr. 


To appropriation 


$20,000 


00 


water-works, am't transferred . 


38,000 


00 

■ ft58 000 00 












Or. 


Paid Anioskeag Savings Bank 


$215 


29 


Manchester Savings Bank . 


933 


41 


Manchester National Bank . 


102 


77 


Geo. B. Chandler 


868 


82 


Ehenezer Knowlton 


25 


00 


W. S. Locke 


9 


25 


coupons, water 


35,808 


00 


coupons, city 


15,539 


00 


By balance on hand 


. 4,498 


46 

$58 000 00 









INTEREST ON TAXES. 
To Geo. E. Morrill, collector . $229 57 



By reserved fund, am't transferred $199 57 
balance on hand . . 100 00 



Dr. 

$299 57 
Or. 

$299 57 



306 



TEMPOKARY LOAN. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 
Manchester Savings Bank 
Amoskeag Savings Bank 
Manchester National Bank 
Geo. B. Chandler . 
Ebenezer Knowlton 
State of N. H., by J. C. Ray 
People's Savings Bank . 
Josiah Carpenter 



Paid Manchester Savings Bank 
Amoskeag Savings Bank 
Amoskeag National Bank 
Manchester National Bank 
Geo. B. Chandler 

By balance to new account . 



. $70,000 


00 


. 105,000 


00 


. 20,000 


00 


. 20,000 


00 


. 45,000 


00 


. 1,000 


00 


. 3,000 


00 


. 5,000 


00 


. 10,000 


00 




1279 000 00 








Cr. 


.$75,000 


00 


. 35,000 


00 


. 15,000 


00 


. 10,000 


00 


. 25,000 


00 


119,000 


00 




$279,000 00 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 

To appropriation . . . $3,000 00 

¥m. A. Maxwell ... 34 88 
County of Hillsborough, board 

inmates of Industrial School 1,797 79 



Paid Daniel Sheehan, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Timothy 
Sullivan .... 



$95 50 



Dr. 



1,832 67 
Cr. 



307 



Paid Daniel Sheehan, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Turcotte . $54 99 

Win. Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Hunter . 144 00 

Geo. W. Wilson, groceries 

furnished Hannah O'Brien 5 00 

Geo. W. Wilson, groceries 

furnished Mary Fitzgerald 14 00 

Geo. W. Wilson, 'groceries 

furnished Mrs. Mary Green 39 61 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Edmund Burke 71 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Mary Doherty . 15 61 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Ellen McGinnis 21 19 

J. Bean & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Levi M. Green . 88 84 

McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Alice Moran . . 11 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Turcotte . 78 24 

J. C. Fifield & Son, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Mary Griffin 5 72 

J. C. Fifield & Son, groceries 

furnished Jacob Maynard 2 06 

P. Fahey, groceries furnished 

Michael Moran . . 73 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries furnished Levi Green 5 00 

Wm. F. Sleeper & Co., gro- 
ceries furnished Mrs. Pat- 
rick Fox ... 10 00 



308 



Paid Griffin Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Walter Lynch . " $20 00 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Frank McCone . 12 00 

B. Bresnehan, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Ellen Rhoades 3 03 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. Laughlin . 24 00 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Rhoades . 6 29 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished James McGinnis 7 28 

Adams & Lamprey, groceries 

furnished Mary Doherty . 3 91 

Bartlett & Thompson, grocer- 
ies furnished Mrs. Lyman 
W. Griffin ... 5 00 

Bartlett & Thompson, grocer- 
ies furnished Mrs. James 
Talty .... 5 00 

Michael Kinney ,groceries fur- 
nished "William Conway . 28 70 

Town of Londonderry, gro- 
ceries furnished Augustus 
B. Fellows ... 3 00 

Town of Lancaster, grocer- 
ies furnished Benson Joy . 28 11 

Joseph Quirin, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Duford . . 24 00 

McQuadeBros., groceries fur- 
nished Michael Spain . 20 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Stephen Sullivan . 24 90 



309 

Paid County of Hillsborough, care 
of John J. Murray . 

County of Hillsborough, care 
of Asenath H. White 

Mrs. Julia Sheehan, groceries 
furnished Mrs. T. Sullivan 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Ellen Bachner 

A. M. Eastman, groceries 

Joseph Murray 

H. B. Sawyer, groceries 

Town of Londonderry, care 
of Wilson Day 

N. H. Asylum for Insane, 
board of John J. Murray . 

2$. H. Asylum for Insane, 
board of Asenath H.White 

~N. H. Asylum for Insane, 
board of Dudley B. Emer- 
son 

Esther Hardy, board of Rod- 
ney Hardy 

Mrs. Wm. C. Chase, board of 
Thomas Chase . 

County of Hillsborough,board 
of John J. Murray . 

County of Hillsborough,board 
of Asenath H. White 

John Wiggin, care of Henry 
Bennett .... 

Ella M. Tinker, care of Tom- 
linson child 

Hannah Ovrier,care of Joseph 
A. Neal .... 



526 


00 


26 


00 


20 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


2 


40 


3 


00 


18 


50 


.03 


26 


80 


96 


65 


95 


36 


00 


68 


00 


26 


00 


40 


85 


31 


25 


2 


50 


5 


00 



310 



Paid Mary A. Campbell, nursing, 




and care of Ellen Rhoades 


$19 45 


A.G. Fairbanks, nursing and 




care of Ellen Buckner 


10 00 


Julia Burrows, nursing and 




care of MaryMcCarty 


5 00 


State Industrial School,board 




of inmates .... 


2,119 .27 


J. B. Hall, medicine 


65 


L. B. Snelling & Co., medicine 


70 


Edward H. Currier, medicine 


1 10 


G. E. Hall, medicine 


3 95 


L. K. Mead, medicine . 


7 95 


Charles P. Still, wood fur- 




nished Levi Green . 


4 00 


Matthew McGinnis,wood fur- 




nished Levi Green . 


6 00 


Isaac Lefebvre, wood fur- 




nished Mrs. James Talty . 


2 00 


Isaac Lefebvre, wood fur- 




nished Edward Frenier 


2 00 


Isaac Lefebvre, wood fur- 




nished Mrs. Lyman W. 




Griffin .... 


5 20 


E.V.Turcotte,wood furnished 




Mrs. A. Turcotte 


9 75 


J. Flynn, wood furnished 




Mary Doherty . 


4 62 


J. Flynn, wood furnished 




Jacob Maynard 


2 25 


J. Flynn, wood furnished 




Mary Griffin 


4 00 


J.T. Garland, wood furnished 




Levi Green 


5 00 



311 



Paid E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 






furnished Mary Doherty . 


$6 


25 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 






furnished Mrs. T. Sullivan 


4 


25 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 






f furnished Levi Green 


4 


25 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 






furnished Ellen Rhoades . 


2 


00 


Pearson & Wallace, burial of 






D. B. Emerson 


15 


00 


Pearson & Wallace, burial . 


25 


00 


P. A. Devine, burial of Ellen 






Rhoades .... 


21 


50 


A.G. Fairbanks, transporting 






paupers .... 


22 


35 


C. H. Simpson, team . 


3 


00 


Temple & Farrington, sta- 






tionery .... 


10 


31 


Town of Londonderry, sup- 






port of Wilson Day . 


50 


10 


Stephen Palmer, rent of tene- 






ment .... 


18 


00 


M. V. Garland . 


4 


63 


McDonald & Cody, shoes 


4 


35 


By reserved fund, amount trans- 






ferred .... 


800 


00 


balance on hand 


180 


43 



$4,832 67 



312 



CITY FARM. 

To appropriation .... $2,500 00 

Barton & Co., overdraft . . 19 81 

"Waite & Piper, overdraft . 8 87 

J. Garvin, on account of farm 370 50 

balance overdrawn . . . 6,619 45 



Paid Jeremiah Garvin, superin- 
tendent . . . . $750 00 
Jeremiah Garvin, horse, wag- 
on, sleigh, milk-cans, har- 



Dr. 



ness, etc 


453 81 


Drake & Carpenter, flour, 




lime, and cement 


217 81 


~W. H. H. Colby, grain, meal, 




etc. . . 


405 11 


Samuel Cooper, grain, meal 




etc 


9 54 


Pettee & Adams, grain, meal, 




etc. . . . . 


760 87 


C. H. Hill & Co. . 


57 97 


George H. Stearns, groceries 


119 57 


George W. Wilson, groceries 


13 13 


Bartlett & Thompson, meats 




etc. . 


204 15 


P. Fahey, groceries 


52 21 


A. G. Grenier, groceries 


75 26 


A. M. Eastman, groceries . 


117 39 


L. Gutterson, groceries 


9 46 


A. ~N. Clapp, groceries anc 


[ 


kerosene oil 


54 19 



),518 63 
Cr. 



313 



Paid George S. dough & Co. 


> 


meats, etc. 


$85 61 


Wilson & Rand, meats, etc. 


107 04 


J. E. Towle & Co., meats, etc 


20 46 


Tom W. Robinson, meats,etc 


67 11 


George C. Lord, groceries 


10 54 


E. M. Slayton, butter . 


133 92 


Hardy & Co., groceries 


13 50 


D. Kerwin, soap, etc. . 


13 76 


Eitzpatrick & Co., butter 


29 17 


Dodge & Laing, butter . 


38 15 


Smith & Bly, crackers, etc. 


8 45 


Bartlett & Colburn, groceries 


25 75 


Adams & Lamprey, groceries 


9 68 


Carl E. York, groceries 


44 52 


A. M. Eastman, groceries 


77 87 


Horace Marshall . 


104 13 


A. G. Fairbanks, butter, etc. 


15 20 


Killey & Wadleigh, grass-seec 


L 


etc 


. 14 31 


J. B. Varick, ensilage-cutter 




hardware, etc. . 


231 35 


Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. 


120 29 


Vm. C. Rogers, hardware 


j 


superphosphate, etc. 


88 94 


Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, etc 


47 29 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


1 75 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 




ing carts, etc. 


342 12 


S. C. Forsaith & Co., lumber 




etc. .... 


71 18 


Thorp & Bartlett, range 


> 


plumbing, etc. 


190 87 


P. C. Cheney Co. 


2 50 



314 



Paid R. D. Gay . 

Pike & Heald, repairing boil- 
er, etc. 
A. H. Lowell, iron-work, etc 
Thorp & Avery, oil stove, etc 
Brown & Magoon, repairing 

carriage, etc. 
Manchester Locomotive 

Works, manure 
"Weston & Hill, dry goods 
Hawley & Barnard, dry goods 
Barton & Co., dry goods 
Waite & Piper, dry goods 
H. M. Moody, clothing 
A. A. Ainsworth . 
Cumner & Co., clothing 
Tarbell & Co., clothing 
Manchester One-Price Cloth 

ing Co., clothing 
G-eo. E. Mitchell, clothing 
Weston & Martin, clothing 
Geo. H. Tanswell, dry goods 
Harley, Robbie, & Vadnais, 

dry goods . 
Chas. P. Sprague, dry goods 
J. H. Cram, blacksmithing . 
Wm. H. Hill, blacksmithing 
Charles Bunton, blacksmith- 
ing 

John F. Woodbury, black- 
smithing . 
Barnard & Pike, blacksmith- 
ing . . . . 
J. Benson, Jr., blacksmithing 



$3 66 

1 75 
13 71 

7 50 

7 50 



12 


81 


195 


09 


98 


54 


39 


62 


68 


39 


13 


00 


2 


50 


10 


55 


12 


00 


8 


25 


14 


20 


6 


00 


18 


29 


13 


08 


9 


82 


59 


60 


25 


93 


80 


42 


6 


45 


1 


75 


1 


50 



315 



Paid George H. Hubbard, tobacco, 


$12 60 


R. G. Sullivan, tobacco 


10 77 


~N. Alexander & Co., tobacco 


64 77 


Granite State Telephone Co., 




use of telephone 


18 50 


ISTew England Telegraph and 




Telephone Co., use of tele- 




phone .... 


35 35 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 


38 95 


Moore & Preston, coal . 


77 35 


F. !N\ McLaren, repairing har- 




nesses, etc. 


6 07 


E. "W. Kimball, harness, etc. 


125 64 


F. C. Dow, boots and shoes . 


26 05 


Ezra A. Day, boots and shoes 


15 60 


Wingate & Gould, boots and 




shoes .... 


31 05 


D.O. Furnald, boots and shoes 


15 25 


J. Hodge, lumber 


101 17 


A. C. Wallace, lumber 


154 15 


Head & Dowst, lumber 


57 22 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 




labor .... 


652 31 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


22 39 


J. Bryson, Jr., painting 


26 66 


C.M.Bailey, pails, mop-cloths, 




etc 


16 73 


Lewis K. Mead, medicines . 


71 15 


George E. Hall, medicines . 


24 27 


A. F. Perry, medicines 


11 93 


Carpenter & Robinson, mason 




work .... 


52 15 


Concord R. R. Corp., freight 


7 65 



316 



Paid L. H. "Wlieeler, wind-mill* 
pipe, etc. .... 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 

J. B. Pattee, taking inventory 

J. Stickney, hose, etc. . 

J. L. Fogg, cow . 

C. D. Welch, difference in 
horses .... 

Dr. J. Alexander, professional 
services .... 

J. J. Bennett, mason-work . 

J. E. Stearns, cows 

James Patten, manure . 

E. P. Richardson, insurance 

Thomas W. Lane, stationery, 
etc., ..... 

Horace Gordon, paper-hang- 
ings .... 

T. A. Barker, swill 

P. A. Devine, burial of John 
Rhodes 

R. M. Rollins 

E. R. Sias, carpenter-work 

Pearson & Wallace, burial of 
Charlotte Scagel 

G. F. Bosher & Co. 

A. Q. Gage . 



$410 61 
10 50 
20 00 
31 50 
60 00 

600 00 

25 75 

4 25 

115 00 

29 25 
240 00 

3 80 

10 78 
150 00 

19 25 
7 00 

23 87 

24 00 
9 50 

100 00 



),518 63 



317 



CITY TEAMS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 


$4,500 00 


D. Kerwin, overdraft 


5 25 


District No. 2 . 


933 75 


District No. 10 


214 50 . 


new highways 


249 00 


watering streets 


818 75 


paving streets . 


187 50 


macadamizing streets 


60 00 


grading for concrete 


405 75 


sewers and drains . 


151 00 


bridges .... 


5 00 


commons 


69 00 


scavenger teams 


1,063 50 


repairs of buildings 


53 75 


incidental expenses 


36 25 




tt8 753 00 








Or. 


Paid Wilbur Fisk, carrots 


$7 92 


C. N. Harvey, straw 


20 25 


E. P. Johnson & Co., hay 


1,393 76 


J. W. Rand . 


16 85 


C. H. Tirrell, straw 


34 71 


E. H. Rowe, hay . 


46 30 


George Harvey, straw . 


14 14 


George Dearborn, straw 


5 80 


J. Q. Perley, straw 


10 44 


Frank Johnson, straw . 


11 80 


Simon Paige, straw 


5 52 


Eugene Hartshorn, straw 


22 13 


H. A. Horton, carrots . 


44 19 


A. N. Clapp, salt . . 


1 54 



318 

Paid H. Fradd & Co., grain and 
meal .... 

Pettee & Adams, grain and 
meal .... 

Drake & Carpenter, grain 
and meal .... 

Charles A. Bailey, traverse 
sled ..... 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repair- 
ing wagons, etc. 

Welch & Culliney, repairing 
wagons, etc. 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing wagons, etc. 

J. H. Cram, blacksmithing . 

D. F. Cressey & Co., black- 
smithing .... 

W. H. Hill, blacksmithing . 

J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith- 
ing ..... 

John Barnes, blacksmithing 

Stephen Austin, blacksmith- 
ing 

F. N". McLaren, repairing 
harness, etc. 

H. C. Banno, repairing har- 
nesses, etc. 

Ezra W. Kimball, repairing 
harness, etc. 

D. S. Ames, repairing har- 
ness, etc. .... 

Dr. J. Alexander, professional 
services .... 



$329 41 


457 


98 


571 


95 


40 


00 


4 


10 


9 


80 


1,084 


99 


154 


75 


83 


88 


107 


30 


87 


50 


8 


25 


3 


10 


137 


51 


104 


12 


18 


71 


3 


40 


37 


25 



6 00 



319 



Paid S. F. Burnham, professional 

services .... $30 00 

R. Wood, professional ser- 
vices ..... 

George W. Butterfield, pro- 
fessional services 

J. B. Hall, medicines . 

D. Kerwin, condition food . 

B. P. Bell, cylinder oil 
F. S. Wallace, harness soap 
J. Bryson, Jr., painting carts 
J. B. Varick, hardware 
Daniels & Co., hardware 

C. T. Newman, medicines . 
Z. F. Campbell, medicines . 
Geo.W. Butterfield, teamster 
Jeremiah Lane, teamster 
Charles Denyou, teamster 
Charles Rogers, teamster 
Walter Seaward, teamster . 
City Hall drug-store, medi- 
cines .... 

J. Bryson, Jr., painting cart 
By balance on hand 



31 


00 


29 


19 


16 


00 


25 


90 


2 67 


7 


21 


5 


15 


2 


35 


29 


16 


9 


32 


302 


25 


303 


00 


156 


00 


17 


25 


18 


00 


5 


00 


9 


39 


2,868 


81 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 
To appropriation 



Paid F. B. Potter, drain pipe 
M. F. Dodge, gravel 



5,753 00 



. $300 00 


Dr. 

$300 00 
Cr. 


$2 81 
10 01 



320 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


$0 87 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


8 53 


Manchester Axe Co., black 




smithing . 


1 20 


labor of men and teams 


250 46 


D. Wells, lumber 


4 50 


By balance on hand 


21 62 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 
To appropriation . . .$11,000 00 



1300 00 



Dr. 



$11,000 00 
Cr. 



Paid James Patten, superintendent $874 00 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc. . . . - . . 22 65 

J. B. Varick Co. hardware, etc. 131 65 

Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. 21 59 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware, 

etc 150 38 

Pike & Heald, lantern, globes, 

etc 15 19 

Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 10 32 

R. W. Flanders, iron-work . 2 93 
Charles Bunton, iron-work, 

etc 79 08 

Elzear Martel, iron-work, etc. 3 20 
Welch & Culliney, iron work, 

etc 66 90 

J. F. Woodbury, iron-work, 

etc 75 



321 



Paid Webster & O'Brien, iron-work 
etc. . ... 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 

J. Hodge, lumber 

Head & Dowst, lumber 

Geo. Holbrook, lumber 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 

Geo. H. Stearns, salt, etc. . 

J. Taylor & Son, salt, oil, etc. 

Hunkins & Wilson, repair- 
ing watering-trough . 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 

Welch & Culliney, black- 
smithing .... 

Lamson & Harden, black- 
smithing .... 

Palmer & Garmon, stone 
chips .... 

Chas. A. Bailey, stone flag- 
ging 

Hanchester Gas Co., gas 

W. H. Yickery, repairing lock 

Hanchester Gas Co., fire brick 

Abbot-Downing Co., repair- 
ing street-sweeper . . 32 25 

J. Stickney, neat's-foot oil, 

etc 8 33 

J. Bryson, Jr., painting, etc. 

J. Bryson, Jr., painting, etc. 

U. S. & C. Express Co. 

City Farm .... 

Abbot-Downing Co., refill- 
ing street broom 

J. J. Connor 

21 



$11 


75 


3 


90 


11 


71 


16 


95 


48 


51 


12 


80 


16 


40 


12 


80 




95 


6 


18 


12 


60 


23 


16 


20 


25 


96 


00 




80 




15 


13 


00 



14 


08 


44 


28 


1 


00 


34 


50 


32 


25 


14 


50 



322 



Paid James Briggs, dippers 

Concord Railroad, freight 
labor of men and teams 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber 

By balance on hand 



$1 50 




25 


. 8,292 


93 


3 


00 


834 


58 




- $11,000 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



To appropriation . . . $700 00 

balance overdrawn . . . 529 56 



Paid Ed. N. Baker, superintendent $343 00 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 

ing 12 60 

J. Welcome & Co., black- 
smithing .... 2 40 
J. B. Varick, hardware . 12 28 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 7 37 
labor of men and teams . 851 91 



Dr. 

^,229 56 
Cr. 



$1,229 56 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



$400 00 
39 01 



Dr. 



$439 01 



323 



Paid Thos. A. Lane, drain pipe . 
R. IT. Whitteniore, superin- 
tendent . 
labor of men and teams 



$6 15 

264 86 
168 00 



Cr. 



$439 01 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT tfO. 5. 



To appropriation .... 


$400 00 


balance overdrawn . 


15 97 


Paid "W. "W. Dickey, superin- 




tendent .... 


$138 50 


~W. W. Dickey, gravel . 


15 04 


R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 




ing 


2 65 


J. B. Yarick Co., hardware 


7 63 


A. C. Wallace, lumber 


2 56 


John Dickey, gravel 


2 70 


C. ~N. Harvey, posts 


3 20 


Geo. H. Stearns, kerosene oil, 




etc. ..... 


65 


Mrs. Rodina ITutt, gravel 


3 20 


labor of men and teams 


239 84 



Dr. 



$415 97 



Cr. 



$415 97 



324 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



To appropriation . . . . $400 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 182 56 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 
To appropriation .... $900 00 



Paid Clias. Francis, superintendent 
P. O. Woodman, superinten- 
dent ..... 
J. W. Watson, blacksmithing 
J. W. Watson, blacksmithing 
J. B. Yarick Co., hardware . 
Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 
J. T. Garland, lumber and 

labor 

Mrs. G. W. Follansbee, stone 
labor of men and teams 

By balance on hand 



$29 00 


120 


51 


2 


38 


7 


25 


6 


61 


20 


71 


19 


26 


6 


00 


648 


18 


40 


10 



Dr. 







$582 56 






Cr. 


Paid Daniel H. Dickey, superin- 






tendent . . . 


$145 50 




Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 


3 75 




J. W. Watson, blacksmithing 


1 95 




labor of men and teams 


431 36 


$582 56 







Dr. 

$900 00 
Cr. 



$900 00 



325 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



To appropriation 



Paid John A. Proctor, superinten 
dent .... 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
Charles Bunton, iron-work 
labor of men and teams 

By balance on hand 



$650 00 



Dr. 





$650 00 
Cr. 


. $175 13 




21 30 




5 40 




418 31 




29 86 


««*n on 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



To appropriation 



Paid J. J. Garman, superinten 
dent .... 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
L. A. Dickey, iron-work 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
Charles Bunton, iron-work 
labor of men and teams 

By balance on hand 



$500 00 



. $196 75 


8 


40 


7 


73 


4 


00 


8 


87 


270 


48 


3 


77 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



To appropriation . 

balance overdrawn . 



. $1,600 00 

789 38 



Dr. 

$500 00 
Cr. 



$500 00 



Dr. 



$2,389 38 



326 



Ce. 



Paid ¥m. N". Chamberlin, super- 






intendent .... 


$310 00 


James Ivennard, gravel 


33 


10 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


71 


86 


A. N. Clapp, nails, etc. 


5 


87 


G. "W. Goffe, lumber and 






posts ..... 


37 


00 


J. G. Holbrook, stone . 


16 


50 


D. H. Morgan,carpenter work 


5 


00 


John Bryson, painting . 


3 


17 


James Briggs, pails, dippers, 






etc 


11 


28 


"Win. C. Rogers, hardware . 




10 


Stephen Austin, blacksmith- 






ing 


14 


40 


E. Hartshorn, sand 


9 


35 


A. C. "Wallace, lumber . 


42 


05 


Moulton & Co., ladder . 


1 


80 


D. F. Cressey & Co., black- 






smithing .... 


15 


40 


labor of men and teams 


1,812 


50 









HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



$1,000 00 

87 87 



Paid Jas. E. Bailey, superintendent $400 50 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 15 32 



De. 

$1,087 87 
Ce. 



327 

Paid S. L. Flanders, powder, salt, 

etc $1 86 

L. N. George, gravel . . 11 05 

labor of men and teams . 659 14 

$1,087 87 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . $300 00 

$300 00 

Cr. 
Paid City Farm for labor . . $267 36 
By balance on band . . . 32 64 

$300 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $200 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 21 86 

$221 86 

Cr. 
Paid J. H. Campbell, superinten- 
dent $33 00 

labor of men and teams . 188 86 

$221 86 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $7,000 00 
reserved fund .... 3,500 00 

$10,500 00 



328 



Cr. 



Paid A. Bodwell & Son, stone 


$35 00 


W. H. Landry, stone, labor . 


171 00 


Lamson & Marden, repairing 




tools ..... 


6 67 


D. F. Cressey, repairing tools 


15 65 


R. W. Flanders,repairing tools 


30 58 


H. F. Thompson, repairing 




tools ..... 


2 98 


James Benson, Jr., repairing 




tools ..... 


6'30 


T. D. Parent, repairing tools 


5 53 


T. D. Parent, repairing tools 


6 55 


A. N. Clapp, powder and fuse 


3 20 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


1 05 


H. Fradd & Co., kerosene oil 


73 


labor of men and teams 


10,013 78 


By balance on hand 


200 98 







$10,500 00 



LAND DAMAGE. 



To appropriation 



$1,250 00 



Paid A. H. Lowell 


$21 73 


Nancy J. Searles . 


182 87 


George S. Smith . 


5 00 


Manchester & K". W. R. P. 


50 00 


R. K Whittemore 


84 37 


Joseph B. Clark . 


99 64 


H. S. Whitney . 


727 54 


By balance on hand 


78 85 



Dr. 

1,250 00 
Cr. 



$1,250 00 



329 



WATERING STREETS. 



To appropriation .... $3,500 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 994 53 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing carts .... $44 76 
Manchester "Water Works, 

water .... 1,880 00 

Pike & Heald, repairing carts 37 36 
Thomas A. Lane, repairing 

stand-pipes . . . 41 16 

A. P. Frye, repairing carts . 5 50 

Abbot-Downing Co., Monitor 465 00 

J. Stickney, hose, etc. . . 3 50 

labor of men and teams . 2,017 25 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $8,500 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred .... 
balance overdrawn . 



Paid K E. Weston Electric Light 
Co., electric lights 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 



Dr. 



,494 53 
Cr. 



$4,494 53 



Dr. 



1,800 
173 


00 
35 




$■ 


>j-\j)iitj rjv 






Cr. 


$3,983 83 
3,477 86 





330 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., setting 

posts, etc. . . . $101 38 

George H. Dunbar, lighting 

streets, etc. . . . 2,109 85 
F.S. Worthen, lighting streets, 

etc 444 11 

F. S. Worthen & Son, setting 

posts, etc. . . . 68 10 

James Briggs, repairing 

lamps, etc. 
Daniels & Co., glass 
A. H. Lowell, lamp-posts and 

frames .... 
T. A. Lane, burners, etc. 
Hunkins & Wilson, resetting 

lamp-posts, etc. 
J. B. Varick, glass, etc. 
Wm. C. Rogers, glass, etc. . 
Brock & Driscoll, repairing 

lanterns, etc. 
James S. Bacheler, plumbing 
F. Riedel,lamp-nxtures,naph- 

tha, etc. .... 
Killey & Wadleigh, glass 



19 


05 


70 


87 


2 


58 


8 


95 


16 


95 


9 


00 


40 


05 


1 


90 


5 


30 


7 


00 




$10,473 35 



PAYING STREETS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $6,000 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 1,836 04 

balance overdrawn . . . 196 70 

$8,032 74 



331 



Cr. 



Paid John B. Clarke, paving-stone 
C. H. Roby, concreting 
Ira ~N. Plumer, paving-stone 
Charles A. Bailey, block pav- 
ing, etc 

J. Fogg, paving-stone . 
Thomas Bolton, paving-stone 
J. H. Giddings, paving-stone 
Stark Mills, block paving 
labor of men and teams 



$398 


10 


3,736 


52 


274 


50 


750 


79 


70 


00 


21 


00 


4 


50 


250 


00 


2,527 


33 



5,032 74 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $5,000 00 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 
repairing crusher . . 248 79 



Dr. 







$5,248 






Cr. 


Paid J. G. Holbrook, 


stone 


$41 00 


G. H. Dunbar, 


a 


19 00 


S. P. Worthley, 


c< 


105 00 


Joseph Tirrell, 


a 


117 00 


H. A. Horton, 


a 


80 00 


Ira 1ST. Plumer, 


a 


191 00 


Chas. H. Simpson, 


a 


41 00 


Daniel Butterfield, 


u 


141 00 


H. S. Plumer, 


a 


111 00 


James Fullerton, 


a 


135 00 


J. Paige, 


a 


81 00 


J. Nutt, 


a 


37 00 


James Kennard, 


a 


24 50 



332 



Paid Wm, Campbell, sto 


ne 


$2 00 


Benjamin Plumer ' 




6 00 


Charles Rankin, " 




68 00 


John Kennard, ' 




47 75 


E. W. Butterfield, " 




10 00 


George Whitford, " 




27 00 


J. L. Fogg, 




14 00 


H. Willey, 




47 00 


P. 0. "Woodman, ' 




42 00 


Palmer & G-armon, " 




14 25 


T. L. Thorpe, waste 


2 55 


Hutchinson Bros., repairing 




crusher, etc. 


75 37 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 




etc 


20 19 


Manchester Water Works, 




water .... 


30 00 


Concord Railroad, freight 


1 80 


Thos. A. Lane, repairing 




crusher .... 


40 


L. M. Aldrich, filing saw, etc. 


3 64 


Lamson & Marden, repairing 




tools 


10 90 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 




stone, etc. 


264 41 


labor of men and teams 


4,023 98 


By balance on hand 


232 57 


GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 


To appropriation .... 


$3,000 00 


balance overdrawn . 


• 


519 63 



$5,248 79 



Dr. 



1,519 63 



333 



Paid C. M. Dodge, grading Myrtle 

and Russell streets . . $69 50 

Wm. Landry, blasting stone, 

etc 240 07 

Charles A. Bailey, stone . 67 05 

"Warren Harvey, stone curb- 
ing 38 70 

labor of men and teams . 3,104 31 



Cr. 



$3,519 63 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

To appropriation . . . $20,000 00 
sewer licenses . . . 1,548 60 



Dr. 

$21,548 60 
Cr. 



Paid F. B. Potter, drain pipe . $6,315 10 
Drake & Carpenter, cement . 167 55 
Pettee & Adams, cement . 132 75 
Merrill Bros., cement . 1 70 
Natt & W. F. Head, brick 727 50 
John Cayzer, rubber boots . 19 00 
C. H. Thayer, rubber boots . 6 50 
Head & Dowst, lumber . 62 10 
A. H. Lowell, cesspool cov- 
ers, grates, etc. . . . 384 27 
Thos. A. Lane, hose, sewer 

pipe, etc 77 94 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware 10 23 
H. Fradd & Co., salt, kero- 
sene oil, etc. ... 8 85 



334 



Paid A. N". Clapp, powder, fuse, 




ete 


$11 95 


D. F. Cressey, repairing tools, 




ete 


30 30 


Carpenter & Pippin, Akron 




pipe ... 


17 10 


James Briggs, scoop, etc. 


6 90 


Mrs. M. E. Groux, supper 




for men .... 


8 00 


A. Bodwell & Son, cesspool 




stone .... 


91 00 


Pike & Heald, lantern, etc. . 


4 22 


Concord Railroad corpora- 




tion, freight 


16 20 


Concord Railroad corpora- 




tion, freight 


5 40 


H. A. Horton, stone 


1 00 


J. Stickney, rubber clothing 


14 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 




and wood .... 


30 34 


labor of men and teams 


12,393, 51 


By balance on hand 


1,005 19 




<ft01 KAQ Oft 






BRIDGES. 





Dr. 

To appropriation .... $3,500 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred .... 6,000 00 

$9,500 00 



335 



Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber 


$422 50 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber and 




labor .... 


184 95 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 




labor .... 


33 54 


Joseph Dana,building bridges 


753 50 


Alpheus Gay, lumber and 




labor .... 


281 08 


J. Bryson, Jr., painting 


108 95 


Joel Daniels & Co., painting 


387 50 


"Warren Harvey, stone-work, 




etc 


2,868 76 


D. F. Cressey & Co., iron- 




work .... 


8 56 


Thos. A. Lane, repairing rail 


1 75 


D. Wells, lumber . 


18 72 


A. Bodwell & Son, stone 


56 00 


Irad Poor, lumber 


14 00 


F. E. McKean, sand . 


32 50 


Thorp & Bartlett, tinning 




Granite bridge . 


232 27 


C. H. Robie, concreting Mc- 




Gregor bridge . 


2,656 70 


A. N. Clapp, spikes 


24 


labor of men and teams 


1,401 94 


By balance on hand 


36 62 



COMMONS. 



To appropriation .... $3,500 00 
A. H. Lowell, overdraft . 1 20 

John Madden, overdraft . . 2 50 



Cr. 



),500 00 



Dr. 



336 



To reserved fund, amount trans- 



ferred .... 


$1,200 00 


balance overdrawn . 


118 64 




4M COO p/J 




^P^jO^ai Ore 




Cr. 


Paid "William P. Scott, superin- 




tendent .... 


$42 00 


F. S. Worthen, superintend- 




ent ..... 


551 25 


F. S. Worthen & Son, plants 


39 49 


W. H. Vickery, repairing 




lawn-mower, etc. 


1 85 


Manchester Water Works, 




water 


25 00 


Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 


5 60 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


4 80 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


17 60 


Daniels & Co., lawn-mower, 




hardware, etc. . ' . 


37 23 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


31 60 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware, 




etc 


3 35 


J. F. Sargent, iron-work 


3 70 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 




etc. ..... 


18 38 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


3 52 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


22 29 


Chas. H. Robie, concreting 




walks .... 


647 55 


Thos. A. Lane, pipe, plumb- 




ing, etc 


199 49 


A. H. Lowell, iron-work, etc. 


37 04 


Chas. A. Bailey, stone curb- 




ing 


2,220 74 



337 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc 
W. Ireland, lumber, etc. 
A. Bodwell & Son, stonework 
Lamson & Marden, stonework 
labor of meu and teams 



$18 13 


29 


15 


: 17 75 


: 55 


60 


789 


23 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

To appropriation .... $35,000 00 
P. Higgins, land on Lowell 



1,822 34 



Dr. 



street ..... 


517 


92 


L. D. Goodwin, overdraft 


25 


00 


J. B. Varick, overdraft . 


3 


90 


A. J. Sawyer, overdraft . 


44 


94 


L. K. Mead, overdraft 


1 


75 


Buffalo School Furniture Co., 






overdraft .... 


172 


50 


Miller, McNeil, & Co., overdraft 


16 


00 


T. A. Lane, overdraft 




20 


"W. C. Rogers, overdraft . 


11 


85 


Samuel Neal, old brick . 


4 


00 


reserved fund, am't transferred 


10,000 


00 


balance overdrawn . 


10,599 


16 

ft^fi 30*7 99 






tyOOjOo 1 u& 






Cr. 


Paid Mead, Mason, & Co., brick- 






work, window-frames, etc. 


$3,636 88 


Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 


1,157 


01 


A. F. Cate, labor, etc. . 


798 


51 


Manchester Locomotive 






Works, boiler, etc. . 


644 


25 


A. C. Wallace, lumber 

22 


1,457 89 



$302 


70 


544 


39 


496 


31 


492 


65 


. 935 


75 


551 


84 


7 


58 


150 


00 


19 


50 


11 


19 


315 


02 



338 



Paid Parker & Son, brick-work . 

Wm. M. Butterfield, architect 

Concord Railroad, freight on 
brick .... 

Clark Bros., teaming . 

J. H. & T. Cunningham, radi- 
ators, etc. .... 

Pike & Heald, tinning, etc. . 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 
lumber .... 

E. R. Morse & Co., vault doors 

Prank Fogg & Co., plumbing 

Lamson & Marden, cutting 
stone, etc. .... 

J. C. Young, rooting . 

¥m, C. Rogers, hardware, 

etc 360 00 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 
etc. . . . . 

Daniels & Co., hardware 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 

H. C. "Weeden, plumbers' 
supplies .... 

P. S. Bodwell, stone-work . 

Jesse Gault, brick 

Charles Bunton, iron-work . 

Fogg & Donnelly, plumbing 

etc 333 23 

Stillman & Mcoll, gas-fix- 
tures, etc 160 29 

Jeremiah Carew, freestone . 1,682 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood . 10 40 

A. B. dishing, teaming . 13 50 

J. F. Sargent, blacksmithing 40 



70 


60 


9 


34 


72 


07 


1,162 


00 


2,123 


00 


3,902 


21 


9 


90 



339 



Paid Carpenter & Robinson, mason 

work $63 90 

A. D. Carpenter, inspector 

police station 
labor of men and teams 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 
Clark Bros., teaming . 
Concord Railroad, freight 
G-eorge ~D. Towne, return of 

births and deaths 
Charles F. George, return of 

births and deaths 
E. A. Lanouette, return of 

births and deaths 
C. B. Sturtevant, return of 

births and deaths 

C. F. Bonney, return of births 
and deaths .... 

Aime Lacerte,return of births 

and deaths 
Thomas Wheat, return of 

births and deaths 

D. S. Adams, return of births 
and deaths 

"W. J. Sleeper, return of births 

and deaths 
R. J. P. Goodwin, return of 

births and deaths 
H. de W. Carvelle, return of 

births and deaths 
M. Richard, return of births 

and deaths 
J. E. Lamaitre, return of 

births and deaths 



374 


64 


893 


90 


281 


26 


75 


00 


154 


93 


1 


50 




25 


10 


50 


1 


00 


2 


75 


3 


00 


3 


00 


1 


75 


1 


25 


1 


25 


1 


25 


14 


00 


3 


50 



340 



Paid C. M. Dodge, return of births 

and deaths ... $7 75 

W. W. WilMns, return of 

births and deaths . . 4 00 

O. D. Abbott, return of 

births and deaths . 5 50 

J. A. Jackson, return of 

births and deaths . . 8 00 

J. "W. Mooar, return of births 

and deaths ... 2 00 

L. M. French, return of births 

and deaths ... 9 00 

L. French, return of births 

and deaths ... 12 00 

J. "W". D. MacDonald, return 

of births and deaths . . 20 50 

H. W. Boutwell, return of 

births and deaths . . 2 00 

C. A. Manning, return of 

births and deaths . . 1 00 

Charles F. Flanders, return of 

births and deaths . . 3 75 

James Sullivan, return of 

births and deaths . . 77 00 

L. B. How, return of births 

and deaths ... 2 25 

Chas. Corey, return of births 

and deaths ... 1 25 

A. D. Smith, return of births 

and deaths ... 75 

Charles F. George, return of 

births and deaths . . 25 

J. P. "Walker, return of births 

and deaths ... 1 75 



341 



Paid James G. Sturgis, return of 

births and deaths . . $4 75 

John Ferguson, return of 

births and deaths . . 17 75 

J. Sullivan, professional ser- 
vices 30 00 

G. W. Bourne, professional 
services .... 50 00 

Dr. L. French, return of births 

and deaths ... 3 25 

C. M. Dodge, professional ser- 
vices 15 00 

G. "W. Bourne, return of 
births and deaths . . 1 75 

L. French, return of births 

and deaths . . . 9 25 

H. "W. Boutwell, return of 

births and deaths . . 4 50 

Pearson & Wilkins, profes- 
sional services . . . 32 50 

J. "W. D. MacDonald, return 

of births and deaths . . 27 00 

L. French, return of births 

and deaths ... 4 00 

H. "W. Boutwell, professional 

services .... 1 50 

C. M. Dodge, return of births 

and deaths ... 16 00 

J. E. Lamaitre, return of 

births and deaths . . 14 75 

C. B. Sturtevant, return of 

births and deaths . . 2 50 

George "W. Nutter, return of 
births and deaths . 4 75 



342 



Paid L. French, returns of births 

and deaths ... $3 50 

J. "W. Mooar, burying nui- 
sances .... 9 00 

E. 0. Pearson, return of 

births and deaths . . 3 50 

E. Mongeon, return of births 

and deaths ... 2 75 

Chas. Corey, return of births 

and deaths . . . 1 50 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 210 83 

Austin, Flint, & Day, lumber 39 18 

J. Hodge, lumber . . 32 42 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 51 51 

W. P. Gale, lumber and labor 3,779 81 

E. A. G. Holmes, lumber and . 

labor . . . . 338 63 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor .... 27 77 

George Holbrook, lumber and 
labor .... 

D. H. Morgan,carpenter work 

J. H. Maynard, carpenter- 
work .... 

A. F. Cate, carpenter-work . 

A. F. Cate, carpenter-work . 

Austin Goings, carpenter- 
work .... 

Amos Heath, damage to land 
■ J.W.Conant,personal injuries 

Burns & Poore, damage to 

sheds and coal . . . 10 00 

Sarah A. Davis, damage to 
person .... 2,214 10 



266 


31 


54 


05 


29 


00 


650 


00 


91 


92 


34 


55 


30 


00 


350 


00 



343 



Paid Adeline Geoffroy, damage to 

person .... $1,025 00 

Agnes McComb, damage to 

person . . . . 25 00 

Jason Weston, damage to 

garden . . . . 100 00 

Wm. T. Morgan, damage to 

team 25 00 

T. M. Conant ... 624 59 

A. W. Prescott, damage to 

team .... 20 00 

W. E. Prescott, damage to 

person .... 40 00 

Timothy Carr, execution . 210 92 

A. W. Read & Son, damage 
to horse .... 25 00 

State Industrial School, exe- 
cution .... 

C. H. Flagg, damage to team 

Manchester Water Works, 
water .... 

C. H. Robie, concreting 

Charles Powers, bounty on 
woodchuck 

Elton W. Morgan, bounty on 
woodchucks 

Eddie A. Moore, bounty on 
woodchucks 

L. D. McDonald, bounty on 
woodchucks 

Alvin Bean, bounty on wood- 
chucks .... 

Byron Blodgett, bounty on 
woodchucks 



50 


68 


50 


00 


159 


89 


280 


52 




10 




20 


2 


40 




40 




40 




20 



344 



Paid James Rowell, bounty 


on 






woodchuck 


. 


$0 


10 


James Rogers, bounty 


on 






woodchucks 


. 




20 


H. W. Brockway, bounty 


on 






woodchuck 


. 




10 


Michael O'Hern, bounty 


on 






woodchuck 


, 




10 


B. M. Corning, bounty 


on 






woodchucks 


. 




20 


L. D. McDonald, bounty 


on 






woodchucks 


. 




30 


L. D. McDonald, bounty 


on 






woodchuck 


. 




10 


Moses Tracy, bounty 


on 






woodchucks 


. 




40 


L. D. Colby, bounty on wood- 






chucks 


. 




40 


Samuel McElroy, bounty 


on 






woodchucks 


. 




40 


J. A. Barker, care of library 






boiler 


. 


128 


00 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


. 


44 


32 


"W. H. Bennett, assistant < 


en- 






gineer 


. 


554 


50 


H. W. Home, assistant 


en- 






gineer 


. 


355 


15 


W. D. Hunter, assistant < 


m- 






gineer 


. 


346 


50 


Frank A. Gay, assistant 


en- 






gineer 


. 


59 


08 


George H. Allen, repairing 






tapes, ink, stationery, etc. 


56 


31 


Warren Harvey, stone and 






stone-work 


. 


4,895 


63 



345 



Paid A. Bodwell & Son, stone 




watering-troughs 


$158 00 


Wm. Landry, troughs . 


53 50 


A. Bodwell & Son, stone 




troughs .... 


29 50 


John B. Clarke, advertising, 




etc. ..... 


207 71 


Republican Press Association, 




advertising, etc. 


8 50 


Kendall & Ladd, advertising, 




etc. ..... 


20 25 


Temple & Farrington, blank- 




books, etc. 


242 45 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 




tising, etc. 


315 22 


J. C. Nichols & Son, teams . 


8 00 


C. EL Simpson, teams . 


' 225 00 


James Bros., teams 


96 50 


George W. Reed, teams 


56 00 


E. T. James, teams 


20 25 


Cavanaugh Bros., teams 


104 96 


C. C. Perry, teams 


90 25 


Jos. A. Brown, teams . 


1 50 


F. X. Chenette, teams . 


8 00 


Burnham & Co., teams 


9 35 


J. P. Buswell, trucking 


75 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 




ing . . . 


2 74 


Thomas A. Lane, stand-pipes, 




etc 


265 63 


Pike & Heald, furnace, 




plumbing, etc. . 


281 50 


A. H. Lowell, iron stay-bars 


6 45 


Hutchinson Bros., iron-work 


8 82 



346 



Paid ¥m. H. Hill blacksmithing $5 75 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 7 00 
S. C. Forsaith Co., lumber 9 25 
Thorp & Avery, furnace, etc. 263 56 
Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. 50 16 
J.B.Varick Co., hardware, etc. 58 16 
J.B.Varick Co.,hardware,etc. 2 87 
¥m.C. Rogers, hardware,etc. 174 33 
Isaac S. Coffin, tin cups and 

chains .... 4 88 

Sulloway,Topliff,& O'Connor, 

professional services . . 392 21 
Granite State Telephone Co. 1 10 

L. N.Dufrain, repairing pump 3 00 

Concord Railroad, freight . 75 

Clark Brothers, teaming . 10 00 

Jas. S. Batchelder, plumbing 2 00 

Hunkins & Wilson, plumbing 1 50 

N. P. Kidder, making city 

report . . . . 150 00 
George E. Mitchell, damage 

to goods .... 60 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co., express, 
etc 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood . 
H. C. Dickey, labor 
H. D. Gordon, chairs . 
C. H. Reed, professional ser- 
vices .... 

C. C. Harriman, use of land 

F. P. Colby, moving piano at 
Bakersville school-house . 

Elliott Manufacturing Co. . 
Wm. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 



5 


50 


13 


50 


20 


00 


16 


00 


10 


00 


5 


50 


2 


00 


3 


75 


11 


50 



347 



Paid Concord Railroad, freight on 




coal ..... 


$117 07 


John Barnes, blacksmithing 


4 90 


H. P. Simpson, expenses to 




Portsmouth and Boston . 


10 00 


E. P. Johnson, expenses to 




Portsmouth and Boston . 


10 00 


Fire King, reserve engine, 




pumping out cellars . 


13 20 


H. W. Herrick, water-color 




painting, old City Hall 


15 00 


"W. S. Davis, blotters, etc. 


1 05 


Concord Railroad, freight 


34 


George W. Prescott, witness 




fees, etc. .... 


75 00 


G. A. R., allowance for hall 




rent 


100 00 


H. B. Putnam, allowance for 




horse-hire . . . 


132 00 


George A. Alger, repairing 




clock at pest-house . 


1 50 


L. Searles, burying nuisances 


7 50 


N. P. Kidder, making returns 




of births, marriages, and 




deaths .... 


408 60 


L. K. Mead, splint, etc. 


1 75 


Isaac : L. Heath, revising ordi- 




nances .... 


250 00 


H. P. Simpson, expenses to 




Salem and Boston 


7 25 


C. C. Webster, watering- 




trough, 1878-79-80-81- 




82-83 .... 


18 00 



348 



Paid M. H. Lathrop, duplicate 

taxes, 1881-82-83 . . 124 57 
Fred Allen, building portion 

of Hanover street . . 90 00 

E. P. Johnson, expenses to 

Salem and Boston . 7 25 

Buff & Berger, repairing 

transit .... 28 20 

C. H. Reed, professional ser- 
vices . . • . . 50 00 

G.W.Varnum, labor at court- 
house yard . . . 2 50 

John "Waters, labor on side- 
walk .... 2 50 

Hunkins & Wilson, plumbing 2 94 

J. M. Crawford, labor on 

census . . . . 30 00 

D. O. Legendre, labor on cen- 
sus ..... 

Irad Poor, cedar posts . 
William Shepard 
N. P. Kidder, expressage, etc. 
J. F. Clough, expenses to 

Suncook and Andover . 
S. P. Cannon, expenses to 

Suncook and Andover 
Standard School Furniture 

Co., furniture for Bakers- 

ville school-house 
Elliott Manufacturing Co. . 
H. P. Simpson, expenses to 

Hooksett and Portsmouth 

E. P. Johnson, expenses to 
Hooksett and Portsmouth 



22 


00 


40 


00 


1 


00 


4 


15 


7 


00 


3 


00 


82 


99 


2 


60 


6 


50 


6 


50 



349 

Paid Concord R. R. Corp., freight 
Concord R. R. Corp., freight 
J. S. Bacheler, plumbing 
A. A. Moore, repairing light- 
ning rods .... 
Campbell & Robinson, maple 
trees .... 

Thomas Badger, tax 1884, 
paid twice 

E. P. Johnson, teaming desks 
G-eorge Thompson, shade 

trees .... 

T.W. Challis, labor on census 
George "W. Prescott, witness 
fees, etc. .... 
O.D. Carpenter, mason-work 
Timothy Sullivan, burying 

nuisances .... 8 00 

H.C.Dickey, repairing school- 
house fence 
Judith Sherer,care pest-house 
George W. Varnum, posting 

health notices . 
C. H. Reed, professional ser- 
vices .... 

F. "W. Follansbee, moving 
building .... 

Charles E. Cochran, profes- 
sional services . 

Dana W. King, recording 
deeds .... 

Harden Hand Grenade Co., 
grenades .... 



$12 


33 




51 


7 


00 


266 


00 


73 


50 


1 


59 


3 


50 


65 


00 


44 


80 


85 


28 


1 


91 



10 


50 


270 


00 


7 


50 


13 


00 


100 


00 


5 


00 




96 


74 


10 



350 

Paid T. L. Thorpe, expenses to 
Concord .... 

Oran J. Berg, labor on census 

Christian Irion, labor on cen- 
sus 

Fred Stott, labor on census . 

"W. E. Gilmore, labor on 
census .... 

William B. Patten, labor on 
census .... 

Isaac Whittemore, labor on 
census .... 

L. D. Goodwin, labor on cen- 
sus ..... 

J. M. Collity, protessional 
services .... 

J. J. Abbott, painting sign . 

Daniel W. Lane, referee in 
case Seth Hill vs. Manches- 
ter 

D. F. Clark, referee in case 
Seth Hill vs. Manchester . 

H. P. Simpson, expenses to 
Suncook and Portsmouth . 

E. P. Johnson, expenses to 
Suncook and Portsmouth . 

Pettee & Adams, cement 
Clough & Clark, professional 

services .... 
G. "W". Varnum, distributing 

health notices . 
George C. Hoitt, professional 

services . . 

R. E. Bean & Co., binders . 



11 


50 


3 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


70 


22 


87 


26 


82 


22 


84 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


9 


00 


4 


50 


8 


50 


10 


00 


21 


00 


1 


50 


11 


25 


5 


00 




55 



351 



Paid Manchester Novelty Co., dat- 




ing-stamp .... 


$7 23 


Briggs & Huse, professional 




services .... 


150 00 


C. H. Reed, professional ser- 




vices 


23 00 


committee on cemeteries, ex- 




penses to Boston 


15 00 


committee on commons, ex- 




penses to Boston 


15 75 


H. C. Dickey 


4 50 


J. M. Crawford, labor on cen- 




sus 


80 00 


J. M. Crawford, labor on cen- 




sus ..... 


125 00 


L. D. Goodwin, labor on cen- 




sus . . 


25 00 


F. H. Challis, labor on census 


53 56 


- L. H. Lamprey, labor on cen- 




sus 


127 60 


Fred W. Cheney, labor on 




census .... 


60 46 


Daniel F. Healy, labor on 




census . . . 


154 94 


P. A. Collins, labor on census 


22 00 


T. J. Howard, labor on census 


16 00 


F. W. Follansbee, moving 




building .... 


140 00 


John R. Stokes 


20 00 


John Moss, labor on Bald 




Hill road .... 


33 00 


S. B. Putnam, auditing col- 




lector's account 


25 00 


H. C. Dickey, labor 


13 80 



352 



id H. C. Dickey, labor 


$10 50 


Daniel Healy, whitewashing 




tree-boxes, etc. . 


81 05 


G-eorge "W. Prescott, witness 




fees, etc. .... 


478 22 


"William M. Butterfield, plan 




engine-house 


105 00 


Berlin Iron Bridge Co., 




bridges, etc. 


4,452 92 


J. B. Maynard, labor . 


48 00 


Daniel Stevens, labor . 


72 00 


Felix Bourjoie, labor . 


18 00 


James Richards, cleaning 




vaults .... 


17 00 


George E. Morrill, distribut- 




ing notices, etc. 


50 68 


Manchester post-office, 




stamps, etc. 


2 22 


E. P. Johnson 


7 50 


E. P. Johnson & Co., wood . 


7 75 


H. D. Gordon, wood chairs . 


12 00 


G. F. Bosher & Co., profes- 




sional services, etc. . 


14 00 


"Wm. H. Hill, blacksmithing 


2 50 


Mrs. F. J. Clement 


1 00 


Weston & Hill, dry goods 


1 90 


G. W. Butterfield, damage to 




wagon .... 


4 00 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


102 98 


J. Bryson, Jr., painting 


21 90 


H. P. Simpson, expenses to 




Boston .... 


9 00 


E. P. Johnson, expenses to 




Boston .... 


5 50 



353 



Paid Buffalo School Furniture 

Co $345 00 

C. H. Reed, professional ser- 
vices .... 28 90 

C. H. Burns, professional ser- 
vices . . . 125 00 

Lamson & Marden, stone- 
work .... 34 65 

G. H. Wheeler, setting hitch- 

ing-posts .... 5 75 

Irad Poor, cedar posts . . 20 60 

James R. Carr, painting . 8 50 

L. Searles, burying nuisances 17 00 

• Nathaniel Baker,witness fees, 

etc 2 00 

J. M. Crawford, labor on 

census . . . . 20 00 

J. M. Crawford, labor for in- 
spectors of check-lists . 83 25 

county commissioners, hear- 
ing on Rowell street . 33 60 

Miller, McNeil, & Co., desk 16 00 

Thomas Dunlap, repairing 

clocks .... 50 00 

Carpenter & Robinson, ma- 
son-work . . . . 33 02 

Alfred Quimby, overpayment 

of tax, 1882 ... 56 70 

George E. Morrill . . 47 

George E. Warren, error in 

assessment ... 1 10 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 76 50 

James S. Bacheler, plumbing 75 



23 



354 



Paid C. H. Reed, professional ser- 
vices .... 

L. Searles, burying nuisances 

Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 

J. Bryson, Jr., painting 

Charles A. Bailey, flagging 
stone .... 

D. C. Whittemore, allowance 
on road .... 

Dr. J. Alexander, profes- 
sional services . . , 

Jesse Gault, brick for engine- 
house .... 

George "W. Prescott, court 
expenses .... 

county commissioners, Gil- 
ford case .... 

Clague, Schlicht, & Field, 
letter files and cases . 

L. Searles, burying nuisances 

Republican Press Associa- 
tion, advertising non-resi- 
dent taxes 

N. S. Bean, inspecting and 
testing boilers . 

"W. E. Gilmore, return and 
stationery 

S. B. Putnam, expenses to 
Concord .... 

C. H. G. Foss, expenses buy- 
ing hook-and-ladder truck 

Daniel Connor 

0. D. Abbott, professional 
services .... 9 00 



$9 00 


7 50 


3 


65 


14 


40 


212 


00 


20 


00 


2 


00 


448 


28 


6 


40 


46 


60 


8 


05 


7 


00 


5 


40 


72 


00 


2 


54 


1 


00 


15 


00 


18 


00 



355 



Paid C. M. Bailey, brooms, etc. . 


$5 02 




Manchester Locomotive 






Works .... 


2 00 




Manchester Water Works, 






water .... 


35 63 




James Sullivan, professional 






services .... 


17 50 




A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


2 25 




J. H. Proctor, labor 


4 00 




Buff & Berger 


17 91 




C. H. Robie, concreting 


589 67 




labor of men and teams 


223 77 






fKC onrr on 




TERY. 


,uu ) ui " **** 


AMOSKEAG CEME 








Dr. 


To reserved fund, amount trans- 






ferred 


$300 00 


$300 00 










Cr. 


Paid W. H. Bennett, staking lots 


$3 00 




W. D. Hunter, staking lots . 


2 25 




F. A. Gay, staking lots 


4 51 




H. W. Home, staking lots . 


6 00 




By balance on hand 


284 24 


$300 00 







v PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . $4,315 20 

appropriation .... 7,000 00 



356 



To J. F. James, lots sold 


$226 96 




S. B. Putnam, lots sold . 


935 46 




B. A. Stearns, digging graves, 






etc 


769 93 






|10 O/IT KZ 




W 


J.WjiJni UXJ 






Cr. 


Paid B. A. Stearns, superintendent 


$871 40 




B. A. Stearns, expenses on 






shrubs .... 


1 59 




C. C. Webster, turf . 


16 65 




F. X. Chenette, manure 


22 75 




S.B.Putnam, recording deeds, 






etc. ..... 


4 00 




R.W.Flanders, repairing tools 


3 95 




H. C. Dickey, lot 


15 00 




J. F. Seaward,carpenter-work 


210 55 




L. A. Dickey, repairing tools 


6 00 




E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


7 00 




J. B. Clarke, printing . 


60 20 




J. W. Manning, shrubs, etc. 


103 35 




Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. 


4 80 




J. B. Varick Co., stone vases, 






hardware, etc. . 


137 22 




Manchester Water Works, 






water .... 


36 50 




Manchester Water Works, 






laying pipes 


375 00 




W. H. Bennett, lines, grades, 






etc 


60 40 




George H. Allen, team 


19 00 




H. W. Home, lines and grades 


24 75 




F. A. Gay, lines and grades . 


16 92 




W. D. Hunter ,lines and grades 


23 25 





357 



Paid A. C. Wallace, chestnut posts $15 00 
J. Hodge, chestnut stakes, etc. 21 43 
Head & Dowst, brick, lum- 
ber, etc 32 75 

A. H. Lowell, iron gates, 

posts, etc 389 04 

Palmer & G-armon,stone-work 73 35 

T. A. Lane, water-pipes, 

plumbing, etc. . . . 3,117 37 
Schlegel & Fottler, flower 

roots 2 40 

E. T. James, manure . . 39 39 
William B. Abbott, painting 

fence 31 69 

Manchester post-office, envel- 
opes 1 10 

Pike & Heald, water-pails, 

broom, pots ... 6 70 

J. F. James, services as treas- 
urer . . . . 37 34 

Temple & Farrington, sta- 
tionery . . . . 2 49 

F. B. Potter, mason-work . 6 00 
Wm. M. Butterfield, profes- 
sional services . . ' . 22 50 

H. H. Huntress, filling vases 

with flowers . . . . 10 00 
Spence & Bond, material and 

labor .... 18 00 

H. C. Annis, part of lot . 2 72 

E. W. Flanders, iron-work . 2 40 

Warren Harvey, stone . 25 00 

M. V. B. Chase, maple trees 8 00 



358 



Paid Livingston & Kimball, print- 




ing 


$2 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 


12 00 


heirs of E. A. Straw, land . 


3,090 00 


Stephen P. Moody, labor 


6 00 


labor of men and teams 


3,077 70 


By balance on hand 


1,169 90 

flO OAfJ EC 







VALLEY CEMETERY. 

To appropriation .... $2,000 00 
H. R. Pettee,digginggraves,etc. 28 50 

F. B. Balch, digging graves, etc. 566 00 
S. B. Putnam ... 115 40 



Paid F. B. Balch, superintendent 
W. H. Bennett, engineering 
F. A. Gay, engineering 
W. D. Hunter, engineering . 
H. "W. Home, engineering . 
Daniels & Co., paints, hard- 
ware, etc. .... 
"W"m. C. Rogers, lawn-mower 
J. B. Varick Co., vase, stone 

border, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
Manchester Water Works, 
water .... 

J. J. Abbott, paint 
George Whitford, loam, etc. 



Dr. 



$609 75 


9 


00 


1 


50 


5 


25 


20 


10 


64 


41 


11 


50 


19 


46 


8 


35 


102 


90 




76 


236 


62 



J,709 90 
Or. 



359 



Paid J. M. N\xtt . . . . $14 00 
Frank Dickey, loam . . 37 50 

T. A. Lane, iron pipes, etc. 267 85 
Wm. B. Abbott, painting 

fence .... 59 88 

A. H. Lowell, drinking-foun- 

tain, etc. .... 
Horace Stearns, stone-work . 
Cbarles H. Wood, painting 

signs .... 

Head & Dowst, lumber 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor .... 

F. S. Worthen, maple trees 
J. H. Maynard, lumber 
S.B. Putnam, recording deeds 
J. F. James, recording deeds 
labor of men 



By balance on hand 



221 


86 


20 


00 


2 


75 


7 


01 


3 


35 


25 


00 


15 


55 


4 


00 


6 


00 


621 


01 


317 


54 




. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $20,000 00 

Daniels Co., overdraft . 1 85 

balance overdrawn . . . 1,830 40 



,709 90 



Dr. 



$21,832 25 

Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co. No. 1. 

Cr. 
Paid pay-roll of company . . $1,135 00 
, Manchester Gas Co., gas . 80 98 

George W. Butterfield, driver 217 00 



360 



id Daniels & Co., hardware 


$9 21 


T. A. Lane, repairing harness, 




etc. ..... 


2 21 


Pike & Heald, cleaning pipe, 




etc 


1 00 


George H. Stearns, matches, 




etc 


1 80 


D.S. Ames, repairing harness, 




etc. ..... 


5 00 


J. R. Carr, hooks and rope . 


3 00 


J. S. Conroy, wood 


8 00 


Manchester Locomotive 




"Works, labor . 


9 60 


T. Berry, repairing chairs . 


1 50 


Jacobs, Whitcomb, & Co., 




clock .... 


4 87 


J. T. Underhill, wood . 


15 00 



,494 17 



N. S. Bean Steam Fike Engine Co. ]STo. 4. 



Cr. 



Paid pay-roll of company . . $1,135 00 

Manchester Gas Co., gas . 65 74 

Jeremiah Lane, driver . . 217 00 

A. J. Morse, driver . 4 50 

Daniels & Co., hardware . 12 26 

A. H. Lowell, iron castings . 3 79 
George H. Stearns, matches, 

etc 84 

D.S. Ames, repairing harness, 

etc 7 50 

E.W. Kimball, swing-harness 100 00 

J. R. Carr .... 5 50 

D. A. Simons, cuspidores . 5 25 



361 

Paid J. S. Conroy, wood . . $8 00 

Manchester Locomotive 

Works, set wheels, paint- 
ing, etc. .... 

Charles E. Berry, names, etc. 

Sanborn Carriage Co., spring 

Wm. F. Rogers, name-plates 

J. T. Underbill, wood . 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1. 



275 


00 


72 


10 




25 


1 


50 


15 


00 



Paid pay-roll of company 


$1,545 00 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


75 84 


"W. L. Blenus, driver . 


660 00 


M. W. Ford, Jr., extra driver 


18 00 


W. S. Flagg, extra driver 


21 00 


Daniels & Co., sperm oil, etc. 


1 85 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


4 73 


Wm, C. Rogers, hardware . 


85 


J. B. Varick Co., chain bolts 


50 


Pike & Heald, coal-hod, oil- 




can, etc. .... 


1 03 


George H. Stearns, matches, 




etc. ..... 


3 14 


D. S. Ames, repairing har- 




ness, etc. .... 


20 40 


Barnard & Pike, iron-work . 


1 50 


J. J. Abbott, paint 


83 


D. A. Simons, cuspidores 


8 72 


Manchester Locomotive 




Works, repairing lanterns 


4 75 


L. J. Flint, fitting boxes for 




grenades .... 


4 00 



$1,929 23 
Cr. 



1,372 14 



362 



Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2. 



Paid pay-roll of company 


$995 00 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


34 92 


Walter Seaward, driver 


120 00 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


4 50 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron- 




work \. 


1 75 


Hunkins & Wilson, labor 


28 


D. S. Ames, repairing har- 




ness, etc. .... 


19 00 


Temple & Farrington,opaque, 




labor, etc. .... 


5 89 


Manchester One-Price Cloth- 




ing Co., reefers 


51 00 


Thomas Dunlap, clock 


4 87 


L. J. Flint, fitting boxes for 




grenades . . . 


4 00 


Geo. C. Lord, matches 


20 


Geo. C. Lord, matches 


23 



E. W. Harrington Hose Co. No. 3. 



Paid pay-roll of company 

Manchester Gas Co., gas 
J. T. O'Dowd, driver . 
Sylvester Cate, sub. driver 
D. F. Cressey, iron-work 
. J. B. Varick Co., rubber hose 
H. Fradd & Co., brooms, 

matches, etc. 
D. S. Ames, repairing harness, 
etc 



. $995 00 


52 


68 


360 


63 


16 


50 


1 


50 


e 6 


00 



5 19 



28 00 



Or. 



.,241 64 



Or. 



363 



Paid H. C. Ranno, repairing har- 
ness, etc $9 42 

Manchester Locomotive 

Works, painting, repairs, 

etc 127 50 

Charles E. Berry, hames, etc. 48 00 

T. L. Thorpe, mop-waste . 1 60 

L. Searles, use of wagon . 10 50 

L. J. Flint, fitting boxes for 

grenades .... 4 00 



Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4. 



Paid pay-roll of company 

Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Charles Rogers, driver 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 
Daniels & Co., hardware 

D. S. Ames, repairing har- 
ness, etc. .... 

E. W. Kimball, bit 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 

L. J. Flint, fitting boxes for 

grenades .... 



$995 


00 


52 


58 


110 


00 




24 


1 


97 


51 


75 




75 


10 


75 


4 


00 



$1,666 52 
Cr. 



.,227 04 



Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co. JSTo. 1. 

Cr. 
Paid pay-roll of company . . $1,935 00 
Manchester Gas Co., gas . 49 84 

Charles M. Denyou, driver . 217 00 
Daniels & Co., hardware . 34 20 

Pike & Heald, lantern globes 6 92 

Geo. H. Stearns, matches, etc. 93 



364 



Paid D. S. Ames, swing-harness, 

etc $120 50 

Barnard & Pike, iron-work, 

etc. 8 25 

J. R. Carr., painting, etc. . 11 10 

Manchester Locomotive 

Works, repairs . . . 52 39 

Manchester Locomotive 



Works, repairs . 


2 


50 


Chas. E. Berry, hames, etc. . 


68 


00 


T. L. Thorpe, waste 




50 


Manchester Axe Co., black- 






smithing .... 


2 


20 

ft2 509 33 








Miscellaneous. 




Cr. 


Paid Daniels & Co., hardware 


$3 


20 


D. S. Ames .... 


2 


00 


Temple & Farrington, glass . 


3 


00 


A. H. Paige, badge 


3 


00 


W. H. Vickery, fitting keys 




95 


C. G. Braxmar, badges 


76 80 


Hyde & Co., flag . 


21 


50 


0. P. Stone & Co., crackers 






and cheese at fire 


3 


22 


Allen Fire Department Sup- 






ply Co., hose-jacket . 


2 


50 


Wm. S. Davis & Son, supply 






wagon and lanterns . 


307 


50 


A. L. N. Robertson, shavings 


1 


00 


Weston & Hill, oil carpet, etc. 


67 82 


Chas. E. Berry, hames, etc. . 


149 


60 


Manchester Locomotive 






Works, labor . 


1 


20 



365 



Paid Fuller, Leonard, & Small, 




repairing fireman's coat 


$1 00 


Fuller, Leonard, & Small, 




rubber coats 


25 00 


Thomas W. Lane, chief engi- 




neer ..... 


300 00 


Frank Hutchinson, assistant 




engineer .... 


8 33 


R. G. Manning, assistant en- 




gineer .... 


100 00 


0. E. Kimball, assistant engi- 




neer 


100 00 


J. F. Pherson, assistant engi- 




neer 


100 00 


Fred S. Bean, assistant engi- 




neer and clerk . 


125 00 


John B. Clarke, printing 


27 50 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood . 


39 00 


¥m. B. Abbott, painting 


19 00 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 




ing ..... 


2 00 


Barnard & Pike, blacksmitk- 




ing, etc. .... 


17 95 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, black- 




smithing, etc. . 


18 30 


Wm. C. Rogers, hardware . 


1 03 


A. H. Lowell, weights . 


3 42 


A. H. Lowell, castings . 


4 91 


T. A. Lane, plumbing . 


1 57 


Daniels & Co., hardware 


32 04 


Concord R. R. Corp., freight 


1 52 


M. W. Ford; driving supply- 




wagon .... 


43 00 


George H. Dudley, repairing 


1 00 



366 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$11 70 


Manchester One-Price Cloth- 




ing Co., blankets 


11 50 


A. C. Wallace, lumber 


1 25 


George E. Davis, labor 


5 00 


George E. Davis, labor 


5 25 


E. W. Harrington Hose Co. 




No. 3 .... 


6 00 


Massabesic Hose Co. ISTo. 2 . 


6 00 


Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 


6 00 


Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4 . 


6 00 


Excelsior Hook and Ladder 




Co. No. 1 . 


6 00 


N. S. Bean Steam Fire En- 




gine Co. No. 4 . 


6 00 


Amoskeag Steam Fire En- 




gine Co. No. 1 . 


6 00 


0. E. Kimball, freight . 


2 00 


Harden Hand Grenade Co., 




hand grenades . 


80 00 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


14 50 


W. S. Davis & Son, lantern 




globes .... 


17 00 


W. S. Flagg, driver 


15 00 


T. W. Lane, express, tele- 




grams, etc. 


14 83 


Samuel Eastman & Co., hose, 




etc. ..... 


2,402 47 


Manchester Water Works, 




water .... 


966 72 


Stephen Gardner, care boiler 


180 00 


New England Telegraph and 




Telephone Co. . 


3 10 


D. M. Goodwin . 


5 00 



;,392 18 



367 



Recapitulation. 

Paid Amoskeag Steam Fire En- 
gine Co. No. 1 . . . $1,494 17 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire En- 
gine Co. No. 4 . . . 1,929 23 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 2,372 14 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 1 ,241 64 

E. "W. Harrington Hose Co. 

No. 3 . . . . 1,666 52 

Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4 . 1,227 04 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder 

Co. No. 1 . . . . 2,509 33 

miscellaneous . . . 5,392 18 

By reserved fund, am't transferred 4,000 00 



$21,832 25 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $1,500 00 



Paid Tristram Berry, superintend- 
ent . . . 
"Wm.C. Rogers, hardware, etc. 
Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 
A. H. Lowell, zinc, etc. 
Concord R. R. Corp., freight 
J. H. Bunnell & Co., zinc, etc. 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 





81,500 00 




Cr. 


$300 00 




1 33 




34 




18 




158 00 




6 09 




57 82 




18 




16 00 





368 



Hodgman & 



Co, 



Paid T. W. Lane, roll-paper, etc 
D. B. Varney, castings, etc. 
Thorp & Bartlett, labor 
George E. Davis, labor 
C. ~N. Lougee, labor 
James Brothers, teams 
C. H 

trucking 
A. B. Ousting, trucking 
Charles L. Bly, battery-jars 

etc. .... 
J. A. & W. Bird & Co., blue 

vitriol 

Edwin Rogers, gong,wire,etc 
T. A. Lane, iron sink, etc 
William T. Smith 
C. B. Littlefield, oil, acid,etc 
J. F. Sargent, blacksmithing 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 
William T. Smith 
L. A. Dickey, iron-work 

By balance on hand ■ . 



$4 25 

1 75 

50 

3 00 

11 00 

11 00 



7 50 
11 25 



32 18 



45 


70 


200 


42 


7 


41 


25 


03 


4 


80 


9 


68 




22 


24 


23 


3 


75 


556 


39 



$1,500 00 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 



Dr. 



To 


appropriation . 
balance overdrawn . 


• 


$20,000 
737 


00 
50 


120,737 50 




















Or. 


Pa 


id Manchester 


Water 


Works 


> 








water 


• 


• 


$20,737 


50 


120.737 50 



369 



RESERVOIRS. 




Dr. 


To balance from old account 


$41 24 


$41 24 










Cr. 


By balance to new account . 


$41 24 


$41 24 







POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $17,000 00 

M. J. Jenkins, costs and fines 2,737 42 

J. C. Bickford, costs and fees . 1,209 84 

balance overdrawn . . . 5,133 47 



Dr. 



$26,080 73 
Cr. 



Paid IS". P. Hunt, judge . . $1,500 00 

I. L. Heath, special justice . 56 00 

J. C. Bickford, clerk . . 600 00 

M. J. Jenkins, city marshal 855 00 
M. J. Jenkins, witness fees, 

conveying prisoners, etc. . 630 10 

Eben Carr, assistant marshal 700 00 
Edgar Farrar, captain night 

patrol . . . 851 65 
Hiram Stearns, night patrol 746 00 
J. F. Cassidy, night patrol . 739 00 
James Bucklin, night patrol 747 00 
Lafayette Tebbetts, night pa- 
trol 747 00 

u 



370 



id L. M. Streeter, night patrol 


$764 00 


Jeremiah Murphy, night pa- 




trol 


767 00 


James F. Dunn, night patrol 


752 00 


Ira P. Fellows, night patrol 


809 00 


Henry Harmon, night patrol 


813 00 


William H. Newhall, night 




patrol .... 


746 00 


B. N. Wilson, night patrol . 


795 00 


Chas. S. Brown, night patrol 


729 00 


Philip Riescher, night patrol 


730 00 


Michael Fox, night patrol 


750 00 


Thomas Frain, night patrol . 


785 00 


Frank Bourrassau, night pa- 




trol 


758 00 


Michael Marr, night patrol . 


750 00 


Alcide Helie, night patrol . 


733 00 


Dennis McEvoy, night patrol 


800 00 


J. Floyd, night patrol . 


710 00 


Timothy P. Shea, night pa- 




trol 


726 00 


John C. Colburn, day patrol 


749 00 


Randall W. Bean, day patrol 


755 00 


Charles H. Reed, day patrol 


752 00 


W. ~N. Ward, special police . 


1 00 


C. A. Burbank, special police 


3 00 


J. H. Tirrell, special police . 


7 00 


Archie Hill, special police . 


8 00 


Florance Sullivan, special 




police .... 


20 00 


Moses Tremblay, special po- 




lice 


7 00 


Samuel Mitchell, special police 


477 00 


John Berry, special police . 


42 00 



371 



Paid Daniel Stevens, special 


police $5 00 


C. W. Arnold, special police 70 00 


E. G.Woodman, special police 7 00 


Geo. W. Varnum, special po 


- 


lice .... 


2 00 


Patrick Dobbin,special police 32 00 


D. C. Jackson, special police 5 00 


Geo. Lovejoy, special police 3 00 


C. D. Wells, special police 


4 00 


J. H. Haughey, special police 8 00 


A. J. Mayhew, special police 5 00 


J. K. Rhodes, special police 2 . 00 


Jules Faueher, special police 2 00 


C. M. Stevens, special police 


J 5 00 


John Waters 


4 00 


George Varnum 






6 00 


L. H. Lamprey 






8 00 


Archie Hill . 






2 00 


William Stevens 






5 00 


Daniel Stevens 






10 00 


C. D.Emerson 






4 00 


George Sibley 






5 00 


James Farley 






10 00 


William Hill 






5 00 


T. P. Heath . 






5 00 


J. H. Haughey 






8 00 


C. A. Burbank 






5 00 


James C. Smith 






5 00 


D. C. Jackson 






5 00 


Willis K". Ward . 






8 00 


James A. Bowker 




5 00 


Joseph H. Tirrell 




10 00 


Lawrence Connor 




5 00 


E. A. G. Holmes 






5 00 



372 



Paid Julius Faucher 


. 


$8 00 


D. S. Harriman 


. . 


2 00 


George Livingston 




5 00 


John Mayhew 


. 


4 00 


John Berry . 


. 


10 00 


Charles D. Wells 


. . 


6 00 


E. G. Woodman . 


, . 


2 00 


Archie Hill . 


, 


1 00 


A. J. Mayhew 


. 


16 00 


C. A. Burbank 


. 


8 00 


Jules Faucher 


. . 


9 00 


J. H. Tirrell 


. . 


16 00 


Charles W. Stevens, 


special 




police 


. 


16 00 


John Barry, special police . 


14 00 


David C. Jackson, 


special 




police 




17 00 


George A. Lovejoy, 


special 




police 


. 


12 00 


John E. SteariiSjSpecial police 


9 00 


Caleb D. Emerson, 


special 




police 


. 


10 00 


Henry H. Philbrick, 


special 




police 


. 


7 00 


J. C. Smith, special police . 


10 00 


Daniel Stevens, special police 


18 00 


Felix Bourgeois, special po- 




lice . 


. 


1 00 


James Haughey, special po- 




lice . 


. 


12 00 


Stephen P. Chase, 


special 




police 


. 


10 00 


Lawrence Connor, special po- 




lice . 


. , 


11 00 



373 



Paid Chas. D.Wells, special police $7 00 

Geo. E. Livingston, special 

police .... 14 00 

James Farley, special police 2 00 

Amos B. Page, special police 7 00 

Geo. W. Page, special police 9 00 

James W. Lathe, special po- 
lice . . . . . 2 00 

Alonzo W. Foster, special 

police .... 6 00 

"Willis N. Ward, special po- 
lice 10 00 

A. C. Martin, special police 6 00 

George Sibley, special police 2 00 

Patrick H. Riley, special po- 
lice . . . . . 2 00 

Wm. Hill, special police . 3 00 

Justin ~N. Tuck, special po- 
lice 1 00 

R. A. Challis, special police 10 00 

L. H. Lamprey, special police 6 00 

Patrick H. Riley, special po- 
lice 1 00 

James C. Smith, special police 2 00 

Levi Caldwell, special police 1 00 

Wm. Hill, special police . 2 00 

Charles W. Stevens, special 

police .... 2 00 

George A. Lovejoy, special 

police .... 2 00 

D. P. & D. L. Perkins, pro- 
fessional services . . 4 00 

A. C. Osgood, professional 

services .... 2 00 



374 



Paid J. P. Bartlett, professional 
services . 

H. E. Burnham, professional 
services .... 

Charles E. Cochran, profes 
sional services . 

Clough & Clark, professional 
services 

Daniel Davis, meals for pris 
oners 

"Western Union Telegraph 
Co., telegrams . 

~W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 

C. H. Wood, painting and 
glazing 

C. H. Simpson, teams 

J. N. Foss, teams 

J. A. Brown, teams 

E. T. James, teams 

W. J. Freeman, teams . 

S. A. Riddle, teams 

H. M. Tarbell,team 

John B. Clarke, printing 

Frank H. Challis, printing 

Ormond D. Kimball, printing 

Campbell & Williams, print- 
ing . . . 

Challis & Campbell, printing 

Temple & Farrington, sta- 
tionery, etc. 

T. W. Lane, stationery, etc. 

Manchester Gas Co., gas 

New England Telegraph and 
Telephone Co., telephones 



$8 00 



2 12 



2 00 



2 00 



405 10 



40 


95 


4 


00 


3 


25 


3 


50 


8 


00 


3 


00 


110 


75 


1 


25 


3 


00 


3 


00 


39 


25 


4 


50 


6 


50 


71 


50 


1 


25 


13 


46 


18 


80 


435 


78 



116 60 



375 



Paid Granite State Telephone Co., 

telephones 

D. Evans & Co., buttons 

J. P. Lovell's Sons, police 

calls . . • • 
Daniels & Co., sperm oil, etc 
Smith & Bly, crackers 
A. H. Paige, badges 
Higgins Bros., cuspidores 
Manchester Steam Laundry 

washing blankets, etc. 
Weston & Hill, blankets 
H. D. Gordon, office-chairs 
City Farm, teams 
C. M. Bailey, paper 
J. N. Foss, team . 
T. A. Barker, lodging, etc. 



$24 90 
41 25 

30 00 

8 40 
36 25 
17 50 

6 00 

28 00 
6 00 

9 00 
6 00 
1 62 
3 00 

36 00 



$26,080 73 



CITY HALL. 



To appropriation . . • 
N. P. Kidder, rents . 
Hunkins & "Wilson, overdraft . 
New England Telegraph and 

Telephone Co., overdraft 
balance overdrawn . 
school department, for coal 



$2,000 00 

2,337 36 

1 12 

21 00 
1,334 41 
1,402 80 



Paid Manchester Water Works, 
water . 
E. P. Johnson, coal 



$2,381 60 
73 43 



Dr. 



r,096J.69 
Or. 



376 



Paid J. Albert Walker, coal 

Concord Railroad, freight on 

coal . 
H. J. Clark, trucking . 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Head &Dowst,carpenter-work 
George H. Dudley, carpenter- 
work . 
George Holbrook, carpenter- 
work . 
L. M. Aldrich,carpenter-work 
Celinda Gorman, scrubbing 

floors, etc. 
New England Telegraph and 
Telephone Co., telephone . 
Granite State Telephone Co., 

telephone . 
"Weston & Hill, rugs, etc. 
Hutchinson Bros., labor on 

bell, etc. . 
A. H. Lowell, iron-work 
W. H. Vickeiy, keys . 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 
George H. Stearns, matches, 

brooms, etc. 
H. D. Gordon, chair 
Hunkins & Wilson, gas fitting 
C. H. Wood, painting . 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
Otis Whidden, labor 



$2,784 00 

609 00 
244 50 
172 80 

85 00 

43 78 

50 
46 15 

153 90 

51 00 

9 00 
11 41 

4 71 

3 65 
6 65 

85 34 

53 04 

8 96 

2 48 
1 91 

11 42 

4 00 
11 56 

3 50 
48 19 

3 50 



377 

Paid Mrs. J. A. Barker, repairing 

awning .... $0 75 

J. A. Barker, broom, etc. . 1 15 

C. M. Bailey, paper . . 5 78 

C. "W. Butler, repairing cell, 

etc. . 6 50 

Carpenter & Robinson, ma- 
son-work . 

Bennett & Lord, mason-work 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 

H. D. Gordon, chairs . 

J. S. Bacheler, plumbing 

Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 
clocks ... 

Gideon Flanders, ice 

Edward N. Fogg, mug . 

C. M. Bailey, paper 

City Hall drug-store, bug 
poison 



29 


85 


: 45 


25 


18 


98 


9 


00 


1 


35 


! 40 


75 


11 


00 




10 


10 


00 


1 


25 



FIREMEN'S PARADE. 

To appropriation .... $300 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 45 66 



Paid Manchester War Veterans' 

Drum Corps, music . . 15 00 

First Regiment Band, music 53 00 

T. W. Lane, stationery . 5 16 

T. A. Barker, caterer . . 214 50 

Cavanaugh Bros., teams . 58 00 



$7,096 69 



Dr. 

$345 66 
Cr. 



$345 66 



378 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


. $1,500 00 




reserved fund, amount trans- 






ferred 


500 00 


$2,000 00 










Or. 


Paid Manchester post-office . 


. ' $47 48 




T. W. Lane . 


20 60 




Livingston & Kimball . 


39 75 




0, D. Kimball 


4 00 




Temple & Farrington . 


46 10 




v John B. Clarke . 


1,793 49 




Campbell & "Williams . 


36 50 




D. B. Brooks & Co., ink 


2 25 




J. Q. Bradish & Co., pens 


3 00 




Alexander Cook, pens . 


2- 00 




Manchester post-office . 


3 30 




By balance on hand 


1 53 


$2,000 00 







REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



To appropriation .... 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred ..... 
balance overdrawn . 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
J. B. Yarick Co., hardware . 



$1,800 00 



Dr. 



800 


00 




297 89 








$2,897 89 










Or. 


$0 


12 




28 


76 




35 


85 





379 



Paid "W. W. Hubbard, lumber 

Austin, Flint, & Day, lumber 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
J. Hodge, lumber 
L. M.Aldrich,carpenter-work 

E. A. G. Holmes, carpenter- 
work . 

Tristram Berry, carpenter- 
work . 
J. F. Seaward,carpenter-work 
George Holbrook, carpenter- 
work .... 
Flint & Little, carpenter-work 
Alpheus Gay, carpenter-work 
Geo. W. Rief, carpenter-work 
A. F. Cate, carpenter-work 
W. R. Gale, carpenter-work 
L. J. Flint, carpenter-work 
D. H. Morgan, carpenter-work 
J. Bryson, Jr., painting 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
J. R. Carr, painting 
Louis Wolf, plumbing . 
J. S. Bacheler, plumbing 
Pike & Healcl, plumbing 
T. A. Lane, plumbing . 
J. L. Kennedy, painting 
J. J. Bennett, mason-work 
Carpenter & Pippin, mason 
work 

F. B. Potter, mason-work 
F. T. Dickey, mason-work 
Carpenter & Robinson, ma- 
son work .... 



$18 50 
4 40 

3 75 

19 81 
251 24 

108 28 

12 00 

4 54 

14 78 
143 99 
334 15 

82 10 
150 50 

38 78 

3 02 

1 65 

646 02 

120 49 

20 35 

1 50 
3 75 

67 67 

105 88 

51 09 

3 75 

2 00 
20 50 
74 07 

19 15 



380 



Paid A. N. Clapp, nails, etc. 
E. J. Williams, roofing 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
George W. Stevens, profes 

sional services . 
W. L. Blenus, bolts, etc. 
Barnard & Pike, iron-work 
Thorp & Avery ,plumbing,etc 
Jas. Dolan, carpenter-work 
Manchester Gas Co., fire-brick 
labor of men and teams 



$3 


53 


127 


90 


6 


25 


- 

20 


00 


76 


65 


16 


25 


;. 3 


72 


7 


00 


k 5 


65 


238 


50 



$2,897 89 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Dr. 



balance from old account 


$323 41 




appropriation .... 


3,000 


00 


$3,323 41 














Cr. 


id M. J. Buncher, librarian 


$800 


00 




Geo. W. Burleigh, assistant 








librarian . 


284 


50 




Temple &Farrington, rebind- 








ing books, etc. . 


276 


58 




Manchester Gas Co., gas 


307 


96 




Manchester Water Works, 








water .... 


31 


50 




E. P. Johnson & Co., wood . 


23 


24 




IS". P. Hunt, postage, etc. 


• 2 


32 




N. P. Hunt, expenses to Bos- 








ton purchasing books 


4 


21 




L. B. Clough, expenses to 








Boston purchasing books . 


4 


01 





381 



Paid L. B. Clough, insurance . $100 00 
J. B. Clarke, printing . . 57 50 
O. D. Kimball, printing . 35 25 
Livingston & Kimball, print- 
ing 58 30 

Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing . . . . 30 00 
Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 

clock .... 4 50 

Thomas A. Lane, blacksmith- 



in g 


3 70 




trustees of city library . 


1,000 00 




City Hall, coal 


210 00 




By balance on hand . . 


89 84 


$3,323 41 






MILITIA. 




Dr. 


To appropriation 


$800 00 


$800 00 










Or. 


Paid Manchester Cadets 


$100 00 




Manchester War Veterans . 


100 00 




City Guards 


100 00 




First N". H. Battery 


100 00 




Head Guards 


100 00 




Headquarters 1st Regiment, 






KG 


100 00 




Sheridan Guards . 


100 00 




Amoskeag Veterans 


100 00 


««r»n r>rt 



382 



FUNDED DEBT. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . .$30,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 41,500 00 

$71,500 00 

Or. 

Paid city bonds . . . .$70,000 00 
Suncook Valley R. R. bonds 1,500 00 

$71,500 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $2,500 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 598 91 

$3,098 91 

Cr. 

Paid sundry persons . . . $3,098 91 

$3,098 91 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $7,000 00 

balance overdrawn . . . 1,261 29 

$8,261 29 

Cr. 
Paid George E. Morrill, collector. $8,261 29 

$8,261 29 



383 



To appropi 
balance 


iation 
overdrj 

Carter, 


STATE 

iwn . 
state treas 


TAX. 

. $41,000 
. 7,404 


00 
00 


Dr. 

$48,404 00 
Ca. 

$48,404 00 


Paid S. A. 


urer. $48,404 00 









COUNTY TAX. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 






$33,000 00 
2,237 74 




foe oq»7 it/j 


ypOO^MO 1 t rt 


Cr. 


Paid county treasurer . 


135,237 74 


OU r 




TAXES. 


rSTAKDING 


List for 1874 
" 1875 








$4,200 46 
. 4,051 91 


" 1876 
" 1877 
" 1878 
" 1879 








2,981 41 

2,816 79 

3,040 21 

945 53 


" 1880 








1,254 71 


" 1881 








1,329 77 


" 1882 
" 1883 








1,139 43 
1,039 21 

$22,799 43 



384 



TAXES FOR 1884. 

Dr. 

To amount of resident tax . $361,401 61 

amount of non-resident tax . 1,538 33 

$362,939 94 

Cr. 

By collections .... $337,375 61 
abatements .... 1,214 34 

discounts .... 8,261 29 
balance uncollected . . 16,088 70 

52,939 94 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $200 00 

$200 00 

Cr. 
Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, 

G. A. R $200 00 

$200 00 



LAND. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . $1,200 00 

$1,200 00 

Cr. 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred $1,200 00 

$1,200 00 



385 



"WOMEN'S AID AND RELIEF SOCIETY HOS- 
PITAL. 

Dr. 

To reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred .... $400 00 

$400 00 



Paid treasurer of hospital .• . $400 00 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 

To appropriation .... $12,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 2,142 91 



Cr. 

$400 00 

Dr. 

$14,142 91 

Cr. 



Paid H. B. Putnam, mayor . . $1,800 00 
H. B. Putnam, school com- 
mittee, ex-officio . . 10 00 
H. B. Putnam, overseer of 

the poor, ex-officio . . 25 00 
S. B. Putnam, city treasurer 1,000 00 
N. P. Kidder, city clerk . 900 00 
George H. Allen, city engi- 
neer 1,000 00 

George W. Prescott, city so- 
licitor . . . . 500 00 
¥m, R. Patten, city solicitor 250 00 
Geo. E. Morrill, tax-collector 1,302 53 
"William E. Buck, superin- 
tendent of schools . . 1,800 00 



25 



386 



Paid James A. Fracker, clerk of 




common council 


$100 00 


J. A. Barker, city messenger 


700 00 


D. K. White, milk-inspector 


750 00 


Daniel Sheehan, overseer of 




the poor .... 


8 34 


"William H.Maxwell, overseer 




of the poor 


25 00 


"William H. Maxwell, clerk of 




overseers of the poor 


75 00 


William Weber, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


P. A. Devine, overseer of the 




poor .... 


16 72 


J. E. Stearns, overseer of the 




poor .... 


25 00 


P. 0. Woodman, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


E. Gr. Woodman, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Horace Gordon, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


James Sutcliffe, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Charles H. Warren, inspector 




of check-lists 


54 00 


H. D. Lord, inspector of 




check-lists 


131 75 


C. C. Tinkham, inspector of 




check-lists 


57 37 


M. J. Callahan, inspector of 




check-lists 


72 00 


D. 0. Furnald, inspector of 




check-lists 


55 12 



387 



Paid S. D. Pollard, inspector of 

check-lists ... $48 37 

F. W. MoKinley, supervisor 4 00 

C. H. Hodgman, supervisor 8 00 
James SutclifFe, supervisor . 6 00 
A. E. P. Martyn, supervisor 8 00 
J. F. Pherson, supervisor . 4 00 
Daniel F. Shea, supervisor . 10 00 
F. J. Morrison, supervisor . 10 00 
S. S. Piper, supervisor . 6 00 
William D. Ladd, supervisor 4 00 
"William T. Paine, supervisor 4 00 
Benjamin SpofYord,supervisor 6 00 
L. S. Proctor, supervisor . 6 00 
Abial C. Flanders, supervisor 6 00 
H. W. Powell, assessor . 127 50 
P. A. Devine, assessor . . 137 50 

D. O. Furnald, assessor . 292 50 
George W. Weeks, assessor 413 50 
J. P. Moore, assessor . . 175 00 
Pius Brown, assessor . . 142 50 
C. H. Brown, assessor . . 165 00 
J. H. Haynes, assessor . 222 00 
J. EL Haynes, inspector of 

check-lists ... 192 37 

C. S. Fisher, assessor . . 214 50 
George H. Dudley, assistant 

assessor .... 42 50 
Isaac Whittemore, inspector 

of check-lists . . . 52 13 
Isaac Whittemore, assistant 

assessor . . . . 47 50 
Reed P. Silver, assistant as- 
sessor . . . . 42 50 



388 



Paid M. J. Jenkins, health officer 
L. H. Lamprey, health officer 
E. 0. Pearson, health officer 

E. 0. Pearson, city physician 
George M. True, moderator 
Daniel L. Stevens, moderator 
Frank B. Potter, moderator 
J. F. Sullivan, moderator 

D. H. Maxfield, moderator . 
George Holbrook, moderator 
J. F. Bohan, ward clerk 

F. "W. Garland, ward clerk . 
Wm. McElroy, ward clerk . 
"Waldo E. Gilmore, ward 

clerk . 

E. A. McQueston, ward clerk 
Charles E. Quimby, ward 

clerk . 

Ernest P. Philbrick, ward 

clerk . 

W. S. Chamberlin, ward 

clerk . 

Abial "W.Eastman,ward clerk 
John J. Sheehan, selectman 
Patrick Kelly, selectman 
"W.'S. Chamberlin, selectman 
J. P. Fellows, selectman 

D. J. Ahern, selectman 
Chas. H. Uhlig, selectman 
P. D. Harrison, selectman 
Zara B. Sawyer, selectman 
Benj. F. Garland, selectman 

E. G. Woodman, selectman 
Geo. C. Kemp, selectman 



$50 00 

25 00 

12 50 

25 00 

6 00 

3 00 

3 00 

6 00 

6 00 

3 00 

5 00 

5 00 

10 00 

10 00 
8 35 

8 00 

10 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 
7 87 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



389 



Paid Herman Rittner, selectman 


110 


00 


Emerson Moulton, selectman 


5 


00 


Geo. E. Glines, selectman 


5 


00 


Edwin N. Baker, selectman 


5 


00 


Chas. F. Garland, selectman 


5 


00 


Geo. "W. Bacon, selectman . 


5 


00 


George M. Bean, selectman 


5 


00 


F. J. Smith, selectman 


10 


00 


Oscar Perkins, selectman 


5 


00 


David Thayer, selectman, 


5 


00 


Fred W. Ranno, selectman . 


5 


00 


F. T. E. Richardson, school 






committee 


1 


66 


F. T. E. Richardson, clerk of 






school committee 


16 


67 


Charles A. O'Connor, school 






committee 


10 


00 


Wm. C. Clarke, school com- 






mittee .... 


10 


00 


Charles H. Manning, school 






committee 


8 


33 


Perry H. Dow, school com- 






mittee .... 


10 


00 


S. D. Lord, school committee 


10 


00 


N. P. Hunt, school committee 


10 


00 


J. J. Abbott, school com- 






mittee .... 


10 


00 


Thomas F. Collins, school 






committee 


10 


00 


Edwin F. Jones, school com- 






mittee .... 


10 


00 


Edwin F. Jones, clerk of 






school committee 


83 


33 



390 



Paid Benj. C. Dean, school com- 








mittee .. . 


$10 00 




J. A. McCrillis, school com- 








mittee, ex-officio 


10 


00 




D. Mitchell, school committee 


10 


00 




L. E. Phelps, school commit- 








tee 


10 


00 




Geo. D. Towne, school com- 








mittee .... 


10 


00 




D. M. Goodwin, school com- 








mittee .... 


10 


00 




J. T. Fanning, school com- 








mittee .... 


10 


00 




H. H. Huse, school committee 


10 


00 




Judith Sherer, matron at 








pest-house 


90 


00 




1ST. Nichols, clerk for assessors 


232 


50 


t 


G. W. Bourne, city physician 


31 


50 




H. S. Perry, selectman 


5 


00 








«1zL 1AO Q1 




KS. 


V 


>j.^)i.^.jj i/j. 


WATER WOR 










Dr. 


To balance from old account . 1 


126,338 


02 




water rents .... 


75,580 


08 








11 m Q18 m 






$u 


VJ.,l/J.«J J.V 








Cr. 



By interest, amount transferred . $38,000 00 
Paid Charles K. Walker, superin- 
tendent .... 1,555 31 
Arthur E. Stearns, clerk . 1,200 00 
George Woodman & Co., nip- 
ples, plugs, etc. . . 19 85 



391 



Paid National Meter Co., meters $433 00 
Boston Lead Manufacturing 

Co., pig lead, etc. . . 982 62 
Jarechi, Hays, & Co. stop- 
cocks, etc. ... 241 00 
Florence Iron "Works, iron 

pipe 2,596 64 

Boston Machine Co., bell, 

gates, etc. . . . 162 30 

Millville Manufacturing Co., 

pipe 86 35 

Leonard & Ellis, oil . . 75 38 

Edson Manufacturing Co., 

pump diaphragm . . 5 00 

Ludlow Yalve Manufacturing 

Co., gates, etc. . . 378 70 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 

jute packing . . . 45 27 

Mowry & Phillips, solder . 7 00 

New England Telegraph and 

Telephone Co., telephone 42 00 

P. Pattee & Co., hydrants . 825 00 
R. D. Wood & Co., iron pipe, 

etc 12,506 52 

Union Water Meter Co., 

meters, etc. . . . 776 99 
J. H. & T. Cunningham, iron 

pipe, etc 839 89 

Concord R. R. Corp., freight 1,565 68 
E.P. Johnson & Co., coal . 353 86 
Geo. H. Stearns, oil, soap, etc. 10 59 

D. J. Mahoney, lumber . 42 72 

L. A. Dickey, blacksmithing 24 03 

J. Hodge, lumber . . 22 07 



$14 31 


47 98 


51 


00 


42 


15 


10 


57 


40 


82 


55 


28 



392 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber 
D. J. Mahoney, lumber 
L. A. Clough, wood 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
Avery Bros., repairing stove, 
etc 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 
Chas. Bunton, blacksmithing 
Hutchinson Bros., black- 
smithing, etc. . . . 246 90 

James S. Bacheler, nipple 
and coupling 

John Barnes, blacksmithing . 

John B. Clarke, printing 

Thomas H. Tuson, printing . 

Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing ..... 

E. R. Coburn & Co., day- 
books, stationery, etc. 

Temple & Farrington, blank- 
books .... 1 07 

J. B. Varick Co., powder, 
hardware, etc. . 

Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. 

Manchester Locomotive 

Works, clamp sleeves, etc. 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing,etc. 

A. H. Lowell, castings, etc. . 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 

Pike & Heald, plumbing 

A. M. Eastman, oil, etc. 

John Moore, service at lake . 

Andrew B. Conant, service 

at lake .... 2 00 





48 


1 


50 


59 


75 


53 49 


8 


00 


49 


45 



229 


24 


54 


15 


215 


19 


103 


28 


283 


32 


109 


62 




65 


3 


75 


2 


00 



393 

Paid Henry Sanborn, service at 

lake ..... 

H. F. Morse, service at lake 

Stephen Palmer, service at 

lake 

(Jeorge "W. Varnum, service 

at lake .... 

H. J. ~W. Varnum, service at 

lake ..... 

[Nathaniel Baker, service at 

lake 

Lewis Simons, service at lake 
Preston Clanin,service at lake 
Town of Auburn, taxes 
Town of Auburn, one-half 

expense on highway . 
C. F. Hall, use of steamboat 
J. L. Kennedy, setting glass 
George W. Prescott, witness 

fees, etc 20 09 

Stephen Piper, making pho- 
tographs of outlet . . 10 00 
Joseph B. Sawyer, engineer- 
ing. . . .' . 93 20 
John C.Young, repairing roof 4 35 
George Fletcher, dinners . 20 00 
F. W. Elliott, dinners . 12 00 
Joseph A. Brown, teams . 14 00 
L. A. Clough, wood . . 60 00 
Geo. "W. Goffe, chestnut posts 3 40 
Geo. Fletcher & Co., dinners 35 20 
Charles H. Robie, concreting 5 85 
B. P. Bell, oil 24 50 
McDougall Bros., wood . 12 00 



84 


00 


2 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


o 


00 


4 


00 


7 


25 


91 


26 


20 


00 


1 


90 



15 


00 


60 


00 


6 


00 


1 


20 


15 


00 



394 

Paid L. ]ST. Dufrain, stop-cocks, 
plumbing, etc. . 

Joseph E. Bennett, auditing 
accounts .... 

J. J. Donnelly, damage from 
water .... 

City of Fitchburg, winding 
twine .... 

¥m. E. Moore, printing 

Nashua Cement and Drain 

Pipe Co., drain pipe . . 33 15 

Ward & Hurley, stop-cocks, 

etc 165 50 

E. T. James, teams . . 124 00 

P. C. Cheney Co., paper . 21 81 

A. N. Clapp .... 83 

H. B. Putnam, water com- 
missioner . . . . 36 00 

Alpheus Gay, water commis- 
sioner .... 33 00 

E. T. James, water commis- 
sioner .... 42 00 

William P. Newell, water 

commissioner . . . 33 00 

E. H. Hobbs, water commis- 
sioner .... 33 00 

A. C. Wallace, water com- 
missioner . . . . 33 00 

J. A. Weston, water commis- 
sioner and clerk of board . 119 00 

labor of men and teams . 9,037 82 

By balance on hand . . . 27,157 37 

$101,918 10 



395 



RESERVED FUND. 

To appropriation . 

D. K. White, milk licenses 

N. P. Kidder,rent of tenements 

ST. P. Kidder, show licenses 

~N. P. Kidder, south city scales 

N. P. Kidder, old iron sold 

Kimball & Gerrish, land in 
Bakersville . 

N". P. Kidder, rent of ward room 

N". P. Kidder, dog licenses 

interest on taxes, amount trans- 
ferred ...... 199 57 

macadamizing, amount trans- 
ferred 800 00 

paupers off farm, amount trans- 
ferred 800 00 

fire department, amount trans- 
ferred 4,000 00 

sewers and drains, amount 

transferred .... 5,500 00 

land, amount transferred . 1,200 00 

new school-house, amount 

transferred .... 6,000 00 



$10,000 00 


125 


00 


766 


71 


271 


00 


112 


00 


77 


20 


1,345 


00 


12 


00 


884 


00 



Dr. 



$32,092 48 
Or. 



By Women's Aid Hospital, amount 

transferred .... $400 00 
Amoskeag Cemetery, amount 

transferred . . . . 300 00 
new highways, amount trans- 
ferred 3,500 00 



396 



By lighting streets, amount trans- 




ferred ..... 


$1,800 00 


paving streets, amount trans- 




ferred 


1,836 04 


bridges, amount transferred 


6,000 00 


commons, amount traDsferred 


1,200 00 


incidental expenses, amount 




transferred .... 


10,000 00 


printing and stationery, amount 




transferred .... 


500 00 


repairs of buildings, amount 




transferred .... 


800 00 


balance on hand 


5,756 44 







!2,092 48 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
balance overdrawn . 



Paid George Holbrook, lumber 
and labor .... 

D. H. Morgan, labor . 

Gr. H. Dudley, labor 

Bennett & Lord, mason-work 

Carpenter & Pippin, mason- 
work .... 19 89 

Carpenter & Robinson,mason- 
work . . . . 418 56 

J.L.Kennedy & Co., painting 105 74 



$153 


55 




3,895 


40 




221 


84 


$4,270 79 










Cr. 


$1,911 


88 




47 


90 




3 


25 




358 


10 





397 



Paid J. R. Carr, painting . . $294 50 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 7 75 

J. Choate, painting . . 246 83 
W.F. Starkweather, painting 135 48 
W. H. Sullivan, painting . 222 13 
W. B. Abbott, painting . 70 81 

Joel Daniels, painting . . 35 

Trefethen & Moore, repairing 

clocks . . . . 10 25 

James Briggs, stove-pipe, 

etc 10 85 

James Briggs, repairing 

stove-pipe, etc. . 3 15 

Pike & Heald, repairing 

stove-pipe, etc. 
G. R. Vance 
Thorp & Bartlett, stove-pipe, 

etc. .... 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
E. T. James, teams 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
William C. Rogers, hardware 
J. B. Young, cleaning vaults 
Isaac S. Coffin, stove-pipe,etc. 
J. S. Avery, extra labor 
C. M. Norton, extra labor . 
G. W. Varnum, extra labor 
James "Watts, extra labor . 5 50 

J. B. Smith, batteries for 

High School, etc. . . 5 00 

Manchester Locomotive 

Works, repairing boiler 3 00 

Clarke & Dixon, repairing 

clocks .... 3 75 



35 


79 


9 


70 


59 


54 


207 


20 


6 


00 




09 


11 


85 


2 


50 


22 


95 


10 


50 


9 


00 


6 


00 



398 



Paid Moses Tracy, mason-work 
Eben Carr, cleaning vault 



$3 00 
2 00 



1,270 79 



FUEL. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$160 79 


appropriation .... 


3,311 


09 


Daniels & Co., overdraft . 


1 


92 

£3 473 80 












Cr. 


Paid Moore & Preston, coal and 






wood .... 


$53 


75 


Clark Bros., hauling coal 


41 


00 


J. Albert Walker, coal 


665 


20 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood . 


429 


12 


Burns & Poore, wood . 


8 


12 


E. P. Johnson & Co., wood 






and coal .... 


22 


50 


Chas. C. Doe, sawing wood 


82 


57 


A. C. Ordway, sawing wood 


1 


25 


J. J. Bennett, mason-work . 


2 


50 


Bennett & Lord, mason-work 


7 25 


Carpenter & Robinson, mason- 






work .... 


7 


00 


J. S. Bacheler, plumbing, etc. 


93 


74 


Prank Fogg & Co., plumbing, 






etc. ..... 


30 


61 


Thorp & Avery, grate, etc. . 


6 


00 


Thorp & Bartlett, grate, etc. 


9 


65 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


16 


94 



399 



Paid T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 


$233 09 




Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. 


9 


58 




George Holbrook, carpenter- 








work .... 


106 


65 




Charles M. Norton, sawing 








wood, etc. 


11 


22 




¥m. H. Vickery, bolts, keys, 








etc. . . 


1 


85 




H. F. Nutt, housing wood . 


3 


38 




J. F. Woodbury, repairing 








fire-pokers 


1 


00 




Bygbalance on hand 


1,629 


80 


$3,473 80 




7PPLIES. 


FURNITURE AND SI 










Dr. 


To balance from old account 


$242 


04 




appropriation .... 


1,266 


01 


$1,508 05 














Cr. 


Paid T. "W. Lane, books, etc. 


$296 


66 




Temple & Farrington, books, 








etc 


11 


48 




E. R. Coburn & Co., books, 








etc. ..... 


22 


00 




J. F. Gillis, binders 




60 




Pike & Heald, door-mats, 








brooms, etc. 


63 


10 




Daniels & Co., dusters, bas- 








kets, etc 


80 


08 




"Wm. C. Rogers, dusters, etc. 


4 


25 




J. B. Varick, dusters, etc. 


12 


75 





400 



Paid E. H. Currier, chemicals, etc. 


$136 88 


D. G. Simons, dusters, etc. . 


13 00 


G-eo. H. Stearns, soap,brooms. 




etc. . 


5 48 


Geo. S. Perry, maps, etc. 


228 45 


Prang Educational Company. 




charts, etc. 


12 67 


E. S. Ritchie & Sons . 


73 60 


Ginn, Heath, & Co.,charts,etc. 


9 35 


Clarke & Dixon, repairing 




clocks . 


7 25 


Avery Bros., mop-waste, etc. 


1 15 


Manchester Print Works 




chemicals . 


2 03 


R. D. Gay . 


19 70 


J. G. Jones, expressage 


50 


D. L. Guernsey, maps . 


4 00 


J. B. Smith, induction coil . 


5 00 


A. C. Stockin, 


1 11 


Redding Electrical Co. 


3 00 


Chas. H. Whiting, books,etc. 


9 44 


Ginn, Heath, & Co., charts . 


19 60 


1ST. E. Pub. Co., books, etc. . 


6 50 


D. M. Poore, floor brush 


1 00 


H. D.Gordon,wood chairs,etc. 


40 00 


J. Stickney, repairing gas bag 


2 00 


CM. Bailey, manilla paper 


2 00 


Trefethen & Moore, clock 


5 00 


Standard School Furniture 




Co. , piano table 


16 00 


G. I. Hopkins, electrical in- 




struments . 


3 95 


J. H. Howard, ribbon, etc. . 


7 18 



401 



Paid A. G-. Whitcomb, metallic 
wells 

H. Fradd & Co., pearline 

Higgins Bros., chestnut chairs 

A. Minard . 

George Holbrook 

W. H. Sullivan . 

J. Choate 

William B. Abbott 

J. K. Carr . 

E. R. Coburn & Co., books,etc 
By balance on hand 



$4 25 

65 

1 50 

1 25 

65 00 

60 00 

60 00 

75 00 

90 00 

23 60 

04 



$1,508 05 



BOOKS AM) STATIONERY. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 



Paid Boston School Supply Co. 

Prang Educational Co. 

Temple & Farrington 

E. R. Coburn & Co. 

Charles H. "Whiting 

Thos. W. Lane . 

P. Rogez 

Harper & Brother 

S. E. Sprague 
By balance on hand 

26 



$56 42 
340 85 



$10 


00 


21 


49 


54 


12 


76 


62 


39 


91 


163 


60 


4 


00 


11 


52 


15 


60 




41 



$397 27 
Or. 



$397 27 



402 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 



$147 08 
633 00 



Paid C. T. Cragin, preparing 


di- 


plomas 


$26 35 


Thomas H. Tuson 


2 25 


Livingston & Kimball . 


84 00 


Campbell & Williams . 


20 55 


Union Publishing Co. . 


40 00 


John B. Clarke 


277 63 


By balance on hand 


329 30 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

To balance from old account . $164 06 
appropriation . . . 1,217 32 



Paid Manchester Water Works, 

water . . . $453 40 

Manchester Gas Co., gas . 81 02 

B. P. Dennis,repairing pianos 10 50 

New England Publishing 

Co., periodicals . 4 00 

Mrs. B. Madden, cleaning 

school-room ... 2 00 

Mrs. O. Webber, cleaning 

school-room . . . 2 00 



Dr. 



$780 08 
Cr. 



$780 08 



Dr. 



$1,381 
Cr. 



403 



1 


00 


109 


23 


14 


00 


16 


09 


16 


09 


21 


90 


8 


22 


20 


98 


2 


00 




75 


1 


75 



Paid Susie G. "Woodman, cleaning 

school-room . . . $1 50 

Mary A. Smith, cotton-cloth, 

etc. .... 
"W*m. E. Buck, use of team 
George W.Varnum, cleaning 

school-houses 
H. H. Huse 
L. E. Phelps 
]ST. P. Hunt . 
C. A. O'Connor 
Thomas Hall, chemicals 
James Brothers, team . 
C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck 

ing . 
J. G. Jones, trucking 

E. B. Benjamin, chemical 
apparatus . 

Temple & Farrington, hind 

ing hooks 
A. G. Whitcomb, ink-wells 
Pike & Heald, hardware 
A. H. Lowell, iron-work 

F. P. & M. L. Buswell, truck 
ing . . . . 

F. P. Colby, moving piano 

F. T. E. Richardson, rubber 
type, etc. . 

Novelty Co., pencil-stamp 

"W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 

E. T. James, hack 

E. F. Jones, postal-cards 

N. S. Clark, ribbon for di- 
plomas .... 1 98 



50 00 



3 


75 


25 


00 


1 


68 


6 


50 




75 


2 


00 


12 


22 




80 


1 


95 




50 


1 


00 



404 



Paid A. A. Jenkins, tuning piano 


$1 25 


H. Fradd & Co., kerosene oil 


1 30 


S. B. Hope, team 


3 00 


B. A. Haselton, stone steps . 


12 50 


A. L. N. Robertson 


8 40 


G. I. Hopkins, express, etc. . 


5 85 


Bullock & Cranshaw 


75 00 


E. H. Currier . ' . 


1 25 


W. H. Vickery . 


2 25 


By balance on band 


396 02 







.,381 38 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



Dk. 



To balance from old account 


. 


$17 62 


appropriation .... 2,921 55 


balance overdrawn . . . 79 99 




%9. 010 16 




Ob. 


Paid J. S. Avery . . . $605 00 


"William Stevens . 






600 00 


D. H. Morgan 






454 50 


C. M. Norton 






412 64 


G. W. Varnum . 






356 79 


James Watts 






249 96 


H. C. Dickey 






100 00 


D. S. Dunbar 






12 50 


M. W. Mitcbell 






19 25 


James Tully 






12 00 


Mabel E. Cbase 






15 52 


Anna O. Proctor 






11 81 


A. C. Ordway 






54 75 


Alvin G. Bean 






15 50 



405 



Paid Lester C. Paige . 


$6 00 


Frank McColley . 


18 00 


Frank H. Dickey 


7 05 


Edgar Carr . 


6 50 


Edson C. Eastman 


7 00 


Fred H. Robinson 


6 00 


Ella F. Barker . 


10 50 


Florence L. Webber 


7 00 


J. F. Rowell 


6 00 


Henry I. Rowell . 


4 25 


Alice Campbell 


2 50 


Florence L. Webber 


3 00 


Harry Bean 


11 00 


0. J. Randall 


4 14 







$3,019 16 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$35 88 




appropriation .... 


1,460 


78 


$1,496 66 














Or. 


Paid F. C. Livingston, teacher 


$181 


20 




Mattie Sanborn, teacher 


14 


40 




Carrie F. Bartlett, teacher . 


30 


00 




Anna J. Dana, teacher . 


27 


00 




Fannie M. Kelley, teacher . 


91 


00 




Hattie E. Daniels, teacher 


30 


60 




Nettie F. Ainsworth, teacher 


56 


70 




M. Alma Fracker, teacher . 


28 


80 




Charles E. Cochran, teacher 


206 


80 




Lizzie D. Hartford, teacher . 


25 


20 





406 



Paid Lelia A. Brooks, teacher 
Mary H. Searle, teacher 
Bessie M. Hall, teacher 
Genevieve L.Whitten,teacher 
Alta C. Willand, teacher 
Fannie L. Sanborn, teacher 
!N\ B. Croning, teacher 
Annie L. Prescott, teacher 
Susie H. Frame, teacher 
Nellie Pearson, teacher 
D. H. Morgan, janitor . 
G. "W. Varnum, janitor 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
A. N. Clapp, kerosene oil, etc 
H. Fradd & Co., oil, etc. 

By balance on hand 



$27 00 

19 80 
88 20 

62 10 
27 00 

63 00 
23 40 
27 90 
44 10 
29 00 
34 50 
56 25 
26 28 

20 55 
1 60 

254 28 







Wj.,io\j uu 


TUITION. 








Dr. 


To balance from old account 


134 88 




William D. Buck . 


199 75 


$234 63 










Or. 


Paid Lee & Shepard, school-books, 






etc 


$130 50 




Ivison, Blakeman, Taylor, 






& Co., school-books, etc. . 


13 34 




Clark & Maynard, school- 






books, etc. 


13 50 




By balance on hand 


77 29 


ft9SU fi3 



407 

XEW SCHOOL-HOUSE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $6,000 00 

$6,000 00 

Cr. 
By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred $6,000 00 

86,000 00 



TRUAXT OFFICERS. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $700 00 
By balance overdrawn . . . 50 00 

$750 00 

Cr. 
Paid H. W. Longa . . . $562 50 
Samuel Brooks . . . 187 50 

$750 00 



INTEREST OS LAXD. 

Dr. 
To appropriation. . . . . 83,000 00 



83,000 00 

Cr. 
Paid Amoskeag M'f'g Co. . . $1,546 58 
By balance on band . . . 1,453 42 

• — $3,000 00 



408 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 



To appropriation . 

By balance overdrawn . 



1,500 00 
866 51 



Paid labor of men and teams . $4,366 51 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



To trustees . 



By cash on hand . 



,200 00 



. $2,200 00 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 

t,366 51 

Cr. 

1,366 51 



Dr. 

$2,200 00 
Cr. 

$2,200 00 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 

appropriation . 
By balance overdrawn . 



Paid A. W. Bacheler 
T. D. Adams 
G. I. Hopkins 
L. E. Manahan 
Mary A. Buzzell 
Rocilla M. Tuson 



$111 


24 




38,954 


00 




527 


18 






<ttQQ CQO /lO 




ST 


, " t ')" 1 "' ^-" 






Cr. 


$1,200 


00 




560 


00 




1,155 


00 




800 


00 




500 


00 




500 


00 





409 



Paid F. C. Baldwin 


$1,200 00 


Lenora C. Gilford 


475 00 


Lottie R. Adams . 


404 00 


Carrie E. Reid 


460 00 


C. Augusta Abbott 


450 00 


Hattie G. Flanders 


450 00 


Ella F. Sanborn . 


450 00 


Nellie M. James . 


490 00 


Annie 0. Heath . 


500 00 


Lizzie P. Gove 


475 00 


, Fannie D. Moulton 


450 00 


Nellie I. Sanderson 


450 00 


Lucia E. Esty 


450 00 


Carrie I. Stevens . 


450 00 


B. F. Dame . 


1,350 00 


A. W. Patten 


457 50 


Mary J. Fife 


460 00 


I. R. Daniels 


460 00 


Mary F. Barnes . 


315 00 


M. F. Barnes 


67 50 


Carrie M. Gilmore 


450 00 


Eva F. Tuson 


377 50 


Emma M. Rowley 


120 00 


E. P. Sherburne . 


810 00 


Mary E. Bunton . 


424 00 


Annie A. Webster 


473 50 


B. L. Dean . 


460 00 


Nancy S. Bunton . 


475 00 


Kittie J. Ferren . 


375 00 


Emma L. Stokes . 


450 00 


Helen F. Wetherbee 


385 00 


F. J. SutclifFe 


1,100 00 


Josie H. Martin . 


240 00 


C. M. Dearborn . 


460 00 



410 



Paid Ellen E. McKean 
Mary A. Smith . 
Maria 1ST. Bower . 
Gertrude H. Brooks 
Florence A. Nichols 
Helen M. Morrill 
Nina D. Annis 
Mary G. Tynan . 
Georgia A. Wyman 
Kate M. Follansbee 
Georgianna Dow . 
Augusta S. Downs 
Jennie F. Bailey . 
Clara E. Woods . 
Belle M. Kelley . 
Alice G. Lord 
Delle E. Haines . 
Flora M. Senter . 
Josie H. Richardson 
Etta J. Carley 
Jennie G. Stebbins 
Nettie C. Woodman 
Edith M. Stebbins 
S. Izetta Locke . 
Georgie A. Nute 
Mary W. Mitchell 
Susie G. Woodman 
Addie C. Prescott 
Olive J. Randall . 
Olive A. Rowe 
J. J. Kimball 
S. E. Sprague 
Lizzie A. Burns . 
Nettie F. Ainsworth 



$450 00 
475 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
475 00 
375 63 
450 00 
367 50 
385 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
360 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
210 00 
500 00 
371 25 
450 00 
400 00 
450 00 
475 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
1,000 00 
780 00 
500 00 
170 75 



411 



Paid Susie H. Frame 
M. L. Gage . 
Ella Hope . 
Cora F. Sanborn 
Lelia A. Brooks 
Bessie M. Hall 
A. L. Prescott 
M. E. Sanborn 
G. L. Whitten 
A. C. Willand 
Will F. Gibson 
F. M. Kelley 
A. L. Prescott 
J. W. Stetson 
E. F. Barker 
E. E. Jones . 
M. K. Webster 
C. 1ST. Brown 
Fannie L. Sanborn 



$257 


50 


303 


25 


271 


87 


99 


55 


141 


75 


153 


87 


18 


75 


147 


50 


150 


50 


156 


00 


37 


50 


32 


75 


2 


50 


480 


00 


160 


00 


200 


00 


2 


75 


2 


50 


32 


75 



,592 42 



INVENTORY OF SCHOOL-HOUSES. 



High-school house and lot . 

Furniture, charts, maps, books, 
and apparatus 
Franklin-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 



$50,000 00 

2,000 00 $52,000 00 
18,000 00 

400 00 18,400 00 
15,000 00 

400 00 15,400 00 
50,000 00 

400 00 50,400 00 
58,000 00 

400 00 58,400 00 



412 



'.North-Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
"Webster-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Blodget-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Bridge-street house and lot . 
Lowell-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Beech-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Center-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
South-Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Stark-District house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Gofte's-Falls house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Harvey-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
"Webster-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Hallsville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 



.$17,000 00 




600 


00 $17,600 00 


. 16,000 


00 




350 


00 


16,350 00 


. 3,500 


00 




150 


00 


3,650 00 


900 


00 


900 00 


. 7,000 


00 




400 


00 


7,400 00 


. 15,000 


00 




550 


00 


15,550 00 


. 3,300 


00 




100 


00 


3,400 00 


. 7,000 


00 




350 


00 


7,350 00 


. 5,000 


00 




425 


00 


5,425 00 


. 2,800 


00 




200 


00 


3,000 00 


. 13,000 


00 




600 


00 


13,600 00 


. 3,000 


00 




150 


00 


3,150 00 


. 3,700 


00 




125 


00 


3,825 00 


. 3,600 


00 




100 


00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 


00 




125 


00 


2,62.5 00 


600 


00 




50 


00 


650 00 


. 3,500- 


00 




125 


00 


3,625 00 



413 

Youngsville house and lot . . $1,400 00 

Furniture, maps, etc. . . 125 00 $1,525 00 

Mosquito-Pond-Dist. house and lot 1,200 00 

Furniture, maps, etc. . . 100 00 1,300 00 

Park-street house and lot . . 8,500 00 8,500 00 

$317,725 00 



414 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Tear. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


STo. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1840 . . 


8946,200 


$3,986 56 


772 


$2 20 


$300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 88 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,661 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


1 76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673 82 


7,831 


1 62 


100 


1883 . . 


20,055,986 


332,741 72 


7,944 


1 65 


100 


1884 . . 


20,613,032 


361,401 61 


8,143 


1 75 


100 



415 
City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


April 1, 


1865 


City Bonds, 


April ] 


, 1885 


$10,000 00 


July 1, 


1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1885 


8,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


, 1885 


1,500 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


U u 


Aug. 1 


, 1886 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


c< tc 


Aug. 1 


, 1887 


3,500 00 


Jan. 1 


1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


, 1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1863 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


, 1888 


35,000 00 


July 1 


1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1890 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1872 


it it 


Jan. 1 


, 1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31 


1863 


City Bonds, 


Nov. 1 


, 1893 


70,000 00 


July 1 


1864 


IC U 


July 1 


, 1894 


50,000 00 


July 1 


1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1895 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1872 


U It 


Jan. 1 


. 1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


, 1872 


U M 


Jan. 1 


, 1902 


100,000 00 


July 1 


1881 


Bridge Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1911 


60,000 00 



416 



FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 

1, 1884 . . . . . $914,500 00 
Paid during the year 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 
1,1885 .... 
Interest due, estimated 
Bills outstanding 
Temporary loan 

* Note due Amoskeag Manufac- 
turing Co. for land ' . 

Cemetery bonds 

Total indebtedness Jan.l, 1885 

Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1885 . 
Notes due the city 
Interest on same 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1885 
Decrease of net indebtedness 
during the year 

* Should have been included in report for 1881. 



71,500 00 




$20,000 00 

45,824 44 

119,000 00 


$843,000 00 


25,776 40 

* 


$210,600 84 
2,200 00 




$1,055,800 84 


$63,719 30 

228 70 

93 55 


■ 64,041 55 




< 


£991,759 29 




$3,422 62 



417 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Land, city scales, etc. . . . . $30,000 00 

City-library building 41,000 00 

Permanent inclosure of commons . . 22,000 00 

City Hall and lot 60,000 00 

City Farm and permanent improvements . 32,000 00 

Stock, tools, furniture, etc., at City Farm . 9,856 28 

Engines, hose, and apparatus . . . 35,283 50 

Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell . 21,550 00 

Engine-house, stable, and land, Vine street 47,000 00 

i Hose-house, cottage, and lot, Maple street . 5,000 00 

Hose-house and cottage, Park street . . 9,000 00 

Houses, tombs, and new cemetery . . 9,000 00 

Court-house and lot 51,000 00 

Common sewers 235,000 00 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall . 3,000 00 

Street-lanterns, posts, and pipes . . . 6,500 00 

Waterworks 819,724 79 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets . 5,000 00 

Ward-room and lot, Manchester street . 10,000 00 

Engine-house and lot, ward eight . . 2,500 00 

Water-pipe, wagons, etc., for watering streets 2,500 00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad . . 50,000 00 

Gravel lot, Belmont street .... 1,200 00 

Gravel lot, Sagamore street . . . 900 00 

Gravel lot, ward eight (one-half acre) . 50 00 

Gravel lot, Bakersville (one acre) . . ■ 100 00 

Gravel lot, Bakersville .... 600 00 

Gravel lot, District No. 8 . . . . 150 00 

Valley Cemetery 9,000 00 

New police station and lot . . . . 30,000 00 

$1,637,914 57 

Amount of school property . . . 317,725 00 

27 $1,955,639 57 



418 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1885. 



Interest 






. 


Paupers off the farm 


. 


City farm 






. 


City teams 






. 


Highway District No. 


1 


a 


a 


a 


2 


a 


a 


a 


3 


n 


a 


M 


4 


it 


a 


a 


5 


(< 


a 


(( 


6 


u 


(< 


il 


7 


a 


« 


a 


8 


u 


a 


a 


9 


a 


a 


a 


10 


a 


a 


a 


11 


a 


a 


a 


12 


a 


a 


a 


13 



New highways . 
Damage for land taken for 
Watering streets 
Lighting streets . 
Paving streets 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete . 
Sewers and drains 
Bridge-street sewer 
"Webster-street sewer . 
South-Main-street sewer 
Commons . 
Bridges 

Incidental expenses . 
Pine Grove Cemetery 
Valley Cemetery 



highways 



$20,000 00 

3,500 00 

2,500 00 

3,000 00 

300 00 

11,000 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

400 00 

400 00 

900 00 

650 00 

500 00 

1,800 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 

200 00 

5,000 00 

1,500 00 

4,000 00 

12,500 00 

3,000 00 

5,000 00 

3,500 00 

6,000 00 

5,000 00 

13,000 00 

1,000 00 

3,500 00 

3,000 00 

5,000 00 

5,875 00 

1,500 00 



419 



Fire department 

Fire-alarm telegraph . 

Hydrant service . 

Police department 

City Hall . 

Printing and stationery 

Repairs of buildings . 

City library 

Militia 

Payment of funded debt 

Abatement of taxes 

Discount on taxes 

State tax 

County tax 

City officers' salaries . 

Firemen's parade 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Land .... 

Reserved fund . 

Repairs of school-houses 

Fuel .... 

Furniture and supplies 

Books and stationery 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Care of rooms 

Evening schools 

Teachers' salaries 

New school-house 

Truant officer 

Interest on land . 

Scavenger teams 

Health department 



$16,000 00 


5,500 


00 


18,500 


00 


20,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,500 


00 


1,800 


00 


4,000 


00 


800 


00 


19,500 


00 


1,500 


00 


7,000 


00 


48,000 


00 


35,000 


00 


12,000 


00 


300 


00 


200 


00 


1,500 


00 


22,000 


00 


3,500 


00 


3,500 


00 


800 


00 


300 


00 


500 


00 


800 


00 


3,200 


00 


1,400 


00 


41,000 


00 


6,000 


00 


700 


00 


600 


00 


4,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


$425,625 00 



INDEX. 



Abatement of Taxes 382 

Account of City Treasurer 298 

Accounts of Appropriations 305 

Alarm-Boxes and Keys 154 

Amoskeag Cemetery 290, 355 

Amoskeag S. F. E. Company No. 1 161, 359 

Appropriations for 1885 418 

Attendance at School 234 

Books and Stationery . . -. 401 

Bridges 334 

Care of Rooms 404 

Cemetery Funds 408 

Cemeteries, Report of Trustees 273 

Treasurer 291, 295 

Trustees of Fund - 293 

City Government, 1884 3 

Engineer, Report of 101 

Debt 382 

Farm .' 312 

Hall 375 

Library 380 

Property 417 

Solicitor, Report of 251 

Teams 317 

Treasurer's Account 298 

Commons 335 

County Tax : 383 

Contingent Expenses 402 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 384 

Debt, Funded 382, 416 

Discount on Taxes 382 

Donations to City Library 91 



422 

E. W. Harrington Hose Company No. 3 169, 362 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 171, 363 

Evening Schools 194, 405 

Farm, City 312 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 147, 367 

Boxes and Keys, Location of 154 

Fire Apparatus 161 

Department 359 

Department, Rules and Regulations of 159 

Firemen's Parade 377 

Relief Association 148 

Fires, Alarms, Losses, 1884 150 

Fuel 398 

Furniture and Supplies 399 

Government, City, 1884 3 

Grading for Concrete 332 

HighSchool 207 

Highway District No. 1 319 

No. 2 320 

No. 3 322 

No. 4 322 

No. 5 323 

No. 6 324 

No. 7 324 

No. 8 325 

No. 9 325 

No. 10 325 

No. 11 326 

No. 12 327 

No. 13 327 

Highways, New 327 

Hydrant Service 368 

Hydrants, Location of 173 

Obstructing 147 

Inaugural Address 29 

Incidental Expenses 337 

Independent Hose Company No. 5 172 

Instructions to Key-Holders 157 

Interest 305, 407 

Inventory of School-houses 411 



423 

Land 384 

Land Damages 328 

Library, City 73 

Donations to 91 

Librarian's Report 85 

Treasurer's Report 79 

Trustees' Report 73 

List of Teachers and Janitors 242 

Lighting Streets 329 

Loan, Temporary 306 

Militia 381 

Miscellaneous Expenses of Fire Department 364 

Macadamizing Streets 331 

Massabesic Hose Company No. 2 169, 362 

Merrimack Hose Company No. 4 170, 363 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Company No. 4 167, 360 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department. . . . 166 

New School-house 407 

Officers, City 3 

Outstanding Taxes 383 

Overseers of Poor, Report of 269 

Paving Streets 330 

Paupers off the City Farm 306 

Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 168, 361 

Pine Grove Cemetery 276, 355 

Police Department 369 

Printing and Advertising *. 402 

Stationery 378 

Property, City 417 

Repairs of School-houses 396 

Buildings 378 

Report of Chief Engineer 143 

City Civil Engineer 101 

City Solicitor 251 

Committee on City Farm 263 

Committee on Finance 302 

Librarian of City Library 85 

Overseers of the Poor 269 

School Committee 191 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 204 



424 

Report of Superintendent of Water- Works 49 

Treasurer of City Library 79 

Trustees of City Library 73 

Trustees of Cemeteries .... 273 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund 293 

Water Commissioners 47 

Reserved Fund 395 

Reservoir 369 

Salaries of Officers 38-5 

Teachers 403 

Scavenger Teams 408 

School Department < 187 

Organization for 1885 239 

Training 220 

High 207 

Schools, Evening 194, 405 

Cost of 202 

Sewers and Drains 333 

State Tax 383 

Streets, Lighting 329 

Macadamizing 331 

Paving 330 

Watering 329 

Taxes, Abatement of 339 

Discount on 339 

For 1884 384 

Outstanding 340 

Temporary Loan 306 

Teachers, list of 242 

Salaries of 403 

Training School.- 220 

Truant Officers 407 

Tuition 406 

Valedictory Address 15 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 414 

Valley Cemetery 273, 358 

Water Commissioners for 1885 46 

Report of 47 

Water- Works 390 

Watering Streets 329 

Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospital 385