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FORTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



City of Manchester. 



Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1885, 



TOGETHER WITH 



PTHER y^NNUAL ^EPORTS AND f APERS j^ELATING 
TO THE y^FFAIRS OF THE CiTY. 




MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY JOHN B. CLARKE. 

1886. 



•w' s-/ *'-. ' V / 



CITY OF MANCHESTER, 



In Board of Common Council. 
AN ORDER to print the Fortieth Annual Report of the Receipts 
and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, 

Ordered, If the board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are 
authorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said' city' 
the printing of the Fortieth Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of 
the Jomt Standing Committee on Finance, the School Board and 
iSuperintendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water- Works, Water 
•Commissioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Marshal. Over- 
seers of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian, and Treasurer of City Library, 
Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Committee on City Farm' 
City Physician, City Solicitor, and City Engineer, the expense 
thereof to be charged to the Appropriation for Printin-^ and 
Stationery. * 

In Board op Common Council. January 12, 1886. 
Passed. 

GEORGE M. TRUE, President 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, January 12, 1886. 
Passed in concurrence. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS, Mai/or. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1885. 



MAYOR. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

JAMES B. STRAW. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

GEORGE W. PRESCOTT. 



\ 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

JAMES M. COLLITY. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

GEORGE M. TRUE. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

PELEG D. HARRISON. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 



CLERK OF WATER-WORKS. 

ARTHUR E. STEARNS. 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward 1. — Stillman P. Cannon. 
Ward 2. — Loring B. Bodwell. 
Ward 3. — Samuel Thompson. 
Ward 4. — John A. McCrillis. 
Ward 5. — Leonard P. Keynolds. 
Ward 6. — Charles D. Welch. 
Ward 7. — Abner J. Sanborn. 
Ward 8. —Frank A. Cadwell. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

George W. Cheney. 
George W. Bacon. 
Jonathan C. Quimby, 

Ward 3. 



Ward 2. 

George M. True. 
Oliver B. Green. 
James R. Carr. 

Ward 4. 



Eugene S. Whitney. 
Abraham G. Grenier. 
William S. Shannon. 



Stephen B. Stearns. 
Frank X. Chenette. 
Charles J. Abbott. 



Ward 5. 

John F. Fox. 
Frank H. Callan. 
John Bryson, Jr. 

Ward 7. 

Guy F. Whitten, 
Frank A. Dockham. 
Oscar Perkins. 



Ward 6. 

John M. Kendall. 
Henry B. Fairbanks. 
George S. Smith. 

Ward 8. 

Ferdinand Riedel. 
Thomas E. McDerby- 
Frank 0. Clement. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Chi Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Bodwell ; 
Messrs. Stearns, Whitney, and Quimby. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Thompson and Cadwell ; 
Messrs. Kendall, Perldns, and McDerby. (Meet Wednes- 
day succeeding the 24th of each month. All bills must 
be left at city clerk's office, properly approved, not later 
than the 24th of each month.) 

0)1 Claims. — Aldermen Thompson and McCrillis ; 
Messrs. Quimby, Whitten, and Dockham. (Meet third 
Friday in each month.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Welch and Sanborn; Messrs. 
Shannon, Fairbanks, and Green. 

On Sewers and Brains. — Aldermen Sanborn and 
Welch; Messrs. Green, Fairbanks, and Shannon. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Bodwell and Rey- 
nolds ; Messrs. Cheney, Grenier, and Riedel. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen McCrillis and 
Bodwell ; Messrs. Carr, Stearns, and Bryson. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Cadwell and McCril- 
lis ; Messrs. Whitney, Cheney, and Carr. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Cannon and 
McCrillis ; Messrs. Clement and Bacon. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Welch and Thomp- 
son ; Messrs. Chenette, Callan, and Clement. 

On Water- Works. — Aldermen McCrillis and Sanborn ; 
Messrs. Fox and Kendall. 

Oti City Farm. — Aldermen Reynolds and Cannon; 
Messrs. Whitten, Smith, and Fox. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Cannon and 
Welch ; Messrs. Chenette, Riedel, and Smith. 

On Military A fairs. — Aldermen Sanborn and Cannon; 
Messrs. Perkins, Callan, and Dockham. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN- 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Caclwell and Cannon. 

On Bills on Second Beading. — Aldermen Thompson and 
Reynolds. 

On Market. — Aldermen Reynolds and BodwelL 

071 Marshal's Account. — Aldermen Bodwell and. Mc- 
Crillis. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen McCrill\s and Cannon. 

O'n Setting Trees. — Aldermen Welch and Sanborn. 

On Special Bolice. — Aldermen Sanborn and Thompson. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Beturns. — Messrs. Quimb}^, Perkins, andl 
Kendall. 

On Bills on Second Beading. — Messrs. Dockham, Gre- 
nier, and Callan. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. McDerby and Fox. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Bolice Court. 

N'athan P. Hunt. 

Associate Justice of Bolice Court 

Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 

John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 



Assistant Marshal. 
Horatio W. Longa. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

George H, Stearns, ex-o^cio Chairman. 
Edwin F. Jones, Clerl-. 



Ward 1. 

Albe C. Heatli. 
Charles H. Manning. 

Ward 2. . 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 

Ward 3. 

:N'athan P. Hnnt. 
James E. Dodge. 

Ward 4. 

Samuel D. Lord. 
Stephen W. Clarke. 



Ward 5. 

Charles A. O'Connor, 
Thomas F. Collins. 

Ward 6. 

Jacob J. Abbott. 
William H. Huse. 

Ward 7. 

Edwin F. Jones. 
Frank B. Potter. 

Ward 8. 

Josiah G. Dearborn. 
Timothy J. Howard. 



George M. True, ex officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



9 



ASSESSORS. 

George W. Weeks, Chairman. 

David 0. Furnald, Clerk. 
Charles H. Brown. Patrick A. Devine. 

John E. Stearns. George II. Dudley. 

David O. Furnald. Frank B. Potter. 

George W. Weeks. Pius Brown. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 



Charles H. Warren. Thomas Howe. 

John E. Stearns. Isaac Whittemore. 

David O. Furnald. Edwin F. Jones. 

Harrison D. Lord. Charles W. Quimby. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Hon. Geo. H. Stearns, ex-officio Chmrman. 
William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 

William H. Maxwell. Thomas P. Conway. 

Thomas L. Quimby. Charles Francis. 

James SutclifFe. Elbridge G. Woodman. 

Horace Gordon. William Weber. 

(Meet third Wednesday of each month). 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 
Fred S. Bean, Clerk. 

Orrin E. Kimball. Horatio Fradd. 

James F. Pherson. Fred S. Bean. 



10 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 
James A. Weston, Clerk. 

William P. Newell.* Alpheas Gay. 

James A. Weston. Andrew C. Wallace. 

Eben T. James. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

Joseph F. Kennard.t George H. Stearns, ex oficio. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY, 



Nathan P. Hunt. Isaac W. Smith. 

William P. Newell. Moody Currier. 

Daniel Clark. Lucien B. Clough. 

Thomas L. Livermore. George H. Stearns, ex officio. 
George M. True, ex officio. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Mrs. M. J. Puncher. 



Dist. 

1. Charles E. Quimby. 

2. William' Sanborn, 

3. Edwin Kennedy. 

4. Ira W. Moore. 

5. John H. Willey. 

6. Samuel B. Dickey. 

13. John H. Giddings. 



HWAY SURVEYORS. 




Dist 

7. 


Peter 0. Woodman 


8. 


.loshua 


Page. 


9. 


Nelson 


W. Page. 


10. 


Charles 


, 0. Phelps. 


11. 


James 


E. Bailey, 


12. 


Jeremiah Garvin. 



* Died. 

t Elected to fill vaeancj'. 



11 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



D. O. Furnald, Hiram Stearns, for four years. 
H. H. Huse, G. P. Whitman, for three years. 
James A, Weston, John E. Stearns, for two years. 
George C. Gilmore, Bushrocl W. Hill, for one year. 



SUB-TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Valley. — Alderman McCrillis; Messrs. Gilmore, Hill, 
and Furnald. 

Pine Grove. — Alderman Cannon; Messrs. Bacon, 
Huse, Wliitman, and Weston. 

Amoskeag. — Frank 0. Clement; Messrs. Hiram Stearns 
and John E. Stearns. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Hon. James A. Weston, Chairman. 

Hon. Person C. Cheney. 

Hon. George H. Stearns, ex officio. 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

C. B. Littleiield. 



12 

WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 

Ward 1. — Augustus Savory. 
Ward 2. — George M. True. 

Ward 3. — William A. Carpenter. 
Ward 4. — Hiram Hill. 

Ward 5. — John F. Sullivan. 

Ward 6. — George Holbrook. 
Ward 7. — Frank B. Potter. 
Wards. — Geo. W. Goffe. 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Abial W. Eastman. 
Ward 2. — Charles E. Quimby. 
Ward 3. — Frank W. Garland. 

Ward 4. —Alfred L. F. Geoffroy. 
Ward 5. — John Looney. 

Ward 6. — Walter S. Heath. 

Ward 7. — Ernest B. Philbrick. 
Ward 8. — John J. McGovern. 

Selecdmen. 
Ward 1. Ward 2. 

George C. Kemp. George H. Colby. 

Henry P. Hunter. Jesse B. Nourse. 

James M. Chase. Kirk C. Bartlett. 

Ward 3. Ward 4. 

David Thayer. Charles F. Garland. 

George C. Lord. George B. Forsaith. 

Charles Atherton. Louis D. Goodwin. 



13 



Ward 5. 

Jeremiah J. Hayes. 
Felix M. Boire. 
John J. Mintiirn. 



Ward 6. 

Edwin :N^. Baker. 
Joseph Quirin. 
Georare H. Benton. 



Ward 7. 

Clarence M. Woodbury, 
Alonzo P. Hall. 
Edson Wyman. 



Ward 8. 

Henry Hebert. 

Eugene C. Smith. 
Abel M. Keniston. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



GEORGE H. STEARICS, Mayor, ex officio. 

Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1887. 
James A. "Weston, term expires January, 1891. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January, 1890. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1892. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January, 1888. 
Edwin H. Hobbs, term expires January, 1889. 



OFFICERS. 



Alpheus Gay, President. 

James A. Weston, Clerk. 

Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Charles C. Cole, Engineer at Pumping Station. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Board of "Water CommissionerB 
herewith present their fourteenth annual report, covering 
the annual report of the superintendent to this board, 
which contains a detailed statement of the operations of 
this department of the city service for the year ending 
December 31, 1885. 

The total income of the water-works for this period of 
time has been eighty thousand four hundred four dollars 
and twelve cents (|80,404.12); the current expense of 
operating and maintaining the works has been fifteen 
thousand one hundred sixty-nine dollars and twenty-seven 
cents ($15,169.27) ; leaving, as net receipts, the sum of 
sixty-five thousand two hundred thirty-four dollars and 
eighty-five cents ($65,234.85). This is an excess of the 
net receipts of the previous year by five hundred thirty- 
three dollars and fourteen cents ($533.14), notwithstanding 
a reduction in the charge for public fire-hydrants from 
sixty dollars ($60.00) to fifty dollars ($50.00) per annum 
each. A further reduction in the water rates, referred to 
in the last annual report, has been made, to take effect 



18 

January 1, 1886, by which it is estimated that the yearly 
revenue will be reduced about fifteen thousand dollars 
($15,000). The rates are now among the very lowest in 
Kew England. 

By reason of the increased quantity of water required 
to be raised into the reservoir, and the waning power of 
the present pumps, which have been in constant use since 
the construction of the works, it has become necessary to 
take immediate steps to furnish additional pumping facili- 
ties. This may be done by improving the present pumps 
or by purchasing additional ones, for which there is 
ample space in the present building. 

Proposals have been in\dted for the work to be done by 
the dift'erent methods proposed, and an early decision 
will be reached, as a due regard for the safety and efficiency 
of the works and the protection of our citizens will not 
permit action to be longer delayed. It is estimated that 
.an expenditure of about ten thousand dollars ($10,000) 
will be required if it should be decided to provide new 
pumps. 

For a more particular statement as to the condition and 
operations of this department, you are respectfully re- 
ferred to the accompanying report of the superintendent. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, Chairman, 
GEORGE H. STEARNS, Mayor, 
A. C. WALLACE, 
E. T. JAMES, 
E. H. HOBBS, 
JOSEPH F. KENNARD, 
JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1886. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the 
City of Manchester: — 

I have the honor to submit my tenth annual report, 
showing the operations of the works during the year 1885. 

MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water in Massabesic lake has averaged higher than 
it has for several years past, and it froze over two feet 
higher than last year. 

i^o repairs have been required on the dam, canal, pen- 
stock, or reservoir ; but the northeast corner of the gate- 
house will have to be taken down and laid over soon. 
The cracks in the masonry of this building are growing 
wdder, and the repairs should be made the coming spring. 

PUMPING STATION. 

The repairs at the pumping station amount to $272, 
which was mostly incurred in painting the buildings and 
fences. 

Four years ago last June one of the valve chambers 
cracked, and it was patched up and used about a year when 
a new one was put in. On the seventh day of last l^To- 
vember this one cracked in the same place, notwithstand- 
ing this part was made thicker in the fasting. Another 
was ordered, and it will probably be delivered in three or 
four weeks. In the meantime the one now in use will 



20 



answer all purposes, as it has been temporarily repaired. 

It takes a little more power than one wheel supplies to 
carry the pumps up to fifteen or sixteen strokes per minute, 
which is about the average running of the pumps. Till 
within about a year one wheel was sufficient ; now one 
wheel will run the pumps only 111 strokes per minute. 
"We are unable to find any cause for this, but it is possible 
that the teeth are worn in the cog-wheels and bevel gears, 
which makes the difierence. The wheels and steps have 
been examined and appear all right. 

The following is the amount pumped each month during 
the year 1885 : — 



RECORD OF PUMPING IN 1885. 



MONTHS. 



January.... 
Februai-y... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August — 
September , 

October 

November.. 
December. 



— o 

0.2 
S5 



803 h. 20 m. 



Totals and average. 8,696 h 



754 
649 
720 
746 
786 
736 
710 
659 
635 
684 



30 
20 
20 
40 
30 
30 
30 
20 
10 
50 



m 9 






14.76 
16.18 
16.43 
15.63 
14.47 
16.65 
17.11 
16.41 
15.97 
16.13 
16.32 
16.62 



16.06 



« 5 

p «> . 

o <» P 

H 



711,566 
785,462 
743,684 
608,928 
642,798 
756,016 
807,286 
725,486 
681,076 
638,320 
621,973 
681,956 



8,404,550 



?55 

Its 

S tn S 



44,828,658 
49,484,106 
46,852,092 
38,362,464 
40,496,274 
47,629,008 
50,859,018 
45,705,618 
42,907,788 
40,214,160 
39,184,236 
42,963,228 



529,486,650 



be a) 

d p, 

«g 

ej p, 
in 

ei SO 
Q 



1,446,085 
1,767,290 
1,511,358 
1,278,738 
1,306,331 
1,587,633 
1,640,613 
1,474,375 
1,430,259 
1,397,231 
1,306,141 
1,385,910 



1,452,664 



21 

You will see by the table that 58,000,000 gallons more 
water have been pumped the past season than ever before. 
You will also notice that the daily average for February 
was 1,767,290 gallons, and for July 1,640,613 gallons; 
little more than 100,000 gallons pumped each day for the 
month of February than for July. 

For two previous years 34,000,000 were pumped in 
the month of February, this year over 49,000,000, mak- 
ing the increase 15,000,000. It is evident that this extra 
amount was nearly all wasted by letting the water run to 
keep it from freezing. 

It is hard to make the average citizen believe but that 
it is just as well to let the water run a little to keep it 
from freezing as it is to shut it oif in the cellar. The 
idea is that there is water enough in the lake and it does 
not cost anything to pump it, and until some rigid means 
fre adopted to stop this waste it will increase. 

The following tigures will show what would.be wasted 
on Elna street out of an orifice iV to -^ inch, if allowed to 
run one month : — 

One sixteenth inch, 36,720 gallons ; one eighth inch, 
146,880 gallons ; one fourth inch, 587,520 gallons ; one 
half inch, 2,354,400 gallons. 

FORCE AND SUPPLY MAIN. 

The force main seems to be in good condition except- 
ing that portion which lies through the Dickey sw^amp in 
Cohas avenue. This has been repaired every year for the 
last ten years, and it still leaks. It is only a question of 
time when this part will have to be laid over. 

The new supply main on Valley street, that was begun 
last year, has been laid, and connected with the old main 



22 

at the Mammoth road, with the idea that at some future 
time it will be extended to the reservoir. This makes 
two supply mains from this point to the fourteen-inch 
pipe on Elm street ; distance, 9,442 feet. The cost of the 
new main from the jail, wheref it connects with the cement 
pipe laid in 1876, is $18,860. The whole cost to Elm 
street is $19,000. 

The advantage of having this second main has been 
tested, for we have had to make the connection with the 
cast-iron which was laid over the brook, corner of Park 
and Massabesic streets, two years ago, on account of leaks. 

In making this change it took two days. One day the 
city was supplied by the Valley-street line alone, with a 
loss of three pounds' pressure, reckoning from the stand- 
ard of the old line. It has averaged from one to two 
pounds higher with both lines running, and when the 
new main is connected at Wilson and Beech streets the 
pressure ,will be the same on both lines. The size of the 
pipe on Valley street is twelve inches from Elm to- Beech, 
fourteen inches from Beech to "Wilson, and twenty inches 
from Wilson to the Mammoth road. If any pipe was to 
be laid on Valley street to supply the hydrants and dwell- 
ing-houses, you would not lay less than twelve-inch, so 
that the extra size pipe from Wilson street would cost 
about $8,000. This makes a main line equal to the old 
one for supplying the city with water in case of fire while 
repairing the old main. 



DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

The water pipe extended in the year 1885 was laid in 
the following streets : A, Adams, Bowman, Blaine, Beech, 
Belmont, Bacon, Beauport, Dunbarton road. East High 



23 

street, Front, Laurel, North, Williams, Wayne, Young, 
Valley, and Massabesic, making eighteen different streets ; 
the amount laid, 12,318 feet, about two and a third miles, 
at an expense of $17,375. 

The excavation for the Laurel-street extension was the 
most expensive. It was mostly solid rock, the distance 
765 feet. The estimated cost was $2,000 ; the actual cost 
was $1,710. 

While the greater part of the old cement-lined pipe is 
in good condition, there are some streets where it will be 
necessary soon to lay it over. It will not do to run much 
risk in places where the pipe looks bad, for a burst in the 
winter is liable to do damage enough to relay a good 
many feet of pipe. We have had fourteen bursts the past 
year wdiere cement pipe has been taken out and cast-iron 
put in its place. All but four have been when the ground 
was not frozen, and no damage was done. On Auburn 
and Chestnut streets, where the breaks occurred in the 
months of February and March, when the ground was 
frozen four feet or more, the water ran into the cellars 
before it got through the frost. The damages were set- 
tled and paid for right away, and to the satisfaction of the 
persons damaged. 

When the present superintendent took charge of the 
works, March 1, 1875, there were already laid 23^1^ miles 
of pipe, 215 hydrants, and 625 services. Now there are 
45 i^'o miles of pipe, 389 hydrants, 2,630 services. That 
year the income was $27,119.15; this year we have col- 
lected $80,404.12. You will see by the above that we 
have about double the amount of distribution pipe, and 
four times as many service pipes, 174 more hydrants, and 
collected nearly three times the amount of money in the 
year 1885 as we did in the year 1875. During this time 
$305,000 have been taken to pay interest on the bonds, and 



24 

the remainder, besides what is now in the city treasury, 
has been used for repairs, laying pipe, and running 
expenses. 

Tiie question has been frequently asked by people liv- 
ing near some of the bad breaks, if we have not about 
all of the old cement pipe taken out. Now, for the infor- 
mation of the public, the superintendent w\\\ say that there 
are twenty-seven miles of cement pipe, and that only 
about 1,000 feet have been laid over since the Avorks were 
constructed. 

The superintendent will take the liberty in this part of 
the report to express his sincere thanks for. the confidence 
and support received from your honorable board during 
the ten years past, and desires to congratulate our citizens 
on having one of the best systems of water-works in the 
United States, considering the cost. 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET IN 1885. 

A near N"o. 73. 

A corner B. 

Beacon corner Merrimack. 

Belmont near ^o. 345. 

Dunbarton road corner Front. 

Dunbarton road near L. D. Colby's house. 

East High corner South. 

East High, fifty feet east of Wilson road. 

Laurel corner Milton. 

Laurel corner Beacon. 

ISTorth corner Pine. 

Valley corner Taylor. 

Valley corner Cypress. 

Valley corner Jewett. 



25 



Valley, one hundred and fifty feet east of John Wood- 
man's house. 
Wayne near G. Belisle's house. 



Young corner Beech. 



Young, ninety-six feet east of E. N. Batchelder's house. 

The following places are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken out and cast-iron pipe laid instead : — 



Streets, 


Length in feet. 


Location. 






12 in. 


1 
10 in. 8 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 














18 
16 
16 
30 
16 
15 


8 
8 














Front of No 11'' 


Bedford 












Brook 
























Canal 










Hydrant, front Locomo. Wks. 
























Opposite No. 172. 
























10 
50 
8 
8 
31 
S 
8 
8 
8 




























HoUis 


































Thirty feet east of Pine. 


















■ 
















Opposite Baldwin's Mill. 




54 












8 








Opposite Emerson's. 
Opposite stand-pipe. 


Milford 








7 


'is' 
































54 




8 




265i 


39 


Total number of feet, 366J. 



26 



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30 



PIPES AKD FIXTURES LAID IN 1885. 



Streets. 


Length in feet laid. 


F^ 


Gates set. 


Location. 




20 in. 


12 in. 


Sin. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


■5 

a 


20 in. 


12 in. 


6in. 


4 in. 




A 








751 
CO 




2 










To B street. 


















To Beauport. 


















1 








524 












1 


Valley to Young. 








435 
576 
978 




1 
























Adams to Temple. 

Valley, north and 
cor. Massabesic. 












1 






2 

1 
1 




Birch 




















255 










Bridge. 










250 








To A. 










































1 
1 


over. 










1210 
1104 




2 
2 






Front to L. D. 














Colby's. 








778 










land. 


















1 














765 




2 




















1 




West side of Pine. 


Massabesic 

North 


716 
2311 










1 

4 
1 






Valley to school - 

house. 
West side of Pine, 


206 




8 

48 

404 


208 








Valley 


1 




1 




eastward. 
To Hallsville 








schoolhouse. 
To 6. Belisle's 
















I 


house. 
Milford, northw'd. 










739 


o 






1 


Beech, westward. 


















3027 


730 


778 


7333 


458 


18 


2 


1 


11 


2 


Total, 12,326 feet 
laid in 1885. 



ITumber miles pipe laid, 1885 
" gates set " . 

" hydrants set " • 



2.33 
16 

18 



31 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1885. 



Size. 


Cement-hned pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20 inch diameter 


20,573.90 ft. 


4,822.00 ft. 


7 


14 inch diameter 


6,825.00 ' 


7,598.00 " 


11 


12 inch diameter 


8,118.00 '• 


10,872.00 " 


20 


10 inch diameter 


5,015.75 " 


9,748.00 " 


14 


8 inch diameter 


12,563.00 " 


8,800.00 " 


32 


6 inch diameter 


82,081.50 " 


51,691.00 " 


224 


4 inch diameter 


8,553.00 " 


4,981.00 " 


24 




143,730.15 ft. 


98,512.00 ft. 


332 



27.221 miles of cement-lined pipe. 
18.655 " " cast-iron pipe. 



45.875 " " cast-iron and cement-lined pipe. 



332 gates. 
389 hydrants. 
7 air-valves. 



METERS. 



There have been set during the year fifty-six (56) 
meters, making in all four hundred and eighty-six (486). 

The number of applications for water to date have 
been twenty-seven hundred and seventy-two (2,772). 



SERVICE PIPES. 



One hundred and forty-four (144) service pipes have 
been laid this year; as follows : — 
142 1 inch diameter 3,474.5 feet. 

2 2" " 34.0 " 



Length of service pipe laid in 1885, 3,508.5 feet. 



32 



Two three-quarter inch service pipes fifty-nine and 
three tenths feet in length have been relaicl, with sixty 
feet of one and a half inch pipe. 

Twenty-six hundred and twenty (2,620) service pipes 



have been laid to date, as follows : 


— 




40 J inch diameter . 




860.7 feet. 


1,783 1 " " . . 




46,887.4 " 


734 1 " " . . 




19,204.5 " 


20 IJ " " . . 




1,188.9 " 


4 11 " " . . 




133.0 " 


33 2 " " . . 




829.2 " 


6 4" " . . 




172.0 " 


Total length of service pipe 


69,275.7 feet. 


Kumber of miles of service pipe, 


13.11. 




The income from the sale of water 


for 18 


85 has been as 


follows : — 






Received for water by rate . . $ 


52,497 


02 


" " " " meter 


25,729 


90 


" " rent of meters . 


1,695 


45 


" " fines 


186 


80 


" " setting meters 


168 


00 


" " building purposes . . 


102 


50 


" " labor and pipe sold . 


13 


45 


" • of B. P. Kendall (for 






grass) 


10 


00 


" of G. G. Griflin . 


1 


00 



Total . 
Abatements, $402.90. 



,404 12 



33 



Current expenses for 1885 . . $15,169 27 

Construction expenses for 1885 . 26,383 51 

Eetained by city for interest . 38,000 00 

Total expended . . . $79,502 78 



Receipts over expenditures . 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1881 



$901 34 
27,157 43 



Balance Dec. 31, 1885 . $28,058 77 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1885. 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs .... 
Stationer}' and printing 
Office and incidental expenses 



Pumping expenses 
Repairs to buildings 



Running expenses for 1885 
Service pipes . 
Distribution pipes . 
Fire-hydrants and valves 
Meters and fittings . 
Land and water rights . 

Expended on construction, 

1885 . . . . 

Total ex]:)ended in 1885 

3 



$8,389 


51 




80 


46 




4,639 


25 






SSI 3 109 


22 




(fP J- *J. JL V %' 


^^ 


11,788.03 




272 


.02 






,«9 060 


05 






\JO 




$15,169 27 


$1,516 35 




21,110 


69 




1,124 


88 




1,093 


07 




1,488 


52 






$26,333 51 




$41,502 


78 



34 



Land and water rights . 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 

Pumping machinery, pump-house 

and buildings 
Distributing reservoir and fixtures 
Porce and supply main 
Distribution pipes 
Fire-hydrants and valves 
Tools and fixtures 
Boarding and store houses . 
Roads and culverts 
Supplies .... 
Engineering 

Livery and traveling expenses 
Legal expenses 
Grading and fencing . 
Service pipes 
Meters and fixtures 



),132 45 
101,399 16 

88,493 96 
71,542 36 
88,674 02 
319,558 16 
35,987 29 
10,649 35 

919 36 
2,193 49 

550 39 

22,176 19 

2,856 64 

563 79 
12,343 50 
38,777 38 
14,505 31 



Total construction account 
to Dec. 31, 1885 . 

Current expenses : — 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs .... 
Stationery, printing, etc 
Office and incidental expenses 
Pumping expenses and repairs 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 

reservoir 
Repairs to buildings 

Current expenses to Dec 
31, 1885 



$851,322 80 



. 181,739 


52 


. 4,496 


84 


. 9,714 


12 


. 18,792 

rl 


30 


u 

. 1,770 


75 


589 


73 


'• 


$117,103 26 



35 



Interest $40,678 51 

Highway expenditures . . . 14,000 53 



$54,679 04 



Total amount of bills ap- 
proved to date . . $1,023,105 10 

Interest, discount, and labor per- 
formed on highways, trans., 
and tools and materials sold . $60,135 99 

(Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1885 117,103 26 

$177,239 25 

Total cost, exclusive of inter- 
est and current expenses . $845,865 85 
Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1884 .... $417,877 51 
Interest for 1885 . . . . 36,093 00 



Total interest and discount 

to Dec. 31, 1885 . . $453,970 51 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31, 1884 . . $267,000 00 

Amount used by city in 1885 . 38,000 00 



Total $305,000 00 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
^treasurer, and credited to the water-works: — 

1872, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . $573 61 

1873, supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 177 07 

accrued interest on 

water bonds sold . 193 2 



36 







1873, accrued interest on 








state bonds sold . 


$146 00- 






water rents 


1,920 53 






1874, supplies and mate- 








rials sold 


607 89' 


March 12, 


1874, highway expendi- 








tures, trans, from 








water account 


14,000 53 


March 17, 


1874, interest and dis- 








count, trans, from 








water account 


12,347 25 


Sept. 


1, 


1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 








water account 


22,361 74 






1874, water and hydrant 








rent, etc. 


30,233 54 


Dec. 


29, 


1874, interest trans- 








ferred . 


4,566 25 


Dec. 


18, 


1875, one anvil sold 


15 00 


Sept. 


25, 


1875, engine, crusher. 








and material sold . 


2,089 45- 






1875, water and hydrant 








rent, etc. 


27,119 15 


May 


20, 


1876, derrick sold 


125 00 


May 


20, 


1876, rent of derrick . 
1875, water and hydrant 


24 00 






rent, etc. 


38,879 47 






1877, water and hydrant 








rent, etc. 


43,823 3a 






1878, water and hydrant 








rent, etc. 


48,873 26 






old plow sold . 


1 00 






1879, derrick sold 


75 00 



37 



1879, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. . ! 


^52,068 17 


1880, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


57,395 25 


sale of grass 


10 00 


level, transit, etc. 


250 00 


1881 , water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


60,164 62 


sale of grass . 


10 00 


sale of derrick 


50 00 


received of G. G. 




Griffin 


1 00 


1882, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


67,403 76 


received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1 00 


1882, received of James 




Baldwin & Co. 


175 00 


received from the sale 




of grass 


10 00 


received from Good- 




hue & Birnie 


24 37 


received for old plank 


1 00 


received for use of 




derrick 


15 00 


1883, received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1 00 


received from sale of 




grass 


20 00 


water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


73,437 20 


1884, received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1 00 


received for stone 


5 00 



38 

1884, received from sale of 

grass ... 110 00 
received from pipe 

sold and labor . 616 20 
received for water 

and hydrant rent . 74,947 88 
1885, received from G. 

G. Griffin . . 1 00 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass . . . 10 00 

labor and pipe sold , 13 45 

received for water 

and hydrant rent . 80,379 67 



Total received for water, etc. . $716,163 87 

Amount appropriated to date . 640,000 00 



Amount received to date . $1,356,168 87 

Amount of bills approved to date 1,023,105 10 



$333,058 77 
Amount transferred toward interest 305,000 00 



Balance onhand,Dec. 31, 1885 $28,058 77 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

SujperintendenL 



39 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


3 Cemeteries. 


13 Churches. 


1 Orphanage. 


1 Court-house. 


1 Post-office. 


5 Hose companies. 


1 City Library. 


4 Fire-engines. 


5 Banks. 


1 Hook-and-ladder. 


4 Hotels. 


2 Opera-houses. 


1 Masonic Hall. 


1 Music HalL 


1 Odd Fellows' HalL 


1 Convent. 


1 Holly-Tree Inn. 


1 City HospitaL 


3 Halls. 


1 Old Ladies' Home, 


22 Schoolhouses. 


1 Soldiers' Monument. 


1 Battery Building. 


1 Turner Hall. 


1 Skating Rink. 


MANUFACTURING 


ESTABLISHMENTS. 


1 Silver-plating. 


2 Sash and blind shops. 


1 Iron foundry. 


1 Brewery. 


2 Dye-houses. 


2 Shoe-shops. 


2 Machine-shops. 


1 Pop-corn. 


6 Clothing manufactories. 


1 Gas-works. 


4 Harness-shops. 


4 Slaughter-houses. 


1 Brush-shop. 


1 Soap manufactory. 


3 Carriage-shops. 


2 ITeedle manufactories, 


4 Cigar. 


2 Beer-bottling. 


1 Brass and copper foundry. 1 Book-bindery. 


1 Locomotive-works. 


1 Paper-mill. 


MARKETS. 


6 Fish. 


2 Meat (wholesale). 


9 Meat and fish. 





40 





STABLES. 


84 Private. 


14 Livery. 


1 Horse-railroad. 






OFFICES. 


8 Dentists. 


8 Printing. 


1 Telephone. 


1 Gas. 


1 Telegra})li. 


3 Coal. 


2 Express. 






SHOPS. 


22 Barber. 


2 Currying. 


1 Wheelright. 


4 Plumber and gas anc 


9 Blacksmith. 


water pipe. 


5 Carpenter. 


8 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 


1 Gunsmith. 




STORES. 


4 Auction. 


71 Grocery. 


20 Drug. 


5 Meal. 


9 Jewel r}-. 


3 Hardware. 


1 Fur. 


18 Boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing g< 


3ods. 8 Stove. 


21 Fancy goods. 


15 Gents' furnishing goods 


1 Wholesale paper. 


10 Book. 


5 Wholesale produce. 


1 Leather and slioe-iinders 


15 Dry goods. 


3 Music. 


12 Candy. 


3 L^pliolstery. 


1 Cloak. 


5 Undertakers. 


15 Millinery. 


5 Sewing-machine. 


2 Tea. 


1 Feather-cleaner. 


2 Furniture. 





41 



10 Dining. 
6 Billiard. 



SALOONS. 

67 Liquor. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



6 Club-rooms. 
2 Bleacheries. 

8 Laundries. 
2 Ice-houses. 

9 Photographers. 



3 Greenhouses. 
1 Band-room. 
12 Bakeries. 
1 Waste. 



AVATER FIXTURES, ETC. 



•6199 Families. 

90 Boarding-houses. 
7579 Faucets. 
1036 Wash-bowls. 
1195 Water-closets. 

306 Wash-tubs. 

382 Bath-tubs. 



114 Urinals. 
1481 Sill-cocks. 
389 Fire-hydrants. 
26 Stand-pipes.* 
17 Water-troughs. 
1352 Horses. 
42 Cattle. 



2 Drinking fountains. 



42 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 



BRANCHES. 



4 double 6 on 12. 
2 double 6 on 8. 
8 double 6 on 10. 
2 double 4 on 6. 
4 single 6 on 12. 



13 single 6 on 6. 
2 single 10 on 10'. 

1 single 6 on 20. 
4 single 6 on 10. 

2 single 8 on 8. 



2 single 6 on 


14. 


1 single 12 on 14, 


3 single 6 on 


4. 


REDUCERS. 


1 14 by 12. 




2 by 12 by 6.. 


1 6 by 4. 




WHOLE SLEEVES. 


2 20 in. 




9 4 in. 


3 12 in. 




4 14 in.. 


9 6 in. 




CLAMP SLEEVES.. 


4 20 in. 




3 14 in. 


4 12 in. 




3 10 in. 


4 Sin. 




8 6 in. 


2 4 in. 




BENDS. 



1 6 in. 1-4 bend. 
1 12 in. 1-8 bend. 



8 6 in. 1-8 bend. 
1 14 in. 1-8 bend. 



708 ft. 20 in. 
348 ft. 14 in. 



PIPE. 



220 ft. 2 in. 
865 ft. 3-4 in. 



43 



723 ft. 12 in. 
1380 ft. 10 in. 
1200 ft. 6 in. 
1200 ft. 4 in. 



588 ft. 8 in. 
480 ft.. 1 in. 
600 lbs. lead pipe. 
700 lbs. lead pipe. 



2 4 in. Ludlow hub. 
2 12 in. cast-iron plugs. 
4 6 in. cast-iron plugs. 



GATES. 



6 cast-iron gate domes.- 
1 6 in. Ludlow spigot. 
8 6 in. coffin valve hub; 



INVENTORY OP TOOLS AT THE PUMPING STATION. 



1 scoop-shovel. 


2 axes. 


4 common shovels. 


4 oil-cans. 


1 desk. 


2 oil-tanks. 


1 one-inch auger. 


75 pounds of waste. 


5 lanterns. 


10 pounds black lead.. 


3 monkey-wrenches. 


1 cord of wood. 


1 square. 


14 tons of coal. 


1 plumb square. 


2 ice-chisels. 


1 sprinkler-pot. 


2 cold chiseisi 


1 clock. 


2 wood-chisels. 


1 washer-cutter. 


2 hammers. 


2 planes. 


3 drip-pans. 


1 thermometer. 


1 two-inch auger. 


1 lawn-mower. 


1 ten-inch arbor for bab- 


1 socket-wrench. 


bitting. 


6 fork wrenches. 


1 flash-board hook. 


2 screen-rakes. 


2 brooms. 


4 crow-bars. 


2 sets blocks and falls. 


1 bellows and anvil. 


6 pounds hemp packing.. 


2 pipe-wrenches. 


1 draw-shave. 


1 window-brush. 


2 screw plates, taps, and 


1 gate-wrench. 


dies. 



44 



1 long key. 
1 hydrant wrench. 
1 wheelbarrow. 
1 five-pail kettle. 
3 picks. 

1 clothes-dryer. 

2 ladders. 
2 sto\ es. 
-3 coal-hods. 

1 coal-sifter. 

2 gallons sperm oil. 

1 bench. 

2 levels. 
1 waste-press. 

1 Scotch driller. 

2 nozzles. 
1 pair shears. 
1 pair pliers. 
1 wire-cutter.. 
1 boat. 
1 set steps. 
|- barrel oil. 
1 jack-screw. 
1 brace and six bits. 

1 trowel. 

2 wood-saws. 
1 iron slush-bucket- 
1 grass sickle. 
;2 dust-brushes. 

^ sets of gate screws (brass), with mats and cases for the 
same. 



1 vise. 

200 feet 7-8 inch hose. 

2 sets dog-chains. 

1 bushel basket. 

2 pieces Scotch sewer- 

pipe. 
1 force-pump. 
1 bill-hook. 
1 clevis and pin. 
1 harrow. 
1 timber-roll. 
4 kSprinkling-pots. 
1 lot lumber. 
1 lot old iron. 
4 oil barrels. 
4 mortar hoes. 
1 iron shovel. 
150 feet hose. 

1 jSTo. 5 plow. 

3 grub-hoes. 

3 bush-scythes and snaths. 

2 axes. 

10 mason hods. 
1 lot of old wheelbarrows. 

1 lot of old shovels. 

2 hand-saws. 

2 scythes (grass). 
1 tape line. 



45 

WATER RATES, MAI^CHESTER WATER-WORKS, 

Adopted December 3, 1885. 

The Total of Rates Collectible from Each Service 
PIPE Shall be at Least §5.00 Per Annum. 



annual domestic water rates. 

Family not exceeding five persons for one faucet 
Two families or more on one service (same owner), 

one faucet to each family, each 
Each additional person in family, above five, each 
Mealers, each ....... 

Roomers, each ....... 

Each additional faucet, not required for a set 

fixture, hereinafter enumerated, ten per cent 

additional. 
There will be additional charges to each family 

for set fixtures, as follows : — 
Wash-bowl, each 
Bath-tub, each . 
Pan water-closet, each 
Hopper water-closet, each 
Set wash-tubs, each . 
Urinal, with self-closing valve, each 
Duplicate of above fixtures one half rate each. 
When the above fixtures are used by more than 

one family, each additional family one half 

rates. 
Boarding-houses exceeding twelve persons hav- 
ing the above fixtures, twice the rates.. 



15 00' 

4 50- 
50 
25 
2& 



1 m 

2 50 
2 50 
5 OO 
1 00 
1 00' 



46 



HOSE. 

For hand-hose in connection with house or store 
supply, for sprinkling gardens and washing 
windows (^ inch nozzle) . . . $2 to $12 00 

Use of hose at above rates limited to two hours 
per day. 

Private stable in connection with house supply, 

each horse 2 00 

Private stable, neat cattle, each head . . 1 00 

Provided, however, that the total rate of any 
stable shall not be less than two dollars, in 
connection with house supply, or five dollars 
otherwise. 

Private fire-plug, to be used only in case of fire, 
of the public hydrant pattern, and accessible 
to the fire department, shall be free. 

ANNUAL PUBLIC AND COMMERCIAL WATER RATES. 

Public wash-basins, each . . . . . $5 00 

Public urinals, each 5 00 

Public pan water-closets, each . . . . 6 00 

Public hopper water-closets, each . . . 12 00 

Public baths, each 6 00 

Public drinking-fountains, self-closing faucets, 

each ........ 6 00 

Public drinking-fountains, not self-closing faucets, 

each 12 00 

Public fire hydrants, each 50 00 

Public watering-troughs, each . . . . 50 00 
Stores, ordinary uses, not including jet or foun- 
tain $5 to 15 00 

Baths, water-closets, and urinals, in stores and 
>ofiices, same as -domestic rates. 



120 


00 


12 


00 


10 


00 


15 


00 


5 


00 




4J 


00 



47 

Dining-rooms or saloons, not including jet or 

fountain $8 to 

Bar-room . . . * . . . |6 to 
Professional and agency offices . . $5 to 
Photographic galleries . . . $8 to 

Barber shops, one chair, $3, each additional 

$1.50, provided no rate less than . 
Livery stable, each horse ..... 

builders' water rates. 

The cost of service pipe for building purposes 
will be charged, and must be paid in advance. 

Water for building purposes will, in all cases, 
be charged to the owners of property. Or- 
dinary houses and tenement blocks will be 
charged»ten cents per room for plastering, but 
in no case will the charge be less than two 
dollars. 

Water for each cask of lime or cement . . $0 10 

Water for other purposes connected with con- 
struction, per barrel ..... 4 

Industrial and mechanical water rates, steam 
engines, non-condensing, working not more 
than twelve hours per day, each horse-power 4 00 

METER RATES. 

For a continuous supply, per 100 cubic feet . | 15 
Pro^dded, however, that in no case where a meter 

is used, shall the annual charge be less than . 12 00 
One meter will be furnished and set near the 

cellar wall free of charge. 
Rates not stated above to be meter or special 

rates- 



48 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

1. Application. Applications for water must be-, 
made at the water commissioners' office, and must be 
signed by the owner of the premises to be supplied, or by 
his duly authorized agent, and must state the uses for 
which the service is desired. 

2. Street mains. Water pipes will be extended on 
streets as per plan at the office, whenever the owners of 
property on said street will guarantee to pay each year 
six per cent on the total cost of laying the same. 

3. Valves. All valves for water-closets and urinals 
are to be self-closing, and must be submitted to, and ap- 
proved by, the inspector to the board. Boilers, if sup- 
plied direct from the main, are to be titted with vacuum 
valves. Tanks receiving water direct from the main are 
to be fitted with approved self-acting float valf es. 

There is to be a stop, with waste, at the inside of the 
cellar wall, or near where the service pipe enters the- 
premises, and in blocks a separate stop for each family, 
or tenant, which stops, when supplied by the commission- 
ers, shall be subject at all times to their control. The 
pipes within each building are to be so pitched that they 
may be fully drained at the waste. 

4. Plumbing. Water will be supplied only to pipes 
and fixtures that have been set up and completed, or 
examined and tested, by a plumber licensed by the com- 
missioners, and which have been fully enumerated and 
described in a report by said plumber to the commission- 
ers, and approved by the inspector. 

5. Plumber's report. Every plumber who shall set 
up any pipes or fixtures for the use of water from the city 
water-works, or shall make repairs upon, or additions to, 
pipes or fixtures already set up, shall, within two days 



49 

after the same shall be completed, iill up and return to 
the commissioners a report describing all fixtures, both 
old and new, for the use of water on the premises. 1*^0 
plumber shall let water on to any premises unless they 
are shown a receipted bill for the same or an order from 
the oifice. 

For any misrepresentation or omission in the statement 
of work done, or of work to which additions have been 
made, the plumber may be suspended and fined, and if 
such error appears to be willful, his license will be 
rievoked. 

6. Service pipes. The commissioners will furnish 
and lay a service pipe from the main pipe to the line of 
the property to be supplied, together with a stop, to be 
placed at the curb line. 

When no main pipe is opposite the a})plicant's premises, 
the commissioners will run only thirty-three feet of ser- 
vice pipe from the main in the street. 

7. Inspections. The inspector to the board must 
have access to, and be permitted at all times to inspect, all 
pipes, fixtures, and apparatus supplied with water, and to 
control the stop-cock in the cellar, as the interest of the 
works may require. 

8. Waste. 'No person supplied with water shall allow 
the same to run to waste to prevent freezing, or by leak, 
or shall introduce water into fixtures not named in his 
application, except on special agreement with the com- 
missioners and the payment of extra rates therefor, such 
as the commissioners shall assess. 

9. Fraudulent use of water. An unnecessary use 
or waste of water, or permitting the same to be used 
for any purpose not particularly specified in the applica- 
tion, will be deemed a fraudulent use, and will subject 
the offender to an immediate stoppage of water and the 



50 

payment of not less than double rates for sucli quantities 
as the inspector shall estimate to have been wasted or 
fraudulently used. 

1^0 water taker will be allowed to supply water to any 
other person or families, nor shall any person take or 
carry away water from any hydrant, watering-trough, or 
public fountain without the consent of the water com- 
missioners, nor after such consent has been withdrawn. 

10. Building purposes. Each owner or contractor 
using city water shall deposit at the water ofHce an amount 
sufficient to pay for the same at the place designated, pro- 
vided that in no case shall the amount be less than two 
dollars. 

11. Water rates payable. All water bills (except 
for building purposes) shall be due and payable at the 
commissioners' office quarterly, on the first day of each 
January, April, July, and October. Meter bills for 
last three months. Rate bills, three months in advance. 
Twenty cents will be added to all bills if not paid on or 
before the 20th of each month. If the bill remains un- 
paid thirty days after it is due, water may be shut off 
from the premises. 

12. Shutting off water. The commissioners re- 
serve the I'ight to shut off water after giving notice of 
their intention to do so, for the purpose of making exten- 
sions, alterations, or necessary "repairs ; and thev will shut 
off" water, without special notice, from an}- person who 
shall disregard the rules for its supply, neglect to pay the 
rates therefor promptly, or shall permit an unauthorized 
use of the water. Any person receiving water through a 
stop in common with another person, will be liable to 
have his supply shut oft' in consequence of a violation of 
the rules by the other person. 

13. Letting on avater. "When water has been shut 



51 

ofi for disregard of rules, non-payment of rates, or other 
offense, it shall not be turned on again until the commis- 
Bioners are satisfied there will be no further cause of com- 
plaint, and a sum of one dollar has been paid to them to 
cover the cost of shutting oif and letting on the water, in 
addition to such fine, not exceeding ten dollars, as the 
commissioners may impose. 

14. Street and yard sprinklers. Street sprinklers 
are to be used only in the morning before eight o'clock, 
and are not to be made a nuisance to either a neighbor 
or a passer-by. The sprinklers are to be used by hand 
only, and not adjusted upon supports of any kind, nor to 
be converted into jets, or used for wetting any area other 
than the one defined in the application therefor, and they 
will be allowed only in connection with premises using 
water for other purposes, or on payment of special rates. 

15. Hydrants and stop-cocks. 'No person shall open, 
or shall use water from, any public fire-hydrant without 
permission from proper authority, except in case of fire, 
or shall obstruct free access thereto, or shall open or dis- 
arrange any stop-cock or stop-cock curb, on penalty of 
twenty dollars. 

Private fire-plugs are to be used only for fire purposes. 

16. Injury to works. ]^o person shall divert water 
from, or pollute water running to or in, the lake, canal, 
reservoir, or mains, or shall move or injure any fixture 
or appurtenance belonging to the gates, canal, reservoir, 
or mains, without permission from proper authority, on 
penalty of fifty dollars. 

17. General fines. The penalty for disregard or 
violation of any of the above rules, when not otherwise 
specified, shall be, in addition to the shutting off" and with- 
holding the supply of water, five dollars. 

18. Meter rates. The commissioners will furnish 



52 

one meter to a service pipe and set it free of charge and 
keep it in repair, except it is injured or allowed to freeze 
by the occupant ; then the repairs will be charged to the 
owner of the premises. The commissioners reserve the 
right to put in a water meter and charge for measured 
water at meter rates, whenever they shall deem such 
action to be for the best interests of the city. 

Whenever a consumer shall deem his water rate, as- 
assessed, to be excessive, he may make application to the 
commissioners to set a meter for him and to supply him 
at a meter rate ; prodded, however, that in no case where a 
meter is used shall the annual charge be less than twelve 
dollars. 

If a meter gets out of order and fails to register, the 
consumer will be charged at the average daily consump- 
tion, as shown by the meter when in order. 

When water passes through a meter it may be used for 
any and all purposes. IN'o service pipes, however, will be 
allowed to be laid across a street. 

All water that passes through a meter will be charged 
for, whether used or wasted. 

All meters will be set by an employe of the commis- 
sioners, and shall not be moved or disturbed without 
permission fi'om the proper officer. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the City 
of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — |I hereby certify that I have examined 
the accounts of the Manchester Water- Works for the 
years 1884 and 1885, and find the same correctly cast and 
properly vouched. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL, 

Auditor. 
Manchester, X. H,, February, 1886, 



R'EPORT 

OF THE 

CITY ENGINEER 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Coun- 
cils : — 
Sirs, — The following is an accurate statement of the 

amount of work in the City Engineer's office, and the 

several highway districts of the city of Manchester, for 

the year ending December 31, 1885. 

Expenses of the office for the year 1885 : — 

For salary of city engineer 
salary of three assistants 
supplies for the office 
repairing instruments 
express on instruments . 
cleaning old office 
horseshoeing and repairs of 

wagon and harness 
express on street numbers 
twenty-five horse-car fares 



. 1,486 


42 


115 


25 


68 


60 


2 


30 


2 


25 


L 

58 


45 


1 


76 


1 


13 



Amount charged to water com- 
pau}- 



$2,736.16 



87 75 



Total cost of the 
office work 



regular 



$2,648 41 



58 



Expense for soldiers' monument 

For painting covering (last year) 
T. A. Lane, repairing piping 
For water .... 
gas .... 

Total ..... $91 87 

The amount of work done in the office during the year 
is as follows : — 



15 


50 


21 


65 


50 


00 


14 


72 



Number of orders tor surveys, — street lines and 



grades 



Number of orders for sewer and paving grades 



562 
103 



Total number of orders .... 665 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 21,418 feet,, 
equal to 4.06 miles. 

These profiles having three lines of levels on 
each street make a total distance actually 

leveled of 64,254 feet. 

Levels for sewer and other center profiles . 26,871 " 
Profiles of avenues. Pine Grove cemetery . 2,110 " 
Levels for accident suits .... 1,408 " 



Total 

Equal to 17.92 miles. 

Surveys of streets and street lines 
Surveys in Pine Grove cemetery . 
Surveys in Valley cemetery 
Surveys for accidents . . . . 


. 94,643 feet 

. 58,636 feet 
. 7,700 " 
. 3,226 " 
. 3,290 " 


Total surveys . , . . 
Equal to 13.8 miles. 


. 72,852 feet. 



59 



Street lines marked on around 



57,076 feet. 



Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove cem- 
etery 13,604 

Lines of lots and avenues, Valley cemeter}'^ . 5,021 

Lines of land purchased .... 3,500 



Total length of lines marked on ground 76,201 feet. 
Equal to 14.43 miles. 



Grades set for sidewalks 
Grades set for macadamizing 
Grades set for grading streets 
Grades set for gutters .... 
Grades for avenues, Pine Grove cemetery 
Grades for lots. Pine Grove cemetery . 
Grades for lots in Valley cemetery 
Grades set for curb .... 

Total length of grades set 
Equal to 8.86 miles. 



24,999 feeU 
1,098 
9,252 
4,204 
2,733 
1,445 
2,246 
804 



46,781 feet. 



BATTERS FOR RETAINING WALLS. 

Park street at foot of Cass street. 
Myrtle street east of Russell street. 

New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 
Old lots relaid in Pine Grove cemetery . 
Old lots relaid in Valley cemetery . 



106 
50 

18 

174 



Total cemetery lots laid out . 

Street numbers assigned and put on, 351. 

At the commencement of the year I was instructed by 
the mayor to investigate and make surveys of all locali- 
ties where suits were liable to be brought against the city. 



60 

"but more particularly in reference to accident suits. This 
work took up a large portion of our time during the win- 
ter season. 

Surveys made for suits ...... 19 

Cases investigated but not surveyed . . . .11 

Total suits investigated 30 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Adams street, from Main to Beauport street. 

Ash street, from Amherst to Myrtle street. 2 plans. 

Auburn street, from Beech to Maple street. 

Bath street, from River to Third street. 

Beauport street, from Wayne to Sullivan street. 

Belmont street, from Hanover to Bridge street. 2 
plans. 

Chestnut street, from Webster to Clarke street. 

Elm street, north side. Cedar to Auburn street. 

Hall street, from Hanover to Bridge street. 2 plans. 

Manchester street, from Elm to Lincoln street. 5 plans. 

Marion street, from McGregor to Main street. 

l!^orth street, from Elm to Pine street. 

Park street, from Beacon to Highland street. 

Pearl street, from Linden to Bridge street. 2 plans. 

Pine street, from Harrison to Peunacook street. 

Putnam street, from Maine to Beauport street. 

Third street, from School street to 'Squog river. 3 
plans. 

Wayne street, from Beauport street 650 feet westerly. 

Total plans and j^roiiles, 28. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

A street, from Boynton to B street. 
Adams street, from Main to Beauport street. 



61 

Amherst street, from Hall to Belmont street. 

Amory street, from McGregor to Beaiiport street. 

Arlington street, from Maple to Russell street. 

Ashland street, from Lowell to High street. 

Beaiiport street, from Wayne to Amory street. 

Belmont street, from Amherst to High street. 

Bridge street, from Nashua street westerly. 

Bridge street, from Elm to Russell street. 3 plans. 

Canal street, from Bridge to Webster street. 4 plans. 

Central south back street, from Wilson to Hall street. 

Chestnut west back street, from Cedar to Spruce street. 

Button street, from Amherst to Concord street. 

Hancock street, from River road to Concord Railroad, 

High street, from Nashua to Jane street. 

Jane street, from High to Lowell street. 

Lincoln street, from Hanover to Manchester street. 

Lowell north back street, from Birchfto Chestnut street. 

Main street, from West Hancock to Boynton street, 
2 plans. 

Main street, from Amory to McGregor street. 

McGregor street, from Wayne to Main street. 

Merrimack street, from Hall to Belmont street. 

Milton street, from Hanover to Merrimack street. 

Orange street, from Russell to Oak street. 

Putnam street, from Main to Beauport street. 

South street, from High to Lowell street. 

Union east back street, north of Pennacook street. 

Webster street, from River road to Union street. 2 
plans. 

West street, from Douglas to School street. 

West street, from Parker to Clinton street. 

Hanover street, from Wilson to Hall street. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 39. 



62 



PROFILES WITHOUT PLANS. 



Avenues in Pine Grove cemetery. 

Highland, "Woodside, and South avenues. Pine Grove. 

Front street, Amoskeag. 

Cypress street, from Massabesic to Valley street. 

Total profiles without plans, 4. 

CEMETERY PLANS. 

Pine Grove, lots south of Magnolia avenue. 
Pine Grove, lots west of Beech and north of Elmwood 
avenues. 

Pine Grove, avenues on Straw land. 
Valle}', proposed improvements at brook. 
Total cemetery plans, 4. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

A B and C streets, We^t Manchester. 
Bath street, River street to Third street. 
Bay street, Sagamore street to Webster street. 
Belmont street, Park street to Baker street. 
Boynton street, Main street to Bedford line. 
Main street. Granite street to Schuyler street. 
Marion street, McGregor street to Main street. 
Mast street. Main street to Old Bedford road. 
Monmouth street, McGregor street to Main street. 
Passage-way off Milford street, east of Riddle street. 
Prospect street, Russell street to Derry old line. 
Salmon street. Elm street to Pine street. 
Third street, School street to 'Squog river. 
Winter street, Main street to N'orth Weare Railroad. 
Total numbering plans, 14. 



63 



MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 



Back street west of Elm south of Munroe street. 

Beech street, plan for Mrs. Belmore's suit. 

Bridge street, plan for Shea suit. 

Hancock street, location of accident. 

Highland, Cass, and Cypress streets, Amherst to Valley 
: street. 

Lake Massabesic, copy of J. B. Sawyer's survey. 

Main street, location of the Rice accident. 

Manchester street, location of the Annis accident. 

Manchester street, location of the Beauvais accident. 

Maple street, land bought of H. P. Simpson. 

Mast road, land bought of G. W. Wilkins. 

Mast road, copy of J. B. Sawyer's plan of Wilkins's 
farm. 

Merrimack-square pond, proposed changes. 

Middle street, location of Stewart accident. 

Park street, Belmont street to J. Hall road. 

River road, at R. ^N". Whittemore's, Goffe's Falls. 

Spruce street, location of Pecor accident. 

Spruce street, land bought of A. D. Gooden. 

Young street. Elm to Wilson street, proposed lines. 

Miscellaneous plans, 19. 

WORKING PLANS NOT RETAINED IN OFFICE. 

Beacon street, Hanover to Laurel street. Profile. 
Bridge street, sewer template. 
Canal street, sewer template. 
City hall. City engineer's office. 
City farm, copy of, for S. N". Bell. 
Cypress and surrounding street for Shoe-Shop Com- 
pany. 

Engine-house, Vine street, proposed changes. 



64 

Hall street, Hanover to Park street. Profile. 

Highland street, Hanover to Park street. Tracing. 

Manchester street. Elm to Lincoln street. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, avenues of new part for com- 
mittee. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots at junction of St. John'& 
path and Laurel avenue. 2 plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots west of Azure avenue, for 
treasurer. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots at Autumn path and Willow 
avenue. 

River road, north, for city solicitor. 

Valley cemetery, proposed improvements. 

Total working plans, 17. 

MAPS. 

City of Manchester and town of Auburn, small map. 

City of Manchester and town of Auburn, for litho- 
graphing. 

Manchester, east of Mammoth road, and town of Au- 
burn, large map. 

Total number of maps, 3. 

Total of all plans made, 128. 

The back work in the oflice has not made much progress 
this year, on account of the large amount of work required 
for the Auburn and Lake Massabesic plans. Some idea 
of the magnitude of this work can be gathered from the 
fact that one of the plans has a superficial area of sixty- 
four square feet, and the total amount of the work was 
equal to the work of one man seventy-five days. This, of 
course, was so much time taken out of the regular busi- 
ness of the oflice, and prevented the back work being 
brought up to date, which I stated in my last report could 
be done. 



65 

Plans of all new highways laid out to December 31, 
1884, have been made in the city clerk's books of records. 
All sewers laid to the same date have been drawn in the 
city clerk's book of sewers and upon the sewer map in- 
this office. 

Surveys have been made for about twenty (20) plans 
and profiles, which will be made up during the winter. 
The index and catalogue of plans have been brought up 
to July 1, 1885 ; the index to level books, to November 4, 
1884; and the index to transit books, to January 31, 1885. 

GRADES ESTABLISHED. 

The following grades have been established during the 
year : — 

Adams street, from Main to Beauport street 
Ash street, from Amherst to Myrtle street . 
Auburn street, from Beech to Maple street . 
Bath street, from River to Third street 
Beauport street, from Wayne to Sullivan 

street 

Belmont street, from Hanover to Bridge 

street ....... 

Chestnut street, from Webster to Clarke 

street ....... 

Hall street, from Hanover to Bridge street . 
Manchester street, from Elm to Lincoln 

street 

Marion street, from McGregor to Main street 
Merrimack street, from Wilson to Belmont 

street 

Myrtle street, from Linden street to Chester 

old line 

North street, from Elm street to Pine east 

back street ...... 

5 



350 feet. 


2,215 


a 


600 


a 


470 


ii. 


1,062 


if. 


1,720 


a 


1,196 


a 


1,720 


Ci. 


3,223 


ii 


300 


a 


1,425 


ii. 


938 


it 


1,079 


a 



66 



Orange street, from Linden street to Chester 
old line ....... 

Parker street, from Main street to N. W. R. R. 

Pearl street, from Linden to Bridge street . 

Pine street, from Harrison to Pennacook 
street . . 

Putnam street, from Main to Beauport street 

Third street, from School street to Squog 
river ........ 

Wayne street, from Beauport street westerly 

Young street, from Pine to Wilson street 

Total grades established 
Equal to 4.95 miles. 



1,219 feet. 

806 
1,312 



900 
350 

1,560 

650 

3,023 



26,118 feet. 



NEAV HIGHWAYS LAID OUT. 

Adams street. Main to Beauport street 
Bath street, River street to Third street 
Highland street, Park to Laurel street 
^orth street. Elm to Pine east back street 
Salmon street. Chestnut to Pine street 
Sullivan street. Main to Beauport street 
Wayne street, Beauport street east 370 ft. 
Young street, Pine to Wilson street . 
Back street, south of Munroe. 



50 feet wide. 



67 



SEWERS BUILT. 



Streets. 



Location. 



Material. 



Size in 
inches. 



Length 
in feet. 



■Canal 

Canal 

Bridge 

Main (relaid) . 

Main 

Adams 

£ridge 

Belmont 

Dutton 

Elm west back. 
Elm west back, 

Hancock 

High 

Lowell 

Pearl 

Putnam 

Canal 

Chestnut 

Elm 

Elm 

Maple 

Maple 

Merrimack . . . . 

Myrtle 

Pearl 

Pine 

Elm 

Arlington 

Ash 

■Belmont 

Blodget back.. 

Bridge 

Canal 

Chestnut 

Chestnut 

Concord 

Button 

Elm west back. 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm 

Hanover 

.Jane 

Jane 

Maple 

Maple 

Merrimack . . . . 

Myrtle 

Orange 

Park 

Park 

Park 

Park back 

Pearl 

Pearl 

Pine 

Pine 

Wilson 



Bridge to Brook 

Brook to near Salmon 

Elm to Union 

Sullivan to Putnam 

West Hancock, southerly. . . 

Main to Beauport 

Nashua to Maple 

At Bodwell's coal-sheds 

Amherst street, northerly . . 

At Dean street 

Market street, southerly 

Near the Brewery 

From Ashland, easterly .... 

At Hall street 

East of Russell street 

Main to Beauport 

At Central street 

Park to Central 

Opposite Central block .... 

Near Blood's foundry 

South of Manchester street. 
South of Spruce street .... 

Hall to Belmont 

Elm to Elm east back street 
Corner of Russell street.... 
North of Blodget street .... 

Near Blood's foundry 

Maple street, easterly 

Corner of Pearl street 

Near Mr. Baldwin's 

West of Nashua street 

At freight depot 

Corner of Park street 

Corner of Central street .... 
Corner of Walnut street .... 
North of Amherst street. . . 

At Dean street 

Corner of Cedar street 

Corner of Central street 

Corner of Pleasant street.. . 

Near Post-office block 

Corner of Nashua street .... 

Corner of High street 

Corner of Manchester street 
South of Spruce street . . . . 

Hall street, easterly 

Elm to Elm east back street 

East of Oak street 

Corner of Union street 

Corner of Belmont street.. . 

At Cass street 

East of Elm street 

Corner of Russell street. . . 

East of Russell street 

From Blodget, northerly. .. 

Corner of Cedar street 

Corner of Manchester street 



Brick, 
it 

Akron. 



Iron. 
Akron. 



32x48 
24x36 
24x36 
15 
15 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



1,844 

708 

1,504 

304 

150 

266 

245 

58 

280 

247 

124 

546 

50 

50 

52 

422 

"73 

260 

14 

20 

122 

161 

364 

140 

16 

161 

15 

40 

57 

52 

4 

25 

12 

51 

44 

20 

52 

42 

6 

4 

2 

72 

6 

16 

50 

72 

67 

38 

70 

16 

12 

4 

8 

28 

50 

72 

26 

20 

9,197 



1,844 feet. 


2,212 




419 




2,340 




1,346 




1,036 




9,197 feet. 




73 


^ ^ 


IT 



68 

Total brick sewers, 32 X 48 inches . 
" " " " 24 X 36 " 
" 15 inch Akron pipe . 

a lo '' '' " 

(( IQ (( (( (( 

" 8 " " " (Dist. 2, only) 

Total length of sewers for year . 
Equal to 1.74 miles. 
]!^umber of catch-basins built . 
Number of manholes built 

SEWERS ORDERED BUT NOT BUILT. 

Manchester street, Belmont to Milton street, 12 

inch Akron ....:.. 225 feet, 

Milton street, Manchester street northerly, 12 

inch Akron 135 feet, 

SEWERS. 

The Canal and Webster street sewers have caused con- 
siderable discussion during the past year, and perhaps a 
statement of facts will not be out of place at the present 
time. This subject M'as carefully considered by the Com- 
mittee on Sewers and Drains during the year 1884, vari- 
ous routes were examined, and consultations held with all 
persons who were in any way acquainted with the subject 
of sewerage. They were fully convinced that this was 
the most feasible route, and so reported to the city govern- 
ment. It then passed into the hands of the committee 
for the year 1885. This committee was even more care- 
ful than the preceding, holding consultations with other 
civil engineers and having estimates made by other par- 
ties, their great aim being to take such action as should. 



69 

in tlie end he of the greatest value to the city. Their 
final decision was, as you are well aware, in favor of the 
Canal-street route. Your committee are therefore entitled 
to the honor of having faithfully attended to their work, 
.and of making their decision in accordance with the best 
information they could obtain. 

Of the various routes proposed the first was to go direct 
±0 the river through a proposed extension of Webster 
street. This was found impracticable, for the reason that 
the water supply of all the mills for drinking and sanitary 
pur]30ses is taken from the river very near the point of 
.discharge. 

A second course, advocated by some this year, was to 
■enter the river at Amoskeag bridge. In order to do this, 
it would be necessary to discharge directly into the mouth 
(Of the canal and so make an open sewer of the entire canal, 
or else build a cofi:er-dam and shut off" the water supply, 
thereby closing all of the mills until a channel could be 
blasted through the bed of the river and an opening made 
in the Amoskeag Company's dam, neither of which would 
be advisable. 

The second route investigated by the committee was to 
«uter the river at Pennacook street. The river at this 
point is very shallow, being merely ^ collection of stag- 
nant pools except at high water ; a discharge at this point 
would create a collection of open cesspools and decaying 
filth throughout the entire summer season. The canal at 
this point is in the ledge ; the entire distance from Canal 
street, under the railroad and canal, to the river is solid 
ledge, which would have cost as much as has already been 
expended, to say nothing about the expense of stopping 
iill the mills while the work was being done through the 
canal. The recent operations of the Amoskeag Company 
in this section prove that if this route had been adopted 



70 

the sewer would have to be extended from one to two" 
hundred feet farther into the river and at a greater depth 
than was at first 'contemplated, and perhaps removed 
entirely. 

These various circumstances left only one available out- 
let; that was by way of Bridge street. This could be 
accomplished in two ways, — either b}^ a sewer in Canal 
street or one in Elm street. The only question remaining 
for decision was which route will be the more beneficial 
to the public, not only for this year and next but for all 
future time. The sewer at present in Elm street was not 
large enough nor deep enough for the service designed,, 
consequently the work would have to commence at Bridge 
street, the same as on Canal street. Estimating the cost 
of the two routes upon the same basis proved that the 
Elm-street line, though shorter, would cost about five 
thousand dollars more than the Canal-street route, on 
account of the increased depth of excavation, the average 
depth of Canal street being nine feet^ that of Elm street sev- 
enteen feet, each additional six feet in depth costing twice 
as much as the preceding six feet. Again, it was almost 
impossible to estimate the Elm-street route, as there 
would be three quagmires to go through at a depth of 
eighteen feet, one of which is acknowledged to be the 
w^orst the city has ever had to contend with. The cost,. 
labor, and danger of putting a sewer through these places 
can only be determined by actually doing the work. 
There would also have been an excavation of eighteen 
feet solid ledge at Salmon street. After all this money 
had been expended and a sewer built in Elm street, there 
would have been no provision made for draining the 
territory west of Elm and north of Brook street, which 
territory not already occupied is rapidly coming into the 
market, and cannot be drained in any other way than by 



71 

Canal street. It was therefore but a matter of a very few 
years when the Canal-street sewer would have to be built. 
You would then have two sewers to do the service that 
will now be done by one, for by the present plan it will 
never be necessary to build a sewer in Elm street between 
Bridge and "Webster streets. Another point to be con-- 
sidered is the difference of elevation between the two 
streets. Canal street at Bridge street is forty and one- 
fourth feet lower than Elm street, and twenty-seven and 
one half feet lower at Webster street. In other wordSj 
Canal street is at the foot and Elm street at the top of the 
hill to be drained. The sewer in Canal street will fur- 
nish an outlet for small sewers in all the cross streets 
north of Bridge street. These small sewers can be con- 
nected with the top of the present Elm-street sewer, form- 
ing overflow sewers to relievcthe pressure during heavy 
rains and sudden showers, and prevent the sewage backing 
back into cellars through the house connections, as has 
been done in the past. Taking these last facts into con- 
sideration, the city government decided upon the Canal- 
street route. The work will overrun the estimate (about 
$16,000), although the nature of the ground was inves- 
tigated by inquiries of parties who had worked it, and by 
test pits as thoroughly as could be done without actually 
digging the trench. An error in the original estimate od 
$13,000 was detected before the work commenced, in- 
creasing it $3,000, and was so reported to some members 
of the committee. 

Bridge-Street. — Fifteen hundred feet of the Bridge-street 
sewer have been built at an expense of $4,721.14, leaving 
a balance from the original estimate of $11,551 to build 
the remaining 1,800 feet. Judging from the past year 
this will not be enough for the ledge work. 

Main-Street. — The estimated cost of this sewer was 



72 

$2,233, which I should now mcrease to $3,000. One 
thousand dollars only was appropriated, to go as far as 
it would. On opening the ledge, instead of the usual 
granite we found a very hard trap-rock which was wind- 
ing and curly, costing twice as much as granite would. 

SEWERS NEEDED. 

Of the sewers for which there will be a call in the im- 
mediate future, the following, with the exception of those 
at the north end leading into the Wehster-street sewer, 
are the most important : Manchester street, between 
Beech and Maple streets, a small sewer sufficient to carry 
two catch-basins midway between the two streets, this 
square being so very flat that the surface water is not dis- 
posed of as rapidly as it should be ; the one in Manches- 
ter and Milton streets called for by the board of health 
and ordered by the city government this year. The Man- 
chester north back street sewer east of Union street has 
caused a great deal of trouble in years past by filling up ; 
a portion of this should be relaid. The Elm west back 
street sewer, between Market and Central streets, is nearly 
filled with sediment, and lies too near the surface to drain 
the cellars. This should be relaid by making a division 
at Merrimack street, running one half north into Market 
street — one hundred feet of which have been built this 
year — and the other half south into Central street. 

The Amoskeag Company will call for a sewer in Mc- 
Gregor street, from Bridge street to Main street, during 
the coming summer. No estimate of cost has been made 
but a large amount of ledge will be encountered. 

The citizens of Amoskeag desire a sewer from the 
Brick store north to Farmer's brook. Nearly all the 
abutters pledge themselves to pay the usual entrance fee. 



73 

There are at present five house-drains discliarging into 
the highway, making it exceedingly unwholesome during 
the hot weather. The citizens naturall}^ feel that they are 
-entitled to some of the benefits, after having been taxed 
so many years for the sewerage of other parts of the city, 
and I doubt not the committee will carefully consider 
this matter. 

Flushing. — More attention has been given to this work 
this year than ever before, and the work has been as well 
'done as it could be with a hydrant and common fireman's 
•hose. A little money invested in a suitable flushing 
apparatus, as suggested in my previous reports, would be 
wisely expended. 

Manholes. — All new sewers have been well supplied 
with manholes, but nothing has been done yet about put- 
ting them into old sewers, where they are very much 
needed, but which should be attended to as soon as the 
•large sewers now under way are completed. 

COMMONS. 

James Patten, superintendent, has had charge of the 
"work upon the several commons. 

Park Square. — The improvements commenced on this 
square last year have been completed by grading the 
■south half, top-dressing and seeding the whole. This 
■common, with the addition of a few trees along the walks, 
and touching up a few spots where the grass seed did not 
•catch, will be in as good condition as any in the city. 

Merrimack Square. — Early in the season it was decided 
to fill up a part of the pond, and make a walk through 
the common diagonally from the northwest to the south- 
east corner. This was to be done by building a retaining 
"wall twenty-five feet southwest of the diagonal line. 



74 

extending the culvert from the present terminus to the 
new wall, and filling all east of the retaining wall, the 
work to be done each year as the appropriations permit, 
until the whole is completed. This year the culvert has 
been extended one hundred and sixty feet, containing one 
hundred and eighty-nine perch of stone, and about four- 
teen hundred cubic yards of tilling put in; two of the 
old trees have been moved back into the line of the new 
walk, and ten new trees set out; the concrete walks 
repaired where necessary. 

Hanover Square. — Five hundred loads of sediment 
were taken from the pond and used for filling the hollow 
at the east end; a flower-bed made and well cared for at 
the southeast corner. 

Trcmont Square. — The fountain on this square has 
been completed, sixty yards of filling around the fountain 
basin, and a concrete walk made through the middle of 
the common from north to south, encircling the fountain. 
The plants in the border of the fountain basin and at the 
southeast corner of the square have been w^ell attended to. 

Concord Square. — ^^That part of Chestnut street run- 
ning through Concord square has been paved with con- 
crete pavement, requiring 1,172.6 square yards; also one 
short walk leading to Vine street, requiring 145.7 square^ 
yards. 

The total -amount of concreting on all the squares, 
including the Chestnut-street drive, and all repairs, equals 
1,743| square yards. The grass was cut on each square 
five times. 

CEMETERIES. 

Amoskeag. — Trustees, Councilman Frank O. Clement, 
chairman, Messrs. H. Stearns and John E. Stearns. 

No work has been done at this cemetery on account of 



75 

the injunction and lawsuit which has recently been de- 
cided adversely to the city. 

Pine Grove. — Trustees, Alderman S. P. Cannon, chair- 
man. Councilman G. W. Bacon, Messrs. H. H. Huse^ 
G. P. Whitman, and James A. "Weston. 

The first work of the season was to make a survey of 
proposed avenues through the new Straw lot, that had 
previously been roughly staked out by Mr. Manning, a 
landscape gardener. The point of waste land southwest of 
the lawn section, which was graded last 3^ear, has been 
laid out into lots. The sidehill section at the northwest 
corner and west of Beech avenue, which has heretofore 
been regarded as waste, has also been laid out into lots; 
it required much more time to do this work than it would 
new work, on account of making the avenues and paths 
conform with those already existing. Another section of 
lots has been laid out on the east side south of Elmwood 
avenue. The first and third sections are restricted to a 
lawn grade ; the second is without restrictions as to grade 
or curbing. There have been laid out altogether one hun- 
dred and six new lots. Lines and grades have been given 
for fifty old lots, where the owners desired to make 
improvements. This work takes more time than the 
report shows, as it is often necessary to surve}^ a large 
number of lots surrounding the required lot, in order to 
make the work join together correctly when the whole 
shall be completed. The labor of straightening out the 
old lots is diminishing each year, as we accumulate data 
in the different sections of the cemetery. Plans have 
been made of the different sections laid out, one copy of 
each to be kept in this office, one for the treasurer, and 
one for the superintendent. The areas of all the lots laid 
out have been computed, profiles made and grade fixed 
for two thousand one hundred and ten feet of avenues. 



76 

Valley. — Trustees, Alderman J. A. McCrillis, chair- 
man, Councilman C. J. Abbott, Messrs. Gr, C. Gilmore, 
B. W, Hill, and D. 0. Furnald. 

Line and grade have been given for eighteen old lots. 
'The remarks about the labor in this work will apply to 
this cemetery as well as to the Pine Grove. Twelve hun- 
dred feet of water pipe have been put in, location made and 
shown on the map. Surveys, plans, and estimates have 
been made for some proposed improvements in the Valley 
near the Pine-street culvert. 

General Remarks. — In these reports of the cemetery 
work I have only spoken of the work which has been 
directly connected with this office, although many valu- 
able improvements have been made in both cemeteries 
with which we have had nothing to do, and which mil no 
doubt be reported in detail by the trustees. 

BRIDGES. 

The Amoskeag and Granite bridges have been re- 
planked ; the Gofie's Falls' bridge rebuilt with the excep- 
tion of the stringers. The new Granite-street bridge over 
the canal must be repainted the very first of the season. 
'The highway surveyor of District Ko. 4 reports that it 
will be necessary to rebuild the small bridge over the little 
Cohas brook early in the coming season. 

HIGHWAYS IN GENERAL. 

Many of our highway districts have great difi&culty 
in getting suitable building material for the roads. In 
many places large quantities of good material can be ob- 
tained by a judicious widening and straightening of the 
roads, and using the material so obtained alongside the 
roads where it is needed, and thus save the expense of 



77 

long hauls. This is well illustrated by Hanover street 
near the Eaton place. By putting the wall back to the- 
street line, 1,000 yards of good gravel could be obtained 
on the south side, and by cutting down the hill as much 
more could be obtained from the roadway. In the city 
proper many of the streets have been filled up in the- 
center higher than the paved sidewalks. In the wet season 
the water will of necessity stand on the sidewalks, instead; 
of running oft* in the gutters. I would therefore suggest 
that the city in the future, instead of buying sand banks 
for ordinary filling, should use this money for cutting 
down their streets to a proper grade, thereby improving 
the street cut, and at the same time getting the desired, 
filling very much nearer the place where it is to be used 
and saving the cost of drawing. During the wet seasoni 
it costs the city large sums to drain flooded walks and 
crossings. This expense would be very much reduced if 
the roadways were cut down, allowing the water to run 
freely from the sidewalks. 

Manchester Street. — Upon fixing the grade for the 
horse-railroad through Manchester street, it was found 
that the center of the street was either even with or above- 
the sidewalks for the whole distance east of Union street. 
The grade of the track was put eight inches below the 
sidewalk grade, making a cut throughout a large portion 
of the street varying from six to fourteen inches. The 
walks on this street have been very bad in the spring- 
time for several years, the water often standing several 
inches in depth upon them. I do not think there Mdll be 
any further trouble after a couple of catch-basins are put 
in between Beech and Maple streets. Owing to the late- 
ness of the season the work upon this street was not com- 
pleted to the satisfaction of the superintendent or the 
committee ; it will have to be smoothed over next season 



78 

:and a part of the gutters relaid, particularly those just 
■east of Chestnut street, which have always been dangerous 
on account of their great depth. Upon cutting back 
Lincoln street to conform with the Manchester-street grade 
a good cobble- paved gutter was uncovered which agreed 
with the new grade. 

Beech Slreet. — This is one of the streets where the 
walks are always underwater. This street should be cut 
down from Hanover street, south, the very first time the 
city needs material in that vicinity. Pine street also 
needs cutting. 

Crossings. — It has been the custom in years past to 
build the street crossings level with the sidewalks, or else 
give them a pitch from each side toward the center; 
then when the streets are graveled, there is invariably a 
ridge made on each side of the crossing higher than the 
walk itself, making the crossing a basin for holding all the 
water and mud that accumulates upon them, and, instead 
of being dry places for the people to walk upon , are even 
worse than the street itself. The laborers that are sent 
to scrape off the mud from the crossings after every rain 
invariably hoe it back into a ridge on each side, so that 
the roadway is continually increasing in height above the 
crossing. No street crossing will be dry unless it has a 
gradual slope downward from the center towards the 
ends ; the water that falls upon it will then run down 
to the ends and tind its way into the gutter, leaving the 
crossing dry. The onl}^ way this can be done is for the 
city to put in a curbstone at the end of every crossing, 
and make a step of six inches down to the crossing, as 
has been done in all other cities for the past ten years, 
where any attempt has been made to profit by experience. 
The attempts that have been made during the past seven 
years to make our street crossings as they should be have 



79 

met wdth a great deal of opposition from the citizens. They 
say they want the crossings up high and dry, but if they 
look around they will see that it is their elevation which 
spoils them, as stated above. It makes no diiference how 
high or low a crossing is put in, the street will always be 
built an inch or tw^o higher, and causes the city great ex- 
pense every winter and spring-time, digging trenches 
to keep the w^ater off the sidewalks. Frequent com- 
plaints are made that teamsters drive across the corners 
of sidewalks, to the injury of the walks and danger to 
pedestrians. Examination proves that in every instance 
the crossings, and consequently the streets, are level Avith 
the walks, and there is nothing to prevent the drivers 
taking the shortest cut. A curb six inches higher than 
the crossing will form a wheel-guard and prevent this. 
In many places it is necessary to put a catch-basin at the 
side of a crossing. When this is done, the walks form a 
vertical embankment from sixteen to twenty-four inches 
in height, making it impossible to drive near the side- 
walk without danger of a breakage or capsizing. Some 
attempts have been made to l^eep the middle of the 
crossing low and avoid the step by having a ver}^ steep 
incline in the concrete from the i^idewalk. These in icy 
times are exceedingly dangerous, and the only surprise is 
that more people are not hurt. 

I think a large part of these objections to the steps in 
the crossings will die out as the people become more 
familiar with them, and would cease altogether if all the 
crossings were made in this manner, and the city govern- 
ment that does it wdll receive the hearty indorsement of 
all the riding population. 



80 



STEAM ROAD-ROLLER. 



During the past five years I have called the attention of 
the various city governments and street committees to- 
the necessity of having modern working tools for the 
construction of macadamized roads, and I am happy to- 
announce that the present city government have care- 
fully considered the question and have contracted for a 
fifteen-ton steam road-roller and a screen to be attached 
to the crusher. All the material for a macadamized road 
should be carefully screened and free from dirt; then,, 
when placed in position, should be well wet and thor- 
oughly compressed with the heavy roller. When the 
new appliances arrive, there is nothing to prevent Man- 
chester from having as good roads as any city in New 
England. They have also purchased a truck for the- 
crusher so that it can be moved to any locality, and thus 
save the great expense of hauling the stone such long 
distances to and from the crusher. 

The following work has been done in the various high- 
way districts during the year: — 

DISTRICT ]^0. 1. 
C. E. QuiMBY, Surveyor. 
No report. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

"William Sanborn, Superintendent. 

block paving. 

Elm street, foot of Manchester street . 121.3 sq. yds^ 
Manchester street, from Elm to Elm east 

back street 408.0 " 

Total 529.3 sq. yds. 



81 



This was old paving that was in a bad condition, and 
would have to be relaid even if the horse-railroad had 
not been laid in the street. 



COBBLE PAVING. 

Amherst street, east of Ashland street 
Ash street, north of Lowell street 
Auburn street, from Elm street east . 
Canal street, at freight depot 
Cedar street, from Beech street westerly 
Cedar street, from Union street easterly 
Dean street, from Elm street westerly 
Lowell street, corner of Maple street 
Manchester street, south side, west of Lin 

coin street ..... 
Manchester street, south side, east of Lin 

coin street . . . ; . 
Manchester street, north side, east of Lin 

coin street ..... 
Park street, east of Elm street . 
Pleasant street, corner of Elm street . 
Union street, from Cedar northerly . 
Webster street, from Elm westerly 

Total cobble paving 
Curbstone set in various places, 1,546 feet. 



13.3 sq. yds. 

32.6 " 
257.8 " 

42.7 " 

93.3 " 
66.7 " 

44.4 " 

71.1 " 

38.7 " 

22.2 " 

6.7 " 

22.2 " 

44.4 " 

22.2 " 

48.9 " 



827.2 sq. yds. 



MACADAMIZING. 

Elm street, east half, north of North (new) 840 sq.yds. 

Chestnut street, from Hanover to Amherst 
(top-dressed) 536 " 

Hanover street, from Chestnut to Pine (top- 
dressed) . . - . . . . 4,896 " 



82 

Park street, from Chestnut to Pine (top 

dressed) 1,040 sq. yds. 

Park street, east of Milton . . . 427 " 

Total macadamizing. 

STKEETS GRAVELED. 

Amherst street, from Hall westerly 
Amherst street, from Hall easterly . 
Arlington street, from Maple easterly 
Ash street, from Gore to Brook 
Ashland street, from Lowell street northerly 
Beacon street, from Hanover northerly . 
Beech street, from Bridge northerly 
Beech street, from Cedar southerly 
Belmont street, from Hanover northerly 
Bridge street, from Maple to Russell 
Chestnut street, from Brook street northerly 
Chestnut street, from Park to Auburn 
Concord street, from Ashland street easterly 
Dean street, from Elm street westerly 
Button street, from Amherst to Concord 
Elm street, from Short street southerly . 
Hanover street, from Hall easterly . 
Lincoln street, from Manchester southerly 
Lowell street, from Maple easterly . 
Lowell street, from Jane easterly 
Myrtle street, from Elm easterly 
Nashua street, from Pearl to Bridge street 
N^ashua street, from Concord northerly . 
Orange street, from Elm to Chestnut 
Park street, from Cass street westerly 
Park street, near Massabesic street 
Pearl street, from Russell to Linden street 



7,739 sq. 


yds 


. 226 feet 


. 175 


a 


. 190 


a 


. 320 


a 


. 350 


a 


. 135 


a 


. 120 


a 


. 800 


a 


. 100 


a 


. 720 


a 


^ . 160 


a 


. 765 


a 


' . 200 


a 


. 128 


a 


. 450 


a 


. 736 


u 


. 335 


a 


. 200 


a 


. 150 


u 


. 1,550 


a 


. 225 


a 


. 400 


a 


. 320 


(( 


. 580 


a 


. 271 


a 


. 100 


a 


. 470 


a 



83 



Prospect street, from Maple to Union street 
Prospect street, from Elm to Chestnut street 
Russell street, from Pearl street northerly 
Salmon street, from Elm to Canal street 
South street, from High street 
Union street, from Hanover southerly 
Union street, from Hanover northerly 
Wilson street, from Manchester street 
"Wilson street, from Park to Valley 

Total graveled 



-eet . 1,095 feet. 


reet . 580 




y . 100 




. 950 




. 375 




. 130 




. 170 




. 106 




. 1,850 




. 15,532 feet 



STREETS GRADED AND GRAVELED. 



Beech street, from Brook to Gore street 
Central street, from Wilson to Hall street 
Gore street, from Union to Beech street 
Hall street, from Central to Merrimack 
Hall street, from Amherst to Concord 
Harrison street, from Walnut street easterly 
High street, from Il^ashua street easterly . 
Lincoln street, at Manchester street 
Linden street, from Pearl street northerly 
Manchester street, from Union to Hall street 
Myrtle street, from Russell easterly 
Park street, from Cass westerly 
Sagamore, from Pine easterly 

Total graded and graveled . 
Total, 21,608 feet, equal to 4.09 miles. 



. 320 feet 


. 260 


a 


. 500 


a 


. 500 


a 


. 550 


i'. 


. 210 


a 


. 250 


a 


. 90 


a 


. 280 


u 


2,550 


a 


. 116 


a 


. 200 


i( 


. 250 


a 



6,076 feet. 



Some of the streets graded and graveled have required 
a large amount of work, as will be shown by the following 
account of the number of cubic yards of earth moved : — 



84 

Central street, from "Wilson to Hall street 361 cu. yds. 

Gore street, from Union to Beech street 1,400 " 
Hall street, from Hanover to Amherst 

street 586 " 

Hall street, from Central to Merrimack 

street 277 " 

High street, from Nashua street easterly 463 " 

Lincoln street, at Manchester street . 72 " 
Manchester street, from Union to Hall 

street 1,148 "- 

Myrtle street, from Russell street easterly 256 " 

Park street, from Cass street westerly . 245 " 

Sagamore street, from Pine street easterly 400 " 



Total . . . . 5,177 cu. yds. 

The above does not include any grading for sidewalks,, 
of which there has been a large amount in all parts of the 
city, also many places in the streets, scattered here and 
there, where the grading has been one foot or less. In 
addition to the above the following commons and school- 
yards have been graded : — 

Park square, south half .... 5,717 sq. yds. 
Lincoln-street school yard . . . 333^ " 
Ash-street school yard .... 183J " 
Franklin-street school yard . ' . . 327J " 

Total grading .... 6,561 sq. yds.. 

RETAINING WALL. 

j»lyrtle street, east of Russell street . . 90 perch.. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

32 by 48 inches, brick 1,844 ftet. 

24 by 36 inches, brick . . . . . 2,212 " 



85 



12-inch Akron pipe 

10-inch Akron pipe 

8-inch Akron pipe 

Total 

Equal to 1.39 miles. (See sewers.) 



PIPE ON HAND AT CITY YARD. 



990 feet 


1,285 


a 


1,024 


a 



24-inch 
20-inch 
15-inch 
12-inch 
10-inch 
8-inch 
6-incli 



Total 

53' Y branches, 15 by 12 inches. 
70 Y branches, 12 by 8 inches. 
53 Y branches, 10 by 8 inches. 
2 8-inch curves. 



Brick in city yard, 3,500. 
Catch-basins built, 56. Manholes, 12. 

CROSSINGS. 

Stone, 1. Concrete, new, 60. Top-dressed, 8. 

CONCRETE. 



7,355 feet. 



22 feet. 
3 

54 

75 
610 
273 



1,045 feet. 



Crossings, new 

Crossings top-dressed . . . . 

Sidewalks repaired . . . , 
Concord square, Chestnut-atreet road- 
way ....... 

Concord square, walk . . . . 



1,883.20 sq. yds. 
63.20 " 
935.32 " 

1,172.60 " 
145.70 " 



86 



Tremont square, new walk . 
Tremont square, walks repaired . 
Ash-street school yard, repairs 
Lincoln-street school yard, repairs 
Park-street school yard, repairs . 
Franklin-street school yard, repairs 
"Wilson-street school sidewalk 
Engine-house cellar and walk repaired 
Police station .... 
McGregor bridge, repairs . 
Freight depot . . , . 

Total .... 

Two hundred and twenty-five yards of the freight depot 
concrete were not paid for by the city. 

CONTRACT WORK. 

Retaining wall. Park street foot of Cass street 189.4 perch. 



355.20 


sq. yds 


55.80 




125.25 




83.67 




118.45 




19.44 




115.55 




a 261.24 




28.60 




695.00 




369.10 




. 6,427.32 


30. yds 



CULVERTS. 

Russell street north from Pearl street 
Union street north of Hooksett road, rebuilt 

Total 



10 perch. 
15 " 

25 perch. 



DISTRICT i^O. 3. 

Edwin Kennedy, Surveyor. 

beech street. 

Hill north of railroad cut .... 440 cu. yds. 
Hill opposite Dodge's cut, and valley filled 336 " 
Hill opposite Young's cut, and valley filled 269 " 

Total Beech-street cut . . . 1,045 cu. yds. 
Graveled at Dodge's and from railroad to Shasta street. 



87 



SHASTA STREET. 



Graded and graveled from Pine to Beech street, and 
extended tliirty-four rods east of Beech street. 

One culvert built 20' X 2' 3" X 1' 10", stone sides, 
plank top. 



NUTT ROAD. 



Built up witii gas lime, heavy stone, cinders, and 
gravel. It has required a large amount of labor to keep 
this road and Pine street in rejoair, on account of the 
heavy teaming over them. 



Calef road, graveled fifteen rods. 



RIVER ROAD. 



Graveled the Howlett hill and opposite Mr. Locke's barn, 
also cemetery hill, tannery hill, north of Brook four rods, 
and from Baker street to Shasta street. Culvert built 
over and enlarged 24' X 1' 6" X 1' 4". 

ELM STREET. 

Very heavily graveled south of the bridge. 
About two hundred yards of grading around watering- 
trough. 

Watering-trough moved to the other side of the street. 

HANCOCK STREET. 

Graveled eight rods and laid five hundred and forty-six 
feet of 12-inch Akron pipe for drainage. 

The water-courses cleaned out to drain the section east 
of Beech street and the line of the Portsmouth Railroad, 
which has each year washed out Beech street and ITutt 
road, causing much damage to Charles H. Barker's prop- 



erty. Culvert at the junction of Beech street and the 
Nutt road lengthened thirteen feet, partly built over and 
cleaned out. This is a stone culvert 15" X 18" opening. 
Washout in school lot repaired. 

Two hundred and eighteen tons of stone drawn to 
crusher. 

Three catch-basins built. 

Bushes cut on River, Nutt, and Calef roads, and Silver 
street. 

All needed repairs attended to. 

DISTRICT ISrO. 4. 
Ika W. Moore, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked and graded, one-half mile. 

Bushed, one hundred rods. 

Planked Little Cohas bridge. 

Raked out stones and made all necessary repairs. 

The Goffe's Falls bridge was built over by contract, 
and is entirely new except stringers. 

Becommendations. — The Little Cohas bridge should 
be rebuilt the coming year, and two or three culverts 
near Mr. Cheney's laid over. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 

John H. Willey, Surveyor. 

Graveled 3,505 feet. 

turnpiked. 

Main road 11,880 feet. 

Cross road 1,320 " 



Total turnpiked . , . . 13,200 feet. 

Equal to 2| miles, 



89 



GRADING. 

At Brown hill 

ISTutt brook ..... 

N^utt road . . 

intersection Harvey and South roads 

Moore's Ferry road 

intersection Nutt and Moore roads 

Total grading .... 

CULVERTS. 



Harvey road at South road, new 
Harvey road at South road, lengthened 
At Cohas brook, new 
At ]^utt brook, old culvert lengthened 

Total new culverts . 

The old culvert at Nutt brook was relaid and raised 
one foot. 

Paved the gutter at Nutt and Moore's Ferry roads, 75 
feet. 

Planked one culvert on South road. 

Railing and posts at Nutt's brook, 30 feet. 

Cut one mile of bushes and trimmed limbs for the same 
(distance. 

Picked stones out of roads every two weeks during the 
isummer. 

Blasted ledge on Brown hill to make a gutter for the 
water previously running in the middle of the road. 

Took out ten large boulders projecting into wheel ruts, 
and made general repairs whenever and wherever needed. 



. 160 


cu. 


yds. 


. 160 




u 


. 102 




i 


. 27 




a 


. 88 




a 


. 63 




'i 


600 


cu. 


yds. 




32 feet. 


. 


12 


li 




50 


a 


• 


8 


u 


. 102 feet. 



90 

DISTRICT ]SrO. 6. 

Samuel B. Dickey, Sukveyor. 

Turnpiked 800 rods. 

Graveled 500 rods. 

Built one culvert 20' X 1^' X 1^. 
Lengthened one culvert 6' X 2' X 2'. 

GRADING. 

One filling 4|-' X 6' X 100, making about 100 cu. yds. 

Hill on Webster road, badly washed . . 50 " " 
Island Pond road, opposite Mallard's . . 445 " 

Total grading 595 cu. yds. 

A large number of boulders blasted and removed from 
the roads, bushes cut, roads kept free from cobbles, and. 
general repairs made where needed. 

Mr. Dickey desires me to once more call your attention 
to the necessity of widening and straightening the Island 
Pond and Lake Shore roads, which you will find more 
fully explained in my report of last year. 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 
Peter 0. Woodman, Surveyor. 

Spruce street, graded and turnpiked from Beacon to 
Canton street, requiring 920 cubic yards of grading and 
1,300 feet of turnpiking ; also one culvert for Mr. Har- 
riman's drive, 16' X 1^-' X l^-'. 

Old Falls road, culvert rebuilt, 25' X 1' X 1'. Gutters 
cleaned. 

Belmont street, culvert, 58|- feet of 12-inch Akron pipe, 
requiring 185 cubic yards of excavation. 

Belmont street, graveled 375 feet. 



91 

Young road, one culvert for driveway, 20' X 1^' X 1^- 

Candia road, graveled 640 feet. Culvert 25'Xl'Xi'. 

Valley street, filling at Massabesic street, 225 yards. 

Massabesic street, retaining wall, 89.12 perch. 3 catch- 
basins built, 600 feet of sidewalk built. Graveled, 1,725- 
feet. Graded, 200 cubic yards. Gutters both sides of 
the road cleaned twice. 295 square yards of new gutters 
paved. 

Old Ferry road, turnpiked 1,000 feet. 

Cypress street, culvert 39 X 2 X 1. Gutters cleaned out.- 

All general repairs carefully attended to. 

Total grading, 1,530 cubic yards. 

Total turnpiking, 2,300 feet. 

Total graveling, 2,740 feet. 

Total culverts built, 6. 

Total catch-basins, 3. 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 
Joshua Page, Surveyor. 

Cleaned ditches and graveled one mile, an average width) 
of 12 feet by 8 inches deep, equal to 1,565 cubic yards. 

Hanover street, at Joseph B. Clark's land, 495' X 8' X 2' 
equal to 293 cubic yards. 

Cut knoll at G. S. Smith's, 165' X 18' X 2', equal to 220 
cubic yards. This required considerable blasting. 

Graveled near Mr. Stevens's house 600 feet, equal to 500 
cubic yards. 

Total grading and graveling, 6,540 feet, equal to 2,578 
cubic yards. 

STONE CULVERTS. 

Hall road, 36' X 2' X 3', mostly new. 
Mammoth road, 36 feet, cover removed and cleaned-^ 
out. 



92 

Hanover-street road, 38' X 1^ X 1|', new. 17' X 1' X 1', 
P. O. Woodman's drive. 28' X 1|-' X 1^, laid over, cleaned 
out, and extended 6 feet. 34' X 2' X 2', raised 1 foot, 
lengthened 3 feet. 132 feet taken up and cleaned out. 
28 feet taken up and cleaned out. 12' X 12' X 1', Joseph 
B. Clark's driveway. 

Proctor road, 6' X 3' X 3', walls lengthened, no covering. 

Candia road, 21' X 1' X If, new; 23 feet taken up and 
cleaned out. 

Brush cut for three-fourths of a mile. 

Five rods of board fence built at the junction of Park 
and Hanover streets. 

Went over the district and picked out small stones three 
times. 

All necessary patching and filling of mud holes attend- 
ed to. 

DISTRICT i^O. 9. 

Il^ELSON W. Page, Surveyor. 
1^0 report. 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 

Charles 0. Phelps, Surveyor. 

Cobble gutter paving, 1,741 square yards. 
Curbstone set, 466 feet. 

CONCRETE. 

\New sidewalks in district . . . 1,314.0 sq. yds. 

Four new crossings . . . . 125.5 " 

Main-street school, repairs . . . 6.8 " 



Total ...... 1,446.3 sq. yds. 



. 300 feet. 


t 300 " 


. 500 " 


. 800 " 


. 800 " 


. 300 " 


. 3,000 feet 



93 

MACADAMIZING. 

School street, Kiver to Shirley, 1,020 square yards. 

STREETS GRAVELED. 

Bridge street, McGregor bridge to McGregor 

street . 
Wayne street. Main street to Beauport street 
Main street. Mast street to Milford street 

Mast road 

Milford street, near cemetery 

Shirley Hill road 

Total graveled .... 

STREETS GRADED AND GRAVELED. 

Granite street, Dover to 

Mast street . 
Douglas-street hill . 
Winter street, Main to 

N. W. R. R. . . 

Putnam street. Main to 

Beauport street . 
Marion street, McGregor 

to Main street 
A street. Main to B street 



Totals . . . 2,680 feet. 1,875 cubic yards, 

GRADED, NOT GRAVELED. 

Clinton street, Dover to West street ' . 44 cubic yards. 

Main street, Sullivan to Wayne street 350 " " 
McGregor street, Putnam to Wayne 

street 139 " " 



260 feet. 




600 " 




700 " 




400 " 


853 cubic yards. 


320 " 


800 " " 


400 " 


222 " " 



94 



jBeauport street, Amory to Wayne 
street 

Main west back street 

Second street, School to Ferry street . 

Third street, School to Ferry street . 

Land of J). P. Wallace, to cover 
sewer ...... 

.Sidewalk grading 

Total grading, 3,921 cubic yards. 



155 cubic yards. 
130 " " 
120 " " 
110 " 

120 " " 

878 " " 

2,046 cubic yards. 



TURNPIKED. 

Walker street, from River to Main street . 1,100 feet. 
Hiver road, Milford street to Bedford line . 4,000 " 
l^oynton street, whole length . . . 4,919 " 

Total ..:.... 10,019 feet. 
Equal to 1.9 miles. 
One wooden culvert built, 45' X 4' X 2'. 

WOODEN RAILING. 



Amory street ..... 




. 69 feet. 


Putnam street 




. 59 " 


Main west back street 




. 50 " 


Parker street 




. 40 " 


Total railing .... 


. 218 feet. 


SEWERS AND DRAINS. 






15 inch Akron pipe 


115 feet, new. 


15 " " " ... 


318 


" relaid. 


12 " " " * . 


688 


" new. 


12 " " " ... 


75 


" relaid. 


10 " •' " . • • 


30 


" relaid. 


Total 


1,226 feet. 



95 

Eight-inch Akron pipe used for catch-basins not 
counted. 

Fifteen-inch Akron pipe in yard, 288 feet. 
Catch-basins built, 14 ; manholes, 5. (See sewers.) 
New highway built, Marion street. 

DISTRICT l!TO. 11. 

James E. Bailey, Surveyor. 

Macadamizing, 1,333 square yards. 

Cobble paving, 100 square yards. 

One stone culvert 38' X 2' X 2'. 

Two plank culverts, 32 feet each. 

Two stone culverts, 38 feet each. 

Graveled, 1,590 feet. 

Ross hill cut down three feet and graveled. 

Turnpiked, 2^ miles. 

Cobbles picked out ; bushes cut throughout the whole 
district. All ditches cleaned out and all general repairs 
carefully attended to. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Jeremiah Garvin, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked, 1 mile. 

Graveled, 1^ miles. 

Bushes cut, | mile. 

Culvert repaired, 12' X 3' X 2'. 

Stones picked out several times. 

General repairs attended to. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 

John H. Giddings, Surveyor. 

Graveled 30 rods. Built two new culverts, each 14' X 
1|' X 1 J', three old culverts rebuilt ; 110 feet new ditch- 



96 

ing. Much extra work was needed on account of wash- 
outs caused by spring rains. 

I desire to call the attention of the Committee on Streets 
to the fact that the junction of Union street and River 
road at the southwest corner has for some years been used 
as a gravel pit, and that no railing or protection of any 
kind has been put up on the Union-street side, leaving a 
perpendicular fall of from six to eight feet, which is ex- 
ceedingly dangerous should a horse become unmanageable 
or a stranger be driving that road after dark. This should 
be looked after before any accident occurs. 

In conclusion, I desire, as usual, to express my thanks 
to Mr. J. B. Sawyer and the engineers of the Amoskeag 
Company for the loan of plans and information obtained 
from their personal surveys, that would be of value to the 
city. My thanks are also due to the Mayor and various' 
members of the city government with whom I have 
been directly associated, for their kind and courteous 
treatment during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE H. ALLEN, 
City Engineer^ 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1885. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



GEORGE H. STEARICS, Ma,jor,''ex-officio Chamnan. 
GEORGE M. TRUE, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1.— Albe C. Heath, 

Charles PL Manning. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean, 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3.— iN'athan P. Hunt, 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Samuel D. Lord, 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
Ward 5. — Charles A. O'Connor, 

Thomas F. Collins. 
Ward 6. — Jacob J. Abbott, 

AVilliam H. Huse. 
Ward 7.— Edwin F. Jones, 

Frank B. Potter. 
Ward 8. — Josiah G. Dearborn, 

Timothy J. Howard. 



100 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWIN F. JONES. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. W. Clarke, True, 
Dodge, Jones. 

Salaries. — Messrs. O'Connor, Jones, Abbott. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, 
Potter, Howard. 

Text-Books, Ajyptaratus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Dearborn, Huse, Heatli. 

Music. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, Dearborn. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
True, Manning, W. C. Clarke. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. W. 
Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Collins, Potter, Heath. 

Health. — Messrs. Abbott, O'Connor, Howard. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, O'Connor, S. W. 
Clarke, Hunt. 



101 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Lord, Abbott, S. W. Clarke. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. O'Connor, Heath, Manning. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Dodge, Jones, Collins. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Heath, Jones, Dearborn. 

Iraining School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodge. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Heath, Huse. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. S. W. Clarke, 
Manning, Howard. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Dearborn, 
Lord, Heath. 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Lord, Dodge. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Abbott, O'Connor, Potter. 

Hcdlsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Huse, Potter, Dear- 
born. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Howard, 
Huse, Abbott. 

Gofe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Potter, 
Howard, Abbott. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Jones, "W. C. Clarke, Collins. 



In Board op School Committee, 
January 1, 1886. 

The Superintendent read his annual report to the committee, and 
it was accepted, 

Charles H. Manning read the annual report prepared by him at 
the request of the Board. 

Voted, That the report by Mr. Manning be accepted, and adopted 
as the report of the Board, and that it be transmitted to the City 
Councils, together with the report of the Superintendent. 

EDWIN F. JONES, Clerk. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



To the City Councils: — 

Gentlemen, — The School Committee would respect- 
fully tender the followin^^ report for the year ending 
December 31, 1885 : — 

The organization of the schools has undergone but 
slight changes during the past year. In the spring, one 
primary school was discontinued at the Lowell-street 
house and the teacher transferred to a vacancy existing 
at the Blodget-street house. At the beginning of the 
fall term, the middle school which had occupied the attic 
of the South-Main-street house was moved to one of the 
new rooms at the IS^orth-Main-street house. Later in the 
fall an additional middle school was opened at the Web- 
ster-street house. 

The epidemic of measles, which prevailed in the spring, 
was the cause of much absenteeism, but no serious derange- 
ment of the school work was caused by it, and the same 
is true of the vaccination epidemic of this fall. 

Two weeks before the close of the last term several of 
the pupils of the primary department of Blodget-street 
school being afflicted with diphtheria, it was deemed 
advisable to close the school for the term. As the sanitary 
condition of the house was not at fault, we expect no 
recurrence of the trouble. 



104 

Early in December, the attention of the repairs com- 
mittee was called to the bad air supplied through the hot- 
air flues in the Lincoln and Franklin street houses. On 
examination at the former house it was found that a large 
pipe which ventilated all the water-closets and originally 
entered the chimney, had, by some one in the past, been 
cut oiF and closed close to the chimney. There being no 
ventilation, all the offensive odors found their way directly 
into the basement, from which the air was taken for heat- 
ing the rooms. Matters were somewhat the same at the 
Franklin-street house but not as bad. At both houses all 
air-boxes have now been extended to receive out-door air 
which, while it means better ventilation, also means more 
fuel for heating. Other changes made in the sanitary 
arrangements at the Lincoln-street house will, we think, 
much improve its healthfulness. 

The school calendar for 1885 was as follows : — 
"Winter term of twelve weeks, from January 5 to March 
27. Vacation of two weeks. Spring term of eleven 
M^eeks, from April 13 to June 26. Vacation of ten weeks. 
Fall term of fourteen weeks, from September 7 to Decem- 
ber 11. Vacation of three weeks. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The High School has shown a steady improvement in 
numbers as well as scholarship under the guidance of it& 
efficient principal, it having opened this fall with nearly 
two hundred pupils. 

During the summer vacation the assembly-room was 
much improved by the removal of the west partition, thus 
absorbing a passage-way some twelve feet wide and 
adding about fifty desks to its seating capacity. 

A chemical laboratory more accessible than the one 



105 

now in use in the attic is very much needed at this school 
as well as a drawing room. Mechanical and free-hand 
drawing is a part of the regular curriculum of this 
school, but facilities are entirely lacking for instruction. 
A well-lighted room with at least forty fixed tables suit- 
able for drawing should be had. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

This school has maintained its usefulness the past year, 
and its usefulness would be largely increased by a compe- 
tent assistant to the hard-worked principal. As there are 
four regular schools, two middle and two primary, in this 
building in which the training pupils are employed as 
teachers, the entire time of the principal is required in 
the supervision of these rooms, leaving no time in school 
hours for special instruction of the training pupils. This 
school, we consider, bears an important part in the pub- 
lic-school system. 

GRADED SCHOOLS. 

In the graded schools the most marked change has been 
the decrease in the primary department, owing largely to 
the increased facilities of the parochial schools. 

Our schools are open for all races and all creeds,, and 
as American citizens we deprecate the conversion of any 
public property to the exclusive use of any race or creed. 

At the close of the spring term, the examination for the 
High School developed very satisfactory results, with few 
exceptions, and those were chiefly due to the change of 
masters. 

The average number of pupils to each teacher has not 
changed much from last year, and throughout these schools 
the teachers have larger classes than they can handle to 
the best advantage. 



106 



SUBURBAN SCHOOLS. 

Four of the suburban schools have been very small, 
averaging during the fall term thirteen pupils each, and 
the continuance of all of these as separate schools may 
come up again for discussion at any time. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Two evening schools for persons over sixteen years of 
age have been conducted at the Spring-street and School- 
street houses. The term began in ISTovember, 1884, was 
closed March 13, and the fall term began October 12, and 
still continues. 

At the Spring-street school, the largest number attend- 
ing one .week was 167, — 93 males and 74 females; the 
average number attending has been 62. 

At the West Manchester school, the largest number 
attending one week was 73, — 44 males and 29 females; 
the average number attending has been 34. 

At the Spring-street school, the largest number of 
teachers was 11 ; the smallest, 2; the average, 6. 

At the West Manchester-street school, the largest num- 
ber of teachers was 6 ; the smallest, 2 ; the average, 3. 

At the Spring-street school, the oldest male was 46 ; the 
oldest female, 28 ; the average age of males was 19 ; of 
females, 18. 

At the West Manchester school, the oldest male was 42; 
the oldest female, 35 ; the average age of males was 19 ; 
of females, 17 years, 6 months. 

At the Spring-street school, 4^ per cent of the pupils 
were French, 34 per cent Irish, 11 per cent Swedes, 
7^ per cent Americans, 1^ per cent German, l per cent 
Scotch. 

At the West Manchester school, 20 per cent were Ger- 



107 

man, 8 per cent were French, 15 per cent were Irish, 
and 57 per cent American. 

The schools have done good work, perhaps, on the 
whole, better than ever before, and are an important fac- 
tor in our educational system; and every measure in the 
way of furnishing ex|ierienced teachers and better accom- 
modations, and of awakening an interest among those 
classes of our people which these schools are designed to 
reach, ought to be adopted. 

PUBLIC EXERCISES. 

The annual contest for the Clarke elocutionary prizes 
was held at Smyth's Hall, Friday, January 30. The 
following named gentlemen kindly served as judges : 
Hon. Henry O. Kent, of Lancaster; Prof. Arthur S. 
Hardy, of Dartmouth College ; Hon. Daniel Hall, of 
Dover ; Hon. John J. Bell, of Exeter ; and Henry B. 
Atherton, Esq., of Xashua. 

The first prize was won by Minnie E. Littlefield, of the 
High School; second, Percy N". Folsoni, Franklin-street; 
third, Herbert J. Hall, Franklin -street ; fourth, Alice D. 
Bond, Lincoln-street. The special prizes for the several 
schools were awarded to Almon B. Rockwell, for the High 
School ; Susie E. Richardson^ for the Franklin-street ; 
Edith M. Dame, for the Lincoln-street ; Alice M. Stewart, 
for the Ash-street. 

The fund having accumulated the amount designed by 
the donor (the interest being sufficient to pay the prizes), 
there is a surplus now of one hundred and fifty dollars, 
the disposition of which, with further surplus, this board 
has not yet decided on, but it is probable that we shall 
conclude to devote it to paying an instructor in elocution, 
which disposition is favored by the donor of the fund. 



108 

The graduating exercises of the High School were held, 
at the Opera House on Wednesday evening, June 24. 
They were very interesting and much enjoyed by the 
friends of the graduating class, who filled the house com- 
pletely. 

Interesting closing exercises were held at each of the 
grammar schools and at the Training school, all of wliich 
attracted large attendance of friends and were all very 
creditable performances. 

SCHOOL ACCOMMODATION. 

With the exception before mentioned, at the High 
School, the accommodation seems ample for the ensuing 
year, though if the school at Webster's Mills is to be con- 
tinued the building of a new house will soon be im- 
perative. 

The rooms at the Webster-street house are now all in 
use, and should this part of the city continue its growth 
of the last few years wings to that building will soon be 
needed. 

The day is not far otf when we shall have to fall into 
line with other cities of our size and like needs, and open 
a " Manual Training School," and the Lowell-street house 
seems as well situated for this purpose as any now belong- 
ing to the city. 

The average number of teachers employed during the 
last year has been seventy -two, and appended is a table of 
the average attendance in the several grades : — 



109 



REPORT OF THE ATTENDANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1885. 



SCHOOLS. 


Whole number 
different pupils. 


If 


is 
2g 


•s-g 

<0 dt . 




Boys. 


Girls. 






64 
357 

327 
987 
156 


98 
409 
325 
935 
148 


163 

581 

512 

1,241 

228 


157 
541 
462 
1,071 
199 


96.3 




93.1 


Middle 


90.2 




86.3 




87.3 






Totals 


1,891 
1,924 ' 


1,915 
1,994 


2,725 
2,872 


2,430 
2,645 


90.6 




92.1 







REPAIRS. 

During the summer vacation all the houses received 
such repairs as could he afforded from the limited appro- 
priation for this purpose. Such ordinary repairs are never 
expected to be below two per cent, on which basis the 
$3,500 appropriated would keep in repair $175,000 worth 
of property, which is far below the cost of our school 
buildings. 

At the North-Main-street house the floors of the second 
story of the main building having sagged over three 
inches on account of the defective roof trusses from which 
the floor was hung, extensive repairs became necessary 
far beyond the means at our command, so they were exe- 
cuted at the city's expense. 

In finishing off the upper room at the Webster-street 
house serious, defects of construction were discovered and 
remedied. A steam-heating apparatus was also supplied 
to this house by special appropriation. 

The plumbing at the Training School and one or two 



110 



other buildings is of a faulty type, and will need thorough 
remodeling during the coming summer. 



TEUANCY. 



The following table states the ^^'ork of the truant ofiicer 
for the year : — 







City Schools. 


Parochial 
Schools. 






300 


''19 






16 


9 


Number reported caused to attend 




165 


162 


Number found sick and unable to attend school 


146 








53 








45 


3 

43 


4 










Number of truants caused to attend 


111 


No. of school age found on street during school hours. . 


859 








962 






Number of truants temporarily confined at city hall. . 


11 


• 






550 








3 








2 










Number applying for certificates who could not read 





















Of the number wdio applied for certificates one and one 
tenth per cent could not read in the third reader, and 
their average age was fourteen years. 



Ill 



PUPILS ENROLLED IN OTHER THAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Park-street, parocMal, boys ..... 450 

St. Agnes, " girls 354 

St. Joseph's, " boys and girls . . . 475 
French, " boys and girls, "West Man- 
chester 230 

Academy, Pine street, boys and girls . , .30 

French school, Spruce street, boys and girls . . 465 

" " Spring street (private), boys and girls 125 

" " 1276 Elm (private), boys and "girls . 35 

English " Mrs. Moore's (private), boys and girls 25 

English " Miss Kimball's (private), boys and 

girls . . . . . . . . .35 



Total 2,224 

FINANCES. 

The available funds for the year were as follows : — 

Appropriation by city councils . . . $55,000 00 

Balance of appropriation for 1884 * . . 180 84 

Balance of tuition account for 1884 . . 77 29 

Tuition of non-resident pupils for 1885 . . 239 29 



Total available |55,497 42 

Total expended 53,133 11 



Balance on hand .... $2,364 31 



♦From the balance of $1,629.80 shown in our last annual report, $1,600 was transferred 
to other purposes by the city councils without notice to this board. 



112 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES AND BALANCES. 



Available. 



Expended. 



Balance. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery . . . 

Care of rooms 

Contingent expenses . . . . 

Fuel* 

Furniture and supplies . . 
Printing and advertising 

Repairs 

Evening schools 

Tuition 



$40,472.82 

600.41 

3,120.01 

1,196.02 

3,029.80 

1,000.04 

829.30 

3,278.16 

1,654.28 

316.58 



S39.819.03 

484.37 

3,108.96 

1,012.31 

2,642.01 

854.03 

499.53 

3,236.83 

1,476.04 



$663.79 
116.04 
11.05 
183.71 
387.79 
146.01 
329.77 
41.33 
178.24 
316.58 



$55,497.42 



$53,133.11 



$2,364.31 



*From the balance of $1,629.80 shown in our last annual report, $1,600 was transferred 
to other purposes by the city councils without notice to this board. 

The income from the state literary fund for the year 
amounted to $2,527.23, which deducted from the total ex- 
penditure of $53,133.11 leaves $50,605.88 as the charge 
on the tax-payers. 



113 



ANNUAL STATISTICS OF COST OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



Datb. 



Average 
No. pupils 



Cost of 
Schools. 



Cost per 
Scholar. 



City 
Valuation. 



City Tax. 



School tax 



1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1S75 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881, 
1882, 
1883. 
1884 
1885. 



2129 
2080 
2278 
2450 
2463 
2501 
2543 
2.513 
2571 
2859 
2970 
2858 
2957 
2848 
2872 
2725 



$42,000 
42,900 
47,900 
47,300 
47,500 
51,800 
50,100 
47,900 
44,900 
46,200 
48,945 
50,729 
51,604 
53,525 
53,477 

53,133.11 



$19.45 
20.62 
21.03 
19.34 
19.28 
20.71 
19.70 
18.78 
17.46 
15.71 
16.49 
17.70 
17.45 
18.79 
18.62 
19.49 



$10,710,252 
11,365,162 
11,542,632 
12,001,200 
12,716,892 
14,195,102 
15,309,348 
15,005,718 
15,912,234 
17,482,132 
17,825,116 
17,943,308 
19,175,408 
20,055,986 
20,613,032 
21,137,464 



$234,047 X 
236,632 
259,196 
300,768 
312,835 
315,131 
248,900 
246,573 
276,873 
264,406 
264,491 
316,462 
312,673 
332,741 
360,732 
345,200 



$ .0041 
.0037 

. .0041 
.0039 
.0037 
.0036 
.0032 
.0030 
.0028 
.0026 
.0027 
.0028 
.0026 
.0026 
.0024 
.0023 



The estimate of school expenses for 1886 is as follows: 
Teachers' salaries |41,000 



Books and stationery 
Care of rooms . 
Contingent expenses . 
Fuel / . 

Furniture and supplies 
Printing and advertising 
Repairs 



Evening schools 



Total 



600 
3,200 

900 
3,500 
1,000 

400 
3,500 
1,400 



. 155,500 
CHAELES H. MA:N^OT]Sra, 

For the Committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the School Committee of Manchester: — 

Gentlemen, — Tii accordance with your rules, requiring 
an annual report from the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, I herewith respectfully submit the follow- 
ing as my ninth repoi;t, the same being for the year 1885, 
and the thirtieth of its series : — 

ORGANIZATION, 

During the past year five teachers have been employed 
in the High School one term, and six teachers two terms. 
There has been an average of sixteen grammar-school 
divisions, thirteen middle schools, thirty-one primary, and 
nine ungraded suburban. This is equivalent to seventy- 
five distinct schools of a single room each ; but the 
average number of regular teachers necessary, and em- 
ployed, has been only seventy-two, because the principal 
of the Training School has charge of the four rooms con- 
stituting that school. The whole number of different 
teachers regularly employed, however, has been seventy- 
six. The following have also been employed for extended 
lengths of time, as substitutes : Spring term, Lelia A. 
Brooks for Miss Gove, and Alta C. Willand for Miss 
Lord; fall term, Cora F. Sanborn for Miss Adams, Lelia 
A. Brooks for Miss Barnes, Mary F. Dana for Miss 
Moulton, Mary A. Putney for Miss Annis, and Martha 
E. Sanborn for Miss Kelley. 



115 



ATTENDANCE. 

The following table presents the main features of in- 
terest pertaining to the attendance upon the public 
schools since 1876. The number of different pupils an- 
nually enrolled prior to 1877 does not appear to have been 
ascertained, hence this table is compiled for only nine 
years : — 





-Si 

. « 
.§.2 


Whole No. 
belonging. 


□ 

< 


* . 

8)1 


'3 

Q 

O o 

11 

^•< 
CM 


So 
a o 

^^ 


a.2 

1 

1^ 


•a 

N 

cs 2 

•1 


•a 

n 

<o*. 

"S'o 
<u o 

■§ 


1 

« o 

so 

O SO 

iz; 






Boys. 


Girls. 


< 


1877 


3607 


1840 


1767 


2571 


2413 


93.8 


96 


76 






38 


70 


1878 

1879 


3515 


1783 


1732 


2571 


2348 


91.3 


106 


89 






47 


70 


3798 


1924 


1874 


2859 


2648 


92.6 


145 


77 






48 


71 


1880. 


4136 
4235 
4095 
4062 


2166 
2200 
2086 
2061 


1970 
2035 
2009 
2001 


2970 
2858 
2957 

2848 


2727 
2602 
2712 
2612 


92.0 
91.0 
91.7 
91.4 


91 

110 

164 
103 


75 
62 
72 
97 






38 
39 
53 

27 


77 


1881 






75 


1882 






73 


1883 






71 


1884. ... 


3918 


1924 


1994 


2872 


2645 


92.1 


95 


84 


72 


56 


38 


72 


1885 


3806 


1891 


1915 


2725 


2430 


90.6 


96 


98 


89 


80 


35 


72 



* Some may have entered from other than the public schools. 

It may be seen from the foregoing that it is not ex- 
ceptional to find the totals for the year less than those for 
the year previous. Diminution in the annual enrollment 
of the public schools has been going on ever since the 
French parochial schools were opened in 1881. The 
total number in the public schools this year has been 112 
less than it was last year ; and yet, by an examination of 
the attendance table, immediately following this report, it 
will be found that the combined number enrolled in the 
high, grammjir, and middle schools this year has been 



116 

greater by 23 than it was last year. This, too, though a 
school which was last year of middle grade, has this year 
become primary. The number of primary schools, how- 
ever, is not increased, because the one just mentioned, 
taught by Miss Senter, is oifset by the one discontinued 
near the close of last year on Lowell street, taught by 
Miss Tynan. The average number of teachers remains 
the same ,as last year, notwithstanding the loss of a 
middle school, because of the employment of an addi- 
tional teacher for two terms at the High School and the 
organization of another grammar division at Webster 
street last term. 

The loss of 112 in the total number, in spite of the gain 
of 23 in the higher grades, remains to be accounted for. 
This loss, by a comparison of the totals for the primary 
and suburban schools with those for the same grades last 
year, is readily discovered. There have been less pupils 
in the primary schools, this year, by 104, and less in the 
suburban schools by 31. Thus the gain of 23 in the 
higher grades is more than offset by the loss in the subur- 
ban schools. The thrift of the city proper continues to 
attract the suburban resident and the outlying schools are 
year by year reduced. Under the new law establishing 
the town system, the very small schools of the country 
towns are likely to be consolidated and greatly improved. 
The opponents of consolidation in our country districts 
cannot expect the farmers of the country towns to locate 
in the suburban precincts on account of the advantages of 
city schools which by inspection may not be found more 
than a quarter as large or as well classified as those organ- 
ized within a reasonable distance of their present homes, 
or, if beyond that, with proper accommodations for the 
conveyance of pupils provided. 

As before shown, the primary schools have "suffered the 



117 

greatest depletion; and this is explained by the fact that 
this is the only grade from which any considerable num- 
ber can be withdrawn for the parochial schools, at least 
on the east side of the river. 

An examination of the table just presented shows that 
the total enrollment of 4,235 in 1881, has gradually dimin- 
ished to 3,806 in 1885, notwithstanding the growth of the 
city. Within this period of time nine primary schools 
have been discontinued in consequence of the withdrawal 
of pupils almost wholly of foreign parentage. Three of 
these schools were at the Beech-street house, four at the 
Manchester-street, and two at the Lowell-street. The last 
of these nine schools was closed during the present year, 
at the Lowell-street house, near the close of the spring 
term, when a teacher was needed to fill the vacancy at 
Blodget-street occasioned by the resignation of Miss 
Nichols. 

In the mean time nine other schools have been organ- 
ized: one at Bakersville, one on Lincoln street, four on 
Webster street, and three on Main street; but the differ- 
ence in the average size of the new schools, as compared 
with those discontinued, is nearly as great as the diminu- 
tion in the totals apparent in the statistical table. 

The lower percentage of daily attendance this year, 
however, is exceptional ; but that is readily accounted for 
when it is remembered how badly broken were many of 
our schools during both the first and second terms of the 
year, b}' the invasion made by general measles. The 
*' small-pox scare" and necessary absences from school 
consequent upon the severity of vaccination in many 
instances, during the third term, also helped to reduce the 
usual standard of attendance. In addition to all this, 
there was this year an entire absence of the pressure here- 
tofore brought to bear to secure perfect attendance by the 



118 

award of attendance cards and diplomas ; and the reaction 
natural from the change doubtless had its influence. 
Considering all these obstacles, we may, indeed, be the 
rather surprised that the rate of attendance is not still less. 
The character of the causes lowering the per cent of 
attendance also explains why the rate is found compara- 
tively so much lower in some schools than would other- 
wise be expected. It is hoped that nothing will occur 
during the coming year to prevent those schools naturally 
most capable of attaining a high standard of punctuality 
from taking the lead. 

By an inspection of the attendance table subjoined to 
this report, it may be seen that the distribution of pupils 
among the various schools is quite unequal. This cannot 
be entirely avoided, but to some extent it may and should 
be remedied. I think it is somewhat more than ten years 
since the last recast of boundary lines w^as made for the 
various school precincts. In the mean time schools have 
been discontinued, others formed in diflferent localities, 
and new houses built. It is quite time for a readjustment 
of the boundary lines between certain schools, and I again 
urge upon the committee the importance of eftecting 
proper changes. 

As a result of considerable study of the matter, I sub- 
mit the following as a basis for your consideration of the 
subject: — 

PROPOSED SCHOOL BOUNDARIES. 

Franklin-street Grammar and Higher Middle Schools : 
North by Stark and Amherst streets, east by Pine street, 
south by Young and Cove streets, west by the river. 

Lower Middle School : Same as above, except eastern 
boundary is by Chestnut street. 

Merrimack-street Lower Middle School : ]S"orth by 



119 

Concord street, east bv Beech street, south by Young, 
street, west by Chestnut street. 

Lincohi-street Grammar, and Higher Middle Schools : 
North by Concord street, west by Pine street. 

Lower Middle School : Same as above, except western 
boundary is by Beech street. 

Spring-street Grammar and Middle Schools : Korth 
by Brook street, east by Chestnut street, south by Am- 
herst and Stark streets, west by the river. 

Ash-street Grammar and Middle Schools : l^orth by 
Blodget and Gore streets, south by Concord street, west 
by Chestnut street, i 

Webster-street Grammar and Middle Schools : South 
by Blodget and Gore streets east of Chestnut, and by 
Brook street west of Chestnut. 

Main-street Grammar and Middle Schools : West 
Manchester. 

Bakersville (all grades) : IS^orth by Cove and Young 
streets, east by Union street, west by the river. 

Franklin-street Primaries : I^Torth by Stark street, east 
by Elm street between Stark and Central, and by Elm 
back street and Willow street between Central and Young; 
south by Young and Cove streets. 

Merrimack-street Primaries : North by Amherst street 
west of Pine, and by Concord street east of Pine ; east 
by Beech street; south by Park street (except that this 
school vvill include the Beech-street precinct for all grades 
not provided for at the house in that district) ; west by 
Elm street between Amherst and Central, and by Elm 
back street between Central and Park. 

Beech-street Primaries : North by Park street ; east 
by Maple (but by Beech for higher-primary grades) ; 
west by Elm back street between Park and Auburn, and 
by Willow street between Auburn and Young. 



120 

Lincoln-street and Wilson-Hill Primaries : North by 
Concord street ; west by Beech street, except for lower 
primary grades the section south of Park street between 
Maple and Beech belongs to the Beech-street school. 

Spring-street Primaries : North by Hollis street, east 
by Elm street, south by Stark street, west by the river. 

Lowell-street Primaries : North by Orange street, 
east by Pine street, south by Amherst street, west by 
Elm street. 

Ash-street Primaries : North by Harrison west of 
Union, and by Gore street east of Union ; south by Con- 
cord street; west by Pine street between Harrison and 
Concord, and by Union street between Harrison and Gore. 

Blodget-street Primaries : North by Salmon street ; 
east by Union street between Salmon and Harrison, and 
by Pine street between Harrison and Orange ; south by 
Harrison street between Pine and Union, and by Orange 
and Hollis streets west of Pine ; west by the river. 

Webster-street Primaries : South by Salmon street west 
of Union, and by Gore street east of Union, 

Any changes made should be at once applicable to the 
admission of new pupils. But it may be well to allow 
pupils now in the respective buildings to continue therein, 
unless they change their abode without moving into the 
precinct of the school in which they may be when the 
boundaries are changed, or unless the school in which any 
living out of its precinct may be becomes filled by those 
belonging to the precinct in which the school is situated. 

PROMOTIONS AND DIPLOMAS. 

Our method of promoting pupils from class to class, 
chiefly upon the recommendation of the teacher, continues 
to prove highly satisfactory. The plan, in brief, as applied 



121 

to the admission of pupils to the High School, is the 
admittance of pupils from the grammar schools upon the 
recommendation of the several grammar masters, the aver- 
age results of the scholastic attainment of their respective 
pupils, as recorded for the year, being taken as a basis for 
determining their literary qualifications. Pupils in any 
grade feeling aggrieved at the decision of the teacher 
have satisfaction in being allowed to try a special exami- 
nation before the superintendent to determine their fitness 
for advancement. Others seeking admission to the High 
School also have this opportunity at the same time, near 
the close of the summer vacation. 

It happens, however, nearly every year that there are 
one, two, or more pupils in the first class of each of the 
upper grammar divisions who cannot be recommended 
for admission to the High School : and they, knowing 
their inability, will not attempt to pass the special exami- 
nation, though they generally greatly desire the grammar 
school diploma. The determinatiouxof its award in such 
cases has usually been left to a special committee for each 
school, consisting of the chairman of its sub-committee, 
the principal of the school, and the superintendent. By 
this plan uniformity is not secured ; for, as the officials 
named are subject to change, a very different course may 
be pursued in the 'same school in different years, or pos- 
sibly in different scliools during the' same year. As it is 
evident there should be uniformity in the matter, I recom- 
mend the committee determine the matter by a general 
rule, and likewise by what direct authority pupils shall be 
admitted to the High School. Such a rule will avoid the 
necessity of annually bringing the subject before the com- 
mittee for action by special vote. I therefore suggest 
additions to section 6, chapter 1 of the Regulations, that 
it may read as follows : — 



122 

" Candidates for admission to tlie High School must give 
evidence of a good moral character, and be able to pass a 
satisfactory examination in the studies of the grammar 
schools before the committee or the superintendent : but 
the sub-committee of the High School who shall pass upon 
the admission of all pupils from elementary schools, may, 
at its discretion, admit to the High School without ex- 
amination those pu}iils who may be recommended by their 
teachers as properly qualified therefor. 

" Every scholar completing the prescribed course of 
a study in the high or grammar schools shall be entitled to 
diploma from the board, provided the attendance, deport- 
ment, and scholarship be satisfactory ; so, also, any of the 
first class of first-division grammar grade who shall have 
been members of said class one year, shall have been in 
such attendance as to receive instruction in all topics pre- 
scribed for the class, with reviews of the same, and shall 
have been commended by the principal for good behavior 
and diligence in study." 

This last provision will entitle pupils going over the- 
work of the first class a second time (for the prescribed 
work is regularly covered in five months) their diplom as 
of graduation from the grammar school ; provided they 
have done their work as well as they could, though they 
are not, scholarly or able to enter profitably upon the work 
of the High School. In the rare cases mentioned, there 
seems a certain sense of justice in the award of the di- 
ploma ; and there is nothing in the language of it to debar 
its bestowal. Graduation day would not be an occasion 
for tears to any who had earnestly tried to do their whole 
duty ; and the award of the diploma, under the restric- 
tions named, would be more significant of an honest en- 
deavor than its bestowal in regular course by the leading 
educational institutions of the land. 



123 



TEACHERS. 



The positions occupied by the several teachers in the- 
city schools during the year may be seen from an inspec- 
tion of the table appended to this report. 

The following, however, will make clearer the changes 
that have taken place in the corps, and the employment 
of teachers for the first time serving in the city schools : 



Tea/-hers ^^^ "^ effect of resig- Expiration of term ol 
nation. Bervice. 


Benjamin F. Dame. Jan. 16. 




Florence A. Nichols. June 5. 




Addie C. Prescott. Aug. 7. 




Elsie S. Dow. 


June 26. 


Maud A. Dean. 


Dec. 11. 


Teachers. ^IVLS.' ^-^-s. 


Date of transfer. 


EdAv. R, Goodwin. Jan. 5. Nina D. 


Annis. June 5. 


Olive A. Evers. Jan. 5. Olive J. 


Randall. Sept 7. 


Fred. W. Shattuck. Feb. 9. 




Elsie S. Dow. Apr. 13. 




Maud A. Dean. Sept. 7. 




Genev. L. Whitten. Sept. 7. 




Alta C. Willand. Sept. 7. 





Misses Dean and Dow were engaged for but one term 
each. They were both found to be good scholars, and 
fully competent to give instruction in the advanced 
branches specially assigned them. Miss Prescott taught 
two years and proved a good teacher. Miss Nichols 
taught several years. She at once took and held a position 
in the front rank of our primary corps of teachers. Mr. 
Dame taught the Lincoln, formerly the East Grammar 
school, about fifteen years. He excelled particularly as 
an instructor in teaching vocal drill and reading. He 



124 

"had the rare faculty of keeping his pupils within reason- 
able bounds without their apparently feeling conscious of 
being under restraint. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Under the laws of this state, as amended in 1881, no 
child under sixteen years of age can be employed in any 
manufacturing establishment unless he has attended 
school at least three months within a year, six months 
if he be under fourteen, and unless he can write legibly 
and read fluently in readers of the grade usually classed 
as third readers. 

ISTow, since children must learn to read before they can 
be thus employed, I think the committee having charge 
of the evening schools are wise in excluding therefrom 
those under sixteen years of age, except in rare cases 
which they recognize on account of the extreme poverty 
of parents whose necessities require that their children 
shall satisfy the conditions of the law with as little inter- 
ruption to bread-winning labor as possible. The general 
exclusion from the evening schools of those under sixteen 
years of age may reduce the number belonging somewhat ; 
but the good of those in attendance is enhanced by such 
exclusion, while the expense of conducting the schools is 
at the same time reduced. For sanitary reasons it is 
better that young persons who endure the fatigue of the 
factory during the day should go early to rest at night, 
after refreshing exercise in the open air during the brief 
time properly at their disposal, rather than retire an hour 
later when still more wearied by study in a poorly venti- 
lated room. Besides, the evening schools cannot be made 
an equivalent for the day schools ; and it is best that 
,those under sixteen years of age should have all the ben- 



125 

efit of the day schools which they can afford, and not less,- 
at the least, than what the law intends for snch. More- 
over, there are hundreds of adult citizens who cannot 
even read English. These should be sought out and 
encouraged to come into the evening schools and learn 
the written form of the spoken language of their adopted 
country, without an understanding of which they cannot 
be expected to rise, as a class, above the lowest type of 
citizenship. Several enter the evening schools for the first 
time every winter, but only a few of these remain long 
enough to derive any profit. The greater part of them 
withdraw, it is believed, for the want of proper accom- 
modations. Men, women, and youth of sixteen to twenty 
years of age cannot be comfortable in seats designed for 
primary-school children. The room of the principal at 
the Spring-street house is the only one furnished properly 
for an evening school, and it is there that the average 
attendance has uniformly been largest and good. 

The evening schools as a whole have done well, con- 
sidering their accommodations. They can, however, and 
should be improved. The first thingisto provide more suit- 
able fixtures for seating and lighting some of the rooms ; 
and I trust the committee will see that proper accommo- 
dations are furnished before another winter. For obvious 
reasons, the evening schools should not be held in rooms 
occupied by the day schools. Separate rooms may be had 
on the east side of the river by fitting up the other vacant 
room at Spring-street, or the two unoccupied ones at the- 
Lowell-street house. 

^STone becoming acquainted with the character of the 
pupils in the evening schools, and the earnestness of their 
purpose, can fail to take a lively interest in their welfare 
or for a moment doubt the expediency of maintaining 
these schools. 



126 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 



The school has been in charge of Miss Olive A. Evers, 
as principal, during the entire year. Miss Evers came 
from Wellesle}' College, where she had been pursuing a 
course of study designed especiall}^ to prepare ladies for 
the work of training teachers. Miss Evers had had no 
practical experience in the discharge of duties similar to 
those that have devolved upon her here, and she has felt 
with redoubled force what every principal under the new 
plan of conducting the Training School has expressed, viz., 
that an assistant teacher versed in the best methods of 
teaching and skilled in their practical application is 
greatly needed to assist in the proper conduct of the 
school. Far from being discouraged, however, Miss 
Evers has labored assiduously for the prosperity of the 
school, and the results have been as satisfactory as could 
reasonably be expected from one for the first time at- 
tempting the double duty devolving upon the principal of 
the Training School. The schools under her charge are 
in efficiency fully up to the average of the corresponding 
grades of our city schools ; and, when all the circum- 
stances are taken into account, this may be considered a 
good achievement for one the first time acting in the 
capacity named, and unassisted except byjiyoung lady sub- 
teachers, recent graduates of the High School. With a 
year's experience in the work and a full understanding 
of the school, it is expected that Miss Evers will soon 
.cause the respective grades of the Training School to take 
highest rank among the city schools of corresponding 
grades. 

The following is a list of sub-teachers who graduated 
from the training school, January 30, 1885 : — 



127 

Lelia A. Brooks, Martha E. Sanborn, 

Bessie M. Hall, Genevieve L. Whitten, 

Alta C. Willand. 

The following have been members of the teachers' 
class since the opening of the fall term, 18^4 ; and hj the 
"first of February, next, they will have served the full 
length of time prescribed for sub-teachers : — 
Carrie A. F. Bartlett, May J. Hickey, 

May J. E'utt. Wma B. Croning, 

The following were admitted as sub-teachers at the 
opening of the fall term, 1885 : — 

Hulda C. Graupner, Alice E. Page, 

Lillian C. Hall, Sarah B. Paige, 

Barbara B. Joy, May A. Southard. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The High School has been in good condition through- 
out the year. Under the direction of its new and efficient 
principal, the school at once came out of the disturbed 
condition in which it had been during the latter part of 
the preceding year, and heartil}^ cooperated with the 
teachers to secure the natural results of sustained and 
earnest work. 

The principal has pursued a policy suggested in my 
report gf last year, in seeking to come in direct class- 
room contact with as large a portion of the individual 
membership of the school as possible. B}^ aid allowed 
in the emplo^'ment of an additional teacher to instruct 
most of the classes in Latin and Greek, he has been able 
to devote about four fifths of his recitation periods to 
instruction in the English branches. Thi& course has 
had at least two good effects : first, it has dignified the 
English studies in the estimation of the pupils ; and, 



128 

second, the superior teaching ability of the principal has; 
aroused and deepened the interest of pupils in their work 
to such an extent that they are more inclined to continue- 
a course to its j^ull conclusion. As evidence of this, it. 
may be said that fourteen in the English course have- 
this year returned to continue their studies beyond the 
two years allowed for graduation as an end to a " Business ^ 
Course." Last year there were but two in this course 
who continued beyond its second year. The attendance 
during the fall term was ten per cent greater than that of 
the corresponding term last year, though the average 
attendance for the year is but one greater than it was last 
year. This is accounted for by the fact that the unsettled 
condition of the school in the fall of 1884 caused it to 
open in January unusually small, the enrollment for the 
term, beginning then, being one hundred and sixty-two 
(162). Last term the enrollment was one hundred and 
ninety-six (196). 

Entertaining and well-executed graduating exercises 
occurred at the Manchester Opera House, Wednesday 
evening, June 24. 

ORDER OF EXERCISES. 



(The assignment of parts not determined by rank.) 

Music. — " The Dawn of Day." Samuel Beay, 

BY THE CJjASS. 

Salutatory. 

nathaniel k. noyes. 

Essay. — "Tapestry." 

MINNIE LINDA HEATH. 

Music. — Piano Duet, " Warbling at Eve." 

NELLIE A. GOGGIN, HATTIE A. KENNEDY.. 



129 



Colloquy. — "Bells." 



STELLA MABEL BALDWIN, FANNIE MAUDE JOY, 

NELLIE ELIZABETH CUMNER, MARIANNA HODGDON. 

Music. — Ballad, "Wrecked and Saved." 

ir. Knowles 
joseph william mcguiness. 

Class History. 

elmer ellsworth hartford. 

Class Prophecies. 

jennie maria boyd. 

Music. — Quartet, "Happy Days Gone By." 

MINNIE ELLA LITTLEFIELD, STELLA MABEL BALDWIN, 
NATHANIEL K. NOYES, JOSEPH WILLIAM MCGUINESS. 

Tent Scene from Julius Cesar. Shakespeare 

BRUTUS, JOHN FRANCIS DOWD. 

CASSIUS, SAMUEL CENTER KENNARD. 

LUCILIUS, WILSON F. HIGGINS. 

Music. — Double Trio, "Charitj-." Rossini 

nellie elizabeth cumner, stella mabel baldwin, 
minnie ella littlefield, fannie maude joy, 
nellie adelaide goggin, jennie maria boyd. 

Class Poem. 

edwin bell davis. 

Valedictory. — " Memory's Pictures." 

minnie ella littlefield. 

Class Song. 

Award of Diplomas. — Charles H. Manning, Chair- 
man of High School Sub- Committee. 



130 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



The elementary grades* constitute by far the greater 
part of our system of public schools; and it is a matter 
of considerable satisfaction that I can truthfully say they 
are in excellent condition. The recent report that they 
were found " up to the standard " when inspected by the 
highest state official authority, was just. These schools 
are generally well officered, from the principalship of the 
grammar school to the teachership of the lower primary. 
Their work during the past year has been faithful, perse- 
vering, substantial, and the results correspondingly good. 
There is, however, a great waste of the best efforts of 
both teacher and pupil in the operation of the system, 
as I have before reported to other organizations of the 
committee. 

The point of my criticism lies in the consequences of 
the fact that pupils annually, or oftener, change teachers, 
and have at least eight different ones during their course 
of elementary instruction. In many instances there is 
not, for three or four months after a pupil comes under 
the tuition of a new teacher, a realization of the outmost 
limit, and just that, of the knowledge from which the 
pupil is actually prepared to advance or an understanding 
of his abilities or power to accomplish results, to say 
nothing of that acquaintance with the disposition neces- 
sary to obtain the best results in the most agreeable man- 
ner. On the other hand, the pupil not infrequently suffers 
in the mean time because of the feeling that he is not ap- 
preciated; and, in consequence, his confidence, coopera- 
tion, and love are tardily won. 

After several years' experience in teaching the various 
grades, and extended observation of the work of other 

* All below the high school grade. 



131 

teachers therein, I do not hesitate to declare my conviction 
that, under the same teacher, who is as competent in every 
department as is the average teacher in the respective 
grades, as much work, and that of a better quality, can be 
doiie in six years as is now done in eight. Having given 
considerable study to attain a better utilization of the 
teaching force in a graded system of schools, and laying- 
aside every doubtful modification of a plan conceived, I 
recommend, with confidence of an improvement for our 
schools, the following : — 

First. At the close of the spring term, advance to the 
room of next higher grade both classes in every school 
between the primary and the high, and from each primary 
school then advance the first and second classes to the 
next higher room. 

Second. At the end of the first four weeks of the win- 
ter term (about the first of Februar}'), again make promo- 
tions, but without then changing the classes to other 
rooms. 

Third. Annually, at the close of the spring term, 
change the position of all teachers between the lower 
primary grade and the highest-division grammar, so that 
the higher-primary and the middle school teachers shall 
go round with their pupils from school to school, starting 
Avith the higher primary and ending with the higher 
middle ; and so, likewise, have the grammar school assist- 
ants perform the circuit of the three lower divisions of 
the grammar school with their pupils. 

These changes would so eiFect that pupils should, dur- 
ing their elementary course of instruction, have but four 
difterent teachers where they now have eight ; and I 
believe better results would thereby be attained with less 
friction, for reasons already suggested, and the addi- 
tional one that the teacher would be led better to see 



132 

the relation of the work as comprised in the several 
grades and to treat it more harmoniously as a whole, thug: 
becoming broader herself and less likely to " get into 
ruts." By the plan suggested no principle for securing 
best results through a division of labor would be violated^ 
for the character of the work throughout each circuit 
named for the rotation of the teacher is not unlike that 
required in any grade of the same circuit. B}'- this plan^ 
the teacher of the lower primary school would continue 
therein as heretofore. This is deemed advisable, because 
of the special qualifications essential for the exceptional 
character of the work done during the first year and a 
half. During this period, too, there is less danger of a 
teacher's performing merely routine work. For the next 
three years and a half, pupils would enjoy the advantages 
derived from being under the same instructor, and, like- 
wise, under but one other teacher during the three years 
covered by the course in the three lower divisions of the 
grammar grade. 

Other advantages that would accrue may well be 
named. The use of two different drawing-books at the 
same time in the same school would be avoided; the 
highest division grammar grade would be filled through- 
out the year, to the profit and increase in numbers of 
those who go from the second class of that grade to the 
High School, as many do every year; and the lower 
primaries Avould be relieved of any overcrowded condi- 
tion during the fall term. The advantages named in this 
paragraph'rmay be secured by pursuing the course indi- 
cated in the first and second of my recommendations; 
and I earnestly recommend their adoption, whether the 
t'lird be accepted or not. 



133 

CONCLUSION. 

Ill conclusion, gentlemen, permit me to congratulate 
jou that the measures you have taken for the improvement 
and prosperity of the schools have been so generally 
effectual. I also thank you for wise counsels, and a con- 
tinuation of that confidence and cooperation without 
which the best directed efforts of an executive officer of 
the board would come to naught. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 

December 31, 1885. 



134 



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ORGANIZATION FOR 1886. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

GEORGE H. STEAElSrS, Mayor, ex-officio Chairman. 
GEORGE M. TRUE, 

President of the Common Gonncil, ex officio. 
Ward 1.— Albe C. Heath, 

Charles H. Manning. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean, 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3.— I^athan P. Hunt, 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Samuel D. Lord, 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
Ward 5. — Charles A. O'Connor, 

Thomas F. Collins. 
Ward 6. — Jacob J. Abbott, 

William H. Huse. 
Ward 7. — Edwin F. Jones, 

Frank B. Potter. 
Ward 8. — Josiah G. Dearborn, 

Timothy J. Howard. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWIN F. JONES. 



140 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. W. Clarke, True, 
Dodge, Jones. 

Salaries. — Messrs. O'Connor, Jones, Abbott. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, 
Potter, Howard. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, ^¥. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Dearborn, Huse, Heath. 

Music. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, Dearborn. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
True, Manning, W. C. Clarke. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. "W. 
Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Collins, Potter, Heath. 

Health. — Messrs. Abbott, O'Connor, Howard. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, O'Connor, S. W. 
'Clarke, Hunt. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, "W. C. 
■Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Lord, Abbott, S. "W. Clarke. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. O'Connor, Heath, Manning. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Dodge, Jones, Collins. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Heath, Jones, Dearborn. 

1 raining School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodg-e. 



141 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Heath, Huse. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. S. W. Clarke,. 
Manning, Howard. 

School Street ami South Main Street. — Messrs. Dearborn, 
Lord, Heath. 

Webster Street., Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Lord, Dodge. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Abbott, O'Connor, Potter, 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Huse, Potter, Dear- 
born. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Howard, 
Huse, Abbott. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Potter, 
Howard, Abbott. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Jones, W. C. Clarke, Collins.- 



142 

LIST OF TEACHERS. 

1886. 

GrIVING THE ISTaME, ScHOOL,- AND GrADE OF ScHOOL. 
HIGH SCHOOL. BEECH STREET. 

Master. — Edward li. Goodwin. 
Sub-Master, — George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. — Lucretia E. Manahan, 

Mary A. Biizzell. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

Mary Stanton. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLS, 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. — Lenora C. Gilford. 

Lottie R. Adams. 

Carrie E. Reid, 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — C, Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary, — Kellie M. James, 
Lower Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Higher Grades. 

Annie 0. Heath (4th division and second class of 3d). 
Lizzie P. Gove (Higher Middle). 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. — Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. — l^ellie I. Sanderson. 



143 

Lower Primary. — Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. — Belle M. Kelley. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar G-rades. 
Principal. — Fred W. Shattiick. 
Assistants. — Annie W. Patten. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

First Floor. — Loioer Grades. 
Higher Middle. — Mary F. Barnes. 
Lower Middle. — Carrie M. Gilmore. 
Higher Primary. — Eva F. Tuson. 
Mixed Primary, — Kate M. Follansbee. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Secoml Floor. — Grammar Girides. 
Principal. — J. Walter Stetson. 
Assistants. — Annie A. Webster. 
Mary E. Bunton. 
Bertha L. Dean. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 
Higher Middle. — j^anc}^ S. Bunton. 
Lower Middle. — Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. — Emma L. Stokes. 
Lower Primary. — Helen F. Wetherbee. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Higher Grades. 
Principal. — Frank S. SutcliiFe. 
Assistants. — Cora M. Dearborn. 

Kettie F. Ainsworth. 
Higher Middle. — Mary L. Gage. 



144 

First Floor. —Lower Grades.. 

Lower Middle. — Ellen E. McKean. 
Lower Middle. — Flora M. Senter. 
Higher Primary. — May J. Hickey. 
Higher Primary. — T^ettie C. Woodman. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades.. 
Mixed Grammar. — Mary A. Smith. 
Assistant. — Alta C. Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 
Mixed Middle. — Maria K Bower. 
Mixed Primary. — Carrie I. Stevens. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. — Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. ^ 

Lower Primary. — Mary A. Putney. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT).. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. — Helen M. Morrill. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Georgia A. Wyman. 

MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER UNION). 

Training School. i 

Principal. — Olive Adele Evers. \ 

A lower middle school, a higher and two lower primary \ 

schools, embracing first four years of school work. Prin- | 

cipal is assisted by members of Training Class. 



145 

AVILSON hAl. 

Lower Primary. — Ella Hope. 

BEECH-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER SPRUCE). 

First Flo(yi\ 
Lower Primary. — Georgiamia Dow. 

SCHOOL-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 

Mixed Primary. — Augusta S, Downs. 
Lower Primary. — Jennie F. Bailey. 

First Floor. 

Lower Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 
Lower Primary. — Mary W. MitchelL 

SOUTH-MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Higher Primary. — Alice G. Lord. 
Lower Primary. — Delle E. Haines. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. — Susie H. Frame. 

2, Amoskeag. — Etta J. Carley. 
Mixed Primary. — Mary Gr. Tynan.. 

3, Bakersville. — Lizzie A. Burns. 
Higher Primary. — S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. — Edith M. Stebbins.. 

4, Gofte's Falls. — Georgie A. ]N'ute. 

5, Harvey District. — Ella F. Barker. 

6, Webster's Mills. — Susie G. Woodman. 
1* Hallsville. — Olive J. Randall. 

8, Youngsville. — Genevieve L. Whitten.. 

9, Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

10 



146 

SPECIAL TEACHER. 

Music. — J. J. Kimball. 

CERTIFICATED AND RESIDENT GRADUATES OF THE TRAINING 

SCHOOL NOT PERMANENTLY EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, 

IN THE ORDER OF THEIR DATES OF GRADUATION. 

f Fannie L. Sanborn. 

* Bessie M. Hall. 
*Lelia A. Brooks, 

* Martha E. Sanborn. 
*Carrie A. F. Bartlett. 
fMajF. mitt. 
■fMay J. Hickej. 
fNina B. Croning. 

OTHERS NOT HERE EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, WHO HAVE 
CERTIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION. 

Maud Bell, Fannie L. Perry, Fannie E. Smith, Etta C. 
McLaren, Martha T. Learnard, Lizzie M. McAffee, Hattie 
J. Hoyt, and William F. Gibson. All certificated for 
grammar and lower grades. 

Helen W. Poor, Susan C. Eastman, Belle F. Small, 
Hattie M. Ellis, Haitie E. Merrill, and Alithea M. Hutch- 
ins. Certificated for middle and primary grades. 

MEMBERS OF TRAINING SCHOOL, t'EBRUARY, 1886. 

Hulda C. Graupner, Lillian C. Hall, Barbara B. Joy, 
Alice E. Page, Sarah B. Paige, May A. Southard, 

JANITORS. 

Webste7' Street, Blodget Street, and Amoskeag. 
. Charles M. mrton. 



* Certificated for grammar and lower grades, 
t Certificated for middle and primary grades. 



147 

High School, Ash Street, Bridge Street, and Wilson Hill. 
John S. Aver J. 

Franklin Street and Lincoln Street. 
William Stevens. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. 
William H. Morrill. 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 
James Watts. 

Piscataquog Schools (Main Street, School Street, and South 
' Main Street). 

Albert T. Barr. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey. 

CALENDAR, 1886. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 4, closes 
March 26. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 12, closes 
JTune 25. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 6, closes 
December 10. Vacation of three weeks. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of ^lanchester : — 

The Trustees of the City Libraiy herewith respectfully 
submit their thirty-second annual report of the affairs of 
the library, and, accompanying the same, the report made 
to them by the treasurer of the board, showing the expen- 
ditures made by him in their behalf for books and period- 
icals, and also the report of the librarian, which gives in 
detail the statistics and operation of the library during 
the past year, and the condition of the library and other 
property under her care at the close of the year. 

From the report of the treasurer, it appears that there 
has been expended during the year for the purchase of 
books the sum of nine hundred and thirty-one dollars 
and thirty-three cents, and for the purchase of periodicals 
the sum of one hundred and seventy-six dollars and forty- 
five cents, being a total expenditure for both these pur- 
poses of one thousand one hundred and seven dollars and 
seventy-eight cents, leaving in the hands of the treasurer 
at the close of the year, of the sum appropriated by the 
city for this purpose, a balance of four hundred and eighty- 
one dollars and eleven cents. 



152 

The income of the Dean fund, with the accumulated 
interest thereon, unexpended at the close of the year was 
four thousand five hundred and fifty-four dollars and 
twenty-three cents. But few books have been purchased 
from the income of this fund during the last year, but it 
is the intention of the trustees to make extensive additions 
to the library therefrom at an early date. 

The report of the librarian shows that the librarj' has 
been open for the delivery of books three hundred and 
six days, during which time the number of books deliv- 
ered for home use was fifty-five thousand one hundred 
and forty -two. In addition to this number, five thousand 
one hundred and fifty-six books and magazines have been 
delivered for use in the reading-room at the library, mak- 
ing the total number delivered during the year sixty 
thousand two hundred and ninety-eight, an average of one 
hundred and ninety-seven per day. The circulation of 
books for home use shows an increase over that of the 
year previous of four thousand two hundred and twenty- 
eight, while the number delivered for use in the reading 
room compared with same year shows a decrease of six 
hundred and ninety-two. The circulation of books for 
home use has exceeded that of any other year since the 
library was established. It is a source of gratification to 
the trustees to be able to report, that with the increase in 
circulation there has also been a marked improvement in 
the character and quality of the books called for by the 
patrons of the library ; and while works of fiction still 
continue to form a large proportion of the circulation, 
there has, nevertheless, been a healthful increase in the 
number of books taken from the library for the purpose of 
jijyestigation and study. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of 
the last report was twenty-seven thousand eight hundred 



153 

and sixty-seven. There have been added during the year 
three hundred and sixty-nine volumes by purchase, three 
hundred and thirty-five volumes Ijy donation, and eighty- 
nine volumes of periodicals have been bound, making the 
number of l;)ound volumes in the library at the present 
time twenty-six thousand seven hundred and nineteen, 
and the total number, including maps and pamphlets, 
twenty-eight thousand six hundred and sixty volumes. 

Sixty-nine different periodicals have been regularly 
received at the library during the year, and as fast as the 
volumes have been completed they have been bound and 
placed upon the shelves for general circulation. 

Forty-one volumes have been withdrawn from circula- 
tion during the year, having become too much worn and 
■ defaced to be of further service. Of this number, and of 
those retired from circulation in former years for the same 
cause, fifty-seven have been replaced at a cost of fifty-four 
dollars and six cents. 

A list of the books presented to the librarj^ during the 
year, together with the names of those presenting them, 
will be found annexed to the report of the librarian. To 
those who have so substantially shown their interest in 
the prosperity of the library, the trustees return the 
thanks of the city. 

The expenditures for the incidental charges of the 
library for the past year have been two thousand three 
liundred and seventy dollars and twenty-three cents. The 
items of these expenditures will be found in detail in the 
annual report of the city, the bills for the same having 
been paid by the city treasurer upon the approval of the 
trustees. 

By tlie will of the late Mary E. Elliot, a bequest of 
two thousand dollars was made to the city, in trust, the 
income of the same to be applied to the purchase of med- 



154 

ioal ]30oks and publications for the city library. In Jan- 
nary last, the trustees were informed by the mayor that 
tlie trustees of the Elliot Hospital had notiiied the city 
authorities that they were ready to pay over this legacy to 
the city whenever any person should be authorized to- 
receive and receipt for the same; also, that the city 
councils had passed a resolution authorizing the treasurer 
of the trustees of the city library to receive the legacy 
and to execute in behalf of the cit}^ any receipt therefor 
that might be necessary, and empowering the trustees,. 
when the legacy should be received, to invest the same 
and apply the income thereof for the purposes indicated 
in the will. Under the authority thus conferred, the 
treasurer has received the sum of two thousand dollars 
from the trustees of the Elliot Hospital, and the same 
has been temporarily deposited in the savings bank until 
an opportunity for a safe investment shall be found. The 
income of this fund, as the same shall from time to time 
accrue, will be appropriated by the trustees to the pur- 
chase of medical works, in accordance with the provisions; 
contained in the will of Mrs. Elliot, and the board recom- 
mend that such purchases be placed in an alcove of the 
librarj^ by themselves, and be designated the "Elliot 
Fund Purchase." 

A communication was received in June last from 
Thomas L. Livermore, resigning his position as a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees, on account of his removal 
from the city. The vacancy thus occasioned was filled by 
the election of Benjamin C. Dean for the unexpired term. 

The Hon, William P. jS'ewell, who had been one of 
the trustees of the library from its organization, and for 
twenty-eight years one of the committee on accounts of 
the board, died in October last. Mr. ISTewell had always 
manifested a deep interest in the success and prosperity of. 



155 

the library, and by liis death the Hbrary has sustained the- 
loss of one of its early friends and earnest supporters. 
The vacancy caused by the death of Mr. Kewell was 
tilled by the election of Herman F. Straw for the unex- 
pired term. 

At the commencement of the year, the city councils 
increased the appropriation usually made to the library, 
for the purpose of enabling the trustees to arrange for 
the compilation of an additional catalogue. The trus- 
tees, when the subject has been considered heretofore, 
have been disposed to provide for the preparation of a 
supplementary catalogue which should contain the books 
added to the library since December 31, 1877, when the 
second volume of the present catalogue was published ; 
but, in view" of the many complaints, from the patrons of 
of the library, of the inconvenience experienced in con- 
sulting the two volumes of the catalogue already pub- 
lished, the trustees have become somewhat doubtful 
whether such a supplementary catalogue, if prepared and 
printed, would satisfy the demands of the public frequent- 
ing the library or be of service proportionate to its cost. 
The trustees have, therefore, taken measures to ascertain 
the cost of compiling and printing an entire new cata- 
logue of all the books contained in the library, that they 
may have the means of determining what plan it may be 
best to adopt for the benefit of all concerned. 

In April last, Mr. George W. Burleigh, who had served 
as an assistant to the librarian for the past three years^ 
resigned his position. The trustees have since employed 
Mr. Harvey E. Martin at tlie library in place of Mr. 
Burleigh. 

During the year no circumstance has occurred to inter- 
fere with the harmonious operation of the library or to- 
call for any unusual action on the part of the trustees. 



k 



156 

The librarian, Mrs. M. J, Bunclier, has continued to dis- 
charge the duties pertaining to her office with her usual 
fidelity and to the satisfiiction of the trustees. 

The trustees desire to return their acknowledgments 
to the members of the cit}^ councils and other otficers of 
the city, for the courtesy and consideration with which 
their suggestions relating to the operation of the library 
have been received and carried out. 

January 25, 1886. 
In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered 
to be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and 
.transmitted to the city councils. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS, 31ayor. 

N"athan p. Hunt, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S . REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : — 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following' 
account of the receipts and expenditures by the board of 
the funds received on account of the City Library : — 

1885. Dr. 



Jan. 


1. 


To balance of appropriation 


$529 55 


Feb. 


20. 


Mrs. M. J. Buncher, 
fines 


balance of 


41 91 




20. 


Mrs. M. J. Buncher, 
etc. 


catalogues, 


11 80 


May 


22. 


appropriation for 1885 for books 


1,000 00 


Jan. 


1. 


balance of income 

fund 
income of Dean fund 


of Dean 

$4,081 67 

153 00 




July 


1. 
1. 

1. 


income of Dean fund 
interest on accumula- 
tion of income 
interest on accumula- 
tion of income 


153 00 

70 77 

101 42 


$4,559 m' 






Feb. 


19. 


To Mary E. Elliot fund 


$2,000 00 




July 


24. 


interest on Mary E. 










Elliot fund . 


54 00 


$2,054 00' 



^197 1% 



158 

1885. Cr. 

.Jan. 1. Paid Cleaves, Macdonald, & Co., 

books . . . . $40 50 
3. New England News Co., 

periodicals . . . 11 33 

8. Little, Bi'own, & Co., for Dean 

Fund Purchase, books . 5 63 

Feb. 2. Chas. C. Soule, periodicals . 5 00 

6. New England News Co., 

periodicals . . . 12 79 
20. W. H. Stevenson, periodicals 5 00 
20. Macdonald & Sons, periodi- 
cals 2 00 

20. J. H. Hickcox, periodicals . 2 00 

20. Mrs. M. J. Buncher, books . 50 

23. Geo. H. Policy & Co., peri- 

odicals .... 12 00 

March 4. New England News Co., 

periodicals 
10. E. A. Haven, books 

12. E. A. Haven, books . 
17. E. A. Haven, books . 
23. Lawyers' Cooperative Pub. 

Co., books 
23. Cleaves, Macdonald, & Co., 

books .... 
27. Cleaves, Macdonald, & Co., 

books .... 
April 3. New England News Co., 

periodicals 
3. Little, Brown, & Co., books 

13. Little, Brown, & Co., books 
20. Chas. Scribner's Sons, books 
20. E. Cliff, periodicals . 



10 


35 


10 


00 


10 


00 


6 


00 


100 


00 


34 


00 


4 


50 


11 


95 


4 


25 


3 


50 


6 


00 


1 


00 



159 



May 4. Paid l!^ew England I^ews Co, 





11 


June 


8 




12 




12 




18 




18 


July 


6 


Aug. 


5 




6 



Sept. 



Oct. 



6. 

20. 

20. 

3. 

8. 
15. 

21. 

25. 
1. 



periodicals 
E. A. Haven, books . 


\^Kj.j 


$10 65 
10 00 


New England l^ews 


Co., 




periodicals 
Cleaves, Macdonald, & 


Co. 


15 09 


books 




90 27 


Cleaves, Macdonald, & 


Co. 




books 




16 63 


Cleaves, Macdonald, & 


Co. 




books 
Cleaves, Macdonald, & 


Co. 


21 05 


books 
'New England I*^ews 


Co. 


15 61 


periodicals 

ISTew England JSTews' 


Co. 


12 85 


periodicals 
Cleaves, Macdonald, & 


Co. 


10 28 


books 




14 28 


Cleaves, Macdonald, & Co. 




books 




4 50 


W. H. Beehler, books 




3 00 


Chas. Scribner's Sons, books 
New England News Co. 


6 00 


periodicals 
Henry C. Nash, books 




14 54 

5 00 


Cleaves, Macdonald, & 

books 
Lockwood, Brooks, & 

books 


Co. 
Co. 


! 164 57 

! 8 75 


Little, Brown, & Co., books 
Cleaves, Macdonald, & Co. 
books 


5 50 

26 84 



160 



Oct. 3. Paid E'ew England l^ews Co., 
periodicals 
9. J. W. Lewis, books 

23. Hamilton Child, books 

i^ov. 3. Cleaves, Macdonald,& Co. 

4. ;N'ew England News Co. 

periodicals 
11. Lawyers' Cooperative Pub 

Co., books 

30. Edward Burgess, periodicals 
Dec. 2. Cleaves, Macdonald, & Co. 

books 
3. ISTew England Kews Co. 

periodicals 
9. Little, Brown, & Co., books 

19. Cleaves, Macdonald, & Co. 

books 

31. By balance of appropriation, etc. 
31. By balance of Dean fund 

31. By Mary E. Elliot fund and 
interest 



$12 46;-. 
12 50 
5 10 
53 70 

12 75 

85 00 
3 00 

128 89 



11 


41 


3 


75 


25 


51 


481 


11 


4,554 


23. 


2,054 


00 



^197 12 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library 
for the year ending December 31, 1885, the items of 
which may be found at length in the annual report of the 
city, are as follows : — 



Services of librarian 

Services of assistant to librarian 

Gas 

Binding .... 

Rebinding .... 



$800 00 
254 00 
276 48 
117 98 
120 04 



161 



Insurance 


. 


. 


. $100 00 


Fuel 


. 


. 


403 


60 


Water . 


. 


. 


16 


00 


Printing 


. 


. 


196 


14 


Supplies and 


inci 


dentals 


85 


99 




$2,370 


23 






KECAPITULATION. 






Balance Dec. 


31, 


1884 . . 


$89 84 


Appropriation for 1885 . 


. 4,000 


00 



Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000 00 
Paid incidental expenses . . 2,370 23 
Balance Dec. 31, 1885 ... 719 61 



$4,089 84 



$4,089 84 



Respectfully submitted. 

ITATHAI^ P. HIIN'T, 

Treasurer of Trustees of City Library. 



December 31, 1885. 
We have examined the above report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

GEO. H. STEARNS, Mayor, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 

Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



162 

December 31, 1885. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of 
receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing re- 
port of the Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library, 
and find the same correctfy cast and properfy vouched. 

:Nr. p. KIDDER, 

City Avditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



•G-enllemen of the Board of Trustees : — 

I respectfully submit to you the thirty-second annual 
report of the City Library, showing the work of the year 
•ending December 31, 1885 : — 

Whole number of volumes Dec. 31, 1884 . 27,867 

Accessions during the year : — 

By purchase .... 369 

Donated ..... 335 

Periodicals bound ... 89 

793 



Whole number of volumes at present : — 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets .... 1,925 

Bound volumes . . . 26,719 



28,660 

l^umber of periodicals and papers regularly 

received ....... 69 

dumber of days open to the public . . 306 

Days open for delivery of books . . . 306 
Number of volumes in circulation during the 

year 55,142 

Average per day ...... 180.3 

Largest number any one day . . . 443 

Xargest number any one month (January) . 5,891 



164 



Number of books, magazines, etc., used in 

the library 5,156" 

Average per day 16.9 

]^umber of guarantees received during the 

year 625- 

Whole number since new registration . . 5,472 

I^umber of cards used on deposit ... 9 

Postals sent for books overdue . . . 440' 
Number of volumes taken from the shelves 

unfit for longer use ..... 41 
Number replaced during the year ... 57 
Books lost or injured, and paid for . . 5 
Number of volumes repaired at the bindery . 476 
Repaired and covered in the library . . 3,946^ 
Books returned, missing at previous exami- 
nations ....... 2 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1884 . $41 91 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31,1884 101 10 



Amount paid for express, stationery, 
and other incidental expenses . 
Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1885 148 63 
Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1884, for 
catalogues and supplements sold, and for 
lost and injured books .... 11 80- 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1885 : 
For 5 new catalogues at 75 cents . $3 75 
For two old catalogues at 35 cents . 70 

For 28 supplements at 10 cents . 2 80 



$52 47 
41 91 


$143 01 

$94 38 





$24 55 
11 80 


$12 75 
48 63 


$61 38 
3 00 



165 

"Five books lost or injured, and paid 

for $5 50 

$12 75 



Paid IT. P. Hunt, treasurer 



Balance of lines on hand 

Total balance on hand 

By gift 

$64 38 

In gathering up the details of another year's work, 
ithere appears great uniformity with previous ones. Little 
change is apparent from year to year in the general statis- 
tics, but a steady progress is visible in the better class of 
books sought after. While fiction and juvenile still lead 
in numbers in the circulation, the call for books of a 
higher order has greatly increased in the past few years. 
This is shown especially in the requests made so fre- 
quently for purchases, which are invariably for books of 
the best class of literature. Great satisfaction is expressed 
by the members of the literary and art clubs for the 
generous supply of books helpful to them in their courses 
of study. 

The accession by purchase is less than last year, but 
equally valuable. JSTo books having been purchased from 
the "Dean fund" m^y account for this. There is an in- 
crease of forty-eight in the number of gifts to the library ; 
the largest proportion are United States publications. 
In that department of the library were many deficiencies ; 
fiome sets have been made complete and others are being 



166 

filled. Our sincere thanks are due not only to the senator® 
and representatives of our state, but to the departments 
of Congress, for the many gifts received the past year. 

The number of periodicals and papers regularly re- 
ceived is about the same ; two only added by purchase^ 
viz., the " United States Publication Catalogue " and " The 
Ornithologist and Oologist." The number of books unfit 
for longer use and removed from the shelves is a little less,. 
but there are many more in a bad condition and will soon 
follow. The number of replaced books is also less. 

There is no visible improvement in the care of books. 
Many, of course, are in such constant use that the wear 
and tear are inevitable, but the carelessness in handling 
new books, and the defacing by turning leaves and steal- 
ing plates, are unpardonable. In the coming year greater 
vigilance will be given to the examination of books as 
they are returned, that, if possible, the guilty parties may 
be detected. 

The number of books sent to the bindery for repairs is 
about the same. 'No little fault may be attributed to the 
binders of new books, as in many cases the thread breaks 
and leaves are loosened with very careful use. 

The circulation the past year was larger by over four 
thousand for home use, but the number used in the library 
for reference and otherwise, somewhat smaller. 

At the examination in J uly four books were missing ; 
two have returned. The present examination shows four 
not yet found, — two fiction, one juvenile, one French 
book. 'None is of much value. There is still an urgent 
call for a catalogue of the later books. Very few of the 
catalogues have been sold the past year as all seem desir- 
ous for a new one, and I will express my own earnest wish 
for the same, as the need is seriously felt in the library as 
well as by the public. 



167 

With sincere acknowledgments to the board of trustees 
tor their uniform kindness, and to the treasurer for his 
liberal assistance, I respectfully submit the foregoing 
report. 

Mrs. M. J. BUNCHEE, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY 

From January 1 to December 31, 1885. 



Hon. James F. Briggs, Manchester, IST. H. 

The Official Records of the Union and Confederate 
Armies of the United States. Yol. 2, Part 3. 
Vol. 12, Parts 1, 2, and 3. Vols. 13 and 14. Six 
volumes. 8vo. ' 

Hon. H. W. Blair, U. S. Senator. 

Investigation of Senate Committee on Education 

and Labor. Four volumes. 8vo. 1885. 
Second and Fourth Annual Reports of the United 
States Geological Survey, J. W. Powell, director. 
1880-81 and"l882 to 1884. 4to. Two volumes. 
Hon. Austin F. Pike, U. S. Senator. 

Message and Documents, Interior Dep't. Vols. 1, 2, 

and 4. 1881-82. 8vo. 
Second Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology. 

1880-81. 4to. 
Report of the Commissioner of Education. 1881. 

8vo. 
Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture for the 
year 1884. 8vo. 
Hon. J. W. Patterson, Supt. of Public Instruction in 
JsTew Hampshire. 

Thirty-seventh and Thirty-eighth Annual Reports. 
Two volumes, 8vo. 



169 

N'ew Jersey State Library. 

New Jersey Archives. Vol. 8. 1751 to 1755. 8vo. 

William Sims, Esq., Secretary. 

Fourth Biennial Report of the State Board of 
Agriculture, Kansas. 1883-1884. 8vo. 

■City of Manchester. 

State Reports for the year, 1884. 12mo. 
State Board of Health. Vol. 3. 1884. 12mo. 
Town Papers. Hammond. Vol. 13. 1690 to 1800. 

8vo. 
ISTew Hampshire Law Reports. Vols. 59 and 60. 

8vo. 
•Statutes of the United States of America. 1883-84. 

4to. 
Digest of New Hampshire Law Reports. Two Vols. 
Eighty-four volumes of city documents, received 

from the principal cities of the United States. 

8vo. 

Hon. Daniel Clark. 

Nineteen volumes of miscellaneous books, to supply 
deficiencies in various sets, and a large number of 
duplicates. 

S. C. Gould, Esq., Manchester, K H. 

Notes and Queries. Vol. 2. 1885. 12mo. 

Bibliography of Manchester, N. H. Part 1. Pam- 
phlet. 

Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Session of the 
Grand Lodge of the Knights of Honor of New 
Hampshire. 1884. Pamphlet. 

Twenty pamphlets, viz.. Reports of the County 
Commissioners of the State of New Hampshire, 
to fill incomplete sets. 



170 

C. F. Livingston, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

"Springfield Republican" for the year 1884. Folio. 
Report of the Committee of the Minor l^ormal 
School of "Washington, D, C, for the year 1884. 
Pamphlet. 
Dartmouth College. 

"The Dartmouth." Edited by the Senior Class. 
Vol. 6. 1884-85. 4to. 

Henry S. Perry, Esq., Manchester, ^N". H. 

Biographical Sketches of the Governors, Councilors, 
and Members of the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the I^ew Hampshire Legislature from 
the year 1881 to 1886. Vols. 1, 2, and 3. 12mo.- 

J. T. Fanning, Esq., Manchester, X. H. 

Report jSTo. 2 on a Water Supply for Xew York and 
Other Cities of the Hudson Valley. By J. T. 
Fanning, C. E: 1884. Pamphlet. 

"William H. Stinson, Master State Grange. 

Journal of Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual 
Session of the ISTew Hampshire State Grange. 
1884. Pamphlet. 
Parker Pillsbury, Esq., Concord, X. H. 

" The American Churches the Bulwark of American- 
Slavery." By James G. Birney. Pamphlet. 
" The Church as it is, or the Forlorn Hope of 
Slavery." By Parker Pillsbury, Esq. Pamphlet. 

BosTONiAN Society, Boston, Mass. 

Proceedings of the Third and Fourth Annual Meet- 
ings. 1884 and 1885. Two Pamphlets. 

Historical Association, Lowell, Mass. 

" Contributions of Old Residents " to the city of 
Lowell. Ko. 2. Vol. 3. Pamphlet. 



171 

From the Several Publishers. 

" Good Health." A Journal of Hygiene. For the 
year 1885. Oakland, Cal. 8vo. 

" The Manifesto." Published by the United Society, 
Shaker Village, Canterbury, IST. H. For the year 
1885. 12mo. 

"Signs of the Times." Published in Oakland, Cal. 
For the year 1885. Folio. 

"The Voice." A Temperance Journal. Published 
by Funk & Wagnall, ITew York. For the year 
1885. Folio. 
Unknown. 

Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics on 
the Industrial, Social, and Economic Conditions of 
Pullman, 111. 1884. Pamphlet. 

Unconstitutionality^ of Fiat ]\Ioney. By Francis A. 
Brooks, Boston. 1885. Pamphlet. 

Report of the American Bar Association on the 
Subject of the Present Delay in Judicial Admin- 
istration; If it can be Lessened and by What 
Means. Pamphlet. 

Address of Isaac S. Whiting at the dedication of the 
town house, Wilton, jST. H., Jan. 1, 1885. Pam- 
phlet. 
J. E. Rockwell, Esq., Washington, D. C. 

New System of Phonography. By J. S. Verity. 
1885. 12mo. 

In Memoriam. J. S. Verity. 1885. 12mo. 

International Tract Society, Lancaster, Mass. Four 
volumes, viz. : — 

United States in Prophecy. By Uriah Smith. 16mo^ 
The Sanctuary. By Uriah Smith. 16mo. 
Spirit of Prophecy. Mrs. E. G. White. 16mo. 



172 

Sketches from the Life of St. Paul. Mrs. E. G. 
White. 16mo. 
Feank B. Webster, Esq., Pawtucket, R. I. 

The Ornithologist and Oologist. Vol. 9. 1884. 8vo. 

John B. Peasley, Esq., Superintendent Public Schools. 

Fifty-fifth Annual Report of the Board of Education. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 1884. 12mo. 
Report of the Ohio State Forestry Association. 

1884. Pamphlet. 
Trees and Tree-planting. By J. B. Peasley, Esq. 
■ Pamphlet. 
€. M. ToLMAN, Esq. 

Epitome of Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Penn, 
Vol. 11. 1885. 8vo. 
Isaac Huse, Jr., Esq. 

Biennial Report of the Territorial Superintendent of 
District Schools, Salt Lake City, for the years 
1882 and 1888. One volume. 8vo. 
Josiah W. Leeds, Esq,, Philadelphia. 

The Theater. Essays. By J. W. Leeds. 1885. 16mo. 
Woman's C. T. U. 

Medical Temperance Journal for the year 1885. 

12mo. 
Eleventh Annual Report of the Woman's C. T. U. 
of ISTew Hampshire. 1884. Pamphlet. 
Woman's Medical College, Philadelphia. 

Thirty-sixth Announcement. May, 1885. Pamph. 
From the Several Librarians or Boards or Trustees. 
Astor Library, 1^. Y. Thirty-sixth Annual Report, 

for the year 1884. Pamphlet. 

Abington (South), Mass. Tenth Annual Report of 

the Public Library, for the year 1884. Pamphlet. 

Catalogue and Supplements. Pamphlets. 



173 

Boston Public Library. Thirty-third Annual Report 
year ending April, 1885. Pamphlet. Bulletins : 
Nos. 4, 5, 6, and 7, Vol. 5, 1884 : iTos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 
and 5, Vol. 6, 1885. 

Brooklyn, IT. Y., Public Library. Twenty-seventh 
Annual Report, year ending March, 1885. Pamph, 

Brookline, Mass., Public Library. Twenty-eighth 
Annual Report, for the year 1884. Pamphlet. 

Baltimore, Md. Eighteenth Annual Report of the 
Peabody Institute. June 1, 1885. Pamphlet. 

Bristol, R. I. Supplementary Catalogue of the 
Rogers' Free Library. 1885. 8vo. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Public Library. Annual Report 
for the year ending June 30, 1884, Pamphlet. 
" Finding List of Books " of the Cincinnati 
Public Library, June, 1882, to January, 1884. 8vo. 

Cleveland, Ohio, Public Library. Seventeenth An- 
nual Report, year ending August 31, 1884. Pamph. 

Clinton, Mass. Eleventh Annual Report of the 
Bigelow Free Library, for the year 1884. Pamj)h. 

Concord, 'N. H. City Reports, including report of 
City Library, for the year 1884. Pamphlet. 

Germantown, Phila., Friends' Free Library. An- 
nual Report for 1884. Pamphlet. 

Lawrence, Mass., Free Library. Annual Report for 
the year 1884. Pamphlet. 

Manchester, England. Thirty-second Annual Report 
of the Public Free Libraries. 1883-84. Pamph. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Sixth and Seventh Annual Re- 
ports of the Public Library, for the years 1883 and 
1884. 2 pamphlets. 

Melrose, Mass. Fourteenth Annual Report of Pub- 
lic Library. 1884. Pamphlet. 



174 

"New York Mercantile Library Association. Fourth 

Annual Report, for the year ending April, 1885. 

Pamphlet. 
!Newton, Mass., Free Library. Annual Report for 

the year 1884. Pamphlet. 
J^ashua, IS". H. City Report, including report of 

Public Library for 1884. 12mo. 
Philadelphia Library Company. Bulletins Nos. 14 

and 15, January and July, 1885. Pamphlets. 
Providence, R. L, Public Library. Seventh Annual 

Report. 1884. Pamphlet. 
San Francisco, Cal., Mercantile Library Association. 

Annual Report for the year 1884. Pamphlet. 
Worcester, Mass., Free Library, Twenty-fiftli An- 
nual Report. 1884. Pamphlet. 
"Woburn, Mass., Public Library. Annual Report for 

the year ending March, 1885. Pamphlet. 
Windham, N. H. Town Reports, including report 

of the N^esmith Free Library for the year ending 

March, 1885. Pamphlet. 

DEPARTMENTS OF CONGRESS. 

Treasury Department, Washington. 

First Annual Report of the Commissioifer of 'Navi- 
gation. 1884. 8vo. 
Annual Report of the United States Life-Saving Ser- 
vice, year ending June 30, 1884. 8vo. 
Finance Report for the year 1884. 8vo. 
Report of the Superintendent of the United States 
Coast and Geodetic Survey for the year 1884. 4to. 
Interior Department. 

United States Official Register for the years 1871, 
1873, and 1875. 3 Vols. 8vo. 



175 

Report of Commissioner of Interal Revenue for year 
ending June 30, 1884. 8vo. 

Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office 
for 1885. 8vo. 

Annual Report of Commissioner of Patents for the 
year 1884. 8vo. 

Report of the Receipts and Distribution of Public 
Documents, on behalf of the Government, by the 
Department of the Interior. Pamphlet. 

Seventeen volumes of the Congressional Globe, from 
the Twenty-third to the Thirtieth Congress, inclus- 
ive. Seventeen volumes from the Thirty-fourth to 
the Forty-second Congress, inclusive. 

Eleven volumes of the Congressional Record of the 
1st, 2d, and 3d sessions of the Forty-fifth Congress. 

'Chief Engineer, War Department. 

Supplement to volume 3, United States Geological 
Survey, west of the 100th meridian. Captain G. 
W. Wheeler, U. S. Army, in charge. 1881. 4to. 

Bureau of Education. 

Circulars of Information : ITos. 6 and 7, 1884 ; I^os. 

1 and 2, 1885. Pamphlets. 
Historical Sketches of the Universities and Colleges 
of the United States. Edited by Dr. F. B. Hough. 
Pamphlet. 

.Smithsonian Institute. 

Contributions to Knowledge. Vols. 24 and 25. 

1885. 4to. 
Publications of the Bureau of Ethnology. J. W. 

Powell, Director. Yols. 2 and 3. 4to. 
Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institute for the 

year 1883. 8vo. 



176 

Post-office Department. 

Report of the Postmaster-General for the years 1884,. 

1885. 2 Vols. 8vo. 

Hon. J. W. Cannon. 

Annual Report of the Comptroller of the Currency,, 
for the year 1884. 8vo. 

First and Second Annual Reports of the United 
States Civil Service Commission. 1884 and 1885. 
2 Pamphlets. 
United States Congress. 

Forty-six volumes of Public Documents of the 
Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth Congresses, includ- 
ing volumes 7, 9, 10, and 11 of the Tenth Census 
of the United States. 



REPORT 

OF THE' 

CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY SOLICITOR 



lo His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : — 

I hereby submit the report of the work done in my 
department during the year 1885. 

Profiting by a year's experience and through the ready 
assistance of the other city ofiicials, I have been able to 
better systematize the duties belonging to this office, and 
all matters pertaining thereto have received prompt and 
reliable attention. 

Claims against the city for personal injuries require a 
great deal of careful examination, and not only have all 
such claims in which the city has been served with legal 
notice been thoroughly investigated, but all other acci- 
dents from which claims might arise. Early in January, 
Officer Cassidy was detailed to assist your solicitor in this 
branch of the work, and I desire to say here that he has 
proved a most efficient assistant, performing all duties 
assigned him in a careful and gentlemanly manner, return- 
ing a full written report of his investigations. During 
the past year I have attended personally, with Officer 
Cassidy, nearly all his examinations of places where 
accidents have occurred, and have visited with him many 
of the injured parties and witnesses. 

A large majority of the claims are founded on alleged 



180 



defects in sidewalks caused by ice, and in the trial of some 
of the more important cases against the city I have met 
with great difficulty in obtaining definite proof of sand- 
ing or other precautionary measures taken by the city to^ 
keep its streets in proper repair ; but under the present 
system this obstacle is well nigh obviated. 

In the beginning of the year, at the suggestion of 
William Sanborn, superintendent of District N^o. 2, a set 
of books was opened upon which almost every shovelful 
of sand spread upon our walks is accounted for. These 
books were placed in the care of Mr. Sanborn, and have 
been faithfully kept for the past twelve months by him 
and his assistant, Mr. L. M. Streeter. The following is a 
copy of their record for December 9, 1885 : — 



SANDING RECORD. 



Driver, C. H. Rogers. 



Date, December 9, 1885. 



Street. 



Depot 

Graaite 

Central 

Park 

Chestnut 

Hanover 

Union 

Manchester 

Merrimack 

Laurel 

Central 

Hanover Common. 



From 



Franklin . 
Franklin . 
Franklin . 

Elm 

Park 

Lincoln.. . 
Amherst . 
Union . . . , 
Union . . . , 
Union , . . . 
Pine 



To 



Canal 

Granite Bridge. 

Canal 

Chestnut 

Central 

Pine 

Laurel 

Chestnut 

Elm 

Chestnut 

Chestnut 



Hour. 



10.45 to 11.30 A. M. 





<i 


li 




tt 


(C 

<i 


1.00 to 3.00 


p. M 






(( 
It 



RHODY CARROLL, 
PATRICK READY, 
MERTY SHEA, 
JERRY HALEY, 



Laborers. 



No. of loads, 2. 



181 

The want of just this evidence has undoubtedly cost 
the city many dollars for damages. There were two 
notable cases in which we were unable to prove the sand- 
ing definitely, viz. : Sarah A. Davis vs. Manchester, tried 
at the March term, 1884, and in which case the plaintifi 
recovered |1,988 with costs ; and Mehitable J. James vs. 
Manchester, in which a trial was begun at the March 
term, 1885, and settled by counsel, the city paying plaintiff 
fifteen hundred dollars. Had Ave been able to have shown 
the condition of the walks at the time of accidents in these 
cases as we could now, assisted by this sanding record and 
other means now employed, the termination of these suits 
would probably have been different. 

Under section 7, chapter 75, General Laws, every per- 
son sustaining damage to his person or team while travel- 
ing npon any highway, by reason of a defect in such 
highway, shall, within ten days from date of receiving 
such damage, notify the toM^i or city, which by law may 
be liable for the same, by written notice under oath, of 
the exact place where and the time when such damage 
was received. 

During the year past when such notice was served, the 
matter was immediately taken in charge by Officer Cas- 
sidy and a preliminary examination made, and if the facts 
warranted, the city engineer was called upon, and in com- 
pany with your solicitor and the officer a careful investi- 
gation was made, the engineer taking measurements of 
the place from which to furnish plans. Officer Cassidy and 
I calling the attention of every available person to the 
place and having a thorough examination made by them 
for the purpose of testifpng when summoned before the 
court or the Committee on Claims. Full reports of these 
examinations have been made in writing by Officer Cas- 
sidy and returned to your solicitor for future reference. 



182 

These reports have been properly filed, and, showing as 
they do all the facts relative to the claim as they were 
found at the time of accident, will prove, of great value to 
the city. 

Whenever there has been an accident from which there 
was a chance for a claim against the city, the matter has 
been as closely examined as in cases where notice of claim 
has been filed, this being rendered necessary by the ex- 
treme leniency of the court in allowing parties to file 
claims long after accidents occurred, and when every con- 
dition of the place complained of had so changed as to 
render it impossible for us to show its actual state at the 
time of the accident. 

Prompt measures on the part of the city to ascertain 
all facts pertaining to claims and prove these facts, are of 
great assistance to the Joint Standing Committee on 
Claims in equitably acting in their disposal, and unques- 
tionably result in preventing many unjust and vexatious 
suits being brought against the city. 

Another great assistance is the record kept by City 
Engineer George H. Allen, which gives the state of the 
thermometer three times each day, with memoranda of 
rain or snow fall [and general condition of the weather. 
Thus we have, first, a prompt examination ; second, a full 
record of the facts ; third, an accurate report of sanding 
the walks ; and fourth, a reliable weather record. With 
these precautions faithfully carried out, the city ought 
not to be defeated in any suit brought by claims in 
which the committee have given claimants " leave to 
withdraw." 

During the past year investigations have been made in 
twenty-seven cases, seventeen of which I have attended 
personally. The Committee on Claims has held eleven 
meetings, all of which I have attended. The same strin- 



183 

gent rules that were adopted by the committee of 1884 
(relative to allowing claimants a hearing when the claim 
was not filed in strict accordance with the statute) were 
acted under by this committee. 

The following is a list of claims coming before the 
committee : — 

Thomas Jones, claim for damage to goods by overflow 
of water in cellar. Allowed $25. 

Michael Healy, claim |300 for injuries received, June 
18, 1884, while working on Putnam street in the employ 
of the city. Allowed $75 and doctor's bill, $36.50. 

Octave LaForest, given leave to withdraw. 

John Pecoy or Pecord, claim for damages received by a 
fall on Spruce street, January 6, 1885. Griven leave to 
withdraw. 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., claim for $100 damages for injury 
to horse, November 12, 1884, on Valley street. Referred 
by the committee to his Honor the Mayor and C. K. 
"Walker, with power to act, and a satisfactory settlement 
was made by them with Mr. Bodwell. 

Margaret Belmore, claim of $3,000 for personal injuries 
received on Beech street, Januaiy 6, 1885. Given leave 
to withdraw. 

Jennie Annis, claim for damages caused by a fall on 
Manchester street. Referred by the committee to Alder- 
man Thompson £vnd your solicitor for investigation and 
report. Their report was made and accepted and a satis- 
factory settlement arranged with the claimant, the city 
paying her board through her illness and doctor's bill, 
amounting in all to about fifty dollars. 

J. W. Watson, injury to horse. Given leave to with- 
draw. 

A. A. Moore, damage to horse and carriage at the 



184 

corner of Orange and Cliestnut streets, October 18, 1884, 
$200. Allowed $50. 

Eliza Sykes, for personal injuries and damage to team 
caused by wire of tlie Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany becoming detached from the pole and falling across 
the road, entangling her team and overturning the same. 
Referred to Mayor Stearns, Charles J. Abbott, and your 
solicitor, the telegraph company assuming the defense. 
She was given leave to withdraw by the committee. 

C. D. "Wells, claim for personal injuries caused by a 
fall on Hanover street, at Elm-street crossing, December 
22, 1884. Given leave to withdraw. 

Mary Yalley, claim for personal injuries caused by a 
fall on Hanover street, |500. Given leave to withdraw. 

Bridget Clark, claim for personal injuries received by a 
fall February 17, 1885, on Park street. Given leave to 
withdraw. 

Amos Bean, claim for bounty as soldier on quota for 
Manchester, August 23, 1862. Allowed |50. 

Claim of Union Publishing Company, $40 for part 
expense in lighting Hanover street by electric light from. 
August 1, 1884, to January 1, 1885. Claim allowed. 

Lewis Rice, damage to sleigh and harness, $22. Claim 
not presented under oath, and under the rule given leave 
to withdraw. 

Aimer D. Gooden, $500 damages for land taken on 
east Spruce street. Reported back to board of mayor 
and aldermen. 

John H. Hamilton, claim $100, for injury to horse, 
February 28, 1885, at the corner of Elm and Central 
streets. Given leave to withdraw. 

Harriet A. Stewart, claim for personal injuries received 
by fall on Middle street, February 24, 1885. Allowed 
$225. 



185 

Claim of Mrs. Clara J. Forsaith for injur}' to team, 
^200; Peter Lee and Lizzie H. Smith, injury to person. 
These claims were the result of an accident to the team 
of Mrs. Forsaith on Auhurn street, Peter Lee the driver 
and Miss Smith being the occupants of the carriage. The 
accident was caused by the caving in of the earth, occa- 
sioned by a break in a water pipe. Referred to Mayor 
Stearns, Alderman Thompson, and C. K. Walker for 
adjustment. Mrs. Forsaith was allowed $200 in full for 
her claim. 

Pettee & Adams, claim for injury to horse on Canal 
street. Given leave to withdraw. 

Theodore Longaway, damage to clothing and furniture 
sustained by fire caused by sparks from engine of stone- 
orusher. Allowed $50. 

C. H. Simpson, claim for injury to horse at the corner 
of Ferry and Main streets, Sept. 11, 1885. Allowed $150. 

Joseph S. Goodwin, claim for damage to team at brew- 
ery on Hancock street, caused by blasting in the street. 
Given leave to withdraw. 

The following cases were pending in the Supreme 
Court at the March term, 1885 : — 

Simon Clark, Admr. of "William Clark, vs. City of 
Manchester. 
This action, which has been pending since the January 
term of 1880, was tried by jury at the March term, result- 
ing iu a disagreement. I made preparation for a new 
trial at this term, but the plaintiff was unable to proceed, 
.and the court granted him a continuance, imposing terms 
against plaintiff. Costs taxed at seventeen dollars and 
£fty cents, to be paid by him before again proceeding to 
trial. 



186 

M. L, Clementine Gtagnon vs. City of Manchester. 

Entered September term, 1883, and described in my 
report for 1884. A continuance was granted in this case 
by the court, a change in plaintiff's counsel being the 
cause assigned. 

City of Manchester vs. Richardson. 

Entered March term, 1884. Marked for jury by plain- 
tiff', but was continued on account of illness of defendant. 

City of Manciiester cs. 'Nvtt. 

Entered March term, 1884. Marked for jury by plain- 
tiff'. Continued on account of absence from the state of 
General A. F. Stevens, one of the defendant's counsel. 

Hannah Gorman vs. City of Manchester. 

Entered March term, 1884. Suit discontinued by plain- 
tiff"s counsel. 

DOLPHAS BeNNOIT VS. CiTY OF MANCHESTER. 

This action was tried at the March term, 1884, and 
resulted in a disagreement of the jury. At this term a 
verdict of il,500 was rendered against the city. 

Mary Frain vs. City of Manchester. 

This case was tried, with a disagreement of the jury, at 
the March term, 1884, and being tried again at this term 
resulted in a second disagreement. 

John W. l^oyes vs. City of Manchester, and Helen A. 
F. Cochran vs. City of Manchester, were discontinued by 
plaintift^'s counsel. 

Julius Herman vs. City of Manchester. 
Verdict for defendant. 



i 



187 



John Shea vs. City of Manchester. 

The owners of the block by the carelessness of whose 
tenants this accident happened (a bnlkhead in the side- 
walk was left open) were summoned to appear and defend, 
but upon its being shown that some of the city officers 
were negligent in their duty respecting this place, a com- 
promise was eifected, the city paying one half of |1,200, 
the amount of damages agreed upon, the other half being 
paid by the owner of the block. 

Amherst Emery vs. City of Manchester. 
Continued. 

Oscar B. Laport vs. City of Manchester. 

This case was discontinued, the plaintilf accepting the 
amount awarded by the Committee on Claims. 

Emma Beauvais vs. City of Manchester. 
Trial by jury. Verdict for defendant. 

John Cremnen vs. City of Manchester. 
Trial by jury. Verdict for defendant. 

Mehitable J. James vs. City of Manchester. 

A jury trial was commenced, but before completion a 
settlement was made by counsel. The city paid $1,500- 
A full statement of all these cases appeared in my report 
for 1884. 

On the session's docket were five cases; four appeals 

»jfrom assessments of damage for land taken for highways, 
mz.: — 



188 

Eleanor B. Guilford vs. City of Manchester. 

A jury trial was begun but not finished, the plaintiff 
nccepting $400 in settlement of suit. 

Annie F. Searles vs. City of Manchester. 
Land taken on Union street. Continued. 

Annie F. Searles vs. City of Manchester. 
Land taken on Webster street. Continued. 

Henry S. Whitney vs. City of Manchester. 
Settled by mayor and aldermen for $1,000. 

One suit was on an appeal from laying out of highway. 
James 0. Clark vs. Manchester. Continued. 

On the criminal docket was an indictment against Man- 
chester for not building Shasta street, which was marked 
not to go forward. Complainant asks for no costs. 

On the equity docket there was only one case in which 
the city was a party : — 

Calvin W. Stevens vs. City of Manchester, et al. 

This was fully treated of in my report for 1884. The 
€ase was continued at this term. 

Only one suit against the city was entered at this term : 

James B. Scott vs. City of Manchester. 

Damages claimed, $10,000 for injuries received by break- 
ing of bridge over Cohas brook, August 14, 1884. 

This case was continued, and since its entry I have 
taken several affidavits of witnesses living out of the 
Btate and have been present at the taking of two deposi- 
tions by the plaintiff*. 



189 

Very little was done in the disposal of city cases at the- 
September term, which was holden at ^Nashua by Hon. 
Lewis W. Clark; he being a resident could not sit in cases 
to which the city was a party, and the jury was discharged 
before any non-resident member of the court was at leisure 
to attend. 

The suits of — 

Simon Clark, Admr., vs. City of Manchester, 
Mary Frain vs. City of Manchester, 
M. L. Clementine Gagnon vs. City of Manchester,. 
Amherst Emery vs. City of Manchester, 
James B. Scott vs. City of Manchester, 
City of Manchester vs. Richardson, and 
City of Manchester vs. l!Tutt on the civil docket, 
were continued for the reasons before stated. 

On the sessions docket in the Searles cases John M, 
Parker was put in place of A. G-. Fairbanks, one of the 
commissioners, who is a resident of Manchester, and in 
the Clark case G. A. Ramsdell was commissioned in place 
of A. G. Fairbanks. 

There was entered at this term a suit in favor of Mary 
J. Merrill vs. Manchester, being an appeal from assess- 
ment of damages for land taken for highway. This being 
the lot adjoining the Searles', on "Webster street, it was 
agreed by counsel that these three cases be heard by the 
same commissioners, and on October 21 and 22 a trial 
was had. In the Merrill case, the commissioners reported 
906 feet of land taken, and assessed the damages at 8 
cents per foot; total, $72.48. The award by mayor and 
aldermen, from which this appeal wAs taken, was 
"nominal damages, $1.00." 

Searles', on Webster street, 5,333 feet taken at 8 cents, 
damages $442.74, and on Union street,l, 611^^ feet at 
10 cents, $161.20. The award of mayor and alder- 



190 

men for Union-street land was $182.87. An appeal from 
the commissioners' finding on the Union-street piece 
has been taken in the Searles case. 

A hearing in the Clark case was had October 20, the 
commissioners finding for the petitioners. The city in 
this suit was nominal defendant, David F. Clark, Esq., 
appearing for parties interested and assuming the defense. 

The equity suit of Calvin W. Stevens vs. Manchester 
et at., was transferred to the law term, Ave basing our 
defense on the reported case of Carter vs. Moulton, 58 
N. H. 64, w^hich was overruled by the court and a man- 
damus issued for the removal of the body of Arthur O. 
Webber, and against all further use of the Amoskeag 
cemetery within twenty rods of the dwelling-house of 
said Stevens. The order has been complied with. 

There were three suits entered at this term in which 
the city was a party : — 

Eliza Sykes vs. City of Manchestek. 

Brought to recover $8,000 damages for personal injuries 
and damage to team received September 9, 1884. The 
"Western Union Telegraph Company, being notified to 
defend this action, have appeared by counsel. 

Mary Yalley vs. City of Manchester. 

Damages claimed for personal injuries received on 
Hanover street. 

A. BoDWELL & Son vs. City of Manchester. 

Brought on contract in connection with the new police 
station. 

These cases were continued for the reasons stated. 

A petition to the Supreme Court was entered in vaca- 
tion against Hon. Frederick Smyth, his agents, and em- 



i 



191 

ployes, restraining them from proceeding with the alter- 
ations on the building at the corner of Bridge and 
Chestnut streets, this building being within the fire 
precinct, and the alterations, we claim, being made 
contrar}' to our ordinance. A temporary injunction was 
granted. At the September term the injunction was con- 
tinued with some modifications until a hearing could be 
had. This being a test case, Messrs. Sulloway, Topliff, 
& O'Connor were employed to assist your solicitor. 

I have employed no assistance in the management of 
the city cases, with the exception of the following: — 

John Shea rs. City of Manchester, Messrs. Briggs & 
Huse were counsel for the city. 

Mehitable J. James vs. City of Manchester, Briggs & 
Huse and David Cross. 

Julius Herman vs. City of Manchester, David Cross. 

I have attended every session of the police court at 
which it was necessary for the city to be represented by 
counsel, and have also been present at nearly every regu- 
lar meeting of the city councils, besides at many meetings 
of the several joint standing committees. 

Charges were made during the latter part of the year 
to the school board that the amounts of several bills for 
labor performed by Jesse B. Il^ourse had been raised from 
the charges actually made by him to a larger sum with 
intent to defraud the city. This matter was referred to 
me by the board for investigation. With the assistance 
of City Marshal Jenkins, I obtained affidavits from a 
number of the parties concerned, and with the concur- 
rence of Mayor Stearns and Marshal Jenkins I referred 
the matter to County Solicitor R. M. Wallace. 

An act to establish a board of health for the city of 
Manchester and define its powers and duties was drawn 



192 

by me and passed by the legislature at the June session, 
and an ordinance relative to the inspection of buildings 
has been drawn, and passed by the city councils. 

There is a great deal of work done in connection with 
this office which seems immaterial to report, but which 
occupies much of the solicitor's time. 

In conclusion, I desire to say that at all times have I 
received the willing assistance of each and every one of 
the city officers, when it has been necessary for me to call 
on them, and particularly have the police department 
placed me under great obligations for favors rendered. 
Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE W. PRESCOTT, 

Solicitor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF HEALTH 



13 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

. As Organized Feb. 1. 1886. 



William A. Webster, M. J)., President, term expires 

February, 1888. 
George C. Hoitt, M. D., term expires February, 1887. 
Joseph B. Saavyer, C. E., Ckrk, term expires February, 

1889. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF HEALTH 



To His Honor the Mayor : — 

The Board of Health respectfully presents its first an- 
nual report, being for the year 1885. 

The members of the board were, in the early part of 
the year, appointed as health officers under the general 
statutes of the state. We at once entered upon the dis- 
charge of our duties, and gave much time and attention to 
the prevention and abatement of nuisances. But a brief 
experience convinced us of what indeed we had before 
suspected, that the provisions of the general statutes, ad- 
mirably comprehensive and well adapted to the needs of 
the smaller towns and villages, were in some important 
respects insufficient for a city of the size of Manchester. 
It was seen that the sanitary affairs of the city should be 
put under the care of a more permanent board, which 
would be able to avail itself of the knowledge and expe- 
rience gained in previous years. It was also thought that 
the powers of such a board should be extended in express 
terms over various matters and things of which the control 
of the health officers was in some degree doubtful and 
uncertain. 

With the approbation and assistance of your Honor, 



196 

and of several citizens interested in sanitary matters, 
prominent among whom we would mention George C. 
Gilmore, Esq., one of the representatives from this city, a 
special act of the legislature was obtained to establish a 
board of health for the city and to define its powers and 
duties. This act is as follows : — 

Section 1. The mayor shall appoint three health officers, one of 
whom shall hold office for one year from the first Monday in Febru- 
ary, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, one for two years, and one 
for three years, from said first Monday in February, who shall con- 
stitute a board of health, and annually hereafter, in the month of 
January in each year, he shall appoint one member to said board, 
who shall hold office for three years from the first Monday in Feb- 
ruary succeeding. In case of a vacancy occurring in said board, 
the mayor shall appoint some person for the remainder of the unex- 
pired term. 

Sect. 2. The board shall enter upon its duties on the first Mon- 
day in February, annually. Said board shall organize by the choice 
of one of its members as chairman and another as clerk, and they 
may adopt such rules and regulations for their own and the govern- 
ment of all subordinate officers by them employed, as they may deem 
expedient, not repugnant to the laws of the state, and the said board 
shall receive such compensation for their services as the city councils 
may determine. 

Sect. 3. The board of health hereby constituted shall have and 
exercise all the powers invested in, and shall perform all the duties 
prescribed to, health officers of towns under the statutes, and shall 
have power to appoint such sanitary inspectors as they may deem 
necessary, and define their duties, term of service, and fix their com- 
pensation ; provided, that the whole amount of such compensation 
shall not exceed the amount appropriated therefor by the city coun- 
cils ; and said inspectors so appointed shall be responsible to the 
board and under its control and direction ; and it shall be the duty 
of said inspectors, under the direction of said board, to enforce the 
laws of the state, the ordinances of said city, and the regulations of 



197 

said board relative to health, and make a report to said board, in 
writing, of all acts done by them as such inspectors, once each 
month. 4 

Sect. 4. The board of health, when satisfied upon due exami- 
nation that a building, tenement, room, or cellar in said city, occupied 
as a dwelling-place or a workshop, has become, by reason of the 
number of occupants, want of cleanliness, unsuitable drainage, lack 
of privy accommodations, or from any other cause, unfit for a 
■dwelling-place or workshop, may issue a notice in writing to such 
occupants, or to the owner or agent in charge, to cause the same to 
be put in a proper sanitary condition ; and in case said pi*emises 
shall not be put in such proper sanitary condition within a reasonable 
time after such notice, then said board may notify the occupants, in 
writing, to quit the premises in such time as the board shall deem 
necessary. 

Sect. 5. The board, after such reasonable notice, and the neg- 
lect and refusal of the occupant, owner, or agent to put the premises 
into such proper sanitary condition, may close up said premises, and, 
if the owner or agent thereafter occupies, or knowingly permits 
others to occupy, such closed premises, without the written permis- 
sion of the board, he shall be fined not less than ten or more than 
fifty dollars for each ofiense. 

Sect. 6. The board of health shall, within certain limits which 
they may establish from time to time, and which shall include the 
compact part of the city, have control of the cleaning of privy- 
vaults and barns and stable cellars, and none shall be opened or 
cleaned without the permission of the board, nor by any other per- 
son, nor in any other manner, nor at any other time, than as said 
hoard may direct. They may, within said limits, prohibit the keep- 
ing of swine, the construction or continuance of privy-vaults, unless 
the same shall be more than forty feet away from any dwelling- 
house, shop, or public street, and is vaulted six feet deep, thoroughly 
built of brick or stone laid in cement, and sufficiently secured, in- 
closed, and ventilated, and shall be a separate and special inelosure, 
and not a part of the cellar of a barn or stable. 

Sect. 7. The board may prepare and enforce such regulations 



198 

as they may deem necessary for the safety and health of the people, 
relative to the drainage of buildings and connections with public 
sewers when such sewer is within one hundred feet of the premises 
to be drained. 

Sect. 8. If any person shall neglect to comply with the provi- 
sions of this act, or the regulations of said board, he shall be pun- 
ished by a fine not less than ten or more than fifty dollars. 

Sect. 9. This act shall take efi'ect on its passage. 

This act was approved July 23, 1885, and on the 30th 
the members of the board were appointed and qualified 
as follows: — 

Joseph B. Sawyer, for one year. 
George C. Hoitt, for two years. 
William A. Webster, for three years. 

The board was organized by the choice of William A, 
Webster as chairman, and J. B. Sawyer as clerk, and the 
same membership and organization have been continued 
to the present time. 

PRIVY-VAULTS. 

The most numerous class of complaints made to the 
board is that in relation to the bad condition of privy- 
vaults. There are great numbers of such vaults in the 
compact part of the city. A large majority of them are 
not built in conformity to the requirements of law, and 
most of them are dangerous and disgusting nuisances. 
It has been the policy of this board, during its brief exis- 
tence, to discountenance and prevent, as far as practicable, 
the building or the continuance of these structures. This 
line of policy will be continued, and all owners of build- 
ings are earnestly requested to substitute water-closets or 
earth-closets wherever it is at all practicable. Wherever 
a good sewer is within reach, no more money should be 
spent in the building or rebuilding of vaults. 



199 

In tlie exercise of tlie powers conferred by section 6 of 
the act above cited, at a meeting of the board held 
August 31, it was ordered that the following limits be 
established, within which this board assumes control of 
the cleaning of privy-vaults and barn and stable cellars, 
and within which the keeping of swine is hereby prohib- 
ited after the first day of ^N^ovember, 1885, viz. : — 

"Beginning at the east end of Amoskeag Falls bridge 
and running thence easterly in the highway to the River 
road, thence northerly on said road to Ray brook, thence 
easterly by said brook to Union street, thence southerly 
in Union street to Gore street, thence easterly in Gore 
street to Russell street, thence southerly in Russell street 
to Orange street, thence easterly in Orange street to Lin- 
den street, thence southerly in Linden street to Bridge 
street, thence easterly in Bridge street to Beacon street, 
thence southerly in Beacon street to Spruce street, thence 
westerly in Spruce street to Massabesic street, thence 
westerly by the Cemetery brook to Beech street, thence 
southerly in Beech street to Young street, thence west- 
erly in Young street to Elm street, thence northerly in 
Elm street to Cove street, thence westerly in Cove street 
to Merrimack river, thence southwesterly to the mouth of 
the Piscataquog river, thence northwesterly by. the Pis- 
cataquog river to a point where School street, othermse 
called Temple street, extended westerly in a straight line 
would strike said river, thence easterly by said extended 
line of School street to the point where Dubuque street, 
if extended southerly in a straight line, would intersect 
^aid School street, thence northerly by said extended line 
of Dubuque street to a point twelve hundred feet north 
of the center of Amory street, thence easterly and at 
right angles to the last described line to Merrimack river, 
thence northerly by said river to the place of beginning." 



200 

The control of the cleaning of vaults had heretofore 
been conferred by an ordmance on the city marshal, and, 
as we understand it, this ordinance is still in force in all 
parts of the city outside of the above limits, "Within 
these limits the control thus far exercised has been 
limited to the granting of a written permit for each vault 
opened, and to the refusal of such permits to all persons 
who had in any way made their work unsatisfactory to 
the public or to this board. 

The work has been done in the night time, with ladles 
and closed wagont, no change having as yet been made in 
the regulations upon this subject, but the matter is under 
consideration, and some improvements will probably be 
made the coming season. 

THE KEEPING OF SWINE. 

This practice was in the former part of the year a source 
of great annoyance and complaint. The order of August 
31 prohibited the keeping of swine in the compact part 
of the city after the first day of November last. This 
order was very generally approved by the public as rea- 
sonable and proper, and was readily complied with by 
many of our people. But as at the time when the order 
went into effect, and indeed up to a recent date, one 
member of the board was sick, the time and attention of 
another was mostly occupied in the quarantine against 
small-pox, and that of the remaining member was being 
devoted in a far greater degree than the salary would 
warrant to the ordinary duties of the board, and as no 
money was available for the pay of an inspector, very 
little has been done in the way of enforcing compliance 
with the order. It is the intention of the board to take 
up the subject again at an early day. 



201 



NUISANCES ABATED. 

No itemized account of the number of these has been 
kept. Probably about 250 complaints have been received, 
and we think that at least an equal number of cases has 
engaged our attention of which no complaint has reached 
us. These nuisances consist in part of privies and vaults 
badly kept, nnventilated, overflowing, wrongly located, or 
out of repair ; of sink-water nuisances, swine and other 
animals improperly kept, dead animals left in the out- 
skirts of the town without burial, filthy yards and cellars, 
bad well-water, loads of bones, offal, and swill carried 
through the streets in an unlawful manner, etc. "We 
have done what we could to remedy these evils, but hardly 
a beginning has been made. The work can never be 
done as it should be without a more liberal expenditure 
of time than can be afforded by three men who have to 
depend on their private business for the principal part of 
their income. To personally inspect the larger part of 
these nuisances, to find out their owners and order them 
to remove the cause of trouble, and then to follow up each 
•case and make sure that this order is complied mth, and 
to attend to the more general duties, such as those relat- 
ing to contagious diseases, purity of water supply, defect- 
ive sewerage, eto., is to do more work than most men can 
.afford for two hundred dollars a piece. The board should 
bave the means of paying a good man for his whole 
>time and attention. 

SMALL-POX. 

There have been five cases of this disease and one of 
varioloid in the city during the year. All these occurred 
rn one family of immigrants from Canada, who had shortly 
before passed through Montreal on their way to this place. 
'The first one was reported to this board as a possible, case 



202 

by Dr. Lanouette, on Friday, September 4. The physi- 
cians of the board immediately saw it, and, deeming it a 
probable case, ordered the family isolated and vaccinated. 
The patient was a boy. Two other boys were then sicken- 
ing with what soon proved to be same disease. 

The isolation was at once enforced by the police depart- 
ment, but we afterwards learned from Dr. Lanouette that 
the order for vaccination was not complied with. On 
Sunday, the 6th, the symptoms in the first case became 
unequivocal, and the family was removed to the pest- 
house, and their tenement and household goods were 
fumigated. The tw^o other children of the family soon 
developed the disease, and the mother was attacked with 
varioloid. Three ot the children died. The surviving 
members of the family, including the father, who did not 
have the disease, were in due time properly cleansed and 
discharged from the pest-house. The tenement in which 
the disease appeared was thoroughly disintected and reno- 
vated, and thus the disease disappeared from the city. A 
number of rumors of other outbreaks came to our knowl- 
edge, but on investigation all of them were found to be 
false alarms. 

VACCINATION. 

On September 5 the board, by appointment of your 
Honor, met yourself and Mr. A. G. Fairbanks, county 
commissioner, in consultation on the subject of vaccina- 
tion at the public expense for those who could not well 
aftbrd to pay for that operation for themselves. It was 
agreed that such vaccination should be provided, and that 
one half of the expense should be borne by the city and 
one half by the county. The best bovine virus was to be 
used exclusively, and to be provided at the joint ejipense 
of the city and county. Some other details of the work 



203 

were agreed upon, and the Mayor was to arrange for 
carrying the plan into effect. Under this arrangement 
3,582 persons were vaccinated at the pubhc expense, and 
the results were highly satisfactory. The cost was about 
$1,220. 

A general vaccination of the operatives on the different 
corporations was also ordered by the respective agents^ 
and was, as w^e are informed, thoroughly carried out. A 
large number of persons w^ere also vaccinated at their own 
expense. To these measures and other precautions here- 
after mentioned, our success in avoiding an epidemic of 
small-pox is undoubtedly due. Such an epidemic would 
have cost in money and loss of business, to say nothing of 
life, many times the amount spent in precautionary 
measures. 

One of the most remarkable things with which we have 
met is the occasional opposition to vaccination. Persons 
who will believe any number of marvels at the bidding of 
quacks and impostors, will ignorantly or obstinately reject 
the proved truth of vaccination. " Alike in rejecting 
what is known and believing what is preposterous, the 
rights of private foolishness assert themselves." The law 
of the state should make vaccination compulsory. 

DISINFECTION AND VACCINATION OF IMMIGRANTS FROM 

CANADA. 

During the summer and autumn our attention was 
continually turned to the liability of an invasion of small- 
pox from Canada. About the last of September we 
became convinced that the quarantine work of the United 
States authorities on the Canadian frontier was not such 
as the exigency required, and your Honor and Dr. Hoitt 
visited Concord and held a consultation on the subject 
with Dr. Watson, secretary of the state board of health. 



204 

The result was that our feeling of insecurity was in- 
creased, and it was determined to institute measures of 
our own. Accordingly a place was fitted up for the pur- 
pose at the depot, and a thorough inspection and fumi- 
gation of the persons and haggage of travelers and im- 
migrants from the infected districts were commenced. 
This, of course, did not include those who went directly 
through to other places, but only those who stopped tem- 
porarily or permanently in the city. It was maintained 
from October 3 to December 25, at which last date the 
disease had so far abated its ravages in Canada that it was 
judged prudent to discontinue the service. During this 
time the whole number of persons intercepted and fumi- 
gated was 1,260. Of these, 421 were known to have 
come from infected districts, many of them from houses 
in which the disease existed, and some of them even from 
the nursing of those sick with it. 

The number of trunks fumigated was 431 ; bags, 265 ; 
boxes, 102. The number of persons vaccinated was 75. 

Many of the boxes were large and heavy, containing 
housekeeping goods and provisions. The vaccination 
appeared to have been pretty thoroughly done by the 
government medical oflicers on the border. 

The cost of this service was about $850. "We believe 
this money was well spent, for, notwithstanding the con- 
stant intercourse of our people with the infected towns, 
the disease did not appear in the city after the service was 
established. The work was done under the care of Dr. 
Hoitt, who desires to acknowledge his obligations to 
J. W. Hildreth, Esq., station agent of the Concord Rail- 
road, and to the other oflicers and employes at the depot, 
for every reasonable assistance and facility. 



205 



OTHER PESTILENTAL DISEASES. 



The table of mortality shows that much is to be feared' 
from other contagious and infectious diseases. In the- 
early part of the year there was an epidemic of measles. 
During the year this disease caused 36 deaths. Scarlet 
fever caused 5 ; diphtheria, 18 ; typhoid fever, 20 ; and 
cerebro-spinal fever, 8. Total for these five diseases, 87, 
just twenty-nine times as many as by small-pox. How 
many cases of these diseases there were which ended by 
recovery we have no means of knowing. There were 
undoubtedly several times as many. 

It is beyond controversy that this amount of sickness 
and death might have been much reduced by reasonable 
and comparatively inexpensive isolation and disinfec- 
tion. With this end in view, the board sent to each 
physician in the city the following circular, accompanying' 
it in each case with postal cards printed with blanks for" 
their convenience in making the asked-for reports : — 

Manchester, N. H., September 4, 1885. 

The Board of Health desires to obtain prompt and definite infor- 
mation of each and every case of dangerous pestilential disease 
occurring in this city, so that a correct record of such diseases may 
be kept, the bad localities ascertained, and that proper measures may 
be taken to protect the public health. 

In this connection attention is called to the following provision of 
the statutes of New Hampshire : — 

It shall be the duty of every physician who attends upon any 
person aifected with the small-pox, the malignant cholera, or any 
other malignant pestilential disease, to immediately report the same 
to the health officers or the selectmen of the town ; and if any 
physician shall neglect so to do, he shall forfeit the sum of one hun- 
dred dollars, to be recovered by such health officers or selectmen in 
the name of the town. — General Laws, Chap. ii2, Sect. j. 



206 

The following named diseases are considered by this board to be 
malignant and p^tilential, and within the meaning of the section 
above quoted, viz. : — 

Asiatic cholera, cerebro-spinal meningitis, small-pox or varioloid, 
typhus fever, typhoid fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria. 

And any physician finding a case of either of them in hi# prac- 
tice within the city limits is requested to fill out one of the accom- 
panying blanks and to transmit it to the board without delay. 

WM. A. WEBSTER, 
GEO. C. HOITT, 
' JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Board of Health of the City of 3Ianchester. 

The net result of this etfort for four months is nineteen 
cases of sickness reported, viz.. six of diphtheria, four of 
scarlet fever, and nine of typhoid fever ; and some of 
these were not reported until the patient had recovered. 
Only ten of our sixty physicians have made anj- reports. 
This shows either a very gratifying state of the public 
health, or great negligence on the part of the physicians 
in a matter hi which they are gravely responsible to the 
public. 

We have recently prepared a circular giving some sug- 
gestions as to isolation and disinfection in cases of diph- 
theria and scarlet fever. This circular is to be placed in : 
every house where these diseases are known to exist. 

LAKE MASSABESIC. 

One of the objects of our care has been to cooperate] 
with the water commissioners and their superintendent 
in preserving the purity of our water supply. "We have] 
made several visits to the lake, and have caused two priviesj 
which contaminated water draining into it to be remove( 
and the danger from several minor sources to be obviated.! 

It behooves the people of Manchester to exercise througl 



207 

their constituted authorities an ever increasing vigilance 
for the safety and purity of. this water. Its uses as a 
place of summer resort and for fishing should be made 
secondary to its uses for water supply. 

AVELL- WATER. 

) 

There are a large number of wells still in use in the 
city. In our sandy soil, underlaid as it is at no great 
depth by an impervious clayey stratum, such wells must 
be looked upon with great suspicion. In the older parts 
of the city they are almost certain to be contaminated by 
leakages from privy-vaults and house-drains. Water 
from such wells, even when it brings no specific disease, 
is pernicious, and to those who have not by long use ac- 
quired a taste for filth, it is disgusting. But such water 
is known to be one of the chief vehicles for the spread of 
typhoid fever and cholera, and circumstances may arise 
in which it will be the duty of this board to summarily 
close man}' of these wells. 

THE POND ON HANOVER SQUARE. 

During the past summer this body of water again, as 
usual, became a nuisance. In the early spring the water 
had been drawn off and the basin was thoroughly cleaned 
under the direction of the Committee on Commons, in 
the hope that it would go through the summer without 
causing trouble. But about the 20th of July the water 
suddenly became filled with a low form of aquatic vegeta- 
tion which quickly decayed, evolving a great deal of foul 
odor. On the 25th, in answer to the complaints of those 
residing about the square, the board ordered the pond 
drawn off. "We had some fears that the empty basin ex- 
posed to the summer sun might prove a source of danger 



208 

and sickness ; but, owing probably to tlie thorough spring 
cleaning, these fears were not realized. 

About September 20, it was thought that the basin 
might again be filled, and the gate was shut down. But 
the pond filled slowly, and after several days, when it was 
about half full, the trouble reappeared and the water was 
again drawn ott'. It so remained until the cool weather 
and copious rains of autumn rendered it possible to again 
fill the basin without creating a nuisance. 

The future of this pond is not difiicult to foresee. It 
will be drained and filled with earth, and a sewer will be 
built for the rivulet which now feeds it. The sooner this 
is done the better. There is no reason to hope that in 
coming summers the pond will be any cleaner or more 
wholesome than in the past. On the contrary , there is every 
reason to expect it to grow worse. Its room is better than 
its company, and it should be abolished without delay. 
When this is done, we believe the same trouble will 
appear to an equal or greater degree in the pond on Mer- 
rimack square, and then that also must be given up. 

Experience here and elsewhere has abundantly demon- 
strated that a small brook running through a compact 
and populous town will inevitably become foul and 
ofiensive. 

MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

This is a matter which is not by law committed to the 
care of this board, but as the study of the number of 
deaths and their causes is so closely connected with sani- 
tary work, we shall need make no apology for introducing 
the following table. The registration law of New Hamp- 
shire requires that all returns of births, marriages, and 
deaths occurring in the city shall be made to the city clerk, 
who shall record the same, and, in the case of death, shall 



209 

grant a permit for burial ; and no interment of the dead 
body of any human being shall be made without such a 
permit. It thus happens that the city clerk's record con- 
tains the names not only of all who die in the city, 
some few of whom are buried in other places, but also of 
a considerable number who, residing and dying abroad, 
are brought here for burial. These are generally mem- 
bers of families which once lived here and still own family 
burial places in our cemeteries, or else residents of neigh- 
boring towns who have purchased burial lots here. By 
some oversight, the record as heretofore kept does not 
state the place of death, and thus the mortality of the city 
is made to appear larger than it really is. The record for 
the last year shows 827 entries. Fifty-six of these are 
thought to be names of persons who lived and died in 
other places and whose remains were brought here for 
interment. This leaves the actual mortality of the j^ear 
at 771, including still-births, as is the custom of our state 
registrar. Reckoning out the still-births, as appears to 
be the general practice of other cities, the mortality is 
733. Estimating the population of the city at 38,000,, 
the death-rate is bj^ the one method 20.29, and by the 
other 19.29, per thousand. 

In the following table the classification is, perhaps, not 
very scientific, but it is the best that can be done with 
such returns as are made. For convenience of compar- 
ison, it follows very closely that of the state registrar. 
u 



210 



TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALIXr OF THE CITr BY pISEASES AND BY 

MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1885, COMPILED PROM THE RECORDS 

IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK. 



Cause of Death. 




1 


i 


a. 


^ 

s 


a 
a 


■3 


3 

3 


rf3 

a 
t 


u 





i 

> 

1 


3 
g 


"3 
1 




















3 








3 






1 

'2' 
2 


6 
1 
1 

'2' 


13 

1 

"i" 


10 
1 


3 

'i' 


2 

i" 






1 




36 




1 

7 


"i" 


1 




5 


Diphtheria 




5 


2 


18 






3 




2 




1 
1 
4 


"3' 


i 
2 


"2 
2 


2 
1 


1 
1 
1 


2 


12 




1 
3 


1 
4 


11 




2 

1 




1 


20 




1 








1 


1 






1 
1 










3 


















1 














1 


1 


2 


















1 
1 


1 


"3* 

1 


2 










2 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 


1 


52 


23 


6 


89 




2 




4 


9 


Cerebro-spinal Meningitis .. . . 


4 


i 


2 

1 






"'2' 


8 








2 






1 
1 

1 

"i" 


1 
1 


1 

1 
3 

1 






4 






1 
1 

i 

10 
1 

1 

1 


2 
1 
1 
1 

7 


1 
1 

2 








2 




2 
2 


2 








1 
1 


12 




2 


i" 


2 


15 




4 




1 
9 






3 


Phthisis 


10 


8 


10 


9 


4 


^ 


9 


5 


5 

1 

2 

1 


93 
2 


Apoplexy 


2 
4 
1 


1 

6 


1 
2 


1 
1 






2 
4 


1 
2 


2 

1 
1 


'3* 


13 


1 


1 


26 




3 




1 
3 












1 






3 


2 


3 


1 
1 




1 


1 
1 
1 


2 

1 
2 


2 


4 
1 


22 






4 




1 


, 2 


' 1' 


4 


1 


1 


2 


14 








1 


















1 

2 


"3" 


1 


Heart Disease 

Hemorrhage 


.... 

3 
1 

7 


2 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 

1 
1 
1 
2 


1 


3 


3 


23 

2 


i' 

5 


1 
1 
6 


6 


2 


3 


1 




"2" 

2 


2 
2 
4 


2 

"4' 
1 


16 




14 




3 


2 
1 
1 
1 




1 


42 




2 












1 
2 












2 








1 




3 
1 

1 


1 
1 


1 






2 


11 










1 
1 


3 




4 




2 




1 


1 
1 
1 


10 




1 
















1 










2 
















1 






1 






1 
2 




"i' 






"i" 


1 




1 




3 










4 




1 




1 










2 














1 
1 

i 






1 






















1 






2 


1 




1 

1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


9 


Nephritis 




2 



211 



TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY, ETC., IN THE CITY, — Continued. 



Cause of Death. 


r 

1 


i 

a 

u 
X) 

r* 

|5=( 


^ 
S 


^ 

^ 


1 




a 




1 
< 


i 

1 

1 


1 




»4 

1 
1 


1 

i 


1 




1 


4 

1 








3 


2 




.... 


1 
1 






11 




1 






1 




4 


















1 
















1 






1 




1 




1 


1 
















3 




1 
4 


















1 


Still-born 


3 


3 


5 


2 
1 

1 


* • • « 


4 
1 


4 


2 


4 


3 


3 


38 




2 










1 












2 


Teething 


1 


1 
1 
3 
2 
2 






1 


2 


.... 


1 


1 




7 


Child-birth 


2 
4 

1 


"i' 

2 


2 
2 

"'3' 




5 


Old Age 


4 

2 






2 
2 
2 

6 


2 
2 






1 
1 


19 


Atrophy and Debility 




3 

1 


2 


2 


20 
12 




1 












7 








1 






2 
1 


2 


1 






6 


















1 








2 

"2 
62 


"i* 

1 

77 






3 








1 


7 






1 

5 

68 








2 




4 
70 


2 

64 


57 


2 
106 


4 

80 


IT 


2 
47 


3 

50 


2 
47 


27 


Totals 


771 



I^umber of deaths from zymotic diseases 

Total deaths of children under five years of age . 



DIARRHEAL DISEASES. 



Under five years of age . 
Above five years of age 



92 
5 



231 
312 



97 



Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM a: WEBSTER, 
GEORGE C. HOITT, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Board of Health. 
Manchester, N. H., Jan. 1, 1886. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MILK INSPECTOR 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the C'dij Coun- 
cils : — 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting ni}- annual 
report as milk inspector for the city of Manchester dur- 
ing the past year, ending December 31, 1885. 

Licenses issued ....... 128 

Kumher of quarts of whole milk consumed daily 

in the city 14,576 

ISTumber quarts of skimmed milk . . . 1,200 



Total number of quarts daily consumed . 15,776 

Estimated number of cows to supply such de- 
mand 2,050 

Cash received $64.00 

I have examined, analyzed, and recorded sixty-one 

samples of milk. The average specific gravity of such 

has been 1.032; of fat, 3 per cent; total milk solids, 13 

per cent. 

I have not kept a record of all samples brought me by 

consumers, as most of it, upon examination, I found up to 

the standard, while in a very few instances the quality was 



216 

poor. I inspected the milk of such dealers and invariably ' 
found it of good quality. I think many complaints of 
poor and bad milk might be avoided if consumers would 
only exercise a little more care in keeping sweet and 
clean vessels used for that purpose. 

This office is always open to all who have any com- 
plaints to make, and ready and willing at all times to 
examine samples of milk from any one who has reason 
to believe that he is getting an inferior article. It is 
ready also to examine for those milkmen who purchase 
their milk from farmers and have doubts as to its purity. 
These examinations are made free of charge. 

It has been my endeavor to see that the milk sold in 
the city was of the quality required by law. For this 
purpose I appointed Officer Joseph Murphy as collector of 
samples. These were taken from the dealers as they 
came to the city from 12 to 3 o'clock in the morning, and 
were secured in a box. They were examined by me at 
the office. The sixty-one samples of milk that I examined 
were taken from dealers in this manner. 

There seems to be a mistaken idea respecting the 
duties of a milk inspector. It is the opinion of many, 
if the inspector does not have some one before the court 
every week, that he is not doing his duty, while his real 
duty is to see that only pure milk is being sold. 

When samples of milk Avere found to fall short of the 
requirements, I notified the seller of the fact. This I 
deemed justice to him, as in nine cases out of ten he pur- 
chased most of his milk, and if he was honestly ignorant 
of the quality, it gave him the advantage of the informa- 
tion so as to guard against it in the future. 



217 



SUPPLY OF MILK. 



The year 1885 has been noted for its unusually large 
supply of milk. There has not been a time for many 
years when milk was so abundant, the supply far exceed- 
ing the demand. There are two reasons assigned for 
this: first, the good pasturage made by the occasional rain 
through the summer months; second, the increase in the 
stock of co^^'s made b}" the farmers, they finding the 
raising of niilk profitable, as it is readily converted into 
cash, their money being received monthly, and there 
being an absence of expense to them in its delivery, as it 
is taken from his door by the dealer, who also returns the 
empty cans, 

SKIMMED MILK. 

Since July, 1885, there has come into existence a large 
traflic in what is known as " skimmed milk." This milk 
is brought here from Short Falls, Epsom, Derry, and 
Boston. Milk is shipped to Boston, there skimmed, and 
returned to Manchester for sale. This milk has, so far, 
been of very good quality; it contains from one half to one 
per cent of fat, and some that I have examined as high as 
one and one half per cent. Many families are using this in 
place of whole milk, and although so large a quantity is dis- 
posed of, it does not diminish the sale of the former article 
in proportion. At first, the skimmed milk was sold by 
parties who made it a specialty ; but at the present time 
it is being carried by several milkmen who sell both 
whole and skimmed. This practice cannot be stopped, 
as I can see, and it may lead to a great deal of trouble to 
the inspector in the future, as in a season when milk is 
short it will be a great temptation to some to mix the 
two kinds. Then complaints will come to the inspector 
from consumers that the milk is not as it ought to be, and 
they want the milkman looked after. The inspector will 



218 

then examine the carts and find the milk all right, for the 
reason that this mixed milk is placed in cans marked 
" skimmed milk," which the inspector has nothing to do 
with, there being no standard for skimmed milk at the 
present time. 

There are always more or less impurities in milk that 
cannot be detected by any chemical or microscopical ex- 
amination. These impurities are produced by the cows 
not having proper food and being compelled to drink 
from stagnant pools. It should be the first duty of all 
raisers of milk to see that a good supply of pure water 
is within easy access of the cows. The raisers of milk 
should examine their cows with great care to see that 
they have no tuberculous disease. Milk from such cows 
should not be sold. The sanitary condition of the stable, 
such as ventilation, drainage, etc., should be properly 
looked after, the cows should be properly bedded, and the 
udders should be thoroughly cleansed before milking. 
If these duties at the farm are properly looked after, the 
many epidemics of typhoid fever, scarlet fever, and other 
diseases well known to have been occasioned by an im- 
pure milk supply, would be greatly diminished. 

Professor Heeren's pioskop, or milk-tester, will be 
found to be very useful for the detection of skimmed or 
watered milk when sold for a whole milk. This milk- 
tester would be of good service in private families in 
order to prevent them from paying the price of whole for 
skimmed milk. They can be had for fifty cents each. 

As most people are ignorant of the law regulating the 
sale of milk in this state, I deem it best to publish it in 
connection with this report. 

Respectfully submitted. 

C. B. LITTLEFIELD, 

Milk Inspeckr\. 



219 



ACT TO REGULATE THE 

SALE AND INSPECTION OF MILK. 



Section 1. The mayor and aldermen of cities and the selectmen' 
of towns may annually appoint one or more persons to be inspectors 
of milk for their respective places, who shall be sworn before enter- 
ing upon the duties of their office. Each inspector shall publish a 
notice of his appointment for two weeks in a newspaper published in 
his city or town, or, if no newspaper is published therein, he shall 
post up such notice in two or more public places in such city or 
town. 

Sect. 2. Such inspectors shall keep an office and books for the 
purpose of recording the names and places of business of all persons 
engaged in the sale of milk within their city or town. They may 
enter all places where milk is stored or kept for sale, and all carriages 
used for the conveyance of milk ; and when they have reason to 
believe that any milk found by them is adulterated, they shall take 
specimens thereof and cause the same to be analyzed or otherwise 
satisfactorily tested, the result of which analysis or test they shall - 
record and preserve as evidence ; and a certificate of such result, 
sworn to by the analyzer, shall be admissible in evidence in all prose- 
cutions under this act. The inspectors shall receive such compensa- 
tion as the mayor and aldermen or selectmen may determine. 

Sect. 3. In all cities and towns in which there is an inspector 
of milk, every person who conveys milk, in carriages or otherwise, 
for the purpose of selling the same in such city or town, shall annu- 
ally, on the first day of May, or within thirty days thereafter, be 
licensed by the said inspector or inspectors to sell milk within the 
limits thereof, and shall pay to such inspector or inspectors fifty cents 
each to the use of the city or town. All inspectors shall pay over 
monthly to the treasurer of the city or town all suras collected by 



220 

tliem. Licenses shall be issued only in the names of the owners of 
carriages or other vehicles, and shall for the purposes of this act be 
conclusive evidence of ownership. No license shall be sold, assigned, 
or transferred. Each license shall record the name, residence, place 
of business, and the number of carriages or other vehicles used, of 
the person engaged in carrying or selling said milk, and the number 
of the license. Each licensee shall, before engaging in the sale of 
milk, cause his name, the number of his license, and his place of 
business to be legibly placed on each outer side of all carriages or 
v^ehicles used by him in the conveyance and sale of milk, and he 
shall report to the inspectors any change of driver or other person 
employed by him which may occur during the term of the license. 
Whoever, without being first licensed under the provisions of this 
. section, sells milk or exposes it for sale from carriages or other vehi- 
cles, or has it in his custody or possession with intent so to sell, and 
whoever violates any of the provisions of this section, shall for a 
first offense be punished by a fine of not less than thirty nor more 
than one hundred dollars ; for a second offense, by a fine of not less 
thun fifty nor more than three hundred dollars ; and for a subsequent 
offense, by a fine of fifty dollars and by imprisonment for not less 
than thirty nor more than sixty days. 

Sect. 4. Every person, before selling milk or offering it for sale 
in a store, booth, stand, or market-place in a city or town in which 
an inspector or inspectors of milk are appointed, shall register in the 
books of such inspector or inspectors, and shall pay to him or them 
fifty cents to the use of such city or town ; and whoever neglects so 
to register shall be punished for each offense by fine of not less than 
ten nor more than twenty dollars. 

Sect. 5. Whoever by himself, or by his servant or agent, or as 
the servant or agent of any other person, sells, exchanges, or delivers, 
or has in his custody or possession with intent to sell or exchange, 
or exposes or offers for sale or exchange, adulterated milk, or milk 
to which water or any foreign substance has been added, or from 
sick or diseased cows, shall for a first offense be punished by a fine 
of not less than fifty nor more than two hundred dollars ; for a 
second offense, by a fine of not less than one hundred nor more than 



221 

three hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not less than thirty 
nor more than sixty days ; and for a subsequent oflfense by fine of 
fifty dollars and by imprisonment for not less than sixty nor more 
than ninety days. 

Sect. 6. Whoever by himself, or by his servant or agent, or as 
the servant or agent of any other person, sells, exchanges, or deliv- 
ers, or has in his custody or possession with intent to sell or ex- 
change, or exposes or offers for sale as pure milk any milk from . 
which the cream or a part thereof has been removed, shall be pun- 
ished by the penalties provided in the pi*eceding section. 

Sect. 7. No dealer in milk, and no servant or agent of such a 
dealer, shall sell, exchange, or deliver, or have in his custody or pos- 
session with intent to sell, exchange, or deliver, milk from which 
the cream or any part thereof has been removed, unless in a con- 
spicuous place abo"^e the center upon the outside of every vessel, can, 
or package from or in which such milk is sold, the words Skimmed 
Milk are distinctly marked in letters not less than one inch in length. 
Whoever violates the provisions of this section shall be punishe'd by 
the penalties provided in section five. 

Sect. 8. Any inspector of milk, and any servant or agent of an 
inspector, who willfully connives at or assists in a violation of the 
provisions of this act, shall be punished by fine of not less than one 
hundred nor more than three hundred dollars, or by imprisonment 
for not less than thirty nor more than sixty days. 

Sect. 9. In all prosecutions under this act, if the milk is shown 
upon analysis to contain more than eighty-seven per cent of watery 
fluid, or to contain less than thirteen per cent of milk solids, it shall 
be deemed for the purposes of this act to be adulterated. 

Sect. 10. It shall be the duty of every inspector to institute a- 
complaint for a violation of any of the provisions of this act on the 
information of any person who lays before him satisfactory evidence 
by which to sustain such complaint. 

Sect. 11. Each inspector shall cause the name and place of busi- 
ness of every person convicted of selling adulterated milk, or of 
having the same in his possession with intent to sell, to be published- 
in two newspapers in the county in which theoff"ense was committed. 



222 

Sect. 12. This act shall take effect and be in force only in those 
towns which shall by vote adopt its provisions, and cities wherein 
inspectors are appointed as provided in section one. 

[Approved August 15, 1883.] 

This act was amended by the legislature in 1885, as follows : 

Section 1. That section 10 of chapter 42 of the laws passed 
.June session, 1883, be amended by adding at the end of said sec- 
tion the following : " But this provision shall not be construed to 
prevent any person from making complaint and instituting and 
carrying on prosecutions for the violation of any of said provisions, 
and such complainant, whether a town or city, by its ofl&cers or an 
individual, shall be entitled to one half of every fine collected through 
prosecution, and in any town where no inspector has been appointed 
complaints may be made to the state board of health, and said board 
shall proceed with such complaint in the same manner as is required 
of the inspector, whether the town from which complaint is made 
has or has not adopted the provisions of this act," so that said sec- 
tion shall read : " It shall be the duty of every inspector to institute 
a complaint for a violation of any of the provisions of this act, on 
the information of any person who lays before him satisfactory evi- 
dence by which to sustain such complaint, but this provision shall 
not be construed to prevent any person from making complaint and 
instituting and carrying on prosecutions for the violation of any of 
said provisions, and such complainant, whether a town or city, by its 
officers or an individual, shall be entitled to one half of every fine 
collected through such prosecution, and in any town where no in- 
.spector has been appointed complaints may be made to the state 
board of health, and said board shall proceed with such complaint 
in the same manner as required of an inspector, whether the town 
from which complaint is made has or has not adopted the provisions 
.of this act." 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

[Approved August 13, 1885.] 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



i 



To the 3IaA/or, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester : — 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the 
Overseers of the Poor herewith present their annual report 
for the year 1885. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the City 
Farm during the j^ear has been thirty-one, at a cost of one 
dollar and fifty-two cents per week for each pauper. 

The whole number of families that have received mor6 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been 
forty, consisting of one hundred and fifty persons, all of 
whom had a settlement in this city. Four of this number 
died during the year. The whole number of persons 
supported at the insane asylum during the year has been 
one, at a cost of four dollars per week. The whole num- 
ber of persons supported at the State Industrial School 
during the year has been four, at a cost of one dollar and 
fifty cents per week for each person. 

The Overseers of the Poor have assisted the paupers 
off" the farm, from the several wards of the city, as 
follows ; — 

15 



226 



Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 



number one 
number two 
number tbree 
number four 
number five 
number six 
number seven 
number eight 



$150 


65 


23 


00 


126 


20 


128 


74 


1,499 


96 


281 


25 


55 


50 


183 


39 



$2,448 69 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 

State Industrial School, board of 
inmates ..... 

Insane Asylum, board of inmate 

County of Hillsborough, board of 
insane paupers .... 

Town of Weare, support of Eben 
Johnson ..... 

Town of Candia, for support of 
George H. Johnson . 

J. M. Collity, setting limb for 
James Callihan .... 

J. C. Bickford, making affidavit in 
the George boy case . 

L. G. Tcwksbury, medicine de- 
livered for police station . 

L. G. Tewksbury, medicine de- 
livered by order of the Mayor. . 

'Frank X. Chenette, burying small- 
pox children .... 

X. G. Whittier, wood delivered E. 
S. Woodward .... 



$1,894 89 
51 68 






208 


00 






102 


25 






22 


50 






25 


00 






1 


00 






6 


80 






6 


80 






43 


00 






2 


00 


2,363 


92 






iJ^ 




$4,812 6,1 



227 



Cash received from county of Hillsborough . $1,643 68 



Total cost for the year .... $3,168 93 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward 1, 
THOMAS L. QUIMBY, Ward 2, 
JAMES SUTCLIFFE, Ward 3, 
HORACE GORDON, Ward 4, 
THOMAS P. CONWAY, Ward 5, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, Ward 6, 
ELBRIDGE G. WOODMAN, Ward 7, 
WILLIAM WEBER, Ward 8, 
Overseers of the Poor for City of Manchester. 
A true copy. Attest : 

William H. Maxwell, 
Clerk of the Overseers of the Poor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON GITY FARM. 



i 



REPORT 

OF THE 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Members of the City Councils 
of Blanche ster : — 

Gentlemen, — Your committee herewith present their 
annual report for the year 1885 : — 

During the past year two brick cells with iron doors 
have been built in the basement of the main building 
in place of the old wooden cells, to be used as dun- 
geons; ventilators have been put into the horse barn 
and vegetable cellar; the steam-heating arrangement has 
been remodeled and improved, being now nearly a new 
arrangement throughout, and gives perfect satisfaction; 
a new hard wood floor has been laid in the kitchen, 
the L has been painted inside, and one room sheathed 
six feet high by fifteen long; the sitting-room has been 
newly carpeted; a new "Crosby invalid bed" has been 
purchased for the hospital department; all the buildings 
at the farm have been fully equipped with hand grenades 
and fire-pails, and some new furniture has been provided. 

Many improvements have been made on the land. In 

kthe pest-house pasture, wood has been cut off", stumps dug 
out, the old cellar has been filled up and leveled, and the 



232 

old well filled in; the Lowell-street-hill lot has been 
graded where the ledge was taken out, and bushes cut 
off; four acres oh Bridge street have been sowed down to 
grass, and the six-acre lot southeast of the barn has been 
cleared of stone since the silo corn was cut, and newly 
laid down to grass. A great deal of time and labor has 
been spent clearing the swamp, and considerable progress 
made there towards preparing it for mowing. 

The crops for the past year have averaged better than 
for several preceding year's, there being raised fifty tons 
of English hay, ten tons of meadow hay, twenty-five tons 
of oat fodder, five tons of clover (second crop), one hun- 
dred and sixty-five tons of ensilage, one thousand bushels of 
potatoes, seven hundred and thirty-eight bushels of corn 
on the ear, twenty bushels of beans, seventy-five bushels of 
carrots, forty bushels of beets, forty bushels of onions, six 
hundred and thirty-five heads of cabbage, five tons of 
pumpkins, and one-half a ton of squashes. 

During the year the Jersey bull has died, and the Hol- 
stein'bull is rendered practically valueless by some disease 
for which we are unable to account. 

The milk route, carried on in connection with the farm, 
is proving a success, receipts for milk the past year being 
$2,891.94, an increase of $535.91 over the sales in 1884. 

Eight pigs have died from hog cholera during the year. 
In 1884 twenty were lost by this same disease. There 
are now fifty-eight pigs and one hundred and fourteen i 
hens at the farm. 

Your committee desire particularly to commend the 
efficient manner in which the farm has been managed by 
the superintendent and his wife. We have at all times 
found their duties ably performed. Mrs. Garvin has per- 
fectly systematized the inside, as has her husband the] 
outside afi^airs of the institution. During the past twelve 



233 

months Mr. Garvin has, in addition to his outdoor man- 
agement, assumed the work of keeping the hooks, which 
have previously been kept by the foreman of the farm. 
"We find all the accounts full and accurate, and add hereto 
a synopsis. 

LEOI^ARD P. REYNOLDS, 
• S. P. CAl^NON, 

JOHIS" F. FOX, 

G. S. SMITH, 

GUY F. WHITTEI^, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 

SYNOPSIS OF CITY FARM ACCOUNTS. 

Total expenses of farm $8,121 40 

Interest. . 1,000 00 



$9,121 40 
Total receipts 3,995 95 



$5,125 45 
Bills receivable 362 70 



$4,762 75 
Difference in stock 321 23 



$4,441 52 
Permanent improvements .... 2,115 12 



$2,326 40 



'Total amount of cash paid to city treasurer 

in 1885 . $1,986 88 

Total number of weeks' board of prisoners and pau- 
\> pars, 1,531. 

Average cost of board per week, one dollar fifty-one 
cents and nine mills. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of the Valley Cemetery respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1885 : — 



RECEIPTS. 




Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1884 


$317 54 


Appropriation for 1885 


. 1,500 00 


For tomb fees 


130 00 


water rents . 


190 00 


grading lots . 


143 06 


care of lots . 


238 00 


opening graves 


199 00 


Total 




JL VJtCtl • • 

EXPENDITURE 


s. 


Paid C. H. G. Foss, superintendeni 


: 1523 25 


F. B. Balch, superintendent 


124 25 


Luther Leavitt, labor . 


197 49 


James Barrett, labor 


183 12 


F. W. Slack, labor 


51 56 


Lewis Foley, labor 


43 12 


Frederick Clark, labor 


21 87 


A. F. Hall, labor . 


46 88- 



$2,717 60" 



238 



Paid Frank Colby, labor 
A. B. Chase, labor 
C. H. Gilmaii, labor 
John White, labor 
James Fitzgerald, labor 
C. Henry, labor , 
Patrick Molan, labor . 
Dennis O'Leary, labor . 
Thomas Connor, labor . 
Michael Britton, labor . 
John Sullivan, labor 
W. H. Bennett, surveying 
H. W. Home, surveying 
Harry M. Young, surveying 
Thomas F. Brown, surveying 
John F. Woodbury, repairs 
W. H. Vickery, repairs 
Hutchinson Bros., repairs 

C, H. Wood, painting signs 
J. J. Abbott, painting signs 
James E. Carr, painting signs 
E. A. Parkhurst, trees . 
H. H. Huntress, plants and 

iiowers 

D. A. Simons, desk and chairs 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor . . . . 

■Jeremiah Hodge, lumber, 
Temple & Farrington, sta- 
tionery .... 
Water commissioners . 
JohnB. Yarick Co., hardware 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware ....... 



$113 87 
48 12 
73 37 
26 87 
21 25 
9 65 

5 00 
4 69 

6 87 
4 37 
2 34 

13 50 
6 12 



88 
50 
00 
65 
43 



24 37 
28 94 

27 14 
31 00 

19 70 
33 15 

28 79 
2 73 

6 00 

106 15 

57 42 

10 75 



239 



Paid Killey & Waclleigh, hardware 
Thos. A. Lane, pipe and labor 
Pike & Heald, pipe and labor, 
G. B, Brown, manure 
J. N. Heath, loam 
C. H. Robie, loam 
J. W. Lathe, loam 
Isaac S. Coffin, loam 
F. E. Yarnum & Co., loam 
John D. Patterson, loam 
George Whitford, teaming 

Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1885 
Total 



i 3 

268 
39 
10 
61 
25 
11 
12 
10 
6 

262 
89 



98 
60 
45 
50 
88 
50 
25 
00 
00 
00 
08 
20 



$2,717 60 

At a meeting of the sub-trustees in February they 
elected Mr. C. H, G. Foss for superintendent, who has 
given entire satisfaction in the management of his tracts, 
in continuing the grading of the public grounds and 
banks, removing unsightly trees and stumps, improving 
the paths by cutting out the grass and graveling them ; 
and many improvements have been made by the owners 
of private lots by putting in curbing and erecting monu- 
ments. The water service has been extended, 300 feet of 
one-inch, 900 feet of two-inch pipe having been put in 
during the year. There is but one opinion of the sub- 
trust ees, that in the near future there should be built a 
new receiving-tomb, the old one being inadequate for the 
purposes intended. 

Submitted to full board February 3, and approved. 
JOHN A. McCRILLIS, 
CHARLES J. ABBOTT, 
GEORGE C. GLLMORE, 
BITSHROD W. HILL, 
DAVID O. FURNALD, 

Sub-Trustees on Valley Cemetery. 



240 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

During the past year the sub-trustees having in charge 
the largest and most important cemetery in the state, have 
endeavored, to the best of their ability, to continue the 
improvements inaugurated the year before, in addition to 
the ordinary care, repair, and preservation of the grounds. 
A commendable and growing interest on the part of lot 
owners and the public generally is being manifested, and 
the sub-trustees are not less encouraged thereby than by 
the commendation so heartily accorded the efforts which 
they have been and are making to beautify and adorn this 
place, so admirably adapted for the purposes for which it 
is set apart. 

WORK DONE ON OLD GROUNDS. 

The appropriation of $2,500 for superintendent's salary 
and for labor has been found insufficient for the require- 
ments of the old grounds, and this amount has been sup- 
plemented by unexpended balances from other items, so 
that work to the amount of $3,308.81 has been done, and 
the sub-trustees believe it has been faithfully and well 
performed. 

All the avenues in the cemetery have been regraveled 
and regraded the past season, a work made necessary by 
the introduction of water. Five hundred and seventeen] 
loads of gravel from the city's gravel bank have beei 
used for this purpose. Poplar avenue has been cut downj 
from six inches to a foot, and the material taken out hag 
been used to lill low places at the lower end of the yard^ 
The work of grading for the new iron fence has beei 
done under the direction of the superintendent, one hun- 
dred and twenty-five loads of gravel being required for" 
that purpose. Oakland avenue has received an extra sup-. 



241 

ply of forty-two loads of gravel, made necessary by its 
extension toward the new public ground, A new stump 
puller has been purchased, and with it two hundred 
stumps have been removed. Two acres of land on the 
east side of the cemetery have been cleared, thoroughly 
prepared and sowed to grass ; it is in splendid condition, 
and when laid out as a lawn the coming spring, will un- 
doubtedly find a ready market. About one half an acre 
of land, on the east side, south of Elmwood avenue, has 
been laid out iuto lawn lots and put upon the market. 
In the northeast corner of the old grounds, about two 
acres have been cleared of brush and stumps, and will be 
farther prepared the coming spring for lawn lots. The 
wooden fence on the east and south sides of the cemetery 
has been repaired, but it is a poor, shaky apology, and 
must soon be replaced. The grading about the new build- 
ing has required twenty-seven loads of gravel and one 
hundred and sixty loads of loam and muck. One of the 
most beautiful lawns anywhere to be found is the result. 
Guide-boards have been placed at the intersection of all 
the avenues, and the work will hereafter be continued to 
the paths as well. The main avenue, from the west en- 
trance to the house, has been raised and widened, and. 
about fifty new^ lots laid out northwest of the house. The 
superintendent has had the care of twenty lots, besides 
the lawn and city plots. All the lots and grounds have 
been cut and trimmed and the rubbish cleared therefrom 
twice this season, and much other general work, not easily 
enumerated but very marked in results, has been accom- 
plished. 

THE STRAW LOT. 

It is a matter of regret that the trustees have been 
obliged to forego the accomplishment of much that needs 

16 



IL 



242 

immediate attention, and especially the practical suspen- 
sion of work upon the new lot recently purchased for 
cemetery uses. The wisdom of the appropriation of $300 
for laying out and building avenues is apparent, when we 
consider the rapidity with which the old lots are being 
sold, and the fact that to properly prepare this land for 
burials is a work of time as well as considerable outlay, 
which can be best accomplished bj' annual expenditures 
of a limited amount. 

The trustees suggest the necessity of an appropriation 
of the same amount as last year, to enable them to carry 
on the work required and perfect improvements in accord- 
ance with the plans already adopted, and which the 
trustees believe will ultimately make of this lot the most 
attractive part of the cemetery. The large amount of 
work which it has been found necessary to do in the old 
cemetery the past season, has prevented opening the new 
avenues, so as to make of the Straw lot an attractive park 
until used for burials, as was desired, but it is hoped that 
the coming season will tind the wprk accomplished. 

WATER-WORKS. 

The introduction of water has fully met a want long 
and painfully experienced in former years, and the results 
have been very nuirked in the improved appearance of 
the grounds and the renewed interest which it has created 
in lot owners, who now find their elforts to beautify their 
lots available at a very small expense. The trustees call 
particular attention to the benefits which would accrue 
from a general use of the water upon all the lots, and 
urge lot owners to contract with the superintendent, who is 
instructed to water lots for a nominal sum, within the reach 
of everybody. In this way the whole face of the ground 
can be kept green and bright, and the rusty, dilapidated, 



I 

.1 



243 

forsaken lots, bespeaking an almost criminal negligence, 
will either be revived or made so conspicuous in their 
ugliness that they will shock their owners into deserved 
shame, and prove a monument to the heartlessness of the 
living rather than to the memory of the dead. 

During the past season, the water pipes were extended 
to various parts of the cemetery where most needed, 1,290 
feet in all having been laid, as follows: On Chestnut 
avenue, 820 feet; Cherry avenue, 200 feet; Oakland 
ayenue, 90 feet ; and on Locust avenue to the Swede lawn, 
180 feet. 

Of eighty-two hydrants in the yard, sixteen were put 
in the past year. There are now five drinking-fountains 
upon the avenues, two of which were placed this year. 
Six gates to water pipes have been put in anew, making 
thirty-three in all now in service. Several applications 
are on file for extensions to other parts of the grounds 
not yet accommodated, and these places should be sup- 
plied as speedily as possible. An appropriation of the 
same amount as last year is thought to be sufficient for 
this purpose. 

BUILDINGS. 

The office and waiting-room has been completed and 
furnished during the year, and is an attraction as well 
as a comfort and necessity which patrons of the cemetery 
would not willingly dispense with. The building was 
wholly paid for by the unexpended balance of last year's 
appropriation for that purpose. It will be found neces- 
sary to strengthen the foundations to prevent settling, and 
to make some minor additions and repairs, but it is 
thought that an appropriation of §100 will be sufficient 
for whatever may be required. The ground around this 
new building has been tastefully laid out into borders, 



244 

lawns, and gardens; the avenues have been regraded, 
widened, and otherwise improved, and the locality has 
become one of the most desirable in the yard. A large 
number of new lots north and west of the house have 
found a ready market, and more will be prepared and 
sold the coming season. * 

The attractiveness of this part of the cemetery is now 
more than ever marred by the piles of lumber, large 
tools, carts, snow-plows, and other things which neces- 
sarily accumulate, and which must be kept somewhere, 
and for which there should be some suitable building 
which can be cheaply but ornamentally constructed. 
Much loss is entailed in the wear of tools and othe^:' 
articles, now unprotected from the weather, which w^ould 
be saved by the erection of such a shelter, and the slov- 
enly appearance of the best part of the yard removed. 
An appropriation of $400 is asked for this purpose. 

NURSEKY. 

The expenditures for trees, shrubs, and flowers have 
been kept within the appropriation, and the success of 
the plan adopted last year, of stocking a nursery with 
young plants and growing them for use when required^ 
has been found to fully warrant a continuance of this ap- 
propriation. Three hundred and twelve ornamental trees, 
eight varieties, two hundred shrubs, twenty varieties, one 
hundred Norway maples, one hundred rock maples, fifty 
evergreens,, five varieties, and twenty-five herbaceous 
plants were placed in the nursery early in the season. 
The place seems especially fitted for their successful cul- 
ture, and with the assistance of the city water, recently 
introduced, there seems to be every encouragement for 
continuing this enterprise and renewing the appropriation 
of $200. By this means we can secure an unfailing sup- 



245 

ply of the most valuable material for ornamentation at a 
small outlay compared with its real value, and ultimately 
accommodate lot owners, as well as realize quite an income 
from the sale of stock for their use. 

DRAINAGE. 

One of the most difficult problems to deal with is the 
matter of drainage. In low places it has been found 
impossible to keep the water from covering the lots and 
avenues at times, rendering the latter impassable until the 
water has disappeared. When it could be done, these 
low places have been raised and catch-basins have been 
put in. The improvement caused thereby is very grati- 
fying, although it is not wholly efficacious. The appro- 
priation of $150 last year has not been wholly expended, 
and the trustees recommend that $100 be applied to the 
drainage account the coming season. 

LOAM AND MUCK. 

Seven hundred and fortj^-five loads of loam have been 
paid for, and mostly used upon the ground the past sea- 
son, for which the sum of $839.75 has been paid, exceed- 
ing the appropriation of $750 by the sum of $89.75 ; and 
yet this amount has proved entirely insufficient for the 
demands, and much important work has been untouched 
for the want of loam and muck. ISTearly two hundred 
loads of muck, taken from the pond on the Straw lot, 
have also been used. It was hoped that the supply of 
muck from this pond would be constantly available, and 
$200 was appropriated for digging and carting. This 
money has been unavailing for the purpose designed, on 
account of the constant supply of water in the pond dur- 
ing the latter part of the season, which prevented access 
thereto. About $100 of this appropriation remains in the 



246 

hands of the treasurer, and the trustees recommend the 
addition thereto of $200 the present year, to enable them 
to avail themselves of this means of partial supply for the 
increasing necessities of the cemetery. The sterility of 
the Pine Grove cemetery cannot be conquered but by the 
addition of a liberal depth of rich soil, but the committee 
have found great difficulty in obtaining a sufficient sup- 
ply. At present our supply is exhausted, orders for the 
grading and raising of lots are of necessity refused, and 
the work of improvement of the grounds and the laying 
out of new plots must await the replenishment of this 
invaluable material. The sub-trustees could doubtless 
expend the same amount as last year to advantage, and 
may be obliged to ; but with the aid of muck from the 
pond they suggest reducing the appropriation to $500 for 
loam, instead of $750, as has been heretofore allowed. 

PLANS AND RECORDS. 

Pine Grove cemetery of to-day is the outgrowth of 
many years of labor under varied administrations, each 
adding some peculiarity of its own to the methods pur- 
sued by their predecessors. The only plans are such as 
have grown with the cemetery, meager and imperfect in 
the beginning and added to from time to time as occasion 
demanded, until now they are, at best, a very imperfect 
and unsatisfactory reliance. A large number of valuable 
lots in various parts of the cemetery, and unlaid plots of 
available land, are not only kept out of the market and 
lost to the treasury, but they are often dreary wastes in 
the midst of improved plots, which have escaped attention 
from want of means to ascertain their ownership. It is 
also impossible, from the condition of the records, to 
determine the present ownership or control of a majority 
of the sold lots, and there is no means of communication 



247 

with the proprietors or of directing parties seeking certain 
lots by the name of present owners. 

The renaming of avennes and walks has rendered the 
difficulties more bewildering, and the sensible solution of 
this trouble, growing rapidly worse with the increasing 
improvements, is to start anew with a plan which shall 
correctly and intelligently record the cemetery as it is 
to-day and will be years hence, if properly attended to. 
Deeds made from the present imperfect and incorrect 
plans in the hands of the treasurer are in direct conflict 
with the names of avenues as posted on the new guide- 
boards which have been placed in position the past sea- 
son, and cannot easily be corrected until proper plans are 
substituted therefor. The committee therefore recom- 
mend to the city government the appropriation of $250 
to enable them to perfect their plans and records, ascertain 
the names and addresses of owners, the number and loca- 
tion of all lots sold, and of such tracts of land as are 
the property of the city and can be made available as a 
source of revenue, and as a means of benefiting and per- 
fecting the general symmetry and completeness of the 
cemetery. 

LAWN PLOTS. 

The sub-trustees for several years have been endeavor- 
ing to demonstrate the absurdity and folly of continuing 
longer in the old-fashioned and now obsolete methods of 
dealing with burial lots as if their peculiar charm must of 
necessity consist of their being made as dismal, forbid- 
ding, and exclusive as it was possible to make them. Lit- 
tle by little the old notions are yielding to improved tastes 
and corrected judgment; a majority are selecting lots 
with lawn restrictions, and many old lots are being re- 
graded upon the lawn system, discarding their encasing 



248 

in costly boulders of cold, cheerless granite, or their pro- 
tection from the depredations of estrays by huge iron 
fences wrought in hideous devices, all repellent and exe- 
crable. The older portions of the cemetery, where each 
owner adopted his own grade, ran his lines according to 
his own fanc}' , and seemed to revel in his own peculiar 
exclusiveness and oddity in open defiance of the rights 
and tastes of his neighbors or the public, are strangely in 
contrast with the newer portions, with uniform grades, in 
harmony with the natural surroundings, gracefully curv- 
ing avenues, open lawns, and carpets of green. The 
glaring defects of tlie old sj^stem, often rendered more 
conspicuous and objectionable by their utter neglect after 
a few years, are deterring the majority from copying after 
so bad an example, and are compelling the laying out of 
lots upon the lawn system, to render them salable and 
attractive. 

HILLSIDE LAWN. 

This is the only plot of land in the cemetery where 
deposits for a perpetual fund to keep the lots in repair are 
required. During the past season seven lots have been 
sold, and $1,050.68 have thereby been added to the fund, 
which, with the 1 839.81 in the hands of the treasurer of 
the fund, makes the total amount |1, 890.49. There are 
in the lawn one hundred and eight lots, eighteen of which 
have been sold. , Several obstacles to the more rapid sale 
of these lots are apparent. 

1. The lot was never properly loamed or prepared, and 
will never sustain a good sward until it is renewed and 
put into proper condition. The income from the fund 
from the lots sold is insufficient to accomplish what is 
required, and besides, it should not be a charge upon this 



249 

fund to prepare the laud so as to make it marketable ; 
aud the unsold lots need the same treatment as those sold. 
2. The approaches to the lots on the height of the land 
should be widened so as to make a driveway thereto, in- 
stead of a walk, as now constructed. A reasonable outlay 
by the city will improve the lawn immensely, satisfy those 
who have purchased lots and are rightfully dissatisfied 
with its present condition, and render salable what should 
be the most desirable lots in the cemetery. Ordinary lots 
cost but ten cents per foot ; to secure one of these sixty 
cents per foot must be paid. It seems but just that they 
should be put into fair condition, to warrant their high 
j)rice. It will cost $500 to make it what it should be. 

RECEIVING-TOMB. 

The sub-trustees respectfull}^ refer to the existing and 
acknowledged necessity of a tomb at the Pine Grove 
cemetery, both on account of the large number of citizens 
who now use this burial ground, and the fact that this is 
the only place where the city's dead can hereafter find 
accommodation. It is almost impossible to keep all the 
avenues and paths open through the winter, to say noth- 
ing of the increased expense and the difliculty of digging 
graves through the frozen ground. The tomb at the Val- 
ley cemetery is suflicient for the necessities of its own lot 
owners, but wholly inadequate for the needs of the larger 
number who are now compelled to use it, and afterwards 
to remove therefrom, and carry their dead to the Pine 
Grove cemetery for burial. Fifteen were removed from 
the Valley-cemetery tomb to Pine Grove cemetery upon 
the opening of the season. We hope the time has come 
when the necessities of the Pine Grove cemetery in this 
respect will be acknowledged. One thousand dollars will 



250 



be a sufficient appropriation, with what the trustees hav^ 
on hand, for this purpose. 

FENCING. 

The iron fence on the west side of the old cemetery has; 
been extended the past season by the addition of four 
hundred feet, at a cost of $2.20 per foot. There remain 
about one hundred and ninety-six feet on that side unin- 
closed. Upon the south and east sides there is practically 
no fence at all, and the new Straw lot is still unfenced. 
It must be apparent that something should be done each 
year toward ultimately inclosing the entire lot, and we 
leave it to the city government to appropriate for this as 
they deem advisable. 

PILGRIM LAWN. 

ISTo progress has been made toward establishing the 
Pilgrim lawn, an appropriation of $150 for which was 
made last year. The pressure of other duties which could 
not be deferred is the only cause, and the work will 
undoubtedly be carried to an early completion the coming 
season. Its design is to enable the trustees to sell single 
graves to persons of limited means, who would otherwise 
be compelled to use the public burial ground. If remov- 
als are made therefrom, the land reverts to the city, but 
in case the owner thereof or his representative becomes 
the purchaser of a lot, the original price for which the 
grave was sold shall be allowed in part payment for the 
lot. 

PUBLIC BURIAL GROUND, 

The new public ground, referred to in the report of last 
year, has been thoroughly laid out, graded, and put int( 
creditable condition; necessary headstones have been pro- 



251 

cured, and it is the design of the trustees to maintain this 
lot an open lawn, doing away as far as possible with the 
offensive appearance which such places too often present. 
The sub-trustees desire, if possible, the coming season, to 
grade, loam, and lawn the old public ground, now discon- 
tinued, and so improve its appearance as to make the land 
adjacent thereto available for sale as first-class lots. 

THE SWEDE LOT. 

The Swede lot has been laid out and thoroughly pre- 
pared, to the entire satisfaction of the society of Swedes, 
for whose use it was set apart. Already six burials have 
been made therein, and the interest which they seem to 
be taking in their exclusive burial place argues well for 
its future care. 

EMPLOYES AT THE YARD. 

In conclusion , the sub-trustees express their satisfaction 
with the labors of the superintendent, Mr. Byron A. 
Stearns, and commend him generally for the manner in 
which he has performed the work intrusted to him, and 
the interest he has manifested in the success of the ceme- 
tery. The Rules and Begulations adopted by the manage- 
ment, printed and accessible to all who desire them, are 
his sole guide, and he is permitted no discretion in their 
enforcement, or given authority heyoiul lohat they confer. If 
at times he seems arbitrary, it is because he is literally 
fulfilling his instructions ; and parties aggrieved thereby 
should make their complaints to the committee having in 
charge the matter to be dealt with, who will always 
endeavor to effect the best interests of the cemetery and 
its lot owners. If parties having occasion to transact 
business at the Pine Grove would procure a copy of the 



252 



printed rules and regulations, read them carefully, with 
the assurance that they were made to he executed, and that the 
employes at the yard, from superintendent down, are 
held to a strict personal accountability for their literal 
enforcement, there would be less see«iing friction and 
more satisfactory results. 



Kumber of deeds delivered and paid for 
Amount received therefor 

Superintendent's receipts for interments 
Superintendent's receipts for wood sold . 
Superintendent's receipts for work on lots, re 

grading ...... 

Superintendent's receipts for advance deposits 

on lots sold ..... 

•Superintendent's receipts for water 
Superintendent's receipts for sundry small 

items, care of lots .... 

Total received by superintendent 

Number of lots regraded during the year 
]^umber of catch-basins built 
I^umber of monuments erected 
Lots sold on Hillside lawn 
Lots unsold on Hillside lawn 
Lots for sale with lawn restrictions 
■Ordinary lots for sale .... 
E'umber of interments during the year . 
ISTumber of interments in public ground 
IlTumber of removals during the year 
Average number of men employed per month 
Whole number of lots in yard 
Whole number of lots sold this year, (ordinary 
28, lawn 20, Hillside 4) . . . 



58 

$1,974 48 

$462 26 
36 00 

276 90 



436 


75 


39 


00 


34 


50 


$1,285 


41 




18 




1 




9 




18 




90 




37 




42 




198 




42 




18 




6 


1,381 



52 



253 



Curbings set ..... , 
"Whole number buried in public ground 



r 

903 



The following is a condensed summary of the expendi- 
tures of the year, and a statement of estimates for the 
year 1886 : — 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand January 1, 1875 
Appropriation for 1885 . 
Sale of lots by superintendent 
Sale of lots by treasurer . 
Interments and work on lots . 
Balance of superintendent's collections 

Total receipts 



il,199 90 

5,875 00 

436 75 

1,537 73 

771 66 

75 00 



1,896 04 



EXPENDITURES. 



Current Expenses. 



Salary of superintendent, and for 

labor ..... 
Material and tools 
Printing, stationery, and postage 
Surveying on old lot 
Use of teams at cemetery 
Trees, shrubs, and flowers 
Water rates .... 
Miscellaneous expenses . 
Clerk hire .... 

Total running expenses . 



1885. 



1884. 



. $3,308 51 


$3,073 96- 


218 49 


450 60 


102 28 


70 79 


; 77 26 


144 32 


167 50 


223 00 


143 40 


125 4& 


200 00 


36 50 


. 62 35 


86 07 


25 00 




. 14,304 79 


$4,210 73 



254 



Permanent Improvem ents. 

Iron fence, west side 
Completing and furnishing house 
Loam, partly delivered in 1884 
Extension of water-works to lots . 
Procuring and placing guide-boards 



179 


69 


1,485 


98 


849 


20 


463 


29 


86 


03 



$2,964 19 



$7,867 92 



ESTIMATES FOR 1886. 



Current Expenses. 


Salary and labor . 


. $2,500 00 


Material and tools . 


350 00 


Printing, stationery, and postage 


50 00 


Surveying .... 


100 00 


Use of teams at cemetery 


200 00 


Trees, shrubs, and flowers . 


200 00 


Water rates .... 


200 00 


Miscellaneous expenses . 


100 00 


Clerk hire .... 


25 00 


Permanent Improi 


ements. 


Extending iron fence . 


$750 00 


Repairing new building and fur 




nishing .... 


100 00 


Extension of water-works to lots 


300 00 


Receiving-tomb 


. 1,000 00 


Storehouse .... 


500 00 


Loam 


500 00 


Improving Straw lot . 


200 00 


Drainage .... 


100 00 



$3,725 00, 



255 

Digging muck .... 
Plans and records .... 
Hillside lawn .... 

Old public ground 
Total for permanent improvements 
Total for current expenses 

Total estimate for 1886 . 
Deduct probable net income . 



Estimated appropriation required . $6,275 00 

Respectfully submitted. 

STILLMAF P. CAN^NON, 
GEORGE W. BACON", 
HENRY H. HUSE, 
G. P. WHITMAN", 
JAMES A. WESTON, 

D^ustees of the Pine Ghwe Cemetery. 



$200 00 




250 00 




500 00 




150 00 






$4,550 00 




• 


3,725 00 


, , 


$8,275 00 


• 


2,000 00 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries: — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual 
report of the money received by me during the year end- 
ing December 31, 1885, on account of cemeteries. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

dumber of lots sold, 58. 



Cash received for same .... 
interest .... 
from B. A. Stearns . 


. 11,954 86 

19 62 

831 53 


VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Cash received from F. B. Balch 

C. H. G. Foss . 


$2,806 01 

154 50 
845 56 



1900 06 

There are written, executed, and ready for delivery 
twenty-two deeds on which there have been partial pay- 
ments made, and which will all be taken and paid for 
with perhaps one or two exceptions, and possibly these if 
I knew where to reach them, which I have failed to do 



257 

thus far, as the notices which I sent have been returned 
to me, as the parties addressed could not be found. 

All money received by me has been turned into the 
city treasury, for which I have the proper vouchers from 
the city clerk. 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLYANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 



Manchester, K H., Feb. 8, 1886. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the cemeteries, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched, 

KATHAK P. laDDER, 

City Auditor. 

17 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: — 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund have 
the honor to present their sixth annual report, accom- 
panied by the report of their treasurer, giving in detail 
the receipts and expenditures for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1885. They believe that the funds at their com- 
mand have been judiciously expended, but the sum 
received is so small that they have been unable to accom- 
plish results altogether satisfactory. Especially is this 
true of the work in the Pine Grove cemetery, where the 
sum set apart for the perpetual care of lots is but forty ^ 
cents per square foot, as fixed by vote of the commit- ■ 
tee of that cemetery. Thus on an ordinary lot, say 
fifteen by twenty feet, the donation would be one 
hundred and twenty dollars, the interest on which 
at five per cent per annum would amount to but six 
dollars, a sum altogether too small to accomplish 
what is desired by the proprietors of the lots or what is 
satisfactory to the trustees. To improve this state of I 
things some of the owners of these lots have volunteered i 
to increase the permanent fund, and as others would 



259 

undoubtedly do so if the matter should be called to their 
attention, the trustees recommend that all who have pur- 
chased lots in " Landscape Lawn " be invited to contribute 
to the permanent fund twenty cents for each square 
foot of land owned by them respectively, in addition to 
what they have already paid, and that on future sales the 
amount to be placed in the permanent fund be fixed at 
sixty cents per square foot. They would also suggest 
that the committee on this cemetery should in equity 
assist in placing these lots in better condition from the 
general fund. Should these suggestions be followed, a 
marked improvement would soon be visible, and those 
most interested would have the satisfaction of having done 
what at present seems imperative to insure proper care in 
beautifying and adorning these grounds. 

Eespectfully submitted. 

GEO. H. STEARNS, Mayor, ex-officio, 
JAMES A. WESTON", Chairman, 
P. C. CHEKEY, 

Trustees of the Cemetery Fund. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the third 
annual report of the funds received up to December 31,, 

1885. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand, as per last report . . $1,200 00' 

Eeceived during the year from 

Heivy W. Dodge, executor 

William B. "Webster, estate 

250 00 



* Total . . . . . $1,450 00 

Interest on hand, as per last report 
Interest received since last report . 

Total $91 81 

Paid expenses as follows : — 
Valley cemetery, for care of lots 
Balance on hand .... 

Total $91 81 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand, as per last report . . $839 SO' 

Eeceived from Mrs. L. A. Stanley 1158 24 
Harvey B. Sawyer 102 22 



$150 00 
100 00 


$31 

60 


20 
61 


$69 72 
22 09 



261 



Received from Gilman Clough 


$158 28 




Lewis A. Clough 


157 34 




George F. Lincolr 


I 158 20 




Daniel F. Straw 


158 20 


^ 


Alpheus Gay 


158 20 


$1,050 68 






Total .... 


$1,890 48 


Interest on hand, as per last reporl 


: $15 75 




Interest received since last report 


43 75 




Total .... 




$59 50 




Paid expenses as follows : — 






James Bros 


$21 66 




N. W . Page 


2 03 




Michael Connor . 


2 50 




Sidney Blood . . . . 


8 70 




Eben T. James . . . . 


15 75 




Balance on hand . . . . 


8 96 




Total .... 




S59 50 



PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 
hand, as per last report . 

Interest on hand, as per last report $2 50 

Interest received since last report . 10 00 

Total . . . . . 



Paid expenses as follows 
Oilman Riddle 



$200 00 



$12 50 



$12^50 



Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 
Treasurer of Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Chief Engineer of Fire Department. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineers' Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, iN". H., December 31, 1885. 

To' His Honor' the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the Oity 

Councils: — 

In compliance with tlie laws and ordinances of the city 
I herewith submit briefly the annual report of the Fire 
Department for the year just closed. 

During the year the department has responded to 
twenty-five bell alarms, a decrease of five from last year, 
and some portions of it to still alarms. The increase of 
" stills," shows the care and good judgment on the part of 
the citizens in not calling out the entire department when 
a few men will answer all purposes. 

The aggregate loss to the fires responded to has been 
$24,300, on which there has been an insurance of $16,505, 
making a net loss over amount insured of $7,795. 

The engineers as well as the firemen generally have 
used their best endeavors to use as little water as was ab- 
solutely necessary to quench the fires; but in many 
instances circumstances are of such a character that more 
is used than seems necessary, and then the " chronic 



266 

grumbler " is in his element, and there is no end to his- 
" croaking," and advice as to the manner in which he 
would have managed it is freely given. 

It is pleasant to notice some changes which have been 
made, as recommended in my report of last year, as to the 
horses of hose companies Nos. 2 and 4, as well as perma- 
nent horses for the Hook and Ladder company. The next 
most needful step to be taken for the increased efficiency of 
the department is to put one additional permanent man tO' 
each of the companies at the central station, and as soon aS' 
the new house is completed in 'Squog an additional perma- 
nent man there. "With this permanent force many incip- 
ient fires can be attended to without a general alarm, 
thereby lessening the expense of calling the entire depart- 
ment as well as lessening the fire loss. It will also be an 
advantage in always having help for the drivers on the- 
immediate arrival of the apparatus at the fire. I hope- 
you will give this your early and careful attention. 

A PROTECTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

This is a matter that has been recommended and urged 
for many years, and which, owing to the condition of fire 
insurance consequent upon a change of our state laws at 
the last session of our legislature, seems more imperative 
now than ever; and I would recommend as an experi- 
ment which has proved a worthy object in every city 
where such a branch of the department has been estab- 
lished, the purchase of a wagon similar to our present 
supply wagon, equipped with blankets for covering goods 
and such articles as are usually carried, and a few men 
detailed whose especial duty shall be to attend wholly to the 
protection of property by these means. A single instance 
might occur where the proper use of one blanket would 



267 

more than compensate for the whole expense incurred for 
the equipment and maintenance of such a force. 

INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 

The appointment of an inspector of buildings has been 
a lon^ felt want, and now that one is appointed give him 
that personal support in the discharge of his duties that 
he may accomplish those results which will be beneficial 
to the city for years to come. 

NEW HOUSES. 

While the residents of 'Squog may congratulate them- 
selves on the prospects of new and improved quarters for 
the company located there, the residents of the "north end" 
regret the unfavorable outlook for a house and additional 
company in that section of the city the coming year, 
when at one time indications were so favorable. With 
the new Fire King steamer already purchased, a company 
could be established without much additional expense,, 
aside from house and lot, and the increase of buildings 
in this section seems to call for some protection from fire. 

ORGANIZATION. • 

The present organization of the department includes 
one hundred and fourteen members, as follows : — 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

2 Steam Fire Engine Companies, — 14 men each. 
1 Horse Hose Company, — 20 men. 

3 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 
1 Hook and Ladder Company, — 25 men. 

In addition to the above is one hand-hose company of 
20 volunteers. 



268 



THE APPARATUS 



has been improved during the year by the addition of a 
new hook and ladder truck, fu^ly equipped, which was 
•deUvered early in the summer, and the old one put on re- 
serve. Two sixty-five feet Bangor extension ladders have 
been procured, which, with the ones on the two trucks, 
make five now in the department. 

The exchange of the old Fire King for the new one 
makes a better protection in case of a large conflagration. 

Additional apparatus will be needed before long for the 
better protection of property on the west side of the river, 
and I would recommend that a steamer be placed in the 
new house, when completed. 

The apparatus, as at present located, consists of — 

* 3 Steam Fire Engines, Central Fire Station. 

1 1 Steam Fire Engine, corner Massabesic and Hall sts. 
1 Horse Hose Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

1 2 Hook and Ladder Trucks, at Central Fire Station. 
1 Supply Wagon, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Maple and East High sts. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, on Clinton street, 'Squog. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Park and Massabesic sts. 

1 Hand Hose Carriage, at junction of Old Falls road 
and Front street, 'Skeag. 

1 2-wheeled Hose Carriage, Derry Mills, Groffe's Falls, 
manned by men at the mills. 

The chemical engine, which has been ordered and is 
expected early the coming year, is a new thing for our 
city and one highly prized and praised in cities where 
used, and I have no doubt it will be a useful adjunct to 
o,ur department. 

* One reserve engine. t Reserve engine. t One reserve truck. 



269 



THE FIKE-ALAEM TELEGRAPH 



has been entirely remodeled during tlie year, by putting 
up new, No. 14, hard-drawn copper wire, all the old N'o. 9 
iron wire being taken down. The advantages of this 
copper over the iron wire are that it is twice as good a 
conductor, and that it is less liable to "sleet" in a cold 
storm, with no liability of rusting. 

While the new system (which is divided into seven cir- 
cuits, in place of the three old ones) covers more territory, 
there are only about twenty-seven miles of wire now to 
over twenty-eight miles before. This is the result of 
doing away with many of the loops which were made 
by additions to the old system. 

Mne new boxes have been added, and the locations of 
eight of the old numbers transferred. It was the desire 
of the board of engineers to add two more boxes, but the 
appropriation would not permit it, and I would call your 
attention to the need of one in the vicinity of Baldwin's 
bobbin shop, and one in the vicinity of Barr and Granite 
streets, in 'Squog. 

The present system embraces all the latest improve- 
ment of boxes, and is equal to any now in use. The 
wires are mostly on poles, and above other wires as far 
as practicable. It would be still better if our wires were 
above all others, and an ordinance should be framed not 
allowing any wire above the fire-alarm, as is the case in 
many other cities. All the old boxes have new mechani- 
cal works in them, anc^ contain an improved lightning 
arrester, patent cut-out for box magnet, Stover switch, 
enabling the box to be tested electrically without striking 
an alarm, and an automatic non-interference attachment 
and trap-locks, so that when a key is once put into the 
box it cannot be removed without the assistance of a 



270 



release-key, carried by the engineers. By this means it 
can be easily ascertained who gives an alarm, as all keys 
are numbered and a record of them kept. All these tend 
to make the alarm more efficient. 

The contract was done under the personal supervision 
of Mr. Edwin Rogers, electrician of the Gamewell Fire 
Alarm Company, in a very satisfactory and substantial 
manner. 

firemen's relief association. 



It is with pleasure that I refer to this association and 
the contributions so generously contributed to its treasury. 

The following is a statement of its funds : — 



Amount in treasury at its annual meeting 


> 


Feb. 10, 1885 


$860 84 


Cash received from special assessments . 


102 00 


membership 


10 00 


Contribution from Gen. Charles Williams 


50 00 


Gov. P. C. Cheney . 


10 00 


Hon. Joseph B. Clark 


10 00 


Stephen B. Stearns . 


5 00 


Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley 


10 00 


William Henry Plummer 


25 00 


owners of Webster block 


50 00 


Herman F. Straw 


50 00 


Hon. A. P. Olzendam 


50 00 


C. C. Perry 


10 OOi 


Massabesic Hose Co. No. S 


' 25 00 


A. H. Daniels . 


5 00 


Dividends from savings bank 


90 69 



$1,363 53 



271 



CONTRA. 



Paid postal cards and printing 
secretary's salary . 
Jeremiah Lane, injuries 
Parker P. Brown, injuries 
John B. Clarke, by-laws 



$2 10 
25 00 
23 00 
11 50 
17 00 



$78 60 



Balance $1,284 93 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The sixth annual parade occurred on Friday, October 
16, and, contrary to the usual custom, carriages for invited 
guests were omitted, and the department paraded by 
itself, the guests assembling at the central station after 
the parade, where inspection was made and the guests 
escorted to City Hall, where the usual collation occurred. 
This omission was caused not by any lack of courtesy, 
but by insuificiency of appropriation to defray expenses. 

CONCLUSION. 

"We may consider ourselves fortunate as a city that our 
fires have been so few and our losses no heavier. One 
fire, however, that of the Webster block, was of a serious 
nature as to the loss of life, yet it was of no fault of the 
department or the management of the fire. It was the re- 
sult of the fright and imprudence of the unfortunate victims, 
as I am told had it been known they were in the building, 
and their whereabouts ascertained, they could have been 
removed with safety. My .absence from the city at 
that time permits me to speak of it in a manner which 
under other other circumstances might seem inappropri- 
ate. ISTothing but the good management of those in charge 



272 

could have saved the building from entire destructionv 
owing to the construction of the building and the head- 
way obtained by the fire. 

In closing I wish to extend my thanks to the Mayor 
and city councils for the assistance rendered in making 
the department more efficient; to Superintendent San- 
born of District No. 2 for his cheerful assistance in the 
arrangement of horses used jointly by the street and fire 
department; to City Marshal Jenkins and the entire police 
force under his charge, for assistance at all times of need, 
and the care they have taken to prevent needless alarms; 
to the assistant engineers, whose efficiency has been of 
valuable assistance in the maintenance of the department 
and the management of fires; and to the officers and men 
of the several companies, who have proved themselves- 
prompt and efficient in cases when their services weret 
required, as well as men at all times. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Fire Departments 



273 



TABLE 

SHOWING NUMBER OF ALARMS FROM EACH BOX SINCE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM 

WAS ESTABLISHED, EXCEPT FROM SEPT., 1872, TO JAN., 1873, WHEN NO 

RECORD WAS KEPT. 



Box. 


1873 


1874 


1875 


1876 


1877 


1878 


i 
1879j 1880 


1881 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 


Total. 


3 




1 


1 




2 






1 






1 






6 


4 


6 


6 


4 


'7 


7 


'5 


'4 


4 


'2 


S 




i 




54 


5 




6 




2 


2 


1 


1 




2 


1 




1 


i 


17 


6 


'4 


1 


"i 


4 


4 


2 


2 






3 


'2 


2 


3 


28 


7 


7 




2 


1 


3 




2 


3 




2 


1 




1 


22 


8 


2 




2 




1 


i 


1 


1 








2 


2 


13 


9 
















1 










2 


4 


12 






























13. ... 






i 


















i 




'3 


14 












i 
















1 


15 






i 








i 




i 






2 


i 


8 


16 






1 






















2 


17 






1 












.. 






1 


i 


4 


18 






1 








i 




1 










3 


21 


3 




1 


1 


'2 


'2 


1 


i 


2 






'2 


"2 


19 


23 












1 






1 






1 


1 


5 


24 






i 








'2 


i 


1 










7 


2.5 






1 














1 






i 


4 


26 
















i 








i 




4 


27 






2 


1 


5 






2 








2 




15 


31 






3 


















1 




5 


32 












i 




i 








1 




4 


34 




























i 


4 


35 






























1 


36 














i 
















1 


41 














1 
















2 


42 






























1 


43 
































45 




























i 


i 


51 


i 


i 










*i 


i 


i 


i 






'4 




14 


52 


4 


3 


i 




'2 






2 








3 


'2 


21 


53 


2 


1 


1 






i 




2 








2 


3 


14 


54 






























61 




i 




i 




i 


i 














'7 


62 




2 




1 


'i 


1 


1 












"2 


8 


71 






i 


1 




1 


3 


'2 








'3 


1 


13 




35 


25 


26 


25 


30 


21 


22 


23 


11 


29 


13 


30 


25 


315 








3 stilL 






1 still. 




1 still. 


1 still. 


1 still. 




1 still. 


12 still 





18 



274 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, Etc., FROM 



Day of Week, 




Location. 



Sunday 

Sunday 

Tuesday — 
Thursday . . 

Friday 

Tuesday. . . 
Sunday. ... 
Thursday . . 
Wednesday. 
Sunday. . . . 
Sunday . • . . 
Wednesday. 
Wednesday. 
Wednesday. 
Saturday . • 

Friday 

Tuesday . . . 
Sunday ■ . 
Monday . ■ . 
Thursday. . 
Monday . . . 

Friday 

Saturday.. . 
Monday . . . 
Sunday . . . 
Tuesday . . . 
Tuesday . . . 
Tuesday . . 
Wednesday 
Tuesday . . . 
Wednesday 
Thursday. 
Wednesday 

Friday 

Friday 

Sunday . . . 
Thursday. . 



February 

February 

February 

March 

April 

April 

May 

May 

June 

.luly 

July 

July 

July 

July 

August 

August 

September 

September 

October 

October 

November 

November 

November 

November 

November 

November 

November 

November 

November 

December 

December 

December 

December 

December 

December 

December 

December 



12.15 A. M. 
10.05 P. M. 
11.28 A. M. 
12.45 P. M. 

G.ll p. M. 
11.49 a.m. 

4.09 P. M. 

9.32 p. M. 

1.30 P. M. 

5.09 P. M. 
10.56 p. M. 
11.65 p. M. 

4.28 A. M. 

9.06 A. M. 

4.18 p. M. 
10.38 p. M. 
10.25 p. M. 

1.50 P. M. 
11.40 a.m. 

5.00 p. M. 
12.08 A. M. 

5.30 p. M. 

7.15 A. M. 

4.40 p. M. 
12.05 A. M. 

3.00 p. M. 

6.50 p. M. 

9.43 P. M. 

8.40 P. M. 

9.50 A. M. 
12.37 P. M. 

2.40 P. M. 

9.26 P. M. 

1.10 p. M. 
3.45 p. M. 
6.30 P. M. 
7.21 p. M. 



Still. 

6 

52 

Still. 

34 

9 

6 

5 

Still. 

6-2 

25 

6 

21 

9 

62 

8 

71 

Still. 

Still. 

Still. 

62 

Still. 

53 

7 

53 

Still. 

17 

53 

8 

Still. 

21 
Still. 

45 

Still. 

Still. 

15 

23 



Rear 192 Amherst street 

42 Hanover street 

49 River street 

212 Manchester street 

Mechanics' row 

Corner Elm and Clarke streets 

Wilson Hill 

Rear of 897 Elm street 

North Union street hill 

424 Granite street 

416 Merrimack street 

Rear 382 Pine street 

Corner Pine and Manchester streets 
1,937 Elm, corner Appleton street. . 

Candia road 

Elm street, Webster block 

226 Cliestnut street 

Manchester street 

Spring, corner Elm street 

.\niherst street 

Taylor street, Hallsville 

16 Amherst street 

River bank, Stark's grave 

Elm street, near Bridge street 

Corner Winter and Parker streets. . 
Corner Hanover and Beech streets. . 

339 Amherst street 

Milford street 

Arkwright street 

29 Washington street 

119 Central street 

Rear 195 Hanover street 

Mechanics' row 

Corner Pine and Central streets .... 
Corner Elm and Merrimack streets. 
Corner Pearl and Chestnut streets.. 
224 Central street 



275 



JANUAEY 1, 1885, TO DECEMBER 31, 1885. 



Description. 



Owned by. 



Occupied by. 



Stable 

Store i n Opera block 

Two-atory dwelling, bed . . 

Dwelling-house 

Sash and Blind Works 

Barn 

Fire in woods 

Clothing store 

Wood lot, lumber 

Two-story house 

Two-story house and barn . 

Shed 

Tenement house 

Barn 

Barn 

Stores and tenements 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Tar kettle 

Tenement house 

Hot-house 

Millin'y st're, Dunlap bl'k. 

Dwelli Dg-house 

"Ten-footers," stores 

Cottage house 

Dwelling-house 

Dwelling-house 

Hot-house 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Manufacturing buildings. . 

Tenement block 

Hotel, Manchester House. . 

■Tenement block 

Barn.. 



Towne heirs 

J. B. Smith 

Frank Sohinck 

Jane Eaton 

Amoakeag Manufucturing Co. 
H. A. Farrington 



W. H. Plumer 

Oilman Clough 

Thomas L. Thorpe .• 

Mrs. Maria George 

Hiram Hill 

Mrs . Broderick 

Thomas W. Lane 

Walter Cody. 

Wheat, Morrill, Simons, et al. 

Thomas Corcoran 

Leroy Bartlett 



L. M. Streeter 

St. J. B. Archambault & Co. 

Paul Gaudes 

T. 0. Furnald 

W. W. Hubbard 

S. M. Worthley 



Talbot & Co. 



August Schnalfos . 

Unoccupied 

Charles A. Craig.. 



Thomas W. Lane.. . 

Walter Cody 

Several tenants 

Dennis McCarthy . . 
Maurice Fitzgerald. 



John Kearns 

William Stevens 

Thomas Dunlap 

Stark heirs 

Mrs. W. W. Brown 

Hiram H. Currier 

W. H. Plumer 

H. E. Stevens 

Fred S. Worthen 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

Mrs. Bresnehan 

Thomas Corcoran 

Frederick Smyth 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 

E. W. Bartlett heirs 

William Shepherd heirs 

David Young 

P. McDonough 



John Kearns 

J. B. Rinn 

La Bonte 

S. A. Farrow 

Several parties 

Mrs. H. H. Currier. 

W. H. Plumer 

John M. Evans 

F. S. Worthen 

John S. Bodkin 

Jerry Bresnehan . . . . 
Napoleon Lanier. . . . 



Low & Walker, and others. 



H. H. Duncklee. 

N. T. Oliver 

P. McDonough. . , 



276 



FIEES, ALARMS, LOSSES, Etc.,— Continued. 



Day of Week. 


Damage. 


Insurance. 


Uncovered 
by Ins. 


Cause. 


Remarks. 


Sunday 

Sunday 

Tuesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Sunday 

Thursday 

Wednesday.. . . 

Sunday 

Sunday 

Wednesday... . 
Wednesday... . 
Wednesday... . 

Saturday 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Sunday 

Mondaj' 

Thursday 

Monday 

Friday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Sunday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday.. . 

Tuesday 

Wednesday.... 

Thursday 

Wednesday... . 

Friday 

Friday 

Sunday 

Thursday 


Slight. 
$2,300.00 
10.00 
None. 
1,000.00 
600.00 
None. 
None. 
1,200.00 
10.00 
2,500.00 
200.00 
15.00 
475.00 
Fire, none 
10,000.00 
Bl'k, none 
None. 
None. 
Slight. 
1,000.00 
50.00 






Incendiary 

Unknown 

Child'n, m'tches 
Sparks, chimney 
Sparks, stove. . . 
Burning grass.. . 




$2,300.00 






$10.00 






Extiug. with pails.- 




1,000.00 
300.00 


$300.00 




None. 

lO.'OO 

7,500.00 

100.00 

15.00 

375.00 

' 7V965.66 




Sparks, elec. I't 
Sparks, boiler.. . 

Hot stove 

Incendiary 

Matches 




1,200.00 


Appar. part way. 


" " " 100.66 


Careless or inten. 


100.00 


Lightning 

liightning 

Unknown 

Lamp explosion 
Matches, careless 




2,035.00 


8 lives lost. 
McCarthy died. 










None, 
.fio.nn 


'i,o'oo'.66 

♦ 


Lamp explosion. 
From furnace.. . 

Gas flame 

Defective flue. . . 
Unknown 


Ex., pails and gren. 
Ex. with grenades. 


1,000.00 i 700.00 
300.00 ! 150.00 
150.00 1 150.00 

100.00 1 moon 


300.00 
150.00 






Exting. with pails. 
Ex., garden hose. 


200.00 
None. 


100.00 


100.00 


Unknown 

Furnace 

Chimney 

Pipe 






20.00 

10.00 

10.00 

3,000.00 

None. 

None. 

1.50.00 


20.00 

10.00 

10.00 

1,500.00 












Hot stove 


Exting. with pails. 


1,500.00 


Chimney 

Chimney 

Matches 

Unknown. ." 










1.50.00 




In partition. 








$7,795.00 






$24,300.00 j $16,505.00 





277 



TABLE SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, 
SECOND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 





a 

o 
02 


i 

.■§ 

la . 
o a 

u a 

S-d 
ce a 
» o 
CO 


t-4 

d 


Hose No. 2. 


o 
C3 


Hose No. *. 


1 


Boxes. 


3 


3 

n 
o 
o 

02 


a 

3 


a 

3 

a 

o 

S 

CO 


o 


3 




2 

2* 

2 

2 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2* 

2 

2 

2* 

2 

2 

2 

'2 

2 

2* 

2* 

2* 

2 

2 

2 

? 

2» 
2 

2 
2 

2* 


1 1 
1 


3 

2 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
3 


3 

2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 

1 
1 

2 
2 
2 
2 
3 


1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 

2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 


2 

2 
2 
2 

2 

r 
1 

1 
1 

2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 


2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 




4 




6 

6 




7 




s 




9 




12 




13 




14 




15 




16 




17 




18 




21 

23 




24 




25 




26 




27 




31 




32 

34 




35 








41 








43 








51 








53 








61... 




71 








81 








113 




212 

312 








314 

















*0n first alarm, the horses of second-run engine will double on engine of first run. 



278 



I^UMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES 
AND KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Jolmson & 
Co.'s office, Gas- Works office, County Jail, and Hutchin- 
son Bros.' shop. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
Haseltine's Hotel, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Gar- 
mon's, and W. C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Manchester House, Tebbetts Brothers' and E. H. Cur- 
rier's drug-stores. 

ISTo. 6. — City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Mead's 
drug-stores. 

No. 7. — Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east 
back streets. Keys at Higgins Bros.', Cavanaugh Bros.' 
stable, and Tewksbury's drug-store. 

No. 8. — Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Wil- 
son's drug-store, residence of Moses N. Smith, No. 1299' 
Elm street, and Partridge Bros.' grain store. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, and J. 
B. Jones. 

No. 12. — Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of Wm. C. Clarke and Charles E. Ham. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Jencks and Lewis Simons. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. L-eland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of William H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keya | 
at residences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. H. Has-; 
sam. 



279 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

!N^o. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of H. E. Stevens, A. 'N. Baker, and 
William Perldns. 

'No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. D. Smith's drag-store, J. McKeon's grocery store, 
and A. L. Walker's office. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. — Merrimack Hose House, corner of Massa- 
besic and Park streets. Keys at residence of D. M. 
Goodwin and hose house. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. 
Keys at residences of S. L. Fogg, Horace Gordon, and 
Horace Stearns. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-shop and residence of John N. 
Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. 
Keys at residences of John P. Lord, H. M, Tarbell, and 
A. G. Fairbanks. 

No. 31. — Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's 
shop. Keys at office, and residence of Mrs. Mary 
Howarth, first house south of shop gate. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and 
Brook streets. Keys at Hoyt & Co.'s paper-mill and Lang- 
don watch-room. 

No. 34. — Mechanics' row. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 36. — Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 43. — Namaske Mills. Keys at watch-room. 



280 

No. 45. — The S. C. Forsaitli Co.'s shops. Keys at 
freight depot, S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office, and Lowell's iron 
foundry office. 

'No. 51. — Corner of Walker and Second streets, " Ger- 
mantown." Keys at stores of F. Riedel and William 
Wehber. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd & 
Follansbee's and A. N". Clapp's stores, and Merrimack 
House. 

I^o. 53. — Wallace's steam-mill. Keys at the office and 
I. R. Dewey's tenement block. 

ISTo. 54. — Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at 
residences of Lord sisters and ISTewell R. Bixby. 

Ko. 61. — Corner of River road and Hancock streets, 
Bakersville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, Carney, Lynch, 
& Co.'g brewery, and residence of H. F. Dillingham. 

^NTo. 62. — Kimball & Gerrish's tanner}' , River road. 
Keys at tannery and residence of Michael Moran. 

ISTo. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. 
Smith, and Daniel F. Healy. 

ISTo. 72. — Corner of Park and Lincoln streets. Keys 
at residences of Austin Jenkins, C. H. Leach, and Clarence 
D. Palmer. 

No. 81. — Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at 
Engine Rooms. 

E'o. 112. — Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. 
Keys at residences of Woodbury Davidson and W. T. 
Stevens. 

No. 113. — Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys 
at residences of Wm, B. Abbott, H. S. Manville, and E. 
M. Topliffi 

Wo. 212. — Massabesic street, Hallsville. Keys at resi_ 
deuces of Charles C. Chase and G. W. Dearborn. 



281 

1^0. 312. — Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor 
streets. Keys at residences of Mitchell Messier, 391 
Main street, and Thomas Bolton. 

1^0. 313. — Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys 
at residences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, 
and Heath's drug-store. 

Xo. 314. — P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. Keys at 
oflice and Independent Hose House. 

Xo. 315. — Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Jveys at store, 
hose house, and Robinson's residence. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be 
given at precisely 12.30 p. m., from Thomas Dunlap's 
jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the 
fire bells. 



282 



ESTSTEUCTIONS TO IvEY-HOLDERS A:ND CITI- 
ZENS. 

1 Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the keys 
to which are in the hands of all regular police, and gen- 
erally of persons at the corner or nearest houses. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go. Shut the door, but do Jiot try to remove the key, 
as it is locked in by a trap lock and can only be removed 
with a release-key, which is carried by each of the engi- 
neers, who will as soon as convenient release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to 
remain by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard 
in the box, pull again; if you still hear no clicking, go to 
the next nearest box, procure another key, and give an 
alarm from that. 

4. iN'ever signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never* 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an 
alarm for no cause other than an actual fire. Don't give; 

AN ALARM FOR A CHIMNEY FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unles^ 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your I'esi 
dence or jjlace of business, lohere the keys are kept, return t) 
keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requestec 
to inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes net 
their property, also all places where the keys are kepi 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in the 
city, and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 
6, six blows, which are repeated three times. Box 212, 



283 

two blows, pause of 6| seconds, one blow, same pause, 
and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke 
of the bells at any time; and, in case of testing the boxes, 
\ each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 

• 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, close 
the primary schools; and to close all the schools, two 
immediate strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds 
two more immediate strokes, — the time of striking the 
bells being at 8.05 a. m., for closing the schools during 
the forenoon, and at 1.15 p. m., for closing them during 
the afternoon. 



284 



RULES AN"D REGULATIOI^S m REGARD TO 
RESPOl^TDESTG TO FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The following order was adopted by the Board of En- 
gineers, December 31, 1885, with which the Fire Depart- 
ment will strictly comply until otherwise ordered, and 
will attend alarms of fire as follows : — 

1. Steamer jSTo. 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes; the days of its second run it will 
report on the first alarm to boxes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 35, 
36, 41, 42, 43, 45 ; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

2. Steamer J^o. 4, same as above. 

3. On the first alarm, from boxes 9, 24, 27, 54, 61, 62, 
212, 315, the horses of the second run will double on to 
the engine of its first run, and on the arrival at the fire 
the second-run horses will return to their house, and in 
case of an alarm from any box the company will imme- 
diately respond with their engine. 

4. Pennacook Hose I^o. 1 will report for duty on first 
alarm to all boxes. 

5. Massabesic Hose ISTo. 2, on da^^s of its first run, will 
report on first alarm to boxes 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 
16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36,41, 42, 
43, 45, 71, 72, 81, 112, 113; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 
212, 312, 313, 314 ; on third alarm, to boxes 3, 51, 52, 53, 
54, 61, 62, 315. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 26, 34, 112, 113 ; on second alarm, to 
boxes 4, 5, 6, 21, 23, 24, 25, 27, 31, 32, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 
45, 71, 72, 81, 212, 312, 313, 314 ; on third alarm, to boxes 
3, 51, 52, 53, 54, 61, 62, 315. 

6. E. W. Harrington Hose ISTo. 3 will report on first 
iilarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 52, 53, 



285 

54, 312, 313 ; on second alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 21, 23y 
31, 32, 34, 61, 62, 81, 314; on third alarm, to boxes 9, 12, 

13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 24, 25, 26, 27, 71, 72, 112, 113, 212, 
315. 

7. Merrimack Hosel^^o. 4, on days of its first run, will 
report on first alarm to boxes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 16, 17, 18, 
21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 61, 
62, 71, 72, 81, 212; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 9, 12, 13, 

14, 51, 52, 53, 54, 112, 113; on third alarm, to boxes 812, 
313, 314, 315. 

Second Run. First alarm, to boxes 4, 21, 23, 24, 25, 
45, 61, 62, 71, 72,212; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 5, 6, 
7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 
41, 42, 43, 51, 52, 53, 54, 81, 112, 113; on third alarm, to 
boxes 312, 313, 314, 315. 

8. Excelsior Hook and Ladder N'o. 1 will report on 
first alarm to all boxes. 

9. Steamer ]^o. 3 to be kept as a reserve engine to be 
used in case of need on third alarm. 

10. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the 
engine, hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first 
will have the right to lead to the fire. Ko running by 

WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER 
PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPART- 
MENT. 

11. The drivers shall not permit persons not connected 
with the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in 
muddy weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit 
any one to ride upon their apparatus when returning from 
fires. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer in 



286 

charge, will be tlie signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses ; or in case this one blow is not 
struck within thirty minutes, companies may consider 
themselves dismissed, except the drivers, who will remain 
in the houses with their horses until the two blows to lim- 
ber up. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
jat a fire to limber up. 



287 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 

AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 Urst-class double-plunger engine and 

hose-earriage $4,500 00 

100 feet three-inch leather hose . . . 140 00 

1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch fabric hose ... 900 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 200 00 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures, including 

harnesses 400 00 



Total amount .... |6,140 00 

" NEW " FIRE KING STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 2. ■ 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class double-plunger engine . $4,000 00 

E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON PARK STREET, CORNER MASSABESIC. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class single-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $1,000 00 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $3,500 00 

50 feet rubber hose 50 00 

1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch Baker fabric hose . . 800 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 200 00 



Tools, furniture, and fixtures, including 

harnesses $400 00 

Total amount .... |4,950 00 



PENNACOOK HOSE NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . 
1 horse hose sled and reel 
3,100 feet leather hose . . . . . 
Firemen's suits and badges . 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses ...... 

Total amount . . . . 



$650 00 

20 00 

3,100 00 

250 00 

400 00 



$4,420 04 



MASSABESIC HOSE NO. 2. 

I^OCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $700 00 

1,700 feet leather hose 1,700 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses . 60 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 175 00 

Total amount .... $2,635 00 



E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON CLINTON STREET, PISCATAQUOG. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $650 00 

2,100 feet leather hose 2,100 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 150 00 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 200 00 



Total amount 



,100 00 



289 

MEERIMACK HOSE NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON PARK STREET, CORNER MA8SABESIC. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $700 00 

1,700 feet leather hose . . . . . 1,700 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 120 00 

Furnitureandfixtures,includino; harness 125 00 



Total amount .... $2,645 00 

EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders . . $1,700 00 
Reserve truck 500 00 

2 extra Ban<>:or extension ladders . . 360 00 
Fireman's suits and badges . . . 350 00 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 340 00 



Total amount .... $3,250 00 

SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

1 supply wagon with boxes and engineers' 

lanterns $312 00 

SPARE HOSE. 

AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

.1,200 feet leather hose $1,200 00 

ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 

5 fire-hats $7 50 

Furniture and fixtures . . . . 125 00 



Total amount .... $132 50 

19 



290 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

At cost (including additions previous to 1885) $21,625 00 

Remodeling in 1885 6,000 00 

Ladders, tools, wire, etc ..... 50 00 



Total amount 



$27,675 00 



INDEPENDENT HOSE CO. 

LOCATED COENER OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET, 'SKEAG. 



1 four-wheeled liose-carriage 
1,200 feet leather hose . 

2 hose-pipes 



Total amount 

RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Engine E'o. 1 

ITew Fire King Engine ITo. 2 

E. W. Harrington Steam Engine No. 3 

E". S. Bean Steam Engine No. 4 . 

Pennacook Hose No. 1 . 

Massabesic Hose No. 2 . 

E. W. Harrington Hose No. 3 

Merrimack Hose No. 4 . 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder No. 1 . 

iSupply Wagon .... 

Store-room 



$400 00 

800 00 

30 00 





Total amount 


$1,230 00 




GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 






LOCATED AT DEKRY MILLS. 


. 


1 


two-wheeled hose-carriage 


. $100 ool 


300 


feet fabric hose .... 


240 00 


2 


hose-pipes 


12 00 



$352 00 



^6,140 00 

4,000 00 

1,000 00 

4,950 00 

4,420 00 

2,685 00 

3,100 00 

2,645 00 

3,250 00 

312 00 

1,200 00: 



291 

Engineers' Department . 
Fire Alarm .... 
Independent Hose at Amoskeag 
sjGroffe's Falls Hose-Carriage . 



$132 


50 


2,767 00 


1,230 


00 


352 


00 



Total amount . . . $38,183 50 



292 



IS'AMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS 
OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

boArd of engineers. 



Ml . 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 

2 
3 


Thomas W. Lane. . . 
Orrin E. Kimball . . 
James F. Pherson . . 

FredS. Bean 

Horatio Fradd 


Chief 

Assistant 


Bookseller 

Wool andLe'th'rDeal'r 


1937 Elm Street. 
17 Harrison St. 
25 M.S. B. 


5 


Assistant and clerk 




96 BridgelSt. 


4 













AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation 

Painter 

Machinist 

Paper Hanger. . 

Machinist 

Machinist 

Teamster , 

Currier 

Machinist 

Painter 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Carpenter 

Piper 

Machinist 



Residence. 



James R. Carr .... 
Charles F. McCoy. 
Frank E. Stearns . 
George R. Simmons 
George B. Forsaith. 
Charles H. Rogers.. 
Artemas C. Barker. 
Joseph H. Gould.. . . 

John H. Stone 

Thomas J. Wyatt... 
Frank B. Marston.. 
George E. Cassidy.. 
WoodhuryDavidson 
Henry A. Boone... . 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman, 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 

Driver 

Hoseman 



1405 Elm St. 
5 M. S. B. 
389 Park St. 
82 Pennacook. 
196 Laurel St. 
28 Vine St. 
455 Pine Street. 
1087 Elm_St. 
8 Orange St. 
14 M. S. B. 
11 M. S. B. 
31 Spring St. 
785 Union St. 
19 M. S. B. 



293 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Eugene S. Whitney. 
Edgar G. Abbott . . . 

John Martin 

Thomas F. Dodge . . 

Albert Merrill 

Jeremiah Lane 

Almus 6. Gushing. . 

Walter Morse 

William H. Dodge.. 
George W. Bacon. . 
Alfred Nearborn . . . 
Frank A. Pherson. . 
George N. Burpee.. 
H.C.Morrill 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman. 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Supt. Electric Light. 
Machinist 



Teamster . 



Machinist . 
Firenfan. . . 
Carpenter . 



Electrician. 
Machinist . . 



96 Bridge St. 
543 Chestnut St. 
624 Main St. 
545 Chestnut St. 
96 Bridge St. 
20 Vine St. 
186 Central St. 
3 Dean St. 
530 Chestnut. 
65 Stark Corp. 
Cor. E.High & Jane 
41 Amoskeag Corp. 
99 Bridge St. 
1221 Elm St. 



294 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street, 



Name. 



Bank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Albert Maxfield.... 
Clarence D. Palmer 
Joseph E. Merrill . . 
Walter L. Blenus... 
George H. Porter. . . 

WillG. Chase 

Lyman M. Aldrich.. 
Joseph H. Alsop.. . . 
Daniel W. Morse. . . 
George W. Cheney.. 
Gilbert A. Sackett.. 
Edwin A. Durgin . . 

Samuel A. Hill 

Edwin E. Weeks... 
Albert A. Puffer... 
Charles W. Brown . 
Martin W. Ford . 
David G. Mills. . 
Charles B. French. . 
John E. Sanborn. . . 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman.) 



Belt-Maker..... 

Marble -Worker. 

Currier 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Photographer. . . 

Carpenter 

Manufacturer. . . 
Machinist 



Weaver 

Machinist 

Carpenter. 

Machinist 

Railroad Employe. 

Clerk 

Molder 

Carpenter. 



23 M. S. B. 

347 Central St. 
92 Walnut St. 
26 Vine St. 
277 Laurel St. 
217 Central St. 
375 Park St. 
54 Douglas St. (P.>> 
1419 Elm St. 
1348 Elm St. 
2 Monmouth St. 
44 Manchester Cor. 
50 Douglas St. (P.) 
502 Manchester St. 
120 Concord St. 
18 Hazel St. 
99 Orange St. 
11 Parker St. (P.) 
18 M. S. B. 
274 Laurel- St. 



295 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on Maple Street, cor. East High. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation 

Carpenter 

Gas-Fitter 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Plumber 

Carpenter 

Grainer 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

Plumber 



Residence. 



John F. Seaward.. . 
Revilo G. Houghton 
Henry G. Seaman. . 

Walter Seaward 

George Huntley 

Jos. W. Batchelder. 
William S. McLeod. 
Daniel W. Clark.... 
Oscar P. Abbott . . . 
George W. Seaward. 
Albert E.Batchelder 
FredS. Lewis... 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman. 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman 



27 Warren St. 
288 Bridge St. 
14 South St. 
521 Maple St. 
31 Warren St. 
521 Maple St. 
40 Arlington St. 
232 East High St. 
East High St. 
106 Concord St. 
9 Linden St. 
27 South St. 



E. W. HARRINGTON HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 
House on Clinton Street, 'Squog. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 

Carpenter - 

Machini!<t 

Wool-Sorter 

Teamster 

Lumber Surveyor 

Roofer 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Engraver. 

Saloon Keeper . . . 

Machinist 

Pattern-Maker. . . 



Residence. 



John T.G.Dinsmore 
William Doran .... 
Joseph Schofield . . . 
John T. O'Dowd . . . 
A. C. Wallace, Jr. . . 

John Mc Derby 

Edward McDerby. . 
Edward Flanagan. . 

John Patterson 

John Walsh 

Jeremiah Haley.. . . 
Elmer B. BuUard . . 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman 



48 Dover St. 
62 Parker St. 
392 Granite St. 
392 Granite St. 
71 Parker St. 
503 Granite St. 
151 Winter St. 
217 Central St. 
45 School St. 
166 Main St. 
131 Cedar St. 
55 A St. 



296 



MERRIMACK HOSE COMPANY NO. 4. 

House on Park Street, corner Massabesic. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation 

Plumber 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Janitor 

Blacksmith 

Machinist 

Manufacturer . . 

Machinist 

Clerk 

Harness-Maker. 



Residence. 



78 



Louis N. Dufrain . . 
Charles H. Colburn 
George H. Wheeler. 
Alphonso E. Foster 

John S. Avery 

Warren F. Wheeler. 
James W. Lathe . . . 
William P. Emerson 

Frank F. Porter 

Lucien P. Nichols. . 
Parker R. Brown. . . 
George Dunnington 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman, 

Clerk.. 

Driver 

Hoseman ... 



373 Hall St. 
286 Laurel St. 
410 Merrimack St. 
Hose House. 
404 Merrimack St. 
1179 Elm St. 
302 Laurel St. 
286 Laurel St. 
357 Park St. 
384 Merrimack St. 
422 Merrimack St. 
570 Wilson St. 



297 



EXCELSIOR HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 

Mason 

Carpenter 

Meat & Fish dealer 

Mechanic 

Teamster 

Contractor 

Barber 

Carpenter 

Overseer 

Carpenter 

Slater 

Carpenter 

Overseer 

Carpenter 

Belt-Maker 

Gardener 

Expressman 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Box-Maker 

Teamster 



Residence. 



Milo B. Wilson . 
Jerome J. Lovering 

Oscar P. Stone 

WinfleldS. Leavitt. 
Charles M. Denyou. 
Warren Harvey .... 

James Orrill 

Ruel G. Manning . . 

John N. Chase 

John Wilson 

Hiram P. Young . . . 
George H. Dudley. . 
Ed. A. G. Holmes. . 

Luther J. Flint 

Harrison H. Cole . . 
Jesse B. Nourse. . . . 
Charles H. Cross.. . 
A. L. N. Robertson. 

Dillwyn Breed 

George M. Jones... . 
Samuel F. Adams. . 

Roscoe Dyer 

Sanborn T. Worthen 

Ralph Pearson 

Arth'r W.Whitcomb 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Treasurer 

Driver 

Fireman 



145 Orange St. 
300 Pine St. 
326 Granite St. 

146 Orange St. 
18 Vine St. 
474 Hanover St. 
57 Myrtle St. 

53 Douglas St. (P.) 
276 Bridge St. 
12 Water St. 
33 Dutton St. 
159 Laurel St. 
224 Manchester St. 
4 Dutton St. 
10 Wilson St. 
Union c. Appleton 
8 Langdon Corp. 
262 Bridge St. 
410 Park St. 
1068 Elm St. 
Smyth road. 
36 Water St. 
493 Maple St. 
92 Arlington St. 
187 Merrimack St. 



298 



INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY. 



Name. 



Bank. 



Occupation 

Grocer 

Teamster 

Clerk 

Farmer 

Ice Dealer 

Teamster 

Engineer 

Paper -Maker 

Teamster 

Edge-Tool Maker. 

Teamster 

Electrician 

Shoemaker 

Milk-Dealer 

Machinist 

Manufacturer. . . . 



Residence. 



Sherman L. Flanders 

D. L. Robinson 

George L. Stearns. . . 
George C. Harwood. 

A. D. Maxwell 

John Doherty 

AlvahR. Mack 

George B. Glidden . . 

Arthur L. Beals 

William H. Maxwell. 
Thomas Hamilton . . . 
Charles B. Fuller... 

George I. Ayer 

William F. Stearns.. 
Charles E. Stearns. . 

Andrew Tuill 

Chas. E. Stearns, 2d. 



Foreman . . 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Steward 

Ex. Com 

Hoseman 



Front St., Amosk'g, 



Milk St., Amoskeag> 

Dunbarton road. 
Mill St., Amoskeag. 
Front St. " 

Goffstown road. 

Second St., Amosk'g 
Front St., Amosk'g. 



299 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Wahiut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincohi street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, corner of Franklin street. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Adams street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Baker, corner of Elm street. 
Baker, corner of Calef road. 
Baker, corner of Nutt road. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 



300 



Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 

Beech, front of IS'o. 584. 

Behnont,''near 345. 

Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 

Bloclget, front of primary schoolhouse. 

Bloclget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Bloclget, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Bloclget, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, front of Is"o. 26. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of "Walnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Bridge, near ^o. 242. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 

Bridge, corner of Ashland street. 

Bridge, corner of Hall street. 

Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 

Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 

Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 

Canal, near office door of M. L. W. 

Cedar, front of l^o. 36. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 

•Oedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 



301 



Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Central, northwest corner of Union street. 

Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 

Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Central, front of l^o. 374. 

Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Chestnut, opposite High street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street, 

Clarke, corner of Elm street. 

Concord, opposite Vine street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Elm, front of Fisk bookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 



302 



Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Gore, corner of Beech street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, near Franklin street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near brewery. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Harrison, opposite No. 13. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 

High, corner of Ashland street. 

High, corner of South street. 

High, 50 feet east of Wilson road. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm street. 



303 



Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near ISTo. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Laurel, near Belmont street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Milton street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 
Lowell, front of l^o. 276. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Central street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Maple, front of ^o. 530. 
Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 
Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Massabesic, northwest corner of old Falls road. 



304 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mammoth roacl. 

Mechanics, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Mechanics, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanics, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Merrimack, near Belmont street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beacon street. 

Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Middle, near 67 Amoskeag corporation. 

Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Myrtle, opposite ISTo. 33. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of "Walnut street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 

[N'orth, northwest corner of Bay street. 

North, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 



306 



Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Orange, corner of Ash street. 

Orange, corner of Maple street. 

Orange, corner of Oak street. 

Orange, corner of Russell street. 

Park, near ^o. 36. 

Park, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Park, northwest corner of Union street. 

Park, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Park, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Park, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Park, east end. 

Pearl, northwest, corner of Clark's avenue. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 

Pearl, corner of Beech stj^eet. 

Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Elm. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 

Pine, northwest corner of Park street. 

Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 

Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 

Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Pine, northwest corner of High street. 

20 



306 



Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near 36 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Eussell street. 
Piver road, north of Webster street. 
Piver road, near Mrs. John Kelley's. 
River road, near J. Otis Clark's. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 
Shasta, corner of Beech street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
♦Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite 57 Manchester corporation. 



307 

State, opposite 13 Manchester corporation. 

State, corner of West Central street. 

Summer, corner of Elm street. 

Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Union, northwest corner of High street. 

A^alley, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Willow street. 

Yalley, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Taylor street. 

Valley, northwest corner of C^^press street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Jewett street. 

Valley, 150 feet east J. L. Woodman's. 

Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Walnut, opposite No. 79. 

Water, near 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Webster, corner of Adams street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 

West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

W est Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 



308 



"West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 
"West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Webster, northwest corner' of Elm street. 
West Webster, northeast corner of Eiver road. 
Wilson, corner of Park street. 
Young, corner of Elm street. 
Young, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Young, 96 feet east of R. JST. Batchelder's. 

PISCATAQUOG. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
A, near No. 73. 

A, northwest corner of B street. 
Adams, corner of Main street, 
Bath, corner of Shirley street. 
Bennington, corner of Main street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Clinton, corner of Dover street. 
Clinton, corner of South Main street. 
Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 
Douglas, corner of Green street. 
Douglas, corner of Barr street. 
Douglas, corner of West street. 
Douglas, corner of Main street. 
Douglas, east of Main street. 
Ferry, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Quincy street. 
Granite, corner of Green street. 
Granite, corner of Barr street. 
Granite, corner of West street. 
Granite, corner of Dover street. 



309 



Granite, corner of Main street. 

Oranite, corner of Shirley street. 

Granite, corner of River street. 

Main, opposite the Rice house. 

Marion, corner of McGregor street. 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's. 

Mast, near J. E". Prescott's. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. ' 

McGregor, opposite " Reed " house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main street. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 

Patten, corner of Ferry street. 

Putnam, corner of Main street. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 

School, corner of South Main street. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 

School, corner of River street. 

Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 

Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry street. 

Sullivan, corner of Main street. 

Temple, corner of Main street. 

"Walker, corner of River road. 

Walker, corner of Patten street. 

Walker, corner of Parker street. 

Walker, near corner of South Main street. 

Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 

Wayne, near corner of Main street. 

Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 

Winter, corner of South Main street. 



310 



AMOSKEAG. 



Dunbarton road, corner of Front street. 
Dunbarton road, near L. B. Colby's. 
Goffstown road. 
Goffstown road. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 
Main, near brick schoolhouse. 
Main, corner of GoiFstown road. 
Main, opposite John E. Stearns's. 
Main, near Hiram Stearns's. 
Mill, near paper-mill. 
Mill, corner of Main street. 
Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are four private hydrants 
that are available in case of need : — 

One at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine-shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at A. H. Lowell's iron foundry. 
Total number, 388. 



AC C O U NT 



SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

City Treasurer^ 

From December 31, 1884, to December 31, 1885. 



312 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer , in account ivith the 



To cash on hand January 1, 1885 . 


. $63,719 30 


Temporary loan .... 


42,000 00 


City bonds sold .... 


. 155,000 00 


Premium on same . . . . 


6,228 00 


Insurance tax 


1,516 50 


Railroad tax ..... 


15,558 25 


Savings-bank tax .... 


47,317 90 


Literary fund ..... 


2,527 23 


Board of paupers off Farm 


1,641 28 


City Farm 


2,003 75 


City teams ..... 


4,526 00 


Ira W. Moore, old plank . 


3 50 


A. N. Clapp, lighting streets (over dra^t) 


11 22 


Concord Railroad corporation, paving stree 


ts . 83 83 


Charles Rankin, macadamizing (over draft ^ 


34 00 


Fred C. Dow, grading for concrete . 


12 00 


Sewer and drain licenses . 


1,060 35 


J. R. Weston, incidentals . 


300 00 


H. Gr. Connor heirs, incidentals 


300 00 


C. H. Burns, incidentals (over draft) 


25 00 


Bounty on woodchucks . 


6 50 


Pine Grove cemetery 


2,806 01 


Valley cemetery .... 


900 06 


Old hose sold, fire department . 


57 61 


Supply wagon sold, fire department . 


75 00 


Police department .... 


3,340 04 


City Hall 


3,144 26 


T. A. Lane, repairs of buildings (over drai 


\) . 36 98 


Fred W. Ranno, city officer, salary (over di 


•aft) . 5 00 


Water- Works 


80,404 12 


Contingent expenses (over draft) 


1 70 


D. C. Parker & Son . . . . 


129 99 


Trustees of cemetery fund, bonds sold 


1,300 00 


Dog licenses ...... 


446 00 


Bilhard tables 


291 50 


Milk licenses ...... 


52 50 


Rent of tenements . . . . • 


472 92 


Show licenses ...... 


197 00 


Tuition . . . . . . 


162 00 


John Foy, Webster-street sewer (over draf 


t) . 8 75 


Amount carried forward . . 


, 1437,706 05 



313 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1885). 



Cr. 



By unpaid bills January 1, 1885 .... S45,824 44 


Temporary loan 








. 161,000 00 


Coupons, water bonds 










36,093 00 


Coupons, city bonds . 










16,289 36 


Interest . 










4,634 28 


Paupers off Farm 










4,878 47 


City Farm : 










6,635 44 


City teams 










7,124 57 


Higbway district No. 1 










319 98 


u a a 2 










10,430 99 


a u (< 3 










1,090 36 


u u " 4 










317 49 


u u C£ 5 










392 22 


c( £c a g 










404 40 


a £« " 'jf 










1,041 35 


u u « 8 










648 18 


(-. u " 9 . 










488 16 


u a 10 










1,839 57 


u :£ <: 11 










1,003 11 


u u a 12 










286 75 


<: " " 13 










191 93 


New highways . 










6,177 84 


Land damage . 










379 95 


Watering streets 










4,367 82 


Lighting streets 










13,331 98 


Paving streets . 










4,169 99 


Macadamizing streets 










5,104 52 


Grrading for concrete 










3,752 31 


Sewers and drains 










8,757 94 


Commons 










2,949 83 


Bridges . 










4,239 64 


Incidental expenses . 










40,055 78 


Pine Grrove cemetery 










7,243 85 


Valley cemetery 










2,628 40 


Fire department 










17,097 98 


Fire alarm telegraph 










6,774 78 


Police department , 










28,172 92 


City Hall 










3,014 57 


Firemen's parade 










290 08 


Hydrant service 








19,150 00 


Amount carried forward 


$478,594 23 



314 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam^ Treasurer, in account with the 





Amount brought 


forward 


To W. A. Carpenter, old plank 


Taxes collected on list of 1874 








1875 








1876 








1877 








1878 








1879 








1880 








1881 








1882 








1883 


•■' 






1884 








1885 


Int 


erest on 


taxes 


. 



Unpaid bills January 1, 1886 . 



$437,706 


05 


2 


00 


7 


12 


12 76 


3 


28 


1 


58 


10 


51 


5 


98 


5 


42 


8 


44 


60 


64 


115 


23 


15,069 


91 


293,489 


78 


294 


71 



$746,793 41 
38,041 65 

$784,835 06. 



315 



CHiy of Manchester (ending December 31, 1885). 



Cr 



Amount brought forward 
By Printing and stationery 
Repairs of buildings 
City library 
Militia 

Funded debt payment 
Abatement of taxes . 
City officers' salaries . 
Decorating soldiers' graves 
Women's Aid Society 
Land 

Water-Works . 
Reserved fund . 
Repairs, scboolhouses 
Fuel 

Furniture and supplies 
Books and stationery 
Printing and advertising 
Contingent expenses 
Care of rooms . 
Evening schools 
Teachers' salaries 
New schoolhouse 
Truant officer . 
Interest on land 
• Scavenger teams 
Health department 
Bridge-street sewer 
Main-street sewer 
Webster-street sewer 
Discount on taxes 
State tax . 



Cash on hand January 1, 1886 . 



$478,594 2^ 

1,176 09' 

4,302 64 

3,371 23 

800 00 

18,500 00' 

1,918 72 

12,839 22 

209 25 

■ 400 00 

1,644 25 

41,502 78 

10,040 81 

3,23^ 83 

2,642 01 

854 03 

484 37 

499 53 

1,013 21 

3,108 96' 

1,476 04 

39,819 03 

6,016 70 

749 58 

451 08 

6,223 15 

2,789 15 

4,751 86' 

1,218 87 

13,395 17 

7,988 50 

48,404 00 

$720,421 29 
64,413 77 

$784,835 06' 



SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

City Treasurer^ 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the accounts 
■of Sylvanus B. Putnam, City Treasurer, for the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-five, and find the same to be 
correct and properfy vouched for. 

S. B. STEARNS, 
GEORaE H. STEARNS, 
L. B. BODWELL, 
J. C. QUIMBY, 
E. S. WHITISTEY, 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 

Manchester, N". H., Jan. 17, 1886. J 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . $119,000 00 

Trustees of city library . 2,000 00 

A. J. Lane .... 20,000 00 

J. A. Weston . . . . 20,000 00 

$161,000 00 

Or. 
Paid James A. "Weston . . $40,000 00 
State of N'ew Hampshire . 3,000 00 
Josiah Carpenter . . 10,000 00 
People's Savings Bank . 5,000 00 
Manchester I^ational Bank 10,000 00 
Manchester Savings Bank . 70,000 00 
Trustees of city library . 2,000 00 
Ebenezer Knowlton . . 1,000 00 
George B. Chandler . . 20,000 00 

$161,000 00 



INTEREST. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . $20,000 00 
water-works,am't transferred 38,000 00 

$58,000 00 



320 



Cr. 



Paid Josiali Carpenter 


$187 50 


State of ]N'ew Hampshire 


76 67 


Peoples Savings Bank 


93 75 


Manchester IS'ational Baul^ 


: 238 90 


Manchester Savings Bank . 


2,831 80 


Ebenezer Knowlton . 


45 83 


George B. Chandler . 


832 50 


A. J. Lane . 


273 33 


Trustees of city library 


54 00 


coupons, city bonds . 


. 16,289 36 


coupons, water . 


36,093 00 


By balance on hand . 


983 36 




<i,^Q, 000 00 







PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


. $180 43 




appropriation . . . 


. 3,500 00 




County of Hillsborough . 


. 1,639 68 




Griffin Bros., overdraft . 


1 00 




L. S. Johnson, overdraft . 


60 


$5,321 71 
Cr. 







Paid Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Jas. McGuinness $22 78 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Michael Spane . 53 81 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

famished Michael Moran . 123 83 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. T. Donovan 40 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Jeremiah Cronin 65 25 



I 



321 



Paid Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. James Otis . $105 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Walter Lynch . 44 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Ellen Sullivan . 110 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished James Callahan . 79 25 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 
furnished John Shaughnes- 
sey . . . ^ . 127 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Samuel Gray . 30 22 

Griffin & Conway, groceries* 

furnished Jules Morency . 35 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Wm. Howe 14 64 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Catherine 
Sullivan . . . ^ 8 00 

Griffin & Conwa^', groceries 
furnished Isabella O'Brien . 8 00 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Fitzgerald . 48 OQ 

M. Harrington, rent for Joseph 

French, disabled soldier . 9 90 

McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Michael Spane . 23 50 

McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Stephen Sullivan . 137 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Turcotte . . 134 10 

Bartlett & Thompson, grocer- 
ies furnished Mary Griffin . 8 00 



822 



Paid Bartlett & Thompson, grocer- 
ies furnished Joseph O'Neal $29 80 

J. Bean & Co., groceries fur- 
nished L. M. Green . . 38 01 

WilHam Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Morgan . . 1 62 

William Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Hunter . . 132 00 

William Weber, groceries fur- 
nished M. Hastings . . 26 38 

William Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Burpee . . 20 00 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Ellen Backner . 30 00 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. P. Houlihan . 6 00 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Phebe Dnford . . 41 00 

L. Gutterson, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Griffin . . 24 00 

L. Gutterson,. groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Daniel Connor 4 00 

A. M. Eastman, groceries fur- 
nished M. Hastings . . 2 54 

A. M. Eastman, groceries fur- 
nished Mary G^-iffin . . 28 00 

Michael Kennej, groceries fur- 
nished Catherine Burke . 32 00 

Michael Kenney, groceries fur- 
nished William Conway . 96 00 

H. B. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished Edward Frenier . 38 00 

;H. B. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished Edward Frenier . 6 00 



323 



Paid George "W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Ellen McGinnis . $2 15 

George "W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Mary Fitzgerald 7 29 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Edwin Ray . . 6 61 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Mary Griffin . 7 05 

George "W". Adams, groceries 

furnished Mary Doherty . 28 40 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished James Callahan . 13 79 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished L. M. Green . 5 99 

Josiah Taylor & Son, groceries 

furnished Thomas Riley . 11 00 

Josiah Taylor & Son, groceries 

furnished Ellen Backner , 11 00 

M. Lavery, groceries furnished 

Bridget Clark ... 11 00 

Joseph Quirin, groceries fur- 
nished Louis Vina . . 3 00 

Joseph Quirin, groceries fur- 
nished Philomene Duford . 8 00 

Joseph Quirin, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Joseph Berube 3 00 

E. E. Colburn, groceries fur- 
nished L. M. Green . . 16 00 

Sarah Sheehan, groceries fur- 
nished M. J. Sullivan . 10 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. Gilbert . 3 00 

.J. F. Moore, groceries fur- 
nished A. P. Fellows . . 21 00 



324 



Paid L. S. Johnson, groceries fur- 
nished L. M. Green . . $16 69^ 

Sawyer & Hoyt, groceries fur- 
nished Kate Sullivan . . 157 00 

N. H. Asylum for Insane . 47 68 

State Industrial School . . 1,894 89' 

County of Hillsborough, care 
Asenath White ... 104 00 

County of Hillsborough, care 

J. J. Murray ... 104 Oa 

Hannah O'Brien, board of 

Joseph O'Mel ... 20 00 

Mrs. "Wm. Chase, board of 

Thomas Chase ... 116 00' 

Mrs. Esther L. Ingham, board 

of Emily F. Ingham . . 40 00 

Esther Hardy, board of Rod- 
ney Hardy .... 3 00 

Town of Candia, support of 

George H. Johnson . , 12 00 

Masse & Beaumier, wood for 

Edward Frenier . . 9 00 

Burns & Poor, wood for 

Michael Spane ... 9 00 

Burns & Poor, wood for Ellen 

Backner .... 2 00 

Burns & Poor, wood for James 

Otis 4 50 

Burns & Poor, wood for Mrs. 

T. Donovan ... 1 98 

Burns & Poor, wood for Mary 

Griffin .... 2 00 

Burns & Poor, wood for Samuel 

Gray 2 25 



325 



Yaid Burns & Poor, wood for James 

McGuinness ... |2 00 

Burns & Poor, wood for John 

Leonard .... 2 50 

-John Flynn, wood for Mary 

Fitzgerald .... 4 00 

John Flynn, wood for James 

Callahan .... 3 75 

John Flynn, wood for Mary 

Doherty .... 9 78 

J'ohn Flynn, wood for L. M. 

Green .... 1 85 

John Flynn, wood for Mary 

Griffin .... 3 50 

John Flynn, wood for Louis 

Yina 1 00 

I. Lefehvre, wood for Mary 

Griffin .... 7 00 

I. Lefehvre, wood for Edward 

Frenier 4 00 

Spaulding Hadley, wood for 

Phehe Duford ... 3 20 

A. Mclndoe, wood for Moses 

Duford .... 1 00 

L. S. Proctor, wood for John 

Lennon .... 2 00 

X. S. Proctor, wood for L. M. 

Green .... 11 50 

E. P. Johnson & Co., wood for 

Mary Doherty ... 3 50 

L. B. Bodwell, & Co., wood 

for Mrs. James McGuinness 9 75 

X. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 

Stephen Sullivan . . 9 00 



326 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 




James Callahan . 


$5 75- 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 




John Shaughnessey . 


4 25 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 




L. M. Green 


5 25 


A. G. Whittier, wood for E. S. 




Woodward 


2 00 


Patrick Healey, wood for 




James Callahan . 


12 00 


Rivard & Gingras, wood for 




Phebe Duford . 


3 00 


Rivard & Gingras, wood for 




Thomas Riley 


3 00 


E. V. Turcotte, wood for 




James Callahan . 


3 25 


Joseph Murray, hoots and 




shoes for Mrs, Samuel Gray 


3 50 


D. 0. Furnald & Son, hoots and 




shoes for Maynard family . 


5 00 


D. 0. Furnald & Son, boots 




and shoes for Phebe Duford 


5 00= 


George E. Hall, medicine 


13 40 


L. K. Mead, medicine . 


1 40 


E, H. Currier, medicine 


1 OO 


J. B. Hall, medicine 


3 10 


L. G. Tewksbury, medicine . 


20 65 


C. C. Perry, team . 


4 00 


J. C. Bickford, professional 




services .... 


1 00 


Town of Weare, care of Eben 




Johnson .... 


102 25 


Town of Candia, care of Geo. 




H. Johnson 


10 5a 



327 



Paid Elliott & Ryder, transporta- 
tion . ' . 
Manchester Gas Co., coke 
P. A. Devine, undertaking 
F. X. Chenette, undertaking 
J. iST. Bruce, undertaking 
Poor & Gray, undertaking 
Dr. J. M, Collity, professional 

services 
Horace Gordon, teams . 
T. J. Wyatt, transportation 
A. G. Grenier, transportation 
H. De W. Carvelle, profes- 
sional services 
Temple & Farrington, sta- 
tionery, etc. 
0. D. Kimball, painting 
McDonald & Cody, boots for 

Ellen McGinnis . 
D. 0. Furnald, boots for Mrs 

A. G. Fellows . 
Chas. Francis, team 
By balance on hand 



$4 15 
2 00 
18 00 
61 50 
12 50 
22 00 

50 00 

2 00 
4 00 

12 00 

25 00 

11 81 

12 50 

3 50 



2 


00 


1 


50 


443 


24 



1,321 71 



CITY FARM. 

To appropriation .... $2,500 00 

J. Garvin, superintendent . 1,986 88 

Wilson & Rand, overdraft . 16 87 

reserved fund, am't transferred 2,300 00 



Dr. 



1,803 75 



328 



Cr. 



Paid Jeremiah Garvin, superintend- 
ent .... 
Pettee & Adams, grain, etc. 
Colby & Kendall, grain, etc. 
Drake & Carpenter, grain, etc 
W. H. H. Colby, grain, etc. 
Merrill Bros., grain, etc. 
Kendall & Jewell, grain, etc. 
Drake & Dodge, grain, etc. 

C. H. Hill, grain, etc. . 

L. Gutterson, groceries, etc. 
Horace Marshall, butter 
A. M. Eastman, groceries, etc 
Geo. W. Adams, groceries, etc 
Smith & Bly, crackers . 
H. B. Sawyer, groceries, etc 
A. G. Grenier, groceries, etc 
"Wilson & Rand, meats . 
Bartlett & Thompson, meats 

etc. . . . 
Tom W. Robinson, meats 

D. M. Poore, groceries, etc. 
George C. Lord, groceries, etc 
H. D. Jones, mackerel . 

O. P. Stone & Co., groceries, 
Carl E. York, groceries, etc. 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., grocer 

ies, etc. 
Bartlett & Colburn, groceries 

etc. .... 
"Webster & Young, butter 
Clough & Co., meats 
Dodge & Laing, butter . 



$580 76 
824 87 

87 89 
159 03 

21 00 
26 93 
77 97 

196 44 

8 00 

69 41 

99 62 

145 33 

76 71 
• 35 36 

41 88 
67 01 
28 74 

270 75 
135 74 

77 98 

6 00 
13 25 

7 85 
54 83 

88 53 

3 42 
5 70 

4 75 

20 83 



329 



Paid 0. Hardy & Co., groceries, etc. $149 55 
Eager & Rand, groceries, etc. 35 72 
George "W. Wilson, molasses . 14 70 
J. B. Yarick Co., farming im- 
plements, etc. . . . 95 18 
Daniels & Co., farming imple- 
ments, etc 53 67 

Killey & "Wadleigh, farming 

implements, etc. . . 25 21 
T. A. Lane, repairing steam 

works, etc 364 28 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 13 38 
Thorp k Bartlett, plumbing, 

etc 51 11 

Hutchinson Bros., plumbing, 40 

W. P. Farmer, phosphate . 32 00 

Roger G. Sullivan, tobacco . 98 75 

N. Alexander, tobacco . . 15 64 

George H. Hubbard, tobacco 10 75 

T. A. Barker, swill . . 150 00 

Bennett & Lord, mason-work 1 40 

B. W. Robinson, mason-work 43 06 
H. M. Moody, clothing . . 24 85 

C. M. Bailey, brooms, etc. . 30 89 
G. R. Vance & Co. . . 25 50 
■J. Stickney, rubber hose, etc. 7 60 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 11 81 
"N'ew England Telegraph & 

Telephone Co., telephone . 39 90 
Killey & Wadley, hardware . 5 68 
Wm. H. Hill, blacksmithing . 13 00 
J. H. Cram, blacksmithing . 44 50 
J, F. "Woodbury, blacksmith- 
ing 24 20 



330 



Paid F. Allen, blacksmithing 
Higgins Bros., chairs 
Charles Buntoii, repairing 

wagons, etc. 
A. Filion & Co., repairing 

wagons, etc. 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair 

ing wagons, etc. . 
Hutchinson Bros., ironwork 
J. K. Piper, dry goods . 
HaAvlej & Barnard, dry goods 
Weston & Hill, dry goods 
Talbot & Co., dry goods 
H. M. Tarbell, clothing. 
Waite & Piper, dry goods 
Daniels & Co., hardware 
L. G. Tewksbury, medicines 
Z. F. Campbell, medicines 
J. B. Hall, medicines 

C. B. Littleiield, medicines 
George E. Hall, medicines 
Edward H. Currier, medicines 
Wingate & Gould, boots and 

shoes . . . . . 
G. "W". Dodge, boots and shoes 

D. 0. Furnald, boots and shoes 
F. C. Dow, boots and shoes 
Ezra W. Kimball, harness, etc 
F. ^. McLaren, harness, etc. 
Moore & Preston, coal . 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
A. I^. Clapp, kerosene oil 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 



$5 00 

13 75 

15 43 

3 00 

199 96 

1 60 
101 89 

70 63 

35 85 

4 70 

5 40 
37 05 

2 19 

36 43 
1 40 

7 60 

14 11 
12 20 

8 13 

19 93 
10 75 
18 00 
32 60 
45 85 
12 01 
135 43 
10 00 
14 83 
4 00 
31 19 



331 



Paid J. Hodge, lumber . 


$6 41 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


9 60 


L. M. Aldrich, carpenter work 


5 00 


A. A. Forbush, carpenter work 


: 69 00 


G. F. Bosher & Co., Crosby 




bed .... 


25.00 


Fairbanks & Co., manure, etc 


31 85 


Temple & Farrington, books 


4 25 


James R. Carr, painting 


90 48 


Higgins Bros., carpet, chairs 


> 


etc .... , 


58 02 


D. Kerwin, soap, etc. 


30 25 


Joshua Page, dressing hogs . 


15 00 


Campbell & Maxwell, ice 


18 00 


E. P. Richardson, insurance 


240 00 


Pearson & Wallace, burying 




pauper . . . . 


27 50 


J. S. Holt & Co., soap . , 


14 75 


Batchelder, Fairbanks, & Co. 




manure 


115 26 


E. H. Hobbs, manure . 


23 00 


C. A. Whittemore 


90 


Otis E. Prescott, manure 


18 50 


Joshua Page, labor 


69 60 


L. J. Proctor, labor 


101 93 


E. J. Garvin, labor 


34 50 


E. M. Slayton, butter . 


18 28 


George S. Smith, bull, etc 


55 00 


T. "W. Lane, stationery . 


5 70 


George Holbrook, carpenter 




work . 


17 44 


By balance on hand 


168 31 



^6,803 75- 



332 



CITY TEAMS. 



Dr. 



"To appropriation . 

Fairbanks & Co., horse sold 
District N"o. 2 . 
District No. 10 
new highwaj^s . 
watering streets 
paving streets . 
macadamizing . 
grading for concrete 
sewers and drains 
scavenger teams 
bridges . 
City Hall . 
repairs of buildings 
reserved fund . 
Webster-street sewer 
Bridge-street sewer 
Main-street sewer 
incidental expenses 
commons 
balance overdrawn 



PaidH. Fradd & Co., grain, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, grain, etc. 
Merrill Bros., grain, etc. 
Colby & Kendall, grain, etc. 
Drake & Carpenter, grain, etc 
Drake & Dodge, grain, etc. 
Kendall & Jewell, grain etc. 



. $3,000 


00 


180 


00 


714 


50 


192 


25 


148 


75 


788 


75 


41 


25 


235 


00 


410 


50 


202 75 


. 1,364 


25 


47 75 


6 


25 


30 


00 


8 


75 


122 


75 


14 


50 


13 


00 


2 


50 


2 


50 


1,098 


57 




^8 624 57 








Cr. 


. $351 


09 


453 


26 


255 


89 


114 


11 


44 


35 


165 


62 


78 


59 



333 



PaidW. H. H. Colby, grain, etc. . $100 6^ 

By reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred .... 1,500 00 

Paid S. W. Prescott, hay . . 548 14 

E. P. Johnson & Co., hay . 409 17 

C. C. Webster, hay . . 103 20 

Clinton Parker, hay . . 8 80^ 

L. Shelters, hay . . . 241 42 

John Quirin, hay . . . 13 05 

0. Hinkley, hay ... 61 74 

M. E. Harvey, hay . . 11 34 

C. K Harvey, hay, etc. . . 37 61 
H. A. Horton, carrots . . 18 36 
George E, Richardson, straw 25 88 
J. Randlett, straw ... 4 76 
Daniels & Co., hardware, etc . 12 69 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc 6 33 

J. B. Varick Co., spring seat, 

etc. ...".. 13 6S 

E. E. Brown & Co., repairing 

wagon .... 2 25 

J. H. Cram, blacksmithing . 183 63 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 44 11 
J. F.Woodbury, blacksmithing 211 55 
Stephen Austin, blacksmithing 20 50 
John Barnes, blacksmithing . 36 87 
Wm. H. Hill, blacksmithing . 18 23 
Barnard & Pike, blacksmithing 9 75 

F. N. McLaren, harness, etc. 204 38 

D. S. Ames, harness, etc. . 63 40 
EzraW. Kimball, harness, etc. 88 26 
H. C. Eamo, harness, etc. . 59 58' 

E. H. Bushey, repairing har- 
ness 3 60- 



334 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing wagons, etc. 

J. J. Connor, repairing wagons, 
etc. ..... 

A. Filion & Co., repairing 
wagons, etc. 

S. F. Burnham, professional 
services .... 

Dr. J. Alexander, professional 
services .... 

George E. Hall, liorse medi- 
cines, etc. .... 

City Hall drug-store, horse 
medicines, etc. . 

John B. Hall, horse medicines, 
etc 

C T. ISTewman, horse medi- 
cines, etc. .... 

Z. F. Campbell, horse medi- 
cines, etc. .... 

J. E. Tolman, horse 

J. R. Carr, paint, etc. 

E. Jobert, horses . 

Concord Railroad corporation, 
freight .... 

J. Bryson, paint, etc. 

J. R. Carr, paint, etc. 

J. Stickney, foot oil 

Fairbanks & Co. . 

Scollay & Poor, harness soap, 
etc. . . 

L. M. Aldrich, carpenter work 

for labor of teamsters . 



$393 


07 


32 


15 




50 


18 


50 


156 


00 


24 


90 


1 


00 


29 


14 


4 


15 


14 


62 


280 


00 


1 


80 


668 


00 


18 


20 




75 


16 


81 




85 


11 


00 


8 


85 


7 


62 


1,410 


78 



5,624 57 



335 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT JSTO. 1. 

To appropriation .... $300 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 50 00 



PaidKilley & Wadleigli, hardware 
Mrs. N. Preston, gravel 
J. B. Yarick & Co., hardware 
M. F. Dodge, gravel 
Fellows & Co., blacksmithing 
for labor of men and teams . 

By balance on hand 



$0 


87 


7 


20 


1 


00 


2 


55 


2 


20 


306 


16 


30 


02 



Dr. 

$350 00 
Cr. 



$350 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT KO. X 
To appropriation .... $11,000 00 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 
ware, etc $114 16 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 
etc. ..... 

DanielSj,& Co., hardware, etc. 

T. A. Lane, blacksmithing, 
etc. ..... 

Pike & Heald, galvanized iron 

Manchester Gas Company, gas 

Temple k Farrington, blank 
books, etc. .... 

T. W. Lane, blank books, etc. 



Dr. 

$11,000 00 
Cr. 



95 


27 


42 


60 


12 


63 




50 


23 


14 


50 


98 


7 


72 



336 



Paid R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 






ing 


121 45 


Charles Buntoii, blacksmith,- 






ing 


12 87 


Barnard & Pike, blacksmith- 






ing . . . . . 


6 


45 


Joseph Boisvert, blacksmith- 






ing . . . . . 


14 


65 


Hutchinson Bros., blacksmith- 






ing . . . . . 


31 


22 


J. J. Connor, blacksmithing . 


115 


45 


Woodbury & Fellows, black- 






smithing .... 


4 


15 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


1 


42 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


5 


89 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


2 


22 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


14 


88 


E. T. James, team . 


1 


50 


J. Taylor & Son, oil, salt, etc. 


26 


97 


L. Gutterson, oil, salt, etc. 


29 


12 


J. Stickney .... 




30 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood . 


8 


00 


Burns & Poor, wood 


7 50 


Moses P. Eastman . 


7 


50 


William H. Vickery, keys 


2 


35 


Warren Harvey, team . 


16 


00 


N. S. Bean, gravel and loam . 


176 50 


C. M. Bailey, w^aste 




50 


Avery Bros., oil-cans, etc. 


2 


15 


Drake & Carpenter, cement 






and lime .... 


2 


75 


for labor of men and teams . 


8,692 


10 


James Patten, superintendent 


85 


45 


Wm. Sanborn, superintendent 


794 75 


By balance on hand 


569 


01 

$11,000 00 



337 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $1,000 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 100 00 



Paid Ed. l!T. Baker, superintendent 
Edwin Kennedy, superinten- 
dent ..... 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 

i"g 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 
etc. ..... 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 
etc 

Marden & Woodbury, edge- 
stone, etc. .... 

Hutchinson Bros., ironwork . 

Brock & Driscoll, dippers and 

chains .... 2 00 

J. B. McCrillis's Son, black- 
smithing 

Pettee & Adams, cement 

for labor of men and teams 
By balance on hand 







$1,100 


00 






Cr. 




$16 


00 






214 


83 






15 


85 






26 


63. 






27 


6Q 






12 


50 






1 


20 







6 


18 




10 


55' 




756 


9^ 




9 


64 


$1,100 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT ISTO. 4. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $400 00 

$400 00 

22 



338 



Paid E. X. Whittemore, superin- 
tendent .... 
Ira W. Moore, superintendent 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 
for labor of men and teams . 

By balance on hand 



181 


75 


166 


75 


1 


75 


67 


24 


82 


51 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 
To appropriation .... $400 00 



PaidW. W. Dickey, superinten- 

tendent .... 

John Willey, superintendent 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

E. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 

ing ..... 

for labor of men and teams . 

By balance on hand 



$26 00 


180 


50 


.28 


25 


1 


21 


4 


95 


151 


31 


7 


78 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



Cr. 



1400 00 



Dr. 

$400 00 
Cr. 



$400 00 



$400 00 
4 40 


Dr. 

$404 40 






i 



339 



Cr. 



Paid Daniel H. Dickey, superin- 




tendent .... 


$20 67 


S. B. Dickey, superintendent 


152 29 


J. W. Watson, blacksmithing 


4 35 


Daniels Hardware Company, 




hardware .... 


16 30 


for labor of men and teams . 


210 79 







$404 40 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



To appropriation .... $900 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred . 150 00 



Dr. 

$1,050 00 
Cr. 



JPaidP. 0. Woodman, superinten- 
dent ..... 1114 87 
Charles Bunton, blacksmith- 
ing . . . . . 
J. W. Watson, blacksmithing 

E. F. Buswell, plank . 

F. S. Bodwell, stone 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 
Daniels Hardware Company, 

hardware 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
for labor of men and teams . 
By balance on hand 



3 


00 


10 


65 


1 


00 


8 


50 


13 


10 


29 


38 


1 


23 


859 


62 


8 


65 



$1,050 00 



340 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 

To appropriation .... $650 00 



Paid John Proctor, superintendent 
J. W. Page, superintendent . 
J. W. Page, stone . 
P. O. Woodman, stone . 
L. S. Proctor, stone 
H. F. Thompson, blacksmith- 

ing . . . • . 
S. J. Forsaith Machine Co. 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
Head & Dowst, chestnut posts 
for labor of men and teams . 

By balance on hand 



$16 


00 


196 


97 


6 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


9 


57 


2 


55 


13 


64 


4 


32 


393 


13 


1 


82 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT ISTO. 9. 
To appropriation . . . . $500 00 



Paid J. J. Garmon, superintendent 


$27 00 


N. W. Page, superintendent . 


180 37 


N. W. Page, lumber 


12 00 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 




etc. ..... 


5 30 


B. McGinnis, gravel 


4 20 


for labor of men and teams . 


259 29 


By balance on hand 


11 84 



Dr. 

$650 00 
Cr. 



$650 00' 



Dr. 

$500 00 
Cr. 



$500 OO 



341 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT KO, 10. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . . . . 


$1,800 00 




balance overdrawn . 


39 57 


$1,839 57 










Cr. 


Paid Wm. N. Chamberlain, super- 






intendent . . . . 


$76 00 




C. 0. Phelps, superintendent . 


514 50 




Daniels & Co., hardware 


11 44 




Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 


39 40 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


3 85 




A. K. Clapp, salt, nails, etc. . 


2 36 




George W. Riddle, gravel 


26 00 




C. H. Robie, sand and gravel 


4 30 




James Briggs, plumbing 


7 05 




Lewis Wolf, plumbing . 


1 60 




H. Fradd & Co. . 


14 54 




J. B. McCrillis & Son, snow 






plow 


20 00 




G. H. Bartlett, stone drag 


5 00 




D» F. Cressey, blacksmithing 


5 65 




A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


25 '77 




F. S. Bodwell, stone posts 


8 10 




for labor of men and teams 


1,074 01 


$1,839 57 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT KO. 11. 



To appropriation . 
balance overdrawn 



$1,000 00 
3 11 



Dr. 



$1,003 11 



342 



Paid J.E. Bailey, superintendent . $375 14 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 1 50 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware 6 80 

S. L. Flanders, salt and spikes 2 69 

for labor of men and teams . 616 98 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT I^^0. 12. 
To appropriation .... $300 00 



Paid City Farm, labor of men and 

teams $286 75 

By balance on hand . . . 13 25 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 
To appropriation .... $200 00 



Paid J. H. Campbell, superintend- 




ent 


$5 00 


J. H. Giddings, superintendent 


44 50 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware 


7 15 


for labor of men and teams . 


135 28 


By balance on hand 


8 07 



Cr.. 



,003 11 



Dr. 

1300 00 
Cr. 



$300 00 



Dr, 

$200 oa 

Cr, 



$200 00 



343 








NEW HIGHWAYS. 












Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$5,000 00 




reserved fund, am't transferred 


1,100 


00 




balance overdrawn . 


77 84 










16,177 84 














Cr. 


Paid Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 








ware ..... 


$28 


00 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


4 


93 




Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 


1 


58 




Warren Harvey, stone . 


411 


00 




Charles A. Bailey, stone 


89 


69 




Landry & Guerin, stone . 


7 


75 




William Landry, stone . 


5 


40 




S. W. Prescott, filling Cass 








street 


50 


66 




M. F. Dodge, gravel 


33 


83 




George W. Piddle, gravel 


20 


00 




Manchester Locomotive 








Works, steel wedges . 


28 


80 




A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


4 


12 




for labor of men and teams . 


5,492 


08 


16,177 84 









LAND DAMAGE. 



To appropriation 



$1,500 00 



Dr. 
,500 00 



344 

Or. 

Paid H. S. Wliituey, Pearl street . |272 46 
Blood & Parsons, back street, 

near Monroe street . . 107 49 

By reserved fund, am't transferred 1,100 00 

balance on hand . . . 20 05 

$1,500 00 



WATERIXG STREETS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $4,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 367 82 

14,367 82 



Cr. 



Paid T. A. Lane, stand pipes, etc. . $65 59 

Pike & Heald, repairing sprink- 
ler, etc 31 13 

E. E. Brown & Co., repairing 

sprinkler, etc. ... 4 00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing sprinkler, etc. . . 218 73 

Manchester Water- Works, 

water 2,080 00 

for labor of men and teams . 1,968 37 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



$4,367 82 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... $12,500 00 
A. N. Clapp, overdraft . . 11 22 

reserved fund, am't transferred 600 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 220 76 

$13,331 98 



345 



Or. 



Paid^ew Eno-land Weston Elec- 
trie Light Co., electric lights 

Manchester Gas Co., gas, 
posts, etc. .... 

George H. Dunbar, superin- 
intendent .... 

F. S. Worthen, superintendent 

C. M. Bailey, chimneys, wicks, > 
matches, etc. 

A. IST. Clapp, kerosene oil 
James Briggs, repairing street 

lamps, etc. 
J. B. Varick Co., glass, etc. 
Kille}^ & Wadleigh, glass, etc 
O. D. Kimball, printing 
A. H. Lowell, lantern frames 

etc. .... 
Brock & Driscoll, repairing 

lanterns, etc. 
J. B. Clarke, advertising 
Union Publishing Company 
J. C. Moore, allowance for 

electric lights 
J. G. Lane, allowance for elec 

trie lights . 
Daniels & Co., glass 

D. L. Stevens, lamp-post 
Hutchinson Bros., posts 
J. D. Patterson, lamp-post 
T. A. Lane, repairs 



4,807 43 


4,735 


08 


362 


14 


2,792 


54 


51 


29 


147 


93 


99 


81 


53 


08 


42 


00 


16 


50 



4 00 

3 50 

7 87 
12 00 

12 00 



4 


00 


6 


25 


52 


50 


105 


00 


15 


00 


2 


06 




$13,331 98 



346 
PAVmG STREETS. 



To appropriation .... |3,000 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 1,200 00 

Concord Railroad . . . 83 83 



Paid C. H. Robie, concreting cross 

ings, etc. 

John McDerby, paving-stone 

etc 

Abbott-Downing Co., refilling 

broom, etc. 
L. D. Colby, paving-stone 
E. H. Hobbs, paving-stone 
George W. "Wilkins, paving- 
stone .... 
George Whitford, paving 

stone .... 
J. C. Messer, paving-stone 
D. Butterfield, paving-stone 
S. A. Blood, paving-stone 
"Wm. M. R. Pollard, paving- 
stone .... 
James Fullerton, paving-stone 
J. Terrill, paving-stone . 
for labor of men and teams 
By balance on hand 



!,834 84 

22 60 

32 25 

9 00 

13 00 



9 00 



9 


82 


3 


99 


5 


20 


21 


00 


16 


24 


12 


00 


21 


39 


1,159 


66 


113 


84 



Dr. 



,283 83; 



Cr.. 



$4,283 83 



347 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 

Charles Rankin, overdraft 


. $5,000 00 
34 00 


balance overdrawn . 


70 52 




%^ 101 ^^ 








Cr. 


Paid Manchester "Water- Works 


> 


water .... 
J. B. Varick Co. , hardware, etc 


$30 00 
35 22 


Killey & Wadleigh 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. 


16 45 


repairing crusher, etc. 
Hutchinson Bros., inspecting 
boiler 


371 23 

r 

! 2 00 


T. A. Lane, hose . 


3 20 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 

J. Stickney, lace leather, etc. 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


20 20 
3 94 
2 31 


Palmer & Garmon, stone chips 


5 7 25 


J. Boisvert, blacksmithing 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., stone 


7 45 

12 27 


J. Terrill, stone 


69 49 


Edwin Minnelly, stone . 
E. W. Butterfield, stone 


39 15 
39 44 


J. Nutt, stone 


8 84 


D. Gilman, stone . 


3 00 


E. E. Brown, stone 


3 50 


M. E. Harvey, stone 


11 25 


H. S. Plummer, stone . 


6 19 


Mrs. M. R. Pollard, stone 


11 39 


J. Fullerton, stone 


130 83 


J.. C. Messer, stone 


8 88 



348 



Paid Edwai'd Guerin 

S. P. Worthley, stone 

C. O. Phelps, stone 
H. Holbrook, stone 
George Whitford, stone 
J. H. Proctor, stone 
L. A. Willey, stone 
H. C. Simpson, stone 
H. K. Tilton, stone 
J. G. Holbrook, stone 

D. Butterfield, stone 
G. S. Eastman, stone 
L. A. Clougli, wood 
T. L. Thorpe, waste, etc. 
for labor of men and teams 



$55 97 


50 


80 


4 


92 


10 


71 


123 


33 


9 


90 


62 


74 


8 


00 


38 


00 


24 


77 


53 


28 


11 


00 


62 


69 


2 


50 


3,742 43 



i,104 52 



GRADING FOR COI^CRETE. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 
F. G. Dow, grading 
balance overdrawn . 


. $3,500 00 

12 00 

240 30 


$3,752 31 
Cr. 

$3,752 31 


Paid C. H. Robie, concreting 
for labor of men and teams 


$148 26 
. 3,604 05 


1 





SEWERS AKD DRAINS. 



To appropriation 
sewer licenses 



16,000 00 
1,053 85 



Dr. 



349 



) Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 


$6 50 


reserved fund .... 


1,500 00 


balance overdrawn . 


197 59 


ddW. F. Head, brick 


$245 00 


I^att & W. F. Head, brick 


162 75 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


115 17 


Merrill Bros., cement 


1 60 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


4 80 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


33 28 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


38 53 


J. B. Yarick Co., hardware 


2 80 


Killey & Wadleigli, hardware 


71 33 


Hutchinson Bros., ironware . 


330 68 


Pike & Heald, ladders, etc. . 


3 57 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware 


16 70 


T. A. Lane, sewer pipe, etc. 


685 70 


F. B. Potter, sewer pipe, etc. 


18 67 


Louis Wolf, blacksmithing . 


2 50 


Charles Bunton, blacksmith- 




ing . . . . 


31 40 


John Barnes, blacksmithing . 


33 40 


Stephen Austin, blacksmith- 




ing 


15 55 


D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 


52 71 


Concord Railroad corporation. 




freight .... 


37 80 


C. M. Stevens, trucking 


35 


H. Fradd & Co., salt, oil, etc. 


8 94 


A. H. Lowell, ironwork 


39 09 


D. J. Jones, ironwork . 


197 55 



!,757 94 
Cr. 



350 



Paid D. L. Stevens, ironwork 

F. S. Bodwell, cesspool stone 
F. B. Potter, pipe, etc. 
H. K. Tilton, stone 
City of Boston, Mass., sewer 

trap . . 
Thorp & Bartlett, soil dippers 
Carpenter & Parker, sewer 

pipe, etc. . 
Ed. F. Sclieer & Co., rubber 

boots .... 
A. K. Clapp, oil, rope, etc. 
J. Stickney, ml suits, etc. 
Samuel Eastman & Co., re 

pairing hose 
.John Caj'zer, rubber boots 
Manchester Gas Co., use of 

portable boiler . 
James Brigg's 
C. 0. Phefps, ladder . 
Warren Harvey, use of pipe 

wagon 
Drake & Dodge, cement 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co 

ironwork . 
for labor of men and teams 



114 34 


225 


50 


15 


43 


22 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 



325 26 



13 


00 


6 


95 


13 


50 


11 


20 


13 


00 


16 


00 


4 


05 


1 


50 


30 


00 


14 


40 


43 


60 


5,834 


34 



,757 94 



BRIDGE-STREET SEWER. 



To appropriation 



$5,000 00 



Dr. 

$5,000 00 



351 



Cr. 



Paid J. J. C^onnor, blacksmithing 
Hutchinson Bros., blacksmith- 
ing ..... 
Barnard & Pike, blacksmith- 
ing .... 
Concord Railroad, freight 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
T. A. Lane, Akron pipe, etc 
A. L, N. Robertson, lumber 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
Head & Dowst, lumber .- 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 
W. F. Head, brick 
Katt & W. F. Head, brick 
D. O. Furnald, rubber boots 
Gritfin & Conway, molasses 

cask .... 
J. Bean & Co., lard tierce 
for labor of men and teams 

By balance on hand 



$4 10 



7 7^ 



29 


30 


162 


00 


414 


27 


12 


78 


3 


00 


138 


04 


10 


22 


5 


06 




53 


e 74 


32 


. , 298 


90 


539 


00 


33 


00 


1 


00 




50 


. 3,018 


07 


248 


14 



$5,000 00 



WEBSTER-STREET SEWER. 



To appropriation .... |13,000 00 
John Foy, overdraft . . 8 75 

reserved fund, am't transferred 400 00 



Dr. 



S13,408 75 



352 



Cr. 



Paid D. 0. Furnald, rubber boots 


$51 00 


Harden & Woodbury, black- 




smithing .... 


120 55. 


Barnard & Pike, blacksmith- 




ing . . . . . 


24 53- 


Concord Railroad corporation, 




freight .... 


356 50 


T. A. Lane, hose, etc. . 


41 28 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


216 25 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


36 25 


A. L. N. Robertson, lumber . 


7 45 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


133 80 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware. 




etc 


251 39 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware, etc 


55 03 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 




etc 


60 04 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


1,164 36 


W. F. Head, brick 


372 40 


Il^att & W. F. Head, brick . 


1,406 30 


J. J. Connor, blacksmithing . 


43 90 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. , 




steel, etc 


14 98 


Avery Bros., lanterns, oils, etc. 


12 43 


Hutchinson Bros., castings 


13 23 


Manchester Locomotive 




Works .... 


19 65 


Thorp & Bartlett, tin dippers 


40 


L. Gutterson, oatmeal . 


3 50 


for labor of men and teams . 


8,989 95 




13 58 



$13,408 75 



353 
MAEST-STREET SEWER. 



To appropriation .... 
reserved fund, am't transferred 



Paid Pettee & Adams, cement 

Killey & Wadleigli, hardware 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware . 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware ..... 

D. F. Cressej, black&mithing 

T. A. Lane, Akron pipe 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 

A. ]^. Clapp, nails, soap, etc. 

H. Fradd & Co., kerosene oil, 

etc 3 73 

French & Dockham, kerosene 

oil, etc 1 35 

for labor of men and teams . 849 77 
By balance on hand . . . 6 13 



Dr. 



$1,000 00 




225 00 






$1,225 00 
Cr. 




$24 65 




55 04 




14 60 




1 44 




31 35 




226 98 




7 56 




2 40 





BRIDGES. 



$1,225 00 



Dr. 



To appropriation . . . $3,000 00 

W. H. Carpenter, old plank . 2 00 

Ira W. Moore, old plank sold . 3 50 

reserved fund, am't transferred 800 00 

By balance overdrawn . . . 434 14 



$4,239 64 



23 



354 



Cr. 



id J. J. Abbott, painting . 


132 14 


• Killey & Waclleigh, hardware 


5 10 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware ..... 


161 53 


L. M. Aldrich, himber and 




labor ..... 


6 06 


J. B. Kourse & Co., lumber and 




labor 


115 60 


Walter JSTeal, lumber and labor 


664 55 


J. 11. Ma^'uard, lumber and 




labor 


4 20 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


2,501 69 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


5 45 


D, Wells, lumber . 


27 31 


J. H. Ryder, lumbeV 


21 60 


for labor of men and teams . 


694 41 


COMMONS. 





To appropriation 



Paid J. H. Messer, stone 

Warren Harvey, stone . 
James Kennard, stone . 
T. A. Lane, fountain, etc. 
Hutchinson Bros., castings, etc. 
W. H. Vickery, repairing 

lawn mower, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, cement, etc. 



1,500 00 



14,239 64 



Dr. 





$3,500 00 




Or. 


$8 00 




103 75 




4 25 




367 80 




42 43 




10 10 




159 35 





355 



Paid George Holbrook, lumber, etc. 


$90 13 


S. M. Bennett, mason-work . 


34 50 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


1 05 


J. F. Conway 


1 95 


George Thompson, maple trees 


35 00 


C H. Robie, concreting 


251 76 


H. H. Huntress, plants . 


26 95 


A. B. Smith, plants 


40 00 


Pike & Heald, wateri\ig-pot . 


62 


Manchester Water- Works,wa- 




ter 


100 00 


S. A. Fling, gravel 


1 25 


J. McDerby, concreting 


55 00 


B. A. Stearns, loam 


7 50 


J. Stickney .... 


5 00 



J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron- 
work, etc 13 77 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 98 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 24 90 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware ..... 35 
for labor of men and teams . 1,563 44 
jBy reserved fund, am't transferred 300 00 
balance on hand . . . 250 17 



mCIDEJSTTAL EXPENSES. 



'To appropriation . . . . 


$5,000 00 


N". P. Hunt, overdraft 


80 


J. R. Weston, Shea vs. City , 


300 00 


H. G. Connor heirs, Shea vs 




City .... 


300 00 



1,500 00 



Dr. 



366 



To C. H. Burns, overdraft . . $25 00 
State of ITew Hampshire, boun- 
ty on wooclchucks . . 6 50 
balance overdrawn . . . 34,423 48 







V^' 


Cr. 


PaidTheodQre Longaway, damage 








to property 


$50 00 




Clara J. Forsaitli, injury to 








horse, etc 


49 


00 




Harriet Stewart, injury to per- 








son 


225 


00 




Margaret Lamere, injury to 








bedding .... 


20 


00 




Peter R. Lee, injury to person 


10 


00 




Lizzie Smith, injury to person 


100 


00 




A. A. Moore, injury to horse, 








etc 


50 


00 




C. H. Simpson, injury to 








horse, etc. . . 


125 


00 




Adolphus Benoit, injury to 








person .... 


1,616 


36 




John Shea, injury to person . 


1,200 


00 




Mehitable James, injury to 








person .... 


1,500 


00 




0. B. Laport, injury from 








water 


100 


00 




L. B. Bodwell & Co., injury to 








horse 


75 


00 




Amos S. Bean, bounty . 


50 


00 




James 0. Clark, judgment 


80 


79 




Jennie Annis, injury to person 


40 


00 




. Annie F. Searles . 


409 


12 





357 



Paid Thomas Jones, damage from 



water 


125 00 


Henry J. Merrill, judgment . 


125 06 


Michael Healy ,inj ury to i3erson 


75 00 


Eleanor B. Gilford, judgment 


400 00 


Calvin "W. Stevens, j udgment 


40 37 


Dr. E. H. Currier, profes- 




sional services . . • . 


25 00 


Dr. C. F. Bonney, professional 




services .... 


50 00 


Dr. L. B. How, professional 




services .... 


35 00 


Dr. J. M. Collity, professional 




services .... 


100 00 


A. C. Osgood, professional 




services .... 


165 00 


Joseph LeBoeuf, professional 




services .... 


2 50 


Sulloway, ToplifF, & O'Con- 




nor, professional services . 


100 00 


Briggs & Huse, professional 




services .... 


200 00 


C. H. Burns, professional ser- 




vices 


50 00 


D. C. Whittemore, allowance 




for care of road . 


20 00 


H. D. Lord, sheriff fees . 


1 98 


Moore & Preston, wood at 




pest-house .... 


4 50 


George "W. Prescott, witness 




fees 


54 92 


Frank Bourrassau, witness 




fees, etc 


75 92 


J. F. Cassidy, witness fees, etc. 


195 99 



358 



Paid Napoleon Davis, witness fees, 




etc 


146 60' 


Elzear Billy, witness fees, etc. 


4 00 


Henry Harmon, witness fees, 




etc 


14 34 


H. W . Longa, witness fees, etc. 


1 37 


C. H. Gr. Foss, witness fees . 


2 74 


Geo. F. Bosher, referee fees . 


5 00 


S. W. Parsons, referee fees . 


5 00 


Joseph F. Kennarcl, referee fees 


5 00 


Jos. H. Haynes, referee fees . 


5 00 


Nelson Billy, witness fees 


15 80 


Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. . 


58 43 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber, etc. . 


191 87 


J. Hodge, lumber, etc. . 


28 73 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


8 73 


J. B. Nourse & Co. , lumber, etc. 


1 20 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber . 


7 95 


James Dolan, whitewashing 




tree-boxes . 


62 80 


C. H. Simpson, teams . 


15 00' 


E. T. James, teams 


10 25 


James Bros., teams 


124 00 


Smith & Whitten, teams 


11 50 


J. F. Fox, teams . 


8 50 


Cavanaugh Bros., teams 


56 75 


W. J. Freeman, teams . 


10 00- 


C. C. Perry, teams 


5 00 


J. N. Foss, teams . 


1 00 


F. X. Chenette, teams . 


5 50' 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


75 35 


[ Union Publishing Co. , printing 


r 100 25 


Kendall & Ladd, printing 


9 40 


T. "W. Lane, stationery . 


55 



359 



Paid Temple & Farrington, blank 
books, etc. . . . . 
"W. H. Bennett, civil engineer 
H. W. Home, rodman . 
H. M. Young, rodman . 
Thomas F. Brown, rodman 
"W. D. Hunter, rodman . 

E. C. Bryant, rodman . 
George H. Allen, atlas, repair 

ing tapes, etc. 
J. A. Barker, care of boiler 

city library 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Manchester "Water- Works, wa 

ter .... 

F. S. Bodwell, watering 
trough, etc. 

George H. Stearns, allowance 

for team, etc. 
Weston & Hill, cloth for deco 

rating, etc. . 
Sampson, Murdock, & Co., di 

rectories . ' . 
T. A. Lane, iron fence, etc. 
J. B. McCrilHs & Son, iron 

work, etc. . 
S. B. Putnam, expenses to 

Concord 
J. B. Varick Co., hand gren 

ades, etc. . 

G. H. Wheeler, hitching-post 
Daniels Hardware Co., lawn 

seed, etc. .... 

Killey & Wadleigh, wire net- 

tino- . . . . . 



^355 30 

529 64 

477 38 

131 64 

29 62 

93 00 

13 50 

44 45 



122 


50 


21 


76 


341 


08 


120 


00 


147 


50 


213 


29 


22 


50 


270 


72 


41 


50 


1 


00 



415 10 

2 25 

1 05 
1 05 



360 



Paid Thorp & Bartlett, lamps, 




brooms, etc. 


$6 00 


Hutchinson Bros., castings, 




etc 


27 31 


Pike & Heald, drinking-cups, 




etc 


8 63 


W. H. Vickery, repairing 




locks, etc. . . . 


5 20 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 


6 75 


Charles Bunton,blacksmithing- 


1 00 




3 00 


George W. Dodge, hammock 




for pest-house 


2 00 


Timothy Connor, burjdng 




nuisances .... 


1 00 


William H. Hill, blacksmith- 




iiig 


7 50 


E. P. Richardson . 


12 95 


Harden & Woodbury, pedes- 




tals, etc 


49 76 


J. M. Collity, return of births 




and deaths .... 


6 00 


J. E. Lemaitre, return of 




births and deaths 


30 00 


W. W. Wilkins, return of 




births and deaths 


6 25 


J. M. Collity, return of births 




and deaths .... 


16 00 


L. M. French, return of births 




and deaths .... 


8 00 


George W. N^utter, return of 




births and deaths 


7 75 


Charles F. Flanders, return of 




births and deaths 


2 75 



361 



Paid L. B. How, return of births 

and deaths .... $6 75 

B. F. Green, return of births 

and deaths .... 50 

Luther Pattee, return of 

births and deaths . . 2 50 

Thomas Wheat, return of 

births and de^^ths . . 3 25 

C. F. Bonney, return of births 

and deaths .... 5 50 

James Sullivan, return of 

births and deaths . . 10 75 

J. E. A. Lanouette, return of 

births and deaths . . 13 00 

J. W. J). MacDonald, return 

of births and deaths . . 37 25 

H. W. Boutwell, return of 

births and deaths . . 5 75 

D. S. Adams, return of births 

and deaths .... 2 75 

J. P. Walker, return of births 

and deaths .... 2 50 

William A. Webster, return 

of births and deaths . . 75 

IS". P. Taplin, return of births 

and deaths .... 2 00 

J. W. Mooar, return of births 

and deaths .... 3 00 

H. T. Boutwell, return of 

births and deaths . . 8 75 

L. French, return of births 

and deaths . . . . 14 00 

A. D. Smith, return of births 

and deaths .... 1 75 



362 



Paid E. Mongeon, return of births 
and deaths .... 

George D. Towne, profes- 
sional services . 

J. A. Jackson, return of 
births and deaths 

J, G. Sturgis, return of births 
and deaths . 

C. M. Dodge, return of births 
and deaths . . . 

W. W. Wilkins, professional 
services .... 

George A. Crosby, profes- 
sional services . 

H. de W. Carvelle, return of 
births and deaths 

M. Richard, return of births 
and deaths .... 

John Ferguson, return of 
births and deaths 

George C. Hoitt, professional 
services .... 

C. M. Dodge, professional 
services .... 

James Sullivan, professional 
services .... 

J. R. Carr, painting, etc. 

J. J. Abbott, painting, etc. . 

Charles E. Austin, painting . 

Cogswell & Martain, painting 

William B. Abbott, painting 

C. H. Wood, painting . 

Joseph H. Beach . 

Condon Hotel 



15 00 

15 00 

12 50 

9 25 

6 00 
10 00 
36 50 

1 25 
10 50 
57 50 

5 00 

8 00 

55 00 
62 25 

2 25 

7 25 
45 85 

4 07 

75 

2 00 

9 30 



363 



Manufacturing 



Co. 



Paid Mary Read 
Elliott 

house numbers . 
'N. P. Kidder, return of births 

deaths, and marriages 
Mabel E. Chase, bounty on 

woodchueks 
0. E. Annis . 
F. S. Bodwell, stone 
W. L. Blenus, chair-pins 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
F. W. Garland, making elec 

tion return 
L. Searles, burying nui 

sances 
John Moss, watering-trough 
Ralph H. Beach, figures, etc 
Clague, SchHcht, & Field 

index .... 
Republican Press Association 

printing 
J. B. Unruh, numbers . 
County Commissioners . 
Will & Tracy, dynamo, gas 

lighter 
B. A. Stearns 
Thomas Franker, interpreter 
Warren Harvey, stone water- 
ing-troughs 
Dana W. King, recording 

deeds, etc 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

land . . . . . 
Forbes Lith. Co., bonds 



$2 


00 


14 


00 


334 


55 




20 


4 


50 


18 


20 


4 


80 




80 



1 00 

8 75 
6 00 

24 13 

9 00 



6 


75 


17 


15 


8 


00 


7 


00 


6 


63 


3 


00 


150 


00 


5 


16 


25,776 40 


130 


00 



364 



Paid Manchester ISTovelty Co. , rub- 
ber bands .... 
A. J. Lane, use of convey- 
ance book .... 
Western Union Tel. Co., tele- 
grams .... 
Geo. W. Adams, tax abated 
C. H. Wilkins, engrossing 
resolutions .... 
J. E. Stearns, use of team 
Manchester post-office, stamps 
J. H. Andrews, recording 

deed .... 
I. S. Coffin, trunk parting 
S. B. Putnam, auditing col 

lector's accounts 
L. Simons, cleaning clock 
Charles E. Cochran, witness 

fees .... 
George E. Morrill, clerical 

work, etc. . 
C. E. Crombie, trees 
S. A. Marston, stonework 
G. H. Wheeler, hitching-posts 
W. D. Gray, ladder 
A. D. Gooden, watering 

trough 
First 1:^. H. Battery, firing 

salute .... 
J. Horan, bounty on wood 

chuck .... 
!N". P. Kidder, making city 

report, etc. 
Isaiah Hoyt, bounty on wood 
chucks 



10 25 


15 


00 


3 


43 


1 


65 


5 


00 


7 


50 


6 


98 




64 




30 


25 


00 


1 


00 



1 37 



64 


74 


61 


00 


3 


50 


31 


00 


2 


16 


3 


00 


39 


75 




10 


150 


45 




30 



365 



aid Israel Dow, watering-trough 


13 00 


E. K. Rowell, watering-trough 


3 00 


J. B. Straw, distributing tax- 




bills ': .... 


64 00 


J. R. Bruce, decorating hall . 


9 30 


W. A. Carpenter, constable 




fees 


2 50 


Manchester Novelty Co., 




stamp .... 


2 00 


J. C. Bickford, professional 




services .... 


1 60 


George W. Adams, cradle, 




etc., at pest-house 


5 24 


F. Kimball, abatement tax, 




1883 


1 65 


W. K. Robbins 


10 00 


J. W. Mooar, burying nui- 




sances .... 


1 00 


L. Searles, burying nuisances 


31 75 


Timothy Sullivan, burying 




nuisances .... 


13 00 


E. C. Miller, burying nui- 




sances .... 


2 00 


J. W. Lewis & Co., burying 




nuisances .... 


12 50 


F. Allen, blacksmithing 


12 50 


Marden & Woodbury, black- 




smithing .... 


5 32 


Buff & Berger, repairing tran- 




sits, etc 


52 70 


Sampson, Davenport, & Co., 




directories .... 


17 00 


for labor of men and teams . 


409 81 



,055 78 



366 



PIXE GROVE CEMETERY. 



"To balance from old account, 
appropriation . 

B. A. Stearns, digging graves . 
S. B. Putnam, lots sold . 



PaidB. A. Stearns, superintendent 

W. H. Yickery, repairing 
lawn mower, etc. 

Palmer & Garmon, grave num 
bers .... 

J. J. Abbott, painting . 

J. R. Carr, painting 

Cavanaugli Bros. . 

Manchester Water- Works, wa- 
ter .... 

H. H. Huse, making report 
etc 

W. H. Bennett, engineering 

H. M. Young, engineering 

H. W. Home, engineering 

Thos. F. Brown, engineering 

Stark Mills, loam . 

Patrick Kean, loam ^ 

Dr. J. Sullivan, loam 

Head & Dowst, screen doors 
etc. .... 

J. Hodge, lumber . 

J. F. Seaward, building house 
etc 



Dr. 



$1,169 90 

5,875 00 

831 53 

1,974 48 


$9,850 91 




$887 75 


Or. 


3 00 




29 70 

2 55 
20 85 

3 00 





200 00 



00 



34 87 


16 


13 


26 


26 


2 


63 


606 


61 


15 


75 


225 


00 


14 


13 


26 


67 



973 25 



367 



Paid Hutchinson Bros., signs, 
posts, etc. .... 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware .... 
J. B. Variclv Co., hardware 
Pike & Heald, hardware 
T. A. Lane, pipe, etc. . 
J. W. Manning, shrubs, etc. 
L. A. Proctor, maple trees 
John Francis, plants 
H. H. Huntress, plants . 
F. B. Potter . 
Temple & Farrington, blank 

books, etc. . 
O. D. Kimball, printing 
Campbell & Williams, printing 
Union Publishing Co. , printing 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 

C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 
ing .... 

Paine's Furn. Co. . 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

D. J. Jones, castings 
D. S. & I. Works, exchange of 

safes .... 
Higgins Bros., chairs, etc. 

F. D. McAllister, fence, etc. 
■C. H. Simpson, use of hack 
Weston & Hill, lignitect, etc 
W. M. Butterfield, profes 

sional services 
-Grustave Muller, painting 



$69 87 

6 31 
139 83 

22 56 
463 29 
105 40 

15 00 
5 50 

17 50 

3 25 

51 53 

8 50 
2 50 
20 00 
19 37 
19 75 
10 20 

2 26 
89 50 

7 00 
5 52 

135 00 
26 35 
75 00 

4 00 
71 09 

7 75 
129 00 



368 



Paid Redding, Baird, & Co., glass . $9 04 

J. Sticknej, rubber door-mat 3 50 

for labor of men and teams . 2,585 33 

By balance on hand . . . 2,607 06 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . . 
F. B. Balch, digging graves 
C. H. G. Foss, digging graves 



Paid F. B. Balch, superintendent . 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 

Hutchinson Bros., ironwork . 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. . 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 
etc 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, etc. 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc. .... 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 

J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith- 

ing 1 00 

Manchester "Water-Works, wa- 
ter 106 15 

W. H. Bennett, engineering . 13 50 

H. W. Home, engineering . 6 12 

H. M. Young, engineering . 4 88 



19,850 91 



De. 



$317 


54 


1,500 


00 


54 


50 


845 


56 


$120 


25^ 


535 


50 


2 


43 


28 


79 


3 


98 


57 42 


10 


75 


39 


45 


268 


60 



$2,717 60' 
Cr. 



369 



Paid Thos. F. Brown, engineering 


|1 50 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


28 94 


George Wbitforcl, loam . 


262 08 


J. ]^. Heath, loam , 


60 88 


J, W. Lathe, loam 


11 25 


J. D. Patterson, loam 


6 00 


F. E. Yarnum & Co., loam 


10 00 


G. B. Brown, manure . 


10 50 


Temple & Farrington, station 




ery .... 


6 00 


W. H. Vickery, repairins 




lawn mower, etc. 


] 3 65 


C. H. Robie, loam . 


25 50 


H. H. Huntress, flowers 


19 70 


D. A. Simons, door-mat, fur 




niture, etc. . 


33 15 


C. H. Wood, painting signs 


24 37 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


2 73 


E. A. Parkhurst, trees . 


31 00 


J. R. Carr, painting 


27 14 


Isaac S. Coffin, stove 


12 00 


for labor of men and teams 


853 19 


By balance on hand 


89 20 




«o 717 fio 




^Zi, / JL < Dv 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $16,000 00 
T. W. Lane, old hose sold . 57 61 
0. E. Kimball, old supply wag- 
on sold .... 75 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 965 37 



Dr, 



$17,097 98' 



u 



370 



Cr. 



lidAmoskeag S. F. E. Co. I^o. 1 


$1,135 


00 


K S. Bean S. F. E. Co. ^o. 4 


1,128 


75 


Pennacook Hose Co. ISTo. 1 . 


1,545 


00 


Massabesic Hose Co. iN'o. 2 . 


995 


00 


E. W. Harrington Co. ]^o. 3 . 


995 


00 


Merrimack Hose Co. J^o. 4. . 


995 


00 


Excelsior Hook and Ladder 






Co. ¥o. 1 . 


1,935 


00 


Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. ^o. 1, 






labor Jnly 4 . . . 


6 


00 


Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. No. 1, 






lighter .... 


5 


00 


K S. Bean S. F. E. Co. No. 4, 






labor July 4 . . . 


6 


00 


Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, 






labor July 4 . . . 


6 


00 


Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2, 






labor July 4 . . . 


6 


00 


E. W. Harrington Hose Co. 






No. 3, labor July 4 . 


6 


00 


Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4, 






labor July 4 . . . 


6 


00 


Excelsior Hook and Ladder 






Co., labor July 4. 


6 


00 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


431 


36 


Manchester Water-Works, wa- 






ter 


1,046 


42 


W. L. Blenus, driver Penna- 






cook Hose .... 


670 


91 


Jeremiah Lane, driver N. S. 






Bean S. F. E. Co. No. 4 . 


229 


25 


iGeo. W. Butterfield, driver 






Amoskeag S. F. E. Co. No. 1 


71 


50 



371 



Paid A. B. Gushing, driver N. S. 

Bean S. F. E. Co. ^o. 4 . $36 50 

Walter Seaward, driver Mas- 

sabesic Hose Co. N"©. 2 . 130 00 

Chas. H. Rogers, driver Am- 

oskeag S. F. E. Co. ]^o. 1 . 171 00 
vOharles M. Denyou, driver 

Hook and Ladder . . 474 50 

J. T. O'Dowd, driver E. W. 

Harrington Hose Co. Ko. 3 343 50 

A. E. Foster, driver Merri- 
mack Hose Co. :N"o. 4 . 80 00 

Oharles S. Brown, sub-driver 

Massabesic Hose Co. N^o. 2 33 50 

M. W. Ford, Jr., driver sup- 
ply wagon , . . , 98 00 

John Shea, sub-driver E. "W. 

Harrington Hose Co. . . 3 00 

^New England Telegraph & 

Telephone Co., telephones . 54 16 

Thorp & Bartlett, repairing 

stoves, etc 10 27 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc 66 82 

J. B.Yarick Co., hardware, etc. 2 93 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc 21 51 

Weston & Hill ... 2 25 

Barnard & Pike, blacksmithing 9 00 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 16 71 

D. F. Cressey & Co., black- 
smithing .... 1 25 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 6 56 

;Stephen Gardner, care of boiler 159 00 



372 



Paid L. Gutterson, matches, etc. 
H. Fradd & Co., matches, etc 
G-eorge C. Lord, matches, etc 
D. A. Simons, office chairs, etc 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood .... 
T. W. Lane, cash paid for 
shoveUng out hydrants, etc 

D. S. Ames, repairing harness 
etc 

E. W. Kimball, repairing har 
ness .... 

Concord Railroad, freight 

Temple & Farrington, window 
shades, etc. 

J. B. Clarke, printing . 

H. C. Ranno, repairing har^ 
ness, etc. 

Fuller, Leonard, & Small, re- 
pairing fireman's coat, etc. 

A. C. Wallace, wood 

James Bros., teams 

J. B. McCrilUs & Son, iron 
work, etc. . 

Woodbury & Fellows, iron 
work .... 

American Fire Hose Co., re 
pairing hose, etc. 

Samuel Eastman & Co., re 
pairing hose, etc. 

C. H. Hodgman & Co., trucking 

Seth W. Fuller, electric door- 
pull 

Higgins Bros,, chairs, etc. 



$6 


27 


4 


34 


1 


04 


34 


42 


1,012 


37 


16 


60 


41 


15 


1 


00 


11 


71 


29 


83 


36 


25 



45 85 





90 


3 


75 


8 


00 


73 


40 


14 


75 


1 


95 


5 


90 


1 


00 


2 


00 


9 


75 



373 



Paid Manchester Locomotive 
Works, repairing steamer 
etc 

George A. Davis . 

G. M. Bowditch, Hook and 
Ladder truck 

Scollay & Poor, J. P. S. polish 

Talbot & Co., reefers 

Benton Bros., matches, etc. 

B. P. Bell, oil, etc. 
W. F. Wheeler . 

J. B. Smith, electric gas light 
ing .... 

C. Callahan, shut-off nozzle 

D. M. Goodwin, brooms 
C. H. Bowker, teaming . 
Charles T. Kewman, sponges 

etc 

J. A. McCrillis, expenses to 
Boston ... 

E. M. Bryant, hand vise 
J. R. Carr, painting 

!N^. S. Bean, examining steam 

ers .... 
A.^Erickson . 
Harden Hand Grenade Co. 

grenades ... 
S. L. Flanders, matches, etc. 
T. W. Lane, chief engineer 
O. E. Kimball, assistant engi 

neer . . . . , 
J. F. Pherson, assistant engi' 

neer .... 



$46 05 


2 


25 


1,700 


00 


3 


80 


117 


50 


2 47 


25 


90 


3 


50 


64 


45 


15 


00 


5 


00 


1 


25 



1 35 



3 


75 


1 


85 


1 


35 


12 


00 


22 


00 


30 


00 


2 


63 


300 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 



374 

Paid Horatio Fradd, assistant engi- 
neer ..... 
Fred S. Bean, assistant engi- 
neer and clerk . 



$100 00 

128 00 



$17,097 98^ 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... $5,500 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 2,000 00 





$7,500 00^ 




Cr.. 


Paid Tristram Berry, superintend- 




ent 


$100 00 


J. B. Smith, superintendent . 


238 00 


George A. Davis, labor . 


13 88' 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


90 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 




etc 


2 08 


A. D. Smith, blue vitriol 


44 98 


D. B. Varney, copper . 


2 62 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


3 25 


T. W. Lane, use of horse 


3 00 


Concord Railroad corporation, 




freight .... 


25 


Trefethen & Moore, repairing 




clock ..... 


75 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 


1 80 


C. B. Littlefield, chemicals . 


1 55 


Washburn & Moen Manufac- 




turing Co., wire . 


14 49 



375 



Paid J. H. Bunnell & Co., jars 

George E. Hall, chemicals 

James Bros., teams 

J. B. I^ourse & Co., lumber, 
etc 

C. H. Hoclgman, trucking, etc. 

Weeks & Potter, blue vitriol . 

A. H. Lowell, zincs 

Barnard & Pike, irouAvork 

W. A. Arthur, labor 

Edwin Rogers, insulated wire, 
etc. . . . . . 

Manchester District Telegraph 
Co. 

Beth W. Fuller & Holtzer, jars 

C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 
ing 

C. H. Bowker^ 

C. C. Perry, team . 

Charles L. Bly, hydrometer 

J. J. Abbott, painting . 

J. A. & W. Bird & Co., blue 
vitriol 

A. H. Paige 

Edwin Rogers, repairing fire 
alarm telegraph 
By balance on hand 



trucking 



$34 01 




50 


5 


00 


15 


81 


• 7 


98 


28 


35 


75 


50 


7 


25 


3 


50 



107 85 

2 33 
9 60 

1 00 
5 25 

2 00 
1 25 

7 77 

30 58 
1 70 

6,000 00 

725 22 



$7,500 00 



376 



HYDEANT SERVICE. 

To appropriation . . . . |18,500 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 700 00 



Dr. 



$19,200 00 
Cr. 



Paid ManchesterWater- Works, wa- 
ter 119,150 00 

By balance on hand ... . 50 00 



$19,200 00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation . . . .$20,000 00 
J. C. Bickford, costs and fees . 1,163 67 
M. J. Jenkins, costs and fines . 2,174 01 
"Western Union Telegraph Co., 

overdraft .... 2 36 

balance overdrawn . . . 4,832 88 



Dr. 



Paid]^. P. Hunt, judge 

I. L. Heath, special justice 
J. C. Bickford, clerk 
M. J. Jenkins, marshal . 
M. J. Jenkins, witness fees, etc 
Eben Carr, assistant marshal 
H.W. Longa, assistant marshal 
H. W. Longa, team 





— $28, 


172 

Cr 


92 


. $1,500 


00 






160 


00 






600 


00 






855 


00 






438 


05 






12 


00 






I 688 


00 






128 


00 







377 



Paid Edward Farrar, captain 
George E. Glines, captain 
Hiram Stearns, sergeant 
"W. H. B. i^ewhall, sergeant 
J. Bncklin, night patrol 
L. Tebbetts, night patrol 
L. M. Streeter, night patrol 
Jeremiah Mnrphy , night patrol 
J. C. Colburn, day patrol 
J. F. Dunn, night patrol 
J. F. Dunn, special patrol 
I. P. Fellows, night patrol 
H. Harmon, night patrol 

B. N. Wilson, night patrol 
Charles S. Browt, night patrol 
P. Eeischer, night patrol 

M. Fox, night patrol 
T. Frain, night patrol . 

F. Bonrrassau, night patrol 
M. Marr, night patrol . 
A. Helie, night patrol . 
D. McEvoy, night patrol 
J. Floyd, night patrol . 
T. P. Shea, night patrol 

S. L. Mitchell, night patrol 
R. W. Bean, da}^ patrol . 
J. F. Cassidy, day patrol 

C. H. Reed, day patrol . 
Merrill Farmer, night patrol 

G. A. Lovejoy, night patrol 
Ed. C. Emerson, night patrol 
A. J. Mayhew, night patrol 
C. M. Stevens, night patrol 
G. W. Goodwin, night patrol 



$31 50 
812 2o 

28 00 
742 00 
718 00 
732*00 

28 00 
776 00 

28 00 

28 00 
404 00 

38 00 
801 00 
824 00 

28 00 
701 00 

733 00 
815 00 
757 00 

28 00 
28 00 
808 00 
750 00 
808 00 
752 00 
696 00 

734 00 
707 00 
768 00 
733 00 
727 00 
691 00 
733 00 
631 00 



378 



Paid Ed. H. Holmes, night patrol 
Joseph Murphy, night patrol 
Patrick Dobbin, special patrol 
J. Berry, special patrol . 
M. Eedd^i, special patrol 
M. Tremblay, special patrol . 
C. A. Burbank, special patrol 
J. Pronk, special patrol . 
George Howard, special patrol 
George W. Varnum, special 

patrol . . . . . 
E. G, Woodman, special 

patrol .... 
J. K. Rhodes, special patrol 
W. Ward, special patrol 
Wm, Stevens, special patrol 
H. H. Philbrick, special 

patrol .... 
P. Hickey, special patrol 
George W. Langmaid, special 

patrol . . . 
R. A. Challis, special patrol 

E. P. Cogswell, special 
patrol . 

G. D. Woodbiir}^ special 

patrol 
Thomas 

patrol 

Jules Faucher, special patrol 
James Farley, special patrol 
Ludger Seguin, special patrol 
L. 0. Fowler, special patrol 
M. L. Brown, special patrol 

F. A. Brown, special patrol 



Franker, special 



^740 00 

793 00 

99 00 

15 00 
114 00 

2 00 
24 00 

3 00 

19 00 

4 00 

24 00 
162 50 

5 00 
5 00 

13 00 

16 00 

3 00 
1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

10 00 

5 00 

15 00 

18 00 

20 00 

4 00 

5 00 



379 



Paid Ed. Gueriii, special patrol . $2 00 

S. S. Carr, special patrol . 3 00 

A. C. Martin, special patrol . 5 00 

Robert Stewart, special patrol 6 00 

D. Jackson, special patrol . 6 00 

J. G. Smith, special patrol . 23 00 

James Dupe, special patrol . 18 00 

C. D. Emerson, special patrol 13 00 
A. C. Manning, special patrol 5 00 
G. M. Baucher, special patrol 6 00 
Archie Hill, special patrol . 13 00 
L. Sanborn, special patrol . 7 00 
Charles Sleeper, special patrol 2 00 
Eli Provencher, special patrol 12 00 
J. Larock, special patrol . 5 00 
L. Sullivan, special patrol . 6 00 
G. L. Sibley, special patrol . 10 00 
Thomas Dobbin, special patrol 4 00 
John Lane, special patrol . 6 00 
A. Foster, special patrol . 2 00 
James Lathe, special patrol . 9 00 
Glory Bushey, special patrol . 8 00 

D. F, O'Connor, professional 

services .... 2 00 
J. B. Pattee, professional ser- 
vices . . . . . 2 00 
M. J. Healy, professional ser- 
vices 2 00 

Thomas Franker, janitor . 379 84 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 

' ware, etc. . . . . 15 64 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 1 01 



380 



Paid Killey & "Wadleigh, hardware 




etc. .... 


$24 13 


Manchester Water-W brks, wa- 




ter ... . 


169 70 


L. M. Aldrich, carpenter 




work .... 


51 05 


Charles F. Spragiie, flannel 




etc 


8 24 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


513 28 


K E. T. & T. Co., telephones 


100 25 


l^oyes Manufacturing Co. 




gas regulator 


50 00 


Daniel Davis, meals for pris 




oners .... 


313 80 


Western Union Tel. Co., tele 




grams. 


42 15 


George E. Hall . 


4 15 


J. F. Fox, teams . 


2 75 


J. G. Jones, teams . 


2 75 


F. X. Chenette. teams . 


1 50 


J, IS". Foss, teams . 


3 00 


James Bros., teams 


13 25 


E. T. James, teams 


18 50 


Campbell & Williams, print- 




ing . . . . 


74 50 


•John B. Clarke, printing 


143 56 


Union Publishing Co., print 




ing .... 


16 00 


Kendall & Ladd, printing 


5 00 


0. D. Kimball, printing . 


4 50 


Temple & Farrington, station 




ery, etc. 


22 69 


T. W. Lane, stationery, etc. . 


28 71 



381 



id D. Evans & Co., coat and vest 




buttons .... 


$40 00 


Smith & Bly, crackers . 


40 65 


C. M. Bailey, tissue paper, 




etc 


15 00 


W. W. Owen, washing blan- 




kets, etc 


6 00 


Avery Bros 


50 


H. Fradd & Co., pails and 




nriatches .... 


39 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal, 




etc 


40 00 


J. F. Gillis, boxes . 


50 


R. D. Gay, shades, cords, etc. 


6 70 


Batch elder, Fairbanks, & Co., 




hack ..... 


75 


J. P. Lovell, merchandise 


4 75 


Clague, Schlicht, & Field, in- 




dex, file, etc. 


4 50 


Henry Gorman, brooms, 




matches, etc. . 


2 12 


Trefethen & Moore, clocks, 




etc 


12 50 


Dr. 0. D. Abbott, professional 




services .... 


3 00 


L. Gutterson, brooms, etc. 


6 13 


W. H. Vickery, keys 


1 00 


C. H. Wood, signs 


4 90 


Mrs. Thomas Franker, care 




lost children 


6 00 


Mrs. John Daniels, washing 




blankets .... 


3 50 


Sampson, Davenport, & Co., 




directory .... 


5 00 



382 



Paid Frances Franker, washing 

blankets, etc. 
Mrs. A. B. Brown, matron 
L. Gutterson, matches, soap 

etc. .... 
D. K. White, special patrol 
A. B. Brown, matron . 
G. F. Bosher & Co. 
T. L. Thorpe 
H. J. Matthews 
Pike & Heald, dippers, etc. 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 



$13 25 
90 00 

16 43 

8 00 
58 00 

3 75 

■ 2 20 

3 22 

9 87 
456 06 



$28,172 92 



CITY HALL. 

To appropriation . . . . $1,000 00 
G. F. Bosher & Co., old iron 



Dr. 



sold 


24 86 




City Library, coal . 


210 00 




new police station, coal . 


346 90 




rents 


2,562 50 


$4,144 26 










Cr. 


Paid Helen B. Holden, scrubbing,- 






etc 


$17 15 




Celinda Germain, scrubbing, 


« 




etc 


57 50 




K E. T. & T. Co., telephones 


41 00 




L. M. Aldrich, carpenter-work 


7 73 




George Holbrook, carpenter- 






work 


7 35 





383 



Paid George H. Dudley, carpenter- 
work . ' . 
"W. W. Ireland, carpenter-work 
Head &T)owst, carpenter-work 
J. B.JSTourse & Co., carpenter- 
work .... 
J. Br^'son, Jr., painting 
Joel Daniels & Co., painting 
C. H. Wood, painting signs 

etc. .... 
J. E. Carr, painting 
W. H. Vickerj', keys, bolts 

etc. .... 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
Manchester Water-Works, wa 

ter .... 
Weston & Hill, rope matting 

etc. .... 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, etc 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard 

ware, etc. . 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 

etc. . . . • 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc 
L. Gutterson, matches, etc. 
J. A. Barker, awnings, etc. 
W. D. Graves, ladder 
F. S. Bodwell, stone step 
R. J. Donnelly, plumbing 
B. W. Robinson, mason-work 
Bennett & Lord, mason-work 
J. C. Young, repairing roof . 
-C. M. Bailey, paper 



124 65 


244 


91 


197 


80 




85 


30 


04 


29 


74 


3 


70 


125 


78 


4 


75 


223 


10 



953 40 

40 77 

170 11 

4 00 

12 22 

•19 80 

11 91 

4 01 

30 00 

2 16 

11 00 
4 50 

76 29 

12 25 
9 52 

92 



384 



Paid Charles Biinton, blacksmith- 



i"g 


$4 80 


Drake & Dodge 


10 25 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 




wood 


350 01 


Mrs. M. P. Barker, making 




awning .... 


14 00 


D. A. Simons, office tables 


9 50 


Trefethen & Moore, repairing 




clock, etc 


6 00 


Otis "Whidden, sawing wood . 


50 


Patrick Moran, brooms . 


1 20 


E. F. Page & Co., telephone 




resonanter .... 


3 00 


Thorp & Bartlett, plumbing, 




etc 


150 95 


Drake & Dodge 


10 25 


Temple &Farrington, opaque. 




etc 


5 20 


for labor of men and teams . 


75 00 


By reserved fund, am't transferred 


600 00 


balance on hand 


529 69 







,144 26- 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



To appropriation .... $1,500 00 



Paid Campbell & Williams . . $68 50 
0. D. Kimball ... 4 00 

John B. Clarke . . . 1,026 38 



Dr. 

$1,500 00 
Cr. 



385 



Paid T. H. Tuson 


U 75 


Manchester post-office . 


2.3 84 


Temple & Farrington 


35 90 


C. P. Buckman & Co. . 


1 50 


T. W. Lane . 


13 22 


Novelty Advertising Co. 


1 00 


By reserved fund, am't transferred 200 00 


balance on hand 


123 91 




"ifil fiOO 00 


• 





REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... $1,800 00 
T. A. Lane, overdraft . . 36 98 
fuel, amount transferred . . 1,600 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 1,000 00 



Paid T. A. Lane, steam-piping, etc. 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 
J. B. Nourse & Co., lumber 

and labor .... 
Nourse & Ham, lumber] and 

labor ..... 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor ..... 
George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor ..... 
J. F. Seaward, lumber and 

labor 

25 





— 


$4,436 98 






Cr. 


$805 06 




71 


27 




232 


74 




11 


50 




78 


21 




12 


51 




28 


28 





386 



Paid A. L, 'N. Robertson, lumber 

and labor . 
George H. Dudley, lumber 

and labor . 
T>. H. Morgan, labor 
Tristram Berry, labor . 
Oeorge Holbrook, lumber and 

labor .... 
William W. Ireland, lumber 

and labor . 
Head & Dowst, lumber 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber 
J. Bryson, Jr., painting 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
Z. B. Stuart, painting . 
J. R. Carr, painting 
William B. Abbott, painting 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, lum 

ber, etc. 
L. N. Dutrain, urinals, etc. 
Bennett & Lord, plastering 

etc 

F. B. Potter, mason-work 
Harden & Woodbury, stone 

work .... 
Hutchinson Bros., blacksmith 

ing .... 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc. . 
J. B. Varick, hardware, etc 
Pike & Head, plumbing, etc 
>Charles H. liobie, concreting 



$47 30 

43 00 

2 00 

12 00 

41 91 



4 


20 


15 


03 


8 


53 


148 


71 


6 


35 


369 


93 


42 


49 


190 


99 


378 


98 


222 


00 


136 


58 


20 


88 


32 


75 


25 


36 



13 12 

4 10 

42 52 

5 78 
73 49 

117 56 



387 



Paid Drake & Dodge, cement 


$6 20 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


1 45 


Warren Harvey, stone . 


24 25 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 




fire-clay .... 


3 85 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


7 68 


Temple & Farrington, shades, 




etc 


11 40 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 




tising . . 


7 00 


J. C. Young, repairing roofs . 


488 10 


J. P. Dearborn 


60 


G. R. Vance & Co., smoke- 




stack ..... 


3 75 


A. Bodwell & Son, stone- 




work 


1 60 


A. H. Lowell, iron-work 


9 05 


for labor of men and teams . 


491 68 


By balance on hand 


134 34 



,436 98 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$89 84 




appropriation . . • . 


4,000 00 


$4,089 84 










Cr. 


Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$276 48 




M. J. Buncher, librarian 


800 00 




H. E. Martin, assistant libra- 






rian ..... 


177 00 




G. W. Burleigh, assistant libra- 






rian 


77 00 





388 



Paid Temple & Farrington, binding 




books, etc 


$300 21 


0. D. Kimball., printing 


203 14 


Manchester Water-Works, wa- 




ter . . . . . 


16 00 


L. B. Clough, insurance 


100 00 


M. R. Marshall & Co. . 


3 50 


L. B. Bodwell^& Co., coal and 




wood ..... 


403 60 


i^. P. Hunt, postage, etc. 


1 80 


Trustees, for books 


1,000 00 


Daniels Hardware Co., repair- 




ing hose .... 


50 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


11 00 


J. J. Abbott, glazing 


1 00 


By balance on hand 


718 61 


MH^ITIA. 





To appropriation 



$800 00 



PaidAmoskeag Veterans 


. $100 00 


Headquarters 1st Regt. N. Q 


100 00 


1st I^. H. Battery . 


100 00 


Sheridan Guards . 


100 00 


Manchester Cadets 


100 00 


Manchester War Veterans 


100 00 


Manchester City Guards 


100 00 


By balance on hand 


100 00 



t,089 84 



Dr. 

$800 00 
Cr. 



$800 00 



389 



PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $19,500 00 

119,500 00 

Or. 
Paid city bonds .... $17,000 00 
Suncook Valley R. R. bonds . 1,500 00 
By balance on band . . . 1,000 00 

$19,500 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $1,500 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 500 00 

$2,000 00 

Cr. 
Paid sundr}^ persons . . . $1,918 72 
By balance on hand . . . 81 28 

$2,000 00 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $7,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 988 50 

$7,988 50 

Or. 
Paid J. B. Straw, collector . . $7,988 50 

$7,988 50 



390 



STATE TAX. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $48,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 404 00 

$48,404 00 

Cr. 
Paid S. A. Carter, state treasurer . $48,404 00 

. 148,404 00- 



COUNTY TAX. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $35,000 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 237 74 

$85,237 74 

Cr. 
PaidD. F. Clark, county treasurer $35,237 74 

$35,237 74 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $12,000 00 
F. W. Ranno, overdraft . . 5 00 

reserved fund, am't transferred 1,500 00 

$13,505 00> 

Cr. 
Paid H. B. Putnam, mayor . . $27 11 
George H. Stearns, mayor . 1,775 00 
J. A. Barker, messenger . 699 96 



391 



Paid Wm. E. Buck, superintendent 

of schools . 
S. B. Putnam, city treasurer 
Geo, H. Allen, city engineer 
]^. P. Kidder, city clerk 
Geo. W. Prescott, city solicitor 
J. M. Collity, city physician 
Geo. E. Morrill, tax collector 
J. B. Straw, tax collector 
Judith Sherer, matron at pest 

house .... 

C. S. Fisher, assessor 
P. A. Devine, assessor . 

D. O. Furnald, assessor . 
G. W. Weeks, assessor . 

C. H. Brown, assessor . 
Pius Brown, assessor 
F. B. Potter, assessor 
George H. Dudley, assessor 
J. E. Stearns, assessor . 
Isaac • Whittemore, assistant 

assessor .... 
P. P. Silver, assistant assessor 
Joseph Levesque, assistant 

assessor . . . . 

E. C. Bryant, assistant asses- 
sor . . . . . 

N. Mchols, assistant assessor 
Wm. H. Maxwell, clerk of 
overseers of poor 

D. K. White, milk inspector 
P. D. Harrison, clerk of com- 
mon council 

George H. Colby, selectman . 



$1,800 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

900 00 

375 00 

100 00 

1,188 53 

400 00 

360 00 
207 50 
128 00 
392 00 
430 00 
189 00 
137 50 
142 50 
167 00 
140 00 

47 50 

32 50 

30 00 



30 


00 


240 


00 


75 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 



392 



Paid George C. Kemp, selectman 


12 50 


John Sheelian, selectman 


5 00 


James M. Chase, selectman . 


2 50 


W. E. Holt, selectman . 


2 50 


Henry Hunter, selectmen 


2 50 


J. F. Bohan, ward clerk 


5 00 


A. "W. Eastman, ward clerk . 


5 00 


D. J. Ahern, selectman . 


5 00 


John Dowst, supervisor 


4 00 


B. L. Hartshorn, supervisor . 


4 00 


S. S. Piper, supervisor . 


3 00 


Benjamin Spofford, supervisor 


3 00 


Hiram Hill, moderator . 


3 00 


A. G. Savory, moderator 


1 50 


J. ~R. Carr, selectman . 


10 00 


Jos. P. Fellows, selectman 


5 00 


Patrick Kelly, selectman 


5 00 


Isaac Whittemore, inspector . 


15 75 


H. D. Lord, inspector . 


23 62 


C. W. Quimby, supervisor 


2 25 


George H. Stearns, ex-officio 




overseer of poor 


25 00 


William H. Maxwell, over- 




seer of poor 


25 00 


T. L, Quimby, overseer of 




poor ..... 


25 00 


James Sutcliffe, overseer of 




poor 


25 00 


Horace Gordon, overseer of 




poor 


25 00 


Thomas P. Conway, overseer 




of poor .... 


25 00 


Charles Francis, overseer of 




poor 


25 00 



393 



Paid E. G. Woodman, overseer of 

poor $25 00 

"William Weber, overseer of 

poor 25 00 

C. H, Manning, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

George H. Stearns, ex-officio 

member of school board . 10 00 

George M. True, ex-officio ' 

member of school board . 10 00 

A. C, Heath, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

B. C. Dean, member of school 

board .... 10 00 

W. C. Clarke, member of 

school board ... 10 00 

J. E, Dodge, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

'N. P. Hunt, member of school 

board 10 00 

:S. D. Lord, member of school 

board 10 00 

S. W. Clarke, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

C. A. O'Connor, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

T. F. Collins, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

H. H. Huse, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

J. J. Abbott, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

E. 'F. Jones, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 



394 



Paid E. F. Jones, clerk of school 

board .$100 00 

F. B. Potter, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

J. G. Dearborn, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

T. J. Howard, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

By balance on hand • . . . 665 78 



$13,505 00 



FIREMEN'S PARADE. 
To appropriation .... |300 00 



Paid T. W. Lane, stationery . 
T. A. Barker, caterer . 
First Regiment Band 
Manchester War Veterans' 

drum corps 
Maxwell & Campbell 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 

By balance on hand 



14 08 


211 


50 


53 


00 


12 


00 


2 


00 


7 


50 


9 


92 



Dr. 

1300 00 
Cr. 



$300 00 



DECORATD^TGl SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $200 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 9 25 

$209 25 



395 

Cr. 
Paid Louis Bell Post, No. 3, 

G. A. E $200 00 

for labor of men and teams . 9 25 

$209 25- 



LAOT). 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $1,500 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 144 25 



[ A. D. Gooden, et al. . . $776 25 
George W. Wilkins . . 518 00 
H. P. Simpson ... 350 00 


Cr. 
$1,644 25 




WOMEN'S AID HOSPITAL. 


Dr. 



To reserved fund, am't transferred $400 00 

$400 00 

Cr. 
Paid Mrs. Aretas Blood, treasurer $400 00 

$400 00 



MANCHESTER WATER-WORKS. 

Dr. 
To balance from old account . $27,157 37 
C. K. Walker, water rents . 80,404 12 

$107,561 49' 



396 



Cr. 



Paid interest, amount transferred |38,000 00 


Charles K. Walker, superin- 




tendent .... 


1,592 84 


A. E. Stearns, clerk . 


1,200 00 


• Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 




packing, etc. . 


47 52 


Leonard & Ellis, machine oil, 




etc. .... 


131 26 


Cunningham Iron-Works, 




iron pipe, etc. . 


419 67 


Jarechi, Hayes, & Co., stop- 




cocks, etc. 


110 90 


E. D. Wood& Co., iron pipe, 




etc. .... 


14,236 53 


ISTational Meter Co., meters. 




etc. 


962 20 


Union Water-Meter Co., 




meters, etc. 


287 65 


Coffin Valve Co., hydrants, 




etc. .... 


871 00 


Grloucester Iron- Works, iron 




pipe, etc. 


1,500 41 


Ward Hurley, cocks, clamps. 




etc 


60 75 


Oity of Lowell . 


2 28 


Pattee & Draper, hydrants . 


165 00 


Mowry & Phillips, pig lead 


83 76 


F. C. Davenport, melting- 




ladles .... 


4 50 


H. R. Worthington, meters. 




etc. .... 


42 24 


Purditt & White, pipe clay 


4 50 


Boston Lead Manufacturing 




Co., pig load . 


433 48 



397 



aid Edson Manufacturing Co., 




suction hose . 


45 60 


Mow.ry & Phillips, solder . 


13 00 


Boston Machine Co., hy- 




drants, etc. 


81 05 


Bramon, Dow, & Co. 


66 


J. Hodge, lumber 


5 77 


D. I. Mahoney, lumber 


45 57 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber 


16 40 


Head & Dowst, lumber 


26 64 


E. A. G. Holmes, lumber, 




etc 


11 90 


Concord Railroad corpora- 




tion, freight 


1,680 87 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware, etc. 


40 20 


Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 




ware, etc. 


100 17 


J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 




etc. .... 


87 65 


K E. T. & T. Co., telephones 


72 40 


Albert W. Palmer 


21 00 


John B. Clarke, printing . 


69 00 


Union Publishing Co., print- 




ing, etc. .... 


133 80 


Campbell & Williams, print- 




ing .... 


2 50 


Temple & Farrington, sta- 




tionery .... 


13 71 


Fletcher & Hutchinson, 




meals, etc. 


430 00 


James R. Carr, painting 


189 94 


Hutchinson Bros., iron- 




work, etc. 


295 88 



398 



Taid P. C. Cheney Co., waste, etc. 


16 32 


D. F. Cressey, blacksmith- 




in^^ ..... 


11 65 


Charles Biinton, blacksmith- 




ing . . . 


21 55 


D. J. Jones, ironwork 


8 55 


D. L. Stevens, ironwork 


7 60 


A. H. Lowell, ironwork 


274 84 


R M. Wallace, et al., pro- 




fessional services 


425 00 


George E-. Vance & Co., 




iron pails, etc. 


12 10 


Brock & Driscoll , coal heater. 




etc. .... 


24 85 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 


59 25 


T. A. Lane, valves, nipples, 




etc. .... 


106 38 


P. D. Harrison . 


6 00 


Smith & Whitten, teams 


4 50 


James Bros., teams 


4 00 


Joseph A. Brown, teams . 


15 00 


E. T. James, teams 


141 25 


Bartlett & Wilson 


11 00 


Phenix Hotel 


660 75 


Manchester Loco. Works, 




ironwork 


209 14 


Merrill Bros., cement 


58 05 


Pv. G. Sullivan . 


18 00 


J. Stickney, rubber mittens, 




etc. .... 


4 25 


Town of Auburn 


5 00 


Pettee & Adams, cement . 


8 00 


Merrill Bros., cement 


3 20 


"E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 


168 46 



399 



Paid Gr. H. Wheeler, hitching- 

posts . . . . 
Auburn, ]S". H., taxes, 1885 
Frank Bourrassau 
J. B. SaAA^yer, engineering . 
David Cross 
Grace A. Elliott, meals 
Dana W. King, copies of 

deeds, etc. 
Fletcher & Hutchinson, din- 
ners, etc. 
W. J. Freeman, damages to 

hack . . . . 
W. H, Bennett, engineering 
J. T, Fanning, engineering 
John Dolber, damage from 

water ... 
J. C. Bickford, et al., pro 

fessional services 
Mrs. Andrew Dolan, dam 

age from water 
George W. Prescott, et al. 

professional service 
Sanborn Carriage Co., re 

pairing team . 
H. B. Putnam, water com 

missioner 
A. M. Eastman, oil 
H. J. Matthews . 
Mrs. Hattie Buxton, repair 

ing fence, etc. . 
Philip Sullivan, damage 

from water 
•George A. Campbell . 



12 


00 


7 


20 


11 


00 


29 


00 


700 


00 


30 


50 


18 


91 


35 


00 


27 


80 


60 


75 


18 


00 


14 


50 


639 


45 


15 


00 


460 


00 


2 


50 


3 


00 


1 


81 


17 


00 



3 50 

5 00 
3 00 



400 



Paid Windsor Hotel, meals 


7 50 


James I. Murray 


4 60 


E. A. G. Holmes, carpenter 




work .... 


8 50 


C. H. Reed, professional ser- 




vices .... 


53 27 


Maurice Welch, damage 




from water 


25 00 


E. M. Bryant, resonanters . 


6 00 


H. D. Gordon, repairing 




table, etc. 


7 50 


C. F. Hall, use of steamer . 


28 00 


J. G. Ellinwood, photo- 




graphs ... 


18 00 


Frink & Batchelder, profes- 




sional services 


30 00 


A. M. Eastman, oil . 


1 00 


W . H. Bennett, engineering 


32 00 


T. W. Lane, lithographs 


75 00 


Stone & Jewell, professional 




services .... 


200 00 


H. H. Huse, professional 




services .... 


200 00 


A. FiHon & Co. . 


2 00 


P.O. Woodman, land 


100 00 


Amoskeag Manufacturing 




Co., land 


1,488 52 


for labor of men and teams 


8,905 58 


Geo. H. Stearns, ex-officio 




water commissioner 


39 00 


A. C. Wallace, water com- 




missioner 


36 00 


Alpheus Gay, president of 




board .... 


75 00 



401 



Paid Eben T. James . 


$36 


00 




James A. Weston, water 








commissioner and clerk 








of board .... 


128 


00 




Wm. P. E'ewell, water com- 








missioner 


15 


00 




E. H. Hobbs, water commis- 








sioner .... 


39 


00 




Joseph F. Kennard, water 








commissioner . 


3 


00 




By balance on hand . 


28,058 


71 


$107,561 49 









RESERVED FUND. 

To appropriation . . . |22,000 00 
D. C. Parker & Son, old brick 129 99 
C. B. Littlefield, milk licenses 52 50 
interest on taxes, amount trans- 
ferred 294 71 

city teams, amount transferred 1,500 00 
land damage, am't transferred 1,100 00 
commons, amount transferred . 300 00 
City Hall, amount transferred . 600 00 
printing and stationery, amount 

transferred . . . . 200 00 
interest on land, amount trans- 
ferred . 
dog licenses 
show licenses . 
billiard table licenses 
rent of tenements 



26 



Dr. 



14« 


yii 


446 


00 


197 00 


291 


50 


472 


92 




— $27,733 54 



402 



Or. 



Paid W. W. Hubbard, windows, 






doors, etc 


$2,392 


80 


A. F. Gate, woodwork, etc. . 


1,001 


69 


A. C. Wallace, lumber, etc. . 


165 


68 


Mead, Mason, & Co., building- 






stairs, etc. . . . 


268 


00 


George Holbrook, carpenter- 






work ..... 


40 


66 


T. A. Lane, gas-fittings, etc. 


213 


67 


Fogg & Donnelly, plumbing 






etc 


196 


17 


Hutchinson Bros., ironwork 


46 


37 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 






ware, etc 


29 


96 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 






etc. ..... 


278 


14 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 






etc 


795 


57 


Pike & Heald, plumbing 


294 


74 


R. J. Donnelly, plumbing 


366 


69 


A. H. Lowell, ironwork 


366 


37 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


39 


52 


A. D. Sherer, painting . 


59 


87 


[ 'iE J- J- Abbott,|painting . 


150 


03 


J. S. Brown, painting . 


380 


00 


Charles H. Wood, lettering, 






etc 


14 


94 


Charles Bunton, blacksmith- 






ing, etc. .... 


16 


90 


I Carpenter & Robinson, mason- 






work ..... 


173 


22 


A-loysius Eastman, mason- 






work 


46 


50 



403 



Paid Bennett & Lord, mason-work 
Parker & Son, mason-work . 
Merrill & Laird, mason-work 
F. S. Bodwell, stonework 
J. A. McCrillis, expressage 
T. L. Thorpe, waste 
Weston & Hill, carpeting, 

etc. .... 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
Drake & Carpenter, cement 
Charles E. Hall, marble slabs 

etc. .... 
Thomas Franker, janitor 
H. C. Weeden, plumbing, etc 
J. Stickney, rubber hose 
Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising .... 
L. Gutterson, soap, etc. 
]Sr. P. Kidder, expressage 
J. B. Clarke, advertising 
Concord Railroad corporation 

freight ... 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
City Hall, coal 

JH. D. Gordon, furniture, etc 
W. M. Butterfield, architect 
Higgins Bros., cuspidores 

etc 

E. Van Norden, galvanized 

skylights, etc. 
for labor of pien and teams 
Manchester Water-Works, wa 

ter . 



$31 


25 


4 


93 


35 


56 


172 


25 


1 


25 


1 


10 


131 


16 


97 


50 


15 


50 


28 


53 


104 


16 


161 


91 


12 


00 


12 


00 


1 


16 


2 


50 


9 


00 


3 


30 


4 


50 


346 


90 


681 


76 


545 


36 



44 75 

54 75 

114 74 

8 90 



404 



Paid Charles F. Sprague, blankets, 
etc. . . . . . 

C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 
ing . . . . . 

By Women's Aid Hospital, 

amount transferred 
Fire-alarm Telegraph, amount 

transferred .... 
City Farm, amount transferred 
District Ko. 1, amount trans- 
ferred 
District No. 3, amount trans 

ferred ... 

District 'No. 7, amount tranS' 

ferred 
new highways, amount trans 

ferred ... 

lighting streets, amount trans 

ferred 
paving streets 
sewers and drains . 
bridges 

hydrant service 
repairs of buildings 
abatement of taxes 
county tax 
city officers' salaries 
decoration of soldiers' graves 
land .... 
truant officer 
Webster-street sewer 
South-Main-Street sewer 
balance on hand 



69 10 

7 50 
$400 00 

2,000 00 
2,300 00 

50 00 

100 00 

150 00 

1,100 00 



600 


00 


1,200 


00 


1,500 


00 


800 


00 


700 


00 


1,000 


00 


. 500 


00 


237 


74 


1,500 


00 


9 


25 


144 


25 


50 


00 


400 


00 


225 


00 


2,726 


49 




— $27,733 54 



405 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 



1,500 00 







- $3,500 00 
Cr. 


By balance from old account 


$221 84 


Paid George Holbrook, carpenter- 






work ..... 


1,321 


32 


L. T. Moody, carpenter-work 


439 


45 


D. H. Morgan, carpenter-work 


11 


80 


J. B, bourse & Co., carpenter- 






work 


120 


56 


J. C. Young, repairing roofs . 


24 


71 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 


293 


84 


William B. Abbott, painting . 


33 


15 


Joel Daniels, painting . 


3 


50 


J. R. Carr, painting 


175 


57 


Wm. F. Starkweather, paint- 






iiig 


1 


30 


J. J. Bennett, mason-work 


3 


25 


B. W. Robinson, mason-work 


66 


97 


Carpenter & Parker, mason- 






work ..... 


213 


88 


Bennett & Lord, mason-work 


118 


12 


H. C. Dickey 


5 


81 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc . 


127 


81 


Timothy Shea, cleaning vaults 


47 00 


Clarke & Brown, repairing 






clocks .... 


12 


75 


Trefethen & Moore, repairing 






clocks .... 


5 


25 


W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 


1 


55 



406 



Paid Mrs. 0. Webber, cleaning, 




schoolhoiise 


$2 OO" 


William Barker, carpenter- 




work 


50 


H. Fradd & Co. . 


1 78- 


Thorp & Bartlett, repairing 




stoves, etc. 


14 40 


D. M. Goodwin, repairing 




boiler .... 


3 00 


T. P. Badger, cleaning well . 


5 00 


Hutchinson Bros., ironwork . 


18 05 


P. W. Flanders, ironwork 


3 00 


A. A. Jenkins, repairing 




pianos .... 


4 00 


James Bros., team . 


2 00 


E. T. James, team 


6 00 


Crane & McMahon 


147 51 


A. H. Andrews & Co. . 


2 00 


By balance on hand 


41 33 







FUEL. 

To balance from old account . $1,629 80 

appropriation .... 3,500 00 



Paid for repairs of buildings, 

amount transferred . . $1,600 00 

E. P. Johnson, coal and wood 1,783 56 

L. B. Bodwell, coal and wood 288 29 

Moore & Preston, wood . . 8 25 



5,500 00 



Dr. 

►,129 80 
Cr. 



407 



Paid C. ]Sr. Harvey, wood 


$99 09 


George Whitford, wood 


365 13 


J. Hodge, wood 


6 00 


C. C. Drew, sawing wood, etc. 


69 90 


C. M. Norton 


5 00 


Joseph Bailey 


16 00 


J. Stickney .... 


79 


By books and stationery, amount 




transferred 


300 00 


furniture and supplies, amount 




transferred 


200 00 


balance on hand 


387 79 







1,129 80 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


10 04 




appropriation .... 


800 00 




fuel, amount transferred . 


200 00 


$1,000 04 










Cr. 


Paid J. B. Varick Co., floor- 






brushes, etc. . 


$18 40 




Daniels & Co., floor-brushes. 






etc 


50 57 




Killey & Wadleigh, floor- 






brushes, etc. 


9 72 




Pike & Heald, brooms, dusters, 






etc 


69 28 




A. H. Andrews & Co., furni- 






ture, etc 


326 85 




Thomas Hall, chemicals 


6 45 





408 



PaidjiT. W. Lane, school-books, 
etc 

E. R. Coburn & Co., school- 
books, etc. . 

Print- Works, chemicals . 

J. Sticknej, rubber goods 
etc 

Clark & Estey, brushes . 

Boston School Supply Co 
maps, etc. . ... 

J. B. Smith, electric bells 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co 

Manchester District Tel. Co 
incandescent lamp, etc. 

L. Gutterson . 

Charles L. Bly, battery cells 

Woodbury & Fellows 

G. I. Hopkins, expressage 

Thorp & Bartlett, sprinkler 

D. H. Morgan 
G. W. Ellison, dusters . 
Concord Railroad corporation 

freight 
IST. Y. Crayon Co., crayons 

E. H. Currier, chemicals 
H. D. Gordon, chairs 
A. II. Lowell, grate 
Patrick Moran, brooms . 
W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 
D.[^A. Simons, dusters . 
P. Brown 
Temple & Farrington, pencils 

crayons, etc. 
J. L. Ilammett, pencils, etc 



$56 21 



51 


71 


8 


00 


15 


44 




40 


12 


40 


8 


50 




82 


1 


75 


6 


48 


5 


65 


19 


00 


1 


55 




75 


2 


00 


12 


00 


12 


49 


15 


22 


1 


50 


9 


72 


4 


11 


2 


25 


4 


05 


16 


00 


4 


12 


28 


27 


16 


97 



409 



Paid Haseltine & Co., dusters 
A. G. Whitcomb, ink, etc. 
Hio-o-ins Bros. 

JBy balance on hand 



114 


40 


39 


50 


1 


50 


146 


01 



$1,000 04 



BOOKS AISTD STATIONERY. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
fuel, amount transferred . 



Paid T. W. Lane . 

Temple & Farrington 

E. R. Coburn & Co. 

M. Garrison & Co. 

Harrison Hume 

Lee & Shepard 

Willard Small 

George S. Perry . 

Ivison, Blakeman, & Taylor 

N". E. Publishing Co. . 

Harper Bros. . 

L. T. Meade . 

Potter, Ainsworth, & Co. 
By balance on hand 



$0 41 
300 00 
300 00 



. $309 82 


44 


69 


49 


53 


18 


00 


6 


03 


5 


40 


13 


56 


4 


25 


5 


04 


6 


50 


11 


00 




80 


9 


75 


116 


04 



Dr. 



300 41 

Cr. 



41 



410 



L'EINTma AND ADVERTISmG. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


. $329 30 




appropriation . 


500 00 


$829 30 
Cr. 






PaidJolin B. Clarke 


. $414 78 




Journal Co. . 


75 




Union Publishing Co. . 


68 75 




Campbell & Williams . 


15 25 




By balance on hand 


329 77 


$829 30 







CONTmGENT EXPENSES. 



To balance from old account 


$396 02 


appropriation . . 


800 00 


O'Neil & Gallagher, overdraft 


: 90 


Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$111 36 


Manchester Water- Works, wa 




ter ... . 


564 15 


C. M. I^orton, extra labor 


9 00 


G. W. Yarnum, extra labor 


5 00 


A. T. Barr, extra labor . 


40 50 


Wm. H. Morrill, extra labor 


9 00 


J. S. Aver}^, extra labor 


10 00 


A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 


> 


etc 


15 50 



Dr. 



L,196 92 
Cr. 



411 



Paid Win. E. Buck, use of horse . 


$93 90 


Thomas Duiilap 


2 00 


Charles T. Cragin, engrossing 




diplomas .... 


26 35 


S. D. Lord, expenses to Boston, 




Woburn, etc. . 


6 10 


H. Fradd & Co., kerosene oil. 




etc 


3 54 


A. N. Clapp, kerosene oil, 




etc 


3 59 


F. M. Ambrose, encyclopedia 


13 00 


Thomas Hall .... 


12 05 


Milton Bradley, drawing-tab- 




lets, etc 


9 45 


J. B. Young, cleaning vaults 


2 50 


Bridget McCabe, cleaning 




floors, etc 


3 00 


E. H. Currier, chemicals 


7 44 


C. C. Currier, tuning pianos, 




etc 


5 55 


Clark & Estey, ribbon . 


4 71 


CNeil & Gallagher, ribbon . 


5 25 


Opera House Co. . 


25 00 


W. H. Yickery, keys, etc. 


1 65 


0. A. Evans, cleaning floors. 




etc. ..... 


15 42 


F. P. Colby, moving settees. 




etc 


3 00 


S. W. Clarke, expenses to 




Lawrence, etc. . 


3 20 


Higgins Bros. 


2 00 


By balance on hand 


183 71 



$1,196 92 



412 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . . . . 


$3,200 


00 


$3,200 00 
Cr. 


By balance overdrawn . 


$79 99 




Paid J. S. Avery . . . . 


600 


00 




William Stevens . 


600 


00 




D. H. Morgan 


262 


50 




A. T. Barr . 


187 


50 




C. M. i^orton 


450 


00 




G. W. Varnum 


204 


19 




William H. Morrill 


145 


85 




James Watts . 


249 


96 




H. C. Dickey 


250 


01 




D. S. Dunbar 


11 


50 




Alvin Gr. Bean 


40 


50 




Ella F. Barker 


29 


50 




Charles P. Moss . 


10 


14 




Willie Zickendrath 


12 


00 




Mabel E, Chase 


15 


31 




Henry I. Rowell . 


5 


50 




Frank McColley . 


15 


50 




Arthur B. Campbell 


12 


00 




Alice C. Campbell . 


7 


00 




By balance on hand 


11 


05 


$3,200 00 









EVENING SCHOOLS. 

To balance from old account . $254 28 

appropriation .... 1,400 00 



Dr. 



$1,654 28 



413 



Cr, 



Paid F. C. Livingston 




. $283 80 


A. J. Dana 




109 20 


F. M. Kelley . 




27 00 


Carrie Bartlett 




70 00 


Hattie E. Daniels 




52 20 


Etta S. Dana . 




52 20 


M. Alma Fracker 




23 40 


Charles E, Cochran 


261 80 


Lizzie D. Hartford 


94 50 


Lelia A. Brooks 


10 80 


Fannie C. Sanborn 


15 30 


Annie L. Prescott*. 


46 80 


^N". B. Croning 




90 


Bessie M. Hall 




56 00 


G. L. Whitten 




25 20 


Alta C. Willand 




10 80 


Annie E. McElroy 




49 50 


Alice H. Boyd 




24 30 


Mary F. Barnes 




59 00 


May H. Searle 




52 20 


May A, Southard 




18 00 


Alice E. Page 




31 50 


E. L. Stebbins 




12 60 


William H. Morrill, janitor 


22 12 


A. T. Barr, janitor 


21 00 


G. W. Varnum, janitor . 


16 50 


D. H. Morgan, janitor . 


18 00 


H. Fradd & Co., kerosene oil 




etc 


9 48 


A. ^. Clapp, kerosene oil, etc 


1 94 


By balance on hand 


• 


178 24 



$1,654 28 



414 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


. 


. 


$41,000 00 




fll 000 00 




Cr. 


By balance overdrawn . . . $527 18 


Paid E. R. Goodwin 






2,000 00 


G. S. Hopkins 






1,200 00 


L. E. Manahan 






800 00 


M. A. Buzzell 






500 00 


R. M. Tnson . 






540 00 


F. C. Baldwin 






' 1,350 00 


L. C. Gilford 






475 00 


L. R. Adams 






300 05 


C. E. Ried . 






460 00 


C. A. Abbott 






450 00 


H. G. Flanders 






450 00 


IT. M. James 






450 00 


E. F. Sanborn 






450 00 


A. 0. Heath . 






540 00 


L. P. Gove . 






332 50 


F. D. Moulton 






315 00 


N. I. Sanderson 






450 00 


L. E. Estey . 






450 00 


B. M. Kelley . 






303 75 


B. F. Dame . 






67 50 


F. W. Shattuck 






1,110 00 


A. W. Patten 






475 00 


M. J. Fife . 






460 00 


L. R. Daniels 






460 00 


M. F. Barnes 






159 75 


C. M. Gilmore 






450 00 



415 



Paid K. M. Follansbee . 






$420 00 


E. F. Tuson . 






405 00 


J. W. Stetson 






1,260 00 


A. A. Webster 






475 00 


M. E. Buntoii 






437 00 


B. L. Dean . 






460 00 


1^. S. Bunton 






475 00 


K. J. Ferren . 






375 00 


E. L. Stokes . 




^ 


450 00 


H. F. Wetherbee 






420 00 


F. S. Sutclifte 






1,140 00 


C. M. Dearborn 






460 00 


M. L. Gage . 






375 00 


E. E. McKean 






450 00 


F. M. Senter . 






450 00 


IST. C. "Woodman 






450 00 


M. A. Smith . 






500 00 


M. IST. Bower 






382 50 


'C. I. Stevens . 






450 00 


G. H. Brooks 






450 00 


F. A. Nichols 






236 25 


H. M. Morrill 






475 00 


G. A. Wyman 






392 50 


Ella Hope 






370 00 


Georgia Dow 






450 00 


A. S. Downs 






450 00 


J. F. Bailey . 






450 00 


C. E. Woods . 






450 00 


M. A. Mitchell 






450 00 


A. G. Lord . 






315 00 


D. E. Haines 






450 00 


S. H. Frame . 






375 00 


E. J. Carley . 






500 00 



416 



Paid S. I. Locke . 






. $450 00- 


M. G. Tynan 






406 13 


L. A. Burns . 






500 00 


E. M. Stebbins 






450 00 


G. A. ^ute . 






475 00 


E. F. Barker . ^ 






420 00 


S. G. "Woodman 




• 


450 00 


A. C. Prescott 






270 00 


0. J. Randall 






450 00 


' 0. A. Rowe . 






450 00 


J. J. Kimball . 






1,000 00 


0. A. Ivers . 






1,000 00 


N. F. Ainsworth 






360 00 


B. M. Hall . 






13 00 


G. L. Whitten 






160 00 


L. A. Brooks 






287 25 


M. Sanborn . 






47 60 


A. C. Willand 






265 20 


C. F. Sanborn 






141 45 


A. W. Smitb . 






1 50 


J. H. Richardson 






1 25 


IST. D. Annis . 






203 00 


N". B. Crowning 






120 00 


M. F. ¥utt . 






118 00 


May Hickey . 






117 00 


C. F. Bartlett 






118 00 


F. L. Sanborn 






114 50 


J. M. Batchelder 






2o 00 


E. S. Dow . 






151 50 


J. G. Dearborn 






60 00 


' Mrs. F. W. Shattuc 


k . 




7 50 


M. A. Dean . 






175 80 


M. A. Putney 






132 30 



417 



Paid M. E. Sanboni ^ 


. 1115 90 


B.B.Joy 


11 25 


S. J. Green . 


1 50 


M. F. Dana . 


102 60 


By balance on hand 


. ^ 653 79 




■ lft'11 000 00 







:n'ew schoolhouse. 



To appropriation 

balance overdrawn 



Paid Head & Dowst, contractors . 
A. H. Andrews, furniture 
William W. Ireland, plans 
Concord Railroad corporation, 
freight . . . . 
T. A. Lane, steam heating 
J. B. Clarke, advertising 
Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising . . . . . 
for labor of men and teams . 



1,000 00 
16*70 



$4,461 37 


395 


33 


75 


00 


1 


02 


1,050 


00 


12 


36 


16 


62 


5 


00 



Dr. 



,016 7a 
Cr. 



),016 70 



TRUAN'T OFFICER. 



To appropriation .... $700 00 
reserved fund, am't transferred 50 00 



27 



Dr. 



$750 00 



418 

Cr. 
Paid H. W. Longa ... $10 00 
Samuel Brooks . . . 739 58 
By balance on hand ... 42 

$750 00 



INTEREST O:^ LAND. 

Dr. 
To a^^propriation .... |600. 00 

$600 00 

Cr. 
Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. $451 08 
By reserved fund, am't transferred 148 92 

$600 00 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $4,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 2,223 15 

$6,223 15 

Cr. 

Paid labor of men and teams . $6,223 15 

$6,223 15 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $1,000 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 1,789 15 

12,789 15 



4 


00 




80 


76 


00 


33 


25 


50 


00 


2 


50 


86 


02 


26 


25 



419 



Paid James Bros., teams , . $44 50 

Daniels Hardware Co., brim- 
stone, etc 

J. B. Varick Co., brimstone, 
etc. ..... 

Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing, etc. .... 

Campbell &Williams, printing, 
etc 

O. D. Kimball, printing, etc. 

"W. E. Moore, printing, etc. . 

J. B. Clarke, printing, etc. 

Kendall & Ladd, printing, etc. 

Judith Sherer, board of pa- 
tients, etc. .... 68 00 

Nellie Clayton, services at pest- 
house . . . . 21 00 

Thomas Frain, services at 

depot 78 00 

J. B. Rejimbal, services at 
depot 

A, D. Sherer, services at depot 

George C. Hoitt, services at 
depot, etc 

William A. Webster, team . 

T. W. Lane, stationery . 

J. B. Sawyer, stamps, etc. 

Dr. J. Sullivan, vaccinating . 

Dr. C. B. Sturtevant, vaccinat- 
ing ..-. . 

Dr. F. G. Mills, vaccinating . 
Dr. J. E. Lemaitre, vaccinating 
Dr. J. W. D. MacDonald, vac- 
cinating .... 44 25 



Or. 



160 


00 


175 


00 


423 


16 


4 


50 


1 


20 


6 


50 


205 


75 


25 


75 


38 


75 


165 


25 



420 



Paid Dr. George C. Hoitt, vaccinat- 
ing $2 50- 

Dr. Tliomas Wheat, vaccinating 8 00 

Dr. J. M. Collity, vaccinating 164 75 
Dr. F. A. Hoyt, vaccinating . 64 OO 

Dr. J. E. A. Lanouette, care of 

patients and vaccinating . 333 00 
Dr. J. L. Robinson, vaccinat- 
ing . . . . . 
]Sr. Mchols, clerical 'services . 
F. X. Chenette, clerical ser- 
vices ..... 
P. A. Devine, clerical services 
J. J. Abbott, papering, etc. . 
George W. Varnum, burying 

nuisances . . . . 19 75 

Edwin Kennedy, burying nui- 
sances .... 2 25 
Timothy Sullivan, burying 

nuisances .... 5 00 

C. B. Littlefield vaccine points 312 03 
J. B. Hall, vaccine points . 36 10 

for labor of men and teams . 5 25 

E. T. James, teams . . 13 75 

James Bros., teams . . 5 50 



5 


00 


22 


50 


12 


50 


12 


50 


29 


34 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 
To trustees $1,300 00 



By cash on hand .... |1,300 00 



5,789 15 



Dr. 

$1,300 00 
Cr. 

$1,300 00 



421 

TUITIOK 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . |77 29 

William E. Buck ... 162 00 

$239 29 

Cr. 
By balance on hand . . . $239 29 

$239 29 



FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 

1885 $843,000 00 

Bonds issued during the year . 155,000 00 

$998,000 00 

Paid during the year . . 18,500 00 



Amount of funded debt, Jan. 1, 

1886 $979,500 00 

Interest due, estimated . . $20,000 00 
Bills outstanding . . . 38,041 65 
Cemetery bonds . . . , 3,500 00 

$61,541 65 



"Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1886 $1,041,041 65 

Cash in treasury, Jan. 1, 1886 . $64,413 77 
Notes due the city ... 228 70 

Interest on the same . . . 107 27 

,749 74 



Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1886 . $976,291 91 

Net indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1885 . 991,759 29 



Decrease of net indebtedness dur- 
ing the year . . . $15,467 38 



422 



OUTSTAm)mG TAXES. 



1874 
1876 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 



$4,193 


34 


4,039 


15 


2,978 


13 


2,815 


21 


3,P29 


70 


939 


55 


1,249 


29 


1,321 


33 


1,078 


79 


923 


98 


1,018 


79 




$23,587 26 



TAXES FOR 1885. 

To amount of resident tax . $343,868 23 

amount of non-resident tax . 1,391 92 



collections . 


. $319,986 


74 


abatements . 


752 


28 


discounts 


7,988 


50 


balance uncollected 


. 16,532 63 



Dr. 

$345,260 15 
Cr. 



$345,260 15 



423 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1840 . . 


$946,200 


$3,986 56 


772 


$2 20 


$300 


1841 . . 


1,229,054 


9,563 74 


892 


3 49 


300 


1842 . . 


1,430,524 


12,952 44 


1,053 


2 76 


300 


1843 . . 


1,598,826 


13,764 32 


1,053 


2 60 


300 


1844 . . 


1,873,286 


13,584 72 


1,053 


2 25 


300 


1845 . . 


2,544,780 


19,246 27 


1,561 


2 30 


300 


1846 . . 


3,187,726 


22,005 95 


1,808 


2 10 


300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 68 


300 


1849 . . 


5,600,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 88 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


1 76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673 82 


7,831 


1 62 


100 


1883 . . 


20,055,986 


332,741 72 


7,944 


1 65 


100 


1884 . . 


20,613,032 


361,401 61 


8,143 


1 75 


100 


1885 . . 


21,137,464 


345,260 15 


8,157 


1 63 


100 



424 

City Debt. 



Date of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


July 1, 


1876 


Sewer Bonds, 


July 1, 


1885 


$1,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


1886 


5,000 00 


Aug. 1 


1869 


li >i 


Aug. 1 


1887 


3,500 00 


Jan. 1 


1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1863 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


1888 


35,000 00 


July 1 


, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


1890 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1872 


iC (( 


Jan. 1 


1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31 


1863 


City Bonds, 


Nov. 1 


1893 


70,000 00 


July 1 


1864 


u u 


July 1 


1894 


50,000 00 


July 1 


, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


1895 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


, 1872 


(. u 


Jan. 1 


1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


, 1872 


u u 


Jan. 1 


1902 


100,000 00 


July 1 


, 1881 


Bridge Bonds, 


July 1 


1911 


60,000 00 


April 1 


, 1885 


City Bonds, 


April 1 


1905 


50,000 00 


April 1 


1885 


u « 


April 1 


1907 


50,000 00 


April 1 


1885 


(C 4( 


April 1 


, 1909 


50,000 00 


April 1 


1885 


a u 


April 1 


, 1911 


5,000 00 



425 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Land, city scales, etc. 
City Library building 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
City Hall and lot ... . 
City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, etc., at City Farm 
Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Fire-Alarm Telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Engine-house, stable and land. Vine street 
Hose-house, cottage and lot, Maple street 
Hose-house, cottage and lot, Park street 
Houses and Pine Grove cemetery 
•Courthouse and lot . 
Common sewers .... 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall 
Street lanterns, posts, and pipes 

Water- Works 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets 
Ward-room and lot, Manchester street 
Engine-house and lot. Ward Eight 



Water pipe, wagons, etc., for 

streets 
Stock in S. Y. R. R. . 
Gravel lot, Belmont street 
Gravel lot. Sagamore street 
Gravel lots, Ward Eight 
Gravel lots, Bakersville 
Gravel lot. District No. 8 
Gravel lot. Gore street 
Yalley cemeter}^ 
Police station and lot . 



watering" 



$30,000 00 

41,000 00 

22,000 00 

60,000 00 

34,000 00 

10,000 00 

35,416 50 

27,670 00 

47,000 00 

5,000 00 

9,000 00 

12,000 00 

51,000 00 

255,000 00 

3,000 00 

7,500 00 

851,322 80 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

2,500 00 

2,500 00 
50,000 00 

1,200 00 
900 00 
400 00 
700 00 
150 00 
350 00 

9,000 00 
40,000 00 

$1,628,608 80 



426 



INVENTORY OF SCH00LH0IT8ES. 



High Scliool house and lot . 

Furniture, charts, maps, books, 
and apparatus 
Franklin-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
North-Main-street, house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Webster-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Blodget-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Bridge-street house and lot . 
Lowell-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Merri mack-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Wilson-Hill house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Beech-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
School-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
South-Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 



.150,000 00 






. 2,000 


00 $52,000 


00^ 


. 18,000 


00 






400 


00 


18,400 


00 


. 15,000 


00 






400 


00 


15,400 


00^ 


. 50,000 


00 






400 


00 


50,400 


00' 


. 58,000 


00 






400 


00 


58,400 


00 


. 23,000 


00 






600 


00 


28,600 


00 


. 17,500 


00 






350 


00 


17,850 


oo 


. 3,500 


00 






150 


00 


3,650 


00' 


900 


00 


900 


00^ 


. 7,000 


00 






400 


00 


7,400 


00' 


. 15,000 


00 






550 


00 


15,550 


00 


. 3,300 


00 






100 


00 


3,400 


00' 


. 7,000 


00 






350 


00 


7,350 


oa 


. 5,000 


00 






425 


00 


5,425 


00* 


. 2,800 


00 






200 


00 


3,000 


00* 


. 13,000 


00 






600 


00 


13,600 


oa 



427 



Stark-District house and lot . 


13,000 00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


150 


00 


$3,150 00 


Araoskeag house and lot 


. 3,700 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


125 


00 


3,825 00 


Goffe's Falls house and lot . 


. 3,600 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


100 


00 


3,700 00 


Harvey-District house and lot 


2,500 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


125 


00 


2,625 00 


"Webster-District house and lot 


600 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


50 


00 


650 00 


Hallsville house and lot 


. 3,500 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


125 


00 


3,625 00 


Youngsville house and lot . 


1,400 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


125 


00 


1,525 00 


Mosquito-Pond-Dist. house and lol 


t 1,200 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


100 


00 


1,300 00 


Park-street house and lot 


8,500 


00 

ft 


8,500 00 


Amount of school property 


J25,225 00 


Amount of city property 


rty . 


1,628,608 80 


Total amount of city prope 


$1,953,833 80 



428 



APPROPRIATIOl^S FOR 1886- 



Interest 

Paupers off tlie Fami . 

City Farm . 

City teams . 

Highway District, ISTo. 1 







b 






G 






7 






8 






9- 






10 






11 






12 






13 



ISTcw highways . 

Damage for land taken for highways 

"Watering streets 

Lighting streets . 

Paving streets 

Macadamizing streets 

Grading for concrete 

Sewers and drains 

Commons . 

Bridges 

Incidental expenses 

Pine Grove cemetery 

Valley cemetery . 

Fire department . 

Fire-alarm telegraph 

Hydrant service . 



$19,000 00 

3,500 00 

3,500 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 

8,000 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

500 00 

400 00 

900 00 

700 00 

500 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 

200 00 

5,000 00 

1,500 00 

4,000 00 

12,500 00 

3,000 00 

8,000 00 

3,500 00 

8,000 00 

3,000 00 

500 00 

10,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,500 00 

20,500 00 

1,500 00 

19,000 00 



429 



Police department 

Printing and stationery 

Repairs of buildings . 

City library 

Militia 

Payment of funded debt 

Abatement of taxes . 

Discount on taxes 

State tax 

County tax . 

City officers' salaries . 

Firemen's parade 

Decoration of soldiers' 



Bridge-street sewer 
"Webster-street sewer . 
Soutli-Main-street sewer 
Eeserved fund 
Repairs of schoolhouses 
Fuel .... 
Furniture and supplies 
Books and stationery . 
Printing and advertising 
Contingent expenses . 
Care of rooms 
Evening schools . 
Teachers' salaries 
Truant officer 
Scavenger teams 
Engine House 
Health department 
Stone road-roller 
Spruce street 



graves 



$23,000 00 

1,500 00 

1,800 00 

3,500 00 

700 00 

5,000 00 

2,000 00 

8,000 00 

48,400 00 

35,237 00 

13,000 00 

300 00 

200 00 

10,000 00 

9,000 00 

1,500 00 

15,000 00 

3,500 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

400 00 

900 00 

3,200 00 

1,400 00 

41,000 00 

750 00 

4,000 00 

10,000 00 

1,400 00 

6,500 00 

1,800 00 



$410,287 00 



INDEX. 



.Abatement of Taxes 389 

Account of City Treasurer 312 

Accounts of Appropriations 319 

.Act to Regulate Sale and Inspection of Milk 219 

Alarm-Boxes and Keys 278 

Amoskeag S. F. E. Company No. 1 292 

Apparatus, Fire 268 

Appropriations for 1886 428 

Attendance at School 134 

Board of Health, Report of 195 

Books and Stationery 409 

Bridge-street Sewer 350 

Bridges 353 

Care of Rooms •. 412 

Cemetery Funds 420 

Cemeteries, Report of Committee on 237 

Oity Government, 1885 3 

Civil Engineer, Report of 57 

Debt 424 

Farm 327 

Hall 382 

Library 387 

Officers 3 

Property 425 

Solicitor, Report of. 179 

Teams 332 

Treasurer's Account 312 

-Chief Engineer, Report of 265 

Commons 354 

County Tax 390 

Contingent Expenses 410 



332 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 394 

Debt, Funded 421 

Payment of. 389 

Discount on Taxes 389 

Donations to City Library ....... 168 

E. W. Harrington Hose Company No. 3 295 

Excelsior Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 297 

Evening Schools 124,412 

Fire- Alarm Telegraph 269, 874 

Boxes and Keys 278 

Fire Department 369 

Apparatus 268 

Names and Kesidence of Members of 292- 

Eules and Regulations of 284 

Firemen's Parade 271, 394 

Fires, Alarms, Losses, 1885 274 

Fuel „ 406 

Furniture and Supplies 407 

Government, City, 1885 3 

Grading for Concrete 348 

Health Department 418 

Highway District No. 1 335- 

No. 2 335 

No. 3 337 

No. 4 337 

No. 5 338 

No. 6 338 

No. 7 339 

No. 8 340 

No. 9 340 

No. 10 341 

No. 11 341 

No. 12 342 

No. 13 342 

High School 127 

Highways, New 343 

Hydrant Service 376 

Hydrants, Location of. 299' 



433 

Incidental Expenses 355 

Independent Hose Company 298 

Instructions to Key-Holders , 282 

Interest 319 

on Land 418 

Inventory of Schoolhouses 426 

Land 395 

Land Damage 343 

Library, City 151 

Donations to 168 

Librarian's Report 163 

Treasurer's Report 157 

Trustees' Report , . . . ; 151 

Lighting Streets 344 

Loan, Temporary 319 

Militia 388 

Macadamizing Streets 347 

Main-^street Sewer 353 

Massabesic Hose Company Xo. 2 295 

Merrimack Hose Company No. 4 296 

Milk Inspector, Report of 215 

New Schoolhouse , 417 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Company No. 4 293 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department 292 

Officers, City 3 

Outstanding Taxes 422 

Overseers of Poor, Report of j 225 

Paving Streets , 346 

Paupers oflf the Farm , 320 

Peuuacook Hose Company No. 1 294 

Pine Grove Cemetery 240, 366 

Police Department 376 

Printing and Advertising 410 

Printing and Stationery 384 

Property, City 425 

Repairs of Buildings 385 

Schoolhouses 405 

•2S 



434 

Eeport of Board of Health 195 

Chief Engineer 265 

City Engineer 57 

City Solicitor 179 

Committee on City Farm 231 

Committee on Finance Sl(j 

Librarian of City Library ' 163 

Milk Inspector .....' 215 

Overseers of Poor 225 

School Committee 103 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 114 

Superintendent of Water-Works 19 

Treasurer of City Library 157 

Treasurer of Cemeteries 256 

Treasurer of Cemetery Fund 260 

Trustees of Cemeteries , 257 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund . . 260 

Trustees of City Library 151 

Water Commissioners 17 

Eeservei Fund 401 

Salaries of Officers 390 

Teachers 414 

Scavenger Teams 418 

Schedule of Water Pipes and Fixtures 127 

School Department 99 

High 127 

Organization for 1886 139 

Training 126 

Evening 124 

Sewers and Drains 348 

State Tax 390 

Streets, Lighting 344 

Macadamizing 347 

Paving 346 

Watering 344 

Taxes, Abatement of ... 389 

Discount on . 389 

for 1885 422 

Outstandinsr 422 



485 

Teachers, List of 142 

Salaries of 414 

Temporary Loan 319 

Training School . 126 

Truant Officer 417 

Tuition 421 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 423 

Valley Cemetery 237, 368 

Water Commissioners % - 16 

Report of. 17 

Water Rates 45 

Water- Works 395 

Rules and Regulations of 48 

AVatering Streets 344 

Webster-street Sewer 351 

Women's Aid Hospital 395