(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

PUBLIC DOCUMExNT. ^" 




§ 



CITY or 



4/ 



^A'CHES'^'^'^I 



ANNUAL REPORTS 




FOB THE 






YEAR 1886. 




^vV4 






a^MiTiiTiiniiiiiiiiiiiHi Hniri iiiiiiiihiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiM 




FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



City of Manchester 



Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1886, 



TOGETHER WITH 



Other Annual Reports and Papers Relating 
TO THE Affairs of the City. 




MANCHESTER, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY JOHN B. CLARKE, 
1887. 



35e...07 



City of Manchester. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Forty-First Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are, au- 
thorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the 
printing of the Forty-First Annual Report of the Receipts and Ex- 
penditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance, the School Board and Super- 
intendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water-Works, Water Com- 
missioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Marshal, Overseers 
of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian, and Treasurer of City Library, 
Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Committee on City Farm, 
City Physician, City Solicitor, and City Engineer, the expense 
thereof to be charged to the Appropriation for Printing and 
Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. January 11, 1887. 

Passed. 

EDWARD L. KIMBALL, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. January 11, 1887. 
Passed in concurrence. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1886. 



MAYOR. 

GEORGE H. STEARNS. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAIT P. KIDDER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

JAMES B. STRAW. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

HENRY H. HUSE. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOKN A. BARKER. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

FRANK A. HOITT. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

GEORGE M. TRUE. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

PELEG D. HARRISON. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF AVATER-WORKS. 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 



CLERK OF WATER-WORKS. 

ARTHUR E. STEARNS. 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward 1. — Stillman P. Cannon. 
Ward 2. — Loring B. Bodwell. 
Ward 3. — Samuel Thompson. 
Ward 4. — John A. McCrillis. 

Ward 5. — Leonard P. Reynolds. 
Ward 6. — Charles D. Welch. 
Ward 7. — Abner J. Sanborn. 
Ward 8. — Frank A. Cadwell. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1, 

George W. Cheney. 
George W. Bacon. 
Jonathan C. Qnimby. 



Ward 2. 

George M. True. 
Oliver B. Green. 
James P. Carr. 



Ward 3. 

Eugene S. Whitney. 
Abraham G. Grenier. 
William S. Shannon. 



Ward 4. 

Stephen B. Stearns. 
Frank X. Chenette. 
Charles J. Abbott. 



Ward 5. 

John F. Fox. 
Frank H. Callan. 
John Bryson, Jr. 



Ward 6. 

John M. Kendall. 
Henry B. Fairbanks. 
George S. Smith. 



Ward 7. 

Guy F. Whitten. 
Frank A. Dockham. 
Oscar Perkins. 



Ward 8. 

Ferdinand Riedel. 
Thomas E. McDerby. 
Frank O. Clement. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Bodwell ; 
Messrs. Stearns, Whitney, and Quimby. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Thompson and Cadwell ; 
Messrs. Kendall, Perkins, and McDerby. (Meet Wednes- 
day succeeding the 24th of each month. All bills must 
be left at city clerk's office, properly approved, not later 
than the 24th of each month.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Thompson and McCrillis ; 
Messrs. Quimby, Whitten, and Dockham. (Meet third 
Friday in each month.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Welch and Sanborn ; Messrs. 
Shannon, Fairbanks, and Green. 

On Seivers and Drains. — Aldermen Sanborn and 
Welch ; Messrs. Green, Fairbanks, and Shannon. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Bodwell and Reyn- 
olds; Messrs. Cheney, Grenier, and Riedel. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen McCrillis and 
Bodwell ; Messrs. Carr, Stearns, and Bryson. 

On Fire DejMrtirwit. — Aldermen Cadwell and McCril- 
lis ; Messrs. Whitney, Cheney, and Carr. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Cannon and 
McCrillis; Messrs. Clement and Bacon. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Welch and Thomp- 
son ; Messrs. Chenette, Callan, and Clement. 

On Water- Works. — Aldermen McCrillis and Sanborn; 
Messrs. Fox and Kendall. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Reynolds and Cannon ; 
Messrs. Whitten, Smith, and Fox. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Cannon and 
Welch ; Messrs. Chenette, Riedel, and Smith. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Sanborn and Cannon; 
Messrs. Perkins, Callan, and Dockham. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Cadwell and Cannon. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Thompson and 
Reynolds. 

On Market. — Aldermen Reynolds and Bodwell. 
- On MarshaVs Account. — Aldermen Bodwell and Mc- 
Crillis. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen McCrillis and Cannon. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Welch and Sanborn. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Sanborn and Thompson. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Messrs, Quimby, Perkins, and 
Kendall. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Dockham, Gre- 
nier, and Callan. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. McDerby and Fox. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Associate Justice of Police Court. 
Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 
John C, Bickford. 



City Marshal. 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Horatio W. Longa. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



George H. Stearns, ex-officio Chairman. 
James E. Dodge, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Albe C. Heath. 
Charles H. Manning. 

Ward 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 

Ward 3. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 
James E. Dodge. 

Ward 4. 

Samuel D. Lord. 
Stephen W. Clarke. 



Ward 5. 

Charles A. O'Connor. 
Thomas F. Collins. 

Ward 6. 

Jacob J. Abbott. 
William H. Huse. 

Ward 7. 

Edwin F. Jones. 
Frank B. Potter. 

Ward 8. 

Josiah Gr. Dearborn. 
Timothy J. Howard. 



George M. True, ex officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



ASSESSORS. 

George "W. Weeks, Chairman. 

David O. Furnald, Clerk. 
■Charles H. Brown. Patrick A. Devine. 

John E. Stearns. George H. Dudley. 

David 0. Furnald. Frank B. Potter. 

George W. Weeks. Pius Brown. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Charles H. Warren. Thomas Howe. 

John E. Stearns. Isaac Whittemore. 

David O. Furnald. Edwin F. Jones. 

Harrison D. Lord. Charles W. Quimby. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Hon. Geo. H. Stearns, ex-offido Chairman. 

William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 
William H. Maxwell. Charles Francis. 

Thomas L. Quimby. Elbridge G. Woodman.* 

James Sutcliffe. William Weber. 

Horace Gordon. William Marshall. f 

Thomas P. Conway. 

(Meet third Wednesday of each month.) 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 

Fred S. Bean, Clerk. 
Orrin E. Kimball. | Horatio Fradd. 

James F. Pherson. Fred S. Bean. 

Ruel G. Manning. t 

* Died. t Elected to fill vacancy. X Resigned. 



10 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 
James A. Weston, Clerk. 

James A. Weston. Andrew C. Wallace. 

Eben T. James. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

Joseph F. Kennard. George H. Stearns, ex officio. 
Alpheus Gay. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Isaac W. Smith. 

Benj. C. Dean. Moody Currier. 

Daniel Clark. Lucien B. Clough. 

Herman F. Straw. George H. Stearns, ex officio. 

George M. True, ex officio. 

LIBRARIAN. 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, 



Bist. 



HIGHWAY SURVEYORS. 
Dist. 



1. John C. Ray. 7. 

2. William Sanborn. 8. 

3. Edwin Kennedy. 9. 

4. Isaac Whittemore. 10. 

5. John H. Willey. 11. 

6. Samuel B. Dickey. 12. 



Peter O. Woodman. 
Joshua Page. 
Nelson W. Pao-e. 
Charles 0. Phelps. 
James E. Bailey. 
Jeremiah Garvin. 



13. Joseph P. Fellows. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



D. O. Furnald, Hiram Stearns, for four years. 
H, H. Huse, G. P. Whitman, for three years. 



11 

James A. Weston, John E. Stearns, for two years. 
George C. Gilmore, Bushrod "W. Hill, for one year. 



SUB-TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Valley. — Alderman McCrillis ; Messrs. Gilmore, Hill, 
and Furuald. 

Pine Grove. — Alderman Cannon; Messrs. Bacon, 
Hiise, "Whitman, and Weston. 

Aimskeag. — Frank O. Clement ; Messrs. Hiram Stearns 
and John E. Stearns. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Hon. James A. Weston, Chairman. 

Hon. Person C. Cheney. 

Hon. George A. Stearns, ex officio. 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

C. B. Littlefield. 

WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 



Ward 1. — Augustus Savory. 
Ward 2. — George M. True. 

Ward 3. — William A. Carpenter. 
Ward 4. — Hiram Hill. 

Ward 5. — John F. Sullivan. 
Ward 6. — George Holbrook. 
Ward 7. — Frank B. Potter. 
Ward 8. — George W. Goffe. 



12 



Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Abial "W. Eastman. 
Ward 2. — Charles E. Qiiimby. 
Ward 3.— Frank W. Garland. 

Ward 4.— Alfred L. F. Geoffroy. 
Ward 5. — John Looney. 

Ward 6.— Walter S. Heath. 

Ward 7. — Ernest B. Philbrick. 
Ward 8. — John J. McGovern. 



Selectmen. 



Ward 1. 

George C. Kemp. 
Henry P. Hunter. 
James M. Chase. 

Ward 3. 

David Thayer. 
George C. Lord. 
Charles Atherton. 

Ward 5. 

Jeremiah J. Hayes. 
Felix M. Boire. 
John J. Minturn. 

Ward 7. 

Clarence M. Woodbury. 
Alonzo P. Hall. 
Edson Wyman. 



Ward 2. 

George H. Colby. 
Jesse B. Nourse. 
Kirk C. Bartlett. 

Ward 4. 

Charles F. Garland. 
George B. Forsaith. 
Louis D. Goodwin. 

Ward 6. 

Edwin ]Sr. Baker. 
Joseph Quirin. 
George H. Benton. 

Ward 8. 

Henry Hebert. 
Eugene C. Smith. 
Abel M. Keniston. 



R e: PO RT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF Water Commissioners. 



GEORGE H. STEARNS, Mayor, ex officio. 

Alpheus Gay, President^ term expires January, 1893. 
James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires January, 1891. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January, 1890. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1892. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January, 1888. 
Edwin H. Hobbs, term expires January, 1889. 



OFFICERS. 



Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Begistrar. 

Charles C. Cole, Engineer at Pumping Station. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners 
have the honor to present herewith their annual report 
for the year ending December 31, 1886, together with the 
report of the superintendent covering the same period of 
time. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year are as fol- 
lows : — 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1885 . $28,058 77 
Receipts from all sources . . . . 75,129 99 



Total $103,188 76 

Appropriated to pay interest $36,000 00 

Expended on construction . 31,149 65 

Repairs and running expenses 17,713 83 

Total expenditures . $84,863 48 



Balance unexpended . . . . . $18,325 28 

As will be seen, the expenditures have exceeded the 
annual income in the sum of $9,733.49. This is occa- 
sioned by a decrease in the receipts, owing to the reduc- 



16 

tion of the rates, amounting to $5,274.13, and by a large 
increase in expenditures by reason of the outlay for new 
pumps and work connected therewith. The price for 
metered water was changed one year ago from twenty 
cents to fifteen cents per 100 cubic feet, and the use of 
meters was made free. This reduction appears to have 
given general satisfaction, and your commissioners are 
not aware of any complaints as to water rates as now 
established. It is their desire and purpose that the 
charges shall continue to be as low as are aftbrded by any 
well-conducted water-works in New England. 

In their last annual report, your commissioners referred 
to the imperative necessity of providing additional pump- 
ing machinery to meet the increasing demands and to 
provide against contingencies and the waning efficiency 
of the old pumps. This early engaged their attention. 
Specifications were prepared for a pair of pumps, to have 
a practical working capacity of five million gallons in 
twenty-four hours, and on the 16th day of January, 1886, 
propositions were invited from the principal manufact- 
urers of hydraulic machinery in the country. Six ditferent 
parties responded with bids. Upon careful investigation, 
and obtaining the opinion of an expert, it was believed 
that the proposition of the Davidson Steam-Pump Com- 
pany of Brooklyn, E". Y., was the most favorable, all 
things considered. The work was therefore awarded to 
said company at their bid — $11,700. The pumps are 
now in position, and are supplying the reservoir with 
water. Proper tests, as required by the terms of the con- 
tract, have not been made, however, owing to the low 
stage of the water and the imperfect working of the 
wheels; but good judges have expressed themselves as 
well pleased with the quality of the materials used and the 
method and thoroughness of construction. 



17 

Careful investigations have shown that the water-wheels 
which have done good service for thirteen years should be 
thoroughly overhauled or replaced by n^w ones. This 
important matter is now under consideration. 

It is not expected that the outlay required for the coming 
year will be as large as for 1886, but it should be borne 
in mind that the cost of maintenance of a work of this 
character, and of such importance to every citizen, will 
naturally increase from year to year. The demands of a 
growing city also call for an annual outlay of considerable 
sums to furnish additional service, and your commis- 
sioners deem it wise and prudent to be financially pre- 
pared for contingencies that may arise suddenly and with- 
out warning. 

In conclusion, they are pleased to say that the works, 
as a whole, are in satisfactory condition, and are admirably 
answering the purposes for which they were constructed. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALPIIEUS GAY, President, 

GEORGE H. STEARNS, Mayor, ex officio, 

A. C. WALLACE, 

E. H. HOBBS, 

HEI^RY CHANDLER, 

J. F. KENNARD, 

JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Hoyiorable Board of Water Commissioners of the City 
of Manchester : — 

I herewith submit my annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1886. 



MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The lake has been lower this season than last^ The 
water was below the clam by the middle of August, 
and continued to fall till the 17th of November, when 
it reached its lowest point, which was 23|^ inches below 
the top of the dam. From this time till the present it 
has risen 12| inches. 

In 1880 — the time the channel, or outlet of the lake, 
was lowered — the water was the lowest since the con- 
struction of the water-works. Following is the height of 
the'[lake on the 31st of December of each year for the 
past six years : — 

Dec. 31, 1880, the water was 27| inches below the dam. 



1881, 


" 231 " 


above 


1882, 


51 u 


below 


1883,' 


6 " 


ii. 


1884, 


201 " 


ii. 


1885, 


81 " 


above 


1886, 


11 " 


below 



19 

Slight repairs have been made on the old raceway at 
the outlet, and the new dam has been repaired by repoint- 
iug the stone-work. 

E"o work has been done on the canal or pen-stock. ]^ew 
screens have been put in at the feeder-head at the lower 
end of canal, the old ones having been broken by eels- 
On the 17th day of October they went through the pen. 
stock in such quantities that they stopped the running of 
the pumps. The new screens are made of larger wire , 
but it will be prudent to put in racks to give greater pro- 
tection. 

Two years ago, in the same month, the screens were 
broken in like manner, and the pumps were stopped by 
the great number of eels that passed through the pen-stock 
and found their way into the wheels. 

PUMPING STATION. 

Here is where the most money has been expended and 
the greatest improvements made in connection with tiie 
city water-works the past year. A new set of pumps have 
been procured, set up, and are now running. They were 
built by the Davidson Steam-Pump Company of Brook- 
lyn. N. Y. The power is communicated from the old 
jack-shafts, and the arrangement is such that the pumps 
can be run together or one at a time. 

The water is taken from a well connected with the tail- 
race instead of the pen-stock, the engineer of the David- 
son Steam-Pump Company claiming that it was better for 
the working of the pumps to suck the water rather than 
have 25 or 30 feet head on the valves. 

The foundations, pumps, and connections cost $16,400. 

The old pumps have done their work the past season 
without a great many repairs, and have pumped nearly 
48,000,000 gallons more than they ever did before in one 



20 



year. A new valve-chamber has been procured to take the 
place of one that was cracked a year ago last November, 
but it has not been used. The old one was so repaired 
that it has given no further trouble. 

The teeth of one bevel gear and one bevel pinion being 
considerably worn, it was thought best to order new ones, 
and R. D. Wood & Co. are now making one of each kind. 

The following is the amount pumped each month dur- 
ing the year 1886 : — 

RECORD OP PUMPING IN 1886. 



MONTHS. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

" [Davidson].. 
December 

Totals and average. 



^3 

"to 3 



12; 



731 h. 30 m. 

754 " 30 " 
758 " 10 " 
639 " 40 " 
717 " 10 " 

755 " 50 " 
906 " 30 " 
869 " 40 " 
792 " 

709 " 50 " 
567 " 
54 " 

756 " 30 " 



9,012 h. 20 m . 



p 0) 



17. 

16.50 

16.87 

16.70 

16.72 

16.98 

17.01 

16.77 

16.83 

16.41 

16.87 

15.66 

17.23 



16.73 



'-0 5 



c * 3 



746,408 
747,022 
767,576 
636,826 
719,492 
777,744 
924,984 
875,008 
794,758 
699,172 
573,886 
50,730 
782,288 



9,095,894 



055 






47,023,704 
47,062,386 
48,357,288 
40,120,038 
45,327,996 
48,997,872 
58,273,992 
55,025,504 
50,071,754 
44,057,636 
36,154,818 
7,419,262 
49,284,144 



577,276,394 









1,.516,958 
1,680,798 
1,559,912 
1,337,331 
1,462,032 
1,633,262 
1,879,806 
1,775,016 
1,669,058 
1,421,214 
1,452,602 

1,589,811 



1,581,483 



21 



RESERVOIR, 



The end of the gate-house at the reservoir has been 
taken down and laid over as recommended in last year's 
report, and the reservoir fence has been painted. The 
total cost of the repairs about the premises was $200. 
Seven hundred and thirty-live feet of fence were built be- 
tween Wilson and Young streets on the land bought of 
the Amoskeag Company for a pipe yard, at an expense of 



THE SUPPLY AND FORCE MAIN. 

Very few repairs have been made on these pipes. The 
connection of the force main with the new pumps required 
the laying of three hundred and ten feet of twenty-inch 
pipe, with branch, gate, and check-valve. * 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

The water-pipe extended in the year 1886 was laid in 
the following streets : Amory, Amoskeag, Baker, Beau- 
port, Blaine, Cartier, Carroll, Calef road. Cedar, Chest- 
nut, East High, Harrison, Langdon, Pine, Marion, Mon- 
mouth, ISTorth, Prospect, Oliver, River road. Sagamore, 
Shasta, Young road, making twenty-three clifterent 
streets. Amount laid, 10,457 feet, — nearly two miles, — 
at an expense of |8,625. There have been ten bursts, 
where we have had to take out the cement pipe and put 
in cast-iron. Four hundred and fifty feet of four-inch 
pipe were relaid on Chestnut between Lake avenue and 
Cedar streets, where quite a number of bad breaks have 
occurred ; also one hundred and thirty-five feet of twelve- 
inch on Beech, corner of Bridge street ; forty feet of four- 
inch, and eight feet of six-inch, corner of Bridge and 
Walnut streets, on account of blasting for the sewer. 



22 

This makes seven hundred and seventj-four feet of 
cement pipe taken out and cast-iron laid in its place 
durin^^ the year. 

The twelve-inch pipe that lies on the bottom of the 
Merrimack River was examined by a diver from Boston, 
— Mr. Mclvers, — in the month of July. After a 
careful inspection he reported the pipe in fair condition. 
He found three leaks in the lead joints, which he 
repaired. 

There is no doubt that a twelve-inch cast-iron pipe 
can be laid under water across a river or pond without 
a coiFer-dam and be a good job. This was laid with 
pipe three fourths of an inch thick, bell-joints only 
three inches deep, without any set-screws, and dropped 
off the end of* a small raft as fast as the joints were 
leaded. The consequence has been that the lead has 
blown out, the pipe pulled apart, and one length broken, 
making it an expensive peice of work to keep in repair.- 
It will be remembered that the city relaid 108 feet on 
the east side of the river where there was a shifting, 
sandy bottom, five years ago last summer. There have 
not been any leaks since it was repaired. The pipe 
was one inch thick with flange-joints, wooden packing,, 
with the same flexible joints that were laid in the first 
place, and made by the South Boston Machine ComiDany. 
The pipe as a whole has caused as little trouble this 
year as any. Fortunately, when bursts have occurred, 
the water has been shut off" before any serious damage 
has been done. Additional gates have been put in 
where it has been relaid, dividing it into smaller sections, 
so that less water-takers and less hydrants will have to 
be shut off when repairs are being made. 



23 



PIPES, GATES, AND HYDRANTS LAID IN 188G. 



Streets. 


Length in feet laid. 


1 


Gates set. 


Location. 




20in. 


12in. 


Sin. 


6in. 


4in. 


4in. 


6in. 


20in 




Amor 






528 






2 
1 








Beauport — west. 


Ash 








204 


1 






Baker 








40 

54 

222 












To Amory. 


Blaine 










































96 
700 
492 
848 
477 




















1 






























1 




Amory — south. 
Wayne — south. 


































168 














310 












Near pumping station. 








1200 
890 




2 
2 


2 














High 


















96 
160 








































204 


1 








East — (2 in. gate). 


North 




622 




8 
108 
260 
120 
2110 
167 
53 


Pine 




















1 










Riddle 






North. 










2 




2 






1 


















1 




1 
1 

1 
1 












South side Bridge. 
South side Bridge. 


Walnut 
























758 




1 






310 






1 






622 


528 9027 

1 


408 


15 


4 


16 


1 


10,895 feet. 



24 

ITiimber miles pipe laid 1886, 2.063. 
" gates set " 21. 

" hydrants set " 15. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET 1886. 

Amoiy, cor. Beaiiport. 

Amory, near Dubuque. 

Baker, cor. River road. 

Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 

Cartier, cor. Putnam. 

GoiFstown road. 

Goftstown road. 

Harrison, cor. Maple. 

Harrison, cor. Oak. 

North, cor. Chestnut. 

Prosj)ect, cor. Walnut. 

River road, near gate to Kimball & Gerrish's tannery. 

River road, near Mrs. B. Chase's house. 

Shasta, cor. River road. 

Young, cor. Maple. 



25 

The following places are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken out and cast-iron laid instead : — 



Streets. 


Length in feet. 




4 inch. 


C incli. 


12 inch. 






34 

8 




Bedford 










135 


Bridge 




8 
40 












490 






8 
8 
8 
















High 


16 






8 
168 
8 
15 
8 
8 




Milford 


























40 

7 




Washington 






8 












553 


337 


135 



26 



CO 
00 
CO 



P5 

o 
o 



<f1 

H 
1—1 

Ph 
I— I 

O 

w 

P 
P 

w 

o 

x/1 



•SlUBjpXH 




"^ 


-*"*-HCOiH -t-Til .i-HCON 


i-l(M -* 10 (N (N rt 00 C^ <r) -(MrH - - 


eo 


'sgAiBA-jiy 




iMii : : : • ; 


1 • ; * .(N • • • 








- 


■ 

1 


a 




: : i : i'^ : 


:::::-::: 


1 ;<N 1 j j 


jio j 1 j 


• :- : 


a 
3 




NlOIN^rHrH .COtHi-I • iH C^ e<l C^ tH CD n< rH • (M m t- tH «D • <N C^ • '• 


•* 


a 

00 








• . • • tH »H • . • 


CO ^ -CO • • 


rtTjH _. j j 




^ 


S 






»-(•••■ (M 












c3 








;;;;;!:-;;• 








N 


_a 














: : : : i'^ : : 


t- 


a 

i 
















"2 
is 

.9* 

a' 
£ 

o 

a 
» 


_a" 




i i : ! i^ ; 






: .g : : 
00 • • 


. CO . . . 

:S : : : 


:S 




.S 

to 




(M • t-eo • • • 


D oocjsin t- * 

■0C5 OCOCO . 
■-CS CO^ 


00 • CC 


00 1-.I 10 Ci tM tJ* CO ■ -i^ 

r)>doco-tio:o5ocoo -co 
oci 10 t- cocot-TjHin • t- 




§ 


a 












g :|5 : 








a 
o 






§ : ; : :!8 

... -co 














a 
2 








I : . ; ; CO • • 

; ; ; : 1 • • 

..... (jj . . 


: : = : \ 






1 


_a 












: ; ; ;^ i 






1 


a 

i 




23 : : : : : 

CC CO • • ; ; ; 












\ 


1 

ID 

c 
a 

a 

a> 
o 
.2 

§ 

a 
>3 








• : : : : 






: :| :g : 

• -CO "1—1 ■ 


: :^ : 




111 

126 

'4496' 
1402 
750 


1938 

18 

"501 
1518 
3891 
2239 

12" 


4206 
1198 
3282 

"'ib' 

29 


CO 


a 

00 








M Hi" i : 


.00 • .CO • 
.to . .1- . 
. t- . .in . 


. _4 t^ . . . 

• 00(M . • • 

• ,-1 10 . • • 




:§ 


a 

o 






.:::::?? 










:< 




a 








: • : : :g : : 








•^ 


_a 












; ; I ^ tX • 

. . . . 10 • 




g : 


;■* 


i 


o eio • • • • • 

SSS : ; : ": : 














I 

1/ 






ic, 

5' 
B 

0) 


Supply main 

Appleton 

Amherst 

Arlington 

Ash 

Ashland 


Auburn 

Baker 

Bay 

Bedford 


a . J 

3 2- 

U IB .- . 

QMMt 


Bridge 

Calef road 

Canal 

Clarke 


Central 

Chestnut 

Concord 

Church 

Dean 


QQf 


a • 
5H 



27 



M 


^ rH Tjl <H 1-1 CO O 


• t- 


eoco-H<Noc0O(Nco 


• eo lO Cl rH Si 


CO 


coosoo-*ocOTj<meo 


CO CO t— CO CO 


























































'^ 
























N 
















•(N 








. :'^ 


















-■ 






























eo 


• 1-1 eo T- iH iH «3 


jeo 


ffiNiHW*iatDeoe< 


• (NCOrHrHCO 








; eo CD cq « ^ (N eo eo 


;PiiNeoMe* 






IN 




































:- 




















•1-1 CD 






































































































































•* 




















^ 




































(N 






















































































































-- 




















eo 






































8 


<o 






























s 
































to 

s 


• coeo 




S^ 


00 

1 


CO 




C-1 T-i 

00 00 








CO 




>n 


1096 

1520 

1800 

1570 

1151 

863 

12 

1232 

2832 

370 

711 

8 

367 

6 

62 






i 






50 
(N 




























(M 












i 






:» 
































■* 


























































































































CO 




































1 






















































































































CO 




















s 
























• 


















i 




OS 
























s 
































N • 


00 lOiO ; 


CO 


to '• 

g : 

1-t • 


OOh-eO':DlOOOCO<N 


00 CD 00 

00 in CO 


05 




S 




CO r--(' t- 

00 t- CO 03 
CO 00 o rt* 






744 

2842 

868 

815 
































CO 










i 


















































i 






































































































o 

CO 


























































o • 












































































































































q 

Tit 
























to 


3 


a 


« 




c 


> 




c 
c 








c 

c 

a 


c 


"a 


T 


t- 

4 




a 


_i 




J 


s 


a 
c 






j: 


> 
r 

s 

> 


i 

-5 


i 


) 


c 






_^. 


^ 


c 


c 






CJ 


t. 


<ii 



28 



■^ 



oo 

CX) 



P5 

p 
o 



-t1 



P 

I— I 
Ah 

O 

P 

P 
H 

O 



•sjut'jp^H 


iH C-)05 




(M 




IMU5 


'^ , 


•* 


CO 


■^ 


"^ 


CO 




T-H • 1-H 


i"^ 




'^ 






CO (N as 




•saAiBA-aiy 


























: : i 
















ID 


9 






eor-i j . 


.'^ 














'•.^ . 
















3 


1-llMlO 


N 


IMCOrH 


(y« i-i,-(i-i • 






rt^r-l(M-HCIS 




CO 




















^ (N 








'^ 














a 
o 












IN 








(M 1 


























(N 








































.a 




'^ 










































s 


i ^ 










































c 
'S, 

O 
o 

J 

•a 

n 

CS 

M 

C 


a 
5 




g" : 


• if 
















• CO 




















00 00 't- • 


lO lO -^ O OS 


lO to t-00 t-O 

cocow ,^ 


OCJ 00— 1 ooc 




00 






















t-t C5 
05 








i 














o 














U5 








C5 • 




























1 




































































































































-a 

i 

p. 
_p 
n 

a 

a> 

o 

V 
13 

n 

C3 

"& 

n 




'•Oi • O 35 to • 
• M • CO 00 CO ■ 


• in 






























to 


lO r1* CO 

to 


i 


to 

CO 


o 


5 


















CO ffJlO 

■*iooo 


00 
















































o 














CO 


































<M 




CO 


























































































B 
O 
















































1 
CO 




0) 

ij 






! .: 

> 




''i 


3 : 

; . 

P : i. 

: <u 

! rt'a 


11 


■ C 


b4 

>■ 

s 
• -s 

JO "3i 

3 -u 


< 


( 

< 


p : 

' 2 ■- 

3 a 5 




" T3 3 £ 


p ': - 
I'M I 


1 


p 
5c 




ii 


' 1 
: d 

)C 


• E 

»i 

3.£ 
3t, 


3 1 

y 


i 

b 

3 
3 
) 



29 





_<N 


eO'^O) 


-< ,H t- CI CO ir 






(N 






rHCOiHr-lrtCOCOrH 


eo (N 


3 

■a< 












































t- 


-^ 






































:-""-< 


S 




- 




IM'1< 


^rt M W(Ni-< 




'^ 




.-ii-l<NrH(M^(M^« 


rHCO 


1 






1H 


-^ 






















OJ 
























CO 














- 














































s 


























































■* 


§ 




























































;:; 






























































00 


l- 






















S3 


t- ci 










-f 00 

lOO 

C4 




s 




o 

C-1 




O CS O -M CO O 

^ X -1 IC CC » 

,- — — lO IS 


■"g 


M^COlOC-lOOC.OO 
CO •* C-. 00 


s- 








If 

- 

1 




i 






O 














(N 






















- 


CO 

O 
^1 












o 
■at 
































































































o 




























































00 
O 

CO 






































































s 














eo 


00 

C3 














CO 

■a* 


§ 




















2 




H 












S2: 


s 


i 


o 


s 




■* 
•9 

00 
CO 
CO 














































































in 

CO 














































1.0 
































































i 
































































i 






























































IS 


c. 

1 


1 

c 

c 
c 

e 

c 


> 


^ 


c 
i- 

i 

c 

i 


ii 


( 
ji 


; 


E 




t- 
c 
t 
< 

i 

'J 


J 
< 




< 


; 








f 








? 


^ 


a 


^ 




? 


^ 
& 


cJ^ 


• 





30 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1886. 



Size. 


Cement-liued pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20 incli diameter 


20,573.90 ft. 


5,132.00 ft. 


8 


14 incb diameter 


6,8-25.00 " 


7,598.00 " 


11 


12 incli diameter 


7,983.00 " 


11,029.00 " 


20 


10 inch diameter 


5,015.75 " 


9,748.00 " 


14 


8 incli diameter 


12,563.00 " 


9,328.00 " 


32 


6 inch diameter 


81,744.50 " 


61,055.00 " 


- 240 


4 inch diameter 


8,000.00 " 


5,942.00 " 


28 




142,705.15 ft. 


110,432.00 ft. 


353 



27.027 miles of cement-lined pipe. 
20.915 " " cast-iron pipe. 



47.942 total miles. 

353 gates. 
404 hydrants. 
7 air-valves. 



METERS. 



The number of meters set during the 3^ear is one hun- 
dred and forty-one (141), making in all six hundred and 
thirteen (613). 

The number of applications for water to date has 
been twenty-nine hundred and seventy (2,970). 



SERVICE PIPES. 



One hundred and eighty-nine (189) service pipes have 
been laid this year, as follows : — 



31 



184 1 inch diameter 
5 2 inch diameter 

Total 



4,483.7 feet. 
81.7 " 

.4,565.4 feet. 



One one inch service pipe relaid with one and a half 
inch pipe. Two old service pipes extended thirty-three 
feet. 

Twenty-eight hundred and nine (2,809) service pipes 
have heen laid to date, as follows : — 



40 1 


inch diameter 


1,783 1 






917 1 






20 11 






5 IJ 






38 2 






6 4 







Total length of service 
iJiTumber of miles of service pi 



pipe 

pe, 13.991 



860.7 feet. 


46,887.4 " 




23,705.7 ' 




1,188.9 ' 




148.5 ' 




910.9 ' 




172.0 " 


73,874.1 feet. 



The income from the sale of water for 1886 has been 
as follows : — 



Received for water by rate 



" " " meters 

" rent of meters . 

" fines 

" building purposes 

" labor and pipe sold 

" wood 

" of B. P. Kimball (grass) 

" of G. G. Griffin . 



$52,812 11 
21,129 15 
444 30 
130 80 
287 40 
282 43 
^ 37 80 
5 00 
1 00 



Total received 
Abatements, $397.15. 



$75,129 99 



32 



Current expenses for 1886 
Construction expenses for 1 
Retained by city for interest 



Expenditures over receipts . 
Amount on hand Jan. 1, 1886 
Amount received 1886 



$17,713 83 




31,149 65 




36,000 00 




< 


^84,863 48 






19,733 49 


$28,058 77 




75,129 99 





$103,188 76 
Amount expended 1886 . . 84,863 48 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1886 


$18,325 28 


CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 


1886. 


Superintendence and repairs . 


19,532 


77 


Stationery and printing 


224 


30 


Office and incidental expenses 


5,237 


97 


Pumping expenses 


2,012 


57 


Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 






reservoir .... 


553 


26 


Repairs to buildings 


152 


96 


Running expenses for 1886 




$17,713 83 


Service pipes 


$2,121 


60 


Distribution pipes .... 


6,461 


13 


Fire-hydrants and valves 


1,291 


86 


Meters and fixtures 


2,274 


18 


Pumping machinery and building 


15,749 


24 


Force main 


1,095 


00 


Fencing 


206 


64 


Land and water rights . 


1,950 


00 


Total expended on construct 


;ion 


$31,149 65 


Total expended in 1886 


$48,863 48 



33 



Land and water rights . . $42,082 45 

Dam, canal, pen-stock, and races . 101,399 16 
Pumping machinery, pump-house, 

and buildings . . . 104,243 20 
Distributing reservoir and fixtures 71,542 36 
Force and supply main . . 89,769 02 
Distribution pipes . . . 326,019 29 

Fire-hydrants and valves . . 37,279 15 
Tools and fixtures . . . 10,649 35 
Boarding and store houses . . 919 36 

Roads and culverts . . . 2,193 49 

Supplies 550 39 

Engineering .... 22,176 19 

Livery and traveling expenses . 2,856 64 
Legal expenses .... 563 79 

Grading and fencing . . . 12,550 14 
Service pipes .... 40,898 98 
Meters and fixtures . . . 16,779 49 

Total construction account 
to Dec. 31, 1886 . 



$882,472 45 



Current expenses : — 



and 



Superintendence, collecting 

repairs 
Stationery, printing, etc. 
Ofiice and incidental expenses 
Pumping expenses and repairs 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 

reservoir 
Repairs to buildings 

Current expenses to Dec 
31, 1886 



. $91,272 


29 


. 4,721 


14 


. 14,952 


09 


. 20,804 87 


LI 

. 2,324 


01 


742 


69 




$134,817^09 



34 



Interest $40,678 51 

Highway expenditures . . 14,000 53 

$54,679 04 



Total amount of liills ap- 
proved to date . . $1,071,968 58 

Interest, discount, and labor per- 
formed on highways, trans., 
and tools and materials sold . $60,462 22 
Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1886 134,817 09 

$195,279 31 

Total cost, exclusive of inter- 
est and current expenses $876,689 27 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1885 .... $453,970 51 

Interest for 1886 .... 35,892 00 



Total interest and discount 
to Dec. 31, 1885 . . $489,862 51 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31, 1885 . . $305,000 00 

Amount used by city in 1886 . 36,000 00 



Total .... $341,000 00 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works : — 

1872,supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . $573 61 

1873,supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 177 07 
accrued interest on 

water bonds sold . 193 20 



35 



1873, accrued interest 

on state bonds sold $146 00 
water rents . . 1,920 53 
1874,supplies and mate- 
rials sold . . 607 89 
March 12, 1874, highway expendi- 
tures, trans, from 
water account . 14,000 53 
March 17, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account . 12,347 25 
Sept. 1, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account 
1874,water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 
Dec. 29, 1874, interest trans- 
ferred . 
Dec. 18, 1875, one anvil sold 
Sept. 25, 1875, engine, crusher, 
and material sold . 
1875,water and hydrant 
rent,' etc. 
May 20, 1876, derrick sold 
May 20, 1876, rent of derrick . 
1875,water and hydrant 

rent, etc. 
1877,water and hydrant 

rent, etc. 
1878,water and hydrant 
rent, etc. 
old plow sold . 
1879, derrick sold 
1879,water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 52,068 17 



22,361 


74 


30,233 


54 


4,566 


25 


15 


00 


2,089 


45 


27,119 


15 


125 


00 


24 


00 


38,879 47 


43,823 


30 


48,873 


26 


1 


00 


75 


00 



36 



1880,water and hydrant 




rent, etc. . . $57,395 25 


sale of grass 


10 00 


level, transit, etc. 


250 00 


1881,water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


60,164 62 


sale of grass 


10 00 


sale of derrick 


50 00 


received of G. G. 




Griffin 


1 00 


1882,vvater and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


67,403 76 


received of G. G. 




Griffin 


1 00 


1882, received of James 




Baldwin & Co. 


175 00 


received from the sale 




of grass 


10 00 


received from Good- 




hue & Birnie 


24 37 


received for old plank 


1 00 


received for use of 




derrick 


15 00 


1883, received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1 00 


received from sale of 




grass . 


20 00 


water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


73,437 20 


1884, received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1 00 


received for stone . 


5 00 


received from sale of 




grass 


10 00 



37 



1884, received from pipe 

sold and labor . $616 20 
received for water 

and hydrant rent . 74,947 88 

1885, received from G. 

G. Griffin . . 1 00 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass . . . 10 00 

labor and pipe sold . 13 45 

received for water 

and hydrant rent . 80,379 67 

1886, received from G. 

G. Griffin . . 1 00 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass ... 5 00 

for wood ... 37 80 

labor and pipe . 282 43 

water and hydrant 

rent . . . 74,803 76 



Total received for water, etc 
Amount appropriated to date 

Amount received to date . 
Amount of bills approved to date 



Amount transferred toward interest 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1886 



$791,293 86 
640,000 00 

$1,431,293 86 

1,071,968 58 

$359,325 28 
341,000 00 

$18,325 28 



CHAS. K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I hereby certify that I have examined [the accounts of 
the Manchester "Water- Works for the year 1886, and find 
the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL, 

Auditor. 
Manchester, N. H., Jan. 8, 1887. 



39 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


3 Cemeteries. 


^5 Churches. 


1 Orphanage. 


1 Court-house. 


1 Post-office. 


5 Hose companies. 


1 City Library. 


4 Fire-engines. 


5 Banks. 


1 Hook-and-ladder. 


4 Hotels. 


2 Opera-houses. 


1 Masonic Hall. 


1 Music Hall. 


1 Odd Fellows' HalL 


1 Convent. 


1 Holly-Tree Inn. 


1 City Hospital. 


3 Halls. 


1 Old Ladies' Home. 


22 Schoolhouses. 


1 Soldiers' Monument. 


1 Battery Building. 


1 Turner Hall. 


1 Skating Rink. 


MANUFACTURING 


ESTABLISHMENTS. 


1 Silver-plating. 


2 Sash and blind shops. 


1 Iron foundry. 


1 Brewery. 


2 Dye-houses. 


8 Shoe-shops. 


2 Machine-shops. 


1 Pop-corn. 


6 Clothing manufactories. 


1 Gas-works. 


4 Harness-shops. 


4 Slaughter-houses. 


1 Brush-shop. 


1 Soap manufactory. 


3 Carriage-shops. 


2 Needle manufactories. 


4 Cigar. 


2 Beer-bottling. 


1 Brass and copper foundry 


. 1 Book-bindery. 


1 Locomotive-works. 


1 Paper-mill. 


2 Electric light. 




MARKETS. 


7 Fish. 


2 Meat (wholesale). 


9 Meat and fish. 





40 





STABLES. 


14 Livery. 


683 Private. 


1 Horse-railroacl. 






OFFICES. 


8 Dentists. 


8 Printing. 


1 Telephone. 


1 Gas. 


1 Telegraph. 


8 Coal. 


2 Express. 






SHOPS. 


25 Barber. 


2 Currying. 


1 Wheelwright. 


4 Plumber and gas and 


9 Blacksmith. 


water pipe. 


5 Carpenter. 


8 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 


1 Gunsmith. 




' STORES. 


4 Auction. 


75 Grocery. 


21 Drug. 


5 Meal. 


9 Jewelry. 


3 Hardw^are. 


1 Fur. 


18 Boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing 


goods. 8 Stove. 


21 Fancy goods. 


15 Gents' furnishing goods, 


1 Wholesale paper. 


10 Book. 


5 Wholesale produce. 1 Leather and shoe-finders, 


15 Dry goods. 


3 Music. 


12 Candy. 


3 Upholstery. 


1 Cloak. 


6 Undertakers. 


15 Millinery. 


5 Bewing-machine. 


2 Tea. 


1 Feather-cleaner. 


2 Furniture. 





41 



10 Dining. 
6 Billiard. 



SALOONS. 

75 Liquor. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



6 Club-rooms, 

2 Bleacheries. 

8 Laundries. 

3 Ice-houses. 

9 Photographers. 



3 Greenhouses. 
1 Band-room. 
12 Bakeries. 
1 Waste. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 



6428 Famines. 

103 Boarding-houses. 
8068 Faucets. 
1102 Wash-bowls. 
1543 Water-closets. 

161 Wash-tubs. 

476 Bath-tubs. 

122 Urinals. 



1601 Sill-cocks. 
404 Fire-hydrants. 
30 Stand-pipes. 
19 Water-troughs. 
2 Drinking-fountains. 
1571 Horses. 
92 Cattle. 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 



BRANCHES. 



double 6 on 12. 
double 6 on 8. 
double 6 on 10. 
double 6 on 6. 
double 4 on 6. 
single 6 on 12. 
single 6 on 14. 



2 single 4 on 6. 
9 single 6 on 6. 
2 single 10 on 10. 

1 single 6 on 20. 
5 single 6 on 10. 

2 single 8 on 8. 

1 single 12 on 14. 



42 



1 14 by 12. 




2 12 by 6. 


1 8 by 6. 




CLAMP SLEEVES. 


4 20 in. 




6 14 in. 


13 12 in. 




15 10 in. 


17 8 in. 




7 6 in. 


3 4 in. 




WHOLE SLEEVES. 


1 20 in. 




6 10 in. 


8 12 in. 




4 14 in. 


16 6 in. 




6 8 in. 


3 4 in. 




BENDS. 


1 6 in. 1-4 bend. 


4 6 in. 1-8 bend. 


1 12 in. 1-8 bend. 


1 14 in. 1-8 bend, 


2 10 in. 1-8 bend. 


2 6 in. S. 






PIPE. 


488 ft. 20 


in. 


1848 ft. 6 in. 


348 ft. 14 


in. 


324 ft. 4 in. 


127 ft. 12 


in. 


48 ft. 8 in. 


1380 ft. 10 


in. 





GATES. 

3 4 in. coffin hub. 2 cast-iron domes. 

4 6 in. coffin hub. 11 6 in. cast-iron plugs. 
2 8 in. coffin hub. 1 14 in. cast-iron plug. 

33 bars lead. 180 ft. 2 in. pipe. 

1 reel lead pipe. 1354 ft. 3-4 in. pipe. 

176 ft. 1 1-2 in. pipe. 1353 ft. 1 in. pipe. 
75 ft. 1 1-4 in. pipe. 



R e: PO RT 



CITY ENGINEER 



City engineer's department. 



ORGANIZATION, 1886. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WmFRED H. BEXI^ETT. 



assistants. 

Harry M. Young, 
George W. Wales, 
John J. McDonough. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the Citif 
Councils : — 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting' my first annual 
report, being the eighth annual report, of the work in 
the City Engineer's office, and the several highway dis- 
tricts of the city of Manchester, for the year ending 
December 31, 1886. 

Expenses of the oflice for the year 1886 : — 



For salary of city engineer . 




$1,000 00 


salary of three assistants 




1,116 61 


supplies for the office 




94 34 


repairing instruments . 




9 40 


express on instruments . 




50 


stakes .... 




22 64 


horseshoeing and repairs 


of 




wagon and harness . 




67 95 


horse-car fares 




5 35 


incidental expenses 


- 


12 16 




12,328 95 


Amount charged to water com- 
pany 


10 07 



Total cost of the regular 
office work 



12318 88 



46 



Expense for soldiers' monument 



T. A. Lane, repairing piping 


$18 60 


S. M. Bennett, repairing fountaii 




basin .... 


6 00 


For water .... 


50 00 


gas .... 


11 01 


Total .... 





$85 61 

The amount of work clone in the office during the year 
is as follows : — 

IlTumber of orders for surveys, — street lines and 
grades ......... 830 

Number of orders for sewer and paving grades . 173 



Total number of orders .... 1003 
Levels for profiles for establishing grades 47,927 feet, 
equal to 9.08 miles. 

These profiles having three lines of levels 
on each street make a total distance actu- 
ally leveled of . 

Levels for sewer profiles 

Levels for other center profiles 

Levels in Pine Grove cemetery 

Levels in Valley cemetery . 

Levels for accident suits 

Total levels taken 
Equal to 35.99 miles. 
Surveys of streets and street lines 
Surveys in Pine Grove cemetery 
Surveys in Valley cemetery 
Surveys for accidents . 
Surveys for street numbers . 

Total surveys made . 
Equal to 21.87 miles. 



. 15,475 " 


. 17,708 " 


. 9,900 " 


. 2,900 " 


300 " 


. 190,064 feet 


s . . 81,790 feet 


. 9,400 " 


. 3,300 " 


900 " 


. 20,091 " 


. 115,481 feet 



47 



Street lines marked on ground . . . 72,068 feet. 
Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove cem- 
etery 13,160 " 

Lines of lots and avenues. Valley cemetery . 4,800 " 
Lines of land purchased .... 1,300 " 



Total length of lines marked on ground 91,328 feet. 
Equal to 17.30 miles. 



Grades set for sidewalks 
Grades set for macadamizing 
Grades set for grading streets 
Grades set for gutters . 
Grades set in Pine Grove cemetery 
Grades set in Valley cemetery 
Grades set for curb 
Grades set for sewers . 

Total length of grades set . 
Equal to 16.34 nnles. 



30,484 feet 
1,610 

8,779 
10,459 

8,900 

2,800 
10,871 
12,386 



86,289 feet. 



BATTERS SET. 

Beech-street culvert, at Cemetery brook. 
Spruce-street culvert, at Cemetery brook. 
Main-street engine-house, set twice. 
Webster-street engine-house. 

Old lots relaid in Pine Grove cemetery 
Old lots relaid in Valley cemetery . ' . 

Total cemetery lots laid out . 

Street numbers assigned and put on 



118 
64 

182 

371 



These have been assigned during the year, so that in- 
stead of taking two or three weeks in looking them up, as 



48 

has been the custom heretofore, they have been attended 
to in connection with onr other work. 

This year, as in previous years, the city engineer has 
investigated and made surveys in all cases where suits 
were liable to be brought against the city. 

Cases investigated but not surveyed . . . .15 
Surveys made for suits ...... 5 

Total suits investigated 20 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEAVALK GRADES. 

Belmont street, from Massabesic to Valley street. Two 
plans. 

Blaine street, from Main to Second street. Two plans. 

Bridge street, from Elm to Walnut east back street. 
Two plans. 

Cartier street, from Wayne to Sullivan street. 

Chestnut street, from Park to Merrimack street. 

Chestnut street, from Hanover to Amherst street. 

Concord street, from Ashland to Hall street. 

Cypress street, from Massabesic to Valley street. 

Elm west back street, from Market to Merrimack street. 

Elm street, at Bakersville. 

Hall street, from Hanover to Central street. Two plans. 

Hanover street, from Ashland to Beacon street. Two 
plans. 

Hanover street, from Chestnut to Pine street. 

Harrison street, from Union to Maple street. Two 
plans. 

Highland street, from Park to Laurel street. 

Kelley street, from Beauport street 4,260 feet westerly. 
Four plans. 

Laurel street, from Lincoln to Wilson street. 



49 

Linden street, from Bridge to Pearl street. 

Marion north back street, from McGregor to Main 
street. 

Merrimack street, from Wilson to Beacon street. Two 
plans. 

Milton street, from Hanover to Park street. Two plans. 

Monmouth street, from Main to McGregor west back 
street. 

Park street, from Elm to Chestnut street. 

Park street, from Pine street to Old Falls road. Six 
plans. 

Pearl street, from Russell to Linden street. 

Pine street, from Park to Merrimack street. 

Putnam street, from Beauport to Dubuque street. 

Salmon street, from Chestnut to Pine street. 

School street, from River to Main street. Two plans. 

Sullivan street, from Main to Dubuque street. Two 
plans. 

Summer street, from Elm to Franklin street. 

Union street, from "Webster to Clarke street. 

Five plans and profiles of streets not laid out. 

Total plans and profiles, 55. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Appleton street, from Elm to Union street. 
Appleton north back street, from Elm street 200 feet 
westerly. 

Beauport street, from Wayne to Sullivan street. 
Beech west back street, from Concord to Lowell street. 
Central street, from Wilson to Hall street. 
Chestnut street, from Webster to Clarke street. 
Concord street, from Ashland to Hall street. 
Elm street, from Webster to Clarke street. 

4 



50 

Elm east back street, from Bridge to Pearl street. 

Elm east back street, from Pennacook to Pennacook 
south back street. 

Hanover street, from Hall to Milton street. 

Lincoln street, from Laurel to Merrimack street. 

Linden street, from Pearl to Orange street. 

Marion street, from McGregor to Main street. 

McGregor street, from Bridge to Main street. 

McGregor west back street, from Amory to Main 
street. 

Pearl street, from Warren to Ashland street. 

Pearl street, from Oak to Russell street. 

Pennacook street, from Elm to Elm east back street. 

Pennacook south back street, from Elm east back street 
250 feet easterly. 

Pine east back street, from Webster street 800 feet 
southerly. 

Union street, from Webster to Clarke street. 

Warren street, from Bridge to Pearl street. 

Wayne street, from Beauport to Dubuque street. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 24. 

There were fifteen other sewer plans started last year, 
which have been completed for use this year. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Barr street, Granite street northerly. 
Green street. Granite street northerly. 
Parker street. Main to Winter street. 
Putnam street. Main to Dubuque street. 
Quincy street. Granite street northerly. 
Schuyler street, Main to Dubuque street. 
Sullivan street, Main to Dubuque street. 
Total numbering plans, 7. 



51 



MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 



Amherst and Maple streets, location of obstructions. 
Amoskeag Company's lots, copy of. 
Beech street, culvert at Cemetery brook. 
City farm buildings, insurance plan. 
City farm, James A. Weston's plan. 
City hall, proposed improvements. 
Elliot hospital lot and surrounding streets. 
Engine-house, proposed improvements. 
Flushing tank for sewers. 
Hanover square, proposed improvements. 
Hook-and-ladder house, proposed improvements. 
Island Pond road, location of the Weeks accident. 
Kelly street, copy of J. B. Sawyer's plan. 
Main street, engine-house lot. 
Main street, location of engine-house. 
Massabesic and Spruce streets, culvert at Cemetery 
brook. 

Mast road, at J. P. Brock's. 

McGregor bridge, disposal of sewerage at the west end. 

Merrimack square, proposed improvements. 

Pine Grove cemetery, section to be drained. 

Public bath-house. Two plans. 

River road, north, location of the telegraph accident. 

Stark farm. West Manchester. 

Webster street, engine-house lot. 

West Webster street, proposed extension. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 26. 

WORKING PLANS NOT RETAINED IN OFFICE. 

Adams street, Main to Dubuque street. Numbering 
plans. 



52 

Appleton north back street, Elm street \vesterl3^ Cen- 
ter profile. 

Beecli street, culvert. Drawing for arch. 

Blaine street. Main to Second street. Profile. 

Canal street, at passenger station. Cross section. 

Central street, Hall to Wilson street. Center profile. 

City farm buildings. Insurance plan. 

Chestnut street, Hanover to Amherst street. Profile. 

Chestnut street, Merrimack to Park street. Profile. 

Concord street, Ashland to Hall street. Center profile. 

Hanover street, Ashland to Hall street. Profile. 

Hanover street. Hall to Belmont street. Profile. 

Hanover street, Hall to Milton street. Center profile. 

Hanover street, Chestnut to Pine street. Profile. 

Linden street. Pearl to Orange street. Center profile. 

Main street, engine-house lot. 

Main street, sewer template. 

Maple and Amherst streets, location of obstructions. 

Mast road. Bowman street westerly. Profile. 

Mast road, at J. P. Brock's. 

McGregor bridge, disposal of sewerage at west end. 

Milford street, Bow^man street westerly. Center 
profile. 

Milton street, Hanover to Manchester street. Center 
profile. 

Park street, Elm to Chestnut street. Profile. 

Park street. Elm to Pine street. Center profile. 

Park street. Pine to Maple street. Center profile. 

Pearl street, Warren to Linden street. Center profile. 

Pine street. Central to Laurel street. Profile. 

Pine east back street, Webster street southerly. Cen- 
ter profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Profile of Beech avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Profile for fence. 



53 

Pine Grove cemetery. Profile of Oakland avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Profile of Cypress avenue. 

Public bath-house. Two plans. 

Putnam street, Main to Dubuque street. Numbering 
plan. 

Schuyler street, Main to Dubuque street. Numbering 
plan. 

Spruce street, Lincoln to Wilson street. Profile. 

Sullivan street. Main to Dubuque street. Numbering 
plan. 

Summer street. Elm to Franklin street. Profile. 

Warren street, Bridge to Pearl street. Center profile. 

Webster street, sewer template. 

Total working plans, 42. 

TKACINGS. 

Amoskeag, plan of land. 

Beech street, culvert at Cemetery brook, for contractor. 

Canal street, at passenger station, cross section. 

City farm buildings, for insurance company. 

Elliot hospital land and surrounding streets. 

Hanover square, proposed improvements. 

Hook-and-ladder house, proposed improvements. 

Main street, engine-house lot. 

Maple and Amherst streets, location of obstructions. 

Mast road, at J. P. Brock's. 

McGregor bridge, disposal of sewerage at west end. 

McGregor and Amory streets, for sewer map. 

Merrimack square, proposed improvements. 

Pine Grove cemetery, section in northwest part, for 
superintendent. 

Pine Grove cemetery, section for tren surer. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots south of Autumn path, for 
superintendent. 



64 

Pine Grove cemetery, section to be drained. 
Public bath-house. Four plans. 
River road, north, for city solicitor. 
Southern section of city, showing sewerage. 
Spruce street, culvert at Cemetery brook, for contractor. 
Summer street, Elm to Franklin street. Center pro- 
file, for water-works. 

Valley cemetery, section for treasurer. 
Valley cemetery, proposed improvements. 
Webster street, engine-house lot. 
Total tracings, 28. 

MAPS. 

City of Manchester, large map, showing sewers. 

In connection with the year's work, seventy six (76) 
tracings from the Amoskeag Company's plans have 
been copied in a book designed for that purpose, and 
properly indexed. These plans show that portion of 
the city originally owned by the Amoskeag Company, 
and the lots as laid out by them. 

Total of all plans made, 274. 

The back work in the office has been carried forward 
as rapidly as circumstances would permit. 

Plans of all new highways laid out to December 31, 
1886, have been made in the city clerk's book of records. 
All sewers laid to the same date have been drawn in 
the city clerk's book of sewers, and upon the sewer 
map in this office. 

The index and catalogue of plans have been brought 
up to December 1, 1886 ; the index to level books to 
December 31, 1886 ; and the index to transit books to 
September 22, 1886. 



55 

GRADES ESTABLISHED. 

The following grades have been established during 
the year : — 

Belmont street, from Massabesi* to Valley 

street ....... 1,680 feet. 

Blaine street, from Main to Second street . 1,065 " 

Bridge street, from Elm to Union street , 1,400 " 
Chestnut street, from Park to Merrimack 

street 720 " 

Chestnut street, from Hanover to Amherst 

street 275 " 

Concord street, from Ashland to Hall street 557 " 
Cypress street, from Massabesic to Valley 

street 430 " 

Elm street, at Bakersville . . . . 800 " 
Elm west back street, from Market street to 

Merrimack street ..... 466 " 

Hanover street, from Chestnut to Pine street 320 " 
Hanover street, from Ashland to Beacon 

street 1,360 " 

Hall street, from Hanover to Central street 980 " 

Harrison street, from Union to Maple street 1,030 " 

Highland street, from Park to Laurel street 442 " 

Kelley street, from Beauport street westerly . 4,260 " 

Laurel street, from Lincoln to "Wilson street 620 " 

Linden street, from Bridge to Pearl street . 494 " 
Marion north back street, from McGregor to 

Main street 352 " 

Merrimack street, from Wilson to Beacon 

street 1,350 " 

Milton street, from Hanover to Park street . 1,235 " 
Monmouth street, from Main to McGregor 

west back street . . . ■ . . 219 " 



56 

Park street, from Elm to Chestnut street . 570 feet. 
Park street, from Pine street to Old Falls 

road 3,600 " 

Pearl street, from Piissell to Linden street . 403 " 

Pine street, from Park to Merrimack street 720 " 

Salmon street, from Chestnut to Pine street 312 " 

School street, from River to Main street . 950 " 

Sullivan street, from Main to Beauport street 300 " 

Union street, from Webster to Clarke street 1,169 " 



Total grades established . . . 28,079 feet. 
Equal to 5.32 miles. 

NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT. 

Blaine street. Main to Third street . . 50 feet wide. 
Kelley street, Beauport street west 4260 ft. 50 " " 
Mast street. Main street to west line of E. 

W. Brigham's land . . . . 50 " " 
Monmouth street. Main to McGregor west 

back street 50 " " 

School south back street, Fourth to River 

street 20 " "" 

River street, Ferry street to M. & JS". W. 

R. R. . . . . . . . 50 " 

HIGHWAYS WIDENED. 

Laurel street, Lincoln to "Wilson street, to 50 feet. 



SCHEDULE OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, 18H6. 





KIND AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 


1 


NAME OF STREET. 


Akboh Pipe. 


PoETLAND Pipe. 


Cement Pipe. 


Earthen 
Pipe. 


Brick Sewers. 


a 






Sin. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


Sin. 


12 in. 


18 in. 


9 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


16 in. 

by 
24 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


29 ill. 


36 in. 


42 in. 


i 
44 in.; 57 in. 


17 in. 
26^. 


20 in. 

by 
30 in. 


24 in. 

by 
36 in. 


27iin. 

by 
36 in. 


29 in. 

by 

39 in. 


29Jin. 

by 

44 in. 


30 in. 
46\. 


32 in. 

by 

48 in. 


36 in. 


fi 
1- 








267 
520 
433 



















1 


"no' 










"'915 


' '735' 



























190 
52 

325 
90 

300 

mo 


575 








Amory 




























...... 






' 




1 















485 


Arlington 

Ash 




400 


' ' 270 



















































...... 













325 












775 













































































"135 

"156 
1,225 

























1 


























135 








506 
140 
160 
60 








"90' 






'"ieo 














' * 315 












! 
























150 
470 
460 
400 


1,005 

1,855 

550 

400 

1,430 

6,T22i 

130 

2,561 

1,650 

2,540 

520 

4,04U 

1,300 

550 

.380 




































j 






























































.... . ... 



















Birch 










































1 






































600 




830 
























**"[ "* 


























1,850 
90 


275 


300 
























1,460 








400 




















750 


187i 

















40 






























































































710 










1,851 




Cedar 




















150 








































1,500 








1,180 














1,300 
130 

1,020 
130 
330 














































160 

470 




^ 






















230 






1 




























1,710 
550 
140 
380 
240 


























840 












[ i 


















390 
80 












100 


























1 




















































1 



















































































130 
















































































525 


















































525 









780 
470 
5C0 
















150 












630 




























































1 


















- 


















500 





























































1,000 
510 






270 
310 














240 






















1 














































1 








• 








1 












Elm 




190 
2,070 
3,130 






440 




470' 




440 




705 

1,460 

740 










1 




435 


520 


' 


1,140 




950 


' 1,100 


1.050 


2,131 







10,748 








480 












1 






' 






4,480 

3,870 

130 






















! 










1 
































130 














. [ 






—■■■, — ■■■ 

































1 
















690 


[ 














1 


1 










690 


Franklin 








2,050 


900 












550 


490 








1 .... 








i 


1 














3,090 








589 






















■ 










1 














5S9 












950 




510 


1,460 


540 


120 

770 










... . 








390 




















9U 


3,705 


Hall 






525 














1 






1 


:::: 

















1.805 








406 






















1 








1 























406 






















2,435 


















1 






















3.126 






























210 




) 
























210 














845 




1,390 




560 










1 































2,795 






















... . . 








1 
























2,905 


Harrison am M K L- 






450 
375 
















860 










































1,310 






























































375 


High . . . 


















330 
700 










.... t 








1 




















330 

























































700 






430 
285 






























. .. . 








. 














430 
























































285 


















1,705 


500 
1,510 










"516" ".'."..' 
■ "i 








:;::::::::;: 







1 

1 














2.206 




. 


110 


flfin L. 




90 




.;:::. 


3-'!S 


Lincoln 




440 240 












Amount carried up. . 


220 


7,622 


20,287 


2,635 


2,050 


2,290 


2,090 


640 


6,810 


540 


17,245 


490 


710 




690 


510 


1,155 


3,235 


1,535 


520 


390 


400 


1,140 


450 


1,197 3,160 




1,100 


2,550 


2,131 


2,601 277i 


86,7G0i 



SCHEDULE OF SEWERS JANUARY 1, 1886. — Concluded. 





KIND AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 


1. 


NAME OF STREET. 


Akbon Pipb. 


PoBTLANn Pipe. 


Cehbnt Pipe. 


Earthen 
Pipe. 


Buck Sewers. 


1 






Sin. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


16 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


Sin. 


12 in. 


18 in. 


9 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


16 in. 

by 
24 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


29 in. 


36 in. 


42 in. 


44 in. 


57 in. 


17 in. 20 in. 

by by 
26 in. 30 in. 


24 in. 

by 
36 in. 


271 in. 

by 
30 in. 


29 in. 

by 
39 in. 


29Hn. 30in. 

by by 
44 in. 46 in. 


32 in. 
48 L. 


36 in. 


fi 
I- 


Amount brought up. 


220 


7,622 
1,155 


20,287 


2,635 
650 


2,060 


2,290 


90 


2,090 


640 


6,810 


540 


17,245 

1,900 

260 


490 


710 





690 
940 

' ' '175 


510 


1,155 


3,236 


1,535 


520 


390 


400 


1,140 


450 


1,197 


3,160 




1,100 


2,550 


2,131 


2,601 


2771 


80,7601 
4,645 
1.270 






210 














800 


""126 




.....y.. '.'-'.'■ 






1,005 
"73b 







































































1,425 




















2,605 

3,115 

5,909 

290 

1,007 

3,794 

2,420 

8US 

535 

1,525 

1,600 

2,706 






75 
325 


2,410 
1,087 














190 




100 








340 




i,'270 












1,627 























970 
170 
729 






































120 














































.... 














276 












614 



.......:.:. 












1,250 
1,050 




130 
620 


840 


1 . . 








960 




































850 
285 










































































620 













































450 
















86 


































































1,525 








: ::;:.; 






















■ 








. ..N.. 















i.soo 

336 


































































^ 




















1,680 












790 


































Orange south back 


180 
















500 

















































370 

2,730 
448 
80 
40 
470 
400 
686 
120 
1,700 
















sio 




















































230 
406 














120 
















































3.0tiO 
854 












































1 
























575 


65 


60 










602 




1,064 
160 








1;::... 














1 




















2,446 
200 






































1 





















































1,000 












j.... 




















1,470 
400 














































..i ...1 








. .. 












50 


260 
300 
















1,275 














600 






























2,771 
















































' 












420 




30 































































1,730 
















1,740 


















































1,740 








350 






























































350 


Oninpv 




70 
1,180 
1,075 
































































70 






































































1,180 






































































1,075 


a ^ ^ 






150 
250 






























































150 






1 




■■ 


























































250 


School 




460 










250 
345 
































1 




















710 










































1* 




















345 






225 


















130 
130 
330 












































355 














































1 






^ 














130 






250 l.iSO 




















"400 


"780" 
























"sob' 


iim 












2,530 


TUird 












375 













375 












1,640 


970 




5,915 






600 


1 mn 














820 




































2,450 






"^ 










360 
115 
















1,210 








800 






























































915 






















350 
1,030 

""220 














































350 


Walni^t (.aaf' hni^fr 






1,100 




























































2,130 


Washington % 






2C0" 
300 












320 
"356 








;:;•;;; 






























..!!!. 


...... 





320 
75 


Wayne"!' *'°"..'?;: 
West 




j 415 


870 


Wilson 

Total fe«t, each size. 


480 


125 

19,553 38,221 


0,185 


3,870 


3,260 90 


3,535 


640 


15,342 


660 


350 
27,904 


1,330 


1,110 


1,300^ 


1,805 


850 


2,945 


6,430 


2,805 


620 


390 


400 


1,140 


1,300 


1,527 


U97 


3,960 


1,200 


1,100 


2,550 


2,iir 


2,601 


277J 


158,6081 



Total feet Akron pipe, 

'* miles " " 

Total miles of sewers 



71,569; 
13..55; 
of all kinds, 30.04. 



cement pipe, 49,451 ; 
9.37; 



brick sewers, 29,251; Iron, 277^. 
5.54; " 0.062; 



57 



SEWERS BUILT IN 1886. 



Street . 



Canal 

Bridge 

River road 

Webster 

Hall 

Main 

Pennacook 

Webster 

Beauport 

Elm 

Elm east back 

Elm east back 

Hancock 

Hamilton 

Marion 

Pejinacook south back 

Wayne • 

Appleton north back. . 

Beauport 

Beauport 

Beech west back 

Central 

Concord 

Hamilton 

Hanover 

Laurel south back 

Lincoln 

Linden 

Maple 

Merrimack 

Milton 

Nashua 

Pearl 

Pearl 

Pine west back 

Spruce, East 

Warren 

Ash 

Ashland 

Beech 

Bridge 

Canal 

Cedar 

Cedar south back 

Central 

Central. .. 

Chestnut 

Chestnut 

Concord 

Elm 

Elm 

Hanover 

Hanover 

High 

Linden 

Lowell 

Manchester 

Maple 

Merrimack 

Merrimack 

Nashua 

Nashua 



Pennacook to Salmon 

Union to Nashua 

Salmon to Webster 

River road to Elm 

And Old Falls road 

From West Hancock, southerly. .. 

Elm to Elm eaSt back 

Elm to Pine east back 

From Putnam, sontherly - 

From Webster, northerly 

Pennacook to Pennacook so. back. 

Bridge to Pearl 

From Hamilton, westerly 

From Hancock, southerly 

From McGregor, westerly 

From Elm east back, easterly 

From Beauport, westerly 

From Elm, westerly 

From Putnam, northerly 

From Putnam, southerly 

Concord to Lowell 

From Hall, westerly 

From Ashland, easterly 

From Hancock, southerly 

Hall to Milton 

From Wilson, westerly 

From Merrimack so. back, north'ly 

From Pearl, northerly 

Corner of Amherst street 

West of Wilson street 

From Hanover, southerly 

From Pearl, southerly 

Warren to Linden . 

From Linden, easterly 

From High, southerly 

At Massabesic street 

Bridge to Pearl 

Comer of Amherst street 

Corner of Concord street 

Near Hanover street 

Near Pine street 

Corner of Salmon street 

Corner of Pine street 

East of Pine street 

Corner of Union street 

Corner of Beech street 

Corner of Merrimack street.. . . 

Corner of Central street 

Corner of Pine street 

Corner of Webster street 

Corner of Appleton street 

Corner of Maple street 

Corner of Milton street 

Corner of Maple street 

<Dorner of Bridge street 

Corner of Union street. . . . i . . . 

Near Elm street 

Corner of Laurel street 

Corner of Lincoln street 

Corner of ( hestnut street 

Corner of Maple street 

Corner of Lowell street 





Size in 


Length 


Material. 


inches. 


in feet. 


Brick. 


24x36 


495 


" 


24x36 


1,537 J 


" 


24x36 


1,175 


" 


24x36 


091J 


Akron. 


15 


122 


" 


15 


100 


" 


15 


139 


" 


15 


1,120 


" 


12 


l.TO 


" 


12 


406 




12 


109 




12 


274 


" 


12 


454 


<' 


12 


80 


I' 


12 


233 


I' 


12 


225 


" 


12 


100 


'1 


10 


269 


" 


10 


459 


" 


10 


357 


" 


10 


!56 


" 


10 


386 


" 


10 


175 


" 


10 


150 


" 


10 


617 


" 


10 


67 


" 


10 


154 


" 


10 


2C4 


" 


10 


10 


" 


10 


65 


" 


10 


146 


" 


10 


90 


" 


10 


196 


" 


10 


160 


" 


10 


140 


'< 


10 


80 


'< 


10 


506 


" 


8 


28 


" 


8 


9 


>i 


8 


15 


" 


8 


9 


'< 


8 


30 


" 


8 


20 


" 


8 


8 


" 


8 


30 


" 


8 


28 


" ! 8 


32 


8 


72 


" 


8 


30 


'• 


8 


50 


" 


8 


4 


" 


8 


50 


" 


8 


25 


" 


8 


18 


" 


8 


40 


" 


8 


20 


" 


8 


14 


<< 


8 


15 


" 


8 


55 


" 


8 


45 


" 


8 


26 


" 


8 


18 



58 



SEWERS BUILT IN 1886. — Continued. 



Streets. 


Location. 


Material. 


Size in 
inches. 


Length 
in feet. 


Oak 




Akron. 


8 

8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


58 


Orange 




20 




106 


Park 


From Elin east back, easterly .... 

Corner of Maple street 

Corner of Chestnut street 


226 


Pearl 


54 




100 




12 


Pine 




28 


Pine 


Corner of Merrimack street 

Between Spruce and Park 

On line of sewer 


35 


Pine 


27 




28 


Webster 


50 


Webster 


Corner of Chestnut street 

Corner of Elm west back street. . . 


75 




8 








13,276 



SEWERS RELAID. 



Streets. 


Location. 


Material. 


Size in 
inches. 


Length 
in feet. 




From Piscataquog River, southerly 
From Piscataquog River, northerly 


Brick. 
Akron. 


24 
15 


75 


Main 


70 




145 



Total brick sewers, 24 X 36 inches 

" 15-inch Akron pipe 

" 12-inch " " . . 

" 10-inch " " . . 

" 8-inch " " (Dist. 2 only) 

Total length of sewers for the year 
Equal to 2.54 miles. 

Number of catch-basins built, 77. 
N^umber of man-holes built, 21. 
Number of lamp-holes built, 3. 



. 3,899 


feet. 


75 




. 1,551 




. 2,031 




. 4,347 




) . 1,518 




ear . 13,421 


feet. 



59 



SEWERS ORDERED BUT NOT BUILT. 

Bridge street, Nashua to Russell street, 

24 X 36 inches, brick .... 175 feet. 

"Webster street. Pine east back to Union 

street, 15-inch, Akron .... 330 " 

Main street, Milford southerly, 15-inch, 

Akron 985 " 

SEWERS. 

Webster-Street. — This sewer was begun at a point just 
north of Pennacook on Canal street, and continued 
through Canal to Salmon street. Up to this point, no 
serious obstructions were met with, the sewer in this 
section being as near the surface as at any place in the 
line. After crossing Salmon street, in Rive rroad, quite 
an amount of blasting was needed to clear away portions 
of a ledge and large boulders which obstructed the course. 
On this portion of the sewer several changes of line were 
necessary, owing to the bends in the highway ; and 
wherever a change was made, a lamp-hole or a man-hole 
was placed, for convenience in the future examination of 
the sewer. Boulders and hard gravel were encountered 
throuo-h all of River road and in Webster street until the 
hill was reached near Elm street. Here the top stratum 
was a clear, sharp sand, ten feet in depth, below which 
came hard, blue gravel, which had to be picked out inch 
by inch. The cut through this hill was twenty feet in 
depth. After passing Elm street, the stratum of sand 
disappeared, and through the remainder of the work marl 
and gravel were encountered to Bay street, then a dry 
gravel, which necessitated a very careful and complete 
bracing. 

At Elm street, a man-hole was built, and connections 
made for a sewer running northerly in Elm street. 



60 

From Brook street to this man-hole the sewer is of 
brick, 24x36 inches; from this point easterly, a 15-inch 
Akron pipe was laid. At Chestnut street, provisions 
were made for connecting a sewer which was called for to 
dispose of the surface water which collects at Appleton 
street. 

The Webster-street sewer is completed to Pine east 
back street, leaving about three hundred feet to be built. 

The cost of this sewer, when completed to Union street, 
will be about $28,000. 

Great care has been taken in fixing grades throughout 
the entire length of this sewer, provisions being made for 
all future sewers to be connected therewith, which will 
obviate the necessity of changing or relaying any portion, 
as has been the case with so much of the sewerage work 
in the past. That section of the sewer between Elm and 
Chestnut streets should have been built of brick, 20 x 30 
inches ; although the 15-inch Akron pipe which is there 
now will suffice for a few years, it will eventually have to 
be removed and a brick sewer substituted. 

JSTotes have been collected and plans made — which are 
on file in this office — for draining the entire section north 
of Webster street. 

Ehn-Strcet. — This was commenced as soon as possible 
after the main sewer had been completed far enough for 
the connection to be made. The cut at this place was 
twenty feet, owing to the grade necessary for draining 
the section around Clarke street. 

Although the sewerage in this section was planned 
previous to my taking the office, the notes in reference to 
it could not be found. 

Bridge-Street. — The year's work on this sewer began at 
the man-hole in Union street and extended easterly fifteen 
hundred feet. 



61 



The deepest cut on this line of sewer (seventeen feet) 
occurred at Maple street. 

At the back street east of Union street, ledge was first 
encountered, which extended as far as Ash street, varying 
in depth from one to fifteen feet. 

Owing to the slow progress and great expense attendant 
upon hand drilling, the city voted to purchase a steam 
drill, which greatly facilitated the work through the ledge. 

The boiler used in connection with the drill furnished 
power for removing the stone from the trench. This was 
the most extensive piece of ledge ever encountered in 
city work. 

Total cost of sewer to date . . . . $19,193 73 
Appropriation 19,000 00 



Amount overran .... $193 73 

The excavation on the Webster-street sewer was under 
the direction of John C. Clifford, and that on the Bridge- 
street sewer under George M. Hobbs. Samuel W. Glea- 
son had charge of the brick-work on both sewers. Much 
credit is due them for the care exercised in directing the 
work. 

Main-Street. — This was one of the most difficult pieces 
of 'iewer work ever encountered in the city. The one 
hundred feet built this year was through a hard curly 
ledge of trap-rock formation, through which hand drills 
made very slow progress. 

I would suggest here that, when work is commenced 
again, the steam drill be used, as the work can then be 
carried forward at much less cost than it was this year. 

Before leaving the work, test-pits were dug and meas- 
urements made, which show the ledge to be about eighty- 
five feet in length from the present terminus, necessitating 



62 

the removal of about one hundred and twenty-five cubic 
yards of stone. This sewer is planned to continue to A 
street, and after passing the ledge the work will progress 
much faster. 

Bridge-Street Sewer. — During investigations in this 
sewer, it was discovered to be slowly falling in for a dis- 
tance of twenty-three feet. It was, when built, three feet 
in diameter, and when measured this year had flattened 
so that it was only 2' 2"x3' 10'^ In repairing the sewer 
much trouble was experienced on account of the large 
amount of water which passes through it, and the position 
of the break being directly under the main track of the 
Concord railroad. Extra precautions were taken in 
repairing it, so that no trouble will be experienced here- 
after. 

SEWERS NEEDED. 

Plans have been made and accepted for the disposal of 
the sewerage of Chestnut and Appleton streets, to connect 
with the Webster-street sewer. These sewers are very 
much needed, and should be built the coming year. 

There are several sewers needed in the eastern section 
of the city. That portion lying between Elm and Lincoln 
streets south of Cedar street will soon have to be drained, 
in connection with which a sewer should be built in Bel- 
mont street. Some means will also have to be provided 
for disposing of the sewerage of Wilson, Merrimack 
Laurel, and Hall streets, which now drains into Cemetery 
brook. A large main is needed for this purpose. Three 
routes have been proposed, the first beginning at Union 
and Cedar streets, thence easterly in Cedar street to Lin- 
coln street, thence through Lincoln street to Spruce 
street, and easterly in Spruce street to Massabesic street. 

The second course beginning at the Elm-street main 
at Auburn street, thence through Auburn street to Maple 



63 

street, thence through Maple street to Cedar street, then 
in Cedar street to Lincohi street, through Lincohi street 
to Spruce street, and through Spruce street to Massabesic 
street. 

The third project, advocated by some, is to make Cem- 
etery brook the main sewer. This latter course would 
entail a great expense, besides destroj'ing one of the most 
beautiful natural features of the Valley cemetery. 

The sewer in Manchester north back street east of 
Union street needs relaying; also the Elm east back 
street sewer from Amherst street northerly. 

This latter sewer causes much trouble and expense in 
keeping it clear. By lowering it and connecting it with 
the Elm-street sewer, a sufficient grade may be obtained 
to prevent it from being continually clogged up, as at 
present. 

Manchester street east of Beech street needs a small 
sewer and two or more cesspools for the disposal of the 
large amount of surface water. 

The sewer in Elm west back street, near the Franklin- 
street schoolhouse, should be one of the first to be con- 
sidered by the new board. 

It is an old cement pipe connected with the main 
sewer at Elm and Central streets. This sub-sewer has 
given much trouble, as the cement pipe, being old and 
rotten, had fallen in in some places, requiring patching 
with new pipe. 

In West Manchester, a sewerage plan has been made 
for the drainage of that section north of Amory street 
and west of McGregor street, including north Main street, 
which is recommended by the committee to the incoming 
board. A sewer is needed on Ferry street between Main 
and Third streets, as the Main-street sewer is not low 
enough — being only four feet below the surface — to 



64 

drain this section. That section west of Dover street, in- 
cluding Douglas and Granite streets, consists of cement 
pipe, and having been in the ground a long time, is in 
such a condition that it must soon be relaid. 

Amosl^eag and Bakersville, two of the oldest sections 
of the city, both desire a sewer. In the latter place, some 
means should be provided, at an early date, for draining 
River road and Elm street. When the Hancock-street 
sewer was constructed this year, provisions were made so 
that ^'hen the above sewers are called for, they may bo 
drained through this street. 

In Amoskeag, as has been mentioned in previous re- 
ports, there is much need of a sewer from the brick store 
north to Black brook. 

Flushing. — The fireman's hose and hydrant service is 
not sufiicient for this work, and steps could be wisely 
taken in this direction which would improve the facilities 
for the cleaning and care of our sewers. Much attention 
has been given to flushing this year, and in the future, 
with suitable apparatus, many of the sewers which are 
now almost useless, owing to accumulations in them, 
could be made to perform their work properly. What- 
ever appliance is used, it is necessary to have more man- 
holes and lamp-holes to render the sewers accessible. 

Man-holes. — All new sewers have been supplied with 
man-holes, built according to the most approved plan. 
They are a decided improvement on the old form, being 
elliptical instead of circular, and having the bottom made 
with special reference to the situation. 

Lam.p-holes. — These have been supplied in all cases 
where necessary. A design was prepared and castings 
made for an improved cover, which has given entire sat- 
isfaction. They are preferable to the old style, being less 
expensive and far more convenient. 



65 

Ventilation. — This is a subject which should receive 
much attention, as it is necessary that all sewers should 
be well ventilated in order to have them properly perform 
the work for which they are intended. In all the sewers 
constructed this year, this object has been attained by 
having perforated covers on all the man-holes ; but thus 
far nothing has been done toward supplying the old sewers 
with them. The Union-street sewer should be one of the 
first to receive attention, as it can readily be ventilated by 
replacing the present solid covers on the man-holes with 
perforated ones. 

Traps. — Those in use in the cesspools for a few years 
have been of the same pattern as those in use in the city 
of Providence, and which were recommended to that city 
by J. Herbert Shedd, C. E. In his recommendation, he 
stated that it was necessary that the seal of the trap should 
be secured by having the cesspool always filled with 
water to the required height ; but here in Manchester, 
where the soil is dry, and one half the cesspools are poorly 
constructed, it is impossible to keep them filled with 
water. In the cesspools built this year, a brick trap has 
been made different from those heretofore used, which has 
given perfect satisfaction. A judicious expenditure could 
be made by appropriating a sufficient amount of money 
to enable the cesspools to be kept properly supplied with 
water during the dry seasons. 

COMMaNS. 

James Patten, superintendent, has had charge of the 
work upon the several commons. 

Merrimack Square. — The culvert here has been extend- 
ed one hundred and twenty feet, and a large amount of 
filling done. A plan has been prepared for future im- 
provements in this square, showing the proposed walks, 



66 

and changes to be made in the pond. The features of 
this plan are to continue the culvert along the south side 
of the present pond, connecting it with the present outlet, 
thus disposing of the water which now fills the pond ; to 
reduce the area and depth of the present pond, then by 
supplying it with city water and the overflow from the 
fountains of the soldiers' monument, it will be kept clear. 

Hanover Square. — Plans have been made for improve- 
ments in this square, embodying changes similar to those 
in Merrimack square. These plans have been approved 
and accepted by the city government. 

Park Square. — Thirteen elm trees were set out to re- 
place those which had died. 

Tremont Square. — The fence around this square has 
been repaired. The flower-beds have received proper 
attention, the grass has been cut every two weeks, and 
the several commons raked as often as necessary. 

CEMETERIES. 

Amoskeag. — Trustees: Councilman Frank O. Clement, 
chan^man, Messrs. H. Stearns and John E. Stearns. 
!Nothing has be'en done the present year at this cemetery. 

Pine Grove, — Trustees: Alderman S. P. Cannon, chair- 
man. Councilman G. W. Bacon, Messrs. H. H. Huse, 
G. P. Whitman, and James A. Weston. That part of 
the cemetery south of Autumn path and east of Oakland 
avenue was graded early in the season, necessitating a 
relaying of lots. This section was raised about two feet, 
greatly improving the lots, which have previously been 
covered with water in the spring time. The grade which 
had been fixed on Oakland avenue, between Spruce and 
Locust avenues, being unsatisfactory to the committee, as 
it was too low, a new grade was established and the ave- 
nue made to conform to it. Grade was set for Beech 



67 

avenue from the lodge house to the northwest corner of 
the cemetery, and grade fixed for the adjoining lots. The 
section west of Beech avenue had all to he restaked, owing 
to the bounds having been disturbed by the removal of 
the trees and stumps. Grade was set for raising the sec- 
tion at the northwest corner of Elmwood and Willow 
avenues. 

Early in the season the committee decided to ascertain 
if Straw's pond could be drained, as a large amount of 
muck might be obtained. Accordingly, surveys were 
made and levels taken, which showed that if the culvert 
in Calef road was lowered two feet, the object could be 
attained. As they decided to do this, grade was given 
for the changes. 

The question of draining that section near the intersec- 
tion of Willow and Elmwood avenues, which has been 
covered by water in the winter and spring, was again 
brought up, .and by order of the committee surveys were 
made to see if this water could be disposed of. The result 
of the surveys showed that a drain could be constructed 
from Pine avenue, through Willow and Spruce avenues 
and Wildey path, connecting with the culvert in River 
road. This plan was accepted and the work carried out 
accordingly. 

Each year demonstrates more forcibly the need of a 
complete plan of the cemetery. At present, whenever it 
is desired to give the lines of a lot, much time is required 
owing to the insufiicient data. It now takes a half-day's 
work to do that which might be done in an hour's time, 
provided a complete plan was at hand. It is hoped the 
incoming board will deem it of such importance that an 
appropriation will be made which will allow such a plan 
to be made. In connection with this, good, substantial 
bounds should be set throughout the cemetery, which will 



68 

readily allow the retracing of old lines. There have been 
ninety-two lots relaid and line and grade given for twenty- 
six other lots for improvements. 

Valley. — Trustees : Alderman J. A. McCrillis, chair- 
man, Councilman C. J. Abbott, Messrs; G. C. Gilmore, 
B. W. Hill, and D. 0. Furnald. 

Plans were submitted and accepted for improvements 
in the valley near East avenue. Lines have been given 
in many places for straightening the walks and paths, 
which have been neglected from year to year till they 
were almost lost sight of. Lines were also given for the 
lots between East, Public, Pine, and Manchester avenues. 
Sixty-four lots have been relaid this year. 

Of the work done in the different cemeteries, only that 
directly connected with the oiSce has been mentioned, 
although suggestions have been given from time to time 
for improvements where plans were not necessary. A 
more complete account of the regular cemetery work will 
be found in the trustees' report. 

BRIDGES. 

Granite bridge has been patched where the planking 
was much worn, and the Main-street bridge entirely re- 
planked. Owing to the amount of travel and the narrow- 
ness of the roadway, the Main-street bridge should be 
rebuilt the full width of the street. I would suggest that 
a stone-arch bridge be built, as the situation is favorable, 
there being a ledge and high banks on both sides. This 
could be done at a nominal cost, probably but little more 
than has been expended in repairs for a few years past. 

At Amoskeag bridge, the west pier has been repaired. 
Several of the cut-water stones had been displaced and car- 
ried by the water some distance below the bridge, and some 
of the remaining stones had become loosened by the action 



69 

of the water and logs, thus endangering the safety of the 
pier. These stones were replaced by new ones, and the 
whole pier carefully repaired. It is now stronger than 
when it was built, owing to the manner in which it was 
dogged and tied together by heavy irons, all inside the 
work and out of the way of the logs and ice striking 
against them and tearing them away, as has happened 
since it was last repaired. As the work progressed, each 
joint was thoroughly filled with cement. The repairs 
were under the direction of the contractor Frank S. Bod- 
well, and were made in a thorough and satisfactory 
manner. 

The planking has been repaired on this bridge in sev- 
eral places where worn. 

When the steam-roller was taken across McGregor 
bridge, no precautions were used for reducing the strain 
occasioned by such a heavy body ; in consequence of 
this, thirty-two of the floor-joists on the upper roadway 
were broken. When these timbers were replaced, it was 
found that the original ones were nothing but sapling 
pine. The timbers used in replacing those broken were 
of Georgia pine. 

STREET LINES. 

Daring the past year much difficulty has been expe- 
rienced in properly locating lines of streets and highways, 
ou account of the loss or removal of the original bounds, 
and much time has been employed in comparing plans 
and making such measurements as were necessary to locate 
the lines upon the ground. When street lines are fixed 
they should be permanently established by having sub- 
stantial stone bounds set at convenient distances, which 
would greatly facilitate future Avork. Many cities are 
complaining of the lack of care in this regard, and some 



70 

have adopted in their ordinances that no street shall be 
laid out or accepted until it is properly marked by stone 
bounds. It would be better if Manchester had some such 
ordinance on her statute-books. As it is now, streets are 
laid out and accepted from hubs set by the Amoskeag' 
Company and private engineers, which, in time becoming 
old and rotten, are useless as bounds. 

HIGHWAYS. 

The highways in the several districts have been kept in 
as good condition as possible with the limited amount 
apj)ropriated for them. Could a sufficient sum be allowed 
for properly building them, they would need very little 
repairing for a number of years. On many of the subur- 
ban highways which are laid out three rods or more wide, 
only twenty feet or so are utilized, leaving banks on either 
side which in many cases afford the best of gravel. If 
these banks were cut down and used for repairing the 
roads, as has been done this year in several places in dis- 
trict ISTo. 7, money could be saved for improvements in 
other directions. In the city proper, many of the streets 
are a foot or more above grade. By cutting these down 
to the established grade much material might be obtained 
for filling, and thus save an unnecessary outlay in the pur- 
chase of sand banks for that purpose. The cause of this 
high grade is very evident. When the streets become 
worn and need repairing, gravel is put on from four to 
eight inches in depth ; when this layer is worn out, it is in 
turn covered with more gravel, and in time the roadway is 
level with or above the sidewalk, thus flooding the walks in 
wet weather, to the great discomfort of pedestrians. "When 
a street is to be graded, the old road-bed should be removed 
to a depth sufficient to allow of a proper amount of new 
gravel being put on to bring the street to the established 
srrade. 



71 



CROSSINGS. 



A great many crossings have been laid the past yep,r, 
and no complaint has been made in regard to them, as has 
been the case with those on Manchester street. It has 
been noticed in our crossings that if there were any water 
around them, it would collect in the basin-like surface ot 
the crossing. Experiments have been made in building 
them which have proved that a crossing constructed high- 
est in the center throughout its length, then sloping regu- 
larly on each side to the street, instead of being rounded, 
prevents the water remaining on them, and gives no dis- 
agreeable jolt in riding over them. 

BUILDINGS. 

Plans were made for the changes necessary in the old 
hook-and-ladder house, for the Chemical Engine Com- 
pany, and also for improvements made in the present 
hook-and-ladder house. 

Plans were also made and submitted for a public bath- 
house. 

ELLIOT HOSPITAL LAND. 

By order of the mayor, all proposed streets which cross 
this property, namely, Cass, Cypress, Auburn, Summer, 
and Weston, were staked out on the ground. 

INSTRUMENTS. 

Early in the season it was voted to purchase a new 
transit for use in the office, and one was procured from 
the manufactory of Butf & Berger, Boston, which has 
given perfect satisfaction. 

Next year a new level will be needed, as the one in the 
office at the present time, having been in use a number of 
years, both in this office and the water-works office, has 
become badly worn. 



72 



WEATHER RECORD. 



A weather record has been kept showing three readings 
daily of the thermometer, direction of the wind, and state 
of the weather. 

MACADAMIZING. 

Early in the summer the Aveling & Porter road-rolling 
machine ordered last year arrived, and was set up under 
the direction of the company's agent. 

After it was in working condition, the machine proved 
its claim for superiority in the diiferent trials to which it 
was subjected. It was first used in rolling the rough, 
uneven bottom stone on Park street ready for the top or 
wearing surface of the road, which in turn was rolled and 
compacted by the machine until the roadway was as 
smooth and solid as could be desired, and the heavy 
traffic which this street is continually undergoing has 
made no impression on its surface, showing the supe- 
riority of this manner of building roads over any other 
that has been tried. 

Park street is not the only street that has been improved 
in this manner; Chestnut, Pine, Elm, and Bridge streets 
have been macadamized, and several other streets top- 
dressed; in all some twenty thousand square yards have 
been made this year by the aid of the roller. 

One change should be made, however, from last year's 
method, that is, to screen the top stone and have it put on 
in separate layers. No dirt should be allowed to be 
mixed or used in the building of the roadway, and after 
completion it should be swept at least once a week to 
remove the dirt and sand which has collected thereon. 
This dirt soon works around the stones, causing them to 
tip or rock when a team passes over them, soon wearing 
away the stone and spoiling the roadway. Should a rut 



73 

or unevenness occur, the surface should be picked up and 
a few shovelfuls of ground stone put on and properly 
rolled. By so doing a road will last for years with very 
few repairs. 

N'ow that the city has a first-class road-rolling machine, 
and plenty of good material, there is no reason why we 
cannot in the future have roads that will compare favora- 
bly with those of any other city. 

As to the relative merits of different systems of road- 
making, we can aptly quote Clemens Herschel, C. E., 
from his prize-essay on road-making : 

" Ancient roads were made with a surface as nearly re- 
sembling solid rock as possible. So in China, roads were 
made of huge granite blocks laid on immovable founda- 
tions. In time these became worn with ruts, especially 
in the joints or seams of the stones, and the surface gener- 
ally so smooth that animals could hardly stand, far less 
trot on it. . . . The invention of MacAdam consisted in 
having no large stones at all on the roadway, but having it 
all pounded into small fragments and spread over the 
road-bed. This has, without fear of efficient contradiction 
or shadow of doubt, been proved b}^ trial to be a worthless 
proceeding, though at one time popular, and even now 
only too often done, either from ignorance or laziness. 
The separate fragments of stone, having no bond among 
themselves, are liable to sink in the underlying ground or 
road-bed, evenly or unevenly as it may chance, more in 
one place than another, and thus never come to rest or to 
an even top surface. 

"Between these two extremes of an ancient Chinese solid- 
rock road and that of MacAdam lies the true principle of 
road-making, which consists in giving every road two 
component parts : one — the foundation — to be solid, 
unyielding, porous, and of large material ; the other — the 



74 

top surface — to be made of lighter material, and to be- 
made to bind compactly and evenly over the rough foun- 
dation." 

The following work has been done in the various high- 
way districts during the year : — 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 
John C. Eay, Surveyor. 

North Elm street, graveled .... 85 rods. 
North Elm street, turnpiked ... 30 rods. 

Assisted Mr. Fellows, of District No. 13, in widening 
road at junction of Union street and River road. 

Small stones removed from the roads and water-bars 
repaired. 

Widened road at junction of Elm and Rowell streets. 

Made general repairs where necessary, especially after 
heavy rains. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 

"William Sanborn, Superintendent. 

cobble paving. 

Bridge street, from Chestnut to Union . 464.0 sq. yds. 

Cedar street, from Pine to Chestnut . 300.0 

Central street, from Wilson easterly . 61.1 

Chestnut street, from Merrimack to Central 266.6 

Concord street, from Ashland easterly . 62.2 

Elm street, from Langdon northerly . 200.0 

Elm street, side of car tracks .* . . 204.0 

Hanover street, from Hall easterly . . 44.4 

Lowell street, at South .... 50.0 
Manchester north back street, from Elm 

east back street easterly . . . 106.0 



75 



Merrimack street, from Lincoln west back 

street westerly 33.3 sq 

Merrimack street, between Wilson and Hall 13.3 

Nashua street, near Lowell . . . 40.0 

Park street, from Elm to Chestnut . . 633.3 

Park street, from Cass easterly . . 49.0 

Pine street, from Laurel to Central . 102.2 



Total cobble paving 



yds. 



2,629.4 sq. yds. 



COBBLE EDGING. 

Bridge street, from Chestnut to Union 
Cedar street, from Pine to Chestnut . 
Central street, from "Wilson westerly . 
Chestnut street, from Merrimack to Central 
Concord street, from Ashland easterly 
Elm street, from Langdon northerly 
Hanover street, from Hall easterly 
Merrimack street, from Lincoln west back 

street westerly 
Nashua street, near Lowell 
Park street, Cass easterly . 
Pine street. Laurel to Central 

Total cobble edging 



1,292 feet. 
375 
110 
800 
140 
450 
100 

60 

90 
110 
190 



3,717 feet. 



■ EDGE STONES. 

Amherst street, between Pine and Chestnut 

Bridge street, east of Elm 

Bridge street, at J. S. Kidder's 

Cedar street, between Chestnut and Union 

Central street, between Elm and Union . 

Chestnut street, from Merrimack northerly 

Church street, from Washington northerly 



120 feet. 

46 
100 
246 
175 
135 

86 



76 

Elm street, from Stark southerly (reset) . . 150 feet. 

Franklin street, from Market southerly (reset) 270 " 

Laurel street, west of Union . . . . 25 " 

Lowell street, at TJniversalist Church (reset) . 95 " 

Passenger station (reset) .... 100 " 
Park street, between Elm and Pine east back 

street 260 " 



Total edge stones set . . . 1,808 feet. 

MACADAMIZING. 

New. 

Bridge street, from Chestnut to Union 2,893.33 sq. yds. 

Chestnut street, from Central to Merri- 
mack 1,305.00 " 

Elm street, from Langdon to Blodget, 

east side 1,150.00 " 

Park street, from Elm to Chestnut . 1,728.77 " 

Pine street, from Central to Laurel . 600.00 " 



Total new macadamizing . . 7,677.10 sq, yds. 

TOP-DRESSED. 

Amherst street, from Chestnut to Vine 

Chestnut street, from Hanover to Mer- 
rimack ...... 

Chestnut street, from Hanover to Am- 
herst ...... 

Concord street, from Chestnut to Pine 

Elm street, from Salmon northerly, east 

side '. . 1,610.0 

Elm west back street, from Market 

to Dean avenue .... 555.5 

Granite street, from Elm westerly . 265.5 



800.0 


sq. yds, 


1,590.0 


a 


600.0 


a 


1,083.0 


u 



77 



Lowell street, from Pine to Walnut . 
Merrimack street, from Elm to Chestnut 
Park street, from Wilson to Milton 

Total top-dressed 



2,014.0 sq. yds. 
1,643.0 " 

2,580.0 " 



12,741.0 sq. yds. 



STREETS GRAVELED AND ROLLED. 

Water street, from Elm westerly 
Mechanic street, from Elm westerly 
Stark street, from Elm westerly 
High street, from Chestnut to Union 

Total graveled and rolled 

STREETS GRAVELED. 

Amherst street, from Ash to Beech 
Amherst street, patching ... 
Arlington street, from Maple to Russell 
Ash street, from Amherst to Concord . 
Ashland street, from Concord to Bridge 
Auburn street, from Beech easterly 
Beech street, from Amherst to Hanover 
Beech street, from Harrison southerly (patch 

ing) 

Buzzell street, from East High to Bridge 
Clarke street, from River road to Elm . 
Concord street, from Maple to Button . 
Elm east back street, from Concord northerly 
Franklin street, from Auburn northerly 
Hanover street, from Hall to Milton 
High street, from l^ashua to South 
High street, from Maple to Jane . 
Hollis street, from Elm to Elm west back 
Kidder street, from Elm to Elm west back 



110 feet. 
110 " 
110 " 
450 " 

780 feet. 



200 feet. 


250 




300 




. 400 




. 1,005 




350 




200 




250 feet 


120 




400 




550 




f 100 




325 




850 




300 




500 




100 




100 





78 



Maple street, from Bridge to Amherst . 
Maple street, patching .... 
North street, from Elm to Pine east back 
Orange street, from Oak to Russell 
Pearl street, from Maple to Russell 
Russell street, from Pearl to Harrison . 
"Wilson street, from Park southerly 
"Wilson street, from Hanover to Merrimack 

Total graveled .... 

STREETS GRADED AND GRAVELED 

Gore street, from Beech to Oak . 
Maple street, from Brook to Gore 
Pearl street, from Linden to Ashland . 
Salmon street, from Elm to River road 
Spruce street, from Lincoln to Wilson . 
Union street, from Webster . 
"Webster street, at Union westerly 

Total graded and graveled . 
Total, 15,659 feet, equal to 2.97 miles. 



975 feet. 

700 " 

1,070 " 

400 " 

350 " 

1,030 " 

500 " 

450 " 



11,775 feet 


840 feet 


300 




200 




450 




624 




120 




140 





2,674 feet. 



TURNPIKED. 



Auburn street, from Beech to Pine 
Clarke street, from Elm to Union 

Total turupiked . 



1,050 feet. 
1,400 " 



2,450 feet. 



In some of the streets graded, a large amount of earth 
had to be moved, as is shown by the following figures : — 



Gore street, from Beech to Oak . 
High street, from Nashua to South 
Maple street, from Brook to Gore 



1,684 cu. yds. 

500 " 
1,100 " 



79 



North street, from Elm to Pine east back 
Pearl street, from Linden to Ashland , 
Spruce street, from Lincoln to Wilson . 
Spruce street, from Wilson easterly 
Salmon street, from Chestnut to Pine . 
Union street, at Webster ... 
Webster street, at Union 

Total 

GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

Amherst street, from Ash westerly 
Amherst street, from Ash easterly 
Ash street, from Amherst northerly 
Ash street, from Harrison northerly 
Ash street, from Concord southerly 
Ashland street, from High southerly 
Ashland street, from Concord southerly 
Bay street, from Salmon street southerly 
Belmont street, from Concord southerly 
Central street, from Hall westerly 
Concord street, from Belmont westerly 
Concord street, from Ashland easterly . 
Elm street, from Webster southerly 
Hall street, from Manchester northerly 
Harrison street, from Ash easterly 
Harrison street, from Ash westerly 
High street, from Ashland westerly 
Laurel street, from Wilson easterly 
Park street, from Pine east back easterly 
Park street, at ward room 
Pine street, from North northerly 
Russell street, from Myrtle southerly . 
:Salmon street, from Bay easterly . 



1,890 cu 


.yds. 


500 


a 


1,100 


a 


1,100 


a 


2,000 


u 


205 


(( 


230 


a 


10,309 cu 


. yds. 


50 cu 


. yds, 


83 


a 


71 


u 


138 


a 


19 


a 


80 


a 


74 


a 


32 


a 


26 


a 


18 


ii 


13 


a 


15 


a 


40 


u 


11 


a 


85 


a 


112 


a 


27 


li 


104 


a 


32 


a 


6 


a 


78 


a 


74 


a 


36 


a 



80 



Webster street, from Elm easterly 
Wilson street, from Bridge southerly 
Wilson street, from Laurel northerly 

Total grading for concrete . 

This refers only to places where the fill has been a foot 
or more ; in many places only a few yards were used, 
scattered here and there. 



17 


cu 


yds 


80 




(( 


14 


cu 


u 


1,335 


yds 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



24 by 36 inches, brick 
15-inch Akron pipe 
12-inch Akron pipe 
10-inch Akron pipe 
8-inch Akron pipe 

Total . 
Equal to 2.1 miles. 



PIPE ON HAND AT CITY YARD. 

24-inch . 
15-inch . 
12-inch . 
10-inch . 

Total 

12 Y branches, 15 by 6 inches. 
1 Y branch, 15 by 12 inches. 
1 Y branch, 15 by 10 inches. 

13 Y branches, 15 by 8 inches. 
40 Y branches, 12 by 8 inches. 

3 Y branches, 10 by 10 inches. 
1 reducer, 15-inch to 12-inch. 
3 6-inch quarter turns. 



3,899 feet. 
1,381 " 
1,014 " i 
3,301 " ^ 
1,518 " 



11,113 feet. 



22 feet 


60 


a 


85 


a 


40 


a 



207 feet. 



81 



Catch-basins built, 59 ; man-holes, 18 ; lamp-holes, I. 



CROSSINGS. 



Concrete, new, 54 ; top-dressed, 9 ; cobble-stone, 2 ; 
stone, relaid, 6. 



CONCRETE. 

Crossings,, new .... 
Crossings, top-dressed 

SIDEWALKS, NEW. 

Amherst street, at Dr. CoUity's 
Amherst street, at J. McKenna's 
Amherst street, at Michael Connor 
Franklin and Merrimack streets 
Laurel street, at J. W. Fellow s's 
Merrimack street, at schoolhouse 
Park street, at James Dolan's 
Park street, at ward room 



SIDEWALKS REPAIRED. 

Amherst street, at L. Dowd's 
Birch street, near Washington 
Bridge street, Walnut easterly 
Central street, Franklin to Canal 
Concord street, east of Maple 
Franklin street, at city libraiy 



GUTTERS. 

Lowell street, at Chas. Williams's .. 



. 1814.66 sq. yds. 
. 244.09 ''• 



34.72 sq. yds. 
79.16 
13.33 
8.89 
49.40 
15.55 
66.71 
125.02 



392.78 sq 


. yds. 


54.44 sq 


. yds. 


4.44 




88.00 




251.00 




16.00 




320.22: 





734.10 sq. yds. 



11.11 sq. yds. 



82 

NEW ROADWAYS. 

Granite street, at canal bridge . . 160.0 sq. yds. 

ROADWAYS REPAIRED. 

Bridge street, at Canal .... 27.19 sq. yds. 

McGregor bridge 205.00 " 

Vine street 7.22 " 



239.41 sq. yds. 
Total concrete laid . . . 3,596.15 sq. yds. 

CONTRACT WORK. 

Beech street, culvert extension, Warren Harvey con- 
tractor. 

Spruce street, culvert extension, Warren Harvey con- 
tractor. 

STONE CULVERTS. 

Beech street, at Cemetery brook, extended (contract). 

Hooksett road, two, rebuilt. 

Kennard road, rebuilt. 

Prospect street, east of Russell, repaired. 

Salmon street, west of Pine, new. 

Smyth road, rebuilt. 

Spruce street, at Cemeter^^ brook, extended (contract). 

PIPE CULVERTS. 

Gore street, at Maple, 10-inch Akron . . 40 feet. 
Beacon street, at Concord, 10-inch Akron . 40 " 

Total 80 feet. 

BOX CULVERTS. 

Spruce street, east of Wilson, 50' X 2' X 1'. 



83 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 



Edwin Kennedy, Surveyor. 



ADAMS STREET. 



Graded at Hamilton street, and a plank culvert 24 feet 



long and 2 feet wide built. 

HAMILTON STREET. 

A drain has been put in 100 feet long by 2 x 3 feet ; 
230 feet of 10 and 12 inch pipe laid. 

SHASTA STREET. 

This street has been filled and made suitable for travel. 

ELM STREET. 

Graveled south of railroad bridge, and graded south of 
Eiver road 400 feet in length and 60 feet Vide. 

Three hundred and seventy square yards of paved 
gutter built. 

Sidewalk graded on east side, 270 feet long. 

Sidewalk graded on west side, 396 feet long. 

One concrete crossing at River road and one at Baker's 
road. 

Bank wall near watering-trough raised to grade and 
78 feet of pipe railing put up. 

Eighty loads of filling put in at Chas. Fish's. 

BEECH STREET. 

Graveled 800 feet. 

Boulders blasted in gutter, hill repaired opposite Mr. 
Titus's, and bushes cut. 



Graveled 170 feet. 



84 

YOUNG STREET. 
BAKER STREET. 



Graveled 1,500 feet. 

Cleaned out gutters near Mr. Ordwaj^'s. 

Made a fill of one foot at junction of River road. 

HANCOCK STREET. 

Graveled 400 feet. 

A 12-ineh Akron -pipe sewer was built, beginning at 
the terminus of the one put in last year and extending to 
the junction of Hamilton street. 

Built one man-hole and two cesspools. 

RIVER ROAD. 

Graveled 5,000 feet. 

Wash-out repaired, requiring 85 cubic yards of filling. 

Culvert west of cemetery, 24 feet long, rebuilt and 
lowered. 

Rubbled gutter on Tannery hill. 

Hill north of cemetery graded, roadway widened, bushes 
cut, and gutter made. 

CALEF ROAD. 

Graveled 400 feet. 

Culvert 27 feet long widened and lowered to drain 
cemetery lot. 

NUTT ROAD. 

Graveled 1,700 feet. 

A watering- trough has been put in at the junction of 
Shasta street, and drain built requiring 90 feet of 8-inch 
pipe and 40 feet of plank boxing. 



85 

This road requires a large amount of extra repairs on 
account of the heavy teaming upon it. 

A fill for concrete, 380 feet long, 7 feet wide, and 2 feet 
deep, was made at Mr. Oshier's place. 

All necessary repairs attended to. 

CONCRETE. 

Two crossings, containing . . . 114.83 sq. yds. 
Sidewalk at Chas, Fish's, containing . 275.00 " 
Gutter on Elm street at Eiver road, con- 
taining . . . . . . 5.83 " 



Total concrete .... 395.66 sq. yds. 

DISTRICT ^0. 4. 

Isaac Whittemore, Surveyor. 

Graveled 175 rods. 

Turnpiked 55 rods. 

Calef road widened. In one place a fill 120 feet long, 
10 feet wide, and 12 feet deep was made. 

Eight hundred feet of double railing and 200 feet of 
single railing put up throughout district. 

One stone culvert relaid. 

One culvert cleaned out and replanked. 

Bushes cut (two miles in length), water-bars repaired, 
stones removed, and general repairs where necessary on 
roads and bridges. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 

John H. Willey, Surveyor. 

Graveled 3,640 feet. 



86 



TURNPIKED. 

Main road 5,280 feet. 

Cross road 2,640 " 



Total turnpiked . . . . 
Equal to 1.5 miles. 


. 7,920 feet 


GRADING. 




'Nutt road 

Moore's Ferry road . . . . 
Harvey road, near South road 


. 400 cu. ft, 
. 300 " 
. 350 " 



Total grading 1,050 cu. ft. 

CULVERTS. 

Conner road, new, 20 feet long. 

Conner road, tv^o rebuilt. 

Conner road, two repaired. 

South road, one replanked. 

South road, one rebuilt at Willey's. The old one was 
38 feet long, 18 inches square ; the new one, 52 feet long, 
4 feet deep, and 3|- feet wide. Twenty-five loads of filling 
used. 

BRIDGES. 

Harvey's Mills, one new bridge built, 12-foot span, 24 
feet wide. 

Harvey's Mills, one replanked, 40-foot span, 21 feet 
wide. 

Conner road, built one, 7-foot span, 18 feet wide, and 
set posts and railing. 

Railing put up on Kutt road near Mrs. Cahill's, 70 
feet long. 

Cut six miles of bushes on both sides of road. 



87 

Picked stones out of roads every two weeks during the 
summer. 

Made general repairs wherever needed. 

Received of Oliver Merrill $8 for old plank, and paid 
the same to city treasurer. 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 
Samuel B. Dickey, Surveyor, 

Graveled 600 feet on Pond road, widened the same for 
a distance of 200 feet, and built 300 feet of railing near 
A. Mallard's. A wash-out 200 feet in length was re- 
paired, requiring 100 loads of stone. This road was also 
graveled opposite Oilman Clough's land, turnpiked and 
graveled 300 feet opposite A. Pollard's, and top-dressed 
200 feet, using 50 loads of fine stone. 

Bushes cut, roads kept free from stones, and general 
repairs where needed. 

Mr. Dickey desires me to call your attention to the 
necessity of widening and straightening the Island Pond 
and Lake Shore roads, which has been explained in pre- 
vious reports. Owing to the narrowness of the Island 
Pond road, an accident occurred this year which cost the 
city a considerable sum. 

DISTRICT 1^0. 7. 

Peter 0. Woodman, Surveyor. 

Massabesic street, graveled 

Belmont street, graveled 

Mammoth road, graded and graveled 

Total 



100 rods. 


40 


a 


40 


u 


180 


rods. 



"Valley street, turnpiked and graded 30 rods. 

Candia road, widened and graded 50 rods. 

Young road, one stone culvert built, 30' X 1' X 1'. 

Huse road, graded 20 rods. - 

Mammoth road, two stone culverts rebuilt, 16' X 1' X 
1', and one bridge replanked. 

Porter street, turnpiked and graded 95 rods ; also built 
two stone culverts, each 30 feet long; one was 2 feet 
square, the other 4' 6" X 4'. 

East Spruce street, graded 10 rods east of Old Falls 
road. 

East Spruce street, between Wilson street and Old Falls 
road, graded by a fill re(|uiring 3,000 cubic yards of earth. 

One plank drain built, 60' X 8" X 8". 

Two cesspools built, and 80 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe 
laid. 

Two hundred and seventy-live rods of ditch cleaned. 

Two bridges repaired, stones removed from roads, mud- 
holes tilled, and general repairs made where needed. 

Massabesic street, 222 square yards of paving laid. 

DISTRICT IN^O. 8. 
Joshua Page, Surveyor. 

Candia road, plowed out the ditches and turnpiked 
near Auburn line ; used 140 loads of grade and 30 loads 
of stone. 

Proctor road, cut down knoll this side of Borough road 
2 rods wide and 6 rods in length, and put the material on 
the Borough road. 

Borough road, graded a knoll 4 rods long, 1 rod wide, 
and 1 foot deep ; used material on road. 

Hanover-street road, near S. I^. Bell's land, made a fill 
of 3 feet on the side, and raised the roadway 1 foot. 



89 



Cut down the road this side of the Eaton place, remov- 
ing- 300 cubic yards of earth, which was used for grading 
Lake avenue and Hanover street east of the Mammoth 
road. Cleaned gutters, lengthened culvert 15 feet; also 
blasted out 50 perch of ledge near George Smith's place. 

Bridge-street road, bushes cut. 

Small stones removed, and all necessary repairs at- 
tended to. 

DISTRICT 1^0. 9. 

E'elson "W. Paige, Surveyor. 

Graveled on main roads . 
Graveled on cross roads . 
Derry road, hill repaired 

Total . 



. 2,700 feet. 
. 1,377 " 


600 cu. yds 
204 " 
60 " 


. 4,077 feet. 


864 cu. yds 

. 3,000 feet 
. 3,800 " 




. 6,800 feet 



Turnpiked on main roads 
Turnpiked on cross roads 

Total ... 

Several culverts repaired. 
Two and one half miles of bushes cut. 
Twenty large boulders blasted and dug out of roadway. 
Three bridges replanked, requiring 3,200 feet of lum- 
ber. 

Picked out stones and made general repairs. 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 
Charles 0. Phelps, Surveyor. 



Cobble gutter paving 
Block paving relaid 
Cobble edging set . 
Curbstone set 



2,060 sq. yds. 
300 " 
3,875 feet. 
435 " 



90 



CONCRETE. 

Ferry street, at F. Eiedel's, sidewalk . 
Main street, at Wm. Bailey's, sidewalk 
Main street, front of engine-house 
Twelve crossings .... 

Main street, at Granite, roadway 
Main street, around engine-house 

Total concrete .... 



54.61 sq. yds. 

42.91 
290.41 
415.77 
195.77 
104.89 



1,104.36 sq. yds. 



MACADAMIZING. 

School street, Second to Third street . •. 694 sq. yds. 

STREETS GRAVELED. 

Beauport street, north of Wayne 
Bedford road .... 
Bowman street, Mast southerly . 
Granite street. Main to Dover 
Granite street, Barr westerly 
McGregor street, near Amory 
Milford street, Main to Bowman . 
Milford street, Riddle westerly . 
Old and E'ew Mast roads 
Railroad street .... 
River road, Boynton road southerly 
West Bridge street 

Total graveled . 



B street, A to C 

Bath street. River to Third 







200 feet. 






870 " 






360 " 






225 " 






150 " 






150 " 






400 " 






750 " 






5,520 " 






540 " 


ly 




1,080 " 






260 " 




10,505 feet 


GRAVELEI 


>. 


200 feet. 


50 cu. yds 


450 


u 


225 



91 



Granite street, N. W. R. R. to 
Winter 

Main west Lack street, north of 
Amory ..... 

Main west back street, south of 
Putnam 

Main street, at engine-house 

McGregor west back street, 
Wayne to Marion 

Milford street, Main to Bowman 

Milford street, Main to Bowman 
(contract) .... 

Milford street. Riddle westerly . 

Railroad street .... 

River street, School to Granite . 

School south back street . 

West street, north of Douglas . 

AV^ayne street, Beauport to Du- 
buque . . ; . . 



204 feet. 


60 cu. yds 


300 


a 


75 " 


650 


a 


931 

730 " 


245 


li 


275 


400 


a 


50 


400 


a 


750 


750 


a 


519 


600 


a 


50 


300 


a 


80 


100 


a 


50 


225 


a 


250 " 


550 


u 


250 " 



Totals .... 5,374 feet. 4,345 cu. yds. 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Bedford road . . . .300 feet. 70 cu. yds. 

C street. Main westerly . . 100 " 20 

Ferry street. Second westerly . 100 " 20 

Main street, Amory northerly . 500 " 75 

Main street, Amory southerly . 600 " 60 

Milford street, Main to Bowman 700 " 550 

River road .... 300 " 70 

Second street. Ferry to Walker 310 " 55 

Wayne street, Beauport westerly 500 " 100 

Totals .... 3,410 feet. 1,020 cu. yds. 



92 



CONCRETE SIDEWALKS. 



1,563 feet of sidewalk, 8 feet wide. 
2,610 feet of sidewalk, 6 feet wide. 
Making 3,130 square yards of concrete sidewalk laid in 
this district hj private individuals. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



24-ineli brick 
15-inch Akron pipe 
15-inch " " 

12-inch " " 

10-inch " " 

Total sewers 



75 feet, r el aid, 
70 " " 
145 " new^ 

517 " " 

797 " " 



1,604 feet. 



Eight-inch Akron pipe used for catch -basins not 
counted. 

Fifteen-inch Akron pipe in yard, 93 feet. 
Catch-basins built, 14 ; man-holes, 2 ; lamp-holes, 2. 



DISTRICT NO. 11. 

James E. Bailey, Surveyor. 



Turnpiked . 
Graveled 
Macadamizing 
Cobble paving- 
Coble edging 
One stone culvert on 
One box culvert . 
One box culvert . 
One box culvert . 



Dunbarton road 



10,560 feet. 

5,280 " 

1,227 sq. yds. 

195 " 

596 feet. 

37' X 16" X 20" 

22' X 16" X 16" 

18' X 16" X 16" 

40' X 12" X 20" 



93 

Bushes cut in district once, cobbles picked out of roads, 
mud-holes filled, and all general repairs carefully at- 
tended to. 

Concrete walks at end. of Anioskeag bridge repaired, 
68.57 square yards. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Jeremiah Garvin, Surveyor. 

Bald Hill road, turnpiked one half mile. 
Robert Neal road, turnpiked and graveled, and culvert 
repaired. 

Mammoth road, graveled in places and bushes cut. 
New Bridge street, general repairs. 
All necessary repairs attended to. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 

Joseph Fellows, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked and graded, 4,000 feet. 

Graveled, 1,240 feet. 

Built 250 feet of fence at Union street and River road, 
and set guide-board. 

Repaired one culvert. 

Graded street near Mr. Carr's. 

Cleaned stones from roads, repaired water-bars, cut 
bushes, and made general repairs. 

I am indebted to Joseph B. Sawyer and George "W. 
Stevens, civil engineers. Perry H. Dow, and the other 
engineers of the Amoskeag Company, for the use of plans, 
and for information which was of value to the city ; also 



94 

to the surveyors of the highway districts, and to the 
superintendents of the several departments. 

In conclusion, it gives me great pleasure to express my 
thanks for the many acts of courtesy and kindness, both 
official and personal, which I have received from the 
members of your board. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BEITNETT, 

City Engineer. 
January 1, 1887. 



R E PO RT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1886. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



GEORGE H. STEARNS, Mayor, ex officio, Chairman. 
GEORGE M. TRUE, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1.— Albe C. Heath, 

Charles H. Manning. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean, 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3.— Nathan P. Hunt, 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Samuel D. Lord, 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
Ward 5. — Charles A. O'Connor, 

Thomas F. Collins. 
Ward 6. — Jacob J. Abbott, 

William H. Huse. 
Ward 7.— Edwin F. Jones,* 

Frank B. Potter. 
Ward 8. — Josiah G. Dearborn, f 

Timothy J. Howard. 

* Resigned; Edward B. Woodbury elected to till vacancy. 
t Resigned; Luther C. Baldwin elected to fill vacancy. 
7 



98 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD, 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWIN F. JONES.* 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. W. Clarke, True, 
Dodge, Jones. t 

Salaries. — Messrs. O'Connor, Jones, Abbott. 

BejMii^s, Furniture, and Siq)2)lies. — Messrs. Manning, 
Potter, Howard. 

Text-Books, ApjMratus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Dearborn,J Huse, Heath. 

Music. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, Dearborn. | 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
True, Manning, W. C. Clarke. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. W. 
Clarke. 

Atteyidance. — Messrs. Collins, Potter, Heath. 

Health. — Messrs. Abbott, O'Connor, Howard. 



* Resigned; James E. Dodge elected to fill vacancy. 

t Resigned; Edward B. Woodbury elected to fill vacancj^ 

X Resigned; Luther C. Baldwin elected to fill vacancy. 



99 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 



High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, O'Connor, 
S. W. Clarke, Hunt. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, "W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Lord, Abbott, S. "W. Clarke, 

Spring Street. — Messrs. O'Connor, Heath, Manning. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Dodge, Jones,* Collins. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Heath, Jones,* Dearborn. f 

Training School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodge. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Heath, Huse. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. S. W". Clarke, 
Manning, Howard. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Dear- 
born, f Lord, Heath. 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Lord, Dodge. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Abbott, O'Connor, Potter. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Huse, Potter, Dear- 
born, f 

3Iosquito Pond and Webstefs Mills. — Messrs. Howard, 
Huse, Abbott. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Potter, 
Howard, Abbott. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs, Jones,* W. C. Clarke, 
Collins. 



* Resigned; Edwai-d B. Woodbury elected to fill vacancy. 
t Resigned; Luther C: Baldwin elected to fill vacancy. 



In Board of School Committee. 
December 31, 1886. 

The Superintendent read his annual report to the committee, and it 
was accepted. 

Samuel D. Lord read the annual report prepared by him at the 
request of the Board. 

Voted, That the report by Mr. Lord be accepted, and adopted as 
the report of the Board, and that it be transmitted to the City Coun- 
cils, together with the report of the Superintendent. 

JAMES E. DODGE, Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Gity Councils: — 

The Board of School Committee submit their annual 
report, as follows: — 

The city councils appropriated for the schools for the 
year 1886, the sum of $55,000, divided as follows: — 



For salaries of teachers . 






$41,000 


books and stationery 
care of rooms . 






600 
3,200 


contingent expenses 
fuel / . . . 






900 
3,000 


furniture and supplies 






1,000 


printing and advertising 

repairs 

evening schools 






400 
3,500 
1,400 



There was a balance of the appropriation of 1885 unex- 
pended of $2,047.73, which, being applied to the special 
objects of service, made available for the use of the com- 
mittee $57,047.73. 

The expenditures for the year 1886 have been $56,- 
128.19, leaving an unexpended balance. 

The financial transactions given before are stated more 
definitely in the following 



102 

DETAILED STATEMENT. 







o 

i 

m 


< 


-a 

a 


i 

13 
1 


hi 

(D 

> 

o 


Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery. . . 


$41,000.00 

6C0.00 

3,200.00 

900.00 

3,000.00 

1,000.00 

400.00 

3,500.00 

1,400.00 


$653.79 
116.04 

11.05 
183.71 
387.79 
146.01 
329.77 

41.33 
178.24 
239.29 


$41,653.79 

716.04 

3,211.05 

1,083.71 

3,387.79 

1,146.01 

729.77 

3,541.33 

1,578.24 

344.64 


$41,689.32 

436.73 

3,249.24 

1,139.81 

3,168.61 

1,009.59 

400.85 

3,663.41 

1,870.63 

312.23 


$279.31 

219.18 
136.42 
328.92 

207.61 
32.41 


$35.53 
38.19 


Contingent expenses 

Fuel 


56.10 


Furniture and supplies. . 
Printing and advertising 


122.88 


Evening schools 

Tuition 




Total 


$55,000.00 


$2,287.02 


$57,392.37 


$56,440.42 


$1,203.85 


$251.90 



The various uses and objects to which these appropria- 
tions have been applied will appear in the treasurer's 
report, and need not be duplicated here. 

The share of the city in the literary fund arising from 
the taxation of banking corporations in the state for 1886 
is $2,619.52, an increase of $82.25 over the amount re- 
ceived for 1885. This sum is not added to the appropri- 
ation for schools, and does not come into the hands of the 
committee specially, but is received into the city treas- 
ury, and accounted for generally. The city is of course 
relieved from taxation to the extent of this amount. The 
sum depends upon the "number of scholars of such towns 
and places, not less than five years of age, who shall, by 
the last report of the school committee, have attended 
the district common schools for a time less than two 
weeks within the year." 



103 

We present the school property and the schools as they 
are. There is no provision for the appraisal annually by 
the school committee of the property, real and personal, 
used for school purposes, and we would suggest that some 
means be taken by the city government to cause such 
inventory to be made annually. 

The sub-committee on repairs have done what they 
were able to do with the limited means given them, to 
put and keep in repair the school buildings. ,They will 
be found to be generally in good condition. It is under- 
stood the expenditures for repairs by the committee are 
special, while the city government takes charge of the 
general repairs needed, where the appropriations given 
the committee are insufficient. 

The schools compare well with their past history, if 
they have not improved upon it. We cannot expect that 
the intellect and mental powers of the children of to-day 
are greater than in the past, but we have a right to expect 
that means and methods to develop the intellect shall ad- 
vance with the improvements of the age. The demand 
for higher education is expected, and we must accede to 
such demands, or the schools will fail to meet the necessi- 
ties of the times. Parents here have a right to ask that 
their children be educated in Manchester in all the studies 
allowed by law. So far as able we have sought to com- 
ply with their wishes, and have emphasized and encour- 
aged those studies calculated to tit the graduate- of the 
schools for immediate business life and intelligent citizen- 
ship, with incidental culture. Proper teachers are of 
course requisite to success, and such have been employed. 
They are generally paid higher wages than are given 
other professions. Their competency and salary are 
made to depend upon the judgment of the committee, 
and here we are responsible. The list of teachers em- 



104 

ployed in tlie schools, with their places of labor, will be 
found in the annexed report of the superintendent, to 
which reference is had for personal notices. 

The High School. — Some three years ago a change was 
made in the course of study in the High School, with the 
purpose of making equally if not more prominent those 
studies needed in ordinary business pursuits, eliminating 
nothing good of the old. This seemed imperative, as a 
large majority of the graduates do not have the time to 
become acquainted with the dead languages, to which 
preference was manifestly given, or pursue the higher 
studies for literary culture. This system has been fol- 
lowed this year with slight change. The building erected 
this year, annexed to the main building, for the use of 
classes in chemistry, etc., will, we think, be remembered 
as a generous ofiering to the demands of scientific learn- 
ing. Chemistry, botany, and mineralogy are pursued 
Math interest more tiian in the past, as the means of illus- 
tration are extended, and with the improved condition of 
the school we cheerfully await results. The graduating 
class numbered forty -two. The particulars of their gradu- 
ation will be found in the report of the superintendent. 

The Grammar Schools supply the High School. They 
now number five, — two, the Webster and Main, having 
during the year been raised to that grade. We fear there 
is a feeling too general among the people that the Gram- 
mar school furnishes all the education needed, unless the 
pupil is to be professionally educated. It might have 
been suificient for the conditions of a half century ago, 
but when we consider the demands made upon the man 
of the present, we find the course of study is not adequate 
in time or kind to fit the boy for what is demanded of 
him. These schools might be raised to a standard sufli- 
cient by adding time and proper studies, but it is deemed 



105 

wisest to put this time and study in the High School 
course, and in our present arrangement the High School 
is the necessary place for graduating. For what is re- 
quired of them, the Grammar schools are in a fair condi- 
tion, and serve their part well. 

The lower schools supply the Grammar grades. Care 
has been taken to secure good teachers for work here, both 
in the city and suburban schools. There is no place from 
the primary to the High School where the faithful and effi- 
cient teacher can be substituted by the inferior. Errors 
made in the lower often follow the child to higher grades, 
and through his course of study. 

Some of our suburban scholars might with profit to 
themselves attend other schools, as the statutes authorize 
such to be done ; but the people living in the more remote 
districts object strenuously to any such movement on our 
part, thinking it would diminish the market value of their 
real estate, and we have not thought it advisable to con- 
test the matter, but have provided a teacher for every 
schoolhouse. 

The Training School, though not named in the statutes, 
has become here a necessity. In a corps of some seventy 
teachers, provision must be made for the exigencies of 
sickness and necessary absence. Teachers are trained to 
be such here; and in the selection of teachers, the grad- 
uates of the Training School "have the preference, if 
equally qualified." They are ready to supply temporary 
or permanent vacancies. Under the present teacher, 
Miss Evers, the Training School meets the object desired, 
in the efficiency of her class and their successful training 
for the profession of teaching. 

Music has been taught in our schools by special teach- 
ers for many years, and it is a fixed part of our curricu- 
lum. Prof. J. J. Kimball has been instructor in this 



106 

branch here for fifteen years, and has been eminently 
successful. He fulfills our wishes in making his instruc- 
tion elementary and thorough, the lowest classes being 
taught to read music. This year, in place of the rhetor- 
ical exercises for the close of the Grammar schools, a mu- 
sical festival was substituted, in which the High School 
also joined, not, however, omitting the usual graduating 
exercises. Some six hundred voices united in chorus, 
and made a flattering exhibition of their musical train- 
ing. 

The Ereyiimj Schools are improving in the attendance 
of scholars, and yet these schools do not receive the en- 
couragement we would be glad to record. 

Permission is given to all over sixteen years of age to 
attend and receive rudimentary instruction. One hour 
and a half is devoted five evenings weekly to such teach- 
ing, and it is gratifying to know that many who have 
neglected (some through circumstances they could not 
control) the school in their early life, avail themselves of 
this opportunit_y to learn to read, write, and cipher. 

The rooms or seats are not adapted for all ages, but a 
little expense would fit them for all needed purposes. 
The old High School house on Lowell street has been 
appropriated this year, in addition to the Spring-street 
and School-street buildings. 

They continue from the middle of October to April, 
when the attendance ceases. We would be glad to have 
them patronized through the whole school year and made 
more generally useful. 

The Prize Speaking, instituted under the financial en- 
couragement of Col. John B. Clarke, has not only 
become self-paying, but furnishes means for the instruc- 
tion of the schools in elocution. 

The public exercises were held in Smyth's Opera-house, 



107 

January 29, and a large audience assembled to witness 
the display of youthful elocution. 

The Judges were: Hon. Edward H. Rollins, Concord; 
Hon. Chester Pike, Cornish ; President "Walter Quincy 
Scott, D. D., Exeter; Prof. A*rthur S. Hardy, Hanover; 
Hon. Charles H. Holman, Nashua, who reported of the 
sixteen contestants, four victors, in the following order, 
and distributed the prizes accordingly. 

1, Master Tom E. Morse; 2, Miss Jennie Maud 
Thompson ; 3, Miss Emma B. Abbott ; 4, Miss Millie B. 
Cayzer. 

The special prizes to the contestants representing the 
four schools were given as follows : High, Master Her- 
bert J. Hall ; Ash, Miss Cora A. Parnell ; Franklin, 
Master Percy ]^. Folsom ; Lincoln, Miss Lizzie M. Davis. 

Elocution during the year has been introduced in the 
schools under Prof. J. J. Hayes, of Harvard College. He 
is paid out of funds accumulated in the management of 
the prize speaking. The instruction is given to the teach- 
ers and the High School, and his system of instruction 
is exemplified in lower classes selected by the superin- 
tendent. Li his efforts so far, we are encouraged to 
believe he is doing work which will develop in great 
usefulness to the schools. 

The committee on health have not reported any sick- 
ness aftecting the schools for the year, and parents will be 
glad to know that while children in cities are liable to be 
exposed to diseases incident to a crowded population, 
we have escaped here any epidemic. Stringent rules 
with regard to^vaccination, contagious diseases, and relat- 
ing to those pupils living in houses where contagious 
diseases exist, are applied, and a clean certificate must be 
furnished before any one who has been sick with a conta- 
gious disease can be admitted to the school-room. 



108 

The following is the report of the attendance in the 
public schools for the year ending December 10, 1886 : — 



SCHOOLS. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Suburban 

Totals... 
Last year 



^hole 
differen 


number 
t pupils. 


if 

t- o 


Average daily 
attendance. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


87 


105 


175 


167 


377 


415 


658 


618 


317 


3-29 


533 


485 


881 


825 


1,149 


1043 


150 


146 


213 


189 


1,812 


1,820 


2,698 


2,475 


1,891 


1,915 


2,725 


2,430 



^■5 



95.4 
93.9 
91.0 
90.8 

88.7 



91.9 
90.6 



We have now to record as a fact the establishment per- 
manently of a system of parochial schools. There need 
not and will not be any conflict between that system and 
our common schools. The parochial adds, with its in- 
struction in the sciences, education in the tenets of the 
Catholic religion. The common school cannot focus all 
the different religions of its supporters to develop any par- 
ticular doctrine. The Bible is read, being its own inter- 
preter. The common school will be preserved, and we 
cannot contest the right of the Catholic who claims the 
school is a matter of conscience with him, and selects the 
parochial for his children. Many children have been 
withdrawn from the public schools, and several schools 
have been discontinued in consequence. Park-street 
Grammar and all the rooms but one of the Beech-street 
school have been discontinued, and the parochial schools 
are using them. The Park-street Grammar-school build- 
ings were given the Catholics by the old District No. 2, 



109 

before the act consolidating the districts of the city, and 
the three rooms of the Beech-street school were leased or 
given the French Catholics by the city government 
of 1886. 

In 1880 the average attendance of the public schools 
was 2,970, and in 1886 it was 2,698. While the popula- 
tion has increased some 5,000 since 1880, the number of 
public scholars has decreased 272. 

School accommodations must be provided for the increas- 
ing population of the city. We call to mind the fact 
that the Jefferson Mill will be put in operation in the 
coming spring, and the shoe-manufacturing establish- 
ment at Hallsville will be greatly increased. The me- 
chanics and operatives will bring their children with 
them, and they must be educated. At this date we can- 
not state definitely what buildings, if any, may be needed 
or where located. Our successors will doubtless be ready 
to apprise the city government more particularly, in due 
time, in this respect. 

The Truant otficer, Mr. Samuel Brooks, furnishes the 
follo^^"ing : — 

REPORT OF THE TRUANT OFFICER FOR SCHOOL YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 10, 1886. 

Absentees reported from city schools, 228 ; from paro- 
chial schools, 315. 

Number voluntarily returned to city schools, 28 ; to 
parochial schools, 13. 

Number reported caused to attend city schools, 134 ; 
parochial schools, 226. 

Number found sick and unable to attend, 70. 

Number otherwise unavoidably detained, 55. 

Number not found at all, for city schools, 8 ; for paro- 
chial schools, 6. 



110 



Unaccounted for, 0. * 

Truants not enrolled, found on streets (caused to attend 
school), 51. 

Number of truants caused to attend city schools, 36 ; 
parochial schools, 65. 

^Number of school age found on streets in school hours, 
675. 

IsTumber of parents visited, 851. 

^Number of truants temporarily coniined at city hall, 18. 

l!^umber brought before the court, 2. 

Number fined, 0. 

Number sent to reformatory schools, 0. 

Number of employment certificates granted, 688. 

Number of persons applying for certificates who could 
not read or write in any language, 8 ; their united ages, 
101 years and 4 months; average age, 12 years and 8 
months. Seven of these were French, or of French 
parentage, or 1.86 per cent applying, as given by truant 
oflicer. 

Number of scholars belonging to parochial and private 
schools in Manchester, term ending December, 1886, as 
follows : — 



Park street . 


. 


Boys' 


school, 


425 


St. Joseph's . 


. 


a 


u 


330 


a 


. 


. Girls' 


ii 


270 


St. Agnes 


. 


(( 


li 


272 


St. Augustine 


. 


a 


i( 


223 


(( a 


• 


. Boys' 


a 


, 227 


St. Mary's, west side 


river 


a 


a 


210 


(( (( 


, 


Girls' 


a 


257 


Academy on Pine 


street, 








Catholic . 


^ ^ 


a 


a 


20 



Ill 



Berube private Catholic, ISTo. 

101 Hanover street . . Boys and girls' school, 176 

Mrs. Moore's private . . " " " 25 

Miss Kimball's, No. 15 Wal- 
nut street. ... 33 



Total ■ 2,468 

ANNUAL STATISTICS OF COST OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



Date. 



1S70 

1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1S75 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 



Average 
No. pupils. 



2129 
2080 
2278 
2450 
2463 
2501 
2543 
2513 
2571 
2859 
2970 
2858 
2957 
2848 
2872 
2725 
2698 



Cost of 
Schools. 


Cost per 
Scholar. 


$42,000.00 


$19.45 


42,900.00 


20,62 


47,900.00 


21.03 


47,300.00 


19.34 


47,500.00 


19.28 


51,800.00 


20.71 


50,100.00 


19.70 


47,900.00 


18.78 


44,900.00 


17.46 


46,200.00 


15.71 


48,945.00 


16.49 


50,729.00 


17.70 


51,604.00 


17.45 


53,525.00 


18.79 


53,477.00 


18.62 


53,133.11 


19.49 


56,128.19 


20.82 



City 
Valuation. 



$10,710,252 
11,365,162 
11,542,632 
12,001,200 
12,716,892 
14,195,102 
15,309,348 
15,605,718 
15,912,234 
17,482,132 
17,825,116 
17,943,308 
19,175,408 
20,055,986 
20,613,032 
21,137,464 
21,379,384 



City Tax. 



$234,047 
236,632 
259,196 
300,768 
312,835 
315,131 
248,900 
246,573 
276,873 
264,406 
264,491 
316,462 
312,673 
332,741 
360,732 
345,200 
347,268 



School 
Tax. 



$ .0041 
.0037 
.0041 
.0039 
.0037 
.0036 
.0032 
.0030 
.0028 
.0026 
.0027 
.0028 
.0026 
.0026 
.0024 
.0023 
.0021 



S. D. LORD, 

For the Cornmitiee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — I respectfully offer the following as the 
Annual Report of the Supermtendent of Schools for the 
year 1886 : — 

STATISTICS. 

I. POPULATION. 

Population of the city by last census, 1884 . . 37,600 
Estimated population, 1886 .... 38,000 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 

II. — SCHOOLHOUSES. 

Number of schoolhouses in use .... 23 
I^umber of schoolhouses not in use ... 1 
(TBridge-street house, corner of Union.) 

I^umber of school-rooms used for day schools . 78 

(Three of the same, and three others, used for evening schools. 
Rooms unoccupied by city for day schools are, one at High School, 
two at Spring-street house, two at Lowell-street, three at Beech- 
street, and two at Bridge-street, the last two being unfit.) 

ITumber of rooms used for High School classes . 6 

Number of rooms used for Grammar schools . . 18 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools . . 14 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools . . 31 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools . . 9 



113 



III. 



SCHOOLS. 



(All for both sexes.) 



Number of High Scliools ..... 1 
JSTumber of combined Grammar and lower grade 

(Middle and Primary) schools . . . , 6 
Number of combined Middle and Primary schools 

(Merrimack-street or Training School) . . 1 

Number of schools all Primary grade ... 6 

Number of Ungraded schools .... 9 



IV. 



PUPILS. 



Whole number of different pupils en- 
rolled in the day schools 
In the evening schools 
Average number belonging to the-day 

schools ...... 

Average daily attendance in the day 

schools ...... 

In the evening schools 

Per cent of attendance in the day 

schools ...... 

Per cent of attendance (to the average 

number belonging) in the High 

School .... 
In the Grammar schools 
In the Middle schools 
In the Primary schools 
In the Ungraded schools . 
Average number of pupils to the 

teacher in the High School 
In the Grammar schools 
In the Middle schools 
In the Primary schools 
In the UnOTaded schools . 



1886. 

3,632 
245 



2,475 

79 

91.9 



1886. 
3,806 



2,698 2,725 



2,430 
96 

90.6 



95.4 


96.3 


93.9 


93.1 


91.0 


90.2 


90.8 


86.3 


88.7 


87.3 


29 


27 


37 


34 


38 


39 


37 


40 


24 


25 



114 



The following table presents the main features of in- 
terest pertaining to the attendance upon the public schools 
for the last ten years : — 





3 

.S'3 
" o 


Whole No. 
Belonging. 


a 

3 

£ to 

« c 
> o 


>> 
'3 
Q . 

1^ 


'5 

° £ 
c s 


u _2 

i§ 

1^ 


*. 

li 

£ a 

IS 


"o 
o 

1-2 


a 

o 


"So 

w 
a 

o 

J1 

5" 


« a 




Boys. 


Girls. 


0) OJ 


1877 


3607 


1840 


1707 


2571 


2413 


93.8 


96 


76 


76 


60 


38 


70 


1878 


3515 


1783 


1732 


2571 


2348 


91.3 


106 


94 


94 


84 


47 


70 


1879 


3798 


1924 


1874 


2859 


2648 


92.6 


145 


77 


77 


52 


48 


71 


1880 


4136 


2106 


1970 


2970 


2727 


92.0 


91 


75 


75 


61 


38 


77 


1881 


4235 


2200 


2035 


2858 


2002 


91.0 


110 


64t 


62 


54 


39 


75 


1882 


4095 


2086 


2009 


2957 


2712 


91.7 


164 


76 


65 


57 


53 


73 


1883 


4062 


2001 


2001 


2848 


2012 


91.4 


103 


97 


75 


66 


27 


71 


1884 


3918 


1924 


1994 


2872 


2645 


92.1 


95 


85 


71 


49 


38 


72 


1885 


3806 


1891 


1915 


2725 


2430 


90.6 


90 


98 


89 


71 


35 


72 


1886 


3632 


1812 


1820 


2698 


2475 


91.9 


79 


78 


71 


53 


42 


74 



V. — TEACHERS. 

Male teachers in the High School .... 2 

Female teachers in the High School ... 4 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools ... 4 

(Four winter and spring terms, five fall term.) 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools . . 14 

(Fourteen winter andspring terms, thirteen fall term.) 

* Including Grammar classes in suburban schools. 

t Usually some pupils have annually entered from other schools. This year six have so 
entered. 

J Prior to 1881, only those passing test examinations for admission to the High School 
were granted Grammar School diplomas ; since then, special consideration has been given 
certain pupils, and the diploma granted them for cause, without admission to the High 
School. See Annual Report for 1885, page 26. 



115 

Female teachers in the Middle schools ... 14 
(One at Bakersville employed fall term only.) 

Female teachers in the Primary schools ... 28 

(One at Wilson Hill spring and fall terms only.) 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools . . 9 
Special teachers : One male in music the entire 
year, and one male in elocution during the fall 
term only . , . . . . . .2 

(The former four days a week, and the latter one day a week.) 

Average number of male teachers * . . . * 6 

Average number of female teachers ... 68 

Increase over last year ...... 2 

Male teachers in the evening schools ... 3 

Female teachers in the evening schools ... 14 
Average number of male teachers in the evening 

schools . . . . . . . . 3 

Average number of female teachers in the evening 

schools ........ 6 

VI. — SCHOOL YEAR. 

Winter term of twelve weeks, opened Jan. 4 ; closed 
March 26. 

(Vacation of two weeks.) 

Spring term of eleven weeks, opened April 12 ; closed 
June 25. 

(Vacation of ten weeks.) 

Fall term of fourteen weeks, opened Sept. 6; closed 
Dec. 10. 

(Vacation of three weeks.) 

.* Exclusive of the special teachers. 



116 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above 
by the school board, 185. 

Average number days the schools were taught, 170. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of " Teachers' Institutes," 
and half-days on account of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 

ORGANIZATIOK 

Throughout the year six teachers have been employed 
in the High School, eighteen in the Grammar schools, and 
nine in the Ungraded. Thirteen have been employed in 
the Middle schools two terms, and fourteen one term. 
There have been thirty Primary schools during two terms, 
and thirty-one during one term. This is equivalent to 
seventy-eight distinct schools of a single room each, but 
an average for the year of only seventy-seven, because 
one of them was in existence only two terms and another 
but one term. 

The average number of regular teachers necessary and 
employed for these seventy-seven schools has been but 
seventy-four, because the principal of the Training School 
has charge of the four rooms constitutino- that school. 
This is an increase of two in the average number of teach- 
ers employed over that of last year. Their employment 
became necessary because of the establishment of 

NEW SCHOOLS. 

One of Grammar grade at the Main-street house, taught 
the entire year by Miss Nettie F. Ainsworth; one of 
Middle grade at Bakersville, taught one term by Miss 
Lelia A. Brooks ; and one of Primary grade at Wilson 
Hill, taught two terms by Miss May F. Nntt. Three in 
all, but an average of only two for the year. 



117 



ATTENDANCE. 

By an inspection of the statistical table on page 114, it 
may be seen that there has been a gradual diminution in 
the annual enrollment of the public schools since 1881, 
the year when the French parochial schools were opened. 
The total attendance in our schools is one hundred and 
seventy-four less than that of last year; the grades in 
which the chief gains and losses have occurred may be 
seen from the folio win 2: : — 



Number enrolled * in the High School . 

Grammar schools 
Middle schools 
Primary schools 
Suburban schools 

High School increase over last year 
Grammar-school increase over last year 

Total increase .... 
Middle-school decrease from last year . 
Primary-school decrease from last year 
Suburban-school decrease from last year 

Total decrease .... 

Net loss ..... 



18S6. 


1885. 


192 


162 


792 


766 


646 


652 


1,706 


1,922 


296 


304 


30 




26 






56 


6 




216 




8 





230 



174 



It is now seen that the withdraw^als for attendance 
upon the new parochial schools have been almost wholly 
from the Primary grades. The immediate effect upon 
the Primary schools has been to reduce the average num- 
ber per teacher to the average in the Grammar and Mid- 
dle schools, as may be seen by comparisons made on page 
113; and hence opportunities for better work in the pri- 
maries have been afforded. 



* Exclusive of those enrolled in anj' other grade. 



118 

I have no doubt that the parochial schools (Irish and 
French) and other private schools in this city have en- 
rolled 3,000 different pupils within the year, without 
reckoning the few enrolled in both the public and the 
private schools. Add this number to the 3,632 registered 
in the public schools, and there are found 6,632 pupils at 
school out of a population of 38,000 or 40,000. In 
Springfield, Mass., for the year 1884, there were found 
by actual enumeration 6,583 children, between the ages 
of five and fifteen, out of a given population of 38,000. 
There are certainly as many children to the thousand in 
Manchester ; and, besides, there have this year been 317 
pupils in our public schools over fifteen years of age. 
Add this number to 6,583, and our city school pupilage 
may be safely regarded above the sum, 6,900. l^ow 
allow that there are 200 in all the private schools here 
over fifteen years of age, and the excess of 7,100 over the 
6,632 assumed to have been registered, or 468, will surely 
account for all under fifteen years of age not enrolled in 
any school. 

HISTORICAL. 

From an inspection of extended tabulations which I 
have made, but will not here insert, it is seen that there 
have been great changes in regard to the attendance upon 
certain schools within the past ten years. The average 
number belonging to the Grammar department at the 
Franklin-street school has diminished from 170 in 1877 
to 130 in 1886, leaving four small divisions. At Spring- 
street, where there were two divisions with 73 pupils in 
1877, there has been but one division since 1882, and 
that, last year and this, with an average of but 33 pupils. 
The lower grades at these two schools, however, have just 
about held their own. These schools on the corporations 



119 

have been reduced in the higher grades, I think, because 
of the more stable character of the well-to-do superintend- 
ents and overseers residing there, whose children are now 
chiefly beyond the school ; while the less able withdraw 
their children and put them to work before they reach 
the Grammar grades. The Franklin-street school has 
also been reduced by the withdrawal of the older grade 
of pupils living at West Manchester and Bakersville, who 
of late have been properly accommodated nearer home. 

The new schools at West Manchester and Bakersville 
have steadily grown both larger and better. The Main- 
etreet school averaged 100 in 1877, and 301 in 1886 ; the 
Bakersville 73 in 1877, and 131 in 1886. The Lincoln- 
street and Ash-street schools have generally been well 
filled, and have respectively been pretty uniform in their 
average number belonging. The higher grades at Lin- 
coln-street, however, have lately been somewhat crowded, 
and from February till July, at least, this school as a 
whole will be unusually full. The Ash-street school be- 
came unduly crowded a few years since, but was relieved 
by the establishment of the Webster-street school. The 
Ash-street, however, has continued to average upwards 
of 40 to the room. The Webster-street school, organized 
in 1882 with 46 pupils, has constantly grown larger, and 
averaged 109 this year. 

The school at Amoskeag has not varied much in its 
average attendance, except that this year the mixed Pri- 
mary there has been unusually large (49). 

The average attendance at the High School for ten 
years is seen to have been highest (196) in 1879, and low- 
est (159) in 1883. It has gradually increased, however, 
since 1882, and this year averages 175, while its whole 
number has been 192. 

Greatest changes have occurred in schools yet to be 



120 

mentioned. The old " Intermediate," which had been 
in existence many years and well served its pnrpose as 
an ungraded school for the accommodation of those who 
could not be properly classed in the graded schools, in 

1877. had an average number of 36 pupils ; in 1878, 24 ; 
in 1879, 16 ; and was then discontinued. The Inter- 
mediate had been transferred from the house at the cor- 
ner of Manchester and Chestnut streets to the old High 
School building on Lowell street, to afford more rooms 
for primaries on Manchester street. These primaries in 
1879 had grown to five schools in number, one being in 
the attic, and that year had an average number of 229 
pupils. Withdrawals for the parochial schools, thereafter 
annually, reduced these schools till in 1883 there were 
but two, with an average number of 61 pupils. These 
two primaries were thereupon also transferred to the 
Lowell-street house, where two out of four * had been 
discontinued two years before. 

The Lowell-street primaries continued as four schools 
until last year, when there were only three ; and this 
year but two, with an aggregate average number of 53 
pupils. 

Other Primary schools that have likewise experienced 
sad fates are those formerly at Bridge street and Beech 
street. The Bridge-street was discontinued in 1879, 
though open for one terra since, in 1882, to relieve the 
overcrowded condition of the lower Primary at Ash street 
that year. The Beech-street school was first opened 
in the old ward room at the corner of Sj)ruce street, in 

1878, to relieve the Manchester-street primaries. A four- 
room building soon became necessary on Beech street. 
It was ready for occupancy in 1880, and four schools 

* Two of Uiese were organizecl iu 1879, in the rooms before occupied by the 
Intermediate scliool. 



121 

were at once organized therein with an average number 
of 154 pupils. This school thereafter began its annual 
decline, owing to large withdrawals for attendance upon 
the new French parochial schools. Since 1882 but one 
public school has been held in the Beech-street house, 
and this year the average number of pupils belonging 
to that has been only 27. 

On the other hand, the school at Wilson Hill has more 
than doubled its numbers ; and another Primary school 
has this year been opened in the additional room there 
so long before unoccupied, except for one term in 1884. 
The school at Hallsville, too, has a largely increased 
attendance, and the services of an assistant there seem 
advisable. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

From the character and extent of what I wrote in 
regard to the High School in m}- report for 1884, it may 
be properly inferred that I regard this school of great 
importance. It is a good school, but it can and should 
be improved. The prevailing notion that the master 
ought to confine his M^hole time for recitation work as 
closely as his assistants to a particular set of classes is a 
mistake, and a bad one. Under such a course, his per- 
sonal influence and teaching power can be directly felt 
only by a small portion of the school, when it should be 
felt largely by every pupil. It can be arranged, too, so 
that this desirable result may be accomplished, a result 
desirable because it should, and I believe would, elevate 
the whole tone of the school, pupil and teaching force 
alike. 

To do proper work at the High School, the master 
should have at least a third of the recitation periods at 
his disposal for utilizing about his school all the ability 



122 

he has, where and how his judgment dictates. This 
Bhould bring him, generally at every period when not 
engaged in the recitation of .his own special classes, into 
one or more of the class-rooms of his assistants. What 
means the marked difference in the salaries of the High 
School teachers, except that the master's influence should 
be exerted and felt for the good of all his pupils and go 
out helpfully to his assistants ? How can he better aid 
the latter than by conducting recitations in their pres- 
ence, exemplifying his best methods of instruction ? He 
would thus be constantly employed, and continually com- 
ing in contact with pupils in other classes than those of 
his own set. Might not the assistant, always present and 
observing his methods of instruction, also obtain hints that 
would be utilized to advantage ? For the purpose of 
affording such, he might at certain recitations daily, 
first for one assistant and then for another, conduct 
the recitation in certain studies for days at a time. At 
another period he could inspect the work of others, to 
suggest improvements or determine how best to accom- 
plish them. Can there be any doubt that by such a 
course the influence of the master would be widely felt 
throughout the school, and that, too, for its general im- 
provement ? For, by pursuing such a course, it is readily 
seen that the master would come in direct contact with 
nearly every pupil in his school in such a way that he 
would be able well to understand the ability and chief 
characteristics of each. And would not such an under- 
standing upon the part of the master enable him to get 
a far stronger hold upon the individual pupil, and so 
have a vastly greater power over him for good? Our 
High School has been kept small, largely because nearly 
as many as have graduated have annually dropped out of 
it. Let us give the master his proper influence, that he 



123 

may know when and how to extend the encouragement 
that will hold pupils to their early ambitions. It is bad 
for them so soon to get in the habit of giving one up, 
especially when so laudable a one as a contemplated 
course at the High School. A turn from such may prove 
the blight of a life. 

I said that arrangements could be so made that time 
would be afforded for the work above .outlined for the 
master. I will proceed to indicate how. There are six 
teachers at the High School, each having five recitation 
periods daily, or time for thirty recitations, which average 
about fifty minutes each. Now cliange the sessions so 
that there shall be two, daily, of two and a half hours 
each, instead of one of three hours and another of two, as 
now. Let the morning session be from 8.45 till 11.15, 
and the afternoon from 1.30 till 4, without any recess 
except the noon intermission of two and a quarter hours. 
Each session can then be divided into three recitation 
periods of fifty minutes each, and thirty-six such periods 
thus secured daily to the six teachers there. 

Let the master regularly instruct a particular set of 
three or four classes during a corresponding number of 
these periods, and have two or three others for doing the 
general w^ork in the school before outlined. There will 
then remain an apparent excess of three or four recitation 
periods; but they are needed to carry out the plan, as far 
as may be, for which the assembly room was specially 
provided with individual desks, viz., to afford a quiet 
room for study under the eye of a teacher. There are 
also other purposes for which these periods could be used 
to the great advantage of the school. 

It occurs to me that the only objection that any one can 
raise to the proposed changes is the abolition of the recess, 
at some intermediate period of the- sessions. Such objec- 



124 



tion, however, is not valid for a school of the grade under 
consideration, for sessions of so short duration. There is 
abundant evidence that, for years together, pupils of 
'Grammar grade have been held in sessions of three hours' 
duration upon the " no recess " plan, not only without 
detriment but with great satisfaction to all concerned. 
The plan does not (as many imagine) presuppose a deaf 
ear, or any lack of attention, to the calls of nature. 

The changes suggested ai-e submitted for your imme- 
diate consideration, in the belief that, put uj^on any fair 
trial, they would speedily result in greatly improving the 
efficiency of our High School. The plan of conducting 
the High School as proposed is, in its main features, not 
an experiment, but a plan long tested, favorably known, 
and in common practice. 

The following is the program of the graduating exer- 
cises of the High School, Class of '86, at the Manchester 
Opera-house, June 25 : — 

Song of Welcome. Words by Lettie M. Smith. 

Music by May E. Clough. 
Introduction of Class, • Emma B. Abbott. 

Prologue, John H. Gerould. 

Essay, " The ISTatural Sciences," Emma L. McLaren. 

Duet, " Cheerfulness," Misses Blake and Clough. 

Essay, "Mathematics," Mary E. Ray. 

Chorus, "Isle of Beauty," By Class. 

Essays, "Literature." English — Minot 0. Simons. 

Classic — Ilattie ^. Gage. 
Recitation, "Hiawatha's Wooing," Mary J. Walsh. 

Essay, "Language," Theodora Richardson. 

Military Drill — Masters Adams, Fox, Franks, Heath, 

Kenney, Quint, Simons, Tobin. 
Poem, "Manual Training," Cora B. Gilford. 



125 

Essay, "Social Life," Victor E. Stevens. 

Medley from "The Mikado." 

Arranged by Anna M. Ainsworth. 
First part adapted by Lillian G. Bullock. 
Second part adapted by Grace A. Mitchell. 
Third part adapted by Mande L. Kent. 
Fourth part adapted by Katie T. Coburn. 
Filth part adapted by Mary E. Hutchinson. 
Sixth part adapted by Elizabeth S. ISTorris. 
Seventh part adapted by Harriet J. Hall. 
Produced by Misses Abbott, Ainsworth, Bullock, Co- 
burn, Hall, Hutchinson, Jackson, Kent, Lamb, 
McDonald, Merrill, Norris, Randall, Ray, Richard- 
son, Rollins. 
Conclusion, "The Value of High School Education," 

Edwin S. Tasker. 
Double Quartet, " Faithfulness." Misses Blake and 
Lamb, Masters Stevens, Gerould, Adams, Simons, 
Blanchard, Tasker. 
Address to Class of '87, A. Blanche Merrill. 

Address to Class of '86, Joseph M. Brennan. 

Address to Friends of School, Lillian A. Ordway. 

Farewell Song. 

Award of Diplomas, Hon. Daniel Clark. 

Pianist — Martha S. Clark. 



FAREWELL SONG. 

Words by Will C. Heath. Music by Fred Blanchard. 

To the verge of the eastern horizon 
of our niauhooiVs career we've attained, 

'Tis the western horizon of scliool life 
In whicli intellect's nurtured and trained.' 

Shall our lives e'er resemble the tempest 
That envelopes with darkness the day ? 

Or be likened to soft-falling showers 
That bring blessing and comfort alway ? 



126 



May the roll of harsh thunder not follow 
When a life flashes forth strong and bright; 

But ambition, attuned to soft numbers, 
Set the world all aglow with delight. 

May our mission be that of the sunbeam. 

That so radiantlj' heralds the day, 
And makes doubt, and all longing, and terror, 

Like the mists of the night, float away. 

So let each from his own little orbit 
Send a ray that is cheery and bright, 

For to rightly make use of our knowledge 
We must give to the world of our light. 

Like the far-away stars that still twinkle, 
Though the source of their liglit may have fled, 

We would live in some good left behind us. 
Although severed be life's slender thread. 



THE GRADUATING CLASS. 



Emma B. Abbott. 
Anna M. Aiiisworth. 
Annie F. Blake. 
Lillian G. Bullock. 
ISIartha S. Clark. 
May E. Clough. 
Katie T. Coburn. 
Hattie N. Gage. 
Cora B. Gilford. 
Harriet J. Hall. 
Mary E. Hutchinson. 
Mabel A. Jackson. 
Maude L. Kent. 
Edna B. Lamb. 
Addie M. McDonald. 
Emma L. McLaren. 
A. Blanche Merrill. 
Grace A. Mitchell. 
Elizabeth S. ITorris. 
Lillian A. Ordway. 
Etta F. Eandall. 



Mary E. Ray. 
Theodora Richardson. 
Liiina M. Rollins. 
Lettie M. Smith. 
Carrie L Snauder. 
Mary J. Walsh. 
Fred H. Blan chard. 
Arthur S. Buntou. 
Joseph M. Brennan. 
Fred H. Cate. 
Eugene H. Everett. 
Arthur L. Franks. 
John H. Gerould. 
Will C. Heath. 
William J. Kenney. 
Minot 0. Simons. 
Harry S. Quint. 
Victor E. Stevens. 
Edmund M. Sturgis. . 
Edwin S. Tasker. 
Charles W. Tobin. 



127 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 

In my report for 1880 I gave a brief history of the 
Training School, from its organization in 1869. Its de- 
sign was said to be primarily to aftbrd means for supply- 
ing our schools with more competent teachers than the 
salaries here paid were attracting from abroad, by train- 
ing for the purpose the young lady graduates of our High 
School. These from necessity, though without teaching 
experience, were being tried as substitutes ; and from the 
slight foothold thus given, they were soon found rapidly 
entering the corps of teachers, and, as a matter of course, 
for several terms while gaining experience, they were an 
element of weakness. The results of the Training School 
have fully justified its establishment and continuance, both 
by strengthening the corps of teachers and by furnishing 
substitutes for temporary service of such efficiency that 
their employment in Primary grades does not much more 
often prove to the detriment of one school than for the 
improvement of another, according to the comparative 
ability of the regular teacher and the substitute employed. 

Details in regard to the varied work of this school, and 
the changes made in* the form of its organization, have 
been given in former reports. In that for 1884 it was 
shown that the average cost of the school had been less 
under its present form of organization than under the 
former plan ; and that, at most, the school had not in any 
year cost more than one hundred dollars more than would 
be required to support its four divisions at regular maxi- 
mum salaries. Nearly half the amount paid for teaching, 
under the present form of organization, is annually dis- 
tributed among the young lady sub-teachers, citizens of 
Manchester, for services as assistant teachers in the school 
after they have each given six months' gratuitous service, 
to make themselves worthy of their hire. 



128 



The Training School has sent out from its membership 
in the course of its existence, one hundred and seven 
young ladies, who have been employed as regular teachers 
in our city schools for varying periods of time. 

Below is given a list of those from the membership of 
this school who have belonged to our corps of teachers 
during the year now closing : — 



Alice G. Lord. 
Mary F. Barnes. 
Mary A. Buzzell. 
Isabelle K. Daniels. 
Anna 0. Heath. 
Rocilla M. Tuson. 
Augusta S. Downs. 
Jennie F. Bailey. 
Mary A. Smith. 
Etta J. Carle3^ 
Cora M. Dearborn. 
Ella F. Sanborn. 
Flora M. Senter. 
Ella F. Barker. 
Bertha L. Dean. 
Mary W. Mitchell. 
Belle M. Kelley. 
Susan G. Woodman. 
Fannie D. Moulton. 
Gertrude II. Brooks. 
Emma L. Stokes. 
Lizzie A. Burns. 
Annie W. Patten. 
Nellie M. James. 



ISTettie C. Woodman. 
Lenora C. Gilford. 
Carrie I. Stevens. 
Olive J. Eandall. 
Izetta S, Locke. 
Olive A. Eowe. 
Mary E. Bunton. 
Kate M. Follansbee. 
Georgie A. Wyman. 
Eva F. Tuson. 
Kittie J. Ferren. 
Edith M. Stebbins. 
Helen M. Wetherbee. 
Ella Hope. 
Susie H. Frame. 
Mary L. Gage. 
]^ettie F. Ainsworth. 
Genevieve L. Whitten. 
Alta C. Willand. 
Carrie A. F. Bartlett. 
May J. Hickey. 
May J. Nutt. 
Lelia A. Brooks. 
Alice E. Pasre. 



From former investigations it has been shown that for 
several years more than fifty per cent of our corps of lady 



129 

teachers lias come from the membership of the Training 
School. In 1884 the per cent was sixty-nine, and this 
year it has been seventy-one. It is therefore evident that 
the character of the Training School must exert a power- 
ful influence upon our schools, more than seven tenths ot 
the present corps of lady teachers having been trained 
therein. 

It may be safely assumed that in the future, as in the 
past, there cannot be brought here from abroad, for the 
salaries Manchester will pay, as good and eiFective teach- 
ing talent as the average of that obtained from the mem- 
bership of our city Training School. Hence it is patent 
that the larger portion of our corps of teachers is likely 
to be selected for years to come from the membership of 
this school. I therefore argue that the most direct and 
effective way to better our schools is to improve the Train- 
ing School. It labors under some difficulties. The chief 
of these is the fact that it is impossible for any principal, 
w^ithout other aid than that which can be afforded by 
recent and inexperienced graduates of the High School, 
to bring and keep the schools under her charge up to a 
better condition than others of corresponding grades in 
the city, as should and must be done if the sub-teachers 
are to have the benefit of observation and practice in 
model schools, and at the same time afford proper instruc- 
tion in the principles of teaching. As a consequence, the 
principal's time and strength must be almost wholly de- 
voted to the production of superior schools, and then 
there is not left enough of either time or strength to ren- 
der properly effective one half the theoretical work that 
ought to be done. 

This has been the feeling and testimony of every prin- 
cipal who has had charge of the school under its present 
form of organization ; and my observation and knowledge 

9 



130 

of its necessities, if the school is to meet expectations, 
convince me that there is sufficient ground for such feel- 
ing. Hence I have given the matter much thought, with 
view to devising some means for relief and improvement. 
Believing that I can now suggest two or three practical 
ways for accomplishing the desired end without additional 
expense, I stand ready to unfold them whenever you are 
ready for such consideration of the subject. 
The following is a list of the 

TRAINING SCHOOL SUB-TEAGHERS, 1886. 

Carrie A. F. Bartlett.* Sarah B. Paige. f 

Nina B. Croning.* JNIay A. Southard.f 

May J. Hickey.* Cora B. Gilford.| 

May J. N"utt.* Emma L. McLaren. J 

Huldah C. Graupner.f Lettie M. Smith.| 

Lillian C. HalLf Genevieve B. Knight.| 

Barbara B. Joy.f Theodora Richardson. | 

Alice E. Page.f Mary J. Walsh.J 

CONDITIOIs^ OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The character ascribed to our schools by the casual in- 
spector would depend upon where he might make his 
most frequent visits ; for it is universally conceded that, 
whatever other appliances be in use, the school is as is 
the teacher. Now, from a careful going over of the en- 
tire list, I find those teachers who may be rated excellent 
to exceed the ordinary by one third of the number of the 
latter, and those considered good to be more than double 
the number of the fair. From this it appears that the 

* Graduated January 29. 

t Entered September, 1885, and expected to graduate Januarj' 28, 1887. 

X Entered Fall of 1886. 



131 

schools as a whole ma}- be considered at least good, and 
my knowledge and judgment of them justifies the con- 
clusion. 

Something more than a mere casual inspection of a 
school, however, is necessary, if one would really know 
the merits of a teacher. Permit me to quote, upon this 
point, from a former report (1881, pages 27 and 28) : "It 
very often happens that a sort of brusqueness in a teach- 
er's ways is mistaken for efficiency, that tact in manage- 
ment is mistaken for faculty to teach, and that necessary 
delay to correct the errors and make up the deficiencies 
of a predecessor is mistakenly regarded as a failure prop- 
erly to advance. It does not follow because a teacher has 
grown somewhat old in the service, that such a one is 
therefore necessarily more antiquated in methods of 
teaching, is more largely lacking a knowledge of human 
nature and the operations of the mind, or is less likely to 
exercise a fair degree of judgment in the management of 
a school, than a younger person who possibly has abetter, 
because a later, preparatory training. General rules have 
their exceptions in this matter, as well as in others ; and I 
think that by the work performed and the results attained, 
thoroughly known and understood, should individual 
teachers alone be judged. Ils^or in a graded system of 
schools like ours can the work of a teacher always be in- 
tuitively understood. It is not infrequently a matter for 
investigation, if one would know it. The real results are 
not always apparent, nor are the apparent ones always 
real. In one building the momentum given a class by 
one or two uncommonly strong teachers may carry that 
class through the next grade commendably well ; indeed, 
so that, though the teacher of that grade be weak, the 
class, when compared with others of the same grade, does 
not for the time appear to sufifer. Yet in another build- 



132 

ing, a really strong teacher, in the same grade as that of 
the weak teacher in the case just supposed, may appear 
to be the inferior, because it is not seen that such a one is 
embarrassed by the shortcomings of, it may be, one, two, 
or three predecessors. Hence in a graded system of 
schools, where the work of a teacher is largely affected, 
in most instances, by the work of one or more predeces- 
sors, it is frequently necessary, in order to understand the 
real efficiency of the teacher, that the non-professional 
observer should criticall}^ note the work of that teacher 
for several terms ; and that, too, in connection with an 
observance of the work done by predecessors, and an 
attainment of a knowledge of the material of which the 
several classes may, in the mean time, be composed. It is 
not designed to intimate, however, that the ordinary ob- 
server may not vevy soon distinguish between a decidedly 
good and a decidedly poor teacher; but when a teacher 
is expected to accomplish a certain amount of work in a 
specified time, and is held accountable for the result of 
that work, then it is important that he who would judge 
of that work and its results should know whether or not 
the teacher concerned has first to make up the deficien- 
cies of one or more weak teachers." 

TEACHERS. 

Enough has been said under the previous head to in- 
dicate my judgment of the general character of our teach- 
ers. It gives me pleasure, however, to add that a spirit 
for improvement has animated the corps more largely 
than during any former year of my superintendence. Our 
teachers are more generally and studiously reading educa- 
tional literature, with view to acquiring a better under- 
standing of the principles of education and the best 



133 



methods of applying them in teaching. !N"ot a few, impa- 
tient for more material to assist them in their work, have 
drawn upon their own funds to secure it, which is most 
convincing evidence of their sincerity and earnestness. 

The whole number of dilFerent teachers employe,d dur- 
ing the year has been 81. Their respective positions may 
be learned from the attendance table immediately follow- 
ing this report, but the various changes made within the 
year can be more readily understood by an inspection of 



the following : — 



Teachers. 



Date of effect 
of resignation. 



Mattie E. Sanborn. Mar. 26. 
Jennie F. Bailey. June 25. 
KateM.Follansbee. June 25. 
Mary A. Smith. June 25. 



Teachers. 



Date of begin- 
ning service. 



CarrieA.F.Bartlett. Apr. 12. 
May F. Nutt. Apr. 12. 

Lelia A. Brooks. Sept. 6. 
Wm. F. Gibson. Sept. 6. 
F. Maude Joy. Sept. 6. 

Eleanor H. Kirk. Sept. 6. 
Alice E. Page. Sept. 6. 

Alice Shovelton. Sept. 6. 
J. Edw. Pickering. Oct. 25. 



Teachers. 



Date of effect 
of resignation. 



Emma L. Stokes. June 25. 
Genev. L. Whitten. June 25. 
FredW. Shattuck. Oct. 25. 

Teachers ^^*® °^ ^^^''t 

leacneis. of transfer. 

Georgianna Dow. Apr.l2. 
Mary A. Putney. Apr. 12. 
Ella F. Sanborn. Apr.l2. 
Susie H. Frame. Sept. 6. 
Mary W. Mitchell. Sept. 6. 
HelenF.Weth'rbee.Sept. 6. 
Clara E. Woods. Sept. 6. 
Georgie A.Wyman.Sept. 6. 
Frank S. Sutcliffe. Oct. 25. 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

After so extended a notice of the evening schools as 
has been given in the report of the committee, it is not 
necessary that I should occupy much space for their con- 
sideration. 

They constitute an important part of our system of 



134 

schools, and by visiting tliem the older pupils of the other 
grades could readily see what it is to be animated by the 
spirit of the student. Such voluntary earnestness for 
learning does not elsewhere exist in our schools. The 
class of students in the evening schools this fall has been 
superior to that of former years. 

The two schools east of the river are now properly 
accommodated in respect to the character and fitness of 
the seats occupied ; but use of one day-school room at the 
Spring-street house continues greatly to annoy the day 
school, and I earnestly recommend that the now unseated 
room there be fitted up for the use of the evening schools 
before they open again next fall. The arrangements 
made by the evening school committee for the proper 
seating of those attending the evening school for males, 
on Lowell street, are admirable, though comparatively 
inexpensive. Men of every size are there made comforta- 
ble ; and the regularity of attendance in all the evening 
schools where suitable seating arrangements have been 
found has uniformly been greater and more constant. 

The evening school in West Manchester has always 
suffered for the want of proper seating accommodations, 
and the repeated trial of putting adults into Primary seats 
has had the usual effect of soon depleting the school. 
From this consideration, and others that will appear, I 
now suggest the building of a 

NEW SCHOOLHOUSE. 

West Manchester, as is well known, has had a phenom- 
enal growth within a few years. The addition of four 
new rooms to the Main-street school building has been a 
necessity. The average number of pupils in its eight 
rooms the present year has been thirty more than in the 



135 

eight at Franklin-street; and during the past term, the 
Main-street school has, in respect to aggregate enrollment, 
exceeded all other of our large schools except the Lin- 
coln-street. At the same time, the School-street house 
has been very full. The four primaries there have aver- 
aged forty-one to the room, while the enrollment has 
usually been about fifty. All this is true, notwithstanding 
the opening of the new and large French parochial schools 
in that part of the city, and the almost entire withdrawal 
from the public schools there of all pupils of French 
parentage. 

I have given the foregoing facts to show that not only 
all the school-rooms in West Manchester will continue to 
be needed, but that more are likely to be a necessity. 
I base my recommendation for a new schoolhouse in that 
section, however, upon present needs, for the following 
reasons : First, the rooms at the School-street house are 
too contracted, badly shaped, and poorly ventilated, for 
the proper accommodation of the large schools held there. 
Second, these circumstances, in my judgment, render 
them unhealthj for both pupils and teachers. Third, at 
least half of the present building is needed for evening 
schools ; and the lower half might be used for a ward 
room, which, I understand, is also greatly needed. 

I therefore suggest that measures be at once taken for 
securino; a desirable lot in West Manchester for a new 
schoolhouse in the neighborhood of the present one on 
School street, before the opportunity of obtaining a good 
lot be past. I recommend that a new house be con- 
structed which shall contain not less than six rooms, prop- 
erly arranged, and at least four of them fitted as soon as 
possible for the four Primary schools now held on School 
street. 



136 



READING. 

A few years since, reading was formally introduced as 
a regular class exercise at the High School, by incorpo- 
rating the requirement of it in the High School course. 
The study of it, however, did not appear progressive, he- 
cause the average ability to teach reading, upon the part 
of the teachers who have been in the High School, has 
not been, nor by them claimed to be, superior to that 
of the average Grammar masters. Considering the 
amount of time that was being devoted to the study in 
the High School, without that progress which was, com- 
paratively speaking, being made in other branches carried 
over from the Grammar school to the High, — as language 
and mathematics, — the continuance of the special recita- 
tions in reading at the High School was becoming, to my 
mind, a question of at least doubtful utility; and in my 
report for 1884 (page 34), I suggested a way for im- 
provement. 

Means for improvement of the most eifective sort have 
finally come through accumulations of the profits of the 
prige-speaking contests, instituted through the liberality 
of Col. John B. Clarke, of this city, who, as I personally 
know, has regarded the employment of a special and pro- 
fessional instructor of reading, of the highest type obtain- 
able, as the chief end of his original idea in establishing 
the annual prize contest for excellence in various forms 
of elocution. These contests, it may be properly added, 
have by their efiects not only improved the reading in our 
schools, but they have awakened a new and increased 
interest in reading and elocution throughout the city, if 
not a large section of the state, with manifestly desirable 
efl'ects. The criticisms occasionally heard in regard to 
the results upon certain pupils in the schools are far out- 



137 

weighed by the general highly beneficial eftect upon 
the mass. 

The employment of a special instructor of reading, 
though only for one day a week for the last term of the 
year, in the person of Prof. J. J. Hayes, special instructor 
in elocution at Harvard University, has already begun to 
show the great wisdom of the employment of such an 
instructor. His services are most highly beneficial as a 
teacher of the corps of teachers, the most direct way of 
speedily and permanently establishing his system of in- 
struction in the schools being dependent upon the 
knowledge which the teachers have of it. The lessons 
are given the teachers at the close of the afternoon session 
on Monday. The committee having the matter in charge 
believed that it would be wise to concentrate somewhere 
such work as the professor might be able to exemplify 
with pupils at school, in order better to determine its 
practicability. The High School, for reasons already 
given, was believed to be the one most in need of help in 
the matter of teaching reading; and two classes there 
have unitedly been under the instruction of the professor 
for an hour every Monday forenoon. The Grammar and 
lower-grade schools have received his attention in the 
afternoon ; but they are so numerous he will scarcely get 
round to each more than twice before July, when his 
present term of service expires. The single visits, how- 
ever, already made to several of them have been produc- 
tive of much good to both pupil and teacher. It is ex- 
pected that the work being done by the professor at the 
High School will, in particular, permanently improve the 
study of reading there. All teachers above the lower 
Primary grade are both observing and studying the sys- 
tem with view to its application to subsequent classes. 

In this connection it may not be improper to submit 



138 

a recommendation affecting the conduct of the prize-speak- 
ing contests, which is, that you arrange, if possible, so 
that a pupil once taking the highest prize shall not again 
be allowed to contest. 

The inculcation of the habit of reading good literature 
is so desirable a thing, in any community, that no argu- 
ment is necessary to justify an attempt to promote it. 
The pupils and teachers in our public schools are fortu- 
nate in having upon the board of school committee an 
influential member of the board of trustees of the city 
library, who is disposed to assist in securing a reasonable 
portion of such books for the library as may be advan- 
tageous to the teacher, and hence the improvement of the 
schools ; and a longer list of such books as are designed 
to attract and more directly improve the youth of our 
city, through whose early training in a proper use of the 
library lies the hope, in another generation, of making 
the advantages of the city library as general and popular 
here as in other cities. 

To further so desirable an end, I publish as an appen- 
dix to this report a catalogue of some of the books of 
both classes mentioned, and now to be found in the city 
library ; and to this I invite the attention of teachers, pu- 
pils, and parents. 

DRAWING. 

The study of drawing was many years since added to 
the curriculum of common-school branches in all the 
leading cities of this country ; and it has been pursued 
therein with varying degrees of success, according to the 
amount and quality of the attention and means bestowed 
upon it. The study was justified on the ground of its 
direct utilitarian effect as the basis of an industrial educa- 
tion which would more speedily enable the common- 



139 

Bcliool graduate to earn his own living, and its influence 
in cultivating the taste and training the hand was soon 
apparent. Even in our city, where the efforts to improve 
the study in our schools have been somewhat spasmodic, 
this influence has adorned many a home, and in not a few 
instances originated realized desires for a more skilled 
training than would otherwise have been thought of. Its 
influence has, in particular, better prepared all to enter 
more readily and efliectively upon any vocation in which 
the judgment is called upon to direct, the hand to manip- 
ulate, or the taste to embellish. Experience has also 
shown that the study of drawing is an attractive and, 
when rightly taught, a highly important means of mental 
training; and hence it may be reasonably inferred that its 
influence, in general, better prepares all having an experi- 
mental knowledge of it for any vocation. I^ow, to be 
rightly taught, this study needs expert supervision and 
appropriate material for affording proper instruction. 
At the next meeting of the committee I propose to sub- 
mit a plan for securing both at but little comparative 
expense ; and I trust it will receive the consideration due 
the importance of the subject. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WM. E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



140 



a 

H 

o 

Ph 

c« 
I-! 
O 
O 
3^ 
Q 

c» 

tJ 

O 

I— I 

w 

H 
H 

W 

Q 

H 
H 
<1 

w 
a 

H 

o 



o 
a 

CO 





s^ p^ s s-s 



c a> >: ffl 



JO !>n90 J9J 



t— M 05 i-H 



(WCO CO t^ 



03 C: 3503 



t^ O rHCO 
'^ CO (>1 CO 



•aouBpasny 
jClie(I93BJ8AY 



OOD tH -* 
CO (M CO SO 



CO OOOU3 
CO CO "^ H* 



CO co^co-* 



•SuiSaoiag; 
•o^ 9Sej3Ay 



CO CO CO CO 



O 000500 
■^ CO ■^ "^ 



»0 GO CO 00 iC 
t^ CO-*CO-«ll 





m 












bo 

a 


.q 




^ 


M 



03t- l- <M 



(N i-i(MCO 



05 CO CM C^CO 



5 



m 



•p9nojua 



t^ CO CO CO 



t- -*-*C5 



05 »)<M r-<(M 



00O5 03 O 
10-* CD CD 



00 t~05T-l 



eot-ioo 

t-^DCOOO 



n 


S 
o 






O 


CO- 


- 


- 


w 


> 






( ) 








CO 


M'C 




fi, 




"S o 


2 


u 
3 
O 




fe(/j 


H 


tH 


















<1 


01 






K 






O 


CO 







p "2^ 



'^ ;q 


n 


ce . » - 


• 




C'S t^ 












w 


p73 ;a 


o 




IBHfe 




-4J S '^ t^ 


*"* 


fl 




V, 


2 8-3 


a> 


H 




^ 




01 


aj 




o 






<u 




o 


(D 


n 


p 




•3 




CO 






1-1 




< 


S 
'u 
ft 



141 











O 7} 






M 


■/; > 


C 


.•-;a 


s 


Q ^ 




'C "*-* 


fn 


■^ ^ 


.t3 


-^ O 


tb 


HPn 



aj t.; 



- o a • -^ "5 2 '•^ • 



c3« 



^fao 




^ 5 =s 



S S 



H 


vJ 


O 


O 


H 


O 


iJ 


a 


O 


o 


o 


m 




W 


OD 


hj 


tf 


P 


-<! 


Q 



® 



: . t. .' o 33 S3 s 



ail 

® 



.s s s 

C) Oi 01 

^ S f/j oT oj^ «j 

;^ D O O*'*^ 






3 O 



' SJ U « o 



nCS 






, SXli. „ „ ^ 

r- jr s <i> oj ii 
c3 a; C 1^ OJ ^ 



93.7 

92.5 
91.7 


CO 


^ 






C3 


91.6 
91.2 
90.9 
94.3 
91.2 
89.1 
91.5 
88.0 
95.1 
88.6 
93.0 
85.7 
91.5 
87.5 


o 


OOOCO 

as :o C3 

0DO5 00 


CO 

CO 


8 


lO 


O t-M 

CO MCO 


o 


!? 


p 




X 

3 


COiraOeOlOOCOfflOS-HOOCOrH 

coco-*eoeoTH.*o<coco-*co-*(S 


1 




o 

CO 


C5 

CO 


■* 


« oco 
CO ■*eo 


s 


§ 


§ 


00 


00 


000-*lOC<Dlf5t~lO-M10COlOt^-# 
COCO^COCO-*^(M-*CO-*CO-*(M 


s? 


01CC5 

It (M e-i 


^ 


^ 


O) 


(M COi-H 


to 


lO 


o 


s 


5I 


■-ICOCOt^rHCO'*lOCOCOi-l-*Oi-l 
NC-lCOC-ICICOCO^HC^CMCOrHCO 


05 


COti rH 




CO 


g 


s ss 


s 


1-1 


00 


§ 


S5 


oooor-(t-..-^i*a)'^cofMcoooo - 
(^^(^^I-l(^1co(^^^Hl-^co(^^co(^^<M • 


CO 


CO rH ©1 


CO 


g 


g 


g g§ 


•*- 


CO 


^ 


■^ 


•^ 


IM(MOC5t~O05^O00mOl0l^ 
tf^COr^tOOOOit-lOCOCOOOCOCOfM 


•^ 


— ItXCO 

t~co in 


^ 


5 


s 



5 • •?!s-S5-'-='> -5 • 

m>TlLj*-^ ID -So hhHlJ 



a 



<D 



• (U oi; 



O 

- cS 



CO S^ J,' <B 

«3 03 r- O T* -5 J, 

PA •? 2 c S .S 



« s s 
g p. 









Sis 



2 aj so 
g « O 



W Hi 



142 



o 
o 
w 

o 
CO 

p 
o 

I— I 

Pi 

H 

H 

Q 

<1 



H 
H 



Ha J 

P a> «~ > =S <p eS 



.rt* « fl 



» S S r 
c S S S 



>-.^ 






a a o Qj 

S r» ^ >^ ' 









5 ^^:i^ 
Hjcc a o^j 



SJH(»W 



cS;z; 



e3 >i t>i QJ a> eS ^ 
■- ^H ;- o 0"ti 
=S ci cj ~ -^ ^ o 



•90UBpU9? 

;-; y A 1 1 B a 
JO (jnao a9<j 



CC X OOiOCiGOOS C5 CO CO 00 GO 35 C5 Oi Ci Ci C5 C5 O Ci Oi Oi 



•aon«pu9MV 



<q CO (soioocoo ^ e-j (M-*ot- lo 



■^ ■*|-I03 



ffl <>> -^M<N-*-*CO ■* S^ OT(MC0C<3 CO CO CO tH CO CO CO (N CO &» 



•SajSnoiag 

•O^ 9SBJ8AY 



in CO IC ffl CD CO 00 CO t~» t- COt^CDCS 00 OOCD <M CS CO COCO(M 
0-l<M->*CO<M ■*-*-* -^ elCO(JJCOCO CO -*'*-*■>* CO C0 01COCO 



2 o 



m 



^ 



O^C-^COdi— ( »OCOr- ( (M(Mr-lCO&^-<* 



O r-( OOOCOlCt-'* 



CO 0>t-i— (Oi O CO-^CO O 



CO-*(M<MCO iO(>l-* (M0^i-I«D(NCO(M<M(MCO 



OCD003 COIM -* 



t^ 1-- (M CO 



CD rHCDOO 



00 lOCOO 
CO r-ICO<^ 



CD r-ICD(>» 
00 lOCD to 




143 



:-a 






O/ ajoooiojco oo coco 



05 »00>OCI CJ OCO 
(MC^CCrHCO I— t rHi-( 



1-1 050I— OOt- rH eJC 
I— t ©ICOCOl— ICO (M rH r 



00 MrHIr-M-^ 05 05(M 
(N <M (N i-l <^< pH 



I-l <M (N r-( (N rH rl 



•^ICOffllO CO T-((N 





o 






o 


u 


H 


m 


tJ 


Q 


O 




o 


<1 


arj 


« 


^< 


CJ 


« 


?^ 


•<! 


& 



cc^ Q 



« ^£«£'> §,2-3 



& <5 <! 



s 


o£ 


o ^ 




fe<(-( 


o 


^ o 


s 


5 a> 


p 

p. 


§1 


>> 




p 


-c 


r,» 



!B ft 



O o3 

j:a 



3^5 



>2 



§2 
g2 



»--* 


>-M 


>x 


6D« 


m^ 


^° 




ei ^ 






« >. 


O r^ 


W.-S 


Ht: 


* o 


•f— ^ 



o3 



CO 'J 


a.s 

o 


S^ 


2io 


•rt o 






0°. 



m p. 
^1 ;^ 






« ft 

sg 



H 2.; 



S ^^ 






^,^3 



5 <2" 



(D o 


.S O 


.•!■ 


t>irt 


eS c3 . 


SS^ 


j^ o 


M oo 


h-S 


S w 


ftO! 



144 



EVENmG SCHOOLS. 

TABLE SHOWING AVERAGE ATTENDANCE, 



MONTHS. 



January . . 
February . 

March 

October. . . 
November 
December 



Spring-street 
School. 



Males. Females. 



Lowell- 
street 
School. 



School-street 
School. 



Males. Females. 



♦Males, east of the river, attentled at Spring-street first three months and 
at Lowell-street last three months. 



Number of evenings open 

^Number in attendance ten evenings or more 

Aggregate average attendance 

Average number of teachers in service . 



106 
245 

79 
9 



TEACHERS. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal of Spring-street school 
first three months, and of Lowell-street school last three 
months. 

Frank C. Livingston, principal of School-street school. 

J. H. Campbell, principal of Spring-street school last 
three months. 

Assistants — Alice H. Boyd, Anna J. Dana, Etta S. 
Dana, Hattie E. Daniels, M. Alma Fracker, Cora B. Gil- 
ford, Lizzie D. Hartford, Annie E. McElroy, Fannie M. 
Kelley, Sarah B. Paige, Cora F. Sanborn, Fannie L. San- 
born, Mary H. Searle, Ellen S. Stebbins. 



145 

It will be seen that the average number of pupils per 
teacher is nine. The attendants are nearly all foreign, 
and many of them upon entering do not even understand 
the English language when spoken ; hence the work is 
largely with the individual, and but few can be properly 
instructed in the brief period of an evening session. 



TEACHERS' EDUCATIONAL CATALOGUE, 



CITY LIBRAE Y. 



NO. sh'lp. 



Education, by Herbert Spencer 
History of, by H. I. Smith 

In Europe, by Henry Barnard 

Its Errors, by Harvey Rice 

Art, by Walter Smith 

Cj^clop^edia of, by Kiddle & Schem 

Helps to, by W. Burton . 

Doctrine of, by J. F. Richter . 

Principles of (author not given) 

Common School, by James Currie . 

Infant School, by James Currie 

As a Science, by Alexander Bain . 

Old Greek, by Mahafty . 

Contributions to Science of, by Wm. H 
Payne ...... 

Psychology in, by Hopkins 

I^^ecessity of Popular, by James Simpson 
The Teacher, by J. Abbott . 

An Artist, by B. R. Hall 
Teaching, by Henry Calderwood . 

Manual of (Eclectic) 

Lectures on, by J. G. Fitch 



. 28 


189 




190 


310 


. 46 


206 


. 62 


208 


. 56 


203 


. 59 


202 


8 


316 


. 57 


184 


. 19 


45 


. 120 


189 


. 121 


189 


. 48 


218 


. 42 


240 


. 116 


189 


. 91 


190 


1 35 


189 


. 15 


193 


. 23 


187 


. 123 


189 


. 122 


189 



147 



Teacliing, Its Ends and Means, by Henry 
Caldefwood .... 

A Science, by B. R. Hall 
Methods of, by John Swett 

Science and Art of, by Joseph Payne 

Talks on, by F. W. Parker . 

Application of Psychology to, by "W". 'N. 
Hailmann ..... 

Science of Mind Applied to, by U. J 
Hoftman ..... 

Thoughts on Educational Topics, by G. S 
Bartwell ...... 

A Book about Dominies (author not given) 
Record of a School, by A. B. Alcott 
A Talk with My Pupils, by Mrs. Chas. Sedgwick 
Elementary Instruction, by E. A. Sheldon 
Methods of Instruction, by J. R. Wickersham 
Art of School Management, by J. Baldwin 
History of Pedagogy, by W. IST. Hailmann 
Life of Horace Mann, by his wife . 
Manual Training, by C. H. Ham . 
History of Pedagogy, Payne's Gompayre 
Educational Theories, by Oscar Browning 
Methods of Teaching History, l)y Hall . 
Principles and Practice of Teaching, by James 
Johonnot ...... 

Conflict of Studies ..... 

Things not Generally Known (6 vols.) . 
The School and the Family, by John Kennedy 
Theory of Design, by Baker . 
• Model and Object Drawing, by Baker . 
Three Pronunciations of Latin, by Fisher 
School Management, by Joseph Landon 



77 208 

23 187 

105 189 

98 189 

81 196 

90 190 

126 189 

103 189 

10 188 

79 168 

75 108 

40 200 

41 200 
58 168 

104 189 

113 189 

119 189 

112 189 

95 189 

114 189 

93 189 

74 203 

95 270 

61 217 

124 189 

125 189 

62 309 
117 189 



148 

Psvcliology, by Sully . . . . . 

Study of English Classics, by Blaisdell . 
The True Order of Studies, by Thomas Hill . 
IVIoral Culture of Infancy, by Mann & Peabody 

Sundford and Merton, by Thomas Day . 



127 


189 


62 


236 


79 


208 


4 


316 


37 


155 


186 


309 



PUPILS' CATALOGUE, 

CITY LIBRARY. 



*'Iu order that pupils may acquire a taste for good 
literature, there must be au orgauized effort to influence 
their reading from the first. In the following list of books, 
which has been prepared with the aid of the librarians 
and the teachers, and with the aid of a similar list from 
Cambridge, Mass., the books, with shelf numbers on the 
right, are contained in the City Library. The list htis 
been divided into three classes: Class A, for older pupils, 
those of the first and second Grammar grades ; Class B, 
for those of the third and fourth grades ; and Class C, for 
the younger pupils, those of the intermediate grades. 
Parents and teachers are requested to give their advice 
and encouragement in making the selections." — Taken, 
loith ivhat follows, from the Newport {R. I.) School Report. 



CLASS A. 

Abbot, The, by Sir Walter Scott . 

African Explorations, by Livingstone 
Age of Chivalry, by Thos. Bulfinch 
Age of Fable, by Thos. Bulfinch . 
Alhambra, The, by Washington Irving 
American Commonwealth Series (as far as 
published). 



NO. SH LP. 



50 


89 


130 


157 


30 


73 


5 


188 


14 


89 


2 


136 



150 



American Men of Letters, edited by C. Dudley 

Warner (as far as published). 
American Statesmen, edited by J. T. Morse, 

Jr. (as far as published). 

Arctic Explorations, by E. K. Kane 



Around the World in Yacht Sunbeam, by 

Mrs. Brassey ...... 

Baddeck and That Sort of Thing, by C. D. 

Warner ....... 

Bleak House, by Charles Dickens . 

Book of American Explorers, by T. W. Hig- 

ginson ....... 

Boys of 76, The, by C. C. Coffin . 
Boys of '61, The, by C. C. Coffin . 
Bracebridge Hall, by Washington Irving 
Building the N'ation, by C. C. Coffin 
Cameos from English History, by C. M. Yonge 
Canoe and the Saddle, by Theodore Winthrop 
Child Life in Prose, by Whittier . 
Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens 
Chronicles of the Schonberg Cotta Family, 

by Mrs. E. Charles .... 
Color Guard, by James R. Hosmer 
Conquest of Mexico, by W. H. Prescott 
Conquest of Peru, by W. H. Prescott . 
Conspiracy of Pontiac, by Francis Parkman 
Courtship of Miles Standish, by Longfellow 
Daisy Chain, by Charlotte M. Yonge 
David Copperfield, by Charles Dickens . 
Days of Bruce, by Grace Aguilar . 
Deephaven, by Sarah 0. Jewett 
English Men of Letters, 24 vols.; ed. by John 

Morley (far as published) .... 



3 52 
16 72 

42 54 

34 70 
108 156 

35 247 
35 233 

49 233 
5 136 

50 233 

51 248 

4 78 
74 108 

114 159 

147 155 

60 158 

3 231 

1 231 

55 268 

12 110 

79 155 

110 156 

16 146 

83 109 



151 



Evangeline, by Henry W. Longfellow . 
Faith Gartney's Girlhood, by Mrs. Whitney . 
Fairyland of Science, by Arabella B. Buckley 
Famous Men of Modern Times, by S. G. Good- 
rich ........ 

Field Book of the Revolution, by J. B. Lossing 
Fireside Science, by J. R. Nichols . 
Fisher Maiden, by B. Bjornson 
Floating Matters of the Air, by John Tyndall 
Getting on in the World, by William Mat- 
thews ....... 

Girlhood of Shakespeare's Heroines, by Mrs 
M. Cowden Clarke .... 

Glaciers of the Alps, by John Tyndall . 
Henry Esmond, by Wm. M. Thackeray 
Heroism of Hannah Dustin, by R. B. Caverly 
Holland and Its People, by Edmondo de Amicis 
Homes without Hands, by J. G. Wood . 
House of Seven Gables, by Nathaniel Haw 
thorne ...... 

How I Found Livingstone, by II. M. Stanley 
Idyls of the King, by Alfred Tennyson . 
Illustrated Natural History, by J. G. Wood 
In his Name, by E. E. Hale . 
Ivanhoe, by Walter Scott . 33 88, 121 
John Halifax, Gentleman, by D. M. Craik 
Kenil worth, by Walter Scott . 
King Richard Second, by Jacob Abbott 
Knickerbocker's History of New York, by 
Washino-ton Irvina; .... 

Lady of the Lake, by Walter Scott 
Land of the Midnight Sun, by Paul Du Chaillu 
Lands of the Saracens, by Bayard Taylor 
Last Days of Pompeii, by Bulwer . 



7 

50 
67 



28 
6 
30 
35 
60 



11 

24 

134 

34 

60 

22 

36 
23 
31 

2 

68 
157, 5 
62 
39 
21 

1 
12 

36 
3 

98 



94 

95 

217 

152 

261 
215 
126 
219 



54 218 



118 

189 

156 

307 

65 

224 

139 

72 

96 

173 

109 

125 

154 

88 

170 

136 
92 
63 

56 
158 



152 



Lay of the Last Minstrel, by Sir Walter Scott 
Lays of Ancient Rome, by Macaulay 
Legends of Charlemagne, by Thomas Bulfinch 
Leslie Goldthwaite, by Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney 
Life and her Children, by Arabella B. Buckley 
Life of Columbus, by "Washington Irving 
Life of Oliver Goldsmith, by John Forster 
Life in Open Air, b^^ Theodore Winthrop 
Life of Washington, by Irving 
Lives of the Presidents, by J. S. C. Abbott 
Lives of the Queens of England, by Agnes 

Strickland ...... 

Marmion, by Sir Walter Scott 
Mary, Queen of Scots, by J. Abbott 
Montcalm and Wolfe, by Francis Parkman 
Monastery, The, by Sir Walter Scott 
Movement and Habits of Climbing Plants, by 

C. Darwin . ., • 

My Days and Kights on the Battlefield, by 

C. C. Cofiin 

My Summer in a Garden, by C. D. Warner 
Naval History of the United States, by J. F 

Cooper ...... 

IToble Life, A, by D. M. Craik 

E'ooks and Corners of the IsT. E. Coast, by S 

A. Drake 

Ocean World, by G. L. Figuier 
Old Curiosity Shop, by Charles Dickens 
Oldtown Folks, by Mrs. H. B. Stowe . 
Our Inheritance in the Great Pyramids, b}' 

Smyth ...... 

Our Old Home, by ]^athaniel Hawthorne 
Our l^ew Way Round the World, by C. C. 

Cotfin ." 



16 


92 


8 


172 


81 


99 


47 


134 


58 


219 


5 


293 


28 


285 


45 


95 


1 


273 


50 


274 


1 


308 


15 


92 


6 


290 


56 


268 


9 


327 



70 204 



41 


159 


75 


155 


1 


262 


70 


154 


30 


233 


37 


228 


5 


326 


47 


136 


38 


234 


24 


78 



59 77 



153 



Palmetto Leaves, by H. B. Stowe . 

Pilgrim's Progress, by Bunyan 

Pizarro, by G. M. Towle 

Plains of the Great West, The, by Richard 

Irving Dodge ..... 
Politics for Young Americans, by Charles 

Nordhoff • 

Putnam, General Israel, by George C. Hill 
Queens of American Society, by E, F. Ellett 
Queens of England, by Agnes Strickland 
Quentin Durward, by Walter Scott 
Pab and His Friends, by John Brown . 
Seaside Studies in l^atural History, by E. C 

and A. Agassiz ..... 
Self-Culture, by James F. Clarke . 
Self-Help, by Samuel Smiles . 
Sesame and Lilies, by John Ruskin 
Seven Lamps of Architecture, by John Ruskin 
Silas Marner, by George Eliot 
Six Months in the Sandwich Islands, by 

Isabella L. Bird ..... 
Spain and the Spaniards, by Edmundo de 

Amicis ...... 

Spectator, 8 vols., by Addison . ■ 

Story of Liberty, by C. C. Coffin . 

Story of the United States Navy, by Benson J 

Lossing ...... 

Stories of the Nations, 4 vols. 

Sunny Memories of Foreign Lands, by H. B 

Stowe ...... 

Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens 
Tales from Shakespeare, by Charles and Mary 

Lamb ...... 

Tales of a Grandfather, by Walter Scott 



50 136 

34 34 

50 69 

31 63 



55 


18 


5 


170 


36 


305 


35 


305 


52 


89 


180 


158 


30 


213 


57 


35 


7 


189 


93 


207 


165 


155 



41 67 



61 


65 


5 


194 


44 


233 


44 


247 


87 


267 


9 


56 


21 


326 


71 


160 


25 


327 



154 



Tales of a Wayside Inn, by Longfellow 
Talisman, The, by Sir Walter Scott 
Tent Life in Siberia, by George Kennan 
Through the Dark Continent, by Henry M 

Stanley ...... 

Tom Brown's School Days at Rugby, by 

Thomas Hughes .... 

Unbeaten Tracks in Japan, by Isabella 

Bird ' . 

Yicar of Wakefield, by Oliver Goldsmith 
Virginians, The, by Wm. M. Thackeray 
WestAvard Ho !, by Charles Kingsley 
Whip and Spur, by George E. Waring, Jr. 
White Hills, by T. Starr King 
Wonderful City of Tokio, Edward Gray 
Yesterdays with Authors, by J. T. Fields 
Young Folks' History of the United States, by 

T. W. Higginson . . . . . 

Young Folks' History of the War for the 

Union, by J. D. Champlin 
Youth's History of the Rebellion, by W. M 

Thayer 

Zenobia, by William Ware 



55 94 

18 327 

80 7T 

34 72 



183 


157 


39 


67 


65 


310 


125 


156 


132 


155 


20 


70 


8 


178 


45 


74 


31 


217 


32 


247 


59 


233 


57 


168 


36 


140' 



CLASS B. 



JEsop's Fables 

Adventures of Capt. Bonneville, by Washing- 



ton Irving 



At Home and Abroad, by Bayard Taylor 
Benedict Arnold, by Geo. Canning Hill 
Book of Golden Deeds, by Charlotte M. Yonge 
Boy's Adventure in the Wilds of Australia, A, 
by William Ilowitt ..... 



20 155 



21 


55 


56 


77 


16 


170 


96 


155 



1 167 



155 



Boys of Other Countries, by Bayard Taylor . 

Boy Travellers in Far East, by Thos. W. Knox 

Capt. John Smith, by Geo. Canning Hill 

Cast Away in the Cold, by Haj-es . 

Child-Life in Italy, by Emily H. Watson 

Country By-Ways, by Sarah 0. Jewett . 

Donald and Dorothy, by Mary Mapes Dodge 

Dut}', by Samuel Smiles 

Easy Star Lessons, by R. A. Proctor 

First Lessons in Natural History, by Mrs. E 

E. Agassiz ...... 

Flower' and Thorn, by T. B. Aldrich . 
Friends Worth Knowing, by Ernest Ingersoll 
Garfield, Life of, by J. M. Bundy . 
Geography of the Heavens, by E. H. Burritt 
Great Fur Land, by H. M. Robinson 
Heart of the White Mountains, by S. Adams 

Drake ...... 

Helen, by Maria Edge worth 

In the Sky Garden, by Lizzie W. Champney 

Knockabout Club Along Shore, by Charles A 

Stephens ...... 

Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains, A, by 

Mrs. Bird 

Land of Desolation, by Isaac I. Hayes . 
Leather Stocking Tales (5 vols.), by J. F 

Cooper ...... 

Little Barefoot, by Berthold Auerbach . 

Marie Antoinette, by J. S. C. Abbott . 

Masterman Ready, by F. Marry at . 

Miles Standish, by J. S. C. Abbott 

My Apingi Kingdom, by Paul Du Chaillu 

My Boys, by Louisa M. Alcott 

Old Fashioned Girl, The, by Alcott 



57 114 
42 75 
17 170 
67 78 

59 114 

60 139 
27 122 

58 309 
74 228 

51 189 

67 97 

56 119 

33 287 

29 247 

61 76 

39 51 

22 143 

37 146 

58 74 



38 


67 


62 


78 


21 


124 


49 


108 


4 


157 


132 


305 


31 


295 


91 


77 


87 


109 


73 


105 



48 


233 


39 


76 


42 


74 


74 


307 


67 


169 



156 

Old Times in the Colonies, by C. C. Coffin . 
Open Polar Sea, The, by Isaac I. Hayes 
Our Boys in India, hy H. "VV. Erench 
Pursuit of Knowledge under Difficulties, by 

G. L. Craik 

Red Letter Days, by Gail Hamilton 

Eound the World by a Boy, Ed. by Samuel 

Smiles . . . '. . . . 60 78 

Series of Histories (6 vols,), by Charlotte M. 

Yonge ....... 

Sketch Book, by Washington Irving 
Song of Hiawatha, by Longfellow 
Stories from Homer, by Alfred J. Church 
Stories of the Island World, by Chas. Nordhoff 
Tom Brown at Oxford, by T. Hughes . 
Twice Told Tales, by Nathaniel Hawthorne . 
Two Years Before the Mast, by R. H. Dana, Jr. 
Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Mrs. H. B. Stowe 
Vasco de Gama, by G. M. Towle . 
Washington, Life of (5 vols.), by Washington 

Irving ....... 

Waverly, by Sir. Walter Scott 

What Mr. Darwin Saw in his Voyage Round 

the World in the ship "Beagle" . . 40 75 

Wild Life Under the Equator, by Paul Du 

Chaillu 61 77 

Wonder Book for Girls and Boys, by ISTathaniel 

ILawthorne 25 156 

World of Wonders, or Marvels in Animate 

and Inanimate Nature .... 55 222 

Young Folks' History of the United- States, 

by T. W. Iligginson 34 247 

Zigzag Journeys in Classic Lands, by Heze- 

kiah Butterworth 39 74 





248 


13 


136 


13 


94 


5 


310 


109 


309 


183 


157 


31 


139 


22 


60 


22 


139 


49 


69 


1 


273 


1 


327 



157 



Zigzag Journeys in Europe, by Hezekiah But- 

terworth 44 75 

Zigzag Journej'S in the Occident, by Heze- 
kiah Butterworth 43 74 

Zigzag Journeys in the Orient, by Hezekiah 

Butterworth 40 74 



CLASS C. 

Adventures of Magellan, by G. M. Towle . 48 69 
Aimwell Stories, by William Symonds. 

Jerry 1 168 

Oscar 10 163 

Whistler 11 163 

Arabian Nights Entertainment ... 9 121 

Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag, by Louisa M. Alcott , 87 109 

Bedtime Stories, by Louise C. Moulton . . 53 119 

Being a Boy, by Charles D. Warner . . 88 169 

Bodley Grandchildren, by H. E. Scudder . 45 146 

Bodleys on Wheels, by IL E. Scudder . . 39 146 

Bodleys, The, Telling Stories, by H.E. Scudder 35 146 

Boston Town, by H. E. Scudder ... 49 247 

Doings of the Bodley Family, by H. E. Scudder 34 146 
Dottie Dimple, by R. S, Clarke. 

Eight Cousins, by Louisa M. Alcott . . 82 108 

Family Flight, A, by E. E. and Susan Hale . 44 74 

Franconia Stories (11 vols.), by Jacob Abbott 18 157 

Gammer Grethel's Fairy Tales, by Grinmi . 2 153 
Hans Brinker, or the Silver Skates, by M. 

Mapes Dodge 35 105 

Histories (22 vols.), by Jacob Abbott . . 6 157 

Histories (12 vols.), by John S. C. Abbott . 32 160 

Jack and Jill, by Louisa M. Alcott . . 54 119 

Leslie Goldthwaite, by Mrs. Whitney . . 47 134 



51 


170 


35 


108 


36 


157 


80 


307 


19 


167 


92 


107 



158 

Little Men, by Louisa M. Alcott ... 76 105 
Little Prudy Series (several vols.), by "Sopliie 

May " 

Little Women, by Louisa M. Alcott 

Marco Paul on the Erie Canal, by Jacob Abbott 

Robinson Crusoe, by Daniel DeFoe 

Rollo Books, The (24 vols.), by Jacob Abbott 

Rose in Bloom, by Louisa M. Alcott 

Stories from Old English Poetry, by Mrs.Abby 

S. Richardson 60 98 

Story Book for Children, by Mrs. Diaz. 
Story of a Bad Boy, by T. B. Aldrich . 
Swiss Family Robinson, by J. R. Von Wyss 
Tanglewood Tales, by Hawthorne . 
Under the Lilacs, by Louisa M. Alcott . 
Vasco de Gama, by G. M. Towle . 
Water Babies, by Charles Kingsley 
Young Folks' Heroes of History, by G. M. 

Towle. 

It is designed to publish a more extended and im- 
proved list next year. Teachers, pupils, and parents are 
requested to furnish lists of such books as will aid in the 
compilation of a longer list of such works as are emi- 
nently suitable for teachers and youth. Please forward 
the lists to the Superintendent of Schools. 



36 


104 


216 


310 


23 


156 


95 


109 


49 


69 


62 


146 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1887. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

JOHN IIOSLEY, Maj^or, ex officio, Chairman. 
EDWARD L. KIMBALL, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1. — Charles H. Manning, 

John G. Hutchinson. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean, 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3.— Nathan P. Hunt, 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4, — Samuel D. Lord, 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
Ward 5. — Thomas F. ColUns, 

John J. Holland. 
Ward 6.— William H. Huse, 

Abial C. Flanders. 
Ward 7. — Marshall P. Hall, 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8.— George W. Xutter, 

Luther C. Baldwin. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 



160 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. W. Clarke, Kimball^ 
Dodge, Holland. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Woodbury, Collins, Hall. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning 
Flanders, Nutter. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean,. 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Huse, Baldwin. 

Music. — Messrs, Lord, Huse, Baldwin. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Kimball, Manning, Flanders. 

Fxamination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. W. 
Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Collins, Hutchinson, Woodbury. 

Health. — Messrs. Nutter, Holland, Hutchinson. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, Hall, S. W. 
Clarke, Hunt. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, S. W. Clarke. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. Hall, Holland, Manning. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Dodge, Woodbury, Hutchin- 
son. 



161 

Lowell Street. — Messrs.. Hutchinson, Flanders, Collins. 

Training School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodge. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Flanders, Woodbury. 

West 31anchester Grammar. — Messrs. S. W". Clarke, 
Manning, Baldwin. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Bald- 
win, Nutter, Hall. 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Lord, Dodge. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Flanders, Holland, Huse. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Huse, Baldwin, 
Hutchinson. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Holland, 
Flanders, ISTutter. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. ITutter, 
Collins, Hutchinson. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Woodbury, Collins, Lord. 



LIST OF TEACHERS. 

1887. 
Giving the ISTame, School, and Grade of School. 

high school. beech street. 

Master. — Edward R. Goodwin. 
Sub-Master. — George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. — Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

Mary Stanton. 
11 



162 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal, — Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. — Lenora C. Gilford. 

Jennie M. Chandler. 

Carrie E. Reid, 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — C. Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. — Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. — Annie O. Heath. 
Higher Middle. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

First Floor. — Loiver Grades. 

Lower Middle. — Fannie J). Moulton. 
Higher Primar3\ — ISTellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. — Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. — Belle M. Kelley. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Frank S. SutclifFe. 
Assistants. — Annie W. Patten. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 



163 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Mary F. Barnes. 
Lower Middle. — Nettie F. Ainsworth. 
Higher Primary. — Eva F. Tuson. 
Lower Primary. — Georgia A. Wyman. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — J. Walter Stetson. 
Assistants. — Annie A. Webster. 

Mary E. Bunton. 

Bertha L. Dean. 

First Floor. — Loiver Grades. 

Higher Middle. — JSTancy S. Bunton. 
Lower Middle. — Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primar}-. — Alice Shovelton. 
Lower Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — J. Edward Pickering. 
Assistants. — Cora M. Dearborn. 

Mary L. Gage. 

Carrie A. F. Bartlett. 

First Floor. — Loioer Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Flora M, Senter. 

Lower Middle. — Ellen E. McKean. 

Mixed Middle and Primary. — Mary J. Hickey. 

Higher Primary. — Nettie C. Woodman. 



164 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — "William F. Gibson. 
Assistant. — Alta C. Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. — Maria N. Bower. 
Mixed Primary. — Carrie I. Stevens. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. — Lizzie A. Burns. 
Mixed Middle. — Lelia A. Brooks. 

First Floor. — Loicer Grades. 

Higher Primary. — S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. — Edith M. Stebbhis. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. — Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Georgianna Dow. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT). 

Second. Floor. 
Higher Primary. — Helen M. Morrill. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Alice E. Page. 



165 

MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER UNION). 

Training School. 

Principal. — Olive Adele Evers. 

A Lower Middle school, a Higher and two Lower Pri- 
mary schools, embracing first four years of school work. 
Principal is assisted by members of Training class. 

WILSON HILL. 

Mixed Primary. — May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. — Ella Hope. 

BEECH-STREET SCHOOL (CORNER SPRUCE). 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Kate T. Clarke. 

SCHOOL-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 

Mixed Primary. — Augusta S. Downs. 
Lower Primary. — Susie H. Frame. 

First Floor. 

Lower Primary. — Mary W. Mitchell. 
Lower Primary. — Mary A. Southard. 

SOUTH-MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Higher Primary. — Alice G. Lord. 
Lower Primary. — Delle E. Haines. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. — Etta J. Carley, principal (Grammar and 
Middle classes). 



166 

Mixed Primary. — Mary G. Tynan. 

Hallsville. — Olive J. Randall, principal (Higher 

classes). 
Assistant. — Susie G. Woodman (Lower classes). 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

'No. 1, Stark District. — F. Maude Joy. 

2, Gofte's Falls. — Georgie A. Nute. 

3, Harvey District. — Ella F. Barker. 

4, Youngsville. — Addie C. Prescott. 

5, Webster's Mills. — Annie M. Curtis. 

6, Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. — J. J. Kimball. 
Elocution. — J. J. Hayes. 

MEMBERS OF TRAINING SCHOOL, NOT YET EMPLOYED AS REG- 
ULAR TEACHERS, WHO ENTERED FALL OF 1885, 

AND WILL RECEIVE DIPLOMAS OF GRADU- J 

ATION JAN. 28, 1887. 

* Barbara B. Joy, 481 Hanover. 
t Hulda C. Graupner, 127 Brook. 
t Lillian C. Hall, 366 Lake avenue, 
t Sarah B. Paige, 28 Grove. 

MEMBERS OF TRAINING SCHOOL AVHO ENTERED FALL OF 1886. 

* Cora B. Gilford, f Genieve B. Knight, 

* Emma L. McLaren, f Theodora Richardson, 
t Lettie M. Smith, f Mary J. Walsh. 



* Certificated for Grammar and lower grades. 
t Certificated for Middle and Trimary grades. 



167 



OTHERS, NOT HERE EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, WHO HAVE 
CERTIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION. 

Maucl Bell, Fannie L. Perry, Fannie E. Smith, Etta 
C. McLaren, Martha T. Learnarcl, Lizzie M. McAfee, 
Hattie J. Hoyt, Eleanor II. Kirk. All certificated for 
Grammar and lower grades. 

Fannie L. Sanborn, Nina B. Croning, Helen W. Poor, 
Susan C. Eastman, Belle F. Small, Hattie M. Ellis, Hattie 
E. Merrill, and Alithea M. Hutchins. Certificated for 
Middle and Primary grades. 

JANITORS. 

Webster Street and Blodget Street. 
Charles M. Norton, 230 Walnut. $400. 

High School, Ash Street, and Wilson Hill. 
John S. Avery, 404 Merrimack Street. $600. 

Franklin Street and Lincoln Street. 
William Stevens, 482 Park. $600. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. 
William H. Morrill, 45 Pennacook. $350. 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 
Edward P. Coggswell, 218 Central Street. $250. 

Piscataquog Schools {Main Street, School Street, and South 
Main Street). 

Albert T. Barr, 73 A, West Manchester. $525. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey, Bakersville. $250. 



168 

CALENDAR, 1887. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 3, closes 
March 25. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 18, closes 
July 1. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 12, closes 
December 16. Vacation of two weeks. 



I 



R e: PO RT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Mcmchester : — 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith present 
their thirty-third annual report of the affairs of the li- 
brary, as administered by them, and with the same the 
report made to them by the treasurer of the board, show- 
ing the expenditures made by him in behalf of the board, 
for books and periodicals, from funds under their control ; 
and also the report of the librarian, giving in detail the 
operations and statistics of the library for the past year, 
and the condition of the library at the close of the year. 

From the report of the librarian it appears that the 
library has been open for the delivery of books three 
hundred and seven days, during which period the number 
of books delivered for home use was fifty-four thousand 
and thirty-seven. In addition to this number, five thou- 
sand five hundred and forty books and periodicals were 
delivered for use in the reading-room at the library,' 
making the total number delivered during the year fifty- 
nine thousand and seventy-seven, being an average of one 
hundred and ninety-four for each day that the library was 
open. The circulation of books for home use was about 



172 

eleven hundred less than the year preceding, but above 
the average of other years. 

The number of vohimes in the library at the time of 
the last report was twenty-eight thousand six hundred 
and sixty. During the year there have been added by 
purchase four hundred and twenty-five volumes, by dona- 
tion two hundred and sixty-five volumes, and ninety-nine 
volumes of periodicals have been bound, making the 
number of bound volumes in the library at the present 
time twenty-seven thousand four hundred and ninety-one, 
and the total number, including maps and pamphlets, 
twenty-nine thousand four hundred and forty-nine. 

Sixty-nine difi:erent periodicals have been regularly 
received at the library, and on completion of the volumes 
they have been bound and placed upon the shelves for 
general circulation. A number of the periodicals re- 
ceived have been donated to the library by the respective 
publishers thereof for the purpose of "preservation, and 
will doubtless prove valuable for future reference. 

During the year, seventy-one volumes have been taken 
from the shelves and withdrawn from circulation, having 
become worn out and unfit for further use. None of these 
have been replaced during the year, but will be as, from 
time to time, the trustees shall be able to procure them. 

By examination of the report of the treasurer it will 
be seen that there has been expended during the year 
for the purchase of books the sum of nine hundred and 
eighty-one dollars and twenty cents, and for the pur- 
chase of periodicals the sum of one hundred and sixty- 
seven dollars and twenty-four cents, a total expenditure 
for both these purposes of eleven hundred and forty-eight 
dollars and forty-four cents. Of the amount expended 
for the purchase of books, the sum of two hundred and 
thirty-three dollars and forty-one cents was taken from 



173 . 

the income of the Dean fund, and used for the increase 
of that department of the library. Tlie balance in the 
hands of the treasurer at the close of the year, of the 
amount appropriated by the City Councils for the pur- 
chase of books, was six hundred and thirty dollars find 
forty -six cents. 

The accumulated income of the Dean fund now 
amounts to ibur thousand eight hundred and thirteen 
dollars. In accordance with the plan heretofore outlined, 
the trustees have continued to purchase from the income 
ot this fund, as opportunity has offered, special works 
on mechanical and scientific subjects, which have been 
placed by themselves and designated as the "Dean Fund 
Purchase." 

The income of the Mary E. Elliot fund is now one 
hundred and fifteen dollars and sixty-two cents. The 
trustees expect to be able soon to commence the purchase 
of medical books and pamphlets from the income of this 
fund, in accordance with the intent of its founder. 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the 
library for the past year were two thousand and sixty-six 
dollars and sixty one cents. The details of these ex- 
penditures may be found in the annual report of the 
city, the bills for the same having been paid through the 
office of the city treasurer on the approval of trustees. 

On the 1st of May last, Mr. Harvey E. Martin, who 
had been employed as an assistant to the librarian for 
about a year, severed his connection with the library to 
accept a more lucrative position. Mr. James Arthur has 
been employed as an assistant in place of Mr. Martin to 
the present time. 

Early in the fall of the past year, the trustees received a 
communication from Mr. S. C. Gould containing a pro- 
posal to sell to the city, for the library, his large collection 



174 

of books and pamphlets publishecT in or relating to Man- 
chester, and his valuable collection of newspapers pub- 
lished in the city, comprising files partially complete from 
1839 to 1862, and complete from 1862 to 1886. This 
ofter of Mr. Gould having been brought to the attention 
of the city authorities, the subject was referred to a joint 
committee of the City Councils ai\d of the trustees for 
investigation. After consideration of the matter, the 
committee were unanimously of the opinion that if both 
collections could not be purchased, the files of newspapers 
at least ought to be secured, as containing a record of the 
progress and growth of the city. This conclusion of the 
committee being reported to the City Councils at their last 
meeting, an order was passed authorizing the trustees to 
purchase the collection, at an expense not exceeding the 
sum of three hundred dollars. The year being so near 
its close, no appropriation was made to enable the trustees 
to make the purchase contemplated, but the City Councils 
adopted a recommendation to the next city government to 
add to the usual appropriation for the library a sum suf- 
ficient to accomplish the purpose. The trustees believe 
that the opportunity to secure this valuable collection of 
newspapers ought not to be lost, and hope that the City 
Councils will appropriate the amount necessary to pur- 
chase the same. 

At the request of the trustees, made by the treasurer of 
the board, Mrs. Harriet M. A. Foster has presented to 
the city, for preservation at the library, an oil portrait 
of her late husband, the Hon. Herman Foster. Mr. Foster 
was one of the early residents of the city, was one of the 
founders, and for a long time the treasurer of the Athe- 
nseum, before it was merged into the city library, and 
w^as also prominent in many measures for the prosperity 
of the city. The portrait, which is a copy of the one in 



176 

the senate chamber at Concord, is the work of Miss Louise 
Clough, a resident of the city, and reflects great credit 
upon her skill and taste. The trustees hope that the ex- 
ample of Mrs. Foster may be followed by others of our 
citizens, and portraits of many distinguished residents be 
added to the collection at the library. The trustees have 
from time to time during the year had under considera- 
tion the subject of a new catalogue for the library. It was 
found upon investigation that the amount appropriated 
at the commencement of the preceding year Was not suf- 
ficient for compiling in a proper manner a supplement 
that should contain the books added to the library since 
1877, the date of the publication of the last catalogue. It 
was not thought advisable by the trustees to conclude a 
contract for the compilation of a supplement at a price 
exceeding the sum appropriated therefor by the City 
Councils. The trustees believe that an entire new^ cata- 
logue of all the books in the library would best meet the 
needs of those frequenting the library, and greatly extend 
its influence and usefulness in the community. 

During the month of December the trustees directed 
that the library should be kept open continuously from 
10 o'clock A. M. till 9 o'clock p. m., with a vicAv of 
making the library more accessible to those employed in 
our stores and mills. Attention w^as called to the change 
of hours by notices published in the daily papers and 
posted in the library rooms. After a month's trial, it 
could not be discovered that the wdiole number using the 
library had been perceptibly increased, while the number 
visiting the library for the purpose of reading or obtaining 
books for home use during the hours it had formerly been 
closed was too small to warrant the trustees in makinsr 
the change permanent. Therefore, at the commencement 
of the year, the trustees directed a return to the hours 
before in use. 



176 

Appended to this report inay be found a list of books 
presented to the library during the year, together with 
the names of the persons presenting them. To all those 
who have in this manner manifested their interest in the 
increase and prosperity of the library, the trustees return 
the thanks of the city. 

The duties of librarian have been discharged during 
the year by Mrs. M. J. Buncher with the same efficiency 
and fidelity, and to the satisfaction of the trustees. 

The trustees desire to express their acknowledgments 
to the members of the City Councils for the courtesy and 
consideration with Avhich their suggestions in relation to 
the affairs of the library have been received and car- 
ried out. 

January 22, 1887. 

In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered 
to be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and 
transmitted to the City Councils. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor, 
N. P. Hunt, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : — 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following 
account of the receipts and expenditures by the board of 
the funds received on account of the City Library : — 

1886. i)R. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation . $ 481 11 

Mar. 11. Mrs. M. J. Buncher, cata- 

logues, etc. ... 15 75 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, balance 

of fines .... 48 63 

July 7. Appropriation for 1886 tor 

books .... 1,000 00 

1886. 
Jan. 1. balance of income of 

Dean fund . . $4,554 23 
income of Dean fund 153 00 
July 1. income of Dean fund 153 00 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income . 68 48 
interest on accumu- 
lation of income . 117 70 



5,046 41 



12 



178 



Jan. 1. 



April 1. 



1886. 
Jan. 4. 

7. 

7. 

8. 
12. 
21. 
25. 

Feb. 3. 

10. 
Mar. 3. 

19. 

23. 

April 2. 

16. 
26. 



To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000 00 

balance of interest on 
Mary E. Elliot 
fund 

interest on Mary E. 
Elliot fund . 

interest on accumula- 
tion of income 



54 00 



60 00 



1 62 



Paid 



N'ew England News Co., 

periodicals 
James Anglim & Co., books 
Charles C. Soule, periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
S. E. Cassino & Co., books . 
W. H. Stevenson, periodicals 
Geo. H. Policy & Co., period- 
icals .... 
New England News Co. 

periodicals 
L. A. Scott, books 
New England News Co. 

periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Cleaves, Macdonald & Co. 

books 
New England News Co. 

periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Cleaves, Macdonald & Co. 

books 



2,115 6'2 



^8,707 


52 


Cr 




$11 


79 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


50 


36 


00 


5 


00 



6 00 



13 


37 


4 


40 


12 


35 


4 


25 



19 74 

11 59 

6 50 

4 50 



179 



May 


4. 


Paid Cleaves, Macdonald & C^,, 
books . . . . 




4. 


New England ]^ews Co., 
periodicals 




13. 


J. W. Lewis & Co., books . 




14. 


John Hopkins Hos p i t a 1 , 
books . . . . 


June 


4. 


New England News Co., 
periodicals 




8. 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
books . . . . 




11. 


J. E. Miller, books 




15. 


Cleaves, Macdonald & Co., 
books . . . . 


June 


28. 


Chas. Scribner's Sons, books 


July 


2. 


Lydia A. Stanley, books 




3. 


New England News Co., 
periodicals 




3. 


Estes & Lauriat, books 




6. 


Wm. H. Briggs, Tr., books . 




22. 


Cleaves, Macdonald & Co., 
books . . . . 


Aug. 


2. 


Cleaves, Macdonald & Co., 
books . . . . 




3. 


New England News Co., 
periodicals 




10. 


Cleaves, Macdonald & Co., 
books . . . . 




11. 


Little, Brown & Co., books . 


Sept. 


10. 


New England News Co., 
periodicals 




18. 


Little, Brown & Co., books . 




21. 


Chas. Scribner's Sons, books 


Oct. 


4. 


New England News Co., 
periodicals 



$46 81 

11 02 
25 00 

5 00 

15 61 

16 50 
10 00 

9 15 

6 00 
125 00 

10 93 
90 00 

10 00 

94 22 
84 40 
14 97 

14 25 

3 50 

11 73 

9 00 
10 00 

10 37 



180 



Kov. 3. Paid Little, Brown '& Co., books 
3. New England 'News Co. 

periodicals 
9. Cleaves, Macdonald & Co. 

books 
17. Geo. ]Sr. Gage, books . 

24. Mason & Fowler, books 

24, Mason & Fowler, books 

26. Cleaves, Macdonald & Co 

books 

27. Cleaves, Macdonald & Co 

books 
Dec. 1. Little, Brown & Co., books 

purchase from Dean fund 
2. New England News Co 

periodicals 
9. Frank B. Webster, periodicals 

9. J. H. Hickcox, periodicals 

9. E. Whitefield, books 

9. Chas. Scribner's Sons, books 

9. Macdonald & Son, books 

9. Hamilton Child, books . 

9. Mrs. M. J. Buncher, books 

9. Geo. E. Foster, books . 

21. Estes & Lauriat, books . 

31. By balance of appropriation . 
balance of Dean fund 
Mary E. Elliot fund and interest 



$ 3 75 
13 01 

5 00 

3 35 
5 00 

4 50 

39 37 

4 50 
233 41 

11 00 

1 50 

2 00 

5 00 



6 


00 


2 


00 


5 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


18 


00 


630 


46 


4,813 


00 


2,115 


62 



,707 52 



The expenditures made for the incidental expenses 
of the library for the year ending December 31, 1886, the 
items of which appear at length in the annual report of 
the city, have been as follows : — 



181 



Services of librarian 


. $800 00 


Services of assistant to librarian 


234 75 


Gas 


278 03 


Insurance ..... 


100 00 


Binding ...... 


139 92 


Rebinding 


137 61 


Fuel 


235 60 


Printing 


56 00 


Water . . . . . 


16 00 


Supplies and incidentals . 


68 70 




$3,066 61 


RECAPITULATION. 




Balance December 31, 1885 . 


. $ 719 61 


Appropriation for 1886 . . . 


. 3,500 00 



Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000 00 
Paid incidental expenses . . 3,066 61 
Balance December 31, 1886, of 
which $800 was appropriated for 
catalogue ..... 1,153 00 



t,219 61 



t,219 61 



Respectfully submitted. 

NATHAN P. HUNT, 

Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library. 



December 31, 1886. 
We have examined the above report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

GEO. H. STEARNS, Mayor, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



182 

December 31, 1886. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of 
receipts and expenditures embraced in the above report 
of the Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : — 

I respectfully submit to you the thirty-third annual 
report of the City Library, showing the work of the year 
ending December 31, 1886 : — 

Wliole number of volumes Dec, 31, 1885 . 28,660 

Accession during the year : — 

3y purchase .... 425 

Donated 265 

Periodicals bound ... 99 

789 



Wliole number of volumes at present : — 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets . . ... 1,942 

Bound volumes . . . 27,491 



29,449 



Kumber of periodicals and papers regularly 

received during the year .... 69 

Number of days open to the public . . 307 

Days open for the delivery of books . . 307 
Number of volumes in circulation during the 

year 54,037 

Average per day ...... 176.5 



184 



Largest number any one day, — F,ebruary 13 
Largest number any one month, — March 
Number of books, magazines, etc., used in the 

library during the year 

Average per day 

l^umber of guarantees received during the year 
"Whole number since new registration . 
ISTumber of cards returned to the library by 

persons leaving the city 
ISTumber of cards used on deposit . 
Postals sent for books overdue 
ITumber of books taken from the shelves unfit 

for longer use ..... 
Number lost, destroyed, or injured, and paid 

for 

Volumes repaired at the bindery . 
Repaired and covered in the library 
Books returned or found, missing at previous 

examinations ..... 

Balance of fines on hand December 1, 1885 
Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1886 



Amount paid for express, stationery, 

and other incidental expenses . $46 95 
Paid K P. Hunt, treasurer . . 48 63 



481 
5,961 

5,540 
18.14 

498 
5,9fO 

114 

7 
478 

71 

9 

439 

4,563 

6 

$ 48 63 
115 36 

$163 99 



$95 58 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1886 . 
Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1885, for 

catalogues and supplements sold, and for 

lost, destroyed, or injured books 
Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1886 



41 



12 75 



$6 00 

70 

1 95 

9 13 


$17 78 




. 


$30 53 
12 75 


. 


$17 78 
68 41 



185 



For 8 large catalogues at 75 cents . 
For 2 small catalogues at 35 cents . 
For 13 supplements at 15 cents 
For 8 books lost, destroyed, or in- 
jured, and paid for 



Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 

Balance of fines on hand 

Total balance on hand . . . . $86 19 

In presenting another report for your acceptance, no 
special information can be given outside the regular rou- 
tine of library work aiid general statistics. As no changes 
of importance have been made during the year, the report 
must necessarily be very similar to preceding ones. 

The circulation the past year shows a decrease of over 
one thousand. It is not easy to account for this in a city 
where the population is so fluctuating as our own. The 
same falling off is observed in other cities of the same 
character; but judging from the discontent expressed so 
frequently by the public in view of the lack of a good 
catalogue, it is reasonable to presume 1»hat this may be 
one cause. Many cards are now lying idle in the library, 
belonging to residents, not having been used for some 
time. The fact of there being seven thousand seven 
hundred and forty-one books in the library, with no cata- 
logue to indicate their location, except a written list, 
clearly shows that the usefulness of the library must be 
much hindered, and the inconvenience to the librarian as 
well as the public be very great. It is hoped that the 
present year will bring the much-desired help. 



186 

The number of visitors to the reading-room shows an 
increase of four hundred over last year. This number 
does not include those who come to consult the State Law 
Reports or the Patent-Office Reports, as they are permit- 
ted to go to the shelves and consult the books there. A 
large proportion of the reading-room visitors evidently 
come for recreation or amusement, as the class of books 
called for are principally of a light character. This has 
been especially the case the last two mouths. One very 
perceptible change the past year has been the absence of 
ladies in the reading-room. It is not difficult to under- 
stand why it is not an agreeable place for ladies to sit, 
and owing to these objections they have been permitted 
the use of the inner room for their convenience. 

The accession by purchase is a little in advance of last 
year. Of the four hundred and twenty-five purchased^ 
ninety-six volumes were from the "Dean fund," and em- 
brace a variety of scientific and mechanical works. The 
number of gifts to the library is less, but among them are 
some valuable accessions; and our sincere acknowledg- 
ments have been returned to all who in any way have 
shown their interest in the increase of the library. The 
departments at Washington have shown their usual liber- 
ality in sending us, not only the regular publications of 
each Congress, but a large number of volumes to fill 
vacancies in incomplete sets. 'No new additions to our 
regular number of periodicals and papers. 

The number of books taken from the shelves, unfit for 
longer use, is nearly double that of last year, and others 
are rapidly giving out. Carelessness on the part of many 
borrowers of books is still a cause for complaint. jSTo 
books have been replaced the last year, but many of the 
absent ones are constantly called for. 

The semi-annual examinations in July and December 



r 



187 

were as carefully and thoroughly made as possible by the 
present method, viz., without calling in the books or in- 
terrupting the circulation. The number of books unac- 
counted for at present is live, but are not all regarded as 
lost: fiction, two; mental physiology, one ; history, one; 
natural history, one. 

In closing, I respectfully present a request for a wire 
screen in front of the delivery counter to prevent confu- 
sion in receiving and delivering books. 

"With sincere acknowledgments to the Board of Trus- 
tees, especially to the Treasurer for his continued co-oper- 
ation, this my ninth annual report is 

Respectfully submitted. 

MRS. M. J. BUTCHER, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY 

From January 1 to December 31, 1886. 



Hon. Austin Pike, M. C. 

Message and Documents, second session Forty- 
seventh Congress. Vols. 1, 2, and 4. 1882-83. 8vo. 

Official Register of the United States Patent-Office 
and Alphabetical List of Patentees for the year 
1886. 8vo. 

Hon. James F. Briggs, Manchester, N. H. 

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Ar- 
mies during the Rebellion. Vols. 15 and 16, parts 
1 and 2 ; Vol. 17, part 1, and supplement to Vol. 
12. 6 vols. 8vo. 

Patent-Office Reports. Vols. 1 and 2. 1853. 8vo. 

Hon. H. W. Blair, M. C. 

Descriptive Catalogue of Government Publications. 
1774-1881. 4tor 

Hon. J. W. Patterson, Concord, N. H. 

Thirty-ninth and Fortieth Annual Reports of the 

Superintendent of Public Instruction in New 

Hampshire. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Fifty-sixth Annual Report of the American Institute 

of Instruction. 1885. 8vo. 



189 

BoAKD OF Education, Cincinnati, 0. 

Fiftj-sixth Annual Report of the School Year ending 
August 31, 1885. 8vo. 

Irving A. Watson, M. D., Concord, 'N. H. 

First and Second Annual Reports of the State Board 
of Health of ^N'ew Hampshire. 1882-83. 2 vols. 
8vo. 

Morris R. Hamilton, Esq., State Librarian, IST. J. 

New Jersey Archives. Vols. 9 and 10. 1757-1776. 
8vo. 

Dr. J. B. Peaslee, Ohio. 

First Annual Report of the Ohio State Forestry 
Bureau, for the year 1885. 8vo. 

Wm. II. Kimball, Esq., State Librarian. ' 

Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the State 
of New Hampshire, December, 1876. 8vo. 

Hon. Daniel Clark, Manchester, N. H. 

Journals of the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the New Hampshire Legislature for the years 
1842, '43, '46, and '55. 4 vols. 8vo. 

Secretary of State, Concord, N. II. 

State Reports for the years 1885-86. 3 vols. 8vo. 
Journal of the Senate and House. 1885. 8vo. 
Laws of New Hampshire. 1885. 8vo. 

J. B. Sawyer, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Fourth Annual Report of the State Board of Health 

of New Hampshire. 1885. 8vo. 
Thirty-two volumes of Patent-Office Reports. (Du- 
plicates.)' 8vo. 

George C. Gilmore, Esq., Manchester, N. II. 

Journal of the Convention to Revise the Constitution 



190 

of New Hampshire, held in Concord, N. H., De- 
cember, 1876. (1791-92.) 8vo. 

Lewis K. Mead, Manchester, N". H. 

Index to the Laws of 'New Hampshire. 1679-1883. 

8vo. 

C. F. Livingston, Esq., Manchester, IST. H. 

Catalogue of the Stratton Free Library and Art Gal- 
lery, Swanzey, N. H. 1885. 12mo. 

The Printers' Circular for the year 1885. 12mo. 

The Annual ^Report of the Massachusetts Homeo- 
pathic Hospital and Ladies' Aid Association. 1885. 
Pamphlet. 

S. C. Gould, Esq., Manchester, IST. H. 

Notes and Queries. Vol. 3. 1885. 8vo. 

A. M. Gibson, Esq., New York. 

" A Political Crime : History of the Great Fraud." 
By A. M. Gibson, New York. 1885. 12mo. 

Miss Mary E. Thompson, Durham, N. H. 

" Memoir of Judge Ebenezer Thompson, of Durham." 
By his Granddaughter. 1885. 12mo. 

Alfred Gilman, Esq., Lowell, Mass. 

Contributions of the " Old Residents' Historical So- 
ciety." No. 3. Vol. 3. 

Charles Pratt, Esq., New York. 

" An Antidote against Melancholy." Choice poems, 
etc. 1884. l'2mo. 

Asa F. Pattee, M. D., Boston. 

" The Percuteur Resume of Nerve Vibration and 
Excitation." 12mo. 

JosiAH W. Leeds, Philadelphia. 

" Concerning Printed Poison." By J. W. Leeds, 
Boston. 1885. 16mo. 



191 

Woman's C. T. U. 

Medical Temperance Journal. 1886. 12mo. 

Dartmouth College. 

" The Dartmouth." Published by the Senior Class. 
1886. Vol. 7. 8vo. 

Harry T. Lord, Dartmouth College. 

" The ^gis." Vol. 29. Published by the Junior 
Class. ^1885. 8vo. 

C. M. ToLMAN, Esq., Providence, P. I. 

Epitome of Lehigh LTnlversity, Bethlehem, Penn. 
Vol. 12. 1886. 8vo. 

Massachusetts Drainage Commission, Boston. 

Report of a Commission to Consider a General Sys- 
tem of Drainage for the Valleys of Mystic, Black- 
stone, and Charles Rivers, Massachusetts. 8vo. 

George W. Riddle, Esq., Manchester, N". H. 

Report of the Fish and Game Commissioner of New 
Hampshire. June, 1886. 8vo. 

Annual Report of the County Commissioner, Hills- 
borough County. April, 1886. Pamphlet. 

Thomas W. Lane, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Memorial Address at the Reunion of the Lane Fami- 
lies of Massachusetts Bay Colony. By Rev. James 
P. Lane. September, 1886. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report of the Chief Engineer of the Fire 
Department, Manchester, N. H. 1885. Pamphlet. 

E. M. Bowman, Esq., City Clerk, Nashua. 

Municipal Report of the City of Nashua. 1885. 12mo. 

N. P. Kidder, Esq., City Clerk, Manchester. 

Municipal Report of the City of Manchester. 1885. 
12mo. 



192 

Walter Baker & Co., Boston. 

History of the Production and Use of Cocoa and 
Cliocolate. 1780-1886. 16mo. 

J. T. Fanning, Esq. 

Two hundred pamphlets, Reports of the Water Com- 
missions of various cities and towns in the United 
States. 

City of Manchester. 

Statutes of the United States of America, passed at 

the second session Forty-eighth Congress, 1884-85 

8vo. 
State Papers of ISTew^ Hampshire (Hammond). VoL 

14. Viz. : Kevolutionary Rolls. Vol. 1. 8vo. 
New Hampshire Reports for the years 1881, '84, and 

'85 (duplicates). 3 vols. 8vo. 
Boston Directory for the year 1885. 8vo. 
Lowell Directory for the year 1880. 8vo. 

From the Several Publishers. 

" Good Health." A Journal of Hygiene, for the 

year 1886. Oakland, Cal. 8vo. 
" The Manifesto." Published at Shaker Village, 

Canterbury, K H. For the year 1886. 8vo. 
" Signs of the Times." Published in Oakland, Cal. 

For the year 1886. Folio. 
" The Voice." A Temperance Journal. Published 

in New York, by Funk & Wagnall. For the year 

1886. Folio. 
" The Weekly Budget." Published by Kendall & 

Ladd, Manchester, N. H. For the year 1885. 

Folio. 
" The Irish in America." A Lecture by Wm. R. 

Grace, mayor of New York. Feb. 21, 1886. 



193 

Published by McDonnell Bros., Chicago, Pam- 
phlet. 
History Durham, Eng. By M. "W. Whitfield, Hull, 
England. Pamphlet. 

E. "W. Woodbury, Esq, Denver, Col.- 

Eight pamphlets on the subject of the " Pacific Re- 
gion of the Rockies." Colorado. 

Miscellaneous Pamphlets. , 

" Digest Shakespeareanea." By the Shakespeare 

Society, E"ew York. Part 1. 1886. Pamphlet. 
Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Boston 

Society. Jan. 12, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Elephant Pipes and Inscribed Tablets in the Museum 

of the Academy of N'atural Science, Davenport, la. 

Pamphlet. 
Third Annual Report of the Denver Chamber of 

Commerce and Board of Trade. For the year 

1885. Pamphlet. 
Proceedings of the jN'ew Hampshire Pharmaceutical 

Association. Sept. 14, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Minutes of the Annual and Semi-annual Sessions of 

the Congregational Association of Utah. Salt 

Lake, April, 1884-86, inclusive. Pamphlet. 
Speech of the Hon. Wm. R. Cox, of Ilorth Carolina, 

on the subject of " Classification and Compensation 

of Public Officers." March 30, 1886. Pamphlet. 

Reports from the Several Librarians or Boards of 
Trustees. 

Astor Library, New York, for the year 1885. Pam- 
phlet. 
Boston Public Library, for the year 1885. Pamphlet. 
Bulletins Kos. 1 and 2. Vol. 7. 1885. 

13 



194 

Brooklyn Library, New York, year ending March 

25, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Brookline (Mass.) Public Library, year ending Jan. 

30, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Baltimore, Md. Peabody Institute, year ending 

June 1, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Birmingham, Eng. Eeport of Free Libraries. Com- 
mittee for the year 1885. Pamphlet. 
Cincinnati Public Library, for the year ending June 

30, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Cleveland (0.) Public Library, year ending Aug. 31, 

1886. Pamphlet. 
Chicago Public Library, year ending June, 1886. ^ 

Pamphlet. 
Cambridge (Mass.) Public Library, for the year 1885. 

Pamphlet. 
Clinton (Mass.) Free Library, for the year 1885. 

Pamphlet. 
Concord, N". H. City Reports, including Report of 

City Library for the year 1885, Pamphlet. 
Danvers, Mass. Peabody Institute, year ending 

March, 1886. 
Dover, N". H. City Reports, including City Library 

Report for 1885. Pamphlet. 
Fitchburg, Mass. Classified Catalogue of the Public 

Library (Wallace Library), 1886. 8vo. 
Dedication of the Wallace Library and Art Building, 

July 1, 1885. Fitchburg, Mass. S. 12mo. 
Germantown (Phila.) Friends' Free Library and 

Reading-room, for the year 1885. Pamphlet. 
Grand Rapids (Mich.) Public School Library Report, 

from Sept., 1885, to August, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Lowell (Mass.) Public Library, for the year 1885. 

Pamphlet. 






195 

Lynn (Mass.) Public Library, for the year 1885. 
Pamphlet. 

Lawrence (Mass.) Free Public Library, for the year 
1885. Pamphlet. 

Manchester, Eng. Report of the Public Free Libra- 
ries, for the year 1885. Pamphlet. 

Melrose (Mass.) Public Library, for the year 1885. 
Pamphlet. 

New York Mercantile Library Association, year 
ending April, 1886. Pamphlet. 

New York. Maimonides Library, for the year 1885. 
Pamphlet. 

Newark (JST. J.) Library Association, for the year 

1885. Pamphlet. 

Newton (Mass.) Free Library, for the year 1885. 

Pamphlet. 
Omaha Public Library, for the year ending May 31, 

1886. Pamphlet. 

Peabody, Mass. Peabody Institute, year ending 

March, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Providence (R. I.) Public Library, for the year 1885. 

Pamphlet. 
Philadelphia. Apprentices' Library Company, year 

ending April, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Philadelphia Library Company, Bulletins Nos. 16 

and 17, Januarj'^ to July, 1886. 
Swansea (Wales) Public Library and Gallery of Art, 

for the year 1885-86. Pamphlet. 
San Francisco Mercantile Library Association, for 

the year 1885. Pamphlet. 
Springfield (Mass.) City Library Association, year 

ending May 3, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Utica (N. Y.) City Library, year ending July 1, 1885. 

Pamphlet. 



196 

Worcester (Mass.) Free Public Library, year ending 

November 30, 1885. Pamphlet. 
Wobiirn (Mass.) Public Library, year ending March 1, 

1886. Pamphlet. 
Windham, J^. H. ISTesmith Library, year ending 

March, 1886. Pamphlet. 

departments of congress. 

Treasury Department. 

Report of the Life-saving Service, for the year 1885. 

8vo. 
Report of the Secretary of the Treasury Department, 
for the year 1885. 2 vols. 8vo. 

Interior Department. 

Seventeen volumes of Government Publications — 
viz.. Reports of the Patent-Office, Agricultural Re- 
ports, and Reports of the Smithsonian Institution — 
to fill vacancies. 8vo. 

Third Annual Report of the United States Civil Ser- 
vice Commission. Pamphlet. 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Patents, for 
the year 1885. 8vo. 

Capital and Labor. Report of the Investigating 
Committee. 4 vols. 8vo. 

Receipt and Distribution of Public Documents, in 
behalf of the Government, by the Interior Depart- 
ment. Pamphlet. 

War Department. 

Report of the Chief Signal Officer of the War De- 
partment,' for the year 1884. 8vo. And seventeen 
weather maps. 



197 

Bureau of Education. 

Special Report on the Educational Exhibits and Con- 
ventions at the World's Industrial and Cotton 
Centennial Exposition, Kew Orleans. 1884-85. 
Part 1. 8vo. 

Report of the Commissioner of Education, for the 
year 1883-84. 8vo. 

Circulars of Information of Bureau of Education. 
Nos. 3, 4, and 5. No. 5 contains " Physical Train- 
ing in American Colleges and Universities." 1885. 
Pamphlets. 

Smithsonian Institute. 

Annual Report of the year 1884. Part 2. 8vo. 

Hon. J. "W. Cannon, Comptroller. 

Annual Report of the Comptroller of the Currency, 
for the year 1885. 8vo. 

Adjutant-General U. S. A. 

Medals of Honor for Distinguished Services during 
the War of the Rebellion. Pamphlet. 

United States Congress. 

Seventy-one volumes of Public Documents of the 
Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth Congresses, includ- 
ing the Official Register. Parts 1 and 2. 

First Session Forty-ninth Congress. 



R e: PO RT 



CITY SOLICITOR 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : — 

The City Solicitor acknowledges his obligation to the 
officials of the city, and especially to the committee on 
claims and the city marshal, for their hearty co-operation 
with him, and for their zealous and prudent regard for 
the interests of the city. His year as city solicitor has thus 
been rendered unusually pleasant as well as successful. 

The usual number of casualties have happened the past 
year, upon the highways and otherwise ; but by the im- 
mediate and thorough inspection given each case as it 
occurred, many have made no claim upon the city, others 
have been settled before claim was made, and the rest 
have been so judiciously and wisely handled by the com- 
mittee on claims, before whom the solicitor has appeared 
whenever any claim was heard, that not a suit at law or in 
equity has been placed upon the docket of the court. 

Unfortunately, both sessions of the court have been 
held by a justice resident in Manchester, and thus dis- 
qualified to try city cases, or the solicitor would have 
left the office at the expiration of a year without a case 
upon the law docket of the court. As it is, no new 
cases have been added thereto, and the old ones remaiu- 
ino^ are as follows : — 



202 

Emory vs. City of Manchester. 

This claim, entered in 1884, for damages resulting from 
a fall upon ice on Amherst street, when the city was envel- 
oped in ice, without fault on the part of the city, seems to he 
so entirely wanting in foundation as to awaken no fears of 
any verdict against the city. Depositions have been taken 
during the year and the case thoroughly prepared for 
trial. It would seem to he an easy matter to dispose of 
this case, when opportunity is given, upon the preparation 
already given it. 

Frain vs. City of Manchester. 

This case is virtually ended, and is upon the docket only 
by suiFerance, an order having been made at the March 
term of this year that costs should be paid the city before 
the October court, or " nonsuit." No costs have been paid,, 
and the solicitor has but to enforce this order and the suit 
will be off the docket. 

Bodwell vs. City of Manchester. 

This claim is for extra work on the new police station. 
The solicitor had very nearly effected a satisfactory set- 
tlement of this suit at the expiration of his term of office, 
and he is of the opinion that the proposed arrangement, 
if carried out, would be for the benefit of the city. 

Clark vs. City of Manchester. 

This action was entered at the January term, 1880, 
and has been twice tried by a jury. It is still upon the 
docket, and will undoubtedly be tried at the earliest term 
of the court when it can be done. 

Thus it will be seen that but four cases remain upon 
the law docket of the court, a smaller number than for 



203 

years before ; and this number would liave received a 
greater reduction if a competent tribunal to dispose of 
them had been available. 

City of Manchester vs. Richardson. 

This action was brought in 1884, and has been on the 
docket since that time. It seeks to recover the amount 
of a judgment of $443, obtained by one Kate Tooher vs. 
the City of Manchester, for injuries resulting from a cel- 
larway, placed or maintained in the highway by Richard- 
son. No doubt can exist of the liability of the defendant, 
if the case is properly presented, but its peculiarities can- 
not be judiciously published in this report. 

City of Manchester vs. Nutt. 

In this case the city seeks to recover |347.87, paid by 
the overseers of the poor for the support of the wife of 
the defendant. The absence of one of the counsel for the 
defendant has prevented a solution of this difficulty. The 
case involves a small sum of money and a good deal of 
law. 

Gagnon vs. City of Manchester. 

Scott vs. City of Manchester. 

Valley vs. City of Manchester. 

Sykes vs. City of Manchester. 

Searles vs. City of Manchester. 

Starr vs. City of Manchester. 

These claims have all been disposed of by settlements 
and by jury trials during the last year. The first two 
were successfully tried. Valley, Searles, and Starr were 



204 

settled favorablj^ to the city, and the action Sjkes vs. 
the City of Manchester was defended by the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, who were summoned in as 
defendants in interest, tiiey being liable over, as claimed 
by the city, for the damages recovered by Mrs. Sykes. 
Immediate action should be taken towards the recovery, 
from the Telegraph Company, of the amount of the verdict 
of $3,500 rendered in this action, with interest to date. 

The following claims have been presented to the city 
government and referred to the committee on claims 
during the past year : — 

John Starr, for injuries by defects in highwa}-, occa- 
sioned by a pile of rubbii^h placed therein by John C. 
Young, or men in his employ, who is responsible over to 
the city for the amount paid by them to settle the claim. 
This matter should receive the immediate attention of the 
city solicitor. 

Jeffroy Larrevre was heard, and refused compensation. 

A. M. Eastman presented a claim, which was fully 
heard upon its merits by the committee, although the 
claim was defective in form and substance, and not under 
oath, as required by law. The committee gave the claim- 
ant leave to withdraw, 

George R. Weeks presented a claim for injuries occa- 
sioned by the overturning of his carriage through a 
defective highway. The matter was heard by the com- 
mittee, the place examined, and the claim settled without 
suit. 

Thomas Scammon, for injuries occasioned by falling 
into a ditch dug by the owner of premises adjoining the 
highway across the sidewalk. This claim was heard be- 
fore the committee, and by them referred to the solicitor, 
who effected a settlement without expense to the city. 

E. T. James's claim for injury to hack at the depot was 



205 

heard luid referred to the solicitor, who made a settlement 
with Mr. James, one half of the amount being paid by the 
Concord Railroad. 

Lizzie Cillej presented a claim, which the committee 
allowed to the amount of $34.50. 

Claim of B. W. Robinson was compromised and paid 
without suit, after full hearing. 

A second claim of E, T. James, for injuries to a hack 
by reason of defective highway, caused by imperfect fill- 
ing of a ditch opened to repair water pipes, was heard 
and referred to the water commissioners. Afterwards 
the claim came back to the committee on claims, and 
was finally compromised and paid. 

Claim of Lynch & Willey was fully heard, and referred 
to the board of mayor and aldermen, by whom it was 
eventually settled. 

Claim of 11. S. Berry, after a full hearing, was not 
allowed. 

A settlement of the claim of John IL Corliss was made, 
and he was paid the sum of $25. 

Claim of Nancy O. Savory, for injuries occasioned 
by falling on Middle street, on an exceedingly slippery 
morning, when the entire city was enveloped in ice. She 
had full knowledge of the fact before leaving her house, 
and the accident would not have happened but for her 
own imprudence. The committee deemed it unwise to 
attempt a compromise while her claims were so exorbi- 
tant and unfounded in justice, and gave her leave to 
withdraw. 

The claim of Patrick Sheehan was compromised, after 
a full hearing, by the payment of $^0. 

The claim of Jeremiah Sullivan was heard at length 
before the committee, and the chairman was authorized 
to make such adjustment of the same as he thought ad- 



206 

visable within certain limits, which duty he successfully 
accomplished. 

Claims in favor of Walter Cody and William Badger, 
having been a long time before the committee, and the 
claimants having failed to appear, after repeated notice, in 
defence of their demands, they were both given leave to 
withdraw at the last meeting of the committee. 

At the same meeting, the claims of A. L. N. Robert- 
son and Elvira H. Jillson were referred to the next city 
government, for want of time otherwise to dispose of 
them. 

Quite a number of other accidents, which would un- 
doubtedly have matured into claims, some of which might 
have proved troublesome, have been compromised and 
adjusted at the time of their occurrence. This branch of 
a solicitor's duties, however, is trifling in importance 
and value when compared with his general duties as 
counselor for the various departments of the city and the 
oflticials who constantly need his advice. The solicitor 
has endeavored to fulfill all the requirements which have 
been made upon him in this direction, and has given his 
assistance to the city marshal so far as it has been 
required. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

HENRr H. HUSE, 

Solicitor. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor : — 

The Board of Health respectfully submits its second 
annual report, for the year 1886. 

^o change has occurred in the membership of the 
board during the year, Mr. J. B. Sawyer, whose term of 
office expired on the first Monday in February, having 
been re-appointed. The board was organized by the 
choice of Dr. Webster as chairman and Mr. Sawyer as 
clerk, and this organization is still continued. 

By a vote of the board, Mr. Russell White was em- 
ployed as a sanitary inspector. He commenced his ser- 
vice April 3 and continued it until December 4, when the 
coming on of winter rendered his further services un- 
necessary. His pay was two dollars per day. 

During the year no violent outbreak of epidemic dis- 
ease has visited the city, and the work of the board has 
been mainly the usual routine of the abatement and pre- 
vention of nuisances and causes of sickness. A memo- 
randum has been kept which shows that the attention of 
the board or of the inspector has in various ways been 
given to about five hundred places and things which 
were not in good sanitary condition. 

In most cases the trouble has been remedied wholly 
or in some good measure. A large number of these cases 

14 



210 



were called to our attention by verbal complaints of our 
citizens. A few complaints were received which, on 
investigation, appeared to be whimsical, and others which 
seemed to be inspired by malevolence, and were attempts 
to draw the board into some quarrel between neighbors, 
or between tenant and landlord. In such cases the board 
has usually failed to win the commendation and good-will 
of the complainant. But these cases are few, and we 
are happy to be able to acknowledge the generous confi- 
dence and support of the public and of the city govern- 
ment. In particular bur thanks are due to the mayor 
for his unvarying kindness and interest in the work of 
our department. 

EXPENSES. 

The bills paid during the year may be summarily stated 
as follows. A more detailed statement will probably be 
found in the city clerk's account of appropriations and 

payments. 

Bills incurred in 1885 in precautions against 

small-pox 
Advertising 

Printing .... 
Traveling expenses 
Badge of inspector 
Blank book and stationery 
Pay of inspector 
Horse-hire and street-car fare 
Burying nuisances 
Disinfectants 

Professional advice of veterinary surgeons 
Other bills approved by the mayor . 



$62 34 

23 63 

24 50 
8 00 

2 50 

3 01 
417 00 

20 55 
11 00 
23 30 
10 00 
70 31 



$676 14 



211 



PRIVY-VAULTS. 



A large part of the citv is so compactly built and so 
well sewered that the people will soon refuse to tolerate 
these relics of barbarism. The most numerous class of 
complaints received by the board relate to this subject. 
It seems that most people consider their neighbors' 
vaults to be nuisances, and many would even willingly 
give up their own if by so doing they could make sure 
of the abolishment of all others in their vicinity. Some 
of the more progressive landlords and householders have 
done so without any such assurance, and the public senti- 
ment will soon, if it does not at present, require the 
passage of an ordinance prohibiting the longer existence 
of these structures in the compact part of the city. If 
built and kept in conformity to law, they are more 
expensive than water-closets. They are dangerous to 
health, and they must go. 

In this connection the board would call attention to 
the requirements of Section 15, Chapter X., of the city 
ordinances. The section is as follows: — 

" No privy-vaults can be connected with any sewer except through 
an intervening catch-basin, and the discharge pipe of the vault must 
be high enough above its bottom to effectually prevenj; anything but 
the liquid contents of the vault from passing into the A-ain." 

This is a dead letter, and in our judgment it should be 
repealed. The . "intervening catch-basin" is rarely or 
never put in. If it were put in, it would make matters 
worse than they now are, for there would then be two 
vaults in which to store filth instead of one. The 
requirement that the discharge pipe shall be above the 
bottom of the vault is frequently disregarded, and it 
would be better for the public health if it were always so. 



212 

We believe this requirement is the exact opposite what of 
it should be, A vault constructed as this ordinance re- 
quires soon becomes filled up to the outlet with a solid 
mass of fecal matter, usually mingled with old boots and 
other household rubbish, which cannot be taken out by 
the ordinary means, and must be removed, if removed 
at all, at more expense than the owner will willingly be 
at if he can avoid it. As such vaults will sometimes run 
for years without filling any further, the solid as well as 
the liquid passing off into the sewer, the chance of avoid- 
ing this expense is considerable. Consequently, the vault 
is not cleaned as often as it should be, and a large quan- 
tity of filth remains, possibly for years, a dangerous 
nuisance. Such deposits are thought by sanitarians to be 
the culture-grounds of the germs of typhoid fever, dysen- 
tery, and cholera ; and if the seeds of either of these dis- 
eases should find their way into such a mass of decaying 
f?eces, the danger is that they would infect the whole 
length of the sewer into which the vault is drained. If 
vaults are to exist, and are to be drained into the sewers, 
they should be so arranged that all which is rightfully 
cast into them should at once go into the sewer, and be 
hurried along to its place of final disposal before the pro- 
cess of fermentation and decay has commenced, and that 
whatever is wrongfully thrown into them should be pre- 
vented from entering the drain, and, by obstructing the 
outlet, should require immediate removal. 

THE CLEANING OF PRIVY-VAULTS. 

The board has during the past year made a change in 
the regulations as to the cleaning of privy-vaults. Here- 
tofore any one engaged in this business was required to 
take out a special permit for each vault opened. As the 



213 

board is not provided with a public office for the trans- 
action of business and has no reguhir office hours, the 
obtaining of such a permit was sometimes a cause of 
delay and vexation. To obviate this we have adopted 
the plan of granting licenses for this work to those who 
apply for them, and who are able to satisfy the board as 
to the fitness of themselves and their teams and apparatus. 
Each licensee is required to notify the board of the time 
and place when and where he intends to open any vault. 
The licenses expire on the first day of March next suc- 
ceeding their date, and are revokable for cause at any 
time. This system has worked well thus far. Fifteen 
licenses have been granted, one of which was revoked. 

The following rule was adopted, at the beginning of 
the autumn season, for cleaning vaults. It has been 
faithfully carried into execution by the inspector, and has 
worked to the satisfaction of all parties concerned. 

It shall be the duty of the sanitary inspector to observe, as far as 
possible, the manner in which the several licensed cleaners do their 
work, to inspect the vaults and adjoining premises after they have 
been left by the cleaner, to ascertain whether they have been left in 
good condition, to see what, if any, I'epairs are needed, to call the 
attention of the person having the care "of the property thereto, and 
to report the facts to the board. 

Since this regulation went into efiect, two hundred and 
seven vaults have been inspected in accordance with its 
provisions. 

AN ODORLESS EXCAVATOR. 

Occasionalh^ a privy-vault or a stable-cellar is found 
which, by accident, or by neglect, has become filled to 
such an extent that the removal of the contents, even in 
the warmest weather, is an imperative necessity. It is 
impossible, with any means now available, to make such 



214 

removal in the summer time without causing great dis- 
comfort and danger to the pubUc. 

An odorless excavating apparatus is a necessity for 
properly meeting such emergencies. If it should be found 
that the use of this apparatus made the work somewhat 
more expensive than when done in the old way, it would, 
perhaps, tend to make those having the care of such 
places more careful to keep them in such condition that 
they would not require to be emptied in the warm 
weather. He who willfully or carelessly neglects to re- 
move such dangerous filth from his premises will not get 
much sympathy from his neighbors, if he makes a loss 
instead of a gain by so doing. 

THE KEEPING OF SWINE. 

The regulation prohibiting this practice has met the 
approval of the great majority of the people. A few of 
those who keep horses have found a good deal of fault, 
saying that swine must be kept in stable-cellars to prevent 
the dung from spoiling as manure, and from fermenting 
and throwing ofi^" gases which make the horses sick and 
injure the carriages and harnesses. And yet the same 
men will sometimes tell us in the next breath that there 
is nothing about horse-dung that is unwholesome. If there 
were no other Avay of preventing this trouble, such con- 
siderations would be entitled to some weight. But as 
long as good ventilation and frequent removal of the 
manure are more cleanly, civilized, and healthful means 
of avoiding these evils, the plea for keeping pigs is not 
very convincing. The owners of some of the largest and 
best kept stables in the city voluntarily abandoned the 
practice before the regulation was promulgated. 

As swine fed on corn will not pay for their keeping, it 



215 

commonly happens that they are fed with swill, which is 
thrown to tliem in large quantities, and much of which is 
so bad that even swine will not eat it; and thus the keep- 
ing of them is practically the adding of several other 
kinds of filth to that which is already too filthy to be 
hoarded in the city. 

Nine tenths of sanitary science may be summed up in 
one word, cleanliness. Cleanliness of person, premises, 
food, drink, the air, and the earth. These are secured by 
the removal of all decaying matter. The fact that horse- 
dung is so prone to decay is an excellent reason for its 
prompt removal, but a very poor one for keeping pigs. 
In this case, as in many others, it is to be remembered 
that the suppression of a bad smell by any means, except 
the removal of the cause, is not the way to avoid danger. 

GLANDERS. 

The statute relating to the diseases of animals lays the 
duty of its enforcement on the city marshal, but as gland- 
ers is a disease dangerous to the health of human beings, 
we have considered it our duty to take cognizance of the 
subject. 

In September last, a probable case of this disease in a 
horse owned by Mr. J. G. Jones came to our notice. We 
at once employed Dr. Alexander and Dr. Ebbitt to exam- 
ine the animal, and they pronounced it a genuine case of 
glanders. The facts were laid before the city marshal, 
who promptly notified the owner of the animal. Mr. 
Jones immediately isolated the horse, and within a few 
hours, becoming convinced of the nature of the disease, 
had him killed and buried, and had the stable disinfected. 



216 



FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLIIOUSE. 

Acting on a suggestion from a member of the school 
board, we visited this building. We find it heated by in- 
direct radiation, the steam being furnished by a boiler 
located in the girls' basement, and the supply of air to the 
coils is by ducts from outside the building. The water- 
closets are in an ell or annex built close against the rear 
wall of the main building, and access to them is through 
doors from the basement. They are ventilated by a pipe 
running up from the ceiling through, and a little above, 
the roof, but not so high as the bottom of the windows of 
the school-rooms in the second story. The draft of the 
boiler chimney is supplied from the air in the basement, 
and, if the door between the basement and the privy is 
opened, the air is naturally drawn down the ventilator and 
through the privy-room into the girls' basement. 

Suspecting that the drain to the public sewer was not 
trapped, we suggested to Mr. Sanborn, the superintendent 
of streets, to dig and make an examination in this partic- 
ular. He did so, and reported that he found no trap, but 
that he put in one. This, of course, improved the situa- 
tion somewhat, but the sanitary arrangements of the 
building are still very poor. The privy building should 
be separated by a short space from the main building, and 
the plumbing should be overhauled and modernized. 
Plum-bing that answered its purpose fairly well twenty 
years ago, when the sewers carried little except storm 
water, is entirely unsuitable now that they carry so much 
that is foul and dangerous. 

We would suggest that accurate and faithful plans of 
thp plumbing and drainage of every city building should 
be made and kept in the office of the city engineer. 

We would also suggest that in school buildings here- 



217 

after erected the water-closets should be located in a sep- 
arate structure, connected with the main building bj a 
short covered walk. The same structure might contain 
the boiler, with its accompanying' coal-dust and ashes. 

THE DISPOSAL OF RUBBISH. 

The present practice of collecting waste matter and 
using it for filling new streets and lots just outside the 
built-up part of the city should be amended. Every 
summer large numbers of people are annoyed by the 
foul smells and put in jeopardy by the pestilential emana- 
tions from the city " dumps." It is a mistake to suppose 
that burying such collections under a layer of clean earth 
obviates all objections to the practice. As well might it 
be thought that burying corpses in the earth removes all 
sanitary objections to the vicinity of a cemetery. The 
places where the collections are deposited are sure to be 
built upon in the near future, and they will probably be 
found to be centers for the propagation and dissemination 
of disease for future generations. 

There could be no objection to the use of ashes and 
other imperishable materials for this purpose if they were 
kept separate from the refuse of vegetable and animal 
origin. In many cities the inhabitants are required to 
keep these two classes of waste separate, and when the 
city scavenger finds a case where this has not been done, 
the owner is required to remove his waste at his own 
expense, or is otherwise punished. 

A part of the perishable waste has some small value as 
feed for swine, but it is so largely mixed with water, and 
with valueless, and even hurtful, rubbish, that in no city 
that we are aware of does it pay for collecting. In our 
case a small part of the expense could probably be met 



218 

by its sale, but the promptest, most cleanly and healthful^ 
and, all things considered, the most satisfactory way of 
disposing of this class of waste is probably by burning 
it in a furnace construfited for the purpose. Such fur- 
naces are now in operation, and are said to burn the 
garbage without the use of other fuel. 

SEWERS. 

The sewer discharging through the abutment at the 
west end of McGregor bridge should be extended in the 
river-bed to low-water line. At high water the river 
reaches to the abutment, but in the usual flow it recedes 
to such an extent that a large area of gravel and stones 
is left above water, and a large pool of sewage is formed 
in a hollow directly under the bridge. The stream from 
the overflow of this pool runs among the stones and 
weeds some three hundred feet to the river. This is a 
nuisance. A similar state of things for which any private 
party was responsible would not be tolerated. 

The outlet at the other end of the bridge, and those at 
each end of Granite bridge, should also receive some 
attention. They all are located a little short of the ordi- 
nary water line, and tend to create a nuisance. 

The sewers discharging at each end of Piscataquog 
bridge have been extended to low water during the past 
year by the proper authorities. 

Hall-street sewer now drains some twenty-five acres of 
land, on which stand a large number of houses. It dis- 
charges into Cemetery brook near Belmont street, and is 
fast becoming a nuisance, which must continue to increase 
until the sewage is disposed of in some other way. Halls- 
ville is in need of sewerage, and the whole valle}'- of the 
brook is rapidly being covered with streets and habita- 



219 

tions. The drainage of this valley, from Pine street on 
the west to the Elliot hospital lot on the east, and as far 
south as to Valley street, is an important problem, for 
the solution of which some comprehensive and well-con- 
sidered plan should be at once adopted. 

Bakersville is greatly in need of more sewerage, and 
must soon receive attention, if it is to remain a healthful 
suburb of the cit}'. 

MORTUARY STATISTICS. 

In the following table, the causes of death are given 
very nearly as we find them on the city clerk's record. 
We are informed by the undertakers that among the for- 
eign population there are many deaths of persons who 
have had no medical attendant. These are largely chil- 
dren. In such cases, the best which the undertaker can 
do is to fill out the blank with such information as he can 
get from the friends of the deceased. "With this explana- 
tion it will not appear strange that we have some deaths 
from causes unknown to the medical fraternity. It may 
be supposed, also, that cholera infantum is sometimes 
wrongly assigned as the cause of death. The deaths from 
causes not reported and from " headache " are mostly 
those of infants. 

It is a remarkable fact that the whole number of deaths, 
including still-births, is precisely the same as for the pre- 
vious year. Other noticeable facts are, that the death- 
rate has diminished ; that, while the deaths from diar- 
rheal diseases have increased in number, those from 
typhoid fever, diphtheria, measles, pneumonia, and whoop- 
ing-cough have very much diminished; that not a single 
death from scarlet fever has been reported during the 
year ; and that the mortality of children under five years 
is only greater by one than in the preceding year, not 
having kept pace with the increase of population. 



220 



TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND 

BY MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1886, COMPILED FROM THE 

RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK. 



Cause of Death. 





t^, 










^ 










Cj 


.a 








^ 


o 




^• 


a 


^ 


eS 


a 


cS 


1-5 


N 


g 


<^ 


^ 



Abscess 

" of brain 

Accidents not specified 

" burns and scalds 

" drowning 

Anteniia , 

Apoplexy , 

" of Lungs 

Atlieroma of Arteries 

Asphyxia . . 

" by smoke 

A sthma 

Blood, Humor in 

" Poisoning 

Bowels, Inflammation . . . 

" Perforation 

" Ulceration 

Brain, Congestion 

" Disease 

Bright's Disease 

Bronchitis 

" Acute 

" Capillary 

Calciili, Biliary 

Calculus, Renal 

Cancer... 

Carcinoiua, Hepatic 

Cause not reported 

Childbirth 

Colic 

Cholera Infantum. 

" Morbus 

Consumption, Bronchial 
" Infantile. 

Convulsions 

Cramps 

Croup 

Cystitis 

Debility 

Del irium Tremens 

Diabetes 

Diarrhea 

" Chronic 

Diphtheria 

Dropsy 

Dysentery 

Epilepsy 

Erysipelas 

Esophagus, Stricture of. 
Fever, Bilious 

" Continued 

" Gastric ...... . .-. 

" Lung 

" Typhoid 

" Worm 



Fits 

Gastritis . 



27 



221 



TABLE SHOWING THE MORTALITY, ETC., OF THE CITY.— Continued. 



Cause of Death. 









' 




.a 






S 


ft 




a; 

3 


3 


S 
M 

3 


y 

ft 


O 

o 


o 


a 

O 


< 


►^ 


^^ 


<! 


.V3 


O 


"^ 


Q 



Gastritis Alcoholic 

Headache 

Heart, Disease of 

Heniori'hage 

" Cerebral . . 

Inanition 

Influenza 

Insan ity 

Intussusception 

Laryngitis 

" pseudo-mem- 

hranoous 

Liver, Atrophy 

" Cirrhosis 

" Disease of 

" Hypertrophy of.. 

Lungs, Congestion "of 

" Inflammation of. 

Malformation 

Mania, Acute 

Marasmus 

Measles 

Meningitis 

" Acute 

" Cerebro-spinal. 

" Tubercular 

Nervous Prostration . . . . 

Old Age 

Paralysis 

Pericartlitis 

Peritonitis 

Phthisis 

" Tubercular 

Pleurisy 

Pneumonia 

" Typhoid 

Pott's Disease 

Premaiure Birth 

Prostatitis 

Rheumatism 

" Acute 

Sarcoma , 

Scrofula 

Senile Atrophy of cere- 
brum 

Septicaemia 

Shoclv 

Spasma Glottitis 

Still-born 

Suicide 

Sunstroke 

Teetliing 

Tetanus 

Tumor 

Tabes Mesenterica 

Throat, Ulceration of 

Whooping-Cough , 



Totals 

Totals for 1885. 



11 



64 



47 



771 
771 



222 



1 T.i COMPARISON OF MORTALITY WITH THAT OF PREVIOUS YEAR. 



Estimated population 

Number of deaths (exclusive of still-births) 

Deaths per thousand 

Diarrheal diseases, under 5 years 

■■^ " " above 5 years 

Deaths of children under 5 years, all causes 

Percentage of deaths of children to total deaths. 

Typhoid fever 

Scarlet fever 

Diphtheria 

Measles 

Pneumonia 

Whooping-cough 

Small-pox . 



39,000 

725 

18.60 

118 

18 

313 

43.17 

12 



38,000 

733 

19.39 

92 

.5 

312 

42.56 

20 

5 

18 

3G 

42 

11 

3 



Respectfully submitted. 

WM. A. WEBSTER, 
GEORGE C. HOITT, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 

Board of Health. 
January 1, 1887. 



R e: port 



MILK INSPECTOR 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Coun- 
cils : — 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my annual 
report as Milk Inspector for the city of Manchester dur- 
ing the past year, ending December 31, 1886. 

Kumber of licenses issued ..... 107 

Number of quarts of whole milk consumed daily 11,272 
IS'umber of quarts of skimmed milk consumed 

daily 1,000 



Total number of quarts daily consumed . 12,272 

Estimated number of cows to supply such de- 
mand of whole milk ..... 1,614 

Cash received and paid to city treasurer . . $53 50 

I have examined all samples of milk brought me, and, 
in a majority of cases, complaints were made of its 
adulteration, but, after examination, I invariably found 
no adulteration, the cause being impurities, from im- 
proper care by the milkmen in putting up the same, and 
neglect by the consumer after receiving it. From the 
few complaints, and the inspections made, I have every 
reason to believe that the milk brought into this city daily 
is much improved in quality since my last report. 
Respectfully submitted. 

C. B. LITTLEFIELD, 

Milk Inspector. 

15 



R E PO RT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor ^ Aldermen, and Common Councils of the City of 

Manchester : — 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report for 
the year 1886. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the city 
farm during the year has been twenty-five, at a cost of 
one dollar seventy-three and one half cents per week for 
each pauper. 

The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been 
seventy, consisting of two hundred persons, all of whom 
had a settlement in the city ; three of this number died 
during the year. 

The whole number of persons supported at the State 
Industrial School during the year has been four, at a cost 
of one dollar and fifty cents per week for each person. 

The Overseers of the Poor have given and allowed six 
hundred and fifty orders for support of paupers ofi the 
farm during the year, consisting chiefly of groceries, fuel, 
medicine, and emergencies. 



230 



The amounts allowed to the several wards of the city 
are as follows : — 



Ward 1 










$87 23 


Ward 2 










147 37 


Ward 3 










365 37 


Ward 4 










502 22 


Ward 5 










1,918 08 


Ward 6 










265 75 


Ward 7 










20 85 


Ward 8 










176 25 



;,483 12 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED FOR EMERGENCY CASES. 



Printing and stationery . 

Making affidavits and administering 

oaths ...... 

Railway tickets and team 
Medical consultation 
Care of Joseph B, Pierce 
Tebbetts Bros., medicine delivered 

for police station 
L. K. Mead, medicine delivered for 

police station .... 
L. G. Tewksbury, medicine delivered 

for police station 
J. B. Hall, medicine delivered for 

police station .... 
Industrial School, for board deliv- 
ered to inmates .... 
County farm, for board of insane 

paupers 



$8 03 



1 


00 


7 


65 


10 


00 


113 


86 


2 


00 


11 


70 


10 


95 


66 


90 


2,110 


43 


208 


00 



231 

Towns in this state, for care of our 



paupers .... 


. $79 81 

O f?OA OO 


Total amount allowed 
Cash received from county 


$6,113 45 
1,851 15 



Total cost for the year . . . $4,262 30 

This amount exceeds the sum allowed by us during 
the year 1885 to the amount of $1,093.37. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward 1, 
THOMAS L. QUIMBY, Ward 2, 
JAxMES SUTCLIFFE, Ward 3, 
HORACE GORDON, Ward 4, 
THOMAS P. CONWAY, Ward 5, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, Ward 6, 
WILLIAxM MARSHALL, Ward 7, 
WILLIAM WEBER, Ward 8, 

Overseers of the Poor for City of Manchester. 

A true copy. Attest: 

William H. Maxwell, 

Clerk of the Overseers of Poor. 



R E PO RT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : -^ 

The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on City 
Farm respectfully present their report for the year 1886. 

"We have been to the farm as a committee and individ- 
uals frequently during the past twelve months, and made 
careful personal examination of the management each 
time. We have always found the condition first-class in 
every respect, everything being in good shape at all times. 
"We have been there without notice to the superintendent 
or matron, and found nothing different than at times 
when notice of our coming was given, and we highly com- 
mend the able and judicious manner in which Mr. and 
Mrs. Garvin have performed their duties, and are pleased 
to add our praise to that of former committees. 

The milk route has been carried on in connection with 
the farm, as in the past three years. The total amount 
received for milk sold the past year has not been so large 
as for the previous year, which is partly accounted for by 
the fact that the price per quart for cream has been re- 
duced from forty cents to thirty all through the year, and 
milk from six cents to five since October 1, These prices, 



236 

being universally charged by other dealers, were adopted 
by the farm route. Also, a considerable quantity of milk 
has been fed to pigs, this being necessary to keep them 
through a severe run of hog cholera during the summer. 
The route is in good condition, all the customers being 
prompt in their payments, and loss by bad bills is simply 
nominal. 

At least five hundred dollars' worth of swine has been 
lost by hog cholera. Every means was tried, without suc- 
cess, to prevent this loss. 

A great deal of labor has been done in the continuation 
of improvements on the land. The "Pest-house lot" is 
a notable example. Brush has been cut, stumps dug out, 
rocks blasted, and stones removed, and the lot has been 
plowed, preparatory to planting next season. Under- 
brush, wood, and stumps have been cleared from the 
" Big Meadow " east of the buildings. |257.87 have been 
paid for manure the past year, which has been used upon 
the land, and which was not reckoned in our appraisal, 
nor among the permanent improvements. Estimating on 
the yield of potatoes for the three years previous to this, 
at least twelve hundred bushels of potatoes would have 
been raised this year ; but owing to the drought, coming 
as it did at the time when vines were in bloom, the crop 
was shrunk at least four hundred bushels. A heavy wind 
and rain flattened and broke down the fodder-corn, neces- 
sitating its being cut a. month before it otherwise would 
have been, to save it, thus causing a loss of twenty-five 
tons. 

The paupers at the farm have been well cared for. No 
deaths have occurred among them during the year. The 
average number of paupers at the farm has been less, 
and that of prisoners more, than in 1885. 

Following is a synopsis of our appraisal : — 



237 



Live stock 


13,446 45 


Hay, grain, and produce .... 


2,841 11 


Carriages, sleighs, etc. .... 


750 50 


Farm implements 


1,195 80 


Household furniture, bedding, wearing ap- 




parel, etc. 


2,238 13 


Provisions and fuel 


902 54 


Miscellaneous 


368 71 


Total 


$11,743 24 



The buildings are in good repair, and the house and 
barn are well stocked with necessary furniture and tools, 
and no great outlay will be required to keep them in 
condition during the next j-ear. 

Thousands of loads of gravel and stone have been taken 
from the farm for use by the city, for macadamizing and 
other purposes, which have never been credited to the 
farm account, but which would have been a large expense 
to the city had it been purchased elsewhere. This should 
be taken into account by our tax-payers in considering the 
general value of the farm to the city. 

STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS, 1886. 

Total expense of the farm .... $7,835 62 
Interest 1,000 00 



8,835 62 
Total receipts of farm ..... 3,373 54 



5,462 08. 
Bills receivable 516 88 

4,945 20 



238 
Difierence in stock $1,515 73 



3,429 47 
Permanent improvements .... 857 78 



2,571 69 

Cash paid city treasurer (1886), |1,469.53. 
Total number of weeks board of prisoners and paupers, 
l,482f 

Average cost of board per week for each individual, 

$1,731. 

Your committee inaugurated this year a new system of 
computing the amount of the permanent improvements, 
by reason of which change the cost of board per week 
appears larger than it would under the system always fol- 
lowed by former committees. 

GEO. H. STEARNS, 3Iayor, 
LEONARD P. REYNOLDS, 

S. P. CANNON, 
GEORGE S. SMITH, 
JOHN F. FOX, 
GUY F. WHITTEN, 

Joint Sfanding Committee on City Farm, 1886. 



R E PO RT 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Tlie Sub-Trustees of the Yalley Cemetery respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1886 : — 



RECEIPTS. 




Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1885 


$89 20 


Appropriation for 1886 ■ 


. 1,500 00 


For tomb fees 


140 75 


water rents 


205 00 


grading lots . . . 


322 25 


care of lots 


312 00 


opening graves 


220 00 


lots sold 


74 50 



J,863 70 



APPROPRIATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND RECEIPTS FOR THE 
LAST FIVE YEARS. 



Tear. 


Appropriations. 


Expenditures. 


Receipts. 


1882 


$1,880 93 


$2,339 81 


$472 88 


1883 


2,000 00 


5,201 84 


549 00 


1884 


2,000 00 


2,392 36 


709 90 


1885 


1,500 00 


2,628 40 


900 06 


1886 


1,500 00 


2,618 74 


1,274 50 



16 



242 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid C. H, G. Foss, superintendent 
Luther Leavitt, labor . 
C. W. Noyes, labor 
James Barrett, labor 
G. Higgins, labor , 
J. H. Fitzgerald, labor . 
John Freeman, labor . 
John C. Caverly, labor . 
C. H. Gilman, labor 
John McDonough, labor 
John Shea, labor . 
District ISTo. 2, running snow 

plow .... 
L. M. Aldrich, repairs . 
James Bros., manure . 
Geo. C. Gilmore, making re 

ports, 1884-5-6 
John C. Young, repairs 
Richard Allen 
George W. Thompson . 
Mrs. Charles E. Balch, loam 
L. P. Rice . 
Bishop & Bros. 
H. M. Young, surveying 
H. W. Home, surveying 
M. H. Perkins 
F. S. Bodwell, stone . 
George Whitford, teaming 
Temple & Farrington, sta 

tionery 
John F. Woodbury, repairs 
Clinton A. Moore, clock 



1689 50 

320 62 

153 34 

304 36 

8 75 

81 66 

46 62 

5 00 
37 75 

1 51 

2 00 

7 75 
25 

2 66 

15 00 
14 70 

6 67 



1 
1 

8 

3 

4 

3 

1 

6 00 

6 00 

5 41 

5 95 
4 50 



50 
25 
00 
45 
50 
39 
50 



243 



Paid H. H, Huntress, plants 

D. A. Simons 

E. A. Parkhurst, trees . 
"W. H, Vickery, repairs 
George II, Dudley, repairs 
Hutchinson Bros., repairs 
Water Commissioners . 
"Willey & Rowe, stone work 
A. B. Smith, plants and flower 
Marshall & Underhill, team- 
ing 

J. W. Kimball, teaming and 
loam ..... 

C. C. Webster, loam 

Yarnum &^ Adams 

Pike & Heald, pipe and labor 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware . . . . . 

Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 
hardware . . . . 

John B. Varick,'hardware 

George W. Wales 

Joel Daniels & Co., painting 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1886 

Total 



Ill 00 


2 50 


27 00 


75 


29 32 


23 21 


59 95 


43 20 


's 24 97 



83 03 

238 33 
29 04 
15 00 

175 67 

24 99 



12 


81 


43 


94 




50 


23 


94 


244 


96 



$2,863 70 



Mr. C. H. G. Foss was re-elected superintendent, and 
has given entire satisfaction to the committee, and the 
public, so far as we know. The water has been extended 
during the year to some twenty lots, and the owners are 
every year increasing the number placed in the care of the 
superintendent to water and care for; and your commit- 
tee would recommend that the price charged for water 
be reduced from $1.50 to $1.00 for ordinary-sized lots, 



244 

but remain at $1.50 for large or double lots, and for the- 
care of the same remain as now at $2.00. 

The grading of the banks commenced last year has 
been continued, using over 1,000 loads of loam, from the 
Corliss lot to the Governor Smyth tomb. Many beau- 
tiful monuments have been erected during the year, the 
Balch, Wells, Forsaith, and Ellsworth being among the 
most noticeable ; and your committee most cordially in- 
dorse the recommendation of his Honor Mayor Hosley 
as to the necessity of a new receiving tomb, while not 
agreeing with him in regard to its location. 

Submitted to full board January 12, 1887, and approved, 

joh:n' a. McCrillis, 
charles j. abbott, 
geo. c. gilmore, 
bushrod w. hill, 
david 0. furnald, 

Sub- Trustees on Valley Cemetery. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

In submitting their annual report for 1886, the Sub- 
Trustees of Pine Grove Cemetery call attention to the fact 
that in 1883 there was appropriated for the improvement 
of this cemetery the sum of $5,000; in 1884, the sum of 
$7,000; and in 1885, the sum of $5,875; while for the 
year 1886, — with the newly acquired tract of land known 
as the " Straw lot " to be reclaimed, plotted, and made 
available for sale and burials ; with several hundred feet 
of iron fencing already contracted for ; with a sewer im- 
peratively demanded ; with the necessity of water-pipe 
extension ; with no store-house for carts, tools, vases, and 



245 

other material ; and with many other imperative necessi- 
ties, set forth in the report of last year, — the sub-trustees 
were given only $2,000 to supplement the current receipts 
of the year. 

They are happy to be able to report that by reason of 
the large increase of receipts from sales of lots and other 
sources over any former year in its history, the Pine 
Grove Cemetery has made commendable progress and 
marked improvement. The interest of the lot-owners and 
the public generally has steadily increased, and the wis- 
dom of the city in laying so well and munificently the 
foundation for one of the most delightful burial-places 
among the many of great beauty and attraction in N^ew 
England is receiving the approval and commendation 
which it merits. The following statistics give ample 
proof of this. The entire receipts from all sources for 
nine years have been as follows : — 



1878 . . 


1974 22 


1883 . 


. . $2,753 50 


1879 . . 


1,053 11 


1884 . 


. . 1,932 35 


1880 . . 


1,294 89 


1885 . 


. . 2,806 01 


1881 . . 


1,205 21 


1886 . 


. . 3,696 68 


1882 . . 


1,324 76 







CEMETERY SELF-SUPPORTING. 

The current expenses are given in the statement accom- 
panyiug this report as $3,738.59, a sum but a few dollars 
in excess of the actual receipts. This staterhent of current 
expenses, however, includes labor of men employed in the 
yard in grading for the new iron fence, in opening and 
filling ditches for sewer and water pipes, and for shovel- 
ing and moving muck now on hand, all of which would 
properly be placed to account of permanent improvements 
if it could be eliminated from the regular work of the 



246 

cemetery. Any fair estimate of tlie amount of this labor, 
deducted from the above sum, would show the receipts of 
the last year considerably in excess of the current 
expenses. 

This result is due almost entirely to the fact that by the 
prudent expenditure of the city's liberal appropriations, 
the place has been so beautiiied, and the lots made so 
available, that they have been and are in great demand. 
The erection of the new superintendent's office and wait- 
ing-room, the introduction of the modern system of laying 
out lots in lawn plots, the purchase of the " Straw lot,"' 
with its immense supply of muck, and especially the ines- 
timable advantages of the water system, — though expen- 
sive, are nevertheless necessities, and the increased receipts 
are already demonstrating their wisdom. 

l!Tot less important have been the permanent improve- 
ments of the year. 

FENCE. 

The iron fence on the west side of the old grounds has 
been extended from its former termination below the main 
entrance on the River road, several hundred feet, to the 
extreme southwestern corner of the lot, at an expense of 
about $1,300, about $500 of which remains to be paid from 
the appropriations of next year or the balance now on 
hand. The old lot is now enclosed in a substantial iron 
fence upon the west side, and about one half of the north 
end. The rest "is outlined by a rickety, tumble-down old 
apologj^, which must soon give way to farther extension 
of the iron fence. The east side of the grounds is rapidly 
being taken up, and some of the most desirable lots in the 
yard are being laid there. It is but justice to the owners 
of lots already sold, and wisdom as an inducement to fur- 
ther purchases, that these lots should not be disgraced by 



247 

this out-crying nuisance for many more years. N'o fence 
of any kind encloses the new " Straw lot," which must 
soon be used for burials. It seems especially desirable 
that some progress should be made each year in this 
respect. 

DRAINAGE. 

The sub-trustees have found it practically impossible to 
drain the low places in the cemetery by any means which 
they have heretofore attempted. The grade has been 
raised, catch-basins introduced, and other means used^ 
the effect of which was salutary during the warm season; 
but in spite of all the trustees have heretofore been able 
to do, the water has every 3'ear covered large areas of im- 
proved lots to a depth sufficient to render them navigable, 
and in some instances entirely covering the tops of the 
gravestones on the submerged lots. The sub trustees 
contracted with F. B. Potter for the construction of a 
sewer to remedy this long-standing defect, and it has been 
faithfully and successfully completed during the past 
season, 950 feet of twelve-inch pipe and 100 feet of eight- 
inch pipe having been laid. With this sewer are con- 
nected five catch-basins and four man-holes, the expendi- 
ture for the entire work, excepting for the labor of the 
employes of the yard in digging and covering the ditch, 
being $683.97. The vexed question of drainage seems 
hereby to have been satisfactorily and permanently settled. 

WATER-WORKS. 

Three hundred and eight dollars and sixty-three cents 
have been expended in extending the pipes to parts of the 
cemetery not heretofore supplied with water facilities, and 
a corresponding expenditure must be made each year as 
the cemetery continues to be developed, until the water is 



248 

accessible to every part thereof. 585 feet of three-inch 
pipe and 106 feet of one-inch have been laid, to which six 
hydrants have been attached. 

LOAM."^ 

In 1885 the expenditure for this indispensable article 
amounted to $849.20, and the supply was entirely ex- 
hausted before the close of the season. Fortunately, the 
superintendent has since been able to make satisfactory 
purchases of a sufficient amount to fulfill the demands of 
this barren anfl sandy country, when supplemented with 
muck, which has been drawn from the " Straw lot " in 
large quantities and piled up on the old lot for use the 
next season. $631 have been expended for loam, and a 
continued demand will necessitate the consideration of 
this important item in making the appropriations for 
another year. We have now on hand ninety-six loads of 
loam and three hundred and four loads of muck. Loam 
is as essential to the prosperity of the Pine Grove as water 
and sunlight. Without a liberal supply of it, not a foot of 
sward can be made or maintained. Progress is at a stand- 
still when the supply of material or means for its pur- 
chase fails. 

Fifty-two lots were sold in 1885, sixty-two in 1886, and 
the trustees look for an increased sale the coming year. 
The city's public ground requires a liberal bestowal of 
loam, and the lawn and ornamental plots owned by the 
city, and which the present year called for an expenditure 
of one hundred and eleven loads of loam, must in the future, 
as in the past, be laid in a substantial foundation of loam. 
It is undoubted economy to make such an appropriation 
for this purpose as will enable the trustees to keep a con- 
stant supply on hand, for their own use and for sale to 
lot-owners. 



249 



"STRAAV LOT. 



The sub-trustees regret that they can report no progress 
in the work of improving this vahiable and most beauti- 
fully situated lot for cemetery purposes, beyond the lay- 
ing out of drives, walks, and ornamental designs by the 
architect, whose plans were accepted the year before. 
Lack of funds alone has prevented. The expending of 
sixty-three dollars for this purpose seemed to be a neces- 
sity, and future improvements and work looking to the 
final completion of these most desirable burial grounds in 
ISTew England, in accordance with the plan of Mr. Man- 
ning, whose acknowledged ability as a landscape gardener 
and architect is unsurpassed, must depend entirely upon 
the judgment of the "city fathers" as to whether the 
policy of the living is to be sacredly mindful of the mem- 
ory of the dead, and to furnish sufficient means to develop, 
in a manner becoming the pride and boasted liberality of 
the citizens of our home, the rare beauties of this lovely 
spot, designed by the Maker of the universe for the pur- 
pose for which we are trying to make it available. 

The city has but eleven ordinary lots, and thirty-seven 
lots with lawu restrictions, now ready for sale. To pre- 
pare at least one hundred lots is a work of necessity, to 
give applicants a choice, and to be prepared for every 
emergency and sudden call. Why not make a beginning 
in the " Straw lot," and introduce the public to this excep- 
tionally fine burial plot, now looked upon as a swamp, 
returning only muck for gold ! 



MUCK. 



During the year workmen have been constantly em- 
ployed in digging and drawing muck from the " Straw 
lot," where a seemingly inexhaustible mine of vegetable 



250 

mould is deposited to a depth of four or five feet. Here- 
tofore the water has covered this tract and prevented 
work. With the opening of the present season, the super- 
intendent was instructed to open the ditch appurtenant to 
the lot and drain this area. The accomplishment of this 
purpose has developed a hidden wealth in this old bog- 
hole, which cannot be estimated in value, but, like all 
other bonanzas, it must be worked before it will yield its 
richness. Many hundred loads of muck have been taken 
therefrom the present season, and three hundred and four 
loads now remain on hand, ready for use in the opening 
spring. It costs something to move it. The superin- 
tendent is ready to take out all the city desires to pay the 
expense of removing. The muck is not only valuable of 
itself, but every load removed is in furtherance of the plan 
of the architect, who proposes the entire removal of this 
muck, to make an artificial pond with picturesque islands 
and gardens, spanned by rustic bridges. 

superintendent's office and waiting-room. 

The convenience and utility of this building are fully 
established, as the patronage it receives abundantly testi- 
fies. A stove, clock, mantel, lamp, mirror, and a few 
minor articles, have been added to the furniture as they 
have been needed, which, with the bill for coal used there, 
make up the expenditure of |94.48, reported among the 
permanent improvements. 

Experience demonstrated that the drives, plots, and 
lawns about the house could not be kept in proper condi- 
tion with the amount of travel which they received, unless 
made of other material than gravel. It was, therefore, 
concluded to concrete them, and for this permanent and 
desirable improvement the sum of $220.06 was paid to 



I 



251 

Mr. Robie. Economy will require the repainting of the 
house the coming year, and the matter of funds for that 
purpose is respectfully suggested. 

The trustees refer with pleasure to the amount of work 
thus accomplished the past season in the way of perma- 
nent improvements, upon the small appropriation of 
|2,000. It could not, however, have been accomplished 
but by the addition thereto of an unexpended balance of 
$2,607.06, which, with the appropriation, gave for this 
purpose the sum of $4,607.06, besides the annual receipts, 
which proved sufficient to pay the current expenses. Of 
the reported balance on hand the present year, nearly 
$500 will be required to pay for fence already in position 
and nearly completed, and $1,000 for the building of a 

STORE-HOUSE, 

which has been imperatively demanded for years, and 
which the trustees have voted to build in accordance with 
plans and specifications prepared under the direction of a 
committee appointed for that purpose. This will about 
exhaust the apparent balance on hand, and leave the sub- 
trustees with only the current income, which ought to 
pay the running expenses, and such appropriations for 
permanent improvements as the necessities of the case 
demand. 

The sub-trustees suggest, for the consideration of the 
full board and the city government, the pressing necessity 
(prominently and wisely referred to by his Honor Mayor 
Hosley, in his recent inaugural address) of a 

RECEIVING TOMB 

at the Pine Grove. Especial reference was made to the 
growing demand for such a winter repository in our 



252 

report of last year, and an appropriation urged for that 
purpose, to which we now cite the authorities and citi- 
zens. The reasons therein urged are only intensified by 
the lapse of time as the interments increase in number, 
and the disagreeable experiences of winter burials in so 
large a tract of land as to render it absolutely impossible 
to keep the multitude of avenues and paths open or pass- 
able are constantly being repeated. The acknowledged 
inadequacy and inconvenience of the tomb at the Valley 
for the purposes of Pine Grove lot-owners need not be 
brought to your attention, as it is too apparent for com- 
ment. The utmost capacity of this ill-constructed charn el- 
vault at the Valley, as well as the patience and tender 
sensibilities of grief-burdened mourners, are each year 
put to their extremest test, and each year revives the hope 
that it may be the last of the continuance of a condition 
of things which is too often characterized by language 
unfitting this report. 

PLANS AND RECORDS. 

A reference to the report of last year, where the reasons 
therefor are fully stated, must be our apology for again 
suggesting the crying need of the Pine Grove Cemetery 
for better records, and for a plan locating its various 
avenues, walks, lots, lawns, and public ground. 

The original sketches were crude and imperfect, and 
time has not improved them. The cemetery has entirely 
outgrown anything ever attempted in the way of plans or 
records. There is no way of ascertaining the locality 
or ownership of lots, .and, as the years pass, it is fast 
becoming an impossibility to get anything like a perfect 
record. Many of the most valuable and available locali- 
ties are neglected, and left unsightly and unsold, because 



253 

no one knows whether they have ever been disposed of 
or not. The re-naming of the avenues and walks has 
added to the universal jargon and patchwork, and noth- 
ing can resolve the chaos but an accurate plan from sur- 
veys, from which may be made record books which will 
truthfully recite the entire history of the resting-place of 
such a diversified family. 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS, 

other than those called to public attention above, have 
been from time to time considered by the trustees, and 
must eventually be acted upon. The reconstruction of 
the " Hillside Lawn" so as to bring it up to the high 
standard attempted to be attained in the outset, and which 
furnishes cause for much merited dissatisfaction in its 
present condition, must receive early attention. Only 
seven of these desirable lots have been sold during the- 
past year, which, with the eighteen previously sold, make 
a total of twenty-five, out of one hundred and eight lots 
in the entire lawn. The perpetual fund for the care and 
preservation of these lots has been increased $1,499.40, 
making the total fund at date $3,389.89; but the interest 
upon this investment, which is all that can be used_, is 
entirely inadequate to do what the necessities of the lawn 
and the representations of the trustees demand ; and it is 
the part of honor and fair dealing with those whose 
money is here invested that the city should put this lawn 
in the condition promised when the deeds were made. 
The "Pilgrim Lawn," where single graves maybe pur- 
chased by persons of limited means, who, but for this pro- 
vision for their benefit, would be obliged to use the "pub- 
lic ground," would have been laid out and offered to the 
public the past season but for the want of funds therefor. 



254 

The object is a worthy one if it should be thought advis- 
able to invest in this direction. 

CURRENT EXPENSES. 

The subjoined summary shows the current expenses of 
the year to be $3,738.59, as against $4,304.79 the previous 
year. The main item alone demands explanation : $2,- 
390.90 for labor and teaming on grounds. Besides the lay- 
ing of sewer and water pipes and the handling of several 
hundred loads of muck already explained, four hundred 
loads of gravel have been used to grade lots and paths 
in the vicinity of Oakland and Beech avenues. Five 
hundred and ninety-eight loads of grade material have 
been used in grading for the new iron fence, upon the 
east and west sides of the old cemetery, and upon a plot 
of land south of Palm avenue. 

Besides the general care of the grounds, the cutting i 
of timber and pulling of stumps for the reclaiming of ■ 
land for lots, much has been done in the way of beauti- 
fying and adorning the grounds, by setting shrubs and 
trees, taken from the nursery on the new lot, and in 
regrading the avenues and walks where most needed. 

The superintendent, Byron A. Stearns, has received for 
his services $2.00 per day, and has faithfully performed 
the duties and fulfilled the responsibilities reposed in him. 
His intimate acquaintance with the minutest details of 
the cemetery work, his love for this sort of service, which 
would be repulsive to many, and his interest. in the gen- 
eral welfare of the scheme, make him an invaluable man 
in that position, and one whose place it would be difiicult 
to fill. 

It is sufficient proof of his fitness and his general 
acceptability that no complaints have been made to the 



255 

board, although the public have been especially requested 
to notify the sub-trustees of any indecorum or impropri- 
ety in him or any of his employes. 

It may also be said to his credit that he does not hesi- 
tate to enforce the rules and regulations of the trustees, 
who alone are responsible for any friction resulting there- 
from. 

The interest of the sub-trustees has not abated in this 
beautiful and promising place of burial for themselves, 
those of their own households, and the multitude of pres- 
ent and past residents of the city, whose munificence has 
established, nurtured, and maintained it, and whose con- 
tinued liberality and consideration for her citizens in the 
sacred hours when the unwelcome messenger brings his 
final summons will not allow the good work to languish. 

They present this report, through the Board of Trustees 
of Cemeteries, to the city government and to the public, 
with the hope that their zeal for the best interests of this 
place of pious pilgrimage for so large a proportion of our 
increasing population may be appreciated by those in 
whose behalf they labor, and that their hands may not 
be stayed by censure or unwise economy. 

The following items may not be devoid of interest to 
patrons of the Pine Grove Cemetery : — 

Superintendent's receipts^ at the cemetery for 

lots ........ $511 00 

Superintendent's receipts at the cemetery for 

interments 373 50 

Superintendent's receipts for water and care 

of lots 99 50 

Superintendent's receipts for grading lots . 286 75 

loam sold . . 45 50 

extra labor on lots 11 75 



256 



Superintendent's receipts for wood and timber 

removal of bodies 
drain-pipe sold . 

Balance of collections in 1885 



Total receipts by superintendent . . $1,740 18 
Superintendent has paid sundry miscellaneous 

expenses ....... 6 01 



$259 25 


60 50 


17 42 


75 00 



Balance paid treasurer by superintend- 
ent . . . ... . . $1,734 IT 



Balance paid treasurer in 1885 

Number of lots regraded 

Number of monuments erected 

Number of catch-basins put in 

Lots sold on Hillside lawn 

Lots unsold on Hillside lawn . 

Lots sold with lawn restrictions, no deposit 

Lots with lawn restrictions unsold 

Ordinary lots sold . 

Ordinary lots for sale 

Number of interments 

Number of interments on public ground 

Number of removals 

Total number of lots sold during year 

Whole number buried in public ground 



1,283 41 

16 

14 

5^ 

7 
83 
23 
37 
32 
11 

193 
47 
13 
62 

950 



The following is a condensed summary of the receipts 
and expenditures of the year : — 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance on hand January 1, 1886 
Appropriation for 1886 . 
Sale of lots by superintendent 



$2,607 06 

2,000 00 

511 00 



267 



Balance of superintendent's receipts, less pay- 
ment of 16.01 

Sale of lots by treasurer . . . . . 

Total receipts in hands of treasurer 



^,223 17 
1,956 50 

^8,297 73 



EXPENDITURES. 




Current Expenses. 






1886. 


1885. 


Salary of superintendent 


$728 00 


$728 00 


Labor and teaming 


2,399 90 


2,748 01 


Material and tools 


175 23 


218 49 


Printing, stationery, and postage 


40 96 


102 28 


Surveying .... 


40 75 


77 26 


Shrubs and flowers 


49 15 


143 40 


Water rates .... 


300 00 


200 00 


Miscellaneous 


4 60 


87 35 




$3,738 59 


$4,304 79 


Permanent Improi 


ements. 






1886. 


1885. 


Iron fence .... 


$795 60 




Furnishing house . 


94 48 




Loam 


631 00 




Extension of water-works 


308 63 




Concreting grounds about house 


220 06 




Sewer 


683 97 




Laying out "Straw lot" 


63 00 





Total permanent imj^rove- 

ments .... $2,796 74 $2,964 92 
Total current expenses . 3,738 59 4,304 79 

Total expenditures . . $6,535 33 $7,269 71 

17 



258 



OUTSTANDING CLAIMS. 

On account of iron fence (estimated) 
store-house 



Total assets . 
Total liabilities 



Available balance 



1886. 
. $8,297 73 
. 8,035 33 



$500 00 
1,000 00 

$1,500 00 

1885. 



$262 40 $2,607 06 



SUMMARY or ESTIMATES FOR 1887. 

Allowing net receipts to be sufficient to liquidate cur- 
rent expenses, the following will be required for all the 
purposes stated in the foregoing report : — 



Iron fence .... 


. $500 00 


"Water-works extension 


300 00 


" Straw lot" and muck . 


500 00 


Loam 


500 00 


Plans and records . 


250 00 


Receiving tomb 


. 1,000 00 


Printing-office 


150 00 


Public ground 


200 00 



$3,400 00 

S. p. CANNON, 
GEORGE W. BACON, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
G. P. WHITMAN, 
HENRY H. HUSE, 
Sub- Ti^ustees of Pine Grove Cemetery 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries: — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual 
report of the money received by me during the year end- 
ing December 31, 1886, on account of cemeteries : — 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Number of lots sold and deeds delivered during the 

past year, 67. 

Cash received for the same .... |2,459 37 

interest 8 13 

from B. A. Stearns . .• ' . 1,223 17 
overdraft . ' . . . . 4 50 



5,695 17 



VALLEY CEMETERY, 



Cash received for the sale of one lot and walks $56 40 

interest 18 10 

from C. H. G. Foss . . . 1,200 00 



§1,274 50 



I have in my possession nineteen deeds ready for de- 
livery, which I think will nearly all be taken with perhaps 
one or two exceptions, and these parties I have been un- 



260 

able to hear from, as the notices which I have sent have 
been returned. 

All money received by me has been turned into the 
city treasury, for which I have the proper vouchers from 
the city clerk. 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTKAM, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 



Manchester, N. H., January 21, 1887. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the cemeteries, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAI^ P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the Oity Councils of the City of Manchester : — 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund 
have the honor to present herewith their seventh annual 
report, together with the statement of the treasurer, show- 
ing the present condition of the funds under their control. 

It is gratifying to note the steady increase of means at 
the disposal of the trustees, thereby stimulating the hope, 
before expressed, that a more satisfactory state of things 
will hereafter exist as to the condition of lots under their 
care ; but too great results must not be expected from 
the meager sum applicable for these improvements. It 
will continue to be their aim to expend the means at 
command in a faithful and judicious manner. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEO. H. STEARNS, Mayor, ex officio, 
JAMES A. WESTOK, Chairman, 
P. C. CHEKEY, 

Trustees of the Cemetery Fund. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund : — 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the fourth 
annual report of the funds received up to December 31, 
1886. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 



Amount of permanent fund on hand, as per 






last report 


. 


$1,450 


00 


Received during the year from 








Hannah Kenniston lot 


$200 00 






Mrs. E. B. Merrill . 


50 00 






George F. Spaulding . 


50 00 






James A. Weston . . 


300 00 










600 


00 






VV 


Total 


$2,050 


00 


Interest on hand, as per last report 


$22 09 






Interest received since last report . 


70 83 


$92 




Total 


. 


92 


Paid expenses as follows : — 








Valley Cemetery, for care of lots . 


$32 85 






Balance on hand .... 


60 07 







Total $92 92 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand, as per 

last report $1,890 49 



263 



Received during the year from 
Henry C. Merrill 
Mrs. Mary A. Martin and Mrs 

Fanny M. Chandler 
Mrs. C. F. Bonney 
Jeremiah Austin 
Mrs. Andrew J. Dow- 
Charles H. Robie 
J. A. "Weston 

Total 

Interest on hand, as per last report 
Interest received since last report . 

Total 

Paid expenses as follows : — 

J. B. Yarick Co. 
James Bros. . 
Sidney Blood . 
Balance on hand 



Total 



PISCATAQUOG 



$158 20 



134 16 




133 80 




140 10 




149 82 




165 88 




617 44 






$1,499 40 




. 


$3,389 89 


|8 96 




83 29 





$92 25 



$5 00 

20 95 

8 31 

57 99 



CEMETERY. 



Amount of permanent fund on hand, as per 

last report 

Interest received since last report . 

Paid expenses as follows : — 

Gilman Riddle 



$92 25 



$200 00 
10 00 



$10 00 



Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 



264 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of 
accounts of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees 
of the cemetery funds, embracing the receipts and expend- 
itures for the year ending December 31, 1886, and that 
I find the same correct and properly vouched. 

I have also examined the securities in which said fund 
is invested, and find as follows : — 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, K. H., 

5 per cent $2,050 00 

Amount of permanent fund .... 2,050 00 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

K H., 5 per cent . . . $8,350 00 
Cash 39 89 



Amount of permanent fund .... $3,389 89 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 

5 per cent $200 00 

Amount of permanent fund .... 200 00 

I^ATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



MAYOR STEARNS'S 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS. 



As the time for which we were chosen by our fellow- 
citizens to administer the government of the city is about 
to expire, and we are to surrender the trusts which were 
placed in our care, and as this is the last occasion we shall 
meet in our oiJicial capacity, I have deemed it proper to 
ask your attention to a brief review of our labors, and to 
refer to some of the most important measures upon which 
we have been called to act. It has seemed to me much 
more appropriate to present a review of our work at this 
time than to follow the course of my predecessors for the 
past few years, who performed a similar service on the 
occasion of the inauguration of a new city government, 
when the attention of most of the audiences assembled 
was absorbed in other matters. 

SEAVERS AND DRAINS. 

One of the most important subjects which have received 
our attention is that relating to the sewerage system of 
our city. Some time before the organization of the pres- 
ent municipal government, our predecessors in office 
adopted plans for the construction of a sewer in Canal 
and "Webster streets, to connect with the Bridge-street 
sewer near the outlet of the latter into the Merrimack 
River, for the purpose of draining the northern section of 



268 

the city. The plans were prepared by skillful and expe- 
rienced engineers, under the direction of the committee 
on sewers and drains, after the most careful and thorough 
consideration of all the facts and circumstances in the 
case. There was much difference of opinion among the 
people most interested in regard to the location of the 
sewer, and considerable opposition was manifested towards 
the plans recommended by the committee. Some parties 
contended that the sewer should enter the river above the 
Amoskeag Falls. To this suggestion it was replied that 
the pollution of the water in the river by drainage in dr}' 
seasons of the year, when the water in the river is low, 
would endanger the health and comfort of the people of 
the city. Others claimed the Elm-street sewer, if extended 
north from Bridge street, would afford the proper drain- 
age needed by the people of that section. In answer, it 
was shown that this plan would give no sewerage to the 
people living on the west side of Elm street. The plan 
suggested by the committee was finally adopted by the 
City Councils, and work was commenced upon the sewer 
in the spring of 1885. Through a considerable portion 
of Canal street the route w^as obstructed by ledges and 
large cobble-stone, to an extent somewhat greater than 
%vas anticipated. This sewer was finished in September, 
1886, at an expense of about |25,000. 

Another important work, which has been carried 
through to l^ashua street during the past two years, was 
the Bridge-std'eet sewer, which was commenced and fin- 
ished to Elm street in 1881. On account of a solid ledge, 
which was found below the surface of the street, the 
greater part of the way from Union to iN'ashua street, a 
very large amount of blasting was necessary, and the 
progress of the work was slow and tedious. A steam 
drill, which was bought at an expense of $300, was used 



269 

to great advantage, as with this machine three men could 
do the work of thirty with the ordinary hand drill. 

The stone which was excavated was used in macadam- 
izing the streets. This sewer was finished and connected 
with the N^ashua-street sewer in October last, at an expense 
of $18,000. The demand for sewerage is constantly in- 
creasing, and large appropriations will be required the 
coming year to meet the wants of the people in this 
regard. 

The following are some of the statistics relating to the 
sewers which have been constructed during the past two 
years: Brick sewers, 32 by 48 inches, 1,844 feet; brick 
sewers, 24 by 36 inches, 6,111 feet; 15-inch Akron pipe, 
1,900 feet; 12-inch Akron pipe, 4,371 feet; 10-inch Ak- 
ron pipe, 5,613 feet; 8-inch Akron pipe, 2,554 feet; sew- 
ers relaid, 145 feet; total number of miles, 4.27. Total 
number of cesspools built, 149; number of man-holes 
built, 37. 

THE STREETS. 

Much progress has been made during the past two years 
in macadamizing the streets of the city. During the early 
part of the past summer an improved steam road-roller 
was purchased, at an expense of $6,000. This machine 
has proved a great success, and the streets which have 
been constructed by its use are so perfect and satisfactory 
that it has been thought block paving will not hereafter 
be required in the city to any considerable extent. The 
roller has also been used with great advantage and econ- 
omy in picking and repairing old macadamized roads. 
Total amount of macadamizing put in, 29,689 square 
yards. Tlie total number of miles of streets which have 
been graveled, graded, and built the two past years was 
45. The total amount of block and cobble paving done 



270 

was 14,982 square yards. Edge stones set and relaid, 
13,294 feet. During the past season a building was erected 
in connection with the High School house for a laboratory, 
at a cost of $1,500. The North-Main-street Grammar- 
school building at West Manchester was enlarged, at an 
expense of |6,000. The sum of $10,000 was expended in 
completing the new police station on Manchester street. 
The capacity of the pumping apparatus at the water-works 
has been increased, at an expense of $12,000, and 4.33 
of distribution pipes have been laid, with fire-hydrants, 
service pipes, and valves, at a cost of $40,000. 

THE POLICE DEPARTMENT 

has been conducted during the past two years with effi- 
ciency and success. But few crimes of a very serious 
nature have been committed, and those violations of the 
laws vv'hich are the most common have been less frequent 
than in many former years. At the commencement of 
the strike by some of the operatives in the Amoskeag 
Mills, in the winter of 1886, there was danger of a serious 
riot. Through the foresight and energy of the head of 
the police department, measures were at once taken to 
prevent any disturbance of the peace of the city. A vigi- 
lant watch was kept over the most turbulent of the strik- 
ers, and also over the places and gatherings where an 
outbreak might be most likely to take place, and the 
peace and order of the city was preserved. Great credit 
is due to the city marshal and police force for the activity 
and good judgment they displayed on this occasion. 

Among the imperfections of our present police system 
is that which arises from the great anxiety which is felt 
among policemen on account of the danger that they may 
fail of a re-election. Upon a change in the city govern- 



271 

ment, there are scores of new ai»plicaiits for places, and 
all sorts of iiitluences are brought to bear upon the ap- 
pointing powers to secure votes in their favor ; and often 
there are demands from politicians for places for them- 
selves or friends, as a reward for party services, without 
the presentation of any evidence as to their fitness for the 
position. Every year there is a liability that good police- 
men may be dropped for others who have no qualifications 
wdiatever. In this state of things I would recommend 
that the appointing power be vested in a board of com- 
missioners, who stand remote from political influences. 
Such a board should examine all candidates as to charac- 
ter and fitness, and without regard to friends or partisans. 
I am confident that civil service rules applied to the 
appointment of our police ofiicers would greatly improve 
this branch of the government. 

CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

All the claims whidh have been brought against the 
city for damages alleged to have been received on account 
of defects in the streets and highways, since the organiza- 
tion of the present city government, have been adjusted 
and settled without resort to the courts, the total amount 
paid by the city being only $1,134. This satisfactory 
result is largely due to the discretion and good manage- 
ment of the city solicitors and committees on claims. 
The city has paid, during the tw^o years past, judgments 
rendered against the city by the courts for damages on 
account of accidents sufiered by reason of defective streets, 
before the incoming of the present city government, to 
the amount of $10,000. 



272 



THE PUBLIC HEALTH. 



Ill 1885 measures were taken to secure a better pres- 
ervation of the public health, and a new board, armed 
with proper authority to enforce the laws and ordinances 
upon this subject, was appointed. As a consequence, a 
rigid inspection of the city was instituted, the violators of 
the sanitary laws were brought to a sense of their duties, 
and the buildings and streets were placed in a more 
cleanly and healthful condition than ever before. 

In the fall of 1885 there was much excitement and 
alarm among the people on account of the ravages of 
small-pox in Canada. A system of quarantine was estab- 
lished at the railroad station, and all persons from that part 
of Canada where the disease was prevalent, to the num- 
ber of 1,200, were fumigated before they were allowed 
to mingle with the people of the city, and 3,582 persons 
were vaccinated at the public expense. Several persons 
who contracted the disease in Canada were taken down 
after their arrival in the city, and taken to the pest-house 
on Bridge street, and three died. It was, doubtless, ow- 
ing to the foresight and vigilance of the proper authori- 
ties that the pestilence was confined within such narrow 
limits. 

COMMONS. 

For several years past the water in the ponds in Han- 
over and Merrimack squares has become so impure that 
the beauty and attractiveness of these places of resort 
have been greatly marred. The volume of water running 
into the ponds has been growing less and less every year, 
and from this and other causes the water in dry seasons 
has become stagnant and foul. To overcome this diffi- 
culty the ponds were partially filled up. But this did 



273 

not effect the purpose. " Plans have been proposed for 
taking the water from the brooks from whicli the ponds 
are supplied, and conducting it off by drains, and to sup- 
ply them from Lake Massabesic. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The department has maintained its high reputation for 
efficiency, and is now in the best of order. During the 
past season, a new engine-house has been built at "West 
Manchester, at a cost of $10,000. A new second-class 
steam fire-engine has been purchased, at an expense of 
$4,000, to replace the old steamer Fire King. A chem- 
ical engine has been bought for $2,250; also a new hook- 
and-ladder truck, at a cost of $1,800, a hose-wagon cost- 
ing $350, and seven horses. A lot of land on Webster 
street has been purchased for a site for a new engine- 
house in that quarter, and contracts have been awarded 
for the erection of a building the coming season. The 
fire-alarm telegraph system of the city has been entirely 
remodeled by putting up new copper wire, and nine new 
boxes have been added, the whole cost being $6,000. 

CONCLUSION. 

With this account of our stewardship, may we not retire 
from the positions of responsibility we have occupied 
with the full consciousness that we have performed our 
duties with a strict regard for the public welfare ; and 
may we not submit our record to the judgment of the 
wisest of our fellow-citizens, who are familiar with the 
history of the public affairs of our city, with the assur- 
ance that it will not suffer in comparison with that of 
any of our predecessors on the score of prudence, econ- 
omy, and fidelity ? And now, gentlemen, as we are 



274 

about to separate, I extend my most sincere and heart-felt 
thanks to all of you who have been associated with me 
in the management of the public interests of our city, 
for your kindness and uniform courtesy, and your readi- 
ness to aid and assist me in the discharge of the duties 
of my position, I shall always cherish the memory of 
the pleasure I have derived from the relations we have 
sustained to each other, and an ardent interest in your 
welfare. 



» 



MAYOR HOSLEY'S 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



GrENTLEMEN, — 111 accordance with the provisions of 
the city chai'ter, and in compliance with the wishes of a 
majority of our fellow-citizens, we have assembled to accept 
in a formal manner the various offices to which we have 
been elected, and to assume the responsibility of conduct- 
ing the public affairs of our city. The blessing of God has 
been invoked in our behalf, that we may be inspired 
with wisdom to enable us to perform all the duties incum- 
bent upon us in a discreet and faithful manner; and 
now we are about to undertake the management of the 
public interests of this enterprising city. As I enter for 
the third time upon the discharge of my duties as mayor, 
I fully appreciate the difficulties and responsibilities of 
the position, and the demand that is made upon me for 
the consecration of my best powers and energies to the 
work that is before me. But, gentlemen, you, too, who 
are to share with me in the work of managing our 
municipal affiiirs, are equally responsible for the manner 
in which you may perform your part; and the call upon 
you for the devotion of your highest faculties to the pub- 
lic service is equally imperative. We are to co-operate 
for the promotion of the public welfare, and if we are 
faithful to the solemn vows we have taken, and at no 
time and under no circumstances allow any considerations 
of private policy or friendship to swerve us from a strict 



278 



adherence to our highest convictions of what is due to 
the people whom we serve, we cannot fail of success, and 
of receiving the commendation of the wisest and best of 
our fellow-citizens. 

FINANCE. 

One of the important duties of the City Councils, and 
one requiring the best intelligence and judgment, is that 
pertaining to the management of the finances of the city. 
The city treasurer informs me that the condition of the 
finances on the first day of January was as follows : — 



Funded debt . 
Interest due, estimated 
Temporary loan 
Cemetery bonds 
Outstandino; bills 



Total indebtedness Jan. 1, 1887 
Cash in treasury 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1887 . ' . 



$973,500 00 

20,000 00 

25,000 00 

5,450 00 

36,224 12 

1,060,174 12 
58,915 11 

.,001,259 01 



In order to meet the necessary expenses of the city 
until the 1st of July next, when the taxes for the year 
are payable, I presume it will be necessary to make a 
temporary loan. The appropriations should be large 
enough to provide for every real want of the city in all 
its various departments during the current year. Many 
applications will no doubt be made for sewers, drains, 
streets, and for the introduction of new improvements 
in various directions. "While we should avoid all extrav- 
agance, we should remember that the best public policy 
consists in affording the means necessary to advance the 
prosperity and welfare of our city. After the appropri- 



279 

ations are made, we should not suffer them to be over- 
drawn, except in cases of extreme emergency. 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

The highways in the suburbs are not up to so higli a 
standard as is demanded to meet the necessities of the 
city. It is highly necessary that the roads leading into 
the city from the adjoining towns should be constructed 
in a thorough manner for the accommodation of the peo- 
ple who come here for purposes of trade or pleasure, and 
it is no less important that these roads should be as per- 
fect as possible, in order that the people of the city proper, 
who pay most of the taxes, may have good and attractive 
drives. It is difficult to secure these results under the 
present 'system of management of our highways. I would 
suggest that it would be far more economical, and in all 
other respects more advantageous, for the city to place our 
highways under the direction of one superintendent of 
streets, with the proviso that applicants for situations to 
labor on the highways in the outlying districts who live 
in the immediate vicinity be given the preference. 

The streets in the city have been greatly improved 
during the past year. The new macadamized streets 
which have been constructed have given good satisfac- 
tion. I would recommend that appropriations larger 
than usual be made for building streets of this kind. 
It is highly important that our streets in all parts of the 
city should be kept in the best condition, and that great 
care should also be taken of the sidewalks, so that acci- 
dents to pedestrians may be prevented. 

Granite bridge and the bridge at Amoskeag Falls will 
have to be replanked the present year. The bridge over 
the Cohas brook, in the Harvey district, will also have to 
be rebuilt the present season. 



280 

I think it would be advisable that the culverts in the 
outlying districts should hereafter be made of stone, and 
when the plank culverts which have been laid become 
worn and decayed, they should be replaced by those con- 
structed of stone, also. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

As the borders of the city are extending in all direc- 
tions, new sewers are demanded. The Bridge-street, the 
"Webster-street, and the South-Main-street sewers should 
be finished the present year. The sewer which drains 
Hall street, crossing Lake avenue, running through Old 
Falls road, and discharging into Cemetery brook, be- 
comes a nuisance during the summer months when the 
water is low, which must be abated. In order to do so, 
a sewer must be constructed through Cedar or Spruce 
street, where it would intersect with a sewer already 
built on Union street. This proposed sewer would take 
the sewage from a sewer petitioned for through South 
Belmont street, and also the proposed one through Massa- 
besic street to Cypress street and the shoe factory. Many 
of the old sewers, which consist of cement pipes, are so 
much decayed that they will need soon to be taken up 
and others laid in their places. Many sewers are laid 
too near the surface, while others are not of sufficient 
capacity to carry off* the drainage of the section in which 
they are laid. A liberal appropriation should be made 
in this department in order that the people may be 
accommodated, and the health of the city secured. 

FIRE DEPARTMBKT. 

Our citizens have always cherished a deep interest in 
their fire department, which continues to stand among 



281 

the best in the country, both on the score of equipment 
and in the skill and energy of its officers and men. ]^o 
pains or expense should be spared in keeping this depart- 
ment up to the highest possible standard. I think it will 
be found necessary to purchase a new engine, to be located 
at the corner of Lake avenue and Massabesic street, for the 
protection of the people in that section of the city. The 
locations nearest this point are so high that the pressure 
of the water coming from the reservoir is not sufficiently 
strong to force the water through the pipes with sufficient 
power. This circumstance makes it impossible for the 
hose company to render the needed service desirable in 
case of a fire in this part of the city. Our predecessors 
have made a contract for building a new engine-house on 
Webster street, which will cost, when completed and fur- 
nished with all needed appliances, about $20,000. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

One of the largest items of expense to the city is that 
for the maintenance of the public schools. The people 
have always been willing to contribute their money freely 
for this object, and they expect to receive a proper return 
for their liberality in this direction. Out of the large 
number of pupils who attend the schools, but a very small 
proportion are prepared for college, and a great majority 
finish their education in the Grammar schools. In view 
of this fact, it would seem that this class of pupils should 
be the chief objects of the care and solicitude of the man- 
agers of our schools. They should receive the elements 
of an English education, and be well fitted for the ordinary 
business and duties of life. 



282 



CITY FARM. 



The city farm and the house of correction are in good 
condition, the farm is well stocked and furnished with all 
the appliances necessary for its successful cultivation. It 
has been thought by many of our fellow-citizens that the 
maintenance of the institution and its inmates has been 
too expensive for some years past, and that some measures 
should be taken for making this institution nearly self- 
supporting. I would suggest that the stone-crusher be 
taken to the city farm, where there is an abundance of 
stone, and where the able-bodied men confined at the 
house of correction may be employed in preparing all the 
material for macadamizing the streets of the city. This 
or some other industry, I believe, should be established, 
so that all who are able to work should be made to earn 
their bread, and not be suffered to live at the expense of 
the tax-payers of the city. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Our city library, which contains upwards of 30,000 vol- 
umes, is well managed and growing in usefulness. A new 
catalogue is greatly needed for the accommodation of the 
patrons of the library. The people of the city are much 
indebted to those public-spirited citizens who have con- 
tributed to the usefulness of the institution by the pre- 
sentation of valuable books, and hold their names in 
grateful remembrance. The custom of presenting por- 
traits to the library of the distinguished citizens who have 
been conspicuous in the development and government of 
the city is gratifying to the people generally, and it is 
hoped that there will soon be a valuable collection of 
paintings of this kind. I believe that it would be a great 
accommodation to many of the people if the library were 



283 

opened a few hours on Sunday for the purpose of reading 
the periodicals and books, and also for the purpose of 
taking books from the library, especially for those whose 
time is wholly employed on other days of the week. The 
experiment has been successful in Boston and other cities. 
I would suggest that it would be of great advantage to the 
people for the city to establish a free public reading-room 
in connection with the library, furnished with a large 
variety of newspapers and periodicals. 

CITY HOSPITAL. 

For many years Manchester has been in need of a public 
hospital. Considering the liberality and enterprise of our 
citizens, it seems strange that in the matter of a public 
hospital they remain behind most cities of its size and 
importance. The want of an institution where the sick 
who' have no homes of their own could be cared for has 
sometimes been most pressing ; and at this time the only 
place in the city where a sick stranger can be accommo- 
dated is the Old Ladies' Home, which is managed under 
the direction of the Ladies' Aid Society. This institution, 
which was established by some of the benevolent ladies of 
the city, has been doing a great amount of good, and it is 
a credit to many of our wealthy citizens that they have 
from year to year contributed liberally for its support. 

The building where the Home is located was given to 
the Ladies' Aid Society by the Amoskeag Company for 
hospital purposes, and that corporation also aids in its 
support. I believe that an appropriation of a few hundred 
dollars from the city treasury in aid of this hospital would 
be well invested. It is probable that the erection of the 
building for the Elliot hospital will be commenced the 
present year, and I would suggest that, when the hospital 



284 

is completed, some arrangements be made by the city 
authorities with the trustees, if possible, whereby the city 
may have the control of a ward in that institution. 

CEMETERIES. 

The cemeteries of the city are now in excellent condi- 
tion, and no very large appropriation will be needed in 
this department for some years to come. A receiving 
tomb should be built, in the near future, at the Pine Grove 
Cemetery, as that at the Valley Cemetery is not large 
enough to meet the wants of the people. The policy of 
beautifying the cemeteries of the city and keeping them 
in good order should be continued. 

GENERAL STARK'S GRAVE. ' 

The subject of erecting a monument to the memory of 
Major-General John Stark was introduced in the legisla- 
ture at the last session by a resolution authorizing the 
governor to appoint a commissioner to inquire as to what 
the city of Manchester andthe heirs of General Stark 
may be willing to do in aid of a monument, and report to 
the next legislature. The governor appointed General 
George Stark, of Nashua, as commissioner. This action 
of the legislature is no doubt gratifying to the people of 
the city where General Stark lived, and where his ashes 
repose, and it is hoped that the city will respond in a lib- 
eral manner in aid of the proposed undertaking. About 
twelve years ago the heirs of General Stark presented to 
the city a tract of land upon which the grave of the hero 
is situated. The right to a passage-way from the River 
road to the lot was also conveyed to the city. This lot 
has not been properly cared for, and is now in bad condi- 
tion. The passage-way referred to has not been properly 



285 

graded, the entrance at the Eiver road is through decayed 
and rickety bars, and strangers who come to the city for 
the purpose of visiting the grave of Stark often become 
puzzled in finding tlie way. For the credit of the city 
where Stark lived and died, the grounds should be kept 
in a respectable condition, and a suitable gate placed at 
the entrance. 

CITY AUDITOR. 

In consideration of the very large disbursements which 
are made from the city treasur}^ every year, I am of the 
opinion that it is high-time that the office of city auditor 
should be created. Such an ofiice should be filled by a 
man of high character and ability, and his duties should 
be defined. 

SPARRING MATCHES. 

The practice of licensing sparring or boxing matches 
should be discontinued, as such matches are very demor- 
alizing in their tendency, and often lead to brutal fights, 
requiring the interference of the police. 

THE POLICE. 

The police department should always be kept under 
strict discipline, and the rules governing the department 
should be rigidly enforced. Every ofi&cer should be a 
man of sound judgment, good habits, and reputation ; he 
should be courteous and gentlemanly in his deportment, 
courageous, faithful, without malice, and able to control 
his temper under provocation. 

TEMPERANCE. 

It is universally acknowledged that intemperance in 
the use of intoxicating drinks is one of the greatest evils 



286 

in the state and nation, and how to overcome it is a prob- 
lem that has never been solved. Appeals to the reason 
and conscience have resulted in effecting partial reforms, 
but not in wholly eradicating the evil, and so the aid of 
the law has been called in, with a view of destroying the 
traffic so that it would become impossible for the intem- 
perate, or those liable to become so, to obtain the means 
to gratify their appetites in this direction. This course 
was adopted upon the theory that drunkards, like the 
insane, are so weak morally that they are utterly unable 
to refrain from the indulgence in spirituous liquor when 
placed within their reach. This scheme for reforming 
the evil has hitherto failed. The prohibitory law, which 
has been upon the statute-book more than thirty years, 
was never faithfully executed in any considerable portion 
of the state, and it has never been difficult to obtain spir- 
ituous liquors in most of the large cities or towns, and 
now, at this very time, there are more than three hundred 
and fifty places where intoxicating beverages are openly 
sold in this city. 

!Now, it is \Vell for us to inquire why this law is almost 
a dead letter. First of all, it will appear that a large 
number of the people are fond of alcoholic drinks of some 
kind, and will have them at all hazards. In this class 
there may be found statesmen, politicians, and many who 
belong to the various benevolent associations, all more or 
less in the habit of using alcoholic drinks. A large num- 
ber of this class indulge in the habit in a temperate and 
moderate manner, as did the people of the state sixty 
years ago, when the habit was universal. 

It is absurd to suppose that this class will tamely sur- 
render the privilege of purchasing and using just such 
luxuries as they please. So far from this, it is notorious 
that the majority scoff at the pretensions of those who 



287 

seriously propose to make it impossible for them to gratify 
their tastes in this particular. Another class consists of 
those who are directly or indirectly interested in the sale 
or manufacture of ardent spirits, and many of these exer- 
cise a powerful influence in politics and in framing and 
administering the laws. 

!N'either of the two great parties in the state has ever 
risked its success by coming in serious conflict with the 
classes of citizens referred to. The prohibitory law was 
not enacted in obedience to the will of a majority of the 
people, or even a majority of either of the leading parties 
of the state, but to secure the continued support of a by 
no means large minority, which consisted of those who 
honestly believed in its principles. From the time when 
the law was enacted the majority of its professed friends 
have failed to demand its thorough execution, and they 
have rarely refused to vote for party candidates who were 
engaged in the liquor trafflc, or for those who were well 
known to be opposed to the principles of total prohibition. 
At the last state election, though it was an " ofi'" year, and 
no important national political principles were involved, 
the candidate for governor wdio stood on a platform the 
chief plank of wdiich w^as entire and immediate prohibi- 
tion received but about two thousand votes in the state, 
and less than one hundred and fifty votes in this city. 

"With these views of the case I am free to say that I am 
in favor of a license law to curtail, regulate, and prevent 
the abuses of the traflSc. But, gentlemen, w^e have no 
such license law, and w^e must therefore do the best we 
can under the circumstances to restrain the sale and abuse 
of intoxicating liquors. "We must see to it that whatever 
orders may be issued upon the subject are strictly obeyed 
in every quarter, and by all persons, without regard to 
their station in life. The peace and good order of the 



288 

city must be preserved at all hazards. In the mean time 
we may hope that every possible moral and religious 
influence may be brought to bear upon this evil. 

IN CONCLUSION. 

And now, gentlemen, the interests of the city are in our 
hands ; let us enter upon the discharge of our duties and 
obligations with the determination to keep the welfare of 
the city ever in view. Let each one of us carefully exam- 
ine every measure upon which we are called to act. I 
trust that every member will appreciate the necessity of a 
prompt attendance at all meetings of the several depart- 
ments and committees to which he belongs, or has been 
appointed. Let us ever cultivate a spirit of kindness and 
courtesy towards each other in our official intercourse, 
and resolve that we will do all in our power to promote 
the welfare of our city. 



AC COUNT 

OF 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 

City Treasurer^ 

From December 31, 1885, to December 31, 1886. 

19 



290 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



To cash on hand January 1, 1886 
Temporary loan 
Insurance tax . 
Railroad tax 
Savings bank tax 
Literaiy fund . 
Board of pauj^ers off Farm 
Jeremiah Garvin, City Farm . 
City teams .... 
J. B. Varick Co. (overdraft) . 
Joshua Page .... 
J. Fullerton .... 
Sewer and drain licenses 
James Lynch (commons) 
J. B. Varick Co. (overdraft) . 
J. H. Willey, old plank sold . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co. (overdraft) 
W. F. Bradbury, land sold 
F. C. Shea, land sold 
Wm. P. Eundlett, estate taxes 
Edmund Fitzgerald, taxes 
Pine Grove Cemeteiy 
Valley Cemetery 
Thos. W. Lane 
Police department . 
City Hall .... 

Water-Works .... 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co. (overdraft) 
Wm. H. Elliot (overdraft) 
Tuition . 
Milk licenses . 
Trustees cemetery fund, bonds sold 
Dog licenses . 
Billiard-table licenses 
Rent of tenements . 
Show licenses . 
Taxes for the year 1883 
" '« " 1884 
" " " " 1885 

Amount carried forward 



$64,413 


77 


200,000 00 


3,068 


62 


16,044 


35 


49,435 


70 


2,619 


52 


1,808 


22 


1,469 


53 


3,629 


75 


2 


10 


3 


00 


4 


00 


1,345 


95 


20 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 


. 9 


75 


500 00 


887 


50 


52 


05 


7 


82 


3,690 67 


1,274 50 


6 


88 


3,860 84 


1,738 


25 


75,129 


99 




82 


10 00 


105 


35 


65 00 


1,950 


00 


508 


26 


273 


00 


448 


26 


251 


00 


1 


65 


66 


71 


15.478 36 


$450,195 


17 



291 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1886). 



Cr 



By unpaid bills 


January 1, 1886 


Temijorary loan 


Coupons, water bonds . 


Coujions, city bonds 


Interest 


Paupers oft' Farm . 


City Farm 


City teams 


Highway, District No. 1 


" 


' " 2 


" 


«' 3 


" 


" 4 


" 


" 5 


«' 


" 6 


" 


" 8 


" 


" 9 


" 


" 10 


" 


" 11 




" 12 




" 13 


New Hiffhw 


xys 



Spruce-street extension 
Steam road-roller . 
Land damages 
Watering streets . 
Lighting streets 
Paving streets 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete 
Sewers and drains 
Bridge-street sewer 
South-Main-sti'eet sewer 
\Yebster-street sewer 
Commons 
Bridges . 

Incidental expenses 
Scavenger teams . 
Pine Grove Cemetery 



Amount carried fonvard 



$38,041 65 

175,000 00 

35,892 00 

18,478 12 

1,766 33 

6,231 13 

6,526 04 

8,574 24 

299 57 

7,966 65 

1,163 34 

401 72, 

528 31 

368 87 

1,501 73 

726 09 

505 51 

2,020 04 

1,022 35 

265 49 

195 90 

6,252 50 

1,495 26 

6,500 00 

401 94 

5,513 90 

13,873 06 

5,882 14 

8,835 95 

4,551 90 

15,522 17 

14,545 81 

1,588 36 

12,822 81 

2,656 97 

1,229 23 

16,652 19 

7,319 44 

6,539 83 

$439,658 54 



292 



Dr. 



Sylvajius B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



A7nou7it brought forivard . 
Taxes for the year 1886 . 
Interest on taxes .... 
Wm. Weber (overdraft) 
F. C. Dow (overdraft) . 
L. K. Tewksbury (overdraft) 
N. Alexander & Co. (overdraft) 
Killey, Wadleigh & Moore (overdraft) 
Clint A. Moore (overdraft) 
Maverick National Bank 



Unpaid bills January 1, 1887 . 





$450,195 17 




297,183 59 




309 45 




2 02 




-14 15 




5 05 




23 10 




75 




4 50 




7,210 00 




$754,947 78 




36,224 12 


$791,171 90 



293 

City of Manchester (ending December 31, 18 8 G.) 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward .... $439,658 54 


Valley Cemeteiy 2,618 74 


Amoskeag Cemeteiy 












46 50 


Fire department . 












26,359 76 


Fire-alai-m telegraph 












2,289 14 


Firemen's parade . 












321 65 


Police department . 












29,991 90 


City Hall 












1,856 47 


Hydrant service 












19,962 50 


Printing and stationery 












1,514 07 


Rejiairs of buildings 












4,144 62 


Militia . 












700 00 


City library . 












3,066 61 


Abatement of taxes 












2,818 07 


Discount on taxes . 












8,106 72 


State tax 












48,404 00 


City officers' salaries 












15,218 08 


Water-Works 












48,863 48 


Health department 












676 14 


Truant officer 












750 00 


New engine-house 












9,984 69 


Repairs schoolhouses 












3,663 41 


Fuel 












3,168 61 


Furniture and sujjplies 












1,009 53 


Books and stationery 












436 73 


Printing and advertising 












400 85 


Contingent exjienses 












1,140 31 


Care of rooms 












3,249 74 


Evening schools 












1,370 63 


Teachers' salaries . 












41,688 32 


Tuition . 












312 23 


Reserve fund 












1,851 00 


Funded debt payments 












6,000 00 


Decoration soldiers' gi'aves 










213 75 


Women's Aid Society . 










400 00 




$732,256 79 


Cash on hanc 


Jam 


lary 


I, 18? 


7 




58,915 11 



$791,171 90 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Citi/ Treasurer. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT 



We hereby certify that we have examined the account 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer, for the year 1886, and 
find the same to be correct and properly vouched for. 

S. B. STEARNS, 
L. B. BODWELL, 
J. C. QUIMBY, 
GEO. H. STEARNS, 
E. S. WHITNEY. 

Manchester, N. H., Jan. 3, 1887. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Dr. 
To Manchester National Bank $100,000 00 
Manchester Savings Bank . 25,000 00 
Second National Bank . 75,000 00 

$200,000 00 

Cr. 

Paid Manchester National Bank $75,000 00 
Manchester Savings Bank . 25,000 00 
Second National Bank . 75,000 00 

By balance .... 25,000 00 







$200,000 00 


INTEREST. 








Dr. 


To appropriation 


$19,000 


00 


water-works, amount trans- 






ferred .... 


36,000 


00 


balance 


1,136 


45 

iii;56 1 36 45 












Cr. 


Paid Walter M. Parker . 


$609 


37 


Manchester National Bank 


924 


31 



298 



Paid Manchester Savings Bank $128 48 

Second National Bank . 104 17 

coupons, city bonds . . 18,478 12 

coupons, water bonds . 35,892 00 



,136 45 



INTEREST ON TAXES. 



To James B. Straw, collector 



By balance 



.$309 45 



$309 45 



Dr. 

$309 45 
Cr. 

$309 45 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 

To balance from old account . $443 24 

County of Hillsborough . . 1,800 22 

Wm. Weber, overdraft . . 2 02 

Town of Pittsfield ... 8 00 

balance overdrawn . . . 477 65 



Paid Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Rose Cooney . $15 00 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Hunter . 10 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Edward Boyle . 13 12 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Michael Hastings 23 86 



Dr. 



,231 13 
Cr. 



299 

Paid Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs.David McKay 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. D. O'Connor 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Joseph King 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. James Mc- 

Govern .... 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Bart. Doyle 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Belle O'Brien 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. John Logue 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Jas. McGuinness 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished J. Shaughenessey 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Isabella O'Brien . 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Bridget Gilbert . 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Ellen Sullivan 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Jerry Sullivan 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. T. Donovan 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Thomas Sullivan 
Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Walter Lvnch 



$12 


50 


3 


00 


8 


52 


15 


00 


43 


34 


5 


00 


30 


64 


61 


73 


40 


00 


6 


50 


8 


77 


118 


22 


17 


12 


66 


50 


110 


00 


48 


00 



300 



Paid Griffin & Conway, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Michael Mo- 
ran $70 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Michael Spain . 47 21 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Jerry Cronin . 74 99 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. Patrick Fox 76 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. James Otis . 120 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Jules Morency . 121 00 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Daniel Connor . 18 00 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Frank McCone . 99 00 

D. M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Houlihan . 18 00 

D, M. Poore, groceries fur- 
nished Wm. Mclntire . 5 00 

Michael Kenney, groceries fur- 
nished Catherine Burke . 48 00 

Michael Kenney, groceries fur- 
nished Wm. Conway . . 8 00 

Michael Kenney, groceries fur- 
nished Wm. Conway . . 88 00 

E. E. Colburn, groceries fur- 
nished L. M. Green . . 114 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Stephen Sullivan . 120 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Turcotte . . 120 00 



301 



Paid P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Fitzgerald . $55 00 

J. Taylor & Son, groceries fur- 
nished Kate Tate . . 53 00 

J. Taylor & Son, groceries fur- 
nished Jos. B. Pierce . . 8 15 

Jas. Hayes, groceries furnished 

Mary Fitzgerald . . 59 25 

Griffin Brothers, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Thos. Cleary . 66 00 

Wm. Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Hunter . . 110 00 

Wm. Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Dan'l Connor . . 6 00 

Wm. Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Burpee . . 8 00 

Wm. Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Henry Hebert . . 3 50 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries fur- 
nished Sarah Rogers . . 3 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Doherty . . 31 60 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries fur- 
nished Ellen Beckner . . 8 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries fur- 
nished James Callahan . 32 70 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Sullivan . . 6 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Converse . 5 08 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Sweeney . 4 00 

French & Dockliam, groceries 

furnished Edward Boyle . 25 00 



k 



302 



Paid Geo.W. Adams, groceries fur- 
nished Julia Mellen . . $6 00 

Carl E. York, groceries fur- 
nished James McGuinness . 5 00 

Carl E. York, groceries fur- 
nished Lavina B. Leavitt . 6 00 

Maxfield & Jackson, groceries 

furnished Edward Frenier . 15 00 

Maxfield & Jackson, groceries 

furnished Abel G. Rankin . 8 00 

J. B. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished Kate Sullivan . . 16 00 

J. B. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished N". M. Randall . 24 00 

Burpee & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Wilson Day . . 14 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. Gilbert . 6 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. J. Sullivan . 3 00 

A. M. Eastman, groceries, fur- 
nished Mary Griffin . . 15 00 

Sawyer & Hoyt, groceries fur- 
nished Kate Sullivan . . 32 00 

Sawyer & Hoyt, groceries fur- 
nished Ann Manning . . 2 00 

Sawyer & Hoyt, groceries fur- 
nished N. M. Randall. . . 12 00 

J. H. Wiggin, groceries fur- 
nished Edward Boyle . . 9 26 

Gaureau & Morency, groceries 
furnished Philomene Dou- 
ville 12 00 



303 

Paid J. C. Fiiield & Son, groceries 

furnished Sarah Rogers 
J. C. Fifield & Son, groceries 

furnished N. M. Randall . 
J. C. Fifield & Son, groceries 

furnished Anna Cunningham 
Bartlett & Thompson, groceries 

furnished Wm. Mclntire 
H. B. Sawyer, groceries fur- 
nished J. L. Wyman , 
"W. ^N". Coleman, groceries fur- 
nished Wilson Day . . 
Charles T. Allen, groceries 

furnished B. Moriarty 
Manchester Tea Co., groceries 
Hardy & Co., groceries . 
Esther L. Ingham, board of 

Marj' F. Ingham 
Mrs. Wm. Chase, board of 

Thos. Chase 
Ansel D. Hatch, board of J. 

W. Hatch . 
Town of Candia, board of Mrs. 

G. H. Johnson . 
H. P. Marshall, board of John 

Horan .... 

Town of Merrimack, board of 

J. B. Pierce 
Town of Grafton, board of L. 

D. Frost .... 
Town of Candia, board of Mrs. 

G. H. Johnson . 
County of Hillsborough, board 

of J. J. Murray . 



$3 


00 


12 


34 


8 


00 


9 


00 


4 


00 


7 


00 


40 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 


120 


00 


120 


00 


110 


00 


67 


50 


20 


58 


38 


00 


34 


80 


37 


01 


104 


00 



304 



Paid County of Hillsborough, board 

of Asenatli White . . |104 00 
Laura J. Rankin, board of 

Abel G. Eankin ... 40 00 

Maggie Lydon, board of Jos. 

B. Pierce .... 53 52 

Thos. Kelly, board of Thos. 

Kelly, Jr 40 00 

Mrs. J. Maynard, board of Sul- 
livan child .... 24 00 
E. Turcotte, wood for Sarah 

Rogers 2 00 

E. Turcotte, wood for Ellen 

Beckner . . . . 3 00 

E. Turcotte, wood for Anna 

Cunningham ... 3 00 

E. Turcotte, wood for Julia 

Miller .... 2 00 

E. Turcotte, wood for Mary 

Sweeney .... 1 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood, Kellie Donovan . 6 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood, L. M. Green . . 10 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood, K M. Randall . . 13 25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood, Mrs. J. Tomlinson . 6 25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood, Mrs. Tim Donovan . 4 50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood, Mrs. P. Donovan . 6 00 

Burns & Poor, coal and wood, 

Edward Bovle ... 3 25 



305 



Paid Burns & Poor, coal and wood, 

Mrs. Ellen Sullivan . . $3 75 

Burns & Poor, coal and wood, 

Mrs. T. Donovan . . 1 75 

Burns & Poor, coal and wood, 

Bart Doyle. ... 8 00 

Burns & Poor, coal and wood, 

Mrs. P. Fox ... 2 00 

Burns & Poor, coal and wood, 

M. Spain .... 8 00 

Burns & Poor, coal and wood. 

Rose Coonej ... 50 

Burns & Poor, coal and wood, 

Mary Griffin ... 2 00 

Moore & Preston, coal and 

wood, Mr. Mclntire . . 6 00 

Moore & Preston, coal and 

wood, J. L. Wyman . . 1 00 

Moore & Preston, coal and 

wood, L. M. Green . . 11 62 

Moore & Preston, coal and 

wood, Edward Frenier . 9 25 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal and 

wood, Mary Griffin . . 2 00 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal and 

wood, N". M. Pandall . . 4 25 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal and 

wood, L. M. Green . . 7 50 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal and 

wood, James Callahan . 4 00 

"W. W. Rogers, coal and wood, 

Frank McCone ... 12 00 

E. V. Turcotte, coal and wood, 

Mary Doherty . . . 3 13 



306 



Paid E. V. Turcotte, coal and wood, 

Aiiu Cunningliam . . $1 00 

L. S. Proctor, wood for J. Lan- 

noii 4 25 

L. S. Proctor, wood for L. M. 

Green .... 4 25 

H. Reimann, coal and wood, 

Henry Hebert ... 4 75 

J. H. Proctor, coal and wood, 

John Lannon . . . 2 50 

Manchester Gas Co., coal, Mrs. 

J. Otis .... 2 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood, Mary 

Converse .... 2 00 

John Flynn, wood, Mary 

Doherty .... 2 25 

Jos. Abbott .... 8 00 

F. McCone, medicine . . 3 00 

E. Y. Turcotte, burial Jacob 

Maynard .... 25 00 

Austin, Flint & Day, wood, J. 

Callahan .... 8 00 

Austin, Flint & Day, wood, 

Mary Doherty ... 3 75 

Wingate & Gould, boots and 

shoes 4 60 

Tebbetts Bros., medicine . 2 00 
Chas. T. Newman, medicine . 1 00 
L. G. Tewksbury, medicine . 35 07 
E. II. Currier, medicine . 2 00 
L. K. Mead, medicine . . 19 85 
J. B; Hall, medicine . . 102 85 
L. B. How, professional ser- 
vices 10 00 



307 



lid Smith & Wliitten, team 


13 00 


Walter A. Green, rent for 




Frank McCone . 


72 00 


Walter A. Green, rent for 




Wm. Mclntire . 


21 00 


M. Harrington, rent for Jos. 




French .... 


35 70 


Felch's Livery Stable, team . 


2 75 


F. X. Chenette, house rent, 




Philomene Douville . 


4 00 


F. X. Chenette, burial Mrs. 




Morency .... 


25 00 


F. X. Chenette, burial David 




Douville .... 


22 50 


F. X. Chenette, wood, Mary 




Doherty .... 


3 00 


F. X. Chenette, wood, James 




Callahan .... 


3 00 


J. Gillis, shoes 


1 00 


Dodge & Straw, shoes . 


1 35 


A. & W. S. Heath, shoes 


45 


J. Murray, shoes . 


7 25 


Temple & Farrington, station- 




ery 


3 43 


E. G. Woodman, expense to 




Candia, N. H. . 


2 50 


State Industrial School, board 




of inmates .... 


2,110 43 


Geo. Marchand, E. R. tickets 


12 75 


J. C. Bickford, professional 




services .... 


1 00 


0. D. Kimball, blank-books . 


2 00 


Manchester Xovelty Co., rub- 




ber stamps, etc. . 


2 60 



308 



Paid H. P. Marshall, board of J. 

Horan .... $8 00 

W. H. Maxwell, R. R. tickets 3 90 

Hawley & Barnard, dry goods 8 09 







CITY FARM. 


To appropriation . 


$3,500 00 


J. Garvin, superintendent 


1,469 53 


F. C. Dow, overdraft 


14 15 


L. G. Tewksbiiry, overdraft 


5 05 


I^. Alexander, overdraft . 


23 10 


reserved fund . 


. 1,500 00 


balance .... 


14 21 



Paid J. Garvin, superintendent 
Mrs. J. Garvin, matron . 
A. M. Eastman, groceries, etc 
Geo. "W. Adams, groceries, etc 
H. Marshall, butter 
E. L. Bryant, groceries, etc 

C. E. York, groceries, etc. 
A. l!T. Clapp, kerosene oil 
Eager & Rand, groceries, etc 
Bartlett & Thompson, meats 
Tom W. Robinson, meats 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., grocer 

ies, etc. 
A. G. Grenier, groceries, etc 

D. M. Poore, groceries, etc. 

E. M.' Slayton, butter, etc. 



$500 00 

225 00 

109 20 

172 36 

31 96 

116 46 
136 26 

16 76 

41 60 

120 12 

117 88 

104 14 

23 50 
70 26 
61 13 



;,231 13 



Dr. 



),526 04 
Cr. 



309 



Paid E. S. Newton, fish, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, grain . 
Drake & Dodge, grain . 
Kendall & Jewell, grain 
Brine & Norcross, dry goods 
Hawley & Barnard, dry goods 
"Weston & Hill, dry goods 
John K. Piper, dry goods 
Plumer & Holton, clothing 
Manchester One Price Cloth 

ing Co., clothing 
H. M. Moody, clothing . 
George W. Prescott 
P. C. Cheney Co. . 
Bartlett & Thompson, meats 
Hervey & Henry, flour . 

C. M. Bailey, barrels, brooms 
etc 

J. B. Varick, hardware, etc. 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc. . 

Killey, "Wadleigh & Moore 
hardware, etc. 

T. A. Lane, plumbing . 

Thorp & Bartlett, kitchen fur 
niture, etc. . 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair 
ing teams, etc. . 

D. Kerwin, pearline, etc. 
G. H. Hubbard, tobacco 

N. Alexander & Co., tobacco 
T. A. Barker, swill 

E. T. James, team . 
George 0. Stevens, swill 



$7 


12 


704 35 


189 


14 


189 


98 


22 


57 


65 


58 


80 


48 


68 


94 


8 


59 


15 


25 


71 


14 


33 


00 


1 


90 


25 


17 


187 


50 


20 


42 


145 


19 



83 42 

36 23 
44 59 

24 22 

97 39 

27 40 

10 50 

153 98 

125 00 

3 00 

112 00 



310 



Paid C. B. Littlefield, medicines . 


|1 50 


J. B. Hall, medicines 


14 00 


L. K. Mead, medicines . 


42 80 


L. G. Tewksbiiry, medicines . 


49 45 


J. F.Woodbury ,blacksmithing 


45 73 


J. H. Cram, blacksmithing . 


42 50 


New England Telephone and 




Telegraph Co., telephone . 


43 85 


Wingate & Gould, shoes 


30 05 


F. C. Dow, shoes . 


23 40 


C. H. Thayer, shoes 


13 90 


Dodge & Straw, shoes . 


10 75 


Moore & Preston, coal . 


76 42 


Joshua Page, dressing hogs. 




etc 


22 85 


Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. . 


. 96 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber, etc. . 


37 38 


J. Hodge, lumber, etc. . 


10 64 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. . 


4 75 


Nourse & Ham, lumber, etc. . 


. 12 05 


E. P. Eichardson, insurance . 


240 00 


J. Y. McQueston & Co., lounge 


8 25- 


J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 


8 62 


George S. Smith, cow . 


50 00 


Carpenter & Parker, mason 




work ..... 


5 20 


C. M. Bailey, kitchen furni- 




ture, etc 


13 86 


Carpenter & Pattee, brooms . 


2 95 


J. B. Pattee, making inven- 




tory, etc 


10 00 


J. R. Carr, painting 


1 25 


R. M. Rollins, mowing-ma- 




chine, etc 


61 50 



311 



Paid J. G. Lake, harness, etc. . 15 85 

Cavanaugb Bros. & Hill, har- 
ness, etc 29 90 

T. W. Lane, stationery . . 6 32 

Dodge & Straw, shoes . . 2 65 

J. W. Rand, ashes ... 66 96 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repair- 
ing teams . . . . 18 45 

G. M. French, oxen . . 190 00 

Dr. F. A. Hoyt, professional 

services . . . . 4 00 

E. James, pigs . . . 15 40 
Dr. J. Alexander, professional 

services .... 8 00 

Isaac Cotiin, milk-cans . . 10 50 

F. X. Chenette, pigs . . 30 00 
L. B. Bod\tell & Co., coal , 288 40 
H. B. Fairbanks, manure, etc. 156 65 
J. F. Fox, manure . . 38 82 
Maxwell & Campbell, cutting 

ice 17 00 

Dodge & Straw, shoes . . 15 10 
Dr. J. M. Collitj, professional 

services . . . . 15 00 

C. M. Bailey, kitchen furni- 
ture, etc 8 39 

F. K. McLaren, repairing har- 
ness, etc. . . . . 30 31 

J. W. Band, butter . . 32 00 

D. A. Simons, ash set . . 25 00 
Bly & Fellows, crackers . . 7 79 
Smith & Bly, crackers . . 8 28 

G. W. Morgan, butter . . 2 30 
T. W. Lane, stationery . • 6 41 



312 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . |137 82 
"Wm. P. Farmer, phosphate . 28 50 

Thorp & Bartlett, wringer, etc. 34 95 







CITY TEAMS. 


To appropriation .... 


$1,000 00 


labor. District N'o. 2 


2,919 50 


labor,*District ^o. 10 


710 25 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 




overdraft .... 


75 


balance 


3,943 74 



Paid Drake & Dodge, grain, etc. 
Merrill Bros., grain, etc. 
Partridge Bros., grain, etc. 
Kendall & Jewell, grain, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, grain, etc. 
H. Fradd & Co., grain, etc. 
CO. Phelps, shorts 
Daniel Shattuck, hay 
L. Shelters, hay 
S. W. Prescott, hay 
E. P. Johnson & Co., hay 
H. A. Horton, carrots . 
D. Butterfield, hay 
C. D. Welch, hay . 
I. F. Underhill, hay 
Geo. E. Richardson, hay 
J. P. Philbrick, hay 
Caroline S. Head, hay . 



1138 71 

689 60 

334 41 

320 85 

533 70 

302 92 

8 40 

40 71 

153 07 

129 85 

100 20 

42 35 

106 75 

175 06 

14 96 

23 36 

20 85 

32 76 



,526 04 



Dr. 



^,574 24 
Cr. 



313 



id C. C. Webster, hay . 


$71 55 


L. Shelters, hay 


22 23 


E. P. Johnson & Co., hay 


9 60 


Daniels & Co., hardware, etc. 


5 26 


J. B. Varick & Co., hardware. 




etc 


3 19 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 




hardware, etc. 


16 77 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 




ing teams, etc. . 


565 50 


Sanborn Carriage Co., repair- 




ing teams, etc. . 


37 50 


J. G. Lake, harness, etc. 


47 60 


F. IS". McLaren, harness, etc. 


211 34 


Cavanaugh Bros. & Hill, har- 




ness, etc 


80 85 


H. C. Ranno, harness, etc. 


91 51 


Stephen Austin, blacksmithing 


8 70 


D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 


44 64 


J. H. Cram, blacksmithing 


135 50 


J. F. "Woodbury, blacksmith'g 


254 35 


J. Barnes, blacksmithing 


59 90 


F. Allen, blacksmithing 


26 35 


W. F. Robie, professional ser- 




vices 


32 75 


C. A. Pierce, professional ser- 




vices 


1 00 


S. F. Burnham, professional 




services .... 


6 50 


Richard Ebbitt, professional 




services .... 


55 00 


W. F. Robie, professional ser- 




vices . . . . . 


3 50 


A. N. Clapp, salt . 


64 



314 



Paid Dr. J. Alexander, professiona 


I 


services 


178 50 


Chas. T. l!^ewman, medicine 


> 


etc 


8 00 


Geo. E. Hall, medicine, etc. 


21 15 


Z. F. Campbell, medicine, etc 


23 02 


Concord Railroad, freight 


93 65 


J. R. Carr, painting 


32 83 


J. Shea, Jr., painting 


8 50 


M. McCabe, rent of barn 


3 00 


A. D. Smith, soap, etc. . 


1 84 


Carpenter & Pattee, brooms 


6 75 


Otis Whitten, cleaning har 




ness .... 


5 00 


JBenj. F. Hyde, horses . 


700 00 


E. L. Putney, horses 


575 00 


Welch & Hall, horse 


250 00 


S. E. Tweed, liniment . 


6 00 


C. H. Yale, professional ser 




vices .... 


42 50 


Wm. Sanborn, soap 


2 00 


C. E. BroAvn, rent of shed 


18 00 


J. J. Abbott, paint 


71 


G. Hazeltine . 


2 88 


pay-roll .... 


. 1,733 79 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore 


5 


hardware . 


88 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 

To appropriation . " . . |300 00 



8,574 24 

Dr. 

$300 00 



315 



Labor of men and teams . . $299 57 
By balance ..... 43 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 
To appropriation . . . . $8,000 00 



Paid J. Galacar, chairs . . . $5 00 

Concord Railroad, freight . 25 

J. B. Varick, hardware, etc. . 126 74 
Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 

hardware, etc. . . . 126 30 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc. . . . . 52 33 
Manchester Gas Co., gas . 40 63 
J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith'g 60 80 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmith'g 27 94 
C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 10 35 
Joseph Boisvert, blacksmith'g 21 98 
Woodbury & Fellows, black- 
smithing . . . . 69 00 
Marden & Woodbury, water- 
ing-trough, etc. . . . 99 84 
Angus Derry, blacksmithing . 3 50 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 11 68 
• Thorp & Bartlett, plumbing, 

etc. .' . . . . 1 20 

J. Hodge, lumber ... 3 55 

. Head & Dowst, lumber . . 24 59 



Cr. 



$300 00 



Dr. 

,000 00 

Cr. 



316 



Paid L. N. Westover, lumber 


$3 64 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber . 


17 03 


Flint & Little, lumber . 


1 20 


l*5'ourse & Ham, lumber . 


16 40 


W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 


5 60 


J. Stickney, oil suits, etc. 


10 28 


J. Taylor & Son, kerosene oil 


) 


etc . 


10 09 


L. Gutterson, kerosene oil, etc 


8 96 


J. E. Carr, glazing, etc. 


95 


Temple & Farrington, station 




ery . 


1 92 


T. A. Lane, drain pipe, etc. 


1 17 


labor of men and teams . 


. 7,227 51 


T. W. Lane, stationery . 


1 90 


J. Baldwin & Co., lumber 


7 67 







^000 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



To appropriation 
reserve fund 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber 
Morrill Bros., salt . 
C. H. Bunton, blacksmitliing 
R. W. Flanders, " 

Hutchinson Bros., " 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard 

ware .... 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
labor of men and teams 



$1,000 00 
163 34 



30 

75 

90 

5 95 

60 

2 85 

18 15 

1,133 84 



Dr. 

L,163 34 
Cr. 



$1,163 34 



317 
HIGHWAY DISTEICT NO. 4. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 

To appropriation .... $500 00 
J. H. Willey, old plank sold . 8 00 

balance 20 31 



Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


$6 41 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


2 90 


R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 


8 00 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 




hardware .... 


6 66 


labor of men and teams 


504 34 


HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 


To appropriation .... 


$400 00 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$400 00 




balance . . . 


1 72 


$401 72 










Cr. 


Paid A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


$39 35 




Head & Dowst, lumber . 


4 97 




Derry Mills, gravel 


12 00 




Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 






ware 


6 70 




labor of men and teams . 


338 70 


1401 72 







Dr. 



$528 31 
Cr. 



28 31 



Dr. 

$400^00 



318 

Cr. 



Paid Chas. H. Bunton, blacksmith- 






ing 


$1 20 




Killey, Wadleigli & Moore, 






hardware .... 


7 65 




J. W. Watson, blacksmithing 


1 80 




balance 


31 13 




labor of men and teams 


358 22 


$400 00 






HIGHWAY DISTEICT NO. 7. 








Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$900 00 




reserve fund .... 


601 73 


$1,501 73 



Cr. 



Paid Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware $9 82 

G. R. Vance & Co., hardware 40 

Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 

hardware .... 7 40 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware . 17 60 

Hutchinson Bros., blacksmith- 
ing ..... 5 76 

Chas. H. Bunton, blacksmith- 
ing . . . . 

F. S. Bodwell, covering stone 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 

J. M. Hall, 1 amber and labor 

labor of men and teams . 



15 


10 


35 


00 


15 


65 


7 


30 


1,387 


70 



L,501 73 



319 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 

To appropriation .... $700 00 

J. B. Varick Co. (overdraft) . 2 10 

J. Page, drag sold . . . 3 00 

balance 20 99 



Paid J. Page, drag plank 
8. G. Reed, gravel 
H. F. Thompson, blacksmith- 

ing 

Elizabeth Shea, gravel . 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 

etc 

labor of men and teams 



$4 75 


8 


00 


2 


05 


13 


30 


19 70 


678 


29 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 

To appropriation .... $500 00 
balance ..... 5 51 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., hardware . $3 55 

labor of men and teams . . 601 96 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

To appropriation .... $2,000 00 
J. Fullerton (overdraft) . . 4 00 

balance. 16 04 



Dr. 



$726 09 
Cr. 



$726 09 

Dr. 

$505 51 
Cr. 

$505 51 

Dr. 

$2,020 04 



320 



Cr. 



Paid A. L. Selfridge, ladder . 


$5 44 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


1 85 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware 


75 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 




hardware .... 


13 20 


A. C. "Wallace, lumber . 


12 87 


labor of men and teams 


1,985 93 







$2,020 04 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT ^0. 11. 

Dr. 



To appropriation .... 
balance 


$1,000 00 
22 35 


$1,022 35 
Cr. 

$1,022 35 


Paid Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware 

labor of men and teams 


$6 40 
1,015 95 




^T NO. 12. 

$300 00 


HIGHWAY DISTRIC 
To appropriation . . . . 


Dr. 

$300 00 
Cr. 

$300 00 


Paid city farm, labor . 

By balance 


$265 49 
34 51 



321 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 
To appropriation .... $200 00 



:n'ew highways. 

To appropriation .... $5,000 00 
balance 1,252 50 



Paid Warren Harvey, stone work $713 62 
Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware 6 98 

F. S. Bodwell, stone work . 86 00 
Geo. Whitford, grading street 200 00 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 19 05 
R. W. Lee, grading street . 10 00 
A. N. Clapp, spikes, etc. . 1 03 
Manchester Mills, use of der- 
rick 14 50 

21 



Dr. 







$200 00 






Cr. 


'aid Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 






hardware .... 


$2 23 




Head & Dowst, lumber . 


9 70 




J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith'g 


3 65 




Woodbury & Fellows, black- 






smithing .... 


50 




labor of men and teams 


179 82 




balance 


4 10 


$200 00 







Dr. 

5,252 50 
Cr. 



322 



Paid Nourse & Ham, lumber, etc. . $17 01 
A. J. Lane, grading Blaine st. 19 25 

labor of men and teams . . 5,165 06 



1,252 50 



LAND DAMAGE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $1,500 00 

$1,500 00 



Paid A. J. Bennett, widening 

Laurel street . . . $401 94 
reserve fund .... 1,098 06 



WATERING STREETS. 

To. appropriation .... $4,000 00 
balance 1,513 90 



Or. 

$1,500 00 

Dr. 

$5,513 90 
Cr. 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber . $18 18 
Manchester Water-w'ks, water 2,420 00 
T. A. Lane, stand-pipes, etc. . 131 15 
Pike &Heald,repairing sprink- 
lers, etc 12 62 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing sprinklers, etc. . . 194 33 
labor of men and teams . . 2,728 26 
Woodbury & Fellows, black- 

smithins: .... 9 36 



$5^13 90 



323 
LIGHTING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $12,500 00 
balance 1,373 06 



Paid Manchester Gas Co.,' gas, 

lighting, etc. . . . $7,912 93 

Manchester Electric Light Co, 4,488 00 
F. S. Worthen, lighting lamps, 

etc 1,076 80 

J. B. Varick & Co., glass, etc. 38 50 

Hutchinson Bros., castings,etc. 175 77 

C. M. Bailey, chimneys, etc . 63 73 

James Briggs, repairing lamps 11 65 

A. N". Clapp, kerosene oil, etc. 59 76 

T. A. Lane, fittings, etc. . 2 92 

J. Frank Moore, kerosene oil 25 13 
Brock & Driscoll, repairing 

lanterns .... 7 75 

J. B. Clarke, printing . . 10 12 



Dr. 

L3,873 06 
Cr. 



$13,873 06 



PAVING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $3,000 00 
balance 2,882 14 



Paid Carpenter & Pattee, brooms . $15 00 

C. H. Robie, concreting . 2,095 82 
Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 

hardware . . . . 8 52 



Dr. 

382 14 
Cr. 



324 



Paid G. S. Smith, cobble stone 
J. S. Proctor, cobble stone 
E. Mulcahy, cobble stone 
J. Fullerton, cobble stone 
"W. L. Carswell, cobble stone 
W. Butterfield, cobble stone 
Emma Pollard, cobble stone 
J. L. Fogg, cobble stone 
Isaac Sweeney, cobble stone 
J. F. Giddings, cobble stone 
C. M. Stevens, cobble stone 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
Abbott, Downing & Co., re 
pairing sweeper broom, etc 
labor of men and teams . 



$159 00 

22 50 

7 50 

12 00 
7 50 
6 00 

15 00 
31 50 

16 50 

13 50 
30 00 

1 08 

64 50 
3,391 22 



$5,882 14 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$8,000 


00 




balance 


835 


95 


$8,835 95 














Cr. 


Paid Manchester Gas Co., coal 


$72 


80 




Manchester Water - works. 








water 


30 


00 




S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 








iron work, etc. . 


85 


90 




Hutchinson Bros., iron work . 


2 


85 




Farrell Foundry Machine Co., 








iron work .... 


27 


22 




Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 








ware, etc 


12 


73 





325 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 
etc 

J. F. Wymaii 

Killey, "Wadleigh & Moore, 
hardware, etc. 

Hutchinson Bros., iron work, 
etc. ..... 

"Woodbury, Fellows & Clark, 
blacksmithing 
. J. F. "Woodbury , blacksmithing 

Marden & Woodbury, black- 
smithing .... 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing 

Dr. J. Sullivan, professional 
services .... 

"Wm. G. Landry, stone chips, 
etc 

J. L. Fogg, stone . 

T>. Butterfield, stone 

J. H. Proctor, stone 

G. S. Smith, stone . 

E. W. Butterfield, stone 
C. Manseau, stone . 
H. S. Plumer, stone 
S. P. Worthley, stone . 
J. Fullerton, stone . 
Charles P. Still, stone . 
Mrs. C. Shaughnessey, stone 
J. G. Holbrook, stone . 

F. R. French, stone 

E. H. Currier, stone 

F. A. Emerson, stone 
C. Manseau, stone . 
C. C. Webster, stone 



3 18 
87 



20 41 



14 31 



2 


20 


5 


30 


17 


25 


11 


26 



5 00 



39 


12 


33 


80 


116 


83 


52 


17 


120 


26 


100 


06 


7 


98 


71 


25 


63 


16 


93 


98 


14 


27 


8 


69 


7 


92 


3 


39 


21 


51 


41 


39 


2 


82 


11 


67 



326 



Paid M. "W. Spencer, stone . 


11 89 


C. 0. Shaughnessey, stone 


3 26 


D. H. Varnum & Co., stone 


8 86 


J. T. Gott, stone . 


19 94 


Mrs. L. A. Willey, stone 


26 15 


J. H. Giddings, stone 


12 62 


J. M. ITutt, stone . 


17 79 


C. IS". Harvey, stone 


8 78 


George Whitford, stone 


19 44 


G. W. Butterfield, stone 


46 04 


Joseph Terrill, stone 


26 00 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . " 


8 66 


G. Thompson, stone 


5 71 


A. C. "Wallace, lumber . 


5 60 


L. A. Clough, wood 


10 26 


J. J. Connor, iron work . 


6 05 


P. W. Hazeltine . 


18 00 


Concord R. R. corp., freight 


2 05 


labor of men and teams . 


7,364 30 







5,835 95 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



To appropriation 
balance . 



Paid L. Gutterson, salt, etc . 
A. ]Sr. Clapp, salt, etc. . 
labor of men and teams . 
C. H. Robie . 



$3,500 


00 


1,051 


90 


$50 19 


2 


20 


4,488 


51 


11 


00 



Dr. 



,551 90 



Cr. 



,551 90 



327 
SEWERS AND DEAmS. 



Dr. 



$8,000 


00 






1,345 


95 






6,176 


22 

— $15,f 


122 
Cr. 


17 


$17 


42 






414 


70 






1,245 


08 






986 


07 






12 


40 






4 


75 






500 


54 






86 


37 







To appropriation . 

]Sr. P. Kidder, sewer licenses 
balance .... 



Paid B. A. Stearns, snperintend- 
ent, sewer-pipe . 

F. B. Potter, sewer-pipe 

O. D. Carpenter, sewer-pipe, 
etc. ..... 

T. A. Lane, sewer-pipe, etc. . 

Drake & Dodge, cement 
[' Merrill Bros., cement . 

Pettee & Adams, cement 

Concord R. R., freight . 

Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 

hardware, etc. . . . 120 09 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc. . . . . 66 35 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 

etc 31 77 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron 

work, etc 4 05 

Hutchinson Bros., castings, 

iron work, etc. . . . 736 38 

John Barnes, blacksmithing, 

etc 31 41 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 53 28 

J. F.Woodbury ,blacksniithing 60 

Woodbury & Fellows, black- 
smithing .... 24 95 



328 



Paid Stephen Austin, stone drag, 

etc 

Brock & Driscoll,cedar pail,etc 

Pike & Heald, lanterns, globes 

etc. .... 
W. F. Head & Son, brick 
Head & Dowst, brick 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 
F. S. Bodwell, cesspool stone 
J. Stickney, gum boots, bose, 

etc 

H. Fradd & Co., kerosene oil, 

etc 

Chas. H. Thayer, rubber boots 
George L. Robinson, rubber 

boots 

A. N. Clapp, nails, spikes, etc. 
George H. Sampson, steam 

drill, etc 

T. A. Barker .... 
French & Dockham, kerosene 

oil, etc. . . . . 
Ed. F. Scheer & Co. , gum boots 
A. McDougall, drag plank 
labor of men and teams . 



$3 15 
1 95 

13 11 

366 00 
25 10 
17 30 
46 52 

58 87 
72 00 

37 50 



2 


60 


9 


00 


18 


25 


5 


36 


443 


51 


6 


00 


3 


92 


3 


00 


3 


00 


10,049 


82 




115,522 17 



WEBSTER-STREET SEWER. 

To appropriation .... $9,000 00 

reserve fund, amount transferred 3,000 00 

reserve fund .... 822 81 



Dr. 



.2,822 81 



329 



Cr. 



Paid T. A. Lane, sewer-pipe, etc 


$i4 73 


F. B. Potter, drain-pipe . 


10 


20 


Concord R. R., freight . 


211 


50 


L. Gutterson, oat meal . 


13 


65 


J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith- 






ing . 


195 


33 


Woodbury, Fellows & Clark 






blacksmitbing 


90 


55 


W. H. Bennett, plumb-bob 


1 


50 


G. A. Clark, filing saws 


2 


40 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore 






hardware, etc. 


106 


29 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


9 


75 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard 






ware .... 


6 


67 


C. E. Haines, gum boots 


21 


00 


Chas. H. Thayer, gum boots 


21 


25 


Geo. H. Allen, engineering 


5 


00 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


247 


71 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


12 


66 ■ 


A. L. N". Robertson, lumber 


3 


75 


• Nourse & Ham, lumber . 


30 


75 


Amoskeag Man'f g Co., cast- 






ings .... 


2 


50 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


788 


42 


J. Stickney, gum boots . 


6 


00 


W. F. Head & Son., brick 


. 1,770 


00 


labor of men and teams . 


. 9,251 


20 

$12,822 81 



330 



MAIN-STREET SEWER. 



To appropriation . 
balance . 



. $1,500 00 
88 36 



Paid A. N. Clapp, hardware, etc, . 

Kelley, Wadleigh & Moore, 
hardware, etc. 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 
etc 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc. . 

Concord R. R., freight . 

D. F. Cressej, blacksmithing 

French & Dockham, kerosene 
oil, etc. 

Frank Daniels, paint, nails, etc 

A. C. "Wallace, lumber . 

labor of men and teams . 

Palmer & Garmon 



|12 95 

131 98 

15 62 



6 


08 


7 


50 


? 37 


73 


3 


43 


4 


28 


49 


30 


. 1,317 


84 


1 


65 



Dr. 

L,588 36 
Cr. 



L,588 36 



BRIDGE-STREET SEWER. 

To appropriation .... $10,000 00 
Reserve fund, amount trans- 
ferred 3,000 00 

Reserve fund, amount trans- 
ferred 1,545 81 



Dr. 



$14,545 81 



331 



Cr. 



Paid Concord R. R., freight . 


$248 40 


Nourse & Ham, lumber, etc. . 


56 69 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber, etc. . 


57 75 


A. C. Wallace, lumber, etc. . 


9 95 


Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. . 


75 56 


J. Hodge, lumber, etc. . 


9 75 


A. L. N^. Robertson, lumber. 




etc 


4 20 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber, etc. 


98 59 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


486 24 


W. F. Head & Son, brick 


1,302 00 


Burns & Poor, coal 


28 00 


E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 


94 98 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 


47 00 


T. A. Lane, drain-pipe, etc. . 


37 20 


J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith- 




ing 


34 75 


Woodbury, Fellows & Clark, 




blacksmithing 


16 90 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 




use of portable bolster 


131 00 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 




lumber .... 


60 38 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 




hardware, etc. 


1,145 96 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 




etc 


63 42 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware, etc 


21 24 


Hutchinson Bros., castings, etc. 


10 30 


Chas. H. Thayer, gum boots . 


29 25 


Maxfield & Jackson, kerosene 




oil, etc 


4 30 



332 



Paid L. Gutterson, oat meal, etc. . 


$9 90 


J. Stickney, gum boots . 


6 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 


89 00 


H. B. Sawyer, kerosene oil, etc. 


2 99 


J. Taylor & Son, kerosene oil. 




etc 


1 38 


U. S. & C. Express Co. . 


1 50 


E. J. Williams, repairing roof 




that was damaged by blast- 




ing 


3 50 


Langdon Manufacturing Co., 




canvas, etc. 


21 02 


Dimond Kennard, water 


3 65 


Dr. J. Sullivan, professional 




services .... 


9 60 


Manchester Mills, use of der- 






105 00 


labor of men and teams . 


10,218 56 



BRIDGES. 



To appropriation .... $500 00 
reserve fund .... 729 23 



,545 81 



Dr. 



$1,229 
Cr. 



Paid E. P. Cogswell, painting . $1 75 

Abbott & Cogswell, painting 86 33 

G. A. Goodwin, painting . 7 70 

Daniels Hardware Co., nails . 12 

F. S. Bodwell, stonework . 268 82 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . . 218 62 



333 

Paid J. Hodge, lumber 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. 
]!^ourse & Ham, lumber, etc. 
Geo. Holbrook, lumber, etc. 
E. Oshier & Co., lumber, etc 

C. M. Wheeler, lumber, etc. 
Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. 

D. Wells 

A. ]^. Clapp, hardware, etc. 
labor of men and teams 



$13 95 

81 37 

3 80 

119 21 

24 83 

3 36 

222 84 

18 61 

6 05 

152 87 



,229 23 



COMMONS. 

To appropriation .... |3,000 00 
James Lynch .... 20 00 

J. B. Varick, overdraft . . 6 00 



Paid Warren Harvey, stone . 

Hutchinson Bros., iron work, 
etc 

W.H.Vickery, repairing lawn- 
mower, etc. 

J. B. Varick Co., lawn-mow- 
er, etc. .... 

T. A. Lane, labor on fountain, 
etc. ..... 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron 
rods, etc. .... 

Thos. Stewart, loam 

H. H. Huntress, plants . 



1139 87 

44 62 

6 55 

125 80 

26 83 

14 56 
1 50 

26 25 



Dr. 



5,026 00 
Cr. 



334 



Paid J. J. Abbott, painting . 


$14 56 


Manchester Mills, use of der- 




rick 


9 50 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 




repairing lawn-mower 


2 40 


J. F, Conway, repairing water- 




gate 


3 25 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


5 92 


C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 


4 22 


Manchester Water-w'ks,water 


150 00 


J. H. Bartlett, maple trees 


57 00 


James Briggs, pails, etc. 


1 40 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber, etc. . 


49 81 


Taylor & Flanders, plants, etc. 


76 88 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


3 50 


city farm, labor of teams 


12 50 


labor of men and teams . 


1,880 05 


By balance 


369 03 







5,026 00 



mCIDEN^TAL EXPENSES. 

To appropriation .... $10,000 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., overdraft 9 75 

A. B. Page, guardian, redemp- 
tion of estate taxed to W. P. 
Rundlett .... 52 05 

Edmund Fitzgerald, redemp- 
tion of estate sold for taxes 
of 1885 . . . . 7 82 

balance 6,582 57 



Dr. 



$16,652 19 



00 



9 00 



335 



Paid E. 0. Pearson, return of births 

and deaths .... |5 25 

E. O. Pearson, professional 

services . . . • 37 50 

J. Ferguson, return of births 

and deaths .... 47 50 
J. Ferguson, professional ser- 
vices 

Wm. A. Webster, return of 

births and deaths . . 25 
Wm. A. Webster, professional 
services .... 
O. D. Abbott, professional ser- 
vices 17 50 

O. D. Abbott, return of births 

and deaths .... 10 00 

L. French, return of births 

and deaths . . . . 14 25 

J. E. Lemaitre, return of births 

and deaths .... 45 25 
J. Sullivan, professional ser- 
vices 158 75 

J. Sullivan, return of births 

and deaths . . . . 22 75 

C. M. Dodge, return of births 

and deaths . . . . 16 00 

C. M. Dodge, professional ser- 
vices ..... 7 50 
L. M. French, return of births 

and deaths . . . . 13 50 

J. W. D, MacDonald, return 

of births and deaths . . 5 00 

J. L. Robinson, return of births 

and deaths .... 9 75 



Cr. 



336 



Paid W. W. Wilkins, return of 




births and deaths 


U 75 


J. P. Walker, return of births 




and deaths .... 


1 00 


L. Pattee, return of births and 




deaths .... 


2 00 


J. F. Brown, return of births 




and deaths .... 


2 50 


H. T. Boutwell, return of births 




and deaths .... 


2 25 


D. S. Adams, return of births 




and deaths .... 


3 75 


B. F. Bailey, return of births 




and deaths .... 


6 00 


C. F. Bonney, return of brrths 




and deaths .... 


2 00 


L, B. How, return of births 




and deaths .... 


4 50 


E. Mongeon, return of births 




and deaths .... 


8 00 


D. S. Adams, professional ser- 
vices 


30 00 


F. A. Hoyt, professional ser- 
vices 


35 00 


L. B. How, professional ser- 




vices 


30 00 


L. Pattee, professional services 


15 00 


G. B. Morey, return of births 




and deaths .... 


1 50 


Emile Sylvain, return of births 




and deaths .... 


3 75 


J. M. Collity, return of births 




and deaths .... 


3 25 


C. B. Sturtevant, return of 




births and deaths 


1 75 



337 



Paid E. Custer, return of births and 




deaths .... 


$1 oa 


Thos. Wheat, return of births 




and deaths . 


3 25 


Thos. Wheat, professional ser- 




vices 


3 00 


Geo.D.Towne, return of births 


1 25 


J. A. Jackson, return of births 




and deaths .... 


13 25 


J. E. A. Lanouette, return of 




births and deaths 


19 75 


Chas. Corey, return of births 




and deaths .... 


1 50 


J. W. Mooar, return of births 




and deaths .... 


3 00 


F. S. Bodwell, stone 


6 50- 


Marden & Woodbury, stone 




work 


1 22 


W.W.Hubbard, kimber 


2 80 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


33 59 


Geo. H. Dudley, lumber 


10 75 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


33 36 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber, etc, . 


457 70 


" " trimming trees 


589 24 


A. L. N. Robertson, lumber, 




etc 


63 00 


j^ourse & Ham, lumber, etc. . 


57 8& 


Thos. Franker 


2 OO 


T. A. Lane, hose, repairing 




fountains, etc. 


197 75 


C. E. Cochran, professional 




services .... 


7 GO 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


33 4a 



32 



338 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron 
work, etc 

J, A. McCrillis, expenses of 
committee to Boston and 
express . . . . 

C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 

J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith- 
ing . . . . . 

Hutchinson Bros., blacksmith- 
ing . 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard 
ware .... 

W. J. Freeman, teams . 

Wm. E. Moore, printing 

Campbell & Williams, print 
ing .... 

O. D. Kimball, printing 

Kendall & Ladd, printing and 
advertising 

Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing and advertising 

J. B. Clarke, printing and ad 
vertising 

Temple & Farrington, blank 
books, etc. 

C. H. Reed . 

S. B. Putnam, expenses to 
Concord 

C. C. Perry, teams 

Smith & Whitten, teams 

Geo. W. Reed, teams 

W. J. Freeman, teams . 

James Bros., teams 



1150 35 

48 55 

3 50 

6 70 

38 97 
12 40 

13 

5 00 

16 24 

14 75 

4 50 

21 90 

257 68 

207 31 

187 58 
12 00 

1 00 
16 50 
14 50 
10 00 

8 00 
156 00 



339 



Paid J. N. Foss, teams 

E. T. James, teams 
J. F. Fox, teams . 

F. X. Chenette, teams . 
C. H. Bowker, teams 
C. H. Simpson, teams . 
W. H. Bennett, ink^ repairing 

tapes, etc. . 
H. "W". Home, assistant engi 

neer .... 
Geo. W. Wales, assistant en 

gineer 
H. M. Young, assistant engi 

neer .... 
J. McDonough, assistant engi 

neer .... 
J. Gr. Ellin wood, making view^ 

for Committee on Claims 
C. H. Robie, concreting 
S. M. Bennett, mason work 
J. A. Barker, care city library' 

boiler ... 

E. K. Rowell, watering-trougl 

1886 .... 
J. R. Carr, painting 
Geo. H. Stearns, expenses to 

Boston 
' Abbott & Cogswell, painting 
E. R. Coburn & Co., pens, blot- 
ters, etc. 
N. P. Kidder, returns of births 

marriages, and deaths 
E. T. James, damage to team 



$27 


00 


56 


50 


8 


00 


2 


00 


1 


25 


5 


00 


4 


70 


345 


99 


141 


62 


403 


49 


140 


44 


5 


00 


739 01 


6 


00 



109 00 



3 


00 


49 


11 


4 


15 


11 


49 



4 28 

346 65 
25 00 



34 45 


1 


92 


10 


79 




60 


12 


00 


2 


78 


125 


43 


319 


05 



340 



Paid Weston & Hill . . . $4 12 

A. H. Lowell, iron work . 1 00 

Buff & Berger, repairing 

transit .... 3 00 

Forbes Lith, Co., lithographed 

bonds . . . . 57 50 

Geo. "W. Prescott, professional 
services .... 

Manchester Gas Co., gas 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 

I. S. Coffin, tin trays 

J. F. Cassidy, witness fees, etc. 

W. U. Tel. Co., telegrams . 

Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 
clocks .... 

Buff & Berger, transit, etc. 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., Bos- 
ton almanac ... 1 00 

N. P. Kidder, making city re- 
port 

Thos. Dunlap, care clocks 

Geo. H. Allen, use of instru- 
ments .... 

W. S. Heath .... 

F. B. Potter, pipe, etc. . 

C. H. "Wood, lettering, etc. . 

Harrington Reserve Engine, 
pumping out cellars . 

H. K. Slay ton, witness fees . 

J. T. Savage, cash-box . 

T. A. Barker, dinners . 

Buswell's express . 

David Cross, professional ser- 
vices . . . . . 350 00 



150 


00 


10 


00 


135 


00 


2 


50 


80 


11 


6 


75 


31 


25 


1 


37 


6 


00 


8 


10 




75 



341 



Paid Geo. H. Stearns, use of team |132 00 
Geo. H. Stearns, expenses in 

Knibbs valve suit , . 25 30 

Lizzie Gray, injury to person 8 35 
J. A. Barker, care of city 

library boiler . . . 15 00 

C. P. Buckman & Co., ink . 1 50 

D. W. King, recording deed . 62 
W. A. Chase, carpenter work 13 63 
Manchester Water -works, 

water . . . . 228 69 

John Moss .... 22 00 

Geo. E. Glines ... 10 25 
P. Sheehan, damage from 

sewer water . . . 50 00 
James Briggs, repairing stove, 

etc 14 93 

G. W. Perkins ... 1 00 
G. A. R., allowance for hall- 
rent 100 00 

Mrs. N. P. Kidder, copying 

Derryfield town records . 135 00 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 

city scales . . . . 19 50 

Thos. Franker, burying dogs . 4 25 
Geo. "W. Prescott, professional 

services . . . . 75 50 
. E. Campbell, shade trees . 4 50 
L. Searles, burying nuisances 18 50 
Manchester Gas Co., gas . 2 56 
B. F. Farrar, burying nui- 
sances .... 50 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

forge, etc 25 20 



342 



Paid Sampson, Murdock & Co., 
Lowell Directory 

H. H. Duncklee, dinner for 
city governments of Law- 
rence, Portland, and Ports- 
mouth 

F. S. Bodwell, stone work 

F. C. Campbell, trees 
Mary Valley, claim, damages 

to person 
J. F. Cassidy, witness fees 

paid .... 
L. Pope, bolts, etc. 
L. D. Goodwin, interpreter in 

city cases . 
J. B. Straw, taxes, 1885, of 

Mystic Boat Club et al. 
Manchester post-office, stamps 
J. Stickney, eyelet set., etc. 
C. H. Reed, witness fees 
C. E. Crombie & Co., trees 
J. A, Barker, stove for pest 

house .... 
Manchester Water-works, wa 

ter .... 
Lizzie Cilley, damage to per 

son .... 
Geo. W. Varnum . 

G. H. Wheeler, hitching-posts 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood 

Geo. L Dicke}', witness fees, 

etc 

Henry Fitzgerald . 



$2 00 



135 00 
100 00 

69 00 

25 00 

131 52 

1 90 

25 00 

63 18 

2 00 
1 45 

12 00 
135 00 

15 00 

486 68 

34 50 
4 50 
7 25 

7 75 

18 00 
42 50 



343 



Paid A. J. Lane, use of book of 

conveyances . . . $10 00 

H. D. Lord, witness fees, etc. 27 92 

Geo. M. Clark, damage to 

person, etc. . . . 50 00 

J. B. Straw, distributing tax- 
bills 82 38 

First N. H. Battery, salute, 

July 5, 1886 ... 39 87 

C. E. Cochran, professional 

services .... 16 00 

F. C. Dow, loam ... 3 75 

Geo. H, Wheeler, hitching- 

posts 7 00 

. Geo. H. Weeks, damage to 

person, team, etc. . . 175 00 

S. B. Putnam, auditing ac- 
count of collector . . 25 00 

J. F. Briggs, professional ser- 
vices 125 00 

James Richard, cleaning vaults 13 60 

H. C. Dickey, whitewashing 

tree-boxes .... 11 25 

J. A. Weston, sheets for map 

of Manchester ... 9 00 

H. H. Duncklee, board of wit- 
nesses, Scott vs. City . . 10 00 

C. H. Wood, painting guide- 
boards, etc. . . . 13 00 

Warren Harvey, stone work . 500 00 

B. W. Robinson, damage to 

team 50 00 

Town of Goftstown, taxes . 1 25 

C. S. Decker, weather signals 3 90 
Pettee & Adams, lime and salt 2 95 



344 



Paid L. Searles, burying nuisances $11 50 

Manchester Water-works, wa- 
ter 241 39 

A. D. Gooden, use of watering- 
trough .... 3 00 

Israel Dow, use of watering- 
trough .... 3 00 

Pettee & Adams, lime and salt 1 85 

J. H.'Wiggin, damage to team, 

etc 20 50 

J. Lane, expense to Boston 

for city .... 4 00 

T. Franker, burying dogs . 3 00 

Lynch & Willey, damage from 
overflow of water in District 
ITo. 5 330 00 

H. B. Fairbanks, professional 

services . . . . 25 00 

J. C. Corliss, damage to horse, 

etc 25 00 

EUza Sykes, judgment . . 3,625 96 

Geo. W. Prescott, professional 

services . . . . 10 00 

E. T. James, damage to hack 75 00 
T. A. Barker, board of divers, 

etc 8 00 

Manchester post-office, stamps, 
etc 

F. S. Bodwell, stone work 
Chemical engine, labor at city 

"dump" .... 

Pennacook hose, labor at city 
"dump" .... 

W. U. Telegraph Co., tele- 
grams .... 



69 


00 


310 


50 


3 


60 


8 


80 


1 


40 



345 



Paid Winchester Furniture Co., fur- 
niture for Bakersville school- 
house . . . . . 

Wm. L. Foster, professional 
services .... 

Geo. A. Alger, error on taxes 

Weston & Hill 

M. Labreche, table, etc. 

A. T. Barr, labor in ward 
room 

E. C. Smith, labor in ward 
room . . . . . 

J. F. Smyth, overvaluation in 
1885 

G. R. Vance & Co., repairing 
stove, etc 

L. Searles, cutting down side- 
walk cor. Union and Web- 
ster streets . . . . 

J. Lane, expense to Boston 
for city 

Manchester Gas Co., gas 

W. H. Bennett, repairing tapes 
car fare, etc. 

W. H. Bennett, assistant en 
gineer 

Manchester Gas Co., gas 

W. H. Smith . 

J. B. Scott, judgment 

J. F, Woodbury, blacksmith 
ing . 

J. W. Kimball, wood 

labor of men and teams . 



$144 75 



128 


12 


6 


35 


4 


50 


5 


25 


5 


75 


4 


10 


4 


07 


3 


16 



25 00 

8 00 
3 95 

41 21 



22 


50 




4 


50 




10 


20 




369 


04 




1 


00 




1 


00 




659 


67 






^16,652 


19 



346 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

To balance from old account . $2,607 06 

appropriation .... 2,000 00 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent . 1,223 17 

S. B. Putnam, lots sold . . 2,467 50 

Clint A. Moore, overdraft . 4 50 



Paid John McDonough, engineer- 
ing $9 18 

Geo. "W. Wales, engineering . 5 32 

H. W. Home, engineering . 10 12 

H. M. Young, engineering . 16 13 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 

ing, etc 10 60 

Frank A. Emerson, loam . 629 00 

C. C. Webster, turf . . 6 90 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 35 87 

D. J. Jones, iron fence . . 795 60 
0. D. Kimball, printing . 4 00 
J. B. Clarke, printing . . 27 75 
Temple & Farrington, station- 
ery, etc. .... 6 97 

C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 6 55 
Manchester Water - Works, 

water 300 00 

T. A. Lane, fountains, etc. . 312 46 

Pike & Heald, stove, etc. . 28 24 

Pettee & Adams, cement, etc. 32 65 

F. B. Potter, sewer-pipe . 575 25 
Hutchinson Bros., iron work . 69 57 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . 40 57 
J. B.Varick Co., hardware, etc. 78 12 



Dr. 



^302 23 
Cr. 



347 



Paid Higgins Bros., furniture for 

house . 
Clint A. Moore, clocks 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
Head & Dowst, lumber 
New England Telephone and 

Telegraph Co., telephone 

C. H. Robie, concreting. 
Killey, Wadleigh & Moore 

hardware . 
John Cleworth, manure . 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 

D. A. Simons, lamp 

M. H. Perkins, lawn-rakes 
Manchester Post-office, stamps 

etc. 
J. W. Manning, professional 

services 
H. H. Huntress, plants, etc 
Wm. H. Vickery, repairing 

lawn-mower 
W. E. & E. B. Dunbar, mak 

ing stone drag . 
J. R. Carr, painting 
J. Stickney, hose, etc. 
J. Ter.' Kuile, bulbs 
Timothy Kenney, cleaning 

vaults . 
labor of men and teams 
By balance . 



$8 


51 


9 


00 


10 


40 


3 


00 


17 


50 


4 


60 


220 


06 


1 


80 


6 


00 


1 


35 


5 


50 


3 


00 



2 24 

63 00 
32 10 

75 



3 


50 


5 


20 


5 


25 


17 


05 


3 


00 


3,116 


17 


1,762 


40 



^,302 23 



348 



VALLEY CEMETERY 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$89 20 


appropriation .... 


1,500 00 


C. H. G. Foss, superintendent . 


1,200 00 


S. B. Putnam, treasurer . 


74 50 


Paid Pike & Heald, iron pipe, 




plumbing, etc. .. 


$175 67 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware, etc 


21 24 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 




hardware, etc. 


12 81 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 




etc 


43 28 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. 


3 75 


J. W. Kimball, sand 


43 50 


J. W. Kimball, sand 


156 95 


C. C. Webster, turf 


29 04 


Varnum & Adams, gravel 


15 00 


John Shea, manure . . , 


2 00 


Marshall & Underhill, grading 


76 24 


Geo. Thompson, loam . 


1 50 


Mrs. Chas. E. Balch, loam 


1 25 


Geo. Whitford, team 


6 00 


J. McDonough, engineering . 


1 13 


Geo. W. Wales, engineering . 


50 


H. M. Young, engineering . 


4 00 


H. W. Home, engineering 


3 39 


Hutchinson Bros., iron work. 




etc 


23 21 



$2,863 70 
Cr. 



349 



*aid Manchester "Water-works, wa 




ter ... . 


159 95 


Temple & Farrington, station 




ery . . " . 


5 41 


Bishop & Bro., ladder . 


3 45 


G. H. Dudley, lumber, etc. 


29 32 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber . 


25 


Willey & Rowe, stone . 


43 20 


F. S. Bodwell, stone 


6 00 


J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith 




ing .... 


5 95 


James Bros., manure 


2 66 


Clint A. Moore, clock . 


4 50 


A. B. Smith, plants 


24 97 


W. H. Vickery, repairing lawn- 




mower . . . . 


75 


H. H. Huntress, plants, etc. . 


11 00 


M. H. Perkins, lawn-rakes 


1 50 


D. A. Simons, repairing table 




etc 


2 50 


Marshall & Underbill, grading 


7 79 


Geo. C. Gilmore, making re- 




port for committee 


15 00 


J. C. Young, felt roofing 


14 70 


labor of men and teams . 


1,760 38 


y balance 


244 96 



To Amoskeag Cemetery 
balance 



Paid Hiram Stearns, labor 



146 50 



$46 50 



$2,863 70 
Dr. 



$46 50 
Cr. 



$46 50 



350 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 




Dr. 


To appropriation . . . .i 


126,500 00 

f Ofi CAA AA 








Cr. 


Paid E. "W. Harrington Hose, July 




4, 1886 r . . . 


$8 00 


Pennacook Hose, July 4, 1886 


8 00 


Amoskeag S. F. E. Co., July 




4, 1876 .... 


8 00 


K S. Bean Hose, July 4, 1886 


8 00 


Merrimack Hose, July 4, 1886 


8 00 


Massabesic Hose, July 4, 1886 


8 00 


Excelsior Hook-and-Laclder, 




July 4, 1886 


8 00 


Higgins Bros., carpets, etc. . 


93 20 


Geo. R. Simmons, labor on 




steamer .... 


10 25 


Stephen G ardner, care of boiler 


173 00 


Manchester "Water-works, wa- 




ter. ..... 


572 99 


Chas. E. Berry, hames, collars. 




etc 


77 00 


Tristram Berry, carpenter work 


8 75 


Tristram Dame, cleaning flues, 




etc 


6 13 


Manchester LocomotiveWorks, 




balance on steamer 


3,500 00 


Manchester LocomotiveWorks, 


! 


repairs on steamer, etc. 


215 50 


Concord R. R., freight 


6 19 1 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


62 00 ' 


Temple & Farrington, blank- 




books, etc 


10 25 



351 



Paid Amoskeag S. F. E. Co., pay- 
roll 

K. S. Bean S. F. E. Co., pay 

roll .... 
Pennacook Hose, pay-roll 
Massabesic Hose, pay-roll 
E. W. Harrington Hose, pay 

roll .... 
Merrimack Hose, pay-roll 
Excelsior Hook-ancl-Laclder 

pay-roll 
Chemical Co., pay-roll . 
M. W. Ford, Jr., driver Cliem 

ical Co. 
W. F. Wheeler, driver Chem 

ical Co. 
C. H. Rogers, driver 
Jeremiah Lane, driver . 
Jeremiah Lane, expense for 
horses from West Lebanon 
W. L. Blenus, driver 
Walter Seaward, driver . 

C. M. Deny on, driver 
Geo. H. Wheeler, driver 
Geo. E. Varnum, driver 
A. E. Foster, driver 
Chas. S. Brown, driver . 
extra services of drivers . 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 

K E. T. & T. Co., telephones 
T. W. Lane, record-book, etc. 
Woodbury & Fellows, black- 
smithing . . . . 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 



pl,116 25 

1,128 75 
1,545 00 

995 00 

995 00 
995 00 

1,925 00 
749 00 

512 57 

23 04 
216 50 
216 50 

21 55 

660 00 

120 00 
660 00 

50 50 

46 50 

121 00 
73 00 

1,051 75 

414 49 

75 96 

6 75 

2 75 

3 60 



352 



Paid Pike & Heald, wall-lamps 

plumbing, etc. 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 

etc 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard 

ware, etc. . 
Manchester Hardware Co. 

hardware, etc. 
T. A. Lane, hose, etc. . 
Hutchinson Bros., iron work 

etc 

Killey, Wadleigh & Moore 

hardware, etc. 
J. F. Woodbury, blacksmitli 

ing . 
H. Fradd & Co., brooms 

matches, etc. 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, hose 

wagon 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair 

ing wagons, etc. . 
Cavanaugh Bros. & Hill, re 

pairing harness, etc. . 
Ezra "W. Kimball, repairing 

harness, etc. 
F. isT. McLaren, repairing har 

ness, etc. ... 
H. C.Ranno, harness, blankets 

etc 

J. Stickney, rubber mats, etc 
Chas. F. Sprague, dry goods 
Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. 
A. C. Wallace, lumber, etc. 



20 01 

21 25 

71 47 

10 67 
21 74 

7 14 

38 66 

4 50 

10 59 

450 00 

215 16 

6 30 

87 

14 95 

352 15 

12 50 

9 25 

31 43 

3 59 

1 25 



353 



Paid A. L. K. Robertson, lumber, 




etc 


$50 95 


bourse & Ham, lumber, etc. . 


11 59 


Granite State Plating Co. 


3 15 


C. H. Bowker, teaming . 


1 75 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 




iron work, etc. . 


5 26. 


E. I. Coupling Co., nozzle-tips, 




etc 


1 00 


Mrs. Lovejoy, washing . 


2 75 


Talbott & Co., reefers 


43 50 


J. F. Sargent, chair-braces 


2 00 


C. C. Braxmar, nickel badges 


15 60 


J. A. & W. Bird & Co., bicar- 




bonate soda 


26 00 


Samuel Eastman & Co., dis- 




charge-pipes, etc. 


29 75 


H. D. Gordon, furniture, etc. 


51 35 


Mrs. M. W. Ford . 


2 OO 


Joseph H. Gould, testing " Fire 




King" .... 


2 50' 


Mary A. Early, washing 


2 00- 




19 15 


Edwin E. Weeks, repairing 




pump 


5 00 


American Hose Manuf'g Co., 




repairing hose 


3 30 


Scrannage Bros. & Cook, re- 




pairing acid jars, etc. . 


14 25 


A. D. Smith, drugs, etc. 


1 71 


J. Francis, rubber coats 


13 OO 


Fuller, Leonard & Small, fire- 




coat 


4 00 


Clarence E. French, crash 


1 19 



23 



354 



Paid H. D. Gordon, furniture 


$384 75 


Lottie A. Lane 


2 50 


D. M. Goodwin, waste . 


21 75 


Geo. Jones, desk . 


25 00 


Jacobs, Whitcomb & Co., clock 


5 00 


T. F. Dodge, labor on steamer 


2 50 


Bridget McGann, scrubbing 




floors 


1 70 


Merrimack Chemical Co., oil 




vitriol 


17 76 


The Gutta-Percha and Rubber 




Manuf g Co., hose 


1,014 00 


E. 11. Currier, acid, etc. 


67 


Bangor Extension Ladder Co., 




ladder .... 


352 79 


Talbott & Co., reefers . 


15 00 


C. M. Clapp & Co., protective 




covers, etc 


314 50 


J. A. & "W. Bird & Co., bicar- 




bonate soda 


15 49 


D. A. Simons, furniture, etc. . 


17 00 


Boston Belting Co., suction 




hose, etc 


31 70 


Hawley & Barnard, blankets . 


3 50 


W. H. Benard, hardware, etc. 


2 80 


Fire Extinguisher Manuf'g 




Co., chemical engine . 


2,250 00 


S. F. Hay ward, patent door- 




openers .... 


50 00 


P. Fitzgerald, shoveling out 




hydrants .... 


3 13 


B. L. Hartshorn, car fare to 




Newport, etc. 


3 28 


S. M. Haselton, wood . 


6 90 



355 



Paid Geo. A. Davis, cleaning chem 

ical engine . 
J. F. Wyman & Co., wood 
Scollay & Poor, J. P. S. polish 
J. Hinman, hose, etc. 
Andrew S. Jackson, cleaning 

oil ... . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
C. E. French, crash 
C. H. Hodgman & Co., trucking 
Stevens & Duncklee 
Parker & Phillips . 
Plumer & Holton, reefers 
Wm. B. Abbott, painting 
T. W. Lane, stationery, etc. 
A. D. Smith, castor-oil, etc. 
T. W. Lane, chief engineer 
O. E. Kimball, assistant en 

gineer ... 

R. G. Manning, assistant en 

gineer 
H. Fradd, assistant engineer 
F. S. Bean, assistant engineer 

and clerk . 
J. F. Pherson, assistant en- 
gineer ... 
J. Alexander, professional ser 

vices .... 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
Geo. E. Hall, medicine, etc. 
S. Gardner, care of boiler 
Thorp & Bartlett, plumbing 
By balance .... 



$3 25- 


3 


75 


6 


19 


13 


50 


2 


00 


13 


50 


2 


50 


6 


00 


7 


50 


1 


50 


112 


00 


3 


00 


18 


41 


1 


40 


300 


00 



25 00 

75 00 
100 00 

125 00 

100 00 



22 


50 


701 


36 


9 


65 


31 


00 




35 


140 


24 



26,500 00 



356 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



To appropriation . 

T. W. Lane, old liose 
reserve fund 



$1,500 00 

6 88 

782 26 



Dr. 



,289 14 



Cr. 



Paid J. Brodie Smith, superintend- 
ent . . . . . 

J. Brodie Smith, automatic 
gas-lighters, etc. 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
etc .... 

Killey, Wadleigh & Moore 
hardware, etc. 

A. D. Smith, vitriol, etc. 

C. L. Bly, batteries, etc. 

Daniels Hardware ^Co., hard 
ware, etc. . 

Edwin Rogers,|bell, etc. 

Concord R. R. corp., freight 

Temple & Farrington, frames 

J. B. Clarke, printing . 

Geo. A. Davis, labor 

J. A. & W. Bird & Co., bicar 
bonate of soda . 

Abiel Pevey, zincs 

Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. 

O. G. Bloomey, labor 

James Arthur, " 

C. H. Bowker, teaming . 

D. B. Varney, zincs, etc. 



$300 00 

373 19 

1 40 

2 69 



2 


53 


77 


85 


21 


00 


1 


88 


1,097 


85 


2 


92 


3 


00 


18 


00 


4 


50 


11 


83 


28 


52 


15 


20 


5 


20 


1 


50 


1 


00 


44 


90 



357 



aid J. H. Bunnell & Co., auto- 




matic burner, etc. 


$9 52 


Morgan, Grossman & Co., steel 




dies, etc 


2 05 


G. A. Goodwin, labor, etc., on 




bell-tower .... 


56 26 


E. L. Burrows, labor 


2 00 


T. W. Lane, use of team 


4 50 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 




ing 


95 


J. Barnes, blacksmithing 


1 50 


L. W. Tenney, labor on tele- 






11 05 


A. D. Smith, acid, etc. . 


1 63 


Head & Dowst, repairing bell- 




tower 


143 84 


Stark Mills, lumber and labor 


40 88 







!,289 14 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 



To appropriation . 
balance 



Paid Water-works, water 



$19,000 00 
962 50 



$19,962 50 



Dr. 

$19,962 50 

Cr. 
$19,962 50 



FIREMEN'S PARADE. 



To appropriation 
balance 



$300 00 
21 65 



Dr. 



521 65 



358 



Paid First Reg. Band, music 
F. H. Roberts, caterer . 
Tower's Drum Corps 
Manchester War Veterans' 

Drum Corps 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 



Or. 



$53 00 


237 


00 


8 


00 


15 


00 


8 


65 



$321 65 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . . . .i 


$23,000 00 




J. C. Bickford, fees . 


1,494 00 




M. J. Jenkins, fines. 


2,366 84 




balance 


3,131 06 






<iton 001 OA 




f 


'^U^UfJ^ %J\I 






Cr. 


Paid K P. Hunt, judge 


$1,500 00 




J. C. Bickford, clerk 


600 00 




J. C. Bickford, collecting S. 






C. court fees 


1 00 




G. A. Ramsdell 


4 50 




I. L. Heath, special justice 


26 00 




M. J. Jenkins, city marshal . 


755 00 




H. "W. Longa, assistant city 






marshal . . 


700 00 




H. W. Longa, conveying pris- 






oners ..... 


494 00 




Geo. E. Glines, captain night 






patrol 


30 38 




W. H. B. Newhall, sergeant 






patrol 


784 00 




T. P. Shea, night patrol 


772 00 





359 



Paid T. Frain, night patrol . 
J. Murphy, night patrol . 

D. McEvoy, night patrol 
M. Fox, night patrol 
J. Bucklin, night patrol . 

F. Bourrassau, night patrol 
J. E. Floyd, night patrol 
S. Mitchell, night patrol 

E. E. Holmes, night patrol 

B. N. Wilson, night patrol 

A. J. Mayhew, night patrol 

G. M. Goodwin, night patrol 
P. Riescher, night patrol 
E. C. Emerson, night patrol 
G. A. Lovejoy, night patrol 
H. Harmon, night patrol 
Joseph Murphy, night patrol 
M. Farmer, night patrol 

C. "W. Stevens, night patrol 
J. B. Rhodes, special police 
M. Redden, special police 
L. 0. Fowler, special police 
J. F. Dunn, special police 

B. Cass, special police . 
E. Farrar, night patrol . 
L. Tebbetts, captain night 

patrol .... 
P. Dobbin, special police 

C. H. Reed, day police . 
R. W. Bean, day police . 
J. F. Cassidy, day police 
I. P. Fellows, night patrol 
J. Dou})e, special police 
G. W. Langman, special police 



. $836 


00 


799 


00 


871 


00 


779 


00 


26 


00 


729 


00 


776 


00 


783 


00 


802 


00 


797 00 


780 


00 


172 


00 


765 


00 


765 


00 


790 


00 


801 


00 


820 


00 


784 


00 


780 


00 


36 


00 


43 


00 


27 


00 


553 


00 


96 


00 


813 

4- 


00 


892 


88 


87 


00 


848 


00 


733 


00 


733 


00 


689 


00 


r 




00 


e 6 


00 



360 



Paid M. L. Brown, special police 
John Wilson, special police 
W. Stevens, special police 
P. Hickey, special police 
E. A. G, Holmes, special police 
James Farley, special police 
Harrison Call, special police 
Oliver Gadwell, special police 
O. E. Stearns, special police 
John Waters, special police- 
Ira Davis, special police . 
A. B. Brown, matron 
H. Stewart, special police 
G. Davis, special police . 
M. Tremblay, special police 
D. C. Emerson, special police 
T. Redden, special police 
T. Franker, janitor, special 

police .... 
Ira Davis, special police . 
W. H. Tafts, special police 
H. H. Philbrick, special police 
Lowell Sargent, special police 
George Sibley, special police . 
W. C. Hoyt, special police 
W. F. Danforth, special police 
IT. Decouteau, special police . 
Eli Provencher, special police 
G. Roballard, special police . 
D, K. White, special police . 

C. B. Hildreth, special police. 

D. C. Jackson, special police . 
Joseph Clement, special police 
T. Reardon, special police 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10 00 



00 
00 



362 00 

7 00 

20 00 

37 00 

6 00 

13 00 



522 31 

23 00 

8 00 
25 00 
14 00 

4 00 

6 00 

18 00 

9 00 
10 00 

4 00 

24 00 
114 00 

17 00 

6 00 

169 00 



361 



id J. W. Berry, special police . 


$18 00 


E. G. Woodman, special police 


6 00 


F. Sullivan, night patrol 


423 00 


I. L. Heath, professional ser- 




vices 


26 00 


C E. Cochran, professional 




services .... 


2 00 


A. C. Osgood, professional 




services .... 


6 00 


J. H. Andrews, professional 




services .... 


5 00 


A. 0. Brown, professional ser- 




vices 


2 00 


Daniel Davis, furnishing meals 




for prisoners 


614 25 


C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 


2 50 


T. A. Barker .... 


30 90 


George W. Reed, teams . 


1 50 


J. N. Foss, teams . 


20 50 


F. X. Chenette, teams . 


61 50 


J. A. Brown, teams 


3 00 


J. F. Fox, teams . 


3 00 


E. T. James, teams 


252 50 


New England Telephone and 




Telegraph Co., telephones . 


120 80 


Western Union Telegraph 




Co., telegrams . 


37 82 


T. L. Thorpe . ' . 


1 20 


J.B.Yarick Co., hardware, etc. 


1 40 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




ware, etc 


3 11 


Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 




hardware, etc. 


30 41 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


369 33 



362 



Paid Vina Trudell, washing blank 

ets . . . . 
H. Gorman, matches, etc. 
Vina Lacore, scrubbing . 
Frances Franker, washing 

blankets 
T. W. Lane, stationery . 
Temple & Farrington, station 

ery .... 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 
S. S. Coffin, repairing boiler 

etc. .... 
Campbell & Williams, printing 
C. E. York, brush . 
Manchester Water-w'ks, water 
"W.H.Vickery, repairing locks, 

etc. .... 
H. Gorman, brooms, oil, etc 
C. F. Sprague, netting , 
J. G. Ellinwood, photographs 
L. "W". Colby, photographs 
M. J. Coleman, plumbing 
J. J. Holland, medicine, etc. 
T. A. Lane, hose-nozzle 
"Weston & Hill, matting, etc. 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
F. F. Shaw, repairing clocks 
Dr. J. Collity, professional ser 

vices .... 
Henry Gorman, brooms 

matches, etc. 

C. F. Sprague, towels, etc. 

D. Evans & Co., buttons 



$7 75 

2 08 

10 50 

58 50 
32 70 

2 59 
458 87 
154 20 

7 88 

63 50 

35 

143 85 



00 



00 

50 

50 

70 

9 45 

75 

23 91 

2 35 

8 00 

6 00 

10 39 

1 78 

10 00 



363 



Paid C. E. York, soap . 


$1 00 


L. Gutterson, ivorine, soap 


> 


etc 


10 40 


F. W. Avery, mop-yarn 


1 13 


Granite State Mckel-plating 


p 


Co 


1 00 


H. H. Duncklee . 


61 60 


City Hall Drug Store, insect 




powder, etc. 


10 95 


R. D. Gay . . . 


92 


W. E. Call, photographs 


7 50 


Pike & Heald, match-box 


33 


D. Evans & Co., buttons 


10 00 


Dr. J. Sullivan, professiona 


[ 


services . . . . 


38 50 


J. Stickney, E. cloth 


1 50 


C. M. Bailey, tissue-paper 


10 00 


C. M. Bailey, bags 


1 80 


Burns & Poor, coal 


17 50 


W. W. Owen, washing blank- 




ets ... . 


3 45 


City Hall Drug Store, medi- 




cine, etc 


12 90 


S. C. Bryant, globes, etc. 


5 25 


C. H. Thayer, blacking, etc. . 


2 60 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 


27 75 


S. C. Chesley, atlas 


7 50 


M.J. Coleman, Weeden closet 




etc 


30 90 


R. D. Gay, screen cloth . 


65 


G. 0. Stevens 


1 75 


Smith & Bly, crackers . 


19 28 


Bly & Fellows, crackers . 


4 00 


D. K. White, special police . 


16 00 



364 



Paid Thos. Franker, janitor 
A. B. Brown, matron 
Geo. Goodwin, night patrol 
A. N. Clapp . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 



$41 67 

31 00 

54 00 

1 85 

29 00 









$1,685 

44 

9 

118 




To rents 

J. Cavanaugli, 
J. A. McCrillis 
balance . 


CITY 

bunting 
, bunting 


HALL 


00 
20 
05 

22 



Paid J. Bryson, Jr., painting 

J. J. Abbott, painting . 

Z. B. Stuart, painting . 

G. A. Goodwin, glazing 

J. R. Carr, glazing 

C. H. Wood, lettering boxes 
etc. .... 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 

Murphy & Farrell, plumbing 
etc. .... 

Head & Dowst, 1 amber . 

W. W. Hubbard, lumber 

W. Irelfind, lumber, etc. 

G. H. Dudley, lumber, etc, 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. 

J. A. Barker, night services 

Woodbury & Fellows, black- 
smithing . . . . 



$29,991 90 



Dr. 



1,856 47 
Cr. 



$2 53 

1 15 
9 62 
8 75 

31 6Q 

20 10 

72 03 

6 47 

2 72 
11 40 
52 97 
35 14 

60 
22 00 

2 00 



$69 00 


274 


11 


44 


37 


89 


55 


17 


95 



07 


82 


25 


95 


2 


80 


29 


23 


16 


02 



365 



Paid N. E. T. & T. Co., telephones 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
C. H. Wood, bronzing, panit- 
ing, etc. .... 
H. B. Holden, washing floors 
Helen O'Hern, washing floors 
Hannah Murphy,wasli'g floors 7 65 

Bridget Riley, washing floors 11 60 

Margaret Lynch, wash 'g floors 3 20 

Weston & Hill, carpeting, etc. 
Manchester Water-w'ks,water 
City Hall Drug Store, carbolic 
acid, etc. .... 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 
R. D. Gay, shades, etc. . 
Manchester Locomotive W'ks, 

castings, etc. ... 4 47 
Killey, Wadleigh & Co., hard- 
ware, etc 1 40 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc 3 60 

J. B. Yarick Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . . 10 00 

F. F. Shaw, repairing clock . 1 85 

W. Chesholm, ladder . . 2 75 

J. S. Holt & Co., soap . . 6 37 

H. D. Gordon, office chairs, etc. 81 40 

Hutchinson Bros., iron work, 

etc 2 96 

W. H. Vickery, repairing 

weather signals, etc. . . 4 00 

Geo. H. Wheeler, type-writer, 

etc 60 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood . 2 50 



366 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 


$466 06 


J. T. Savage, carpenter work 


15 00 


W. B. Abbott, painting 


5 70 


Temple & Farrington, flag, etc. 


13 01 


H. D. Gordon, table, etc. 


16 50 


Clint. A. Moore, clock, etc. . 


6 00 


W. H. Vickery, keys 


60 


Hill Grate Bar Co., iron grates 


53 40 


T. L. Thorpe 


3 50 


P. C. Cheney Co. . 


7 50 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 


18 26 


Bennett & Lord,whitewa8hing, 




etc 


91 25 


* 





L,856 47 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



To appropriation . 
balance 



$1,500 00 
14 07 



Paid 0. D. Kimball 


$6 00 


Novelty Advertising Co 


1 25 


T. W. Lane . 


26 00 


W. E. Moore 


17 00 


Manchester post-office 


35 20 


Temple & Farrington 


135 40 


Campbell & Williams 


61 60 


John B. Clarke 


. 1,230 62 


F. W. Briggs 


1 00 



Dr. 



,514 07 
Cr. 



.,514 07 



367 



REPAIRS OF BUILDESTGS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 
reserve fund, am't transferred . 


$1,800 00 
1,500 00 


a li a a 


844 


62 

$4 144 6'> 






(jprtjiTtT: U-J 


Paid Geo. Holbrook, lumber and 




Or. 


labor 


$20 


55 


Hutchinson Bros., iron work, 
etc 


42 


70 - 


Scrannage Bros. & Cook, slid- 
ing poles, etc. 

Thorp & Bartlett, plumbing, 
etc 


90 
36 


00 
00 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 
L. N. Dufrain, plumbing, etc. 


175 

7 


24 

50 


J. R. Carr, painting, etc. 

T. A. Lane, gas-tittings, etc. . 


333 30 

264 81 


J. F. Seaward, lumber and 






labor 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware 


1,958 
14 


76 
20 


J. F. Seaward, lumber, etc. . 


8 


38 


Killey, "Wadleigh & Moore, 
hardware .... 


2 


79 


J. B. Yarick Co., hardware . 


3 


45 


J. F. Seaward, lumber, etc. . 


17 


66 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, lumber, 
etc. ..... 


176 


79 


J. C. Young, repairing roofs . 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
E. J. Williams & Son, repair- 
ing slate .... 


11 

9 

5 


74 

50 

75 



$28 


87 


18 


60 


166 


91 


13 


95 


18 


31 


6 


27 


101 


92 


45 


14 


2 


88 



368 

Paid 0. D. Carpenter, mason work 
R, D. Gay, shades, etc. . 
Head & Dowst, lumber . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 
J. A. Sargent, lumber and 

labor 

J. W. Lathe, lumber and labor 

J. Bryson, Jr., painting 

G. H. Dudley, lumber and 

labor ..... 
J. Hodge, lumber . 
Palmer & Garmon, marble 

shelf 2 85 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor 23 00 

Nourse & Ham, lumber and 

labor 8 11 

James Briggs, galvanized pipe, 

etc. . . . . . 3 80 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor ..... 
Higgins Bros., curtains, etc. . 
Wilson & Lyons, mason work 
Merrill & Laird, mason work 
D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 
Murphy & Farrell, plumbing . 
W. M. ButteKfield, architect . 
F. S. Bodwell, stone work 

B. W. Robinson, mason work 
D. J. Jones, iron work, etc. . 
A. L. IT. Robertson, lumber 

and labor .... 

C. F. Sprague, spreads, etc. . 
Merrill & Laird, mason work 



26 


20 


10 


00 


10 


30 


2 


44 


10 


63 


7 


53 


59 


48 


10 


50 


12 


50 


80 


55 


126 


02 


25 


13 


15 


60 



369 



Paid Eastman Bros., mason work . 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, tube-cleaner 

C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 

Wni. F. Starkweather, paint- 
ing ..... 

J. Hodge, lumber . 

H. D. Gordon, upholstering, 
etc. . . . 

labor of men and teams . 



$3 00 



1 


50 


19 


55 


8 


65 


33 


67 


37 


14 


24 


50 



t,144 62 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 



Paid M. J. Buncher, librarian 
J. E. Arthur, asst. librarian 
H. E. Martin, " " 
Temple & Farrington, binding 

books, etc. . 
Manchester Gas Co., gas 
0. D. Kimball, printing 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 
Marshall & Underbill, ice 
L. B. Bodwell, wood 
E. P. Johnson & Co., coal 
trustees, for books 
Manchester iTovelty Co., re- 
pairing stamp 

24 



$718 61 
3,500 00 



$4,218 61 
Cr. 



$800 00 

157 50 

77 25 

302 12 

278 03 

75 75 

11 00 
5 65 

16 25 

12 85 
1,000 00 

2 75 



370 



Paid L. B. Clough, insurance 


$100 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 


206 50 


Manchester Water - w o r k s , 




water 


16 00 


]Sr. P. Hunt, stationery, stamps, 




etc 


4 96 


By balance 


1,152 00 







t,218 61 



PAYMENT OF FUNDED DEBT. 

To balance from old account . $1,000 00 

appropriation .... 5,000 00 



Dr. 





Cr. 


Paid city bonds . . . ' . $1,000 00 




S. V. R. R. bonds . . . 5,t)00 00 






$6,000 00 




ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 






Dr. 


To appropriation .... $2,000 00 




balance 818 07 






$2,818 07 
Cr. 


" ■ 


Paid sundry persons . . . $2,818 07 






$2,818 07 



371 

DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

To appropriation . . . . $8,000 00 

balance . . . . . 106 72 



Paid J. B. Straw, collector . . |8,106 72 



Dr. 

^106 72 
Cr. 

1,106 72 



STATE TAX. 



To appropriation .... $48,400 00 
balance 4 00 



Paid S. A. Carter, state treasurer $48,404 00 



Dr. 

,404 00 
Cr. 

$48,404 00 



COUXTY TAX. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $35,237 00 
balance overdrawn ... 74 

;,237 74 



Cr. 
Paid D. F. Clark, county treasurer $35,237 74 

$35,237 74 



372 



STONE ROAD-ROLLER. 



To appropriation 



),500 00 



Paid Wm. C. Oastler, road-roller . $6,442 40 
Concord R. R., freight . . 57 60 



Dr. 

5,500 00 
Cr. 

),500 00 



1883 
1884 
1885 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 

$922 33 

952 08 

. 1,054 27 



Dr. 



TAXES FOR 1886. 

To amount of resident tax . . $345,245 71 
non-resident tax . 1,763 60 



Dr. 





$347,009 31 




Cr. 


collections . 


.$323,117 48 


abatements . 


1,197 13 


discounts . . -, 


. 8,106 72 


balance uncollected 


. 14,587 98 




$347,009 31 



25 


00 


1,200 


00 


1,653 


51 


1,800 


00 


1,000 


00 


200 


00 


700 


00 



373 

CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $13,000 00 

balance 2,218 08 

$15,218 08 

Cr. 
Paid George H. Stearns, mayor . $1,800 00 

George H. Stearns, ex-officio 
overseer of poor 

S. B. Putnam, treasurer 

J. B. Straw, collector 

Wm. E. Buck, superintendent 
of schools .... 

W. H. Bennett, city engineer 

F. A. Hoyt, city physician 

J. A. Barker, city messenger . 

David Farmer, inspector of 

check-lists .... 82 50 

William B. Stearns, inspector 

of check-lists ... 64 00 

H. D. Lord, inspector of check- 
lists and clerk ... 209 75 

John Ryan, inspector of check- 
lists 74 25 

J. E. Stearns, inspector of 

check-lists .... 56 00 

C. W. Quimhy, inspector of 
check-lists . . . . 117 01 

Isaac Whittemore, inspector 

of check-Hsts . -. . 152 25 

D. O. Furnald, inspector of 
check-lists .... 93 00 

F. B. Potter, moderator . 3 00 

George "W. Goffe, moderator . 6 00 



374 



Paid Hiram Hill, moderator . 
J. F. Sullivan, moderator 
Ct. M. True, moderator . 
Wm. A. Carpenter, moderator 
A. G. Savory,, moderator 

E. P. Philbrick, ward clerk 

F. W. Garland, ward clerk 
J. F. Looney, ward clerk 
Abial W. Eastman, ward clerk 
Walter S. Heath, ward clerk 
J. J. McGovern, ward clerk 
Chas. E. Quimby, ward clerk 
"Walter S. Heath, ward clerk 
Pius Brown, assessor 

D. 0. Furnald, assessor 
C. H. Brown, assessor 
F. B. Potter, assessor 
J. E. Stearns, assessor 
George W. Weeks, assessor 
P. A. Devin'e, assistant assessor 
C. S. Fisher, clerical work for 

assessors 
l!^. Mchols, clerical work for 

assessors 
J. P. Moore, assistant assessor 

E. W. Brigham, assistant asr 
sessor ..... 

R. P. Silver, assistant assessor 

I. Whittemore, assistant as- 
sessor . . ... 

P. A. Devine, assessor . 

George C. Gilmore, assistant 
assessor . . . . 

George H. Dudley, assessor . 



$9 00. 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 

10 00 

11 00 
5 00 
5 75 
5 00 

10 00 

16 00 

8 00 

140 00 

509 30 

152 50 

210 00 

140 00 

181 50 

30 00 

110 00 



252 


50 


72 


00 


32 


50 


32 


50 


47 


50 


82 


50 


47 


50 


143 


00 



375 



Paid J. B. Rezimbal, French inter- 




preter 


$96 00 


Judith Sharer, matron at pest- 




house 


360 00 


E. G. Woodman, overseer of 




the poor . . 


8 36 


James Sutcliiie, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


W. II. Maxwell, clerk over- 




seer of the poor, etc. . 


82 50 


W. H. Maxwell, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


William Marshall, overseer of 




the poor .... 


16 67 


William Weber, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Thomas L. Quimby, overseer 




of the poor .... 


25 25 


Thomas P. Conway, overseer 




of the poor .... 


25 00 


Horace Gordon, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Charles Francis, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Edson Wyman, selectman 


2 50 


C. M. Woodbury, selectman . 


5 00 


Edson Wyman, selectman 


2 50 


A. P. Hall, selectman 


2 50 


Abel M. Keniston, selectman. 


5 00 


Ed. N. Baker, selectman 


2 50 


Henry Hebert, selectman 


5 00 


J. J. Hayes, selectman . 


2 50 


Joseph Quirin, selectman 


5 00 


J. J. Minturn, selectman 


2 50 



376 



Paid Ed, N. Baker, selectman 
L. D. Goodwin, selectman 
H. P. Hunter, selectman 
George B. Forsaith, selectman 
George C. Kemp, selectman 
Charles H. Uhlig, selectman 
James M. Chase, selectman 
Eugene C. Smith, selectman 
Charles Atherton, selectman 
G. H. Colby, selectman . 
George C. Lord, selectman 
J. B. Nonrse, selectman. 
David Thayer, selectman 
K. C. Bartlett, selectman 
George H. Benton, selectman 
Benjamin Spoiibrd, supervisor 
D. F. Shea, supervisor . 
S. S. Piper, supervisor . 
James Sutclifie, supervisor 
F. J. Morrison, supervisor 
C H. Hodgman, supervisor 
A. E. P. Marty n, supervisor 
J. F. Pherson, supervisor 
F. W. McKinley, supervisor 
John Hosley, supervisor 
H. H. Huse, city solicitor 
P. D. Harrison, clerk Common 

Council 
N. P. Kidder, city clerk. 
Edwin F. Jones, school com 

mittee 
Edwin F. Jones, clerk school 

committee . 
Geo. M. True, ex officio, school 

committee . 



15 00 



5 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


9 


00 


10 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


10 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


7 00 


500 


00 


100 


00 


900 


00 


3 


33 


30 


00 


10 


00 



377 



Paid George H. Stearns, ex officio^. 




school committee 


$10 00 


Charles H. Manning, school 




committee .... 


10 00 


Albe C. Heath, school com- 




mittee .... 


10 00 


William C. Clarke, school 




committee .... 


10 00 


Benj. C. Dean, school com- 


% 


mittee .... 


10 00 


K. P. Hunt, school committee 


10 00 


J. E. Dodge, school commit- 




tee and clerk 


85 00 


S. D. Lord, school committee 


10 00 


S. W. Clarke, school commit- 




tee 


10 00 


Charles A. O'Connor, school 




committee .... 


10 00 


John F. Collins, school com- 




mittee .... 


10 00 


William H. Huse, school com- 




mittee .... 


10 00 


J. J. Abbott, school conmiittee 


10 00 


F. B. Potter, school committee 


10 00 


T. J. Howard, school com- 




mittee .... 


10 00 


E. B. Woodbury, school com- 




mittee . . . . 


10 00 


L. C. Baldwin, school com- 




mittee .... 


10 00 


J. G. Dearborn, school com- 




mittee .... 


10 00 


William A. Webster, board 




of health .... 


200 00 



378 



Paid Joseph B. Sawyer, board of 

health .... $200 00 

Geo. C. Hoitt, board of health 200 00 

C.B.Littlefield,milkmspector 150 00 

Geo. W. Prescott, city solicitor 125 00 
Geo. H. Allen, city engineer, 

etc. . . . . . 90 40 

W. G. Furnald, clerical work 

for assessors . . . 18 00 



$15,218 08 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . . $200 00 
balance overdrawn . . . 13 75 



Paid Louis Bell Post Ko. 3, G. A. R. $200 00 
labor of men and teams . . 13 75 



WOMEN'S AID HOSPITAL. 



213 75 
Or. 

$213 75 



Dr. 



To reserve fund, amount trans- 
ferred $400 00 

1400 00 

Cr. 
Paid Mrs. A. Blood, treasurer . $400 00 

. $400 00 



379 

WATER-WORKS. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . |28,058 71 
C. K. Walker, water rents . 75,129 99 

^ $103,188 70 



Cr. 



Paid interest . . . . $36,000 00 

Chas. K. Walker, superin- 
tendent .... 1,698 49 

Manchester Locomotive W'ks, 
iron work, etc. 

K E. T.;& T. Co., telephones 

Merrill Bros., cement, etc. . 

Pettee & Adams, cement, etc. 

Pike & Heald, galvanized 
pipe, etc. 

H. J. Sawyer 

E. R. Cohurn & Co.,station- 

eiy 

Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 

powder .... 

Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc. 

Hutchinson Bros., iron work, 
etc. .... 

J. B. Varick Co., locks, oil, 
etc 

J. B. Sawyer, engineering, 
etc 

D. F. Cressey, iron work . 

Moses Tracy, stone 

Geo. Fletcher, steamboat, 

etc. . . . . . 65 00 



569 


14 


72 


50 


305 


90 


36 


00 


16 


78 


50 


00 


7 


75 


7 


00 


52 


59 


191 


13 


237 


60 


110 


50 


10 


25 


355 


00 



380 



Paid T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc 
D. I. Malioney, lumber 
Concord R. R.., freight 
Norris & Foster, professional 

services . 
J. P. Bartlett, professional 

services .* 
SuUoway & Topliif, profes 

sional services 
H. H. Huse, professional 

services . 
Osgood & Prescott, profes 

sional services 

D. F. Healey 
W. H. Bennett . 
J. McDonough . 
Geo. W. Wales . 

G. R. Vance & Co., stove 

etc. .... 
J. Hodge, lumber 
J. B. Clarke, printing 
Campbell & "Williams, print 

ing . ... 
T. H. Tuson, printing 
Union Publishing Co., print 

ing. 
Temple & Farrington, sta 

tionery . 
C. H. Bunton,blacksmithing 
L. A. Clough, chestnut posts 

E. A. G. Holmes, lumber 
and labor 

E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . 

F. C. Dow, gum boots 



$158 


09 


209 


19 


940 


89 


211 


50 


210 


00 


2,620 


20 


937 


85 


480 


55 


200 


00 


2 


00 


1 


13 


4 


06 


45 


00 


2 


76 


118 


75 


26 


00 


18 


85 



7 20 



2 


35 


23 


95 


8 


40 


106 


14 


165 


19 


9 


00 



381 



Paid C. H. Robie, concreting . $43 05 

Brock & Driscoll, iron pipe, 
etc. ..... 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 
James Bros,, teams 
Wm. P. Emerson, black- 
smithing .... 

H. M. Young 

A. M. Eastman, oil, etc. 

E. R. Coburn & Co., station- 
ery 

Auburn, IST. H.. taxes 
J L. Kennedy, painting 

F. S. Bodwell, stone work . 
J. Stickney, screws 
F. "W. Follansbee, use of 

timber .... 
W. F. Head & Son, brick . 
Geo. W. Weston, recording 

deeds .... 
E. A. G. Holmes, carpenter 

work . . . . 
D. F. Cressey, blacksmith- 
ing . . . 
James Bros., teams 
Chas. Bowker, teams . 
J. P. Finn, painting . 
0. D. Carpenter, mason 

work .... 
City of Lowell, casting 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 
J. Stickney, rubber matting, 

etc 

J. Cashman, damage from 

water .... 



7 


55 


16 


40 


10 


00 


14 


75 


4 


88 


2 


75 


16 


40 


8 


14 


97 


07 


510 


00 


1 


25 


5 


20 


48 


00 


1 


77 


358 


02 


24 


14 


11 


50 


29 


35 


10 


45 


34 47 


2 


64 


35 


00 


7 


16 


30 


00 



382 



Paid E. T. James, teams . 
Geo. P. Clark, land, . 
I. T. Webster, fence-posts 
A. L. N". Robertson, office 

desk 
J. H. Maynard, land . 
J. Garmon, hauling wood 
ISTational Meter Co., meters 

etc 

Boston Lead Manuf 'g Co. 

pig-lead . 
Leonard & Ellis, pig-lead 
Boston Lead Manuf g Co. 

pig-lead ... 
Union Water-Meter Co., me 

ters, etc. . 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co. 

jute packing . 
Gloucester Iron- Works, iron 

pipe, etc. 
Sumner & Goodwin, corpo 

ration locks, etc. 
Ward & Hurley, cocks 

bands, etc. 
The Coffin Valve Co., water 

gates, etc. 
Jarechi, Hay & Co., boxes 

pipe, etc. 
Pattee & Draper, hydrants 
Geo. Woodman & Co., enam 

eled pipe, etc. . 
R. D. Wood & Co., valve 

chest, etc. 
Braman, Dow & Co., enam 

eled tees . 



$38 75 

750 00 

6 00 

25 00 

1,200 00 

20 00 

2,022 20 



242 


29 


438 


63 


295 


98 


362 


60 


26 


82 


4,580 


19 


186 


95 


157 


50 


504 


00 


444 


71 


615 


00 


503 


32 


122 


95 


3' 


06 



383 



Paid Cunningham Ironworks . $2 52 

Geo. W.^Townsend, diver . 20 00 

Edson Manuf'g Co., dia- 
phragms for pumps . 4 60 

E. D. Leavitt, Jr., profes- 
sional services 

J. S. Kewell & Co., water- 
screens, etc. 

Davison Steam Pump Co., 
pumping machinery 

Holyoke Hydrant Iron Co. 

A. G. Grenier, damage by 
water .... 

J. C. Bigelow, cutting wood 

Geo. E. Morrill, auditing 
accounts .... 

L. Gutterson, oil, salt, etc. . 

J. C. Holt, damage to team 

M. Fitzgerald, blacksmithing 

P. C. Cheney Co. 

labor of men and teams 

J. A. Weston, water commis- 
sioner and clerk . . 122 00 

A. C. Wallace, water com- 
missioner ... 63 00 

Geo. H. Stearns, water com- 
missioner ex officio . . 51 00 

J. F. Kennard, water com- 
missioner ... 39 00 

E. T. James, water commis- 
sioner .... 34 00 

E. H. Hobbs, water com- 
missioner ... 60 00 

Henry Chandler, water com- 
missioner ... 48 00 



193 


95 


200 


62 


12,739 


34 


1 


00 


3 


60 


9 


60 


36 


25 


6 


69 


15 


25 


3 


00 


34 


13 


10,134 


80 



384 



Paid Alpheus Gay, water com- 
missioner . . .. 193 00 
Eastman & Dickey, mason 

work .... 19 25 

By balance .... 18,325 22 



$103,188 70 



RESERVE FUND. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 



District No. 7 
District No. 3 
city farm 



C. B. Littlefiekl, milk licenses 

rent of tenements . 

show licenses . 

W. F. Bradbury, land 

F. C. Shea, land 

dog licenses 

billiard licenses 

land damage . 



By repairs of buiklings 
Bridge-street sewer . 
"Webster-street sewer 
Women's Aid Hospital 
"Webster-street sewer 
Bridge-street sewer . 
fire-alarm telegraph 
bridges 
lighting streets 



$15,000 


00 


65 


00 


348 


26 


251 


00 


500 


00 


887 


50 


508 


26- 


273 


00 


1,098 


06 




SSI 8 Q31 OR 








Cr. 


$2,344 


62 


3,000 


00 


3,000 


00 


400 


00 


822 


81 


1,545 


81 


782 


26 


729 


23 


1,373 


06 


601 


73 


163 


34 


1,500 


00 



385 



Paid First Regiment Band, music 

on commons . . . $200 00 
W. E. Butterfield, architect, 

land, etc 1,637 50 

Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising .... 13 50 
By balance 817 22 



$18,931 08 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
printing and advertising 



Paid Temple & Farrington, roll 

paper, etc. .... 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

lumber .... 

E. J. Williams, repairing slate 
roof, etc. .... 

B. W. Robinson, mason work 
Carpenter & Parker, mason 

work ..... 
Bennett & Lord, mason work 
G. R. Vance & Co., repairing 

furnace .... 1 00 

F. W. Avery, galvanized pipe, 

etc 19 00 

T. A. Lane, steam piping, etc. 630 12 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, pip- 
ing, etc 292 03 

25 



Dr. 



$11 


33 




3,500 


00 




150 


00 


$3,691 35 










Cr. 


$21 80 




4 


20 




41 


15 




83 


37 




1 


50 




162 


33 





386 

Paid J. Bryson, Jr., painting, etc. $6 04 

J. R. Carr, painting, etc. . 43 57 

J. A. Sargent, painting, etc. . 180 52 
E. Oshier & Co., carpenter 

work ..... 78 75 

L. M. Alclrich, carpenter work 44 28 

P. Brown, carpenter work . 9 41 

Head & Dowst, lumber . . 20 05 
Geo. Holbrook, lumber and 

labor 2,010 79 

District Ko. 2, labor men and 

teams ..... 13 50 

By balance . . . . . 27 92 







FUEL. 

To balance from old account 

appropriation . . . , 


$387 79 
3,000 00 



Paid E. P. Johnson & Co., coal . $2,145 97 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 466 66 

C. i^. Harvey, wood . . 157 14 
J. H. Proctor, wood, etc. . 6 00 
Geo. Whitford, wood . . 80 56 

D. J. Jones, grate ... 4 06 
Alfred Gower, sawing wood . 75 
V. W. Fairbanks, care furnace 84 00 
Thorp & Bartlett, pipe, etc. . 9 11 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

wood 2 00 



$3,691 33 



Dr. 

^3,387 79 
Cr. 



387 

Paid J. Bailey, putting in coal 
Gilman Clougli, wood . 
S. D. Glidden, sawing wood 

By balance .... 



$20 00 


146 


76 


45 


60 


219 


18 



1,387 79 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 

Dk. 
To balance from old account 

appropriation .... 
Amoskeag M'f g Co. (overdraft) 



Paid Geo. S. Perry ,blackboards, etc. 

J. B. Varick Co., thermome- 
ters, etc. .... 

H. D. Gordon, ofKce chairs, 
etc. ..... 

Pike & Heald, door-mats, etc. 

Higgins Bros., chairs, etc. 

Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 
baskets, etc. 

Daniels Hardware Co., floor- 
brushes, etc. 

Temple & Farrington, fixtures, 
shades, etc. 

Prang Educational Co., mod- 
els, etc. .... 

E. S. Ritchie & Sons, cells, 
Grenet battery, etc. . 

C. E. York, beans, etc. . 

S. H. Andrews & Co., erasers 



$146 01 

1,000 00 

82 


$1,146 83 




125 15 


Cr. 


5 10 




28 90 
60 63 
47 40 




20 95 




44 85 




19 44 




32 70 




7 70 

2 35 

12 00 





388 

Paid City Hall Drug Store, sal am- 
moniac, etc. 

Troy Rubber-Stamp Works 
stamp ... 

E. H. Currier, disinfectant, etc 

Barton & Co., mat 

New York Crayon Co., crayons 

C. M. Bailey, manilla paper 

Carroll W. Clark, globe, etc 

E. H. Butler & Co., maps, etc 

Carpenter & Pattee, brooms 

Ginn & Co. 

J. W. Queen Co. . 

A. G. Whitcomb . 
T. A. Lane . 

Whitall, Tatum & Co., igni- 
tion tubes, etc. . 

Brock & DriscoU, stove-pipe 
etc 

Chas. Hardon, erasers . 

J. C. Young, repairing roofs 

B. "W. Robinson, mason work 
Amoskeag M'f g Co., cast-iron 

sinks . . . . . 
A. N. Clapp, brooms, etc. 
Educational Supply Co., blast, 

etc 

E. R. Goodwin 
By balance 



$2 00 

4 00 
24 73 

3 00 
14 00 

1 20 

8 35 

17 63 

4 40 
17 90 
96 25 

5 25 
386 69 

14 72 



32 


40 




75 


12 


72 


4 


75 


26 


42 


1 


16 


18 


00 


6 


04 


137 30 



L,146 83 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 



$116 04 
600 00 



Dk. 



$716 04 



389 



Cr. 



Paid T. W. Lane . 


$271 18 


E. R. Coburn & Co. . . 


118 50 


Temple & Farrington 


8 95 


Geo. S. Perry 


3 45 


Wm. Ware & Co. 


4 05 


Prang Educational Co. 


48 


Milton Bradley Co. 


7 03 


K E. Publishing Co. . 


2 50 


0. Adele Evers 


4 37 


T. W. Lane . 


16 22 


contingent expenses 


75 00 


care of rooms 


50 00 


By balance .... 


154 31 







$716 04 



PRmTrnG AND ADVERTISING. 



To balance from old account 


. $329 77 


appropriation . 


400 00 


Paid Union Publishing Co . 


$56 20 


Campbell & "Williams . 


4 00 


J. B. Clarke . 


340 65 


Teachers' salaries . 


50 00 


repairs of schoolhouses . 


150 00 


By balance .... 


. ■ 128 92 



Dr. 



$729 77 
Cr. 



$729 77 



390 



COJSTTLN'GENT EXPENSES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$183 


71 


appropriation .... 


900 


00 


W. H. Elliott, overdraft . 


10 


00 


books and stationery 


75 


00 

."SI 168 71 






<ipi,J-UO 1 JL 






Cr. 


Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 


$119 07 


Manchester Water-w'ks,water 


630 


30 


Wm. E. Buck, use of team . 


97 


80 


J. Stickney, hose, etc. . 


4 


80 


Daniels Hardware Co., hard- 




^ 


ware, etc. ■■' . 


9 


39 


A. A. Jenkins, tuning piano . 


1 


50 


Clarke & Browne, repairing 






clocks, etc. 


26 


10 


W.H. Elliott, repairing pianos, 






etc 


37 


50 


E. H. Currier, chemicals, etc. 


31 


93 


Woodbury & Fellows, black- 






smithing . . . . 


4 


00 


J. P. Ankarloo, dyeing piano- 






cover ..... 


1 


50 


C. E. York, beans 


1 


20 


H. F. Nutt, cutting wood, etc. 


2 


00 


Thos. Dunlap, cleaning clock 


2 


00 


Mrs. 0. Webber, cleaning 






schoolhouse 


2 


00 


Manchester Print Works, am- 






monia, etc 


3 


76 


Trefethen & Moore, repairing 






clocks .... 


2 


25 


R. D. Gay . 


1 


00 



391 



Paid E. F. Jones, postage, etc. 
Wm. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 
F. W. Fitts, ribbons 
Barton & Co., drilling . 
Manchester Opera-house Co 

rent .... 
Clark & Estey, ribbon . 
Chas. T. Cragin, engrossing 

diplomas 
L. Gutterson, soapine, etc. 
J. B. Varick Co., duster, etc 
Mudge & Son 

E. R. Coburn & Co., paper, etc 
Higgins Bros., use of chairs 

F. H. Gilson . 
Chas. Francis 
T. Shea, cleaning vaults 
C. E. Clough, teaming, etc. 
James Bros., team . 

By balance .... 



$1 50 
1 75 
8 40 

1 95 

25 00 
3 60 

25 95 
6 05 
3 75 
5 50 

25 06 

2 00 
50 

2 00 

45 00 

2 20 

2 00 

28 40 



,168 71 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
books and stationery 



Paid "Wm. Stevens 
J. S. Avery . 
A. T. Barr . 
C. M. Norton 



111 


05 


3,200 


00 


50 


00 


1600 


00 


614 


00 


515 


50 


448 


32 



Dr. 



$3,261 05 
Cr. 



392 



Paid W. H. Morrill 


$350 04 


H. C. Dickey 


250 06 


F. F. Gate . . . . 


83 32 


James Watts 


166 64 


Mabel E. Chase 


9 63 


D. S. Dunbar 


25 50 


Thomas Dobbin 


27 50 


Arthur Sinclair 


15 50 


Ella F. Barker 


30 00 


0. J. Randall 


2 00 


G. L. Whitten 


2 50 


George Lincoln 


11 00 


Florence L. Webber 


12 50 


C. S. Jenness 


3 75 


Arthur B. Campbell 


12 00 


Mary Bean 


12 00 


J. L. Proctor 


3 00 


Eleanor Kirk 


2 50 


G. A. Nute . 


1 25 


Mrs. Lanahan 


2 20 


Patrick Reagan 


3 75 


0. J. Randall 


2 00 


Geo. Lincoln . 


14 00 


Patrick Desmond . 


16 64 


Susie "Woodman 


5 64 


Hiram H. Proctor . 


7 00 


By balance .... 


11 31 







5,261 05 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

To balance from old account . $178 24 

appropriation .... 1,400 00 



Dr. 



L,578 24 



393 



Cr. 



Paid Chas. E. Cochran . 


. $233 20 


Ellen S. Stebbins . 


49 50 


Sarah B. Paige 


23 40 


Etta S. Dana . 


51 30 


Anna J. Dana 


89 50 


Cora Sanborn 


53 00 


AnnaE. McElro}^ . 


74 80 


Cora B. Gilford . 


49 50 


M. Alma Fracker . 


29 70 


F. C. Livingston . 


233 20 


J. H. Campbell 


68 80 


Alice Stebbins 


5 40 


Lizzie D. Hartford 


99 90 


Fannie L. Sanborn 


49 50 


Alice H. Boyd 


40 50 


Fannie M. Kelley . 


30 60 


May Searle 


33 00 


Hattie E. Daniels . 


13 50 


May F. Barnes 


1 00 


F. P. Colby, posting bill 


s . 8 00 


A. T. Barr, janitor 


34 75 


W. H. Morrill, janitor 


54 75 


A. N. Clapp, kerosene oi 


1, etc. 4 49 


H. Fradd & Co., kerosec 


le oil, 


etc. 


5 57 


Union Pub. Co., adverti 


sing . 21 67 


A. G. Whitcomb . 


10 25 


A. IsT. Clapp, kerosene oi 


1, etc. 1 85 


By balance . 


207 61 



,578 24 



394 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 




. $653 79 




appropriation . 

printing and advertising . 


41,000 00 

50 00 

•ft 11 70'^ 


79 




Cr 




Paid E. R. Goodwin . . . $2,000 00 




G. I. Hopkins 
L. E. Manahan 






1,260 00 
720 00 




R. M. Tuson . 






600 00 




M. A. Buzzell 






540 00 




Mary Stanton 
F. C. Baldwin 






512 00 
1,410 00 




L. C. Gilford . 






475 00 




C. E. Reid . 






460 00 




C. A. Abbott . 






450 00 




H. G. Flanders 






450 00 




^. M. James . 






450 00 




E. F. Sanborn 






450 00 




A. 0. Heath . 






600 00 




L. P. Gove . 






485 00 




F. D. Moulton 






346 50 




1^. I. Sanderson 






326 25 




A. S. Downs . 






450 00 




C. E. Woods . 






450 00 




J. F. Bailey . 
M. W. Bowers 






227 25 
450 00 




M. W. Mitchell . 






450 00 




C. I. Stevens 






450 00 




A. G. Lord 






450 00 




D. E. Haines 






450 00 




M. A. Smith 






287 50 





I 



395 



Paid 0. A. Evers 






11,000 00 


Ella Hope 






395 00 


Mary F. Nutt 






295 00 


A. C. Willand 






360 00 


G. H. Brooks 






450 00 


H. M. Morrill 






475 00 


G. A. Wymau 






435 00 


Georgie Dow 






450 00 


S. H. Frame . 






400 00 


E. J. Carley . 






500 00 


M. G. Tynan 






450 00 


L. A. Burns . 






500 00 


I. S. Lock 






450 00 


E. M. Stebbins 






450 00 


G. A. i^ute . 






475 00 


0. J. Randall 






450 00 


B. M. Kelley 






450 00 


L. E. Estey 






450 00 


F. W. Shattuck . 






1,065 40 


A. W. Patten 






475 00 


M. J. Fife . 






460 00 


B. R. Daniels 






460 00 


M. F. Barnes 






450 00 


CM. Gil more 






450 00 


E. F. Tuson 






450 00 


K. M. Follansbee 






270 00 


J. W. Stetson 






1,350 00 


A. A. Webster 






475 00 


M. E. Bunton 






460 00 


B. L. Dean 






460 00 


N. S. Bimton 






475 00 


K. J. Ferren 






427 50 


H. F. Wetherbee 




450 00 


E. L. Stokes 






270 00 



396 



Paid F. S. Sntcliffe 


$1,260 00 


C. M. Dearborn 


460 00 


E. E. McKean 


450 00 


F. M. Seuter 


450 00 


N. C. Woodman 


450 00 


M. L. Gage 


397 50 


N. F. Ainsworth 


385 00 


E. F. Barker 


450 00 


S. S. Woodman 


450 00 


0. A. Rowe 


450 00 


G. L. Whitten 


203 00 


J. J. Kimball 


1,000 00 


L. A. Brooks 


321 00 


M. A. Southard 


108 25 


C. F. Bartlett 


339 50 


M. E. Sanborn 


114 00 


Hulda Graupner . 


111 00 


N. B. Croning 


32 00 


Cora F. Sanborn . 


12 75 


Sarah Paige 


111 75 


B. B. Joy . . . 


108 25 


Alice E. Paige 


183 00 


May Hickey 


334 50 


S. C. Hall . 


114 25 


Minnie Littlefield 


81 00 


L. P. Hartford 


14 25 


W. F. Gibson 


227 08 


Mary Putney 


312 25 


Eleanor A. Kirk . 


157 50 


Alice Shovelton 


142 50 


Maud Joy 


131 25 


J. Edward Pickering 


202 50 


Kate T. Clarke 


7 50 


A. C. Prescott 


11 25 



397 



Paid M. F. Dana .... 


$9 


75 




Maud A. Dean 


13 


34 




By balance .... 


15 


47 




$239 


29 


rr J., 1 \jij 1 «/ 


TUITION. 

To balance from old account 


Dr. 


William E. Buck . 


105 


35 


$344 64 








Paid J. J. Hayes, special teacher 
in elocution 


$116 


11 


Cr. 


Wm. Ware & Co., books, etc. 


40 


00 




Ginn & Co., books, etc. . 


60 


16 




Lee & Shepard, books, etc. . 
D, Appleton & Co., books, etc. 
Harrison Hume, books, etc. . 


25 
39 
20 


05 

77 
00 




Willard Small, books, etc. 


9 


74 




K E. Pub. Co., "American 








Teacher" .... 


1 


40 




By balance 


32 


41 


$344 64 









NEW ENGINE-HOUSE, WEST MANCHESTEE. 

Dr. 



To appropriation ^ 



$10,000 00 



Paid Head & Dowst, contractors . $7,000 00 
H. D. Gordon, furniture . 269 50 

Manchester Mills, land . . 1,772 85 



$10,000 00 
Cr. 



898 



Paid William Bailej, land . 


$100 


00 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 


33 


57 


J. B. Smith, automatic gas- 






burners, etc. 


187 


20 


labor of men and teams . 


400 


26 


W. L. Blenus, iron work, etc. 


32 


50 


Weston & Hill, carpets, etc. . 


139 


77 


Manchester Hardware Co., 






hardware, etc. . 


10 


22 


Temple & Farrington, win- 






dow-shades, etc. . 


33 


86 


J. Bryson, Jr., painting. 


4 


96 


By balance 


15 


31 



$10,000 00 



MH^ITIA. 



To appropriation 



Paid Sheridan Guards, armory rent 
1st N^. H. Battery, armory rent 
Manchester City Guards, ar- 
mory rent .... 
Manchester War Veterans, 

armory rent 
Amoskeag Veterans, armory 
rent ..... 
Headquarters 1st Regt. 'N. H. 

isr. G 

Manchester Cadets 



$700 00 

$100 00 
100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 
100 00 



Dr. 

$700 00 
Cr. 



$700 00 



399 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $750 00 

$750 00 

Cr. 
Paid Samuel Brooks . . . $750 00 

$750 00 



SPRUCE STREET. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $1,800 00 

$1,800 00 

Cr. 

Paid Warren Harvey, stone work . $548 00 

ISTourse & Ham, lumber and 

labor 17 01 

labor of men and teams . . 930 25 

By balance 304 74 

$1,800 00 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 

To appropriation .... $4,000 00 
balance 3,319 44 



Paid labor of men and teams . $7,317 64 
Ivilley, Wadleigh & Moore, 

hardware .... 1 80 



Dr. 

^319 44 
Cr. 

^319 44 



400 



HEALTH DEPAETMENT. 



To appropriation 



. $1,400 00 



Dr. 



$1,400 00 



Cr. 



Paid J. B. Clarke, printing . 

L. K.Mead . 

J. B. Sawyer, traveling ex 
penses, etc. 

William A. Webster, travel 
ing expenses, etc. 

T. A. Lane, plumbing . 

George C. Hoitt, traveling 
expenses, etc. 

Russell White, inspector 

Kate F. Dailey 

Joanna Dai ley 

Campbell & Williams,printing 

A. H. Paige . 

Daniels Hardware Co. . 

Temple & Farrington 

C. W. Lerned & Co. 

E. T. James, teams 

T. Sullivan, burying nuisances 

Edwin Kennedy, burying nui- 
sances . . . . 

L. Searles, burying nuisances 

Union Pub. Co., printing 

James Bros., teams 

Dr. J. Alexander, professional 
services . . . . 

J. Ferguson, professional ser- 
vices . . . . . 



$21 88 

4 00 

8 86 

5 61 

7 34 

4 00 

431 55 

25 00 

20 00 



7 


50 


2 


50 




55 


1 


75 


23 


30 


2 


50 


7 


00 


2 


50 


21 


50 


53 


80 


3 


50 



5 00 



10 00 



401 



Paid James "W. Breene 


$1 50 




Richard Ebbitt, professional 
services .... 


5 00 




By balance 


723 86 


$1,400 00 







To trustees 



By bonds 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



11,950 00 



$1,950 00 



Dr. 

$1,950 00 
Cr. 

$1,950 00 



FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 

1886 

Paid during the year 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 

1887 . 
Interest due, estimated 
Bills outstanding 
Temporary loan 
Cemetery bonds 

Total indebtedness Jan. 1, 1887 
Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1887 . 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1887 . 
Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1886 . 

Increase of net indebtedness dur- 
ing the year .... 

26 



$979,500 00 
6,000 00 

$973,500 00 



20,000 00 

36,224 12 

25,000 00 

5,450 00 



.,060,174 12 
5,915 11 



[,001,259 01 
976,291 91 

124,967 10 



402 
Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1846 . . 


$3,187,726 


$22,005 95 


1,808 


%2 10 


$300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


800 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


800 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


800 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 88 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,-343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1809 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


6,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,2.34 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


I 76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673 82 


7,831 


1 62 


100 


1883 . . 


20,055,986 


332,741 72 


7,944 


1 65 


100 


1884 . . 


20,613,032 


361,401 61 


8,143 


1 75 


100 


1885 . . 


21,137,464 


345,260 15 


8,157 


1 63 


100 


1886' . . 


21,379,384 


347,009 31 


8,602 


1 62 


100 



403 
City Debt.' 



Date of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


Aug. 1 


, 1869 


City Bonds, 


Aug. 1 


, 1887 


3,500 00 


Jan. ] 


, 1872 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


, 1887 


100,000 00 


Jan. ] 


, 1863 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


, 18.88 


35,000 00 


July 1 


, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1890 


100,000 00 


Jan. ] 


, 1872 


(( ii 


Jan. 1 


, 1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31 


, 1863 


City Bonds, 


Nov. 1 


, 1893 


70,000 00 


July 1 


, 1864 


" " 


July 1 


, 1894 


50,000 00 


July 1 


, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1895 


100,000 00 


Jan. ] 


, 1872 


a u 


Jan. ] 


. 1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


, 1872 


u u 


Jan. 1 


; 1902 


100,000 00 


July 1 


, 1881 


Bridge Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1911 


60,000 00 


April 1 


, 1885 


City Bonds, 


April 1 


, 1905 


50,000 00 


April 1 


, 1885 


u u 


April 1 


, 1907 


50,000 00 


April 1 


, 1885 


u u 


April 1 


, 1909 


50,000 00 


April 1 


, 1885 


li u 


April 1 


, 1911 


5,000 00 



404 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Land, city scales, etc. 
City Library building 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
City Hall and lot .... 

City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, etc., at City Farm 
Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Engine-house, stable, and land, Vine street 
Hose-house, cottage, and lot. Maple street 
Hose-house, cottage, and lot, Park street 
Houses and Pine Grove Cemetery 
Court-house and lot . 
Common sewers .... 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall 
Street lanterns, posts, and pipes . 
Water-works ..... 
Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets 
Ward room and lot, Manchester street 
Engine-house and lot. Ward 8 



Water-pipe, wagons, etc., for 
Stock in S. V. R. R. . 
Gravel lot, Belmont street 
Lot, Webster street 
Gravel lots. Ward 8 
Gravel lots, Bakersville 
Gravel lot. District No. 8 
Gravel lot. Gore street 
Yalley Cemetery 
Police station and lot . 



watering streets 



$30,000 00 

41,000 00 

22,000 00 

60,000 00 

34,000 00 

10,000 00 

38,052 25 

28,000 00 

47,000 00 

5,000 00 

9,000 00 

12,000 00 

51,000 00 

300,000 00 

3,000 00 

7,500 00 

876,689 31 

5,000 00 

10,000 00 

2,500 00 

15,000 00 

2,500 00 

50,000 00 

1,200 00 

1,300 00 

400 00 

700 00 

150 00 

350 00 

9,000 00 

40,000 00 



:,712,339 56 



405 



INVENTORY OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



High School house and lot . 


$50,000 00 






Furniture, charts, maps, books. 










and apparatus 


2,000 00 $52,000 


00 


Franklin-street house and lot 


. 18,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


18,400 


00 


Spring-street house and lot , 


15,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


15,400 


00 


Lincoln-street house and lot . 


50,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


50,400 


00 


Ash-street house and lot 


58,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


58,400 


00 


North-Main-street house and lot 


. 23,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


600 


00 


23,600 


00 


Webster-street house and lot 


17,500 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


350 


00 


17,850 


00 


Blodget-street house and lot 


3,500 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


150 


00 


3,650 


00 


Bridge-street house and lot . 


900 


00 


900 


00 


Lowell-street house and lot . 


. 7,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


7,400 


00 


Merrimack-street house and lot 


15,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


550 


00 


15,550 


00 


Wilson Hill house and lot 


3,300 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


100 


00 


3,400 


00 


Beech-street house and lot 


. 7,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


350 


00 


7,350 


00 


School-street house and lot . 


. 5,000 


00 






Furniture, aaaaps, etc. 


425 


00 


5,425 


00 


South-Main-Street house and lot . 


2,800 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


200 


00 


3,000 


00 


Bakersville house and lot 


. 13,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


600 


00 


13,600 


00 



406 



Stark-District house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Goffe's Falls house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Harvey-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Webster-District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Hallsville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Youngsville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito-Pond-Dist. house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house and lot 

Amount of school property 
Amount of city property . 

Total amount of city property 



• 13,000 00 




. 150 00 


$3,150 00 


. 3,700 00 




. 125 00 


3,825 00 


. 3,600 00 




. 100 00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 00 




. 125 00 


2,625 00 


. 600 00 




50 00 


650 00 


. 3,500 00 




. 125 00 


3,625 00 


. 1,400 00 




. 125 00 


1,525 00 


t 1,200 00 




. 100 00 


1,300 00 


. 8,500 00 


8,500 00 



. 1325,225 00 
1,712,339 56 

$2,037,564 56 



407 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1887. 



Interest 


. . 


Paupers off the farm . 


City, farm 


. 


City teams 


. 


Highway District No. 1 


a 


u 2 


a 


" 3 


<; 


" " 4 


(( 


" 5 


a 


" 6 


a 


" 7 


a 


" 8 


ii 


a 9 


a 


" 10 


a 


u 11 


u 


a 12 


a 


" 13 


New highw 


ays . 


Damage for land taken for 



highways 
AVatering streets . 
Lighting streets . 
Paving streets 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete 
Sewers and drains 
Commons . 
Bridges 

Incidental expenses 
Pine Grove Cemetery 
Valley Cemetery . 
Fire department 
Fire-alarm telegraph 
Hydrant service . 
Fire department, individual alarm 



$18,500 00 

3,500 00 

3,500 00 

3,000 00 

300 00 

9,000 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

500 00 

400 00 

1,100 00 

700 00 

500 00 

2,200 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 

200 00 

6,000 00 

1,000 00 

4,000 00 

15,000 00 

2,500 00 

10,000 00 

3,500 00 

15,000 00 

3,000 00 

2,000 00- 

15,000 00 

2,500 00 

1,500 00 

30,000 00 

1,500 00 

20,000 00 

3,000 00 



408 



Police department 

Printing and stationery 

Repairs of buildings . 

City library 

Militia .... 

Payment of funded debt 

Abatement of taxes 

Discount on taxes 

State tax .... 

County tax .... 

City officers' salaries . 

Firemen's parade 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Stark Monument square 

Women's Aid and Relief Society 

Reserve fund 

Repairs of schoolhouses 

Fuel 

Furniture and supplies 
Books and stationery . 
Printing and advertising 
Contingent expenses . 
Care of rooms 
Evening schools . 
Teachers' salaries 
South-Main-street sewer 
Truant officer 
Spruce street 
Health department 
Scavenger teams 
Evening schools, mechanical dr? 
Webster-street engine-house 
West Manchester engine-house 
City engineer's department 



Hospital 



awinof 



$27,000 00 

1,500 00 

2,000 00 

3,800 00 

700 00 

3,500 00 

2,500 00 

8,000 00 

48,404 00 

35,237 00 

15,000 00 

300 00 

200 00 

300 00 

400 00 

20,000 00 

4,000 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

400 00 

800 00 

3,200 00 

1,400 00 

42,000 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

5,000 00 

500 00 

12,000 00 

5,500 00 

2,600 00 



1436,091 00 



R e: PO RT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Enghneers' Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1886. 

To His Honor the 3Ia^or, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : — 

In compliance with the laws and ordinances of the city 
I herewith submit the annual report of the Manchester 
Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 1886, 
also an inventory of the property of the department, and 
a statement of alarms, fires, losses, insurance, etc. 

During the year the department has responded to twen- 
ty-four bell alarms, and some portions of it to sixteen 
" stills." This is a decrease of bell alarms of one from 
last year and six from 1884, which, considering the size 
of our city, and the loose and careless manner in which 
very many of the houses have been constructed, seems 
quite remarkable. 

The aggregate loss at the fires to which the department 
has responded is $12,806, on which insurance has been 
allowed to the amount of $7,381.40, making a net loss 
over insurance allowed, $5,424.60. 



412 



ORGANIZATION. 



The present organization of the department includes 
one hundred and eighteen members, as follows : — 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

2 Steam Fire-engine Companies, — 14 men each. 
1 Horse Hose Company, — 20 men. 

3 Horse Hose Companies,* — 12 men each. 
1 Chemical Engine Company, — 4 men. 

1 Hook-and-Ladder Company, — 25 men. 

In addition to the above is one Hand Hose Company 
of 20 volunteers. 

Before this report appears in printed form, the " or- 
ganization" of the department will be somewhat changed, 
so that at the beginning of the year 1887 the hose com- 
pany (No. 3) in 'Squog will be changed to a steamer 
company with two additional men, making the same 
number as now compose the steamer companies at the 
central station. 

NEW ENGINE-HOUSES. 

During the year a substantial brick engine-house has 
been erected on North Main street, 'Squog, and is con- 
sidered a " model " for convenience of arrangement and 
construction, and a credit to that section of the city. The 
committee who had charge of the building of it en- 
deavored to make it best fitted to the requirements, and 
how well they succeeded in their plans may be judged by 
the praises of all who examine it thoroughly. 

Another has been contracted for, to be completed in 
September, at the north end, on a lot purchased for that 

* One hose company since changed to steamer company. 



413 

purpose on Webster, corner of Chestnut street. That this 
may be equally as well adapted to the wants of the city 
as any other is the earnest desire of those who have an 
interest in the welfare of our fire department. 

Some have thought the location a little too far north, 
but, owing to the "late unpleasantness" of last year, it 
was impossible to get a lot nearer, and the rapid increase 
of buildings in this section, I have no doubt, will soon 
show the location a good one. 

CHEMICAL ENGINE. 

The 1st of April a new chemical engine of two sixty- 
gallon tanks went into commission, with a permanent 
driver and engineer and two "call" men. With the two 
men on duty all of the time, this piece of apparatus has 
answered several "stills," some of which have been 
merely burning chimneys, although by it many needless 
alarms have been prevented, thus saving the calling out 
of the entire department. For a fire in its early stage, 
or one in a partition or a confined limit, this saves much 
damage by water. It is a useful piece of apparatus in 
its place, but our citizens should not spend too much time 
in sending in "stills" when the indications show imme- 
diate danger and loss, and particularly in that portion of 
the night when the firemen are asleep and men are 
needed as much as apparatus. 

PROTECTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

During the year the committee on fire department 
purchased twelve large rubber blankets or covers, same 
as are used by protective or insurance patrols in other 
cities for covering goods. They are now carried on the 
hook-and-ladder truck and the supply wagon, but, to be 



414 

more eiFective, and to meet the requirements in case of 
need, should be in charge of a companj^ especially trained 
to use them, and ready in the earliest stages of a fire. 
I would recommend the purchase of additional covers, 
and at the same time repeat a portion of my last year's 
suggestion on this matter, and one that has been alluded 
to annually for a number of years : — 

"This is a matter that has been recommended and 
urged for many years, and which, owing to the condition 
of fire insurance consequent upon a change of our state 
laws at the last session of our legislature, seems more im- 
perative now than ever ; and I would recommend the 
purchase of a wagon similar to our present supply wagon, 
equipped with blankets for covering goods and such arti- 
cles as are usually carried, and a few men detailed whose 
especial duty shall be to attend wholly to the protection 
•of property by these means." 

Unless some such measures are adopted, they will not 
" fill the bill" to such an extent as they ought, and I trust 
early steps may be taken in the matter. 

THE APPARATUS 

has been changed somewhat in its location from last year 
by the Fire King steamer being transferred to the new 
engine-house in 'Squog, by vote of the City Councils, and 
the "Hose 3" carriage changed from Clinton street, to 
be run in connection with this steamer. 

The apparatus, as at present located, consists of — 

2 Steam Fire-engines, Central Fire Station. 

] Steam Fire-engine and Horse Hose Carriage at- 
tached, North Main street, 'Squog. 

* 1 Steam Fire-engine, corner Lake avenue and Mas- 
sabesic street. 

* Reserve engine. 



415 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

* 2 Hook-and-Laclder Trucks, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Supply Wagon, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Maple and East High 
streets. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Lake avenue and Mas- 
sabesic street. 

1 Hand Hose Carriage, at junction of Old Falls road 
and Front street, 'Skeag. 

1 Two-wheeled Hose Carriage, Derrj Mills, Gofte's 
Falls, manned by men at the mills. 

1 Horse Hose Wagon, corner Lake avenue and Mas- 
sabesic street. 

On the completion of the hose wagon, the board of 
engineers desired to place it in the room occupied by the 
superintendent of streets in District 2, but the room has 
not been fitted up for its accommodation, and the wagon 
remains stored in the house of Hose 4, to await suitable 
quarters. 

When the Webster-street house is completed, there 
ought to be a new light steamer placed there ; and while 
there have been rumors of the transfer of Steamer 4 to 
that place, the board of engineers are unanimous in their 
opinion that it is inexpedient to lessen the steamers in the 
business center of the city by such a transfer, 

PROTECTION IN BLOCKS. 

The old saying of " An ounce of prevention is better 
than a pound of cure" may be well applied to our busi- 
ness and tenement blocks. A comparatively cheap 
arrangement might be put into the hall-ways of our 
blocks, at the head of the sta,irs, by placing two or three 

* One reserve tinek. 



416 

pails of water upon a shelf easy of access ; also an ax and 
bar marked "For fire purposes only." Upon the discov- 
ery of a fire on the premises, with these near at hand^ 
much execution might be done, and we hope our property- 
owners will heed this suggestion ; and there may occur 
instances that will well repay them for the outlay. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH, 

which had just been remodeled at the time of my last 
report, now consists of twenty-seven miles of wire, forty- 
five boxes, and seven tower-strikers ; has worked success- 
fully during the year, and has been carefully and system- 
atically cared for by J. Brodie Smith, who severs his 
connection as superintendent with the close of the year, 
on account of duties of electrician and superintendent of 
one of the local electric light companies. 

There has been a tower-striker placed upon the Stark 
Mills, the Stark Manufacturing Company furnishing the 
use of the bell. 

There has been less trouble with "grounds" and 
" crosses" with other wires this year than in fqrmer years,, 
as in remodeling the system the wires were in most in- 
stances placed above others. 

There should be an ordinance prohibiting any wires from 
being placed above the fire-alarm, and a rule established, 
when granting any company permission to erect poles, to 
reserve the top cross-arm in all cases for the fire-alarm 
wires. This, in many places, is the only condition upon 
which permission is granted. 

One of the greatest annoyances we are subjected to is 
the moving of buildings through streets where the wires 
are strung, and permission ought not to be granted to 
any one who is not only willing but responsible for all 



417 

damage and expense incurred by cutting the wires. There 
never has been, but yet there may be cases where much 
destruction might be caused to property by the delay 
occasioned by having wires cut and the fire-alarm tel- 
egraph disabled thereby. 

GROWING "WANTS. 

There should be in the near future a steamer purchased 
to be placed in the vicinity of the Merrimack Hose Com- 
pany, and a suitable building with modern improvements 
erected upon the site of the present house, for the accom- 
modation of the same, with the present hose carriage to 
run in connection therewith. 

A light steamer ought also to be in the eastern section 
of the cit}^, that in case of a fire on Wilson Hill it might 
arrive on the spot easier than one from the central station. 

In planning for new houses,the matter of light one-horse 
hook-and-ladder trucks ought to receive attention. Our 
present truck is too heavy to be drawn a mile or more for 
a slight fire, when a lighter one will answer all purposes, 
and usually at these distances short ladders answer as 
well as long ones. 

I do not in any degree advocate the doing away with 
the one now in use, but the establishment of a light one 
in 'Squog, with shorter ladders, would answer the require- 
ments, and be a saving not only in "wear and tear" of 
apparatus, but of horses as well. The above suggestion 
would apply equally to Hallsville and vicinity, as well as 
the north end and other localities. 

The house used by Hose 5 in Amoskeag has no tower 
for drying hose, and when much of it has been wet it has 
been brought to the central station to dry. A suitable 
tower could be added at small expense. 

27 



418 



THE FIREMEN S RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

While congratulating the Association on its financial 
standing, and not being called upon to pay any benefits 
during the year, I also congratulate the entire department 
on its freedom from accidents, thereby making no calls 
upon the treasury. 

In behalf of the Association I desire to thank the citi- 
zens for their liberal donations to its funds. 

The following- is a statement of the funds : — 



Cash on hand Feb. 9, 1886 . . . . 


$1,284 93 


Assessments 


4 00 


Membership fees 


21 00 


Dividends 


22 18 


Donation, People's Fire Insurance Co. 


50 00 


N. H. 


50 00 


Hon. Frederick Smyth 


50 00 


Col. Waterman Smith 


25 00 


James T. Donahoe 


15 00 


Bishop Bradley 


10 00 


Hon. Moody Currier 


10 00 


Hon. P. C. Cheney 


10 00 


Daniel F. Healy . 


10 00 


Total 


$1,562 11 


EXPENDITURES. 




Salary of secretary .... 


$25 00 


Postal cards . . . . . 


4 60 


Printing 


1 30 



Total $30 80 

Leaving a balance in the treasury of $1,531.31. 



419 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The seventh annual parade occurred on Friday, Octo- 
ber 15, and proved as successful as the previous ones. 
Our City Councils should take into consideration the mat- 
ter of appropriation for this annual parade, and bear in 
mind that our department has more than a third more 
men than when first inaugurated, and that the expenses 
must be necessarily larger. 

coNCLusioisr. 

In closing, I desire to express my appreciation of 
the cordial support the assistant engineers have at all 
times rendered, and to offer my thanks to the officers and 
men of the several companies for their prompt and will- 
ing response to all calls to duty ; to His Honor Mayor 
Stearns and his associate City Councils ; to City Marshal 
Jenkins and his police force for their willingness to co- 
operate with this department, and to superintendents of 
streets in Districts 'No. 2 and 10 for the agreeable manner 
in which they have made the arrangements of horses that 
are used jointly with their several departments and the 
fire department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 

Chief Engineer Fire Department. 



420 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, ETC., FROM 



Day of Week. 



Tuesday — 

Friday 

Saturday . . . 

Friday 

Wednesday . 
Thursday. .. 
Thursday . . . 
Saturday.... 

Friday 

Thursday... 

Friday 

Saturday . . . 
Thursday.. . 
Saturday . . . 
Monday . • . . 
Monday . . . . 
Thursday. .. 
Thursday . . . 
Monday . . . . 
Tuesday . . . . 
Monday . . . . 
Wednesday . 
Wednesday . 
Monday . . . . 
Saturday . . . 

Sunday 

Sunday 

Monday . . . . 

Tuesday 

Wednesday. 
Tuesday . . ■ ■ 

Friday 

Monday . . . . 
Tuesday — 
Tuesday . . . . 
Sunday . . . . 
Monday . . . . 
Tuesday . . . . 
Tuesday . . . . 
Thursday. . . 



Day of Month. 



Hour. 



March 


5 


March 


6 


March 


12 


March 


24 


March 


25 


April 


1 


April 


3 


April 


23 


May 


6 


May 


11 


May 


19 


June 


17 


June 


26 


June 


28 


July 


5 


Julv 


8 


July 


8 


July 


12 


September 


7 


September 


13 


September 


22 


September 


22 


September 


26 


October 


16 


October 


17 


October 


24 


October 


25 


October 


26 


November 


17 


November 


23 


November 


26 


November 


29 


November 


30 


November 


30 


December 


5 


December 


6 


December 


28 


December 


28 


December 


30 



12.36 p. M. 

2.02 A. M. 

1.15 p. M. 
10.35 p M. 

4.45 A. M. 

8.25 A. M. 

0.46 p. M. 

11.56 A. M. 

3.30 P. M. 
7.51 P. M. 
1.37 A. M. 
4.40 A. M. 

10.2? p. M. 

4.59 A. M. 
11.48 p. M. 

3.00 p. M. 

3.53 p. M. 

4.31 p. M. 

p. M. 

6.20 A. M. 
9.20 p. M. 
9.30 p. M. 
11.40 p. M. 

1.45 A. M. 

4,40 p. M. 

2.14 A. M. 

6.15 p. M. 
1.00 a. m. 
7.03 a. m. 

10.25 a. m. 

1.40 A. M. 
11.27 A. M. 

5.55 A. M. 

6.10 a. m. 
12.10 p. M. 

3.55 p. M. 

8.03 p. M. 

5.20 p. M. 

7.02 p. M. 

5.20 p. M. 



Box. 



21 
71 
S. 

7 
S. 
27 
31 
81 
S. 
53 

3 
21 

5 
52 
31 

4 

21 

113 

S. 

s. 

s. 
s. 

81 
4 
81 
21 
S. 



Location. 



Attic 118 Merrimack street 

182 Auburn street 

Sweeney blk. c. Ch'stn't and C'ntr'l 

41 Church street 

858 Elm street, Merchants' Ex 

585 Belmont street 

Canal street, cor. Hollis 

Ill Amherst street 

Riverside, River road, north 

22 Winter street 

Young road, Hallsville 

81 Laurel street, 

712 Elm street, Brown's block 

56 North Main street 

20 Kidder street 

Corner Elm and Spruce streets 

135 Merrimack street 

Smyth road 

Mast road 

47 Cliurch street, cor. Washington. 

25 Amherst street 

286 Pine street 

1005-1011 Elm street 

Corner Elm and Central streets. . . . 
" " " Concord " 
" Central and Chestnut streets 

Chestnut street near Park 

Pine street, corner Auburn 

671 Elm street ' 

399 Pine street 

Railroad street, 'Squog 

855 Elm street, Riddle's building. . . 

Amherst back street 

Pearl avenue 

Clark avenue 

64 Hanover street 

22 Amherst street 

86 Manchester street 

North Main street 

Corner Main and Wayne 



421 



JANUARY 1, 1886, TO DECEMBER 31, 1886. 



Description. 



Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Dwelling-house 

Armory 

Store-house' 

Brass foundry 

Dwelling-house 

Burning brush 

Cottage house 

Store house 

Cottage house 

Cigar manufactory 

Shed 

Shed 

Tenement block 

Orocery store 

Wood lot, burning brush. 

Burning brush 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Music Hall block 

Wood yard - 

Business block 

Grocery store 

Tenement block 

City " dump " 

Tenement block . . 

Cottage house 

Slaughter-house 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Straw bed 

Office 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 

Tenement block 



Owned by. 



H. T.MoGrath 

Samuel B. Hope 

John Sweeney 

Mrs. D. Dailey 

Daniel Clark 

John Campbell 

Manchester Locomotive Works. 

Nathan Parker 

Mrs. A. M. Eastman 

A. J. McKelvie 

Wilber Fisk 

Mrs. John Blonquest 

Mrs. W. W. Brown 

Manchester Print Works 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co... 
Johnson heirs 



Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 

A. C. Wallace 

Tom W. Robinson 

John A. Riddle 

Thomas Corcoran 

Beau, Simons, et al 

Burns & Poor 

Cilley heirs 

John Sweeney 

Chas. E. Cochran 



Aimer D. Gooden 

J. W. Pettigrew 

E. G. & F. E. McKean 

John A. Riddle 

John A. Riddle 

A.L. Walker 



Gay, Hill, et al . 
John A. Riddle . 
Francis Mentor . 
Johnson heirs. . . 
Robert Leach... 



Occupied by. 



Hayman Levy 

Several families 

Several families 

Mary Ann Dailey 

City Guards 

John Campbell 

Manchester Loco. Works. . . 
N. Connor and Peter Ferris. 



Mrs. John McKelvie. . . 

Wilbur Fisk 

Mrs. John Blonquest. . 

Roger 6. Sullivan 

W. H. Tasker 

Christopher Enermen. 

Unoccupied 

Joseph Quirin 

Lewis A. Clough 



Several families . 



A. W. McKellups 

G. True, J. Donahoe, et al . 

Burns & Poor 

Several parties 

J. H. King& Co 



Mr. Sandville 

J. W. Pettigrew 

E. G. & F. E. McKean. 
Tristram Dane 



A. E.Clarke 

Martha A. Cilley. 



422 



FIRES, ALARMS, LOSSES, ETC. — Co7itinuecl. 



Damage. 


Insurance. 


Uncovered by 
Insurance. 


Cause. 


Remarks. 


$50.00 
15.00 


$25.00 
15.00 


$25.00 


Smoker's pipe 

Defective flue 

Defective flue 

Overturned lamp. . 




Slight. 




Exting. with pails. 






20.00 


20.00 


125.66 " 


Exting. with pails. 


125.00 


Spark from stove. . . 
Hot flask . . 


50 00 


50.00 
100.00 




100.00 




Defective flue 

Spark froml'c'mtve 
Defective flue 




137.00 


137.00 

275. 4o' ' 

314.00 






200.00 


200.00 
124.60 




400.00 
314.00 


Unknown 

Sparks from stove. . 




Slight. 
20.00 






20.00 












Match 

Match 


Exting. with pails. 
Exting. with pails. 
































Burning chimney . . 

Burning dress. 

Burning chimney. . 
Unaccounted for. 

Engine furnace. 

Unaccounted for. . . 
Unaccounted for. . . 




Slight. 














5,450.00 

600.00 

50.00 


3,450.00 
150.00 

6om 

1,200.00 


2,000.00 
450.00 




1 200 00 


















Spontaneous 

Youthful incendiary 
Chimney . 
Unaccounted for. 
Tar kettle 




25 00 


25.66 












4,000.00 


1,500.00 


2,500.00 






































Stove smoke 

Lamp explosion. . . . 

Chimney 

Unknown 




















50 00 


50.00 






















$12,806.00 


$7,381.40 


$5,424.60 





423 



TABLE 

SHOWING NUMBER OF ALARMS FROM EACH BOX SINCE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM 

WAS ESTABLISHED, EXCEPT FROM SEPT., 1872, TO JAN., 1873, WHEN 

NO RECORD WAS KEPT. 



K 

& 


1873 


1884 


1875 


1876 


1877 


1878 


1879 


1880 


1881 


1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1 


3 
4 
5 
6 


'e' 

"4' 

7 
2 


1 
6 
6 

1 


1 
4 

"i 

2 
2 


2 
4 

1 
1 


2 

7 

4 
3 

1 






1 
4 






1 

2 
1 


■■■i"!.:"::. 

1 1 1 

2 1 3 


1 
4 

1 
1 
1 


7 


5 
1 

.2 

'" i' 


4 
1 
2 
2 
1 


2 
2 


8 
1 
3 
2 


58 
18 
?9 


7 
8 
9 
12 


3 

1 
1 




■"2" 


1 
2 
2 


23 
13 




1 




4 






















13 
14 
15 
16 
17 






1 


















1 






3 






1 

















1 






1 
1 
1 






1 




1 


2 




2 ; 1 




8 
? 


1 
















1 1 




4 


18 
21 
23 


"3 




1 






1 
1 


" i' 


1 
2 
1 

1 






3 


.... 1 


1 


2 


2 

1 


1 
1 

"i 




2 i 2 
1 i 1 


5 


24 
5 


24 






] 


i 


1 


2 


1 


7 


25 
26 
27 
31 








1 




4 


I 






1 


1 

2 






1 
2 


4 


2 ' '> 


1 


«» 






1 

1 
1 






1 
3 


16 




3 








1 .:.;.. 


7 


32 










1 




1 




1 




4 


34 


2 












' 




4 


35 




















1 


36 
41 












1 

1 














1 








1 


















<> 


42 






















1 


43 
45 


















































1 




1 


51 

52 


1 
4 
2 


1 
3 

1 


"i 

1 


1 
i 


"2' 


1 




1 

2 
2 


1 


■■"2" 

1 


3 

2 


4 

8 


14 


2 


2 

1 


23 


63 

64 
61 
62 
71. 


1 




2 3 


15 




1 
2 




1 
1 
1 




1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
3 






2 








7 






2 

1 


"i" 


8 




1 


2 




1 




3 


14 


72* 










81* 
























3 


3 


Ijo* 


























113* 
212* 








\ 
















1 


1 




























312* 






























313* 






























314* 
315* 
































1 


























1 


























35 


25 


26 


25 


30 


21 


22 23 


11 


29 


13 


30 25 


24 


339 






{3 still. 






1 still. 


1 still. 


1 still. 


1 still. 




1 still. 12 still 


IGstill 



* Added in December, 1885. 



424 



TABLE SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST 
SECOND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 



2 

2 
2 

2* 

2* 

2* 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2* 

2 

2 

2 

2* 



Hose No. 2. 



^ On first alarm, the horses of second-run engine will double on engine of firi>t run. 



425 



NUMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES 
AND IvEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson 
& Co.'s office, Gas-works' office, County Jail, and Hutch- 
inson Bros.' shop. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
Hotel Belmont, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Gar- 
mon's, and W. C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. ILeys 
at Manchester House, Tebbetts Brothers' and E. H. Cur- 
rier's drug stores. 

No. 6. — City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Mead's 
drug stores. 

No. 7. — Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east 
back streets. Keys at Higgins Bros.', Cavanaugh Bros.' 
stable, and Tewksbury's drug store. 

No. 8. — Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Wil- 
son's drug store, residence of Moses N. Smith (No 1299 
Elm street), and Partridge Bros.' grain store. 

No. 9. — Corner of Ehn and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, and J. 
B. Jones. 

No. 12. — Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of Wm. C. Clarke and Charles E. Ham. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Jencks and Lewis Simons, and No. 1 
Senter's block. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of William H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. H. Has- 
sam. 



426 

IsTo. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Iveys 
at residences of H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. 'N. 
Baker, and William Perkins. 

IsTo. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. D. Smith's drug store, J. McKeon's grocery store, 
and A. L. Walker's office. 

]^o. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

'No. 24. — Merrimack Hose House, corner of Massabesic 
street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of I). M. 
Groodwin and hose house. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. 
Keys at residenges of S. L. Fogg, Horace Gordon, and 
Horace Stearns. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Kussell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-shop and residence of John N. 
Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. 
Keys at residences of John P. Lord, H. M. Tarbell, and 
A. G. Fairbanks. 

No. 31. — Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's 
shop. Keys at office, and residence of Mrs. Mary How- 
arth, first house south of shop gate. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and 
Brook streets. Keys at Hoyt & Co.'s paper-mill, Lang- 
don watch-room, and Electric Light Station. 

No. 34. — Jeffiirson Mill. Keys at watch-room and 
pumping-station. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 36. — Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 



I 



427 

No. 43. — N'amaske Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

^o. 45. — The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at 
freight depot, S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office, and Lowell's 
iron foundry office. 

No. 51. — Corner of "Walker and Second streets, "Ger- 
mantown." Keys at stores of F. Riedel and "William 
Weber. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd 
& Follansbee's and A. N. Clapp's stores, and Merrimack 
House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's steam-mill. Keys at the office and 
I. R. Dewey's tenement block. 

No. 54. — Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at 
residences of Lord sisters and Newell R. Bixby. 

No. 61. — Corner of River road and Hancock street, 
Bakersville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, Carney, Lynch 
& Co.'s brewery, and residence of H. F. Dillingham. 

No. 62. — Kimball & Gerrish's tannery. River road. 
Keys at tannery and residence of Edwin Kennedy. 

No. 71. — -Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, Thomas J. 
Smith, and Daniel F. Healy. 

No. 72. — Corner of Park and Lincoln streets. Keys 
at residences of Austin Jenkins, C. H. Leach, and Clar- 
ence D. Palmer. 

No. 81. — Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at 
Engine-rooms. 

No. 112. — Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. 
Keys at residences of Woodbury Davidson and W. T. 
Stevens. 

No. 113. — Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys 
at residences of William B. Abbott, H. S. Manville, and 
E. M. Topliffi 

No. 212. — Massabesic street, Hallsville. Keys at resi- 



428 



deuces of Charles 0. Chase and G. W. Dearborn, and at 
shoe factory. 

1^0. 312. — Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor 
streets. Keys at residences of James Spence (391 Main 
street) and Thomas Bolton, 

ISTo. 313. — Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys 
at residences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, 
and Bouthillier & Gingras's drug store. 

No. 314. — P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. Keys at 
otSce and Independent Hose House. 

'No. 315. — Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Keys at store, 
hose house, and Robinson's residence. 

Also keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be 
given at precisely 12.30 p. M.,from Thomas Dunlap's jew- 
elry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the fire 
bells. 



429 



mSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITI- 
ZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearCvSt alarm-box, the keys 
to which are in the hands of all regular police, and gen- 
erally of persons at the corner or nearest houses. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go. Shut the door, but do not try to remove the key,, 
as it is locked in by a trap-lock, and can only be removed 
with a release-key, which is carried by each of the engi- 
neers, who will as soon as convenient release and re- 
turn it. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to 
remain by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard 
in the box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to 
the next nearest box, procure another key, and give an 
alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an 
alarm for no cause other than an actual fire. Don't give 

AN ALARM FOR A CHIMNEY FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your resi- 
dence or place of business, where the keys are kepi, return the 
keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near 
their property, also all places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in the 
city, and the- number of the box will be given thus : Box, 



430 

6, six blows, which are repeated three times. Box 212, 
two blows, pause of 6^ seconds, one blow, same pause, 
and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke 
of the bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, close 
the primary schools ; and to close all the schools, two 
immediate strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds 
two more immediate strokes, — the time of striking the 
bells being at 8.05 a. m. for closing the schools during 
the forenoon, and at 1.15 p. m. for closing them during 
the afternoon. 



431 



EULES AND REGULATIONS IN REGARD TO 
RESPONDING TO FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The following order wae^ adopted by the Board of En- 
gineers, with which the Fire Department will strictly 
€omply until otherwise ordered, and will attend alarms of 
fire as follows : — 

1. Steamer No, 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes ; the days of its second run it will 
report on the first alarm to boxes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 35, 
36, 41, 42, 43, 45 ; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

2. Steamer No. 2 will report for duty on the first alarm 
to boxes 4, 31, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 52, 53, 54, 
312, 313; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 21, 
32, 81, 314; on third alarm, to boxes 9, 12, 13, 14, 16, 
17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 61, 62, 71, 72, 112, 113, 212, 
315. 

3. Steamer No. 4, same as Steamer No. 1. 

4. On the first alarm, from boxes 9, 24, 27, 54, 61, 62, 
212, 315, the horses of the second run will double on to 
the engine of its first run, and on the arrival at the fire 
the second-run horses will return to their house, and in 
case of an alarm from any box the company will immedi- 
ately respond with their engine. 

5. Pennacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on first 
alarm to all boxes. 

6. Massabesic Hose No. 2, on days of its first run, wall 
report on first alarm to boxes 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 
16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 
43, 45, 71, 72, 81, 112, 113 ; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 
212, 312, 313, 314 ; on third alarm, to boxes 3, 51, 52, 53, 
54, 61, 62, 315. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 



432 

•l4, 15, 16, 17, 18, 26, 34, 112, 113 ; on second alarm, to 
boxes 4, 5, 6, 21, 23, 24, 25, 27, 31, 32, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 
45, 71, 72, 81, 212, 312, 313, 314; on third alarm, to 
boxes 3, 51, 52, 53, 54, 61, 62, 315. 

7. Merrimack Hose 'No. 4, on days of its first run, will 
report on first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 
61, 62, 71, 72, 81, 212; on second alarm, to boxes 9, 12, 
13, 14, 51, 52, 53, 54, 112, 113 ; on third alarm, to boxes 
312, 313, 314, 315. 

Second Eun. First alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 21, 23, 24, 
25, 45, 61, 62, 71, 72, 212; on second alarm, to boxes 5, 
6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 
36, 41, 42, 43, 51, 52, 53, 54, 81, 112, 113; ou third 
alarm, to boxes 312, 313, 314, 315. 

8. Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder No. 1 will report on 
first alarm to all boxes. 

9. Chemical Engine No. 1 will report for duty on first 
alarm to all boxes. 

10. Steamer ITo. 3 to be kept as a reserve engine to be 
used in case of need on third alarm. 

11. During the progress of a fire, any of the apparatus 
not called on that alarm will promptly respond to an 
alarm from any other box. 

12. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the 
engine, hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first 
will have the right to lead to the fire. ]^o running by 

WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER 
PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPART- 
MENT. 

13. The drivers shall not permit persons not connected 
with the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in 
muddy weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit 
any one to ride upon their apparatus when returning 
from fires. 



433 

14. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer in 
charge, will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses ; or in case this one blow is not 
struck within thirty minutes, companies may consider 
themselves dismissed, except the drivers, who will remain 
in the houses with their horses until the two blows to 
limber up. 

15. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 

28 



434 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and 
hose-carriage ..... 
100 feet three-inch leather hose . 
1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch fabric hose 

Firemen's suits and badges . 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures, including 
harnesses , . 



Total amount 



$4,000 00 
100 00 
900 00 
200 00 

400 00 

$5,600 00 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine . $4,000 00 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . 600 00 

1,500 feet leather hose 1,500 00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. . . 466 00 

Harnesses, blankets, etc. . . . 325 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 150 00 

Total amount $7,041 00 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON PARK STREET, CORNER MASSABESIC. 

(Reserve engine.) 
1 second-class single-plunger engine and 



hose-carriao-e 



$750 00 



435 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COIVIPANY NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class' double-plunger engine and 
hose-carriage .... 
50 feet rubber hose .... 
1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch Baker fabric hose . 
Firemen's suits and badges . 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures, including 
harnesses ..... 

Total amount .... 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 foui'-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $600 00 

1 horse hose-sled and reel . . . 20 00 

3,100 feet leather hose 3,100 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 250 00 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses ...... 500 00 



. $3,500 


00 


50 


00 


800 


00 


200 


00 


400 


00 


. $4,950 00 



Total amount $4,370 00 

MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $600 00 

1,100'feet leather hose 1,500 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 160 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 175 00 



Total amount $2,435 00 



436 



MERRIMACK HOSE COMPANY NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON PARK STREET, CORNER MASSABESIC. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . 
1,000 feet leather hose ..... 
Firemen's suits and badges . 
Furniture and fixtures, including harness 
Beds and bedding, etc. .... 

Total amount ..... 



$600 00 


1,500 


00 


120 


00 


125 


00 


50 


00 



$2,395 00 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders 
Reserve truck . . . . . 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 

6 rubber blanket covers . . . . 
Firemen's suits and badges . 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses ...... 

Total amount 



$1,700 00 
500 00 
860 00 
144 00 
350 00 

340 00 

$3,894 00 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 double-tank (60 gallons each) engine 
1 pair harnesses and blankets, etc. 

Firemen's suits and badges . 
I pair horses .... 

Furniture, bedding, etc. 

Total amount 



$2,250 


00 


190 


00 


35 


00 


300 


00 


190 


00 



2,965 00 



437 

SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

1 supply wagon with boxes and engineers' 

lanterns 1312 00 

6 rubber blanket covers .... 144 00 



Total amount .... $456 00 

SPARE HOSE. 

AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

1,200 feet leather hose $1,000 00 



engineers' department. 

5 fire-hats $7 50 

Furniture and fixtures . . . . 125 00 



Total amount . . . . $132 50 

hose wagon. 

1 four-wheeled hose wagon (not in use) . $450 00 

independent HOSE COMPANY. 

LOCATED CORNER OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET, 'SKEAG. 

1 four-wheeled hose-carriage . . . $400 00 
1,200 feet leather hose 800 00 

2 hose-pipes 30 00 



Total amount .... $1,230 00 



438 



GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT DEKRY MILLS. 



1 two-wlieeled hose-carriage 
300 feet fabric hose 

2 hose-pipes 

Total amount 



$100 00 

240 00 

12 00 

$352 00 



SLEEPING HALL. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

5 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. 



$234 25 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



At cost (including additions previous to 1885) $21,625 00 

Remodeling in 1885 6,000 00 

Ladders, tools, wire, etc. .... 50 00 

1 tower-striker and gong (added in 1886) . 775 00 



Total amount 



28,450 00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Engine Co. 'No. 1 

Fire King Steam Engine Co. No. 2 

E. W. Harrington Steam Engine Co. No. 3 

N. S. Bean Steam Engine Co. No. 4 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 

Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4 

Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1 

Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 . 

Supply Wagon .... 



$5,600 00 

7,041 oa 

750 00 
4,950 00 
4,370 00 
2,435 00 
2,395 00 
3,394 00 
2,965 00 

456 00 



439 



Spare Hose .... 


. $1,000 00 


Engineers' Department . 


132 50 


Hose Wagon .... 


450 00 


Independent Hose Co. ]^o. 5 . 


. 1,230 00 


Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage . 


352 00 


Sleeping Hall 


234 25 


Fire- Alarm Telegraph . 


. 28,450 00 


Total amount 


.$66,204 75 



440 



:n'ames and residences of the members 
of the fire department. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 

Bookseller 

Wool a'dLe'th'rDeal'r 

Painter 

Machinist 

Grocer 

Carpenter 



Residence. 



Thomas W. Lane. . . Chief 

Orrin E. Kimball*. ; Assistant 

James F. Pherson. . Assistant 

Fred S. Bean Assistant and clerk 

i 
Horatio Fradd [ Assistant 

Ruel 6. Manningt . Assistant — 



1937 Elm Street. 
17 Harrison St. 
25 M. S. B. 
96 Bridge St. 
64 Dover St. 
53 Douglas St. 



* Resigned April 1. t Elected April 6, to fill vacancy. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



1^ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 
15 
17 


Charles F. McCoy 
Thomas J. Wyatt. . . 
Greorge E. Cassidy. . 
George R. Simmons 
Joseph H. Gould . . . 
Charles H. Rogers . 
Artemas C. Barker. 

John H. Stone 

Frank B. Marston . 
Woodbury Davidson 
Henry A. Boone.. . 
Frank E. Stearns . . 
George tf. Forsaith. 
Charles F. Hall .... 


Foreman 

Assistant Foreman. 
Clerk 




5 M. S. B. 




14 M. S. B. 


Carpenter 


31 spring St. 


9 
13 
11 




Assistant Engineer. 




1087 Elm St. 




28 Vine St. 


12 
14 


Hoseman 




455 Pine Street. 




8 Orange Street. 
11 M. S. B. 


16 
18 
19 






ji 




785 Union St. 


,j 




19 M. S. B. 


8 


jj 


Paper-hanger 


389 Park Street. 


10 


„ 


196 Laurel St. 


g 


^^ 




45 W. Merr imackSt . 











441 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on North Main Street, 'Squog. 



66 
«7 
68 
120 
119 
76 
69 
72 
75 
70 
71 
77 
73 
73 



Name. 



Joseph H. Alsop. . . . 

David G.Mills 

John Martin 

Thomas F. Dodge . . 
Stephen Thomes.... 

John Shea 

John T. O'Dowd... 

Samuel A. Hill 

Robert I. Hill 

John T.6. Dinsmore 
Charles 6. Ranno. . 
Daniel B. Emery. . . 
Charles S. Cousins. 
Thomas E. Foote... 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 
Driver Steamer — 

Driver Hose 

Hoseman 



Occupation. 



Manufacturer 

Carpenter 

Machinist 



Carpenter 
Teamster.. 



Carpenter . 



HarnessManufacturer 

Machinist 

Harness-maker 

Wool-sorter 



Residence. 



54 Douglas Street. 
34 Parker Street. 
624 No. Main St. 
Engine-house. 

55 Douglas St. 
Engine-house. 

36 School Street. 

48 Dover St. 
Parker & Dover. 
Williams St. 
53 Douglas St. 
34 P. W. 



442 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 

Eugene S. Whitney 
Edgar G. Abbott. . . 

John Martin 

Thomas F. Dodge.. 

Albert Merrill 

Jeremiah Lane 

Lorenzo J. Chandler 

Walter Morse 

William H. Dodge. . 
George W. Bacon... 

JohnN. Brown 

Frank Dustin 

Warren F. Wheeler. 
H. C. Morrill 



Rank. 

Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation. 

Supt. Electric Light 
Machinist 

Teamster 

Clerk 

Machinist 

Fireman 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Teamster . 

Blacksmith 

Machinist 



Residence. 



96 Bridge St. 
543 Chestnut St. 
624 Main St. 
545 Chestnut St. 
96 Bridge St. 
20 Vine St. 
Orange St. 
3 Dean St. 
530 Chestnut St. 
65 Stark Corp. 



1221 Elm St. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



s.. 

-o o 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


115 


Clarence D. Palmer. 

Geo. N. Burpee 

Warren F. Wheeler. 
Frank A. Pherson. . 




Marble- worker 

Electrician 


347 Central St. 


116 
117 


Clerk 


99 Bridge St. 


lis 


Engineer 




41 Water St. 









443 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Albert Maxfleld... 
Joseph £. Merrill. 
Chas. W. Brown. . 
Walter L. Blenus . . 

Geo. H. Porter 

Will G. Chase 

Lyman M. Aldrich 
Joseph H. Alsop... 
Daniel W. Morse.. 
Geo. W. Cheney... 
Samuel A. Hill.... 
Edwin E. Weeks.. 
Albert A. Puffer... 

David G. Mills 

Chas. B. French... 
John E. Sanborn. . 
Samuel W. Patten. 
Frank D. Burleigh 
Chas. F. Glidden.. 
Robert J. Hill 



Foreman Belt-maker . . . 

Assistant Foreman . Currier 

Clerk Clei;k 

Driver Teamster 

Hoseman Carpenter . . . . 

Photographer . 

Carpenter 

Manufacturer. 

Machinist 



Carpenter 

Machinist 

Railroad employe 
Carpenter 



Belt-maker . 
Carpenter . . 

Clerk 

Carpenter . . 



23 M. S. B. 
92 Walnut St. 
16 Hazel St. 

26 Vine St. 
277 Laurel St. 
217 Central St. 
375 Park St. 

54 Douglas St. (P.) 
1419 Elm St. 
1490 Elm St. 
50 Douglas St. (P.) 
502 Manchester St. 
120 Concord St. 
11 Parker St. (P.) 
18 M. S. B. 
274 Laurel St. 
3 M. S. B. 

27 M. S. B. 
277 Laurel St. 

35 School St. (P.) 



444 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



91 
92 
113 
93 
«4 
95 
96 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
108 
109 
111 
112 
114 
110 
90 
97 
107 



Name. 

Jerome J. Levering. 

Oscar P. Stone 

Ralph Pearson 

Winfield S. Leavitt. 
Charles M. Denyou. 

Warren Harvey 

James Orrill 

John N. Chase 

John Wilson 

Hiram P. Young. . . 
George H. Dudley. 
Ed. A. G.Holmes.. 
Luther J. Flint... 
Harrison H. Cole. . . 
Jesse B. Nourse . . . 
Charles H. Cross.. . 
Dillwyn Breed. . .. 
George M. Jones. . . 

Roscoe Dyer 

Sanborn T. Worthen 
Arth'rW.Whitcomb 
Pharis E. Rogers. 
Henry Johnson. . 
Charles W. Bailey 
Henry Heap 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman, 

Clerk 

Treasurer 

Driver 

Fireman 



Occupation. 



Carpenter 

Meat and fish dealer . 

Box-maker 

Mechanic 

Teamster 

Contractor 

Barber 

Overseer 

Carpenter 

Slater 

Carpenter 



Overseer 

Belt-maker 

Gardener 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Mason 

Piper. 

Carriage-maker. 
Manufacturer. . . 



Residence. 



300 Pine St. 
326 Granite St. 
9-2 Arlington St. 
146 Orange St. 
18 Vine St. 
474 Hanover St. 
57 Myrtle St. 
276 Bridge St. 
12 Water St. 
33 Dutton St. 
159 Laurel St. 
224 Manchester St. 
4 Dutton St. 
10 Wilson St. 
Uuion c. Appleton. 
8 Langdon Corp. 
410 Park St. 
1068 Elm St. 
36 Water St. 
493 Maple St. 
187 Merrimack St. 
69 Ash St. 
20 M.S. B. 



445 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Maple Street, corner East Hicjh. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



John F. Seaward.. . Foreman | Carpenter . 

Revile G. Houghton Assistant Foreman . | Gas-fitter. 



Henry G. Seaman. 
Walter Seaward... 
George Huntley . . . 
Jos. W. Batchelder. 
William S. McLeod. 
Daniel W. Clark. . . 
Oscar P. Abbott... 
George W. Seaward 
Alberts. Batchelder 
Fred S. Lewis 



Clerk ' Carpenter 



Driver. . . . 
Hoseman . 



Teamster . . 
Plumber . . 
Carpenter . 
Grainer.. ., 



Carpenter . 



Teamster.. 
Carpenter . 
Plumber .. 



Residence. 



27 Warren St. 
288 Bridge St. 
14 South St. 
521 Maple St. 
1211 Elm St. 
521 Maple St. 
58 Nashua St. 
232 East High St. 
232 East High St. 
106 Concord St. 
11 Linden St. 
27 South St. 



MERRIMACK HOSECOMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Park Street, corner Massabesic. 



Name. 



Louis N. Dufrain . . 
Charles H. Colburn 
William P.Emerson ^ Clerk 
Alphonso E. Foster Driver, 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman , 



John S. Avery. . . 
James W. Lathe. . . 
Frank F. Porter. . . 
George H. Wheeler 
Parker R. Brown.. 
George Dunnington 
Clarence R. Merrill 
Fred S. Sloan 



Hoseman . 



Occupation. 

Plumber 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Janitor 

Machinist 

Manufacturer . . . 

Machinist 

Clerk 

Harness-maker. . 
Grain dealer. .. . 
Painter 



Residence. 



373 Hall St. 
286 Laurel St. 
286 Laurel St. 
Hose-house, 
404 Merrimack St. 
302 Laurel St. 
357 Park St. 
410 Merrimack St. 
422 Merrimack St. 
570 Wilson St. 
177 Merrimack St. 



446 



INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY No. 5. 
House corner of Old Falls Road and Front Street. 



133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
150 
147 
148 
146 
149 
152 



Kame. 

ShermanL. Flanders 

D. L. Robinson 

Geo. L. Stearns... . 
Geo. C. Harwood. .. 
Clarence H. Stearns 
Geo. B. Glidden... 

John Doherty 

A. D. Maxwell. ... 
Thos. Hamilton... 
Charles D. Fuller.. 
William H. Maxwell 
Charles E. Stearns 
Wm. F. Stearns... 

Will Walker 

W. E. Harvey 

Chas. S. Beadle . . . 
Alvah R. Mack... 
George Lawrence.. 
Will Littlefield. . . . 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Steward 

Hoseman . 



Occupation. 



Grocer 

Butcher 

Clerk 

Teamster 

Grocer 

Machinist 

Teamster... .. 

Ice dealer 

Wood- worker. 

Butcher 

Teamster . . . . 
Milk dealer . . . 
Shoemaker . . . 

Butcher 

Paper -maker. . 

Teamster 

Teamster 

Teamster 

Butcher 



Residence. 



Front St., A. 



Dunbarton road. 
Mill St. 
Front St. 
Goffstown road. 

Front St. 



Gofifstown road. 
Mill St. 

Bedford St. 
Front St. 
Mill St. 



447 



LOCATION" OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of N'o. 32. 
Auburn, corner of Franklin street. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of ISTo. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Adams street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Baker, corner of Elm street. 
Baker, corner of River road. 
Baker, corner of Calef road. 
Baker, corner of N'utt road. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 



448 



Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 

Beech, front of No. 584. 

Belmont, near 345. 

Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Birch, northwest corner of Washington street, 

Blodget, front of primary schoolhouse, 

Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, front of No. 26. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of "Walnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 

Bridge, corner of Ashland street. 

Bridge, corner of Hall street. 

Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 

Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 

Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 

Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 

Canal, near office door of M. L. W. 

Cedar, front of No. 36. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 



449 



Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, front of N'o, 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Chestnut, opposite High street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 
Clarke, corner of Elm street. 
Concord, opposite Vine street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 
Concord, northwest corner of "Walnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Elm, front of Fisk bookstore. 
Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 



450 



Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Gore, corner of Beecli street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite,- northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, near Franklin street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near Brewery. 

Hanover, front of Opera-house. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Harrison, opposite No. 13. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Hiffh, corner of Ashland street. 

High, corner of South street. 

Hiffh, 50 feet east of Wilson road. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 



451 



Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near 'No. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Laurel, near Belmont street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Milton street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 
Lowell, northwest corner of "Wilson road. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Central street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Maple, front of No. 530. 
Market, near Canal street. 



452 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of Old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mammoth road. 

Mechanics, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Mechanics, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanics, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Merrimack, near Belmont street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beacon street. 

Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Middle, near 67 Amoskeag corporation. 

Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 



453 



North, northwest corner of Bay street. 

North, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

North, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 

Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Wahiut street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Orange, corner of Ash street. 

Orange, corner of Maple street. 

Orange, corner of Oak street. 

Orange, corner of Russell street. 

Lake avenue, near No. 36. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Union street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Lake avenue, east end. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Pine stj^eet. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 

Pearl, corner of Beech street. 

Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 

Pine, northwest corner of Lake avenue. 



454 

Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
River road (north), north of Webster street. 
River road (north), near Mrs. John Kelley's. 
River road (north), near J. Otis Clark's. 
River road (south), near Mrs. B. Chase's house. 
River road (south), near gate of Kimball & Gerrish's tan- 
nery. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 
Shasta, corner of River road. 
Shasta, corner of Beech street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 



455 



Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite 57 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite 13 Manchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 
Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Union, northwest corner of High street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Willow street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Taylor street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Cypress street. 
A^alley, northwest corner of Jewett street. 
Valley, 150 feet east J. L, Woodman's. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Water, near 38 Amoskeag corporation. 
Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Webster, corner of Adams street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 
West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 



456 

West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 
"West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Webster, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Webster, northeast corner of River road. 
Wilson, corner of Lake avenue. 
Young, corner of Elm street. 
Young, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Young, corner Maple street. 
Young, 96 feet east of R. N. Batchelder's. 

PISCATAQUOG AND McGREGORVILLE. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
A, near 'No. 73. 

A, northwest corner of B street. 
Adams, corner of Main street. 
Amory, corner of Beauport street. 
Amory, near Dubuque street. 
Bath, corner Shirley street. 
Bennington, corner of Main street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Cartier, corner Putnam street. 
Clinton, corner of Do\&er street. 



457 



Clinton, corner of South Main street. 

Douglas, corner of Quincy street, 

Douglas, corner of Green street. 

Douglas, corner of Barr street. 

Douglas, corner of West street. 

Douglas, corner of Main street. 

Douglas, east of Main street. 

Terry, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Quincy street. 

Granite, corner of Green street. 

Granite, corner of Barr street. 

Granite, corner of West street. 

Granite, corner of Dover street. 

Granite, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Shirley street. 

Granite, corner of River street. 

Main, opposite the Rice house. 

Marion, corner of McGregor street. 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's. 

Mast, near J. N". Prescott's. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite " Reed " house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main street. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 

Patten, corner of Ferry street. 

Putnam, corner of Main street. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 

School, corner of South Main street. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 



458 

School, corner of River street. 
Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 
Shirle}', southwest corner of Ferry street. 
Sullivan, corner of Main street. 
Temple, corner of Main street. 
Walker, corner of River road. 
Walker, corner of Patten street. 
Walker, corner of Parker street. 
Walker, near corner of South Main street. 
Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 
Wayne, near corner of Main street. 
Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 
Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Dunbarton road, corner of Front street. 

Dunbarton road, near L. D. Colby's. 

Goffstown road, 4. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 

Main, near brick schoolhouse. 

Main, corner of Goffstown road. 

Main, opposite John E. Stearns's. 

Main, near Hiram Stearns's. 

Mill, near paper mill. 

Mill, corner Main street. 

Yarnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are four private hydrants 
that are available in case of need : — 

Two at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at A. H. Lowell's iron foundry. 
Total number, 404. 



INDEX. 



INDEX 



Page 

Address, Mayor's 276 

Abatement of Taxes 370 

Account of City Treasurer 290 

Alarm-Boxes and Keys 425 

Amoskeag Cemetery ^ 348 

Amoskeag S. F. E. Company No. 1 434 

Appropriations for 1886 407 

Attendance at School ... 140 

Books and Stationery 388 

Bridges 332 

Care of Rooms .... 391 

Cemetery Funds 401 

Cemeteries, Report of Trustees 242 

Treasurer 259 

Trustees of Fund 261 

City Government, 1886 3 

Engineer, Report of. 45 

Debt 401-403 

Farm 808 

Hall 364 

Library 369 

Property 404 

Solicitor, Report of 201 

Teams 312 

Treasurer's Account. ... 290 

Commons 333 

County Tax 371 

Contingent Expenses 390 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 378 

Debt, Funded 401 

Discount on Taxes 371 

Donations to City Library 188 



462 

E. W. Harrington Hose Company No. 3 434 

Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Company No. 1 436 

Evening Schools 392 

Farm, City 308 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 356 

Boxes and Keys, Location of 425 

Eire Apparatus 434 

Department 350 

Department, Rules'and Regulations of 431 

Firemen's Parade 357 

Relief Association 418 

Fires, Alarms, Losses, 1886 420 

Fuel 386 

Furniture and Supplies 387 

Government, City, 1886 3 

Grading for Concrete 326 

Health Department 400 

High School 207 

Highway District No. 1 314 

2 316 

3 316 

4 317 

5 317 

6 317 

7 318 

8 319 

9 319 

10 319 

11 320 

12 320 

13 321 

Highways, Kew 321 

Hydrant Service 357 

Hydrants, Location of. 447 

Inaugural Address 276 

Incidental Expenses - 334 

Independent Hose Company No. 5 437 

Instructions to Key-Holders 429 

Interest < 298 

Inventory of Schoolhquses 405 



463 

Land Damages 322 

Library /City 172, 369 

Donations to 188 

Librarian's Report 183 

Treasurer's Report 177 

Trustees' Report 171 

List of Teacliers and Janitors 160 

Lighting Streets 323 

Loan, Temporary 297 

Militia 398 

Macadamizing Streets 324 

Massabesic Hose Company No. 2 435 

Merrimack Hose Company No. 4 436 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 4 435 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department 440 

Officers, City 3 

Outstanding Taxes 372 

Overseers of Poor, Report of. 229 

Paving Streets 323 

Paupers off the City Farm 298 

Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 435 

Pine Grove Cemetery 244, 346 

Police Department 358 

Printing and Advertising 389 

Stationery 366 

Property, City 404 

Repairs of Schoolhouses 385 

Buildings 367 

Report of Chief Engineer, 411 

City Civil Engineer. 45 

City Solicitor 201 

Committee on City Farm 235 

Committee on Finance 294 

Librarian of City Library 183 

Overseers of the Poor 229 

School Committee 191 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 112 

Board of Health 209 

Milk Inspector 223 



464 

Report of Superintendent of "Water-Works 18 

Treasurer of City Library 177 

Trustees of City Library 169 

Trustees of Cemeteries 239 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund , . . 401 

Water Commissioners 13 

Reserve Fund 384 

Salaries of Officers 373 

Teachers 394 

Scavenger Teams 399 

School Department 97 

Organization for 1886 97 

Training , 127 

High 121 

Schools, Evening 392 

Sewers and Drains 326 

State Tax 371 

Streets, Lighting 323 

Macadamizing 324 

Paving 323 

Watering 322 

Taxes, Abatement of. ... , 371 

Discount on 372 

For 1886 372 

Outstanding 372 

Temporary Loan 297 

Teachers, List of. 161 

Salaries of. 394 

Training School 127 

Truant Officers 399 

Tuition 397 

Valedictory Address 264 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 402 

Valley Cemetery 348 

Water Commissioners for 1886. 15 

Report of 15 

Water-Works 379 

Watering Streets 322 

Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospital 378