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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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CITV OF 



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Annual Reports. 



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THE YEA£ ,~ 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 
STATh LIBRARY 



7. 




FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



City of Manchester 



Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1887, 



TOGETHER WITH 



Other Annual Reports and Papers Relating 
to the Affairs of the City. 




MANCHESTER, N. H. : 

PRINTED BY JOHN B. CLARKE. 

1888. 



35?, 07 

City of Manchester. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Forty-Second Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester : 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are, au- 
thorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the 
printing of the Forty-Second Annual Report of the Receipts and Ex- 
penditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, the School Board and 
Superintendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water-Works, Water 
Commissioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Marshal, Over- 
seers of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian, and Treasurer of City 
Library, Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Committee on 
City Farm, City Physician, City Solicitor, and City Engineer, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the Appropriation for Printing 
and Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. January 3, 1888. 
Passed. 

EDWARD L. KIMBALL, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. January 17, 1888. 
Passed in concurrence. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1887. 



MAYOR. 

HON. JOHN HOSLEY. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

EDWIN F. JONES. 



4 

CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

JAMES M. COLLITY. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

EDWARD L. KIMBALL. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

PELEG D. HARRISON. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 



CLERK OF WATER-WORKS. 

ARTHUR E. STEARNS. 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward 1. — George W. Cheney. 
Ward 2. — Orrin E. Kimball. 

Ward 3. — William S. Shannon. 
Ward 4. — Horace D. Gordon. 

Ward 5. — Leonard P. Reynolds. 
Ward 6. — Charles W. Eager. 

Ward 7. — Frank A. Dockham. 
Ward 8. — Charles W. Quimby. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

George W. Bacon. 
Charles D. Sumner. 
E. Parker French. 

Ward 3. 

Edward L. Kimball. 
John A. Bartlett. 
Frank M. Forsaith. 

Ward 5. 

John F. Bohan. 
David E. Guiney. 
John F. Fox. 



Ward 2. 

Thomas Hamilton. 
Charles A. Carpenter. 
George S. Clough. 

Ward 4. 

John M. Crawford. 
W. Byron Stearns. 
George Blanchet. 

Ward 6. 

John M. Kendall. 
Joseph Quirin. 
Milton A. Abbott. 



Ward 7. 

John F. Frost. 
Clarence M. Woodbury. 
Guy F. Whitten. 



Ward 8. 

Joseph Lariviere. 
Edward Weber. 
Benjamin Freeman. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Kimball ; 
Messrs. Stearns, Forsaith, and Sumner. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Eager and Quimby; Messrs. 
Forsaith, Bohan, and Frost. (Meet "Wednesday succeed- 
ing the 24th of each month. All bills must be left at 
the city clerk's office, properly approved, not later than 
the 24th of each month.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Dockham and Kimball; Messrs. 
Sumner, Woodbury, and Whitten. (Meet third Friday 
in each month.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Reynolds and Shannon; Messrs. 
Bartlett, Carpenter, and Kendall. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Shannon' and Rey- 
nolds ; Messrs. Carpenter, Kendall, and Bartlett. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Cheney and Gordon; 
Messrs. Woodbury, Freeman, and Stearns. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Quimby and Gor- 
don; Messrs. Frost, Guiney, and Abbott. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Kimball and Cheney ; 
Messrs. Bacon, Hamilton, and Blanchet. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Gordon and 
Quimby; Messrs. Quirin, Bacon, and French. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Eager and Dockham; 
Messrs. French, Clough, and Weber. 

On Water -Works. — Aldermen Gordon and Eager; 
Messrs. Crawford, Lariviere, and Abbott. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Cheney and Reynolds; 
Messrs. Fox, Clough, and Whitten. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Dockham and 
Shannon; Messrs'. Weber, Fox, and Quirin. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Shannon and Eager; 
Messrs. Lariviere, Crawford, and Guiney. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Gordon and Shannon. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Reynolds and 
Dockham. 

On Market. — Aldermen Eager and Gordon. 

On Marshal's Account. — Aldermen Shannon and 
Cheney. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Kimball and Eager. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Cheney and Quimby. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Dockham and Reynolds. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Messrs. Hamilton, Blanchet, and 
Abbott. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Stearns, Frost, 
and Bohan. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Fox, Clough, and Forsaith. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Associate Justice of Police Court. 
Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 



City Marshal. 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Horatio W. Longa. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

John Hosley, ex- officio Chairman. 
James E. Dodge, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Charles H. Manning. 
John G. Hutchinson. 

Ward 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 

Ward 3. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 
James E. Dodge. 

Ward 4. 



Ward 5. 

Thomas F. Collins. 
John J. Holland. 

Ward 6. 

William H. Huse. 
Abial C. Flanders. 

Ward 7. 

Ed. B. Woodbury. 
Marshall P. Hall. 

Ward 8. 



Samuel D. Lord. 
Stephen W. Clarke. 

Edward L. Kimball, ex officio. 



Luther C. Baldwin. 
George W. Nutter. 



superintendent of public instruction. 
William E. Buck. 



ASSESSORS. 



Charles H. Brown. 
John E. Stearns. 
David 0. Furnald. 
Harrison D. Lord. 



John Ryan. 
George H. Dudley. 
Ira W. Stearns. 
Frank E. McKean. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 



George C. Kemp. 
Benjamin L. Hartshorn. 
David O. Furnald. 
Harrison D. Lord. 



Edward J. Lawler. 
Isaac Whittemore. 
Joseph A. Foster. 
Henry F. Stone. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

John Hosley, ex-officio Chairman. 

William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 
William H. Maxwell. Frank J. Morrison. 

Thomas L. Quimby. Charles Francis. 

James Sutcliffe. William Marshall. 

Horace Gordon. Horatio Fradd. 

(Meet third Wednesday of each month.) 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



William A. Webster, Chairman. 
Joseph B. Sawyer, Clerk. 
Joseph B. Sawyer. William A. Webster. 

George C. Hoitt. 



10 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 

Fred S. Bean, Clerk. 
James F. Pherson. Orrin A. Manning. 

Fred S. Bean. Eugene S. "Whitney. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 

James A. "Weston, Clerk. 
Henry Chandler. Alpheus Gay. 

James A. Weston. Andrew C. Wallace. 

Joseph F. Kennard. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

John Hosley, ex officio. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Moody Currier. 

Benjamin C. Dean. Lucien B. Clough. 

Daniel Clark. Herman F. Straw. 

Isaac W. Smith. John Hosley, ex officio. 

Edward L. Kimball, ex officio. 



HIGHWAY SURVEYORS. 
Dist. Dist. 

1. Orison Webber. 7. George M. Bean. 

2. William Sanborn. 8. John Proctor. 

3. Edwin Kennedy. 9. Eliphalet M. Wiggin. 

4. Isaac Whittemore. 10. Charles O. Phelps. 

5. John H. Willey. 11. Frank D. Hanscom. 

6. Albert J. Peaslee. 12. Jeremiah Garvin. 

13. William Campbell. 



11 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Edwin W. Blake. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, Clerk. 
James A. Weston, John E. Stearns, for four years. 
George C. Gilmore, Bushrod W. Hill, for three years. 
D. O. Furnald, Hiram Stearns, for two years. 
H. H. Huse, G. P. Whitman, for one year. 



SUB-TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Valley. — Alderman Quimby; Messrs. Quirin, Gilmore, 
Hill, and Furnald. 

Pine Grove. — Alderman Gordon; Messrs. Bacon, Huse, 
Whitman, and Weston. 

Amoskeag. — E. Parker French ; Messrs. Hiram Stearns 
and J. E. Stearns. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Hon. James A. Weston, Chairman. 
Hon. Person C. Cheney. 
Hon. John Hosley, ex officio. 



INSPECTORS. 



Milk. — C. B. Littlefield. 

Buildings. — Thomas W. Lane. 

Oil. — John P. Cronin and Edward J. Powers. 



12 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 
Ward 1. — JMarcellus Gould. 
Ward 2. — George M, True. 

Ward 3. — William A. Carpenter. 
Ward 4. — John C. Bickford. 
Ward 5. — Hugh McDonough. 
Ward 6. — George Hoi brook. 

Ward 7. — Timothy W. Challis. 
Ward 8.— George W. Goffe. 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Michael Herbert. 

Ward 2. — Henry J. Matthews. 
Ward 3. — Jesse B. Pattee. 

Ward 4.— A. L. F. Geoffroy. 
Ward 5. — John J. Sherry. 

Ward 6. — Charles H. Harvey. 
Ward 7. — Saniield McDonald. 
Ward 8. — Gillis Stark. 



Ward 1. 
Henry P. Hunter. 
Oliver C. Mombleau. 
Edward L. Carpenter. 

Ward 3. 
David Thayer. 
Charles Atherton. 
George C. Lord. 

Ward 5. 
Jeremiah J. Hayes. 
William Morrissey. 
Patrick McManus. 

Ward 7. 
David W. Anderson. 
Sylvester Drew. 
John F. Frost. 



Selectmen. 

Ward 2. 
William Smith. 
Everett J. Anthes. 
George W. Varnum. 

Ward 4. 
George B. Forsaith. 
John P. Croniu. 
Clarence R. Merrill. 

Ward 6. 
George H. Benton. 
Charles G. Dodge. 
Lyman Dickey. 

Ward 8. 
Abel M. Keniston. 
Henry Hebert. 
Napoleon Richard. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Board of Water commissioners. 



JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor, ex officio. 

Alpheus Gay, President, term expires January, 1893. 
James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires January, 1891. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January, 1890. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1892. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January, 1894. 
Edwin H. Hobbs, term expires January, 1889. 



OFFICERS. 



Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Charles C. Cole, Engineer at Pum/ping Station. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners 
have the honor to present herewith their annual report 
for the year ending December 31, 1887, together with the 
report of the superintendent covering the same period of 
time. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year are as fol- 
lows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1886 . $18,325 28 

Receipts from all sources .... 80,518 17 



Total . " $98,843 45 

Appropriated to pay interest $36,000 00 

Expended on construction . 18,801 68 

Repairs and running expenses 20,542 15 

Total expenditures . $75,343 83 



Balance unexpended .... $23,499 62 

With no change in rates, it will be seen that the gross 
income has increased $5,388.18 over the previous year. 

The investigation as to water-wheels, referred to in the 
last annual report, resulted in a decision to put in new 



16 

wheels. Accordingly, a contract was made with T. H. 
Risdon & Co. to do the work, the price being $5,627. 
Although there was some delay in the completion of the 
contract, the work was satisfactorily done and the tests 
required under the terms of the contract, as made by an 
engineer in the employ of the city, proved satisfactory. 

Since the completion of the new wheels, proper facili- 
ties have been afforded to test the power of the pumps 
recently put in by the Davidson Steam Pump Company, 
and the result has shown a capacity far beyond what was 
guaranteed. It is believed that the pumping machinery 
and appendages are now in a condition to render effective 
and adequate service for years to come, with trivial outlays 
for repairs. 

The other portions of the water-works system are in 
satisfactory condition, as will be found more fully ex- 
plained in the report of the superintendent, to which 
reference is made. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, President, 
JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor ex officio, 
A. C. WALLACE, 
E. H. HOBBS, 
HENRY CHANDLER, 
JOSEPH F. KENNARD, 
JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1888. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the City 

of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, —"I have the honor to submit herewith 
the annual report of the superintendent for the year end- 



ing Dec. 31, 1887. 



MASSABESIC LAKE. 



The abundance of rain the first seven months of the 
year caused unusually high water in the lake all summer. 
The records at Concord, N. H., show that the rainfall for 
seven months was 22.06 inches, being 4.34 inches more 
than in the corresponding months of last year, and 5.35 
inches more than the average for the last thirty-two years. 

At the present time the water stands at 24 inches 
above the dam, and is running to waste. Last year at 
this time it stood 11 inches below the dam, making the 
water in the lake 35 inches higher than it was one year 
•ago. 

The new Risdon wheels put in last summer are work- 
ing well and fulfill the contract, which was for two wheels 
and two gates for each penstock. The wheels were to be 
175 horse-power each, and to give a useful effect of 
not less than 85 per cent of the total power of the water 
used ; the gates to be made of cast iron with compo- 
sition seats and working parts. The wheels, gates, con- 
nections, and gearing were to be set up and put in good 

2 



18 

running order, including the foundations, for the sum of 
$5,627. The work and tests having been pronounced 
satisfactory by the engineer, Mr. J. B. Sawyer, the above 
amount has been paid the Risdon Wheel Company. 

The new Davidson pumps give satisfaction. They 
pump 5,000,000 gallons in twenty-four hours, according 
to the contract, with ease, and could perform much 
greater service if it was required. The old pumps are 
in good repair, and never worked better than they do now. 
The arrangements are such that one wheel carries each 
set of pumps, and they can be run together or sepa- 
rately, and started up without going into the wheel pit, 
as formerly. The gearing that starts the new wheels 
was brought upon a level with the floor, and everything 
has been done to make things convenient. There is 
no better working machinery to be found anywhere. 
The new valve chamber bought last year has been put 
into the old pumps. The dwelling-house and grounds 
connected with the pumping station have been repaired 
and put in good condition. The highway in front of the 
station has been cut down to the original grade as estab- 
lished when laid out, and the earth used to widen out the 
road just north of the arch bridge. There has been an 
iron railing put up on the bridge in place of the old 
wooden one, and a fence built each side of the embank- 
ment north of the brook. 



19 



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20 



THE FORCE AND SUPPLY MAIN. 

The force main burst close to the reservoir bank, and 
fourteen feet of cast-iron pipe was laid in its place, mak- 
ing a connection with the iron pipe laid in the embank- 
ment. A hydrant was set to use as an air valve when 
the pipe was being filled. The old two-inch air valve 
was set three hundred feet from the reservoir, and the 
air that was between this point and the gate chamber 
burst the pipe when refilling, after repairing a leak. The 
supply main has not required much attention; what 
repairs have been made were at the corner of Massabesic 
and Park streets, on a soldered branch. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

The water pipe extended in the year 1887 was laid in 
the following streets : Auburn, Amory, Beaufort, Blair, 
Brook, Bedford road, Carroll, Cypress, Cedar, Cartier, 
Clarke, Dubuque, Gore, Hancock, Harrison, Kelley, 
Langdon, Manchester, Pearl, Union, Schuyler, Spruce, 
Sullivan, South, and Wayne streets. Amount laid, 7,769 
feet — about one and one half miles, — at an expense of 
$6,186. There have been twenty-two bursts where we 
have taken out cement pipe, and put in cast iron. The 
whole amount relaid this year, 363 feet. There is in this 
city to-day, 49.41 miles of pipe; 26.96 miles of wrought 
iron and cement, and 22.45 miles of cast iron. 



21 



PIPES, GATES, AND HYDRANTS LAID IN 18S7. 



Streets. 



Amory 

Auburn 

Beauport. . . 
Beauport. . . 
Beauport. . . 

Blaine 

Brook 

Carroll 

Cartier 

Cedar 

Clarke 

Cypress .... 
Dubuque . . . 

Gore 

Hancock.... 
Harrison . . . 

Kelley 

Langdon . . . 
Manchester 
Old Bedford rd 

Pearl 

Schuyler . . . 

South 

Spruce 

Sullivan.... 
Sullivan. .. 

Union 

Wayne 

Force main. 



Length in feet laid. Gates set 



320 



320 



6in. 



304 
240 
127 
700 
152 
268 
390 
72 
508 
470 
371 
321 
205 
682 
466 
33 
53 
140 
285 
222 
156 



476 
35 



4 in. 6 in. 4 in. 



476 



162 



638 



Location. 



Main to Beauport. 
East to Beech. 
Adams st. — north. 
Sullivan St.— south. 
Amory to Kelly. 
Eastward. 
Beech to Ash. 
To Old Bedford road. 
North Cartier st. — south. 
To Lincoln. 
East of Elm. 
Valley — northward. 
Each side Wayne st. 
Beech to Ash. 
Main — eastward. 
To Russell. 

Beauport — westward. 
Elm — westward. 
Belmont — eastward. 
Carroll to Mast. 
Linden to Ashland. 
Main — westward. 
East High — southward. 
To Wilson. 

Beauport — westward. 
Beauport — eastward. 
Sagamore — northward. 
To Dubuque. 



i,769 feet. 



22 



Number miles of pipe laid, 1887, 1.4714 
" gates set " 12. 

" hydrants set " 14. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 1887. 

Auburn, cor. Beech. 
Blaine, cor. Cleveland. 
Brook, cor. Ash. 
Carroll, near old Bedford road. 
Cedar, cor. Lincoln. 
Clarke, cor. Chestnut. 
Cypress, front of shoe shop. 
Hancock. 

Harrison, cor. Russell. 
Kelly, cor. Beauport. 
Pearl, cor. Ashland. 
Spruce, cor Wilson. 
Sullivan, cor. Beauport. 
Force main, at reservoir. 



23 



The following places are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken out and cast iron laid instead: 



Streets. 



Amherst — 

Auburn 

Birch 

Bowman 

Bridge 

Cedar 

Chestnut — 

Concord 

Douglass — 
Hanover — 

Main 

Manchester . 
Merrimack., 
Prospect . . . 

Spruce 

Force Main 



14 



Length in feet. 



20 inch. 10 inch. 8 inch 



186 



186 



6 inch. 



8 
16 
9 
8 
20 
14 
12 



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28 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1887. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 




20,560.00 ft. 


5,146.00 ft. 


8 




6.825.00 " 


7,598.00 " 


11 




7,983.00 " 


11,629.00 " 


20 




4,829.75 " 


9,934.00 " 


14 




12,555.00 " 


9,656.00 " 


32 




81,589.50 " 


68,021.00 " 


251 




8,000.00 " 


6,580.00 " 


29 




142,342.25 ft. 


118,564.00 ft. 


365 



26.959 miles of cement-lined pipe. 
22.455 " " cast-iron pipe. 



49.414 total miles of pipe. 

365 gates. 
418 hydrants. 
7 air valves. 

METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year is one hun- 
dred and twenty-six (126). 

Total number of meters in use, seven hundred and 
thirty-nine (739). 

The number of applications for water to date has been 
thirty-one hundred and two (3,102). 

SERVICE PIPES. 

One hundred and thirty-five (135) service pipes have 
been laid this year, as follows : 

132 1 inch diameter 3,242.3 feet. 



1 li 



99.2 



29 



1 1J inch diameter 
1 3~ " 



Total 



23.0 feet. 

16.8 " 



. 3,381.3 feet. 



3 £• inch service have been changed to 1 inch. 



1 | " " has " 

1 j} a a u « 

11,. n a a 

1 1£ " " " " 

155.1 feet f inch taken out and 



17.0 
61.0 



li 



a 

a 


"li 

u 9 




a 


" 4 


a 


106.3 feet of 1 inch laid 
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15.5 " 2 " " 


17.0 


u 


2 " " 


61. 


a 


4 << « 



Twenty-nine hundred and forty-four (2,944) services 
have been laid to date, as follows : 



40 


J inch diameter 


1778 


3 U 


a 


1051 


1 " 


u 


21 


U" 


a 


6 


1J " 


u 


40 


9 a 


a 


1 


3 " 


a 


7 


4 " 


u 



860.7 


feet. 


46,732.3 


u 


27,037.3 


a 


1,252.6 


u 


171.5 


a 


943.4 


a 


16.8 


a 


233.0 


a 


77,247.6 


feet 



Total length of service pipe 
dumber of miles of service pipe, 14.63. 

The income from the sale of water for 1887 has been as 
follows : 



Received for water by rate . 
" " " " meter 



,934 71 

25,277 09 



30 



Received for building purposes . $351 70 
" fines ... 119 20 



$79,682 70 



" labor and pipe sold $768 86 

of G. G. Griffin . 1 00 

" C. C. Cole, for fence, etc. 50 

" B. P. Kimball, for grass 10 00 

" A. J. Crombie, for grass 5 00 

" A. Goodwin, hoop poles 10 00 

" William G. Brown . 25 00 
" T. H. Risdon & Co., 

freight, etc., on gear 15 11 



835 47 



Total received 
Abatement, $285.75. 

Current expenses for 1887 . 
Construction expenses for 1887 
Retained by city for interest 

Receipt over expenditures . 
Amount on hand Jan. 1, 1887 
Amount received 1887 



Amount expended 1887 



,518 17 



$20,542 15 
18,801 68 
36,000 00 



$75,343 83 



i,174 34 



$18,325 28 
80,518 17 



843 45 
75,343 83 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1887 



. $23,499 62 



CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1887. 

Superintendence and repairs . $9,689 07 

Stationery and printing . . 234 52 

Office and incidental expenses . 1,222 05 

Pumping expenses . . . 8,751 15 



31 



Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 
reservoir ..... 
Repairs to buildings . 

Running expenses for 1887 
Service pipes .... 
Distribution pipes 
Fire hydrants and valves 
Meters and fixtures 
Fencing ..... 
Land and water rights 

Total expended on construction 



$195 


75 


449 


61 


$1,991 43 


9,794 


35 


896 


98 


2,399 


83 


• 719 


09 


3,000 


00 



20,542 15 



$18,801 68 



Total expended in 1887 . 
Land and water rights 
Dam, canal, pen-stock, and races 
Pumping machinery, pump-house, 
and buildings .... 
Distributing reservoir and fixtures 
Force and supply main 
Distribution pipes 
Fire-hydrants and valves 
Tools and fixtures 
Boarding and store houses . 
Roads and culverts 
Supplies .... 
Engineering 

Livery and traveling expenses 
Legal expenses . 
Grading and fencing . 
Service pipes 
Meters and fixtures 

Total construction account 
to Dec. 31, 1887 . 



,343 83 



$45,082 45 
101,399 16 

104,243 20 
71,542 36 

89,769 02 

335,813 64 

38,176 13 

10,649 35 

919 36 

2,193 49 

550 39 

22,176 19 

2,856 64 

563 79 

13,269 23 

42,890 41 

19,179 32 



$901,274 13 



32 



Current expenses : 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs ... 
Stationery, printing, etc. 
Office and incidental expenses 
Pumping expenses amd repairs 
Repairs to dam, canal races, and 

reservoir .... 
Repairs to buildings . 

Current expenses to Dec 
31, 1887 

Interest .... 
Highway expenditures 

Total amount of bills ap- 
proved to date 

Interest, discount, and labor per- 
formed on highways, trans., 
and tools and materials sold . 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1887 

Total cost, exclusive of in- 
terest and current ex- 
penses .... 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1886 ..... 

Interest for 1887 

Total interest and discount 
to Dec. 31, 1887 . 



$100,961 36 

4,955 66 

16,174 14 

29,556 02 

2,519 76 
1,192 30 



$155,359 24 



$40,678 51 
14,000 53 



$54,679 04 



,111,312 41 



$61,297 69 
155,359 24 



-$216,656 93 



4,655 48 



,862 51 
35,099 00 



$524,961 51 



33 



Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31,1886 . . .$341,000 00 
Amount used by city in 1887 . 36,000 00 



S573 


61 


177 


07 


193 


26 


146 


00 


1,920 


53 



Total $377,000 00 

The following- amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, supplies and ma- 
terials sold . 

1873, supplies and ma- 
terials sold . 

accrued interest on 
water bonds sold 

1873, accrued interest 
on state bonds sold 

water rents 

1874, supplies and ma- 
terials sold . . 607 89 

March 12, 1874, highway expendi- 
tures, trans, from 
water account . 14,000 53 

March 17, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account . 12,347 25 

Sept. 1, 1874, interest and dis- 
count, trans, from 
water account . 22,361 74 
1874, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 30,233 54 

Dec. 29, 1874, interest trans- 
ferred . . . 4,566 25 

Dec. 18, 1875, one anvil sold . 15 00 

Sept. 25, 1875, engine, crusher, 

and material sold . 2,089 45 

3 



34 



1875, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. . . i 


f27,H9 15 


May 20, 1876, derrick sold 


125 00 


May 20, 1876, rent of derrick . 


24 00 


1875,water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


38,879 47 


1877,water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


43,823 30 


1878, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


48,873 26 


old plow sold . 


1 00 


1879, derrick sold 


75 00 


1879,water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


53,068 17 


1880,water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


57,395 25 


sale of grass 


10 00 


level, transit, etc. 


250 00 


1881, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


60,154 62 


sale of grass 


10 00 


sale of derrick 


50 00 


received of G. G. 




Griffin 


1 00 


188 2, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


67,403 76 


received of G. G. 




Griffin 


1 00 


1882, received of James 




Baldwin & Co. . 


175 00 


received from the sale 




of grass 


10 00 


received from Good- 




hue & Birnie 


24 37 



35 



1882, received for old 

plank . $1 00 

received for use of 

derrick . 15 00 

1883, received of G. G. 

Griffin ... 1 00 

received from sale of 

grass ... 20 00 

water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 73,437 20 

1884, received of G. G. 

Griffin ... 1 00 

received for stone . 5 00 

received from sale of 

grass ... 10 00 

1884,received from pipe 

sold and labor . 616 20 
received for water 

and hydrant rent . 74,947 88 

1885, received from G. 

G. Griffin . . 1 00 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass ... 10 00 

labor and pipe sold . 13 45 

received for water 

and hydrant rent . 80,379 67 

1886, received from G. 

G. Griffin . 1 00 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass ... 5 00 

for wood . . . 37 80 

labor and pipe . . 282 43 
water and hydrant 

rent . . . 74,803 76 



36 



1887, received for 

labor and pipe 
received of G. G 

Griffin . 
received of C. C 

Cole . 
received of B. P 

Kimball, for grass 
received of A. J. 

Crombie, for grass 
received of A. Good- 
win, for poles 
received of W. G 

Brown . 
received of T. H 

Ri scion & Co., for 

freight . 
received for water 

and hydrant rent 79,682 70 



1 00 

50 

10 00 

5 00 

10 00 

25 00 

15 11 



Total received for water, etc. 
Amount appropriated to date 

Amount received to date . 
Amount of bills approved to date 

Amount transferred toward interest 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1887 



. $871,812 03 
. 640,000 00 

$1,511,812 03 
1,111,312 41 



,499 62 
377,000 00 

$23,499 62 



CHAS. K. WALKER, 

Superintendent. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
the Manchester Water- Works for the year 1887, and find 
the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL, 

Auditor. 
Manchester, "S. H., Jan. 10, 1888. 



38 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 
15 Churches. 
1 Court-house. 
6 Hose companies. 
4 Fire-engines. 

1 Hook-and-ladder. 

2 Opera-houses. 
1 Convent. 

1 City Hospital. 
1 Old Ladies' Home. 
1 Soldiers' Monument. 
1 Turner Hall. 

3 Fountains. 



4 Cemeteries. 
1 Orphanage. 
1 Post-office. 

1 City Library. 

5 Banks. 
4 Hotels. 

1 Masonic Hall. 
1 Odd Fellows' Hall. 
1 Holly-Tree Inn. 
3 Halls. 

22 Schoolhouses. 
1 Battery Building. 
1 Skating Rink. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



1 Silver-plating. 

2 Iron foundries. 

2 Dyehouses. 

4 Machine-shops. 

6 Clothing manufactories. 

6 Harness-shops. 

1 Brush-shop. 

3 Carriage-shops. 
6 Cigar. 

1 Brass and copper foundry. 
1 Locomotive-works. 



2 Electric light. 



7 Fish. 

9 Meat and fish. 



3 Sash and blind shops. 
1 Brewery. 

3 Shoe-shops. 
1 Pop-corn. 

1 Gas-works. 

4 Slaughter-houses. 

1 Soap manufactory. 

2 Needle manufactories. 
4 Beer-bottling. 

1 Book-bindery. 
1 Paper-mill. 



MARKETS. 



2 Meat (wholesale). 



39 





STABLES. 


14 Livery. 


695 Private. 


1 Horse-railroad. 






OFFICES. 


8 Dentists. 


8 Printing. 


1 Telephone. 


1 Gas. 


1 Telegraph. 


4 Coal. 


2 Express. 






SHOPS. 


27 Barber. 


2 Currying. 


2 Wheelwright. 


6 Plumber and gas an( 


9 Blacksmith. 


water pipe. 


5 Carpenter. 


8 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 


1 Gunsmith. 




STORES. 


4 Auction. 


80 Grocery. 


23 Drug. 


5 Meal. 


9 Jewelry. 


3 Hardware. 


1 Fur. 


20 Boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing goods. 8 Stove. 


20 Fancy goods. 


15 Gents' furnishing goods. 


1 Wholesale paper. 


10 Book. 


5 Wholesale produce. 


1 Leather and shoe-finders, 


15 Dry goods. 


3 Music. 


12 Candy. 


3 Upholstery. 


1 Cloak. 


6 Undertakers. 


15 Millinery. 


5 Sewing-machine. 


2 Tea. 


1 Feather-cleaner. 


2 Furniture. 


1 Rubber. 



11 Dining. 
6 Billiard. 



40 

SALOONS. 

84 Liquor. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



6 Club-rooms. 

2 Bleacheries. 

8 Laundries. 

3 Ice-houses. 

9 Photographers. 



3 Greenhouses. 
1 Band-room. 
12 Bakeries. 
1 Waste. 



6805]Families. 

109 Boarding-houses 
8541 Faucets. 
1217 Wash-bowls. 
1778 Water-closets. 

171 Wash-tubs. 

554 Bath-tubs. 

126 Urinals. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

1809 Sill-cocks. 
418 Fire-hydrants. 
31 Stand-pipes. 
20 Water-troughs. 
2 Drinking-fountains. 
1667 Horses. 
86 Cattle. 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 





BRANCHES. 


3 double 6 on 12. 


19 single 6 on 6. 


1 double 6 on 8. 


2 single 10 on 10. 


7 double 6 on 10. 


1 single 6 on 20. 


8 double 6 on 6. 


4 single 6 on 10. 


1 double 4 on 6. 


3 single 8 on 8. 


1 single 6 on 12. 


1 single 12 on 14, 


2 single 6 on 14. 


1 single 4 on 4. 


6 single 4 on 6. 





41 

REDUCERS. 

2 12 to 6. 

1 6 to 4. 

CLAMP SLEEVES. 

8 14 in. 
29 10 in. 
18 6 in. 

WHOLE SLEEVES. 

4 10 in. 

4 14 in. 

5 8 in. 



BENDS. 

2 6 in. 1-4 bend. 3 6 in. 1-8 bend. 

1 12 in. 1-8 bend. 1 14 in. 1-8 bend. 

2 10 in. 1-8 bend. 2 6 in. S bend. 

PIPE. 

474 ft. 20 in. 700 ft. 6 in. 

935 ft. 14 in. 3100 ft. 4 in. 

1200 ft, 12 in. 937 ft. 8 in. 

1380 ft. 10 in. 



1 14 to 12. 


1 8 to 6. 


4 


20 in. 


11 


12 in. 


14 


8 in. 


10 


4 in. 


1 


20 in. 


8 


12 in. 


13 


6 in. 


3 


4 in. 



SERVICE PIPE. 



546 ft. 1 1-2 in. 841 ft. 3-4 in. 

488 ft. 1 1-4 in. 2076 ft. 1 in. 

437 ft. 2 in. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



City Engineer's Department. 



ORGANIZATION, 1887. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINTERED H. BENNETT. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Harrie M. Young. 
George W. Wales. 
John J. McDonough. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my second 
annual report, being the ninth annual report of the work 
in the City Engineer's office, and the several highway 
districts of the city of Manchester, for the year ending 
December 31, 1887. 

Expenses of the office for the year 1887 : 



Appropriation 

salary of city engineer 

salary of three assistants 


$1,000 00 
. 1,239 75 


$2,600 00 


supplies for the office 


. 106 20 




repairing 


9 39 




express 

stakes .... 


65 
38 53 




horseshoeing and repairs 
wagon and harness 


of 

12 45 




horse-car fares 


5 25 




street numbers 


13^00 




printing reports 


31*50 





$2,456 72 
Amount charged to water company 4 25 



Total cost of the regular 
office work 



52,452 47 



Balance 



$147 53 



46 



Expenses for soldiers' monument : 

T. A. Lane, repairing piping 

For water 



Total 



$6 08 

50 00 

1 80 



The amount of work done in the office during the year 
is as follows : 

Number of orders for surveys, — street lines and 

grades 736 

Number of orders for sewer and paving grades . 105 

Number of orders for horse-railroad grades . . 26 

Total number of orders .... 867 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 49,350 feet, 
equal to 9.35 miles. 

These profiles, having three lines of levels 
on each street, make a total distance actu- 
ally leveled of 148,050 feet. 



Levels for sewer profiles 
Levels for other center profiles 
Levels in Pine Grove cemetery 
Levels in Valley cemetery . 
Levels for accidents 
Other levels. 

Total levels taken 
Equal to 38.45 miles. 

Surveys of streets and street lines 
Surveys in Pine Grove cemetery 
Surveys in Valley cemetery 
Surveys for accidents 



8,220 

15,050 

8,350 

2,000 

300 

21,070 



203,040 feet 


144,450 feet. 


11,500 " 


4,400 " 


1,100 " 



47 



Surveys for street numbers 

Other surveys 

Total surveys made . . . 
Equal to 33.87 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground . 
Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove cem- 
etery 

Lines of lots and avenues, Valley cemetery 
Lines of land purchased .... 

Total length of lines marked on 
ground ..... 

Equal to 20.56 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks 

Grades set for macadamizing 

Grades set for grading streets 

Grades set for gutters 

Grades set for horse-railroad tracks 

Grades set in Pine Grove cemetery 

Grades set in Valley cemetery . 

Grades set for curb 

Grades set for sewers 

Other grades .... 

Total length of grades set 
Equal to 23.26 miles. 

BATTERS SET. 

Webster-street engine-house. 

Pine Grove cemetery storehouse. 

Valley cemetery, addition to lodge-house. 

Grove-street culvert, at Cemetery brook. 

East High street, retaining wall. 

Park square, fountain basin. 



14,494 feet 


2,900 " 


it 


178,844 fe< 


97,670 feet 


7,700 " 


2,750 « 


445 ' 


i 
it 


108,565 fee 


38,408 feet 


3,100 ' 




13,242 < 




14,850 < 




19,200 ' 




7,050 < 




1,200 ' 




15,270 ' 




9,100 < 




1,388 < 




122,808 fee 


it. 



48 



Old lots relaid in Valley cemetery . . . .11 
Old lots relaid in Pine Grove cemetery ... 35 
New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery . . 93 



Total cemetery lots laid out .... 139 

In the public ground at Pine Grove cemetery ranges 
have been laid out for 204 graves. 

Street numbers assigned and put on 181 

Street numbers replaced ..... 93 



Total numbers put on . . . . . 274 

This year, as in previous years, the city engineer has 
investigated and made surveys in all cases where suits 
were liable to be brought against the city. 

Cases investigated and reported to the Committee on 
Claims, 22. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Amherst street, from Maple to Ashland street. Two 
plans. 

Beacon street, from Spruce to Hanover street. 

Bridge street, from Maple to Russell street. 

Carroll street, from Milford street to Amherst road. 

Cedar south back street, from Elm east back to Chest- 
nut street. 

Cedar street, from Elm to Chestnut street. 

Cedar street, from Pine to Lincoln street. Two plans. 

Central street, from Chestnut to Union street. 

Central street, from Hall to Beacon street. 

Clarke street, from Elm to Union street. 

Con ant street, from Main street westerly. 

Dean street, from Elm to Canal street. 

Elm street, from Clarke to Rowell street. Three plans. 



49 

Franklin street, from Granite to Merrimack street. 
Two plans. 

High street, East, from Maple to Jane street. 

Laurel street, from Pine to Lincoln street. Two plans. 

Laurel street, from Wilson to Highland street. Two 
plans. 

Massabesic street, from Lake avenue to Cypress street. 
Three plans. 

Mast road, from Amherst road westerly. 

Old Falls road, from Belmont to Massabesic street. 

Pine street, from Merrimack to Amherst street. 

Riddle street, from Milford to Mast street. 

River street, from Ferry street to N". W. R. R. 

Second street, from Granite street to 1ST. W. R. R. 
Two plans. 

Spruce street, from Pine street to James Hall road. 
Six plans. 

Tilton street, from Milford street northerly. 

West Hancock street, from Main street easterly. 

Five plans and profiles of streets not laid out. 

Total plans and profiles, 47. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Canal street, from Central to Granite street. 

Cedar street, from Elm west back to Canal street. 

Central street, from Hall to Beacon street. 

Elm east back street, from Lowell to Lowell south back 
street. 

Hamilton street, from Adams to Jefferson street. 

Hanover south back street, from Union to Maple east 
back street. 

Lowell south back street, from Elm east back to Chest- 
nut street. 

Manchester street, at Coffin & Avery's lots. 



50 

McGregor, McGregor west back and Main streets. 
Merrimack south back street, from Union to Beech 
street. 

North street, from Pine to Pine east back street. 
Pine street, from Salmon to North street. 
Pine east back street, from North street northerly. 
Pine west back street, from High street southerly. 
Salmon street, from Bay east back to Pine street. 
Total sewer plans and profiles, 15. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

A street, Main to B street. 

Adams street, Main to Dubuque street. 

Amory street, McGregor to Dubuque street. Two 
plans. 

B street, A to C street. 

Bath street, River to Third street. 

Barr street, Granite street northerly. 

Bay street, Pennacook to Webster street. Three 
plans. 

Beauport street, Conant to Putnam street. Two plans. 

Beauport street, Wayne to Kelly street. 

Belmont street, Clay to Auburn street. Four plans. 

Blaine street, Merrimack River to Main street. Two 
plans. 

Boynton street, A street southerly. 

C street, Boynton to B street. 

Carroll street, Milford street to Amherst road. 

Cartier street, Conant to Kelly street. Four plans. 

Conant street, Main street westerly. 

Dubuque street, Conant to Kelly street. Four plans. 

Gore street, Union to Russell street. Two plans. 

Green street, Granite street northerly. 

Main street, Granite to McGregor street. Five plans. 



51 

Main street, A street to Bedford line. Five plans. 

Marion street, Main to McGregor street. 

Mast street, Main street to Old Mast road. 

McGregor street, Main to Bridge street. Two plans. 

Milford street, Main street to Bedford road. Three 
plans. 

Milton street, Merrimack to Concord street. Two 
plans. 

Monmouth street, Main to McGregor west back street. 

North street, Elm to Pine street. Two plans. 

Parker street, Main to Wiuter street. 

Putnam street, Main to Dubuque street. 

Quincy street, Granite street northerly. 

Riddle street, Mast to Milford street. 

Sagamore street, Elm to Pine street. 

School street, River to Main street. Two plans. 

Schuyler street, Main to Dubuque street. 

Spruce street, Wilson to Massabesic street. 

Sullivan street, Main to Dubuque street. 

Third street, School street to Merrimack River. Two 
plans. 

Tilton street, Milford street northerly. 

Wayne street, McGregor to Dubuque street. Two 
plans. 

Winter street, Main street to Piscataquog River. Two 
plans. 

Total numbering plans, 73. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Amoskeag, plan of lots, copy. Two plans. 

Amherst street, Maple street easterly, plan of lots, 
copy. 

Belmont street, lots owned by William E. Moore and 
others, copy. 



52 

Calef road, gravel bank bought of Chase, copy. 

Cohas-brook bridge, plan. 

Cilley road, plan of a part of, copy. 

Hanover street, Beacon street easterly, location of 
accident. 

Land of Alfred Wallace, Piscataquog, copy. 

Ma ssabesic street, land of C. E. Hodgdon, copy. 

Mast road, land of C. H. Robie, copy. 

Merrimack square, proposed improvements. 

Monument square and surrounding streets. 

Old Falls road, Lake avenue southerly. 

Old Falls road, land of S. N". Bell, copy. 

Park square, plan of fountain basin. 

Pine Grove cemetery extension, plan of lots, copy. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots in east section. 

School south back street, River to Fourth street. 

Spring street, location of Mrs. Jillson's accident. 

Valley cemetery, addition to lodge-house. 

"Webster-street schoolhouse, plan of sewerage. 

Hall-street extension, south, comprising Lake avenue, 
Central, Spruce, Wilson, Hall, Belmont, Milton, and 
Massabesic streets, and Wilson road, equaling 9 plans. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 31. 

WORKING PLANS NOT RETAINED IN OFFICE. 

Amory street, McGregor to Main street. Profile. 

Amory street, Beauport to Dubuque street. Profile. 

Bridge street, Merrimack River to McGregor street. 
Profile. 

Bridge street, Canal to McGregor street. 

Bridge street, design for overflow man-hole. 

Cedar street, Elm west back to Canal street. Center 
profile. 

Central street, Union street easterly. Profile for pav- 
ing. 



53 

Cohas-brook bridge. 

Douglas street, Barr to Green street. Center profile. 

Elliot Hospital Building, sketch for Trustees. 

Elm street, Depot to Short street. Center profile. 

Elm street, Short to Baker street. Profile. 

Franklin street, Cedar to Granite street. Center pro- 
file. 

Granite street, Second street, westerly. Profile of 
south side. 

Hanover south back street, Union to Maple street. 
Center profile. 

Lake avenue proposed engine-house. Four plans. 

Laurel street, Chestnut to Lincoln street. Profile. 

Massabesic street, Old Falls road to C} 7 press street. 
Profile. 

Merrimack square. Drawing for culvert. 

Merrimack south back street, Union to Beech street. 
Center profile. 

Monument Square and surrounding streets. 

Monument Square and surrounding streets. Blue 
print. 

Old Falls road, Belmont to Massabesic street. Profile. 

Old Falls road and Massabesic street. 

Park square. Fountain basin. 

Park square. Detail of center stone of fountain. 

Park square. Detail of side stone of fountain. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Profile of Maple avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Profile of Oakland avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Profile of Acacia avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Profile of Willow avenue. 

Sagamore street, Chestnut to Pine. Profile. 

Valley cemetery. Plan of building. 

Valley cemetery. Addition to lodge-house, for con- 
tractor. 



54 

Valley cemetery. Design for receiving-vault. 
West and Douglas streets. Location of accident. 
Total working plans, 42. 

TRACINGS. 

Amoskeag bridge, copy of original plan. Two plans. 

Auburn, Beech, Valley, and Pine streets, square 
bounded by. 

Beech street, culvert at Cemetery brook. 

Belmont street, land bought of James Dearborn. 

Cohas-brook bridge. Two plans. 

Elliot Hospital land, for trustees. 

Goffe's Falls, schoolhouse lot. 
• Lake avenue proposed engine-house. Four plans. 

Land of John Calef and others. 

Land of J. F. James and others. 

Manchester street, Elm to Chestnut street. 

Maple street at Nashua street, for Judge Fellows. 

Monument square and surrounding streets. Two 
plans. 

Nutt's pond, plan of. 

Park square, fountain basin. 

Pine-street culvert at Cemetery brook. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Twenty-four plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots in Landscape lawn for super- 
intendent. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots in new section, for superin- 
tendent. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lot No. 1401, for P. Blanchard, 
Concord, K H. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan showing water pipes, for 
J. A. Weston. 

Pine Grove cemetery extension, plan of lots. 

Russell farm, plan of. 



55 

Spruce street, from Maple street to James Hall road. 
Spruce street, at Nos. 62 and 64. 
Valley cemetery, plan of buildings. 
Valley cemetery, plan, section, and elevation of receiv- 
ing-vault. Two plans. 

West and Douglas streets, location of accident. 
Young street, Pine street to C. & P. R. R. 
Total tracings, 59. 

MAPS. 

City of Manchester, small map, showing sewers, for 
Committee on Sewers and Drains. 

Nine plans of streets laid out have been made in the 
city clerk's book of records. 

Total of all plans made, 274. 

In connection with the year's work, a large map show- 
ing the entire city has been started. 

Plans of all new highways laid out to December 31, 
1887, have been made in the City Clerk's book of records. 
All sewers laid to the same date have been drawn in the 
City Clerk's book of sewers, upon the sewer committee's 
map and the sewer map in the office. 

The index and catalogue of plans have been brought 
up to December 31, 1887 ; the index to level books to 
November 2, 1887 ; and the index to transit books to Sep- 
tember 20, 1887. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade 

on laid out streets ..... 35,903 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade 

on streets not laid out .... 3,123 " 



Total 39,026 feet. 

Equal to 7.39 miles. 



56 



NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT. 

Carroll street, Milford street to Amherst 

road . . . . . . . .45 feet wide. 

Conant street, Main to "West street . . 50 

Dean street, Elm to Canal street . . 50 

Franklin street, Granite to Pleasant street 50 

Lincoln street, Spruce to Cedar street . 50 

Riddle .street, Milford to Mast street . 45 

Til ton street, Milford street northerly . 33 
West Hancock street, Main street east 

600 feet 50 



HIGHWAYS STRAIGHTENED. 

Mast street, Amherst road west 800 feet, 45 feet wide. 



57 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1887. 



Bridge 

Chestnut 

Main 

Main 

Salmon 

Webster 

Appleton 

Appleton 

Cedar 

Central 

Concord 

Dean 

Elm east back . . . 

Granite 

Merrimack 

North , 

Pine 

Pine east back 

Pine east back 

Pleasant 

Wayne 

Arlington 

Beech east back. . . . 

Bridge 

Central 

Dean 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Orange , 

South , 

West 

Amherst 

Arlington , 

Ash 

Auburn north back 

Beech 

Beech east back. . . . 

Bridge , 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Bridge 

Bridge south back. 

Brook 

Cedar 

Cedar 

Cedar 

Central 

Central 

Central 

Central , 

Chestnut 

Chestnut 

Concord 

Depot 

Elm 

Elm 

Elm east back 

Franklin 

Granite 

Lake avenue 



Location. 



Nashua to Russell 

Webster to Appleton 

From Milford, northerly 

From Putnam, southerly 

Bay east back to Pine 

Pine east back to Union 

From Chestnut, easterly 

From Chestnut, westerly 

Canal to Franklin 

Corner of Franklin street 

Hall, east and west 

Corner of Canal street 

Lowell to Lowell south back 

Corner of Franklin street 

Corner of Franklin street 

Pine to Pine east back 

Salmon to North . 

From North, northerly 

From Webster, southerly 

Corner of Franklin street 

From Beauport west back, westerly 

West of Nashua street 

Between Brook and Gore 

Corner of Un ion street 

From Hall, easterly 

Corner of Canal street 

From Belmont, easterly 

Corner of Pine street 

Corner of Elm street 

From Lowell, northerly 

From Conant, southerly 

Corner of Beech east back street. 

Corner of Warren street 

Corner of Pearl street 

West of Beech street 

North of Harrison street 

North of Brook street 

East of Elm east back street 

Corner of Birch street 

Corner of Pine street 

Corner of Walnut street 

Corner of Nashua street 

Corner of Russell street 

West of Chestnut street 

Corner of Elm street 

Corner of Franklin street 

West of Franklin street 

At junction with railroad track.. . 

Corner of Hall street 

East of Hall street 

East of Pine street 

Corner of Franklin street 

Corner of Salmon street 

Corner of Appleton street 

Corner of Hall street 

East of Franklin street 

Corner of Sagamore street 

Corner of Salmon street 

North of Concord street 

North of Depot street 

Corner of Franklin street 

At Union street 



Brick. 
Akron. 



Size in 
inches. 



Length 
in feet. 



24x36 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



198 

290 

60 

84 

599 

328 

140 

347 

370 

6 

511 

30 

172 

4 

6 

109 

524 

260 

222 

10 

278 

139 

144 

10 

168 

36 

50 

12 

14 

103 

49 

28 

14 

10 

8 

30 

4 

8 

10 

26 

14 

8 

20 

4 

38 

6 

24 

4 

30 

95 

32 

28 

76 

68 

24 

66 

54 

4 

6 

36 

28 

42 



58 



SEWERS BUILT IN 1887. — Continued. 



Street. 


Location. 


Material. 


Si e in 
inches. 


Length 
in feet. 






Akron. 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


116 




Between Wilson and Hall streets. 


243 




30 




8 
28 






20 






°0 






8 






20 


Pine 


Corner of Manchester south back. 


100 


Pine 


36 
12 


Pine 


76 




32 


Pine 


g 






28 
g 






9 






18 






40 










6,978 



CEMENT PIPE REPLACED BY AKRON PIPE. 



Street. 


Location. 


Size 
Removed. 


Size sub- 
stituted. 


Length 
in feet. 






9 
9 

12 
9 

12 


10 
12 
12 
12 
12 


189 


Hanover south back.. . 
Hanover south back.. . 


Union to Maple east back 


940 
580 
422 






410 






2,541 



SEWERS RELAID. 



Street. 


Location. 


Material. 


Size in 
inches. 


Length 

in feet. 

1 






Akron. 


8 
8 
8 
8 
10 
12 


4 






8 






8 




4 






6 




42 






72 



SCHEDULE OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, 1888. 































MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 




























1 . 


NAME OF STREET. 


Akron Pn?E. 


Portland Pipe. 


Cement Pipe. 


Earthen 
Pipe. 


Brick Sewers. 




11 




Sin. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in 


18 in. 


24 in. 


8In. 


12 in 


18 in. 


9 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


16 in. 

by 
24 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


29 in. 


36 in. 


42 in. 


44 in. 


57 in. 


17 in. 
by 


20 in. 

by 

30 in. 


24 in. 

by 

36 in. 


27J in. 

by 

36 in. 


29 in. 
by 
39 in. 


29J in. 

by 
44 in. 


30 in. 
by 

46 in. 


32 in. 
by 
48 in. 


36 in. 










267 
520 
433 

487 




























































267 

4,033 

485 

487 

269 

486 

855 

1,075 

309 

135 

1,472 






















575 




710 










915 


735 
































52 
























































































































Appleton . . . ... . . 




2G9 
464 
90 
300 
300 
































































A r c^ D 


22 

95 


































































Ah 


400 


270 






























































Ah p st back 








775 






















































Ahlfl 


9 
































































Asa an 




















135 














































Auburn. . 




816 
150 
014 
460 
400 
































































JJeauport . . . 


45 
4 
82 


140 
160 








90 






160 




150 
1,225 












315 


































Tt h t \ a k 






















































2,003 


±seecn ease oac . 






























































iselmonc 






































































4 
120 
















600 




830 
















































1,860 
90 




300 
























1,460 








400 










3,235* 










750 


187} 


8,313 


iJridge . v-j^w 












40 








































,/' ~ 


38 
46 

5i 
70 

243 
8 

::34 
































































r , 






















































1,205 










1,851 




3,102 
2,074 
2,556 
1,603 
4,048 
1.794 


C Ha 


554 

390 
80 

130 
















150 








































1,500 






1,180 
















1,300 
130 

1,020 
130 
330 














































220 


























230 
































1,710 470 
























840 










































100 








































































































550 






380 
240 






























































380 
































































370 


















525 


















































525 


Concord 


74 


36 


1,466 
30 
60 
470 
500 






























630 
































2,170 


T)pan 




























































66 




66 
































































126 
































































470 






500 


1,000 


T>nv r 









440 








240 
440 


















































510 




54 

rj4 
6 








705 
1,460 
740 
















435 


520 






1,140 


450 




1,197 


950 




1,100 


1,050 


2,131 






364 






536 
2.625 
3,130 




11,278 




480 






470 


























5,041 


Elm wpst nark 


























































3,870 


















130 












690 






































130 




















690 




36 
1568 








2,050 


900 












550 


490 










































4,026 


Amount carried up . 


8.G85 


16,576 


2,030 


2,270 


1,340 


90 


1,245 


130 


2,255 




9,280 


490 


710 




690 




1,155 


3,235 


1,170 


520 




400 


1,140 


450 




1,197 


5,390J 




1,100 


2,550 


2,131 


2,601 | 187$ 


70,586 











































































SCHEDULE OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, 1888. — Continued. 





MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 


g 


NAME OF STREET. 


Akron PirE. 


Portland Pipe. 


Cement Pipe. 


Earthen 
Pipe. 


Brick Sewers. 




a 8 
•5 " 




Bin. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


8 in. 


12 in. 


18 in. 


9 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


16 in. 
by 

24 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


29 in. 


36 in. 


42 in. 


44 in. 


57 in. 


17 in. 
by 

26 in. 


20 in. 

t>y 

30 in. 


24 in. 

by 
36 in. 


27Jin. 

by 

36 in. 


29 in. 

by 

39 in. 


29J in. 

by 
44 in. 


30 in. 

by 
46 in. 


32 in. 

by 
48in. 


36 in. 


II 
•3 a 


Amount brought up. 


1,568 


8,685 


16,576 

589 

4 


2,030 


2,270 


1,340 


90 


1,245 


130 


2,255 




9,280 


490 


710 




690 




1,155 


3,235 


1,170 


520 




400 


1,140 


450 




1,197 


5,390} 




1,100 


2,550 


2,131 


2,601 


187} 


70,586 

589 

3,743 

210 

1,927 

230 

860 

3.S90 

210 

2,815 

2,905 

1 1,310 

375 

330 

700 

448 

307 

948 

3,096 

2,205 

3,187 

834 

304 

4,665 

1,270 

564 

2,924 

3,115 

6,269 

2,677 


C 'Ip 


28 


195 






950 








1,271 f 


120 
















155 




390 






















90 


., 












210 












































525 
80 
860 
426 


122 










510 






770 


















































150 
























































H ck 
































































, , 


147 


017 


265 
















2,435 














































H o 'er snuare 






























210 






























„ south back 






1,520 

2,215 

451 

375 










845 




450 
















































H ■ 






690 
























































H smith bark 




















860 














































ffaxel 
























































































330 
700 




















































































































18 

22 
2G8 
10 


430 

285 


















































































































..:.:: " 






Lake avenue 














130 
120 

1,705 




180 














































Lake avenue south back. 


230: 2,730 








































































500 
1,540 














































laurel south hack 




1771 900 






















510 




































T inroln 






























































Liudeu 


40 
20 

4 

2.37 

116 

302 


204 


































































I nwell 




















1,900 
260 
3G0 








940 






















































378 














































200 

1,487 


























































Manchester 






















175 






1,005 




































:::::: ::::: 






190 




100 








340 


































325 1,087 


1,214 





















730 


1,270 












1,527 
















Maole 










370 










































Mari m 




233 






















































:.... 










170 
729 


120 
































































278 

6 

1,260 

285 
























































1,007 
4,100 
2,420 


Merriuiack 


235 


C79 










1.250 
1,050 




130 
110 


840 












9G0 




































































































520 





































































































146 


Myrtle 


38 
















85 
1,525 
















































615 




























































1,525 




44 


1,090 




























































1,734 




109 




























































58 




























































58 




350 














1,580 












790 
































2,936 
















500 












































680 










2,290 




















































Amount carried up. 


3,037 


19,799 


34,592 


5,?70 


2,390 


90 2,090 C40 


11,489 540 

1 


21,155 1,330 


710 


520 


1,805 


850 1,945 


5,030 


2,805 


520 


390 


400 


1,140 


450 


1,527 


1,197 


5,390} 




1,100 


2,550 


2,131 2,601 2771 


140,151 



SCHEDULE OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, 1888. -Concluded. 



MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 



NAME OF STREET. 



Amount brought up 

Parker 

Pearl 

Pearl south back 

Peuuacook 

Pennacook south back.. 

Pine 

Pine east back 

Pine west back 

Pleasant 

Prospect 

Prospect south back 

Putnam 

Quincy 

River 

River road 

Russell 



Portland Pipe. 



10 in. 12in.ll5in. IS in. 24 in 



3,G37 19,799 34,592 5.S70 2,390 2.290 

106 44S 

132 931 SO 65 60 

■'iia. '::;:: ... 40 i"i39 :::.: :::;:: 

695 

510 SCO 1,310 

I 602 



10 

1,700 



Sagamore south back. 

Salmon 

School 

Second 

South 

Spruce 

Spruce, East 

Spruce south back 

Third 

Union 

Union east back 

Vallev 

Walker 

Walnut 

Walnut east back 

Washington 

Warren 

Wayne 

Webster 

Wilson 

Winter 

Winter Place 



350 

7n ... 

1,180 

s'iJ075 '.'. 

■■■■ "ioo 

4 

460 . 

9 32S . '. 



. .. 125 
600 1,030 



Cement Pipe. 



2,090 640 



1,040 



too 

50 1,100 '.'.'.'... '.'.'.'." 

' 506 '.'..'.'.'. '.'."..[ '""'. 

793 206' 

153 1.44S 

19 300 

20 125 ! 

.... 1,260 1 



Total feet, each size. 4,709 27,865 45,925 0,0S7 4,090 



Total ft., each kind. 



10 in. 12 in. 



11.4S9 
"602 



1,740 



250 ... 
345 ... 



360 ... 
115 ... 






21,155 



1,330 



1,064 .. 

100 .. 



1,275 . 



640 14,501 



130 
130 



350 

1,030 



220 .. . 
350 ... . 



16 in. 
by 

24 in 



540 1 27,014 1,330 



Earthen 
Pipe. 



1,300 



Brick Sewers. 



5,930 2.S05 



1,805 S50 | 2,043 6,430 



4,265 

0.S1 



42 in. 



2,805 



1,110 






1,527 



20 in 



1,197 



fifi 



24 in. 27J in 

by by 
36 in. 36 in 



5,390i 



1,140 1,300 1,527 



1,175 



29 in. 29J in. 30 in. 32 in. 

by by by by 36 i 
39 in. 44 in. 46 in. 48 in. 



1,1011 



2,550 2,131 2,601 



691} 



1.197 ! S,057 1,200 



277J 



2,550 2,131 2,001 



140,151 

854 

2,934 

200 

251 

1,695 

3,755 

902 

140 

38 

1,730 

1,740 

350 

70 

1,180 

1,175 

1,083 

150 

400 

853 

710 

345 

467 

130 

80 

2,530 

375 

5,973 

2,450 

1,210 

915 

350 

2,186 

320 

506 

1,059 

2,2924 

919 

495 

1,250 



277* 



1S4.221J 



33,348 
6.315 



59 



. 198 feet. 


. 1,361 " 


. 5,383 " 


. 920 " 


. 1,729 " 


. 9,591 feet 



Total brick sewers, 24 X 36 inches 
" 15-inch Akron pipe 
" 12-inch " " . 

" 10-inch " " . 

" 8-inch " " . 



Total length of sewers for the year 
Equal to 1.82 miles. 

Number of catch-basins built, 81. 
Number of catch-basins rebuilt, 6. 
Number of catch-basins repaired, 3. 
Number of man-holes built, 9. 
Number of lamp-holes built, 9. 

SEWERS. 

The Bridge-street sewer, started in 1885, was com- 
pleted this year, and connections made with the sewer on 
Russell street, and on Bridge street east of Russell street. 
The sewage in this section is now conducted directly to 
the river, instead of running through the overcrowded 
Nashua-street sub-main. Where the west branch of 
Mile brook crosses the sewer, a flushing-basin was con- 
structed, with an overflow allowing the surplus water of 
the brook to continue in its original channel. During 
the heavy storm of July 23 and 24, when six inches 
of rain fell in thirty-six hours, an examination was made, 
and the overflow found to work satisfactorily. 

In Chestnut street a 15-inch main was laid from Web- 
ster to Appleton streets, giving an outlet for the laterals 
running east and west on Appleton street. 

The Salmon-street sewer was extended through Sal- 
mon, Pine, North, and Pine east back streets, and a lat- 
eral also laid in Pine east back street, from Webster 
street southerly. 



60 

These sewers afford the residents ample means for 
drainage, and practically complete the main sewerage of 
this section for the present. 

That standing order, the South-Main-street sewer, was 
again opened this summer and sixty feet of pipe laid, 
when the appropriation was exhausted. Owing to the 
expense of opening and refilling this trench each year, it 
would seem economy to make a transfer of enough 
money to enable the ledge to be removed, when the 
remainder will be comparatively easy. 

One of the most important items in relation to sewer- 
age this year has been the removal of some twenty-five 
hundred feet of old cement pipe and replacing it by 
Akron pipe. 

In most cases it was found that the original sewer was 
laid very near the surface; notably, the sewer in Merri- 
mack south back street, which was not low enough to 
drain the cellars abutting thereon. These sewers through 
age have become porous and nearly filled with sediment, 
rendering them almost useless as drains. More trouble 
is experienced with our nine miles of cement pipe than 
with all the other sewers combined. 

It is hoped the work now begun will not stop till 
every vestige of the old cement pipe is removed, and its 
place supplied with proper material. 

A departure has been made this year in the method of 
giving line and grade for sewers, batters being used 
instead of common grade pins. 

Surveys have been made for the drainage of East Man- 
chester through* the proposed Spruce-street main, and 
for other sections of the city where sewers have been 
petitioned for. 

I would again call attention to the necessity of properly 
ventilating and flushing the old sewers. Complaints are 



61 

continually being made, but, owing to limited appropria- 
tions, no money has been expended for this purpose. 

COMMONS. 

Horace Gordon, superintendent, has had charge of the 
work on the several commons. 

Merrimack Square. — The culvert here has been com- 
pleted through the square, a distance of three hundred 
and seventy-two feet, using eighty-nine and thirty-nine 
hundredths perch of new stone in addition to that com- 
posing the original wall of the pond. 

A large amount of fill has also been made. That part 
of the pond east of the diagonal walk has been brought 
nearly to grade, and the remaining portion partially filled. 
Fourteen new seats were built in this square. 

Park Square. — A spray and a drinking- fountain have 
been constructed in this square. F. S. Bodwell had the 
contract for the fountain basin ; Thomas A. Lane, for the 
spray fountain and piping ; and Pike & Heald, the con- 
tract for the drinking-fountain. All plans for the same 
are on file in this office. 

Owing to the lateness of the season when these foun- 
tains were finished, the concrete approaches were not 
laid. About one hundred loads of street scrapings were 
spread upon this square early in the season. Forty-one 
elm trees have been set out to replace those which had 
died. Tree boxes were put up and repaired where neces- 
sary, and all whitewashed. 

Tremont Square. — A drinking-fountain has been placed 
in this square, Daniel J. Murphy having the contract. 

The fence was also repaired in several places. 

Hanover Square. — The diagonal walk has been raised 
and the flower plots attended to as usual. 



62 

The several commons have been cleaned and the grass 
cut as often as necessary. 

Monument Square. — The burial place of General John 
Stark has undergone several changes the past year. The 
trees have been trimmed and all bushes removed, giving 
it a much better appearance. It is hoped that the sug- 
gested improvements at this square will soon be carried 
out, and thus, in a more fitting manner, mark the rest- 
ing-place of the " Hero of Bennington." 

CEMETERIES. 

Amoskeag. — Trustees: Councilman E. Parker French, 
chairman; Messrs. Hiram Stearns and J. E. Stearns. 
Nothing has been done the present year at this cemetery. 

Pine Grove. — Trustees: Alderman H. D. Gordon, 
chairman; Councilman G. W. Bacon, Messrs H. H. 
Huse, G. P. Whitman and James A. "Weston. The drain 
constructed in this cemetery last year was found to work 
satisfactorily, and that section formerly covered with water 
to the depth of two or three feet is now thoroughly 
drained. 

Surveys have been made for the laying out of lots in 
the eastern and southwestern sections. Twenty-two lots 
were relaid on the north side, and twenty-one on the east 
side of Landscape lawn. 

Supervision was exercised over the construction of the 
storehouse, plans of which were submitted by Mr. 
George W. Bacon. 

When the long-talked-of plan mentioned in former 
reports is completed, it will save a large amount of extra 
labor on the part of the engineer. 

Valley. — Trustees : Alderman C. W. Quimby, chair- 
man ; Councilman Joseph Quirin, Messrs. G. C. Gilmore, 



63 

B. W. Hill, and D. O. FurnalcL The improvements in 
the valley, for which plans were made last year, have 
been fully carried out. 

Plans were submitted and accepted for the enlarge- 
ment of the lodge-house. The changes embodied in 
these plans were, the addition of an office for the super- 
intendent, octagonal in form, a cellar under the entire 
building, giving ample facilities for storage, the addition 
of a piazza, and changes in the sanitary arrangements. 

Line and grade have been given in all cases where lots 
were to be improved. 

Of the work done in the different cemeteries, only that 
directly connected with the office has been mentioned, 
although suggestions have been given, from time to time, 
where plans were not necessary. 

BRIDGES. 

Owing to the bad condition of the old bridge at Cohas 
brook, it was deemed necessary to build a new one. A 
three-panel truss bridge of thirty feet clear span and 
twenty feet roadway was constructed. The abutments 
were repaired, and the grade raised about fifteen inches. 
The contractor was John H. Willey. 

McGregor bridge has been examined by the builders, 
and adjustments made where necessary. The planking, 
which was found unsafe in many places, was repaired. 

At Amoskeag bridge, the span over the railroad track 
was repaired and adjusted, under contract made with Mr. 
Patterson, of the construction department of the Concord 
Railroad. 

The South-Main-street bridge was replanked, and the 
other bridges repaired where necessary, using in all fifty 
thousand feet of plank. 



64 



STREET LINES. 



In reference to street lines, I cannot too forcibly repeat 
that which has been said in former reports, the import- 
ance of having substantial bounds on all of our streets. 
I am pleased to report this year the purchase of stone 
bounds, which have been set in all streets where the lines 
have been established. 

STREET GRADES. 

I can only repeat what was said in my last report, and 
which has been carried out where macadamizing has been 
done : " In the city proper, many of the streets are a foot 
or more above grade. By cutting these down to the 
established grade much material might be obtained for 
filling, and thus save an unnecessary outlay in the pur- 
chase of sand banks for that purpose. The cause of this 
high grade is very evident. When the streets become 
worn and need repairing, gravel is put on from four to 
eight inches in depth ; when this layer is worn out, it is 
in turn covered with more gravel, and in time the road- 
way is level with or above the sidewalk, thus flooding the 
walks in wet weather, to the great discomfort of pedes- 
trians. When a street is to be graded^ the old road-bed 
should be removed to a depth sufficient to allow of a 
amount of new gravel being put on to bring the street to 
the established grade." 

BUILDINGS. 

Sketches were made and submitted for the proposed 
new engine-house on Lake avenue. 

Plans were also made for the addition to the Valley 
cemetery lodge-house. 



65 

WEATHER RECORD. 

A weather record has been kept showing three read- 
ings daily of the thermometer, direction of the wind, and 
state of the weather. 

MACADAMIZING. 

Now that we have had two seasons' experience with 
the road-roller, and ample opportunities to observe its 
practical utility in building our roadways, I cannot more 
properly refer to it than by quoting the following specifi- 
cations, prepared by ¥m. C. Oastler, for Telford macadam 
pavements : 

" The roadway, when consolidated and finished, will be 
twelve inches in depth at the gutters, and fifteen inches 
at the center, diminishing gradually from this point, right 
and left, to the depth named. 

" The gutters to be two feet six inches in width, and to 
be of stone blocks six inches square and six inches deep, 
and to be laid in sand on a firmly consolidated surface of 
small broken stone or gravel, as shown in plan. 

" Preparation of the Road-bed. — The earth road-bed, on 
which the pavement is to rest, shall be excavated to the 
required depth, and when graded and shaped to its proper 
form it shall be thoroughly and repeatedly rolled with 
the steam roller, and all depressions which shall then 
appear are to be filled with the same material as the road- 
bed and rolled until the whole shall be uniformly com- 
pact and firm. 

" Note. — Too much attention cannot be given to the 
careful preparation of the road-bed. To begin correctly is 
necessary for ultimate success. It is insufficient that the 
road-bed be simply smoothed over with loose earth and 
then built upon ; it must be heavily rolled until it is uni- 
formly compacted; otherwise, the wearing surface of the 



66 

pavement will soon follow the unevenness of the subway, 
and wear in waves and undulations, causing an infinity of 
trouble and expense, which can be avoided by some extra 
trouble in the earlier stages of the construction of the 
road. Plowing up the road-bed should not be allowed. 
The depths reached by this means are irregular, and uni- 
formity of compactness is made more difficult. 

" Stone Foundation. — On the road-bed, thus formed and 
compacted, a bottom layer of stone — to the depth of eight 
inches at the center of the road, and gradually diminish- 
ing to six inches at the curb — is to be set by hand, to form 
a close, firm pavement. The stones are to be laid with 
their largest side down, in parallel lines across the street, 
breaking joints as much as practicable. The width of the 
upper part of the stones not to be more than eight inches 
nor less than six inches. The stones not to exceed fifteen 
inches in length. After being set closely together, the 
stones are to be firmly wedged by inserting a bar in all 
possible places, and placing between them stones as nearly 
as possible of the depth of the pavement, until the whole 
is bound in position. 

" Projections of the upper part of this course shall be 
broken off, care being taken not to loosen the pavement ; 
and no wedging shall be done within twenty feet of the 
face of the work being laid. The small interstices are 
to be filled in with stone chips, firmly wedged with ham- 
mers. The whole is to be thoroughly rammed and settled 
to place, and all undue irregularities of surface broken off. 

" JSTote. — The purpose of this course of rough stone is 
not only to secure for the superstructure a permanent and 
unyielding foundation, but to act also as an open drain 
through which all superfluous moisture may readily find 
its way to the proper channel, and thus keep the pave- 
ment dry. To this end, it is necessary to avoid the filling 
up of the openings between the stones with anything finer 



67 

than "drippings." By wedging the stones, and filling in 
with smaller pieces, the foundation can be made unyield- 
ing and firm without being solid. Almost any quality of 
stone is suitable for this foundation course, and also for 
the next or intermediate layer. Once properly laid, it 
needs no renewal, and this permanency of the well-made 
Telford road is a strong recommendation from an eco- 
nomical point of view. 

" The gutter blocks may be either of trap-rock or slate, 
or blue-stone slabs, or even small cobble stones. In New 
York city, blocks of trap-rock have been used. At New 
Haven, gutters of blue-stone twelve inches wide and four 
inches thick are used. Some engineers think gutter 
stones may be dispensed with altogether, except on streets 
having heavy grades. 

" Intermediate Layer of Stone. — On the foundation course 
shall be laid an intermediate layer of broken stones, vary- 
ing in size from three inches in their greatest diameters to 
one inch in their smallest diameters. These irregular-sized 
stones may be either the 'tailings' of the screened stones, 
or may be raked from the quarry and placed on the road- 
way without being machine broken; but they must, never- 
theless, be so laid as to compact solidly, and must be clean, 
broken stone, free from dust and dirt, and within the 
dimensions given above. This intermediate course will 
be four inches in depth at the center of the roadway, 
gradually decreasing to three inches in depth at the gut- 
ters ; it will be thoroughly rolled by the steam roller until 
it shall be firm, compact, and solid. On its upper surface 
it shall be identical in rise and form to the cross-section 
of the finished pavement, as specified above. In the lay- 
ing of this course of stone, a small quantity of binding 
material will be used, sufficient only to fill up the crevices 
and render this portion of the pavement solid. Prefer- 
ably the binding is to be of fine screened gravel or sand, 
which is to be sufficiently watered during the process of 



68 

rolling, so that the ' licking up ' of the road material and 
its adherence to the rolling wheels may be prevented. 

" Note. — On this course, where no vehicular wear oc- 
curs, stones of irregular size may be used, and they need 
not be of the best quality, provided any money saving can 
be effected by using an inferior stone. The object of speci- 
fying unscreened irregular stone, is to lessen the cost of 
construction, but every care must be taken to make this 
course compact and solid, and if inferior stones be used 
they must not be such as will crush under the weight of 
the steam roller ; neither must they be laid except in such 
manner as shall insure a close, compact, and solid layer. 
The watering of the binding material also requires care. 
The holes in the water-cart tube are generally too large 
and are apt to ' flush ' the material used for binding and 
drive it through the layer. A convenient arrangement is 
to have two tubes and valves to each water-cart, the tubes 
having different.sized holes. 

"Surface Layer. — On the intermediate course will be 
laid the surface layer of broken stone. It will be three 
inches in depth when consolidated, and the stones shall be 
practically uniform in quality, and as near an approach to 
a cube in form as possible. Each stone used in this layer 
shall have passed through a two and one half inch circular 
hole, and all stones that are wedge-shaped and do not 
approach uniformity of measurement on their sides shall 
be taken from the road with properly shaped rakes, and 
no stones allowed to remain which are not sound, strong, 
and equable in size and quality of material. The 
stones shall be raked into an even layer, and the steam 
roller passed over them twice or thrice. After this, a 
quantity of fine screened gravel or sand shall be thrown 
on and sufficiently sprinkled to moisten the mass without 
' licking up.' The rolling shall then be continued (work- 
ing the roller backwards and forwards, gradually from the 
gutter to the crown), with an occasional light watering of 



69 

the pavement, until the cross-section shall be exact accord- 
ing to specification, the interstices filled in, the roadway 
firmly compacted and solid, and all excess of binding 
removed from the surface of the finished pavement. 

" Note. — If the earth subway, the foundation course, 
and the intermediate layer have been carefully laid and 
thoroughly consolidated, the wear will be confined to the 
surface of the road, and this alone will require renewal. 
This is one great feature in the economy of well-built 
broken-stone pavements. . . . The conditions for 
this economy are simply that the roadway shall be well 
built with proper material and watchfully maintained. 
Thoroughness in all parts of the work, and the best 
possible material, of uniform size, for the wearing surface, 
will insure success. . . . The stones of the upper 
layer should be the wearing surface of the pavement, and 
the traffic should come in contact with them. Gravel or 
dirt remaining on the roadway will increase its wear and 
tear. Long experience in England places this beyond a 
doubt, and the record says : ' The oftener that streets are 
cleansed, the less is the mud which is created and removed, 
whilst the attendant expenses are by no means increased, 
and the roads are kept in a better state of preservation. 
The worn particles, if left on the surface, act as a grind- 
ing powder under the wheels, and the horses' feet to re- 
duce to similar powder the surface of the road.' Again, 
' The more frequent cleansing was instrumental not only 
in keeping the streets in better condition, but in reducing 
the wear and tear of the pavement.' Therefore, put no 
'top-dressing' on the surface layer of stones, but keep 
them clean and free from grinding powder. 

" In this specification, only fine gravel and sand have 
been named as ' binding.' One or the other of these is 
preferred to stone screenings ; but cost has of course to be 
considered, and in some cases the employment of screen- 
ings will happen of necessity." 

The back work in the office has been brought forward 
as rapidly as circumstances would permit, 258 plans, dat- 



70 

ing back for several years and left in pencil, have been 
properly lettered and completed in ink. 

I am indebted to Joseph B. Sawyer and George W. 
Stevens, civil engineers, Perry H. Dow and the other 
engineers of the Amoskeag Company, for the use of plans 
and for information which was of value to the city ; also, 
to the surveyors of the highway districts and to the 
superintendents of the several departments. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my thanks for the 
many acts of courtesy and kindness, both official and per- 
sonal, which I have received from the members of your 
board. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENKETT, 

City Engineer. 

January 2, 1888. 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT SURVEYORS. 



Report of the work done in the various highway dis- 
tricts during the year 1887 : 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 

Orison Webber, Surveyor. 
No report. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. 
William Sanborn, Superintendent. 



COBBLE PAVING. 

Bridge street, from Elm to Chestnut 
Cedar street, from Chestnut westerly 
Central street, from Pine to Union 
Central street, from Union easterly 
Dean street, from Elm to Canal 
Elm street, from Blodget to Salmon 
Franklin street, from Granite to Merri 

mack ...... 

Lake Avenue, from Union to Beech 
Lake Avenue, from Lincoln to Wilson 
Pine street, from Lake Avenue to Central 

street ...... 

Pine street, from Laurel to Manchester 

Total cobble paving 



510 sq. yds. 

12 " 

418 " 

177 " 

232 " 

352 " 

693 " 

440 " 

300 " 

177 " 

429 " 



3,740 sq. yds. 



72 

COBBLE PAVING RELAID. 

Manchester street, from Maple to Lincoln 133 sq. yds. 

COBBLE EDGING. 

Bridge street, from Elm to Chestnut . . 600 feet 

Central street, from Pine to Union . . 954 

Central street, from Union easterly . . 400 

Elm street, from Blodget to Salmon . . 792 

Franklin street, from Granite to Pleasant . 588 

Lake avenue, from Union to Beech . . 890 

Lake avenue, from Lincoln to Wilson . 750 

Pine street, from Lake ave. to Central street 300 

Pine street, from Laurel to Manchester . 652 



Total cobble edging . . . 5,926 feet, 

EDGE STONES. 

Dean street, from Elm to Canal . . 1,568 feet. 
Franklin street, from Central to Merrimack 

(reset) 492 " 

Lake avenue, from Beech westerly (reset) . 100 " 

Other streets 633 " 



Total edge stones set 2,793 feet. 

MACADAMIZING. 

New. 

Bridge street, from Elm to Chestnut 1,913.33 sq. yds. 
Central street, from Pine to Union . 1,435.77 " 
Central street, from Union easterly 751.11 " 
Elm street, from Blodget to Salmon 2,645.33 " 
Franklin street, from Granite to Mer- 
rimack 2,280.00 " 



73 



Pine street, from Lake avenue to 

Central street .... 

Pine street, from Laurel to Man- 
chester . 

Total new macadamizing 

TOP-DRESSED. 

Number of loads of crushed stone 



644.22 sq. yds. 
1,542.66 



11,212.42 sq. yds. 



489 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Amherst street, from Beech easterly 
Ash street, from Bridge northerly 
Auburn street, from Elm westerly 
Auburn street, from Chestnut westerly 
Beech street, from Auburn southerly 
Bridge street, from Maple westerly 
Bridge street, from Ashland easterly 
Bridge street, from Russell westerly 
Cedar street, from Elm westerly 
Cedar street, from Chestnut westerly 
Cedar street, from Chestnut easterly 
Cedar street, from Union easterly 
Central street, from Wilson westerly 
Hall street, from Central northerly 
Hanover street, from Maple easterly 
Harrison street, from Beech easterly 
High street, from Jane easterly 
Lake avenue, from Milton easterly 
Laurel street, from Hall easterly 
Lincoln street, from Hanover northerly 
Manchester street, from Maple easterly 
Maple street, from Merrimack southerly 
Merrimack street, from Pine easterly 



325 feet. 

600 

220 

360 

332 

220 

450 

900 

220 

360 

305 

490 



740 

3,005 
270 
200 
980 
180 
150 
550 
710 
405 



74 



Nashua street, from Bridge northerly 
Pearl street, from Beech easterly- 
Pine street, from Auburn southerly 
Union street, from Lake avenue southerly 
Warren street, from Bridge northerly 

Total graveled 

STREETS GRADED. 

By Gut. 

Cedar south back street, from Pine westerly 
Cedar south back street, from Chestnut west- 
erly 

Linden street, from Orange northerly 
Orange street, from Linden easterly . 
Prospect street, from Linden easterly 
Sagamore street, from Pine street to Hook 

sett road 

Young street, from Pine easterly 

Total length of cut . 

By Fill. 

Auburn north back street, from Beech west- 
erly 

Liberty east back street, from Webster 
southerly ...... 

Orange street, from Russell easterly . 

Pine east back street, from Salmon north- 
erly 

Prospect street, from Russell easterly 

Young street, from Beech westerly 

Total length of fill . 
Total, 17,295 feet; equal to 3.28 miles. 



150 feet. 
500 " 

200 " 
220 " 
320 " 



14,350 feet. 



250 feet. 



100 


n 


230 


a 


260 


i( 


125 


a 


200 


a 


500 


a ' 


. 1,665 


feet 



100 feet. 

75 " 
425 " 

50 " 
130 " 

500 " 



1,280 feet. 



75 

In some of the streets graded, a large amount of earth 
had to be moved, as is shown by the following figures : 

Auburn north back street, from Beech 

westerly 444.44 cu. yds. 

Cedar south back street, from Pine 

westerly ...... 555.55 

Cedar south back street, from'Chestnut 

westerly 222.22 

Liberty east back street, from Webster 

southerly 333.33 

Linden street, from Orange northerly 1,277.78 

Orange street, from Linden easterly . 1,444.44 

Orange street, from Russell easterly . 1,770.83 
Pine east back street, from Salmon 

northerly 333.33 

Prospect street, from Linden easterly 416.67 

Prospect street, from Russell easterly 1,083.33 
Sagamore street, from Pine street to 

Hooksett road .... 888.89 

Young street, from Pine to Beech . 5,611.11 



Total 14,381.92 cu. yds. 

GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

Arlington street, from Russell westerly . 30 cu. yds. 

Ash street, from Brook northerly . . 44 

Auburn street, from Beech westerly . 165 
Beech street, from Auburn northerly . 41 

Belmont street, from Central northerly . 30 

Belmont street, from Hanover northerly 22 

Brook street, from Ash westerly- . . 88 

Central street, from Belmont westerly . 30 

Chestnut street, from Orange northerly 20 

Chestnut street, from Salmon northerly 14 



76 



Clarke street, from Chestnut westerly 
Dean street, from Elm westerly 
Elm street, from Young southerly . 
Hall street, from Hanover southerly 
Harrison street, from Maple westerly 
High street, from Nashua easterly . 
Lake avenue, from Belmont easterly 
Liberty street, from Webster southerly 
Lincoln street, from Cedar northerly 
Milton street, from Manchester southerly 
Pine street, from Salmon northerly 
Pine street, from Pennacook southerly 
Salmon street, from Chestnut westerly 
Union street, from Sagamore northerly 
Webster street, from Liberty easterly 
Young street, from Beech westerly 



30 cu. 
302 
368 
118 

71 
118 

44 

11 

22 
118 

14 

65 

14 

14 

14 
266 



yds. 



Total grading for concrete . . 2,073 cu. yds. 

This refers only to places where the fill has been a foot, 
or more; in many places, only a few yards were used, 
scattered here and there. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



24 by 36 inches, brick .... 


198 feet 


15-inch Akron pipe ..... 


1,217 " 


12-inch Akron pipe ..... 


5,105 " 


10-inch Akron pipe ..... 


682 " 


8-inch Akron pipe ..... 


1,613 " 


Total 


8,815 feet. 


Equal to 1.67 miles. 




PIPE ON HAND AT CITY YARD. 




24-inch 


12 feet. 


15-inch ....... 


120 " 



77 



12-inch 

10-inch 

8-inch 



Total 



50 feet. 



196 feet. 



12 Y branches, 8 by 15 inches. 

12 Y branches, 10 by 15 inches. 

1 Y branch, 12 by 15 inches. 

3 Y branches, 8 by 12 inches. 
1 Y branch, 10 by 10 inches. 
1 12-inch quarter turn. 

1 8-inch quarter turn. 
1 reducer, 15 inch to 12 inch. 
11 15-inch curves. 

4 12-inch curves. 
11 10-inch curves. 

Catch-basins built, 71; rebuilt, 6; repaired, 3; man- 
holes built, 9 ; lamp-holes, 6. 

CROSSINGS. 

Concrete, new, 37 ; patched, 7 ; top-dressed, 2. 



CONCRETE. 



Crossings, new . 
Crossings, patched 
Crossings, top-dressed 



Total 



Sidewalks Repaired 



Bridge street, at Nichols's stable 

City Hall 

Dean avenue .... 
Franklin street, at schoolhouse 



1,024.39 sq. yds. 
38.60 " 
49.70 " 



1,112.69 sq. yds. 



5.30 sq. yds. 

9.00 " 

5.56 " 

71.65 " 



78 



Merrimack street .... 
West Central street .... 


36.40 sq. yds 
9.00 " 


Total 


136.91 sq. yds 


Roadways Repaired. 




Bridge street . . 
Granite street, canal bridge 


40.97 sq. yds 
267.50 " 


Total . 


308.47 sq. yds 



CONTKACT WORK. 

McGregor bridge, concreting; C. H. Robie, contractor. 

STONE CULVERTS. 

Grove street, at Cemetery brook. 
Old Bridge street, rebuilt. 
"Webster street, at River road. 
Young street, west of Beech. 
Merrimack square, through pond. 



PIPE CULVERTS. 



Canton street, at Spruce, 12-inch Akron 
Laurel street, 12-inch Akron 



Total . 



RETAINING-WALLS. 



East High street, east of Nashua 
Prospect street, east of Russell, culvert 
and walls ...... 



50 feet. 
40 " 

90 feet. 



102 perch. 
63 " 



No report. 



DISTRICT NO. 3. 
Edwin Kennedy, Surveyor. 



79 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Isaac Whittemore, Surveyor. 

Graveled 4,200 feet. 

Built 120 feet of double railing. 

Built one Akron pipe sewer, 28 feet in length. 

Culverts cleaned, bushes cut, bridges repaired, stones 
removed from road, water-bars repaired, ditches cleaned, 
and washouts filled. 

All general repairs attended to, where necessary, on 
roads and bridges. 

I would recommend that the stringers on Little Cohas 
brook bridge, which have been in use thirty-five years, be 
replaced by new timbers. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 
John H. Willey, Surveyor.* 

Graveled ■ . . 3,779 feet. 

Turnpiked 4,752 " 

Graded on South road (cut) . . . 2,970 cu. ft. 

Graded on Nutt road (fill) . . . . 450 " 

CULVERTS. 

Corner road, new, 20 feet long. 
Nutt road, one repaired. 

BRIDGES. 

Built one new bridge over Cohas brook, by contract. 
Cut bushes, put up railing, removed stones from road, 
and made general repairs, where needed. 

Mark Harvey, Surveyor.! 
General repairs attended to. 

* To October 1, 1887. t From October 1, 1887. 



80 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 
Albert J. Peaslee, Surveyor.. 

TURNPIKED. 

Cohas avenue ...... 

Island Pond road ..... 

Lake Shore road 

Total 1,455 feet. 

GRAVELED. 

Cohas avenue 820 feet. 

Island Pond road 650 " 



. 625 feet. 


. 300 


« 


. 530 


a 



Total 1,470 feet. 

One stone culvert partly relaid with new covering 
stone. 

One stone culvert taken up, cleaned, and relaid. 

Bushes cut, cobble stones removed throughout district, 
and general repairs attended to. 

A muddy section on Island Pond road, near Mrs. Car- 
velle's, was repaired by digging a trench in the road-bed 
300 feet long, 10 feet wide, and 18 inches deep. This was 
filled with cobble stones and covered with the earth 
thrown from the trench. It was cheaper using stones in 
this case, as the gravel would have to be carted a long 
distance. 

If the city would purchase a few gravel knolls in dif- 
ferent parts of the district, grading could be done at 
much less expense than at present. Most of the gravel 
used has to be purchased by the load, or drawn from 
other districts. 



81 



DISTRICT NO. 7. 
George M. Bean, Surveyor. 



GRAVELED. 




Belmont street .... 


52 rods. 


Massabesic street .... 


. 103 " 


Old Falls road .... 


. 39 " 


Porter street ..... 


. 17 " 


Total . . . . . 


. 211 rods. 


TURNPIKED AND GRADED. 




Belmont street . 


38 rods. 


Candia road ..... 


. 75 " 


Cilley street . . . ... 


. 25 " 


Huse road ..... 


. 30 " 


James Hall road .... 


. 12 " 


Mammoth road .... 


. 10 " 


Young road ..... 


. 16 " 


Total 


. 206 rods. 



TURNPIKED AND GRAVELED. 

Valley street . . ... . . .79 rods. 

GRADED. 

Mammoth road .40 rods. 

STONE CULVERTS. 

New. 



Cilley street 
Candia road 
Jewett street 
Mammoth road 



25' 

20' 
22' 
24' 



X 15" X 18" 
X 1' X 1' 

X 18" X 18" 
X V X V 



82 



Massabesic street 


. 






12' 


X 


15" 


X 18" 


Spruce street 


. 


60' 


X 


V 


X 18" 


Young road 


STONE CULVERTS. 

Rebuilt. 


15' 


X 


V 


X 15" 


Candia road 




24' 


X 


18" 


X 20" 


a a 








24' 


X 


18" 


X 18" 


ii a 








20' 


X 


V 


x r 


a a 








24' 


X 


V 


x v 


a u 








24' 


X 


18" 


X 18" 


Cilley street 








24' 


X 


V 


X 15" 


Massabesic street 








30' 


X 


15" 


X 20" 


u a 








20' 


X 


V 


X 1' 


Valley street 








24' 


X 


V 


X 15" 



One culvert replanked on Cilley road and one on Mam- 
moth road. 

Two hundred feet of wooden railing and three hun- 
dred and ten feet of iron railing put up. 

Ditches cleaned, stones removed from roads, bushes 
cut, and general repairs made. 



DISTRICT NO. 8. 
John Proctor, Surveyor. 

Bridge street, blasted stones and turnpiked 100 rods. 

Candia road, relaid two culverts. Built one new cul- 
vert, widened road 40 rods. 

Hanover street, macadamized 20 rods east of Eaton 
place, for trial. This has proved satisfactory. 

Borough road, cut trees and bushes, moved back 40 
rods of wall, and turnpiked road. 

Other repairs attended to, where necessary, throughout 
district. 



83 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 
E. M. Wiggin, Surveyor. 

Blodget road, made cut of 18 inches on Perley hill, 
west of Cohas brook, removing 100 loads of gravel, which 
were used on Mammoth road. 

Dickey road, graveled 10 rods. 

Mammoth and Derry roads, graveled 150 rods, using 
600 loads of gravel ; made 36 rods of new gutters, and 
cleaned 200 rods of old gutters. 

Removed 40 loads of stone from gutters. 

Built three stone culverts 72 feet long, east of Cohas 
brook. 

Mammoth road, turnpiked and graded 154 rods; 
cleaned gutters and culverts. 

Page road, repaired water-bars, cleaned gutters, and 
removed stones from road. 

Corning road, removed stones, filled washouts, and 
repaired water-bars. 

Hatch road, turnpiked and graded 20 rods, filled wash- 
out, widened the road 4 feet over culvert, and put up 70 
feet of railing. 

Derry road, east of Cohas brook, graveled 33 rods on 
Dunbar hill. Turnpiked and graded 55 rods. Built two 
stone culverts 62 feet long. 

Clark hill, graveled 18 rods, made 40 rods of new 
gutters, and filled washouts. Scraped roads two miles, 
filled mud-holes, and removed stones. 

Cohas avenue, widened road 4 feet over culvert, and 
removed stones from road. 

Webster road, repaired water-bars, and removed stones. 

Other repairs attended to, where necessary, in district. 



84 



DISTRICT NO. 10. 
Charles 0. Phelps, Surveyor. 

Cobble gutter paving . . . 
Cobble edging set . 
Curbstone set ..... 
Wooden railing built, on Old Mast road 



648 sq. yds. 
4,040 feet. 
400 " 
540 " 



concrete. 



Twelve crossings 



. 325.30 sq. yds. 
Main-street schoolhouse yard (top-dressed) 193.24 " 
South-Main-street schoolhouse yard (top- 
dressed) 79.80 " 

South-Main-street schoolhouse yard (new) 101.00 " 

Total concrete .... 699.34 sq. yds. 

One thousand six hundred and twenty and thirty-three 
hundredths square yards of concrete have been laid by 
private individuals in this district. 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Bowman street, Mast southerly . 

Boynton road 

Milford street 

New Mast road 

Old Mast road 

River street . 

River road . 

Second street, Granite southerly 

Sullivan street, Main westerly 

Wayne street, Beauport westerly 

West Hancock street . 

Total graveled . 



200 feet. 
1,500 

500 

800 

700 

620 
3,000 

300 

330 

300 

125 



8,375 feet. 



85 



STREETS GRADED. 






Amory south back street 


200 feet 


80 cu.yds 


Carroll street .... 


300 " 


550 


u 


Line of horse-railroad 




500 


u 


Main-street engine-house yard 




350 


a 


McGregor street, south of Amory 








street ..... 


200 feet 


145 


a 


Milford street, Bowman westerly . 


300 " 


148 


a 


Old Mast road, at Brock's 


400 " 


900 


a 


Riddle street, Milford northerly . 


150 " 


70 


a 


Schuyler street .... 


150 " 


200 


a 


Sullivan street .... 


315 " 


450 


a 


Wayne street, Beauport westerly . 


320 " 


175 


it 



Totals . 



2,335 feet. 3,568 cu.yds. 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Amory street, Main easterly 


200 feet. 


45 cu 


Fourth street .... 


75 


a 


40 


Main street, Putnam northerly . 


150 


a 


27 


Main street, Amory southerly 


100 


a 


30 


Main street, Amory northerly 


100 


a 


20 


Marion street .... 


150 


a 


30 


McGregor street, Wayne north- 








erly 


190 


a 


48 


Milford street . 


1,100 


a 


84 


Monmouth street 


50 


a 


35 


River road . 


270 


a 


35 


Third street, Ferry southerly 


140 


a 


74 


Wayne street, Main westerly 


100 


a 


20 


Wayne street, Dubuque easterly . 


100 


a 


30 


Totals . 


2,725 feet. 


518 cu 



yds. 



86 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



15-inch Akron pipe 
12-inch " 
10-inch " 
10-inch " " 
' 8-inch " 

Total sewers 



144 feet, new. 
278 " " 
189 " relaid. 
49 " new. 
116 " " 



776 feet. 



Eight-inch Akron pipe used for catch-basins, not 
counted. 

Fifteen-inch Akron pipe in yard, 453 feet. 

Catch-basins built, 10; lamp-holes, 3. 

The Main-street bridge over Piscataquog River has been 
replanked. 

DISTRICT NO. 11. 
Frank D. Hanscom, Surveyor. 

Hauled out sand on GofFstown road. Hauled stone on 
the same road and graveled 6,240 feet. 

Widened the road 4 feet, for a distance of 250 feet. 

Built 300 feet of sidewalk. 

Cut hill front of G. R. Stevens's house, 18 inches. 

Built one culvert 16' X 14" X 18". 

Turnpiked on Hooksett and Goffstown roads two 
miles. 

Replaced four stringers on Black-brook bridge and 
replanked where needed. 

Cleaned culverts and gutters, filled mud-holes, and 
made all necessary repairs. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 

Jeremiah Garvin, Surveyor.* 



No report. 



* To October 1, 1887. 



87 
John H. Willey, Surveyor.* 
General repairs attended to. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 

William Campbell, Surveyor. 

Union street, turnpiked with machine, 5,280 feet. 

Repaired two very bad washouts near Eben Carr's. 

Graded and graveled, 825 feet. 

Built one stone culvert 25' X V X 1'. 

Built one stone culvert 15' X 1' X V. 

Two stone culverts repaired on Union street. 

Cut two miles of bushes, blasted several large bowlders 
and stumps from roadway, repaired water-bars, and made 
general repairs. 

*From October 1, 1887. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1887. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor, ex officio, Chairman. 
EDWARD L. KIMBALL, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1. — Charles H. Manning. 

John G. Hutchinson. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean. 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3. — Nathan P. Hunt. 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Samuel D. Lord. 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
Ward 5. — Thomas F. Collins. 

John J. Holland. 
Ward 6. — William H. Huse. 

Abial C. Flanders. 
Ward 7. — Marshall P. Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8. — George W. Nutter. 

Luther C. Baldwin. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 



92 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. W. Clarke, Kimball, 
Dodge, Holland. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Woodbury, Collins, Hall. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, 
Flanders, Nutter. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Huse, Baldwin. 

Music. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, Baldwin. 

. Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Kimball, Manning, Flanders. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. W. 
Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Collins, Hutchinson, Woodbury. 

Health. — Messrs. Nutter, Holland, Hutchinson. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, Hall, S. W. 
Clarke, Hunt. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, S. W. Clarke. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. Hall, Holland, Manning. 



93 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Dodge, "Woodbury, Hutchin- 
son. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Hutchinson, Flanders, Collins. 

Training School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodge. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Flanders, Woodbury. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. S. W. Clarke, 
Manning, Baldwin. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Baldwin, 
Nutter, Hall. 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Lord, Dodge. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Flanders, Holland, Huse. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Huse, Baldwin, 
Hutchinson. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Holland, 
Flanders, Nutter. 

Goff'e's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Nutter, 
Collins, Hutchinson. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Woodbury, Collins, Lord. 



In Board of School Committee. 

December 31, 1887. 

The Superintendent presented his annual report to the committee, 
and it was accepted. 

Marshall P. Hall presented the annual report prepared by him at 
the request of the Board. 

Voted, That the report by Mr. Hall be accepted, and adopted as 
the report of the Board, and that it be transmitted to the City Coun- 
cils, together with the report of the Superintendent. 

JAMES E. DODGE, Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Honorable City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — The public schools have been so long 
established, and their regular work varies so little from 
year to year, that it is entirely familiar to the public. 
Aside from the facts presented in the report of the Super- 
intendent, relating to teachers, studies, and methods, there 
is, ordinarily, little information to be communicated upon 
these subjects. 

All statistical information for the year is condensed into 
tables, printed in an appendix, under the following heads : 

1. General Statistics. 

2. Relating to School Buildings. 

3. " " " Schools. 

4. " " Teachers. 

5. " " Pupils. 

6. " " Truancy. 

7. " " Revenue and Expenses. 

The figures for the present year are accompanied by 
those for former years, so far as possible. The chief value 
of these statistics is for purposes of comparison, and they 
should be presented from year to year, on a uniform plan. 

The following is a brief review of the principal trans- 
actions of the board during the year : 

Early in the year a petition was received from the first 
assistant teachers of the grammar schools for an increase 



96 

of salary. A general comparison of the salaries paid 
here with those of other places, was made at that time. 
While it appeared that the wages of the petitioners were 
proportionately somewhat lower than in other grades, it 
was deemed inexpedient to make any increase this year 
on account of the state of the finances. 

A vote was passed in February making the sessions of 
the High School of equal length in the forenoon and after- 
noon, and later the other schools were included in the 
plan. This was tried until the end of the spring term. 
It proved to be an unpopular change, and with the open- 
ing of the fall term the schools went back to the old 
schedule. The one-session plan for the High School has 
many strong and consistent advocates. As a partial ex- 
periment in this direction, the principal was given dis- 
cretionary power to continue the morning session till 
1 p. m., and then close for the day, in stormy weather. 
He has exercised this privilege frequently, and the board 
has heard no objection. 

A proposition to sell the school lot at the corner of 
Bridge and Union streets, having been referred to this 
board by the City Councils, it was unanimously voted that 
it ought not to be done. Probably no objection would be 
made to the removal of the building now standing upon 
the lot ; but the expression in regard to the land was em- 
phatic, and in accordance with the expressed policy of all 
our predecessors in office, to retain all school lands suit- 
ably located. This lot, as well as nearly all others owned 
by the city, was acquired under a deed restricting its use 
to school purposes. It cannot be sold, therefore, without 
the consent of the conveyor, and by legal release of such 
restriction. 

The annual election of teachers and janitors took place 
in June, without a change in the list of names (except to 



97 

fill vacancies), or in the schedule of salaries. At a later 
meeting, Mr. J. J. Hayes was re-elected special teacher in 
elocution, and it is a matter of regret that he has been 
prevented from entering upon his duties until the present 
time. Our citizens generally are aware that through the 
accumulations of the Clarke prize-speaking fund, the ser- 
vices of a professional teacher in this important branch 
are secured for a large part of the time without expense 
to the city. This fund was most wisely bestowed ; few 
gifts for educational purposes have so quickly and effectu- 
ally realized the design of the giver. The annual compe- 
titions continue with unabated interest. As their real ob- 
ject becomes understood, the pupils enter into these con- 
tests with better spirit, and the evil effects which at first 
attended such intense rivalry have nearly disappeared. 

The course of study in the grammar schools has been 
extended by the introduction of book-keeping, in the 
upper classes for the last half of the year. This has not 
imposed additional work upon the pupils. The time 
given to it is taken from penmanship, with no loss to the 
latter but rather a gain, because book-keeping is largely 
a practical application of penmanship. There has been a 
change in the text-book for beginners in Latin, in the 
High School. Yaggy's Anatomical Charts for the high and 
grammar schools, and new books for use in geometry and 
arithmetic have been supplied, and the old music charts, in 
use for sixteen years, have all been exchanged for a new 
and improved edition. 

Temporary suspension of schools at Bakersville has 
been necessary to prevent the spread of scarlet fever and 
diphtheria. The subjects of contagious diseases and de- 
fective eyesight of pupils have been presented in addresses 
before the board by Drs. Crosby and Carvelle, and some 
modifications of our health regulations have been made. 

7 



98 

The following memoranda of important repairs to 
school buildings is furnished by the committee having 
charge : During the summer the entire water-closet sys- 
tem at the Franklin-street house was taken out, and 
renewed in the best manner known at the present time, 
and the results have been entirely satisfactory. Extensive 
repairs were made to the roofs of several of the large 
buildings, especially the Franklin-street and Spring-street 
houses. During the vacation, the furniture in five rooms 
was altered from double to single desks, at an expense of 
about one dollar a seat, and several more rooms have been 
altered the present month. 

Mr. Samuel Brooks has been re-elected truant officer. 
He reports a satisfactory state of affairs in his department, 
especially as to the employment of children in mills. The 
state law, as amended at the last session of the legislature, 
forbids the employment of any person under thirteen 
years of age in manufacturing establishments at any time. 
Since the faithful enforcement of this and other regula- 
tions, overseers and employers are finding it more con- 
venient, and perhaps more profitable, to employ adult help 
than to depend upon children who must so often go and 
come to attend school. In the opinion of the truant 
officer, there is now less child help employed in our mills 
than ever before. The great duty before us is to see that 
these persons shall profit by their emancipation from the 
hardships of early labor and attend school, instead of 
becoming idlers on the streets. 

The truant officer has granted 610 certificates allowing 
children to work. The average age of the applicants was 
13f years : 47 per cent were French; 25 per cent, Irish; 20 
per cent, American; 4 per cent, Germans; and 3 per cent, 
Swedes. All of the Irish and French, or 72 per cent of 
the whole, had obtained the schooling necessary to secure 



99 

their certificates, in the parochial schools; the others, 
in the public schools. Of the whole number, 17 could 
not read in any language, — 15 French, 1 German, and 
1 Swede. Excepting the last two, all the Germans and 
Swedes, having been in the public schools, could read 
English; but less than 5 per cent of the 268 French chil- 
dren could read the simplest words in the language of 
this country. This indicates that the French parochial 
schools, from which these children came, are making no 
effort to instruct their pupils in the language of the com- 
munity in which they live, and of the nation in which 
they are soon to become citizens. This is repugnant to 
our national idea, if not contrary to our laws, and is a 
state of affairs which ought not to exist on American soil. 

The Superintendent reports 3,670 pupils enrolled in the 
public day schools for the year, — 1,817 boys and 1,853 
girls. There has been a gain in the growing sections of 
the city sufficient to demand more sittings, but a deple- 
tion in others. The net gain over last year is 5 boys 
and 33 girls. There are 1,437 children of nationalities 
other than American, and the cosmopolitan growth of 
the city is indicated by the fact that there are found in the 
public schools children of Irish, French, German, Swed- 
ish, English, Scotch, Nova Scotian, Italian, Norwegian, 
Danish, and Russian parentage. 

The attendance in the parochial schools during the last 
term was reported to be 2,948. Our superintendent 
estimates that there have been fully 3,700 children in 
these schools during the year. This number equals the 
enrollment in the public schools of our city; it is 1,200 
more than the whole number in the schools of Concord, 
and double that of Nashua or Dover. 

The year has witnessed a notable advance in evening- 
school work. The classes for girls, at Spring street, for 



100 

boys, at Lowell street, and the mixed classes, at School 
street, were opened earlier than usual, and the enrollment 
is the largest ever recorded in these schools. A new 
school has been opened at Goffe's Falls, with good attend- 
ance. The new evening schools of drawing, which the 
favorable action of the present city government enabled 
the board to open in April last, have been entirely success- 
ful. A single room in the Spring-street house being 
available for their use, it was fitted up with tables and 
other furniture. The top of each table forms a draught- 
ing board, 24 by 30 inches, for a single pupil. These are 
movable, and by providing three sets, three classes of 
twenty-four persons each have been accommodated, on 
alternate evenings, in the same room. As this work was 
entirely new here, Mr. S. G. Stephens, an instructor in the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and for six years 
in charge of the evening drawing schools in Lowell, was 
employed to inaugurate it, and supervise it for nine 
weeks. He was assisted by Messrs. J. M. Kendall, Henry 
W. Allen, and Frank A. Higgins, of this city. At the re- 
opening of the school, in November, Mr. Kendall took 
charge of the classes in machine drawing, and Mr. Henry 
A. Herrick was employed for the architectural classes. 
Under their direction the several divisions are now work- 
ing five evenings in each week, with excellent results. 
The course of instruction is outlined as follows : 1. Les- 
sons in use of instruments, and precision of measure- 
ment and lines; 2. Practical geometrical problems; 3. 
Sketching and making to scale simple working drawings 
from models. The school is furnished with machinery 
parts, and other models, generously loaned to the city 
from the workshops of the Amoskeag Company, the Man- 
chester Print- Works, and Mr. Jeremiah Hodge. These 
schools have been in session seventeen weeks in all. 



101 

There are now applications for admission from fifty per- 
sons more than can be accommodated. 

The cost of the schools for the year will be found in 
detail in the table of " Revenue and Expenses." As usual, 
the annual expenditure has been exceedingly small for a 
city of our population and valuation. The school funds 
have been carefully expended, and if at any time defi- 
ciencies exist, it is because appropriations have been 
reduced below the actual needs of the schools, after our 
most careful estimates. 

The following suggestions as to the needs of the 
schools and desirable improvements are offered : 

I. — THE PURCHASE OF NEW SCHOOL LOTS. 

The time is very near when increased school accom- 
modations must be provided in West Manchester and 
Hallsville. Both sections are rapidly growing. The 
people in the latter district are already moving in the 
matter, by a petition for a new house to be located on 
a more eligible lot. In West Manchester, a new building 
will be needed on the south side of Piscataquog River, 
probably most conveniently located on the site of the 
present South-Main-street house, which could be removed 
to another lot for primary purposes in the rapidly 
growing neighborhood between the Piscataquog River 
and Milford street. Even were there no immediate 
necessity for new buildings in these sections, it would 
be unwise to delay the purchase of land. We advise 
the purchase of large lots, — so large that no possible 
contingency of the future can shut out the light and 
pure air from the buildings erected upon them. We 
have too many instances of the lamentable results of a 
contrary policy. Observe the effects at the Spring-street, 
Franklin-street, School-street, and Merrimack-street 



102 

houses. Close to the latter a stable has been built, 
which emits a fearful stench in summer. High buildings 
in close proximity to the Spring-street and Franklin- 
street houses have completely shut out the sunlight 
from certain rooms. The Ash-street, Lincoln-street, and 
Webster-street lots, on the contrary, are models. They 
show how easily school premises, like the public squares, 
may be made to adorn the city and lend health to her 
citizens. Who would now part with a single foot of 
these fine areas? And yet we remember the objections 
to their purchase on account of their size. There is no 
excuse for the purchase of small lots on the plea of 
scarcity or cost. Manchester has been greatly favored 
in this respect. The Amoskeag Company has sold to 
the city at various times, for school purposes, 400,000 
square feet of land, or nearly ten acres, at an average 
price of six cents per foot. With land at such prices, 
it has been, and now is, wise policy to purchase large 
lots in advance of immediate needs. 

It is scarcely necessary to reiterate the statements 
which have been presented to the City Councils con- 
cerning the Franklin-street schoolhouse. The building 
is old; it was badly planned and cheaply built. Com- 
petent judges affirm that rebuilding is the only sensible 
and economical course. The wooden building on School 
street is a shabby apology for a schoolhouse. It ought 
to be abandoned for day-school use ; otherwise it must 
have extensive repairs. The walls of the schoolhouse 
at Amoskeag are badly cracked, and will need attention 
the coming summer ; and the fence at the High School 
must be replaced. The water-closet arrangements at 
Webster street are inconvenient and unfit. The heating 
apparatus at the Training School is inadequate. The 
furnaces in use there ought to be replaced by steam 



103 

heating. They have cost more for repairs and removals 
the present year than the repairs on all the steam-plants 
in the schoolhouses combined. 

II. — PRACTICAL EDUCATION. 

We need a further development on the side of prac- 
tical education, as represented in the evening schools 
and in certain departments of the High School. In- 
creased interest in evening-school work is reported from 
all our New England towns. These schools appear to 
be firmly established as an integrant part of the common 
school system. As they are chiefly patronized by work- 
ing people, and their attendance increases as the hours 
of labor lessen, their growth is a significant sign of the 
times. The ordinary evening school is capable of great 
development for good. Besides the usual instruction, 
advantage might be taken in its classes to teach the 
principles of our government, and so counteract some 
of the political evils which exist in cities. Our own 
evening schools may be directly improved by the em- 
ployment of better teachers, the introduction of other 
and more interesting studies, and by a more watchful 
supervision. 

Evening schools for special instruction in subjects 
relating to the trades and industries are also increasing 
in number in manufacturing towns. Our classes in 
mechanical drawing are a beginning in this direction. 
They should be made free to every apprentice and arti- 
san in the city, and enlarged until all applicants can 
be accommodated. Every man who attends them is 
made a better workman ; he more highly respects him- 
self and his calling; he is stimulated to invention, and 
animated to become a master in his business. The 
action of our city in providing such facilities for young 



104 

mechanics will tend to induce them to remain in our 
midst, and to build up here the smaller but important 
industries which we so much need. 

In the day schools also the practical idea is to be 
developed. The evening school and the day school 
afford a curious illustration of the needs of two great 
classes of youth. In the former are found those, who, 
by force of circumstances, have early learned the lessons 
of industry, and now need intellectual growth and dis- 
cipline. In the day schools the order is reversed; the 
pupils are students exclusively from their earliest days, 
and most of them sadly need some direction toward 
industrial pursuits. There is an unmistakable demand 
for something supplementary to the common school to 
meet this need. Drawing schools, laboratories, manual- 
labor classes, and the like, may seem to many of our 
older citizens like useless innovations, and yet the 
swiftly changing conditions of our day make them 
necessities. The most stupendous fact of modern times 
is the growth of cities. In the year 1800, only one 
twentieth of the inhabitants of the United States lived 
in cities. The last census reports that there are now 
more than twelve millions of people, or fully one fourth 
of our whole population, in cities of 8,000 inhabitants 
or over. This vast massing of men has revolutionized 
all conditions, political, social, and educational. It has 
placed our children in a new world. The essential 
laws of education do not change, but its methods and 
aims must move on. In the days of our fathers there 
were no educational problems such as puzzle us. In- 
dustry was amply taught in the household and on the 
farm; health and exercise needed not to be supplied 
by artificial devices. Then, the State had to provide only 



105 

for the simple needs of intelligence ; now, it must edu- 
cate for social and industrial demands. 

III. PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

A system of physical training should be established 
in the High School. Medical authorities now generally 
agree that there is little danger to the health of children 
in, grades below the High School, and they are quite 
as unanimous in their opinion that grave dangers attend 
the higher courses of study, especially for girls. We 
must abandon the class system, and all the other un- 
natural and exacting conditions of stud}' which now 
apply to girls and boys alike, and introduce a course 
of physical exercise of equal rank with the mental. A 
spacious but inexpensive building, to be used for military 
drill for boys and gymnastic exercises for girls, at proper 
times and under the direction of teachers, ought to be 
attached to the High School. If the city cannot afford 
it, will not some public-spirited citizen give it? 

Other important subjects press upon our attention, 
but cannot be discussed here. We ask the co-operation 
of the city government in our plans for the improve- 
ment of the public schools. Our city is prosperous. 
Other departments are demanding large things at your 
hands. Assuredly the schools are not second to any 
other public interest. Let them have your friendly 
attention and their full share in the appropriations. 
Respectfully submitted. 

MARSHALL P. HALL, 

For the Committee. 

Manchester, Dec. 30, 1887. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — I respectfully offer the following as the 
Annual Report of the Superintendent of Schools for the 
year 1887 : 

At the suggestion of the member of your committee 
who has this year written the customary report in your 
behalf, an improvement is believed to have been inaugu- 
rated in the general form of our city school report by 
placing all statistical tables properly classified in the 
"Appendix." To this you are therefore respectfully re- 
ferred for important information pertaining to the schools. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Throughout the year six teachers have been em ployed 
in the High School, twenty in the grammar schools, and 
fourteen in the middle schools. There have been thirty 
primary schools taught by twenty-seven teachers ; since 
the principal of the Training School, who for convenience 
is reckoned among the middle-school teachers, has charge 
of three primary schools where no regular teachers are 
employed. There have also been two partially graded 
schools * employing three teachers, and six ungraded 
schools f with one teacher for each. This is equivalent 
to seventy-eight distinct schools of a single room each, 

* The upper room at Amoskeag and the Hallsville school. 
t Country subm-ban. 



107 

taught by an average of seventy-six teachers. Last year 
there was an average of seventy-seven schools and seventy- 
four teachers. The increase has been occasioned by the 
addition of one school at Bakersville for the entire year, 
and the employment of an assistant at Hallsville. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The aggregate increase in enrollment over that of last 
year is thirty-eight; but the average number belonging 
is only thirteen more than last year, while the average 
attendance is seven less. The unusual prevalence of scar- 
let fever and diphtheria, necessitating the closing of the 
Bakersville schools for about three weeks and the un- 
avoidable depletion of others for varying periods of time, 
readily and sufficiently accounts for this year's decrease in 
the attendance. 

There were 8,678 instances of tardiness on an enroll- 
ment of 3,632 pupils last year ; and this year there have 
been 7,387 tardinesses on an enrollment of 3,670 pupils. 
The average instances of tardiness on the average attend- 
ance has this year been, per pupil, in the High School, 4.6 ; 
in the grammar schools, 2.6 ; in the middle schools, 3.2; 
in the primary schools, 2.1 ; in the partially graded 
schools, 2.9; in the ungraded schools, 4.1. 

The^ general average per pupil may not appear appall- 
ing, but when it is considered that a fifth part of the 
pupils in a given school is responsible for four fifths 
of its tardinesses, it is apparent that several hundred 
pupils in our schools are not only forming habits which 
foretoken a great lack of efficiency in their future, but 
such as are exerting a demoralizing influence upon their 
associates at school which ought not to be tolerated. 
Erroneous conduct, like other evil, appears to be conta- 
gious. In one building of eight rooms, four of the rooms 



108 

have each had over two hundred instances of tardiness ; 
while in another building, of the same number of rooms, 
hut two rooms have each had as many as one hundred 
cases of tardiness. The attention of teachers was called 
to the enormous number of tardinesses in the schools last 
year, and all their efforts to reduce it this year have been 
only partially successful. While several have not had 
half as many, others have had more than last year ; and 
the average reduction is less than a half of one tardiness 
per pupil. The truth is that the fault is back of the 
school, in the home. There are very few cases of tardi- 
ness that are really unavoidable, and parents should under- 
stand that the habits their children form in and about 
school are quite as likely to determine their ultimate suc- 
cess or failure as all they will otherwise get from it. 
Realizing this, parents will feel that it is about as impor- 
tant that their children are punctual at school as that they 
attend at all. Parents should see to it that their house- 
hold arrangements are such as will enable their children 
to be prompt in attendance. Young men attending the 
High School who repeatedly offer no better excuse for 
tardiness than " I didn't get up in season," are only ex- 
celled in their lack of appreciating the sort of discipline 
necessary for attaining an effective manhood by parents 
who would justify such an excuse by putting it in writing, 
instead of seeing that no such instance could happen. It 
is not any wonder, despite the earnest efforts of its teach- 
ers to avoid it, that the High School has the highest per- 
centage of tardiness, when it is known what flimsy excuses 
have been offered for its occurrence. 

I sincerely trust that parents, as they value anything 
that largely pertains to the advancement of the interests 
of their children, will heartily co-operate with teachers 
during the coming year in the attempt to establish in all 



109 

the principle of punctuality, and thus help us to banish 
from the schools one of their greatest defects. I also 
especially appeal to the few pupils in the upper divisions 
of the grammar schools and in the High School, whom 
the records show to be most largely chargeable with 
instances of tardiness per individual, well to consider the 
injurious effect of the habit which is being formed, and 
to remember that, unless overcome, it will be likely to 
prove the obstacle that will prevent their procurement, 
upon graduation, of most coveted positions of responsi- 
bility and trust. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT. 

A school that is not under proper control cannot do 
efficient work. Such a school is not worthy of the 
expense of its support, and usually its members are more 
harmed by the improper habits formed than profited by 
the little knowledge gained. In the formation of char- 
acter, habit precedes principle, and doubtless, in the 
majority of cases, exerts the greater and more abiding 
influence; hence, one's habits chiefly determine his 
work and condition in life. Correct habits are largely 
the result of proper discipline ; therefore, good discipline 
is the first essential of a good school, and one's ability 
agreeably, to discipline a school properly is the first mark 
of his fitness for a position at the teacher's desk. Ordi- 
narily, the condition of the American family is such, at 
the present day, that good order at school is generally 
and agreeably secured by the good sense and tact of 
the teacher, supplemented by the moral support of 
parents ; but occasionally an apparently incorrigible pupil 
is encountered, who, "like a hornet in a beehive," brings 
consternation to the queen, creates confusion in the swarm, 
and threatens all with destruction. In the beehive, the 



110 

death of the offender, or his expulsion, is immediately 
determined; and in the school, the willful disturber must 
be promptly met with subjection, or exclusion. 

It may be properly inferred from the foregoing, that, 
in the matter of school discipline, I regard as best the 
mildest means that can be made successful, but that the 
means must be successful at all hazards. So it would 
seem that there may be instances where corporal punish- 
ment might be regarded as justifiable; but it should be 
inflicted only as a last resort, and then not hastily or 
inconsiderately. I hold it safe to enunciate the general 
principle, that whatever a judicious parent may rightfully 
do in the matter of correcting his child and enforcing 
obedience, the teacher, standing in the place of parent, 
would be justified in doing ; and yet, while believing 
that corporal punishment is justifiable in some in- 
stances, I think it well that the teacher should consider in 
each case appearing to merit its infliction whether it 
would not be wiser to pursue a different course from what 
the parent even would be likely to take in regard to a 
misdemeanor deserving corporal punishment ; for the 
teacher has the parent back of him, and, by conditioning 
the case so that the parent will have to take cognizance of 
it, the co-operation of the parent may be secured when 
otherwise it might be antagonized. 

The alternative for corporal punishment in school is 
suspension therefrom; and in no instance, when such 
suspension occurs, should the pupil be allowed to return 
to the school except under conditions which would cause 
him, his parents, the school, and the teacher, all to feel 
that whatever of good could have been gained by the 
the infliction of corporal punishment had been attained, 
unless, indeed, it should become clear that the case was 
not deserving of such punishment. Conditions sufficiently 



Ill 

effective to attain the end in view may generally be 
made with pupils as far advanced as the higher divisions 
of the grammar school, by requiring of such, upon their 
return from suspension (for a misdemeanor deserving cor- 
poral punishment), a written statement, signed by the 
pupil, with at least the tacit approval of the parent, 
embodying an acknowledgment of the error committed, 
expressions of sorrow or regret therefor, and a promise 
that in consideration of re-admission at school the pupil 
will in future be dutiful and obedient, and exert his 
influence for good order and harmony in the school. Such 
a statement should be more or less specific and stringent, 
simply made known to the school in a general way, or 
read to it by the teacher or by the offender, according to 
the nature of the offence and other modifying circum- 
stances. Such a course of procedure in treating the 
exasperating misconduct of older pupils has generally 
been found, whenever tried, quite satisfactory to the 
parents concerned, and usually resulted in the return of 
suspended pupils, by direction of their parents, prepared 
either to submit to a reasonable infliction of corporal 
punishment, or to subscribe to a statement of the char- 
acter above indicated ; and in either case, chiefly by rea- 
son of the co-operation of the parents, this form of disci- 
pline has been both effectual and salutary. 

There will always be differences of opinion as to whether 
corporal punishment should ever be administered to 
pupils by the teacher, but a reasonable application of it to 
younger pupils (those of higher primary, middle-school, 
and lower grammar grades) who have become rebellious 
through lack of right early training, sometimes seems to 
be the only effective remedy, and often more humane 
than the expedients frequently heard of as designed to 
take its place. With this class of pupils suspension would 



112 

frequently result in exclusion, for parents too lax to estab- 
lish the principle of obedience in the child before his 
entrance at school would be indifferent about his return, 
or powerless to effect it under proper conditions. Higher 
grade pupils would, indeed, have no just grounds for com- 
plaint if corporal punishment should be immediately 
administered for grossly defiant disobedience of the teach- 
er's reasonable requirements, or for open and insolent 
impudence to the teacher, — especially after having been 
warned against them. Scarcely any one could be found 
with any sympathy for such pupils ; for no one would be 
able to banish from his thought what he himself would 
regard, under similar circumstances, as a fitting rebuke 
for such conduct. 

Our teachers, I am happy to say, have generally suc- 
ceeded exceptionally well in securing proper control of 
their pupils, without exercising undue violence. From 
tabulated statistics in school reports of other cities, item- 
izing the instances of suspension, restoration, and the in- 
fliction of corporal punishment, I am satisfied that no 
other superintendent in so large a field of labor can have 
had fewer complaints from parents than myself in regard 
to the treatment of children at school. Our schools, too, 
have very generally been in excellent order. The effort 
upon the part of teachers who have uniformly succeeded 
in keeping their schools in best condition, has been 
directed to an attempt to furnish every pupil with a suffi- 
cient amount of proper work, and then to cause such in- 
terest in the performance of it that none would have 
either time or inclination to attend to any thing else. 
Such teachers have to work hard. They plan and arrange, 
while others doze or sport; but they daily get satisfaction 
enough to repeat their extra labors at night for the next 
day, a satisfaction derived from the greater enjoyment of 



113 

school because of the manifest interest .and improvement 
of pupils who when let loose are too cheerful to fight and 
therefore play. Teachers who attain such a high ideal do 
not feel the necessity of frequently reminding their pupils 
of examinations and next promotion day; they do not, 
twenty-four hours beforehand, contrive to let something 
slip that will lead their pupils to infer the subject for 
written examination upon the following day, so the best 
scholars may take their books home to work it up all 
night and come on the morrow too nervous to do them- 
selves justice; nor do they forget to give pupils two 
weeks' prior notice of the time when compositions and 
declamations are to be presented before the school, and so 
free themselves from the annoyance of having justifiable 
delinquents, while, on the other hand, their pupils have 
time to give a little thought to the subject of their theme 
before writing upon it, or ample time for rehearsals of a 
declamation which with a fair time for such may be 
uttered so as to mean something. 

I have no recommendation, as the result of these obser- 
vations, for the formation of additional restrictions to be 
imposed upon the corps of teachers because some are not 
so thoughtful as might be desired. It will be better to 
give hints, or direct advice, as occasions seem most to 
demand; for I believe in giving teachers the greatest 
freedom possible in their school work, that without great 
freedom they cannot do their best, while with the privi- 
lege of its exercise they may properly be held responsible 
for results. 

WRITTEN REVIEWS, OR EXAMINATIONS. 

Written reviews, or " examinations " as they are unfor- 
tunately more commonly called, have a proper place in 
school economy, and notwithstanding an occasional error 



114 

in their application they generally serve a good purpose. 
They are misused, however, when submitted with too 
great frequency or with too little consideration in their 
preparation, — when pupils are daily fretted by intimations 
that they will be left behind at promotion time, unless 
they attain a certain standard in their written reviews, — 
also when pupils are forewarned by a day or two of the 
time of their recurrence, that opportunity for cramming 
may be afforded. 

Formerly, a set of written reviews was submitted 
every school month, or ten a year. During the first year 
of my superintendency, I advised that the number be 
reduced to six, two each term, and the plan was author- 
ized. Two or three years ago, I suggested that four times 
a year, twice each semester, might be regarded as fre- 
quently enough to submit written reviews. The sugges- 
tion was taken as a recommendation and adopted. This 
degree of frequency has proved very satisfactory. It is 
not often that I learn of any inconsiderateness in the 
preparation of the questions or in the manner of their 
submission ; nor have I for a long time heard complaint 
from parents in regard to any injurious effect of the writ- 
ten reviews upon pupils, except in cases where teachers 
have injudiciously allowed their pupils to know by a day 
or so beforehand the time when such an exercise would 
recur. 

There are at least two direct and highly beneficial 
advantages arising from the judicious use of written 
reviews. They are the one thing needful to reveal to 
teachers the lamentable and unaccountable misapprehen- 
sion which some pupils are constantly getting in regard 
to their studies, from both their own efforts and the 
instruction of their teachers. Written reviews also pro- 
mote exactness of thought, definiteness of conclusions, 



115 

and cultivate the power of clear and concise expression. 
Indirectly they are, when wisely treated, great helps in 
creating an earnest and high moral tone in the school, 
and thus often become efficient aids in securing good dis- 
cipline. 

As applied in our schools, " Written reviews do not in 
general annoy or harmfully disturb pupils. Fully ninety 
per cent of them apparently care no more for these exer- 
cises than for the ordinary recitation; while the remain- 
ing few possibly fret over all school work, either because 
it is their natural disposition or because they acquire the 
habit from parents who are impracticable and censorious, 
some of whom, perchance, have become soured in regard 
to all things pertaining to school because they have tried 
to be teachers and proved failures." 

The written language work begun in the lowest grade 
and daily practiced, to a limited extent, for the live years 
preceding the time when any particular account is made 
of the per cents attained in written work, causes pupils, 
by the time they have entered the grammar grade, to 
prefer that their papers should bear marks indicative 
of results attained. It is a satisfaction to them to have 
some definite idea of the success of their efforts. They 
regard the figures much as one does those oh mile-stones, 
significant in some degree of the part of their journey 
performed. 

Promotions, through all our grades, are practically 
based upon the judgment of the teacher. The per cents 
attained in written reviews, upon the work submitted by 
both teacher and superintendent, are unitedly regarded 
as a fair representation of the relative standing of pupils 
in the same class, and they are used to assist the teacher 
in deciding how far down the list he may safely go in 
determining the last to be recommended for promotion. 



116 

In doing this, teachers are not required to take a uniform 
or any established per cent as a basis for advancement; 
but each teacher, in passing his eye down the record of 
his own class, is expected to consider every pupil with 
reference to his individual ability and fitness for ad- 
vancement, from all that the teacher in any way knows 
about him, and then to draw the line of division, 
between those recommended for promotion and those 
who cannot be approved, immediately below the name 
of the last pupil on the list considered properly qualified 
for entrance upon the work of the next higher class. 
Pupils aggrieved at the decision of the teacher have 
opportunity to be specially examined by the superinten- 
dent, but a trial generally convinces the pupil of the cor- 
rectness of the teacher's estimate. 

With such a use of per cents, it is evident that worry 
on account of them is groundless. Parents and teachers 
should alike, without reference to per cents or by use 
of other rasping friction, confidently encourage pupils 
daily to do as well as they can, assuring them that by so 
doing they will be most likely to realize all they expect. 

Pupils and all concerned should be informed of the 
attendant circumstances, outside of the pupil's jurisdic- 
tion, which are liable to cause a limited variation in per 
cents given, in order that no one, through ignorance of 
the injustice likely to be done, may attempt to compare 
the per cent of any pupil with that of another in some 
other class, or in a class of the same grade in another 
school. Per cents given at school, as representative of a 
pupil's standing, are only relatively correct. They sim- 
ply indicate his standing in comparison with others having 
exactly the same questions to answer, submitted in all 
respects in exactly the same way, and impartially marked 
from exactly the same standpoint by the same teacher. 



117 

"With even the submission of the same questions to classes 
of exactly the same ability, the other conditions varying, 
there might easily be a difference of a few per cent in 
the representative average attainment; because, chiefly, 
of the difference among teachers in the degree of strin- 
gency or liberality with which they mark results. Hence, 
under circumstances just suggested, a pupil having 
ninety-five per cent in one school, might not really be as 
good a scholar as another in some other school marked 
but ninety per cent. How much more absurd, then, to 
compare per cents of individuals not in the same class 
of the same school, or one class with another in different 
schools, when not only the teachers are different, and 
possibly the conditions of submission vary more or less 
favorably for the pupil, but the questions themselves may 
be far more general and easy to answer in one than in 
the other. 

Consideration is given these variably attending cir- 
cumstances in the form of report which the pupil takes 
to his parents. His card bears the following explana- 
tion: 100 signifies highest; 90, excellent; 80, good; 70, 
fair; 60, indifferent; 50, poor; lower numbers indicate 
different degrees of failure. Hence, any per cent from 
90 to 99, inclusive, denotes "excellent"; any from 80 
to 89, inclusive, "good"; and so on down the scale. 
These allowances, it is believed, equitably offset the 
limited range of varying circumstances attendant upon 
the submission and marking of written reviews. 

It must now be seen that in the Manchester schools, at 
least, written reviews are not submitted for the sake of 
the per cents that may be derived therefrom, but because 
of their intrinsic value as a means in the educative pro- 
cess. The per cents found are merely circumstantial ; 
and they are sought for the satisfaction of pupils, as evi- 



118 

dence to parents of their children's scholastic standing, 
and as aids to teachers in determining promotions in a 
way that, when understood, should clearly relieve them 
of any charge or suspicion of partiality. The fact that 
their value, like that of the American dollar, is only rela- 
tive, matters not; they serve their purpose just as well. 
Care, however, by all nearest in authority over the schools 
should always be exercised not to think of the per cents 
as having an absolute value, whenever there is a disposi- 
tion to lay hold of something from which to determine 
the merits of respective schools ; for, because of reasons 
which I have outlined, greater injustice could not be done, 
and I can think of nothing that would more speedily 
work harm to the schools by producing a hot-house rivalry 
which would result in a forcing that would soon deprive 
them of all natural growth and strength. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

By the withdrawal of Miss Olive A. Evers, who resigned 
at the opening of the fall term to take charge of the train- 
ing class at Minneapolis, our city Training School has 
experienced another change in its principalship. It has 
now had five different principals within as many years. 
No school composed of several departments, especially 
when organized as is our Training School, can possibly 
fulfill its proper mission while suffering an average annual 
change in its principalship. 

At the opening of the fall term, Miss Caroline E. Wing, 
who for two years had been principal of the Bridgewater 
School of Observation, was placed in charge of our school 
for the training of teachers. Miss Wing appears to have 
good health and strong powers of endurance. She is evi- 
dently conscientious and faithful in attempting to discharge 
her duties properly, and it is expected that she will prove 



119 

a good principal. Her recent predecessors have regarded 
the work as too much for one teacher. With some modi- 
fication in the arrangement of the sub-teachers' classes, 
however, Miss Wing feels herself equal to the work, and 
signifies her intention, if wanted, to stay by the school 
long enough to make a thorough trial at least of an attempt 
to put the school in first-class condition. I recommend 
that the committee give her unlimited confidence in her 
effort and every reasonable material aid. 

THE WORK OF THE SCHOOLS. 

The schools have been closely held to their legitimate 
work, — a steady, gradual advance along the whole line ; 
and it is believed the results of the year have, as a whole, 
been fully as good as usual. One of the most common 
evidences of the excellence of our schools is the unvarying 
testimony of those who take up their residences here from 
the cities of nearly every' New England State. They are 
pleased with the course of study, because their children 
can generally be so classed as to lose no time; they com- 
pliment both teachers and pupils for their kindly consider- 
ation of strangers; and they express satisfaction with that 
sort of teaching which sends their children to the diction- 
ary and cyclopedia at home, and to the city library for 
other books of information. 

In the matter of reading, our schools received material 
help from the continued instruction of the special teacher 
during the first two terms of the year, and it is a matter 
of great regret that he has since been unable to serve us. 
The teachers, however, have quite generally laid hold of 
the essential principles of his s}'stem, and improved their 
instruction by attaining more satisfactory results in pro- 
nunciation, articulation, natural and effective expression. 
It is hoped that the services of Mr. Hayes may be secured 



120 

again as soon as possible, and retained until he can com- 
plete a full course of instruction and furnish our teachers 
with a printed syllabus of it. 

In the work of written arithmetic, as evinced by an 
inspection of papers submitted as test exercises, it was 
observed that more failures occurred from inaccuracy in 
fundamental operations than from any lack of compre- 
hension or proper application of principles involved. 
Teachers, upon inquiry, testified to a like observation in 
the daily work of their classes. Investigation in many 
schools soon convinced me that not more than half the 
pupils studying written arithmetic had been in the habit 
of looking over their work for errors before presenting 
results as final. The importance of correcting this great 
defect lias been earnestly impressed upon teachers, and 
far better results have already been observed. Facility in 
arithmetical calculations is no substitute for accuracy. 
Pupils must first acquire the habit of infallible accuracy. 
This can be secured without sacrificing a reasonable 
degree of dexterity, which can and should be also attained. 
There should be daily drill in the fundamental operations 
of arithmetic with every class below high-school grade, 
for the purpose of securing both accuracy and facility. 
Only one or two examples of the sort designed need be 
daily given to higher classes ; but the lower the grade the 
more numerously should such exercises be given. Ample 
time may be had for this in our schools. Indeed, the 
course of study is shaped so as to afford time for teachers 
to do such supplementary work with nearly every subject 
of study as they may find desirable, or necessary for a 
proper understanding of it by respective classes. I ques- 
tion whether there is another city of any considerable size 
in the country whose course of study for grades below the 
high school has so little in its positive requirements, and 



121 

allows so great latitude to teachers as ours. Only the 
minimum consistent with a show of reasonable require- 
ments is demanded, while it is expected that by the very 
opportunity afforded teachers for supplementing the 
course in their own way, they will produce schools second 
to none. 

As an illustration of the way in which the course of 
study has been simplified, it may be said that in the 
matter of arithmetic the following subjects have been 
omitted for several years: circulating decimals, the un- 
practical portions of compound numbers, duodecimals, 
the metric system, equation of payments, exchange, " sim- 
ilar surfaces," the mensuration of all solids except the 
rectangular, alligation, and the progressions. It is pro- 
posed also to omit in future compound interest, compound 
proportion, and cube root, in order to get additional time 
in first divisions of the grammar school for taking the 
first three forms of single-entry book-keeping,* as pre- 
sented in Meservey's system. This will be taught only 
from February till July, and the chief time for the study 
will be found by substituting it for the lessons in penman- 
ship heretofore given during that period. 

I think the schools are doing good work in all studies, 
though, perhaps, none so poor as that in penmanship and 
drawing ; but they are probably treating these as well as 
the average of city schools where the subjects are not in 
the hands of special teachers. In teaching the use of 
language, I think there has been most marked improve- 
ment. In brief, the course consists, in primary schools, of 
both oral and written reproductions of stories told, or read, 
and of original descriptions of pictures and of things 
made or seen. In middle schools, the chief basis of the 
work in language is the oral instruction afforded by 

* Proposed by Superintendent in 1883. 



122 

teachers in regard to occupations, articles of commerce, 
animals, plants, the human body, etc. Pupils are re- 
quired to write abstracts of the knowledge already orally 
imparted by the teacher. The written abstracts serve 
the purpose of testing with what correctness the infor- 
mation has been appropriated ; and at the same time 
they constitute exercises in the use of language, repre- 
senting the power of pupils at original expression, and 
disclosing for correction whatever technical errors may be 
made. In the grammar grades, training in the written 
use of language is continued by the occasional require- 
ment of written abstracts of topics in geography or his- 
tory, or of biographical sketches, and by the paraphras- 
ing of selections of both poetry and prose. Exercises in 
various forms of letter writing and in writing from 
dictation are also required in all grades above the lower 
primary. 

This course of training, as I have before intimated, is 
yielding very satisfactory results. I have, within the past 
term, both seen and heard in our schools many exercises 
in the use of written language, the production of which 
would do credit to well-educated adults. By the senti- 
ments expressed in many of these exercises, it is evident 
that teachers are not failing in their duty to inculcate " a 
constant adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, 
industry, frugality, and all the social virtues, indispensably 
necessary to preserve the blessings of liberty and good 
government."* 

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS. 

Though it is manifest that I think more than well of 
the schools, I am not ignorant of their partial failure. 
There is a general feeling everywhere, and among the 

* Constitution of New Hampshire, Part I, Art. XXXVIII. 



123 

most eminent of educators, that something must be done 
to lengthen the average term of pupilage. In our schools 
about seventy per cent of the entire enrollment this year 
has been in grades below the grammar. Regarding this 
as an average proportion in the lower grades, one may 
fairly assume that fully two thirds of those supposed to 
be trained in the public schools never reach the grammar 
grade, and therefore do not half complete even a com- 
mon-school education. 

This very large representation of the school enrollment 
goes out into life as illy prepared for its duties as a nurs- 
ing babe for school ; and from this element mingling in 
the community, it is easy to point even to a majority of 
those once enrolled in the schools as making a very poor 
show for what is claimed for a common-school education. 
Let but two thirds of oi>e generation get the full benefit 
of what the common schools can now do, and there would 
be such an uplift as the country has not yet experienced. 
It would be no longer charged that the public school does 
not materially aid one to earn his own living. Investiga- 
tion would show that even the tramps of our time are not 
of its graduates. Dr. William T. Harris, in his recent 
paper read before the Social Science Association, well 
says : " "We hear of over-production in manufactures and 
at the same time in agriculture. Over-production can 
only happen because too many people are fitted only for 
the lower order of occupations. The persons fitted for 
the higher occupations that minister to luxury, protection, 
and culture, can perform the lower order of work when- 
ever it is necessary, without waste of time in re-adjusting 
their vocations. Those of the lower order of work can- 
not fit for the higher vocations except with much expen- 
diture of time in general and special education and 
training. With a whole people educated, complete prep- 



124 

aration is made for the changes incident to material 
progress." 

The great question, then, is not whether manual train- 
ing should have a place in the common-school course, 
whether civics should be taught in the grammar grades, 
or whether type-writing or stenography should be taught 
in any, but rather, with scarcely half of our school 
population in the public schools and only twenty-nine 
per cent of the enrollment in the high and grammar 
schools, what shall be done to keep pupils at school 
long enough to learn to read a fourth reader, under- 
stand fractions, and know enough of geography and 
history, at least, to talk intelligently about the country 
in which they live ? This is, indeed, a problem well 
worthy of consideration by the highest; and if a sim- 
ilar condition of things exists in the cities of the coun- 
try at large, where so large a proportion of the whole 
population is now centered, it is well that the common- 
school question should speedily come to the fore and 
become a national issue. The laws of our own State in 
regard to compulsory attendance and the employment of 
children in manufacturing establishments are both com- 
plex and defective. I earnestly recommend that what- 
ever influence you can exert for their simplification and 
improvement may be put forth. 

Manual training is offered as the great panacea for pro- 
longing the term of pupilage at school. But its strongest 
supporters only advocate its introduction in the higher 
grades of the grammar school and in the high school. 
While thinking favorably of its introduction in these 
grades, I fear it would there be so far away from, and 
so imperfectly understood by, the primary pupil that it 
would fail to rouse his determination to enter the higher 
grades. We must reach both him and his parents, who 



125 

are most largely at fault through sheer carelessness or 
indifference, in some other way. I can think of no 
means so effective as those that may be exerted by the 
teacher who is both an expert in the work of the school 
and a missionary at heart. I therefore urge the selection 
of the best teachers for the primary schools, and that 
those who most largely secure the great end in view 
shall be best paid. 

In conclusion, gentlemen of the committee, I heartily 
thank you, and through you the teachers of our public 
schools, for direct and material help, as well as for other 
encouragement, in a constant attempt to cause our schools 
to meet public expectations. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

in. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 

V. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VHI. School Year, 1887. 

IX. High School Graduation. 

X. Organization of Committees, 1888. 

XL List of Teachers, 1888. 

XH. School Year, 



APPEN DIX 



STATISTICS. 
I. — Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1884 . 37,600 

Estimated population, 1887 .... 40,000 
Legal school age, 5 to 21. 

II. — SCHOOLHOUSES. 

Number of schoolhouses in use . . . .23 

Number of schoolhouses not in use .... 1 

(Bridge-street house, corner of Union.) 

Number of school-rooms used for day schools . . 78 

(Three of the same, and three others, used for evening schools. 
Rooms unoccupied by city for day schools are, two at Spring-street 
house, two at Lowell-street, three at Beech-street, and two at Bridge- 
street, the last two being unfit.) 

Number of rooms used for High School classes . 6 

Number of rooms used for Grammar schools . . 20 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools . . 14 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools . . 30 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 2 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools . . 6 

III. — Schools. 
(All for both sexes.) 
Number of High Schools 1 



129 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade 

(Middle and Primary) schools .... 7 
Number of combined Middle and Primary schools 

(Merrimack-street or Training School) . . .1 

Number of schools all Primary grade ... 6 

Number of Partially Graded schools ... 2 

Number of Ungraded schools ..... 6 

IV. — Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High School .... 2 

Female teachers in the High School ... 4 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools ... .5 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools . . .15 
Female teachers in the Middle schools . . .14 
Female teachers in the Primary schools . . .27 
Female teachers in the P'artially Graded schools . 3 
Female teachers in the Ungraded schools . . 6 

Special teachers : One male in music the entire year 
and one male in elecution during the winter and 
spring terms only ....... 2 

(The former four days a week, and the latter one day a week.) 
Average number of male teachers * ... 7 

Average number of female teachers . . .69 

Increase over last year ...... 2 

Male teachers in the evening schools ... 3 

Female teachers in the evening schools . . .19 
Average number of male teachers in the evening 
schools ......... 3 

Average number of female teachers in the evening 
schools ......... 8 

Male teachers in the evening drawing schools . . 6 
Average number of male teachers in the evening 

drawing schools ...... 4 

* Exclusive of the special teachers. 



130 




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134 



DAY SCHOOLS. 

The following is a summary of the attendance upon 
the several grades of public day schools for the year end- 
ing December 16, 1887 : 



SCHOOLS. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially Graded . . 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1S87 
Totals, 1886 



Whole number 
different pupils. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


83 


100 


422 


447 


319 


342 


856 


819 


46 


56 


91 


89 


1,817 


1,853 


1,812 


1,820 



fc M 



178 
725 
540 
1,077 
73 
118 



2,711 
2,698 



168 
677 
485 
968 
64 
106 



2,468 
2,475 






94.4 
93.4 



87.7 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

TABLE SHOWING AVERAGE ATTENDANCE, 1887. 



MONTHS. 


Lowell-street 
School. 


Spring-street 
School. 


School-street 
School. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 

10 

9 

9 
31 
20 
13 


Females. 




26 
16 
10 
86 
48 
40 


22 
14 
13 
81 
41 
27 


8 
7 
5 




25 




IS 




11 







135 

1887. 1886. 

Number of evenings open . . . 114 106 

Number in attendance ten evenings or more . 382 245 

Aggregate average attendance . . 98 79 

Average number of teachers in service 11 9 

The average number of pupils per teacher, for both 
years, is nine. The attendants are nearly all foreign, 
and many of them upon entering do not even under- 
stand the English language when spoken ; hence the 
work is largely with the individual, and only a few can 
be properly instructed by each teacher in the brief 
period of an evening sessidn. 

TEACHERS. 

Charles E. Cochran, Principal of Lowell-street School, 
for boys. 

Assistants, — Anna J. Dana, Etta S. Dana, Fannie 
M. Kelley, Sarah B. Paige, Cora F. Sanborn, and Lizzie 
F. Williams. 

J. H. Campbell, Principal of Spring-street School, for 
girls. 

Assistants, — Alice H. Boyd, Lizzie D. Hartford, Fannie 
L. Sanborn, Ellen S. Stebbins, Genevieve B. Knight, 
Maggie Linen, Etta C. McLaren, and Alice M. Stebbins. 

Frank C. Livingston, Principal of School-street School, 
for both sexes. 

Assistants, — Hattie E. Daniels, M. Alma Fracker, 
Cora B. Gilford, Annie E. McElroy, and Grace R. 
Nichols. 



136 
EVENING DRAWING SCHOOLS. 

AVERAGE ATTENDANCE, 1887. 



Months. 


Machine Drawing Class. 


Architectural Drawing Class. 


Total. 


November 
December 


42 
34' 


18 
18 


60 
52 



Number of evenings open . 
Aggregate average attendance 
Average number of teacbers in service 



36 

56 

4 



TEACHERS. 

S. G. Stephens, John M. Kendall, Henry A. Herrick, 
Henry W. Allen, Frank A. Higgins, and Alphonso H. 
Sanborn. 

These schools were first opened in April. The first 
term closed in June, but the records of that term were 
mislaid and have not yet been found. 



137 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



The following table presents the main features of in- 
terest pertaining to the attendance upon the public 
schools for the last ten years : 



Whole No. 
Belonging. 



|« | Boys. 



Girls. 



<& 




pq 




t. 




~ 




B 




a 




fe 


t-.r. 


» 










St 


u 

> 





< 





«<.£ 



2w 



Cm . 



ii s 

5 9 



b.bo 



.SP3 
K 2 






gee 



5§ ^ 



878. 
879 . 



882. 
883. 



8S7. 



3515 
3798 
4136 
4235 
4095 
4062 
3918 
3806 
3632 
3670 



1783 


1732 


2571 


1924 


1874 


2859 


2166 


1970 


2970 


2200 


2035 


?858 


2086 


2009 


2957 


2061 


2001 


2848 


1924 


1994 


28" 2 


1891 


1915 


2725 


1812 


1820 


2698 


1817 


1853 


2711 



2348 
2648 
2727 
2602 
2712 
2612 
2645 
2430 
2475 
2468 



91.3 
92.6 
92.0 



106 

145 

91 



91.0 110 
91.7 164 
91.4 103 

92.1 '' 95 
90.6 96 



91.9 
90.8 



94 
77 
75 
62 
65 
75 
71 
89 
71 
95 



* Including Grammar classes in suburban schools. 

t Usually some pupils have annually entered from other schools. This year seven 
have so entered. 



CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The whole number of different teachers employed in 
the day schools during the year has been 84. Their 
respective positions may be learned from the attendance 
table on page 130, but the various changes made within 
the year can be more readily understood by an inspec- 
tion of the following;: 



138 



Teachers. 



Date of effect 
of resignation. 



Teachers. 



Date of effect 
of resignation. 



Helen F.Wetherbee. Jan. 14. Addie C. Prescott. June 3. 
Mary A. Putney. Feb. 4. Alice Shovelton. July 1. 
Annie M. Curtis. Mar. 25. Olive A. E vers. Sept. 1. 

Mary L. Gage. Mar.25. Carrie A. F.Bartlett. Nov. 16. 



Teachers. 



Date of begin- 
ning service. 



Teachers. 



Date of effect 
of transfer. 



Mary A. Southard. 
Jennie M. Chandler. 
Nina B. Croning. 
Barbara B. Joy. 
Lillian C. Hall. 
Hulda C. Graupner. 
Caroline E. Wing. 
Josie H. Newton. 



Jan. 17. Alice Shovelton. Jan. 17. 

Feb. 10. Mary J. Hickey. Apr. 18. 

Apr. 18. Kate T. Clarke. Sept. 12. 

Apr. 18. Augusta S. Downs. Sept. 12. 

June 6. Mary W. Mitchell. Sept. 12. 

Sept.12. May F. Nutt. Sept. 12. 

Sept.12. Barbara B. Joy. Nov. 17. 
Nov. 17. 



TRAINING SCHOOL SUB-TEACHERS, 1887. 



Huldah C. Graupner.* 
Lillian C. Hall.* 
Barbara B. Joy.* 
Alice E. Page.* 
Sarah B. Paige.* 
Mary A. Southard.* 
Cora B. Gilford.f 
Genevieve B. Knight, f 
Emma L. McLaren. f 
Theodora Richardson. f 



Lettie M. Smith. f 
Mary J. Walsh.f 
Annie E. Abbott.J 
Nellie M. Atwood.J 
Nettie B. Fogg. J 
Lillian Little.J 
Kate Townsend.| 
Inez M. Warren. J 
Abbie R. West.J 



* Graduated January 28. 

t Entered September, 1886, and expected to graduate January 27, 1888. 

J Entered Fall of 1887, but Miss Abbott soon withdrew. 



139 



VI. — Work of Truant Officer. 





ABSENTEES 
reported from. 


No. volunta- 
rily return- 
ed to. 


No. report- 
ed caused 
to attend. 


No. found sick 
and unable to 
attend. 


No. othe rwise 
unavoi d a b 1 y 
detained. 


No. not 

found 

at all for. 


Date. 


.- o 

°l 

CO 


« on 

3 8 

o o 

O J3 

b a 

04 


£ o 

w t» 

co 


*(« CO 

11 

t»co 
CM 


S 

5 | 

co 

6 

6 

8 

9 

15 

28 

14 

15 

11 

4 


"3 m 
*8 

O J3 

«CO 
Oh 


£ 

°| 
00 




E 

a 




16 
16 
13 
14 

28 
44 
28 
32 
22 
8 


2 
9 
16 
17 
88 
42 
47 
23 
50 
15 


6 




1 

7 
14 
12 
63 
30 
37 
17 
27 
10 


1 

8 

4 

5 

15 

12 

11 

8 

15 

4 


4 
4 
2 










1 
3 
3 
5 
5 
6 
3 
2 


2 
2 
2 
3 

5 












16 
8 
5 
9 
7 
3 


1 
1 


1 






September . . . 
November... . 




1 


3 










221 


309 


34 


14 


116 


218 


83 


58 


3 


4 



Date. 


2 s 
a 3 

02.2 
H co 
£S 'O *-* 
< — « 

Qj P. <0 

H 


No. truants 

caused 
to attend. 


tp to • 

IPS £ 

58 tc 3 

_ ►" O 
O^ 
O 

■s§ 8 

. O 3 

46 
61 
47 
50 
94 
61 
66 
82 
66 
45 


B 

£ 

a 

a. 

to 


No. tempor a r i 1 y 
confined at Po- 
lice^Station. 


tc 

u 

to 
.0 

ao S 

s ° 

A tp 

..B 

■» 

to 


a 

<2 • 

e " 

ss 

£ **> 

. O 

©■" 

to 


-w to 

S CD 

to _£ 


£ 
: «■§ 

CO 


"3 
3 ° 


g--"o 
««^ 

<M «" B 

tp * 
to 
to 




1 

4 

1 

21 

21 


2 

2 
3 

7 
5 
3 
4 
3 


2 
9 
6 
5 

10 
8 

16 
6 

10 


58 
76 
50 
72 

145 
99 

124 
97 
82 
36 

839 


1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
3 
1 
3 
3 






50 








35 








88 




1 

1 


1 


66 




64 




93 




24 
16 
5 
1 






80 








21 






1 


21 
92 












Total 


94 


29 


72 


618 j 


20 


2 


2 


610 



140 



w 

H 

o 
to 

c 

H 

I— I 

o 

« 

Ph 
<5 



•simox 



•uoi^mx 



siooqosSuiuaAa 



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•Suisii.iaApv 



t~r-*~HCOCO:OCOCMl~-* 
-*10COOCO<NCM-*CO'* 

cMcdoc'r-'cc'ciidt^oico' 

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cdco -* co* cT-* o'lc't-^oo' 



COCSCOlOCMt~COCC^i— I 
^lOOtOOICCDOCO'O 

-coidcc'o"-*cd-<i'© 



lOCOt-lOIOCOCOCO-* — 

^HCOt^-H*-<*cocd-3*o6t-* 

t'HKt'XCl-.IOt-O 



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00 f^r-^CC I— tO^O^CM^lO O^ 

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141 



COST OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOB FIVE YEARS. 



Date. 



1883. 
1884. 
1885.. 
18S6., 
1887.. 



* £ 



2,990 
3,005 
2,860 
2,810 
2,925 



$53,505.70 
53,477.10 
53,133.11 
56,440.42 
58,679.26 



3 93 



$17.89 
17.80 
18.58 
20.0S 
20.06 



> o 
Pv3 



$20,055,986 
20,613.032 
21,137,464 
21,379,384 
21,905,476 



$332,741 
360,732 
345,200 
347,268 
373,139 



;.0026 
.0026 
.0025 
.0026 
.0026 



* Pupils of both day and evening schools included. 

VIII. — School Year. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 3, closed 
March 25. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 18, closed 
July 1. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 12, 
closed December 16. Vacation of two weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above 
by the school board, 185. 

Average number days the schools were taught, 170. 

(Being closed several 'holidays, days of "Teachers' Institutes," 
and half-days on account of bad weather or insufficient heat. 11 ) 

IX. — High-School Graduating Exercises. 

Class of '87. 

"Esse, quam videri." 

Music. — " Gypsies' Woodland Home." 

CLASS. 

Salutatory. 

albert l. clough. 



142 

Class History. 

effie a. gardner. 

Music. — " Flaxen-haired Maiden." 

lillian little, bertha tower, austin everett, james 
weston, george fox, james andrews, fred stark, 
thomas hobbs. 

Extracts from the Columns of the " Merton Even- 
ing News." 

emma l. holmes. 

Declamation. — " Toussaint L'Ouverture. " 

JAMES P. HEDDERMAN. 

Music. — Quintet, " Now is the Month of Maying." 

jessie palmer,. lillian little, austin everett, james 
andrews, william j. abbott. 

Statistics. 

nettie b. fogg. 

Music. —Piano, " Witches' Flight." 

gertrude f. how, grace h. weston. 

Poem. 

lillian little. 

Music. — " Happy and Light." 

CLASS. 

Essay. — " Manchester." 

GEORGE H. CHANDLER. 

Recitation. — " The Bankrupt's Visitor." 

BERTHA M. TOWER. 

Music. — " Answered." 

LILLIAN LITTLE, BERTHA TOWER, AUSTIN EVERETT, JAMES 
WESTON, GEORGE FOX, JAMES ANDREWS, FRED STARK, 
THOMAS HOBBS. 



143 

Prophecies. 

carrie l. patch. 

Series of Opposing Movements, and of Attitudes indi- 
cating certain emotions, as follows : 
1, Opposition of Gladiator; 2, Attraction and Repul- 
sion; 3, Defiance; 4, Imprecation ; j3, Abandonment 
with Self-sUppression ; 6, Pathetic Repulsion ; 7, Sal- 
utation ; 8, Appeal ; 9, Tender Reproach ; 10, Grief 
or Shame; 11, Rejection ; 12, Benediction. 

BERTHA TOWER, INEZ WARREN, ANNA M. SPENCER, GER- 
TRUDE HOW, GRACE WESTON, MATTIE GEORGE," NETTIE 
FOGG, EMMA HOLMES, ABBIE R. WEST, ANNIE B. NORRIS, 

ANNIE M. ROBINSON. 

Recitation. — " The Hero of the Tower." 

blanche sargent. 
Vocal Quartet. 

fred stark, james andrews, james weston, george 

A. FOX. 

Valedictory. 

jessie m. palmer. 

Ode. — By Amelia Graupner. 

CLASS. 

Award of Diplomas — Marshall P. Hall, 

For the Committee. 

CLASS ODE. 

BY AMELIA GRAUPNER. 

O Summer, you drowsy beauty, 

Asleep on the couch of Spring, 
You know that our school has ended, 

So waken and help us sing. 
Adroop are your wayside blossoms, 

And lazily drones the bee ; 
The mignonette, little darling, 

Knows well ' ' '87 " is free. 



144 



Your idle wind woos the daisy, 

" She loves him, she loves him not." 
He comes from the sweet thyme hollows 

And beds of forget-me-not, 
And brings us a gladsome message 

From mountain, and glen, and sea, 
A call from the bustling cities 

To wander with footsteps free, 

Where, over the hilltops tripping, 

Comes day with the song of birds, 
And loitering mid the rushes, 

Knee-deep, stand the lowing herds. 
We'll take of your strength and sweetness 

O Summer, for who may know 
That life will be bright and cheery, 

Or whither the clouds may blow ? 

THE GRADUATING CLASS. 



James Currier Andrews. 
Joseph William Abbott. 
Alverta Preston Barrett. 
Alice Dixon Bond. 
James Scribner Brown. 
Albert Lucien Clough. 
George Henry Chandler. 
George Alpheus Corson. 
George Henry Campbell. 
Charles Edwin Chase. 
Leslie Elmore Dickinson. 
Austin Manson Everett. 
Nettie Bickford Fogg. 
George Aloysius Fox. 
Matie Ada George. 
Mabel Goggin. 
Effie A. Gardner. 
Amelia Lisette Graupner. 
Minnie Frances Hamilton. 
Thomas Hobbs. 
Joseph Michael Heaney. 



James Patrick Hedderman. 
Gertrude Frances How. 
Emma Lottie Holmes. 
Denis Francis Lane. 
Lillian Little. 
Annie Burleigh Morris. 
Jessie Mabel Palmer. 
Carrie Lillian Patch. 
Bertha Pearson. 
Annie Maria Robinson. 
Frederick Russell Stark. 
Charles Edward Sanborn. 
Anna Mabel Spencer. 
Blanche Carrie Sargent. 
Bertha Marion Tower. 
Inez Marion Warren. 
Abbie Rosalinda West. 
Grace Helen Weston. 
James Henry Weston. 
John Elliot Williamson. 
Arthur Bartlett Worthen. 



145 
X.— ORGANIZATION, 1888. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor, ex officio, Chairman. 
EDWARD L. KIMBALL, 

President of the Common Council, ex offcio. 
Ward 1. — Charles H. Manning, 

John G. Hutchinson. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean, 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3. — Nathan P. Hunt, 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Samuel D. Lord, 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
Ward 5. — Thomas F. Collins, 

John J. Holland. 
Ward 6.— William H. Huse, 

Abial C. Flanders. 
Ward 7. — Marshall P. Hall, 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8. — George W. Nutter, 

Luther C. Baldwin. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 



146 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. W. Clarke, Kimball, 
Dodge, Holland. 

Salaries. — Messrs. "Woodbury, Collins, Hall. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, 
Flanders, Nutter. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Huse, Baldwin. 

Music. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, Baldwin. 

Fuel, and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Kimball, Manning, Flanders. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. VV. 
Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Collins, Hutchinson, Woodbury. 

Health. — Messrs. Nutter, Holland, Hutchinson. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, Hall, S. W. 
Clarke, Hunt. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, S. W. Clarke. 

Spring Street. — Messrs. Hall, Holland, Manning. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Dodge, Woodbury, Hutchin- 
son. 

Lowell Street. — Messrs. Hutchinson, Flanders, Collins. 

Training School and WUsoji Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodge. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Collins, Flanders, Woodbury. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. S. W. Clarke, 
Manning, Baldwin. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Baldwin, 
Nutter, Hall. 



147 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Lord, Dodge, 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Flanders, Holland, Huse. 

Hallsville and Young sville. — Messrs. Huse, Baldwin, 
Hutchinson. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Holland, 
Flanders, Nutter. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Nutter, 
Collins, Hutchinson. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Woodbury, Collins, Lord. 

XL — LIST OF TEACHERS. 

1888. 
Giving the Name, School, and Grade of School. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. — Edward R. Goodwin. 
Sub-Master. — George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. — Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

Mary Stanton. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. — Lenora C. Gilford. 

Jennie M. Chandler. 

Carrie E. Reid. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — C. Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders. 



148 

Higher Primary. — Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. — Annie O. Heath. 
Higher Middle. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. — Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. — Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. — Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. — Belle M. Kelley. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistants. — Annie W. Patten. 

Mary J. Fife. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Mary F. Barnes. 
Lower Middle. — Nettie F. Ainsworth. 
Mixed Middle and Primary. — EvaF- Tuson. 
Higher Primary. — Georgia A. "Wyman. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — J. "Walter Stetson. 
Assistants. — Annie A. Webster. 

Mary E. Bunton. 

Bertha L. Dean. 



149 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Nancy S. Bunton. 
Lower Middle. — Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. — May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — J. Edward Pickering. 
Assistants. — Cora M. Dearborn. 

Mary J. Hickey. 

Barbara B. Joy. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Flora M. Senter. 

Lower Middle. — Ellen E. McKean. 

Mixed Middle and Primary. — Josie H. Newton. 

Higher Primary. — Nettie C. Woodman. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — William F. Gibson. 
Assistant. — Alta C. Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. — Maria N. Bower. 
Mixed Primary. — Carrie I. Stevens. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. — Lizzie A. Burns. 
Mixed Middle. — Lelia A. Brooks. 



150 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Primary. — S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. — Edith M. Stebbins. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. — Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Georgianna Dow. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT). 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. — Helen M. Morrill. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Alice E. Page. 

MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER UNION). 

Training School. 

Principal. — Caroline E. Wing. 

A Lower Middle school, a Higher and two Lower Pri- 
mary schools, embracing first four years of school work. 
Principal is assisted by members of Training class. 

WILSON HILL. 

Mixed Primary. — Hulda C. Graupner. 
Lower Primary. — Ella Hope. 

BEECH-STREET SCHOOL (CORNER SPRUCE). 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Augusta S. Downs. 



151 

SCHOOL-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 

Mixed Primary. — Mary W. Mitchell. 
Lower Primary. — Susie H. Frame. 

First Floor. 

Lower Primary. — Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. — Mary A. Southard. 

SOUTH-MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Higher Primary. — Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. — Sarah B. Paige. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. — Etta J. Carley, Principal (Grammar 

and Middle classes). 
Mixed Primary. — Mary G. Tynan. 
Hallsville. — Olive J. Randall, Principal]' (Higher 

classes). 
Assistant. — Susie G. "Woodman (Lower classes). 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. — F. Maude Joy. 

2, Gofie's Falls. — Georgie A. Nute. 

3, Harvey District. — Ella F. Barker. 

4, Youngsville. — Lillian C. Hall. 

5, "Webster's Mills. — Nina B. Croning. 

6, Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

SPECIAL TEACHER. 

Music. — J. J. Kimball. 



152 



MEMBERS OF TRAINING SCHOOL, NOT YET EMPLOYED AS REG- 
ULAR TEACHERS, WHO ENTERED FALL OF 1886, AND WILL 
RECEIVE DIPLOMAS OF GRADUATION, JAN. 27, 1888. 

Cora B. Gilford,* Genevieve B. Knight,t 

Emma L. McLaren,* Theodora Richardson, f 

Lettie M. Smith,f Mary J. Walsh, f 

OTHERS, NOT HERE EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, WHO HAVE 
CERTIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION. 

Maud Bell, Fannie L. Perry, Fannie E. Smith, Etta 
C. McLaren, Martha T. Learnard, Lizzie M. McAfee, 
Hattie J. Hoyt, Eleanor H. Kirk, Elvina Davis, and 
"William S. Harris. All certificated for Grammar and 
lower grades. 

Fannie L. Sanborn, Helen W. Poor, Belle F. Small, 
Hattie M. Ellis, Hattie E. Merrill, and Alithea M. 
Hutchins. Certificated for Middle and Primary grades. 

JANITORS. 

Webster Street and Blodget Street. 
Michael Finley, Pearl, near Chestnut Street. $400. 

High School, Ash Street, and Wilson Hill. 
John S. Avery, 404 Merrimack Street. $600. 

Franklin Street and Lincoln Street. 
William Stevens, 418 Central Street. 8600. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. 
William H. Morrill, 45 Pennacook Street. $350. 

* Certificated for Grammar and lower grades. 
t Certificated for Middle and Primary grades. 



153 

Merrimack Street and Beech Street. 
Edward P. Cogswell, 218 Central Street. $250. 

Piscataquog Schools (Main Street, School Street, and South 
Main Street). 

Albert T. Barr, 73 A Street, West Manchester. $525. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey, Bakersville. $250. 

XII. — School Year, 1888. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 2, closes 
March 23. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 16, closes 
June 29. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 10, closes 
December 14. Vacation of two weeks. 



REPORT 



CITY SOLICITOR 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and the Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : 

The City Solicitor reports as follows as to the doings in 
his office for the year 1887 : 

Of the cases upon the law docket of the Supreme 
Court upon his entering the office, last January, the fol- 
lowing have been disposed of: 

Manchester vs. Richardson. 

This was entered " Neither party," on payment by the 
defendant of a sum equal to the plaintiff's costs. The 
case could not be tried, owing to the death of one neces- 
sary witness and the ignorance as to the whereabouts of 
others. 

Emery vs. Manchester. 

Entered " Judgment for the plaintiff by agreement ; 
judgment satisfied." This case had some merit in it, and 
the amount paid did not exceed the expenses of a trial. 

Frain vs. Manchester. 
Entered "Judgment for the defendant; no costs." 

Manchester vs. Nutt. 

Entered " Neither party," owing to the fact that the 
amount involved would not have covered the expense of 



158 

trying it, even if the city was successful, and the issue of 
the numerous legal questions raised by it was so doubt- 
ful, that it was deemed best to go no further with the 
matter. Nothing was paid by either party. 

Clark, Admr., vs. Manchester. 

Tried by jury at the March term, and the trial resulted 
in a verdict of $4,420.09 for the plaintiff. Exceptions 
were taken by the defendant, and the case is still pending 
in the law term. 

Bodwell vs. Manchester. 
This case still stands upon the docket. 

A large number of claims have been presented to the 
city government during the year, and in each instance the 
facts connected therewith were immediately investigated. 
The Solicitor has attended every meeting of the Commit- 
tee on Claims, to which they were referred. Without 
going into detail, the claims were all heard by the com- 
mittee, and so adjusted that in no case has a suit yet been 
brought against the city upon any claim arising during 
the year 1887. 

But for personal injuries received in 1886, three suits 
for damages were entered at the March term,, and one at 
the September term, 1887. They are as follows, viz. : 

Elvira H. Jillson vs. Manchester. 

Plaintiff claims $2,000 for injuries alleged to have been 
caused by the defective condition of Spring street, on 
November 14, 1886. 

Jessie Quigley vs. Manchester. 

In this case $2,000 damages are sued for, on account of 
falling on the ice in Methodist court, December 9, 1886. 



159 

Nancy 0. Savory vs.- Manchester. 

Claim is made that the plaintiff fell, owing to the icy 
condition of Middle street, on January 27, 1886, and was 
injured, $2,500 being claimed as damages. 

James Neal vs. Manchester. 

Plaintiff sues for damages to recompense him for in- 
juries alleged to have been received on account of a defect 
in Hanover street, in front of the Post-Office block, on 
July 9, 1886. 

There are also pending in the Supreme Court : On the 
sessions docket, a petition for a new highway in Halls- 
ville, which was filed in court, February 13, 1886, and 
has not yet been heard ; and upon the equity docket, 
the following petitions : Of Fred P. Danforth, filed Sep- 
tember 8, 1886, for damages alleged to have been caused 
by turning water on the plaintiff's land from Park street ; 
and of Sarah B. Bean, Clara Moore, and J. G. Kelsea, for 
leave to file notices of claims for damages for personal 
injuries alleged to have been caused by defective high- 
ways, the first two in December, 1886, and the last in 
April, 1887. 

At the March term, a writ, Manchester vs. the "West- 
ern Union Telegraph Company, was entered. This suit 
seeks to recover the amount of the judgment against the 
city in the case of Sykes vs. Manchester. The defendant 
company had the case transferred, as a matter of right, 
to the United States Circuit Court, where it is still 
pending. 

In the same court, a new suit on account of using the 
" Knibbs valve " was entered against the city at the Octo- 
ber term. In this matter, Manchester has united with the 
other cities of the State, which have had similar suits 



160 

begun against them, in. defending, and has employed 
Hon. W. L. Foster, of Concord, as counsel, and he has 
full charge of the case for the city. 

The Solicitor would state that the attending to the 
cases in court constitutes but a small part of his duties. 
The investigation of accidents, the looking after the mat- 
ters which come before the Committee on Claims, and the 
advising of the various city officials as they call for it, take 
up much more time than this. The Solicitor has attended 
the police court, whenever the marshal has so requested, 
and given him all the assistance required ; also, there 
were several matters before the legislature at its recent 
session, at the hearings of which the Solicitor appeared, 
at the request of his Honor the Mayor, or of the Board 
of Mayor and Aldermen, before various legislative com- 
mittees. 

The Solicitor would acknowledge his obligation to the 
various city officials, especially to his Honor the Mayor, 
the Marshal, and the Committee on Claims, for their uni- 
formly kind and courteous treatment, as their duties have 
brought them together, and his hope is that his first year 
in this office may prove as satisfactory to them as it has 
been pleasant to him. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

Solicitor. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



lo the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 

Manchester : 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the 
Overseers of the Poor herewith present their annual report 
for the year 1887 : 

The whole number of paupers supported at the City 
Farm during the year has been thirty, at a cost of four 
dollars and sixty-four and nine-tenths cents per week for 
each pauper. 

The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been 
one hundred and three, consisting of three hundred and 
nineteen persons, all of whom have a settlement in this 
city ; four of this number died during the year. 

The whole number of persons supported at the State 
Industrial School during the year has been six, at a cost 
of one dollar and fifty cents per week for each person. 

The whole number of insane persons supported at the 
county farm has been two, at a cost of two dollars per 
week for each person. Those two persons have been 
pronounced by physicians incurable, and not safe to go 



164 



into company with other paupers, and therefore cannot be 
cared for at our city farm. 

The Overseers of the Poor have given and allowed 
seven hundred and sixty orders for support of paupers^off 
the farm during the year, consisting chiefly of groceries, 
fuel, medicine, and emergencies. 

The amount allowed to the several wards is as'follows : 



Ward 1 

Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 



$151 


44 


240 


73 


590 


18 


691 


84 


1,772 


98 


302 


50 


46 


00 


226 


90 



t,022 57 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED FOR EMERGENCY CASES. 



State Industrial School, board of 
inmates $2,491 09 

Josie Haft", board and care of in- 
sane husband . . . . 99 20 

William T. B. Pearsons, board and 

care of insane wife . . . 11 33 

Fred Wallace & Co., burial of Wil- 
liam Cogswell .... 25 00 

Town of Kingston, support of 
William Coombs and wife . 220 00 

William Ferrin and others, for 

support of Emma J. Gray . 53 10 

Joseph B. Pierce, for support . 138 95 



165 



County of Hillsborough, support 

of John J. Murray . 
County of Hillsborough, support 

of Asenath H. White 
Printing and stationery 
Team conveyance to city farm and 

hospital .... 
A. G. Fairbanks, care of H. W 

Fisher .... 
Medicine to police station 
Town of Candia, support of Mrs 

George H. Johnson . 
City of Portsmouth, support of 

William B. Coombs . 
William H. Maxwell, expense ex 

aminins; town records 



$104 00 

104 00 
21 50 

5 25 



12 


75 


14 


65 


86 


84 


73 


00 


6 


06 



,466 72 



Total amount allowed 
Cash received from county of Hills- 
borough for board of inmates 
of Industrial School . 
Cash received from city of Concord 
for support of Emma J. Gray . 

Total cash received 



!,089 09 
53 10 



r ,489 29 



,142 19 



Total cost for the year 



i,347 10 



166 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward 1, Clerk, 
THOMAS L. QUIMBY, Ward 2, 
JAMES SUTCLIFFE, Ward 3, 
HORACE GORDON, Ward 4, 
FRANK J. MORRISON, Ward 5, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, Ward 6, 
WILLIAM MARSHALL, Ward 7, 
HORATIO FRADD, Ward 8, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 

A true copy. Attest : 

William H. Maxwell, 
Clerk of the Overseers of the Poor. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM, 



To the City Councils of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — Your committee, in making their annual 
statement, have to report that several important changes 
have been made at the City Farm during the past year, 
prominent among which are the 'resignation of Jeremiah 
Garvin as superintendent, and Mrs. Garvin as matron, 
the election of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Willey to fill the 
vacancies so made, the discontinuance of the milk route, 
and the sale of the stock connected with the milk route. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garvin were tendered similar positions 
as those by them occupied for the city, at the Hillsborough 
county farm in Wilton, and resigned from the City Farm 
to accept these places. They seasonably handed their 
resignations to your committee, and considering the facts 
as presented, the same were accepted, to take effect Octo- 
ber 1, 1887, and Mr. and Mrs. Willey were elected to the 
offices vacated by them. 

In the withdrawal of Mr. and Mrs. Garvin the city lost 
faithful and efficient officers, but we are fully satisfied of 
the ability of the succeeding superintendent and matron 



170 

to successfully manage the farm, with its various duties 
and responsibilities, for the best interests of the city. 

The change of officers came at such a time in the year 
that but few new plans of operation could be put in force, 
although considerable was done in breaking up new land, 
clearing other land, and building stone wall. A system 
of cleaning the vaults was inaugurated by Mr. Willey by 
which the contents are carried from the buildings, by 
pipes, to a large tank in the ground east of the house, and 
by an ingenious arrangement this tank, by the raising of 
a gate, can be emptied directly into a cart and transferred 
to any part of the farm. This system does away with 
the old arrangement of the frequent cleaning of the vaults 
by hand ladle, requiring a great deal of time and labor. 

Arrangements have been made for the introduction of 
steam to the clothes-boilers in the laundry, and to a set 
kettle in the kitchen for boiling purposes, using the steam 
from the heating boiler. This can be done at a nominal 
expense, and will be a great saving of fuel. 

The superintendent was instructed to cause a partition 
to be put across the large room directly east of the office, 
making two rooms amply sufficient for the use of two 
insane paupers. This was made necessary on account of 
the habits of one of these paupers, who has previously 
been confined in the men's dining-room, to the great in- 
convenience of both the occupants and the superintendent. 
Each door in the prison part of the house has been 
numbered by the superintendent, adding another con- 
venience to the employes and inmates. 

A great many improvements are planned for the next 
year which can be made with very small expense, and we 
feel confident that our next annual report will prove very 
satisfactory to the citizens and tax-payers of Manchester. 



171 



Following is a recapitulation of our appraisal and state- 
ment of accounts for the year ending December 31, 1887 : 



APPRAISAL. 




Live stock ..... 


. $1,322 00 


Hay, grain, and produce 


. 1,708 65 


Carriage, sleighs, etc. . 


684 20 


Farm implements . 


. 1,123 25 


Household furniture, bedding, etc. 


. 1,663 59 


Provisions and fuel . . 


564 60 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS, 1887. 



Total cash paid out 
Interest . . . 



Total receipts of farm 
Bills receivable 
Permanent improvements 
Difference in stock (less) 



$7,066 29 



$7,489 85 
1,000 00 

$8,479 85 
4,004 71 

$4,475 14 
171 70 

$4,303 44 
216 75 

$4,086 69 
4,676 95 

$8,763 64 



Cash paid City Treasurer, 1887, $1,404.49. 
Total number of weeks' board of prisoners and paupers, 
l,967f 



172 

Average cost of board per week for each individual, 
$4.64^. 

It will be noticed that the expense of board of prisoners 
and paupers per week is considerably larger than for some 
years past, but this is accounted for in the appraisal. As 
will be seen by the above statement, the difference in 
appraisal of live stock from last year is $2,124.45. This is 
caused partly by the sale of cows when the milk route 
was discontinued. One horse has died during the year 
from old age. 

The total amount of the appraisal falls below that of 
the year 1886, and this is due to the fact that your com- 
mittee, instead of following the previous system of ap- 
praisal, viz., deducting from ten to fifteen per cent from 
the amount of former appraisals of such stock and goods 
as depreciate in value by reason of age and use, examined 
the property, and, regardless of other valuations, appraised 
it at what we considered its actual value at the time. 
These two reasons, the sale of stock and actual valuation, 
fully account for such a large difference in the cost of 
weekly board. 

In connection with this matter, attention should also be 
called to one other item, that is, the failure of the potato 
crop. Whereas in December, 1886, the farm had on hand 
six hundred bushels of potatoes appraised at fifty cents 
per bushel, — three hundred dollars, — in December, 1887, 
there were only five bushels on hand, valued at one dollar 
a bushel, — five dollars. This should be attributed to the 
fault of no one, as the same difficulty with the crop pre- 
vailed universally in this section of the country. 

It is the purpose of your committee and the superin- 
tendent to make a better showing in the vegetable depart- 
ment the coming year than has been done previously. 
We wish to call the attention of your honorable board 



178 

and of our citizens to the class of labor with which we 
have to contend at the farm. Outside of two or three 
men employed as overseers, the male help consists of 
paupers and short-term prisoners. Of course little labor 
can be got from the paupers, and the majority of prison- 
ers are sent for ten-day terms, many on their arrival being 
totally unfit, from the effects of liquor or for other reasons, 
for physical labor, and by the time they recover a 
healthy condition their term has expired. This is a con- 
dition of affairs for which there is probably no remedy; 
but it should be considered in comparing our City Farm 
with other institutions having long-sentence prisoners. 
Of course such labor is of little value compared with that 
on private farms, where competent men are employed for 
pay. 

Your committee respectfully request the members of 
your board, and citizens generally, to visit the City Farm 
as individuals and personally inspect the books and man- 
agement of the institution. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE W. CHENEY, 
LEONARD P. REYNOLDS, 
GEORGE S. CLOUGH, 
GUY F. WHITTEN, 
THOMAS P. RILEY, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



RE PORT 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of the Valley Cemetery respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1887: 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1886 
Appropriation for 1887 
For tomb fees 

water rents 

grading lots . 

care of lots 

opening graves 

extending water to private 
grounds 

grass sold 

amount overdrawn 



$244 96 
1,500 00 
108 00 
190 00 
392 50 
330 00 
230 50 

66 00 
8 00 
5 37 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid C. H. G. Foss, superintendent $708 54 
Luther Leavitt, labor . . 301 12 
' C. "W. Noyes, labor . . 288 77 

12 



5,075 33 



178 



Paid James Barrett, labor 
Jacques Bilodeau, labor 
C. French, labor . 
Michael Falvy, labor 
Y. French, labor 
C. H. Oilman, labor 
District No. 2, breaking roads 
Sewers and drains, for brick 
Water Commissioners . 
J. B. Varick Co., phosphate 

and seed. . 
Killey & Wadleigh, hoes and 

rakes 
Manchester Hardware Co. 

sundries 
T. A. Lane, pipe . 
O. D. Carpenter . 
Dodge & Straw 
C. L. Mead . 
W. H. Vickery . 
Palmer & Garmon 
J. G. Ellinwood . 
Temple & Farrington . 
Heath & Stevens, stone 
F. S. Bod well, stone . 
M. Harrington, manure 
J. Hodge, window frame and 

sash ..... 
B. W. Robinson, mason-work 
H. H. Huntress, flowers and 

shrubs .... 
E. A. Parkhurst, trees . 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
James R. Carr 



$271 09 
90 00 
44 67 
24 00 
17 50 

10 67 

11 25 
53 10 
83 25 

24 80 

5 49 



20 


21 


8 


15 


1 


40 


5 


40 


7 


25 


1 


50 


3 


77 


7 


00 


3 


70 


14 


72 


11 


81 


10 


50 


18 


25 


40 


28 


58 


25 


27 


00 


17 


08 


4 


35 



179 



Paid Pettee & Adams, lime and 




cement .... 


$8 15 


F. X. Chenette, teaming and 




stone .... 


10 50 


D. H. Varnum & Co., loam . 


17 50 


L. M. Aldrich, building 




bridge .... 


59 75 


Taylor & Flanders, plank 


19 55 


Clark Brothers, teaming 


52 00 


Pike & Heald, labor and pipe 


192 48 


J. W. Kimball, teaming and 




loam .... 


125 87 


Head & Dowst, remodeling 




house .... 


' 394 66 



!,075 33 



For many years the want of a suitable place in which 
to store fuel, wheelbarrows, rakes, hoes, and tools has 
caused great inconvenience, and, in order to have what 
was desired, your trustees concluded to remodel the 
house used as a reception-room for visitors, by raising 
it and making a cellar under the entire building, with 
brick walls, and also add to the building a superinten- 
dent's office, with water-closets in the rear, well supplied 
with water and drained to the brook, thus leaving what 
was formerly the whole building for a reception-room, 
well supplied with suitable furniture. 

The lower bridge over the brook, used for carriage 
travel, having become rotten and deemed unsafe, has 
been replaced by a new one. 

The improvements inaugurated in former years have 
been continued by Mr. Foss, the superintendent. 

In three previous reports of this committee, attention 
has been called to the necessity of a new receiving 



tomb, and it is understood an appropriation for that 
purpose is receiving consideration by the finance com- 
mittee of the City Councils. 

Submitted to full board, Feb. 1, 1888, and approved. 

CHARLES W. QITIMBY, 
JOSEPH QUIRIN, 
GEO. C. GILMORE, 
BUSHROD W. HELL, 
DAVID 0. FURNALD, 

Sub- Trustees Valley Cemetery. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees, referring with pride to the record of 
the Pine Grove Cemetery in the past and to their aus- 
picious predictions in earlier reports, are happy to be able 
to assure the city government and the citizens of Man- 
chester that the year 1887 has been no exception to its 
annual improvement and ability to fulfill the require- 
ments of its increasing list of patrons. The year past 
has demonstrated in an unusual degree the fact, that the 
city fathers have inaugurated here a necessity for the 
growing demands of our city concerning the interment 
of its sacred dead; that by its wise and liberal appropri- 
ations it has thus far accomplished what it has sought, 
in view of the apparent ultimate failure of all other 
places of burial in our city to furnish the needed facili- 
ties. The proprietors of many of the best lots in the 
Valley Cemetery, once an object of rare beauty and full 
of auspicious hope to a prosperous village just bursting 
into cityhood, but now suffocated by the growth of a 
laboring population and the encroachments of mechani- 



181 

cal industries, are seeking the benefits of the modern 
facilities assured by the official determination t^at no 
cemetery in New England shall possess in larger degree 
the ability to rob death of its torments and make for rel- 
atives and friends a sacred place of consoling resort. 
Each year in the progressive era of the Pine Grove an 
increasing tendency is manifest to appropriate the loveli- 
ness of this sacred spot, dedicated by nature and art to 
the fulfillment of our noblest and best impulses, in the 
trying times which are the common lot of frail humanity. 
The sub-trustees are not unmindful of the fact, that the 
prosperity of the cemetery during the past year is largely 
due to other influences than persistency in the discharge 
of their duties. For various unavoidable reasons, the 
work of permanent improvements in many of the direc- 
tions which have received the attention of the sub- 
trustees, has been retarded, and much yet remains to be 
accomplished. The physical disability of Colonel Whit- 
man to inspire and work out the many schemes which 
his admirable judgment and enthusiastic love for the 
work of his position had suggested to him, has been 
seriously felt. The trustees are particularly fortunate in 
the assistance which they receive from the present super- 
intendent, whose experience, faithfulness, and fidelity to 
their instructions insure their confidence and the success 
of their plans. Unfortunately, now and then he incurs 
the criticisms of persons who forget that he is the ser- 
vant of the trustees, and who have not courage to present 
their complaints to the board, who alone are responsible 
for the instructions he follows, and who will censure him 
for disobedience as heartily as they will commend and 
defend him for executing their commands. 

Section 13 of the "Rules and Regulations" is none the 
less the expression of the bottom-rock of the desire of 



182 

the board because it is at the end of the list, but when it 
requests the co-operation of proprietors of lots, and 
notice of any " violation of duty, misdemeanor, or want 
of attention and courtesy on the part of any officer or 
employe," it means that the public rights shall be fully 
and impartially sustained, according to the standard of 
the board ; and the fact that in four years of service since 
the promulgation of the rule no complaint from any 
quarter has been officially presented to the board, is the 
strongest evidence of their integrity, faithfulness, and 
acceptability which could supplement the primary ap- 
proval of the board. 

The board takes occasion again to remind the public 
that its " by-laws and rules and regulations," are published 
in pamphlet form, for the information of proprietors, un- 
dertakers, marble-workers, and the public generally, which 
may be had for the asking. If errors exist therein, con- 
vince the sub-trustees, not the superintendent, and they 
will be amended and improved. Until then, they will be 
literally and fully enforced, or the sub-trustees will be 
deceived. 

FINANCIALLY 

the Pine Grove Cemetery has maintained its record of 
progress and substantial development. While permanent 
improvements have been fewer than usual, the attention 
of the employes has been especially directed to general 
improvements, and a vast amount of work has been 
accomplished, not at once perceptible to the visitor. 

Fully $3,000 has been judiciously and carefully ex- 
pended for labor and the use of teams, yet, notwith- 
standing the large amount of work thus accomplished, 
such is the public appreciation of wdiat has been done in 
recent years, that the receipts of the grounds are fully 
sufficient to defray the necessary current expenses. 



183 

The city is called upon, therefore, to make annual appro- 
priations for such permanent improvements alone as will 
adapt it to the growing requirements of our city, and 
make it so necessary and attractive to our citizens as to 
enlist their interest and assistance in properly developing 
its hidden beauties. 

A brief synopsis of the work of the year may not 
prove profitless. 

AVENUES. 

The introduction of water and sewage pipes through 
many of the most-used and best-surfaced avenues has 
made it necessary to spend upon them an unusual amount 
of labor, not alone to restore them to their former con- 
dition, but in many cases this necessity has been made 
the occasion for regrading and graveling, and this work 
has been extended during the past year to embrace 
avenues not before graveled and to the laying out of new 
avenues, covering a distance of more than a thousand 
feet. By reason of the reclaiming and work preparatory 
to laying into lots of as fine a location as the original 
cemetery contains, — the beautiful crown of land in its 
southwest corner, — Maple avenue has been extended 
nearly seven hundred feet and thoroughly graded, ready 
for gravel the coming spring. This avenue not only 
opens a most desirable plot for ordinary lots, so much 
needed and which will find a ready market, but it affords 
a more direct and better means of access to the new pub- 
lic grounds, where fifty-six interments were made the 
past year. 

Some four hundred loads of surplus material were used 
in filling the low land on the east side of this avenue, 
and, although not a sufficient quantity was furnished for 
the completion of the fill, enough available material is in 
the immediate vicinity to make this locality the most 



184 

desirable in the cemetery, with the opening of spring. 
Olive avenue has been laid out and graded, extending 
from Beech to Cypress avenue. 

"When it is considered that nearly four miles of avenues 
are in constant use, and that it is the purpose of the 
trustees as rapidly as possible to grade and gravel the 
whole of them, it will be no wonder that the item of 
" labor and teaming" is the largest among all the expen- 
ditures of the grounds. In addition to this, the number- 
less paths must be cleared of weeds by numerous hoe- 
ings during the season, which have received due attention 
the past year. One hundred and ninety-seven loads of 
gravel have been drawn, and used in the improvements 
made on the avenues. In all, two hundred and forty 
loads of gravel have been drawn, and used in the ceme- 
tery the past year. 

NEW LOTS. 

Beside the labor incident to breaking up, grading, and 
clearing of stumps and bowlders the large tract of land 
on Maple avenue before referred to, and which is readily 
available for the use of the public, a tract of land 
south of the lawn lot near the east entrance to the ceme- 
tery has been laid out into lawn lots, where no deposit is 
required, and sixty-six lots have been added to those 
already laid out. The popularity of this style of lots 
compels a continued expenditure to prepare unreclaimed 
land for this purpose. 

HILLSIDE LAWN. 

Much has been expended upon this plot of land, in 
addition to the income from the fund created by the 
required deposit of twice the price of the lot as a fund 
to care for its preservation indefinitely. 



185 

The beauty and attractiveness of this delightful spot are 
being rapidly enhanced by the erection, on lots already 
sold, of monuments of great value and rare artistic 
beauty, and the increasing demand for these lots attests 
the success of this method of providing for their per- 
petual care. Ten of these lots have been sold during 
the past year. A reference to the report of the Trustees 
of Cemetery Funds, will show the condition and manage- 
ment of this fund. 

LOAM AND MUCK. 

Great difficulty has been experienced in the ability 
of the trustees to procure all the loam which is required 
for the successful administration of this sandy area. 
Its necessity need not be rehearsed. Some means must 
be devised to provide a more liberal supply than we 
have had at our command the past year. 

The supply of muck from the " Straw lot " has proved 
to be of great utility when properly cured by exposure. 
During the past season but little was attempted in 
the direction of getting out muck, on account of the 
unfavorable season and the amount on hand. One hun- 
dred and fifty-eight loads of loam have been used, eighty- 
three in grading and preparing public plots and seventy- 
five in regrading old lots. One hundred and twenty 
loads of muck have also been used in grading. 

t 

STOKEHOUSE. 

The most important work in the line of permanent 
improvements is the erection of the long-desired store- 
house, and the improvement of the grounds in the rear 
of the superintendent's office, upon which the same is 
situated. It is admirably conceived for the purposes 
for which it is needed, and possesses the added charm 



186 

of beirfg ornamental as well as useful. Five hundred 
and ninety-one dollars and thirty cents have already 
been expended in construction, and there is an unpaid 
balance of one hundred and forty-six dollars and eighty- 
two cents now due. In this storehouse closets for the 
use of lot-owners who desire to store tools or hose can 
be obtained by the payment of a moderate rental, on 
application to the superintendent. 

PUBLIC TOMB. 

This matter has been so thoroughly discussed in for- 
mer reports, and upon multitudinous occasions when the 
pressing need of such a temporary place of interment 
called the matter in question, that further advocacy of 
its absolute necessity would be idle. Indeed, its im- 
portance is universally admitted. The trustees are en- 
couraged to believe that the present year will witness 
the fulfillment of their hopes in this respect, and that 
the wisdom and prudent judgment of the city govern- 
ment will not suffer the inauguration of its construction 
to be longer delayed for want of an appropriation for 
that purpose. To defer it, is to seriously impede the 
growth of the Pine Grove Cemetery ; to force its patrons 
to bury on their lots in the winter at great expense, 
inconvenience, and peril-to health; to require the keeping 
open of four miles of avenues under all circumstances, 
or compel its patrons to inter their dead in a locality 
having now few qualifications to lure the grief-stricken 
with its restful quiet and soothing surroundings. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

The trustees have heretofore called the attention of 
the city government to the immediate needs of the Pine 



187 

Grove Cemetery in detail, with an estimate of the appro- 
priations required therefor. It would be but a needless 
repetition were they to adopt that course at this time. 

The receipts from the earnings of the grounds should 
be hereafter sufficient to pay running expenses, and 
appropriations should be devoted to the necessary en- 
largement to meet the growing demand for lots and to 
such permanent improvements as it is thought advisable 
for the city to invest in. 

We make the following suggestions : 

IRON FENCE. 

The entire west side and a portion of the north end 
of the original cemetery lot are inclosed in a substantial 
iron fence. The other half of the old lot and the whole 
of the new purchase, known as the " Straw Lot," are 
either unfenced, or, what is worse, struggling to keep 
inside of a lot of rotten, rickety old boards and posts, 
once a poor apology for a public fence, but now name- 
less and useless. 

In 1886 new fence to the value of $1,300 was put 
up, $517.25 of which was paid in 1887 out of the unex- 
pended balance of the year before. A small appropri- 
ation each year for this purpose would in time accom- 
plish permanently inclosing the entire area. 

WATER-WORKS. 

No extension has been made during the past year, 
but the laying out of the new lots in progress, and to 
be completed with the opening spring, will soon neces- 
sitate the laying of more pipes, for which provision 
must be made by other means than current receipts. 



188 



SEWER. 

The success of the scheme inaugurated in 1886 for 
the draining of the low places proves so successful that 
its continuation to a limited extent is recommended. 

PLANS AND RECORDS. 

Reference need only be made to the extended presen- 
tation of this important subject in the reports of the last 
two years. A personal inspection of the few detached 
apologies for attempted plans, once made evidently for 
temporary purposes, but now worn out and defaced by use 
and indiscriminate additions, would shut out all need of 
further comment. It is enough to say that there are 
absolutely no plans locating the various avenues, walks, 
paths, lots, lawns, and public grounds, and no available 
means for locating particular lots or establishing their 
ownership. To half do this important work would 
avail nothing. When it is thought best to give the 
trustees an appropriation, they will gratefully commence 
the work and assure the city goverment that the be- 
ginning was made none too soon to preserve what is 
every day being wrapped in more intangible obscurity. 

NURSERY. 

The practice, established some time since, of setting 
apart small and prominent plots of land for garden spots 
and other decorative purposes, has found universal ap- 
proval, and should be more liberally encouraged. The 
nursery has proved quite satisfactory, but more could easily 
be accomplished in this direction if the encouragement 
should come in the form of a liberal appropriation for the 
restocking of the nursery with young plants, shrubs, and 
evergreens, and for loam and muck with which to grade 
and establish these oases of beauty in that sandy desert. 



189 



A WORD TO THE PUBLIC. 



During the past year there have been 210 interments 
in Pine Grove Cemetery. In every instance the interest 
of the afflicted relatives and friends in the sacred places 
where these interments have been made, has then been 
seriously enforced upon the attention of the superin- 
tendent; but, alas! in too many instances the lots are 
speedily forgotten and persistently neglected. Weeds 
are encouraged to overrun the place where, of all others, 
an elegant sward or beautiful flowers should constantly 
proclaim the freshness of memories enduring as time ; 
headstones and curbings are tipped over; the earth 
above the peaceful sleeper has sunken with its return 
to dust; desolation and neglect reproach continually the 
bad faith of the living, and publish their indifference. 

This is the most obstinate obstacle with which cem- 
etery managers are compelled to deal, and the obstacle, 
shameful and unnatural as it may seem, generally gets 
the best of it. The dismal, repellant, horrifying eye- 
sores in the midst of the carefully kept and beautifully 
adorned lots which stamp our modern cemeteries with 
extreme beauty are seldom unsold lots, but almost 
always the property of some one, who, for a trifling out- 
lay or a little labor of his own, could relieve his neigh- 
bors of a nuisance, himself from criticisms which his 
own ears should hear, and place the general appearance 
of the cemetery grounds where they never can be placed 
but by the willingness of every proprietor to keep his 
lot in a neat, attractive, and thrifty condition. 

The superintendent will care for all lots, at trifling 
expense, upon application, and the trustees urge upon 
owners the better care of their lots for the general im- 
provement of the cemetery grounds. 



190 



CONGRATULATIONS AND REGRETS. 

The election of Joseph L. Stevens to the position on the 
Board of Trustees of Cemeteries, and his assignment to 
the Pine Grove, are occasions for rejoicing that so capable 
and enthusiastic a friend of the good work should be 
intrusted with its responsibilities. "While we regret ex- 
ceedingly the withdrawal of the valuable services and 
wise counsels of our respected friend and associate, Col. 
G. P. Whitman, made necessary by his physical disabilities 
which force his retirement, we congratulate the city upon 
securing the invaluable services of his former co-worker 
and present successor. He knows all there is to know of 
the needs of the Pine Grove Cemetery ; he is one of its 
pioneer admirers, — of its most enthusiastic supporters ; 
and everybody in Manchester knows that his election 
means four years of hearty, sensible, and successful labor, 
in conjunction with the other members, who are forbidden 
by their modesty from publishing more than their deter- 
mination to do all in their power to promote the future 
interests of the charge committed to their trust, and to 
keep their end up with the new arrival, whom we also 
welcome. 

In accordance with a custom which has seemed to please 
patrons of the Pine Grove Cemetery, the sub-trustees 
append the following tables of cemetery statistics for the 
year ending December 31, 1887 : 



191 



Superintendent's Account. 


1887. 


1886. 

* 


Superintendent's receipts at the cemetery for lots. . 
" " for water and care of lots 


$426.00 

391.00 

211.50 

335.50 

29.00 

5.25 

3S6.55 

16.15 


$511.00 

373.50 

99.50 

286.75 




45.00 


" " from extra labor on lots.. 
" " from wood and timber... 
" " for removal of bodies 


11.75 

259.26 

60.50 




$1,800.95 

2.85 


$1,740.18 
6.01 


Superintendent has paid sundry minor expenses.. . 


Balance paid treasurer by superintendent 


$1,798.10 


$1,734.17 



Miscellaneous. 



Number lots regraded 

" monuments erected 

Lots sold on Hillside lawn 

" unsold on Hillside lawn 

" sold with lawn restrictions 

" unsold with lawn restrictions , 

Ordinary lots sold 

" " for sale , 

Number interments 

" " on public grounds — 

Total number lots sold 

Whole number buried in public grounds 



1887. 



20 


16 


25 


14 


10 


7 


73 


83 


27 


23 


73 


37 


15 


32 


20 


11 


210 


193 


56 


47 


52 


62 


1,006 


950 



1886. 



Receipts. 


1887. 


1886. 




$1,762.40 

2,500.00 

426.00 

1,372.10 

1,591.80 


$2,607.06 


Appropriations for 1887 


2,000.00 




511.00 


Balance of superintendent's receipts, less $2.85. 


1,223.17 
1,956.50 






$7,652.30 
$7,655.15 


$8,297.73 









192 



Current Expenses. 



1887. 



Salary of superintendent, at $2 

Labor and teaming 

Material and tools 

Printing and stationery 

Shrubs and flowers 

Water rates 

Telephone 

Totals 



$728.00 


$728.00 


2,251.16 


2,399.90 


84.74 


175.23 


68.02 


40.96 


84.75 


49.15 


300.00 


300.00 


50.65 









$3,567.32 



$3,738.59 



Permanent Improvements. 



Iron fence , 

Furnishing and painting house 

Loani and turf 

New storehouse 

Laying out "Straw lot" 

Total 



1887. 



$517.25 

76.47 

40.02 

591.30 

32.90 



$1,257.94 



Total current expenses 
Permanent improvements 



Balance on hand 
Total 



$3,567 32 
1,257 94 

$4,825 26 

.$2,827 04 

$7,652 32 



HORACE D. GORDON, 
GEORGE W. BACON, 
HENRY H. HUSE, 
G. P. WHITMAN, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
Trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual 
report of the money received by me during the year end- 
ing December 31, 1887, on account of cemeteries: 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Number of lots sold and deeds delivered during the 
past year, 46. 

Cash received for the same .... $2,017 80 
from B. A. Stearns . . . 1,372 10 



5,389 90 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Cash received from C. H. G. Foss . . . $1,325 

I have in my possession twenty-five deeds ready for 
delivery, which I think will all be taken, with perhaps 
one or two exceptions. These parties have left town and 
I can get no trace of them, having written to each one 
several times and in every case the letter has been re- 
turned. 

All money received by me has been turned into the city 
treasury, for which I have the proper vouchers from the 
City Clerk. 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 

13 



194 

Manchester, 1ST. H., January 10, 1888. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the account of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the cemeteries, and 
find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund 
have the honor to present herewith their eighth annual 
report, together with the statement of the treasurer, 
showing the present condition of the fund under their 
control. 

Nothing has occurred to change the condition of this 
trust from what was expressed in the last annual report, 
where it was said: "It is gratifying to note the steady in- 
crease of means at the disposal of the trustees, thereby 
stimulating the hope before expressed, that a more satis- 
factory state of things will hereafter exist as to the con- 
dition of lots under their care ; but too great results 
must not be expected from the meager sum applicable for 
these improvements. It will continue to be their aim to 
expend the means at command in a faithful and judicious 
manner." 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor, ex officio, 
P. C. CHENEY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 

Trustees of the Cemetery Fund. 
January 1, 1888. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the fifth 
annual report of the funds received and expenses paid 
to December 31, 1887. 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



Amount of permanent fund on hand, as per 

last report $2,050 

Received during the year from I. S. & J. P. 

Craige 100 



Total $2,150 

Interest on hand as per last report . $60 07 
Interest received since last report . 95 00 



Paid expenses as follows : 

Valley cemetery, for care of lots . $49 12 
Cash on hand .... 105 95 



$155 07 



$155 07 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



Amount of permanent fund on hand, as per 

last report $3,389 89 

Received during the year from 

John Hoyt . . . . $154 22 

Mrs. Elizabeth S. Crosley . . 93 20 
Mrs. M. A. Follansbee . .162 50 



197 



Mrs. S. R. Tewksbury 




$275 57 


James Kennard estate . 




500 00 


George G. Shute 




149 00 


Richard S. Eastman . 




150 06 


Mrs. Caroline P. Brown 




100 00 


Mrs. Anna B. Aldrich 




149 00 


Total . 




Interest on hand, as per last 


report 


$57 99 


Interest received since last r< 


iport . 


157 49 


Paid expenses as follows : 




C. C. Webster 




$10 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co. 




21 17 


F. X. Chenette 




14 38 


J. B. Yarick Co. . 




5 70 


Cash on hand 




164 23 



PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand, as per 
last report ....... 

Interest received since last report . $10 00 
Cash on hand . . . . 10 00 



L,733 55 
.,123 44 



$215 48 



$215 48 



$200 00 



20 00 



Most respectfully submitted. 

SYL VASTUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 



198 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of 
accounts of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the Trustees 
of the Cemetery Fund, embracing the receipts and expen- 
ditures for the year ending December 31, 1887, and that 
I find the same correct and properly vouched. 

I have also examined the securities in which said fund 
is invested, and find as follows : 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

1ST. H., 5 per cent . . . $2,150 00 



Amount of permanent fund . . $2,150 00 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

K H., 5 per cent . . . $5,100 00 
Cash 23 44 



Amount of permanent fund . . $5,123 44 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

K H., 5 per cent .... $200 00 



Amount of permanent fund . . $200 00 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



R E PORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPO RT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library present herewith their 
thirty-fourth annual report of the affairs and condition of 
the library, and accompanying the same the report made 
to them by the treasurer of the board, showing the 
amounts received and expenditures made by him, in behalf 
of the board, of the funds under their control ; and also 
the report of the librarian, which gives in detail the sta- 
tistics and operations of the library during the year, and 
the condition of the library and property in her care at 
the close of the year. 

From the report of the treasurer it appears that during 
the year the sum of eleven hundred and fifty-three dollars 
and thirty-four cents has been expended for the purchase 
of books, and the sum of one hundred and sixty -live dol- 
lars and eighty-three cents for the purchase of periodicals, 
being a total expenditure for both these purposes of thir- 
teen hundred and nineteen dollars and seventeen cents. 
Of the amount expended for the purchase of books, the 
sum of three hundred and sixty-seven dollars and thirty- 
one cents was taken from the income of the Dean fund 
and applied to the increase of that department of the 



202 

library. The balance in the hands of the treasurer, at the 
close of the year, of the amount appropriated by the City 
Councils for the purchase of books, was seven hundred and 
sixty-four dollars and fifty-nine cents. 

The income of the Dean fund, with the accumulated 
interest thereon, unexpended at the close of the year, was 
four thousand nine hundred and seventy-six dollars and 
twenty-eight cents. In the purchase of books from the 
income of this fund, the trustees have followed the plan 
originally adopted, and during the year have added to this 
department of the library one hundred and thirty-eight 
volumes of works on the arts and sciences, at an expense, 
as above indicated, of three hundred and sixty-seven dol- 
lars and thirty-one cents. These accessions have been 
placed with those heretofore purchased and designated 
as the " Dean Fund Purchase." 

The accumulated income of the Mary E. Elliot fund at 
the close of the year was two hundred and ten dollars 
and seventy-nine cents. From the income of this fund it 
is the design of the trustees to purchase medical works, 
in accordance with the intent of the founder, as soon 
as suitable arrangements can be made for their proper 
shelving and classification. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year 
have been two thousand seven hundred and nineteen dol- 
lars and three cents. The items of these expenditures 
may be found in detail in the annual report of the city, 
the bills for the same having been paid by the City Treas- 
urer, upon the approval of the trustees, from the appro- 
priation for the library. 

The report of the librarian shows that the library has 
been open for the delivery of books three hundred and 
seven days, being the same number as during the year 
previous. During this period the number of books deliv- 



203 

ered for home use was fifty thousand three hundred and 
thirty-five. In addition to this number, five thousand six 
hundred and sixty-five books and magazines have been 
delivered for use in the reading-room, making the total 
number delivered during the year fifty-six thousand, an 
average of one hundred and eighty-two per day. 

As compared with the year preceding, the circulation 
for home use is about thirty-seven hundred less, while the 
number delivered for use at the reading-room compared 
with the same year shows a slight increase. This decrease 
in circulation may perhaps be accounted for in part, as 
the librarian suggests, by the change that has taken place 
in the character of our population, as well as by the pub- 
lication of standard literature at cheaper prices and within 
the means of those who have hitherto been borrowers. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of 
the last report was twenty-nine thousand four hundred 
and forty-nine. There have been added during the year 
five hundred and forty-eight volumes by purchase, two 
hundred and thirty volumes by donation, and eighty 
volumes of periodicals have been bound, making the 
number of bound volumes in the library at the close of 
the present year twenty-eight thousand three hundred and 
twenty-nine, and the total number, including maps and 
pamphlets, thirty thousand three hundred and seven. 

Sixty-nine volumes have been withdrawn from circula- 
tion during the year, having become so worn and defaced 
as to be of no further service. None of these have as yet 
been replaced, but the trustees hope that they may be able 
to do so before many months. It becomes more and more 
difficult with each succeeding year to replace these worn- 
out books in the same edition, as has been the custom 
hitherto. 

The number of different periodicals regularly received 



204 

at the library during the year has been seventy-one, and 
as the various volumes have been completed they have 
been bound and placed upon the shelves for circulation. 

A list of the books presented to the library during the 
year, together with the names of the persons presenting 
them, will be found annexed to the report of the librarian. 
To those who have thus aided in the increase and useful- 
ness of the library, the trustees return the thanks of the 
city. 

The City Councils having appropriated a sum sufficient 
for the purpose, the trustees, in the early part of the year, 
purchased of Mr. 8. C. Gould his valuable files of news- 
papers published in this city, alluded to in the last report 
of the board. These newspapers comprise files partially 
complete from 1839 to 1862, and complete from 1863 to 
1886. During the year these papers have been carefully 
looked over and arranged in years and volumes, and when 
found perfect have been sent to the bindery. Of the 
newspapers that have been published regularly in the city 
there will be about one hundred and forty-five complete 
volumes, and in addition there will be about forty vol- 
umes of perfect files of miscellaneous papers which have 
been published in the city but now discontinued. These 
papers, containing, as they do, a history of the growth 
and prosperity of the city, are an important addition to 
the library, the value and usefulness of which will 
increase with time. 

During the early part of the summer the Mayor received 
a communication from Mr. J. Henry Stickney, of Balti- 
more, Md., offering to donate to the library a framed oil 
painting of the residence of the Hon. Samuel Blodget, 
which formerly stood on the east bank of the Merrimack 
River in this city. This offer having been accepted by 
the Mayor, Mr. Stickney forwarded the painting to the 



205 

library, and by direction of the trustees the same has been 
suspended upon the walls in the reading-room. Subse- 
quently, at a convention of the aldermen of the city and 
the trustees of the library, the thanks of the city were 
tendered to Mr. Stickney for his donation. 

In July last, Mr. James E. Arthur, who for some time 
had been employed as an assistant to the librarian, having 
obtained a more lucrative position, tendered his resigna- 
tion. Mr. Harvey E. Martin, who had formerly been 
employed at the library, has temporarily taken the place 
of Mr. Arthur. 

The trustees are pleased to report that no circum- 
stance has occurred during the year to disturb the har- 
monious operation of the library, or to call for any 
unusual action on the part of the board. The duties of 
librarian have been discharged by Mrs. Buncher with the 
same fidelity as in the past, and to the satisfaction of the 
trustees. 

In closing this report the trustees would again call the 
attention of the City Councils to the pressing need of a 
new catalogue of the library. The second volume of 
the present catalogue was published nearly ten years ago, 
since which time eight thousand and six hundred books 
have been added to the library. The public have no proper 
facilities of obtaining a knowledge of these accessions, 
and unless such facilities are furnished it is useless to ex- 
pect that the influence of the library in the community 
can be greatly increased, or that it will accomplish the 
purpose for which it was established. The publication of 
a supplementary catalogue containing these accessions 
would, perhaps, afford temporary relief, but would be of 
doubtful expediency in view of the fact that complaints 
are already made by the patrons of the library of the 
annoyance and inconvenience experienced in the use of 



206 

the two volumes of catalogues heretofore published. 
The time, too, is rapidly approaching when the library 
must be re-arranged and reclassified, and when this is 
done a new catalogue of the whole library will be re- 
quired. In their last report, the trustees expressed the 
belief " that an entire new catalogue of all the books 
in the library would best meet the needs of those fre- 
quenting the library, and greatly extend its influence and 
usefulness in the community." The consideration of 
this subject during the year has only served to confirm 
the trustees in the belief that in the end this course 
would be the most economical and advantageous to pur- 
sue for all concerned. 

The trustees, therefore, hope that the City Councils will 
give this subject their early attention, and appropriate a 
sum, that, with the balance heretofore appropriated, will 
be sufficient to enable the trustees to arrange for the com- 
pilation and printing of a new catalogue. 

February 17, 1888. 
In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered to 
be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and 
transmitted to the City Councils. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor. 
Nathan P. Hunt, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following 
account of the receipts and expenditures by the board 
of the funds received on account of the City Library : 

1887. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation . $630 46 
Mrs. M. J. Buncher, for cata- 
logues, etc. ... 17 78 
Mrs. M. J. Buncher, for bal- 
ance of fines ... 68 41 
appropriation for 1887 for 

books 1,000 00 

Jan. 1. balance of income of 

Dean fund . $4,813 00 

income of Dean fund 153 00 
July 1. income of Dean fund 153 00 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income 224 59 

$5,343 59 



Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000 00 
balance of interest 
on Mary E. Elliot 
fund . . .115 62 

April 1. interest on Mary E. 

Elliot fund . . 90 00 



208 



April 1. 


To interest on accumu- 
lation of income 
Mary E. Elliot 
fund . . . |5 11 


r 

■ $2,210 79 








$9,271 03 


1887. 




Or. 


Jan. 5. 


Paid New England News Co. 






periodicals 


$10 46 


5. 


S. C. Gould, books 


2 00 


8. 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 






books 


32 00 


12. 


W. H. Thompson, Dear 


L 




fund, books 


40 00 


23. 


L. A. Sawyer, books . 


11 50 


Feb. 2. 


W. H. Briggs, Tr., books 


5 00 


4. 


New England News Co. 






periodicals 


12 52 


9. 


Laughton, Macdonald & Co.. 






books . 


21 90 


9. 


Chas. C. Soule, periodicals 


5 00 


10. 


Laughton, Macdonald & Co., 






books . 


4 50 


14. 


Chas. M. Moody, books 


4 50 


23. 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 






books . 


5 50 


March 1. 


Geo. H. Polley & Co., pe- 






riodicals . 


6 00 


4. 


¥m, H. Stevenson, period- 






icals . 


5 00 


4. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


12 02 



209 



March 9. Paid Sampson, Murdock & Co., 
books . 
9. John N. McClintock, books 

April 1. Little, Brown & Co., books 

1. Geo. E. Littlefield, books 

1. D. Appleton & Co., books 

5. New England NeWs Co. 

periodicals 

6. D. Appleton & Co., books 
May 4. New England News Co. 

periodicals 
9. Laughton, Macdonald & Co. 

books 

24. Little, Brown & Co., books 
June 4. New England News Co. 

periodicals 
22. Estes & Lauriat, books 

25. Laughton, Macdonald & Co. 

books 
July 6. New England News Co. 

periodicals 

19. D. Appleton & Co., books 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
New England News Co. 

periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Estes & Lauriat, books 
Estes & Lauriat, books 
S. C. Gould, books 
' New England News Co. 

periodicals 

20. Laughton, Macdonald & Co. 
books 



Aug. 


3. 
3. 




5. 




10. 


Sept. 


1. 

7. 




12. 



$1 50 
2 00 
4 25 

13 03 

14 75 

15 93 

4 67 

13 30 



4 


50 


7 


00 


1 


69 


9 


00 



167 36 



12 


58 


5 


00 


3 


50 


13 


93 


125 


00 


18 


00 


75 


70 


2 


62 



12 13 



30 33 



210 



Oct. 3. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



12. 

19. 

26. 

29. 

5. 

6. 

22. 



31. 



Paid New England News Co., 
periodicals 
New England News Co., 

periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Wm. H. Briggs, Tr., books 
Estes & Lauriat, books 
Geo. E. Littlefield, books . 
New England News Co., 

periodicals 
Laughton, Macdonald & Co., 
books .... 
Little, Brown & Co., Dean 

fund, books 
Estes & Lauriat, books 
By balance of appropriation 
balance of Dean fund . 
balance of Mary E. Elliot 
fund and interest 



$11 71 



13 


86 


3 


75 


5 


00 


173 


00 


9 


87 


9 


70 


5 


00 


327 


31 


4 


50 


764 59 


4,976 


28 


2,210 


79 



,271 03 



The expenditures made for the incidental expenses 
of the library for the year ending December 31, 1887, 
the items of which appear at length in the annual report 
of the city, have been as follows : 



Services of librarian 


. 






$800 00 


Services of assistant to librarian 






289 75 


Gas 






259 04 


Insurance 






, . 






]00 00 


Binding 






, . 






106 11 


Rebinding 






. 






178 52 


Fuel . 






. 






605 86 


Newspapers 






. 






300 00 


Water . 






. 






16 00 



211 ' 

Printing $11 00 

Supplies 41 50 

Incidentals ....... 11 25 





$2,719 03 


RECAPITULATION. 




Balance Dec. 31, 1886 .... 


. $1,153 00 


Appropriation for 1887 


3,800 00 



$4,953 00 

Paid trustees, purchase of books . $1,000 00 

Paid incidental expenses . . 2,719 03 

Balance Dec. 31, 1887 . . . 1,233 97 

$4,953 00 

Respectfully submitted. 

NATHAN P. HUNT, 

Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library. 



December 31, 1887. 
We have examined the foregoing report, and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 31, 1887. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of 
receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing 
report of the Treasurer of the Trustees of the City 
Library, and find the same correctly cast and properly 
vouched. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

I respectfully submit to you the thirty-fourth annual 
report of the City Library, showing the work of the year 
ending December 31, 1887. 

Whole number of volumes Dec. 31, 1886 . 29,449 

Accessions during the year : 

By purchase .... 548 

Donated 230 

Periodicals .... 80 



Whole number of volumes at present : 

Maps ..... 16 

Pamphlets .... 1,962 

Bound volumes . . . 28,329 



30,307 



Number of periodicals and papers regularly 

received during the year ..... 71 

Number received by gift .... 12 

Number of days open to the public . . 307 

Days open for the delivery of books . . 307 
Number of volumes delivered during the year 

for home use ...... 50,335 

Average per day 164 

Largest number any one day, — March 12 . 435 



213 



Largest Dumber any one month, — March 
Number of books, magazines, etc., used in 

the library during the year 
Average per day 
Number of guaranties received during the 

year . 

"Whole number since new registration . 
Number of cards returned to the library by 

persons leaving the city 
Number of cards used on deposit . 
Postals sent to delinquents 
Number of books unfit for longer use and 

removed from the shelves . 
Books lost, destroyed or injured, and paid for 
Number of volumes repaired at bindery 
Volumes repaired and covered in the library 
Books returned, missing at former examina 

tions ....... 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 1, 1886 . 
Amount received from Jan. 1, to Dec. 31, 1887 

Amount paid for express, stationery 

and other incidental expenses . $55.37 
Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . . 68.41 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1887 . 

Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1886, for 
catalogues and supplements sold and for lost 
and injured books 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1887: 

For 1 large catalogue at 75 cts. $0.75 

For 1 small catalogue at 35 cts. .35 



5,456 

5,665 
18.45 

490 
6,460 

89 

12 

461 

69 

10 

587 

4,016 



.41 
107.12 

$175.53 



$123.78 
$51.75 



17.78 



214 

For 8 supplements at 15 cts. . $1.20 
For 10 books lost or injured, 

and paid for ... 12.05 



$14.35 



$32.13 
Paid K P. Hunt, treasurer . . . . 17.78 



$14.35 
Balance of fines on hand . . . . 51.75 



Total balance on hand . . $66.10 

I am aware that in presenting another report for your 
acceptance, it will appear in its general features a dupli- 
cate of former ones. The work from year to year is so 
uniform, and the changes so few, that it is difficult to pre- 
sent anything especially new. The statistics for the past 
year compare favorably with former ones, although the 
circulation shows a decrease, as in 1886. Reports from 
other libraries show the same conditions, especially in man- 
ufacturing cities. In addition to the one cause given in 
my last report, viz., the great need of a new catalogue, 
two others have been suggested which undoubtedly have 
their influence, — the constant increase of foreign popu- 
lation (not a reading class), and the market so flooded by 
cheap books (not necessarily cheap in character, but 
good literature in cheap form), that many prefer to pur- 
chase rather than borrow and return at the library. 
There are at present in the library over one hundred cards 
belonging to residents, not in use, and about the same 
number have been returned by persons leaving the city. 
Many of the patrons use their cards so spasmodically 
that it is difficult to determine how many are in constant 
use. 



215 

The number of books, magazines, etc., delivered for 
use in the reading-room is a little larger than last year, 
and does not include the use of reference books consulted 
in the interior department of the library. There is still 
room for improvement in the deportment of many of the 
young people who visit the reading-room. They seem to 
forget it is a resort for quiet reading, and oblige us fre- 
quently to call their attention to the fact. 

The accession the past year by purchase is five hun- 
dred and forty-eight. Of this number one hundred and 
thirty-five belong to the " Dean Donation," and are books 
of the same character as former purchases from the 
Dean fund, viz., pertaining to science and the mechanic 
arts. 

The number of books donated and entered in the 
accession book show somewhat less than the real num- 
ber received, as it does not include a large number of 
duplicate books sent us by resident gentlemen of our 
city, mostly public documents. 

The departments at Washington have, as usual, favored 
us with a large number of public documents, and sent us 
many valuable publications to fill vacancies. In exchange 
we have returned to the same a large number of dupli- 
cate documents to supply deficiencies in other libraries. 

Of the seventy-one periodicals and papers regularly 
received during the year, twelve were donations from 
the several publishers, for which our sincere acknowledg- 
ments have been returned. 

The number of books taken from the shelves, literally 
worn out, is about the same as last year, and there are 
many still in circulation in a wretched condition and 
ought to be withdrawn, but owing to their popularity 
are suffered to remain until they may possibly be re- 
placed. 



216 

The covering and repairing of the books constitute no 
inconsiderable part of the general work of the library. 
The wear and tear are very great. Beside the five hun- 
dred and eighty-seven rebound and repaired at the 
bindery, four thousand and sixteen have been repaired 
and covered at the library. 

The number of books missing at the semi-annual 
examinations was six : fiction, three ; bound magazines, 
two; classical, one. The latter, we have reason to believe, 
will be returned. 

In conclusion, I would again return sincere acknowl- 
edgments to the Board of Trustees for their continued 
kindness and co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Mks. M. J. BUNCHER, 
Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY 

From January 1 to December 31, 1887. 



Hon. James F. Briggs, Manchester, N. H. 

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Ar- 
mies during the Rebellion. Vol. 17, part 2; Vols. 
18 and 19, parts 1 and 2. 4 vols. 1887. 8vo. 

Hon. P. C. Cheney, Manchester, N. H. 

Rambles in Europe. By L. A. Morrison. 1887. 12mo. 

John B. Clarke, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Vacation Excursion from Massachusetts Bay to Puget 
Sound in 1884. By Mrs. John B. Clarke. 1887. 
16mo. 

Herbert E. Missinge, Manchester, 1ST. H. 

Life and Public Services of James G. Blaine. By 
Russell H. Conwall. 12mo. 

Charles F. Livingston, Manchester, N. H. . 
Printer's Circular. Vol. 21. 1886. 12mo. 
Springfield Republican for the year 1886. Folio. ■ 

Irving A. Watson, M. D., Concord, 1ST. H. 

Third and Fourth Annual Reports of the State Board 
of Health of New Hampshire. 1884 and 1885. 2 
vols. 8vo. 

William Sims, Esq., Secretary. 

Fifth Biennial Report of the. State Board of Agricul- 
ture, Kansas. Vol. 10. 1885-86. 8vo. 



218 

C. M. Solman, Esq., Providence, R. I. 

The Epitome of Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pa. 
Vol. 13. 1887. 8vo. 

Theodore Sutro, Esq., New York. 

The Sutro Tunnel. Report of the Stockholders. 
1887. 12mo. 

George W. Varnum, Manchester, 1ST. H. 

Forty-first Annual Report of the Superintendent of 
Public Instruction in New Hampshire. 2 vols. 
1887. 8vo. 

Seventy-first Annual Report of the Asylum, Hart- 
ford, Conn., for the Education of the Deaf and 
Dumb. 1887. 2 Pamphlets. 

Dedication of the Statue of Daniel "Webster, June 
17, 1886. Pamphlet. 

S. C. Gould, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Notes and Queries. Vol. 4. 1887. 8vo. 

The Staff of Adam, and the Shem Hammephorash. 

Read before the Massachusetts College, Boston, 

June 2, 1887. Pamphlet. 

Sawyer Free Library, Gloucester, Mass. 

The West Roxbury Park. 1873-87. 8vo. 

Alfred Gilman, Esq., Lowell, Mass. 

Contributions of the " Old Residents' Plistorical So- 
ciety." No. 4. Vol. 3. 1887. Pamphlet. 

Woman's C. T. IT., Manchester, N. H. 

Medical Temperance Journal, for the year 1887. 

12mo. 
Thirteenth Annual Report of the W. C. T. U. 1886. 

Pamphlet. " 



219 

Y. M. C. A., Meriden, Conn. 

Catalogue of the Y. M. C. Association Library. 
1887. 8vo. 

Nevins Memorial Library, Methuen, Mass. 

Catalogue of the Nevins Memorial Library. Prepared 
by Miss Harriet How Ames. 2 vols. 1887. 8vo. 

Joseph A. Stickney, Great Falls, N. H. 

A Collection of New Hampshire Registers, with 
note and comment therein. By Joseph A. Stick- 
ney. 12mo. 

A. S. Batchellor, Littleton, 1ST. H. 

Table of Representation of Apthorp and Littleton in 
the New Hampshire Provincial Congress and 
House of Representatives, 1775 to 1887. Pamphlet. 

Historical Address delivered at the Centennial Cel- 
ebration of the Incorporation of Littleton, N. H., 
July 4, 1884, by A. S. Batchellor. Pamphlet. 

E. M. Bowman, Esq., City Clerk, Nashua, N. H. 

Municipal Report of the City of Nashua, for the year 

1886. 12mo. 

Miss Elizabeth Blanchard, South Hadley, Mass. 

Fiftieth Annual Catalogue of Mt. Holyoke Seminary, 
South Hadley. 1886-87. Pamphlet. 

Joseph E. Bennett, Esq. 

Charter and By-Laws of Trinity Commandery of 
Knights Templar and the Appendant Orders. 

1887. 16mo. 

J. T. Fanning, Minneapolis. 

Report of the Red-River Valley Drainage in Minne- 
sota, with maps. Dec, 1886. Pamphlet. 



220 

William H. Stinson, Dumbarton, 1ST. H. 

Proceedings of the Thirteenth Annual Session of the 
New Hampshire State Grange. 1886. Pamphlet. 

Cobden Club, London. 

Fair Trade Unmasked. By George W. Medley. 
London. 1887. Pamphlet. 

Financial Reform Association, Liverpool. 

The Financial Reform Almanack for 1887. 8vo. 

University of California. 

Register of the University. 1886-87. Pamphlet. 

C. B. Spofford, Claremont, N. H. 

Proceedings of the New Hampshire Pharmaceuti cal 
Association, Sept. 27 and 28, 1887. Pamphlet. 

N. P. Hunt, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

Proceedings of the Grand Commandery of Knights 
Templar of New Hampshire for the year 1886. 
Vol. 5, part 3. Pamphlet. 
Annual Report of the County Commissioners of 
Hillsborough County for the year ending April 30, 
1887. 

Hon. John Hosley, Manchester, N. H. 

Inaugural Address of Hon. .John Hosley, Mayor, 
January 4, 1887. Pamphlet. 

K P. Kidder, Esq., City Clerk, Manchester, N. H. 

Municipal Report of the City of Manchester, N. H., 
for the year 1886. 12mo. 

George W. Morrison, Esq., Manchester, N. H. 

One hundred and forty-five volumes, consisting of 
Congressional Debates, Annals of Congress, Exe- 
cutive Documents, etc. 8vo. 



221 

City of Manchester, 1ST. H. 

State Papers of New Hampshire (Hammond.) Vol. 

15. Revolutionary War Rolls. Vol. 2. 8vo. 
Nine volumes of Municipal Reports of various cities 

in the United States. 8vo. 

From the Several Publishers. 

" The Dartmouth." Published by the Senior Class, 
Dartmouth College. For the year 1887. Vol. 8. 
8vo. 

" Good Health." A Journal of Hygiene. Published 
in Oakland, Cal. For the year 1887. 8vo. 

"The Manifesto." Published at Shaker Village, 
Canterbury, N. H. For the year 1887. 8vo. 

"Lake Village Times" (now the "Belknap Republi- 
can"). Published at Lake Village, 1ST. H., by Locke 
& Gould. For the year 1887. Folio. 

" Plymouth Record." Published at Plymouth, 
IN". H., by the Record Publishing Co. For the 
year 1887. Folio. 

" The Northwest." Vol. 5. Published at St. Paul, 
Minn., by E. V. Smalley. For the year 1887. 
Folio. 

" The Weirs Times and Tourists' Gazette." Pub- 
lished at the Weirs, Lake Winnipesaukee, N. H., 
during the summer months, by M. H. Calvert & 
Co. For the season, 1887. Folio. 

; 'The Veteran's Advocate." Published by Ira C. 
Evans, Concord, N. H. Presented by Mr. Harry 
Clifton of Manchester. For the year 1887. Folio. 

" The New Hampshire Catholic." Published in 
Manchester, N. H., by Chas. A. O'Connor, Esq. 
For the year 1887. Folio. 

" The Weekly Budget." Published in Manchester, 



222 

N. H., by Challis & Eastman. For the year 1886. 

Folio. 
" The Voice." A Temperance Journal. Published 

in New York, by Funk & Wagnall. For the year 

1887. Folio. 
" Lawrence Anzeiger." Published at Lawrence, 

Mass. For the year 1887. Folio. 

Miscellaneous Pamphlets. 

Annual Report of the Omaha Board of Trade for the 

years 1885, 1886, and 1887. Two pamphlets. 
Annual Report of the St. Paul's (Minn.) Chamber of 

Commerce for the year 1886. Pamphlet. 
Maverick National Bank Manual. Boston. 1887. 

12mo. 
Catalogues of Amherst College, 1821-85, and 

1886-87. Two pamphlets. 
What is Unitarianism ? Dec, 1886. Pamphlet. 

Reports from the Several Librarians or Boards of 
Trustees. 

Abington (South), Mass. Twelfth Annual Report, 

and Supplement to Catalogue. 1886. Pamphlet. 
Boston Public Library, for the year 1886. Pamphlet. 

Bulletins Nos. 3 and 4. Vol. 7. 1887. Two 

pamphlets. 
Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Library, year ending March 

31, 1887. Pamphlet. Music Catalogue, Nos. 1 

and 2. Jan., 1887. Pamphlet. Bulletin No. 25. 

March 1, 1886, to Nov. 1, 1887. Pamphlet. 
Brookline (Mass.) Public Library, for the year 1886. 

Pamphlet. 
Baltimore, Md. Peabody Institute, year ending June 

1, 1887. Pamphlet. 






223 

Chicago Public Library, year ending June, 1887. 

Pamphlet. 
Clinton, Mass. Bigelow Free Library, for the year 

1886. Pamphlet. 
Detroit, Mich. Historical Summary of the Reports 

of the Library Commission, including Report for 

the year 1886. Pamphlet. 
Dover (N. H.) Public Library, for the year 1886. 

Pamphlet. 
Germantown (Phila.) Friends' Free Library and 

Reading-room, for the year 1886. Pamphlet. 
Indianapolis (Ind.) Public Library, Sixth Report, from 

July 1, 1883, to June 30, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Lynn (Mass.) Public Library, for the year 1886. 

Pamphlet. 
Lawrence (Mass.) Free Public Library, for the year 

1886. Pamphlet. 
Manchester, Eng. Report of the Public Free Libra- 
ries, for the year 1886. Pamphlet. 
Melrose (Mass.) Free Public Library, for the year 

1886. Pamphlet. 
New York. Astor Library, for the year 1886. 

Pamphlet. 
New York. Mercantile Library Association, year 

ending April, 1887. Pamphlet. 
New York. Maimonides Library, for the year 1886. 

Pamphlet. 
Newton (Mass.) Free Public Library, for the year 

1886. Pamphlet. 
Omaha (Neb.) Public Library, for the year ending 

May 30, 1887. Pamphlet. 
Providence (R. I.) Public Library, for the year 1886. 

Second Supplement of the Finding List, 1887. 

Two pamphlets. 



224 

Philadelphia. Apprentices' Library Association, 

year ending April 1887. Pamphlet. 
Philadelphia Library Company, Bulletins (new series) 

Nos. 18 and 19. January-July, 1887. 
Pawtucket (R. I.) Free Public Library, for the year 

1886. Pamphlet. 
San Francisco (Cal.) Mercantile Library Association, 

year ending May 3, 1887. Pamphlet. 
Springfield (Mass.) City Library Association, year 

ending May 2, 1887. 
Swansea (Wales) Public Library and Gallery of Art, 

for the year 1886-87. Pamphlet. 
Utica, N. Y. Report of Public Schools, including 

Library Report, for the year ending Aug. 20, 1886. 

Pamphlet. 
"Windham, N. H., Nesmith Library, year ending 

March, 1887. Pamphlet. 
Woburn (Mass.) Public Library, year ending March 

1, 1887. Pamphlet. 
Worcester (Mass.) Public Library, for. year ending 

Nov. 30, 1886. Pamphlet. 

departments of congress. 

State Department. 

Nine volumes of Consular Reports (complete), 8vo, 

and several incomplete volumes, from 1880 to 1887 

inclusive. 
Index to Consular Reports No. 1 to No. 59. 1880-85. 

8vo. Twelve numbers of miscellaneous reports 

on the Commercial Relations of the United States. 

Pamphlets. 
A Digest of International Law of the United States. 

Edited by Francis Wharton, LL. D. 3 vols. 8vo. 



225 

Treasury Department. 

Report of the Comptroller of Currency for the year 
1886. 8vo. 

Report of the Secretary of the Treasury for the year 
1886. 8vo. 

Report on the Collection of Duties for the year 1886. 
8vo. 

Report of the Life-Saving Service for the year end- 
ing June 30, 1886. 8vo. 

Report of the Commissioner of Navigation, Novem- 
ber, 1886. 8vo. 

Reports of the Committee of Investigation sent in 
1873 by the Mexican government to the frontier of 
Texas. 8vo. 

The Republic of Mexico in 1876. By Antonia Garcia 
Cubas. 8vo. 

Report of the United States Geodetic Survey for the 
year 1885. 4to. 

Interior Department. 

Reports of the Geological Survey of the Territories, 
(Hayden), 1872, viz. : Tertiary Vertebrate, by 
Cope; Tertiary Flora, by Lesquereux. 3 vols. 
4to. 

Patent Office Reports. 3 vols. 8vo. 

Agricultural Reports. 2 vols. 8vo. 

Congressional Documents. Third session, 46th Con- 
gress. 2 vols. 8vo. (The above to supply vacan- 
cies in incomplete sets.) 

American Archives. Vols. 1, 2, 3, and 6. 1776. 4to. 

American State Papers. Vols. 1 and 2. 1832. 4to. 

Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office 
for the year 1887. 



226 

Annual Report of the United States Patent Office 

for the year 1886. 8vo. 
Second Annual Report of the Commissioners of 

Labor. 1886. 8vo. 
Report of the Receipts and Distribution of Public 

Documents in behalf of the Government. 1887. 

Pamphlet. 

War Department. 

Seven volumes (complete) of the " Daily Bulletins " 
of the Signal Service of the United States. 1872-73. 
4to. Several incomplete volumes also received. 

Bureau of Education. 

Report of the Commissioner of Education. 1884-85. 

8vo. 
Circular of Information of Bureau of Education. 

Nos. 1 and 2. 1886. 2 pamphlets. 
Historical Sketches of Universities and Colleges of 

the United States. Edited by Dr. Franklin B. 

Hough. Pamphlet. 

Smithsonian Institute. 

Fourth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology. 

J. W. Powell, Director. 1882-83. 4to. 
Miscellaneous Collections, Smithsonian Institute. 

Vols. 28, 29, and 30. 8vo. 
Report of the Smithsonian Institution for the year 

ending July, 1885. 8vo. 

United States Commission of Fish and Fisheries. 

Reports,' parts 2 and 3. 1872-73, and 1874-75. 

Scientific Examination of the German Seas. 1879. 

Bulletin of the United States Commission of Fish 
and Fisheries, viz. : Gill-Nets in the Cod Fishery, 
etc. By Capt. J. W. Collins. 1881. Pamphlet. 



227 

United States Congress. 

Ninety-four volumes of Public Documents of the 
Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, and Forty-ninth Con- 
gresses. 

J. Henry Stickney, Esq. 

One oil painting, viz., " The Blodget House," Man- 
chester, K". H. From a sketch made in 1810 by 
Thomas Stickney, Esq. Painted by his grand- 
daughter. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



.Engineer's Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1887. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : 

In compliance with the laws and ordinances of the city 
I herewith submit the annual report of the Manchester 
Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 1887. 

Appended thereto will be found a detailed statement of 
the list of fires and alarms that have occurred during the 
year to which the department has responded, with the 
amount of losses and insurance paid, as near as can be 
ascertained ; an inventory of the property of the depart- 
ment; rolls of the officers and members of the several 
companies; number and location of the fire-alarm signal 
boxes; location of hydrants, etc. 

The department as a whole or in part has responded 
to twenty-seven bell alarms and twenty-three " stills," the 
latter having been conveyed to the central station by tele- 
phone and otherwise. 

In addition to the foregoing, a telephone call came from 
Suncook, May 10, at 4.55 p. m., and through the courtesy 
of Joseph W. Hildreth, of the Concord Railroad, special 



232 

cars were soon in readiness, taking N. S. Bean Steamer 
!Nb. 4 and a detail of ten men. On arriving at Suncook 
the steamer was unloaded, but before reaching the village 
word was sent that the fire was under control. 

The aggregate losses within the city limits at the fires 
to which the department has responded are $17,919, on 
which insurance has been allowed to the amount of $13,- 
111, leaving a net loss uncovered by insurance of $4,808. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The present organization of the department includes 
one hundred and twenty members, as follows : 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

5 Steam Fire-engine Companies, — 14 men each. 

1 Horse Hose Company, — 20 men. 

2 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 
1 Chemical Engine Company, — 4 men. 

1 Hook-and-Ladder Company, — 25 men. 

In addition to the above is a volunteer hand hose com- 
pany, formerly of twenty men, but at present of only six- 
teen. 

Early the coming season, and probably before this 
report appears in printed form, Merrimack Hose Com- 
pany No. 4 will be changed to Merrimack Steamer Com- 
pany No. 3, an Amoskeag second-class engine having 
been purchased a few months since, and horses and har- 
nesses for the same within a few weeks, in accordance 
with a recommendation made in my last year's report. 

NEW ENGINE-HOUSE. 

The Webster-street engine-house at the north end, a 
substantial three-story brick building contracted for a 



233 

little more than a year ago, is nearly or quite completed, 
although not yet turned over to the city. It is thought 
that by the tirst of April next this house will be furnished 
with a steamer, hose-carriage, and all the necessary equip- 
ments (an order having already passed to that effect), and 
a company formed for the same. This will fill a long felt 
want for this rapidly growing section of the city. 

FIRE PROTECTION IN BLOCKS. 

1 think there is no city of the size of ours where so 
little attention is given to fire protection in business and 
tenement blocks as in this. Aside from the mills and 
buildings used for manufacturing purposes, there is 
scarcely a block or place of business supplied with either 
buckets, pails, axes, bars, fire-extinguishers, or hose, in 
places easy of access, that might in many cases be used to 
great advantage in the early stages of fires, where by 
their use considerable damage might be saved. Most or 
all of these can be supplied at no great cost, and they 
would more than repay the expenditure incurred. 

THE APPARATUS 

as at present located, consists of — 

2 Steam Fire-engines, Central Fire Station. 

1 Steam Fire-engine and Horse Hose Carriage attached, 
Korth Main street, 'Squog. 

1 Steam Fire-engine and Horse Hose Carriage attached, 
at corner of Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

* 2 Hook-and-Ladder Trucks, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Double Tank (60 gallons each) Chemical Engine, at 
Central Fire Station. 

*1 Reserve Truck. 



234 

1 Supply Wagon, at Central Fire Station. 

1 'Horse Hose Carriage, corner Maple and East High 
streets. 

1 Hose Wagon and 1 Steam Fire-engine (reserve) at 
old engine-house on Clinton street, 'Squog. 

1 Hand Hose Carriage, at junction of Old Falls road 
and Front street, 'Skeag. 

1 Two-wheeled Hose Carriage, Derry Mills, Goffe's 
Falls, manned by men at the mills. 

During September and October, the steamers, hose 
carriages, hook-and-ladder truck, and chemical engine 
were " touched up " and varnished. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

The main lines, of twenty-seven miles, are divided into 
seven circuits, constructed of No. 12 hard drawn copper 
wire, and consist of 1 automatic eight-circuit repeater, 
46 signal boxes, 7 tower-strikers, 8 engine-house gongs, 
8 indicators, 5 engineers' gongs, and 7 gongs and tappers 
on the corporations. 

It has worked quite satisfactorily, with but one or two 
exceptions, and those were occasioned by the extreme 
changes of temperature, causing some of the tower-strikers 
to work slowly or not at all. 

Considerable trouble has been caused by " dead " wires 
carelessly constructed and left loosely hanging from poles, 
buildings, and trees, causing " grounds " and " crosses." I 
trust some action will be taken by the councils, not allow- 
ing " dead " wires to remain suspended, as annoyances 
from " live " telephone wires are liable to be frequent 
enough. 

There has just been completed, at an expense of three 
thousand dollars, an " Individual," or Tapper, fire-alarm, 
by putting 100 gongs into the residences of the firemen. 



235 

This system is constructed of the same size and quality of 
wire as the main lines, and contains about twenty-six 
miles of wire. This addition will greatly increase the 
electrical work of this department, it taking about 40 
per cent more battery power than the main lines, and 
contains more instruments. It will require constant and 
careful attention to keep it in working order. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I earnestly recommend two or three one-horse light 
hook-and-ladder trucks, carrying lighter and shorter lad- 
ders than the one at the central station, that such loca- 
tions as 'Squog and Hallsville might be equipped without 
necessitating the running of the heavy truck such distances 
on first alarms. Some provision for ladders at the north 
end ought to receive early attention, but this locality does 
not require such immediate attention as the two first men- 
tioned places. 

The protective department, urged so many times by my- 
self and my predecessors in office, is a long felt want, and 
in many localities within our city limits would, in case of 
fire, well repay the equipping of such a branch of the fire 
service. 

I hope the time is not far distant when permanent en- 
gineers will be detailed to each of the steamers. 

I would recommend that a veterinary be employed at a 
stated yearly sum to visit all the horses weekly, and 
oftener if necessary. Such an outlay, I have no doubt, 
would well repay the city. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The eighth annual parade occurred on Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 11, and was considered as successful as the preceding 
ones, although the appropriation for the same is rather 



236 



meager considering the department, with volunteer com- 
pany in Amoskeag, numbers one hundred and forty 
against one hundred and two when the parade was first 
established, while the appropriation remains the same. 

firemen's relief association 

has received numerous donations from liberal-hearted 
citizens who appreciate the services of our firemen as 
well as the aims of the association. 

The following is a statement of the treasury : 

Balance on hand last year .... $1,531 21 

Received for membership . . . . 10 00 

for interest on deposits . . . 69 04 

donation, Mrs. C. E. Balch . . ' 100 00 

P. C. Cheney Co. . 25 00 

Merrimack Hose Co. 

No. 4 . . . . 25 00 

Hon. G. B. Chandler . 25 00 

Henry Chandler . . 25 00 

Hon. P. C. Cheney . 25 00 

Col. Waterman Smith . 20 00 

Hon. Moody Currier . 10 00 

Col. B. C. Dean . 10 00 

Edwin F. Jones . 10 00 

Josiah G. Dearborn . 10 00 



From which have been paid : 
Secretary's salary .... 
Postal cards and printing 
Benefit paid F. J. Dustin (on account 

of accident) ..... 

Balance in treasury 





$1,895 25 


$25 00 
2 25 




20 25 


$47 50 





.,847 75 



237 

"W". P. Emerson, of Hose jSTo. 4, is now on the sick list 
from result of injuries, which will reduce the above 
amount. 

CONCLUSION. 

The entire membership of the department desire to ex- 
press their appreciation to General Charles Williams, for 
his generosity in furnishing for the past two years all the 
coffee (with milk and sifgar) that could be used at fires, 
with the only limit of " be sure and have enough.'" 

In responding to an alarm from box 36, November 23, 
Steamer 4 was overturned in rounding the corner of Con- 
cord and Vine streets, the engine damaged to the extent 
of $156.75, and the driver, Frank J. Dustin, bruised so as 
to be off duty for about three weeks. No blame is at- 
tached to the driver, as he was doing his best to avoid a 
collision with the many teams standing on the sides of 
Concord street. It is remarkable that no more serious 
damage was done to either himself, the engine, or other 
teams. 

Merrimack Hose Carriage No. 4, in responding to an 
alarm from box 32, December 31, owing to the extremely 
icy condition of the streets, overturned at the corner of 
Lake Avenue and Maple streets, damaging the carriage 
to the extent of only a few dollars, while the clerk of 
the company, Mr. W. P. Emerson, who was on the reel, 
received severe injuries to one knee that will probably 
disable him for a number of weeks. 

While we congratulate the department upon no more 
serious accidents to its members during the year, we 
are sorry to record the death of an aged lady, Mrs. 
Margaret Fahey, who was struck by the horse of Hose 
4, while laying a line of hose from a hydrant at the 
time of an alarm from box 4, on the 30th of November. 



238 

E"o blame is attached to the driver, as the evening was 
dark, and the lady was evidently crowded into the street 
by the throng upon the sidewalk and was not seen by 
him until struck by the horse. 

At the beginning of the year, the call-members' pay 
was increased $25, making their present salary $100, 
This increase is well merited, as a majority of the mem- 
bers have seen many years of fire service in the depart- 
ment, and long and continued service in any one line 
usually familiarizes one with their duties, and the better 
fits them to perform them ; and I think there are but few 
exceptions to this rule within our membership, thus 
sustaining that efficiency long ago accredited to them. 

In closing, I desire to convey to your honorable body 
my sincere thanks for the courtesies received at your 
hands ; to the assistant engineers, my full appreciation 
for their promptness and willingness to aid at all times ; 
to the officers and men, my heartfelt thanks for the 
material assistance they have rendered in time of need; 
to the police force, for assisting in preserving order at 
fires, and their vigilance in discovering fires and pre- 
venting needless alarms. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOS. W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Fire Department. 



239 



FIRES AND ALARMS DURING 1887, WITH 
LOSSES AND INSURANCE PAID. 

Sunday, January 2, 6.20 p. m. Still. Two-story tene- 
ment block, Nos. 28-32 Bridge street, owned by Hon. 
J. W. Fellows, occupied by Frank C. Shea as a saloon, 
and several French families as tenements. Fire origi- 
nated in tenement of P. B. Berube, and was confined 
to the partitions. Chemical Engine, Pennacook Hose, 
and Hook-and-Ladder responded, but the fire was ex- 
tinguished by Chemical Engine Co. Damage, $75. In- 
surance paid, $75. Cause, defective chimney. 

Friday, January 7, 5.20 p. m. Box 7. Two-story tene- 
ment block No. 33 Washington street, owned by William 
Dunn, and occupied by Frank J. Dunn as a tenement. 
Fire originated in a closet on first floor, and ascended 
to the roof in the partitions. Apparatus present, Steam- 
ers 1 and 4, Hose 1, Hook-and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1. 
Extinguished by Chemical Engine Co. Damage, $150. 
No insurance. Cause, defective chimney. 

Friday, January 7, 8.43 p. m. Box 53. Cottage house 
at corner of Mast road and Mast street, 'Squog, owned 
by Hiram S. Hoitt, and occupied by him and Frank H. 
Davis. The fire originated around the chimney, in the 
attic of east end of L, and communicated, under the roof, 
to main building. Apparatus present, Steamer 2, Hose 
1 and 3, Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical 1. Damage to 
Hoitt's house and furniture, $600; insurance paid, $600. 
Davis, to furniture, $200 ; no insurance. Cause, defective 
chimney. 

Saturday, January 8, 9.20 p. m. Box 16. Church, cor- 
ner of Concord and Union streets, owned and occupied 
by First Baptist Society. The fire originated in the 
basement, from an overheated furnace. Damage, $1,067. 
Insurance paid, $1,067. 



240 

Wednesday, January 12, 6.10 p. m. Box 4. Two-story 
tenement block, No. 74 Lake avenue, owned by Hon. John 
Hosley, and occupied by several families. Fire originated 
in tenement occupied by John Downing, rear of No. 74, 
and was merely some burning paper upon a table. 
Caused by carelessness, and was extinguished before the 
arrival of department. No damage. 

Saturday, January 22, 5.25 p. m. Still. Five-story 
brick block, corner of Elm and Hanover streets, owned 
by John A. Riddle, occupied for stores, tenements, and 
offices. Fire originated in basement of 889 Elm street, 
occupied by Frederick H. Roberts, confectioner, caused 
by kettle melting. Chemical Engine responded. Dam- 
age, $6. Insurance paid, #6. 

Sunday, January 23, 8.35 a. m. Box 81. Opera House 
block. The fire originated in a partition between two 
radiators, in rooms occupied by Charles Howard on the 
second floor. Damage, $100. Insurance paid, $75. 

Sunday, January 23, 12.05 p. m. Still. Two-story 
brick block, corner of Elm and Spring streets, leased by 
Higgins Brothers. Salvation Army barracks were full 
of smoke, and word was sent to Central Station. Chem- 
ical Engine responded. Nothing was discovered except 
an open chimney hole, out of which poured smoke from 
a stove on floor above. 

Friday, January 28, 6.10 p. m. Box 71. Two-story 
tenement block, No. 126 East Spruce street, owned by 
E. M. James. Some children playing in attic of tene- 
ment occupied by Mrs. Wilkins, overturned a lamp. 
No damage. 

Saturday, January 29, 5.57 a. m. Box 6. Three-story 
tenement block at No. 49 Manchester street. Tenement 
occupied by Edward Calfred. A person was filling a 
kerosene lamp while burning, which caught fire, but was 
extinguished without damage. 



241 

Monday, January 31, 1.39 a. m, Box 15. Two-story 
wooden building, No. 490 Chestnut street, owned by C. S. 
Fisher, and occupied by Mrs. N. J. Davison as boarding- 
house. Fire originated in basement near water-closet, 
from some cause unknown. Apparatus present, Steamers 
1 and 4, Hose 1, 2, 4, Hook-and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 
1. Damage, $900. Insurance paid, $750. 

Monday, January 31, 10.16 p. m. Still. Chemical En- 
gine called for burning chimney at north end of Stark 
block. No damage. 

Wednesday, February 2, 4.43 a. m. Box 15. Three-story 
wooden tenement block, Nos. 50-56 Pearl street, owned 
by Charles C. Hayes, and occupied by fourteen families. 
Fire originated in tenement occupied by Temple Pray, in 
northern section of block. The building having a " bal- 
loon " frame, was on fire from " cellar to garret " at one 
and the same time, but was confined to the northerly sec- 
tion. Apparatus present, Steamer 1, Hose 1, 2, and 4, 
Hook-and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1. Damage, $900. 
Insurance paid, $750. Cause, unknown. 

Friday, February 4, 2.25 a. m. Box 113. Three-story 
wooden dwelling-house, corner of Myrtle and Russell 
streets, owned and occupied by Dr. C. M. Dodge. The 
fire originated in the cellar, probably from a misplaced 
funnel of the furnace. Apparatus present, Steamer 1, 
Hose 1, 2, and 4, Hook-and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1. 
Building nearly a total loss. Damage, $12,000. Insur- 
ance paid, $8,572. 

Sunday, February 6, 12.50 a. m. Box 314. Waste Mill 
in Amoskeag Village, owned and occupied by P. C. Che- 
ney Company. Apparatus present, Steamer 1, Hose 1, 
Hook-and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1. Damage, $500. No 
insurance. Cause, spontaneous combustion. 

Saturday, February 12, 8.03 a. m. Still. Chemical 

16 



242 

Engine was called to a burning chimney, No. 371 Chest- 
nut street, tenement block owned by Isaac Huse. No 
damage. 

Monday, February 21, 9.50 p. m. Box 6. Four-story 
brick block, Hanover street. Fire originated in millinery 
store of Mrs. M. A. Barton, No. 49, from some cause un- 
accounted for. Apparatus present, Steamer 4, Hose 1 
and 4, Hook-and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1. Damage, 
$616. Insurance paid, $616. 

Monday, March 14, 10.24 p. m. Box 4. Four-story 
wooden tenement block, No. 571 Elm street, owned by 
Blodgett & Clark, occupied by several families. A kero- 
sene lamp exploded, burning Mrs. Julia Berry in such a 
manner that she died in few hours. The flames were 
extinguished without damage to building, before the 
arrival of the department. 

Wednesday, March 16, 3.50 a. m. Still. Four-story 
brick block, No. 22 Concord street, owned by Riddle & 
Chandlers. Kerosene lamp exploded in printing-office of 
L. M. Beauregard, on second floor. Extinguished by 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1. Damage, $90. Insurance 
paid, $90. 

Monday, March 28, 8.05 p. m. Box 23. Four-story 
tenement block, No. 418 Union street, owned by Burke 
& Gooley. Fire originated in room on second floor occu- 
pied by Max Heirschfield for storage of dry goods. Ex- 
tinguished with pails before arrival of department. Dam- 
age claimed to be $50. Fully insured. Cause, unknown. 

Thursday, April 7, 2.15 p. m. Box 313. Four-story 
brick tenement block on McGregor street, owned by 
Lewis K. Mead. Fire originated in a bed in tenement 
occupied by Clement Malieu, from some cause unknown, 
and was extinguished with pails before the arrival of the 
department. 



243 

Thursday, A}ml 28, 7 a. m. Still. Three-story tene- 
ment block, No. 191 Hanover street, owned by Hon. Fred- 
erick Smyth. Chemical Engine was called for a burning 
chimney. No damage. 

Thursday, May 19, 7.18 p. m. Box 5. Two-story wooden 
tenement house, No. 60 Merrimack street, owned by Wil- 
liam P. Merrill, and occupied by Victor Deslauniers, 
where the fire originated in a closet, from some cause 
unknown. Extinguished by Chemical Engine. Appa- 
ratus responding, Steamers 1 and 4, Hose 1 and 4, Hook- 
and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1. Damage, $10. No insur- 
ance. 

Saturday, May 21, 7.50 p. m. Box 4. Three-story wooden 
block, No. 24 Spruce street. Mrs. Ellen Knight was fill- 
ing kerosene lamp, which exploded, burning her so that 
she died in a few hours. No damage resulted to building 
or furniture. 

Monday, June 27, 9.20 p. m. Still. Chemical Engine 
called for overturned lamp in a tenement in alley off 
Bridge street. Extinguished without their aid. No 
damage. 

Wednesday, June 29, 12.35 a. m. Box 4. Four-story 
brick hotel, corner of Elm and Granite streets, owned by 
A. C. Wallace, and known as " Hotel Belmont." The 
bed in room 38, occupied by Peter Collins of Bangor, Me., 
took fire from some unknown cause. Damage, $45. In- 
surance paid, $45. 

Tuesday, July 5, 2.45 p. m. Still. Shed in rear of 
No. 28 Concord street, owned by Michael McCabe. Hose 
1, Hook-and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1 responded. Ex- 
tinguished without damage. Cause, sparks. 

Sunday, July 10, 9 a. m. Still. Chemical Engine 
called to Church street, near Washington, for a burning 
chimney. No fire, no damage, no cause for alarm. 



244 

Monday, August 8, 1.48 p. m. Still. Chemical Engine 
called to Morris block, corner Elm and Hanover, for a 
smoky chimney. No damage. 

Monday, August 8, 7.30 p. m. Still. Opera block, 24 
Hanover street, store occupied by George Blanchet. 
Dry goods; show window caught fire from gas jet. Ex- 
tinguished with pails and by Chemical Engine. Damage, 
$65. Insurance paid, $65. 

Sunday, August 14, 9.49 p. m. Box 4. At 224 Chest- 
nut street, in tenement occupied by Thomas Doherty, 
a kerosene lamp was overturned in a drunken row, 
and some excited individual pulled two alarms from 
box, summoning the whole department. No damage 
from fire. 

Wednesday, October 12, 6.27 p. m. Box 4. Three-story 
wooden block, corner of Spruce and Chestnut streets. 
Fire originated in basement of ISTo. 76 Spruce street, 
occupied by John Maloney, from stove. Damage esti- 
mated at $10. No insurance. Extinguished without aid 
of department. 

Monday, October 24, 7.15 p. m. Still. Chemical Engine 
called for a blaze about the forge in blacksmith shop 
occupied by Chapman & Frye, No. 1186 Elm street. Ex- 
tinguished before their arrival. No damage. 

Tuesday, November 1, 5.40 p. m. Still. Chemical En- 
gine called to No. 33 Washington street for burning 
chimney, in block owned by Hon. Frederick Smyth and 
occupied by James Cronin. No damage. 

Thursday, November 3, 4.30 p. m. Still. Three-story 
wooden block, No. 148 Manchester street, owned by J. 
Trask Plumer. Fire originated in the attic, occupied by 
Telesfore Paris, from matches in a closet. Extinguished 
by Chemical Engine. Damage, $20. No insurance. 

Friday, November 4, 7 p. m. Still. Chemical Engine 



245 

called for a burning chimney in rear of Fremont block, 
Manchester back street. No damage. 

Wednesday, November 16. Still. Three-story brick 
tenement block, corner of State and Central streets, 
owned by Manchester Mills, and occupied by Nettie 
Hardy. The fire originated from a burning chimney, 
and ignited the woodwork. The fire department con- 
nected with the mills put on two streams, and word was 
telephoned to Central Station, and Chemical Engine re- 
sponded. Damage, $50. Insurance paid, $50. 

Thursday, November 17, 1.33 a. m. Box 3. Machine shop 
and iron foundry, No. 329 Elm street, owned and occu- 
pied by Charles H. Hutchinson. Fire originated in the 
boiler-room in the basement, where it was confined, from 
the boiler furnace. Damage, $25. Insurance paid, $25. 

Wednesday, November 23, 3.45 p. m. Box 36. Two- 
story brick block, No. 11 Canal street, owned by Amos- 
keag Manufacturing Company. The fire originated in 
the tenement occupied by Napoleon Lambert, and was 
caused by entering the stove-pipe into the ventilating-flue 
of the chimney. Entire apparatus responded, except 
Steamer No. 4, which tipped over in turning corner of 
Vine and Concord streets. Damage, $200. Fully insured. 

Sunday, November 27, 12.02 a. m. Still. Chemical 
called to D. W. Shea's, 28 Concord street,|for a burning 
bed, caused by lamp explosion. Damage, $15. No insur- 
ance. 

Wednesday, November 30, 5.30 p. m. Box 4. Three- 
story wooden tenement block, No. 76 Cedar street, 
owned by F. G. Stark. The cause of the alarm was a 
burning chimney, which was extinguished without dam- 
age to building. 

Saturday, December 10, 2.55 a. m. Box 21. Two-story 
wooden tenement house, No. 186 Manchester street, 



246 

owned by D. A. Simons and occupied by Alexander St. 
John. Fire originated in pump-house connected to rear 
part of L, from some cause unknown. Apparatus re- 
sponding, Steamer 4, Hose 1 and 4, Hook-and-Ladder 
1, and Chemical Engine 1. Damage, $50. Fully insured. 

Friday, December 16, 3.55 a. m. Still. Two-story 
wooden dwelling, No. 49 Amherst street, owned by Law- 
rence Dowd, and occupied by Ulix Shine. Fire origi- 
nated in Shine's tenement, from careless use of matches. 
Extinguished by Chemical Engine Company. Damage, 
$10. Insurance paid, $10. 

Thursday, December 22, 3.49 a. m. Box 4. An old two- 
story wooden building, unoccupied, on Elm east back 
street, between Lake avenue and Central street, owned by 
Alonzo Elliott. Apparatus responding, Steamers 2 and 
4, Hose 1 and 4, Hook-and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1. 
Damage, $50. No insurance. Cause, incendiary. 

Saturday, December 24, 3.29 a. m. Box 7. Three-story 
wooden tenement block, ISTo. 45 Lowell street, owned by 
A. D. Stark and Quint heirs. Fire originated in room 
occupied by Jesse Kimball, from burning chimney. Ap- 
paratus present, Steamers 1 and 4, Hose 1 and 2, Hook- 
and-Ladder 1, and Chemical 1. Damage, $15. Fully 
insured. 

Saturday, December 24, 6.05 a. m. Still. Chemical 
Engine called to 38 Pearl street for burning chimney. 
No damage. 

Wednesday, December 28, 12.25 p. m. Still. Chemical 
Engine called for burning chimney at 520 Chestnut street. 
No damage. 

Thursday, December 29, 7.10 p. m. Still. Chemical 
Engine called for burning chimney, rear of 95 Amherst 
street. No damage. 

Friday, December 30, 7.05 p. m. Still. Chemical En- 



247 



gine called to 355 Pine street, for burning chimney. No 
damage. 

Saturday, December 31, 12.34 p. m. Box 32. Carload of 
picker waste on side-track, corner of "West Brook and 
Canal streets, owned by P. C. Cheney Company. By 
error, two alarms were turned in from this box, all the 
department responding, but Hose 4, in turning the cor- 
ner of Lake avenue and Maple, overturned, and returned 
to its quarters. Carriage very slightly damaged. Dam- 



age by fire, 



~No insurance. 



Total number of bell alarms 
" " still " ■■." 

Aggregate losses for year 1887 
On which insurance paid 

Balance uncovered bv insurance 



27 
23 

$17,919.00 
13,111.00 

$4,808.00 



248 



TABLE 

SHOWING NUMBER OF ALARMS FROM EACH BOX SINCE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM 
WAS ESTABLISHED, SEPTEMBER 7, 1872. 



M 
O 

« 


1872 


'73 


'74 

1 
6 
6 

1 


'75 

1 
4 

1 

2 
2 


'76 

"t 

2 

4 
1 

1 


'77 

2 
7 
2 
4 
3 
1 


'78 


'79 

4 
i 

2 
2 
1 


'80 

1 

4 


'81 


'82 


'83 


'84 


'85 


'86 


'87 


i 


3 


"b" 

1 
2 

l" 






1 

2 

1 






1 
4 
1 
1 
1 


1 
8 
1 
2 

2 


s 


4 
5 
6 


5 


6 

"4" 

7 
2 


2 
2 


8 
1 
3 
2 

"l ' 


1 
1 

2 

2 


1 
3 
1 
2 
2 


71 
19 

31 


7 

s 


3 
I 




'25 

is 


9 






I 


1* 


1 
























1 


13 


1 




1 


















1 








3 


14 






1 


















1 


15 


1 






1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






1 




1 


2 




2 


1 




2 
1 


11 


16 


1 










g 


17 


1 
















1 


1 




4 


18 












1 
1 


1 


1 

2 
1 

1 










S 


21 
23 


5 
1 


3 




1 


2 


2 
1 


1 
1 

1 


1 

"i" 


2 
1 


2 
1 


5 


1 
1 


30 

7 


24 






1 
1 


"i" 


1 


2 


1 


7 


25 










1 






•1 


26 




1 








1 


1 
2 






1 

2 
1 
1 






4 


27 


2 


2 
3 


i 


5 






1 --- 




1 

2 


1 


16 


31 






1 

1 




7 


32 






1 




1 




5 


34 




2 


1 








1 




4 


35 


















i 








1 


36 














1 
1 
















1 


? 


41 










i 




















2 


42 




. 1 
























1 


43 






























45 




























1 






1 


51 




1 
4 
2 


1 
3 
1 


1 
1 


i 
T 


2 


1 


1 


1 

2 

2 


1 


2 
1 


3 
2 


4 
3 
2 






14 


52 


2 
3 


2 
1 


1 


?a 


53 

54 


1 




16 


66* 




































61 






1 

2 


1 


i 
i 
i 


.... 


1 
1 
1 


1 

1 
3 






2 


1 










7 


62 












2 
1 






R 


71 






2 




1 




3 


1 


1 


15 


72t 










81f 
112f 
113f 
212J 
312f 
313f 
314f 
315f 




























3 


1 


4 




























































1 


1 


o 
































































































1 

1 


1 
































1 


































13 


35 


25 


26 


25 


30 


21 


22 


23 


11 


29 
















13 


30 


25 


24 


27 


379 










3 still 




1 still 




1 still 


1 still 


1 still 




1 still 


12 still 1C still 

i 


23 still 





♦Added in 1887. 



t Added in 18S5. 



249 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, 
SECOND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 



Boxes. 



3.-- 
4.... 
5.... 
6.... 
7.... 
8.... 
9.... 

12.... 

13.... 

14. . . . 

15.... 

16.... 

17.... 

18.... 

21.... 

23.... 

24.... 

25.... 

26.... 

27.... 

31.... 

32. . . . 

34.... 

35.... 

36.--- 

41.... 

42.... 

43.... 

45-... 

51.... 

52.... 

53.... 

54.... 

56.... 

61.... 

62.... 

71.... 

72.... 

81.... 
112.... 
113.... 
212.... 
312.... 
313.... 
314.... 
315.... 



a -2 



2* 

2* 
2* 
2 
2 
2 
2 
.2 
2* 
2 
2 
2 
2* 



2 


2 




1 




2 




2 




2 




2 


2* 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


1 


2 


2 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2* 


3 


2 


3 


2 


3 


2* 


3 


2 


1 


2 


2 



Hose No. 2. 



Hose No. 4. 



* On first alarm, the horses of second-run engine will double on engine^of first run. 



250 



NUMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES 
AND KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P. Johnson 
& Co.'s office, Gas-work's office, County Jail, and Hutch- 
inson Bros.' shop. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
Hotel Belmont, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Gar- 
mon's, and W. C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Manchester House, Tebbetts Brothers' and E. H. Cur- 
rier's drug stores. 

No. 6. — City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Mead's 
drug stores, and J. A. Riddle's office. 

No. 7. — Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east 
back streets. Keys at Higgins Bros.', Old City Hotel 
stable, and Eames Bros.' drug store. 

No. 8. — Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Wil- 
son's drug store, and Partridge Bros.' grain store. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, and 
J. B. Jones. 

No. 12. — Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of Wm. C. Clarke and Charles E. Ham. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of Welcome Jencks and Lewis Simons, and 
No. 1 Senter's block. * 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of William H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. H. Has- 
sam. 



251 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of H. P. "Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. 1ST. Baker, 
and William Perkins. 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys 
at A. D. Smith's drug store, J. McKeon's grocery store, 
and A. L. Walker's office. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. — Merrimack Hose House, corner of Massabesic 
street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. 
Goodwin and hose house. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. 
Keys at residences of George F. Lincoln, Horace Gordon, 
and Horace Stearns. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-shop and residence of John N. 
Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. 
Keys at residences of John P. Lord, H. M. Tarbell, and 
A. G. Fairbanks. 

No. 31. — Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's 
shop. Keys at office, and residence of Mrs. Mary How- 
arth, first house south of shop gate. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and 
Brook streets. Keys at Hoyt & Co.'s paper-mill, Lang- 
don watch-room, and Electric Light Station. 

No. 34. — Jefferson Mill. Keys at watch-room and 
pumping-station. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 36. — Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 



252 

No. 43. — Namaske Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 45.— The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at 
freight depot, S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office, and Lowell's 
iron foundry office. 

No. 51. — Corner of "Walker and Second streets, " Ger- 
mantown." Keys at stores of F. Riedel and William 
"Weber. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd 
& Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's store, and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — "Wallace's steam-mill. Keys at the office and 
I. R. Dewey's tenement block. 

No. 54. — Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at 
residences of Lord sisters and Newell R. Bixby. 

No. 56. — Mast road, near Riddle street. Keys at 
Baldwin's bobbin-shop, and residences of J. C. Smith 
and E. P. Littlefield. 

No. 61. — Corner of River road and Hancock street, 
Bakersville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, Carney, Lynch 
& Co.'s brewery, and residence of H. F. Dillingham. 

No. 62. — Kimball & Gerrish's tannery, River road. 
Keys at tannery and residence of Edwin Kennedy. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, and Thomas J. 
Smith. 

No. 72. — Corner of Park and Lincoln streets. Keys 
at residences of Austin Jenkins, C. H. Leach, and Clar- 
ence D. Palmer. 

No. 81. — Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at 
engine-rooms. 

No. 112. — Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. 
Keys at residences of "Woodbury Davison and W. T. 
Stevens. 

No. 113. — Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys 
at residences of William B. Abbott, H. S. Manville, and 
E. M. Topliff. 



253 

No. 212. — Shoe-shop, Hallsville. Keys at office of 
shoe factory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. 
Dearborn, Milton A. Abbott, and M. V. B. Garland. 

No. 312. — Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor 
streets. Keys at residences of James Spence (391 Main 
street) and Thomas Bolton. 

No. 313. — Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys 
at residences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, 
and Bouthillier & Gingras's drug store. 

No. 314. — P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. Keys at 
office and Independent Hose House. 

No. 315. — Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Keys at store, 
hose house, and Robinson's residence. 

Also keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be 
given at precisely 12.30 p. m., from Charles A. Trefethen's 
jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of the 
fire bells. 



254 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITI- 
ZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a lire, notice should be imme- 
diately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the keys 
to which are in the hands of all regular police, and gen- 
erally of persons at the corner or nearest houses. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of afire, or positive 
information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the 
hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and then 
let go. Shut the door, but do not try to remove the key, 
as it is locked in by a trap-lock, and can only be removed 
with a release-key, which is carried by each of the engi- 
neers, who will, as soon as convenient, release and re- 
turn it. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to 
remain by the box a moment, and, if no clicking is heard 
in the box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to 
the next nearest box, procure another key, and give an 
alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an 
alarm for no cause other than an actual fire. Don't give 

AN ALARM FOR A CHIMNEY FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your resi- 
dence or place of business, where the keys are kept, return the 
keys to tke same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to 
inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near 
their property, also all places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in the 
city, and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 



255 

6, six blows, which are repeated three times. Box 212, 
two blows, pause of 6^ seconds, one blow, same pause, 
and two blows, 2—1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke 
of the bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, close 
the primary schools ; and to close all the schools, two 
immediate strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds 
two more immediate strokes, — the time of striking the 
bells being at 8.05 a. m. for closing the schools during the 
forenoon, and at 1.15 p. m. for closing them during the 
afternoon. 



256 



RULES AND REGULATIONS IN REGARD TO 
RESPONDING TO FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The following order was adopted by the Board of En- 
gineers, with which the Fire Department will strictly 
comply until otherwise ordered, and will attend alarms of 
fire as follows : 

1. Steamer No. 1 will report for duty on the days of its 
first run to all boxes; the days of its second run it will 
report on the first alarm to boxes 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 35, 
36, 41, 42, 43, 45 ; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

2. Steamer No. 2 will report for duty on the first alarm 
to boxes 4, 31, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 
312, 313 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 21, 
32, 81,. 314; on third alarm, to boxes 9, 12, 13, 14, 16, 
17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 61, 62, 71, 72, 112, 113, 212, 
315. 

3. Steamer No. 4, same as Steamer No. 1. 

4. On the first alarm, from boxes 9, 24, 27, 54, 56, 61, 
62, 212, 315, the horses of the second run will double on 
to the engine of its first run, and on the arrival at the fire 
the second-run horses will return to their house, and in case of 
an alarm from any box the company will immediately 
respond with their engine. 

5. Peiinacook Hose No. 1 will report for duty on first 
alarm to all boxes. 

6. Massabesic Hose No. 2, on days of its first run, will 
report on first alarm to boxes 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 
16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 41,42, 
43, 45, 71, 72, 81, 112, 113 ; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 
212, 312, 313, 314; on third alarm, to boxes 3, 51, 52, 53, 
54, 56, 61, 62, 315. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 26, 34, 112, 113; on second alarm, to 



257 

boxes 4, 5, 6, 21, 23, 24, 25, 27, 31, 32, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 
45, 71, 72, 81, 212, 312, 313, 314; on third alarm, to 
boxes 3, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 61, 62, 315. 

7. Merrimack Hose No. 4, on days of its first run, will 
report on first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 41,42,43, 45, 
61, 62, 71, 72, 81, 212; on second alarm, to boxes 9, 12, 
13, 14, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 112, 113; on third alarm, to 
boxes 312, 313, 314, 315. 

Second Run. First alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 21, 23, 24, 
25, 45, 61, 62, 71, 72, 212 ; on second alarm, to boxes 5, 
6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 
36, 41, 42, 43, 51, 52, 53, 54, 56, 81, 112, 113 ; on third 
alarm, to boxes 312, 313, 314, 315. 

8. Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder No. 1 will report on 
first alarm to all boxes. 

9. Chemical Engine No. 1 will report for duty on first 
alarm to all boxes. 

10. During the progress of a fire, any of the apparatus 
not called on that alarm will promptly respond to an 
alarm from any other box. 

11. At any time when alarm of fire is given, the 
engine, hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first 
will have the right to lead to the fire. No running by 

WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER 
PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPART- 
MENT. 

12. The drivers shall not permit persons not connected 
with the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in 
muddy weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit 
any one to ride upon their apparatus when returning 
from fires. 

13. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 

17 






258 

readiness for a second or third alarm; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs, by the engineer in 
charge, will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses ; or in case this one blow is not 
struck within thirty minutes, companies may consider 
themselves dismissed, except the drivers, who will remain 
in the houses with their horses until the two blows to 
limber up. 

14. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 



259 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 first-class double-plunger engine and 
hose-carriage ..... 
100 feet three-inch leather hose . 
1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch fabric hose 

Firemen's suits and badges . 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures, including 
harnesses 



Total amount 



$4,000 00 

100 00 

900 00 

200 00 

400 00 

$5,600 00 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine . $4,000 00 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . 600 00 

1,850 feet leather hose 1,665 00 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. . . 466 00 

Harnesses, blankets, etc. . . . 325 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 150 00 



Total amount .... $7,206 00 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE-ENGINE. 

LOCATED ON CLINTON STREET, 'SQUOG. 

(Reserve engine.) 

1 second-class single-plunger engine and 
hose-carriage ..... 



$750 00 



260 

MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE ENGINE NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine . $3,500 00 
1 pair swinging harnesses . . . 100 00 



$3,600 00 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 second-class double-plunger engine and 

hose-carriage $3,500 00 

1,000 feet 2 1-4 inch Baker fabric hose . . 800 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 200 00 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures, including 

harnesses 400 00 



Total amount .... $4,900 00 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . 
1 horse hose sled and reel 

2,300 feet leather hose 

Firemen's suits and badges . 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 

Total amount .... $3,440 00 

MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . . $600 00 
2,200 feet leather hose 1,980 00 



$600 00 


20 


00 


2,070 


00 


250 


00 


500 


00 



261 

Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses $160 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 175 00 



Total amount .... $2,915 00 

MERRIMACK HOSE COMPANY NO. 4. 

LOCATED ON PARK STREET, CORNER MASSABESIC. 

1 four-wheeled horse hose-carriage . $600 00 

1,000 feet leather hose 900 00 

2,000 feet Callahan fabric hose . . . 1,375 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 120 00 

Furniture and fixtures, including harness ■ 125 00 

Beds and bedding, etc. ... . 50 00 



Total amount .... $3,170 00 

EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-L ADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 truck with hooks and ladders . . $1,700 00 
Reserve truck 500 00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders . . 360 00 
6 rubber blanket covers .... 144 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . 350 00 
Furniture and fixtures, including har- 
nesses 340 00 



Total amount .... $3,394 00 

CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 double-tank (60 gallons each) engine . $2,250 00 

1 pair harnesses and blankets, etc. . . 190 00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 35 00 



262 

1 pair horses $750 00 

Furniture, bedding, etc. . . . 190 00 



Total amount .... $3,415 00 

SUPPLY WAGON. 

LOCATED AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

1 supply wagon with boxes and engineers' 
lanterns ..... 

5 rubber coats .... 

6 rubber blanket covers . 

Total amount .... $471 00 

SPARE HOSE. 

AT ENGINE-HOUSE ON VINE STREET. 

1,000 feet leather hose $900 00 

800 feet fabric hose 512 00 



$312 00 


15 


00 


144 


00 



$1,412 00 

ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 

5 fire hats $7 50 

Furniture and fixtures .... 125 00 

Total amount .... $132 50 

HOSE- WAGON. 

1 four-wheeled hose wagon (not in use) . $450 00 

INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY. 

LOCATED CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET, 'SKEAG. 

1 four-wheeled hose-carriage . . . $400 00 
1,000 feet leather hose . . . . '. 700 00 

2 hose-pipes 30 00 



Total amount $1,130 00 



263 



GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT DERRY MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage . 

300 feet fabric hose .... 

2 hose-pipes ..... 

Total amount 

SLEEPING HALL. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

5 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



$50 00 

240 00 
10 00 

$300 00 



$234 25 



At cost (including additions previous to 1885) $21,625 00 

Remodeling in 1885 6,000 00 

Instruments added in 1886 
" 1887 

" Individual Tapper " system 
Ladders, tools, wire, etc. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Amoskeag Steam Engine Co. No. 1 
Fire King Steam Engine Co. No. 2 
Merrimack Steam Fire Engine No. 3 
E. "W. Harrington Steam Engine . 
N. S. Bean Steam Engine Co. No. 4 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 
Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 
Merrimack Hose Co. No. 4 . 
Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1 
Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 . 



775 


00 


375 


00 


3,000 


00 


40 


00 


$32,815 


00 


$5,600 00 


7,206 


00 


3,600 


00 


750 


00 


4,900 


00 


3,440 


00 


2,915 


00 


3,270 


00 


3,394 


00 


3,415 


00 



264 



Supply Wagon 

Spare Hose 

Engineers' Department . 

Hose Wagon 

Independent Hose Co. No. 5 

Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage 

Sleeping Hall 

Fire- Alarm Telegraph . 





. $471 00 




. 1,412 00 




132 50 




450 00 




. 1,130 00 




300 00 




234 25 




. 32,115 00 




$74,734 75 



265 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS 
OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



to J 

■si 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane . . . 
James F. Pherson . . 

Ruel 6. Manning.. . 
Eugene S.Whitney. 


Chief 






s 






1 M. S. B. 


5 


Assistant and clerk 


102 Orange. 

53 Douglas Street. 

96 Bridge Street. 


f 




4 




Supt. Electric Light. . 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



•03 
m 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charles F. McCoy.. 
Thomas J. Wyatt.. 
Frank E. Stearns. . 
George R. Simmons 
Joseph H. Oould . . . 
Charles H. Rogers . 
Artemas C. Barker. 

Frank B. Marston . . 
Woodbury Davison 
Henry A. Boone. . . 
George E. Cassidy.. 
George B. Forsaith. 
Charles F. Hall 






5M. S. B. 


15 


Assistant Foreman. 
Clerk 




44 Middle Street. 


8 






9 






13 


Assistant Engineer. 




1087 Elm Street. 


11 






1? 








14 


it 




8 Orange Street. 
11 M. S. B. 


1fi 




18 


u 






19 


CI 




19 M. S. B. 


17 


(( 




31 Spring Street. 
196 Laurel Street. 


10 


<( 




fi 


„ 















266 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on North Main Street, 'Squog. 



'Same. 

Joseph H. Alsop. . 

David G. Mills 

John Martin 

Thomas F. Dodge . . 
Stephen Thornes . . . 
George E. Varnuin. 
Benjamin M. Lay. . 

Samuel A. Hill 

Robert I. Hill 

John T.G. Dinsmore 
Charles G. Ranno . . 
Daniel B. Emery.. . 
Charles S. Cousins. 
Thomas E. Foote. . . 



Rank. 



Occupation. 

Manufacturer 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Carpenter 

u 

Harness Manufacturer 

Machinist 

Harness-maker . . . 
Wool-sorter 



Residence. 



66 

67 
68 
120 
119 
76 
69 
72 
75 
70 
71 
77 
73 
73 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 
Driver Steamer. . . . 

Driver Hose 

Hoseman 



54 Douglas Street. 
34 Parker Street. 
624 No. Main St. 
Engine-house. 

55 Douglas Street. 
Engine-house. 

i( u 

36 School Street. 

U (( 

48 Dover Street. 
63 Parker Street. 
William Street. 
53 Douglas Street. 
34 Print- Works. 



267 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



Name. 



George W . Bacon . . 

L. J. Chandler 

Walter Morse 

Albert Merrill 

Edgar G. Abbott. . . 
Frank J. Dustin... 
William H. Dodge. 
John N. Brown .... 

H. C. Morrill 

George A. Cann .... 
Edward C. Heath.. 
Benj. R. Richardson 
Lucius B. Snelling. 
Martin W. Ford .... 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation 

Carpenter 

Clerk , 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Fireman 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Machinist 

Pharmacist 
Moulder 



Residence. 



65 Stark Corp. 
123 Orange St. 
556 Chestnut St. 
96 Bridge St. 
543 Chestnut St. 
20 Vine St. 
530 Chestnut St. 
28 Arlington St. 
556 Chestnut St. 
307 Chestnut St. 
11 Russell St. 
95 Orange St. 
37 Water St. 
99 Orange St. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



m 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


115 


Clarence D. Palmer. 
Geo. N. Burpee .... 
Warren F. Wheeler 
Frank A. Pherson. . 






11R 


Clerk 




99 Bridge St. 


117 






118 

















268 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 






Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 

Belt- maker 

Currier 

Clerk 

Teamster 

Carpenter ....... 

Photographer. . . . 

Carpenter 

Machinist. ... ... 

Railroad employ*} 
Carpenter 

Belt-maker 

Carpenter 

Clerk 

Electrician ..... 

Tinsmith 

Machinist 



Residence. 



Albert Maxfield. . . . 
Joseph E. Merrill. . 
Chas. W. Brown.. . 
Walter L. Blenus. . 

Geo. H. Porter 

Will G. Chase 

Lyman M. Aldrich. 
Daniel W. Morse.. 
Geo. W. Cheney. . , 

47 ! Edwin E. Weeks... 

48 Albert A. Puffer... 

52 Chas. B. French.., 

53 ' John E. Sanborn. . , 



Samuel W. Patten., 
Frank D. Burleigh. 
Chas. F. Glidden.. 
Edgar A. Young.. , 

George I. Ayer 

Charles H. Barrett. 
Edwin A. Durgin. . 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk , 

Driver 

Hoseman 



23 M. S. B. 
92 Walnut St. 
16 Hazel St. 

26 Vine St. 
277 Laurel St. 
217 Central St. 
375 Lake Avenue. 
1419 Elm St. 
1492 Elm St. 

326 Manchester St. 
120 Concord St. 
18 M. S. B. 
274 Laurel St. 
3M. S. B. 

27 M. S. B. 
277 Laurel St. 
371 Merrimack St. 

28 M. S. B. 
16 Stark St. 
22 M. P. W. 



269 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 






91 
92 
113 
93 
94 
95 
96 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
108 
109 
111 
112 
114 
110 
90 
97 
107 



Name. 



Jerome J. Lovering 
Oscar P. Stone. 
Ralph Pearson . 
Winfield S. Leavitt 
Charles M. Denyou 
Warren Harvey . . . 

James Orril 1 

John N. Chase.. . . 

John Wilson 

Hiram P. Young. . 
George H. Dudley 
Ed. A. G. Holmes 
Luther J. Flint... 
Harrison H. Cole . 
Jesse B. Nourse. . . 
Charles H. Cross . 
Dillwyn Breed. . . . 
George M. Jones . . 

Roscoe Dyer 

Sanborn T.Worthen 
A. W. Whitcomb.. 
Pharis E. Rogers . . 
Henry Johnson . . . 
Charles W. Bailey. 
Henry Heap 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Treasurer 

Driver 

Fireman 



Occupation. 

Carpenter 

Meat and fish dealer 

Box-maker 

Mechanic 

Teamster 

Contractor 

Barber 

Overseer 

Carpenter 

Slater 

Carpenter 

u 

Overseer 

Belt-maker 

Gardener 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Mason 

Piper < 

Carriage-maker. . . . 
Manufacturer 



Residence. 



300 Pine St. 
326 Granite St. 
20 Warren St. 
96 Orange St. 
IS Vine St. 
474 Hanover St. 
100 Blodget St. 
276 Bridge St. 
287 Bridge St. 
33 Dutton St. 
159 Laurel St. 
224 Manchester St. 
4 Dutton St. 
45 M. S. B. 
318 Lake Avenue. 
8 Langdon Corp. 
410 Lake Avenue. 
1068 Elm St. 
36 Water St. 
493 Maple St. 
243 Manchester St. 
100 Orange St. 
20 M. S. B. 
265 Concord St. 
4 Whitney St. 



270 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on Maple Street, comer East High. 



Name. 



John F. Seaward . . . 
William S. McLeod. 
Henry G. Seaman . . 
Walter Seaward .... 
Revilo 6. Houghton 
George W. Huntley. 
Jos. W. Batchelder. 
George W. Seaward. 
Albert E. Batchelder 

Fred S.Lewis 

George H. Shepard. 
Julien B. Huntley.. 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman, 

Clerk.. 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation 

Carpenter 

Grainer , 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Gas-fitter 

Plumber 

Carpenter 

Teamster , 

Carpenter 

Plumber 

Tinsmith 

Plumber 



Residence. 



27 Warren St. 
58 Nashua St. 
14 South St. 
521 Maple St. 
288 Bridge St. 
1211 Elm St. 
521 Maple St. 
Central Fire Sta. 
11 Linden St. 
27 South St. 
8 South St. 
36 Dutton St. 



MERRIMACK HOSE COMPANY NO. 4. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 



Name. 



Louis N. Dufrain 
Charles H. Colburn 
William P. Emerson 
Alphonso E. Foster 

John S. Avery 

James W. Lathe... 
Frank F. Porter... 
George H. Wheeler 
Parker R. Brown. . 
George Dunnington 
Clarence R. Merrill 
Fred S. Sloan 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Driver , 

Hoseman 



Occupation 

Plumber 

Carpenter 

Teamster , 

Janitor 

Carpenter 

Manufacturer. . 

Machinist 

Clerk 

Harness-maker. 
Grain-dealer .... 
Painter 



Residence. 



373 Hall St. 
286 Laurel St. 

ft ti 

Hose-bouse. 
404 Merrimack St. 
302 Laurel St. 
357 Lake Ave. 
383 Central St. 
422 Merrimack St. 
570 Wilson St. 
414 Merrimack St. 
58 Massabesic St. 



271 



INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 

House corner of Old Falls Road and Front Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 



D. L. Robinson 

A. D. Maxwell 

Clarence H. Stearns Clerk 
George Lawrence. . . Steward 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 



Sherman L.Flanders 
George L. Stearns. . 
George C. Harwood. 
George B. Glidden.. 

John Doherty 

Thomas Hamilton . . 
Chas. E. Stearns.. . . 
Wm. F. Stearns . . . 
Sfm, E. Harvey. 
Alvah R. Mack. . 

F.P.Gove 

Ben. Herbert... 



Hoseman 



Butcher , 

Ice-dealer 

Clerk 

Milkman 

Grocer 

Clerk 

Teamster 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Handle-maker. 

Milkman 

Shoemaker 
Paper-maker .. 

Teamster 

Clerk 



Front St. (A.) 



Myrtle St. 
Front St. (A.) 
Dunbarton Road. 
Mill St. (A.) 
GoffstownRoad(A.) 
Front St. (A.) 



62 Appleton St. 
Front St. (A.) 



Badges 149, 150, 151, 152, not filled. 



272 

LOCATION" OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of "Walnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of "Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, corner of Franklin street. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Adams street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Baker, corner of Elm street. 
Baker, corner of River road. 
Baker, corner of Calef road. 
Baker, corner of Nutt road. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 



273 



Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 
Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 
Beech, front of No. 584. 
Belmont, near No. 345. 
Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 
Blodget, front of primary schoolhouse. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, front of No. 26. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Bridge, corner of Ashland street. 
Bridge, corner of Hall street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 
Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near office door of M.. L. TV. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

18 



274 



Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, front of No. 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Chestnut, opposite High street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 
Clarke, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Clarke, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, opposite Vine street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Cyprus, at Manchester shoe-shop. 



275 



Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Elm, front of Fisk bookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Gore, corner of Beech street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, near Franklin street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 

Hancock street. 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near Brewery. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Harrison, opposite No. 15. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Russell street. 



276 



High, corner of Ashland street. 

High, corner of South street. 

High, fifty feet east of Wilson road. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Lake avenue, near No. 36. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Union street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner 'of Lincoln street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Lake avenue, east end. 

Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Laurel, near No. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Laurel, near Belmont street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Milton street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 

Lowell, front of No. 276. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 



277 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Central street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Maple, front of No. 350. 
Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 
Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Massabesic, northwest corner of Old Falls road. 
Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 
Massabesic avenue. 
Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 
Mammoth road. 

Mechanics, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Mechanics, near second back street west of Elm street. 
Mechanics, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 



278 



Merrimack, near Belmont street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Beacon street. 
Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Middle, near ISTo. 67 Amoskeag corporation. 
Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 
North, northwest corner of Bay street. 
North, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
North, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 
Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Orange, corner of Ash street. 
Orange, corner of Maple street. 
Orange, corner of Oak street. 
Orange, corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 



279 



Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lake avenue. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of "Walnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Reservoir, on Force Main. 
River road (north), north of Webster street. 
River road (north), near Mrs. John Kelley's. 
River road (north), near J. Otis Clark's. 
River road (south), near Mrs. B. Chase's house. 
River road (south), near gate of tannery. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 



280 



Shasta, corner of River road. 
Shasta, corner of Beech street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near No. 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite No. 57 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13 Manchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 
Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Union, northwest corner of High street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Willow street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Taylor street. 
Valley, northwest corner 6f Cypress street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Jewett street. 
Valley, 150 feet east of J. L. Woodman's. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 



281 

"Water, near No. 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Webster, corner of Adams street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 

West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Webster, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Webster, northeast corner of River road. 

Wilson, corner of Lake avenue. 

Young, corner of Elm street. 

Young, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Young, corner Maple street. 

Young, 96 feet east of R. N. Batch elder's. 

PISCATAQUOG AND MCGREGORVILLE. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
A, near No. 73. 

A, northwest corner of B street. 
Adams, corner of Main street. 
Arnory, corner of Beauport street. 



282 



Amory, near Dubuque street. 

Bath, corner of Shirley street. 

Bennington, corner of Main street. 

Bedford road, near Huntress's. 

Blaine, corner Cleveland street. 

Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 

C street, corner of Bedford road. 

Cartier, corner Putnam street. 

Carroll street. 

Clinton, corner of Dover street. 

Clinton, corner of South Main street. 

Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 

Douglas, corner of Green street. 

Douglas, corner of Barr street. 

Douglas, corner of West street. 

Douglas, corner of Main street. 

Douglas, east of Main street. 

Ferry, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Quincy street. 

Granite, corner of Green street. 

Granite, corner of Barr street. 

Granite, corner of West street. 

Granite, corner of Dover street. 

Granite, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Shirley street. 

Granite, corner of River street. 

Kelly, corner of Beauport street. 

Main, opposite the Bice house. 

Marion, corner of McGregor street. 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main* streets. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's. 



283 



Mast, near J. N. Prescott's. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite "Reed" house. 

Mil ford, southwest corner of South Main street. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 

Patten, corner of Ferry street. 

Putnam, corner of Main street. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 

School, corner of South Main street. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 

School, corner of River street. 

Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 

Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry street. 

Sullivan, corner of Main street. 

Sullivan, corner of Beauport street. 

Temple, corner of Main street. 

Walker, corner of River road. 

Walker, corner of Patten street. 

Walker, corner of Parker street. 

Walker, near corner of South Main street. 

Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 

Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 

Wayne, near corner of Main street. 

Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Dunbarton road, corner of Front street. 

Dunbarton road, near L. D. Colby's. 

Goffstown road, 4 hydrants. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 

Main, near brick schoolhouse. 

Main, corner of Goffstown road. 

Main,' opposite John E. Stearns's. 



284 

Main, near Hiram Stearns's. 
Mill, near paper-mill. 
Mill, corner Main street. 
Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are five private hy- 
drants that are available in case of need : 

Two at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at A. H. Lowell's iron foundry. 
Total number, 418. 



ACCO U N T 



SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

City Treasurer, 

From December 31, 1886, to December 31, 1887. 



286 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Ptotnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



To cash on hand January 1, 1887 .... 


$58,915 11 


Bonds sold 


100,000 00 


Temporary loan 


100,000 00 


Insurance tax 


3,053 62 


Railroad tax 


16,724 86 


Savings bank tax 


54,874 80 


Literary fund 


2,868 98 


Board of paupers off farm .... 


2,107 04 


Jeremiah Garvin, City Farm .... 


1,522 00 


John H. Wiltey, City Farm 


490 86 


City teams . . 


4,622 24 


Post-office block 


10 00 


H. B. Fairbanks, old iron .... 


31 77 


County of Hillsborough .... 


13 00 


J. B. Yarick Co. (overdraft) .... 


6 00 


John Shea (overdraft) 


10 50 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., crushed stone 


24 00 


Dickey & Harvey, crushed stone 


50 00 


Manchester Mills, macadamizing . 


785 68 


Sewer licenses 


1,325 10 


Head & Dowst (overdraft) .... 


4 80 


Concord Railroad Corporation . . 


4 65 


William P. Richardson, cost of suit 


10 00 


D. W. Lane, agent 


100 00 


Pine Grove Cemetery 


3,389 90 


Valley Cemetery 


1,325 00 


Samuel Eastman & Co., freight on hose 


3 12 


T. W. Lane, old wire sold . 


3 75 


Police department 


3,560 44 


City Hall 


2,220 75 


T. A. Lane (overdraft) 


1 87 


E. B. Woodbury (overdraft) .... 


3 33 


L. C. Baldwin (overdraft) .... 


3 33 


J. G. Dearborn (overdraft) .... 


6 67 


Water rents 


80,518 17 


Russell White 


1 30 


Tuition 


198 10 


Show licenses 


. 170 00 


.Dog licenses 


340 00 


Amount carried forward .... 


$439,300 74 



287 



City of Manchester {ending December 31, 1887). 



Cr. 



By unpaid bills January 1, 1887 $36,224 12 


Funded debt payment . 






101,800 00 


Temporary loan 










125,000 00 


Coupons, water bonds 










35,099 00 


Coupons, city bonds 










18,220 49 


Interest 










944 79 


Paupers off farm 










7,437 59 


City Farm .... 










5,835 59 


City teams .... 










7,335 43 


Highway District No. 1 










265 32 


u u <c 2 










9,028 28 


" « « 3 










1,226 85 


(( c( i< 4. 










407 63 


u u u 5 










471 92 


« K « g 










415 93 


l< u t< 7 










1,087 33 


K l< (( g 










717 55 


u u «< 9 










506 40 


♦' " " 10 










2,661 80 


K « »t XI 










1,158 89 


« •' " 12 










336 00 


" « " 13 










212 94 


New highways 










7,695 71 


Land damages 










398 06 


Watering streets 










4,436 71 


Lighting streets 










13,970 98 


Paving streets 










4,148 86 


Macadamizing streets 










11,835 99 


Grading for concrete 










5,305 24 


Sewers and drains 










18,648 97 


South- Main-street sewer 










1,244 95 


Commons 










3,447 14 


Bridges .... 










2,226 72 


Incidental expenses 










10,928 48 


Pine Grove Cemetery 










4,833 06 


Valley Cemetery 










3,075 33 


Amoskeag Cemetery 










3 50 


Fire department 










. 31,307 11 


Fire-alarm telegraph 










1,120 80 


Amount carried forward 


. $481,021 46 



288 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward 
To trustees cemetery fund . 
Milk licenses . ... 










$439,300 74 

1,850 00 

43 00 


Rent of tenements . 










487 90 


Interest on taxes 










298 49 


Taxes for the year 1882 . 

« " " 1884 . 










3 43 
26 25 


« " " 1885 . 










86 94 


" " " 1886 . 
'< " " 1887 . 










13,399 87 
322,619 62 


Unpaid bills January 1, 1888 .... 


$778,116 24 
32,314 82 


$810,431 06 



289 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1887). 



Cr. 



Amount brought fomvard 
By fire department, individual alarm 
Firemen's parade . 
Police department . 
City Hall 

Printing and stationery 
Eepairs of buildings 
City Library . 
Abatement of taxes 
State tax 

City officers' salaries 
Water-Works 
Health department 
City Engineer's department 
Scavenger teams 
Repaii*s of schoolhouses 
Fuel .... 
Furniture and supplies . 
Books and stationery 
Printing and advertising 
Contingent expenses 
Care of rooms 
Evening schools 
Teachers' salaries . 
Mechanical drawing school 
Hydrant service 
Women's Aid Society 
Militia .... 
Discount on taxes . 
Decoration of soldiers' graves 
New engine-house, Webster street 
New engine-house, Main street 
Truant officer 
Stai'k Monument square 

Tuition 

East Spruce street . 



19 



$481,021 46 

2,296 76 

256 85 

28,837 05 

2,387 45 

1,083 00 

2,159 .25 

3,719 01 

2,411 22 

48,404 00 

13,659 49" 

39,343 83 

1,447 40 

2,452 47 

8,524 la 

3,742 21 

3,506 21 

656 25 

565 63. 

474 91 

1,092 31 

3,215 19 

1,893 85 

42,627 98 

516 83 

20,537 50 

400 00 

700 00 

8,905 82 

212 75 

8,896 00 

5,003 38 

750 00 

45 20 

514 40 

885 11 

$743,144 90 
67,286 16 

$810,431 06 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

City Treasurer. 



Cash on hand January 1, 1888 . 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the account 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer for the year 1887, and 
find the same to be correct, and properly vouched for. 

W. B. STEARNS, 
JOHN" HOSLEY, 
0. E. KIMBALL, 
CHAS. D. SUMNER, 
F. M. FORSAITH, 

Finance Committee. 

Manchester, N. H., Jan. 21, 1888. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



TEMPORARY LOAN". 

To balance from old account . $25,000 00 

Manchester National Bank . 25,000 00 

Merchants' National Bank . 15,000 00 

Amoskeag National Bank . 20,000 00 

Manchester Savings Bank . 20,000 00 

Amoskeag Savings Bank . 20,000 00 



Dr. 



Paid Merchants' National Bank . $50,000 00 
Amoskeag National Bank . 20,000 00 
Merchants' National Bank . 15,000 00 
Manchester Savings Bank . 20,000 00 
Amoskeag Savings Bank . 20,000 00 



$125,000 00 
Cr. 



$125,000 00 



INTEREST. 

To appropriation . . . $18,500 00 
water-works, am't transferred 36,000 00 



Paid Merchants' National Bank . $266 67 
Manchester National Bank 315 62 



Dr. 

,500 00 
Cr. 



294 

Paid Manchester Savings Bank 
Amoskeag Savings Bank 
Amoskeag National Bank 
coupons, city bonds 
coupons, water bonds . 

By balance on hand . 



$167 


50 






97 


50 






97 


50 






18,220 


49 






35,099 


00 






235 


72 










$54,500 


00 



INTEREST ON TAXES. 
To J. B. Straw, collector . . $298 49 



Dr. 

$298 49 

Cr. 
By reserve fund, am't transferred $298 49 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



To appropriation 


. $3,500 00 


County of Hillsborough 


2,053 94 


City of Concord, N. H. 


53 10 


reserve fund 


2,308 20 



By balance from old account . $477 65 
Paid Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Walter Lynch . 8 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. J. Otis . 30 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 
furnished Mrs. Isabelle 
O'Brien .... 10 00 



Dr. 



r ,915 24 
Cr. 



295 



Paid Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. D. McKay . $10 00 
G-riffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Thos. Sullivan . 20 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. E. Sullivan . 20 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. C. Sullivan . 10 92 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. J. McGovern 10 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished John Goodsell . 2 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Patrick Casey . 19 22 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Thomas Lane . 16 60 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Michael Spain . 17 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Jules Morency . 23 02 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. P. Fox . 12 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished J. Cronin . . 13 09 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. T. Donovan 14 57 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. P. Quinn . 3 25 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished B. Doyle . . 12 00 

Griffin & Conway, groceries 

furnished Mrs. E. Cooney . 6 00 

Griffin Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. T. Cleary . 30 00 



296 



Paid Griffin Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Thos. Sullivan . $13 00 

Jos. Quirin, groceries furnished 

Joseph French ... 66 00 

Jos. Quirin, groceries furnished 

John Murray ... 25 00 

E. E. Colburn, groceries fur- 
nished J. S. Gamble . . 73 44 

E. E. Colburn, groceries fur- 

• nished L. M. Green . 9 00 

Eager & Rand, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Ed. O'Hern . 25 00 

S. L. Flanders, groceries fur- 
nished Willie A. Proctor . Ill 63 

Jas. Hayes, groceries furnished 

Mary Fitzgerald ... 59 42 

T. F. Fifield, groceries fur- 
nished Nelly Donovan . 2 35 

T. F. Fifield, groceries fur- 
nished Bridget Milne . 54 00 

C. EL Clark, groceries fur- 
nished Willie Proctor . 32 54 

William Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Connor . 6 00 

William Weber, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Hunter . . 21 08 

D. B. Morency, groceries fur- 
nished Jules Morency . 8 36 

L. Gutterson, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. K Dickey . 24 00 

French & Dockham, groceries 

furnished E. Boyle . 10 00 

J. C. Fifield & Son, groceries 

furnished Bridget Milne . 18 00 



297 



Paid J. C. Fifield & Son, groceries 

furnished Mary Griffin . $2 00 

J. C. Fifield & Son, groceries 

furnished Mary Kilday . 5 00 

P. Fahey, groceries furnished 

Patrick Casey ... 10 00 

P. Fahey, groceries furnished 

Nellie Donovan ... 2 00 

G. C. Lord, groceries fur- 
nished N. B. Dickey . 36 00 

Hood & Parker, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Griffin . . 5 00 

Carl E. York, groceries fur- 
nished Mary Sweeney . 6 00 

Carl E. York, groceries fur- 
nished J. M. Collins . . 6 00 

P. Scollard, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. John Logue . 5 00 

Orison Hardy, groceries fur- 
nished A. J. Smith . . 6 00 

Henry Gorman, groceries fur- 
nished S. P. Nesmith . . 5 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished A. Cunningham . 9 49 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished John Day . 1 35 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Ellen Beckner . 37 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Mary Fitzgerald . 5 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 
furnished James Callahan . 52 49 

George W. Adams, groceries 
furnished Bridget Sullivan . 5 00 



298 



Paid George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Mary Doherty . $4 88 

George W. Adams, groceries 

. furnished A. B. Webster . 4 55 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Mary Sullivan . 23 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Sarah Rogers . 6 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished D. Vadeboncceur . 8 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Nelly Donovan . 2 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished James McGinnis . 4 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Bridget Connelly . 2 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Willie Proctor . 8 33 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Israel Duford . 3 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Mary A. Conley . 1 00 

George W. Adams, groceries 

furnished Jos. B. Pierce . 10 00 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Connor . 30 02 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries fur- 
, nished Mrs. Hunter . . 86 04 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Ed. Boyle . . 50 30 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries fur- 
nished Chas. Buswell . 6 49 

Jos. Wiggin, groceries fur- 
nished Thos. Burke . 8 00 



299 



fur- 



fur- 



fur- 



Paid Jos. Wiggin, groceries 

nished Edward Frenier 
Jos. Wiggin, groceries 

nished Ed. J. Wells . 
Jos. Wiggin, groceries 

nished Anthony Smith 
J. H. Wiggin, groceries fur 

nished Mrs. Thos. Egan 
J. H. Wiggin, groceries fur 

nished Mrs. Mary Griffin 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Mrs. Turcotte . 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Pat Casey 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Stephen Sullivan 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Ellen Sullivan 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Mrs. Jerry Cronin 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Mary Fitzgerald 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Bridget Otis . 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Kate Sullivan . 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Thos. Burke . 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished A. B. Fellows 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Mrs. Thos. Keefe 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur 

nished Mrs. D. Graham 



. $10 


00 


22 


00 


18 


60 


30 


00 


48 


77 


29 


99 


12 


09 


96 


02 


93 


08 


76 


90 


20 


00 


14 


00 


5 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


7 


00 


5 


00 



300 



Paid McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Angeline Messier . $10 50 
McQuade Bros., groceries fur- 
nished Julia Messier . . 10 00 
"W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. M. Moran . 10 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished J. J. Hayes . 7 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Jas. Dowd . . 15 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. C. Sullivan 49 08 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. T. Sullivan 67 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Wm. Conway . 27 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mary Fitzgerald 10 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Thomas Lane . 19 10 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. D. McKay . 39 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Bart Doyle . 44 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. T. Cleary . 30 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Jas. O'Brien . 22 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. J. Smith . 30 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. T. Donovan 14 77 

W.F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Goodsell children 24 82 



301 



Paid W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. P. Fox . $10 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Mrs. I. E. Foster 5 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Samuel Gray . 3 00 

W.F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Michael Spain . 8 00 

W.F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 

furnished Thos. Burke . 4 00 

Bartlett & Thompson, groceries 

furnished Mary Griffin . 10 00 

Bartlett & Thompson, groceries 

furnished L. M. Green . 94 98 

Bartlett & Thompson, groceries 

furnished Wm. Mclntire . 5 00 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. David McKay . 10 00 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. M. Fitzgerald . 20 00 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. Jas. Otis . . 59 07 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Mrs. J. McGovern . 50 00 

P. Harrington, groceries fur- 
nished Michael Spain . 15 72 

Maxfield & Jackson, groceries 

furnished J. L. Wyman . 6 00 

Maxfield & Jackson, groceries 

furnished Wm. Mellen . 3 00 

Maxfield & Jackson, groceries 

furnished Ed. Frenier . 47 00 

Charles T. Allen, groceries 

furnished Bart Moriarty . 108 19 



302 



Paid Michael Kenney, groceries 

furnished Wm. Conway 
Michael Kenney, groceries fur 

nished Mrs. C. Burke 
H. B. Sawyer, groceries fur 

nished Noah M. Randall 
H. B. Sawyer, groceries fur 

nished C. Sullivan 
J. Taylor & Son, groceries 

furnished Kate Tate . 
J. Taylor & Son, groceries 

furnished £T. B. Dickey 
J. Taylor & Son, groceries 

furnished S. P. Nesmith 
Charles A. Smith, medicine 
John B. Hall, medicine . 
Lewis K. Mead, medicine 
Tebbetts Bros., medicine 
George E. Hall, medicine 
L. G. Tewksbury, medicine 
City of Portsmouth, medicine 

etc., for Wm. B> Coombs 
A. D. Emery, team 
F. P. Kimball, clothing 
S. F. Curtis, clothing 
W. E. & E. B. Dunbar, rent 

of tenement 
Smith Whitten, team 
Esther L. Ingham, board and 

care of Mary F. Ingham 
Mrs. Wm. Chase, board and 

care of Thos. Chase . 
Mrs. Mary J. Crosby, board 

and care of Richard Spring 



$40 00 


20 


00 


71 


80 


12 


00 


76 


63 


12 


00 


5 


00 


1 


60 


10 


60 


55 


85 


2 


60 


38 


35 


8 


70 


73 


50 


3 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


1 


50 


120 


00 


120 


00 


35 


00 



303 



Paid Margaret Lydon, board and 

care of Joseph Pierce . $36 00 
Mrs. Gideon Rochette, board 

and care of Hector Rochette 21 00 

Josie A. Haff, board and care 

of Fred Haff ... 99 20 

Ansel D. Hatch, board and 

care of J. W. Hatch . 40 00 

Laura J. Rankin, board and 

care of Abel G. Rankin . 60 00 

H. C. Tilton, board and care 

of Izetta E. Foster . . 5 00 

Town of Kingston, board and 

care of W. Coombs and wife 220 00 
Town of Candia, board and 

care of Mrs. G. H. Johnson 86 84 

John D. Welcome, board and 

care of Doherty children . .36 00 

John D. Welcome, burial of 

James Doherty . . . 15 00 

Thos. Kelley, board and care 

of Thomas Kelley, Jr. . 70 00 

Mrs. J. Maynard, board and 

care of Sullivan child . 24 00 

J. L. Taylor, board and care 

of Sullivan child . . 16 50 

W. T. B. Pearsons, board and 

care of J. L. Pearsons . 11 33 

E. J. Collins, board and care 

of Edward P. Gross . 7 00 

Mary C. Emerson, board and 

care of Maggie Galligan . 4 00 

Wm. Ferren, board and care 

of Emma J. Gray . 9 00 



304 

Paid C. M. Watts, board and care 

of Emma J. Price 
County of Hillsborough, board 

and care of A. White 
County of Hillsborough, board 

and care of J. J. Murray . 
State Industrial School, board 

and care of inmates . 
L. S. Proctor, wood for L. M. 

Green .... 

E. V. Turcotte, wood for 

Mary Griffin 
E. V. Turcotte, wood for 

Mary A. Sullivan 
E. V. Turcotte, wood for Anna 

Cunningham 
E. V. Turcotte, wood for Sarah 

Rogers .... 
Austin, Flint & Day, wood for 

E. P. Hill .... 
Austin, Flint & Day, wood for 

K M. Randall . 
Austin, Flint & Day, wood for 

Ellen Beckner . 
Burns & Poore, wood for M. 

Spain . . . 
Burns & Poore, wood for Bart 

Doyle 

Burns & Poore, wood for Rose 

Cooney .... 
Burns & Poore, wood for Mrs. 

A. J. Smith 
Burns & Poore, coal for Mrs. 

Jules Morency . 



$21 


50 


104 


00 


104 


00 


2,491 


09 


5 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


3 


50 


3 


75 


4 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


2 


10 



305 



Paid J. W. Kimball, wood for N. 

M. Randall ... $8 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Ellen 

Beckner .... 15 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Mary 

Doherty .... 6 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Mary 

Sullivan .... 12 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Sarah 

Rogers . . . . 6 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for James 

Callahan .... 3 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Mary 

Sweeney . . . 2 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Celina 

Jarvis .... 1 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Mary 

Kilday .... 2 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for Nellie 

Proctor .... 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 

David Graham . . .. 2 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 

Julia Messier ... 1 50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 

Bart Doyle .... 8 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood for 

Thomas Burke ... 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal, 

K M. Randall ... 7 75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood, 

E. J. Wills . . . 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal, L. 

M. Green .... 8 00 

20 



306 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal, S. 




P. Nesmith 


$4 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood, 




Mary Griffin 


1 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood, 




Joseph French . 


1 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood, 




Mrs. McKay 


1 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood, 




M. Spane . 


2 00 


J. F. Wyman, wood, Mrs. 




Hunter .... 


13 00 


Moore & Preston, wood, Mary 




Griffin .... 


8 25 


Moore & Preston, coal, J. L. 




Wyman .... 


6 00 


Moore & Preston, coal, S. P. 




Nesmith .... 


5 00 


Moore & Preston, coal and 




wood, L. M. Green 


21 25 


Moore & Preston, wood, W. 




A. Proctor .... 


4 25 


Moore & Preston, wood, Ed- 




ward Frenier 


14 75 


Moore & Preston, wood, E. J. 




Wills 


11 00 


George Whitforcl, wood, Mary 




Doherty .... 


3 50 


E. P. Johnson Co., wood, W. 




A. Proctor .... 


15 37 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal, 




James Callahan . 


. 8 45 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal, N. 




M. Randall 


12 50 



307 



Paid A. Mclndoe, wood, Jules Mo- 

rency .... 
S. L. Flanders, wood, W. A 

Proctor 
L. B. Melvin, wood, W. A 

Proctor 
Fessenden & Lowell, wood 

J. B. Pierce 
B. B. "Warner, wood, Ellen 

Beckner 
EL J. DeCourcey, wood . 
Wingate & Gould, shoes 
Wingate & Gould, shoes 
Joseph Murray, shoes . 
Philbrick & Webster, shoes 
F. C. Dow, shoes . 
A. & W. S. Heath, shoes 
A. & W. S. Heath, shoes 

D. Bean, repairs 

E. T. James, team . 
M. Harrington, rent for Jos 

French 
Harley & Robbie, shawl 
Manchester One-Price Cloth 

ing Co., clothing 
J. C. Bickford, professional 

services . . 
H. D. Gordon, lounge for sick 

nurse .... 

F. L. Wallace & Co., burial 
services 

James Bros., team . 
Temple & Farrington 
Horace Gordon, team 



$5 00 
7 01 
4 00 

25 50 



2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


25 


2 


00 


2 


50 


2 


00 


4 


75 


1 


25 




85 


1 


50 


27 


00 


3 


50 


8 


75 


1 


00 


14 


00 


25 


00 


4 


75 


9 


00 


2 


00 



308 



Paid E. B. Henion, M. D., profes- 
sional services . . . $25 00 

Mrs. E. G. Woodman, wash- 
ing 1 00 

J. M. Collity, professional ser- 
vices ..... 4 00 

C. B. Sturtevant, professional 

services . . . . 11 00 

O. D. Kimball, printing blanks 12 50 

"William H. Maxwell, clerical 

services, etc. ... 6 06 

B. F. Lake, expenses to Wil- 
ton with J. W. Doherty . 8 40 

H. B. Fairbanks, bedding, etc., 

for E. Wills ... 17 85 

A. G. Fairbanks . ... 12 75 





appropriation . 
J. Garvin, super 
J. H. Willey . 
reserve fund 




$3,500 

1,522 

490 

322 




To 


CITY FARM 

intendent 


00 
00 
86 
73 



Paid Merrill Bros, grain, etc. 
W. S. Jewell, grain, etc. 
Drake & Dodge, grain, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, grain, etc. 
A. N". Clapp, kerosene oil 
D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc 



$43 28 

30 63 

285 02 

429 66 

28 45 

4 25 



r ,915 24 



Dr. 



>,835 59 
Cr. 



309 



Paid E. M. Slayton, butter . 

A. M. Eastman, groceries, etc 
George W. Adams, groceries 

etc 

Eager & Rand, groceries, etc 
W. D. Ladd & Co., crackers 

etc 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

etc 

J. McKeon, groceries, etc. 

D. Kerwin, pearline, etc. 
Bartlett & Thompson, provi 

sions, etc. . 
J. H. Pierce & Co., provisions 

etc 

H. Marshall, butter 
Carl E. York, groceries, etc. 
Eager & Rand, groceries, etc 
Union Pacific Tea Co., coffee 

etc 

Hervey & Henry, flour . 
E. L. Bryant, groceries, etc. 
A. G. Grenier, groceries, etc 
Joseph Quirin, groceries, etc 
George W. Adams, groceries 

etc. .... 
J. A. Langley, fish 
Dodge & Laing, groceries, etc 
J. Garvin and wife 

E. E. McKean, meats 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
etc. .... 

Manchester Hardware Co. 
hardware, etc. . 



$77 97 
134 68 

100 00 
247 60 

11 00 

52 77 
10 71 
44 80 

222 28 



106 


25 


19 


17 


107 


25 


5 


97 


13 


20 


41 


00 


35 


58 


8 


50 


9 


30 


5 


12 


6 


25 


11 


89 


733 


34 


6 


88 



116 72 



20 77 



310 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc $45 01 

Thorp & Bartlett, plumbing, 
etc 41 68 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 6 94 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs 

on carts, etc. . . . 31 75 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 
smithing .... 29 75 

J. H. Cram, blacksmithing . 9 25 

Charles H. Bunton, black- 
smithing .... 20 95 

Joseph 0. Tremblay, black- 
smithing . . . . 11 00 

Thomas Hickey, blacksmith- 
ing 

H. F. Thompson, blacksmith- 
ing 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 
ing 

Sanborn Carriage Company, 

blacksmithing ... 5 00 

K E. T. & T. Co., telephone 46 73 

Moore & Preston, coal . . 353 66 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 136 80 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal . 42 62 

F. C. Dow, boots and shoes . 63 21 
George H. Wilson, boots and 

shoes 5 00 

Wingate & Gould, boots and 

shoes 14 50 

G. W. Dodge, boots and shoes 3 25 
McDonald & Cody, boots and 

shoes 4 00 



4 25 
4 00 

2 50 



31 L 



Paid F. D. Hansconi, meats . 


$145 92 


C. E. Cox, meats . 


35 92 


Tom W. Robinson, meats 


132 80 


Tom W. Robinson, meats 


48 36 


Cavanaugh Bros., harness, etc. 


78 64 


R. G. Sullivan, tobacco 


56 76 


L. P. Reynolds 


17 52 


Temple & Farrington, station- 




ery 


1 47 


Wm. W. Hubbard, sawdust . 


3 00 


Thorp & Bartlett, plumbing . 


3 50 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


1 86 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


7 80 


Weston & Martin, clothing . 


16 50 


Talbot & Co., clothing . 


9 24 


F. P. Kimball, clothing . 


2 55 


H. M. Moody, clothing . 


35 65 


H. M. Tarbell, clothing 


7 75 


J. A. Folsom, clothing . 


7 35 


Geo. Blanchet, dry goods 


20 00 


Hawley & Barnard, dry goods 


25 99 


"Weston & Hill, dry goods 


77 82 


Talbot & Co., clothing . 


32 19 


Mrs. J. F. Fox, manure 


25 00 


H. B. Fairbanks, hog-feed, 




etc. . ' . 


61 00 


H. D. Gordon, repair of 




lounge, etc. 


3 60 


C. M. Bailey, mops, brooms, 




etc 


12 25 


Dr. W. F. Robie, professional 




services, etc. 


18 15 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., mid- 




dlings .... 


10 25 



312 



Paid Stevens & Clough, swill 


$24 00 


George 0. Stevens, swill 


12 00 


Daniel Davis, swill 


55 00 


T. A. Barker, swill 


100 00 


Dodge & Straw, boots, etc. 


14 15 


L. G. Tewksbury, medicine 


28 50 


J. B. Hall, medicine 


10 35 


C. A. Smith, medicine . 


6 98 


George E. Hall, medicine 


12 05 


L. K. Mead, medicine . 


61 93 


Carpenter & Co., brooms 


6 00 


Maxwell & Campbell, cutting 




ice . . . . 


12 50 


J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 


27 88 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


6 21 


R. M. Rollins, creamery, etc 


47 80 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


1 07 


E. P. Richardson, insurance 


237 00 


C. H. Thayer, boots 


5 00 


E. L. Wallace & Co., burying 


r 

5 


child .... 


5 00 


T. W. Lane, stationery . 


1 61 


J. 0. Burbank, medicines 


2 30 


J. G. Ellinwood . 


5 00 


W. P. Farmer, superphos 




phate .... 


22 80 


T. A. Lane, plumbing . 


70 


F. L. Downs . . . 


3 75 


D. Kerwin, soap 


4 00 


Enterprise Manufacturing Co 


30 15 


Carney, Lynch & Co., hog 


- 


feed .... 


4 73 


B. F. Witham 


33 00 


F. B. Potter, sewer pipe 


2 80 



313 



Paid J. Stickney . 

McDougall Bros., thrashing 
F. P. Kimball, clothing 
J. H. Willey and wife . 
J. O. Burbank, medicine 
Reed Bros., mason-work 
J. Bryson, Jr., paints, etc. 
McQuade Bros., groceries 



$4 40 

20 30 

2 60 

200 00 

8 55 

2 65 

8 45 

54 40 









IS. 






CITY 


TEA^ 




To appropriation . 


, 


, 


$3,000 


00 


Partridge Bros., 


overdraft 


10 


13 


Cavanaugh Bros 


., horse 


sold 


94 


00 


labor in District No. 2 


. 


3,796 


36 


labor in District No. 10 


• 


721 


75 



15,835 59 



Dr. 



Paid City Farm, hay 

L. Shelters, hay . 
G. W. Butterfield, hay 
"W. M. Plummer, hay 
D. Butterfield, hay 
S. Goffe, hay 
F. D. Han scorn, hay 
John Pillsbury, hay 
C. D. Welch, hay 
"W. M. Patten, hay 
Joseph Quirin, carrots 
Merrill Bros., grain 
Partridge Bros., grain 



r ,622 24 
Ob. 



$465 39 
283 95 
34 56 
13 39 
49 32 
21 82 
42 00 

23 35 
213 45 

24 75 
4 25 

827 10 
447 44 



314 



Paid H. Fradd & Co., grain . 


$336 52 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. . 


15 20 


Drake & Dodge, grain . 


110 15 


W. S. Jewell, grain 


190 31 


Pettee & Adams, grain, etc. . 


460 36 


H. A. Horton, carrots . 


36 00 


1ST. J. Walen, harness, etc. . 


91 80 


F. N. McLaren, harness, etc. 


175 60 


H. C. Ranno, harness, etc. . 


80 52 


H. C. Ranno, harness, etc. . 


11 65 


J. G. Lake, harness, etc. 


79 59 


F. P. Riley, harness, etc. 


94 95 


Cavanaugh Bros., harness, 




etc 


50 05 


J. H. Cram, blacksmithing . 


47 80 


D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 


81 56 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 




smithing . 


369 60 


Brown & Howie, blacksmith- 




ing 


37 50 


Joseph 0. Tremblay, black- 




smithing . 


84 00 


J. J. Connor, blacksmithing 


1 75 


Stephen Austin, blacksmith- 




ing 


3 00 


John Barnes, blacksmithing 


7 82 


Thomas Hickey, blacksmith- 




ing . 


2 00 


S. Lavigne, blacksmithing . 


60 


F. Allen, blacksmithing 


8 00 


L. Pope, blacksmithing 


1 35 


A. M. Corning, admr., wagon 


30 00 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. . 


40 



315 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair 




of carts, etc. 


$425 54 


Sanborn Carriage Co., repair 




of carts, etc. 


85 25 


J. B. JSTourse, lumber 


1 08 


Looney & Shea, brooms 


6 00 


Dr. R. Ebbitt, veterinary 


103 50 


Dr. J. Alexander, veterinary . 


89 00 


Dr. J. Blakely, veterinary 


165 00 


Dr. J. L. Golden, veterinary . 


7 50 


Dr. W. F. Robie, veterinary . 


12 00 


Snelling & Woods, borse med- 




icine ..... 


8 60 


George E. Hall, horse med- 




icine ...... 


12 65 


Z. F. Campbell, horse med- 




icine ..... 


34 26 


J. J. Holland & Co., horse 




medicine .... 


9 10 


C. T. Newman, horse med- 




icine 


5 50 


Manchester Hardware Com- 




pany, hardware, etc. . 


19 44 


Manchester Hardware Com- 




pany, hardware, etc. . 


67 


J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, etc. 


17 82 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 




etc 


8 05 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


4 82 


Head & Dowst, lumber . 


4 00 


A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


2 55 


A. IS". Clapp, salt, etc. . 


1 97 


Mrs. S. Brown, rent of sheds 





for storage of carts 



21 00 



316 



Paid C. A. Carpenter, stable 






brooms .... 


$6 00 




J. Stickney, rubber horse 






cover . 


5 00 




N. H. Rubber Co., syringe 


2 00 




Concord Railroad, freight on 






horses .... 


6 30 




labor of teamsters 


1,412 40 




By balance on hand 


286 81 


$7,622 24 






HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 








Dr. 


To appropriation . 


1300 00 


$300 00 
Ob. 






PaidKilley & Wadleigh, hardware, 






etc 


$1 88 




labor of men and teams 


263 44 




By balance on hand 


34 68 


$300 00 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 

To appropriation .... $9,000 00 

P. O. block, snow removed . 10 00 

county of Hillsborough, labor 13 00 

reserve fund .... 5 28 



Dr. 



),028 28 



317 



Cr. 



Paid J. B. Nourse, lumber and 
labor . . . ' . 

Westover & Gould, lumber 
and labor . 

P. J. Kean, filing saws . 

L. N. Westover, lumber 

Flint & Little, lumber and 
labor .... 

J. Hodge, lumber . 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 
labor .... 

J. Stickney, rubber mittens 
etc. .... 

L. A. Clough, lumber . 

Trudel & Joutras, blacksmith 
ing .... 

E. Frye, blacksmithing . 

Boisvert & Turcotte, black- 
smithing .... 

R.W. Flanders, blacksmithing 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 
smithing .... 

Woodbury & Fellows, black- 
smithing .... 

J. P. Fellows & Co., black- 
smithing .... 

C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork, 
etc. ...... 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 
etc 

Manchester Hardware Com- 
pany, hardware, etc. . 



$9 99 






95 




60 




80 


1 


65 


7 


29 


9 


62 



33 38 



4 47 


2 


50 


3 


40 


17 


05 


2 


20 


47 


90 


12 


90 


50 


00 


157 


04 


141 


67 


123 


41 


149 


58 



318 

Paid Pike & Heald, hardware, etc 
T. A. Lane, labor on pumps 

etc. .... 
J. B. Yarick Co., hardware 

etc 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 
People's Gas-light Co., gas 
Temple & Farrington, station 

ery . 
T. W. Lane, stationery 
L. Gutterson, salt, etc. . 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., molasses 

hogshead 
J. Taylor & Son, oil, brooms 

etc. .... 
L. Gutterson, oil, salt 
J. Taylor & Son, oil, salt, etc 
W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 
T. L. Thorpe, bags 
G. A. Clark, filing saws 
T. W. Lane, stationery, etc. 
Geo. Blanchet 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co 

lumber, etc. 
Temple & Farrington, time 

books, etc. . 
labor of men and teams . 



$7 


69 


1 


20 


195 


89 


30 


45 


14 


98 




75 


2 


71 


20 


43 



1 25 

6 70 
19 90 



5 25 
2 55 

6 32 

6 40 

7 74 
9 75 



5 99 



30 95 

7,824 98 



),028 28 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 



To appropriation 
reserve fund 



$1,000 00 
226 85 



Dr. 

$1,226 85 






319 



Paid F. X. Chenette, blacksmith- 

ing $1 30 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 12 22 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc. ..... 80 

Hutchinson Bros., ironwork, 

etc 5 24 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 

ing 1 90 

C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 40 

J. B. McCrillis & Son . . 1 50 

labor of men and teams . . 1,203 49 



Cr. 



$1,226 85 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . 

reserve fund 



Paid Devonshire Mills, gravel 

Manchester Hardware Com- 
pany, hardware . 
F. B. Potter, Akron pipe 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 
labor of men and teams 



$400 00 
7 63 


$407 63 




$16 98 


Cr. 


4 05 

8 22 

5 53 
372 85 


SHOT ft.Q 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 
To appropriation .... $500 00 



Dr. 

$500 00 



320 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 




etc 


$2 16 


R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 




ing 


1 60 


labor of men and teams 


468 16 


By balance on hand 


28 08 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 

To appropriation . . . $400 00 

reserve fund .... 15 93 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc $1 40 

Charles H. Bunton, black- 
smithing .... 1 90 

labor of men and teams . 412 63 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 

To appropriation .... $1,100 00 
J. B. Varick Co., overdraft . 6 00 



Cr. 



$500 00 

Dr. 

$415 93 
Cr. 



$415 93 

Dr. 

$1,106 00 

Cr. 



PaidC. H. Bunton, blacksmithing $8 63 

J. B. Varick Co. . . . 66 66 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 9 68 



321 



PaidJames Morrison, blacksmith 




ing . 


$3 19 


Warren Harvey, stone . 


12 50 


T. A. Lane, pipe, etc. . 


5 78 


Hutchinson Bros., ironwork 


5 76 


F. S. Bodwell, stone 


22 00 


labor of men and teams 


953 13 


By balance on hand 


18 67 







$1,106 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



To appropriation . 
reserve fund 



$700 00 
17 55 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware . . . . $9 56 

J. B. Varick .... 80 

labor of men and teams . 707 19 



Dr. 

$717 55 
Ob. 



$717 55 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



To appropriation 
reserve fund 



Paid Jas. Morrison, blacksmithing 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc. ..... 



Dr. 



$500 00 




6 40 






$506 40 






Or. 


$1 20 




4 17 





21 



322 

Paid Head & Dowst, lumber 
labor of men and teams 



$2 05 
498 98 



$506 40 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



To appropriation . 

John Shea (overdraft) 
reserve fund 



Paid Westover & Gould, lumber 
C. H. Robie, sand 
J. F. Wyman, coal and wood 
James Baldwin, plank . 
People's Gas-light Co., gas 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gi 
James Briggs, scoop, etc. 
A. N. Clapp, hardware, etc. 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 

etc. .... 
labor of men and teams 



$2,200 00 

10 50 

451 30 



$2 


10 


7 


60 


d 16 


88 


5 


40 


3 


22 


s 2 


85 


3 


00 


6 


75 


57 


87 


. 2,556 


13 



Dr. 



$2,661 80 
Cr. 



,661 80 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



To appropriation 
reserve fund 



$1,000 00 

158 89 



Dr. 



.,158 89 



323 



Paid Wm. Hoyt, stone and gravel $28 80 
J. P. Fellows & Co., black- 
smithing .... 1 50 
I. C. Hardy, gravel . . 7 84 
labor of men and teams . 1,120 75 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 

To appropriation .... $300 00 
reserve fund .... 36 00 



Paid City Farm, labor . . . $331 00 
F. S. Bodwell, stone . . 5 00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 



To appropriation . 
reserve fund 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh 

labor of men and teams 



Cr. 



.,158 89 



Dr. 

$336 00 
Cr. 

$336 00 



$200 00 
12 94 


Dr. 

$212 94 
Cr. 

$212 94 


$1 20 
211 74 



324 
NEW HIGHWAYS. 



To appropriation . 
reserve fund 



Paid John Proctor, building Kelly 
street .... 

F. S. Bodwell, stone 

Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing . . ... 

J. B. Clarke, printing . 

A. C. Wallace, lumber 

L. A. Clough, lumber . 

John Barnes, blacksmithing 

Jos. Boisvert, blacksmithing 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc. ..... 38 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc. ..... 6 55 

labor of men and teams . 7,311 30 



LAND DAMAGE. 

To appropriation .... $1,000 00 



Paid Geo. W. Riddle, Carroll street 
Geo. W. Riddle, Riddle street 
A. J. Bennett, Laurel street 

By balance on hand 



Dr. 



16,000 00 




1,695 71 






$7,695 71 






Cr. 


$245 00 




51 25 




6 25 


' 


5 64 




21 59 




21 60 




16 65 




9 50 





$100 


00 


200 


00 


98 


06 


601 


94 



,695 71 



Dr. 

$1,000 00 
Cr. 



$1,000 00 



325 






WATERING STREETS. 






* 


Dr. 


To appropriation . 


$4,000 00 




reserve fund . 


436 71 


$4,436 71 










Cr. 


Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 






ing carts, etc. 


$88 31 




Pike & Heald, repairing carts 






etc 


11 88 




J. B. Varick & Co., paint 






varnish, etc. 


9 67 




T. A. Lane, stand-pipes, etc. 


79 60 




Manchester Water - works 






water 


2,500 00 




labor of men and teams 


1,747 25 





t,436 71 



LIGHTING STREETS. 
To appropriation . . . .$15,000 00 



Dr. 

$15,000 00 
Cr. 



Paid Manchester Gas-light Co., 

gas, etc $5,083 24 

People's Gas-light Co., gas, 

etc 3,635 54 

Manchester Electric-light Co. 4,631 95 
Ben Franklin Electric-light 

Co 370 52 

C. M. Bailey, chimneys, 

wicks, etc. ... 77 36 



326 



Paid Lowell's iron foundry, lamp- 




posts, etc. 


$120 75 


C. H. Hutchinson, lamp-posts 




etc 


41 75 


Albert Eettel, oil, chimneys 




etc 


5 15 


J. Frank Moore, oil, chim- 




neys, etc. . 


4 72 


By balance on hand 


1,029 02 




f 1 ^ 000 00 







PAVING STREETS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


. 


$2,500 


00 




reserve fund 


• 


1,648 


86 


$4,148 86 
















Cr. 


Paid C. H. Robie, concreting 


$1,130 ] 




W. Fullerton, cobble paving 




99 




W. H. Colburn, 


u 


64 


50 




Isaac Sweeney, 


u 


76 


16 




L. J. Proctor, 


it 


14 


67 




J. H. Colburn, 


a 


.99 


00 




J. H. Proctor, 


a 


59 


78 




James Fullerton, 


a 


33 


00 




A. J. Wilkinson, 


a 


24 


00 




J. Parmenter, 


a 


6 


00 




D. H. Varnum & Co. 


a 
> 


6 


12 




H. S. Hoyt, 


a 


37 


50 




J. B. Clarke, 


a 


3 


00 




George S. Smith, 


a - 


6 


11 




W. S. Jewell, 


a 


3 


00 





327 



Paid C. C. Webster, cobble paving 


$7 50 


Carpenter & Co., repairing 




street-sweeper, etc. 


60 00 


J. J. Bennett, paving brick, 




etc 


10 00 


labor of men and teams 


2,507 36 







,148 86 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $10,000 00 
American Manufacturing Co., 

crushed stone . . . 24 00 
Dickey & Harvey, crushed 

stone 50 00 

Manchester Mills, crushed stone 785 68 

reserve fund .... 976 31 



Dr. 







$11,835 99 






Cr. 


aid F. S. Bodwell, stone 


$111 


90 


S. B. Page, stone . 


20 


40 


R. P. Campbell, stone . 


29 


50 


A. G. Fairbanks, stone 


37 


8] 


J. H. Colburn, stone 


235 


08 


A. J. Wilkinson, stone 


18 


04 


J. Fullerton, stone 


214 


43 


E. S. Hoyt, stone . 


27 


74 


E. A. Campbell, stone . 


25 


33 


F. A. Emerson, stone . 


2 


69 


F. B. Worthley, stone . 


64 


51 


F. H. Libby, stone 


39 


25 


M. W. Spencer, stone . 


1 


14 



328 



Paid E. "W". Butterfield, stone 


$62 31 


M. E. Harvey, stone 


52 49 


L. J. Proctor, stone 


70 18 


H. S. Hoyt, stone 


84 03 


D. Butterfield, stone 


161 75 


I. Sweeney, stone 


396 07 


"W. S. Jewell, stone 


56 55 


G. H. Bartlett, stone 


25 04 


G. W. Butterfield, stone 


230 97 


Campbell & Tilton, stone 


69 75 


George Whitford, stone 


288 22 


C. Manseau, stone 


67 27 


J. G. Ellinwood, stone . 


59 44 


E. C. Emerson, stone . 


11 98 


E. S. Bodwell, stone . 


82 77 


C. C. Webster, stone . 


4 50 


Dickey & Harvey, stone 


34 00 


George Thompson, stone 


6 34 


J. V. Gott, stone . 


6 90 


C. E. Buswell, stone 


6 11 


George Goodwin, stone 


14 22 


C. H. Robie, stone 


28 42 


T. Ellis, stone 


2 49 


J. W. Kimball, stone . 


151 94 


G. S. Smith, stone 


51 89 


H. S. Plumer, stone 


144 58 


Joseph Terrill, stone 


116 46 


Wm. G. Landry, stone 


86 87 


F. S. Bodwell, stone 


31 73 


Charles P. Still, stone . 


10 61 


F. E. Shea, stone . 


2 55 


H. A. Horton, stone 


37 76 


G. H. Bartlett, stone 


3 78 


J. B. Clarke, stone 


3 28 



329 



Paid F. A. Emerson, stone . 


$50 54 


W. Parmenter, stone . 


91 


"W. H. Coburn, stone . 


11 08 


H. L. Kimball, stone . 


3 51 


F. X. Chenette, stone . 


4 91 


F. X. Chenette, stone . 


20 53 


S. A. Blood, stone 


5 29 


C. N. Harvey, stone 


9 55 


George Thompson, stone 


10 79 


Edwin Kennedy, stone 


5 98 


E. R. Giddings, stone . 


6 97 


J. H. Proctor, stone 


4 40 


H. Holbrook, stone 


17 31 


City Farm, stone . 


14 84 


Concord Railroad corpora- 




tion, freight 


3 94 


water-works, water 


30 00 


Manchester Gas-light Co., 




coke .... 


38 00 


T. A. Lane, labor on crusher, 




etc 


36 62 


J. Stickney, labor on crusher, 




etc. ..... 


6 05 


Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 




ware, etc. .... 


12 63 


Killey & "Wadleigh, hard- 




ware, etc. .... 


45 


J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 




etc. ..... 


157 83 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co,, 




repair of road-roller, etc. . 


42 19 


Head & Dowst, lumber 


29 13 


L. A. Clough, lumber . 


18 75 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


3 40 



330 



Paid Marden & Woodbury, stone 

chips, etc. . . . . $17 05 
J. P. Fellows & Co., black- 



smithing .... 


87 50 




R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 






ing . 


81 14 . 




Hutchinson Bros., repair of 






crusher, etc. 


118 18 




Farrell Foundry & Machine 






Co., repair of roller . 


64 39 




T. L. Thorpe, cop. waste 


3 60 




L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood . 


7 50 




J. J. Abbott, painting . 


4 80 




S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. . 


1 63 




Pettee & Adams, cement 


16 50 




labor of men and teams 


7,597 03 






in o R F i 


99 




fl> J. JL, OOU 

NCRETE. 


GRADING FOR CO: 






Dr, 




To appropriation .... 


$3,500 00 




reserve fund .... 


1,805 24 






in 90^ 


24 




Cr. 


Paid labor of men and teams 


$5,287 04 




C. H. Robie, gravel 


18 20 

*! i^ 30*1 


94 




*AINS. 


— t: 


SEWERS AND Dl 






Dr. 




To appropriation .... 


$15,000 00 




sewer licenses .... 


1,325 10 




Head & Dowst, overdraft 


4 80 




reserve fund . 


2,319 07 






$18,648 


97 



Cr. 



Paid Pike & Heald, ladles, oil-cans, 

etc $8 79 

C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork, 

etc 475 69 

W. F. Head & Son, brick . 840 00 
A. H. Lowell, ironwork . 246 18 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 19 52 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 43 50 

Killey & Wadleigk, hard- 
ware, etc. .... 
Concord Railroad, freight 
F. S. Bodwell, cesspool stone 
Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . 
Louis Wolf, plumbing . 
J. Stickney, rubber clothing, 

etc 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 
Head & Dowst, lumber 
George Holbrook, lumber . 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

ironwork, etc. ... 4 35 

J. B. Nourse, lumber and 

labor . . . . 10 08 

Manchester Locomotive 

Works, ironwork, etc. . 19 13 

Hood & Parker, oatmeal, etc. 3 78 

Geo. L. Robinson, gum boots 6 50 

Wingate & Gould, gum boots 3 00 

C. H. Thayer, gum boots . 42 00 

T. L. Thorpe, bags . . 14 48 

F. B. Potter, Akron pipe . 1,984 38 



67 


92 


119 


00 


155 


00 


3 


66 


9 


00 


24 


55 


12 


96 


4 


80 


31 


52 



332 



Paid T. A. Lane, Akron pipe, etc 


$2,638 


96 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


580 


35 


Merrill Bros., cement . 


21 


45 


Dr. C. F. Flanders, profes- 






sional services . 


31 


00 


H. Fradd & Co., pail . 




35 


L. Gutterson, oatmeal, etc. 


13 


30 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 






tising . 


15 


00 


Pike & Heald 




10 


" Manchester Weekly Bud 






get," advertising 


3 


90 


G. A. Clark, filing saws 


5 


00 


L. Gutterson, oatmeal, etc. 


8 


38 


Henry Fisk, sewer pipe 


31 


13 


W. B. Corey & Co., teaming 


? 3 


50 


labor of men and teams 


. 11,146 


06 

«ifi «48 Q7 









MAIN-STREET SEWER. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$1,000 00 




reserve fund . 


244 95 


$1,244 95 
•Cr. 






Paid A. ~N. Clapp, spikes, etc. 


$7 84 




D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 


71 15 




C. H. Hutchinson, black- 






smithing, etc. 


5 35 




Killey & Wadleigh, powder, 






etc. ..... 


33 54 




F. B. Potter, Akron pipe 


313 50 





333 



Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber 


$92 


24 




T. A. Lane, hardware, etc. . 


2 


12 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 








etc. ..... 


10 


20 




D. E. Guiney, pipe, etc. 


31 


25 




J. F. Wyraan, coal 


8 


00 




Head & Dowst, use of engine 


20 


00 




L. Robinson 


15 


00 




labor of men and teams 


634 


76 


$1,244 95 








• BRIDGES. 






Dr. 


To appropriation 


$2,000 


00 




reserve fund .... 


226 


72 


«9 99ft 79 



Cr. 



Paid Walter Neal, carpenter-work 
etc. ..... 

J. B. Nourse, carpenter-work 
George Holbrook, carpenter- 
work 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 
D. Wells, lumber, 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 
S. F. Patterson, lumber 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
etc. .... 

A. 1ST. Clapp, hardware, etc 
Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising 
J. B. Clarke, advertisins; 



$17 60 


z 96 


12 


164 


30 


484 37 


14 


35 


133 


86 


140 


20 




90 


5 


52 


6 


00 


4 


50 



334 

Paid " Manchester Weekly Bud- 
get," advertising . . $2 25 

John H. Willey, building 

bridge . . . . 565 00 

Charles H. Robie, repairing 

concrete .... 100 00 

labor of men and teams . 491 75 



COMMONS. 



To appropriation .... $3,000 00 
reserve fund .... 447 14 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber . $71 33 

J. B. Kourse,. lumber . . 1 25 

J. Hodge, lumber . . 10 22 
F. S. Bodwell, stone . .263 77 

Pettee & Adams, cement, etc. 34 47 
"W. H. Vickery, repairing 

lawn-mower, etc. . . 6 65 

J. J. Abbott, paints, etc. . 3 07 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 10 47 

sewer and drains, bricks . 3 90 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc 11 85 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 

etc 22 51 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . 1 53 
C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork, 

etc 81 21 



$2,226 72 

Dr. 

$3,447 14 
Cr. 



335 



Paid Eastman & Dickey, mason- 




work . . " . 


$1 75 


Leander Pope, blacksmithing 


1 55 


Charles H. Bunton, black- 




smithing .... 


4 85 


J. P. Fellows & Co., black- 




smithing .... 


5 37 


H. H. Huntress, flowers, etc. 


50 05 


F. S. Worthen & Son, flow- 




ers ..... 


19 80 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 




repairing lawn-mower 


50 


J. "W. Kimball, teaming 


28 00 


water-works, water 


150 00 


J. B. Clarke, advertising 


7 50 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 




tising .... 


7 00 


Philbrick & Webster, gum 




boots .... 


9 75 


labor of men and teams 


2,638 79 







INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

To appropriation .... $15,000 00 
Concord Railroad, damage to 

sleigh of J. B. Mooar . 4 65 

W. P. Richardson, costs in suit 10 00 

D. W. Lane, agent on account 

of claim of F. E. Brooks 100 00 



,447 14 



Dr. 



$15,114 65 



336 



Cb. 



Paid George H. Allen, attendance 

at supreme court, etc. 
Republican Press Associa- 
tion, advertising 
J. B. Clarke, advertising, etc 
Union Publishing Co., adver 

tising, etc. 
" Manchester Weekly Bud 

get," advertising, etc. 
T. W. Lane, index books 
Temple & Farrington, tax 

books, etc. 
Thomas Wheat, births, deaths 

etc. .... 
J. K. Demaitre, births, deaths 

etc 

C. M. Dodge, births, deaths 

etc. . . . 
E. Sylvain, births, deaths 

etc 

Charles F. Flanders, births 

deaths, etc. 
Guy Holbrook, births, deaths 

etc. . . . . 
V. Bourgeault, births, deaths 

etc 

J. Sullivan, births, deaths 

etc. .... 
J. M. Collity, births, deaths 

etc 

William A. Webster, births 

deaths, etc. 
L. French, births, deaths, etc 



12 00 

6 75 

78 22 

62 50 



6 


25 


2 


70 


159 


24 


13 


50 


43 


75 


6 


00 


11 


00 


20 


50 


2 


00 


2 


50 


79 


75 


7 


00 


6 


75 


19 


00 



337 



Paid William M. Parsons, births 

deaths, etc. 
W. 'W. Wilkins, births, deaths 

etc. .... 
H. C. Canney, births, deaths 

etc 

John Ferguson , births, deaths 

etc 

J. W. D. MacDonald, births 

deaths, etc. 
Geo. D. Towne, births, deaths 

etc 

J. W. Mooar, births, deaths 

etc. .... 
J. A. Jackson, births, deaths 

etc 

J. P. Walker, births, deaths 

etc. .... 
0. D. Abbott, births, deaths 

etc 

R. O. Wood, births, deaths 

etc 

L. B. How, births, deaths, etc 
F. A. Hoyt, births, deaths 

etc 

J. E. A. Lanouette, births 

deaths, etc. 
Wm. Holland, births, deaths 

etc 

F. A. Babbitt, births, deaths 

etc 

Luther Pattee, births, deaths 

etc 



$67 00 

2 75 
27 50 
56 75 
22 25 

3 25 
3 50 

10 75 

1 75 

9 50 

7 50 
5 50 

10 00 
24 75 

1 50 
25 

11 50 



338 



Paid L. M. French, births, deaths 




etc 


$13 50 


D. S. Adams, births, deaths 




etc. .... 


4 25 


G. W. Nutter, births, deaths 




etc. .... 


22 25 


A. Gladu, births, deaths, etc 


4 00 


C. B. Sturtevairt, births 




deaths, etc. 


2 75 


E. 0. Pearson, births, deaths 




etc 


3 00 


Charles Corey, births, deaths 




etc 


1 00 


C. C. Webster, use of water 




ing-trough 


12 00 


J. W. Mooar, damage to team 


l 4 65 


Charles F. Flanders, damage 


i 


to team 


160 00 


L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 


13 25 


Moore & Preston, coal . 


369 45 


F. S. Bodwell, stonework 


> 


etc 


937 64 


Pettee & Adams, cement, etc 


8 20 


First Regiment Band . 


400 00 


James Briggs, dippers, etc. 


9 67 


Manchester Hardware Co. 


> 


hardware . 


3 35 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


1 65 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 




smithing . 


5 25 


C. H. Hutchinson, repairing 


r 


scales . 


80 


Temple & Farrington Co. 


> 


books and stationery 


21 22 



339 



Paid J. F. Larkin, ironwork, etc. 


$201 41 


Pike & Heald, ironwork, etc. 


123 85 


D. J. Murphy, ironwork, etc. 


213 66 


T. A. Lane, fountains, iron- 




work, etc. 


641 73 


S. B. Putnam, expenses to 




Concord, K H. 


72 


Smith & Whitten, teams 


11 00 


E. V. Turcotte, teams . 


13 00 


J. C. Nichols, teams 


36 00 


E. T. James, teams 


26 50 


P. T. Kean, teams 


5 00 


W. J. Freeman, teams . 


57 00 


J. N. Foss, teams . 


65 00 


James Bros., teams 


86 50 


W. H. Weston • 


1 50 


E. R. Coburn & Co., station- 




ery ..... 


2 00 


Dr. J. Blakely, professional 




services .... 


5 00 


H. H. Duncklee . 


5 00 


E. T. James, damage to hack, 




etc. ..... 


60 00 


Almira Molyneux, damage to 




person .... 


35 00 


Joel Daniels & Co., painting 


3 00 


Manchester P. 0., stamps 


1 00 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. . 


61 58 


Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. . 


98 49 


Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. . 


6 05 


E. H. Holmes, lumber, etc. . 


10 75 


Geo. Holbrook, lumber, etc. 


18 50 


Nourse & Ham, lumber, etc. 


3 94 


J. B. Nourse, lumber, etc. 


41 19 



340 

Paid J. A. Barker, care of city li- 
brary boiler, etc. 

Manchester Water - works , 
water .... 

John Hosley, allowance for 
horse-hire .... 

T. A. Lane, labor on fountain 

Sulloway & Topliff, profes- 
sional services . 

Sulloway, Topliff & O'Con- 
nor, professional services . 

Geo. W. Prescott, profes- 
sional services . 

Osgood & Prescott, profes- 
sional services . 

Clough & Clark, professional 
services .... 

H. H. Huse, professional ser- 
vices ..... 

Jeremiah Sullivan, damage to 
person .... 

Frank I. Paige, damage to 
person .... 

Eliza A. Cross, damage to 
person .... 

Mary Frain, damage to person 

F. E. Brooks, damage to per- 
son ..... 

Samuel W. Shepard, damage 
to person .... 

Margaret Sheehan, damage to 
person .... 

Letitia Barnes, damage to per- 
son ..... 



$127 00 


761 


07 


132 


00 




53 


442 


00 


50 


00 


68 


00 


63 


00 


5 


00 


19 


97 


150 


00 


20 


00 


75 


00 


35 


00 


100 


00 


125 


00 


230 


00 


75 


00 



341 



Paid Amherst Emery, damage to 




person .... 


$250 00 


Elra D. Campbell, damage 




to horse .... 


75 00 


A. M. Eastman, damage to 




team, etc. .... 


274 00 


H. D. Gordon, hassock . 


75 


Geo. E. Morrill, distributing 




tax bills .... 


51 38 


Manchester Gas Co., gas 


1 80 


A. D. Gooden, watering- 




trough .... 


3 00 


First Light Battery, firing 




salute July 4, 1887 . 


39 00 


James Fullerton, labor . 


15 00 


T. L. Thorpe, cop waste 


3 00 


A. N". Clapp, grass seed 


3 75 


H. H. Duncklee, entertaining 




guests of city 


10 00 


S. B. Putnam, auditing ac- 




count of collector 


25 00 


¥m, Blake & Co., bell, etc. 


338 22 


J. B. Straw, collating unpaid 




taxes ..... 


39 00 


H. D. Lord, summoning wit- 




nesses .... 


8 32 


Town of Goffstown, taxes 


86 


H. C. Dickey, setting trees . 


4 00 


H. J. Matthews, witness fees, 




etc 


24 64 


Geo. A. Alger, taxes abated 


13 69 


P. Ebbitt, professional ser- 




vices ..... 


7 00 


G. H. Wheeler, hitching posts 


8 25 



253 


20 


3 


80 


35 


00 


5 


33 


3 


00 



342 



Paid L. A. Proctor, trees, etc. . $154 60 
Harry A. Titus, error in tax 4 00 

G. A. Alger, tax and interest 

on Daniel Murray property 5 14 

A. H. Andrews & Co., school 

desks, etc. . . . 181 50 

E. F. Jones, witness fees, etc. 7 26 
Dr. J. Alexander, professional 

services . . . . 3 00 

1ST. P. Kidder, returns of 

births and marriages . 
D. W. King, recording deeds 
Howe & Co., repairing city 

scales .... 

"Weston & Hill, matting 
Hale & Whittemore, frame . 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., 

directories . . . . 30 00 

J. M. Crawford, clerical work 

for inspectors of check-lists 40 50 

U. S. & C. Express Co., ex- 
press on bonds . . . 40 74 
L. T. Meade, blotting paper 72 
Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 

clocks . . . . 133 00 

N. P. Kidder, preparing city 

report, etc. 

F. S. Bodwell, stone 
"W. Heron, Jr., engrossing 

resolutions 
James Dearborn, land . 
David F. Miller, claim for 

sewer pipe and labor . 
C. H. Robie, repairing concrete 



276 


90 


60 


00 


1 


50 


129 


58 


65 


00 


63 


42 



343 



Paid C.H. Robie, repairing concrete $53 96 
E. K. Rowell, use of watering- 
trough .... 

E. F. Jones, witness fees, etc. 
Henry Harmon, witness fees, 

etc 

Western Union Telegraph 

Co., telegrams . 
Geo. A. Alger, error in taxes 

1885 

F. W. Follansbee, moving 
buildings, etc. . 

Manchester Water -works, 
water 

G. A. Ramsdell, copies, etc. 
L. L. Moore, damage to team 
O. E. Kimball 
J. M. Collity, return of births, 

deaths, etc. 
E. Mongeon, return of births, 

deaths, etc. 
C. M. Dodge, return of births, 

deaths, etc. 
labor of men and teams 
By balance on hand 



3 


00 


3 


50 


8 


00 


3 


01 


6 


92 


33 


25 


278 


69 


13 


50 


30 


00 


26 


50 


8 


25 


5 


00 


4 


50 


751 


49 


4,186 


17 




$15,114 65 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

To balance from old account . 11,762 40 

appropriation .... 2,500 00 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent . 1,372 10 

S. B. Putnam, lots sold . . 2,017 80 



Dr. 



$7,652 30 



344 



Cr. 



aid T. A. Lane, lawn-sprinkler, 




etc 


$3 50 


Killey & Wadleigh, phos- 




phate, etc. 


6 50 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 




paint, etc. .... 


107 66 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




ax handles 


45 


H. D. Gordon, umbrella- 




stand, etc. 


5 35 


J. C. Nichols, teams 


23 00 


K E. T. & T. Co., telephone 


50 65 


J. Hodge, lumber 


2 23 


L. M. Alclrich, building 




house .... 


500 00 


water-works, water 


300 00 


J. B. Clarke, advertising, etc. 


32 96 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 




tising .... 


8 75 


0. D. Kimball, printing, etc. 


13 75 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




stationery, etc. . 


8 31 


F. N. McLaren, repair of 




harness, etc. 


2 15 


Charles H. Bunton, black- 




smithing .... 


12 31 


J. Choate, Jr., painting 


50 64 


F. A. Emerson, loam . 


84 31 


W. H. Manning, trees, shrubs, 




etc. ..... 


83 65 


George Blake, stonework 


6 00 


Timothy Shea, cleaning vault 


3 00 


D. H. Varnum & Co., con- 




creting .... 


47 11 



345 



Paid Ferdinand Riedell, loam 




$24 00 


H. H. Huntress, flowers, 


etc. 


29 80 


Geo. E. Hall 




5 80 


J. K Foss, hack . 




3 00 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 




8 92 


D. J. Jones, iron fence 




517 25 


H. H. Huse, clerk of 


sub- 




trustees, etc. 




25 00 


Pike & Heald, registers, 


etc. 


5 95 


James Bros., team 




2 00 


W. H. Vickery, repaii 


of 




lawn-mower 




75 


J. Francis, pansies 




4 20 


E. R. Coburn & Co., station- 




ery .... 




75 


Burns & Poore, coal 




7 00 


0. D. Kimball, printing 




4 25 


labor of men and teams 




2,841 61 


By balance on hand 




2,819 24 









,652 30 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

To balance from old account . $244 96 

appropriation .... 1,500 00 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 1,325 00 

balance ..... 5 37 



Paid F. S. Bodwell, stone . . $11 81 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 19 37 



Dr. 



>3,075 33 
Cr. 



346 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 

etc. .... 
Manchester Hardware Co. 

hardware, etc. . 
Pike & Heald, pipe, etc. 
water-works, water 
Pettee & Adams, lime and 

cement 
T. A. Lane, hose, etc. . 
H. H. Huntress, flowers 

bulbs, etc. 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. 
J. Hodge, lumber, etc. . 
J. W. Kimball, loam, teams 

etc 

F. X. Chenette, stone, teams 

etc 

D. H. Varnum & Co., loam 
etc. .... 

E. A. Parkhurst, trees . 
0. D. Carpenter, Akron pipe 
"W. H. Vickery, repair of 

lawn-mower 
Mrs. Mary Harrington, ma 

nure .... 
Taylor & Flanders, plants 

etc. .... 
J. J. Abbott, paint 
J. R. Carr, paint . 
Dodge & Straw, gum boots 
Head & Dowst, building 

house 
J. B. Yarick Co., hardware 
Palmer & Garmon, iron bolts 

etc. .... 



49 



20 


51 


162 


13 


83 


25 


8 


15 


8 


15 


58 


25 


58 


95 


7 


10 



125 87 
10 50 

17 50 

27 00 
1 40 

1 50 
10 50 



19 


55 


6 


11 


4 


35 


5 


40 


394 


66 


5 


43 



3 77 



347 

Paid Heath & Stevens, blacksmith 

ing, etc. . 
J. J. Abbott, paints, etc. 
L. M. Aldrich, filing saws 
J. Hodge, lumber 
Temple & Farrington Co 

stationery . 
sewers and drains, brick 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc 
labor of men and teams 



$14 


72 


10 


97 




80 


11 


15 


3 


70 


53 


10 


j. 28 


87 


. 1,875 


32 



!,075 33 



AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 
To reserve fund .... $3 50 



Paid water-works, water 



$3 50 



Dr. 

$3 50 
Cr. 
$3 50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation . . . .$30,000 00 
Samuel Eastman & Co., freight 

on hose .... 3 12 

reserve fund .... 1,303 99 



Paid W. L. Blenus, driver, etc. 
Jeremiah Lane, driver 
C. M. Denyou, driver . 



Dr. 





— 1 


m, 


307 
Cr 


11 


$690 


04 








107 


50 








660 


00 









348 



Paid A. E. Foster, driver 
F. J. Dustin, driver 
J. T. O'Dowd, driver 
J. Shea, driver 
C. H. Rogers, driver 
"Walter Seaward, driver 
George Seaward, driver 
George E. Varnum, driver 
Charles S. Brown, driver 
Sylvester Reed, driver . 
Warren F. Wheeler, driver 
Frank A. Pherson, chemical 

engine 
Thos. F. Dodge, engineer, etc 
John Martin, sub-engineer 
Thos. F. Brown, driver 
Chas. T. Newman, chemicals 
Geo. E. Hall, chemicals 
Snelling & Woods, chemicals 
A. D. Smith, chemicals 
Ed. H. Currier, chemicals 
Manchester Locomotive 

Works, steam fire-engine 
Manchester Locomotive 

Works, ironwork, etc 
Manchester Locomotive 

Works, ironwork, etc. 
J. B. Nourse, lumber, etc. 
Head & Dowst, lumber 
L. Gutterson, matches, oil 

etc 

H. Fradcl & Co., matches, oil 

etc. . 
J. B. Clarke, printing 



£124 


50 


109 


00 


100 


00 


26 


50 


216 


50 


120 


00 


6 


00 


169 


00 


63 


00 


26 


75 


660 


00 


660 


00 


660 


00 


7 


50 


44 


00 


1 


45 


7 45 


2 


98 


31 


86 




70 


,600 


00 


29 


90 


2 


50 


1 


85 


17 


03 



6 04 

5 41 
47 25 



349 



Paid George H. Wheeler, sub- 
engineer, etc. . . . $42 00 

H. D. Gordon, furniture, etc. 82 35 

water-works, water . . 686 77 
Chas. F. Sprague, dry goods 6 14 

Weston & Hill, dry goods . 75 

Plumer & Hoi ton, reefers . 116 00 
Thos. W. Lane, chief en- 
gineer .... 1,000 00 

Thos. W. Lane, blank books, 

etc. . . . . . 21 05 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repair 

of steamers . . . 18 20 

Weston & Hill, dry goods . 8 51 

C. F. Sprague, dry goods . 1 75 

Stephen Gardner, care of 

boiler . . . . 155 50 

K E. T. & T. Co., telephones 79 51 

Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 298 35 
People's Gas-light Co., gas . 122 92 
N". S. Bean Co., services July 

4, 1887 . . . . 8 00 

Pennacook Hose Co., services 

July 4, 1887 . . . 8 00 

Fire King Engine Co., ser- 
vices July 4, 1887 . 8 00 
Amoskeag Engine Co., ser- 
vices July 4," 1887 . 8 00 
Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder 

Co., services July 4, 1887 8 00 

Merrimack Hose Co., ser- 
vices July 4, 1887 . 8 00 
Massabesic Hose Co., services 

July 4, 1887 ... 8 00 



350 



Paid J. B. Smith, automatic gas 
burners, etc. 
Moore & Preston, coal . 
J. F. Wyman, coal 
L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 
and wood . 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal 
Thos. P. Riley, Moods, blan 

kets, etc. . 
J. G. Lake, harness dressing 
etc 

F. N. McLaren, harness, etc 
Cavanaugh Bros., harness, 

etc. .... 
H. C. Ranno, harness, etc. 
Hutchinson Bros., ironwork 

etc. .... 
Pike & Heald, stove, iron 

work, etc. . 
Manchester Hardware Co. 

hardware, etc. . 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 

etc. .... 
Manchester Hardware Co 

hardware, etc. . 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc 
Manchester Locomotive 

Works, labor on steamer 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair 

ing teams, etc. . 
A. E. Lovejoy, washing 
Sarah Wyman, washing 



$162 96 


786 


11 


4 


00 


77 


19 


126 


00 



21 50 



14 


00 


51 


81 


18 


67 


232 


34 


52 


94 


55 


72 


24 


45 


2 


15 


83 


33 


7 


98 


4 


04 


38 


54 



2 00 

84 02 
8 84 
2 00 



351 



Paid Annie O'Dowd, washing . $6 00 

Mary Fish, washing ... 14 71 

Chas. E. Berry, names, etc. . 112 00 
Alexander Boyd, play pipes . 30 00 

Geo. A. Davis, labor on hose 7 00 

Carpenter & Co., brooms . 4 2& 

D. A. Simons, cuspidores, etc. 16 42 

A. T. Barr, care of boiler . 5 25 

Louis "Wolf, coal-hods, etc. . 2 00 

Peter Milon, painting car- 
riages, etc. . . . 53 00 
Joseph Smith, carting hose . 50 
C. H. Hodgman, carting hose 1 00 
J. C. Nichols & Son, team . 1 00 
J. Stickney, matting . . 4 33 
J. H. Gould, repairing pump 2 00 
J). Kerwin, soap ... 4 50 
Concord Railroad, freight . 3 12 
Peter Milon, painting car- 
riages, etc. . . . 119 00 
Samuel Eastman & Co., jacket 

hose ..... 1,295 00 
Stephen Thomas, cleaning 

engine ..... 2 00 

Boston Woven Hose Co., 

hose 65 00 

Geo. B. Forsaith, polishing 

steamers .... 7 60 

I. H. Thurber & Son, dam- 
age to team 
Annie F. Dowd, washing 
J. W. "Watson, pasturing 
horse .... 

J. H. Alsop, mop wash, etc. 



1 


60 


7 


25 


20 


00 


1 


41 



352 



Paid Boyd Bros., use of horse, 

etc. . 
Bishop & Bro., ladder 
D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 
Merrill Bros., use of horse 
J. R. Carr & Co., apron for 

steamer 

C. H. Hodgrnan & Co., truck 
ing . . . . 

Scollay & Rich, polish, etc 
Cavanaugh Bros., one pair 

horses 
T. L. Thorpe, cop waste 
A. S. Jackson, snaps 

D. A. Simons, crockery, etc 
C. C. Kerrick, one pair horses 
J. B. Jones . 
Samuel Eastman & Co., labor 

on hose, etc. 
Geo. C. Lord 
P. M. Carpenter . 
Amoskeag S. F. E. Co., pay- 
roll . 

Fire King S. F. E.'Co., pay-roll 
K S. Bean S. F. E. Co., pay- 
roll . . 
Pennacook Hose Co., pay-roll 
Chemical Engine Co., pay-roll 
Massabesic Hose Co., pay-roll 
Merrimack Hose Co., pay-roll 
Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder 

Co., pay-roll 
Fred. S. Bean, assistant en- 
gineer and clerk 



$6 00 
1 75 
5 35 
8 00 

7 00 





50 


6 


00 


675 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


1 


15 


800 


00 


1 


00 


30 


00 


1 


25 


4 


00 


1,485 


00 


1,485 


00 


1,485 


00 


2,045 


00 


435 


00 


1,245 


00 


1,245 


00 


2,545 


00 


150 


00 



353 



Paid Ruel Manning, assistant en- 
gineer 
Eugene S. Whitney, assistant 

engineer . 
J. F. Pherson, assistant en 

gineer ... 
Head & Dowst, lumber . 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc 
D. F. Cressey, ironwork 
H. Fradd & Co., matches 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., soapine 
D. M. Goodwin, brooms 
Burpee & Co., merchandise 
Mrs. W. L. Blenus 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 
Edwin Rogers, insulators, etc 
Cutler Bros. Co., bicarbonate 

soda .... 
Stephen Gardner, care of 

boiler 
S. L. Flanders, oil, wood, etc 
Manchester Locomotive 

Works, ironwork, etc. 
Chas. E. Berry, hames, etc. 
Mary Fish, washing 
Temple & Farrington Co., sta 

tionery 

B. M. Lay, driver supply 
wagon 

Concord Railroad, freight 

C. L. Bly, magnetic bell 
Snelling & Woods, chemicals, 

etc. . 



$125 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


22 


29 


12 


96 


2 


.50 




13 




20 


4 


75 


2 


10 


3 


00 




75 


3 


00 



8 12 



31 


00 


5 


57 


165 


45 


52 


00 


1 


23 



1 62 

6 00 

26 

5 50 

5 95 



23 



354 



Paid People's Gas-light Co., gas. . 


$55 44 


R. D. Gay . . . . 


1 25 


T. L. Thorpe, cop waste 


10 00 


Eureka Fire Hose Co., hose 


32 50 


Welch & Ball, horses . 


650 00 


Bay State Belting Co., hose, 




etc. ..... 


46 50 


labor of extra teamsters 


1,577 00 


i 





,307 11 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 


. $1,500 00 




T. W. Lane, old wire sold 


3 


75 


$1,503 75 














Cr. 


Paid Concord Railroad, freight 


$5 


23 




A. D. Smith, sulphate of cop 








per, etc. 


100 


19 




D. B. Varney, copper, etc. 


178 


74 




J. B. Smith, tickers, etc. 


58 


73 




Cutler Bros., blue vitriol 


32 


23 




T. W. Lane, carbons, truck 








ing, etc. 


12 


25 




Tristam Dame, labor 


1 


00 




L. W. Tenney, " 


4 


50 




Walter Arthur, " 


10 


75 




American Electric Works 


8 


99 




Edwin Rogers, signal boxes 








etc. . 


630 


79 




Concord Railroad, freight 




74 




L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. 


8 


38 





355 



Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


$16 00 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


75 


Pike & Heald, sink, etc. 


5 49 


J. H. Bunnell, ice 


24 15 


T. A. Lane, hardware, etc. 


1 83 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware 




etc 


20 


Charles L. Bly . 


3 25 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 




etc 


1 58 


L. W. Tenney, labor 


3 00 


C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 




in 0. 


2 43 


C. H. Baker, trucking . 


1 10 


J. N. Foss, teams . 


3 50 


James Bros., " 


5 00 


By balance on hand 


382 95 







:,503 75 



INDIVIDUAL FIRE-ALARM. 
To appropriation .... $3,000 00 



Paid Tenney & Landon, labor and 




material .... 


$795 00 


Concord Railroad, freight 


1 76 


Albert L. Russell, material, 




etc 


1,500 00 


By balance on hand 


703 24 



Dr. 

!,000 00 
Cr. 



$3,000 00 



356 



FIREMEN'S ANNUAL PARADE. 



To appropriation . 



Paid First Regiment Band, music 
Manchester Drum Corps, " 
T. W. Lane, stationery, etc 
J. B. Clarke, printing . 
T. A. Barker, caterer . 
Edwin E. Weeks . 
■ W. S. Jewell 

F. D. Hanscom, use of horse 

By balance on hand 



$300 00 



c $50 00 


10 


00 


4 


90 


6 


85 


166 


00 


3 


60 


14 

• 

e 1 


00 
50 


43 


15 



Dr. 



3300 00 
Cr. 



$300 00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $27,000 00 
M. J. Jenkins, costs and fines . 2,476 14 
J. C. Bickford, " " . 1,084 30 



Dr. 



$30,560 44 
Cr. 



Paid N. P. Hunt, judge 

J. C. Bickford, clerk . 

M. J. Jenkins, city marshal . 

H. W. Longa, asst. marshal . 

H. W. Longa, conveying pris- 
oners, witness fees, etc. 

M. J. Healy, professional ser- 
vices ..... 



$1,500 00 
600 00 

854 75 
700 00 

720 26 

2 00 



357 



Paid J. Andrews, professional ser- 




vices ..... 


$4 00 


Geo. A. Little, professional 




services 


2 00 


J. P. Bartlett, professional 




services .... 


5 00 


" Manchester Weekly Bud- 




get," printing . 


6 00 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




stationery, etc. . 


1 34 


Campbell & Williams, print- 




ing . . 


85 15 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


123 89 


Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 


191 40 


People's Gas-light Co., gas . 


126 56 


Western Union Telegraph 




Co., telegrams . 


30 56 


New England Telephone and 




Telegraph Co., telephones 


130 85 


Daniel Davis, meals for pris- 




oners .... 


255 20 


J. N. Foss, teams 


4 00 


J. C. Nichols & Son 


2 50 


E. T. James, teams 


226 00 


F. X. Chenette, teams . 


53 75 


James Bros., " 


2 00 


Charles H. Bunton, black- 




smithing . . 


5 05 


M. J. Coleman, blacksmithing 


29 57 


T. W. Lane, stationery, etc. 


26 45 


J. B. Varick Co., sperm oil, 




hardware, etc. . 


17 71 


Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 




ware, etc. 


8 34 



358 



dd Moore & Preston, coal . 


$348 69 


L. B. Bodwell, coal, etc. 


60 31 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 


61 36 


Henry Gorman, brooms, oil, 




etc 


36 88 


Carl E. York, soap, etc. 


4 44 


Frances Franker, washing 




blankets, etc. 


. 28 50 


Ada Franker, washing blank- 




ets, etc. .... 


40 50 


Mabel Frost, washing blank- 




ets, etc. .... 


14 00 


Delia Pecor, scrubbing 


12 00 


Dr. James Sullivan, profes- 




sional services . 


58 00 


Dr. F. A. Hoyt, professional 




services .... 


11 00 


Manchester Water - works, 




water .... 


193 95 


J. Stickney, rubber tubing . 


2 18 


C. M. Bailey, toilet paper 


20 00 


H. D. Gordon, repair of cell, 




etc 


8 00 


C. H. Reed, expenses to Lynn, 




Mass 


8 75 


J. Holland & Co., medicine, 




etc 


35 85 


P. H. Kelley, drugs, etc. 


7 25 


C. H. Thayer 


50 


Bly & Fellows, crackers 


14 40 


Weston & Hill, matting, etc. 


3 44 


J. G. Lake, leather frame for 




slate 


10 00 


Frank Fish, repair of chairs 


3 00 



359 



Paid Lee's Gas Governor Co., gas 

governor ... . . $30 81 
Dr. W. F. Robie, professional 

services .... 7 00 

Thomas Franker, burying 

nuisances .... 
C. H. Wood, lettering slate . 

C. F. Sprague, cotton cloth 
F. W. Avery, mop waste 
A. H. Paige, badges 

D. Evans & Co., coat buttons 
I. L. Heath, associate justice 
J. B. Varick Co., oil, etc. 
pay-roll of officers 

By balance on hand 



2 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 


3 


20 


21 


00 


19 


17 


70 


00 


7 


36 


21,975 


68 


1,723 


39 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 

To appropriation .... $20,000 00 
reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred 537 50 



,560 44 



Paid Manchester Water - works, 

water . . . .$20,537 50 



Dr. 

$20,537 50 
Cr. 

,537 50 



$189 30 


96 


60 


86 


03 


81 


20 


2 


00 


1 


60 


33 


75 



360 
CITY HALL. 

To rents $2,220 75 

reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . 166 70 



Paid Manchester Gas Co., gas 
People's Gas Co., gas . 
New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Co., telephones 
Ellen Ahearn, scrubbing, etc. 
Otis Whitten, labor 
Matilda Lavine, scrubbing . 
Mary Fish, " 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 

wood .... 52 77 

E. J. Williams & Son, repair 

of roof, etc. ... 37 10 

Manchester Water - works, 

water .... 14 40 

Joel Daniels & Co., painting 198 41 
J. L.Kennedy & Co., " 17 44 

H. D. Gordon, chairs, etc. . 12 50 

J. A. Barker, extra services . 22 00 

W. S. Baker, whitewashing . 6 75 

Bennett & Lord, " . 6 10 

Head & Dowst, carpenter- 
work, etc. . . . 767 15 
Killey, Wadleigh & Moore, 

hardware, etc. ... 49 

J. B. Varick Co., glass, hard- 
ware, etc. . . . 169 41 



Dr. 

$2,387 45 
Cr. 



361 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co 

hardware, etc. . 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
D. E. Guiney, " " 

Pike & Heald, " 
Brock & Driscoll . 
"Weston & Hill, oil-cloth, etc 
"W. H. Vickery, repair of 

locks, etc. 
A. M. Finney, cleaning car 

pets, etc. . 
J. K. Rhodes, labor 
L. Gutterson, brooms, etc. 
Union Publishing Co., adver 

tising 
J. B. Clarke, advertising 
Carpenter & Co., brooms 
C. S. Decker, flag, etc. 
J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 
J. J. Holland & Co. . 
J. C. Young, repair of roof 
Moore & Preston, coal 
Barton & Co., matting 
labor of men and teams 



$8 32 
30 82 
59 36 
23 58 
40 
37 38 

3 65 



6 


71 


19 


20 


1 


61 


6 


25 


8 


44 


2 


25 


17 


50 


3 


63 


2 


20 


5 


56 


333 


87 


4 47 


17 


25 



$2,387 45 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 



. $1,500 00 



$1,500 00 



Cr. 



Paid John B. Clarke, printing re- 
port, etc $884 86 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

stationery .... 71 51 

Campbell & Williams, print- 
ing .. . . . . 89 05 

Manchester P. O., stamps, 
etc. ..... 

¥m, E. Moore, printing 

T. H. Tuson, printing . 

C. P. Buckman, ink 

T. W. Lane, stationery 

Mrs. K. Cook, pens 

Hayes & Arnold, pens . 

E. R. Coburn & Co., station- 
ery 

By balance on hand 



10 


60 


6 


00 


2 


85 




75 


7 


80 


3 


00 


2 


00 


4 


58 


417 


00 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

To appropriation .... $2,000 00 
T. A. Lane, overdraft . 1 87 

reserve fund, am't transferred 157 38 



$1,500 00 

Dr. 

$2,159 25 
Cr. 



Paid Frank Fogg & Co., plumbing, 

etc 89 35 

James Briggs, repairing fur- 
naces .... 60 00 
D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 230 88 



363 



Paid T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc 
Head & Dowst, lumber, etc 
A. F. Cate, lumber, etc. 
J. B. Nourse, lumber, etc. 
*W. Ireland, lumber, etc. 
J. Hodge, lumber, etc. 
P. Brown, lumber, etc. 
N. K. Bixby, lumber, etc. 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, lum 

ber, etc. 
G. H. Dudley, lumber, etc. 
N. W. Graves, lumber, etc. 
Manchester Hardware Co. 

hardware, etc. 
Killey & Waclleigh, hardware 

etc 

Manchester Hardware Co 

hardware, etc. . 
J.B.Varick Co.,hardware,etc 
Manchester Locomotive 

Works, ironwork 
Hutchinson Bros., ironwork 
C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork 
J. J. Abbott, painting, etc. 
J. L. Kennedy & Co., paint- 
ing, etc. . 
Sullivan & Sloan, painting, 

etc 

J. R. Carr, painting, etc. 

J. A. Sargent, painting, etc. 

Mills & Sturtevant, painting, 

etc 



$19 54 


100 


00 


21 


62 


83 


20 


131 


39 


111 


74 


302 


82 


4 


84 


30 


78 


43 


50 


44 40 


4 


35 


27 


00 



5 50 



1 45 



1 


92 


92 37 


63 


55 


3 


20 


60 


60 


14 


89 



52 91 

64 33 
23 70 

58 86 

8 25 



364 



Paid Merrill & Morgan, glass, etc. 
Joel Daniels & Co., painting, 

etc. ..... 

J. P. Finn, painting, etc. 
Wm. F. Starkweather, paint- 
ing, etc. . 
L. & W. Seiberlich, painting, 

etc 

Bennett & Lord, mason-work 
Merrill & Laird, mason-work 
J. J. Bennett, mason-work 
James Dolan, mason- work 
W. S. Baker, mason-work 
E. J. Williams & Son, repair 

ing roofs . 
J. C. Young estate, repairing 

roofs 
labor of teams 
Sanborn Carriage Co., iron 

work, etc. 
W. L. Blenus, ironwork 
1ST. J. Whalen, ropes 
D. A. Simons, wall-paper 
Temple & Farrington Co 

wall-paper 
Louis Wolf 



$1 25 

9 89 
29 50 

202 93 

8 16 

50 50 

38 00 

3 50 

5 00 

1 50 

49 25 



3 


54 


6 


00 


14 


95 


15 


70 


4 


50 


10 


71 


21 


43 


6 


00 



$2,159 25 



WEST MANCHESTER ENGINE-HOUSE. 



To appropriation 



. 85,500 00 



Dr. 



$5,500 00 



365 



Cr. 



Paid Head & Dowst, contractors . 


$3,880 09 


D. E. Guiney, piping and 




plumbing 


26 37 


T. A. Lane, piping and plumb- 




ing ..... 


32 81 


Pike & Heald, piping and 




plumbing .... 


917 86 


Hutchinson Bros., ironwork 


12 13 


Wm, F. Starkweather, paint- 




ing 


12 00 


J. Stickney, rubber mats 


21 00 


"Weston & Hill, carpets, etc. 


101 12 


By balance on hand 


496 62 







i,500 00 



WEBSTER-STREET ENGINE-HOUSE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $12,000 00 

$12,000 00 

Or. 
Paid W. Ireland, contractor . . $8,825 00 
W. M. Butterfield, architect 71 00 

By balance on hand . . . 3,104 00 

$12,000 00 



CITY LIBRARY. 

Dr. 

To balance from old account . $1,152 00 

appropriation .... 3,800 00 

$4,952 00 



366 



Paid Mrs. M. J. Buncher, librarian $800 00 

James E. Arthur, assistant 

librarian .... 149 75 

H. E. Martin, assistant libra- 
rian 140 00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

binding books, etc. . . 327 36 

People's Gas-light Co., gas . 92 54 

Manchester Gas-light Co., 

gas 166 50 

S. C. Gould, sets of news- 



Cr. 



papers .... 


300 00 




J. B. Clarke, printing . 


11 00 




L. B. Clough, insurance 


100 00 




L. B. Bod well & Co., wood . 


17 00 




Moore & Preston, coal . 


588 86 




Marshall & Underhill, ice 


4 60 




Trustees of city library, books 


1,000 00 




N". P. Hunt, stamps, etc. 


5 40 




Manchester Water - works, 






water .... 


16 00 




By balance on hand 


1,232 99 


$4,952 00 






MILITIA. 




Dr. 


To appropriation .... 


$700 00 


$700 00 
Cr. 






Paid Sheridan Guards . 


$100 00 




Manchester City Guards 


100 00 




Manchester Cadets 


100 00 





367 



Paid First K H. Battery 


$100 00 


Manchester War Veterans' . 


100 00 


Amoskeag Veterans 


100 00 


Headquarters First Regt. 




K H. K G. 


100 00 







1700 00 



WOMEN'S AID SOCIETY HOSPITAL. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $400 00 

$400 00 

Cr. 



Paid Mrs. A. Blood, treasurer . $400 00 



WATER-WORKS. 

To balance from old account . $18,325 22 

Chas. K Walker, water rents 80,518 17 



$400 00 



Dr. 





$c 


>8,843 39 
Cr. 


id Chas. K. Walker, superin- 






tendent, etc. 


$1,551 25 




Manchester Locomotive 






Works, ironwork, etc. 


566 55 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 






etc. ..... 


194 24 




Manchester Hardware Co., 






hardware, etc. . 


32 12 




Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 






etc 


2 40 





368 



Paid T. A. Lane, couplings, valves, 
etc. . 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings, 
etc 

Pike & Heald, hardware, etc. 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 
Chas. H. Bunton, blacksmith- 
ing 

E. R. Coburn & Co., station- 
ery . . 

Temple & Farrington Co 

stationery . 
Union Publishing Co., print 

ing .... 
Thos. H. Tuson, printing 
Campbell & Williams, printing 
Wm. E. Moore, printing 
John B. Clarke, printing 
Concord Railroad, freight 
K E.T. & T. Co., telephones 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 
E. P. Johnson Co., coal 
J. Stickney, wading-boots 

etc 

Jos. B. Sawyer, engineering 
E. T. James, teams 
James Bros., teams 
P. C. Cheney Co., wiping 

waste, etc. 
Coffin Valve Co., water gates 
G-eo. Woodman & Co., pipe 

etc 

T. H. Risclon & Co., water 

wheels, etc. . 



$128 24 

231 19 
13 49 

37 67 

13 30 
16 02 

46 72 



5 


00 


65 


10 


17 90 


9 


50 


43 


50 


861 


30 


90 


45 


45 


00 


13 


90 


17 


20 


238 


78 


71 


00 


56 


00 


31 


22 


258 


00 


693 


46 


5,331 


08 



369 



aid Sumner & Goodwin, corp. 




cocks, etc. 


$213 16 


Leonard & Ellis, machine oil, 




etc. ..... 


139 80 


Builders Iron Foundry, iron- 




work .... 


82 00 


Warren Foundry and Ma- 




chine Co., iron pipe . 


7,518 49 


Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 




jute packing 


25 48 


Holyoke Hydrant and Iron 




Works, hydrants 


341 00 


National Meter Co., meters . 


2,398 95 


Union Water Meter Co., 




meters .... 


245 71 


Head & Dowst, lumber 


69 28 


D. I. Mahoney, lumber 


99 32 


J. Hodge, lumber 


2 01 


Wm. W. Hubbard, sawdust 


1 50 


E. A. G. Holmes, lumber and 




labor .... 


270 32 


J. H. Maynard, lumber 


12 00 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 




labor .... 


8 70 


Austin, Flint & Day, shavings 


50 


J. H. Cunningham, pipe 


30 03 


Boston Lead Manuf'g Co., 




pig-lead .... 


210 79 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


15 90 


Merrill Bros., cement . 


49 90 


Waite, Williams & Co., ma- 




chine oil . 


33 48 


Gloucester Iron Works, iron 




PiP e 


104 05 



M 



370 

Paid Mrs. Mary Sweeney, damage 
by water . ... 

J. J. Lane, damage by water 

John Francis, damage by 
water .... 

Mrs. Mary Langdon, damage 
by water .... 

Charles H. Manning, inspec- 
tion, etc., of pumps . 

D. B. Varney, repair on pat- 
tern, etc. .... 

Pike & Heald, ironwork, etc. 

George E. Morrill, auditing 
accounts .... 

D. A. Simons, cuspidores, 
etc 

Amoskeag Manufactu ring 
Co., lumber 

Thomas Buckley, damage by 
water .... 

N. H. Rubber Co., rubber 
mat ..... 

Joseph A. Brown, teams 

J.<L. Kennedy, painting 

L. P. Reynolds, cigars . 

George Fletcher & Co., cater- 
ing June 17, 1887 . 

Burditt & White, fire-clay . 

J. H. Wales, team 

Wm. P. Miller & Co. . 

F. H. Roberts, catering June 
17,1887 . .' . 

G. R. Vance & Co., galvan- 
ized iron pails, etc. . 



$5 


00 


8 


00 


32 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


1 


40 


76 


35 


16 


50 


5 


35 


2 


30 


5 


00 


8 


50 


80 


00 


30 


00 


36 


00 


530 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 


25 


26 


11 


10 


12 


32 



371 



Paid L. Gutterson, matches, soap, 

etc 

F. B. Potter, Akron pipe 
Town of Auburn, taxes 
Charles H. Robie, concreting 
P. 0. Holmes & Co., wheel 

gear .... 
George W. Wales 
American Steam Gauge Co 

repair of gauge, etc. 
J. J. McDonough 
C. H. Robie, concreting 
Dennison & Brown, account 

books, etc. 
Lowell Iron Foundry, iron 

work 
A. M. Eastman, oil 
Merrill & Morgan, painting 
H. M. Young 

E. J. "Williams & Son, repair 
of roof, etc. 

F. C. Davenport, ladles 
Dennison & Brown, record 

book 
Cyrus Whittemore, mason 

work, etc. . 
George Whitford, teaming 

G. H. Bartlett, manure, etc. 
Merrill & Laird, mason-work 
A. F. Fox, land . 
Gloucester Iron Works, pipe 
F. F. Waters Manufacturing 

Co., drill . ... 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 



$9 83 


192 


50 


15 


76 


24 


01 


150 


00 


1 


50 


11 


40 


1 


00 


8 


46 



56 25 



16 


37 


1 


80 


221 


45 


1 


75 


13 


55 


3 


25 



10 75 



37 


90 


7 


00 


10 


00 


23 


90 


3,000 


00 


170 


10 


6 


00 


16 


08 



372 



Paid E. D. Wood & Co., ironwork 


$350 00 


Jarechi, Hays & Co., stop- 




cocks, etc. 


460 75 


Lowell Iron Foundry, iron- 




work .... 


1 91 


American Steam Gauge Co., 




repair of gauge 


2 00 


Ludlow Valve Manufacturing 




Co., hydrants . 


186 00 


A. M. Eastman, oil, etc. 


4 05 


George Fletcher & Co., use 




of steamer 


15 00 


L. A. Clough, wood 


10 60 


L. B. Bod well & Co., coal . 


65 60 


Henry Chandler, water com- 




missioner .... 


15 00 


A. C. Wallace, water com- 




missioner .... 


42 00 


E. H. Hobbs, water commis- 





sioner .... 


45 00 


Joseph F. Kennard, water 




commissioner . 


39 00 


James A. Weston, water 




commissioner 


119 00 


Alpheus Gay, water commis- 




sioner . ... 


81 00 


John Hosley, ex officio, water 




commissioner . 


33 00 


labor of men and teams 


10,382 28 


interest, amount transferred . 


36,000 00 


By balance on hand 


23,499 56 



,843 39 



373 

FUNDED DEBT. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $3,500 00 

$3,500 00 



Paid city bonds .... $3,500 00 


Cr. 

$3,500 00 




ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

To appropriation .... $2,500 00 


Dr. 

$2,500 00 
Cr. 

$2,500 00 


Paid sundry persons . . . $2,411 22 
By balance on hand . . . 88 78 





DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $8,000 00 
reserve fund .... 905 82 

$8,905 82 

Cr. 
Paid George E. Morrill, collector . $8,905 82 

$8,905 82 



374 

STATE TAX. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $48,404 00 

$48,404 00 



Paid S. A. Carter, state treasurer . $48,404 00 



COUNTY TAX. 



To appropriation .... $35,237 00 
reserve fund .... 74 



Paid Edwin F. Jones, county 

treasurer . . .$35,237 74 



Cr. 

,404 00 

Dr. 

,237 74 
Cr. 





U,AOI (** 


1 

OUTSTANDING TAXES. 






Dr. 


1884 $925 83 




1885 967 33 




1886 1,188 11 




• 

TAXES FOR 1886. 






Dr. 


To resident taxes . . . $371,847 36 




non-resident taxes . . 1,291 60 




$373,138 96 



375 



By collections" . . . $348,232 46 

abatements . . . 719 08 

discounts .... 8,905 82 

balance uncollected . . 15,281 60 



Cr. 



$373,138 96 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 

To appropriation .... $15,000 00 
To E. B. Woodbury, overdraft 3 33 

L. C. Baldwin, overdraft . . 3 33 

J. G. Dearborn, overdraft . 6 67 



Dr. 







— $1 


5,013 33 
Cr. 


Paid John Hosley, mayor 


$1,800 


00 




George H. Stearns, mayor 


20 


00 




S. B. Putnam, city treasurer 


1,200 


00 




N. P. Kidder, city clerk 


900 


00 




J. M. Collity, city physician 


200 


00 




Wm. E. Buck, superintendent 






• 


of schools 


1,800 


00 




Edward F. Jones, city soli- 








citor ..... 


500 


00 




J. A. Barker, city messenger 


699 


96 




J. B. Straw, collector of taxes 


1,255 


86 




Geo. E. Morrill, collector of 








taxes .... 


400 


00 




C. B. Littlefield, inspector of 








milk ..... 


150 


00 




E. P. Richardson, inspector of 








buildings .... 


125 


00 





376 



Paid William A. Webster, health 

officer 
Geo. C. Hoitt, health officer 
Joseph B. Sawyer, " 
Judith Sherer, matron of pest 

house 
P. D. Harrison, clerk of com 



$200 00 
200 00 
200 00 

360 00 



mon council 


100 00 


Wm. D. Ladd, supervisor, 


6 00 


Wm. T. Payne, 


14 00 


A. C. Flauders, " 


7 00 


Benj. L. Hartshorn, " 


6 00 


John Dowst, " 


6 00 


D. H. Young, " 


6 00 


Geo. C. Kemp, " 


9 00 


P. W. McKinley, " 


2 00 


J. F. Pherson, " 


2 00 


F. J. Morrison, " 


4 00 


D. F. Shea, 


4 00 


A. L. F. Geoffroy, ward clerk 


> 


etc. .... 


11 00 


John F. Looney, ward clerk 


: 5 00 


Geo. B. Forsaith, selectmai 


i 2 50 


J. J. Hayes, " 


2 50 


Chas. H. Uhlig, 


5 00 


J. J. Minturu, " 


2 50 


Ed.' K Baker, 


2 50 


D. O. Furnald, assessor 


520 23 


F. E. McKean, 


145 00 


H. D. Lord, 


165 00 


Geo. H. Dudley, " 


320 00 


John Ryan, " 


165 00 


Chas. H. Brown, " 


145 00 


Ira W. Stearns, " 


165 00 



377 



Paid J. E. Stearns, assessor . 


$165 00 


Isaac Whittemore, assistant 




assessor .... 


47 50 


E. W. Brigharu, assistant as- 




sessor .... 


65 00 


R. P. Silver, assistant assessor 


42 50 


F. B. Potter, " 


25 00 


J. P. Moore, " 


78 00 


!N". Nichols, clerical services 




for assessors 


, 252 50 


C. S. Fisher, clerical services 




for assessors 


130 00 


W. G. Furnald, clerical ser- 




vices for assessors 


90 00 


J. B. Rejimbal, interpreter 




for assessors 


40 00 


Benj. L. Hartshorn, inspector 


46 13 


E. J. Lawler, " 


46 13 


D. 0. Furnald, " 


46 13 


Isaac Whittemore, " 


48 63 


H. D. Lord, 


54 00 


Joseph A. Foster, " 


46 13 


H. F. Stone, 


2 25 


Geo. C. Kemp, " 


23 63 


Horace Gordon, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Wm. H. Maxwell, overseer of 




the poor and clerk 


100 00 


James Sutcliffe, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


William Marshall, overseer 




of the poor 


25 00 


Horatio Fradd, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 



378 



Paid Charles Francis, overseer of 

the poor . . . . $25 00 
Thos. P. Conway, overseer of 

the poor . ... 6 25 

F. J. Morrison, overseer of 

the poor . . . . 16 66 

T. L. Quimby, overseer of 

the poor . . . . 25 00 

John Hosley, ex officio, over- 
seer of the poor . . 25 00 
N. P. Hunt, member school 

board .... 10 00 

W. H. Huse, member school 

board .... 10 00 

J. E. Dodge, member school 

board and clerk . . 110 00 

J, J. Holland, member school 

board .... 10 00 

S. D. Lord, member school 

board .... 10 00 

J. G. Hutchinson, member 

school board . . . 10 00 

G. B. "Woodbury, member 

school board . . . 10 00 

S. W. Clarke, member school 

board .... 10 00 

W. C. Clarke, member school 

board .... 10 00 

Benj. C. Dean, member school 

board .... 10 00 

C. H. Manning, member school 

board .... 10 00 

T. F. Collins, member school 

board .... 10 00 



379 

Paid A. C. Flanders, member school 

board 
G. W. Nutter, member school 

board 
L. C. Baldwin, member school 

board 
M. P. Hall, member school 

board 
John Hosley, ex officio, mem 

ber school board 
Edward L. Kimball, ex officio 

member school board 
By balance on hand 



$10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 
1,353 84 



$15,013 33 



STARK-MONUMENT SQUARE. 



To appropriation . 



Paid Chas. H. Bnnton, blacksmith 
ing . . 
John B. Varick Co., scythe, 

snath, etc. 
labor of men and teams 
By balance on hand 



$300 00 



45 



2 


75 


42 


00 


254 


80 



Dr. 

$300 00 

Cr. 



$300 00 



RESERVE FUND. 



To appropriation . 
show licenses . 



$20,000 00 
170 00 



Dr. 



380 



To rent of tenements 
dog licenses 
interest on taxes 
milk licenses . 



By paupers off farm 
City Farm . . 
highway district No. 2 



a a 


3 


it u 


4 


n a 


6 


u a 


8 


a a 


9 


a a 


10 


a a 


11 


a u 


12 


a (« 


13 


new highways 




watering streets 


. 



paving streets . 

macadamizing streets 

grading for concrete 

sewers and drains 

commons 

bridges 

Valley cemetery 

fire department 

hydrant service 

City Hall 

repairs of buildings 

discount on taxes 

county tax 



$487 90 


340 


00 


298 


49 


43 


00 




$iii.L,OOt7 Of 




Cr. 


$2,308 


20 


322 


73 


5 


28 


226 


85 


7 


63 


15 


93 


17 


55 


6 


40 


451 


30 


158 


89 


36 


00 


12 


94 


1,695 


71 


436 


71 


1,648 


86 


976 


31 


1,805 


24 


2,319 


07 


447 


14 


226 


72 


5 


37 


1,303 


99 


537 


50 


166 


70 


157 


38 


905 


82 




74 



381 

By decoration of soldiers' graves 
Main-street sewer . 
scavenger teams 
health department . 
Amoskeag cemetery 
teachers' salaries 
evening schools 
balance on hand 



$12 


75 


241 


95 


3,524 


13 


446 


10 


3 


50 


612 


51 


286 


24 


6 


25 




$21,339 39 



ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 
To appropriation .... $2,600 00 



Dr. 

$2,600 00 
Cr. 



Paid W. H. Bennett, city engineer $1,000 00 

W. H. Bennett, supplies, etc. 23 59 

H. M. Young, assistant en- 
gineer . . . . 503 00 

George "W. "Wales, assistant 

engineer .... 437 25 

J. J. McDonough, assistant 

engineer .... 269 75 

Charles Bickford, assistant 

engineer . . . . 25 50 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 
smithing .... 6 00 

Joel Daniels & Co., tracing 

cloth, etc 33 52 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

tracing cloth, etc. . . 34 28 



382 



Paid R. H. Beach Manufacturing 










Co., street numbers . 


$13 00 






George Blanchet, cotton 










cloth, etc. 


11 


05 






J. Hodge, grade stakes 


38 


53 






J. J. Abbott, painting rod . 




50 






J. J. Holland & Co., sponges 


1 


00 






J. B. Clarke, printing . 


31 


50 






J. B. Varick Co., tape meas- 










ure, etc. .... 


12 


50 






T. W. Lane, rubbers, etc. 


3 


00 






Smith & Whitten, use of 










team ..... 


3 


50 






0. B. Kimball, printing 


5 


00 






By balance on hand . 


147 


53 


$2,600 


00 


TRUANT OFFICER. 














Dr 




To appropriation .... 


$750 00 












$750 


00 














Cr 




Paid Samuel Brooks 


$750 00 












$750 


00 









SPRUCE STREET. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $1,000 00 

$1,000 00 



383 

Cr. 

Paid J. B. Nourse, lumber, etc. . $6 57 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber, etc. . 2 34 

labor of men and teams . 876 20 

By balance on hand . . . 114 89 

$1,000 00 



SCAA 7 ENGER TEAMS. 

To appropriation .... $5,000 00 
reserve fund .... 3,524 13 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc $5 50 

labor of men and teams . 8,518 63 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $1,000 00 
R. White, burying horse . 1 30 

reserve fund .... 446 10 



Paid R. White, sanitary inspector $500 87 
S. B. Hope, " " 117 00 
D. K. White, " " 10 00 
Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing 18 00 



Dr. 

5,524 13 
Cr. 

5,524 13 
Dr. 



,447 40 
Cr. 



384 



Paid J. B. Clarke, printing . 


$43 25 




"W. E. Moore, printing 


11 50 




Campbell & Williams, print- 






ing 


19 00 




T. H. Tuson, printing . 


3 40 




Thos. Franker, burying nui- 






sances .... 


8 00 




J. D. Hall, burying nuisances 


1 00 




L. Searles, burying nuisances 


15 00 




Edwin Kennedy, burying 






nuisances .... 


7 25 




Timothy Sullivan, burying 






nuisances .... 


6 00 




James Bros., teams 


3 00 




E. T. James, teams 


6 00 




Joseph B. Sawyer, stationery, 






etc 


16 88 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 


75 




Dr. W. F. Robie, professional 






services .... 


9 00 




F. P. Colby, posting notices 


2 00 




labor of men and teams 


649 50 


$1,447 40 






CEMETERY FUKDS. 








Dr. 


To trustees ..... 


$1,850 00 


$1,850 00 










Or. 


By bonds ..... 


$1,850 00 


$1,850 00 



385 



FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 

1, 1887 .... $973,500 00 
Added during the year . . 100,000 00 



Paid during the year .... 

Amount of funded debt Jan. 1, 1888 
Interest due, estimated . . $20,000 00 
Bills outstanding . . . 32,314 82 
Cemetery bonds . . . 7,300 00 



Total indebtedness Jan. 1, 1888 
Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1888 

Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1888 
Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1887 

Decrease of net indebtedness during the 
year ..... 



1,073,500 00 
101,800 00 

$971,700 00 



,614 82 

51,031,314 82 

67,286 16 

$964,028 6& 
1,001,259 01 

§37,230 35 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$27 92 




appropriation .... 


4,000 00 


$4,027 92 










Cr. 


Paid George H. Dudley, lumber 






and labor .... 


$708 85 




George Holbrook, lumber 






and labor .... 


530 21 




Head & Dowst, lumber and 






labor .... 


2 00 





25 



386 



Paid Pike & Heald, repair of fur- 
naces, etc. .... 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 
Brock & Driscoll, repair of 

stoves, etc. 
Lowell's Iron Foundry, desk 
legs . . . . . 

J. A. Swasey, blackboards, 
etc. ..... 

B. W. Robinson, mason-work 
J. J. Bennett, " 

Bennett & Lord, " 

E. J. Williams, repair of roofs 
John C. Young, " " 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
Sullivan & Sloan, painting 

J. A. Sargent, painting, etc. 
J. L. Kennedy & Co. 
Thorp & Bartlett, stove, pipe 

etc 

Amoskeag Manufact u r i n g 

Co., castings 
W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 

F. W. Avery, gal. pipe, etc 
Henry McElwin, repair of 

blackboards, etc. 
J. L. Hammett, ink wells, etc 
James Richards . 
D. S. Dunbar 
H. K. Tilton 
R. D. Gay . 
labor of men and teams 
By balance on hand 



$376 20 
762 54 

75 90 

53 35 

166 48 

96 75 

1 25 

124 50 
38 39 
81 01 

323 58 
6 08 

106 75 
68 35 

21 49 



9 


20 


2 


55 


19 


00 


61 


60 


5 


85 


12 


00 


1 


50 


19 


08 


3 


00 


64 


75 


285 


71 



t,027 92 



387 



FUEL. 



To balance from old account 


$219- 18 


appropriation .... 


3,000 00 


balance ..... 


287 03 


Paid L. S. Proctor, wood 


$152 30 


George W. Goffe, wood 


338 00 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 


2,266 25 


Burns & Poore, wood . 


3 25 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood . 


8 00 


Marshall & Underhill, wood 


23 00 


Wm. Stearns, coal, etc. 


684 16 


C. N. Harvey, wood 


21 25 


John Proctor, wood, etc. 


10 00 







Dr. 



5,506 21 



Cr. 



;,506 21 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 

To balance from old account . $137 30 
To appropriation .... 1,000 00 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, floor 

brushes, etc. . . . $21 85 

J. B. Varick Co., floor 

brushes, etc. ... 7 63 

Manchester Hardware Co., 
floor brushes, etc. . . 27 34 



Dr. 

$1,137 30 
Cr. 



388 



Paid Temple & Farrington, shades 
etc 

A. G. Whitcomb, desks, etc 
Thomas Hall, reagent bottles 
H. D. Gordon, settees, etc. 
J. B. Varick Co., cluster 
George S. Perry, blackboards 

etc. .... 
Charles Hardon, erasers 
J. L. Hammett, crayons 
Ginn & Co., charts, etc. 
Amoskeag Manufact u r i n g 

Co., Bunsen burners 

B. A. Fowler, anatomical 
study 

R. D. Gay . 

Manchester Broom Co 

blooms 
Weston & Hill, matting, etc 
D. A. Simons, dusters . 
A. N. Clapp, brooms, etc 
Pike & Heald, pails, brushes 
Manchester Print Works, 

chemicals . 
Prang Educational Co., chart 
Educational Supply Co. 
D. A. Simons 
Manchester Pottery Co. 
Evening school of mechanical 

drawing . 
By balance on hand 



$10 86 


28 


65 


70 


15 


56 


70 


1 


88 


63 


22 


18 


00 


16 


00 


9 


00 



24 25 



210 


00 


20 


00 


6 


45 


7 


50 


9 


00 


1 


41 


20 


80 




62 


; 4 


15 


6 


16 


9 


00 


5 


63 


200 


00 


281 


05 



,137 30 



389 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$154 31 




appropriation . 


500 


00 


$654 31 








Paid George S. Perry . 

Interstate Publishing Co. 
Temple & Farrington Co. 
E. R. Coburn & Co. . 


$10 30 

4 20 

12 09 

96 57 


Cr. 


Thomas W. Lane 


308 


41 




A. A. Evers 


4 


76 




~W. P. Goodman . 


2 


50 




"William A. Morey 

E. E. Babb & Co. . 


6 
17 


50 

50 




New England Publishing Co 
Ginn & Co. . 


3 

8 


00 
53 




A. Mudge & Son . 


11 


25 




Ginn & Co. . 


30 


60 




Boston School Supply Co. 


20 


25 




Leach, Shewell & Sanborn 


7 


50 




L. T. Meade 


2 


75 




J. B. Clarke 


10 


00 




D. C. Heath & Co. 




75 




Silver, Rogers & Co. 


4 


00' 




Harrison Hume 


4 17 




By balance on hand 


88 


68 


$654 31 









PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 



$128 92 
400 00 



Dr. 



$528 92 



390 



Paid John B. Clarke 


$379 06 


Union Publishing Co. . 


82 50 


Campbell & Williams . 


4 85 


" Manchester Weekly Bud- 




get " . . 


8 50 


By balance on hand 


54 01 







Cr. 



$528 92 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



To balance from old account 
appropriation . 
balance 



Paid People's Gas-light Co., gas . 
Manchester Gas-light Co., 

gas . ... 

Man chest er Water-works, 

water . . 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc, . 
Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware .... 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
F. P. Colby, moving pianos . 
W. E. Buck, use of team, etc. 
Clarke & Brown, repairing 

clocks .... 
S. W. Clarke, repairing 

clocks .... 
J. H. Proctor, cleaning vault 



Dr. 



$28 40 




800 00 




263 91 






$1,092 31 






Cr. 


$21 28 




111 60 




478 65 




1 34 




3 20 




3 98 




8 00 




105 31 





10 25 

3 75 
1 50 



391 

Paid J. L. Proctor, cleaning chim- 
ney . . .' . 
W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 
A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 

E. H. Currier, chemicals 
Barton & Co., mats 

F. W. Fitts, ribbon 
Manchester Opera House, use 

of house .... 

J. S. Avery, cleaning school- 
houses .... 

E. J. Carley, cleaning school- 
houses .... 

L. Gutterson, brooms, soap, 
etc. ..... 

Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Co., brass tags . 

H. H. Duncklee . 

Timothy Shea, cleaning vaults 

Mrs. M. J. Craig, cleaning 
schoolhouse 

Mrs. Keating, cleaning school- 
house .... 

Mrs. A. Keniston, cleaning' 
schoolhouse 

Mrs. L. A. Proctor, cleaning 
schoolhouse 

Georgie A. Nute, oil, lamps, 
etc. ..... 

C. B. Littlefield, chemicals . 

F. M. Joy, cleaning school- 
house .... 

S. W. Clarke, repairing 
clocks .... 



n 


50 


3 


20 


48 


00 


14 


86 


5 


00 


6 


00 


25 


00 


10 


00 


8 


10 


3 


75 


2 


20 


2 


00 


56 


50 


3 


50 


4 


00 


1 


50 


2 


50 


2 


70 




83 


4 


00 


7 


75 



392 



Paid C. E. Clough, trucking, etc. 


$15 75 


K. D. Gay . 


5 00 


F. C. Baldwin 


7 51 


J. L. Hammett, black broad- 




cloth ..... 


7 15 


E. A. Joy, use of team . 


5 50 


J. B. Young, cleaning vaults 


2 50 


Harley & Robbie, felt . 


3 00 


J. Holland & Co., chemicals 


1 75 


0. D. Kimball, printing 


1 25 


Manchester Print Works, 




chemicals .... 


90 


J. M. Russell, sheet music . 


12 03 


Stark & Quint, use of hall . 


9 00 


J. B. Smith, battery cells 


8 25 


Higgins Bros., use of chairs 


14 00 


Clark & Estey, ribbons, etc. 


9 07 


Weston & Hill, cambric 


90 


Novelty advertising Co., card- 




board .... 


1 75 


W. Heron, Jr., lettering di- 




plomas .... 


24 15 


H. D. Gordon, feather duster 


1 10 







$1,092 31 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 



To appropriation 
reserve fund 



$200 00 
12 75 



Paid Louis Bell Post No. 3, G. A. R. $200 00 
labor of men and teams . 12 75 



Dr. 

$212 75 
Cr. 

$212 75 



393 

CARE OF ROOMS. 

To balance from old account . $11 31 
appropriation .... 3,200 00 
balance 3 88 



Paid J. S. Avery 


$600 00 


Wm. Stevens 


600 00 


A. T. Barr . 


533 00 


Charles M. Norton 


299 97 


Michael Finlej 


99 99 


Wm. H. Morrill . 


366 04 


H. C. Dickey 


250 08 


E. P. Cogswell . 


232 73 


Frank Derome 


12 00 


D. S. Dunbar 


18 50 


Arthur Sinclair 


12 50 


Mrs. Keating 


30 28 


0. J. Randall 


25 55 


Thos. Dobbin 


17 50 


Ella F. Barker . 


30 40 


Frank F. Cate 


20 83 


Florence L. Webber 


8 25 


Alice Campbell 


10 50 


Wm. Dobbin 


8 00 


Patrick Desmond . 


8 32 


Nathan Sleeper 


1 00 


O. Webber . 


15 00 


Hiram Proctor 


6 00 


Susie G. Woodman 


8 75 



Dr. 

5,215 19 
Cr. 



1,215 19 



394 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

To balance from old account . $207 61 
appropriation .... 1,400 00 
balance 286 24 



Paid G. R. Nichols 






$24 30 


F. C. Livingston 






253 00 


M. A. Fracker 






92 70 


A. E. McElroy 






110 00 


C. B. Gilford 






51 30 


C. E. Cochran 






253 00 


E. S. Dana . 






39 60 


F. M. Kelley 






54 00 


A. J. Dana . 






90 00 


S. B. Page . 






58 50 


C. F. Sanborn 






108 00 


Maggie Linnen 






34 20 


A. H. Boyd . 






58 50 


E. C. McLaren . 






18 00 


Alice Stebbins 






58 50 


E. L. Stebbins 






45 00 


L. D. Hartford 






114 00 


J. H. Campbell 






210 00 


G. B. Knight 






18 90 


G. A. Nute . 






52 00 


L.F. Williams 






14 40 


F. L. Sanborn 






27 90 


A. T. Barr, janitor 






38 00 


W. H. Morrill, janitor . 




58 00 


A. N. Clapp, oil, chimneys, etc 


4 45 


" Weekly Budget," adver- 




tising . . . . 


5 10 


E. T. James, team 


• 




2 50 



Dr. 



$1,893 85 
Cr. 



$1,893 85 



395 

TUITION. 

To balance from old account . $32 41 
William E. Buck ... 198 10 
balance 283 89 



Paid Ginn & Co . . . . $144 00 
J. J. Hayes . . . . 370 40 



Dr. 

$514 40 
Cr. 

$514 40 



EVENING MECHANICAL DRAWING SCHOOL. 

Dr. 



To appropriation .... $500 

furniture and supplies .. . 200 



$700 00 
Cr. 



Paid Samuel G. Stephens, instructor $156 60 

John M. Kendall, instructor . 51 00 

Henry W. Allen, instructor . 16 50 

Henry A. Herrick, instructor . 18 00 
Frank A. Higgins, assistant 

instructor . . . . 13 50 
John B. Clarke, advertising . 14 75 
A. H. Sanborn, assistant in- 
structor . . . . 9 00 
" Manchester Weekly Budget," 

advertising . . . . 3 50 

Head & Dowst, tables, etc. . 134 54 

W. W. Hubbard, table, etc. . 4 00 



396 



Paid H. H. Duncklee, board of 




S. G. Stephens . 


$16 25 


D. A. Simons, stools 


10 00 


E. R. Coburn & Co., drawing 




paper, etc. .... 


31 94 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 




tising ..... 


8 00 


William H. Morrill, janitor . 


29 25 


By balance on hand 


183 17 





$700 00 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


. 


$15 47 


appropriation . . . 42,000 


00 


reserve fund .... 612 


51 






$42 627 98 








Cr. 


Paid E. R. Goodwin . . . $2,000 


00 


George I. Hopkins 




1,350 


00 


L. E. Manahan . 




900 


00 


M. A. Buzzell 






600 


00 


R. M. Tuson 






600 


00 


Mary Stanton 






500 


00 


F. C. Baldwin 






1,440 


00 


L. C. Gilford 






475 


00 


Mary A. Putney 






. . 57 


50 


C. E. Reid . 






451 


75 


C. A. Abbott 






450 


00 


H. G. Flanders 






450 


00 


N". M. James 






450 


00 


E. F. Sanborn 






450 


00 



397 



Paid A. 0. Heath 






$600 00 


L. P. Gove . 






500 00 


F. D. Moulton 






450 00 


1ST. I. Sanborn 






450 00 


Lucia E. Esty 






450 00 


Belle M. Kelley . 






450 00 


F. S. Sutcliffe 






1,350 00 


A. W. Patten 






410 80 


M. J. Fife . 






333 50 


I. R. Daniels 






460 00 


M. F. Barnes 






450 00 


K F. Ainsworth 






420 00 


E. F. Tuson 






450 00 


G. A. Wyman 






438 75 


J. W. Stetson 






1,350 00 


A. A. Webster 






463 12 


M. E. Bunton 






460 00 


B. L. Dean . 






460 00 


K S. Bunton 






475 00 


K. J. Ferren 






450 00 


Alice Shovelton . 






225 00 


C. E. Woods 






450 00 


J. E. Pickering 






960 00 


C. M. Dearborn 






456 00 


M. L. Gage 






132 00 


C. A. F. Bartlett 






314 38 


F. M. Senter 






450 00 


E. E. McKean 






450 00 


Mary J. Hickey 






372 00 


N. C. Woodman 






450 00 


W. F. Gibson 






588 92 


A. C. Willand 






385 00 


M. K Bower 






450 00 


C. I. Stevens 






450 00 



398 



Paid L. A. Brooks 






$385 00 


L. A. Burns 






500 00 


I. S. Locke 






450 00 


E. M. Stebbins 






450 00 


G. H. Brooks 






450 00 


G. Dow 






315 00 


H. M. Morrill 






475 00 


Alice E. Page 






360 00 


May F. Nutt 






365 00 


Ella Hope . 






440 00 


K. T. Clarke 






332 50 


A. S. Downs 






450 00 


S. H. Frame 






450 00 


M. W. Mitchell 






450 00 


M. A. Southard 






339 00 


A. G. Lord . 






350 00 


D. E. Haines 






450 00 


E. J. Carley 






500 00 


M. C. Tynan 






450 00 


0. J. Randall 






450 00 


S. G. Woodman 






450 00 


F. M. Joy . 






360 00 


G. A. Nute . 






475 00 


E. F. Barker 






450 00 


A. C. Prescott 






225 00 


A. M. Curtis 






112 50 


0. A. Rowe . 






450 00 


J. J. Kimball 






1,000 00 


0. A. Ivers. 






600 00 


H. Graupner 






265 00 


L. C. Hall . 






238 50 


Sarah Paige . 






112 70 


B. B. Joy^ . 






264 00 


H. F. Wcthcrbee 






22 50 



399 



Paid J. M. Chandler . 


$395 50 


Cora Gilford 


107 00 


M. J. Walsh 


117 75 


Genevieve Knight 


126 00 


L. M. Smith 


114 50 


T. Richardson 


113 00 


E. McLaren . 


115 50 


Mary F. Dana 


15 75 


C. F. Sanborn 


33 75 


N. B. Croning 


237 50 


M. E. Lord . 


172 31 


C. E. Wing . 


400 00 


Mrs. F. S. Sutcliffe 


7 50 


J. H. Newton 


56 00 



12,627 98 



400 



Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1846 . . 


§3,187,726 


$22,005 95 


1,808 


&2 10 


$300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 88 


• 3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


1 76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673 82 


7,831 


1 62 


100 


1883 . . 


20,055,986 


332,741 72 


7,944 


1 65 


100 


1884 . . 


20,613,032 


361,401 61 


8,143 


1 75 


100 


1885 . . 


21,137,464 


345,260 15 


8,157 


1 63 


100 


1886 . . 


21,379,384 


347,009 31 


8,602 


1 62 


100 


1887 . . 


21,905,476 


373,138 96 


8,996 


1 70 


100 



401 
City Debt. 



Dale of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


Jan. 1, 1863 


City Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


, 1888 


$35,000 00 


July 1, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1890 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


u a 


Jan. 1 


, 1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31, 1863 


City Bonds, 


Nov. 1 


, 1893 


70,000 00 


July 1, 1864 


u u 


July 1 


, 1894 


50,000 00 


July 1, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1895 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


U tC 


• ian. 1 


. 1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1872 


U it 


Jan. 1 


, 1902 


100,000 00 


July 1, 1881 


Bridge Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1911 


60,000 00 


April 1, 1885 


City Bonds, 


April 1 


, 1905 


50,000 00 


April 1, 1885 


k< u 


April 1 


, 1907 


50,000 00 


April 1, 1885 


U U 


April 1 


, 1909 


50,000 00 


April 1, 1885 


1< u 


April 1 


, 1911 


5,000 00 


Jan. 1, 1887 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


, 1907 


100,000 00 



402 



INVENTORY OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



High School house and lot . 


$50,000 


00 






Furniture, charts, maps, books 


» 








and apparatus 


2,000 00$52,000 


00 


Franklin-street house and lot 


18,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


18,400 


00 * 


Spring-street house and lot . 


15,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


15,400 


00' 


Lincoln-street house and lot . 


50,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


50,400 


00 


Ash-street house and lot 


. 58,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


58,400 


00 


Main-street house and lot 


23,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


600 


00 


23,600 


00 


"Webster-street house and lot 


17,500 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


350 


00 


17,850 


00 


Blodget-street house and lot 


3,500 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


150 


00 


3,650 


00 


Bridge-street house and lot . 


900 


00 


900 


00 


Lowell-street house and lot . 


7,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


400 


00 


7,400 


00 


Merrimack-street house and lot 


15,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


550 


00 


15,550 


00 


Wilson Hill house and lot 


3,300 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


100 


00 


3,400 


00 


Beech-street house and lot . 


7,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


350 


00 


7,350 


00 


School-street house and lot . 


5,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


425 


00 


5,425 


00 


South-Main-street house and lot . 


2,800 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


200 


00 


3,000 


00 


Bakersville house and lot 


13,000 


00 






Furniture, maps, etc. 


600 


00 


13,600 


00 



403 



Stark District house and lot . 


$3,000 00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


150 


00 


$3,150 00 


Amoskeag house and lot 


. 3,700 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


125 


00 


3,825 00 


Goffe's Falls house and lot . 


. 3,600 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


100 


00 


3,700 00 


Harvey District house and lot 


2,500 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


125 


00 


2,625 00 


Webster District house and lot 


600 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


50 


00 


650 00 


Hallsville house and lot 


. 3,500 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


125 


00 


3,625 00 


Youngsville house and lot . 


. 1,400 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


125 


00 


1,525 00 


Mosquito Pond Dist. house and lo 


t 1,200 


00 




Furniture, maps, etc. 


100 


00 


1,300 00 


Park-street house and lot 


8,500 


00 


8,500 00 


Amount of school property 


$325,225 00 


Amount of city property 


7 


1,805,824 67 


Total amount of city property 


$2,131,049 67 



404 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Land, city scales, etc $30,000 00 

City Library building .... 41,000 00 

Permanent inelosure of commons . . 22,000 00 

City Hall and lot 60,000 00 

City Farm and permanent improvements . 34,000 00 

Stock, tools, furniture, etc., at City Farm . 7,066 29 

Engines, hose, and apparatus . . . 74,734 25 

Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell . 28,000 00 

Engine-house, stable and land, Vine street . 47,000 00 

Hose-house, cottage, and lot, Maple street . 5,000 00 

Hose-house, cottage, and lot, Park street . 9,000 00 

Houses and Pine Grove cemetery . . 13,000 00 

Court-house and lot 51,000 00 

Common sewers ...... 318,000 00 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall . 3,000 00 

Street lanterns, posts, and pipes . . . 8,000 00 

Water-works 901,274 13 

Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets . 5,000 00 

Fire department individual alarm . . 2,300 00 

Ward room and lot, Manchester street . 10,000 00 

Police station and lot, Manchester street . 40,000 00 

Engine-house and lot, Ward 8 . . . 2,500 00 

" " "... 20,000 00 

Water pipe, wagons, etc., for watering streets 2,500 00 

Stock in S. Y. R. R. . . . . 50,000 00 

Gravel lot, Belmont street .... 1,200 00 

Engine-house and lot, Webster street . . 10,000 00 

Gravel lots, Ward 8 400 00 

Gravel lots, Bakersville .... 700 00 

Gravel lot, District No. 8 . . . . 150 00 

Valley cemetery 9,000 00 

$1,805,824 67 



405 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1888. 



Interest 

Paupers off the farm . 

City Farm . 

City teams . 

Highway District No. 1 



u 




a < 


' 2 


u 




C( ( 


' 3 


(( 




a « 


< 4 


a 




a < 


< 5 


a 




a < 


' 6 


a 




a c 


< 7 


a 




a t 


< 8 


a 




(« t 


< 9 


« 




t< < 


< 10 


u 




a < 


< 11 


a- 




u « 


' 12 


u 




a i 


< 13 


New hig 


hw 


ays . 


. 


Damage 


for land ta 


ken for 



"Watering streets 
Lighting streets . 
Paving streets 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete 
Sewers and drains 
Commons . 
Bridges 

Incidental expenses 
Pine Grove cemetery 
Valley cemetery 
Fire department . 
Fire-alarm telegraph 



highways 



$18,500 00 

6,000 00 

3,500 00 

3,000 00 

300 00 

9,500 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

500 00 

400 00 

1,100 00 

700 00 

500 00 

2,500 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 

200 00 

6,000 00 

1,000 00 

4,500 00 

16,000 00 

.3,000 00 

15,000 00 

4,000 00 

20,000 00 

3,000 00 

8,000 00 

15,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,500 00 

40,000 00 

1,500 00 



406 



Hydrant service . 

Police department 

Printing and stationery 

Repairs of buildings 

City library 

Militia 

Abatement of taxes 

Discount on taxes 

State tax 

County tax . 

City officers' salaries 

Firemen's parade 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Stark Monument square 

"Women's Aid and Relief Society hospital 

Main-street sewer 

Reserve fund 

Repairs of schoolhouses 

Fuel .... 

Furniture and supplies 

Books and stationery . 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses . 

Care of rooms . . 

Evening schools . 

Teachers' salaries 

Truant officer 

Engineer's department 

Scavenger teams 

Fire department, individual alarms 

Health department 

New engine-house, "Webster street 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 

New engine-house, Lake avenue 



$21,000 


00 


28,500 


00 


1,200 


00 


2,000 


00 


3,800 


00 


700 


00 


2,500 


00 


9,000 


00 


63,435 


00 


40,508 


54 


14,000 


00 


300 


00 


200 


00 


100 


00 


400 


00 


1,500 


00 


20,000 


00 


4,000' 


00 


3,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


500 


00 


400 


00 


800 


00 


3,200 


00 


1,600 


00 


43,500 


00 


750 


00 


2,500 


00 


8,500 


00 


750 


00 


1,200 


00 


4,000 


00 


700 


00 


9,000 


00 



407 

Police telegraph $5,000 00 

City stables 2,500 00 

New receiving-tomb ..... 4,000 00 

Webster-street, east extension . . . 1,500 00 
Furniture and equipments, Webster-street 

engine-house 10,000 00 



$506,443 54 



f 



INDEX 



NDEX 



PAGE 

Abatement of Taxes 373 

Account of City Treasurer 285 

Alarm Boxes and Keys 350 

Amoskeag Cemetery 347 

Appropriations for 1888 405 

Attendance at School 134 

Books and Station ery - 389 

Bridges 332 

Care of Rooms 393 

Cemetery Funds 384 

Cemeteries, report of Trustees 175 

Treasurer 193 

Trustees of Fund .... 195 

City Government, 1887 ........ 3 

Engineer, report of 45 

Debt 385 

Farm 308, 401 

Hall 360 

Library 366 

Property . . . .... . . . 404 

Solicitor, report of _ 154 

Teams 313 

Treasurer's Account 285 

Commons 334 

County Tax . • 374 

Contingent Expenses 390 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 392 

Debt, Funded 385 



412 

Discount on Taxes 373 

Donations to City Library 217 

Evening Schools 394 

Engineer's Department 381 

Farm, City . . . 308 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 354 

Boxes and Keys, Location of .... 250 

Fire Apparatus . . . . ' 259 

Department 347 

Firemen's Parade 356 

Relief Association 236 

Fires, Alarms, Losses, 1887 239 

Fuel 387 

Furniture and Supplies 387 

Government, City, 1887 ........ 3 

Grading for Concrete 330 

Health Department 383 

Highway District No. 1 316 

2 316 

3 318 

4 319 

5 319 

6 320 

7 320 

8 321 

9 321 

10 322- 

11 322 

12 323 

14 323 

Highways, New 324 

Hj'drant Service 359 

Hydrants, Location of • 272 

Incidental Expenses 335 

Individual Alarm, Fire Department 355 

Instructions to Key-Holders . ... . . . 254 



413 



Interest .... 
Inventory of Schoolhouses 

Land Damages 

Library, City . 

Donations to 
Librarian's report 
Treasurer's report 
Trustees' report 

List of Teachers and Janitors 

Lighting Streets 

Loan, Temporary 

Militia .... 
Macadamizing Streets 



Names and Residences of Members of Fire Depar 



tment 



Officers, City . 
Outstanding Taxes . 
Overseers of Poor, report of 

Paving Streets 
Paupers off the City Farm 
Pine Grove Cemetery 
Police Department . 
Printing and Advertising 

Stationery 
Property, City . 

Repair of Schoolhouses 

Buildings 
Report of Chief Engineer, Fire Department 

City Civil Engineer 

City Solicitor .... 

Committee on City Farm 

Committee on Finance . 

Librarian of City Library 

Overseers of the Poor 

School Committee . 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 



414 



Report of Superintendent of Water- Works 
Treasurer of City Library 
Trustees of City Library 
Trustees of Cemeteries . 
Trustees of Cemetery Fund 
Water Commissioners 

Reserve Fund .... 

Salaries of Officers . 
Teachers 
Scavenger Teams 
School Department . 

Organization for 1887 
Training 

Evening, Mechanical Drawing 
Sewers and Drains . 
State Tax 
Streets, Lighting 

Macadamizing . 
Paving 
Watering . 

Taxes, Abatement of 

Discount on . 

For 1887 . ' . 

Outstanding . 
Temporary Loan 
Teachers, List of 

Salaries of 
Training School 
Truant Officers 
Tuition .... 

Valuation, Taxes, etc. 
Valley Cemetery 

Water Commissioners for 1888 
report of 
Water-Works .... 
Watering Streets 
Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospital