(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

Man 



352.0742B 



•^-•ifc*-^--^^--^-|.--i^-ik4..|.^^..|.^Hf^^.^.^^^>.--^jJs^.^.^.4.^-{ww^.li.^.^ ' 



Public Document. 



0irY or Manghester 




yf Rr^Gial • I^epopts 




FOR THE YEAR 



•^1- 1 B 5 B 1^ 



-I- -^ 4"^ •*• ^ -4^ -i^ ^ •*• ■*• -^ H 



>^<4j«r|l^.^>'^<l^>^-.^^.ijb^KiF>-4^Hli>>^<^<J!.<^.^H^.^^^ 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 
STATE LIBRARY 



FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



Receipts and Expenditures 



P^ITYOF IV^ANCHESTER 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAK ENDING 

DECEIMBEIR 31, 1888, 

TOGETHER WITH 

Other Annual Reports and Papers Relating to 
THE Affairs of the City. 




MANCHESTEK, N. H. : 

PRINTED BY JOHN B. CLARKE. 

1889. 



M 
25^07 



City of Manchester. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Forty-Third Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Exj^enditures of the Cit}- of Manchester: 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are, au- 
thorized to procure, for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the 
printing of the Forty-Third Annual Report of the Receipts and Ex- 
penditures of the City of Manchester, including the Reports of 
the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, the School Board and 
Superintendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water-works, Water 
Commissioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Marshal, Over- 
seers of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian, and Treasurer of City 
Libraiy, Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Committee on 
City Farm, City Physician, City Solicitor, and City Engineer, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the Appropriation for Printing and 
Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. December 28, 1888. 

JOHN M. KENDALL, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. December 28, 1888. 

Passed in concurrence. 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1888. 



MAYOR. 

HON. JOHN HOSLEY 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

EDWIN F. JONES. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

JAMES M. COLLITY. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

EDWARD L. KIMBALL.* 
JOHN M. KENDALL.f 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

PELEG D. HARRISON. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 



CLERK OF WATER-WORKS. 

ARTHUR E. STEARNS. 

• Resigned . f Elected to fill vacancy. 



ALDERMEN. 

Ward 1. — George W. Cheney. 
Ward 2. — Orriii E. Kimball. 
Ward 3. — William S. Shannon. 
Ward 4. — Horace D. Gordon. 
Ward 5. — Leonard P. Reynolds. 
Ward 6. — Charles W. Eager. 
Ward 7. — Frank A. Dockham. 
Ward 8. — Charles W. Quimby. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

George W. Bacon. 
Charles D. Sumner. 
E. Parker French. 

Ward 3. 

Edward L. Kimball. 
John A. Bartlett. 
Frank M. Forsaith. 

Ward 5. 

John F. Bohan. 
David E. Guiney. 
Thomas P. Riley. 

Ward 7. 

John F. Frost. 
Clarence M. Woodbury. 
Guy F. Whitten. 



Ward 2. 

Thomas Hamilton. 
Charles A. Carpenter. 
George S. Clough. 

Ward 4. 

John M. Crawford. 
W. Byron Stearns. 
George Blanchet. 

Ward 6. 

John M. Kendall. 
Joseph Quirin. 
Milton A. Abbott. 

Ward 8. 

Joseph Lariviere. 
Edward Weber. 
Benjamin Freeman. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Kimball; 
Messrs. Stearns, Forsaith, and Sumner. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Eager and Quimby ; Messrs. 
Forsaith, Bohan, and Frost. (Meet Wednesday succeed- 
ing the 24th of each month. All bills must be left at 
the city clerk's office, properly approved, not later than 
the 24th of each month.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Dockham and Kimball ; Messrs. 
Sumner, Woodbury, and Whitten. (Meet third Friday 
in each month.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Reynolds and Shannon ; Messrs. 
Bartlett, Carpenter, and Kendall. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Shannon and Rey- 
nolds ; Messrs. Carpenter, Kendall, and Bartlett. 

On Lightiyig Streets. — Aldermen Cheney and Gordon; 
Messrs. Woodbury, Freeman, and Stearns. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Quimby and Gror- 
don ; Messrs. Frost, Guiney, and Abbott. 

On Fire Dejoartment. — Aldermen Kimball and Cheney ; 
Messrs. Bacon, Hamilton, and Blanchet. 

On Commons and CemMeries. — Aldermen Gordon and 
Quimby; Messrs. Quirin, Bacon, and French. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Eager and Dockham ; 
Messrs. French, Clough, and Weber, 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Gordon and Eager; 
Messrs. Crawford, Lariviere, and Abbott. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Cheney and Reynolds; 
Messrs. Fox, Clough, and Whitten. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Dockham and 
Shannon; Messrs. Weber, Fox, and Quirin. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Shannon and Eager ; 
Messrs. Lariviere, Crawford, and Guiney. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Gordon and Shannon. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Reynolds and 
Dockham. 

On Market. — Aldermen Eager and Gordon. 

On Marshal's Account. — Aldermen Shannon and 
Cheney. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Kimball and Eager. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Cheney and Quimby. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Dockham and Reynolds. 



STANDING COMMITTEES IN BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Messrs. Hamilton, Blanchet, and 
Abbott. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Messrs. Stearns, Frost, 
and Bohan. 

On Enrollment. — Messrs. Fox, Clough, and Forsaith. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 

Associate Justice of Police Court, f 
Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 



8 

City Marshal, 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Horatio W. Longa. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

John Hosley, ex-officio Chairman. 
James E. Dodge, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Charles H. Manning. 
John G. Hutchinson. 

Ward 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 



Ward 5. 

Thomas F. Collins. 
John J. Holland. 

Ward 6. 

William H. Huse. 
Abial C. Flanders. 

Ward 7. 



Ed. B. Woodbury. 
Marshall P. Hall. 



Ward 3. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 
James E. Dodge. 

Ward 4. Ward 8. 

Samuel D. Lord. Luther C. Baldwin. 

Stephen W. Clarke. George W. ISTutter. 

Edward L. Kimball, ex officio, 
John M. Kendall, ex officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



ASSESSORS. 



Charles H. Brown. 
John E. Stearns. 
David O. Furnald. 
Harrison D, Lord. 



John Ryan. 
George H. Dudley. 
Ira W. Stearns. 
Frank E. McKean. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 



George C. Kemp. 
Benjamin L. Hartshorn. 
David 0. Furnald. 
Harrison D. Lord. 



Edward J. Lawler. 
Isaac Whittemore. 
Joseph A. Foster. 
Henry F. Stone. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

John Hosley, ex-officio Chairman. 
William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 

William H. Maxwell. Frank J. Morrison. 

Thomas L. Quimby. Charles Francis. 

James Sutcliffe. William Marshall. 

Horace Gordon. Horatio Fradd. 

(Meet third Wednesday of each month.) 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

George C. Hoitt, Chairman. 
Joseph B. Sawj^er, Clerk. 



Joseph B. Sawyer. 



William M. Parsons. 



George C. Hoitt. 



10 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 

Fred. S. Bean, Clerk. 
James F. Pherson. Orrin A. Manning. 

Fred. S. Bean. Eugene S. Whitney. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS, 

Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 

James A. Weston, Clerk. 
Henry Chandler. Alpheus Gay. 

James A. Weston. Andrew C. Wallace. 

Joseph F. Kennard. Edwin H. Hobbs. 

John Hosley, ex officio. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Moody Currier. 

Benjamin C. Dean. Lucien B. Clough. 

Daniel Clark. Herman F. Straw. 

Isaac W. Smith. John Hosley, ex officio. 

Edward L. Kimball, ex officio. 

John M. Kendall, ex officio. 



HIGHWAY SURVEYORS. 
Dist. Dist. 

1. Orison Webber. 7. George M. Bean. 

2. William Sanborn. 8. John Proctor. 

3. FrankfA. Emerson. 9. Nelson W. Paige. 

4. Isaac;^Whittemore. 10. Charles 0. Phelps. 

5. Mark E. Harvey. 11. Frank D. Hanscom. 

6. Albert J. Peaslee. 12. John H. Willey. 

13. WilHam Campbell. 



11 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Edwin W. Blake. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, Clerk. 

H. H. Huse, Joseph L. Stevens, for four years. 
James A. Weston, John E. Stearns, for three years. 
George C. Gilmore, Bushrod W. Hill, for two years. 
D. 0. Furnald, Hiram Stearns, for one year. 



SUB-TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Valley. — Alderman Quimby; Messrs. Quirin, Gilmore, 
Hill, and Furnald. 

Pine Grove. — Alderman Gordon ; Messrs. Bacon, Huse, 
Whitman, and Weston. 

Amoskeag. — E. Parker French ; Messrs. Hiram Stearns 
and J. E. Stearns. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Hon. James A. Weston, Chairman. 
Hon. Person C. Cheney. 
Hon. John Hosley, ex officio. 



INSPECTORS. 



MUk. — H. F. W. Little. 

Buildings. — Thomas W. Lane. 

Oil. — John P. Cronin and Edward J. Powers. 



12 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 

Ward 1. — Marcellus Gould. 
Ward 2. — George M. True. 

Ward 3. — William A. Carpenter. 
Ward 4.— John C. Bickford. 
Ward 5. — Hugh McDonough. 
Ward 6. — George Holbrook. 
Ward 7.— Timothy W. Challis. 
Ward 8. — George W. Gofie. 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Michael Herbert. 
Ward 2. — Henry J. Matthews. 
Ward 3. — Jesse B. Pattee. 
Ward 4. —A. L. F. GeofFroy. 
Ward 5. — John J. Sherry. 
Ward 6. — Charles H. Harvey. 
Ward 7. — Sanfield McDonald. 
Ward 8. — GiUis Stark. 

Selectmen. 

Ward 1. Ward 2. 

Henry P. Hunter. William Smith. 

Oliver C. Mombleau. Everett J. Anthes. 

Edward L. Carpenter. George W. Varnum. 

Ward 3. Ward 4. 

David Thayer. George B. Forsaith. 

Charles Atherton. ' John P. Cronin. 

George C. Lord. Clarence R. Merrill. 



13 

Ward 5. Ward 6. 

Jeremiah J. Hayes. George H. Benton. 

William Morrissey. Charles G. Dodge. 

Patrick McManus. Lyman Dickey. 

Ward 7. Ward 8. 

David W. Anderson. Abel M. Keniston. 
Sylvester Drew. Henry Hebert. 

John F. Frost. IS'apoleon Richard. 



MAYOR HOSLEY'S 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS. 



VALEDICTORY ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

Our official relations with the government of our city 
are about to terminate, and others selected from among- 
our fellow citizens will soon fill the places we have occu- 
pied during the past two years. As w^e meet together 
here for the last time it is both natural and fitting that 
we should take a retrospective view of the path we have 
trodden in our endeavors to promote the public welfare, 
and revive the memory of the difficulties we have en- 
countered, the obstacles we have overcome, the criticisms 
of unfriendly cynics, the cheerful co-operation and en- 
couragement of many of the wisest and best of our fel- 
low citizens, our sympathies with one another, and the 
work we have accomplished. 

FINANCE. 

During the past two years the sum of $35,000 has been 
paid towards liquidating the funded debt of the city, and 
the sum of $25,000 in payment of a temporary loan made 
prior to January 1, 1887. The finances of the city are 
in a very sound and healthy condition, and the forth- 
coming report of the city treasurer will show that the net 
indebtedness of the city has been largely diminished 
during the past two years. 



18 



STREETS. 



More than two and one half miles of streets have been 
built during the last two years; 7,496 yards of cobble 
paving and nearly three miles of cobble edging have 
been laid; 25,186 yards of macadamizing have been done 
on the streets; upwards of seven miles of streets have 
been graveled. The streets which have been macad- 
amized have given universal satisfaction. During these 
two years the Manchester Horse Railroad has extended 
its tracks three and one fourth miles through our streets, 
and to put the streets through which the road has been 
built on a proper grade, as established by the city, has 
cost several thousand dollars. 

SCHOOLS. 

The public schools of the city have been well managed. 
The system of instruction has been kept up to a high 
standard of excellence, and the teachers have performed 
their duty to their pupils wisely and well. It is a credit 
to our citizens that they have always been willing to do 
all in their power to give the youth of the city an educa- 
tion and training that will fit them to perform their duty 
in a manner which will promote their highest happiness. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

In this department the sum of $6,000 was expended 
for the completion of the engine-house in West Man- 
chester. The sum of $20,000 has been paid for erecting 
and equipping the Stark engine-house on Webster street. 
Two steam fire-engines and one combination hose hook- 
and-ladder carriage, 6,000 feet of the best grade fabric 
hose, and ten horses have been purchased. The Inde- 
pendent hose-house at Amoskeag has been thoroughly 



19 

repaired and a new hose-tower erected. The new engine- 
house and ward-room which has been erected on Lake 
avenue is in process of completion. When this building 
is finished it will be a great ornament to that portion of 
the city. This structure will take the place of the dilapi- 
dated wooden building which experience has proven to 
be unsafe for use as a ward-room. When we consider 
the excellence of our fire department, our splendid hy- 
drant system, and our ample water supply, and remem- 
ber that the Amoskeag Company, with its independent 
water supply, can manage any ordinary fire which occurs 
upon its own premises, it would seem that the rates of 
insurance upon the property in the city might be greatly 
reduced. The fire department is in excellent condition, 
and fully sustains its high reputation for its completeness, 
its efficiency, its discipline, and the high standing of its 
officers and members. 

BRIDGES. 

A new bridge has been built over the Cohas brook, in 
the Harvey district, to replace the old decayed one in that 
section. 

A new arched stone bridge has been built over Ceme- 
tery brook, at the junction of Belmont street and the Old 
Falls road, and extensive repairs have been made upon 
Granite and McGregor bridges, as well as upon many of 
the other bridges of the city. 

SEWERS. 

The sewerage system of our city has been greatly ex- 
tended, and a large amount of money has been laid out 
in this direction within the past two years. The total 
length of the sewers put in is four and one fourth miles. 
The excavations for some of these sewers were throuo:h 



20 

ledges, and necessarily very expensive. Levels have been 
taken upon about 5,000 acres of land in tbe city for an 
improved system of sewerage. Maps and plans have 
been drawn and submitted to E. W. Bowditch, a very 
eminent consulting engineer of Boston. Mr. Bowditch 
has examined the maps and plans and made a decision 
upon all the important points involved in the matter, and 
where changes were necessary they were made upon the 
city plan. 

COMMONS. 

The commons, which are one of the chief ornaments 
of the city, are in excellent condition. A spray fountain 
and a drinking-fountain have been put in at Park com- 
mon, concrete walks have been constructed, trees have 
been set out, and this will soon become a very attractive 
locality. The unsightly pond on Merrimack square has 
been filled with about 7,000 cubic yards of earth, broad 
concrete avenues have been^^put in, one of which extends 
from the northwest to the southeast corner ; by this ar- 
rangement many pedestrians who reside in that quarter 
are greatly accommodated. 

CEMETERIES. 

Great improvements have been made in the Valley 
Cemetery, the most important of which is an admirably 
constructed city receiving tomb, which is of sufficient 
dimensions to contain the remains of a very large num- 
ber of persons. The driveways along the winding stream 
have been much improved. 

At Pine Grove Cemetery a new store and tool house 
has been erected, many avenues have been laid out and 
graded, and a large amount of money has been expended 
in making other improvements. 



21 



CITY HALL. 



Extensive improvements and repairs have been made 
upon the City Hall building. The outside has been 
painted, new floors have been laid, and the stores have 
been remodeled and repaired at a large expense to the 
city. 

WATER-WORKS. 

The water-works are in most excellent condition. 
Within the past two years the city has paid for land on 
the shore of Massabesic lake, on account of flowage, the 
sum of $6,635. Within the same space of time there 
have been laid 19,120 feet, or three and five-eighths miles 
of cast-iron pipe for the accommodation of new water- 
takers, and twenty-two new hydrants have been set. 
New water-wheels have been put in at the pumping- 
station by the Risdon Wheel Company at a cost of 
$5,627. A brick addition has been made to the pump- 
ing-station, a boiler has been put in, and the whole build- 
ing has been piped, so that it can now be heated by steam, 
the expense of these improvements amounting to $8,000. 
The vast benefits which have followed the introduction 
of water into the city were hardly dreamed of by the 
people who resided in Manchester twenty years ago. 
The improvements I have briefly referred to are only a 
small portion of those which have been made in the 
various departments throughout the city. 

ELLIOT HOSPITAL. 

Through the benevolence of the late Mrs. Elizabeth 
iCllliot a large sum of money was left for the purpose of 
founding a public hospital in our city. A board of trus- 
tees was appointed, which, a few months since, purchased 



22 

a tract of land consisting of twenty-seven acres, and an 
elegant building for hospital purposes is now in process of 
erection and it is expected will be completed and ready 
for the reception of patients by the middle of June next. 
This hospital will not be in any respect a private specula- 
tion, but a public charity, and is to be devoted solely to 
aiding and comforting the sick and helpless of all classes 
of people in our city. 

Though the funds left by Mrs, Elliott are sufficient for 
the purchase of the grounds, the erection and furnishing 
of the buildings, and the partial support of the institu- 
tion, other funds will soon be needed for the erection of 
other buildings and for the accommodation of the many 
patients who will doubtless in the near future be glad to 
find an asylum here. 

The endowed free-bed system prevails in many cities, 
and by this means the sick and indigent are provided 
with hospital accommodations free. It is hoped that this 
system may be adopted in our city. 

I would recommend that the city councils make an ap- 
propriation each year for a certain number of free beds 
for the accommodation of people who are suiFering from 
sickness and are too poor to pay the expense of hospital 
treatment, these beds to be under the control of the 
trustees representing the city and designated City Free 
Beds. 

It is also hoped that our great manufacturing and rail- 
road corporations, which have always manifested ^ com- 
mendable interest in the welfare of their operatives, will 
appropriate a liberal sum for the purpose of free beds in 
this institution. Our churches and benevolent associa- 
tions will find an opportunity to extend a helping hand 
to those unfortunates who come under their notice by 
aiding this great charity. 



23 



CONCLUSION. 



And now, gentlemen, before we separate, I desire to 
extend to you, one and all, my most sincere thanks for 
your uniform kindness and courtesy to me personally, 
and I assure you that I fully appreciate the constancy of 
your zeal in the support of all those measures which 
seemed to us the best calculated to promote the order 
and good government of the city, and to bring pros- 
perity ajid happiness to all the people. I am sure that 
we shall all rejoice in the success of those who are to 
assume the responsibilities of the offices we vacate, as we 
rejoice in the many evidences about us of the wisdom 
and foresight of those who preceded us. Many of those 
eminent citizens who have aided in shaping our public 
afiairs during the past forty years have passed on to a 
higher life, and we are fast following in their footsteps ; 
but the city survives, and will doubtless continue to ad- 
vance from one degree of prosperity and importance to 
another for many generations to come. As we march 
along in the journey of life, and recall the memory of 
these sceneSj we shall have the satisfaction of knowing 
that we have been in a position to do something in the 
way of contributing to its greatness and renown. 



MAYOR VARNEY'S 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils: 

Having been chosen by the suiFrages of our fellow- 
citizens to take the management of the atfairs of our 
city for the two ensuing years, and having appeared and 
taken the oath required by the city charter, faithfully to 
discharge the duties of the several offices to which we 
have been elected, we are met now to assume, in a formal 
manner, the responsibilities which have been laid upon 
us. 

It becomes us not to forget that we are the servants of 
the people, who have placed the conduct of their public 
business in our hands. Let us see to it that their confi- 
dence was not misplaced. 

Entering for the first time upon the duties and under- 
taking the responsibilities of the office of mayor of our 
growing and prosperous city, I realize the importance of 
the position in which I am placed, and the demand that 
will be made of me for the best service I can render this 
community. Trusting that a generous public will criti- 
cise only to enlighten and advise, I enter with confidence 
upon the discharge of my duties. 

But, gentlemen, we are to share these responsibilities 
between us. Therefore we should endeavor, as far as 
possible, to act in harmony. 

I am not familiar enough with the wants of the several 
departments of the municipal administration to make 



28 

many recommendations at the present time, but will call 
your attention to such matters as will require your action 
\ in the near future. 

FINANCES. 

One of the important duties of the City Councils is 
that pertaining to the management of the city finances. 

I am unable to give you the exact amount of the in- 
debtedness of the city, as the treasurer makes up his ac- 
counts to-day. 



The funded debt, January 1, 1888, was . 
There was paid during the year 1888 
Leaving the funded debt January 1, 1889 
Cemetery bonds ..... 
Making a total of . 



$971,700 

36,200 

935,500 

8,300 

943,800 



None of these bonds mature until Jul}^ 1, 1890. 

STREETS AND HIGHWAYS. 

The importance of maintaining well-graded streets in 
the city proper, and highways in the suburbs, cannot be 
overestimated. Our citizens who ride for health or 
pleasure, or who do business on our streets, demand that 
the streets and highways shall be kept in good condition, 
and are willing to be taxed for that purpose, provided 
they can feel assured that their money will be judiciously 
expended. The men employed to work on our streets 
should be able and willing to do a fair day's work for a 
fair day's pay. The city has all the machinery necessary 
for macadamizing the streets, and good progress has 
been made in that direction during the past year. We 
should make our appropriation for this department large 
enough to further the continuance of the work. 



29 

Our bridges are in fair condition. McGregor bridge 
will require to be replanked early in the spring. With 
this exception, no great outlay will be required this year. 

SEWERS. 

A plan of our system of sewerage has been completed, 
embracing the whole city proper. Hereafter all sewers 
put in will be in accordance with this plan. As the city 
is extending its borders in all directions, a large amount 
of new sewerage will be called for this year. There 
remain about nine miles of the old sewer pipe, part of 
which will require to be renewed this year. A due re- 
gard for the health of our city requires that this part of 
our duty should not be neglected. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

We, in common with our citizens generally, take great 
pride in our fire department. I think it safe to say that 
no city in New England possesses a better equipment for 
fire purposes, or a more eflacient body of men to handle 
that equipment, than Manchester. We should aim to do 
all in our power to help them maintain the high standard 
they have established. We have now all the engines and 
engine-houses that will be required for several years, 
therefore no great outlay will be called for, aside from 
what is necessary for repairs. 

OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

We have shared with other citizens the just pride 
taken in our public schools. 

It now becomes our duty to provide for their proper 
support. The direction of this important interest has 
wisely been committed to a special board, who, like our- 



30 

selves, are chosen by tlie people, to whom they also are 
accountable. So long as this department shall continue 
to be managed as wisely and economically as it has been 
in the past we may with confidence grant all reasonable 
requests for the needs of the schools, feeling assured 
that no more of the public funds will be used than shall 
be found necessary for their support. 

Especially should we provide, as far as lies in our 
power, everything necessary for guarding the health of 
the children attending our schools. In this connection I 
will say it has been suggested to me that the four-room 
school building on School street in West Manchester, 
where there is an attendance of nearly two hundred 
pupils, is unfit for occupancy by reason of defective 
sanitary appliances. It will become our duty to give 
careful consideration to any recommendation of the 
school board in this particular case, or in other cases 
of a like nature. 

CITY FARM. 

Our city farm, under its able superintendent and 
committee of last year, has shown very good results, a 
detailed report of which will soon be published. Mr. 
"Willey, the present superintendent, informs me that he 
does not desire a re-election. This is a very important 
position to fill, and great care should be exercised in the 
selection of his successor. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

The needs of the city library will require thoughtful 
consideration and a liberal appropriation. As a part of 
our educational system this institution should receive as 
generous aid and support as we so willingly bestow upon 
our schools. I am informed by the librarian that there 



31 

are no less than ten thousand volumes upon the shelves 
of which no catalogue has been made. The last printed 
catalogue was issued in 1878, and the seven thousand 
card-holders can obtain these books only by taxing the 
memory of the librarian, or when that fails, as it often of 
necessity must fail, by the tedious process of looking 
through a written list. 

The report of the trustees and librarian will soon be 
laid before you, and will probably contain valuable sug- 
gestions. 

ELLIOT HOSPITAL. 

It seems now well assured that the Elliot Hospital will 
be opened for the admission of patients early in the fall 
of the present year. 

In this connection I would suggest that much suifering 
might frequently be prevented, and possibly lives saved, 
by the establishment of an " accident room," properly 
equipped, in some one of the city buildings near the busi- 
ness center, where persons seriously injured might receive 
prompt medical or surgical treatment before being re- 
moved to the hospital. In consideration of the generous 
accommodations now provided for our fire department, 
would it not be practicable and wise to set apart and equip 
a room at the Vine-street station for this purpose, and 
also to provide an ambulance to be kept there ready at 
all times to respond to a call at a moment's notice ? 

CEMETERIES. 

The committees having in charge the care of our ceme- 
teries have shown a commendable interest in the work 
assigned them. Both the Valley and Pine Grove ceme- 
teries have been much improved during the last year. 

In order to continue the improvements as contemplated 



32 

by the committees, an appropriation about the same in 
amount as that of last year will be required, besides the 
sum of five hundred dollars to complete the new tomb at 
the Yalley Cemetery, 

POLICE. 

In the present condition of society all cities and large 
towns are obliged to maintain a police force. The more 
perfect the discipline of this organization, the better will 
the lives and property of the citizens be protected. 

The men selected for police duty should be of good 
character, and able to keep their tempers in the most try- 
ing circumstances. Officers should not be in haste to 
make arrests when peace and order can be maintained 
without so doing. Personal observation leads me to be- 
lieve that in many cases the desired result might be 
attained without going so far as to bring ofiending parties 
before the court. 

I^one but well-known citizens of good character should 
be selected for duty as special police. 

TEMPERANCE. 

The temperance question is one of vital importance to 
the peace and prosperity of our city. How to control 
the sale and use of alcoholic liquors as a beverage is a 
question which agitates our community with more than 
usual force at the present time. It is, moreover, a ques- 
tion with regard to which people may honestly differ. 

What is known as the "prohibitory law" has been on 
our statute books for more than twenty-five years, but 
only occasionally has any attempt been made to enforce 
it. So long as this is the law of the State, it should be 
enforced by our regular police with the same earnestness 
and fidelity which they display in the enforcement of all 



33 

other laws. At the same time, I am personally in favor 
of a "high license" law, which in many of our sister 
States has proved to be far easier of enforcement than a 
prohibitory law, and which has, in my judgment, partic- 
ularly in cities and large towns containing a mixed popu- 
lation, done very much to diminish the number of open 
saloons, and control the sale of intoxicants. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, permit me again to remind 
you of the importance of the trust committed to us by our 
fellow citizens. Let us at the outset resolve that we will 
carefully examine all matters that are brought before us 
to be acted upon. While we should avoid all extrava- 
gance, we should not allow any needed improvement to 
be neglected. 

I think I need not speak of the importance of your 
prompt attendance at all our meetings, or of the necessity 
that our deliberations should be conducted in a spirit of 
courtesy and harmony. Only by adhering to these 
requisite principles shall we so wisely and successfully 
manage the aiFairs of this city that when our terms of 
office shall expire, the citizens shall have no just cause of 
complaint against us. 

It is gratifying on an occasion like this to be able to say 
that after forty-two years of municipal government no 
taint of corruption or defalcation has ever been charged 
against any official of this city. May it be a long time 
before this record is broken ! 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF Water Commissioners. 

1889. 



DAVID B. VARNEY, Mayor, ex officio. 

Alpheus Gay, President, term expires January, 1893. 
James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires January, 1891. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January, 1890. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1892. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January, 1894. 
Edwin H. Hobbs, term expires January, 1895. 



OFFICERS. 



Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Charles C. Cole, Engineer at Pumping Station. 



R E P O RT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners 
have the honor to present herewith their seventeenth an- 
nual report for the year ending December 31, 1888, 
together with the report of the superintendent covering 
the same period of time, to which reference is made for 
the details of the service connected with this department. 
The receipts and expenditures for the year are as fol- 
lows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1887 . $23,499 62 
Receipts from all sources .... 85,643 82 

Total $109,143 44 

Appropriated to pay interest . $36,000 00 
Expended on construction . 22,733 31 

Repairs and running expenses 14,283 39 

Total expenditure . $73,016 70 

Balance unexpended $36,126 74 

The increase in gross receipts over the year 1887 is 
$5,125.65, being about the same rate of increase as was 
made the year preceding, and all being based on the same 



38 

water-rates. In view of this gradual increase in tlie gross 
income, and in accordance with the policy heretofore laid 
down, — to keep the charges for water as low as are 
afforded by any well-conducted system of water-works in 
the country, — your board have reduced the rates charged 
for fire-hydrants from fifty dollars to forty dollars per 
annum each, the original rate being sixty dollars. Other 
reductions will follow whenever a due regard for the de- 
mands for renewals, repairs, and general maintenance 
would seem to warrant such a course. It will be the aim 
of your commissioners to keep the charges as equitable 
as the nature of the case will admit. 

It is believed that the water- works as a whole were 
never in a more satisfactory condition, and consequently 
no very large outlay will be required the present season, 
unless it should be deemed wise to take advantage of the 
very low price of iron and purchase more than a year's 
supply of pipe, in anticipation of higher prices. This 
matter will receive early consideration. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, President, 
JOHN" HOSLEY, Mayor, ex officio, 
A. C. WALLACE, 
E. H. HOBBS, 
HENRY CHANDLER, 
JOSEPH F. KENNARD, 
JAMES A. WESTOJST, Clerk, 
Board of Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1889. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

In accordance with the ordinances of the city, I have 
the honor to present herewith my annual report, relative 
to the work under my charge and the general condition 
of this department, for the year ending December 31, 
1888. 

Another rainy season has kept the water in the lake 
higher than the dam the past year. The lowest point 
reached was eight inches above the dam, and the highest 
thirty-four inches above. Slight repairs have been made 
on the dam; 125 perch of long, heavy stone having been 
laid over the apron for the water to fall upon at the 
higher stages, at an expense of $600. A building has 
been erected over the gates at the head of the canal, 
which cost $250. 

PUMPING STATION. 

The wheels and pumps have worked satisfactorily. 
A boiler-house and coal-shed have been built at the north 
side of the station, and steam put in for heating the 
pump-room and dwelling-house. This addition to the 
pumping station was built by Head & Dowst, under con- 
tract, for $1,306. The heating apparatus was also put in 
by contract, the work being awarded to Thbs. A. Lane, 
for $1,000. The whole expense, including grading and 
concreting, was about $2,700. 

The following table shows the quantity of water 
pumped : 



40 



•aSBJ9AB jC[re(i 



•qinotn iioca 
bhoiibS .laqtnnn ib^ox 



Ift 




in '• 








o 


(N 










o 
























<N 


CM 




Ml 


■* 


o • 








n 














































o • 



C-5 O CC O lO CO (N 



O lO 00 Ci 03 CO »i3 



5J (M •* O) 00 C<1 00 
- • t-i CO (M CO C5 00 



OJ OO IC t' 00 O »-* 



■^ -rt* iQ '^ Id iO rt* 



-*i 1-1 

t-Tco 

CO 00 



•dnind i[0B8 saoiiB3 -oi^ 



J— I 

o 

(— I 

I 

fa 
O 

Q 
O 

o 

w 



•padmnd 
Ba}[OJ43 jaqmnu ib^ox 



•9;naiin 
and sastoj^s sSBjaAy 



«#OqiMTt<CDIMO(M-*OOCO(NOOTjl^Cl 
OOCSDOOt'lOCM-HCOCMOOOSOOC^IOOCO 
W^CO OC3 OD^C-^IO 00 <N O^TJ* 03 — "^CO t- 

OOOaJOOSTt^-^OOlOt-COO-^OfNt-. 
T-i^ir^CO C-1 CO 00 CS_<?3 CO^t- -^ CO ^f CO rH 

^t- lo oo'c^oo'^oTt^co'^cro ccco^cc 

CDlO "O IM i-H ^ TO CO lO lO ^ CM <N lO 



<NiHcot-eOrtOe»iMrti05(Noot--*m 
■*E-t-tN'*oc-Jooco--iw-Hr^mi^io 

O^CO O 05^f-l CC (N Ci^t- -^ CO CN O^tP Cj t- 

^00 CO c4^ cc'cT (Ti ciTc-fco" w c-f oTin" t-Tc^' 
C<J f- ■■ — 

•* --o 



(Mt-'>i'oOT-(ODoc^it-ocncooooocc 

^ CO 1-1 CO b- CO -^ CO t>> t^ I— 1 CO CO 



b-TO^COia-^dO^-t't-Ot-COOOO 

ascoj3occ»cocoinooio^C5»-ico^co 
o-i^<N{N^c^c4o^c4c4c4^c4(>io^cq 

C0(M(M<N(MC^IN<NC><NC4IM0M0M(M<N 



•3jaOM jSjnoq 'O^ 



laoOOOlO O lO lO 
lO (M rt^ CO lO CO (N Cvl 1-1 

coco ' 

o t-< 

eo(N 



•dtnnd jo puig 



.•0.0.00...00.0. 

■> ■? O ■> G "> Q Q ■> •> •> P O -p Q •? 



£.55 j • : : : : .^|s;| •= 



41 

The foregoing table shows that there has been a steady 
increase of the daily average pumped in the last five 
years. In the year 1883 the average was 1,211,278 gal- 
lons, in 1888, 1,822,726 gallons, an increase of about 
600,000 gallons, K the season just closed had been as 
dry as we frequently have, the daily average would 
probably have been 2,000,000 or more. This is not a 
bad showing, as it gives, on the basis of 40,000 inhab- 
itants, forty -five gallons for each person per day ; but it 
must be taken into consideration that bursts have taken 
a large quantity of water out of the reservoir. 

Your attention is called to the fact that in January and 
February, the coldest months of the season, we pump the 
most water. This shows that a large quantity is wasted 
in these two months. There have not been any bursts 
on the force or supply main, and but few leaks. 

The reservoir has required no repairs the past year. 
At the gate-house a gauge was put up to indicate the 
height of the water. A telegraph wire was run to the 
pumping station, and so connected that by means of an 
electric bell an alarm was sounded when the reservoir 
was full. 

This was planned by Mr, C. C. Cole, who has charge 
of the pumping station, and it proves very convenient. 
It relieves the man in charge, when pumping nights, of 
any anxiety about running the reservoir over, which 
would waste the water, although no damage could be 
done. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

Began to extend the water-pipe in May, and finished 
laying in December. Pipes were laid in thirty-three 
streets by odd jobs, varying from 100 to 1,000 feet in 
each, as the circumstances I'equired, and from four to 



42 

twelve inches in size, according to the plan. The follow- 
ing are the streets where it was laid : 

Appleton, Arlington, Ash, Ashland, Bath, Beech, 
Beauport, Blaine, Central, Chestnut, Clarke, Conant, 
Cypress, Dubuque, Goffstown Lane, Langdon, Liberty, 
Mast road, North, Nutt road, Parker, Pearl, Pine, Rid- 
dle, Spruce, Sullivan, Taylor, Union, Welch, First, 
Second, West, and Wilson. Amount laid, 11,351 feet — 
a little over two miles, — at an expense of $^8,736. There 
have been twenty-two bursts where we have taken out 
cement and put in cast-iron pipe. The amount relaid 
this year is 959 feet. 

There have been three places where water has run 
into the cellars from bursts in the cement pipe, and where 
the owners of the houses claim damage. Two of these 
claims have not been adjusted. 

Last winter the ground froze at an unusual depth. A 
number of service pipes froze, one that was laid five 
feet deep. Several hydrants, where they had leaked or 
had been used, were found frozen ; but they did not cause 
any trouble when there was a fire. 

The superintendent has never seen or heard of any 
hydrant that would always open easily in very cold 
weather. 



43 



PIPES, GATES, AND HYDRANTS LAID IN 1888. 



Streets. 


Pipe laid in feet. 


Gates set. 


a 
g 






4 in. 


6 in. 


Sin. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


4 in. 6 in. 


Sin. 








17 
56 










1 




To Union. 
To Ashland. 
Harrison, n. (1^ ia. gate) 
Bridge to Pearl. 














1 






Ash 


144 




















574 












Bath 




192 








1 


i' 


1 




620 








1 aiiocfo En..fl< 






15 

477 
680 
174 
27 
125 
516 












Cbrner Conant. 

Eastward. 

Canal to Franklin. 

Clarke — north. 

To Chestnut. 

West to Beauport. 

Southward. 

Corner Douglas. 

Amory — south. 

Wayne to Putnam. 

Road to Black brook. 

Westward. 

Corner Pine. 

North — north. 

Westward. 

Corner Pine. 

To Liberty. 

To Pine. 

Winter — north. 

Ashland. 


















1 
1 














1 
1 














1 


Clark 












































1 




1 












1 






356 

476 








1 




















1 




506 








1 








192 


























1 

1 










567 
300 












1 


























1 






North 










80 














800 








1 


. . . 




156 








1 






72 








2 










380 










1 


Riddle 




565 
225 








1 
1 




1 Tn Moof TnoA 




















168 
















Beauport — west. 




890 
475 
300 










2 






















Appleton — north. 














1 






Welch, north . . . 


384 
292 














Elm, west (IJ in. gate). 




10 
300 








1 
1 








West 








1 






Douglas to Conant. 
Lake to Spruce. 


Wilson 






240 
















80 












1,650 


7,007 


1,800 


814 


6 


18 


2 


8 


Total, 11,351 feet. 



44 

Number miles of pipe laid, 1888 .... 2.15 
" gates set " . . . . 26 

" hydrants set ." . . . .8 

LOCATION OP HYDRANTS SET, 1888. 

Bath, cor. Eiver. 
Blaine, cor. Second. 
Central, cor. Franklin. 
Cypress, cor. south end of street. 
Dubuque, cor. Putnam. 
Liberty, cor. ITorth. 
Pine, opposite T. Shea's. 
Riddle, near I^esmith's residence. 



45 



TBe following places are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken out and cast-iron laid instead : 



Streets. 



Auburn 

Amherst . . ■ ■ 
Amberst .... 

Cedar 

Central 

Central 

Chestnut.. . . 

Chestnut 

Clinton 

Dover 

Douglas 

Granite 

Manchester.. 

Pine 

Pine 

Second...... 

School 

School 

Spruce 

Spruce 

Spruce 

State 

Washington , 

Winter 

Winter 



Length in feet. 



4 in. 



18 



33 



192 
16 



200 



950 



Location. 



16 



Opposite 'No. 54. 
East of Pine. 
Corner Elm. 
East of Pine. 
Corner Pine. 
West of Pine. 
Come'' Central. 
Corner High. 
Near engine-house. 
Corner Douglas. 
Main to Dover. 
Opposite No. 236. 
Opposite Dealy block. 
Corner Hanover. 
South of Central. 
Near Walker. 
East of Main. 
East of Main. 
East of Union. 
West of Chestnut. 

South of Central. 
Corner Elm. 
East of Parker. 
East of Parker. 



Total, 999 feet. 



46 



•s^ncjpjCH 1 




(N'*'* 


5 


CO 


'^ 




00 ■* 




■^ 


CO(N 


'"' 


N'^lOOOC^XNNOiCOSOO 




(NC<I 


"^ 






CO 


eo 




■S3AI«A Jiy 1 


iM <-!;•; ; 






■ ^ ■ ■ ; i : ; ; 








^ : 






.2 1 • 
■^ 1 


• : • • jrH : 






•rt 1 • • • ;<M ; 


; : . to ; j 


: : : : 


- : : 




p 1 
to 1 


(NIOCO tOlM -^ 


■*T^rt 


iHIN«N«H tOlOiH • 


c^ioooioto 


cieoiN 




•* 




■S 1 

00 ' 






















r-in 






CO 




CO 




rH-* 














tHCC 




a 1 
3 1 




- 






- 


(N • 


-• 


- 


- 


-• 










































a 1 
2 1 
















t- 




































« 




a 1 
"* 1 










^. 


- 


" 












































iH 




t-- _ 




.2 1 ^ rt rt 
S 1 




















































3 
'a 

<D 

a, 

'S. 
a 
o 

1 

o 

•s 

.2 

1 

"S 

p 














2? 

CO 




















o 
2 








•* • 

S : 






rt> 






«o 




<M 


T(< t- to 




o 00 C5 lO r^ 
mcjococo 
ototo-* 


978 

16 

16 

848 

858 

708 

31 

1142 

1247 

1483 

680 

1598 


00 "" 

ooS 






to to 


a 

CO 


























o 

2 






CM 


to t- 




























. a 
'o 






00 








05 


- 


- 


- 


- 


CO 


- 














































































-- 










SI 

to. 




a 1 








































to 














00 
I- 




1 




a 1 

i 1' 


ii 


























































•6 

'a 

o. 

'S. 

-a 
» 
a 

3 

a 
B 

(U 
CM 

o 

1 

be 

.2 


■2 1 










































1 


^ 






5 : 




a 
to 




r-l to 


Tt* -^ t— 


i 






CO 00 


485 
1518 
3883 
2239 


<N 


.-llOtOO 
OOJl- t- 

eiSSeo 




S§ 




^ 




.2 

00 


























|5 










CO 




Sc5 
1-1 in 














g 




a' 
o 
















CO 

cc 






























i 


















































i 

CO 




































'to 

CO 




.2 










































lO 




















ii 




a 

i 


Oi OQ Oi 

SSI 




























































► 




































































c 


a 


H 
1- 

s 




is 


5 c 

n 

HE/ 


'i 


a 4. 


- 1 

ii 


i 



3 

] < 


: 1 

a' 
§4 




3 
3 a 

3^ 
3 
IP 


1 ; 


• ] 




3^ 

1 1 
51^ 


1 
5(2 


a 

N 

3-' 


5 1 
; C 




h 

3(i 


< 

i 

3(! 


1 

11 


a 






It 


> c 

3 C 


a : 

3 ,C 


a 3 
i < 

a c 

a > 


i. c 

■■(: 


'\i 


i 1 
3.1 

3 a 


• c 

it: 




■1 


1 

D 

3 

i 
a 



47 



i-ir-iTi<wrtMO -00 -eoeoi-ie-io^^coiNco •«mo'"05 •« •« ■osooTji.-it-Ti'oeo -eo -cooo 



• e^ « rH i-l .H to 



M • (M C<1 «(N10>-IIOO«<N 



> (N t-i-H ^eo 



• eooe^Tji^(Mcoco 






" X) ic -^ CO cN 00 eo t* 



:S§ 



• o o t- « o 
. o la — " 



oiaiocO'* • ■* CO o o 



•• CO o o 
o -<o 



' 00 mo • '^ 



> -r to ■ CO t- -et* CO 



■2— '^— 



£ a a 



: 2 £ « a a s .^o s 3 5 a -2 S 



^^£%'?t'5-ZSS^g-=^ 



« « — J>! S j: 



,§32 



a" o 






gs-^a. 






48 



■sjnejp/^H 



eOCOiH .Nro • !N 'INIOW •■^ 



MrHrtCO -NrH • »H N r1 . rt ,H r-( 



•saAjBA jiy 



(MC^ ^ NMIO 



(M -C^ieOrH -N 



• t- O Oi X CD lO 

• ^ 00 00 *»* O C<I 



• 03 • O 05 05 
. — • . -J< OOl 
•CO • CO OOd 






■25 



; Spja'ja 






S -^ ? • 5? o---- ® a ? 
•<-<-Jl<Maa5«MpqcaMo 



49 



r^Si^D 


•IHN 


•CO"* 


• cc 


. rH tH .-H » 


H t-iM COlO 






• N 


; "^ 


; C<5 CO -^ .-1 tH rt CO CO tH . 


eoiM 


1 '^ 






























t- 


1 • • N ; ; 




: :- : 








: ""I : 




• • • • j (N rt rf rt 


1" 


-H-HW 


^^: 




|(M 


;■* 


'i-HrHi-Hi-HMCOlNf-l 


i-^ 


■- 


|^-H(Meqi-i 


|(MrH<N(M<M ; 


.H(N 


Is 

1 N 
















:- 




• rH 




























: '^ 
























!s5 






























; t- 
















































■* 












































































:'* 


§ 
















































































;3 
















































































00 




































s 

N 




t- 




















n""oo 














S 








CO 

g 



































:? 






i 
00 


0> 


lOO 


SS 


CO h* 


O 


682 

33 

10 

186 

2420 

2152 

586 

1580 




•^^SOOOt-<CCC-3 00Ci(MO • 
wS o cq -^ 0:1 Ci CO • 


CO C-J 
00 


00 
S ! 

f2 




















o 












o 
















CJ 






















1 (N 

1 s 
















o 












50 
















































00 

r 












































































• 














































































1 00 

OS 

1 *" 














































































1 10 








■5 

lO 














i 
























i 


§ 
















00 ■ 


i~ 




i 


»rt 00 00 • 














CO 

■* 










3 




t- 














00 CD 

•* 







i 


• 


§ 

* 


- 


s 










































































































g 
















































^ i 
















































































OS 
















































































1 














































































1 IM 


c 
a 
C 
e 
C 


c 

1 




1 <s 
> 
c 
Q 


a 
c 


1 

c 
c 


> 




1 


1 

c 
c 


e 

B 
c 

a 

it 

o 

a 




1 


c 


1 

tr 


> 

"a 




c 
c 

1 




1 
1 


1 

i 


1 


: 
o 

s 
c 


o 

1 

5 




C 


B 

d 


'5 




"c 
c 

Si 


s 
c 


_0 

1 


^ > 


1 


> 


u 
■« 


03 
> 




1 









50 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1888. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-Iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20 inch diameter 


20,560.00 ft. 


5,146.00 ft. 


8 


14 inch diameter 


6,825.00 " 


7,598.00 " 


11 


12 inch diameter 


7,983.00 " 


11,709.00 " 


20 


10 inch diameter 


4,829.75 " 


10,748.00 " 


14 


8 inch diameter 


12,5.39.00 " 


11,472.00 " 


34 


6 inch diameter 


80,639.50 " 


75,978.00 " 


269 


4 inch diameter 


7,967.00 " 


8,263.00 " 


35 




141,343.25 ft. 


130,914.00 ft. 


391 



26.773 miles of cement-lined pipe. 
24.791 miles of cast-iron pipe. 



51.564, total miles of pipe. 

391 gates. 
426 hydrants. 

7 air valves. 

METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year is one hun- 
dred and six. 

Total number of meters in use, eight hundred and 
fortj^-two. 

The number of applications for water to date has been 
thirty-two hundred and forty. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

One hundred and forty-three (143) service pipes have 
been laid this year, as follows : 

140 1 inch diameter . . . . 8,543.8 feet. 
2 2" " . ■ . . . 50.0 " 



1 21 " 



57.0 



Total number of feet laid, 1888 . 3,650.8 feet. 



51 



I inch service has been changed to 1 inch, 
have been " 1 " 

has been 



49.5 
21.5 
21.0 
19.4 
33.0 



n 




li 


li 




li 


a 




li 


u 




li 


14.7 feet 1 


inch 


49.5 " 


1 




21.5 " 


li 




21.0 " 


IJ 




19.4 " 


li 




33.0 " 


IJ 





Thirty hundred and eighty-seven (3,087) service pipes 
have been laid to date, as follows : 



39 


1 

2 


inch diameter 


1774 


1 






1192 


1 






23 


li 






8 


li 






42 


2 






1 


^ 






1 


3 






7 


4 







845.0 


feet. 


46,640.3 


a 


. 30,592.9 


a 


1,293.5 




225.5 


a 


993.4 


a 


57.0 


li 


16.8 


a 


233.0 


a 


80,897.4 feet. 



Total length of service pipe 
Number of miles of service pipe, 15.32. 

The income from the sale of water for 1888 has been 
as follows : 

Received for water by rate . . $54,864 78 
" " meter. . 29,838 82 

" for building purposes . 543 80 
" from fines ... 149 80 

,397 20 



52 



Keceived for labor and pipe sold 
" of G. G. Griffin . 
" George P. Clark 

" R D.Wood & Co. (gear) 

Total received . 

Abatements, $252.73. 

Current expenses for 1888 . 
Construction expenses for 1888 . 
Appropriated for interest 

Receipts over expenditures 

Amount on hand January 1, 1888 $23,499 62 
Amount received, 1888 . . 85,643 82 



. $227 


33 




1 


00 




2 


00 




) 16 


29 


$246 62 




- 




$85,643 82 


$14,283 39 
22,733 31 




36,000 


00 


$73,016.70 




- 




$12,627 12 



$109,143 44 
Amount expended, 1888 . . 73,016 70 

Balance December 31, 1888 $36,126 74 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1888. 



Superintendence and repairs 


$10,133 18 


Stationery and printing 


132 78 


Office and incidental expenses 


320 99 


Pumping expenses 


2,453 44 


Repairs to dam, canal, and reser- 




voir 


1,113 89 


Repairs to building 


129 11 


Current expenses for 1888 


$14,283 39 


Service pipes .... 


$1,551 55 


Distribution pipes 


11,865 79 



53 



Fire-hydrants and valves 
Meter and fixtures 
Pump-house and building 
Land .... 
Grading 



$740 84 

2,068 23 

2,625 90 

3,635 00 

246 00 



Construction expense, 1888 




$22,733 31 


Total expended, 1888 . 


$37,016 70 


Land and water rights 


$48,717 45 


Dam, canal, penstock, and races . 


101,399 


16 


Pumping machinery, pump-house, 






and buildings .... 


106,869 


10 


Distributing reservoir and fixtures 


71,542 


36 


Force and supply main 


89,769 


02 


Distribution pipes 


347,679 


43 


Fire-hydrants and valves 


38,916 


97 


Tools and fixtures 


10,649 


35 


Boarding and store houses . 


919 


36 


Roads and culverts 


2,193 


49 


Supplies . . , . . 


550 


39 


Engineering . . . . 


22,176 


19 


Livery and traveling expenses 


2,856 


64 


Legal expenses .... 


563 


79 


Grading and fencing . 


13,515 


23 


Service pipes .... 


44,441 


96 


Meters and fixtures 


21,247 


55 



Total construction account 

to Dec. 31, 1888 . . $924,007 44 

Current expenses: 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs .... $111,094 54 

Stationery, printing, etc. . . 5,088 44 



54 



Office and incidental expenses 
Pumping expenses and repairs 
Repairs to dam, canal races, and 

reservoir .... 
Repairs to buildings 



$16,495 
32,009 

3,633 
1,321 



13 
46 

65 
41 



Current expenses to Dec. 
31, 1888 

Interest $40,678 

Highway expenditures . . 14,000 


$169,642 63 
51 
53 






Total amount of bills ap- 
proved to date . . $1,148,329 11 

Interest, discount, and labor per- 
formed on highways, trans., 
and tools and materials sold . $61,444 31 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1888 155,359 24 

<tt01C QAQ P.K 






Total cost, exclusive of in- 
terest and current ex- 
penses 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1887 $524,961 

Interest for 1888 .... 33,772 


$931,525 56 

51 
00 


Total interest and discount 
to Dec. 31, 1888 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31, 1887 . . . $377,000 
Amount used by city in 1888 . 36,000 


$558,733 51 

00 
00 



Total 



$413,000 00 



55 

The follov/iug amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works : 







1872, supphes and ma- 








terials sold . 


$573 61 






1873, supplies and ma- 








terials sold . 


177 07 






. accrued interest on 








water bonds sold . 


193 26 






1873, accrued interest 








on state bonds sold 


146 00 






water rents 


1,920 53 






1874, supplies and ma- 








terials sold . 


607 89 


March 12, 


1874, highway expendi- 








tures, trans, from 








water account 


14,000 53, 


March 17, 


1874, interest and dis- 








count, trans, from 








water account 


12,347 25 


Sept. 


1, 


1874, interest and dis- 
count trans, from 








water account 


22,361 74 






1874, water and hydrant 








rent, etc. 


30,233 54 


Dec. 


2a 


, 1874, interest trans- 








ferred . 


4,566 25 


Dec. 


18, 


1875, one anvil sold 


15 00 


Sept. 


25, 


1875, engine, crusher, 








and material sold 


2,089 45 






1875, water and hydrant 








rent, etc. 


27,119 15 


May 


20, 


1876, derrick sold 


125 00 


May 


20, 


, 1876, rent of derrick . 


24 00 



56 



1875, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. . . I 


138,879 47 


1877, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


43,823 30 


1878, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


48,873 26 


old plow sold . 


1 00 


1879, derrick sold 


75 00 


1879, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


53,068 17 


1880, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


57,395 25 



sale of grass . 


10 


00 


level, transit, etc 


250 


00 


1881, water and hydrant 






rent, etc. 


60,154 


62 


sale of grass . 


10 


00 


sale of derrick 


50 


00 


received of G. G. 






Griffin 


1 


00 


1882, water and hydrant 






rent, etc. 


67,403 


76 


received of G. G. 






Griffin 


1 


00 


1882, received of James 






Baldwin & Co 


175 


00 


received from the sale 






of grass 


10 


00 


received from Good- 






hue & Birnie 


24 


37 


1882, received for old 






plank 


1 


00 


received for use of 






derrick 


15 


00 



57 



1883, received of G. G. 

Griffin ... $1 00 

received from sale of 

grass ... 20 00 

vi^ater and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 73,437 20 

1884, received of G. G. 
Griffin . 

received for stone 
received from sale of 

grass 
1884,received from pipe 

sold and labor 
received for water 

and hydrant rent . 

1885, received from G. 
G. Griffin . 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass 
labor and pipe sold . 
received for water 

and hydrant rent . 

1886, received from G. 
G. Griffin . 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass 
for wood . 
labor and pipe . 
water and hydrant 

rent . . . 74,803 76 

1887, received for 

labor and pipe . 768 86 
received of G. G. 

Griffin ... 1 00 



1 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


616 


20 


74,947 


88 


1 


00 


10 


00 


13 


45 


80,379 


67 


1 


00 


5 


00 


37 


80 


282 


43 



58 



1887, received of C. C. 

Cole ... 10 50 

received of B. P. 

Kimball, for grass 10 00 

received of A. J. 

Crombie, for grass 5 00 

received of A. Good- 
win, for poles . 10 00 

received of W. G. 

Brown ... 25 00 

received of T. H. 

Risdon & Co., for 

freight ... 15 11 

received for water 

and hydrant rent 79,682 70 

1888, received for labor 

and pipe . . 227 33 
received of G. G. 

Griffin . . 1 00 

received of Geo. P. 

Clark ... 2 00 

received R. D. Wood 

& Co. (gear) . 16 29 

received for water 

and hydrant rent . 85,397 20 



Total received for water, etc. . $957,455 85 

Amount appropriated to date . . 640,000 00 

Amount received to date . . $1,597,455 85 
Amount of bills approved to date . 1,148,329 11 

$449,126 74 
Amount transferred toward interest . 413,000 00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1888 . $36,126 74 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Superiniendent, 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
the Manchester Water-Works for the year 1888, and find 
the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL, 

Auditor. 
Manchester, N. H., Jan. 6, 1889. 



60 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


4 Cemeteries. 


16 Churches. 


1 Orphanage. 


1 Court-house. 


1 Post-office. 


6 Hose companies. 


1 City Library. 


4 Fire-engines. 


5 Banks. 


1 Hook-and-laclder. 


3 Hotels. 


2 Opera-houses. 


1 Masonic Hall. 


1 Convent. 


1 Odd Fellows' Hall. 


1 City Hospitah 


1 Holly-Tree Inn. 


1 Old Ladies' Home. 


3 Halls. 


1 Soldiers' Monument. 


22 Schoolhouses. 


1 Turner Hall. 


1 Battery Building. 


3 Fountains. 


1 Skating Rink. 


MANUFACTURING 


ESTABLISHMENTS. 


1 Silver-plating. 


2 Electric light. 


2 Iron foundries. 


3 Sash and blind shops. 


2 Dyehouses. 


1 Brewery. 


4 Machine-shops. 


1 Shoe-shop. 


6 Clothing manufactories. 


1 Gas-works. 


6 Harness-shops. 


4 Slaughter-houses. 


1 Brush-shop. 


1 Soap manufactory. 


3 Carriage-shops. 


2 iTeedle manufactories, 


6 Cigar. 


4 Beer-bottling. 


1 Brassand copper foundry. 


, 1 Book-bindery. 


1 Locomotive works. 


1 Paper-mill. 


MARKETS. 


7 Fish. 


2 Meat (wholesale). 


9 Meat and fish. 





61 



15 Livery. 
1 Horse-railroad. 



11 Dentists. 
1 Telephone. 

1 Telegraph. 

2 Express. 



27 Barber. 
2 Wheelwright. 
9 Blacksmith. 
5 Carpenter. 
1 Tinsmith. 



STABLES. 

688 Private. 

OFFICES. 

10 Printing. 
• 1 Gas. 
4 Coal. 



SHOPS. 



2 Currying. 

6 Plumber and 

water pipe. 
8 Paint. 
1 Gunsmith. 



o-as and 



STORES. 



4 Auction. 
23 Drug. 

9 Jewelry. 

1 Fur. 

2 House-furnishing goods. 
20 Fancy goods. 

1 "Wholesale paper. 

5 Wholesale produce. 
15 Dry goods. 

12 Candy. 

1 Cloak. 

15 Millinery. 

2 Tea. 

5 Furniture. 



80 Grocery. 

5 Meal. 

3 Hardware. 
30 Boot and shoe. 

7 Stove. 
15 Gents' furnishing goods. 
10 Book. 

1 Leather and shoe-finders. 

3 Music. 

3 Upholstery. 

6 Undertakers. 

5 Sewing-machine. 
1 Feather-cleaner. 
1 Rubber. 



62 



SALOONS. 



11 Dining. 
6 Billiai'xl. 



6 Club-rooms. 

2 Bleacheries. 

8 Laundries. 

3 Ice-houses. 

9 Photographers. 



62 Liquor, 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



4 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. 
13 Bakeries. 
1 Waste. 



7102 Families. 

Ill Boarding-houses. 

8798 Faucets. 

1285 Wash-bowls. 

1888 Water-closets. 

179 Wash-tubs. 

586 Bath-tubs. 

135 Urinals. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

1714 Sill-cocks. 
426 Fire-hydrants. 
33 Stand-pipes. 
20 Watering-troughs. 
4 Brinking-fountains. 
1665 Horses. 
79 Cattle. 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 



PIPE. 



474 feet 20 in. 


476 feet 8 in. 


935 feet 14 in. 


4400 feet 6 in, 


1200 feet 12 in. 


1476 feet 4 in. 


1332 feet 10 in. 






GATES. 


2 4 in. 


2 8 in. 


8 6 in. 


1 10 in. 



63 



4 


14 in. 


8 


12 in. 


1 


10 in. 


7 


20 in. 


11 


14 in, 


10 


12 in 


33 


10 in. 


2 


14 in. 


1 


12 in. 


5 


10 in. 



2 double 6 on 12. 
2 double 6 on 10. 

2 double 6 on 8. 

3 double 6 on 6. 



14 to 12. 

6 to 4. 



2 10 in. 1-8. 

2 6 in. S S. 

1 14 in. 1-8. 

1 12 in. 1-8. 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 

11 6 in. 
8 4 in. 



CLAMP SLEEVES. 



19 


8 in, 


21 


6 in 


21 


4 in 



PLUGS. 



5 6 in. 






2 4 in. 






BRANCHES. 






2 single 


6 on 


14, 


1 single 


12 on 


14. 


2 single 


8 on 


8. 


3 single 


6 on 


8. 


10 single 


6 on 


6. 


REDUCERS. 






2 8 to 6. 







BENDS. 



2 6 in. 1-4. 
2 6 in. 1-16. 
1 6 in. 1-8. 



64 







SERVICE PIPE 


Um. 


318 feet. 


21 in. 


11 in. 


324 feet. 


2 in. 


1 in. 


3200 feet. 


f in. 



88 feet. 
344 feet. 
770 feet. 



35 pigs of lead. 



R e: P O RT 



CITY ENGINEER 



City Engineer's Department. 

1888. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BEI^IS^ETT. 



ASSISTANTS. 



IIarrie M. Young, 

George W. Wales, 

John J. McDonough. 



temporary assistants. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 

Charles W. Bickford, 

Edward H. Doherty. 

The last three named received their salary from special 
appropriations. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting mj third annual 
report, being the tenth annual report of the work in the 
City Engineer's office, and the several highway districts 
of the city of Manchester, for the year ending December 
31, 1888.' 

Expenses of the office for the year 1888 : 



For salary of city engineer . 


11,000 


00 




salary of three assistants 


1,296 


99 




supplies for the office . 


92 


43 




repairing . . . . 


34 


70 




express 


1 


75 




stakes 


31 


70 




horse-shoeing and repairs o; 


? 






wagon and harness . 


21 


85 




bill of 1887 . 


33 


28 




horse-car fares 


5 


70 




street numbers 


18 


45 




printing reports 


24 


95 




Total. 


, , 


, 


$2,561 80 


Appropriation 


• 


• 


2,500 00 



Amount overdrawn 



$61 80 



68 



Expenses for soldiers' monument : 

For water ..... 
gas 

Total 



$50 00 
42 



150 42 



The amount of work done in the office during the year 
is as follows : 

Number of orders for surveys, street lines and 

grades 527 

Number of orders for sewer and paving grades . 126 

Number of orders for profile levels . . . 119 



Total number of orders 



772 



Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 188,348 feet, 
equal to 35.67 miles. 

These profiles, having three lines of levels on 

each street, make a total distance actually 

leveled of . . . 
Levels for sewer profiles . 
Levels for other center profiles 
Levels in Pine Grove cemetery 
Levels in Valley cemetery . 
Levels for accidents . 
Other levels 

Total levels taken . 
Equal to 125.61 miles. 

Surveys of streets and street lines 
Surveys in Pine Grove cemetery 
Surveys in Valley cemetery 
Surveys for accidents 



665,044 feet. 


7,710 " 


53,762 " 


1,100 " 


800 " 


700 " 


34,090 " 


663,206 feet. 


54,285 feet. 


8,160 " 


6,400 " 


600 " 



69 



Surveys for street numbers 

Other surveys ...... 

Total surveys made 
Equal to 17.96 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground . 
Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove 
cemetery ...... 

Lines of lots and avenues, Valley cemetery 
Lines of land sold . . . . ■ . 

Total length lines marked on ground 
Equal to 14.21 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks . 

Grades set for centers 

Grades set for gutters 

Grades set for horse-railroad tracks 

Grades set in Pine Grove cemetery 

Grades set in Valley cemetery . 

Grades set for curb . 

Grades set for sewers 

Other grades .... 

Total length of grades set 
Equal to 12.33 miles. 

BATTERS SET. 

Lake-avenue engine-house. 

Elliot Hospital building. 

Valley cemetery, city tomb. 

City Hall, public comfort. 

Belmont-street culvert, at Cemetery brook. 

Grove-street culvert, at Cemetery brook. 

Elm street, retaining wall. 



16,922 feet. 


8,600 " 


t. 


94,967 fee 


59,832 feet. 


10,880 " 


2,300 " 


2,000 " 


t. 


75,012 fee 


17,551 feet. 


8,304 ' 




9,409 ' 




200 ' 




3,000 ' 




1,600 ' 




9,639 ' 




13,154 ' 




2,256 ' 




65,113 fe( 


it. 



70 

Old lots relaid in Valley cemetery ... 9 

Old lots relaid in Pine Grove cemetery ... 40 

New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery . . 142 



Total cemetery lots laid out . . . 191 

Street numbers assigned and put on ... 171 

Street numbers replaced ..... 125 



Total numbers put on .... 296 

This year, as in j)revious years, the city engineer has 
investigated and made surveys in all cases where suits 
were liable to be brought against the city. Cases inves- 
tigated and reported to the Committee on Claims, 14. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Bridge street, from Russell to Hall street. Two plans. 

Chestnut street, from Brook to Webster street. Two 
plans. 

Elm street, from Short to Baker street. Three plans. 

Hanover street, from Elm to Chestnut street. 

Mast street, from Main street to west line of Eugene 
Brigham's land. 

Total plans and profiles, 9. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Amherst street, from Pine to Union street. 

Amherst south back street, from Elm east back to Pine 
street. 

Cedar street, from Union to Lincoln street. Two plans. 

Clarke street, from Elm to Union street. 

Lincoln street, from Cedar to Spruce street. 

Monmouth street, from McGregor west back to Main 
street. 



71 

River street, and westerly across private land. 
Second street, from Granite to Ferry street. 
Total sewer plans and profiles, 9. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Beacon street. Spruce to Hanover street. Two plans. 

Bowman street, Mast to A street. Two plans. 

Central street, Elm to Canal street. 

Chestnut street, Appleton to Ray street. Two plans. 

Clarke street, Elm to Union street. Two plans. 

Clinton street. Main to West street. 

Douglas street. River to Quincy street. Three plans. 

Dover street, Clinton to Douglas street. 

Ferry street. River to Main street. Two plans. 

Fourth street. School street to N. W. R. R. 

Franklin street, Canal to Market street. Four plans. 

Granite street, Elm to Quincy street. Six plans. 

Laurel street, Highland street westerly. 

Main street. Granite to A street. Four plans. • 

River street, Douglas street to ]N". W. R. R. Three 
plans. 

Second street. Granite street to ]^. W. R. R. Two 
plans. 

Walker street, River to Main street. Two plans. 

West street, Parker to Douglas street. 

West Hancock street. Main street to Merrimack river. 
Three plans. 

Total numbering plans, 43. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Amherst road, land of John C. Head, copy. 
Church street, plan of saloon. 

Concord street, at Dutton street, land of Cbas. jST. 
Heald, copy. 



72 

Concord street, at Dutton street, plan of lots, copy. 
Two plans. 

Concord street, land of Jane Young, copy. 

Concord street, at Wilson, land of Samuel Bartlett, 
copy. 

Dean avenue, location of Mrs. Quigley's accident. Two 
plans. 

Hanover street, land of Dr. Bell, copy. 

Lake avenue, Massabesic, Spruce, and Belmont streets, 
square bounded by. 

Lowell and Wilson streets, land of John Hall, copy. 

Lowell street, land of Jason Weston, copy. 

Lowell street, land of Wallace, copy. 

Lowell street, land of Wilson and Weston, and Mrs. 
Henry Clough, copy. 

Park square, plan and section of fountain. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan of extension. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan and elevation of store- 
house. 

Pine Grove cemetery, profile of Acacia avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery, profile of Beech avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery, profile of Maple avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery, profile of Oakland avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery, profile of Willow avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery, profile of fence. 

Public comfort, plan, section, and elevation. 

Riddle estate, West Manchester, plan of lots. 

Union, Bridge, Hall, and Manchester streets, square 
bounded by. 

Valley cemetery, plan of Frederick Smyth's lot. 

Welch avenue, land of Chas. D. Welch, copy. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 28. 



73 



WORKING PLANS NOT RETAINED IN OFFICE. 

Amherst road, Mast road southerly. Profile. 

Arlington street, Warren to Ashland street. Center 
profile. 

Ashland street. Bridge to Pearl street. Profile. 

Beech street, sketch and notes for paA^ng. 

Beech street, Merrimack to Hanover street. Profile. 

Belmont-street extension, location of culvert. 

Cedar street. Union to Lincoln street. Center profile. 

Central street, Elm to Canal street. N'umbering plan. 

Central street. Union to Beech street. Profile. 

City stable, design for. Eleven plans. 

Cypress street. Lake avenue to Massabesic street. 
Center profile. 

Electric-light locations, for Weston Company. 

Electric-light locations, for Brush Company. 

Electric-light locations, for Thompson-Houston 
Company. 

Electric-light locations, by committee. 

Elliot Hospital land, cross section. 

Elm street, east side, Merrimack to Manchester street. 
Profile. 

Ferry street. River to Main street. Profile. 

High south back street. Pine to Union street. Center 
profile. 

Lake avenue, plan of lots belonging to John Hosley. 

Lake avenue, engine-house. Twenty-four plans. 

Lowell street, Walnut to Maple street. Profile. 

Manchester south back street, Elm east back to Chest- 
nut street. Profile. 

Merrimack street, Elm to Chestnut street. Profile. 

Merrimack square. Profile of diagonal walk. 

Pine street, Salmon to Salmon south back street. 
Center profile. 



74 

Pine street, Concord to Bridge street. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lot 'No. 1471|. 

Public comfort. Two plans. 

Salmon south back street, Pine street easterly. Center 
profile. 

Spruce street. Union to Massabesic street. Center 
profile. 

Summer street, Wilson to Massabesic street. 

Union street. Laurel to Manchester street. Profile. 

Union street. Sagamore to Webster street. Profile. 

Valley cemetery, city tomb. Eleven plans. 

Valley cemetery, city tomb, design for grill. 

Valley cemetery, city tomb, design for doors. 

Valley cemetery, design for bridge. 

Towlesville, comprising Amherst, Ashland, Concord, 
Maple, Dutton, Derry, Porter, and Chester streets, 
equaling eight plans. 

East Manchester, comprising Massabesic, Belmont, 
Weston, Cypress, Jewett, Spruce, Summer, and Valley 
streets and Old Falls road, equaling nine plans. 

Total working plans, 99. 

TRACINGS. 

Amherst south back street sewer, fpr government 
building superintendent. 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Company's land and mill 
privileges in 1835. 

Belmont street, culvert. 

City of Manchester, improved sewerage. Three plans. 

City farm, location of proposed public park. 

City stable, design for. Eleven plans. 

Cypress and Weston streets, for county commissioners. 

Eastern section of city. 

Elliot Hospital land, cross section, for architect. ^ 



75 

Lake avenue, engine-house. Forty-seven plans. 

Luke avenue, land of John Hosley. 

Land of S. N. Bell, West Manchester. 

Merrimack river, Amoskeag Falls to Hooksett Falls. 

Merrimack river. Granite bridge to Cromwell's Falls. 

Xutt road and Elm street. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots on Birch avenue. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lot No. 1471|^, for treasurer. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots for treasurer. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots in new section. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots in northwest corner, for 
superintendent. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots in eastern section, for super- 
intendent. 

Police station, stonework, for Bodwell suit. 

Public comfort, for contractor. 

Eiddle estate, West Manchester, plan of lots. 

Valley cemetery, city tomb. Three plans. 

Valley cemetery, city tomb, design for grill. 

Valley cemetery, city tomb, design for doors. ^ 

Weston street. Center profile. 

Total tracings, 88. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

Belmont street, culvert. 

City stable. Twenty-two plans. , 

Lake avenue, engine-house. Eighty-four plans. 

Valley cemetery, city tomb. Two plans. 

Total blue prints, 109. 

MAPS. 

One large map showing entire city. 
Two large contour maps of city, for improved system 
of sewerage. 



76 

These maps have a superficial area of 146 square feet. 

In connection with the contour maps, 256 profiles of 
streets have been made, covering a distance of seventy- 
one miles. 

Twelve plans of streets laid out, and one plan of road 
discontinued, have been made in the City Clerk's book of 
records. 

Total of all plans made, 656. 

In connection with the year's work two large maps of 
the city have been started, showing the sewerage system 
as adopted. 

Plans of all new highways laid out to December 31, 
1888, have been made in the City Clerk's book of records. 

The index and catalogue of plans have been brought 
up to December 31, 1888 ; the index to level books to 
December 31, 1888 ; and the index to transmit books to 
December 22, 1888. 

GRADES ESTABLISHED. 

The following grades have been established during the 
year: 

Amory street, from Beauport to Dubuque street 540 feet. 

Amherst street, from Maple to Ashland street 1,128 " 

Beacon street, from Spruce to Hanover street 1,510 " 

Beauport street, from Amory to Kelly street . 650 " 

Beauport street, from Conant to Sullivan street 1,263 " 

Blaine street, from Second to Third street . 185 " 

Bridge street, from Walnut to Hall street . 2,678 " 
Carroll street, from Milford street to Amherst 

road 820 " 

Cartier street, from Amory to Amory south 

back street 250 " 

Cartier street, from Wayne to Putnam street . 500 " 

Cedar street, from Elm to Chestnut street . 570 " 



77 

Cedar street, from Pine to Lincoln street . 2,650 feet. 
Cedar south back street, from Elm east back 

to Chestnut street ...... 450 " 

Chestnut street, from Brook to Webster street . 2,324 " 

Clarke street, from Elm to Union street . . 810 " 

Conant street, from Main street westerly . 700 " 

Dean street, from Elm to Canal street . . 648 " 

Elm street, from Clarke to Rowell street . 2,666 " 

Elm street, from Short to Baker street . . 3,475 " 
Franklin street, from Granite to Merrimack 

street 950 " 

High street, from Maple to Jane street . . 580 " 

Laurel street, from Pine to Lincoln street . 2,199 " 

Laurel street, from Wilson to Hall street . . 471 " 

Laurel street, from Belmont to Highland street 1,460 " 
Massabesic street, from Lake avenue to Cypress 

street 2,510 " 

Mast street, from Main street to Brigham's 

west line 1,050 " 

Mast road, from Amherst road westerly . . 1,100 " 
Old Falls road, from Belmont to Massabesic 

street 930 " 

Pine street, from Merrimack to Amherst street 830 " 
Putnam street, from Beauport to Dubuque 

street 540 " 

Piver street, from Ferry street to M. & 1^. W. 

P. R 816 " 

Piddle street, from Milford to Mast street . 888 " 

Second street, from Granite to M. & K W. P. R. 1,580 " 
Spruce street, from Pine street to James Hall 

road 6,404 " 

Tilton street, from Milford street northerly . 485 " 

West Hancock street, from Main street easterly 600 " 



Total grades established . . 47,210 feet. 
Equal to 8.94 miles. 



78 



NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT. 

Amory street, Beauport to Dubuque street 
Beauport street, Sullivan to Conant street 
Beech street, Gore street north 370 feet . 
Blaine street, Third to Second street 
Cartier street, Amor}^ to Amory south back 

street ....... 

Cartier street, Wayne to Sullivan street . 
Chestnut street, Hooksett road to "Webster 

street ....... 50 

Chestnut street, Clarke street north 256 

feet 

Dubuque street, Wayne to Amory street . 
Morgan street, Amory to Kell}^ street 
Putnam street, Beauportto Dubuque street 
Welch avenue, Elm street to Calef road . 

ROADS DISCONTINUED. 

Young road. Pine to Beech street 



50 feet 


wide, 


50 


u 


a 


50 


u 


(( 


50 


il 


a 


50 


ii 


a 


50 


a 


(( 



50 






50 






50 






50 






30 






990 feet 


long, 























SCHEDULE OF SEWERS, 


JANUARY 1 


1889. 






























MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS 


- 








h 


STREETS. 


A EBON Pipe. 


Portland Pipe. 


Cement Pipe. 


Eaethen 
Pipe. 






Bbick Sewers. 


S£ 


II 




Sin. 10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in. 



'276 


18 in. 

_ 




20 in. 

\',m 


24 in. 


8 in. 


12 in. 

"365' 

' '775' 





18 in. 


9 in. 

"336 

75 

"ieo 
"eoo 

730 
40 

"iso 


10 in. 12 in. 
'.'.'.'.'.'. "797 

'.'.'.'.'.'. 'm 


ISO 

j 1,300 

'.'.".'.'." 830 
'.'.'.'.'.'. "l,3io 


15 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


16 in. 

by 
24in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


18 in. 
'"650 

' iiozb 


24 in. 


29 in. 


36 in. 


42 in. 


44 in. 


1 

57 in. 


17 .in. 
26"^. 


20 in. 

by 
30 in. 


24 in.' 

by 
36 in. 


.9iin. 
44 in. 


30 in. 32 in. 

by by 
46 in. 48 in. 


40 in. 

by 
44 in. 


36 in. 


1' 


Adams 

Amherst 

Amherst south back 

Amory 

Appleton 

Appleton nortli back 

Arlington 

Ash 

Ash east back 

Ashlan.I 

Auburn 

Bay east back 

Beauport 

Beech 

Beech east back 

Belcnont 

Birch 

Btodget south back 

Bridge 

Bt iJge south back 

Brook 

Canal 

Cedar 


' 146 

198' 576 

80 

'• 52 

118; 

1 269 

22 834 
95I 90 

1 300 

9 300 

j 816 

45* 150 
4 625 
82 460 

1 405 

4 

120 1,860 

1 135 

38! 

46 

54 

76 

243 551 

8 

334 390 


267 
520 
515 
433 
549 

'"460 

'"635 
656 
140 

'""eo 

'"766 

402 

1,180 

6 

1,710 

1,510 

120 

380 

247 


'.'.'.'.'.'. 




' ' '460 











1 


'315 


" 767 




"'166 


'446 




;::::: 








3,2351 

'1,205 


"i",b66 




1 

'"756 
"l',85i 




"•■:: 
..... 

1 

— 


413 

4,288 

975 

485 

667 

269 

856 

855 

1,076 

309 

135 

635 

1,472 

1,050 

1,929 

602 

405 

1,434 

8,901 

175 

38 

3,802 

3,946 

2,576 

1,603 

4,056 

2,754 

560 


Central 

Central soutli back 

Chestnut 


226 

478 
290 


220 












"166 




130 

1,020 

130 

330 










'"sio 






;::::::::::■ 
















:::::::::::: 


Chestnut east back 

Church 


!!!!.' ■"127 



















:::::: 































:::::: 




:::::::::::: 


380 
374 

127 


Clinton . 


74 ..'.'.'.'. 

30 

66 


1,649 
30 
60 
















525 










1 






""m '.'.'.'.'.'. 







;;;;•; 
















'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'. 


525 
2,483 


Dean 














'.'.'.'.'.'. 












...Ml 






126 
470 


Douglas 

Dover 


SOU 

1 270 

51 310 
124 


500 








"466 








"246 
' '446 


' ' '935 


705 
270 
740 


■•:::::;••:: 


1 

1 










' 'l',600 


::::::i::;:: 


1,195 


' " '566 




1,197 


'"955 


'2,150 


'l,3'60 







610 




790j 




Elm 


59C 






6,047 


Elm west back 

Falls road 


3,130 














"'iso 




i 






























..'.'.'.'. 




::::::l:::::: 


3,870 
130 
690 


Franklin 


30 




1,100 




450 
"'956 












550 
"'126 


490 














'"155 




1 


















'.'.'.'.'.'. "'90 




Gore 

Granite 


28 '"19.5 


589 

4 


.... 






'i",27i 


' " 540 


1 




' ' '396 




3,743 


Granite, south of 

Green 


604 


















"2i6 




"'805 

'2,435 
11,897 




















::::: 




















210 
1,925 






SO 
860 
446 

21,862 


'"360 
2,435 


1,320 


1,840 


1,860 


90 






1,880 


770 


:::::; 

4,871 




i 


















1':;;:: 


..... 
















230 


Hancock 

Hanover 


147 617 


1 


3,946 


Amount carried up.... 


2,111 10,881 


1,475 


490l 460 


690 




1,300 


2,530 


912 


1,600 


54S 


446 1,195 


BOO 





1,107 


6,395J 


3,650 


1,360| 2,601 


790 277>i 





SCPIEDULE OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, ISS'J. — Continued. 





























MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 






























STREETS. 


Akboh Fifk. 


POETLAHD Pipe. 


Cehest Pipe. 


Eaethen 
Pipe. 


Brick Sewebs. 


1" 

as 




Sin. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


16 in. 
2,436 


18 in. 


20 in. 


24 in. 
1,860 


8 in. 
90 


12 in. 
1,880 


18 in. 


9 in. 
4,871 


10 in. 


12 in. 
11,897 


16 in. 
490 


18 in. 
460 


24 in. 


16 in. 

by 
24 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


18 in. 


24in. 

912 
210 


29 in. 
1,600 


36 in. 
545 


42 in. 
440 


44 in. 
1,195 


57 in. 


17 in. 

by 
26 in. 


20 in. 24 in. 

by by 
30 in. 36 in. 


29Jin. 

by 
44 iu. 


30 in. 32 in. 140 in. 

by , by by 
46 in. 48 in. 44 in. 


36 in. 


ij 


Amount brought up. 


2111 


10,881 


21,862 


1,320 


1,840 


770 


1,475 




690 


1,300 


2,530 


600 




1,197 5395,'i 


3,660 


1,360| 2,601 


790 


277 -i 










I, .520 

2,3.30 

450 

375 

36 










846 




450 












































2,815 
3,020 








690 






j 




































































860 












































































































^^^^ 
























330 
700 












































n h fh h W 


































































uign ^ucn DacK. . 


18 


































































T ' 


296 





















































1 












318 

998 

3.212 

2,20S 

3,200 

1,104 

304 

4,665 

1,365 

204 

2,924 

3,115 

7,110 

2,677 

23» 

290 

1,119 

60S 

4,664 

2,420 

809 

18S 

120 

61S 

1,525 






vrn 
















130 

120 

1,705 




180 












































lake Ave. south back. . . 16 


260 2,i26 












































































500 
1,640 












































lAiirpI Rmifh hnpk 


ioo' 960 
























610 


































i. . ■• j 






270 






















































T iniiftn 


40 
20 


264 




























































» .. 




650 


















1,900 
260 








940 





















































378 














































4 
257 


200 
1,487 




























































M^inrhpstpr 






























176 






1,005 






























Minchp^tftr sniith h fir 


















190 




100 








340 


































325' 11625 


1,517 
























730 


1,270 












1,627 
















Maple j 362 














370 












































233 


































































170 
841 
608 
440 


120 


























































.... 






278 

































































































































235 


693 


6 

1,260 

285 














1,250 
1,050 




130 
110 


840 












960 


















































































Milford 


































520 
































186 


































































120 
38 





















































1 












Myrtle 


460! 42 
















85 
1,525 


















































































































44 


1,690 
































































North 


109 


































































Oak 


58 



































































w 


Old Mast road 




70 


::.::;:..:; 








































............ 




















216 

180 


350 




















1,680 












790 






























2,936 


Orange south back 


















500 
































.. 












Parker 


406 
1,055 


448 
985 
40 































































854 

3,087 

200 

251 

1,630 

4,475 

915 

160 

38 

1,730 

1,740 

350 

70 


Pearl 


132 


150 














480 




286 
160 












































Pearl south back 
























































Pennacook 


112 
































































Pennacook south back... 




1,076 

1,770 

615 
































456 
































Pine 


640 


29(1 
300 
150 




















1,276 












500 






























Pine east back 




























































Pine west back 


































































Pleaifant 


28 
30 


10 
1,700 
































































Prospect 
































































Prospect south back.... 
















1,740 

















































Putnam 






350 






























































Quincy 




70 
































































Amount carried up 




































































isin 


23,431 


45,307 


7,640 


1,440 


2,110 


1,860 


90 


2,725 


770 


14,844 


1,475 


21,807 


1,330 


460 




1,805 


860 


2,545 


6,726 


2,912 


1,600 


«6 


446 


1,195 


500 


1,527 


1,197 


5395>a 


3,650 


1,360 


2,601 


790 

1 


277S 



SCHEDULE OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, IS8S.— Concluded. 





— 


MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 
















1 . 


STRBBl'S. 


AUOS PiPK. 




POKTUHD PlP«. 


CUONT PiPK. 


Pm. 








Bbice Bbvbb^. 






AmouDt brought up. 


Sin. 
5,117 


10 in. 
23,431 


12 in. 
46,307 


16 in. 

7,640 
146 


18 in. 
1,440 


20 in. 



2,110 


24 in. 
1,860 


8!n. 

90 

.... 


12 in. 
2,726 


18 in. 
770 


9 in. 
14,84* 


10 in. 

1,475 


12 in. 
21,807 


16 in. 
1,330 


18 in. 
460 


24 in. 


16 in. 
24Yn. 

1,806 



10 in. 
850 


12 in. 
2,646 


18 in. 
6,726 


24 in. 
2,912 


29 in. 
1,600 


36 in. 
546 


42 in. 
446 


44 in. 
1,196 


17 in. 20 in. 
57 in. by I by 
!26 in.!30 in. 

500i l,527i 1,197 
i 

, t 


24 in. 

by 
36 in. 

5,3964 

i',i76 


29i in. 
44"^. 

3,650 


30 in. 

by 
46 in. 

1,360 



32 in. 

by 
48 in. 

■2,601 


40 in. 

by 
44 in. 

790 


36 in. |-= 






1,443 








Ri n r^iul 






R II 


8 
110 


1,116 






































t 




















Sigamore 




183 



























































405 


























































4 




849 


























































* 


246 
141 
:i42 





























































460 
"328 












250 
346 

















































47 
9 






























































' 












130 
130 




































































































80 
250 








10 






















































2,141 


















330 


















































376 












































og 


"825 


126 
1,060 




1,396 




1,260 














400 


735 


















980 


880 




















210 


660 










































360 
116 






































Walker 






800 












































































350 




















j 




















440 


397 
















537 
320 












326 






























































1 






















506 




















































Wayne 




793 


266 

1,448 

300 










1 






































Webater 


Ifiil 






























1. 


::;■■: ■.:■■■■{ 






691i 












West 




49 

160 

1,250 














360 







































WilBon 


154 














.350 




















1 1 












' ■ 






Winter 














1 











































Winter Place 


8 














! 










































































■ 























1 "^ 


Total feet, each size. 


5,668 


30,327 


61,767 


10,831 


2,835 


2,120 


3,110 


90 


4,170J 770 16,061 


1,685 


24,379 


1,330 


860 


736 


1,805 


1,175 


2,646 


3,726 


2,912 


1,600 


546 446i 1,195 


1,4001 l,527i 1,197 

1 


3,242 


4,530 


1,360 


2,601 790' 277i I96,5.<IOi 


Total feet, each kind. 
" milea, " " 






106,648 ! 5,030 
20.198 ; 0.9B2 


46,845 ! 3,720 
8.872 0.704 | 








34,070 
6.463 












21U Miles. 
0.0B2 37.23 



79 



SEWERS BUILT IN 1888. 



Street. 



Cedar 

Lincoln 

Spruce, east 

Bridge 

McGregor 

McGregor west back.. . . 

Main 

Merrimack 

Reed lot 

Appleton 

Bay east back 

Chestnut 

Chestnut 

Clarke 

Concord 

High 

Lake avenue south back 

Lowell south back 

Main 

Pine 

Pine 

Salmon south back 

School, extension 

School, extension 

Second 

Spruce south back. 

Adams 

Arlington 

Lowell south back 

Pearl 

River 

Union east back . . . 

Amherst 

Appleton 

Lake avenue 

Monmouth. 

Pine 

Sagamore 

Second 

Wilson 



Location. 



Material. 



Union to Lincoln 

Cedar to Spruce 

From Lincoln, easterly. . 

From McGregur, easterly 

From Bridge, northerly.. . 

From Main, southerly 

From Milford, southerly 

From Elm, easterly 

McGregor to McGregor west back 

East of Chestnut street 

Salmon to North 

Appleton to Clarke 

Across Ray brook 

From Chestnut, westerly 

From Derry, westerly 

From Pine, westerly 

From Wilson, westerly 

From Chestnut, westerly 

From Monmouth, northerly 

Concord to Lowell south back . . 
Salmon to Salmon south back.... 

From Pine, easterly 

Across Co. 's land to river 

Across Co.'s land to river. 

Ferry to School south back 

From Lincoln, easterly 

From Beauport, westerly 

Warren to Ashland 

From Chestnut, westerly 

From Ashland, westerly 

And across private land 

North of Sagamore street 

From Union, easterly 

West of Chestnut street 

From Wilson, easterly 

McGregor west back , westerly .... 
Salmon south back to Sagamore.. 

From Pine, westerlj' 

Kerry to School south back 

Lake ave. to Lake ave. south back 



Iron. 
Akron. 



Iron. 
Akron. 



Size in 
Inches. 



Length 
in feet. 



1,840 
'270 

10 

97 
112 
608 
303 
440 
145 

62 
635 
948 

12 
127 
155 

36 

96 

12 
538 
159 
26T 
246 
117 

24 
342 
191 
146 
370 

30 
124 
867 

75 
170 
118 

50 
120 
130 
110 

47 
134 



10,283 



SUMMARY. 



Total 20-inch Akron pipe 
" 15-inch " 
" 12-inch 
" 12-inch Iron 
" 10-inch Akron 
" 8-inch 



2,120 feet. 
1,705 
3,931 
36 
1,612 
879 



80 



lO-inch Akron pipe in new cesspools 

8-incli " ^ " " " 

12-inch " " culverts and drains 

8-incli " " " " " 

Total length of new pipe laid in 1888 12,096 feet. 
12-inch Portland pipe relaid . . . .198 feet. 



. 170 


feet 


. 999 


a 


70 


a 


. 574 


a 



8-inch Akron pipe relaid for cesspools 
10-inch Akron pipe connections repaired 
8-inch " " •' " 

6-inch " " 

Total 

Total pipe laid in 1888 . 
Equal to 2.41 miles. 



238 

2 

168 

32 



638 feet. 
12,734 " 



Former reports have spoken in detail of the various 
demands upon our time, and it is unnecessary for me to 
repeat. I wish to speak, however, of some of the pressing 
needs of the office, made more apparent by the increasing 
growth of the work year by year. 

The most important of these is the need of a fire-proof 
vault. We have now in the office eighty field-books and 
more than one thousand plans, besides records of one kind 
and another, representing ten years of labor, and valued 
at the lowest estimate at fifty thousand dollars. These 
are without protection of any kind should a fire ever 
break out in the building. 

Though our drawing room is partially fire-proof, it 
would afford but little protection, as the entire building 
is a veritable tinder-box, filled with inflammable material. 
Even should the fire not destroy it, the damage to plans 
and books by water would be fully as great. 

The year just passed marks the end of the first decade 
of the existence of this office. Starting ten years ago 



81 

with a few plans, and doing a few small jobs here and 
there, the office has been steadily growing, till the past 
year we have attended to everything from setting stakes 
for a cobble gutter to preparing plans for the handsome 
engine-house and ward-room on Lake avenue. While 
the work in the office has extended in all directions, the 
appropriation remains substantially the same as at first. 
It is obvious that this state of things is not in keeping 
with the liberal policy pursued by the city in other 
departments. 

l^ature has been playing some curious pranks with our 
streets, or else there have been some terrible blunders 
made by past engineers. There are places in this city 
where distances are given from one stone-bound to another 
that do not measure within four feet of the given distance. 
It has been our aim to have these mistakes honestly and 
justly corrected before it is too late. 

During my first year in charge of the office, plans were 
laid for a complete survey of the city. These surveys 
have been extended as rapidly as possible, when not con- 
flicting with our regular work. With the present force 
in the office, and the many demands upon our time by the 
city and by private individuals, little can be done towards 
completing the plans. If the appropriation could be en- 
larged, I should employ additional assistants, and com- 
plete the survey as soon as possible, as each year makes 
the work more difficult, owing to the loss of old fences 
and hubs, which in many streets are the only means of 
determining the lines. 

SEWERS. 

Early in the year, the Committee on Sewers and Drains, 
recognizing the need of a system of sewerage for the city, 
issued an order to prepare a plan whereby the entire city 



82 

would be provided with adequate sewerage for years to 
come. This was a larger and more extensive undertaking 
than any previous city engineer had been called upon to 
perform. The fact that it had to be done in connection 
with our regular work necessitated the employment of 
additional assistants, and devoting nearly every evening 
to it. 

The plan was submitted to Mr. E. W. Bowditch, chief 
engineer of Boston, sewerage expert and consulting 
engineer, and the suggestions made by him were adopted. 

The plan, as completed and accepted by your honorable 
board, embraces substantially the following : The princi- 
pal main sewer begins near the present Valley -street out- 
let, only farther into the river ; thence through Valley and 
Elm streets to Bridge street, varying in size, as the drain- 
age area and grade demand, from seven-feet circular 
(brick) at the river to ten-inch circular pipe at Bridge 
street. The next main is the Bridge and Canal streets outlet, 
which will remain as at present, except a slight change in 
size. These sewers drain the settled portion of the city 
north of Auburn street and east of Canal street. 

In the southern part of the city there are two large 
mains. One starts at Auburn and Elm streets; thence 
through Auburn, Pine, and Summer streets to Massabesic 
street. This sewer is to drain the valley east of Massa- 
besic street, Hallsville, and the land north of Young 
street and east of the Valley Cemetery. The next main 
begins at Elm and Cedar streets, thence through Cedar 
street to Lincoln street, and drains the Wilson Hill, "Wil- 
son-street, and Lincoln-street sections. 

Starting from Cedar street is the Union-street main, 
following the same course as the present sewer, but of 
sufficient size and proper grade to drain without overflow 
and damage to cellars, as at present. 



83 

These are the principal mains in the central portion of 
the city. In Bakersville there is a main starting at the 
river, thence through the proposed Somerville-street ex- 
tension, as shown on plan, crossing Elm street low enough 
to drain Baker street, and continuing to Union street. 
This drains all the territory east of Elm street to the Con- 
cord & Portsmouth Railroad, and south of Valley street to 
Baker street. 

If the growth of the city in this direction demands it, 
a second main will be built in a proposed street following 
the valley of the brook from the river to Calef road, and 
thence easterly, making the main a direct line to the river. 

In West Manchester, the mains in McGregorville, Ferry 
street, and the section south of Piscataquog river follow 
substantially the same routes as at present, but will be 
relaid with larger pipe. The sewers in the Douglas-street 
section, that have caused so much trouble in the past, 
will all be relaid and connected with a main in Douglas 
street, running' direct to Piscataquog river. A small 
main in West Hancock street, draining the surrounding 
territory, will empty into Merrimack river. 

Amoskeag is provided with two small mains, one enter- 
ing the river at Amoskeag Falls, the other near the eddy. 

In connection with these main sewers, sub-mains and 
laterals have been provided for throughout the city, of 
sufficient size, and laid at such depths and grades, as to 
properly drain all cellars and cesspools. 

In the city proper, provisions have been made for a 
low-level collecting sewer, running through Canal street, 
so that the sewage may all be discharged at one point. 
On the west side the same thing has been provided for 
by a proposed intercepting sewer in River street. 
Should it ever be necessary to dispose of the sewage by 



84 

precipitation or filtration, it can easily be clone through 
the last mentioned outlets. 

In conclusion, to insure the success of this plan, one 
thing is necessary, — it should he followed out in every par- 
ticular. 

It may seem unnecessary to-day to lay a 24-inch* sewer 
in a certain street, when for the present an 8-inch sewer 
would do as well ; but in future years, when all streets 
have been provided for as laid down on the plan, the wis- 
dom of making the sewer 24 inches instead of 8 inches 
will be apparent. No sewer will be too large or too small, 
but all will work together as perfectly as the most care- 
fully constructed machine. 

In regard to connections, the present method of allow- 
ing any one to open the sewer for the purpose of connect- 
ing a private drain is radically wrong. IS^o sewer should 
be allowed to be opened unless by some person employed 
by the sewer department, or under his direction. When 
such connection is made, a careful record should be en- 
tered on the books, giving location, depth, size, and grade, 
not only where it leaves the sewer, but also where it 
enters the building. By having this work done under 
the direction of a competent person, the common com- 
plaint that the sewers do not work properly will be stopped. 
Mne tenths of the cases, upon investigation, prove to be 
due entirely to improperly constructed house-drains. 

The present city ordinance relating to sewer connec- 
tions should be so amended as to admit of the appointment 
of an inspector of sewers, whose duty it should be to see 
that the rules are properly enforced. 

SEWER PLANS. 

The plans cover an area of about five thousand acres, 
and consist of one plan 5' by 9', including that part of 



85 

the city proper lying between Merrimack river, Mammoth 
road, Pine Grove Cemetery, and the State Industrial 
School ; one plan of West Manchester, 5' by 9', includ- 
ing McGregorville and Amoskeag, and extending to the 
Goffstown line ; and two hundred and fifty-six profiles of 
streets, covering a distance of seventy-one miles. About 
one hundred and twenty miles of profile levels have been 
taken and eight months' time consumed, in connection 
with the regular oflice work, in preparing the plans. 

PUBLIC SQUARES. 

"William Sanborn, superintendent of District N'o. 2, has 
had charge of the work in the several public squares. 

In Merrimack square, a cast-iron urinal has been placed 
in position and the approaches concreted. Two thousand 
and thirteen square yards of concrete have been laid for 
walks. The fill over the old pond has been completed. 

In Hanover, Concord, Tremont, and Park squares, minor 
repairs have been made. The walk on the north side of 
Hanover square should be concreted the coming season, 
and the main walk repaired in places. 

The interest taken in regard to Monument square seems 
to have died out. Nothing has been done except to trim 
a few trees and cut the grass and weeds, and strangers are 
as much at a loss to know how to reach it as ever. At 
a slight expense a driveway could be constructed from 
River road to the main entrance, allowing visitors to ride 
directly to the square, instead of walking some distance 
over plowed ground and stubble. 

CEMETERIES. 

Fine-Grove. — A great amount of work has been done 
here, and more than the usual number of lots laid out. 
The section east of Willow avenue has been divided into 



86 

lots upon the plan, and about two thirds of it staked 
out on the ground. We began staking this out in 1887, 
but stopped on account of the grading not being done. 
We were delayed this year in starting upon the work by 
reason of waiting for the grading to be completed. When 
one third of this section was graded, sixty lots were laid 
out; then, upon receiving complaints that there were not 
lots enough, the next section of sixty lots was staked out 
without waiting for the grading. This latter part will 
have to be restaked whenever the grading is completed. 
It would be a saving in expense to this office, if in the 
future all new sections were graded before staking out 
the lots. The section in the southwest corner is partially 
graded. The plans will be completed by the time it is 
ready for staking out. 

Valley. — Line and grade have been given for improv- 
ing the usual number of lots. Suggestions were also 
given regarding the grading in the valley and around the 
brook. A design was submitted and accepted for a car- 
riage bridge across the brook, to replace the small foot- 
bridge. 

When it was decided to have a new tomb, various loca- 
tions were examined by the committee, and sketches were 
made for buildings particularly adapted for each site. 
Having agreed upon the present location, plans were made 
for a tomb appropriate to the place, and coming within 
the amount to be expended. After the plans were com- 
pleted, the committee decided to make the tomb some 
twenty feet longer, besides making other changes in 
the manner of construction, one being in reducing the 
thickness of the back wall, the most important part of 
the building. The peculiar location of the tomb will 
necessitate the building of a retaining-wall and railing at 
the bank in front, for the security of the driveway. The 



87 

bank at the rear will also be a source of considerable 
trouble and expense in maintaining in proper shape. 

BRIDGES. 

The various bridges have had the planking repaired in 
places. McGregor bridge needs to be entirely replanked. 
The piers to the approaches should be rebuilt on account 
of settling and canting, due to frost and the pressure of 
the bank behind them. 

When it becomes necessary to rebuild the Main-street 
bridge over Piscataquog river and the bridge across Black 
brook, it w^ould be economy for the city to have them 
constructed of stone. 

BUILDINGS. 

Plans have been made in the office for the public com- 
fort in the rear of the City Hall. 

Plans w^ere also made for the Lake-avenue engine-house 
and v^ard-room, and for the proposed city stable, in which 
work we received the assistance of Mr. John M. Kendall. 
The excerior of the engine-house is finished, and the inside 
work is rapidly advancing. The contract calls for its 
completion by March. In the plans for the city stable, 
the main building provides for the accommodation of 
nineteen horses, together with two box stalls, harness- 
room, and a commodious hay-loft. The L includes a 
carriage-room, tool-room, public office, and a private 
office for the superintendent of streets. The need of this 
building is clearly demonstrated, the street department 
having long ago outgrown its present quarters. 

In addition to the above work, sketches .vere submitted 
for the addition to the Lincoln-street school building. 



Several plans have been prepared for the electric light 
committee and various companies, and for the police tele- 
graph committee. Many small jobs have been attended to, 
and suggestions given in regard to work, of which no 
mention is made in this report, 

I wish to thank those who have kindly loaned plans, 
and for information which was of value to the city. In 
conclusion, I wish to acknowledge my indebtedness to 
3^our board for the unvarying kindness with which I have 
been treated. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENKETT, 

City Engineer. 
January 1, 1889. 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT SURVEYORS. 



Report of the work done in the various highway dis- 
tricts during the year 1888. 

DISTRICT ^0. 1. 

Orison "Webber, Surveyor. 

Graveled fifteen rods. 

Repaired three culverts. 

General repairs attended to where necessary. 

DISTRICT ^O. 2. 

"William Sanborn, Superintendent. 

cobble paving. 

Ashland street, from Bridge northerly 
Beech street, from Hanover to Central 
Bridge street, from Union to Walnut 
Cedar street, from Elm to Chestnut . 
Central street, from Beech westerly . 
Central street, from Chestnut to Pine 
Granite street, from Franklin westerly 
Hanover street, from Hall to Milton 
High street, from Ashland easterly . 
Lake avenue, from Wilson easterly . 
Lowell street, from Walnut to Beech 
Manchester street, from Chestnut to Pine 
Pine street, from Hanover northerly 

Total cobble paving 



. 77.7 


sq. yds, 


. 576.6 


iC 


. 146.6 


a 


. 87.5 


(( 


. 210.7 


a 


. 280.0 


a 


. 44.4 


a 


. 177.7 


a 


. 40.0 




. 273.3 




. 146.6 




3 206.6 




. 793.3 


a 


. 3,061.0 i 


3q. yds. 



90 



COBBLE EDGING. 

Ashland street, from Bridge northerly 
Beech street, from Hanover to Central 
Bridge street, from Union to Walnut 
Central street, from Chestnut to Pine 
Central street, from Beech westerly 
Hanover street, from Hall to Milton 
High street, from Ashland easterly 
Lake avenue, from Wilson easterly 
Lowell street, from Walnut to Beech 
Manchester street, from Pine westerly 
Pine street, from Hanover northerly 

Total cobble edging . 



200 feet. 
1,630 

440 

420 

632 

400 

120 

820 

440 

100 
2,080 

7,282 feet. 



EDGE STONES. 

Auburn street, from Elm east back easterly 
Belmont street, from Hanover northerly 
Cedar street, from Elm to Union . 
Central street, from Chestnut to Pine . 
Hanover street, from Belmont westerly 
Lake avenue, from Elm east back easterly 
Laurel street, from Lincoln westerly 
Manchester south back street, from Elm east 

back easterly .... 
Merrimack street, at Young's block 
Pine street, from Concord to High 
Spruce street, from Elm to Union . 

Total edge stones set . 



25 feet. 

120 " 

200 " 

103 " 

120 " 

50 " 

20 " 

56 " 

75 " 

230 " 

145 " 

1,144 feet. 



EDGE STONES RESET. 



Central street, from Chestnut westerly 
Elm street, at City Hall 



25 feet. 
100 " 



91 



Elm street, at Merchants' Exchange 
Granite street, at city yard 
Union street, from Merrimack southerly 
Spruce street ...... 

Total edge stones reset 

MACADAMIZING. 

New. 



Beech street, from Central to Hanover 
Bridge street, from Union to Walnut . 
Central street, from Chestnut to Pine 
Central street, from Beech westerly 
Lowell street, from Walnut to Beech 
Manchester street, from Chestnut to 

Pine 

Pearl street, from Chestnut to Pine 
Pine street, from Manchester to Am 

herst 

Pine street, from Concord to Bridge 
Union street, from Laurel to Merri 

mack ..... 

Total new macadamizing . 

To2')-Dressed. 

Central street, from Chestnut to Frank- 
lin ....... 

Granite street, from Elm to Canal 

Total top-dressed 



70 feet. 
100 " 
56 " 

25 " 



376 feet. 



2,858.66 sq. yds. 

824.00 
1,011.00 

741.00 

754.00 

728.00 
965.00 

1,562.66 
2,039.00 

533.00 " 
12,016.32 sq. yds. 



2,316.61 sq. yds. 
1,302.00 " 



3,618.61 sq. yds. 



i^umber of loads of crushed stone used, 2,669. 
Number of loads of bottom stone used, 794. 



92 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Amherst street, from Beech easterly 
Ashland street, from Arlington to Bridge 
Belmont street ..... 
Auburn street, near Maple 
Central street, from Belmont to Milton . 
Chestnut street, from Webster northerly 
Franklin street, from Grai;ite southerly 
Hanover street, from Maple easterly 
High street, from Chestnut to Union 
Hollis street, from Elm westerly . 
Lake avenue, from Wilson to Massabesic 
Laurel street, from Union to Beech 
Laurel street, from Maple to Belmont . 
Lincoln street, from Hanover to Laurel 
Manchester street, from Belmont to Milton 
Merrimack street, from Pine to Beech . 
Merrimack street, from Maple to Lincoln 
Merrimack street, from Lincoln easterly 
N"ashua street, from Arlington to Bridge 
Old Falls road, from Lake avenue to Spruce 
Pearl street, from Chestnut to Pine 
Pine street, from Blodget to Salmon 
Salmon street, from Chestnut to Pine 
Spruce street, from Elm to Chestnut 
Union street, from Auburn to Laurel 
Webster street, from Elm to Union 
Wilson street, from Hanover to Manchester 



250 feet. 

200 " 

100 " 

100 " 

250 " 

490 " 

620 " 

275 " 

496 " 

200 " 

630 " 

582 " 

1,738 " 

512 " 

250 " 

600 " 

550 " 

50 " 

290 " 

300 " 

312 " . 

570 " 

200 " 

570 " 

840 " 

1400 " 

130 " 



Total graveled 



12,505 feet. 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Ash street, from Amherst to Concord . 166.6 cu. yds. 
Ash street, from Harrison northerly . 133.3 " 



93 



Ash and Pearl streets .... 
Ashland street, from East High northerly 
Auburn street, from Pine easterly . 
Auburn street, from Union to Beech 
Auburn and Beech streets 
Elm and Valley streets , 
Elm street, from Valley northerly . 
Elm street, from Merrill to Young 
Hanover street, from Wilson westerly 
Hanover square .... 
Merrimack street, from Hall easterly 
Merrimack square .... 
Milton street, from Lake avenue northerly 
I^orth and Bay streets . 
Orange street, from Walnut to Beech 
Orange street, from Oak to Russell 
Pearl street, from Russell easterly . 
Pine street, from Hanover to Amherst 
Webster street, from Elm westerly 

Total grading for concrete . 



119.9 cu 

90.0 
320.0 
711.1 
621.6 
444.4 
586.6 
240.0 

90.0 
266.6 
180.0 
666.6 
133.3 
180.0 
131.0 

90.0 
177.7 
216.6 
213.3 



yds. 



5,778.6 cu. yds. 



This refers only to places where the fill has been a foot 
or more. In many places only a few yards have been 
used, scattered here and there. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

20-inch Akron pipe 
15-inch Akron pipe 
12-inch Akron pipe 
12-inch Portland pipe (relaid) 
12-inch iron pipe . 
10-inch Akron pipe 
8-inch Akron pipe 

Total . . 









2,120 feet 








440 " 








2,934 " 








. 198 " 








12 " 








599 " 








. 712 " 








7,015 feet 



94 



CESSPOOL CONNECTIONS. 



172 feet. 


1,081 


a 


360 


a 


32 


ii 


1,645 feet. 


8,660 


a 



lO-inch Akron pipe .... 
8-inch Akron pipe .... 
8-inch Akron pipe (relaid) . 
6-inch Akron pipe (relaid) . 

Total 

Total pipe laid .... 
Equal to 1.64 miles. 

PIPE ON HAND. 

Pipe on hand corner of Spruce and Wilson 

streets, 20-inch Akron .... 1,445 feet. 

Pipe on hand at city yard, 24-inch . . 8 feet. 

15-inch . . 27 " 

" " 12-inch . . 96 " 

" " 10-inch . . 41 " 

" " 8-inch . . 362 " 

Total . . . ' . . . . 1,979 feet 

11 Y branches, 6 by 15 inches. 
6 Y branches, 8 by 12 inches. 
22 Y branches, 8 by 10 inches. 
10 12-inch curves. 

Catch-basins built, QQ ; repaired, 20 ; manholes built, 8. 

CROSSINGS. 

Concrete, new, 26 ; top-dressed, 22 ; patched, 4. 

CONCRETE. 

Crossings, new ..... 751.8 sq. yds. 
Crossings patched . , . . 16.1 " 

Crossings top-dressed .... 645.2 " 

City Hall 41.7 " 



95 

City yard ..... 
Merrimack square 
Park square ..... 
Tremont square .... 
Webster-street engine-house . 

Total 

Boadwcujs Repaired. 
Granite street, canal bridge . 

Gutters Repaired. 
Beech street, at A. M. Eastman's . 

CONTRACT WORK. 

Belmont-street culvert : Warren Harvey, contractor. 
Grove-street culvert : J. A. Brown, contractor. 
Webster street, 5 culverts : John Perham, contractor. 
Webster street, turnpiking : John Perham, contractor. 

PIPE CULVERTS. 

Ashland street, at East High, 12-inch Akron 40 feet. 

Pearl street, at Warren, 12-inch Akron . 70 " 



233.0 


sq. 


yds. 


2,013.0 




u 


393.0 




a 


1,076.4 




u 


574.7 


sq. 


a 


5,744.9 


yds. 


893.0 


sq. 


yds.. 


33.3 


sq. 


yds. 



Total 110 feet. 

DISTRICT NO. 3. 
Frank A. Emerson, Surveyor.* 

Built bank wall on Elm street at Mr. Colby's. 
Turnpiked and graveled roads where needed. 
Minor repairs where necessary. 

Edwin IS". Baker, Surveyor.! 
General rex")airs attended to. 

* To December 4, 1888. t From December 4, 1888. 



96 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Isaac Whittemore, Surveyor. 

No report. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked 2,321 feet. 

Graveled 3,967 " 

Graded (cut) 6,124 cu. ft 

culverts. 

Built one new stone culvert (side) . 22' X 1' X 1' 
Rebuilt one (stone) . . . . 22' X 18" X 18" 
Cleared and rebuilt part of two (stone). 

Rebuilt part of one abutment of the small bridge near 
the old "Harvey Mill", using 11.2 perch of stone; also 
rubbled the bed of the brook at this place, using ten cart- 
loads of stone. 

Cut bushes on eight miles of road, both sides. 

Built 131 feet of new railing. 

Repaired railings, removed stones from road, and made 
all general repairs where needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 
Albert J. Peaslee, Surveyor. 

Graveled 900 feet. 

Turnpiked 2,900 " 

One stone culvert built and two repaired. 
Replanked Webster-road bridge, over Cohas brook, at 
water-works dam. 



97 

Lowered 140 feet of paved gutter 13 inches, on Cohas 
avenue, near reservoir, using material removed on road. 

"Water-bars repaired, ditches cleaned, and other repairs 
attended to throughout the district. 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 
George M. Bean, Surveyor. 
No report. 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 
John Proctor, Surveyor, 

Proctor road, lengthened large culvert twenty feet, 
small culvert ten feet. 

Straightened road in many places and filled hollows. 

Hanover-street road, graveled 300 feet at McGregor hill 
and Eaton hill. 

Hanover-street road and Candia road, turnpiked and 
graded one mile. 

Hanover street, filled at sides, using 75 cubic yards of 
earth. 

Cut bushes throughout district ; built 50 feet of wall. 

Made all necessary repairs. 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Nelson W. Paige, Surveyor. 
No report, 

DISTRICT NO, 10, 

Charles O. Phelps, Superintendent, 

Cobble gutter paving .... 125 sq, yds. 

Curbstone set 239 feet. 



98 



CONCRETE. 



Four crossings .... 
Main-street, at engine-lioiise . 
Douglas and Main, sidewalk repaired 

Total 



102.36 sq. yds. 
32.00 " 
5.33 " 



139.69 sq. yds. 



One thousand three hundred and six square yards of 
concrete have been laid by private individuals. 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Amory street. Main westerly 
Beauport street, Amory southerly 
Blaine street, Main easterly 
Bridge street 

Carroll street, Miiford northerly 
Hancock street. Main easterly 
Main street. Mast southerly 
Miiford street, Tilton westerly 
Riddle street, Miiford northerly 
Third street, Blaine northerly 
Tilton street, Miiford northerly 

Total graveled . 



350 feet. 

360 

500 

450 

650 

400 

900 

700 

860 

300 

450 



5,920 feet. 



STREETS GRADED. 



675 feet. 332 cu. yds. 



Beauport street, Adams southerly 

Blaine street, Maine easterly . 1,100 " 1,336 

Carroll street, Miiford northerly 650 " 789 

Cartier street, Amory southerly 190 " 246 

Cartier street, Wayne southerly 475 " 376 

Conant street, Main westerly . 387 " 183 



500 feet. 93 cu 


.. yds, 


633 " 


461 


a 


800 " 


132 




500 " 


64 




208 " 


126 




860 " 


1,044 




330 " 


143 




450 " 


100 




650 " 


123 


a 



99 

Douglas street, Barr westerly 

Ferry street, Main easterly 

McGregor street, Amory north- 
erly- 

McGregor west back street 

Monmouth street 

Riddle street, Milford southerly 

Third street, Blaine northerly . 

Tilton street, Milford northerly . 

West Hancock street. Main east- 
erly 

Totals .... 8,408 feet. 5,548 cu. yds. 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

Amory street, Cartier northerlj^ 
Bowman street, Milford southerly 
Bridge street .... 
Carroll street, Milford northerly 
Cartier street, Amory southerly 
Ferry street. Main easterly 
Main street, Milford southerly . 
Main street, Amory northerly . 
Main street, Monmouth north- 
erly 

Milford street, Bowman westerly 
Monmouth street 
Third street, Ferry southerly 
West street, Douglas northerly . 



234 feet. 


67^ 


cu. yds, 


150 


u 


43 


(( 


400 


ii 


37 


ii 


617 


ii 


176 


a 


190 


ii 


54 


a 


633 


u 


145 


ii 


100 


ii 


20 


n 


100 


ii 


38 


ii 


216 


ii 


124 


ii 


75 


ii 


22 


a 


50 


ii 


43 


(( 


264 


it 


151 


ii 


100 


ii 


27 


a 



Totals .... 3,129 ft. 947 cu. yds. 



100 



SEWEKS AND DRAINS. 



15 -inch Akron pipe . 

12-incli " " . 
12-inch iron pipe 

10-inch Akron pipe . 

8-inch " " . 

8-inch " " relaid 

Total sewers . 



1,265 feet 


1,067 


u 


24 


ii 


1,013 


ii 


613 


i( 


46 


ii 



4,028 feet. 



Catch-basins built, 17 ; manholes, 11 ; lamp-holes, 1. 
Streets turnpiked with road-machine, gutters cleaned, 
and minor repairs attended to. 



DISTRICT NO. 11. 
Frank D. Hanscom, Surveyor. 

Macadamized 331 yards. 

Graveled 1,500 feet in lengthTand 15 feet wide. Turn- 
piked 3 miles. 

Built one culvert 20' X 16" X 16", and two culverts 
8' X 1' X 1', each. 

Replanked both bridges over Black brook. 

Removed stones from roads, jB.lled mud-holes, repaired 
railings, reset guide-boards, and made all necessary 
repairs. 

Owing to the extra expense attendant upon breaking 
out roads during the winter, very little of the appropria- 
tion was left for needed improvements. 

I would call the attention of the city government to 
the dangerous condition of the road at the eddy, espe- 
cially during seasons of high water. It is necessary to 
keep constant watch there at such times, to guard against 
accidents. 



101 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 
John H. Willey, Surveyor. 

Bald Hill road, turnpiked one half mile, cut bushes, 
and removed large stones from roadway. 

New Bridge street, blasted and removed large boulders 
from road. 

Mammoth road, graveled where needed, removed 
small stones and several large boulders. 

General repairs throughout the district, where 'needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 
William Campbell, Surveyor. 

Graded one half mile by filling in with stone chips ; 
graveled the same seventy rods. Repaired two culverts. 
Cut two miles of brush. Filled mud-holes, repaired 
water-bars, and attended to all necessary repairs. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1888. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

JOHN HOSLEY, Mayor, ex officio, Chairman. 
EDWARD L. KIMBALL, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1. — Charles H. Manning. 

John G. Hutchinson. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean. 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3. —Nathan P. Hunt. 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Samuel D. Lord. 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
Ward 5. — Thomas F. Collins. 

John J. Holland. 
Ward 6. — William H. Huse. 

Abial C. Flanders. 
Ward 7. — Marshall P. Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8. — George W. Nutter. 

Luther C. Baldwin. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 



106 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICERS. 

SAMUEL BROOKS.* 
GEORGE M. L. LANE.f 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. W. Clarke, Kimball, 
Dodge, Holland. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Woodbury, Collins, Hall. 

Repairs, Furniture, and SiqjpUes. — Messrs. Manning, 
Flanders, ISTutter. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Huse, Baldwin. 

Music. — Messrs. Lord, Huse, Baldwin. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Kimball, Manning, Flanders. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. W. 
Clarke. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Collins, Hutchinson, Woodbury. 

Health. — Messrs. Nutter, Holland, Hutchinson. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, Hall, S. W. 
Clarke, Hunt. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

* Two terms. t One term. 



107 

Lincoln Street — Messrs. Lord, Huse, S. W. Clarke. 

Spring Street — Messrs. Hall, Holland, Manning. 

Franklin Street — Messrs. Dodge, Woodbury, Hutch- 
inson. 

Lowell Street — Messrs. Hutchinson, Flanders, Collins. 

Training School and Wilson Hill — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodge. 

Beech Street — Messrs. Collins, Flanders, Woodbury. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. S. W. Clarke, 
Manning, Baldwin. 

School Street and South Main Street — Messrs. Baldwin, 
ITutter, Hall. 

Webster Street^ Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Lord, Dodge. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Flanders, Holland, Huse. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Huse, Baldwin, 
Hutchinson. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster^ s Mills. — Messrs. Holland, 
Flanders, Nutter. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey District — Messrs. ISTutter, 
Collins, Hutchinson. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Woodbury, Collins, Lord. 



In Board of School Committee. 

December 31, 1888. 
The Superintendent presented his annual report to the committee, 
and it was accepted. 

Charles H. Manning presented the annual report prepared by 
him at the request of the board. 

Voted, That the report by Mr. Manning be accepted, and adopted 
as the report of the l)oard, and that it be transmitted to the City 
Councils, together with the report of the Superintendent. 

JAMES E. DODGE, Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Honorable City Councils: 

Gentlemen, — We would respectfully present this, the 
fiftieth annual report of the condition and needs of the 
public schools of this city. 

Such statistical information as can best be tabulated 
will be found, as in our report for last year, in the Appen- 
dix, under the following heads : 



1. 


General Statistics. 


2. 


Relating 


to School Buildings. 


3. 




" Schools. 


4. 




" Teachers. 


5. 




" Pupils. 


6. 




" Truancy. 


7. 




" Revenue and Expenditures 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

Early in the year the matter of changes in the course 
of study in the High School was referred to the sub- 
committee of that school, who, however, thought it best 
not to report till after the close of the spring term ; and 
after consultation with the superintendent, as well as 
both the retiring and incoming principals of that school, 
a course was recommended by that sub-committee and 
adopted by the board, which slightly modified the then 
existing courses, changing the business course from two 



110 

years to three, but so arranged that any one desiring to 
remain in the school but two years could receive sub- 
stantially the same benefits as formerly. The full col- 
lege course was arranged so that pupils can be fitted for 
any of the colleges in the country, ^o other changes of 
note have been made in any of the day-school courses. 

A complete course in both mechanical and architec- 
tural drawing for the evening school has been arranged 
by the sub-committee on that school, and is now in suc- 
cessful operation. 

Drawing is taught in all the schools, and we feel that 
there should be a special teacher in this branch, in order 
that more uniform methods may be used and better 
results obtained, with corresponding greater benefit to 
the pupils. In the High School a good course of tech- 
nical drawing should be established, and this can be suc- 
cessfully conducted only by a specialist. 

TEACHERS. 

At the close of the spring term, Mr. E. K. Goodwin, 
the efficient principal of our High School, having re- 
ceived a more advantageous offer elsewhere, resigned his 
position, and Mr. Albert Somes was elected to the 
vacancy, and so far has fully met the expectations of the 
committee. 

The principal of the North Main Street Grammar 
School failing of a re-election, his place was filled by Mr. 
George Winch, who is meeting with excellent success. 

Death has removed during the year two of our most 
efficient assistants in the grammar schools. Miss Lenora 
C. Gilford, of the Franklin-street school, and Mrs. Mary 
J. Fife, of the Lincoln-street school. 

The special instructor in elocution having been in ill- 
health, he has not been able to resume his work this year, 



Ill 

and none other has been secured to take his place, which 
is a serious loss to the schools. 

Other changes will be more fully noted in the report 
of the superintendent. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

In the matter of school accommodation the city has 
little to be proud of, as most of the buildings are old, and 
one or two are in a very dilapidated condition. 

The high-school building has no large hall for holding 
general exercises in, all such having to be held in the 
main assembly-room, a room dark on three sides and well 
calculated to ruin the eyesight of three quarters of the 
pupils obliged to study at their desks. Provision should 
be made for two more recitation-rooms, and those on the 
first floor, to the west of the main assembly-room, thrown 
into it, thus lighting it from the west, the most important 
side for light in our dim winter afternoons. 

This school should also be furnished with a gymnasium, 
which could be used also as a drill shed for the Cadet 
Company, which should be encouraged and also be 
brought under control of the school authorities. That 
the girls as well as the boys of this school stand in need 
of physical training, is only too painfully apparent to 
any one who will carefully scrutinize a class as it passes 
to or from a recitation. 

The Franklin-street building should either be rebuilt 
or extensively altered and repaired, as the internal ar- 
rangement could hardly be worse, as regards light and 
ventilation. The School-street building needs extensive 
renovation inside, if it is to be continued in use, and the 
sanitary arrangements entirely changed. For this work 
a special appropriation of at least twenty-five hundred 



112 

dollars should be made, and the work done during the 
next summer vacation. 

The need of new buildings in West Manchester and 
Hallsville is even more pressing than when we called 
your attention to the fact a year ago. We recommend 
the purchase of the lot of land on the corner of Mast 
and Bowman Streets, containing about sixty-two thousand 
square feet, which can be had for the sum of six thousand 
dollars. At Hallsville there are several lots available, 
and it would be well to secure one of them immediately. 

During the summer the Amoskeag schoolhouse was 
replastered throughout, new floor laid, new outside doors 
hung, and the building and fence painted. An annex 
building was added to the Lincoln-street house, and all 
the water-closets removed from the basement to this 
building, the fixtures being almost entirely renewed. 
The high-school fence was rebuilt on three sides ; the 
east side being comparatively new, needed but small re- 
pairs. 

Steam-heating has been substituted for the furnaces at 
the Training School, with good results, l^early all the 
double desks have been altered to single ones, at a com- 
paratively small expense. This was done in the interest 
of good discipline. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The evening schools continued in the spring term till 
about March 10; but the fall term, owing to the political 
excitement, it was deemed wise to delay opening till 
Xovember 12. They are now in excellent working order,, 
as can be judged by the tabulated statement in the Ap- 
pendix. 

The interest in the Evening Drawing School has been 
fully sustained this year, the accommodation being in- 



113 

sufficient for all applying. The work accomplished is 
very encouraging, and we can safely report this school as 
an established success and well worthy of your liberal 
support. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

There has been a change in truant officer, Mr. G. 
M. L. Lane having been chosen at the annual election. 
A report of the work of this officer will be found in 
the Appendix. 

In conclusion, we would say that, though what we have 
accomplished for the schools of the city may fall far below 
our desires, we have endeavored to do the best we could 
with the means placed at our disposal, and trust our work 
has met with your approval. 

CHARLES H. MAITNE^G, 

For the Committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Manchester School Board : 

Gentlemen, — I respectfully offer the following as the 
annual report of the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion for the year 1888 : 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

Throughout the year six teachers have been employed 
in the High School, twenty in the grammar schools, and 
fifteen in the middle schools. There have been twenty- 
nine primary schools, taught by twenty-six teachers. This 
is accounted for from the fact that the principal of the 
Training School, who for convenience is reckoned among 
the middle-school teachers, has charge of three primary 
schools where no regular teachers are employed. There 
have also been two partially graded schools * employing 
three teachers, and six ungraded schools f with one 
teacher for each. This is equivalent to sevent}^- eight dis- 
tinct schools of a single room each, taught by an average 
of seventy-six teachers. The whole number of schools 
and of teachers is the same as for each last year, and the 
only difference in the form of organization is, that a pri- 
mary school at the Main-street house, taught by Mrs. 
Josephine H. Newton, has become of middle-school 
grade; because, when the pupils were ready for promo- 

* The upper room at Amoskeag and the Hallsville school, 
t Country suburban. 



115 

tion, there was not room for them in the then existing 
Main-street middle schools. 

ATTENDANCE. 

By an inspection of the attendance table for " Day 
Schools, " found upon the eighth page (G) of the appen- 
dix to this report, it will be seen that there has been a 
slight general increase over last year in the attendance 
upon the various public schools. I am also pleased to 
record that there has been a little diminution from last 
year in the number of tardinesses. Though the decrease 
is only about one third of a tardiness to each pupil in the 
average attendance, in the aggregate there are not so 
many instances of tardiness by 752. 

The average tardinesses on the average attendance have 
this year been, per pupil : in the high school 4, last year 
4.6; in the grammar schools 2, last year 2.6; in the 
middle schools 3.2, last year the same; in the primary 
schools 2.4, last year 2.1; in the partially graded schools 
2.7, last year 2.9; in the ungraded schools 2.7, last year 
4.1. The change is for the better in every instance, 
except for the primary schools; and failure of improve- 
ment in their average is largely due to the excessive in- 
stances of tardiness that occurred in primary schools Nos. 
11 and 30, in each of which there were over two hun- 
dred cases. Last year the primary schools were in the 
van ; this year, the grammar schools are there. 

The waste of time, labor, money, and of the teachers' 
energies and enthusiasm, on account of non-membership, 
irregularity of attendance, and lack of punctuality, is the 
one great, overmastering discouragement of every school 
system. Were it not for the constant and courageous 
fight that our teachers make to overcome these evils, 
there would be still far greater losses. As it is, I would 



116 

have parents realize, if possible, the great waste occasioned 
largely by their inattention or indifference. 

The enrollment for this year has been 3,712 pupils; 
the number of schools maintained, 78. This gives an 
average of nearly 48 pupils to the room. The rooms, 
for the most part, have the seats; and not even an in- 
crease of salary would make our teachers so happy as to 
see (without effort upon their part) every one ^f their 
seats every day filled by a pupil never tardy ! But out of 
the enrollment of 3,712, the average daily attendance 
has been only 2,500. Here is shown a loss, to nearly one 
third of those enrolled, of the instruction for them pro- 
vided; and, to those in attendance, there remains the 
damaging effect occasioned by 6,635 instances of tardi- 
ness. If to the losses thus manifest there be added the 
indirect harm and demoralization that so great a number 
of absences and tardinesses work upon the schools, it 
must be seen that the instruction afforded the public is 
not being fully utilized by many more than half of those 
who have children of school age and are patrons of the 
public schools. 

This is no new condition of things, nor is it peculiar to 
our city. It is the crying evil in every system of public 
schools; but I have said so much upon the subject in 
former reports, that I offer for the thoughtful consider- 
ation of parents, with whom largely rests the responsi- 
bility for the evil and in whom chiefly is the power to 
overcome it, the following extracts from the latest an- 
nual report of our worthy State Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Instruction : 

" Irregular attendance is the burden of nearly all school 
reports, and has been since my remembrance. Tardiness, 
absenteeism, and dismissals are the pests of the school. 
They are like rust and mildew, like the countless insects 



117 

that mar the beauty and devour the fruits of the field, 
like the winged and creeping things that infest our homes 
and torment our lives. . . . We fondly flatter our- 
selves that v^e have perfected by infinite pains a system of 
popular education which will perpetuate liberty and in- 
sure public prosperity, but our system is disarranged and 
our labors baflled by neglect or indifference. ... In 
every town there are parents, who, either too ignorant to 
appreciate or to selfish to regard the interests of society 
or the welfare of their children, will, for the paltry value 
of a child's labor, or to gratify its love of play, become 
the conscious or unconscious agents in disturbing the 
discipline, breaking down the classification, and destroy- 
ing the usefulness of schools, by causing or allowing their 
'children to be continually irregular in their attendance. 
The waste of school funds and the loss of intellectual 
and moral power to the community from this source are 
incalculable, for the good and the bad suffer alike from 
this unconscious criminality. As things are, it is impos- 
sible for teachers or school boards to remove the evil. 
. . . We cannot anticipate a complete and perma- 
nent cure, as it is one of those troubles that spring from 
the imperfection of society. It will depart with the 
general improvement of humanity. The character of 
the school will not rise far above the level of the people." 

DAY SCHOOLS. 

The work of the day schools during the past year has, 
for the most part, been highly satisfactory. Teachers 
have been faithful in an attempt to discharge their duties 
properly, and pupils commendably regular and punctual 
in their attendance have made good progress. About 
the usual per cent of the average membership has been 
in attendance ; and by daily inspection and occasional 



118 

examination of more or less schools, I have found the 
pupils in general industriously reaping the advantages 
by you provided, and by the corps of teachers presented 
with such wisdom and skill as is attained only by those 
specially trained or by those of a somewhat extended 
and thoughtful experience. 

The citizens, too, of our several school precincts are, 
with a single exception, I think, generally well satisfied 
with the schools provided for their children. The patrons 
of the "Webster-street school, however, seem to think 
there should be better facilities afiorded them ; and the 
point is made, that with three classes of grammar grade in 
a room as good instruction cannot be afirarded as in other 
schools of similar grade where there are but two classes. 
But there have hardly been pupils enough in this school 
to justify the employment of more teachers. 

The Webster-street house was first opened in Septem- 
ber, 1882, both to better accommodate the people living 
at the ISTorth End and to relieve the over-crowded condi- 
tion of the Ash-street schools. A school of middle 
grade and one of primary grade were organized for the 
fall term. The former had an average membership of 
25 pupils ; and the latter, of 21. The following will 
show the subsequent growth of the 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Average Number Belonging. 

1883. Grammar and middle grades ... 26 

Primary grade ...... 30 

Total 56 



119 



1884. Grammar grade * 






29 


Middle " . 






33 


Primary " 






35 


Total . 






97 


1885. Grammar grade . 






29 


Second * grammar grade 






20 


Middle grade 






34 


Primary " 






26 


Total . 






109 


1886. Grammar grade 






26 


Second grammar grade 






22 


Middle grade . 




# 


36 


Primary " 






25 


Total . . ' . 






109 


1887. Grammar grade 






30 


Second grammar grade 






30 


Middle grade . 






39- 


Primary " 






26 


Total . 






125 


1888. Grammar grade . 






30 


Second grammar grade 






35 


Middle grade . 






28 


Primary " . 






24 


Total . . 






117 


At next promotion time, February 1, another class will 


be ready for the grammar grade. 
1. .1 _ ^ ii 1 • 1 


Th( 


5re will th 


en again 
1 



be need of three classes in each grammar division, unless 

* Organized from the grammar classes at the opening of the fall term. 



120 

another division is organized. Three divisions would 
accommodate the six classes upon the general plan of 
having two classes to a room ; and, as nearly as I can now 
determine, the number for the respective schools would 
be as follows : Master's room, first and second divisions, 
30 ; third division, 21 ; fourth division, 20 ; middle 
school, 27; and primary school, 22; or, 120 pupils for 
5 teachers ; and an average of 24 pupils per teacher. 
The little variation in number likely to occur would 
probably increase rather than decrease the estimates. In 
view of the improvement that would be afforded by the 
employment of the right additional teacher, I some 
weeks since suggested to the chairman of the sub-com- 
mittee of this school a consideration of the advisability 
of effecting such a change upon occasion of making next 
promotions. 

The average number of pupils belonging to the gram- 
mar schools per teacher, this year, has been as follows : 
At the Lincoln-street and Ash-street schools, each, 43 ; at 
the Spring-street and Main-street schools, each, 39; at 
the Franklin-street and Webster-street schools, each, 32. 
Only the last named of these schools has more than 
two classes to any division. The foregoing unequal dis- 
tribution of pupils is unfortunate ; but it cannot be 
helped, so far as the Webster-street school is concerned, 
without requiring pupils to go far from home to school. 
There is a plan under consideration by the appropriate 
sub-committees for the union, at the proper time, of the 
one grammar division at the Spring-street house with the 
grammar school on Franklin street. Such a change 
would bring the latter school approximately near the 
other large schools, in respect to numbers. The change 
would be agreeable to the master of the Franklin-street 
school, who would like to see his first and second divi- 



121 

sions well filled ; and the discontinuance of the Spring- 
street grammar division would release a teacher there, 
who might be transferred to the Webster-street school, 
or wherever else more needed. The eifect of the con- 
solidation upon the Spring-street pupils would be merely 
to anticipate their transfer by one year. 

PROMOTIONS. 

The subject of greatest general interest among parents 
appears to be the advancement of their children from 
class to class. 

As long as they are regularly advanced, all is satisfac- 
tory; but when any fail of such promotion, those of their 
parents who are in the habit of acting from first impulses 
usually blame the teacher. Such do not seem to think 
that three or four weeks' non-membership (though but 
eighteen weeks are required for doing the entire work of 
a class), or any amount of irregularity in punctuality or 
attendance, or so weak a condition of scholarship when 
last promotions were made that the pupil in question 
was then advanced only through the benefit of a doubt, 
may have had anything to do in causing deficiencies 
which have finally culminated in the loss of promotion; 
nor, if none of the foregoing conditions prevail, do such 
parents seem to remember anything about the admoni- 
tions sent them, from time to time, in the form of peri- 
odical reports bearing a low record in scholarship (the 
cause of which might be justly inferred, in many in- 
stances, from a correspondingly low deportment mark 
showing repeated misconduct, inattention, or neglect), 
the teacher thus signifying to the parent the improbabil- 
ity of the pupil's advancement, unless great improvement 
should be made. Now and then, indeed, a parent has 
been found so very unreasonable as to claim the promo- 



122 

tion of a pupil whose scholarship record had not only 
been uniformly low, but whose conduct had been such as 
to cause the teacher to leel either the necessity or the 
propriety of reporting to the parent in regard to him 
more especially, by use of printed blanks prepared for 
the purpose, or otherwise. 

Very general satisfaction, however, has prevailed among 
parents with reference to the treatment of their children 
in regard to promotions; but it is deemed well to set forth 
somewhat particularly the practice of our schools in the 
matter of determining promotions, and the relation that 
the results of the written reviews sustain thereto. The 
present is also deemed an opportune time for such a 
statement, because our practice has not before been 
definitely published, and it appears advisable that it 
should be so presented that it may be fully understood 
both by parents and by their representatives, who, from 
time to time, become members of the School Board. 

I deem it important, at the outset, to make clear our 
form of school organization, and therefore proceed to say 
that all grades below that of the High School may be seen 
in any of our larger grammar-school buildings which 
contain eight schools. A " Lower Primary School " and a 
"Higher Primary School," also a " Lower Middle School" 
and a " Higher Middle School," occupy the four rooms on 
the first floor; and the four divisions of the grammar 
school, known as " First Division," " Second Division," 
etc., occupy the four rooms on the second floor. Beginners 
may enter the " Lower Primary " at the age of five, and 
they generally remain there a year and a half. Promo- 
tions are made in all schools below the upper class of 
" First Division " (grammar) grade, semi-annually. Thus 
we have three classes, or three distinct grades, in each 
primary school; for pupils also remain a year and a half 



123 

in the " Higher Primary." In each of the six rooms 
above the primary schools the work is regularly clone in 
one year, there being two classes, or two distinct grades, 
to a room. It will be seen from the foregoing that there 
are nine years in the elementary course ; but a few pupils 
complete it in eight years, or less, by reason of individual 
promotions at irregular times. Teachers, however, are 
not allowed to require of pupils below high-school grade 
any preparation of lessons at home ; yet some are annually 
found ready to enter the High School at thirteen, and 
occasionally one at twelve. 

Principals of grammar schools have no assistant teacher 
in their rooms, and they are therefore held responsible, in 
the matter of instruction, for only the grammar-school 
divisions. The primary and middle schools are under the 
direction of the superintendent, in the matter of their 
studies, without intermediate supervision. Principals, 
however, have charge of the personal conduct of pupils 
of the lower schools, in general ; and sometimes, in par- 
ticular, as when they are out of order in the hallways, 
basements, or yard, and whenever assistance is needed by 
the class-teacher on account of the violent opposition of 
a pupil. 

No formal written tests are submitted primary pupils by 
their teachers ; nor are any required of middle-school pupils 
unless the questions are furnished their teachers by the 
superintendent, and he especially requests the application 
of such tests, — a thing that usually happens once a year, 
during the semester of his choice ; but most middle-school 
teachers give a set of written reviews of their own con- 
struction, or selection, during the semester their classes 
are not thus tested by the superintendent. They do this 
of their own accord ; because, first, they desire the ben- 
efit, for both themselves and their pupils, of those peculiar 



124 

revelations which the written review alone reveals in regard 
to possible defects or neglects in the character of the 
instruction afforded, or in regard to the otherwise undis- 
coverable misapprehension, by pupils, of important facts 
believed to have been thoroughly taught ; and, secondly, 
because the}" desire that pupils, under their charge may 
have this much practice in writing reviews before entering 
the grammar school, where they are regularly submitted 
and critically marked. 

Written reviews are required of all grammar and high 
school classes during each quarter of the school year, or 
at intervals of nine or ten weeks. 

Three weeks are required for the presentation of a set 
of written reviews, for an exercise in only one subject is 
allowed during any week; and it is expected, for the 
most part, that the exercise upon any subject will be com- 
pleted within the limits of a half-day, and chiefly during 
the period usually allowed for recitation upon that sub- 
ject. Language, including an exercise in spelling and 
one in grammar * (or some exercise in the use of 
language), may, however, be given upon the same half- 
day ; arithmetic, upon a half-day of the next week ; and 
geography or history, upon a half-day of the following 
week. 

It is thus seen that the regular work of the schools is 
but slightly, and, not harmfully, disturbed by the submis- 
sion of the formal exercises in written review ; for they 
occur only at long intervals, but one a week, and then the 
subject is made that of the recitation period during which 
it occurs. These written reviews are carefully prepared 
by either the teacher or the superintendent, and the 
results attained therein by pupils are critically examined 

* Or speUing and anj' one of the other studies, at the discretion of the 
teacher. 



125 

and marked by the teacher. At some subsequent recita- 
tion period, regularly allotted the subject, results are 
returned to the pupils, and while the papers are in their 
hands a recitation is made covering the essential points 
treated ; and any misunderstood marking is also explained. 

The papers are then re-collected and kept on file at least 
a month after next promotions are made. It is for several 
reasons believed that important advantages are attained 
by a regular return to the superintendent of all these re- 
collected papers, together with a copy of the questions 
submitted, and my more recent practice has been to 
require such a return. The retention of pupils' papers 
until promotions are satisfactorily adjusted is important; 
because, in cases of difficulty, such papers will usually 
furnish convincing evidence to the parent that no injus- 
tice has been done, when his child, failing of promotion, 
may claim that others of the class of no better scholar- 
ship have been promoted, intimating, if not directly 
charging, that the teacher has been partial and marked 
accordingly. When, therefore, the written work upon 
which the markings are based is accessible, and when a 
comparison of papers satisfies a parent that not only has 
the teacher been impartial, but also that his child has no 
case, the efiect is salutary upon all concerned, and feelings 
of similar dissatisfaction are not likely frequently to arise. 
When, in such cases, a parent becomes unreasonable, 
especially when (as is commonly the case, if at all) he 
becomes so through the undue influence of his child, a 
satisfactory disposal of the difliculty has usually been 
found by an offer upon the part of the superintendent to 
submit a fair and impartial test. 

It may be said in conclusion, upon this point, that since 
it has come to be understood that the written work ot 
pupils is retained until promotions are settled, there have 



126 

been very few charges that teachers unfairly mark the 
scholarship ; and in no case is it recalled that any parent 
who has once investigated the matter has repeated the 
charge. 

From what has been said, it is seen that no formal writ- 
ten reviews are submitted pupils in the primary schools, 
and, during each period intervening between the times of 
making promotions, but one set of written reviews is sub- 
mitted in the middle schools; while, for a like period, 
only two sets are presented in the grammar schools ; and 
in the High School, likewise, but two sets are given each 
half-year. 

This much, at least, of written review work is deemed 
desirable as a purely educational factor, but I will not 
digress to discuss the merits of a subject that has been so 
generally and broadly considered. Any one caring to 
know my own views, however, maj^ find them somewhat 
extendedly given in my last annual report. 

The estimates made of results attained in written re- 
views, as numerically expressed, are recorded and made 
use of in our schools, ab«ve the middle-school grade, as 
vehicles sufficiently definite and reliable for conveying to 
parents adequate ideas of their children's progress and 
standing at school. They are also used as means of as- 
sistance by teachers in their efforts to determine promo- 
tions impartially. 

The form of report which pupils take to their parents, 
quarterly, gives information in regard to attendance, de- 
portment, and scholarship. Deportment and scholarship 
are marked upon the following scale : 100 signifies high- 
est; 90, excellent ; 80, good; 70, fair; 60, indifferent; 50, 
poor; and lower numbers denote different degrees of 
failure. Of course, these numbers may be, and they gen- 
erally are, regarded as per cents. 



127 

To discountenance the tendency among children, how- 
ever, critically to compare one another's standing, no 
provision is made on the report card for carrying out the 
"average" or " rank"; and to cause both a liberal and 
just interpretation of the numerical representation, the 
following, addressed to parents and guardians, appears 
upon the back of the card : 

" The per cents given to represent a pupil's standing at 
school can be justly compared only with those of another 
in the same class ; for it is necessary to a fair comparison 
that it should be made only with reference to those who 
are subject to the same treatment, who have exactly the 
same questions in written reviews, which are submitted in 
all respects in exactly the same way, and the answers to 
which are impartially marked from exactly the same 
standpoint by the same teacher. 

" Eighty-six or eighty-seven per cent from one teacher 
may represent no better standing than eighty per cent 
from another ; because of the difference among teachers in 
respect to the character of their tests, the manner of sub- 
mitting them, and the different degrees of stringency or 
liberality exercised in marking results. Hence the differ- 
ence of a few per cents, especially when found by a com- 
parison of reports made by different teachers, has no certain 
meaning ; and a pupil may have a lower per cent under 
one teacher than another, though in reality he may have 
done quite as well when he received the lesser per cent. 
It is therefore important that the significance of the scale of 
marking be carefully observed, it being noted in particular 
that any per cent from 90 to 99, inclusive, denotes 
"excellent"; and any from 80 to 89, inclusive, denotes 
" good " ; and so on down the scale. 

" This interpretation of the scale of marking is believed 
necessary, in order to offset the varying differences among 



128 

teachers attendant upon their submission and marking of 
either recitations or written reviews." 

My standing directions to teachers, in regard to making 
promotions, are simply as follows : 

" Make promotions on the last half-day of the spring 
term, also on the last afternoon of the fourth week of the 
winter term, in accordance with the following: It is 
designed and desired to make promotions as general as 
the good of the pupils will warrant ; but it is not intended 
to advance those not sufficiently fitted to enter with profit 
upon the work of the next class, except as hereinafter 
provided. You are therefore directed to promote or ad- 
vance : first, those who are well qualified to enter upon 
the work of the next class; second, those who have 
belonged to the same class a year,* and have been com- 
mendably regular in their attendance and attentive to 
their work ; third, those two years older than the standard 
age of their grade, provided they have been quite regular 
in attendance and have made a laudable effort to do their 
work properly. 

" (This last direction, however, does not apply to pupil& 
who are retarded in their progress because of their ina- 
bility to read English sufficiently well to go on with the 
work of the next class.) 

" Do not feel it necessary to be rigidly governed by any 
marked designation of scholarship results; but, rather^ 
consider every pupil with reference to individual ability 
and fitness for advancement, as estimated from all that 
you may personally know in regard to him. 

" The following may be regarded as standard ages (of 
first classes) for the various grades : Lower primary, 6 J ; 
higher primary, 8 ; lower middle, 9 ; higher middle, 10 ; 

* Such will have been over the work for that class, or grade, a second time ^ 
really three or four times, if reviews he reckoned. 



129 

fourth division, 11 ; third division, 12 ; second division, 
13. 

" Assistant teachers will comply with the decision of 
their principal in regard to all cases of promotion not 
provided for in the foregoing, and other teachers will, in 
doubtful cases, confer with the superintendent." 

In accordance with the foregoing, primary and middle 
school teachers usually determine a week or two before 
the time for making the changes whom of their pupils 
they will promote solely upon their own responsibility ; 
and then they consult the superintendent in regard to the 
promotion of any about the propriety of whose advance- 
ment they entertain much doubt. 

The superintendent, if in doubt what to advise after 
conferring with the teacher, takes occasion to make a 
personal examination of each of her pupik about whom 
she has thus consulted. This is done in connection with 
recitations of the whole class, so that pupils in question 
shall not be aware of what is being attempted. The 
recitations for this purpose are upon only special or nearly 
all subjects in the pupil's curriculum, oral or informally 
partly written, according to circumstances. These 
special cases are then determined in accordance with the 
combined judgment of the teacher and superintendent; 
or, if the teacher unduly hesitates, the superintendent 
decides them upon his own responsibility. 

After several years' trial of determining promotions 
in the lower grades upon the recommendation of the 
teachers, without any dependence upon results attained 
in formal written reviews, and even without any submis- 
sion of them in the primary schools, I think that on an 
average not more than twenty-five per cent of the 
teachers have felt themselves in need of advice in regard 



130 

to special cases. By beginning a week, or more if neces- 
sary, before promotion day, tbe superintendent can per- 
sonally investigate the few instances demanding special 
examination, and still have time to inspect the work, 
somewhat critically, of the entire school of any new 
teachers. 

In our grammar schools the teachers tabulate the 
average results of the written reviews, arranging them in 
the order of their rank, the names of the pupils being 
prefixed. Then, without any regard to the per cents, 
the teacher looks slowly and very carefully down the list, 
intent only upon pausing as soon as the name of a pupil 
is reached who in the general judgment of the teacher ought 
not to be advanced. Above such, if any be found, a line 
is drawn. All above that line are thus marked for pro- 
motion. The teacher then looks below the line to see 
whether any there named ought to be advanced. Occa- 
sionally one or two such are thus found, and designated 
by the plus sign for promotion. Exceptions of this sort 
are usually of two kinds : one represents the compara- 
tively new pupil who has not been trained to express 
himself in writing, but who at recitation has shown a 
good knowledge of the subjects and has perhaps sur- 
passed all in degree of general improvement; the other 
represents a pupil who cannot learn to spell, and on this 
account solely, has an average whicli would rob him of 
promotion when he ought not to be kept back. 

But how, it may be asked, shall the pupil with a higher 
average than the two exceptions instanced, who is per- 
haps first below the division line of the list, be satisfied? 
He will not question the propriety of advancing the new 
pupil circumstanced as represented; and, to satisfy him 
in regard to the other, it may be shown that for the pur- 
pose of determining promotions properly by the scale of 



131 

marking (a thing which prior to a consideration of his 
case had not been attempted with his class), the arrange- 
ment of his marks as compared with those of the one 
poor in spelling should be as follows : 



Himself. 




Studies. 


Poor 


Speller. 




iof 52 


per cent = 


= 13 


Arithmetic 


^ of 88 per cent = 


:22 


i " 60 


" 


' 15 


Lano-uage 


1" 80 


(( <( 


20 


i -70 


'« 


' 14 


Geography 


i " 70 


" " 


14 


1 " 80 


(( 1 


' 16 


Histoi-y 


1- 60 


(( (( 


12 


tV " S8 


•' ' 


' 9 


Spelling 


tV" 52 


<< li 


5 



Average, 67 per cent. Average, 73 per cent. 

He will now see that " Poor Speller" has an average of 
6 per cent more than " Himself," and his parents at least 
will recognize the propriety of his having a better knowl- 
edge of the more important studies before being ad- 
vanced ; for it Avould appear that he had not done even 
fairly * in either arithmetic or language. 

If promotions were to be made chiefly dependent upon 
some standard per cent, the averages of the class list 
should be made up in the first place in accordance with 
the jJTinciple shown in the foregoing " arrangement," by 
allowing greater values for the more important studies. 

But by the description given before the presentation of 
the " arrangement," it is seen how the per cents of attain- 
ment in written reviews are used in our schools merely 
as aids by teachers in enabling them to determine promo- 
tions upon their personal estimate of the fitness of each 
pupil for advancement, from all they may in any way 
know about him; for no uniform nor any established per 
cent is taken as a basis for advancement, each teacher 
being expected to know, to indicate, and to advance the 
worthy. 

* 70 represents a fair attainment. 



132 

There is no deviation from the practices already de- 
scribed, except that the averages upon the results attained 
during the last year in the grammar schools are found in 
accordance with the principle, previously illustrated, of 
allowing the greater values for the more important studies. 
This is done merely because it has been found in practice 
that when the lists are thus made up, the recommenda- 
tions made by the various masters for the promotion of 
pupils to the High School almost invariably find their 
lowest limit at the same per cent;* and the high school 
sub-committee, to whom the admission of pupils has been 
referred with power, have deemed it best to be ready 
annually to announce some per cent as the basis of 
admission for the year. Since this basis is yearly made 
to conform to the lowest per cent attained by any pupil 
who is recommended for admission to the High School by 
any master, the effect is the same as that attained by the 
practice first outlined ; and the fact must therefore be ap- 
parent, that promotions are practically made throughout 
all our schools upon the recommendations of the teachers. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The High School has been both unfortunate and fortu- 
nate, during the past year ; unfortunate in again under- 
going a change in its principalship, and fortunate in hav- 
ing the position so promptly and so worthily filled. 

The selection of Mr. Goodwin for the principalship of 
the High School at Lawrence, after an inspection of his 
work here, sufficiently attests his merits ; and Lawrence 
thereby again compliments the character of Manchester's 
teachers, by so soon selecting from among them another 
master at such an increase of salary as to secure his ser- 
vices. 

• Without consultation of the masters with one another. 



133 

Principal Somes has had charge of the High School 
only one term ; but by his gentlemanly and agreeable 
courtesies, by his evident understanding of the essential 
characteristics necessary for a good school, and by his 
quiet and consistent determination to secure them, he 
seems already to have largely won the confidence and co- 
operation of both teachers and pupils in his effort to at- 
tain a high ideal for the school. I shall be greatly sur- 
prised if his continued devotion to the working out of 
his plan does not secure the hearty co-operation of pa- 
rents and much improve the school. 

The following modest report from Mr. Somes is self- 
explanatory : 

"Manchester High School, 

December 21, 1888. 
Mr. William E. Buck, Superintendent of Schools : 

Sir, — In accordance with your request, I submit a 
report of the condition of the High School. 

The number of pupils attending the last term was one 
hundred and ninety-one. Of these, forty-four were in 
the first, or senior, class ; thirty-two in the second class ; 
fifty-two in the third class ; and sixty-three in the fourth 
class, which entered the school at the beginning of the 
fall term. 

The attendance has been good, though the percentage 
has been considerably reduced by the prolonged absence 
of a few scholars who have been kept out of school by 
illness. The school is now as large as can well be accom- 
modated in the building. We have had, during the last 
term, more scholars than desks in the assembly-room, 
and no more desks can be put into that room. 

The school is very well supplied with apparatus of 
various kinds for use in teaching, though some pieces are 
needed, for which I have placed a request in the hands of 
the sub-committee. Nothing less than a physical labora- 
tory will enable us to teach physics in the most approved 
way. 



134 

A special teacher of elocution is needed in the school, 
and there is work which cannot be well done except by 
such a teacher. If it is not possible to employ a teacher 
of elocution all the time, cannot some city near Man- 
chester be found that would unite with this city in pay- 
ing the salary of a competent teacher who would teach a 
portion of the time in each place ? 

The regular work of the school seems to me to be 
done in a very satisfactory way, and in some of the gen- 
eral exercises we have made changes that will, we expect, 
bring more satisfactory results. We have done a reason- 
able term's work in all departments, and the general 
tendency of the school in work and deportment has been 
towards improvement. 

Respectfully, 

Albert Somes, Master. ^^ 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The city Training School for teachers has been in 
good condition throughout the year. There have been 
twenty diiferent sub-teachers (see Appendix, page K) in 
the school within the year. Of these, six graduated in 
January and two in June, so the school still has its 
full quota of twelve; and of the eight graduated during 
the year, seven have already been elected as regular 
teachers. * 

Miss Wing is a competent, faithful, and painstaking 
principal; and the cit}^ is fortunate in having retained 
her services, through the persuasion of the sub-com- 
mittee of the school; for she was solicited to accept a 
similar position in a thriving Rhode Island city at a 
tempting increase of salary. 

I am glad to feel that the time has apparently passed 
when it becomes necessary to show the utility of this 

* The eighth has since been so elected. 



135 

school, ill order to perpetuate its distinctive form of 
organization. 

" Manchester|Training School for Teachers, 

December 31, 1888. 
Mr. William. E. Buck, Siqjemiiendeyit of Schools : 

Sir, — III accordance with your request, I submit a 
report of the work of the Manchester Training School. 

September 12, 1887, I took charge of your school. It 
consisted of one hundred and fifty pupils and six pupil- 
teachers. These teachers had partly finished the course 
of instruction and formed the senior class. In order that 
I might become better acquainted with my new sur- 
roundings, the junior class, seven in number, was not 
admitted until October, thus making me responsible for 
thirteen pupil-teachers. 

With this organization, the senior teachers, who were 
expected to graduated the following February, could 
give no time in school hours to study or recitations 
upon the professional subjects necessary to complete 
their course. The junior teachers, new to the work, 
must receive instruction, both in subjects they were to 
teach and in methods of teaching, before they could have 
any work with the children. Time was lost, and the 
organization seemed to be not an advantageous one in 
many ways. 

After consultation, the superintendent and committee 
consented to the trial of the following plan : Of the six 
teachers who graduated in February, 1888, two were 
retained in the school at a salary of twenty dollars a 
month. These, with two juniors who were promoted, 
formed a new senior class. The four remaining juniors 
formed a middle class, and a new junior class of four 
entered. 

The course for the pupil-teachers includes training and 
instruction for one year and a half With the present 
arrangement, a class will graduate in February and one 
in June of each year, and a new class will enter at these 
times. There will then be, at the beginning of each term, 



136 

eight teachers who are in some degree familiar with the 
workings of the school. Little more than the usual 
break incidental to closing a term and beginning a new 
one is felt. If after a fair t'^ial any appear to lack ability 
to become a teacher, she is advised to sever her connection 
with the school, and may be compelled so to do, at the 
discretion of the committee. 

The normal work is to be completed the first year. 
The senior teacher is to be responsible, as far as practica- 
ble, for the room she is in charge of She is assisted by 
a teacher from the middle and one from the junior classes. 
To secure practice in each of the grades, the work of the 
junior teacher is changed to a diiierent room at the mid- 
dle of the fall term, also at the time of each promotion. 
Substitutes are taken from the middle class, in order to 
secure the best results for all concerned. 

People who are not familiar with the work of the school 
fear that the children are being practiced upon by inex- 
perienced teachers. The fear is groundless. A pupil- 
teacher is not given a class until she has had instruction 
in methods, observed the teaching of the seniors, criti- 
cised and reported work done by the principal with the 
children ; and afterwards she is under the constant super- 
vision of the principal. The children enjoy the enthuei- 
asm of these young teachers fresh from the High School, 
and respond accordingly. Means are constantly em- 
ployed to save loss of time and energ3\ 

A' plan of work for the week is made out by each pupil- 
teacher, and criticised by the principal. One hour and a 
half a day is used in giving instruction to the pupil- 
teachers in subject-matter, methods, and planning work. 
The principal devotes the rest of the time to supervising, 
criticising, and in actual teaching with the children. The 
object of the school is to fit teachers for the work of 
organizing, governing, and teaching in the public schools. 

The course of study for the normal class is as follows 
(forty-five minutes a day being devoted to recitation) : 

First Six Months. Reading, Writing, Language, Oral 
Instruction, Elementary Botany, Elementary Physiology 
and Hygiene, with reference to eftects of stimulants and 



137 

narcotics, Elementary Geography, Arithmetic, Drawing, 
Clay Modeling, Care of Schoolroom and Children, Read- 
ing of Educational Papers and Magazines, followed by 
discussions of matter read. 

Second Six Months. Psychology, with reference to the 
Development of the Child-mind, Art of Teaching, School 
Government, School Organization, History of Pedagogy, 
School Laws of New Hampshire, Reading of Educational 
Papers and Magazines, followed b}^ discussion of matter 
read. 

Third Six 3Ionths. Reading of Educational Papers, 
Magazines, Educational "Writings, followed by discussion 
of matter read ; Care of Registers, Reports for Month, 
Term, and Year. 

Caroline E. Wing, Principal." 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

There has been an effort to improve the evening schools. 
A few years since the different sexes were housed in sep- 
arate buildings. This change reduced the numbers, but 
secured an improved class of attendants. The greatest 
annoyance connected with the evening schools has been 
the early withdrawal of a large part of the annual enroll- 
ment, and the irregularity in attendance of those pretend- 
ing subsequent membership ; so largely, indeed, have been 
these disturbances that the averag-e attendance has never 
been more than one fourth or one third of the enrollment. 
The speedy large withdrawals were attributed to unsuita- 
ble seating arrangements, the attempt to accommodate 
adults at primary and middle school desks. This defect 
was remedied at the Lowell-street and Clinton-street 
houses ; but there has not been, nevertheless, much differ- 
ence among the schools, as a whole, in respect to the 
relative amount of withdrawals. It was thought that 
perhaps by the employment of teachers constantly engaged 
in the work, and consequently more familiar with the 



138 

better methods of instruction, the evening-school pupils 
could be enough interested to become regular in attend- 
ance ; but even by the employment of some of our best 
day-school teachers, the evil of irregular attendance has 
not been much reduced. 

We are therefore forced to the conclusion, in the light 
of these facts and some others ascertained by inquiries of 
the teachers, that the evils mentioned are largely due to 
outside influences, and chiefly to the habits formed by 
such as have been inclined either early to withdraw or 
irregularly to attend. Such, rather than seek opportu- 
nities for self-improvement, are inclined to waste their 
time and substance in parading the streets, attending 
cheap shows, and squandering their earnings in less rep- 
utable places. For the most part, they never attended 
our day schools, nor do they even understand much of 
our language. How much the greater, then, is their need 
of the advantages of the evening schools, where the bet- 
ter element of their own nationality learns both how to 
read and make a proper use of time. 

The question, then, that naturally arises is, " What 
can the School Board do toward preventing the formation 
of the improper habits named, upon the part of the youth 
of this city who are so circumstanced that they are likely 
to be gradually and unconsciously led into the evil ways of 
those with whom they associate in their employment ? " I 
reply by advising that all children over fourteen^ years of 
age, for the time being not in attendance upon the day 
schools, may attend the evening schools. Those between 
thirteen and fourteen are required by law to attend school 
tvf'enty-four weeks annually before they can be employed 
in any manufacturing establishment; while those between 
fourteen and sixteen need only attend twelve weeks before 

*None under sixteen heretofore admitted to tlie evening schools. 



139 

such employment. Those between fourteen and sixteen 
may therefore work in the mills forty weeks out of fifty- 
two. The impairment to habits of thought and conduct 
inculcated by the school, which is wrought upon unso- 
phisticated children by acquaintances formed in the mill 
and upon the street, who are often only too fond of 
opening youthful eyes to certain ways of the world, can 
be fully realized only by those who have been teachers 
of the class of children most largely employed in the mills, 
both before and after their employment there. 

The hours of daily employment for mill operatives are 
somewhat less than formerly; and my more familiar 
acquaintance with the extent to which the youth of our 
city are allowed upon the streets during the long winter 
evenings, and the knowledge I have of the conduct of 
many while there, cause me to conclude that for them to 
attend the evening schools would not be worse for their 
health than their accustomed course of conduct. By at- 
tendance upon the evening schools they would probably 
thereby be withdrawn from many of the evil influences 
of the street; and if admitted before improper habits 
become characteristic, they would be likely to attend sev- 
eral winters, constitute the more stable portion of the 
evening schools, and considerablv extend their own edu- 
cation, which is frequently quite meager with many of 
this class, even at the age of fourteen, owing to the fact 
that they often first enter our day schools at the age of 
eight, ten, or twelve, from countries where the English 
language had not been taught them. 

The evening schools have been improved since their 
re-opening, last fall, by a gain in the average efficiency of 
the teachers employed, and by the use of free text-books, 
which have made better classification and improved 
methods of instruction possible. 



140 

These schools have also been more economically con- 
ducted than heretofore, as another consequence of the 
better classification, b}' lessening the number of teachers 
required. There may also be further improvement in 
this direction next winter, by uniting the two schools for 
boys, and locating the one for boys (who live both sides of 
the river) in the four upper rooms at the Franklin-street 
house. The girls' school on Spring street could then be 
moved to the Lowell-street house, and the girls' school 
on School street to the Clinton-street house. By these 
changes all the evening schools would occupy rooms 
where the seats are sufficiently high for adults, and no 
more of the rooms occupied by day schools would 
thereby be used for evening schools than by the present 
arrangement. 

The most important as well as the most difficult prob- 
lem for the further improvement of the evening schools, 
yet remains to be solved. This is, how to increase the 
ratio of the average membership to at least seventy per 
cent of the entire enrollment, and secure commendable 
regularity of attendance. 

The following plan is the best that I can now suggest. 
Let those who may wish to attend the evening schools 
each deposit with the principal, at time of registration, 
twenty-five cents, with the understanding that the money 
shall be forfeited to the evening-school fund : first, if the 
pupil fails to enter the school within a week after regis- 
tration or withdraws therefrom at an}' time except at 
the close of a school month; second, whenever a pupil has 
been five times absent, or ten times tardy, for other 
reasons than providential detention, the same to be set- 
tled to the satisfaction of the principal. Forfeiture of 
the deposit should constitute forfeiture of membership in 
the school; and no re-instatement of a pupil who has for- 



141 

feited his metobership should be allowed to occur, unless 
he shall first make another similar deposit subject to like 
conditions. 

Such small fines may appear trivial ; but it is only 
desired to correct the prevailing evils relating to the 
attendance upon the evening schools, and in doing this 
care must be exercised not to provide such conditions as 
will deter the poor and deserving from attendance. But 
without some effectual plan for approximately determining 
early in the term the number that will be in attendance 
upon the evening schools, the city is likely to continue 
being put to much unnecessary expense in providing for 
the many who register and attend with great irregularity 
only for a few weeks, and then withdraw without giving 
notice. Such attendance results in no profit to the indi- 
vidual, and has a highly injurious effect upon the general 
attendance. The excessive enrollment, moreover, makes 
necessary the maintenance of a large corps of teachers 
until it can be ascertained what will be the approximate 
average attendance. The plan that I have outlined, would, 
I think, speedily determine this, and also effect regularity 
of attendance. If so, the evening schools would thereby 
not only be less expensive, relatively, but the good they 
could do under the more favorable conditions would be 
of still much greater account. 

For statistics pertaining to the evening schools, see the 
Appendix, pages G, H, and I. 

TEACHERS. 

The whole number of different teachers regularly em- 
ployed in the day schools, for the year 1888, has been 
eighty-five. Their respective positions may be learned 
from the "Attendance Table" in the Appendix (pages C, 



142 

D, E, and F); but the various changes made within the 
year can be more readily understood by an inspection of 
the arrangement showing " Changes in the Corps of 
Teachers" (Appendix, page K). 

Nine teachers have left the schools during the year 
by resignation, one by expiration of term of service, and 
two have died. One school on Lowell street was discon- 
tinued, and the teacher transferred to the Spring-street 
house. Ten of the other positions w^ere duly filled by 
the election of new teachers, two males and eight females. 
The latter are all graduates of our city Training School. 
The only present vacancy is at the Stark District school.* 

It is gratifying to feel, especially considering the excel- 
lence of several of the teachers who have withdrawn 
during the year, that you have succeeded in filling the 
vacancies in a way that has strengthened rather than 
weakened the corps of teachers as a whole. Without 
the right teacher in a school, there is no power to make 
it good. 

OBITUARIES. 

By the fell destroyer of all mortals, two worthy 
teachers were stricken down last June in the midst of 
their labors; and by the deaths of Mrs. Mary J. Fife 
and Miss Lenora C. Gilford the city was .summarily and 
sorrowfully deprived of the duly appreciated services of 
two faithful servants. 

Mrs. Fife came to the city when a young girl, and 
obtained her education in our schools, including a course 
at the High School. She taught, at a very early age, 
several of the city suburban schools, then studied at 
Bradford (Mass.) Academy, after which she resumed, 
and for many years followed, teaching in our graded 

* Filled at opening of the new year. 



143 

schools until the time of her death. She was an excel- 
lent teacher of several subjects, and a noble-hearted, 
worthy woman. Her school usually took a prominent 
part in the Lincoln-street-school exhibitions, and the 
patrons of that school will long remember with great 
satisfaction tl^e fine physical exercises of her pride, the 
"Third Division." 

Miss Gilford was a native and constant resident of this 
city. She passed through all grades of our city schools, 
including the city Training School for teachers. In her 
examination for a teacher's certificate she showed herself 
an excellent scholar, as also in all her subsequent work 
as a teacher. She first taught primary classes, and therein, 
early exhibited both great tact in management and a high 
degree of skill in teaching. So successful, indeed, was 
she, that it was not long before she was promoted to the 
first assistantship at the Franklin-street school. There 
she also gave excellent satisfaction.- Miss Gilford was 
both a student and an earnest and painstaking worker. 
She devoted her time, thought, and, as it might appear, 
even her life, to her chosen profession. 

The following, presented b}^ the sub-committee of the 
Franklin-street school, and unanimously adopted by the 
School Board, was abundantly deserved : 

"Whereas, It has pleased God to remove Miss Lenova C. Gil- 
ford from Manchester's corps of teachers, 

Resolved, That in her death we deeply deplore the loss of a highly 
accomplished and successful teacher, whose valuable work in the 
several positions occupied by her is fully appreciated by the mem- 
bers of this body ; and that we hereby extend our most profound 
sympathy to the family of the deceased." 



144 



CONCLUSION. 



Thanking you, gentlemen of the School Board, for 
your cordial support of my work, the patrons of the 
public schools for numerous kindly courtesies, andfthe 
teachers for their friendly and earnest co-operation for 
the common good, I respectfully submit ihis report. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent 
December 27, 1888. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Population, etc. 

11. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 
Y. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

Vn. Finance. 

Vm. School Year, 1888. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Organization of* Committees, 1889. 

XL List of Teachers, 1889. 

Xn. School Year, 1889. 

10 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 
I. — Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1884 . 37,600 

Estimated population, 1888 .... 40,000 

Legal school age, 5 to 21, 

II. — SCHOOLHOUSES. 

N'umber of schoolhouses in use . . . .23 

iN'umber of schoolhouses not in use .... 1 

(Bridge -street house, corner of Union.) 

Number of schoolrooms used for day schools . . 78 

(Four of the same, and six others, used for evening schools. 
Rooms unoccupied by city for day schools are, two at Spring-street 
house, three at Lowell-street, three at Beech-street, and two at 
Bridge-street, the last two being unfit.) 

Number of rooms used for High School classes . . 6 
Number of rooms used for Grammar schools . . 20 
Number of rooms used for Middle schools . . 15 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools . . 29 
Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 2 
Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools . .6 

III. — Schools. 
(All for both sexes.) 
Number of High schools 1 

(A) 



147 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade 

(Middle and Primary) schools .... 7 
Number of combined Middle and Primary schools 

(Merrimack-street or Training School) ... 1 
Number of schools all Primary grade . . .6 

Number of Partially Graded schools ... 2 

Number of Ungraded schools . .... 6 



IV. — Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High School 

Female teachers in the High School . 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools . 

Female teachers in the Middle schools 

Female teachers in the Primary schools . 

Female teachers in the Partially Graded schools 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools . 

Special teachers : One male in music the entire year 

(four days a week) ..... 

Average number of male teachers * . 
Average number of female teachers . 

(No increase'or decrease from last year.) 
Male teachers in the Evening schools 
Female teachers in the Evening schools . 
Average number of male teachers in the Evening 

schools 

Average number of female teachers in the Evening 

schools . • . 
Male teachers in the Evening Drawing schools 
Average number of male teachers in the Evening 

Drawing schools ....... 

* Exclusive of the epecial teacher. 

(B) 



2 

4 

5 

15 

15 

26 

3 

6 

1 

7 
69 

4 
15 



148 




-« a a" 

^ « IB '-S -"J « CO 

S^ M o !; o i- 

rQ ^ . 3 re o !* 






o - s - 



h ai^ d « a) ^ 

"" 5 ^ SrH(M 

Sj-S « cj a 

<j J El, «!) S m X S 



g a; Q » 

gfe sQ 
•^ a ts S 



JO ^aaa joj; 



.-1 «D 03<N 

to eq rj< lO 
0)0)03 



0)0)0) O) 



to t- b-t- 



80n«pna}^y 



lO lO -HO 



« in <N t- t- lO 

<N to Tf< CO CO T)l 



w^ lAOO lO^ 



•SatiSaoiag 

'OJ(I 83«J8Ay 



(N cq CO-* 



»H t-^oooo 



o bo 
(D bo 

> ® 



t-. 00 00 00 



00 CO COCO N 



l-COOOOO to 



to Tj< -<•<)« 
T-( -H (NC^ 



to t-00 O 

cq (Nil c^ 



•paiiojaa 



to CO 0)0 

»S< -f CD t- 



CO OCO 00 

t- to to to 



Q -d 



fa M Bfa 



fa 2 2 



ja E^oQ H 



fi-d 



facoE 



(C) 



149 



as 

» t3 



S^( 






o 



So 
'^5 



^9 2" 
5 o - E t. o , 

O o -^ qj o s » 

2 f^ g'.S .2 g ■ 
5 cs a iJ g 5 



^ j:^ 3 S S g 



!<< O S 



feS 






uooW 



5 S 



^^.a 









CO C^ t- CO t- o 



Ifl r-l iH U3 T^ iri ^ l« 



as -- *-» o o^ o 



CO (M c^ t- m b- 00 t- 



00 C5 O^ O 00 OT C^ 05 C5 C5 00 CC C^ 00 CO 



10 00 CO C5 in 10 

CI CO CO C^ CO Tj< 



CO 10 10 -H t- N t- '^ 
■* CO CC C<< CO Tl< CO (N 



>eOT*< 



00 (N o e^ C5 o 
CM T** CO CO CO 10 



O 00 00 Tt< CO 00 (M ■ 

'j' CO CO e^ ■* ■>* Tt< < 



•<j< ■* 10 ■* O CO 
>-l <N IM N (M CO 



'I* Tj" O 10 05 iM t- «0 
CI (N !» T-HM CO C^ »-t 



CO "J< t-H CD 05 CD 



O 00 00 10 10 t- <y> o> 

CO (N IM rt l>! (M (M T-( 



ri t-CD O "-1 OS 

^ ;d«o m t- 00 



CO CD t^ OS O -< OS -H 
t- CD ■^ CO 00 CD ># 



O "2. 



E COHiit 






5 1^ w s ^4 









^ -< 



l^g )€ 



(D) 



^ 



O rt 

a ^ 

tea ^ •§ 

►3 - . » 



■" ce S 

C5.13 m " 

a >>-2 >» 

g-S'a ;= 

III I 

— fe^ » 

g.S'o, .3 

^ a's a 









a) 

a 
'C 

A 

o i o ^ S 
, ~ t. » fc, 



I 01 



-a s »! g '^ 

o t. s q ^ 

g.2 « — ^ 
.2 :s ~ ^ 3> 

B i s J i 



150 



a 

H 

o 

;? 

c 

H 
H 
H 



■^^^ 



• P ^ , = , 






55tgS 



0; 'c ;>^::; 7^ on 
see -^ a>g tc 



SfO 









S3 
§ ."I . 



gcoo 



. "^.^ 5 ^ 

S a^ £;'.2 £:>« >» 

0^ aj.^ F5C3 rfeS 

!2iH;ziSt«SWS 



•80aBpa94 
-IV ^irea 

JO !)a9D J8J 



li^ lO 00 C^ 00 1-H C^ 0^00 00 rJJ 00 U2 C^ CO CO CO O 10 t- 00 ^ O tJ< 

e- b^ ^02^"-H-^ 006 06 ot-^o^ooo6oooirfo6 IC co—^ 

CO CO COCOasC^'J3 000 t^ OOOC500C500C005COOOOO O) OOuO 






10 tH 00 co»^ ^ b-O o oj 

CO (N ?J CO <*" ^ rl i-l ■* CO 



00 CO t- 10 ffq -H CO 83 e<l to O •"! Olio 

CO CO CO so o^ CO N CO CO CO Ti< ■* coco 



•3ai3uoi8a 
•o^ 93ej9Ay 



o ■* CO t- o 10 05 1- ■* o CO co^oc»io>no ot— <Nio 00 t-e 



tH in CO CO ■* •>!< iI .-( tJ< CO 



^ ^ >a" (N <N CO CO Tf CO Tf Tl< T)< ^" 






^ 



m 



t- CO COCOCOlflOOCOCOCl 
<N 1-1 cq CO CO ■* 11 CO IM CO 



ir--HOioco(M CO 050000 10 mt- 

(M CO IM OJ r-l rt CO (M ■* IM CO IM CO r»l 



O CO 00 00 00 CO la O CO t^ 00 CO CO O t^ ^ CO ••* "^ ^ O <M T^ C5 00 



•«« CO rHCOrHCOC-J^COCO 



(MTJ<(MCOCNeOCO(MCOiMCO CO -^CO 



•p9U0jna 

•O^ 31011AY 



CO 05 -H ^H ■^ 1/2 00 CO 10 r- 

t- CO CO t- t- 00 CO 10 t- CO 



CO 10 Tj< CC CO ^ 00 CO CO •"! CO Tj< 0005 
CO 00 b- >0 10 00 t- CO 00 00 t- 00 0000 



I ^ (5-2. 



<) ^ s 






^e fe 2 S 



3 ii«^l 

M M jj^ tH 



^ 3mS 



s<^ 



(E) 



151 



p4 W ai S 



00 CO CO t- 



Wki 



aS 



. 0) ■" t.— 
O o ^ '^ ^ 



^ =^ bo 

CD cs 2 £ 



ao OiOi a> 



o t-; o 
o ui 

CO CO 



Cl i-H lO O 00 IM 
i-1 ^ »-t M tH 



lO toco (M c •* 
,-1 'Jlrt -N ,-, rt 



CO iat~ -^ CD CD 
r-l eO.-l rH 



tH !Meo o t- o 



->H t-C-1 00 lO CO 
e-J O 50 CO iH r1 



a -s 



1 


S*3 




■> 



s g 






to be 



23 



5 IS 

a§ 



§a 



o 


e 


<D 


a .q 




o 








u 










fl 


o 


m 


o 


fe 


o 






:;^ 


t4 


,o 


a 





eg > 
3 te O 



=1 C a 



«^ p 



b CD =« 

CD ° C3 

a a a 



O <D tS 

> S2 



^ a 



(F) 



152 



DAY SCHOOLS. 

The following is a summary of the attendance upon 
the several grades of public day schools for the year end- 
ing December 14, 1888 : 



SCHOOLS. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially Graded . . 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1888 
Totals, 1887. 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. 



86 
413 
357 
820 

44 



1,801 
1,817 



Girls. 



110 
500 
347 
802 
49 
98 



1,906 
1,853 



185 
754 
574 
1,058 
77 
120 



2,768 
2,711 



176 
703 
516 
930 
67 
108 



2,500 
2,468 






95.1 
93.2 
89.9 
87.9 
87.0 
90.0 



90.3 
90.8 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

TABLE SHOWING AVERAGE ATTENDANCE, 1888. 



MONTHS. 


Lowell-st. 
School. 


Spring-st. 
School. 


School-street 
School. 


Clinton-st. 
School. 


Goffe's Falls. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Males. 


Females. 


January 

February 

November 

December .... 


30 
23 
65 
50 


20 
13 
69 
43 


10 
10 


10 
10 
15 
14 


19 
19 


9 

8 

7 

7 


5 
5 
7 

7 



(G) 



153 

1888. 1887. 

Number of evenings open .... 70 114 

^Number in attendance ten evenings or more . 456 382 

Aggregate average attendance . . . 116 98 

Average number of teachers in service . . 11 11 

See report of the superintendent, under " Evening 
Schools," for further information in regard to them. 



TEACHERS. 

Charles E. Cochran, Principal of Lowell-street school, 
for boys. 

Assistants, — Anna J. Dana, Cora F. Sanborn, Etta S. 
Dana, and Edith M. Stebbins. 

J. H. Campbell, Principal of Spring-street school, for 
girls. 

Assistants, — Lizzie D, Hartford, Alice H. Boyd, Emma 
J. Ela, Maggie Linen, Alice M. Stebbins, and N'ellie M. 
Atwood. 

Frank C. Livingston, Principal of School-street school, 
for both sexes. 

Assistants, — Annie E. McElroy, M. AlmaFracker, and 
Sarah B, Paige. 

Fred C. Baldwin, Principal of Clinton-street school,* 
for boys. 

Assistant, — Mary A. Southard. 

Georgie A. l^ute, teacher of the Goffe's Falls school. 

* In existence during the fall only. 



(H) 



154 



EVENING DRAWING SCHOOLS. 



AVERAGE ATTENDANCE, 1888. 



Months. 


Machine Drawing Class. 


Architectural Drawing Class. 


Total. 


January 

February 

November 

December 


29 
28 
34 
29 


15 
17 
15 
13 


44 
45 
49 
42 



Number of evenings open . 
Aggregate average attendance 
Average number of teachers 



97 


36 


45 


56 


2 


4 



TEACHERS. 

John M. Kendall, Henry A. Herrick, Henry W. Allen, 
and Alphonso H. Sanborn. 

GENERAL SUMMARY. 

The following table presents the main features of in- 
terest pertaining to the attendance upon the public schools 
for the last ten years : 



(I) 



155 



Date. 


_2 
3 

3 
Oh 

•2| 

so 


Whole No. 
Belonging. 


pa 

D 

.a 
1 

at* 

b a 


< 

a 

6 
« 5 


'« 

Q 

o . 

® 5 

Oh 


Ho 

II 

? s 

> " 
-< 


a 

O 

a*. 

o 

o 


1 
>> 


B 
o 

■so 


■a 

s 

i 

■a 


H 




Boys. 


Girls. 


2 S 


1879 .... 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884. ... 
1885 

1886 .... 

1887 .... 
1888 


3,798 
4,136 
4,235 
4,095 
4,062 
3,918 
3,806 
3,632 
3,670 
3,712 


1,924 
2,166 
2,200 
2,086 
2,061 
1,924 
1,891 
1,812 
1,817 
1,806 


1,874 
1,970 
2,035 
2,009 
2,001 
1,994 
1,915 
1,820 
1,853 
1,906 


2,859 
2,970 
2,858 
2,957 
2,848 
2,872 
2,725 
2,698 
2,711 
2,768 


2,648 
2,727 
2,602 
2,712 
2,612 
2,645 
2,430 
2,475 
2,468 
2,500 


92.6 
92.0 
91.0 
91.7 
91.4 
92.1 
90.6 
91.9 
90.8 
90.3 


145 
91 
110 

164 
103 
95 
96 
79 
98 
116 


77 
75 
64 
76 
97 
85 
98 
78 
98 
88 


77 
75 
62 
65 
75 
71 
89 
71 
95 
80 


52 
61 
54 
57 
66 
49 
71 
53 
61 
58 


48 
38 
39 
53 
27 
38 
35 
42 
42 
45 


71 

77 
75 
73 
71 
72 
72 
74 
76 
76 



* Including Grammar classes in suburban schools. 

t Usually some pupils have annually entered from other schools. This year one has so 
entered. 

CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The whole number of ditferent teachers regularly em- 
ployed in the day schools during the year has been 85. 
Their respective positions may be learned from the at- 
tendance table on pages C, D, E, and F of the Appen- 
dix, but the various changes made within the year can be 
more readily understood by an inspection of the follow- 
ing: 



Teachers. 



Date of effect 
of resignation. 



Teachei-s. 



Date of effect 
of resignation. 



Belle M. Kelley. Mar. 24. 
Lenora C. Gilford.* June 23. 
Mary J. Fife. * June 26 

Edwin R. Groodwin. June 30. 
Carrie I. Stevens. June 30. 
Susie H. Frame. June 30. 



F. Maud Joy. June 30. 

Lillian C. Hall June 30. 
i^ina B. Croning June 30. 
J.Edw'dPickeringt Aug. 1. 
Mary E. Lord. Dec. 10. 
Maria E". Bower. Dec. 15. 



* Died. t Expiration of term of service. 
(J) 



156 



Teachers. 



Date of begin- 
ning service. 



Teachers. 



Date of effect 
of transfer. 



Emma L. McLaren. April 16. 
Albert Somes. Sept. 10. 

George Winch. Sept. 10. 

Cora B. Gilford. Sept. 10. 
Lettie M. Smith. Sept. 10. 
Mary J. Walsh. Sept. 10. 

Kate Townsend. Sept. 10, 
Genevieve B.Knight.Sept. 10. 
Mary E. Lord.| Oct. 8. 

Theodora Richards'n. § 



Maria N. Bower. Sept. 10 
Eva F. Tuson. Sept. 10 
Anna O. Heath. Oct. 8 
Lizzie P. Gove. Oct. 8 
EmmaL.M'Laren.Oct. 8 
Alice E. Page. || Oct. 8 
Belle R. Daniels. Oct. 8 
Mary F. Barnes. Oct. 8 
i^ettie F. Aiusworth. Oct. 8 
Susie G. Woodman Dec. 10 



TRAINING SCHOOL SUB-TEACHERS, 1888. 



Cora B. Gilford. * * 
Genevieve B. Knight. * * 
Emma L. McLaren.** 
Theodora Richardson. * * 
Lettie M. Smith. * * 
Mary J. Walsh. * * 
Nellie M. Atwood. ft 
Kate Townsend.f t 
Nettie B. Fogg, ft 
Lillian Little, ft 



Inez M. Warren. ff 
AbbieR. West. ft 
Emma B. Abbott. || 
Alverta P. Barrett. 1 1 
Maude L. Kent. || 
Millies. Morse. II 
Mabel J. Brickett. § § 
Annie B. Goodwin. §§ 
Emma M. Streeter. § § 
Bertha A. Young. §§ 



t Had temporary charge of a class in early part of the year, on Clinton 
street. Substituted at Lincoln street, subsequently; elected there October 5. 

§ Elected December 7, to begin service at Hallsville at opening of the new 
year. 

II Miss Page's school on Lowell street was discontinued October 5. 

* * Graduated January 27. 

1 1 Entered September, 1887, and expected to graduate January 25, 1889, 
except that INIisses Atwood and Townsend graduated June 29, having taught 
before entering. 

t t Entered February 6, 188S. 

§ § Entered September 10, 1888. 



(K) 



157 



VI. — Work op Truant Officer. 





Absentees 
reported from. 


No. volunta- 
rily return- 
ed to. 


No. report- 
ed caused 
to attend. 




2 

.2 
3 


S 

g 


X! 
« . 


No. not 

found 

at all for 


Date. 


o 
.a 

o 


•S.S 


1 

.■Sm 
O 


II 


o 


31 
.a o 

o o 


Ill 

d C3 C5 
'A 


o'S c 

si 
. a » 
s-o 


.- 

02 


1 


January 


23 


67 


1 


11 


18 


i 36 


14 


8 






February 


49 


53 


3 


1 


38 


44 


7 


8 




1 


March 


60 


48 


8 


7 


30 


27 


26 


9 






April 


19 


22 


2 


1 


14 


14 


8 


5 




1 


May 


23 


50 


5 


2 


13 


39 


4 


9 






June 


30 


50 


5 


1 


16 


38 


16 


4 




1 


September 


17 


23 




3 


6 


20 


5 


5 




1 


October 


23 


19 


1 




12 


15 


7 


7 






November 


28 


31 


5 




14 


1 25 

j 


11 


3 




1 


I'ecember .... 


24 


14 


3 




12 


9 8 


4 


2 




Total 


296 


377 


33 


26 


173 


267 


106 


62 


2 


5 








No. truants 


* * 


4J 


a "= 
" 




^ 


Date 




4^ 

O 3 

Jil 


caused 
to attend. 


•s|| 

. o s 


a. 


s 

cS 

h 



Is 






"o 
o 

5 
g 


!2 

1 

g 


®-3 

"= = 3 

3 S) 




17 


56 
126 
161 

74 


88 
139 
187 
115 




> 


112 
23 
37 
63 




14 


7 


7 
8 
4 






16 


g 


1 




April 





12 


4 




May 


3 


4 


5 


93 


100 


4 


I 


88 






12 


2 


2 


70 


90 


i 
4 




33 
63 
100 
38 
63 




6 














3 

7 
6 








6 


1 


81 

48 


99 

72 






13 




i 




Total 


9Q 


34 1 "^1 ' 


806 


997 


29 








!■ 




1 















(L) 



158 



•SIBIOI 



^ M '^^-^ ^^"^ ^^^ 

acT TiT <D oT -^ irT urT h^ 00 cT 

OiCCOC3t*COQOT*<^-QO 

f- '/5 lO g c-i •* to T)H o ^ 

t_10t-Oc^(MC0CCC0 

•» — -I- 



•siooijng SaiaaA^ 



(M 05^^ t- ^- Tt^ to lA CO CO 



•BJiEdaH 



•Sa!st:)J9A 



— igi-'tooomasMriio 

00C;t^t-«t-O5^^COC5t- 

OlOCTJOoioOQO^t^lO 
»-i ^CO^^-; *^^ (M lO o Tf 

CO loioto' «■*'«'« TiTTt*' 



OOCNt— INQOOt-C^f-H 
OOOlOCOOCOt-050 



•S8!iddns 
p n « 9 a n :jmanj 



tgiot-mooiOT(< — oo 

COCJ— "OSCOOOOCOOO 

cct^t^^Hoo6ocDt-^(>i 

t-00(NCOlOO^.-.Cg 



•l^na 



O^tOOi-^OOOSOOOO 

i-iniqoiooooSt-r-S 

,- ^ _ ,^ - . C^ 00 — J-l 



CO O ^ O ^ I 



•sasaad 



OO'^t— COQOC^i-«OlC 

oO'-;csrrcoot-Tj;io 

O»n^t-r^»-^C0CCG0t-I 

otrgJrS'^o'oooim 

10OOCS05.-C»-hO00(>I 



•snioo^ JO 9J«o 



•Xj9Uop 

-UJg pUB S5[00a 



oot-a)c>t- — li^ — ^ 

OOINCOO^-OOCOS 

oooiocoosOf-I^c4 

Oo-^--;00c<3<N— -^CO 
•^»O_t-^00 C5 Ci t-i <>» o^ c^ 



<NQ-r^l'^t-*-H'^^00 



i-'OOiOtNt-^OCOTfioO 

OOO'-'ODOiOi-llOOO 

o:otococol^^co^-colo 



•SJatlDBQX 

}0 seu^ieg 



^OOCiCO^CNOSOOO 



;OT(HC0t-;0<00t-;0SO 
OJO— JlOOlri(NC0 1-^CO 
JgOt-lOC35CCr-lOCMO 

C^iOi-Ht'^O'^COCOlO 

5g oo'cfo'sof o">-r(N « 



030^C1COT*llftCDt-00 

t-oooooooooooooooooo 

00000000000000000000 



(M) 



H 

o 

s 

Ph 



CD o'cm' t-^ CO" CO CO o" CO oT 



, f-HOOO 
,COC^<N 



la , f-HCOO 



C0Ot>-0iG0CCOCDCD05 

(M IC tr- 00 b- O t-- l— ,— M 
CNOCCt-TfCM^C0r*^(N 



OOC^'MCOOiCO^*-'»A 

ixtcoioaicot^co«OTf*co 

CO lO' Tt*" cTco Tf'" CO CO' CO rjT 



-t*Q0lOCOTtiQ0C0lO'-<Cq 

ocooiqict^ii^ooasio 

OQC£>O'»*'U00iwh-rf 
CO'^lCrt^tC't'^'^^CC 



Tt^gp-^COrt^^COOSlOcD 
CCOCNIOCOOOIOC^IO 
>*COlO*-Ho6cOr*CiCO — 
^OO-^i-HQOOlOOlCCM 
rtHCOt-^CCOOOOOOiM 
^ r-T ^ ^ ^ 



cs iri CD »o lo o ^ i-i 1— ( 00 

rHt--C^t-7t-;OOCDC^Oi 

OCiOOm-HCQOOCDt-^ 
r-OOCOCSC^ITiJ^T^CDOrH 
CO 30_O O CN^OO CO 1-^ lOO 

rn" (N'cO Co"(N"i-r CN CO eO^Cff 



-^l^CDt-lOt-CD^^ — lO 

«00i-hC. COCOCOOOCOlO 

(N-^coaioiiOc^aic^t^ 

00t--C^»OCD00^C0OiCO 
C5050005Tj'CiOi-<OC^ 



COCCCSCOt-CDCDTfCSTti 
Q0t^COCOTjJi-HC5C^^<M 
t-OiTfrJ^OOcicOCiuic^ 

CSCOCir— CD'—Ort*«-«CD 

c^"c^f>ro4"c^co co'co co'co" 



COOiOS(MC<»COt-COCC00 
CNOOq^CDQOCOr^CDCO 

■"^'OcioiritD-i^cDiriT^ 

t^Tt'Ci-^tMOSCOCOCOlO 



CD0 0105(NeO(NQOCO 



t^lMOlOt-Cii-iaXNO 



- »0 lO CO CD CD ' 



COC0C0COC0C0C0T*<^Tt< 



CiO^C<JCO*+<lOOt*00 

t-ooooxcoooooooooco 

COCOOOOOOOCOQOCOOOCO 






159 



COST OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOR SIX YEARS. 



883. 
884. 



887. 



* Average 
No. pupils. 


o 
O 


2,990 


$53,505.70 


3,005 


53,477.10 


2,860 


53,133.11 


2,810 


56,440.42 


2,925 


58,679.26 


2,990 


59,684.02 



> a 



$17.80 1520,055,986 

17.80 20,613,032 

18.58 21,137,464 

20.08 21,379,384 

20.06 21,905,476 

19.96 22,162,928 



$332,741 
360,732 
345,200 
347,268 
373,139 
432,914 



$.0026 
.0026 
.0025 
.0026 
.0026 
.0026 



* Pupils of both day and evening schools included. 



VIIL — School Year. 



Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 2, closed 
March 23. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 16, closed 
June 29. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 10, 
closed December 14. Vacation of two weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above 
by the school board, 185. 

Average number days the schools were taught, 172. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of "Teachers' Institutes," 
and half-days on account of bad weather or insufl&cient heat.) 



(N) 



160 



IX.— HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATING CLASS. 



William Argyle Abbott. 
Warner Mitchell Allen. 
Harry Elmer Andrews. 
Yennie Shepard Bartlett. 
George Whitney Bartlett. 
Harry Ernest Blanchard. 
Harriet Lewis Blake. 
Seddie Berry. 
Mabel Josephine Brickett. 
Maud Ashley Briggs. 
Clara Ellen Brown. 
Minnie Maud Brown. 
George Byron Carr. 
Arthur Henry Caswell. 
Mary Frances Chandler. 
N'athaniel Ward Colby. 
]S[ora Sallie Dearborn. 
Arthur Boynton Dickey. 
Jennie Gertrude Dixon. 
Edith Smith Dole. 
Helen Parker Drake. 
Minnie Florence Eastman. 



Maude Gertrude Fifield. 
Susie Oilman Fogg. 
Hattie Belle Folsom. 
Annie Belle Goodwin. 
Etta Bell Goodwin. 
Lillian Josephine Gray. 
Margaret P. Harrington. 
Mary Augusta Hawley. 
Ethel Gertrude Lamprey. 
Maude Amelia Leighton. 
Julian Samuel Lord. 
Oilman McAllister. 
John Bernard McGuiness. 
Alice Alberta Mears; 
Emma Abbie Putney. 
Harry Messer Quimby. 
Ernest Augustus Royal. 
Sarah Gertrude Sawyer. 
William Henry Saxton. 
Imogene Inona Stearns. 
Carrie Melvin Story. 
Mary Emma Streeter. 



Bertha Alice Young. 
X. — OROAmZATION, 1889. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

DAYID B. YARNEY, Mayor, ex-officio, Chairman. 
CHARLES A. CARPENTER, 

President of the Common Council, ex-oficio. 
Ward 1. — Charles H. Manning. 
John L. Sanborn. 



(O) 



161 

Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean. 

William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3.— Kathan P. Hunt. 

James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Frederick C. Crosby. 

Stephen W. Clarke. 
• Ward 5.— John F. Cahill. 

James P. Slattery. 
Ward 6. — John C. Balch. 

Frank T. E. Richardson. 
Ward 7. — Edward B. Woodbury. 

Marshall P. Hall. 
Ward 8. — Luther C. Baldwin. 

William K. Robbins. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAK 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

Wn^LIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

GEORGE M. L. LANE. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. S. W. Clarke, Car- 
penter, Dodge, Slattery. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Woodbury, Hall, Robbins. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, 
Balch, Sanborn. 



162 

Text-Books, Ajyparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, Richardson. 

Music. — Messrs. Richardson, W. C. Clarke, Crosby. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Manning, Carpenter, Balch. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, S. W. 
Clarke. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, Hall, Hunt, 
S. W. Clarke. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. S. W. Clarke, Woodbury, 
Richardson. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. — Messrs. Hall, Man- 
ning, Sanborn. 

Frankliyi Street. — Messrs. Woodbury, Dodge, Sanborn. 

Training School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
Dodge. 

Beech Street. — Messrs. Sanborn, Cahill, Crosby. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs, Baldwin, S. W. 
Clarke, Balch. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Robbins, 
Slattery, Baldwin 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Robbins, Slattery. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Balch, Hall, Woodbury. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Crosby, Balch, 
Cahill. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Cahill, 
Robbins, Slattery. 

(Q) 



163 

Gome's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. Dodge, 
Baldwin, Crosby. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Richardson, Manning, W. C. 
Clarke. 

XL— LIST OF TEACHERS. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. — Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. — George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. — Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

Mary Stanton. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. — Annie 0. Heath. 

Jennie M. Chandler. 

Carrie E. Reid. 

Frst Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — C. Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. — Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 



Principal. — Lizzie P. Gove. 

ima ] 

(R) 



Higher Middle. — Emma L. McLaren. 



164 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. — Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. — iTellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. — Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. — Alice E. Page. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistants. — Annie W. Patten. 

Isabelle P. Daniels. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

First Floor. — Loiver Grades. 

Grammar and Middle. — ITettie F. Ainsworth. 
Higher Middle. — Susie G. Woodman. 
Lower Middle. — Cora B. Gilford. 
Higher Primary. — Georgie A. Wyman. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — J. Walter Stetson. 
Assistants. — Annie A. Webster. 

Mary E. Bunton. 

Bertha L. Dean, 

Fij'st Floor. — Lower Grades, 

Higher Middle. — Nancy S. Bunton. 
Lower Middle. — Kittle J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. — Mary F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 

(S) 



165 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — George Winch. 
Assistants. — Cora M. Dearborn. 

Mary J. Hickey. 

Barbara B. Joy. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Flora M. Senter. 
Mixed Middle. — Ellen E. McKean. 
Lower Middle. — Josephine H. Newton. 
Lower Middle. — l^ettie C. Woodman. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — William F. Gibson. 
Assistant. — Alta C. Willand. 

Frst Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. —Eva F. Tuson. 
Mixed Primary. — Lettie M. Smith. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. — Lizzie A. Burns. 
Mixed Middle. — Lelia A. Brooks. 

Frst Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Primary. — S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. — Edith M. Stebbins. 

(T) 



166 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. — Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Georgianna Dow. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT). 

Second Floor. 
Used for evening schools. 

First Floor. 
•Mixed Primary. — Helen M. Morrill. 

MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER UNION). 

Training School. 

Principal. — Caroline E. "Wing. 

A Lower Middle school, a Higher and two Lower Pri- 
mary schools, embracing lirst four years of school work. 
Principal is assisted by members of Training class. 

WILSON HILL, 

Lower Primary. — Huldah C. Graupner. 
Lower Primary. — Ella Hope. 

BEECH-STREET SCHOOL (cORNER SPRUCE). 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Augusta S. Downs. 

(U) 



167 

SCHOOL-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 

Higher Primary. — Mary "W. Mitchell . 
Lower Primary. — Mary J. Walsh. 

First Floor. 

Lower Primary. — Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. — Mary A. Southard. 

SOUTH-MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Higher Primary. — Delia E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. — Sarah B. Paige. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. — Etta J. Carley, Principal. 

Mary G. Tynan, Primary Department. 
Hallsville. — Olive J. Randall, Principal. . 

Theodora Richardson, Assistant. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

~^o 1, Stark District. — Nellie M. Atwood. 

2, Gofte's Falls. — Georgie A. Nute. 

3, Harvey District. —EUa F. Barker. 

4, Youngsville. — Kate Townsend. 

5, Webster's Mills. — Genevieve B. Knight. 

6, Mosquito Pond — Olive A. Powe. 

SPECIAL TEACHER. 

Music. — J. J. Kimball. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

(Open from October to March, five evenings each week.) 

(V) 



168 

Lowell-street Building. 
Three schools for boys. 

Spring-street Building. 
Three schools for girls. 

Clinton-street Building. 
A school for boys. 

School-street Building. 
A school for girls. 

Goffe's Falls. 
A school for both sexes. 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

(Open from October to March.) 

Spring-street Bidlding. 

Machine- drawing classes meet on Monday and Thursday 

evenings. 

Architectural-drawing classes meet on Tuesday and 
Friday evenings. 

GRADUATES OF TRAINING SCHOOL JAN. 25, 1889, NOT AT 
GIVEN DATE EMPLOYED AS REGULAR TEACHERS. 

Nettie B. Fogg. * Inez M. Warren. * 

Lillian Little. * Abbie R. West.* 

* Certiflcatecl for middle and primary gi-ades. 
(W) 



169 

MEMBERS OF TRAINING SCHOOL, 1889. — ENTERED FEB. 6, 

1888. 

Emma B. Abbott. Maude L. Kent. 

Alverta P. Barrett. Millie S. Morse. 

ENTERED SEPT. 10, 1888. 

Mabel J. Brickett. Emma M. Streeter. 

Annie B. Goodwin. Bertha A. Young. 

ENTERED JAN. 28, 1889. 

Mary E. Moulton. 

OTHERS, NOT HERE EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, WHO HAVE 
CERTIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION. 

Maud Bell, Fanny L. Perry, Fannie E. Smith, Martha 
T. Learnard, Lizzie M. McAffee, Hattie J. Hoyt, Eleanor 
H. Kirk, Evelina Davis, "William S. Harris, Charles W. 
Bickford, Cora F. Sanborn, Hattie ^N". Gage, Grace 
Irwin, and Carrie L. Barker. All certificated for Gram- 
mar and lower grades. 

Fannie L. Sanborn, Helen W. Poor, Belle F. Small, 
Hattie M. Ellis, Hattie E. Merrill, and Alithea M. 
Hutchins. Certificated for Middle and Primary grades. 

JANITORS. 

Webster Street and Blodget Street. 
Michael Finley, Pearl, near Chestnut. 

High School, Ash Street, and Wilson Hill. 
John S. Avery, 404 Merrimack. 

(X) 



170 

Franklin Street and Lincoln Street. 
William Stevens, 418 Central. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. 
William H. Morrill, 45 Pennacook. . 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 
Edward P. Cogswell, 218 Central. 

Piscataquog Schools {Main Street, School Street, and South 
Main Street). 

Albert T. Barr, 73 A, West Manchester. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey, Bakersville. 

Xn. — School Year, 1889. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens December 31, 
1888, closes March 22, 1889. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 15, closes 
June 28. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 9, closes 
December 13. Vacation of two weeks. 



(Y) 



REPORT 



CITY SOLICITOR 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : 

The City Solicitor would respectfully submit the fol- 
lowing report : 

There are now pending against the city, upon the law 
docket of the Supreme Court for Hillsborough county, 
the following cases : 

Frank S. Bodwell vs. Manchester. 

This case has already been heard by E. S. Cutter, 
referee, in a two days' trial. This is a claim for addi- 
tional compensation for stonework upon the police 
station in 1884. The report of the referee has not yet 
been made. Something was due the plaintiff. The 
question tried was, " How much ? " 

Nancy O, Savory vs. Manchester. 

A suit for $2,500, for damages alleged to have been 
occasioned by the icy condition of Middle street, January 
27, 1886. 

Arthur L. Clark vs. Manchester. 

This is a suit for $7,000, for injuries received by falling 
into a bulkhead on Elm street, in front of the Music 
Hall building, December 2, 1887, the iron grating having 
been left off the opening. The plaintiff has since died, 
as it is claimed, of his injuries, and his administrator. 



174 

comes in to prosecute the case. The city will look to 
the owners of the block, or to the parties who removed 
the grating and caused the defect, in case a verdict is had 
against the city. Proper notices have been made to all 
parties in any way connected with the cause of the 
defect. 

Henry Lang vs. Manchester. 

A claim of one thousand dollars for an injury to the 
plaintiff's wrist, received by falling, on account of the 
alleged icy condition of Pearl street, February 1, 1888. 
In this case notice has been served upon the owners of 
the buildings whose projecting eaves caused any defect 
there may have been, to appear and defend the suit. 

Elizabeth W". Miller vs. Manchester. 

The plaintiff sues to recover the amount paid to enter 
a sewer in Bakersville, from which her pipe was after- 
wards disconnected. 

John G. KeTlsea vs. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for a sprained ankle received in 
1887, alleged to have been caused by a hole in the side- 
walk on Massabesic street. 

Clara Moore vs Manchester. 

In this case the plaintiff seeks to recover $7,000, for 
injuries alleged to have been caused by falling upon the 
ice upon Orange street, December 20, 1886. 

Mary Kildea vs. Manchester. 

This is a suit for $3,000, for injuries alleged to have 
been caused by falling upon the temporary sidewalk 
around the lot on which the Manchester House formerly 
sat, while that building was being moved, on June 19, 



175 

1888. The proper parties have been summoned to 
appear and defend the case. 

Emeline C. Call vs. Manchester. 

This plaintiff asks for |3,000, for injuries claimed to 
have been caused by a fall, owing to an alleged defect in 
Lowell street, July 18, 1888. 

In Merrimack count}^ there is one suit : 

Sarah B. Bean vs. Manchester. 

A suit to recover $7,000, for injuries received by plain- 
tiff by being thrown from her carriage, December 1, 
1886, alleged to have been caused by a hole in the Young 
road in Hallsville. 

There are also upon, the sessions docket of Hillsbor- 
ough county two petitions : One of Luther W. Hall, for 
additional land damages caused by laying out East 
Spruce street a number of years ago; the other of the 
P. C. Cheney Company and others, for a new highway 
in West Manchester. 

Upon the equity docket is the petition of Fred P. 
Danforth, filed September 3, 1886, for damages alleged 
to have been caused his land by repairing Lake avenue. 

In the United States Circuit Court for this district the 
case of Manchester vs. the Western Union Telegraph 
Company, to recover the amount of the verdict against 
the city in the case of Mary Sykes vs. Manchester, is still 
pending. 

During the past year the. following cases have been 
disposed of: 

Jessie Quigley vs. Manchester was tried by a jury at 
the March term, and a verdict for the plaintiff of $1,075 
and costs was found, and has been paid. 

Elvira H. Jillson vs. Manchester, and James ITeal vs. 



176 

Manchester, were both disposed of without trial, the city 
paying a part of the amount agreed upon, and the own- 
ers of the buildings in front of which each plaintiff fell, 
paying a part, and the sidewalk was thoroughly repaired, 
and similar accidents in the future prevented. 

The petitions of Gust Foster and others, for an exten- 
sion of Cypress street, and of Samuel Amsden and others, 
for an extension of Manchester street, were tried before 
the county commissioners. In the first, the petition was 
denied ; in the second, the street was extended, as asked 
for, from Belmont to Milton street. 

In the case of State vs. Manchester, an indictment was 
found against the city for not building Webster street as 
laid out. This case was disposed of by the building of 
the street during the summer. 

In the "Knibbs valve" suit against the city in the 
United States Circuit Court, which case, in common 
with that of all the other cities of ISTew Hampshire, was 
managed entirely by Hon. W. L. Foster of Concord, 
final judgment was rendered in favor of the city. 

In addition to these court cases, the solicitor would 
state that he has devoted his time, as requested, to the 
various details of the office. He has attended every 
meeting of the Committee on Claims, has investigated 
such accidents as have been brought to' his notice, has 
attended the sessions of the police court whenever re- 
quested to do so by the marshal, and has given advice to 
various city ofiicials whenever called upon by them. He 
has found his relations with all the members of the city 
government to be of the most pleasant character, and 
would lender his thanks to your honorable body for all 
your courtesy and kindness. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

Citij Solicitor. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



R E P O RiT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 

of Manchester: 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the 
Overseers of the Poor herewith present their annual 
report for the year 1888. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the City 
Farm during the year has been twenty, at a cost of one 
dollar and forty cents per week for each pauper. 
• The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance off the farm during the year has been 
one hundred and twenty, consisting of three hundred and 
sixty persons, all of whom have a settlement in this city ; 
five of this number died during the year. 

The whole number of persons supported at the State 
Industrial School during the year has been six, at a cost 
of one dollar and fifty cents per week for each person. 
The whole number of persons supported at the County 
Farm during the year has been five, consisting of one 
woman, insane; two men, insane; and two small children, 
at a cost of two dollars per week for each* adult, and one 
dollar per week for each child, for board, clothing, and 
care for each person. 



180 



The overseers have given and allowed eight hundred 
and eighty orders for support of paupers off the farm 
during the year, consisting chiefly of groceries, fuel, med- 
icine, and emergencies. 

The amount allowed to the several wards is as follows : 



Ward 1 








$101 17 


Ward 2 








348 97 


Ward 3 








983 51 


Ward 4 








763 11 


Ward 5 








1,886 33 


Ward 6 








438 75 


Ward 7 








169 00 


Ward 8 








300 44 



$4,991 28 



BILLS ALLOWED FOR EMERGENCY CASES. 

IndustrialSchool, board of inmates $2,447 14 

County of Hillsborough, support 

of John J. Murray . . . 104 00 

County of Hillsborough, support of 
Asenath H. White ... 104 00 

County of Hillsborough, support of 
Patrick Keefe .... 70 00 

County of Hillsborough, support of 

Sheehan and Emerson, two babes 62 00 

Mrs. E. B. Fellows, support of Wil- 
lis Gray, a child ... 67 00 

Women's Aid Hospital, support of 

Henry Fisher .... 77 50 

Josie Haff", support of insane hus- 
band 95 17 

A. E.Morse, burial of Celia Jackson 10 00 



181 

Town of Candia, support of Mrs. 

George H. Johnson ... $34 76 
Town of Enfield, support of George 

W. Berry 18 40 

Lewis K. Mead, medicine delivered 

to police station ... 8 80 

Mary Wilson, conveyance by rail 

of Robert C. Dow to Vermont . 5 00 

E. T. James, conveyance of Joseph 
Foss to city farm ... 1 50 

City of Portsmouth, support of 
William Cooms . . . 11 25 

F. L. Wallace & Co., burial of John 
H. Day 25 50 

Town of New Boston, support of 

Joseph Foss 
Temple & Farrington, stationery 
O. D. Kimball, printing 

Total amount allowed . . . $8,198 00 

Cash received from county of Hills- 
borough for boarding inmates of 
Industrial School . . . $2,065 07 

Cash received from city of Concord 

for support of Willie Gray . 56 00 

Cash received from county of Hills- 
borough for burial of Celia Jack- 
son 10 00 



35 


05 




14 


40 




15 


25 


$3,206 72 







Total cash received .... $2,131 07 



Total cost for the year . . . $6,066 93 



182 

All of whicli is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward 1, Clerk, 
THOMAS L. QIJIMBY, Ward 2, 
JAMES SUTCLIFFE, Ward 3, 
HORACE GORDON, Ward 4, 
FRA:NK J. MORRISON, Ward 5, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, Ward 6, 
WILLIAM MARSHALL, Ward 7, 
HORATIO FRADD, Ward 8, 
Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



R E P O RT 

or THE 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To His Honor the Jlayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : 

In presenting our report for the year ending December 
31, 1888, your committee feel gratified that they close 
their official duties with so good a showing. 

There have been no expensive improvements made 
during the past year, although a great deal has been done 
for the general good of the buildings, farm, and tools. 
During the winter months, one hundred and seventy- 
six cords of hard wood were cut and drawn to the sheds, 
where it was prepared for the stove and piled under cover. 
The wagons, sleds, and tools were all carefully exam- 
ined, repaired, and painted at the farm, readj- for use, 
two new hay-racks were made, and considerable work 
done in breaking roads. 

Under the management of the sujDerintendent, the old 
wall from the road to the drain, by the vegetable garden, 
has been removed, making available a strip of land about 
twenty feet wide and the length of the vegetable garden ; 
this, with the field beyond, has been plowed, and with 
the garden sowed to vegetables. The wall in the lane at 
the back of the barn, begun by Superintendent Willey in 
the fall of 1887, has been finished. 



186 

The small number of cattle at the farm does away 
with the necessity of a silo, and the silo has been changed 
into a vegetable cellar. 

The old sink-drain under the house cellar has been 
taken up, and new pipes put in, being a much needed re- 
pair. The boiler chimney has been topped out about four 
feet, thus increasing the draft, so there has been no 
trouble, as heretofore, in running the fire under the boiler. 
The plastering was all taken off the walls of the kitchen, 
and new put on ; the walls were then painted, so they can 
be easily washed. Five rooms in the house were newly 
papered and, with the hall, were painted. 

A dumb-waiter has been put in the passageway between 
the dining-room and kitchen. Steam-pipes have been 
placed in boilers in the wash-room, for the purpose of 
heating the water without building fires purposely, thus 
providing hot water at all times, and saving the expense 
of separate fires. A bath-tub has been put in for the use 
of the superintendent and family. A tapestry carpet was 
purchased for the parlor. 

The premises have been whitewashed several times, 
the barn patched twice, and it needs shingling now. All 
the buildings should be painted at once. 

A valuable horse that was purchased for $250, died 
within three months, from infiammation.of the bowels. 
A new democrat wagon has been bought. Four cows 
have been added to the farm. Two heifers, which were 
appraised $30, have been raised during the year. 

Your committee and the superintendent expressed 
themselves, in their last report, as proposing to make a 
better showing in the vegetable department than had 
previously been done, and we think this has been done. 
As is shown by the sale-book of the superintendent, 
quite a sum has been realized from the sale of vegetables. 



187 



275 bushels 


95 




125 




40 




55 




125 




1,500 





These have been disposed of at the stores, and peddled 
on the streets. 

At the time of our appraisal, December 20, 1888, we 
found the vegetables as follows, being those remaining 
after selling and consuming from harvest to that date : 

Potatoes 

Onions 

Carrots 

Parsnips 

Beets 

Turnips 

Heads of cabbage 

There were also fifty tons of English hay, and sixty- 
seven barrels of apples, besides a good showing of 
meadow hay, corn-fodder, and beans. 

The potato crop was greatly injured by drouth, fol- 
lowed by extreme cold, wet weather. The crop was very 
promising early in the season, well topped out, and 
appeared remarkably fine until spoiled by the exception- 
ally bad weather. Four hundred and fifty Hubbard 
squashes were touched by early frost, and spoiled. There 
were 583 gallons of vinegar, and 7,748 gallons of cider 
in the process of making vinegar, at the farm. 

Following is a recapitulation of our appraisal : 



Live-stock 


. 


. $1,564 50 


W agons, carts, and team 


furnishings 


830 75 


Hay, grain, and produce 


. 


. 2,621 27 


Farm implements, etc. . 


. 


. 1,235 58 


Household furniture, etc. 


. . • 


. 1,735 25 


Provisions and fuel 


• 


894 84 


Total . 


. $8,882 19 



188 

Statement of accounts for year ending December 31, 
1888: 

Total cash paid out $5,859 97 

Interest 1,000 00 



$6,859 97 
Total receipts of farm 2,334 51 



$4,525 46 
Bills receivable 34 00 



$4,491 46 
Permanent improvements .... 305 33 



$4,186 13 
Difference in stock (more) .... 1,815 90 

$2,370 23 

Total cash paid city treasurer, $1,817.97. 

Total number of weeks' board of prisoners and paupers, 
l,688f 

Average cost of board of each individual, per week, 
$1.40|. 

Your committee have visited the farm frequently dur- 
ing the year, and have watched with a great deal of satis- 
faction the management of Superintendent John H. 
Willey, and we willingly testify to his ability for the 
position he has held, and we believe the affairs of the 
farm have been conducted honestly, economically and 
successfully. 

The position of matron is one requiring especial quali- 
fications, and is fully equal in responsibility to that of the 
superintendent, and we have found Mrs. Willey equal in 



189 

every particular to the requirments of the office, and we 
regret that Mr. and Mrs. Willey are not candidates for 
re-election. 

Respectfully submitted. 

L. P. REYNOLDS, 
GEO. S. CLOUGH, 
THOS. P. RILEY, 
GUY F. WHITTEN, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



REPORTS 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



R E P O RT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of the Valley Cemetery respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1888 : 

The City Councils having, for several years past, their 
attention called to the absolute necessity of a more com- 
modious receiving-tomb, made an appropriation for that 
purpose, and ordered its location in the Valley Cemetery, 
and your committee have built as follows : la side hill, north 
of the brook, between Chestnut and Pine streets ; inside di- 
mensions, 16 by 75 feet, and 10 feet in height ; rear and 
end walls, 24 inches, stone, laid in best Portland cement; 
front wall cut stone, laid in courses of 15 and 16 inches in 
depth, backed with a 12-inch brick wall ; roof, 24 wrought 
iron beams, 8 inches in depth, 17 feet 4 inches in length, 
weighing 22 pounds to the foot, and laid 32 inches apart, 
with brick arches covered with asphalt, tar, and concrete, 
with 8 inches of soil on top ; doors of half-inch steel ; 
bottom concreted, with a three-inch drainage-pipe from in- 
side to the brook, and have raised the roadway nearly four 
feet. Owing to the lateness in the year when the work 
was commenced — August 6 — and the rainy weather 

13 



194 

(which we consider worthy of record, as in the one hun- 
dred and ten days to November 23, thirty-five days were 
rainy, and twenty-two and nine tenths inches of rain fell, 
according to Mr. Lord's account), we were unable to com- 
plete the outside drainage and grading, but it will be done 
early in the spring. There are on hand and paid for 
seventy loads of loam and two thousand brick. 

Your committee are under great obligations to City 
Engineer Bennett, who made all the plans and specifica- 
tions, and all the work subject to his approval, and also 
to Mr. Sullivan, of Concord, Hon. Alpheus Gay, and Hon. 
Frank Dowst, of this city, for suggestions and advice. 



Appropriation .... 


$4,000 


00 


Transfer 


240 


80 
«4 240 80 






^^j^irtv Ov 


EXPENDITURES. 






Paid J. W. Kimball, excavating . 


$160 50 


J. W. Kimball, teaming and 






loam 


. 70 


85 


Frank S. Bodwell, stone and 






labor .... 


1,338 


24 


Martin Fitzgerald, stone and 






labor .... 


1,080 


00 


B. W. Eobinson, brickwork 


150 


44 


Pettee & Adams, cement and 






lime ..... 


197 


80 


Head & Dowst, 28,000 brick 


210 


40 


A. H. Lowell, iron and labor 


409 


41 


C. H. Robie, concreting 


150 


82 


E. J. Williams, tarring roof . 


51 


10 


George C. Gil more, labor 


120 


50 



195 



Paid Michael Kane, labor 


$84 75 


Daniel Sullivan, labor . 


84 00 


L. M. Aldrich, material and 




labor 


30 86 


Pike & Heald, material and 




labor .... 


26 90 


Samuel Cooper, drawings 


22 50 


Union Publishing Co. . 


6 25 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


12 27 


"Warren Harvey, lumber 


6 00 


D. 0. Furnald, expense 


5 12 


Charles W. Quimby, expense 


1 00 


J. B. Varick Co. . 


7 15 


Killey & Wadleigh 


1 86 


White M. F. Co. . 


3 46 


Patrick Long, labor 


3 00 


Aleck Shine, labor 


3 75 


John Corey, labor 


1 87 



t,240-80 

Respectfully submitted. 

George C. Gilmore, 
Charles W. Quimby, 
Building Committee of Sub- Trustees. 

During the year, Mr. C. H. G. Foss,the superintendent, 
has continued the improvement of the valley by grading 
the banks of the brook and walling it with stone, and it 
is now finished nearly or quite one half its length in the 
grounds. A new bridge for carriage travel has been built, 
and the old foot-bridge moved higher up the stream, and 
the lot-owners generally are showing commendable inter- 
est by having more taken care of, watered, and trimmed 
up. The water service has been extended to many private 
lots, and the graveling of the paths and roads continued. 



196 



Shrubs, flowers, and trees have been set out, andfseveral 
ladies have asked to have distinct plots assigned them to 
ornament and care for at their pleasure, which has-been 
cheerfully granted. 



RECEIPTS. 








Appropriation for 1888 


, 


. 


$1,500 00 


Earnings, care of lots . 


. $370 00 




materials and labor 


273 


05 




for water 


190 


00 




for opening graves 


162 


00 




for tomb fees 


184 


25 




for material sold . 


125 


00 




for extending water 


81 


70 




for grass sold 


14 


00 


$1,400 00 




, , 


, 


Total .... 


$2,900 00 


EXPENDITURE 


s. 






Paid C. H. G. Foss, superintendeni 


t 1705 25 




C. W. ISToyes, labor 


314 


12 




Luther Leavitt, labor . 


111 


62 




James Barrett, labor 


293 


01 




Jaques Bilodeau, labor . 


117 


99 




Seventeen Associates, grave" 


130 


91 




George Whitford, teaming 


39 


20 




District No. 2 


32 


75 




J. W. Kimball, loam anc 


[ 






teaming 


158 


36 




L. M. Aldrich, new bridge . 


70 


04 




A. C. Wallace, new bridge . 


39 


50 




F. S. Bodwell, new bridge . 


42 


00 




J. J. Abbott, new bridge 


10 


35 




N. E. Fullerton . 


26 


50 





197 



Paid Marshall & Underbill . 
Hiram H. Gurney 
"W. B. Abbott, painting 
John Gannon, Jr., painting 
"Water Commissioners . 
Thomas A. Lane, pipe and 

labor 
0. D. Carpenter, labor 
Manchester Hardware Co 
J. B. Yarick Co. . 
W. H. Yickery . 
Palmer & Garmon 
D. 0. Furnald 
Temple & Farrington 
J. Hodge 
Pike & Heald 
Higgins Brothers . 
Campbell & Williams 
Heath & Stevens . 
F. S. Worthen & Son 
H. H. Huntress 
J. Francis 
Peter 0. Woodman 
Taylor & Flanders 
C. C. Webster 

F. X. Chenette 
Clark Brothers 

George W. Rodgers 
Thomas Barrett 

G. L. Moore . 
B. W. Robinson 

J. Doherty . 
J. Mali on ey . 
J. McLaughlin 



$20 88 
24 75 
64 35 
99 55 

133 80 

89 75 
8 20 

14 30 
32 27 

2 95 

7 00 

15 00 

12 44 

8 70 
29 87 
10 00 

4 25 
7 80 

17 85 

7 00 
28 62 

3 60 
3 75 

8 25 
10 25 

13 50 
6 16 

34 78 
1 00 

5 00 
1 50 

15 75 
5 00 



198 



Paid P. A. Meade 


$5 00 




George W. Dodge 


3 


00 




William Weil 


10 


62 




M. Harrington 


6 


00 




John Abraham 


9 


37 




James Clifford 


8 


75 




Pettee & Adams . 


3 


10 




J. F. Woodbury & Co. . 




75 




C. H. Hutchinson 


1 


11 




J. A. Coverly 


3 


00 




C. Manseau . 


1 


50 




Total .... 


^ 


, 


$2,881 17 


Balance on hand December 31, 1888 . 




18 83 



$2,900 00 

Submitted to full board, February 5, and approved. 

CHARLES QUIMBY, 
JOSEPH QUIRIN, 
GEORGE C. GH^MORE, 
BUSHROD W. HILL, 
DAVID 0. FURi^ALD, 

Sub-Trustees Valley Cemetery. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



The Sub-Trustees record with pleasure the continued 
prosperity of the Pine Grove Cemetery, and an increas- 
ing demand for the superior facilities which the improve- 
ments of recent years have placed within the reach of 
the public. 

Especial efforts have been made during the past year 
to beautify and improve the portions of the cemetery not 



199 

heretofore plotted for burial lots; to lay out thereon new- 
lots, diversified in size and construction so as to answer 
the demands of persons of varying tastes and means; to 
provide new avenues, and to refit the old ones, tor the 
constantly increasing use for which they are required. 

Many permanent improvements heretofore referred to 
in the reports of the sub-trustees are still unaccom- 
plished, and it has been thought best, the past year, to 
attempt nothing beyond a judicious expenditure of what 
was necessary to perform satisfactorily the work referred 
to, and to provide for the desires of the rapidly increas- 
ing list of lot-owners all that is required or possible to 
beautify and adorn this sacred place, and stimulate them 
to assist in the desirable work by their personal care of 
what is their immediate charge. 

A statement, somewhat in detail, of what has been 
accomplished may not be uninteresting, or devoid of 
benefit to the future interests of the cemetery. 

AVENUES. 

In the report of last year, attention was called to new 
avenues in the southern portion of the old grounds, mak- 
ing available an attractive crown of land in the south- 
w^est corner, which, during the past year, has been 
reclaimed and graded; the low places having been raised 
by the placing of nearly four hundred loads of earth from 
the highest point, and from other places in that vicinity 
where perfection of grade w^as required. This tract is 
ready to be laid into lots in the early spring, and will 
prove one of the most beautiful and attractive locations, 
for lawn or ordinary lots, in the entire grounds. Adja- 
cent to it, new avenues have been built and old ones 
extended, so as to utilize and make available the sites for 
most desirable lots, which will speedily* be finished upon 
them. 



200 

"Woodside avenue has been extended nearly a thou- 
sand feet, to Acacia, and thoroughly graded the entire 
length. Riverside avenue has been extended nearly five 
hundred, and South avenue four hundred feet. Poplar 
avenue has been laid and graded from Linnet to Wood- 
side avenue, and all the others have received more than 
ordinary care. 

The necessary work upon the avenues and paths can 
hardly be appreciated, and the increasing distances of 
both, with the new tracts of land constantly being put 
upon the market, occasion an item of expenditure among 
the largest in the list. 

NEW LOTS. 

Early in the spring the demand for lots was unusually 
large, and that adequate provision might be made to sat- 
isfy the wants of the public in this regard, seventy-two 
lawn lots were laid out south of the same grade of lots 
on the east side of the cemetery. For the accomplish- 
ment of this indispensable service, about two hundred 
loads of filling were required, and much labor to bring 
the plot to the desirable grade. The addition has lots of 
pronounced popularity, and they were disposed of nearly 
as fast as completed. Another plot has been laid out 
immediately south of this, of the same general character, 
and will be put into lawn lots upon the opening of the 
spring. 

GENERAL IMPROVEMENTS. 

During the year a large amount of clearing, in places 
where objectionable pines prevented the use of the land 
for burial and the erection of valuable granite or marble 
monuments, has been accomplished, and nearly two hun- 
dred dollars have been received from the sale of the 



201 

lumber taken therefrom. Stumps in large numbers have 
been taken out, principally from the west side, and gen- 
erally throughout the yard. 

WATER-WOKKS. 

Poplar avenue, as extended the past year, has been 
supplied with water-pipe for a distance of nearly two 
hundred feet, for the accommodation of lot owners in 
that vicinity, and six hydrants have been placed in posi- 
tion for the same purpose. Other extensions will be re- 
quired with the opening spring, requiring a larger outlay 
than for many years. Less fault was found with the lack 
of sufficient water facilities for new lots, on account of 
the lesser need of water than usual, by reason of frequent 
rains, which made the use of city water less necessary, 
and this fact also accounts for the apparent falling off in 
water-rates. 

SEWAGE. 

Time has demonstrated the absolute success of the 
system of sewerage introduced in 1886, and the sub- 
trustees recommend that the necessary expenditures for 
continuing this beneficial work may be provided for in 
the appropriations soon to be made. 

HILLSIDE LAWN. 

The eminent success of the attempt to make of this 
symmetrical elevation and graceful slope of land a spe- 
cial feature in the general attractiveness of this beau- 
tiful cemetery, has been fully demonstrated. Magnifi- 
cent monuments of unexcelled workmanship and artistic 
beauty are rapidly and significantly testifying to the 
wisdom of this assignment. During the past year seven- 
teen of these lots have been sold. The cemetery fund, 



202 

set apart for the future care and preservation of these 
lots, now amounts to over seven thousand dollars, two 
thousand of which has been received during the past 
year. The income of this fund has been expended by 
the superintendent for the purposes for which its expen- 
diture is required to be made, under the direction of 
the sub-trustees. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Permanent improvements must be provided for by the 
city government, in its wise apportionment of the public 
funds. The sub-trustees are very gratetul for judicious 
investments in this city of our dead since its foundation. 
We have no doubt that the necessities of the present and 
immediate future will receive equally commendable con- 
sideration and liberality. We suggest, therefore, much- 
needed permanent improvements, as follows : 

IRON FENCE. 

At least one half of the old lot, and the entire new 
territory designated as the " Straw lot," are either entirely 
uninclosed or insulting the public with decay and ruin, 
never more than a poor apology for an ordinary fence. 
In 1886 the last new fence was placed on the grounds^ 
for which one thousand three hundred dollars was paid. 

LOAM AND MUCK. 

The cemetery requires a much larger expenditure for 
these indispensable articles to facilitate the growth of 
sward, flowers, and shrubs, and keep public parks and 
private lots in attractive condition, than has heretofore 
been made. 

Another unfavorable season prevented the digging of 
muck from the new lot, but the old supply is not ex- 



203 

liausted. It is hoped that work may be continued the 
coming season in excavating for the artificial pond, which 
is ultimately to be one of the attractions of the " Straw 
lot," and a twofold result be thus accomplished. 

PXANS AND RECORDS. 

The suggestions of last year's report are herein re- 
newed, and the necessity of a liberal expenditure for this 
indispensable necessity urged upon the city government. 
Each year sends landmarks and recollections farther into 
oblivion, and soon it will be impossible to resuscitate or 
identify original boundaries of avenues, paths, or lots, if 
not preserved by thorough and well-conceived work. 

NURSERY. 

What remains of the original possessions of this in- 
closure should be taken therefrom and used for beautify- 
ing the grounds, in accordance with the original design, 
and the nursery replenished with a new supply of infant 
stock. Only a small amount of money will be required 
to furnish the germs for a flood of beauty. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

The rapid growth of this cemetery for several years, 
the extended plans for its future development, which 
from time to time have been made, the partial progression 
in various directions, the personal wants of lot-owners, 
and the necessity of a general acquaintance with the 
practical requirements of the cemetery, make the duties 
of the superintendent especially arduous and trying. The 
sub-trustees have endeavored in every possible way to 
protect him from the caprices and whims of persons who 
overrate his authority, and are offended if he refuses to 



204 

grant them all the indulgence they desire, as of neces- 
sity he must. They have also been mindful of the rights 
and privileges of lot owners, undertakers, monument 
manufacturers, and the public generally, and have pro- 
vided, in the by-laws and rules, abundant means to 
reform all abuses, to cause to be performed all services 
which applicants have a right to demand, and to correct 
any violation of duty, misdemeanor, or want of attention 
and courtesy on the part of any officer or employee. The 
superintendent is the servant of the sub-trustees alone, 
not of the public, or any branch of it, and he is com- 
pelled to enforce every rule and regulation laid down for 
his guidance, and to submit, for instruction all requests 
not especially provided for thereby. The public are 
invited to present their complaints to the sub-trustees in 
writing, and we guarantee an investigation and a decision 
according to the best judgment of the board. The board 
can properly take into consideration, in forming their 
estimate of the faithfulness of the superintendent and 
the other employes, the fact that no formal complaint has 
been made, and nothing has been brought to the atten- 
tion of the trustees except idle rumors. The trustees 
commend the superintendent, and his assistants at the 
yard, for their faithful services and courteous deportment, 
so far as they are aware, by their own observation, or 
responsible criticism ; at the same time they announce 
their readiness to pass impartial judgment upon all 
complaints or charges which may properly be made to 
thena. 

The sub-trustees close this report with the expression 
of their assurance that the Pine Grove Cemetery was 
never in a more prosperous condition ; that its prospects 
were never more hopeful, nor its possibilities more propi- 
tious. It is the pride of those whose claims upon it are 



205 



the most sacred, and it should have its share of the official 
patronage and public commendation. 

H. D. GORDON", 
GEO. W. BACOJST, 
HENRY H. HUSE, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
JOSEPH L. STEVENS, 
Sub- Trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 

To their report the sub-trustees append the following 
statistical tables, which they have prepared, with the 
hope that the information may be gratifying to the lot 
owners and the friends of the Pine Grove Cemetery : 



SnPEHINTENDENl-'s ACCOUNT. 



Received for advance payments ou lots sold. 

" " interments 

" " water and care of lots 

" " grading lots 

" " loam sold 

" " extra labor on lots 

" " wood and timber 

" " removal of bodies 



Total receipts 

Deduct minor expenses 

Balance paid city treasurer. 



$626.00 
436.00 
395.93 
422.26 



21.05 

272.53 

91.00 



$2,264.77 
3.70 



$2,261.07 



1887. 



$426.00 

391.00 

211.50 

335.50 

29.00 

5.25 

386.55 

16.15 



$1,800.95 
2.85 



$1,798.10 



MiSCELLANEOnS. 



Number lots regraded 

" monuments erected 

Lots sold on "Hillside Lawn" 

" unsold on " Hillside Lawn " 

" sold with lawn restrictions 

" with lawn restrictions, unsold 

Ordinary lots sold 

" " unsold 

Total number of lots sold 

Number of interments 

" of interments on public grounds 
Whole number buried in public grounds.. 



1888. 



1887. 



25 


20 


20 


25 


17 


10 


53 


73 


54 


27 


50 


73 


13 


15 


17 


20 


84 


52 


232 


■210 


49 


50 


1,015 


1,006 



206 



Receipts. 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1888 

Appropriation for 1888 

Advance payments for lots sold 

Sale of lots by treasurer 

Balance of superintendent's receipts less $3.70 

Totals 

Total receipts from all sources 



1888. 



$2,819.24 

1,000.00 

626.00 

2,040.40 

1,635.15 



$8,120.79 



$8,124.49 



1887. 



$1,762.40 

2,500.00 

426.00 

1,591.80 

1,372.10 



$7,652.30 



$7,655.15 



Current Expenses. 



Salary of superintendent at $2. 

Labor and teaming 

Material and tools 

Printing and stationery 

Flowers and shrubs 

Water-rates 

Telephone 



Totals , 



$4,024.64 



1887. 



$730.00 


$728.00 


1.751.68 


2,251.16 


132.40 


84.74 


20.66 


68.02 


36.40 


84.75 


300.00 


300.00 


53.50 


50.65 



$3,567.32 



Permanent Ihproyeiients. 



1887. 



Water extension 

Storehouse 

Furnishing house 

Loam and turf 

Laying out "Straw lot," and iron fence. 



Totals . 



$122.93 
166.10 
55.43 
^8.48 



$562.94 



$591.30 
76.47 
40.02 
550.15 



$1,257.94 



SUMMARY. 

Balance Jan. 1, 1888, and appro- 
priation 13,819 24 

Receipts from cemetery during the 

year 4,301 55 

Total receipts ..... 

Expenditures for the year 1888 . $4,587 58 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1888 . 3,533 21 



a20 79 



Total 



5,120 79 



TREASURERS REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual 
report of the money received by me during the year 
ending December 31, 1888, on account of cemeteries, 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Number of lots sold and deeds delivered during the 
year 1888, seventy-five. 

Cashfreceived for the same .... |2,666 40 
Cash received from superintendent . . . 1,635 15 



Total ^4,301 55 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Cash received from superintendent . . . $1,400 00 

I have in my possession twenty-seven deeds ready for 
delivery, the most of which will soon be taken. There 
are a few lots, however, which have been bargained for 
and a small deposit made, where the parties appear to 
have left town, and I can get no reply to repeated notices 
which I have sent. I hardly think in these cases the con- 
tract will ever be completed on their part, and the deed 
taken. 



208 

All money received b}^ me has been turned into the city 
treasury, for which I have the proper vouchers from the 
City Clerk. 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLYANUS B. PUTiiTAM, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 



Manchester, January, 1889. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of cemete- 
ries, and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

]^ATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor.. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



Jo the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund 
have the honor to present herewith their ninth annual 
report, embracing the report of their treasurer, which 
shows the financial operations for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1888, and the condition of the fund at the 
present time. 

The lots embraced in the following table have been 
endowed for perpetual care : 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 



When paid. 



1880. July 1. 

1883. Mar. 6. 

1884. May 31. 
June 13. 
Dec. 8. 

1885. June 8. 
Oct. 29. 

1886. Junt21. 
Aug. 27. 
Sept. 18. 
Dec. 31. 

1887. June 11. 

1888. Feb. 25. 
May 19. 



Name of Owner. 



James Hall 

George W. Bailey, estate. . . . 
Thomas C. Shepherd, estate. 
Mrs. Emeline McNab 



No. lot. , Location. 



14 
210 
339 
185 

Harris J. Poor ! 22, 23 

Betsey B. Dame, estate 152 

William B. Webster, estate 

Hannah Kenniston, estate 

Mrs. E. B. Merrill 1 

George F. Spaulding J 

James A. Weston 

L S. and J. P. Craig 

William and Mary Shepherd, estate. 
Ami Wbidden, estate 



305 

88 
597 
341 
256 



East ave 

Birch ave.... 
Cedar walk. . 
Chestnut ave, 
PathB& C. 
Path K 

Pleasant ave. 

Pine ave 

Chestnut ave 
Sylvan path. . 
Cedar path... 
PathO 



Amt. 



$200 
500 
300 
100 
100 
150 
100 
200 

100 

300 
100 
300 
100 

$2,550 



14 



When paid. 



1883. June 23. 

" 23. 

Dec. 13. 

1884. May 21. 
July 1 . 

1885. Jan. 1. 
Aug. G. 
Sept. 15 

" 15. 
Oct. 17. 
Dec. 2. 

'■ 8. 

1886. Jan. 1. 
June 18. 

July 21. 

■" 28. 

Aug. 16. 

Dec. 21. 



" 31. 

1887. April 6. 
" 19. 
" 21. 



June 17. 
July 1.. 

" 1. 

Aug. 1 . 

Nov. 22. 

1888. Jan. 6. 

May 1 . 

" 8. 
July 7. 

" 31. 
Aug. 23. 
Sept. 19. 

" 24. 

Nov. 9. 

" 9. 

Dec. 29. 



210 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



Name of Owner. 



Mrs. H. G. Connor 

Charles Osbrey, estate. 

Phiiiehas Adams 



Thomas S. Foot 

B. F, Martin 

Mrs. C. W. Stanley.. 
Harvey B. Sawyer. . . 

Giltnau Clough 

Lewis A. Clough . . . . 
George F. Lincoln.. 
Daniel F. Straw .. .. 

Alpheus Gay 

Henry C. M-rrill 

Mary Ann Martin . . . 
Fannie M. Chandler. 

C. F. Bonney 

Jeremiah Austin. . . . 

Mrs. A. J. Dow 

Charles H. Robie . . . 



James A. Weston. 



John Hoyt 

Elizabeth S. Crosby. 
M. A. FoDausbee... 



S. R. Tewksbury 

James Kennard, estate. 

George G. Shute 

Richard S. Eastman . . . . 

Caroline P. Brown 

Ann B. Aldrich 

John C. Young 

Rebecca W. Smith 

Joseph C. Fifield 

James A. Fracker 

I. D. Palmer 

Noahs. Clark 

Mrs. Robert Moore 

Henry W. Moore 

Edith Taylor 

Joseph B. Wiggin 

Mabel M. Cheney 

John C. French 



2066 
2101 
( 2001 
{2062 
(2063 
2065 
206i 
2089 
2099 
2068 
2067 
2071 
2072 
2073 
2070 

2060 

2028 

2058 

2057 

2074 

f2076 

J 2075 

1 2049 

i.2048 

2055 

2102 

2056 

(2001 

I 2026 

1513 

2053 

2054 

645 

2052 

2002 

717 

2045 

2051 

2047 

2042 

522 

709 

2043 
2036 
2050 



Location. 



Laurel avenue 

Laurel ave 

Laurel ave 

Laurel ave 

Laurel ave 

Laurel ave 

Lawn ave 

Laurel ave 

Laurel ave 

Magnolia ave 

Magnolia ave 

Magnolia ave 

Magnolia ave 

Woodbine ave 

Woodbine ave 

Woodbine ave 

Woodbine ave 

Magnolia ave 

Magnolia ave l 

Magnolia ave { 

Woodbine ave ( 

Woodbine ave J 

Woodbine ave 

Lawn ave 

Woodbine ave 

Floral ave J 

Woodbine ave | 

Highland ave 

Woodbine ave 

Woodbine ave 

Chessom ave 

Woodbine ave 

Cedar ave 

Chestnut ave 

Birch ave 

Woodbine ave 

Birch ave 

Woodbine ave 

Vernal and May paths. 

Chestnut ave 

Walks 

Woodbine ave 

Woodbine ave 



Amt. 



$158 12 
70 11 

343 60 

146 56 
12142 
158 24 
102 22 
158 28 

157 34 

158 20 
158 20 
158 20 
158 20 

13416 

133 80 
140 10 
149 82 
165 88 

617 44 



154 22 

93 20 

162 50 

275 57 

600 00 

149 00 

150 06 
100 00 
149 00 
160 00 
100 00 

151 63 
149 00 
148 90 
153 90 
140 00 

160 00 

145 44 
126 70 
164 12 

$6,723 13 



PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 
March 27, 1884. Gilman Riddle 



$200 00 



The trustees desire to call attention to the measrer sum 
that most of the proprietors of lots have provided for the 
perpetual care and maintenance of their lots, and more 



211 

especially in cases where the grounds are fitted with 
granite curbing, and have upon them marble head-stones 
and monuments that in time will need repairing or re- 
placing. The perishable nature of many kinds of marble 
in general use has come to be well understood ; there- 
fore, a proper sum should always be on hand to replace 
any structure that may be destroyed from natural decay 
or from accidental causes. To meet these contingencies, 
and pa}" the ordinary annual expenses, the trustees ven- 
ture to remark that, for a lot of average size, and fitted 
up in the ordinary manner, the interest of at least three 
hundred dollars will be required to cover the cost of 
proper care and maintenance during a series of years; 
for larger lots, having expensive monuments or costly 
works of art upon them, a larger sum would be necessary. 
It is a pleasure to state that a marked improvement in 
the condition of the lots during the past year has been 
very apparent, and it is confidently believed that still 
greater progress in this direction will be made in the 
future. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOJIN HOSLEY, Mai/or, 
P. C. CHEKEY, 
JAMES A. WESTOl:^, 

TVusiees of Cemetery Fund. 
January 1, 1889. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund: 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to 3-ou the sixth 
annual report of the funds received and the expenses 
paid to December 31, 1888. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand as per last report . . $2,150 00 

Received during the year from: 

Estate of William and Mary 

Shepherd .... 

A. G. Fairbanks, administrator 



Income on hand as per last report 
Received since last report 



300 
100 


00 

00 


$105. 
116 


,95 
25 


$50 75 
171 45 



J,550 00 



Total income $222 20 

Expenses paid as follows : 
Galley cemetery, care of lots 
Cash on hand 

Total $222 20 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand as per last report . . $5,123 44 

Received during the year from : 

John C. Young heirs . . 160 00 

Rebecca W. Smith ... 100 00 



213 



Joseph C. Fifield 

James A. Fracker 

I. D. Palmer 

I^oali S. Clark . 

Mrs. Robert Moore . 

Henry W. Moore and Edith 

Taylor . 
Joseph B. Wiggin heirs 
Mabel M. Cheney 
John C. French 

Total . 

Income on hand as per last report 
Received since last report 

Total income 
Expenses paid as follows : 
Eben T. James .... 
Sidney A, Blood .... 
Byron A. Stearns 
Pine Grove cemetery, care of lots 
Cash on hand 



Total expenses ..... 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund as per 
last report ...... 

Cash on hand as per last report . |10 00 
Interest received since last report . 10 00 



$151 


63 


149 


00 


148 


90 


153 


90 


140 


00 


160 


00 


145 


44 


126 


70 


164 


12 


$164 23 


255 


62 


$29 51 


11 


06 


3 


55 


87 


00 


288 


73 



),723 13 



$419 85 



$419 85 



$200 00 



$20 00 



Total cash on hand .... 
Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLYANUS B. PUTNAM, 
Treasurer of Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 



214 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of 
accounts of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trus- 
tees of the cemetery fund, embracing the receipts and 
expenditures for the year ending December 31, 1888 and 
that I find the same correct and properly vouched. 

I have also examined the securities in which said fund 
is invested, and find as follows : 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

K H., 5 per cent . . . $2,650 00 

Amount of permanent fund . . |2,550 00 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

K H., 5 per cent . . . $6,700 00 
Cash 23 13 



Amount of permanent fund . . $6,723 13 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

K Ii.,5per cent . . . $200 00 

Amount of permanent fund . . . $200 00 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



p 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineer's Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, JST. H., December 31, 1888. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : 

In compliance with the laws and ordinances of the city 
I herewith submit the annual report of the Manchester 
Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 1888. 

The report will be found to contain detailed statements 
of the fires and alarms the department has responded to 
during the year, with causes thereof, and losses and in- 
surance paid, as nearly as could be ascertained ; a register 
of the officers and men, with rank, occupation, residence, 
and number of badge; list of fire-alarm stations and 
keys, location of hydrants, etc. 

The department, as a whole or in part, have responded 
to twenty-two bell and twenty -five " still " alarms. 
Many of the " stills " have amounted to nothing but 
burning chimneys, with no damage, and were needless; 
yet they prevented the calling out of the department by a 
bell alarm, which excited individuals are prone to do. 

The aggregate losses, within the city limits, to which 
any portion of the department has responded, amount to 
$33,902.04, on which there has been paid $19,182.33 in- 



218 

surance, leaving a net loss, over and above insurance, of 
$14,719.71, the heaviest loss being that of the Print 
"Works laboratory, on which there was no insurance. 

THE FORCE 

has been subject to quite a number of changes 
during the year. On February 8, Merrimack Hose 
Company ISTo. 4 was changed to Merrimack Steam Fire- 
Engine Company ISlo. 3, and two men were added by 
transfer ; one from Steamer Company 'No. 1, and one 
from Hose Company No. 1. On April 16, Gen. Stark 
Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 5 was organized to 
man the new third-class steamer built by the Manchester 
Locomotive Works, and assigned to the new engine- 
house at the Korth End, corner of Webster and Chest- 
nut streets. Most of these men were transferred from 
companies at the central station. A combination car- 
riage, carrying a hose-reel, light ladders and two hand 
chemical extinguishers to run in connection with this 
steamer, was built to order by Galen Bowditch, Charles- 
town, Mass., and will prove a very serviceable piece of 
apparatus for this section of the city. In accordance with 
a change in the city ordinances, on the third of July 
Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 was reduced from 
twenty to twelve men, and Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder 
Company l!^o. 1, from twenty-five to twenty men. 

The present organization of the department includes 
one hundred and twenty-three members, as follows : 

1 Chief Engineer, 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

5 Steam Fire-engine Companies, — 14 men each. 

2 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 
1 Chemical Engine Company, — 4 men. 

1 Hook-and-Ladder Company, — 20 men. 



! 



219 

In addition to the above is a volunteer hand-hose com- 
pany, formerly of twenty men, but at present of only 
sixteen. 

THE BUILDINGS 

occupied by the department, aside from some minor 
repairs needed, are in good condition, those at the 
central station demanding the most attention. The 
plumbing in this building is very defective, and the sewer 
gas and stench that permeate the tenements, either from 
the bad plumbing or lack of suitable sewerage, or both, 
are of a nature that would hardly be allowed to exist 
in any but a public building. The stable connected there- 
with is poorly ventilated, and its roof should be thoroughly 
overhauled and regraveled at an earlv date. 

The new building on Lake avenue, when completed, 
will be a model of convenience, a credit to the city, and 
a structure that the inhabitants of ward six may well feel 
proud of; and yet I feel the time will come when its 
voters will see that they would be better accommodated 
by having a ward-room and an engine-house entirely 
separate from one another. The time is coming when 
we shall, in all probability, have a paid department, and 
in constructing new buildings care should be exercised 
for the convenience of such a system. 

THE APPAKATUS 

as at present located, consists of — 

2 Steam Fire-engines, Central Fire Station. 

1 Steam Fire-engine and Horse Hose Carriage at- 
tached, i!^orth Main street, 'Squog. 

1 Steam Fire-engine and Horse Hose Carrriage at- 
tached, at corner of Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 Steam Fire-engine and 1 Horse Hose Carriage and 



220 

Hook-and-Ladder^combination, at corner of Webster and 
Chestnut streets. 

1 Hose Wae^on at Webster-street ensrine-house. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

2 Hook-and-Ladder Trucks, at Central Fire Station. 
1 Double Tank (60 gallons each) Chemical Engine, at 

Central Fire Station. 

1 Supply Wagon, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose Carriage, corner Maple and East High 
streets. 

1 Steam Fire-engine (reserve), at old engine-house on 
Clinton street, 'Squog. 

1 Hand Hose Carriage, at junction of Old Falls road 
and Front street, 'Skeag. 

1 Two-wheeled Hose Carriage, Derry Mills, Goffe's 
Falls, manned by men at the mills. 

Whenever suitable horses are procured for the Cen. 
Stark engine, the one now owned by the city will be 
placed at central fire station and the spare hose wagon 
put into service, to run wdth Steamer 1, thus doing 
away wdth that long endured objectionable "jumper" in 
rear of steamer. When this is accomplished only one 
engine, Steamer 4, will have a "jumper " attached, and 
I hope the incoming City Councils will favorably con- 
sider, and devise some plans whereby the engine-room 
and stable can be arranged so that a horse hose wagon 
may be run in connection with this steamer. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH 

has worked satisfactorily during the year and with its 
usual reliability, no false alarms occurring except in a few 
cases where careless persons have broken the wires by 
falling or trimming trees, where the wires would get 
" swinging grounds," causing irregular blow^s. 



221 

On the 25tli of February a tower striker at the 
Bakersville school was put into circuit, and May 7, Box 
114 was added to the system and located at the corner of 
Pearl and Ash streets. 

We have been unusually fortunate and free from 
damage by lightning ; not a single instance of "burning 
out " on the lines during the year. The main hnes con- 
sist of about twenty-eight miles ot ]^o. 12 (B and S 
gauge) hard drawn copper wire, 1 automatic eight-cir- 
cuit repeater, 47 signal-boxes, 8 tower bell-strikers, 9 
engine-house gongs, 9 automatic indicators, 5 automatic 
gas-lighting instruments, 5 engineers, 9 gongs and tap- 
pers on corporations and in shops, 174 jars of gravity 
battery. The "Individual" or " Tapper" alarm consists 
of about twenty-six miles of the same kind of wire as 
the main lines, and 100 gongs and 215 jars of batter3^ 

THE HORSES. 

In the early part of January, all of the horses used for 
lire purposes were transferred from the street department 
to the fire department, and there are now twenty-one of 
them in this service. One of the pair of blacks attached 
to the General iStark steamer died, and since its death 
that company has had the use of one belonging to Alder- 
man O. E. Kimball. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The ninth annual parade occurred on Tuesday, October 
9, amid quite a smart little snow storm, and while it 
dimmed the polish of the apparatus, it dampened not the 
spirits or courage of the members. It closed with the 
usual collation at City Hall. I trust the next appro- 
priation may be made to cover the expense of this parade. 



222 



THE FIREMEN S RELIEF ASSOCIATION 

lias been generously remember by kind-hearted citizens, 
and has been called upon to pay out but little on account 
of misforture to its members. 

The following is the present condition of its treasury: 

Balance on hand at last annual 

meeting $1,795 60 

Received for membership . . 13 00 
interest on deposits . 84 94 
advertising in " Fire 
Service" . . 196 64 
Donation, Xcw Hampshire Insur- 
ance Co 50 00 

Donation, Temple & Farrington 25 00 

Col. Waterman Smith 20 00 

Col. Bcnj. C. Dean . 15 00 

Rt. Rev. IBishop Bradley 10 00 

Gov. Moody Currier . 10 00 

Mrs. F. C. Dow . . 10 00 

Weston & Hill . . 10 00 

W. W. Hubbard . . 10 00 

A. J. Lane ... 5 00 

John Hayes ... 5 00 

James T. Donahoe . 5 00 



There has been paid from the fund : 
Joseph E. Merrill, secretary 
Postage and printing 
H. C. Morrill, injury at Print- 
Works fire .... 
George Dunnington, injury at 
McQuillan's fire 



$25 00 
2 40 

22 00 



$2,265 18 



7 00 



$56 40 



Balance in treasury 



$2,208 70 



223 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 



I would renew my recommendations of last year, — a 
light one-horse hook-and-ladder truck for the new engine- 
house on Lake avenue, and one for 'Squog, equipped in 
the usual manner, and not to require the heavy one from 
the central station to go to the extreme limits of the city 
on alarms where shorter and lighter ones will answer the 
requirements; while otherwise it would leave the thickly 
part of the city unprotected for ladder service in case of 
another alarm at the same time in the business portion of 
the city. 

I earnestl}^ recommend an increase to the permanent 
force; of an engineer for each of the steamers on this side 
of the river, and an additional permanent man to the 
Hook-and-Ladder Company, and Pennacook Hose Com- 
pany. The additional men of the latter companies could 
materially lessen the expenses now paid for repairs and 
for iiremen on the heating boiler. I feel confident that 
a careful consideration of this matter will convince the 
Councils, that the rapid growth of our city necessitates 
this increase. Keyless fire-alarm boxes are no longer 
an experiment, and I would recommend their substitution 
on boxes in our business center. I would recommend 
that plans be made in the engine-room and stables of 
Steamer 4, for the accommodation of a hose wagon 
and an additional horse, so as to do away with the 
"jumper," as referred to under a previous head. 1 would 
recommend the purchase of three thousand feet of hose the 
coming year, the better to equip the department in case 
of a large conflagration, the occurrence of which our city 
has been remarkably fortunate for quite a number of 
years. I would recommend the construction of bath- 
rooms at the central station and Massabesic Hose Com- 



224 

pany's house that the members at those stations may- 
enjoy the healthful luxury accorded those at the other 
fire stations. 

CONCLUSION. 

In closing I desire to tender the thanks of the entire 
membership to General Charles Williams for his supply 
of coffee refreshments that he provides and desires served 
at all fires. 

My personal acknowledgments are hereby tendered 
to his Honor Major Hosley and the members of the City 
Councils, for the interest manifested in the welfare of the 
departments; to my assistant engineers and the officers 
and members, for the prompt and efficient manner they 
have at all times responded to alarms, and their untiring 
interest in sustaining the reputation and efficiency of the 
department; and to the chief of police and his depart- 
ment for their assistance at fires, as well as escort at our 
annual parade. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOS. W. LAKE, 
Chief Engineer' Fire Department. 



225 



FIRES AND ALARMS DURING 1888, WITH 
LOSSES AND INSURANCE PAID. 

Still. Tuesday, January 3, 10.50 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney on Hanover street, near Union. No damage. 

Box 212. Saturday, January 14, 7.42 p. m. Four-story 
brick building, corner Massabesic and Cypress streets, 
owned by Manchester Shoe-Manufacturing Company, 
and occupied by Kimball Brothers for the manufacture 
of shoes. Fire originated in the boiler-room among some 
leather scraps sent down from the work-room, and com- 
municated to the woodwork and belting about the en- 
gine. Damage, |89. Insurance paid, $89. 

Box 212. Sunday, January 15, 7.12 a. m. Rekindling 
of leather scraps from last night's fire. Extinguished 
with a pail of water before the arrival of the department. 
Needless alarm. No damage. 

Box 7. Tuesday, January 24, 1.23 a. m. Three-story 
wooden block at 1157 Elm street, owned by George W. 
Riddle, and occupied by Pigeon & Maynard as a millinery 
and fancv goods store. The fire is said to have originated 
in a box of rubbish from some unknown cause. Stock 
insured for Sl,500. Damage to stock, $750. Damage to 
building, $194. Insurance paid, 1944. 

Box 4. Wednesday, January 25, 11.07 a. m. Two-and- 
half-story wooden dwelling at No. 131 Cedar street, 
owned by Daniel F. Healy, and occupied by Cornelius 
A. Healy and Patrick Ryan. The fire originated in the 
basement, from plumber's lamp, thawing water pipes, and 
communicated through the house to the roof in the parti- 
tions. Building insured for $1,500. Damage to build- 
ing, $800 ; to contents, $50. Insurance paid, $800. 

Still. Wednesday, January 25, 9.45 a. m. Manches- 

15 



226 

ter House, IN"©. 787 Elm street. Kettle of fat caught fire. 
Chemical respoucled. No damage. 

Box 113. Sunday, January 29, 1. a. m. Two-story 
wooden dwelling, situated at corner of Maple and Myrtle 
streets, owned by the Manchester Print Works, and occu- 
pied by Colonel Benjamin C. Dean as a residence. The 
fire was caused hj a defective chimney, and obtained con- 
siderable headway within the partitions before discovered. 
Building insured for $12,000; contents, for $3,000. Dam- 
age to building, $10,892.33; to contents, $5,000. Insur- 
ance paid, $13,^892.33. 

Still. Wednesday, February 15, 6.30 p. m. Two- 
story wooden tenement on Amherst street, near Vine, 
and at 6.30 p. m., four-story brick block, corner Elm and 
Hanover streets. Burning chimneys in each case. 'No 
damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Thu,rsday, February 16, 9 a. m. Chimney at 
ISTo. 119 Central street. ISTo damage. Chemical responded. 

Box 4. Sunday, February 26, 8.30 a. m. Burning 
chimne}^ in house, rear JSTo. 46 Auburn street, owned by 
Barney Gill, and occupied by Thomas Gorman, j^o 
damage. ISTeedless alarm. 

Box 53. Tuesday, February 28, 2.49 p. m. Cottage 
house at 'No. 124 Milford street, owned by Charles W. 
Quimby. Fire originated from a defective chimney, and 
was confined wholly to the roof Extinguished by Fire 
King Steamer Company before the arrival of apparatus 
from this side of river. Damage, $25. Fully insured. 

Still. Saturday, March 3, 11.45 p. m. Burning 
chimney in Green's block, corner Laurel and Chestnut 
streets. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 313. Sunday, March 11, 1.57 p. m. One-story 
wooden building, corner of Main and McGregor streets, 
owned by F. C. Charland. Shavings on floor caught 



227 

from spark from oven. Damage by smoke, $15. 
Insured. 

Still. Monday, March 26, 10.15 a. m. Three-story 
brick building at ISTo. 787 Elm street, Manchester House, 
owned by Weston, Elliott, et als., and occupied by H. H. 
Duncklee. Fire from an overheated chimney ignited 
casing, causing damage to the amount of $8. Fully 
insured. Extinguished by Chemical Engine Company. 

Still. Thursday, April 5, 3.55 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney in house owned by IST. J. Smith at No. 134 Central 
street. Chemical responded. 'No damage. 

Still. Sunday, April 8, 5.50 a. m. Four-story brick 
building at JSTo. 742 Elm street, owned by Simons, 
Clough, et als., and occupied by M. S. Chamberlin as a 
hotel. Burning chimney ignited woodwork in store 
underneath hotel occupied by Marshall & Knowlton. 
Damage to building, $12. Insurance paid, $12. Extin- 
guished by Chemical Engine Company. 

Still. Tuesday, April 24, 3.50 p. m. Fire in closet 
of Parsons's block on Concord street, in tenement occu- 
pied by Talty. ISTo damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Wednesday, April 25, 10.15 a. m. Burning 
chimney, corner Chestnut and Park streets. ISTo damage. 

Still, Thursday, April 26, 9 a. m. Cottage house, 
No. 20 Dover street, owned by William McElroy, and 
occupied by George Brown. Fire caught from over- 
heated stove and communicated to the woodwork about 
the partition. Insured for $700. Damage, $60. Insur- 
ance paid, $60. Extinguished by Fire King Engine 
Company No. 2. 

Box 56. Sunday, April 29, 2.26 p. M. Burning brush 
near residence of J, P. Brock, Mast street and Bedford 
road, in 'Squog. Fears were entertained that the fire 



228 

would reach houses in that vicinity, but the fire was 
extinguished without damage. 

Still. At 3.55 p. m. Burning brush in Amoskeag 
Company's woods, corner of Union street and Hooksett 
road. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Monday, April 30, 7.15 a. m. Burning chim- 
ney, corner Central and Elm streets. Chemical re- 
sponded. Ko damage. 

Still. Friday, May 4, 9.30 p. m. Sparks from a loco- 
motive set fire to some cotton in a car in Concord Rail- 
road yard. Damage to cotton, $100, insured ; to car, |50, 
no insurance. Extinguished with chemical engine and 
hydrant stream. 

Still. "Wednesday, May 9, 9 a. m. Cottage house 
'No. 169 Laurel street, owned and occupied by Clark M. 
Bailey. Fire caught from defective chimney and com- 
municated to partitions. Insured for $2,700. Damage, 
$30. Insurance paid, $30. Pennacook Hose and chem- 
ical engine responded. 

During the progress of this fire word was telephoned 
from Hotel Windsor for assistance. Investigation 
showed the cause of the fright to be only smoke from an 
open funnel hole in room No. 38. 

Still. Monday, May 14, 8.45 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney in house of William Mahoney on East Spruce street. 
Chemical engine called. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, May 15, 2.40 a. m. Four-story 
brick block, No. 772 Elm street, owned by Green heirs, 
and occupied by C. H. Spollett as a boarding house. 
Overheated range ignited woodwork. Damage, $50. 
Insurance paid, $50. Extinguished by chemical engine. 

Box 51. Thursday, June 7, 7.07 p. m. While testing 
Steamer 2 at hydrant on River street, some " wild " citi- 
zens, seeing the smoke of the steamer, and without 



229 

ascertaining whether it was anything serious or not, 
caused false alarm from box 51. 

Box 42. Tuesday; June 12, 6.35 p. m. Laboratory of 
Manchester Print Works, used for manufactory of chem- 
icals, caught from ignition of gases from a still. Damage 
to building and contents, $12,519.71. No insurance. 

Box 7. Saturday, June 23, 5.50 p. m. Two-story 
wooden building, corner of Washington and Church 
streets, owned by Dennis Lane, and occupied by J. L. 
Barry. Cause, kerosene-can exploded on stove. Dam- 
age, $10. Fully insured. 

Box. 15. Tuesday, July 3, 7.54 p. m. Barn in rear of 
No. 93 Pearl street, owned by Merrill W. Higgins. Dam- 
age, $187. Insurance paid, $187. The flames damaged 
the block of D. K. Mack, adjoining, about $120. Fully 
insured. Cause, fire-crackers. 

Still. Wednesday, July 4, 9.30 a. m. Two-story 
house, No. 397 Pine street. Fire on roof, caused from 
sparks. Chemical responded. Extinguished with pails, 
without damage. 

Box 7. Wednesday, August 1, 9.48 p. m. Burning 
chimney in Kennard's block, corner Elm and Washing- 
ton streets. No damage. 

Box 31. Thursday, August 2, 7.04 p. m. Blacksmith- 
shop of Manchester Locomotive Works. Sparks from 
furnace ignited woodwork about the roof. Damage, $50. 
Fully insured. 

Box 45. Thursday, August 2, 8.32 p. m. Oil-shed 
owned and occupied by A. N. Clapp, adjoining railroad 
yard, containing thirteen barrels of kerosene oil. Dam- 
age, $350. Fully insured. 

Still. Monday, August 27, 5.15 p. m. Two-story 
dwelling. No. 82 Spruce street, owned by Mary Thorn- 



230 

ton, and occupied by John Thornton. Defective chimney 
caused damage to the amount of $20. Fully insured. 

Still. Saturday, September 8, -9,30 a. m. Cottage 
house, No. 240 Manchester street, owned by Charles 
Kebbon, and occupied by himself and David Ladd. 
Burning soot in an old fireplace ignited woodwork. 
Damage, $35. Fully insured. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Engine Company. 

Still. Thursda}', September 13, 4.15 p. m. Bed in 
tenement, corner of Amherst and Pine streets. Extin- 
guished with pails. Damage trifling. 

Box 7. Tuesday, September 18, 10.28 a. m. Burning 
chimney in Dunlap's three-story wooden block, ISTo. 36 
Bridge street. No damage. Needless alarm. 

Still. Wednesday, September 26, 8.20 p. m. Lamp 
explosion in tenement second house east of police station. 
No damage. 

Still. Saturday, September 29, 12.32 p. m. Three- 
story tenement block. No. 186 Auburn street, owned by 
John Conway, and occupied by several families. Cause, 
defective chimney. Damage, $50. Insurance paid, $50. 
Extinguished by Chemical Engine Company. 

Box 21. Monday, October 1, 7.15 p. m. Two-story 
wooden dwelling at No. 181 Merrimack street, owned by 
Mrs. Mary Connor, and occupied by Fred D. Carlton. 
A defective chimney caused a loss of $350. Insurance 
paid, $350. 

Box 24. Thursday, October 11, 12.10 a. m. Cottage 
house and barn at No. 473 Central street, owned by Peter 
McQuillan, and occupied by Gustave Munier. Fire orig- 
inated in barn (which was connected with the house), 
from some unknown cause. Total loss on barn, and par- 
tial on house and contents. McQuillan's damage, $1,150 ; 
Munier's, $450. Insurance paid, $1,500. 



231 

Still. Sunday, November 18, 4 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney in house of Catherine Edwards, No. 350 Chestnut 
street, called out the Chemical Engine Company. Ko 
damage. 

Box 62. Friday, K'ovember 23, 6.08 p. m. Cottage 
house on river road in Bakersville, owned by Mitchell 
heirs, and occupied by Isaiah Emerson. Fire originated 
from a defective chimney, and the distance from the cen- 
tral station being about 1| miles, it obtained consider- 
able headway. It was coniined, however, to the main 
part of the house. Insured for $800. Damage, $275. 
Insurance paid, $275. 

Box 4. Sunday, December 2, 4.24 a. m. Four-story 
wooden tenement block, corner Cedar and Elm streets, 
owned by Blodgett & Young, and occupied by several 
families. Ashes carelessly kept in a wooden box in closet 
caused damage to the extent of $20. Fully insured. 
Extinguished by chemical engine. 

Box 7. Thursday, December 6, 7.42 a. m. Two-story 
wooden dwelling, owned by Whitford & Sherwood, and 
occupied by Frank King and Nazair Reni. Fire origi- 
nated under the floor of the second story, probably from 
matches. House insured for $1,500. Damage to house, 
$250; contents, $100. Insurance paid, $250. 

Still. Monday, December 10, 5.40 p. m. Burning 
chimney in Fremont block, corner Manchester and Union 
streets, called chemical engine. 'No damage. 

Still. Saturday, December 15, 5.50 p. m. Burning 
chimney on Manchester street, near corner of Chestnut, 
called chemical engine. "No fire, no danger, no loss, 
no need of alarm." 



232 



Number of bell alarms . 
ISTumber of still alarms . 

Total 

Aggregate losses for the year 1888 
On which insurance has been paid 



22 
25 

47 

$33,902 04 
19,182 33 



Balance uncovered by insurance . $14,719 71 



233 



TABLE 

SHOWING NUMBER OF ALARMS FROM EACH BOX SINCE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM WAS 
ESTABLISHED, SEPTEMBER 7, 1872. 



H 

o 


1872 


'73 


'74 


'75 


'76 

"7' 
2 
4 
1 
1 


'77 

2 

7 
2 
4 
3 

1 


'78 


'79 


'80 

1 
4 


'81 


'82 


83 

1 

2' 
1 


'84 ^ 



'85 


'86 


'87 


'88 


f 


— 






1 
6 
6 
1 


1 
4 

"i"' 
2 
2 






1 
4 

1 
1 
1 


1 
8 
1 
2 
2 


'"3" 
'"5" 


•-8 


5* 


"5* 




5 

1 

2 

..... 


4 
1 
2 

2 

1 


2 
2 


8 
1 
3 
2 


i 

1 
2 

"2" 
..... 


3 

1 
2 
2 


19 
31 






4 
7 
2 


7{ 


3 

1 
1 




30 
13 


121 
13, 




1 










4 


1 


T 




..... 
















1 
3 
1 


14 
15 
16 

17 


"i 






"i* 

1 

1 

1 

1 
..... 






i 


"i' 




..... 


"2" 




"2" 
"1 


1 

"i" 




2 

1 


1 


12 
3 
4 
3 

31 
7 
8 
4 


1 










18 
21 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
31 
33 


"5 
1 


"'3* 








"2" 

1 


i 

1 

"2" 


"i" 


i 

2 
1 
1 


"i * 

1 


i" 
i* 


"2" 

1 


■"2" 

1 

"1 


"5" 


"i ' 

1 


1 

"i" 


.... 


1 


"2" 


"2" 
3 






"i" 


1 


1 
2 

"i" 




"i" 
1 

1 




1 

2 
1 
1 


"i" 


' i" 

2 


...... 


"i" 


4 
16 
8 
5 
4 


34 
36 
36 




2 


1 








..... 
1 










1 








"i" 




1 
2 
2 


41 

42 

43 

45j 

51 






.:." 


•■••• 





















"i" 






i 
...... 

1 


2 

"2 
15 
23 


•••• 


1 

4 
2 


1 
3 

1 


"i" 

1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


..... 
1 


3 
2 


4 
3 
2 


"2" 
3 


■2" 

1 




b2J 

64J 
56^ 


1 




2 


1 


1 
...... 


17 

"i 

Z 
9 
15 


61i 
62^ 

71 






1 
2 


"i ' 


1 
1 
1 




1 

1 
1 


1 
1 






2 


i 




''''2']'^'.'.'.'.\''.'.'.'.'. 


1 






3 


2 




1 




3 


1 


1 1 
""3 i" 


72j 
81^ 

11^ 
114 
212 
312 
313 
3141 
316 








— i 


4 































1 


1 


i 

'"2" 

1 


3 
"2 


:::: 




25 


26 
Sstill 






21 

1 still 


.... 




11 

1 still 


::::: 











"i" 

1 


1 
1 

1 




13 35 


25 30 


22 ; 23 


29 
1 still 


13 


30 
1 still 


25 


24 


27 


22 


401 




1 










1 still 


12 still 


lestill 23 still 25 still 



234 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SECOND, 
^ND THIRD ALARMS. 





§ 
S3 . 

a » 
|2 


1 

a' . 

a 

0) fa 

c3 a 

01 o 


i 

s 
1 


CO 

a 

a 


10 

6 

1 

CO 


W 


Hose No. 2. 


fa 

-a 

i 

§ 

n 


6 

a 


Boxes. 


fa 


a 

s 
fa 

■IS 

a 




bo 

a 

1 



3 


....1... 





3... 


. ,.1... 


....3... 




3... 


3 


.. 1 


1 


4.... 


....1... 


2... 


....2. . 


1... 


...3... 




2... 


....2 


.. 1.. 


1 


5. ... 


...1... 


....2... 


2... 


... 1. . 


3... 




....2.,. 


....2.. 


1 


.. 1 


6 

7 

8 


. .1... 
....1... 
1... 


....1... 
...1... 
1... 


....3... 
...3... 
....3... 


....2... 
....2. . 
... 2... 


....2... 




....1... 
....1... 
1... 


....2... 

....1... 

1 


...1.. 
...1.. 
. . 1 


...1 
...1 

1 


9 

12 


....2... 

....2... 


....3*.. 
....3... 


....3... 
....3... 


....3... 
....3... 






... 2... 
2... 


....2... 
2 . 


..1.. 
1 


...1 


13 


1... 


....2... 


....3... 


...3... 






....1... 


1. 


.. 1.. 


1 


14 


....1... 


....2... 


. ..3... 


3... 






....1... 


...1. 


.. .1.. 


1 


15 


....1... 


....1... 


....3... 








....1... 


....1.. 


...1.. 


1 


16 


....1... 


....2... 


....3... 




....2... 




1... 


1.. 


...1.. 


.1 


17 


1... 


....2... 


....3... 




....3.. 




1... 


....1.. 


...1.. 


...1 


18 


1... 


2... 


....3... 




.,..3.. 




1... 


... 1 


1.. 


1 


21 


1... 


2... 


....3... 




....3.. 




....1... 


2.. 


.. 1 


1 


23 


....1... 


2... 


....3... 




....3.. 




1... 


....2.. 


. . 1 . . 


...1 


24 


1... 


2*.. 


3... 




3.. 




....I.. . 


2 


, 1 


.. 1 


25 


1... 


....2... 


3... 




... 3.. 




....1... 


1.. 


.. 1.. 


.. 1 


26 


1... 


...2... 


3... 




....3.. 




1... 


. .1.. 


. 1.. 


.. 1 


27 


1... 


2*.. 


3... 




....3.. 




1... 


. .2.. 


1.. 


...1 


31 


1 2. 


2... 


2... 


....1.. 




....1... 


2.. 


...1.. 


.. 1 


32 


1... 


....2... 


2... 


...3... 


....I.. 




1... 


....2.. 


.. 1 


.. 1 


34 


1.. . 


1... 




2... 


..1.. 




. ...1... 


1 


1 


1 


35 


....1... 


...1... 




2 .. 


1.. 




....1... 


....2 


1 




36 


1... 


1... 




2 .. 


2... 




1... 


2..' 


. 1 


.. 1 


41 


1... 


....1... 




....1... 


....1... 




1... 


2 


. 1.. 


.. 1 


42 


1... 


1... 




1,.. 


....2... 




1... 


....2 


..'i.. 


...1 


43 


...1... 


...2... 




...1... 


....3... 




2... 


....2 . 


1.. 


. ..1 


45 


....1. . 


1... 




1 .. 


. ..3... 




2... 


2 . 


1 


.. 1 


51. ... 
52 


....2... 
1.. 


....3... 
3. 




....2... 
....2... 


....3... 
..3... 




....3... 
3... 


....3... 
....3 


...1.. 
1.. 


...1 

...1 


53 


1,.. 


....3... 




....2... 


....3... 




....3... 


... 3... 


...1.. 


...1 


54 

56 

61 


....2... 
...2... 

... 1. .. 


...3*.. 
... 3*.. 
2*.. 


....3!.. 


....3... 
....2... 
1 .. 


....3... 
...3... 
.. 3... 




....■3... 
....3... 
... 3... 


....3... 

....3... 

3 


...1.. 

...1.. 

1.. 


...1 
...1 

.1 


62 

71 


....1... 
....1.. . 


....2*.. 
2... 


....3... 
....3... 


....1... 
1... 


....3 .. 
..3... 




....3... 
2... 


....3... 
... 2... 


...1.. 
1 


...1 
...1 


72 


1... 


2... 


3,.. 


1... 


....3... 




1... 


....2... 


.. 1.. 


,1 


73 

81 


....1... 
....1... 


... 2... 
1. 


....3... 
....3... 


....1... 

.. 2. 


.. 3... 
2... 




....2... 
....1.. . 


....2... 
2.. 


..!i.. 
1.. 


...1 

...1 


112 

113 


....1... 
....1... 
....1... 


....2... 
....2... 
... 2... 


....3... 
....3... 
3... 


....3... 
....3... 
3.. 


....1... 
....1. 
1... 




....1,.. 
....1... 


....1... 
....1... 


...1.. 
...1.. 


...1 

...1 


114 




....1... 


1.. 


].. 


...1 


212 


1... 


3*.. 


3... 


1... 


....3... 




2... 


2... 


...1.. 


1 


213 

312 

313 

314 


....1... 
....1... 
....1... 
....1. .. 


....2*.. 
....2... 
....2... 

....2*. 


....3... 
....1... 
....1... 
3... 


....1... 
....3... 
....3... 
....3... 


....3... 
....2... 
....2... 
1... 




....3... 
...2... 
....2... 
... 2... 


...3... 
....2... 
....2... 
2. .. 


...1.. 
...1.. 
...1.. 
...1.. 


...1 

...1 

...1 

1 


315 


,...2... 


3».. 


....3... 


....3... 


1... 




....3... 


3... 


...1.. 


1 

























*0n first alarm, the horses of second-run engine will double on engine of first run. 



235 



NUMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES 
AND KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Kej^s at E. P. Johnson 
Co.'s office, Gas-works office, County Jail, and Charles 
H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
Hotel Belmont, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Gar- 
mon's, and W. C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Tebbetts Brothers' and E. H. Currier's drug stores. 

No. 6. — City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Mead's 
drug stores, and J. A. Riddle's office. 

No. 7. — Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east 
back streets. Keys at Higgins Bros.', Cavanaugh Bros.' 
stable, and Eames Bros.' drug store. 

No. 8. — Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Wil- 
son's and Kelley's drug stores, and Partridge Bros.' grain 
store. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, J. B. 
Jones, and General Stark engine-house. 

No. 12. — Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of William C. Clarke and George Emerson. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of Welcome Jencks and Lewis Simons, and 
No. 1 Senter's block. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland and N. L. Hardy. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of Willie H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. H. 
Hassam. 



236 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. 
Baker, and William Perkins. 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. 
Keys at A. D. Smith's drug store, J. McKeon's grocery 
store, and A. L. Walker's office. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. — Merrimack Steamer house, corner of Massabe- 
sic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. 
Goodwin and steamer house. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. 
Keys at residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, 
Horace Stearns, and the late Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-shop and residence of John N. 
Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. 
Keys at residences of H. M. Tarbell, A. G. Fairbanks, 
William B. Orrill, E. S. Fletcher, and George H. Hubbard. 

No. 31. — Corner of Canal and Hollis streets. Blood's 
shop. Keys at office, and residence of Mrs. Mary How- 
arth, first house south of shop gate. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and 
Brook streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Co.'s mill, 
Langdon watch-room, and Electric Light Station. 

No. 34. — Jefferson Mill. Keys at watch-room and 
pumping station. 

No. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 36. — Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 41. — Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 



237 

^0. 43. — Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watch-room. 

IN"©. 45.— The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at 
freight depot, S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office^ and Lowell's iron 
foundry office. 

No. 51. — Corner of Walker and Second streets, "Ger- 
mantown." Keys at stores of F. Riedel and William 
Weber. 

JSTo. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd 
& Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's store, and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's steam-mill. Keys at the office and 
I. R. Dewey's tenement block. 

No. 54. — Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at 
residences of Lord sisters and Newell R. Bixby. 

No. 56. — Mast road, near Riddle street. Keys at 
Baldwin's bobbin-shop, and residences of J. C. Smith 
and E. P. Littlefield. 

No. 61. — Corner of River road and Hancock street, 
Bakersville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, Carney, Lynch 
& Co.'s brewery, and residence of H. F. Dillingham. 

No. 62. — Kimball & .Gerrish's tannery. River road. 
Keys at tannery, and residence of Edwin Kennedy. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, and Thomas J. 
Smith. 

No. 72. — Corner of Park and Lincoln streets. Keys 
at residences of Austin Jenkins, C. H. Leach, and 
Clarence D. Palmer. 

No. 73. — (To be located corner of Beech and Cedar- 
streets.) 

No. 81. — Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at 
all the engine-rooms. 

No. 112. — Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. 
Keys at residences of Woodbury Davison and W. T.. 
Steve ns. 



238 

1^0. 113. — Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys 
at residences of William B. Abbott, H. S. Manville, and 
E. M. Toplifi. 

1^0. 114, — Corner of Pearl and Asb streets. Keys at 
residences of A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. 
Shannon and John J. Bennett. 

^N'o. 212. — Shoe-shop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of 
shoe factory, and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. "W". 
Dearborn, Milton A. Abbott, and M. V. B. Garland. 

'No. 213. —(To be located at sash and blind factory of 
Austin, Flint & Day, South Beech street, junction of 
Portsmouth Railroad.) 

No. 312. — Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor 
streets. Keys at residences of James Spence (391 Main 
street) and Thomas Bolton. 

No. 313. — Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys 
at residences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, 
and Bouthillier & Gingras's drug store. 

jSTo. 314. — P. C. Cheney Company's paper-mill. 
Keys at office and Independent hose house. 

No. 315. — Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Keys at store, 
hose-house, and Robinson's residence. 

Also keys will be found in th6 hands of all regular 
police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be 
given at precisely 12.30 p. m., from Charles A. Trefeth- 
en's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one stroke of 
the fire bells. 



239 



INSTRUCTION'S TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITI- 
ZENS. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be im- 
mediately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the 
keys to which are in the hands of all regular police, and 
generally of persons at the corner or nearest houses. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or posi- 
tive information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down 
the hook once as far as it will go (without jerking), and 
then let go. Shut the door, but do not try to remove the 
key, as it is locked in by a trap-lock, and can only be 
removed with a release-key, -^vhich is carried by each of 
the engineers, who will, as soon as convenient, release 
and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard 
in the box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go 
to the next nearest box, procure another key, and give 
an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never 
touch the box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an 
alarm for no cause other than actual fire. Don't give an 

ALARM FOR A CHIMNEY FIRE. 

5. Never let the kej^s go out of your possession unless 
called for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your 
residence or place of business, where the keys are kept, return 
the keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested 
to inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near 
their property, also all places where the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 



240 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in 
the city, and the number of the box will be given thus : 
Box 6, six blows, 2| seconds apart, repeated three times. 
Box 212, two blows, pause of 6^ seconds, one blow, same 
pause, and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke 
of the bells at any time; and, in case of testing the 
boxes, each test will be preceded by one stroke of the 
bells. 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, close 
the primary schools; and to close all the schools, two 
immediate strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds 
two more immediate strokes, — the time of striking the 
bells being at 8.05 a. m. for closing the schools during 
the forenoon, and at 11.05 a. m. or 1.15 p. m. for closing 
them durino; the afternoon. 



241 



RULES AKD REGULATIONS IN REGARD TO 
RESPONDD^G TO FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The following order has been adopted by the Board of 
Engineers, and the Fire Department will strictly comply 
until otherwise ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as 
follows : 

1. Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, Hook-and-Ladder Co. 
No. 1, and Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 will report for 
duty to all boxes on first alarm. 

2. Amoskeag Steamer Co. No. 1 will report for duty, 
on days of its first run, on first alarm to all boxes exce-pt 
9, 12, 51, 54, 56, 315; on second alarm, to all boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 
35, 36, 41, 42, 45, 81 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 
13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 
62, 71, 72, 73, 112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314; on 
third alarm, to all other boxes. 

3. Fire King Steamer Co. No. 2 will report for duty 
on first alarm to boxes 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 52, 53, 
54, 56, 312, 313; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 5, 31, 32; 
on third alarm, to all other boxes. 

4. Merrimack Steamer Co. No. 3 will report for duty 
on first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 
26, 27, 41, 42, 43, 45, 61, 62 ,71, 72, 73, 212, 213 ; on second 
alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 35, 36, 51, 52, 53, 56 ; on 
third alarm, to all other boxes. 

5. N. S. Bean Steamer Co. No. 4 will report for duty, 
on days of its first run, on first alarm to all boxes except 
9, 12, 51, 54, 56, 315. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 84, 
35, 36, 41, 42, 45, 81 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 
13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 

16 



242 

62, 71, 72, 73, 112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 318, 314; on 
third alarm, to all other boxes. 

6.. G§n. Stark Steamer Co. l^o. 5 will report for duty on 
first alarm to boxes 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 31, 32, 34, 35, 
112, 113, 114, 314, 315 ; on second alarm, to boxes 6, 16, 
36, 41, 42, 81, 312, 313; on thml alarm, to all other 
boxes. 

7. Massabesic Hose Companj^ ]^o. 2 will report for 
duty, on days of its first run, 07i first alarm to boxes 6, 7, 
8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 
35, 36, 41, 42, 72, 81, 112, 113, 114 ; on second alarm, to 
boxes 4, 5, 9, 12, 43, 45, 71, 73, 212, 312, 313, 314; on 
third alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm., to boxes 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 
17, 18, 25, 26, 34, 112, 113, 114; on second alarm, to boxes 
4, 5, 6, 9, 12, 21, 23, -24, 27, 31, 32, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45," 
71, 72, 73, 81, 212, 313, 314 ; on third alarm, to all other 
boxes. 

8. On the first alarm, from boxes 9, 24, 27, 54, 56, 61, 
62, 212, 213, 314, 315, the horses of the second run will 
double on to the engine of its first run, and on the arri- 
val AT THE FIRE THE SECOND-RUN HORSES WILL RETURN TO 

THEIR HOUSE, and in case of an alarm from any box the 
company will immediately respond with their engine, 

9. During the progress of a fire, any of the apparatus 
not called on that alarm will promptly respond to an 
alarm from any other box. 

10. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the 
engine, hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first 
will have the right to lead to the fire. No running by 

WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER PEN- 
ALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

' 11. The drivers shall not permit persons not connected 
with the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in 



243 

muddy weather or heavy wheeUng they shall not permit 
any one to ride upon their apparatus when returning from 
fires. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs by the engineer in 
charge will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses ; or in case this one blow is not 
struck within thirty minutes, companies may consider 
themselves dismissed, except the drivers, who will remain 
in the houses with their horses until the two blows to 
limber up. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 



244 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 first-class steamer, double-plunger engine 

and hose-carriage 
1 pair gray horses 
1 set double harnesses (street work) 
1 pair swinging harnesses 
1,000 feet fabric hose 
100 feet three-inch leather hose . 
1 double cart .... 

1 sled 

Stable fixtures and blankets . 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures 
Firemen's suits and badges . 

Total amount . 



14,000 


00 


800 


00 


60 


00 


100 


00 


900 


00 


75 


00 


100 


00 


40 


00 


30 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 



,505 00 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 



1 second-class double 


plunger steamer 


. $4,000 00 


1 pair bay horses for 


steamer . 


800 00 


2 single horses . 


. 


600 00 


3 street harnesses, two at |40, one at $20 


100 00 


3 swinging harnesses 


. 


150 00 


1 four-wheeled hose-carriage . 


600 00 


1 single cart (old) 




20 00 


1 two-horse cart 




75 00 


1 double sled . 




75 00 


1 single sled 




50 00 


,000 feet fabric hose 




1,500 00 



245 



Stable fixtures and blankets ... $60 00 
Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. . . 466 00 
Firemen's suits and badges . . . 150 00 

Total amount . . • . . • $8,646 00 

MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 second-class steamer 

1 pair black horses .... 

1 single horse ..... 

3 street harnesses, two at $50, one at 

3 swinging harnesses 

1 one-horse four-wheeled hose-carriage 

1 double cart 

1 single cart ..... 

1 single sled ..... 

2,000 feet fabric hose .... 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 

Beds, bedding, wardrobe, etc. 

Total amount . 



. $3,500 


00 


600 


00 


250 


00 


140 


00 


150 


00 


600 


00 


162 


50 


40 


00 


40 


00 


. 1,500 


00 


50 


00 


75 


00 


. $7,107 


50 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 steamer and hose-carriage 

1 pair bay horses 

1 pair street harnesses 

1 pair swinging harnesses 
2,000 feet Baker fabric hose . 

Furniture, fixtures, tools, etc 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount . 



$3,500 00 

600 00 

50 00 

100 00 

800 00 

250 00 

50 00 

200 00 

$5,550 00 



246 



GENERAL STARK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 

LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT. 



1 third-class double-plunger engine 

2 horses ..... 

3 sets street harnesses 
3 swinging harnesses 

1 combination hose reel and ladder 
1 double cart . 
1 single cart 
1 double sled . 
1 single sled 
2,000 feet fabric hose 

Furniture, fixtures, tools, etc. 

Stable fixtures and blankets . 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc. 

Total amount . 



$3,600 00 

600 00 

150 00 

150 00 

1,000 00 

162 50 

115 00 

75 00 

50 00 

1,500 00 

175 00 

60 00 

200 00 

$7,837 50 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE-ENGINE. 

LOCATED AT OLD ENGINE-HOUSE, CLINTON STREET. 



Old U tank engine 



$500 00 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hose-carriage 

2 horses . 
2 single harnesses 
1 single cart 
1 single sled 
1 hose sled 

3,200 feet leather hose, at 80 cents per foot 
Furniture and fixtures . 



$600 00 

600 00 

60 00 

75 00 

40 00 

20 00 

2,560 00 

200 00 



247 



Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount . 



$60 00 
175 00 

t,390 00 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 



1 four-wlieeled horse hose-carriage . 


. $600 00 


1 bay horse 


350 00 


1 street harness .... 


40 00 


1 swinging harness .... 


50 00 


1 single cart 


60 00 


1 single sled 


40 00 


2,000 feet leather hose, at 80 cents per foot 


1,600 00 


Furniture and fixtures . 


100 00 


Firemen's suits and badges . 


175 00 


Total amount . . . . 


$3,015 00 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 hook-and-ladder truck .... $1,700 00 

1 reserve truck 500 00 

1 pair bay horses . . . . . 600 00 

1 pair exercise harnesses . . . . 30 00 

1 pair swinging harnesses . . . 100 00 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders . . 360 00 
6 rubber blanket covers .... 144 00 

Furniture and fixtures .... 200 00 

Stable fixtures and blankets ... 35 00 

Firemen's suits and bado;es . . . 280 00 



Total amount 



J,949 00 



248 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STEEET. 

1 double tank (60 gallons eacli) engine 

1 pair black horses . 

1 pair exercise harnesses . 

1 pair swinging harnesses 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount . 



?2,250 


00 


750 


00 


30 


00 


100 


00 


60 


00 


50 


00 


35 


00 



5,275 00 



SUPPLY "WAGON. 

1 supply wagon with boxes and engineers' 
lanterns ...... 

5 rubber coats ...... 

6 rubber blanket covers .... 

Total amount .... 



$312 


00 


15 


00 


144 


00 



$471 00 



SPARE HOSE. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 



1,100 feet leather hose . 
400 feet fabric hose . 

Total amount 



$880 00 
450 00 

$1,330 00 



HOSE WAGON. 

LOCATED AT WEBSTER-STREET ENGINE-HOUSE. 



1* four-wheeled hose wagon 



$450 00 



EXERCISE WAGON. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 



1 four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole and 

shafts $40 00 



249 




ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 




ire hats 


$7 50 


urniture and fixtures .... 


175 00 



Total amount . 



$182 50 



INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 

LOCATED AT COKNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 

1 four-wheeled hand hose-carriage . 
1,000 feet leather hose .... 
2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc 

Total amount .... 

GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT DERRT MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage 
300 feet fabric hose .... 

2 hose-pipes 

Total amount .... 

SLEEPING HALL. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

7 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

At cost (including additions previous to 1885) 
Bemodeling in 1885 
Additions in 1886 

" in 1887 

" in 1888 
"Individual Tapper" system 
Wire, ladders, etc. 

Total 



$400 


00 


600 


00 


40 


00 



L,040 00 



$50 


00 


200 


00 


10 


00 



$260 00 



$275 00 



21,625 00 

6,000 00 

775 00 

375 00 

575 00 

3,000 00 

100 00 

$32,450 00 



250 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 1 
Fire King Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 2 
Merrimack Steam Fire-Eno-ine Co. No. 3 



N. S. Bean Steam Fire-Engine Co. No 
General Stark Steam Fire-Engine Co. 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 
Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 
Excelsior Hook-and-La'clder Co. No. 1 
E. W. Harrington Steam Fire-Engine ( 
Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 
Supply Wagon 

Independent Hose Company No 
Goffe's Falls Hose Carriage 
Sleeping Hall 
Spare Hose . 
Hose Wagon 
Exercise Wagon . 
Engineers' Department 
Fire-Alarm Telegraph . 



4 

No. 



old) 



16,505 


00 


8,646 


00 


7,107 


50 


5,550 


00 


7,837 


50 


4,390 


00 


3,015 


00 


3,949 


00 


500 


00 


3,275 


00 


471 


00 


1,040 


00 


260 


00 


275 


00 


1,330 


00 


450 


00 


40 


00 


182 


50 


32,450 


00 


$87,273 50 



251 



NAMES AND EESIDEIvTCES OF THE MEMBERS 
OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

BOAED OF ENGINEERS. 



bo . 


Name. 


;Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane. . . 

FredS. Bean 

Ruel G. Manning. . . 
Eugene S. Whitney. 
Clarence D. Palmer 


Chief 




1937 Elm Street 


^ 


Assistant and clerk. 
Assistant ... 




102 Orange St. 
52 Douglas St. 


. "> 




4 


Supt. Electric Light.. 
Marble- worker 


5 


Assistant 


Lake Avenue. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Charles F. McCoy. . 
Artemas C. Barker. 
Frank E. Stearns... 

Charles F.Hall 

Joseph H. Gould. . . 
Charles H. Rogers. . 
John H. Stone 



Frank B. Marston. . 
Henry A. Boone . . . 
George E. Cassidy.. 
Thomas J. Wyatt . . 
James L. Brock. . . . 
Lewis G. Bryant. . . 
E. H. Smith 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation 

Machinist 

Currier 

Paper-hanger... 
Machinist 

Teamster 

Painter 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Tinsmith 

Teamster 



Residence. 



5M. S.B. 
453 Pine Street. 
389 Lake Avenue. 
45 W Merrimack St 
1087 Elm Street. 
28 Vine Street. 
106 Bridge Street. 

11 M. S. B. 
19 M. S. B. 

31 Spring Street. 
44 Middle Street. 
31 Spring Street. 

12 M. S. B. 

42 Market Street. 



252 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on North Main Street, ^Squog. 



PQ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


66 


Joseph H, Alsop... 
David G. Mills 






54 Douglas Street. 
34 Parker Street. 


67 


Assistant Foreman. 


Carpenter 


68 




Clerk 






^'>o 


Thomas F. Dodge.. 
Stephen Thornes. . . 
George E. Varnum. 






Engine-house. 
55 Douglas Street. 
Engine-house. 


119 


Assistant Engineer. 
Driver of Steamer.. 




76 


Teamster 


69 


ArthurW.Whitcomb 


Driver of Hose .... 





" 


72 


Samuel A. Hill 








75 


Robert I. Hill 






86 '• " 


70 


„ 


^, 




71 


Charles G. Kanno. . 


,, 


Harness manufacturer 


63 Parker Street. 


77 


Daniel B. Emery.. . 


jj 






73 


,, 




53 Douglas Street. 


7S 


Thomas E. Foote... 


^j 













253 



MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

Mouse on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Kesidence 


80 

84 








414 Merrimack St. 
286 Laurel Street. 


Charles H. Colburn. 


Assistant Foreman . 


Carpenter . . 


85 




Clerk 


„ 




121 


George B.Forsaith. 
Edwin E. Weeks... 






196 Laurel Street. 


122 


Assistant Engineer. 




87 


George H. Wheeler. 
Alphonso E. Foster. 
John S.Avery 






81 








82 






404, Merrimack St. 


83 




Carpenter 


86 


Frank F. Porter. . . . 


„ 


357 Lake Avenue. 
422 Merrimack St. 
570 Wilson Street. 


89 




^j 


Clerk 


78 


George Dunnington 
Fred S. Sloan 


,, 




88 


,, 




79 


Louis N. Dufrain. . . 


1, 




373 Hall Street. 









254 

N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



pa 



Name. 



George W. Bacon 
L. J. Chandler.. 
Walter Morse . . . 
Albert Merrill . 
Edgar G. Abbott 
Frank J. Dustin. 
Willie H. Dodge 
H. C. Morrill... 
George A. Oann. 
Benj.R. Richardson 
Lucius B. Snelling. 
Ellsworth V. Rowe. 
Walter A. Clarkaon 
Frank B. Stevens. . 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman. 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation. 



Carpenter . 

Clerk 

Machinist . 



Teamster 

Fireman 

Machinist 

Watchman... . 

Machinist 

Pharmacist . . . 
Section Hand . 

Carpenter 

Clerk 



Residence. 



65 Stark Corp . 
123 Orange St. 
556 Chestnut St. 
96 Bridge St. 
5i3 Chestnut St. 
20 Vine St. 
530 Chestnut St. 
556 Chestnut St. 
307 Chestnut St. 
95 Orange St. 
37 Water St. 
1261 Elm St. 
123 Orange St. 
301 Amherst St. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


116 


George N. Burpee. . 

Jesse W. Truell 

Warren F. Wheeler 
Frank A. Pherson.. 






99 Bridge St. 
153 Hanover St. 
8 Vine St 


115 


Clerk 


Toomafo.. 


117 




118 






8 Vine St 











255 

GENERAL STARK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 

House corner Webster and Chestnut Streets. 



bo . 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


43 


George W. Cheney. 
George R. Simmons 
Charles W. Brown. 
Daniel W. Morse. . . 






1490 Elm Street 


123 








49 


Clerk 


Clerk 


16 Hazel Street 


42 






1419 Elm Street. 


102 


Arthur W. Bond . . . 


Assistant Engineer 




9 Langdon Corp. 

Engine-house. 

Engine-house. 


125 






124 


Martin W. Ford, Jr. 


Driver of Hose 




101 


Milo B. Wilson .... 






48 Blodget Street. 
785 Union Street 


46 


Woodbury Davison . 
Russell L. Cilley . . . 
Edward H. Clough. 
Walter K. Sanborn . 






47 


,, 


Book-keeper 


1449 Elm Street 


95 


„ 


41 Appleton Street. 
735 Pine Street. 


10R 


,, 


Clerk 


41 


Arthur A. Smith... 


" 


Blacksmith 


River Road, north. 


99 


John J. Kelley 


tc 















256 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



o 










Kame. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


34 


Albert Maxfield.... 


Foreman 


Belt-maker 


23 M. S. B. 


36 


Joseph E. Merrill.. 
Frank D. Burleigh. 






21 Ash Street. 


50 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


6 M. S. B. 


37 




26 Vine Street. 


38 


George H. Porter . . . 
Will G Chase 






279 Laurel Street.- 


39 




Photographer 

Railroad employe . . 


217 Central Street. 










52 
53 
35 
45 
51 






18 M. S. B. 








274 Laurel Street. 








3 M. S. B. 


George I. Ayer. . . 
Edwin A. Durgin... 






28 M. S. B. 






22 M. P. W, 









MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 
House on Maple Street, corner East High. 



Name. 



John F. Seaward . . . 
William S.McLeod. 
Henry G. Seaman. . 

Walter Seaward 

Revilo G. Houghton 
George W. Huntley. 
Jos. W. Batchelder. 
Albert E.Batchelder 

Fred S. Lewis 

George H. Shepard. 
Julien B. Huntley.. 
Frank E. Heald 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman. 

Clerk ; 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation, 

Carpenter . . . . 

Grainer 

Carpenter 

Teamster 

Gas-fitter . . . . 

Plumber 

Carpenter 

Plumber 

Tinsmith , 

Plumber 

Book-keeper . . 



Residence. 



27 Warren Street. 
58 Nashua Street. 
14 South Street. 
521 Maple Street. 

288 Bridge Street. 
1211 Elm Street. 
521 Maple Street. 
13 Wilson Street. 
27 South Street. 

8 South Street. 
36 Dutton Street. 

289 Concord Street. 



257 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House on Vine Street. 



91 
111 

105 
93 
94 
92 
96 
98 
114 
100 
103 
104 
106 
113 
109 
112 
110 
90 
97 
107 



Name. 



Jerome J. Lovering. 

Roscoe Dyer 

Jesse B. Nourse 

Winfield S. Leavitt. 
Charles M. Denyou. 

Oscar P. Stone 

James Orrill 

John N. Chase 

John Wilson 

Hiram P. Young. . . 

Luther J. Flint 

Harrison H. Cole. . . 
Charles H. Cross . . . 

Ralph Pearson 

George M. Jones... . 
Sanborn T. Worthen 
Pharis E. Rogers 
Henry Johnson. . 
Charles W. Bailey. . 
Henry Heap .... 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman. 

Clerk 

Treasurer 

Driver 

Fireman 



Occupation. 



Mechanic... 
Teamster . . . , 

Clerk 

Barber 

Overseer. . . . 
Carpenter . . 
Taxidermist 
Carpenter... 



Clerk 

Box-maker 

Gardener 

Carpenter 

Mason 

Piper 

Carriage-maker . 
Manufacturer. . . 



Residence. 



Carpenter 300 Pine Street. 

Machinist 36 Water Street. 

Carpenter ' Gore Street. 



96 Prospect Street. 
18 Vine Street. 
326 Granite Street. 
100 Blodget Street. 
276 Bridge Street. 
287 Bridge Street. 
33 Dutton Street. 
4 Dutton Street. 
45 M. S. B. 
201 Walnut Street. 
20 Warren Street. 
1068 Elm Street. 
493 Maple Street. 
100 Orange Street. 
20 M. S. B. 
265 Concord Street. 
4 Whitney Street. 



17 



258 



INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 

House corner of Old Falls Road and Front Street. 






133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
144 
142 
143 
145 
146 
147 
149 
148 
150 



Name. 



Charles E. Stearns. 
Thomas Hamilton . . 
Clarence H. Stearns 
George Lawrence.. 
Sherman L.Flanders 
George P. Glidden.. 

John Doherty 

Walter E. Harvey.. 

D. L. Robinson 

A. D. Maxwell 

Alvah R. Mack 

William F. Stearns. 

F. P. Gove 

Benjamin Herbert.. 
H. A. Moynihan . . 

E. G. Reed 

Sherman L. Greer. 
Fred E. Wilson.... 



Rank. 



Foreman . . , 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Steward 

Hoseman 



Occupation 

Milk dealer 

Handle-maker.. 

Clerk 

Milk dealer 

Grocer 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Paper -maker. .. 

Butcher 

Ice dealer 

Teamster 

Shoemaker 

Clerk 

Mechanic 

Milk dealer 

Clerk 



Residence. 



Front Street. 
GofEstown Road. 
Front Street. 



Dunbarton Road. 
Mill Street. 
Front Street. 



61 Appleton Street. 
Front Street. 



259 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Wahiut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincohi street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, corner of Franklin street. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Adams street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Baker, corner of Elm street. 
Baker, corner of River road. 
Baker, corner of Calef road. 
Baker, corner of Nutt road. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 
Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 



260 



Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 

Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 

Beech, front of No. 684. 

Belmont, near No. 345. 

Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 

Blodget, front of primary schoolhouse. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, front of ISTo. 26. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 

Bridge, corner of Ashland street. 

Bridge, corner of Hall street. 

Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 

Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Brook, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 

Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 

Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 

Canal, near office door of M. L. W. 

Cedar, front of No. 36. 

Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 



261 



Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central^ front of No. 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Chestnut, opposite High street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 
Clarke, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Clarke, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, opposite Vine street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Cypress, south end of street. 



262 

Cypress, at Manchester shoe-shop. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Elm, front of Temple & Farrington Co.'s bookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Gore, corner of Beech street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, near Franklin street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 

Hancock street, 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near brewery. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Harrison, opposite No. 15. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Oak street. 



263 



Harrison, northwest corner of Russell street. 
High, corner of Ashland street. 
High, corner of South street. 
High, fifty feet east of Wilson road. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Lake avenue, near ISTo. 36. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Union street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Lake avenue, east end. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near IsTo. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Laurel, near Belmont street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Milton street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon street. 
Lowell, northweet corner of Beech street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 
Lowell, front of ITo. 276. 



264 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road, 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Mammoth road. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Central street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
•Maple, front of No. 350. 
Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 
Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Massabesic, northwest corner of Old Falls road. 
Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 
Massabesic avenue. 
Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 
Mechanics, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Mechanics, near second back street west of Elm street. 
Mechanics, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Merrimack, near No. 362. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 



265 



Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Merrimack, near Belmont street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Beacon street. 
Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Middle, near JSTo. 67 Amoskeag corporation. 
Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 
North, northwest corner of Bay street. 
Il^orth, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
North, northwest corner of Pine street. 
North, corner of Liberty street. 
Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 
Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Orange, corner of Ash street. 
Orange, corner of Maple street. 
Orange, corner of Oak street. 
Orange, corner of Pussell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of CJnion street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 



266 



Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pine, near Road House. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lake avenue. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near ^o. 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Reservoir, on force main. 
River road (north), north of Webster street. 
River road (north), near Mrs. John Kelly's. 
River road (north), near J. Otis Clark's. 



267 



River road (south), near gate of tannery. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 
Shasta, corner of River road. 
Shasta, corner of Beech street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near No. 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite No. 57 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13 Manchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 
Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Union, northwest corner of High street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Willow street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Taylor street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Cypress street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Jewett street. 
Valley, 150 feet east of J. L. Woodman's. 



268 

"Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Walnut, opposite ISTo. 79. 

Water, near l^o. 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Webster, corner of Adams street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 

West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Central, corner of Franklin. 

West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Webster, northwest corner of Elm .street. 

West Webster, northeast corner of River road. 

Wilson, corner of Lake avenue. 

Young, corner of Elm street. 

Young, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Young, corner of Maple street. 

Young, 96 feet east of R. N. Batchelder's. 



269 



PISCATAQUOG AND MCGREGORVILLE. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
A, near 'No. 73. 

A, northwest corner of B street. 
Adams, corner of Main street. 
Amory, corner of Beauport street. 
Amory, near Dubuque street. 
Bath, corner of River street. 
Bath, corner of Shirley street. 
Bennington, corner of Main street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Blaine, corner of Cleveland street. 
Blaine, east end of street. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Cartier, corner of Putnam street. 
Carroll street. 

Clinton, corner of Dover street. 
Clinton, corner of South Main street. 
Douglas, corner of Quinc}^ street. 
Douglas, corner of Green street. 
Douglas, corner of Barr street. 
Douglas, corner of West street. 
Douglas, corner of Main street. 
Douglas, east of Main street. 
Ferry, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Quincy street. 
Granite, corner of Green street. 
Granite, corner of Barr street. 
Granite, corner of West street. 
Granite, corner of Dover street. 
Granite, corner of Main street. 
Granite, corner of Shirley street. 



270 



Granite, corner of River street. 

Kelly, corner of Beauport street. 

Main, opposite the Rice house. 

Marion, corner of McGregor street. 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's. 

Mast, near the J. ]^. Prescott house. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite "Reed" house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main street. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of Old Bedford road. 

Patten, corner of Ferry street. 

Putnam, corner of Main street. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 

Putnam, corner of Dubuque street. 

Riddle, near Mast street. 

School, corner of South Main street. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 

School, corner of River street. 

Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 

Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry street. 

Sullivan, corner of Main street. 

Sullivan, corner of Beauport street. 

Temple, corner of Main street. 

Walker, corner of River street. 

Walker, corner of Patten street. 

Walker, corner of Parker street. 

Walker, near corner of South Main street. 

Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 

Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 



271 

Wayne, near corner of Main street. 
Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Dunbarton road, corner of Front street. 

Dunbarton road, near L. D. Colby's. 

GofFstown road, four hydrants. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 

Main, near brick schoolhouse. 

Main, corner of Goffstown road. 

Main, opposite the John E. Stearns house. 

Main, near the Hiram Stearns house. 

Mill, near paper-mill. 

Mill, corner of Main street. 

Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are five private 
hydrants that are available in case of need : 

Two at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 

One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine shop. 

One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 

One at A. H. Lowell's iron foundry. 

Total number, 426. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



18 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library present herewith 
their thirty-lifth annual report of the afiairs of the library, 
together with the report made to them by the treasurer of 
the board, showing the amounts received and the expendi- 
tures made by^him in behalf of the board from the funds 
in their possession and under their control, and also the 
report of the librarian, which gives in detail the statistics 
and operations of the library during the year, and the 
condition ot the library and property under her charge 
at the close ot the year. 

From the report of the treasurer it appears that there 
has been expended during the year, for the purchase of 
books, the sum of nine hundred and eighty-one dollars 
and ninety-six cents, and for the purchase of periodicals 
the sum of one hundred and ninety dollars and fifty-one 
cents, making a total expenditure for both these purposes 
of eleven hundred and seventy -two dollars and forty-seven 
cents. Of the amotnt expended for the purchase of 
books, the sum of four hundred and five dollars and thirty- 
seven cents was derived from the income of the Dean 
Fund and applied to the purchase of additional books for 
that department of the library. The balance in the hands 



276 

of the treasurer, at the close of the year, of the amount 
appropriated by the City Councils for the purchase of 
books, was one thousand and sixty-three dollars and fifty- 
nine cents. 

The balance of the income of the Dean Fund, with the 
accumulated interest thereon, unexpended at the close of 
the year, was five thousand one hundred and eleven dol- 
lars and fifty-two cents. 

The accumulated income of the Mary E. Elliot Fund at 
the close of the year was three hundred and ten dollars 
and twenty-four cents. It is expected that the trustees 
will soon be able to commence the purchase of books 
from the income of this fund. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the year, as 
reported to the trustees by the treasurer, have been two 
thousand and forty-six dollars and thirty-five cents. No 
bill for coal for the library for the past year has been 
approved by the trustees. A supply of coal was fur- 
nished the library without consultation with the trustees, 
and thus far no return of the amount supplied has been 
made to the board or its officers. The items of the inci- 
dental expenditures approved by the trustees, with the 
above exception, may be found in detail in the annual 
report of the city. 

The report of the librarian shows that the library has 
been open three hundred and six days for the delivery of 
books, during which time the number of books delivered 
for home use was fifty thousand four hundred and seven- 
teen. In addition to this number delivered for general 
circulation, six thousand and thirty-^ne books and maga- 
zines have been delivered for use in the reading-room at 
the library, making the total number delivered during 
the year fifty-six thousand four hundred and forty-eight ; 
an average of one hundred and eighty-four per day. As 



277 

compared with the circulation of the previous year, this 
shows a slight increase. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of 
the last report was thirty thousand three hundred and 
seven. During the year there have been added by pur- 
chase five hundred and ninety three volumes, by dona- 
tion two hundred and sixty two volumes, and eighty-eight 
volumes of periodicals have been bound, making the 
number of bound volumes in the library at the close ot 
the year twenty-nine thousand two hundred and sixty, 
and the total number, including maps and pamphlets, 
thirty-one thousand two hundred and fifty. Of the num- 
ber of volumes added to the library by purchase, one 
hundred and fifty-four volumes were acquired by expendi- 
tures from the income of the Dean Fund. 

Seventy diiFerent periodicals have been regularly re- 
ceived at the library, — fifty-five by purchase and fifteen 
by donation, — and as the respective volumes have been 
completed, they have been bound and placed in general 
circulation. 

The number of volumes withdrawn from circulation 
by reason of their worn and defaced condition was 
seventy-six. Of this number, and of others retired in 
previous years for the same reason, ninety-nine have been 
replaced. A large number of others were ordered, but 
have not yet been received. 

Following the report of the librarian will be found a 
,list of the books presented to the library during the year, 
with the names of the persons presenting them. Due 
acknowledgment has been made by the trustees in behalf 
of the city, for these donations, to all who have thus man- 
ifested an interest in the increase of the library. 

The trustees have employed Mr. Alton F. Payne as 
assistant to the librarian in the place of Mr. Arthur, the 



278 

former assistant, who resigned his position during the 
preceding year. 

During the year no circumstance has occurred to call 
for any unusual action on the j)art of the trustees in the 
administration of the affairs of the library, or to interfere 
with its harmonious operation. The librarian, Mrs. M. J. 
Buncher, has continued to perform the duties pertaining 
to her office with the same fidelity and earnest effort for 
the accommodation of the public as in previous years. 

The trustees regret to report that no progress has been 
made during the past year toward the preparation of a new 
catalogue of the library on account of the failure of the 
City Councils to appropriate a sum sufiicient for the pur- 
pose. It is not necessary for the trustees to repeat what 
has been said in former reports concerning the need of a 
new catalogue of the library. The necessity of such a 
catalogue as shall enable the patrons of the library to ob- 
tain a knowledge of what books are therein contained 
with the least possible inconvenience is generally con- 
ceded. It is for the City Councils to take the initiative in 
the matter and place at the disposal of the trustees a sum 
sufficient to meet the expense of its compilation. Should 
the City Councils appropriate a suitable amount toward 
the preparation of a new catalogue, the trustees will en- 
deavor to provide for its compilation without unreason- 
able delay. 

February 16, 1889. 
In BoaVd of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered 
to be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and 
transmitted to the City Councils. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 
N. P. Hunt, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Jo the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following 
account of the receipts and expenditures by the board 
of the funds received on account of the library : 

1888. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation . $764 59 
March 3. Mrs. M. J. Buncher, cata- 

logues sold and lost books 14 35 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, balance 

of fines .... 51 75 

July 21. appropriation for books for 

Jan. 



July 1. 



Jan. 1. 



April 1. 



1888 . 






1,000 


00 


balance of income of 










Dean fund . $4,976 


28 






income of Dean fund 


153 


00 






income of Dean fund 


153 


00 






interest on accumu- 










lation of income 


234 


61 


$5,516 


89 








k^ fJ 


To Mary E. Elliotfund $2,000 


00 






balance of interest 










on Mary E. Elliot 










fund . 


210 


79 






interest on Mary E. 










Elliot fund . 


90 


00 







280 



April 1. To interest on accumu- 
lation of income 
of Mary E. Elliot 
fund . . . $9 45 







tff^l^tJ^\J jUI 




$9,657 82 


1888. 




Cr. 


Jan. 5. 


Paid New England News Co., 






periodicals 


$12 95 


7. 


Charles C. Soule, periodicals 


5 00 


21. 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 






books .... 


5 50 


23. 


Little, Brown & Co. (Dean 






fund) books . 


1 60 


26. 


Estes & Lauriat, books 


9 00 


Feb. 6. 


Geo. H. Policy & Co., peri- 






odicals .... 


6 00 


7. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


9 26 


10. 


Laughton, Macdonald & 






Co., books 


15 00 


27. 


William H. Stevenson, pe- 






riodicals .... 


5 00 


March 5. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


11 86 


6. 


John S. Smith, Treas., peri- 






odicals .... 


4 00 


6. 


F. H. Carpenter, periodi- 






cals .... 


2 00 


6. 


J. H. Hickcox, periodicals 


5 00 


6. 


Sarah D. Stow, books 


2 00 


6. 


Sampson, Murdock & Co., 






books .... 


1 50 



281 



April 



May 



June 



July 



Auff. 



Sept. 



16. 


Paid Charles Scribner's Sons, 






books .... 


$6 00 


6. 


John N". McClintock, books 


2 00 


21. 


Boston Societ}' Natural 






History, periodicals 


7 00 


23. 


Little, Brown & Co., books 


4 25 


3. 


Estes & Lauriat, books 


9 00 


4. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


14 20 


16. 


Estes & Lauriat, books 


7 35 


26. 


Laughton, Macdonald & 






* Co., books 


2 34 


■3. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


12 68 


9. 


Laughton, Macdonald & 






Co., books 


5 00 


25. 


D. Appleton & Co., books 


5 00 


4. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


10 32 


7. 


Little, Brown & Co., books 


5 50 


12. 


Charles H. Bell, books 


4 25 


5. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


14 53 


23. 


Little, Brown & Co., books 


3 50 


2. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


11 58 


3. 


Laughton, Macdonald & 






Co., books 


5 00 


11. 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 






books .... 


5 50 


27. 


Chas. L. Woodward, books 


2 00 


6. 


New England News Co., 






periodicals 


11 78 



282 

Oct. 4. Paid ITew England News Co., 
periodicals 
9. William H. Briggs, Treas., 

books .... 
11. Young Women's Chris- 

tian Association, replaced 
books . . . 

17. Laughton, Macdonald & 

Co., books 

18. Laughton, Macdonald & 

Co., books 

23. Charles Scribner's Sons, 

(Dean fund) books . 
^N'ov. 2. New England News Co., 

periodicals 

24. Laughton, Macdonald & 

Co., books 
27. Geo. E. Littlefleld, books 

Dec. 4. New England News Co., 

periodicals 
4. S. C. Gould, books . 

19. Geo. E. Littlefield, books . 

20. Little, Brown & Co. (Dean 

fund) books . ... 

20. Charles Scribner's Sons, 

books .... 

20. Young Women's Chris- 

tian Association, replaced 
books .... 

20. S. H. Hickcox, periodicals 

20. A. S. Clark, periodicals 

20. L. T. Mead, periodicals 

20. Temple & Farrington, peri- 

odicals .... 35 



$15 


10 


5 


00 


101 


00 


148 


58 


44 


83 


18 


00 


11 


56 


134 


57 


8 


42 


10 


99 


3 


00 


7 


65 


385 


77 


6 


00 


17 85 


5 


00 


1 


31 


3 


04 



283 



By balance of appropriation . . ■ . 
balance of Dean fund .... 
balance ot Mary E. Elliot fund, and 
interest 



$1,063 59 
5,111 52 

2,310 24 



,657 82 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library 
for the year ending December 31, 1888, paid upon the 
approval of the Committee on Accounts of the Board of 
Trustees, the items of which may be found in detail in 
the annual report of the city, are as follows : 



Services as librarian 












$800 00 


Services of assi 


stant to librarian 






288 25 


Binding , 

Rebinding 

Insurance 














. 299 85 
184 43 
100 00 


Gas 














238 14 


Fuel 














12 00 


iTewspapers 
Water 














24 00 
16 00 


Printing . 














11 00 


Supplies . 
Incidentals 














61 95 
10 73 




$2,046 35 


RECAPITULATION. 




Balance Dec. 

general bala 

Appropriation 


31, 

nee, 1 
fori 


1887 
433.C 

888 . 


(for ( 
)7) 


3atalo 


gue. 


$800 


$1,233 97 
3,800 00 



i,033 97 



284 

Paidtrustees, for purchase of books $1,000 00 
Paid incidental expenses . . 2,046 35 
Balance Dec. 31, 1888 (catalogue 

), general balance $1,187.62) 1,987 62 

$5,033 97 

Respectfully submitted. 

KATHA]!^ P. HUNT, 

Treasurer of the Dmstees of the City Library. 



December 31, 1888. 
We have examined the foregoing report, and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

JOHN HOSLEY, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 31, 1888. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of 
receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing 
report of the Trustees of the City Library, and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

K P. KIDDER, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

I respectfully submit to you the thirty -fifth annual 
report of the City Library, showing the work of the year 
ending December 31, 1888. 

Whole number of volumes Dec. 31, 1887 . 30,307 

Accessions during the year : • 

By purchase . . . . 593 



Donated 262 

Periodicals bound ... 88 



943 



Whole number of volumes at present : 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets 1,974 

Bound volumes .... 29,260 

31,250 

ITumber of periodicals and papers regularly 

received ....... 70 

Number of periodicals and papers received by 

gift 15 

Number of days open to the public . . 306 

Days open for delivery of books . . . 306 

Number of books delivered for home use . 50,417 

Average per day 165 

Largest number any one day, March 12 . . 425 



286 



Largest number any one month, March . . 5,400 
Number of books, magazines, etc., used in the 

reading-room ...... 6,031 

Average per day ...... 20 

E'umber of guaranties received and cards issued 

during the year ...... 412 

Whole number since new registration . . 6,873 
Number of cards returned to the library 

during the year ...... 74 

Number of cards used on deposit ... 9 

Postals sent to delinquents . . . . 457 

Number of books taken from the shelves unfit 

for longer use ...... 76 

Volumes replaced during the year ... 99 

Volumes missing, not yet accounted for . 4 

Number lost or injured, and paid for . . 6 

Volumes repaired at the bindery . . . 543 

Repaired and covered in the library . . 4,255 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1887 . . $51 75 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1888 113 99 



Amount paid for express, stationery 

and other incidentals . . $64 39 

Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . . 51 75 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1888 . 

Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1887, for 
catalogues and supplements sold and for lost 
or injured books ...... 



$165 .74 

$106 14 

$59 60 

$14 35 



287 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1888 

For 4 catalogues, at 75 cts. 
For 14 supplements, at 15 cts. . 
Six books lost or injured ., 

Paid the treasurer . 

Balance of fines on hand 

Total balance on hand . . . $69 41 



13 00 
2 10 
4 71 


$9 81 


. 


§24 16 
14 35 




$9 81 
. 59 60 



There is nothing of special importance to add to the 
above statistics. They give substantially the work of the 
library the past year. 'No changes have been made. The 
demand for a new catalogue becomes more and more 
imperative. ISTone but those who have had experience in 
library work can estimate the amount of extra labor 
brought upon the librarian and assistant by the absence 
of a good catalogue, but it is easy to understand that it 
must detract greatly from the usefulness of the library, 
when it is known there are over nine thousand books, a 
large proportion of them belonging to the higher order of 
literature, with no catalogue to give the public any knowl- 
edge concerning them. As a rule, the public will not 
consult the written lists, and many depend entirely upon 
the librarian for the information they desire. In most 
cases the titles and locations are in the mind of the 
librarian ; if absent, there is naturally confusion. The 
frequent changes of the assistant, caused by a desire for 
better compensation, make it impossible for him to become 
familiar with this most important part of library work. 
These changes are very detrimental to the usefulness of 



288 

the library, and bring additional care and anxiety upon 
the librarian. If provision could be made by which a 
competent assistant might be secured and retained, it would 
prove a valuable acquisition both to library and public. 
The falling off in the circulation for the two preceding 
years was a source of regret, and mainly attributable to 
the want of a good catalogue. We may reasonably ex- 
pect a very considerable increase when this most essential 
help is supplied. It is hoped that those in authority will 
appreciate these conditions of our otherwise valuable 
institution, and grant the earnest desire of the public. 

The number of volumes delivered for home use during 
the year just closed was 50,417, a trifle in advance of last 
year. Number used in the reading-room, not including 
the books consulted in the law and patent office depart- 
ment, 5,944, an increase over last year of nearly three 
hundred. 

It is a pleasure to report a much better observance of 
the rules of the library and reading-room than hitherto. 
There has been very little cause for complaint the past year. 

The number of volumes in the library, as indicated in 
the accession-book at the close of 1887, was 30,307. From 
that number an allowance is to be made for a large num- 
ber of worn-out books not yet replaced. There have been 
added the past year 943 volumes, — 593 by purchase, 262 
by gift, and 88 bound volumes of periodicals. Of the 
purchase, 154 were from the Dean Fund, pertaining to 
science and the mechanic arts ; 155 volumes, a purchase 
from S. C. Gould (mentioned in the treasurer's last report), 
being a collection of valuable papers published in our city, 
a jnirchase of last year, but bound and added to the 
accession-book the present year. There are many other 
volumes yet to be bound as soon as they are made complete. 

Among the gifts of the year are seventy-two public 



289 

documents, belonging to the regular set, and a large num- 
ber of publications from the several departments ; also 
some valuable books from the honorable members of 
Congress. Included in the gifts are forty-nine volumes of 
registers, presented by the Shepherd heirs, containing a 
list of names registered at the Manchester House from the 
year 1839 to 1884, inclusive, except 1864, 1865, 1866. 
The library reports received are not included in the 
number, as they are reserved in cases until a sufficient 
number has accumulated for binding. 

Of the seventy periodicals and papers regularly received, 
fifteen are gifts from the several publishers, with two 
exceptions. Four have been discontinued, viz., " Belknap 
Eepublican," " Townsend's Costumes," " The Northwest,'* 
and "The Student and Statesman;'" four added, viz., 
"Leavenworth Times," "Daily Press," and two French 
papers published in our city, "Le Courier duN^ew Hamp- 
shire," and "L'Avenir Canadien." 

. Mnety-nine volumes have been replaced during the 
year, being a collection of bound and unbound maga- 
zines, purchased of the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation, to fill the vacancies made from time to time by 
the wear and tear in that department of the library. The 
number of books taken from the shelves unfit for longer 
use, is about the same as last year, and many others will 
soon share the same fate. 

The work of repairing and covering books increases 
yearly, and no little time is given to the erasure of pencil 
marks and other defacements. It is difficult to detect the 
offenders, as our time will not admit of a thorough exam- 
ination when the books come in, and when questioned, 
the answer is always in the negative. There is good 
reason to believe it is not always the work of the 
juveniles. 

19 



290 

The number of missing books for the year is very 
small, three at the examination in June, and one addi- 
tional in December: fiction, two; history, one; classical, 
one. 

In closing this, my eleventh report, I desire to ac- 
knowledge the kind co-operation of the treasurer of the 
board in the work of the library. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Mrs. M. J. BUN^CHER, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 

1888. 



Hon. H. W. Blair, M. C. 

Seventeen volumes of Congressional Records of the 
Forty-eighth and Forty-ninth Congresses. 4to. 

The Growth of Industrial Art, arranged and com- 
piled under the supervision of Hon. Benj. Butter- 
worth. Folio. 

Hon. L. F. Mckinney, M. C. 

The Growth of Industrial Art. By Hon. Benj. 
Butterworth. Folio. 

Hon. James F. Briggs, Manchester. 

Four volumes of the Official Records of the Union 
and Confederate Armies. Vol. 20, parts 1, 2; 
vols. 21, 22, part 1. 8vo. 

Btate Librarian, Concord, IST. H. 

Hitchcock's Geology of New Hampshire. Three 
volumes and Atlas. 8vo. 

A. B. Thompson, Secretary of State, Concord. 

Journal of the Senate and House, 1887. 2 vols. 
8vo. 

State Reports for the year 1887. 1 vol. 8vo. 

State Laws for the year 1887. 1 vol. 8vo. 

State Papers (Hammond.), vol. 16; of the Revolu- 
tionary War Rolls, vol. 3. 8vo. 



292 

Irving A. Watson, Secretary State Board of Health : 
Seventh Annual Registration Eeport for the year 

1886. 
Reports of the State Board of Health. Vols. 1, 2, 

3, 6, 7. 5 vols. 8vo. 

Col. L. B. Marsh, Boston. 

The Genealogy of John Marsh, of Salem, Mass., and 
his Descendants. 1633-1888. 8vo. 

D. Appleton, ]S"ew York. 

Index to the Annual Cyclopedia. 1876-1887. 8vo: 

F. D. SoNE, Secretary. 

Banquet to commemorate the Framing and Signing 
of the Constitution of the United States. 8vo. 

J. Henry Stickney, Esq., Baltimore. 

A Genealogical Memoir of the Stickney Family, 
1637-1869. By Matthew A. Stickney. 8vo. 

Right Rev. Bishop Bradley, Manchester. 

The Catholic Church in the United States. Vols. 1 
and 2. By John Gilmary Shea. 1888. 8vo. 

Grand Rapids Board of Trade. 

Grand Rapids as It Is. 1888. 4to. 

Hon. Henry H. Huse, Manchester. 

Nineteenth annual report of the|Insurance Com- 
missioner of New Hampshire. 1888. 8vo. 

J. P. Thorndike, Manchester. 

Seven Dozen Gems. (Poems.) 1887. 12mo. 

G. "Waldo Brown, Manchester. 

The Lady of Dardale and other poems. By Horace 
E. Walker. 1886. 8vo. 



293 

Charles F. Livingston, Manchester. 

Springfield Republican for the year 1887. Folio. 
Printer's Circular for the year 1887. 8vo. 

E. M. Bowman, Esq., Nashua. 

Municipal report of the City of Nashua for the year 

1887. 12mo. 

K. P. Kidder, City Clerk. 

Municipal report of the City of Manchester for the 
year 1887. 12mo. 

S. C. Gould, Manchester. 

Notes and Queries. Vol. 5. 1888. 8vo. 
Bibliography on the Polemic Problem : What is the 
Value of Pi. By S. C. Gould. Pamphlet. 

Harry Clifton, Manchester. 

American Politics, by Hon Thomas Y. Cooper and 
W. F. Fenton, Esq., Philadelphia. 1886. 8vo. 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell. 

Ayer's Almanac for the year 1889. 12mo. 

Historical Association, Lowell. 

Contributions of "Old Residents." No. 1. Vol. 4. 

1888. Pamphlet. 

J. C. W. Livermore, Esq. 

Ancient Society of Tennessee. " The Mound 

Builders were Lidians. " By J. P. Thurston. 
Report b}^ Prof. Proctor on the Properties of the 

American Association, Knoxville, Tenn. (geologi- 

ical). Two pamphlets. 

Stephen B. Weeks, Esq. 

Historical Sketch of the Young Men's Christian 
Association in North Carolina. 1857-1888. 

Journal of Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Con- 
vention, April, 1888. Two pamphlets. 



294 

Ladies' Calhoun Association. 

History of the Calhoun Monument at Charleston, 
South Carolina. 1888. Pamphlet. 

Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Manchester. 
Medical Temperance Journal for the year 1888. 

12mo. 
Fourteenth annual report of the W. C. T. U. in 

New Hampshire. Pamphlet. 

Woman's Medical College, of Penn. 

Thirty-ninth Annual Announcement. May. 1888. 
Pamphlet. University of California. 

University of California. 

Register of the University, Berkeley, Cal. Pamphlet. 

George B. Swift, Commissioner of Public Works, 
Chicago. 

Twelfth annual report of the Department for the 
year 1887. Pamphlet. 

Board of Trade, Omaha. 

Eleventh annual report of the Trade and Com- 
merce of Omaha, for the year ending June, 1888. 
Pamphlet. 

Amherst College. 

Catalogues for the years 1887, 1888, and 1889. Three 

pamphlets. 
Addresses of the Alumni, June, 1888. No. 2. 
Pamphlet. 

Unknown. 

The Brotherhood of Thieves. By Stephen Foster, 
Concord, K H. 1886. Pamphlet. 

Tenth annual catalogue of the School of Expres- 
sion. Boston, 1888. Pamphlet. 



295 

The Wilk6sbarre Letters on Theosophy. By Alex- 
ander Fullerton. Pamphlet. 

From Mayor's Office. 

Twenty-four volumes of Municipal Reports ot 
various cities in the United States, 8vo. 

Heirs of William Shepherd. 

Forty-nine volumes of Registers, containing a list of 
names registered at the Manchester House from 
1839 to 1884, inclusive, except 1864, 1865, and 
1866. 

Reports from Librarians or Boards of Trustees. 

Boston Public Library, for the year 1887. Pamphlet. 

Bulletins Kos. 1 and 2. Vol. 8. 1888. Two 

pamphlets. 
Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Library. Thirteenth an- 
nual report. March 29, 1888. Pamphlet. 
Brookline, Mass. Thirty-first annual report. 1887. 

Pamphlet. 
Baltimore, Md. Twenty-first annual report of the 

Peabody Institute. June, 1888. Pamphlet. 
Birmingham, Eng. Twenty -sixth annual report o± 

the Free Libraries Committee. 1887. Pamphlet. 
Bridgeport, Conn. Seventh annual report. July 

1, 1888. Pamphlet. 
Cincinnati (0.) Public Library. Report for the year 

ending June 30, 1886. Pamphlet. 
Cleveland, O. Mneteenth annual report. Aug. 31, 

1887. Pamphlet. 
Chicago, 111. First annual report of the i^ewberry 

Library. July, 1887, to January, 1888. Pamphlet. 
Clinton, Mass. Fourteenth annual report of the 

Bigelow Free Library. 1887. Pamphlet. 



296 

Cardiff, Glamorgan county, Wales. Annual report 
of the Free Library, Museum, and Science and 
Art Schools. 1887-88. Pamphlet. 

Detroit, Mich. Seventh annual report of the 
Library Commission. 1887. Pamphlet. 

Dover, 'N. H. Fifth annual report for the year 

1887. Pamphlet. 

Germantown, Phila. Report of the Friends' Free 

Library and Reading-room, for 1887. Pamphlet. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. Reports of Public School 

Library. 1886-87 and 1887-88. Two pamphlets. 
Lawrence, Mass. Sixteenth annual report. 1887. 

Pamphlet. 
Lowell, Mass. Report of the City Library for 1887. 

Pamphlet. 
Manchester, Eng. Thirty-sixth annual report of 

the Public Free Libraries. 1887-88. Pamphlet. 
Milwaukee, Wis. Eleventh annual report, Oct. 1, 

1888. Pamphlet. 

Maiden, Mass, Tenth annual report. 1887. Pam- 
phlet. 

Melrose, Mass. Seventeenth annual report for the 
year 1887. Pamphlet. 

New Haven, Conn. First annual report of the 
Free Public Library. November, 1887. Pam- 
phlet. 

Newark, IST. J. Forty-first annual report of the 
Library Associations. 1887. Pamphlet. 

Newton, Mass. Annual report for 1887. Pam- 
phlet. 

New York. Maimonides Library, report for the 
year 1887. Pamphlet. 

Omaha, Neb. Eleventh annual report. May, 1888. 
Pamphlet. 



297 

Philadelphia. Sixtj-eighth annual report of the 

Apprentices' Library Company. 1887. Pamphlet. 
Philadelphia. Bulletins of the Library Company 

for January, 1888. New series, Nos. 20 and 21. 

Pamphlet. 
Providence, P. L Tenth annual report. 1887. 

Pamphlet. 
Peabody, Mass. Thirty-sixth annual report of the 

Peabody Institute. March, 1887. Pamphlet. 
Springfield, Mass. Annual report of the City 

Library Association, year ending May, 1888. 

Pamphlet. Bulletins Nos. 1 and 2. Vol. 2. 

Pamphlets. 
San Francisco. Annual reports of the Mercantile 

Library Association for the years 1884, 1887, 1888. 

Three pamphlets. 
Worcester, Mass, Twenty-eighth annual report of 

the Free Library. November, 1887. Pamphlet. 
"Woburn, Mass. Third annual report of Public 

Library, year ending February, 1888. Pamphlet, 
"Waterbury, Conn. Reports of the Board of 

Agents of the Bronson Library Fund for the years 

1886-87 and 1887-88. Two pamphlets. 
Windham, N. H. Report of the Nesmith Library, 

year ending March, 1888. Pamphlet. 

From the Several Publishers. 

" The Dartmouth," Published by the Senior Class, 

Dartmouth College. For the year 1888. Vol. 9. 
"The Manifesto," Published at Shaker A^illage, 

Canterbury, N. H. For the year 1888. 8vo, 
"Good Health." A Journal of Hygiene. Pub- 

hshed at Oakland, Cal. For 1888. 8vo. 
" Notes and Queries," Published by S. C. Gould, 

Manchester, N. H. 1888. 8vo. 



298 

" Plymouth Record." Published at Plymouth, 
K H. For the year 1888. Folio. 

" The Veteran's Advocate." Published in Concord, 
K H. Presented by Mr. Harry Clifton, Man- 
chester. Folio. 

" 'New Hampshire Catholic." Published in Man- 
chester, by Charles A. O'Connor, Esq. For 1888. 
Folio. 

" The Weekly Budget." Published in Manchester, 
by Challis & Eastman. For 1887. FoHo. (Pre- 
sented bound.) 

" The Weirs Times." Published by M. K Calvert, 
during the summer months at the Weirs. For the 
season of 1887. Folio. 

" The Voice." A Temperance Journal. Published 
by Funk & Wagnall, Kew York. 1888. Folio. 

" Lawrence Anzeiger." Published at Lawrence, 
Mass. For the year 1888. Folio. 

" Leavenworth Times." Published by Smith & 
Lamborn, Leavenworth, Kansas. For 1888. 
Folio. 

"The Daily Press." Manchester. Published by 
the Daily Press Co. For the year 1888. Folio. 

united states government. 

State Department. 

Consular Reports. Vols. 24, 25 and 26, and j^os. 

95 and 96, vol. 27. 1888. 8vo. 
Commercial Relations of the United States with 

. Foreign Countries. 1885,1886. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Technical Education in Europe. First part. 
Industrial Education in France. By J. Schoenhof, 
consul at Temstall. 1888. 



299 

First annual report of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. December 1, 1887. Pamphlet. 

Treasury Department, 

Eeports of the Director of the Mint for the years 

1883 to 1887, inclusive. 5 vols. 8vo. 
Reports on the Production of the Precious Metals 

for the years 1880, 1883, 1884, 1885, and 1886. 

5 vols. 8vo. 
Report of the Comptroller of the Currency for the 

year 1887. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Report of the Secretary of the Treasury for 1887. 

8vo. 
Report of the Commissioner of Navigation. 1887. 

8vo. 
Report of the United States Coast and Geodetic 

Survey for 1887. 4to. 
Annual report of the Operations of the Life-Saving 

Service during the year 1887. 8vo. 

Interior Department. 

American State Papers. Vol. 3. December 22, 

1815, to May 26, 1824. 8vo. 
Reports of the Commissioner of Agriculture for 

the years 1874 and 1883. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Reports of the Superintendent of the Coast Survey 

for the years 1851 and 1859. With maps. 2 vols. 

8vo. 
Reports on Commerce and jN^avigation ot the United 

States for the years 1851 and 1886. 2 vols. 

8vo. 
(The above seven volumes sent to fill vacancies.) 
Annual report of the Commissioner of Patents for 

1887. 8vo. 



300 

Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office 

for the year 1888. 4 vols. 8vo. 
Annual report of the Commissioner of Pensions for 

1888. 8vo. 
Third annual report of the Commissioner of Labor, 

viz., On Strikes and Lockouts. 1887. 8vo. 
Report of Receipts and Distribution' of Public 

Documents in behalf of the Government, for the 

year 1888. Pamphlet. 

Bureau of Education. 

Circulars of Information. Nos. 1, 2, 3. 1887. 

Smithsonian Institute. 

Miscellaneous Collections. Vols. 31, 32, 33. 8vo. 
Report of the Smithsonian Institution for the year 
1885. Part 2. 8vo. 

War Department. 

Reports of the Chief Signal Officer for the years 
1872, 1882 to 1887, inclusive, except 1884. 8 
vols. 8vo. 

Monthly Weather Reviews from 1874 to 1881, inclu- 
sive, and 1883, 1884, 1886, 1887. (Somewhat 
incomplete.) 

Tri-Weekly Meteorological Record for 1878. 4 
vols. 4to. 

Weekly Weather Chronicles for 1872, 1873, 1874, 
1875, 1879. 5 vols. 4to. 

Daily Bulletins, Synopses, Indications, and Facts for 
the months of January, March, September, Octo- 
ber, E"ovember, and December, 1887. 6 Nos. 
4to. 

Tornado Circular, ISTo. 1. ISTew Series. Pamphlet. 

Instructions to Observers of the Signal Service. 
With plates and maps. 8vo. 



301 

Official Danger, Distress, and Storm Signal Codes for 

Signal Service, etc. 8vo. 
Instructions to Voluntary Observers of the Signal 

Service. 8vo. 
Practical IJse of Meteorological Reports and 

Weather Maps, etc. 4 vols. 8vo. 

Commission of Fish and Fisheries. 

Commissioners' reports for the years 1873 to 1885, 
inclusive, except 1876, 1887, 1878, and 1879. 
8 vols. 8vo. 
Bulletins of the United States Commission for the 
years 1881 to 1886, inclusive. 6 vols. 8vo. 

United States Congress. 

Seventy-two volumes of Public Documents of the 
Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, Forty-ninth, and 
first session of the Fiftieth Congress. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH, 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor : 

The Board ot Health respectfully submits its report for 
the year 1888. 

At the beginning of the year, the board consisted of 
Dr. George C. Hoitt, chairman, Joseph B. Sawyer, clerk, 
and Dr. George A. Crosby, who had been appointed to 
the place made vacant by the death of Dr. William A. 
Webster, which took place on February 7, 1887. Dr. 
Crosby died on the 30th of January last, and the vacancy 
thus occasioned was filled by the appointment of Dr. 
William M. Parsons. The board as thus constituted has 
since remained unchanged. 

Mr. Russell White has been employed throughout the 
year, and Mr. W. H. B. ^N'ewhall from April 23 to Sep- 
tember 29, each at two dollars per day. 

EXPENSES. 

A more detailed statement will be found in the City 
Clerk's account of appropriations and payments. 

The expenses of the board may be classified as follows : 



Pay of employes 


. $838 00 


Street-car fares 


25 50 


Stationery and postage 


21 18 


Carriage hire .... 


2 25 


Express charges 


2 70 



20 



306 



Professional advice of veterinary surgeons 
Paid for assistance to Mr. White, burying dead 

animals , . , . . 

Chemical analyses of water 

Printing 

Advertising . . . 

Total 



$10 00 



11 


75 


15 


00 


53 


90 


33 


25 



L,013 53 



In addition to the foregoing amount, the sum of 1700.87 
has been charged to the health department for labor of 
men and teams. The appropriation to the health depart- ' 
ment was $1,200, and it has thus been overdrawn to the 
amount of $514.40. The explanation of this matter is as 
follows : 

At the request of the board, the superintendent of 
streets in District No. 2 was instructed to put on, during 
the warm weather, in addition to his regular scavenger 
teams, a one-horse cart and men for the daily removal 
of the more perishable class of wastes from the compact 
business portion of the city. Mr. Sanborn, the super- 
intendent, willingly made the arrangement, and it was a 
great convenience and satisfaction to our people. He 
has always been courteous to hear our suggestions, and 
ready to carry them into practice, so far as they did not 
interfere with his other and larger operations in the street 
department ; but the board has been, in no regular and 
legal way, responsible for what has been done, any more 
than for what has been done by the regular scavenger 
teams. The cost of this service has somehow been ascer- 
tained or estimated, and without any auditing by the board 
has been charged to their account. We would not be 
understood as intimating or suspecting wrong-doing on 
the part of any one. We have no such complaint to 
make ; but the system, if so it can be called, is loose and 



307 

improper. It is not to be supposed that the City Councils, 
when they appropriated more than eighty thousand dollars 
to be expended in various ways by the superintendents of 
streets, eighty-five hundred of which was for scavenger 
service, intended that these appropriations should be 
pieced out by recourse to the modest little appropriation 
for the care of the public health. It is suggested that 
hereafter all expenses of the scavenger service be charged 
to the appropriation for that purpose. 

THE WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

The ordinary work of a board of health is hardly sus- 
ceptible of being set forth in imposing rhetoric, or even 
in a great array of statistics, at least not unless a record 
has been kept of a multitude of aifairs small in them- 
selves, although of considerable importance in the aggre- 
gate, a record which is hardly worth the time required in 
its making. In the absence of such a record, only a few 
of the more important items can l)e given : 

Number of recorded inspections of premises, mostly 
tenement and business blocks, 76. In most of these 
premises repairs were made or cleaning was done by the 
owner at the suggestion or order of the board. 

Number of dead animals found and buried by the board, 
or by the owner on notice from the board, 86 ; viz., swine, 
51 ; horses, 10 ; dogs, 19 ; cats, 5 ; cow, 1. Thirty-five 
dead swine were found at one time in one field. 

Other nuisances abated, 170. Special permits, granted 
after examination of the premises, for occupant to clean 
his own privj'-vault, 29. Vaults inspected after being 
cleaned by the licensed cleaners, 1,032. Houses placarded 
for infectious diseases, 295. Houses containing cases of 
typhoid fever visited but not placarded, 33. 

One privy-vault has been cleaned by the lioard by 
authority of law, and one case of suspected glanders in a 



308 

horse has been investigated. Two parties have been 
licensed to clean vaults by the pumping process and the 
closed tank. Their work is constantly under the watch 
of an inspector, and while it is not absolutely "odorless," 
it is done in a way that causes very little, if any, annoy- 
ance to the people, and few would approve of going back 
to the old style of night-work, in vogue until within the 
last two years. 

A still greater advance, and one which the future is 
sure to bring, will be the abolishment of the privy-vault 
itself as a relic of barbarism, fit only for the times when 
j)eople were innoculated with the small-pox as a protective 
measure, and were bled for the cure of their diseases. It 
is a question whether public sentiment would not even 
now approve and sustain a regulation abolishing these 
structures in the business portion of the city. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The year has passed without any startling outbreak of 
pestilence like what has occurred in distant parts of our 
country and in foreign lands. Yellow fever, small-pox, 
and cholera have not invaded our city; but there are 
always present contagious diseases which may at any time 
assume the character of wide-spread and malignant pesti- 
lence. The tables on the following pages show that there 
have been one hundred and twenty-six cases of diphtheria, 
with thirty deaths ; forty-four cases of scarlet fever, with 
one death ; thirty-five cases of typhoid fever, with twelve 
deaths; and one hundred and eighty-seven cases of measles, 
with nine deaths; in all, three hundred and nine-two 
cases of sickness, with fifty-two deaths. History records 
that each of these diseases has repeatedly proved itself 
capable of slaying its hundreds in some stricken com- 
munity. If there had been one hundred and twenty-six 
cases of small-pox, resulting in thirty deaths, the whole 



309 

community would have been excited, and the health 
department would have been sustained in the most vigor- 
ous and arbitrary measures for restricting and extermin- 
ating the disease. 

Diphtheria and scarlet fever, no less than small-pox and 
cholera, are preventable by isolation and disinfection. 
Whenever a case of diphtheria, scarlet-fever, or measles 
has come to the knowledge of the board, we have imme- 
diately placarded the house in which it existed, notified 
the teachers of the schools which the children who had 
been exposed to the disease attended, distributed copies 
of the instructions and requirements of the State Board 
of Health as to the restriction and prevention of the dis- 
ease, and taken such other measures as were practicable. 
We have also left at the house a paper containing a blank 
certificate, to be filled out and signed by the attending 
physician after all danger of contagion is past, and to be 
returned to board. Upon the receipt of this certificate, 
the placard has always been promptly removed from the 
house. 

We believe these measures have produced good results, 
but in a community like ours efiective isolation and disin- 
fection cannot thus be secured. Probably more than one 
half of our population are foreigners, A large part of 
the remainder came here from scattered farm-houses and 
small villages, where the health ofiicer has never troubled 
them, and the sanitary precautions needful in a city have 
been practically unknown. A considerable part inherit 
the belief, which was once pardonable in the then existing 
state of human knowledge, that sickness, and especially 
pestilence, is something which man cannot prevent and 
for the spread of which he is not responsible, and that 
the proper measures to be taken in such an emergency 
are devotional rather than sanitary. Many of the families 



310 

in which these diseases appear live in crowded tenement- 
blocks, and are dependent on the weekly earnings of some 
of their members for their weekly subsistence. To pre- 
vent the grown-up members of such a family from going 
out to their daily labor is a hardship to which they ought 
not to be subjected; and to do this after the sick one has 
become convalescent, although the danger of infection has 
not passed, is impracticable. 

These diseases should be dealt with in the same manner 
as is small-pox. A hospital should be provided for their 
reception and treatment at the public expense, and when- 
ever a case is found in circumstances where for any reason 
isolation and disinfection cannot be thoroughly secured, 
it should be at once removed thereto. This is the dictate 
alike of care for ourselves and of charity for the poor and 
the sick. It is believed that such an arrangement would 
restrict the cases of contagious disease to very small 
numbers ; that by the favorable surroundings, the good 
nursing, and the skillful medical attendance which might 
be thus secured, a much larger percentage of recoveries 
would be realized, and that when once the institution 
should be in working -order, it would show itself to be 
one of our most beneficent public charities. 

Such an institution need not be very costly. Probably 
a sum equal to that spent in building, equipping, and 
maintaining one of our three new fire-engine houses 
would be ample for the purpose. It would seem that we 
should be as well fore-armed against pestilence as against 
conflagration. 

Two instances showing how contagious diseases are 
spread by ignorance or carelessness have recently come 
to our knowledge. On December 5, notice was received 
from one of our physicians that a case of diphtheria 
existed in the person of a child in a certain Canadian 



311 



family. It appears that the grandmother, who lived in 
the city with another daughter, came and assisted the 
mother in the care of the child, returning after a few 
days to her usual home, whe>'e there was a family of 
children. It was in a tenement block. On the 18th of the 
same month a case was reported from that family, on the 
20th another, followed on the 23d and 24th by two more. 
Three of these four cases were terminated by death. 

The other instance was where an infant of four months 
in an American family living in the suburbs, and well 
apart from all others, fell sick with measles. JSTo case of 
the disease had been known to the board for several 
weeks. It was learned that about two weeks before the 
appearance of this case, the family had received a call 
from a man living in a neighboring town in whose family 
the disease at that time existed. 

The following table shows that measles were most prev- 
alent in the first half of the year, and diphtheria in the 
last half. 



CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES REPORTED DURING THE YEAR. 





















C 














>. 












. 


^ 




<a 








la 
a 

1-5 


C3 

2 

1 




CI. 


3 


§ 

1-5 

6 


"3 
3 


3 

9 

■«! 
4 


(B 

i 

30 


1 

O 
24 


a 

i 

17 


a 

o 

19 


3 

o 
H 


Diphtheria 


4 


7 


3 


6 


126 


Scarlet fever 


6 


4 


8 


5 


2 


1 


2 


7 


6 


2 


1 


1 


44 


Typhoid fever 






5 


3 


1 


1 


1 


2 


4 


10 


7 


1 


35 




23 


32 


50 


35 


21 


18 


2 


2 






4 


•• 


187 







The following table, which has the indorsement of 
eminent medical and sanitary authority, is printed as 
answering questions which are often asked, and afford- 
ing other information of interest to parents, school- 
teachers, and the general public. 



312 



Disease. 



Time from incep- 
tion to beginning 
of eruption. 



Time from final pre- 
cursory symptoms 
to beginning of 
eruption. 



Time from be- 
ginning of 
eruption to 
cessation of 
pyrexia (fe- 
ver). 



Time from be- 
ginning of 
eruptio n 
till patient 
ceases to be 
infective. 



Small-pox 


13 days. 
Ramge 7 to 21 days. 


2 days. 

Range a few hours 

to 7 days. 


14 days. 


56 days. 


Varioloid or Mod- 
ified Small -pox.. 


13 days. 
Range 7 to 21 days. 


2 days. 

Range a few hours 

to 7 days. 


14 days. 


35 days. 


Chicken-pox 


13 days. 
Range 4 to 17 days. 


2 days. 

Range a few hours 

to 3 days. 


5 days. 

Range 3 to 7 

days. 


17 days. 




14 days. 
Range 7 to 21 days. 


4 days. 
Range 1 to 9 days. 


6 days. 


27 days. 






German Measles. . . 


14 days. 
Range 10 to 20 days. 


Iday. 
Range nil to 3 days. 


7 days. 


14 days. 


Scarlatina or 
Scarlet Fever*.. 


4 days. 

Range a few hours 

to 14 days. 


1 day. 


7 days. 


49 days. 



Diphtheria. 



28 days. 




Typhus Fever- 



21 days. 



Typhoid or Enteric 


21 days. 
Range 1 to 28 days. 




21 davs. 


28 davs. 




Range 7 to 12 days. IRange 14 to 23 
days. 




18 days. 
Range 3 to 25 days. 


4 days. 


7 days. 


21 days. 







* In scarlet fever the common period of incubation is from 24 to 48 hours, — occasion- 
ally longer, lasting from three to five days. In rare instances the incubatory period is 
practically absent, the symptoms following quickly upon exposure to infection. Any sus- 
ceptible person who has been exposed to infection should, before being pronounced safe 
from itb probable consequences, be kept under surveillance for a week, and then only be 
set at liberty after change of clothes and baths. It is an error to regard the infective 
process at an end before the cessation of desquamation and for some considerable interval 
thereafter. The tendency to albuminuria ought always to be remembered and guarded 
against. The isolation of scarlet fever patients for a period of not less than eight weeks 
is regarded as absolutely necessary by some prominent physicians. 



313 



THE DISPOSAL OF CITY WASTES 

is a subject which is now forcing itself upon the atten- 
tion of many city councils and boards of health. The 
warnings of sanitarians and the constant and reasonable 
complaints of those who live near any city dumping- 
place are beginning to command attention. The practice 
in our own city should be amended. When we require 
a man to keep his own premises clean, he very naturally 
objects to the collected filth and rubbish from a thousand 
houses being brought and dumped near his door. Such 
stuff is not made harmless by being collected into a great 
bank in a ravine, any more than it would be by being 
left in a great heap on level ground; and streets built in 
that way can never become proper places for habitations. 
Decay deep under ground may proceed more slowly, 
but none the less surely ; and it is precisely this decay 
which goes on with a scant supply of air that is most 
poisonous and most to be feared. Disease germs buried 
in the earth have been known to survive for centuries. 
One instance is where in 1828 the plague broke out at 
Modena in Italy, as a consequence of an excavation in the 
ground where three hundred years previously the victims 
of that disease had been interred. Our city has already 
extended itself over several old dumping-places, and it 
will ere long cover those now in use. It is our belief 
that these spots will be for centuries the vulnerable points 
where sickness and contagion will oftenest strike the city. 
The safest, the most satisfactory, and, as we are assured, 
the cheapest way of disposing of waste matters in inland 
cities is by burning. It is claimed to be the cheapest be- 
cause the attendance required by a furnace is little, if at 
all, greater than that necessarily bestowed on a dumping- 
place ; and as a furnace can be located and operated in 
the midst of the city without producing a nuisance, the 



314 

cost of a long haul into the suburbs is avoided. During 
the last twenty years several forms of crematories for 
garbage have been devised, both in this country and in 
Europe, which are said to burn up, at a reasonable ex- 
pense, whatever of organic matter is fed to them so. thor- 
oughly as to create no nuisance or danger. In America 
we have the Rider furnace, which is in use at Pittsburg : 
the Mann, at Montreal and Chicago; and the Engle, at 
Milwaukee, Des Moines, Coney Island, and Minneapolis. 
All these are said to work satisfactorily. The following 
statement of the work done by the one at Minneapolis is 
made by Dr. Kilvington, the president of the local board 
of health : With three men to work the furnace, two of 
whom were on duty by day and one by night, there were 
consumed in five days, 33 horses, 59 dogs, 103 barrels of 
hotel and commission-house refuse, 12 loads of market 
otfal, and 70 loads of manure, weighing in all over 200 tons 
at a total cost for labor and fuel of $38.25. And he fur- 
ther states that the " possibility of burning the refuse 
materials of a great city were without imposing upon its 
people a penalty of insanitary consequences in the perform- 
ance of the act, has been established beyond the shadow 
of a doubt." It is believed that a furnace of this kind, 
large enough to serve for the next ten years, with a suit- 
able chimney, storage for fuel and shelter for the teams, 
can be built in Manchester, exclusive of the cost of the lot, 
for about five thousand dollars. 

PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY. 

In March last the board sent two samples of water to 
Prof. Edmund R. Angell, of Derry, for sanitary analysis. 
His reports are appended. It should be stated that when 
the reports were made, Prof. Angell had no knowledge 
as to the sources from wdiich the samples were taken. 



315 

Water from the fountain at the City Hall, siqjplied from the 
spring on Hanover Square, taken March 16, 1888. 

Odorless. 

Colorless. 

Evaporation, quiet. 

Residue, uniform and white. 

Total solids, grains per gallon, 12.2. 

Residue darkens but slightly on ignition. 

Volatile and combustible matter, 4. 

Hardness, equivalent to grains of CaCOg, 4.5. 

Alkalinity, equivalent to grains of CaCOg, 0.5. 

Chlorine, grains per gallon, 1.7. 

Free ammonia, parts per million, none. 

Albuminoid ammonia, parts per million, 0.03. 

Mtric acid, some. 

I^itrous acid, none. 

Lead, none. 

Iron, slight trace. 

Sediment, none. 

Microscopic examination shows nothing significant. 

Bacterium termo in small number. 

Chlorine and nitric acid are in excess. They have 
filtered through the soil, while the organic matter with 
which they were associated was retained. There is an 
unusually small amount of ammonia. This fact, in con- 
nection with the slight darkening of the residue during 
ignition, shows that there is no appreciable amount of 
organic matter in the water at present. How long it 
may remain so can best be estimated by examination of 
the surroundings. But the fact that so much chlorine is 
present shows some unfavorable connection with the 
water, and if organic matter itself, in dangerous amount, 
is not brought into it, there would, nevertheless, be lia- 
bility of disease germs entering, should they be present 
in sources of pollution about the premises. Although 
the present condition of the water does not appear to be 
prejudicial to health, for reasons given above it must be 
denominated suspicious water, unless the excess of chlo- 
rine and nitric acid can be satisfactorily accounted for in 



316 

a way other than to attribute them to some source of filth. 
The earthy salts are sulphates mostly. 

Edmund R. Angell. 
Derry, IS\ H., March 19, 1888. 

Massabesic water (city water), taken from the fountain near 
the corner of Elm and Myrtle streets, March 21, 1888. 

Odor, slight. 

Color, marked yellowish brown. 

Evaporation, somewhat foamy. 

Residue, in circles and patches, brownish. 

Total solids, grains per gallon, 2.8. 

Residue darkens decidedly on ignition. 

Volatile and combustible matter, 0.5. 

Hardness, equiA^alent to grains of CaCOg, 2. 

Alkalinity, equivalent to grains of CaCOg, 1. 

Chlorine, grains per gallon, 0.1. 

Free ammonia, parts per million, 0.025. 

Albuminoid ammonia, parts per million, 0.13. 

Nitric acid, slight trace. 

!N"itrous acid, none. 

Lead, none. 

Iron, grains per gallon, about y^. 

Sediment, none. 

Microscopic examination shows nothing significant. 

The first portion of condensed steam from this water 
has a slight odor, which reminds one. of decayed wood. 
The color appears to be due to dissolved organic matter 
because the residue becomes colorless on ignition, but it 
would remain brown if the color was owing to iron. 
The total solids are very small in amount, and the hard- 
ness shows that the larger part of them consists of earthy 
salts. 

The amount of albuminoid ammonia shows that the 
quantity of dissolved organic matter is rather more than 
desirable, though it is low for river or pond water. 

Edmund R. Angell. 

Derry, K H., March 23, 1888. 



317 

It will be seen that the spring water contains more 
than four times the total solids, eight times as much vola- 
tile and combustible matter, and seventeen times as much 
chlorine as the city water, that it is more than twice as 
hard, and has more nitric acid; while, on the other hand, 
it has the advantage as to alkalinity and albuminoid am- 
monia. This is precisely the kind of water that might 
be expected from a spring draining a sandy eoil covered* 
with houses, and then percolating through the sand of a 
public square to its outlet. And yet this water, with all 
its impurities, is doubtless better than that drawn from 
the wells in the older parts of the cit}-. 

THE BACK STREETS. 

The condition of these passage-ways is a reproach to 
the city, for which the board of health is sometimes 
blamed. Some of these passage-ways are not laid out as 
highways; most of them are not graded; few are paved or 
even graveled ; and almost without exception they are re- 
garded by all classes of our people as the appointed and 
proper places for piling wood, drying stable-bedding, 
throwing slops, waste paper, ashes, kitchen wastes, and 
every kind of rubbish. A city ordinance forbids these 
practices ; but by general consent it has not been consid- 
ered to apply to the passage-ways, so that our city, with its 
well-swept front streets and its dirty back streets, is much 
like a man with a silk hat, a broadcloth coat, and the most 
filthy and ragged underclothing. So far as the prac- 
tices above mentioned are 'injurious to the public health, 
they are by law within the cognizance of the board ; but 
they are so firmly rooted in the habits of our people that 
nothing but the frequent and persistent arrest and punish- 
ment of oflenders will break them up. This will require a 
vigilant and constant patrol of these streets by an officer 



318 

such as this board has neither the power to appoint nor the 
means to pay. As things are now arranged, the duty of 
cleaning and caring for the streets, both front and back, 
is laid upon other departments ; but this board would 
earnestly suggest, in the interest of the public health, that 
the time has come when more attention should be given 
to this matter. All the passage-ways should be laid out 
as highways, and the work of grading, curbing, and pav- 
ing should be commenced in earnest. We believe that 
the more important of these passage-ways should be paved 
with concrete, as being not as costly as granite block pav- 
ing or crushed stone, and much more easily cleaned with 
either shovel, broom, or hose. 

SEWERAGE. 

The growth of the citj^ has recently been so rapid that 
a great many localities are in sore need of sewerage. Pre- 
suming that the committee of the City Councils having 
charge of this department will be more thoroughly ac- 
quainted with the situation then we are, we yet take the 
liberty to call attention to two or three items which seem 
to us to be most urgent. 

The very worst sewage nuisance in this city, and one 
which can be abated for a moderate outlay, is one of 
which we have spoken in a previous report, and for which 
the city is itself responsible. We refer to that at the out- 
let of the sewer under the west end of McGregor bridge. 
A similar nuisance for which a manufacturing corporation 
or a private party should be responsible, would not be 
tolerated. It is hoped that one of the first acts of the com- 
mittee will be the abatement of this danger to the public 
health. 

Probably no sewer of equal length could be built which 
is so urgently necessary as one in Massabesic street from 



319 

Spruce to the Portsmouth Raih'oad. The new Spruce- 
street sewer now affords a way- of disposing of the sew- 
age, and the drainage of the many houses in that vicinity 
ought no longer to be neglected. The needs of the shoe- 
shop are especially urgent. Last autumn the board con- 
sented that, as a temporary arrangement, the drainage of 
this establishment might be led on to a small piece of flat 
land by the side of the cemetery brook. It appeared to 
us that in the present state of things this was the best that 
could be done, the only alternative being the collection 
of the drainage in a cesspool, and the carting of it away ; 
but in the hot weather of summer the situation will be 
dangerous, and if no sewer is provided the alternative 
may have to be resorted to. It is easy to say that those 
who located this important enterprise should have placed 
it where sewers were already built, a rule which if gener- 
ally followed would stop all extension of the city, or at 
least compel such extensions to wait until sewers could be 
built in advance of the shops and dwellings. We hope 
that the City Councils will find it proper to build this 
sewer the coming spring. 

The marked prevalence of diphtheria in West Man- 
chester last fall, and in Bakersville in the autumn of 1887, 
though not distinctly proved to be occasioned by lack of 
sewerage in those "localities, is at least sufficient to direct 
attention to the subject. In both places considerable ex- 
tensions and improvements are absolutely necessary. 

CONCLUSION. 

Important interests are committed to the care of your 
board. Some of the means that have been used to serve 
them, and others which in our judgment ought to be 
used, have been spoken of in the preceding pages. There 
are other sanitary measures which a growing public senti- 



320 

ment will sometime permit or demand. Among these 
may be mentioned an efficient supervision of house 
plumbing; a medical inspector of the schools, and of the 
scholars as well; free public baths, both for summer and 
winter; a summer camp hospital for sick and weakly in- 
fants and their mothers, where a healthful location, clean 
food, pure air, and good attendance can be found, so that 
cholera infantum will no longer be the most deadly 
disease in our city. 

Perhaps it is not too much to hope that sometime in the 
future the health department, instead of being regarded 
as one of the least of municipal affairs, will be seen to have 
in its keeping interests as important and vital as those of 
the fire department, the police, or the schools; and that it 
will be o-iven the means to defend those interests with 
something more than the thin line of works which is 
now at its command, — a line which the enemy is always 
slipping through, and which there is constant danger of 
his carrying by a general assault. 

We append the usual table of mortuary statistics of the 
year, also a table of comparisons of the last four years. 
The table for 1887, having never been printed, is also 

given. 

GEORGE C. HOITT, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
WILLIAM M. PARSONS, 

Board of Health of Manchester. 
January, 1889. 



321 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND BY MONTHS. 

FOR THE YEAR 1888, COMPILED FROM THE RECORDS OF THE CITY 

REGISTRAR. 



Causes of Death. 
Zymotic. 




e 

s 




b4 

< 


^ 

s 


a 
4 


>) 
"a 
"-a 

38 
1 
1 
1 


3 
ho 
3 
< 

44 
2 


1 

22 
2 

8 


C 
o 

_!_ 

s 

1 

8 


a) 

> 

1 
2 
1 


M 

a 

A 

8 


i 








1 


1 

2 


2 
1 


115 




3 
1 


3 
2 


24 


Diphtheria — 


30 






X 






















1 


















1 
3 








■^ 
























R 






















t 


£, *.' 












1 












1 














1 
2 




3' 


'3' 
1 

i" 


T 














2 






12 










1 






















1 
1 


1 


Inanition 


1 
1 
3 










1 










T 














1 




2 




1 




3 
1 














» 
















1 








2 


' i' 
1 

6 


1 






1 

"i' 

41 








4 










1 
1 

44 


1 
52 


"i 

IG 


9 


20 


S 


Whooping cough 


9 


8 


3 


1 
7 


12 


5 
22T 



Causes of Death. 
Constitutional. 


3 

1 


S 
3 

i 

T 


1 

1^ 


< 


§» 

S 


a 
3 
i-s 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 


3 
bo 

3 
<j 

1 
1 


1 

t/2 


c 

1 



.0 

a 

> 

125 


J 
B 

Q 


"ei 


. 


5 




1 


1 




i 


1 


1 




7 








?: 






1 


















1 






1 




















1 






* ' 


















1 


1 








1 


















1 








1 


















1 










1 






1 




• • • 


1 

6 


















1 


Consumption 


11 


15 
2 


7 
1 


3 


9 


11 

1 


6 


11 

1 


8 


16 


G 

1 


1C9 
6 




1 
1 
1 








1 








2 










1 




1 




6 


Hemorrhage of lungs 






2 




!• 


1 














1 










1 
















1 










1 
















1 










1 
















1 


Rheumatism of heart 


1 








' 












i 


1 




















1 




1 






















1 






1 






1 






1 




1 




4 




1 

18 












1 




9 


21 


14 


6 


14 


14 


8 


15 


9 


19 


10 


157 



21 



322 
TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes op Death. 
Local, 


ta 

3 

a 
m 

1-5 


1 
1 


i 


a. 
< 


§• 

% 


6 


1 


3 
60 


Q. 


1 


1 


1 

a 




















2 




2 










1 




1 i 

2 1 






s 


Apoplexy 


2 




1 






4 






11 










1 


1 




1 




1 




2 




I 


1 


l' 






fi 






1 












1 

1 












1 














1 












9 












1 










1 


























1 




1 
1 
1 












1 

















1 


1 

1 


1 






1 










11 




1 
1 
1 




s 












"l 






1 












1 
1 








s 






















1 








1 

3 


















1 


Bronchitis.. 


6 




1 
2 

1 
1 
1 


2 




1 




1 


1 


4 


3 
3 

1 


25 

R 




















1 




■>, 










1 










4 




















1 


3 
































1 


































1 








1 

1 


















































4 


2 


2 


2 






2 


2 

1 


3 




3 


Olj 














2 
1 




















1 












































1 
























1 


























































1 




















1 

1 






























































I 










































1 
1 




1 




























































1 






1 
3 


























2 


3 


3 


2 


1 

1 


4 


2 


6 


4 


3 


3 


?fl 


** fatty degeneration 








































































1 




























1 ...J T 










1 
















1 






1 














1 




1 






















1 






















1 




1 


9 




















2 


'I 


** atrophy. 




1 










1 




1 


1 

























2 








1 


1 


<! 
















1 1 1 


* ' inflammation 






1 




















1 



323 

TABLE. — Conti7iued. 



Causes of Death. 
Local, — Contimted. 


>> 

C8 

S 

c3 


S 
.a 




'u 
0. 


§» 
S 




s 


s 
bo 

3 


1 

CO 


u 
o 

o 

8 


a 

>• 


a 


1 
5 




1 
1 


1 
1 


1 

1 


2 






2 
1 




1 






1 


9 


" cerebro-spinal... . 






4 




1 














1 


























1 












1 
1 
1 














1 






1 

3 



















2 
1^ 






4 




1 

1 














1 










2 




















1 






1 




















1 




1 


1 

5 

•> 




1 
2 
1 
















3 




? ? 


2 


3 


1 
1 


1 


3 


1 




36 




e 


Pyelitis 






1 




1 










2 


























1 




1 












1 


1 








2 
















1 










1 
















1 




1 














1 
1 

21 






1 






1 
30 






1 


.. 








2 




42 


30 


25 


25 17 


21 


17 




22 


16 


22 


288 



Causes of Death. 
BevelopmentaL 


a 

3 

a 

1-5 


2 




fi. 
< 




6 

1 


■3 


9 

s 
<! 


a 


c 


.a 





a 



!2i 


a 


"3 
1 














1 














1 




















1 






1 






1 














1 


9, 






1 
2 
4 


















1 




3 
5 


2 


1 
2 






6 
5 
1 


■■2' 


2 
2 


3 

7 


3 

2 


'4' 


^0 


Debility 


4 


2 


41 
1 


















1 








1 








1 
1 




1 














9. 




1 
1 

3 


.... 






1 




1 


2 




1 










1 


Old age 


6 
1 


1 


4 
2 


2 

1 


3 
1 




1 


1 


2 


1 


2 

1 


26 
6 








1 

7 








1 


Still-births 


5 


8 


14 


2 


5 


7 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 

1 
1 

12 


62 




1 








11 














1 


18 


IT 


24 


13 




14 


16 


12 


10 


16 


11 


175 



324 
TABLE. — Concluded. 



Causes op Death. 
Violence. 


s 
a 
a 

"-5 


3 

i 


a 
a 


< 


a 


a 

3 


■3 


1 


3 

05 


U 
CD 

t 


.a 


1 


"S 
1 


Accident, not specified 


2 








2 






1 
1 


"i" 


1 






6 


1 


2 






5 
















1 

1 




1 
























1 














■" 










1 














2 












2 


" concussion of spine 
























1 












1 




2 


1 
1 






4 




















1 














1 












2 






















1 


1 












1 
3 












1 




2 


— 


1 





3 


5 


2 


"T 


3 


3 


1 


26 


Unclassified. 
Cause not stated 


3 


7 


1 


3 


11 

1 

12 
66 


5 




3 


1 


3 


3 


1 


41 
1 


Totals, all classes 


3 
92 


7 
72 


1 
80 


59 


5 

65 


100 


3 
94 


1 

92 


3 

68 


3 

61 


1 

66 


42 
915 



325 




i " S a g a 

'T-Soi'-aa • •=« 

rt **-i ^ ■ a *^ • -r -^ 
' «■; ^ > .- — o. . 5 .-g 

5 II o-m S a g-2 „ 
qpO«QOQOOOO« 



5 cs 






326 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITT BY DISEASES AND BY MONTHS 

FOR THE YEAR 1887, COMPILED FROM THE RECORDS IN 

THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK. 



Causes of Death. 


s 

1-5 




J3 

a 


0, 
•< 


^ 

S 




CI 

a 


1 


1 

9 


1 

03 


1 


1 


.0 

s 


1 




1 






1 












1 






'^ 


** kidneys 

Accidents not specified 


1 


1 
1 
















<) 


1 


3 




2 


2 
1 






1 


1 


11 








1 








1 




2 














4 










1 






2 


s 




1 
1 




"i 












J 


















2 












1 
2 






1 










1 


2 


3 




1 


1 
1 


1 




11 












1 




















1 






1 




1 


















1 




















2 






2 










2 












2 


















1 








1 




2 




5 




3 

1 

.... 

2 


"i* 
1 

1 


.... 

"'3' 

1 


1 








11 

2 












1 

1 

"i* 


1 

"i" 


"2' 

2 


1 
2 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 


"i" 


"i' 

6 

"i' 


^ 






1 
1 
1 


"i" 


g 






18 




1 


s 































1 




1 








1 
1 




1 
1 
1 


1 

"i* 


2 
.... 


1 


1 


10 




s 














1 


5 












1 


1 


Childbirth 
















1 
22 








1 












3 


4 


72 

1 


38 
1 


3 


4 


2 


\/\f^ 












9 








1 
1 

""5' 
















1 




3 
3 
3 


1 

2 






1 
2 
3 


1 


2 


3 
3 

4 






2 
4 
4 


1'f 




1 
2 

1 


3 
3 


4 
4 


3 

2 


25 


"nphilitv 


2 


■ 3 


35 




1 
















1 










1 




1 






2 






1 










i\ 


















2 



















1 








1 




1 




1 

1 
1 


1 

1 


2 




2 


7 


1 
1 


2 


17 










1 


i\ 




1 






1 
1 


1 






4 


















1 




1 






















1 


















1 






1 


■> 








i 
2 




1 














1 




















.... 


1 


















1 






■> 


















1 














1 
1 


2 


1 




1 




2 


1 




4 


1 


4 


1 


17 
1 


** malarial 


1 



327 

TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes of Death, 


t 

3 

i 

•-9 






0. 
< 


s- 

S 




□ 
3 


3 
>-? 

1 


3 

< 



a. 

CO 




« 

a 

> 




a 


s 


H 


Fever, worm 


1 


'* scarlet 




1 














2 






4 


*' relapsing 






1 












1 


*' puerperal 

" brain 








.... 




.... 


1 











1 






4 


Fistula 


1 








1 




"> 


Fits 






















1 


Gastritis 


1 






















1 


Gangrene 




1 

3 




"5' 


"4" 


'i' 
1 


"2" 


■2 


"i" 




"e' 


1 




7 




iJ9 




1 


























1 










— 














1 


1 


























'^, 




















1 




1 










1 








... . 








1 
























.... 


■^ 












1 

1 


1 
1 




? 








2 




2 


3 








1 


13 








1 








1 


















1 












1 
1 




1 
.... 










3 




3 














1 
1 


S 












4 




















1 
























1 










1 


1 








. . . . 






■ ? 












.... 










1 












1 
1 
1 














■^ 










1 

1 










? 










1 


"i' 


1 

1 


1 
1 




2 
2 


1 
1 


10 




2 


8 








1 




1 










3 




1 
1 


1 


1 








7 












1 












1 












1 
1 
1 


? 












1 












3 






















1 


























1 










1 
















1 




1 























?. 










1 
1 
2 






2 


"3" 

1 


1 
1 
4 
1 


?. 




1 
2 


2 

2 


1 

2 


"2 








2 


13 








2 18 










1 










1 

"4' 
1 

'4 


i" 

6 








1 






3 








1 

6 






2 
9 






4 


Phthisis 


6 


4 


- 6 


10 


7 


8 




8 


89! 




1 




1 
3 
1 


'2' 
3 


2 










1 
1 
1 


'2 
'i' 




"4' 


?l 




2 

1 
1 

1 


4 




1 


32 




7 












2 


8 
















1 






















1 


























1 














J 






1 




2 


*' of heart 














1 
1 


3 




















1 


Stomach, disease of 


'.'.'.'. 




1 


1 
















2 



.328 
TABLE. — Concluded. 



Causes of Death. 


1 






< 


^ 

S 


a 
s 


>. 

§ 


3 

S 
< 


B 

e 
a. 


1 
6 


i 

o 


u 

i 


1 






1 

1 


















2 


.... 


R 








1 
1 














"> 








1 

1 














3 
















1 






















1 






1 

1 


1 






1 


2 


1 


2 




4 


1^ 






























1 


■> 
























1 
























3 








1 












1 




2 






















1 




1 


2 

47 
8 


43 
3 


5 

73 
6 


. 3 

"IT 

4 


1 
4 


3 

88 

1 


2 

81 
4 


1 

70 
4 


3 

68 
5 


3 

73 
3 


ff, 


Totals 


65 33 
3 S 


'98 


Still-born 


48 











REPORT 



MILK INSPECTOR 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the 

City of Manchester: 

I herewith submit a report for the year 1888. 

The first duty of my office was to learn the quality of 
the milk brought into the city by the various milkmen 
engaged in the traffic, and also of those milkmen who 
derive their sources of supply within the limits of the 
city. To eifectually do this, I made a practice of station- 
ing myself on the various roads leading into the city, 
over which these milkmen drive their loaded teams, ar- 
riving at my station at 1 o'clock a. m., and remaining 
out until 6 A. M., gathering from twelve to twenty sam- 
ples each morning, taking my sample from a can of 
my own selection in each load, and properly marking 
each sample. This gave me a correct idea of what was 
brought into the city for milk ; and in every case I found 
the samples thus collected, upon analysis, to contain thir- 
teen per cent of total milk solids. 

Having thoroughly tested the milk in the different ve- 
hicles from which it was sold as they were driven into the 
city, I next turned my attention to that being delivered 
to customers in the different parts of the city, and in 
doing so made a practice of being out, generally twice, 
each week, except in bad weather, and was in different 
sections of the city each consecutive morning, and took 
samples from the cans from which the milkmen were 



332 

delivering milk to their customers. Upon testing these 
samples and comparing the result with that obtained 
from the samples from the wagons, I had an opportunity 
to detect any crookedness which might have been prac- 
ticed between the loads as they were brought in and the 
milk delivered to customers. This practice I kept up 
during the summer months, and did not find any crooked- 
ness practiced by the milkmen in this way. To effect- 
ually attend to this inspection of the milk as being de- 
livered, I patrolled the different parts of the city from 2 
o'clock A. M. until 6 o'clock a. m., and I frequently made 
these sallies among the milk-drivers until January 1, 1889. 

I next turned my attention to the milk which was sold 
in stores, and in doing this I tested and sampled the milk 
in nearly every store within the city limits, and in each 
case I found the milk an average with that sold from the 
wagons. I find the prevalent custom among those who 
keep milk for sale in stores is to measure out the milk 
to their customers without first properly stirring or turn- 
ing the milk from one can to another, in order to thor- 
oughly mix the cream which may have risen to the 
top of the can with the milk in the can. The result of 
such carelessness on the part of the seller is to serve 
his later customers with poorer milk as the bottom of the 
can is reached. 

In my visits to the stores, I found many who were not 
licensed, and in fact they knew very little or nothing 
regarding the law regulating the sale of milk. This was 
particularly so among the French and Swede citizens, 
who have started in business during the past four years, 
although a number were found who had been doing a 
prominent business for a number of years. Although 
" ignorance of the law excuses no one," it is but right 
that the oftender should be looked up and made to 



333 

conform to the statutes, and in every case I found an 
expressed willingness to obey the law as soon as atten- 
tion was called to the oflence. 

During the year, I collected for licenses sixty-one dol- 
lars, and issued one hundred and twenty-two licenses. I 
found one milkman who had not been licensed for two 
years, and at once took his license fee for three years. 
There was no intention on his part to evade the 
law, but it was a case of negligence or carelessness, his 
license fee being so small a matter that he labored under 
the impression that it had been paid. 

The number of quarts of whole milk consumed in the 
city daily is 15,048; number of quarts of skimmed milk 
consumed daily, 1,050. There are seventy-two milkmen, 
or persons who own routes, and eighty-one wagons are 
used for conveyance. Estimated number of cows to pro- 
duce the daily supply of milk for the city, 2,145. 

During the year I licensed thirty-three stores for the 
sale of milk. 

The milk supply during the hottest months was short, 
many milk-drivers being obliged for a time to deliver 
their load and go back to the farms for the morning's 
milk, in order to get to all their customers. 

I would suggest that the licenses be rated higher, and 
that the law be changed to that effect, as a license of 
12.50 or even more would meet with the same approval _ 
as the one for fifty cents, for carriages, and that the 
license for stores be rated according to the amount of 
milk sold, on the same basis. 

Among the owners of routes there seems to be a ten- 
dency to consolidation, and already there are several 
original route numbers merged in one; and in several 
cases there is more than one carriage used upon a single 
route, and in one case there are four carriages used. 



334 

There are but seven dealers who handle, or profess to 
handle, skimmed milk, and two of these handle skimmed 
milk only. 

In my round of duty, during both day and night, I 
have always found the drivers and store-keepers courte- 
ous and gentlemanly ; and I have performed the duties of 
the office impartially, having attended to the duties of the 
office wholly myself. I have collected one hundred and 
eighty samples and have analyzed eighty, and have cor- 
rectly tested and compared the others, and am satisfied 
that our citizens are getting as good, if not better, milk 
than the surrounding cities. I have not had a half-dozen 
complaints during the year, which tends to show that 
our milk supply has been quite satisfactory. 

Very respectfully, • 

H. F. W. LITTLE, 

Milk Inspector. 

Manchestek, January 1, 1889. 



ACCO U N T 

OF 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 

City Treasurer^ 

From December 31, 1887, to December 31, 1888. 



336 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



To cash on hand January 1, 1888 
Temporary loan 
Insurance tax 
Railroad tax . 
Savings-bank tax 
Literary fund . 
Board of paupers off farm 
City Farm 

Dodge & Laing (overdraft) 
S. P. Pike & Co. (overdraft) 
C. E. Cox (overdraft) . 
Public Market (overdraft) 
Manchester Hardware Co. (overdraft) 
City teams 

Adolph Lossing (overdraft) 
Albert J. Peaslee, old plank 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., crushing stone 
J. S. Paige, weighing stone 
Sewer licenses 
Commons, sewer pipe . 
Valley Cemetery, sewer pipe 
S. P. Conway, sewer pipe 
E. P. Hull, sewer pipe . 
Town of Londonderry, cesspool stone 
Incidental expenses 
C. W. Davis, old junk . 
H. B. Fairbanks, land sold 
Pine Grove Cemetery 
Valley Cemetery 
Fire department 
J. F. Woodbury, old hose 
Police department . 

Western Union Telegraph Co. (overdraft) 
New England Telephone and Telegraph 

(overdraft) . 
City Hall . 
A. J. Lane 
Water-works . 
M. T. Thompson (overdraft) 

Amount carried forward 



. $67,286 16 


. 140,000 


00 


3,653 


25 


16,616 31 


57,937 


69 


3,309 


66 


2,074 


15 


1,818 


22 


11 


89 


14 31 




50 


1 


00 




38 


2,701 


22 




75 


2 60 


300 


00 


24 


00 


1,234 


65 


3 


90 


53 


10 


2 


00 


2 


00 


7 


00 


223 


88 




86 


100 00 


4,301 


55 


1,400 


00 


4,410 


32 


16 70 


7,446 


18 


1 


49 


11 


20 


2,439 


00 


20 


00 


. 85,643 


82 


200 00 


. $403,269 


74 



337 



City oj Manchester (ending December 31, 1888). 



Or. 



By unpaid bills January 1, 1888 
Temporary loan . 
Funded debt, payment 
Coupons, water bonds 
Coupons, city bonds 
Interest 

Paupers oflf farm . 
City Farm . 
City teams . 
Highway District l^o. 1 

(( u u 2 

U k( u ^ 

(( (( u r. 

(( (( u g 

(( (( u y 

*' " '*' 9 

" " " 10 

" " " 12 

" " "^ 13 

New highways 

Watering streets . 

Lighting streets . 

Paving streets 

Macadamizing streets 

Grading for concrete 

Sewers and drains 

Commons 

Incidental expenses 

Pine Grove Cemetery 

Valley Cemetery . 

Amoskeag Cemetery 

Fire department . 

Fire-alarm telegraph 

Individual alarm . 

Police department 

Hydrant service . 

Amount carried forward 

2-2 



$32,314 82 


140,000 


00 


36,200 


00 


33,772 


00 


17,401 


87 


2,076 95 


8,322 92 


6,635 


30 


4,820 


86 


314 


96 


9,651 


89 


971 59 


402 31 


498 


73 


411 


72 


1,114 


80 


645 


24 


493 


41 


2,636 


90 


1,156 


62 


378 


52 


243 


72 


4,916 


27 


4,896 


89 


15,763 


29 


3,521 


82 


15,654 37 


4,553 47 


29,618 46 


3,659 


72 


21,283 


14 


4,587 


58 


2,881 


17 


205 


87 


35,818 


58 


1,003 


73 


716 


12 


30,721 


29 


21,100 


00 


$501,366 


90 



338 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward 
To Mary Y. Crombie (overdraft) 
Martin Klemke, old boiler 








$403,269 74 

200 00 

75 00 


Dog licenses 










609 00 


Billiard-table licenses 










287 00 


Killey & Wadleigh (overdraft 
Interest on taxes . 


) 








1 75 
322 29 


Taxes for the year 1883 . 










2 96 


" " 1884 . 










7 75 


" » 1885 . 










19 56 


« '^ 1886 . 










187 63 


1887 . 
« " 1888 . 
Show licenses . . 










14,909 37 

• 374,514 56 

174 00 


Rent of tenement . 










436 19 


Tuition .... 










81 48 


Milk licenses . 










59 50 


Trustees cemetery fund . 
Fletcher Brown (overdraft) 
Mead, Mason & Co., land 










2,000 00 
1,750 00 
1,654 13 


Unpaid bills January J, 1889 . . . . 


$800,561 91 
37,088 16 


Total .... 


. 


. 


. 


. 


$837,650 07 



339 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1888). 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward .... $501,366 90 


By City Hall 






3,855 41 


Printing and stationery 






861 07 


Eepairs of buildings .... 






2,028 87 


City Library 






3,240 87 


Abatement of taxes .... 






3,024 88 


State tax 






63,435 00 


Discount on taxes .... 






10,282 19 


City officers' salaries .... 






14,826 99 


Water-works 






39,166 70 


Health department .... 






1,714 40 


City Engineer's department 






2.561 80 


Scavenger teams 






9^481 75 


Kepairs of schoolhouses 






4,435 75 


Fuel 






3,630 95 


Furniture and supplies 






1,221 56 


Books and stationery .... 






554 68 


Printing and advertising 






346 52 


Contingent expenses .... 






973 64 


Care of rooms 






3,258 36 


Evening schools ..... 






1,224 93 


Teachers' salaries 






43,401 33 


Mechanical drawing school . 






593 59 


Equipment of Webster-street engine- 


hous 




8,330 90 


Land damage 






34 38 


Bridges . . . . 






4,696 80 


Lake-avenue engine-house . 






11,500 52 


Women's Aid Society . 






400 00 


Militia 






500 00 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 






315 25 


Firemen's parade 






390 15 


South-Main-Street sewer 






1,505 73 


Webster-street engine-house 






4,285 16 


City stable 






79 68 


Truant officer .... 






750 00 


Stark Monument square 






20 25 


Receiving-tomb .... 






4,240 80 


Webster-street extension . 






995 00 




$753,532 76 


Cash on hand January 1, 1889 . . . . 84,117 31 


Total 


. 


. 


. $837,650 07 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the accounts 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer for the year 1888, and 
find the same correct, and properly vouched for. 

W. B. STEARNS, 
JOmsT HOSLEY, 
0. E. KIMBALL, 
CHAS. D. SUMNER, 

Finance Committee. 

Manchester, January 5, 1889. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT. 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

To Manchester National Bank . 160,000 00 
Geo. B. Chandler . . . 40,000 00 
Second National Bank . . 40,000 00 



Dr. 



$140,000 00 
Cr. 



Paid Manchester National Bank |60,000 00 
Geo. B. Chandler . . 40,000 00 
Second National Bank . 40,000 00 



$140,000 00 



INTEREST. 

To appropriation . . . $18,500 00 
Water-work8,am't transferred 36,000 00 



Paid Manchester National Bank 


$1,449 73 


Geo. B. Chandler 


460 56 


Second National Bank 


166 Q6 


Coupons, water bonds 


33,772 00 


Coupons, city bonds . 


17,401 87 


By balance on hand . 


1,249 18 



Dr. 



$54,500 00 
Cr. 



$54,500 00 



344 



INTEREST ON .TAXES. 

To Geo. E. Morrill, collector . $322 29 



By reserved fund, am't transferred $322 29 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



To appropriation 

City of Concord, N. H. 
County of Hillsborough 
Reserved fund 



Paid J. H. Wiggin & Co., grocer- 
ies for Edward Frenier . 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., gro- 
ceries for Mary Griffin . 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., grocer- 
ies for Wm. Mclntire 
H. Wigrgin & Co., g-rocer- 



J. 



J 



ies for Mrs. T. 



Egan 



H. Wiggin & Co., grocer- 
ies for Anthony Smith . 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. T. Burke 

J. H. Wiggin & Co. , grocer- 
ies for Owen Sullivan 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., grocer- 
ies for J. W. Cook . 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., grocer- 
ies for Ceylon A. Clark . 



^6,000 00 

20 00 

2,054 15 

248 77 



$70 00 
82 00 

24 00 
111 75 

25 50 
16 00 
63 89 

4 00 
24 00 



Dr. 

$322 29 
Cr. I 

$322 29 
Dr. 



i,322 92 
Gr. 



345 



Paid J. H. Wigg'in & Co., grocer- 
ies for Wm. Conley . $8 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Bart Doyle . . 43 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for (yatharine Sullivan 48 00 

W. F. Sleeper & (^o., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. D. McKay . 69 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. J. O'Brien . 72 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for G. Eochette . 56 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co , grocer- 
ies for Wm. Conway . 88 97 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for John J. Hayes . 51 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Ed. Stanton . . 22 00 

W.F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for John Harrington , 45 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Michael Spane . 26 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Jerry Cronin . 32 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Joseph French . 48 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Thos. Kelley . 40 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. 0. McPherson 81 00 

"W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Angeline Messier . 12 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. Thos. Keefe 14 00 



346 



Paid W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Thos. Burke . $12 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Ellen Sullivan . 7 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. D. Graham . 5 00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Hugh Donahoe . 4 84 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Wm. Coombs . 3 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

for Steve Sullivan . . 59 76 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

for Wm. Coombs . . 75 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

for Ellen Sullivan , . 85 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

for Angeline Messier . 42 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

for Jerry Cronin . . 64 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

for Mary Fitzgerald . 14 65 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

for Mrs. D. Graham . 10 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries 
for Mrs. Thos. Keefe . 63 00 

McQuade Bros., groceries 

for Thomas Burke . . 8 00 

Carl E. York, groceries for 

Mrs. P. Ducherme . . 41 00 

Carl E. York, groceries for 

A. Webster ... 8 00 

J. Taylor & Son, groceries 

for Kate Tate . ^ . . 6 00 



347 



Paid J. Taylor & Son, groceries 

for mhum Dickey . . |11 96 

J. Taylor & Son, groceries 

for S. W. Putney . . 15 00 

Joseph Qui rin, groceries for 

William Coombs . . 30 00 

Joseph Quirin, groceries for 

Joseph Guevin . . 51 92 

Joseph Quirin, groceries 

for David Vadeboncour , 8 00 

Joseph Quirin, groceries 

for Joseph French . . 32 00 

Joseph Quirin, groceries 

for John Murray . . 65 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for Mary Doherty . . 27 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for E. C. Miller . . 25 85 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for Hugh Donahoe . 10 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for Mary Fitzgerald . 22 97 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for James Callahan . 62 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for Bridget Sullivan . 46 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for Owen Sullivan . . 32 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for Lizzie Cronin . . 9 00 

Geo. W, Adams, groceries 

for A. B. Webster . . 10 00 

Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for Mary Donovan . . 2 00 



348 



Paid Geo. W. Adams, groceries 

for Joseph Guevin . . $6 00 

James Hayes, groceries for 

Mary Fitzgerald . . 21 59 

H. B. Sawyer, groceries for 

K M. Randall . . 23 68 

H. B. Sawyer, groceries for 

Mary Sawyer ... 5 00 

Eager & Rand, groceries 

for S. W. Putney . . 12 59 

Eager & Rand, groceries for 

Walter Towne . . 22 58 

Eager & Rand, groceries for 

Mrs. Ed. O'Hern . . 55 00 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries 

for Ed. Boyle ... 60 10 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries 

for Mrs. D. Connor . 36 00 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries 

for Mrs. Ann Hunter . 128 04 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries 

for Mrs. Gowett . . 21 02 

H Fradd & Co., groceries 

for Mrs. James Burpee . .5 00 

E. E. Colburn, groceries for 

J. S. Gamble . . . 120 00 
Bartlett & Thompson, gro- 
ceries for Levi M. Green 82 00 
P. Harrington, groceries for 

Mrs. James McGovern . 60 00 

P. Harrington, groceries for 

Mrs. James Otis . . 84 00 

T. F. Fifield, groceries for 

Bridget Milne . . 72 00 



349 



Paid T. F. Fifield, groceries for 

Joseph Guevin . . |6 00 

T. F. Fifield, groceries for 

Lena Moody ... 5 00 

S. L. Flanders, groceries for 

Mrs. W. A. Proctor . 13 00 

S. L. Flanders, groceries for 

Mrs. J. Kenney . . 24 00 

Charles T. Allen, groceries 

for Bart Moriarty . . 80 00 

Geo. C. Lord, groceries for 

N". B. Dickey . . . 12 00 

A. M. Eastman, groceries 

for Sarah Pilkington . 6 00 

E. L. Bryant, groceries for 

Peter Hunt ... 6 00 

D. M. Poore, groceries for 

Mrs. W. A. Proctor . 10 00 

A. G. Grenier, groceries for 

Joseph Guevin . . 6 00 

A. L. Gadbois, groceries 

for T. P. Frost . . 6 00 

Bartlett & Thompson, gro- 
ceries for L. M. Green . 6 00 
Town of New Boston, board 

of Joseph Foss . . 35 05 

Enfield, board of George W. 

Berry .... 18 40 

Candia, board of Mrs. 

George H. Johnson . 26 28 

Candia, board of Mrs. Geo. 

H. Johnson ... 8 48 

City of Portsmouth, board 

of William Coombs . 11 25 



350 



Paid County of Hillsborough, 

board of Patrick Keefe . $70 00 

County of Hillsborough, 

Asenath H. White . 104 00 

County of Hillsborough, 

board, J. J. Murray . 104 00 

County of Hillsborough, 

board of Emerson child 31 00 

County of Hillsborough, 

board of Sheehan child 31 00 

Anna Collins, board of 

John M. Day ... 50 00 

Thomas Kelly, board of 

Thomas Kelly, Jr. . 76 00 

State Industrial School, 

board of inmates . . 2,447 14 
Sarah Abbott, board of Tim- 
othy Clark ... 85 00 
A. A. Puifer, board of 

Charles Moore . . 88 00 

Women's Aid Hospital, 

board of H. W. Fisher . 81 00 

Esther L. Ingham, board of 

Mary F. Ingham . . 120 00 

Mrs. William Chase, board 

of Thomas Chase . . 120 00 

Lyman Dickey, board of 

Kahum Dickey . . 60 00 

I^ellie M. Worthley, board 

of William Worthley . 36 00 

Ansel D. Hatch, board of 

James W. Hatch . . 80 00 

Mrs. E. B. Fellows, board of 

Willie Gray ... 67 00 



351 



Paid Josie A, HafF, board of 

FredHafF ... $94 45 
Mary J. Crosbie, board of 

Richard Spring . . 140 00 

J. D. Welcome, board of 

Doherty children . . 144 00 

L. A. Wright, board ot Kate 

Tate ^ . . . . 101 00 

Mrs. Gideon Rochette, 

board of Hector Rochette 21 00 

J. Stark Webster, board of 

William Griffin . . 4 00 

Henry C. Tilton, board of 

Isette E. Foster . . 5 00 

Daniel E. Sullivan, board of 

Owen Sullivan . . 18 00 

William Ferren, bread for 

Mrs. Wilcott ... 55 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for William Coombs . 40 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

for T. P. Frost . . 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Bart Doyle . . 26 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

for Mrs. Solon Batchelder 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for John Harrington . 11 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Bart Doyle . . 3 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Michael Spane . . 8 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

David Vadeboncour . 2 00 



352 



Paid L. B. Bod well & Co., wood 

for Edward Stanton . $10 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Mrs. D. McKay . 2 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Mrs. Samuel Gray . 1 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Thomas Burke . . 4 00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Joseph French . . 8 00 

Moore & Preston, wood for 

Edward Frenier . . 20 00 

Moore & Preston, wood for 

Levi M. Green . . 19 00 

Moore & Preston, wood for 

William Mclntire . . 4 00 

Moore & Preston, wood for 

Mary Griffin ... 6 00 

Moore & Preston, wood for 

J. S. Gamble ... 8 00 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal for 

S. W. Putney . . 16 75 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal for 

N. M. Randall . . 9 00 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal for 

A. Webster ... 3 75 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal for 

James Callahan . . 4 50 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal for 

Walter D. Towns . . 2 00 

Burns & Poore, coal for 

James Callahan . . 12 25 

Burns & Poore, coal for 

Mrs. G. Woodman . 4 00 



353 



Paid Burns & Poore, coal for 

Joseph Guevin . . $4 00 

Burns & Poore, wood for 

John Flynn . . . 4 00 

Melvin Wason, wood for 

Owen Sullivan ... 2 00 

Melvin Wason, wood for 

John Flynn . . . 2 50 

Melvin Wason, wood for 

Mary Doherty . . 2 50 

J. F. Wyman, wood for 

James Hunter . . 5 50 

J. F. Wyman, wood for 

Mrs. Ansell ... 1 00 

J. H. DeCouroey, wood 

for Kate Tate ... 8 00 

J. H. DeCourcey, wood for 

William Mclntire . . 2 00 

Wason & Lynch, wood for 

John Flynn ... 32 45 

S. L. Flanders, wood for 

John Kenney . . 13 01 

S. L. Flanders, wood for 

Mrs. William A. Proctor 9 26 

E. V. Turcotte, wood for 

Joseph Guevin . . 4 4Q 

DeCourcey & Holland, wood 

for William Mclntire . 7 00 

, L. S. Proctor, wood for 

L. M. Green ... 10 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for 

J. H. Dajl ... 1 00 

J. W. Kimball, wood for 

Joseph Guevin . . 7 25 

23 



354 



id J. W. Kimball, wood for 




Mary Doherty 


$2 50 


George Whitford, wood for 




Mary Doherty 


10 50 


George Whitford, wood for 




Hugh Donahoe . . 


3 00 


George Whitford, wood for 




N. M. Randall 


8 00 


Z. F. Campbell, medicines 


3 30 


Geo. E. Hall, medicines 


5 00 


L. K. Mead, medicines 


32 15 


A. & W. S. Heath, boots 




and shoes 


16 25 


Dodge & Straw, boots and 




shoes .... 


16 70 


George Dodge, boots and 




shoes .... 


3 15 


J. F. Gillis, boots and shoes 


3 50 


Wingate & Gould, shoes . 


1 25 


J. M. Robinson, shoes 


65 


F. C. Dow, boots and shoes 


3 00 


Plumer & Hoi ton, clothing 




for Anthony Smith 


13 00 


Plumer & Holton, clothing 




for Timothy Clark . 


22 24 


Plumer & Holton, clothing 




for N. Dickey 


7 50 


J. T. Donahoe, clothing for 




J. M. Day 


9 40 


J. T. Donahoe, clothing for 




Proctor child . 


2 50 


Manchester One-Price Cloth- 


# 


ing Co., clothing for 




French children 


21 25 



355 



Paid Manchester One-Price Cloth- 
ing Co., clothing for 
William Coombs . 

Geo. A. Parsons, clothing 
for Kate Tate . 

Hawley & Gilbert, clothing 
for Kate Tate . 

Weston & Hill, dry goods 
for Mrs. W. A. Proctor . 

L. A. Wright, rent for 
Kate Tate 

Walter A. Green, rent for 
Frank McGone 

A. G. Fairbanks, rent for 
Ceylon Clark 

Weston & Wheat, rent for 
William Mclntire . 

Blodgett & Clark, rent for 
William Coombs . 

F. L. Wallace, undertaker . 

P. A. Devine, undertaker . 

F. X. Chenette, undertaker 

A. E. Morse, undertaker . 

L. A. Wright, filling bed . 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
stationery 

Horace Gordon, transpor- 
tation of paupers . 

Eben T. James, transporta- 
tion of paupers 

Mary E. Wilson, car-fare of 
Robert C. Dow to Ver- 
mont .... 5 00 



13 


00 


8 


34 


2 


66 


3 


53 


3 


00 


64 


00 


18 


00 


48 


00 


45 


00 


50 


50 


25 


00 


20 


00 


10 


00 


1 


00 


14 


40 


4 


00 


1 


50 



356 



Paid James Sutclifie, car-fare to 

ITewmarket, ^. H. . $0 78 

Ormond D. Kimball, print- 
ing 15 25 

Geo. Blancliet, clothing for 

G. Ducine ... 5 06 

B. N". Wilson, transporta- 
tion of Frank Maycook 
to Insane Asylum . . 4 25 

N. H. Asylum for Insane, 
board and care of Frank 
Maycook ... 14 33 







CITY FARM 


. 


To appropriation 


$3,500 00 


Dodge & Laing (overdraft) . 


11 89 


S. P. Pike & Co. (overdraft) 


14 31 


C. E. Cox (overdraft) . 


50 


Manchester Public Market 




(overdraft) 


1 00 


Manchester Hardware Co. 




(overdraft) 


■ 38 


J. H. Willey, superintendent 


1,452 01 


J. H. Willey, superintendent 


366 21 


Reserved fund 


1,655 21 



Paid McQuade Bros., groceries . $425 46 

Bartlett & Thompson, gro- 
ceries, etc. . . ■ . 132 49 

A. M. Eastman, groceries, 

etc 32 54 



^322 92 



Dr. 



$7,001 51 
Cr. 



357 



Paid J. H. Wiggin & Co., gro- 




ceries, etc. 


$21 67 


Carl E. York, groceries, etc. 


10 80 


A. N. Clapp, kerosene oil . 


18 65 


E. M. Slayton, potatoes, etc. 


148 90 


H. Marshall, butter 


27 82 


Joseph Quirin, groceries 


8 22 


Carl E. York, groceries 


18 24 


G. W. Batchelder, potatoes 


27 30 


Dodge & Laing, butter 


45 46 


W. D. Ladd & Co., crackers 


10 15 


George C. Lord, groceries 




etc 


1 19 


John McKeon, groceries, etc 


7 20 


W. F. Sleeper & Co., gro 




eeries, etc. 


1 53 


C.jF. Fifield, groceries, etc 


5 24 


J.W. Monroe & Co., molasses 


5 40 46 


E. S. Kewton, fish 


9 83 


A. G. Grenier, groceries 


2 45 


George W. Adams, groceries 


5 1 35 


E. S. I^ewton, fish 


8 42 


C. E. Cox, meats 


228 34 


Clough & Co., meats . 


29 24 


S. P. Pike & Co., meats 


75 28 


F. D. Hauscom, meats 


19 58 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware 




etc 


80 67 


Killey & Wadleigh, hard 




ware, etc. 


66 25 


Manchester Hardware Co. 




hardware, etc. . 


' 10 64 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc 


26 06 



358 



Paid C. H. Hutchinson, castings, 

etc $5 65 

Thorp & Bartlett, repairing 

stoves, etc. ... 26 70 

D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 51 09 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing carts, etc. ... 9 35 

John Hayes & Co., grain and 

meal .... 2 60 

Merrill & Freeman, grain 



and meal .... 


97 01 


Merrill Bros., grain and meal 


112 68 


"W. S. Jewell, grain and flour 


32 56 


Pettee & Adams, grain, etc. 


26 80 


Drake & Dodge, grain and 




flour .... 


160 20 


Cavanaugh Bros., oats 


30 00 


Carney, Lynch & Co., grain 


15 54 


Charles H. Bunton, black- 




smithing .... 


19 00 


J. F.Woodbury & Co., black- 




smithing .... 


7 50 


P. W. Flanders, blacks mi th- 




ing 


6 35 


Thomas Hickey, blacksmith- 




ing 


11 50 


George H. Hubbard, tobacco 


4 90 


Robinson Bros., tobacco 


10 08 


John Eaton, tobacco . 


19 50 


L. P. Reynolds, tobacco 


84 95 


R. G. Sullivan, tobacco 


11 35 


F. P. Kimball, clothing, etc. 


32 50 


J. G. Lake, sweat-collars . 


3 00 



359 



Paid Thomas P. Riley, repairing 

harness, etc. . 
Cavanaugh Bros., repairing 

harness, etc. 
Cavanaugh Bros., democrat 

wagon .... 
Cavanaugh Bros., horse 
D. Kerwin, soap, pearline, 

etc. . . . 
N. E. T.&T. Co., telephone 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor 
J. Hodge, lumber 

D. Lothrop & Co. 
James Briggs 
W. F. Robie, professional 

services . 
F. L. Downs, shoes 
J. B. Baril, medicine . 
J. H. Pierce & Co. 
Barton & Co., dry goods 
George Blanchet, dry goods 
"Weston & Martin, socks 
Manchester One-Price Cloth 

ing Co., clothing 
"Weston & Hill, dry goods 

carpets, etc. 
J, A. Folsom, clothing 
George W. Chapman . 

E. M. Slayton, potatoes 
Burns & Poore, guano and 

coal ... 

J. R. Carr, wall-paper, etc 
Pamelia J. Page, manure 



$23 25 

12 10 

110 00 
225 00 

47 39 
42 15 

69 34 
5 51 

45 00 
2 50 

2 00 
5 25 
2 30 
2 11 
11 58 
9 67 
1 80 

49 79 



135 


06 


3 


75 


1 


00 


22 


43 


20 


00 


18 


97 


3 


75 



360 



Paid E. H. Currier, drugs, etc. . 


$3 18 


J. Blakely, professional ser- 




vices .... 


10 00 


J. A. Langley, fish 


4 93 


S. P. Pike & Co., meats . 


14 31 


F. L. Wallace & Co., under- 




takers .... 


22 50 


C. E. Cox, meats 


17 44 


Geo. H. Penniman, tin ware, 




etc. .... 


2 55 


D. Kerwin, starch 


4 60 


Joseph Quirin, groceries,etc. 


9 26 


Helen Parsons, manure 


4 00 


W. W. Critchett, cow 


50 00 


James Brothers, manure 


76 00 


J. Stickney, leather, etc. 


5 66 


C. M. Bailey, brooms, etc. . 


4 75 


J. Blakely, professional ser- 




vices .... 


35 00 


Brock & Driscoll, kitchen 




furniture, etc. . 


7 55 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 


2 00 


C. M. Bailey, brooms, etc. . 


4 75 


J. Bryson, Jr., paints, etc. . 


3 26 


E. P. Richardson, insurance 


210 00 


H. D. Gordon, chairs . 


14 00 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., filling 




icehouse, etc. . 


10 60 


J. S. & M. R. Burbank & Co., 




cabbages, etc. . 


2 60 


J. 0. Smith, horse 


250 00 


Burns & Poore, coal . 


2 00 


C. H. Hodgman, soap . 


3 50 


C. M. Bailey, brooms, etc. . 


6 38 



361 



Paid J. Blakely, professional ser- 
vices . . . . 

D. S. Adams, professional 
services . 

J. H. Proctor, use of oxen 
Geo. H. Penniman, tin pans 
H. B. Fairbanks, chair 
Myron Richardson, making 

cider 
R. M. Rollins, repairing 

mowing-machine 
A. & E. Reed Bros., mason 

work 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal 

F. B. Potter, Akron pipe 
C. A. Eastman, cows . 
J. S. Holt & Co., soap 
Blackstone & Fisher, den 

tistry 
J. H. Willey and wife 
A. & E. Reed Bros., mason 

work 
Geo. E. Hall, medicine, etc 
F. P. Colby, manure . 
William E. Moore, printing 
M. O'Dowd, overalls . 
J. A. Langley, fish 
Charles H. Thayer, boots 
C. M. Bailey, chopping-trays 

C. M. Bailey, brooms . 
Amoskeag Fire Insurance 

Co., insurance . 
Dodge & Straw, boots 

D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc 



$14 50 

5 00 

6 75 
3 00 
1 00 

11 25 

5 00 



10 


50 


280 


18 


8 


39 


150 


00 


48 


07 


1 


50 


800 


00 


7 


50 


14 


80 


5 


00 


3 


00 


9 


00 


9 


56 


3 


75 


1 


10 


2 


25 


30 


00 


6 


75 


26 


33 



362 



Paid Wingate & Gould, rubber 




boots .... 


$5 60 


F. L. Downs, boots 


5 75 


McDonald & Cody, boots . 


3 00 


G.W. Dodge, boots and shoes 


19 05 


H. H. Duncklee, swill 


40 00 


Dodge & Straw, boots 


5 00 


W. P. Merrill, meats . 


17 75 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, re- 




pairing cart 


1 25 


Labor, men and women 


1,049 73 


L. K. Mead, medicine 


24 35 


J. B. Clarke, printing 


1 65 


J. 0. Burbank, medicine . 


11 90 


George C. Lord, groceries . 


2 40 


J. A. Langley, fish 


4 13 


By balance on hand . 


366 21 


CITY TEAMS. 





To appropriation . . . |3,000 00 
Labor in Districts Nos. 2 and 

10 2,508 22 

Labor in District No. 2 . 193 00 



r,001 51 



Dr. 







^5,701 22 
Cr. 


Paid City Farm, hay . 


. $103 39 




C. E". Harvey, straw . 


21 89 




L. Shelters, hay . 


46 35 




D. Butterfield, hay 


46 25 




C. D. Welch, hay 


78 80 




C. C. Webster, hay . 


85 95 





363 



Paid William M. Moore, hay 


131 28 


A. A. Mitchell, hay . 


20 70 


George Thompson, straw 


25 86 


J. J. Perley, hay 


15 97 


H. A. Horton, carrots 


25 50 


J. Hayes & Co., grain 


162 88 


Pettee & Adams, grain 


127 89 


Drake & Dodge, grain 


181 75 


H. Fradd & Co., grain 


10 00 


Merrill & Freeman, grain 


183 54 


Partridge Brothers 


349 85 


Merrill Brothers, grain 


415 84 


A. H. Stark, painting carts 


5 58 00 


I. S. York, repairing har 




ness, etc. 


2 60 


F, N. McLaren, repairing 




harness, etc. 


108 75 


N. J. Whalen, repairing 




harness, etc. . 


2 25 


H. C. Ranno, repairing har 




ness, etc. 


8 85 


J. G. Lake, repairing har 




ness, etc. 


20 65 


Thomas P. Riley, repairing 




harness, etc. . 


164 65 


Cavanaugh Bros,, repairing 




harness, etc. . 


] 25 55 


J. T. Beach, repairing 




wagons . 


76 15 


J. F. Conway, repairing 


wagons, etc. . 


4 25 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


> 


etc. . . 


22 53 



364 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, ■ hard- 
ware, etc. 

Manchester Hardware Co., 
hardware, etc. 

Dr. J. Alexander, profes-' 
sional services 

Dr. J. Blakely, professional 
services .... 

Dr. W. F. Robie, profes- 
sional services 

Thomas Hickey, blacksmith- 
ing .... 

"Welcome & Co.,blacksmith- 

ing 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 
ing . . . . 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmith- 
ing . . . . . 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., 
blacksmithing 

J. 0. Tremblay, black- 
smithing 

Leander' Pope, blacksmith- 
ing 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 

Sanb.orn Carriage Co., re- 
pairing wagon 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, re- 
pairing wagons 

Westover & Gould, carpen- 
ter-work 

J. B. l^ourse, carpenter- 
work .... 



$2 


82 


20 


39 


23 


50 


38 


00 


18 


50 


13 


75 


2 


00 


14 


15 


7 


23 


193 


15 


81 


25 




25 


4 


10 


5 


95 


154 


81 


22 


97 


9 


48 



365 



Paid Nourse & Briggs, carpenter 
work 
A. G. Grenier, carrots 
A. W. Baker, horse dentis 

try .... 
Teamsters . 
Z. F. Campbell, medicines 

etc. 
Pike & Heald, plumbing 
J. R. Carr, paint 
By reserved fund, amount trans 
ferrec] .... 



$14 69 


4 


00 


18 


00 


. 1,716 


09 


23 


36 


3 


45 


1 


10 


880 


36 



S5,701 22 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 

To appropriation . . . $300 00 

Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred ..... 14 96 



Paid labor of men and teams . $314 96 



Dr. 



$314 96 
Cr. 

$314 96 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 

To appropriation . . . $9,500 00 

Adolphe Laing (overdraft) . 75 

Reserved fund, amount trans- 
ferred . . . . 151 14 



Dr. 



),651 89 



366 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 
ware, etc. . . . $185 74 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . 103 93 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 178 39 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. 17 75 

C. H. Hutchinson, iron- 
work, etc. . . . 13 21 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

sawdust .... 4 00 

D. E. Guiney, plumbing, 
etc. .... 

T. W. Lane, stationery, etc. 
Westover & Gould, filing 

saws, lumber, etc. . 
Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. 
J. B. Nourse, lumber, etc. 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber, etc. 
George Holbrook, lumber . 
People's Gas-light Co., gas 
J. Taylor & Son, rock salt, 

oil, etc 

E. Frye, blacksmithing 
R. "W. Flanders, blacksmith- 
ing ... . 38 65 

Joseph Greenwood, black- 
smithing ... 9 60 

Charles H. Bunton, black- 
smithing . . . 16 80 

W. H. Yickery, keys, etc. 2 40 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
record-book, stationery, 
etc 18 97 



Cr. 



8 


75 


3 


85 


21 


70 


15 


65 


16 


25 


47 46 




75 


39 


48 


49 


72 


lb 


85 



367 



Paid J. Stickney, rubber boots, 

etc $15 25 

M. F. Dodge, gravel . 83 50 

T. L.Thorpe, bags . . 2 00 

Heath & Stevens, stonework 10 85 

C. A. Willey estate, gravel 17 50 

Carpenter & Co., brooms . 2 25 

B. & M. R. U. Corporation, 

freight .... 5 40 

Snelling & Woods, sulphur 30 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, re- 
pairing teams, etc.. . 170 61 
Manchester Locomotive 

"Works, two fifths porta 

ble boiler ... 200 00 

National Kovelty Supply 

Co., wrench ... 1 50 

M. J. Coleman, ironwork, 

etc 3 15 

Pike & Heald plumbing, 

etc 10 34 

Labor of men and teams . 8,375 34 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 

To appropriation . . . $1,000 00 



Paid B. H. Piper, hammer 

handles . . . • $0 80 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . 1 00 



),651 89 



Dr. 

$1,000 00 
Cr. 



368 

Paid J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc $16 59 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 12 69 

Betsey Chase, gravel . . 11 80 

J. F. Chase, gravel . . 14 30 
Palmer & Garmon, stone 

chips ... . . 2 25 
R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 

ing . . . . 1 20 

Reserved fund . , . 28 41 

Labor of men and teams . 910 96 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT 1^0 4. 

To appropriation . . • . $400 00 

Reserved fund ... 2 31 



Paid Head & Dowst, plank . $6 69 

Devonshire Mills, gravel . 11 22 

Labor of men and teams . 384 40 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 
To appropriation . . . $500 00 



Paid R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 

ing . . . . $2 82 

J. T. Beach, blacksmithing 70 



$1,000 00 

Dr. 

$402 31 
Cr. 

$402 31 

Dr. 

$500 00 
Ce. 



369 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber 


$19 36 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


60 




Labor of men and teams . 


475 25 




By balance on band . 


127 GO 


§500^00 




CT XO. 6. 


HIGHWAY DISTRI 








Dr. 


To appropriation 


8400 00 




Reserved fund 


11 72 


§411 72 
Cr. 






Paid James Morrison, bolts 


81 00 




Leander Pope, blacksmith- 






ing .... 


75 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


78 




Labor of men and teams . 


409 19 


$411 72 




• 
:CT NO. 7. 


HIGHWAY DISTR] 








Dr. 


To appropriation 


§1,100 00 




Reserved fund 


14 80 


§1,114 80 
Cr. 






Paid R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 






iiig 


84 95 




F. S. Bodwell, covering 






stone .... 


13 50 




Head and Dowst, lumber . 


6 60 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


10 96 




Labor of men and teams . 


1,078 79 





§1,114 80 

24 



370 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 
To appropriation . . . $700 00 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware 


$14 25 


Eeserved fund . 


54 76 


Labor of men and teams . 


630 99 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9 
To appropriation 



Paid E. J. O'Brien, blacksmith- 
ing . • . 
J. B. Yarick Co., hardware 
Labor of men and teams . 



By balance on hand . 



Dr. 

$700 00 
Cr. 



$700 00 



$500 00 


Dr. 

$500 00 






Cr. 


$1 60 
7 80- 
484 01 
6 59 


$/^nn on 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 

Dr. 
To appropriation 
Reserved fund 



Paid A. N. Clapp, hardware 

People's Gas-light Co., gas 



12,500 00 
136 90 


$2,636 90 
Cr. 


$0 85 
4 48 



371 



PaidKilley & Wadleigh, hard- 






ware .... 


$6 50 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


6 70 




Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, 






etc. .... 


2 93 




C. H. Hutchinson, iron- 






work, etc. 


8 92 




Temple & Farrington Co., 






time books, etc. 


9 85 




Labor of men and teams . 


2,596 67 


$2,636 90 


• 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT KO. 11. 








Dr. 


To appropriation 


$1,000 00 




Reserved fund 


156 62 


$1,166 62 



Cr. 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 
ware .... 
Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 
S. L. Flanders, spikes and 

nails 
"William Hoyt, gravel 
L. D. Colby, gravel . 
Daniel Farmer,'gravel 
Elizabeth Farmer, gravel 
Labor'.of men and teams 



$5 00 



4 


04 


e 3 


32 


a 

2 


46 


2 


70 


5 


50 


6 


10 


14 


50 


. 1,113 


00 



[,156 62 



372 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 

To appropriation . . . $200 00 
Reserved fund ... 43 72 



Paid labor of men and teams . $243 72 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

To appropriation . . . $6,000 00 



Dr. 



To appropriation. 
Reserved fund 


$300 00 
78 52 


$378 52 






Paid Gilman K. Worthen, labor 


$2 62 


Cr. 


John Moss, labor 


4 25 




City Farm .... 


371 65 


$378 52 







Dr. 

$243 72 
Cr. 

$243 72 



Dr. 







$6,000 00 






Cr. 


Paid Warren Harvey, stone 


$31 14 




A. G. Gage 


17 00 




F. A. Emerson, stone 


60 00 




Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 






ware, etc. 


19 62 




J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 






etc. .... 


11 00 





373 

Paid J. Hadlock, road-machine . $258 00 
Eeserved fund . . . 1,088 73 
Labor of men and teams . 4,519 51 

$6,000 00 



LAND DAMAGE. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . $1,000 00 

$1,000 00 

Cr. 
Paid William H. Marty n, Carroll 

street . . . . $10 00 
"William Starr, Manchester 

street .... 24 38 

Reserved fund . . . 965 62 

$1,000 00 



WATERING STREETS. 

To appropriation . . . $4,500 00 

Reserved fund ... 396 89 



Dr. 

$4,896 89 
Cr. 



Paid Manchester Water - works, 

water .... $2,590 00 

Pike & Heald, repairing 

• sprinkler, etc. . . 2 25 

Pike & Heald, repairing 

sprinkler, etc. . . . 4 91 

T. A. Lane, stand-pipes, etc. 145 70 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, re- 
pairing water-carts, etc. 185 15 



374 

•Paid A. L. Putnam, repairing 

water-carts, etc. . . $6 45 

J. F. Larkin, stand-pipes, 

etc 26 35 

Labor of men and teams . 1,986 08 

$4,896 89 



LIGHTING STREETS. 

Dr. 
To appropriation . . . $16,000 00 





$16,000 
Cr. 


Paid People's Gas-light Co., gas. 




and lighting and oil, etc. 


$9,308 52 


Manchester Electric Light 




Co 


4,884 00 


Ben Franklin Electric 




Light Co. . . . 


1,294 40 


C. H. Hutchinson, lamp- 




posts .... 


18 50 


A.H. Lowell, lamp-post8,etc. 


57 40 


C. M. Bailey, chimneys, 




wicks, etc. 


149 92 


A. W. E'ettel, chimneys, oil. 




etc. .... 


7 55 


J. B. Clarke, printing 


17 50 


Daily Press Association, 


. 


printing .... 


10 50 


Union Publishing Co., 




printing .... 


15 00 


Reserved fund . 


236 71 



$16,000 00 



375 
PAVESTG STREETS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . . 
Reserved fund 


$3,000 00 
521 82 


$3,521 82 








Paid Charles H. Robie, concret- 






Cr. 


ing 

W. H. Colburn, paving- 
stone .... 


$826 68 
331 50 




J. H. Colburn, paving-stone 


103 


50 




H. A. Horton, paving-stone 


49 


50 




George M. Bean, paving- 
stone .... 


21 


00 




E. H. Currier, paving-stone 
J. L. Fogg, paving-stone 
J. H. Proctor, paving-stone 
"W. G. Butteriield, paving- 
stone .... 


12 

70 
6 

3 


00 
50 
00 

00 




Manchester Broom Co., re- 








filling street-sweeper 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 


33 


25 




etc. .... 


2 


58 




Labor of men and teams . 


2,062 


31 


$3,521 82 









MACADAMIZESTG STREETS. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . $15,000 00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing 

Co., crushing stone. . . 300 00 

Reserved fund . . . 354 37 

$16,654 37 



376 



Cr. 



Paid H. S. Plumer, stone 
Peter Kean, stone 
Charlotte A. Willey estate 

stone .... 
Joseph A. Brown, stone 
J. G. Ellimvood, stone . 
T. Shea, stone 
H. S. Hoitt, stone 
F. A. Emerson, stone . 
J. Fullerton, stone 
F. A. Emerson, stone . 
F. S. Bodwell, stone . 
O. W. Butterlield, stone 
J. L. Fogg, stone . 
J. Fullerton, stone 
E. C. Tilton, stone 
H. Holbrook, stone 

D. Butterfield, stone 

J. A. Weston & Co., stone 
L. J. Proctor, stone 
H. S. Hoitt, stone 
Joseph Peltier, stone 
L. W. Bartlett, stone . 
George S. Smith, stone 

E. W. Butterfield, stone 
• J. W. Terrill, stone 

F. C. Campbell, stone 
Charles P. Still, stone 
J. H. Colburn, stone 
F. B. Worthley, stone 
C. Manseau, stone 
M. E. Harvey, stone 
J. W. Kimball, stone 



$135 08 

56 87 

128 95 

20 41 

37 43 
28 28 

6 86 

8 14 

21 04 

38 22 
454 69 

54 29 
50 00 
65 26 

9 66 
20 08 

100 11 
32 22 

31 91 
13 50 
27 32 
56 11 

128 24 

131 65 

123 06 

17 20 

32 53 
163 94 

97 87 

24 63 

69 58 

71 23 



377 



Paid William G. Landry, stone 
George Whitford, stone 
George W. Bean, stone 
E. Hoitt, stone 
A. G. Fairbanks, stone 
M. W. Spencer, stone . 
K E. Fullerton, stone . 
C. N. Harvey, stone 
James M. Nute, stone . 
S. M. Haselton, stone . 
J. T. Gott, stone . 
City Farm, stone . 
H. S. Hoitt, stone 
City Farm, stone . 
W. H. Colburn, stone . 
H. A. Horton, stone 
R. I. Stevens, stone 
H. Willey, stone . 
L. J. Proctor, stone 
George Whitford, stone 
City Farm, stone . 
M. F. Dodge, stone 
"William G. Landry, stone 
K B. Abbott, stone 
Amoskeag Manufacturing 

Co., stone . 
E. H. Currier, stone 
H. A. Horton, stone 
H. Willey, stone . 
E. Hoitt, stone 
L. J. Proctor, stone 
L McDougall, stone 
R. L Stevens, stone 
L. J. Proctor, stone 



$12 


48 


52 


72 


13 


52 


2 


07 


7 


47 


1 


02 


5 


21 


1 


01 


37 


01 


2 


29 


8 


00 


29 


16 


4 


39 


19 


28 


4 


69 


10 


15 


19 


14 


1 


15 


27 


01 




88 


28 


75 


5 


50 


30 


63 


9 


00 


"! 37 


25 


13 


23 


18 


80 


6 


60 


6 


22 


5 


75 


22 48 


19 


76 


4 


34 



378 



Paid G. S. Eastman, stone . 


116 36 


Joseph Bean, stone 


28 76 


M. "W. Spencer, stone . 


1 02 


W. J. Lawrence, stone 


6 93 


W. G. Landry, stone . 


6 13 


Pius Brown, stone 


15 07 


C. N. Harvey, stone 


4 76 


James Cavanaugh, stone 


10 77 


People's Gas-light Co., coke 


20 00 


C. H. Robie, concreting 


122 73 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 




rubber packing, etc. . 


9 33 


C. H. Hutchinson, repairing 




engine and crusher, etc. . 


325 40 


T. A. Lane, oil-cup, hose, etc. 


14 47 


J, B. Varick Co., hardware, 




etc 


214 50 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. . 


39 12 


Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 




ware, etc 


30 57 


Manchester Water - works. 




water .... 


30 00 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 


10 75 


Farrell Foundry and Machine 




Co., castings 


72 99 


B. & M. R R Corp., freight 


4 72 


Concord R R. Corp., freight 


28 80 


Head & Dowst, lumber 


8 21 


John W. "Wilson, trucking . 


6 88 


Amoskeag Manufacturing 




Co., stone .... 


273 00 


Providence Oil-works, oil 


41 45 


Burns & Poore, coal 


38 75 



379 



Paid J. Sticknej, leather belting, 

etc $6 94 

Palmer & Garmon, stone chips 10 50 

Manchester Broom Co., re- 
pairing street-sweeper . 34 00 

Marden & Woodbury, stone 

chips . . ... 9 00 

J. Taylor & Son, kerosene 
oil, etc. 

Heath & Stevens, stonework 

T. L. Thorpe, cop waste 

Whitford & Varnum, con- 
creting 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

Labor of men and teams 



4 


60 


: 2 


75 


12 


60 


34 


90 


12 


00 


11,622 


29 




$15,654 37 



GRADmG FOR CONCRETE. 

To appropriation . . . $4,000 00 

Reserved fund ... 553 47 



Dr. 

t,553 47 
Cr. 



Paid C. H. Robie, concreting . $108 70 
D. H. Varnum & Co., con- 
creting .... 2 00 
Labor of men and teams . 4,442 77 



$4,553 47 



380 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 


$20,000 00 




Pipe delivered commons 


3 90 




Pipe delivered Valley Cem- 






etery . . . . 


53 10 




Sewer licenses . . 


1,234 65 




P. S. Conway, sewer pipe 


2 00 




E. P. Hull, old pipe . 


2 00 




Town of Londonderry, cess- 






pool stone 


7 00 




Reserved fund 


8,345 81 


129,648 46 



Paid Pike & Heald, scoops . $3 50 

Thorpe & Bartlett, sewer 

pipe, etc. . . . 2,323 83 

Henry Fisk, sewer pipe, etc. 2,925 03 
Pettee & Adams, cement . 145 95 

J. Taylor & Son, oatmeal, 

oil, salt, etc. ... 44 00 

Merrill & Laird, labor on 

cesspools, etc. . . . 109 69 

D. F. Cressey, blacksraith- 

ing 113 77 

Head & Dowst, lumber and 

brick .... 21 11 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 444 17 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 81 92 

Pettee & Adams, cement, 

etc 465 10 

Pettee & Adams drain pipe 605 57 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings, 

etc 916 36 



Cr. 



381 



Paid Thos. A. Lane, drain pipe, 
etc. .... 

Concord Ra.ilroad Corpora- 
tion, freight . 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 
etc. .... 

Manchester Hardware Co., 
hardware, etc. 

Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 
ware, etc. 

W. F. Head & Son, brick . 

F. S. Bodwell, cesspool 
stone .... 

A. N. Clapp, oatmeal, kero- 
sene oil, spikes, etc. 

J. Stickney, rubber boots, 
mittens, etc. . 

Geo. L. Robinson, rubber 
boots .... 

Frank L. Downs 

Geo. W. In galls & Co., rub- 
ber boots 

Merrill & Freeman, cement 

H. Fradd & Co., pork barrel 

Warren Harvey, stone 

Damase Roy, filing saWs . 

Charles A. Bailey, cesspool 
stone .... 

Thomas L. Thorpe, bags . 

Lacourse & Paris, oatmeal . 

O. D. Carpenter, drain pipe 

M. L. Felch, 

R. H. Howard & Co., oil 

coat 1 00 



:,882 


13 


107 


10 


59 


85 


52 


65 


183 


69 


731, 


50 


49 


50 


18 


61 


46 


70 


16 


25 


9 


75 


6 


00 


4 


80 




75 


110 


00 




90 


71 


50 


4 


80 




50 


3 


26 


9 


00 



382 

Paid Louis Wolf ... $9 74 

Labor of men and teams . 17,068 48 

$29,648 46 



Dr. 



' MAIN-STREET 


SEWER. 


~^iir- ^-'■ 




To appropriation 


$1,500 00 


Reserved fund 


5 73 


Paid A. N. Clapp, oatmeal, kero- 




sene oil, etc. . 


$11 84 


D. F. Cressey, blacksmith- 




ing . . . . 


56 58 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 




etc. .... 


1 91 


Killey & Wadleigh, faucet, 




fuse, etc. 


29 54 


Head Sc Dowst, brick 


8 24 


A. C. Wallace, lumber 


115 02 


Labor of men and teams . 


1,282 60 







BRIDXIES. 

To appropriation . . . $8,000 00 
A. J. Peaslee, old plank sold 2 60 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . $30 41 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc. . . •. . 16 90 



,002 60 
Or. 



383 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh hard- 



ware, etc. 


$15 


05 




Warren Harvey, stonework 


1,737 


50 




C. H. Robie, concreting 


196 


50 




J. B. Nourse, carpenter- 
work .... 


38 


87 




A. C. Wallace, lumber 


1,144 


13 




Head & Dowst, lumber 


31 


66 




A. J. Sawyer, lumber 


93 


92 




Charles. H. Bunton, black- 








smithing .... 


2 


40 




George Holbrook, carpen- 








ter work 


11 


45 




Nourse & Briggs, carpenter- 
work .... 


4 


75 




Labor of men and teams . 


1,373 


26 




Reserved fund . 


3,305 


80 


$8,002 60 








COMMONS. 








To appropriation 
Reserved fund 


$3,000 00 

659 72 


Dr. 

$3,650 72 








Paid Manchester Water-works, 






Cr. 


water . . . . 


$225 


00 




C. H. Robie, concreting 


1,174 


95 


• 


Head & Dowst, lumber 




57 




D. J. Murphy, plumbing, 
etc. .... 


17 


11 




Thomas A. Lane, plumb- 








ing, etc 


11 


69 





384 



Paid C. H. Hutchinson, repair- 




ing lawn-mower, etc. 


$55 62 


Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 




ware, etc. 


2 81 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 




etc. .... 


51 50 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. 


11 97 


Taylor & Flanders 


16 10 


Marshall & Underhill, loam 


5 25 


Leander Pope, blacksmith- 




ing 


1 70 


George S. McLauthlin, 




urinal .... 


350 00 


W. H. Vickery, repairing 




lawn-mower . 


9 25 


J. Hodge, lumber 


3 99 


Merrill & Laird, mason- 




work .... 


8 24 


Pike & Heald . 


3 86 


F. S. Worthen & Son, 




flowers .... 


22 04 


H. H. Huntress, flowers 


18 15 


Joel Daniels & Co., paint- 




ing, etc 


21 61 


J. J. Abbott, painting, etc. 


32 


A. C. Wallace, lumber 


6 26 


J. F. Conway, repairing 




lawn-mower . 


5 00 


D. E. Guiney, repairing 




urinal .... 


1 50 


Labor of men and teams 


1,635 23 



53,659 72 



385 

mCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 

To appropriation . . . $15,000 00 
C. W. Davis, old measures 

sold 86 

H. B. Fairbanks, land sold . 100 00 

Coal delivered Pine Grove 

Cemetery .... 29 74 

Coal delivered police depart- 



Dr. 



ment .... 


. 


38 69 


Coal delivered City Hall 


. 


53 95 


Coal delivered fuel 


, 


101 50 


Reserved fund 


• 


6,058 40 

iJtOI OQO -I/I 










Cr. 


aid Frederick Smyth, equity 




$257 00 


Lucy S. Craggy, damage 


to 




team 




10 00 


"Walter Cody, damage 


to 




horse, etc. 




50 00 


Lewis "Warren, damage 


to 




sleigh, etc. 




1 20 


Elvira H. Jillson, damage 


to 




person 




1,250 00 


SamuelJ. Hayes, damage 


to 




team 




15 00 


• James A. ISTeal, judgment 


140 00 


Annie A. Welch, damage 


to 




person . . . 


. 


75 00 


Samuel Burchill, damage to 




person 


. 


200 00 


Isabella McNay, damage to 




person 


. 


100 00 



25 



386 



Paid Simon Clark, administrator 

of estate of William Clark $5,006 72- 
Jessie Quigley, damage to 

person .... 
Charles E. Stearns, damage 

to sleigh 
Margaret Falvey, damage to 

person .... 
Nellie Brodie, damage to 

person .... 
J. B. Chagnon, damage to 

team .... 
N. H. "Wilson, professional 

services .... 
David Cross, professional 

services .... 
E. F. Jones 
Amos B. Page, witness fees, 

etc. .... 

Dr. L. French, returns of 

births and deaths 
J. M. CoUity, returns of 

births and deaths . 
J. M. Collitj, professional 

services .... 
Luther Pattee, professional 

services . ... 
Luther Pattee, returns of 

births and deaths . 
W. W. Wilkins, profes- 
sional services 
Geo. D. Towne, returns of 

births and deaths . 
"William Holland, = returns 

of births and deaths 



1,118 


51 


18 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


15 


00 




75 


343 


00 


3^ 


;50 


6 


00 


12 


75 


7 


50 


110 


00 


5 


00 


5 


75 


31 


00 


4 


50 




75 



387 



Paid Charles Corey, returns of 

births and deaths . . $0 50 

L. B. How, returns of 

birth and deaths . . 5 25 

C. H. Fessendeu, returns of 

births and deaths . . 3 25 

J. W. D. MacDonald, re- 
turns of births and deaths 28 00 
C. E. Dodge, returns of 

births and deaths . . 3 75 

J. E. A. Lanouette, returns 

of births and deaths . 35 75 

0. D. Abbott, returns of 

births and deaths . . 8 75 

J. A. Jackson, returns of 

births and deaths . . 17 00 

C. B. Sturtevant, returns 

of births and deaths , 3 00 

Jacob W. Mooar, returns 

of births and deaths . 2 25 

J. P. Walker, returns of 

births and deaths . . 2 50 

H. C. Canney, returns of 

births and deaths . . 2 25 

C. F. Flanders, returns of 

births and deaths . . 6 75- 

Geo. A. Campbell, returns 

of births and deaths . 5 75 

Daniel S. Adams, returns 

of births and deaths . 3 25 

A. E. Cote, returns of 

births and deaths . . 14 25 

J. Sullivan, returns of 

births and deaths . . 28 25- 



388 

Paid A. Gladu, returns of births 

and deaths . . . $7 50 

C. M. Dodge, returns of 

births and deaths . . 3 00 

E. B. Dunbar, returns of 

births and deaths . . 1 00 

H. C. Canney, professional 

services .... 6 00 

J. Sullivan, professional ser- 
vices .... 115 00 

E. Mongeon, returns of 

births and deaths . . 3 25 

John Ferguson, returns of 

births and deaths . . 23 75 

W. W. Wilkins, profes- 
sional services . . 5 00 

L, M. French, returns of 

births and deaths . . 12 75 

L. B. How, professional ser- 
vices .... 5 00 

Republican Press Associa- 
tion, advertising non-resi- 
dent taxes ... 4 80 

"Manchester Weekly Bud- 
get," printing . . 6 00 

Daily Press Publishing Co., 

printing . . . . 24 00 

Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing .... 82 25 

John B. Clarke, printing . 416 26 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

tax-books, etc. . . 171 29 

Manchester Post-office, 

stamps . . , . . 6 08 



389 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

ironwork . . . $0 60 

D. J. Murphy, plumbing, 

etc. .... 2 80 

J. F.Larkin, plumbing, etc. 31 52 

D. G. Guiney, plumbing, 

etc 104 71 

Thos. A. Lane, repairing 

fountains, etc. . . 98 94 

Pike & Heald, repairing 

fountains, etc. . . 21 70 

James Bros., teams . . 103 50 

Smith & Whitten, teams . 19 50 

J. C. Nichols & Son, teams 83 50 

J. K Foss, teams . . 75 00 

W. J. Freeman, teams . 41 00 

E. T. James, teams . . 19 00 
Geo. W. Reed, teams . 20 00 
E. A. Kean, teams . . 5 00 
E. V. Turcotte, teams . 5 00 
J. A. Caverly, teams . 75 
John Hosley, allowance for 

horse-hire . . . 132 00 

J. A. Barker, care of city 
library boiler . 

Warren Harvey, watering- 
troughs .... 

Warren Harvey, making 
estimates and attendance 
at court .... 

G. H. Dudley, carpenter- 
work .... 

L. M. Aldrich, carpenter- 
work .... 



127 


00 


150 


00 


25 


00 


5 


55 


52 


10 



390 

Paid J. Hodge, lumber, etc. 

Head & Dowst, lumber, 
tower clock, etc. 

Miles & Sturtevant, build- 
ing addition to Lincoln- 
street schoolhouse . 

Charles H. Bartlett, work 
on sewerage plan . 

W. H. Bennett, work on 
sewerage plan 

E. T. Doherty, work on 
sewerage plan 

Manchester Water-works, 
water .... 

C. H. ~s¥ood, painting 

Committee on Police Tele- 
graph, expenses to Lynn, 
Mass 

C. H. Hodgman & Co., dam- 
age to buggy, etc. . 

"Western Union Telegraph 
Co., telegrams 

J. M. Greaney, paper, en- 
velopes, etc. . 

Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 
clocks .... 

D. C. Whittemore, to allow- 
ance for keeping roads in 

repair two years . . 40 00 

Committee on Police Tele- 
graph, expenses to Wor- 
cester, Mass. . . . 26 60 

H. F. Thompson, repairing 

sleigh .... 2 80 



§15 


66 


810 


61 


500 


00 


165 


00 


354 


50 


8 


75 


798 


57 


3 


00 


15 


00 


12 


10 


3 


96 




57 


168 


25 



391 



Paid Edwin Rogers, bell-striking 

machine .... $450 00 

Committee on Lands and 
Buildings, expenses to 
Boston, Mass. . . 6 00 

J. J. Abbott, painting . 7 00 

Committee on Electric 
Lighting, expenses to 
Boston, Lynn, and Port- 
land .... 97 56 

H. D. Gordon ... 7 15 

Committee on Eire Depart- 
ment, expenses to Boston, 
Mass 24 50 

Committee on Police Tele- 
graph, expenses to Bos- 
ton, Mass. ... 23 00 

Dana W. King, recording 

deeds .... 4 71 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal 

and wood ... 8 25 

Committee on Lands and 
Buildings, expenses to 
Lawrence, Boston, and 
Chelsea, Mass. . . 29 20 

H. D. Gordon, chairs . 24 50 

N". P. Kidder, making city 

report . . . . 150 00 

N.P. Kidder, making returns 
of births, marriages, and 
deaths .... 409 95 

H. B. Eairbanks, advertising 

and selling land . . 25 00 

Brown & Howie, blacksmith- 

ing, etc 14 50 



392 



Paid Committee on Lands and 
Buildings, expenses to 
Boston, Mass. 

George E. Morrill, postage- 
stamps .... 

J. G. Hutchinson, witness 
fees, etc. .... 

Committee on Police Tele- 
graph, expenses to Boston, 
Mass. .... 

H. D. Gordon, reseating 
chairs .... 

C. H. Reed, expenses City 
vs. Quigley 

Fairbanks, Brown & Co., 
copper measures 

"W. L. & E. Gourley, sur- 
veyor's level . 

J. Blakely, professional ser- 
vices .... 

W. H. Yickery, sealing 
weights and measures . 

Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment, expenses to Lowell, 
Mass 11 00 

L. A. Proctor, shade trees 

and loam . . . 135 40 

A. H. Low^ell, hitching-posts 8 00 

A. H. Lowell, ironwork, etc. 24 50 

Nellie Emerson, copying 
specifications for police 
telegraph ... 2 00 

Committee on Public In- 
struction, expenses to Bos- 
ton, Mass. ... 11 25 



$12 


00 


3 


18 


33 


29 


13 


00 


4 


35 


7 


00 


6 


00 


115 


00 


25 


00 


4 


20 



393 



Paid Lafayette Guards, armory 

rent .... 

Joseph A.Brown, stonework 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 
Pettee & Adams, rock salt 

and lime .... 
C. H. Robie, concreting 

E. Haskell, carpenter-work 
Chickering & Sons, piano . 

F. W. Elliott, entertaining 
Lowell city government . 

J. J. Abbott, painting 

H. D. Gordon, lounge 

First Eegiment Band, ar- 
mory rent 

C. P. Buckman, ink . 

John Bryson, Jr., painting 

John W. Wilson, trucking 

Thomas Clancy, error in 

taxation, 1887 . . 2 21 

First Light Battery, national 
salute July 4, 1888 . 

A. D. Gooden, watering- 
trough .... 

Mary J. Phillips, over-pay- 
ment of tax, voluntary 
list, 1887 .... 

George E. Morrill, distribut- 
ing tax-bills 

Fred E. Flanders, error in 
taxation, 1887 . 

The Lyon Platinum Co., 
pens .... 

J. K Rhodes . 



$100 


00 


323 


51 


1 


00 


3 


90 


176 


85 


1 


84 


600 


00 


57 


60 


2 


50 


11 


00 


100 


00 


1 


00 


20 


39 


7 


00 



37 


00 


3 


00 


10 


10 


54 


76 


1 


93 


3 


00 


20 


00 



4 


98 


1 


00 


251 


81 


3 


30 


2 


00 



394 



Paid IsTovelty Advertising Co., 

seal press . . . $4 00 

A. T>. & C. L. Gooden, land 

on East Spruce street . 575 00 

Edward M. Slayton, error in 
taxes 1886 and 1887 

M. Klempke 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal 

H. C. Dickey, whitewashing 
tree-boxes 

Jones Express Co., sawdust 

J. Blakely, professional ser- 
vices .... 30 00 

Harden & Woodbury, reset- 
ting watering-trough . 3 50 

Ephraim K. Howell, water- 
ing-trough ... 3 00 

•Charles E. Cochran, profes- 
sional services . . 40 00 

Flint & Little, carpenter- 
work .... 3 18 

S. B. Putnam, auditing ac- 
count of collector . . 25 00 

W. W. Hubbard . . 75 

Mrs. N^. P. Kidder, copying 

Derryfield town records . 71 80 

ISTorthern Express Co., ex- 

pressage .... 15 

W. A. Greenough & Co. . 5 00 

A. T. Cote, returns of births 

and deaths . . . 14 00 

J. M. Collity, returns of 

births and deaths . . 5 50 

W. W. Wilkins, professional 

services . . . . 8 00 



395 



Paid A. Gladu, returns of births 




and deaths 


$10 50 


J. Ferguson, returns of births 




and deaths 


27 00 


George Holbrook, lumber 




and labor 


7 50 


Nourse & Briggs, lumber 




and labor 


1 90 


Thomas A. Lane, plumbing. 




etc 


4 07 


W. H. Bennett, labor on 




sewerage plan 


154 60 


J. IST. Foss, teams 


8 00 


Guy F. Whitten, teams 


6 00 


Smith Whitten, teams 


1 00 


C. H. Simpson, teams 


4 00 


E. T. James, teams . 


8 00 


James Brothers, teams 


5 00 


Ernest W. Bowditch, sewer- 




age plan .... 


600 00 


People's Gas-light Co., gas 


7 00 


Manchester Water - works, 




water .... 


266 19 


Sulloway & Topliff, profes- 




sional services 


612 51 


Novelty Advertising Co. . 


1 75 


S. B. Putnam, expenses to 




Concord, K H. 


72 


William M. Butterfield, pro- 




fessional services 


15 00 


William L. Foster, profes- 




sional services in Knibbs 




valve suits 


343 48 


G. H. Wheeler . 


2 00 



396 



Paid Edson S. Heath, making 

return of votes . . $1 00 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. 20 00 
J. M. Greaney, stationery . 85 
Lovejoy & Stratton, repair- 
ing clocks . . . 284 50 
Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 12 57 
C. P. Trickey, blank-books 24 
J. G. Hutchinson, witness 

fees .... 3 48 

O.D. Carpenter, witness fees 2 50 

S. H. Mead, witness fees . 2 50 

James Briggs . . . 16 83 
George W. iJTutter, returns 

of births and deaths . 14 00 
Temple & Farrington Co., 

blank-books, etc. . . 16 00 

Labor of men and teams . 521 25 









^lETER 

$1,635 
2,666 
2,819 
1,000 




PINE 

To B. A. Stearns, 
S. B. Putnam, 
Balance from ( 
Appropriation 


GROVE CEJ 

superintendent 
lots sold . 
3ld account 


Y. 

15 
40 

24 
00 



$21,383 14 



Dr. 



Paid J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 

phosphate, etc. . . . $74 16 
New England Telegraph and 
Telephone Co., use of tel- 
ephone .... 53 25 



^20 79' 
Cr. 



397 



Paid Manchester Water - works, 
water .... 

Thomas A. Lane, piping, etc. 

J. Hodge, grade stakes 

L. M. Aldrich, balance on 
house 

Head & Dowst, carpenter- 
work, etc. .... 

J. C. Mchols & Son, teams . 

Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing 

C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 

H. D. Gordon, table, mirror, 
etc 

P. 0. "Woodman, loam . 

Waterman Smith, turf 

C. C. Webster, turf . 

M. Prout, loam 

Frank Emerson, turf . 

Gilman L. Moore, turf and 
loam .... 

Mrs. Henriette Schlough, loam 

Robert Leggett, loam . 

Samuel JST. Worthley, loam 

Stephen Brown, loam . 

F. N. McLaren, collar, repair 
ing harness 

N. J. Whalen, repairing coffin 
straps 

Incidental expenses, coal 

A. J. Lane, cans . 

H. H. Huse, clerk of sub-trus 
tees, making report, etc. 

Manchester Post-office, en 
velopes 



$300 00 

122 93 

21 60 

146 82 



5 


38 


13 


00 


8 


75 


9 


80 


16 


00 


18 


40 


13 


31 


3 


15 


90 


50 


7 


62 


4 


50 


5 


10 


41 


60 


18 


80 


15 


00 



3 75 



90 


29 74 


1 00 


25 00 


2 16 



398 

Paid H. H. Huntress, flowers, etc. 
J. Stickney, oil suits 
Timothy Shea, cleaning vaults 
Heath & Stevens, stonework 
I^ovelty Advertising Co., 

printing, etc. 
Labor of men and teams 

By balance on hand 



136 40 


6 00 


3 00 


9 00 


1 50 


3,479 46 


3,533 21 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

To appropriation . . . $1,500 00 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 1,400 00 



^,120 7& 



Dr. 







$2,900 00 






Cr. 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 






grass seed, hardware, etc. 


$14 30 




J. B. Varick Co., grass seed, 






hardware, etc. 


32 27 




]^. E. Fullerton, loam and 






stone .... 


4 00 




J. W. Kimball, loam and 






stone, etc. 


78 50 




L. M. Aldrich, carpenter- 






work, etc. 


70 04 




A. C. Wallace, lumber 


39 50 




J. Hodge, lumber, etc. 


7 40 




George "Whitford, filling . 


39 20 




Marshall & Underbill, loam 






and sand 


20 88 




J. A. Caverly, manure 


3 OO 




C. C. Webster, turf . 


8 25 





399 



Paid C. Manseau, loam 

Oilman L. Moore, loam 
P. 0. Woodman, loam 
M. Harrington, manure 
F. S. Bodwell, stone . 
William B. Abbott, paint 

ing . . . 

J. J. Abbott, painting 
Manchester Water-works 

water 
Campbell & Williams, print 

ing 
W. H. Vickery, repairing 

lawn-mower, etc. 
C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork 
T. A. Lane, piping, etc. 
Palmer & Garmon, setting 

head-stones, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, cement 
Temple & Farrington Co 

record-book, etc. 
Hiram H. Gurney, nursery 

stock 
J. Francis, flowers 
H. H. Huntress, flowers 

F. S. Worthen & Son 
flowers . 

Pike & Heald, plumbing 

etc. 
0. I). Carpenter, mason 

work 
Thomas A. Lane, piping, 

etc. 

G. W. Dodge, rubber boots 



$1 50 

1 00 

3 60 

6 00 
42 00 

54 35 
10 35 

133 80 

4 25 

2 95 
1 11 

49 89 

7 00 
3^10 

12 44 



24,75 


28^62- 


7 00 


17 85 


29 37 


8 20 


39 86- 


3 00 



400 



Paid Heath & Stevens, setting 

slabs, etc. ... $7 80 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., 



L;ia.vji\.Diiaii.iiiiig. . . 

J. Hodge, lumber 


1 o 

1 30 


John Gannon, Jr., fresco- 




ing building . 


99 55 


Taylor & Flanders 


3 75 


Higgins Brothers Co., 




mirror .... 


10 00 


B. W. Robinson, mason- 




work .... 


5 00 


D. 0. Furnald, furniture 




and fixtures 


15 00 


George W. Rogers, canvas 


6 16 


The Seventeen Associates, 




filling .... 


130 91 


Labor of men and teams . 


1,791 62 


By balance on hand . 


18 83 







AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

To reserved fund . . . |206 87 



'aid Manchester Water-works, 




water .... 


|12 00 


S. L. Flanders, posts . 


12 12 


A. J. Sawyer, pickets, etc. 


30 45 


Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 




ware, etc. 


3 43 


J. J. Abbott, painting fence 


4'8 50 


Labor of men . ... 


99 37 



$2,900 00 



Dr. 

1205 87 
Cr. 



$205 87 



401 

EECEIYmG-TOMB, VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Dr. 



To appropriation 


$4,000 00 


Reserved fund 


240 


80 

«4 940 SO 












Cr. 


PaidKilley & Wadleigh, hard- 






ware, etc. 


$1 86 


J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 






etc. . . 


7 


15 


Pettee & Adams, cement 


197 80 


J. W. Kimball, excavating, 






etc. .... 


160 


50 


Warren Harvey, chestnut 






posts .... 


6 


00 


J. Hodge, lumber 


12 


27 


Head & Dowst, lumber and 






brick .... 


210 


40 


E. J. Williams & Son,' as- 






phalt roofing, etc. . 


51 


10 


C. H. Robie, concreting 


150 


82 


White Mountain Freezer 






Co., galvanizing castings, 






etc. .... 


3 


46 


B. W. Robinson, mason- 






work .... 


140 


62 


Martin Fitzgerald, stone- 






work .... 


1,080 


00 


F. S. Bodwell, stonework . 


1,338 


24 


Lowell's Iron Foundry, iron- 






work .... 


409 


41 


Samuel Cooper, professional 






services .... 


22 


50 



26 



402 



Paid Union Publishing Co., ad- 
vertising proposals . 

C. W. Quimby, expenses to 
Concord 

D. 0. Furnald . 
Pike & Heald . 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc 
George C. Gil more 
Labor of men and teams 



25 



1 


00 


5 


12 


26 


90 


30 


86 


120 


50 


258 


04 



$4,240 80 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation . . . $40,000 00 
Labor in Districts Nos. 2 and 

10 ... . 
J. F. Woodbur}^, old hose 



Paid^Chemical Engine Co., pay 

roll 
General Stark Engine Co. 

pay-roll ... 
Merrimack Engine Co. 

pay-roll . 
N. S. Bean Engine Co., pay 

roll 
Fire King Engine Co., pay 

roll .... 
Amoskeag Engine Co., pay 

roll 
Pennacook Hose Co., pay 

roll .... 



Dr. 



. 4,410 
16 


32 

70 
M4 4*^7 0' 




<pTtT:.^^ 1 Vi 




Cr. 


$435 


00 


993 


36 


! 1,461 


06 


. 1,485 


00 


. 1,485 


00 


. 1,485 


00 


. 1,606 


20 



403 



Paid Massabesic Hose Co., pay- 
roll .... 

Excelsior Hook-and-Laclder 
Co., pay-roll 

Thomas W. Lane, chief en- 
gineer .... 

Fred S. Bean, assistant en- 
gineer and clerk 

Clarence D. Palmer, assist- 
ant engineer . 

Eugene S. Whitney, assist- 
ant engineer . 

E-uel G. Manning, assistant 
engineer 

Thos. W. Lane, telegrams, 
expressage, etc. 

Pettee & Adams, hay, grain 



1,245 


00 


2,289 


18 


1,000 


00 


150 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 



125 00 



16 50 



and straw 


275 75 


H. Fradd & Co., grain, etc. 


301 03 


Merrill Bros., grain, etc. 


524 34 


Merrill & Freeman, grain, 




etc. . . . . 


303 56 


Drake & Dodge, grain, etc. 


248 92 


Partridge Bros., grain, etc. 


413 93 


John Hayes & Co., grain . 


16 00 


H. A. Horton, carrots 


25 50 


City Farm, hay . 


208 30 


Albe Morrill, hay. 


36 10 


Israel Dow, hay 


237 63 


Charles D. Welch, hay 


131 90 


Charles M. Wheeler, carrots 


1 30 


L. N. George, straw . 


28 80 


Robert Neal, straw . 


15 56 


Wm. W. Moore, hay 


61 47 



404 

Paid J. L. Woodman . . $31 95 

J. Q. Perley, hay . . 67 25 

Thos. A. Lane, hose, pipina:, 

etc. , . . ". 109 84 

Joseph 0. Tremblaj, black- 
smithing . . . . 86 75 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmith- 

ing 54 57 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., 

blacksmithing . . 244 57 

Brown & Howie, black- 
smithing ... 1 75 

James Morrison, black- 
smithing ... 4 75 

Pike & Heald, lanterns, iron- 
work, etc. . . . 61 17 

C. H. Hutchinson, iron- 
work, etc. . . . 41 86 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, re- 
pairing carts, etc. . . 538 14 

Sanborn Carriage Co., re- 
pairing carts . . . 12 30 

J. B. Yarick Co., hardware, 

etc 1 50 

Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor .... 265 77 

J. B. Nourse, lumber and 

labor .... 12 05 

J. Hodge, lumber . . 1 05 

Kew England Telephone & 

Telegraph Co., telephones 121 68 

F. N. McLaren, repairing 

harness, etc. ... 18 93 

Cavanaugh Bros., harness 

repaired and harness, etc. 156 09 



405 



Paid J. G. Lake, repairing har- 
ness, etc. 

H. C. Ranno, harness, etc. 

Thos. P. Riley, repairing 
harness, etc. . 

J. W. Wilson, trucking 

Wilson & Hardy, trucking 

H. D. Gordon, chairs, com- 
forters, etc. 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, rubber valves, etc. 
. Electric Gas-light Co., auto- 
matic burners, etc. 

Boston Woven Hose Co., 
hose, etc. 

Scollay & Rich, metal polish 

Thos. L. Thorpe, cop waste 

Chemical Polish Co., polish 

Welch & Hall, horses 

J. A. and W. Bird & Co., 

bicarbonate of soda . 35 59 

Snelling & Woods, horse 

medicine, etc. . . 35 87 

Mary Fish, washing . . 13 89 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham, wash- 
ing .... 15 52 

James Kerwin, laundry 
work .... 

Annie F. O'Dowd, washing 

Boston & Maine Railroad, 
freight .... 

Concord Railroad, freight 

J. B. Clarke, printing 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
shade, fixture, etc. . . 6 27 



Ul 


30 


345 


83 


35 


40 


4 


60 


2 


85 


34 


00 


54 


80 


38 


75 


158 


80 


18 


00 


16 


30 


10 


00 


600 


00 



10 


73 


2 


00 


4 


70 


8 


49 


57 


50 



406 



Paid Cumner & Co., reefers 


$52 50 


Plumer & Holton, reefers, 




etc. .... 


129 50 


Weston & Hill, matting, etc. 


62 21 


J. R. Carr & Co., aprons for 




steamers .... 


15 00 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 


664 39 


L. B. Boclwell, coal and 




wood .... 


363 25 


Manchester Water- works, 




water .... 


939 86 


J. Taylor & Son, oil, pear- 




line, etc 


19 04 


S. L. Flanders, oil, wood, 




etc 


5 85 


H. H. Burpee, oil, matches. 




etc. .... 


2 84 


Geo. C. Lord, oil, matches, 




etc. .... 


32 


Carswell & Brown, matches 


48 


Stephen Gardner, care of 




boiler .... 


210 75 


General Stark Engine Co., 




services July 4, 1888 


•8 00 


Amoskeag Engine Co., ser- 




vices July 4, 1888 . 


8 00 


Fire King Engine Co., ser- 




vices July 4, 1888 . 


8 00 


^. S. Bean Engine Co., ser- 




• vices July 4, 1888 ; 


8 00 


Merrimack Engine Co., ser- . 




vices July 4, 1888 . 


8 00 


Pennacook Hose Co., ser- 




vices July 4, 1888 . 


8 00 



407 



Paid Massabesic Hose Co., ser- 






vices July 4, 1888 . 


'$8 


00 


Excelsior Hook-and-Ladcler 






Co., services July 4, 1888 


8 


00 


City Farm, hay . 


32 


40 


Geo. W. Seaward 


2 


00 


J. Alexander, veterinary 






surgeon .... 


42 


06 


W. F, Robie, veterinary 






surgeon .... 


69 


00 


J. Blakely, veterinary sur- 






geon .... 


298 


50 


Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 






ware, etc. 


14 


59 


Manchester Hardware Co., 






lantern, hardware, etc. . 


165 


94 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 






etc 


20 


28 


People's Gas-light Co., gas. 


507 


08 


. Thomas F. Dodge, engineer 






Steamer 'No. 2 


660 


00 


F. A. Pherson, engineer 






Chemical Co. . 


660 


00 


Jeremiah Lane, driver 


464 


03 


M. W. Ford, Jr., driver 


421 


67 


Geo. H. Wheeler, driver . 


591 


25 


A. W. Whitcomb, driver . 


532 


67 


W. F. Wheeler, driver 


660 


00 


C. M. Denyou, driver 


660 


00 


Jeremiah Burke, driver 


55 


25 


A. E. Foster, driver . 


590 


00 


Walter L. Blenus, driver . 


660 


00 


Charles H. Rogers, driver . 


653 


00 


Benj. M. Lay, driver . 


417 


66 



408 



Paid Frank J. Dustin, driver 


$653 00 


Walter Seaward, driver 


590 00 


Geo. E. Varnum, driver 


636 50 


Jesse W. Truell, driver 


93 25 


A. G. Barker, driver . 


8 25 


Sylvester Reed, driver 


214 50 


Parker E. Brown, driver . 


21 00 


Geo. H. Chapman, driver . 


24 00 


Stephen Thomas, driver 


62 25 


Edwin Rogers, wire connec- 




tors, etc. 


8 50 


D. B. Varney, castings, etc. 


47 25 


Charles E. Berry, rein 




snaps, etc. 


15 00 


D. Foley, sawing wood 


1 25 


Mrs. Mary Cressey, carrots 


6 51 


Dennis Kerwin, soap 


4 50 


Joseph E. Power, badges . 


92 50 


A. S. Jackson, hose-brushes 


12 50 


Manchester Broom Co., 




brooms .... 


2 35 


D. A. Simons, cuspidores . 


6 00 


L. W. Tenney, labor on 




Tapper circuit, etc. 


7 10 


J. A. Tremblay, blacksmith- 




ing .... 


22 00 


Palmer & Garmon, marble 




shelf .... 


3 50 


Lawrence W. (>lark, fire 




extinguisher . 


27 50 


J. T. Beach, cart, etc. 


164 35 


George Dunnington, Salem 




horse collar 


12 00 


Michael Kilboy . 


50 



409 



Paid N". H. Belting & Packing 

Co., jacket cable . . $32 50 

J. H. Boyd, use of horse . 12 00 

J. B. Jones, vise, etc. . 4 50 

Thomas F. Brown, labor . 12 00 

A."W. Baker, horse dentistry 30 00 

George M. Jones, labor . 18 25 

■ L. & W. T. Serberlich, oil- 
ing floor .... 4 00 

Merrimack Chemical Co., 

oil of vitriol ... 13 54 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing 

clock .... 1 00 

A. M. Finney, cleaning car- 
pets, etc. 

C. M. Bailey, sacking 

Eureka Fire Hose Co., hose 

F. F. Shaw, repairing clock 

H. Crosby . 

J. L. Woodman, hay . 

W. L. Blenus, bolts, etc. . 

T. W. Lane, Jr., driver 

Mrs. W. L. Blenus, washing 

Rhode Island Coupling Co., 
couplings, etc. 

J. B. Clarke, printing 

E. J.Williams & Son, roofing 

William Lane 

Flint & Little, carpenter- 
work .... 45 

Nourse & Briggs, carpenter- 
work .... 1 90 

Thomas Hickey, blacksmith- 
iug 



5 


93 


5 


15 


1,265 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 


31 


95 


13 


60 


19 


50 


5 


00 


18 


00 


8 


40 


15 


00 


12 


75 



7 00 



410 



Paid George C.Lord, matches, etc. 
J. A. Brown 
Samuel Eastman & Co. 
Mrs. J. P. Hulme, washing 
Labor of extra teamsters . 
Reserved fund . 



$0 27 




9 


00 




6 


50 




6 


00 




573 


91 




8,608 


44 


$44,427 02 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



To appropriation 



Dk. 



$1,500 00 







— 


$1,600 00 








Cr. 


Paid L. W. Tenney, gong, wire, etc. 


156 01 




Henry McQuade, hibor 


3 


38 




A. D. Smith, sulphate of cop- 








per, etc 


- 153 


81 




James Brothers, teams . 


4 


00 




Wilson & Hardy, trucking . 


3 


77 




C. H. Hodgman & Co., truck- 








ing, etc 


•5 


10 




D. B. Varney, zincs, etc. 


320 


90 




Edwin Rogers, battery jars, 








wire, etc 


116 


81 




Boston & Maine Railroad, 








freight .... 




67 




Concord Railroad, freight 


7 


39 




American Electrical Works, 








wire ..... 


22 


62 




J. H. Bunnell & Co., bells. 








wire, etc 


26 


47 




Electric Gas-lighting Co. 


18 


14 





411 



Paid Thomas W. Lane,expressage, 

postage, etc. . . " . $12 40 
Pike & Heald, soldering wires 25 

James P. Carr, lettering fire- 
alarm boxes . . . 22 50 
C. H. Hutchinson, repairing 

striker .... 1 20 

J. H. Bunnell & Co., testing- 
set, jars, etc. . . . 61 50 
Washburn & Moen Manufac- 
turing Co., wire . . 40 79 
Beattie Electrical Co., zincs, 

etc 4 20 

A. C. Wallace, telegraph pole 2 00 

Cutler Bros. Co., blue vitriol 17 90 

W. H. Vickery, repairing 

gouge .... 60 

Geo. E. Davis, labor on tickers 6 00 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor 72 

J. H. Seaward, lumber and 

labor .... 7 30 

Mason, Chapin & Co. . . 83 55 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor .... 3 75 

Reserved fund ... 496 27 



$1,500 00 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 



To appropriation 
Reserved fund 



. $21,000 00 
100 00 



Dr. 



$21,100 00 



412 

Or. 
Paid Manchester Water -works, 

water .... $21,100 00 

$21,100 00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT INDIVIDUAL ALARM. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $750 00 







$750 00 






Cr. 


Paid Tenney & Landon, balance of 






contract .... 


$590 00 




Tenney & Landon, labor and 






material .... 


85 32 




L. W. Tenney, labor . 


38 30 




- T."W. Lane, repairing Tapper 






circuit, etc. 


2 50 




By balance on hand 


33 88 






_ 


$750 00 



WEBSTER-STREET ENGINE-HOUSE. 

Dr. 



To appropriation 


$4,000 00 




Reserved fund 


285 16 


$4,285 16 










Or. 


Paid W. M. Butterfield, architect 


$35 00 




W. M. Butterfield, architect 


11 67 




W. Ireland, contractor . 


3,292 00 




Head & Dowst, lumber and 






labor .... 


329 78 





413 

Paid Pike & Heald, plumbing;, etc. |6 10 

D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 94 65 

Charles H. Robie, concreting 373 54 

J. Bryson, Jr., painting . 31 95 

A. H. Lowell, ironwork, etc. 6 69 
Temple & Farrington Co., 

shades, fixtures, etc. . . 103 78 



1,285 16 



FURmTIJRE AKD EQUIPMENT OF WEBSTER- 
STREET ENGmE-HOUSE. 



To appropriation 


$10,000 00 


$10,000 00 










Cr. 


Paid Cumner & Co., reefers and 






overalls .... 


$143 50 




Manchester Hardware Co., 






hardware, etc. 


127 65 




Killey & "Wadleigh, hard- 






ware, etc. 


6 73 




Thomas A. Lane, slide 






poles, etc. 


74 65 




Pike & Heald, fender, etc. 


9 04 




C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork. 






etc. .... 


24 30 




Lowell's Iron Foundry, iron- 






work, etc. 


29 32 




Head & Dowst, sash weights. 






pulleys, etc. 


20 07 




Thomas P. Riley, harness, 






etc. .... 


65 85 




H. C. Ranno, harness, etc. 


256 45 





414 



Paid Eureka Fire Hose Co., hose, 

etc $1,295 00 

J. T. Beach, carts, etc. . 281 35 

Boston "Woven Hose Co., 

spanners, etc. . . . 34 50 

Charles E. Berry, hames and 

collars .... 78 00 

J. Brodie Smith, automatic 

gas-lighting a p paratus, 

etc 193 61 

Edwin Rogers, fire alarm 

indicator . . . 125 00 

Cavanaugh Brothers, har- 
ness, etc. ... 133 30 

C. H.Hanson & Co., horses 650 00 
Manchester Locomotive 

Works, steam fire engine 3,657 00 

D. A. Simons, cuspidores . 25 58 
Galen M. Bowditch, hose 

carriage, etc. . . . 1,000 00 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, snow 

plow, etc. ... 100 00 

Reserved fund . . . 1,669 10 



110,000 00 



LAKE-AVENUE ENGINE-HOUSE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation ... $9,000 00 

Reserved fund . . . 2,500 52 

$11,500 52 



415 

Cr. 



Paid J. M. Kendall, plans . 


$100 00 


Charles H. Bickford, copy- 






ing plans, etc. 


18 


50 


H. M. Youn^, copying 






plans, etc. 


14 


00 


N'ellie Emerson, copying 






specifications, etc. . 


4 


00 


E. R. Coburn & Co., tracing 






cloth, etc. 


18 


43 


Goodwin & Mclver, moving 






house and cottage . 


210 


12 


John B. Clarke, advertising 


24 


75 


Daily Press Co., advertising 


13 


50 


George Holbrook, lumber 






and labor 


15 


65 


W. Ireland, contractor 


11,005 


23 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 






etc. .... 


76 


34 

.«ii f^oO 52 






^PA.±*0\J\J Om 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation . . . $28,500 00 

J. C. Bickford, costs and fees 2,032 75 
M. J. Jenkins, costs and fines 5,413 43 
Western Union Telegraph 

Co. (overdraft) ... 1 49 

New Englan<J Telephone and 
Telegraph Company (over- 
draft) .... 11 20 



Dr. 



$35,958 87 



416 



Paid K P. Hunt, judge . . $1,500 00 

J. C. Bicktord, clerk . . 600 00 

M. J. Jenkins, city marshal 641 25 

H. W. Longa, assistant mar- 
shal . . . . 700 00 

H. W. Longa, conveying 

prisoner, witness fees, etc. 600 86 

A. R. Simmons, profes- 
sional services . . 3 00 

C. A. Sulloway, professional 
services . . . . 2 00 

George W. Prescott, pro- 
fessional services . . 3 00 

Isaac L. Heath, special jus- 
tice . . . . 46 00 

Isaac L. Heath, professional 

services . . , . 13 00 

People's Gas-light Co., gas 440 02 

New England Telephone 
and Telegraph Co., tele- 
phones .... 128 90 

Ada Franker, washing 

sheets, towels, etc. . . 48 00 

Frances Franker, washing 

sheets, towels, etc. . . 22 00 

W. W. Owen, laundering 

blankets, etc. ... 21 82 

Delia Recore, scrubbing . 8 75 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

brushes, wrench, etc. . 4 97 

J. B. Varick Co., brushes, 

oil, etc. . . . . 35 25 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on 
boiler, etc. . . . 2 26 



Cr. 



417 



id W. H. Vickery, repairing 




locks, etc. 


$4 80 


Killey & Wadleigh, feather 




duster .... 


2 00 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., 




hooks .... 


1 25 


C. M. Bailey, tissue paper . 


11 65 


D. E. Guiney, repairing 




water-closets, etc. . 


12 25 


J. B. Clarke, printing 


142 80 


Campbell & Williams, print- 




ing .... 


58 00 


Daily Press Publishing Co., 




advertising toy pistols. 




printing, etc. . 


36 25 


T. W. Lane, toilet paper. 




stationery, etc. 


33 20 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




"Justice and Sherifi," 




glass, etc. 


8 54 


Incidental expenses, coal 


38 69 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal. 




wood, and ice . 


154 68 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal and 




wood .... 


355 15 


Henry Gorman, i v o r i n e. 




etc. .... 


48 10 


Carl E. York, crackers. 




brushes, etc. . 


5 79 


Western Union Telegraph 




Co., telegrams 


20 36 


Eben T. James, teams 


265 25 


James Bros., teams 


7 25 


J. N. Foss, teams 


14 50 



27 



418 



Paid Smith & Whitteii, teams 

Daniel Davis, meals for pris- 
oners .... 
Manchester "Water - works, 
water .... 

C. H. Reed, expenses to 
Boston, Lynn, Derry, etc. 

"W. D. Ladd & Co., crackers, 
etc. . . . . 

H. D. Gordon, furniture, etc. 

^ H. A. Winship, belts and 

clubs . . . . 

Charles Gould, disinfectant 

Isaac S. Coffin, mop cloth, 
dippers, etc. . 

D. Evans & Co., buttons 
J. P. Lovell Arms Co. 
"Weston & Hill, cleaning 

and laying carpet . 
J. H. McKelvey, criminal 

records . 
C. A. Twitchell & Co 

badges 
J. G. Lake, belt 
J. B. Sanborn, " Session 

Laws," etc. 
Charles H. Bunton, forks 

staples, etc. 
C. M. Bailey, tissue paper 
R. D. Gay . 
J. Sullivan, professional ser 

vices 
James Briggs, repairing 

stove 



$3 00 
323 00 
154 05 

23 17 

8 70 
152 65 

118 13 

3 00 

3 70 
75 00 
12 83 

2 00 

10 00 

8 00 
1 00 

15 00 



6 


25 


10 


00 


6 


23 


30 


00 


2 


00 



419 



Paid Dr. L. M. French, profes- 
sional services . . $3 00 

J. J. Holland & Co., drugs, 
etc. .... 

J. C. Nichols, team 

I. L. Heath, professional 
services .... 

C. F. Sprague . 

L. M. Aldrich, carpenter- 
work .... 20 89 

Dr. H. C. Canney, profes- 



29 


65 


2 


00 


28 


00 


10 


35 



sional services 


6 


00 




Reserved fund . 


2,281 


29 




Pay-roll of officers 


23,612 


10 




By balance on hand . 


2,956 


29 


$35,958 87 








CITY HALL. 












Dr. 


To A. J. Lane .... 


$20 


00 




Rents 


2,439 


00 




Reserved fund 


1,441 


91 


$3,900 91 














Cr. 


Paid People's Gas-light Co., gas . 


$347 84 




K E. T. & T. Co., tele- 








phones .... 


76 


76 




Mary Fish, scrubbing 


96 


25 




J. B. Varick Co., wheelbar- 








row, hardware, etc. . . 


18 


55 




Manchester Hardware Co., 








hardware, etc. 


I 


56 





2 


75 


64 


80 


107 


00 


12 


00 




75 


1 


95 




75 


53 


95 


346 


66 



420 



Paid Manchester Water - works, 

water .... $168 75 

H. D. Gordon, table, repair- 
ing settees, etc. . . 38 25 

W. H. Vickery, repairing 
locks, etc. 

J. J. Abbott, painting 

D. E. Guiney, piping, 
plumbing, etc. 

J. A. Barker, extra services 
Tristram Dame, labor 
John White, cleaning hall . 
H. K. Rhodes, cleaning hall 
Incidental expenses, coal . 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 

and wood ... 9 58 

T. A. Lane, piping, plumb- 
ing, etc 30 74 

Pike & Heald, smoke-pipe, 

etc 57 11 

Weston & Hill, [matting, etc. 40 40 

A. M. Eastman, matches, 

etc. . ... ,82 

Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor . . . . 494 64 

George Holbrook, lumber 

and labor ... 8 65 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 

labor .... 9a 

Head & Dowst, urinal build- 
ing, etc. . . . . 1,725 00 

0. D. Carpenter, plastering 1 00 

Charles H. Robie, concret- 
ing .... 



25 85' 



421 



Paid Lovejoy & Strattou, clock . 


$25 00 


Barton & Co., rug 


10 00 


D. A. Simons, water pitcher. 




cLispidores, etc. 


5 50 


J. J. Holland & Co., soap, 




etc 


1 25 


Boston & Maine Railroad 




Corp., freight 


3 90 


Charles S. Putnam, repair- 




ing clock 


2 00 


Mrs. M. P. Barker, making 




awnings .... 


24 00 


Carpenter & Co., brooms , 


2 25 


John Knapp, repairing chair 


1 50 


Merrill & Laird, whitewash- 




ing, etc 


3 00 


J. S. Holt & Co., soap . . 


2 75 


C. H. Wood, lettering boxes 


1 25 


People's Gas-light Co., gas 




stove .... 


6 00 


Labor of men clearing roof, 




etc, .... 


34 72 


By balance on hand . 


45 50 







$3,900 91 



PRINTmG AND STATIONERY. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $1,200 00 

$1,200 00 

Cr. 
Paid John B. Clarke, printing re- 
port, etc $752 66 



422 



Paid Campbell & Williams, print- 




ing 


$72 95 


William E. Moore, printing . 


4 50 


Thomas W. Lane, stationery 


11 38 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




stationery .... 


15 33 


Manchester Post-office, 




stamps, etc. 


2 25 


0. D. Kimball, printing 


2 00 


Keserved fund 


338 93 







EEPAIRS OF BUILDmCS. 



To appropriation 


$2,000 00 


Eeserved fund 


28 87 


Paid J. E. Carr & Co., painting 




and glazing 


$35 74 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


47 69 


John Gannon, Jr., painting . 


20 00 


J. Bryson, Jr., glazing, etc. . 


13 92 


J. B. Yarick Co., wire cloth. 




etc 


3 87 


Head & Dowst, lumber and 




labor 


760 28 


Miles & Sturtevant, lumber 




and labor .... 


443 00 


Flint & Little, glazing, etc. . 


55 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and 




labor 


8 66 



$1,200 00 



Be. 

2,028 87 
Cr. 



423 



Paid J. B. E^ourse, lumber and 

labor . . . . $17 56 

J. Hodge, lumber ... 6 97 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . 13 24 

W. S. Baker, whitewashing . 1 00 

Merrill & Laird, mason-work 7 49 

J. M. Bennett, mason-work . 10 60 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairing 

clock . . . ^ 9 00 

D. E. Guiney, piping, plumb- 
ing, etc 366 12 

T. A. Lane, piping, plumbing, 

etc 22 03 

Pike & Heald, piping, plumb- 
ing, etc 30 48 

C. H. Bunton, blacksmithing 18 45 

E. J. Williams & Son, repair- 
ing roofs, etc. ... 30 93 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, lumber 41 67 

Louis Wolf, plumbing, etc. . 10 45 
Temple & Farrington Co., 

shades, etc. , . . 64 92 

Labor of men and teams . 44 25 



CITY LIBRARY. 

To balance from old account . $1,232 99 
Appropriation . . . 3,800 00 



Paid M. J. Puncher, librarian . $800 00 
H. E. Martin, assistant libra- 
rian 122 00 



$2,028 87 



Dr. 

$5,032 99 
Cr. 



424 



Paid Henry H. Andrews, assistant 

librarian $39 75 

John E. McKeon, assistant 

librarian .... 62 00 

Alton F. Payne, assistant 

librarian .... 57 00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

binding books, etc. 
People's Gas-light Co., gas . 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal' . 
E. P. Johnson Co., coal 
0. D. Kimball, printing 
John B. Clarke, printing, etc. 
Straw & Lovejoy, repairing 

clock .... 

L. B. Clough, insurance 
Louise E. N'ewell, classing 

newspapers, etc. . . 7 50 

Trustees of City Library, 

books ..... 
Labor of men 
Manchester Water - works, 

water .... 

^. P. Hunt, stamps, etc. 
By balance on hand 



529 


01 


238 


14 


12 


00 


191 


52 


18 


00 


35 


00 


5 


50 


100 


00 



1,000 


00 


3 


00 


16 


00 


4 


45 


1,792 


12 



CITY STABLE. 

To appropriation . . . $2,500 00 



),032 99 



Dr. 

S2,500 00 



425 



Cr. 



Paid John M. Kendall, architect . 


$50 00 


John B. Clarke, advertising . 


9 00 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 




tising .... 


8 75 


Nellie Emerson, copies of 




specifications 


2 25 


E. K. Coburn & Co., drafting 




paper .... 


1 43 


George W. Wales, lahor on 




plans . . . 


8 25 


Reserved fund 


2,420 32 


MILITIA. 




To appropriation .... 


$700 00 



Paid Manchester City Guards 

Headquarters First Regiment 



$2,500 00 



Dr. 



$700 00 
Cr. 



$100 00 



K H. N. G. . 


100 00 


Amoskeag Veterans 


100 00 


Manchester "War Veterans . 


100 00 


Sheridan Guards . 


100 00 


By balance on hand 


200 00 







$700 00 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



To appropriation 
Reserved fund 



. $2,500 00 
524 88 



Dr. 



5,024 88 



426 

Cr. 
Paid sundry persons . . . $3,024 88 

$3,024 88 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation . . . $9,000 00 

Eeserved fund . . . 1,282 19 

,282 19 



Cr. 
Paid George E. Morrill, collector . $10,282 19 

$10,282 19 



STATE TAX. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $63,435 00 

$63,435 00 

Cr. 
Paid S. A. Carter, state treasurer . $63,435 00 

5,435 00 



COUNTY TAX. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $40,508 54 

$40,508 54 

Cr. 
Paid Edwin F. Jones, county treas- 
urer . . ... $40,508 54 

),508 54 



427 






OUTSTANDING TAXES. 




1884 


, . , 


$918 08 


1885 . ■ . 


. 


947 77 


1886 . . ■ . . . 


. 


1,000 48 


1887 


. 


1,334 63 


TAXES, 


1888. 


Dr. 


To resident taxes 


$432,914 45 




Non-resident taxes . 


1,804 59 


$434,719 04 










Or. 


By collections 


$403,566 52 




Abatements 


1,174 39 




Discounts 


10,282 19 




Balance uncollected 


19,695 94 


$434,719 04 







CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 


. 


$14,000 00 




Reserved fund 


• 


826 99 


$14,826 99 












Cr. 


Paid John Hosley, mayor . 


. 


$1,800 00 




S. B. Putnam, city treas- 






urer 


. 


1,200 00 




N. P. Kidder, city clerk 


. 


900 00 




J. M. Collity, city physician 


200 00 




P. D. Harrison, clerk 


of 






common council 


, 


150 00 





428 



Paid J, E. Dodge, clerk of school 

board .... $100 00 

J. E. Dodge, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

George "W. Nutter, member 

of school board . . 10 00 

L. C. Baldwin, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

E. L. Kimball, ex-officio mem- 
ber of school board . 3 33 

John Hosley, ex-officio mem- 
ber of school board . 10 00 

E. B. Woodbury, member 

of school board . . 10 00 

M. P. Hall, member of 
school board . . . 10 00 

Abial C. Flanders, member 

of school board . . . 10 00 

William H. Huse, member 

of school board . . 10 00 

John J, Holland, member 

of school board . . 10 00 

T. P. Collins, member of 

school board . . . 10 ,00 

Samuel D. Lord, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

S. W. Clarke, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

N. P. Hunt, member of 

school board . . . 10 00 

William C. Clarke, mem- 
ber of school board . ' 10 00 

Charles H. Manning, mem- 
ber of school board . 10 00 



429 



Paid J. G. Hutchinson, member 

of school board . . SIO 00 

Benj. C. Dean, member of 

school board ... 10 00 

J. M. Kendall, ex-officio mem- 
ber of school board . 6 67 

George E. Morrill, tax-col- 
lector .... 1,662 41 

William E. Buck, superin- 
tendent of schools . . 1.900 00 

Edwin F. Jones, citv solici- 
tor . . . \ . 500 00 

J. A. -Barker, citv messen- 
ger . .* . . 699 96 

D. 0. Furnald, assessor and 
inspector . . . 751 00 

John Ryan, assessor . . 215 00 
George H. Dudlev, assessor 350 00 
Frank E. McKean, assessor 140 00 
H. D. Lord, assessor . . 225 00 
J. E. Stearns, assessor . 198 00 
Ira "VT. Stearns, assessor . 200 00 
C. H. Browii, assessor . 37 b6 
F. B. Potter, assistant asses- 
sor 45 00 

William Stearns, assistant 

assessor .... 30 00 

Isaac Whittemore, assistant 

assessor .... 48 00 

S. L. Flanders, assistant 

assessor . . . . 45 00 

E. W. Brigham. clerical ser- 
vices for assessors . . 212 50 

Harrj T. Lord, clerical ser- 
vices for assessors . . 62 50 



430 



Paid N". Nichols, clerical services 




for assessors . 


1260 00 


T. S. Moriette, interpreter 




for assessors . 


28 00 


C. A. U. Ouilette, interpre- 




ter for assessors 


31 00 


Isaac Whittemore, inspector 




of check-lists . 


118 50 


George C. Kemp, inspector 




of check-lists . 


66 00 


Edward J. Lawler, inspec- 




tor of check-lists 


16 87 


Henrj F. Stone, inspector 




o± check-lists . 


160 00 


Charles E. Morrison, in- 




spector of check-lists 


67 50 


H. D. Lord, inspector of 




check-lists 


163 75 


B. L. Hartshorn, inspector 




of check-lists . 


27 00 


Joseph A. Foster, inspector 




of check-lists . 


74 75 


Eugene W. Brigham, assist- 




ant inspector of check- 




lists .... 


45 00 


Charles A. Carpenter, assist- 




ant inspector of check- 




lists .... 


42 75 


John Dowst, supervisor 


6 00 


F. W. McKinlej, supervisor 


6 00 


F. T. E. Richardson, super- 




visor .... 


10 00 


William C. Knowlton, 




supervisor 


6 00 



431 



Paid James Sutclifte, supervisor 


$6 00 


Joseph Lariviere, supervisor 


19 00 


W. T. Paine, supervisor 


8 00 


W. D. Lacld, supervisor 


8 00 


Hiram Hill, supervisor 


8 00 


J. J. Minturn, supervisor . 


12 00 


Benj. Spoffbrd, supervisor . 


8 00 


E. B. Dunbar, supervisor . 


10 00 


C. H. Hodgman, supervisor 


18 00 


John H. Slater, supervisor 


12 00 


C. A. Carpenter, supervisor 


8 00 


William H. Maxwell, over- 




seer of the poor 


25 00 


William H. Maxwell, clerk 




of overseers of the poor . 


75 00 


Horatio Fradd, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


William Marshall, overseer 




of the poor 


25 00 


John Hosley, ex-officio over- 




seer of the poor 


25 00 


Charles Francis, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


F. J. Morrison, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Horace Gordon, overseer of 




the poor 


25 00 


James Sutcliffe, overseer of 




the poor .... 


25 00 


Thomas L. Quimby, overseer 




of the poor 


25 00 


Judith Sherer, matron at 




pest-house 


360 00 


Marcellus Gould, moderator 


3 00 



432 

Paid T. W. Challis, moderator . $3 00 

"W. A. Carpenter, moderator 3 00 

H. McDoiJOUgh, moderator 3 00 

J. M. Greaney, ward clerk . 10 00 

Michael Herbert, ward clerk 10 00 

A. L.F.Geoffroy, ward clerk 6 00 

H. J. Matthews, ward clerk 5 00 

George H. Allen, ward clerk 5 00 

Edson S. Heath, ward clerk 10 00 

Jesse B. Pattee, ward clerk 11 00 

J. J. Sherry, ward clerk . 10 00 

H. P. Hunter, selectman . 5 00 

E. L. Carpenter, selectman 5 00 

0. C. Monbleau, selectman 5 00 

Charles Atherton, selectman 5 00 

George C. Lord, selectman 5 00 

David Thayer, selectman . 5 00 

D. W. Anderson, selectman 5 00 

C. G. Dodge, selectman . 5 00 

Sylvester Drew, selectman 5 00 

J. F. Frost, selectman . 5 00 

P. McManus, selectman . 5 00 

"Wm. Morrissey, selectman . 5 00 

J. J. Hayes, selectman . 5 00 
Thomas W. Lane, inspector 

of buildings ... 100 00 
C. B. Littlefield, inspector 

of milk . . . . 150 00 
J. M. Crawford, clerical 

labor for inspectors 
G. A. Crosby, health officer 
Geo. C. Hoitt, health officer 
J. B. Sawyer, health officer 



75 00 




200 00 




200 00 




200 00 






$14,826 99 



433 
TRUANT OFFICER. 

To appropriation . . . $750 00 



Paid Samuel Brooks . 
G. M. L. Lane . 



$562 50 
187 50 



Dr. 

$750 00 
Cr. 

$750 00 



EFGmEERS' DEPARTMENT. 



Dr, 



To appropriation 


$2,500 00 




Reserved fund 


61 


80 


$2,561 80 
Cr, 








Paid W. H. Bennett, city engi- 








neer .... 


$1,000 


00 




"W. H. Bennett, supplies, 








etc 


38 


85 




J. J. McDonough, assistant 








engineer 


311 


50 




H. M. Young, assistant en- 








gineer .... 


524 


99 




George W. Wales, assistant 








engineer .... 


460 


50 




J. F. Woodbury & Co., 








blacksmithiug 


13 


25 




J. B. Yarick Co., ax and 








crayons .... 


1 


25 




Wadsworth, Rowland & 








Co., tracing cloth . 


8 


40 




T. W. Lane, pencils . 




50 





28 



434 



Paid W. W". Hubbard, stakes . 

J. Hodge, stakes 

Temple & Farrington Co., 
tracing paper, blank- 
books, etc. 

O. D. Kimball, printing 

John B. Clarke, printing 
reports .... 

C. H. Wood, painting 

Buff & Berger, leveling- 
rod, etc. .... 

F. F. Shaw, repairing clock 

George Blanchet, cotton 

cloth, etc. . . . 9 81 

Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor .... 2 42 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, re- 
pairing wagon, etc. . 33 28 

John T. Beach, repairing 

wagon, etc. . . . 8 60 



$1 


00 


30 


70 


45 


10 


6 


00 


24 


95 


11 


50 


28 


20 


1 


00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation . . . $1,200 00 

Reserved fund . . . 514 40 



Paid John B. Clarke, printing . $49 00 
Campbell & Williams, print- 
ing .... 13 65 
William E. Moore, printing 5 00 



$2,561 80 



Dr. 

.,714 40 
Cr. 



435 



Paid Union Publishing Co., 

printing ... $14 00 

Daily Press Publishing 
Association, printing 

T. H. Tuson, printing 

Russell White, inspector, 
etc. .... 

W. H. B. Newhall, inspec- 
tor, etc. .... 

J. Blakely, professional ser- 
vices .... 

W. F. Robie, professional 
services .... 

F. X. Chenette, burying 
nuisances 

Edwin Kennedy, burying 
nuisances 

Thomas Franker, burying 
nuisances 

D. K. White, burying nui- 
sances .... 

J. W. Mooar, burying nui- 
sances . . • . 

J. B. Sawyer, stationery, 
etc. .... 

L. M. Aldrich, carpenter- 
work .... 

Labor of men and teams 

E. E. Angell, disinfectant . 



8 


00 


2 


50 


600 


10 


266 


40 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


50 


4 


50 


2 


00 


1 


00 


17 


53 




•75 


700 


87 


15 


60 



,714 40 



436 



FIREMEN'S ANNUAL PARADE. 



To appropriation 
Reserved fund 



Paid Knights of Pythias' Drum 
Corps 
John B. Clarke, printing 
F. H. Roberts, caterer 
Sons of Veterans' Drum 

Corps 
First Regiment Band . 
C. D. Palmer, team . 
T. W. Lane, stationery 

By balance on hand . 



$300 00 
100 00 



15 


00 


7 


65 


248 


25 


a 

10 


00 


50 


00 


65 


50 


3 


75 


9 


85 



Dk. 



$400 00 



Ce. 



$400 00 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' 



GRAVES. 

Dr. 



To appropriation . . . $200 00 

Incidental expenses . . 100 00 

Reserved fund . . . 15 25 



Paid Louis Bell Post, G. A. R. . $300 00 
Labor of men and teams . 15 25 



$315 25 



Cr. 



$315 25 



437 

WOMEN'S AID SOCIETY HOSPITAL. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $400 00 

$400 00 

Cr. 
Paid Mrs. Aretas Blood, treasurer $400 00 

$400 00 



STARK MONUMENT SQUARE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $100 00 

1100 00 

Cr. 
Paid labor of men and teams . $20 25 
By balance on hand . . . 79 75 

$100 00 



TUITION. 

Dr. 

To William E. Buck ... . $81 48 
Balance 202 41 

$283 89 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $5,000 00 

Reserved fund .... 3,524 13 

$8,524 18 

Cr. 
Paid labor of men and teams . $8,524 13 

$8,524 13 



438 

CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Dr. 

To trustees |2,000 00 

$2,000 00 

Cr. 

By bonds $2,000 00 

$2,000 00 



POLICE TELEGRAPH. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $5,000 00 

$5,000 00'. 

Cr. 
By reserved fund .... |5,000 00 

$5,000 00 



WEBSTER-STREET EAST EXTENSION. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $1,500 00 

$1,500 00 

Cr. 
Paid John Perham, contractor . $995 00 

By reserved fund . . . 505 00 

$1,500 00 



RESERVED FUND. 

Dr. 



To appropriation 


. $20,000 00 


Mead, Mason & Co. , land 


. 1,654 13 


Old boiler 


75 00 


Dog licenses . 


609 00 



439 



To Billiard-table licenses 


$287 00 


Milk licenses 


59 50 


Show licenses 


174 00 


Rent of tenements 


436 19 


J. A. Weston & Co. , weighing 


r 


stone .... 


] 24 00 


Interest on taxes , 


322 29 


City teams 


880 36 


District N"o. 3 


28 41 


District I^To. 8 


54 76 


l^ew highways 


1,083 73 


Land damage 


965 62 


Lighting streets 


236 71 


Bridges .... 


. 3,305 80 


Fire department 


8,608 44 


Fire-alarm telegraph 


496 27 


Police department 


2,281 29 


Printing and stationery 


338 93 


Police telegraph . 


5,000 00 


City stable 


2,420 32 


"Webster-street east extensior 


I 505 00 


Equipment of Webster-street 




engine-house 


1,669 10 


5y paupers off the farm 


$248 77 


City Farm . . . . 


1,655 21 


Highway District ISTo. 1 


14 96 


(( a 9 


151 14 


(( u 4 


2 31 


" " 6 . 


11 72 


" " 7 . 


14 80 


" " 10 


136 90 



551,515 85 



Cr. 



440 



Highway District No. 11 


. $156 62 


u ii j2 


78 52 


13 


43 72 


Watering streets . 


396 89 


Paving streets 


521 82 


Macadamizing streets 


354 37 


Grading for concrete 


553 47 


Sewers and drains . 


. 8,345 81 


Con'mons 


659 72 


Incidental expenses 


. 6,058 40 


Hydrant service 


100 00 


City Hall 


. 1,441 91 


Repairs of buildings 


28 87 


Abatement of taxes 


524 88 


Discount on taxes . 


1,282 19 


City officers' salaries 


826 99 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 


5 15 25 


Main-street sewer . 


5 73 


Repairs of schoolhouses 


150 04 


Fuel .... 


917 98 


Contingent expenses 


437 55 


Care of rooms 


62 24 


Engineers' department . 


61 80 


Scavenger teams 


981 75 


Health department 


514 40 


Engine-house, Webster streel 


: 285 16 


Amoskeag Cemetery 


•205 87 


Lake-avenue engine-house 


2,500 52 


New tomb 


240 80 


Firemen's parade . 


100 00 


By balance on hand 


21,426 77 



,515 85 



441 
WATER-WORKS. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$23,499 


56 


M. T. Thompson (overdraft) . 


200 


00 


Mary Y. Crombie (overdraft) 


200 


00 


Fletcher Brown (overdraft) . 


1,750 


00 


Charles K. Walker, water- 






rents 


85,643 


82 

£111 9Q^ 












Cr, 


Paid Charles K. Walker, superin- 






tendent, etc. . 


$1,573 85 


M. F. Thompson, land 


200 


00 


Mary Y. Crombie, land 


200 


00 


Fletcher Brown, land 


1,750 


00 


L. W. Tenney, battery. 






gong, etc. 


72 


50 


New England Tel e p h o n e 






and Telegraph Co., tele- 






phones .... 


72 00 


J. H. Proctor, land . 


100 


00 


J, H. and Luther S. Proc- 






tor, land .... 


800 


00 


Luther S. and Mary E. 






Proctor, land . 


2,400 


00 


Alzina Ordway, land 


335 


00 


Thomas Corcoran, damage 






from leak 


40 


00 


George Fletcher & Co., re- 






freshments 


20 


00 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 






etc. .... 


128 


95 


Xilley & Wadleigh, hard- 






ware, etc. 


2 


00 



442 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. 


$31 25 


C. H. Robie, concreting 


188 89 


J. J. Abbott, painting 


21 34 


D. I. Mahoney, lumber 


51 53 


J. Hodge, lumber 


4 34 


Dana & Provost, lumber and 




labor .... 


148 19 


E. A. G. Holmes, lumber 




and labor 


106 58 


Head & Dowst, lumber and 




labor .... 


1,745 54 


Manchester Locomotive 




"Works, sleeves, plugs, etc. 


258 20 


Manchester Locomotive 




Works, 1 portable boiler 


300 00 


Lowell's Iron Foundry, 




sleeves, caps, etc. . 


22 79 


Pike & Heald, galvanized 




iron, etc. 


66 2( 


D. F. Cressey, blacksmith- 




ing 


78 03 


C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork. 




etc. .... 


23 .51 


Thomas A. Lane, valves. 




nipples, etc. 


1,178 35 


Concord Railroad Corpora- 




tion, freight . 


1,279 35 


E. T. James, teams 


7 50 


James Brothers, teams 


40 50 


J. C. Mchols & Son, team . 


2 00 


John Dodge, team 


3 50 


Parent & Trudeau, wood . 


1 00 


J. F. Wyman, wood . 


19 94 



443 



Paid L. B. Bod well & Co., coal 




and wood 


$77 05 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal and 




wood .... 


512 31 


J. B. Clarke, printing 


26 50 


Campbell & Williams, print- 




ing .... 


24 25 


T. H. Tuson, printing 


41 79 


Union Publishing Co., print- 




ing 


8 20 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




slate and pencils 


1 37 


Merrill Brothers, cement. 




etc. .... 


80 40 


Merrill & Freeman, cement 


112 20 


Pettee & Adams, cement . 


2 40 


J. S. Webster, stone . 


30 00 


M. Fitzgerald, sharpening 




drills, etc. 


25 80 


Edson Manufacturing Co., 




pump, hose, etc. 


52 26 


Chapman Yalve Co., w^ater 




gates .... 


215 94 


Boston Lead Manufacturing 




Co., pig lead . 


765 97 


W. H. Ward & Co., bands 




and cocks 


75 70 


I^ational Meter Co., meters 


1,874 60 


Holyoke Hydrant and Iron- 




works, hydrants 


310 00 


Hays Manufacturing Co., 




boxes and cocks 


247 50 


J. H. Cunningham, nipples. 




etc. .... 


56 00 



444 



Paid Hersey Meter Co., meters, 




etc 


$61 00 


George "Woodman & Co., 




nipples, unions, etc. 


13 28 


]S'ew Bedford Cordage Co., 




gaskets, etc. . 


51 10 


Leonard & Ellis, machine oil 


142 65 


Union Water Meter Co., 




meters, etc. . 


368 21 


Gilchrist & Gorham, pipes. 




etc 


519 14 


Builders' Iron Foundry, 




branches, etc. . 


96 00 


Dennison & Brown, meter- 




books .... 


12 00 


P. C. Holmes & Co., wheel- 




ring, etc. 


130 90 


Seeley Brothers, black paint 


14 00 


R D. Wood & Co., pipe . 


8,889 40 


Boston Belting Co., hose. 




etc. .... 


32 57 


Coffin Valve Co., gates 


168 00 


James S. Newell & Co., 




copper netting 


49 05 


Sumner & Goodwin, pipe . 


13 65 


J. Stickney, leather packing 


10 00 


George E. Morrill, auditing 




accounts .... 


20 00 


M. Connor, damage to team 


9 50 


Swift Bros., damage from 




water .... 


15 00 


Leander Pope, blacksmith- 




ing 


2 86 


New Hampshire Rubber 




Co., rubber jacket . 


2 55 



445 

Paid G. H. Bartlett, manure . |16 00 

E. R. Coburn & Co., station- 

eiy, etc 8 17 

Manchester File Co., files . 2 42 

A. N. Clapp, lead . . 29 

G. R. Vance & Co., gal- 
vanized float, etc. . . 2 10 

H. D. Gordon, umbrella 

racks, etc. . . . 10 25 

Dennis Kerwin, tallow . 7 50 

Morse & Wilson, dinner for 

water commissioners . 2 50 

John Ferguson, professional 
services .... 

George H. Bartlett, manure 

New Hampshire Rubber 
Co., packing . 

Brock & Driscoll, water-pot, 
etc. ..... 

A. M. Eastman, oil, matches, 
etc 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, sleeves, etc. 

Town of Auburn, taxes 

J. K. Wilson, trucking 

Austin, Flint & Day, lum- 
ber 2 00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Co., ironwork . 

George Whitford, wood 

George R. Vance 

Joseph B. Sawyer, engineer- 
ing .... 
Merrill & Freeman, cement 



3 


00 


80 


00 


3 


45 


1 


00 


2 


75 


103 


70 


18 


76 




75 



71 


58 


27 


44 


6 


00 


6 


00 


6 


40 



446 



Paid E. T. James, teams 



$26 50 



Walworth Manufacturing 



Co 


12 90 


Sewall & Day Cordage Co. . 


13 58 


W. P. Miller & Co. \ 


22 50 


Eager & Rand, oil, matches. 




etc. .... 


12 01 


Alpheus Gay, water com- 




missioner 


75 00 


Henry Chandler, water 




commissioner . 


45 00 


James A. Weston, water 




commissioner . 


125 00 


A. C. Wallace, water com- 




missioner 


75 00 


Joseph F. Kennard, water 




commissioner . 


51 00 


E. H. Hobbs, water com- 




missioner 


51 00 


John Hosley, ex-officio water 




commissioner . 


45 00 


Labor of men and teams . 


9,795 17 


Interest .... 


36,000 00 


By balance on hand . 


36,126 68 







$111,293 38 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 

To balance from old account . $285 71 
Appropriation . . . 4,000 00 
Reserved fund ... 150 04 



Dr. 



,435 76 



447 



Cr. 



Paid George H. Dudley, carpen- 




ter-work 


$1,580 21 


Miles & Sturtevant 


20 00 


George W. Rief, carpenter- 




work .... 


23 78 


George Holbrook, carpen- 




ter-work 


16 50 


J. A. Sargent, painting 


150 39 


R. Landers, painting, etc. . 


81 88 


J. J. Abbott, painting, etc. . 


66 81 


J. Daniels & Co., painting . 


2 25 


J. Choate, painting . 


110 56 


Sullivan & Sloan, painting . 


101 55 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, pip- 




ing, etc. .... 


496 02 


Amoskeag Manufacturing 




Co., ironwork, etc. 


470 26 


Pike & Heald, piping, 




plumbing, etc. 


117 89 


Bennett & Lord, mason- 




work .... 


102 22 


B. W. Robinson, mason- 




work .... 


44 12 


D. J. Murphy, urinals, 




water-closets, etc. . 


706 79 


H. C. Dickey, whitewashing 


10 00 


B. W. Robinson, white- 




washing, etc . 


118 12 


J. B. Varick Co., asbestos 




sheathing 


3 70 


Lowell's L^on Foundry, 




ironwork,- etc. 


79 05 


E. Frye, ironwork 


1 00 



. 448 

Paid Timothy Shea, cleaning 

vaults .... $56 25 
W. F. Gibson, portable plat- 
form .... 5 50 
E. T. James, team . . 2 50 
DeCourcy & Holland, labor 5 00 
E. C. Tilton, stone, etc. . 10 25 
Frank Oliver ... 3 75 
John B. Kenney . . 7 50 
Educational Supply Co. . 22 08 
Labor of men and teams . 19 72 



FUEL. 

To appropriation . . . $3,000 00 

Keserved fund . . . 917 98 



By balance from old account 


$287 03 


Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 




wood .... 


226 83 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 


2,510 56 


Incidental expenses, coal 


101 50 


C. N. Harvey, wood 


602 44 


L. S. Proctor, wood 


131 37 


J. Hodge, wood . 


1 75 


John B. Clarke, advertising . 


15 75 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 




tising .... 


11 25 


Press Publishing Association, 




advertising 


9 00 


Labor of men and teams 


20 50 



14,435 75 



Dr. 

1,917 98 
Cr. 



1,917 98 



449 



FURNITURE AOT) SUPPLIES, 

To^balance from old account . $281 05 
Appropriation . . . 1,000 00 
Killey & Wadleigh (overdraft) 1 75 



Dr. 



Paid^J. L. Hammett, crayons, call- 
bells, etc $52 75 

J. J. Holland, drugs, etc. . 12 75 

Milton Bradley Co. . . 1 58 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

sketch-books, etc. . . 40 31 

E. R. Coburn & Co., paper, 
' ink, etc 58 19 

H. D. Gordon, chairs . . 7 25 

Thorp & Adams Manufact- 
uring Co., ink . . . 14 25 

Pike & Heald, hods, brooms, 

etc 31 99 

Manchester Hardware Co., 
floor-br u shes , waste-baskets, 
etc 60 62 

Killey & Wadleigh, feather 

dusters, etc. . . . 15 46 

John B. Varick Co., floor- 
brushes, hods, etc. . . 9 03 

Silver, Rogers & Co., mops, 

etc. . " . . . . 12 00 

D. A. Simons, feather dust- 
ers, etc. . . . • 13 50 

Thomas A. Lane, steam con- 
tract at Training School . 793 42 

Dupree Electric Supply Co. 6 55 

29 



$1,282 80 
Cr. 



450 



Paid Geo. S. Perry, blackboards, 



etc 


$5 


95 




Clark & Estey, ribbon . 


13 


50 




Barton & Co., rope matting 


3 


00 




J. Stickney, hose . 


9 


00 




A. !N'.Clapp, soap, brooms, etc 


. 


65 




Carpenter & Co., brooms 


4 


10 




Geo. B. Carr, mineral case, etc 


!. 13 


00 




American Manufacturing 






Co., desk-stands, etc. 


39 


46 




C. P. Trickey, crayons, etc. 


3 


25 




By balance on hand 


61 


24 


$1,282 80' 








BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 










Dr. 


To balance from old account 


$88 68 




Appropriation 


500 


00 


$588 as 














Cr. 


Paid Thomas W. Lane 


. $362 


70 




Temple & Farrington Co. 


24 


50 




Eastern Educational Bureai 


I 6 


75 




E. R. Coburn & Co. . 


52 


94 




George S. Perry . 


15 


45 




William Ware & Co. . 


4 


05 




New England Publishing Co 


2 


70 




Ginn & Co. . 


22 


00 




Boston School Supply Co. 


5 


20 




H. C. Baird & Co. 


4 


00 




A. M. Edwards . 


3 


50 




E. H. Butler & Co. 


15 


20 




Willard Small . 


14 


58 





451 



Paid A. Miidge & Son 
A. C. Stockin 
C. P. Trickey 

By balance on hand 



$6 


75 


12 


26 


2 


10 


34 


00 



$588 68 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation 



154 01 
400 00 



Paid John B. Clarke . 


$303 77 


Union Publishing Co. . 


30 25 


Campbell & Williams . 


9 50 


Manchester Weekly Budget . 


3 00 


By balance on hand 


107 49 



Dr. 

$454 01 
Cr. 



$454 01 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



To appropriation 


$800 00 


Reserved fund 


437 55 


Paid People's Gas-light Co., gas . 


$179 76 


Manchester Water - works, 




water .... 


477 75 


A. A. Jenkins, tuning piano 


17 00 


W. E. Buck, use of team 


88 80 


Wilham H. Vickery, repair- 




ing locks, keys, etc. . 


7 70 



Dr. 



$1,237 55. 
Cr. 



452 



Paid ITovelty Advertising Co., card 

board, etc. . . . $0 85 

W. J. Heron, filling diplomas 24 05 

J. S. Avery, setting glass, etc. 9 10 

S.W. Clarke, repairing clocks 31 00 

Manchester Print-works, 

chemicals .... 2 34 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

knob, brooms, etc. 
Killey & Wadleigh, sperm oil 
J. B. Varick Co., sponges 
A. M. Eastman, soap, ivorine, 

etc 

Chas. F. Hoyt, moving settees 
F. P. Colby, moving pianos . 
Joel Daniels & Co., glazing . 
C. H. Kimball, outline pictures 
Harley & Robbie, oil-cloth . 
Manchester Opera House Co., 

use of opera house 
Higgins Bros., use of chairs 
Weston Sc Hill, ribbon . 
George W. Reed, teams 
M. D. Fife & Co., rubber cover 

for piano, etc. . 
"W. H. Elliott, tuning pipes . 
E. J. Carley, cash paid for 

cleaning windows, etc. 
L. K. Mead, dye, picks, etc. . 
Moses Tracy, use of well 
H. E.Yaughan, moving pianos 
R. D. Gay, shades, etc. . 
Ed. H. Currier, chemicals . 
J. B. Young, cleaning vaults 



1 


44 




31 




75 


2 


15 




75 


7 


00 




35 




50 




19 


25 


00 


8 


50 


3 


69 


4 


00 


7 75 


1 


00 


1 


55 




50 


30 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


9 


76 


2 


50 



453 



Paid A. K. Clapp, snow-shovel . |0 40 
Carswell & Brown, lamp- 

chimnejs .... 20 

A. T. BaiT, labor . . 2 00 

Timothy Shea, cleaning vault 5 00 
S. G. Woodman, cleaning 

schoolhouse ... 2 00 
M. ]^. Bower, cleaning school- 
house .... 3 00 
By balance from old account . 263 91 



§1,237 55 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation 


$3,200 


00 


Reserved fund 


62 


24 












Ck. 


Paid William Stevens 


$600 


00 


J. S. Avery 


600 


00 


A. T. Barr 


545 


00 


Michael Finley . 


399 


97 


William H. Morrill . 


350 


04 


H. C. Dickey . 


250 


07 


E. P. Cogswell . 


250 


08 


William Clancy . 


1 


00 


Frank Derome . 


3 


00 


Otis L. Webster 


22 


00 


Etta J. Carley . 


49 


95 


D. S. Dunbar . 


18 


50 


Ella F. Barker . 


48 


75 


William Dobbin 


26 


50 


L. E. Heath 


18 


75 



454 



Paid Fred R. Currier 
John T. Duncan 
Alice C. Campbell 
Olive J, Randall 
Arthur Sinclair 

By balance from old account 



$31 


25 


4 


50 


18 


00 


15 


00 


6 


00 


3 


88 



5,262 24 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 
To appropriation . . . $1,600 00 



Dr. 







< 


$1,600 00 
Cr. 


Paid Mary A. Southard 


$30 


00 




Fred C. Baldwin 


66 


00 




Frank C. Livingston . 


154 


00 




Sarah B. Paige . 


39 


60 




Charles E. Cochran . 


154 


00 




Cora F. Sanborn 


69 


00 




Etta S. Dana 


46 


80 




Edith M. Stebbins 


27 


00 




Maggie G. Linen 


27 


00 




Nellie M. Atwood 


27 


00 




Lizzie D. Hartford 


67 


00 




Emma J. Ela . 


30 


00 




Georgie A. Nute 


56 


00 




J. H." Campbell . 


146 


00 




E. R. Wood 


3 


00 




Annie E. McElroy 


40 


00 




M. Alma Fracker 


30 


60 




A. H. Boyd 


27 90 




A. J. Dana 


13 


50 




A. Stebbins 




90 





455 



Paid W. H. Morrill, janitor . $56 80 

A. T. Barr, janitor . . 30 00 

F. P. Colby, posting cards . 4 00 

John B. Clarke, printing 

and advertising . . 29 69 

Daily Press Publishing Co., 

advertising ... 9 00 

Union Publishing Co., ad- 
vertising . . . 29 16 
Georgie A. l^ute, oil, chim- 
neys, wicks, and care of 



rooms .... 


10 98 




By balance on hand . 


375 07 


$1,600 00 






EVENING SCHOOL, MECHANICAL DRAWING. 






Dr. 


To appropriation 


$700 00 


$700 00 










Cr. 


Paid H. A. Herrick, instructor . 


$78 00 




J. M. Kendall, instructor . 


177 00 




A. H. Sanborn, assistant 






instructor 


67 50 




H. W. Allen, assistant in- 






structor .... 


120 00 




W. H. Morrill, janitor 


21 10 




F. W . Stickney, blue prints 


21 00 




E. R. Coburn & Co., draw- 






ing paper, etc. 


36 24 




D. A. Simons, stools . 


13 50 




Head & Dowst, stands for 






tables .... 


23 00 





456 



Paid Press Publishing Co., ad- 



vertising 

Union Publishing Co., ad- 
vertising 

John B. Clarke, advertising 
and printing . 
By balance on hand . 


$7 00 

12 00 

17 25 
106 41 


$700 00' 


TEACHERS 


' SALARIES 


. 




To appropriation 


. $43,500 


00 


Dk. 

$43,500 oa 


Paid E. P. Goodwin . 
Albert Somes . 




. $1,200 00 
800 00 


Cr, 


G. I. Hopkins . 
L. E. Manahan . 




1,350 
900 


00 
00 




R. M. Tuson 




600 


00 




Mary A. Buzzell 
Mary Stanton 
Fred C. Baldwin 




600 

640 

1,350 


00 
00 
00 




Lenora C. Gilford 




183 


04 




Jennie M. Chandler . 




500 


00 




Carrie E. Reid . 




500 


00 




C. A. Abbott . 




431 


75 




H. G. Flanders . 




450 


00 




I^ellie M. James 




450 


00 




Ella F. Sanborn 




450 


00 




Anna 0. Heath . 




600 


00 




L. P. Gove 




495 


00 




Fannie D. Moulton 




450 


00 




N. I. Sanderson 




450 


00 





457 



Paid Lucia E. Estj . 
Belle M. Kelley . 

F. S. Sutcliffe . 
Annie W. Patten 
M. J. Fife . 
Belle R. Daniels 
M. F. Barnes 

K F. Ainsworth 
Eva F. Tuson . 

G. A. Wyman . 
J. W. Stetson 
Annie A. "Webster 
Mary E. Bunton 
Bertha L. Dean . 
N^ancy S. Bunton 
Kittie J. Ferren 
Mary F. Nutt . 
Clara E. Woods 

J. E. Pickering . 
Cora M. Dearborn 
M. J. Hickey 
Barbara B. Joy . 
Flora M. Senter 
E. E. McKean . 
Josie H. Newton 
Nettie C. Woodman 
William F. Gibson 
Alta C. Willand 
M. N. Bower 
Carrie I. Stevens 
Lizzie A. Burns 
Lelia A. Brooks . 
Izetta S. Locke . 
Edith M. Stebbins 



$450 00 
135 00 

1,350 00 
525 00 
200 00 
500 00 
475 00 
450 00 
450 00 
393 75 

1,350 00 

439 86 
500 00 
500 00 
475 00 
450 00 
380 00 
450 00 
630 00 
485 62 
397 50 
410 50 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
760 00 

440 00 
450 00 
270 00 
550 00 
420 00 
450 00 
270 00 



458 



Paid Cora F. Sanborn 


$45 25 


Hattie N. Gage . 


29 50 


Georgia A. Dow 


450 00 


Gertrude H. Brooks . 


450 00 


Helen M. Morrill 


475 00 


Alice E. Page . 


385 00 


Huldah C. Graupner . 


360 00 


Ella Hope . 


450 00 


A. S. Downs 


450 00 


M. W. Mitchell . 


450 00 


Susie H, Frame 


270 00 


Kate F. Clarke . 


286 85 


Mary A. Southard 


375 00 


D. E. Haines 


450 00 


8. B. Paige 


360 00 


Etta J. Carley . 


500 00 


Mary G. Tynan . 


450 00 


Olive J. Randall 


450 00 


Susie G. Woodman . 


450 00 


P. Maude Joy . 


225 00 


Georgie A. Xute 


495 00 


Ella F. Barker . 


450 00 


Lillian C. Hall . 


240 00 


Nina B. Croning 


208 13- 


Olive A. Rowe . 


450 00 


Caroline E. Wing 


1,020 00 


Genevieve B. Knight . 


188 50 


C. B. Gilford . 


272 37 


L. M. Smith 


235 75 


Emma McLaren 


287 00 


Theodora Richardson 


171 44 


Mary J. Walsh . 


248 00 


Kate Townsend . 


252 50 


i^ellie M. Atwood 


107 25 



459 



Paid Lillian Little 


$122 75 


Abbie R. West . 


116 


00 


l^ettie B. Fogg . ' . 


116 


25 


Inez M. Warren 


107 


25 


Mrs. F. S. Sutcliffe . 


56 


25 


M. E. Lord 


308 


17 


J. J. Kimball . 


700 


00 


Kate Halliday . 


108 


10 


L. H. Bailey 


4 


50 


C. W. Bickford 


3 


00 


George Winch . 


480 


00 


Nellie S. Brown 


80 


00 


Alverta P. Barrett 


34 


50 


Maude L. Kent . 


31 


25 


Millie S. Morse . 


38 


25 


Emma B. Abbott 


40 


50 


By balance on band . 


98 


66 

$43,500 00 



460 



FUNDED DEBT. 



Amount of funded debt, 

Jan. 1, 1888 . . . $971,700 00 
Paid during the year . . 36,200 00 



Amount of funded debt 

Jan. 1, 1889 $935,500_0(> 

Interest due, estimated . $20,000 00 

Bills outstanding . . 37,088 16 

Cemetery bonds . . 9,300 00 



,388 16 



Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1889 . . $1,001,888 16 
Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1889 . . . 84,117 31 



Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1889 . . $917,770^85 
Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1888 . . . 964,028^66 



Decrease of net indebtedness during the year $46,257 81 



461 



Valuation, Taxes, Etc. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1846 . . 


$3,187,726 


$22,005 95 


1,808 


82 10 


$300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979 92 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 88 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


6,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


1 76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673 82 


7,831 


1 62 


100 


1883 . . 


20,055,986 


332,741 72 


7,944 


1 65 


100 


1884 . . 


20,613,032 


361,401 61 


8,143 


1 75 


100 


1885 . . 


21,137,464 


345,260 15 


8,157 


1 63 


100 


1886 . . 


21,379,384 


347,009 31 


8,602 


1 62 


100 


1887 . . 


21,905,476 


373,138 96 


8,996 


1 70 


100 


1888 . . 


22,162,928 


432,914 45 


9,344 


1 95 


100 



462 
City Debt. 



Dale of Notes. 


To Whom Payable. 


When Payable. 


Principal. 


July 1, 1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1890 


100,000 00 


Jan, 1 


1872 


U (( 


Jan. ] 


, 1892 


100,000 00 


Oct. 31 


1863 


City Bonds, 


Nov. 1 


, 1893 


70,000 00 


July 1 


, 1864 


u w 


July 1 


, 1894 


50,000 00 


July 1 


1874 


Water Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1895 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1872 


u u 


Jan. ] 


. 1897 


100,000 00 


Jan. 1 


, 1872 


(( 4( 


Jan. ] 


; 1902 


100,000 00 


July 1 


1881 


Bridge Bonds, 


July 1 


, 1911 


60,000 00 


April 1 


1885 


City Bonds, 


April ] 


, 1905 


50,000 00 


April 1 


1885 


a u 


April ] 


, 1907 


50,000 00 


April 1 


1885 


U (( 


April ] 


, 1909 


50,000 00 


April 1, 


1885 


it u 


April ] 


, 1911 


5,000 00 


Jan. 1 


1887 


Water Bonds, 


Jan. 1 


, 1907 


100,000 00 



463 



mVENTORY OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 



High School house and lot . 

Furniture, charts, maps, books 
and apparatus 
Franklin-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Spring-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Lincoln-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Ash-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Webster-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Blodget-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Bridge-street house and lot . 
Lowell-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Merrimack-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Wilson Hill house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Beech-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
School-street house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
South-Main-street house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Bakersville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 



$50,000 00 



. 2,000 00 $52,000 00 


. 18,000 00 




400 00 


18,400 00 


. 15,000 00 




400 00 


15,400 00 


. 50,000 00 




400 00 


50,400 00 


. 58,000 00 




400 00 


58,400 00 


. 23,000 00 




600 00 


23,600 00 


. 17,500 00 




350 00 


17,850 00 


. 3,500 00 




150 00 


3,650 00 


900 00 


900 00 


. 7,000 00 




400 00 


7,400 00 


. 15,000 00 




550 00 


15,550 00 


. 3,300 00 




100 00 


3,400 00 


. 7,000 00 




350 00 


7,350 00 


. 5,000 00 




425 00 


5,425 00 


. 2,800 00 




200 00 


3,000 00 


. 13,000 00 




600 00 


13,600 00 



464 



Stark District house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Amoskeag house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Groffe's Falls house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Harvey District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Webster District house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Hallsville house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Youngsville house and lot . 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Mosquito Pond Dist. house and lot 

Furniture, maps, etc. 
Park-street house and lot 

Amount of school property 
Amount of city property 

Total amount of property 



. 13,000 


00 




150 


00 


$3,150 00 


. 3,700 


00 




125 


00 


3,825 00 


. 3,600 


00 




100 


00 


3,700 00 


. 2,500 


00 




125 


00 


2,625 00 


600 


00 




50 


00 


650 00 


. 3,500 


00 




125 


00 


3,625 00 


. 1,400 


00 




125 


00 


1,525 00 


t 1,200 


00 




100 


00 


1,300 00 


. 8,500 


00 


8,500 00 


525,225 00 


• 


1,840,112 13 


, , 


$2,165,337 13 



465 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Land, city scales, etc. 
City Library building 
Permanent inclosure of commons 
City Hall and lot ... . 
City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, etc., at City Farm 
Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Engine-house, stable, and land. Vine street 
Hose-house, cottage, and lot, Maple street 
Hose-house, cottage, and lot. Lake avenue 
Houses and Pine Grove Cemetery 
Court-house and lot . 
Common sewers .... 

Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall 
Street lanterns, posts, and pipes 
Water-works ..... 
Horses, carts, plows, and tools for streets 
Fire department individual alarm 
TVard-room and lot, Manchester street 
Police station and lot, Manchester street 
Engine-house and lot, Ward 8 . 
Engine-house and lot. Ward 8 . 
Water-pipe, wagons, etc. ,for watering streets 
Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad 
Gravel lot, Belmont street . 
Engine-house and lot, Webster street 
Gravel lots. Ward 8 . . . . 
Gravel lots, Bakersville 
Gravel lot, District No. 8 . 
Valley Cemetery and tomb 



$30,000 00 
41,000 00 
22,000 00 
60,000 00 
34,000 00 

8,882 19 
54,322 50 
33,450 00 
47,000 00 

5,000 00 

9,000 00 

13,000 00 

51,000 00 

338,000 00 

3,000 00 

8,000 00 
924,007 44 

5,000 00 

3,000 00 
10,000 00 
40,000 00 

2,500 00 
20,000 00 

2,500 00 
50,000 00 

1,200 00 

10,000 00 

400 00 

700 00 

150 00 

13,000 00 



30 



1,840,112 13 



466 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1889. 



Interest 


. 








118,500 oa 


Paupers off the farm . 






6,000 00 


City Farm . 






4,000 00 


City teams . 






2,500 00 


Highway District No 1 






300 00 


a I 


' 2 






10,000 00 


U i 


3 






1,000 00 


<( ( 


4 






500 00 


(C ( 


. 5 






500 00 


U ( 


6 






400 00 


li i 


7 






1,200 00 


il I 


8 






800 00 


a ( 


9 






500 00 


a < 


' 10 






2,800 00 


u < 


11 






1,000 do 


U ( 


12 






300 00 


li I 


13 






200 00 


New highways , 






6,000 00 


Damage for land taken for ' 


lighways 




1,000 00 


Watering streets 






5,000 00 


Lighting streets . 








33,000 00 


Paving streets 








3,500 00 


Macadamizing streets 








• 18 000 00 


Grading for concrete 








4,000 00 


Sewers and drains 








18,000 00 


Commons . 








3,500 00 


Bridges 








8,000 00 


Incidental expenses 








15,000 00 


Pine Grove Cemetery 








1,000 00 


Valley Cemetery 








1,500 00 


Fire department . 








35,000 00 


Fire-alarm telegraph 








1,200 00 


Hydrant servi( 


JG . 








21,000 00 



467 



Police department $33,000 00 

Printing and stationery .... 1,200 00 

Eepairs of buildings 2,000 00 

City library 4,000 00 

Miiitia 800 00 

Abatement of taxes 3,000 00 

Discount on taxes 10,000 00 

State tax 63,435 00 

County tax 40,508 54 

City officers' salaries . . . . . 14,500 00 

Firemen's parade 300 00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves . . . 300 00 

Stark Monument square .... 100 00 

Women's Aid and Relief Society hospital . 400 00 

Reserved fund 20,000 00 

Repairs of schoolhouses .... 4,000 00 

Fuel 3,200 00 

Furniture and supplies .... 1,000 00 

Printing and advertising .... 300 00 

Contingent expenses ..... 800 00 

Care of rooms 3,200 00 

Evening schools 1,200 00 

Teachers' salaries 43,500 00 

Truant officer 750 00 

Engineer's department .... 2,700 00 

Scavenger teams 9,000 00 

Health department 1,400 00 

Evening school, mechanical drawing . . 700 00 

Lake-avenue engine-house .... 6,500 00 

City tomb 1,500 00 

Catalogue for City Library . . . 2,500 00 

New schoolhouse, West Manchester . . 15,000 00 



$516,493 54 



INDEX. 



I N D e: X. 



Abatement of Taxes 
Account of City Treasurer 
Alarm Boxes and Keys 
Amoskeag Cemetery 
Appropriations for 1889 
Attendance at School 

Books and Stationery 
Bridges . 

Care of Rooms 
Cemetery Funds 
Cemeteries, report of Trustees 
Treasurer 
Trustees of Fund 
City Government, 1888 

Engineer, report of 

Debt . 

Farm 

Hall . 

Library 

Propei-ty . 

Solicitor, report of 

Stable 

Teams 

Treasurer's Account 
Commons 

Contingent Expenses 
County Tax 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 
Debt, Funded .... 



PAGE 

425 
336 
235 
400 
466 
155 

450 
382 

453 
438 
193 
207 
209 
3 
67 
462 
186, 356 
419 
423 
465 
173 
424 
362 
336 
383 
451 
426 

436 
460 



472 



Discount on Taxes . 
Donations to City Library 

Evening Schools 
Engineers' Department . 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 

Boxes and Keys, Location of 
Fire Apparatus 

Department 
Firemen's Parade 

Relief Association 
Fires, Alarms, Losses, 1888 
Fuel 
Furniture and Supplies 

Grading for Concrete 

Health Department . 
Highway District No. 1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
Highways, New 
Hydrant Service 
Hydrants, Location of 

Inaugural Address of Mayor Varney 
Incidental Expenses 
Individual Alarm, Fire Department 
Instructions to Key-holders 
Interest ...... 

Inventory of Schoolhouses 



473 



Lake-avenue Engine-house 

Land Damage 

Library, Cit}- . 

Donations to 
LiVjrarian's report of 
Treasurer's report of 
Trustees' report cvf 

List of Teachers and Janitors 

Loan, Temporary 

Main-street Sewer . 
Militia .... 

Names and Residences of Members 



Officers, City . 

Overseers of Poor, report of 

Paupers off the City Farm 
Pine Grove Cemetery 
Police Department . 

Telegraph 
Printing and Advertising 
Stationery . 
Property, City 

Repairs of Schoolhouses 

Buildings 
Report of Board of Health 

Chief Engineer of Fire Department 

City Civil Engineer 

Cit}- Solicitor . 

Committee on City Farm 

Committee on Finance 

District Surveyors . 

Librarian of City Library 

Milk Inspector 

Overseers of the Poor 

School Committee . 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Superintendent of Water-works 

Treasurer of City Library 

Trustees of City Library 

31 



of Fire Department 



474 

Keport of Trustees of Cemeteries 19S 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund 209 

Water Commissioners 37 

Reserved Fund 438 

Salaries of City Officers 427 

Teachers 456 

Scavenger Teams 437 

School Depai'tment . . 105 

Evening, Mechanical Drawing 455 

Organization for 1889 160 

Training 134 

Sewers and Drains . . 380 

Stark Monument Square 437 

State Tax 426 

Streets, Lighting 374 

Macadamizing 375 

Paving 375 

Watering 373 

Taxes, Abatement of 425 

Discount on 426 

For 1888 427 

Interest on 344 

Outstanding 427 

Temporary Loan 343 

Teachers, List of 163 

Salaries of 456 

Training School 134 

Truant Officer 433 

Tuition •. . 437 

Valuation, Taxes, etc 461 

Valedictory Address of Mayor Hosley 17 

Valley Cemetery 398 

Receiving-tomb 401 

Water Commissioners for 1889 36 

Report of 37 

Water-works 441 

Webster-street East Extension 438 

Webster-street Engine-house 412 

Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospital .... 437 






j!'-