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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

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Forty-Fourth Annual Report 



Receipts and Expenditures 



(jTY OF |V\ANCHESTER 

FOH THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

December 31, 1889, 

TOGETHER WITH 

OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY. 




MANCHESTER: * 

PRINTED BY JOHN B. CLARKE. 
1890. 



NH 
552.. 67 

A- 1 o / a 



City of Manchester. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Fort3-fourth Annual Report of the Re- 
ceipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester : 

Ordeueu, If the Board of Mayor and Aklermen concur, that the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance be, and they hereby are, au- 
thorized to procure, for tlie use of the inhabitants of said city, the 
printing of the Fortj^-fourth Annual Report of the Receipts and Ex- 
penditures of the City of Manchester, including tlie Reports of the 
Joint Standing Committee on Finance, the School 13oard and Super- 
intendent of Schools, Superintendent of Water-works, Water Com- 
missioners, Engineer of Fire Department, City Marshal, Overseers 
of the Poor, Trustees, Librarian, and Treasm'cr of City Library, 
Committee on Cemeteries, Joint Standing Committee on City Farm, 
City Physician, City .Solicitor, and City Engineer, the expense thereof 
to be charged to the Ajipropriation for Printing and Stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. December 3. 1889. 

Passed. 

JOHN F. FROST, Prcsicknt, 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. December .'i, 1889. 
Passed in concurrence. 

D. B. V.MtNKV. Mat^or. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1889. 



MAYOR. 

DAVID B. YARNEY. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLYANUS B. PUTNAM. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. , 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

WIN F. JONES. 



4 

CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BAKKER. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

JAMES M. COLLITY. * 
CLARENCE W. DOWNING, f 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFREI) H. BENNETT. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

CHARLES A. CARPENTER. * 
JOHN F. FROST, f 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JESSE B. PATTEE. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF AVATER-AVORKS. 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 

• Resigned. t Elected to till vaeiiney. 



CLERK OF WATER-WORKS. 

ARTHUR E. STEARNS. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward 1. — George W. Bacon. 
Ward 2. — Frank A. Lane. 
Ward 3. — John A. Bartlett. 
Ward 4. — W. Byron Stearns, 
Ward 5. — John J. Holland. 
Ward 6. — William P. Farmer. 
Ward 7. — David Farmer. 

Ward 8. — James F. Baldwin. 



MEMBERS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Ward 1. 

John P. Mullen. 
Roscoe Dyer. 
Henry P. Hunter. 

Ward 3. 

Frank D. Thorp. 
George W. Reed. 
Walter H. Wright. 

Ward 5. 

David E. Guiney. 
William J. Freeman. 
Thomas P. Riley. 



Ward 2. 

Charles A. Carpenter. 
Alfred D. Maxwell. 
William M. Butterfield. 

Ward 4. 



George C 



Chase. 
Desire Laneville. 
Clarence R. Merrill. 



• Ward 6. 

Joseph Quirin. 
Edward A. Plummer. 
Thomas Walker, Jr. 



Ward 7. Ward 8. 

John F. Frost. Henry Schimmel. 

Edson S. Heath. Joseph N. Laoourse. 

Irving L. Campbell. Charles S. Cousins. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Stearns ; 
Councilmen Chase, Walker, Jr., and Heath. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Bartlett and Holland; 
Councilmen Hunter, Frost, and Lacourse. 

On Claims. — Aldermen Baldwin and W. P. Farmer; 
Councilmen Butterfield, Campbell, and Wright. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Stearns and Bartlett; Council- 
men Maxwell, Quirin, and Thorp. 

On Servers and Drains. — Aldermen Lane and Bald- 
win; Councilmen Quirin, Merrill, and Maxwell. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Bartlett and I). 
Farmer; Councilmen AValker, Jr., Reed, and Butter- 
field. 

071 Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen D, Farmer and 
Bacon ; Councilmen Frost, Guiney, and Mullen. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Lane and Baldwin; 
Councilmen Cousins, Plummer, and Dyer. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Bacon and 
Lane; Councilmen Wright, Heath, and Hunter. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Baldwin and Hol- 
land; Councilmen Laneville, Schimmel, and Thorp. 

On Wate7^- Works. — Aldermen W. P. Farmer and 
Stearns; Councilmen Freeman, Keed, and Cousins. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Baldwin and W. P. 
Farmer; Councilmen Campbell, Riley, and Chase. 



Oji House of Correction. — Aldermen Bartlett and Hol- 
land; Councilmen Lacourse, Mullen, and Merrill. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Holland and Bald- 
win ; Councilmen Plummer, Dyer, and Scliimmel. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollmeiit. — Aldermen Bacon and Bartlett. 

On Bills 071 Second Beading. — Aldermen Baldwin and 
W. P. Farmer. 

On Market. — Aldermen Bartlett and Lane. 

On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Stearns and Hol- 
land. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Bacon and W. P. Farmer. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Lane and Stearns. 

On Special Bolice. — Aldermen D. Farmer and Bacon, 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Beturns. — Councilmen Frost, Walkei-, Jr., 
and Lacourse. 

On Bills on Second Beading. — Couninlmen Reedy 
Cousins, and Freeman. 

On Enrollment. — Councilmen Wright, Campbell, and 
Merrill. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Bolice Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 



Associate Justice of Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 

John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 
Melvin J. Jenkins. 
Assistant Marshal. 



Horatio W. Longa. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

David B. Varney, ex officio Chairman. 
James E. Dodge, Clerk. 



Ward 1. 

Charles H. Manning. 
John L. Sanborn. 

AVakd 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 

Ward 8. 

Nathan P. Hnnt. 
James E. Dodge. 

Ward 4. 



Ward 5. 

John F. Cahill. 
James P. Slattery. 

Ward 6. 

F. T. E. Richardson. 
John C. Balch. 

Ward 7. 

Ed. B. Woodlniry. 
Marshall P. Halh 

Ward 8. 



Frederick C. Crosby. 
Stephen W. (^larke. 

Charles A. Cari>cnter, ex officio. 



Luther (\ r>al(l\vin. 
WiHiani K. Ixohbins. 



9 

•SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

G. M. L. Lane. 



ASSESSORS. 



Henry Lewis. 
John E. Stearns. 
David 0. Furnald. 
Harrison D. Lord. 



John Ryan. 
George H. Dudley. 
Andrew J. Dickey. 
Frank T. Provost. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 



William B. Stearns. 
Benjamin L. Hartshorn. 
David 0. Furnald. 
Harrison D. Lord. 



Michael F. Lawler. 
Isaac Whittemore. 
Joseph A. Foster. 
Charles C Tinkham. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

David B. Varney, ex officio Chairman. 
William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 

William H. Maxwell. Thomas H. Mahoney. 

Thomas L. Quimby. Charles Francis. 

James SutclifFe. David W. Anderson. 

George S. Holmes. Horatio Fradd. 



10 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



George C. Hoitt, Chairman. 
Joseph B. 8awyer, Clerk. 
"Wm. M. Parsons. Jose[th B. Sawyer, 

George C. lloitt. 

Eussell White, Sanitary Inspector. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Thomas W. Lane, Chitf Engineer. 

Fred S. Beau, Clerk. 
Clarence D. Palmer. Ruel G. Manning. 

Fred S. Bean. Eugene S. Whitney, 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

David B. Varney, ex officio. 

Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 

James A. Weston, Clerk. 
Edwin H. Hobbs. Henry Chandicr. 

Andrew C. Wallace. James A. Weston. 

Alpheus Gay. Joseph F. Kennard 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

David B. Varney, ex officio. 

Charles A. Carpenter, ex ofirio. 
Lucien B. Clough. Daniel Clark. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Isaac W. Smith. 

licrnuin F. Straw. Moody Currier. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 



11 



HIGHWAY SURVEYORS. 



Dlst. Dist. 

1. Orison Webber. 7. Charles Francis. 

2. Wm. Sanborn. 8. Levi J. Proctor. 

3. Edwin X. Baker. 9. Nelson W. Paige. 

4. Rodney K Whittemore. 10. Charles O. Phelps. 

5. Mark E. Harvey. 11. Frank D. Hanscom. 

6. Albert J. Peaslee. 12. Leroy M. Streeter. 

13. John H. Campbell. 



CITY WEIGHER. 

Jonathan S. Paige. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Joseph B. Baril. 



FISH AND GAME WARDENS. 



John C. Higgins. William F. Bradbury. 

George A. Clark. Samuel S. James. 

William C. Clarke. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, Clerl:. 
John M. Kendall, Hiram Stearns, for four years. 
H. H. Huse, Joseph L. Stevens, for three years. 
James A. Weston, John E. Stearns, for two years. 
George C, Gilmore, Bushrod W. Hill, for one year, 



12 



SUB-TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



Valley. — Alderman Lane, Councilman Wright ; Messrs. 
Gilmore, Hill, and Kendall. 

Pine Grove. — Alderman Bacon, (Councilman Hunter; 
Messrs. Huse, Stevens, and Weston. 

Amoskeag. — Councilman Heath; Messrs. J. E. Stearns 
and Hiram Stearns. 

Byron A. Stearns, Supt. Fine Grove Cemetery. 
Charles H. G. Foss, Supt. Valley Cemetery. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Hon. James A. Weston, Chairman. 

Hon. Person C. Cheney. 

Hon. David B. Varney, ex officio. 



INSPECTORS. 



Milk. — Chauncey B. Littleiield. 

Buildinys. — Thomas W. Lane. 

Oil, — John P. Cronin and Echvard J. Powers. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 
Ward 1. — Stillman P. Cannon. 
Ward 2. — George W. True. 
Ward 3. — Lyman W. Coll)y. 
Ward 4.— John C. Bicktbrd. 
• Ward 5. — John McAllister. 

Ward (). — Clarence I>. Palmer. 
Ward 7. — L-a W. Stearns. 
\V,xn\ 8. —John W. Wilson. 



13 



Wai^d Clerks. 

Ward 1. — Elmer E. Sawyer. 
Ward 2. ~ Daniel C. Smith. 

Ward 3. — Frank 0. Moulton. 

Ward 4. — Edwin L. Kichardgon. 
Ward 5. — Herbert Cullen, 

Ward 6. — William II. Sleeper. 
^ Ward 7. — Fred W. Pillsbury. 

Ward 8. — Charles G. Ranno. 



Ward 1. 

Lees Ward. 
George C. Kemp. 
Amasa S. Hilands, 



Selectmeji. 



Ward 2. 



Daniel G. Andrews. 
Charles E. Holbrook. 
Harry P. Ray. 



Ward 3. 

David Thayer. 
Charles F. Garland. 
William H. Darling. 



Ward 4. 

John F. Gillis. 
George E. Richards. 
Josiah H. Mann. 



Ward 5. 

Charles J. Woods. 
Martin J. Harvey. 
Patrick C. Campbell. 



Ward 6. 

George B. Rogers. 
Jerome B. Titus. 
Peter D. St. Germain. 



Ward 7. 

George B. Smith. 
Sumner F. Claflin. 
Willie D. Wheeler, 



Ward 8. 

Joseph A. Heon. 
Henry J. Hatch. 
Victor Sansoucie. 



MAYOR VARNEY'S ADDRESS. 



MAYOR'S ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Although my action in presenting to you an annual 
report at this time is, so far as I can learn, without a 
precedent, the necessity for such a document is to my 
mind as great as when one year ago we entered upon our 
duties together. 

FINANCE. 

Our total funded debt January 1, 1890, including |9, 950 
of cemetery bonds, was 1944,950. July 1 bonds amount- 
ing to $100,000 will mature, and some provision must be 
made to care for them. I can not forbear, while upon 
this subject, urging upon your attention the advisability 
and feasibility of making a radical change in our present 
method of raising monej^ for municipal expenses. In a 
city growing as rapidly as this, the call for the extension 
of our street and sewerage system is continuous and most 
urgent. We have been accustomed, by a more or less 
burdensome rate of taxation, to raise enough from year to 
year to carry on these enterprises in a slow, meager, and 
unsatisfactory way. I propose that we change all this, and 
in place of appropriating a stated sum from our tax levy 
each year, that we borrow $200,000 with which to complete 
our street and sewerage system. We have ample security 
for such a loan. Bonds to mature in ten or twenty years 
could be issued for the amount, and an immediate and 
gratifying reduction made in our tax rate. The increase in 



18 

viiluatioii tliat would result, throiigli new industries being 
attracted to our midst on account of our low rate of tax- 
ation, would, I believe, more tlian warrant us for tlie step 
we had taken. Posterity, which will share in the benefits 
of these permanent improvements, should help pay for 
them. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

The health of a city is fully as important as its moral 
or financial welfare, and first-class sanitary conditions are 
always dependent upon an efiicient sewerage system. The 
city has progressed along this line during the past twelve 
months. There have been 3.13 miles of new sewer mains 
laid, — an extraordinary amount when compared with other 
years, the average being about one mile and a quarter. 
The expense for the putting in of new sewerage during 
the year 1889 was |27,513.73. This year we shall be 
called upon to extend the Spruce-street sewer to the Kim- 
ball Brothers' shoe factory, in East Manchester ; also to 
build a new sewer in West Manchester, to be known as 
the Douglas-street sewer, with the usual number of lesser 
mains. 

STREET DEPARTiMENT. 

A great deal has been accomplished in the way of im- 
proving our streets during the past year. From the 
city engineer I learn that there have been 17,553.28 
square yards of macadamizing laid in this city the past 
year, and 17,483.25 square yards of old macadam top- 
dressed, a total length of partially and completeh' 
new macadamizing amounting to 11,510 lineal feet, or, 
in other words, 2J miles. The year's macadaniizitig ac- 
count amounted to $21,589.37, and included, beside 
the above, 0,077 feet of street dressed with crushed 
stone, 1,372 yards of concrete roadway, and 1,233.9 yards 
of crossing. During the }»resen t year, in addition to tlie 



19 

customary demands upon the expense account of this de- 
partment, there promises to be a number of unusual calls. 
It has already been decided to place in a suitable legal 
condition the main street in Amoskeag, and in addition to 
this, both the "Webster and the Beech street extension are 
in such condition that they must be attended to immedi- 
ately. It is also proposed to widen and straighten Han- 
over sti'eet to the lake ; a most important project when un- 
dertaken. The call for new highways and repairs upon 
those we now have, is as strenuous as any that come to 
my attention. 

HIGHWAY DISTRICTS. 

I am firmly convinced that, aside from an}- mere eco- 
nomic standpoint, the welfare of the suburbs as well as 
the city proper would be greatly enhanced by a consoli- 
dation of all the small districts on either side of the river 
into two large ones, and shall recommend, gentlemen, that 
your action taken with reference to District l^o. 3 be ex- 
tended to the other small distiicts throughout the city. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

During; 1889 the new Lake Avenue engine-house was 
completed, and the Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Com- 
pany has now for several months been occupying commo- 
dious and finely appointed quarters in that building. The 
IST. S. Bean Company desires some repairs made in its 
house and the addition of a hose carriage or wagon in 
place of the jumper now attached to the steamer. I think 
the company's efficiency will be increased by these 
changes, and recommend that they be made. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The free text-book law passed at the last session of the 
Legislature has gone into efi:ect, and as a result the city 



•20 

will hereafter furnish its puhlic school pupils with text- 
books fpee. The Board of Education asks the City Coun- 
cils for $10,000, in addition to its usual appropriation, to 
purchase these supplies. 

POLICE. 

There have been quite a number of changes made in 
the police department during the past year, and we hope 
they may result in increased efficiency and better satisfac- 
tion to the pul)lic. 

OVERSEERS OF TUE POOR. 

The overseers of the poor are deserving of commenda- 
tion for their management of affairs during the year. 
They are very often called upon to deal with vexed ques- 
tions, and have frequent appeals to their sympathies. 
While they should be jealous of the city's aid, they should 
never neglect the deserving poor, conducting their busi- 
ness with " malice toward none and charity for all." Re- 
cent legislative action will result beneficially to the city 
in transferring the care of a large class of indigent poor 
to the county authorities. 

WATER-WORKS. 

The water-works have proved as usual an important 
source of revenue to the city treasury. There is a peti- 
tion before the City Councils at the present time, I believe, 
asking for a high-service reservoir on Wilson Hill. This 
is needed both for fire protection and the ordinary sources 
of water supply, and I recommend that the next improve- 
ment made in our water-works system be in this direction. 

CLAIMS. 

The claims against the city have been settled with less 
friction and with greater promptitude during the past 
year than for a long time i>eriod. Mr. Reed made an 



21 

efficient claim agent, and to him much credit is due for 
the favorable settlements effected. Through his efforts, 
too, the sidewalks were very generally placed in a state 
superior to their condition for many years. 

BRIDGES. 

There ought not to be any expensive outlay in this di- 
rection the present year. The McGregor bridge has had 
an entire new roadway and foot-path placed in position, 
and planking and other repairs have been made on the 
other bridges of the city during the year. The Amos- 
keag bridge will have to be re-planked early in the 
spring. 

WEST MANCHESTER SCHOOLHOUSE. 

A lot has been purchased and the ledge blasted away 
for the placing in position of the foundation of the new 
schoolhouse in West Manchester. Plans have been pre- 
pared and accepted for the structure, and I should hope 
that the present city government, which saw the incep- 
tion of this movement, might witness, before it retires 
from office, the completed building thrown open to the 
purposes for which it is designed. To this end, gentle- 
men, I recommend that the amount necessary to erect 
the building be at once appropriated. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

The trustees have entered upon the work of catalogu- 
ing the City Library, a movement already too long de- 
layed, and having secured an expert for that purpose, 
they state that an additional appropriation of $1,000 will 
be necessary to carry the work to a successful and imme- 
diate completion. They should have the sum asked for. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

The health officers have been engaged the past year, 
as they have for several years, in endeavoring to solve the 



22 

problem of how the city can best dispose of its offensive 
garbage and refuse, which, in the summer time especially, 
is a matter of no small consequence. A committee has 
been appointed, from the city councils, to act with the 
Board of Health, and a report of the result of their de- 
liberations may be expected shortly. 

BOARD OF TRADE. 

The recent movement in favor of a Board of Trade 
appears to be crystallizing into action of a favorable 
character, and a committee has been appointed to act 
with a committee from the city government in taking 
some steps to better acquaint the outside world with the 
many advantages that we have here to offer to all classes 
of industries. Any movement that tends to advance our 
"Queen City" is deserving of sympathy, assistance, and 



encouragement. 



CONCLUSION. 



In conclusion, gentlemen, allow me to thank you for 
the uniform courtesy that you have shown me during the 
year, and to congratulate you upon the prosperity that 
has attended your several ways. Your attendance upon 
the regular meetings of the city government has been 
gratityingly large, and you have also shown a commend- 
able spirit in attending all special and committee meet- 
ings. 'No great disaster, such as visited many of our 
sister cities, came to sweep away our financial and indus- 
trial resources during 1889. We have been, as a commu- 
nity, healthy, prosperous, and contented, Tn order that 
as city officials we may retire from office witli the feeling 
that we have faithfully discharged the duties laid upon us 
when we accepted the suffrages of our fellow-eitizens, I 
incite you, gentlemen, to a repetition tiiis year of the ex- 
cellent record made by you during the twelve* months 
that have just passed into history. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Board of Water commissioners. 

1890. 



DAYID B. VARNEY, Mayor, ex officio. 

Alpheus Gay, President, term expires January, 1893. 
James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires January, 1891. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January-, 1896. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1892. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January, 1894. 
Edwin H. Hobbs, term expires January, 1895. 



officers. 



Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Recjistrar. 

Charles C. Cole, Engineer at Pumping Station. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To (he City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners 
have the honor to present herewith their eighteenth 
annual report, for the year ending December 31, 1889, 
together with the report of the Superintendent, covering 
the same period of time, to which reference is made for 
the details of the service connected with this department. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year are as fol- 
lows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1888 . $36,126.74 
Receipts from all sources .... 86,700.46 



Total $122,827.20 

Appropriated to pay interest . $36,000.00 

Expended on construction . 30,232.09 

Repairs and running expenses 17,005.90 

Total expenditures . $83,237.99 



Balance unexpended . . . .$39,589.21 



26 

The increase in gross receipts over the year 1888 is 
$1,056.64, notwithstanding the rates charged for fire 
hydrants were reduced, April 1, 1889, from fifty dollars 
to forty dollars per annum, each, the original rate being 
sixty dollars. 

From year to year, small amounts of wrought-iron and 
cement water-pipe have been replaced with cast-iron in 
places where the former had failed by reason of poor 
workmanship, Realizing that this process must continue, 
and in order to take advantage of the exce[)tionally low 
price of iron, your commissioners purchased a larger 
supply of water-pipe than usual, most of which is now on 
hand. This will be used for the above purpose and for 
making extensions, which are constant! v demanded bv 
the expansion of the city limits. 

The rain-fall' for the past three years has been unusu- 
ally heavy. In consequence of this, the water in Massa- 
besic Lake has been higher than before, and the low 
grounds on its borders and the streams tributary thereto, 
as well as all other meadows and brooks, have been 
affected thereby. In some instances the owners of these 
lands around the lake have made claims for damages 
occasioned by the surplus water. In reply to these de- 
mands, your commissioners have ottered to purchase the 
property alleged to be injured at fair prices. In this way 
considerable land bordering on the lake has been ac- 
quired. 

The attention of the boards of health, both of Man- 
chester and Auburn, has been called to the sanitary con- 
ditions of various localities surrounding the lake, and 
with commendable promptness they have ado})ted and 
published such regulations as will protect and nuiintain 
the purity and healthfulness of the water, as far as prac- 
tical)le, if the rules laid down are riuidlv enforced. 



27 

Your commissioners hrve also purchased several par- 
cels of land with a view ( f improving the sanitary condi- 
tions and to avoid complications. The importance and 
wisdom of this action are so apparent that it cannot fail to 
be appreciated by every consumer of the water. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALPIIEUS GAY, President, 
^ DAVID B. VARNEY, Mayor, ex officio, 

A. C. WALLA.CE, 
E. H. HOBBS, 
HENRY CHANDLER, 
JOSEPH F. KENNARD, 
JAMES A. WESTON, Clerk, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 
January 1, 1890. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners : 

Gentlemen, — The following is the report of your 
Superintendent for the year 1889 : 

There seems to be little that is new to your honorable 
board to present, as you are already familiar with the work 
under raj' charge, and the general condition of the aliairs 
of this department. It has been my endeavor to report to 
you at the regular monthly and other meetings of the board, 
if anything unusual had occurred, and to seek advice. 
It seems desirable, however, to have the transactions re- 
corded for future reference. I will therefore, in a "short 
report, sum up what has been done in this department for 
the year 1889. Massabesic Lake has averaged higher 
than last season ; the water at the dam at the lowest point 
was sixteen inches above the crest, which is not often 
seen. This makes the third year of a large supply of 
water in the lake. 

No repairs have been made on the dam, canal, or pen- 
stock. At the [.umping station, new gearing was bought 
and two new steps put under the water-wheels, also one 
pump cylinder bored out, one new crank-pin and two 
trees set on the crank-disc of the Davidson pumj). The 
cylinder was cut badly by the sand and gravel taken up 
from the well connected uitli tlie tail race, both of wliich 
were cleaned out last summer. 

The following table shows the (piantity of water 
pumped. It will be noticed that the daily average is a 
little over 2,000,000 gallons, a steady increase since 1883, 
when it was 1,211,278 gallons. 



29 



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30 

February 5 a piston-rod broke at the same time a Y 
brancU split which connects the ohl pumps with the force 
main. There was no way to pump without wasting a 
large quantity ]of water until the branch was repaired, and 
as this required a special casting which would take ten 
days to get and put in, it was thought best to take out a 
piece of the force main beyond this branch and near the 
new pump connection, and plug it till we could get a 20- 
inch gate and put in, which might come handy at any 
time ; then we could run the pumps and keep up the 
supply ; this was done, with the exception of twent}'- 
four hours supplied from the Amoskeag Company's reser- 
voir. In a few days after they had an accident, and we 
furnished them with water for three days. 

We found, on running the pumps, that the same shock 
or water-hammer that cracked the Y branch caused a 
good many leaks on the force main. These had to be re- 
paired in the daytime, and the pumps run in the night to 
keep the reservoir full. Other leaks were all on the flat land 
just above the meadows, a thousand feet from the station 
and all within the space of four hundred feet. The top 
of the pipe at this place is eight feet below the surface of 
the ground, and is in very wet land. A gang of sixteen 
men was employed most of the time for Ave weeks mak- 
ing the repairs. The pipe now is in good condition. The 
leaks were in the joint, which had to be sleeved and packed 
with lead. 

No repairs were made on the reservoir. A few small 
leaks on the cast-iron })ipe on Valley street were all there 
were on the su}»j>ly nmiii. 

DISTKIBUTION PIPE. 

Water-])ipc's have been extended 10,183 feet, nearly two 
miles. The following are the streets where it was laid : 
Amorv, Adams in 'Squog, Adams street at the north 
end. Ash, i'ehiiont, (Marke, Chestnut, Cypress, Cartier, 



31 

•Cass, Central, Dubuque, Kelly, Liberty, Mast road, 
Pine, Somerville, Union, Spruce, Rimmon, Sagamore, 
Silver, Taylor, Young, — twenty-four streets, at an ex- 
pense of $7,253. 

The pipe was taken up and laid over, besides that which 
was repaired : 466 feet on Winter street ; on Merrimack 
street from Pine to Beech, 1,017 feet; Hollis street, 375 
feet; Birch, 416 feet; Washington, 242 feet; Church, 148 
feet. The pipe on these streets had caused the most 
trouble for the last two years, and it was thought best to 
relay it. 

Three hundred and twentj'-four feet of 10-inch cast-iron 
pipe were re laid at the Eddy in Amoskeag. The pipe 
had settled and the lead had started at the joints, so that 
they leaked badly and had to be repaired quite often. It 
was feared that it might break some night and wash out 
the roadway, and deprive Amoskeag of water till the 
break could be repaired. It was therefore thought best to 
lay it over. This is a bad place on account of high water, 
which works through the wall and under the pipe, caus- 
ing it to settle. It was relaid farther from the wall and 
over to the west side of the highway, and the chances are 
that it will be less work to keep this portion of the pipe 
in repair than it has been. Three hundred feet of 6-inch 
pipe on the Goffstown road was lowered on account of 
cutting down the hill west of the brick store. 

The pipe line under the water across the Merrimack 
river has been used but twice this season ; that was 
when repairs were being made on the other line. It seems 
in good condition, but as we have said in former reports 
a small leak would soon cut a large hole in the pipe, and 
it is necessary to keep water on this line only when act- 
ually needed. 

About 641 tons of pipe were bought of the Mcl^eal 
Pipe and Foundry Company, Burlington, IST. J., averaging 



32 



a little less than ^27. 50 per ton of 2,240 pounds, deliv- 
ered in the city. This is the lowest price paid for water 
pipe since the water-works were constructed. The amount 
paid was $17,504.94. 

Hydrants set this year, 15, making 441 hydrants in this 
city. Seven new ones were put in where the old ones got 
broken or had to be taken out and repaired. Last winter 
the hydrants did not freeze and no thawing out was done, 
which is something unusual. The past season the hy- 
drants have been used more by the street department than 
by the firemen, and more water has been used to puddle 
ditches and clean out sewers than to put out fires. 

PIPES, GATES, AND HYDRANTS LAID IN 1889. 



Streets. 


Pipe laid, in feet. 


Gates set. 


n 

a 

1 


Location. 




4 in. 


6 in. 


Sin. 


4,n. 


6 In 


I 
Sin. 


20 in 








34 


Beauport — west. 






358 

g 






1 






Amory 


244' 


07 J. 








1 








.... 






Northward (near Brook). 




1 










Kprlfnrrl 




1 




1 

1 
1 






.... 








452 
705 
84 
245 
535 
185 
304 






South of Valley. 
North of Amory. 


p'^ . 












r f 






















1 






'i 












West of Cass. 










1 






North of Appleton. 
East of Cliestnut. 




























1 




Near piiiiip-liouse. 
To Young. 
Amory to Kelly. 
Heauport to Dubuque. 






27 
705 
5:U 

90 

422 

1 


















1 
















2 


























1 


Westward. 










1 






West of Bowman. 








327 




... 1 




To Silver. 






284 
212 

1,033 
417 

1,C65 


2 


1 


.... 

2 
1 
2 


North and south of Amory. 










To Union. 














Pine to Heech. 
























East of Wilson. 
















Cor. Ctiitral. 






272 

200 

83 

423' 




.;. ..:. 






1 


To Youiifi road. 
















North to Mr. Blood's. 




■| 














North of SnK»">0''«'- 
















1 


East of Cypress. 


VVaHliiiigton .. 






2 












1 1 


1 

2 

17 














1 














244 


1 1 
9,338 001 1 2 


- 


1 


16 





33 

Number miles pipe laid, 1889 . 1.93, or 10,183 feet 

gates set, 1889 20 

hydrants set, 1889 ..... 15 

Gate at the Eddy changed to 6-inch. 

LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 1889. 

Adams, cor. Beauport. 

Amory, cor. Rimmon. 

Behiiont, cor. Young. 

Central, cor. Cass. 

Kelly, cor. Cartier. 

Kelly, cor. Dubuque. 

Mast, near Fogg's residence. 

Sagamore, cor. Union. 

Silver, cor. Union. 

Silver, cor. [Beech. 

Somerville, cor. Union. 

Spruce, cor. Belmont. 

Spruce, near T. J. Perry's residence. 

Taylor, cor. Young road. 

Young, cor. Jewett. 



34 



The following places are where cement-lined pipe was 
taken up and cast-iron laid : 



Length in feet. 



Streets. 



4 in. 



C in. 



Amherst 8 

Birch 41G 

Church 147 I 

Hanover 8 

Hanover I 8 

Hanover .. ..1 8 



Hollis 

Manchester. 
Manchester. 

Mast 

Main 

Main 

Merrimack . . 
Merrimack . 
Merrimack . 
Pearl 



Pine 

Spruce 

Spruce 

Second , 

State 

Vine 

Washington . 
Winter 



375 



478 



7 
243 



396 



1863 



10 in.' 



539 



556 



16 



Near Beecli . 
Lowell to Bridge. 
North of Washington. 
Opposite " Union " office. 
Corner Pine. 
Corner Elm. 
Canal to Elm. 
Opposite No. 200. 
Opposite No. 198. 

Opposite Geo. Goffe's residence. 

Opposite Geo. Goffe's residence. 

Pine to Union. 

Union to Beech. 

Corner Chestnut. 

Opposite No. CO. 

Corner Central. 

Corner Chestnut. 



Elm to Birch. 



Total, 2,830 feet. 



•SCHEDULE 



PIPES AND FIXTURES LAID. 



36 



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39 



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40 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1889. 



8lZB. 



20-inch diameter 

l-l-inch diameter 

12-iDch diameter 

10-inch diameter 

8-incb diameter 

C-inch diameter 

4-inch diameter 



Cement-lined pipe. 


CaHt iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20,560.00 ft. 


5,146.00 ft. 


9 


6,825.00 " 


7,598.00 " 


11 


7,983.00 " 


11,709.00 " 


20 


4,813.75 " 


10,764.00 " 


14 


11,500.00 " 


12,628.00 " 


33 


79,254.50 " 


87,171.00 '• 


287 


7,571.00 " 


8,911.00 " 


37 


138,513.25 ft. 


143,927.00 ft. 


411 



26.233 miles cement-lined pipe. 
27.259 miles cast-iron pipe. 

53.492, total miles of pipe. 
411 gates. 
441 hydrants. 

7 ail" valves. 

METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year is one hun- 
dred and six. 

Total number of meters now in use, nine hundred and 
fifty-one. 

The number of api)lieations for water to date has been 
thirty-three hundred and eighty. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

One hundred and thirty-nine (139) service pipes liave 
V)een laid this year, as follows: 

1 .V inch diameter .... 27.0 feet. 

131 1 " " .... 3,337.4 " 

3 IJ " " .... 77.5 " 

4 2" " .... 890.0 " 



Total number of i'eet laid, 1889 . 4,331.9 feet. 



41 









SERVICE PIPES RELAID 


1 


1 inch, 


34 feet, 


to Ih inch. 


1 


f " 


19 


li 


u " 


1 


1 " 


33 


a 


11 " 

^2 


1 


1 " 


59 


a 


11 « 
-•■2 



Thirty-two hundred and twenty-six service pipes have 
been laid to date, as follows : 

845.0 feet. 
46,614.3 

33,838.3 

1,293.5 

448.0 

1,883.4 

57.0 

16.8 

233.0 



39 


1 

2 


inch diametei 


1773 


1 






1321 


1 






23 


u 






15 


^ 






46 


2 






1 


^ 






1 


3 






7 


4 







Total length of service pipe . 85,229.3 feet. 
]S"umber of miles of service pipe, 16.14. 



The 


income from the sale of water for 1889 has been 


as follows : 




Received for water by rate . 


$52,380.99 


u 


" meter 


33,596.05 


it 


for building purposes 


361.95 


t( 


from fines 


153.20 


il 


for labor and pipe sold 


89.77 


li 


of G. G. Griffin . 


1.00 


(( 


B. P. Kimball 


2.00 


(( 


James Baldwin 


65.00 


(( 


W. G. Brown 


50.00 


(( 


Mr. Clement . 
Total received . 


.50 




$86,700.46 



42 



Abatements, $245.06. 



Current expenses for 1889 . . $17,005.90 
Construction expenses for 1889 . 30,232.09 
Appropriated for interest . . 36,000.00 

$83,237.99 



Receipts over expenditures $3,462.47 

Amount on hand January 1, 1889 $36,126.74 
Amount received, 1889 . . 86,700.46 



$122,827.20 
Amount expended, 1889 . . 83,237.99 



Amount on hand December 

31, 1889 . . * . . $39,589.21 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1889. 

Superintendence and repairs . $11,879.42 
Stationery and printing . . 162.19 
Office and incidental expenses . 408.82 
Pumping expenses . . . 4,428.72 
Repairs to dam, canal, and reser- 
voir 6.50 

Repairs to building . . . 120.25 



Current expenses for 


1889 


$17 


,005.90 


Service pipes 




$1,379.41 




Distribution pipes 




18,841.09 




Fire-hydrants and valves 




1,144.25 




Meter and fixtures 




2,160.25 




Pump-house and building 




276.07 




Land . . . . 




6,375.00 




Grading 




56.02 





Construction c-xi.ense, 1889 $30,232.09 



43 



Land and water rights . . . $55,092.45 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races . 101,399.16 
Pumping machinery, pump-house, 

and buildings .... 107,145,17 

Distributing reservoir and fixtures 71,542.36 

Force and supply main . . 89,769.02 

Distribution pipes . . . 366,520.52 

Fire-hydrants and valves . . 40,061.22 

Tools and fixtures . . . 10,649.35 

Boarding and store houses . . 919.36 

Roads and culverts . . . 2,193.49 

Supplies 550.39 

Engineering .... 22,176.19 

Livery and traveling expenses . 2,856.64 

Legal expenses .... 563.79 

Grading and fencing . . . 13,571.25 

Service pipes .... 45,821.37 
Meters and fixtures . . . 23,407.80 

Total construction account 
to Dec. 31, 1889 . 

Current expenses : 

Superintendence, collecting, and 

repairs .... 
Stationery, printing, etc. 
Ofiice and incidental expenses 
Pumping expenses and repairs 
Repairs to dam, canal, races, and 

reservoir .... 
Repairs to buildings 

Current expenses to Dec 
31, 1889 . 



$954,239.53 



$122,973.96 
5,250.63 
16,903.95 
36,438.18 

3,640.15 
1,441.66 



$186,648.53 



44 

Interest $40,678.51 

Higlnvay expenditures . . 14,000.53 

§54,679.04 



Total amount of bills ap- 
proved to date . . $1,195,567.10 

Interest, discount, and labor per- 
formed on highways, trans., 
and tools and materials sold . $61,752.58 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1889 186,648.53 

$248,401. 11 



Total cost, exclusive of in- 
terest and current ex- 
penses .... $947,165.99 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 

1888 $558,733.51 

Interest for 1889 .... 34,186.00 



Total interest and discount 

to Dec. 31, 1889 . . $592,919.51 

Amount paid toward interest to 

Dec. 31, 1888 . . . $413,000.00 

Amount used by city in 1889 . 36,000.00 



Total $449,000.00 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city 
treasurer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, supplies and ma- 
terials sold . . $573.61 

1873, supplies and ma- 
terials sold . . 177.07 

accrued interest on 

water bonds sold 193.26 



45 



1873, accrued interest 

on state bonds sold $146.00 
water rents . . 1,920.53 

1874, supplies and ma- 
terials sold . . 607.89 

March 12, 1874, highway expendi- 
tures, trans, from 
water account . 14,000.53 

March 17, 1874, interest and dis- 
count trans, from 
water account . 12,347.25 

Sept. 1, 1874, interest and dis- 
count trans, from 
water account . 22,361.74 

1874, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 30,233.54 

Dec. 29, 1874, interest trans- 
ferred . . . 4,566.25 

Dec. 18, 1875, one anvil sold . 15.00 

Sept. 25, 1875, engine, crusher, 

and material sold 2,089.45 

1875, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 27,119.15 
May 20, 1876, derrick sold . 125.00 

May 20, 1876, rent of derrick . 24.00 

1876, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 38,879.47 

1877, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 43,823.30 

1878, water and hydrant 

rent, etc. . . 48,873.26 
old plow sold . . 1.00 

1879, derrick sold . 75.00 



46 



May 



20, 1879, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. . . $53,068.17 


1880, water and li ydrant 




rent, etc. 


57,395.25 


sale of grass . 


10.00 


level, transit, etc. 


250.00 


1881, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


60,154.62 


sale of grass . 


10.00 


sale of derrick 


50.00 


received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1.00 


1882, water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


67,403.76 


received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1.00 


1882, received of James 




Baldwin & Co. 


175.00 


received from the sale 




of grass 


10.00 


received from Good- 




hue & Birnie 


24.37 


1882, received for old 




plank . 


1.00 


received for use of 




derrick 


15.00 


1883, received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


$1.00 


received from sale of 




grass 


20.00 


water and hydrant 




rent, etc. 


73,437.20 


1884, received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1.00 



47 

received for stone 
received from sale of 

^rass 
1884, received from pipe 

sold and labor 
received for water 

and hydrant rent 

1885, received from G 
G. Griffin . 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass 
labor and pipe sold 
received for water 

and hydrant rent 

1886, received from G 
G. Griffin . 

B. P. Kimball, for 

grass 
for wood . 
labor and pipe . 
water and hydrant 

rent 

1887, . received for 
labor and pipe 

received of G. G 
Griffin . 
1887, received of C. C 
Cole . 

received of B. P 
Kimball, for grass 

received of A. J. 
Crombie, for grass 

received of A. Good- 
win, for poles 



^5.00 

10.00 

616.20 

74,947.88 

1.00 

10.00 
13.45 

80,379.67 

1.00 

5.00 
37.80 

282.43 

74,803.76 

768.86 

1.00 

.50 

10.00 

5.00 

10.00 



48 



received of W. G. 




Brown . 


825.00 


received of T. II. 




Risdon & Co., for 




freight . 


15.11 


received for water 




and hydrant rent 


79,682.70 


1888, received for labor 




and pipe 


227.33 


received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1.00 


received of Geo. P. 




Clark . 


2.00 


received R. D. Wood 




& Co. (gear) . 


16.29 


received for water 




and hydrant rent . 


85,397.20 


1889, received for labor 




and pipe 


89.77 


received of G. G. 




Griffin . 


1.00 


received of B. P. 




Kimball, for grass 


2.00 


received of W. G. 




Brown, for rent . 


50.00 


received of James 




Baldwin, for pipe 


65.00 


received of Mr. Clem- 




ent, for pipe . 


.50 


received for water 




and hydrant retit . 


86,492.19 


il received for water, etc 


S?l,044,156.31 



49 

Amount appropriated to date . . $640,000.00 



Amount received to date . . $1,684,156.31 

Amount of bills approved to date . 1,195,567.10 



$488,589.21 
Amount transferred toward interest . 449,000.00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1889, $39,589.21 

CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Su2-)erintmdent. 



I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of 
the Manchester Water-Works for the year 1889, and find 
the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL, 

A uditor. 
Manchester, N. H., Dec 29, 1889. 



50 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



1 Jail. 


4 


Cemeteries. 


21 Churches. 


1 


Or[ than age. 


1 Court-house. 


1 


Post-otiice. 


6 Hose Companies. 


1 


City Library. 


4 Fire-engines. 


6 


Banks. 


1 Hook-and-ladder. 


7 


Hotels. 


2 Opera-houses. 


1 


Masonic Hall. 


1 Convent. 


1 


Odd Fellows' Hall 


1 City Hospital. 


1 


Holly-Tree Inn. 


1 Old Ladies' Home. 


3 


Halls. 


1 Soldiers' Monument. 


22 


Schoolhouses. 


1 Turner Hall. 


1 


Battery Building. 


4 Fountains. 


1 


Skating Rink. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



1 Silver-plating. 

2 Iron Foundries. 

2 Dyehouses. 

4 Machine-shops. 

6 Clothing manufactories. 

6 Harness-shops. 

1 Brush-shop. 

3 Carriage-shops. 
6 Cigar. 

1 Brassand copper foundry. 
1 Locomotive works. 



2 Electric light. 

3 Sash and blind shops. 
1 Brewery. 

1 Shoe-shop. 
1 Gas-works. 

4 Slaughter-houses. 

1 Soap manufactory. 

2 Needle manufactories. 
4 Beer-bottling. 

1 Book-bindery. 
1 l^ipcr-mill. 



7 Fish. 

9 Meat and llsh. 



MARKETS. 

2 Meat (wholesale). 



51 





STABLES. 


19 Liver}'. 


728 Private. 


1 Horse-railroad. 






OFFICES. 


12 Dentists. 


10 Printing. 


1 Telephone. 


1 Gas. 


2 Telegraph. 


4 Coal. 


3 Express. 


• 




SHOPS. 


27 Barber. 


2 Currying, 


3 Wheelwright. 


6 Plumber and gas and 


11 Blacksmith. 


water pipe. 


5 Carpenter. 


8 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 


1 Gunsmith. 




STORES. 


4 Auction. 


72 Grocery. 


27 Drug. 


5 Meal. 


12 Jewelry. 


3 Hardware. 


1 Fur. 


30 Boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing goods. 7 Stove. 


20 Fancy goods. 


15 Gents' furnishing goods. 


1 Wholesale paper. 


8 Book. 


5 Wholesale produce. 


1 Leather and shoe-finders, 


21 Dry goods. 


3 Music. 


12 Candy. 


3 Upholstery. 


1 Cloak. 


6 Undertakers. 


15 Millinery. 


5 Sewing-machine. 


2 Tea. 


1 Feather-cleaner. 


6 Furniture. 


1 Rubber. 



52 



11 Dining. 
6 Billiard. 



6 Club-rooms. 

2 Bleacheries. 
19 Laundries. 

3 Ice-houses. 

10 Photographers. 



SALOONS. 

69 Liquor, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



4 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. 
13 Bakeries. 
2 Waste. 



7544 Families. 

115 Boarding-houses 

9358 Faucets. 

1384 Wash-howls. 

2145 Water-closets. 

199 Wash-tubs. 

677 Bath-tubs. 

144 Urinals. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 

1809 Sill-cocks. 
441 Fire-hydrants. 
34 Stand-pipes. 
21 Watering-troughs. 
4 Drinking-fountains, 
1783 Horses. 
89 Cattle. 
1 Public urinal. 



MATERIAL ON HAXD. 



PIPE. 



1074 feet 20 in. 


1535 feet 14 in, 


2100 feet 12 in. 


2100 feet 10 in 


9252 feet 8 in. 


17638 feet 6 in. 


3213 feet 4 in. 






GATES. 


5 4 in. 


3 6 in. 


3 8 in. 


1 10 in. 



53 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 



1 20 in. 
6 12 in. 
6 4iu. 



6 

5 

10 



14 in. 
10 in. 
6 in. 



10 20 in. 

6 12 in. 

24 8 in. 

14 4 in. 



CLAMP SLEEVES. 

7 14 in. 
31 10 in. 
41 6 in. 



2 14 in. 
5 10 in. 
4 4 in. 



PLUGS. 



1 12 in. 

1 6 in. 

2 8 in. 



BRANCHES. 



2 double 6 on 12. 
5 double 6 on 10. 
4 double 6 on 8. 
1 double 6 on 6. 
4 double 4 on 6. 
1 double 4 on 4. 



2 single 6 on 14. 
1 single 12 on 14. 

1 single 6 on 12. 

2 single 10 on 10. 
2 single 6 on 10. 
2 single 8 on 8. 

1 single 6 on 8. 
5 single 6 on 6. 

2 single 4 on 6. 



1 


14 to 12. 


1 


6 to 4. 


2 


8 to 6. 


2 


12 to 6. 



54 







BENDS. 


1 

1 

2 
1 


10 in. 1-8. 
14 in. 1-8. 

6 in. 1-4. 

6 in. 1-8. 


1 6 in. S. S. 

1 12 in. 1-8. 

2 6 in. 1-16. 

SERVICE PIPES. 


2| 

^ 
1 


in. 96 feet, 
in. 354 feet, 
in. 382 feet. 


2 in. 518 feet, 

1^ in. 362 feet. 

1 in. 612 feet. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



ORGANIZATION" FOR 1889. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



DAVID B. VARNEY, ex officio Chairman. 
CHARLES A. CARPENTER, 

President of the Common Council, resigned. 
JOHN F. FROST, President of the Common Council 
BENJAMIN C. DEAN, Vice-chairman of the Board. 
JAMES E. DODGE, Clerk of the Board. 
Ward 1. — Charles H. Manning. 

John L. Sanborn. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3. — Nathan P. Hunt. 
James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Frederick C. Crosby. 

Stephen AV. (.''larke, deceased. 
S. B. Stearns. 
Ward 5. — John F. Cahill. 

James P. Slatter3\ 
Ward 6. — John C. Balch, deceased. 
Charles G. Dodge. 
Frank T. E. Richardson. 
Ward 7. — Edward B. Woodbury. 
Marshall P. Hall. 



58 

Ward 8. — Lutlier C. BaUhvin. 
William K. Robbins. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. [S. W. Clarke, Carpen- 
ter,] J. E. Dodge, Slattery, Stearns, Frost. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Woodbury, Hall, Robbins. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, 
[Balch,] Sanborn, Charles G. Dodge. 

Text-books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, Richardson. 

Music. — Messrs. Richardson, W. C. Clarke, Crosby. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. J. E. Dodge, the Mayor, Mes- 
srs. Manning, [Carpenter, Balch,] Frost, C. G. Dodge. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, [S. W. 
Clarke,] Stearns. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Baldwin, Woodbury, Crosby. 

Health. — Messrs. Bobbins, Cahill, Sanborn. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, ])oaii, Hall, Hunt, 
Stearns. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Stearns, W<)()(li)ury, Richard- 
son. 



59 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. — Messrs, Hal], Manning 
Sanborn. 

FranMin Street. — Messrs. Woodbury, J. E. Dodge, San- 
born. 

Training School and Wdson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
J. E. Dodge. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. Baldwin, Stearns, 
Charles G. Dodge. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Bobbins, 
Slattery, Baldwin. 

Webster Street, Blodgett Street, Amoskeag, and, Stark dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Bobbins, Slatter3^ 

Bakersville. — Messrs. Charles G. Dodge, Hall, "Wood- 
bur}'. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Crosby, [Balch,] 
Cahill, Charles G. Dodge. 

Mosquito Po7id and Webster's Mills. — Messrs. Cahill, 
Robbins, Slattery. 

Gojf'e's Falls cord Harvey District. — Messrs. J. E. 
Dodge, Baldwin, Crosby. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Eiehardson, Manning, W. 
C. Clarke. 



In Board of School Committee. 

January 3, 1800. 
Tlie Superintendent presented his annual report to the committee, 
and it was aecei^ted. 

Marshall P. Hall presented the annual report prepared by Iiini at 
the request of the Boai'd. 

Voted, That the report by Mr. Hall be accepted, and adopted as 
the report of the Board, and that it be transmitted to the City Coun- 
cils, together with the report of the Superintendent. 

JAMES E. DODGE, Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Honorable City Councils : 

The school committee have the honor to present their 
report for the year ending December 31, 1889, it' being 
the forty-third in the series of annual school reports. 

We would make a fitting allusion to the death of two 
members of this board since the beginning of this year, — 
Mr. Stephen W. Clarke, who had served continuously 
for nearly five years, and Mr. John C. Balch, who was 
first elected a member in ISTovember, 1888. In all their 
official relations, our late associates commanded our high- 
est respect. Both were deeply interested in educational 
matters, and both served the city with honor to them- 
selves and profit to the schools. In testimony to their 
character and services, suitable resolutions have been en- 
tered upon the permanent records of the board. 

Classified statistics relating to schoolhouses, receipts 
and expenditures, teachers, janitors, pupils, prize speak- 
ing, attendance, truancy, terms and vacations, etc., will 
be found in the Appendix. 

The public schools are in excellent condition. They 
have been materially improved, as we believe, by the 
changes we have introduced during the year. The most 
important of these is the establishment of the one-session 
plan at the High School. The change has resulted in ad- 
vantage to the school. Among other benefits, it permits 



62 

a rational division of the day into periods of study, rest, 
and recreation. The daily session of the school now ends 
at 1 p. M., and nineteen hours elapse before it again as- 
sembles. We would suggest to parents that the progress 
and welfare of the pupils depend largely upon the proper 
use of these intervening hours. There is ample time in 
the afternoon for exercise at\d such study as may be neces- 
sary out of school, without encroaching upon the early 
and long hours of sleep necessary to health while pursu- 
ing a continuous course of study. With a judicious divis- 
ion of this long intermission, the pupils of the High 
School should be able to accomplish more work than 
has hitherto been done there, without danger to their 
health. We would again refer to the [need of physical 
culture in this school. The boys maintain a militar}- com- 
pany, and the girls, with commendable enterprise, have 
recently formed an " athletic club." There is always dan- 
ger, however, that such organizations, when conducted 
independently of the school management, will result in 
excess to the few and neglect of the many. In order that 
all may share alike in the benefits of physical exercises, 
a daily military drill, or something equivalent, for boys 
and girls, should be introduced into the school under the 
direction of the committee. To secure room for this, and 
for other sanitary purposes, we recommend changes in 
the high school building, and the erection of an inexpen- 
sive gymnasium annex. 

There has been a change of masters in two of the large 
grammar schools, — Ash street and Webster street. Nu- 
merous changes have also occurred in the corps of female 
teachers, by resignation. The new teachers have main- 
tained, and in some cases improved, the condition of the 
schools of their predecessors. With two exceptions, al 
vacancies in lower grade schools have been filled from the 



63 

Training School, and by daughters of our own citizens. 
Since the opening of that school a constantly increasing 
number of its graduates has heeu employed here. Fifty- 
one are now on our roll of teachers. The wages paid them 
remain at home. The Training School is a successful 
" home industry," worthy of " protection.'' It is not a 
professional school, nor a Kormal school, in the true 
sense, yet its work is equivalent to that of many so- 
called Normal schools, which, as a writer has justly said, 
are " only high schools with a slight infusion of pedagogy 
in the curriculum of the last year." "We would encour- 
age the young lady graduates of the High School to enter 
the Training School, whether they wish to teach here, or 
contemplate a full course of training elsewhere. 

The nominal school year in this city is thirty-seven 
weeks. The primary schools have been closed by bad 
weather signals seven half days, and the higher grades 
two half days. Thirteen half days have been given for 
holiday recesses, so that the schools have been in session 
an average time of one hundred and seventy-six days, 
or thirty-five and one fifth weeks. Our school year was 
formerly forty weeks, and this time is still adhered to in 
many places. Not only is our school year a full month 
shorter, but the number of branches taught here and the 
amount of work required of our pupils is considerably less 
than in the other large towns of New England. 

By reference to the statistical tables presented as a 
part of this report, it will be seen that the total registra- 
tion of pupils in the public schools exceeds that of last 
year. The attendance is as follows : 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Enrolled : Boys, 1,862; girls, 1,925 ; total, 3,787. 
Average daily attendance, 2,581. 



64 



PAROCHIAL AND OTHER SCHOOLS. 

Catholic, enrolled : Boys, 1,643; ^irls, 1,554; total, 3,197. 

Other private schools, 36. 

(Av. daily attendance in these schools not reported.) 

SUMMARY. 

Pupils enrolled in public schools .... 3,787 
Pupils enrolled in other schools .... 3,233 



Total in the city 7,020 

One school, that on Beech street, has been discontinued. 
The school in the Stark district was closed on account of 
small attendance, the average number having fallen to five. 
In the opinion of the committee the pupils could be accom- 
modated in another school with more profit to themselves 
and at less cost to the city. The school was re-established 
in obedience to a strong petition of the people of the dis- 
trict ; and it is gratifying to report that cttorts to increase 
the attendance have not been without results, the average 
number now being seven. A school t0(^ large, or one too 
small, is a misfortune. If too small, teacher and pupils 
lose interest in their work ; if too large, the pupils can 
not have much personal attention from the teacher, with- 
out which there can be no true teaching. Owing to the 
withdrawal of Catholic children, it is the parochial schools 
and not the juiblic schools which are now overcrowded. 
With a few exceptions, the public schools of all grades 
are of a size best adajttcd for the comfort and health of 
the }tupils and the l)est work of the teachers. Ihider these 
circumstances more individual teaching is possible, and 
our citizens whose (•liililieii attend tlu' public schools may 
expect them to make riipid and substantial progress. 



65 

A change in the method of teacliing drawing has been 
introduced into the primary schools. The drawing-books 
formerly used have, in part, been dispensed with, and the 
schools are supplied with models in their stead. The 
models are placed in the hands of teacher and pupils, and 
are handled, examined, and talked about until their forms 
and other properties are thoroughly understood. When 
this is done, the pupil is required to make a drawing from 
the model. He will then understand that he is drawing 
an object, and not copying from a book. 

Drawing in these schools has heretofore been little else 
than copying flat figures from the drawing-book, and the 
child could have no intelligent idea of the objects which 
the figures were intended to represent. If the side of a 
cube, for instance, were to be drawn, the copy in the book 
represented to the child's mind only four lines inclosing 
a bhink space on the page, and when he had drawn a 
similar figure it represented nothing more. But if he 
draws the same figure after having seen and handled the 
model of a cube, he knows what the side of a cube is, and 
what his drawing means. It is evident that this is a ra- 
tional method of teaching drawing. The study of form 
by means of models is not new in our primary schools, as 
It is a feature of the kindergarten methods now so gener- 
ally in use, but its application to drawing is new in these 
schools. Miss Manahan, of the High School, who thor- 
oughly understands the object to be attained, has been 
employed to assist the teachers in the change until the 
end of the school year, when it is hoped a complete sched- 
ule of the work to be done in each grade under the new 
method may be prepared. A subject so important as 
drawing should have a special teacher, and we call atten- 
tion to the Superintendent's recommendations on this 
subject. 



66 

The evening schools have been fully attended, and good 
work has been done in them. The evening drawing, 
schools have had their facilities increased by additional 
fixtures and models, and are now equal to any schools of 
their kind in New England. 

The school buildings and grounds and other school 
property committed to our care have l)een kept in a con- 
dition as good as possible with the means provided. The 
Smead system of dry closets has been ])Ul in at Spring- 
street, in place of the old vaults, the walls of which had 
fallen in, leaving the premises in a condition liable to in- 
dictment by the Hoard of Health. The new closets are 
thus far entirely satisfactory. No trace of odor is found 
about them, and tlie air in the closets an hour after school 
begins will be found purer than that within the school- 
rooms. The system requires no water or sewer connec- 
tions. 

An old furnace, taken from the training-school build- 
ing, has been put into the Anioskeag house in place of 
stoves. New brick vaults have been built at Amoskeag 
and Mosquito Pond. Considerable concreting has been 
done, both in rejtairing old walks and laying a few much 
needed new ones. The changing of all double desks to 
single ones is nearly comi)leted. A new fence was built 
about the Franklin-street yard, and cleaning, whitewash- 
in";, and i)aintini]: done in manv of the buildings. 

The iiiinnal approiiriation for repairs is too small. The 
change at Spring-street cost ^1,077.47, or nearly one 
third of the whole approi)riation. Nearly every year 
some similar cxtraordinai'v job has to be done, U'aviiig a 
sum insutticient for general re})airs, which must, in con- 
sequence, be neglected from year to year. 

We are gratified at the progress nnide toward the erec- 
tion of a new building on the West Side, after i>l;ms ajt- 



67 

proved by a committee of competent gentlemen. It is 
hoped that the building will show a large advance in fit- 
ness for school purposes over anything we now have. 
Progress in school architecture has hardly kept pace with 
that in other direction^. Probably not a single building 
has been erected in the city the past year that is not bet- 
ter adapted for its intended use as a habitation for human 
beings than the best schoolhouse we have. In the mat- 
ter of ventilation, recent mill construction is vastly supe- 
rior to that of our churches and schools. Of all sanitary 
abominations, an unventilated schoolroom is the worst, 
especially if it be overcrowded. It is reported that a single 
schoolroom in this city (not a public school), built to ac- 
commodate fort3'-eight pupils, at a recent session con- 
tained 07ie hundred and ten children ! 

Col. G. M. L. Lane having resigned his position as tru- 
ant officer in May last, Mr. Samuel Brooks was re-elected 
to the place. 

The truant officer's reports for the year show some 
gratifj'ing changes. The whole number of cases of ab- 
sence reported from the public schools is 183 ; from the 
parochial schools, 354. This is a reduction of more than 
one half in the public schools, and a gain in the parochial 
schools, since the last report. 

The percentage of dail}^ attendance is 92.2 this year, 
against 90.3 last year. This item is not reported to us 
from other schools. It would appear that the habit of 
regular attendance is increasing. 

The number of certificates granted to children is as 
follows : 

French 238 

Irish 107 

German ....... 40 



68 



Swedes ....... 27 

Americans . . . . . .102 



Total .-.14 

Of these, 308 were boys and 206'girls, and the average 
age was 14.3 years. 

It is still a matter of regret tliat nearly all the French 
children Avho apj.ly for certificates to obtain work in the 
mills? are unable to speak the English language, even 
after attending tlie parochial schools for many months. 
This is not alluded to in order to question the riglit of 
parents to teach their children French, or any other lan- 
guage foreign to this country. Nevertheless we believe 
they make a grave mistake in refusing to give them a 
good Ejiglish educatioi! when it can be had for the ask- 
ing. We respect their feeling of affection for their native 
tongue, and the tenacity with which tliey cling to tlie 
customs and traditions of fatherland is entirely reason- 
able. But this has nothing to do with the question of the 
child's best interests. Every child that grows up in an 
English-speaking country witliout a good knowledge of 
that language, suffers a positive loss and misfortune. He 
can never intelligently exercise the privileges of citizen- 
ship, nor compete successfully with his fellows in any 
sphere of life. Other languages may be desirable as ac- 
complishments, but English, and English only, is the 
language of American citizenship. It is the language 
of our business, our newspapers and books, and of our 
constitution and laws. A child kept from a knowledge 
of it in this land of free schools is defrauded of liis natu- 
ral right. Onr foreign-speaking }>eople have observed 
that their children often learn to s]teak English by con- 
tact with others, in 8}»it«.' of all ctluits to {\\v contrary. 
Indeed, any attempt to jtreveiit it will be in \aiii. In this 



69 

age of individual freedom, the child as well as the adult 
touches life at too many points to be kept in ignorance 
of the world about him. To isolate him and teach him a 
foreign tongue will delay, but it cannot prevent, the su- 
premacy of the English speech. In youth is the time for 
the right education, and it is a pity that any child who is 
to become an American citizen should be obli2:ed to 
spend hie school days in the study of a foreign language, 
and then pick up his English in the street, or acquire it 
with difficulty in after years. 

The subject of manual training has been referred to in 
previous reports of the school committee. It has now as- 
sumed such importance as to justify our further attention. 
Its success, wherever introduced, points to its early adop- 
tion as a part of common school education everywhere. 
The limits of this report forbid a full discussion of the 
subject. Briefly, manual training in the schools means 
the introduction of a system of hand-training by means of 
regular lessons in the use of tools. Rooms with suitable 
fixtures are provided, and the pupils of the higher grades, 
generally of the grammar divisions, take their lessons in 
the workshop by turns, thus alternating hand work and 
brain work. The object of manual training is not to teach 
the trades, as some have supposed. • It is absurd to think 
of turning our schools into apprentice shops. We do not 
know what vocations our children will follow in after life. 
It is well that we do not know. If we did, we should at- 
tempt some special and narrow training for them, instead 
of the broad and general education which our common 
schools now so admirably provide. Manual training is 
not technical training, though the two are often con- 
founded. Technical education is the work of special 
schools, which teach a particular trade or industry with a 
view to preparing individuals to earn a living thereby. 



70 

Nothing of this sort can legally or logically be intro- 
duced into the public school. Kothing belongs there 
which will not benefit all classes alike, whatever may be 
their future calling. Manual training is advocated because 
it promises to be a valuable aid to the schools in general 
education for the practical duties of life. It has a distinct 
economic value, it is true; but its chief distinction is 
broadly educational. It certainly will make better me- 
chanics and artisans of those boys and girls who may 
choose such callings, and it may induce many to make 
such a choice ; it is equally true that those who become 
manufacturers, merchants, doctors, and lawyers will be 
better educated men and better equipped for their work if 
all their faculties, physical and mental, have been duly 
trained. One result of manual training is expressed by 
the homely word handiness, and " handy " men are gener- 
ally successful men. Manual training has also what may 
be called a social value. The majority of American boys 
do not find the highest grades of school attractive. 
More than eighty per cent of them leave the schools be- 
fore tlie age of fourteen. From fourteen to eighteen is a 
critical period, when the future character is largely deter- 
mined. This period is often spent aimlessly, without any 
preparation for the practical duties of life. Ex}>c'rience 
has shown that nuuuial training is so attractive to bo3's at 
this age that they will ronuiin in the schools, whose health- 
ful and helpi'ul discipline will carry them safely over many 
temptations. The healthfulness of manual training alone 
is a sufficient argument for its introduction. 

Manual training would cure some of the ills which 
arise from false notions of the value and dignity of labor. 
Every year thousands of 3'oung ]icople leave the schools 
with a feeling that manual labor is ItiMK'ath them. This 
is not a result of anything taught in the schools, but rather 
of what is not taught. It is largely due to the social sur- 



71 

roundings of the pupils. We cannot disguise the fact, 
liowever, that the schools give greatest prominence to the 
intellectual side. The studies pursued exercise the men- 
tal powers upon subjects which suggest the accomplish- 
ments rather than the common things of life. Reading, 
writing, and drawing are the only studies which allow a 
play of the expressive faculties. Nine tenths of all the 
time is given to training of the receptive and reflective 
powers ; the delineative, executive, and constructive fac- 
ulties are neglected. Expression by means of language, 
the most abstract and difhcult of all forms, is given most 
prominence. Manual training is intended to give the 
other forms of expression their appropriate place in the 
school. It need not be feared that this will lower the in- 
tellectual standard of the schools; which is none too high. 
Manual training in itself is a valuable means of mental 
discipline. The mind is disciplined quite as successfully 
through the hand in the construction of an object as 
through the brain in thinking of the same object. A 
lesson in the use of tools, requiring the exercise of delib- 
eration and judgment, is a means of mental discipline dif- 
fering in kind, but quite as valuable as the cultivation of 
the memory through the study of history. The argument 
for manual training is sound and scientific. It meets an 
acknowledged demand of the times. More people than 
ever before are engaged in industrial pursuits. In thirty 
years the manufactured products of this country increased 
550 per cent, and the number of people employed in man- 
ufactures increased 325 per cent. 

Skilled labor was never in greater demand. IS'ever 
before did all the pursuits of men and women demand 
such powers of observation, judgment, and executive 
ability. And yet there never was a time when the chil- 
dren of the common people had fewer opportunities for 
the training of these faculties. The home education has 



72 

lost its industriiil features; the apprentice system has dis- 
appeared. Manual training in the schools seems to be 
the appropriate and opportune means of meeting the 
difficulty. More than forty cities in this countr}' have in- 
troduced it into their public schools, and twenty-live 
States and Territories have it taught in some form. The 
character of the population of this city makes it desirable 
here. The old building on Lowell street, from its 
arrangement and central location, would be an admirable 
place for a beginning, and could not be put to better use. 

On the first of February, next, the city will begin to 
furnish free text-books to the public schools, in accord- 
ance with the act of the last Legislature. The books 
will be purchased directly from the publishers, numbered 
and marked as public propert}', and loaned to the pupils. 
They will be accounted for by the teachers the same as 
other property now in their hands. As any city or town 
in the State may use any series of books, and as it costs no 
more to buy a new series than an old one, we shall intro- 
duce new and better text-books in reading, grammar, 
penmanship, and in several branches taught in the High 
School. These will be furnished at once to all pupils; 
other books to those only whose old ones are worn out, 
or who rcfiuire them by reason of promotion to higher 
classes. The introduction will thus be gradual, and may 
extend over a period of two or three years. The passage 
of this law has lu-ovoked a lively competition among 
the pu])lishers, and the city will not oidy get the best 
books, but will buy them at extremely low prices, 
lower tlian the old wholesale rates and at least 33 per 
cent less than the retail prices which our citizens have 
been obliged to }>ay. The expense at first will be 
considerable ; after the schools are once sup[)lied, a small 
annual outlay will 1k' sufficient to replace the books worn 



73 

out. Tlie change comes at a favorable time, when our 
school expenses are low. We call attention to the tables 
in the appendix, showing the cost of the schools, and in- 
vite a comparison with other cities in this and other JSTew 
England States. The rate of school tax in this city has 
not increased a single mill in the last ten years. If our 
taxes are burdensome, the school department is not re- 
sponsible therefor. 

The public schools are now free in fact as in name. 
The poorest man in our midst, if he have the means to 
feed and clothe his children, may keep them in school at 
his pleasure, and give them an education as good as the 
richest man can buy, without the expenditure of a single 
dollar. All the excellent school privileges of Manches- 
ter, — the primary schools, with their interesting exer- 
cises for the younger children ; the grammar schools, 
which give an excellent English education to those who 
can go no farther; the High School, which prepares its 
pupils to enter the highest institutions of learning in the 
land ; the Training School, in which the daughters of our 
citizens are fitted to earn good wages as teachers ; the 
evening schools, for those who must work in the day; 
the drawing schools, to aid apprentices and mechanics, — 
all these are absolutely free. Such munificent advantages 
are found only in our own favored land, and he must be 
an ungrateful citizen who will not give his children the 
full benefit of them. 

In conclusion, we commend the faithful work of the 
teachers, ofiicers, and others connected with the schools, 
and thank your honorable bodies for your co-operation 
with this Board. 

Respectfully submitted. 

MARSHALL P. HALL, 

For the Committee. 
Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1889. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



T'o the Manchester School Board: 

Gentlemen, — I respectfully ofter the following as the 
annual report of the Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion for the year 1889 : 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

Throughout the year six teachers have been employed 
in the High School, twenty in the grammar schools, and 
sixteen in the middle schools. There have been twenty- 
seven primary schools, taught by twenty-four teachers. 
This is accounted for from the fact that the principal of 
the Training School, who for convenience is reckoned 
among the middle-school teachers, has charge of three 
primary schools where no regular teachers are employed. 
There have also been two partially graded schools * em- 
ploying three teachers, and six ungraded schools f ^vith 
one teacher for each. This is e(|uivalent to seventy-seven 
distinct schools of a single room each, taught by an aver- 
age of seventy-iive teachers. The number of schools and 
of teachers isles8,by one of each, than the number last year: 
and the only difference in the form of organization is, that a 
primary school at the Lowell-street house was discontin- 
ued near the close of last year, and that the primary 
school at the Main-street house, taught by Miss Nettie C. 
Woodman, l)ccame of middle-school grade early in the 

♦The upper room at Anioskoag aiul tlie Ilallsville school. 
tCouiUry subiirbiin. 



75 

year, because when her pupils were ready for promotion 
there was not room for them in existing Main- 
street middle schools. The grade of Miss Woodman's 
school was therefore then changed from a primary to a 
middle school, and there has since been no'school of pri- 
mary grade at the Main-street house. There have since 
been four middle schools in this house, and they are 
easily filled with pupils from the four primaries at the 
School-street house and the two primaries at the South 
Main-street house. 

The school on Beech street, closed at the opening of 
the fall term in consequence of the sale of the school- 
house, together with the extra school in West Manches- 
ter (on Clinton street) during the spring term only, 
would be equivalent to one school for the entire year ; 
and they are so reckoned in computing both the number 
of schools and the attendance totals, for the year. 

ATTENDANCE, 

The public schools are being increasingly better at- 
tended from year to year, and the almost bodily with- 
drawal of more than a hundred pupils from the schools 
on the west side of the river at the opening of the fall 
term has apparently been offset by the return, within the 
year, of others to schools upon the east side of the 
river. 

Our city schools were most extensively patronized in 
1881. From then on, while the French parochial schools 
were being established, there was an annual decrease in 
the attendance upon the city schools till 1886. Since 
that year the public schools of the city have shown a 
slight but steady annual increase in their aggregate totals 
of attendance. 



76 



These facts may be seen })y an inspection of the " Gen- 
eral Summary " table upon page I * of the appendix to 
this report. Other points of interest will also be found 
in that table. 

The law providing for the use of " free text-books and 
other supplies " in our schools at the expense of the city 
treasury will doubtless have some influence in acceler- 
ating an increased attendance upon the public schools, 
but to what extent time alone can tell. 

There has not been that improvement this year in the 
reduction of tardinesses which the eltbrts of teachers to 
secure it would seem to justify us in expecting. In 
1886, the total tardinesses in the city schools were 8,678 ; 
in 1887, 7,387; in 1888, 6,635; in 1889, 7,231. These 
were distributed as follows, so far as tabulated : 



AVERAGE TARDINESSES ON AVERAGE ATTENDANCE, PER PUPIL. 



Schools. 



High School 

Grammar schools 

Miiidle schools 

Primary schools 

Partially graded schools. 
Ungraded schools 



1887. 1888. 1889 



4.6 
2 6 
3.2 
2.1 
2.9 
4.1 



4.0 
2.0 
3.2 
2.4 
2.7 
2.7 



4.8 
2.0 
3.1 
2.8 
4.2 
2.1 



From the above it will be seen that for this year the 
grammar schools have had least tardinesses, pro{)ortion- 
ally; that the ungraded scliools rank second, and have 
shown greatest improvement of all (in reducing tarili- 
nesses) for the past three years. The great increase in 
the partially graded schools is due chiefly to the fact that 
the regular teacher has been absent from the Amoskeag 
school nearly the entire school year. The tardinesses 
there have been three times as many as for last year.f It 
is certainly unfortunate that the High School should uni- 

•Obseive letters at foot of pages In the appeiuli.x. 

t The scliool this year has been in charge of two diflerciit teachers. 



77 

formly make the poorest showing in the matter of tardi- 
nesses ; for pupils of this grade chiefiy have command of 
their own time, and it does not foretoken a great degree 
of success in life for the few (who are mainly responsible 
for the excessive instances of tardiness at the High 
School) that they should be negligent in so important a 
matter. I think it worth while here to repeat, for the 
benefit of such, what I wrote in a former report : " I 
earnestly appeal to the few pupils in the higher grades, 
whom the records show to be most largely chargeable 
with the instances of tardiness per individual, well to 
consider the injurious effect of the habit which is being 
formed, and to remember that, unless overcome, it will 
be likely to prove the obstacle that will prevent their 
procurement, upon graduation, of most coveted positions 
of responsibility and trust." 

SCHOOLS A^^D TEACHERS. 

The average number of pupils belonging to the various 
grades this year has been, per teacher : in the high school, 
30 ; in the grammar schools, 37 ; in the middle schools, 38 ; 
in the primary schools, 40 ; in the partially graded, 24 ; 
in the ungraded (or suburban) schools, 20 ; and in all the 
schools, 37. This, considering existing location of schools, 
appears like quite as equitable a distribution as could be 
expected, and it would certainly seem like one that should 
insure first-class work in every room. But close inspec- 
tion of the attendance tables placed first in the appendix 
will reveal great variety in the number of pujDils per 
teacher. Four grammar divisions have averaged over 45 
pupils each, while four others have averaged less than 30 
each. Four middle schools have averaged 45, or more, 
each ; while four others have each averaged 32, or less. 
Five primary schools have averaged 49, or more, each ; 
while five others have each averaged 30, or less. 



78 

It is impossible to equalize the attendance, as long as 
schools exist in present locations. The two Ash-street 
primaries have been badly over-crowded the greater 
part of the time for two or three years. This year the 
two have averaged 105, notwithstanding some belonging 
ill the district have been required to go out to the schools 
at Wilson Hill and Blodget street. Even when living as 
near to other schools, some parents get very much pro- 
voked if required to send their children out of their own 
district, though their own school be over-crowded and 
there be plenty of room in another which their children 
can conveniently attend. While it has been impossible 
adequately to relieve the Ash-street primaries (and some 
others) of an excess of numbers, it has been equally im- 
possible to keep the primary schools at South Main-street 
house sufficiently well tilled. These two schools averaged 
but 63 for the year, — the same as the number in the Ash- 
street lower primary alone during the fall term. The 
South Main-street schools take all the pupils of their 
grade living the south side of the Piscataquog river, while 
the four schools at the School-street house properly ac- 
commodate the other primary pupils living in West Man- 
chester. 

Similar conditions exist in other localities that make it 
impracticable to attempt even an ajiproximate equaliza- 
tion of the numbers in attendance upon all the schools. 
Much, however, is done to adjust the numbers as well as 
possible, otherwise there would be still greater ditterences 
than at present. 

The (luality of respective schools cannot, however, be 
determined from their size. The excei»tionally good 
teacher will make a school good, whether large or small ; 
and I sometimes think the average teacher is at her worst 
when she has a small school. It would be fooli.^li to con- 



79 

tend that a given teacher couldn't better manage and in- 
struct a school of 25 pupils than one of 45 of similar 
material, but my observation is that teachers are, as a 
matter of fad, usually at their best when in schoolrooms 
containing about 40 pupils' desks with every seat every 
day punctually filled. At any rate, " the rule " here is 
that those of our schools that are best filled are best. 
I:^ow, though teachers are not responsible in general for 
having small schools, they are responsible for having any 
that is poorer than their best, and doubly to blame if their 
schools are poor simply because small ; for under such a 
condition they might be better than they could possibly 
make them if they were large. 

It is generally admitted that the character of a school 
is chiefly dependent upon its teacher. The problem then 
is how to secure good teachers. Our teachers are largely 
selected from among the graduates of our city Training 
School, and for reasons many times told we have usually 
been better served by these than by others ; but occasion- 
ally a graduate of this school disappoints us, because, 
when she has received an appointment apparently perma- 
nent, she appears to feel little or no necessity for further 
improvement or special effort, and seems to think she will 
equally well enjoy the regular increase of salary as often 
as duly advanced. 

I, therefore, think it would be better, in order to secure 
the best possible service from all beginners, so to change 
the "Rules" that such teachers should be understood to 
be serving on trial until they could attain the maximum 
salary ; and so provide, also, that such should receive the 
regular installments of increase in salary only upon the 
concurrent recommendation of either the chairman of the 
sub-comraittee and the superintendent, or of the entire 
sub-committee after suflicient personal inspection of the 



80 

teacher's work by every member of said committee. I 
sincerely hope something of the sort will be provided, for 
I feel sure that much good would come to our schools by 
a plan that would insure the constant elfort of beginners 
to do the best work possible during the first three years 
of their service. Many would not feel any jtressure, for 
they have love for the work from the start ; the indiffer- 
ent capables would rouse themselves to secure the desired 
recommendation lest their pride be wounded by the im- 
plied brand of incompetency ; and those adjudged un- 
worthy of the maximum salary would doubtless soon with- 
draw from the corps of teachers. By the time any would 
receive the maximum salary under the plan outlined, it 
may be safe to assume that the teacher would have ac- 
quired such a habit of doing her best that she would be 
likely to continue in the practice of it ; or, if not, it would 
be known what she might do, and certain results could 
then be properly demanded. The change recommended 
is designed, in short, so to ])rovide that only good teachers 
could ever attain the maximum salary of their grade, and 
that others would soon disap})car from every grade. 

The teachers in general have been faithful and true to 
the interests of those under their charge, and the schools 
therefore have for the most part been in good condition 
and the pupils properly advanced in their studies. Sev- 
eral teachers have clearly earned much more than the sal- 
ary they have received, while a few are paid what they 
get with scanty justice. Hence my recommendation in 
regard to the way in wliicli the inaxiiiiinii salary should 
be attained by all teachers here who cannot bring per- 
fectly satisfactory evidence of well-known prior estab- 
lished success as teachers. 

I think the recent action of the Board whereby teachers 
will aii^ain be allowed a day each term for visiting sehools 



81 

a wise provision, for observation of tlie results of former 
outgrowths of the practice convinces me tliat both the vis- 
iting teacher and the teacher visited are alike greatly 
benefited, and, consequently, respective schools. No 
teacher having any worthy ambition will have a school 
less worthy of inspection and commendation by her co- 
laborers than another of a similar grade, if in her power 
to make it as good and thus save herself from the gen- 
eral reputation of having an inferior school. 

Manchester has lost the services this yenv of several 
notably good teachers. The eight who have withdrawn 
are J. Walter Stetson, Annie A, Webster, Mary J. 
Hickey, Etta J. Carle}-, Cora M. Dearborn, Olive J. Ran- 
dall, Georgie A. Wyman, and William F. Gibson. The 
majority of these could scarcely be equalled by any sim- 
ilar number in our corps of teachers for the past dozen 
years. Greater praise is unnecessary, and would be diffi- 
cult to bestow. Miss Carley is included in this majority, 
and was not excelled in efiiciency as a teacher of schools 
lacking the ease of those completely graded. She ma}^ 
also be assured while heroically suffering great impair- 
ment of health that in her affliction she has the lov- 
ing respect of her former pupils, and the profound sym- 
pathy of all her co-laborers, the school authorities, and 
the entire community ; and that all this is won as much 
by her excellent personal qualities as by the fact of her 
very creditable connection with our public schools. 

If, for the benefit of others, I were to undertake to sum 
up the qualities that give best teachers their meritorious 
reputations, I could not do better than to say they con- 
stantly attempt to train the judgment how best to treat 
every phase of school life, thoroughly devote themselves 
to their chosen vocation, and with enduring perseverance 
work out to a successful issue the best ideas they may be 



82 



able to invent or aiscover. Such teachers reach , d .ty - 
suish essential., and emphasize them. By thoughtful 
preparation and study, they are enabled so to direct the 
efforts of their pupils that they largely discover for them 
selves that it is the proper development of the nmnl that 
constitutes all true education. The influence of such 
teaching ends not with school days, for it permeates and 
enriches the whole life. 

NEW SCHOOLS AND SCHOOLIIOUSES. 

The Ash-street primaries are annually growing larger, 
and the services of an assistant teacher will doubtless be 
needed for their relief by April of the commg 3-ear. 
But there is no lit place for the work of such ^^ the Ash- 
street house. A four-room school budding should be 
erected on the lot owned by the city at the corner ot 
Brido-e and Union streets. The use of one room there 
by April next will be highly desirable; and, without 
doubt two rooms will be needed by the time a new house 
can be obtained. The second story could be used as a 
ward-room, in whole or in part, until more ^ooms might 
be needed for school purposes, as would probably be th. 
<;a8e but a few years later. 

The Ilallsville school is also rapidly growing. The 
fifty-two seats there have all been tilled at two or three 
different times tins year, and sixty-nine ditlerent pupils 
have been registered. An assistant teacher is already em- 
ployed there:but the room for her work is no longer suit- 
able in consequence of the increased minibers. There 
«bould also be a new four-room sclun.l budding in thi. 
section of the city, and I should advise its location to he 
^outh of the track of the Bortsniouth nnlway. I teel that 
for the interests of the city, as specified, you cannottoo 
,juh-kly secure the ad.litional school accommodations 
recommended. 



83 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

• 

The High School has beeu under the charge of Prin- 
cipal Somes throughout the entire year. It has also been 
in a much improved condition. Pupils have appeared 
more like young ladies and gentlemen in the yard and 
upon the streets about the schoolhouse, and more like 
students imbued with a love of learning within doors. 
This is progress in the right direction, and we congrat- 
ulate the teachers that their pull in one line is having the 
right immediate eifect and highly promising for the con- 
tinued proficiency of the school. 

At my request for suggestions in regard to present 
needs of the High School, the principal returns the fol- 
lowing : 

Manchester, K H., 

December 28, 1889. 

31r. William E. Buck, Sujjerintendeyit of Schools : 

Dear Sir, — At your request I submit a report of the 
condition of the High School. 

It is well known to the school authorities that the high 
school building is not suitable for the accommodation of 
the school, and the general opinion seems to have been 
that at some time in the future it would be necessary to 
enlarge the building or erect another. That time has 
already arrived and, whether it shall be decided to en- 
large our schoolhouse or build a new one, steps should be 
taken at once to provide a more suitable building for the 
school. 

Our recitation rooms are well lighted and generally 
large enough to serve the purpose for which they were 
intended, but they are not well ventilated and it would 
often save serious inconvenience if they were larger. 

The study room where the scholars assemble when 
they are not in recitations is not at all suited to the use 
made of it. A study room should be large, high, well 
ventilated, well lighted, and situated so that the sunshine 



84 

^11 find its way into it for a large part of the day. Our 
study room is in the center of the building, surrounded 
on three sides by halls and rooms which shut out the 
light and sunshine. It is so poorly lighted that scholars 
studying there do so at the risk of permanent injury to 
their eyesight. With the school as large as it now is, the 
room is overcrowded, and there is no way to ventilate the 
room exce[)t by doors and windows; and with the most 
careful attention I can give to ventilation, we must either 
remain shut up in a room filled with impure air or be 
blow!i upon by cold currents coming from open doors 
and windows. To provide a more spacious, better lighted 
and ventilated study room in the building we now have 
is neither a difficult nor an expensive undertaking. 

By removing the partition between the recitation 
rooms on the second floor a room would be made a third 
larger than our present study room, abundantly lighted, 
and with doors and windows so numerous and so situated 
that, if we were obliged to depend on them for fresh air, 
it could be obtained without any one being subjected to 
drafts. 

To provide recitation rooms, an addition could be 
made to the schoolhouse on the Concord-street side, in 
which, besides the regular recitation rooms, a physical 
lal)oratory, which we ought to have, and a more conven- 
ient drawing-room than we now have could be placed. 

The room we now use for a study-room could then be 
utilized for a gymnasium, for there should be provision 
made in the High School for physical training, including 
military drill. It is a mistaken idea that young people 
exercise enough in their various sports. The very ones 
who need exercise never take part in any sports. Visit 
the High School at recess time and you will find in pleas- 
ant weather a small part of the boys engaged in some 
vigorous ]>lay, but the larger number standing in the 
shade looking on. In un})leasant weather and in winter 
you will find them in the basement taking no exercise at 
all. The girls never take exercise in the open air at re- 
cess more than to walk slowly around the yard. 

Now if a part of tlie recess time could be devoted to 
systematic physical exercise, under the care and direction 



85 

of the teachers, I beHeve it would add very much to the 
scholar's vigor of body and mind. We need, too, an ad- 
dition to our corps of teachers. It is essential to the suc- 
cess and efficiency of a school like ours that the principal 
be acquainted with his teachers' methods of instruction 
and the results they reach ; and such knowledge can be 
gained only by frequent visits to the recitation rooms 
while classes are being heard. Besides, every day there 
are various matters which demand the principal's attention 
during the session of the school. All my time during the 
school session is occupied in hearing classes, so that I have 
no time either to listen to other recitations or to attend to 
the general business of the school, unless I shorten the 
time due some of my own classes or omit the recitation 
altogether. I respectfully recommend that a second sub- 
master be added to our force of teachers. 

One session has proved a success. Our attendance is cer- 
tainly as good and our lessons generally as well prepared, 
while both teachers and scholars have more time out of 
school to devote to school work. If some pupils devote 
all their out-of-school hours to pleasure, as some parents 
complain they do, it is not the fault of " one session," but 
of parents themselves. The time available for study in 
school is just the same as when we had two sessions, but 
no scholar should expect to do all his studying in school 
and parents should make it their business to see that they 
do not. So much of school time is taken up with recita- 
tions and other exercises that ver}' little time is left for 
study, and unless a generous part of the afternoon or 
evening is devoted to study, no scholar can gain all he 
might from his school course. Parents should not think 
their duty done when they send their children to school, 
but we trust we shall receive parents' hearty co-operation 
in our endeavors to lead their children to do right from a 
love for the right and to devote their time to school work 
from a true love for knowledge. 

I cannot close this report without expressing ray thanks 
to you and the committee for the assistance I have received 
in my work for the school during my connection with it. 

Respectfully, 

Albert Somes, Master. 



86 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 



A local school for the special training of teachers is in- 
dispensable to any school system circumstanced like ours, 
if it be attempted to keep the various schools of the sys- 
tem in an efficient condition. A sufficient supply of capa- 
ble substitute teacliers cannot otherwise be secured ; and 
an experience of many years has repeatedly proved that 
of the new teachers annually employed as regular teachers 
in our schools more (proportionally), by far, of those who 
have been most successful have been selected from among 
the graduates of our city Training School. 

I can think of no instance of failure to attain at least a 
good degree of success as a regular teacher in our schools 
upon the part of any graduate of our Training School who 
while she was a member of the sub-teachers' class in that 
school did well there chiefly through her own volition. 
Several of these, indeed, are most eminent in our present 
corps of teachers, and the same remark could have been 
made with equal propriety in any annual report for at 
least the last ten years. Of those who did well in the 
Training School chiefly in consequence of special effi)rts 
on the part of the principal to enable them to keep their 
place in the school, some have wisely lieeded the sugges- 
tions of another authority and cordially' responded for 
the good of both themselves and their schools ; others have 
failed to meet expectations because self-satisfled, indiffer- 
ent to the attainment of even the best of their own capa- 
bilit}', or unable to do better unless under as constant a 
supervision as when themselves pupils or sub-teachers. 

It is because of what has been observed in regard to 
these " others " that I made the recommendation I did, 
ui)on a previous page, in regard to the itiK' that should 
regulate the increase of salaries ot all be<;inn(.'rs. 



87 

The Training School has been in excellent condition 
throughout the year under the efficient supervision of 
Miss Wing, who has now been principal two years and 
one term. I herewith submit her report, as follows : 

Manchester Training School for Teachers, 

December 21,»1889. 
3Ir. William E. Buck, Superintendent of Schools: 

Sir, — In accordance with your request, I submit a re- 
port of the Manchester Training School for the year 1889. 

The number of pupil teachers now in the school is ten. 
Four are in the senior, one in the middle, and five in the 
junior class. Januarj^ 1889, a class of four graduated 
and one junior was admitted. In June four others grad- 
uated, and in September five new sub-teachers were ad- 
mitted. 

The new form of organization has been satisfactory in 
ever}' respect. By it we have been able to accomplish 
more and better work than ever before. We have followed 
the course of study that was outlined in the report of 
1888. The plan, however, was somewhat broken in Jan- 
uary. As the junior class then consisted of but one mem- 
ber, we thought it best to unite the junior and middle 
classes. By this means the Normal class has recited once 
a day. The rest of each day I have spent in actual teach- 
ing of the children and in criticising and supervising the 
work of the sub-teachers. Since February substitutes have 
been furn shed for ninety four half days of school. These 
were taken in nearly every case from the middle class. 

"The E"ew York School Journal" and "Treasure 
Trove " have been added to our list of periodicals, thir- 
teen books to the library, and various kindergarten sup- 
plies have also been furnished during the year. 

The young ladies have shown themselves willing and 
faithful workers. Their eighteen months' training can- 
not, however, completely fit them without further advice 
and assistance to meet all the demands wldch the schools 
of a city like Manchester may make. They have shown 
a good spirit for work, and are not afraid of it ; and while 



88 

their future success lies mainly with themselves, they still 
may need the advice of their fellow-workers of more ex- 
tended experience. 

Respectfully, 

Caroline E. Wixg, Principal. 

A list showino; the enrollment of sub-teachers in the 
Training School during the year may be found on page 
J of the appendix. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The evening schools have made a good gain in the 
number of pupils enrolled, as may be seen by an inspec- 
tion of the, table on page G of the appendix ; but they 
have, nevertheless, encountered their usual hindrance to 
the attainment of their highest success, in a large enroll- 
ment of those who attend insufficiently to derive much 
profit for themselves and yet enough to necessitate the 
employment of several teachers whose services are not 
long needed. The early and extended withdrawal of this 
class of pupils has a demoralizing influence upon many who 
would otherwise considerably prolong their attendance. 
I, therefore, urge upon the committee a trial of the plan 
which I outlined in my rci)ort last year, for the improve- 
ment of the attendance upon the evening schools. 

For the same purpose I now further recommend that 
the evening seliools be organized upon the plan of 
two terms instead of one, the vacation between them 
being the same as that at Christmas time for the day 
schools. 

Pupils who attend the evening schools with commend- 
able regularity make good progress, and the first effort of 
the committee should therefore be to contrive, if ])0ssible, 
to secure regulai-ity of attendance upoii (he }»ai't of all 
enrolled. 



89 



ELOCUTION. 



Mr. J. J. Hayes, special instructor in elocution at Har- 
vard University, resumed work here at the opening of 
the fall term. The eliects of his services here in 1887 
were still apparent in our schools; but many new teach- 
ers and pupils have since entered the schools, and all are 
now being- profited by the instruction of Mr. Hayes, 
whether recognized as new or as a review. 

DRAAVING. 

l)rawing is a comparatively new study in the public 
schools, and, in common with other cities not providing 
a special teacher of the subject, we have suffered more or 
less from the theories of those authors who have not been 
masters of the science, and from consequent interminable 
changes of publishers in the drawing-books designed for 
school use. Our schools have also suffered a loss of much 
that the teachers could have far better taught if the ap- 
propriations for needed drawing material asked for by the 
committee on drawing, from time to time, had not gener- 
ally been declined. I deem it proper, therefore, that I 
should thank the present Board, in behalf of the city, 
that when a similar request was again made you did not 
refuse an attempt to improve this highly important study. 
It is the basis of nearly every mechanical industry the 
world over, and the establishment of manual training 
schools as a part of the public school system is only a 
more extended expression of the art of drawing. Hence 
no city not well grounded in the latter can ever realize 
the former. 

At the opening of the fall term Miss L. E. Manahan, 
who has for many years had charge of drawing in the 
High School, was selected to supervise the drawing in 
the other schools. She has devoted but four afternoons 



00 

a week to the work ; but her knowledge of our schools 
ill general, and their needs in this particular, her famil- 
iarity with the subject, and the ready confidence and co- 
operation of the teachers given, have enabled her to ac- 
complish as much in one term, considering the limited 
amount of material afforded, as a strange special teacher 
would probably have accomplished in a year. Miss Man- 
ahan has made it positive that she will not continue this 
work after July. I therefore trust the Board will 
promptly furnish further much needed supplies, that 
teachers may be so far assisted by that time that they 
can carry on the work for at least the rest of the j^ear 
without suffering any impairment of the improvement 
inaugurated. 

The regular services of a special teacher of draw- 
ing, however, are necessary in order to secure constant 
improvement in this study. Other cities have found it 
so; and they have likewise found that such a teacher, if 
not altogether right, is worse than none. Our schools 
need a right special teacher of drawing, and I earnestly 
urge the employment of one by February, 1891, at latest. 
Miss Manahan could well serve us in this capacity ; but 
we could not easilj^ fill her place in other lines of work at 
the High School and, moreover, she decidedly refuses to 
allow the use of her name in this connection. 

THE SCIIOOLHOUSE FLAG. 

Every national fiag is highly significant, and nearly all 
are representative of much sentiment. Xone, however, 
is more specifically significant or more largely symbolizes 
the sentiment of those over whom it tloats than our own 
starry banner. 

It is, therefore, no matter of surprise that the idea o^ 
displaying the American tlag from the domes of the 



91 

schoolhouses should have originated in those of our cities 
having large anarchical tendencies. We all instinctively 
unite in sympathizing in any movement calculated to in- 
spire patriotism and love of home. Over the original 
home of the anarchist is held the flag of the government ; 
hence it is detested, because it represents cruelty, oppres- 
sion, and wrong. But not so in free America, where the 
national flag is the flag of the people, joyously flung to 
the breezes b^^ themselves as the representative of their 
most patriotic emotions and the symbol that government 
here is by and for the people. 

Then let our rising generations, as did the fathers, learn 
most to love the flag of their country through their own 
contributions to its support. I therefore recommend that 
the rule of the Board prohibiting the taking of contribu- 
tions in our schools be so far modified as to allow the es- 
tablishment of a collection box for the deposit of wholly 
voluntary contributions for the purchase of a school flag, 
in any building where the pupils may generally so desire, 
subject to such restrictions as the sub-committee of the 
school ma}^ deem proper to provide. 

Even the children of anarchists (if such there be in the 
schools) would naturally catch the spirit of " Young 
America " from their associates, and delight in contributing 
some of their spare pennies toward the purchase of the 
flag. Though this plan might not most speedily procure 
a school flag, I feel sure that such a method of providing 
it would greatly and abidingly heighten the interest in it ; 
for every pupil who might contribute but a penny would 
feel a joint ownership in it that would be the pride of his 
life, and no father could point to that flag, or its like, as a. 
symbol of tyranny, without hearing a vigorous protest in 
his own home. 



92 



CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, gentlemen of the School Board, I con- 
gratulate you upon the great harmony that has prevailed 
in your deliberations during the year, and the city that it 
has thereby highly profited by wise counsels in the inter- 
ests of its schools. I also esteem it a great personal pleas- 
ure, as well as a high official honor, that I have so largely 
had your confidence, which I duly appreciate, and for 
which I heartily thank you. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 
V. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

Vni. School Year, 1889. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1890. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1890. 

XIII. School Year, 1890. 



APPENDIX 



STATISTICS. 

I. —POP UL ATIOK 

Population of the city b}' last census, 1884 
Estimated population, 1889 
Legal school age, 5 to 21. 

II. — SCHOOLHOUSES. 



37,600 
40,000 



I^^umber of schoolhouses in use . . . . * 23 
Number of schoolhouses not in use . ... 1 

(Bridge-street house, corner of Union.) 
I^umber of schoolrooms used for day schools . . 77 

(Three of the same, and six others, used for evening schools. 
Rooms unoccupied by city for day schools are, two at Spring-street 
house, three at Lowell-street, three at Beech-street,* and two at 
Bridge-street, the last two being unfit.) 
Number of rooms used for High School classes . 
Number of rooms used for Grammar schools 
Number of rooms used for Middle schools 
Number of rooms used for Primary schools 
Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 
Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools 

IIL — SCHOOLS. 

(All for both sexes.) 
Number of High schools ..... 

• Tlie Beech-street house was told diiiintj the summer vacation. 

(A) 



6 
20 
16 

27 
2 

6 



95 

Number of combined Grammar and lower grade 

(Middle and Primary) schools . 
i^Tumber of combined Middle and Primary schools 
t (Merrimack-street or Training School) 
Number of schools all Primary grade 
Number of Partially Graded schools 
Number of Ungraded schools 

^ IV. — TEACHERS 



Male teachers in the High School .... 2 

Female teachers in the High School . . . . 4 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools . . .5 
Female teachers in the Grammar schools . . .15 
Female teachers in the Middle schools . . .16 
Female teachers in the Primary schools . . ,24 
Female teachers in the Partially Graded schools . 3 
Female teachers in the Ungraded schools . . .6 
Special teachers : One male in music* the entire year, 

one male in elocutionf fall term only . . .2 
Average number of male teachers | . . . .7 

Average number of female teachers . . . . Q8 

(Decrease of one from last year in day schools.) 
Male teachers in the Eveni^ig schools . . .4 

Female teachers in the Evening schools . . .13 
Average number of male teachers in the Evening 
schools ......... 4 

Average number of female teachers in the Evening 

schools .8 

Male teachers in the Evening Drawing schools . . 3 
Average number of male teachers in the Evening- 
Drawing schools ....... 3 

* Four days a week. f Once a week. X Exclusive of special teachers. 

(B) 



96 




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100 



DAY SCUOOLS. 



Buuiinary of the attoiiclance upon the several grades of 
public day schools for the year 1889 : 



GRAPES. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially Graded. 
Ungraded 



Totals, 1889.. 
Totals, 1888. 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



o to 

iz;.e 

go 



' 85 


109 


420 


503 


367 


370 


860 


819 


45 


46 



85 



1,862 
1,800 



1,926 
1,906 



181 
756 
602 

1,006 
73 
123 



2,801 
2,768 



Jo 

3S 



gis 






175 
714 
545 
968 
65 
114 



2,581 
2,500 






96.3 
94.4 
90.5 
90.8 
89.0 
92.7 



92.2 
90.3 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance u})on the several grades of 
public evening schools for the year 1889: 



•a a 
2 ® 

a S 



SCHOOLS. 



Lowell street 

Spring street 

Clinton street 

School street 

Goffe's Falls 

Drawing-schools. . 

Totals, 1883, 
Totals, 1888, 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. I Girls. 



284 ... 

254 
135 
... I 59 

15 ! 10 

89 



523 
315 



323 
162 



68 
64 
29 
30 
13 
52 



246 
222 



49 
35 
21 
18 
12 
42 



177 
161 






72.1 
64.8 
72.4 
60.0 
92.3 
80.7 



71.9 
72.5 



101 

Foming School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, Principal of Lowell-street school, 
for boys. 

Assistants, — Cora F. Sanborn, Etta S. Dana, Mary 
A. Buzzell, and Nellie M. Atwood. 

J. H. Campbell,* Principal of Spring-street school, for 
girls. 

Assistants, — Emma J. Ela, Lizzie D. Hartford, and 
Maggie Linen. 

Frank C. Livingston, Principal of School-street school, 
for both sexes. 

Assistants, — Sarah B. Paige and Annie E. McElroy. 

Fred C. Baldwin, Principal of Clinton-street school, 
for boys. 

Assistants, — Mary A. Southard, Maude L. Kent, and 
Fannie L. Sanborn. 

Georgie A. I^ute, teacher of the Gotfe's Falls school. 

Evening Drawing-School Teachers. 

John M. Kendall, Henry W. Allen, and Alphonso H. 
Sanborn. 

i^* Mr. Campbell resigned at opeuing of the fall term, and Charles W. Bickford was ap- 
pointed Principal for the rest of the year. 



(H) 



102 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



The following table presents the main features of inter- 
est pertaining to the attendance upon tlie public schools 
for the last ten 3'ears. 



Date. 



SO 



Whole No. 
Belonging. 



Girls. 



E s 

<D O 



M 



>. 



£:< 



a; ? 

■<1 



fl 


^ 


a 


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2 


2 


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5 . 


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It 





£ 


H 


! 



C-3 

0)0 



1880. . . 
1881... 

1882... 
1883... 
1884. . . 
1885... 
1886... 
1887... 
1888... 
1889. . . 



4,136 
4,235 
4,095 
4,062 
3,918 



2,166 
2,200 
2,086 
2,061 
J, 924 



3,806 


1,891 


3,632 


1,812 


3,670 


1,817 


3,712 I 1,806 


3,787 


1,862 



1,970 
2,035 
2,009 
2,001 
1,994 
1,915 
1,820 
1,853 
1,906 
1,925 



2,970 2,727 

2,858 2,602 

2,957 2,712 
2,848 ' 2,612 

2,872 2,645 

2,725 2,430 

2,698 2,475 

2,711 2,468 

2,768 2,500 

2,801 2,681 



92.0 
91.0 
91.7 



91 
110 
164 



91.4 103 



92.1 
90.6 
91.9 
90.8 
90.3 
92.2 



95 
96 
79 
98 
116 
177 



75 
64 
76 
97 
85 
98 
78 
98 
88 
101 



75 


61 


38 I 


62 


54 


39 


66 


57 


53 


75 


66 


27 


71 


49 


38 


89 


71 


35 


71 


63 


42 { 


96 


61 


42 


80 


68 


45 


96 


73 


65 i 



* Including Grammar. classes in suburban schools. 

t Usually some pupils have annually entered from other schools. This year five have so 
entered. 



CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The whole number of dilterent teachers regularly em- 
ployed in the day schools within the year has been 85. 
Their respective positions may be learned from the at- 
tendance table on pages C, D, Fj, and F of the Appen- 
dix, but the various changes made within the year can be 
more readily understood l»y an inspection of the follow- 
ing : 

(I) 



103 



Teachers. 

Cora M. Dearborn 



Date of effect Date of effect 

of resignation . Teachers. of reHignation. 

Jan. 11. Annie A. Wcbster.Apr. 12 
Georgie A. Wyman.Mar. 22. Etta J. Carley.f Apr. 26 
Wm. F. Gibson.* Mar. 22. Mary J. Hickey. Jane 28 
J. Walter Stetson. April 12. Olive J. Randall. June 28 



Date of begin- 
ning service. 

Jan. 21. 



Teachers. 

Grace W. Irwin. 
B. S. Andrews. April 15. 
Ifettie B. Fogg. April 15. 
Wm. H. Furber. April 22. 
Inez M. Warren. May 6. 
Jennie L. ThompsonSept. 16. 
Lillian Little. Sept. 16. 

Alverta P. Barrett. Sept. 16. 



Date of effect 
Teachers. of transfer. 

TheodoraRich'ds'nApr. 15 
Nellie M. Atwood.Apr. 15 
Kettie B. Fogg. Sept. 16 
Grace W. Irwin. Sept. 16 
Ella F. Barker. Sept. 16 



TKAINING SCHOOL SUB-TEACHERS. 1889. 



N"ettie B. Fogg.| 
Lillian Little. | 
Inez M. Warren. I 
Abbie R. West. J 
Emma B. Abbott. || 
Alverta P. Barrett. || 
Maude L. Kent.|| 
Millie S. Morse. II 
Mabel J. Brickett.§ 

* Dismissed. 

t Graduated January 25, 1889. 
§ Entered September 10, 1888. 
tt Entered September 16, 1889. 



Annie B. Goodwin. § 
Emma M. Streeter.§ 
Bertba A. Youn^.S 
Mary E. Moulton. ** 
Gertrude A. Burns. ff 
Georgia M. Cheney. ff 
Annie M. Sleeper.ff 
Gertrude L. Southard. ff 
Mary G. Worthen.ft 

t Taught during April only. 
II Graduated June 28, 1SS9. 
** Entered January 28, 1889. 



(J) 



104 



YI._AVORK OF TRUANT OFP^ICER. 





Absentees 
reported from. 


No. volunta- 
rily return- 
ed to. 


No. report- 
ed caused 
to attend. 


No moved out of 
the city. 


No. found sick 
and unable to 
attend. 


si 
I*' 

o'c .= 

z - 


s 
s 


Date. 


City 
Schools. 


"5 js 

11 


■i 

d 




City 
Schools. 


<2" 


o 

B 


January 


16 


63 


1 


12 


13 


33 




8 


11 


1 


February . . . 


10 


35 


1 


2 


6 


16 




11 


8 


1 


Marcli 


22 


54 


2 


7 


8 


32 




10 


13 




April 


16 


12 


4 




7 


10 




4 


3 






31 
23 
14 


73 
19 
16 


7 
2 


1 
3 


19 
18 

i 13 

1 


53 
12 
12 




16 
4 
3 


7 
3 
2 








September 




October 


27 


34 


6 


1 


13 


26 




6 


8 




November 


11 


28 


3 




8 


24 




3 


1 




December .... 


13 


20 


5 


1 


5 


16 




3 


3 




Totals 


183 


351 


so 


27 


110 


233 


8 


68 


69 


' 



Date. 



January. . 
Febru ary . 
March.. . . 

April 

May 

June 

September 
October . . 
November 
December 

Totals 






No. truants 

caused 
to attend. 



i 


:i 


o 
o 


■sy 




.ca 






>.to 








o 


CM 


2 


15 


3 


14 


2 


3 


1 


17 


8 


9 


G 


C 


1 


2 


23 


66 



B O S 

. as c 



o ti «> 



O fl O 



o .Q 



18 



118 
111 
136 
83 
109 
94 
60 
110 
82 
75 

968 



183 
132 
101 
60 
150 
64 
102 
93 
60 
40 

976 



o u 



a ^ 






49 
.■)9 
85 
6C 
47 
63 
50 
27 
14 
84 

514 



(K) 



105 



■SIBIOX 



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-py puB Sui^auj^ 



■sajiddng 
p a B 9 J n iinanj 



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■smooa JO 9IB0 



-BJS puB Bsioog 



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JO S9!JtJ\'0g 



— OOOOCCMNt-'fOt- 
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^^ 

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c o o lo o lo o 1.-3 -a* 50 

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C:CiOU3COr-<'t'c^QOw 

mt-oc-ie^Mco»M <N 



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lo'-rt-^— '"^cooot-^o 

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■* : (M : f^ ; iM CO N 
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^ • ■ • * * 




$1,057.05 
1,374.75 
1,784.95 
1,474.89 
1,252.38 
l,47G.0.i 
1,370.63 
2,410.68 
1,224.93 
1,798.83 



OC^OC001CO<-IW10CO 
r-lt-lO(Ml-;00r)<(Mt-t-^ 

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enmoscot-cOCD-fcOCO 
o 05,10 ^-^-^l^|^^ «o t-,"* t^ 
ifJ'^«oco'"T«''co'~coco'"'j<'eo 



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(jf co'"c(3 (tT T-T (N CO CO co' PS 



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OOOT^COODCOt^OCDOO 

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COOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

(XOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOO 



106 



COST OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS FOR SEVEN YEARS. 



Date. 



> . 

• >5 



1883 2,990 

1884 3,0o5 

1885 2,?60 

1886 j 1?,810 

1887 2,925 

1888 2,990 

1889 I 3,047 



o 

o 



$53,505.70 


$17.89 


$20,055,986 


$332,741 


53,477.10 


17.80 


20,613,032 


360,732 


53,133.11 


18.58 


21,137,404 


345,200 


56,440.42 


20.08 


21,379,384 


347,268 


58,679.26 


20.06 


•21,905,476 


373,139 


59,684.02 


19.96 


22,162,928 


43-2,914 


^69,566.80 


19.55 


22,962,790 


437,093 



$.0026 
.0026 
.0025 
.0026 
.0026 
.0026 
.0020 



VIII. — SCHOOL YEAR. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened December 31, 
closed March 22. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 15, closed 
June 28. Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 16, 
closed December 20. Vacation of two weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above 
by the school board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 176. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of " Teachers' Institutes,"' 
and half-days on account of bad wcatlier or insufficient heat.) 



TX.— HIGH SCHOOL CJKADr.VTlXG CLASS. 



Maud Percy Abbott. 
Ethel Blanche Aldrich. 
Rena Estelle Barr. 
Fred Drown Bartlett. 



Herbert George Hatch. 
Mary Elizabeth Hanson. 
Susie Sheldon Ilawley. 
Jennie Florence Hddo-kinf 



Pupils of both day and evening scliools included. 



(M) 



107 



May Lizzie Buck. 

Lewis Judson Bullard. 
George Sessions Brooks. 
Gertrude Alcna Burns. 
James Osgood Carr. 
Fred Melvin Caswell. 
John Bernard Cavanaugh. 



Samuel Parker Hunt. 
Lenna-Bernice McCoy. 
Harry Newell McLaren. 
William John Mooar. 
Kate Louise Perkins. 
Louis Gordon Phelps. 
George Henry Phinney. 
Charles Philbrick Chapman. Charles Marshall Poor. 



Georgia Ma}^ Cheney. 
Bessie Christophe. 
Marion Hill Clark. 
Norris Poore Colby. 
Lawrence M. Connor. 
Guy Wilbur Cox. 
Charles Harvey Cross. 
Dennis Andrew Dealy. 
Helen Maud Dearborn, 
Josie Eleanor Drake. 
George Byron Dodge. 
Mary Edith Everett. 
Katie Maria Gooden. 
Herbert James Hall. 
Edith May Hadley. 



Mabel E. Putney. 
Susan Alice Bichardson. 
Arthur William RowSll. 
Frederick Eaton Sargeant. 
Annie Maud Sleeper. 
Arthur Judson Smith. 
Gertrude Louise Southard. 
Lillian Charlotte Stearns. 
Eudora Ada Stevens. 
Alice May Stewart. 
Rosa C. Thayer. 
George Augustus Wagner. 
George K. Willand. 
Hattie Olive Willand. 
Frank Taylor Woodbury. 



Mary Guy Worthen. 



X. — WINNERS OF CLARKE PRIZES, 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, 
JANUARY 31, 1889. 

Jennie M. Thompson, $13. Estelle Smith, $5. 
George B. Tyler, $11. Moodybell S. Bennett, 

Blanche M. Folsom, $9. L. Corinne Gazaille, |5 
Seth E. Mills, $7. 

(N) 



108 
XL — OPvGAXIZATION', 1890. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

DAVID B. VARNEY, Mayor, ex officio Chairman. 
JOHX F. FROST. 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1. — Charles H. Manning. 

John L. Sanborn. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean. 
, William C. Clarke. 

Ward 3. — :N'athan P. Hunt. 
James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Frederick C. Crosby. 
Stephen B. Stearns. 
Ward 5. —John F. Ci]^hill. 

James P. Slattery. 
Ward 6. — Charles G. Dodge. 

Frank T. E. Richardson. 
Ward 7. — Edward B. Woodbury. 

Marshall P. Hall. 
Ward 8. — Luther C. Baldwin. 
William K. Bobbins. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

BENJAMIN C. DEAN. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

JAMES E. DODGE. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

(0) 



109 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. Stearns, Frost, J. E. 
Dodge, Slattery. 

Salaries. — Messi's. AN-^oodburj, Hall, Robbins. 

Repairs., Farnitare, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, 
C. G. Dodge, Sanborn. 

Text-books, Apparatus., and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, 
Hunt, W. 0. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, Eichardson. 

Music. — Messrs. Richardson, W. C. Clarke, Crosby. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. J. E. Dodge, the Maj^or, Messrs. 
Manning, Carpenter, C. G. Dodge. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, Stearns. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, Hall, Hunt, 
Stearns. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs, Dean, Hunt, W. C. 
Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Stearns, Woodbury, Rich- 
ardson. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. ■ — Messrs. Hall, Manning, 
Sanborn. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Woodbury, J. E. Dodge, San- 
born. 

Training School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, 
J. E. Dodge. 

West 3Icnichester Grammar. — Messrs. Baldwin, Stearns, 
C. G. Dodge. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Robbins, 
Slattery, Baldwin. 

Webster Street, Blodget Street, Amoskeag, and Stark Dis- 
trict. — Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Robbins, Slattery. 



110 

Bakersville. — Messrs. C. G. Dodge, Hall, Woodbury. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Crosby, C. '^G. 
Dodge, Caliill. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster's 3Ms. — Messrs. Caliill, 
Robbins, Slattery. 

Gof'e's Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. J. E. 
Dodge, Baldwin, Crosby. 

Ecening Schools. — Messrs. Richardson, Manning, AV. 
C. Clarke. 

XII. — LIST OF TEACHERS. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. — Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. — George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. — Lucretia E. Manaliaii. 

Mary A. Buzzell. 

Rocilla M. Tuson. 

Mary Stanton. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Charles "VV. Bickford. 
Assistants. — Annie 0. Heath. 

Jennie M. Chandler. 

Carrie E. l\eid. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — ('. Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle — llattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. — Nellie M. dames. 
Lower l*rimary. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

(Q) 



Ill 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — 3Iirc(l Grades. 

Principal. — Li/zic P. Gove. 

Higher Middle. — Eninui L. McLaren. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. — Fannie D, Moulton. 
Higher Primary. — Xellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary.. — Lucia E. Estey. 
Lower Primary. — Alice E. Page. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutclifie. 
Assistants. — Annie W. Patten. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Grammar and Middle. — Nettie F. Ainswortli. 
Higher Middle. — Susie G. Woodman. 
Lower Middle. — Cora B. Gilford. 
Higher Primary. — Theodora Richardson. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Granunar Grades. 

Principal. — Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. — Jennie L. Thompson. 

Mary E. Bun ton. 

Bertha L. Dean. 

(R) 



112 

First Floor. — Loirer Graifrs. 

Higher Middle. — Nancy S. Buntoii. 
Lower Middle. — Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. — Mary F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — George Winch. 
Assistants. — Lillian Little. 

Grace W. Irwin. 

Barbara B. Joy. 

First Floor. — Lotcer Grades. 

Higher Middle. — Flora M. Senter. 
Mixed Middle. —Ellen E. McKean. 
Lower Middle. — Josephine IL Newton. 
Lower Middle. — Nettie C. Woodman. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — B. S. Andrews. 
Assistants. — Mabel J. Brickett. 
Alta C. Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed MiddK-. — EvaF. Tuson. 
Mixed Primary. — Lettie M. Smith. 

BAKERSVILLE SCilOOLS. 

Second Floor. — 31i.red Grad(S. 

Princiital. — Lizzie A. Burns. 
Mixed Middle. — Lelia A. Brooks. 



113 

First Floor. — Lotoer Grades. 

Higher Primary. — S. Izettu LocIvg. 
Lower Prirnary. — Edith M. Stebbins. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 
Higlier Primary. — Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. — Georgian na Dow. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER CHESTNUT.) 

Second Floor. 
Used for evening schools. 

First Floor. 

Mixed Primary. — Helen M. Morrill. 

MERRIMACK-STREET SCHOOLS (CORNER UNION). 

Training School. 

Principal. — Caroline E. Wing. 

A Lower Middle School, a Higher and two Lower Pri- 
mary Schools, embracing first four years of school work. 
Principal is assisted by members of Training class. 

WILSON HILL. 

Lower Primary. — Huldah C. Graupner. 
Lower Primary. — Ella Hope. 

(T) 



114 

SCirOOL-STRKKT SCHOOLS. 

Second Floor. 

Higher Primary. — Mary W. Mitchell. 
Lower Priiuary. — Mary J. Walsh. 

First lloor. 

Lower Primary. — Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. — Mary E. Bro})hy. 

SOUTII-.MAIX-STREET SCHOOLS. 

Higher Primary. — Delia E. Haines, 
Lower Primary. — Sarah B. Paige. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. — Nettie B. Fogg, Principal. 

Mary G. Tynan, Primary Department. 
Hallsville — Ella E. Barker, Principal. 

Nellie M. Atwood, Assistant. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

No. 1, Stark District. — Inez M. Warren. 

2, Goffers Falls. — Gcorgic A. Nnte. 

3, Harvey District. — 

4, Youngsville. — 

5, Wel)ster's Mills. — Genevieve B. Knight. 
G, Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Kowe. 

SPECIAL TEACMIERS. 

Music. 1. .1. Kimhail. 

Elocution. — .1. .1. Hayes. 



115 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

{Open from October to March, five evenings each week.) 

Lowell-street Building. 

Three schools for boys. 

Spring-street Building. 

% Two schools for girls. 

Clinton-street Building. 

A school for boys. 

School-street Building. 

A school for girls. 

Gofe's Falls. 

A school for both sexes. 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

(Open from October to March.) 
Spring-street Building. 

Machine-drawing classes meet on Monday and Thursday 

evenings. 

Architectural-drawing classes meet on Tuesday and Fri- 
day evenings. 

GRADUATES OF TRAINING SCHOOL FEBROARY 1, 1890, NOT 
AT GIVEN DATE EMPLOYED AS REGULAR TEACHERS. 

Abbie R. West. Annie B. Goodwin. 

Emma B. Abbott. Millie S. Morse. 

Alverta P. Barrett. Emma M. Streeter. 

Maude L. Kent. Bertha A. Young. 

(V) 



116 

MEMBERS OF TRAINING SCHOOL, 1890. — ENTERED JANUARY 

28, 1889. 
Mary E. Moulton. 

ENTERED SEPTEMBER 16, 1889. 

Gertrude A. Burns. Annie M. Sleeper. 

Georgia M. Cheney. Gertrude L. Southard. 

Mary G. "Worthen. 

ENTERED FEBRUARY 3, 1890. 

Mary A. Clement. 

OTHERS, NOT HERE EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, WHO HAVE 
CERTIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION. 

Maud Bell, Fanny L. Perry, Fannie E. Smith, Martha 
T. Learnard, Lizzie M. McAffee, Ilattie J. Hoyt, Eleanor 
H. Kirk, Evelina Davis, Wilham S. Harris, Cora F. San- 
born, Carrie L. Barker, Georgie F. Drake, and Lucie 
Thompson. All certificated for Grammar and lower 
grades. 

Fannie L. Sanborn, Helen W. Poor, Belle F. Small, 
Hattie M. Ellis, Hattic E. Merrill, Alithea M. Hutchins, 
Amy B. Smith. Certificated for Middle and Primary 
grades. 

JANITORS. 

Webster Street and Bhih/cf Street. 
Michael Finley, Pearl, near Cla'stiiut. 

Jlff/h School, Ash Street, (Utd Wilson Hill. 
John S. Avery, 404 Merrimack. 

(W) 



117 

Franklin Street and Lincoln Street. 
William Stevens, 418 Central. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. 
William H. Morrill, 45 Peunacook. 

Merrimack Street and Spruce Street. 
Edward P. Cogswell, 218 Central. 

Piscataquog Schools (Main Street, School Street, and South 
Main Street). 

Samuel A. Hill, 86 School Street, W. M. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey, Bakersville. 

XIII. — School Year, 1890. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 6, closes 
March 28. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 14, closes 
June 27. Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 8, closes 
December 12. Vacation of two weeks. 



(X) 



REPORT 



CITY SOLICITOR 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To His Honor the 3Iayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : 

The City Solicitor respectfully submits the following 
report for the year ending December 31, 1889 : 

Of the cases pending upon the law docket of Hillsbor- 
ough county at the beginning of the year the following, 
Nancy 0. Savory vs. Manchester^ Arthur L. Clark vs. Man- 
chester, Henry Lang Y^. Manchester, and Elizabeth W. 3Iiller 
vs. 31anchester, were settled without trial, and in a manner 
beneficial to the city. In the Lang and Clark cases the 
owners of the buildings, bj^ whose neglect the defects 
which caused the accidents existed, ver}^ materially con- 
tributed toward the settlements, and the city was saved 
from trying cases in which it had no defense, and from 
the necessity of collecting by suit the amount of the ver- 
dicts in such cases from the owners, who claimed that no 
negligence on their part could be shown. John G. Kelsea 
vs. Manchester was tried by jury at the March term, and 
the verdict was in favor of the city. 

The cases of 31ary Kildea vs. Manchester, Clara Moore vs. 
Manchester, and Emeline C. Call vs. Manchester, still stand 
upon the docket, and will have to be disposed of by trial 
or otherwise at the next March term. Also the case of 
Sarah B. Bean vs. Manchester was transferred from Merri- 
mack count}^ to Hillsborough county, and stands in 
order for some disposition at the coming term. 



122 

The petition of Fred P. Danforth on the equity docket, 
was settled satisfactorily by paying him a small sum for 
damages done his land by the city, and in consideration 
of a release of all claim for future damages. 

The two cases upon the sessions docket at the begin- 
ning of the year, viz. : The petition of the P. C. Cheney 
Co. and others, and the petition of Luther Ilall, still stand 
there. On the Cheney petition for a new highway in 
West Manchester several long hearings have been had 
by the county commissioners, and the hearing is to pro- 
ceed again February 18. In the case of Manchester vs. 
Western Union Telegraph Company, negotiations are pend- 
ing which may result in an amicable arrangement of 
the suit. 

During the year the following new cases have been 
entered in the Supreme Court for Hillsborough county 
and are now pending : 

Florence O'Leary cs. Manchester. 

This is a suit for damages for injuries resulting in a 
broken leg, caused by slipping on the ice on Granite 
street, February 15, 1888. 

Augusta A. Currin cs. Manchester. 

A case for damages for injuries caused by being thrown 
from a sleigh on Main street in West Manchester, Febru- 
ary 5, 1889, by a collision with a city sled which was out 
for sanding purposes. 

Maria Colby vs. Manchester, and Thaddeus 8. Colby 
vs. Manchester, 

Are two cases for damages for injuries to Mr. Colby and 
his wife by being thrown from their carriage on Man- 
chester street, September 2!), 1888, by their horse becom- 
ing frightened at the steam road-roller. 



123 

Margaret Kelley vs. Manchester, 

Is a suit for damages for injuries alleged to Lave been 
occasioned by falling into an open bulkhead on Central 
street, May 4, 1888. The owner of the building has been 
summoned to appear and defend the case, and agrees to 
take care of the suit. 

^Worthley Brothers r^. Manchester, 

Is a suit for damages for injuries received by the plain- 
tiff's milk wagon and horse by driving off' the Hooksett 
road into a gulley in the night time, May 14, 1889, it be- 
ing alleged that the railing was not suitable. 

Caroline S. Head and others r.?. Manchester, 

Is a suit for damages for alleged injuries to the plaintifl"'s 
land caused by water flowing on to it from Mast street in 
West Manchester. 

Margaret Flynn vs. Manchester, 

A suit for damages for injuries received by falling on 
the ice on Pine street, January 1, 1888, was entered 
at the March term. Owing to the fact that no legal no- 
tice had been served upon the city within ten days after 
the accident, and the six months in which to petition the 
court for leave to file a claim having expired, the solici- 
tor was able to get it dismissed the same term. 

To the sessions docket the petitions of Jacob B. Mooar 
and Rebecca C. Newton were added during the year, be- 
ing both claims for damage to real estate caused by 
changing the grade of streets. 

In addition to looking after the foregoing suits, the 
solicitor has investigated and with the consent of the 
Mayor settled numerous claims for damages for accidents 



124 

ill which it appeared there was some fault on the part of 
the city. He has investigated all claims and accidents 
which have come to his knowledge ; he has attended 
every meeting of the Committee on Claims and has ad- 
vised the Mayor and other city officials when consulted 
by them, as he is every day, to the best of his ability. He 
has attended police court when called by the city marshal, 
and given more time and attention to the multifarious du- 
ties of the office than any year since he has held the posi- 
tion. The duties increase every year. To the perform- 
ance of them the solicitor has brouglit his best efforts, 
and has the satisfaction which earnest, conscientious work 
always brings, that, even if all do not approve his course, 
he may feel that he has done his best. To you all, for the 
indorsement wdiich a re-election gives his labors, and es- 
pecially to his Honor the Mayor, for his courtesy and 
considerate action during the year, and to the Committee 
on Claims, with whom he is most often brought in con- 
tact, the solicitor returns his hearty thanks. He would 
also express his appreciation of the kind and fair treat- 
ment of the cit}^ marshal and every other cit}- officer with 
wdiom he has had official dealings. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIX F. JONES, 

Solir'dor. 
Manchester, N. H., Feb. 1, 1890. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor^ Aldetmen, and Common Council of the City 

of Manchester : 

In compliance with the ordinances of said cit}', the 
Overseers of the Poor herewith present their annual re- 
port for the year 1889. 

The whole number of families that have received more 
or less assistance oii' the farm during the year has been 
one hundred and thirty, consisting of three hundred and 
seventy persons, all of whom have a settlement in this 
city. Six of this number died during the year. 

The whole number of persons supported at the State 
Industrial School during the year has been six, at a cost 
of one dollar and fifty cents per week for each person. 
The whole number of persons supported at the count}" 
farm during the year has been six, at a cost of two dol- 
lars per week for each adult and one dollar per week for 
each child, for board, clothing, and care for each person. 
The Overseers of the Poor have given and allowed eiffht 
hundred and nine orders for support of paupers oti" the 
farm during the year, chiefly for groceries, fuel, medi- 
cine, board, clothing, and in emergency cases. The Legis- 
lature of 1889 having amended chapter 80, Laws of 1883, 
in relation to the settlement of paupers, reducing the 
pauper settlement to 1880, the appropriation for pau- 
pers off the farm for 1890 need not be more than 
two thousand dollars; also, the Legislature of 1889 has 
amended section 2, chapter 41 of the Laws of 1885, in 
relation to the relief of poor persons who have served in 



128 



the army or navy of the United States (luring the Re- 
bellion, and their dependent families. It will be neces- 
sary to make a separate appropriation for that purpose for 
the year 1890, amounting to one thousand dollars, under 
the head of indigent soldiers and their dependent families. 
The amount allowed to the several wards is as follows : 



Ward 1 








$14.00 




Ward 2 








249.75 




Ward 3 








930.48 




Ward 4 








497.79 




Ward 5 








1,759.63 




Ward 6 








484.24 




Ward 7 








184.05 




Ward 8 








389.78 










$4,509.72 






Bills allowed for 


emergency cases . 




3,026.99 


Total amount allowed 




$7,536.71 


Cash received 


. 


• 


1,736.71 



Total cost for the year . . . $5,800.00 

Out of this amount $1,679.05 has been allowed for in- 
digent soldiers and their dependent families. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward 1, Clerk. 
THOMAS L. QUIMBY, AVard 2, 
JAMES SUTCLIFFE, Ward 3, 
GEORGE S. HOLMES, Ward 4, 
THOMAS IL MAHONEY, Ward 5, 
CHARLES FRANCIS, Ward 6, 
DAVID W. ANDERSON, Ward 7, 
HORATIO FRADD, Ward 8, 
Overseers of tlic Poor for the Citij of Mancliester. 

r.\ (liiection of the Board of Overseers of the Poor. 
WM. H. MAXWELL, Clerk 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM, 



f 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils: 

We hereby submit to yon our annual report on the City 
Farm for the year ending December 31, 1889: 

At the time of our appraisal, December 19, we find the 
following property at the farm : 

Live stock 



Wagons, carts, and team furnishings 


<ipx,uu 1 .vu 

828.50 


Farming implements .... 


. 1,237.72 


Hay, grain, and produce 


. 3,282.26 


Household furniture .... 


. 1,959.51 


Provisions and fuel .... 


975,33 


Total 


. ^9,950.32 


Against a total in January, 1889, of 


. 7,421.18 


Which makes a gain of 


. $2,529.14 


Statement of accounts for 1889 : 




Total cash paid out 


. $7,333.51 


Interest ....... 


. 1,000.00 



^,333.51 



182 



Total receipts of the farm 



Bills receivable 



Permanent improvements 



Gain in stock 



§1,897.32 

$6,436.19 
123.00 

$6,313.19 
275.46 

$6,037.73 
2,529.14 



$3,508.59 
Total number of weeks' board of pani)ers and pris- 
oners, 2,345f . 

Average cost of board for each individual per week, 
$l,49f. 

Total cash paid city treasurer, $1,829.86. 

The increase of stock is owing mostly to the large 
amount of hay, grain, and produce now found on hand. 
This is seen on passing througli the barn and cellars, 
which seem to be tilled to their utmost. 

We find eighty-four tons of good English hay and twenty- 
eight tons of corn-fodder, oat straw, and second-crop hay, 
and eight tons of meadow hay, which was stacked in the 
Held on account of no storage room in the barn. 



Corn .... 


425 


bushels 


Potatoes 


275 




Kuta-baga turnips . 


225 




Mangold beets 


225 




Sugar beets . 


84 




Blood beets . 


42 




Carrots .... 


85 




English turnips 


40 




Pea boa) IS 


IS 





133 

Apples 40 barrels. 

Cabbage 3,500 pounds. 

Salt pork 1,200 

And other things in small quantities, too numerous to 
mention. 

There has been quite an improvement in live stock 
during the year. Four nice four-year-old grade cows, 
which took both the first and second premiums at the 
State Fair, have been added to the herd in place of four 
old ones which were disposed of last spring. A nice 
pair of oxen has also been purchased, which took the 
second premium. The fine registered Holstein bull, 
which was so much admired by all and took the prize at 
the State Fair, had to be killed on account of being dan- 
gerously cross. 

Superintendent Streeter was credited with a good ex- 
hibit at the State Fair, receiving twelve cash premiums, 
amounting to $29. Among them was his Canada field 
corn, which yielded 110 bushels of ears per acre. 

During the season there have been $130 worth of pigs 
sold from the farm, and $58.17 worth of pork and lard, 
making a total of $188.17. There yet remain fifty-three 
hogs and pigs on the farm. 

Besides the permanent improvements of $275.46, there 
have been repairs made at an expense of $451.35 which 
have heretofore been counted as permanent improve- 
ments, but your committee thought it better to count 
them as repairs and credit nothing for improvements ex- 
cept new work. For instance, one side of the barn has 
been shingled at an expense of $162.16, which was counted 
as repairs. The report of 1880 shows the expense of 
shingling the barn as permanent improvements, also all 
other like repairs, and if your committee had reckoned 
in the $451.35, which was paid out for like repairs, it 



134 

would have brought the board for each individual down 
to |1.30fV per week in place of $1.49^. 

The following are some of the most important repairs: 

One side of the barn has been shingled ; several new 
flooring timbers put in ; new posts put under the 
floor ; a doorway cut through the underpinning walls be- 
tween the large barn and horse-barn, and a walk built 
which connects the two cellars, making them more conven- 
ient. The cow-stable floor has been newly planked, and 
chain tie-ups put in in place of the old stanchions. The 
old loft-floor in the large barn, which consisted of poles 
and loose boards, has been removed, and a new, substan- 
tial floor built in its place. ISTew galvanized iron eaves- 
troughs have been put up on the south and east sides of the 
barns, which conduct the water outside of the barnyard. 
Heretofore much of the water from the roof has run 
into the barn cellar. The silo cellar has been partitioned 
off' into large bins with a walk through the center, with 
large shelves built for storing apples and cabbage. 

The two piazzas of the house have been painted ; 
the rooms and halls on the flrst two floors of the wing 
part of the house, consisting of eighteen rooms, have 
been painted and whitewashed throughout, also the walls 
o the halls on the first floor and the walls of five of the 
rooms have been painted, which makes tliem more easily 
kept clean. A new clothes-closet has been built in one 
of tlic halls for the convenience of the hired men. 
There have been new flooring timbers i)ut in, and a new 
floor built in the reservoir house at the top of Lowell- 
street hill, and the windmill repaired at i[\\\tv an expense. 

Five and one half acres of the old pasture have been 
cleared from stone and broken up ready for cultivation 
next year. Two acres of the meadow land have been 
cleared from bushes by })ulling tlR'ni u[t. Eighteen 



135 

acres of land have been seeded to grass this season, and 
twenty-five acres plowed during the tall. 

The old butternut trees north of the house have been 
grubbed out, and the bushes cut beside the road south 
of the buildings and around the walls of the fields, and 
fifty-eight days' work have been done cutting bushes on 
the grounds of the new park. 

Two deaths occurred at the farm during the year : 
Nicholas Fitzgerald died March 9, 1889 ; Jesse Kim- 
ball died June 26, 1889. 

CONCllUSIONS. 

Your committee have visited the farm as often during 
the year as they deemed it necessary to do so, and have 
noted with satisfaction the management of Superintend- 
ent L. M. Streeter, and we do not hesitate to testify to his 
efficiency for the position he occupies, and we believe the 
afiairs of the farm have been honestly, economically, and 
successfully administered. 

We cannot close without speaking a word of praise for 
the matron of the farm, whose position is one equally re- 
sponsible with that of the superintendent, and we have 
found Mrs. Streeter equal to every requirement of the 
position. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES F. BALDWIN, 
WILLIAM B. FARMER, 
IRVING L. CAMPBELL, 
THOMAS P. RILEY, 
GEORGE C. CHASE, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



REPORTS 



COMMITTEE ON CEMETERIES. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of the Valley Cemetery respectfully 
submit the following report for the year 1889 : 

During the year several improvements have been made. 
The old tomb has been removed and the lot graded. The 
avenue starting from the Chestnut-street entrance has 
been widened, and a stone gutter made on each side to 
carry off the surface water. A cesspool has been placed 
at the end of the gutters, and pipe laid to the brook. 

jSTear the new tomb two cesspools have been placed, and 
about eighty feet of eight-inch pipe laid from them to the 
brook. The avenue east of the tomb has been graded 
and graveled, and stone gutters made. Both banks east 
of the tomb have been graded and sowed down. A sum- 
mer-house has been erected in the valley, which seems to 
be appreciated, being both convenient and ornamental. 

The stone bottom and edges of the brook have been 
extended about five hundred feet and the banks graded 
the same distance. A great addition to the appearance 
of the cemetery is the magnificent tomb erected this year 
by Hon. Aretas Blood, it being one of the finest tombs 
in this section of the country. Several very handsome 



140 



monuments have been erected. The superintendent, Mr. 
C. H. G. Foss, has shown his usual ability and good 
taste, and deserves more than passing mention for the 
faithful performance of his duties. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance, January 1, 1889 
Appropriation 

Receipts, care and water for lots 
graves and removals 
tomb fees 

for extending water 
for materials sold . 
materials and labor 

Received by city treasurer 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid C. II. G. Foss, superintendent 
C. W. Xoyes, labor 
James Barrett, labor 
C. II. Griffin, labor 
J. Bilodeau 
Joseph Hazen 

F. L. Mead ... 
J. W. Kimball, loam, gravel, 
Campbell & Williams, printin 
District No. 2, sand, etc. 

G. 0. Gil more 

Marshall & Undci'lilll, loam 
G. B. McManaiiiiin, trees and 



$18.U4 
1,500.00 

$650.00 
180.50 
89.25 
39.33 
24.00 
21»).92 
49.50 



ston 



, etc 



lii'Uhs 



$1,518:83 



^1,249.50 
S2.7l38.33 



S705.25 

261.00 

246.49 

300.75 

146.67 

9.67 

6.00 

209.60 

5.00 

66.12 

10.00 

6.00 

26.00 



141 



T. A. Lane, pipe and labor . 




$95.92 


Palmer & Garmon, stonework 




25.65 


B. W. Robinson, brickwork . 




15.75 


Hig^ins Brothers, furniture . 




12.00 


Pike & Heald, pipe and labor 




24.16 


R. W. Lamprey, tree 




1.50 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 




3.70 


J. Hodge, lumber . 




2.20 


J. B. Yarick Co., hardware and phosphate 


47.81 


Flint & Little, lumber and labor 




176.65 


P. 0. Woodman, loam . 




9.00 


George Whitford, loam and team 


. 


53.15 


F. X. Chenette, team, etc. 




16.35 


J. Francis, plants and labor . 




73.27 


Water commissioners 




36.60 


C. C. Webster, turf 




11.67 


F. L. Bodwell, stone 




3.00 


Lowell's Foundry . 




29.08 


Manchester Hardware Company 




5.50 


"J. J. Abbott, painting . 




43.26 


Sundry small bills . 




13.11 




$2,697.88 


Balance on hand December 31, 1889 




70.45 




$2,768.33 


NEW TOMB. 






Appropriation .... 


. 


. $1,500.00 


Paid Manchester Locomotive Works 


$385.1^ 




Lowell Foundry 


18.6( 




Killey & Wadleigh . 


2.6^ 




Palmer & Garmon . 


27.1^ 




J. J. Abbott .... 


1.2. 




J. W. Kimball 


6.2^ 





142 



T. A. Lane . 


$26.11 


B. W. Robinson 


3.75 


Flint & Little . 


35.67 


F. L. Bodwell 


495.00 


Dickey & Eastman . 


16.68 


Pettee & Adams 


27.50 


For labor 


54.84 



§1,100.61 
S399.39 



Balance, January 1, 1890 . 

FRANK A. LANE, 
WALTER H. WRIGHT, 
GEORGE C. GILMORE, 
BUSHROD W. HILL, 
JOHN M. KENDALL, 
Sub- Trustees of Valley Cemetery 



PLNE GROVE CEMETERY. 

It is with renewed pleasure that the Sub-Trustees can 
present to the public a report showing the continued 
prosperity of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Some improvements have been made during the past 
year, but there are still others which the growing needs 
of the cemetery demand. 

A detailed statement may better show the work that 
has been in progress durini; the vcar. 



AVENUES. 



No new avenues have been laid out, but all tlie avenues 
have been top-dressed and jtut in g(^od condition, which 
has taken much time and labor. 



H3 



NEW LOTS. 



The new lots which were being laid ont last year have 
been completed and graded, and the whole made into 
restricted lots, for which there is a constantly increasing 
demand. 



GENERAL IMPROVEMENTS. 

During the year much has been done for the general 
improvement of the cemetery. Trees and stumps which 
were out of place and unsightly have been removed, the 
underbrush has been nearly all cut, and the water-gutters 
have been paved 282 feet, which must certainly be con- 
sidered an improvement. 

WATER-WORKS. 

Twenty-two hydrants have been put in during the year, 
also 1,305 feet of water-pipe, mostly on the east side of 
the cemetery, so that now the lots in this section are all 
provided with city water, and all can be supplied by mak- 
ing their wants known to the superintendent. The in- 
crease in the amount received for water shows how the 
public appreciates the advantages from these increased 
water facilities. 

SEWAGE. 

One hundred and eighty-live feet of sewer pipe were 
laid on the east side of the cemetery where the new lots 
were completed. This section is now thoroughly drained, 
and no further complaints are made of standing water. 

IRON FENCE. 

Gradually the grounds are becoming inclosed with a 
suitable fence. This year two hundred and eight feet of 



144 

new fence have been placed on the northeast side of the 
cemetery, on the Calef road. It is the desire of the sub- 
trustees that this work may be extended, and sufficient 
appro})riation be made, that soon the entire grounds may 
be suitably inclosed. 

LOAM AND MUCK. 

There were five hundred and twenty loads of loam used 
during the year to help put the grounds in better condi- 
tion. The sward and beds for flowers and shrubs require 
an abundance of rich soil. Five hundred loads of muck 
which have been taken from the "Straw lot " will help 
to carry on this work the coming spring, but this will all 
be needed in the southwest part of the grounds. There 
is a large expenditure needed for these indispensable 
articles. 

Besides the amount of loam above specified, four hun- 
dred loads of gravel and one thousand three hundred and 
fifty-six feet of turf have been used for the improvement 
of the grounds. Plants, trees, and shrubs have been set 
out to help beautify and adorn the cemetery. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

Owing to charges made against the superintendent 
early in the season, with which the public are familiar, 
the sub-trustees have been especially observant during 
the past season to see that the rights of lot owners were 
respected, and that all visitors were courteously treated, 
and are })leased to be able to report that no complaints 
have been made where the superiiiteiidciit was to blame, 
but have generally originated where lot-owners have been 
reminded of the restrictions on their lots, and the sub- 
trustees are satisfied that he has faithfully discharged his 
duties as sui)erintendeiit of the Pine Grove (\unetery. 



145 



Altogether, we feel that the work of the year has been 
well and faithfully done, and a great gain has been made 
in the permanent improvement of this lovely and sacred 
spot. 

The sub-trustees present this report with the firm con- 
viction that the Pine Grove Cemetery is in quite as pros- 
perous a condition as ever, and those who take the most 
interest in it are more hopeful than ever of the consum- 
mation of its grand possibilities. 

GEORGE W. BACON", 
H. P. HUi^TER, 
J. L. STEVENS, 
HENRY H. HUSE, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
Sub-Trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 



To their report the sub-trustees append the following 
statistical tables, which they have prepared with the hope 
that the information may be gratifying to the lot-owners 
and the^friends of the Pine Grove Cemetery : 



Supeeintendent's Account. 



Received for advance payments on lots sold. 

" " interments 

" " water and care of lots 

" " grading lots 

" " loam sold 

" " old fence sjld ■. 

" " wood and timber ... 

" " extra labor on lots 

" " removal of bodies 



Total receipts . 
Deduct minor expenses. 



flikid city treasurer. 



10 



1889. 



$495.00 
384.00 
481.00 
384.98 
59.00 
(i.34 



65.00 



$1,875.32 
1.84 

$1,873.48 



1888. 



$626.00 
436.00 
395.93 
422.26 



272.53 
21.05 
91.00 ' 



$2,264.77 
3.70 

$2,261.07 



146 



HiSGBLLANRODS. 



Number of lots re-graded. 

" inonumenta erected 

Lots sold oil Hillside Lawn 

" unsold on " " 

" sold, witli lawn restrictions 

" with lawn restrictions, unsold 

Ordinary lots sold 

" " unsold 

Total number of lota sold 

Number of interments 

" " on public grounds 

Whole number buried in public grounds. 




I8S8. 



24 


25 


21 


20 


9 


17 


44 


63 


38 


64 


44 


50 


16 


13 


17 


17 


C3 


84 


199 


2 2 


47 


49 


,0C2 


1,015 



Receipts. 


1889. 1888. 




$3,533.21 ' $2,819.24 




1,000.00 1,000.00 
495.00 626.00 






1,344.53 2,040.40 




.96 




1,378.48 1,035.77 






Totals 


*7,752.18 $8,120.79 






$7,752.18 1 $8,124.49 





Current Expenses. 



Salary of superintendent 

Labor and teaming 

Material and tools 

Printing and stationer)- 

Flowers and shrubs 

Water-rates 

Telephone 

Coal 

Paint-for iron fence and castings. 

Totals 



1889. 



1888. 



$730.00 


$730.00 


3,485.88 


1,751.08 


234.58 


132.40 


45.93 


20.06 


64.80 


36.40 


300.00 


300.00 


49. SO 


53.50 


24.75 




19.53 








$4,954.97 


$4,024.64 



147 



Permanent Improvements. 



1889. 



Water extension 

Sewage extension 

Storehouse 

Furnishing house. ....... 

Loam and turf 

Clay 

Iron fence 

Castings for gates 

Granite posts for bounds. 



Totals. 



$509.11 
104.84 



680.12 

453.00 

462.00 

13.30 

26.25 



$2,248.62 



$122.93 



16G.10 

55.43 

218.48 



$562.94 



SUMMARY. 

Balance, Jan. 1, 1889, and appro- 
priation $4,533.21 

Receipts from cemetery during the 

year 3,218.97 



Total receipts . . . $7,752.18 

Expenditures for the year 1889 . $7,203.59 
Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1889 . 548.59 



Total 



^752.18 



REPORT 

OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund 
have the honor to present herewith their tenth annual re- 
port, embracing the report of their treasurer, which shows 
the financial operations for the year ending December 31, 
1889, and the condition of the fund at the present time. 

The trustees have little to say in addition to what is em- 
braced in former reports. The grounds placed in their 
charge have been cared for and improved to as great an 
extent as the meager means at their command would 
warrant. If the proprietors of lots desire their grounds 
beautified and adorned to a greater degree, it is essential 
that larger endowments be made, so as to make the re- 
quired improvements possible. With increased means, 
which are confidently hoped for, and the accumulations of 
the present funds, it is believed that more satisfactory re- 
sults may be attained. 

liespectfullv submitted. 

D. B. VAKXEY, Mayor, 
P. C. CHENEY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 

Trustees of Ccnutcry Fund. 
January 1, 1890. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery land : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the seventh 
annual report of the funds received and the expenses paid 
to December 31, 1889. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand as per last report . . $2,550.00 

Received during the year from : 

Mrs. Lydia A. Sleeper . . 100.00 

Mrs. Louise Hunton . . . 100.00 

Adaline Hartshorn . . . 100.00 

Nathan Parker .... 300.00 

Mrs. Nellie W. Moore . . 100.00 

Total permanent fund . $3,250.00 

Income on hand as per last report $171.45 
Received since last report . . 128.75 

Total income . . . $800.20 

Expenses paid as follows : 
Valley cemetery, care of lots . $68.20 

Cash on hand .... 231.91 

Total $800.20 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand as per last report . . $6,723.13 



150 



Received during the year from 
Henry A. Farrington 
Mrs. B. F. Blaisdell . 
Hosea B. Burnham . 
G. A. Olzendam 
Benjamii) F. Garland 
Abbie E. Wilson 
Mary S. Brown 

Total permanent fund 

Income on hand as per last report 
Received since last report 
Total income 



S125.13 
160.00 
136.64 
84.27 
130.50 
158.15 
145.00 

$288.73 
340.00 



Expenses paid as 


foil 


ows : 




Thomas Johnson . 






$7.50 


S. A. Blood . 




. 


17.00 


"William Barrett . 






1.20 


J. B. Varick Co. . 






33.50 


James Bros. . 






28.00 


Pine Grove cemetery, 


care of lots 


175.00 


Edward Currier . 






3.00 


Cash on hand 






363.53 


Total . 









$7,662.82 



8628.73 



$628.73 



PISCATAQUOG CEiMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on 

hand as per last report . . $200.00 

Total permanent fund . $200.00 

Income on hand as per last report $20.00 
Received since last report . . 10.00 

Total income . . . $30.00 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 
Treasurer of D'ustees of Cemetery/ Fund. 



151 

This is to certify that I have examined the books ot 
accounts of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees 
of the cemetery fund, embracing the receipts and expen- 
ditures for the year ending December 31, 1889, and that 
I find the same correct and properly vouched. 

I have also examined the securities in which said fund 
is invested, and find as follows : 

* VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

K H., 5 per cent . . . $3,250.00 

Amount of permanent fund $3,250.00 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

N. H., 5 per cent . . . $7,650.00 

Cash 12.82 

Amount of permanent fund $7,662.82 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, 

K. H., 5 per cent . . . $200.00 

Amount of permanent fund $200.00 

NATHAN P. KIDDER, 

A uditor. 



i 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



City Engineer's Department. 

1889. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFKED H. BENNETT. 



ASSISTANTS. 



IIarkie M. Young, 

George W. Wales, 



John J. McDonough. 



temporary assistants. 

Harry J. Briggs, 

Charles W. Bickford, 

Edward II. Doherty. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 

Councils : 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my fourth an- 
nual report, being the eleventh annual report of the work 
in the City Engineer's otfice and the several highway dis- 
tricts of the city of Manchester, for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1889. 

Expenses of the office for the year 1889: 



salary of city engineer . . . 


$1,000.00 


salary of assistants ..... 


1,570.38 


supplies for the office .... 


153.03 


repairing ...... 


3.75 


additional horse-hire .... 


63.75 


stakes ....... 


36.21 


horse-shoeing and repairs of wagon and 




harness . . 


25.05 


horse-car fares ..... 


16.70 


street numbers ..... 


4.40 


printing reports ..... 


21.00 


repairs of office ..... 


32.43 


blue-print frame and sink 


27.64 


steel bars for testing ground . 


17.32 


Total 


12,971.66 


ropriation ...... 


2,700.00 


Amount overdrawn .... 


1271.66 



156 



Expenses for soldiers' monunient 

For water ..... 
gas . . . . . 

Total 



8100.00 
.42 

8100.42 



The amount of work done in the office during the year 
is as follows : 

Number of orders for surveys, street lines, and 

grades ......... 866 

Number of orders for sewer and paving grades . 65 

Number of orders for profile levels .... 29 



Total numl)or of orders 



960 



Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 13,045 feet, 
equal to 2.47 miles. 

These profiles, having three lines of levels 
on each street, make a total distance act- 
ually leveled of 39,135 feet. 

Levels for sewer profiles . . . . 7,110 

Levels for other center profiles . . . 27,727 

Levels in Pine Grove cemetery . . 6,367 

Levels in Valley cemetery . . . 200 

Levels for accidents . . . . . 900 

Other levels 20,888 



Total levels taken . 
Equal to 19.38 miles. 

Surveys of streets and street lines 
Surveys in Pine Grove cemetery 
Surveys in Valley cemeter}- 
Surveys for accidents 
Surveys of hind sold . 
Surveys for street nmiibers 



102,327 feet. 



119,464 feet 

46,205 

800 

1,600 

1,876 

15,617 



157 



Other surveys ...... 

Total surveys made 
Equal to 51.45 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground . 
Lines of lots and avejiues, Pine Grove 
cemetery ...... 

Lines of lots and avenues, Valley cemetery, 
Other lines ...... 

Total length of lines marked on 
ground . . . . . 

Equal to 12.72 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks . 

Grades set for centers 

Grades set for gutters 

Grades set for horse-railroad tracks 

Grades set in Pine Grove cemetery 

Grades set in Valley cemetery . 

Grades set for curb . . . 

Grades set for sewers 

Other grades .... 



86,105 feet. 



Total length of grades set 
Equal to 14.49 miles. 

Profile measurements made 
Equal to 15.2 miles. 

Area leveled for cross section . 
Equal to 32.6 acres. 

BATTERS SET. 



271,067 feet 


59,550 feet. 


4,208 


(4 


230 


ii 


3,200 


a 


67,188 feet 


27,113 feet 


1,327 




11,962 




490 




9,020 




269 




11,108 




14,024 




1,178 





76,491 feet. 
80,300 feet. 
1,420,042 sq. ft. 



Bowman street, schoolhouse. 
Chestnut-street culvert, at Christian's brook. 
Grove-street culvert, at Cemetery brook. 



158 

Hanover-square culvert. 

Main-street engine-house, sheds (twice). 

Valley cemeter}', summer-house. 

Old lots relaid in Valley cemetery . 
Old lots relaid in Pine Grove cemetery . 
JS'ew lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 

Total cemetery lots laid out . 

Street numbers assigned and put on 
Street numbers replaced .... 



3 
20 
13 



36 

115 
10 

125 



Total numbers put on . 

This year, as in previous years, the city engineer has 
investigated and made surveys in all cases where suits 
were liable to be brought against the city. Cases inves- 
tigated and reported to the Committee on Claims, 14. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Adams street, from Clarke street northerly. 

Arlington street, from Maple to east of Ashland street. 

Baker street, from River road to Xutt road. Two 
plans. 

Bowman street, from Mast to A street. 

Bridge street, from Walnut to Maple street. 

Cartier street, from Amor}' south back to Kelly street. 

Hancock street, from River road to C. R. R. 

Lake avenue, from Belmont street to Mammoth road. 
Three plans. 

Manchester street, from Milton to Beacon street. 

McGregor west back street, from Marion to Wayne 
street. 

Nashua street, from Bridge to Pearl street. 

North street, from Pine east back to Union street. 

Sagamore street, from Elm to Canal street. 



159 

Sagamore street, from Bay to Chestnut street. 
Spruce south back street, from Lincohi to Wilson 
street. 

Weston street, from Lake avenue to Massabesic street, 
Wilson street, from Lake avenue to Hanover street. 
Total plans and profiles, 20. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

ft 

Adams street, from Webster street to Ray brook. 

Amherst street, from Elm to Elm east back street. 

Amherst south back street, from Beach east back to 
Maple street. 

Arlington street, from Russell to east of Ashland street. 

Amory street, from Beauport to Dubuque street. 

Bay east back street, from Salmon to Webster street. 

Beauport street, from Conant to Sullivan street. 

Cartier street, from Amory south back to Kelly street. 

Cedar south back street, from Chestnut to Pine street. 

Conant street, from Main street westerly. 

Concord street, from Union to Union east back street. 

Dean street, from Elm to Canal street. 

Elm east back street, from Hanover to Concord street. 

Granite south back street, from Canal to Franklin 
street. 

Lake avenue, from Wilson street easterl}'. 

Lake avenue south back street, from Wilson street 
westerly. 

Lake avenue south back street, from Wilson to Massa- 
besic street. 

Manchester street, from Beech to Maple street. 

McGregor west back street, from Marion to Wayne 
street. 

Merrimack street, from Elm to Pine Street. 

Merrimack street, from Lincoln to Hall street. 



ItiO 

North street, from Pine east l>ack to Union street. 

Pearl south back street, from Elm east back to Chest- 
nut street. 

Pine street, from Cedar to Cedar south back street. 

Pine street, from Sagamore to Salmon south back 
street. 

Pine street, from Salmon to Salmon south back street. 

Sagamore street, from Chestnut to Pine street. 

Salmon south back street, from Pine street easterly. 

School street, from Third to Main street. 

Spruce street, from Lincoln to Massabesic street. 

Spruce south back street, from Lincoln to Wilson street. 

Union east back street, from Concord to Bridge street. 

Wilson street, from Spruce to Lake avenue south back 
street. 

Wilson street, from Lake avenue to ]jake avenue south 
back street. 

Wilson street, from Hanover to Spruce street. 

Total sewer plans and protiles, 35. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Beacon street, Hanover to Bridge street. Two plans. 

Brook street, Maple to Oak street. 

Dean street, Elm to Canal street. 

Depot street. Elm to Canal street. 

Elm avenue, Elm street to Calef road. 

Granite street, N. W. R. P. to Winter street. 

Oak street. Brook street nortlierly. 

Salmon street, Pine to Union street. 

Thayer street, Elm street to Piver road. 

Valley street. Elm to Wilson street. Five plan-. 

Welch avenue, Elm street to Calel" I'oail. 

Total niinil)eriiig jilaiis, 10. 



161 



MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 



Ashland street, Pearl to Myrtle street, plan of lots, 
copy. Two plans. 

B street, Milford to A street, proposed extension. 

Bowman and Mast streets, schoolhouse lot with cross- 
section and location of bnilding. Two plans. 

Candia road, plan of Proctor land, copy. 

Christians' brook. Elm to Pine street. 

Concord street and Wilson road, land of Samuel Bart- 
lett, copy. 

Goftstown, original laying out, copy. 

Hall street, land of George W. Morrison, copy. 

Hanover street, land of James P. Eaton, copy. 

Jewett street, land of Michael Prout, copy. 

John Hall farm, plan of lots, copy. 

Main-street engine-house, plan of sheds. 

Mammoth road, land of Eobert I. Stevens, copy. 

Mammoth road, land of Gen. James McQuestion, copy. 

Mammoth road, Humphrey's brook and adjacent mead- 
ows, copy. 

Mammoth road, plan of Cohas brook, copy. 

Nashua, Jane, and South streets, plan of lots, copy. 

Nutt road, land of People's Gas-Light Company, copy. 

Lowell street, land of Wilson and Weston and others, 
copy. 

Pine Grove cemetery, J. B. Sawyer's copy of Jacob 
F. James's plans, copy. Three plans. 

River road, land of Daniel Farmer, copy. 

River road, land of Hon. Herman Foster and Rufus 
Calef, Webster and Calef, John Calef and David F. 
Webster, and the Webster house-lot, copy. Four plans. 

Stevens' pond and surrounding territory, copy. 

Square bounded by Elm, Valley, and Willow streets 
and C. R. R., with profile of Elm east back street, copy. 



162 

Taylor street, John Hall farm No. 2, copy. 

Towlesville, plan of Porter land, copy. 

Tremont, Park, and Concord squares, plan of fences 
around fountains. 

Union, Silver, Wilson, and Shasta streets, land of 
Weston, Shirley, and Bell, copy. 

Valley cemetery, plan, section and elevation of tomb. 

Vine-street engine-house, proposed improvements. 

Young road, location of Mrs. Bean's accident. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 38. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Amherst street. Elm to Elm east back street. Center 
profile. 

Andierst street. Maple to Lincoln street. Center pro- 
file. 

Beech street, Valley to Cedar street. Profile. 

Bowman street. Mast to A street. Profile. 

Bowman and Mast streets, schoolhouse lot. 

Calef road, Grover street southerly. Profile. 

(>^anal street, Granite to Pleasant street. Center profile. 

Candia road, Hanover street to Auburn line. 

Candia road, Hanover to Massabesic street. 

Central street, Beech to Lincoln street. Profile. 

Chestnut street, Clarke street northerly. Profile. 

City engineer's oflice, plan of vault. 

Concord street, Union to Union east back street. 
Center profile. 

Cypress street, Valley street to Young road. Profile. 

Dubuque street, Amory to Sullivan street. Profile. 

Elm street, Blodget to Langdon street, sketch and 
notes for paving. 

Elm east back street, Amherst to Concord street. 
Center profile. 



163 

Front street, Gotfstown road to north of Dunbarton 
road. Plan for widening. 

Goffstown road, Front street westerly. Profile. 

Hanover street, Maple to Ashland street. Profile, 
Two plans. 

Hanover street, Beacon street to Candia road. 

Hanover street. Old Falls to Mammoth road. 

Hanover street, Lincoln to Ashland street. Center 
profile. 

Hanover square, plan and section of culvert. 

Harrison street, Maple to Russell street. Profile. 

Jewett street, Massabesic street to Youno- road. Pro- 
tile. 

Kelly street, proposed extension. 

Lake avenue south back street, Wilson to Massabesic 
street. Center profile. 

Liberty street, Salmon to Webster street. Profile. 

Lincoln street, Amherst to Hanover street. Center 
profile. 

Main-street engine-house, plan of sheds. 

McGregor west back street, Marion to Wayne street. 
Center profile. 

Merrimack and Union streets, location of accident. 

Milford street, William street to Amherst road. Pro- 
file of south side. 

New road, Candia road to Bridge street. 

North street. Pine to Union street. Profile. 

Pine street. Bridge to Orange street. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, cross section of new lots. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Riverside avenue. Center pro- 
file. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Knights of Pythias lot. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan of a part of. 



164 

Pine Grove cemetery, details of cross sections of new 
lawn. Two plans. 

Russell street, Orange to Gore street. Profile. 

Tremont, Park, and Concord squares, fountain fences. 

Union east back street, Concord to Lowell street. 
Center profile. 

Valley cemetery, details of tomb, for contractor. 

Valley cemetery, design for summer-bouse. 

Vine street engine-bouse, proposed improvements. 
Nine plans. 

Welch avenue, Elm street to Calef road. Profile. 

Welch avenue, section of D. F. Miller's building. 

Wilson and Spruce streets, details of manhole. 

Wilson street. Spruce to Lake avenue south back street. 
Center profile. 

Total working plans, 62. 

TRACINGS. 

Ashland street, Pearl to Orange street. Two plans. 

Bell's routes to Gofl:stown. 

Bowman and Mast streets, school lot, for committee. 

Bowman and Mast streets, school lot, for architect. 

Candia road, Hanover street to Anbuni line, location 
of. Two plans. 

Candia road, Hanover street to Auburn line, original 
laying out. 

Candia road, Hanover to Massabesic street. 

City of Manchester, location of electric lights. 

City Hall, new vaults. Two plans. 

LLill street, land of George W. Morrison. 

Kelley's Falls, land of Jjcighton Manufacturing Com- 
pany. 

Lots adjoining land of George Porter and others. 



165 

Mammoth road, north of Bridge street, plan of hind. 

Niitt road, land of People's Gas-Light Company. 

Pine Grove cemeterj', plan of. 

Pine Grove cemetery, proposed lots north of lodge 
house. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan of new lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots on east side. 

Pine Grove cemetery, proposed lots in southeast section. 

Pine Grove cemetery, proposed lots in southwest sec- 
tion, for trustees. Three plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Knights of Pythias lot, for treas- 
urer. 

Tremont, Park, and Concord squares, fountain fences. 

Valley cemetery, summer-house, for contractor. 

Valley cemetery, lots in northeast corner. Two plans. 

Valley cemetery tomb, ornamental work for contractor. 

Vine-street engine-house, proposed improvements. 
Three plans. 

Welch avenue, Elm street to Calef road. 

West Manchester, plan of a part of. 

West Manchester, showing location of schoolhouse. 

Total tracings, 37. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

Bowman and Mast, schoolhouse foundation, for con- 
tractor. 

Land of Benjamin M. Boyes, South Manchester. 

Location of electric lights, for committee. Six plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, part of eastern section, for super- 
intendent. 

Other plans, six. 

Total blue prints, 15. 



166 



MAPS 



City of MaiK'liC'ster, sewerage system. Two plans. 

Part of Manchester, for county commissioners. 

Part of Goffstown, for county commissioners. 

Total maps, 4. 

In connection with these two latter maps, 13 profiles of 
proposed roads have been made, covering a distance of 
52,750 feet. 

Total of all plans made, 240. 

The index and catalogue of plans have been brought 
up to December 31,1889; the index to level books to 
December 10, 1889 ; and the index to transit l)ooks to 
December 22, 1889. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on 

laid-out streets 12,738 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on 

streets not laid out ..... 5,219 " 



Total 17,952 feet. 

Equal to 3.4 miles. 

NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT, 

Adams street, A])iileton street north 22»)feet, 50 feet wide. 

Adams street, Clarke street north 3(33 feet, 50 " "■ 

Cartier street, Putnam to Sullivan street . 50 '' *' 

Elm avenue. Elm street to Calef road . 30 " " 
Front street, Goffstown road to Black hrook. 

Liberty street, North to Webster street . 4<5 •• 

New road, Candia road to Bridge street . 50 '* " 

Prospect street, Dorry old line to llall street 50 " " 

Sullivan street, lieauport to Cartier street 50 " " 



SCHEDULE OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, 1890. 



Adams 

Adams, W. MaDcbeater. 

Amherst 

Amherst south back. . ■ • 

Amory 

Appleton 

ArltDgton 

Ash 

Ash east back 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Bay east back 

Beauport 

Beech 

Beech east back 

Belmont 

Birch 

Blodget south back. - . . 

Bowman 

Bridge 

Bridge south back 

Brook 

Canal 

Cartier 

Cedar 

Cedar south back 

Central 

Central south back 

Chestnut 

Chestnut west back. . . . . 

Chestnut eaiit back 

Church 

Clarke 

Clinton 

Conant 

Concord 

Dean 

Depot 

Derry 

Douglas 

Dover 

Dubuque 

Duttou 

Elm 

Elm east back 

Elm west back 

Falls road ••• 

Ferry 



MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 



402 
1,180 



1,710 
l,510i 



6 2201 220 



Amount carried up . 2,333 10,958 20,&40 3,604 



220 1,981 460 90, 1,700 



Portland Pipe. 



Brick Sewers. 



1,020 



1,300 2,530 



757 1,600 



17 in. '20 in. 24 in.29iin 
by I by by i by 
i in. 30 in. 36 in. '44 in 



I in. 32 in. 40 in. 

by by by 

4G in. 48 in. 44 in. 



1,197 965 



500 1 1,197 5,395i 3,650,1 1,360 2,601 



1,851 



2,150' 1,360 790 



SCHEDULE OF SEWERS, JANUARY 1, 1890. — Continued. 































MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 




























1 


1 


STREETS. 


Akeon Pipe. 


PoETLAND Pipe. 


Cemest Pipe. 


Earthen 
Pipe. 


Brick Sewers. 


as r* 

36 in.' 
187i 


II 




8 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


15 in. 


18 in. 


20 in. 
1,981 


24 in. 


Sin. 
90 


12 in. 18 in. 

1 
1,701) 130 


9 in. 


10 in. 


2 in. 


15 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


6 in. 


in. 


12 in.' 
1,300 


18 in. 
2,630 


24 in. 29 in. 
757 1,600 


36 in. 
156 


12 in. '44 in. 
446 1,195 


57 in. 
500 


7 in. 
26 m. 


in. 

by 

10 in. 

1,197 


24 in. 

by 
36 in. 


29iin. 

by 1 

44 in.' 

3,65o' 


SO in. 32 in.j 

by 1 fay 
16 in. 48 in. 

1,300 2,601 


10 in. 
I4I. 

790 


1- 


Amount brought up. 


2,333 
36 

"28 


10,958 


20,940 


3,604 


220 
1,100 


460 
450 

"956 


3,995 


7,675 
650 

"126 


"'496 


460 




690 






5,395i 


78,900 
2.626 


FrankliD 

Gore 


'"ios 

604 
339 


■ ■ '689 
4 






;;;;;;i;;;;;; 


"i,m 

" ' "216 


"546 










;;;;;:;;;;;; 


::;:;;i;;:::; 

156 


'"396;;;;;;^;;;;"! 













;:;:;:;;;:; 




""96 


589 
3,743 


Granite 

Granite, south of 

Granite south back 

Green 










::::::|:::::: 



















;;;;;; 


;;;:;!;;;;;: 




■ 





601 

339 

210 

1,925 


Hamilton 

Hancock 


' 147 


160 


80 

1,110 

446 

"l',526 

2,330 

460 

376 

36 


"'366 











1 






■ i',434 










.;;;;; 









'216 






1 




















230 
1,110 
3,945 


Hanover square 










"845.!];;". 


' " "456 
















1 










2,813 


Harrison 






690 












""860 

'"336 
700 

















' 




I 








I 










3,020 
1,310 


Harrison south back 

Hazel 








































i 




;;;;:;!;;:;:; 




















375 

366 

700 

1,002 

318 

998 

3,599 

2,205 

3,200 


High south back 

High east. 


■"i8i"'984 


































..;;;. 


;;;;;;;;;;;; 

1 




";::; 




















;;;;;; 


Lake avenue 

Lake avenue south back. 
Laurel 


318 
16 


'"637 


370 
2,826 
















130 

120 

1,705 




180 
"566 
















;;;;;;';;;;;; 




..;;.. 


;;;;;;'!;;;;; 




















Lincoln 


■■■46 

20 


594 

264 

1,155 


680 






270 














"l',966 
260 




;;;;;; 




"" 940 
'175 














.... 
;;;;;;';;;;;; 




















1,444 

304 

4,665 




697 
















318 






;;;;;; 








1 

1 




















1,397 

204 

3,174 


Lowell north back 

Manchester 

Mancheste'- south back . 

Maple 


4 


200 

















-. .1 75! 2,410 


1,449 




""68 






;;:;;;r.;";: 


190 
'"376 




100 








340 






1 












' "l',527 




::;;;; 
































362 


1,310 


636 
233 






i . !.;. 












2,677 
233 


Market 






"no 

841 
608 
440 




120 






























■■;■" ;;;;;; 

1 1 




...... 



















..:::: 




290 
1,119 


Mcdregor west back 

Merrimack 


"mh 


142 
963 


206 

1,260 

285 














" "I'.ooe 

1,050 




"iso 

110 














'""960 


















;;;;.; 






750 
3,939 


Merrimack south back. . 


































""526 



























805 
185 
262 


Milton 




185 





































Monroe south back 

Myrtle 


'"SR 


"269 
450 


............ 

42' 














""'"86 
1,626 










































\ 


1 


615 
I,5-'5 
1,734 

259 
58 


MjTtle south back 

Hashua 

North 


"44 


' l',696 
150 


"0)9.'.'.'.'.'. 






































;::;:; 










;;; 




'.'.'.'. y.'.'.'.. 








4,354 


1 ! 

25,60240,876 8,752 


1,440 


2,319 


1,860 


90 


2,545 


770 


12,424 


1 640 


17,194 


490 


46C 





1,805 


86C 


1,300 

1 


5,226 


2,912 


1,600 


646 

1 


446 


1,195 


500 


1,527 


1,197 


6,395J 


3,650 


1,360| 2,601 


790 


277J 


152,892 



SCHEDULE or SEWERS, JANUARY 1, IS90.— Concluded. 





MATERIAL AND LENGTH OF SEWERS. 


1 


STREETS. 


Akbon Pipe. 


Portland Pipb. 


Cement Pipe. 


Earthen 
Pipe. 


Brick Sewers. g ^ 


58 




Sin. 


10 in. 12 in. 


16 in. 


18 in. 


20 in. 


24 in. 


Sin. 


12 in. 


18 in. 
770 


9 in. 
12,424 


10 in. 
640 


12 in. 


16 in. 


18 in. 


24 in. 


16 in. 

by 

24 in 


10 in. 


12 in 


18 in. 


24 in. 29 in. 36 in. 


42 in. 


44 in. 


17 in. 20 in. 
57in.i by ! by 
26 in.: 30 in. 


24 in. 

by 
36 in. 


291 in- 

by 
44 in. 


30 in. 

by 
46 in. 


32 in. 

by 

48 in. 


40 in. 

by 36 in. 
44 in. 


•3 


Amount brought up. 


4,354 


26,602 40,876 
70 


8,752 


1,440 


2,319 


1,860 


90 


2,546 


17,194 


490 


460 




1,806 


860 


1,300 


5,226 


2,912 1,600 645 
... ......1 


446 


1,195 


eOOJ 1,627 


1,197 


5,395i 


3,660 


1,360 


2,001 


790 


277J 


152,892 

70 

2,936 

680 

854 

3,087 

401 

251 

1,530 

4,475 

965 

150 

38 

1,730 

1,740 

330 


Orange 

Orange south back 


216 
180 


350 






















'1,680 












790 








































600 
















1 ' 






















406 448 
1.0.^5 985 



























































Pearl 


132 


150 














480 




286 










































.. ..1 '404 
112 


























































1,076 
1.900 


139 
























































































465 





























640 


290 




















1,145 












600 




1 
























350 616 




















































.... 










150 


































































28 
30 


10 
































































1 1,700 

1 














































































1,740 





















































350 






























































70 































































R^d lot 






146 




























































14S 
1,443 
1,175 
1,123 


River 




1,443 







































































































1 














1,175 














8 
110 


1,115 




































' 
























Sagamore 


■"405 

'"306 
141 


183 

























































































' 












! 














405 




4 




849 
































'••; : 


























































1 : 


























School 




612 












250 
345 




J 










































1,003 
734 




47 
9 


Si? 
































1 
























328 




















130 
130 

















1 



























































































80 

565 




































1 


















678 












2.19B 




















330 






































3,091 


Third 














375 






















1 


























58 


125 

1,365 1,060 




1,396 




1,250 














400 


735 


























980 






















60 




316 






































Vallev 










... 




360 
116 




























900 


















Walker 






800 

















































































360 
412 










































Walnut east back 




440! 397 
1 
















537 
320 












326 


































Washington 












































............ 














Warren 




606 


































































Wayne 




793 


266 

1,448 
300 
897 




























































1.059 
2,292t 
919 
1,216 
1,250 
S 


Webeter 


153 














































691 i 












West 


49 

25 

1,250 


62 














360 




158 
100 






. .1 






























Wilson 


44 




ISO 
















































Winter 






;:::: 














































Winter place 


8 






























.. .. 








































64,656 


13,129 





















490 


860 











6,725 


1 
























Total feet, each size 


6,133 


36,465 


2,836 


2,469 


3,110 


3,990 


770 


16,411 


540 


22,130 


735 


1,806 


1,176 


2,645 


2,912 1,600 


546: 446 


1,196 


1,400 


1,527 1,197 


8,242 


4,630 


1,360 


3,279 


790 277^205,353} 


Total feet, each kind. 
" miles, " 


118,787 


4,860 
0.919 


42,971 
8.138 


3,720 
0.704 


34,748 
6.681 


227}i MUes. 
0.062| 38.89 



167 

SEWERS BUILT IN 1880. 



Street. 



Spruce 

Amherst 

Main 

Wilson 

Amory 

Beauport 

Beauport 

Conant 

Elm east back 

Wilson 

Amory 

Amory 

Appleton 

Clinton 

Dean 

Elm east back 

Hancock 

Lincoln 

Main 

Maple 

Maple 

Merrimack 

Pine 

Salmon south back 

Spruce south back 

West 

Adams 

Amherst south back. . . 

Appleton 

Ashland 

Cartier 

Cedar south back 

Chestnut 

Concord 

Dover 

Dubuque 

Granite south back 

Hanover 

Hanover 

High, East 

Lake avenue south back 

Lowell south back 

Manchester , 

McGregor west back 

Merrimack 

Merrimack 

Merrimack 

North 

Pearl south back 

Pine east back 

School 

Spruce south back , 

Union east back , 

Union east back 

Beech 

Bowman 

Chestnut 

Elm east back 

Monmouth 



Location. 



Lincoln to Wilson 

Kim to Elm east back 

At Piscata<iuog river 

Spruce to Lake avenue south back. 

Beauport to Cartier 

From Amory southerly 

Conant to Adams 

Main to Beauport 

Hanover to Amherst south back . . 
Lake Ave. S. back to Merrimack.. 

McGregor to Main (relaid) 

Cartier to Dubuque 

Adams to Ray 

At Dover 

Canal to Elm west back 

Amherst to Concord 

From Hamilton easterly 

Amherst to Hanover 

North of Wayne (relaid) 

Hanoyer to Amherst S.back (rel'd) 

Concord to Lowell 

From Wilson easterly 

Cedar to Cedar south back 

East of Pine 

East of Lincoln 

Near Clinton 

From Appleton southerly 

And across private land 

Ray to Union . 

From East High southerly 

Amory to Amory south back 

Pine to Chestnut 

Hanover to Hanover S.back (rel'd) 

Union to Union east back 

At Douglas 

Amory to Wayne 

Canal to Franklin 

From Maple easterly 

From Lincoln easterly 

Ashland to Hall 

From Lincoln easterly 

From Union westerly 

From Beech easterly 

Marion to Marion south back 

East of Wilson 

From Wilson westerly 

From Wilson westerly (relaid). . . . 

Pine east back to Liberty 

Elm east back to Chestnut 

North of North 

From Fourth westerly 

West of Wilson 

From Concord northerly 

From Lowell northerly 

From Central southerly 

At Mast 

At Pennacook 

At Young 

At Main 



Material 



Brick. 
Akron . 



Size in 
inches. 



32x48 
20 
20 
20 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



Length 
in feet. 



678 
141 

68 

1.50 

270 

45 

618 

350 

186 

897 

334 

270 

372 

30 

565 

300 

250 

340 

85 

170 

305 

200 

130 

60 

55 

62 

92 

295 

275 

72 

256 

312 

130 

129 

a3 

448 
339 
515 
486 
554 
387 

92 
250 
142 
200 

70 
330 
150 
404 

50 
■ 152 
315 
256 
334 
150 
110 

73 
100 
142 

14,574 



168 



PIPE REMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT. 



Street. 



Spruce 

Main 

Cedar south back. 

Elm east back 

Hanover 

Hanover 

Pearl south back . . 
Pearl south back . . 



From Lincoln easterly 

At Piscataquog river 

Pine to Chestnut 

Hanover to Amherst south back. 

From Maple easterly 

From Lincoln easterly 

From Kim east back easterly. . . . 
From Elm east back easterly 



Pine Cedar to Cedar south back. 

Union east back | From Lowell northerly . 

Wilson 

West 

Maple 

Union east back.. . 

Wilson 

Elm east back 

Clinton 

Lowell south back. 

Merrimack 

Union east back. . . 
Wilson 



Merrimack to Laurel. 

Near Clinton 

Concord to Lowell 

From Concord northerly 

Laurel to Laurel south back 

Amherst to Concord. 

At Dover 

From Union westerly 

From Wilson easterly 

From Concord northerly 

Lake Ave. to Lake Ave. S. back.. 



Material. 



Akron. 

Akron. 
Cement. 
Portland. 
Cement. 



Earthen. 
Cement. 



Akron. 
Cement. 



Akron. 



Size in Length 
inches, in feet. 



20 

15 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

10 

10 

10 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 



10 

as 

312 
180 
516 
48C 
150 

30 
130 
334 
250 

62 
305 

50 
]i5 
300 

30 

60 
245 
150 
110 



3,902 



SUMMARY. 



Total 32 by 48 inches, brick 
" 20-inch Akron pipe . 
" 15-inch " 
" 12-inch " " 
" 10-inch " 
8-inch " 
8-inch Akron pipe in new cesspools 
12-inch " " culverts and drains 

8-inch " " 



678 feet. 

359 
2,366 
3,528 
7,068 

575 
1,607 

180 
28 



Total length of new sewers built, 1889 16,389 feet. 
8-inch Akron pipe relaid for cesspools . 140 " 



Total sewers built in 1889 
E(|ual to 3.13 miles. 



16,529 feet. 



169 



VAULT. 



The Committee on Lands and Buildings, recognizing 
the need of a lire-proof vault for the storage of drawings 
and field books, as spoken of in my last report, caused one 
to be constructed early Iti the year. We now have ample 
accommodations for the safe keeping of the valuable 
data that have been collected in the eleven years the oiEce 
has been in existence. The vault is a model one in its 
way, and has been examined with interest by many en- 
gineers from other cities having in view the construction 
of similar ones. 

SEWERS. 

The working plans for the new system of sewerage ac- 
cepted by the last city government, have been copied dur- 
ing the year. 

As these maps are drawn to the regular scale, 200 feet 
to the inch, they are necessarily somewhat bulky and in- 
convenient to handle. I would suggest the advisability 
of subdividing these maps into sheets which can be 
bound in book form, making them more compact and 
easy to examine when necessary. 

A departure has been made this year from the method 
heretofore pursued in sewer-work. At the beginning of 
the season, William Sanborn, superintendent of District 
No. 2, in conjunction with the Committee on Sewers, se- 
cured the services of Mr. Charles B. Clarkson, who has 
had charge of the sewer-laying in the city proper. All 
sewers constructed this year have been in accordance 
with the plan as accepted. 

In this connection it would perhaps not be out of place 
to emphasize what was said in the last report in regard 
to connections made with the city sewers by incompetent 
persons. The same trouble has been experienced this 



170 

3'ear as heretofore, perhaps to a 2:rcater degree, as the city 
grows. It matters not how carefully the sewer is laid, 
it will not pi'operly perform its loork if every one is allowed 
to connect his house-drain as he sees fit. In most cases 
the work is slovenly done, the main object seeming to be 
to complete it as soon as possible, no care being taken to 
properly connect the pipes. These connections are made 
at all grades and angles and in man}' instances project 
some distance into the sewer. This causes debris to col- 
lect, forming a dam at each connection and seriously in- 
terfering with the working of the sewer. 

A competent person should be employed whose duty 
should be to personally superintend the entrance into 
any sewer and keep an accurate record of the same, to- 
gether witli the location and grade of the house-drain. 

PUBLIC SQUARES. 

William Sanborn, superintendent of District No. 2, has 
had charge of the work in the several public squares. 

Merrimack square has been graded, loamed, and 
grassed, and is now one of the most attractive of the city 
squares. 

In Hanover square a culvert has been built over Mile 
brook, and the pond partially filled, about 5,000 cubic 
yards of earth being used. 

At Tremont square the old wooden fence, for many 
3'ears an eyesore to the residents in that section, has been 
removed, and a wide concrete walk laid entirely around 
the square. The change has greatly improved the ap- 
pearance of this square, which is becoming one of the 
most popular outdoor resorts in the city. 

The wisdom of beautifying and making attractive these 
breathing places grows more a[)[>aront year by year, and 



171 

it is the verdict of all liberal-minded people that money 
used in this direction is well expended. 

In Concord and Park squares minor repairs have been 
made. 

At Monument square, notwithstanding the agitation of 
two years ago regarding improvements, nothing has been 
done. The square is fast growing up to weeds and 
bushes, and presents a very unattractive appearance to 
visitors. To reach it one is still obliged to follow the 
primitive beaten path over plowed ground and stubble. A 
few hours' work with the road machine would make a 
substantial driveway from the river road to the square, as 
the soil is particularly adapted to road making, being 
composed of very good gravel. 

CEMETERIES. 

Pine Grove. — The usual amount of line and grade 
work in connection with improvements has been attended 
to. In the southwestern section, grade has been given 
for the work upon the knoll preparatory to dividing into 
lots. Sketches of this section, showing the proposed walks 
and lots, were submitted to the trustees. One of these 
plans was accepted, and instructions given to lay out the 
lots accordingly as soon as the grading should be finished. 
In other sections of the cemetery new lots have been laid 
out as required from time to time. 

One of the most important items in relation to ceme- 
tery work has been the setting of substantial stone bounds 
ten inches square and four feet long, at the angles and 
corners of both the old and new parts. In giving line for 
the new iron fence on Calef road, it was found that the 
cemetery had encroached several feet on the road ; the 
new fence has been placed on the correct line. 



172 

Late in the full the committee decided to commence 
the long deferred survey of the cemetery. The work was 
Avell under way, and everything progressing smoothh', 
when the appropriation, all too small to begin with, was 
exhausted. This necessitated the cessation of work when 
about one half of the cemetery had been surveyed. So 
much having been said regarding the necessity of a com- 
plete plan, it is a matter of regret that work could not 
have been begun before the cemetery funds became so 
depleted as not to allow of the survey being completed. 
It will cost considerable more to begin where the work 
was stopped in the fall than it would have done to finish 
it at the time, as many of the points, being through neces- 
sity only temporar}', will be disturbed by the frost, and 
have to be relocated when work is resumed. It is very 
important that this survey should be completed as soon 
as possible, as every day makes the locating of old points 
more difficult. In many cases the corners of lots had to 
be assumed, as nothing remained of the original bounds. 
Valley. — This cemetery has been still further beautified 
in the valley under the careful eye of the superintendent, 
Mr. Charles H. G. Foss. Phms were furnished for an 
attractive summer-house, wliich has been constructed at 
a bend in the brook. The l)anks of the brook liave been 
rubbled and turfed for a considerable distance. The un- 
sightly depression left by the removal of the old tomb has 
been filled and grass seed sown. The Chestnut-street 
driveway has also been widened and graded, and gutters 
paved on either side. The outside stonework of the city 
tomb has been completed by jilacing an ornamental cap- 
stone in position. Considerable work will have to be 
done yet in the interior, and also on the roof, which is to 
receive a coating of cement before the grading is done. 
The driveway in IVont will have to be graded, and tho 



173 

slopes at the ends and top tilled in and grassed. This 
will probably be attended to early the coming summer. 
Among other improvements may be mentioned the Are- 
tas Blood mausoleum. Occupying as it does a sightly 
position at the right of the main entrance, it agreeably 
varies the monotony of long rows of white headstones, 
and forms a substantial addition to the many fine memo- 
rials in the cemetery. 

BRIDGES. 

The necessity of repairing McGregor bridge, as men- 
tioned in the last report, became so apparent this year 
that the committee on streets decided to have the upper 
roadway entirely re timbered and replanked. Three hun- 
dred thousand feet of lumber were required for the work. 
The iloor timbers are of Georgia pine, the bottom floor 
plank three-inch white hemlock, and the top floor plank 
three-inch hard pine. A change was made in the man- 
ner of laying the floor plank by raising the center three 
inches, and allowing it to pitch either way. The wheel 
guards were also raised two inches from the floor, allow- 
ing the water to run oft' instead of remaining on the 
planks as heretofore. The ironwork and the piers also 
received attention. It will be necessary to repaint the 
ironwork the coming summer, as it shows the need of it 
badly in many places. 

A large amount of time has been spent this summer on 
the various proposed routes to Goffstown, made necessary 
by the petition presented to the county commissioners for 
a highway. As the notes in the oflSce for this section 
were very crude, surveys had to be made and levels taken 
over the entire section. In connection with this a survey 
was made of the Xorth Weare Railroad from Main street 
to the proposed Amoskeag route, and also of a consider- 
able portion of Piscataquog river. A survey was also 



174 

made of the Mast road connecting the various routes, and 
these together with the necessary plans made have con- 
sumed mucli vaUiable time at a cost to the office of 
3222.42. 

The survey of the new pul^lic park has been completed 
and levels for cross-sectioning taken over thirty acres, or 
about one half the area of the park. 

Other important pieces of work may be briefly summa- 
rized, as follows : 

Surveys have been made of Hanover street road from 
Beacon street to Candia road ; Candia road from Mam- 
moth road to Aul)urn line ; the new road from Candia 
road to Bridge street; and Calefroad from Ehn street to 
the south end of Pine Grove cemetery. A surve}' was 
also made for widening and straightening Fi-ont street in 
Amoskeag, from Gotfstown road to Black brook. Plans 
of all these highways will be made during the winter. 

The demands upon the office have grown steadily each 
year, and with the present force little more than the reg- 
ular work can be attended to. As it is necessary to com- 
plete the survey of the city with the outlying roads and 
streets before the original bounds are destroyed, additional 
assistants should be employed. 

I would suggest that in all streets iin}>roved hereafter, 
curbstone be used in place of cobble-edging, also wherever 
crossings are laid that edge-stones be set on the curb-line. 

In conclusion, I desire to* express my thanks for the 
many acts of courtesy and kindness, both official and per- 
sonal, which I have received from the members of your 
board, also to the civil engineers and others for the use of 
}»lans and for infoiMuation wliich was ol" value to the city. 
Kespect fully su I unit ted. 

WlXFKEl) II. BENNETT, 

City Enf/inccr. 

Jaiiuarv 1, ISOO. 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT SURVEYORS. 



Report of the work done in the various highway dis- 
tricts during the year 1889. 

DISTRICT NO. 1. 
Orison Webber, Surveyor. 

At the beginning of the season, filled ruts and mudholes 
on all roads in district, and finished roadway by brush 
harrowing. 

During the summer put 130 loads of gravel on roads, 
using about one load to a rod, the cost of graveling aver- 
aging $1.10 per rod completed. 

Cut bushes the entire district, two miles, the full width 
of the roadway. 

Turnpiked Adams street from Clarke street northerl}" 
363 feet, at a cost of $45. 

Built 400 feet of plank sidewalk, two planks wide, on 
Elm street from Clarke street northerly. 

DISTRICT XO. 2. 
William Sanborn, Superintendent, 
cobble paving. 

Amherst street, from Maple easterly . 73.3 sq. yds. 

Appleton street, from Union ^^'esterly . 32.0 " 

Beech street, from Lake Ave. to Central . 133.3 " 

Central street, from Beech to Maple . 400.0 " 



176 



Central street, from Hall to Belmont 
Clarke street, from Chestnut westerly 
Concord street, from Elm to Pine (relaid) 
Concord street, from Walnut to Maple 
Elm street, from Merrimack northerly 
Elm street, from Blodget to Langdon 
Elm east back street, from Concord north 

erly (relaid) ..... 
Hanover street, from Maple to Wilson 
Lowell street, from Beech to Maple 
Manchester street, from Pine to Maple 
Merrimack street, from Elm to Pine 
Milton street, from Central northerly 
Pine street, from Bridge to Orange . 
Webster street, west of Elm . 

Total cobble paving 



80.9 sq. 

93.3 
129.0 

66.6 

25.0 
164.6 

200.0 
913.3 
392.6 
1,026.7 
216.6 
25.0 
349.3 
104.6 



. 4,426.1 sq. yds. 



COBBLE EDGING. 

Amherst street, from Maple easterly 
Appleton street, from Union westerly 
Beech street, from Lake Ave. to Central 
Central street, from Beech to Maple 
Central street, from Hall to Belmont 
Clarke street, from Chestnut westerly 
Concord street, from Walnut to Mai)le 
Elm street, from Blodget to Langdon 
Hanover street, from Maple to Wilson 
Lowell street, from Beech to Maple 
Manchester street, from Pine to Maple 
Milton street, from Central northerly 
Pine street, from Bridge to Orange 
Webster street, west of Elm . 

Total t'obhU' edging 



165 feet. 
72 " 

400 ^' 
1,200 

182 

210 

200 

494 
2,740 
1,000 
2,250 
75 
1 ,048 

249 



10,285 loot. 



177 



EDGE STONES. 

Auburn street, from Pine to Beech 

Bay street, at North 

Cedar street, from Pine to Union . 

Central street, west of Beech 

Chestnut street. Central to Lake Ave. 

Elm and Merrimack streets . 

Elm east back street, at " Hotel Windsor " 

Elm west back street, at Ferren's block 

Lake avenue, from Chestnut to Union . 

Lowell and Maple streets 

Merrimack street, at "■ Manchester House" 

Webster street, at Elm .... 

Total edge stones set . 

Edge Stones Reset. 
Chestnut and Myrtle streets . 
Concord street, from Elm to Pine . 
Elm and Merrimack streets . 
Manchester street, from Pine to Beech 



Total edge stones reset 



MACADAMIZING. 

NeiD. 
Beech street, from Central to Lake Ave. 
Central street, from Beech to Maple 
Elm street, from Langdon to Blodget 
Hanover street, from Maple to Wilson 
Lowell street, from Beech to Maple 
Manchester street, from Pine to Maple 
Pine street, from Bridge to Orange 



225 feet. 

15 
151 

24 
110 
155 

11 

11 

90 
115 
126 

15 



1,048 feet. 



284 feet 


290 


u 


54 


(( 


191 


it. 



819 feet. 



662.21 sq. yds. 
1,733.33 
1,110.44 

4,259.33 
2,630.66 
4,220.43 

1,665.88 



Total new macadamizing 



12 



16,282.28 sq. yds. 



178 



Top-Dressed. 
Chestnut street, from Manchester north- 
erly ....... 

Hanover street, from Maple westerly . 
Lowell street, from Elm to Chestnut . 
Streets west of Elm street 

Total top-dressed 



1,200.00 sq. yds. 
5,777.70 " 
1,805.55 " 
7,600.00 " 



10,383.25 sq. yds. 



Graveled Streets Toj^dressed, with Crushed Stone. 
Amherst street, from Beech easterly 
Back streets ...... 

Bay street, from Salmon to Xorth 
Beech street, from Orange to Myrtle . 
Concord street, from Walnut to Beech 
Hanover street, east of Wilson 
Lincoln street, from Hanover to Man- 
chester ...... 

Pine street, south of Valley . 
Salmon street, from Elm to Amoskeag 
bridge ...... 

Spruce street, from Lincoln to Wilson 1,383.00 
Wilson street, from Spruce to Central . 400.00 



388.88 


sq. yds 


777.77 


(( 


2,243.73 


(( 


400.00 


(( 


583.33 


(( 


830.55 


(( 


550.00 


i.i 


555.55 


(( 



2,533.33 



Total top-dressed . . . 10,646.14 sq. yds. 
Crushed Stone sent from Yard. 



Amoskeag Manufacturing Company 
District No. 10 . 
General repairing .... 
Macadamizing .... 
Top-dressing .... 

Valley cemetery, Aretas Blood's tomb 

Total crushed stone 
Each load hciiig equal to one cubic } 



32 loads. 

441 

301 

3,536 

1,632 

9 



5, it.")! loach 



ard. 



179 



STREETS GRAVELED. 

Amherst street, Hall westerly 
Amherst street, Ashland westerly 
Appleton street, Union westerly . 
Arlington street, Linden westerly 
Ashland street. Bridge northerly 
Beech street, Spruce southerly 
Bridge street. Walnut easterly 
Bridge street. Maple easterly 
Bridge street, Warren easterly 
Chestnut street, Harrison northerly 
Concord street, Belmont westerly 
East High street, Ashland easterly 
Elm street. Valley southerly 
Ehn street. Valley northerly 
Elm east back street, North northerly 
Gore street. Oak easterly 
Hanover street, Merrimack westerly 
Hanover street, Wilson easterly . 
Lake avenue, Union easterly 
Lake avenue, Wilson easterly 
Lake avenue, Cass easterly . 
Lowell street. Maple easterly 
Manchester street. Maple easterly 
Manchester street. Hall westerly . 
Merrimack street, Hall easterly . 
Myrtle street, Walnut easterly 
Myrtle street. Maple easterly 
North street. Elm westerly . 
Orange street, LTnion easterly 
Pearl street. Union easterly 
Pine street ..... 
Salmon street, Chestnut westerly 



Feet. 

225 
100 
100 
267 
400 
100 
550 
700 
400 
700 
444 
150 
556 
325 
368 
800 
475 
185 
240 
450 
400 
700 
450 
200 
400 
500 
275 
750 
186 
263 
2,625 
375 



Sq. Yd8. 

425.00 
188.89 
277.78 
682.33 
933.33 
222.22 

1,711.11 

1,944.44 
800.00 

1,944.44 
789.89 
333.33 

2,347.56 
722.22 
490.66 

1,244.44 

1,055.56 
616.67 
586.67 

1,200.00 
800.00 

1,711.11 

1,000.00 
266.67 
533.33 
833.33 
550.00 
833.33 
372.00 
584.44 

6,238.89 
916.67 



180 



Union street, Webster northerly . 
Union street, Hooksett road southerl} 
Valley street, Beech easterly 
Valley street. Elm easterly . 
"Wilson street, Lake avenue northerly 

Totals .... 

STREETS GRADED. 

By Cut. 

Appleton street. Union westerly . 
Arlington street .... 
Bay street, Salmon to North 
Chestnut street, Salmon to "Webster 
Elm east back street, North northerly 
Liberty street, North to "Webster 
Prospect street, Russell easterly . 
Russell street, Prospect northerly 
Salmon street, Union easterly 
Union street, Webster northerly . 
Webster street, Hooksett road easterly 



Totals 



By Fill 



Ash street, Harrison northerly 
Auburn street at Maple 
Belmont street, Lake avenue to Massa- 
l)esic ...... 

Chestnut street, Peniiacook to Salmon 
Hanover street. Beacon easterly . 
Prospect street, Russell easterly . 
Spruce street, Wilson easterly 

Totals ... 



Feet. 

650 
200 
1,150 
300 
120 



Sq. Yds. 

1,300.00 
400.00 

1,788.89 
533.33 
240.00 



17,079 37,418.53 



Feet. 
100 

160 

475 

1,000 

300 
600 
260 
200 
50 
200 



Feet. 



360 

475 
150 
100 



Cu. Yds. 

125.9 
206.2 

1,319.4 

2,392.5 
222.2 

1,055.4 
269.6 
222.2 
148.1 
207.4 

5,448.0 



3,345 11,616.9 



Cu. Yds. 

50.0 
300.0 

4,663.0 

8,750.0 

133.3 

133.3 

1,000.0 



1,085 15,029.6 



181 



TURNPIKING. 

Hubbard street, Hanover to Amherst 

GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

By Cut. 

Central street, Milton easterlj^ 
Chestnut street, Webster southerly 
Liberty street, Webster southerly 
Prospect street, Russell easterly . 
Webster street, Elm easterly 
Webster-street schoolhouse . 



Totals 



By mil 



Feet.! 

75 

480 
200 
150 
225 
670 



330 feet. 



Cu. Yds. 

44.-4 
213.3 

77.7 

44.4 

100.0 

198.5 



Ash street, Myrtle northerly 
Ash street, Harrison northerly 
Auburn street, Pine easterly 
Auburn street, Union easterly 
Belmont street, Amherst southerly 
Concord street, Ashland easterly 
Laurel street, Hall westerly 
Lowell street, Ash easterly . 
Manchester street. Beech easterly 
Maple street, Manchester southerly 
Milton street, Central northerly . 
Pine street, Salmon northerly 
Valley street, Elm easterly . 
Warren street, Arlington northerly 
Webster street, Elm easterly 

Totals 2,635 1,951.7 

This refers only to the larger fills, as in many places 
only a few yards have been used, scattered here and there. 



1,800 


678.3 


Feet. 


Cu. Yds. 


220 


28.5 


200 


166.6 


150 


111.1 


550 


140.7 


160 


24.1 


175 


51.8 


150 


19.4 


155 


45.9 


275 


40.7 


150 


22.2 


100 


38.9 




1,173.0 


150 


44.4 


100 


14.8 


100 


29.6 



182 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



32 by 48 inches, brick . 


. 678 feet 


20-inch Akron pipe 


. 291 " 


15-inch Akron pipe 


. 1,083 " 


12-inch Akron pipe 


. 2,327 " 


12-inch Akron pipe (relaid) . 


. 170 " 


10-inch Akron pipe 


. 5,577 " 


10-inch Akron pipe (relaid) . 


. 460 " 


8-inch Akron pipe 


. 323 " 


Total 


. 10,909 feet 


CESSPOOL CONNECTIONS. 


8-inch Akron pipe 


. 1,364 feet 


8-inch Akron pipe (relaid) 


. 140 " 


Total .... 


. 1,504 feet 


Total pipe laid . 


.12,413 " 



Equal to 2.35 miles. 



ON HAND AT CITY YARD. 

24-inch Akron pipe 4 feet. 

15-inch Akron pipe ..... 78 

12-inch Akron pipe ..... 234 

10-inch Akron pipe 274 

8-inch Akron pipe ..... 720 

20-inch pipe, cor. Spruce and Wilson streets, 1,068 



Total pipe on hand 

12 Y branches, 8 on 15 inches. 
8 Y branches, 6 on 15 inches. 
4 Y branches, 8 on 12 inches. 

1 Y branch, 10 on 10 inches. 

2 15-inch quarter turns. 



2,378 feet. 



183 



6 8-incli quarter turns. 

4 15-iiich curves, 

4 12-incb curves. 

4 reducers, 15 to 12 inches. 

328 20-inch rings. 

2 manhole covers. 
15 cesspool grates. 

3 cesspool curbs. 

4 M. brick. 

Catch-basins built, 40 ; repaired, 25 ; manholes built, 
40 ; lampholes built, 14. 

CROSSINGS. 

Concrete, new, 33 ; top-dressed, 14 ; patched, 2. 



CONCRETE. 

Crossings (new) 
Crossings (patched) . 
Crossings (top-dressed) 
Ash-street school yard 
City Hall 

Lake-avenue engine-house 
Lake-avenue school yard (new 
Lake-avenue schoolyard (top-dressed) 
Lincoln-street school yard 
Merrimack-street school yard (new) 
Merrimack-street school yard (top-dresssd) 
Police station ..... 
Tremont square (new) 
Tremont square (top-dressed) . 
Webster-street school house, sidewalk 
Wilson Hill school yard . 

Total 



yds. 



868.5 sq 

17.0 

348.4 

1,050.6 

90.0 
323.7 
140.4 
118.6 
566.2 
167.3 
206.0 
169.5 
1,198.2 

98.2 
460.0 
150.0 



5,972.6 sq. yds. 



184 



CONCRETE ROADWAYS. 



Amherst street (top-dressed) . . . 875.8 sq. yds. 

Bridge street 80.9 " 

Elm east back street .... 415.3 " 



Total 1,372.0 sq. yds. 

CONTRACT WORK. 

Chestnut-street culvert : F. S. Bodwell, contractor. 
Grove-street culvert : William G. Landr}-, contractor. 

CULVERTS. 

Belmont street, south of East High, 12-inch 

square, stone ...... 

Central street, between Belmont and Milton, 

10-ineh iron pipe ..... 

East High street, east of Belmont, 18-inch 

square, stone ...... 

Maple street, at Gore, 18-inch square, stone . 

Tremont square, 6-inch iron pipe . 

Wilson road between Lowell and East High, 

8-inch Akron pipe 28 " 

DISTRICT NO. 3. 

Edwin N. Baker, Surveyor. 

Built Welch avenue, from Elm street to Calef road, 350 
feet long and 30 feet wide, the fill averaging three feet. 

The sand used for tilling came from the sides of the 
railroad track at Baker street, the removal of which 
greatly lessens the danger at that crossing. 

Paved cobble gutters and built sidewalks five feet wich' 
on both sides of the avenue, also used on the roadway 
150 loads of coal cinders and 53 loads of <j:ravcl. 



33 feet. 


16 


(( 


25 


<< 


100 


(( 


14 


(( 



185 

Elm avenue has been partially filled, using 650 loads of 
sand. 

One concrete crossing has been laid across Elm street, 
eight feet wide, containing 62.6 square yards. 

On Elm street, graded for concrete 400 feet long, 21 
feet wide, and repaired the gutters. 

On River road, graded for concrete 150 feet long, 8 feet 
wide. 

On Hancock street, built 250 feet of 12-inch Akron-pipe 
sewer and one cesspool, using 33 feet of eight-inch pipe. 

Have also laid 150 feet of 12-inch Akron pipe near 
Marshall & Underhill's ice-houses. 

Cut six and one-half miles of brush, cleaned culverts, 
and kept roads free from stones throughout district. 

The coal cinders and gas lime used can be had for the 
carting, while gravel is w^orth from ten to twenty-five 
cents a load in the pit. 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 
Rodney M. Whittemore, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked 125 rods. 

Graveled 200 rods. 

Built sidewalk from main road to schoolhouse. 

Built one 12-inch Akron-pipe culvert, 30 feet long, north 
of village. 

Built sidewalk on east side of main road from village 
to Depot road, and graveled the same, a distance of 150 
rods. 

Set back the fence on the west side of road by consent 
of the ow^ner, Mr. Ira W. Moore. This has been done 
without expense to the city for land damages, and has 
greatly improved the road which w^as very narrow at 
this place. 



186 

The l)ri(lge at Goft'e's Falls over Cohas brook has been 
raised, new stringers laid, and the roadway replanked. 
The approaches have also been graded. 

General repairs have been made where needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey, Surveyor. 

Turiipiked 1,044 feet 

Graveled 3,416 " 

Turnpiked and graveled .... 1,341 " 

Graded (cut) 8,045 cu. ft. 

Built 500 feet of new railing. 

Cut bushes on one and one half miles of road. 

The retaining walls near R. W. Flanders' house, hav- 
ing become broken in two places, were repaired, using 
23 perch of stone. 

Removed stones from road once a month, and made all 
general repairs where needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 6. 

Albert J. Peaslee, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked 1,448 feet. 

Graveled 2,475 " 

Laid one pipe culvert, cleaned and rebuilt one stone 
culvert, and built one stone side-culvert. 

Replanked upper bridge near Mill Dam House, 

"Widened Island Pond road at the bog and built 400 
feet of board railing. 

Cut buslies, removed stones, repaired water-bars, tilled 
mudholes, and made all general repairs. 



187 



DISTRICT NO. 7. 



Charles 


Francis, Surveyor, 
graveling. 




Massabesic street . 




70 rods 


Mammoth road 




115 " 


Young street 




25 " 


Taylor street 




34 " 


Candia road . 




70 " 


Valley street 
Total . 




60 " 
374 rods 



Graded and graveled Belmont street, an average cut of 
two feet for 650 feet. 



Grading for concrete 
Paved gutters . 
Relaid gutters . 



450 feet. 
325 " 
300 " 



CULVERTS. 



One, 12 by 14 inches, 20 feet long. 
Two, 12 by 18 inches, 30 feet long. 
One, 12 by 12 inches, 16 feet long. 
Cut bushes one half mile and made other repairs where 
needed. 



DISTRICT NO. 8. 
Levi J. Proctor, Surveyor. 

Bald Hill road, turnpiked 150 rods. 
Candia road, cut down one knoll, graded 300 rods, and 
built one culvert 40 feet long. 



188 

Hanover-street road, graveled 500 feet. 

Borough road, relaid one culvert, cut down one knoll, 
graveled 50 rods, and turnpiked 40 rods. 

Bridge-street road, cut down one knoll and graveled 
30 rods. 

Built one new culvert 20 feet long and put up 75 feet 
of railing. 

Cut bushes, removed stones, and made necessary re- 
pairs throughout the district. 

DISTRICT NO. 9. 

Nelson W. Paige, Surveyob. 

Mammoth road, graded 80 rods. 
Barker road, graded and graveled 60 rods. 
Pumping Station road, turnpiked and graded 100 rods. 
Derry road, graveled 150 rods. 
Built two culverts, each 20' X 18" X 18". 
Cut bushes, repaired several washouts, removed stones 
from roads, and made all necessary repairs. 

DISTRICT NO. 10. 
Charles 0. Phelps, Superintendent. 

Cobble gutter paving .... 810 sq. yds. 

Cobble edging set 1,644 feet. 

Curbstone set 464 " 

Block paving relaid .... 2,232 sq. yds. 

concrete. 
Four crossings ..... 223.2 sq. yds. 

Two thousand six hundred and eight square yards of 
concrete have been laid by private individuals. 



189 



MACADAMIZING. 

School Street, Third to Main . . . 1,271 sq. yds. 

Top-dressed with Crushed Stone. 
School street, River to Third . . . 1,100 sq. yds. 

% Top-dressed ivith Screened Stone. 
Milford street, Bowman westerly . . 869 sq. yds. 



TURFING. 

Ferry and Third streets at new Catholic 
church ...... 

STREETS GRADED. 



1,500 sq. ft. 



Cartier street, north 

Cartier street, south 

Duhuque street, Amory to 
Wayne 

McGregor west back street 
Marion to Wayne 

Milford street, Bedford line 
easterly 

Sullivan street, Beauport west- 
erly .... 

Totals 



100 feet. 74 cu. yds. 

325 " 962 " 

450 " 366 " 

250 " 93 " 

1,000 " 148 " 

168 " 311 " 



2,293 ft. 1,954 cu. yds. 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

250 feet. 74 cu. yds. 



A street 

Beauport street, Adams south- 
erly 400 



237 



190 



Bowman street 

C street ..... 

Dubuque street, at Wayne 

Hancock street 

Main street, Aniory northerly, 

Main street, Putnam southerh', 

Main street, Wayne southerly, 

Mast street .... 

McGregor street, Amory south- 
erly 

Second street, Walker south- 
erly 

Walker street. Second westerly, 

Wayne street, Beauport west- 
erly 

Wilton street, Beauport west- 
erly 

Totals . . . . 



470 f 


eet. 


33 cu. . 


90 


a 


27 " 


150 


(( 


44 " 


400 


u 


52 - 


250 


a 


44 - 


150 


u 


44 " 


185 


u 


109 " 


240 


(( 


46 " 


1,500 


u 


341 " 


100 


a 


28 " 


70 


a 


21 " 


130 


a 


39 " 


104 


a 


62 " 



yds. 



i 



4,489 ft. 1,201 eu. yds. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



20-inch Akron pipe, rclaid 

15-inch "".... 

12-inch "".... 

12-inch " " rclaid 

10-inch "''.... 

8-inch "•-.... 

8-ineh " " in cesspools 

'J'otal sewers .... 
Catch-basins Ituill, 17; manholes, 11. 



68 feet 
1,283 

270 

511 
1,031 

252 

210 



3,625 feet. 



191 



BRIDGES. 



Main-street bridge, at Piscataqiiog river, replanked. 
Parker-street bridge, planking repaired. 
Streets turnpiked with road machine, gutters cleaned, 
and minor repairs made. 

DISTRICT NO. 11. 
Frank D. Hanscom, Surveyor. 

Goffstown road, Jones' Hill, has been graded by remov- 
ing 1,200 cubic yards of earth, and the roadbed filled in 
with ledge chips and rolled, covering 1,666 square yards. 
The remainder of the road to Front street, 290 feet, has 
been top-dressed wnth crushed stone, 15 feet wide. 

In connection with this work, 800 feet have been graded 
by fill, 1,500 feet of sidewalk have been built, 600 feet of 
cobble edging laid, and 84 square yards of cobble gutter 
paved. 

The school yard has been graded, using 200 loads of 
earth. 

Turnpiked about three miles. 

The road around the Eddy has been raised one foot for 
a distance of 200 feet. Considerable extra work had to 
be done here on account of the water-pipe being moved. 

Have repaired a number of bad washouts on Dunbarton 
road and Hackett Hill road. 

Built three culverts, one 30' X 20" X 20", one 40' X 
20" X 24", and one 16' X 10" X 12". 

Three concrete crossings have been laid, containing 
122.6 square j^ards. One hundred square yards of con- 
crete have also been laid at the schoolhouse. 

Filled mudholes, repaired water-bars, kept roads and 
gutters free from obstructions, and made all necessary 
repairs. 



192 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 
Leroy M. Streeter, Surveyor. 

Mammoth road, from Bridge street to the Hooksett line, 
has been turnpiked and several large boulders removed. 

A portion of Bridge street and of Bald Hill road have 
also been turnpiked. 

The road machine has been used with good success on 
these various roads. 

The bushes have been cut the entire length of each 
road throughout the district, and all other repairs at- 
tended to. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 
John II. Campbell, Surveyor. 

Built culvert 35 feet long at Mr. K^idder's house, and 
graded street at same place. 

Graded by means of ledge chips, 6 rods. 

Graveled one half mile on the two hills. 

Cut three fourths mile of bushes and made all neces- 
sary repairs. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



REPORT 

OF THE 

CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineer's Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, K H., December 31, 1889. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and Genilemen of the City 
Councils : 

In compliance with the laws and ordinances of the city, I 
herewith submit my eleventh annual report (it being the 
forty-fourth of this department), giving a complete record 
of the operations of the department for the year ending 
December 31, 1889 ; also giving a detailed statement of the 
fires and alarms responded to, with the losses, the insur- 
ance paid thereon, and the probable causes so far as could 
be ascertained. In most instances this information has 
been freely given, and whenever it has not the losses have 
been estimated as closely as possible. The report will also 
contain the roster of the officers and men, list of fire 
alarm stations and keys, location of hydrants, etc. 

The fire alarms that the department have responded 
to during the year number fift^'-nine (59), of which 
thirty (30) were bell alarms and twenty-nine (29) " still " 
alarms, an increase of twelve (12) over last year, while 
the net losses by fire will be found to be considerably di- 
minished. 



196 

The total insurance on property endangered by fire was 
$108,850.00; the damage has been $17,889.02, and the 
insurance paid thereon §15,474.40, leaving only'$2,414.62 
of uncovered losses. This is the smallest net loss, with 
one exception, for the past ten years. 

THE FORCE 

of the department remains substantially the same in point 
of numbers as last year, with slight changes in positions, 
and is divided as follows : 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

5 Steam Fire-engine companies, — 14 "men each. 

2 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 
1 Chemical Engine Compan}-, — 4 men. 

1 Hook-and-Ladder Company, — 20 men. 

Making one hundred and twenty-three (123) members. 
In addition to the foregoing is a volunteer hand-hose com- 
pany in Amoskeag of about twenty men who have made 
no returns to this office. 

There are not as many men on permanent duty as there 
should be for a city of this size, which can only be ac- 
counted for on the ground that our " call " men have been 
fortunate in arriving^ at tires in good season. Onlv two 
of our five steamer companies have permanent engineers, 
while the drivers of some are at work a portion of the 
time upon the streets. Each steamer company should 
have a permanent engineer, and I trust the da}' is not far 
distant when our City Councils and citizens as well will 
demand it. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

The Lake-avenue engine-liouse has been completed, 
and Steamer Company No. 3 was transferred from the old 



197 

house into the new, September 14. The sleeping apart- 
ments have^^been furnished by the Committee on Lands 
and Buildings, and the company at their own expense 
have had their parlor finely frescoed and furnished, and it 
is a credit to the company as well as to the department. 

The sanitary condition of the apartments at the Central 
Station, which was referred to in my last report, has not 
been materially improved, and the stables connected with 
this building should be ventilated, the roof repaired and 
regraveled. 

THE APPARATUS, 

as at present located, consists of — 

1 Steam Fire-engine, at Central Station, with Horse 
Hose-Wagon. 

1 Steam Fire-engine at Central Station with ^'■antiquated 
jumper" attached. 

1 Steam Fire-engine with Horse Hose-Carriage, North 
Main street. 

1 Steam Fire-engine and Horse Hose-Carriage at cor- 
ner of Lake avenue and Massabesic street. 

1 Steam Fire-engine and 1 Horse Hose-Carriage and 
Hook-and-Ladder combination, at corner of Webster and 
Chestnut streets. 

1 Horse Hose-Carriage, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Hook-and-Ladder Truck, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Hook-and-Ladder Truck (reserve), at Lake-avenue 
Station. 

1 Double Tank (60 gallons each) Chemical Engine, at 
Central Fire Station. 

1 Supply Wagon, at Central Fire Station. 

1 Horse Hose-Carriage, corner Maple and East High 
streets. 



198 

1 Steam Fire-engine (reserve) at old engine-house on 
Clinton street. Of but little use for fire purposes. 

1 Hand Hose-Carriage, at junction of Old Falls road 
and Front street, 'Skeag. 

1 Two-wheeled Hose-Carriage, Derry Mills, Goffe's 
Falls, manned by men at the mills. 

On the 6th of April the "jumper" was discarded from 
Steamer 1, and the Hose Wagon which the city has 
had for the past two years put into service in thatjcom- 
pany. 

The combination Hose and Hook-and-Ladder Carriage 
at the Webster-street station, I feel confident is too heavy 
for one horse, and would recommend that it be changed 
for two horses, then this company could carry more hose 
upon their reel and also be able to reach a fire much 
more easily. 

THE FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH 

has worked with its usual accuracy the entire year. We 
have been very free from damage by lightning, only one 
burn-out occurring. Three new boxes have been added 
to the system, — Box 73, corner of Beech and Cedar 
streets, adding about one fourth of a mile of wire; Box 
213, corner Beech street and Portsmouth Railroad, with 
one and one fourth miles of wire ; and Box 511, corner 
Douglas and Green streets, with one half mile, making 
about thirty miles of wire on the main lines, and twenty- 
six miles on the "Tapper" lines, and with this amount of 
wire and instruments to look after, one person should 
give his entire attention to it. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The'tentli annual parade occurred on Tuesday, October 
1. The weather of tlie forenoon was exceedingly rainy, 



199 

and for a time it was thought best to postpone the out- 
door parade ; but the sun appearing about two o'clock, 
the lines were formed, and the route curtailed consider- 
ably on account of the muddy streets. The exercises 
closed with the usual collation at the City Hall. Many 
firemen from different parts of the State were in attend- 
ance. I am glad to see the appropriation for the annual 
parade increased to such a sum as will probably cover 
expenses without assessing the individual members. 

THE HORSES. 

There are twenty-one horses now connected with the 
department, and some changes and transfers of the horses 
have been made during the year. 

One of the "blacks" of the Chemical has been sold, on 
account of an incurable lameness, and another purchased 
to supply its place, thus making a fine pair suitable for 
service. 

A new pair was purchased in the early part of the year 
for Steamer 5, and the remaining one of the original pair 
assigned for duty on the Hose Wagon of Steamer 1. 

There are one or two other changes of horses that 
would increase the efiiciency of the department. There 
has been but little sickness among the horses the past 
year as compared with the previous year. 

THE firemen's RELIEF AS^SOCIATIGN 

still has a warm hold on the hearts of our liberal citizens. 
The financial condition of this association is as follows : 

Balance on hand Februarj^ 13, 

1889 $2,208.78 

Received for membership . . 6.00 

dividends on deposits 89.28 



200 



Donations : 






N. II. Fire Insurance Company 


$50.00 




A. P. Olzendam & Son . 


50.00 




Gen. Charles Williams . 


25.00 




Col. Waterman Smith . 


20.00 




John M. Crawford 


10.00 




Lewis A. Clough . 


10.00 




Hon. G. B. Chandler . 


10.00 




Hon. Moody Currier 


10.00 




Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley 


10.00 




Hon. James A. Weston 


10.00 




Hon. P. C. Cheney 


10.00 




Henry Chandler . 


10.00 




F. L. Wallace & Co. . . 


10.00 




Hon. D. B. Varney 


5.00 




Hon. Jacob F. James . 


5.00 




James Mitchell 


5.00 


$2,554.06 


There has been paid from this f 


und : 


Joseph E. Merrill, secretary, salar} 


§25.00 




" postage anc 


I 




printing- 


2.50 




George H. Porter, accident at fire 


) 




Sept. 30 


14.00 




Frank A. Plierson, accident re 






turning from "still," Dec. 23 . 


14.00 


§55.50 


• 





Leaving a balance in the treasury of 



§2,498.50 



On Decenil)er 7, the surviving members of the old 
Manchester Engine Co. No. 6, through a committee con- 
sisting of William T. Evans, Hiram Hill, George A. 
Clark, and A. C. Flanders, transferred to this association 
a burial lot in Vallev cemeterv. It is the desire of the 



201 

surviving members of "old No. 6," as well as the mem- 
bers of this association, that a suitable firemen's monu- 
ment be erected on the lot, and some steps will probably 
be taken in the early part of the year to start some move- 
ment whereby it may be done without too heavy a tax on 
the present membership. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I would earnestly recommend to all citizens that they 
become familiar with the location of fire-alarm boxes 
nearest their residences, and particularly where keys to the 
same are kept. Then, in case of fire, much time will be 
saved in summoning the department. 

There is much need of a new exercise wagon, the one 
in present use being pretty nearly worn out. A larger and 
heavier one, thoroughly made, ought to be procured. With 
the present number of permanent horses, it receives more 
"wear and tear" than any other piece of apparatus we 
have. 

The Heddemon fire on Wilson Hill, October 15, showed 
conclusively the urgent need of a high-service water sup- 
ply in that growing section of the city, and I trust steps 
will soon be taken to furnish it. 

I would recommend the purchase of at least three thou- 
sand feet of hose the present year. 

At a fire on the West Side, February 26, some pieces 
of the apparatus were detained at the railroad cross- 
ing on Granite street by those in charge letting 
trains through after a portion of the department had 
passed the tracks. The attention of the railroad ofii- 
cials was called to this fact, and they must have considered 
it a matter of slight importance, as no notice was taken 
of the affair. As New Hampshire patterns considerably 
after Massachusetts in regard to its laws, I hope the law 



202 

of " riglit of way " in case of tire will be copied from 
our sister State, and the matter agitated to such an extent 
that our next Legislature will pass an act giving fire ap- 
paratus the right of way in case of an alarm of tire. Such 
a law would have a tendency to clear our streets of team 
obstructions on such occasions. 

As high buildings are being erected in our city, the 
necessity of longer ladders is strongly felt, and I would 
recommend the purchase, at an early date, of an aerial 
ladder truck. With such a piece of apparatus, the effi- 
ciency of our department would be greatly enhanced. 
There is not a ladder in service at the present time that 
will reach the roof of the new Pembroke block. 

I would recommend for better ladder service on the 
West Side, a combination hose wagon, carrying a few light 
ladders, in place of the hose carriage connected with 
Steamer Xo. 2. With such a piece of apparatus in this 
station, the tops of most buildings in this section of the 
city could be reached, 

CONCLUSION. 

I desire to extend my personal thanks to his Honor 
Mayor V^arney and the Committee on Fire Department for 
their cordial support and indorsement of matters pertain- 
ing to the improvement of the department ; to the chief 
and members of the police force for their assistance at 
tires ; to the assistant engineers for the aid and support 
they have at all times given ; and to the ottiecrs and men 
for the [yrompt, willing, and ctiiciciit nuuiiKT in wiiich 
they have res})onded to all calls for their as.sistance. 

In behalf of the entire department, I would return 
their thanks to both branches of the City Councils for 
their liberality in regard to the tinaneial wants of the de- 



203 

partment, and to Gon. Charles Williams for his continued 
generosity in furnishing hot coftee at all tires. 

Gentlemen, I think the efficiency of the department 
compares ftivorably with past years, and trust with your 
fosterinej care it will remain so the comina^ year. 
Kespectfully submitted. 

THOS. W. LAKE, 
C/uef Engineer Fire Department. 



FIRES AND ALARMS DURING 1889, WITH 
LOSSES AND INSURANCE PAID. 

Box 6. Friday, January 4, 5.16 p. m. The two-story 
brick front and wooden building at 923 Elm street, owned 
by the heirs of A. W. Quint, and occupied by J. H. Wig- 
gin & Co. as a grocery store. The fire originated in the 
rear basement about the "five-barrel" kerosene oil tank, 
from accidental source. The damage was caused mostly 
by smoke. Insured for $14,500. Loss on building, 
$227.50 ; on stock and fixtures, §6,000. Insurance paid, 
$6,227.50. Box pulled by officer Reed. 

Box 4. Monday, January 14, 9.38 a. m. Two-story 
wooden house, 24 Auburn street, owned and occupied by 
Patrick Consedine. Pat was smoking in bed and came 
near getting suffocated. Extinguished with pails. The 
damage to bed and bedding was about $10, on which there 
was no insurance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 4. Wednesday, January 16, 5.40 p. m. Burning 
chimney in tenement, 43 Spruce street. No damage. 
Needless alarm. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 17. Thursday, January 17, 5.46 a. m. One-story 
building at No. 352 Amherst street, corner of Dutton, 



204 

owned by Ella J. Martin, and occupied by C. H. Clark as 
a grocery store. The damage to stock was mostly from 
smoke. Cause, match or cigar-stub in sawdust-wooden- 
spittoon. Stock insured for $800. Building insured for 
$250. Loss on stock, §423 : on building, 8133.50. Insur- 
ance paid, $556.50. 

Box 7. Friday, January 18, 12.25 p. m. Three-story 
brick block at Xo. 1094 Elm street, owned by Elliot & 
Means, and occupied b}* stores, offices, and tenements. 
Fire was discovered in the basement occupied by Joel 
Daniels & Co., painters, and was caused by spontaneous 
combustion in the store-room. Insurance on building, 
$20,000; on stock, $4,500. Damage to stock, $703.55. 
Damage to building, $75.75. Insurance paid, $779.30. 

Still. Sunday, January 20, 10 a. m. Burning chim- 
ney at Xo. 48 Church street. Xo damage. Chemical 
Engine Company responded. 

Still. Thursday, January 31, 9.40 a. m. Three-story 
tenement block at Xo. 134 Manchester street, owned by 
Timothy F. Sullivan, and occupied by him and several 
other families. An overheated chimney ignited the wood- 
work in the attic. Building insured for $1,500. Dam- 
age, $20. Insurance paid, $20. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Engine Company. 

Still. Sunday, February 3, 10.30 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney at Xo. 248 Chestnut street, in house of Thomas 
Clark. Xo damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Wednesday, February 20, 1.15 p. m. Two-story 
house at Xo. 173 Hanover street, owned by Drake & Dodge, 
and occupied by Charles II. Richardson as a laundry. A 
hot stove ignited w uodwork. Building insured for $1,500. 
Damage, $7.25. rnsui-ance paid, $7.25. Chemical engine 
responded. 

Box 52. Tuesday, February 20, 11.43 a. .m. Two and 



205 

one half story wooden tenement house at 24-26 Dover 
street, owned by H. I. Burnham, and occupied by Joseph 
Leahey and Humphrey Scanlon. The fire caught in a 
" bUnd attic," from a defective chimne}-. Building in- 
sured for $1,200. Damage about |50. Fully insured. 

Still. Tuesday, February 26,6.20 p.m. Four bales 
of cotton at Concord Railroad freight-house, belonging to 
P. C. Cheney Company. The fire caught from a gas-jet. 
Damage, 145.62. Coinsurance. Extinguished by Chem- 
ical Engine Company. 

Box 212. Saturday, March 16, 6.16 p. M. Two-story 
brick house on Mooresville road, 3i miles from Central 
Station, owned and occupied by Mrs. Susan C. Blodgett. 
The fire was caused by a defective chimney. Insured for 
$4,000. Damage, $2,104.50. Insurance paid, $2,104.50. 

Still. Wednesday, March 20, 11.20 a. m. Burning 
chimney in Drake & Dodge's four-story brick block on 
Granite street, is'o damage. Chemical engine responded. 

Box 7. Thursday, March 21, 11.22 p. m. One-story 
brick blacksmith's shop at 1110 Elm street, owned by G. 
W. Elliott and occupied by Davis & Co. Fire probably 
originated from the forge in the basement. Damage $65. 
Fully insured. 

Still. Friday, March 22, 6 a. m. Burning chimney in 
tenement block at 371 Chestnut street, owned by Isaac 
Huse. Xo damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Sunday, March 24, 11.15 a. m. Telephone mes- 
sasre from Xichols & Sons' stable on Bridge street. Re- 
sponded with chemical engine, but could find no traces of 
fire anywhere. 

Box^Sl. Saturday, March 30, 2.26 p. m. Two-story 
wooden tenement house, 95 Amherst street, owned by 
Joanna Collity, and occupied by E. Z. Belibeau and 
others. Fire is supposed to have originated from Mr. 



206 

Belibeau's pipe while smoking in bed. The damage was 
slight and is supposed to have been fully covered by in- 
surance, but Mrs. Collity refused to state the amount of 
insurance on the building or the damage thereto. 

Box 52. Tuesday, April 2, 2.24 a. m. Wood-shed in 
rear of two-story wooden building at Xo. 123 Parker 
street, owned b}- Moies Sansouci, and occuined by H. F. 
Norris and Frank Miller. The iire is supposed to have 
been caused by " tramps." Loss, $100. Xo insurance. 

Still. Friday, April 5, 11.15 a. m. Four-story brick 
block, Xo. 4 Stark street, owned by Thomas Wheat and 
occupied by several families. Caused by defective chim- 
ney. Damage, $6.50. Insurance paid, $6.50. Pennacook 
Hose-carriage responded. 

Still. Saturday, April 6, 11.55 a. m. Burning chim- 
ney at Xo. 19 Cedar street. Xo damage. Chemical en- 
gine responded but was not needed. 

Still. Saturday, April 6, 5.45 p. m. Burning chimney 
on Amherst street. Xo damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Tuesday, April 9, 12.05 p. m. Brush fire at 
Goftstown line. Xo damage. Chemical engine went 
part way over and returned. 

Still. Sunday, April 14, 9.45 a. m. Burning chimney 
at corner of Pine and Merrimack tJtreets. Xo damage. 
Chemical responded. 

Still. Sunday, April 14, 2.45 p. m. Brush tire on 
Heath-IIen Hill. Responded with chemical engine and 
about twenty-five firemen. Set back-fires to keep it away 
from Pest House. The fire being in scrub-oak bushes, 
did no damage. 

Still. Monday, April 15, 11 a. m. Brush fire on Mc- 
Gregor Hill, McGregorville. Extinguished by members. 
of Fire King Steamer Company, Xo. 2. Xo damage. 



207 

Still. Sunday, April 21, 5 r. m. Brush fire in Cath- 
olic cemeterj' on Milford street. Steamer 2 and chemical 
responded, but could use neither to any advantage. 

Still. Monday, April 22, 7.45 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney at 44 Lake avenue in house owned by A. D. Gooden. 
No damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Tuesday, April 23, 5.45 p. m. Tenement block 
No. 43 Orange street, owned by heirs of Joseph B. Clark, 
occupied by John Holt. Child about four years old set 
fire to a bed. Extinguished with pails, with slight dam- 
age. Chemical responded. 

Box 7. Monday, April 29, 10.25 p. m. Burning chim- 
ne}' on church street. No damage. Needless alarm. 

Box 45. Sunday, May 5, 2.05 p. m. Boiler explosion 
at the A. H. Lowell Iron Foundry, at corner of Auburn 
and Franklin streets. There was no damage by fire, al- 
though the end of the building was blown to atoms. 

Still. Wednesday, May 15, 5.30 p. m. Defective 
chimney caused a slight blaze in tenement No. 23 Wash- 
ington street, owned by Daniel and Michael Lane. Ex- 
tinguished with " Pony " extinguisher, with slight 
damage. 

Box 21. Thursday, June 6, 8.45 p. m. Barn in rear of 
No. 71 Manchester street, owned by John Dealy, and oc- 
cupied by Philip F. Grenier. ^ The building was insured 
for $500, and contents for $300. Damage to building 
$300 ; to contents, $300. Lisurance paid, $600. Cause 
unknown. 

Still. Friday, June 7, 7.45 p. m. A slight fire in 
paint-shop of Higgins Bros. Company, rear of Wells' 
block. Cause, spontaneous combustion. Extinguished 
by Chemical Engine Company without damage. 

Box 52. Thursday, July 10, 12.52 a. m. Two-story 
double tenement, wooden dwelling, at No. 462 Granite 



208 

street, owned hy Levi Dodge, and occupied by S. Max- 
well and George H. Marston. The lire was caused by 
the explosion of a kerosene lamp in Maxwell's tenement. 
Insured for $1,600. ])amage, $246.50. Insurance paid, 
$246.50. 

Box 42. Saturday, July 13, 10.50 p. m. Explosion of 
kerosene lamp at No. 41 Bedford street, in the boarding- 
house of S. D. Pollard. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, July 16, 9.29 p. m. Storehouse on 
River road (north), owned by J. B. Jones and unoccu- 
pied. Caused b}' tramps. Damage, S-So. No insurance. 
Steamer Company No. 5 responded with hose-carriage. 

Still. Sunday, September 22, 7.30 p. m. Burning 
chimney at No. 15 High street, in dwelling of Joseph Y. 
Kennard. 

Box 14. Sunday, September 29, 12.32 a. m. Two- 
story, wooden, two-tenement dwelling, at No. 146 Orange 
street, owned by Mrs. W. W. Leighton, and occupied 
by Fred L. Burtt and E. M. Mandigo. The fire was 
plainly of incendiary origin. It undoubtedlj' was set in 
the barn adjoining the house, and in three closets down 
stairs, using a liberal supply of kerosene. Insurance on 
the buildings, $3,000. Insurance on Mandigo's furniture, 
$2,200. Damage to buildings, $1,600, which amount has 
been paid. Damage to coyitents estimated at $300, of 
which no settlement is yet effected. 

Box 15. Monday, September 30, 10.02 a. m. Kettle 
of fat boiled over and caught fire on the stove, at No. 99 
Pearl street. No damage. 

Box 15. Monday, September 30, 11.35 a. m. Two- 
story tenement house, No. 99 Pearl street, owned by 
Joseph AV. Ilildrcth and occui)ied by Charles W. York. 
Spark from chimney ignited the shingles. Building in- 
sured for $2,500. lianiage, $3.48. Insurance paid, $3.48. 



209 

Box 45. Sunday, October 13, 4.53 p. m. One-story 
brick building, at corner of Auburn and Canal streets, 
owned by the Amoskeag National Bank, and formerly 
occupied by A, H. Lowell, as agent, for iron foundry. 
The cause was undoubtedly incendiary, as there had been 
no work performed in the foundry for several days previ- 
. ous. Damage to building and contents estimated $1,000. 
Ko insurance. 

Box 27. Tuesday, October 15, 8.17 a. m. Cottage 
house and barn attached, at 507 Concord street, corner of 
Beacon, owned and occupied by William Heddemon. 
The lire originated in the barn from some unexplained 
cause. Insurance on buildings, $1,400 ; on contents, 
§100. Damage to buildings, $285 ; to contents, $325. 
Insurance paid, $310. 

Still. Friday, October 18, 8.20 p. m. Chimney fire 
rear of No. 109 Amherst street. No damage. 

Still. Friday, October 18, 10.25 p. m. Two and one 
half story tenement house at No. 140 Manchester street, 
owned by Samuel D. Lord, and occupied by Severe De- 
saulniers and Nazaire Cote.' An overheated chimney 
ignited the woodwork about the roof. Building insured 
for $2,400. Damage, $11.07. Insurance paid, $11.07. 
Extinguished by chemical engine. 

Still. Saturday, October 19, 8.40 p. m. Two-story 
wooden tenement house at No. 28 Pearl street, owned by 
the heirs of Joseph B. Clark, and occupied by Henry 
Durant. The fire was caused by a defective flue, which 
ignited the woodwork in the lower story and worked its 
way in the partitions into the attic. Building insured for 
$5,000. Damage, $75. Insurance paid, $46. Extin- 
guished by chemical engine. 

Still. Sunday, October 27, 9.45 p. m. Haystack at 
corner of Mast and Bedford roads, belonging to J. P. 

14 



210 

Brock. Damage, $20. No insurance. Extinguished by 
Fire King Steamer Co., with hydrant stream. 

Still. Wednesday, October 30, 8.20 p. m. Fire in a 
bed in the tenement of John Roberts, rear of 672 Elm 
street. Extinguished with pails of water. Damage 
slight. Chemical responded. 

Box 52. Friday, November 8, 10.56 a. m. This was 
for a fire in Bedford, on the river road just across the eity 
line. House and barn belonging to S. W. Dunbar. Two 
children perished in the flames. (Being outside the city 
limits, no insurance or loss given.) 

Box 21. Monday, November 18, 3 a. m. Two-story 
wooden dwelling at No. 160 Central street, owned and 
occupied by Patrick Tangney. The fire cauglit from a 
defective flue in the basement, and worked its way to the 
attic beside the chimney. Building insured for §1,000. 
Damage, $132.80. Insurance paid, $132.80. 

Box 21. Tuesday, November 19, 5.04 p. m. Barn in 
rear of Nos. 171-3 Manchester street, owned by Daniel 
D. Adams, and occupied as livery stable by John N. Foss. 
The fire was caused b}' the breaking of a kerosene lamp. 
Buihling insured for $500 ; contents uninsured. Damage 
to building, $250; to contents, $200. Insurance paid, $250. 

Box 62. Saturday, November 23, 5.24 r, .ai. Barn on 
River road, Bakersville, owned by Mary Gauthier, and 
occupied by Israel Gauthier. Cause unknown. Dam. 
age, $25. No insurance. 

Box 26. Saturday, November 23, 7.02 p. m. Supposed 
to be a l)urning chimney, corner of Linden and Bridge 
streets. 

Box 4. Monday, November 25, 7.27 p. m. Cottage 
house No. 28 Auburn street, owned and occupied b}' 
Mary Reagan. Cause, overheated chimney. Building 
insured for $500. Damage, $3. Insurance paid, $3. 



211 

Box 52. Tuesday, November 26, 12.27 p. m. Two and 
one half story wooden tenement block at ISTo. 204 Doug- 
las street, owned by Mary Wyman, and occupied by James 
Muir, Didace Lamarre, and Alvin Lutwig. Sparks ig- 
nited the shingles. Steamer No. 2 had fire under control 
before the box was pulled. Building insured for $2,500. 
Damage, $20. Insurance paid, $20. 

Still. Tuesday, December 3, 3.50 p. m. Three-story 
W'Ooden tenement block at 1405-1451 Elm street, owned 
by the heirs of Parsons and Ricker. The fire originated 
in the tenement No. 1407, occupied by Charles W. Boyd, 
from an overheated stove. Insurance on block, |4,000. 
Damage, $87. Insurance paid, 187. Extinguished by 
chemical engine. 

Box 213. Thursday, December 12, 2.45 p. m. Two 
and one half story wooden dwelling, with barn attached, on 
Young road east of Beech street, and occupied by John 
Muir and R. K. Gould. The tire originated in the barn 
from some unknown cause. The barn and L were en- 
tirely destroyed. Buildings insured for $1,700. Damage, 
$1,700. Insurance paid, $1,700. 

Still. Monday, December 23, 7.47 p. m. Burning 
chimney at corner of Pine street and Lake avenue, in 
cottage owned by J. B. Jones. No damage. Chemical 
responded. 

Box 26. Thursday, December 26, 6.44 a. m. Cottage 
house at No. 1 Wilson street, owned by Annie S. Head, 
and occupied by Charles A. Savory. The fire originated 
in a closet, probably from matches, and was first discov- 
ered by parties outside. Before all the inmates could be 
aroused, Mrs. Savory was- found suffocated, and two of 
the children nearly so. The children recovered. These 
three persons were removed from the building by W. 0. 
Davison and John Robie by the aid of a ladder at the 



212 



chamber window. The house was insured for $800. 
Damage to building and contents, §320. Insurance paid, 
$270. 

Box 81. Thursday, December 26, 9.55 p. m. Four- 
story brick (opera) block at 18-50 Hanover street. Fire 
was discovered in the mailing room of the " Union " office, 
east end of the block, owned by John B. Smith and oc- 
cupied by Union Publishing Company. Smith's insur- 
ance on his part of the block, $30,000. Insurance on fur- 
niture and fixtures, $1,000. Damage to building, $378 ; 
to furniture and fixtures, $300. Insurance paid, $378. 

Number of bell alarms 30 

Number of still alarms ..... 29 

Total 59 

Aggregate losses for the year 1889 . . $17,889.02 
On which an insurance has been paid of . 15,474.40 

Leaving a balance uncovered of. . $2,414.62 



RECAPITULATION FOR TEN YEARS FROM 1880 TO 1889 INCLUSIVE. 



YEAR. 



1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

Totals 



LoBses. 



$11,924.66 
8,171.00 
15,475.00 
6,725.60 
31,340.60 
24,300.00 
12,806.00 
17,919.00 
33,902.04 
17,889.02 

$180,452.82 



Insurance paid. 



$8,799.66 
5,601.00 
10,790.00 
6,465.60 
25,095.60 
16,506.00 
7,381.40 
13,111.00 
19,182.33 
16,474.40 



$127,406.89 



Excess of Losses 
over iDBiirance. 



$3,125.00 
2,570.00 
4,685.00 
1,260.00 
6,246.00 
7,795.00 
6,424.60 
4,808.00 

14,719.71 
2,414.62 



$53,046.93 



213 
TABLE 

SHOWING NUMBER OF ALARMS FROM EACH BOX SINCE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM 

LISHED, SEPTEMBER 7, 1872. 


WAS 


ESTAB- 


i 

3 
4 
6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
21 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
31 
32 
34 

36 
41 
42 
43 
46 
61 
62 
53 
54 
56 
61 
62 
71 
72 
73 
81 
112 
113 
114 
212 
213 
312 
313 
314 
315 
,611 


1872 


'73 


'74 

I 
6 
6 
1 


'75 

1 
4 

"i" 

2 
2 


'76 

"7' 
2 

t 
1 


'77 

2 
7 
2 
4 
3 
1 


'78 


'79 


'80 


'81 


'82 


'83 


'84 


'85 


'86 


'87 


'88 


'89 


"3 
1 






1 
4 






1 

'2' 

1 






1 
4 
1 
1 
1 


1 

8 

1 
2 
2 




8 


6 


6 

"4" 

7 
2 


5 
1 

2 

"i" 


4 
1 
2 
2 

1 


2 
2 


8 

1 
3 
2 


1 
1 
2 

"2" 


3 

1 
2 
2 


3 


3 


77 
19 


"■5" 


1 

3 


S? 


3 

I 
1 




33 
13 




1 












4 


1 




























1 


1 




1 


















1 












s 






1 




















1 
2 

"i"' 


? 


1 






1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






1 




1 


2 




2 


1 




2 

1 


1 


1 + 


1 










3 


1 
















1 


1 




5 












1 
1 


"i" 


1 
2 
1 
1 












s 


6 

1 


3 




1 


2 


2 

1 


1 

1 

"i" 




2 
1 


2 
1 


5 


1 
1 


1 


3 


34 
7 






1 
1 




1 


2 


1 


1 




8 










1 






4 




1 








1 


1 
2 






1 

2 

1 
1 








2 

1 


6 




2 
3 




5 






1 
1 

1 






1 

2 






17 












"*"i 


1 


8 












1 




1 




5 




2 










1 








4 






























1 














1 
1 
















1 






? 












.... 




















9 




1 




















1 


1 


3 




























































1 






1 

1 


2 
"5"* 


4 


• • 


1 
4 
2 


1 
3 
1 


..... 

1 




"2 


1 




1 
2 
2 


1 


"2" 

1 


3 

2 


4 
3 

2 






15 


2 
3 


2 
1 




?8 


1 




I 


1 


17 


































1 




1 






1 
2 


"i " 


1 
1 
1 


1 


1 
1 


1 

1 
3 






2 


1 










7 












2 
1 






1 


1 


10 






.. ' 1 


2 




1 




3 


1 


1 


15 




















































































3 


1 




2 


f; 




























































1 


1 


1 




3 
































































2 ' 1 


S 




































1 


1 


































1 


1 
































i 
1 


1 








t 


























1 






\:\r:":r" 






























::::i::::i:::::t:::' 






























13 


35 


1 


30 


21 


22 


23 


11 




















25 


26 ' 25 


29 


13 


30 


25 


24 


27 


22 


30 


431 






Sstill 


Istill 




Igtill 


Istill 


Utill 




Istill 


12still 


16still 23atill 


25atill 


298till 













































214 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SECOND 
AND THIRD ALARMS. 





1 

a 

O 

s . 

B a 
|2 


u 

a ■ 
o a 

S2 

r 


e4 

d 

So 


i 

u 
a 

s 

1 


M Steamer No. 5. 




Hose No. 2. 


c 

« 

a 
1 


d 

a 


Boxes. 


c 

3 

£ 


d 

2 
1 

OQ 


a 

9 
1 

1 


Q 


... 1... 


2... 


..3... 


....t... 


....1... 


3... 


3... 


...1.. 


1 


A 


1... 


2... 


2... 


....1... 


3.. 


1... 


2... 


...2... 


...1.. 


1 




1... 


2... 


2 .. 


1. 


3... 


1... 


....2... 


2... 


...1.. 


...1 


6 


....1... 


1... 


3... 


....2... 


....2... 


1... 


....1... 


. ..2... 


...1.. 


.. 1 




1... 


1... 


....3... 


....2... 


1... 


1... 


....1... 


1... 


...1 . 


. , 1 


g 


]... 


1... 


....3... 


2... 


1... 


....1... 


....1... 


1... 


...1.. 


, 1 




2... 


3*.. 


3... 


....3... 


1. 


....1.. . 


....2... 


2... 


...1.. 


1 


12 


2... 


3... 


...3. 


.. .3.. 


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1 









* On first alarm, the horses of second-run engine will double on engine of first run. 



215 



NUMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES 
AND KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at E. P, Johnson 
Go's office, Gas-works office, County Jail, and Charles 
H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at 
Hotel Belmont, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, 
Horse-railroad stables, and W. C. Blodo^ett's office. 

No. 5. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys 
at Tebbetts Brothers' and Currier's drug stores, and Man- 
chester House. 

No. 6. — City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Mead's 
drug stores, and J. A. Riddle's office. 

No. 7. — Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east 
back streets. Keys at Higgins Bros.', Eugene F. Wil- 
son's stable, and Fames Bros.' drug store. 

No. 8. — Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at 
Smith & Co.'s and Colby's drug stores, and Partridge 
Bros. ' grain store. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at 
residences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, 
J. B. Jones, and General Stark engine-house. 

No. 12. — Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of William C. Clarke and George Emerson. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. 
Keys at residences of Welcome Jencks and Lewis Si- 
mons, and No. 1 Senter's block. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of W. Ireland, N. L. Hardy, and D. J. 
Adams. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys 
at residences of Willie H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 



216 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys 
at residences of lit. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. H. 
Hassam. 

^N'o. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. 
Keys at residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. 
Baker, and William Perkins. 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. 
Keys at A. J). Smith's drug-store, J. McKeon's grocery 
store, A. L. Walker's office, and residence of James F. 
Gillis. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys 
at residences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. — Merrimack Steamer house, corner of Massa- 
besic street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of 
D. M. Goodwin and steamer house. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. 
Keys at residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, 
Horace Stearns, and the late Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys 
at McCrillis's carriage-shop, Geo. W. AVhittier's stable, 
and residence of John N. Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. 
Keys at residences of H. M. Tarbcll, A. G. Fairbanks, 
William B. Orrill, E. S. Fletcher, and George IL Hub- 
bard. 

No. 31. — Corner of Canal and Ilollis streets. Blood's 
shop. Ke3's at office and residence of Mrs. Mary How- 
arth, first house south of shop gate. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and 
Brook streets. Keys at the Anioskeag Paper Co.'s mill, 
Lanmlon watch-room, and Electric Liu'lit Station. 



217 

ISTo. 34. — Jefferson Mill. Keys at watch-room and 
pumping station. 

JSTo. 35. — Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

ISTo. 36. — Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

l!^o. 41. — Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. — Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 43. — Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watch-room. 

iq-o. 45. — The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at 
freight depot, S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office, and the Lowell 
iron foundry office. 

No. 51. — Corner of Walker and Second streets, " Ger- 
mantown." Keys at stores of F. Riedel and William 
Weher. 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd 
& Co.'s and A. N. Clapp's stores«and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's steam-mill. Keys at the office and 
I. R. Dewey's tenement block. 

No. 54. — Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at 
residences of Lord sisters and Albert T. Barr. 

No. 56. — Mast road, near Riddle street. Keys at 
Baldwin's bobbin-shop, and residences of J. C. Smith and 
E. P. Littlefield. 

No. 61. — Corner of River road and Hancock street, 
Bakersville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, Carney, Lynch 
& Co.'s brewery, and residence of H. F. Dillingham. 

No. 62. — Kimball & Gerrish's tannery. River road. 
Keys at tannery, and residence of Edwin Kennedy. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at 
residences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, and Thomas J. 
Smith. 

No. 72. — Corner of Park and Lincoln streets. Keys 
at residences of Austin Jenkins, C. H. Leach, and Clar- 
ence D. Palmer. 

No. 73. — Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys 



218 

at residences of Rev, J. A. Chevalier and Ed^Yard Prin- 
dable. 

No. 81. — Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at 
all tlie engine-rooms. 

No. 112. — Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. 
Keys at residences of Woodbury Davison and W. T. 
Stevens. 

No. 113. — Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys 
at residences of William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and 
E. M. Topliff. 

No. 114. — Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at 
residences of A, P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. 
Shannon, and John J. Bennett. 

No. 212. — Shoe-shop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of 
shoe factory, and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. 
Dearborn, Milton A. Abbott, and M. V. B. Garland. 

No. 213. — Sash and Blind factory. South Beech street, 
junction of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at office of Aus- 
tin, Flint & Day. 

No. 312. — Corner of Putnam,' Main, and McGregor 
streets. Keys at residences of James Spence (391 Main 
street) and Thomas Bolton. 

No. 313. — Corner of Araor}^ and Main streets. Keys 
at residences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, 
and Bouthillier & Gingras's drug store. 

No. 314. — P. C. Cheney Company's paper-mill. KejB 
at office and Independent hose house. 

No. 315. ~ Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders' 
store, hose-house, and Robinson's residence. 

No. 511. — Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys 
at residences of Henry Harmon, Amelia Davis, and Char- 
lotte T. Snow. 

Also keys will be found in the hands of all regular 
police. 



219 



The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be 
given at precisely 12.30 p. m., from Charles A. Trefethen's 
jewelry store, and will be denoted b}^ one strike of the 
fire bells. 



TELEPHONE Ci^LLS. 

Central station, Chemical Engine 
Chief Engineer Lane's residence 
Assistant Engineer Whitney's residence 
Fire King Steamer ^o. 2 . 
Merrimack Steamer Xo. 3 . 
General Stark Steamer Xo. 5 
Massabesic Hose Xo. 2 . . . 



64-3 
64-4 
20-8 
59-3 
56-3 
64-6 
116-4 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITL 

ZENS. 

1. LTpon the discovery of a fire, notice should be im- 
mediately communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the 
keys to which are in the hands of all regular police, and 
generally of persons at the corner or nearest houses. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or posi- 
tive information of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down 
the hook once as far as it w^ill go (without jerking), and 
then let go. Shut the door, but do not try to remove the 
key, as it is locked in by a trap-lock, and can only be re- 
moved with a release-key, which is carried by each of the 
engineers, who will, as soon as convenient, release and 
return it. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to re- 
main by the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in 
the box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to 
the next nearest box, procure another key, and give an 
alarm from that. 



220 

4. Xever signal for a fire seen at a distance. Xever 
touch the box excapt to give an alarm of tire. Give an 
alarm for no cause other than actual fire. Don't give an 

ALARM FOR A CHIMNEY FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless 
called for by the ('hief Engineer. If you change your res- 
idence or place of business, lohere the keys are kept, return the 
keys to the same officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested 
to inform themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near 
their property, also all places Avhere the keys are kept. 
Be sure the alarm is promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in 
the city, and the number of the box will be given thus: 
Box 6, six blows, 2| seconds apart, repeated three times. 
Box 212, two blows, pause of 6J seconds, one blow, same 
pause and two blows, 2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke 
of the bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, 
each test will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, close 
the primary schools; and to close all the schools, two im- 
mediate strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds two 
more immediate strokes, — the time of striking the bells 
being at 8.05 a. m. for closing the schools during the fore- 
noon, and at 11.80 a. m. or 1.15 i\ m. for closing them 
during the afternoon. 



221 



RULES AND REGULATION'S IN REGARD TO 
RESPONDING TO FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The following order has been adopted by the Board of 
Engineers, and the Fire Department will strictly comply 
until otherwise ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as 
follows : 

1. Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, Hook-and-Ladder Co. 
No. 1, and Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 will report for 
duty to all boxes on first alarm. 

2. Amoskeag Steamer Co. No. 1 will report for duty, 
on days of its first run, on first alarm to all boxes except 
9, 12, 51, 54, 56, 315; on second alarm, to ail other boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 
35, 36, 41, 42, 46, 81; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 
13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 
62, 71, 72, 73, 112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314, 511; on 
tldrd alarm., to all other boxes. 

3. Fire King Steamer Co. No. 2 will report for duty 
on first alarm to boxes 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 52, 
53, 54, 56, 312, 313, 511 ; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 5, 
31, 32; on tJdrd alarm, to all other boxes. 

4. Merrimack Steamer Co. No. 3 will report for duty 
on first alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 
26,27, 41, 42, 43, 45, 61, 62, 71, 72, 73, 212, 213 ; on sec- 
ond alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 31, 34, 35, 36, 51, 52, 53, 
56, 81 ; on third alarm., to all other boxes. 

5. N. S. Bean Steamer Co. No. 4 will report for duty, 
on days of its first run, on first alarm to all boxes except 
9, 12, 51, 54, 56, 315; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. On first cdarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 
35, 36, 41, 42, 45, 81; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 



222 

13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 
62, 71, 72, 73, 112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314, 511; on 
third alarm, to all other boxes. 

6. Gen. Stark Steamq;* Co. Xo. 5, will report for duty 
on Jirst alarm to boxes 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 31, 32, 34, 
35, 41, 112, 113, 114, 314, 315; on secoml alarm, to boxes 
6, 16, 36,42, 81, 312, 313; on Odrd alarm, to all other 
boxes. 

7. Massabesic Hose Company Xo. 2 will report for 
duty, on days of its tirst run, on first alarm to boxes 6, 7, 
8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 
35, 36, 41, 42, 72, 81, 112, 113, 114; on second alarm, to 
boxes 4, 5, 9, 12, 43, 45, 71, 73, 212, 312, 313, 314; 
on third alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run, On first alarm, to boxes 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 
16, 17, 18, 25, 26, 34, 112, 113, 114; on second alann, to 
boxes 4, 5, 6, 9, 12, 21, 23, 24, 27, 31, 32, 35, 36, 41, 42, 
43, 45, 71, 72, 73, 81, 212, 312, 313, 314; on third alarm, 
to all other boxes. 

8. On the first alarm from boxes 9, 24, 27, 54, 56, 61, 
62, 212, 213, 314, 315, the horses of the second run will 
double on to the engine of its first run, and on the arri- 
val AT THE FIRE THE SECOND-RUN HORSES WILL RETURN TO 

THEIR HOUSE, and in case of an alarm from any box the 
company will immediately respond with their engine. 

9. During the progress of a fire, any of the apparatus 
not called on that alarm will promptly respond to an alarm 
from any other box. 

10. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the 
engine, hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first 
will have the right to lead to the fire. No running by 

WILL BE ALLOWED, EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER PEN- 
ALTY or DISMISSAL OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

11. The drivers shall not permit persons not connected 



223 

with the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in 
muddy weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit 
any one to ride upon their apparatus when returning from 
fires. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the 
first alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in 
readiness for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, 
one stroke on the bells and gongs by the engineer in 
charge will be the signal for discharge to all companies 
remaining at the houses ; or in case this one blow is not 
struck within thirty minutes, companies may consider 
themselves dismissed, except the drivers, who will remain 
in the houses with their horses until the two blows to 
limber up. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those 
at a fire to limber up. 



224 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 extra first-size Amoskeag Steamer . 
1 one-horse hose-wagon (McCrillis' make), 
1 pair gray horses for steamer . 
1 black horse for hose-wagon . 
3 swinging harnesses 
1 pair double harnesses (for street work) 
1 single harness (for street work) 
1,550 feet fabric hose 
100 feet three-inch leather hose 
1 double cart .... 
1 single cart .... 
1 sled 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. . 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures . 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$4,000.00 

450.00 

800.00 

375.00 

150.00 

60.00 

50.00 

1,007.50 

50.00 

100.00 

100.00 

40.00 

60.00 

200.00 

200.00 

$7,642.50 



FIRl^KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 



LOCATED ON NORTH MAIN STBEKT, SQUOQ. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer 

1 pair bay horses for steamer . 

2 single horses ..... 

3 street harnesses, two at $40, 1 at $20 
3 swinging harnesses 

1 four-wheeled hose-carriage 

1 single cart ..... 

1 two-horse cart .... 



$4,000.00 
800.00 
600.00 
100.00 
150.00 
600.00 
100.00 
75.00 



225 



1 double sled .... 
1 single sled .... 
2,000 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures and blankets . 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. 

Firemen's suits and badges . 

Total amount 



$75.00 

50.00 

1,500.00 

60.00 

466.00 

150.00 

^8,726.00 



MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 



LOCATED ON LAKE AVEKUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 

1 second-size Amoskeag steamer 
1 pair black horses .... 
1 single horse ..... 
3 street harnesses, two at $50, one at |40 
3 swinging harnesses 
1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 
1 double cart ..... 
1 single cart ..... 
1 single sled ..... 
2,000 feet fabric hose .... 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc 

Total amount 



$3,500.00 

600.00 

250.00 

140.00 

150.00 

600.00 

162.50 

40.00 

40.00 

1,500.00 

50.00 

575.00 

$7,607.50 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 second-size Amoskeag steamer and hose 

"jumper" . 
1 pair bay horses 
1 pair street harnesses 
1 pair swinging harnesses 
1,800 feet Baker fabric hose . 

Hall furniture, fixtures, tools, etc. 



5,500.00 
600.00 
50.00 
100.00 
800.00 
350.00 



226 



Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



S50.00 
150.00 

S5,600.00 



GENERAL STARK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 

LOCATED OK WEBSTEE STREET, COHNEB CHESTNUT. 

1 third-size Amoskeag steamer 
3 horses ..... 
3 sets street harnesses 
3 swinging harnesses 
1 combination hose reel and ladder 
1 double cart 
1 single cart 
1 double sled 
1 single sled 
2,000 feet fabric hose 

Furniture, fixtures, tools, etc. 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits, badges, etc. 

Total amount 



13,600.00 


900.00 


150.00 


150.00 


1,000.00 


162.50 


115.00 


75.00 


50.00 


1,500.00 


175.00 


60.00 


150.00 



^087.50 



E. W.- HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE-ENGINE. 

LOCATED AT OLD ENOINE-HODSE, CLINTON STREET. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 



2 horses 

2 single harnesses 
1 single cart 
1 single sled 
1 hose sled 
1,600 feet fabric hose 



$500.00 



$600.00 
600.00 
60.00 
50.00 
40.00 
20.00 

1,040.00 



227 



3,400 feet leather hose $2,550.00 

Furniture and fixtures .... 200.00 

Stable fixtures and blankets . . . 50.00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 175.00 

Total amount .... $5,385.00 

MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST BIGB. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage . $600.00 

1 bay horse 350.00 

1 street harness ..... 40.00 

1 swinging harness ..... 50.00 

1 single cart 60.00 

1 single sled 40.00 

1,000 feet fabric hose 650.00 

2,000 feet leather hose 1,500.00 

Furniture and fixtures .... 100.00 

Firemen's suits and badges . . . 175.00 

Total amount .... $3,565.00 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-L ADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 hook-and-ladder truck . 

1 reserve truck .... 

1 pair bay horees 

1 pair exercise harnesses . 

1 pair swinging harnesses . 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 
6 rubber blanket covers . 

Furniture and fixtures . 
Stable fixtures and blankets . 
Firemen's suits and badges . 

Total amount 



$1,700.00 
300.00 
600.00 

30.00 
100.00 
360.00 
144.00 
200.00 

50.00 
280.00 

$3,764.00 



228 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE 8TBEBT. 



1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine 

1 pair black horses . 

1 pair exercise harnesses . 

1 pair swinging harnesses . 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Stable fixtures and blankets . 

Firemen's suits and badges . 

Total amount 



^2,250.00 
750.00 
50.00 
100.00 
75.00 
50.00 
35.00 

$3,310.00 



SUPPLY WAGON. 

1 supply wagon with boxes and engineers' lan- 
terns ....... 

6 rubber blanket covers . . . . . 



$312.00 
144.00 



Total amount 



$456.00 



SPARE HOSE. 



AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 



600 feet leather hose 
100 feet fabric hose . 

Total amount 



$528.00 
65.00 

$593.00 



EXERCISE WAGON. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINB STREET. 

1 four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole and 
shafts ...... 



$40.00 



ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 

5 fire hats 

5 engineers' white rubber coats 



$10.00 
37.50 



229 



Furniture and fixtures ..... 
Total amount ..... 

INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 

LOCATED AT COENBE OP OLD FALLS EOAD AND FEONT 8TEEBT. 

1 four-wheeled hand hose-carriage 
600 feet leather hose 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc. . 
Furniture and fixtures 

Total amount . 

GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 

LOCATED AT DEEET MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage 
300 feet fabric hose ..... 

2 hose-pipes ..... 

Total amount .... 

SLEEPING HALL. 

AT CENTEAL STATION, VINE STBEET. 

7 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. . 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



$175.00 

$222.50 



$400.00 

360.00 

40.00 

10.00 

$810.00 



$50.00 

200.00 

10.00 

$260.00 



$275.00 



At cost (including additions previous to 1885) $21,625.00 

6,000.00 
775.00 



Remodeling in 1885 
Additions in 1886 

" in 1887 
in 1888 

" in 1889 
" Individual Tapper " system . 
Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc. 

Total .... 



375.00 
575.00 
430.00 
3,000.00 
150.00 

$32,930.00 



230 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 1 . $7,642.50 

Fire King Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 2 . . 8,720.00 

Merrimack Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 3 . 7,007.50 

K S. Bean Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 4 . 5,600.00 

Gen. Stark Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 5 . 8,087.50 

E. ^Y. Harrington Steamer (old) . . . 500.00 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . . . . 5,385.00 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . . . . 3,565.00 

Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1 . . 3,764.00 

Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 . . . . 3,310.00 

Supply Wagon ...... 456.00 

Soare Hose 593.00 

Exercise Wagon ...... 40.00 

Engineers' Department 222.50 

Independent Hose Co. No. 5 .... 810.00 

Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage .... 260.00 

Sleeping Hall (Central Station) . . . 275.00 

Fire- Alarm Telegraph 32,930.00 



$89,774.00 



231 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OE THE MEMBERS 
OF THE FmE DEPARTMENT. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane. . . 

Fred S. Bean 

Ruel G. Manning . . 
Eugene S. Whitney. 


Chief 




1937 Elm street. 


3 


Assistant and clerk. 




102 Orange street. 
52 Douglas street. 


<> 


Carpenter 

Supt. Electric Light. . 
Marble-worker 


4 




5 















AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House JVb. 28 Vine Street. 



Name. 



Charles F. McCoy.. 
Frank E. Stearns... 
Henry C. Parsons.. 
Charles F. Hall... 
Joseph H. Gould. . . 
Charles H. Rogers . 
Artemas C. Barker. 
Frank B. Marstou.. 
Henry A. Boone.. . 
Thomas J. Wyatt . . 

James L. Brock 

Lewis G. Bryant. . . 
Edgar A. Young . . . 
Frank H. Harvey.. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Foreman : Machinist 

Assistant foreman.. Paper-hanger. 

Clerk Auctioneer . . . 

Engineer i Machinist 

Assistant engineer.. I " 

Driver of steamer. . ; Teamster 

Driver of hose " 

Hoseman Carpenter . . . . 

Machinist 



Carpenter , 
Tinsmith.. 
Teamster . . 

Clerk 

Teamster.. 



Residence. 



5 M.S. B. 

389 Lake avenue. 

28 Vine street. 

45 W Merrimack St 

1087 Elm street. 

28 Vine street. 

28 Vine street. 

11 M.S. B. 
986 Elm street. 
44 Middle street. 
21 Market street. 

12 M. S. B. 

371 Merrimack St. 
143 Orange street. 



232 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on North Main Street, ^Squog. 



e 
67 
71 
C8 
120 
119 
76 
69 
72 
75 
77 
73 
74 
66 
70 



Namb. 



David O. Hills 

Charles G. Ranuo.. 

John Martin 

Thomas F. Dodge.. 
Stephen Thomes... 



Rank. 



Foreman 

Assistant foreman.. 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 



Jeremiah Lane Driver of Steamer 

ArthurW.Whitcomb Driver of Hose . . . 

Samuel A. Hill Hoseman 

Robert J. Hill " 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Daniel B. Emery. .. 
Charles S. Cousins. 
Thomas E. Foote. .. 
Joseph H. Alsop. . . . 
Charles Tewksbury . 





607 Granite atT««t. 


Harness-maker 


63 Parker street. 




624 No. Main St. 




Engine-house. 




55 Douglas street. 




Engine-bouse. 






Carpenter 


86 School street. 





86 " " 


Machinist 


Williams street. 


Harness-maker 


53 Douglas street. 




56 North Main St 


Manufacturer 


54 Douglas street. 


Freighter 


' 86 School street. 



233 



MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 
House on Lake Avenue, Corner Massahetic. 



84 

8C 

86 

121 
I . 
122 

87 

81 

82 

80 

78 

79 



83 



Make. 



Charles H.Colburn. 
.Frank F. Porter.... 

Will P. Emerson... 

Gieorge B. Forsaith. 
iEdwiu E. WeekB. . 

George H. Wheeler. 

William S. McLecd. 

John S. Avery 

Clarence R. Merrill. 

George Dunnington 

Louis N. Dufrain. . . 

Parker R. Brown.. . 

FredS. Sloan 

Ernest E. Hubbell.. 



Rank. 

Foreman 

Assistant Foreman . 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 
Driver of Steamer.. 
Driver of Hose. . . . 
Hoseman 



Occupation 

Carpenter 

Manufacturer... 

Engineer 

Machinist 

Teamster 

Janitor 

Grain dealer. . 
Harness-maker. 

Plumber 

Clerk 

Painter 

Agent 



Residence. 



286 Laurel street. 
330 E. Spruce St. 
28G Laurel street. 
Engine-house. 
284 E. Spruce St. 
Engine-house. 
Engine-house. 
404 Merrimack St. 
414 Merrimack St. 
510 Wilson street. 
373 Hall street. 
422 Merrimack St. 
68 Massabesic St. 
428 Central street. 



234 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

House No. 20 Vine Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Besidence. 



George W. Bacon . . Foreman 

Lorenzo J. Chandler Assistant Foreman. 



Walter Morse. . . 
Albert Merrill... 
Edgar G. Abbott 
Frank J. Dustin. 
Willie H. Dodge. 
Henry C. Morrill, 
George A. Cann. 
Benj.R. Ricliardsou 
Lucius B. Snelling. 
Ellswortli V. Rowe. 
Walter A. Clarkson. 
Frank B. Stevens . . 



Clerk 

Engineer 

Assistant Engineer. 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Carpenter C5 Stark Corp. 

Clerk 1'23 Orange street. 

Machinist 90 Blodget street. 

Electrician River road, north. 

Clerk... 10 Russell street. 

Teamster 20 Vine street. 

Fireman 530 Chestnut St. 

Machinist 224 Bridge street. 

Watchman 142 Central street. 

Macliinist 12 M. S. B. 

Pharmacist 37 Water street. 

Section Hand 12C1 Elm street. 

Carpenter 123 Orange street. 

Clerk 301 Amherst street. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

Ilotue No. 8 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


116 


George N. Burpee. . 
Jesse W.Truell.... 
Warren F. Wheeler. 
Frank A. Pherson. . 






19 Ash street. 


115 
117 
118 


Clerk 

Driver 

Engineer 






Teamster 


8 Vine street. 









2«5 



GENERAL STARK STEAINI FIRE-ENGINE COMPANYJNO. 5, 

House 44 Webster, Corner Chestnut Street. 



■ill 
« 

49 
123 

46 

42 
102 
125 
124 
101 

47 

95 

41 

99 

43 
102 



Naue. 



Rank. 



Charles W. Brown . Foreman 

George R. Simmons Assistant Foreman . 

Woodbury Davison., Clerk 

Daniel W. Morse. . . , Engineer 



Arthur W. Bond . . . 

Emil H. Smith 

Martin W. Ford, Jr, 

MiloB. Wilson 

Russell L. Cilley... 
Edward H. C lough. 
Arthur A. Smith.. . 

John J. Kelley 

Alvin McLane 

L. O. Blanchard... . 



Assistant Engineer, 
Driver of Steamer.. 
Driver of Hose. .. . 
Hoseman 



Occupation. 

Clerk 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Machinist 

Engineer 

Teamster 

Mason 

Book-keeper. 

Meat dealer 

Blacksmith , 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Blacksmith 



Residence. 



16 Hazel street. 
82 Pennacook St. 
785 Union street. 
1419 Elm street. 
9 Langdon Corp. 
Engine-house. 
Engine-house. 
48 Blodget street. 
1449 Elm street. 
41 Appleton street. 
River road, north. 
River road, no rt h. 
6G1 Chestnut St. 
817 Union street. 



236 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

Home No 20 Vine Street. 



S^ 



Name. 



«_ 

34 Albert Maxfleld.. 

36 Joseph E.Merrill.. 
50 Frank D. Burleigh. 

37 Walter L. Blenus . 

38 George H. Porter.. 

39 Will G. Chase 

48 Albert A. Pufifer.. 

52 Charles B. French. 



John E. Sanborn. 
Samuel W. Patten.. 
George I. Ayer. . . 
Edwin A. Durgin 



Rank. 

Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Clerk 

Driver 

Hoseman 



Occupation. 



Belt-maker.. 
Currier. . . . , 



Residence. 



23 M. S. B. 
21 Ash street. 



Carpenter 6 M.S. B 



Teamster 

Carpenter 

Photographer. . . . 
Railroad employe 
Carpenter 



Belt-maker . 
Electrician. 
Machinist. . . 



26 Vine street. 
279 Laurel street. 
217 Central street. 
120 Concord street. 
ISM. S.B. 
274 Laurel street. 
3 M. S. B. 
28 M. S.B. 
22 M. P. W. 



237 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 

House No. 525 Maple Street, corner East High. 



600 
C3 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 










55 


Revilo G. Houghton 
Henry G. Seaman . . 
Walter Seaward .... 
Jos. W. Batchelder. 
Albert E. Batchelder 

FredS. Lewis 

George W. Huntley. 
George H. Shepard. 
Julien B. Huntley. . 
Frank E. Heald. . . . 
Charles W. Parnell. 




Gas-fitter 


288 Bridge street. 


58 


Olerk 




57 






521 Maple street. 
521 Maple street. 
447 Maple street. 
27 South street 


59 






64 




i( 


65 


^, 




56 


(( 




1211 Elm street 


61 


jj 


Tinsmith 




62 


„ 




36 Button street. 


63 


<( 




289 Concord street. 


60 


,, 




540 Maple street. 









238 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

Bouse No. 18 Vine Street. 



boo 

pa 

91 

111 

112 

94 

92 

96 

98 

114 

100 

103 

104 

109 

110 

90 

■^97' 

107 

93 

113 

106 

105 



Nahb. 



Jerome J. Lovering 

Roscoe Dyer 

Sanborn T.Worthe 
Charles M. Denyou 
Oscar P. Stone... 

James Orrill 

John N. Chase. .. 

John Wilson 

Hiram P. Toung. 
Luther J. Flint.. 
Harrison H. Cole 
George M. Jones . 
Pharis E. Rogers. 
Henry Johnson.. 
Charles W. Bailey 

Henry Heap 

Edward E. White 
Charles H. Saxon 
Charles Edgar — 
JohnT. Gott 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Foreman 

Assistant Foreman. 

Clerk 

Driver 

Fireman 



Carpenter ■ 300 Pine street. 

Machinist 36 Water street. 

Carpenter 493 Maple street. 

Teamster 18 Vine street. 

Clerk 696 Elm street. 

Barber 100 Blodget street. 

Overseer 268 Bridge street. 

Carpenter 19 Warren street. 

Taxidermist 33 Dutton street. 

Carpenter 4 Dutton street. 

" 45M. S. B. 

Gardener 558 Chestnut St. 

Mason 99 Orange street. 

Piper 20 M. S. B. 

Carriage-maker 265 Concord street. 

Manufacturer 4 Whitney street. 

Teanwter 107 Manchester St. 

Carpenter 9 Myrtle street. 

16 M.S. B. 

Teamster I 301 EastSpruceSt. 



239 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Wahiut street, 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincohi street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, corner of Franklin street. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Adams street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Baker, corner of Elm street. 
Baker, corner of River road. 
Baker, corner of Calef road. 
Baker, corner of Nutt road. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 



240 



Bedford, near Xo. 3G M. P. "W. corporation. 
Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 
Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 
Beech, front of Xo. 584. 
Bebiiont, near Xo. 345. 
Belmont, corner of Young street. 
Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 
Blodget, front of primary school house. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, front of Xo. 26. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Bridge, northwest gorner of Beech street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near Xo. 242. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Bridge, corner of Ashland street. 
Bridge, corner of Hall street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 
Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near office door of M. li. W. 



241 



Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Lincohi street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, front of l^o. 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Central, corner of Cass street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Chestnut, opposite High street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 
Clarke, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Clarke, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, opposite Vine street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 
Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 



242 

Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Cypress, south end of street. 

Cypress, at Manchester shoe-shop. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Elm, front of Temple & Farrington Co.'s bookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Gore, corner of Beech street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, near Franklin street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 

Hancock street. 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near brewer}'. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Asliland street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Harrison, opposite No. 15, 

Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 



243 

Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Harrison, nortiiwest corner of Russell street. 
High, corner of Ashland street. 
High, corner of South street. 
High, fifty feet east of Wilson roacl. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Lake avenue, near ISTo. 36. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Union street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Lake avenue, east end. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near No. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Laurel, near Belmont street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Milton street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 



244 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Mammoth road. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Central street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Maple, front of No. 350. 

Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of Old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mechanic, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Mechanic, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanic, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 



I 



245 



Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Merrimack, near 'No. 362. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Merrimack, near Belmont street. 
Merrimack, northwest corner of Beacon street. 
Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Middle, near No. 67 Amoskeag corporation. 
Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 
North, northwest corner of Bay street. 
North, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
North, northwest corner of Pine street. 
North, corner of Liberty street. 
Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 
Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Orange, corner of Ash street. 
Orange, corner of Maple street. 
Orange, corner of Oak street. 
Orange, corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 



246 



Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pine, near Road House. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lake avenue. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hi^^h street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester corporation. 

Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 

Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Russell sti-eet. 

Reservoir, on force main. 



247 



River road (north), north of Webster street. 
River road (north), near Mrs. John Kelly's. 
■River road (north), near J. Otis Clark's. 
River road (south) near gate of tannery. 
Sagamore, corner of Union street. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 
Shasta, corner of River road. 
Shasta, corner of Beech street. 
Silver, corner of Union street. 
Silver, corner of Beech street. 
Somerville, corner of Union street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Spruce, near T. J. Perry's house. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near No. 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite No. 57 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13 Manchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 
Taylor, corner Young road. 
Union, northwest corner ot Lowell street. 



248 

Union, northwest corner of Iligli street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Ehn street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Willow street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Taylor street. 

Valle}', northwest corner of Cypress street. 

Valley, northwest corner of Jewett street. 

Valley, 150 feet east of J. L. Woodman's. 

Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

"Walnut, opposite No. 79. 

"Water, near No. 38 Amoskeag corporation. 

Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Webster, corner of Adams street. 

Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 

West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Cedar, northwest corner of Ehn street. 

West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Central, corner of Franklin street. 

West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Merrimack, near 111 Amoskeag corporation. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Webster, northwest coniei- of Kim street. 



249 



"West Webster, northeast corner of River road. 

"Wilson, corner of Lake avenue. 

Youn^^, corner of Elm street. 

Young, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Young, corner of Maple street. 

Young, 96 feet east of R. IS". Batchelder's. 

Young, corner of Jewett street. 

PISCATAQUOG AND MCGREGORVILLE. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
A, near No. 73. 

A, northwest corner of B street. 
Adams, corner of Main street. 
Adams, corner of Beauport street. 
Amorj, corner of Beauport street. 
Amory, near Dubuque street. 
Amory, corner of Rimmon street. 
Bath, corner of River street. 
Bath, corner of Shirley street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Bennington, corner of Main street. 
Blaine, corner of Cleveland street. 
Blaine, east end of street. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Cartier, corner of Putnam street. 
Carroll street. 

Clinton, corner of Dover street. 
Clinton, corner of South Main street. 
Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 
Douglas, corner of Green street. 
Douglas, corner of Barr street. 
Douglas, corner of "West street. 
Douglas, corner of Main street. 



250 



Douglas, east of Main street. 

Ferry, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Quiiicy street. 

Granite, corner of Green street. 

Granite, corner of Barr street. 

Granite, corner of West street. 

Granite, corner of Dover street. 

Granite, corner of Main street. 

Granite corner of Shirley street. 

Granite, corner of River street. 

Kelly, corner of Beauport street. 

Kelly, corner of Cartier street. 

Kelly, corner of Dubuque street. 

Main, near Milford street. 

Marion, corner of McGregor street. 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, 400 feet west of Charles Hoitt's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's. 

Mast, near the J. N. Prescott house. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite '' Reed " house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main street. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of Old Bedford road. 

Patten, corner of Ferry street. 

Putnam, corner of Main street. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 

Putnam, corner of Dubuque street. 

Riddle, near Mast street. 

School, corner of South Main street. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 



251 

School, corner of River street. 
Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 
Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry street. 
Sullivan, corner of Main street. 
Sullivan, corner of Beauport street. 
Temple, corner of Main street. 
Walker, corner of River street. 
Walker, corner of Patten street. 
Walker, corner of Parker street. 
Walker, near corner of South Main street. 
Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 
Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 
Wayne, near corner of Main street. 
Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Dunbarton road, corner of Front street. 

Dunbarton road, near L. D. Colby's. 

GolFstown road, four hydrants. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 

Main, near brick school house. 

Main, corner of Gofistown road. 

Main, opposite the John E. Stearns house. 

Main, near the Hiram Stearns house. 

Mill, near paper-mill. 

Mill, corner of Main street. 

Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are five private hydrants 
that are available in case of need : 

Two at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at the A. H. Lowell iron foundry. 
Total number, 441. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith respectfully 
submit their thirty-sixth annual report of the affairs and 
condition of the library, and, accompanying the same, 
the report made to them by the treasurer of the board, 
showing the amounts received and the expenditures 
made by him, in behalf of the board, from the funds in 
their possession and under their control, and also the re- 
port of the librarian, which gives in detail the statis- 
tics and operations of the library during the year, and 
the condition of the library and property under her 
charge at the close of the year. 

From the report of the treasurer, it appears that during 
the year the sum of eleven hundred forty-five dollars and 
forty-six cents has been expended for the purchase of books 
and the sum of one hundred sixty-three dollars and seventy- 
five cents for the purchase of periodicals, being a total ex- 
penditure for both these purposes of thirteen hundred and 
nine dollars and twenty-one cents. Of the amount ex- 
pended for the purchase of books, the sum of one hun- 
dred and sixteen dollars and twelve cents was taken from 
the income of the Dean Fund and applied to the increase 
of that department of the library. The balance in the 
hands of the treasurer, at the close of the year, of the 



256 

amount appropriated by the City Councils for the pur- 
chase of books, was nine hunflred and thirty-nine dollars 
and ninety-one cents. 

The balance of the accumulated income of the Dean 
Fund, unexpended at the close of the year, was five thou- 
sand five hundred and forty-two dollars and tweuty-five 
cents. In expending the income of this fund, the trustees, 
in accordance with the plan heretofore adopted, have made 
purchases of special works on mechanical and scientific 
subjects not ordinarily found in private libraries. 

The accumulated income of the Mary E. Elliot fund 
at the close of the year, was four hundred and fourteen 
dollars and nineteen cents. The trustees hope to arrange 
during the coming year, for the purchase, from the income 
of this fund, of medical books and publications in ac- 
cordance with the request expressed in the will of Mrs. 
Elliot. 

The incidental expenses of the library, for the past 
year, have been two thousand one hundred and sixty-four 
dollars and seven cents. The items of these expenditures 
may be found in detail in the annual report of the city, 
the bills for the same having been paid by the city treas- 
urer from the sum appropriated for the library upon their 
approval by the trustees. 

The report of the librarian shows that the library has 
been open for the delivery of books three hundred and 
seven days. During this period, the number of books 
delivered for home use was forty-nine thousand one hun- 
dred and eighty-seven. In addition to this number, nine 
thousand three hundred and eighty-three books and mag- 
azines have been delivered for use in the reading-room, 
making the total number delivered during the year fifty- 
eight thousand five hundred and seventy, an average of 
one hundred and ninety per day. 



257 

As compared with the year preceding, the circulation 
for home use is about twelve hundred less, while the 
number delivered for use at the reading-room, compared 
with the same year, shows an increase of three thousand 
three hundred and Hfty-two. 

The number of books delivered for use in the reading- 
room has constantly increased during the past five years, 
while the circulation for home use during the same period 
has gradually fallen off until for the past year it was more 
than three thousand less than the average for the j&ve 
years previous. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of 
the last report was thirty-one thousand two hundred and 
fifty. There have been added during the year by pur- 
chase six hundred and two volumes; by donation, five 
hundred and eighty-one volumes, and ninety volumes of 
periodicals have been bound, making the number of bound 
volumes in the library at the end of the year thirty thou- 
sand five hundred and seventeen, and the total number, 
including maps and pamphlets, thirty-two thousand five 
hundred and twenty-three. 

During the year sixty-four volumes have been taken 
from the shelves and withdrawn from circulation, having 
become too much worn to be of further use. Of this 
number and of others retired in previous years for the 
same cause, fifty-three have been replaced. 

The number of different periodicals regularly received 
at the library during the year has been eighty-two, — 
sixty-one by purchase and twenty-one by donation, — and 
as the various volumes have been completed they have 
been bound and placed upon the shelves for circulation. 

Annexed to the report of the librarian, will be found a list 
of the books presented to the library during the past year, 
together with the names of the persons presenting them. 



258 

To those who have thus manifested their interest in the 
usefuhiess and increase of the library, the trustees have 
caused due acknowledgment to be made in behalf of the 
city. 

By the will of the late Mrs. Eliza A. Eaton, who had 
resided in the city for a long time, the residue and re- 
mainder of her estate after payment of debts and a few 
legacies was devised and bequeathed to the city of Man- 
chester for the benefit of the city library, the same when 
received to be expended by the trustees in the purchase 
of books for the increase of the library. The estate of 
Mrs. Eaton is still in process of settlement, and therefore 
the amount that will be realized therefrom cannot now be 
determined. It is expected, however, that the real estate 
belonging to the testatrix will be disposed of early in the 
coming spring, and that the executor will be able to pa}' 
to the city during the present year the balance of the es- 
tate in his hands on final settlement. 

The City Councils at the commencement of the year 
having appropriuted the additional sum of twenty-five 
hundred dollars ibr the eom]iilalic)n of a new catalogue 
of the library, the trustees at once took measures to se- 
cure the pre})aration of the same. After careful investi- 
gation of the metliods of classification and cataloguing in 
use in the best libraries, the trustees concluded that a sub- 
jective index catalogue on the dictionary plan would be 
the most economical, and would best meet the needs of 
the library, especially as in the preparation of such a cat- 
alogue the expense and labor of renumbering and re- 
classification of the books, as well as the closing of the 
libi'ai'v tor a time, could be avoided. In addition, it was 
thought desirable that a subjective canl catalogue should 
be prepared at the s;ime time for use at the library rooms, 
since it coiUd be made in connection with the compilation 



259 

of the printed catalogue at a much less cost, could be ex- 
tended subjectively from time to time as the needs of the 
library might demand, and keep pace with the increase 
and growth of the library with but little expense each 
year, thus altbrding the patrons of the library information 
of the latest accessions. 

Applications for the preparation of the catalogue were 
received from a large number of persons ; but a small 
number of the applicants, however, seemed to possess 
the necessary experience and qualifications to insure the 
satisfactory completion of the work. From among those 
who seemed best qualified to undertake the preparation 
of the catalogue, the trustees selected Mr. Charles A. 
Durfee, of New York, a gentleman of experience in li- 
brary work and especially in the preparation of catalogues 
for private libraries. Mr. Durfee commenced work upon 
the catalogue in the month of January last and already 
has his work well advanced. The trustees congratulate 
the City Councils and the public upon the successful in- 
itiation of the work of preparing the catalogue for the 
library, and trust that upon its completion it will meet 
the approval of all patrons of the library. 

The duties of librarian have been discharged during 
the year by Mrs. M. J. Buncher with the same conscien- 
tious effort for the accommodation of the public as here- 
tofore, and to the satisfaction of the trustees. 

The trustees desire to return their thanks to the mem- 
bers of the City Councils for the courtesy and considera- 
tion with which their recomriiendations for improvements 
at the library have been received and carried out. 

March 10, 1890. 

In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered 

to be signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and 

transmitted to the city councils. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 
N. P. Hunt, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of D'usiees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following ac- 
count of the receipts and expenditures by the board of 
the funds received on account of the library : 

1889. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation . . $1,063.59 
Feb. 7. Mrs. M. J. Buncher, fines, cata- 

logues, and lost books . . 69.41 

July .1. appropriation for books for 1889, 1,000.00 
Jan. 1. balance of income of 

Dean fund . . $5,111.52 
income of Dean fund 153.00 
July 1. income of Dean fund 153.00 

interest on accumu- 
lation of income . 240.85 

$5,658.37 



Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund $2,000.00 
balance of interest 
on Mary E. Elliot 
fund . . . 310.24 

April 2. interest on Mary E. 

Elliot fund . . 90.00 

interest on accumu- 
lation of Mary E. 
Elliot fund . . 13.95 



$2,414.19 
$10,205.56 



261 

1889. ■ Cr. 
Jan. 3. Paid New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals .... $9.07 
9. Charles C. Soule, periodicals 5.00 

11. Little, Brown & Co., books . 3.75 
22. George H. Policy & Co., pe- 
riodicals .... 6.00 

24.^ Central Law Journal, period- 
icals . . . . 5.00 
31. Parker Pillsbury, books . 1.13 
Feb. 6. New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals .... 11.46 
7. Lend A Hand Publishing 

Co., periodicals . . . 2.00 
7. John N. McClintock, periodi- 
cals 2.00 

7. John N. McClintock, books . 3.00 

7. Charles Scribner's Sons, books 6.00 

8. Little, Brown & Co., books . 4.25 
20. Laughton, Macdonald & Co., 

books .... 5.00 
March 2. Little, Brown & Co., books . 5.00 
4. New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals .... 12.05 

12. Wm. Macdonald & Co., books 8.35 
19. Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 

books .... 5.50 
27. C. A. Stevens, books . . 27.00 
April 2. New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals .... 13.83 
10. Little, Brown & Co., books . 3.50 
10. C. A. Stevens, books . . 30.00 
27. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 143.13 
30. W. E. Johnson, books . . 46.00 



May 


1 




3, 




16, 




20, 




21, 




25, 


June 


4. 




6. 




10. 




15. 



262 

Little, Bi'own & Co. (Dean 

fund), books . . . §116.12 
New England Xews Co., pe- 
riodicals . ... . 12.27 
B. A. Fowler & Co., books . 50.00 
Library Bureau, books . . 5.00 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 71.96 
W. B. Clarke Si Co., books . 57.4.3 
New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals .... 14.05 
George E. Littlefield, books . 8.10 
The History Company, books 4.50 
New Hampshire State Li- 
brary, books . . . 2.00 
July 6. New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals . . . . 12.32 
H. C. Nash, books . . 5.00 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 9.59 
New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals .... 10.49 
Temple & Farrington, books 4.30 
New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals . . . . 14.70 
W. II. Briggs, treas., books 5.00 
Little, Brown Sc Co., books . 4.25 
Wm. Macdonald Sc Co., books 8.75 
New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals .... 10.23 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 146.98 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 85.79 
The History Company, books 4.50 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 34.84 
New England News Co., pe- 
riodicals .... 9.52 





6. 




9. 


Aug. 


5. 




22. 


Sept. 


3 




3. 




4. 




27. 


Oct. 


3. 




16. 




21. 




24. 




29. 


Nov. 


2. 



263 



Nov. 4. The History Corapaii}^, books 

19. Geo. E. Littlefield, books 

21. Houghton, Mifflin & Co.,books 

27. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 

29. Estes & Lauriat, books . 

Dec. 4. New England News Co., pe- 

riodicals .... 
18. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 

21. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 

31. By balance of appropriation . 
Dean fund 
Mary E. EHiot fund 
and interest . 



$4.50 
9.45 
5.50 

19.98 
9.00 

13.76 

221.06 

10.25 

939.91 

5,542.25 

2,414.19 
$10,205.56 



The expenditures for incidental expenses of the library 
for the year ending December 31, 1889, paid upon the 
approval of the Committee on Accounts of the Board of 
Trustees, the items of which ma}^ be found in detail in the 
annual report of the city, are as follows : 



Services of librarian 
Services of assistant to HI 


traria 


n 






$800.00 
307.00 


Gas 








212.94 


Insurance 












100.00 


Binding , 












163.09 


Rebinding 
Fuel 












207.87 
272.45 


Newspapers 
Printing . 












6.00 
11.00 


Supplies . 
Catalogue 
Incidentals 












39.33 
23.90 
20.49 



5,164.07 



264 



RECAPITULATION, 



Balance Dec. 31, 1888 (for catalogue, S800, 

general balance, $1,187.62) .... $1,987.62 
Appropriation for 1889 4,000.00 



$5,987.62 

Paid trustees for purchase of books $1,000.00 
Paid incidental expenses . . 2,164.07 

Balance Dec. 31, 1889 (for cata- 
logue, $776.10, general balance, 

$2,047.45) 2,823.55 

$5,987.62 

Respectfully submitted. 

NATHAN P. HUNT, 

Ti^easurer of the D'lisiees of the City Lihrar.y. 



December 31, 1889. 
We have examined the foregoing report, and find the 
same correctly cast' and properly vouched. 

D. B. VARNEY, 
L. B. CLOFGH, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 81, 1889. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of 
receipts and expenditures embraced in the foregoing 
report of the Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Libra- 
ry, and find the saiue correctly cast and [)ropcrly vouched. 

N. P. KIDDER, 

City A uditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gmtlemen of the Board of Trustees: 

I respectfully submit to you the thirty -sixth annual re- 
port of the City Library, showing the work of the year 
and its present condition. 



Whole number of volumes Dec. 31, 1888 

Accessions during the year : 

By purchase .... 602 

Donated ..... 581 

Periodicals bound ... 90 



Whole number of volumes at present : 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets .... 1,990 
Bound volumes . . . 30,517 



Number of periodicals and papers regularl}' 
received ...... 

Number by gift ..... 

Number of days open to the public 
Days open for delivery of books 
Number of books delivered for home use 
Average per day ..... 



31,250 



1,273 



32,523 



82 

21 

307 

307 

49,187 

160.2 



266 



Largest number any one day, February 23 
Largest nunil)er any one month, March 
Number of books, magazines, etc., used in 

the reading-room .... 

Average per day ..... 
Number of guarantees received and cards 

issued during the year 
Whole number since new registration . 
Number of cards returned to the library 
Number of cards used on deposit , 
Notices sent to delinquents . 
Number of books taken from circulation unfit 

for longer use 

Volumes replaced during the year . 

Number of books missing 

Lost and paid for . 

Number of books repaired and rebound at 

the bindery ..... 

Repaired and covered in the library 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1888'. 
Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec 31, 1889 



Amount paid for express, station- ■ 

ery, and incidentals . . . $52.05 

Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . . 59.60 



422 

4,990 

9,383 
31 

395 

7,268 

105 

5 

397 

64 
53 

2 

1 

574 
4,216 

$59.60 
129.98 

$189.58 



Sill. 65 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1888 . 

Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1888, for 
catalogues, supplements, and books lost or 
injured ....... 



$77.93 



$9.81 



267 



Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1889 

For 6 catalogues sold . . $2.50 

For supplements . . .75 

One book lost and paid for . .55 



$3.80 



$13.61 
Paid the treasurer 9.81 



$3.80 
Balance of fines on hand .... 77.93 



Total balance on hand .... $81.73 

In presenting my twelfth annual report for your accept- 
ance, I regret to be obliged to record the same condition 
of affairs as in the last two or three years, viz., the falling 
off in the circulation of books for home use. The issue 
has been steadily decreasing since 1885. It is not neces- 
sary to repeat what has been said in previous reports rel- 
ative to the causes of the above, but rather to express a 
hope that another year will bring the one most essential 
help, whereby the public will be made acquainted with 
the valuable accessions to the library in the last twelve 
years. To this change the patrons are looking forward 
with some impatience and a good deal of interest. The 
work to be accomplished is of vital importance to the 
library, and although it will be a considerable time before 
they will receive the benefit, there is no doubt they will 
exercise a good degree of patience when they see the 
work in progress. The library is rapidly growing in size 
and value, and ought to receive an increased interest 
from the public. 

There has been an unusual degree of interest mani- 
fested in the use of the reading-room. It will be seen 



268 

that the nunil)er of readers far exceeds that of last year, 
and the demand has heen for a hetter cLiss of literature. 
The improved, quiet condition of the room has been a 
source of pleasure and frequent remark. 

The accession the past year shows an increase of 1,257 
bound volumes and 16 pamphlets, — 602 by purchase and 
581 by gift, — and 90 volumes of bound periodicals and 
papers, a total of 1,273. Of this number, 21 volumes 
were a purchase from the Dean Fund, and 20 volumes of 
the S. C. Gould purchase, bound and entered the present 
year. Of this purchase there are a few remaining vol- 
umes to be added as soon as numbers can be obtained to 
complete them. The number of pamphlets is small ow- 
ing to our present method of holding them in cases until 
the number of each class is sufficient for a volume, when 
they will be entered and specified in the accession-book. 

Eighty-two periodicals and papers have been regularly 
received. Of this number, twenty-one were gifts. Two 
have been discontinued and nine added since last year. 

The number of gifts from the several departments of 
Congress has been unusually large, owing to the arrange- 
ment made by the Interior Department for drawing 
duplicates from the usual Depositories of Public Docu- 
ments throughout the country and supplying deficiencies, 
a mutual exchange to complete sets. 

Sixty-four volumes have been taken from circulation, 
literally worn out. Many more are in a poor c-ondition, 
waiting to be replaced, '^i'here are a large number of 
vacant phices that ought to be filled. The absence of so 
many i)()[)ular books gives additional labor to the libra- 
rian and assistant, as they are so constantly ininiirod for. 
Only fifty-three have been replaced the past 3'eai'. 

The number of volumes repaired at the bindery is some- 
what lai'ger than last year. Many of the books are so 



269 

nearly used up that they require frequent repairs. The 
Ubrary work of repairing and covering has been about 
the same as usual. 

The examinations have been very satisfactory. The 
"first six months of the year not a book was missing. At 
the close of the year, only two are unaccounted for, one 
small book of fiction, one old volume of juvenile. 

With sincere thanks to the treasurer of the board for 
his kind assistance through the year, this, my twelfth re- 
port, is respectfully submitted. 

MRS. M. J. BUNCHER, 

Librarian, 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 

1889. 



Hon. James F. Briggs. 

Eleven volumes of the OflBcial Records of the Union 
and Confederate Armies. 8vo. 

Hon. L. F. McKinney. 

Eleven volumes of Executive Documents of the Inte- 
rior and Navy Departments, 1888-89. 8vo. 

Third Annual Report of the Commissioners of La- 
bor (Strikes and Lockouts), 1887. 8vo. 

Annual Report of Smithsonian Institution, 1886. 8vo. 

United States Coast and Geodetic Survey for 1886. 
4to. 

Three volumes of the United States Commission on 
Fish and Fisheries. 4to. Text, 2 vols, ; plates, 
1vol. 

Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of 
Hon. Austin Pike. February, 1887. 8vo. 

Hon. J. H. Gallinger, M. C. 

Commerce and Navigation of the United States, Im- 
migration and Tonnage for the year 1888. 1 vol. 
8vo. 

Hon. a. B. Thompson, Secretary of State, N. H. 

State Papers of New llanipsliiro (Hammond), vol. 

17; of the Revolutionary War Rolls, vol. 4. 8vo. 
Reports of the State for the year 1882, 1 vol. ; 1888, 

2 vols. 3 vols. 8vo. 



271 

D. F. Secomb, Librarian, Concord, E". H. 

Thirty-sixth annual report of the City of Concord, 

K H., for the year 1888. 12mo. 
Annual Report of the Union School District, 1888-89. 
. Pamphlet. 

Ten numbers of the Farmer's Monthly Visitor, vol. 
9, 1847. 

Charles R. Corning, Esq., Concord, 

Dedication of the Fowler Library Building, Concord, 
K H., October 18, 1888. Pamphlet. 

Rev. G. L. Demarest, Manchester. 

Seventy-seven volumes of Magazines, viz. : 

Popular Science Monthly. 27 vols. From 1872 

to 1888, inclusive. 
North American Review. 36 vols. 1860 to 1888, 

inclusive. 
Education (International Magazine). 5 vols. 1880 

to 1884, inclusive. 
Harper's Monthly. 5 vols. 1873 to 1875 inclusive. 
Forum. Vols. 4, 5, 6, 7. 
One hundred and thirty-one miscellaneous pamphlets. 

Mrs. Judge Stanley, Manchester. 

Set of Dartmouth College Catalogues from 1831 to 
1888, inclusive, except 1833, 1834, and 1839. 

Ex-Governor Smyth, Manchester. 

Sketches of the Life and Services of Frederick 
Smyth, of JSTew Hampshire, compiled by Ben : Per- 
ley Poore and F. B. Eaton. 1885. 8vo. 

J. Henry Stickney, Esq., Baltimore. 

Poems of the Pilgrims. Selected by Z. H. Spooner. 
1886. 12mo. 



272 

Irving A. Watson, M. D., Concord. 

Fifth Annual Report of the State Board of Health. 

1886. 8vo. 
Sixth Annual Keport of the Registration. 1885. 

8vo. 

Joseph B. Walker, Es'q., Concord. 

New Hampshire Federal Convention. 1788. 12mo. 

State Library, Concord, N. H. 

Thirteen volumes of the New Hampshire County 
Reports. From 1876 to 1888, inclusive. 12mo, 

Hennecke Co., Chicago. 

Art Studies. Fourth edition. 1889. 4to. 

New Jersey Historical Society. 

General Index to the first ten volumes of the New 
Jersey Archives. 1889. 8vo. 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Boston. 

Census of Massachusetts. 6 vols. For the year 

1875, 2 vols; 1885, 4 vols. 
Statistics of Labor for the years 1872, 1874, 1879, 

1886, 1887, 1888. 6 vols. 8vo. 
Statistics of Manufactures. 1886-87. 1 vol. 8vo. 
Memorial of Gen. Henry K. Oliver. 1 vol. 8vo. 
Fourteen miscellaneous pamphlets. 

Belford, Clarke & Co., Chicago. 

"Mr. Donnelly's Reviewers," by William D. O'Con- 
nor, of the Life-saving Service. 1889. 12mo. 

Richard Randolph, Esij., I'hiladelphia. 

Sober Thoughts on Staple Themes. 1889. 12mo. 
Windfalls. 1889. 12mo. rublished bv the author. 



273 

Mks. 0. C. MooKE, ITashua. 

Journal of the Fifth National Convention of the 
Woman's Relief Corps, held in St. Louis, 1887. 
8vo. 

G, C. GiLMORE, Esq., Manchester. 

Biographical Sketches of Delegates to the New 
Hampshire Constitutional Convention. 1889. 8vo. 

Journal of the Constitutional Convention. 1889. 8vo. 

Bill of Rights and the Constitution of New Hamp- 
shire, etc. 1889. Pamphlet. 

Vote on the Constitutional Amendment. 1877. 
Pamphlet. 

Constitution of the Amoskeas: Veterans. November 
20, 1855. Pamphlet. 

Address before the Amoskeag Veterans. By C. E. 
Potter. February 22, 1855. Pamphlet. 

Charles F. Livingston, Esq., Manchester. 

Six volumes of the Unity and University, for the 

years 1886, 1887, and 1888. Published at Chicago 

by Charles H. Kerr. 4to. 
A Silent City, and other Poems. By Arul. 1885. 

12mo. 
Printer's Circular, vol. 23. 1888. 12mo. 

S. C. Gould, Esq., Manchester. 

Report of Agriculture for 1881-82. 8vo. 

Notes and Queries for the year 1889. Edited and 

published b}^ S. C. Gould. 8vo. 
Bibliograph}^ on the Polemic Problem. No. 2. 

Pamphlet. 1888. 
The Path of Rectitude, or Ye Samian Y. 1889. 

Pamphlet. 



274 

Harry Clifton, Mancliester. 

A Trip Around the World. By George Moerlein, 

of Cincinnati. 1888. 8vo. 
Stanley's Wonderful Adventures in Africa. By 

Hon. J. T. Headley. 1889. 8vo. 
Sword and Pen, or Ventures and Adventures of 

Willard Glazier, the soldier author. By John A. 

Owens, riiiladelphia. 1889. 12mo. 

A. E. Lancaster (Author), New York. 
All is Dross but Love. 16mo. 1889. 

S. A. McEean & Co. 

The Law of Municipal Bonds. By J. A. Burhans of 
the Chicago Bar. 1889. 12mo. 

Edward 0. Kinsman, Secretary. 

Proceedings of the twenty-fifth annual meeting of 
the New England Dental Society. Boston. Octo- 
ber, 1887. 8vo. 

Hon. Henry H. Huse, Commissioner. 

Annual report of the Lisurance Commissioner of 
New Hampshire. June, 1889. 8vo. 

Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

The Medical Temperance Journal for the year 1889. 
12mo. 

H. E. Messenger, Manchester. 
Seven volumes, viz. : 

Heaven opened. By Emanuel Swedenborg. 1870. 

12ino. 
Unitarian jirinciples. By John \\'ilson. 1855. 8vo. 
Ivanhoe. Sir Walter Scott. 12nu>. 
Tom Brown's School Days. Thomas Hughes. 1887. 
12mo. 



275 

The Scottish Chiefs. Jane Porter. 12mo. 

Cast Up by the Sea. By Samuel W. Baker, F. R. 

G. S. i2rao. 
She. By Rider Haggard. 12mo. 

Judge IST. P. Hunt, Manchester. 

Valedictory Address of Hon. John Hosley, Mayor, 

December 28, 1888. Pamphlet. 
Inaugural Address of Hon. David Yarney, Mayor, 

January 1, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Memorial Address of Hon. C. H. Bartlett before the 

Frederick Smyth Post, G. A. R, Newport, R. I. 

1889. Pamphlet. 
Annual report of the Count}" Commissioner. 1888. 

Pamphlet. 
Report of the "Water Commissioner of the city of 

Manchester for the year 1888. Five pamphlets. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 

Annual reports of the Fire Department of Manches- 
ter for the years 1884, 1886, 1887, and 1888. Four 
pamphlets. 

The Fire Service of Manchester, K. H. (a souvenir). 
Published by the Manchester Firemen's Relief 
Association. 1888. Two pamphlets. 

Hon. William H. Stewart, M. C, Nevada. 

Speech on the Question, Money and the Tariff. 
January 2, 1889. Pamphlet. 

Gen. Thomas Ewing. 

Address at the Centennial celebration at Marietta, 
O., July 15, 1888. On the Settlement of the 
Northwest Territor}^ Pamphlet. 



276 

C. B. Spofford, Esq., Claremont. 

Proceedings of the Pharmaceutical Society, Septem- 
ber, 1888 and 1889. Two pamphlets. 

Old Resident Historical Association, Lowell. 

Contributions No. 2. Vol. 4. 1889. Pamphlet. 

Franklin L. Pope, Esq. 

Evolution of the Electric Incandescent Lamp. By 
F. L. Pope. Elizabeth, N. J. Pamphlet. 

University of California. 

Register for the year 1888-89. Pamphlet. 

Omaha Board of Trade. 

Twelfth annual report. 1888-89. Pamphlet. 

Amherst College, Massachusetts. 

Catalogue for the year 1889-90. Pamphlet. 

Massachusetts New Church Union. 

The New Church Almanac for 1889. 12mo. 

Unknown. 

Looking Backward. By Edward Bellamy. 1889. 

16mo. 
Conception of Deity. Extracts from the Life of 

Jesus and the Apostolic Age. Pamphlet. 
Orjj:anization and Historical Sketch of the Woman's 

Anthropological Society of America. Pamphlet. 
Pratt's Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. Record Xo. 1. 

Vol. 1. (Founder's Day.) October, 1889. Pam- 

[)hlet. 
Eight pamphlets, viz. : 

Letters on the Annexation of Santo l)t)iningo. Hy 

Sam.uel G. Howe, M. D. 
Letters on the State Reform Schools for Girls. S. G. 

Howe. 



277 

The Cause and Prevention of Idiocy. 

Letter to the Governor of Massachusetts in behalf of 
the school for idiotic children. S. G. Howe, M. D. 

Letter of Dr. Howe in behalf of the pauper lunatics 

An Appeal to the people of the United States in be- 
half of the women and children of the Island of 
Crete, etc., etc. 

Reports from Librarians and Boards of Trustees, 
Boston, Mass. 

Annual report for the year 1888. Pamphlet. 
Bulletin 'No. 3. Vol. 8. Containing books added 

from May t© September, 1888. 
Plans of the new library building to be erected on 
Copley square. 
Baltimore, Md. Twenty-second annual report of the 

Peabody Institute. June, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Bridgeport, Conn. Eighth annual report. May 31, 

1889. Pamphlet. 
Brookline, Mass. Thirty-second annual report. 1888. 

Pamphlet. 
Birmingham, Eng. Twenty-seventh annual report of 
the Free Libraries Committee for the year 1888. 
Pamphlet. 
Brooklyn, IST. Y. Thirty-first annual report of the 
Board of Directors. March 28, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Bulletin No. 27. December 1, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Chicago, 111. Seventeenth annual report of the Pub- 
lic Library. June, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Proceedings of the Trustees of the Newbury Li- 
brary tor 1888. Pamphlet. 
Cleveland, O. Alphabetical Catalogue of the Pub- 
lic Library. 1889. 4to. 
Twentieth annual report. August, 1888. Pam- 
phlet. 



278 

Clinton, Mass. Bigelow Free Library. Fifteenth 
annual report. 1888. Pamphlet. 

Cincinnati, 0. Librarian and Treasurer's report for 
the year ending June 30, 1887. Pamphlet. 

Detroit, Mich. Eighth annual report of the Library 
Commission for 1888. Pamphlet. 

Dover, N. H. Fifth annual rejjort of the Public Li- 
brary for 1887. Pamphlet. 

Dedham, Mass. Annual report for the year 1888. 
Pamphlet. 

Fall Piver, Mass. Bulletin containing accession of 
books to the Public Library from January, 1886, 
to January, 1889. 8vo. 

Germantown, Phila. Report of Friends' Free Li- 
brary and Peading-room for the year 1888. Pam- 
phlet. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. Annual reports from Septem- 
ber 1, 1888, to August 31, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Catalogue, section 2, of the Public School Library. 
August, 1889. 8vo. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Seventh annual reports. From 
July, 1886, to June, 1888. Pamphlet. 

Lynn, Mass. Twenty-sixth annual report. For the 
year 1888. Pamphlet. 

Lawrence, Mass. Seventeenth annual report of the 
Free Public Library. 1888. Pamphlet. 

Lowell, Mass. Annual report of the Cit}' Library 
for 1888. Pamphlet. 

Melrose, Mass. Report for the year 1888. Pamphlet. 

Mahlen, Mass. Eleventh Annual Report for the year 
1888. Pamphlet. 

New York. Report of the Maimonides IVibrary for 
the year 1888. Pamphlet. 



279 

ISTew Haven, Conn, Second annual report of Public 

Library. 1888. Pamphlet. 
N'ewark, X. J, Opening exercises of the new edifice 

of the ITewark Library Association. West Park. 

October, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Newton, Mass. Annual report of the Free Library. 

1888. Pamphlet. 
Omaha, ]Neb. Report of the Public Library for the 

year ending May 31, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Providence, R. L Eleventh annual report for the 

year 1888. Pamphlet. 
Peabody, Mass, Report of the Peabody Institute for 

1888-89. Pamphlet. 
Philadelphia. Sixty-ninth annual report of the Ap- 
prentices' Library Company. 1888. Pamphlet. 

Bulletins of the Library Company, January, June. 
Two pamphlets. 
San Francisco. Mercantile Library Association. 
Thirty-sixth annual report. 1888, Pamphlet. 

Report of Free Public Library for the year end- 
ing June 30, 1889. Pamphlet. 
St. Louis, Mo. Annual report of Public Library. 

1887-88. Pamphlet. 
Springfield, Mass. Library Association. Annual 

report for the year ending May 6, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Swansea, Wales. Fifteenth annual report of the 

Public Library and Gallery of Art Committee. 

1888-89. Pamphlet, 
Wilmington, Del. Report of Wilmington Institute. 

April, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Waterbury, Conn. Finding-list of the'Silas Bronson 

Library. 1889. 8vo. 
Worcester, Mass. Free Public Library. Twenty- 
ninth annual report. ISTovember 30,'^1888. Pam- 
phlet. 



280 

Wobiirii, Mass. Fourth [iiinual report of the Free 
Library. 1888. Pamphlet. 

From the Several Publishers. 

" Good Health." A Journal of Hygiene. From the 

Sanitarium Health and Temperance Society, Battle 

Creek, Mich. For the year 1880. 4to. . 
"American Sentinel." Pacific Press Association, 

Oakland, Cal. For the year 1889. Folio. 
"Plymouth Record," Plymouth, N. H. For 1889. 

Folio. 
" The Veteran's Advocate." Concord, IST. H. Pre- 
sented by Mr. Harry Clifton, Manchester. Folio. 
" New Hampshire Catholic." Published by Charles 

A. O'Connor, Manchester. For 1889. Folio. 
"The Daily Press." Daily Press Company, Man- 
chester, K H. For the year 1889. Folio. 
"The Weekly Budget." Published by Challis & 

Eastman, Manchester. For 1888. {Bound Copy.) 

Folio. 
"The Manifesto." Published at Shaker Village. 

Canterbury, X. H. For 1889. 8vo. 
" The Voice." A Temperance Journal. Funk & 

Wagnalls, New York City. For 1889. Folio. 
"Lawrence Anzeiger." Published at Lawrence, 

Mass. For the year 1889. Folio. 
" Weirs Times." M. X. Calvert, Weirs, X. II. For 

the suinmer months of 1889. Folio. 
"Weekly Oregonian.'' Pu])lished at Portland, Or., 

by L. Samuel. For 1889. Folio. 
" Denver Times." A daily paper. riiMished by the 

Times Company, Denver, Col. For the year 1889. 

P^olio. 



281 

"The Open Court." A Weekly Journal of Relig- 
ion and Science. Published at Chicago. Vol. 3. 
For 1889. 4to. 

"The Practical Mechanic." Published by F. S. 
Blanchard & Co., Worcester, Mass. For 1889. 
Folio. 

" West Shore." From the Oregon Immigration 
Board, Portland, Oregon. For one year from 
Sept. 14, 1889, to Sept., 1890. 4to. 

"The City Library." Published monthly by the 
City Library Association, Springfield, Mass. Vol. 
■ 2. For 1889. 4to. 

" The Traveler's Record." Published by The Trav- 
elers' Lisurance Co., Hartford, ('onn. For 1889. 
4to. 

united states government. 

State Department. 

Report of a committee of the Lords of the Privy 

Council on the trade of Great Britain with the 

United States. January, 1791. 4to. 
Commercial Relations of the United States with 

Foreign Countries in 1886 and 1887. 2 vols. 

8vo. 
Trade and Transportation between the United States 

and Spanish America. By William E. Curtis. 

1889. 
Consular Reports. Vols. 28 and 29. E'os. 108 and 

109 of vol. 30. 1889. 
First annual report on the Statistics of Railwaj^s in 

the United States to the Interstate Commerce 

Commission. For the year. June 30, 1888. 8vo. 
Second annual report of the Interstate Commerce 

Commission. December 1, 1888. 8vo. 



282 

(To fill vacancies.) 

Official Register of the United States for 1885. 2 
vols. 4to. 

International Mo)ietary Conference. 1878. 8vo. 

Digest of the Puhlic Opinions of the Attorney-Gen- 
eral in the Federal Courts, etc. 1877. 8vo, 

Report of the Electrical Conference in Philadelphia. 
1884. 8vo. 

International Sanitary Conference. 1881. 8vo. 

Survey of the Northern Boundary of the United 
States, from the Lake of the Woods to the Sum- 
mit of the Rocky Mountains. 1878. 4to, and 24 
maps. 

Twenty-eight volumes of cloth-bound documents per- 
taining to the Commercial and Foreign Relations 
of the United States, from 1868 to 1887, inclu- 
sive. 8vo. 

Treasury Department. 

Report of the Director of the Mint, for the year 

1888. 8vo. 
Production of Gold and Silver in the United States 

in 1887 and 1888. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Report of the Comptroller of the Currency for the 

year 1888. vols. 1 and 2. 8vo. 
Annual report of the Secretary of the Treasury on 

the Finances for 1888. 8vo. 
Bulletins of the United States Coast and Geodetic 

Survey, Nos. 1 to 13, inclusive. 1889. 
Coast and Geodetic Survey for the year 1887. 4to. 

Interior Department. 

Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office 
for the vear 1889. 4 vols. 8vo. 



283 

Foiirtli annual report of the Commissioner of Labor, 

viz., Working Women in Large Cities. 1888. 

8vo. 
Annual report of the Commissioner of Patents, for 

1889. 8vo. 
Annual report of the Commissioner of Pensions for 

1889. 8vo. 
Bureau of Education. 

Circulars of Information. !N"os. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. 

1888. Pamphlets. 

Contributions to American Educational History. 
ITos. 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, viz.. Education in N^orth and 
South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Wisconsin. 

1889. Pamphlets. 

Report of the Commissioner of Education. 1886 
and 1887. 8vo. 

Smithsonian Institution. 

Joseph Henry and the Magnetic Telegraph. By 
Edward M. Dickenson, LL. D. 8vo. 

War Department. 

International Polar Expedition, viz., Expedition to 
Lady Franklin Bay, Grinnell Land. Vol. 1. By 
A. W. Greeley. 1885. 4to. 

Chief Signal Officer, U. S. A. 

Summary and Review of International Meteorologi- 
cal Observations for the years 1885, 1886, 1887. 
3 vols. 4to. 

Tri-Daily Meteorological Record for the months of 
May to December, inclusive, completing the vol- 
ume for the year 1878. 

United States Fish Commission. 

Geographical Review of the Industries and Fishery 



284 

Communities for the year 1880. Section 2. 1 

vol. 4to. Sections 3, 4, and 5. With plates. 
1887. 5 vols. 4to. 
Investigation of the Fur-Seal and other Fisheries of 

Alaska. 1889. 8vo. 
Commissioners' report for the year 1886, on the 

Propagation of Food Fishes, etc. 8vo.| 

Department of Agriculture. 

Hon. J. M. Rusk, secretary. Album of Agricultural 
Statistics of the United States. June, 1889. 2 
vols. 4to. 

United States Congress. 

One hundred twenty-four volumes of Public Docu- 
ments of the Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth and 
Forty-ninth Congresses, belonging to the regular 
set. 
One hundredfand ninety volumes belonging to Early 
Congresses, to fill vacancies. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the 31ai/or: 

The Board of Health submits its report for the year 
1889. At the beginning of the year the board consisted 
of George C. Hoitt, M. D., chairman, Joseph B. Sawyer, 
clerk, and William M. Parsons, M, D. On the first 
Monday of February the term of Mr. Sawyer expired, 
and he was reappointed for three years. On the same 
day the Board was re-organized by the re-election of the 
old officers, and as thus constituted and organized it has 
remained unchanged. 



FINANCES. 



The appropriation for the year was $1,400. The Board 
has drawn against this as follows : 

Pay of employes 
Street-car fares . 



Stationery and postage 
Carriage-hire 
Printing . 
Advertising 
Traveling expenses . 
Fixtures at city hospital 

Total $864.79 

This is seven dollars more than is charged against the 
Board by the city clerk. The discrepancy is occasioned 



$629.50 
34.05 
13.00 
14.50 
80.00 
43.90 
48.34 
1.50 



288 



by two bills approved by us, and amounting to that sum, 
which were by him charged to some other account. In 
addition to the above amount drawn by the Board, the 
sum of two hundred and forty-three dollars has been 
drawn against the health department appropriation by 
other parties. In 1888 the amount thus drawn was seven 
hundred dollars. It is hoped that with the advent of a 
city auditor this practice has ceased. 



WORK OF THE INSPECTOR. 

Mr. Russell White has been employed throughout the 
year. His work, so fiir as it has been recorded, has been 
as follows : 

Houses placarded for infectious diseases : 

Scarlet fever 224 

Diphtheria 72 

Measles 38 

334 

In a large proportion of these cases it has been neces- 
sary to notifv school teachers and employers of the pres- 
ence of the disease ; also it involves a second visit to the 
house for the purpose of removing the placard after the 
receipt of the doctor's certificate that the danger of infec- 
tion has passed. 

Number of privy- vaults inspected after being cleaned 1,204 



Houses containing cases of typhoi<l fever visited 
Dead animals Ixiricd : 



35 



Swine ...... 


. 38 


Horses 


. 20 


Dogs 


. IG 


Cats 


. 8 


Skunk ...... 


1 



83 



289 

Two ImiKlred and thirtj-six inspections were made by 
him, resulting generally in finding nuisances, the abate- 
ment of which was secured. A considerable number of 
complaints have been investigated, and nuisances not 
complained of have been found and abated by the indi- 
vidual action of members of the board. 

PRIVY-VAULTS. 

The cleaning of privy- vaults by licensed parties using 
the so-called odorless process, has been continued during 
the year, and has caused very little inconvenience or com- 
plaint, not nearly so much as has the existence of the 
vaults themselves. Very few of our people would now 
tolerate the old style of night-work, with its accompany- 
ing stench, filth, and inefficiency. Two parties, Mr, 
Timothy McKenna and Mr. Timothy Shea have taken 
licences. The former has returned three hundred and 
fortv-nine vaults cleaned, and the latter eio;ht hundred 
and fifty-five. The Board has granted thirty-eight special 
permits for parties to clean their own vaults. The rule 
is to give these only in the outskirts of the city, w^here 
the lots are large, and where the contents of the vault are 
small in quantity, and to give them only after an exam- 
ination of the premises. The conditions of the permit 
are : 

That the cleaning shall be between sunrise and sunset ; that the 
contents of said vault shall not be taken away fi'om said premises, 
or carried over, or deposited upon, any street or highway, or the 
premises of any other person ; that said contents shall not be buried 
deeply in the earth, but shall be thoi'oughly worked into the surface 
soil as manure ; that the work of opening, removing, and depositing 
shall be so performed by the use of deodorizing and disinfecting 
agents that no offensive or noxious odors shall escape dui'ing the 
process; and that said permit shall not be valid after three days 
from its date. 



290 

The Board is considering measures for abolishing, or at 
least greatly diminishing, the number of these evil-smell- 
ing institutions in all the sewered parts of the city. The 
legislature at its last session passed the following act. It 
seems to give health officers all needed powers in this 
regard : 

Sect. 1. If any person shall erect or continue any house of ease- 
ment or privy, arranged for the storage of excrement, within one 
hundred feet of any public sewer, the health oifieers may direct 
such privy to be proj^erly connected with said sewer, if in their judg- 
ment such action is necessary to abate a nuisance or for the public 
good; and no privy, or pen, or sty for swine shall be erected or 
continued so near any street, dwelling, shop, or well of any jjerson 
.as in the judgment of the healtli officers to be a nuisance. Any 
person violating the provisions of this act, after due notice in writ- 
ing from the health officers, shall be fined ten dollars, and a like 
fine for each month he shall continue to violate the same. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take eftect upon its passage, and section 
11, chapter 111 of the (General Laws is hereby repealed, and all 
other acts and i)arts of acts inconsistent with this act are hereby 
repealed. 

THE DISPOSAL OF WASTE MATTERS. 

The city dumping-places have for a long time been a 
fruitful cause of complaint from our citizens. At the re- 
quest of this board, in- May last a joint special committee 
of the City Councils was appointed to confer with the 
Board, and to examine and report as to some better way 
of disposing of these wastes. This committee has held 
several meetings, and has given the subject its earnest 
consideration. In September last, at the suggestion of 
the mayor, two members of the Board visited and exam- 
ined the garbage furnaces at Newport, R. I., and at Fort 
Columbus and Coney Island near New York. The con- 
clusions of the Board have in compliance with the request 
of the committee been embodied in a report, whicli, to- 



291 

gether with a draft of an order for building a crematory, 
and an ordinance providing for the collection and dis- 
posal of waste matters, has been laid before the City 
Councils. The report is as follows : 

On account of the numerous and well-founded complaints from 
persons living near the city dumping-places, we have for many 
months had our attention dii-ected to the question of the proper dis- 
posal of Avaste matters. We have availed ourselves of all accessi- 
ble sources of information, and have personally examined the 
different ways in which the question is solved in several different 
places. 

As a result of these investigations, we have become satisfied that 
our garbage should be burned, and that the Engle crematory is the 
one best adapted to the wants of the city. We therefore recommend 
that one of that pattern be built. 

As to the location, we may say that we have been assured by 
health officers, by those in charge of the furnaces, and by persons 
living or working near them, as well as by those interested in the 
different furnaces, that the smoke and gases from the chimney do 
not cause a nuisance, and this we believe to be true of each 
o:f the three kinds of furnaces which we have examined. Still the 
nature of the work makes it proper that the location should be in 
some neighborhood away from residences, and where rough work is 
done. Another point to b^ considered is that the location should be 
as accessible as possible for the scavenger teams, both in respect to 
distances and grades, and taking into account the west side of the 
river and the corporations. A saving of $5,000 in the first cost of a 
lot would be more than offset by an increase of one dollar per day 
in the cost of teaming. Minor considerations are that a sloping lot 
is better than a level one, and that it would be well to have it where 
fuel can be readily taken from the cars to the coal-shed. A lot con- 
taining 10,000 or 15,000 square feet would be of suitable size for the 
present and prospective needs of the city.* 

The proposed ordinance above mentioned provides that 
the scavenger service shall be in the care of the superin- 
tendents of streets ; that they shall keep all organic waste, 

* The cost of a furnace, including the royalty, with a smoke-stack seventy 
feet high, twenty feet of brick and fifty feel of iron, would be $3,500. Substi- 
tuting a brick chimney one hundred feet high, adding a suitable wooden 



202 

whether of animal or vegetable origin, separate from 
ashes and mineral wastes, using only the latter for tilling 
new streets, and carrying the former to the crematory to 
be burned. It also requires that householders shall keep 
the two classes of wastes separate, using if necessary two 
receptacles therefor. 

It is hoped that we are now on the road to a solution 
of this question. The present practice of making the tills 
in new streets in large part of swill, brush, straw, waste 
paper, dung, and small dead animals ought to cease, 
Manchester has many things to be proud of, but this is 
not one of them. 

THE BACK STREETS, 

We take the liberty to repeat the suggestions of our 
last annual report as to these thoroughfares. Many of 
them continue to be a reproach, not to say a disgrace, 
alike to the city and to the occupants of the adjoining 
property. Ungraded, uncurbed, unpaved, and mud(>y, 
it is perhaps to be expected that the abuttors will think 
that the wastes from their houses and stables will not add 
perceptibly, or unlawfully, to the general filth and squalor. 
A beginning has, however, been made in grading and con- 
creting, and we have one back street where the city has 
done its whole duty in this respect. Let us hope that the 
abutters will have sufficient pride and public spirit to do 
theirs without coercion. 

THE CITY WATER SUPPLY, 

Manchester has a water supply of exceptional purity 
and abundance, and it ought to be protected and ])re- 

buiUliiig over the t'urniice, and lencing tlio yiiid, woulil uiako the whole cost, 
aside from the h)t, about $5,000. The operatiiij^ expenses wonld depend upon 
the fpiantity and quality of the material to l)e l)urned. A.h thriving some indi- 
cation of wliat c-an be done, it may be said that the furnace at I'oney Island 
consumes tlie debris of that great seaside resort in six or eight hours per day, 
re<iniring about seven tons of coal per nionUi, and the services of one man 
at llfty dollars per month. 



293 



served at any necessary cost. It is the duty and pleasure 
of this board to contribute what it may to all efforts to 
that end. The following regulations were adopted and 
published in September last. W"e have found the board 
of health of Auburn ready and zealous in their co-oper- 
ation to secure the same result, and they have adopted 
the same regulations covering that part of the lake and 
its tributaries within their jurisdiction : 

1. No privy, pigpen, or stable in which horses or other animals 
are kept shall be built or be continued within seventy-five feet of 
Massabesic Lake, or of any stream tributai'y thereto, except in such 
cases as the board of health may permit, and under such regulations 
and conditions as they may require. 

2. No sink-water shall be allowed to run into the lake or its trib- 
utaries, or on the surface of any ground within one hundred feet of 
the lake or of any stream tributary" thereto. 

3. No dead animal or fish, or parts thereof, and no dung of man 
or beast, or kitchen wastes, shall be thrown into said lake, or left 
within seventy-five feet thereof ; and no such substance shall be 
thrown into anj^ stream tributary to said lake. 

4. No sawdust shall be thrown or be allowed to fall into the lake, 
or into any stream tributaxy thereto. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table gives the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases reported to the Board in each month, also 
the number of deaths which have resulted therefrom : 





if 

1 

6 

7 


s 

i 

2 

1 
1 
1 


J3 
o 

a 

2 

1 
1 
1 


1 
< 

10 

7 


>> 

s 

4 
11 

6 


6 

a 
a 
i-s 

6 
63 

1 
2 


3 

8 
76 

1 


1 

9 
< 

6 

37 
8 

1 


J 
ai 

10 
12 

14 


o 

Q 

o 

13 
15 

1 


u 

a . 

s 

>• 
o 

iz; 

7 
17 

6 
10 


1 
S 

a 

s 

Q 

5 
12 

2 
31 


"5 
1 

79 

259 

36 

54 






23 
5 




Typhoid fever 


16 
,1 









294 

Scarlet fever was epidemic in the summer, and has 
been present in every month of the year. It has, how- 
ever, retained the same mild form which it has exhibited 
for the past five years, and has caused comparatively few 
deaths ; considering the number of cases, it has been 
much less fatal than measles. Diphtheria has been with 
us in every month, and has proved fatal in about twenty- 
nine per cent of the cases. • Typhoid fever prevailed most 
in the autumn, and it has slain about forty-four per cent 
of its victims. 

The experience of another year has emphasized what 
we have said in previous reports as to the necessity of a 
hospital for contagious diseases. The value of isolation 
and disinfection in scarlet fever and diphtheria admits of 
no question ; but among a large class of our population 
it is impossible to secure these conditions. A hospi- 
tal should be provided and maintained at the public 
expense, with appointments and surroundings so inviting 
and comfortable that it would be esteemed a privilege for 
the sick children of the tenement blocks to be admitted 
there. If this were done, the tenement could be disin- 
fected and the well members of the family could be al- 
lowed to go to their usual employments. 

VITAL STATISTICS. 

The vital statistics of the city are by law in the charge 
of the city clerk, but as he publishes no report, and as 
the subject is so closely related to the work of the health 
department, we take the liberty to present the following 
tables compiled from his books. 

The estimate of population is based principally njion 
the number cf polls taxed by the assessors, the figures for 
1880, in which year the last enumeration was made, being 
32,G30 inhabitants, and 7,210 polls taxed. This gives a 



295 

ratio of a little more than four and one half to one. 
Since then the number of polls taxed has increased pretty 
regularly, so that last year it was 9,527, and if the same 
ratio still holds the population was nearly 43,000. We 
have thought it entirely safe to call it 42,000 in 1889, and 
to expect that the census of 1890 will show 43,000 or 
more. 

By reference to the table. of comparisons it will be 
seen that the number of deaths is smaller than in either 
of the two preceding years, and that the death rate is 
lower than it has been since 1885, when the board was 
organized and the compilation of the tables was begun. 
The number of deaths from the zymotic diseases was 
also less than in any other year covered by the table. It 
is to be remarked that during the five years measles and 
whooping cough have each caused more deaths than 
scarlet fever, the former more than four times as many. 
It is a lamentable fact, and one perhaps discreditable to 
our city, that forty-six per cent of the deaths are those of 
persons less than five years of age. This ratio is about 
double that for the whole State. 

Of the 353 deaths of children, 86 were attributed to 
cholera infantum. This is likewise a smaller number 
than in any other 3'ear of which we have record. Some 
of our leading physicians say that the true cholera infan- 
tum is a disease comparatively rare in this city, and that 
much which passes for it should be returned as infantile 
diarrhea, a diiferent and far more prevalent disease. 



296 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND BY MONTHS 

FOR THE YEAit 1889, COMPILED FROM THE RECORDS OF THE CITY 

REGISTRAR. 



Cadses of Death. 
Zymotic. 


January. 

February. 

March. 


Apiil. 

May. 


i 




1 
< 


a 


1 

O 


S 

1 


1 
S 


1 


1 . 


1 




















.... 


1 


Cholera infantum 






1 


17 


28 

1 


18 


14 


6 


1 


86 
1 




3 




1' 

1 
1 




1 


2 


I 


1 


1 


2 


4 


1<» 






1 








1 






2 
1 


1 








5 




1 
1 
3 






2 








>> 
















1 
3 
2 




2 






1 










3 
1 


6 


6 

1 
1 


93 








3 


8 














..:...:. 


1 
















1 










? 
















1 










1 
















1 

2 

"i" 

1 










•■> 








1 






i 


1 
3 








5 


" typhoid 


1 
1 










2 


* 


2 


16 
3 




















1 

9 


■^ 










.... 






2 


4 
















1 








1 






1 














1 






3 




















1 


1 


Whooping cough 


1 
11 












2 
42 


1 
32 






? 


G 


5 


6 





3 


23 


26 


16 


17 


"" 


199 



Causes op Death. 
ConstiiuiionaL 


q 


1 


1 


1 
•< 




o 

a 
a 
1^ 


i-s 


m 

a 


s 


1 u 

o 

>- XI 

S S 
^ 1 

a 1 


»4 

o 

§ 


"5 

1 






i 


1 


1 


! ' ' 1 














1 






1 1 2 




1 


1 1 




4 


1 


1» 




1 


1 1.... 
















1 ^ ' 












1 




1 1.... 


















3 














1 














1 


















I 
















1 
6 










] 








Consumption 






6 


4 


11 


4 


1 


9 


9 6 


6 


70 






3 

1 












1 
























J 




















1 
























1 






p. f ■ • f ' 




















7. * * * , ,.*^ 


























































1 .... 




■>. 
















1 


.. . . .... 




1 










..:.... 




1 






1 
9 


2 




8 


13 


16 6 7 18 


~ 


2 15 1 14 6 


120 



297 



TABLE. — Conti7mecl. 



Causes of Death. 
Local. 


>> 

13 

s 
a 
a 


3 
u 
Si 




•a 


S" 

3 






3 
be 

3 




.0 


•4-> 


fa 

S 

1 


s> 

a 

1 


"3 
1 












1 
1 


1 
1 














2 




2 


2 




2 


3 

1 


1 




2 


2 


1 


17 




1 






















1 




1 












1 




1 
1 








2 




2 


"i' 

1 
1 
1 


1 
3 

i' 

2 




1 
1 


1 








g 
















5 






"4' 

1 


1 
1 
1 








1 
1 
1 






3 




2 
2 


1 
2 






1 

— 


3 1 
3 6 


12 




::.: V 


23 








1 












2 






1 


1 




7 






2 










1 


4 




1 












1 1 


2 




1 


2 
















2 






1 

1 


















1 



























2 


















2 


"3 




2 






1 


1 


2 




2 






11 


Cystitis 




1 












2 
1 
1 


# 












3 
























1 




:::: ■■■ 












1 
1 








3 














1 
1 








3 






















1 














1 








1 


.... 


2 


Fright 




















1 




' 




1 










1 






1. 


5 




. . . . 










1 


















1 






1 


















1 

2 

1 








1 






2 

1 


4 


5 


2 


1 


3 


6 

1 


3 


7. 


3 


41 




3 


















1 




1 






















1 






1 
1 


















1 


























1 
















1 
1 










1 


























1 












1 




1 

1 










3 


















1 


Lungs, congestion 




3 

""4' 


1 
1 


2 

1 
1 




3 






2 


.... "2" 


12 








3 




1 
1 


1 

1 
1 


3 


1 






15 




2 










1 










i 


4 






. . . . 




1 




1 
















1 








1 


















1 






2 


5 












! 


1 


'* spinal.. 1 




















1 






















3 














1 
1 




1 














1 








3 




1 
1 

4 












1 


















"2 
1 


'5 






2 




3 




5 


5 

2 
1 






1 fi 


SS 








3 
























1 




























1 








1 


















1 






















1 


1 














14 








1 


31 


25 


22 2S 


21 


21 


20 


20 


23 


26 


26 


277 



298 



TABLE.— Continued. 



Causes of Death. 
Developmental. 


>> 

1 


1 


1 


April. 
May. 


i 
a 

a 

•-9 


>> 

1 


a 
9 

9 
< 


1 


j 




a 

>• 


^ 




1 




1 
3 
















1 


Debility, general 




2 6 

1 


4 


3 


4 


1 


6 




1 


1 

3 


31 
3 




1 




















1 






1 










1 
1 

4 


"3" 
.... 

1 


2 
2 
4 


"2* 


1 


5 




2 




2 


3 


2 


1 
1 


18 








q 
















1 


" septicaemia 


1 































1 
8 
3 












1 


Still-births 


7 


3 

1 


1 


10 4 


3 


4 


3 
3 
1 

18 


3 
2 


8 

4 


9 
1 


63 




14 








1 


1 




11 


6 


8 


16 1 11 


17 


9 


11 


13 


Is 


15 


150 



Causes of Death. 
Violent. 


d 

9 
C 


3 

u 


1 
1 


0. 

■«1 


i 


June. 
July. 


1 


U 

J 

a 

a. 



.a 


.s 
a 

> 


1 




■5 












1 






1 












, 








1 










1 






1 






1 


1 








'.;:.■::: 


5 














1 
1 


1 


«* fall ' 


1 
1 






1 












1 


4 






1 




[ 








1 








....!.... 




1 








3 








1 












1 






1 


















1 
1 
1 

6 


2 




















1 


Suicide 




1 

6 






2 
3 










4 







2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 


1 


26 


Unclassified. 


4 


10 


4 


i 
3 2 


13 


4 


3 


2 


2 


3 


5 


S5 











Totals, all classes 65. 64 67 62 45 95 85 63 82 71 67 71 



827 



SUMMART. 



Zymotic 

('oiiHtiliitioiial. 

Locnl . 

Duvcloi>iii(.Mital 

Violoiit 

UDclasHifled ... 



>> 






iii 






2 


.0 



^ 












e. 


A 


a 


•< 


6 


c 


7 


13 


15 


6 


25 




28 


6 


8 


10 


6 


2 


2 


10 


4 


3 



'^ 



■S ' 3 



3 i 23 42 32 
7 18 8 2 



20 14 
9 11 
2 1 



16 17 

14 I 6 
23 26 

15 I 16 
3 1 
2 3 



a ■ 



Q I H 



11 I 199 
J) 120 



150 
26 
66 



299 



o o ir5 CO in 00 

00 t- (N <N CO CO 



lO lO OJ 



IN CO CO ■* 



CO rt <N 03 



00 50 O 00 CO lO 



03 (N ^ (N 



lOOOCOCOOOIOlOlCOi^^OS^ 



<M >-( »- 



•-■ (N CO 



eOO5IM(N00'JtDO5 
CO ^H ^ ^ CO 00 



00 »H r-( 



£-333 



J ? 



ago 



Ti © -; Sii 



jziQQ«QQQuouQM 



300 



^ CC O 03 •* 



~ ^ ^ 



301 



CONCLUSION. 



We note with satisfaction the increasing attention given 
year by year to sanitation, and while far more is expected 
of the Board than formerly, our work is much facilitated 
by this change in the public estimation of its value and 
necessity, as well as by the disfavor of the community 
which usually meets any individual who attempts to dis- 
regard the suggestions or requirements of the Board. 
When such an one finds few or none to applaud his 
course, he usually concludes that discretion is the better 
part of valor. * 

The time is at hand, if indeed it be not already present, 
when some pretty radical changes ought to be made in 
the functions and methods of the Board. The public 
convenience requires that the Board should have a public 
office which should be kept open during business hours." 
It should have the control of the city hospital or pest- 
house, and of the registration of vital statistics. The city 
scavenger service would probably eventually be trans- 
ferred to the health department, but as that would require 
a separate organization of men and teams, with a stable, 
it may well be doubted whether this is now expedient. 

We acknowledge our obligations to the physicians of 
the city and to the daily papers for their helpful co-opera- 
tion and suggestions, and we bespeak a continuance of 
their favors. 

Our thanks are especially due to your Honor and to 
the City Councils for hearty and zealous assistance in the 
discharge of our duties. 

GEORGE C. HOITT, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
WM. M. PARSONS, 

Board of Health of Manchester, 

Manchester, N. H., Mar. 17, 1890. 



ACCOU NT 



SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Cikj Treasurer^ 

From December 31, 1888, to December 31, 1889. 



304 



Dr. 



Sylva7ius B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



To cash on hand January 1, 18.^9 .... $84,117.31 


Tc'ini)orary loan 






. 100,000.00 


Insurance tax 








3,957.00 


Railroad tax . 








17,376.33 


Savings-bank tax . 








61,624.60 


Literary fund . 








3,571.75 


Board of paupers off farm 








2,333.30 


City farm 








1,829.86 


City teams, district No. 2, pay-rol 






2,660.70 


Tike & Ileald (overdraft) 






1.00 


David H. Young (overdraft) 






22.36 


National Novelty and Supi)ly Co. ( 


overdraft^ 




2.00 


Michael Sheehan (overdraft) 






7.50 


Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. 






71.60 


L. W. Bartlett (overdraft) . 






44.39 


Sevrer licenses 






1,606.20 


J. B. Varick Co. (overdraft) 






39.70 


A. D. Burgess estate 






133.33 


Manchester Street Railway . 






9.00 


C. H. Hutchinson, old iron . 






12.45 


D. H. Maxfield, chopping-blocks 






2.55 


Pine Grove Cemetery, lots sold 






1,839.53 


J. B. Varick Co. (overdraft) 






.96 


B. A. Stearns, superintendent 






1,378.48 


Valley Cemetery . 






1,249.50 


Fire department 








4,881.31 


J. A. Colby, horse sold . 








115.00 


Police department 








7,802.80 


City Hall 








3,722.83 


Sam. C. Lowell (overdraft) . 




* 




8.00 


Water-woi'ks . 








86,692.46 


Rev. J. A. Chevalier 








4,750.00 


Dog licenses . 








1,285.18 


Billiard-table licenses . 








177.00 


Taxes for the year 1883 








5.61 


" 1884 








3.50 


" 1885 








24.77 


Aviou/it c(u-ricdj\ra'(ird . 


§393,359.86 



305 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1889). 



Cr. 



By unpaid bills January 1, 1889 $37,088.16 


Temjjorary loan 










100,000.00 


Funded debt payment 












500.00 


Coupons, water bonds 












34,18(3.00 


Coupons, city bonds 












16,344.75 


Interest . 












838.39 


Paupers oft' farm . 












8,109.83 


City farm 












7,266.03 


City teams 












5,289.59 


Highway District No. 1 










265.52 


"2 










9,935.96 


" 3 










1,187.61 


" 4 










544.00 


" 5 










474.98 


" 6 










399.10 


■" 7 










1,272.45 


" 8 










786.98 


u .. w 9 










481.02 


" 10 










2,860.34 


" 11 










1,415.35 


" 12 










298.47 


" 13 










188.11 


New highways 










8,132.13 


Land damages 












182.28 


Watering streets . 












6,277.87 


Lighting streets 












31,041.43 


Paving streets 












6,471.27 


Macadamizing streets 












21,589.87 


Grading for concrete 












4,353.38 


Sewers and drains . 












27,513.73 


Commons 












4,002.75 


Bridges . 












9,727.67 


Incidental expenses 












17,572.88 


Pine Grove cemetery 












7,203.59 


Valley cemetery . 












2,697.88 


Amoskeag cemetery 












16.00 


Fire dejiartment . 












39,009.19 


Fire alarm telegraph 












1,302.80 


Amount carried forward 


$416,826.86 



306 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forivard 
Taxes for the year 1886 








$393,359.86 
25.97 


" 1887 










145.19 


" 1888 
" 1889 
Interest on taxes . 










16,590.72 

383,111.00 

387.84 


Engine-house, Lake avenue 
Show licenses 
Rent of tenement . 










1,060.00 
197.00 
550.30 


Tuition .... 










216.60 


Buildings sold on schoolhouse lot 








935.75 


IVIilk licenses .... 








56.50 


Trustees of cemetery fund, bonds sold 
Mark E. ITarvey, old j^lank sold . 






1,650.00 
5.00 




$798,291.73 


Uni^aid bills January 1, 1890 

Total 


29,462.50 


$827,754.23 



307 



City of Manchester (ending December 31, 1889). 



Cr. 



Amount brought fonvard .... $416,826.86 


Hydrant service 








17,330.00 


Police department . 










35,969.95 


City hall 










5,147.88 


Printing and stationery . 










1,850.30 


Repairs of buildings 










3,352.49 


City library . 










3,164.07 


Militia .... 










900.00 


Abatement of taxes 










2,798.74 


State tax 










63,435.00 


City officers' salaries 










14,328.14 


Water-works . 










47,237.99 


Health department 










1,100.79 


City engineer's department . 










2,971.66 


Scavenger teams . 










13,715.40 


Repairs of schoolhouses 










3,735.73 


Fuel 










3,330.93 


Furniture and supplies . 










1,093.07 


Books and stationery 










432.81 


Printing and advertising 










520.72 


Contingent expenses 










1,095.89 


Care of rooms 










3,345.94 


Evening schools 










1,798.83 


Teachers' salaries . 










44.212.88 


Mechanical drawing school 










454.75 


Lake avenue engine-house 










8,168.11 


Woman's Aid Society . 










400.00 


Discount on taxes . 










10,330.20 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 










300.00 


Firemen's parade . 










403.25 


Truant officer 










750.00 


Stark monument square 










89.41 


New schoolhouse, West Manchester 






6,750.00 


Receiving tomb .... 






1,100.61 




$718,442.40 


Cash on hand January 1, 189( 


) 








109,311.83 



Total 



',754.23 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, City Treasurer. 



FINANCE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



We hereby certify that we have examined the accounts 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer for the year 1889, and 
find the same correct and properly vouched for. 

GEO. C. CHASE, 
D. B. VARXEY, 
W. B. STEARXS, 
TIIOS. WALKER, Jr., 
EDSON S. HEATH, 

Finance Committee. 



REVENUE ACCOUNT, 



ACCOUNTS OF APPROPRIATIONS. 



^ TEMPORARY LOAK 

To Amoskeag :N'ational Bank . $12,500.00 
Manchester National Bank . 87,500.00 
George B. Chandler . . 50,000.00 



Dr. 



$100,000.00 
Cr. 



Paid George B. Chandler . . $25,000.00 
l^ational Revere Bank . 37,500.00 
National Exchange Bank . 37,500.00 



$100,000.00 



INTEREST. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $18,500.00 
Water-works, am't transferred 36,000.00 





$54,500.00 




Cr. 


Paid Amoskeag National Bank . 


$149.35 


Manchester National Bank . 


340.42 


Hide and Leather Nat'l Bank 


15.00 


George B. Chandler 


333.62 


Coupons, water bonds . 


34,186.00 


Coupons, city bonds 


16,344.75 


By balance on hand 


3,130.86 



312 
INTEREST ON TAXES. 
To George E. Morrill, collector . $387.84 



By reserved fund, am't transferred §387.84 



Dr. 

§387.84 
Cr. 

$387.84 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . 

T. H. Mahoney, overdraft 

City of Concord 

County of Hillsborough . 



Paid T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Michael Kelley . . . $20.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Christopher Champagne . 24.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Catherine Sullivan . . 38.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Thomas Tvcl'ley . . . 56.00 

T. II. Mahoney, groceries for 

Mrs. Joseph French . . 72.00 

T. II. Mahoney, groceries for 

Mrs. David McKay . . 51.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Mrs. James O'Brien . . 56.00 



$6,000.00 

7.00 

113.56 

2,212.74 


$8,333.30 
Cr. 





313 



Paid T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

John Murray . . . $50.00 

T. H. Malioiiey, groceries for 

William Conway . . 132.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

William McKelvey . . 79.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Ellen Sullivan . . . 110.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Michael Spane . . . 41.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Jerry Cronin , . . 64.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Mrs. Thomas Sullivan . 48.00 

T. H. Mahone}^ groceries for 

Hugh Donahoe . . . 80.00 

T. H, Mahoney, groceries for 

Mrs. Rose Cooney . . 10.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Patrick Doyle ... 2.91 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Thomas Kelley ... 8.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

John Bonner . . . 8.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Patrick Murray . . 6.00 

T, H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Mrs. Johnson . . . 2.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Mrs. Ann Manning . . 4.00 

T. H. Mahoney, groceries for 

Michael Lowe . . . 12.00 

J. H. Wiggin & Co. , groceries 

for Mary Griffin . . 45.00 



314 

Paid J. H. Wiggin & Co., groceries 
for Mrs. Thomas Eagan . 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., groceries 
for Edward Frenier . 

J. H. Wiggin & Co. , groceries 
for William Mclntire 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., groceries 
for E. G. Woodman . 

J. H. Wiggin & Co. , groceries 
for Anthony Smith . 

J, H. Wiggin & Co., groceries 
for Thomas Burke . 

J. H. Wiggin & Co., groceries 
for George W. Smith 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. G. Rochette . 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Bart. Doyle 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for James Larkin 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for E. R. Hill 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Catherine Sullivan . 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. J. Cronin 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Michael Spane 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. E. G. Wood- 
man 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for C. A. Clark . 



$100.00 


45.00 


20.00 


18.00 


2.00 


2.00 


3.00 


15.00 


6.00 


30.00 


14.19 


4.00 


8.47 


7.00 


8.00 


10.00 



315 



Paid W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. J. O'Brien . $6.00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Mrs. Thomas Lane 2.00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for David McKay . 5.00 

W. F. Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Joseph French . 8.00 

W. F, Sleeper & Co., grocer- 
ies for Onslow McPherson 1.15 

P. Harrington, groceries for 

James Otis . . . 63.00 

P. Harrington, groceries for 

James McGovern . . 45.00 

P. Harrington, groceries for 

Thomas Howe . . . 15.00 

T. F. Fifield, groceries for 

Bridget Milne . . . 66.00 

T. F. Fifield, groceries for 

Hugh Donahoe . . . 23.00 

T. F. Fifield, groceries for 

James Plumpton . . 24.00 

T. F. Fifield, groceries for 

Mrs. Mary Woodman . 12.00 

T. F. Fifield, groceries for 
George W. Smith . . 6.00 

H. Fradd & Co. , groceries for 

Mrs. A. Hunter . . 84.42 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries for 

James Duval . . . 23.07 

H. Fradd k Co., groceries for 

A. Schmalfus . . . 20.00 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries for 

U. Baudet . . . 17.64 



316 



Paid II. Fradd & Co., groceries for 

J. Pierce .... $24.23 

H. Fradd & Co. , groceries for 

Mrs. D. Connor . . 33.14 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries for 

Ed. Boyle .... 49.08 

H. Fradd & Co., groceries for 

Jennie Damon . . . 4.62 

A. H. Gray, groceries for 

Herman Rittner . . 7.00 

G. W. Adams, groceries for 

E. C. Miller . . . 68.00 

G. W. Adams, groceries for 

Owen Sullivan . . . 16.00 

G. W. Adams, groceries for 

Hugh Donahoe . . . 18.00 

G. W. Adams, groceries for 

Edward Dugan ... 8.00 

G. W. Adams, groceries for 

Dennis Moody . . . 8.00 

G. W. Adams, groceries for 

Bridget Sullivan . . 21.00 

G. W. Adams, groceries for 

Mary Doherty . . . 6.00 

G, W. Adams, groceries for 

George W. Smith . . 5.00 

G. W. Adams, groceries for 

George Marsh . . . 6.00 

M. Savory, groceries for Mrs. 

Mary Fitzgerald . . 23.00 

McQuade Bros., groceries for 

Michael O'Neil . . . 5.43 

McQuade Bros., groceries for 

Ann Manning" . . . 5.00 



317 

Paid McQuade Bros., groceries for 

Mrs. Ellen Sullivan . . |20.00 

James Hayes, groceries for 

Mrs. Thomas Devine . 36.00 

Bartlett & Thompson, gro- 
ceries for L. M. Green . 69.73 
Bartlett & Thompson, gro- 
ceries for Jerry Burke . 15.00 
Carl E. York, groceries for 

Mrs. P. Duchane . . ,5.00 

Carl E. York, groceries for 

Joseph Pierce . . . 16.90 

Carl E. York, groceries for 

Joseph Berube . . . 19.00 

Carl E. York, groceries for 

A. B. Webster . . . 38.00 

Taylor & Son, groceries for 

Herman Rittner . . 15.00 

Joseph Quirin, groceries for 

E. R. Hill .... 11.36 

Joseph Quirin, groceries for 

Mrs. E. G. Woodman . 10.00 

Hazen & Clay, groceries for 

Mrs. Mary Woodman . 12.00 

Griffin Bros., groceries for 

Bart. Doyle . . . 68.00 

E. E. Colburn, groceries for 

J. S. Gamble . . . 90.00 

J. T. Bugbee, groceries for 

George Molyneaux . . 26.00 

Eager & Rand, groceries for 

Mrs. Edward Ahern . . 55.03 

D. M. Poore, groceries for 

C. A. Clark . . . 78.34 



318 



Paid James H. Reynolds, groceries 

for F. B. Fogg . . . 114.00 

D. A. Shanahan, groceries 

for Mrs. Gideon Rochette, 7.00 

Venette Bros., groceries for 

Nelson Saulsville . . 5.00 

John Sweeney, groceries for 

Michael Kelley ... 4.00 

P. Ryan, groceries for Mrs. 

Theodore Berube . . 6.00 

0. D. Knox & Co., groceries 

for G. Molyneaux . . 6.00 

B. Bresnahan, groceries for 

John Harrington . . 5.00 

L. F. Philbrick . . . 12.00 

F. L. Wallace & Co., burial 

of Abigail A. Silver . . 25.00 

Mrs. F. Lamarch, care of 

Harry Speed . . . 12.00 

Town of Eniield, board and 

care of George W. Berry 10.59 

Mary Woodman, board and 

care of Mrs. Wm. Coombs 

and family . . . 30.00 

Joseph W. Fellows, board 

and care of Timothy Clark 22.50 

Women's Aid Hospital, 

board and care of Henry 

Fisher . . . . 54.00 

J. D. Welcome, board and 

care of Doherty children . 144.00 

Mrs. William Chase, board 

and care of Thomas Chase 120.00 



f 



319 



Paid A. D. Hatch, l)oard and care 

of Joseph Hatch . . $110.00 
Mrs. E. B. Fellows, board 

and care of Willie Gray . 72.00 

Mrs. M. J. Crosby, board 

and care of Richard Spring, 114.00 

A. A. Puifer, board and care 

of Charles Moore . . 64.00 

" Daniel E. Sullivan, board and 

care of Patrick Sullivan . 70.00 

L. A. Wright, board and 

care of Kate Tate . . 22.95 

Thomas Kelley, board and 

care of Thomas Kelley, Jr. 96.00 

Thomas Kelley, rent, Kate 

Tate 12.00 

Sarah Abbott, board of Tim- 
othy Clark . . . 65.00 
Lyman Dickey, board and 

care of Nahum Dickey . 42.86 

E'ellie M. Worthley, board 

and care of William 

Worthley . . . 24.00 

Esther L. Ingham, board and 

care of Mary F. Ingham . 90.00 

Emma F. N'ason, board and 

care of William Coombs . 106.70 

New Hampshire Asylum for 

the Insane, board and care 

of Frank Maycook . . 153.57 

New Hampshire Asylum for 

the Insane, board and care 

of Nahuni Dickey . . 89.41 



320 



Paid Xew Hampshire Asylum for 

the Insane, board and care 

of Mary Chmcy . . $ 100.82 
New Hampshire Asylum for 

the Insane, board and care 

of John Quinn . . . 16.48 

State Industrial School, board 

and care of inmates . . 2.479.50 
County of Hillsborough, 

board and care of Asenath 

H. White .... 65.00 

County of Hillsborough, 

board and care of J. J. 

Murray .... 65.00 

County of Hillsborough, 

board and care of Daniel 

Keefe .... 65.00 

County of Hillsborough, 

board and care of Willie 

Shehaue . . . 32..00 

County of Hillsborough, 

board and care of Michael 

Callahan .... 4.60 

County of Hillsborough, 

board and care of James 

Callahan .... 13.00 

County of Hillsborough, 

burial of Baby Emerson . 5.00 

F. C. Miville, medicine . 2.20 

Eames Brothers, medicine . 3.25 

John B. Hall, medicine . 56.15 

L. K. Meail, medicine . . 65.60 

William Smith, wooil for E. 

K. Hill .... 5.00 



321 



Paid S. A. Blood, wood for E. R. 




Hill 


$2.50 


S. A. Blood, wood for C. A. 




Clark .... 


5.75 


Clement Beaudet, wood and 




care of U. Beaudet 


4.70 


L. S. Proctor, wood for L. M. 




Green .... 


12.50 


Patrick Healey, wood for J. 




French .... 


2.00 


Patrick Healey, wood for M. 




Spane .... 


2.00 


Ahern & McKay, wood for 




M. Spane .... 


6.00 


Ahern & McKay, wood for 




Mrs. J. French . 


8.00 


Ahern & McKay, wood for 




Bart. Doyle 


11.00 


Ahern & McKay, wood for 




Mrs. D. McKay 


1.00 


Ahern & McKay, wood for 




H. Donahoe 


4.50 


Ahern & McKay, wood for 




William McKelvey . 


1.00 


George Whitford, w^ood for 




H. Donahoe 


3.00 


George Whitford, wood for 




Mary Doherty . 


3.00 


F. y J)nnlap, wood and coal 




• for Mrs. S. B. Batchelder . 


21.01 


F. T. Dunlap, wood for Owen 




Snllivan .... 


4.50 


F. T. Dunlap, coal for C. A. 




Clark .... 


7.00 



322 



Paid F. T. Dunlap, coal for C. A. 

Clark .... $1.50 

E. P. Johnson Co., wood and 

coal for S. W. Putney . 8.00 

E. P. Johnson Co., wood and 

coal for S. W. Putne}- . 3.50 

E. P. Johnson Co., wood for 

Hugh Donahoe . . . 4.00 

E. P. Johnson Co., wood and 

coal for Mrs. S. Batchelder, 5.00 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal for 

Mrs. Mary Woodman . 11.96 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal for 

James Larkin , . . 7.50 

Moore & Preston, coal for L. 

M. Green .... 4.00 

Moore & Preston, wood and 

coal for George Molyneaux, 15.75 

Moore & Preston, wood and 

coal for Edward Frenier . 13.00 

Moore & Preston, coal for J. 

S. Gamble . . . 4.00 

Burns & Poore, coal for Mrs. 

Mary Woodman . . 4.00 

E. V. Tureotte, wood for 

Hugh J)onahoe . . 2.00 

J. F. Wyman, wood for S. E. 

Foster .... 5.50 

L. B. Bod well & Co., wood 

for William McKelvey '. 2.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Wm. .NfcKelvey . . 3.75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for Michael Spanc . . 4.00 



323 



Paid L. B. Bodwell &■ Co., wood 

and coal for Joseph French, $13.75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

and coal for Wm. Conway, 10.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

and coal for Bart. Doyle . 16.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

for James Dowd . . 3.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal for 

Mrs. E. G. Woodman . 4.00 

DeCourcey & Holland, wood 

for Mary Griffin . . 1.00 

DeCourcey & Holland, wood 

for John Morrow . . 2.00 

DeCourcey & Holland, wood 

for Herman Rittner . . 3.00 

DeCourcey & Holland, wood 
for William Mclntire . 10.00 

DeCourcey & Holland, wood 

and coal for Kate Tate . 10.60 

DeCourcey & Holland, wood 
and coal for Mrs. E. G. 
Woodman . . . 11.25 

Plumer & Holton, clothing . 21.50 

A. G. Fairbanks, rent of ten- 
ement .... 6.00 

A. G. Fairbanks, burial of 

James Doherty . . . 10.00 

Chalifoux & Co., clothing . 26.00 

W. C. Blodgett, rent of ten- 
ement .... 31.00 

W. A. Green, rent of tene- 
ment 64.00 



324 



Paid Weston & Wheat, rent of 




tenement .... 


^64.00 


J. R. Laflamme, rent of ten- 




ement .... 


4.50 


Blodgett & Clark, rent of 




tenement .... 


4.16 


Charles F. Sprague, clothing 


5.00 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




statiopery, etc. . 


13.92 


L. M. French, professional 




services .... 


3.00 


L. B. How, professional ser- 




vices ..... 


29.00 


C. W. Downing, professional 




services .... 


12.00 


C. M. Dodge, professional 




services .... 


20.00 


H. D. W. Carvelle, profes- 




sional services . 


20.00 


H. W. Boutwell, professional 




services .... 


3.00 


W. H. Maxwell, preparing 




pauper list 


25.00 


J. G. Hutchinson, serving 




notices .... 


5.28 


W. J. Freeman, teams . 


4.50 


John B. Clarke, printing 


4.25 


J. M. CoUity, professional 




services .... 


(3.00 


A. E. Morse, burial of Geo. 




H. Richardson . 


25.00 


Dodge k Straw, shoes . 


3.00 


J. J. Twomey, shoes 


2.75 



325 



Paid George W". Hamlin, storage 




of furniture 


$7.50 


Charles Simpson, hack . 


1.50 


F. L. Wallace & Co., burial 




of Kate Tate . . . 


25.00 


0. D. Kimball, printing 


4.75 


F. C. Dow, boots . 


2.34 


Hawley & Gilbert, clothing . 


15.16 


Lafayette Tebbetts, transpor- 




tation of l!^ahum Dickey to 




asylum .... 


15.80 


H, C. Canney, professional 




services .... 


3.00 


F. X. Chenette, burial of 




Mrs. Beaudette . 


20.00 


Merrill Farmer, transporta- 




tion of Mary Clancy to 




asylum .... 


4.21 


0. D. Kimball, printing 


9.00 


J. Murray, boots . 


2.50 


Plumer & Holton, clothing . 


14.00 


George H. Tans well, clothing 


5.00 


J. J. Twomey, shoes 


2.75 


George A. Parsons, clothing. 


.80 


Thomas Stewart, trucking . 


3.00 


E. T. James, hack 


.75 


P. T. Kean, burial of Marga- 




ret Town .... 


25.00 


Bart Wilson, transportation 




to insane asylum of Frank 




Maycock .... 


6.25 


Town of Orange, N. H. 


25.75 


Patrick Flynn 


.5.00 


Reserved fund 


223.97 



!,333.30 



326 



CITY FARM. 

To appropriation .... ^4,000.00 
Reserved fund . . . 1,615.25 

L. M. Streeter, superintendent, 1,829.86 



Paid J. H. Willey, superintendent 
Mrs. S. A. Willey, matron 
L. M. Streeter and wife 
Joseph Quirin, groceries, etc 

C. E. Cox, meats . 
McQuade Bros., groceries 

etc. .... 
Partridge Bros., grain, etc 
Pettee & Adams, grain, etc 
Briggs & Roberts, crackers 
Drake & Dodge, flour, etc. 
Bartlett & Thompson, meats 

etc. .... 
J. Taylor & Son, groceries 

etc. .... 
Dodge & Laing, flour, etc. 
S. P. Pike & Co., meats, etc 
F, D. Ilanscom, meats, etc. 
J. H.Pierce & Co., groceries 

etc. .... 
A. G. Grenicr, groceries, etc 

D. Kerwin, soap, pearlinc,etc 
J. II. Wiggin & Co., grocer 

ies, etc. 
Tom W. Robinson, meats 
Carl E. York, groceries, etc 



320.55 
12.45 

766.44 
75.22 

113.67 

208.01 

45.32 

61.13 

6.63 

45.07 

251.01 

27.39 
44.45 
63.95 
42.44 

131.85 
66.38 
22.60 

59.51 
72.35 
69.90 



Dr. 

^445.11 
Cr. 



327 



Paid Merrill & Freeman, grain, 



etc. ..... 


$680.43 


E. E. Colbiirn, groceries, etc. 


31.00 


G. W. Batchelder, potatoes . 


7.00 


H. McGrath, potatoes . 


12.50 


Carney, Lynch & Co., grain 


30.12 


E. S. Newton, fish 


6.70 


John Towle & Co., lard 


3.96 


Clougli & Co., meats 


72.71 


E. M. Slayton, beans and tur- 




keys 


18.96 


George W. Clark, potatoes . 


7.10 


C. W. Lerned & Co., disin- 




fectants .... 


8.00 


W. M. Plummer, potatoes . 


7.70 


Manchester Heating and 




Lighting Co., gutter-trough 




etc 


42.56 


Leonard Shelters, onions 


1.00 


Dodge & Laing, beans . 


45.97 


G. W. Li galls & Co., boots . 


4.75 


J. E. Stearns & Co., meats . 


33.95 


T. S. Solomon . 


3.00 


W. P. Farmer 


9.45 


G. W. Perkins . 


15.00 


H. M. Moody, clothing, etc. 


97.65 


George Blanchet, dry goods, 




etc. ..... 


83.56 


Weston & Hill, dry goods. 




etc. ..... 


53.99 


Barton & Co., dry goods, etc. 


62.07 


M. O'Dowd, clothing . 


1.00 


J. A. Folsom, clothing 


11.05 



328 



Paid M. 0. P. Clothing Co., cloth- 
ing ..... ^3.75 

G. ,Gr. Richardson, tin pans, 

etc 2.26 

'New England Telephone Co., 

use of telephone . . 42.30 

A. C. Wallace, lumher . 7.72 

S. C. Forsaith^Machine Co., 

labor .... 148.56 

L. !N". Westover, lumber and 

labor .... 5.25 

George Holbrook, lumber and 

labor .... 40.66 

Flint & Little, lumber and 

labor .... 7.39 

Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor .... 16.04 

J. Hodge, lumber and labor .92 

"Westover & Gould, lumber 

and labor .... 2.27 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . 60.56 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . 10.50 

F. S. Downs, boots and shoes 11.00 

F. C. Dow, boots and shoes . 12.85 

G. W. Dodge, boots and shoes 69.37 
J. F. Gillis, shoes . . . 1.00 
C. H. Thayer, boots . . 1.00 
Wingate & Gould, boots and 

shoes .... 12.65 
A. N, Clapp, kerosene oil . 34.08 
George H. Hubbard, tobacco 66.76 
L. P. Reynolds, tobacco . 25.90 
T. P. Riley, repairing har- 
ness, etc. .... 33.30 



329 



Paid F. N. McLaren, repairing 

harness, etc. . . . $14.17 

Z. B. Stuart, mason-work, 

etc 3.00 

Joel Daniels & Co., paints, 

etc. . . . . . 4.98 

Laneville Lussier, wall-paper 2.70 

Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 
ware, etc 82.59 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 82.43 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . . 85.13 

C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork, 

etc 30.88 

T. A. Lane, plumbing . . 10.57 

J. H. Cram, blacksmithing . 40.00 

J. O. Tremblay, blacksmith- 
ing 13.25 

Thos. Hickey, blacksmithing 24.50 

W. H. Vickery, repairing 

locks, etc. .... .50 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc., 12.75 

T. W. Lane, books and sta- 
tionery .... 4.33 

Gordon Woodbury, making 

cider 1.92 

E. S. Newton, fish . . 14.41 

Moore & Preston, coal . . 60.00 

Emerson & Rogers, manure 25.38 

A. L. Dodge, professional ser- 
vices ..... 3.25 

Dunmore & McQ u a r r y, 

crockery .... 1.80 



330 



Paid Burns k Poore, coal 


$192.33 


J. J. Holland & Co., medicine 


3.65 


Eames Brothers, medicine 


1.05 


Mrs. P. J. Pais^e, manure 


4.00 


Union Publishing Co., adver- 




tising 


13.40 


Moore & Preston, coal . 


15.50 


Concord Railroad Corpora- 




tion, freight 


.25 


Pike & Heald, bread-pan 


3.75 


G. G. Richardson, crockery 




etc 


13.36 


Higgins Brothers Co., buncl 




cane .... 


.75 


J. J. Abbott, paints, etc. 


27.93 


Dodge & Straw, boots . 


4.00 


L. M. French, professiona 




services 


3.00 


Burns & Poore, coal 


1.00 


Temple & Farrington Co. 




stationery , 


1.15 


J.J.Holland & Co.,medicinct 


5 9.00 


Moore & Preston, coal . 


15.50 


F. L. Gray, undertaker 


25.00 


J. P. Lovell Arms Co., leg 




shackles . 


12.50 


Concord Railroad Corj)ora 




tion, freight 


.25 


William H. Elliott, spoons 


2.00 


Moore & Preston, coal 


17.50 


J. Alexander, professiona 




services 


4.50 


Manchester Broom Co. 




brooms 


5.50 



331 



Paid J, B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing carts, etc. . . . $15.10 

G. L. Richardson, crockery, 

etc. 7.57 

George W. Reed, manure . 51.87 

Thorpe & Bartlett, plumbing, 

etc 6.85 

Maxwell & Campbell, cutting 

ice . . . . ■ . 12.00 

Charles E. Hoitt & Co., cane 1.60 

E. P. Johnson Co., coal , 2.00 
Burns & Poore, coal . . 33.96 
P. A. Devine, undertaker . 25.00 
Fitzgerald & Co.. medicines 8.25 
Concord Railroad Corpora- 
tion, freight . . . 1.26 

O. D. Kimball, printing . 2.75 

John Driscoll, pans, etc. . 9.18 

Emerson & Haine, manure . 70.85 

F. L. Downs, boots . . 10.25 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing cart .... 1.65 

Amoskeag Fire Insurance 

Co., insurance . . . 30.00 

E. P. Richardson, insurance 210.00 

W. F. Head & Son, cattle . 260.00 
Concord R. R. corporation, 

freight .... .25 
Higgins Bros. Co., parlor set, 

etc 80.00 

George W. Prescott, making 

inventory, etc. . . . 45.00 

J. B. Hall, medicine . . 11.20 

J. B. Hall, medicine . . 8.90 



332 



Paid Timothy Shea, repairing fence 
Higgins Bros. Co., crockery 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., ice 
J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 
Labor, men and women 

By balance on hand 



$2.25 

2.95 

1.75 

0.00 

1,277.59 

179.08 



$7,445.11 



CITY TEAMS. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . . . . 


§2,500.00 


Pike & Heald, overdraft . 


1.00 


D. H. Young, overdraft . 


22.36 


Nat. Novelty and Supply Co. 


> 


overdraft . . . . 


2.00 


Labor, district No. 2 


2,660.70 


Reserved fund, am't transferrec 


103.53 




<!^5 ooq 59 








Cr. 


Paid Pettee & Adams, grain 


|;189.12 


Partridge Bros., grain . 


263.15 


Merrill & Freeman, grain 


616.24 


Drake & Dodge, grain . 


97.55 


John Hayes & Co., grain 


5.97 


F. D. Emery, hay 


27.29 


Leonard Powe, hay 


17.63 


C. D. Welch, hay . 


176.63 


D. H. Young, hay 


6SM 


City farm, ha}' 


145.84 


Daniel Bntterfield, hay . 


26.50 


J. L. Woodman, hay 


19.12 


II. A. Horton, carrots . 


16.00 



333 



Paid T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . $1.96 

J. B. Varick Co., stable pails, 

etc 1.75 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

spring cushions, etc. . . 7.23 

Killey & Wadleigh, axle 

grease, etc. . . . .75 

Dr. J. Blakeley, professional 

services . . . . 52.00 

Dr. J. Alexander, professional 
services . . . . 50.00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, dump 
cart, and repairing carts, 
etc 444.65 

J. T. Beach, repairing carts, 

etc 307.05 

Sanborn Carriage Co., repair- 
ing carts, etc. . . . 22.45 

Mahoney & McSweeney, 

blacksmithing ... 2.00 

Thos. Hickey, blacksmithing 17.50 

Joseph 0. Tremblay, black- 
smithing . . . . 68.25 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 
smithing . . . . 217.25 

Thomas P. Riley, repairing 

harness, etc. . . . 105.70 

N. J. Whalen, repairing har- 
ness, etc. .... 14.50 

Cavanaugh Bros., repairing 

harness, etc. . . . 25.15 

J. G. Lake, repairing har- 
ness, etc. . . . . 10.85 

J. H. Willey, whiffletrees . 30.00 



334 



Paid Frederick Allen, repairing 

harness, etc. . . . $32.85 
F. N. McLaren, repairing 

harness, etc. . . . 96.48 
John Lucy, operating on 

horses .... 4.50 

J. B. Hall, horse medicine . 7.70 

F. A. Lane, teams . . 107.00 
ll^at, Novelty and Supply Co., 

lamp-wick trimmers . . 2.00 

James Kelliher, rent of barn 40.00 
J. J. Holland & Co., horse 

medicine . . . . 1.75 

Z.F.Campbell, horse medicine 17.06 
W. ' S. McLeod, lettering 

carts, etc 2.00 

Dr. A. C. Daniels, horse med- 
icine 4.00 

Pike & Heald, gas-stove, etc. 3.45 

A. W. Baker, horse dentistry 12.00 

Guy F. Whitten, teams . 2.00 

C. H. Robie, concreting . 276.83 

T. A. Lane .... 10.00 

Teamsters .... 1,621.23 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 
To appropriation .... $300.00 



PaidKilley & Wadleigh, hard- 
ware, etc $7.20 



$5,289.59 



Dr. 

$300.00 
Cr. 



335 



Paid labor of men and teams . $258.32 
Reserved fund . . . 34.48 



poo.oo 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 2. 
To appropriation .... $10,000.00 



Dr. 



Michael Sheehan, overdraft 


7.50 


$10,007.50 










Cr. 


'aid Killey & Wadleigli, hard- 






ware, etc, .... 


1127.25 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 






etc 


65.19 




Manchester Hardware Co., 






hardware, etc. . 


86.39 




C. H. Hutchinson, black- 






smithing, etc. 


35.63 




T. A. Lane, suction hose, etc. 


31.65 




Pike & Heald, repairing hose, 






etc 


6.47 




Westover & Gould, lumber 






and labor .... 


49.51 




S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 






lumber .... 


3.10 




Flint & Little, lumber and 






labor 


.48 




A. C. Wallace, lumber 


9.00 




■ J. Hodge, lumber 


.85 




A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


20.51 




Flint & Little, lumber and 






labor .... 


2.05 





336 



Paid Austin, Flint & Day, sawdust $3.00 

Head & Dowst, lumber . 5.67 
J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith- 

ing 10.45 

E. Frye, blacksmithing . 1.53 
Mahoney & McSweeney, 

blacksmithing . . . 1.00 
Thomas Hickey, blacksmith- 
ing . . "^ . . . 1.10 
James Morrison, blacksmith- 
ing .60 

W. H.Vickery, keys, etc. . 2.75 
J, Stickney, repairing hose, 

etc 13.89 

People's Gas-light Co., gas . 46.20 

J. Taylor & Son, salt, oil, etc. 31.37 

Burns & Poore, coal . . 3.50 

F. S. Bodwell, stone, etc. . 89.00 
J. R. Carr & Co., glazing . 1.60 
Joseph Quirin, pails, oil, etc. 1.18 
Manchester Broom Co., refill- 
ing street-sweeper . . 33.25 

James Briggs, repairing 

steam-roller, etc. . . 6.70 

J. Alexander, professional 

services .... 10.00 

Thomas L. Thorpe, bagging, .45 

Samuel Coo[)er, lamp-trim- 
mers .... 2.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

time-books, etc. . . 19.31 

D. M. Poore, salt . . . 1.12 

E. Hartshorn, sand . . 6.60 
L. D. Colby, sand . . 1.50 



337 



Paid W. A. Clarkson, gravel 


$6.00 


C. C. Harriman 


5.00 


Frank L. Downs, rubber 




boots .... 


9.00 


Labor of men and teams 


9,184.11 


Reserved fund 


71.54 




tin no7 ^0 






% 





HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 3. 

To appropriation .... $1,000.00 
Reserved fund . . . 187.61 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., hardware $7.17 

J. Hodge, lumber . . 2.02 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

lumber, etc. . . . 7.78 

McQuade Bros., shovels . 2.75 

B. H. Piper, pick handles . 1.25 
Mrs. William Chase, paving 

stone .... 1.70 

W. S. Locke, gravel . . 2.40 

F. R. Farrar, lumber . . 9.55 
Labor of men and teams . 1,152.99 



■ HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 

To appropriation .... $500.00 
Reserved fund . . . 44.00 



Dr. 

.,187.61 
Cr. 



$1,187.61 

Dr. 
$544.00 



338 

Cr. 
Paid labor of men and teams . $544.00 

3544.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 
To appropriation .... $500.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. C^. 
To appropriation .... $400.00 



Dr. 







$500.00 






Cr. 


Paid R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 






ing . . 


$3.40 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 






etc 


1.55 




Labor of men and teams 


470.03 




Reserved fund 


25.02 


$500.00 







Dr. 







$400.00 
Cr. 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 






hardware .... 


$0.65 




T. A. Lane, pipe . 


.30 




James Morrison, blacksmith- 






i»g 


1.95 




Welcome & Son, blacksmith- 






ing . . 


.90 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 






etc. ..... 


C).55 





339 

Paid labor of men and teams . $388.75 
Reserved fund ... .90 

$400.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT -RO. 7. 

Dr. 



To'appropriation .... 


$1,000.00 




Reserved fund 


272.45 


$1,272.45 










Cr. 


Paid J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 






etc 


$11.45 




F. S. Bodwell, covering stone 


9.00 




Head & Dowst, lumber 


3.42 




McDonald & Cody, rubber 






boots .... 


2.75 




M. Klemke & Co., jug . 


.45 




Welcome & Son, blacksmith- 






ing 


13.80 




Labor of men and teams 


1,231.58 


$1,272.45 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . •. $800.00 

$800.00 

Cr. 



id Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware .... 


$1.70 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware 


16.41 


Labor of men and teams 


768.87 


Reserved fund 


13.02 



$800.00 



340 

HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 
To appropriation .... §500.00 



Dr. 

$500.00 
Cr. 



Paid R. W. Flanders, blacksmith- 

ing §0.50 

Labor of men and teams . 480.52 

Reserved fund . . . 18.98 



§500.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT XO. 10. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


§2,800.00 




Reserved fund 


60.34 


§2,860.34 
Cr. 






Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 






etc. ..... 


§82.21 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 






etc. ..... 


15.10 




A. N. Clapp, hardware, etc. 


2.69 




T. A. Lane, pkimbing, etc. . 


5.31 




A. C. WaHace, kimber 


10.04 




G. A. Durgin, painting, etc. 


14.00 




Temple & Farrington Co., 






stationery .... 


.92 




People's Gas-light Co., gas . 


.14 




D. F. Cressej, blacksmithing 


13.40 




Labor of men and teams 


2,716.53 





§2,860.34 



341 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 

To appropriation .... $1,000.00 
Reserved fund . . . 415.35 



Paid Daniel Farmer, cobble paving $6.00 
Joseph Greenwood, black- 
smithing .... 3.60 
S. L. Flanders, hardware . 2.61 
Labor of men and teams . 1,404.14 



Dr. 

1,415.35 

Or. 



$1,415.35 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 12. 



To appropriation . 



$300.00 



Dr. 









$300.00 








Or. 


Paid Manchester Hardware 


Co. 


> 




hardware . 




$8.10 




Joseph Peltier, labor . 




8.00 




Melvin Hall, labor 




4.00 




City farm, labor . 




278.37 




Reserved fund 




1.53 


$300.00 







HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 



To appropriation . 



$200.00 



Dr. 

$200.00 



442 



Paid labor of men and teams . ^188.11 
Reserved fund . . . 11.89 



XEW HIGHWAYS. 

To appropriation .... $6,000.00 
Reserved fund . . . 2,132.13 



Paid Warren Harvey, stone . . $4.00 

Joseph Kennard, stone . 22.25 

Kennard Bros., stone . . 27.25 
Manchester Hardware Co. , 

hardware, etc. . . . 30.38 
J. Hadlock, repairing road- 
machine .... 35.80 
Killey& Wadleigh, hardware 5.48 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware 15.89 
T. A. Lane, pipes, etc. . . 13.57 
J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 
smithing .... 2.50 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, black- 
smithing .... 29.87 
Palmer & Garmon, stone . 18.75 
E. Frye, blacksmithing . 3.95 
Thomas W. Lane, stationery 1.51 
George S. Smith, cobble stone, 

etc 47.89 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

lumber .... 25.57 

L. M. Aldrich, hinibcr. . 30.35 



Cr. 

$200.00 



Dr. 

$8,132.13 
Cr. 



343 



Paid Horace Willey, stone . 


$3.60 


Addison Grey, stone and 




gravel .... 


5.00 


C. H. Green, chestnut posts 


10.00 


F. S. Bodwell, stone posts . 


52.00 


James Baldwin Co., plank, 




etc 


13.10 


Thomas Doherty, filling 


12.75 


Labor of men and teams 


7,724.67 







1,132.12 



DAMAGE FOR LAND TAKEN FOR HIGHWAYS. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $1,000.00 

$1,000.00 

Cr. 
Paid Moses Webster heirs, Welch 

avenue .... $152.28 

David C. Lovering, Page 

street 30.00 

Reserved fund . . . 817.72 

$1,000.00 



WATERING STREETS. 



To appropriation .... $5,000.00 
Reserved fund . . . . 1,277.87 



Dr. 



),277.87 



344 



Paid Thomas A. Lane, labor, etc., 

on stand-pipes . . . $184.95 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing water-carts . . . 181.35 

Manchester Water-works, 

water .... 2,700.00 

Manchester Heating and 
Lighting Co., repairing 
water-carts, etc. . . 38.59 

Pike & Heald, repairing 

water-carts, etc. . . 14.62 

J. B. Varick Co., spring rub- 
ber .90 

D. E. Guiney, repairing wa- 
ter-cart .... 9.56 

Mancliester Locomotive 

Works, dome covers . 2.61 

D. F. Cressey, repairing wa- 
ter-cart .... 14.90 

George A. Durgin, painting 

water-cart .... 40.00 

A. Filion, repairing water-cart 69.00 

Labor of men and teams . 3,021.39 



LIGHTING STREETS. 
To appropriation ..... $33,000.00 



Cr. 



$6,277.87 



Dr. 



$33,000.00 

Cr. 

Paid People's Gas-light Co., gas 

and lighting . . . $6,370.52 



345 



Paid Manchester Electric Light 

Co., electric lights . . $24,079.95 
Ben Franklin Electric Light 

Co., electric lights . . 472.64 

C. M. Bailey, chimneys, 

founts, etc. . . . 94.54 

Albert ISTettel, oil, chimneys, 

etc 21.28 

J. B. Varick Co., glass . 2.50 

Eeserved fund T . . 1,958.57 



$33,000.00 



PAVD^G STREETS. 

To appropriation .... $3,500.00 
Reserved fund . . . . 2,971.27 



Paid C. H. Robie, concreting . $2,001.48 
W. H. Coburn, paving-stone 52.60 
L. J. Proctor, paving-stone . 25.50 
A. McDougal, paving-stone . 104.00 
C. P. Still, paving-stone . 6.20 
George Whitford, paving- 
stone .... 7.50 
J. H. Proctor, paving-stone . 6.00 
J. G. Ellinwood, paving-stone 6.40 
G. S. Smith, paving-stone . 77.37 
Merrill & Freeman, cement . 1.15 
A. H. Lowell, ironwork . 4.98 
J. B. Varick Co., paving 

hammer .... 1.30 

Labor of men and teams . 4,176.79 



Dr. 

;,471.27 
Cr. 



),471.27 



346 



MACADAMIZING STREETS. 

To appropriation .... ^18,000.00 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 



Dr. 



weio-hino; stone 


71.60 




L. W. Bartlett, overdraft . 


44.39 




Reserved fund .... 


3,473.88 






?!21 


,589.87 
Cr. 


Paid J. B. Varick Co., oil, hard- 






ware, etc. .... 


§471.45 




Manchester Hardware Co., 






hardware, etc. . 


32.67 




Killoy & Wadleigh, hardware, 






etc 


520.32 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 






etc 


114.99 




Manchester Water-works, 






water .... 


30.00 




C. 11, Hutchinson, repairing 






crusher, etc. 


396.01 




Lowell's Iron Foundry, iron- 






work .... 


82.73 




Manchester Mills, belting, etc. 


19.05 




S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 






belting, etc. 


276.16 




J. Hodge, lumber, etc. . 


9.21 




Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. . 


43.72 




A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


81.92 




L. M. Aldrich, tiling saws 


8.20 




Westover & Gould, lumber 






and labor .... 


42.63 




L. N. Westover, Umdjor 


3.20 




Joseph Quirin, oatmeal 


2.50 





347 



Paid J. Stickney, belt cement . $0.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., coke . 8.29 

Burns & Poore, coke . . 32.35 

People's Gas-light Co., coke . 51.60 
James Briggs, repairing 

crusher .... 40.67 
Pike & Heald, repairing 

crusher . . . . 11.05 

D. E. Guiney, repairing 

crusher .... 33.07 
T. A. Lane, pipe, plumbing, 

etc 239.63 

T. L. Thorpe, copper waste . 15.00 

Concord P. R., freight . . .25 

B. & M. R. P., freight . . 3.49 

C. E. Roberts, insurance on 

engine .... 22.50 

B. H. Piper, sledge handles . 3.80 

J. A. Brown, wood . . 89.00 
Farrell Foundry and Machine 

Co., ironwork . . . 34.95 

John W. Wilson, wood . 39.83 
Farrell Foundry and Machine 

Co., ironwork . . . 27.19 

George L. Young, felt roofing 8.76 
James Baldwin Co., stone and 

lumber .... 15.52 

H. Holbrook, stone . . 85.32 

Libby Bros., stone . . 16.91 

ITelson Forscher, stone . 128.67 

E. B. Fellows, stone . . 56.08 
J. S. Parkhurst, stone . . 56.87 
James Fullerton, stone . . 25.95 

D. Butterfield, stone . . 22.54 



348 



Paid C. W. Downing, stone . 


§13.27 


F. R. French, stone 


81.73 


H. S. Plumer, stone 


118.04 


G. W. Butterfield, stone 


37.01 


F. B. Worthley, stone . 


52.45 


D. W. Atwood, stone . 


97.99 


George Whitford, stone 
Waterman Smith, stone 


35.37 
271.25 


Joseph Tirrt'll, stone . 
C. H. Robie, stone 


65.86 
106.68 


J. G. ElHnwood, stone 


64.37 


A. McDouga], stone 


24.86 


McDougall Bros., stone 


21.93 


L. W. Bartlett, stone . 


49.32 


H. S. Hoitt, stone 


36.39 


H. L. Kimball, stone . 


49.77 


E. W. Butterfield, stone 


59.77 


P. Kean, stone 


34.39 


H. Willey, stone . 


14.76 


John A. Dunlap, stone 
C. Buswell, stone 


12.60 
7.20 


George Whitford, stone 


2.25 


J. A. Brown, stone 


10.65 


J. W. Kimball, stone . 


24.59 


H. P. Hurd, stone 


9.62 


J. H. Proctor, stone 


14.34 


F. Emerson, stone 
E. Campbell, stone 


53.20 
27.18 


C. W. Temple, stone . 


57.95 


C. Buswell, stone 


13.57 


G. A. Cota, stone 


0.47 


F. E. Scheer, stone 


11.60 


J. L. Fogg, stone 


29.45 


A. (J. I'^iirbaiiks, stone 


6.16 



349 

Paid G. A. Clark, filing saws, etc. $4.00 

Labor of men and teams . 16,856.28 

• $21,589.87 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

To appropriation .... $4,000.00 
Reserved fund . . . 353.38 



Paid Ebenezer Hartshorn, sand . $9.70 

C. H. Robie, concreting . 219.62 

Labor of men and teams . 4,124.06 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

To appropriation .... $18,000.00 
Incidental expenses, amount 

transferred .... 1,000.00 
Sewer licenses .... 1,606.20 
Reserved fund .... 6,907.53 



Dr. 

$4,353.38 
Ck. 

$4,353.38 
Dr. 



Paid Thomas A. Lane, sewer 

pipes, etc $6,474.55 

J. B. Variek Co., hardware, 

etc 66.99 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . . 26.56 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc 71.96 



$27,513.73 

Cr. 



350 



Paid Pike & Heald, scoops, etc. . $4.21 

C. H. Ilutcliinson, castings, 

etc 967.90 

A. H. Lowell, castings, etc. . 122.45 

D. L. Stevens, castings, etc. . 33.00 
D. F. Oressey, 'blacksmithing 60.26 
James Morrison, blacksmith- 
ing 9.36 

A. C. Wallace, lumber . 109.04 
Head & Dowst, lumber and 

brick .... 76.23 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

lumber .... 215.05 
A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . 461.77 
J. Hodge, lumber . . 3.30 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. . 6.00 
J. Stickney, gum boots, etc. 59.05 
W. F. Head & Son, brick . 1,365.00 
A. N. Clapp, hardware, etc. 23.51 
Concord Railroad Corpora- 
tion, freight . . . 201.60 
Pettee & Adams, cement and 

lime 133.33 

Merrill & Freeman, cement 

and lime .... 924.25 
New Hampshire Rubber Co., 

gum boots . . . 12.00 

Wingatc At Gould, gum boots 2.85 

F. L. Downs, gum boots . 11.00 
Dodge & Straw, Gum boots 10.00 

G. W. Dodge, gum boots . 2.50 
A. G. Grenier, hogshead . 1.50 
J, Taylor & Son, oatmeal, etc. 5.20 



351 



Paid Joseph Quirin, oatmeal, etc 
George L. Robinson, gum 

boots 
F. C. and C. W. Atwood 

saw-liling, etc. . 
Moore & Preston, coal . 
K W. Ellis & Co., stone-lifter 

etc 

Union Publishing Co., adver 

tising 
D. J. Adams, filing saw 
Amoskeag Manufacturing 

Co., one half extension Mc 

Gregorville sewer 
r. S. Bodwell, cesspool stone 
A. L. Putnum, carpenter 

work 
M. Fitzgerald & Co., stone 

work . . . 

J. B. Clarke, advertising 
C. O. Phelps, ladders . 
A. Filion, stone drag . 
Mills & Sturtevant, locker 
H. Fradd & Co., pork-harrel 
T. L, Thorpe, bagging . 
James Briggs, scoops . 
Stark Mills . 

Edward R. Geer, couplings 
Peter Dowd, filing saws 
F. B. Potter, Akron pipe 
Labor of men and teams 



m.62 


6.50 


6.45 


1.25 



22.00 

13.75 

.20 



504.03 
15.00 

3.45 

2.00 

13.00 

3.60 

8.00 

10.00 

.40 

1.01 

2.00 

9.25 

10.00 

.80 

7.04 

15,402.96 



127,513.73 



352 



BRIDGES. 






Dr. 


To appropriation . , . . 


^8,000.00 


Mark E. Harvey, old plank sole 


5.00 


Reserved fund . 


1,722.67 




CO 707 an 








Cr. 


Paid A. C. Wallace, lumber . 


$1,933.46 


S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. 




lumber 


1,961.40 


A. J. Sawyer, lumber . 


273.67 


Walter Neal, planking 




bridges 


1,176.81 


Cunningham, Banks & Co. 




lumber 


1,874.97 


Head & Dowst, lumber 


540.00 


George Ilolbrook, lumber , 


59.98 


Wm. W. Hubbard, lumber . 


1.35 


Manchester Hardware Co. 




hardware, etc. . 


130.77 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware 




etc 


23.32 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 




etc 


162.21 


A. N. Chipp, hardware, etc 


7.32 


Daily Press Publishing Co. 




advertising 


19.00 


Union Publishing Co., adver 




tising 


13.00 


J. R. Carr & Co., painting 


9.85 


Boston & Maine Raih-oac 




Corporation, freight . 


229.26 


C. H. Robic, concreting 


52.59 



353 



Paid Berlin Iron Bridge Co., ad- 
justing bridge . . . $70.94 
Merrill & Freeman, cement . 32.50 
Labor of men and teams . 1,155.77 



COMMOlSrS. 



To appropriation .... |3,500.00 
J. B. Varick Co., overdraft . 39.70 

Reserved fund . . . 463.05 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . . $2.47 

J. B. Varick Co., phosphate, 

hardware, etc. . . . 238.03 

A. J. Sawyer, lumber . . 6.42 

J. Hodge, lumber . . 11.75 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber . 20.01 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairing 

mowers, etc. . . . 54.51 

W. H. Vickery, repairing 
mowers .... 
Thomas A. Lane, iron fence, 

etc 458.30 

A. H. Lowell, park settees . 104.00 

H. H. Huntress, flowers, etc. 76.82 

People's Gas-light Co., gas . .42 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 
ing lawn-mower . . . 8.90 
Charles H. Robie, concreting, 563.74 

23 



4.50 



),727.67 



Dr. 



14,002.75 
Cr. 



354 



Paid F. S. Bod well, stone posts 

etc 

Manchester Water-works 

water 
John Waters, loam 
Wm. B. Abbott, painting, etc 
J. N". Heath, sowing seed 
C. K. Walker, loam 
E. Whitney, loam 
Waterman Smith, loam 
C. D. Welch, loam 
George Whitford, loam 
Pike & Heald, drinking-cups 

etc. .... 
Elizabeth Gordon, grindstone 
D.E. Guiuey, repairing pipes 
Flint & Little, repairing rakes 
Marshall & Underhill, loam 
Labor of men and teams 



$78.00 

300.00 

45.00 

33.86 

1.25 

147.00 
36.00 
14.50 
64.00 

150.25 

1.10 

3.00 

3.25 

.80 

151.25 

1,723.62 



S4,002.75 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



Dr. 



appropriation . 


^15 


,000.00 


A. D. Burgess estate 




133.33 


Manchester Street Kailway, 






damage to C. E. Stearns 




9.00 


C. II. Hutchinson, old iron 




12.45 


D. H. Maxfield, chopping- 






blocks . . . . . 




2.55 


Pcscrved fund 


'1 


,415.55 



$18,572.88 



356 



Paid New England Telegraph and 

Telephone Co., use of tele- 
phone .... $35.50 
J. A. Barker, care of boiler 

at city library . . . 120.50 

Manchester Water-w o r k s , 

water .... 1,077.19 

Dr. J. Alexander, professional 

services .... 15.00 

F. H. Challis, printing . 2.50 

Daily Press Publishing Co., 

printing .... 44.75 
J. B. Clarke, printing . . 46.50 
Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing 59.83 

Dr. L. French, return of 

births and deaths . . 14.00 

Dr. C. M. Dodge, return of 

births and deaths . . 9.25 

Dr. D. S. Adams, return of 

births and deaths . . 5.75 

Dr. J. W. Mooar, return of 

births and deaths . , 2.75 

Dr. C. F. Flanders, return of 

births and deaths . . 9.50 

Dr. R. 0. "Wood, return of 

births and deaths . 4.75 

Dr. Geo. D. Towne, return 

of births and deaths . . 7.25 

Dr. E. B. Dunbar, return of 

births and deaths . . 2.25 

Dr. T. Wheat, return of 

births and deaths . . 5.00 



Or. 



356 



Paid Dr. L. M. French, return of 

births and deaths . . ^11.50 

Dr. Charles Corey, return of 

births and deaths . . .25 

Dr. J. A. Jackson, return of 

births and deaths . . 14.00 

Dr. L. B. Howe, return of 

births and deaths . . 5.50 

Dr. H. C. Canney, profes- 
sional services . . . 6.00 

Dr. J. Sullivan, return of 

births and deaths . . 33.75 

Dr. H. T. Boutwell, return of 

births and deaths . . 5.00 

Dr. O. D. Abbott, return of 

births and deaths . . 9.50 

Dr. J. W. D. MacDonald, re- 
turn of births and deaths . 27.25 

Dr. C. B. Sturtevant, return 

of births and deaths . . 2.00 

Dr. E. Sylvain, return of 

births and deaths . . 20.75 

Dr. J. E. Lemaitre, return of 

births and deaths . . 43.50 

Dr. J. E. A. Lanouette, return 

of births and deatlis . . 39.50 

Dr. C. W. Downing, return 

of births and deaths . . 12.50 

Dr. J. Ferguson, return of 

births and deaths . . 41.50 

Dr. C. W. Downing, profes- 
sional services . . . 23.00 

Dr. C. E. Dodge, professional 

services .... 30.00 



357 



Paid Dr. George D, Towne, pro- 
fessional services . . $3.00 
Dr. J, M. Collity, professional 

services .... 125.00 
Dr. D. S. Adams, profes- 
sional services . . . 40.00 
Dr. C. M. Dodge, professional 

services . . . . 28.00 
. Dr. J. E. Lemaitre, return of 

births and deaths . . 56.25 
Dr. J. M. Collity, return of 

births and deaths . . 9.75 

Burns & Poore, wood . . 1.15 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., wood 

and coal .... 18.15 

Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. . 45.35 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

lumber, etc. . . . 28.04 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

portable boiler and engine 850.00 
"William G. Landry, stone- 
work .... 416.00 
Warren Harvey, stonework . 700.00 
F. S. Bodwell, stonework . 331.26 
F. S. Bodwell, stone water- 
ing-trough . . . 75.00 
George W. Reed, teams . 255.00 
Guy F. Whitten, teams . 99.50 
J. C. Nichols & Son, teams . 45.00 
F. P. Chenette, teams . . 3.00 
W. J. Freeman, teams . . 30.00 
E. T. James, teams . . 104.00 
James Bros., teams . . 135.50 
E. R. Hill, damage to person 25.00 



358 



Paid Elizabeth W. Miller, judg- 
ment .... S27.05 

Kate Connor, damage to per- 
son 160.00 

George Locke, damage from 
Bnow and ice . . . 5.00 

Etta H. Manning, damage to 

person . . . . 25.00 

Nancy 0. Savory, damage to 

person .... 500.00 

Benj. P. Kimball, damage to 

wagon, harness, etc. . . 12.00 

Luther M. Clark, adm'r, 

damage to Arthur L.Clarke 2,500.00 

Fred P. Danforth, damage to 

land on Lake avenue . 150.00 

Stephen Emery, damage to 

person .... 125.00 

Anna E. Buck, damage to 

person . . . . 42.25 

Thos. J. and Patrick Welch, 

damage to team, etc. . 50.00 

Joseph H. Richards, damage 

to person .... 37.50 

Timothy McKcnna, damage 

to person . . . . 25.00 

Henry Lang, damage to per- 
son 400.00 

Harvey B. Sawyer, damage 

from water in cellar . . 15.00 

Annie Solon, damage to per- 
son ..... 35.00 

Ann Harmon, danuige to 

person .... 100.00 



359 
Paid Michael La Touche, damage 



to person .... 


$15.00 


Frank S. Bodwcll, judi^ment 


312.11 


Sarah Whelploy, damage to 




garden .... 


52.50 


Joseph Moreau, damage from 




overflow of sewer 


30.00 


E. M. Kellogg, damage to 




team ..... 


1.75 


Welcome &Co. ,blacksmithing 


5.25 


D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 


15.38 


A. H. Lowell, ironwork 


52.31 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. . 


11.08 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 




etc 


11.68 


D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 


18.85 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 


193.80 


Manchester postoffice, stamps, 




etc. ..... 


2L80 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


3.01 


H. B. Fairbanks . 


8.00 


S. B. Putnam, expenses to 




Concord .... 


.72 


L. I!^, "Westover, carpenter- 




work, etc. .... 


2.88 


Daniel L. Stevens, delivering 




notices, etc. 


3.44 


Daniel Farmer, damage to 




land ..... 


150.00 


Lovejoy & Stratton, repairing 




clocks .... 


308.00 


Louis Wolf, plumbing, etc. 


10.65 


J. B. Hall, red fire '. 


14.00 



10.17 


10.00 


150.00 


3.75 


5.10 


.42 



360 

Paid A. Landers, repairing roof . S5.75 

E. F. Jones, expenses to Con- 
cord and Nashua 
' Timothy Shea, cleaning vaults 

J. Bailey Moore, revising city 
ordinances 

Troy Rubber Stamp "Works, 
rubber stamp 

Daniel L. Stevens, serving 
notices .... 

People's Gas-light Co., gas . 

John J. Holland, brush- 
broom, etc. . . . 1.85 

Gilman B. Hoyt, recording 

deed 1.00 

D. F. Healy, serving notices 5.46 

D. F. GeoffVoy, return of 

election, etc. . . . 2.02 

]Sr, p. Kidder, return of deaths 

and marriages, etc. . . 367.95 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., di- 
rectories .... 30.00 

K P. Kidder, return of births 181.70 

County Commissioners, hear- 
ing, Cypress street . . 170.00 

County Commissioners, hear- 
ing, Manchester street . 65.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

tax-books, etc. . . . 114.11 

Ilill Grate Bar Co., grates, 

etc. . . . \ . 97.42 

Ilepul)li(jaii Press Association, 
advertising non-resident 
taxes ..... 7.50 



361 



Paid Town of Goffstown, taxes . 


$1.39 


J. A. Weston, land damage 




on Manchester street 


843.20 


David Farmer, expenses of 




Committee on Lands and 




Buildings to Boston . 


4.00 


David B. Varney, allowance 




for horse-hire . 


132.00 


J. G. Hutchinson, witness fees 


12.70 


People's Gas-light Co., gas . 


.28 


J. J. Holland, medicines 


12.05 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




wood-books, etc. 


46.08 


L.&W. T. Leiberlich, glaz- 




ing, etc. .... 


18.04 


B. B. Hoyt, scrub-brush, etc. 


.65 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repair- 




ing wagon 


15.94 


J. J. Abbott, whitewashing 




tree boxes .... 


39.50 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




weighers' books 


18.00 


George A. Alger, rebate on 




taxes .... 


19.00 


Crombie & Chappelle, trees 


82.50 


A. J. Lane, use of deed and 




mortgage book . 


10.00 


Town of Goffstown, taxes . 


1.51 



The Lagoon Platinum Pen 

Co., pens .... 2.00 

!N'ovelty Advertising Co., ink 

pad .50 

John Hosley, services in Kel- 

sea vs. Manchester . . 10.00 



362 



Paid C.S. Decker, weather signals §2.26 

Gilmaii B. Hoyt, recording 
deed 1.00 

D. A. Simons, office desk, etc. 50.00 

George A. Alger, tax abated 19.80 

Committee on Lands and 
Buildings, expenses to Bos- 
ton 12.00 

George E. Morrill, distribut- 
ing tax bills . . . 60.14 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

pencils, ink, etc. . . 7.40 

Charles H. Robie, concreting 207.00 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. 40.07 

First Light Battery, salute, 

July fourth . . . 37.25 

George W. Bacon, expenses 
of Committee on Commons 
to Lawrence . . . 8.00 

J. B. Baril, red tire . . 5.50 

D. C. Whittemore, keeping 
roads in repair, 1887 and 
1888 40.60 

J. F. Briggs, professional ser- 
vices 70.00 

Manchester War Veterans' 

Drum Corps . . . 10.00 

First Light Battery, salute 

to President Harrison . 30.00 

Israel Dow, watering-trough 3.00 

Palmer k Garmon, stone- 
work .... G.OG 

Higgins Brothers Co., carpets, 

desk, etc 225.76 



363 



Paid Joel Daniels, painting . 


135.37 


J. J. Holland & Co., red fire 


35.00 


E. R. Coburn & Co., fireworks 


144.82 


A. D. Goodeu, watering- 




trough .... 


3.00 


Manchester City Band, Pres- 




ident's reception 


50.00 


First Regiment Band, Presi- 




dent's reception 


75.00 


H. C. Dickey, whitewashing 




tree-boxes .... 


10.50 


H. B, Fairbanks, selling real 




estate .... 


25.00 


F. E. Stuart, settees 


150.00 


J. P. Finn, glazing 


3.00 


Manchester Military Band, 




concerts on commons 


100.00 


George W. Townsend, sub- 




marine diver 


27.00 


D. "W. King, recording deeds. 




etc 


4.22 


J. G. Hutchinson, serving 




notices, etc. 


3.24 


J. Alexander, professional 




services .... 


10.00 


Manchester Print "Works, 




building fence . 


17.54 


Laneville & Lussier, painting 


12.00 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




blank-books 


4.00 


E. E. Colburn, rock salt 


.30 


F. B. Potter, distributing 




documents 


5.00 


F. E. Stuart, chairs, etc. 


28.50 



364 



Paid Mancliester City Band, con- 




certs on commons 
F. X. Chenette, loam . 


$100.00 
2.00 


George Whitford, filling 


39.25 


Novelty Advertising Co., 




stamp .... 
Darius Merrill, certified copy 


1.75 


of law .... 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., 

directories 
Labor of men and teams 


1.50 

32.00 
2,706.38 


Sewers and drains 


1,000.00 




^±0^0 1 ^i.OO 



I 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

To balance from old account . $3,533.21 

Appropriation . . . 1,000.00 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent 1,378.48 

S. B. Putnam, lots sold . . 1,839.53 

J. B. Varick, overdraft . . .96 



Dr. 







$7,752.18 










Cr. 


aid Manchester Water-works, 






water .... 


$300.00 




T. A. Lane, wrenches, noz- 






zles, etc. .... 


2.10 




C. H. Hutchinson, castings, 






etc 


13.30 




Pike & Ileald, watcr-piite, 






etc. ..... 


509.11 




Lowell Iron Eoundry, iron 






fence, etc. 


462.00 





365 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . . $18.00 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 105.44 

New England Telegraph and 
Telephone Co., use of tel- 
ephone .... 49.50 
Frank Emerson, loam . . 563.50 
C. C. Webster, clay . . 373.00 
Monroe Hall, loam . . 24.50 
William L. Riley, loam . 12.50 
J. M. Hall, loam . . . 18.00 
Waterman Smith, turf . 27.12 
H. H. Young, loam . . 19.50 
G. A. Durgin . . . 40.00 
Cavanaugh Bros. . . 15.00 
Head & Dowst, brick . . 17.10 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber, etc. . 3.03 
J. Hodge, stakes . . . 19.73 
0. D. Kimball, printing . 10.00 
Campbell & Williams, print- 
ing 2.00 

Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing 4.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, teams . 14.00 
The Government Water- 
proof Co., paint . . 15.00 
Stark Mills, paint, duck, etc. 23.33 
Novelty Advertising Co. , 

stamp and ink . . . 1.05 

H. H. Huntress, plants . 64.80 

C. P. Trickey, letter paper . .49 
Timothy Shea, cleaning 

vault .... 3.00 



366 



Paid Howard P. Moore, reporting 




testimony .... 


$20.00 


Mrs. Spaulding, cleaning 




house .... 


1.00 


Pettee & Adams, cement, etc. 


74.94 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 


11.25 


Temple & Farrington Co., sta- 




tionery .... 


8.39 


G. R. Vance & Co., sprinkler. 




etc 


.75 


F. N. McLaren, coffin straps 


4.20 


J. J.JiAbbott, paints, etc. 


4.53 


F. B. Potter, sewer grates . 


12.80 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 


13.50 


Palmer & Garmon, granite 




posts .... 


26.25 


Labor of men and teams 


4,295.88 


By balance on hand 


548.59 







VALLEY CEMETERY. 

To balance from old account . $18.83 

Appropriation . . . 1,500.00 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 1,200.00 

S. B. Putnam, lot sold . . 49.50 



Paid B. W. Robinson, mason- 
work, etc. . . . . $15.75 
Higgins Bros. Co., table and 

rocker . . . . 12.00 

J. Hodge, luuibiT . . . 2.20 



$7,752.18 



Dr. 



$2,768.33 
Cr. 



367 



Paid Flint & Little, building sum- 
mer-house, etc. . . $176.65 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saw . .20 

Ivilley & Wadleigh, hard- 
ware, etc. .... 3.70 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . . 5.55 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 47.06 

Pike & Heald, plumbing . 24.16 

J. Francis, plants . . . 73.27 

Palmer & Garmon, stone- 
work . . . . 25.65 

T. A. Lane, piping, etc. . 95.92 

J. W. Kimball, stone, loam, 

etc 209.60 

C. C. Webster, turf . . 11.76 

George Whitford, loam . 53.16 

P. 0. Woodman, loam . . 9.00 

Manchester Water-w o r k s, 

water .... 36.60 

Campbell & Williams, print- 
ing, etc. ... . . 5.00 

G. W. Dodge, rubber boots 2.75 

W. H. Yickery, repairing 

lawn-mower , . . .75 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

receipt-book, etc. . . 3.32 

R. W. Lamprey, maple tree 1.50 

George B. McManamon, nur- 
sery stock . . . 26.00 

Marshall & Underbill, loam . 6.00 

George C. Gilmore, making 

report of Valley cemetery. 10.00 



368 



Paid F. S. Bodwell, stone . 


$3.00 


Lowell Iron Foundry, park 




settees, etc. 


29.08 


C. A. Hoitt & Co., chairs 


5.20 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


43.26 


Labor of men and teams 


1,759.80 


By balance on hand 


70.45 


• 





$2,768.33 



AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 



To reserved fund 



816.00 



Dr. 



id L. M. Aid rich, l)ier 

Manchester Water- works, 
water .... 


$4.00 
12.00 


$16.00 
Or. 

$16.00 







FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $35,000.00 
J. A. Colby, horse sold . . 115.00 

Labor in districts Nos. 2 and 

10 4,881.31 



Dr. 



Paid Amoskeag Steam Fire-En- 

giiio Co. No. 1, pay-roll . $1,485.00 
Fire King Steam Fire-Kiigiiie 

Co. No. 2, pay-roll . ' . 1,476.67 



$39,996.31 
Or. 



369 



Paid Merrimack Steam Fire-En- 
gine Co. N"o. 3, pay-roll . $1,485.00 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire-En- 

gine Co. No. 4, pay-roll . 1,485.00 

Gen. Stark Steam Fire-En- 
gine Co. No. 5, pay-roll . 1,485.00 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, 

pay-roll .... 1,245.00 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2, 

pay-roll .... 1,245.00 

Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1, 

pay-roll .... 2,047.50 

Chemical Engine Co., pay- 
roll 435.00 

Manchester Hardware Co. , 

hardware, etc. . . . 279.57 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 2.58 

Killey & Wadleigh, hard- 
ware, etc 14.26 

C. H. Hutchinson, castings, 

etc 50.06 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 157.91 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 365.01 

D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 64.69 
D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 21.90 
Merrill & Freeman, grain, etc. 1,104.36 
Partridge Bros., grain, etc. . 231.81 
H. Fradd & Co., grain, etc. . 235.90 
Pettee & Adams, grain, etc. . 278.59 
C.T.Newman, horse medicine .50 
J. H. Wiggin ... 1.00 
John Hayes & Co., grain . 17.05 
Drake & Dodge, grain . . 83.40 

24 



370 



i^aid Charles Francis, carrots 


$10.28 


Welch & Hall, pair horses 


700.00 


Manchester Locomotive 




Works, ironwork, etc. 


105.20 


J. B. McCrillis k Son, repair- 




ing carts, etc. 


826.60 


Samuel Eastman & Co., hose. 




etc. ..... 


138.17 


Eureka Hose Co., hose, etc. , 


948.75 


Boston Woven Hose Co., 




hose, etc 


48.45 


J. A. and W. Beard & Co., 




bicarbonate of soda . 


72.79 


H. C. Ran no, repairing har- 




ness, etc. .... 


290.30 


Thomas P. Hiley, repairing 




harness, etc. 


108.35 


Cavanaugh Bros., repairing 




harness, etc. 


95.87 


W. H. Adams, repairing har- 




ness, etc. .... 


50.80 


Frederick Allen, repairing 




harness, etc. 


48.95 


J. G. Lake, repairing harness. 




etc 


18.90 


F. N. McLaren, repairing 




harness, etc. 


10.58 


S. L. Flanders, wood, oil, etc. 


21.55 


J. Taylor & Son, oil, etc. 


3.98 


S. M. Worthlej, oil, matches. 




etc 


4.77 


A. C. Wallace, lumber 


9.72 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


26.21 


Head k Dowst, lumber, etc. . 


128.67 



371 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, carpenter-work 


$5.13 


Flint & Little, carpenter-work 


7.15 


New England Telephone and 




Telegraph Co., telephones . 


197.86 


People's Gas-light Co., gas . 


754.18 


Cornelius Callahan Co., hose, 




etc 


977.35 


J. L. Woodman, hay . 


239.55 


C. B. Dickey, hay 


134.46 


C. D. Welch, hay . 


261.80 


City farm, hay 


37.21 


J. L. Cole, hay 


9.81 


J. Q. Perley, hay . 


43.83 


Albe Morrill, hay 


28.26 


D. H. Young, hay 


11.38 


F. R. Emery, hay . 


56.07 


William P. Farmer, hay 


32.30 


J. B. Jones, hay . 


8.73 


J. T. Gott, hay . 


18.70 


S. E. Bryant, hay . 


36.94 


C. M. Wheeler, hay 


18.14 


Daniel Butterfield, hay 


69.70 


Concord Railroad Corpora- 




tion, freight 


21.85 


Boston & Maine Railroad, 




freight .... 


10.37 


J. F. Woodbury & Co., black- 




smithing .... 


204.80 


D, F. Cressey, blacksmithing 


74.39 


Thos. Hickey, blacksmithing 


9.50 


Joseph 0. Tremblay, black- 




smithing 


95.75 


Mahoney & McSweeney, 




blacksmithing . 


102.38 



372 



Paid James Morrison, blacksmith- 

ing $0.80 

Manchester Water-w o r k s , 

water .... 1,083.52 

Mrs. M. H. Hulme, launder- 
ing 31.90 

Mrs. Fred Sunbury, launder- 
ing 4.33 

Mrs. George A. Wheeler, 

laundering . . . 4.35 

Mrs. Mary Cressey, launder- 
ing ..... 5.31 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham, laun- 
dering .... 15.84 

Mrs. S. Batchelder, launder- 
ing 3.10 

Mills & Sturtevant, carpenter- 
work, etc. . . . 53.56 

J. R. Carr & Co., painting 

and glazing . . . 17.21 

Fred S. Sloan, painting and 

• glazing .... 12.30 

J. J. Abbott, painting and 
glazing .... 1.87 

Weston & Hill, matting, etc. 79.18 

J. B. Jones, stove,bench-vise, 

etc. . . . . . 16.25 

A. D. Smith, horse medicine 2.04 

T. W. Lane, telegrams, ex- 

pressage, etc. . . . 26.25 

J. B. Clarke, printing, etc. . 45.40 

Dennis Kerwin, soapine, etc. 15.85 

A. C. Daniels, horse medi- 
cine 11.00 



373 



Paid Joliii W. Wilson, trucking . $11.63 

Dr. J. Blakeley, professional 
services .... 134.50 

Dr. J, Alexander, professional 

services .... 52.00 

A. W. Baker, professional 

services . . . . 18.00 

Dr. A. L. Dodge, professional 

services .... 2.00 

Dr. J. E. Stanhope, profes- 
sional services . . . 2.00 

Edwin Rogers & W. E. Du- 

crow, gong, etc. . . 136.20 

D. L. Stevens, ironwork . 37.00 
C. P. Trickey, stationery, etc. 3.65 
Z. F. Campbell, horse medi- 
cine 50.76 

E. T. James, hack . . 3.00 
C. H. Wood, painting sign . 1.00 
Warren Harvey, chestnut 

poles .... 31.50 

W. L. Blenus, automatic 

whip attachment . . 4.50 
C. T. N'ewman, horse medi- 
cine 4.05 

F. P. Proctor, axle oil . . 3.25 
J. Hinman, Babcock fire ex- 
tinguisher . . . . 30.00 

Electric Gas-lighting Co., 

automatic burners . . 5.20 

Washburn & Moen Manufac- 
turing Co., copper wire . 28.00 

Sanborn Carriage Co. , repair- 
ing carts, etc. . . . 16.60 



374 



Paid A. Filion & Co., repairing 




carts, etc. 


$20.25 


Moore & Preston, charcoal . 


1.00 


A. W. Harris Oil Co., 




scouree .... 


8.25 


Fuller, Leonard & Small, lire 




coats .... 


9.75 


A. L. Putnam, repairing 




carts 


5.90 


Stephen Gardner, sawing 




wood, etc 


5.00 


E. G. McKean, stable rent . 


5.00 


W. L. Blenus, oiling hose 


24.00 


George W. Simmons & Co., 




trumpets .... 


25.50 


J. B. Hall, horse medicine . 


1.35 


J. A. Brown, wood 


5.00 


Snelling & Woods, horse 




medicine .... 


6.95 


Sanborn Carriage Co., re- 




pairing carts 


30.25 


C. A. Trefethen, clock 


3.50 


D. A. Simons, office chairs . 


21.00 


Moore & Preston, wood 


5.00 


James Bros., hacks 


10.00 


L. B. Bod well & Co., coal . 


211.30 


A. M. Finney, cleaning car- 




pets 


8.44 


Plumer & Holton, buttons . 


.60 


D. A. Simons, cuspidores, 




etc. ..... 


!t.l7 


Lowell Iron Found rv, cast- 




ings, etc. .... 


2.34 


"Welch & Hall, horse . 


250.00 



375 



Paid J. Hinman, Babcock -fire ex- 
tinguisher, etc. . . . $32.25 

A. W. Harris Oil ^ Co., 

scouree, etc. . . . 15.50 

Charles E. Berry, hames and 

collars .... 52.00 

C. M. Bailey, wiping waste . 37.00 

D. M. Goodwin, brooms . 4.50 
J. IN". Foss, clipping horses . 13.50 
C. F. Sprague, spreads . 2.00 
Snelling & Woods, horse 

medicine .... 11.47 

Lowell Iron Foundry, cast- 
ings, etc 7.16 

L. B. Bodwell& Co., coal . 1,049.70 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

opaque, etc. . . . 1.08 

Sanborn Carriage Co., iron- 
work, etc. . . . . 7.15 

Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. 38.07 

James Bros., team . . 5.00 

Charles Wood, gilding signs 3.00 

Amoskeag Steam Fire-En- 
gine Co. ISTo. 1, services 
July 4, 1889 . . . 8.00 

Fire King Steam Fire-En- 
gine Co. No. 2, services 
July 4, 1889 . . . 8.00 

Merrimack Steam Fire-En- 
gine Co. !N"o. 3, services 
July 4, 1889 . . . 8.00 

R S. Bean Steam Fire-En- 
gine Co. N^o. 4, services 
July 4, 1889 . . 8.00 



376 



Paid Gen. Stark Steam Fire-En- 
gine Co. No. 5, services 
July 4, 1889 . 

Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, 
services July 4, 1889 

Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2, 
services July 4, 1889 

Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1, 
services July 4, 1889 

F. F. Shaw, repairing clock 

Thomas W. Lane, chief en- 
gineer .... 

Fred S. Bean, assistant en- 
gineer and clerk 

Clarence D. Palmer, assistant 
engineer , , . . 

Ruel G. Manning, assistant 
engineer . . . . 

Eugene S. Whitney, assistant 
engineer . . . . 

George B. Forsaith, services 
as engineer 

Drivers and assistant drivers 
By reserved fund . , . . 
Balance on hand 



$8.00 

8.00 

8.00 

8.00 
1.75 

1,000.00 

150.00 

125.00 

125.00 

125.00 

55.00 

10,975.42 

669.38 

317.74 



$39,996.31 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



To appropriation . 
Reserved fund 



. $1,200.00 
102.80 



Dr. 



$1,302.80 



377 



Paid 'American Electrical Works, 

arms, rubber, etc. . . |29.67 

Thomas W. Lane, cash paid 

for trucking ... 5.50 

William Parr, labor on cir- 
cuits 12.25 

J. Hodge, lumber . . 30.21 

Mason, Chapin & Co., blue 

vitriol .... 234.81 

J. Brodie Smith, labor on 

circuits, etc. . . . 64.30 

T. W. Lane, Jr., labor on 

circuits, etc. . . . 161.25 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . . 47.53 

Concord Railroad Corpora- 
. tion, freight . . . 7.91 

Boston & Maine Railroad, 

freight .... .40 

Edwin Rogers, fire-alarm box 125.00 

Edwin Rogers and W. E. 

Ducrow, fire-al^'m boxes . 294.00 

J. H. Bunnell & Co., insula- 
tors, etc 65.17 

J. B. Clarke, printing . . 11.80 

W. B. Corey & Co., trucking, 

etc 2.15 

James Baldwin Co., pins and 

brackets .... 6.20 

Washburn & Moen Manufac- 
turing Co., copper wire . 54.81 

Electric Gas-lighting Co., 

bells, burners, etc. . . 14.92 



Cr. 



378 



Paid A. D. Smith, chemicals, etc. §1.00 
D. B. Varney, zincs, etc. . 124.92 
H. P. Young, labor on tele- 
graph .... 3.00 
Mahoney & Mc Sweeney, 

blacksmithing . . . 6.00 



31,302.80 



HYDRAXT SERVICE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation . . . .§21,000.00 

§21,000.00 

Cr. 
Paid Manchester Water-w o r k s , 

water .... §17,330.00 

By reserved fund .... 3,670.00 

§21,000.00 



FIREMEN'S PARADE. 

Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


§300.00 




Reserved fund 


103.25 


§403.25 










Cr. 


Paid E. S. Whitney, collation for 






visiting firemen 


§50.00 




Manchester First Regiment 






Band, music 


52.00 




R. G. Sullivan, cigars . 


55.00 




"W. J. Freeman, barges 


13.00 





379 



Paid E. V. Turcotte, barge . . $5.00 

F. X. Chenette, barge . . 5.00 

F. J. Corzilius, caterer . 169.75 

Manchester City Band, music 40.00 

J. B. Clarke, printing . . 13.50 



$403.25 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

To appropriation .... $33,000.00 
M. J. Jenkins, costs and fines 3,720.62 



Dr. 



H. W. Longa, costs and fines 


2,853.33 


J. C. Bickford, costs and fees . 


1,228.85 




(fi/IA QAO QA 








Cr. 


PaidN. P. Hunt, judge . 


$1,500.00 


Isaac L. Heath, associate jus- 




tice ..... 


79.00 


J. C. BickfiDrd, clerk . 


600.00 


M. J. Jenkins, city marshal 


702.05 


H. W. Longa, city marshal 


405.00 


H. W. Longa, assistant mar- 




shal ..... 


415.02 


J. F. Cassidy, assistant mar- 




shal 


200.00 


H. W. Longa, conveying 




prisoners .... 


838.00 


H. W. Longa, witness fees, 




etc 


160.88 


H. W. Longa, witness fees. 




etc 


35.89 


T. L. Thorpe, cop waste 


3.30 



380 



Paid W. 11. Drury, professional 




services .... 


$2.00 


A. C. Osgood, professional 




services .... 


4.24 


A. R. Simmons, professional 




services .... 


6.00 


R J. Peaslee, professional 




services .... 


2.12 


Cballis & Eastman, printing 


9.75 


J. B. Clarke, printing . 


130.35 


Campbell & Williams, print- 




ing 


79.40 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal and 




wood .... 


434.86 


F. B. Fish, repairing chairs, 




etc. ..... 


5.50 


Isaac S. Coffin, waste, dippers, 




etc 


8.98 


D. S. Adams, professional 




services .... 


30.00 


J. E. Lemaitre, professional 




services .... 


10.00 


H. C. Canney, professional 




ser\^ces .... 


6.00 


L. M. French, professional 




services .... 


16.00 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




blank-books, etc. 


5.76 


J. J. Holland & Co., ammo- 




nia, soap, etc. . 


75.00 


J. II. Cram, repairing chairs. 




etc. ..... 


2.50 


M. J. Coleman, water-closet, 




etc 


40.50 



381 



Paid W. H. Vickery, repairing 

badges •. . . . $0.50 

T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 124.57 

D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 1.50 
Louis Wolf, plumbing, etc. . 8.62 
James Brothers, teams . . 6.00 

E. T. James, teams . . 231.50 
J. C. Nichols & Son, teams . 9.50 
Guy F. Whitten, teams . 5.00 
J. K Foss, teams . . . 1.75 
W. J. Freeman, teams . . 2.25 
Thomas W. Lane, stationery 10.10 
Henry Gorman, ivoriue, etc. 55.63 
Carl E. York, ivorine, etc. . 21.59 
H. Fradd &Co., matches . .15 
Patrick Scollard, blacking . 1.20 
Manchester Water-works, 

water .... 152.25 
Troy Rubber Stamp Co., 

daters, etc. . . . 10.60 

J. J. Abbott, painting . . 18.00 
Thomas Franker,killiug dogs, 

etc 24.00 

Mary Cotta, scrubbing floors 8.00 
Mrs. Philibert, scrubbing 

floors . . . . 25.50 
Ada Franker, washing sheets, 

etc 76.50 

Mabel Frost, washing blan- 
kets, etc 33.00 

Marsden & Cutting, washing 

blankets, etc. ... 1.25 
Joseph Franker, dragging 

river for Howard Engstrom 5.00 



382 



Paid Delia Cotta, scrubbing floors $4.00 

Mrs. T. Franker, care of lost • 

children .... 5.00 

W. H. Yicker}-, repairing 

locks and badges . . .40 

Killey & Wadleigh, lanterns, 

etc 11.29 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 48.79 

Western Union Telegraph 

Co., telegrams . . . 17.66 

People's Gas-light Co., gas 518.14 

C. M. Bailey, toilet paper, 

mop-yarn, etc. . . . 37.07 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 
slabs ..... 8.25 

L. M. Aldrich, carpenter 

work .... 25.48 

New England Telegraph and 
Telephone Co., use of tel- 
ephones .... 116.19 

Daniel Davis, meals for pris- 
oners .... 345.00 

Weston & Hill, matting, etc. 3.92 

F. F. Shaw, repairing clock 3.25 

Merrill & Freeman, lime . .25 

C. F. Sprague, towels, crash, 

etc 10.35 

Briggs & Roberts, crackers . 7.14 

John Campbell, police clubs, 

etc 19.40 

A. N. Nettel, team . . 5.00 

Lovejoy & Stratton, repairing 

clocks .... 8.00 



383 



Paid W. H. Vickery, repairing 
badges and locks 

L3mian W. Colby, photo- 
graphs of criminals . 

John Pierce, whisperphones 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., chair cush- 
ion . . . . . 

Humane Restraint Co., wrist- 
lets, etc 

E. Eismann, storing goods of 
sub-marine diver 

J. Blakeley, professional ser- 
vices . . . . . 

H. C. Wallace, photographs 
of criminals 

Charles E. Longa, electric 
gong, etc. . . . . 

R. D. Gay, screens, etc. 

W. D. Ladd & Co., crackers, 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works 

J. Driscoll . 

Labor of men and teams 

Services of patrol officers 
By reserved fund . 
Balance on hand 



$L50 

4.00 
4.00 

1.00 

5.80 

1.50 

10.00 

4.00 

9.40 
6.23 
5.70 

.81 

7.75 

16.25 

28,055.87 

2,788.56 

2,094.29 



$40,802.80 



CITY HALL. 



To rents $8,164.50 

Kew Hampshire Trust Co. . 558.83 

Reserved fund . . . 1,425.05 



Dr. 



$5,147.88 



384 



Cr. 



Paid People's Gas-light Co., gas . 


1401.80 


New England Telegraph and 




Telephone Co., use of tel- 




ephone .... 


79.77 


Thomas A. Lane, plumbing, 




etc 


206.69 


Pike & Heald, mops, ash 




hods, etc. .... 


8.18 


W. H. Vickery, repairing 




locks, keys, etc. 


2.60 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. . 


5.53 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 




etc 


1.99 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware. 




etc 


.95 


C. H. Hutchinson, repairing 




clock .... 


4.80 


Thorp & Bartlett, stove, etc. 


9.25 


Head & Dowst, vaults, lum- 




ber, etc. .... 


2,644.52 


George Holbrook, lumber, 




etc 


10.80 


G. H. Dudley, carpenter- 




work, etc. 


5.25 


L. M. Aldrich, carpenter- 




work .... 


.35 


Mary Shiney, scrubbing, etc. 


126.80 


J. J. Abbott, wall-paper, etc. 


32.14 


J. It. Carr Sc Co., glazing. 




.etc 


6.10 


Charles Wood, }taiiiting 




signs ..... 


7.55 



385 



Paid Manchester Water-w o r k s , 




water .... 


$576.00 


J. J. Holland & Co., alcohol, 




soap, etc. .... 


3.00 


C. A. Hoitt & Co., table and 




cuspidores 


15.00 


C. M. Bailey, toilet paper 


2.0.00 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




wall-paper, opaque, etc. 


43.37 


Weston & Hill, matting, etc. 


33.29 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 


395.71 


A. M. Eastman, pearline, 




brooms, etc. 


4.65 


A. M. Finney, cleaning car- 




pets, etc. .... 


7.71 


M. P. Barker, making awn- 




ing 


12.00 


J. Taylor & Son, matches, 




etc 


.43 


T. W. Lane, ink, etc. . 


1.25 


Maxwell & Campbell, ice 


5.00 


Damon Safe and Iron Works, 




vault doors 


350.00 


Bennett & Lord, mason-work 


20.05 


R. D. Gay, moulding . 


11.40 


J. A. Barker, night services 


2.00 


Alfred Harrington, sawing 




wood, etc. 


3.50 


Merrill & Laird, mason-work 


4.60 


Frank Wilson, matches 


3.5(> 


John White, labor 


3.45 


Bennett & Lord, mason-work 


8.25 


J. S. Holt & Co., soap . 


7.12 



25 



386 



Paid C. 11. Robie, concreting . ^40.50 

Labor of men, clearing snow 

from roof . . . . 21.13 



85,147.88 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Dr. 



To appropriation . . . . 


$1,200.00 




Reserved fund 


650.30 


81,850.30 










Cr. 


Paid John B. Clarke . 


$1,232.46 




Campbell & Williams . 


82.30 




0. D. Kimball 


396.40 




Daily Press Publishing Co. 


13.50 




. William E. Moore 


3.00 




F. H. Challis 


3.00 




T. W. Lane . . 


2.90 




Temple & Farrington Co. 


87.94 




Manchester postoffice . 


28.80 


81,850.30 







REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



To appropriation . 
Reserved fund 



82,000.00 
1,352.49 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor 8869.67 



Db. 

83,352.49 
Cr. 



387 



Paid Sanborn Carriage Co., lumber 


$4.00 


S. C. Forsaitb Machine Co., 




lumber .... 


.75 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, lumber 


35.37 


E. A. G. Holmes, lumber and 




labor ..... 


84.49 


George Holbrook, lumber 




and labor .... 


220.07 


Mills & Sturtevant, lumber 




and labor .... 


667.75 


McLaughlin & Dolan, paint- 




ing . . . . 


47.50 


J. E. Carr & Co., painting . 


67.56 


Joel Daniels & Co., painting. 




etc 


226.44 


J. J. Abbott, painting . 


35.69 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 


65.23 


D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 


313.82 


W. M. Darrah & Co., repair- 




ing roofs, etc. . 


51.72 


E. J. Williams, repairing roofs 


16.81 


Weston & Hill 


69.75 


Bennett & Lord, mason-work 


12.75 


Milo B. Wilson, mason-work 


23.11 


Merrill & Laird, mason-work 


3.75 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


125 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware .... 


2.22 


D. A. Simons 


103.05 


T. L. Thorpe 


8.40 


Labor of men and teams 


421.34 




$3,352.49 



388 

CITY LIBRARY. 

To balance from old account . $1,792.12 
Appropriation .... 4,000.00 



Paid Mrs. M. J. Buncher, librarian §800.00 
A. F.Payne,assistant librarian 307.00 
People's Gas-light Co., gas . 215.19 
Temple & Farrington Co., re- 
binding books, etc. . . 397.54 
T. A. Lane, repairing hose . 1.30 
J. B. Clarke, printing re- 
ports, etc 17.00 

C. F. Livingston, covers and 

placards . . . . 14.75 
N. P. Hunt, postage, etc. . 2.87 
N. P. Hunt, expenses of self 
and L. B. Clough to Bos- 
ton, Lawrence, and Lowell 12.07 
Moore & Preston, wood . 5.00 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 267.45 
Mudgett & Dow, dinners, 

Messrs. Bond and Banks . 3.50 
M. H. G. Banks, expenses 

from New Jersey . . 10.40 

Charles A. Durfee, expenses 10.00 

Trustees of city lil)rury, books 1,000.00 

L. B. Clough, insurance . 100.00 

By balance on hand . . . 2,628.05 



Dr. 

$5,792.12 
Cr. 



$5,792.12 



389 



MILITIA. 

To appropriation .... $800.00 
Reserved fund . . . 100.00 



Paid First Light Battery . . $200.00 

Lafayette Guards . . . 100.00 

Manchester Cadets . . 100.00 

Manchester War Veterans . 100.00 

Sheridan Guards . . . 100.00 

Manchester City Guards . 100.00 

Amoskeag Veterans . . 100.00 
Headquarters First Regiment 

K H. K G. . . . 100.00 



Dr. 

$900.00 
Cr. 



|900.00» 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



To appropriation 



Paid sundry persons 
By reserved fund . 



. $3,000.00 



$2,798.74 
201.26 



Dr. 

$3,000.00 
Cr. 

13,000.00 



DISCOIIN'T ON TAXES. 



To appropriation . 
Reserved fund 



$10,000.00 
330.20 



Dr. 



$10,330.20 



390 



Paid George E. Morrill, collector $10,330.20 



Cr. 

$10,330.20 



STATE TAX. 



To appropriation .... $63,435.00 
Paid Solon A, Carter, state treas- 



urer . 



$63,435.00 



Dr. 

$63,435.00 
Cr. 

$63,435.00 



COUNTY TAX. 



To appropriation . 



140,508.54 



Paid Edwin F. Jones, county treas- 
urer $40,508.54 



Dr. 

$40,508.54 
Cr. 

$40,508.54 



OUTSTANDING TAXES. 



1883 


$913.76 


1884 


914.58 


1885 


923.00 


1886 


974.51 


1887 


1,189.44 


1888 


1,721.07 



391 

TAXES, 1889. 

Dr. 

To resident taxes . . . $435,728.71 
ISTon-resideiit taxes . . 1,363.98 

$437,092.69 

Cr. 

By collections .... $412,355.77 

Abatements. . . . 933.57 

Discounts . . . " . 10,330.20 

Balance uncollected . . 13,473.15 

$437,092.69 



CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $14,500.00 



$14,500.00 
Cr. 



Paid David B. Varney, mayor . $1,800.00 

D. B. Yarney, overseer of the 

poor ex officio . . . 25.00 

David B. Yarney, member of 

school board ex officio . 10.00 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, treas- 
urer 1,200.00 

Nathan P. Kidder, city clerk 900.00 

George E. Morrill, tax col- 
lector . . . . 1,663.22 

John A. Barker, city messen- 
ger 699.96 

Edwin F. Jones, city solicitor 500.00 

William E. Buck, superin- 
tendent of schools . . 2,000.00 



392 



Paid ^ J. M. Collity, city physician 


$100.00 


C. W. Downing, city physi- 




cian ..... 


98.!tl 


P. D. Harrison, clerk of com- 




mon council 


50.00 


J. B. Pattee, clerk of com- 




mon council 


200.00 


Judith Sherer, matron , 


360.00 


A. J. Dickey, assessor • . 


142.50 


John Ryan, assessor 


165.00 


G. H. Dudley, assessor . 


387.50 


D. 0. Furnald, assessor 


722.55 


H. D. Lord, assessor 


215.50 


J. E. Stearns, assessor . 


92.50 


F. T. Provost, assessor . 


145.00 


Henry Lewis, assessor . 


144.50 


B. L. Hartshorn, inspector of 




check-lists 


33.75 


M. F. Lawler, inspector of 




check-lists 


33.75 


William B. Stearns, inspector 




of check-lists 


36.00 


D. 0. Furnald, inspector of 




check-lists 


33.75 


J. A. Foster, inspector of 




check-lists 


36.00 


Isaac Whittemore, inspector 




of check-lists 


36.00 


C. C. Tinkham, inspector of 




check-lists 


33.75 


H. D. Lord, inspector of 




check-lists 


36.00 


Horace Gordon, overseer of 




the poor .... 


2.08 



393 



Paid William H. Maxwell, overseer 

of the poor, and clerk . $100.00 
James Sutclitfe, overseer of 

the poor . . . . 25.00 

T. L. Quimby, overseer of 

the poor .... 25.00 

D. W. Anderson, overseer of 

the poor .... 25.00 

Horatio Fradd, overseer of 

the poor .... 25.00 

George S. Holmes, overseer 

of the poor . . . 22.92 

Charles Francis, overseer of 

the poor .... 25.00 

Thomas H. Mahoney, over- 
seer of the poor . . . 25.00 

James Sutcliffe, supervisor of 

check-lists ... 6.00 

Charles A. Carpenter, super- 
visor of check-lists , . 6.00 

Joseph Lariviere, supervisor 

of check-lists . . . 4.00 

Charles C. Hayes, supervisor 

of check-lists . . . 6.00 

C. H. Hodgman, supervisor 

of check-lists . . . 4.00 

Hiram Hill, supervisor of 

check-lists ... 6.00 

E. M. James, supervisor of 
check-lists ... 6.00 

"W. D. Ladd, supervisor of 

check-lists . . . 6.00 

J. H. Slater, supervisor of 

check-lists . . . 6.00 



394 



Paid John J. Minton, supervisor 

of check-lists . . . $6.00 

D. H. Maxfield, supervisor of 
check-lists . . . 6.00 

"William T. Paine, supervisor 

of check-lists . . . 6.00 

E. B. Dunhar, supervisor of 
check-lists . . . 6.00 

"William C. Knowlton, su- 
pervisor of check-lists . 4.00 

F. W. McKinley, supervisor 

of check-lists . . . 4.00 

D. H. Young, supervisor of 
check-lists . . . 18.00 

E. W. Brigham, assistant 

assessor .... 222.50 

Hiram Forsaith, assistant 

assessor .... 35.00 

H. F. Stone, assistant assessor 27.50 

S. L. Flanders, assistant as- 
sessor .... 95.00 

Isaac Whittemore, assistant 

assessor .... 60.00 

N. Nichols, assistant assessor 277.50 

Harry T. Lord, clerical ser- 
vices for assessors . . 75.00 

A. C. U. Anillette, interpreter 

for assessors . . . 28.00 

J. N. W. Germain, interpre- 
ter for assessors . . 13.00 

A. E. Foster, services as city 

messenger .... 20.00 

H. F. W. Little, milk inspec- 
tor 150.00 



395 



Paid T. "W. Lane, inspector of 

buildings .... $100.00 
George W. Goffe, moderator 3.00 
George M. True, moderator . 3.00 
Allan D. Eastman, ward clerk 10.00 
A. L. F. GeofFroy, ward clerk 5.00 
A. M. Keniston, selectman . 5.00 
Henry Hebert, selectman . 5.00 
John P. Cronin, selectman . 5.00 
George B. Forsaith, select- 
man ..... 5.00 
"William S. Smith, selectman 5.00 
J. Everett Anthes, selectman 5.00 
C. E. Merrill, selectman . 5.00 
H. C. Paige, selectman . 5.00 
iN". P. Richard, selectman . 5.00 
A. M. Keniston, selectman . 5.00 
George H.Benton, selectman 5.00 
H. C. Paige, selectman . 2.50 
Geo. C. Hoitt, health officer 200.00 
Joseph B. . Sawyer, health 

officer .... 200.00 
"William M. Parsons, health 

officer .... 200.00 
James E. Dodge, member of 

school board and clerk . 110.00 
Edward B. Woodbury, mem- 
ber of school board . . 10.00 
John C. Balch, member of 

school board . . . 6.67 
Charles H. Manning, member 

of school board . . 10.00 
Benjamin C. Dean, member 

of school board . . 10.00 



396 



Paid L. C. Baldwin, member of 






school board 


$10.00 




Charles G. Dodge, member of 






school board 


3.33 




S. B. Stearns, mem])er of 






school board 


6.67 




Fred C. Crosby, member of 






school board 


10.00 




William C. Clarke, member 






of school board 


10.00 




F. T. E. Richardson, member 






of school board 


10.00 




J. F. Frost, member of school 






board .... 


.86 




Nathan P. Hunt, member of 






school board 


10.00 




Charles A. Carpenter, mem- 






ber of school board . 


9.16 




J. L. Sanborn, member of 






school board 


10.00 




William K. Robbins, mem- 






ber of school board . 


10.00 




M. P. Hall, member of school 






board .... 


10.00 




J. F. Cahill, member of 






school board 


10.00 




J. P. Slattery, member of 






school board 


10.00 




S. W, Clarke, member of 






school board 


3.33 




By reserved fund 


171.86 






$14, 


,500.00 



397 

DECORATION" OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $300.00 

$300.00 

Cr. 
Paid Louis Bell PostNo. 3, G. A. R. $300.00 

$300.00 



WOMEN'S AID AND RELIEF SOCIETY HOS- 
PITAL. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $400.00 

$400.00 

Cr. 
Paid Mrs. Aretas Blood, treasurer $400.00 

$400.00 



STARK MONUMENT SQUARE. 

Dr. 
To appropriation . . . . $100.00 

$100.00 

Cr. 
Paid, labor of men and teams . $89.41 
By reserved fund . . . 10.59 

$100.00 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $750.00 

$750.00 



398 



Paid G. M. L. Lane . . . $250.00 
Samuel Brooks . . . 500.00 



Cr. 
3750.00 



WATER-WORKS. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account . $36,126.68 

Charles K Walker, %Yater rents 86,692.46 

Sam C. Lowell, overdraft . 8.00 

$122,827.14 

Cr. 

Paid interest $36,000.00 

Charles K. Walker, superin- 
tendent .... 1,556.97 
Merrill & Freeman, cement, 

etc 75.10 

Pettee & Adams, cement, etc. 6.50 

A. C. Wallace, water com- 
missioner .... 90.00 
J. A. Weston, water com- 
missioner and clerk . . 137.00 
Alpheus Gay, water commis- 
sioner .... 93.00 

D. B. Varney, water commis- 
sioner ex officio . . . 24.00 

E. H. Ilobbs, water commis- 
sioner . . . . . 36.00 

J. F. Kennard, water com- 
missioner .... 78.00 

Henry Chandler, water com- 
missioner .... 42.00 



399 



Paid J. Stickney, oak leather pack- 
ing $41.50 

D. J. Mahoney, lumber . 40.93 
J. Hodge, lumber . . 2.06 
Austin, Flint & Day, wood . 2.00 
Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. . 10.61 

E. A. G. Holmes, lumber, etc. 316.70 
Mills & Sturtevant, locker . 11.00 
A. M. Eastman, oil and 

matches .... 3.75 

Eager & Rand, oil, soap, etc. 6.70 

!New England Telegraph and 
Telephone Co., use of tele- 
phone .... 99.65 

James Bros., teams . . 35.50 

E. T. James, teams . . 59.00 

Pike & Heald, Russia strips, 

etc 19.94 

T. A. Lane, pipe, etc. . . 224.68 

D. F. Cressey, blacksmithing 92.64 

C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork, 

etc 73.72 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 

etc 175.53 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, 

etc 17.83 

Manchester Hardware Co., 

hardware, etc. . . . 11.00 

Leander Pope, blacksmithing 4.50 

Concord Railroad Corpora- 
tion, freight . . . 1,945.33 

Manchester Locomotive 
Works, sleeves, forge, iron, 
etc 879.00 



400 



damage 



Paid Boston & Maine Eailroad, 
freight 
Samuel T. Page, land . 
Fletcher Brown, land . 
Elisha Slager, land 
Henry A. Hunter, land 
Jacob Chase, land 
Richard S. Clark, land . 
Elias S. Emery, land 
Amos and Mary Hamlet 
John Dealy, damage from 

water 
A. G. Wallace, damage from 

water 
Fannie D. Hardy 

from water 
Hersey Meter Co., meter, etc 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co. 

jute packing, etc. 
T, H. Risdon & Co., steps 
The McNeal Pipe and Foun- 
dry Co., iron pipe, etc. 
Davidson Steam Pump Co. 

packing 
Leonard & Ellis, machine oil 
R. D. Wood & Co., sleeves, etc 
E. W. Bigelow, machine oil, 

etc 

Holyoke Hydrant and Iron 

Works, hydrants, etc. 
Chapman Valve Manufactur- 
ing Co., hydrants, etc. 
Amoskeag Manufacturing 
Co., crown gears, etc. 



$10.81 

150.00 

1,900.00 

1,700.00 

. 125.00 

75.00 

1,000.00 

850.00 

575.00 

75.00 

28.83 

102.00 
43.75 

23.85 
9.00 

15,788.82 

78.75 

77.82 

134.54 

33.27 

314.44 

570.27 

1,004.88 



401 



Paid Boston Lead Manufacturing 

Co., pig lead, etc. . . $198.94 
Hays Manufacturing Co., 

boxes, locks, etc. . . 210.40 
Gilchrist & Gorham Corpora- 
tion, cocks, etc. . . . 206.49 
Hersey Meter Co., meters, 

etc 202.75 

l!»rational Meter Co., meters, 

etc 1,925.65 

■ Union Water Meter Co., me- 
ters, etc 97.21 

Builders' Iron Foundry, 

branches, sleeves, etc. . 189.50 
Whittier Machine Co., pipe, 

elbows, etc. . . . 332.06 
J. W. Wilson, teaming . 20.00 
P. C. Cheney Co., waste, etc. 43.59 
I. T. Webster, wood . . 12.00 
J. M. Hall, wood . . . 6.00 
J. F. Wyman, wood . . 51.26 
J. M. & D. A. Parker, wood . 22.00 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., coal . 94.3(> 
E. P. Johnson Co., coal, etc. 344.20 
C. H. Robie, concreting . 57.32 
T. H. Tr.,-^on, prinring . . 44.39 
Campbell & Williams, print- 
ing 22.40 

J. B. Clarke, printing . . 73.35 
Union Publishing Co., print- 
ing 10.70 

John Driscoll, funnel, etc. . 2.13 
George E. Morrill, auditing 

pcconnts .... 20.00 

26 



402 



Paid W. li. Ward & Co., bands and 




cocks .... 


§14.25 


Parker & Jencks, posts 


1.50 


Edson Manufacturing Co., 




diaphragm, bolts, etc. 


13.98 


G. R. Vance & Co., iron 




torches, etc. 


1.95 


E. R. Coburn & Co., books 




and stationery . 


1L35 


J. H. Cunningham, elbows, 




nipples, etc. 


5.35 


Chadwick Lead Works, pig 




lead ..... 


216.59 


J. II. Farnham, repairing 




files 


1.75 


Clough & Clark, examining 




titles 


2.00 


Chadwick Lead Works, pipe. 




etc 


32.99 


Farnum's Brass Works, locks, 




etc. ..... 


37.75 


George Fletcher & Co., cater- 




ing, etc. .... 


83.00 


J. B. Sawyer, engineering. 




etc. ..... 


65.75 


Auburn, N. H., taxes . 


16.82 


New Hampshire Rubber Co., 




gaskets .... 


3.17 


Dodge, Haley & Co., chain- 




block, etc 


13.75 


William P. Miller .^- Co., lu- 




bricator .... 


21.78 


The Water-Wash Prevention 




Co., meter .... 


2»).90 



403 



Paid,|John Dodge, teams, etc. 


$15.25 


F. W. Elliott,>eals . 


4.00 


Boston Woven Hose Co., 




packing .... 


14.04 


Boston Belting Co., packing 


8.75 


Labor of men and teams 


11,548.62 


By balance on hand 


39,589.15 




(tt-ioo 007 -l/j 







RESERVED FUND. 



To milk licenses . 


. 


. 




$56.50 


Show licenses . 


, 


. 




197.00 


Dog licenses . 


. 


. 




1,285.18 


Billiard-table licenses 


, 




177.00 


Rent of tenements 




. 




550.30 


Rev. J. A. Chevalier, 


Beech- 




street schoolhouse lot 


. 




4,750.00 


Interest on taxes 


, 


, 




387.84 


Paupers off farm 


. 


. 




223.97 


Highway District 


No. 


1 




34.48 


a a 




2 




71.54 


(( li 




5 




25.02 


(( a 




6 




.90 


u a 




8 




13.02 


a ' '- • a 




9 




18.98 


(( a 




12 




1.53 


i( a 




13 




11.89 


Damage for land 


taken 


for 




highways 


. 


. 




817.72 


Lighting streets 


. 


. 




1,958.57 


Fire department 


^ 


, 




669.38 



Dr. 



404 



Paid hydrant service 
Police department 
Abatement of taxes 
City officers' salaries 
Stark Monument square 
Health department 
Appropriation 

By firemen's parade 
City Farm 
City teams 
Highway District !N'o. 3 



a n 


4 


it a 


7 


a (( 


10 


(( n 


11 


New highways 


. 



"Watering streets 
Paving streets . 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete 
Sewers and drains . 
Commons 
Bridges . 
Incidental expenses 
Fire-alarm telegraph 
City Hall 

Printing and stationery 
Repairs of buildings 
Militia 

Discount on taxes . 
Firemen's parade 
Engineers' department 



§3,670 

2,738. 

201. 

171. 

10. 

299. 

20,000. 



00 
56 
26 
86 
59 
21 
00 



$38,342.30 
Cr. 



§100, 
1,615 

299, 

187 
44 
72 
60 

415 
2,132 
1,277, 
2,971, 
3,473 

353. 
6,907 

463 
1,722. 
3,415. 

102, 
1,425, 

650 
1,352 

100 

330 
3 

271 



00 
25 
46 
61 
00 
45 
34 
35 
.13 
87 
27 
,88 
38 
,53 
,05 
67 
55 
80 
05 
.30 
49 
00 
20 
.25 
6i^ 



405 



By scavenger teams . . . $4,715.40 

Amoskeag cemetery . . 16.00 

Lake-avenue engine-house . 608.11 

Balance on hand . . . 3,255.25 



$38,342.30 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $4,000.00 





$4,000.00 




Cr. 


Paid Head & Dowst, lumber, etc. 


$1,231.45 


G. H. Dudley, lumber and 




labor .... 


747.15 


T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 


196.58 


Lowell Iron Foundry, iron- 




work, etc. . 


48.46 


C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork, 




etc 


17.04 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. . 


5.68 


Pike & Heald, galvanized 




pipe, etc 


123.58 


J. J. Abbott, painting, etc. . 


202.78 


J. A. Sargent, blackboards, 




etc 


222.83 


Bennett & Lord, mason-work 


95.60 


S. M. Bennett, mason-work . 


1.00 


Shirley & Stuart, mason- 




work .... 


10.67 


R. Landers, repairing roofs. 




etc 


81.94 



406 



Paid B. "W. Robinson, raason-work 


$213.28 


Isaac S. Coffin, galvanized 




pipe, etc 


19.60 


Amoskeag Manufacturing 




Co., ironwork . 


7.35 


A. T. Barr, glazing, etc. 


2.56 


William P. Buck, repairing 




clocks .... 


4.00 


C. A. Trefethen, repairing 




clocks .... 


5.00 


G. A. Nute, repairing organ 


2.00 


Smead Warming and Venti- 




lating Co., dry closets 


450.00 


Thorp & Bartlett, repairing 




stoves .... 


4.85 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




opaque, fixtures, etc. 


18.48 


M. Fitzgerald, cutting soap- 




stone .... 


6.00 


W. H. Vickery, keys, etc. 


1.85 


G. H. Eastman, carpenter- 




work .... 


5.00 


W. G. Landry, stone . 


6.00 


A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 


5.00 


By balance on hand 


264.27 







FUEL. 

To appropriation .... $3,200.00 
Balance overdrawn . . . 130.03 



$4,000.00 



Dr. 
$3,330.93 



407 



Cr. 



Paid C. N. Harvey, wood 


. 


$369.77 


J. M. Nutt, wood . 




74.59 


L. B. Bodwell & Co., 


wood 




and coal . 


. 


2,867.82 


E. P. Johnson Co., coal 




15.00 


J. Hodge, wood . 


. 


1.75 


C. C. Haskell ^ . 




2.00 







$3,330.93 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$61.24 




Appropriation .... 


1,000.00 




Balance overdrawn . 


31.83 


$1,093.07 










Cr. 


PaidKilley & Wadleigb, hard- 






ware, etc. .... 


$31.10 




Manchester Hardware Co., 






hardware, etc, . 


52.99 




J. B. Varick Co., hardware. 






etc 


7.50 




Pike & 'Heald, door-mats. 






brushes, etc. 


64.44 




T. W. Lane, pencils, crayons, 






etc 


25.40 




J. L. Hammett, erasers, etc. 


202.75 




Prang Educational Co., mod- 






els, etc. .... 


93.98 




J. J. Holland, chemicals 


52.07 




Weston & Hill, matting, etc. 


9.12 





408 



Paid Harley & Rol)bie, ribbon . $15.25 
Ginu & Co., music charts, etc. 16.86 
Xovelty Advertising Co., card- 
board, etc. . , . 4.25 
C. A. Hoitt & Co., tables and 

chairs .... 24.40 
Milton Bradley Co., charts, 

etc 7.38 

C. P. Trickey, book-holder, 

etc 2.75 

Thorp & Adams Manufactur- 
ing Co., ink . . . 21.00 
Rubber Stamp Works, stamps 9.75 
Manchester Broom Co., 

brooms .... 2.00 

A. N. Clapp, brooms, etc. . 1.95 

George S. Perry, maps, etc. . 16.15 

R. D. Gay . . . . 32.99 

C. M. Bailey, manilla paper . 3.60 
Educational Supply Co., wire, 

holders, etc. . . . 8.24 
• King & Merrill, slates, cray- 
ons, etc. .... 50.90 
E. R. Coburn & Co., writing- 
paper, crayons, etc. . . 16.20 
Higgins Bros. Co., ink jugs . 2.94 
Clark & Estey, ribbon . . 2.98 
William II. Elliott, piano 

stool, etc. .... 3.00 

Carl E. York, brooms . . .88 

W.Heron,Jr., filling diplomas 30.65 

W. J. Brecknell,di"plomas . 275.00 

L. H. Josselyn . . . 4.60 



«il,093.07 



409 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



To balance from old account 


$34.00 


Appropriation . 


500.00 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co. 


$17.90 


E. R. Coburn & Co. 


63.69 


Ginn & Co. . . . 


10.00 


T. W. Lane . 


189.99 


W. P. Goodman . 


90.15 


Harrison Hume . 


31.50 


Ginn & Co. . 


2.92 


Educational Publishing Co. 


.75 


J. M. Russell 


17.04 


Eastern Educational Bureau 


I 8.87 


By balance on hand 


101.19 







Dr. 



$534.00 
Cr. 



$534.00 



PRESTTING AND ADVERTISING. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation 
Balance overdrawn . 



$107.49 
300.00 
113.23 



Paid J. B. Clarke . 


$414.02 


Daily Press Publishing Co. 


38.50 


Union Publishing Co. . 


62.25 


Campbell & Williams . 


4.40 


0. D. Kimball 


1.00 


Novelty Advertising Co. 


.55 



Dr. 



$520.72 
Cr. 



$520.72 



410 
CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



Dr. 



To appropriation .... 


$800.00 


Balance overdrawn 


295.89 




CI oQt 80 








Cr. 


Paid People's Gas-light Co., gas . 


$164.50 


Manchester Water- works, 




water .... 


494.20 


"William E. Buck, horse, etc. 


124.58 


J. S. Aver}', glazing, etc. 


6.60 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware, etc. . 


.68 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 


1.30 


W. H. Vickery, repairing 




locks, etc 


2.95 


A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 


12.75 


George Locke, glazing . 


1.05 


Carl E. York, ink jugs . 


1.70 


C. A. Trefethen, repairing 




clocks .... 


13.50* 


A. T. Barr, cleaning school- 




room 


1.00 


A. N. Clapp, brooms, etc. 


.88 


Samuel Brooks, distributing 




notices .... 


2.15 


A. M. Eastman, Ivorine and 




soap ..... 


1.07 


Jones's Express, trucking 


3.33 


W. K. Robbins, expenses to 




Dover, Boston, Haverhill, 




for committee . 


8.11 



Joel Daniels & Co., glazing . 1.40 



411 



Paid W. H. Thurber, telegrams . $5.60 
W. J. Freeman, teams . . 45.00 
DeCourcey k Holland, remov- 
ing wood to clean vault at 
Spring-street schoolhouse . 5.00 
F. H. & W. M. Fames, chem- 
icals 1.00 

Edward H. Currier, chemicals 6.40 

F. W. Fitts, yarn ... .50 
S. W. Clarke estate, cleaning 

clocks .... 2.00 

George W. Reed, team . 2.00 

C. W. Anderson & Co., re- 
pairing clocks . . . 2.25 

Timothy McKenna, cleaning 

vaults . . . . 59.50 
Manchester Opera House Co., 

use of Opera House . . 25.00 

Thomas Stewart, trucking . 4.00 

F. P. Colby, moving pianos . 6.00 
Higgins Brothers Co., use of 

chairs .... 5.00 

D. C. Heath & Co. . . 3.34 
Higgins Brothers Co., use of 

chairs .... 6.00 

J. L. Wentworth, trucking . 6.05 

E. F. Blackman . . . 4.00 
Emma B. Abbott, teams . 55.50 
Carrie L. Barker . . . 10.00 



$1,095.89 



412 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



To appropriation . 
Balance overdrawn 



$3,200.00 
145.94 



Paid J. S. Avery . 


$600.00 


William Stevens . 


600.00 


A. T. Barr . 


557.00 


Michael Finley 


406.87 


William H. Morrill 


350.04 


H. C. Dickey 


250.08 


E. P. Cogswell . 


250.08 


J. E. Bailey . 


60.27 


C. F. Sanborn 


31.05 


E. L. Bennett 


28.75 


Frank Quartz 


16.00 


Ava M. Robinson . 


38.00 


D. S. Dunbar 


18.50 


Ella F. Barker . 


52.30 


Cora Fox 


9.50 


Otis L. Webster . 


20.50 


Hiram Proctor 


4.50 


Willie Dobbin 


12.00 


Frank B. Annis . 


7.00 


Margaret Flynn . 


4.00 


Alverta P. Barrett 


19.50 


Ruby I. Fox 


7.00 


Martha Tracey 


3.00 



Dr. 

$3,345.94 
Cr. 



$3,345.94 



413 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



To balance from old account 
Appropriation . 
Balance overdrawn . 



$375.07 

1,200.00 

223.76 



% 




Paid Georgia A. Nnte . 


1100.05 


F. C.'^Baldwin 


235.40 


Fannie L. Sanborn 


46.80 


Maude L. Kent . 


57.00 


Annie McClery . 


37.80 


F. C. Livingston . 


299.20 


C. E. Cochran 


171.60 


Cora F. Sanborn . 


82.00 


Nellie M. Atwood 


28.80 


Etta S. Dana 


96.30 


Mary A. Bnzzell . 


51.30 


C. W. Bickford . 


77.00 


Lizzie D. Hartford 


51.30 


Maggie Linen 


67.50 


Emma J. Ela 


80.00 


J. H. Campbell . 


110.00 


Sarah B. Paige 


38.70 


Mary A. Southard 


25.00 


William H. Morrill, janitor 


102.80 


Albert T. Barr . 


28.80 


People's Gas-light Co., gas 


11.48 



Dr. 

1,798.83 
Cr. 



$1,798.83 



414 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



Dr. 



To balance from old account 


$98.67 


Appropriation . 


43,500.00 


Balance overdrawn . 


614.21 




<i,\A 010 QQ 




Cr. 


Paid Albert A. Somes . 


$2,000.00 


George I. Hopkins 


1,410.00 


L. E. Manahan 


900.00 


Mary A. Buzzell . 


600.00 


Rocilla M. Tuson . 


563.78 


Mary Stanton 


600.00 


Fred C. Baldwin . 


1,410.00 


Annie 0. Heath . 


600.00 


Jennie M. Chandler 


500.00 


Carrie E. Reid 


500.00 


C. A. Abbott 


450.00 


Hattie G. Flanders 


450.00 


Nellie M. James . 


450.00 


Ella F. Sanborn . 


192.16 


Lizzie P. Gove 


570.00 


Emma L. McClaren 


867.50 


Fannie D. Moulton 


450.00 


Nellie L Sanderson 


450.00 


Lucia E. Estey 


450.00 


Alice E. Page 


420.00 


Frank S. Sutcliffe 


1,410.00 


Annie W. Patten . 


525.00 


Isabella R. Daniels 


500.00 


Mary F. Barnes . 


500.00 


Nettie F. Ains worth 


482.50 


Susie G. Woodman 


450.00 



415 



Paid Cora B. Guilford . 


. $348.54 


Theodora Richardson . 


185.00 


Mary E. Buuton . 


500.00 


Bertha L, Dean 


500.00 


Nancy S. Bunton . 


475.00 


Kittie J. Ferren . 


450.00 


Mary F. Nutt 


430.00 


Clara E. Woods . 


450.00 


George Winch 


1,320.00 


Cora M. Dearborn 


26.25 


Mary J. Hickey . 


290.00 


Barbara B. Joy 


440.00 


Flora M. Senter . 


450.00 


Ellen E. McKean . 


450.00 


Josie H. Newton . 


450.00 


Kittie C. Woodman 


380.56 


Alta C. Willand . 


500.00 


Eva F. Tuson 


450.00 


Letta M. Smith . 


350.00 


Lizzie A. Burns . 


570.00 


Lelia A. Brooks . 


450.00 


S. Izetta Locke 


450.00 


Edith M. Stebbins 


450.00 


Gertrude H. Brooks 


225.00 


Annie A. Webster 


157.50 


W. F. Gibson 


240.00 


Etta J. Carley 


52.50 


Mary G. Tynan . 


450.00 


Olive J. Randall , 


270.00 


Theodora Richardson . 


175.00 


Nellie M. Atwood 


407.50 


Georgia A. Nute . 


525.00 


Ella F. Barker . 


450.00 


Kate Townsend . 


400.00 



416 



Paid Genevieve B. Knight . 


$360.00 


Olive A. Kowe 


360.00 


J. J. Kimball 


1,000.00 


Caroline E. Wing 


1,140.00 


Gertrude H. Brooks 


225.00 


Georgianna Dow . 


450.00 


Helen M. Morrill . 


475.00 


Iluldali C. Graupner 


392.50 


Ella Hope . 


450.00 


Augusta S. Downs 


337.50 


Mary W. Mitchell 


450.00 


Mary J. Walsh 


360.00 


Kate T. Clarke . 


400.00 


Mary A. Southard 


400.00 


Delia E. Haines . 


450.00 


Sarah B. Paige 


385.00 


Alverta P. Barrett 


237.43 


Emma B. Abbott . 


160.50 


Maude L. Kent . 


105.25 


Millie S. Morse 


103.25 


Lillian Little 


34.00 


Abbie R. West . 


231.93 


Liez M. Warren . 


264.47 


I^ettie B. Fogg 


246.94 


Grace W. Irwin . 


461.25 


Annie B. Goodwin 


114.75 


Emma M. Streeter 


112.25 


Mabel J. Brickett 


125.25 


Bertha A. Young . 


117.00 


W. P. Abl)ott 


100.00 


Cora F. Sanborn . 


271.87 


William H. Furber 


1>59,52 


B. S. Andrews 


910.00 


C. W. Bickford . 


1S7.75 



417 



Paid G. A. Wymaii 


$135.00 




J. W. Stetson 


405.00 




Jennie L. Thompson 


210.00 




Lillian Little 


132.43 




Mary E. Monlton . 


27.00 




Fannie L. Sanborn 


6.25 


$44,212.88 






% 






TUITIOK 








Dr. 


To William E. Buck . 


$216.60 


$216.60 


' 








Cr. 


By balance from old account 


$202.41 




Balance on hand 


14.19 


$216.60 







EVENING SCHOOL, 



MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

Dr. 



To balance from old account 

Appropriation .... 


$106.41 ■ 
700.00 


$806.41 






Paid A. H. Sanborn, instructor . 


$123.00 


Cr. 


Henry W. Allen, instructor . 


177.00 




John M. Kendall, instructor 


112.75 




W". H. Morrill, janitor . 
Ivison, Blakeman & Co., 


24.00 




models .... 


10.00 




E. R. Coburn & Co., drawing- 






paper .... 
0. D. Kimball, printing 
By balance on hand 


4.50 

3.50 

351.66 





,41 



418 

CATALOGUE FOR CITY LIBRARY. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $2,500.00 

$2,500.00 

Cr. 
By cash on hand .... $2,500.00 

$2,500.00 



NEW SCHOOLHOUSE, WEST MANCHESTER. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $15,000.00 
H. B. Fairbanks, buildings sold 935.75 

$15,935.75 

Cr. 
Paid Rowena L. H. Walker, land $0,700.00 
J. B. Clarke, advertising . 16.00 

H. B. Fairbanks, selling 

buildings .... 25.00 

Labor of men and teams . 9.00 

By balance on hand . . . 9,185.75 

$15,935.75 



LAKE-AVENUE ENGINE-HOUSE. 

Dr. 

To appropriation .... $6,500.00 
H. B. Fairbanks, houses sold 1,060.00 
Reserved fund .... 608.11 

$8,168.11 



419 



Paid Mead, Mason & Co., con- 
tractors .... ^6,271.04 

W. Ireland, extra services . 103.00 

Head & Dowst, lumber and 

labor .... 308.48 

T. A. Lane, chandeliers, etc. 59.68 

C. H. Hutchinson, ironwork 36.62 
T. A. Lane, plumbing, etc. . 25.60 

D. E. Guiney, plumbing, etc. 27.81 
C. H. Robie, concreting . 210.40 
Concord Railroad Corpora- 
tion, freight ... .64 

J. M. Kendall, architect . 346.00 

Union Publishing Co., adver- 
tising proposals . . 7.50 

Paine's Furniture Co., furni- 
ture, etc 112.05 

Mrs. S. A. Batchelder, clean- 
ing house .... 11.00 

J. B. Smith, burners, battery, 

etc 225.27 

W. L. Blenus, horse-pull, etc. 20.65 

Jones's City Baggage Express, 

freight, etc. . . . 3.74 

Temple & Farrington Co., 

opaque shades, etc. . . 44.11 

Weston & Hill, carpets, etc. 216.54 

Committee on Lands and 
Buildings, expenses to Bos- 
ton to purchase furniture . 20.00 

C. A. Hoitt & Co., beds, mat- 
tresses, etc. . . • 117.98 



Cr. 



,168.11 



420 

CEMETERY FU:N'DS. 

Dr. 

To trustees $1,650.00 

$1,650.00 

Cr. 

By bonds $1,650.00 

$1,650.00 



ENGmEERS' DEPARTMENT. 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... 12,700.00 
Reserved fund . . . 271.66 

$2,971.66 

Cr. 
Paid W. H. Bennett, city engineer $1,000.00 

W. H. Bennett, india ink, 
horse-car fares, etc. . . 22.70 

H. M. Young, assistant en- 
gineer .... 566.42 

George W. Wales, assistant 

engineer .... 504.25 

J. J. McDonough, assistant 

engineer .... 357.00 

H. J. Briggs, assistant engi- 
neer ..... 

C. W. Bickford, assistant 
engineer .... 

Head & Dowst, plate-glass, 

etc 23.41 

Flint & Little, carpenter- 
work, etc. . . . 4.61 



85.75 
51.63 



421 



'aid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 




stakes, etc. 


$33. 46 


J. Hodge, stakes, etc. . 


24.63 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware, 




etc. ..... 


51.02 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 


1.00 


Manchester Hardware Co., 




hardware .... 


2.00 


Pike & Heald, plumbing, etc. 


2.63 


J. F. Woodbury, blacksmith- 




ing 


9.25 


Mahoney & McSweeney, 




blacksmithing . 


5.00 


J. B. Clarke, printing re- 




ports, etc. .... 


27.00 


0. D. Kimball, paper and 




printing .... 


9.00 


T. A. Lane, gas fitting, etc. . 


5.03 


C. H. Wood,painting signs, etc. 


13.90 


George W. Reed, teams 


58.75 


J. J. Holland, chamois skin . 


.30 


Temple & Farrington Co., 




drawing-paper, etc. . 


18.55 


Edward Doherty, assistant 




engineer .... 


9.75 


Thomas P. Riley, repairing 




harness, etc. 


2.80 


Forrest F. Shaw, reading-glass 


2.50 


Guy F. Whitten, team . 


1.00 


Joel Daniels & Co., drawing- 




paper, etc 


8.50 


W. L. Blenus, repairing 




tapes, etc. . . 


2.50 



422 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing 

Co., steel liamn^er 
Manchester Gas-light Co., gas 

stove .... 
E. T. James, team 
T. W. Lane, letter paper and 

pens .... 
Geo. Blanchet, cotton cloth 
Temple & Farrington Co. 

stationery . 
"Wadsworth, Howland & Co 
A. H. Stark, repairing wagon 



$4.00 

6.00 
1.00 

3.25 
10.70 

5.47 

28.90 

8.00 



$2,971.66 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



To appropriation .... $1,400.00 



Paid Russell White, inspector . $659.05 

J. B. Clarke, printing . . 70.10 

Campbell & Williams,printing 16.50 

Wm. E. Moore, printing . 9.00 

0. D. Kimball, printing . 6.50 
Daily Press Publishing Co., 

printing .... 11.30 

F. H. Challis, printing . . 6.00 

Union PublishingCo., printing 17.00 
Thomas Franker, burying 

nuisances .... 5.00 

E. T. James, teams . . 5.50 

James Bros., team . . 2.00 



Dr. 

$1,400.00 
Cr. 



423 

Paid J. Stickney, enameled cloth . i,$1.25 
George C. Hoitt, expenses to 
New York, Long Island, 
and Newport . . . 24.17 

Joseph B. Sawyer, expenses 
to New York, Long Island, 
and Newport . . . 24.17 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware . .25 

Labor of men and teams . 243.00 
By reserved fund .... 299.21 



$1,400.00 



EECEIVING TOMB, VALLEY CEMETERY. 
To appropriation .... $1,500.00 







$1,500.00 






Cr. 


Paid Palmer & Garmon, stonework 


$27.15 




Pettee & Adams, cement 


27.50 




Lowell Iron Foundry, iron- 






work ..... 


18.60 




J. J. Abbott, painting . 


1.25 




Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 


2.64 




Manchester Locomotive 






Works, ironwork 


385.17 




Thos. A. Lane, Akron pipe, 






etc 


26.11 




B. W. Robinson, mason-work 


3.75 




Dickey & Eastman, mason- 






work .... 


16.68 




Labor of men 


54.84 




J. W. Kimball, stone . 


6.25 





424 



Paid F. S. Bodwell, stone-work . $495.00 

Flint & Little, lumber, etc. . 35.67 

Bv balance on hand . . . 399.39 



31,500.00 



FUNDED DEBT. 

Amount of funded debt, 



Jan. 1, 1889 
Paid during the year 

Amount of funded 

Jan. 1, 1890 
Interest due, estimated . 
Bills outstanding . 
Cemetery bonds 



debt. 



$935,500.00 
500.00 



§20,000.00 
29,462.50 
10,950.00 



Total indebtedness, Jan. 1, 1890 . 
Cash in treasury Jan. 1, 1890 

'Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1890 
Net indebtedness Jan. 1, 1889 

Decrease of net indebtedness during the year 



§935,000.00 



§60,412.50 

§995,412.50 
109,311.83 



§886,100.67 
917,770.85 



§31,670.18 



425 





Valuation, Taxes, Etc 






Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


Val. of Poll. 


1846 . . 


$3,187,726 


$22,005 95 


1,808 


S2 10 


$300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953 54 


2,056 


1 68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712 53 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,600,049 


44,979 92 


. 2,518 


2 47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974 23 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798 47 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379 45 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545 81 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022 44 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952 09 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214 88 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862 98 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210 85 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368 01 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644,937 


86,804 87 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104 96 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827 45 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233 86 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815 98 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696 20 


3,176 


5 18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567 19 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457 39 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783 07 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022 43 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047 63 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639 74 


5,404 


3 12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196 67 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768 00 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835 95 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131 29 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900 93 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573 46 


6,341 


1 68 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873 32 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406 73 


6,633 


1 60 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812 17 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462 26 


7,574 


1 76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673 82 


7,831 


1 62 


100 


1883 . . 


20,055,986 


332,741 72 


7,944 


1 65 


100 


1884 . . 


20,613,032 


361,401 61 


8,143 


. 1 75 


100 


1885 . , 


21,137,464 


345,260 15 


8,157 


1 63 


100 


1886 . . 


21,379,384 


347,009 31 


8,602 


1 62 


100 


1887 . . 


21,905,476 


373,138 96 


8,996 


1 70 


100 


1888 . . 


22,162,928 


432,914 45 


9,344 


1 95 


100 


1889 . . 


22,962,790 


437,092 69 


9,527 


1 90 


100 



426 
City Debt. 



Dale of Notes. 



To \VTiom Payable. 



When Payable. 



Principal. 



July 1, 1874 

Jan. 1, 1872 

Oct. 31, 1863 

July 1, 1864 

1, 1874 

1, 1872 

1, 1872 

July 1, 1881 

April 1, 1885 

April 1, 1885 

April 1, 1885 

April 1, 1885 

Jan. 1, 1887 



July 
Jan. 
Jan. 



"Water Bonds, 
City Bonds, 
Water Bonds, 



Bridge Bonds, 
City Bonds, 



"Water Bonds, 



July 

Jan. 

Nov. 

July 

July 

Jan. 

Jan. 

July 

April 

April 

April 

April 

Jan. 



1890 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1897 
1902 
1911 
1905 
1907 
1909 
1911 
1907 



8100,000 00 

100,000 00 

70,000 00 

50,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

60,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

5,000 00 

100.000 00 



DTTENTORY OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 

$50,000.00 



High School house and lot . 
Furniture, charts, maps, books 
and apparatus 

Franklin-street house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Spring-street house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Lincoln-street house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Ash-street house and lot 
furniture, maps, etc. 

Main-street house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

"Webster-street house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 



2,000.00 $52,000.00 

18,000.00 

400.00 18,400.00 

15,000.00 

400.00 15,400.00 

50,000.00 

400.00 50,400.00 

58,000.00 

400.00 58,400.00 

23,000.00 

600.00 23,600.00 

17,500.00 

350.00 17,850.00 



427 



Bloclget-street house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Bridge-street house and lot . 

Lowell-street house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Merrimack-street house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

"Wilson Hill house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

School-street house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

South-Main-Street house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Bakersville house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Stark District house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Amoskeag house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

GoiFe's Falls house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Harvey District house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

"Webster District house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Hallsville house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 



. $3,500.00 




150.00 


$3,650.00 


900.00 


900.00 


. 7,000.00 




400.00 


7,400.00 


. 15,000.00 




550.00 


15,550.00 


. 3,300.00 




100.00 


3,400.00 


. 5,000.00 




425.00 


5,425.00 


. 2,800.00 




200.00 


3,000.00 


. 13,000.00 




600.00 


13,600.00 


. 3,000.00 




150.00 


3,150.00 


. 3,700.00 




125.00 


3,825.00 


. 3,600.00 




100.00 


3,700.00 


. 2,500.00 




125.00 


2,625.00 


600.00 




50.00 


650.00 


. 3,500.00 




125.00 


3,625.00 



428 



Youngsville house and lot . 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Mosquito Pond Dist. house and lot 
Furniture, maps, etc. 

Park-street house and lot 

Amount of school property . 
Amount of city property 

Total amount of property 



$1,400.00 

125.00 $1,525.00 

1,200.00 
100.00 1,300.00 

8,500.00 8,500.00 



$317,875.00 
1,913,045.72 

$2,230,920.72 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Land, city scales, etc. .... 
City Library building .... 
Permanent inclosure of common 
City Hall and lot 

City Farm and permanent improvements 
Stock, tools, furniture, etc., at City Farm 
Engines, hose, and apparatus 
Fire-alarm telegraph, bell-tower, and bell 
Engine-house, stable, and land, Vine street 
Hose-house, cottage, and lot, Maple street 
Engine-house, cottage, and lot. Lake avenue 
Houses and Pine Grove Cemetery 
Court-house and lot . 
Common sewers ..... 
Safes, furniture, and fixtures at City Hall 
Street lanterns, posts and pipes . 
AVatcr- works ..... 
Horses, carts, tools, and j)lows for streets 
Fire departn)ent, individual alarm 



$30,000.00 

41,000.00 

22,000.00 

60,000.00 

34,000.00 

8,882.19 

56,844.00 

32,930.00 

47,000.00 

5,000.00 

20,000.00 

13,000.00 

51,000.00 

308,000.00 

3,000.60 

8,000.00 

954,239.53 

5,000.00 

3,000.00 



429 



Ward-room and lot, Manchester street . $10,000.00 

Police station and lot, Manchester street . 40,000.00 

Engine-house and lot. Ward 8 . . . 2 500.00 

Engine-house and lot. Ward 8 . . . 20 000.00 

Water-pipe, wagons, etc., for watering streets 2,500.00 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad . . 50 000.00 

Gravel lot, Belmont street .... i 200.00 

Engine-house and lot, Webster street . 13,000.00 

Gravel lots. Ward 8 400.00 

Gravel lots, Bakersville .... 700.00 

Gravel lot. District iN'o. 8 . ... 150.00 

Valley Cemetery and tomb . . , . 13,000.00 

Schoolhouse lot. West Manchester . . 6,700.00 

$1,913,045.72 



APPROPRIATIONS FOR 1890. 


Interest $17,000.00 


Paupers off the farm 








2,000.00 


City Farm . 








4,000.00 


City teams . 








2,500.00 


Highway District No. 1 








300.00 


(( ( 


2 








12,000.00 


a a 


4 








500.00 


H I 


5 








500.00 


u ; 


6 








500.00 


U i 


7 








1,300.00 


U ( 


8 








800.00 


a I 


9 








500.00 


a i 


10 








3,300.00 


" ( 


11 








1,000.00 


(( i, 


12 








300.00 


a I 


13 








200.00 



430 



l^Tew highways .... 

Damage for land taken for highways 

Watering streets . 

Lighting streets . 

Paving streets 

Macadamizing streets 

Grading for concrete 

Sewers and drains 

Commons 

Bridges 

Incidental expenses 

Pine Grove Cemetery 

Valley Cemetery . 

Fire department . 

Fire alarm telegraph 

Hydrant service . 

Police department 

Printing and stationery 

Repairs of buildings 

City library . 

Militia . 

Abatement of taxes 

Discount on taxes 

State tax 

County tax . 

City officers' salaries 

Firemen's parade . 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Stark Monument square 

Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospi 

Reserved fund 

Repairs of schoolhouses 

Fuel 

Furniture and supplies 



tal 



89,000.00 
1,000.00 
7,500.00 

41,000.00 
5,500.00 

18,000.00 
4,000.00 

20,000.00 
4,000.00 
4,000.00 

15,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,500.00 

35,000.00 
1,200.00 

18,000.00 

31,000.00 
1,200.00 
4,000.00 
4,000.00 
900.00 
3,000.00 

10,000.00 

63,435.00 

40,508.54 

15,500.00 
500.00 
300.00 
100.00 
400.00 

20,000.00 
3,700.00 
3,200.00 
1,000.00 



431 



Books and stationery . 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Care of rooms 

Evening schools . 

Teachers' salaries 

Truant officer 

Engineers' department 

Scavenger teams . 

Health department 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 

Catalogue of city library 

'New schoolhouse, West Manchester 

Street sweeping .... 

'New text-books, free 

Indigent soldiers and their dependent families 



,<?400.00 

400.00 

800.00 

3,300.00 

1,500.00 

44,000.00 

750.00 

3,000.00 

12,000.00 

1,400.00 

600.00 

1,000.00 

30,000.00 

1,200.00 

9,000.00 

1,000.00 

$545,493.54 



AMENDMENTS 



CITY OHDnSTA-IsrOES 



AMENDMENTS TO CITY ORDINANCES. 



Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Section 20 of chapter 5 of the Ordinances of the 
City of Manchester is hereby amended by striking out the word 
" twenty-five " in second line, and inserting instead thereof the word 
" fifty," so said section will read : 

"Section 20. Said captain of the watch shall receive in full for 
his services the sum of two dollars and fifty cents per day." 

Sect. 2. Section 12 of chapter 14 of the Ordinances of the City 
of Manchester is hereby amended by striking out the words " eight 
hundred and fifty-five," in the second and third lines and inserting in- 
stead thereof the words " nine hundred," so said section will read: 

" Section 12. The city marshal shall receive in full for all ser- 
vices rendered by him to the city, nine hundred dollars, payable in 
equal quarterly payments." 

Sect. 3. Section 13 of chapter 14 of the Ordinances of the City 
of Manchester is hereby amended by striking out the word " seven" 
in the second line, and inserting instead thereof the word " eight," 
so said section will read : 

" Section 13. The assistant city marshal shall receive in full, 
for all services rendered by him to the city, eight hundred dollars, 
payable in equal quarterly payments." 

Sect. 4. Section 14 of chapter 14 of the Ordinances of the City 
of Manchester is hereby repealed and the following new section 
enacted instead thereof : 

" Section 14. The pay of special police ofiicers shall be one 
dollar and seventy-five cents per day while actually employed on 
duty. The pay of the watchmen and regular police officers of the 
city shall be jDayable monthly, and at the rate of two dollars and 
twenty-five cents per day while actually employed. Said city mar- 
shal,- assistant marshal, watchmen, and regular police officers shall, 



436 

at their own expense, furnish themselves with a])pr()j)riute uniforms 
of blue, witli gilt buttons l)earing the letters M. P., and shall wear said 
uniforms at all times when on duty. The committee on marshal's ac- 
counts shall furnish to each police officer a uniform Ijadge suitably 
lettered and numbered, to be worn at all times when on duty, in 
some conspicuous place designated by said committee." 
Sect. 5. This ordinance shall take etiect upon its passage. 

In Board of Common Council. March 5, 1889. 
Passed to be ordained. 

CHARLES A. CARPENTER, President. 

In Board ok Mayor and Aldermen. March 5, 1889. 

Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mnxjor. 



Be it ordained by the Mayor, Alderrticn, and Common Council of 
the City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That that part of the Old Mast Road (so called) from corner 
near residence of Adam Dickey running northerly to Goftstown 
line, shall hereafter be called Rockland avenue. 

In Board of Common Council. May 7, 1889. 
Passed to be ordained. 

CHARLES A. CARPENTER, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. May 7, 1889. 

Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the City of Manchester in City Council asscniblcd, as follows : 

That chapter 14, section 27, be amended by striking out the words 
"two dollars and seventy-five cents i)er day," in the second line 
thereof, and inserting instead thereof the words, " twelve huni'edd 
dollars per annum, to be paid in equal monthly payments," so that 
said section shall read as follows: "The superintendent of high- 
ways in District No. 2 shall receive twelve hundred dollars per an- 
num, to be paid in equal monthly payments, and in each of the 



437 

other districts, two dollars per day for each da}' actuall}' employed, 
payable monthly." 

In Board of Common Council. August C, 1889. 
Passed to be ordained. 

CHARLES A. CARPENTER, President. 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. August 6, 1889. 
Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That chapter 28, section 2, be amended by striking out the word 
" Monday," so that the ordinance will read : 

" Section 2. He shall keep his office in the City Hall building, 
and shall devote the usual hours of business to the duties of his 
office ; he shall keep regular office hours, of which jjublic notice 
shall be given, and shall keep his office open for the receipt of taxes 
on Thursday and Saturday evenings, from seven to nine o'clock." 

In Board of Common Council. September 3, 1889. 
Passed to be ordained. 

CHARLES A. CARPENTER, President. 
In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. September 3, 1889. 
Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



Be it ordained by the Mayor, Alderinen., and Common Council of 
the City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as follows : 

Section 1. There shall be appointed in the month of January, 
annually, by the mayor, with the approval of the board of alder- 
men, an able and competent person, to be styled Auditor of the 
City of Manchester, who shall continue in office for one year follow- 
ing his appointment and until his successor is aj^pointedand qualified. 
He shall be removable from his office for good and sufficient cause, 
by the board of mayor and aldermen. He shall receive in full for his 
services as said auditor an annual salary of one thousand dollars, 
payable (quarterly. He shall be sworn to the faithful discharge of 
the duties of his office, and give a bond with sureties satisfactory to 
the board of mayor and aldermen, conditioned in the penal sum of 



438 

one thousand dollars, for the faithful discharge of said duties, the 
true accounting for and payment to the city treasurer of all mon- 
eys belonging to the city which shall come into his hands, and the 
delirery over to his successor, or to the city clerk, of all the books, 
accounts, papers, and other documents and property which belong 
to said office. And in case said office shall become vacant by death, 
resignation, removal, or otherwise, a successor shall be forthwith 
and in like manner ajipointed and (|ualified, who shall continue in 
office imtil the January following such appointment and until his 
successor shall be appointed and qualified. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of such auditor to carefully exam- 
ine and audit, semi-annually, the accounts kept by the city treas- 
urer, city clerk, tax collector, city marshal, and all other city offi- 
cials who may keep accounts with the city, and make re2)ort of such 
examinations to the city councils ; and no such account kept by any 
city official shall be accepted or approved by the city councils until 
so examined and approved as correct by said auditor. 

Skct. 3. The auditor shall, annually, in the month of February, 
made an inventory of tlie real estate and personal property belong- 
ing to the city of Mancliester in the hands of any of its officers, 
or agents, or committees, and further shall keep a record of all 
property bought during the year ; and it is hereby made the duty of 
every officer, committee, or agent of the city, who shall buy any 
real or personal property, to make immetliate return to the auditor, 
stating the nature of the thing purchased, the date of the purchase 
and the price paid, and the auditor shall keep the inventory and the 
list of purchases in form for convenient reference by the city coimcils. 

Sect. 4. It shall further be the duty of said auditor to receive all 
accounts and bills against the city from persons having such de- 
mands; to carefully examine all such accounts and bills, and see 
that they are correctl}^ cast, and lix his a])proval to all such ac- 
counts and bills which he finds to be correct. He shall approve no 
such bill or account unless the same shall be accompanied by a cer- 
tificate of the mayor, or some other city official, committee, or 
agent authorized in l)elialf of the city to make the contract, or 
cause tiie expenditure to be made, upon whicli sucli bill or account 
is founded, that the same is correct. He shall present such accounts 
and bills so examined and approved, neatly folded, filed, and labeled, 
to the committee on accounts, who shall examine the same in the 
manner heretofore provided. In case there are bills or accounts 
which said auditor shall not approve, he shall present them to said 
committee on accounts with his reasons for refusing to approve the 



439 

same. Said committee on accounts shall not certify any such bill 
or account which has not been approved by the auditoi-, and no such 
bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until said auditor 
has approved it as correct, in addition to the other indorsements 
heretofore required. Said auditor shall keep a book in the man- 
ner and form the said committee on accounts shall direct, wherein 
he shall enter the date of evci-y account, or bill, or claim against 
the city, as finally cori-ected and allowed by said committee, and 
also the name of the person to whom the same shall be allowed; 
and the certificate of the said committee allowing any such account, 
bill, or claim, shall be made in the book thus kept by the auditor, 
and said auditor shall monthly, within forty-eight hours after such 
approval by the committee on accounts, hand over all such bills, 
claims or accounts, so approved by said committee, together with a 
certified copy of the aforesaid lists kejDt by him, and of the certifi- 
cate of the committee allowing the same, to the city clerk, who 
shall then deal with them in the manner now by ordinance provided. 
And further, said auditor shall in addition to the other duties enu- 
merated above, prepare the annual city report. 

P'Sect. 5. All ordinances or pai'ts of ordinances inconsistent with 
the provisions of this ordinance are hereb}^ i-epealed, and this ordi- 
nance shall take effect January 1, 1890. 
In Board of Common Council. January 7, 1890. 
Passed to be ordained. 

JOHN F. FROST, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. January 7, 1890. 
Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as follows : 
That chapter 8, section 8, in the seventh line thereof, be amended 
by striking out the word "three" and inserting instead thereof the 
word "five." 
In Board of Common Council. January 7, 1890. 
Passed to be ordained. 

JOHX F. FROST, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. January 7, 1890. 

Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



440 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Coicncil of the 
City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as follows: 

All that part of the city of Manchester now by ordinance divided 
into and known as Highwa}- District Number Three, is hereby an- 
nexed to and made a part of Highway District Xumber Two. 

This ordinance to take effect and be in force February 1, 1890. 

In Board of Common Council. January 7, 1890. 
Passed to be ordained. 

JOHN F. FROST, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. January 7, 1890. 
Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as folloivs: 

That section 7, chapter 5, of the laws and ordinances be amended 
in the fourth line thereof by striking out the word "thirty'' and 
inserting instead thereof the word "thirty-three," so that said sec- 
tion shall read as follows : 

" The mayor and aldermen may from time to time order a suita- 
ble Avatch to be kept, and for that purpose may appoint any number 
of watchmen, not exceeding thirty-three, which they may deem 
necessary, and establish all needful rules and regulations for the 
government thereof." 

In Board of Common Council. February 4, 1890. 

Passed to be ordained. 

JOHN F. FROST, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. February 4, 1890. 

Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



441 

Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City oj Manchester in City Council assembled, asfolloivs: 

By striking out in the second line of said section the words " one 
thousand" and inserting instead "twelve hundred," so that the 
section shall read : 

" Section 31. The civil engineer of the city shall receive twelve 
hundred dollars per annum in full for his services as such, payable 
in quarterly payments." 

In Board op Common Council. March 4, 1890. 
Passed to be ordained. 

JOHN F. FROST, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. March 4, 1890. 
Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



Be it ordained by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Cotmril of the 
City of Manchester in City Council assembled, asfolloivs: 

Section 1. No horse or street railroad cori^oration shall put or 
place, or cause to be put or placed, upon or about its tiacks or rails 
(switches, turnouts, and curves at street corners excepted), any salt, 
brine, pickle, or any other article, mixture, or comjjosition, which 
tends to melt or decomj)ose ice or snow, unless a permit is granted 
by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen ; and permits shall only be 
granted for such use of said articles as shall in no way interfere 
with the use of vehicles on runners. 

Sect. 2. Any person or corporation offending against section 1 
of this ordinance shall be fined not less than ten dollars for each 
offense. 

In Board of Common Council. March 4, 1890. 

Passed to be ordained. 

JOHN F. FROST, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. March 4, 1890. 

Passed to be ordained. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



INDEX 



I N DEX 



•• 






PAGE. 


Abatement of Taxes 


389 


Account of City Treasurer 


304 


Address of Mayor Varney 


17 


Alarm Boxes and Keys 


215 


Amoskeag Cemeteiy 


368 


Appendix to School Report 


94 


Appropriations for 1890 


429 


Attendance at School 


102 


Board of Health, report 


287 


Water Commissioners 


24 


Books and Stationery 


409 


Bridges 


352 


Care of Rooms 


412 


Catalogue for City Library 


418 


Cemeteries, reports of Committees on . 


139 


Cemetery, Amoskeag 


368 


Pine Grove 


364 


Valley 


366 


Funds, report of Treasurer of . . . 


149 


Trustees of . 


148 


City Debt 


426 


Engineer, report of 


155 


Engineer's Department, 1889 


154 


Farm 


326 


Report of Joint Standing Committee on 


. 132 


Government, 1889 


3 


Hall 


. 383 



446 



City Library .... 

report of Librarian 
Treasurer 
Trustees 
Donations to 
Officers' Salaries 
Ordinances, Amendments to 
Property . 
Solicitor, report of . 
Teams 

Treasurer, report of 
Contingent Expenses 
County Tax 

Damages for Land taken for Highways 
Debt, Funded ..... 

City 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 
Discount on Taxes .... 
Donations to City Library 

Engineer, City, rejiort of 

Fire Department, report of 
Engineers' Department . 

City, Organization, 1889 
Estimated Value of Property 
Evening Schools 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 

Boxes and Keys, Location of 
Fire Apparatus 

Dej^artment 

Names and Residences of Members of 

Report of Chief Engineer of 
Firemen's Pai-ade . 

Relief Association . 
Fires, Alarms, Losses, etc., 1889 

Fuel 

Funded Debt .... 
Furniture and Supplies . 

Grading for Concrete 



447 



Health, Board of, report 

Department 
High School . . 

Highway District No. 1 . 

2 . 

3 . 

4 . 

5 . 

6 . 



9 . 

10 . 

11 . 

12 . 

13 . 
Highways, new 

Damages for land 
Hydrant Service 
Hydrants, Location of 



taken 



for 



Incidental Expenses 
Instructions to Key-holders 
Interest .... 

on Taxes 
Inventory of Schoolhouses 

City Property 

Property, Fire Department 

Joint Standing Committee on City Farm, repoi't of 



Lake-avenue Engine-house 

Land Damage . 

Library, City . 

Donations to 
Librarian's report of 
Treasurer's report of 
Trustees' report of 

Lighting Streets 

List of Teachers and Janitors 

Loan, Temporary . 

Location of Hydrants 



448 



Macadamizing Streets ...... 

Mayor's Address 

Militia 

Names and Residences of Members of Fire Department 
New Schoolhouse, West Manchester 



Officers, City 

Organization of School Department, 1890 

Outstanding Taxes 

Overseers of Poor, report 

Paupers oil' Farm ..... 

Pacing Streets 

Pine Grove Cemetery .... 
Police Department ..... 
Printing and Stationery .... 

Advertising- 
Property, City 

Receiving Toml), Valley Cemetery . 
Record of Pumping, 1889 ... 

Repairs of Buildings .... 
Schoolhouses .... 
Report of Board of Health 

Chief Engineer of Fire Depai'tment 
City Engineer .... 
Solicitor .... 
Committee on Cemeteries 
City Farm 
Finance 
District Surveyors . 
Liljrarian of City Library 
Overseers of the Pocn' 
School Committee . 
Sui)erintondent of Public Instructioi 

Water-works 
Treasurer of Cemetery Fund . 

City Lil)rary 
Trustees of City Library 
Cemeteries . 
Cemetery Fund 



346 

17 
389 



449 



Report of AVater ( 'onimissioners 
Reserved Fund 
Revenue Aecoiiiit 

Salaries of C'itj' Ollieers 

Teachers 
School Department . 

Ev(>ning-, Mechani 

High : . 

*Organizati(Mi lor 1890 
Training 
Schools, Evening 
Sewers and Drains .• 
Stark Monument Scpuire 
State Tax 
Streets, Lighting 

Macadamizing 

Paving 

Watering . 

Tax, State 

Taxes, Abatement of 

for 1889 

Interest on . 

Outstanding . 
Teachers, List of ^. 
Salaries of 
Teams, City . 
Temjiorary Loan 
Training School 
Truant Oificers 
Tuition 



Valley Cemetery 

receivm 
Valuation, Taxes, etc. 



o'-toml) 



1890 



Water Commissioners for 

Report of 
Watering streets 
Water-works .... 
Women's Aid and Relief Society Hospita