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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

\. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 

1890. 



MAYOR. 

DAVID B. VARNEY. 



CITY CLERK. 

NATHAN P. KIDDER. 



CITY AUDITOR. 

JAMES B. STRAW. 



AUDITOR S CLERK. 

ALLAN E. HERRICK. 



CITY TREASURER. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 
COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

GEORGE E. MORRILL. 



DEPUTY COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

EDWIN C. PAUL. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

EDWIN F. JONES. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

JOHN A. BARKER. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

CLARENCE W. DOWNING. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 



PRESIDENT OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JOHN F. FROST. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

JESSE B. PATTEE. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 
-SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

CHARLES K. WALKER. 



CLERK OF WATER-WORKS. 

ARTHUR E. STEARNS. 



ALDERMEN. 



Ward I. — George W. Bacon. 
Ward 2. — Frank A. Lane. 

Ward 3. — John A. Bartlett. 
Ward 4. — W, Byron Stearns. 
Ward 5. — John J. Holland. 
Ward 6. — William P. Farmer. 
Ward 7. — David Farmer. 

Ward 8. — James F. Baldwin. 



members of common council. 
Ward i. Ward 2. 

John P. Mullen. Charles A. Carpenter.* 

Roscoe Dyer. Alfred D. Maxwell. 

Henry P. Hunter. William M. Butterfield. 

Ward 3. Ward 4. 

Frank D. Thorp.* George C. Chase. 

George W. Reed. Desire Laneville. 

Walter H. Wright. Clarence R. Merrill.* 

* Resigned. 



b manchester city government. 

Ward 5. Ward 6. 

David E. Guiney. Joseph Quirin. 

William J. Freeman. Edward A. Plummer. 

Thomas P. Riley. Thomas Walker, Jr. 

Ward 7. Ward 8. 

John F. Frost. Henry Schimmel. 

Edson S. Heath. Joseph N. Lacourse. 

Irving L. Campbell. Charles S. Cousins. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Stearns ; Council- 
men Chase, Walker, Jr., and Heath. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Bartlett and Holland ; Councilman 
Hunter, Frost, and Lacourse. 

On Clai?ns. — Aldermen Baldwin and W. P. Farmer ; Coun- 
cilmen Butterfield, Campbell, and Wright. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Stearns and Bartlett ; Councilmen 
Maxwell and Quirin. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Lane and Baldwin ; 
Councilmen Quirin, Merrill, and Maxwell. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Bartlett and D. Farmer ; 
Councilmen Walker, Jr., Reed, and Butterfield. 

On Lafids and Buildings. — Aldermen D. Farmer and Bacon ; 
Councilmen Frost, Guiney, and Mullen. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Lane and Baldwin ; Coun- 
cilmen Cousins, Plummer, and Dyer. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Bacon and Lane ; 
Councilmen Wright, Heath, and Hunter. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Baldwin and Holland ; 
Councilmen Laneville and Schimmel. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen W. P. Farmer and Stearns; 
Councilmen Freeman, Reed, and Cousins. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Baldwin and W. P. Farmer ; 
Councilmen Campbell, Riley, and Chase. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Bartlett and Holland ; 
Councilmen Lacourse, Mullen, and Merrill. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Holland and Baldwin ; 
Councilmen Plummer, Dyer, and Schimmel. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Enrollment. — Aldermen Bacon and Bartlett. 
On Bills on Second jReading. — Aldermen Baldwin and W. P. 
Farmer. 

On Market. — Aldermen Bartlett and Lane. 

On MarshaV s Accounts. — Aldermen Stearns and Holland. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Bacon and W. P. Farmer. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Lane and Stearns. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen D. Farmer and Bacon. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Election Returns. — Councilmen Frost, Walker, Jr., and 
Lacourse. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Councilmen Reed, Cousins, 
and Freeman. 

On Enrollment. — Councilmen Wright, Campbell, and 
Merrill. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Judge of Police Court. 
Nathan P. Hunt. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Associate Justice of Police Court. 
Isaac L. Heath. 

Clerk. 
John C. Bickford. 

City Marshal. 

Horatio W. Longa. 

Assistant Marshal. 

John F. Cassidy. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

David B. Varney, ex officio Chairman. 
James E. Dodge, Clerk. 



Ward i. 

Charles H. Manning. 
John L. Sanborn. 

Ward 2. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 

Ward 3. 

Nathan P. Hunt. 
James E. Dodge. 

Ward 4. 

Frederick C. Crosby. 
Stephen B. Stearns. 



Ward 5. 

John F. Cahill. 
James P. Slattery. 

Ward 6. 

F. T. E. Richardson. 
Charles G. Dodge. 

Ward 7. ' 

Ed. B. Woodbury. 
Marshall P. Hall. 

Ward 8. 

Luther C. Baldwin. 
William K. Robbins. 



John F. Frost, ex officio. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

William E. Buck. 



TRUANT OFFICER. 

Samuel Brooks. 

ASSESSORS. 



Henry Lewis. John Ryan. 

John E. Stearns. George H. Dudley. 

David O. Furnald. Andrew J. Dickey. 

Harrison D. Lord. Frank T. Provost. 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 



William B. Stearns. Michael F. Lawler. 

Benjamin L. Hartshorn. Isaac Whittemore. 

David O. Furnald. Joseph A. Foster. 

Harrison D. Lord. Charles C. Tinkham. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

David B. Varney, ex officio Chairman. 
William H. Maxwell, Clerk. 
William H. Maxwell. Thomas H. Mahoney. 

Thomas L. Quimby. Charles Francis. 

James Sutcliffe. * David W. Anderson. 

Benjamin F. Garland, t Horatio Fradd. 

George S. Holmes. 
* Deceased. t Elected to fill vacancy. 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

George C. Hoitt, Chairman. 
Joseph B. Sawyer, Clerk. 
Wm. M. Parsons. Joseph B. Sawyer. 

George C. Hoitt. 
Russell White, Sanitary Inspector. 
Charles H. Reed, Sanitary hispector. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 

Fred S. Bean, Clerk. 
Clarence D. Palmer. * Ruel G. Manning. 

Fred S. Bean. Eugene S. Whitney 

Clarence R. Merrill. ^f 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

David B. Varney, ex officio. 

Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 

James A. Weston, Clerk. 
Edwin H. Hobbs. | Henry Chandler. 

Andrew C. Wallace. James A. Weston. 

Alpheus Gay. Joseph F. Kennard. 



TRUSTEES OF CITY LIBRARY. 

David B. Varney, ex officio. 
John F. Frost, ex officio. 
Lucien B. Clough. Daniel Clark. 

Nathan P. Hunt. Isaac W. Smith. 

Herman F. Straw. Moody Currier. 

Benjamin C. Dean. 
* Resigned. f Elected to fill vacancy. J Deceased November 27, 1890. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



11 



HIGHWAY SURVEYORS. 



Dist 




Dlst. 


I. 


John C. Ray. 


8. Levi J. Proctor. 


2. 


Wm. Sanborn. 


9. Alphonzo Boyce. 


3- 


it a 


10. Charles O. Phelps. 


4- 


Rodney N. Whittemore. 


11. Wm. H. Colby.* 


5- 


Mark E. Harvey. 


II. Frank D. Hanscom.-f 


6. 


Albert J, Peaslee. 


12. Leroy M. Streeter. 


7- 


Charles Francis. 


13. John H. Campbell. 




CITY 


WEIGHER. 



Jonathan S. Paige. * 
Frank H. Crawford. * J 
William Bayley. § 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Joseph B. Baril. 



FISH AND GAME WARDENS. 



John C. Higgins. 
George A. Clark. 



William F. Bradbury. 
Samuel S. James. 
William C. Clarke. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, Clerk. 

Nathan P. Hunt, Bushrod W. Hill, for four years. 

» Kesigned. f Elected to fill vacancy of Colby, Sept. 2, 1890, % Elected to 
fill vacancy of Paige. § Elected to fill vacancy of Crawford. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

John M. Kendall, Hiram Stearns, for three years. 
C. H. Bartlett, Joseph L. Stevens, for two years. 
James A. Weston, John E. Stearns, for one year. 



SUB-TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 

Valley. — Alderman Lane, Councilman Wright; Messrs. 
Hunt, Hill, and Kendall. 

Pine Grove. — Alderman Bacon, Councilman Hunter ; Messrs. 
Bartlett, Stevens, and Weston. 

Amoskeag. — Councilman Heath ; Messrs. J. E. Stearns and 
Hiram Stearns. 

Byron A. Stearns, Supt. Pine Grove Cemetery. 
Charles H. G. Foss, Supt. Valley Cemetery. 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

Hon. James A. Weston, Chairman. 

Hon. Person C. Cheney. 

Hon. David B. Varney, ex officio. 



INSPECTORS. 



Milk. — H. F. W. Little. 

Buildings. — Thomas W. Lane. 

Oil. — John P. Cronin and Edward J. Powers. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

WARD OFFICERS. 

Moderators. 

Ward I. — Stillman P. Cannon. 
Ward 2. — Nicholas Nichols. 
Ward 3. — Lyman W. Colby. 
Ward 4. — John C. Bickford. 
Ward 5. — John McAllister. 
Ward 6. — Clarence D. Palmer. 
Ward 7. — Ira W. Stearns. 
Ward 8. —John W. Wilson. 

Ward Clerks. 

Ward I. — Frank X. Foster. 
Ward 2. — Daniel C. Smith. 
Ward 3. — Frank O. Moulton. 
Ward 4. ' — Edwin L. Richardson. 
Ward 5. — Thomas Howe. 

Ward 6. — William H. Sleeper. 
Ward 7. — Fred W. Pillsbury. 
Ward 8. — Charles G. Ranno. 

Selectmen. 
Ward i. Ward 2. 

Lees Ward. Daniel G. Andrews. 

George C. Kemp. Charles R. Holbrook. 

Amasa S. Hilands. Harry P. Ray. 

Ward 3. Ward 4. 

David Thayer. John F. Gillis. 

Charles F. Garland. George E. Richards. 

William H. Darling. Josiah H. Mann, 

Ward 5. . Ward 6. 

Charles J. Woods. George B. Rogers. 

Martin J. Harvey. Jerome B. Titus. 

Patrick C. Campbell. Peter D. St. Germain. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



(JTtStSi 



Ward 7. Ward 8. 

George B. Smith. Joseph A. Heon. 

Sumner F. Claflin. Henry J. Hatch. 

Willie D. Wheeler. Victor Sansoucie. 



MAYOR VARNEY'S 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS. 



MAYOR VARNEY'S ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

As this is the last meeting that will be held under the present 
administration, I deem it proper to take this occasion to thank 
you individually and collectively for the courtesies that you have 
extended to me during my incumbency of the office of Mayor. 
Coming to the office without any previous training in matters of 
municipal government, mistakes could not but be anticipated. If 
from any error of judgment, or difference of opinion, any of you 
have had reason to complain of any decision of mine, you have 
done so in a manner creditable to yourselves and satisfactory to 
me. In many cases, in your generosity you have kindly overlooked 
the fault, and have been content to ignore the matter altogether. 
I wish also to thank you for your prompt attendance at the 
various meetings of the city government, and the wholesome in- 
terest you have shown in all matters relating to the city's affairs. 

I think I am justified in saying that the retiring city govern- 
ment has done much that will redound to its credit ; that the 
two years in which we have held control of the city's affairs have 
been years of progress, and that now as we prepare to lay down 
our trust that we can look back w'ith pride on what has been ac- 
complished. 

I do not propose, as has been the custom of my predecessors, 
to write a valedictory for publication, as the auditor early in 
the year will issue the annual year book, giving a detailed state- 
ment of what has been done in all the public departments during 
the year 1890, together with amass of other information with re- 
lation to the city's recent municipal career, of a most interesting 
character. 
•2 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

I cannot refrain, however, from calling your attention to a few 
of the things, permanent in their character, by which this admin- 
istration will be judged not only by the people of our own day 
but, I trust, by those of a later generation. 

In a city the size and character of Manchester, with more 
than 140 miles of streets and roads in its corporate limits, there 
is a constant demand for new sewers and streets, and for im- 
provements and repairs upon those already in existence. During 
the last two years there have been built in Manchester 28,425 
feet of sewerage, more than five and one fourth miles. There have 
been laid 33,773 square yards of macadamizing, amounting in a 
lineal measurement to 10,849 ^^^^j °^ ^ little over two miles. 
There has also been laid 5,963}^ square yards of concrete road- 
way, amounting to 2,450 feet in length. There have been about 
30 miles of streets turnpiked and graded, and a great amount of 
other work done in the street department, enumeration of which 
is not necessary here. The sewers that have been constructed 
have many of them been built under tremendous difficulties ; in 
many places the sev/er trenches have been from 15 to 20 feet in 
depth, much of the distance through a solid ledge. In spite of 
the odds under which the sewer department has labored, the facts 
show that more sewer main has been constructed during the past 
two years than has ever been the case before, during the same 
length of time. 

An important piece of work was the replanking of McGregor 
bridge. All the bridges in the city have been replanked or re- 
paired, and are believed to be in,a good state of preservation. 

Another matter that will be readily recalled by many of you 
is the building of the new city stables. It has been obvious for 
a long time that the quarters at the Vine-street station were too 
cramped for both the street and fire departments,,and the city 
government is, I believe, to be congratulated on having remedied 
this evil, and given to each department the quarters it so mani- 
festly needed. 

The chief building enterprise of this administration has been 
the new West Manchester school building. The school facilities 
on that side of the river have for some time been crowded and 



MAYOR VARNEY's ADDRESS. 19 

insufficient ; realizing this fact, the present city government took 
steps very early in its career to increase the school property on 
the West Side. A lot was purchased on a commanding elevation 
and a substantial and modernly appointed structure erected 
thereon at a cost of not far from $42,000. The building will 
accommodate eight schools, and by a comparatively small outlay 
two more. The edifice is one in which we may well take pride, 
and although the erection of a school building, or any other 
structure where it is necessary to expend any considerable sum, 
is apt to arouse criticism for the time being, that is the lot of 
all public servants and should be borne cheerfully. I think, gen- 
tlemen, we can safely await the verdict of the future as to the 
wisdom of erecting this structure in the thorough and pains- 
taking manner that we have done. 

The creation of the office of City Auditor is another event 
which belongs to this administration and one I think in which 
we may all take a just pride. The influence of the office cannot 
but be beneficial to the city. 

Our police and fire departments have maintained their previous 
high standard of efficiency, and are believed to be in better con- 
dition to-day than ever before. The city's enterprise has been 
shown by the interest taken in the matter of public parks, two of 
which in easily accessible locations we now control. There are 
other matters of which I might speak, but I will not further tres- 
pass on your time. 

The office of mayor of a city of 44,000 inhabitants, with the 
industry, enterprise, and zeal of Manchester, is one which any 
citizen may well feel proud to hold. The responsibilities at- 
tached to the position are many and great and are deserving of 
the best thought and warmest endeavor of the ablest men in the 
community. Manchester should be no laggard in the race for 
industrial and mercantile honor and position in which she is en- 
gaged, and in which she has as competitors many older, richer, 
and more powerful municipalities. It is only by pursuing a wise, 
broad-minded, and liberal policy that she will be able to avoid 
the mistakes of others and secure to herself that full measure of 
prosperity which is so manifestly in the future her due. 

DAVID B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



BOARD OF Water commissioners. 

1890. 



DAVID B. VARNEY, Mayor, ex officio. 

James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires January, 1897. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1892. 
Alpheus Gay, Ptesideiit, term expires January, 1893. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January, 1894. 
Edwin H. Hobbs,* term expires January, 1895. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January, 1896. 



officers. 



Charles K. Walker, Supej-intendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Charles C. Cole, Engineer at Pumping Station. 

* Deceased November 27, 1890. Charles H. Manning elected to fill vacancy .^ 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners have the 
honor to present herewith their nineteenth annual report for the 
year ending December 31, 1890, together with the report of the 
superintendent covering the same period of time, to which refer- 
ence is made for the details of the service connected with this 
department. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year have been as fol- 
lows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1889 . . $39,589.21 
Receipts from all sources ..... 90,463.37 

Total $130,052.58 

Appropriated to pay interest . $36,000.00 

Expended on construction . . 11,314.87 

Repairs and running expenses . 22,088.82 



Total expenditures ..... 69,403.69 

Balance unexpended ...... $60,648.89 

The increase in gross receipts over the year 1889 is $3,762.91. 

The construction expenses have not been as large as usual from 
the fact that very little cast iron pipe has been purchased, the 
stock left over from the previous year having been nearlv suffi- 
cient to answer the requirements. It is estimated that an ex- 



24 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

penditure of about $30,000 will be advisable the coming year to 
furnish the desired quantity of pipe, gates, hydrants, and special 
castings, in order to continue the renewals and make the exten- 
sions demanded by the expansion of the city limits. 

Another year of excessive rainfall has caused the low lands 
surrounding Massabesic lake to be unusually wet and in some 
instances flooded immediately after heavy rains. The water in 
the lake has in consequence been kept high a considerable part 
of the season. While it is a manifest advantage to the owners of 
land bordering on the lake to have a full pond and as near as 
possible an unvarying stage of water, some have entertained a 
different view and have claimed that the high water was due to 
the dam at the outlet, instead of ascribing it to the true cause, so 
manifest to those who have given attention to the subject, 
namely, the heavy and, for considerable periods of time, almost 
incessant rains. Yet your commissioners have pursued the pol- 
icy adopted some years ago and have purchased such lands as 
have been offered at reasonable prices. They have also purchased 
several pieces of real estate in Auburn village, where locations 
were such that the drainage from the buildings must necessarily 
mingle with the waters of the lake. 

The attention of your commissioners has been called to the 
subject of a high service system of water-works by a petition to 
your honorable body, which was referred to them. After con- 
sultation with the joint standing committee on water-works, Mr. 
M. M. Tidd, of Boston, a hydraulic engineer of long experience 
and acknowledged ability, was employed to make a thorough ex- 
amination of the various methods that have been suggested for 
carrying out the project, and prepare estimates of the cost of the 
different plans. The results of his investigations are embodied in 
an exhaustive report appended hereto. It is desirable that atten- 
tion be given to this subject before the annual appropriations are 
made, in order that means may be provided for carrying on the 
work, should it be deemed expedient to inaugurate the enterprise 
the coming season. The questions, therefore, as to the advisabil- 
ity of constructing this system, and also whether the time has ar- 
rived when it is required for the convenience of the citizens 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 25 

immediately interested and for the reasonable protection of their 
property, are submitted for your early consideration and de- 
cision. 

In such investigation as you wish to make bearing on this sub- 
ject, your commissioners will be glad to furnish any aid in their 
power by conference or otherwise. In this connection they beg 
to suggest that whenever the work is undertaken it progress by 
such moderate stages that the cost may be met by the income of 
the water-works and thus avoid raising the funds by taxation. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, President, 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor, ex officio, 

A. C. WALLACE, 

HENRY CHANDLER, 

JOSEPH F. KENNARD, 

JAMES A. WESTON, C/er^, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 
January i, 1891. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners of the City of Ma^ichester • 
Gentlemen, — I herewith submit the report of the superin- 
tendent for the year 1890. 

For the past four years there has been a large supply of water 
in the lake. The lowest point reached the past season was eleven 
inches above the dam. This was in the month of August. In 
the month of October the water was the highest on account of 
the heavy rains during that month. 

The following is the rainfall each year for the past three years, 
furnished by Sergeant J. H. Melton : 

1888 ..... 46.81 inches. 

1889 36.94 " 

1890 45-70 " 

From the records kept by the Amoskeag Corporation at the 
gate house, we get the amount from 1880 to 1888. 



1880 . 


27.76 inches. 


1884 . 


38.32 inches, 


I88I . 


• 38.91 " 


1885 . 


. 36.28 " 


1882 . 


• 33-9° " 


1886 . 


- 35-79 " 


1883 . 


• 30-93 " 


1887 . 


• 43-02 



There has been cut on the city's land just south of Johnson's 
Beach a little over 100 cords of wood, mostly birches that had 
begun to decay. On the same land there is a small growth of 
sapling pines that were left. They are growing quite fast, and 
will thrive all the better for cutting out the other trees. About 
three fourths of this wood was hauled to the pipe yard near the 
Portsmouth railroad, sawed, and piled up to be used for melting 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 27 

lead. The remainder was hauled to the pumping-station. 
There is now wood enough on hand for another year. A fire at 
the pipe yard last autumn caused the loss of about five cords of 
wood and several lengths of fence. No repairs have been made 
on the dam, canal, or penstock, with the exception of some wood 
work on the gates at the head of the canal. 

At the pumping-station we have had no serious accident. 
Every part of the machinery has run well, and is in good condi- 
tion at the present time. The old blacksmith shop just west of 
the station has been taken down and a new building erected. 
One part is used for a storehouse, and the other for a blacksmith 
shop. 

The following table shows the amount of water pumped each 
month during the year 1890 by each pump : 



28 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 20 

The force and supply main had about the usual number of 
leaks. No repairs have been made on the reservoir or gate house. 
A cheap shed 48 feet long and 16 feet wide has been built at the 
pipe yard for storing special castings, hydrants, and wood. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

We commenced to lay pipe the last day of April and finished 
the 29th day of October. The following are the streets where 
the pipe has been extended : Auburn, Belmont, Beauport, Bay, 
Conant, Cartier, Dubuque, Gore, Prospect, Lake Avenue, Jew- 
ett, West Hancock, and Young road. The whole amount is 
7,629 feet, equal to 1.44 miles, at an expense of ^5,375. 

The pipe taken out and laid over was 995 feet on Auburn 
street from the 14-inch on Elm to Pine with 8-inch pipe ; west of 
Elm to Canal street, 426 feet of 6-inch pipe; Bowman street, 810 
feet of 6-inch ; Barr street, 232 feet of 4-inch ; Cedar street, from 
the 14-inch on Elm to Pine, 993 feet of 8-inch ; Concord street, 
from the east side of Elm to Pine street, 940 feet of 8-inch ; 
Chestnut street, 275 feet of 4-inch; Central street, 40 feet of 6- 
inch ; Granite street, 355 feet of 6-inch ; Hanover street from 
the east side of Elm to Pine, 929 feet of 8-inch ; Douglas street, 
124 feet of 6-inch ; Laurel street, 40 feet 6-inch; Main street, 
430 feet lo-inch, Merrimack street from the 14-inch on Elm to 
Pine, 985 feet of 8-inch; Mast road, 461 feet of 6-inch; Man- 
chester street from the east side of Elm to Chestnut street, 570 
feet of 8-inch ; Pearl street from the east side of Elm to Pine, 
920 feet of 8-inch, 32 feet of 6-inch; Pine street from Amherst 
to Concord street, 330 feet of 8-inch ; Pine from Lake Avenue 
to Merrimack, 750 feet of 8-inch, 8 feet of 6-inch; Second street, 
488 feet 6-inch ; Spruce street, from the 14-inch on Elm to Chest- 
nut, 640 feet of 8-inch; Walnut street, 260 feet of 4-inch ; Vine 
street, 30 feet 4-inch. The whole length, 12,063 ^^^^ i^ equal to 
a little over 2^^ miles, at an expense of $11,426. 

The greater part of the old cement pipe is found to be in bad 
condition. But there are some sections of 50 to 100 feet in 
length where the cement pipe is perfectly sound. One place in 
particular was noticed in making the connection on Merrimack 



30 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

street with the 14- inch on Ehii across the latter street, the pipe 
was just as sound and free from rust as when first laid. The 
cement pipe has been taken out where it was considered the 
poorest. It will be noticed by the above that the pipes relaid, 
excepting 430 feet of lo-inch, are the smaller sized, mostly 8, 6, 
and 4 inch. 

Two years ago 641 tons of cast iron pipe were bought, think- 
ing it would be enough for a two years supply, but laying more 
8-inch than was estimated at that time, 400 pieces more were 
purchased, equal to about 100 tons. Next year we shall have to 
buy a large amount if we are to continue to re-lay and make ex- 
tensions, as has been done the past season. 

We have set twenty new hydrants the past year, making in all 
461. Last winter there was not much trouble about freezing. 
Last month, during the first of the cold weather, the street de- 
partment began to use them for washing out sewers and cess- 
pools, but were notified to quit till warmer weather. As it was 
we found five hydrants frozen on account of letting water in 
when the thermometer was about zero. 

As a whole, the water works have run with as little trouble the 
past season as any. We have had about the same number of 
leaks and washouts. All claims presented for damages on this 
account have been adjusted. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



31 



PIPES, GATES, AND HYDRANTS LAID IN 1890. 



Streets. 


Pipe laid in feet. 


Gates set. 


c 


Location. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


CO 


•r-t 

to 


a 




204 










East to No 3SS 






1 


2 
















Barr 










Bay 


625 

263 

778 

390 

9 






2 




Bay 










S'thw'd to John Dolber res. 
Northward to Massabesic. 
Schuyler — northward. 










Beauport 






























Cor. Milford. 




252 
613 






Southward to Sullivan. 
















1 




Central 










West side Pine 








1 






466 




West St. to Dubuque. 
Cor Elm 






1 






Dubuque 


550 










248 




Valley northward. 
To Walnut. 




60 
667 


















Eastward to shoe shop. 
Cor.Elni, Chestnut and Pine. 
Valley northward. 
Eastward from Cass st. 
Cor. Pine. 






3 








373 

419 




2 


























2 
1 






Cor. Elm and Chestnut. 
Cor. Elm. 


Merrimack.. . . 










Pearl 


232 








East of Ashland 


Pearl 




1 






' 1 ' 
20 


Cor Elm 


Prospect 


721 




2 




East of Russell 




1 


Cor Elm 










1 






7G0 








East of Taylor. 




248 


12 


13 


3 




7,381 





Number miles of pipe laid, 1890, 
" gates set, " 

" hydrants set, " 



1.44, or 7,629 feet, 
28 
20 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 189O. 

Auburn, cor. Elm; Bay, cor. Salmon; Belmont, near Coffin 
residence ; Blaine, cor. Main ; Cartier, cor. Sullivan ; Cedar, 
cor. Elm; Conant, cor. Cartier; Conant, cor. Dubuque; Con- 
cord, cor. Elm ; Hancock, near Shoe shop ; Hanover, cor. Elm ; 
Hanover, cor. Pine ; Jewett, cor. Massabesic ; Lake Ave. ; 
Manchester, cor. Elm ; Merrimack, cor. Elm ; Pearl, cor. Elm ; 
Prospect, cor. Linden ; Spruce, cor. Elm ; Young road. 



32 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



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BOARD OP WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



33 



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34 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



■sinBjp.CH 



C0C0.H^C-1C5 -CI -C^lC^H -lOft • CCC^rH^ -Clf-i -^ec^ -iH^C^I 



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.g:^g:g:^g:>H>H^ g; <)< <! <; p3 fq a pq cq a; 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



35 



noito 


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36 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following places are where cement-lined pipe was taken up 
and cast-iron laid : 



Steeets. 


Length 


in feet. 




Gates. 


Location. 




10 in. 


8 iu. 


6 in. 


4 in. 








995 






1 








426 






Elm to Canal. 
Granite to Douglas. 
Mast to Milford. 


BaiT 






232 










810 




Cedar , 




993 




1 








40 












275 










940 










124 
355 















West St. west. 






929 _ 






Elm to Pine. 
Corner Pine. 
Near engine-house. 
Elm to Chestnut. 






40 








430 










570 












461 










985 
920 
330 
750 
640 




1 




Pearl 




32 






Pine 










Pine 




8 














1 








488 






Walnut 






260 
30 




Bridge to Pearl. 


Vine 




















430 


8052 


2784 


797 


4 


Total 12,063 feet. 



On Auburn, Spruce, Cedar, Merrimack, Manchester, Hanover, 
and Concord, 6-inch pipe was replaced with 8-inch pipe. One 
6-inch gate was taken out on Auburn, Cedar, Spruce, and Merri- 
mack, corner Elm. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 37 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1890. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20 ineli diameter 


20,660.00 ft. 


5,146.00 ft. 


9 


14 iucli diameter 


6,825.00 " 


7,598.00 " 


11 


12 inch diameter 


7,983.00 " 


11,709.00 " 


20 


10 inch diameter 


4,383.75 " 


11,194.00 " 


14 


8 inch diameter 


9,506.00 " 


20,680.00 " 


45 


6 inch diameter 


70,402.50 " 


97,336.00 " 


296 


4 inch diameter 


6,774.00 " 


9,956.00 " 


40 




126,434.25 ft. 


163,619.00 ft. 


435 



23.946 miles cement-lined pipe. 
30.988 miles cast-iron pipe. 



54.934 total miles of pipe. 

435 gates. 
461 hydrants. 
7 air valves. 

METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year was one hundred 
and eighty-four (184). 

Total number of meters now in use, eleven hundred and thir- 
ty-five (1,135). 

The number of applications for water to date has been thirty- 
five hundred forty-five (3,545). 

SERVICE PIPES. 

One hundred and sixty-six (166) service pipes have been laid 
this year, as follows : 

164 I inch diameter ..... 4,199.7 feet. 

I i| " " 36.0 " 

12"" 21.5 " 



Total number of feet laid, 1S90 



4,257.2 



38 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Service Pipes Relaid. 
\ inch diameter, 73.8 feet, to i inch diameter, 74.5 feet. 



3 £( 



66.6 
33-0 



to i^ 
to I 



68.3 
16.0 



Thirty-three hundred and ninety-two (3,392) service pipes 
have been laid to date, as follows : 



39 Y-z inch diameter 
1768 ^ 

1488 I 

23 i^ 
18 i>^ 

47 2 

I 2>^ 

I 3 

7 4 



Total length of service pipe 
Number of miles of service pipe, 16.95 



845.0 


feet. 


46,473-9 


u 


38,095.5 


u 


1.293.5 


(( 


552-3 


(( 


1,904.9 


(1 


57-0 


(1 


16.8 


<( 


233-0 


1( 



,471.9 feet. 



The income from the sale of water for 1890 has been as 
follows : 



Received for water by rate . 

" for water by meter 

" for building purposes 

" from fines 

" for labor and pipe sold 

" of G. G. Griffin (lease) 

'' of B. P. Kimball (for grass) 

" of W. G. Brown (rent) . 

" of George P. Clark (lease) 

'' of Fletcher Brown (lease) 

Abatements, ^191.66. 



^52,311. ID 

37,009.80 

649.90 

151.80 

298.77 

1. 00 

2.00 

36.00 

2.00 

I. GO 



^0,463-37 



Current expenses for 1890 



^22,088.82 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



39 



Construction expenses for 1890 
Appropriated for interest, 1890 

Receipts over expenditures 

Amount on hand January i, 1890 
Amount received, 1890 

Amount expended, 1890 

Amount on hand, Dec. 31, 1890 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUN 

Superintendence and repairs 

Stationery and printing 

Office and incidental expenses 

Pumping expenses 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoir 

Repairs to buildings 

Current expenses for 1890 

Service pipes 
Distribution pipes 
Fire hydrants and valves 
Meters and fixtures 
Pump house and building 
Land .... 
Grading and fencing 

Construction expense, 1890 

Land and water rights . 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races . 

Pumping machinery, pump house, and 

buildings . 
Distributing reservoir . 
Force and supply main . 
Distribution pipes 



$11,314.87 
36,000.00 



$69,403.69 
$21,059.68 



$39,589.21 
90.463-37 

5130,052.58 
69,403.69 



$60,648.89 



rs 



FOR 1890. 

$17,640.11 
229.37 

1,409.01 

2,590.90 

85.00 

134-43 



$1,871.37 

2,077.73 
1,801.78 

2,957-33 

298.90 

2,290.75 

17.01 



$11,314.87 



$57,383-20 
101,399.16 

107,444.07 
71,542.36 
89,769.02 

368,598.25 



40 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Fire hydrants and valves 

Tools and fixtures 

Boarding and store houses 

Roads and culverts 

Supplies ... 

Engineering 

Livery and traveling expenses 

Legal expenses 

Grading and fencing . 

Service pipes 

Meters and fixtures 



Total construction account to 
Dec. 31, 1S90 

Current expenses : 

Superintendence, collecting, a.nd re- 
pairs .... 

Stationery and printing 

Office and incidental expenses 

Pumping expenses and repairs 

Repairs to buildings 

Repairs to dam, canal, races, and reser- 
voir . . .... 

Total current expenses to Dec. 
31, 1890 . . . . 

Interest ...... 

Highway expenditures .... 

Total amount of bills approved 
to date . . . . 

Interest, discount, and labor performed 
on highways, trans., and tools and 
materials sold ..... 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1890 



141,863.00 

10,649.35 

919.36 

2,193.49 

550.39 

22,176.19 

2,856.64 

563-79 
13,588.26 

47,692.74 

26,365.13 



$140,614.07 

5,480.00 

18,312.96 

39,029.08 

1,576.09 

3:725-15 



,554-40 



^208,737.35 



$40,678.51 
14,000.53 



54,679.04 



$1,228,970.79 



^62,093.35 

208,737.35 



270,830.70 



BOARD OP WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



41 



Total 


interest and 


discount 


to 








Dec. 


31 


1S90 


• 








Amount 


paid tow 


ard interest to Dec. 


31. 






1890 












^449: 


000.00 


Amount 


trans 


in 


1890 


• 




36 


000.00 



Total cost, exclusive of interest 

and current expenses . . $958,140.09 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 1890 $592,919.51 
Interest for 1890 ..... -34,177.00 



•27,096.51 



$485,000.00 
the city treas- 

$S73-6i 
177.07 
193.26 
146.00 

1.920.53 
607.89 

14,000.53 

12,347-25 

22,361.74 

30,233.54 

4,566.25 

15.00 

2,089.45 

27,119.15 

125.00 

24.00 

38,879.47 

43,823.30 

48,873.26 

1. 00 



Total ..... 

The following amounts have been paid over to 
urer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, supplies and materials sold 

1873, supplies and materials sold 
accrued interest on water bonds sold 
accrued interest on state bonds sold 
water rents .... 

1874, supplies and materials sold 
March 12, highway expenditures, trans 

from water account 
March 17, interest and discount trans 

from water account 
Sept. I, interest and discount trans, from 

water account 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 
Dec. 29, interest transferred 

1875, Dec. 18, one anvil sold 
Sept. 25, engine, crusher, and material sold 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1876, May 20, derrick sold 
May 20, rent of derrick 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1877, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1878, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
old plow sold .... 



42 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1879, derrick sold .... 
May 20, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1880, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
sale of grass 
level, transit, etc. 

1 88 1, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
sale of grass 

derrick .... 
received of G. G. Griffin . 

1882, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
received of G. G. Griffin . 
received of James Baldwin & C( 
received from the sale of grass 
received from Goodhue & Birnie 
received for old plank 
received for use of derrick 

1883, received of G. G. Griffin . 
received from sale of grass 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1884, received of G. G. Griffin . 
received for stone 
received from sale of grass 
received from pipe sold and labor 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1885, received from G. G. Griffin 
B. P. Kimball, for grass 
labor and pipe sold . 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1886, received from G. G. Griffin 
B. P. Kimball, for grass 
for wood .... 
labor and pipe . 
water and hydrant rent 

1887, received for labor and pipe 
received of G. G. Griffin . 
received of C. C. Cole 
received of B. P. Kimball, for grass 



$75.00 
53,068.17 

57,395-25 

10.00 

250.00 

60,154.62 

10.00 

50.00 

1. 00 

67,403.76 

1. 00 

175.00 

10.00 

24-37 

1. 00 

15.00 

1. 00 

20.00 

73j437-2o 

1. 00 

5.00 

10.00 

616.20 

74,947.88 

1. 00 

10.00 

13-45 

80,379.67 

1. 00 

5.00 

37.80 

282.43 

74,803.76 

768.86 

1. 00 

-50 
10.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



43 



1887, received of A. J, Crombie, for grass 
received of A. Goodwin, for poles 
received of W, G. Brown . 
received of T, H. Risdon & Co., for freight 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1888, received for labor and pipe 
received of G. G. Griffin . 
received of George P. Clark 
received of R. D. Wood & Co. (gear) 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1889, received for labor and pipe 
received of G. G. Griffin . 
received of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
received of W. G. Brown, for rent 
received of James Baldwin, for pipe 
received of Mr. Clement, for pipe 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1890, received of G. G. Griffin (lease) 
received of Fletcher Brown (lease) 
received of George P. Clark (lease) 
received of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
received of W. G. Brown, for rent 
received of N, W. Ellis & Co., for pipe 
received of J. H. Dearborn, for pipe 
received for water and hydrant rent 



Total received for water, etc. 
Amount appropriated to date 

Amount received to date . 
Amount of bills approved to date 

Amount transferred toward interest 



$5.00 

10.00 

25.00 

15. II 

79,682.70 

227.33 

1. 00 

2.00 

16.29 

85.397-20 

89.77 

1. 00 

2.00 

50.00 

65.00 

•50 
86,492.19 
1. 00 
1. 00 
2.00 
2.00 
36.00 

153-00 

35-40 

90,232.97 

$1,134,619.68 
640,000.00 

$.i»774,6i9.68 
1,228,970.79 

$545,648.89 
485,000.00 



Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1890 . . $60,648.89 
CHARLES K. WALKER, 

Supeririten dent. 



44 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



USES FOR WHICH WATER IS SUPPLIED. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



I Jail. 


4 


Cemeteries. 


21 Churches. 


I 


Orphanage. 


I Court-house. 


I 


Post-office. 


6 Hose Companies. 


I 


City Library. 


4 Fire-engines. 


6 


Banks. 


I Hook-and-ladder. 


8 


HoteJs. 


2 Opera-houses. 


I 


Masonic Hall. 


I Convent. 


I 


Odd Fellows' Hall. 


2 City Hospitals. 


I 


Holly-Tree Inn. 


I Old Ladies' Home. 


3 


Halls. 


I Soldiers' Monument. 


23 


Schoolhouses. 


I Turner Hall. 


I 


Battery Building. 


4 Fountains. 


I 


Skating Rink. 


2 Trust Companies. 






MANUFACTURING 


', ESTABLISHMENTS. 


I Hosiery mill. 


2 


Granite works. 


I Silver-plating. 


2 


Electric light stations, 


2 iron foundries. 


3 


Sash and blind shops. 


2 Dyehouses. 


I 


Brewery. 


4 Machine-shops. 


I 


Shoe-shop. 


6 Clothing manufactories. 


I 


Gas-works. 


8 Harness-shops. 


4 


Slaughter-houses. 


I Brush-shop. 


I 


Soap manufactory. 


9 Carriage-shops. 


4 


Needle manufactories, 


12 Cigar factories. 


4 


Beer-bottling. 


I Brass and copper foundry. 


3 


Book-binderies. 


I Locomotive works. 


I 


Paper-mill. 


I Grist-mill. 


2 


Box makers. 


MARKETS. 


5 Fish. 


2 


Meat (wholesale). 


9 Meat and fish. 







BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



45 



STABLES. 



19 Livery. 


798 


Private. 


I Horse-railroad. 








OFFICES. 


15 Dentists. 


14 


Printing. 


I Telephone. 


I 


Gas. 


2 Telegraph. 


9 


Coal. 


3 Express. 








SHOPS. 


27 Barber. 


2 


Currying. 


9 Wheelwright. 


6 


Plumber and gas and water 


II Blacksmith. 




pipe. 


5 Carpenter. 


8 


Paint. 


I Tinsmith. 


I 


Gunsmith. 




STORES. 


4 Auction. 


82 


Grocery. 


28 Drug. 


S 


Meal. 


13 Jewelry. 


3 


Hardware. 


I Fur. 


30 


Boot and shoe. 


2 House-furnishing goods, 


8 


Stove. 


20 Fancy goods. 


17 


Gents' furnishing goods. 


I Wholesale paper. 


7 


Book. 


5 Wholesale produce. 


I 


Leather and shoe-finders. 


21 Dry goods. 


3 


Music. 


12 Candy. 


3 


Upholstery. 


I Cloak. 


8 


Undertakers. 


15 Millinery. 


5 


Sewing-machine. 


2 Tea. 


I 


Feather-cleaner. 


9 Furniture. 


I 


Rubber. 




SALOONS. 


II Dining. 


69 


Liquor. 


6 Billiard. 







46 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



MISCELLANEOUS, 



6 Club-rooms. 

2 Bleacheries. 
19 Laundries. 

3 Ice-houses. 

10 Photographers. 



5 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. 
18 Bakeries. 
2 Waste. 
X Business college. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 



7807 Families. 

117 Boarding-houses. 
9743 Faucets. 
15 1 2 Wash-bowls. 
2485 Water-closets. 

235 Wash-tubs. 

747 Bath-tubs. 

128 Urinals. 



1983 Sill-cocks. 
461 Fire-hydrants. 
35 Stand-pipes. 
21 Watering-troughs. 
4 Drinking-fountains. 
1932 Horses. 
90 Cattle. 
I Public urinal. 



MATERIAL ON HAND. 



PIPE. 



1300 feet 20 in. 
2100 feet 12 in. 
1935 feet 8 in. 
1896 feet 4 in. 



4 m. 
8 in. 



1535 feet 14 in. 
1644 feet 10 in. 
7000 feet 6 in. 



GATES. 



7 6 in. 
I 10 in. 



I 20 in. 

6 12 in. 

24 6 in. 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 

6 14 in. 

7 10 in. 
10 4 in. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



47 



CLAMP SLEEVES. 



3 20 


in. 




3 12 


in. 




27 8 


in. 




10 4 


in. 




2 14 


in. 




5 10 


in. 




I 12 


in. 




5 double 6 on 


12. 


8 doi; 


ible 6 on- 


10. 


2 double 6 on 


6. 


2 double 4 on 


6. 


8 double 4 on 


4- 


10 double 8 on 


8. 


4 double 4 on 


8. 


2 single 6 on 


14, 


I sin^ 


^le 12 on 


14. 



I 14 to 12. 

8 8 to 6. 

5 10 to 6. 

3 8 to 4- 



I 10 in. 1-8. 
I 14 in. 1-8. 
I 



6 14 in. 
46 10 in. 
65 6 in. 



PLUCxS. 



6 in. 1-8. 



17 6 in. 

18 8 in. 



BRANCHES. 

3 single 6 on 12. 

2 single 10 on 10. 

I single 6 on 10. 

I single 8 on 8. 

10 single 6 on 8. 

16 single 6 on 6. 

I single 4 on 6. 

I single 4 on 4. 

1 single 8 on 10. 

REDUCERS. 

8 6 to 4. 

2 12 to 6. 

5 8 to 10. 

BENDS. 

6 6 in. 1-4. 
10 8 in. 1-4. * 

I 12 in. 1-8. 



2^ in. 54 feet. 
2 in. 476 feet. 
lyi in. 250 feet. 



SERVICE PIPE. 



i/< ill- 332 feet. 

I in. 1490 feet. 

^ in. 664 feet. 




irn 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER. 



CITY ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 
1890. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT. 



ASSISTANTS. 



Harrie M. Young. 

George W. Wales. 

John J. McDonough. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my fifth annual report, 
being the twelfth annual report of the work in the City En- 
gineer's office and the several highway districts of the city of 
Manchester, for the year ending December 31, 1890. 

Expenses of the office for the year 1890 : 



For salary of city engineer 


^1,170.00 




salary of assistants .... 


1,478.88 




supplies for the office 


153-74 




repairing ..... 


10.69 




additional horse hire 


242.00 




stakes 


19-35 




horse-shoeing and repairs of wagon 






and harness, including bill of 1S89 


45-75 




horse-car fares ..... 


10.45 




street numbers .... 


9-3° 




printing reports .... 


25-75 




express and postage .... 


2.85 




repairing drawing-boards . . 


12.43 




expenses ...... 


2.85 




books and folios .... 


37-85 




Total 


. . 


$3,221.89 


Appropriation 


• 


3,000.00 


Amount overdrawn 


.■^221.80 



52 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The items for salary of assistants may be divided as follows : 

For giving lines and grades for the extension and 

construction of streets and sidewalks . . $136.05 

plans and profiles relating to the construction of 

streets and sidewalks . . . . . 99.18 

surveys and levels for the construction of streets 

and scAvers ....... 103.54 

giving lines and grades for the construction of 

sewers not mentioned in these items . . 52-47 

plans and profiles relating to the construction of 

sewers as above ...... 63.47 

surveys and measurements for the assignment of 

street numbers ...... 92-53 

making plans, taking levels, and preparing data 

for the laying out of Candia road . . . 82.01 

making plans, taking levels, and preparing data 

for the laying out of Hanover-street road . 4i'53 

taking levels and making plans of Calef road . - 21.78 

plans, levels, lines, and grades relating to the 

construction of the Massabesic-street sewer . 33-^3 

plans, levels, lines, and grades relating to the 

construction of the Granite-street sewer . . i7-45 

plans, levels, lines, and grades relating to the 
construction of the main sewer outlet at Merri- 
mack river . . . . . . . 1-1-74 

making plans for improvements other than those 

mentioned in this account .... 54-35 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for improvements in Pine Grove ceme- 
tery ........ 97-69 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 

given for improvements in Valley cemetery . 10.76 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for repairing and extending the street 
railway ........ 38-05 

collecting data, classifying accounts, and other 

work in relation to office report .■ . . 44.10- 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



53 



For plan and notes for Derryfield park 

copying and indexing old records of highways . 

indexing plans and notes ..... 

making plans, furnishing lines and grades for con- 
tractor, and estimating amount of earth re- 
moved on Beauport street 

checking notes, figures, etc. 

measuring amount of coal in schoolhouses for 
city auditor ...... 

making plans of streets in city clerk's book of 
records ....... 

levels and grades at Government building . 

work in city yard in relation to stable 

making plan of present city farm, also for pro 
posed improvements .... 

plans for improvements at central fire station 

locating street-signs ..... 

preparing and mounting drawing paper for office 
use ....... 

locating cesspools, manholes, etc. 

office work preparing notes, data, records, etc 

office work, information given engineers and 
others regarding lines, grades, sewers, etc. 

Total 



^68.25 

47-95 
11.77 



21-53 
9.60 

15-72 

17.00 
13.68 
1 4. 1 1 

17.10 

22.76 

6.60 

19.25 
21.50 
93-93 

.75-3° 
^1,478-88 



Expenses for soldiers' monument : 

For water ...... . $190.00 

The amount of work done in the office during the year is as 

follows : 

Number of orders for surveys, street lines, and grades . 846 

Number of orders for sewer and paving grades . . 99 

Number of orders for street-railway grades . . . 19 

Number of orders for profile levels . . . . . 18 



Total number of orders 



982 



54 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 38,868 feet, equal to 
7.36 miles. These profiles, having three lines of levels on each 
street, make a total distance actually leveled of 116,604 f^et. 

Levels for sewer profiles . . . . . 1,455 ^'^^t- 



Levels for other center profiles 
Levels in Pine Grove cemetery 
Levels in Valley cemetery 
Other levels .... 

Total levels taken 
Equal to 25.94 miles. 

Surveys of streets and street lines 
Surveys in Pine Grove cemetery 
Surveys in Valley cemetery . 
Surveys for street numbers 
Other surveys 

Total surveys made . 
Equal to 26.42 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground . , . 

Lines of lots and avenues. Pine Grove cemetery 

Lines of lots and avenues, Valley cemetery 

Lines, for street centers 

Lines for gutters . 

Lines for curbs 

Lines for sewers 

Lines for street railway 

Other lines . 



Total length of lines marked on ground 
Equal to 14.71 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks 

Grades set for centers . 

Grades set for gutters . 

Grades set for curb 

Grades set for sewers 

Grades set for street-railway tracks 



4,535 

1,855 

179 

12,361 



136,989 


feet 


47,550 


feet 


13,270 


(( 


1,300 


( ( 


28,125 


11 


49,264 


li 


139,509 


feet 


32,290 


feet 


6,950 






800 






2,811 






15,542 






3,901 






10,243 






4,731 






400 







77,668 feet. 



31,552 feet 

2,811 
15,542 

3,901 
10,243 

4,731 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



55 



Grades set in Pine Grove cemetery 

Grades set in Valley cemetery 

Other grades ..... 

Total length of grades set . 
Equal to 14 miles. 

Area leveled for cross-section 

Profile measurements made . 

Equal to 9.75 miles. 

Perambulation of lines between Manchester and 
surrounding towns ...... 

Equal to 27.35 I'liil^s. 

BATTERS SET. 

City yard, city stable. 

Massabesic-street culvert, at Cemetery brook 
Old lots relaid in Valley cemetery . 
Old lots relaid in Pine Grove cemetery . 
New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 

Total cemetery lots laid out . 

Street numbers assigned and put on 
Street numbers replaced .... 
Street numbers assigned, but not put on . 

Total 



3,657 feet. 
178 " 

1,344 " 



• 73,959 feet. 

24,825 sq. feet. 
51,500 feet. 



144,439 feet. 



5 

33 

106 

144 

142 
846 
294 

1,282 

This year, as in previous years, the city engineer has investi- 
gated, and made surveys in all cases where suits were liable to be 
brought against the city. Cases investigated and reported to the 
Committee on Claims, 4. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Adams street, from Webster street to Ray brook. 
Candia road, from Mammoth road to Auburn line. Fifteen 
plans. 

Central street, from Beacon to Highland street. 
Chestnut street, from Clarke street northerly. 



56 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

East High street, from Jane street to Wilson road. 

Elm avenue, from Elm street to Calef road. 

Front street, from Goffstown road to north of Dunbarton 
road. Three plans. 

Hanover street, from Chestnut to Pine street. 

Hanover street, from Beech to Maple street. 

Hanover street, from Beacon street to Candia road. Ten 
plans. 

Massabesic street, from Cypress street to Mammoth road. 
Three plans. 

Merrimack street, from Elm to Wilson street. Four plans. 

Second street, from M. & N. W. R. R, to Piscataquog river. 

West Hancock street, from Merrimack river westerly 1,435 
feet. 

Total plans and profiles, 43. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Adams street, from Clarke street northerly. 

Bay street, from Sagamore to Salmon street. 

Concord street, from Maple to Derry street. 

Elm east back street, from Valley to Young street. 

Granite, Barr, and Douglas streets, mains and laterals. Three 
plans. 

Main sewer outlet, extension to river. 

Massabesic street, from Lake avenue to Cypress street. Two 
plans. 

Pearl street, from Ashland to Belmont street. 

Sagamore street, from Elm to Bay street. 

Total sewer plans and profiles, 12. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Adams street, Webster street northerly. Two plans. 

Brown avenue, Baker to Elm street. 

Buzzell street, East High to Bridge street. 

Calef road. Baker street northerly. 

Central street, Beacon to Cass street. 

Cheney place, Elm street westerly. 

Chester street, Amherst to Button street. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 57 

Cleveland street, Merrimack river to Blaine street. Two 
plans. 

Cypress street, Young road to Massabesic street. 

Dean street, Elm to Canal street. 

Foster avenue, Valley to Young street. 

Garland avenue, Taylor to Cypress street. 

Gates street, Cartier to Rimmon street. 

Jewett street, Cilley road to Massabesic street. 

Liberty street, Sagamore to Webster street. Two plans. 

Market street, Elm to Franklin street. 

Marlborough street, Bowman street westerly. 

Mechanic street, Elm street westerly. 

Pleasant street. Elm to Franklin street. 

Rimmon street, Conant to Kelly street. Four plans. 

Spring street, Elm street westerly. 

Spruce street, Hall street to James Hall road. Three plans. 

Stark street, Elm street westerly. 

Taylor street, Young road to Massabesic street. 

Union street, North to Clarke street. Two plans. 

Valley street, Wilson to Massabesic street. 

Water street, Elm street westerly. 

West Merrimack street. Elm to Franklin street. 

Young street, Taylor to east of Jewett street. 

Young road, Taylor to east of Jewett street. 

Total numbering plans, 39. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Central fire station, proposed changes. 

City yard, location of buildings. 

Hanover square, sections and location of culvert. 

Hanover square, plan, section, and details of pond basin. 

Massabesic street, plan, section, and location of culvert. 

Valley cemetery, plan of summer-house. 

Total miscellaneous plans, 6. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Ash east back street, Harrison to Brook street. Sewer profile. 
Cartier street, Conant to Sullivan street. Profile. 



58 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Central street, Beacon to Highland street. Profile. 

Central fire station, proposed improvements. Three plans. 

Chandler street, North to Webster street. Profile. 

Chandler street, North* to North north back street. Sewer 
profile. 

City farm, present building. Three plans. 

City farm, proposed building. Nine plans. 

City stable, detail of date. 

Douglas street. West to Barr street. Profile. 

Dubuque street, Conant to Sullivan street. Profile. 

Elm street, Blodget to Salmon street. Center profile. 

Elm street. River road to Baker street. Sewer profile. 

Elm avenue. Elm street to Calef road. Profile. 

Elm west back street. North north back to Webster street. 
Profile. 

Elm west back street, North north back to Webster street. 
Sewer profile. 

Falls road, Amoskeag bridge to Front street. Profile. 

Foster avenue, Young to Valley street. Profile. 

Government building, arrangement of interior of vaults. 

Granite and Main streets, location of car tracks. Two plans. 

Hancock street, River road westerly. Sewer profile. 

Hanover street, Hall to Belmont street. Profile of gutters. 

Hanover-street road. Mammoth road to Candia road. Laying 
out. 

Hanover square, proposed pond basin. 

Lowell street, Maple to Ashland street. Profile. 

Main street, proposed bridge over Piscataquog river. 

Massabesic street. Spruce street to Mammoth road. Two 
profiles. 

North street, Elm street to River road. Profile. 

North north back street, Chandler to Elm west back street. 
Sewer profile. 

North route to Goffstown road. Profile. 

Pearl street, Elm to Chestnut street. Profile. 

Pine street, Amherst to Concord street. Profile. 

Pine street, Oransfe to Harrison street. Profile. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 59 

Pine Grove cemetery, James A. Weston's lot. 
Rimmon street, Kelly to Wayne street. Center profile. 
River road, Hancock to Elm street. Sewer profile. 
Schuyler street, Main to Cartier street. Profile. 
Union street, Lowell to Bridge street. Profile. 
Valley cemetery, lot for Palmer & Garmon. 
Total working plans, 53. 

TRACINGS. 

Ash street. Concord to Lowell street, city lot. Two plans. 

Candia road, Mammoth road to Hanover street. 

Central fire station, proposed improvements. 

City stable. Three plans. 

Government building, curbing and walks. Two plans. 

Government building, section of post-office. 

Government building, arrangement of interior of vaults. 

Hancock street, land taken from Waterman Smith. 

Hanover street, land of A. G. Fairbanks. 

Hanover street. Beacon street to Candia road. 

Lake avenue, turnout for street railway. 

Main street, proposed bridge over Piscataquog river. 

Main sewer outlet, at Merrimack river. 

McGregorville, portion of sewerage map. 

Pine Grove cemetery, curbing at James A. Weston's lot. 
Two plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Swede lot, for G. W. Bacon. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Mrs. Charles H. Hill's lot. Two plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots in northwest section, for superinten- 
dent. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Riverside lawn. Three plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Landscape lawn. Two plans. 

Square bounded by Chestnut, Webster, Union, and North 
streets. •* 

Total tracings, 30. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

City stable. Ten plans. 

Main sewer outlet at Merrimack river. Eleven plans. 



60 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Part of West Manchester, from Amoskeag company. 
Total blue prints, 22. 

MAPS. 

City of Manchester, showing scavenger district. Two plans. 

Derryfield park, showing walks, drives, etc. 

Total maps, 3. 

Eight plans of streets laid out have been copied in the city 
clerk's book of records. 

Total of all plans made, 216. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on laid-out streets, 
37,626 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on streets not laid 
out, 2,607 f^st- 

Total, 40,233 feet, equal to 7.62 miles. 

NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT. 



Street. 



Location. 



Candia road Massabesic street to Auburn line . . . 

Cartier i Conant to Sullivan 

Cartier ! Amory to Kelly 

Forest Milford street to Old Mast road 

Hoyt I South Main stieet to Boynton road . 

Milford i Amherst road westerly 

Mitchell I Beech street to Calef road 

North I Pine east back to Union 

Second I M. & N. W. R. R. to Blaine 

Wayne Dubuque to Rimmon 

West Hancock Merrimack river westerly 

West Webster \ River road to C. R. R 



Width. 



66 feet. 

50 

50 

45 

40 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

40 



Length. 



14,900 feet. 

900 " 

700 " 

1,460 " 

604 " 

517 " 

1,260 " 

336 " 

175 " 

270 " 

1,435 " 

382 " 

23,002 feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



61 






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62 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PIPE REMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT. 



Street. 


Location. 


Material 


Size in 
inches. 


Length 
in feet. 




River St. to Merrimack river 


Cement. 

Akron. 
Cement. 


16x24 

12 

12 
. 10 

10 
9 


108 




18 




Merrimack to Hanover .. .. 


325 




189 




West to Barr 


379 




275 














1,204 



SUMMARY. 



Total 48-inch Steel 

" 24 X 36 inches, brick 

" 22 X 33 " " 

" 24-inch brick 

" 20-inch Akron pipe 

" 20-inch iron 

" 1 5 -inch Akron 

" 14-inch iron 

" 12-inch Akron 

" lo-inch " 

8 -inch " 
" 12-inch " 
" lo-inch " 

8-inch " 

6-inch " 



Total sewers built in 1890 
Equal to 2.23 miles. 

Following is the total amount of sewerage in the city January 
, i8qi. 



cesspools and connections, 



312 


feet. 


. 712 


a 


379 


i( 


• 275 


a 


. 2,424 


f ( 


45 


a 


• 939 


a 


12 


a 


3-319 


i( 


1.354 


i i 


323 


a 


10 


a 


258 


(I 


1,184 


e i 


246 


iC 


11,792 


feet. 



8-inch Akron pipe 

lo-inch " " 

12-inch " " 

15-inch " " 



6,456 feet. 
37,246 " 
57^433 " 
13^963 " 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



63 



1 8-inch Akron pipe . 
20-inch " " 

24-inch " " 

Total Akron pipe 
Equal to 23.852 miles. 
8-inch Portland pipe 



12- 


inch 


li 


a 




18- 


inch 


li 


u 


• 




Total Portland 


pipe 




Equal 


to 


919 mi 


les. 


9- 


inch cement 


pipe . 




10- 


inch 




cc 




12 


inch 




(( 




15 


-inch 




(1 




18 


-inch 




ii 




24 


-inch 




IC 




16 


X 24 inches, 


cement 


pipe 



Total cement pipe 
Equal to 7.969 miles. 

lo-inch earthen pipe 
12-inch " " 

Total earthen pipe 
Equal to 0.704 miles. 



2,835 


feet. 


4,893 


u 


3,110 


u 


125,936 feet. 


90 


feet. 


3,990 


u 


770 


u 



4,850 feet. 



16,071 feet 

161 
22,064 

490 

860 

735 
1,697 



42,078 feet. 

1,175 ^eet. 

2,545 " 



3,720 feet. 



18-inch brick sewers . 








5,725 feet 


24-inch " " . . . 








3,187 " 


29-inch " " 








1,600 " 


36-inch " " . 








545 " 


42-inch " " . 








446 " 


44-inch " " 








1,195 " 


57-inch " " . . 








1,400 " 


17 X 26 inches, brick sewers 








1,527 " 


20x30 " 








1,197 " 



64 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



22 X 33 inches, 


brick sewers 


379 feet 


24x36 " 




8,954 " 


29i X44" 




4,530 " 


30x46 " 




1,360 " 


32x48 " 




3,279 " 


40 X 44 " 


rick sewers .... 


790 " 


Total b 


. 36,114 feet 


Equal to 6.839 niiles. 




14-inch iron pipe ..... 


12 feet 


20-inch " 


a 


45 " 


36-inch " 


u 


277i " 



334i feet. 



312 feet. 
• 213,344? feet. 



Total iron pipe .... 

Equal to 0.064 miles. 
48-inch steel pipe ..... 

Equal to 0.052 miles. 
Total in all sewers ..... 

Equal to 40.406 miles. 

Some of the important work attended to this year may prove 
of interest and is herewith given : 

The entire city has been systematically and thoroughly gone 
over and a list made of all house numbers required. Owing 
to the extension of the free-delivery system by the post-office 
authorities, the suburbs of East and South Manchester were in- 
cluded in this list. Three thousand nickel numbers have been 
purchased, but on account of the lack of funds only a few were 
placed on the buildings. The work will be completed the com- 
ing year. 

Considerable time has been devoted to assisting the city audi- 
tor in preparing drafts of his books, bills, balance sheets, etc., 
for the printer, also in investigating accounts rendered for work 
done on the city buildings where he was in doubt. 

Under the instructions of a special committee, one himdred 
and seventy-three street signs were located, the majority of which 
have been placed in position. 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 65 

Early in the season the subject of new water carts was broached. 
At first it was intended to procure what is known as the " Cen- 
trifugal Street Sprinkler," but the amount asked being more 
than the committee desired to expend, an ordinary, old-style 
watering cart was purchased in its stead, and two already owned 
by the city repaired. 

After the fire in the basement of the City Hall in February, 
the doors in that part of the building were tinned to prevent fire 
from being communicated to other rooms than the one where it 
originated. 

Conferences were had with a special committee of the city 
government in relation to the disposal of garbage, and in com- 
pany with them and the board of health investigations were made 
of a system of cremation. The expense of construction being 
considerable and the idea being in a rudimentary state, it was 
deemed advisable to employ other means. A contract was made 
for removing the material to the suburbs, and plans showing the 
district to be covered were made in the office. 

Numerous complaints having been made regarding the outlet 
of the main sewer south of the lower canal weir, the committee 
on sewers ordered plans prepared for extending this sewer into 
the river below low-water mark by means of a forty-eight-inch 
steel pipe. Considerable time was demanded of the office in pre- 
paring plans and superintending the construction of the sewer. 
The contract was awarded Richard Dobbins, of Lowell, and the 
work done in a highly satisfactory manner. 

Plans were prepared for an addition to the N. S. Bean steamer 
quarters at the central station, including extra engine room, 
extra stall, smoking room, bath and sleeping rooms. Plans were 
also made for improvements in the rooms of the chief engineer 
and chemical engine company, and for remodeling the stall 
floors in the various houses in accordance wrth the latest system. 

By order of the mayor, all lines, grades, levels, and measure- 
ments required at the government building for completing the 
grounds and approaches were given. 

The system of sewerage as accepted by the previous city gov- 
ernment called for a main sewer through Douglas street empty- 



QQ ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ing into Piscataquog river. Certain abutters objecting, and 
finding that such objection would be sustained by the courts, a 
new plan of the entire section drained by the Douglas-street 
sewer was prepared, providing for a main connecting with the 
sewer in Main street. Work was begun early in the season and 
the sewer built to the corner of Granite and Barr streets. 

Considerable time has been spent in the Pine Grove cemetery, 
the more important pieces of work being the laying out of lots 
on the new Riverside lawn, preparing plans for the curbing at 
James A. Weston's lot on Landscape lawn, and levels, plans, 
and grades incident to the remodeling of the Bean, Gerrish, 
and Hosley lots on Landscape lawn. 

The question of providing more commodious buildings at the 
city farm was brought before the committee on lands and build- 
ings. Under their instructions a survey and plan was made 
showing the present structure and in what manner improvements 
could be made. Plans were also prepared calling for a new 
building of brick, three stories high and so constructed as to 
admit of the paupers and prisoners being kept entirely separate, 
each having their own dining, sleeping, and bath rooms. The 
new building would be practically fire proof and far more suita- 
ble than the present cramped quarters. 

Several plans were made for improvements in Hanover square 
relating to a fountain or pond basin. The committee deciding 
to lay the matter over, grades were given for completing the fill. 

Measurements were made for the amount of plank necessary 
for replanking Amoskeag and Granite bridges, also for repairing 
the roof of the former and for the iron rods replacing those 
broken on McGregor bridge. 

By order of the mayor, all lines and grades required at the 
Elliot Hospital for grading and for the concrete walks were 
given. 

The contract for building Beauport street to the sub-grade was 
awarded to George Whitford and lines and grades given for the 
work. Through carelessness and ignorance on the part of the 
workmen the stakes were displaced several times, necessitating re- 
setting them at considerable expense. On account of the slow 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 67 

progress made the ground became frozen before the work was 
completed. Levels were taken and the amount of earth removed 
computed. 

* The plans for the city stable made last year were modified to 
admit of constructing the offices in the main l)uilding which has 
since been built. The batters for the building were set and 
daily visits made during the progress of construction. 

Plans and specifications were prepared for enlarging the Mas- 
sabesic-street culvert at Cemetery brook and a general oversight 
given to the work. At this point the Spruce-street sewer crosses 
beneath the brook, forty-five feet of iron pipe being used. 

A complete plan of the city yard has been made, showing the 
location of all the buildings, including the new stable. 

In West Manchester the Ferry-street sewer outlet has been re- 
laid. On removing the old cement pipe it was found to be 
nearly filled with roots, rendering it useless. It was relaid with 
2o-inch Akron pipe. 

The lines of Candia and Hanover street roads, as determined, 
have been plotted, and accepted by the city government. 

In rebuilding the crossings at Hanover and Chestnut streets 
two parallel rows of flag stones were laid on the outer edges and 
the space between concreted, this having been proven to be the 
best form of a crossing. 

Chapter 51, section 2, of the General Laws of the State pro- 
vides for the perambulation of the town lines every seven years. 
Agreeable to notices received from the selectmen of Auburn, 
Bedford, Goffstown, Litchfield, and Londonderry, and by order 
of the mayor, the lines adjoining each town have been perambu- 
lated in company with each town's selectmen. The marks on 
every bound have been renewed, and twelve new bounds set to 
replace those liable to be removed by persons mistaking them 
for common stones. One of these bounds was placed on the 
Auburn line, and the remainder on the Londonderry line, includ- 
ing one at the corner of Auburn and Londonderry and line of 
Manchester, known as 134. I would suggest that all of the re- 
maining bounds be replaced by substantial stones, many of the 
present bounds being nothing but round bowlders or wall stones. 



68 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The abutters' names have been procured for the city clerk on 
all new streets laid out and on all streets where the street railway 
company has petitioned to lay tracks. In connection with this, 
lot areas have been given to the different officials as occasion 
required. 

Levels have been taken and surveys made for a bridge at Sec- 
ond street, and plans showing the desired grade transmitted to 
the acting superintendent of the Concord & Montreal Railroad, 
construction department. The plans for the bridge and abut- 
ments have been made by the railroad officials. 

In compliance with the request of Dr. John S. Billings, sur- 
geon, U. S. A., special agent of the census office, numerous 
blanks were filled out in relation to social statistics of cities. A 
brief synopsis is herewith given : 

The highest point in the city above mean sea level is 539 feet, 
the lowest, 129 feet. 

There are three cemeteries belonging to the city having a 
combined area of 84.55 acres, and twelve private cemeteries con- 
taining 42.5 acres. The average yearly number of interments in 
all cemeteries for the past ten years has been 746.3. 

The total length of all sewers in the city is 38.9 miles, of 
which 33 miles are pipe sewers and 5.9 miles brick. The largest 
sewer is 57 inches in diameter and the smallest 8 inches. There 
are six outlets, all discharging into the river, — two above high 
water mark and four submerged from i to 8 feet. In connection 
with the sewers are 1,939 house drains, 1,232 catch-basins, 220 
manholes, and 38 lampholes. 

The city has seven parks with a'total area of 93.3 acres. Six of 
these, with an area of 25.3 acres, are inside the city limits ; five of 
the parks, containing 19. i acres, are improved, and two, containing 
74. 2 acres, are not open to the public. All of the parks were 
either given to the city or set apart from city land. They have 
300 feet of driveways and 2.4 miles of footways. The average 
yearly cost of maintenance of all parks for the past ten years has 
been ^2,770.77. 

The city owns wholly or in part ^8 public buildings, of which 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 69 

I is built of brick and stone, 21 of brick, and 16 of wood. Of 
the 25 schoolhouses, 11 are built of wood and 14 of brick. 

There are in the city 146.6 miles of streets and roads, built of 
the following materials: cobble, 0.14 miles; stone block, 2.18 
miles; concrete, 0.2 miles; McAdam, 5.9 miles; gravel, 138.2 
miles. The common width of streets is 50 feet; the widest street is 
100 feet and the narrowest 20 feet. There are 196.7 miles of side- 
walks in the city, the width averaging one third the width of the 
street. About 90 miles of the streets have shade trees. 

Only the more important answers are given here, the entire 
list required occupying eight pages. 

In addition to this, many questions have been answered from 
engineers, boards of trade, and others in various cities throughout 
the country. 

I would respectfully tender my acknowledgments to His 
Honor the Mayor and the various committees of the city council, 
for the support which they have given. 

I wish also to acknowledge the courtesies shown by the various 
heads of departments, and the co-operation of the assistants of 
this department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT, 

City Engineer. 

January i, 1891. 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT SURVEYORS, 



Report of the work done in the various highway districts dur- 
ing the year 1890 : 

DISTRICT NO. I. 

John C Ray, Surveyor. 

The road machine has been used tliroughout nearly the whole 
district and the small stones removed from the roads. 

Rebuilt several small culverts and repaired the water bars where 
needed. 

Built rail fence the entire length of the east side of the road on 
Clark's Hill. 

During the season thirty-five loads of gravel were purchased at 
a cost of fifteen cents a load. 

One hundred dollars remain of the year's appropriation which 
could be used to advantage in building Chestnut street from 
Clarke northerly. 

DISTRICT NO. 2.* 

William Sanborn, Superintendent. 

cobble gutter paving. 



Beech street, Lake avenue to Cedar 
Belmont street, Hanover to Amherst 
Depot street, Elm westerly .... 
Elm street, Blodget to Pennacook, W. side 

* District No. 3 is now included in this district. 



Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 


880 


293-3 


630 


210.0 


30 


lO.O 


200 


66.7 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



71 



Elm avenue, Elm to Calef road 
Hanover street, Wilson to Milton 
High street, Jane to Wilson road 
Lake avenue, at Cass (relaid) 
Lincoln street, Manchester to Merrimac 
Lincoln street, Central to Lake avenue 
Manchester street, Belmont to Milton 
Pearl street. Elm to Chestnut 
Pine street, Orange to Prospect 
Pine street, Amherst to Concord . 
Union street, Lowell to Bridge 
Wilson street, Manchester to Hanover 

Total cobble gutter paving 

COBBLE EDGING 

Beech street. Lake avenue to Cedar 
Belmont street, Hanover to Amherst 
Elm street, Blodget to Pennacook, W. h 
Elm avenue. Elm to Calef road 
Hanover street, Wilson to Milton . 
High street, Jane to Wilson road . 
Lincoln street, Merrimack northerly 
Manchester street, Belmont to Milton 
Pearl street, Elm to Chestnut 
Pine street, Orange to Prospect 
Union street, Lowell to Bridge 

Total cobble edging . 

EDGE STONES. 

Netv. 

Auburn street. Pine to Beech 
Beech street, at St. Augustine's church , 
Cedar street, west of Lincoln 
Central street, Lincoln easterly . ■ 



de 



Feet. 

700 

1,910 

50 
230 
220 
400 
1,140 
S80 

i,o8q 



Sq. Yds. 

o ^ 't 'y 

636.7 

64-3 
16.7 
76.7 

73-3 
^33-3 
511. 1 

293-3 
256.9 

360.0 

41.7 



9,246 3,277.3 



654 feet. 

486 " 

200 " 

700 " 

1.550 " 

193 " 

83 " 

400 " 

439 " 

880 " 

1,080 " 



6,665 feet. 



150 feet. 
200 " 

88 " 

89 " 



72 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Central street, west of Franklin 

Chestnut street, Hanover northerly 

Elm street, Dean southerly . 

Hanover street, Chestnut easterly 

Kidder street, west of Elm . 

Lake avenue, Chestnut west back westerly 

Laurel street. Chestnut to Union . 

Lincoln street, Central to Lake avenue . 

Spruce street, Pine to Union 

Union street, at High .... 

Total edge stones set 

Eds:e Stones Reset. 



95 


feet 


182 




161 




262 




16 




25 




88 




216 




50 




97 





1,719 feet. 



Canal street, near passenger station 
Chestnut street, Hanover northerly 
Depot street, west of Elm 
Granite street, at city yard . 
Hanover street. Pine westerly 
Hanover street, Chestnut westerly . 
Pine street, Amherst to Concord 
Pleasant street, Ehii to Franklin . 

Total edsre stones reset 



28 feet 
■ 18 
68 

125 

163 

61 

50 
200 



713 feet. 



Canal street 
Granite street 
Hanover street 



BLOCK PAVING RELAID. 



Total block paving relaid . 



Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 


215 


238.9 


100 


III. I 


547 


607.8 



862 



957-8 



MACADAMIZING. 

Netv. 

Beech street, Lake Avenue to Cedar . 
Belmont street, Hanover to Amherst . 
Elm street, Blodget to Pennacook, W. side 



Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 


500 


. 1,388.9 


Z^Z 


969.0 


204 


566.7 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



73 



Hanover street, Wilson to Milton 
Pearl street. Elm to Chestnut 
Pine street, Amherst to Concord 
Pine street, Orange to Prospect . 
Union street, Lowell to Bridge . 

Total new macadamizing 

Top-Dressed. 

Franklin street, Granite northerly 
Lowell street, Pine easterly 

Total top-dressed 



Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 


1,122 


4,481.3 


575 


1,597-2 


289 


802.8 


515 


1,430-5 


586 


1,627.8 


• 4,114 


12,864.2 


Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 


395 


1,623.3 


719 


1,997.2 



1,114 3,620.5 



GRAVELED STREETS TOP-DRESSED WITH CRUSHED STONE. 



Central street, Milton easterly 
Hall street, Manchester southerly 
Hanover street 
HoUis street, Elm westerly . 
Hooksett road, Webster northerly 
Lake avenue, near Beacon street 
Lake avenue, Cass easterly . 
Lowell south back street, Chestnut 
Milton street, Central southerly 
Pennacook street, Pine easterly 
Pine street. Prospect northerly 
Pine street, Pennacook southerly 
Wilson street, Hanover southerly 
Wilson street. Valley northerly 

Totals 



District No. 6 
District No. 10 . 
Forsaith Machine Company 
General repairing 





Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 




100 


155-6 




250 


416.7 




434 


115. 6 




no 


427.8 


. 


220 


635-6 




225 


50G.0 


. 


800 


i,iii.r 


t westerly 


no 


207.8 




220 


440.0 




450 


1,450.0 




263 


730.6 




200 


711. 1 




214 


404.1 




275 


70-3 


• 


3,871 


7,376.3 


NT FROM Y 


ARD. 


6 loads. 
602 " 
170 " 
108 " 



74 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Government building ...... 

Macadamizing ....... 

Top-dressing ....... 

Total sent from yard .... 

Stone chips drawn from ledge for general repairs 

and top-dressing ...... 

Total stone used ..... 
Each load being equal to one cubic yard. 

Stone drawn from ledge to crusher 

From all other sources . . . . 





13 


loads. 


3 


360 


< i 


I 


007 


ti 


5 


,266 loads. 




350 


loads. 



Total 



STREETS GRAVELED. 



Amherst street, Ashland westerly . 

Auburn street, Pine easterly 

Beacon street, Manchester southerly 

Belmont street, Manchester southerly 

Bridge street, Hall Avesterly 

Cedar street, Beech easterly 

Chestnut street, Webster southerly 

East High street. Maple easterly 

Hanover street, Highland easterly 

Hooksett road, north of Webster 

Lake avenue, Mammoth road westerly 

Laurel street. Beacon westerly 

Liberty street, W^ebster southerly 

Maple street. Cedar northerly 

Maple street, Lowell southerly 

Merrimack street. Hall westerly 

Merrimack street, Hall easterly 

Myrtle street. Ash easterly . 

Myrtle street, Russell easterly 

Pine east back street. Lake avenue southerly 



5,616 loads. 

1,181 loads. 
3.579 " 



Feet. 

700 
1,000 

500 

200 
I, 100 

250 

900 
1,050 

600 
1,100 

500 

575 
500 
400 
925 
775 
500 
200 
400 
100 



4,760 loads. 

Sq. Yds. 
1,244.4 

3.777-8 

1,1 1 I.I 

400.0 

2,566.7 

555-6 
2,800.0 
2,450.0 

^'533-3 
2,200.0 

1,388.9 
1,150.0 

1.555-6 
800.0 
2,466.7 
2,066.7 
944-4 
355-6 
888.9 

^33-3 



Totals 



12,275 30,389-0 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 



75 



STREETS TURNPIKED AND GRAVELED. 



Baker street 
Calef road . 
Cilley street 
Elm street . 
Hancock street 
Highland street 
Nutt road . 
Pine street . 
Shasta street 
Valley street 

Total 

STREET 

Amherst street 
Arlington street 
Ash street . 
Auburn street 
Beacon street 
Beech street 
Belmont street 
Calef road . 
Cass street . 
Cedar street 
Central street 
Chestnut street 
Elm street . 
Harrison street 
Hooksett road 
Jane street . 
Kennard road 
Lake avenue 
Langdon street 
Laurel street 
Lincoln street 
Maple street 
Milton street 



S TURNPIKED WITH ROAD 





1,875 


feet 




• 8,875 


(( 




1,125 


" 




3,000 


a 




1,125 


i I 




1,250 


a 




4,500 


( i 




9,375 


li 




750 


li 




2,250 


a 




34,125 


feet 


MACHINE. 






1,150 


feet 




1,344 


a 




500 


it 




1,000 


a 




1,200 


i ( 




10,300 


it 




650 


It 




1,000 


i i 




218 


li 




1,200 


"l' 




1,500 


i i 




1,000 


it 




1,200 


i I 




3,100 


a 




5,300 


i I 




400 


ti 




2,000 


'• 




3,450 


11 




1,300 


1 1 




6,050 


i t 




900 


" 




1,885 


i: 




650 


It 



76 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Myrtle street 
Nashua street 
North street 
Oak street . 
Old Bridge street 
Pearl street 
Pennacook street 
Pine street 
Prospect street 
River road . 
Russell street 
Sagamore street 
Smyth road 
Spruce street 
Union street 
Walnut street 

Total 



423 


feet 


700 




550 




1.450 




i>725 




400 




929 




1,128 




3,000 




3.350 




1,190 




450 




5.500 




2,700 




1,650 




1,792 





74,234 feet. 



STREETS GRADED. 

By cut. 

Chestnut street, Webster southerly . 
Elm avenue. Elm to Calef road 
Liberty street, Webster southerly 
Manchester street, Belmont easterly 
Manchester street, Milton easterly 
Maple street, Harrison northerly 
North street, Pine easterly 
Orange street, Ashland easterly 
Pearl street, Ashland easterly . 
Webster street, east of Hooksett road 

Totals ...... 3,102 6,929.0 

The cut on Manchester street, east of Milton street, was 
through ledge the entire distance. 



Feet. 


Cu. Yds. 


600 


zzz-z 


375 


95-0 


400 


414.7 


230 


212.7 


250 


1,481.4 


250 


231.4 


150 


z-^z-z 


147 


98.0 


250 


641.8 


450 


3.107.4 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



77 



By fill. 

Ash street, Gore southerly 
Behiiont street, Central southerly 
Chestnut street, Pennacoolc northerly 
Prospect street, Russell easterly 
Sagamore street, Chestnut easterly . 
Webster street, Hooksett road easterly 
Wilson road, Bridge southerly 



Totals 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 

By cut. 



Belmont street, Hanover northerly 
Hanover street, Belmont easterly 
Liberty street. North northerly 
North street, Chestnut easterly 
North street. Liberty westerly . 



Totals 



By fill. 



Ash street, Myrtle northerly 
Ashland street, Hanover northerly . 
Auburn street, Union westerly 
Auburn street, Union easterly 
Auburn street, Beech easterly . 
Bakersville ..... 
Beech street. Gore northerly . 
Belmont street, Lake avenue northerly 
Belmont street, Amherst northerly . 
Bridge street, Russell westerly 
East High street, Wilson road easterly 
Elm street, Orange northerly . 
Gore street, Union easterly 
Hanover street, Ashland westerly 



Feet. Cu. Yds. 

loo 255.5 

200 266.6 

500 2,592.5 

300 777.7 

100 1,851.7 

2,300 6,785.0 



JO 



8 



650.9 



pSjS i3»i79-9 



Feet. 
163 

77 
50 

75 

ICC 



Cu. Yds. 
96-5 

34-2 
22.2 
I I.I 
44.4 



465 208.4 



Feet. 


Cu. Yds. 


225 


32-7 


125 


74.1 


150 


22.2 


150 


44.4 


ICO 


148.2 


5,280 


782.2 


TOO 


129.6 


100 


29.6 


120 


53-3 


TOO 


25-9 


50 


29.6 


120 


71. 1 


100 


59-2 


100 


37-1 



78 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Lowell street, Maple easterly . 
North street, Elm westerly 
North street, Chestnut easterly 
Prospect street, Beech easterly 
Sagamore street, Elm easterly . 
Sagamore street, Pine easterly 
Walnut street. Gore northerly 
Wilson road, Bridge southerly 
Winter place. Elm westerly 

Totals ....... 8,ii6 2,130.7 

This refers only to the larger fills, as in many places only a 
few yards have been used, scattered here and there. 



Feet. 


Cu. Yds. 


150 


44.4 


ICO 


88.8 


ICO 


29.6 


220 


65.2 


100 


15-1 


ICO 


59-2 


75 


66.6 


376 


194.9 


75 


27.7 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



48-inch Steel 
24x36 inches, brick 
20-inch Akron pipe 
20-inch iron pipe 
1 5 -inch Akron pipe 

nch Akron pipe (relaid) 

nch iron pipe 

nch Akron pipe 

nch Akron pipe (relaid) 

nch Akron pipe 
lo-inch Akron pipe (relaid) 
8-inch Akron pipe 

Total 



15- 
14- 
12- 
12- 
10- 



312 feet 

505 
2,328 

33 

531 
106 
12 
2,434 
736 
989 

365 

72 



8,423 feet. 



CESSPOOL CONNECTIONS. 



lo-inch Akron pipe 

8-inch Akron pipe 

8-inch Akron pipe (relaid) 

Total 

Total pipe laid 
Equal to 1.75 miles. 



34 feet. 
718 " 

42 " 



794 feet. 
9,217 feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



79 



Following is the amount paid for labor on the various sewers 
during the year : 



Street. 



Belmont and Massabesic 

City stable with Granite 

Clarke and Adams 

Concord 

East High 

East Spruce 

Hancock and River road 

Hanover 

Harrison and Ash east back 

Laurel 

Main sewer outlet 

Merrimack 

North, Chandler, and North north bad' 

Pearl 

Ray 

Sagamore and Bay 

Wilson 



Labor of 
men. 



Labor of 
teams. 



$4,803.11 

210.87 

1,250.71 

220.08 

74.75 

2,043.77 

500.16 

343.68 

810.64 

51.84 



950.75 
972.23 
122.40 
75.G1 
237.25 
295.47 



$148.00 



60.00 
10.00 
5.00 
110.00 
36.00 
18.00 
16.00 
15.00 



42.00 
111.00 
18.00 
5.50 
13..50 
32.00 



Total. 



$.5,011.11 

210.87 

1,310.71 

230.08 

79.75 

2,153.77 

536.16 

361.68 

826.64 

66.84 

978.56 

992.75 

1,083.23 

140.40 

81.11 

250.75 

327.47 



$14,641.88 



Paid Concord Railroad for labor of men and material for fill 
at main sewer outlet, $2^^.06. 



ON HAND AT CITY YARD. 



24-inch Akron pipe 
20-inch Akron pipe 
1 5 -inch Akron pipe 
12-inch Akron pipe 
lo-inch Akron-pipe 
8-inch Akron pipe 



Total pipe on hand 



46 feet. 
66 



o 

164 

1,096 

700 
1,204 



;, 5 76 feet. 



80 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

4 Y branches, 8 on 20 inches. 

20 Y branches, 8 on 15 inches. 
7 Y branches, 6 on 15 inches. 

21 Y branches, 8 on 12 inches. 
T Y branch, 10 on 10 inches. 
2 Y branches, 8 on 10 inches. 

32 Y branches, 8 on 8 inches. 

6 15-inch quarter turns. 

10 12-inch quarter turns. 

11 lo-inch quarter turns. 
II 8-inch quarter turns. 

I 6-inch quarter turn. 

1 1 1 5 -inch curves. 

5 lo-inch curves. 

I reducer, 15 to 10 inches. 

22 20-inch rings. 

6 manhole covers. 
4 cesspool traps. 

12 oval cesspool grates. 
4 flat cesspool grates. 
4 cesspool curbs. 

4 water gate covers. 
10 M. brick. 

I barrel cement. 
13,440 feet of new hemlock plank. 
2,000 feet of old hemlock plank. 
20 cords of hard wood. 

Catch-basins built, 43 ; repaired, 30 ; manholes built, 25 ; 
lampholes built, 9. 

CROSSINGS. 

Concrete, new, 25 ; top-dressed, 7 ; patched, 3. 
Stone, new, 6 ; relaid, 11. 

CONCRETE. 

Crossings (new) . . . . . . 812.7 sq. yds. 

Crossings (patched) ..... 45.0 " 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



81 



Crossings (top-dressed) . . . . , 
Belmont and Hanover streets, at Dea. James 

Baldwin's ...... 

Chestnut and Myrtle streets, at Gen. Charles 

Williams's ..... 
City stable ..... 
Concord square (top-dressed) 
Elm street, at Aretas Blood's . 
Hanover square .... 
Lincoln-street school yard (new) 
Lincoln-street school yard (top-dressed) 
Merrimack square (new) 
Merrimack square (top-dressed) 

Total 



179.3 ^q 


yds 


361-5 


a 


113-9 


(( 


314.0 


t( 


1,892.5 


'• 


102.0 


a 


643.6 


11 


221.7 


a 


307.1 


a 


72.6 


u 


1,394-7 


•' 



6,460.6 sq. yds. 



CONCRETE ROADWAYS. 



Bridge street (repaired) 
Chestnut street 
Granite street 
Merrimack street . 

Total . 



239.4 sq. yds. 
930.9 " 
281.1 " 
2,100.6 " 



3,552.0 sq. yds. 



CONTRACT WORK. 



Massabesic-street culvert : Warren Harvey, contractor. 



PIPE CULVERTS. 



Belmont street, at Dea. James Baldwin's, 12-inch iron 46 feet. 

Behnont and Central streets, lo-inch iron . . . 50 " 

Hanover, east of Belmont, 8-inch iron . . . 12 " 

Laurel street, east of Beacon, 12-inch Akron . . 22 " 

Bushes have been cut from sides of roads for a distance of two 
miles. 

6 



82 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

DISTRICT NO. 4. 

Rodney N. Whittemore, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked 100 rods. 

Graded and graveled 236 rods. 

Cobble gutters paved, 500 feet, 166.7 sq- yds. 

Laid 40 feet of 12-inch Akron pipe. 

Extended the sidewalk on the north side of Depot road from 
the main road to the depot. 

Four hundred loads of gravel were used and five hundred feet 
of cobble edging laid. 

Repaired bridges, cut bushes, removed stones from roadbed, 
and made general repairs where needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 5. 
Mark E. Harvey, Surveyor. 

Graveled . . . . . . . . 4,170 feet. 

Turnpiked ....... 2,340 " 

Turnpiked and graveled . . . • . 1,140 " 

Graded (cut) . . . . . . . 9,458 cu. ft. 

Taken up, cleaned, and relaid two stone culverts. 

Replanked twelve feet of center of bridge over Cohas brook, 
also small bridge near the old Harvey mill. This latter bridge 
should be rebuilt the coming season. The timbers are badly 
decayed and in its present condition it is unsafe for loaded 
teams to cross. 

Cut bushes on three and one half miles of road. 

Laid 48 feet of 8-inch pipe. 

Removed stones from road and made all general repairs. 

A larger appropriation is necessary in this district, as many 
needed improvements are called for which cannot be made, as 
the present amount is only sufficient for the regular work. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



83 



DISTRICT NO. 6. 
Albert J. Peaslee, Surveyor. 

Graveled . . . . . . . . 320 rods. 

Turnpiked ........ 42 " 

Built three stone culverts, one 18" X 18" X 24', one 15" X 
15" X 24', and one 12" X 12" X 17'. 

Raised Island Pond road from six to twelve inches for a dis- 
tance of two hundred feet, across the bog. 

Made all necessary repairs throughout the district. 

DISTRICT NO. 7. 
Charles Francis, Surveyor. 



graveled. 

Belmont street 
Candia road . 
Falls roads 
Massabesic street 
Taylor street . 
Valley street . 
Young road . 

Total . . . . . . . .270 rods. 

Graded and graveled Cypress street, 450 feet long, 50 feet 
wide. 



15 rods. 

30 
20 

25 
70 

80 
30 



turnpiked and graveled. 



Hall road 
Valley street 

Total 



70 rods. 

28 " 



98 rods. 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Belmont street 



50 feet. 



84 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Cypress street . 
Massabesic street 

Total . 



800 feet. 

300 " 



1,150 feet. 



GUTTERS. 



Belmont street 
Cypress street 
Massabesic street (relaid) 



Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 


700 


233-3 


800 


266.7 


400 


^33-3 



1,900 633. 



CESSPOOLS AND CONNECTIONS. 



Belmont street at Massabesic 
Massabesic street at Felmont 
Massabesic street at Spruce 
1 5 -inch Akron pipe (new) 
1 5 -inch Akron pipe (relaid) 
lo-inch Akron pipe . 



2 
2 

2 
40 feet. 
40 " 
. 160 " 

Repaired stone culvert 3 by 4 feet on Young road and 
lengthened the same 20 feet. 

Built two stone culverts, one 14" X 18" X 40', and one 12" X 
14" X 20'. 

Made general repairs throughout the district where most 
needed. 

DISTRICT NO. 8. 
Levi J. Proctor, Surveyor. 



No report. 



DISTRICT NO. 9. 
Alphonso N. Boyce, Surveyor. 



No report. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



85 



DISTRICT NO. lo. 



Charles O. Phelps, Superintendent. 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Bowman street, Mast southerly 
Bridge street, McGregor easterly 
Carroll street, south of Amherst road 
Douglas street, West easterly 
Douglas street, Barr easterly 
Granite street, Main westerly 
Main street, Douglas northerly 
Main street, Hancock northerly 
Wayne street, Beauport westerly 
West street, Douglas northerly . 
West Hancock street. Main easterly 

Totals .... 



COBBLE EDGING. 

Bowman street. Mast southerly 
Bridge street, McGregor easterly . 
Carroll street, Amherst road southerly 
Main street, Douglas northerly 
Main street. West Hancock northerly 
Wayne street, Beauport westerly 
West Hancock street, Main easterly 



Total 



EDGE STONES. 



Douglas street, West easterly 
Main street, Douglas northerly 
Main street, Monmouth northerly 
West street, Douglas northerly 



Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 


75° 


250 


lOO 


33 


1 20 


40 


5S 


19 


100 


33 


400 


^33 


1,282 


427 


58 


19 


600 


200 


112 


37 


50 


17 


3.630 


1,208 



750 feet. 

100 " 

120 " 

1,312 " 

58 " 

600 " 

50 " 

2,990 feet. 



58 feet. 
250 " 
150 '' 
112 " 



Total . 



570 feet. 



86 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



MACADAMIZING. 

Main street, engine-house to Adams street, 675 feet, 2,550 
square yards. 

GRAVELED STREETS TOP-DRESSED WITH CRUSHED STONE. 

Main street, Granite to Douglas, 372 feet, 1,166 square yards. 

STREETS GRAVELED. 



Amory street, at Beauport 
Beauport street, Conant northerly 
Boynton street 
Douglas street 

Granite street, Dover to Barr . 
Main street, Monmouth northerly 
Mast road .... 
Third street. Fourth to Walker 
Wayne street. Main to Dubuque 
West street, Douglas to Conant 

Total .... 



STREETS GRADED. 

Bowman street, Mast to Milford 
Fourth street. School to Walker 
Main street. Granite to Sullivan 
School south back street, Third to Fourth 
Walker street. River to Second . 

Total 

GRADING. 



Feet. 


Sq. Yds. 


100 


378 


432 


1,632 


1,200 


4,533' 


400 


1,511 


450 


1,400 


630 


2,380 


500 


1,888 


200 


755 


950 


3,588 


250 


944 



5,112 19,009. 



Feet. 


Cu. Yds. 


837 


2,046 


350 


620 


2,181 


2,058 


250 


240 


200 


311 



,818 5,275 



Kelly street at Beauport, 260 feet, 481 cubic yards. 
Varney school lot, 1,481 cubic yards. 

TURNPIKING. 

Morgan street, Amory to Kelly, 650 feet, 2,210 square yards.. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



87 



CONCRETE. 

Seven crossings ..... 
Main street, roadway .... 
Main street, at engine-house (new) . 
Main street, at engine-house (patched) 
Main street, at engine-house cellar (patched) 
Main street, sidewalk at Mr. Bailey's 
McGregor and Marion streets, roadway 

Total 



186.0 sq. 


yds 


• 3692 




• 259.0 




■ 59-3 




19.9 




• 52-4 




171.6 




1,117.4 sq 


yds 



CONTRACT WORK. 

Beauport street, sub-grading, George Whitford contractor. 

Parker-street bridge has been replanked, using 4,034 feet of 
hemlock plank, also the culvert at the junction of Old and 
New Mast roads, using 1,568 feet of plank. 

The following tables give an itemized account of the two 
principal sewers constructed in the district this year. 

GRANITE-STREET SEWER. 

Length, Main to Barr street, 861 feet. 
Brick, 103,93, ^t ;^6.5o per M . . . 
Cement, 273 bbls. Norton's and 2 bbls. Portland 
Manhole castings, 1,066 lbs. at ;^o.o3 per lb 
Labor of men and teams 
Car fare, carrying battery 
Damage to buildings by blasting 
Lumber for cribbing trench, 25,500 feet 
Ropes, snaps, etc. 
Blacksmithing 
Hardware and oil 
Material for blasting 

Total . . , . . . . ^7,040.14 

Akron pipe used in cesspools and connections : 
12-inch, 10 feet; lo-inch, 6 feet; 8-inch, 164 feet; 6-inch 
186 feet. 



1675-55 


416.00 


31.98 


4,973.00 


9-5° 


14.00 


459-45 


3-57 


268.36 


55-65 


133-08 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The cost of constructing this sewer was greatly augmented by 
the large amount of ledge encountered. 



WEST-STREET SEW'ER. 



Length, Granite to Conant south back street, 428 feet. 
Brick, in manholes, 4,000 at $6.50 per M. . . ^26.00 

Cement, 8 bbls. Norton's . . . . . 12.00 

Manhole castings, 533 lbs. at ^0.03 per lb . . 15-99 

Lumber for cribbing trench, 4,180 feet . . . 73-66 

Labor of men and teams ..... 947-75 

Total ........ $1,075.40 

15-inch Akron pipe, relaid, 217 feet; new, 62 feet. 
12-inch Akron pipe, relaid, 137 feet : new, 12 feet. 
Akron pipe in cesspools and connections, lo-inch, 8 feet ; 
8-inch, 56 feet ; 6-inch, 60 feet. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



new 
relaid 



24 X 36 inches, brick . 

22 X 33 inches, brick . 

24-inch, brick 

20-inch, Akron pipe, relaid . 

1 5 -inch '•■ 

1 5 -inch " 

12-inch " 

8-inch " 
1 2 -inch " 
lo-inch " 

8-inch 

6-inch " 



in cesspools and connections 



Total sewers ..... 
Cesspools built, 11 ; manholes, 6. 

PIPE ON HAND AT YARD. 

200 feet of 24 inch Akron, 50 feet of odd sizes. 

Total amount of cement used in sewers, 295 barrels. 
Total number of brick used in sewers, 114,931. 
Paid for tools used on sewers, $180.39. 



207 feet. 
379 

275 
108 

85 
262 
149 

251 
10 

64 

424 
246 

2,415 feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 89 

DISTRICT NO. II. 
William H. Colby, Suryeyor.* 

No report. 

Concrete, Falls road, 1,190.7 square yards. 

Frank D. HANScoM.f 
General repairs. 

DISTRICT NO. 12. 
Leroy M. Streeter, Suryeyor. 

The road machine has been used to good advantage in the dis- 
trict this year. Mammoth road from Hanover to Bridge street 
and a portion of Bald Hill road have been turnpiked. 

A bank wall has been built on the Mammoth road near the 
city farm buildings, 390 feet long, containing ninety perch of 
stone and one hundred cubic yards of cobble stone and other 
filling. Four hundred feet of 3 x 4 railing has been built, sup- 
ported by one-inch iron rods firmly cemented in the wall. 

The road is now from four to ten feet wider than formerly, and 
is much safer for public travel. 

The James Hall road has been widened at Mr. Plummer's, 
using fifty cubic yards of fill. 

General repairs have been attended to on all roads throughout 
the district. 

DISTRICT NO. 13. 
John H. Campbell, Surveyor. 
No report. 

*To September. fFrom September. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineer's Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1890. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City 
Councils : 

In compliance with the laws and ordinances of the city, I 
herewith submit my twelfth annual report (it being the forty-fifth 
of this department), giving a complete record of the operations 
of the department for the year ending December 31, 1890; also 
giving a detailed statement of the fires and alarms responded to, 
with the losses, the insurance carried upon the property endan- 
gered, the insurance paid thereon, and causes, so far as could be 
ascertained by inspection and inquiry. The report will also 
contain a complete list of the working force of the department, 
giving their rank, occupation, residence, etc., a list of the fire- 
alarm stations and locations of keys to the same, location of 
hydrants, etc. 

During the past year the department has responded to thirty- 
five " bell alarms " and thirty " stills," making a total of sixty- 
five, a slight increase over last year, although many of the 
"stills" were of little or no consequence and some of them en- 
tirely needless. 

The total insurance on the property endangered by fire, as 
will be seen by the list in the following pages, was ^229,150.00 ; 



94 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the damage resulting therefrom has been $16,533.28 and the 
amount of insurance paid $10,026.28, leaving only $6,507.00 as 
uncovered losses. 

THE FORCE 

of the department consists of eighteen permanent men and one 
hundred and six call men, divided as follows : 

1 Chief Engineer. 

4 Assistant Engineers. 

5 Steamer Companies of 14 men each. 

2 Horse Hose Companies, — 12 men each. 
I Hook-and-Ladder Company, — 20 men. 

1 Chemical Engine Company, — 5 men. 

In addition to the above there is a volunteer hand-hose com- 
pany in Amoskeag village of twelve men. 

The two Steamer companies at the Central Station, Nos. i and 
4, in close proximity to the business portion of the city, are both 
without permanent engineers, and the increasing demands upon 
the department should warrant the increase of the permanent 
force that one should be assigned to each of these companies. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

The roof of the Central Station requires some repairs ; the tin 
on the east slope should receive a coat of paint to prevent its 
further rust and the entire roof of the stables in the rear should 
be re-graveled, as in its present condition much of the hay is 
wasted by the leakage of water. 

THE APPARATUS 

as at present located consists of — 

2 Steam Fire-engines at Central Station with Horse Hose 
Wagons. 

I Steam Fire-engine with two-horse Hose Wagon and Hook- 
and-Ladder combination, North Main street. 

I Steam Fire-engine and Horse Carriage, at corner of Lake 
avenue and Massabesic street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. " 95 

I Steam Fire-engine and two-horse Hose Carriage and Hook- 
and-Ladder combination, at corner of Webster and Chestnut 
streets. ^^■ 

I Horse Hose Carriage at Central Station. 

I Horse Hose Carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

I Hook-and-Ladder Truck at Central Station. 

I Hook-and-Ladder Truck (old), at Lake Avenue Station. 

I Double Tank (60 gallons each) Chemical Engine at (Central 
Station. 

I Supply Wagon at Central Fire Station. 

I Steam Fire-engine (reserve) at old engine-house, Clinton 
street, of but little use for fire purposes. 

I Hand Hose Carriage at junction of Old Falls road and 
Front street, Amoskeag. 

I Two-wheeled Hose Carriage, Derry Mills, Goffe's Falls. 

On the eighteenth of December, the one-horse hose carriage 
run in connection with Fire King Steamer No. 2 was exchanged 
for a two-horse combination hose wagon carrying six ladders. 
This change will enable the company to have a few ladders to 
use until the arrival of the truck from this side of the river. 

On the thirty-first of December, the "jumper" attached to 
N. S. Bean Steamer No. 4 was discarded and a modern one- 
horse hose wagon placed in its stead. 

During the month of April the Pennacook hose carriage was 
supplied with a new set of rear wheels, the front ones sent to the 
manufacturer and received new rmis, and the carriage painted at 
the expense of ^220.19. 

In August the N. S. Bean steamer was taken to the Manchester 
Locomotive Works and thoroughly overhauled and supplied with 
a new set of tubes, at the expense of $335-55. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Satisfactory results have attended the working of this impor- 
tant auxiliary of the department when called upon to perform 
service, and only once during the year has a second alarm been 
given for the same fire. (French Catholic Church, October 17.) 

There have been no additional stations added during the year, 



96 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

although two have been ordered and will be placed in service m 
due time. 

I desire to enter my protest against the granting of licenses to 
irresponsible persons to move buildings through our streets, es- 
pecially where it interferes with, and requires cutting our fire- 
alarm wires. On one occasion during the summer, one of our 
circuits was open during an alarm of fire. Had there been a fire 
in that vicinity then it would have been impossible to give an 
alarm by telegraph for a number of hours. 

Another standing evil is the " Acoustic " telephones. Our 
lines have received more annoyance from these wires than from 
all other sources combined. From their nature the wires cannot 
be put up as firmly as others, and the whole southeastern section 
of the city was cut out by a cross from these wires for several 
hours before t he cause could be found. Serious results may fol- 
low their continuance. 

There are now about thirty (30) miles of main lines wire and 
twenty-nine (29) miles of " Tapper " lines, that require the ser- 
vices of four hundred and eleven (41 1) jars of gravity battery. 

THE HORSES. 

There are at present twenty-six horses connected with this de- 
partment. 

During the year one pair of grays have been purchased to take 
the place of the single horse on the Combination hose carriage 
of Steamer No. 5, and a pair of grays for the new combination 
hose wagon that took the place of the one-horse carriage of 
Steamer No. 2. 

Two or three changes of horses should be made the coming 
year, by exchanging some unfit for fire service. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The eleventh annual parade occurred on Thursday, October 
9, and was observed in the usual manner of a street parade, fol- 
lowed by collation in the City Hall. The bills for the parade 
amounted to $343.85. Notwithstanding an appropriation of 
$500 was made by the City Councils in accordance with section. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



97 



8 of chapter 8, City Ordinances, the city auditor refused to ap- 
prove the bills and even after being authorized by vote of the 
Councils to allow said bill he did not do it, and they still remain 
unpaid. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

This benevolent institution has been in existence since 1873, 
and its treasury has received substantial aid through the liberality 
of our citizens and the local insurance companies. 

The condition of the treasury is as follows, December 31, 1890 : 

Cash on hand February 11, 1890 . $2,498.56 

Interest on deposits .... 104.72 

Franklin-street Congregational society . 50.00 
Chandler Brothers (George B., Henry, 

and J. M.) ..... 20.00 

^t. Rev. Bishop Bradley . . . 10.00 

Col. Waterman Smith .... 10.00 

Hon. Moody Currier .... 10.00 

Hon. P. C. Cheney . . . •. 10.00 

Hon. Horatio Fradd .... 10.00 

Hon. H. D. Upton .... 10.00 

Hon. Jacob F. James .... 5.00 

Hon. D. B. Varney .... 5.00 

Col. H. B. Fairbanks .... 5.00 



CR. 

By cash paid J. E. 



Merrill, secretary 



$2,748.28 

25.00 

$2,723.28 

To those who have so kindly aided us by their contributions 
during the last eighteen years of the existence of the association, 
we desire to say " God bless them," and if they ever need our 
services we will endeavor to care for them as they have cared for 
us. 

7 



98 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I would renew my recommendation of last year for the pur- 
chase of an aerial ladder truck for especial use in our business 
section. 

The rapidly growing sections of Bakersville and McGregor- 
ville are requiring better protection, and I would recommend 
placing a horse hose carriage in both of these sections. The hose 
carriage displaced at Steamer No. 2 by the combination wagon, 
is in good, serviceable condition, and could be placed in one of 
these places with comparatively small expense. 

I would recommend a change of section 3 of chapter 8 of City 
Ordinances, whereby the officers of the several companies would 
receive their appointments from the board of engineers. I am 
confident a majority of the entire membership feel that such a 
move would be beneficial to the discipline and efficiency of the 
department. 

I would recommend the adoption of a police call and a mili- 
tary call, by means of the fire-alarm telegraph. In case of an 
extensive conflagration, or a riot, this would be of great impor- 
tance in notifying these departments quickly. This is only a 
precautionary measure, but one which I think ought to receive 
early attention. 

I would recommend the purchase of at least two thousand feet 
of hose the coming year. 

INSPECTION OF BUILDINGS. 

There can be but little accomplished in the way of a thorough 
building inspection until something can be brought to bear upon 
contractors and builders to convince them that they should be 
called to account for putting up death traps and " tinder boxes." 

So long as men who are considered reputable and responsible 
contractors delight in telling their patrons they have a right to 
erect such buildings as they choose on property they have bought 
and paid for, and the city cannot deprive them of such rights, 
and until carpenters and builders are in sympathy with whole- 
some building laws, just so long shall we have " tinder boxes, " 
erroneously called dwellings, erected in our midst. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 99 

No building ought to be allowed to be erected within the city 
limits until a permit has been granted, and then only when the 
builder shall comply with specifications furnished. 

When a building in process of construction takes fire from a 
defective chimney what may we expect when such chimneys are 
inclosed inside of plastering and sheathing ? 

A building inspector can accomplish but little if the officers 
of the law and the courts will not uphold him in the perform- 
ance of his duties. 

PERSONAL.' 

Before closing this report I desire to return my personal thanks 
to the New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company, and the Peo- 
ples Fire Insurance Company, of this city, for their generosity 
in paying the expenses of the chief engineer to the eighteenth 
session of the National Association of Fire Engineers at Detroit, 
Mich., August 19-22. This is an expense that should properly 
be borne by the city, as is the case in most of the large cities in 
New England. These conventions are not " junketing " trips, 
as some suppose, but a meeting of practical fire fighters ■who 
have made their branch of business a study, and meet annually 
for an exchange of ideas and discussions on the methods and ap- 
paratus pertaining to the prevention and extinguishment of fires 
and the saving of life and property when endangered thereby. 

I desire to return my thanks to the associate engineers for 
their unselfish support and for the efficient aid they have ren- 
dered on all occasions ; to the officers and men composing the 
different companies, who have always striven to keep the effi- 
ciency of the department at its present high standard, and for 
the uniform courtesy they have always shown, as well as their 
alacrity in responding to alarms and their fidelity to the cause 
they are engaged in. They have stood shoulder to shoulder in 
times past, and may they continue so to do. 

To the committee on fire department, who have striven hard 
to make our department efficient, to His Honor the Mayor and 
other members of the City Council, for their encouragement, to 
City Marshal Longa and his entire police force for their valuable 
and willing assistance, I also desire to return my thanks. 



100 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

To Gen. Charles Williams, I desire to extend not only my 
personal thanks but those of the entire department for his con- 
tinued hospitality for refreshments at fires. 

To the incoming City Councils, I desire to say that our de- 
partment will, in a measure, be what you make it. See to it 
that it is not crippled in any way so as to reduce its efficiency, 
and render it such aid as to make it among the best in the Union. 
Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Fire Department. 



LIST OF FIRES AND ALARMS DURING 1890, WITH 
LOSSES AND INSURANCE PAID. 

Still. Tuesday, January 7, 5.25 p. m. One of the roomers at 
No. 1 06 1 Elm street was lighting a fire with kerosene. Some 
boys seeing the flash gave the alarm, to which the Chemical re- 
sponded. No services required. 

Still. Thursday, January 16, 5.30 p. m. Three-story brick 
building, owned by Higgins Bros., and occupied by the Higgins 
Bros. Co. as furniture and upholstery rooms. The fire took in a 
bale of wadding from a gas jet. Insured for $12,000. Loss, $50. 
Fully covered. 

Still. Wednesday, January 29, 6.20 A. jm. Three-story 
brick block, known as Post-office Block, owned by Bartlett, Gay, 
and others. The fire originated in a waste basket in the store 
occupied by Thomas A. Lane, gas fixtures, piping, etc. Penna- 
cook Hose Co. responded, and with hydrant stream through 
quarter-inch shut-off nozzle, extinguished the fire with very little 
damage by either fire or water. Building insured for $20,000. 
Stock for $6,000. Damage to building, $6. To stock, $25. 
Insurance paid, $31. 

Box 6. Thursday, January 30, 10.56 a. m. City Hall build- 
ing. Fire originated in the basement under John J. Holland's 
drug store, and was caused by hot oil boiling over. No damage 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 101 

to building. Stock insured for $10,000. Damage to stock, 
^200. Insurance paid, $200. 

Still. Sunday, February 9, 2.47 p. m. Two-and-a-half story 
house, corner of Merrimack and Maple streets, owned and occu- 
pied by Mrs. Henry A. Follansbee. Burning chimney extin- 
guished with " Pony " Extinguisher without damage. 

Box 4. Sunday, February 16, 2.48 a. m. Two-story wooden 
house, owned and occupied by Jeremiah J. Horan, as residence 
and saloon. Cause, cigar stub carelessly thrown into the saw- 
dust upon the floor. Building insured for $300. Damage, 
^22.50. Insurance paid, $22.50. No damage to contents. 

Still. Monday, February 17, 9.45 a. m. Four-story brick 
block, Nos. 43-61 Hanover street, owned by the heirs of J. 
N. Brown and William B. Johnson. A burning chimney filled 
the entire block with smoke. Chemical Engine responded. No 
damage. 

Still. Monday, February 17, 1.40 p.m. Three-story brick 
boarding block, No. ;^;^ Mechanic street, owned by Stark Manu- 
facturing Co. An overheated chimney ignited the lathing and 
sheathing. Damage estimated, $10. No insurance. Used 
" Pony " Extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, March 4, 7.40 p. M. Three-story wooden 
block. No. 7 Pearl street, corner Elm, owned by the heirs of 
Hugh Ramsey. An overheated chimney ignited the "header" 
about the chimney. Extinguished with " Pony " with slight 
damage. 

Box 8. Friday, March 7, 7.12 a. m. Burning chimney in 
Webster block caused a needless alarm. No damage. 

Still. Friday, March 7, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in Wig- 
gins block, No. 136 Lake Avenue. Used "Pony" Extin- 
guisher. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, March 11, 2.48 p. m. Burning chimney. 
No. 10 Clark's avenue, off Pearl street. Used two charges in 
"Pony" Extinguisher. 

Still. Friday, April 11, 5.20 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment No. 26 Dover street, occupied by Joseph Lahey. Re- 
sponded to by Fire King Co. No. 2 with "Pony." No 
damage. 



102 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. Saturday, April 19, 7.40 a. i\l An eight-tenement 
block, No. 470 Granite street, owned by Mrs. Tolman and Mrs. 
N. T. Folsom. Sparks from the chimney set fire to roof which 
was slightly damaged. Insurance on block, $3,000. Damage, 
$20. Insurance paid, $20. Fire King Co. No. 2 responded 
with hose carriage. 

Still. Saturday, April 19, 12.15 ^- ^^- Brush fire on Mc- 
Gregor hill. Fire King Co. No. 2 responded with hose carriage. 

Still. Monday, April 21, 11.20 A. m. Two-story brick 
tenement block. No. 16 Machine Shop Corporation, owned by 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., and occupied by Charles Edgar. 
Fire originated among some clothes in the attic, from some un- 
known cause. Damage to building, $5. Damage to contents, 
$10. No insurance. Chemical responded, but services not 
needed. Extinguished with pails of water before arrival of 
engine. 

Still. Monday, April 21, 3.58 p. u. Word received by 
telephone of fire at Driving Park. Went down with Steamer 4 
with four horses, and a hose wagon. On arrival at grounds 
found only a small brush fire. No damage. 

Box 313. Monday, April 21, 7.06 p. m. Three-story wooden 
block No. 511 North Main street, McGregorville. Kerosene 
lamp exploded in tenement occupied by Antoine Giguire. No 
damage. Extinguished before arrival of department. 

Box 45. Friday, April 25, 11. 18 a. m. Three-story brick 
block, at corner of Franklin and West Auburn streets, owned 
and occupied by the S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. The fire 
originated in a bin for shavings over the boiler-room from some 
unknown cause. Buildings insured for $33,500. Damage 
$51.45. Insurance paid, $51.45. 

Box 71. Saturday, April 26, 2.04 p. m. Two-and-one-half- 
story wooden dwelling, No. 153 Cedar street, owned by heirs of 
Edward Gallagher, and occupied by John Healey and John Reddy. 
The fire caught from sparks upon the dry shingles, burning 
through the roof. Insurance on building, $1,200. Damage, 
^58. Insurance paid, $58. 

Still. Tuesday, April 29, 5.03 p. m. Chimney fire in Baker 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 103 

& Burnham's block, Dover street. Responded to by Fire King 
Co. No. 2. No damage. 

Box 8. Sunday, May ii, 11.45 ^- ^- Four-story brick tene- 
ment block owned by Charles F. Morrill at No. 13 Hollis street, 
occupied by Louis Letourneau. A member of the family 
attempted to light a fire with kerosene and succeeded to such an 
extent as to explode the can partly filled with oil. Building in- 
sured for ^6,000. Damage, $28.05. Insurance paid, $28.05. 
Extinguished by Chemical. 

Box 24. Wednesday, May 14, 9.15 p. m. Three-story brick 
building, "The Elliot Hospital," situated on Hall hill. The 
fire originated in the kitchen or pantry adjoining, from some 
cause not definitely known, but I have no doubt it was from ex- 
plosion of kerosene lamp. Mrs. Daniel S. Harriman, an employe 
of the hospital, who occupied a room directly over the kitchen, 
was suffocated in the early stage of the fire, and on the arrival of 
the department it was impossible to rescue her body until the 
flames were nearly extinguished. The fire was confined wholly 
to the east wing of the building. Building insured for $20,000. 
Contents uninsured. Damage to building, $2,150; to contents, 
$450. Insurance paid, $2,150. 

Box 7. Thursday, May 15, 8.57 P. m. Two-and-one-half- 
story wooden block, No. 38 Lowell street, owed by Michael Mc- 
Cabe and occupied by John Turcotte, who upset a kerosene lamp, 
setting fire to the bedding. Damage to building, $5 ; to con- 
tents, $10. Uninsured. 

Box 7. Friday, May 16, 5.18 p. m. Burning chimney at No. 
17 Washington street. Needless alarm. No damage. 

Box 52. Sunday, May 18, 6.22 p. m. Burning chimney in 
tenement rear of 26 Dover street, occupied by Joseph Lahey. 
No damage. 

Still. Sunday, June 8, 9.15 a. m. Burning chimney at No. 
163 Hanover street, in house owned and occupied by Sarah A. 
Foster. No damage. Chemical responded. 

Box 53. Monday, June 9, 4.22 p. m. Two-story wooden 
dwelling. No. 54 Milford street, owned by John D. Bean and oc- 
cupied by Frank F. Ferguson, Levi Caldwell, and A. Whitte- 



104 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

more. Fire caught from a spark on the roof, burning through 
into an open attic. Building insured for $800. Damage to build- 
ing, $60. Insurance paid, ^60. No damage to contents. 

Box 8. Saturday, June 21, 12.59 a. m. Three-story wooden 
tenement block, No. 7 Clark's avenue. Pearl street, owned by 
heirs of Joseph B. Clark. The fire originated in the tenement 
occupied by Mary C. Houlihan, in a storeroom, from some 
cause unexplained. It spread through the partition to the sec- 
ond and third stories and roof. Building insured for $2,000. 
Damage to buiding, $210.50. Insurance paid, $210.50. Damage 
to contents, $20. Uninsured. 

Box 511. Wednesday, June 25, 4. 14. p. m. Slight fire on the 
roof of Johnson's block, Douglas street, from sparks from chim- 
ney. Extinguished with hydrant stream of Steamer Company 
No. 2 before the arrival of the department from this side. Dam- 
age slight. 

Box 8. Thursday, July 3, 11.42 p. m. One-story cobbler's 
shop, No. 21 Dean street, owned and occupied by Gustavus D. 
Parker. The building and contents were totally destroyed. 
Damage, $100. No insurance. Cause, fire-crackers. 

Box 7. Friday, July 4, 10.05 p- ^^- Two-and-one-half- story 
wooden building, No. 11 27 Elm street, corner Washington, 
owned by Kennard Brothers & Chadwick. The fire originated 
in the store occupied by Thomas Kelley, and was caused by a 
fire-cracker thrown among the fire-works in Kelley's window. 
Insurance on building, $1,400. Damage to building, $65. In- 
surance paid, $65. Insurance on contents, $200. Damage to 
same, $200. Insurance paid, $100. 

Box 52. Saturday, July 5, 7.42 a. m. One-story flat-roof 
building, No. 38 South Main street, corner of School street, 
owned by George S. Eastman and occupied by Carl Koehler & 
Sons as a bakery. ' The fire resulted from an overheated chim- 
ney. Damage to building, $25. No insurance. Insurance on 
contents, $700. Damage to contents, $32. Insurance paid, $32. 

Still. Wednesday, July g, 5.48 p. m. Four-story brick block 
owned by Michael Lane, rear of No. 12 Birch street. A bed 
in the tenement occupied by Ann Turcotte caught fire from some 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 105 

unknown cause. No damage to building. Damage to contents, 
^5. No insurance. Extinguished with pails of water. 

Box 17. Monday, July 14, 10.55 a. m. Ash barrel in rear of 
509 Maple street caught fire, causing needless alarm. 

Box 15. Saturday, July 19, 7.10 a. i\r. Two-story wooden 
dwelling, No. 67 Orange street, owned by Henry Fiske and 
occupied by John Millet. Sparks from stove set fire to cra- 
dle near by, causing very slight damage to contents. 

Box 7. Two-story tenement house, No. 50 Bridge street 
owned by Jonas Paige and occupied by Cornelius Kearns. The 
fire originated in an attic occupied by the Kearns family, proba- 
bly from carelessness with matches. No damage to building. 
Damage to contents, ^3. Uninsured. 

Still. Tuesday, August 12, 5 p. m. Tenement house on Mast 
road owned by James Baldwin Co. Fire in bed ; cause unknown. 
Damage slight. Fire King Company No. 2 responded. 

Box 313. Wednesday, August 13, 8.10 p. m. Three-story 
wooden block, No. 14 Marion street. Lamp exploded in grocery 
store of J. MoUieur & Co. No damage. Services of depart- 
ment not needed. 

Box 4. Friday, August 22, 10.17 ^- m. Tenement in rear of 
No. 653 Elm street, owned by Alonzo Elliott and occupied by 
Frank Massant. Slight fire in bed with but little damage. Cause 
unknown. 

Box 313. Monday, August 25, 2.10 a. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement block owned by Robert Leggett. The fire orig- 
inated from some unknown cause in the photograph rooms 
occupied by Oliver Desmarais. Building insured for $3,800. 
Damage, $325. Insurance paid, $325. Contents insured for 
$500. Damage, $275. Insurance paid, $249.50. 

Box 21. Thursday, September 18, 7.33 p. m. The upsetting 
of a kerosene lamp in a tenement, rear of No. 189 Manchester 
street, caused an alarm. Fire extinguished before the arrival of 
the department without damage. 

Box 313. (Box 312 for second alarm.) Friday, October 17, 
12.02 A. M. Wooden French Catholic church of St. Marie So- 
ciety, next to 376 Beauport street. Fire originated from some 



106 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

unknown cause in the church and had gained considerable head- 
way before it was discovered. The structure with the exception 
of a small portion of the northwest wing was a total loss. The 
heat set fire to the parsonage on the north and the orphanage on 
the south. Church insured for ^4,000. Damage estimated at 
19,000. Insurance paid, ^4,oqo. Orphanage insured for 
$10,000. Damaged, $1,050. Insurance paid, $1,050. Parson- 
age insured for $3,700. Damaged $405. Insurance paid, $405. 
Charles W. Bailey, member of Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder 
Company No. i, was injured in the head by a falling slate, and 
was conveyed to his home in a hack. Recovered in a few days. 

Still. Saturday, October 18, 12.10 p.m. Load of straw 
in Elm west back street, rear of Whitten & Fifield's stable, be- 
longing to Mr. Bailey, of New Boston. Loss, $15. No in- 
surance. 

Box 15. Wednesday, November 5, 5.05 p. :\l Chimney fire 
in tenement block, No. 50 Pearl street. No damage. 

Box 313. Thursday, November 6, 5.15 p. m. A needless 
alarm was "rung in" from this box, caused by a light from a 
slight fire, in the Amoskeag dye-house, which was attended to by 
the employes of the yard and the assistance of the department 
was not needed. 

Still. Sunday, November 16, 12.37 p. m. Chimney fire on 
North Main street. Responded to by Fire King Company No. 
2. No damage. 

Still. Sunday, November 16, 3.20 p. m. In yard of water- 
works, south of Valley street, on the Concord & Portsmouth 
Railroad. Boys set fire to woodpile. Loss estimated at $15. 
No insurance. Responded to by Merrimack Company No. 3 
with hose carriage. 

Box 15. Tuesday, November 18, 5.13 p. m. Two-and-one- 
half-story house. No. 73 Orange street, owned by Mrs. Eliza 
Creighton and occupied by Mrs. Emma Freldst. " Rats and 
matches" caused a little disturbance which was early attended 
to. Building insured for $1,200. Damage to building, $3.50. 
Insurance paid, $3.50. 

Still. Wednesday, November 19, 8.30 p. m. Chimney fire 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 107 

in house of Dennis Lane, 412 Beauport street. No damage. 
Responded to by Fire King Company No. 2. 

Still. Sunday, November 23, 8.07 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Thorp's block, West street. No damage. Responded to by 
Fire King Company No. 2. 

Still. Wednesday, November 26, 3 p. m. Brush fire on 
North Weare Railroad, near head of Granite street. No dam- 
age. Responded to by Fire King Company No. 2, with hose 
carriage. 

Still. Tuesday, December 2, 6.46 p. m. Chimney fire at No. 
42 Bridge street. No damage. Chemical Company responded. 
Used " Pony " Extinguisher. 

Box 4. Friday, December 5, 3.05 a. m. Car shed of the 
Manchester Horse Railroad, on Depot street. Too hot fire in 
''drivers' lobby" caught clothes on fire. Building insured for 
^1,150. Damage, ^81.02. Insurance paid, $81.02. 

Box 4. 5.50 A. M. Rekindling of same fire. Extinguished 
by stream from Chemical Engine. 

Box 45. 10.05 ^- ^^- Four-story brick building on corner of 
Franklin and West Cedar streets, owned by the S. C. Forsaith 
Machine Co., and occupied by L. N. Westover & Co., Allan E. 
Eaton «& Co., and Thomas L. Thorp. The fire originated in the 
room occupied by the latter for wool-carding, and was caused by 
friction in the card rollers. Building insured for $3,600. Dam- 
age to building, $117.03. Insurance paid, $117.03. L. N. 
Westover & Co., insurance on stock, $1,000. Damage, $300. 
Insurance paid, $300. Allan E. Eaton's stock damaged $25. 
No insurance. Thomas L. Thorp's stock damaged $600. No 
insurance. 

Still. Monday, December 8, 6.30 a. m. Chimney fire in 
Patrick O'Dowd's house, 69 Dover street. No damage. Fire 
King Company No. 2 responded. 

Box 113. Friday, December 12, 6.12 p. m. House in pro- 
cess of construction at corner of Prospect and Russell streets, 
owned by Clarence M. Edgerly. Cause, defective chimney. 
Damage estimated, $6. No insurance. 

Still. Friday, December 12, 8.04 p. m. Chimney fire in 



108 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Johnson's block, corner Douglas and Barr streets. Responded 
to by Fire King Company No. 2 with " Pony " Extinguisher. 

Box 15. Saturday, December 13, 12.38 p. m. Two-and- 
half-story tenement building, No. 28 Pearl street, owned by heirs 
of Joseph B. Clark and occupied by Peter Martin. Fire in bed, 
from some cause unknown. No damage to building. Damage 
to contents, $2.50. No insurance. 

Still. Monday, December 15, 7.20 p. m. Four-story brick 
block, owned by Thomas Dunlap, corner of Elm and Amherst 
streets. Fire was discovered among some packing in the base- 
ment of jewelry store occupied by Charles A. Trefethen. Cause 
unknown. No damage to building. Stock insured for ^7,000. 
Damage, ^200. Insurance paid, $200. Chemical Engine re- 
sponded. 

Box 5. Tuesday, December 16, 12.24 a. i\l Two-and-half- 
story house. No. 40 Merrimack street, owned by John D. 
Murphy and occupied by him and Mrs. Bridget McCarty and 
Frank St. Lawrence. Building insured for $1,100. Damage to 
building, $180. Insurance paid, $180. Damage to contents, 
$75. No insurance. Roderick E. Wilson, a standing member 
of Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Company was rendered insensible 
for several hours by a falling brick from the chimney, and con- 
fined to his house for a few weeks in consequence. 

Still. Wednesday, December 17, 7.15 a. m. Four-story 
brick block, — Opera House Block. Fire in office of Northern 
Express, No. 36 Hanover street, caused by electric-light wires. 
Building insured for $75,000. Damage on building, $36.73. 
Insurance paid, $36.73. Contents uninjured. Chemical Engine 
responded. 

Box 15. Thursday, December 18, 5.53 P. M. Chimney fire in 
tenement block of George H. Dorr, in Elm east back street. No 
damage. Needless alarm. 

Still. Thursday, December 18, 6.17 p. m. Burning chimney 
in Smyth & Carpenter's block, 1 208-1 244 Elm street. No dam- 
age. Responded with " Pony " Extinguisher. 

Number of bell alarms . . . . • . . 35 

Number of still alarms ....... 30 

Total 65 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 109 

Aggregate losses for the year 1890 . . . . ^16,533.28 

Amount of insurance paid ..... 10,026.28 



Leaving a balance uncovered of . . . ^6,507.00 

Note. — In addition to the foregoing, word was received from Reed's 
Ferry, Wednesday, November 26, at 12.25 ^- ^i-> of a fire in the kit factory 
near the depot. I took the N. S. Bean Steamer No. 4 with horses, hose, 
and a delegation of men and went there by special train. The structure 
was in ruins on our arrival there, and after some delay in getting water we 
played upon the ruins as long as the water lasted, returning a few hours 
later. 



110 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, 
SECOND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 



Boxes. 



4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 

12. 

13. 

14 

15, 

16, 

17. 

18, 

21. 

23. 

24, 

25. 

26. 

27. 

31. 

32, 

34. 

35 

36. 

41, 

42, 

43 

45 

51 

52 

53 

54 

56 

61 

62 

71 

72 

73, 

81 

112 

113 

114 

212 

213 

312 

313 

314 

315 

321 

511 

513 



^ 






























Hose No. 2. 




« 


















iS 


(M 


m 


lO 






13 
























a 
o 


§d 


fes 


il 


o 

iz; 






a 
s 






" 2 




u 










fl 




01 u 


s 




m 










a fl 


S'S 


s 


a 


a 






g 


.M 






































OS 


CD 


£ 


OS 


£ 


a 


s 


cc 


w 




2 


3 


1 


3 




3 


3 






2 


2 


1 


3 




2 


2 









2 


1 


3 




2 


2 




1 


1 


3 


2 


2 




1 


2 




1 


1 


3 


2 






1 


1 






1 


3 


2 






1 


1 






3* 


8 


3 








2 






3 


3 


3 




1 




2 






2 


3 


3 








1 






2 


3 


3 








1 






1 


3 


2 








1 






2 


3 


1 


2 






1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


1 


3 






1 






2 


3 


] 


3 






1 






2 


3 


1 


3 






2 






2 


3 


1 


3 






2 


1 




2* 


3 


1 


3 






2 






2 


3 


1 


3 






1 






2 


3 


1 


3 






1 






2* 


3 


1 


3 






2 






2 


2 


2 


1 






2 


1 




2 


2 


3 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 


1 
1 

1 
2 

1 

2 






2 
1 
2 
2 

2 
2 


f^ 




2 




1 


3 




2 


2 


I 




1 




1 


3 




2 


2 






3 




2 


3 




3 


3 






3 




2 


3 




• 3 


3 






3 




2 


3 




3 


3 






3* 




3 


3 




3 


3 






3* 




2 


3 




3 


3 






2* 


3 


1 


3 




3 


3 






2* 


3 


1 


3 




3 


3 






2 


3 


1 


3 




2 


2 






2 


3 


1 


3 




1 


2 






2 


3 


1 


3 




2 


2 






1 


3 


2 


2 




1 


2 






2 


3 


3 


1 




1 


1 






2 


3 


3 


1 




1 


1 






2 


3 


3 


1 




1 


1 






3* 


3 


1 


3 




2 


2 






2* 


3 


1 


3 




3 


3 






2 


1 


3 


2 




o 


2 






2 


1 


3 


2 




2 


2 






2* 


' 3 


3 


1 




2 


2 






3* 


3 


3 


1 




3 


3 






2 


1 


3 


2 




2 


2 






2 


1 


3 


3 




3 


3 




2 


3* 


1 


3 


3 




3 


3 





* On.'flrst alarm, the horses of second-run engine will double on engine of first run. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. Ill 

NUMBER AND LOCATION OF ALARM-BOXES AND 

KEYS. 

No. 3. — Blood's lower shop. Keys at ofifices of E. P. John- 
son Co., Gas-works, County Jail, Marshall & Underhill, and 
Charles H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. — Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel 
Belmont, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, Horse 
Railroad stables, and W. C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. — Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at 
Tebbetts Brothers' and Currier's drug stores, and Manchester 
House. 

No. 6. — City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Mead's drug 
stores, and J. A. Riddle's office. 

No. 7. — Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east back 
streets. Keys at Higgins Bros.', Brewer Bros.' stable, and Eames 
Bros.' drug store. 

No. 8. — Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Smith & 
Co.'s and Colby's drug stores, and Partridge Bros.' grain store. 

No. 9. — Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, J. B. Jones, 
and General Stark engine-house. 

No. 12. — Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of William C. Clarke, George Emerson, and Walter A. 
Green. 

No. 13. — Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at 
residences of Welcome Jencks and Lewis Simons, and No. i Sen- 
ter's block. 

No. 14. — Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of W. Ireland, Mrs. N. L. Hardy, and D. J. Adams. 

No. 15. — Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Willie H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 

No. 16. — Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. — Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at 
residences of Mrs. H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 



112 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 1 8. — Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at 
residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and William 
Perkins. 

No. 21. — Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at 
A. D. Smith's drug store, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. 
Walker's office, and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. — Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. — Merrimack Steamer house, corner of Massabesic 
street and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. Goodwin 
and Steamer houee. 

No. 25. — Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at 
residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, Horace Stearns, 
and the late Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. — Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at 
McCrillis's carriage-shop, Geo. W. Bailey's stable, and residence 
of John N. Chase. 

No. 27. — Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at 
residences of H. M. Tarbell, A. G. Fairbanks, William B. Orrill,. 
E. S. Fletcher, William Carr, and George H. Hubbard. 

No. 31. — Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's shop. 
Keys at office and Amory Mills watch-room. 

No. 32. — Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Co.'s mill, Langdon watch- 
room, and Electric Light Station. 

No. 34. — Jefferson Mill. Keys at watch-room and pumping 

— Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

— Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

— Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

— Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

— Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watch-room. 

— The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at freight 
depot, S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office, and the Lowell iron foundry 
office. 

No. 51. — Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at 
stores of F. Riedel and William Weber. 



ition. 


No. 


35- 


No. 


36. 


No. 


41. 


No. 


42. 


No. 


43- 


No. 


45- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 113 

No. 52. — Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd & Co.'s 
and A. N. Clapp's stores and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. — Wallace's steam-mill. Keys at the office and I. R. 
Dewey's tenement block. 

No. 54. — Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Lord sisters and Neil Fullerton. 

No. 56. — Mast road, near Riddle street. Keys at Baldwin's 
bobbin shop, and residences of J. C. Smith and E. P. Littlefield. 

No. 61. — Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, Carney, Lynch & Co.'s 
brewery, and residence of H. F. Dillingham. 

No. 62. — Kimball & Gerrish's tannery, River road. Keys at 
tannery, and residence of Edwin Kennedy. 

No. 71. — Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at residences 
of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, and Thomas J- Smith. 

No. 72. — Corner of Park and Lincoln streets. Keys at res- 
idences of Austin Jenkins, C. H. Leach, and Clarence D. Palmer. 

No. 73. — Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Edward Prindable. 

No. 81. — Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the 
engine-rooms. 

No. 112. — Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Woodbury Davison and W. T. Stevens. 

No. 113. — Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at 
residences of William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. 
Topi iff. 

No. 114. — Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. P. 01zendam,G. A. Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, and 
John J. Bennett. 

No. 212. — Shoe-shop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of shoe 
factory, and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, 
Mrs. Milton A. Abbott, and M. V. B. Garland. 

No. 213. — Sash and blind factory, South Beech street, junc- 
tion of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at office of Austin, Flint & 
Day. 

No. 312. — Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. 



114 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Keys at residences of James Spence (391 Main street), Thomas 
Bolton, and Amoskeag Co.'s gate. 

No. 313. — Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys at 
residences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Bouthillier 
& Gingras's drug store, and Amoskeag Co.'s gate. 

No. 314. — P. C. Cheney Company's paper-mill. Keys at 
office and Independent hose-house. 

No. 315. — Old Brick Store, 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders' store. 
Independent hose-house, and Robinson's residence. 

No. 32.1. — To be located near corner Beauport and Wayne 
streets. 

No. 511. — Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at 
residences of Henry Harmon, Amelia Davis, and Charlotte T. 
Snow. 

No. 513. — To be located near corner Milford and Carroll 
streets. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given at 
precisely 12.30 P. M., from Charles A. Trefethen's jewelry store, 
and will be denoted by one strike of the fire bells. 



TELEPHONE CALLS. 

Central station, Chemical Engine 
Chief Engineer Lane's residence . 
Assistant Engineer Whitney's residence 

" " Merrill's residence 

" '' Merrill's store 

Fire King Steamer No. 2 
Merrimack Steamer No. 3 
General Stark Steamer No. 5 
Massabesic Hose No. 2 



64-3 
64-4 

34-4 
71-3 
55-4 
59-3 
56-3 
64-6 
1 1 6-4 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS AND CITIZENS. 

I. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately 
communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the keys to which are in 
the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the 
vcorner or nearest houses. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 115 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive infor- 
mation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once as 
far as it will go (without jerking) and then let go. Shut the 
door, but do not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a 
trap-lock, and can only be removed with a release-key, which is 
carried by each of the engineers, who will, as soon as convenient, 
release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by 
the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull 
again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box, 
procure another key, and give an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the 
box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no cause 
other than actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chimney fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called 
for by the Chief Engineer. If you change your residence or place 
of business, where the keys are kept, return the keys to the same 
officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform 
themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their property, also 
all places where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is promptly 
and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in the city, 
and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 6, six blows, 
2\ seconds apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, 
pause of 6^ seconds, one blow, same pause, and two blows, 
2 — I — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the 
bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, each test 
will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, close the 
primary schools ; and to close all the schools, two immediate 
strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds two more immediate 
strokes, — the time of striking the bells being at 7.45 a. m. for 
closing the schools during the forenoon, and at 11.30 a. m. or 
1. 1 5 p. M. for closing them during the afternoon. 



116 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS IN REGARD TO RE- 
SPONDING TO FIRES AND ALARMS. 

The following order has been adopted by the Board of En- 
gineers, and the Fire Department will strictly comply until other- 
wise ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as follows : 

1. Pennacook Hose Co. No. i, Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. i, 
and Chemical Engine Co. No. i will report for duty to all boxes 
QXi first alarm. 

2. Amoskeag Steamer Co. No. i will report for duty, on days 
of its first run, on first alarm to all boxes except 9, 12, 51, 54, 56, 
315, 513 ; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. Ox\ first alarm., to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 35, 
36, 41, 42, 45, 81 ; on second alaj'm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 13, 14, 

16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 62, 71, 7?, 73, 

112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314, 321, 511 ; on third alarm, to 
all other boxes. 

3. Fire King Steamer Co. No. 2 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 34, 35, 36, 41, 42,43- 45- S^' 52, .53' 54,56,312, 
313, 321, 511, 513; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 5, 31, 32 ; on 
third alarm, to all other boxes. 

4. Merrimack Steamer Co. No. 3 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes ;^, 4, 5, t6, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24,25, 26,27, 4i, 42, 
43, 45, 61,62, 71, 72, 73, 212, 213; on second alarm, to boxes 
6, 7, 8, 15, 31, 34, 35' 36, SI' 52, 53' 56, 81 ; on third alarm, 
to all other boxes. 

5. N. S. Bean Steamer Co. No. 4 will report for duty, on days 
of its first run, on first alann to all boxes except 9, 12, 51, 54, 
56, 315 ; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 35, 36, 
41, 42, 45, 81 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 13, 14, 16, 

17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61,62, 71, 72, 73, 112, 

113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314, 321, 511 ; on third alarm, to all 
other boxes. 

6. Gen. Stark Steamer Co. No. 5 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 31, 32, 34, 35, 41, 112, 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 117 

113, 114, 314, 315 ; on second alarm, to boxes 6, 16, T^d^ 42, 81, 
312, 313, 321 ; on third alarm, to all other boxes. 

7. Massabesic Hose Company No. 2 will report for duty, on 
days of its first run, ox\ first alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 
17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 72, 81, 
112, 113, 114; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 5, 9, 12, 43, 45, 71, 
73, 212, 312, 313, 314, 321 ; on third alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm^ to boxes 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 
17, 18, 25, 26, 34, 112, 113, 114; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 
5, 6, 9, 12, 21, 23, 24, 27, 31, 32, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 71, 72, 
73, 81, 212, 312, 313, 314, 321; on tliird alarm, to all other 
boxes. 

8. On the first alarm from boxes 9, 24, 27, 54, 56, 61, 62, 212, 
213, 314, 315, 513, the horses of the second run will double on 
to the engine of its first run, and on the arrival at the fire 

THE second-run HORSES WILL RETURN TO THEIR HOUSE, and in 

case of an alarm from any box the company will immediately re- 
spond with their engine. 

9. During the progress of a fire, any of the apparatus not called 
on that alarm will promptly respond to an alarm from any other 
box. 

10. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, 
hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will have the 
right to lead to the fire. No running by will be allowed, ex- 
cept IN CASE OF accident, UNDER PENALTY OF DISMISSAL OF THE 
DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

11. The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with 
the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy 
weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit any one to ride 
upon their apparatus when returning from fires. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the first 
alarm will prepare for a start and hold themselves in readiness for 
a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, one stroke on the 
bells and gongs by the engineer in charge will be the signal for 
discharge to all companies remaining at the houses ; or in case 
this one blow is not struck within thirty minutes, companies may 
consider themselves dismissed ; except the drivers, who will remain 



118 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



in the houses with their horses until the two blows to limber up. 
13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those at a fire 
to limber up. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. i. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I extra first-size Amoskeag steamer 
I one-horse hose-wagon 
I pair gray horses for steamer . 
I black horse for hose-wagon . 
3 swinging harnesses 
I pair double harnesses (for_ street work) 
I single harness (for street work) 
2,000 feet fabric hose 

100 feet three-inch leather hose 
I double cart . 
I single cart 
I sled .... 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$4,000.00 
450.00 
800.00 

375-00 

150.00 

60.00 

50.00 

1,200.00 

50.00 

T 00.00 
100.00 
40.00 
60.00 
200.00 
200.00 

$7,835.00 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

LOCATED ON NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 

I second-size Amoskeag steamer . . . $4,000.00 

I combination hose-wagon .... 650.00 

I pair bay horses for steamer .... 800.00 

1 pair gray horses for combination . . . 600.00 
3 street harnesses, two at 540, i at $20 . . 100.00 

2 pairs harnesses ...... 200.00 

I four-wheeled hose-carriage .... 600.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



119 



I 


single cart 


. 


-Iioo.oo 


I 


two-horse cart 


. 


75.00 


I 


double sled . 




75.00 


I 


single sled 




50.00 


2,000 


feet fabric hose 




1,500.00 




Stable fixtures and blankets . 


60.00 




Furniture, fixtures, 


carpets, etc. 


466.00 




Firemen's suits and badges . 
Total amount .... 


150.00 




. $0,426.00 



MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4- 



LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 



I second-size Amoskeag steamer 
I pair black horses .... 
I single horse ..... 
3 street harnesses, two at $50, one at $40 
3 swinging harnesses 
I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 
I double cart ..... 
I single cart ..... 
I single sled ..... 
2,000 feet fabric hose .... 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc 

Total amount ..... 



$3,500.00 

600.00 

250.00 

140.00 

150.00 

600.00 

162.50 

40.00 

40.00 

1,200.00 

50.00 

575-00 

$7,307-50 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I second-size Amoskeag steamer 

I hose-wagon ..... 

I pair bay horses for steamer . 

I horse for hose-wagon 

I pair street harnesses 



1,500.00 

400.00 

600.00 

200.00 

50.00 



120 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



I pair swinging harnesses for steamer 
I single swinging harness for hose-wagon 
550 feet fabric hose 
900 feet Baker fabric hose . 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc. 
Stable fixtures and blankets . 
Firemen's suits and badges . 

Total amount 



^100.00 
50.00 
330.00 
360.00 
275.00 
75.00 
150.00 

$6,090.00 



GENERAL STARK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 

LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT. 



I third-size Amoskeag steamer 

I combination hose reel and ladder 

I pair bay horses 

1 pair gray horses 

2 double carts . 
2 double sleds . 
2 pairs swinging harnesses 
2 pairs street harnesses 

2,000 feet fabric hose 

Furniture, fixtures, tools, etc. 
Stable fixtures and blankets . 
Firemen's suits, badges, etc. 

Total amount 



$3,600.00 

1,000.00 

600.00 

400.00 

225.00 

150.00 

200.00 

iSo.oo 

1,200.00 

175.00 

80.00 

150.00 

$7,960.00 



E. W. HARRINGTON STEAM FIRE-ENGINE. 

LOCATED AT OLD ENGINE-HOUSE, CLINTON STREET. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine 

PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. i. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 

2 horses ........ 

2 single harnesses . . . • . 



$500.00 



$600.00 
600.00 

70.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



121 



I single cart 

I single sled 

I hose sled 

1,650 feet fabric hose 

3,000 feet leather hose 

Furniture and fixtures 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$50.00 
40.00 
20.00 

990.00 
i,Soo.oo 

200.00 
50.00 

175.00 

54,595-00 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 



LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

I tour-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 

I bay horse 

I street harness 

I swinging harness 

I single cart 

I single sled 
2,000 feet fabric hose 
2,000 feet leather hose 

Furniture and fixtures 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$ 


600.00 




350.00 




40.00 




50.00 




60.00 




40.00 


I 


,200.00 


I 


,200.00 




100.00 




175.00 



5,815.00 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. i. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



I hook-and-ladder truck . 


. $1,700.00 


I reserve truck .... 


300.00 


I pair bay horses .... 


600.00 


I pair exercise harnesses . 


30.00 


I pair swinging harnesses . 


100.00 


2 extra Bangor extension ladders 


360.00 


6 rubber blanket covers 


144.00 



122 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 



Furniture and fixtures . 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. i. 

LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I double tank (60 gallons each) engine 

I pair black horses . 

I pair exercise harnesses . 

I pair swinging harnesses 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 

SUPPLY WAGON. 

I supply wagon with boxes and engineer's lanterns 
6 rubber blanket covers ..... 

Total amount ..... 

SPARE HOSE. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

500 feet leather hose ..... 

600 feet fabric hose ...... 

Total amount ..... 



$200.00 

50.00 

280.00 

$3,764.00 



;2, 250.00 
750.00 
50.00 
100.00 
75.00 
50.00 
35-00 

^3,310.00 



$312.00 
144.00 



$456.00 



$500.00 
360.00 

$860.00 



EXERCISE WAGON. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

I four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole and shafts 

and coal boxes $350.00 

I second-hand hand wagon ..... 30.00 



Total amount 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



123 



ENGINEERS' DEPARTMENT. 



5 fire hats . . . . 

5 engineers' white rubber coats 
Furniture and fixtures 

Total amount 



$io.oo 

37-5° 
175.00 

^222.50 



INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 



LOCATED AT CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 



1 four-wheeled hand hose-carriage 
600 feet leather hose 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc. 
Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 



^400.00 

360.00 

40.00 

10.00 



GOFFE'S FALLS HOSE-CARRIAGE. 



LOCATED AT DERRY MILLS. 

1 two-wheeled hose-carriage 

300 feet fabric hose ..... 

2 hose-pipes ...... 

Total amount ..... 
SLEEPING-HALL. 

AT CENTRAL ST.\TION, VINE STREET. 

7 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

At cost (including additions previous to 1S85) 
Remodeling in 1885 
Additions in 1886 . 

" in 1887 . 

" in 1888 . 
in i88g . 



^50.00 

200.00 

10.00 

^260.00 



5275.00 



521,625.00 
6,000.00 

775.00 
375-00 
575-00 
430.00 



124 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Additions in 1890 . 

" Individual Tapper " system . 

Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc. 



Total 



RECAPITULATION. 



Amoskeag Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. i 
Fire King Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 2 
Merrimack Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 3 
N. S. Bean Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 4 
Gen. Stark Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 5 
E. W. Harrington Steamer (old) 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. i 
Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 
Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co. No, 
Chemical Engine Co. No. i 
Supply Wagon 

Spare Hose .... 
Exercise Wagon 
Engineers' Department 
Independent Hose Co. No. 5 . 
Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage 
Sleeping Hall (Central Station) 
Fire-Alarm Telegraph 

Total .... 



$300.00 

3,000.00 

150.00 

$33)230-00 



^7)835-oo 
9,426.00 

7)3o7-5o 

6,090.00 

7,960.00 

500.00 

4,595-oo 

3,815.00 

3,764.00 

3,310.00 

456.00 

860.00 

380.00 

222.50 

810.00 

260.00 

275.00 

33,230.00 

$91,096.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



125 



NAMES AND RESIDENCES OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane 

Fred S Bean 


Chief 




1937 Elm street 


3 


Asst. and clerk 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Assistant 


Machinist 

Carpenter 

Supt.Electric L't 
Grain dealer 


IC Orange St 


2 
4 
5 


Ruel G. Manning 

Eiigene S. Whitney. . . 
Clarence R. Merrill *. . 


52 Douglas St. 
River road, N. 
414 Merrimack. 



* Elected to fill vacancj' caused by resignation of Clarence D. Palmer, 
July 1, 1890. 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House No. 28 Vine Street. 



1° 

PQ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charles F. McCoy 


Foreman 


Machinist 


5M. S.B. 


8 


Frank E. Stearns 


Asst. foreman.. 


Paper-hanger 


389 Lake Ave. 


18 


Henry C. Parsons — 


Clerk 


Auctioneer 


28 Vine street. 


6 


Charles F.Hall 


Engineer 


Machinist 


146 Orange St. 


13 


Joseph H. Gould 


Asst. engineer. 





1087 Elm street. 


11 


Charles H. Rogers — 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


28 Vine street. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker.... 


Driver of hose. 


. " 


28 Vine street. 


16 


Frank B. Marston . . 


Hosenian 


Carpenter 


11 M. S B. 


19 


Henry A. Boone 





Machinist 


546ChestiuitSt. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 





Carpenter 


44 Middle St. 


IS 


James L. Brock 


u 


Tinsmith 


21 Market St. 


10 


Lewis G. Bryant 





Teamster 


12 M. S. B. 


K 


Edgar A. Young 

Frank H. Harvey 


,1 


Clerk 




9 





Teamster 


546 Chestnut St. 



126 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on North Main Street, ' Squog. 



* . 

pa 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


67 


David G.Mills 


Foreman 


Contractor 


607 Granite Ex. 


71 


Charles G. Ranuo — 


Asst. foreman . 


Harness-maker. . 


63 Parker St. 


68 




Clerk IVraphinist 


624 N. Main St. 


120 


Thomas F. Dodge .... 


Engineer 


Engineer 


Engine house. 


119 


Stephen Thomes 


Asst. engineer Carpenter 


55 Douglas St. 


76 


Jeremiah Lane 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


Engine house. 


69 


Arthur W. Whitcomb 


Driver of hose- 





Engine house. 


72 


Samuel A. Hill 


Hoseman 


Janitor 


86 School St. 




Robert J. Hill 





Carpenter 


86 School St. 


77 


Daniel B. Emery 





Machinist 


Williams St. 


73 


Charles S. Cousins 





Harness-maker. . 


f3 Douglas St. 


74 


Thomas C. Foote 





Wool-sorter 


56 N. Main St. 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 





Wool-waste-s'rt'r 


34 Douglas St. 


70 


Charles Tewksbury .. 





Freight-]] andler . 


86 School St. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



127 



MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 
House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


84 


Charles H. Colburn... 


Foreman 


Carpenter 


294 Laurel St. 


86 


Frank F. Porter 


Asst. foreman.. 


Manufacturer.... 


330 Spruce St. 


S'i 


Will P. Emerson 


Clerk 


Carpenter 

Engineer 


294 Laurel St. 
196 Laurel St. 


121 


George B. Forsaith. . . 


Engineer 


122 


Edwin E. Weeks 


Asst. engineer. 


Machinist... 


284 Spruce St. 


87 


George H. Wheeler. .. 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


419 Lake Ave. 


81 


William S. McLeod... 


Driver of hose. 





347 Spruce St. 


78 


George Dunnington. 
Louis N. Dufrain 




Clerk 


422 Merrimack. 
373 Hall street. 
253 Lake Ave. 
404 Merrimack. 
428 Central St. 


79 






SO 


Ernest L. George 




Clerk 


89, 


John S. Avery 






83 


Ernest E. Hubbell 




Yeast agent 


88 


Fred S. Sloan 






58 Massabesic. 
422 Merrimack. 


89 


Parker K. Brown 




Clerk 



128 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 



pa 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


26 


Lorenzo J. Chandler. . 


Foreman 


Clerk 


123 Orange St. 


27 
20 
24 




Asst. foreman.. 
Clerk 


Machinist 

Pharmacist 


90 Blodget St. 


Lucius B. Snelling.. .. 
Albert Merrill 


37 Water street. 


Engineer 


Electrician 


River road, N. 


21 


Edgar G. Abbott 


Asst. engineer. 


Machinist 


12 Linden St. 


31 


Frank J. Dustin 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


20 Vine street. 


29 


Alphonso E. Foster.. . 


Driver of hose. 





20 Vine street. 


28 


William H. Dodge — 


Hoseman 


R. K. fireman — 


530 Chestnut St. 


33 


Henry C. Morrill 


,, 


Machinist 


112 Pearl St. 


23 


George A.Cann 





Watchman 


27 Middle St. 


32 


Benj. R. Richardson.. 





Machinist 


12 Mechanic St. 


30 


Ellsworth V. Rowe. . . 





Section-hand 


1261 Elm street. 


22 


Walter A. Clarkson.. . 





Carpenter 


98 Sagamore St. 


25 


Frank B. Stevens 





Clerk 


301 Amherst St. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



129 



GENERAL STARK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 
House on Webster Street. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



Charles W. Brown — 

Geo. R. Simmons 

Woodbury Davison. . . 

Daniel W. Morse 

Arthur W. Bond...... 

Emil H. Smith 

Martin W. Ford 

Arthur A. Smith 

Russell L. Cilley 

Edward H. Clough.... 

John J. Kelley 

Mile B. Wilson 

Lnville O. Blanchai'd 
Alvin McLane 



Foreman 

Asst. foreman . 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Asst. engineer. 
Driver steam'r 
Driver hose . . . 
Hoseman 



Clerk 

Machinist. 
Carpenter 
Engineer . . 



Teamster. 



Blacksmith. 
Clerk 



Machinist... 

Mason 

Blacksmith . 
Carpenter . . 



16 Hazel St. 
82 Pennacook. 
78.5 Union St. 
1419 Elm St. 
630 Pine street. 
44 AVebster St. 

44 Webster St. 
W. Appleton. 
1449 Elm St. 

41 Ajipleton St. 
River road N. 

45 Blodget St. 
817 Union St. 
661 Chestnut St. 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House No. 26 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


34 


Albert Maxfleld 


Foreman 


Belt-maker 


23 M. S. B. 


36 


Joseph E. Merrill 

Frank D. Burleigh. . . . 






21 Ash street. 


50 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


6 M. S. B. 


37 


Walter L. Blenus 


Driver 


Teamster 


26 Vine street. 


38 


George H. Porter 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


■ 279 Laurel St. 


48 


Albert A. Puffer 





R. R. emploj'e.... 


499 Beech St. 


.52 


Charles B. French — 





Carpenter 


ISM. S. B. 


.53 


John E. Sanborn 








274 Laurel St. 


35 


Samuel W. Patten — 





Belt-maker 


3 M. S. B. 


45 


George I. Ayer 





Electrician 


28 M. S. B. 


51 


Edwin W Merrill 


,1 


Clerk 


21 Ash street. 


39 




" 


Mechanic 


7 M. S. B. 









130 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House No. 8 Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


116 


George N. Burpee — 


Foreman 


Electrician 


19 Ash street. 


115 


Jesse W Ti'nell. 


Clerk 






117 
118 








8 Vine street. 


Frank A. Pherson .... 


Engineer 


Engineer 


8 Vine street. 


44 Henry S. Reed 


Fireman 


Teamster 


273 Chestnut St. 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on Maple Street, corner East High. 



P3 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 


John F. Seaward 


Foreman 


Carpenter 


27 Warren St. 


55 


Revilo G. Houghton.. 


A>3St. foreman . 


Gas-fitter 


288 Bridge St. 


58 


Henry G. Seaman 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


14 South street 


57 




521 Maple St. 
"64 Lowell St 


56 


George \V. Huntley... 
Jos. W. Batchelder.... 






59 




Carpenter 


521 Maple St. 


64 


Albert E. Batchelder. 








467 Maple St. 


65 


Fred S Lewis 


,1 






62 


Julien B. Huntley 

Frank E.Heald 


„ 




36 Dutton St 


63 





Book-keeper 


289 Concord St. 


60 


Charles W. Powell . . . 





Carpenter 


540 Maple St. 


61 


Addison Seaward 


" 


" 


296 Orange St. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



131 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDEK COMPANY NO. 1. 

House No. 18 Vine Street. 



¥ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


91 


Jerome J. Loverin g. . . 


Foreman 


Carpenter 


300 Pine street. 


111 
90 
94 
92 






Machinist 


36 Water St. 


Henry Jolinson 

Charles M. Denyou ... 
Oscar P. Stone 


Clerk. 


Piper 


20 M. S. B. 




Teamster 


18 Vine street. 


Fireman 


Clerk 


696 Elm street. 


96 

98 

114 

100 




100 Blodget St. 
268 Bridge St. 




John Wilson \ " rnrnpntpv 


19 Warren St. 


Hiram p. Young " 


Taxidermist 


33 Dulton St. 


103 


Luther J. Flint " 


Carpenter 


4 Button St. 


104 


Harrison H. Cole 







45 M. S. B. 


109 


George M. Jones 




Gardener 


558 Chestnut St. 


110 


Pharis E. Rogers 




Mason — 


118 Pearl St. 


97 


Charles W . Bailey — 


" Carriage-maker.. 


265 Concord St. 


107 
93 








4 Whitney St. 


Edward E. White 




Teamsler 


107 Manchest'r. 


113 


Charles H. Laxon 


" Carpenter 


9 Myrtle street. 


106 




16 M. S. B. 


105 


John T. Gott ... 


" ' Teamster 


301 E. Spruce. 


112 


Henry C. Crosby 




10 South street. 


93 


Charles Gile 


" ! ( larnenter 


56 Stark Corp. 













132 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 

House corner of Front Street and Old Falls Road, Amoskeag. 





Name. 


Bank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


133 


Charles E. Stearns . . . . 


Foreman 


Milk-dealer 


Front street. 


134 


Thomas Hamilton . . . 


Asst. foreman . 


Handle-maker. 


Goffstown R'd. 


135 


George B. Glidclen 


Clerk 


Milk-dealer 


Dunbart'n R'd. 


136 


George Lawrence — 


Steward 




Front street. 


137 


Sherman L. FJanders. 


Hoseman 


Grocer 


» u 


138 


Andrew J. Moynihan. 






l( t( 


139 


., 




.. 


140 


Clarence H.Stearns.. 


„ 


Clerk 


<l X 


141 


William F. Stearns.... 


" 


Leather-cutter .. 


.. 


142 


Alfred D. Maxwell.... 





Ice-dealer 


Goffstown R'd. 


143 


Elbridge G. Keed 


K 


Driver 


223 Lowell St. 


1't'l 


Benjamin Herbert. . . . 


,, 















LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 



Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 133 

Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Ash, front of No. 32. 

Auburn, corner of Franklin street. 

Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Auburn, front of No. 40. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Adams street. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Baker, corner of Elm street. 

Baker, corner of River road. 

Baker, corner of Calef road. 

Baker, corner of Nutt road. 

Bay, corner of Salmon street. 

Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 

Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 

Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 

Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 

Beech, front of No. 584. 

Belmont, near No. 345. 

Belmont, corner of Young street. 

Belmont, near Coffin residence. 

Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 

Blodget, front of primary school house. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, front of No. 26, 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 



134 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Bridge, corner of Ashland street. 
Bridge, corner of Hall street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 
Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near office door M. L. W. 
Cedar, corner of Elm street. 
Cedar, front of No. ;^6. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, front of No. 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Central, corner of Cass street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Chestnut, opposite High street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 135 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 

Clarke, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Clarke, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Concord, corner Elm street. 

Concord, opposite Vine street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Cypress, south end of street. 

Cypress, at Manchester shoe-shop. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Elm, front Temple & Farrington Co.'s bookstore. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Gore, corner of Beech street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, near Franklin street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 

Hancock street. 

Hancock, near shoe-shop. 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near brewery. 

Hanover, corner of Elm street. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 



136 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Lincohi street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Harrison, opposite No. 15. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Harrison, northwest corner of Russell street. 
High, corner of Ashland street. 
High, corner of South street. 
High, fifty feet east of Wilson road. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Jevvett, corner of Massabesic street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Lake avenue, near No. 36. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Union street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Lake avenue, corner of Cass street. 
Lake avenue, east end near Hastings residence. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. ' 137 

Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Laurel, near No. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Laurel, near Belmont street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Milton street. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 

Lowell, front of No. 276. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Mammoth road. 

Manchester, corner of Elm street. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Central street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of W^ilson street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Maple, front of No. 350. 

Market, near Canal street. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of Old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mechanic, northeast corner of Canal street. 



138 ■ ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mechanic, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanic, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street, 

]\Ierrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 

]\Ierrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Merrimack, near No 362. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Merrimack, near Belmont street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beacon street. 

Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Middle, near No. 67 x\moskeag corporation. 

Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Myrtle, opposite No. ;^^. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 

North, northwest corner of Bay ctreet. 

North, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

North, northwest corner of Pine street. 

North, corner of Liberty street. 

Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 

Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Orange, corner of Ash street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 139 

Orange, corner of Maple street. 
Orange, corner of Oak street. 
Orange, corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 
Pearl, northwest*corner of Pine street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pearl, corner of Beech street. 
Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Pine, near Road House. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lake avenue. 
Pine, northwest corner of Hanover street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Pine, northwest corner of High street. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 



140 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Prospect, corner of Linden street. 
Reservoir, on force main. 
River road (north), north of Webster street. 
River road (north), near Mrs. John Kelly's. 
River road (north), near J. Otis Clark's. 
River road (south), near gate of tannery. 
Sagamore, corner of Union street. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 
Shasta, corner of River road. 
Shasta, corner of Beech street. 
Silver, corner of Union street. 
Silver, corner of Beech street. 
Somerville, corner of Union street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spring, corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. . 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Spruce, near T. J. Perry's house. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near No. 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite No. 57 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13 Manchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 141 

Taylor, corner Young road. 
Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Union, northwest corner of High street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Willow street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Taylor street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Cypress street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Jewett street. 
Valley, 150 feet east of J. L. Woodman's. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Water, near No. ^8 Amoskeag corporation. 
Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Webster, corner of Adams street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 
West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Central, corner of Franklin street. 
West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Merrimack, near iii Amoskeag corporation. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Webster, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Webster, northeast corner of River road. 



142 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Wilson, corner of Lake avenue. 

Young, corner of Elm street. 

Young, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Young, corner of Maple street. 

Young, 96 feet east of R. N. Batchelder's. 

Young, corner of Jevvett street. 

Young road. 

PISCATAQUOG AND MCGREGORVILLE. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
A, near No. 73. 

A, northwest corner of B street. 
Adams, corner of Main street. 
Adams, corner of Beauport street. 
Amory, corner of Beauport street. 
Amory, near Dubuque street. 
Amory, corner of Rimmon street. 
Bath, corner of River street. 
Bath, corner of Shirley street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Bennington, corner of Main street. 
Blaine, corner of Wayne street. 
Blaine, corner of Cleveland street. 
Blaine, east end of street. 
Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 
C street, corner of Bedford road. 
Cartier, corner of Sullivan street. 
Cartier, corner of Putnam street. 
Carroll street. 

Clinton, corner of Dover street. 
Clinton, corner of South Main street. 
Conant, corner of Cartier street. 
Conant, corner of Dubuque street. 
Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 
Douglas, corner of Green street. 
Douglas, corner of Barr street. 
Douglas, corner of West street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 143 

Douglas, corner of Main street. 

Douglas, east of Main street. 

Ferry, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Quincy street. 

Granite, corner of Green street. 

Granite, corner of Barr street. 

Granite, corner of West street. 

Granite, corner of Dover street. 

Granite, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Shirley street. 

Granite, corner of River street. 

Kelly, corner of Beauport street. 

Kelly, corner of Cartier street. 

Kelly, corner of Dubuque street. 

Main, near Milford street. 

Marion, corner of McGregor street. 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, 400 feet west of Charles Hoitt's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's. 

Mast, near the J. N. Prescott house. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite " Reed " house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main street. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of Old Bedford road. 

Patten, corner of Ferry street. 

Putnam, corner of Main street. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 

Putnam, corner of Dubuque street. 

Riddle, near Mast street. 

School, corner of South Main street. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 

School, corner of River street. 

Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 



144 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry street. 
Sullivan, corner of Main street. 
Sullivan, corner of Beauport street. 
Temple, corner of Main street. 
Walker, corner of River street. 
Walker, corner of Patten street. 
Walker, corner of Parker street. 
Walker, near corner of South Main street. 
Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 
Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 
Wayne, near corner of Main street. 
Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Dunbarton road, corner of Front street. 

Dunbarton road, near L. D. Colby's. 

Goffstown road,/cwr hydrants. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 

Main, near brick schoolhouse. 

Main, corner of Goffstowm road. 

Main, opposite the John E. Stearns house. 

Main, near the Hiram Stearns house. 

Mill, near paper-mill. 

Mill, corner of Main street. 

Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are five private hydrants that 
are available in case of need : 

Two at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill 
One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at the A. H. Lowell iron foundry. 
Total number, 458. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester- : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith respectfully present 
their thirty-seventh annual report of the affairs of the library, and 
with the same the report made to them by the treasurer of the 
board, containing a statement of the amounts received and the 
expenditures made by him in behalf of the board from the funds 
in their possession and under their control, and also the report of 
the librarian giving in detail the statistics of the operation of the 
library during the year, and the condition of the property in her 
charge at the close of the year. 

The treasurer's report shows that during the year the sum of 
fifteen hundred and twelve dollars and eighty-nine cents has been 
expended for the purchase of books, and the sum of one hundred 
and seventy dollars and eighty-one cents for the purchase of 
periodicals, making a total expenditure for both these purposes 
of sixteen hundred and eighty-three dollars and seventy cents. 
Of the amount expended for the purchase of books, the sum of 
one hundred and forty-five dollars and ten cents was taken from 
the income of the Dean Fund, and used for the purchase of 
additional books for that department of the library, and the sum 
of three hundred and sixty-six dollars and eleven cents was 
expended in the purchase of books to replace those worn out and 
withdrawn from circulation. Excluding those two amounts, the 
sum expended for the purchase of books is one thousand and one 



148 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

dollars and sixty-eight cents. The balance in the hands of the 
treasurer, at the close of the year, of the amounts appropriated by 
the City Councils for the purchase of books, was four hundred 
and eighty-three dollars and four cents. 

The balance of the accumulated income of the Dean Fund at 
the end of the year was five thousand nine hundred and fifty- 
seven dollars and ten cents. In expending the income of this 
fund the trustees have followed the plan originally adopted, of 
purchasing special works on mechanical and scientific subjects. 

The accumulated income of the Mary E. Elliot fund at the 
close of the year was five hundred and twenty-two dollars and 
eighty-two cents. 

No books have as yet been purchased from the income of this 
fund, but the trustees expect soon to arrange for the purchase of 
that class of books specified in the will of Mrs. Elliot. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have 
been three thousand two hundred and thirty-nine dollars and 
eighty-eight cents, which amount includes the sum of eight hun- 
dred and eighty-eight dollars and twelve cents expended towards 
the preparation of a new catalogue. 

The items of these expenditures may be found in detail in the 
annual report of the city, the bills for the same having been 
paid by the city treasurer, upon the approval of the trustees, 
from the sum appropriated for the library. 

The librarian reports that the library has been open for the 
delivery of books three hundred and eight days, during which 
time the number of books delivered for home use was fifty-one 
thousand four hundred and ninety-eight, being an average of one 
hundred and sixty-seven per day. In addition to this number 
delivered for general circulation, ten thousand and fifteen books 
were delivered for use in the reading-room at the library, an 
average of about thirty-two per day. The total number of books 
delivered for both these purposes during the year, was sixty-one 
thousand five hundred and thirteen, an average of almost two 
hundred per day. As compared with the year preceding, the 
circulation for home use shows an increase of two thousand three 
hundred and eleven, and the number delivered for use at the 



REPOKT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 149 

reading-room an increase of six hundred and thirty-two, a total 
increase of twenty-nine hundred and forty-three. For conven- 
ience of comparison the circulation of the library for twelve years 
is given below in tabular form, from which it appears that the 
circulation of books for home use of the past year was exceeded 
in the years 1879, 1883, 1885, and 1886, while the total circu- 
lation was exceeded only in the year 1879. No explanation is 
given in the report of the librarian of that year for the large 
increase in the number of books used in the reading-room, the 
largest in the history of the library. 

TABLE OF CIRCULATION, 1879 to 1890 INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 


For home use. 


Use in reading-room. 


Total. 


1879 


53,558 


10,861 


64,419 


1880 


45,109 


7,128 


52,237 


1881 


38,122 


4,916 


43,038 


1882 


41,788 


4,770 


46,558 


1883 


53,948 


4,380 


58,328 


1884 


50,914 


5,848 


56,763 


1885 


55,142 


5,156 


60,298 


1886 


54,037 


5,540 


59,577 


1887 


50,335 


5,665 


56,000 


1888 


50,417 


6,031 


56,448 


1889 


49,187 


9,383 


58,570 


1890 


51,498 


10,015 


61,513 



The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last 
report was thirty-two thousand five hundred and twenty-three. 
During the year there have been added six hundred and eighty- 
seven volumes by purchase, three hundred and thirty-seven vol- 
umes by donation, and ninety-two volumes of periodicals have 
been bound, making the number of bound volumes in the library 
at the close of the year, thirty-one thousand six hundred and 
thirty-three, and the total number, including maps and pamphlets, 
thirty-three thousand six hundred and thirty-nine. 



150 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Eighty-three different periodicals have been regularly received 
at the library during the year, — sixty by purchase and twenty- 
three by donation, and as the several volumes have been com- 
pleted they have been bound and placed upon the shelves for 
general circulation. 

The number of volumes withdrawn from circulation on ac- 
count of their worn and defaced condition was eighty-six. Of 
this number, and of others retired from circulation in previous 
years for the same reason, four hundred and fourteen have been 
replaced at a cost of three hundred and sixty-six dollars and 
eleven cents. There is still a large number of books remaining 
upon the shelves, which by long and constant use have become 
badly worn, and must soon.be replaced by new editions, the 
purchase of which will be a considerable item for several years. 
A special appropriation should be made by the City Councils for 
this purpose, that the usual annual appropriation may be applied, 
as undoubtedly intended under the original contract, to the pur- 
chase of new books and periodicals, and not for the renewal of 
books worn out and lost. 

Following the report of the librarian is a list of books pre- 
sented to the library during the year with the names of the per- 
sons presenting them. Among these donations are sixty-eight 
volumes of the British Poets, presented by the Hon. Moody 
Currier, as an addition to the " Currier Donation, " making a 
total number of twelve hundred and thirty volumes presented by 
him to the library for this department. Due acknowledgment 
has been made to all those who have in this manner contributed 
to the increase of the library. 

Three portraits in oil have been presented to the library dur- 
ing the year : one of the late Hon. Samuel N. Bell, who was one 
of the trustees, and the treasurer of the Board from the time the 
library was established till his resignation in 1879, presented by 
his brother, Hon. John J. Bell ; one of the late Hon. John Hos- 
ley, mayor of the city in the years 1866, 18S7, and 1888, pre- 
sented by his daughter, Mrs. William M. Parsons, and one of the 
late Dr. Josiah Crosby, one of the leading physicians of the city, 
presented by Mrs. George A. Crosby. The trustees hope that 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 151 

portraits of other prominent citizens may be added to the col- 
lection already in the library rooms. 

The estate of the late Eliza A. Eaton, the residue of which, 
after payment of debts and legacies, was devised and bequeathed 
to the city for the benefit of the library, and of which mention 
was made in the last report of the Board, is still unsettled, and in 
the hands of the executor. The trustees are not aware of any 
reason why all matters relating to this estate should not be finally 
determined during the present year, and the balance of the es- 
tate paid over for the purpose expressed in the will of Mrs. 
Eaton. 

The compilation of a new catalogue of the library, of which 
mention was made in the last report as having been commenced, 
has been continued during the year by Mr. Charles A. Durfee, 
who was engaged to prepare the same under the supervision of a 
committee of the trustees. The work upon the catalogue has not 
progressed so rapidly, nor advanced so far toward completion at 
this time as the trustees were led to expect by the compiler it 
would be when he entered upon its preparation. It was not ex- 
pected that more than a year would be needed for the proper 
preparation of the manuscript of the catalogue for the printer. 
That the work upon the catalogue might be carried on as rapidly 
as practicable, the trustees, at the close of the year, secured the 
services of Mrs. Emma A. H. Piper, as an assistant to Mr. Durfee. 
It is now expected that the. catalogue may be ready for the 
printer about the middle of the present year. 

In the death of the Hon. Daniel Clark, which occurred Jan- 
uary 2 of the present year, the Board of Trustees has sustamed 
the loss of one of its most honored and useful members. The 
late Judge Clark was one of the directors of the Athenaeum and 
under the contract with that institution establishing the City Li- 
brary in 1854 became a member of the Board of Trustees, and 
held the position continuously to the time of his death. He al- 
ways manifested a deep interest in the success and welfare of the 
library, and by his valuable advice and earnest efforts in its be- 
half materially assisted in the establishing of the library, and in 
its successful operation. 



152 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The duties of librarian have been performed by Mrs. M. J. 
Buncher during the year with the same fidelity to the public as 
in previous years, and to the satisfaction of the trustees. 

The trustees desire again to return their acknowledgments to 
the members of the City Councils for the courtesy and consider- 
ation with which their suggestions relating to the operation or 
improvements for the library have been received and carried out. 

March io, 1891. 
In Board of Trustees, read and approved, and ordered to be 
signed by the chairman and clerk of the Board, and transmitted 
to the City Councils. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor. 
N. P. Hunt, Clerk. 

At a meeting of the Trustees of the City Library held at the 
mayor's office on the loth day of March, 1891, the following 
resolutions of respect to the memory of the late Judge Clark, 
presented by Judge Isaac W. Smith, were unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, On the second day of January of the present year, the Hon. 
Daniel Clark, a member of this Board from its formation in 1854, departed this 
life ; and 

Whereas, It is fitting that the surviving members of this Board should put 
on record their appreciation of his valuable services to the city as a member of 
the Board ; therefore, 

Resolved, That in the death of Judge Clark the city of Manchester has met 
with an irreparable loss. His interest in the intellectual welfare of its citizens 
was early manifested in the formation and maintenance of the Manchester 
Athenseum, of which he was a prominent officer. However well adapted 
that institution was to the needs of the city in the earlier years of its existence, 
when it became necessary to lay the foundations of an institution as deep and 
broad as the prospective growth of the city required, he cordially co-operated 
with the late Chief Justice Bell and others in merging the Athenteum in the 
present organization, and, to the time of his death, gave it the benefit of his 
cultivated m.ind and of his large business experience. He took pride in its 
growth and success, and pleasure in the rich benefits his fellow citizens were 
thereby enabled to enjoy. Other organizations have placed on record their 
testimony of the value of his services to the city, the State, and the nation in 
other offices of trust which he was called to hold, of his high standing as a 
lawyer and judge, and of his character as a citizen, in.all of which this Board 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 153 

cordially joins. On this occasion the trustees of the city library discharge a 
grateful duty by placing on their records this testimonial of their appreciation 
of his invaluable services as one of its trustees. 

Resok'fd, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the family of the 
deceased. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The Treasurer of the Board presents the following account of 
the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received 
on account of the Library : 

1890. Dr. 

Jan. I. To balance of appropriation, 

Feb. 

July 



Jan. 
July 

Jan. 
April 





etc 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, fines, 


5939-91 








catalogues, etc. . 


81.73 








appropriation for books 
for 1890 . 


1,000.00 


$2; 


,021.64 






To 


balance of income of 

Dean fund 
income of Dean fund 
income of Dean fund 
interest on accumulation 


55.542.25 

153-00 
153-00 








of income . 


253-95 


6; 


,102.20 


To 


Mary E. Elliot fund 


^2,000.00 




balance of interest on 










Mary E. Elliot fund 
interest on Mary E. Elliot 


414.19 








fund 


90.00 








interest on accumulation 










of income 


18.63 


2; 


,522.82 








5IO: 


,646.66 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 155 



1890. 



Jan. 



Feb. 





17 


March 


8 




22 


April 


4- 




28 




29 


May 


3 




10 




13 




14 




17 




29 


June 


4- 


• 


13- 




19 




26 



Paid New England News Co., period- 
icals ...... 

Geo. H. Policy & Co., periodicals 

Boston Book Co., periodicals . 

Central Law Journal, periodicals 

New England News Co., periodicals 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books 

The History Co., books . 

J. N. McClintock, books . 

Sampson, Murdock, & Co., books 

Frank B. Webster, periodicals . 

J. H. Hickcox, periodicals 

Charles Scribners' Sons, books . 

James E. Abbe, books 

Estes & Lauriat, books 

New England News Co., periodicals 

Little, Brown & Co., books 

New England News Co., periodicals 

The History Co., books . 

The Franklin Institute, books . 

The Historical Society of Penn., books 

William T. Davis, books . 

New England News Co., periodicals 

New Hampshire State Library, books 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 

, W. B. Clarke & Co., books (replaced) 
Little, Brown & Co, books 
Geo. A. Leavitt & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books (replaced) 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books (replaced) 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Balch Bros., books .... 
Geo. E. Littlefield, books 
Estes & Lauriat, books 



Cr. 

$11.48 

6.00 

5.00 

5.00 

11.74 

26.75 

4-5° 
2.00 

3-5° 
1. 00 
5.00 
5.00 
1.25 
9.00 
11.97 

3-5° 
15-87 

4-5° 

5.00 

5.00 

1.66 

10.91 

10.00 

355-20 

22.39 

3-75 

6.05 

82.44 

Si. 17 

26.15 

102.01 

13.60 

30.00 

24.30 

9.00 



Aug. 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



6. 



5- 
II. 



156 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

July 8. New Engiand News Co., periodicals $10.43 

9. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . . 80.37 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books (replaced) 18.97 

15. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . . 3.68 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books (replaced) 1.50 

29. The History Company, books . . 4.50 

5. New England News Co., periodicals 10.86 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . . 22.23 
W. H. Briggs, treasurer, books . . 5.00 
Little, Brown & Co., books (Dean 

purchase) . . . . . i45-io 

New England News Co., periodicals 16.20 

Little, Brown & Co., books . . 4.25 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books . . 17.17 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books (replaced) 113-93 

20. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . . 3.58 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books (replaced) 15-12 

Temple & Farrington Co., books . .50 

27. S. G. Abbott, books . . . 2.00 

2. New England News Co., periodicals n-o.S 

3. W. B. Clarke & Co., books ($11.02 
replaced) ..... 12.86 

20. Estes & Lauriat, books . . . 9.00 

24. The History Company, books . . 4.50 

3. New England News Co., periodicals 11. 16 

6. Boston Society Natural History, books 10.00 

10. Little, Brown & Co!, books . . 3.50 
Balch Bros., books . . . . 10.00 

26. Estes & Lauriat, books . . . 9.00 

2. New England News Co., periodicals i3-54 

4. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . . 21.52 
22. W. B. Clarke & Co., books . . 170.49 
31. By balance of appropriation, etc. , . 483.04 

balance of Dean fund . . . 5>957-io 

Mary E. Elliot fund and interest . 2,522.82 



$10,646.66 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 157 



The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library for 
the year ending December 31, 1890, paid by the city treasurer 
upon the approval of the committee on accounts of the board of 
trustees, the items of which may be found in detail in the annual 
report of the city, are as follows : 



bervices 01 libra 


nar 


1 












^800.00 


Services of assistant librarian . 










335-72 


Gas 














216.86 


Insurance 
















100.00 


Binding 
















144.09 


Rebinding 
















207.67 


Supplies 
















193.72 


Fuel 
















289.28 


Printing 
















11.00 


Newspapers 
















6.00 


Water . 
















32.00 


Incidentals 
















15.42 


New catalogue 
















888.12 








$3,239.88 




RECAPITULATION 








Balance Dec. 31 


, 1889 . . . . 


$2, 


047-45 




Balance of appropriation for catalogue . 




776.10 


^2,823.55 
4,000.00 


Appropriation for 1890 . 






Additional appropriation for catalogue 


$2 


500.00 




Additional appropriation for catalogue . 


I 


000.00 


3,500.00 




purchase of books 


$1 


000.00 


Paid trustees for 


^10,323-55 


Paid incidental 


exp 


enses and c 


-atalo 


gue 


3 


239.5 


8 





Balance Dec. 31, 1890 . . $2,695.69 
Balance, Dec. 31, 1890, of ap- 
propriation for catalogue 3)387.98 



6,083.67 



$10,323.55 



Respectfully submitted. 

NATHAN P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library. 



158 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

December" 31, 1890. 
We have examined the foregoing report and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

D. B. VARNEY, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 
Committee on Accounts of City Library. 



December 31, 1890. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and 
expenditures embraced in the foregoing report of the Treasurer 
of the Trustees of the City Library, and find the same correctly 
cast and properly vouched. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

I respectfully submit to you the thirth-seventh report of the 
City Library, showing the work of the year and its present 
condition. 

Whole number of volumes Dec. 31, 1889 . . . 32,523 

Accessions during the year : 

By purchase . . . . . 687 

Donated ...... 337 

Periodicals and papers bound . . 92 

1,116 



Whole number of volumes at present : 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets ...... 1,990 

Bound volumes ..... 31,633 



33.639 
Number of periodicals and papers regularly received 

by purchase ....... 60 

Number by gift ....... 23 

Number of days open to the public for reading and 

distribution of books ...... 30S 

Number of books delivered for home use . . . 51,498 

Average per day ....... 167.2 

Largest number any one day, March 16 . . . 361 

Largest number any one month, March . . . 4,990 



160 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Number of books, magazines, etc., used in the read- 
ing-room ....... 

Average per day ...... 

Number of guarantees received and new cards issued 
during the year ...... 

Whole number since new registration 

Number of cards returned to the library during the 
year ........ 

Number used on deposit .... 

Postals sent to delinquents .... 

Number of volumes taken from the shelves, unfit for 
use . . .'.... 

Volumes replaced during the year . 

Number of books lost or destroyed and paid for 

Not yet paid for ..... . 

Books repaired at the bindery 

Number repaired and covered in the library 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1889 . 
Amount received from Jan. i to Dec. i, 1890 



Amount paid for express, stationery, and 

incidentals ^46.98 

Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . . . 77-93 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1890 

Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1889, for catalogues 
and supplements sold, and lost or injured books . 

Amount received from Jan. i to Dec. 31, 1890: 

For 250 finding-lists at 10 cts. . . $25.00 
For 2 old supplements at 15 cts. . . .30 

For 5 books lost or destroyed . . 5.21 



10,015 
32-5 

429 
7>623 



13 

455 

86 

414 

5 
2 

500 
4,792 

$77-93 
119. 14 

$197.07 



124.91 
$72.16 

$3-8o 



30-51 



$34-31 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 161 

Paid the treasurer ...... $3-8o 



$30-51 
Balance of fines on hand ..... 72.16 



Total balance on hand ..... ^102.67 

The general work of the library the past year has been uniform 
with the preceding ones, but its gradual growth brings increase 
of labor, and the work of compiling a new catalogue (although 
performed by a specialist) necessarily brings additional work 
and has made the year an unusually busy one. 

The reclassification and recataloguing are steadily progressing, 
and we rejoice in the belief that before another year has passed 
we shall be in possession of both a new printed catalogue for 
general use and card catalogue for exclusively library use. 

The issuing of a finding-list of the late works of fiction and 
juvenile already shows its influence in the circulation, and the 
catalogue, even in its present condition, is of great service in 
enabling us more readily to find the recent works of the higher 
branches of literature. 

The delivery of books for home use for the year shows an in- 
crease of 2,311, and as the greatest gain has been made during the 
last four months we may give the credit largely to the finding-list 
referred to above ; 250 have already been sold. It will be ob- 
served, also, that the number using the reading-room has steadily 
increased. During the year 1887 the number was 5,665 ; the 
past year shows 10,015 (not including the number who come to 
consult the patent office and state law reports), an increase of 
4,350 in three years. It seems that this showing should stimulate 
a forward movement toward the provision of a more commodious 
and agreeable apartment for the public use. 

There has been very little cause for criticism or complaint in 
regard to the deportment of the younger visitors. The improve, 
ment in this respect has been very marked. 

The number of new cards issued during the year is larger than 
in 1889, and the number relinquished less. 

Eighty-six volumes have been withdrawn from circulation, 



11 



162 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

unfit for longer use, and 414 have been replaced, relieving us 
greatly in the department of fiction and juvenile. There are 
many more which we trust will be obtained before the completion 
of the catalogue. The total number of books added to the library 
during the year is 1,116 ; by purchase 687. Of this number 78 
were a purchase from the "Dean Fund, " on mechanical and 
scientific subjects. Of the 337 volumes donated, special mention 
should be made of the liberal gift by the Hon. Moody Currier of 
68 volumes, viz., the Riverside edition of " British Poets. " 

A large number of pamphlets have been received not included 
in the accession number, but held in reserve for future arrange- 
ment. 

Our periodical list remains the same, but I would respectfully 
suggest a change in some of the publications, as they are so rarely 
called for, and seem of little practical use to our patrons. 

The departments of Congress have shown their usual liberality. 
Besides a large number of miscellaneous publications, we have re- 
ceived 75 volumes belonging to the regular set of the Forty-ninth 
and Fiftieth Congresses, and at their request we have returned to 
them about 100 duplicates of past Congresses, to supply defi- 
ciencies in other public libraries. 

The work of repairing books has been less at the bindery, but 
an increase of 576 volumes in the library, including the re- 
covering. 

We have had very little trouble from delinquents. Some, of 
course, are in arrears for fines, and two lost books are yet unpaid 
for. 

The examination of the library shows four books missing at 
the present time. Two are very old editions of fiction and ju- 
venile ; the other two doubtless will be returned later on. 

In closing I desire to express my sincere sorrow in the recent 
death of one of the honored members of the Board of Trustees. 
The memory of his uniform kindness, his pleasant words of cheer 
and encouragement, and his unwavering interest in all pertaining 
to the library, made him a helpful and wise counselor, an honored 
and respected friend. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Mrs. M. J. BUNCHER, Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 

1890. 



Secretary of the State of New Hampshire. 

Annual Reports of the State, 1889. Vols, i and 2. 8vo. 
Journal of the Senate and House, 1889. i vol. 8vo. 
Pamphlet Laws of New Hampshire, 1889. i vol. 8vo. 
Constitutional Convention, 1889. i vol. 8vo. 

Irving A. Watson, M. D., Secretary. 

Eighth Annual Report of the New Hampshire State Board 
of Health. 1889. i vol. 8vo. 

Hon. Moody Currier. 

vSixty-eight volumes of "British Poets. " Riverside edition. 
i2mo. 

Hon. James F. Briggs, Manchester. 

Eleven volumes of the Official Records of the Union and 
Confederate Armies. From Vol. 27 to Vol. 30, with 
parts. 8vo. 

John C. Linehan, Commissioner. 

Twenty-first Annual Report of the New Hampshire Insur- 
ance Commissioner. 1890. 8vo. 

Benjamin C. Dean, Esq., Manchester. 

Scientific and Industrial History of Aniline Black. By 
Nelting. 1889. 8vo. 

Hon. Benjamin F. Prescott, Epping, N. H. 

History of the Class of 1856, Dartmouth College. By B. 
F. Prescott. i8qo. 8vo. 



164 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 

Charlemagne Tower Collection of American Colonial Laws. 
1890. 8vo. 

Edward Ingersol, Esq., Philadelphia. 

Recollections : Historical, Political, Geographical, and 
Social. By Charles J. Ingersol. Vol i. Svo. 

Wilford Woodruff, Utah. 

History of Utah. By Herbert H. Bancroft. From 1540 to 
1887. I vol. 1890. 8vo. 

Waldo Thompson, Esq., Lynn, Mass. 

Sketches of Swampscott, Mass. 1885. 121110. 

Charles H. Osgood, Esq., Manchester. 

Narrative of the Second Arctic Expedition Made by C. F. 
Hall. 1864-69. I vol 4to. 

William L Washburn. (Author.) 

"Spring and Summer, or Blushing Hours." Poems. 
1890. i6mo. 

Wilbur Larremore, New York. (Author.) 

" Mother Carey's Chickens. " Poems. 1890. i6nio. 

Allen Eastman Cross, Manchester. 

"Amherst Memories." A collection of undergraduate 
verse of Amherst College. 1890. i6mo. 

Rev. William E. Griffis, Boston. (Author.) 
" Japanese Fairy World. " 1880. i6mo. 

City of Nashua, N. H. 

Memorial Volume of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 
erected at Nashua in 18S9. 8vo. 

David McKnight, Esq., Philadelphia. (Author.) 

" The Electoral System of the United States. " 12 mo. 

Boston & Maine R. R. 

"Along Shore among the Mountains, Lakes, and Streams. " 
By M. A. Sweetzer. 1889. i2mo. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 165 

Charles A. Durfee, New York. 

History of Williams College. By Rev. Calvin Durfee. 8vo. 
The Romance of Trade. By H. R. F, Bourne. i6mo. 
Tennyson's Poems (a complete volume). i2mo. 
Harper's Descriptive List of Publications. Compiled by 

C. A. Durfee. 1888. 8vo. 
Catalogue of the Mercantile Library, New York, 8vo. 

5 vols, in all. 

H. E. Messinger, Manchester. 

"The Civil War in Song and Story." 1860-65. Ar- 
ranged by Frank Moore, Esq., New York. 8vo. 

Harry Clifton, Manchester. 

"The Curse of the Century. " By Henry M. Hunt. 1889. 

1 2rao. 
Sparks from the Camp Fire. Compiled by Lieut. Charles S 

Green. 1889. i2mo. 
"The Veterans' Advocate" for the year 1890. Folio. 

Charles F. Livingston, Esq., Manchester. 

" The Unity and University. " 1888-89. 4^0- 
The Printer's Circular. Vol. 24. 1889-90. 4to. 

Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

"The Medical Temperance Journal" for the year 1890. 
1 2 mo. 

Executive Committee. 

" The Nation's Birthday. " A souvenir volume of the Cen- 
tennial Celebration of Washington's Inauguration at Chi- 
ago, April, 1889. 4to. 

Adolph Lene, Secretary. 

Fourth annual report of the Ohio State Forestry Bureau. 
For the year 1888. 8vo. 

S. C. Gould, Esq., Manchester. 

" Notes and Queries" for the year 1890. 8yo. 
Constitution and By-Laws of the Boston Theosophical So- 
ciety. 1889. Pamphlet. 



166 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

G. C. GiLMORE, Manchester. 

Report of the Joint Special Committee of the Bunker Hill 

Monument. May, 1889. Pamphlet. 
Report upon the Bronze Tablets in memory of the Soldiers 

killed at Bunker Hill, June, 1775. Placed in Winthrop 

Square, June, 1889. Pamphlet. 

Trustees and Hon. Secretary. 

Report of the O'Connell Monument Committee. By Rev. 
John Canon O'Hanton, P. P. Sec, Dublin, Ireland. 
Pamphlet. 

IvisON, Blakeman & Co., New York. 

The Story of the Invention of the Steel Pen. By Henry 
Bore. London. i6mo. 

Joseph M, Brown, Atlanta, Ga. 

The Mountain Campaigns in Georgia ; or War Scenes on 
the W. and A. Illustrated. Pamphlet. 4to. 

Grand Rapids Board of Trade. 

Grand Rapids as It Is, Published by the Board of Trade. 
1890-91. Pamphlet. 

H. B. Battle. 

Report of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion for the year 1888. 8vo. 

W. H. Jeffrey, Manchester. 

Monographical Paper on Mutual Co-operation. Delivered 
in New York, October 31, 1890, by W. H. Jeffrey. 8vo. 

A. S. Batchellor, Littleton, N. H. 

Report of the Committee of the Executive Council to His 
Excellency Governor Charles H. Sawyer, of New Hamp- 
shire. 1887-89. Pamphlet. 

Old Residents' Historical Association, Lowell. 

Contributions No. 3 of Vol. 4. 1890. Pamphlet. 

Judge N. P. Hunt. 

The Laws of New Hampshire relating to Common Schools. 
Compiled by N. P. Hunt, Esq. 1886. i2mo. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 107 

Annual Report of the County Commissioners of Hillsbor- 
ough County. 1890. Pamphlet. 

N. P. Kidder, Esq., City Clerk. 

Manchester City Documents for the year 1889. i2mo. 

John C. French, Esq., Manchester. 

Historical Sketch of Epsom, N. H. By Jonathan Curtis, 
A. M. 1823. Pamphlet. 

Amherst College. 

General Catalogue of Amherst College, 1 821-1890, and 
Obituary Record ot 'Graduates, for the year ending June 
25, 1890. Two pamphlets. 

Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Register of the University, for the years 1889-90 and 
1S90-91. Two pamphlets. 

University of Pennsylvania. 

Catalogue and Announcement. 1889-90. i2mo. 

University of California. 

Register of the University, for the year 1889-90. Pam- 
phlet. 

W. M. Griswold. 

Directory of Writers for the Literary Press. Pamphlet. 

Tribune Association, New York. 

Tribune Almanac, for 1889. Pamphlet. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 

Annual Report of the Fire Department of Manchester, 
N. H., for the year 1889. Pamphlet. 

Hon. H. K. Slayton, Manchester, N. H. 

Report of the Twentieth Annual Meeting of the Vermont 
Dairymen's Association. 1890. Pamphlet. 

Harvey L. Currier, Manchestei. 

Annual Reports ol the Hillsborough County Commissioners, 
for the years 1889 and 1890. Two pamphlets. 



168 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Isaac R. Shepard, Esq., Manchester. 

Annual Reports of the Directors of the Manchester & Law- 
rence Railroad, from the year 1866 to 1883 inclusive, ex- 
cepting 1868. Seventeen pamphlets. 

Horace G. Wadlin, Chief of Bureau of Statistics of Labor in 
Massachusetts. 
The Annual Statistics of Manufactures. 1888. 8vo. Five 

pamphlets, viz. : 
Fifth and Seventh National Conventions of the Bureau of 

Statistics of Labor in the United States. 1887 and 1889. 

Two pamphlets. 
Strikes in Massachusetts. 1830-80. Carroll D. Wright. 

Comparative Wages, Prices, and Cost of Living. Carroll 

D. Wright. influence of Intemperance upon Crime. 

Carroll D. Wright 3 pamphlets. 

Board of Trade, Manchester. 

Historical Sketch of the City of Manchester, N. H. : Its 
Rapid Rise and Material Development ; Its Healthfulness, 
Industries, etc. Compiled September, 1890. 

Unknown. 

" Buddha's Dhammapada, or Path of Virtue." By J. P. C. 

Pamphlet. 
Costa Rica and Her Future. By Paul Biolley, Professor in 

the College at San Jose, Cal. Pamphlet. 
Relations between the Central Pacific Railroad Company 

and the United States Government ; Summary of Facts. 

1889. Pamphlet. 
Dennison Board of Trade. Glimpses of Dennison, Texas, 

in Photographs. Pamphlet. 

Reports of Librarians and Boards of Trustees. 

Boston, Mass. Clas:-ified Illustrated Catalogue of the Library 
Bureau. 8vo. Decimal, Classified, and Relative Index. 
Pamphlet. Catalogue of the Bibliographies of Special Sub- 
jects in the Boston City Library, by J. L. Whitney. 8vo. 



KEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 169 

Bulletins of Volume 8 completed. 1 88 7-S9. 8vo. Bulletin 
No. I, Vol. 9. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Thirty-Second Annual Report of the Public 
Library, year ending March, 1890. Bulletin No. 28 of books 
added during the year 1890. Pamphlets. Catalogue of Pratt 
Institute. 1890-91. 4to. 

Baltimore, Md. Twenty-third Annual Report of the Peabody 
Institute. June, 1890. Pamphlet. 

Brookline, Mass. Thirty-third Annual Report of the Public Li- 
brary. 1889. Pamphlet. 

Birmingham, Eng. Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Free 
Libraries' Committee, for the year 1889. Pamphlet. 

Cambridge, Mass. Annual Report for the year 1889. Pam- 
phlet. 

Chicago, 111. Seventeenth Annual Report of the Public Library. 
June, 1890. Catalogue of English Prose Fiction. Finding-List 
of History and Biography. Bulletins of accessions to the library 
from December, 1887, to October, 1889. Nine pamphlets. 
Proceedings of the Trustees and Librarian's Report of the New- 
berry Library, for the year 1889. Pamphlet. 

Cincinnati, O. Annual Report of the Public Library, for the 
year 1889. Pamphlet. 

Cleveland, O. Twenty-first Annual Report, for the year 1889. 
Pamphlet. 

Detroit, Mich. Ninth Report of the Library Commission, for 
1889. Pamphlet. 

Fall River, Mass. Annual Report of the Public Library. 1889- 
Pamphlet. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. Annual Report of the Public School Li- 
brary, from September i, 1889, to August 31, 1890. Pam- 
phlet. 

Germantown, Phila. Report of the Friends' Free Library and 
Reading-room, for the year 1889. Pamphlet. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Finding List of Biography, History, and 
Travels, belonging to the Public Library. 1890. 

Lowell, Mass. Annual Report of the City Library. 1889. 
Pamphlet. 



170 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lawrence, Mass. Eighteenth Annual Report of the Free 
Public Library. 1889. Pamphlet. Bulletins of books 
added to the library from January to October, 1890. 
Three pamphlets. 

Lynn, Mass. Twenty-seventh Annual Report, for the year 
1889. Pamphlet. 

Los Angeles, Cal. Annual Report of the Public Library, 
for the year 1889. Pamphlet. 

Minneapolis, Minn. " The Public Library of Minneapolis, 
Described and Illustrated." Quarto. "Finding-Lists 
of English Fiction " and " Books for the Young. " 1890. 
8vo. Bulletin No. i " Handbook of the Public Library 
and School of Fine Arts. " 1889-90. Five Pamphlets. 

Maiden, Mass. Twelfth Annual Report, for the year 
1889. Pamphlet. 

Melrose, Mass. Report of the Public Library, for the year 
1889. Pamphlet. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Twelfth Annual Report of the Public Li- 
brary. October, 1889. Pamphlet. 

Manchester, Eng. Twenty-seventh and twenty-eighth an- 
nual reports of the Free Public Libraries, 1888-89 ^^''^ 
1889-90. Two pamphlets. 

New York. Annual report of the Maimonides Library for 
the year 1889. Pamphlet. 

New Haven, Conn. Third and fourth annual reports of 
the Free Public Library, 1889 and 1890. Two pamphlets. 

Newton, Mass. Annual report of the Newton Free Library 
for the year 1889. Pamphlet. 

Philadelphia. Seventieth annual report of the Apprentice's 
Library for year ending April, 1890. Pamphlet. Bul- 
letins of Library Company for January and September. 
Nos. 24 and 25. 1890. Report of the Board of Direc- 
tors, May, 1890. Four pamphlets. 

Peabody, Mass. Thirty-eighth report of the Peabody Insti- 
tute, 1889-90. Pamphlet. 

Providence, R. I. Twelfth annual report of the Providence 
Public Library. 1889. Pamphlet. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 171 

Peoria, 111. Rules and by-laws of the Public Library, re- 
vised March, 1890. Pamphlet. 

San Francisco. Thirty-seventh annual report of the Mer- 
cantile Library Association for the year 1889. Pamphlet. 
Report of the Free Library for the year ending June 30, 
1890. Pamphlet. 

Salem, Mass. Address of John M. Raymond at the open- 
ing of the Salem Free Library, June 26, 1889. Pamphlet. 
First report of the Trustees of the Salem Free Library, 
December, 1889. Pamphlet. 

St. Louis, Mo. Annual report of the Public Library for 
the year 1888-89. Pamphlet. 

Springfield, Mass. Annual report of the City Library Asso- 
ciation for the year ending May 6, 1890. Pamphlet. 

Worcester, Mass. Thirteenth annual report of the Worces- 
ter Free Library, 1889. Pamphlet. 

Wilmington, Del. Thirty-third annual report of the Wil- 
mington Institute for the year 1890. Pamphlet. 

Woburn, Mass. Thirty-third report of the Public Library, 
1889. Pamphlet. 

Windham, N. H. Annual report of the Nesmith Free Li- 
brary. 1889. Pamphlet. 

From the Several Publishers. 

" Good Health. " A Journal of Hygiene. From the San- 
itarium Health and Temperance Society, Battle Creek, 
Mich. For 1890. 4to. 

"The Manifesto." Published in Shaker Village, Canter- 
bury, N. H. For the year 1890. 8vo. 

"American Sentinel." Pacific Press Association, Oakland, 
Cal. For 1890. Folio. 

'•'Weekly Oregonian." Published by L. Samuel, Esq., 
Portland, Oregon. For 1890. Folio. 

"West Shore." From the Oregon Immigration Board, 
Portland, Oregon. Foj 1890. 4to. 

" Denver Times." Published by the Times Company, Den- 
ver, Col. For 1890. Folio. 



172 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

"The Voice." A Temperance Journal. Published by 
Funk and Wagnalls, New York City. For 1890. Folio. 

"Lawrence Anzeiger." Published at Lawrence, Mass. For 
1890. Folio. 

" The Practical Mechanic." F. S. Blanchard & Co., 
Worcester, Mass. 1890. Folio. 

"Plymouth Record." Record Publishing Company, Ply- 
mouth, N. H. 1890. Folio. 

" Weirs Times." From M. N. Calvert, Weirs, N. H. For 
the summer months of 1890. Folio. 

" New Hampshire Catholic." Charles A. O'Connor, Esq., 
publisher. Manchester. 1890. Folio. 

"The Weekly Budget." Frank H. Challis, publisher. 
Manchester. For 1889. (A bound copy.) Folio. 

"The Daily Press." Daily Press Publishing Company, 
Manchester, N. H. For 1S90. Folio. 

"American Young Folks." A monthly magazine. G. 
Waldo Brown, publisher. Manchester, N. H. For the 
year 1890. 4to. 

"Saturday Telegram." William M. Kendall, publisher, 
Manchester, N. H. 1890. Folio. 

" Santa Monica Outlook. " L. T. Fisher, publisher. Santa 
Monica, Los Angeles, Cal. 1890. Folio. 

" City Library." Published by the City Library Associa- 
tion, Springfield, Mass. Vol. 3. 1890. 4to. 

"The Traveler's Record." Published by the Travelers' 
Lisurance Co., Hartford, Conn. 1890. 4to. 

" L'Avenir Canadien." E. R. Dufresne, proprietaire, Man- 
chester, N. H. For 1890. Folio. 

"Le Fidele Messanger." Journal Mensuel. Thomas A. 
Dorian, proprietaire, Manchester, N. H. For 1890. 4to. 

"High School Echo." Published by the senior class of 
the Manchester High School. Vol. i. 1890. 4to. 

united states government. 

State Department. 

Consular Reports, Vols. 30, 31, and 32. Nos. 117 to 120 in- 
clusive, of Vol. 33. 1890. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 173 

Bureau of Statistics. Special reports, i, 3, 4, and 5. 1890. 

Index to Consular Reports. From Vol. 18 to 31 inclusive. 
1886-1889. 

United States Official Catalogue of the Exhibit of Paris 
Universal Exposition. 1889. i6mo. 

Reports and Recommendations of the International Ameri- 
can Conference. William E. Curtis, executive officer. 
1890. 8vo. • 

Minutes of the International American Conference. 1890. 
4to. 

Third annual report of the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sioner, Hon. W. G. Veazey. 1889. 8vo. 

Treasury Department. 

Annual reports of the Comptroller of the Currency for the 
years 1889 and 1890. Two vols. 8vo. 

Annual reports of the Director of the Mint upon the produc- 
tion of the Precious Metals. For the years 1889 and 
1890. Two vols. 8vo. 

Report of the Secretary of the Treasuary on the Finances of 
the United States for 1889. 8vo. 

Bulletins Nos. 14 to 18 inclusive of the United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey. 1889. 

"A permanent National Bank Circulation" — An inter- 
view between the Committee on Banking and John J. 
Knox of the National Bank, New York. 1890. 

Interior Department. 

Official Gazette of the United States Pension Office for the 
year 1890. Four vols. 8vo. 

Annual report of the Commissioner of Pensions for the year 
ending June 30, 1890. 8vo. 

Report of the receipt, distribution, and sale of Public Docu- 
ments on behalf of the Government. 1887-88. 

Special Report on Public Libraries. Pt. 2. Rules for a 
Dictionary Catalogue. By Charles A. Cutter, Boston. 



174 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Bureau of Education. 

Circulars of Information Nos. 2 and 3. 1889. Nos. i, 2, 
and 3. 1890. 

Contributions to American Educational History, edited by 
H. B. Adams. Nos. 7, 8, and 9. 

Bulletin No. i, 1889. Indian Education, by General T. J. 
Morgan, Commissioner. 

Bulletin No. i, 1890. Honorary Degrees Conferred in 
American Colleges. Charles F. Smith. 

Report of the Commissioner of Education. 18^7-88. 8vo. 

Report of Factory System of the United States. By Carroll 
D. Wright, Special Agent. 1884. 4to. 

United States Postal Guide for January 1890, and July sup- 
plement. By Hon. W. B. Cooley, chief clerk of Post-of- 
fice Department. i2mo. 

Smithsonian Institution. 

Contributions to Knowledge. Vol. 26. 1890. 4to. 
Report of the Smithsonian Institution for the year 1887. 
2 vols. 8vo. 

War Department. 

Chief Signal Officer, U. S. A. 

Contour Map of the United States, showing the River and 
Lake Systems. Locations of the Meteorological Stations 
of the Signal Service. Folio. 
Tri-Daily chart of Meteorological Observations for the 
month of October, 1878. (To complete the volume.) 

Agricultural Department. 

From Hon. J. M. Rusk, Secretary. 

Bulletin No. 4, Forestry Division. Report on the Substitu- 
tion of Metal for Wood in Railroad Ties. By E. E. 
Russell. 1890. 8vo. 

United States Congress. 

Seventy-two volumes of Public Documents of the Forty- 
ninth and Fiftieth Congresses, belonging to the regular 
set. 



REPORTS 



COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES, 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of the Valley Cemetery respectfully submit 
the following report for the year 1890 : 

During the year many improvements have been made. Stone 
gutters have been made ; the water pipes have been extended 
five hundred feet, sewer pipes about one hundred feet ; the 
stone bottom and edges of the brook have been extended, and 
the usual amount of graveling of the avenues has been done. 
Monuments have been erected on the S. N. Bell, J. C. Tasker, 
Joseph Peabody, J. S. Shannon, Walter Neal, Mrs. Schaefer, J. 
N. Sanborn, and Piper lots. Material used in improvements as 
follows : 

1,184 loads of sand. 



171 




"■ loam. 


no 




" gravel. 


20 




" stone. 


>52o 


feet of turf. 


2DO 


i: 


2 -inch water pipe. 


100 


it 


1 14^ -inch water pipe. 


200 


a 


I -inch water pipe. 


100 


i i 


sewer pipe. 


12 







178 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance January 
Appropriation 



1890 



Tomb fees 
Graves and removals 
Care and water 
Grass and wood sold 
Labor and materials 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid C. H. G. Foss, superintendent . 
C. W. Noyes, labor 
C. H. Griffin, labor 
James Barrett, labor 
J. Bilodeau, labor 
F. Sullivan, labor 
S. McCuen, labor 
M. Kelley, labor 
Luther Leavitt, labor 
F. L. Mead, labor 
Samuel Neal 
Campbell «Sc Williams, printing 
Dist. No. 2, sand, loam, etc. 
George Piper, team, sand, etc. . 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware . 
Temple & Farrington Co., book, etc 
Timothy Carr, loam 
C. H. Hutchinson, repairing fence 
Geo. Whitford, sand 
C. H. G. Foss, cash paid for plants 
John Francis, plants and labor . 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware and 
phosphate . . . . . 



$70-45 




1,500.00 






$1,570-45 




$203.00 




209.25 




650.00 




17.00 




220.75 


1,300.00 





$2,870.45 



5719.25 

91.87 
327.17 
270.65 

170.78 

5-63 

50-17 

44.00 

173-25 

6.00 

7-33 
1.25 

142.38 

144.42 

25.81 

4-34 
7.00 
2.83 

67.00 
7.12 

81.87 

47.02 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 



179 



Paid Peter Woodman, loam and turf 
C. C. Webster, turf . 
T. A. Lane, pipe 
Pike & Heald, pipe . 
G. W. Dodge, rubber boots 
J. B. Abbott, painting 
Palmer & Garmon, repairing stoves 
Pettee & Adams, cement . 
F. X. Chenette, sand, team, etc. 
F. G. Riddle, printing 
Manchester Water-works . 
M. L. Aldrich, boxes, etc. • . 
Head & Dowst, sand and gravel 
C. H. Chase, trees . 
B. F. Bascomb, team, sand, and turf 
Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 
F. W. Blood, loam . 

Balance .... 



^46.50 
7.98 
80.93 
53-12 
2.50 
7.68 
5.60 

•75 

25-65 

1-75 

35-55 

16.80 

57-41 
4.00 

26.00 
2.00 

18.50 



$2,789.86 
80.59 

$2,870.45 

The]committee have been very much pleased with the man- 
ner in which Superintendent Foss has performed his duties, and 
consider the city fortunate in having so faithful a man in this 
position. 

FRANK A. LANE, 
BUSHROD W. HHX, 
JOHN M. KENDALL, 
N. P. HUNT, 
WALTER H. WRIGHT, 
Sjib- Trustees of the Valley Cemetery. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

The Sub-Trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery submit the fol- 
lowing report of work done for the year ending December 31, 
1890 : 



180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Much has been done the past year for the general improve- 
ment of the cemetery. Fifty maple shade trees have been set 
out. A new fountain has been put on Willow Avenue to accom- 
modate lot owners on Hillside lawn and the east side of the 
cemetery. The underbrush has been cut on the Straw lot, and 
granite bounds set, thereby permanently establishing the bound- 
ary lines of this lot. 

AVENUES. 

Two new avenues have been laid out and graded, one on the 
west side and one on the south side of the Swedish lawn. All 
the avenues have^received attention with top-dressing and gravel, 
950 loads of the latter having been used for that purpose the past 
season. 

LOAM AND MUCK. 

As has been stated in former reports of the sub-trustees, with- 
out a liberal supply of these indispensable articles little can be 
accomplished toward making and maintaining sward. Five 
hundred loads of muck taken from the Straw lot have been used 
this season in grading new lots and re-grading old lots. 

The superintendent has been able to make satisfactory purchase 
of a sufficient quantity of loam to meet the demands of the ceme- 
tery, which has been used with the muck mentioned above. Be- 
sides the muck and loam above mentioned one hundred and 
fifty-eight loads of clay have been used. 

RIVERSIDE LAWN. 

The hill in the southwest part of the cemetery, which will here- 
after be known as Riverside lawn, although not entirely finished, 
is one of the most beautiful locations in the cemetery. Work on 
this section was advanced as far the past season as was possible, 
and continued in the thorough manner in which it was begun, 
and the sub-trustees hope to see this lawn completed early the 
coming summer. After cutting the hill down to a desirable 
grade, a covering of clay four inches in thickness was put on ; 
next, four inches of muck, taken from the Straw lot, were ap- 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 181 

plied, and over this four to six inches of rich loam. Clay has 
been used for several years in different parts of the cemetery 
with excellent results ; not only does a lawn so prepared stand 
the dry weather much better, but will show the benefit of a dress- 
ing of manure after all signs of it have disappeared on a lawn 
where clay is not used. The lots on Riverside lawn are to be 
under perpetual care, subject to the same restrictions and regula- 
tions as Hillside lawn. 

HILLSIDE LAWN. 

The lots on this beautiful lawn are being rapidly taken up, and 
each year adds to its beauty and to the number of magnificent 
monuments which adorn its graceful slopes. 

SWEDISH LAWN. 

In 1886, the sub-trustees set aside a plot of ground for the 
exclusive use of the Swedish society, which, owing to the rapidly 
increasing number of graves thereon, the sub-trustees have, at the 
request of the Swedish society, extended. This plot will here- 
after be known as the "Swedish Gethsemane Lawn, " and adds 
much to the appearance of this part of the cemetery. 

CEMETERY EXTENSION. 

At a meeting of the sub-trustees held December 22, it was 
voted to recommend to the City Councils that the land lying 
north of the present cemetery, owned by the heirs of Benjamin 
Mitchell, and containing about sixteen acres, be purchased by 
the city for cemetery purposes, the sub-trustees having previously 
gone over the ground, said vote being duly certified by the clerk. 

IRON FENCE. 

The fence on the Calef road, with the exception of about 200 
feet of iron fence built in 1889, is in a deplorable condition. 
The same is true at the south end and a portion of the north end 
of the old lot, while the entire Straw lot is without a fence of 
any kind. 

It is the hope of the sub-trustees that the matter may be seri- 
ow^y considered by the city government in their wise apportion- 
ment of the city's funds. 



182 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUPERINTENDENT. 

The superintendent, Mr. Byron A. Stearns, has given entire 
satisfaction the past year, and deserves much credit for the faith- 
ful manner in which he has discharged his duties as superintend- 
ent of the Pine Grove Cemetery. 

GEORGE W. BACON, 
HENRY P. HUNTER, 
CHARLES H. BARTLETT, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
JOSEPH L. STEVENS, 
Sub- Trustees of the Fine Grove Ce7netery. 

The sub-trustees append the following statistical tables to their 
report with the hope that they may be satisfactory to the lot 
owners, and those who are interested in the prosperity of the Pine 
Grove Cemetery : 



Superintendent's account. 



Received for advcance payments on lots sold 

" " interments 

" " water and care of lots 

" " grading lots 

" " loam sold 

" " clay sold 

" " wood sold 

" " removal of bodies • 

Total receipts 

Deduct minor expenses 

Paid city treasurer 



1890. 



$2,334.37 



$551.00 


$495.00 


438.00 


384.00 


665.00 


481.00 


547.37 


384. 9S 


7.00 


59.(10 


10.00 


6.34 


60.44 




61.56 


65.00 


$2,340.87 


$1,875.32 


6.50 


1.84 



$1,873.48 



Miscellaneous. 



Number of lots re-graded 

" of monuments erected 

Lots sold on Hillside lawn 

" unsold on Hillside lawn 

" sold with lawn restrictions 

" unsold with lawn restrictions 

Ordinai-y lots sold 

" " unsold 

Lots sold on Riverside lawn 

" unsold on Riverside lawn 

Total number of lots sold 

Number of interments 

" " " on public ground 

Whole number buried on public ground 



1890. 



1889. 



38 


24 


28 


21 


14 


9 


30 


44 


31 


38 


20 


44 


21 


16 


25 


17 


o 




60 




68 


63 


228 


199 


67 


47 


1,129 


1,062 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 



183 



Receipts. 



Balance on hand January 1 

Appropriation 

Advance payments on lots sold 

Sale of lots bj' treasurer 

John B. Varick's overdraft 

Balance of superintendent's receipts. 



Totals. 



1890. 



$548.59 

1,000.00 

551.00 

2,600.00 



1,789.87 



$6,489.46 



1S89. 



$3,5.33.21 

1. 000.00 

495.00 



.96 
1,378.48 

$7,752.18 



Current Expenses. 



1890. 



Salary of superintendent 

Labor and teaming 

Materials and tools 

Printing and stationery 

Flowers and shrubs 

Water rates 

Telephone 

Coal 

Paint for iron fence and castins 



Totals. 



S!730 00 


$730.00 


2,851.19 


3,485.88 


168.70 


234.58 


20.48 


45.93 


61.54 


64.80 


300.00 


300.00 


48.25 


49.50 


74.48 


24.75 




19..53 







$4,254.64 



$4,954.97 



Permanent Improvement. 



Water extension 

Sewerage extension 

Loam and turf 

Clay 

Castings for gates 

Iron fence 

Granite posts for bounds 

Markers for graves on public ground. 
Maple shade trees 



Totals. 



So42.7.'3 
158.00 



47.15 
15.00 



$762 90 



1889. 



$.509.11 
104.84 
680.12 
453.00 

13.30 
462.00 

26.25 



$2,248.62 



SUMMARY. 

Balance January i, 1890, and appropria- 
tion $1,548.59 

Receipts from cemetery during the year 4,940.87 

Total receipts ..... 

Expenditures for the year 1890 . . $5,017.54 
Amount transferred to reserve fund . 654.22 

Balance on hand December 31, 1890 . 300.20 



,489.46 



Total 



$5-97i-96 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To llie Trustees of Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual report of 
the money received by me during the year ending December 31, 
1890 : 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Number of deeds delivered during the year 1890, sixty-four. 

To cash received for the same . . $2,707.06 
interest ..... 1.80 

cash received from superintendent 1)783.37 



By superintendent's receipt . . , $1,783.37 
treasurer's receipts . . . . 2,600.00 
cash on hand .... 108.86 



$4,492.23 



$4,492.23 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



To cash received from superintendent . . . $1,300.00 
By superintendent's receipt ..... 1,300.00 

I have in my possession thirty-four deeds ready for delivery, 
some of which have been standing for a long time and probably 
never will be taken, and the only way to dispose of such is to re- 
move the bodies buried in the lots and sell the lots to other 
parties. In some of these cases I am sure the contract never will be 
completed by the original purchaser. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES, 185 

All money received by me has been turned into the city treas- 
ury ; for which I have the proper vouchers from the city clerk. 
Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasii7-er of Tj'iistces of Cemeteries. 



Manchester, N. H., January, 1891. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus 
B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the 
same correct and properly vouched for. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund have the 
honor to present herewith their eleventh annual report, embrac- 
ing the report of the treasurer, which shows the financial opera- 
tions for the year ending December 31, 1890, and the condition 
of the fund at the present time. 

Your trustees are pleased to say that gradual improvements are 
being made upon the lots placed in their care, and in some cases 
quite satisfactory progress has been made in laying the founda- 
tion for beautifying and adorning these grounds, as provided in 
the ordinance under the act and in accordance with the desires 
of the donors of this fund. 

The owners of lots on Landscape Lawn have commenced, at 
their own expense, the environment of this beautiful plot with a 
substantial border of granite, which, when completed, will en- 
hance its general appearance and be of practical utility in guard- 
ing the ground against the encroachments of vehicles and injury 
from other causes. 

It is the aim of the trustees to do all that the means at their 
command will allow to carry out the wishes of the proprietors of 
endowed lots, and they will be glad to receive suggestions from 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 187 

parties interested, in order that the trust may be executed in the 
most satisfactory and faithful manner. 

Respectfully submitted. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor, 
P. C. CHENEY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 
January i, 1891. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the eighth annual 
report of the funds received and the expenses paid to December 
31, 1890. 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



Amount of permanent fund on hand as 
per last report . . . . 

Received during the year from : 
Estate of Cyrus W. Wallace 
John Hosley . 
Chas. W. Eager 
Henry A. Bailey 
Henry H. Huse 
Mrs. J. G. Sturgis . 
Frank M. Gerrish . 
Chas. H. Bartlett . 
John D. Bean and L. K. Mead 
Asa W. Davis 
Amos, Edson S., and Walter S. Heath 
Wm. Bailey 
Henry D. Soule 
Estate of Ruth L. Waterman 

Total permanent fund . 

Income on hand as per last report 
Income received since last report 



$7,662.82 

155-00 
160.00 
97.80 
100.00 
101.40 

135-05 
344.00 

209.84 
344.00 
181. 12 
151. 18 
134.48 
160.00 
109. 02 



^363-53 
395-00 



$10,045.71 



Total income 



$758-53 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 



189 



Expenses paid as follows : 






B. A. Stearns .... 


14-15 




S. A. Blood .... 


35-17 




E. T. James .... 


13-25 




J. B. Varick Co. . 


16.30 


. 


Thomas Johnson 


8.00 




Marden & Woodbury 


25.00 




Pine Grove Cemetery, care of lots 


189.00 




Total expenses . . . . 




^290.87 


Cash on hand . . . . 




467.66 



^758-53 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand as 

per last report .... $3,250.00 

Received during the year from : 

Estate of James A. McEvoy . . 100.00 

Estate of Elvira H. Brewer 



Total amount of permanent fund 

Income on hand as per last report 
Income received since last report 

Total 

Expenses paid as follows : 

To Valley Cemetery for care of lots 
Cash on hand 

Total 



5231. 91 
162.50 



$69.65 
324.76 



;, 450.00 



.41 



^394-41 



PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand as 

per last report .... $200.00 



Total amount of permanent fund 



$200.00 



190 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Income on hand as per last report . $30.00 

Income received since last report . 10.00 



Expenses paid as follows : 

Oilman Riddle .... $28.75 

Cash on hand . . . . ii.2q 



$40.00 



$40.00 



MERRILL CEMETERY, 



Amount of permanent fund received 
since last report : 
From Harriet W. Emerson . . $200.00 



Total^amount of permanent fund . . . $200.00 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 
Treasurer of Trustees of Cetnetery Fund. 



This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts of 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery 
fund, embracing the receipts and expenditures for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1890, and that I find the same correct and 
properly vouched. 

I have'also examined the securities in which said fund is in- 
vested, and find as follows : 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 

5 percent, 19 13 .... $10,000.00 
Cash . . . . . . . 45-71 

$10,045.71 

Amount of permanent fund ... . 10.045. 71 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 191 



VALLEY CEMETERY, 



Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H,, 

5 per cent, 1913 .... ^3,450.00 



Amount of permanent fund ... . $3,450.00 

PISCATAQUOG CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 

5 percent, 1913 .... $200.00 



Amount of permanent fund . . . $200.00 

MERRILL CEMETERY. 

Bonds of the city of Manchester, N, H., 

5 per cent, 1913 .... $200.00 



Amount of permanent fund ... . $200.00 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commo7i Council of the City 
of Manchester : 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the Overseers 
of the Poor herewith present their annual report for the year 
1890. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the City Farm 
during the year has been two. 

The whole number of families that have received more or less 
assistance off the farm during the year has been forty, consisting 
of one hundred persons, all of whom have a settlement in this 
city. Six of this number died during the year. 

The whole number of persons supported at the State Indus- 
trial School during the year has been three, at a cost of one dol- 
lar and fifty cents per week for each person. 

The whole number of persons supported at the County Farm 
during the year has been one, at a cost of two dollars per week. 

The whole number of persons supported at the Asylum for the 
Insane has been one, at a cost of four dollars per week. 

The whole number of persons supported at the Insane Asylum 
under control of the State Board of Commissioners of Lunacy, 
under chapter 18, Laws of 1889, June session, has been three, 
without cost to this city. 

The Overseers of the Poor have given and allowed three hun- 
dred and seventy-six orders to paupers off the farm during the 



196 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



year, consisting chiefly of groceries, fuel, medicine, board, cloth- 
ing, and for emergencies. 

The amount allowed to the several wards is as follows: 



Ward 2 . . . . . 


$24.58 




Ward 3 . . • • • 


135-90 




Ward 4 


226.40 




Ward 5 ..... 


923.86 




Ward 6 


250.00 




Ward 7 


6.35 




Ward 8 


• 315-88 


$1,882.97 






Bills allowed for emergency cases . 


. . 


2,518.60 




$4,401-57 


Cash received from county 


* • * 


2,201.57 


Total cost allowed 


$2,200.00' 



Cost over appropriation allowed, $200. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward i. Clerk. 
THOMAS L. QUIMBY, Ward 2. 
BENJAMIN F. GARLAND. 
GEORGE S. HOLMES. 
THOMAS H. MAHONEY. 
CHARLES FRANCIS. 
DAVID W. ANDERSON. 
HORATIO FRADD. 



A true copy. 



WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 

Clerk of the Board of Overseers of the Poor. 



To the Mayor ^ Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 
of Manchester : 
In compliance with chapter 81, sections i and 2, Laws, State 
of New Hampshire, passed at the June session, 1889, the Over- 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 197 

seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report under the 
head of " Aid to Dependent Soldiers and their Families." 

The whole number of families of indigent soldiers who have 
received more or less aid during the year has been twelve, con- 
sisting of thirty-two persons, at a cost of seven hundred ninety- 
five dollars and twenty-five cents. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, Ward i, Clerk. 

THOMAS L. QUIMBY, Ward 2. 

BENJAMIN F. GARLAND, Ward 3. 

GEORGE S. HOLMES, Ward 4- 

THOMAS H. MAHONEY, Ward 5. 

CHARLES FRANCIS, Ward 6. 

DAVID W. ANDERSON, Ward 7. 

HORATIO FRADD, Ward 8. 

A true copy. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 

Clo'k of the Board of Overseers of the Poor. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON 
CITY FARM. 



REPORT 



lOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY 

FARM. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester: 
Gentlemen, — The Mayor and Joint Standing Committee on 

the City Farm hereby submit their annual report for the year 

ending December 31, 1890. 

The following is the inventory and appraisal of the personal 

property of the City Farm made December 31, 1S90. 



Live-stock 


• 1:1,705.00 


Wagons, carts, and team furnishings 


963.50 


Farm implements ...... 


1,284.55 


Hay, grain, and produce .... 


2,952.40 


Household furniture . . 


2,117.14 


Provisions and fuel ..... 


1,116.81 


Total 


. ^10,139.40 


Statement of accounts for the year 1890 : 




Total cash paid out ..... 


$7,467.20 


Interest ....... 


1,000.00 




^8,467.20 


Total receipts of farm ..... 


2,432.75 



,034.45 



202 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Bills receivable 



Permanent improvements 



Increase in stock . 



$190.76 


$5^843.69 

300.20 


$5>543-49 
189.08 



$5:354-4^ 



Total number of weeks' board furnished, 2,2oo|-. 
Average cost of board for each individual per week, $2.43. 
Total cash paid city treasurer, 12,432.75. 



There was raised on the farm last season 
Corn 
Turnips 



Onions . . . . . . , , 45 " 

Beets . . . . . . . . 120 " 

Mangold beets . . . . . . . 253 " 

Carrots . . . . . . . . 158 " 

Beans . . . . . . . . 30 " 

Potatoes . . . . . . . .1,231 " 

Cabbage . . . . . . . .8,035 pounds. 

Squash ........ 2,800 " 

Hay . . . . . . . . 100 tons. 

Pork 5,482 pounds. 

Beef 2,844 

The potatoes were all sold early in the season instead of being 
kept for use, as they showed signs of rotting badly, and the 
superintendent thought best to dispose of them, which he was 
obliged to do at a very low price. 

The stock remains in full as good condition as one year ago. 
Early in the spring the committee thought it advisable to dispose 
of the oxen, which they did and replaced them with a pair of 
horses. 

The general appearance of the farm has been much improved 
by the removal of old walls, hedges, clearing brush, etc. 



613 bushels. 
547 " 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 203 

Mr. Streeter as superintendent, ably assisted by Mrs. Streeter as 
matron, have met the full expectations of the committee, and 
they heartily approve of their management. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor, 
JAMES F. BALDWIN, 
WILLIAM P. FARMER, 
THOMAS P. RILEY, 
GEORGE C. CHASE, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY SOLICITOR 



REPORT OF CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commom Council of the City of 
Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The City Solicitor hereby submits the follow- 
ing report for the year 1890 : 

Of the cases pending in court in which the city of Manchester 
was a party at the beginning of the year, the following, 
Clara Moore vs. Manchester, Mary Kildea vs. Manchester, 
Margaret Kelly vs. Manchester, and Sarah B. Bean vs. Manches- 
ter, were tried by the jury at the March term of the Supreme 
Court for Hillsborough county, all being for damages for per- 
sonal injuries while traveling on highways ; the trials resulted in 
verdicts for the plaintiffs, in each case for much less than the 
amount sued for. For the amounts paid by the city on the verdicts 
in the Kildea and Kelley cases, suit has been brought against the 
owners of the buildings in front of which the injuries were 
received, who are responsible for the obstructions in the high- 
way which caused the accidents. The cases of Florence O'Leary 
vs. Manchester, for damages for personal injuries ; of Jacob B. 
Mooar vs. Manchester, for land damages by changing the grade 
of a street ; of Manchester vs. the Western Union Telegraph 
Company, to recover the verdict in the Sykes case ; and of Man- 
chester vs. Manchester Shoe M'fg Company, to recover ex- 
pense of cleaning their vault under direction of the health 
officers, were all adjusted out of court, in a manner, in the 
judgment of the solicitor, beneficial to the city. Luther Hall vs. 
Manchester for land damages in laying out East Spruce street 
was tried by the county commissioners, and he was awarded a 
much smaller sum than he claimed. 



208 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

In the petition of P. C. Cheney Co. and others for a new 
highway from Amory street to the Mast road in Manchester, which 
was on trial at the beginning of the year before the county 
commissioners, the petitioners withdrew, before the city had 
put in its side of the case. The other cases on the docket January 
I, viz., those of Emeline C. Call, Augusta A. Currin, Maria 
Colby, T. S. Colby, and Worthley Brothers, all for damages for 
injuries received on highways ; of Caroline S. Head and others 
for damages to land by water flowing on it from the highway ; 
and of Rebecca C. Newton for land damages by changing the 
grade of Webster street, are still pending in court and m order 
for some disposition at the coming term of the Supreme Court. 

During the year new suits have been entered in the Supreme 
Court for Hillsborough county and now stand on the docket as 
follows : 

At the March Term : 

Louis Laventure vs. Manchester. 

A suit for $7,000 for damages for personal injuries occasioned 
by a telephone pole falling on the plaintiff in Hanover back 
street, October 15, 1889. The New England Telegraph and 
Telephone Company have been summoned to appear and take 
care of the case. 

WiNi. M. Parsons vs. Manchester. 

A suit for $15,000 damages for personal injuries occasioned by 
being thrown from his carriage in Beech back street, Septea"iber 
25, 1889. F. H. Auger and wife have been summoned to appear 
and defend the case, as they are responsible for any defect which 
may have existed in the road. 

Margaret Golden vs. Manchester. 

A suit for $5,000 for personal injuries received by falling on 
Merrimack street, November 15, 1889. John H. Maynard, who 
occasioned whatever obstruction there was in the street, if any, 
has been summoned to defend the action, and agrees to hold the 
city harmless therefrom. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 209 

■ Lee Big vs. Manchester. 

In this action the plaintiff sues for $5,000, for personal injur- 
ies occasioned by falling on Elm street, December 29, 1889. 

Frederick E. Scheer zfs. Manchester. 

This plaintiff alleges that on February 27, 18S8, he fell on 
Walker street and broke his leg, and sues for ^5,000. 

Hannah Ryan vs. Manchester. 

This suit is brought to recover damages for injuries alleged to 
have been received by falling, owing to the slippery condition of 
Lake avenue, February 17, 1889. 

The appeal of Campbell & Maxwell from the judgment of the 
committee of appraisers as to the value of a horse killed by 
order of the mayor and aldermen as having glanders. 

The petition of P. C. Cheney and others for a new highway 
from Amoskeag Village to the Mast road in Goffstown. 

At the September Term : 

Edwin Branch vs. Manchester. 

A suit to recover ^7,000, for injuries alleged to have been 
received by falling on Pearl street, July 22, 1890. 

Edwin R. Whitney vs. Manchester. 

In which the plaintiff claims ^15,000 for injuries which he 
says were caused by the icy condition of North street, March 19, 
1890. 

December 29, 1890, under direction of the Mayor and Alder- 
men, the solicitor brought suits against ex-City Marshal M. J. 
Jenkins, and his bondsmen, W. B. Patten, H. B. Sawyer, and 
C. E. York, to recover the amount of money unpaid by said 
Jenkins, according to the result of the examination of his accounts 
by the city auditor. 

14 



210 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This covers the cases now in court in ^yhich the city is a 
party. There seems to be an idea somewhat prevalent that the 
looking after cases in the Supreme Court is about all the solicitor 
has to do. As a matter of fact, that portion of his duties, though 
very important, forms but a small part of his labors. In per- 
forming them, in the actual trial of causes, the solicitor has had 
assistance in some of the cases of other counsel. It is im- 
possible, almost, and in important cases very rarely attempted, for 
one man to try a difficult cause alone ; but in the performance 
■of other numerous labors of his office, the solicitor has worked 
unaided. These duties cover nearly every day in the year. What 
whh attending Police Court and trying every variety of criminal 
•cause, advising the mayor and other officials in the line of their 
•duties, investigating claims, attending committee meetings and 
•meetings of the aldermen, drawing all sorts of documents which 
the city needs, draftmg ordinances and performing many other 
•duties, the office of solicitor is no sinecure. The present incum- 
bent has givea the city his best endeavor, and appreciates the 
manner in which his efforts have been received by the City Coun- 
cils of 1889-90. He would publicly express his thanks to you 
all, and for the favors and courtesies shown him by the various 
officials with whom his duties have brought him in contact, he 

as deeply grateful. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

O'/)' Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of 

Alanchester : 

I herewith submit a report for the year 1S90. 

The milk brought into the city from the suburbs and sur- 
rounding towns was sampled by stationing myself on the differ- 
ent roads leading into the city, and afterwards samples of that 
being delivered were compared with that taken from the full 
loads as originally brought in, which conclusively showed me in 
each case whether the milk delivered would stand the same test 
as that of the load before any delivery had been made. 

To give an idea of the amount of business on some of the 
roads entering the city it may be well to state that there are t^'^ 
well loaded wagons which enter the city by South Main street, 
eight by the way of Amoskeag, and from that number down to 
one or two on other roads. The larger part of the milk supply 
of the city comes from the towns of Dunbarton, Goffstown, and 
Bedford, the town of Bedford furnishing a much larger quantity 
than any other town ; yet within the city limits a much larger 
amount is raised than is generally supposed. 

The milk supply was not affected by severe droughts or scar- 
city of feed, as has often been the case in previous years, and in 
fact the supply was so good that at times many milk raisers were 
unable to dispose of all they raised, daily, especially when pas- 
turage was at its best. 

During the month of October tuberculosis was found to be 
badly developed in the Industrial School herd of cows, and steps 
were at once taken to ascertain whether other herds in that vicin- 
ity were suffering from the same disease. As the Industrial 
School herd furnished no milk supplied to the city, I did not 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

make a specialty of examining the milk from that herd, but I 
at once visited all other herds in that locality, and all in the 
northern section of the city, from which a portion of our milk 
supply is obtained, and took samples from the different herds, 
which I took particular pains to mark, that the cow from which 
the sample was obtained might be easily identified in the future, 
should any of the animals be condemned by the veterinary sur- 
geons, as I took all of my samples direct from these different 
herds before any examination had been made by a veterinary 
surgeon, except at the Industrial School. The next thing to do 
was to obtain the use of a powerful microscope. As none was 
owned by the city, and on account of the cost of such an instru- 
ment it was not deemed advisable to purchase one for this par- 
ticular occasion, therefore, by permission of the mayor, I em- 
ployed Dr. J. Frank Robinson to prepare these samples for ex- 
amination, especially for the detection of bacilli, or germs of tu- 
berculosis, and 19 samples were thus examined very thoroughly, 
and nothing could be found, and a portion of these samples I 
examined with him, and on the following day, a part of these 
herds were examined by a veterinary surgeon ; three cows were 
condemned and slaughtered, in only one of which traces of tu- 
berculosis were found. From two of the slaughtered cows I had 
taken samples of milk. It was afterwards reported that symp- 
toms of the disease had again been found in one of the herds, 
and I again visited the herd and procured two samples in which 
nothing was found, and an examination by veterinary surgeons 
on the following day proved the report groundless. 

These examinations were of much benefit, inasmuch as they 
establish beyond a doubt that the trouble arising from this source 
was of much smaller consequence than was at first supposed, al- 
though it established beyond doubt that tuberculosis existed 
among cattle in our vicinity, but not to any extent among herds 
from which the milk supply of the city had been obtained, and 
again, it was the means of causing all herds to be examined by 
expert veterinary surgeons and cards of health were given to each 
owner, thereby allaying any fears consumers might have regard- 
ing their milk supply. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 215 

At first it seemed a serious affair, and one which was very lia- 
ble to contaminate the whole community with tuberculosis, and 
at the same time almost wholly obliterate the milk traffic, besides 
entailing a severe loss upon the farmers and milkmen, but the 
appearance of the disease will be an incentive to each milk 
raiser to keep his herd in a healthy condition, and it will cause 
every milkman to be more careful of the source of his supply. 

One hundred and four licenses have been given out and duly- 
recorded, amounting to $52. There have not been as many- 
store licenses given out as during some previous years, owing tO' 
fewer changes in firms handling milk, and fewer new firms com- 
mencing business who cared to sell milk. There is a growing 
tendency to consolidation among the milkmen, and a few routes 
have been purchased and consolidated with others during the 
year. One route already has six teams, and another has five, 
while a few have two teams each. There are 87 regular routes,, 
and the number of quarts of new milk delivered daily 15,311, 
and 1,192 quarts of skimmed milk are delivered daily. Esti- 
mated number of cows to produce the daily supply of milk for 
the city, 2,347. The average daily consumption of milk has in- 
creased during the year, as have also small routes of from two to 
six cans capacity. The sale of skimmed milk is confined to five 
routes. 

I have collected 155 samples, which I have carefully tested, 
and have analyzed 35 samples, none of which have been found 
below the standard required by law. I have examined many 
samples for private parties, at one time going to an adjoining 
town for the purpose, although outside the limits of my jurisdic- 
tion, and have at all times held myself in readiness to respond to 
any call, whether for the general public or for parties requiring 
private tests or analysis, and during the year I have had but four 
complaints, which were on account of milk souring in hot 
weather, as many of our citizens did not take ice on account of 
the cost being more than in previous seasons. 

In my visits to the herds within the city limits I have found 
the farmers very courteous and untiring in their efforts to assist 
me in any way in the performance of my duty, and the store- 



216 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

keepers and milkmen, whose patience no doubt I sometimes 
taxed in the strict performance of duty, and which seemed per- 
haps unnecessarily often to them, have invariably treated me in 
a gentlemanly manner, both by day and by night. 

Very respectfully, 

H. F. W. LITTLE, 

Alilk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



City Marshal's Office, 
Manchester, N. H., February 23, 1891. 

To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit to you my annual 
report of the Police Department for the year ending December 
31, 1890, showing the strength and condition of the force, and 
reviewing briefly the service performed by it during the year. 

POLICE organization. 

The police force of Manchester at the date of making this re- 
port consists of thirty-six men, organized with rank and title as 
follows, viz : 

City Marshal, Horatio W, Longa. 

Deputy Marshal, John F. Cassidy. 

Captain, Lafayette Tebbetts. 

Sergeant, Michael J. Healey. 

Day Patrol. 

Randall W. Bean. John T. O'Dowd. 

Edgar Farrar. Florence Sullivan. 

Ira P. Fellows. Bartlett N. Wilson. 
Edwin A. Hutchins. 

Night Patrol. 

Francois E. Bourassa. Benjamin F. Lake. 

Henry A. Burns. George A. Lovejoy. 

William M. Caldwell. Andrew J. Mayhew. 



220 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

George W. Cheney. Samuel L. Mitchell. 

John C. Colburn. John T. O'Malley. 

Norbert Decoteau. Francis Renville. 

James F. Dunn. Philip Richer. 

Edward C. Emerson. Olof Ring. 

Merrill Farmer. Gilbert A. Sackett. 

George E. Flanders. Timothy P. Shea. 

Jonathan E. Floyd. Charles W. Stevens. 

Lowell O. Fowler. " George E. Varnum. 
Edward H. Holmes. 

SUMMARY OF THE WORK ACCOMPLISHED BY THE DEPARTMENT. 

Fines and costs, $5,773-3i. 

Assault, 1 80; aggravated assault, 4; assault on officer, 23; 
adultery, 2 ; attempt to rescue prisoner, i ; burglary, 23 ; break- 
ing glass, 8; common drunkard, i; drunk, 1,230; disorderly 
conduct, 8 ; defacing buildings, 2 ; disorderly house, 3 ; expos- 
ure of person, 2; embezzlement, i; fornication, 25; fast driv- 
ing, 12 ; keeping liquor for sale, 158 ; keeping open Sunday, 10; 
keeping dog without license, 31; larceny from the person, 6; 
larceny, 112; manslaughter, i; malicious mischief, 3; noise 
and brawl, 20 ; obscene and profane language, i ; attempt at 
rape, 3 ; running away from house of correction, 6 ; stealing a 
ride, 7 ; selling liquor, 2 ; stubborn child, i ; throwing stones, i ; 
throwing snow-balls, 3; vagabond, 3. 

The cases were disposed of as follows: 

Paid fine imposed, 556; committed to house of correction, 
SoS ; committed to house of correction on sentence, 48 ; com- 
mitted to jail for non-payment of fine, 120; nol-prossed, 31; 
committed to reform school, 4 ; bound over to Supreme Court, 
140 ; committed to jail — bail not furnished, 51 ; committed to 
Wilton, 21 ; sentence suspended, 30; appealed, 15 ; discharged, 
48; whole number of arrests, 2,599; females, 396; on file, 80. 

Admitted for lodging, 1,293 5 accidents reported, 14; assisted 
out of town officers, 24; buildings found open and secured, 435 ; 
cases investigated, 310; cases of cruelty to animals investigated, 
8 ; defective streets and sidewalks reported, 30 ; disturbances 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 221 

suppressed, 468; dogs killed, 112; dogs lost and found, 22; 
dangerous dogs reported, 64; fires discovered and reported, 7; 
fires extinguished without an. alarm, 19; injured and sick per- 
sons assisted, 55 ; intoxicated persons taken home, 155 ; lights 
extinguished in buildings, 70; lights furnished for dangerous 
places, 83; lost children restored to their parents, 108; stolea 
property recovered, ^2,499.66; nuisances abated, 56; search 
warrants for liquor, none found, 11 ; search warrants for stolen 
goods served, 3 ; stray teams put up, 79 ; street obstructions 
removed, 145. 

A large amount of business is required of and performed by 
the police that does not appear on the records, in attending to 
complaints and in the general exercise of care and watchfulness 
over the property and personal well-being of the citizens. 

An officer of the police department is supposed to be a well- 
stored encyclopedia of information on all matters and thmgs 
transpiring or existing in the city, and is called upon to remedy 
all troubles of whatever nature that occur. 

The last year has been one of unusual quiet as regards crime. 
No serious disturbances or outbreaks have occurred during the 
year. 

Special pains has been taken to render the fire department 
every assistance to protect life and property. Both have worked 
harmoniously together and the very best feeling exists between 
the two departments. 

A large number of cases reported, which demanded investiga- 
tion requiring considerable labor on the part of the officers, are 
of such character that they cannot be presented in form or sum- 
marized. 

The members of the department have, with a few exceptions, 
performed their duties in a satisfactory manner. My desire has- 
been that the force might reach a high standard of excellence, and 
I point with some pride to the fact that of the higher crimes com- 
mitted, the offenders were arrested and found guilty. This is grat- 
ifying and must show to the citizens of Manchester that the offi- 
cers are zealous in the discharge of their duties. 

I have made an effort to conduct the department on a basis of 



222 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

economy as well as efificiency. As a result, a very large saving 
has been made. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The conduct of the officers in the department has been good. 
Only one case has been brought before the Board, and that was 
not considered of sufficient importance to merit removal or rep- 
rimand. 

I am satisfied with the department, that they intend to dis- 
charge their duties with fidelity and zeal, and the discretion ex- 
ercised by them in dealing with the varied interests with which 
they are officially brought in contact and the lack of complaint 
of official misconduct are the best testimonials to the efificiency 
and sobriety of the force. 

We have assisted officers from other places in numerous cases, 
and have also received valuable assistance and favors from officers 
in our neighboring cities, for which we are extremely grateful. 

TRAMPS AND LODGERS. 

The whole number of persons applying for and furnished with 
lodgings has been 1,293. 

The poor and unfortunate we have always with us. 

Many who apply for lodging at the police station are truly un- 
fortunate, but the greater number are what have come to be 
known as " tramps." They are a nuisance. They have no 
abiding place, and live upon the mistaken charity of any one 
who gives them either food or clothing. 

POLICE MATRON. 

This department has been looked after very carefully and effi- 
ciently by the present matron, Miss A. B. Brown, who reports 
daily and attends to such duties at the police station as are in her 
line of duty. Miss Brown also investigates such cases of young 
girls as are liable to fall into habits of vice and immorality as are 
called to her attention. 

The police business from its very nature is liable to make ene- 
mies for the officer who discharges duty faithfully, for in the en- 
forcement of the city ordinances, and in the execution of crimi- 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 223 

nal law, it is not strange that frequently he should run against 
the sharp corners of men and test the individual peculiarities of 
their nature ; for rarely is a person arrested who has not sympa- 
thizing friends ready to believe that the officer has exceeded his 
authority. 

A policeman should be civil and courteous at all times and so 
conduct himself as to possess the moral support of law-abiding 
citizens, but he who is everybody's friend is usually better adapt- 
ed to other occupations than for this peculiar work. It requires 
time, experience, and study, before a police officer becomes 
thoroughly acquainted with the duties of this office. 

In closing my report, I would remember His Honor, the retir- 
ing Mayor, whose counsel and assistance in the duties pertaining 
to this office have been of great value, the members of the honor- 
able City Council for their confidence and co-operation, and the 
rank and file of this department who have so ably assisted me, 
and tender to each and all my hearty thanks for these favors so 
generously bestowed, with the assurance that during the coming 
year I shall continue to perform the duties without partiality, 
and to the best of my knowledge and ability. I also extend my 
heartfelt thanks to Solicitor Jones, Judge Hunt, and Police Clerk 
Bickford, for their kind words of encouragement ; and for the 
members of the police department I have only words of praise 
for the manner in which they have performed their duties during 
the past fiscal year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

H. W. LONGA, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



15 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



ORGANIZATION FOR 1890. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

DAVID B. VARNEY, ex officio Chairman. 
JOHN F. FROST, President of the Common Council. 
BENJAMIN C. DEAN, Vice-chairman of the Board. 
JAMES E. DODGE, Clerk of the Board. 
Ward I. — Charles H. Manning. 

John L. Sanborn. 
Ward 2. — Benjamin C. Dean. 
William C. Clarke. 
Ward 3. — Nathan P. Hunt. 
James E. Dodge. 
Ward 4. — Frederick C. Crosby. 

S. B. Stearns. 
AVard 5.— John F. Cahill. 

James P. Slattery. 
Ward 6. — Charles G. Dodge. 

Frank T. E. Richardson 
Ward 7. — : Edward B. Woodbury 

Marshall P. Hall. 
Ward 8. — Luther C. Baldwin. 
William K. Robbins. 



228 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. J. E. Dodge, Slattery, Stearns^ 
Frost. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Woodbury, Hall, Robbins. 

Repairs, Furniture, a?id Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, San- 
born, Charles G. Dodge. 

Text-books, Apparatus, and Studies. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt^ 
W. C. Clarke. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, Richardson. 

Music. — Messrs. Richardson, W. C. Clarke, Crosby. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. J. E. Dodge, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Manning, Frost, C. G. Dodge. 

Examinatioti of Teachers. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, Stearns. 

Attendance. — Messrs. Baldwin, Woodbury, Crosby. 

Health. — Messrs. Robbins, Cahill, Sanborn. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Dean, Hall, Hunt, Stearns. 

Ash and Bridge Streets. — Messrs. Dean, Hunt, W. C. Clarke. 

Lincoln Street. — Messrs. Stearns, Woodbury, Richardson. 

Spring Street and Lowell Street. — Messrs. Hall, Manning, 
Sanborn. 

Franklin Street. — Messrs. Woodbury, J. E. Dodge, Sanborn. 

Training School and Wilson Hill. — Messrs. Hunt, Dean, J. E. 
Dodge. 

West Manchester Grammar. — Messrs. Baldwin, Stearns, C. G. 
Dodge. 

School Street and South Main Street. — Messrs. Robbins, Slat- 
tery, Baldwin. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 229 

Webster Street, B lodge t Street, Amoskeag, and Stark District. 
— Messrs. W. C. Clarke, Robbins, Slattery. 

Bakersville. — Messrs. C. G. Dodge, Hall, Woodbury. 

Hallsville and Youngsville. — Messrs. Crosby, C. G. Dodge, 
Cahill. 

Mosquito Pond and Webster'' s Mills. — Messrs. Cahill, Robbins, 
Slattery. 

Goffe'' s Falls and Harvey District. — Messrs. J. E. Dodge, 
Baldwin, Crosby. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. Richardson, Manning, W. C. 
Clarke. 



In Board of School Committee. 
December 31, 1890. 

The Superintendent presented his annual report to the committee, and it was 
accepted. 

Charles H. Manning presented the annual report prepared by him at the re- 
quest of the Board. 

Voted, That the report by Mr. Manning be accepted and adopted as the re- 
port of the Board, and that it be transmitted to the City Councils, together with 
the report of the Superintendent, for publication in the annual City Report. 

JAMES E. DODGE, Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the City Councils : 

The school committee respectfully present the following report 
for the year ending December 31, 1890, it being their final re- 
port and the forty-fourth in the annual series. 

In the Appendix will be found, in a tabulated form, all the 
usual statistics covered by this report. 

Though the total enrollment of pupils for the year shows but a. 
slight increase over that of last year, the general condition and use- 
fulness of the schools we believe has improved, and with the now- 
increased accommodation in West Manchester we expect a con- 
siderable increase in the enrollment in that quarter, and the same 
would be true with increased accommodation east of Elm street, 
where nearly every house is overcrowded. 

Commencing at the North End, the Webster-street house, in 
the midst of one of the most rapidly growing sections of the 
city, has already five schools in four rooms, the upper east rooni 
having been temporarily partitioned off into two rooms, neither 
of which affords proper light or ventilation. Immediate provi- 
sion should be made for the addition of at least two rooms on 
the south side. 

Blodget-street house is full, but we do not consider the en- 
largement of that building advisable. 

The Ash-street house is overcrowded and a temporary room, 
has been divided off from the hall in the third story, until the 
building can be relieved by the erection of a four-room building; 
on the Bridge-street lot, and this also should be done at once. 

The High School needs an addition of four recitation rooms^ 
which would allow the two rooms on the west of the assembly 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to be added to that room, making of it a fairly lighted one of 
sufficient size for the present needs of the school. As at present 
arranged, the assembly room is dark, gloomy, and poorly ven- 
tilated. 

Under the new recitation rooms should be a gymnasium and 
drill hall for the use of both girls and boys. 

A much better scheme would be to build a new high-school 
house on a suitable lot nearer the center of the city and use the 
present high-school house instead of erecting a new building on 
the Bridge-street lot. 

The Training School, comfortably filled during the fall and 
winter terms, is generally overcrowded during the spring. 

Lincoln-street house and Wilson Hill are full to overflowing, 
but a new six-room schoolhouse at Hallsville, taken with the pro- 
posed changes north, would obviate this. 

A new house at Hallsville is the most imperative need of all 
and a lot should at once be procured and the building com- 
menced in the spring. 

The ill-advised sale of the Beech-street house of course is 
partly to blame for the overcrowded condition of the schools in 
this quarter. 

We congratulate you on the completion of the new Varney 
school house in West Manchester, which gives ample accommo- 
dations for some years to come in that quarter, and, while there 
is nothing unnecessary or extravagant about it, we believe it to 
be one of the most perfect houses in the New England States. 

This year will be the last of mixed courses in the High School, 
as the class which graduates in June is the last that entered be- 
fore the adoption of the present courses. This will simplify 
matters somewhat, and though the courses are yet far from per- 
fection we think all the changes have been for the better. 

The growing needs of the school require the services of another 
teacher, as some of the classes are much too large to receive 
proper attention in the time allowed. 

The master of the school should have at least one hour a day 
during the session to devote to visiting the other recitation rooms, 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 233 

that his influence may be felt throughout the school, but with the 
present force this is impossible. 

The new free text-book law has added much work to the 
teachers' duties here as elsewhere. 

The scholarship, discipline, and attendance at this school 
never were better than they are to-day, notwithstanding dis- 
orders that have occurred out of school hours. 

In the grammar schools there have been no changes of note 
and they, as well as all the lower grades, have been maintained 
in a high state of efficiency. 

Among the teachers we have lost by death is Miss Rocilla M. 
Tuson from the High School, one of the ablest and most con- 
scientious teachers the school has ever had. Death has also re- 
moved Miss Etta J. Carley, of the Amoskeag school, an able 
teacher of many years' experience and usefulness. 

Other changes in the pe?'sonnel of the teaching force will be 
more fully noted in the report of our able superintendent of 
schools, to whose untiring energy and good judgment is largely 
due the success of our unusually able corps of teachers. 

To the Training School is due the fact that a large part of our 
force is home talent, and we are confident that this school was 
never doing better work than at present. 

The evening drawing school, which has been a marked suc- 
cess from its beginning, is doing better work than ever, the classes 
being full and the attendance excellent. There is no money 
expended by the city for education that shows more direct and 
satisfactory returns for the expenditure. 

The condition of the school buildings is fair, but the limited 
means at the disposal of the Board (about two per cent on the 
value of the houses) allows very little for improvement. 

During the last summer vacation, besides the ordinary repairs, 
the Youngsville house was reshingled, replastered, and new floors 
laid, brick vaults built for the outhouses, and the entire building 
painted inside and out. At the Webster-street house, the Smead 
system of dry closets was introduced at a cost of about fourteen 
hundred dollars, and it is a great improvement over the former 
arrangement. During the next summer, a steam heating system 



234 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

should be placed in the Bakersville house, at present heated by 
two hot-air furnaces which are insufficient and cost more to re- 
pair every year than all the steam plants in the other houses. 

The steam heating at the Ash-street house is insufficient to 
allow any ventilation in very cold weather. During the coming 
summer the boilers should be repaired and the radiating surface 
in most of the rooms increased. 

The free text-book law has been a source of considerable more 
expense this year than it will be again, as the renewal and addi- 
tion will be much less than the first cost of starting the system. 
It has hardly been in operation here long enough to pronounce 
judgment as to its real merits, but as far as our experience goes we 
are well pleased with it, as it is the final step in making the 
schools free in fact as well as in name. 

If any one doubts the utility of a truant officer, a perusal of 
the appended report of that official should be convincing. Of 
the whole number of 375 absentees reported to him, there were 
but three cases where the delinquent was n'ot found or accounted 
for. 

In conclusion, we would thank you, gentlemen of the Coun- 
cils, for the prompt and kind consideration received by all mat- 
ters we have brought before you. 

CHARLES H. MANNING, 

J^of the Cotfwiittee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Manchester School Board : 

Gentlemen, — I present the following as the Annual Report of 
the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the year 1890 : 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

Throughout the year six teachers have been employed in the 
High School, twenty-one in the grammar schools, and sixteen in 
the middle schools. There have been twenty-six primary schools, 
taught by twenty-three teachers. This is accounted for from the 
fact that the principal of the Training School, who for conven- 
ience is reckoned among the middle-school teachers, has charge 
of three primary schools where no regular teachers are employed. 
There have also been two partially graded schools^ employing 
three teachers, and six ungraded schools f with one teacher for 
each. 

The organization of the city schools for 1890 has therefore 
been equivalent to seventy-seven distinct schools of a single room 
each, taught by an average of seventy-five teachers. The num- 
ber of schools and of teachers is respectively the same as the 
number of each last year ; for the gain this year was offset by the 
discontinuance of the Beech-street school at the end of the 
second term in 1889. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The number of pupils in attendance upon the public day 
schools this year is greater by 27 than for last year, while the 
average number belonging is less than for last year by 6, and the 

* The upper room at Amoskeag and the Hallsville schooL 
t Country suburban. 



236 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



average attendance is less by 45. To understand so unusual a 
record, it is necessary to give the latter items by terms. 

Av. No. Belonging. A v. Daily Attendance. 

Winter Term, 1889, . . 2,818 2,588 

" " 1890, . . 2,607 2,305 

Spring " 1889, . . 2,821 2,590 

" " 1890, . . 2,791 2,581 

Fall " 1889, . . 2,764 2,565 

" " 1890, . . 2,987 2,722 

From the foregoing figures it is readily seen that though the 
averages for the fall term make the showing about 200 better for 
1S90, the absences during the spring and more especially during 
the winter cause the items under comparison to make the record 
in the aggregate appear slightly to a disadvantage for 1890. 
These excessive absences occurred when la grippe was rampant 
throughout our community, and it is justly chargeable with the 
apparently inconsistent record for the present year. 

It is difficult yet to tell to what extent the increase of about 
200 during the fall term of this year over any term of last year is 
attributable to the introduction of free text-books ; for other rea- 
sons than their use have quite as often been given for more largely 
patronizing the public schools. 

The following tabular arrangement will show the comparative 
rate of tardinesses for four years, including the present year : 

Average Tardinesses on Average Attendance, ^jer Ptipil. 



Schools. 



1887. 



High school I 4.6 

Grammar schools 2.6 

Middle schools 3.2 

Primary schools 2.1 

Partially graded schools 2.9 

Ungraded schools 4.1 



1888. 


1889. 


4.0 


4.8 


2.0 


2.0 


3.2 


3.1 


2.4 


2.8 


2.7 


4.2 


2.7 


2.1 



1890. 

2.8 
1.9 
2.4 
2.3 
3.4 
1.1 



Total tardinesses, 1889, 7,231 ; 1890, 5,755. 
There has been a gratifying decrease in every grade. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 237 



NEED OF MORE SCHOOLROOMS. 

What I said in my report for 1889 in regard to additional 
schoolrooms and new schoolhouses has proved emphatically 
true. There is imperative need of a new schoolhouse at Halls- 
ville, and of additional rooms for the relief of the overcrowded 
schools in the Ash-street and Lincoln-street buildings. 

There should also be more room provided for high-school 
purposes, and it has been wisely suggested by the chairman of 
the sub-committee of the High School that a new and properly 
appointed building be erected for its use. 

Upon completion of a new high-school house, the present 
building could be used for the relief of the Ash-street and Lin- 
coln-street buildings, already overcrowded, and also be used for 
the accommodation of the rapidly increasing school population 
in the eastern part of the city. . • 

CHANGES. 

The new school building in West Manchester, known as the 
Varney school, will next term be occupied by the only grammar 
school on the west side of the Merrimack, and by such pupils of 
middle school grade as live beyond the Piscataquog river. 

By the withdrawal from the Main-street house of the grammar 
school, and of the other pupils above mentioned, sufficient room 
will be provided on Main street for the four unduly large and im- 
properly housed schools now at the School-street building, — 
with opportunity, if deemed advisable, to organize them as five 
schools. 

The rapidly growing needs of this part of the town are such 
that it will be unwise for the city to dispose of the School-street 
property, unless a larger lot is immediately secured in a southeast- 
erly direction therefrom. It will be better to sell the Clinton-street 
engine-house, and use the house on School street for evening 
schools and a ward room a few years. The old building can then 
be removed and replaced by a proper structure for primary 
schools likely to be needed in that locality within five or six 
years. 



238 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. 

The work of the schools is in accord with that agreed upon 
by the leading educators of our day as best adapted to train the 
rising generation for the emergencies of immediate citizenship, 
and for the proper discharge of the general duties of life. 

The efforts of superintendent and teachers for the year 
have therefore been to improve the quality of that work, rather 
than to make any radical changes in its character. The free text- 
book law, which became operative in our schools early in the 
year, provided opportunity for desired changes in text-books, and 
the superintendent then exerted his influence to secure the best 
in the market ; he also prepared modifications of the course of 
study necessitated by the changes made ; and has endeavored to 
advise teachers to the best of his ability according to their ap- 
parent needs, throughout the year. The teachers have not only 
heartily co-operated, but of their own volition they have in 
general taken a deep and abiding interest in the improve- 
ments attempted, and have sought from every available source 
any aid seemingly helpful. The result has been in a good meas- 
ure satisfactory. Specialists who have been among us do not find 
the work of our schools to suffer in the lines of their work, when 
compared with the efforts of others in similar grades whose work 
they have inspected or directed; and it is designed that the work 
in all its lines shall be so done that it may at every point be 
found entitled to similar approbation when duly inspected. 

The High School stands at the head of our public school sys- 
tem, and the present efficiency of its organization and the excel- 
lence of its work are commensurate with its normal position. This 
school has been greatly improved since the organization of the 
present board of school committee: and you, gentlemen, may 
take just pride that your efforts have produced a school that must 
well satisfy its patrons. 

While all the schools have profited at your hands, it may be 
proper to mention the Webster-street schools and the schools at 
Hallsville and Youngsville as especially improved, — the latter 
largely in consequence of what has been done by the committee 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 239 

on repairs of schoolhouses, though the teachers there for the last 
two terms are exceptionally good, at least for country districts. 

The City Training School for Teachers has maintained its usual 
efficiency throughout the year, and continued to do excellent 
work. This school is a highly important factor in our system, 
and it has particularly well fulfilled its mission during the admin- 
istration of your Board. 

The Lincoln-street and Ash-street schools have from their 
organization occupied a leading position in our system of schools, 
and they are still largest and as important and successful as any. 
The overcrowded condition in the lower grades at Ash street 
has already resulted in forcing one of the grammar divisions to 
the third floor of the building, and similar conditions will pre- 
vail in the Lincoln-street district as early as the opening of the 
spring term. Moreover, unless relief is soon afforded the schools 
in these two districts, the large halls in the Ash-street and Lin- 
coln-street buildings will have to be subdivided into school rooms 
and pupils be required to mount thereto. 

The whole number of different teachers employed one term or 
more in the day schools, for the year 1890, has been eighty-six. 
Their respective positions may be learned from the " Attendance 
Table" in the Appendix (Pages C, D, E, and F) ; but the 
various changes made within the year can be more readily under- 
stood by an inspection of the arrangement showing " Changes in 
the Corps of Teachers." (Appendix, page K.) 

Eight teachers have left the schools during the year by resig- 
nation, two * by expiration of term of service, and one has died. 
The ten teachers' positions thus made vacant were duly filled by 
transfers and the election of new teachers, two males and eight 
females ; of these, one half (or five) are graduates of our city 
schools and three of the five of the Training School. Each of 
these five has shown good results ; and, likewise, most of the oth- 
ers, who came from out of town. At least four of those with- 
drawn from our schools during the year were as good as the best, 
and of these none was better than Miss Rocilla M. Tuson, who 
suddenly died June 3, 1890. 

* Both at Youngsville. 



240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



OBITUARIES. 

I here submit a most just and sincere tribute to the memory of 
Miss Tuson, uttered on the day of her death by Col. B. C. 
Dean, vice-chairman of your board, as the result of a newspaper 
interview. 

" The sudden death of Miss Rocilla M. Tuson, of our high school corps of 
teachers, is a crushing blow to her family and friends, and casts a deep gloom 
over the hearts of all who are interested in the cause of education in our city. 

An acquaintance with her and with her school work of some twelve years^ 
covering her service in both the grammar and high schools, convinces me that 
the latter has met with an almost irreparable loss. Miss Tuson had no superior 
among our teachers as a disciplinarian or as an instructor. Thoroughly 
equipped for all work she undertook to perform, and always ready and willing 
to take upon herself any additional labor called for by committee or principal of 
the school, she invariably carried to the discharge of her duties a strong mind, 
well trained, intelligent methods, and a bright, cheerful, and winning manner 
which never failed to win the love of her pupils, and the hearty respect and 
esteem of all her associates. She was a thoroughly conscientious, true, and 
noble woman, pure in mind, upright in life, and devoted to and enthusiastic in 
her work. She fully deserved the success which ever attended her efforts, and 
merits the highest commendations possible to bestow. In every way her death 
is a serious blow to high-school work, and her place can hardly be filled " 

The following resolutions were also offered on behalf of the 
high-school sub-committee by Marshall P. Hall, at the special 
meeting of your Board in June, and unanimously adopted by the 
Board. 

In view of the recent death of Miss Rocilla M. Tuson, an instructor in the 
High School, it is 

Resolved by the Board of School Committee, That we greatly deplore the 
loss of a teacher whose work was of inestimable value, and whose purity of 
character and noble devotion to duty have called forth unwonted expressions 
of love and respect, both private and public, in this community. 

Resolved, That we hold in admiration the record of her life, which has given 
another and most beautiful expression to our conception of a true teacher — 
faithful, patient, and earnest, loving the task of teaching for the sake of those 
she taught. 

" Nor reaping for self the harvest sown. " 

Resolved, That the clerk transmit a copy of these resolutions to the family of 
the deceased teacher, and tender therewith the personal regard and sympathy 
of the members of this Board. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 241 

Miss Etta J. Carley was but nominally in the employ of the 
Board at the time of her death, February 14, 1890. It was only, 
however, on account of loss of health that she, last year, closed 
active duties as a teacher. Miss Carley was a product of our 
schools. For several years she rendered exceptionally satisfac- 
tory service as a teacher. Though in a difficult position, by her 
cheerftilness, energy, and tact, she invariably had a school that 
was a credit to herself and highly profitable to her pupils. 

At the regular meeting of the School Board in April, Mr. Wm. 
C. Clarke offered the following, which was unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, It has pleased the All-wise Father to remove Miss Etta J. Carley 
to her heavenly home, 

Resolved, that in her death we sincerely mourn for the loss of an unusually 
faithful, energetic, and efficient teacher, whose work has ever been held in high 
appreciation by this Board; and that we hereby extend to her relatives and 
friends our profound sympathy in the days of their sorrow for one so worthily 
beloved. 

CLOSING SCHOOL IN BAD WEATHER. 

The following are present regulations in regard to closing the 
schools by aid of the fire-alarm signals : 

The bells of the city fire-alarm will signal to close the schools 
when in the judgment of the superintendent the severity of the 
weather or very bad traveling may seem to require it, as follows : 

To close the primary and middle schools, two strokes with 
fifteen seconds between them. 

To close all the schools, two immediate strokes and after a 
lapse of fifteen seconds two more immediate strokes. 

The times of striking the bells for closing the schools are, — 

1. For no forenoon session, at 8.05 a. m. 

2. For no afternoon session, at 11.30 a. m., or at 1.15 r. i\r. 
Whenever the four signals are given at 11.30 to dispense with 

the afternoon session, the primary, middle, and grammar schools 
will be dismissed for the day at 11.45, ^^''d the high school at i 
o'clock. 

Janitors are directed not to ring the school bells on any half- 
day for which the four signals may be given for closing all the 
schools. 

16 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Teachers should keep their pupils informed in regard to the 
foregoing regulations, and suggest to them that they listen for 
signals at the times named, whenever the weather and traveling 
are very bad. 

If at any time pupils should appear at a school through failure 
to hear or understand attempted signals for closing the schools in 
bad weather, teachers who may be present are directed to care 
for pupils as their interests most demand, and not thoughtlessly 
turn them back before they have opportunity to get rested or 
dry. If a session be held, other pupils who fail to attend are 
not to be marked absent. 

The authority thus delegated to the superintendent has been 
exercised this year rather more frec|uently than heretofore ; be- 
cause, first, it has seemed to be the wish of the patrons of our 
Bchools that their children should be excused from attending in 
rainy weather, or whenever the ground is very wet. This is es- 
pecially true of their feelings in regard to younger pupils attend- 
ing the primary and middle schools. Secondly, the schools have 
been closed more frequently in the afternoon, especially the 
lower grades, for the following reasons: It has been observed 
that parents will not send their children to school afternoons of 
days when the schools are closed for the forenoon, if there is any- 
thing about the weather that can be regarded as an excuse for 
their detention ; and there may as well be no session as to have 
one but half attended, in any system of graded schools, for 
the teacher necessarily has to repeat the work under such circum- 
stances. The schools have also been closed some afternoons, 
not so much because of the severity of the weather as because it 
had been noticed that pupils in general went home at noon un- 
protected from rains that had originated after the opening of 
school in the morning, they having left home without a thought 
of preparing for bad weather. Experience has shown that under 
such circumstances no considerable attendance can be secured 
for the afternoon. 

From facts submitted below, it may be seen that the schools 
have been closed but a few times in the forenoon, comparatively, 
du ring the year. The more important and major part of the 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 243 

work of the schools is done during the forenoon, and it is for- 
tunate that even in bad weather conditions are usually more fav- 
orable to the attendance of pupils at school upon that part of the 
day. 

Since the time for striking out the schools for the forenoon 
was fixed, the opening of the high-school session has been made 
a half hour earlier (8.15); and, in consequence, the time for sig- 
naling out the schools in the forenoon (8.05) has made the ar- 
rangement practically useless to the high-school pupils. I there- 
fore recommend that the time for striking out the schools for the 
forenoon session be changed from 8.05 to 7.45 o'clock a. m.* 

All the schools have been closed during the year on account 
of bad weather but one whole day, no other forenoons, and only 
four other afternoons. In addition to the foregoing, the pri- 
mary and middle schools have been closed three whole days, 
three other forenoons, and two other afternoons. 

SCHOOLHOUSE FLAGS. 

Among the interesting events of the year, of great prominence 
and high value, has been the furnishing of our larger schools 
with the United States flag by the more notable military and 
civic organizations of our city, and by the munificence of private 
generosity as follows : 

1. The City Training School for Teachers, February 21, 1890, 
by friends of the school, through subscriptions solicited by the 
janitor, Mr. Edward P. Cogswell. Mr. Cogswell is a veteran 
soldier and a member of the G. A. R. He felled the tree for 
the staff, and chiefly prepared it ; he claims the training-school 
flag was the first to float as a schoolhouse flag in the city, first in 
the county, and only third in the State. 

2. The Franklin-street school, February 21, 1890, by the Can- 
ton Ridgely organization — F. A. Taylor, Captain. 

3. The Lincoln-street school, March 12, 1890, by the Order 
of United American Mechanics — J. E. Hall, Councilor, 

4. The Webster-street school, March 28, 1890, by the Sons of 
Veterans — Charles S. Brennan, Captain. 

* Recommendation has since been adopted. 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

5. The Bakersville school, March 28, 1890, by friends of the 
school — through neighborhood subscriptions raised chiefly by 
Mr. Edwin N. Baker. 

6. The High School, Memorial Day, by the Grand Army of 
the Republic — John G. Hutchinson, Commander. 

7. The Ash-street school, Memorial Day, by Miss Mabel A. 
Williams, a graduate of the school and daughter of General 
Charles Williams. 

8. The Main-street school. Memorial Day, by the Fire King 
Company, — active and honorary members, — David G. Mills^ 
foreman. Colonel A. C. Wallace donated the staff, and the 
presentation exercises were under the direction of the G. A. R. 

9. The Varney school, December 24, 1890, by Colonel 
George W. Riddle. 

The public presentations of these flags at the several schools 
were occasions of great interest and profit, and the abiding and 
general concern felt by our citizens for the welfare of the public 
schools was never more manifest or more beautifully expressed. 

Lasting good must surely result from the daily display of our 
nation's flag upon the schoolhouse. It will constantly re- 
mind the teacher that the right of the school to exist at the pub- 
lic expense can be maintained only by the development of its 
pupils mto reputable and loyal citizens, who shall be able not 
only to care for themselves but competent to uphold and propa- 
gate the principles of our government. The constant display of 
the flag before the pupils of our schools, together with the knowl- 
edge received in regard to its history and symbolization, must 
make right and inspiring impressions upon youthful minds and 
hearts which time cannot efface and the threats of foes would only 
materialize into acts of successful defense. 

FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 

The most notable event of the year affecting our schools is 
doubtless the introduction and supply of free text-books and 
other supplies to all pupils not previously furnished with needed 
text-books and other necessary material of their own. The ex- 
pense of this has been about nine thousand dollars, and the text- 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 245 

books in the schools previously and still owned by pupils must 
have cost their parents from three to five thousand dollars more. 
Their books will gradually go out of use as the owners are ad- 
vanced from grade to grade and finally leave the schools. To 
supply the place of these, and keep good the furnishing already 
provided, will require thirty-five hundred dollars next year, three 
thousand dollars for each of the two or three years following, and 
at least twenty-five hundred dollars annually thereafter. 

The Committee on Text-books and Studies are entitled to 
great credit for their devotion of much valuable time, great care, 
and experienced financial ability, in securing for the city a 
choice list of text-books upon unusually favorable terms. The 
purchases of this year are, doubtless, not two thirds of what 
would have been the cost to parents for the same articles. 

The members of this committee, together with the clerk, con- 
stitute the entire representation of wards two and three upon this 
board ; and I feel sure that in expressing my own feelings I but 
voice those of the board in general, when I say that for long, 
conscientious, faithful, and highly efficient services in the inter- 
ests of our public schools, the gentlemen from wards two and 
three, all of whom are about to retire from the board of school 
committee, are clearly entitled to the hearty thanks not only of 
their constituents but also of the entire city. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

'Owing chiefly to numerous changes of text-books made during 
the year, it has become necessary to republish the course of study. 
Occasion has therefore been taken to improve it as much as pos- 
sible, and for this purpose I have had several recent conferences 
with teachers of the various grades. 

I submit the result as the conclusion of my report, as much 
that the public may see the outline work of the schools as that 
teachers may be governed thereby. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WM. E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 
December 24, 1890. 



COURSE OF STUDY 

FOR THE 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE CFFY OF MANCHESTER. 



REVISED, 189I. 



SPECIAL NOTICE TO MANCHESTER TEACHERS. 

Continue to follow the course issued in 1886 in the matter of 

General Directions, Music, History, and Geography, except for 

classes I and L in the study of geography, till otherwise directed. 

Drawing is to be continued till July, 1891, in accordance with 

instructions furnished last September. 

In other particulars, for which a course of study is purposed, 
be guided by the following revised form.* 

WM. E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



LIST OF TEXT-BOOKS. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Readers. — The New Franklin. 
Spelter. — Harrington's Graded. 

Arithmetic. — First Steps in Number, Fish's " Number One, " 
the Franklin Written, and Seaver and Walton's Mental. 

* It is designed to have the revised course published in due form for teachers' use, with 
complete instructions, by the opening of the fall term. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 247 

Geography. — Swinton's Introductory and Grammar-School. 

Grammar. — Hyde's Practical Lessons and Patterson's Ele- 
ments. 

History. — Barnes's United States ; and Higginson's, as a 
reader. 

Fefimafis/iip. — Harper's Copy-Books. 

Music. — Mason's Charts and Readers. 

Draiving. — The American Text-Books of Art Education. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, Wentworth's, and Crittenden's 
Commercial ; Book-keeping, Meservey's ; Algebra and Geome- 
try, Bradbury's and Wentworth's ; Trigonometry and Surveying, 
Wentworth's. 

English Language. — Grammar and Composition, Patterson's 
Advanced; Rhetoric, D. J. Hill's; Studies in English, Swin- 
ton's ; English Authors, Kellogg's English Literature. 

Natural Sciences. — Physiology, Hutchinson's ; Physical 
Geography, Guyot's ; Philosophy, Avery's ; Chemistry, Rem- 
sen's ; Botany, Wood's Botanist and Florist ; Mineralogy and 
Geology, Dana's Geological Story ; Astronomy, Young's. 

Political Science. — Civil Government,. Young's Government 
Class Book ; Political Economy, Macvane's. 

History. — General, Myer's; English, Montgomery's ; Roman, 
Leighton's; Grecian, Smith's. 

French. — Berlitz Method and Buffet's Method ; Reader, 
Super's ; Grammar, Worman's and Whitney's. 

Latin. — Lesson's, Collar and Daniell's ; Grammar, Allen and 
Greenough's ; Caesar, Cicero, and Virgil, Greenough's ; Prose 
Composition, Jones's and Collar's. 

Greek. — Lessons, White's ; Grammar, Goodwin's ; Anabasis, 
Goodwin and White's; Homer, Seymour's; Prose Composition, 
Jones's. 

Music. — High School Music Reader, Julius Eichberg's. 

Drawing. — The American Text-Books of Art Education. 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



REPORTS. 

The custom in regard to pupils' reports and written reviews is 
as follows : 

Individual report cards (bearing a record of each grammar and 
high school pupil's attendance, deportment, and scholarship for 
the school quarter) are forwarded to parents of pupils in the High 
School at the middle of the fall term and at the close of each 
term ; to parents of pupils in grammar classes at the end of the 
first nine weeks after the opening of the fall term, the first of 
February, at the close of the winter term, and at the close of the 
spring term. 

WRITTEN REVIEWS.* 

The written reviews are limited to the three or four weeks im- 
mediately preceding the above-named dates ; and only one such 
exercise is designed to be submitted in any one week, except that 
the test in spelling and one in some other subject may be given 
the same week. To avoid cramming and any undue nervous 
excitement, pupils are not to be informed, by intimation or 
otherwise, of the subject of a contemplated written review before 
the time of its submission ; nor are pupils to be informed of 
its occurrence earlier, than an hour and a half before the time 
of the submission, and not until necessary to make apparent the 
preparations therefor. 



GRADATION. 



High School. — Four Courses. 

An English Course of either 3 or 4 years ; a Scientific Prepar- 
atory Course of 3 years ; a Classical Course of 4 years ; a Col- 
lege Preparatory Course of either 4 or 5 years. 

* The marking of daily recitations has been left optional with teachers, in the belief that 
while such marking may be helpful to the attainment of best results by some, a requirement of 
it might prove a hindrance to the best work of others. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 249 



Grammar School. — Four Divisions. 

Divisions first, second, third, and fourth. Classes in each 
division, two. Time in each division, one year; in each class, 
five months. The classes in each division do distinct work. 

Middle School. — Two Grades. 

Grades are known as "Higher" and "Lower." Classes in 
each grade, two. Time in each grade, one year ; in each class, 
five months. The classes in each grade do distinct work. 

Primary School. — Two Grades. 

Grades are known as " Higher" and ^' Lower." Classes in 
each grade, three. Time in each grade, one year and a half; in 
each class, five months. The classes in each grade do distinct 
v/ork. 



LOWER PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

classes p, q, r. 
Time : First Year and a Half ; Each Class, Five Months. 



CLASS R. 



Reading and Spelling. — During the first few days of the 
child's attendance at school, the teacher should gain the confi- 
dence of the pupil by conversational exercises in regard to famil- 
iar objects, — animals, pictures, sports ; things perceived by the 
senses ; articles of clothing or furniture ; stories, etc. 

When confidence 'has been gained and the pupil becomes free 
to express his thoughts and feelings, reading from the blackboard 
should be commenced. Use only script letters. The meaning 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

of words is first to be taught by the use of objects, pictures, 
drawings, actions, stories, etc. ; then the visible signs (written 
words) are to be placed upon the board singly or combined in 
sentences — as the purpose may be best attained ; lastly, the oral 
signs (pronounced words) are to be given. Prepositions, con- 
junctions, and other unimportant words should be first taught 
only in sentences. Pupils should never be permitted to read 
aloud until the meaning is clear to them. Naturalness of expres- 
sion is thus attained. 

The work of this class is first to master, in script, all the words 
upon the first twenty-five pages of Monroe's Chart, taught from 
the blackboard and slate according to the method above de- 
scribed ; then the printed forms of the same words are to be 
taught while applied i'n reading the first twenty-five pages of the 
chart, in print, from itself. Spare time should be devoted to ad- 
vanced reading from the chart. (See that the elevation of the 
chart is sufficient to secure proper position of the head of the 
pupil when reading.) 

Spelling is to be chiefly learned from exercises in •' Language," 
which see. Let all oral spelling be by sound. 

Penmanship. — Upon slates the letter /; also copy-book No. 
I of the Tracing Course, pupils to use well-pointed slate pencils. 

Arithmetic. — Full knowledge oifive according to the Grube 
system, taught by use of objects as outlined in the Teacher's 
Edition of Wentworth and Reed's First Steps in Number. (See 
especially, for principles of teaching, paragraphs 2, 3, and 4 of 
the " Introduction," pages i and 2 ; also the last 15 lines on 
page 4.) 

Oral Instruction. — Familiar talks in regard to objects 
around a child's home, as cat, dog, horse, mouse, knife, bureau, 
clock, apple, potato, sugar, etc. ; also objects in the schoolroom. 
Names of external parts of the human body taught. 

Language. — Pupils are daily to copy their reading lessons 
(in script) upon their slates, from the blackboard or chart — as 
each is used. 

The purpose of all written work in copyifig (whether from the 
blackboard, chart, or book) is to accustom pupils to correct 



KEPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 251 

spelling, capitalization, and punctuation, b}^ unconscious imita- 
tion ; also to improve their penmanship. 

CLASS Q. 

Reading and Spelling. — Complete the Chart ; read the 
Chart Primer as far as it is a reproduction of the chart, and as 
much of Davis's Beginner's Book as time permits. All new 
words of each lesson should be taught from the blackboard, their 
meaning being first developed as directed for " Class R." Test 
the result of the development by requiring pupils to show the 
proper use of words in sentences of their own invention. Pay 
particular attention to position of the pupil and the book, observ- 
ing suggestions on reading under general directions.* 

Spelling is to be learned from exercises in both reading and 
"Language," which see. Oral spelling should be hy sound ex- 
cept that easy words without silent letters may be spelled by let- 
ter as each is pointed out on the chart, since pupils should know 
the names of all letters of the alphabet by the close of the first 
year at school. 

Penmanship. — Upon slates, /, //, n, m, in order, only so far 
as well-nigh perfect forms are attained; also copy-book No. i of 
the Tracing Course, pupils to use lead pencils. 

Arithmetic. — Full knowledge of nine, taught as directed for 
Class R. This comprises the substance of the entire contents of 
Part I. (or the first nine chapters) of the Teacher's Edition of 
First Steps in Number, including, also, the first six lessons in the 
Pupil's Edition. (The lessons from the Pupil's Edition may be 
presented individual members of the class by use of the cards 
which are duplicates of the pages of the Pupil's Edition.) 

Oral Instruction. — Conversational studies of familiar 
plants, in their season, — flower, leaf, stem, and root : of prom- 
inent qualities of objects, — rough, smooth ; sweet, sour ; brittle, 
tough ; etc. Names and uses of external parts of human body 
treated. 

* As given on page 7 of the Course issued in 1886. 



252 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Language. — Pupils are daily to copy upon their slates, in 
script, what they read. 

Purpose, the same as for " Class R," 

CLASS P. 

Reading and Spelling. — Davis's Beginner's Book and the 
New Franklin First Reader completed, their use being inter- 
changeable ; * then as much of Parker's First Book (or its equiv- 
alent) as time permits. 

Pupils should often be required to repeat, 'from memory, the 
substance of what they read. 

Spelling, both by sound and letter, j somewhat extended, 
words being selected from reading lessons. 

(Reading, spelling, and penmanship taught as outlined for pre- 
vious class.) 

Penmanship. — Upon slates, ?n, x, v, w; also copy-book No. 
I, of the Tracing Course, pupils to use lead pencils. 

Arithmetic. — Lessons i to 44 from the Pupil's Edition of 
First Steps in Number ; also, in connection therewith, the oral 
instruction intended to be derived from, and given according to, 
suggestions found upon those pages of the Teacher's Edition 
which are indicated in parenthesis at the head of the several les- 
sons above named, as found in the Pupil's Edition. (The lessons 
from the Pupil's Edition may be put before the class as suggested 
for Class Q.) Roman numerals to X also taught. 

Oral Instruction. — Further consideration of plants, in 
their season, — bud, fruit, and seed; consideration of place, — 
on, above, under; before, behind; left, right, etc. Movements 
and care of parts of human body treated. Injurious effect of 
stimulants and narcotics on the human system impressed upon 
this class, and preceding ones, by simple conversational exercises 
adapted to the understanding of youngest pupils. Primary 
colors taught. 

Language. — Pupils are to copy upon their slates, in script, 
selected sentences from their reading lessons ; and occasionally 

* Keep the reading easy by using first one book and then the other, changing as frequently 
as may be necessary therefor. 

t By letter yr^;« memory, but not to a great extent. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 253 

the simpler forms of such sentences (those containing only the 
terminal mark) should be written from dictation. (Form of ter- 
minal mark should be period or interrogation point.) Observe use 
of letters and punctuation. 

Stories from pictures required, also the reproduction of stories 
told pupils. (The picture stories and the reproductions of those 
told should be both oral and written.) 



HIGHER PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

C.ASSES M, N, O. 

Time : Second Year and a Half ; Each Class, Five Months. 



CLASS O. 

Reading* and Spelling. — The new Franklin Second 
Reader (only) twice a day, for nine weeks ; then the same as far 
as convenient by use once a day, also once a day (as supplement- 
ary) such readers as may be furnished. (Reading taught as sug- 
gested for classes Q and P.) 

Spelling is to be learned from exercises in both reading and 
"Language," which see. Words for oral spelling should be 
selected from reading lessons, and they should be uttered both by 
sound and by letter. 

Penmanship. — Copy-book No. 2 of the Tracing Course, pupils 
using pen and ink. For busy work, in part, upon slates, perfect 
in order the letters 0, a, c, e. 

Arithmetic. — Lessons 44 to 89 from the Pupil's Edition of 
Wentworth and Reed's First Steps in Number ; also, in connec- 
tion therewith, the oral instruction intended to be derived from, 
and given according to, suggestions found upon those pages of 
the Teacher's Edition which are indicated in parenthesis at the 
head of the several lessons above named, as found in the Pupil's 

* Reading for higher primary classes marked as supplementary is for sight reading, only. 



254 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Edition. (The lessons from the Pupil's Edition may be put be- 
fore the class as suggested for Class Q.) Roman numerals to 
XXX also taught. 

Oral Instruction. — Plants ; work of previous classes re- 
viewed with familiar plants ; comparison of them with one 
another, and with those less iamiliar. (May to November.) 

Place and size : direction and distance, the cardinal points of 
the compass ; comparison of size, familiar objects used to de- 
velop proper use of terms ; as, large, small, great, little, long, 
short, larger, largest, etc. — Lessons outlined for previous classes 
on the human body (under the head of oral instruction) reviewed 
and extended a little. Secondary colors taught. (November to 
May.) 

Language. — Same as for " Class P," with more'frequent dic- 
tation exercises. For these, select sentences requiring use (i) of 
the period, interrogation mark, or exclamation point, as the ter- 
minal mark ; and (2) of the comma in forms of address at the be- 
ginning of sentences, of which the following are types : Mary, 
please show me your new hat. — John, can I see you to-morrow ? 
— Mother, see how it rains ! 

Stories from pictures and reproductions of stories told or read 
(both oral and written). 

CLASS N. 

Reading. — The New Franklin Second Reader once a day till 
completed and more difficult parts reviewed, also once a day (as 
supplementary) the Young Folk's Library, Vol. V. * (Reading 
taught as suggested for previous classes.) 

Spelling. — As for previous class, also Harrington's Graded 
Speller from page i to page 21. Review the same. 

Penmanship. — Copy-book No. 2 of the Tracing Course, pupils 
using pen and ink. For busy work, in part, upon slates, perfect 
in order the letters r, s, /, d, q. 

Arithmetic. — Lessons 89 to 149 from the Pupil's Edition of 
First Steps in Number ; also, in connection therewith, the oral 

* Twice a day after the Second Reader lias been completed according to requirement. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 255 

instruction intended to be derived from, and given according to, 
suggestions found upon those pages of the Teacher's Edition 
which are indicated in parenthesis at the head of the several les- 
sons above named, as found in the Pupil's Edition. (The les- 
sons from the Pupil's Edition may be put before the class as sug- 
gested for Class Q.) Reman numerals to L also taught. 

Oral Instruction.* — Plants: different kinds of leaves, parts 
and shapes of flowers. Place and size : knowledge of direction 
and distance extended, cardinal points of compass reviewed; 
measurement of objects in the schoolroom, their relative size 
considered. — Secondary colors reviewed and commonly used 
hues, tints, and shades of color (as, scarlet, crimson, pink, etc.,) 
distinguished. — Lessons on human body, to afford a knowledge 
of the special senses— what they are, their purpose, and how 
used ; effects of stimulants and narcotics upon the senses, and the 
injury their improper use produces in general also taught. 

Language. * — Pupils are to write, from memory, abstracts 
of stories read in their readers, and of others told or read them 
by the teacher. Stories from pictures continued. Observe use of 
letters and punctuation. 

Dictation exercises as for the previous class, extended also by 
proper punctuation in forms of address occurring in other parts 
of the sentence; as, Let us run, Henry. — Will you tell me. 
Aunt Sarah, what mother said ? — Be quick, O girls ! — Look at 
this orange, little boy, and tell me what you see. 

CLASS M. 

Reading. — The New Franklin Third Reader once a day, as 
far as convenient, also once a day the Young Folks' Library, 
Vol. VL J (Reading taught as suggested tor previous classes.) 

Spelling. — As for "Class O," also Harrington's Graded 
Speller from page 21 to page 33. Review the same. 

* Oral Instruction and Language are so arranged that classes N and O may be taught what 
is required as one class by teachers so desiring to teach. The work assigned both classes can 
thus be properly done in the given time, if suitably planned lor securing greater knowledge 
and better expression from the liigher class. 

t Val. v. should be com;3leted by this class, if not finishid by the previous class, and Vol 
VI. should also be completed, — even though it may therefor have to be used twice a day a 
part of the time. 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Penmanship. — Copy-book 02, special, with copies same as 
those for the previous class, in review. For busy work, in part, 
upon slates, perfect in order the letters //, k, /, b, p,f. 

Arithmetic. — Fish's Arithmetic, number one, from page 9 
to page 5 1 (omit last half of page 39), review from page 8 to 
page 51. Roman numerals to C also taught. 

Oral Instruction. — Plants; instruction outlined for all pre- 
vious classes (N to Q) reviewed. — Place: the serai-cardinal 
points of the compass taught, direction and distance reviewed. — 
Color: relations of colors in rainbow, harmony and contrast of 
colors. — Lessons on human body ; why we eat, offices of the 
blood, how we move and breathe, why we need pure air ; effect 
of stimulants and narcotics upon the blood, the conseqences por- 
trayed. 

Language. — Hyde's Practical Lessons in the Use of English, 
First Book, for use by the teacher only as a guide in giving oral 
instruction^ the first twenty-six lessons. Supplementary work, 
stories (oral and written) as for classes N and O. 



LOWER MIDDLE SCHOOL. ~ 

classes k and l. 
Time : Fourth Year ; Each Class, Five Months. 



CLASS L. 

Reading.* — The New Franklin Third Reader, completed 
and reviewed. Observe suggestions for classes Q and P. 

Spelling. — As for "Class O," also Harrington's Graded 
Speller from page 33 to page 48. Review the same. 

Penmanship. — September to February, copy-book No. 3 ; 
February to July, No. 4, both of the Primary Course. 

* Supplementary reading for classes K and L, lessons fron; the Introductory Geography 
and from books already furnished for supplementary reading by exercises with three books, 
— as indicated on page 8 of the Course issued in 1886. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 257 

Arithmetic. — Multiplication table to loo, reviewed. Fish's 
Arithmetic, " Number One," from page 51 to page 83, review the 
same. Roman numerals to CC also taught. 

Language. — Hyde's Practical Lessons in the Use of English, 
r irst Book (Parts I. and IL), for use by the teacher only as a guide 
in giving oral instruction^ from page 26 to page 69. Supplement- 
ary work, written abstracts oi knowledge derived from studies at 
school — divisions and sub-divisions of form, human body, plants, 
animals, geography, etc., etc. Written abstracts of stories told 
or read also continued. 

Oral Instruction. — Principal occupations of city life named 
and described. Articles of domestic commerce discussed. 
Plants, from May to November. (Selections from Hooker's 
Child's Book of Nature, Part L, pages 13 to 67.) Animals, from 
November to May. (Selections from Hooker's Child's Book of 
Nature, Part IL, pages 7 to 19. Also Harper's First Lessons in 
Natu'-al History and Language, Parts I. and II.) Essentials of 
lessons upon the human body, as outlined for all previous classes, 
reviewed ; and the same extended, as warranted by the increased 
capacity of pupils. 

Geography. — The Introductory, pages i to 16. 22 to 32, and 
34 to 40. Review the same. (Spare time from page 40.) 

CLASS K. 

Reading. — The Advanced Franklin Third Reader. Observe 
suggestions for previous class. 

Spelling. — As for previous class, also Llarrington's Graded 
Speller, from page 48 to page 65. Review the same. 

Penmanship, Language and Oral Instruction. — Same as 
for previous class. 

Arithmetic. — Fish's Arithmetic, " Number One," from page 
83 to page 116; review the same, then from page 45 onward. 
Roman numerals to CCC. 

Geography. — The Introductory, pages 12 to 34, and 64 to 
82. Review from 64 to 82, and then advance as far as time jer- 
mits. 

17 



258 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HIGHER MIDDLE SCHOOL. 

CLASSES I AND J. 

Time: Fifth Year; Each Class, Five Months. 



CLASS J. 



Reading. — The Fourth Reader, easier selections, taught as 
suggested for classes Q and P. 

Spelling. — Taught as for "Class O, " also Harrington's 
Graded Speller from pages 65 to 79. Review the same, also all 
'' Review " lessons in Part I. 

Penmanship. — September to February, copy-book No. 5; 
February to July, No. 6, both of the Primary Course. 

Arithmetic. — Fish's Arithmetic, "Number One," from 
page 119 to page 150 ; review the same ; Roman numerals to D 
also taught. Spare time from page 150 of the arithmetic. 

Language. — Hyde's Practical Lessons in the use of English, 
First Book (Parts L and IL) for use by teachers only as a 
guide in giving oral instruction, from page 69 to page 114. Sup- 
plementary work, written abstracts of knowledge derived from 
studies at school, oral instruction and otherwise, as suggested for 
"Class L. " 

Oral Instruction. — Principal occupations of country life 
named and described. Articles of foreign commerce. Plants, 
from May to November. (Selections from Hooker's Child's 
Book of Nature, Part L, pages 67 to 121.) Animals, from Novem- 
ber to May. (Selections from Hooker's Child's Book of Nature, 
Part H., pages 91 to 171. Also Harper's First Lessons in Natural 
History and Language, Parts HL and IV.) Lessons upon the 
human body: the bones and joints, the muscles; effect of stim- 
ulants and narcotics upon the same. (Teach essentials of treat- 
ment of these subjects as found outlined in "The Human Body 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COiMMITTEE, 259 

* 

and its Health," by Dr. William T. Smith; use also "The 
Laws of Health, " by Dr. Joseph C. Hutchinson, for such addi- 
tional information as can be advantageously utilized.) 

Geography. — The Introductory. Review from page 82, if 
advisable. Advance to page 115 ; then review essentials from 
page I to page 115, omitting pages 40 to 64. 

CLASS L 

Reading. — The Fourth Reader, nearly or quite completed, 
taught as for the previous class. 

Spelling. — As for the previous class, also Harrington's 
Graded Speller, Part IL, from page i to page 25. Review the 
same. 

Penmanship, Language, and Oral Instruction. — Same as 
for previous class. 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, from page i to page 
64, omitting Articles 116 and 117. (Observe notes on pages 16, 
25, 35, and 48.) Review the same. Many problems from the 
Drill Tables on pages 58-63, especially in final review. 

Oral Arithmetic, also exercises from the Franklin Written, and 
from Seaver and Walton's Mental (three books), — pages i to 14 
and 31 to 43, — as directed and suggested under " Arithmetic, " 
pages 9 and 10 of the course issued in 1886. 

Geography. — Oral instruction on latitude, longitude, and 
climate. Swinton's Grammar School, pages 12, 13, 19, and 
from page 30 to page 46. Review the same. Spare time, if any, 
on New Hampshire, as found in the " Supplement." 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

FOURTH DIVISION OF THE GRAMMAR 
SCHOOL. 

CLASSES G AND H. 

Time: Sixth Year; Each Class, Five Months^ 



CLASS H. 



Reading. — The Fourth Reader.* 

Spelling. — Harrington's Graded Speller, Part II., from page 
25 to page 49. Reviewed with next class. 

Penmanship. — September to February, copy-book No. 3 ; 
February to July, No. 3^, both of the Grammar Course. 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, pages 64 to 75 and 
pages 50 to 57. Review each assignment as soon as its work has 
been covered, then advance from page 75 as far as time permits. 

Oral Arithmetic, also, exercises from Seaver and Walton's 
Mental — pages 43 to 62 — as directed and suggested under 
" Arithmetic, " on pages 9 and 10 of the course issued in 1886. 

Language. — Hyde's Practical Lessons in the Use of English, 
Second Book, to Lesson XX. Supplementary work from Part 
IV. f , also as suggested for Class L. 

Geography. — The Grammar-School, from page 46 to page 59. 
Pages 30 to 59, in review ; also New Hampshire, as found in the 
" Supplement. " 

Oral Instruction. — Lessons upon the human body: work 
and waste, the blood, the circulation ; effects of stimulants and 
narcotics upon the same. (^The foregoing to be reviewed with 
the next class. For treatment of these subjects, see suggestions 
in parenthesis herein given under oral instruction for " Class J.") 

* The easier selections. The class is to read from Higginson's United States History twice: 
a week. See suggestions for classes Q and P. 
t Of Hyde's Second Book. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 261 

CLASS G. 

Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, and Oral Instruction. — 
Same as for previous class. 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, pages 75 to iii. Re- 
view to page III from most advanced topic attained when pupils 
constituted " CJass H. " Spare time in drill, from tables on 
pages 122 and 123, and in reviewing essentials of arithmetic 
■assigned the preceding class and this one. 

Oral Arithmetic, also exercises from Seaver and Walton's 
Mental — pages 1410 31 and 62 to 67 — as directed and sug- 
gested for the previous class. 

Language. — Hyde's Second Book, from page 39 to page 74. 
Supplementary work as for the previous class. 

Geography. — Swinton's Grammar-School, from page 62 to 
page 86. Review the same. Spare time, if any, on New Hamp- 
shire, as found in the " Supplement. " 



THIRD DIVISION OF THE GRAMMAR 
SCHOOL, 

classes e and f. 
Time : Seventh Year ; Each Class, Five Months. 



CLASS F. 



Reading. — The Fourth Reader.* 

Spelling. — Harrington's Graded Speller, Part H., from page 
49 to page 73. Reviewed with next class. 

Penmanship. — September to February, copy-book No. 4 ; 
February to July, No. 5, both of the Grammar Course. 

*The more difficult selections. The class is to read from Higginson's United States History 
twice a week. See suggestions for classes Q and P. 



262 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, pages iii to 136, omit- 
ting Articles 284 to 289. Review the same, then review from 
page 88 to page 136. (At the opening of the fall term, begin on 
page 88 and advance to page 136, then review from page iii to 
page 136.) 

Oral Arithmetic , also exercises from Seaver and Walton's 
Mental — pages 67 to 90 — as directed and suggested under 
"Arithmetic," on pages 9 and 10 of the course issued in 1886. 

Language. — Patterson's Elements, from page i to page 37- 
Review the same. Supplementary work as for " Class H. " 

Geography. — Swinton's Grammar-School, from page 86 to 
page III. Review the same. Spare time, if any, in reviewing 
Europe. 

Oral Instruction. — Lessons upon the human body : food 
and water, digestion and absorption ; effects of stimulants and 
narcotics upon the same. (The foregoing to be reviewed with 
the next class. For treatment of these subjects, see suggestions 
in parenthesis herein given under oral instruction for " Class J.") 

CLASS E. 

Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, and Oral Instruction. — 
Same as for previous class. 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, pages 136 to 172, 
omitting Articles 375 to 385. Review the same. Spare time on 
essentials of arithmetic assigned the preceding class and this one. 

Oral Aritlimetic also, exercises from Seaver and Walton's 
Mental — pages 108 to 123 — as directed and suggested for the 
previous class. 

Language. — Patterson's Elements, from page 37 to page 
67^. Review the same. Supplementary work as for the pre- 
vious class. 

History. — Barnes's United States History from page 9 to 
page loi. Make reading and talking lessons, only, of the first 
three of the Intercolonial Wars. Review the same. Spare time,, 
from page loi onward. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 263 

SECOND DIVISION OF THE GRAMMAR 
SCHOOL. 

CLASSES C AND D. 

Time : Eighth Year ; Each Class, Five Months. 



CLASS D. 



Reading. — The Fifth Reader.* 

Spelling. — Harrington's Graded Speller, Part II., from page 
73 to page 93. Reviewed with next class. 

Penmanship. — September to February, copy-book No. 6; 
February to July, No. 7, both of the Grammar Course. 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, pages 185 to 209. 
Review the same (see pages 250 to 254) ; then advance as far as 
time permits. 

Oral Arithmetic, also exercises from Seaver and Walton's 
Mental — pages 123 to 131 and 103 to 108 — as directed and 
suggested under "Arithmetic," on pages 9 and 10 of the course 
issued in 1886. 

Language. — Patterson's Elements, from page 67^ to page 
112. Review the same. Supplementary work, — selections from 
Metcalf and Bright's Language Exercises, Parts I. and II. ; from 
Our Language, Part I. ; and from other similar works. See also 
directions and suggestions for classes H and L. Let the selec- 
tions be such as will test (and furnish needed reviews of) work 
indicated for previous classes, also advance it progressively. 

History. — Barnes's United States History, from page loi to 
215. Review the same. 

Oral Instruction. — Lessons upon the human body : respi- 
ration and the voice, the nervous system ; effects of stimulants 
and narcotics upon the same. (The foregoing to be reviewed 
with the next class. For treatment of these subjects, see sugges- 
tions in parenthesis herein given under oral instruction for 
"Class J.") 

* The easier selections. See suggestions for classes Q and P. 



264 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

CLASS C. 

Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, and Oral Instruction. 
— Same as for " Class D. " 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, pages 209 to 224. Re- 
view the same, then take pages 88 to 136 in review. Spare time 
on essentials of arithmetic assigned the preceding class and this 
one. 

Oral Aritluiietic, also exercises from Seaver and Walton's 
Mental — pages 131 to 139 and 90 to 103 — as directed and 
suggested for the previous class. 

Language. — Patterson's Elements, from page 112* to page 
138. Review irom page 6752- Supplementary work as for fhe 
previous class. 

Geography. — Swinton's Grammar-School, from page 1 to 
page 30. Review the ?ame. Also essentials of the United 
States. Spare time, if any, on New Hampshire and Massachu- 
setts, as found in the " Supplement. " 



FIRST DIVISION. OF THE GRAMMAR 
SCHOOL. 

CLASSES A AND B. 

Time : Ninth Year; Eacii Class, Five Months. "s 



CLASS B. 



Reading. — The Franklin Fifth Reader. | 
Spelling. — Harrington's Graded Speller, all " Review " les- 
sons and other most difficult words in entire book. 

* Fall term, first review from page 67 J^ to page 112; then advance to page 138, and in 
January review from page 112 to page 138. 

t Or ten months in Class B for those who enter this division in February, unless they are 
able to complete the course by the following July. 

+ The more difficult selections. See suggestions for classes Q and P. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 265 

Penmanship. — September to February, copy-book No. 8; 
February to July, Meservey's Book-keeping — single entry — to 
the Fourth Form. 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, pages 254 to 260; 263 
to 272; 277 to 287; 226 to 234; and 245 to 254. Review the 
same by topics, or otherwise, at discretion of teacher. Selections 
may be made, also, from pages 315 and 316 ; and any spare time 
can be utilized in doing the elementary part of the work as- 
signed the next class. 

Oral Arithmetic, also exercises from Seaver and Walton's 
Mental — pages 139 to 161 — as directed and suggested under 
"Arithmetic," on pages 9 and 10 of the course issued in 1886. 

Language. — Patterson's Elements, from page 138 to 177. 
Supplementary work as outlined for Class D. 

History and Geography. — Barnes's United States History, 
from page 215 to the Constitution. Instead of reviewing the 
history'^ in the spring, review Swinton's Grammar-School Geog- 
raphy from page 62 onward — as soon as the history is com- 
pleted. In the fall, have the history completed and reviewed by 
December 25. 

During the winter term, pupils (who constituted Class B in 
the fall) are to review the entire Geography. 

Oral Instruction. — Lessons upon the human body : the 
skin, the ear, and the eye ; things to be done in cases of acci- 
dent ; effects of stimulants and narcotics upon the human system, 
general and particular. (The foregoing to be reviewed with the 
next class. For treatment of these subjects, see suggestions in 
parenthesis herein given under oral instruction for '' Class J. ") 

CLASS A.f 

Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, and Oral Instruction. 
— Same as for previous class. 

Arithmetic. — The Franklin Written, pages i to 12; 51 to 
57, and 317 ; 68 to 72, and 321; 115 to 122 and 322 to 324 ; 

*The few pupils who will be found prepared to enter the High School from this class will 
not need a review of the history, and the rest of the class will get the review in the fall. 

t Those of this class in June who return in the fall should review work of Class B from 
September to February. 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

135 and 324; 136 to 170 and 325 to 329 ; 250 to 254 and 330 
to 334>^ ; 335 to 337; 265 to 285 and 337 to 339J ; 293 to 
299 ; 340 and 341 ; and 343 to 349. This re-review should be 
treated with special reference to the discussion of the principles 
of arithmetic. 

Oral Arithmetic, also exercises from Seaver and Walton's 
Mental — pages 62 to 67, 79 to 103, and 106 to 161 — asdirect- 
ed and suggested under "Arithmetic," on pages 9 and 10 of the 
course issued in 1886. 

Language. — Patterson's Elements, from page 177 to page 
223; also exercises from the Reader — explanation of subject- 
matter, thorough drill in analysis and parsing of selections from 
the same, weak points in grammar toned up. 

Geography. — During the winter term, review the entire 
geography. 

Civics. — During the spring term, as yet to be directed. 



268 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






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APPENDIX 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 
V. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1890. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. ■ 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1891. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1891. 

XIII. School Year, 1S91. 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 
I. — POPULATION. 

Population of the city by last census, 1890 . . . 43,983 
Legal school age, 5 to 21. 

11. — SCHOOLHOUSES. 

Number of schoolhouses in use ...... 22 

Number of schoolhouses not in use ..... i 

(Bridge- street house, corner of Union.) 
Number of schoolrooms used for day schools . . -77 

(Three of the same, and six others, used for evening schools. Rooms unoc- 
cupied by city for day schools are, f.vo at Spring-street house, three at Lowell- 
street, and two at Bridge-street, the last two being unfit.) 
Number of rooms used for High-school classes ... 6 
Number of rooms used for Grammar schools . . ,21 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools . . . .16 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools . . .26 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools . . 2 
Number of rooms used for L^ngraded Schools ... 6 



III. — SCHOOLS. 



( All for both sexes. ) 
Number of Hi^jh Schools 



(A) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



273 



Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle 

and Primary) schools ....... 7 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools (Merri- 

mack-street or Training school) . . , . .1 

Number of schools all Primary grade ..... 5 

Number of Partially Graded schools ..... 2 

Number of Ungraded schools ...... 6 



IV. —TEACHERS. 

Male teachers in the High School 

Female teachers in the High school . 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools 

Female teachers in the Middle schools 

Female teachers in the Primary schools 

Female teachers in the Partially Graded schools 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools . 

Special teachers : One male in music the entire year, one 

male in elocution f winter and spring term 
Average number of male teachers | 
Average number of female teachers 
Male teachers in the evening schools . 
Female teachers in the evening schools 
Average number of male teachers in the evening schools. 
Average number of female teachers in the evening schools 
Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools 
Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawing 

schools ......... 



-^ 2 
4 

5 

16 

16 

23 

3 

6 



8 
10 

5 
7 
3 



* Three during fall term, one in place of lady resigned. 

,J Exclusive of special teachers. 

(B) 



t Once a week. 



274 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



13 

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(C) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



275 







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(D) 



276 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORT. 



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(E) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



277 




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(4H 



278 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DAY SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance npon the several grades of public 
day schools for the year 1890 : 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

i^artially graded . 
Ungraded 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls. 



Totals, 1890 1,881 

Totals, 1889 \ 1,862 



70 

464 

368 

826 

56 

97 



107 
505 
376 
801 
64 
80 



1,933 
1,925 



^ a 



^o 



184 
776 
586 
1,044 
87 
118 



2,795 
2,801 



c5 fl 



179 
723 
526 
932 
77 
99 






2,536 
2,581 



97.3 
93.1 
89.7 
89.2 
88.5 
83.9 



91.3 
92.2 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance upon the several grades of public 
evening schools for the year 1890 : 



Lowell street . . . . 

Spring street 

Clinton street 

School street 

Drawing-schools . 



Totals, 1890. 
Totals, 1889. 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls 



215 



93 



430 
523 



190 



257 
323 



^S 



S.2 



189 

246 



> OS 



141 

177 









74.0 
73.0 
64.0 
70.6 
82.1 



74.1 
71.9 



(G) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 279 

Evening-School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, Principal of Lowell-street school, for 
boys. 

Assistants, — Etta S. Dana, Mary A. Buzzell, C. A. Bohlin, 
Nellie M. James, and W. J. Mooar. 

Charles W. Bickford (Winter) and Frank S. Sutcliffe (Fall), 
Principals of Spring-street school, for girls. 

Assistants, — Emma J. Ela, Lizzie D. Hartford, Maggie Linen, 
and Fannie L. Sanborn. 

Frank C. Livingston (Winter) and L. H. Carpenter (Fall), 
Principals of School-street school, for both sexes. 

Assistant, — Nellie M. Atvvood. 

Fred C. Baldwin (Winter) and Charles W. Bickford (Fall), 
Principals of Clinton-street school, for boys. 

Assistants, — Maude L. Kent, Emma B. Abbott, and S. C. 
Kennard. 

Evening Drawing-School Teachers. 

John M, Kendall, Henry W. Allen, and Alphonzo H. Sanborn. 

(H) 



280 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



The following table presents the main features of interest per- 
taining to the attendance upon the public schools for the last ten 
years. 



Date. 



1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 






4,235 
4,095 
4,062 
3,918 
3,806 
3,632 
3,670 
3,712 
3,787 
3,814 



Whole No. 
belonging. 



Boys. 



2,200 
2,086 
2,061 
1,924 
1,891 
1,812 
1,817 
1,806 
1,862 



Girls 



2,035 
2,009 
2,001 
1,994 
1,915 
1,820 
1,853 
1,906 
1,925 



1,881 1,933 



s 


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bp c3 


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> ® 


n 


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S.SP 


a '3 


<J 


< 


Ah 


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o 


Ph 


H 


2,858 


2,602 


91.0 


no 


64 


62 


54 


2,957 


2,712 


91.7 


164 


76 


65 


57 


2,848 


2,012 


91.4 


103 


97 


75 


66 


2,872 


2,645 


92.1 


95 


85 


71 


49 


2,725 


2,430 


90.6 


96 


98 


89 


71 


2,698 


2,475 


91.9 


79 


78 


71 


53 


2,711 


2,468 


90.8 


98 


98 


95 


61 


2,768 


2,500 


90.3 


116 


88 


80 


58 


2,801 


2,581 


92.2 


177 


101 


96 


73 


2,795 


2,536 


91.3 


141 


121 


114 


83 






39 
53 
27 
38 
35 
42 
42 
45 
55 
33 



^1 



x> o 
bo -3 

Sr p. 



75 
73 
71 
72 
72 
74 
76 
76 
75 
75 



CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. • 

The whole number of different teachers employed one term or 
more in the day schools, within the year, has been 86. Their 
respective positions may be learned from the attendance table on 
pages C, D, E, and F of the Appendix, but the various changes 
made within the year can be more readily understood by an in- 
spection of the following : 

* Including grammar classes in suburban schools. 

t Usually some pupils have annually entered from other schools. This year two have so 
entered. 

(I) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



281 



Teachers. 

Wm. H. Furber. 
Mary A. Buzzell. 
Jennie L. Thompson. 
Grace W. Irwin. 
Josephine H. Newton 
Sarah B. Paige. 
Alice E. Page. 
Nellie M. Atwood. 



Fred C. Baldwin. 
Abbie R. West. 



Date of effect 
of resignation. 

Jan. 24. 


Teachers. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 


Date of begin- 
ning service. 

Jan. 6. 


June 27. 


Charles W. Bickford. 


, Jan. 


27. 


June 27. 


Wm. T. Abbott. 


Sept. 


8. 


June 27. 
. June 27. 


Nellie Pickering. 
Gertrude F. How. 


Sept. 
Sept. 


8. 
8. 


June 27. 


Mabel L. Davis. 


Sept. 


8. 


June 27. 


Millie S. Morse. 


Sept. 


8. 


June 27. 


Annie B. Goodwin. 


Sept. 


8. 


Date of effect 
of transfer. 


Maude L. Kent. 
Georgie Kendrick. 


Sept. 
Sept. 


8. 
8. 


Jan. 24. 
Sept. 8. 


Mary A. Seavey. 
Bertha A. Young. 


Sept. 
Sept. 


8. 
8. 



TRAINING SCHOOL SUB-TEACHERS. 



Mabel J. Brickett. * 
Annie B. Goodwin. * 
Emma M. Streeter. ^ 
Bertha A. Young. ^^ 
Mary E. Moulton. f 
Gertrude A. Burns. | 
Georgia M. Cheney. J 

* Graduated Januarj- 31, 1890. 

t Graduated June 27, 1890. 

t Expected to graduate January 30, 



Annie M. Sleeper. | 
Gertrude L. Southard. J 
Mary G. Worthen. | 
Mary A. Clement. || 
B. Millie Cayzer. § 
Susie L. Dodge. § 
Carrie E. Litch. ij 



II Entered February 3, i8go. 
§ Entered September 8, 1890. 



(J) 



282 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



VI.— WORK OF TRUANT OFFICER. 





Absentees 
reported from 


No. volunta- 
rily returned 
to 


No. reported 
caused to 
attend 


o 

§ 

"si 

o a 

1^ 


■«! a) 

O q . 

O rt C3 




a 

3 


Date. 


o 

3 " 


"3 m 


1 
3" 

4 

4 
2 
5 
6 

5 
2 


"3 n 

i§ 


1 
3 " 


3*0 


No. other 
avoidab 
tained. 

No. not fc 


January 

February 

March 

April 


17 
12 
17 
15 
23 
14 
19 
30 
18 
7 


7 
28 
22 
36 
33 
27 

5 
20 
17 

8 


3 
1 
1 

1 
3 


11 
6 
12 

" 
17 
12 

7 
18 
8 
5 


4 
21 
14 
24 
24 
20 

5 
14 
14 

5 


1 

2 

8 

2 
1 


7 

6 
8 
5 
3 

4 
1 


1 
3 

3 
5 
5 
4 
4 
2 
2 

1 








September ... 

October 

November . . . 
December 


1 
1 


Totals 


172 


203 


27 


9 


107 


145 


14 


40 


30 


3 



January... 
February . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

September 
October... 
November. 
December. 

Totals 



to 


13 


*i a 


o s 


"■2 


Truants 
rolled 
streets 


35 


6 


6 


13 


19 


20 


21 


19 


1 


140 



No. truants 

caused 

to attend 



83 



No. others between 6 
and 16 unable,from 
111 health, to attend 
any school. 


No. of school age 
found on streets in 
school hours. 


a 

1 

o — 


15 

1 3 
2 

2 
2 


85 
80 
86 
61 
118 
73 
83 
84 
73 
29 


84 
67 
55 
64 

106 
50 

110 
75 
49 
23 


24 


772 


683 



^ o 



5" « "= 



19 



a «a 



48 
79 
65 
71 
54 
70 
9 
21 
54 

539 



(K) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 288 

VII. —FINANCE. — 1890. 



Items of Account. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books and stationery 

Free text-boolis and supplies 

Furniture and supplies , 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Evening common schools.... 
Evening drawing schools 

Total 



Resources from 
appropriations, 
receipts, and 
transfers. * 



$46,019.08 

141.35 
9,005.11 

606.98 
4,119.76 
3,522.69 
3,834.25 

502.28 
1,125.99 
1,478.57 

694.89 



$71,050.95 



Over-drafts 
of previous 
years. 



$614.21 



31.83 



145.94 
130.93 
113.23 
295.89 
223.76 



$1,555.79 



Expendi- 
tures, 1890. 



$45,404.87 

141.35 

9,005.11 

575.15 

4,119.76 

3,376.75 

3,703.33 

389.05 

830.10 

1,254.81 



$69,495.16 



Cost of City Schools, 1890. 



Expenditures, as above specified 

Salaries. 
Members of the school board 
Clerk of the board 
Superintendent of schools 
Truant officer .... 



Total 



Receipts on Account of the Schools. 



Literary fund 

Non-resident tuition .... 

Total 

* At Close of year, after transfers had.toeen made. 

(L) 



39,495.16 

$170.00 
100.00 

2,000.00 
750.00 

'2,515.16 



,504.70 
428.75 

.933-45 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The difference between the two totals last named is $67,581.71, 
and this is therefore the amount raised by direct tax for the sup- 
port of the city schools during the year. The " City Valua- 
tion '' for 1890 is $24,173,240 ; and hence the rate of school tax 
for the year is .00279. 

The amount (^9,005.11) of the new item of expense, known as 
^' Free Text-books " and made obligatory by statute law, is re- 
sponsible for the increase in the general expense to the extent of 
.00037 of the city's valuation. Therefore, .00279 minus .00037, 
or .00242, would be the rate of school tax for 1890, if based (for 
the sake of a just comparison) upon the same data as used in de- 
termining the rate for last year. The rate for 1889 was .00259. 
Then .00259 minus .00242, or .00017, is the diminution in the 
rate this year based on the usual items of expenditure as for last 
year ; and this diminution shows not only economical manage- 
ment by the school board, but also that the increase in the aggre- 
gate expense for the support of the schools has not kept pace 
with the increase in the city's valuation. 

School Property, December 31, 1890. 

Furniture. — Included under this head are teachers' and pupils' 
desks, chairs, settees, tables, portable blackboards, clocks, pianos 
and their appurtenances, ladders, double windows, and heating 
apparatus. 

General Supplies. — Included under this head are ink-stands, 
bells, waste baskets, thermometers, brooms, floor-brushes, dusters, 
dust-pans and brushes, door-mats, pails, dippers, wash basins, 
window brushes, mops, coal hods, shovels, axes, hammers, screw 
drivers, and wheelbarrows. 

(M) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



285 



School, Buildings. 



Furniture. 



General supplies. 



High school '. 

Franklin-street — 

Spring-street 

Lincoln-street — 

Ash-street 

Main-street 

Webster-street 

Bakersville 

Blodget-street 

Lowell-street 

Ti-aining school . . 

Wilson Hill 

School-street 

Soiith Main-street 

Amoskeag 

Hallsville 

Stark District 

Golfe's Falls 

Harvey District... 

Youngsville 

Webster's Mills . . . 
Mosquito Ponci . . . 
Evening Schools.. 

Total 



$3,428.00 

2,229.00 

1,937.00 

3,355.00 

3,231.00 

2,107.00 

3,108.00 

813.00 

2-28.00 

302.00 

1,613.00 

321.00 



$23 427 00 



$25.00 
36.00 
28.00 
56.00 
30.00 
30.00 
54.00 
15.00 

7.00 
11.00 
28.00 

9.00 



319.00 


12.00 


345.00 


8.00 


169.00 


7.00 


94.00 


4.00 


114.00 


5.00 


124.00 


6.00 


85.00 


5.00 


65.00 


5.00 


62.00 


4.00 


250.00 


200.00 



$585.00 



Special Supplies. — Included under this head are maps, globes, 
charts and chart supporters, numeral frames, slates, pencils, pen- 
cil sharpeners, pens, penholders, crayon, erasers, pointers, meas- 
ures, geometrical forms, compasses, and rulers. 

(N) 



286 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



Grades. 


Special supplies. 


Unabridged dic- 
tionaries and li- 
brary or refer- 
ence books. 


Regular 
text- 
books. 


High School 


$•200.00 
725.00 
474.00 
387.00 
154.00 
5.00 


$535.00 

225.00 

175.00 

150.00 

75.00 


$1,500.00 
2,400.00 






1,200.00 


Primary schools 


500.00 
400.00 




50.00 








Totals 


§1,945.00 


$1,160.00 


$6,050.00 





Amount of totals in two foregoing tables . . $33,167.00 
Siiperiiitendenf s Office, December jz, i8go. 



Value of furniture . 


$200.00 


general supplies 


25.00 


special supplies 


110.00 


blank books and paper 


250.00 


regular text-books . 


535-00 



Aggregate total of personal property belonging to 

city school department ..... $34,287.00 

VIII. — SCHOOL YEAR. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 6, closed March 
28. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 14, closed June 27. 
Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 8, closed De- 
cember 12. Vacation of two weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above by the 
school board, 1S5. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 176. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of " Teachers' Institutes," and half-days 
on account of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 

(O) 



■ REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 287 

IX. —HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATING CLASS. 

FOUR years' course. 

Norwin Sherwood Bean, c. Alfred Kimball Hobbs, e. 

Grace Berry, c. James Franklin McKinney, c. 

Annie A. Brigham, c. Bessie Campbell Mitchell, c. 

Bertha Millie Cayzer, c. Arthur Warren Morgan, col. 
Mattie Sophronia Chadwick, e. Charles D. Osgood, col. 

Benjamin Martin Cliandler, e. Eugene Woodbury Sargent, e. 

Lucy May Choate, c. Florence Sophia Shirley, c. 

Susie Lena Dodge, c. Cora Belle Simmons, e. 

Susie Christine Fogg, c. Nellie Viola Southard, c. 

Percy N. Folsom, col. Jennie Maud Thompson, e. 

Fred W. Hall, col. Arthur Fitts Wheat, col. 
Irving L. Woodman, c. 

THREE years' COURSE. 

Charles Joseph Adams, c. Carrie Ella Head, c. 

Annie L. Blonquest, e. Harry Taylor Lovering, e. 

Ellen H. Burke, e. Jennie May Morse, e. 

Harriet Laura Garmon, e. Winthrop Parker, e. 

Grace Lee Smith, e. 

TO receive a two years' certificate. 

Edith R. Mears. 

C indicates Clasiical Course. Col. indicates College Course. 

E indicates English Course. 

X. — WINNERS OF CLARKE PRIZES 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 29, 189O. 

Myra Shepard, $13. Jennie E. Patch, 5. 

Edgar E. Farmer, $11. Grace A. Phillips, ^5. 

Mabelle Bosher, $9. Blanche M. Folsom, ^5. 
Charles Robie, ^7. 

(P) 



288 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

XI. — ORGANIZATION, 1 89 1 . 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex officio, Chait^man. 
EDSON S. HEATH, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward I. — Charles H. Manning. 

Charles D. Sumner. 
Ward 2. — William H.Morrison. 

George H. Stearns. 
Ward 3. — George D. Towne. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Ward 4. — Stephen B. Stearns. 

Edwin L. Richardson. 
Ward 5. — James P. Slattery. 

William J. Sughrue. 
Ward 6. — Frank T. E. Richardson. 

George W. Dearborn. 
Ward 7. —Marshall P. Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8. — William K. Robbins. 

Luther C. Baldwin. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

SUPERINTENQENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

(Q) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 289 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. — The Mayor, Messrs. Heath, Hall, Woodbury, and 
F. T. E. Richardson. 

Salaries. — Messrs. Woodbury, Robbins, and Slattery. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. — Messrs. Manning, S. B. 
Stearns, and Sumner. 

Text-Books, Apparatus., and Studies. — Messrs. Hall, Baldwin^ 
and G. H. Stearns. 

Drawing. — Messrs. Baldwin, Hall, and Phelps. 

Music. — Messrs. F. T. E. Richardson, Phelps, and Morrison. 

Fuel and Heating. — Mr. G. H. Stearns, The Mayor, Messrs. 
Heath, Manning, and Dearborn. 

Examination of Teachers. — Messrs. Robbins, Morrison, and 
Towne. 

Attendance. — Messrs. E. L. Richardson, S. B. Stearns, and 
Sughrue. 

Health. — Messrs. Towne, Slattery, and Sumner. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 

High School. — Messrs. Manning, Hall, Morrison, S. B. 
Stearns, Robbins, and Towne. 

Franklin-street School. — Messrs Woodbury, Sumner, and 
Baldwin. 

Spring-street and Loiuell-strect Schools. — Messrs. Towne, Slat- 
tery, and Sumner. 

Lincoln-street School. — Messrs. S. B. Stearns, F. T. E. Rich- 
ardson, and E. L. Richardson. 

Ash-street School.^ — Messrs. Phelps, Towne, and Hall. 

Webster-street and Blodgef-street Schools. — Messrs. G. H. 
Stearns, Morrison, and Woodbury. 

Bakersville School. — Messrs. Morrison, F. T. E. Richardson, 
and Wcodbury, 

Varney School. — Messrs. Baldwin, S. B. Stearns, and Phelps. 

Training School and Wilson Hill School. — ^Itssr^. Hall, Rob- 
bins, and Phelps. 

*Also of any others that may be organized on Bridge street. 

(R) 

19 



290 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Main-street and South Maiji-strcet Schools. — Messrs. Robbins, 
Baldwin, and Dearborn. 

Afnoskeag and Stark District Schools. — Messrs. Sumner, Dear- 
born, and Sughrue. 

Hallsville and Youngsville Schools. — Messrs. Dearborn, Man- 
ning, and Sughrue. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey District Schools. — Messrs. Slattery, 
G. H. Stearns, and E. L. Richardson. 

Webster's Mills and Mosquito Pond Schools. — Messrs. E. L. 
Richardson, Slattery, and Sughrue. 

Evening Schools. — Messrs. F. T. E. Richardson, Manning, 
and G. H. Stearns. 

XII. — LIST OF TEACHERS. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. — Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. — George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. — William T. Abbott. 

Lucretia E. Manahan. 

Mary Stanton. 

Nellie Pickering. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Charles W. Bickford. 
Assistants. — Annie O. Heath. 

Jennie M. Chandler. 

Carrie E. Reid. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. — C. Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle. — Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. — Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. — Ella F. Sanborn. 

(S) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 291 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. — Lizzie P. Gove (4th Grammar division). 
Higher Middle. — Emma L. McLaren. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle — Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. — Nellie L Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. — Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. — Maude L. Kent. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistants. — Annie W. Patten. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

Annie M. Sleeper. * 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Grammar and Middle. — Nettie F. Ainsworth. 
Higher Middle. — Susie G. Woodman. 
Lower Middle. — Cora B. Gilford. 
Higher Primary. — Theodora Richardson. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. — Gertrude F. How. 

Mary E. Bun ton. 

Bertha L. Dean. 

* Third floor. 

(T) 



292 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

First Floor. — Loiver Grades^ 

Higher Middle. — Nancy S. Eunton. 
Lower Middle. — Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. — May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. — Clara E. Woods. 
Lower Primary. — Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades.. 

Principal. — B. S. Andrew. 
Assistants. — F. Maude Joy. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Alta C.Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. — Eva F. Tuson. 
Mixed Primary. — Lettie ]\L Smith. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. — Lizzie A. Burns (grammar classes). 
Higher Middle. * — Lelia A. Brooks. 
Lower Middle. — Carrie E. Hoit. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Primary. — S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. — Edith M. Stebbins. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. — George Winch. 
Assistant. — Barbara B. Joy. 

* Third floor. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 293 

First Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Assistants. — Lillian Little (Third Division). 

Maria Dickey (Fourth Division). 
Grammar and Middle. — Ellen E. McKean. 
Mixed Middle. — Nettie C. Woodman. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

(Merrimack street, cor. Union.) 
Principal. — Caroline E. Wing. 

A lower middle school (No. 15), a higher (No. 21) and two 
lower (Nos. 22 and 23) primary schools, embracing first four 
years of school work. Principal is assisted by members of Train- 
ing Class. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor, — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. — Mary W. Mitchell, (Higher Middle). 
Lower Middle. — Millie S. Morse. 
Higher Primary. — Mary E. Brophy. 

First Floor. — Primary Grades. 

Mixed Primary. — Mary A. Clement. 
Mixed Primary. — Mary J. Walsh. 
Lower Primary. — Kate T. Clarke. 
Lower Primary. — Gertrude L. Southard. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. — Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. ' 

Lower Primary. — Georgianna Dow. 
(V) 



294 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Used for evening schools. 

First Floor. 
Mixed Primary — Helen M. Morrill. 

WILSON-HILL SCHOOL. 

Lower Primary. — Huldah C. Graupner. 
Lower Primary. — Ella Hope. 

SOUTH MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Pligher Primary. — Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. — Annie B. Goodwin. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. — Nettie B. Fogg. 
Mixed Primary. — Mary G. Tynan. 
Hallsville. — Ella F. Barker (higher classes). 
Assistant. — Abbie R. West (lower classes). 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

No. I. Stark. — Inez M. Warren. 

2. Goffe's Falls. — Georgie Kendrick. 

3. Harvey. — Emma J. Ela. 

4. Youngsville. — Mary A. Seavey. 

5. Webster's Mills. — Genevieve B. Knight. 

6. Mosquito Pond. — Olive A. Rowe. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. — J.J.Kimball. 
Elocution. — J. J. Hayes. 

(W) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 295 

JANITORS. 

Webster-street and Blodget-street Schools. 
Michael Finley, Pearl, near Chestnut. 

High School, Ash-street, and Wilson-Hill Schools. 
John S. Avery, 404 Merrimack. 

Franklin-street and Lincoln-street Schools. 
William Stevens, 418 Central. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. 
William H. Morrill, 45 Pennacook. 

Training School. 
Edward P. Cogswell, 218 Central. 

Vai'ney and Main-street Schools. 
Samuel A. Hill, 86 School. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey, Bakersville. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

(Open from October to March, five evenings each week.) 
Lowell-street Biiildifig. 
Three schools for boys. 

Spring-street Building. 

Two schools for girls. 

(X) 



296 " ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

School-street Building. 
Two schools, one for each sex. 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

Open from October to March. 

Spring-street Building. 

Machine-drawing classes meet on Monday and Thursday even- 
ings. 

Architectural-drawing classes meet on Tuesday and Friday 
evenings. 

GRADUATES OF TRAINING SCHOOL NOT EMPLOYED AS REGULAR 
TEACHERS FEB. 20, 1 89 1. 

Emma B. Abbott. * Gertrude A. Burns. * 

Alverta P. Barrett. * Georgia M. Cheney. * 

Emma M. Streeter. * Mary G. Worthen. f 
Mary E. Moulton. * 

OTHERS NEVER HERE EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, WHO HAVE CER- 
TIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION. 

Maud Bell, Fanny L. Perry, Fannie E. Smith, Martha T. 
Learnard, Lizzie M. McAfee, Hattie J. Hoyt, Evelina Davis, 
William S. Harris, Hattie N. Gage, Carrie L. Barker, George F. 
Drake, and Lucie G. Thompson. All certificated for grammar 
and lower grades. 

Helen W. Poor, Belle F. Small, Hattie M. Ellis, Hattie E. 
Merrill, Alithea M. Hutchins, Amy B. Smith, Emma J. Cooper, 
.and S. Louise Valentine. Certificated for middle and primary 
grades. 

XHL— SCHOOL YEAR, 1891. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens December 29, 1890, closes 
March 20. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 13, closes June 26. 
Rest of year not yet determined. 

* Certificated for primary and middle grades, 
t Certificated for grammar and lower grades. 

(Y) 



REPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To His Honor the Mayor : 

The Board of Health submits its report for the year 1890. 

At tlie beginning of the year the Board consisted of George C* 
Hoitt, M. D., chairman ; Joseph B. Sawyer, clerk, and William 
M. Parsons, M. D. On the first Monday in Febr^iary the term 
of Dr. Hoitt expired, and he was re-appointed for three years. On 
the same day, as by law required, the Board was reorganized, the 
old officers being re-elected, and it has since remained unchanged. 

EMPLOYEES. 

Mr. Russell White has been employed throughout the year, and 
Mr. C. H. Reed about one month in July and August, in the 
ordinary work of the department. Mr. Patrick Dobbins, special 
police officer, was employed twenty-two days in watching an 
infected house and family. 



EXPENDITURES. 

The expenditures of the Board have been 
Pay of employes . 
Street-car fares 

Stationery, postage, and express charges 
Carriage hire 
Printing 

Traveling expenses 
Fixtures 

Assistance in burying dead animals 
Analysis of water 



^679.00 
41.80 
18.24 
12.50 

39-65 
2.49 

.90 

10.00 

28.65 



•300 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Special police $3^-5° 

Cleaning vault of shoe shop, 1888 .... 42-50 

Posting regulations 2.75 

Examination of Lake Massabesic ..... 23.50 



$940.48 



To this amount seven dollars may be added, that being the 
amount of two bills approved by the Board in the preceding 
year, but which laid over in the hands of the auditor, and were 
included in the January draft. 

The salaries of the members of the Board have been charged to 
this account, making the whole expenditures of the health depart- 
ment $1,547.48. 

In the summer of 1888 the contents of a large privy-vault at 
the shoe shop in Hallsville overflowed, ran into the highway, and 
became a public nuisance. The proper parties were notified to 
empty the vault, but they refused or neglected to do so, where- 
upon the Board proceeded to abate the nuisance by having the 
vault emptied. A suit to recover the cost of the work was com- 
menced, and was to have been tried at the last September term of 
court, but it was settled or compromised in some manner without 
the consent of this Board. 

WORK OF THE INSPECTOR. 

Houses placarded for infectious diseases : 

Scarlet fever ......... 63 

Diphtheria ......... 41 

Measles 298 

402 

In a large part of these cases it has been necessary to notify 
school teachers and employers of the existence of the disease ; also 
it is necessary to make a second visit to the house for the purpose 
of removing the placard after the receipt of the doctor's certi- 
ficate that the danger of infection has passed. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 301 

Houses containing cases of typhoid fever visited . . 36 

Privy-vaults inspected after being cleaned : 

Cleaned by A. McDougall ...... 23 

" T. Shea . . . . . . -773 

" T. McKenna ...... 59a 

1,388 
Dead animals buried : 

Swine .......... 6 

Horses .......... 20 

Dogs 37 

Cats, hens, and skunk ....... 23 

86 

Other nuisances found and abated . . . . -351 

SLAUGHTER HOUSE AT BAKERSVILLE, 

In August last a complaint was made by Mr. N. S. Burns and 
others, residents of Bakersville, of a nuisance caused by the 
slaughtering and rendering works of the Manchester Beef Co., 
and a public hearing was given on the subject of the complaint. 
The hearing occupied two half-days. Many witnesses were ex- 
amined, the works were repeatedly visited by the Board and by 
its individual members, and all practicable means were used to 
arrive at the truth in the case. It appeared that earlier in the 
season the establishment had been a nuisance, but that the work 
was then being carried on by the use of improved methods and 
apparatus by which the bad smells and noises were to a great 
extent obviated. The decision was that the works did not then 
create a nuisance of such a character as to require their stoppage 
or removal. 

The establishment has since been visited occasionally by mem^ 
bers of the Board, and has always been found clean and free from 
anything which could be considered a nuisance injurious to the 
public health. 



302 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TUBERCULOSIS. 



The duty of guarding against the spread of contagious diseases 
among domestic animals is by statute laid on the Mayor and 
Aldermen, but as tuberculosis is so closely related to the public 
health of mankind it becomes the duty of the Board of Health to 
take cognizance of it also. 

Last autumn the disease was found or suspected in the herd 
at the farm of the State Industrial School in this city. The 
Mayor and Mr. Ray, the superintendent, thereupon employed F. 
J. Smith, V. S., of Rochester, to examine the herd. Two mem- 
bers of this Board were present by request of the Mayor and 
assisted in the examination. The herd consisted of twenty-seven 
animals, all of which were condemned and killed, and in every 
case the diagnosis of Dr. Smith was fully confirmed by post mor- 
tem examination. 

The flesh of all the animals was condemned and buried by 
order of the Board, thus making sure that it would not be bought 
ostensibly for the rendering shop, but really for the market. 

The affair created a great excitement, and the most absurd 
rumors found circulation and credence ; but when, a few days 
afterwards, one or two animals belonging to other herds were 
condemned by Dr. Smith, and on post mortem examination 
showed only very equivocal indications of the disease, the pen- 
dulum of popular rumor swung equally suddenly and absurdly to 
the opposite extreme, and an unwarranted feeling of security 
against this insidious and dangerous disease now pervades the 
community. The foremost sanitarians and biologists in the 
world, together with the great majority of observant physicians, 
are agreed that tuberculosis is the same disease in man and in 
beast, and is communicable. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table gives the number of cases of contagious 
diseases reported to the Board in each month, also the number of 
deaths which have resulted therefrom. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



303 



































a 


oi 
3 

&4 


o 
OS 


P. 
< 


cS 
5 


a3 

p 

3 


9, 


P 

be 

<^ 

1 


g 

P. 
v 

CO 


o 
o 

O 




s 
s 




s 

o 

0) 

P 

n 


"3 



Eh 

41 


03 

p 




n 


5 


17 


9 
3 


Scarlet fever 


7 


22 


n 


2 


3 


1 


1 


2 





9, 


5 


7 


fiS 


Typhoid fever 


2 











4 





2 


3 


8 


4 


2 


11 


36 


17 


Mpasles 


65 


59 


105 


55 


2 


2 


8 


1 





1 








298 


6 



The epidemic of measles began in the fall of 1889, there having 
been one case in October, ten in November, and thirty-one in 
December of that year. The table indicates that about two per 
cent of the cases of that disease have been fatal ; but this is mis- 
leading, because while the return of deaths is complete that of 
cases is not so. Many cases of measles to which no doctor is 
called do not come to the knowledge of this Board. The same is 
true, although perhaps to a less extent, of scarlet fever. The law 
does not, as it should, require householders to report cases of 
contagious disease. The fatalities in scarlet fever have been less 
than five per cent, while in diphtheria they have been twenty-two 
per cent, and in typhoid fever forty-seven per cent of the number 
of cases. Small-pox has been absent since 1885. Influenza or 
grippe prevailed extensively in January, and to some extent in 
the following months. Some statistics gathered at the close of 
January showed that in a population of 13,823 persons employed 
in some of the principal mills, shops, and other establishments of 
the city, 4,969 had during the month been absent from work 
one or more days on the plea of sickness. This indicates that 
one third of the whole population suffered in that month from 
the epidemic. Information from the schools, both public and 
private, points to the same conclusion. 



304 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND BY 

MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1890, COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF THE CITY REGISTRAR. 



Causes of Death. 




s 

a} 


JS 


'S 
ft 
< 




6 

a 


>> 

a 


-si 

1 


53 

aj 

P. 
« 

CO 






s 




s 
ft 








1 




1 










1 








1 






1 
















■^ 




















1 


Accident, not specified... 1 






1 


1 2 








1 
1 






f; 






3 










/( 
















T 


*' pistol-shot '..,. 
















1 




1 


" fall 1 








! 










1 










1 
1 
















1 


** suffocatd,sm'ke 
























1 






1 










1 

i' 











2 
1 














■> 












1 








s 




1 


1 
1 


1 




1 
2 










4 


Apoplexy 1 


1 1 




1 
1 


2 


2 


2 


13 
1 




















1 


2 






















1 








1 










1 











1 
















1 








1 






1 






<?, 




















1 




1 


I 








1 


1 




3 


3 
1 

1 






in 


** embolism 










1 








1 


<) 


1 

"3' 

1 


1 
1 
1 






6 




3 


2 

1 


"5" 


1 1 

3 [.... 

1 1 


4 


1 






IS 




1 


3 




18 








4 


** capillary 3 








2 
1 

"i' 


"2 


1 
I 


1 
1 


in 






1 
1 


I 






n 




1 




2 


1 




3 


q 




1 














1 










1 


** of lip t... , 














1 








1 




1 




















1 
















1 






1 
1 


f 






















1 




1 


1 
1 
2 






^ 


45 


53 


26 


9 


2 


141 










1 


Consumption. 20 


3 


5 


8 10 


8 


9 


9 


8 


3 

1 


9 

i' 

1 


94 
1 




3 
2 
1 


2 
2 

a 


2 


1 






2 


2 


1 




14 




1 
1 








6 




1 




"i" 


2 


1 








q 


Cystitis 










1 


Debility I 3 

•' general i 6 

*' infantile 




4 
















1 
2 

1 


s 






2 s 


3 


5 1 s 


3 


qq 




1 


1 










.. 


3 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



305 



TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


i 


u 
a 


H 

.o 






>1 


a 

•-5 


>> 

>-> 


CO 

3 
6£ 


a 

P. 

CO 


4) 

,a 
o 

o 


^^ 

a 

t> 
o 

I2i 


® 

s 

® 

O 

Q 


o5'' 

H 

o 








1 




1 














1 




1 




1 




^ 




1 




1 








<t 












1 
1 










1 


























1 




1 








1 

4 








2 






5 








3 


2 






f> 




















2 
.... 

1 


<> 


























1 


















1 




r{ 














1 


















1 

1 








1 


Enteritis 






















1 


^ 


" acute 


















1 
1 


1 
























9 






















1 


Fever, brain 




















i 




•^ 


" gastric 


1 
















7 


" scarlet* 








1 












<? 




2 
10 










2 






3 
3 

1 


5 

"i 


17 


Grippe 




3 




IS 


Gall-stones 
















] 


Gastritis 






















/) 


Gangrene, senile 
















1 










1 
3 
1 

1 
1 










1 
5 






9 




5 

2 
2 




2 
2 
1 


1 






4 




2 

1 


"i' 

1 


21 


" failure 


7 


" valvular disease 














f> 




1 
1 














o 
























1 


























1 


Hepatitis 


1 




















i> 








1 
















1 




















1 






•) 


Ileocolitis 






















] 








1 
1 










^ 


1 


2 




q 


Infanticide 










1 




1 






















'^ 


Insanitv 






















1 


Kidneys, disease 






1 
1 


















<) 


























1 
























1 


1 


Leucocvthfemia 




I 




















1 


Liver, disease 


3 




2 








1 












Lungs, congestion 




... 

i 


2 












4 
1 

1 


10 












<> 


















■ 






1 


Malaria 






1 
1 

2 






1 
1 












!? 


Marasmus 




*"i' 




3 


1 
1 


" 








10 


Measles 


1 
2 








H 






1 
1 
1 










1 


11 


" acute 








^ 


" cerebral 










1 












'> 


" chronic 


1 

1 




















1 


" tubercular 


1 


1 








1 


1 










5 



20 



306 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE. — Concluded. 



Causes of Death. 


i 

5 


S 

s 




ft 
<1 






s 

Irs 


91 

P 


s 
a 

ft 
m 


a) 
O 
o 

O 


1 


0) 1 

-^ i 

a 
® 

o 




in 

O 






1 
1 
1 


1 








1 


















9, 












1 






1 






s 
















1 




1 
1 
1 

23 
1 
8 
1 
2 
3 


Nervous exhaustion 


1 




















1 










1 
3 
















6 


1 


1 3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 

1 
4 




2 j 








2 












1 


1 


.... 












1 










1 1 




























1 
1 
1 


1 
4 




1 






14 


3 


6 1 2 


4 


1 


4 


6 45 


" bronchial 


1 




1 






3 
1 




1 














" typhoid 


4 2 














1 


1 


"l 


8 














1 








1 

2 

1 
1 














1 






1 


3 


3 














1 


10 


















1 




'l 




1 

1 
















1 


3 












1 




3 


















1 


1 






1 
1 




















1 






.... 




















1 












1 






.... 


.... 


1 








2 




1 


1 




3 




1 
1 


















?, 














1 
5 






?, 




1 


13 


4 


4 


4 


4 


2 


3 


9 


7 

1 


63 




1 


" ulceratiou 










"i' 




1 










1 
1 




2 


1 
1 




















1 










2 


1 


1 


3 


1 






11 




1 
2 










1 
























1 


3 
















1 








1 








1 


















9, 
























1 














2 












0, 
















1 










1 


(< fibroid 




















1 




1 
























1 






1 








1 
1 












?, 




1 










1 


1 








4 










1 
1 

52 










1 




5 
137 


2 
56 


5 

83 


6 
56 


9 1 21 


3 

106 


93 


4 
72 


3 
51 


3 
71 


66 


Totals 


61 


126 


964 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



307 





















u 




b 


j; 








t>, 


















aj 


V 






ti 


•r. 
















^ 


^ 


,a 




Classification. 


r4 
3 


g 


2 


"S 


tA 


6 


>> 


be 






S 


S 


"3 




22 
23 
61 
24 


01 

16 

7 

26 

4 


11 

8 
32 
24 


6 

6 

25 

12 


8 

8 

21 

9 




i-s 

8 
12 
15 
15 


D 
•-J 

51 

9 

28 

13 


< 

61 
14 

20 

8 


36 

12 
27 
14 


o 

O 

11 
11 
29 
14 


12 
5 
18 
12 


10 
13 
31 
14 


o 

6^ 




?5?, 




TJ-S 




33^? 


Developmental 


163 




o, 


1 


3 


1 


5 


2 


4 






3 


1 




?', 


Unclassified 


5 


2 


5 


6 


1 


9 


21 


3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


66 


Totals 


137 


56 


83 


56 


52 


61 


126 


106 


93 


72 


51 


71 


964 



The number of persons whose remains were brought from 
other places for interment here is as follows : January, 14 ; Feb- 
ruary, ID ; March, 6 ; April, 7 ; May, 6 ; June, g ; July, 8 ; 
August, 14; September, 7 ; October, 12 ; November, 8; Decem- 
ber, 7. Total, 108. 

The number of deaths was larger than in any former year, be- 
ing nine hundred and one against seven hundred and sixty-four 
for the previous year, and eight hundred and fifty-three in 1888. 
The rate per thousand of population was 20.49 against 17.90 the 
year before. The increase occurred mostly in the months of Jan- 
uary, July, August, and September, and was due to an increase of 
bowel diseases in children in the warm months, and probably to 
the influenza or grippe which prevailed in January. During the 
year grippe and influenza are charged with twenty deaths, and 
they may have added malignity to some other diseases. There 
was a noticeable increase in the number of deaths from heart dis- 
eases, bronchitis, and pneumonia. The number of deaths from 
consumption in January was twenty, against an average of about 
eight in former years, but the number for the whole year was not 
above the average. 

The sixty-six deaths from causes not stated are mostly those of 
children less than one year of age. Probably a large part of 
these deaths were caused by diarrheal diseases, but as the regis- 



308 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

tration law now stands and is administered, it appears to be no> 
great obstacle to the hiding of a murder, either of infant or adult. 
It would seem reasonable that in this city the body of no human 
being should be buried until some competent medical man has. 
given a certificate founded upon his own knowledge of the case, 
or on his belief after due investigation, as to the cause of death. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



309 



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310 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The national census taken in June last showed the'Jpopulation 
of the city to be 43,983, and indicated an annual increase since 
1880 of a little more than three per cent. This is slightly larger 
than the annual estimates of this Board for the past four years as 
given in the tables of comparisons in previous reports. In the 
preceding table these estimates have been revised in the light af- 
forded by the census, and are believed to be substantially correct. 
It is gratifying to find the growth of the city outrunning our es- 
timates. At present the increase is estimated at one hundred per 
month. 

SANITARY NEEDS OF THE CITY. 

A brief notice of some of the more obvious of these will close 
this report. Some of them are within the scope of the powers in- 
trusted to this Board, and it will be our endeavor to meet them 
to the full extent of our ability with the limited means at our 
command. Others can only be secured by the action of other 
departments of the city government, and by enlightenment of the 
general public opinion. 

1. We need the abolishment of a large number of privy-vaults 
and stable cellars situated in the compact part of the city. 

2. Abetter way of disposing of the waste of the city. The 
swill is now carried away two miles from the City Hall by a con- 
tractor and fed to swine. The other rubbish is collected by the 
highway department and dumped into ravines and low places in 
proposed streets. These dumps are nearly as foul and evil- 
smelling as they were when the swill went into them. The work 
of the contractor has made but slight improvement in their char- 
acter. The whole mass of rubbish should be burned in a furnace 
constructed for that purpose. 

3. A frequent examination by a competent veterinary surgeon 
of all the cows from which milk is brought into the city, includ- 
ing their housing aad feeding. 

4. A more enlightened and vigorous public sentiment in re- 
gard to the protection of our water supply. The experience of 
other cities and the researches of scientific men admonish us that 
the apathy of our people in this regard is little short of criminal 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 311 

negligence. The building of dwellings and boathouses with one 
end hanging out over the lake, and even in some cases \i^olly on 
piles standing in the water, should be stopped. The two uses of 
the lake as a place of summer resort and as a source of water 
supply are incompatible with each other. The city should at 
once acquire a belt of land at least one hundred and fifty feet 
wide, extending entirely around the lake, and on this belt no 
building, either permanent or temporary, for the housing of 
man or beast should be allowed. 

5. Public baths, including an out-of-door place, under the 
care of a competent and reliable man, during the summer 
months, where the boys could learn to swim and could enjoy a 
bath in safety. 

6. We need above all things of a sanitary nature the dispelling 
of that ignorance and apathy which tolerates filth and unclean- 
ness in person and surroundings. When the community can be 
made to realize that filth and decay bear as close a relation to 
sickness as benzine and oily waste do to a fire, the battle will be 
more than half won. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE C. HOITT, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
WM. M. PARSONS, 

Board of Health of Manchester. 
January, 1891. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, ETC. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND 
OIL LAMPS. 



No. I. Corner Cypress and Massabesic, arm. 

2. Massabesic-street watering trough, pole. 

3. Corner Park and Beacon, arm. 

4. Corner Central and Hall, arm. 

5. Corner Lake avenue and Massabesic, arm. 

6. Corner Wilson and Laurel, arm. 

7. Corner Merrimack and Hall, arm. 

8. Corner Manchester and Hall, arm. 

9. Corner Manchester and Wilson, arm. 

10. Corner Hanover and Ashland, arm. 

11. Corner Hanover and Hall, arm. 

12. Corner Hanover and Beacon, arm. 

13. Corner Concord and Ashland, arm. 

14. Corner Bridge and Hall, arm. 

15. Corner Myrtle and Russell, arm. 

16. Corner Pearl and Linden, arm. 

17. Corner Pearl and Russell, arm. 

18. Corner Bridge and Nashua, arm. 

19. Corner Nashua and High, arm. 

20. Corner Concord and Button, arm. 

21. Corner Amherst and Porter, arm. 

22. Corner Hanover and Lincoln, arm. 

23. Corner Manchester and Lincoln, arm. 

24. Corner Merrimack and Lincoln, arm. 

25. Corner Laurel and Lincoln, arm. 

26. Corner Central and Lincoln, arm. 



316 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 27. Corner Lake avenue and Lincoln, arm. 

28. Corner Spruce and Lincoln, arm. 

29. Corner Spruce and Maple, arm. 

30. Corner Lake avenue and Maple, arm. 

31. Corner Central and Maple, arm. 

32. Corner Merrimack and Maple, arm. 

33. Corner Manchester and Maple, arm. 

34. Corner Hanover and Maple, arm. 

35. Corner Amherst and Maple, arm. 

36. Corner Concord and Maple, arm. 

37. Corner Lowell and Nashua, arm. 

38. Corner Bridge and Maple, arm. 

39. Corner Myrtle and Maple, arm. 

40. Corner Orange and Ash, arm. 

41. Corner Harrison and Beech, arm. 

42. Corner Myrtle and Beech, arm. 

43. Corner Pearl and Beech, arm. 

44. Corner Bridge and Beech, arm. 

45. Corner Lowell and Ash, arm. 

46. Corner Amherst and Ash, arm. 

47. Corner Lowell and Beech, arm. 

48. Corner Concord and Walnut, arm. 

49. Corner Amherst and Beech, arm. 

50. Corner Hanover and Beech, arm. 

51. Hanover Square, pole. 

52. Corner Manchester and Beech, arm. 

53. Corner Merrimack and Beech, arm. 

54. Corner Laurel and Beech, arm. 

55. Corner Central and Beech, arm. 

56. Corner Lake avenue and Beech, arm. 

57. Corner Spruce and Beech, arm. 

58. Corner Cedar and Union, arm. 

59. Corner Lake avenue and Union, arm. 

60. Corner Central and Union, arm. 

61. Corner Laurel and Union, arm. 

62. Corner Merrimack and Union, arm. 

63. Corner Manchester and Union, arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 317 

No. 64. Corner Hanover and Union, arm. 

65. Corner Amherst and Union, arm. 

66. Corner Concord and Union, arm. 

67. Corner Lowell and Walnut, arm. 

68. Corner Lowell and Union, arm. 

69. Corner High and Union, arm. 

70. Corner Bridge and Union, arm. 

71. Corner Bridge and Walnut, arm. 

72. Corner Orange and Union, arm. 

73. Corner Prospect and Union, arm. 

74. Corner Brook and Union, arm. 

75. Corner Pennacook and Union, arm. 

76. Corner Webster and Pine, arm. 

77. Corner North and Pine, pole. 

78. Corner Sagamore and Pine, arm. 

79. Corner Blodget and Pine, arm. 

80. Corner Harrison and Hazel, arm. 

81. Corner Prospect and Pine, arm. 

82. Corner Myrtle and Pine, arm. 
8^. Corner Orange and Pine, arm. 

84. Corner Pearl and Pine, arm. 

85. Corner Bridge and Pine, arm. 

86. Tremont Square, pole. 

87. Corner High and Pine, arm. 

88. Corner Lowell and Pine, arm. 

89. Corner Concord and Pine, arm. 

90. Corner Amherst and Pine, arm. 

91. Corner Hanover and Pine, arm. 

92. Corner Manchester and Pine, arm. 

93. Corner Merrimack and Pine, arm. 

94. Corner Laurel and Pine, arm. 

95. Corner Central and Pine, arm. 

96. Corner Lake avenue and Pine, arm. 

97. Corner Cedar and Pine, arm. 

98. Corner Auburn and Pine, arm. 

99. Corner Cedar and Chestnut, arm. 
100. Park Square, pole. 



318 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

No. loi. Corner Lake avenue and Chestnut, arm. 

102. Corner Central and Chestnut, arm. 

103. Merrimack Square, pole. 

104. Corner Merrimack and Chestnut, arm. 

105. Corner Manchester and Chestnut, arm. 

106. Corner Hanover and Chestnut, arm. 

107. Concord Square, east, pole. 

108. Concord Square, west, pole. 

109. Corner Chestnut and Concord B. S., arm. 
no. Corner Chestnut and High, arm. 

111. Corner Chestnut and Bridge, arm. 

112. Corner Chestnut and Pearl, arm. 

113. Corner Chestnut and Myrtle, arm. 

114. Corner Chestnut and Harrison, arm. 

115. Corner Chestnut and Brook, arm. 

116. Corner Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

117. Corner Salmon and Chestnut, pole. 

118. Corner Webster and Chestnut, arm. 

119. Corner Clarke and Elm, arm. 

120. Corner Webster and Elm, arm. 

121. Corner North and Elm, arm. 

122. Corner Salmon and Elm, arm. 

123. Corner Pennacook and Elm, arm. 

124. Corner Brook and Elm, arm. 

125. Corner Harrison and Elm, arm. 

126. Langdon street, pole. 

127. Corner Dean and Elm, arm. 

128. Corner Prospect and Chestnut, arm. 

129. Corner Orange and Elm, arm. 

130. Corner Pearl and Elm, arm. 

131. Elm East B. S., between Pearl and Bridge, arm. 

132. Corner Bridge and Elm, arm. 

133. Corner Washington and Church, arm. 

134. Corner Birch and Lowell, arm. 

135. Corner Lowell and Elm, arm. 

136. Elm East B. S. between Lowell and Concord, arm. 

137. Corner Water and Elm, arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 

No. 138. Corner Vine and Concord, arm. 

139. Corner Vine and Amherst, arm. 

140. Corner Amherst and Elm, arm. 

141. Corner Mechanic and Elm West B. S., arm. 

142. Stark street, arm. 

143. Corner Market and Franklin, arm. 

144. Corner Market and Elm, arm. 

145. Corner Hanover and Elm East B. S., arm. 

146. Corner Elm and Manchester, arm. 

147. Corner Dean avenue and Elm West B. S., arm. 

148. Corner Elm and Merrimack, arm. 

149. Middle street. 

150. Corner Pleasant and Elm West B. S., arm. 

151. Merrimack Square, west, pole. 

152. Corner Elm and Central, arm. 

153. Corner Elm and Lake avenue, arm. 

154. Corner Elm and Spruce, arm. 

155. Beech and Cedar, pole. 
15-6. Corner Elm and Cedar, arm. 

157. Corner Franklin and Granite, arm. 

158. Corner Elm and Auburn, arm. 

159. Corner Elm and Green, arm. 

160. Corner Elm and Valley, arm. 

161. Bakersville watering trough, arm. 

162. Corner Summer and State, pole. 

163. Corner Granite and State, arm. 

164. Granite Bridge, east, pole. 

165. Corner Bedford and Granite, pole. 

166. Corner Canal and Granite, pole. 

167. Corner Depot and Canal, pole. 

168. Central between Franklin and Canal, pole. 

169. Corner Bedford and Central, arm. 

170. Corner Canal and Merrimack, arm. 

171. Corner Canal and Middle, arm. 

172. Corner Canal and Stark, arm. 

173. Corner Canal and Mechanic, arm. 

174. Corner Canal and Spring, arm. 



319 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 175. Corner Canal and Bridge, arm. 

176. McGregor Bridge, east, pole. 

177. Corner Canal and Hollis, pole. 

178. Corner Canal and Dean, pole. 

179. Corner Canal and Langdon, arm. 

180. Corner River road and North street, arm. 

181. Amoskeag Bridge, east, arm. 

182. Amoskeag Bridge, west, arm. 

183. Amoskeag watering trough, pole. 

184. Amoskeag brick store, pole. 

185. Corner McGregor and Main, pole. 

186. Corner McGregor and Bridge, pole. 

187. McGregor Bridge, west, pole. 

188. Corner Amory and Main, pole. 

189. Corner Amory and Beauport, pole. 

190. Corner Wayne and Beauport, pole. 

191. Corner Marion and Main, pole. 

192. Corner McGregor and Wayne, pole. 

193. Corner McGregor and Putnam, arm. 

194. Corner Sullivan and Main, pole, 

195. Corner Beauport and Sullivan, pole. 

196. Corner Main and Schuyler, pole. 

197. Corner Wilton and Main, pole. 

198. Corner Douglas and Main, arm. 

199. Corner Douglas and Barr, arm. 

200. Corner Granite and Green, arm. 

201. Corner West and Granite, arm. 

202. Corner Granite and Main, arm. 

203. Corner Granite and Second, arm. 

204. Granite Bridge, west, pole. 

205. Corner School and River, arm, 

206. Corner School and Third, arm. 

207. Corner Second and Bath, pole. 

208. Corner Ferry and River, arm. 

209. Corner Ferry and Third, arm. 

210. Corner Walker and Second, arm. 

211. Corner Blaine and Third, arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 321 

No. 2X2. Corner Clinton and Main, arm. 

213. Corner Walker and Main, arm. 

214. Corner Parker and West, arm. 

215. Corner Winter and Parker, arm. 

216. Corner Main and Mast, pole. 

217. Corner Main and Milford, arm. 

218. Corner Main and A, arm. 

219. Corner Carroll and Milford, arm. 

220. Corner Old Mast road and Mast, arm. 

221. Corner Hall and Amherst, arm. 

222. Corner Laurel and Maple, arm. 

223. Corner Central and Wilson, arm. 

224. Corner Harrison and Pine, arm. 

225. Corner Massabesic and Belmont, pole. "■ 

226. Corner Union and Appleton, arm, 

227. Corner Elm and railroad crossing, pole. 

228. Corner Franklin and Pleasant, arm. 

229. Corner Elm and Appleton, arm. 

230. Corner Milford and Riddle, arm. 

231. Corner Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad, pole. 

232. Corner Lake avenue and Canton, pole. 

233. Corner Laurel and Hall, arm. 

234. Corner Beech and Brook, arm. 

235. Corner Kidder and Boyden, pole. 

236. Corner Myrtle and Walnut, arm. 

237. Bridge and Linden, arm. 

238. Corner Lowell and Ashland, arm. 

239. Corner Lowell and Belmont, arm. 

240. Corner Pearl and Union, arm. 

241. Corner Salmon and Union, pole. 

242. Water street, arm. 

243. Corner Arlington and Ashland, arm. 

244. Corner Orange and Oak, arm. 

245. Corner Prospect and Oak, arm. 

246. Corner Arlington and Russell, arm. 

247. Corner Gore and Walnut, arm. 

21 



822 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

248. Corner Laurel and Milton, arm. 

249. Massabesic street — Hospital, pole. 

250. Corner Lake avenue and Wilson, arm. 

251. Corner Bridge and Ash, arm. 

252. Hanover street, east, pole. 

253. Corner Franklin and Depot, arm. 

254. Corner Spruce and Union, arm. 

255. Corner East High and Wilson road, pole. 



GAS LIGHTS IN USE. 

Appleton and Pine. 

Clarke and Chestnut. 

Clarke and River road. 

Elm, near Ray brook. 

Monroe street. 

Appleton, West End. 

Webster and River road. 

Salmon and River road. 

Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 

Canal, near paper mill. 

Blodget, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Blodget and Chestnut. 

Brook and Pine. 

Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Myrtle, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Orange and Chestnut. 

Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Pearl and Walnut. 

Orange and Walnut. 

Orange and Beech. 

Myrtle and Ash. 

Pearl and Maple. 

Arlington and Maple. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 323 

East High and Maple. 

I^owell and South. 

Lowell and Jane. 

Amherst and Ashland. 

Concord and Hall. 

Lowell and Hall. 

Concord and Belmont. 

Amherst and Belmont. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

Lowell and Beacon. 

East High and Belmont. 

Prospect and Russell. 

Harrison and Russell. 

Harrison and Oak. 

Harrison and Maple. 

Harrison and Ash. 

Prospect and Ash. 

Prospect and Beech. 

Prospect and Walnut. 

Belmont and Central. 

Maple and Cedar. 

Beech and Auburn. 

Willow and Merrill, 

Two lights on South Elm. 

Two lights on Hancock and River road. 

Auburn and Franklin. 

Three lights on State. 

River street, near Turner Hall. 

Milford and Bowman. 

Mast and Bowman. 

Dover and Clinton. 

Dover and Granite. 

Two lights on Hancock, West of River road. 

Dover and Douglas. 

Douglas, half way between Main and River streets. 

Two lights on Pleasant, between Franklin and Canal. 

Merrimack Common. 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Two lights on Mechanic. 

Spring street. 

Hanover, near the old Post-office. 

Wilson and Merrimack. 

Manchester and Belmont. 

Hanover and Milton. 

Two lights on River road, between Hancock and Baker streets. 

Hanover and Belmont. 



OIL LIGHTS IN USE. 

Clarke and Union. 

Concord and Beacon. 

East High and Hall. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and Mammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Mammoth road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

Two lights on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quincy. 

Granite and Quincy. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll street. 

Bowman street. 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

" " and Island Pond road. 

" " and Cilley. 

" " and Young. 

" " and Candia road. 

Massabesic and Old Falls road. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT8, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 325 

Massabesic and Taylor. 

Belmont and Green. 

Belmont, at A. L. Walker's house. 

Belmont and Valley. 

Valley and Taylor. 

Valley and Cypress. 

Valley and Jewett. 

Cypress and Prout avenue. 

Jewett and Young. 

Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on River road south of Blue store. 

Three lights in Amoskeag. 

Ten lights in Goffe's Falls. 

Three lights in Youngsville. 

One light on Candia road, near Noah Reed's. 

One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 

One light junction Lake avenue and Hanover. 

One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam House. 



ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT. 

The Manchester Electric Light Company, a corporation duly 
established by law and doing business in Manchester, in the 
county of Hillsborough and State of New Hampshire, and the 
city of Manchester, a municipal corporation in said county and 
State, acting by its special committee duly authorized by the vote 
of the City Councils of said city, hereby agree as follows, to wit : 

The said company, for the consideration hereinafter mentioned, 
agrees for itself, its successors and assigns, at its own expense, to 
provide, erect, and maintain one each at such points within the 
limits fixed by the vote of said committee, October 8, 1888, to 
wit : within a radius of one and one quarter miles from the city 
hall, as said committee shall designate, two hundred electric 
lights, to be arc lamps, of two thousand candle power each, 
French measurement ; to place such a part of said lamps on 



326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

posts, andsuch a part on mast-arms as said committee s>iall des- 
ignate ; to keep the same lighted from sunset to sunrise upon 
every night of the year; and to use in the maintenance of said 
lights the Thomson-Houston system of electric lighting. 

The said city agrees to pay monthly for the said two hundred 
lights provided, erected, and maintained, as above, the sum of 
thirty-nine cents per night each, for all lamps placed on posts, 
and thesum of forty-three cents per night each, for all lamps 
placed on mast-arms, each lamp to be accepted and pay for the 
same to begin as soon as it is placed in position and lighted ; but 
in case any lamp for any cause shall fail to be lighted, upon such 
nights and parts of nights as it shall remain unlighted, a propor- 
tionate reduction in the price shall be made. 

The said city further agrees that said company may erect and 
maintain through and over the streets of said city, such lines, not 
nearer than twenty-five feet to the ground, as may be found ne- 
cessary for the convenient and economical maintenance of said 
lights ; and said company agrees that the furnishings shall be of 
first-class line construction, and the mast-arms shall be such as to 
reach the middle line of the streets over which they shall hang, 
and so permit said city to use the topmost arms of such poles or 
posts as said company shall erect for its system of fire-alarm tele- 
graph. And it is hereby mutually agreed that all damages or in- 
juries to said lights or lines arising from fire or other unavoidable 
casualty, shall be repaired by said company with reasonable dili- 
gence, and shall not vitiate this contract ; and that all damages 
to any person or property caused by the poles, lamps, wire, or 
other apparatus used by said company, or by the use of the same, 
occasioned by the negligence or want of care of said company, 
or its servants or agents, shall be borne by said company ; that 
all liability because of damages from the maintenance of the. sys- 
tem of lighting used by said company shall rest upon said com- 
pany ; that this contract shall terminate in three years from its 
date; that at the termination of this contract all property used 
by said company under this contract shall remain and be the 
property of said company, its successors, or assigns; that in case 
during the period for which this contract shall remain in force 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 327 

said city shall desire more electric lights, said company will fur- 
nish the same at a price not exceeding the price fixed for the two 
hundred lights provided for in the foregoing ; that said city shall 
have the benefit of any new improvement which may be intro- 
duced, thereby reducing the expense of lighting and maintaining 
said lights ; and that said company shall furnish a bond signed 
by three sureties satisfactory to the aforesaid committee in the 
penal sum of ten thousand dollars, conditioned by the faithful 
performance of all the terms of this contract. 

In witness of which we have set our hands this twenty-sixth 
day of December, 1888. 

[l. s.] MANCHESTER ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., 

By Andrew Robeson, Treasurer. 

THE CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

By Leonard P. Reynolds, 
H. D. Gordon, 
John M. Kendall, 
Benj. Freeman, 
C. M. Woodbury, 
John F. Bohan, 
Guy F. Whitten, 

Special Committee. 

BOND. 

Know all men by these presents, 

That we, the Manchester Electric Light Company, a corpora- 
tion duly established by law and doing business in Manchester, 
in the county of Hillsborough and State of New Hampshire, as 
principal, and A. Elliott, N. W. Ellis, W. G. Africa as sureties, 
are holden and stand firmly bound unto the city of Manchester, 
a municipal corporation in said county and State, in the sum of 
ten thousand dollars, to the payment of which to the said city 
of Manchester, or its successors or assigns, we hereby severally 
bind ourselves, our heirs, executors, and administrators, and the 
successors of said Electric Light Company. 



328 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The condition of the obligation is such that if the said Man- 
chester Electric Light Company shall well and faithfully perform 
all and singular the terms of a certain contract of even date here- 
with, between the said company and the city of Manchester, for 
the provision, erection, and maintenance of two hundred electric 
lights for the term of three years from its date, under certain 
conditions and for a certain price expressed therein, then this 
obligation shall be void, otherwise it shall be and remain in full 
force and virtue. 

In wiiness tuhereofwt hereunto set our hands and seal this 26th 
day of December, A. D. 1888. 

MANCHESTER ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., 

By Andrew Robeson, Ti-easurer. 
A. Elliott. 

N. W. Ellis. 
W. G. Africa. 
Signed and sealed in presence of 
Percy H. Everett. 
J. H. Dearborn. 




37. GOVERNMENT BUILDING. 

II Manchester N H JILII 

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INVENTORY OF ASSETS. 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 



Inventory of Schoolhouses. 



Furniture, 

charts, maps, 

etc. 




Higli-school house and lot 

Franklin -street house and lot 

Spring-street house and lot 

Lincoln-street house and lot 

Ash-street liouse and lot 

Main-street house and lot 

Webster-street house and lot 

Blodget-street house and lot 

Bridge-street house and lot 

Lowell-street house and lot 

Merrimack-street house and lot 

Wilson Hill house and lot 

School-street house and lot 

South Main-street house and lot 

Bakersville house and lot 

Stark District house and lot 

Amoskeag house and lot 

Goffe's Falls house and lot 

Harvey District house and lot 

Webster District house and lot 

Hallsville house and lot 

Youngsville house and lot 

Mosquito Pond District house and lot 

Park-street house and lot 

Varney-school lot 

Total .*. 



$7,875.00 



340 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 



City library building and lot ! $41,000.00 

City Hall building and lot | 60,000.00 

City farm and permanent improvements i 34,000.00 

Court house and lot I 51,000.00 

Battery building on Manchester street j 18,000.00 

Police station on Manchester street 43,303.77 

City yard I 30,000.00 

Gravel lot, Belmont street ! 1,200.00 

Gravel lots, ward 8 400.00 

Gravel lots, Bakersville 700.00 

Gravel lots, district 8 i 150.00 

City tombs (2) | 10,000.00 

Total I $289,753.77 



ENGINE-HOUSES. 



Engine-house, stable and land. Vine street 

Engine-house, North Main street, West Manchester 

Engine-house, cottage, and lot, Lake avenue, corner Massabe 

sic street 

Engine-house and lot, Webster street, corner Chestnut street.. 

Hose-house, cottage, and lot. Maple street 

Engine-house, Clinton street. West Manchester 

Total 



$47,000.00 
20,000.00 

19,371 .00 
13,000.00 
5,000.00 
2,500.00 



$106,871.00 



PERSONAL AND OTHER PROPERTY. 



stock, tools, furniture, etc., at city farm 

Safes, furniture, etc., at City Hall 

Street lanterns, posts, and pipes 

Water pipes, wagons, and apparatus for watering streets.. . 

Teams and tools for streets 

Stock in Suncook Valley Railroad (face value) 

Fountains (5) and water" troughs (31) on streets and comnaon 

Soldiers' monument 

Permanent inclosure of commons 

Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 

McGregor " " " 

Granite " " " 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 

Print-works bridge, over lower canal 

Expended on construction of sewers 

Two bridges in district No. 9 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls 

Total 



$8,882.19 

3,000.00 

10,000.00 

3,000.00 

20,000.00 

50,000.00 

3,500.00 

2,5,000.00 

19,200.00 

25,000.00 

90,000.00 

25,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

205,171.79 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 



$505,753.98 



STATISTICS OF WEALTH, DEBT, AND TAXATION. 341 



The. city has the following property devoted and restricted to the uses indi- 
cated by the names below. If it was unrestricted and salable at market 
prices, it could be fairly estimated at the values attached : 



Valley cemetery 

Pine Grove cemetery 
Amoskeag cemetery. 
Stark monument lot. 
Concord common — 
Tremont ct)mmon... 
Hanover common... 

Park common 

Merrimack common. 

Total 



$200,000.00 

40,000.00 

4,000.00 

1,000.00 

200,000.00 

40,000.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 

200,000.00 



$845,000.00 



342 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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344 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Remarks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in 
the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $ioo and upward. 
There are $10,950 in cemetery bonds, so-called, in the hands of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $935,000. 
(They are additions.) The water-works are valued, at a low es- 
timate, to be worth $1,500,000. The city owns other property 
to the extent of $1,000,000, consisting of schoolhouses, court 
house, city hall building, engine-houses, city library building, etc. 

Total amount of bonded debt .... $935,000 
Net indebtedness for water purposes . . . 600,000 

Net debt after deducting water debt . . $335,000 

No indebtedness existing in other forms than are herein stated. 

The assessed value of personal property . . $4,603,634 

The assessed value of real estate .... $18,359,156 

Total value for taxation .... $22,962,790 

Tax rate, 1.9 per cent on a hundred. 
Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation ..... i-459 
Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for water 

purposes) to assessed valuation ..... 4-071 

As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1889. 

Present population, estimated ..... 42,000 
Population last census, 1880 ..... 32,458 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at ma- 
turity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in 
gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by Section 6, 
Chapter 70, New Hampshire Laws of 187 1, entitled "An Act to 
enable the City of Manchester to establish water-works." 



STATISTICS OF WEALTH, DEBT, AND. TAXATION. 345 

The receipts and expenditures of the water-works, as stated in the 
Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioners for the 
year 1889, were as follows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1888 $36,126.74 
Receipts from all sources in 1889 . 86,700.46 



Total ....... . $122,827.20 

Appropriated to pay interest . . $36,000.00 
Expended on -construction . . . 30,232.09 
Repairs and running expenses . . 17,005.90 



Total expenditures .... . 83,237.96 



Balance unexpended .... . $39,589.21 

Notwithstanding a heavy reduction in the water rates of the 
past year over those of the preceding, the gross receipts of the 
year 1889 show an increase over the previous year of $1,056.64. 

The foregoing statements I certify to be, to the best of my 
knowledge and belief, true and correct. 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor. 
Date of report, April 22, 1890. 



346 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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STATISTICS OF WEALTH, DEBT, AND TAXATION. 347 

LETTER OF THE CITY AUDITOR TO THE SUPER- 
INTENDENT OF CENSUS. 

Manchester, N. H., June 13, 1890. 
To Hon. Robert P. Porter, Superintendent of Census, Washing- 
ton, D. C. : 

Sir, — I send herewith a compilation of the receipts and ex- 
penditures of the city of Manchester, N. H., from the year 1880 
to 1889 inchisive. Perhaps a few words of explanation in regard 
to this compilation may not be considered unnecessary. In 
making this compilation, as you will perceive by reference to the 
Treasurer's accounts printed in the City Reports, I have in every 
instance deducted from the amount of cash on hand as stated in 
the said city reports, the amount of bills unpaid. This I have 
done because this amount of bills unpaid is a part of the expend- 
itures of the previous year, and is so placed in the city reports 
simply because the last draft which the city treasurer receives in 
the latter part of December, he has not had time to disburse ; 
and it was the only way in which I could make out the analysis 
of the receipts and expenditures of the city. I have also added 
to the receipts and expenditures, the county tax each year. This 
county tax forms a part of the percentage on a hundred which is 
assessed and raised upon the property of the citizens of Manches- 
ter, and really should appear in the treasurer's statement, but the 
law holds the tax collector responsible to the county for that 
amount, so the custom has been for the tax collector to take his 
receipt from the county treasurer, and so the amount does not 
appear in the city treasurer's report. In the city report you will 
find the account headed "County Taxes," which shows the 
whole matter. Now then, if you take the amount of expenditures 
for any one year, say the year 1889, you will find in the treas- 
urer's statement for that year, the amount of expenditures 
$718,442.40; deduct from that amount the amount of unpaid 
bills, January i, 1889, $37,088.16, and the sum total will be 
$681,354.24; add to this the county tax, which is for that year 
$40,508.54, and you will find the sum to be $721,862.78, which 



348 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

agrees with the grand total of all expenditures as shown in the 
compilation herewith sent you. The same statement holds true 
in regard to each and every year. Take the receipts of the year 
1889, as shown in the treasurer's account in the city report, and 
they amount to $798,291.73 ; you take from that the unpaid 
bills, January i, 1889, $37,088.16, which makes the sum 
$761,203.57 ; add to that the county tax of $40,508.54 and you 
have the amount of $801,712.11, which agrees with the total re- 
ceipts of that year, as shown in the compilation above referred 
to. 

Under the head of " Sewers and Drains," especially in the 
years 1882, 1883, and possibly 1887, 1888, 1889, the expenses 
of construction of sewers and drains is mixed with the mainte- 
nance, and I was unable to entirely separate it. The whole com- 
pilation represents the best I have been able to do under all 
circumstances of the case, and I trust may prove satisfactory to 
you. I have placed the amount of claims and judgments recov- 
ered against the city, with the legal expenses relating to sundry 
suits against the city, under the clause, " Payments made under 
special headings, as they arise from circumstances beyond the 
control of the City Council." The water-works, the cash in the 
treasury, the uncollected taxes, the schoolhouses and lots, engine- 
houses and apparatus, amounting to $1,537,111.32, may be fairly 
considered as available assets. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 

P. S. — In making this compilation for various years, "inci- 
dental expenses" have been analyzed and the expenditures 
therein contained put under their proper headings. This work 
required the examination of a large amount of vouchers in the 
hands of the city treasurer, and out of these " incidental ex- 
penses " were obtained the cost of a police station, three or four 
engine-houses, etc. This letter is intended to be partially ex- 
planatory of the process which the city auditor has found it 
necessary to use in order to get the proper showing for the city. 

J. B. S. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — The City Auditor herewith submits to your 
honorable body his first annual report. The duties of the office 
were quite fully outlined in the communication made to the City 
Councils February 4, 1890, and have been still further exem- 
plified by subsequent communications, many of which are 
printed in the annual city report for 1890. 

It is the intention of the Auditor to perform the duties of his 
office in accordance with the requirements of the law, relying 
upon the intelligence and virtue of the City Councils, and the 
people, to sustain that position. 

Early in the year it was apparent that the labor required to 
meet the demands made upon this office could not be met by 
one man, and the Mayor, upon the request of the Auditor, em- 
ployed Allan E. Herrick as clerk. No better selection could be 
made. Mr. Herrick has proved himself to be industrious and 
efficient ; his knowledge as a type-writer, stenographer, and en- 
graver has been of special benefit to the city in many ways. 
The Auditor recommends that his salary be increased. 

WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during the year two examinations of 
the Treasurer's accounts, two examinations of the City Clerk's 
accounts, annual examination and settlement with the Tax Col- 
lector, annual examination of water-works accounts, annual 
examination of accounts of Superintendent of Pine Grove ceme- 
tery, annual examination of accounts of Superintendent of Val- 



352 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ley cemetery, annual examination of accounts of Superintend- 
ent of City Farm, monthly examination of accounts of weigher 
at city scales, quarterly examination of accounts of City Mar- 
shal, semi-annual examination of accounts of Clerk of Police 
Court. 

About 6,000 bills against the city have been examined and 
certified as " correct." All the pay-rolls for the thirteen high- 
way districts, for the schools, for the fire department, the water- 
works, the police department, the cemeteries, and the city offi- 
cials, have been examined and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to $890,- 
311.34, have been drawn on the city treasury. 

Accounts have been kept with all of the appropriations, with 
the Treasurer, and with the Tax Collector. 

Special examinations of the accounts of J. S. Paige, weigher 
at the city scales, and ex-City Marshal Melvin Jenkins, were 
made, reports of which have been presented to and acted upon 
by the City Councils. 

Three hundred and forty letters, fifteen communications to the 
City Councils, twenty orders and ordinances, and eight resolu- 
tions to be presented by committees for the action of the City 
Councils, and many bills due to the city from various parties 
have been prepared, type-written, and forwarded to their desti- 
nations. 

Some type-writing has been done for the City Clerk, the 
Treasurer, the Superintendent of the public schools, and the 
City Engineer. 

The book of deeds and mortgages, 183 in number, showing the 
real estate transactions to which the city of Manchester is a 
party, has been recopied by the type-writer, and an improved 
index added. 

Blank forms have been formulated to meet the requirements in 
relation to diseased cattle, imposed upon the Mayor and Alder- 
men by chapter 93 of the New Hampshire Laws of 1889. 

A statement of the wealth, debt, and taxation of the city from 
January i, 1880, to January i, 1890, with many other docu- 
ments, has been compiled at the request of the census depart- 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 353 

ment, and under the order of the Mayor. The city report for 
1890 is the compilation of the Auditor as required by the ordi- 
nance. 

IMPROVEMENTS SUGGESTED. 

The growth of the city within the last fifteen years has been 
very large, and with it has come a large increase of the business 
of city officials. The City Clerk's office has been overburdened 
with the duties thrust upon it. Cribbed, cabined, and confined 
in a room not much, if any, larger than a box stall, he has done 
his business as well as the disadvantages under which he has la- 
bored would permit. The first relief to this abused official came 
in the appointment of an Auditor and the transfer of some of the 
clerk's business to the auditor's office. The second relief should 
come in the removal of the office to more commodious quarters, 
the transfer of all fees connected therewith to the city treasury, 
an increase in the present salary of the City Clerk from ^900.00 
to not less than ^1,500.00, and the employment of an assistant 
clerk who should also be a type-writer, and might act as clerk to 
several of the prominent committees. In short, the Clerk's office 
should be thoroughly re-organized. The collection of dog 
licenses, sewer licenses, and all collections except those of fees, 
could more properly be made the work of the Tax Collector or 
the City Treasurer. 

Within the time mentioned the business of the Treasurer has 
increased fourfold. That honest and efficient city official, who 
left his right arm at Cold Harbor, but fortunately saved his head 
and left arm for still further public uses, could be greatly assisted 
if by the addition of a few hundred dollars to the present salary 
of the Deputy Collector of Taxes, he, the Treasurer, could mo- 
nopolize the spare time of the said deputy in the service of the 
Treasury. With these few changes, the collection of licenses, 
etc., could then be fairly imposed upon the Treasurer's office; the 
number of offices where public dues are payable would be lessened, 
and in the case of sickness, or disability from any cause, of the 
Treasurer or City Clerk, the public business would not be ini- 

23 



354 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

peded. These changes in relation to fees and collections would 
require the action of the Legislature. 

WATER-WORKS. 

The books of the water-works department are kept in a model 
manner, and it is a satisfaction to the Auditor to examine such 
orderly and accurate accounts. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The accounts of the police department for the last two years 
have been well and correctly kept. 

CITY SCALES. 

The present weigher at the city scales, William Bailey, is an 
honest and efficient man, and his certificates can be relied upon 
as correct. The fees for weighing were established many years 
ago and need to be revised. This is an important office, as many 
of the articles purchased by the city are there weighed and the 
payments made in accordance therewith. The salary of the 
weigher should be increased. Under a proper adjustment of the 
fees the income from the city scales would probably be enlarged. 
It should be stated in all contracts, verbal or written, made by 
the city for fuel, hay, etc., that the certificate of the weigher at 
the city scales should in all cases be affixed to the bill. 

CITY FARM AND CEMETERIES. 

The accounts at the city farm are well kept. 

The accounts kept by the Superintendent of the Pine Grove 
cemetery are correct and the method is in process of improve- 
ment. 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

The accounts are well kept and the business of the office thor- 
oughly done. 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

The clerical methods and accounts in Districts No. 2 and No. 3 
have been much improved since January i, 1890. The employ- 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 355 

ment of a clerk and giving to him the facilities necessary for the 
transaction of his business have aided much in that direction. 
The system of orders and rules for goods purchased, insisted 
upon by the Auditor and cheerfully complied with by the Super- 
intendent, has tended still further to throw impediments in the 
way of dishonest claimants. 

District No. lo. — The Superintendent of this district, which 
is rapidly growing in importance, has readily complied with the 
requirements of this office. His accounts are few and his returns 
are promptly made. 

Other Districts. — Many of the outlying districts are " pocket 
boroughs," a very large share of the money appropriated finding 
a lodgment, perhaps necessarily, in the purse of the Superintend- 
ent, or that of his family or friends. In the opinion of the Au- 
ditor, the street and sewer department, expending during the 
year 1890, including the lighting of streets, the sum of 
^177,940.37, can never be successfully and properly managed 
until it is consolidated and placed under the control of one man, 
chosen solely on account of his practical qualifications and sci- 
entific attainments. 

EXPENDITURES. * 

The expenditures relating to the work of the Auditor Imve 
been as follows : 

Services. 

Salary of auditor ..... . <;9So.5o 

clerk 406.32 



$1,386.82 

Furnishings for Office. 

Type-writer and table, roll-top desk, bill-case, mim- 
eograph, self-inking stamp, letter press, etc. . 344-31 

Stationery. 
Blank bills, blanks of all kinds, blank books, laws, 

etc 338.06 



Total . ^2,069.19 



356 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The Auditor acknowledges his indebtedness to the Mayor and 
many members of the late City Councils for their constant sup- 
port, and to the heads of departments for their courtesy and 
kindness. Knowing that the ideal is always in advance of the 
realization, he submits himself to the considerate judgment of 
his fellow citizens. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus B. 
Putnam, City Treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 1890, 
and find proper vouchers for all payments, and all receipts are 
duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January i, 1890 . . $79,849.33 

Receipts during the year ..... 890,014 



Amount of drafts during the }ear 
Net cash on hand December 31. 1S90 



The cash balance taken December i 

follows: : 

Deposited in Suffolk National Bank 
First National Bank . 
Second National Bank 
Manchester National Bank 
Amoskeag National Bai^k 
Merchants National Bank 
Office safe 

Gross amount of cash on hand 
Deduct amount of bills unj^aid 



$969,863 

$890,311 
79>552 



$969,863 



36 

34 
02 



36 



, I, 1S90, I find to be as 



$8,930.00 
I •'•'', 994- 39 
7.295.79 
27,798.67 
II. 651. 58 

I9-736-73 
40. 1S7. 83 

$134,594.99 
55.042.97 



Net cash on hand December 31, 1890 . . $79,552.0:: 

The accounts for the year ending December 31, 1890, of the 
City Clerk, of the Superintendent of Schools, of the Tax Col- 
lector, of the Water- Works, of the City Marshal, of the Clerk of 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 357 

the Police Court, of the Superintendent of the Pine Grove Cem- 
etery, of the Superintendent of the Valley Cemetery, of the 
Treasurer of the Cemetery Trustees, of the Superintendent of the 
City Farm, and of the Weighers at the City Scales, have each 
and all been carefully examined and the mcome from these 
sources as shown by the said books (excepting J. S. Paige) has 
been deposited with the City Treasurer and appears in his ac- 
counts. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dr. Sylvanus B. Fufnat?i, Treasurer, in account with the 



To cash on hand January i, 1890 
temporary loan 

bonds sold to N. H. Harris «& Co 
premium on bonds sold 
insurance tax 
railroad tax . 
savings bank tax . 
literary fund 

board of paupers off farm 
L. M. Streeter, city farm 
Joseph B. Clark estate .. 
Barton &: Co. (overdraft) 
J. B. Baril (overdraft) . 
city teams, District No. 2 
George W. Weeks . 
Warren Harvey 
S. G. Reed (overdraft) . 
Joseph A. Poor (overdraft) 
sewer licenses 

New Hampshire Rubber Co. (overdraft) 
A. N. Clapp (overdraft) 
Charles O. Phelps (broken pipe) 
Manchester Water-Works, for labor 
Richard Dobbins, for labor . 
W. H. Pluraer, for brick 
J. B. Varick Co., goods returned 
old bridge plank sold 
Amoskeag Manufactur'g Co., painting bridge 
West'rn Union Telegraph and Telephone Co 

E. P. Johnson Co., chopping block 
Timothy Shea, land sold 

Edward Wagner, land sold . 

F. O. Clement, old iron 

^ Amotint carried forward 



^109,311.83 

100,000.00 

100,000.00 

5,670.00 

3i752'25 

21,443-72 

68,392.94 

4,504.70 

2,201.57 

2,432-75 
12.64 

15-93 

1. 00 

2,700.69 

30.00 

30.00 

1. 00 

3.00 

1,013.40 

8.00 

11.66 

3-9° 
20.25 

58-05 

14.40 

15.09 

138.88 

295.21 

2,500.00 

1.50 

3T2-50 

i,375-oo 
1-79 

$426,273.65 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



City of Manchester, year ending December ji , 

By unpaid bills, January i, i^ 
funded debt . 
temporary loan 
coupons, water bonds 
coupons, city bonds 
coupons, cemetery bonds 
interest .... 
paupers off farm . 
city farm 
city teams 
highway district No. i 



359 



i8go. 



2 an«li 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 

ID 
I I 
12 



new highways 

land taken for new highways 

w-atering streets 

lighting streets 

paving streets 

macadamizing 

grading for concrete 

sewers and drains . 

commons 

bridges 

incidental expenses 

Amount carried forward 



Cr. 

$29,462.50 

99,900.00 

100,000.00 

34,177.00 

15,771.00 

567-50 

555-57 

4,336-46 

7,467.30 

5,246.19 

199.25 

11,807.87 

499-75 
486.75 

498.80 

1,308.03 

792.73 

536.81 

3'357-oi 

1,064.50 

299.80 

194-15 

9'575-6i 

358-16 

7>593-oo 
41,099.64 

6,633-75 

20,925.52 

5,089.86 

39,297.97 

4,214.03 

3,879.68 

17,441.26 

^474,637.45 



360 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer^ in account with the 



Amount brought fonvard . 


^426,273.65 


To C. W. Strain, land sold 


$50.00 


Matthew McDonald .... 


10.00 


Pine Grove Cemetery, lots sold 


2,600.00 


B. A. Stearns, superintendent 


1,783-37 


. George A. Durgin (overdraft) 


40.00 


C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 


1,300.00 


fire department 


4,699.47 


John Leonard (overdraft) 


6.00 


D. B. Varney (overdraft) 


20.00 


police department .... 


6,939-57 


City Hall 


-^ . 


2,410.00 


John P. Mullen 




4.00 


water-works . 




90,463-37 


P. Harrington 




30.00 


George H. Dudley 




40.00 


Joseph Gillott &: Son 




7-55 


dog licenses 




1,361.16 


billiard tables 




37-5° 


old bills unclaimed 




678.95 


show licenses 




190.50 


rent of tenements 




461.63 


city scales 




502.31 


tuition 




42S.75 


E. W. Brigham 




38-50 


milk licenses 




49-50 


trustees cemetery fund 




2,900.00 


Manchester Shoe Manufacturing Co. 


21.25 


James Bros, (overdraft) 


2.00 


interest on taxes ..... 


342.44 


taxes for the year 1885 


14.72 


'•' 1886 


12.34 


" 1887 


17.00 


Amount carried forward 


$543>735-53 



REPORT OF THE CITY 


AUDITOR. 


361 


City of Manchester, year ending December 31, i8go. Cr. 


Amount brought forivard . . . .^474,637.45 


By Pine Grove cemetery 






$5>oi7-54 


Valley cemetery . 






2,789.86 


fire department 






41,409-53 


fire-alarm telegraph 






1,585-43 


hydrant service .... 






18,080.00 


police department 






37,096.16 


City Hall .... 






2,741.79 


printing and stationery 






2,058.18 


Repairs of buildings 






4,443-87 


city library .... 






4,239.88 


abatement of taxes 






2,999-39 


discount on taxes . 






11,265.25 


state tax . . • • • 






63,435.00 


county tax .... 






46,032.47 


city officers' salaries 






16,509.41 


Water-Works 






33,403-69 


decoration of soldiers' graves 






374-27 


Stark monument square 






8,060.75 


Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 






400.00 


W. C. T. U. Mercy Home . 






500.00 


Elliot Hospital, two free beds 






600.00 


repairs of schoolhouses . 






4,119.76 


new schoolhouse . 






43,704.11 


fuel 






3,703-32 


furniture and supplies . 






575-15 


books and stationery 






141-35 


printing and advertising 






389.05 


contingent expenses 






830.10 


care of rooms 






3,376.75 


mechanical drawing school 






694.89 


teachers' salaries . 






45,404.87 


evening school 






1,254.81 


Amount carried forward 


. S881, 874.08 



362 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

Dr. Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 

Amount brought forward .... ^543,735-53 

To taxes for the year 1888 . . . . $118.55 

" " 1889 .... 12,401.32 

" " 1890 .... 443,070.46 



$999,325-86 
Unpaid bills, January i, 1891 . . . 55,042.97 



Total $1,054,368.83 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



363 



City of Manchester, year ending December ji, i8go. 



Cr. 



Amotint brought forward . 
By new text-books, free .... 


. $881,874.08 
$9,005.11 


engineers' department .... 


3,221.89 


scavenger teams 

health department .... 
indigent soldiers ..... 


15,958.46 
1,557.38 

737.82 


street sweeping 

mayor, incidentals .... 


1,237.08 
188.00 


new city stables 


5,994.02 


Cash on hand, January i, 1891 


^919,773-84 
134,594.99 



Total 



$1,054,368.83 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

City Treasurer. 



364 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STATEMENT OF THE MUNICIPAL RECEIPTS AND 

EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

N. H., FOR THE YEAR 1890. 

RECEIPTS. 

Jan. I, 1890, balance of cash on hand $109,311.83 
Less amount of unpaid bills , . 29,462.50 



Net cash on hand .... . $79,849.33 

Received from : 

tax on the city $455,634.39 

the Sta*- on insurance, 
railroai savings bank, 
and litei y fund taxes '98,093.61 
Costs and inte.est on taxes 342-44 



$554,070.44 



Less discount on 

taxes . $11,265.25 
abatement on 

taxes . 2,999.39 

state tax' . 63,435.00 

county tax . 46,032.47 



123,732.11 



Net amount of taxes for 

municipal purposes . . . $43o>338.33 

Received from court fines and costs . 6,939.57 

city farm . $2,462.32 
Hillsborough 

county . 2,201.57 

4,663.89 

Received from licenses : 

To enter sewer . . $1,013.40 

keep dog . . . 1,361.16 



MUNICIPAL RECEIPTS. 365 



To sell milk . . . $49.50 

keep billiard table . 37-5° 

For shows and exhibitions 190.50 



$2,652.06 

Received from rents .... 2.871.63 
Water-Works . . 50,463 37 

Pine Grove 

cemetery . $4,423.37 
Valley ceme- 
tery . 1,300.00 

5.723-:W 



city scales . . 487.45 

street depart- 
ment teams $2,700.69 

fire departm't 

teams . 4,699.47 

7,400. 16 

428.75 



MISCELLANEOUS. 


Rei cived from tuition 




land sold 


^1,747-50 


premium on 




bonds 


5,670 00 


judgment 




recovered 


2,500.00 


other miscel- 




1 a n e u s 




sources 


3S2.80 


unpaid bills 




covered 




into treas'y 


678.95 



10,979.25 

Received from bridges . . . 434 09 

temp o r a r y 

loan . $100,000.00 

water bonds 

re-funded 100,000.00 
cemet'y b'ds 2,900.00 

202,900.00 



Total amount of receipts for the year 1890 $766,281.92 

$846,131.25 



366 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXPENDITURES. 








1S90. 








Paid interest on water bonds 


$34,177.00 






interest on city bonds 


15,771.00 






interest on cemetery bonds . 


567-50 






interest on temporary loan . 


555-57 


$51,071. 


07 






funded debt, water bonds of July 








i> 1874 


199,900.00 






temporary loan of 1890 


100,000.00 


199,900 


00 






printing and stationery 


$2,058.18 






incidental expenses 


17,380.91 






mayor's incidentals 


188.00 






city officers' salaries 


13,489.41 






city hall . . . . . 


2,741.79 










35,85s 


.29 






Paid for street and sewer department : 








on thirteen highway districts 


$21,045.45 






new highways 


9,075.61 






land damages 


858.16 






sprinkling . . . . 


7>593-oo 




• 


paving . . . . 


6,633.75 






macadamizing 


20,925.52 






grading for concrete 


5,089.86 






scavenger teams 


15,958.46 






street sweeping 


1,237.08 






lighting streets 


41,099.64 






bridges . . . . 


3,879.68 






city teams . . . . 


5,246.19 






sewers and drains . 


39,297-97 


177,940 


37 






Paid for engineers' department 




3,221 


89 


health " 




i>557 


38 


School department : 








Paid for repairs on schoolhouses . 


$4,119.76 






fuel . . . . 


3-703-32 







MUNICIPAL EXPENDITURES. 



867 



Paid for furniture and supplies . 


$575-15, 






books and stationery 


141-35 






printing and advertising 


389-05 






contingent expenses 


830.10 






care of rooms 


3>376-75 






evening schools 


1,254.81 






teachers' salaries 


45,404.87 






school committee and truant 








officer . . . . 


1,020.00* 






superintendent's salary . 


2,000.00* 






evening schools, mechanical 








drawing . . . . 


694.89 






free text-books 


9,005.11 










$72, 


515-^6 






Paid for city library, maintenance 


$3,239.88 






books . 


1,000.00 










4, 


239.88 






Paid for fire department 


$41,409-53 






fire-alarm telegraph 


1,585-43 






hydrant service 


18,080.00 










61, 


074.96 






Paid for police department . 




37 


,096.16 


Public buildings : 








Paid for repairs . . . . . 


$4,443-87 






new city stables 


5,994.02 






new schoolhouse (Varney) 


43,704.11 


C A 








54 


142. 00 


Paid for water-works, maintenance 


$22,088.82 






construction 


11,314.87 




A r\ -^ A/-\ 



Public places : 




dd on commons .... 


$4,214.03 


Stark monument square, main- 




tenance .... 


60.75 


Stark monument square, land 


8.000.00 


Pine Grove cemetery 


5'Oi7-54 



* {3,020 deducted from city officers' salaries and added to school department. 



368 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid on Valley cemetery 


^2,789.86 




Amoskeag cemetery , . 


60.35* 


$20,142.53 






Charity, philanthropy, patriotism : 






Paid for paupers off the farm 


^4,336.46 




city farm .... 


7.467-30 




Women's Aid and Relief So- 






ciety ..... 


400.00 




free beds, Elliot Hospital 


600.00 




Woman's Mercy Home 


500.00 




indigent soldiers . 


737.82 




decoration of soldiers' graves . 


374-27 


14,415.85 







Total expenditures for the year 1890 . . $766,579.23 
Cash on hand December 31, 1890 $134,594.99 

Less amount of bill unpaid . . . 55,042.97 



Net cash on hand January i, 1891 . . . 79,552.02 



-131-25 

* $60.35 taken from incidental expenses account and added to Amoskeag cemetery. 



GROSS RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 



369 



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372 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 373 

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 
Appropriation raised by tax ..... $15,000.00 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from Western Union Telegraph 

Company, in settlement of suit $2,500.00 

from E. P. Johnson, for chop- 
ping block . . , . 1.50 

from Edward Wagner, first pay- 
ment for land . . . 100.00 

from Edward Wagner, balance 

for land .... 1,275.00 

from F. O. Clement, for old iron 1.79 

from Charles W. Strain, on ac- 
count of land . . . 50.00 

from Timothy Shea, first pay- 
ment for land . . . 100.00 

from Timothy Shea, balance for 

land ..... 212.50 

from Matthew McDonald, on 

account of land . . . 10.00 



4,250.79 



Transferred from reserved fund . . $2,293.20 
'' " '^ " . . 1,724.46 

4,017.66 

Balance overdrawn, paid from money not otherwise 

appropriated ....... 254.40 

$23,522.85 

EXPENDITURES. 

FOR RETURN OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES. 

Paid O. D. Abbott .... $10.00 

D. S. Adams .... 4.00 

E. Bernier ..... 8.50 
C. W. Downing .... 6.75 
E. B. Dunbar .... 3.25 



374 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



id C. E. Dodge 




^24.25 


C. W. Dodge 




5-25 


C. M. Dodge 




5.00 


L. French 




9-25 


L. M. French 




1S.25 


L. B. How . 




3-75 


William Holland 




•50 


J. A. Jackson 




12.00 


M. G. Kean . 




IO-75 


N. P. Kidder, 9 28 deaths at 15c. 


139.20 


N. P. Kidder, 873 births at 15c. 


130-95 


N. P. Kidder, 512 marriages at 15c 


76.80 


J. S. Mahoney 


2-75 


J. E. Laiiouette 


38-75 


J. W. D. MacDonald . 


27-75 


Jacob W. Mooar . 


I. DO 


George W. Nutter 


27.50 


J. E. E. Roy 


3-5° 


C. B. Sturtevant . 


3-75 


E. Sylvain .... 


25-75 


J. Sullivan .... 


29.50 


Thomas Wheat 


8.50 


Charles F. Flanders 


21.75 


John Ferguson 


33-50 


Georgianna Wilsor 


. 


■25 



.70 



LABOR OF MEN AND TEAMS, DISTRICT NO. 2., AS PER PAY-ROLLS. 



Paid, January . 


$50.00 


February 


28.93 


March . . . . 


21.00 


April . . . . 


28.50 


May . . . . 


45-93 


June 


105.49 


July . . . . 


350.18 


August . . . . 


574-13 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES, 375 

Paid, September ..... $153.61 

October . . . . . 301-72 

November ..... 1 8 1.63 

December . . . . . 76.11 



DISTRICT NO 10. 



Paid, November ..... 

DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 

Paid Samuel Amsden, damage to house by 

blasting ..... $3-oo 

Joseph Allen, injuries at the city farm 20.00 

Sarah B. Bean, on execution . . iS.ii 

Sarah B. Bean, on execution . 2,487.88 
Michael Burns, damage to person on 

Cedar street .... 150.00 

W. B. Corey & Co., damage to team 23.59 
Mary Carey, damage to person on 

Chestnut street .... 300.00 

Margaret Kelley, on execution . 257.12 

Mary Kildea, on execution . . 713-30 
J. B. Moore, changing grade of 

highway .... 300.00 

Clara Moore, on execution . . 1,303.94 
Clara Moore, on execution . . 23.59 
Florence O'Leary, damage to per- 
son ...... 700.00 

Orrin River, damage to wagon . .75 
George S. Smith, four sheep killed 

by dogs ..... 12.00 

Charles F. Read, damage to horse 75-oo 

Luther W. Hall, on execution . 548.09 
M. E. Kean, for attendance on Po- 

lidor Beausoliel . . . 30.00 



;i,9i7.23 



5,966.37 



376 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Paid D. S. Adams, services, expenses, 

etc., in Moore and Kildea cases. $137.00 

J. F. Briggs, services and expenses, 
Manchester 7's. Western Union 
Telegraph Company . . 40.00 

Campbell & Williams, printing note 
and letter heads for the city so- 
licitor ..... 5.15 

John F. Cassidy, expenses to Frank- 
lin, N. H., and summoning wit- 
nesses at Franklin . . ' . ly-S? 

James M. Collity, expert services, 

etc. ..... 60.00 

James M. Collity, medical attend- 
ance on Erwin Hill . . . 30.00 

Hillsborough County Commission- 
ers, services hearing L. W. Hall 
vs. Manchester . . . 71 -45 

Hillsborough County Commission- 
ers, services in the road hearing 
of the P. C. Cheney Co., and 
others ..... 339-8o 

J. G. Hutchinson, witness fees and 
services in summoning same, in 
Bean case .... 8.79 

J. G. Hutchinson, witness fees and 
services in Moore vs. Manches- 
ter 17.74 

J. G. Hutchinson, serving notices, 

and expenses. Parsons case . 8.10 

Warren Harvey, seven and one half 
days' service and team, in Goffs- 
town road case . . . 39'00 

D. F. Healy, services and witness 
fees, Kildea vs. the City of 
Manchester . . . . 5.22 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 377 

Paid W. H. Hackett, clerk U. S. cir- 
cuit court, fees in Western Un- 
ion Telegraph case . . . $6.00 
E. F. Jones, cash paid T. D. Luce, 

copy 4-5° 

E. F. Jones, expenses in L. W. 

Hall case . • . . . . 3.06 

James Brothers, horse and buggy . 2.00 

E. T. James, horse and buggy for 

solicitor ..... 3.00 

E. T. James, horse and buggy for 

C. H. Reed .... 5.00 

George A. Lovejoy, witness fees . 1.37 

A. J. Mayhew, witness fees . . 1.37 

E. F. McQueston, services in Bean 

case . . . . . 65.00 

C. H. Reed, services in Goffstown 

road hearing .... S5.50 

C. H. Reed, teams of E. T. James, 

Goffstown road hearing . . 11 .00 

C. H. Reed, five days' service in 

Moore vs. Manchester 
C. H. Reed, two days' services in 

matter of sheep killing 
Town of New Boston, fees, etc., in 

P. C. Cheney Company road 

hearing . . . • . 
Town of Goffstown, fees, etc., in 

P. C. Cheney road hearing 
Town of Weare, fees, etc., in P. C. 

Cheney road hearing 
W. W. Wilkins, services, etc., in 

Clara Moore case 
W. W. Wilkins, services, etc , in 

Mary Kildea case 
Harry S. Lovering, deposition, in 

case of Golden 71s. Manchester . 



11.25 


4-5° 


26.05 


2574 


21.52 


60.00 


35-00 


4.00 



378 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid David Perkins, services in relation 

to Cypress street . . . $10.00 

C. C. Harriman, services in the 

matter of Cypress street . . 15-24 



CITY COUNCIL AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid C. H. Simpson, use of hack for 

inspectors in posting check-lists $3-00 

Hattie E. Daniels, for typewriting 2.89 
H. W. Herrick, work and expense 

on drawing of city hall . . 17.00 
E. T. James, for carriage hire . 16.00 
James Brothers, carriage hire . 75 -oo 
New England Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Co 51-44 

George VV. Reed, hack hire . 10.00 
J. A. Shatswell, i vol. encyclo- 
pedia of law. Mayor's office . 6.00 
U. D. Tenney, varnishing portrait 

of Gen. Stark .... i.oo 

E. V. Turcotte, hacks . . . 10.00 

Guy F. Whitten, teams in 1889 . 12.00 

Whitten & Fifield, carriage hire . 110.25 

Whitten & Fifield, carriage hire . 21.50 
James Brothers, horse and buggy, 

city messenger . . . 6.50 
James Brothers, horse and buggy, 

Mayor to city farm ... 3.50 
James Brothers, two hacks, com- 
mittee on streets . . . 10.00 
E. T. James, two hacks, commit- 
tee on streets .... 10.00 
E. T. James, two hacks, committee 

on lighting streets . . . 10.00 
E. T. James, horse and buggy, to 

lower cemetery . . . 2.00 



U, 181. 22 



$37808 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 379 



EXPENSES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



Paid Thomas A. Lane, labor and ma- 
terial for the city library . 

D. A. Simons for one table . 

John A. Barker, care of boiler at 
city library .... 

Henry Parker, work on and around 
city library .... 

Robert Clark, work on and around 

city library . . . . 39-25 



^I, 


,80 


2, 


75 


32 


■50 


6 


.00 



DISEASED CATTLE, ETC. 

Paid D. C. James, examination of Cole's 

horse . . . . . . $2.00 

Maxwell & Campbell, isolating and 

killing diseased cattle . . 38-5° 

James Bros., examining Chenette's 

horse . . . . . 2.00 

J. Blakely, visit and opinion on 

Chenette's horse . . . 5.00 

J. L. Golden, examination of Che- 
nette's horse .... 2.00 

Wm. E. Moore, printing blank 

forms, diseased cattle . . 12.00 

Jabez Alexander, examination of 

diseased horses . . . 2.00 

Jabez Alexander, horse and expense 

for team . . . . 6.00 

Jabez Alexander, expense and ap- 
praisal, horse of Henry Cole . 4.00 

George H. Bailey, V. S., for ser- 
vices ..... 50.00 

Henry Cole, killing and burying 

horse ..... 3.00 



$182.30 



380 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid James Cavanaugh, examination 
and appraisal of horse of Henry 
Cole ..... ^2.00 

H. Fox Davis, et al, fees as aprais- 

ers of C. H. H. horse . . 6.00 

Mrs. H. L. Robinson, value of 

horse killed .... 50.00 

Dr. F. I. Smith, four days/ expert 

service and expenses . . 46.50 

D. C. Whittemore, examination of 

Lovering's horse . . . 3.00 

James B. Straw, expenses to Con- 
cord to see state treasurer . . 1.28 

Tom W. Robinson, services as ap- 
praiser of diseased cattle at the 
State Industrial School . . 5.00 

Robert E. Wheeler, killing dis- 
eased cattle at the State Indus- 
trial School . . . . 10.00 

Robert E. Wheeler, appraising and 

killing diseased cattle at Rowell's 2.00 

Robert E. Wheeler, appraising and 
killing diseased cattle at J. O. 
Clark's ..... 2.00 

Robert E. Wheeler, killing dis- 
eased cattle at the State Indus- 
trial School . . . . 3.00 

Robert E. Wheeler, appraising and 
killing diseased cattle at J. O. 
Clark's ..... 2.00 

F. I. Smith, one and one half days' 

■ service at the State Industrial 

School, hotel and R. R. expense i?-5o 

H. Fox Davis, services as apprais- 
er, Frank Hutchinson's cattle, 
et al . . . . . 5- 00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 381 

Paid H. Fox Davis, services as apprais- 
er at J. O. Clark's . . . $5-oo 

H. Fox Davis, services as apprais- 
er at C. W. Rowell's . . 5.00 

Benjamin C. Dean, one cow killed, 

appraised at . . . . ' 43-33 

J. Blakely, V. S., visit to C. H. 

Hutchinson's horse, glanders . 5.00 

J. A. Alexander, V. S., services as 
examiner, appraiser, etc., at State 
Industrial School . . . 52.00 

J. Alexander, V. S., services as 
examiner, appraiser, etc., of 
Rowell's, Clark's, Quimby's, 
Preston's, and Weber's cows and 
oxen, at State Industrial School 

J. Otis Clark, two cows killed 

Robert J. McGuire, examining 
diseased cattle of O. Clark 

C. W. Rowell, 2 cows killed 



29 


.00 


60. 


00 


2S- 


00 


70. 


00 



CITY SCALES. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., fuel for city 

scales ..... ^12.00 

J. S. Paige, salary as weigher . 151-09 

J. B. Varick Company, 2 pad- 
locks . . . . . 1.50 
Frank H. Crawford, .salary as 

weigher 73.32 

William Bailey, salary as weigher 75-56 

Pike & Heald, stove and stove- 
pipe, etc., city scales . . 13-88 

MILK INSPECTOR. 

Paid Daily Press Publishing Company, 
advertising milk inspector's no- 
tice ..... $8.67 



i577-ii 



^327-35 



382 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid C. B. Littlcfield, for milk inspec- 
tor's tools .... $16.15 

C. B. Littlefield, for one year's ser- 
vices, 1889 .... 150.00 

L. B. Bodwell, wood for city scales 3.25 

J. Frank Robinson, microscopic 

examination of milk . . 16.00 

John B. Clarke, advertising notice 
of milk inspector, four squares, 
one week . . . . 9.00 



RELATING TO THE STREETS. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Company, 

1889, six time-books for Dist. 2 10.70 

pens, paper,rubber,ink, etc., Dist. 2 10.99 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, sharpening 

tools, repairing cart, etc., Dist. 2 2.15 

Temple & Farrington Company, 

pens, paper, and time-books . 9.95 

Concord Railroad, freight of desk .70 

W. P.Goodman, stationery . 3.25 

Thomas A. Lane, 23 heavy dippers, 

for watering troughs . . . 4.60 

Thomas A. Lane, 38-foot chain, for 

watering trough . .. . .76 

Thomas A. Lane, labor, two men 

seven hours, for watering trough 3.50 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on two gas 

lanterns, Elm back street . . .60 

Thomas A. Lane, repairing watering 

trough, Amoskeag . . . 1.88 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on watering 

trough, Bakersville . . . 1.65 

Thomas A. Lane, i double swing 

heavy bracket . . . . 2.00 

Thomas A. Lane, labor . . . 1.65 

Thomas A. Lane, pipe, fittings, etc. .90 



$203.07 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 383 

Paid W. H. Vickery, i spring lock and 

keys, District No. 2 . . . $'^■^5 

Water-Works, water for troughs . 796.50 

T. A. Lane, labor on trougli, Ba- 

kersville ..... .40 

Hartford S. B. Inspection &: Insur- 
ance Co. for insurance on boiler 
at stone crusher . . . 22.50 

Warren Harvey, stone culvert across 

Massabesic street, as per contract 971.00 

Drake & Parker, lime and salt . 1.85 

J. J. Abbott, paint and labor on 

urinals and fountains . . . 7. 48 

L. M. Aldrich, labor and materials, 
making tree boxes and placing 
them ..... 94- 41 

Charles H. Robie, repair'g concrete 
at Lincoln-street schoolhouse : 
221.7 yards at 45 cts, ^99.76 ) ^ . 

307 yards at 25 cts, 76.75 ) ' '•^ 

A. D. Gooden, use of water'g trough 

on Park street .... 3.00 

C. H. Wood, painting numbers . 1.50 

Granite State Plating Co., 3,000 

street numbers . . . . 135 00 

George H. Holbrook, 40 days' work 

on trees, from June ti to Sept. 22 100.00 

George H. Holbrook, for iron rods, 

washers, and trucking ladders . 3.00 

F. S. Bodwell, 17}^ feet of curb- 
stone* ..... 17-50 

F. S. Bodwell, I step* . . 9.00 

F. S. Bodwell, i step* . . . 17.00 

F. S. Bodwell, 5 men setting over 

steps* . . . . . 10.00 

F. S. Bodwell, I load of stone* . 3.00 

* At James Baldwin's house. 



384 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Charles A. Bailey, 252 feet of edge- 
stone, at 40 cents . . . $100. So 

Charles A. Bailey, 2 circular stones, 

at $3 . . . . . 6.00 

curbing in front of the North 
Main-street schoolhouse 

Thomas A. Lane, materials and 
labor in taking down and re- 
building fence on Massabesic 
street . . . . . 13-22 

Thomas A. Lane, 190 feet Akron 
pipe, 4 feet 5-in. bends, i ft. 5- 
in. Y, at new city stables . . 14-07 

Charles H. Robie, concrete work 
around James Baldwin's resi- 

' dence, sidewalk, 1,396^ square 
feet; 155.16 square yards . . 69.82 

Charles H. Robie, for concreting 

driveways, 172.87 square yards . 112.35 



ASSESSORS. 

Paid J. G. Dearborn, P. M., postage 

stamps . . . . . $2.00 

A. J. Lane, use of transfer book . 10.00 

Union Publishing Co., Assessors' 

notice, 2^ squares 13 t . . i3-5o 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid George E. Morrill, collector, paid 

for distribution tax bills . . ^68.28 

George E. Morrill, collector, paid 
Republican Press Association, for 
advertising sale of non-resident 
lands ..... 5.10 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

tax collector's notice . , . 23.35 



$2,742.44 



$25.50 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 385 

Paid John B. Clarke, advertising sale of 

non-resident lands . . . $18.00 

John B. Clarke, advertising tax col- 
lector's notice . . . . 30.00 
J. C. Nichols & Son, horse and 

buggy 4-5° 

$149-23 



AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 



MEDICAL ATTENDANCE. 

Paid Dr. J. F. Brown, medical attend- 
ance on Mr. Savory . . . $23.75 

Dr. C. W. Downing, medical at- 
tendance on sundry cases . . 6r.oo 

Dr. George W. Nutter, attendance 

on Mr. Bugher . . . . i.oo 

Dr. C. W. Downing, dressing wound 
for Albert Burns, etc., James 
Plumpton, extra service . . 18.75 



Paid Hiram Stearns, 8 days' work at 

Amoskeag cemetery . . . $12.00 

R. P. Stevens & Co., resetting 20 

headstones, Amoskeag cemetery 25.00 

Anson McGaffey, 7}^ days cutting 

grass in Amoskeag cemetery . ii-35 

Water-Works, water for Amoskeag 

cemetery . . . . . 12.00 



POLITICAL EXPENSES. 

Paid John B. Clarke, printing 472 check- 
lists and warrant blanks for eight 

wards $288.50 

John B. Clarke, printing 800 no- 
tices, etc. ..... 4.20 

25 



;io4.5o 



>o-35 



386 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., print- 
ing 49 blank books for inspectors 

Isaac Whittemore, services of horse 
and carriage 7 days canvassing 
ward 6 . 

G. H. Dudley, materials and labor 
in wardrooms Nos. 2 and 6 

John B. Clarke, printing oaths, 
posters, and voters' certificates 
for inspectors of elections 

John B. Clarke, printing additions 
to check-lists and changes 

Edwin C. Richardson, return to 
city clerk and postage 

E. V. Turcot te .... 

L. N. Dufrain, cleaning out ward 
6 wardroom .... 

George H. Holbrook, labor, lum- 
ber, etc., at ward 6 wardroom . 

Harrison D. Lord, team to post lists 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas in 
wardroom, Lake Avenue . 



8.75 
12.32 

6.50 
5.00 

1.30 

10.00 

2.50 

22.43 
2.00 

1.68 



^377-i8 



PERAMBULATION OF TOWN LINES. 



Paid Whitten & Fi field for team, peram- 
bulating line between Manches- 
ter and Goffstown, Auburn, 
• Londonderry, and Bedford 

Harrie M. Young, 2 days' labor 
perambulating 

W. H. Bennett, shoeing horse 

Harrie M. Young, 3 J days peram- 
bulating town lines . 

W. H. Bennett, perambulating town 
lines, and setting stone bounds 



^8.50 

4.00 
2.50 

6.50 
34.85 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 387 



Paid F. S. Bodwell, stone bounds for re- 
marking town lines, $16.00; 
Manchester's share , . . $7-75 



CITY auditor's office. 

Paid J. B. Sanborn, General and Ses- 
sion Laws .... $18.25 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., for 8 chairs, 
2 iron cuspidors, for auditor's 
office 18.75 

J. B. Varick Co., i copying-press 

and stand for the auditor's office 23.50 

A. E. Herrick, clerical labor for 

mayor and city auditor . . 406.52 

Hammond Typewriter Co., i 

drop cabinet .... 20.00 

Thorp & Adams Co., for i mime- 
ograph ..... 29.50 

Hammond Typewriter Co., mani- 
fold paper, carbon, etc. . . 5.28 

Keeler & Co., for i walnut desk . 50.00 



Paid J. W. Williams & Co., for i cut- 
out machine, treasurer's office . $20.00 
Goodwin &. Mclvers, for use of 

blocking under hose house . 15 00 

Head & Dowst, repairs, etc., on 

pest house . . . . ^3-45 

B. W. Robinson, building chim- 
ney at court house . . . 17-51 
Gilman B. Hoyt, recording deed . i.oo 
Dana W. King, abstract of titles . 5.73 
John A. Barker, extra night ser- 
vice December 16 and 17 . 4.00 



$64.10 



171.80 



388 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Charles E. Lord, labor, lime, etc., 
at city stables .... 

Water-Works, water for Women's 
Aid Hospital, April to January 

Water- Works, water for Women's 
Aid Hospital .... 

W. B. Corey, trucking diver's tools 

Dana W. King, copying 2 deeds . 

James R. Carr, setting glass . 

Timothy Shea, cleaning vault 

Campbell & Williams, printing 
certificates, etc., for inspector 
of weights and measures . 

A. M. Eastman, brooms and match- 
es for city messenger 

John Kendall, 19 days' work, 

drawing plan for city farm 

buildings 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., 6 maps 

of Manchester for census . 
G. W. Varnum, 2 days clearing up 

around court house . 
American Bank Note Co., furnish 

ing blank water bonds 
J. B. Varick Co., 41 square feet 

screen cloth 
First N. H. Battery, powder, etc. 

Fourth of July, 1890 
J. K. Rhodes, services as city mes 

senger 14 days 

B. W. Robinson, horse i day 
D. C. Whittemore, use of land for 

road . . . . 

F. S. Sutclifife, use of piano and 

moving same, for school festival 
Simon Dodge, making guide-posts 

and placing same 



30-59 

10.98 
1.50 
1.08 
1. 00 

3-5° 



5.00 



57.00 

1.50 

3.00 

180.00 

1.03 

38.58 

24.50 
1.50 

20.00 

9.00 

5.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 389 

Paid town of Goffstown, tax on land . $1-67 

G. F. Bosher, advertising and sell- 
ing lot, corner Douglas and 
West streets . . . . 25.00 

G. F. Bosher, advertising and sell- 
ing lot and house on Maple street 25.00 

E. T. James, horse and buggy for 

Reed to pond . . . . 3.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid A. R. Ingham, eleven dinners at 
50c, at the laying out of the ex- 
tension of the Manchester Street 
Railway to the Massabesic pond 5.50 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., twenty 

Manchester directories . . 40.00 

Mrs. E. E. Patch, tax returned, 

taxed to other parties . . 5.70 

G. A. Alger, tax rebated . . 87.93 

George S. Clough, tax on Oberlin 

Levasseus rebated, duplicate tax ^3-3^ 

N. P. Kidder, for making city re- 
port, 1889 .... 150.00 

. $840.62 



Total expenditures ..... $17,441.26 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred to new schoolhouse $900.00 
Amount transferred to printing and sta- 
tionery . . .... 1,654.09 

Amount transferred to sewers and drains 2,456.04 
Amount transferred to fire-alarm telegraph 29 3. 85 
Amount transferred to city teams . . 47 7-6 1 
Amount transferred to Mayor's inciden- 
tals ....... 300.00 

$6,081.59 

$23,532.85 



390 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



INTEREST. 



Appropriation raised by tax 
Transfers, Water-Works 



^17,000.00 
36,000.00 

$53,000.00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid George B. Chandler, on tempo- 
rary loan ..... 

George B. Chandler, on tempo- 
rary loan . 

Manchester National Bank, tem- 
porary loan 

coupons on water bonds 

coupons on city bonds 

coupons on cemetery bonds 

Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$194-45 
166.67 

194-45 
34,177.00 
15,771.00 

567-50 



ii,o7i.o7 
1,928.93 



5,000.00 



TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Received from National Revere bank, Boston, 
Mass., on note dated May i, 1890 
from George B. Chandler, or order, on 

note dated May i, 1890 
from George B. Chandler, or order, on 
two notes dated June 14, 1890 

Paid, July 11, 1890, to the National Re- 
vere Bank, Boston, Mass., note 
dated May i, 1890 . . . $25,000.00 



$25,000.00 

25,000.00 

50,000.00 
$100,000.00 



RESERVED FUND. 



391 



Paid, July 1 1, 1S90, to George B. Chand- 
ler, or order, note dated May 
I, 1890 ..... ^25,000.00 
July 14, 1890, to George B. Chan- 
dler, or order, notes dated June 
14, 1890 ..... 50,000.00 



$100,000.00 



FUNDED DEBT. 

Received from water bonds re-issued 
Paid water bonds redeemed . . $ 

balance outstanding 



,900.00 
100.00 



$100,000.00 



,100,000.00 



RESERVED FUND. 

Appropriation raised by tax . 



,20,000.00 



RECEIPTS. 



Received from city scales, J. S. Paige 




e^ a/. 


^487-45 


from show licenses, N. P. Kid- 




der ..... 


190.50 


from rent of tenements, N. P. 




Kidder .... 


461.63 


from milk licenses, H. F. W. 




Little .... 


49.00 


from milk licenses, C. B. Little- 




field 


50.00 


from dog licenses, N. P. 




Kidder .... 


1,361.16 


from billiard table licenses, N. 




P. Kidder 


37-50 


from premium on w a t e r 




bonds, N. W. Harris & 




Company .... 


5,670.00 



392 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Received from interest on note from 

J. S. Paige . . . $14-86 

from unpaid bills covered 

into the treasury . . 678.95 



TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred from interest . . $1,928.93 

Amount transferred from printing and 

stationery ...... 795-91 

Amount transferred from indigent sol- 
diers . ...... 262.18 

Amount transferred from interest on 

taxes. ...... 34244 

Amount transferred from abatement of 

taxes. ...... .61 

Amount transferred from Mayor's inci- 
dentals 112.00 

Amount transferred from funded debt . 100.00 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No, I IOO-75 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. 2 252.13 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. 4 .25 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. 5 13-25 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. 6 1.20 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. 8 8.27 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. 9 35.98 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. II 10.50 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. 12 .20 



),ooi.o5 



RESERVED FUND. 393 

Amount transferred from highway dis- 
trict No. 13 ^5.85 

Amount transferred from land taken for 

highways . . . . . . 141.84 

Amount transferred from bridges . . 480.72 

Amount transferred from city teams . 432.11 

Amount transferred from fire alarm tele- 
graph ...... 21.81 

Amount transferred from firemen's parade 500.00 

Amount transferred from police depart- 
ment ...... 843.41 

Amount transferred from new city stables 5.98 

Amount transferred from Water- Works . 9,711.47 

Amount transferred from Stark Monu- 
ment square . . . . . 39-2 5 

Amount transferred from Pine Grove 

cemetery . . . . . . 654.22 

Amount transferred from Valley cemetery 80.59 

Amount transferred from receiving tomb 399-39 



;i7,28i.24 

Amount transferred to balance from 
money in treasury not specifically ap- 
appropriated i, 9 73-45 

^48,155-74 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid W. C. T. U. Mercy Home .... ^500.00 

Amount transferred to free beds, Elliot 

Hospital ..... $600.00 

Amount transferred to new city stables 6,000.00 

Amount transferred to sewers and drains 5,000.00 

Amount transferred to sewers and drains 10,951.58 

Amount transferred to decoration of sol- 
diers' graves . . . . . 74-27 

Amount transferred to incidental ex- 
penses ...... 4,017.66 



394 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Amount transferred to macadamizing . 
Amount transferred to scavenger teams 
Amount transferred to street sweeping 
Amount transferred to health depart- 
ment ...... 

Amount transferred to discount on taxes 
Amount transferred to highway dis- 
trict No. II . 
Amount transferred to new schoolhouse, 

West Manchester 
Amount transferred to fuel . 
Amount transferred to teachers' salaries 
Amount transferred to City Hall . 
Amount transferred to city officers 
salaries ..... 

Amount transferred to highway dis 
trict No. 7 . . . . 

Amount transferred to highway dis 

trict No. lo . 
Amount transferred to new highways 
Amount transferred to watering streets 
Amount transferred to paving streets 
Amount transferred to grading for con 
Crete ..... 

Amount transferred to lighting streets 
Amount transferred to engineers' depart 
raent ..... 

Amount transferred to fire department 
Amount transferred to hydrant service 
Amount transferred to repairs of build- 
ings 

Amount transferred to commons . 
Amount transferred to paupers off the 
farm ...... 

Amount transferred to city farm . 



$2,922.52 

3.958-46 

37.08 

13413 
1,265.25 

75.00 

3.779-61 

7-45 

1,801.94 

327.79 

259.41 

8.03 

57-OI 
75-6i 
93.00 

1.133-43 

1,089.86 
99.64 



1.797-35 
80.00 

443-87 
204.03 

134.89 
1,004.98 



$47,655-74 



S155-74 



CITY HALL. 395 



CITY HALL. 



RECEIPTS. 



Received from N. P. Kidder, rent of 

stores . . . . . .$1,717.50 

Received from N. P. Kidder, rent of 

stores ...... 90.00 

Received from N. P. Kidder, rent of 

stores ...... 602.50 

Received from J. P. Mullen, old carpet 4.00 



$2,414.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 327.79 



EXPENDITURES. 
PUBLIC COMFORT. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., for 12 

sheets of sandpaper . . . $0.10 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on urinal i.io 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on public 

comfort . . . . . 1.55 

Manchester Heating & Lighting 

Co., 15 pounds waste yarn . 2.25 



FUEL AND LIGHTS. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co. . . $321.58 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., 25 tons of 

coal ..... 162.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 56 615- 

2000 tons at $6.25 . . . 353-84 



Paid G. H. Dudley, for repairing doors 

at the City Hall . . . ^0.50 



12,741.79 



17-92 



35 



■35 
5.00 



396 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid G. H. Dudley, for two small signs ^i. 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

snow shovel .... 
Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

sidewalk cleaner ... .40 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

14- inch duster . . . . 1.40 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 

sperm oil, emery cloth, etc. . 1.23 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 

glass 1.26 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

16-inch ostrich duster . . 1.75 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

snow shovel .... 
J. B. Varick Co., for 50 feet ^- 

inch rubber hose 
Thomas A. Lane, gas fixtures, etc., 

school committee room . . 18.48 

Thomas A. Lane, gas fixtures, etc., 

school committee room . . 23.84 

Thomas A. Lane, packing faucets, 

engineer's office ... .30 

Thomas A. Lane, 4 opal globes. 

City Hall . . . . i.oo 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on gas in 

entry ..... .40 

Thomas A. Lane, labor in com- 
mon council room, taking down 

fixtures ..... .60 

Thomas A. Lane, 3 ^-inch caps .09 

Thomas A. Lane, stock and labor 

on City Hall . . . . .90 

Thomas A. Lane, stock and labor, 

common council rooms, etc. . io-37 

Thomas A. Lane, labor and pack- 
ing sill cock .... .45 



CITY HALL. 397 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, labor on water 

leak ^i-oo 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on closets 

and material .... 4-38 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on water .75 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on keys, 

etc 7-68 

Mary Shiney, labor at the City 
Hall, washing, etc., 586 hours 
at 20 cents . . . . 117.20 

J. J. Abbot, painting school com- 
mittee room, auditor's office, 
and public comfort . . . 78.27 

A. M. Eastman, 6 brooms . . 1.50 

A. M. Eastman, for brooms and 

matches . . . . • i-8o 

Flint & Little, lumber, 84 feet . 2.52 

Flint & Little, hardware . . 1.72 

Flint & Little, 16^ hours labor 4.62 

J. W. Gould, paper hanging . 9.12 

Head & Dowst, lumber, hardware, 
labor, etc., school committee 
room 230.62 

Head & Dowst, materials and la- 
bor, for table, school commit- 
tee room . . . . 47-57 

Thomas A. Lane, for piping water- 
closet, etc., in school commit- 
tee room . . . . 42 43 

Keeler & Co., 2 5-foot walnut 
desks, for school committee and 
superintendent of District No. 2 100.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., room 

paper, school committee room 56.62 

Weston & Hill, carpet border for 

auditor's office . . . 4-o7 

Weston & Hill, carpet, etc., for 

school committee room . . 128.83 



398 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid, carpet and rug for mayor and al- 
dermen's room . . . ^ii8.88 
James R. Carr & Co., setting glass r.oo 
George L. Young, slate and labor 17-07 
A. M. Finney, cleaning carpets 4.05 
A. M. Finney, cleaning roping, 

common council room . . 5-09 

A. M. Finney, cleaning and lay- 
ing roping . . . . 5.39 
Charles E. Lord, mason work and 

stock 23.75 

Charles E. Lord, mason work and 

stock 33.55 

Water-Works, for water . . 643.80 

W. H. Vickery, for keys . . 5.00 

J. Y. McQueston & Co., oak desk, 

city engineer's office . . 50.00 

C. H. Wood, painting tin sign, 

city clerk's office . . . 2.75 

New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co. . . . . 6.34 
New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co. (Sept.) . . . 6.^;^ 
New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co. (Oct.) . . . 6.34 
New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co. (Dec.) . . . 6.34 
Pike & Heald, 5 mops . . .69 
Pike & Heald, materials and labor 

on roof, water-closets, etc. . 15-97 

Pike & Heald, plumbing and ma- 
terials (gas) in auditor's office . ^3-43 
Pike & Heald, labor on roof . 2.15 
Pike & Heald, plumbing and ma- 
terial . . . . . 1.77 
E. J. Williams, cement, labor, etc., 

on roof ..... 7.96 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 399 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, i window 

screen, auditor's office . . $o-5o 

L. K. Mead, i cake C. B. soap, 

city clerk's office ... .25 

L. M. Aldrich, iron work, screws, 

nails, and labor . . . 1.60 

J. S. Holt & Co., 30 gallons soap 3.75 

George H. Holbrook, lumber on 

desk, etc. .... 4.75 

^1,898.87 



Total expenditures ..... ^2,741.79 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Appropriation raised by tax ... . . ^1,200.00 

Transferred from incidental expenses . . . 1,654.09 

$2,854.09 

EXPENDITURES. 

ASSESSORS. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., for 

blank tax books . . . $105.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., pens, 

penholders, ink, etc. . . 6.40 

Temple & Farrington Co., 2 direc- 
tories ..... 4.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., i Pam- 
phlet Laws .... I. GO 

Temple & Farrington Co., i blank 

book ..... 2.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., pencils, 

blotting paper, etc., . . 5.63 

John B. Clarke, advertising assess- 
ors' notice, 2 in. 13 times . iS-oo 

$139-03 



2.50 

I.50 



400 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

CITY CLERK. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., i blank 

book $13-50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 500 
letter heads .... 

Temple & Farrington Co., i can- 
vas cover .... 

Temple & Farrington Co., index, 

ink, etc 3.50 

Temple & Farringion Co., rubber 

bands, blank book, etc. . . 5.65 

Temple & Farrington Co., 500 No. 

9 envelopes .... 2.00' 

Temple & Farrington Co., record- 
books and covers . . . 19-25 

Temple & Farrington Co., 2 rul- 
ers, rubber bands, etc. . . 1.48 

Temple & Farrington Co., rubber 

bands, blanks, etc. . . . 5.39 

Campbell & Williams, 50 blanks 

ruled to order .... 3.50 

Campbell & Williams, 600 copies 

city ordinances . . . 4.50 

Campbell & Williams, 3,000 blanks 

for returns of deaths, etc. . 23.50 

Campbell & Williams, 500 com- 
missions and ordinances . . 3.75 

A. S. Campbell & Co., bills of 

sale, burial permits, etc. . . 7.75 

A. S. Campbell & Co., dog licenses 
and ordinances 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 

1,200 blanks of various kinds . 14-50 

A. S. Campbell & Co., burial per- 
mits, etc. .... 5.00 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 200 ruled 

blanks, and marriage reports . 2.75 



5-25 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 401 

Paid John B. Clarke, advertisement, set- 
ting fires, 9 squares, one week . $16.25 
Manchester post-office, fifty postal 

cards ..... .50 

Pike cv Heald, 2 tin boxes . . 3.90 

C. H. Wood, lettering 2 tin boxes .60 

$146.52 



CITY TREASURER. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., envel- 
opes, etc. . . . . $4-25 

Temple & Farrington Co., pay- 
roll sheets .... 6.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., receipt 

book, pens, and rubber bands . i5-oS 

Temple & Farrington Co., i blank 

cash book and cover . . 7.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., pay en- 
velopes ..... 2.50 

Temple cS: Farrington Co., pay- 
rolls, etc. .... 6.75 

Temple & Farrington, envelopes, 

rubber bands, penholders . . 7.45 

Novelty Advertising Co., i atlas 

dater ..... i.oo 

F. Pratt, Jr., pens and ho^Jl's 2.20 

Manchester post-office, postage 

stamps ..... 3.00 

Thomas H. Tuson, printing 1,000 

treasurer's receipts . . . 2.50 

Cincinnati Ink Co. . . . .50 

J. J. Jones, I improved dating 

stamp ..... 4.00 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., i mem- 
orandum book . . . $0'5o 



$62.23 



26 



402 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Temple ^: Farrington Co., i tax 




receipt book .... 


$8-75 


Temple & Farrington Co., interest 




table 


I. GO 


Temple &: Farrington Co. . pencils 




and paper .... 


.70 


Temple &: Farrington Co.. 6 




blocks . . . . . 


.50 


Temple &: Farrington Co., index 




and penholders 


.45 


John B. Clarke, printing 2,000 tax 




receipts ..... 


20.00 


John B. Clarke, 20,000 summons 


20.00 


Manchester post-office, i ,000 




stamped envelopes . 


21. Sc 


AuorroR. 




Paid Temple &: Farrington Co., 100 




pay-roll sheets 


$8.15 


Temple .k Farrington Co.. 4 blank 




books 


4-60 



Temple & Farrington Co., 50 

drawers for bills . . . 21.0c 

Temple & Farrington Co., i blank 

book . ^^ . 9.00 

Temple &: Farrington Co., pens, 

ink. paper, etc. . . . 12.52 

Temple & Farrington Co.. 2 Pam- 
phlet Laws . . 2. CO 

Temple 6c Farrington Co., copy- 
books ..... 5.CC 

Temple & Farrington Co., envel- 
opes, mucilage, etc. . . . 4.67 

Temple &: Farrington Co., blanks, 

etc. ..... 9.62 

Temple &: Farrington Co.. 129 

ruled sheets .... 2.35 



PRINTIN(; AND STATIONERY. 403 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 500 

large stamped envelopes . . Si 3.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., ink, etc. .65 

Temple ivr Farrington Co., station- 
ery 52.40 

Temple & Farrington Co., 500 
ruled sheets, 2 typewriter rib- 
bons, ink, pens, pencils, etc. . 8.72 

John B, Clarke, blanks, bill heads, 

etc. . . ... 33-00 

John B. Clarke, printing 6,000 

bills, 8^4 X 7, ruled to order . 27.00 

John B. Clarke, printing 300 bills, 

8}4 X 7, red line notice . . 4.50 

John B. Clarke, printing 150 state- 
ments bonded debt . . . 7.50 

John B. Clarke, printing 1,000 
billheads, jix8}4 • • • S.50 

John B. Clarke, printing 400 lists, 

wealth, debt, taxation . . 41.00 

John B. Clarke, printing 500 half- 
letter heads .... 2.00 

John B. Clarke, printing 550 

blank bills, etc. . . . 12.00 

John B. Clarke, printing 500 half- 
letter heads .... 1.50 

John B. Clarke, printing 1,000 

bill heads .... 9.00 

John B. Clarke, printing 100 ap- 
propriation blanks . . 6.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., paper 

shears, duster, etc. . . . 5.83 

Novelty Advertising Co., i lever 

self-inking stamp . . . 7.00 

Hammond Typewriter Co., 1 type- 
writer, supplies, etc. . . 100.34 



404 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Hammond Typewriter Co., car- 
bons, shields, blotters, etc. . ^S-oo 

Hammond Typewriter Co., record 

ribbon, oil ... . 1.20 

Hammond Typewriter Co., envel- 
opes, shields, carbon . . 3.50 

Hammond Typewriter Co., i type- 
writer brush . . . . .12 

Hammond Typewriter Co., i iron 
stand, I record ribbon, No. 2 
type wheel, carbon paper . . 11-50 

Hammond Typewriter Co., 3 reams 

of paper, etc., .... 5.65 

Hammond Typewriter Co., 2 type 

wheels, Nos. 2 and 4 . . 10.00 

Hammond Typewriter Co., 3 rib- 
bons ..... 6.00 

Hammond Typewriter Co., 2 reams 

legal, ruled .... 2.80 

Manchester post-ofifice, 150 2-cent 

stamps ..... 3.00 

Head & Dowst, materials and labor 

on bill case . . . . 16.97 

Thorp & Adams Manufacturing 

Co., I desk rack . . . 2.00 

Albert Hilcken, i blank book . 5.00 

Albert Hilcken, i blank book . 5.00 

Albert Hilcken, i portfolio . . 2.50 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Clarke, printing 1,500 city 

reports, etc $632.60 

John B. Clarke, printing 1,000 

half-letter circulars, scavenger . 4.50 

John B. Clarke, printing 100 half- 
letter circulars, on card . . .75 



^499-59 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 405 

Paid John B. Clarke, printing, advertis- 
ing water-works bonds [7 sq. 4 1.] $1 1-75 

John B. Clarke, printing, advertis- 
ing scavenger ordinance . . 28.83 

John B. Clarke, printing, adver- 
tising amendment to chapter 14 
[4^ in. 3t & I taw] . . 11-50 

John B. Clarke, printing, advertis- 
ing amendment to chapter 6 [4}^ 
in. I taw] . . . . ii'iS 

John B. Clarke, printing, advertis- 
ing ordinances [38 in. 3 t] . 58-5° 

John B. Clarke, binding 12 re- 
ports, Morocco . . . 36.00 

John B. Clarke, binding 34 re- 
ports, half-roan, lettered on side 51-00 

John B. Clarke, binding 54 re- 
ports, half-roan, seal on side . 67.50 

John B. Clarke, printing, advertis- 
ing proposals for city stables . 9.00 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising ordinances, i column 3 w. 20.00 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising ordinances 3 Sat. . . 12.00 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising proposals, city stables i w 7.50 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

proposals, city stables . . 10.50 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
amendments to ordinances i col. 
3 t . . . . . . 60.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

garbage team service, 8 sq. 3 t . 16.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

bond sale, 4 sq. 4 t. . . . 10.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

proposals for sewer pipe . . i5-oo 



406 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. G. Ellinwood, photographing 
buildings for city report, 1890 . 

William E. Moore, printing labels 
for photographs 

H. W. Herrick, labor and materials 
mounting- . . , , 



Total amount of expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$39-5° 




3-50 




20.00 






$i:i37-o8 






$2,058.18 




795-91 



MAYOR'S INCIDENTALS. 

Amount transferred from incidental expenses . 

EXPENDITURES. 



$2,854.09 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid H. Giebel, decorating City Hall, 
St. John's Day 
Whitten & Fifield, hacks 
John B. Clarke, advertising, Law- 
rence sufferers .... 
John B. Clarke, 500 envelopes 
D. B. Varney, telephone, extra, to 
Lawrence .... 

telegram to Dr. Bailey 
paid use of team for the year 1890 
Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising, Lawrence sufferers . 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$30.00 
15.00 

4-5° 
1. 00 

•25 

•50 

133.00 

3-75 



; 1 88.00 
112.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 407 

CITY OFFICERS' SALARIES. 

Appropriation raised by tax ..... $15,500.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . $259.41 
from truant officer . . 750.00 



EXPENDITURES. 
CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Paid David B. Varney, mayor . . $1,800.00 
Nathan P. Kidder, city clerk . 900.00 
Sylvan us B. Putnam, city treasurer 1,200.00 
James B. Straw, city auditor . 980.56 
Edwin F. Jones, city solicitor . 745 00 
Jesse B. Pattee, clerk of the com- 
mon council .... 200.00 
Inspector of Buildings T. W. Lane 100.00 
City Messenger John A. Barker . 699.96 
City Messenger John A. Barker, 

extra services .... 4.00 



MODERATORS. 



Paid S. P. Cannon, ward i, 1889 and 

1890 $3-oo 

N. Nichols, ward 2, 1889 and 1890 3.00 

Lyman W. Colby, ward 3, 1889 

and 1890 .... 3-00 

John C. Bickford, ward 4, 1S89 

and 1890 .... 3.00 

J. J. McAllister, ward 5, 1889 and 

1890 ..... 3.00 

Clarence D. Palmer, ward 6, 1889 

and 1890 .... 3.00 



1,009.41 
$16,509.41 



$6,629.52 



408 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Ira W. Stearns, ward 7, 1889 ^'""^ 

1890 ..... $3-oo 

John W. Wilson, ward 8, 1S89 

and 1890 .... 3.00 



WARD CLERKS. 



§24.00 



Paid Frank X. Foster, ward i, 1890 

D. C. Smith, ward 2, 1889 and 
1890 ..... 

F. O. Moulton, ward 3, 1889 and 
1890 ..... 

E. L Richardson, ward 4, 1889 
and 1890 .... 

Thomas Howe, ward 5, 1889 and 

1890 ..... 

Wm. H. Sleeper, ward 6, 1889 and 

1890 ..... 

Fred W. Pillsbury, ward 7, 1889 

and 1890 .... 

Charles G. Ranno, ward 8, 1889 

and i8qo .... 



$5.00 



^75-oo 



INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LIST. 



Paid Wm. B. Stearns, ward i, 39 days 




at $2.25 .... 


I87.75 


B. L. Hartshorn, ward 2, 35 days 




at ^2.25 


78.75 


D. 0. Furnald, ward 3, 30 days at 




$2.25 


67.50 


H. D. Lord, ward 4, 64 days at 




^2.25 


144.00 


M. F. Lawler, ward 5, 30 days at 




$2.25 


75.00 


Isaac Whittemoie, ward 6, 57 days 




^t$2.25 


128.25 



CITY officers' salaries. 4.09 

Paid "Jos. A. Foster, ward 7, 34 days at 

^2.25 $576-50 

Charles C. Tinkham, ward 8, 49 

days at $2.25 .... 110.50 

Arthur Provost, as interpreter, 7 

days at $2.00 . . . . 14.00 



SUPERVISORS. 

Paid Wm. C. Knowlton, ward i, 4 

days at $1.75 .... $7-oo 

F. W. McKinley, ward i, 4 days 

at ^1.75 7-00 

Fred C. Hale, ward 2, 4 days at 

$1-75 7-00 

John Dowst, ward 2, 4 days at 

$1-75 7-00 

H. F. W. Little, ward 3, 3 days at 

$1.75 5-25 

D. H. Young, ward 3, 3 days at 

$1-75 5-25 

Charles H. Uhlig, ward 4: 5 days 

at $1.75 8-75 

Charles H. Flagg, ward 4, 5 days • 

at $1.75 8.75 

John J. Minton, ward 5, 6 days at 

$1-75 ^°-5o 

J. H. Slater, ward 5, 6 days at 

$1-75 10-50 

J. S. Hutchinson, ward 6, 6 days 

at $1.75 10.50 

Wm. C. Blodgett, ward 6, 6 days 

at $1.75 10.50 

W. T. Payne, ward 7, 4 days at 

$1-75 7-00 

John W. Davis, ward 7, 3}^ days 

at $1.75 6.13 



32.25 



410 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John Martin, ward 8, 7^4 days at 

$i-75 $13-12 

Charles H. Hodgman, ward 8, 7^ 

days at ^1.75 . . . . 13-12 



SELECTMEN. 



Paid Lees Ward, ward i, 1889 and 1890 $5-o° 

George C. Kemp, ward i, 18S9 

and 1890 ..... 5.00 

Amasa S. Hilands, ward i, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5-co 

D. G. Andrews, ward 2, 1889 ^'""^ 

1890 ..... 5.00 

C. R. Holbrook, ward 2, 1889 and 

1890 ..... 5.00 

Harry P. Ray, ward 2, 1889 and 

1890 ..... 5.00 

David Thayer, ward 3, 1889 '^^^'^ 

1890 ..... 5.00 

Charles F. Garland, ward 3, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5.00 

Wm. H. Darling, ward 3, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5.00 

George E. Richards, ward 4, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5.00 

J. F. Gillis, ward 4, 1889 and 

1890 ..... 5.00 

J. H. Mann, ward 4, 1889 and 

1S90 ..... 5.00 

Martin J. Harney, ward 5, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5.00 

Charles J. Woods, ward 5, 1889 

and 1890 . . . . 5.00 

Patrick C. Campbell, ward 5, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5.00 



$137-37 



CITY officers' salaries. 



411 



Paid George B. Rogers, ward 6, 1889 

and 1890 .... $5-oo 

Jerome B. Titus, ward 6, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5.00 

P. D. St. Germain, ward 6, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5.00 

George D. Smith, ward 7, 1889 

and 1890 .... 5.00 

S. F. Claflin, ward 7, 1889 and 

1890 5-00 

W. D. Wheeler, ward 7, 1S89 and 

1890 S-oo 

H. J. Hatch, ward 8, 1889 and 

1890 5.00 

Victor Sancoucie, ward 8, 1889 

and 1890 ..... 5.00 

Jos. A. Heon, ward 8, 18S9 and 

1890 2.50 

Jerome B. Titus, selectman, for 

year ending January i, 1890 . 2.50 

W. H. Sleeper, clerk, for year end- 
ing January i, 1890 . . 5.00 
overdraft ..... 60.50 



$185.00 



CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Paid C. W. Downing, city physician . 
D. B. Varney, chairman, ex officio 
William H. Maxwell, ward i 
Thomas L. Quimby, ward 2 
James Sutcliffe, ward 3 
Benjamin F. Garland, ward 3 
George S. Holmes, ward 4 . 
Thomas H. Mahoney, ward 5 
Charles Francis, ward 6 
David W. Anderson, ward 7 
Horatio Fradd, ward 8 



)200.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

6.25 

18.75 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 



412 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid William H. Maxfield, clerk . . $75-oo 

Judith Sherer, matron at the pest- 
house for year 1890 . . . 360.00 
Judith Sherer, matron at the pest- 
house I month, December, 1889 30.00 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Paid William E. Buck, superintendent 
of schools .... 
Samuel Brooks, truant officer 
D. B. Varney, chairman, ex officio 
C. H. Manning, ward i 
J. L. Sanborn, ward i . 
Benjamin C. Dean, ward 2 . 
William C. Clarke, ward 2 . 
Nathan P. Hunt, ward 3 
James E. Dodge, ward 3 
Stephen B. Stearns, ward 4 . 
John F. Cahill, ward 5 
James P. Slattery, ward 5 
F. T. E. Richardson, ward 6 
Charles G. Dodge, ward 6 . 
Edward B. Woodbury, ward 7 
Marshall P. Hall, ward 7 
Luther C. Baldwin, ward 8 . 
William K. Robbins, ward 8 
J. F. Frost, president of the com- 
mon council, ex officio 
James E. Dodge, clerk of school 
board . . . . . 



$2,000.00 
750.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

TO. 00 
10.00 
10.00 



$3,020.00 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 



Paid Henry Lewis, ward i, assessor . $144.50 
John E. Stearns, ward 2, assessor . 165.00 

D. O. Furnald, ward 3, assessor . 705.00 



CITY officers' salaries. 413 

Paid H. D. Lord, ward 4, assessor . $250.00 

John Ryan, ward 5, assessor . 165.00 

George H. Dudley, ward 6, assessor 410.00 

A. J. Dickey, ward 7, assessor . 142.50 

Frank T. Provost, ward 8, assessor 147-50 

E. W. Brigham, assistant assessor 257.50 

P. A. Devine, assistant assessor . 25.00 

W. G. Furnald, assistant assessor . 102.50 

Hiram Forsaith, assistant assessor 57-5° 

Nicholas Nichols, assistant assessor 287.50 

H. F. Stone, assistant assessor . 30.00 

Isaac Whittemore, assistant assessor 45-oo 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Paid Joseph Z. A. Adam, interpreter . 20.00 

C. A. U. Ouillet, interpreter . 30.00 
Isaac Whittemore, 13 days, horse 

and carriage at $1.25 . . 16.25 
John E. Stearns, 3 days, horse and 

carriage at $1.25 . . . 3.75 

D. O. Furnald, expenses to C^lon- 

cord two limes . . . 1.44 



CITY WEIGHER. 



CITY TAX COLLECTOR. 



Paid George E. Morrill, quarter ending 

February 28, 1890 . . . $200.00 

George E. Morrill, quarter ending 

June I, 1890 .... 200.00 

George E. Morrill, balance of sal- 
ary as collector of taxes for year 
1889 ..... 850.00 

George E. Morrill, commission on 

old taxes . . • . . . ^°-33 



$3005-94 



Paid Jonathan S. Paige, 3 months' salary, from Jan. 

I to March 31, 1890 ...... $100.00 



414 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid George E. Morrill, 6 months' sal- 
ary, ending November 30, 1890 $400.00 

$1,660.33 



$16,509.41 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. i. 

Appropriation raised by tax .... $300.00 

EXPENDITURES. 



Paid J. C. Ray, labor of men and teams. 

State Industrial School . . $130.50 

J. C. Ray, 2g3/^ days services as 

road surveyor . . . . 59-5° 

. $190.00 



Paid J. C. Ray, 35 loads of gravel at 
15 cents .... 

J. C. Ray, 12 posts at 15c. . 
J. C. Ray, 135 feet of lumber 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



HIGHWAY DISTRICTS NOS. 2 AND t, 

Appropriation raised by tax 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from George W. Weeks 
Received from Warren Harvey, use of 
derrick ...... 



$5-25 






1.80 






2.20 











9-25 




$199-25 






100.75 




$300.00 


2 AND 


■^ 








$ 


12,000.00 


$30.00 






30.00 








$: 


60.00 






12,060.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICTS NOS. 2 AND 3. 



415 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid pay-roll, labor of men and teams 
for the month of January . 
for the month of February 
for the month of March 
for the month of April 
for the month of May 
for the month of June 
for the month of July 
for the month of August 
for the month of September 
for the month of October 
for the month of November 
for the month of December 

William Sanborn for November and 
December 1889, ^"^ January 
1890 ..... 

in district prior to February, 1890 : 
Edward N. Baker superintend- 
ent, for 25 days labor . 
H. C. Dickey, 6 days labor, at 

^1-50 

A. McDougal, self and two-horse 
team ..... 

Martin Fitzgerald, labor of self 
et al. as stonecutters, at sundry 
places, as per bill (cesspool 
stone, etc.) .... 



;^56o.23 
619.72 
714.98 

1,035.65 
859.67 
804. II 
971.92 
864.68 

1,163.07 
869.46 

755-58 
1,449.80 



300.00 



50.00 



g.oo 



32.00 



73-40 



ill, 097. 27 



Paid J. Hadlock, for road machine . $16.50 

J. B. Varick, brackets, waste basket, 

etc. . . . . . 1.27 



$!• 


08 




'75 


I. 


25 




•50 


II 


.00 


5 


.00 


I 


•25 



416 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. B. Varick, 21^^ pounds steel 

crow bar .... 

J. B. Varick, i No. 8 plow cleaver 
y, B. A^arick, blacksmith's hammer 
J. B. Varick Co., for i fiber pail . 
J. B. Varick Co., for i dozen shovels 
J. B. Varick Co., for i dozen street 

hoes ..... 

J. B. Varick Co., for i set of stencil 

figures and letters 
J. B. Varick Co., for i dozen Ames 

round point shovels . . 11.00 

J. B. Varick Co., for 3 i6-toolh 

steel rakes . . . . 1.50 

J. B. Varick Co., for J^ dozen 

Ames L. H. Rd. Pt. shovels . 4.00 

J. B. Varick Co., for pail and dipper .80 

J. B. Varick Co., for one dozen 

street hoes . . . . 5.50 

J. B. Varick Co., for i 14-inch 

Wilder thermometer . ■ . i.oo 

J. B. Varick Co., for i broom . .25 

Killey & Wadleigh, for i dozen 

square pointed shovels . . 10.00 

Killey & Wadleigh, for J dozen 

round point shovels . . . 5.25 

Killey &: Wadleigh, for i T square .50 

Killey & Wadleigh, for i dozen 

O. H. Shovels .... 10.00 

Killey & Wadleigh, for 2 mattocks 2.00 

Killey «Sj Wadleigh, for 2 handles .40 

Killey & Wadleigh, for i dozen 

street brooms .... 6.00 

Killey & Wadleigh, for i dozen 

heavy brooms .... 4.50 

■ Killey & Wadleigh, for 2 dozen 

brooms ..... 12.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICTS NOS. 2 AND 3. 417 



EXPLOSIVES. 



50 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, for i dozen 

hoes ..... 

Killey & Wadleigh, for i dozen 

snow shovels . . . . 3.50 

Killey &r Wadleigh, for 2 dozen oak 

pick handles . . . . 1.13 

John B. Varick, tools . . . 8.13 

Manchester hardware Co., for 112- 

tooth steel rake ... .40 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

pair of shears .... i .00 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

basket ..... 1.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

dozen pick handles . • . 4.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 132 

lbs. coil chain .... 7.92 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 3 

lanterns with red globes . . 2.10 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 2 

oak stable pails . . . i.oo 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 2- 

foot rule ..... .40 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 2 
mattocks .... 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 5 

scoop handles .... 
Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

scythe and snath 
Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

stone ..... 



1.50 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., for powder . ^7-02 

J. B. Varick Co., for fuse . . 1.78 

J. B. Varick Co., for 504-foot fuse 1.50 



5153-73 



$10.30 



27 



418 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., on Vine 

street . . . . . $61.60 

John J. Bell, rent of office . . 58.00 

Thomas A. Lane, fountain in Dean 

avenue ..... .60 

Thomas A. Lane, gas light. Elm 

back street . . . . i.io 

Thomas A. Lane, pipe and fittings 8.87 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on lantern, 

back of engine-house . . .25 

J. B. Varick Co., for 15 pounds of 

wire spikes .... .53 

J. B. Varick Co., for bolts . . .25 

J. B. Varick Co., for 2^ gallons of 

kerosene oil . . . . .30 

J. B. Varick Co., for hardware . 8.80 

J. B. Varick Co., for y^ dozen 

Belknap axle paste . . . 1.20 

Killey & Wadleigh, i bottle of 

glue . . . . . .12 

Killey & Wadleigh, bolts, wire, 

tallow, etc. .... .39 

Killey & Wadleigh, for sponges . .50 

Killey &: Wadleigh, for 5 pounds 

glass and putty ... .40 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 

leather washers, axle grease, and 

road machinery steel 
Manchester Hardware Co., for 64 

pounds I -inch oct. cast steel 
Manchester Hardware Co., for 15 

pounds 4-penny nails at 3^ 
Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

ball of twine .... 
Manchester Hardware Co. for wire, 

spikes, washers, etc. 



68 
53 
50 
29 



HIGHWAY DISTRICTS NOS. 2 AND 3. 419 

Manchester Hardware Co., for re- 
pairs on curry comb . . $^■'^5 

Manchester Hardware Co., for wire, 

spikes, nails, etc. . . . 1.83 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

brush ..... .10 

Manchester Hardware Co., for 25 

pounds steel wire spikes . .88 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., for 
Georgia Pine, machine, steel, 
and labor, for road roller . 7.70 

George W. Reif, for black walnut, 

Michigan pine, and labor . . 2.56 

Temple & Farrington Co., for blank 

books, time books, pens, books 30-30 

J. Stickney, for i pound rubber 

bands . . ... . .75 

Eager & Rand, for I- gross matches .14 

Head & Dowst, for lumber and 

labor on table . . . 19-42 

Burns & Poor, for i barrel Cumber- 
land coal, on Lake avenue and 
Wilson streets . . . . 1.25 

Boston & Maine R. R. for freight . 3.64 

Manchester horse R. R. for 100 

tickets ..... 4.80 

E. T. James, for horse and carriage 
hire ..... 40.25 

Heath & Stevens, for labor and 

lead, district 3 . . . 1.50 

Stark Mills, for use of wagon from 

July I, to August 16 .# . 20.00 

Pike & Heald, for solder pail . .10 

L. N. Westover .... .40 

^288.66 



420 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



BLACKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid John T. Beach, materials and labor 
on tools, teams, etc. 

G. H. Booth, blacksmithing 

Joseph O. Tremblay . 

Sanborn Carriage Co., welding 4 
links in chain .... 

W. H. Vickery, 4 keys, etc. 

L. M. Aldrich, setting vials in 
levels ..... 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saws [5] 

Flint iS: Little, 3 glasses and repair- 
ing level ..... 

Thomas Hickey, sharpening 2 bars 



329-79 


5-5° 


6.60 


.20 


1-95 


•S5 


1.60 


.62 


.20 



$47-3^ 



MATERIALS. 

Paid D. Connor, 25 loads paving-stones 

at 25 cents, for Welch avenue . $2.50 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., So 
feet sheathing, 9 feet crown mold- 
ing, and 13 feet clear spruce, 

planed ..... 2.65 

Eager & Rand, 16 gallons of oil . 2.08 

Eager & Rand, 50 gallons of oil . 6.50 

Eager & Rand, i box of salt . .20 

Eager & Rand, 15 gallons of oil . 1.95 

Eager & Rand, tallow . . . 3.25 

Eager & Rand, soap . . . .15 

Eager &^Rand, 5 gallons of oil . .65 

Eager &: Rand, 2 dozen *»vicks . .20 
Thomas L. Thorpe, 50 lbs. No. i 

cop waste .... 5.00 
Head & Dowst, for 442 loads of 

gravel ..... 93-7° 

Head (S: Dowst, 2 loads of stone . 3.50 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



421 



Paid F. S. Bodwell, i stone hitching 

post ..... 

Joseph A. Poor, 40 loads of gravel 

Horace Willey, labor and gravel 

in widening highway 
Addison Gray, 511 loads of gravel 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 510 
feet spruce at ^17 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . 



$9-5° 
4.00 

15.00 
51.10 

8.67 



;2io.6o 



. $11,807.87 
252.13 

Si2,o6o.oo 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 4- 



Appropriation raised by tax 



EXPENDITURES. 




PAY-ROLL. 




Paid R. N. Whittemore, team, etc.. 


$415-75 


Ira Moore 


3.00 


J. Burgess 


42.75 


William Buckley .... 


3.00 


Byron Moore .... 


10.00 


W. Burgess 


15.00 


C. C. Webster, team, etc. 


8.00 


Edward R. Wood 


2.25 


Total expenditure .... 


$499-75 


Balance 


•25 



500.00 



422 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 5. 
Appropriation raised by tax .... 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid labor of men and teams as per pay- 




roll 


$6.50 


Mark E. Harvey, superintendent . 


70.50 


Frank Platts 


2.25 


E. R. Hill .... 


8.63 


Shirley Merrill 


3.00 


W. P. Merrill .... 


1.50 


Oliver Merrill 


13.12 


John Kearns 


3.00 


Mrs. Mary Cressey 


7-5° 


W. W. Dickey . 


7-50 


E. S. Harvey 


1.50 


Timothy Kearns . 


57-76 


Henry Golden 


S0.25 


Charles Pierce 


3-75 


Charles Wheeler, as per pay-roll 


6.00 


TEAMS. 




Paid labor of teams, as per pay-roll 


$5.00 


Mark E. Harvey, superintendent 


1 16.00 


W. W. Dickey . 


41.00 


C. N. Harvey 


6.00 


E. S. Harvey 


•75 


BRIDGES. 





Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Company, 
32 feet spruce joist at ^17 . 



$272.76 



168.75 



^o-54 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 6. 423 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Company, 

939 feet hemlock plank at $14 . $^3.15 

J. B. Varick Company, 10 pounds 

6-penny nails .... .30 

$13-99 



Paid Libbey Brothers. 53 loads of gravel $5 -3° 

Libbey Brothers, 10 loads of gravel 1.00 

Charles Wheeler, 21 loads of gravel 2. 10 

Charles Wheeler, 68 loads of gravel 6.80 
Mark E. Harvey, 103 loads of 

gravel . . . . . 10-30 

25.50 



Paid J. B. Varick Company, i Doe cut- 
ter point . . . . . $0.65 

J. B. Varick Company, i pick- 
handle ..... .20 

R. W. Flanders, blacksmithing . 4.90 



5-75 



Total expenditures ..... ^486.75 

Balance transferred to reserved fund . . . 13-25 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NUMBER 6. 
Appropriation raised by tax .... 

EXPENDITURES. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

A. J. Peaslee, superintendent . $107.00 
Fred L. Peaslee . . . . 29.60 



424 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



id Fred Keniston 








^4-88 


Greenleaf Coleman 






13.00 


I. T. Webster 






7.S7 


E. J. Matott 








9.00 


F. L. Blaisdell . 








54-76 


Bert Webster 








6.3S 


John Emerson 








8.63 


Jonas Tirrell 








7-13 


Peter Matott 








7.12 


H. Corning 








7-87 


Peter CuUom 








1.50 


A. CuUom . 








1.50 


James Lynch 








1.50 


Ely Gilbert . 








1.50 



$269.34 



TEAMS. 



Paid for teams, as per pay-roll 
Fred I^. Peaslee . 
D. H. Dickey 
Greenleaf Coleman 
John S. Webster . 
I. T. Webster 
David Dickey 



^30-75 
73-5° 
22.00 
32.00 
34.00 
28.31 
5-25 



225.81 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Varick Company, for i 

Doe plow point, No. 3 

James Morrison, sharpening picks 

J. S. Webster, covering-stone for 

culvert ..... 



Total expenditure 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$o-55 
1.60 

1.50 



3-65 

^498.80 
1.20 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 425 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NUMBER 7. 

Appropriation rai'^ed by tax .... $1,300.00 

Transferred from reserved fund . . . . S.03 



^1,308.03 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, January .... 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, February 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, March .... 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, April .... 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, May .... 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, June .... 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, July .... 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, August . . . 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, September 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, October .... 

labor of men and teams, as per pay- 
rolls, November 



Paid Head & Dowst, 257 feet spruce 

boards $4-ii 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., 2 Doe E No. 

5 plow-points . . . $i-4o 



51-87 




72.24 




425-7.5 




I84.II 




294.69 




6.00 




"5-99 




19.50 




31.00 




15-50 


^1-238.77 



426 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. B. Varick Co., 2 Doe E No. 5 

plow-points . . . . $1-40 

J. B. Varick Co., ^ dozen pick- 
handles . . . . . T.OO 
J. B. Varick Co., i barrow . . 2.00 
J. B. Varick Co., 3 lanterns with 

ruby globes . . . . 3.00 

J. B. Varick Co., 2 ruby globes . 1.50 

Killey «S: Wadleigh, i cesspool 

scoop ..... .85 



III. 15 



Paid Charles Still, 22 loads of paving- 
stone ..... $33-oo 
F. S. Bodwell, I load covering- 
stone ..... 3.00 

^36.00 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid Welcome & Son, for blacksmithing $16.50 $16.50 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 6 pounds 10- 

penny nails .... $0-15 

T. A. Lane, 4 heavy dippers . .80 

T. A. Lane, lo-foot chain . . .20 

T. A. Lane, 3.7 feet J inch E. pipe .25 

T. A. Lane, cutting . . . .10 

$1-50 

Total expenditures ..... $1,308.03 
HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 8. 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation raised by tax . ... $800.00 

From Samuel G. Reed, overdraft .... i.oo 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



427 



EXPENDITURES 




LABOR OF MEN AND TEAMS, LEVI J. PROCTOR, SUPER 'N 


Paid Levi J. Proctor, superintendent 


$168.50 


Samuel McDonald 


37.12 


Robert I. Stevens 




1.50 


Charles E. Richardson . 




10.50 


J. H. Proctor 




38.25 


George W. Lawrence 




3.00 


A. J. Haselton 




75.00 


John Shea . 




4-5° 


Charles Spofford . 




25.12 


Elmer Reed 




46.87 


George Davis 




10.12 


John Foley . 




5.62 


Dennis Shea 




12.75 


George Spofford . 




10.12 


James M. Crombie 




12.00 


Willie Clancy 




12.00 


Benjamin P. Kemell 




1.50 


TEAMS. 




Paid Levi J. Proctor, supt. . 


$177.00 


George Smith 


23.00 


Amos LaTouch .... 


59.00 


S. G. Reed .... 


8.00 


J. H. Proctor 




35'Oo 



Manchester Hardware Co., i E 4 

plow-point .... 

Manchester Hardware Co., i E 4 

plow-point, with cutter 
Manchester Hardware Co., 2 round 

pointed shovels 
Manchester Hardware Co., 2 steel 

rakes ..... 



.70 

.90 

1.86 

1.30 



$474-47 



428 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., i E 4 

plow-point .... $0.70 

Manchester Hardware Co., i E 4 

plow point, with cutter . . .90 

J. B. Varick Co., 2 bush scythes . 1.20 

J. B. Varick Co., 2 14-tooth steel 

rakes ..... .80 

BLACKSMITHING AND SUNDRIES. 

Paid H. F. Thompson, sharpening drills, 

picks, etc. .... ^5'2o 

Head & Dowst, 50 feet drag plank 2.00 

J. B. Varick Co., 20 4)4 x }4 inch 

carriage bolts .... .70 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund . . . . 



110.36 



$7.90 

792-73 
8.27 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 9. 



Appropriation raised by tax . 
Amount transferred from bridges 



500.00 
72.79 





EXPENDITURES. 




• 


LABOR OF MEN. 




Paid Alfred Boyce 




$123.00 


* N. W. Paige 




7.00 


E. Corning 




55-11 


L. C. Paige 




2.25 


G. W. Carr 




9.00 


Oliver Merrill 




35-62 



172-79 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 9. 



429 



Paid Luther Healey . 




^24-37 


William Carr 




5.62 


Wesley Platts 




6.75 


George McQueston 




16.50 


Mrs. Rebecca Garmon 




5-25 


George Dunbar . 




2.50 


LABOR OF 


TEAMS. 




Paid Alfred Boyce 




$137.62 


G. W. Carr 




8.15 


William Carr 




4-05 


Mrs. Rebecca Garmon . 




3-75 


George Dunbar . 




2.50 



1292.97 



$156.07 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co. for i ax 
Manchester Hardware Co. for i 

mattock and handle 
Manchester Hardware Co. for 2 

round-point shovels . 



$0.38 

.90 

1.86 



.14 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 5,198 
feet 3-in. hemlock for bridge 
Manchester Hardware Co., 2 kegs 

6-penny cut spikes . 
Manchester Hardware Co., barbed 
wire, etc. .... 



Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



2.77 




4.20 




7.66 






$84.63 




$536-81 




3598 



172-79 



430 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. lo. 

Appropriation raised by tax 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



^3,300.00 
57-OI 

$3,357-01 





EXPENDITURES 






LABOR OF MEN AND TEAMS. 




Paid pay-roll, labor of 


men and teams : 






for January 




^64.00 




for February 








124.65 




for March 








207.88 




for x\pril 








296.00 




for May . 








447-31 




for June . 








637.81 




for July . 








726,50 




for August 








253-64 




for September . 








184.53 




for November 








29.50 




for December . 








7113 


$3,042.95 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 6 snow 

shovels $1-50 

Manchester Hardware Co., 9 street 

hoes ...... 4.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., i dozen 

sledge handles .... .75 

Manchester Hardware Co., 4 canal 

barrows ..... 10.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., tools . 8.07 

Killey & Wadleigh, 6 scoop han- 
dles 2.38 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 431 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, i bent fork 

handle $o-i5 

Killey & Wadleigh, i8 hoe handles 3.75 
Killey & Wadleigh, 18 Harvey's 

picks ..... 19-50 

Killey & Wadleigh, 4 brooms . 2.17 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 brooms . i.oo 
Killey & Wadleigh, i cesspool 

scoop ..... .75 

Killey & Wadleigh, i dozen square- 
pointed shovels . . . 10.00 
Killey & Wadleigh, i padlock . .90 
Killey & Wadleigh, i saw . . 2.00 
J. Stickney, 2 oil suits at $2.25 . 4.50 
J. Stickney, 2 rubber hats, at $0.75 1.50 
A. N. Clapp, 2 ax handles . . .40 
A. N. Clapp, I pail ... .10 

A. N. Clapp, I ax . . . .90 

A. N. Clapp, 2 pails ... .60 

D. F. Cressey, i snow plow . . 5.00 
George L.- Robinson, i pair pure 

gum rubber boots . . . 3.25 



^83.67 



LUMBER, STONE, ETC. 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 2,231 

feet spruce plank at $17 . . ^37-93 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 1,053 

feet spruce plank at $17 . . i7-9o 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 214 

feet spruce boards, i x 8 at $17 . 3.64 

Thomas Holbrook, for 2 So loads 

of gravel at 15 cents . . 42.00 

D. F. Cressey, for sharpening 

picks, etc. .... 7.40 

A. C. Wallace, 1,120 feet 3-in. 

hemlock plank, at $14 . . 15.68 



432 REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. K. McQueston, 50 loads of 

gravel . . . . . $5-oo 

Head &: Dowst, 194 loads of 

gravel ..... 19.40 

George W. Riddle, 84 loads of clay 

at 17 cents .... 14.28 



SUNDRIES. 



$16 



Paid People's Gas-Light Company . ^4-28 
T. A. Lane, for 12 feet suction 

hose, putting on couplings . 21.75 
Manchester Hardware Co., 3 E 

No. 3 plow points . . . i.So 
Manchester Hardware Co., i No. 5 

plow clevis .... .65 

P. Duval, for filing 6 saws . . 1.20 

J. F. Wyman, wood and coal . i.voo 
Temple &: Farrington Co., pens 

and ink ..... i9-74 

A. N. Clapp, 25 pounds spikes . .80 

A. N. Clapp, I gallon of oil . .15 

A. N. Clapp, nails, sandpaper, etc. .39 

A. N. Clapp, 2 gallons of oil . .30 

A. N. Clapp, 20 spikes . . .60 

A. N. Clapp, I gallon of oil . .15 

Charles S. Fisher, 3 keys . . .35 



J---3 



§67.16 
Total expenditures ... . . $3,357-oi 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 11. 

Appropriation raised by tax . .... §i,oco.oo 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . . 75 00 

$1,075.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



433 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January ..... $62.75 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

December 



BLACKSMITHING. 



Paid G. R. Person, sharpening picks 

Joseph Greenwood, sharpening 
picks ..... 



42.25 
62.75 
89. 00 

159-75 
428.00 

81.50 

6-75 

72.25 



1:6.30 
3-25 



11,005.00 



■55 



Paid Head & Dowst, 300 feet spruce 

plank ..... 

C. H. Hutchinson, i grate, 98 lbs. 

at 3 cents ..... 

Pettee & Adams, i bbl. N. cement 

David Wells, 40 chestnut posts at 

15 cents ..... 



2.94 

1-45 

6.00 



$15-49 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 6 

shovels ..... 

Manchester Hardware Co., 2 steel 

rakes ..... 

Manchester Hardware Co., 4 picks 

28 



1.25 
4.60 



434 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 4 pick 

handles ..... ^0.67 

Manchester Hardware Co., 2 red 

lantern globes .... .67 

Manchester Hardware Co., 6 extra 

pick handles .... i.oo 

Manchester Hardware Co., 4 red 

lantern globes .... 1.34 

Manchester Hardware Co., 6 round- 
point shovels .... 5.58 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

No. 8 landside D. on plow . 1.15 

Manchester Hardware Co., for i 

No. 8 in. coulter . . . 2.75 

J. B. Varick Co., for 2 stone pick- 
ers . . . . . . 1.20 

J. B. Varick Co., for 3 street 
brooms ..... 

J. B. Varick Co., 6 pick handles . 

J. B. Varick Co., 6 contractor's 
picks ..... 

J. B. Varick Co., 6 pick handles 

Total expenditures 
Transferred to reserved fund 



1-25 




1.00 




5.00 




1.00 






$34-46 






$1,064.50 


• ■ • 


10.50 



51,075.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 12. 

Appropriation raised by tax .... . $300.00 

EXPENDITURES. 
LABOR. 

Paid city farm $ 193-75 

George Greeley .... 5.25 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 435 

Paid Melvin Hall .... $8.00 

E. Kendall 5.25 

Michael Lowe .... 9.50 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 40 

hours' labor on road fence . 16.00 

^237.75 



Paid J. H. Colburn and team . . ^16.00 

James Nutt and team . . . 16.00 

John Proctor and team . . 11.00 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 237 

lbs. of iron, on r'd fence . . ^10. 11 

Manchester Hardware Co., 3 dozen 

42 X 7-16 carriage bolts . . .09 

John Moss, use of watering trough 

for 1889 and 1890 . . . 6.00 

Palmer & Garmon, brimstone, and 

labor on fence . . . . 2.85 



$43.00 



^19.05 

Total expenditures .... . $299.80 

Balance transferred to reserved fund . . . .20 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT No. 13. 
Appropriation raised by tax ... . $200.00 

EXPENDITURES. 
LABOR. 

Paid J. H. Campbell . . . . $22.00 

F. Jewell . . . . . 32.25 



436 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. Jewell $30. 75 

A. Jewell . . . . . 17-25 

L. Campbell .... 3.75 

Eben Carr .... 1.50 



Paid H. Willey 


$10.00 


L. Campbell .... 


28.00 


A. B. Campbell .... 


8.00 


Mrs. J. P. Fellows 


20.25 


GRAVEL. 




Paid H. Willey & Co., gravel 


$11.00 


H. Willey & Co., stone 


2.00 


Wm. Campbell .... 


7.40 



EXPENDITURES. 



$107.50 



$66.25 



$20.40 

Total expenditures .... . $194.15 

Transferred to reserved fund . . . . - 5-85 



$200.00 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 

Appropriation raised by tax ... . $9,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . 75-6i 



,075.61 



Paid labor of men and teams, per pay-rolls, District No. 2 : 
January ..... $278.49 
February .... 302.42 

March . . . . . 218.79 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



437 



April 




$703-15 


May 




1,610.85 


June 




i»i33-37 


July 




602.92 


August 




286.00 


September 




534.49 


October . 




479-75 


November 




312.86 


December 


md teams, per pay-roll, 


5.00 


Paid labor of men i 


District 


April 


. 


175.00 


August 


. 


75.00 


October . 


. 


191.00 


Paid labor of men 


and teams, per pay- 




roll, district No. lo . 


829.18 



5,468.09 



George Whitford, building Beau- 
port street on contract 

Walter Neal, labor of self and four 
men on fence .... 

Marshall & Underbill, stone work 
and filling, as per contract with 
Mayor and committee on streets 



26.00 



150.00 



$1,270.18 



$676.00 



Paid J. Hadlock, road-machine . . $258.00 
Manchester Hardware Co., i dozen 

sledge handles ... 2.25 

Manchester Hardware Co., i dozen 

square-point shovels . . . n-iS 

Manchester Hardware Co., i black 

C. wrench .... .69 

Manchester Hardware Co., 2 E. 

No. 5 Doe plow points . . 1.50 



438 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 3 E. 

No. 5 Doe plow-points . . $2.25 

Killey & Wadleigh, i 15-inch 

Goes screw wrench . . . i.oo 

Killey & Wadleigh, i padlock . .20 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 2-galloncans .80 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 dozen pick 

handles ..... 2.50 

J. B. Varick Co., i dozen D. han- 
dles, round-point shovels . 8.00 
J. B. Varick Co., i E. No. 8 plow 18.00 
J. B. Varick Co., i plow handle . .75 
J. B. Varick Co., 6 No. 8 plow- 
points . . . . . 5.70 

J. B. Varick Co., 2 mattocks . 1.50 

J. B. Varick Co., i pair dividers .40 

J. B. Varick Co., 2 mattocks and 

2 handles .... 2.24 

J. B. Varick Co., 4J gallons ker- 
osene oil . . . . .54 

J. B. Varick Co., round iron steel 

nails, etc. . . . . .31 

J. B. Varick Co., 11 pounds Oct. 

cast steel . . . . 1.65 

J. B. Varick Co., i saw blade . .75 

J. B. Varick Co., i Doe E. No. 

8 moldboard .... 4.80 

J. B. Varick Co., i Doe E. No. 8 

plow-point .... .90 

J. B. Varick Co., 

plow-points 
J. B. Varick Co. 
point shovels . 
A. N. Clapp, for tools 



2 Doe E. No. 5 






1.50 


, 6 Ames round- 






4.00 


ools . 


3.22 



$334- 60 



NEW HIGHAVAYS. 439 



EXPLOSIVES. 



id Killey & Wadleigh, i roll blast- 




ing wire ..... 


^0.50 


Killey & Wadleigh, 9 pounds of 




powder ..... 


1-35 


Killey & Wadleigh, 150 plat, fuse 


7-3° 


Killey & Wadleigh, 4 pounds blast- 




ing powder .... 


.60 


Killey & Wadleigh, 25 feet fuse . 


•i.S 


Killey & Wadleigh, 100 pounds 




No. I forcite .... 


45.00 


Killey & Wadleigh, 100 pounds 




No. I forcite .... 


45.00 


Killey & Wadleigh, forcite, powder. 




and fuse .... 


90.12 


Killey & Wadleigh, 125 pounds 




powder 


1.88 


Killey & Wadleigh, 100 feet W. 




P. fuse 


.60 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., i pair 

hinges and screws, . . . $0.10 

Manchester Hardware Co., i hinge, 

hasp, and screws . . . .10 

Killey & Wadleigh, 5 pounds of 

waste ..... .50 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 gallons lard 

oil ..... . 1.50 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 gallons ker- 
osene oil .24 

Killey & Wadleigh, i gallon ker- 
osene oil . . . . . .14 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 gallons ker- 
osene oil . . . . . .24 



$192.50 



440 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 2 gallons ker- 
osene oil .... $0.24 

Killey & Wadleigh, for i^ pounds 

Eagle packing .... .79 

J. B. Varick Co., 35 pounds Oct. 

cast steel . . . . . 5.25 

J. B. Varick Co., 2 gallons ker- 
osene oil .... .36 

J. B. Varick Co., 2 gallons ker- 
osene oil .... .24 

A. N. Clapp, for oil . . . 3.03 



REPAIRS. 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 66J 

hours' labor on road rollei . ^26.60 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 9 

pounds Norway iron . . .39 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., repair- 
ing copper tube . . . 1.75 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 48 

feet lumber, pointed . . 1.20 

Thomas A. Lane, i gauge glass and 

4 packings . . . . .27 

Thomas A. Lane, 12 feet, 2-inch 
canvas hose, for steam drill . 5.40 

Thomas A. Lane, labor, etc. . 1.98 

Thomas A. Lane, 5 pounds sheet 

rubber ..... 2.00 

9^ pounds fine marline . . 1.73 

Thomas A. Lane, 25 feet 6-inch 

ply steam hose . . . 17.00 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on hose 

and winding .... 7.15 

Thomas A. Lane, pipe, nips, 

valves, etc. . . . . 5.74 

George W. Rief, lumber, nails, 

and labor .... 3.23 



$12.73 



$74-44 



DAMAGES FOR LAND TAKEN FOR HIGHWAYS. 441 



Paid Concord Railroad, freight on steel 

edges . . . . . $0.25 

Concord Railroad, freight on road 

scraper ..... 6.66 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

on spindle . . . . .55 



;7.46 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid J. Tremblay, sharpening drills, etc. ^7-4o 

N. Decoteau, sharpening drills, etc. 4.55 
G. H. Booth, sharpening picks, 

etc. ..... 4- 20 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools, 

etc 23.46 



$39.61 



Total expenditures ..... ^9,075.61 



DAMAGES FOR LAND TAKEN FOR HIGHWAYS. 
Appropriation raised by tax ..... $1,000. 

EXPENDITURES. 
DAMAGES AWARDED BY MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Paid Daniel Fogg, land damage on 

River road, Anioskeag village $9-33 

William Stearns, land damage on 

River road, Amoskeag village 22.50 

Hiram Stearns, land damage on 

River road, Amoskeag village 8.88 

Martha Stearns, land damage on 

River road, Amoskeag village 18.06 



442 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Ruth Stearns, land damage on 

River road, Amoskeag village ^40.83 

Clarence Stearns, land damage on 

River road, Amoskeag village 23.25 

Mrs. Welch, land damage on River 

road, Amoskeag village . . 36-37 

James M. Webber, land damage on 

River road, Amoskeag village 48-94 

Henry Sachs, for land damage . 500.00 



^708.16 



Paid Charles N. Heald for land, as per 
deed of August 15, 1890 . 
Charles P. Cummings, for land 
deeded to city, August 21, 1890, 
and for release of same date 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$100.00 



50.00 



$150.00 

$858.16 
141.84 

$1,000.00 



WATERING STREETS. 



Appropriation raised by tax 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



17,500.00 
93.00 



EXPENDITURES. 
LABOR OF MEN AND TEAMS. 



Paid labor, as per pay-roll, district 
No. 2, April 



$170.00 



1,593-00 



WATERING STREETS. 



443 



Paid labor, as per pay-roll, district No. 2, 

May .... 

labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

2, June .... 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

2, July .... 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

2, August 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

2, September ... 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

2, October 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

2, November . 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

2, December ... 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

10, April .... 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

10, May .... 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

10, June .... 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

10, July .... 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

10, August 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

10, September . 
labor, as per pay-roll, district No 

10, October 



^193.98 

232.00 

840.99 

487.50 

341-25 

71-37 

III. 38 

99.62 

32.00 

68.00 

130.00 

252.00 

247.00 

157.00 



,444.09 



Paid Manchester Water-Works, for water 

for April ..... 

Manchester Water-Works, for water 

for June ..... 



720.00 



444 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Manchester Water-Works, for water 

for September .... ^700.00 

Manchester Water-Works . . 265.50 

Manchester Water-Works . . 700.00 

REPAIRS. 

Paid T. A. Lane, labor on fountain, 

Dean avenue .... $0.60 

T. A. Lane, i coupling and labor, 

watering troughs . . . 1.16 

T. A, Lane, labor on stand-pipes 

in April ..... 9.00 

T. A. Lane, labor and materials on 

watering troughs, May . . 2.89 

T. A. Lane, labor and materials, 

watering troughs and fountains 13-68 

T. A. Lane, labor and materials, 

stand-pipes .... 12.89 

T. A. Lane, labor and materials, 
stand-pipe, Parker street, dis- 
trict 10 .... . 16.47 

T. A. Lane, 8 2-inch globe valves, 

district 10 .... 22.74 

T. A. Lane, 2 2-inch globe valves, 

district 10 .... 7.81 

T. A. Lane, labor on stand-pipes, 

district 10 .... 8.25 

T. A. Lane, labor on fountain, dis- 
trict 10 .53 

T. A. Lane, piping, labor and ma- 
terials, Weston & Hill fountain 12.90 

T. A. Lane, labor on trough, at 

Head & Dowst's . . . 1.33 

T. A. Lane, labor on stand-pipe, 

near Gov. Weston's house . .60 

T. A. Lane, labor on stand-pipe, 
Pennacook and Pine, Walnut 
and Harrison .... 2.25 



$3,065.50 



WATERING STREETS. 445 

Paid T. A. Lane, labor on Currier 

fountain $0.40 

T. A. Lane, labor, dippers, pipe, 

etc., on watering troughs . . 11. 81 

T. A. Lane, labor on watering 

trough, South Manchester, etc. 3.19 

T. A. Lane, 2 heavy dippers, etc. .92 

T. A. Lane, labor, hemp packing 

for watering troughs, etc. • 6.21 

T, -A. Lane, labor, plumbing ma- 

erials on watering troughs . 2.38 

T. A. Lane, labor, stand-pipe . 4.10 

T. A. Lane, 4 dippers and labor 

on same . . . . . 1.55 

T. A. Lane, labor and materials 
on troughs and fountains, No- 
vember 5 to 14 . . . 12.24 
T. A. Lane, labor and materials 

in district No. 10, November 8 7.71 

T. A. Lane, labor on fountains, in 

district to .... 1.05 

T. A. Lane, labor and materials 

on troughs and fountains . . ^3-5^ 

L. Wolf, repairs on watering 

troughs, etc 7.70 

■i Manchester Locomotive Works, i 

gate dome, 98 pounds . . 2.94 

Pike & Heald, 10 pounds of cop- 
per, at 30 cents . . . 3.00 
Pike & Heald, 4 pounds of solder, 

at 20 cents .... .80 

Pike & Heald, 3 leather tubes, at 

$2.50 7-5° 

Pike & Heald, 2 days' labor, 2 
men repairing at $5.50, on 
sprinklers .... 11.00 

Pike & Heald, materials and labor 

repairing sprinklers . . . 2.27 



446 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, iron work 
and materials, sprinklers, June 
and July, 1890 . . . $97-58 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, painting 
and lettering sprinklers and 
iron work, etc., on sprinklers, 
April 23.45 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs on 

water cart . . . . 11.22 

John T. Beach, wood tank for 

sprinkler No. 3 . . . 50.00 

John T. Beach, wood frames . 24.00 

John T. Beach, 30 long bolts . 3.00 

John T. Beach, taking off old iron, 
repairing irons and ironing 
tank ..... 55'Oo 

John T. Beach, taking off springs, 

repairing and putting on . . 6.00 

John T. Beach, 2 new tires, re- 
pairing wheels, and tri-bolt . 10.00 

John T. Beach, 76 carriage bolts, 

and 2 bolts, ^-inch . . 4,65 

John T. Beach, repairing 2 neck 

yokes, links, staples, etc. . . 1.25 

John T. Beach, repairing gate 

valves, making connections, etc. 7.00 

John T. Beach, drilling holes in 

axles, and putting in pins . . 1,00 

.John T. Beach, 2 hoops on turret 

and fitting on . . . . 1,00 

John T. Beach, materials and la- 
bor, draw hooks, etc. . . 18.26 

John T. Beach, repairing wood 

and iron work. Monitor No. i . ii'85 

John T. Beach, painting Monitor 

No. I .... . 27.00 

John T. Beach, painting Monitor 

No. 2 .... . 27.00 



PAVING STREETS. 447 

John T. Beach, repairing wood 

and iron work, Monitor No. 2 $10.85 

John T. Beach, other repairs . 10.00 

D. F. Cressey, repairs on water 

cart, district No. 10 . . . 6.25 

G. A. Durgin, mending, painting, 

and varnishing street sprinkler 20,00 

A. FiUon, repairing water cart, 

district No. 10 ... 10.50 

A. Filion, crown for water cart, 

district No. 10 . . . . 1.50 

H. C. Ranno & Son, rubber spring 

and pair straps . . . . 2.10 

A. H. Stark, painting sprinkler . 27.00 



goso.pi 

NEW WATER CARTS. 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, i new water cart, as 

per contract ...... |i4oo.oo 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., i 30-foot wire- 
spring cushion on water cart . . . $2.50 



PAVING STREETS. 

Appropriation raised by tax . . . $5,500.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund i)i33'75 



EXPENDITURES. 
LABOR. 



Total expenditures ..... $7,59300 



>.633-75 



Paid labor of men and teams, per pay-roll. District No. 2 
January ..... $17.00 

March 8.25 

April ..... 164.74 



448 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



May 


$397-54 


June 


269.54 


July . . . 


426.65 


August 


242.24 


September 


427.68 


October . 


320.93 


November 


179-73 


December 


24.50 



$2,478.80 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. lO. 



Paid men and teams, as per pay-rol 


I: 


April .... 


^17.86 


May .... 


39.00 


June .... 


19-15 


July .... 


63.88 


August .... 


143-33 


September 


119.38 


October .... 


232.46 


November 


333-81 


December . . . 


30.00 



$998.87 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Paid men and teams, as per pay-roll . $50.00 
men and teams, as per pay-roll, Oc- 
tober 80.96 



$130.96 



Paid George Rivers, 9 loads of paving- 
stone $14-40 

John B. Clarke, 21 loads of pav- 
ing-stone .... 21.00 

Ebenezer Hartshorn, 45 loads of 

paving-stone .... 27.00 



PAVING STREETS. 449 

Paid J. H. Proctor, i6 loads of paving- 
stone ..... $25.60 

J, L. Fogg, 18 loads of paving- 
stone ..... 18.00 

Josiah Carpenter, 25 loads of pav- 
ing-stone .... 13-00 

P. McQuillan, 67 loads of paving- 
stone ..... 107.20 

Mead & Mason, 12 loads of pav- 
ing-stone .... 18.00 

Charles A. Bailey, 133 feet, at 80 
cents, paving-stone, corner Han- 
over and Chestnut . . . 106.40 

Charles P. Still, 65 loads of pav- 
ing-stone .... 97-50 



29 



450 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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452 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



MACADAMIZING. 

Appropriation raised by tax 
Transferred from reserved fund . 
Transferred from reserved fund . 
Received from Jos. A. Poor (overdraft) 



$18,000.00 

350-78 

2,571-74 

3.00 

$20,925.52 



EXPENDITURES. 
LABOR, DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 
January . 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 



August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



June 
July 
August 
October . 
November 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO 



^73-85 
I 10.84 
201.49 
696.29 

i»58i.77 
1,736.82 
2,288.17 
2,501.50 
2,390.04 
1,314.02 
914.28 
32.62 
$13,841.69 



$8.00 

16.63 

21.00 

269.78 

1,030.20 



^i,345-6i 



Paid D. W. Atwood, 204,380 lbs. of 
stone ..... 



$51-09 



MACADAMIZING. 453 

Paid J. A. Brown, 3,610 lbs. of stone $0.90 

Frank Bodwell, 15 loads of stone 22.50 

George W. Butterfield, 140,130 

lbs. of stone . . . . 35-oi 

E. W. Butterfield, 231,465 lbs. of 

stone ..... 57.84 

D. Butterfield, 247,885 lbs. of 

stone ..... 63.41 

C. E. Buswell, 142,855 lbs. of stone 35- 70 
George F. Barnard, 131,320 lbs. 

of stone ..... 32.82 

J. L. Fogg, 13 loads of stone . 25.27 

J. L. Fogg, 45,210 lbs. of stone . 11.42 

F.'R. French, 64,450 lbs. of stone 16. 11 

E. B. Fellows, 221,335 lbs. of 

stone 55.31 

James Fullerton, 311,080 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 77-77 

Josiah Carpenter, 126 loads of 

stone ..... 37-So 

Cavanaugh Brothers, 4,350 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 1.08 

City farm, 288,800 lbs. of stone . 98.89 

H. Holbrook, 498,170 lbs. of 

stone ..... 124.52 

H. L. Kimball, 449,466 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 1 2 1. 41 

M. Lemaux, 4,560 lbs. of stone . 1.14 

William McDougall, 55,450 lbs. 

of stone ..... 13-85 

George H. Penniman, 885855 lbs. 

of stone . . . . . 22.21 

H. S. Plummer, 184,830 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 46.19 

L. J. Proctor, 19,690 lbs. of stone 4.92 

J. H. Proctor, 37,005 lbs. of stone 9.25 

Palmer & Garmon, 39,880 lbs. of 

stone ..... 9.97 



454 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Palmer & Garmon, 9 hours' work 
cutting stone coping, horse rail- 
road transfer station . . $3- 60 
Palmer & Garmon, 18 loads of 

chips ..... 11.68 

A. Peltier, 87,170 lbs. of stone . 21.79 

Charles H. Robie, 318,880 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 79-71 

F. Sheer, 134,720 lbs. of stone . 33-67 

Jos. Tirrell, 625,330 lbs. of stone 157-95 

H. Willey, 142,685 lbs. of stone 35-67 

C. C. Webster, 37,370 lbs. of stone 9.33 

F. B. Worthley, 362,620 lbs. of 

stone ..... 90.64 

W. Campbell, 105,270 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 26.31 

Mead & Mason, 76,685 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 19-17 

Kennard Brothers, 46 loads of 

stone . . . . . 13-80 

Kennard Brothers, 1,040 lbs. of 

stone ..... 2.51 

F. M. Barnard, 62,500 lbs. of stone 15-62 

L. W. Bartlett, 180,240 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 45 -05 

Warren Harvey, 224,670 lbs. of 

stone . . . . . 32.12 

Warren Harvey, 5 loads of stone 6.25 

Head & Dowst, 94 loads of stone * 47.00 
Joseph A. Poor, 4 loads of stone 

at 25c. ..... 1. 00 

C. H. Tirrell, 109,995 ^bs. of 
stone . . . . . 27.49 

Manchester Street Railway Com- 
pany, 5,470 lbs. of stone . . 1.36 
Marden & Woodbury, 21 loads of 

stone chips, at 75c. . . . ^5-75 



MACADAMIZING. 455 



Paid Addison Gray, 35 loads of stone, 

at 25c. .... 18.75 



Paid Water-Works, water for the crusher, 
etc. ...... 



Paid People's Gas-Light Company, 2 

4-6 chaldrons coke . . . $24.00 

E. P. Johnson Company, coal for 

road-roller and steam-drill . i3-S5 

E. P. Johnson Company, 3 barrels 

Cumberland coal ... 3.75 

E. P. Johnson Company, coal for 

road -roller . . . . 28.80 

E. V. Turcotte, 2 cords of wood 7.00 



CONCRETING. 

Paid Charles H. Robie, 253 gallons of 

pitch, at lie. . . . . $27.83 

Charles H. Robie, labor of 2 men 

one day ..... 4.00 

Charles H. Robie, use of kettle, 
brushes, etc., for 20 days . 2.50 

Charles H. Robie, concrete cross- 
ing, Hanover- and Chestnut, 
26.05 sq. yds., at 75c. . . 19.54 

Charles H. Robie, concrete cross- 
ing, Hanover and Chestnut, 
30.22 yds., at 75c. . . . 22.66 

Charles H. Robie, concreting 
Chestnut street, 930.89 yds., at 
75c 698.17 

Charles H. Robie, work on Merri- 
mack street, 2,100.64 yds., at 
75c 1,575-48 



$1,682.60 



;77.io 



$2,350.18 



456 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXPLOSIVES. 




Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 




400 pounds No. I forcite . 


$180.00 


300 plat, fuse . 






12.00 


300 pounds No. I forcite 






135-00 


100 plat, fuse . 






4.00 


150 pounds forcite . 






67.50 


200 feet plat, fuse . 






8.00 


350 feet plat, fuse . 






14.00 


223 pounds forcite . 






100.35 


Paid J. B. Varick Co., 25 feet yEtnaTuse .89 


25 6-foot fuses 


.89 


TOOLS. 




Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 




2 mattocks ..... 


$2.00 


2 handles .... 


.42 


4 fiber pail covers . 


t.20 


Tools of various kinds 


15.98 


2 dozen 34-inch Hick sledge handles 


4.00 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co : 




I fiber pail .... 


•50 


I fiber pail cover . ... 


•25 


I doz. square-point Ames shovels 


II. 15 


I doz. round-point Ames shovels 


II. 15 


34 pounds steel bars 


2.38 


I 12-inch wrench 


•55 


I 2-foot rule .... 


•15 


[ hammer ..... 


.50 


I screw plate .... 


2-75 


I doz. sledge hammer handles . 


2.00 


Paid J. B. Varick Co. : 




Files and file handles 


.69 


Wheelbarrow trays . 


9.00 


I thermometer .... 


•25 


I steel square . 


. 


. 


.70 



122.63 



MACADAMIZING. 



457 



lid J. B. Varick Co. : 






I pair of dividers 




$0.85 


I spoke shave . 




•25 


I chisel .... 




•37 


I gauge .... 




.62 


I 5-16 Russell Jennings 




•25 


I dozen sledge handles 




2.00 


I mallet .... 




.40 


I paint brush . 




•30 


I oiler .... 




•30 


2 electric axes . 




1.40 


2 handles . . . ' . 




•50 


2 doz. pick handles . 




I. GO 


5 doz. 30-inch sledge hammei 


• handle? 


> 1. 00 


Ax and handle 




•95 


I water pail 




•50 


I dozen sledge handles 




2.00 


I hammer 




.60 


I oil can .... 




.40 


2 pails .... 




.60 


I 8-inch Baxter wrench 




•75 


I engine oiler . 




1.60 


I brass oiler 




■ -5° 


I cast steel bar, 26 pounds 




3-9° 


I 50-foot tape measure 




.60 


I saw set . 




•75 


J dozen sledge handles 




1. 13 


2 dozen 6- pound contractor's 


picks 


20.00 


2 dozen pick handles 


. 


4.00 


lid Chas. H. Hutchinson, one swing 




jaw, 15x9, complete . 


• 


70.00 



1183. 14 



LUxMBER, CASTINGS, AND REPAIRS. 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

2 cyl. ring castings, 33 pounds, at 3^0 ^1.16 
41 hours' labor on same, road-roller 16.40 

3 pounds spring steel ... .75 



458 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 
9 pounds of Babbitt, at 32c 
I pound 5-8 Macb. steel . 
115 pounds 4-inch Mach. steel at 7c 
4 pounds ig-inch Mach. steel . 
542- hours' labor for crusher 
' li inches coupling . 
iT-inch nipple .... 
4 hours' labor on crusher engine 
100 feet ^-inch lacing 
28 feet spruce, P. 4 S. 
50 chestnut posts, city yard 
196 feet spruce plank and joist, ^18 
400 feet spruce plank and joist, ^17 
50 feet sheathing, ^25 
48 feet spruce joist and plank, at 20c 
150 feet sheathing, at 25 cents . 
12 feet spruce joist, P. 4 S. 
2^ pounds machinery steel 

1 tripod weight 

2 pounds rubber packing .• 

I cylinder buffer. No. 3 drill . 

14 hours' labor .... 
250 feet random spruce, at ^11 
700 feet matched spruce, at $16 
362 feet spruce timber, at ^17 
8 feet finish, at ^25 . 
2,000 spruce shingles, at ^2 
128 feet spruce timber, at ^17 
60 feet sheathing, at $25 . 
50 feet random spruce, at ^11 
75 feet matched spruce, at $16 
Y-z M. spruce shingles, at ^2 

II feet long strap furring . 

15 feet finish 

96 feet spruce 3x4, sawed, $17 
^ hour's sawing 



$2.88 

.07 

8.05 

.28 

21.80 

•03 

.02 

1.60 

1-25 
.70 

7-5° 

3-53 

6.80 

1.25 

.96 

3-75 

•30 

.18 

4-50 

•50 

1.60 

5.60 

2-75 

11.20 

6. 1 1 

.20 
4.00 
2.1S 
1.50 

•55 

1.20 

1. 00 

•05 

■Z^ 

1.63 

•30 



MACADAMIZING. 



459 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co 
302 spruce boards and plank 
Cast iron key for crusher . 
Express paid on same 
4 cap screws 
4 feet ^-inch pipe . 
42 feet lo-inch double leather belt 
I pulley, 58 pounds . 

1 P. S. shaft, 12 pounds 

2 i-inch ped. boxes . 
One half pound steel . 
18 pounds boiler plate 
52 hours, labor . 

96^ hours, labor on steam boiler 
I 2-inch flue cleaner 
160 pounds machinery steel 
4 pounds machinery steel . 
Coupling, bushing, etc., etc. 
\y^ pounds Babbitt . 
4 hours' labor, crusher engine 
I hour's labor, crusher engine 

3 brass castings, crusher engine 
2^ hours' labor, crusher engine 
117 feet oak posts, 5x5 

7 hours' labor on wood rolls 
8^ hours' labor on ledge whistle and 

bolts .... 
10 pounds machinery steel, whistle 
and bolts .... 

8 nuts, whistle and bolts . 
395 pounds iron for wheelbarrows 
92 hours' labor . . . 
25 pounds Babbitt on crusher . 
10 pounds machine steel, crusher 
41^ hours' labor on engine 
I hour's labor on crusher . 

9 hours' labor on crusher . 



$5-14 

1-75 

•50 

.20 

.24 

54.18 

2.32 

.72 

2.20 

.04 

i.oS 

20.80 

38.70 

11.20 

.28 
5-74 

.48 
1.60 

.40 
1.05 
1. 00 

2-93 
2.80 

3- 40 

.70 
.21 

11.85 

36.80 

6.25 

.70 

16.70 

.40 

3.60 



460 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

2 3^ -inch gauge cocks . . , ^2.50 

Refined iron, 30 pounds, at 3 cents . .90 

^}4 hours' labor, at 40 cents . , 1.40 

I sheave wheel for hoist [September] 3.50 

Express . . . . , . .^^ 

I new top sheave, for Weston hoist 

[October] ..... 3.50 

Express ...... .55 

Pulley, 12 X 7, 35 pounds, at 4 cents . 1.40 

5 hours' labor on crusher . . . 2.00 
Paid Farrell Found. Machine Co.'s account : 

1 pair 15 X9 plates, 660 pounds . 23.10 
Planing plates ..... 3.00 

2 pairs 15 X 9 plates, 1,359 pounds . 47-5 7 
Planing same ..... 6.00 

Paid Charles H. Hutchinson's account : 

3 glasses, for duffer's oilers . . i.oo 
9 hours' labor drilling shanks on C. . 3.60 
Labor and materials on steam-roller . 12.16 
Labor, ^ hour on safety plug . . .20 
Labor and grates on steam-roller . 6.27 
Labor and materials on steam-roller . 8.80 

Paid Thomas A. Lane's account : 

50 feet ^-inch hose, coupled . . 6.00 

Labor of 2 men . . . . 5.68 

3 globe valves, ^-inch ... 2.25 

Labor on pump . . . . 1.05 

Pipe, fittings, rubber packing, etc. . 5.35 

25 feet 6-ply steam hose, wound . 20.75 

17^ pounds rubber packing . . 4.38 

300 feet 4-ply hose .... 60.00 

Paid T. A. Lane : 

Fittings, pipe, and labor . . . 3.34 

6 10 x-| gauge glasses ... .90 
245 feet i-inch pipe . . . . i4-7o 
Labor ...... 8.25 



MACADAMIZING. 



461 



Paid T. A. Lane : 

19 feet I -inch pipe .... 

20 feet I -inch 4-ply extra hose . 
Fittings ...... 

I injector for steam-drill . 

Labor ...... 

Glass for oiler, gauge-glass, and 4 gas- 
kets 

25 feet i-inch6 ply steam-hose, wound 
labor ...... 

Paid Jere. Hodge, y^ window-sash 

Thos. L. Thorpe, 100 lbs. bagging 

25 lbs. cop-waste 
L. M. Aldrich, filing 2 saws and 

repairing level, etc. . 
J. O. Tremblay, sharpening picks, 
etc. ...... 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Joseph Quirin, Aug. 24, 1889, 10 

lbs. oatmeal 

Eager & Rand, 10 gallons kerosene 

oil . . . . 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 

Oil-can, trays, and chain-wheels 

I No. 3 rocker .... 

3 rocker-pins .... 

Nails, tarred paper, etc. 

3 lbs. tallow .... 
Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

i^ pair 6-inch light hinges 

nails, screws, and barrel-bolts . 

wire nails .... 

Paid J. B. Varick Company's account 

Band-iron, bolts, and washers . 

Screws, bolts, and varnish 

Screws, files, wire nails, bolts, etc. 

Band-iron, steel, washers, etc. 



$1 


14 


5- 


00 


4 


12 


9 


60 


2 


20 




72 


22 


75 




55 




70 



2.50 



6.30 



$0.50 

1.30 

20.85 

I. GO 

1.25 

10.07 

•93 

7-3° 
1.96 

^5-77 
14.46 



^683.03 



462 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



1 Holroye top and die 

2 files ..... 
Band-iron, strap hinges, wire nails,etc 
6 bolts, 2^ X 5-16 . 
Turpentine, car-bolts, and washers 
Bolts, sand-paper, etc. 

Ivory black, chrome yellow, etc. , road 

roller ..... 
2 axe-wedges .... 
Rubber packing, sperm-oil, files, etc 
Oil, wood wedges, etc. 

1 ps. gravel-screen, to order 

2 lbs. wire staples 

5 gallons cylinder oil 
Nails, bolts, turpentine, etc. 
Bolts, lacing, etc. 
Hoop iron, etc. 
15 feet 14-inch Lea belting 
Oil, tallow, copper tacks, etc. 
5 gallons cylinder oil 
Rubber-packing, tarred marline, etc 
5 gallons cylinder oil 
12^ feet leather belting . 
I pint LePage's glue 
Belts, copper tacks, oil, etc. 
Tallow and oil . 
Oil, elevator, bolts, lacing, etc.. 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 2 
hours' labor for city engineer's office 

George W. Rief, i gallon belt- 
dressing . 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 
on castings . . . . 

Pike & Heald, 3 water-dippers 



0.85 
.80 

5-49 

.09 

2.05 

4-25 



.10 

9.67 

5.00 

. 10 

3-75 
3-76 
1.98 

7.22 
13.80 

3-75 
9.27 

3-75 

•77 

•35 

5-33 

7.89 

37-27 

.80 

2.50 

1-54 
•37 



5209.54 



Total expenditures 



$20,925.52 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



463 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Appropriation raised by tax 
Transferred from reserved fund 



^4,000.00 
1,089.86 

1:5,089.86 



EXPENDITURES. 



Labor of men and teams, per pay-roll. District No. 2 
January $743-9^ 



February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



267.20 
263.38 



97 


48 


160. 


.SI 


^36- 


86 


116 


49 


73 


01 


116.68 


184 


86 


5^ 


13 


408.55 



$3,086.06 



Labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, District No. 10 
January . . . . . ^216.39 



February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



132-93 

70.38 
85.62 

97-50 
163.03 
131. 14 
183.00 
185.09 

71.94 
181. 13 
279.25 



11,797.40 



464 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, District No. 7 



June 

September 
October . 



525.00 
21.00 
75.00 



SAND AND GRAVEL. 



Paid E. Hartshorn, 205 loads of gravel ^20.50 

E. Hartshorn, 104 loads of sand 10.40 
Charles H. Robie, 260 loads of 

gravel, sanding sidewalks . 26.00 



$56.90 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 2 dozen No. 2 
steel scoops ..... 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. H. Wiggin, 20 bushels of salt . 
Total expenditures 



^20.00 



•50 



$8.50 
$5,089.86 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 

Appropriation raised by tax 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 



$12,000.00 
3.958-46 

$15,958.46 



EXPENDITURES. 

Labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, District No. 2 : 
January ..... $1,045.88 
February ..... 730.36 

March ..... 1,042.01 
April 1,241.29 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 



465 



May 






$844-63 




June 






791.00 




July 






1,046.75 




August 






786.30 




September 






1,058.79 




October . 






1,010.71 




November 






925-25 




December 






986.38 


$11,509-35 



Labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, District No. 10 : 



February . 








146.63 


March 








152. 88 


April 








226.62 


May 








173.00 


June 








144.24 


July 








180.00 


August 








148.00 


September 








177-50 


October . 








135-95 


November 








141.00 


December 








185-75 



$1,998.11 



ON CONTRACT AS SCAVENGER. 



Paid Timothy Shea, on contract as scav- 
enger, first quarter . . . $1,225.00 
Timothy Shea, contract as scav- 
enger, second quarter . . 1,225.00 



$2,450.00 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, for 2 16-inch 
steel rakes ..... 



Total expenditures 

30 



$15,958.46 



466 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STREET SWEEPING. 



Appropriation raised by tax 
Transferred from reserved fund 



,1,200.00 
37.08 



EXPENDITURES. 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. 2. 



;i,237.oJ 



Paid labor of men and teams as per pay-roll : 


February $57-39 


April 


257.00 


May 


136.23 


June 


234.30 


July 


116.24 


August 


156.81 


September 


54.13 


October . 


81.98 



$1,094.08 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. ID. 



Paid labor of men and teams as per pay-roll : 

April $33-oo 

August 36.00 

November . . . . 36.00 



$105.00 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid S. A. Felton & Son, i revolving 
street scraper, refitted 
Killey & Wadleigh, i dozen street 
brooms ...... 



6.00 



$38.00 



Total expenditures . 



;i, 237.08 



LIGHTING STREETS. 467 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

Appropriation raised by tax ... . $41,000.00 

Transferred from reserved fund ... . 99-64 



$41,099.64 



EXPENDITURES. 
MANCHESTER ELECTRIC LIGHT COMPANY, ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

1890. Charges. Discounts. 

December 25 to January 25, 198, 

31 nights at 40c. . . . $2,639.34 
December 25 to January 25, 49, 

31 nights at 39c. . . . 592-41 ^25.67 

January 25 to February 25, 198, 

31 nights at 43c. . . . 2,639.34 

January 25 to February 25, 49, 

31 nights at 39c. . . . 592.41 

January 25 to February 25, i, 15 

nights at 43c. . . . 6.45 2.15 

February 25 to March 21, 199, 24 

nights at 43c. . . . 2,053.68 

February 25 to March 21, 49, 24 

nights 39c. . . . . 458-64 2.97 

March 21 to April 21, 199, 31 

nights at 43c. . . . 2,652.67 

March 21 to April 21, 49, 31 

nights at 39c. . . . 592.41 .62 

April 21 to May 21, 199, 30 

nights at 43c. . . . 2,567.10 

April 21 to May 21, 49, 30 

nights at 39c. . . . 575-3° i-4i 

May 21 to June 21, 203, 31 

nights at 43c. . . . 2,705.99 

May 21 to June 21, 45, 31 

nights at 39c. . . . 544-05 



468 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

May 21 to June 21,2, i night 

at 39c ^0.78 $1.20 

June 21 to July 21, 203, 30 

nights at 43c. . . . 2,618.70 

June 21 to July 21, 45, 30 

nights at 39c. . . . 526.50 

June 21 to July 21, i, 24 nights 

at 43c- .... 10.32 

June 21 to July 21, 2, i night 

at 39c .78 26.86 

July 21 to August 21, 203, 31 

nights at 43c. . . . 2,705.99 

July 21 to August 21, 46, 31 

nights at 39c. . . . 556.14 

July 21 to August 21, I, 14 

nights at 43c. . . . 6.02 

July 21 to August 21, 2, I night 

at 39c .78 21.50 

August 21 to September 21, 202, 

31 nights at 43c. . . 2,692.66 

August 21 to September 21, 48, 

31 nights at 39c. . . . 580.32 
August 21 to September 2 1, 1,^26 

nights;at43C. . . . ir.i8 

August 21 to September 21, 3, 

I night at 39c. . . . 1.17 10.75 

September 21 to October 21, 

205, 30 nights at 43c. . . 2,644.50 
September 21 to October 21, 47, 

30 nights at 39c. . . . 549.90 44.35 
October 21 to November 21, 

205, 31 nights at 43c. . . 2,732.65 
October 21 to November 21, 47, 

31 nights at 39c. . . . 568.23 
October 21 to November 21,1, 

13 nights at 43c. . . . 5.59 138.23 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



469 



November 21 to December 21, 

207 nights at 43c. 
November 21 to December 21, 

46, 30 nights at 39c. 
November 21 to December 21, 

I, 10 nights at 39c. 



Total discounts deductedj 
Net exj)eaditures 



$2,670.30 



538-20 



3.90 $18.52 



,042.40 $294.23 
294.23 



$37,748.17 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for gas : 




December . . . . 


$128.66 


January . . . . . 


120.54 


February . . . . 


103.46 


March . . . . . 


104.02 


April ^ . . . 


94-36 


May .... 


81.06 


June .... 


73-78 


July .... 


70.28 


August .... 


82.46 


September 


91.70 


October .... 


112.00 


November 


115-50 



CARE OF GAS-LIGHTS. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., lighting, extinguish- 
ing, care of 141 street lights : 

28 nights, December . . . $150.70 



January 
February 
March . 
April . 
May 
June 



152-85 
149.83 

154-30 
148.93 

154-03 
146.97 



;i, 177-82 



470 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



July . 
August . 
September 
October 
November 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 
Oil, whisky, matches, etc. . 
3 barrels of oil . 
2 boxes of glass 
I -gallon kerosene oil can . 
^-gallon kerosene oil can 

2 I -gallon whisky cans 
Cash paid C. H. Hutchinson, red 

lanterns .... 

Labor on lanterns [Lane] 
Changing posts, 3 men i day . 
Use of team i day 
Setting lantern frames on posts [Lane 

y2 day] .... 

Use of team ^ day . 
I gallon of whisky . 

3 barrels of kerosene oil . 
Paid C. H. Hutchinson 
10 hours' labor on oil lights 

4 barrels kerosene oil 
Repairing lanterns [Hutchinson] 
y^ gallon sperm oil . 
Setting gas post, West Appleton street 
Labor on oil lights . 
Removing gas post, Hanover street 
Labor on oil lights . 
Changed lamp post. Granite street 
8 barrels of oil . 
12 sheets tin for lanterns, xxxx . 



$i43'83 
158.16 
148.62 
165.16 
142.61 



^30.36 

15-49 

4-95 

•50 

•25 
2.00 

9-57 
4.00 
8.50 
3.00 

2.00 
1.50 
1.40 

15-95 
.66 

2.50 

20.40 

2.20 

•50 
3.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1. 00 

3-45 
38.60 

3-84 



$1,815.99 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



471 



^ box 12x14 glS'SS • • • • ^1-38 

12 sheets XXX tin for lanterns . . 1.56 

2 street-lighting torches . . . 8.00 

Express on same . . . . .15 

I 5 -gallon kerosene oil can . . 1.25 

Repairing oil lights, Candia road . 3.50 

Repairing oil lights, Amoskeag road 1.50 
Removing lamp post, Hanover and 

Cnestnut streets . . . . 1.40 

Setting 3 oil lights, River road . 2.90 

Repairing lanterns .... 3.00 

Repairing oil lights, Candia road . 4.00 

Repairing lanterns . . . . 1.50 

Removing lamp post, Chestnut street 3.00 

8 barrels kerosene oil . . . 39- 1 3 

Paid Eager & Rand, matches . . 4.99 

I gallon whisky . . . . 1.40 
Paid Nathan A. Sleeper, setting glass, 
last six months in 1889 and for 

the year 1890 .... 3.55 
Clark M. Bailey, for 49^^ dozen 

burners and chimneys . . 57-5o 

Clark M. Bailey, for wicks . . . 2.65 
J. B. Varick Co., i oil can, 6 

pounds cotton waste . . . 1.60 
Clark M. Bailey, burners, chim- 
neys, and wicks . . . 33-75 
Thomas A. Eane, labor on lanterns .83 

Total expenditures ..... 
BRIDGES. 

Appropriation raised by tax .... 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from Henry Buldec, for old 

plank .... $30.00 



$357-66 
^i, 099. 64 



L, 000.00 



472 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Received from Louis Dandoin, for old 

plank .... $2.50 

from L. B. Bodwell & Co., 

old plank . . . . 20.35 

fromW. J. Freeman, old plank 3.75 

from Timothy Shea, old plank 47.00 

from Peter Riley, old plank . 2.50 

from Joseph Nichols, old 

plank .... 2.40 

Received from J. N. Chase, for chopping 

block, etc, . . . ^8.45 

from Head & Dowst, for old 

plank . . . . 16.43 

from Jos. Tirrell, for old plank 3- 00 

from Mark E. Harvey, for old 

plank . . . . 2.50 

from Amoskeag Manuf. Co., 
Yi expense painting McGre- 
gor bridge .... 295.21 



EXPENDITURES. 



February 
March . 
April 
May 
June 

July 

September 
October . 
December 



Paid labor of men and team 
May 
June 



90.24 
102. 12 

55-3° 
23-75 
38.25 
22.00 

M-37 
103-50 
233-47 



$434-09 



.434-09 



Paid labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, District No. 2 
January . . . . . ^32.00 



, per pay-roll, District No. 5 : 

. . . S0.88 

.50 



$715.00 



LIGHTING STREETS. 473 

July . . . . ' . ^4-75 

November . . . . 4.62 

$10.75 

Paid labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, District No. 7 : 

May $21.00 

August . . . . . 20.00 

$41.00 

Paid labor of men and teams, per pay roll, District No. 10: 
June . . . . . ^2.00 

August 35.00 

$37.00 



Paid J. M. Crawford, sched. for com- 
mittee on streets, McGregor 
bridge, 1889 .... $5.00 

W, Neal, labor of self and 4 men . 274.91 

W. Neal, 14^^ days' labor of team, 

Amo.skeag bridge . . . 21.75 

W. Neal, labor, etc., on Granite 

bridge . . . . . 123.25 

W. Neal, labor, etc., on Canal 

bridge . . . . . 117.00 



Paid A. C. Wallace, 222 feet oak, 

3 X 6, $22^ . . . $4.99 

A. C. Wallace, 6,7 1 7 feet oak plank, 

3-i"ch 151-13 

A.J. Sawyer, 53,510 feet 3-inch 

hemlock plank, $11.70 . . 626.06 

A. J. Sawyer, 2,412 feet hemlock 

plank, 3-inch . . . . 28.22 

A. J. Sawyer, 10,281 feet hemlock 

plank, 3-inch, $11.70 . . 120.28 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

36 feet of spruce at $17 . . . .91 



|i54i-9i 



474 



REPORT or THE CITY AUDITOR. 



2,0 1 6 feet of spruce at ^18 

26,748 feet of hemlock at ^14 . 

99 feet of Georgia pine 

I piece strip furring, 16 feet long 

246 feet Georgia pine 3x12 

28 feet spruce, 3x4, sawed 

Yz hours sawing 

1,089 feet hemlock plank, 3-inch, Dist 

5 

Paid M. A. Wason, 22 M. long shingles 
at $4.50 .... 
1,904 feet 2 X 3 joists for Amoskeag 
bridge .... 



^36.29 




374.48 




. 396 




.10 




9.84 




.70 




.20 




15-25 




99.00 
0* 




& 

22.84 






$1,493-95 



Paid National Paint Works, 6 barrels 

Asphaltum paint 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 6 

barrels paint .... 
Western Union Telegraph Co., 

telegram to Williamsport, Pa. . 
J. J. Abbott, painting McGregor 

bridge ..... 
J. J. Abbott, painting canal bridge. 

Bridge street, railroad bridge, 

Parker street 



$204.76 
11-57 

•50 
429. 1 1 

67.40 



$713-34 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid W. Neal, for spikes, etc. . . $i-55 
J. B. Varick Co., 10 pounds 6- 

penny nails .... .30 

J. B. Varick Co., i turn buckle . .63 
J. B. Varick Co., 23 pounds 

6o-penny cut nails ... .69 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



475 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 23 kegs 

6-penny wire spikes . 
Manchester Hardware Co., 66 

pounds 6-penny wire spikes 
Manchester Hardware Co., i broom 
Manchester Hardware Co., i keg 

7-penny wire spikes . 
A. J. Sawyer, trucking hniiber at 

65c 

A. J. Sawyer, trucking old plank . 

A. N. Clapp, keg of nails, $2.75, 6 
pounds spikes, $1.80 

John W. Wilson, trucking 6 bar- 
rels paint .... 

Alphonzo Boyce, lumber, stone, 
labor, etc., as per contract, 
Dist. No. 9 . . . . 

Alphonzo Boyce, culvert in district 
No. 9, pe. contract . 

T. A. Lane, repairing iron braces, 
McGregor bridge 

T. A. Lane, 1 2 pounds Norway iron, 
22 hours labor 

Killey & Wadleigh, nails, washers, 
zinc, etc. .... 

Total expenditures . 



$68.50 



1.88 
•45 



25 

00 

55 



34 

24 



150.00 

10.00 

3.00 

IO-55 
11.60 



$326.73 
5,879.68 



TRANSFERS. 



Amount transferred to district No. 9 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 

Balance .... 



$72.79 
480.72 



;3-5i 
.90 



.434.09 



476 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY TEAMS. 
Appropriation raised by tax 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from team labor . . . . 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred from incidental expenses 



,2,500.00 



2,700.69 



477.61 











^5^678.30 


EXPENDITURES. 


id labor of men and teams, per pay roll, District No. 2 : 


January . 


$191.50 


February 






155 


12 


March 






190 


37 


April 






256 


87 


May 






85 


88 


June 






88 


3S 


July . . 






94 


50 


August . 






63 


00 


September 






104 


43 


October . 






81 


50 


November 






74 


38 


December 






199 


37 



^1,585-30 



OATS, CORN, FEED, HAY, STRAW. 



Paid Pettee & Adams : 




315 bags of oats 


1^283.59 


29 bags of corn 


28.43 


4 bags of feed .... 


3.60 


170 pounds of bran . 


2.04 


4 bags of feed .... 


3.68 


2 bags of feed .... 


1.84 


8 bags of feed .... 


6.80 



CITY 


TEAMS. 




200 pounds of bran . 




$1.80 


1 4 bags of feed 


. 


12.32 


75 pounds of bran . 




.70 


10 bags of feed 




11-95 


660 pounds of bran . 


. 


7.70 


1,114 pounds of hay 




10.01 


2,109 pounds of hay 




1S.99 


759 pounds of hay . 


. 


6.83 


18 pounds of hay 




1.62 


985 pounds of rye straw . 




9-85 


2,321 pounds of rye straw 




22.18 


2,125 pounds of rye straw 




20. 19 


Paid Leonard Rowe, 2,065 


rounds of 




hay 




17-55 


Leonard Rowe, 4,075 


pounds of 




hay at $17 




34-64 


D. Butterfield, 2,310 


rounds of 




hay at $18 




20.79 


L. Shelters, 324 pounds 


of hay at 




^18 ... 




2.85 


C. D. Welch, 13,695 


rounds of 




hay at ^18 


. 


123.24 


C. D. Welch, 2,180 pounds of hay 




at $18 . . . 




19.62 


Paid City Farm : 






6,785 pounds of hay at $17 




57.66 


5,160 pounds of hay at ^17 




39-42 


6,145 pounds of hay at ^18 




55-3° 


9,655 pounds of hay at $1'] 




82.05 


3,375 pounds of hay at $18 




30-37 


1,096 pounds of hay . 




9-85 


Paid Merrill & Freeman : 






191 bags of oats 




176.21 


22 bags of corn 




24.84 


20 bags of feed 




20.51 


75 pounds of feed 




•75 


2,281 pounds of hay . 




20.53 


3,350 pounds of straw 




33-50 



477 



478 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Partridge Brothers : 




.202 bags of oats . '. . . 


^203-55 


25 bags of corn .... 


28.60 


470 pounds of feed .... 


5-05 


15 bags of feed .... 


16.85 


4,587 pounds of hay 


42.37 


3,131 pounds of straw 


36-37 


Paid J. A. Brown, 1,870 pounds hay . 


14.96 


H. A. Horton, i ton of carrots . 


16.00 


Paid Drake & Parker : 




50 bags of oats .... 


47.00 


I bag of corn ..... 


1.25 


4 bags of feed .... 


4.80 


4 bags of ground feed 


4.80 


150 pounds shorts .... 


1.58 


Paid James W. Nutt, 1,745 pounds hay 


13.96 


Parker R. Brown, 17 bags of oats 


12.24 


Parker R. Brown, 2,079 pounds 




rye straw ..... 


19-75 


BLACKSMITHING. 




Paid J. F. Woodbury, shoeing horses . 


;^2i9.4o 


J. 0. Tremblay, shoeing horses . 


84.40 


HARNESS AND REPAIRS. 




Paid Frederick Allen : 




I can of oleo ..... 


$o-75 


I harness ...... 


65.00 


2 straps 


•75 


Repairing harness, oleo, etc. 


28.80 


I horse cover ..... 


3-75 


2 team collars, ;^io.oo, 3 blankets. 




^6.75 


16.75 


Hame straps, rosettes, repairing har- 




ness, etc 


29.60 



51,694.93 



$303.80 



CITY TEAMS. 479 

Paid N. T- Whalen, repairing, oiling, 

blacking harnesses, etc. . . $36.05 

F. N. McLaren, i blanket . . 4.50 
F. N. McLaren, i rubber horse 

covering ..... 6.25 
F. N. McLaren, reins, repairing 

harness, etc. . . . . i5-S4 

W. H. Adams, repairs on harnesses .95 

$208.69 



REPAIRS ON CARRIAGES. 

Paid John T. Beach, repairs on teams . $107.32 
Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs on 

teams 5.35 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs on 

carriages and materials . . 235.56 



HARDWARE. 



Paid John B. A^arick Co., sandpaper, 

Norway iron, etc. . . . $31.25 

John B. Varick Co., chain, screws, 

staples, snaps, wire nails, etc. . 13-76 

John B. Varick Co., chain, screws, 

staples, snaps, wire nails, etc. . 25.98 

Manchester Hardware Co., chain, 
links, curry comb, brush, bolts, 
sponges ..... 10.96 

Manchester Hardware Co., castile 
soap, whip and socket, curry 
combs, brooms .... 7.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., i 
sponge ..... .40 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 stubble 

brooms ..... .90 

Killey & Wadleigh, butcher knives, 

broom, axes, etc. . . . 8.15 



$348.2: 



$98.90 



480 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



MEDICINES AND MEDICAL SERVICES. 

Paid J. Blakely, V. S., Dec. lo, 1889, 

and March 22, 1890 . . $6 

J. Blakely, V. S., visits and dress- 
ing foot daily and operating on 
grey horse, punctured with gath- 
ered nail ..... 

A. E. Dodge, V. S., 4 visits and 
medicine ..... 

Jabez Alexander, V. S., medical 
services ..... 

D. S. Kimball, 2 sets of bandages, 
I boot ..... 

Ellinwood & Co., i dozen El-a- 
tol, (disinfectant) 

Edward H. Currier, medicine 

Z. F. Campbell, medicines . 

John Holland & Co., prescrip- 
tions in Dec, 1889 . 

Snelling & Woods, medicines 

John Lucy, operation on 6 horses 



35-00 



4-25 



52.00 



4-5° 
4-50 
S-74 

2.50 
2.40 
6.00 



$123.89 



Paid Pettee & Adams, ^ bushel of rock 

salt $0.25 

Drake & Parker, i bag of salt . .75 

Drake & Parker, 3 casks of lime . 3.30 
Manchester Hardware Co., 25 feet 

2-inch rubber hose . . . 2.50 

Eager & Rand, salt and ginger . .50 

Eager & Rand, 2 sugar barrels . .30 

J. Stickney, 4 yards rubber cloth . 2.40 
Head & Dowst, sapling spruce, 

etc 5.79 

Head & Dowst, lumber, etc., city 

yard ..... 18.99 



CITY TEAMS. 481 

Paid Head & Dowst, lumber, etc., city 

stables . . . . . $8-75 

L. N. Westover, lumber, labor, 

etc., on teams .... 25.64 

F. L. Proctor, 7 gallons axle oil . 3.86 

James Kelleher, 5 months' rent of 

stable ..... 20.00 

James Kelleher, 6 months' rent of 

stable to Nov. 30, 1890 . . 28.50 

Wheeler & Rogers, clipping 

horses ..... 2.00 

Pike & Heald, i pail ... .65 

Pike & Heald, stoves, pipe, and 

plumbing at city stables . . 107.44 

Pike & Heald, stoves, pipe, and 
* plumbing at city stables . . 3^-79 

L. M. Aldrich, pipe, blacksmith- 

ing, etc., .... 5.15 

D. H. Maxfield, paid express on 

cutters, road-machine . . .40 

D. H. Maxfield, paid express on 
whififletree springs . . . .40 

E. J.Williams, materials and labor 
on crusher building and steam- 
roller shed . . . . 11-51 

Thomas A. Lane, piping and labor 2.18 

W. H. Vickery, for keys . . 2.05 

E. T. James, horse and wagon from 

July 30 to September 22 . . 23.75 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 150 

feet matched boards . . 2.40 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 18 

feet finished boards . . .45 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 5 bar- 
rels sawdust .... .50 

Clough & Co., I pair steel gray 

horses ..... 550.00 

31 



482 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., telephone, city stables 
Water-Works, water at new stable 

Transferred to reserved fund 



$9-5° 
IO-75 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 
Appropriation raised by tax .... 



RECEIPTS. 

Received from N. H. Rubber Co. (over- 
draft) . . . . 

from A. N. Clapp (overdraft) 

from N. P. Kidder, sewer 
licenses .... 

from C. O. Phelps, sewer pipe 

from water-works, labor on 
sewer .... 

from Richard Dobbins, freight 
and labor. 

from W. H. Plummer for 1800 
brick .... 

from J. B. Varick Co., explo- 
sives returned . 



$8.00 
11.66 

1,013.40 
3-9° 

20.25 
58.05 
14.40 
15.09 



TRANSFERS. 




Transferred from appropriation : 




For reserved fund 


^5,000.00 


For incidental expenses 


2,456.04 


For reserved fund 


5>205.5i 


For reserved fund 


3,854.28 


For reserved fund 


1,891.79 



$882.45 
432.11 

$5>678.3o 



$20,000.00 



$1,144.75 



$18,407.62 



$39652-37 



SEWERS AND DRAINS, 



483 



EXPENDITURES. 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 



January . 








^235.42 


February 




85.06 


March 








• ■ 301-85 


April 








724.96 


May 








1,918.58 


June 








2.037.54 


July 








• 3>482.64 


August . 








2,637.87 


September 








2,437-13 


October . 








1,493.98 


November 








1,181.42 


December 








296.62 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. ID. 

Paid labor of men and teams as per pay-roll : 



January . 


$43.91 


February 


19.44 


March 


60.63 


April 


70.38 


May 


1,396.90 


June 


1,676.81 


July . . . 


2,053.68 


August 


1,845.46 


September 


• 1,783-48 


October . 


842.17 


November 


333-3^ 


December 


27.87 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. 7. 

Paid labor of men and teams as per pay-roll : 

July $62 



62 



1516,833.07 



510,154-11 



)2.62 



484 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Dodge & Straw, 2 pairs men' 




rubber boots 


^4-80 


J. Stickney, 2 pairs pure gum rub 




ber boots 


6.00 


G. W. Dodge, 6 pairs rubber boot 


5 15-30 


H. M. Fletcher, i dozen picks 


8.50 


Pike & Heald, 6 scoops 


4-50 


Paid Killey & Wadleigh's account : 




^ dozen scoop-handles . 


2.38 


2 cesspool scoops 


•75 


6 stable pails .... 


2.75 


I plumb bob .... 


.10 


4 round-point shovels 


2.60 


I dozen stable pails . 


2.75 


I gimlet 


. 10 


I level glass .... 


.10 


I tape-measure 


.60 


Yn dozen globe lanterns . 


4-63 


I level glass .... 


.08 


I Morrill saw-set . . . , 


1. 00 


ij^ dozen heavy picks 


19.50 


i^ dozen hickory pick-handles 


Z-Z^ 


^ dozen round-point shovels . 


3-50 


Yi dozen square-point shovels . 


3-34 


2 L. H. round-point shovels 


1.08 


24)^ lbs. drills 


4.41 


bY\ lbs. shims and wedges 


1.25 


I striking-hammer, 3^ pounds . 


1.05 


I handle 


.10 


43 lbs. I -inch rope . 


7.10 


2 Piper pail covers . 


.60 


I No. 2 brass oiler . 


.20 


15^ lbs. striking hammers 


2.48 


6 handles 


.90 


Tools 


28.67 



SEAVBRS AND DRAINS. 



485 



Paid Manchester Hardware Company's account 



I scoop 


^0.75 


6 8-lb. picks, at ^1.15 


6.90 


6 pick-handles .... 


1.20 


2 street hoes .... 


1.20 


I padlock .... 


.65 


3 dozen round-point shovels 


33-45 


6 2-foot rules .... 


.60 


4 canal-barrows 


10.00 


2 50-foot tape-measures 


4.68 


9 tubular lanterns 


3-75 


I red lantern globe . 


•50 


2 lantern reflectors . 


.40 


1 No. 4 hand ax . . . 


1. 00 


1 2 round-point shovels 


II. 15 


I 5-foot tape-line 


.40 


6 red globes .... 


2.00 


2 hardware pails 


1.24 


6 8-foot scoop-handles 


2.52 


I padlock .... 


.40 


2 7^ -lb. striking-hammers (district 




No. 10) .... 


3.00 


I dozen red globes . 


4.00 


I hoe handle .... 


•IS 


2 paint brushes 


2.20 


3 stable pails .... 


•75 


I fiber pail . . . . . 


•50 


I 5-foot tape-line 


2.50 


Tools 


17.47 


Paid John B.. Varick Company's accoui 


t: 


I dozen pick-handles 


2.00 


I dozen round-point shovels 


8.00 


I fiber pail 


•50 


2 dippers .... 


.20 


6 swivel harness-snaps 


-65 


6 square-point shovels 


5-50 


6 round-point shovels 


5^5o 



486 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



2 handles .... 


^0.20 


12 6-lb contractor's picks 


10.00 


12 pick handles 


2.00 


I level 


2.00 


I Maydoe harrow 


2.50 


3 red lantern globes . 


2.25 


3 lantern burners 


2-55 


2 tape-measures 


.60 


2 pulp waterpails 


1. 00 


2 tin dippers .... 


.10 


I trowel ..... 


.60 


4 lantern globes 


.40 


4 contractor's picks . 


■3-50 


6 pick handles . . . . 


1. 00 


12 square-point shovels 


11.00 


I trowel ..... 


.60 


15 lbs. No. I Manilla rope 


2.25 


3 L. H. round-point shovels 


2-75 


I gimlet ..... 


.10 


I gimlet ..... 


•05 


I level glass .... 


.10 


6^ pounds ^-inch Manilla rope 


1.08 


6 sledge hammer handles . 


113 


I part to level . . . . . 


.10 


3 red lantern globes 


I. So 


12 pick handles . . . . 


2.00 


I 50-foot tape measure 


•75 


3 sledge handles . . . . 


•50 


36 pounds ^-inch man ilia rope 


5-76 


2 ax handles . . . . . 


.40 


2 paint brushes . . . . 


1.50 


Hardware 


23-55 


Paid J. Stickney : 




2 pair rubber boots . . . . 


5-85 


I oil suit 


2.25 


I pair of overalls . . . . 


1.25 


2 oil coats . . . . . 


2.50 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



487 



I pair No. lo rubber boots 


$3.00 


I pair oil overalls [district lo] 


1.25 


Paid New Hampshire Rubber Co., i 


[ 


pair hip boots . 


4.00 


George L. Robinson, i pair rubber 


boots .... 


3-25 


George L. Robinson, i pair hip 


boots .... 


3-5° 


EXPLOSIVES. 




Paid J. B. Varick Co. : 




50 feet water-proof fuse . 


•37 


26 feet cotton fuse . 


•13 


iSyz pounds ^tna cartridges . 


5-92 


50 pounds 4- foot fuse 


1.50 


25 pounds 6-foot fuse 


.89 


Forcite, fuse, etc. 


24-95 


Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 




^^ feet platinum fuse 


1.32 


50 feet platinum fuse 


2.00 


100 pounds No. I forcite 


45.00 


50 pounds No. 2 forcite . 


20.00 


250 feet platinum fuse 


10.00 


4 pounds blasting powder 


.60 


50 pounds No. 3 forcite . 


12.50 


50 feet platinum fuse 


2.00 


100 feet platinum fuse 


4.00 


42 J pounds No. 3 C. forcite 


10.63 


50 feet platinum fuse 


2.00 


Forcite, fuse, etc. 


266.26 


5 pounds forcite No. i 


2.25 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 




20 pounds of powder 


5.00 


50 feet platinum fuse 


2.00 


No. 3 forcite . . • . 


10.50 


32 feet platinum fuse 


1.28 



I38I.I6 



488 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SEWER-PIPE. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, for Akron pipe, 

per contract .... ^3,014.24 
Richard Dobbins, for iron pipe, 

per contract .... 1,962.00 



MATERIALS, LABOR, SEWER-PIPE, AND IRON PIPE. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane : 

1 diaphragm for Edson pump . . $2.75 
Labor fitting Edson pump . . .60 
Repairing suction hose ... i.io 
Labor on Edson pump ... i.io 
3 pipes for Edson pump . . . 1.50 
Repairing suction hose . . . i.io 

2 8-inch Akron curves . . . 1.35 
I Edson diaphragm ... 2.75 
Labor on pumps . . . . i.io 
12 feet suction hose . . . . 21.00 

3 barrels of coal, at 45 cents . . 1.35 

15 pounds of hemp, at 18 cents . 2.70 
Fire clay ...... .65 

150 pounds caulking lead, at 4}i cents 6.19 

16 bags .80 

Blacksmithing ..... .75 

Labor on sewer, Massabesic street, 2 

men 6.8 days, at ^5 per day . 
Edson diaphragm 
Labor on pump 

Akron pipe and curves, district 10 
Copper wire .... 
Labor on suction hose 
I 8-inch Akron ell . 
I 12 X 10 Akron pipe 
I diaphragm for Edson pump . 
Labor ..... 
I diaphragm .... 



34.00 

2.25 

.60 

11.32 

.20 

1. 10 

.72 

1-54 
2.25 

•75 
2.25 



$4,976.24 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



489 



Labor 

Labor on broken water-pipes on sew 

ers 
I ^-inch branch union 
Labor 

5^ feet I -inch pipe 
I I -inch elbow, R. &. L. 
I I -inch E. coupling 
Labor 

6 6-inch Akron curves 
3 8-inch Akron curves 
8 8-inch Akron curves 
72 feet 6-inch pipe . 



Less 60 per cent discount 



$6.60 

• 5- 40 

14.40 

21.60 

$48.00 
28.80 



Pipe, materials and labor 
Paid J- B. Va'rick Co., hardware 

Pike & Heald, repairing lanterns, 
etc. ..... 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs and 

blacksmith work 
H. C. Ranno & Son, braiding 
rope, etc. .... 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson : 
I cover, 103 pounds at 3c. 
2^^ pounds brass pins at 30c. . 

1 grate and trap, 171 pounds at 3c. . 

2 traps, 2 grates, i solid cover, 524 
pounds at 3c. 

2^ pounds brass pins 
6 grates, 595 pounds at 3c. 
I trap, 70 pounds at 3c. . 
I J pounds of iron at 3c. . 
6 traps, 450 pounds at 3c. 
4i pounds brass pins at 30c. 



$0.90 

.70 
.10 

1.80 
.61 
.12 
.12 

1.6^ 



19 


20 


66, 


37 


7 


13 




45 


8 


35 



3-97 

3-09 

•75 

5-13 

15-72 

•75 

I7-8S 

2. 10 

■05 

^3-5° 

1-35 



490 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



6 traps, 2 grates, manhole and cover, 

1,147 pounds at 3c. . 
Manhole and cover, 435 pounds at 3c. 
2? pounds of brass pins at 30c. 
45 J hours' labor drilling traps, grates 
Iron ...... 

Castings, 1,594 pounds at 34C. 
Castings, 6 ps., 108 pounds at 3]c. . 
Iron, 62 pounds at 3c. . 
2 square grates, 147 pounds $4.78 
Less 7 pounds old iron . .42 



Boiler plate .... 

3 traps, 224 pounds at 3c. 

3 traps, 226 pounds at 3c. 

3 grates, 289 pounds at 3c. 

8 hours drilling at 40c. 

li hours drilling castings at 40c. • 

3 hours drilling and filing at 40c. 

10 J hours on staples, for grates, etc 

II hours' labor on grate pattern 

3 brass pins for traps 

3 brass pins, 12 J pounds brass . 

25 hours repairing manhole pattern 

loj hours drilling, riveting traps, etc. 

Manhole and cover, 1,061 pounds at 

3c. (d. 10) . 
Manhole and cover, 520 pounds at 3c 
Manhole and trap, 585 pounds at 3c 
8 traps and 13 grates, 1,884 pounds at 

3c 

Manhole castings, 405 pounds at 3c 
Manhole castings, 402 pounds at ^c 
2 manholes and 2 covers, 1,052 at 3c 

1 grate casting, 93 pounds at 3c. 

2 cover castings, 195 pounds at 3c. 
92 pounds of iron 



$34-4^ 

14-55 

■75 

18.10 

.28 
51-78 

3-51 
.20 



4-36 

•63 

6.72 

6.78 

8.67 

3.20 

.60 

1.20 

4.20 

4.40 

.90 

•45 

I. CO 

3.60 

3^-83 
15.60 

^7-55 

56-52 

12.15 

1 2.06 

31-56 

2-79 

5-85 

•29 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 491 

4 manholes aiid 3 covers, 2,054 

pounds at 3c. . . . . ^61.62 

8 grate castings, 770 pounds at 3c. . 23.10 

I manhole, 430 pounds at 3c. . . 12.90 
I manhole and cover, 540 pounds at 

3c. ...... 16.20 

6} hours drilling traps ... 2.60 

4 hours blacksmithing on trap hooks 1.60 
Manholes, grates and other castings, 

11,689 pounds at 3c. • • • 35°-67 

Brass pins, 8i pounds at 30c. . . 2.55 

9J pounds of iron .... .31 

49 hours' labor drilling traps, etc. . 19.60 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works, 3 

grates, 315 pounds at 3c . . 9.45 
Warren Harvey, 2 loads of stone . 8.00 
Warren Harvey, i load of cover- 
ing-stone ..... 6.00 

Warren Harvey, 6 men J day 

each ..... 9.00 

Warren Harvey, h day, team . 2.00 
Concord & Montreal Railroad, ma- 
terial and labor furnished, grad- 
ing around new sewer . . 235.26 

$1,392.88 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid John Welcome, sharpening drills $5- 17 

James Morrison, sharpening drills 

and picks . . . . 8.49 

D. F. Cressey, district No. 10, 

sharpening tools, etc. . . 272.66 

Leander Pope, sharpening tools, 

etc. . . . . . 14-65 

J. O. Tremblay, sharpening tools, 

etc. 8.30 

Willey & Rowe, sharpening tools, 

etc. 11-50 



;2i-77 



492 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, AND LUMBER. 

Paid Mrs. F. E. McKean . . . ^9.40 

Paid Merrill & Freeman's account : 

680 163-300 barrels Norton cement 980.55 

23 barrels Portland cement . . 69.00 

I barrel Portland cement . . 3.00 

80 barrels Norton cement . . 116.00 

1 barrel lime . . . . . 1.05 

2 barrels Norton cement . . . 2.90 
Paid Pettee & Adams, 35 barrels cement 53-9° 

W. F. Head & Sons, 231 M. brick 1,501.50 
W. F. Head & Sons, 28 M. brick, 

at ^6.50 ..... 182.00 

W. F. Head & Sons, 42 M. brick 273.00 
F. S. Bodwell, 30 cesspool-stones 

at $2.75 82.50 

F. S. Bodwell, curbstone, corner 

Hanover and Chestnut streets 5.50 

F. S. Bodwell, labor . . . i4-43 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Company's account : 

5,486 feet spruce lumber . . 143-26 

28,196 feet spruce lumber, ^17 . . 479.20 

56 chestnut posts .... 8.40 

6,070 feet spruce, $17 . . . 103.19 

1,508 feet hemlock boards . . 22.12 

935 feet spruce . . . . 15-89 

Sundry other small lots . . . 24.80 

Paid Jere. Hodge, sapling, screws, and 

labor . . . . . 12.80 
A. C. Wallace, 200 feet clear pine, 

at;^3o ..... 6.00 
A. C. Wallace, 3,980 feet spruce, 

at ^18 67.66 



$4,178.05 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 493 



Paid Concord Railroad, freight on brick 

and sewer- pipe . . . $278.80 

Boston & Maine, freight on sewer- 

Pipe 24.55 



Paid Walter Neal, labor of self and men $12.00 

T. L. Thorpe, 401 lbs. sacking . 12.06 

H. Hartshorn, 19 loads mortar 

sand 4-75 

J. B. Varick Co., bolts, washers, 
band-iron, rope, battery-wire, 
sperm oil, etc. . . . 16.31 

Killey & Wadleigh, nails and other 

hardware . . . . ii-93 

Manchester Hardware Co., cop- 
peras, steel wire, nails, hinges, 
etc. ..... 12.82 

Hallsville Grocery Store, kerosene 

oil . . . . . . 2.72 

A. N. Clapp, hardware, oil, nails, 

etc. ..... 61.76 

John B. Clarke, advertising pro- 
posals for sewer-pipe . . ^o-75 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., rub- 
ber packing for steam-drill . 3.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., ex- 
press on above ... .35 

S. M. Worthley, oil, etc. . . 9.04 

J. Stickney, 10 yds. 56-inch white 

duck ..... 2.50 

J. Stickney, repairing leather hose 4.00 

J. Stickney, i oil suit, delivered to 

Mr. Phelps .... 2.25 

Eager & Rand, kerosene oil . 8.43 



503-35 



494 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Eager & Rand, oatmeal, salt, soda, 

alum, ginger, etc. . . . $10.97 

Pettee &: Adams, 125 sacks . . 8.50 

Joseph Quirin, 123 lbs. oatmeal . 6.15 

Joseph Quirin, 2 dozen lamp-wicks .20 

D. B. Varney, 3 railroad fares to 
Lowell and return, to see about 
iron sewer-pipe . . . 4.86 

Whitten & Fifield, teams and hacks 22.50 

Merrill & Freeman, 113 sacks . 4.52 

A. Gorman, 13^ gallons oil . 1.89 

A. & D. M. Poore, 400 lbs. Cum- 
berland coal . . . . 1.20 

I.. M. Aldrich, materials and labor 

on tools . . . . . 6.58 

T. F. Fifield, 20 gallons kerosene 

oil . . . . . . 2.80 

Manchester Street Railway, i pack- 
age horse-car tickets . . 4.50 

George Ames, horse-car fare, carry- 
ing battery to and from Granite- 
street sewer .... 9.50 

J. J. Abbott, 2 lights, 24 x 28, and 

setting, broken by blasting . 2.50 

Head & Dowst, 7 feet ^-inch 

sheathing . . . . .18 

George C. Lord, 15 gallons of oil 2.10 

$263.62 

Total expenditures ..... $39,297.97 
Balance . 254.40 

^39>552-37 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Appropriation raised by tax .... $3,000.00 

Transferred from the reserved fund . . . 221.89 

$3,221.89 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 495 



EXPENDITURES. 
LABOR. 

Paid W. H, Bennett, city engineer . $900.00 

W. H. Bennett, city engineer . 270.00 

Harry T. Briggs, 6 days at $1.75 10.50 

J, M. Kendall, 3^^ days at $3 . 10.50 
John J. McDonough, 240 days at 

$1.25 300.00 

John J. McDonough, 36)2 days at 

$1-25 45-63 

George W. Wales, 277 days at 

^1-75 484-75 

Harrie M. Young, 313^ days at 

$2 627.50 

• $2,648.88 



SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 

Paid W. H. Bennett : 

Cash paid for binding and sewing 

maps ...... $6.00 

Horse-car fares, express charges, and 
atomizing-tube for office 

Postage stamps and cards . 

Expenses in reference to sewer com- 
mittee ...... 

Horse-car fares in April, May, and 
June 

Horse-car fares from July to Dec. 27, 
1890 ...... 

I pencil sharpener for office 
Paid H. M. Young : 

Copy of court record 

Express on paper, etc. 

Boat hire ..... 

Repairs of tapes 
Paid James W. Queen & Co., drawing 

paper 25.95 



1.60 


2.00 


2.60 


3-70 


6-35 


1-75 


•25 


•Z2, 


-25 


3-50 



496 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid James W. Queen & Co., pencils 

and India ink . . . . $6.75 

Frank H. Challis, 2,000 envelopes 6.00 
Frank H. Challis, 2,000 letter 

heads 6.75 

Pike & Heald, i glass dish . . .15 

Frost & Adams, drawing paper . 6.45 

Frost & Adams, drawing paper . 8.85 
J. Stickney, 5 yards 50-inch black 

duck . . . . . 1.75 
Albert Hilcken, 3 portfolios at 

$6.50 19.50 

Joel Daniels & Co., 2 rolls blue 

process paper . . . . 6.00 
Paid E. R. Coburn & Co. : 

Haskell's Engineer's Handbook . 3.00 

5 quires drawing paper . . . 19-70 

T quart ink, i binder, 2 record books 3.05 

Pencils, ink, etc. . , . . 5.78 
Paid George Blanchett, 135^ yards 

bleached cotton . . . 15-88 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

1 blank book ..... 6.25 
12 blank books .... 6.60 

2 blank books . . . . . 2.00 
Ink, mucilage, paper, etc. . . 9.13 

Paid Walter Blenus, repairing tapes for 

city engineer . . . . 2.80 

Weston & Hill, 5 yards flannel . 1.25 

J. B. Varick Co., draftsman's 
scale, cutting pliers, sponge, 
tacks, and other hardware . 7.18 

Head & Dowst, repairing transit 

box .45 

Head & Dowst, 3 hours' labor, ^/^ 

dozen 3-inch R. H. screws . .80 



>2oo.35 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 497 

TEAM AND TEAM EXPENSES. 

Paid H. M. Young, horse and carriage, 

I day . . . . . $2.50 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, 4 bolts, i 

check-loop, and screw-up . . .40 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairing 

wagon . . . . . 1. 00 

John F. Woodbury, shoeing horse 9.50 

John T. Beach, repairing team . 15-90 

George W. Reed, use of horse and 

wagon, Nov. and Dec, 1889 . 7.50 

Thomas P. Riley, repairing and 

oiling harnesses, Dec, 1889 . 5.60 

Whitten & Fifield, use of team de- 
livered to city engineer . . 232.00 

A. H. Stark, painting wagon . 13-00 

Frederick Allen, repairing saddle 

and bridle .... .35 

$287.75 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Charles H. Wood, painting street 

numbers and signs . . . $11 -55 

John B. Clarke, printing 125 re- 
ports 25.75 

Manchester Hardware Co., i 
scratch-awl, 3 ax handles, i 2- 
foot rule . . . . . 1.20 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 

sharpening transit rods . . .50 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 15 
Pieces spruce, 2x3, sawed and 
pointed ..... .85 

John F. Gillis, 2 pair long-legged 

rubber boots .... 8.00 

Flint & Little, butts, bolt, 3^^ 

hours' labor in office . . r.i^ 



498 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber and labor 
Jere. Hodge, 2,000 pine grade 

stakes ..... 
Jere. Hodge, stair rail, etc. . 
Thomas A. Lane, pipe, swing 

joints, heavy brackets, etc., in 

city engineer's office 
Thomas A. Lane, 2 rail brackets . 
Thomas A. Lane, 2 rail brackets . 

Total expenditures 



$12.43 

18.00 
1.24 



3.26 

•50 
•50 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Appropriation raised by tax 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from Manchester Shoe Co., for 

cleaning vaults ..... 

Received from James Bros, (overdraft) 



S21.25 

2.00 



TRANSFERS. 



Transferred from reserved fund 
Transferred from reserved fund 



$2.46 
131.67 



EXPENDITURES. 
LABOR OF HEALTH OFFICER AND OTHERS. 

Paid William M. Parsons, health officer, 
one year's service, to Feb. i, 
1890 ..... ^200.00 

G. C. Hoitt, services i year, to 

Feb. I, 1890 .... 200.00 



$84.91 



;,22i.< 



$1,400.00 



^23.25 



$134-13 

$1^557-38 



g200, 


.00 


2, 


,00 


I, 


,00 


38.50 


54. 


00 


622. 


,00 



Paid E. T. James, horse and buggy for 
use of C. H. Reed, putting up 
notices at pond . . . $5-oo 

James Bros., use of team . . ii-5o 

Fred T. Partelow, 5 hours' use of 

boat ..... 7.50 

Whitten & Fifield, horses and 

double sleigh . . . . 3.00 

Russell White, for horse railroad 

fares . . • . . . 5 1 • 7° 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. B. Sawyer, postage, envelopes, 

.stationery , . . . ^11.25 



ii, 317-50 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 499 



Paid J. B. Sawyer, services i year, to 

Feb. I, 1890 .... 5 
Daniel Harriman, i day's service 
E. V. Turcotte, services 
P. Dobbins, services 22 days as 

special police, Goffe's Falls 
Charles H. Reed, 24 days' service 
Russell White, 311 days' service . 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., station- 
ery ^1.87 

H. E. Daniels, typewriting . . .90 

Campbell & Williams, printing 

placards . . . . . 2.00 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 

notices, etc. . . . . 18.25 

John B. Clarke, printing licenses 4-S° 

John B. Clarke, printing 150 re- 
ports . . . . . 14.00 



^1-52 



$78.70 



500 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. B. Sawyer, express charges and 

lantern ..... $o-55 

J. B. Sawyer, traveling expenses . 2.49 

J. B. Sawyer, express charges, etc. 4.97 

L. M. Aldrich, i box . . . .50 

Edmund R. Angell, analysis of 

water, in 1889 . . . 12.75 

Edmund R. Angell, analysis of 

Avater . . . . . 15-90 

Timothy Shea, cleaning vault at 
shoe-shop, 1888, by order of 
the board of health . . . 42.50 

F. X. Chenette, for removing 

dead horse .... 4.00 

H. W. Sawyer, distributing and 

posting bills .... 2.75 

Thomas Francceur,services in bury- 
ing dead animals . . . 6.00 

George Fletcher, expenses attend- 
ing examination of Massabesic 
lake . . . . . 16.00 



$119.66 

Total expenditures .... . $Ij557-38 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. • 

Appropriation raised by tax .... $3,700.00 

Balance unexpended on last year .... 264.27 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from P. Harrington, old fence 

at Webster-street schoolhouse . . $30-00 

Received from G. H. Dudley, for old 

furniture sold ..... 40.00 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 501 



TRANSFERS. 



Amount transferred from furniture and 

supplies .... ^136.98 
transferred from books and sta- 
tionery . . . . 1 6 1. 41 
transferred from evening schools 2 1 .43 
transferred from tuition . . 202.27 



EXPENDITURES. 



MASON WORK. 



PAINTING. 



Paid R. Landers, materials and mason 

work on school building . . $111.76 

B. W. Robinson, materials and 
mason labor on Youngsville 
schoolhouse .... 90'59 

B. W. Robinson, 5^ days' mason 
labor at Main-street school- 
house ..... 22.62 

B. W. Robinson, whitewashing 
and kalsomining and other la- 
bor on seventeen schoolhouses 213.37 

John J. Bennett, labor, mortar, and 
brick, at Franklin-street school- 
house . . . . . 1.75 



Paid J. J. Abbott, painting in 10 school- 
houses, setting glass . . . $122.03 
John A. Sargent, painting, glazing, 

etc. ...... 231.71 



$522.09 
$4,556-36 



$440.09 



;3-74 



502 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



CLEANING VAULTS. 

Paid S. H. Webster, for cleaning vaults 

district No. 6 . 
T. McKenna, for cleaning vaults 

city ..... 
C. C. Webster, for cleaning vaults 

Harvey District and Goffe's Falls 
J. H. Proctor, for cleaning vaults 

and shed ..... 



WOOD WORK. 

Paid Head & Dowst, 75 feet pine, 5 
hours' labor at Ash-street school 
house .... 

Smead ventilating system, Web 

ster-street schoolhouse 
G. H. Dudley, labor, hardware 

lumber, and other materials 
Smead Heating & Ventilating Co. 
to amount of contract for intro- 
duction of dry-closets into the 
Webster-street schoolhouse 
J. A. Swasey, putting blackboard 
surface on new wooden boards 
in high-school building 
Paid Amoskeag Manf. Co. : 

I window sill, Webster-street school- 
house ...... 

51 feet i-inch sapling pine, Ash street- 
schoolhouse . . . . . 

99 feet I }^ -inch sapling pine, Ash- 
street schoolhouse . . . . 

30 feet 2-inch sapling pine, Ash-street 
schoolhouse . . . . . 

802 feet spruce sheathing . 



5-5° 
6.00 



$4-25 

855.80 

1,286.45 

500.00 
37.00 



.92 

178' 

•54 
20.05 



12.50 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 503 



Paid George Holbrook, labor, lumber, 
hinges, zinc, etc., on cover to 
scuttle. Franklin-street 



153-43 


82.70 


63-52 


105.63 



PLUMBING AND IRON WORK. 

Paid Pike & Heald, for work on furnaces ^30.00 

D. J. Adams, fitting keys, repairing 

sharpeners, etc. ... .80 

S. C. Austin & Bro., labor and 
materials for lightning-rods on 
Ash-street, Webster-street, and 
Lincoln-street schoolhouses . 48.00 

Paid T. A. Lane, plumbing, piping, etc. : 
In Main-street schoolhouse 
In Lincoln-street schoolhouse . 
In Franklin-street schoolhouse . 
In other schoolhouses 



Paid Amoskeag Manuf. Co., forging and 

labor on flag poles . . . ^^6.55 

Amoskeag Manuf. Co., desk-stand, 

stoves, etc. .... 46-17 

Pike & Heald, stoves, brooms, etc. 21.18 

George H. Holbrook, labor on 
windows at Webster-street school- 
house ..... 1.50 

Higging Bros. Co., reseating chairs 

(5) 3-75 

Temple & Farrington Co., rings, 

shades, etc., Youngsville school- 
house . . . . . 7-14 
J. S. Avery, setting glass, etc. . 2.55 
Emma J. Ela, setting glass, etc., 2 

squares . . . • • -72 



^2,709.79 



^484.08; 



^99-56- 



Total expenditures ..... ^4,119.76 



504 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TRANSFERS. 






Amount transferred to fuel . 


$370-65 




transferred to printing and 






advertising 


49.00 




transferred to contingent ex- 






penses 


16.93 






• 


$436.58 


Balance .... 


$4,556-34 
.02 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid E. p. Johnson Co., 12,000 pounds 

of coal at $'] per ton . . ^42.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 145,115 

pounds coal at $6.50 per ton . 471.62 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 865,225 

pounds coal at $6.25 per ton . 2,703.83 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., i ton of egg 

coal, Clinton street . . . 6.25 

Amount overdrawn on last year . 130-93 



$4,556-36 



FUEL. 

Appropriation raised by tax ... . $3,200.00 

TRANSFERS. 

Transferred from furniture and supplies $256.15 
from repairs of schoolhouses 370.65 

from reserved fund . . 7.45 



$634.25 
$3^834-25 



$3'354-63 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



505 



CHARCOAL. 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 4 barrels of 

charcoal ..... 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 barrels of 

charcoal ..... 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., i cord of 
hard wood .... 
Cleaves N. Harvey, wood and saw- 
ing (48 cords hard, 18 pine) . 
E. C. Haskell, i load of wood 
Augustus Brown, sawing wood. 
Franklin-street and Amoskeag 
schoolhouses .... 



$7.00 

460.02 
2.00 



7-50 



$476.52 
3.834-25 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



Appropriation raised .by tax 
Balance (overdraft) 



$1,000.00 
.11 

$1,000. II 



EXPENDITURES. 



CHEMICAL APPARATUS AND SUPPLIES. 

Paid Educational Supply Co., i large 

Kipps' apparatus . . . $6.00 

Tebbetts & Soule, test tubes, chem- 
icals, apparatus, supplies . . 18.21 
E. S. Ritchie &: Son, apparatus and 

supplies . . , . . 96-13 



506 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Albert Somes, railroad fares to 
Boston for self and G. I. Hop- 
kins ..... $5-2o 
freight and cartage on apparatus . . 75 



HARDWARE. 



FURNITURE. 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, i dozen 

feather dusters . . . ^3-25 

Killey & Wadleigh, feather dusters, 

sponges, brooms, etc. . . i7-85 

Manchester hardware Co., snow 
shovel, feather dusters, waste 
baskets, shipping tags, floor 
brushes, step-ladder, hemp 
twine, and other kinds hardware 

Pike & Heald, dust pans, ash hods, 
wire mats, brooms, etc. 

J. B. Varick Co., 3 No. 14 floor 
brushes, i shovel 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., sta- 
tionery ^^-33 

W. P. Goodman, rubber band and 

note cap ..... .98 

Novelty Advertising Co., block 

card boards .... 3.90 

John B. Clarke, i ream of paper . 3.00 



92. 


51 


215- 


,19 


6. 


30 



Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 6 wood 

chairs ;^5-r5 

Higgins Brothers Co., i cherry 

chair ..... 2.25 



^126.29 



$335-1° 



;^26.2i 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 507 

Paid Higgins Brothers Co., use of 35 
folding chairs, Opera House, for 
graduating class . . . $i-5° 

Winchester Furniture Co., 52 sq. 

ft. of slate . . . . 11-96 

S. E. Butterfield, goods . . 3.00 

R. D. Gay, window shades . . 6.00 

H. C. Dickey, work on portable 

seat 2.30 

J. L. Hammett, 2 dozen 3-foot 

blackboard pointers ... 1.80 

Ginn & Co., 2 new 2d music 

charts . . . - • • 15-25 

Everett O. Fisk & Co., map of 
Europe, map of Russian Em- 
pire ..... 

"The Kitchen," 2 bracket lamps 
at Bakersville schoolhouse . . .59 



SUNDRIES. 



8.00 



Paid Harley & Robbie, ribbon, high- 
school diplomas . . . ^10.10 

W. H. Elliott, for 4 pitch-pipes i.oo 

John Kane . . • • 1-15 

W. H. Vickery, for 4 keys and re- 
pairs on locks and keys . . 1.50 

A. A. Jenkins, for tuning pianos at 

6 schoolhouses . . . 9.50 

R. E. McKean, chamois bag for 

telescope at the High School . 3.50 

H. L. Hall, repairing clock at Ash - 

street school .... i.oo 

Henry W. Allen, repairing draw- 
ing instruments, High School . 2.00 



$57.80 



^29.75 



Total expenditures .... . $575-i5 



508 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TRANSFERS. 



Amount transferred to fuel . . . ^256.15 
Amount transferred to repairs of school- 
houses . . . . . . 136.98 



Balance overdrawn January i , 1 890 (ex- 
pended in 1889) .... 



$393-13 

31-83 
$1,000.11 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



Appropriation raised by tax . 
Balance from last year, unexpended 



EXPENDITURES. 



^400.00 
IOI.I9 

$501.19 



Paid W. E. Buck, cash paid for i set 
People's Cyclopedia for the 
Hallsville school 

W. E. Buck, cash paid for postage 

Ginn & Co., music books . 

W. P. Goodman, record book and 
stationery .... 

Manchester post-office, postage 
and envelopes for the use of 
schoolboard .... 

Temple & Farrington Co., sta- 
tionery ..... 

Temple & Farrington, Co., sta- 
tionery, envelopes . 

Balch Brothers, i set Redpath's 
History, high-school library 



)20.00 

10.00 

2.50 

4.14 



17.20 

16.01 

8.00 

20.00 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 509 

Paid Novelty Advertising Co., 6 sheets 

cardboard and cutting . . ^0.40 

Houghton & Mifflin, Riverside 

literature . . . . 5.20 

• Prang Educational Co., color 
boxes, Whatman paper, 100 
pads ..... 37-9° 



Total expenditures 


• 


^141-35 


TRANSFERS. 






)unt transferred to printing and 






advertising 


$22.03 




transferred to contingent ex- 






penses .... 


176.40 




transferred to repairs of school- 






houses .... 


161. 41 


$359-84 







501.19 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 
Appropriation raised by tax .... . $400.00 

TRANSFERS. 



Amount transferred from books and sta- 






tionery .... 


$22.03 




transferred from repairs of 






buildings .... 


49.00 




transferred from tuition 


21.25 


$92.28 






Balance 




10.00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Balance overdrawn (expended in 1S89) . . $113.23 



510 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., 200 postals 

and printing same . . . ^2.75 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tizing teachers' examinations, 2I 
inches 4 days .... 5.00 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising examination of teachers 
and pupils .... 12.25 

Union Publishing Co., advertis- 
ing teachers' examinations, 3 
squares, 4 times . . . 7.50 

Union Publishing Co., advertis- 
ing teachers' examinations, 5 
sq., daily 6, w. 2 t. . . 25.00 

Paid John B. Clarke : 

Advertising teachers' examination, 5 

sq. 4 t. (Jan. 15) . . . 9.25 

400 reports, 66 pages and cover . 41.00 

Advertising teachers' examinations, 50 

L, w. 2 t., d. 6 t. (July3i) . . 32.75 

Printing circulars of all kinds, blank 
forms of all kinds, and postal cards, 
bill headings, etc.,- used in the su- 
perintendent's office . . . 210.55 
Printing 400 music programs and 

dates ...... 7.75 

Blank-book orders, 200 leaves . . 4*00 

1,500 report cards (November) . 12.50 

Blanks 18.75 



^389-05 



Total expenditures for 1890 ... . ^502.28 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 511 

CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 
Appropriation raised by tax .... |Soo.oo 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred from books and sta- 
tionery . . . . ^176.40 
transferred from repairs of 

schoolhouses . . . 16.93 

transferred from tuition . . 132.66 

1325-99 

$1,125.99 

EXPENDITURES. 
FREIGHT, REPAIRS, ETC. 

Paid Jones's city and baggage express, 

freight and truckage . . $40.09 

John S. Avery, setting 7 lights of 

glass at High School . . 2.90 

S. A. Hill, setting glass and win- 
dow cord, repairs ... 6.13 

Carl E. York, washing-powder and 

soap ..... 3.64 

C. A. Hoitt, repairing 3 chairs . 2.00 

J. G. Jones, freight bills and 

trucking . . . . 8.18 



WATER AND CiAS. 



Paid Water- Works, for water . . $336.90 

People's Gas-Light Company, for 

gas 164.36 



Paid Charles H. Manning, expense to 
Milford, Mass., and return, in 
quest of high-school assistant $7- 20 



)2.94 



$501.26 



512 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid W. C. Richardson, moving settees 
from City Hall and Webster- 
street schoolhouse to engine- 
house on Webster street, and 
back again .... $12.58 

E. T. James, horse and carriage 
for committee .... 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos 
Higgins Bros., use of 35 chairs at 

school festival, Opera House 
Higgins Bros., labor draping flag 
W. Heron, Jr., writing diplomas 
W. E. Buck, carriage hire and 

other expenses 
J. M. Kendall, cartage of models, 

evening drawing schools . 
William H. Vickery, for keys 
Lizzie M. Cogswell, labor on ac- 
count of free text-books, superin- 
tendent's office 
C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 
C. A. Trefethen, clock for superin- 
tendent's office . . . 4.50 

F. P. Colby, moving pianos at 3 
schoolhouses .... i4-5o 

Manchester Opera House Co., for 

use of Opera House i night . 25.00 

B. N. Wilson, services as door- 
keeper at Opera House, high- 
school graduation . . . i.oo 

J. B, Varick Co., 40 lbs. Manilla 

rope (i inch) .... 6.40 



6. CO 


19.00 


1.50 


.80 


27-35 


82.32 


•95 


.80 


50.00 


6.00 



„S265.9o 

Total expenditures ..... $830.10 

Balance overdrawn (expended in 1889) • •295.89 

$1,125.99 



CARE OF ROOMS. 51S 

CARE OF ROOMS. 
Paid appropriation raised by tax . . . . $3,300.00. 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred from tuition . . $86.76 

Amount transferred from evening school, 

mechanical drawing . . . 135-93 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid J. S. Avery, janitor of High, Ash, 

and Wilson Hill schoolhouses $600 00 

James E. Bailey, janitor of Amos- 
keag schoolhouse from Decem- 
ber 24, 1889, to September 20, 
1890 ..... 167.87 

Alverta P. Barrett, janitor Harvey 

District, at $1.50 per week . 18.00 

Ella F. Barker, at Hallsville, at 
$1.50 per week 

E. P. Cogswell, at training school 

H. C. Dickey, Bakersville school- 
house ..... 

D. S. Dunbar, at Mosquito Pond . 

H. H. Proctor, at schoolhouse, Dis- 
trict No. 8 . . . . 

Emma J. Ela, at Harvey District 

V. W. Fairbanks, at Webster-street 

and Blodget-street schools, i wk. io-5o 

Michael Finley, at Webster-street 

and Blodget-street schools, to 

September 30, 1890 . . . 391. 68 

33 



57- 


oo- 


5°- 


oS 


50- 


08 


20. 


00 


5' 


■25 


29.50 



$3,522.69, 



514 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Ruby Fox, at Youngsville school- 
house ^15-00 

Samuel A. Hill, at West Manches- 
ter schoolhouse (12 months) . 525.00 

William H. Morrill, at Spring-street 
and Lowell-street schoolhouses 
(11 months) .... 35o-o4 

Frank Quartz, at Goffe's Falls . i4-5o 

A. M. Robinson, at Stark District 40.25 

William Stevens, at Lincoln and 

Franklin schools (12 months) . 600.00 

Mrs. M. Tracy, cleaning at Web- 
ster's Mills schoolhouse . . 3.50 

Otis L. Webster, at Webster's Mills 16.00 

Dollie R. Webster, at Webster's 

Mills 5.50 

Mrs. Peter Fish, cleaning at the 

Hallsville schoolhouse . . 1.50 

Mrs. Nathan Sleeper, cleaning at 

the Hallsville schoolhouse . 2.50 

Inez M. Warren, cleaning school- 
house. Stark District . . 3.00 



Total expenditures in 1890 .... ^35376.75 
Balance overdrawn, January 1, 1890, 

(expended in 1889) ...... i45j94 

^3,522.69 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 
Appropriation raised by tax ..... $1,500.00 

EXPENDITURES. 
SALARIES. 

Paid Frank C. Livingston, 23 evenings 

at $2.20 ..... $50.60 

F. C. Baldwin, 23 evenings at 

$2.20 ..... 50.60 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 515 

Paid Maud L. Kent, 23 evenings at 

$1.00 ^23.00 

Chas. E. Cochran, 88 evenings at 

$2.20 193-60 

Etta S. Dana, 88 evenings at 90c. 79.20 

Mary A. Buzzell, 5 evenings at 90c. 4.50 

Cora M. Dearborn, i evening at 

^1-50 ^-5° 

Chas. W. Bickford, 88 evenings at 

^2.20 193-60 

Emma J. Ela, 27 evenings at ^i. 00 27.00 

Lizzie Hartford, 28 eveningsat 90c. 25.20 

Lizzie Hartford, 45 evenings at 

$1.00 ..... 45-00 

Maggie Linen, 22 evenings at 90c. 19.80 

Emma B. Abbott, 17 evenings at 

90c. 15.30 • 

Nellie M. Atwood, 23 evenings at 

$1.00 ..... 23.00 

C. A. Bohlin, 45 evenings at 90c. 40.50 

L. H. Carpenter, 37 evenings at 

$2.20 ..... 81.40 

Nellie M.James, 33 evenings at 90c. 29.70 

Samuel C. Kennard, 31 evenings 

at ^i.oo ..... 31-00 

Maggie Linen, 30 evenings at 90c. 27.00 

Wm. J. Mooar, 36 evenings at 90c. 32.40 

F. S. Sutcliffe, 45 evenings at 

^2.20 ..... 99.00 

Fannie L. Sanborn, 35 evenings at 

90c 31.50 

^1,124.40 



JANITORS. 

Paid Wm. H. Morrill, services as janitor ^62.60 

Samuel A. Hill, services as janitor 
cleaning Clinton-street school- 
house ..... 25.90 



•50 



516 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Wm. P. Goodman, i dozen copy- 
books, No. 5 . . . . 



PRINTING. 



Paid Union Pub. Co., advertising even- 
ing schools 6 times . 

John B. Clarke, advertising even- 
ing schools 6 times . 

John B. Clarke, printing placards 

Daily Press Pub. Co. . 



$0.96 



$14-00 



5-25 
8.00 



^0.96 



$37-45 



Paid People's Gas Light Co. . . $3-5° 

Total expenditures for 1889 . . . . 

Balance overdrawn last year (expended in 1889) 
Amount transferred to repairs of schoolhouses 



•5» 



1,254.81 

223.76 

21.43 

$1,500.00 



EVENING SCHOOL, MECHANICAL DRAWING. 



Appropriation raised by tax . 
Balance unexpended last year 



5600.00 
351-66 

5q';i.66 



EXPENDITURES. 
SALARIES. , 



Paid J. M. Kendall, for services . 
H. W. Allen, for services . 
A. H. Sanborn, for services 



ii4i.oo 
229.25 
143-50 



;i3'75 



EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 517 



JANITOR. 

Paid W. H. Morrill, for services . ^23.40 



Paid E. R. Coburn, drawing paper and 

T squares , . . . $22.88 

E. R. Coburn, drawing paper, 2 

reams . . . . . 36.00 

Jones's city and baggage express, 

moving models . . . i.oo 

Temple & Farrington Co., 800 

sheets paper printed in checks . 5.75 



TRANSFERS. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, 47 hours' labor . ^11.75 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber, paint, etc. 12.68 
L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor 17.26 
Union Publishmg Co., advertising 
evening schools, mechanical 
drawing, 5 sq. 5 t. . . . 15-00 
John B. Clarke, advertising even- 
ing schools, mechanical draw- 
ing 15-67 

John B. Clarke, printing cards, etc. 9.25 

Daily Press Publishing Co. . . 10.50 



Amount transferred to care of rooms . $135 -93 
Amount transferred to teachers' salaries 120.84 



$23.40 



:.6'. 



Total expenditures for 1S90 . . . . 694.89 



^256.77 
$951.66 



518 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

Appropriation raised by tax . 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred from evening 

school, drawing . . $120.84 

transferred from free text-books 2.44 

transferred from reserved fund 1,801.94 



j,ooo.oo 



Balance paid from money in treasury, 
wise appropriated 


not other- 


551,925.22 
93.86 




$46,019.08 


EXPENDITURES. 




teachers' pay-roll. 




Paid for the month of: 




January . 
February . 
March 
April 
May 






$4,175-05 
4,616.53 
4,611.59 

4,257-23 
4,655-18 




June 

August 

September 

October , 

November 

December 






• 4,727-41 

50.00 

4,406.75 

. 4,730-88 
4,599-48 
4,574-77 


$45,404-87 
614.21 


Amount overdrawn (expended in 1889) 






$46,019.08 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 519 



TUITION. 



To balance from l^st year . . . $14.19 

W. E. Buck, superintendent, fees col- 
lected of sundry pupils . . 428.75 



TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred to repairs of school- 
houses .... $202.27 

transferred to printing and ad- 
vertising . . . . 21.25 

transferred to contingent ex- 
penses .... 132.66 

transferred to care of rooms . 86.76 



EXPENDITURES. 
TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Paid F. M. Ambrose . . . . «=;8.oo 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 

Paid Warren P. Adams . . . $483.20 

American Book Co. . . . 377>4o 

Boston School Supply Co. . . 12.75 



^2.94 



^442-94 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 

Appropriation raised by tax ..... $9,000.00 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from Gillott & Sons (overdraft) . . $7-55 



.007-55 



$58.00. 



520 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid A. S. Barnes & Co. 


^251.30 


Clark & Maynard 


42.00 


E. R. Coburn & Co. . 


148.48 


D. C. Colesworthy 


'43.60 


John B. Clarke 


96-35 


Joel Daniels & Co. 


77.72 


Dion & Co. 


30.46 


Effingham, Maynard & Co. 


87.96 


Faunce Linus 


10.00 


Frost & Adams 


2-34 


Ginn &: Co. 


1,322.75 


Gillott & Sons 


50-33 


W. P. Goodman . . . . 


66.58 


J. L. Hammett . . . . 


435-28 


D. C. Heath & Co. . 


204.42 


Henry Holt & Co. 


86.11 


Harper & Brother 


152-15 


H. Hume .... 


330-45 


J. J. Holland & Co. . 


5-95 


Holden Book Cover Co. 


188.17 


Ivison, Blakeman & Co. 


381.30 


N. T. Joy . 


10.75 


King & Merrill . 


189.74 


Chas. H. Kilburn 


36-35 


Lee & Shepard . 


69.34 


Leach, Sherwell & Sanborn 


10.20 


J. B. Lippincott & Co. 


866.75 


Novelty Advertising Co. 


11-35 


Porter &: Coates . 


45-30 


G. S. Perry .... 


102.85 


Reynolds & Reynolds Co. . 


86.23 


A. C. Stockin 


321.20 


Salisbury Manuf. Co. . 


17.00 


Silver, Burdett & Co. . 


127.35 


Carl Schoenhof . 


110.92 


J. Stickney .... 


.60 


Willard Small . 


12.76 



CITY LIBRARY. 



521 



Paid Thompson, Brown & Co. 


^200.98 




The Prang Educational Co. 


598.01 




Thorp & Adams Manuf. Co. 


18.00 




C. P. Trickey .... 


4.40 




W. Ware & Co 


1,004.30 




Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


5.10 




Manchester Heating and Lighting 






Co 


7-56 




University Pub. Co. 


4.17 








$8,806.26 






LABOR. 






Paid J. G. Jones, truckage, etc. 


^32-25 




H. E. Daniels, type writing 


•85 




Lillian Gray, labor 


3-3° 




Lillian Stearns, labor . 


•95 




Fannie L. Sanborn, labor 


99-5° 




Maud L. Kent, labor . 


2.00 




Lizzie Cogswell, labor . 


60.00 









$198.85 


Total expenditures for 1S90 


. 


$9,005.11 


Amount transferred to teachers' salaries 




2.44 




^9'Oo7-55 


CITY LIBRARY. 




Balance unexpended January 1, 1890 . 




$2,628.05 


Appropriation . •. 




4,000.00 


Appropriation for catalogue . 


. 


2,500.00 


Appropriation for new books 


* 


1,000.09 




$10,128.05 



EXPENDITURES. 
LIBRARIAN AND ASSISTANT. 



Paid Mrs. M. J. Buncher, librarian 

Alton F. Payne, assistant librarian 



5000.00 
335-72 



ii, 135-72 



522 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CATALOGUE. 



Paid C. A. Durfee .... $748.00 
Mary P. Stone .... 20.33 

John B. Clarke,printing catalogue. 

and corrections . . . 84.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., card- 
board, gummed letters and figures 
for catalogue . . . • 20.00 

Head & Dowst, lumber and labor 2.67 



RE-BINDING AND RE-SEWING. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.,re-binding 

and re-sewing . . . • $^5^-9''^ 



NEW BOOKS. 



Paid trustees, to be expended for new 

books $1,000.00 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., binding 

books, etc. . . , . $194-85 



GAS, WATER, FUEL, AND INSURANCE. 

Paid L. B. Clough, agent, insurance of 

$10,000 on library contents . $100.00 

L. B. Bodvvell & Co., .1 cord of 

hard pine slabs . . . 5.00 

L. B. Bodvvell & Co., 15 pounds 
ice daily, May 30 to September 
18, 1889 8.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 15 pounds 
ice daily, June 19 to September 
5, 1890 4-12 



$875.00 



$156.91 



$1,000.00 



;^i94-85 



CITY LIBRARY. 523 

Paid Water- Works, for water for the year 

1890 ^32-00 

People's Gas-Light Co. . . 216.86 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 89,690 

pounds of egg coal . . . 280.28 

^646.76 

NEWSPAPERS. 

Paid John B. Clarke, "Daily Mirror," 
from April i, 1889, to April i, 
1890 $6.00 



Paid John B. Clarke, printing 200 an- 
nual reports . . . . $11.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, 
pens, ink; blotting paper, blank 
books, and other stationery . 67.91 

C. F. Livingston, printing 21,500 

book covers . . . • 21.50 

C. F. Livingston, cover paper, 
freight, cartage of same . . ii8-S5 

N. P. Hunt, expenses to Boston to 

buy books .... 4.00 

N. P. Hunt, postage . . . 1.68 



^224.64 



Total expenditures for 1890 ... . $4,239.88 

Balance to new account .... . 5,888.17 

$10,128.05 



524 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Appropriation raised by tax . 



RECEIPTS. 



Received from district 2, for team la- 
bor from January to August 
30, 1890 .... $2,355.72 
from district 2, for team labor 1,026.00 



Received from district 10, for team la- 
bor, January to August 30, 
1890 . 
from district 10, for team la- 
bor ..... 

Received from John Lennon (overdraft) 

TRANSFERS. 

Transferred from reserved fund 
Balance ...... 



EXPENDITURES. 
SERVICE. 

Paid Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer . 

Fred S. Bean, assistant engineer . 

Ruel G. Manning, assistant en- 
gineer . . . . . 

Eugene S. Whitney, assistant en- 
gineer . . . . . 

Clarence D. Palmer, assistant en- 
gineer ..... 

Clarence B. Merrill, engineer 

Fred S. Bean, clerk 



5810.50 

507-25 



;,ooo.oo 



^3>38i-72 



11,317-75 
6.00 



^i»797-35 
.10 

;4i,502.92 



;i,ooo.oo 
125.00 

125.00 

125.00 

62.50 
62.50 
25.00 



;i, 525.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



525 



Paid 1 8 teamsters and engineers, as per pay-rolls : 



January . 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



call , members, Amoskeag Steam 
Fire Engine Co., for the year 
1890 ..... 

extra duty, 2 men, July 3 and 4 . 

call members. Fire King Steam 
Fire Engine Co., for the year 
1890 ..... 

extra duty, 2 men, July 3 and 4 . 

call members, N. S. Bean Steam 
Fire Engine Co., for tlie year 
1890 ..... 

extra duty, 2 men, July 3 and 4 . 

call members, Merrimack Steam 
Fire Engine Co., for the year 
1890 ..... 

extra duty, 4 men, July 3 and 4 . 

call members, Gen. Stark Steam 
Fire Engine Co., for the year 
1890 ..... 

extra duty, 4 men, July 3 and 4 . 

call members, Chemical Engine 
Co., for the year 1890 

extra duty, 4 men, July 3 and 4 . 



$900.75 
964.50 

939-5° 

955-00 
924.00 
924.00 
913.00 

913 50 
922.25 

954-25 
1,001.00 
1,010.00 



;i,476.66 
8.00 



1,385.00 
8.00 



1,456-25 
8.00 



1,460.00 

8.00 



1,485.00 
8.00 

435- 00 
8.00 



-II;32I-7S 



626 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid call members, Massabesic Hose 

Co., for the year 1890 . . $1,245.00 
extra duty, 4 men, July 3 and 4 . 8.00 

call members, Pen nacook Hose Co., 

for the year 1890 . . . 1,245.00 

extra duty, 4 men, July 3 and 4 . 8.00 

call members, Excelsior Hook and 

Ladder Co., for the year 1890 . 1,935.00 
A. E. Foster, 14 days driving . 21.00 

Thomas Brown, 16 nights doubling 

driver, Pennacook Hose Co. 

No. I .... . 4.00 

John Burke, 8 nights driving 

doubling horse. Chemical . . 2.00 

Henry Crosby, extra driving . ii-75 

A. B. Cushing, extra driving, 7 

days . . . . . 12.25 

George W. Dimick, driving for 

Steamer No. 3, 17 nights 

extra ..... 4.25 

John T. Gott, 2 days driver Hose 

No. I, at $1.75 . . . 3.50 

Henry C. Parsons, 45 days driving 

back-street team . . . 67.50 

Benjamin R. Richardson, i day 

driving Hose No. 2 . . . 1.50 

Benjamin R. Richardson, 14 days 

engineer. Chemical Engine Co. 21.00 

H. S. Reed, driving .supply-wagon 

at 2,6 alarms .... 36.00 

John Shea, driver of hose for 

Steamer No. 2, i day, 2 nights 2.50 

John Shea, driving 'Squog horse 

5 days 7.50 

vStephen Thomas, 14 nights as 

doubling driver, on Fire King 

No. 2 .... . 3.50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



527 



Paid Stephen Thomas, 6 days' labor on 
boiler ..... 

George E. Varnum, driver Steamer 
No. 2 (i week) 

Edwin E. Weeks, 25 1/^ days, en- 
gineer of Merrimack Steamer 
No. 3 

Henry A. Brown, use of horse for 
doubling, chemical engine 

John K. Wilson, 51^ days' labor 
at Vine-street station 

John K. Wilson, lumber and hard- 
ware ..... 

John K. Wilson, lumber and labor 



$6.00 
12.50 

44-52 
1 1. 00 

15-75 

6.40 
21.63 



^12,502.96 



Paid Mrs. G. H. Wheeler . 

Mrs. G. B. Forsaith . 

Mrs. S. B. Batchelder . 
Mrs. M. H. Hulme 

FURNITURE, ETC. 

Paid D. A. Simons, 3 iron cuspidors 
and I dozen mugs 
D. A. Simons, 2 towel-racks 
Paid Weston & Hill: 

Crash ...... 

I dozen pillow-cases, i dozen sheets, 
flannel, silk, making and hanging 
curtains, rubber mats, etc. 
I dozen pillow-slips . 
Crash and towels 
Matting and laying for Pennacook 

Hose No. I . 
Yz dozen pillow-cases for Chemical 
Engine Co., 17^3 yds. 5-4 inch 
matting, zincing ends 



^a.oo 
14.00 

5-45 
32.80 



^2.88 
.90 

2.38 



23.90 
2.00 
5-13 

10.30 
1S.22 



50.25 



528 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



65^ yds. matting, zincing ends . $53-i3 

Zincing . . . . . . 1.50 

18^ yds. matting, zincing ends . 17.48 

Rubber mat ..... 2.00 

4 yds. opaque, fixtures, etc. . . 2.34 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., i wardrobe 13-00 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., i dressing- 
case . . . . . . 9.00 

Charles H. Colburn, 11 window and 

door screen? and fitting same, for 

Lake-avenue engine-house . . 14.00 

Charles H. Colburn, castings and 

labor on stall doors, at Merrimack 

steam fire engine house 

Jere. Hodge, 5 radiator boards, at 

Lake-avenue engine-house 

Paid Head & Dowst : 

Lumber and labor .... 

242 feet pine, Webster-street engine- 
house ...... 

Lumber and labor, etc., for Lake- 
avenue engine-house 
Lumber and labor, etc., at Webster- 
street engine-house 
Paid C. H. Hutchinson, il hours' labor 
C. H. Hutchinson, planing weight, 
Vine-street engine-house, cast- 
ings, stand-pipe, etc. . . 5-26 
Temple & Farrington Co., making 
and hanging shades, N. S. Bean 
engine company . . . 10.66 
J. K. Wilson, labor, lumber and 

hardware . . . . . 35 -30 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid John B. Clarke, printing 250 re- 
ports ..... ;^3o.oo 



5-52 


3-5° 


7-30 


9.68 


45-5^ 


51-71 


.60 



^353-2o 



FIRE DEPAKTMENT. 



529 



Paid John B. Clarke, envelopes, etc. . $20.05 
John B. Clarke, 300 envelopes . 7.50 
Temple & Farrington Co., sta- 
tionery . . . . . 4.50 
L. T. Mead, ink, letter paper and 

record book . . . . 4.12 



WATER, GAS, AND TELEPHONE. 


Paid Water-Works, for water 


^980.29 


People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . 


797.72 


New England Telegraph and Tele- 




phone Co., telephones, etc. 


220.27 


FUEL. 




Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 




i^ cords of wood .... 


$9.00 


58,830 pounds of coal, at $6.50 


191.20 


302,665 pounds of coal 


1,062.71 


I cord of slab wood 


5.00 


2 barrels charcoal .... 


1. 00 


Paid Neil Fullerton, 12 cords cleft pine 




wood . . . . . 


54.00 


Neil Fullerton, i]^ cords hard 




wood ..... 


9.00 


A. Nolette, sawing and putting in 




wood 


2.50 


John Lenard, sawing and splitting 




wood ..... 


12.00 


Stephen Gardner, splitting wood . 


15.00 


S. L. Flanders, ijA cords of wood 


10.38 


TRUCKING AND FREIGHT. 




Paid Boston & Maine Railroad for 




freight 


$0.90 


Con«ord Railroad, for freight 


14.69 


John W. Wilson, for trucking 


12.85 


J. G. Jones, for trucking 


•50 



17 



^1,998.28 



'1. 371-79 



;28.94 



630 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Plumer & Holton, 14 reefer coats ^122.50 

A. R. Gage, i pair gray horses . 400.00 
Cavanaugh Bros., span of gray 

horses . . . . • 650.00 
Eureka Fire Hose Co., 3,000 feet 

hose 1,800.00 

Samuel Eastman & Co., 3 Perfec- 
tion nozzles and holders . . 105.00 
Paid Cornelius Callahan Co. : 

2 Regan plaster-hooks and poles . 20.00 

2 shut-off nozzles .... 30.00 

2 flexible pipes . . . . . 30.00 
5 white rubber surf coats . . . 37-5° 

3 sets call couplings .... 10.50 
Nickel plating 2 snaps . . . • 1.25 
2 Baltimore snaps . . . . 5.00 
2 extinguisher holders . . . 20.00 

1 14-inch gong striker . . . 6.00 

2 belts ...... 30.00 

I HoUoway extinguisher . . . 26.00 

Paid Dennis Kerwin, soap and soapine 16.15 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., ammonia 

and sugar . . . . 2.77 . 
D. Milton Goodwin, i dozen 

H. brooms .... 4.50 

L. M. Aldrich, mending pike pole .25 

A. S. Jackson, i dozen spanners . 5.15 
J, Hinman, 6 dozen bottles and 

corks, for fire extinguishers . 5.00 
Manahan Manufacturing Co., i 

dozen ladder hooks and express 12.30 
Sanborn Carriage Co., i straight 

hydrant wrench, etc. . . 1.55 * 
Sanborn Carriage Co., 37 brackets, 

steel stride bar, etc. . . . 17.10 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



531 



Paid J. J. Abbott, setting glass . 

James R. Carr, painting and glaz- 
ing 

S. L. Flanders, oil, chimneys, etc 
Charles H. Hutchinson, labor on 

Stark hose wagon 
D. M. Poore, for 3 boxes of salt 
H. Fradd, matches and oil . 
H. Fradd, 125 pounds bran 
Peter Milon, varnishing 2 wheels 

Merrimack steam fire engine 
A. S. Jackson, for 6 squilgees 
A. S. Jackson, for 2 sets ax holders 
A. S. Jackson, for 6 globes, i ruby 
Scollay & Rich, for polish, etc. 
J. A. W. Bird & Co., i barrel 

bicarbonate of soda 
Merrimack Chemical Co., 6 car 

boys vitriol ... 
Geo. C. Lord, matches, soapine, 
oil, and wicks . . . . 



$6.14 

16.53 
2.23 

2.10 
.60 

•30 
1.38 

2.50 

7-50 

4.00 

12.00 

10.85 

15-93 

13-45 

.80 



^3»454-83 



PLUMBING AND REPAIRS. 



Paid Manchester Locomotive Works 


$582.69 


Pike & Heald 


. 


38.88 


Thos. A. Lane 


HARDWARE. 


219.31 


Paid Killey & Wadleigh 


. . . 


$69.98 


J. B. Varick Co. 


. 


2.29 


Manchester Hardware 


Co. . 


128.67 



$840.88 



$200.94 



582 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL. 

Paid EUingvvood &: Co., i barrel 

"El-a-tol" .... $12.00 

Snelling & Wood, arnica, horse 

medicine, alcohol, etc. . . 38-55 

Edward H. Currier, i}4 dozen of 
Williams' Sure Cure . . . 10.50 

A. W. Baker, dental work on 7 

horses ..... i^.oo 

J. Blakely, services as veterinary 

surgeon ..... 91-50 

George H. EUinwood, veterinary 

dentistry ..... 4.00 

Frank L. Way, for arnica . . .85 

Z. Foster Campbell, horse med- 
icine, powders, liniment, etc. . 20.91 



CARRIAGE WORK AND CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs 

and other carriage work . . $554-88 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, i platform 



spring wagon .... 


375-00 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairs, etc. 


84.82 


Sanborn Carriage Co. . 


23.40 


A. Filion 


13-50 


J. B. McCrillis & Son, i combi- 




nation hose wagon . 


800.00 


John T. Beach, N. S. Bean hose 




wagon 


400.00 


KLACKSMITHING. 




id Thomas Hickey .... 


$22.00 


D. F. Cressey .... 


95-35 


Mahaney & McSweeney 


260.78 



$192.31 



$2,251.60 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 533 

Paid Jos. O. Tremblay . . . $118.75 

John F. Woodbury & Co. . . 147-90 

Alonzo E. Gage, shoeing . . 4.00 
Welcome & Sons, springs on new 

yol^e 4.75 

I653.53 



1-75 



HAY AND GRAIN. 

Paid H. Fradd & Co., 40 bags of oats . 
H. Fradd & Co., 175 pounds of 

bran ..... 

Wm. Clark, 13,685 pounds of hay 111.61 

Moore & Preston, 885 pounds of 

straw . . . . . 7.97 

G. W. Butterfield, 1,620 pounds of 

liay 14.58 

Daniel Butterfield, 19,075 pounds 

of hay . . . . . 166.15 

L. Rowe, 2,260 pounds of hay . 19-31 

C. H. Rogers, 200 pounds rye 

straw ..... 2.20 

G. E. Lane, 980 pounds of hay . 8.82 

Mary Cressey, 1,485 pounds of hay ^3-3^ 

Chas. D. Welch, 10,970 pounds 

of hay . . . . . 98-73 

John L. Woodman, 12,385 pounds 

of hay 1 1 1.46 

L. Shelters, 25,063 pounds of hay 219.35 

Pettee & Adams, oats, bran, etc. . 424.95 

Drake & Dodge, oats and meal . 40-95 

Parker R. Brown, oats . . . 19-44 

Drake & Parker, oats, shorts, etc. 295.81 

Merrill & Freeman, oats, bran, etc. 278.36 

Partridge Brothers, oats, bran, etc. 791-37 

City farm, 26,615 pounds of hay . 231.79 

C. M. Wheeler, 4,375 pounds 

carrots ..... 39-38 



534 



REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid T. L. Emery, hay . . . ^37-87 

A. D. Haynes, 6,980 pounds of 
hay 55. 84 



HARNESSES AND HARNESS REPAIRS. 

Paid Thomas P. Riley, i pair of reins 

(December, 1889) . . . $3-50 
W. H. Adams, harness repairing, 

etc. ...... 202.20 

Charles E. Berry, 2 pairs harnesses 40.00 
Charles E. Berry, 2 collars, box, 

repairing hames . . . 26.25 
Charles E. Berry, 4 pole snaps . 5.00 
Granite State Plating Co., plating 
rein snaps, check chains, ro- 
settes, etc. .... 4.65 

Paid H. C. Ranno & Son : 

I Baker blanket .... 4.00 

5 patent flail whips .... 10.00 

I canvas cushion .... 2.75 

1 large nickel-ring bit . . . 3-oo 

2 Salem collars . . . . . 13-00 

I bridle ...... 2.50 

22 celluloid rings . . . . 4-3° 

1 pair exercise harnesses . . . 40.00 

2 Boston truck collars . . . 9-oo 
New pieces and repairs . . . 83-55 
I dozen 7-8 inch Ger. snaps . . .35 
I dozen i-inch Ger. snaps . . .35 
I set English wool bandages . . 2.25 
I pair Kersey stable blankets . . 10.00 

Paid Frederick Allen : 

Oleo, blacking, etc. . . . *32-35 

I pair heavy double harnesses . 75 -oo 

Repairing harnesses, blankets, etc. 8.90 

Paid D. S.Kimball, polish, rosettes, etc. 8.70 



;, 023.05 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



535 



Paid H. C. Ranno & Son : 

I pair 90x96 Fawn street blankets . $14.00 

1 leatherine street blanket . . 3.00 

2 hame straps, 70c., 3 cans oil and 

dressing . . . . . 1.95 

26 celluloid rings .... 7.20 

I whip, $1, I pair breeching straps . 2.50 

I double swing harness . . . 50.00 
Repairing and altering harness to 

double ..... 17-50 

Repairing pair of swing collars . 2.00 

1 1 2-inch double pole strap . . 4.50 
Repairing harness .... 2.75 

2 Kersey stable blankets . . . 10.00 

3 surcingles 2.55 

2 whips . ..... 4.00 

I pair nickel trimmed swing harnesses 100.00 

3 swing collars .... 3.75 

1 collar, 2 halters, bridle attachment 9.50 
Repairing plow harness, etc. . . 3.75 

2 wool blankets .... 15.00 
2 Salem collars .... 13-00 
Labor and strapping on hose wagon . 3.75 
2 brushes ...... i.oo 



LABOR OF MEN AND TEAMS. 



Paid labor of men and teams from District No. 



I863.30 



jtxiiua.1 y 

February . 


39.50 


March 


. ■ . . . 39.00 


April 


33-75 


May 


28.50 


June 


28.50 


July 


63.50 


August 


66.00 



536 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

September . . . . $57-75 

October .... 31-50 

November . . . . 52.12 

December . . . . 43- 50 



Paid E. G. McKean, rent of stable 2 

weeks ..... $2.00 

James Brothers, use of hack . 5.00 

Joint Standing Committee on fire 
department, Frank A. Lane, 
chairman, expenses of said com- 
mittee to Lawrence, Haverhill, 
Worcester, and Boston, in the 
interest of the aerial truck and 
combination wagon : 

Fares-. .... 21.72 

Hotel and meals . . . 16.05 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 9.00 

Wheeler &: Rogers,* clipping horses 42.00 

Jos. Breault, use of hack convey- 
ing injured fireman to his resi- 
dence ..... 2.00 
Thomas W. Lane, cash paid ex- 
press at sundry times 
C. P. Trickey, blank books, etc. 
George Gagnon, assisting steamer 
to fire ..... 

Total expenditures for 1890 . 
Amount transferred to fire-alarm telegraph 



$590.12 



8.65 
3.21 

1. 00 


$110.63 






$41,409.53 

93-39 



^I, 502.92 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 537 

FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Appropriation raised by tax ..... ^1,200.00 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred from incidental ex- 
penses $293.85 

Amount transferred from fire department 93-39 

$387.24 

Received from D. B. Varney (overdraft) . . 20.00 

$1,607.24 

EXPENDITURES. 



Paid Thomas W. Lane, Jr., 167 days at 

$1-50 $250.50 

Thomas W. Lane, Jr., 77 days at 

$1-75 134-75 

George E. Badger, 17 days at $1.25 21.25 

Henry C. Parsons, 26 days at ^1.50 39-oo 

$445-50 



Paid Mason, Chapin & Co., 5 barrels of 

blue vitriol, 2,500 at S/i^- ■ $i3''-25 
Mason, Chapin & Co., 6 barrels of 

blue vitriol, 2,859 ^^ 4j^c. . 139-38 

W. H. Darling, 522 zinc castings 

at 35c 182.70 

Paid D. B. Varney : 

106 zinc castings at 35c. . . . 57-io 

381 zinc castings at 35c. . . . 98-35 

8 composition castings at 35c. . . 2.80 

2 J sheets of copper at 30c. . . .75 

Paid J. B. Prescott & Son, 100 standard 

zincs ..... 25.10 



538 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Manhattan Electric Supply Co. : 

200 copper connections . . . $11.90 

3 experimental coils .... 1.80 

24 binding posts .... 1.73 

Bell, switches, etc. .... 4.30 

Paid J. H. Runnell & Co., jars, line, 

tapping clamp, etc. . . . 13.33 

Paid Rogers & DeCrow : 

500 pony glass insulators, etc. . . i7-75 

Lightning arresters .... 6.00 

2 fire-alarm signal boxes . . . 250.00 

50 main keys at 25c. . . . . 12.50 

Paid American electric works, rubber, 

etc 49.43 

Washburn & Moen Manuf. Co., 

2ioi feet copper wire at i8^c. 39-47 

Electric Gas-Lighting Co., i No. 

2 screw driver .... .34 

Electric Gas-Lighting Co., other 

tools ..... To-39 

Killey & Wadleigh, paints and oils 

and hammer handles . . 6.68 

Manchester Hardware Co., wire 
nails, washers, and other hard- 
ware ..... 12.59 

C. H. Hutchinson, i pound iron 

and labor on pins . . . 2.03 

Sanborn Carriage Co., 7 tripods 

and welding feet on two . . 6.10 

Sanborn Carriage Co., making 
over bolt, and other blacksmith- 
ing ...... 6.20 

Pike & Heald, soldering . . .85 

J. Brodie Smith, renewing battery, 
2 auto-burners, and other work 
and materials .... 23.90 

Head & Dowst, 266 feet spruce, 

and labor ..... 7.52 



$1,122.25 



firemen's parade. 539 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 



Paid Concord R. R., freight . . $3-4o 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight . 4.03 

John W. Wilson, truckage . . 1.75 



$9.18 



Paid James Brothers, team . . . ^8.50 $8.50 

Total expenditures for 1890 . . . ^1,585.43 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 21.81 

^'1,607.24 



HYDRANT SERVICE. 

Appropriation raised by tax .... $18,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . 80.00 

;^i8,o8o.oo 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Water-Works, for water : 

ist quarter ..... ^4,390. 00 



2d quarter 
3d quarter 
4th quarter 

Total expenditures for 1890 



4,550.00 
4,550.00 
4,590.00 



$18,080.00 



FIREMEN'S PARADE. 

Appropriation raised by tax .... $500.00 

Transferred to reserved fund . . • . 500.00 



540 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 
Appropriation raised by tax .... 



RECEIPTS. 



Received from H. W. Longa : 
Fines and costs 
Fines and costs 
Fines and costs 
Fines and costs 



51,616.92 
1,389.22 
1,527.78 
1.238.39 



Received from J. C. Bickford : 




Clerk fees ..... 


^82.82 


Clerk fees ..... 


496.36 


Clerk fees 


i75'34 


Clerk fees ..... 


412.74 


EXPENDITURES. 




SERVICES. 




Paid N. P. Hunt, police justice . 


$1,500.00 


I. L. Heath, associate justice 


84.00 


John C. Bickford, clerk 


600.00 


H. W. Longa, marshal 


900.00 


John F. Cassidy, assistant marshal 


800.00 


night patrol ..... 


20,349.00 


day patrol 


4,826.25 


extra time of regular and special 




patrol ..... 


2,249.54 


Thomas Francoeur, as janitor 


619-33 


Miss A. B. Brown, matron . 


365.00 



GAS, FUEL, AND WATER. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . $742.60 
Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

20 tons of coal at $6.50 . . . 130.00 



[1, 000. GO 



;>772 31 



$1,167.26 

$37,939-57 



12,293.12 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



541 



II tons of coal at ^6.50 . 

6 J cords of Hard wood 

II 2" cords of hard wood . 

52.8075 tons coal at ^6.25 

Paid A. C. Wallace, i cord of wood 

Water- Works, for water 

L. B. Bod well & Co., 20 pounds 

ice daily from May 8 to Oct. 31 



45-5° 
73-50 

330-05 
1-75 

32115 

15.20 



TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH. 

Paid New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephones at 
Central and Clinton-street sta- 
tions, and tolls . . . $157-78 
Western Union Telegraph Co., 

for telegrams . . . . 4° -39 



!i. 731-25 



ii98.i7 



Paid D. H. Morgan, use of team 

Whitten & Fifield, use of team 

John N. Foss, use of team . 

James Brothers 

E. T. James 

J. C. Nichols, use of teams . 



$6.00 
1. 00 
4.00 
2.25 
151.00 
3-25 



FEEDING PRISONERS. 

Paid Daniel Davis, for rations . . $117.00 

PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid John B. Clarke : 

Criminal dockets and blank writs for 

police court ..... $52.25 

Printing 200 annual reports . . 16.00 

Sundry advertisements . . . 31-50 



$167.50 



;ii7-oo 



542 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Blanks, letter headings, etc. . . ^4i-75 

I, ooo envelopes, 500 printed . . 2.75 

Paid advertising notice to license dogs 

(1889) ...... 21.50 

advertising notice to license dogs 21.00 
Paid Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising notice to license dogs . iS-oo 
E. R. Coburn & Co., letter paper, 

ink, etc., for police court . 5.17 
Temple & Farrington Co., station- 
ery for police court . . . 3.63 
Temple & Farrington Co., sta- 
tionery for marshal . . . 14-23 
Paid A. S. Campbell & Co. : . 

Police court docket, mittimus . . 8. 90 

Blanks for court .... 25.00 

Blank writs for marshal . . . 18.75 

Blank writs and civil docket . . 6.50 

Paid Campbell & Williams, civil dockets 19.00 



Paid Thomas D. Luce, appeals certificate 

to police court .... $4.00 

labor of men and teams in district 

No. 2 .... . 6.25 

H. W. Longa, cash paid for wit- 
ness' fees, teams, etc. . . 116.97 

David Perkins, officers' fees on two 

complaints .... 3.24 

J. F. Cassidy, expenses to Boston 

and return . . . . 5.00 

Longa & Cassidy, conveying pris- 
oners to the house of correction 784.00 

Thomas Francoeur, killing 38 dogs 22.50 

Ada Francueur, caring for lost chil- 
dren ..... 13-00 



502.93 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 543 

Paid Ada Fiancoeur, washing towels, 

blankets, etc. .... $69.00 

Mrs. Filibert, scrubbing and clean- 
ing 102.65 

L. W. Colby, photographing crim- 
inals ..... 8.00 

Patrick Scollard, brooms, brushes, 

matches, crackers, etc. . . 42.23 

Clark M. Bailey, 2 cases of toilet 

paper . , . . . 20.00 

Clark M. Bailey, 15 pounds mop 

yarn, 400 paper bags, etc. . 3.07 

A. J. Wheeler, repairing police 

belts ..... .40 

W. H. Vickery, keys, repairing 

locks, etc. .... 2.20 

R. D. Gay, awnings and netting . 30.00 

D. Evans iS: Co., i gross coat but- 
tons ..... 10.00 

D. Evans & Co., i gross vest but- 
tons ..... 5-00 

D. Evans &: Co., i gross small 

buttons . . . . . 5- 00 

R. D. Martin, engraving police 

badge 3.00 

J. Y. McQueston & Co., 2 cotton 

mattresses .... 7.00 

J. Y. McQueston & Co, 2 pairs of 

pillows ..... 3.00 

J. Y. McQueston & Co., other 

supplies ..... 17.00 

Carl E. York, brushes, brooms, 

coffee, sugar, etc. . . . 18.89 

Carl E. York, soapine . . . 4.93 

Cark E. York, crackers . . i9-39 

Novelty Advertising Co., stamp 

and outfit .... .40 



544 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Geo. Blanchet, gingham, crash, 

towels, thread .... $5- 7° 

Geo. D. Towne, M. D., services 

in case John Moore . . . ' i-5o 

Chas. E. Dodge, call in case of 

John Brown .... 3-oo 

John J. Holland, prescriptions, 
ammonia, insect powder, etc. 
(1889 and 1890) . . . 38.90 

Lewis K. Mead, i carboy of am- 
monia, bath brush, hairbrush, 
comb, etc. .... 34-03 

Ellingwood & Co., A gross El-a-tol 

(disinfectant) .... 25.00 

Mary A. Gorman, salt, crackers, 

ivorine, and matches . . 7.48 

Killey & Wadleigh, one 22 feather 

duster ..... 2.00 

Killey & Wadleigh, i night latch .75 

J. B. Varick Co., pails, brush, 
mop stick, coal sieve, lock, ham- 
mer handles, sperm oil, feather 
duster, and other hardware, ax 
handle, i dozen brooms, paper 
bags, etc 31.58 

Chas F. Sprague, cotton and crash 3.10 

J. F, Conway, repairs on broken 

carriage . . . . . 4.50 

Geo. W. Rief, 630 pounds coco- 

bolo wood, all for billies . . 25.20 

Geo. W. Rief, labor and freight 21.84 

Geo. W. Rief, 26 long billies . 32.50 

• Jos. E. Power, 35 police badges 61.25 

D. Evans & Co, 3 gross M. P. 

coat buttons . . . . 20.00 

T. L. Thorpe, 55 pounds waste . 2.50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



545 



id Boston & Maine Railroad, for 




freight 


$0.84 


J. H. Cram 


•75 


C. W. Downing, medical services 




at sundry times 


49-5° 


Robitaille Brothers 


8.26 


John W. Wilson, trucking . 


•50 


REPAH^S. 





$1,706.80 



Paid J. J. Abbott, painting . . $309.18 
L. M. Aldrich, labor, putty, glass, " 

knobs, lumber, blacksmithing . 39 -08 
Pike & Heald, labor and materials 11-85 
Chas. E. Lord, mason work, white- 
washing, etc. .... 60.55 
M. J. Coleman, repairs on water- 
closets, etc. . . . . 21.67 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing . 80.90 
Pettee & Adams, lime and cement .81 
James P. Finn, paint and labor . 12.52 
C. E. Longa, electrical bell and 

putting in the same . . . 5.53 

John DriscoU . . . . 17.80 

Albert N. Nettle ... 2.50 
L. Wolf, repairs at Clinton-street 

station . . . . . 17.00 

Total expenditures for 1890 ... 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . 



$579-39 

$37,096.16 
843.41 



35 



$37>939-57 



546 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

• REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

Appropriation raised by tax ... . $4,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 443-87 



EXPENDITURES. 



ENGINE-HOUSES. 



Paid J. J. Abbott, paints, paper, and 

labor . .. . . . $111.09 

Pike & Heald, materials for and 

labor on gutter, etc. . . 10.59 

John K. Wilson, 150 feet chair 
rail, 20 hours' labor, painting . i5-5o 

C. H. Hutchinson, 125 hours' la- 
bor on clock. Fire King en- 
gine-house .... 5.00 

F. J. Dustin, paints, oil, etc. . ii-37 

Chas. H. Colburn, chair rail and 

labor 5.55 

Temple &: Farrington Co., 156 

feet molding, putting up . . 17.88 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing and ma- 
terials ..... 91-71 

Thos. A. Lane, steam contract 
for bath-room, etc., in Chemical 
engine-house .... 250.00 

Thos. A. Lane, materials and la- 
bor on boiler, Vine-street en- 
gine-house . . . . 5^.22 

J. B. Varick Co., paints, brushes, 

etc., N. S. Bean stables . . ii-37 

Geo. L. Young, labor, composi- 
tion, felt, Fire King engine- 
house ..... 4.88 



W443-87 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 547 

Paid Louis Wolf, labor and stock in re- 
pairing water-pipe, putting in 
ventilators, registers, etc. . . jg 11.90 

Head & Dow&t, amount as per 
contract for changes and addi- 
tions to the N. S. Bean steam 
fire engine house . . . 2,490.00 

Head & Dowst, lumber, labor, and 
hardware at various engine- 
houses ..... 229.87 

Head & Dowst, lumber, labor, and 
iiardware, N. S. Bean engine- 
house ..... 42.36 

Chas. E. Lord, mason labor, etc. . 2.50 

A. C. Wallace, 50 feet chestnut, 

Fire King engine-house . . 1.25 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Paid J. J. Abbott, glass and setting . $0.50 

James R. Carr & Co., setting 

glass . . . . 2.50 

Frank F. Gate, labor cutting lawn, 

cleaning windows, sweeping 

sidewalks, etc. . . . i^.oo 

R. Landers, slate, zinc, cement, 

labor, etc., repairing roof . 9.92 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing . . 33-53 

Thos. A. Lane, i valve, pipe, and 

labor ..... 1.40 

George Holbrook, labor on door 

and springs . . . . 1.75 

George Holbrook, labor and cord 

for city library . . . 8.25 



564.04 



$71-85 



548 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



COMMON COUNCIL ROOM. 



Paid J. J. Abbott, paints, paper, and 

labor ..... 

Chas. E. Lord, mason labor, etc. 

PUBLIC COMFORT. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, plumbing 

BATTERY BUILDING. 

Paid George L. Young, labor, zinc, 
nails, and solder 

POLICE STATION. 

Paid Head & Dowst, expense of flag- 
pole, finishing, painting, and 
putting up the same 

LABOR, DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Paid labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, District No. 2 



^66.09 
33-15 



^15.46 



$19.18 



$99.24 



$15-56 



$19.18 



$55-86 



155-86 



jauucny . . . . . 

February 


47.00 


March .... 


21.00 


April .... 


25-50 


May 


21.00 


June .... 


32-63 


July .... 


27.00 


August .... 


21.00 


September 


25-50 


October .... 


21.00 


November 


21.00 


December 


25.50 



Paid labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, district 
No. 10, in September . . . . 



$345-26 



99-03 



NEW CITY STABLES. 549 



Paid Drake & Dodge, 5 casks of lime, 2 

bags C. F. salt . . . $7-°o 

Killey & Wadleigh, 3 lights of 

glass, I dozen rubber washers . .26 

Killey & Wadleigh, i extra roll 

for I Vic. hanger ... .25 

J. B. Varick Co., lock, harness 

hook, strap hinges, etc. . . 2.57 

Paid George Holbrook : 

Labor on bronze door-latch, city en- 
gineer's office .... 3.25 
603 feet oak plank, 20 pounds spikes, 

trucking, 29 hours' labor . . 32.92 

Work, nails, etc., at sundry buildings 3.30 

Paid Whitten & Fifield, span and dou- 
ble sleigh, for committee on 
lands and buildings . . . 3.00 

Lovejoy & Stratton, repairing, 
winding, and care of clocks on 
all schoolhouses and other public 
buildings, for the year 1890 . 3i7-So 

D. F. Cressey, bolts for shed to 

store sand .... 3.90 



$373-95 
Total expenditures for 1890 . . . ^4,443.87 



NEW CITY STABLES. 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Mead, Mason & Co., on contract 

for building .... $2,500.00 



550 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Mead, Mason & Co., balance con- 
tract for building . . . $3,306.00 

Charles H. Robie, 314.04 yards 
concrete in basement . . 157.02 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., lum- 
ber for grain boxes, etc. . . 27.78 

Head & Dowst, lumber, door 
jambs, etc. . . . . 3.22 



Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$5,994.02 
5-98 



NEW SCHOOLHOUSE, WEST MANCHESTER. 

Balance unexpended last year .... $9)185.75 
Appropriation raised by tax .... 30,000.00 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from E. W. Brigham, for stone steps . $38.50 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred from incidental ex- 
penses, for school furniture . $900.00 
transferred from reserved fund, 

to balance . . . 3,579.61 

transferred from reserved fund, 

for school .... 200.00 

$4,679.61 



$43,903.86 



EXPENDITURES. 

FURNITURE. 



Paid Head & Dowst, 130 hours putting 

down school desks . . . $32.50 

Grand Rapids School Furniture 

Company .... 963.80 



$996.30 



NEW SCHOOLHOUSE, WEST MANCHESTER. 



551 



BUILDING. 






Paid Head & Dowst, on contract : 






May 


^4,500.00 




June ..... 


3,000.00 




July 


7,500.00 




September .... 


7,300.00 




October 


4,100.00 




November .... 


1,500.00 




December .... 


9,385.00 









$37,285.00 


Bill of extras, — timber, bolts, and la- 






bor changing trusses 


$107.90 




On account of excavation and foun- 






dation ...... 


1,500.00 


C T f\r\l rtCi 



Paid Head & Dowst : 

3 days' labor on stairway partition $7-5° 
189.14 perch of stone, foundation be- 
low grade . . . . . 756.56 
165.4 days' excavation, below grade 248.00 
15,100 brick ..... 214.42 



$1,226.48 



Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 
proposals to complete cchool- 
house in West Manchester 



$20.00 



GRADING. 



Paid pay-roll, district No. 10, labor of 
men and teams, grading lot, etc. 



i29.i8 



$629.18 



552 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



architect's COMPENSATION'. 



Paid Fred W. Stickney, for plans . $500.00 

Fred W. Stickney, on commission 400.00 

Fred W. Stickney . . . 1,039.25 



Total expenditures in 1890 
Balance carried to new account 



$1,939-25 

^43,704.11 
199-75 

$43,903-86 



COMMONS. 



Appropriation raised by tax . 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 
Balance overdrawn 



$4,000.00 

204.03 

10.00 

$4,214.03 



EXPENDITURES. 



REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid John A. Sargent, lampblack and 

green paint . . . . $4.38 

John J. Abbott, paint and labor . 16.47 

John B. Varick Co., lawn-mower, 

hardware, clover seed, etc. . 64.06 

Killey & Wadleigh, cylinder for 

14-inch lawn-mower . . 2.95 

Pike &: Heald, materials and 

plumbing . . . . 5.92 

W. H, Vickery, repairing and 

sharpening lawn-mowers . . 4.00 

D. J. Adams, grinding, cleaning, 

etc., lawn-mowers . . . i.oo 



COMMONS. 553 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson, I casting,cover, 

178 lbs. at 3c $5.34 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor on lawn- 
mowers . . . . . 19-94 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber, labor, etc. ^3-^3 

John J. Bennett, brick, cement, 

and labor .... 3.20 

Thomas A. Lane, materials and 

labor plumbing . . . 42.12 

Jere. Hodge, lumber and grade- 
stakes . . . . . 13 62 

Temple & Farrington Co., i time- 
book ..... .50 

^196.63 



WATER AND MACADAMIZING. 

C. H. Robie : 

New walks in Merrimack common, 

72.55 sq. yds., at 45c. . . . $32-64 

Re-covering walks in Merrimack com- 
mon, 1,394.66 sq. yds., at 25c. . 348.66 
Other concrete work . . . 289.59 
Concrete work in Concord common, 

f,892.45 sq. yds.,at 25c. . . 473-ii 

Paid Water-Works, for water for )'ear . 300.00 



FLOWERS, LOAM, ETC. 

Paid J. S. Holt & Co., 160 bushels of 

ashes at 15c. .... $24.00 

Lewis Coir, 1 10 loads of loam . 99.00 

Crombie & Patten, 23 maple trees 

for Merrimack common . . 23.00 

Crombie & Patten, i elm tree for 

Park-street common . . i.oo 

Crombie & Patten, i rock maple 

for Hanover common . . i.oo 



$1,444.00 



554 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid F. S. Worthen & Son, flowers on 
Hanover common . 

Flanders & Hood, flowers on Fre- 
mont common 

H. H. Huntress, flowers 

D. H. Young, manure 

John J. Silva 

Cavanaugh Brothers, sand 



$27.43 

38.84 
74-05 
3.00 
30.00 
46.75 



$368.07 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. 2. 



Paid labor of men and teams, 


as per pay 


-roll : 




January . 
February . 
March 








$6.13 

37-25 
57-18 




April 

May 








54-25 
204.80 




June 
July 








143.68 
20.00 




August 
September 
October . 








384.43 

227.25 
62.25 


$1,197.22 




Paid labor of men and teams, per common's pay-roll 




April 
May 






$83.75 
144.00 




June 

July . . 

August 

September 

October . 

November 






157.62 
148.75 
105.00 
191.99 

104.75 

72.25 














$1,008.11 



Total expenditures for 1890 



^21403 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



555 



STARK MONUMENT SQUARE. 



Paid appropriation raised by tax . 
Transferred from Water- Works . 



ISico.oo 
8,000.00 

58,100.00 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per common's pay-roll: 



June 

July .. 
August . 
October 
November 



Paid Stark heirs, for land 
Transferred to reserved fund 



$7-25 

8.75 

12.75 

7-75 
24.25 



$60.75 

8,000.00 

39-25 

g8,ioo.co 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



Appropriation raised by tax 
Balance on hand January i, 1890 



!i,ooo.oo 
548.59 



RECEIPTS. 

Received from B. A. Stearns, superintendent, from 

sale of lots .... . . $1)783.37 

from S. B. Putnam, treasurer of trustees 
of cemetery funds .... 2,600.00 

from George A. Vergin (overdraft) . 40.00 



$5)971-96 



556 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 





EXPENDITURES 






LABOR. 




Paid labor of men and teams, as per 


Pine Grove 


cemetery pay-rolls : 




January .... 


$190-57 


February 






190 


23 


March 






190 


47 


April 






281 


45 


May 






317 


46 


June 






383 


65 


July . 






382 


34 


August . 






300 


57 


September 






351 


83 


October . 






279 


13 


November 






274 


51 


December 




207 


70 


Paid Byron A. Stearns, 29 days' worl, 




of team, from December 23 


, 


1889, to January 25, 1890 


43-50 


PLANTS, TREES, LOAM, AN 


D CLAY. 


Paid H. H. Huntress, flower plants 


$50.00 


J. Woodman, for 


97 lo 


ads of loam 


145 


50 



Waterman Smith, 1,250 feet turf 

at i^c i8-75 

George H. Folsom, 45 rock maple 

trees . . . . . i5-oo 

A. Turcotte, 5 loads of loam . 7.50 

C. C. Webster, 158 loads of clay . 158.00 

Frank Emerson, 212 loads of loam 371-00 



COAL, WATER, TELEPHONE, ETC. 

Paid John Driscoll, stove brush and 
blacking, large water-pot and tin 
dippers ..... ^ 



$3,393-41 



$765-75 



■57 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 557 

Paid Darwin A. Simons, 2 cuspidors . $0-7° 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 6 tons egg 

coal ..... 40.50 

Water-Works, for water from 
October i, 1889, to Octol^er r, 
1890 ..... 300.00 

New England Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone . 48-25 

Moore & Preston, 5 70-2,000 tons 

coal at $6.25 .... 33-98 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



Paid Wm. E. Moore, 2 blank books . $6.50 

Wm. E. Moore, 100 postals and 

printing same . . . . 2.50 

Wra. E. Moore, printing note 

heads ..... 2.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, 
ink, rubber bands, and other sta- 
tionery ..... 8.19 

Byron A. Stearns, postage and 

envelopes .... 3.29 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid Head & Dowst, lock, keys, knobs 

and labor, lumber, brick . . ^23.12 
N. Whalen, straps and repairing . 3.25 
John T. Beach, repairs on team . 45-5° 
J. J. Abbott, painting and varnish- 
ing 4-5° 

John B. Varick Co., oil, nails, 
hose coupling, window brush, 
grass seed, phosphate, etc. . 66.31 

Pike & Heald, plumbing and 

materials . . . . 74-29 



^22.98 



558 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Jere. Hodge, grade stakes, nails, 

and labor . . . . $14-63 

C. W. Anderson &: Co., repairing 

clocks . . . . . 2.00 

Timothy Shea, cleaning vault . 3.00 

J. Stickney, rubber overcoat and 

blanket . . . . . 9.00 

C. H. Hutchinson, 2 cast stands 

finished . . . . . 1.20 

J. H. Wales, materials and labor 

for chimney .... 4.00 

Palmer & Garmon, 100 graves 

numbered, stones and labor . 47- 15 



GENERAL EXPENSE. 

Paid J. C. Nichols & Son, carriage hire 
for committees 

Geo. W. Reed, carriage hire for 
committees .... 

James Brothers, use of team 

Henry H. Huse, services as clerk, 
and for making the annual 
report ..... 

E. T. James, use of teams . 

Henry P. Hunter, clerk for com- 
mittee ..... 

G. R. Vance & Co., i hanging 
lamp and bracket . 

Total expenditures for 1890 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 
Balance ...... 



^297.95 



2.00 




4.00 




50.00 




4.00 




25.00 




1-45 






$107.45 




$5.'Oi7-54 


• 


654.22 


. 


300.20 



;,97i.96 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



559 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Appropriation raised by tax 

Balance unexpended last year 

Received from C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 



$1,500.00 

70-45 
1,300.00 

$2,870.45 





EXPENDITURES 




LABOR. 




Paid labor, as per pay-roll, at cemetery 




January . . . . . 


^71-25 


February 








52-75 


March . 








51-50 


April 








140.45 


May 








197-50 


June 








196.20 


July . 








277.86 


August . 








208.42 


September 








231.77 


October . 








166.57 


November 








166.58 


December 








105.25 


Paid George Piper, team labor 




96.00 


B. F. Bascom, team labor 5! day 


3 '23.00 



- $1,985-10 



WATER, TURF, SAND, ETC. 

Paid George Piper : 

Turf and sand $i8-37 

Stone ...... 8.00 

37 loads of sand .... 7.40 

5 loads of stone .... 3.75 

Team 23<( days .... 11.00 

Paid Water-Works for water, from Oct. 

I, 1889, to Oct. I, 1890 . . 35.55 

Timothy Carr, 7 loads of loam . 7.00 

C. C. Webster, 266 feet of turf . 7.98 



560 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid George Whitford, 335 loads of 

filling §67.00 

Peter Woodman, 850 feet of turf . 10.00 
Peter Woodman, 73 loads of loam 36-50 
J. Francis, flower plants . . 81.87 
C. H. G. Foss, cash paid for flow- 
ers, shrubs, etc. . . . 7.12 
Killey & Wadleigh, fertilizers, 

grass seeds, etc. . . . 25.81 
Paid J. B. Varick Co. : 

1 lawn-mower . . . . . 6.90 
50 feet j4-mch. rubber hose . . 4.00 
75 feet ^-inch rubber hose . . 6.75 
Fertilizers, grass seed, etc. . . 28.73 
Nails, brush, etc. .... .69 

Paid F. X. Chenette, 107 loads of filling 21.40 

F. X. Chenette, team i^ days . 4.25 

C. H. Chase, evergreens . . 4.00 
Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

Filing 2 saws ..... .40 

2 door frames . . . . . i.oo 

3 screen doors ..... 9.00 
7 coffin boxes ..... 6.40 

Paid B. F. Bascom, 3 loads of loam . 3.00 

S. W. Blood, 37 loads of loam . 18.50 

STATIONERY. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., blank 

book and stationery . . . §4- 19 

F. G. Riddle, 300 receipts, printed 

and bound . . . . 1.75 

Campbell & Williams, 200 receipts 1.25 



LABOR, DISTRICT NO. 2. 

Paid labor, as per pay-roll, District No. 2 : 

February ..... $4- 00 

April 53.87 



$442.37 



^7-19 



RECEIVING TOMB. 561 



June ^23.13 

July 61.38 



REPAIRS, EXTENSIONS, TOOLS, ETC. 

Paid Pike & Heald, plumbing and ma- 
terials ..... ^53.12 

Palmer & Gannon, lead and stone 

work . . . . , 5.60 

J. J. Abbott, paints and painting 7.68 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairs on 
gate, etc. .... 2.83 

Thomas A. Lane, Akron pipe, 
plumbing on extension of water- 
works, labor on urinal . . 80.93 

G. W. Dodge, rubber boots, i pair 2.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., 4 lawn 

rakes ..... 2.00 

Head & Dowst, 189 loads of grav- 
el and grading .... 

Head & Dowst, 2 loads of stone . 

Pettee & Adams, ^ barrel cement 



Total expenditures for 1890 . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



;^i42. 38 



56.41 




1. 00 




■75 






$212.82 






^2,789.86 




80.59 



$2,870.45 



RECEIVING TOMB. 

Balance unexpended from last year . . . $399-39 

Transferred to reserved fund .... 399-39 

36 



562 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



WATER-WORKS. 



Balance on hand January i, 1891 



$39'589-i5 



RECEIPTS. 




ipts from water rents 


$89,970.80 


fines 


151.80 


labor, and pipe sold 


298.77 


sale of grass . 


2.00 


G. G. Griffin, lease 


1. 00 


George P. Clark, lease 


2.00 


Fletcher Brown, lease 


I. CO 


W. G. Brown, rent 


36.00 




c/*^^ Ik f\ ^ '^ -1 




^90,403.37 




$130,052.52 


EXPENDITURES 





GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid Charles K. Walker, superintendent : 

Salary ...... $1,500.00 

Gas 38.78 

Two directories .... 4.00 

Express ...... 9.05 

Postage stamps . . . . 20.13 

Repairing chairs .... 2.25 

Car fare . . . . . . i.oo 

Sundries ..... 6. (yd 

Paid Burnham & Brown, counsel fees . 5.00 
Jos. B. Sawyer, for services as civil 
engineer, and for expenses and 

cash paid for recording deeds . 620.40 
M. M. Tidd, for services and 

report on high-pre.ssure service 359.60 

Town of Auburn, taxes . . 20.88 
Town of Auburn, one half expense 

rubbling shore . . . 21.05 



WATER-WORKS. 



568 



Paid E. R. Angell, analysis of water . 
John N. Foss, team to station 
Thomas M. Freeman, team to 
station ..... 
E. T. James, team 
James Brothers .... 
Paid Geo. Fletcher & Co. : 

24 dinners ..... 
Lunch . . ... 
Steamboat use .... 

Paid A. R. Ingham, 9 dinners 

A. R. Ingham, 4 dinners for horses 
George E. Morrill, auditing Water- 
Works account, 1889, 4}4 days 
at ^5 per day .... 
J. Y. McQueston & Co., 6 chest- 
nut chairs .... 
New England Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Co., use of three tele- 
phones ..... 
H. I. McQuade, repairing tele- 
graph at pumping station 
James A. Weston, clerk of board 
of water commissioners . 



^6.25 
2.00 

9.00 
66.50 

35-5° 

36.00 
4.00 

20.00 
9.00 
2.00 



22.50 
3.00 

108.00 

4-5° 
50.00 



$2,987.05 



DAMAGES. 



Paid N. S. Bean S. F. Engine 


Co., for 




pumping out cellar . 






$8.60 


J. J. Abbott, glass and 


setting, at 




Webster block 






4.60 


Mrs. E. Boudreau 






5.00 


Leander Boudreau 






16.00 


Norman H. Colby 






300.00 


Thomas Carey 






5.00 


Thomas Corcoran 






75.00 


Joseph Drapeau . 






6. CO 



564 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid E. Dauphine 




^5.00 


P. Flatterly 




10.00 


Mrs. C. Gallagher 




10.00 


Mrs. L. Lavaler . 




5.00 


Michael Leighley 




5.00 


Mrs. R. Mandleshon . 




5.00 


Thomas H. Mahoney . 




10.00 


Renker& Scheer 




15.00 


Chas. H. Robie, concrete work on 




Main-street engine-house 


38.51 


Chas. H. Robie, concrete work on 




Manchester street . 


22.95 


Thos. H. Tuson 


24.10 


Geo. W. Webster 


25.00 









$595-76 



Paid T. J. Crombie, for land 

A. F. Fox, buildings and lease 
J. P. Grififin, for land . 
George W. Reed, for land . 
Charles H. Reed, for land . 



5243-75 

875.00 

47.00 

900.00 

225.00 



$2,290.75 



METERS, GAUGES, GATES, PLUMBING MATERIALS, ETC. 

Paid American Steam Gauge Co., guages 

Chapman Valve Co., gates . 

Gilchrist & Gorham, plumbing 
materials .... 

Hays Manufacturing Co., stop- 
cocks and service boxes . 

Thomas A. Lane, plumbing mate- 
rials ..... 

Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co., 
10 hydrants .... 

National Meter Co., for meters . 

Thomson Meter Co., for meters . 



|2I 


50 


488 


10 


191 


06 


380 


65 


88 


37 


352 


00 


2,827.50 


147.40 



WATER-WORKS. 



565 



Paid Union Water Meter Co., for meters 

and repairs .... ^261.20 

Walworth Manufacturing Co., cor- 
poration cocks, etc. . . 181.83 

W. H. Ward & Co., corporation 

cocks and bands . . . 50.00 



$4,989.61 



BRICK, CEMENT, LUMBER. 

Paid Pettee & Adams, cement 

Parker & Jencks, hemlock boards 
D. I. Mahoney, lumber, meter 

boxes, etc. .... 
Mills & Sturtevant, lumber, posts, 

etc. ...... 

Head & Dowst, brick and lumber 
J. Hodge, lumber and boxes 
Parker R. Brown, cement and 

wood ..... 



$36.90 
8.66 

236.85 



134-14 


19-45 


14-85 


8-55 



$459-40 



IRON PIPE, CASTINGS, ETC. 

Paid Builders Iron Foundry, iron pipes, 

reducers, branches . . . $618 
Boston Lead Manufacturing Co., 

100 pounds of fine solder . 15 

Chadwick Lead Works, lead pipe 

and pig lead . . . . 874 

Holyoke Hydrant Iron-Works, 20 

hydrants ..... 6S0 

P. C. Holmes & Co., two bevel 

wheel rims . . . 158 

McNeal Pipe and Foundry Co., 

for pipe 3,oor 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 

materials and labor . . . 407 



73 
75 
96 

GO 

66 

54 
54 



566 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Pennichuck Water- Works, iron 

pipe $17-70 

Whittier Machine Co., water gates 

and pipes, coated with adamanta 602.04 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., picks, 

barbed wire, etc. . . . $38.08 

J. B. Varick Co., nails, strap 
hinges, staples, oil, bolts, butts, 
paints, solder, pick handles, lan- 
terns, measuring tape, sponges, 
packing, etc. . . . . 195-69 



BLACKSMITHING. 



Paid D. F. Cressey, sharpening picks, 

drills, chisels, etc. . . . $38.80 

A. Filion, repairing pipe wagon . 19-50 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 



Paid Concord Railroad Corporation . $520.49 
J. W. Wilson, truckage . . 25.00 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., note heads, 

postals, etc. .... $9-25 

Campbell & Williams, 2,900 water 

notices, 1,000 postals printed . 31-50 

John B. Clarke, printing 500 re- 
ports, 32 pages . . . 28.50 

John B. Clarke, 800 pamphlets, 20 

pages, and covers . . . 32.00 

John B. Clarke, advertising sundry 

notices ..... 10.50 



176.92 



$233-77 



$58-30 



$545-49 



WATER-AVORKS. 567 

Paid E. R. Coburn & Co., envelopes, 

rubber bands, paper, ink, etc. . ^19-15 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising water bills ... .So 
Temple & Farrington Co., blocks, 

pencils, and other stationery . 5.64 

Thomas Tuson, 14,050 meter and 

rate bills .... 45.80 

$183.14 



Paid Austin, Flint & Day, for 22 loads 

of wood ..... $7-15 

Burns & Poore, for coal and wood io-37 

Moore & Preston, 81 tons of coal 

(egg) 59-63 

J. F. Wyman, wood ... 4.70 

Geo. Whitford, wood . . . 21.00 
E. P. Johnson Co., 46 tons 

Draper egg coal . . . 322.00 
E. P. Johnson Co., 4 400-2000 

tons coal (stove) . . . 30- 45 



TOOLS, SUPPLIES, AND REPAIRS. 

Paid P. C. Cheney Co., 60 pounds No. 

I wiping waste . . . $4-8o 

City of Manchester, 132 days' 

work . . . . . 20.25 

Cavanaugh Brothers, 23 loads of 

sand 5.75 

John Driscoll, tin cup, washdish, 

etc. ..... 1.60 

Eager & Rand, oil, soap, brooms, 

etc. ..... 3.10 

Edson Manufacturing Co., 15 feet 

suction hose, 3-inch . . 23.52 



$455-3° 



568 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid E. A. G. Holmes, labor, window 

frames, sash, etc. . . . $187.90 

C. H. Hutchinson, labor and ma- 
terials furnished . . . 165.06 

Dennis Kerwin, h barrel tallow, 

124 pounds at 6c. . . . 7.44 

L. L. Lord, tools . . . ii-o5 

Leonard & Ellis, 985 gallons burn- 
ing oil 19.75 

Pike & Heald, materials and labor 70.61 

J. Brodie Smith, renewing battery, 

etc. ..... 5.92 

J. Stickney, 4 oak leather pack- 
ing ..... 20.00 

Seeley Brothers, 5 gallons marine 

black ..... 6.50 

Summer & Goodwin, calking 

irons, ladle, etc. . . . 11.00 

Sewell & Day Cordage Co., jute 

packing . . . . . 48.62 

Stark Mills, for use of 2-horse 

wagon ..... 150.00 

Taunton Locomotive Manufactur- 
ing Co., one melting furnace . 18-50 

Vacuum Oil Co., 103^2 gallons 

cylinder oil . . . . 67.28 

G. R. Vance & Co., 6 galvanized 
iron pails . . . . 6.00 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. : 

1 crown gear, 125 feet, and finishing, 
planing, shrinking on wrought iron 

hook, with royalty . . . 180.00 

2 steel splines, 2 steel backers . . 5.20 
Labor on drills .... 3.50 



^1,043-35 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



569 



LABOR OF MEN AND TEAMS, AS PER PAY-ROLLS. 



Paid labor of men and teams, per pay-rolls : 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October . 

November 

December 



$1,046.19 
899.41 
964.24 
984.59 

1,047.54 
1,103.82 

i>326.33 
1,017-53 
1,372.90 
1,103.69 
1,107.69 
1,133.42 



Paid labor of men and teams, per pay-roll, district 
No. 2, September ..... 

Total expenditures for 1890 .... 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred to interest . . $36,000.00 

transferred to reserved fund . 9,711.47 
transferred to Stark Monument 

square .... 8,000.00 



Balance 



$13. 107-35 

77-50 
^33'403-69 



^53.71^-47 
42,937-36 

^130,052.52 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 

Appropriation raised by tax ..... $2,000.00 

Received from county of Hillsborough, for board of 

paupers ........ 2,201.57 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 134-89 



^336-46 



570 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXPENDITURES. 



GROCERIES. 

Paid G. W. Adams, groceries 

Charles H. Clark, groceries . 
Allen N. Clapp, groceries 
L. Dowd, groceries 
Eager & Rand, groceries 
H. Fradd & (^o., groceries . 
T. F. Fifield, groceries 
Griffin Bros., groceries 
Patrick Harrington, groceries 
O. D. Knox, groceries 
Michael Kearns, groceries 
Michael Kenney, groceries . 
George C. Lord, groceries 
Thomas H. Mahoney, groceries 
John McKean, groceries 
McQuade Bros., groceries 
D. M. Poore, groceries 
Robitaille Bros., groceries 
Patrick Ryan, groceries 
W. F. Sleeper & Co., groceries 
Town of Enfield, groceries . 
Carl E. York, groceries 
B. Bresnehan, groceries 

D. A. Shanahan, groceries 

WOOD AND COAL, 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., for fuel 
Fred T. Dunlap, for fuel 
S. L. Flanders, for fuel 
Patrick Healy, for fuel 
Thomas Kelley, for fuel 
Moore & Preston, for fuel 

E. P. Johnson Co., for iuel 

F. X. Chenette, for fuel 
William Smith, V-, cord of wood 



§44.00 
22. 10 
44.00 
10.00 
60.00 
24.16 
95.00 

221.00 

87.00 

5.00 

3-9° 
40.00 
12.00 
1 14.00 
16.00 
88.00 

15-49 

24.96 

86.00 

10.00 

2.72 

5.00 

8.00 

12.00 



^19-50 
42.30 

7.87 
12.00 
40.00 

2.00 

7-25 
2.00 
4.00 



$i>o5o-33 



$136.92 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



571 



CARE AND BOARD 

Paid county of Hillsborough 
Mrs. William Chase 
DeCourcey & Holland 
Cordelia A. Farwell 
A. D. Hatch 
Ellen J. Maycock 
New Hampshire Asylum for the 

Insane 
Joseph Rivard 
State Industrial School 
John D. Welcome 



$56.00 

1 20.00 

3.00 

6.69 

120.00 

65.18 

104.68 

67.00 

2,271.43 

116.00 



$2,929.98 



Paid F. L. Downs, for shoes 
Plumer & Holton, hose 
Weston & Martin, i wool shirt 



MEDICINE. 



Paid Eames Brothers . 
I^ane & Co. 
Lewis K. Mead . 
J. J. Holland & Co. 
A. D. Smith 



Si. 50 
1.50 
1.50 



!i2.75 
8.00 

20.00 
5-5° 

■75 



•50 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Clarke, blank bills . 

C. W. Downing, certificate of in- 
sanity (2 cases). 

L. Melville French 

H. D. Lord, house rent 

David Moore, rent 

H. P. Marshall, conveying, at dif- 
ferent times, two insane paupers 
to asvlum .... 



^8.75 

6.00 
3.00 
6.00 



572 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., for 8 
directories .... 

F. L. Wallace & Co., burial ex- 
penses ..... 

Charles F. Flanders, certificate of 
insanity ..... 

Thomas F. Collins, burial of H. 
Donovan .... 

E. V. Turcotte, burial expenses . 

Total expenditures for 1890 . 



$16.00 




67.00 




3.00 




25.00 




10.00 






$167.63 





^336-46 



CITY FARM. 



Appropriation raised by tax 



$4,000.00 



RECEIPTS. 



Received from L. M. 
city farm, as follows 
Hay sold 
Potatoes 
Pigs 
Fines 
Labor 
Straw 
Butter 
Lard 
Eggs 
Stone 
Cabbage 
Beets 
Hides 
Veal , 
Chickens 



Streeter, superintendent of 



5856.84 
464.63 
253.00 
208.12 

193-75 
115.22 

43-24 
33-00 
12.55 
98.89 

50.75 
16.56 

15-43 
8.46 



CITY FARM. 



573 



Pork 

Cream and milk 

Hams sold 

Rhubarb 

Squash 

Parsnips 

Corn 

Beans 

Carrots 

Weighing hay 

Old iron 

Dandelions 

Use of boar 

Use of bull 

Grass 

Turnips 

Board of sow 



Received of the estate of J. B. Clark 
of Otis Barton (overdraft) 
of J. B. Baril (overdraft) 

Transferred from reserved fund . 



EXPENDITURES. 

HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 

Paid L. M. Streeter, superintendent 
Mrs. Mary E. Streeter, matron 
George W. Bailey 
Lucy Bunker 
Thomas Burke 
Arthur Bancroft 
Thomas Barker 
Edward Burke 
Annie Cook 
Wm. Cheney 
Levi Colwell 



^8.25 
6.70 
365 
7-95 
7-54 
2.48 
1. 00 
1.50 
1.25 
4.40 

5-74 
2.25 
2.00 
1. 00 
2.00 
•85 
•75 

ii2.64 

15-63 

1. 00 



;5oo.oo 

300.00 

129.00 

6S.61 

85-05 
82.65 

1-35 
16.00 

4.94 
10.66 

4.00 



S2, 432-75 



29-57 
1,004.98 

$7>467-30 



574 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Mary Clark 






$21.25 


Alfred Corey 






2.62 


W. E. Davis 






87.00 


Wra. Day 






16.00 


J. B. Ensworth . 






40.00 


Mrs. T. J. Estes . 






100.74 


Thomas J. Estes . 






185.95 


C. Estes 






2.58 


Will. Fowler 






26.66 


James Francceur . 






7.00 


John Gilbert 






25.86 


Michael Godfrey . 






1.25 


Patrick Healy 






5.00 


Kate Houghton . 






64.29 


Hannah Hackett . 






47-82 


H. D. Judkins . 






16.13 


L. A. Lannon 






20.00 


Michael Lowe 






2.00 


Chas. L. Lyford . 






10.00 


Peter McQuillan . 






42.00 


Nettie A. Merrill . 






8.38 


Frank Merrill 






16.90 


James H. Martin . 






5.00 


Kate Proctor 






31-71 


Levi J. Proctor . 






48.65 


John Proctor 






39-5° 


Will. C. Rogers . 






9.87 


Hattie A. Rever . 






21.78 


H. W. Schimmell, Jr. 






32-50 


Jennie Sargent 






6.88 


Mary Smith 






78.70 


W. K. Stockdale . 






9.00 


G. D. Sanborn . 






60.99 


Edward Tilton, cutting 


ice . 




10.00 


C. W. Pike 






80.00 


Patrick Murphy . 






1. 00 


Warren Harvey . 


• 




4.00 



$2,391.27 



CITY FARM. 



575 



Paid Moore & Preston : 

10 tons stove coal .... ^75-oo 

1 barrel Cumberland coal . . . i.oo 
30 925-2,000 tons furnace coal . 179-73 

Paid Burns & Poore, 9 tons of egg coal 

at $6.85 61.65 

Burns & Poore, i barrel Cumber- 
land coal .... 1.00 

CLOTHING AND DRY GOODS. 

Paid Barton & Co., crash, cambric, 

prints, cottons, etc. . . . $83.97 
George Blanchet, drilling, ging- 
ham, etc 53.79 

Clark & Estey, socks, drawers, 

needles, etc. . . . . 61.77 

Charles F. Sprague, check, cottons, 

etc 9.30 

H. M. Moody, jumpers, overalls, 
coats, caps, umbrella, collars, 
straw hats, etc. .... 53-3° 

Paid James A. Folsom : 

Overalls, suits, and hat . . . 16.00 

2 pairs of pants .... 2.50 
5 vests 3.75 

11 jumpers . . . . . 5.50 
Paid Weston & Hill, 92^4^ cottons at 

7^ cents ..... 6.92 

G. W. Dodge, boots, shoes, etc. . 29.30 

F. L. Downs, boots, shoes, etc. . 35- 00 

Fred C. Dow, boots, shoes, etc. . 11.87 

Wingate & Gould, shoes, etc. . 28.80 

Burke Bros., calf shoes . . 2.00 

H. B. Fairbanks, 5 pairs of shoes 3.75 



;i8..-.8 



to?. 52 



576 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Paid Bartlett & Thompson, 366 pounds 

of beef at 7 cents . . . $25.62 
G. W. Batchelder, 22 bushels of 

potatoes at 95 cents . . . 20.90 

C. E. Cox, beef .... 280.52 

A. N. Clapp, oil . . . . 25.75 

Eager & Rand, groceries . . 22.62 

A. G. Grenier, groceries . . 114.84 

George H. Hubbard, tobacco . 103- 79 

Hardy & Co., groceries , . 56.86 

McQuade, Bros., groceries . . 172.27 

Manchester Beef Co., beef and lamb 26.21 
E. S. Newton, lobsters, oysters, 

fish, etc 34- 6 1 

J. H. Pierce & Co., groceries . 99-85 
Public Market, S. P. Pike & Co., 

beef and provisions . . . 83.57 

Joseph Quirin, groceries . . 8.13 

Tom W. Robinson, beef . . 77-33 
L. Shelters, onions, potatoes, and 

flour ..... 114-99 
R. G. Sullivan, smoking tobacco . 19-44 
J. H. Wiggin, groceries . . 113.02 
Carl E. York .... 62.49 
Drake & Parker, 24 barrels Pills- 
bury' s best flour . . . 180.30 
Merrill & Freeman, 3 barrels Roll- 
er Queen flour . . . . 15-45 
E. M. Slayton, 40 bushels of pota- 
toes 32.00 

Manchester Provision Co., 3 pork 

barrels . . • • • 3- 00 
Manchester Provision Co., 17 

pounds Bologna saugages . . 1.02 
Manchester Provision Co., other 

provisions .... 4.50 



CITY FARM. 



577 



Paid N. H. Brewing Co., barrels, etc. 
George C. Lord, provisions . 



$15.92 



51,715-30 



FURNITURE AND COOKING UTENSILS. 

Paid Dunmore & McQuarry, for one 6- 

gallon jar . . . . $1.00 
F. E. Nelson, crockery, knives and 

forks, kitchen utensils . . 39-9^ 

D. A. Simons, platters and bakers 12.66 

C. A. Trefethen, watchman's clock 80.00 
C. A. Trefethen, forks, knives, 

spoons, and alarm clock . . 10.00 

Weston & Hill, carpet and thread 8.44 
Paid Higgins Brothers : 

I dark pine chamber suit . . . 15-00 

I spring bed ..... 3.00 

1 excelsior mattress . . . . 2.00 
27 yards carpeting . . . . i7-55 

2 skeins thread .... .06 

3 sham holders . . . . 1.50 
I spring bed ..... 3.00 



;t94.i2 



SERVICES AND MEDICINES. 



Paid Jabez Alexander, V. S., services, 

and medicines to animals . $14.00 

J. B. Baril, insect powder, etc. . ii-95 

E. H. Currier, expectorant . . i.oo 

Eames Bros., prescriptions . . 5.85 

Dr. L. M. French, visit . . 3.00 

J. J. Holland, prescriptions . 1.90 

J. N. Lacourse & Co., medicines 1.63 

L. K. Mead, prescription . . .35 



$39.68 



37 



578 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Cavanaugh Bros., i span of brown 

mares ..... ^500.00 
John L. Woodman, i boar . . 6.00 



$506.00 



FERTILIZERS, SEEDS, ETC. 

Paid Aretas Blood, 5 cords of manure 

at $3.50 $17-50 

Bartlett & Dow, i ton Mapes Po- 
tato Fertilizer . . . . 45 -oo 

James P. Elliott, 2 bushels yellow- 
eyed beans .... 7.00 

John N. Foss, 23 cords of manure 

at $3.50 80.50 

James H. Gregory, vegetable seeds 8.50 

May Brothers, 2 cherry and 2 
plum trees, 8 grape and 24 
blackberry vines . . . 16.25 

P. J. Page, 3 loads of manure at 

$1-50 4-5° 

L. B. Putnam, 4 loads of manure 

at $2 . . . ' . . 8.00 

Killey & Wadleigh, 1,000 pounds 

Bradley's X. L. Phosphate . 18.00 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 

252 pounds galvanized wire at 5fc. . $14.49 

126 pounds galvanized wire . . 7.25 

I mowing-machine sharpener . . 5.75 

I champion horse-rake . . . 24.00 

Other hardware .... 42-33 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., paint, 

varnish, tools, and hardware . 61.17 



S205.25 



CITY FARM. 



579 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., plow-points, 

coffee mill, etc. . . . $12.50 

B. Varick Co., Yankee plow, 2 
hog scrapers . , , . 13-00 



HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 



Paid Parker R. Brown, bran, rye meal 

oats, etc. .... 
Merrill & Freeman, bran, oats 

meal, middlings 
Partridge Brothers, oats, meal 

middlings, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, bran, oats, meal 

middlings, etc. 



$32-19 

467-51 

53-35 

146.02 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid Pettee & Adams, i cask of lime, 

100 pounds of cement 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., laths, 

lumber, and labor on windmills 
C. H. Hutchinson, nuts, screws, 

bolts, and labor on boiler ' 
Head &: Dowst, 1,000 feet spruce 

boards ..... 
Head & Dowst, 200 laths . 
Head &: Dowst, 600 feet hemlock 

boards . 
Thomas A. Lane, materials and 

plumbing .... 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., stove grates, repairs . 
Pike & Heald, stove grate, zinc 

etc. .... 

Pike & Heald, dippers, kettles 

and repairs 



$2.00 
15.00 

33-94 

15.00 

•52 

8.40 

36.29 

23.08 

3-87 

3-05 



$180.49 



$699.07 



580 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOB. 



Paid D. L. Stevens, deputy sheriff, 8 
feet stable gutter 
L. N. Westover, lumber and la- 
bor ..... 
J. J. Abbott, paints 
George Holbrook, 9 hours' labor 
at stable ..... 
A. C. Wallace, lumber 



49-43 
13-30 

2.50 
8.62 



$216.20 



BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC. 



Paid J. H. Cram, shoeing horses and 

oxen . . . . . 

F. N. McClaren, sponges, dusters, 

and repairing harnesses 
F. N. McClaren, 2 collars, halters, 

repairing harness, etc. 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, painting 

wagon, neckyoke, setting 4 

tires, etc. . . . . 

Paid H. C. Ranno & Son : 

I pair heavy team harnesses 

I pair leather fly nets 

Stable blanket, and one pair street 

blankets .... 

Leatherine blankets . 
Paid Thomas P. Riley, robe, whip, and 
axle grease 
J. O. Tremblay, shoeing horses 
P. D. St. Germain 



$76.25 



11-95 



27.50 



35-54 

65.00 
3.00 

10.50 
1.50 

12.75 
4.00 

•75 



$248.74 



Paid New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone . $38.50 
J. O. Burbank, 150 printed envel- 
opes . ... .85 



INDIGENT SOLDIERS. 581 

Paid Clough & Co., 2 boxes . . ^1.20 
Win. C. Chase, 108 pounds wash- 
ing powder .... 7.56 
Concord Railroad, freight . . 2.60 
John B. Clarke, 25 i ruled sheets 2.50 
C. W. Leonard, disinfectants . i5-75 
R. D. Martin, rubber stamp , i.oo 

F. P. Proctor, axle oil . . .68 
E. P. Richardson, agent, $10,000 

insurance in the Manufacturers 

«& Merchants' .... 200.00 

G. G. Richardson, buttons, 

needles, stove polish, etc. . i9-i7 

Temple & Farrington Co., paper, 

pens, ink, order book . . 15-20 

Temple & Farrington Co., room 

paper, etc. . . . . 2.04 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

pigs for sale . . . . 7.60 

A. C. Wallace, 4 loads of sawdust 4.00 

L. M. Streeter, postage stamps, 

machine needles, expenses to 

Boston and return, expenses to 

Wilton, return, etc. . . . 26.63 



Total expenditures for 1890 ... . 1^7,467.30 



INDIGENT SOLDIERS. 
Appropriation raised by tax ... . . ^1,000.00 

EXPENDITURES. 
HOUSE RENT. 

Paid Agnes Linen .... $15.00 

D. Moore ..... 27.00 

W. C. Blodgett .... 6.00 



582 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CLOTHING. 



Paid Chalifoux & Co. . 
George L. Robinson 



^3.00 
2.00 



GROCERIES. 



Paid G. W. Adams, groceries 


^124.00 


Allen N. Clapp . 


4.71 


Griffin Bros. 


276.00 


McQuade Bros. 


3.00 


Thomas H. Mahoney . 


24.00 


E. W. Perkins . 


7-75 


W. F. Sleeper & C^o. . 


20.00 


George C. Lord . 


8.00 



$467.46 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. 
F. T. Dunlap 
E. P. Johnson Co. 



CARE AND BOARD. 



Paid Mrs. N. Cook 

Daniel Sullivan . 



Paid L. K. Mead 



MEDICINE. 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid O. D. Abbott, certificate of in- 
sanity . . . . . 
C. W. Downing, certificate of in- 
sanity . . . . . 



!i7-25 

16.28 

8.00 



582. 00 
78.00 



$4-65 
3-. 00 



$41-53 



$160.00 



14-65 



MILITIA. 583 

Paid G. W. Nutter, expenses to Con- 
cord at7d return . . . $5-i8 

$11.18 



Total expenditures for 1S90 .... ^737.82 

Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 262.18 



$1,000.00 



WOMEN'S AID AND RELIEF HOSPIIAL. 
Appropriation raised by tax .... 5400.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Women's Aid and Relief Hospital $400.00 



FREE BEDS, ELLIOT HOSPITAL. 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Elliot (Hospital .... $600.00 







^UUW.VJW 


MILITIA. 




Appropriation raised by tax 




$900.00 


EXPENDITURES. 






Balance . . . . ' . 


$900.00 


$900.00 



584 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

DECORATION OF THE SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 
Appropriation raised by tax ..... $300.00 

TRANSFERS. 

Transferred from reserved fund . . , . . $74.27 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid J. G. Hutchinson, commander of Louis Bell 
Post, for bills paid sundry persons, as follows : 

PRINTING. 

Paid Frank H. Challis, for printing . $11.25 



CARRIAGE HIRE. 

Paid W. J. Freeman, for two barges and 

hack ..... $12.00 
F. X. Chenette, for two barges and 

one barouche .... 17.00 

E. T. James, landau in parade . 4.00 

Whitten & Fifield, two hacks . 8.00 

C. H. Simpson, two hacks . . 8.00 

Joseph Shiney, team . . . 1.50 

John N. Foss, hack . . . 4.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, 6 hacks . 24.00 

E. V. Turcotte, i hack . . 4.00 



MUSIC AND SINGING. 



Paid Unitarian choir, for services . $15.00 

committee on St. Joseph's ceme- 
tery, by D. S. Healy . . 10.00 
Manchester Military Band, First 

regiment . . . . 75 -oo 



^374-27 



;ii.25 



52.50 



INTEREST ON TAXES. 585 

Paid War Veterans' Drum Corps . . $15.00 

G. A. R. Quartet, services . . 7.00 

Manchester City Band . . 50.00 



Paid cash paid for stamped envelopes, 

postage stamps, postal cards, etc. $9. 1 7 

Higgins Bros., use of chairs . 2.25 

First Light Battery, powder . io-35 

H. H. Huntress, buttonhole bou- 
quets ..... 12.50 
Hartley E. Vaughn, use of 20 

settees . . . . . 1.50 

Hartley E. Vaughn, 25 headstones i.oo 

Palmer & Garmon, 25 flagstones . 17-25 

W. W. Bennett, services, etc., at 

hall ..... 3-00 

Clarence A. Hart &. Co., decora- 
tive merchandise . . . 43-oo 
E. P. Richardson, in part, for bill 

of C. C. Colby . . . 8.50 



I172.00 



$108.52 

Total expenditures for 1890 . . . • . $374.27 



INTEREST ON TAXES. 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from George E. Morrill, collector of taxes $342.44 

TRANSFERS. 

Transferred to reserved fund . . $342.44 

$342.44 



586 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 
Appropriation raised by tax ..... 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid sundry persons on taxes abated . $2,999.39 



^2,999.39 

Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . .61 



$3,000.00 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 
Appropriation raised by tax ..... $10,000.00 

TRANSFERS. 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . $1,265.25 



$11,265.25 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid sundry persons, discount on taxes $11,265.25 

^11,265.25 



STATE TAX. 
Appropriation raised by tax .... $63,435.00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer . $63,435.00 



$63,435-00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



587 



COUNTY TAX. 

Appropriation raised by tax . . . . $40,508.54 

Balance paid from money in the treasury not spe- 
cifically appropriated ..... 5,523.93 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid E. F. Jones, county treasurer . ^46,032.47 



,032.47 



$46,032.47 



RESOLUTION RAISING MONEY AND MAKING APPRO- 
PRIATIONS FOR THE YEAR 1890. 

CITY OF MANCHESTER. 

IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Conunon Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the sum. of four hundred fifty nine thousand seven hun- 
dred forty-three and 54-100 dollars ($459,743.54) be raised for 
the use of the city for the year 1890, by tax on the polls and es- 
tates liable to be taxed therein, which, together with such unap- 
propriated money as may be now in the city treasury, or may 
hereafter come into it, shall be appropriated as follows : 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Interest .... 

Reserved fund 
Printing and stationery 
Incidental expenses 
City officers' salaries 

STREET AND SEWER DEPARTS 

Highway District No. i 



ENT. 



,17,000.00 

20,000.00 

1,200.00 

15,000.00 

15,500.00 



$300.00 
12,000.00 



588 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



H 


ighvvay 


District No 


4 
5 








6 








7 








8 








9 

lO 








II 








12 



13 

New highways 

Damage for land taken for h 
Watering streets . 
Lighting streets 
Paving streets 
Macadamizing streets 
Grading for concrete 
Sewers and drains 
Bridges 
City teams . 
Scavenger teams . 
Street sweeping 



ghways 



Engineers' department 



ENGINEERS DEPARTMENT 



^500.00 

500.00 

500.00 

1,300.00 

800.00 

500.00 

3,300.00 

1,000.00 

300.00 

200.00 

9,000.00 

1,000.00 

7,500.00 

41,000.00 

5,500.00 

18,000.00 

4,000.00 

20,000.00 

4,000.00 

2,500.00 

12,000.00 

1,200.00 



53,000.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



Health department 



$1,400.00 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Repairs of fchoolhouses 
Fuel .... 
Furniture and supplies . 
Books and stationery . 
Printing and advertising 
Contingent expenses 



53,700.00 

3,200.00 

1,000.00 

400.00 

400.00 

800.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



589 



Care of rooms .... 
Evening schools .... 
Teachers' salaries .... 
Truant officer .... 
Evening school, mechanical drawing 
New text-books, free 



CITY LIBRARY. 



City library 
Catalogue, city library 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Fire department . 
Fire-alarm telegraph 
Hydrant service . 
Firemen's parade 



Police department 



POLICE. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Repairs on buildings . 

New schoolhouse, West Manchester 



$3,300.00 

1,500.00 

44,000.00 

750.00 

600.00 

9,000.00 



,4,000.00 
1,000.00 



,35,000.00 

1,200.00 

18,000.00 

500.00 



;i,ooo.oo 



$4,000.00 
30,000.00 



PUBLIC PLACES. 

Commons ........ $4,000.00 

Stark Monument square . . . . . 100.00 

Pine Grove cemetery ...... 1,000.00 

Valley cemetery . . . . . . . 1,500.00 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paupers off the farm ...... $2,000.00 

City farm ........ 4,000.00 

Indigent soldiers and their dependent families . 1,000.00 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospital . . . 400.00 

Decoration of soldiers' graves .... 300.00 

Militia 900.00 



590 



REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TAXES. 



Abatement of taxes 
Discount on taxes 
State tax 
County tax 



^3,000.00 
10,000.00 
63.435-00 
40,508.54 

^545.493-54 



And that the sum of thirty-six thousand dollars be transferred 
from Water- Works to interest. 



The estimated receipts for the year are 

Amount to be raised by tax 
Insurance tax 
Railroad tax 
Savings bank tax . 
Literary fund 



S459. 743-54 

3,650.00 

17,000.00 

61,600.00 

3,500.00 

?545. 493-54 



In Board of Common Council. February 4, 1890. 

Passed. 

JOHN F. FROST, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. February 4, 1890. 

Passed. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF TAXATION. 



691 



05 
< 

p5 
O 
cc 

CO 

W 
CO 
cc 

< 

O 

Q 
oq 

O 
M 

>H 

pq 

O 

i-H 
H 

H 
P^ 

O 

H 

H 

H 
cc 

P3 
<J 
.:; 







8 
g 

«4 




Horses, asses, 
anil mules, 
over 18 months 
old. . 


6 





S 




<-■« o 
^ (h aj 


D 
> 




so 

n -* 

CO jb 


a3 

CO 


CO 




25 


1 

CO 




Dogs. 




s 




a3 

s 


10 


1 
— 





1- 


00 

O 
Ph 


a3 
3 

"3 






co_ 




6 


CO 








'5 


a 

c 
1- 

c 
c 
5z 





ci 


H 




§ . 

=0 : 
00 

to 






Tax 
levied. 


$461.71-2.17 

345.00 

t 812.00 


Rate of 
tax per 
hun- 
dred. 


C5 




M 








s g 

•^ * 
-*< 




0} tj >^ 


6 
3 
"3 






g 

i 






Stock in 

public 

funds and 

bonds. 


2 

> 






Oi 

cT 






Stock in 
banks and 
other cor- 
porations. 


"3 





g 

01 






a; CO 

oj c 
OJ ft 


3 
"3 





CO 






1 


t- 






Hogs. 


3 

"3 


§ 








1 1 1 






Cows, oxen and 

other neat 

stock over 18 

months old. 


6 

> 


§ 

•* 




- 


6 


t- 








H a; 



592 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 

The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and 
personal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the 
year 1890, was as follows, viz. : 



Valuation. 

Real estate* . . $19,966,570 

Personal property . . 3,234,370 
Overlay . . . ... 

Manchester Building As- 
sociation f . . 34,500 



Rate per $1,000. 



Tax. 



$19.10 $381,361.48 

19.10 61,775.57 

4.19 

10.00 • 345.00 



No. of polls, 9,723 



$23,235,440 
972,300 



19.10 



Totals . . . $24,207,740 

Special tax on 710 male dogs . . @ $1.00 

Special tax on 51 female dogs . . @ 2.00 

Total . . ■ 



$443,486.24 
18,570.93 

$462,057.17 
710.00 
102.00 

$462,869.17 



The share distributed to Manchester of the amount of the tax 
assessed, as per returns made by the corporations to state treas- 
urer : 



On railroads 

On savings banks 

On insurance companies 

On literary fund . 

Grand tax total . 



$21,443 

68,392 

3.752 

4,504 



$560,962 



72 

94 

25 
70 



78 



Appropriated and assessed in 1890 

For city appropriation 

For state tax .... 

* Includes tax on factories and machinery. 
t See Laws of 1889, Chapter 12. 



$441,550-00 

63:435-00 



TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



593 



For county tax . 
Overlay^ . 

Grand tax total 



$40,508.54 
15,469.24 

. I560.962.78 



For further information in relation to taxes collected by the 
State, see State Treasurer's Report of June i, 1890. 

TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



Taxes of 1883. 
Taxes of 1884. 
Taxes of 1885. 
Taxes of 1886. 
Taxes of 1887 . 
Taxes of 1888. 
Taxes of 1889. 
Taxes of 1890. 



Due June 1, 

1890, assessed 

in 1890. 



$1,170.10 

1,397.21 
1,222.85 
1,278.81 
1,189.44 

1,721.07 

494.45 I 
13,473.15 I 

462,869.17 



Discounts 
and abate- 
ments, 1890. 



$1,915.08 

12,265.37 



Collected in 
1890. 



$14 72 

12.34 

17.00 

118.55 

10,485.64 

430,805.09 



$484,816.25 $14,181.05 $441,453.34 $29,181.86 



Due Dec. 
31, 1890. 



$1,170.10 

1,397.21 
1,208.13 
1,266.47 
1,172.44 
1,602.52 
1,566.28 
19,798.71 



*This consists of $3,125.63 assessed by the local assessors under the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 57, Section 4; and the sum of 112,343.61 in the amount received from rail- 
roads, banks, insurance companies, and literary fund above the amount estimated by the city 
councils. 

38 



594 eeport of the city auditor. 

Tax Valuations, Etc., from 1846 to 1890, Inclusive. 



Year. 



Valiaation. 



Taxes. No. Polls. Poll Tax. Val. of Poll. 



1846 . 

1847 . 

1848 . 

1849 . 

1850 . 

1851 . 

1852 . 

1853 . 

1854 . 

1855 . 

1856 . 

1857 . 

1858 . 

1859 . 

1860 . 

1861 . 

1862 . 

1863 . 

1864 . 

1865 . 

1866 . 

1867 . 

1868 . 

1869 . 

1870 . 

1871 . 

1872 . 

1873 . 

1874 . 

1875 . 

1876 . 

1877 . 

1878 . 

1879 . 

1880 . 

1881 . 

1882 . 

1883 . 

1884 . 

1885 . 

1886 . 

1887 . 

1888 . 

1889 . 

1890 . 



$3,187,726 

4,488,550 

4,664,957 

5,600,049 

5,832,080 

6,906,462 

6,795,682 

6,995,528 

8,237,617 

8,833,248 

9,244,062 

9,983,862 

10,259,080 

9,853,310 

9,644,937 

9,343,254 

8,891,250 

9,597,786 

9,517,512 

9,478,368 

10,050,020 

10,101,556 

9,929,072 

10,205,303 

10,710,252 

11,365,162 

11, .542,632 

12,001,200 

12,716,892 

14,195,102 

15,309,348 

15,605,918 

15,912,234 

17,482,132 

17,735,990 

17,943,308 

19,175,408 

20,055.986 

20,013,032 

21,137,464 

21,379,384 

21,905,476 

22,162,928 

22,962,790 

24,207,740 



$22,005 95 

24,953 54 

39,712 53 

44,979 92 

48,974 23 

51,798 47 

54,379 45 

61,545 81 

62,022 44 

71,952 09 

114,214 88 

84,862 98 

78,210 85 

81,368 01 

86,804 87 

99,104 96 

84,827 45 

96,233 86 

142,815 98 

209,696 20 

245,567 19 

207,4.57 39 

208,783 07 

254,022 43 

234,047 63 

236,639 74 

259,196 67 

300,768 00 

312,835 95 

315,131 29 

248,900 93 

246,573 46 

276,873 32 

264,406 73 

263,812 17 

316,462 26 

312,673 82 

332,741 72 

361,401 61 

345,260 15 

347,009 31 

373,138 90 

432,914 45 

437,092 69 

462,869 17 



1,808 


S2 10 


$300 


2,056 


1 68 i 


300 


2,688 


2 58 


300 


2,518 


2 47 


300 


2,820 


2 37 


300 


2,910 


2 25 


300 


2,745 


1 92 


240 


2,907 


1 82 


240 


2,814 


1 80 


240 


3,725 


1 94 


240 


3,760 


2 96 


240 


3,695 


2 04 


240 


3,695 


1 83 


240 


3,495 


1 92 


240 


3,651 


2 16 


240 


3,974 


2 40 


240 


3,071 


2 21 


240 


2,995 


2 40 


240 


3,168 


3 50 


240 


3,176 


6 18 


240 


4,114 


5 50 


240 


4,170 


4 61 


240 


4,583 


2 85 


150 


4,709 


3 72 


150 


4,959 


3 27 


150 


5,404 


8 12 


150 


5,911 


2 24 


100 


6,212 


2 50 


100 


6,219 


2 46 


100 


6,227 


2 22 


100 


6,295 


1 62 


100 


6,341 


1 58 


100 


6,477 


1 74 


100 


6,633 


1 50 


100 


7,219 


1 48 


100 


7,574 


1 76 


100 


7,831 


1 62 


100 


7,944 


1 65 


100 


8,143 


1 75 


100 


8,157 


1 63 


100 


8,602 


1 62 


100 


8,996 


1 70 


100 


9,344 


1 95 


100 


9,527 


1 90 


100 


9,723 


1 91 


1 100 



ACCOUNT OF THE COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



595 



SETTLEMENT OF THE ACCOUNT OF GEORGE E. 
MORRILL, COLLECTOR OF TAXES, JUNE i, 1890. 



Tax list, 1S85 
1886 
1887 
1 888 



Amount out- 
standing June 

I, 1888. 


Amount 
collected. 


Balance out- 
standing June 
I, 1S90. 


$1,222.85 


$14-72 


$1,208.13 


1,278.81 


12.34 


1,266.47 


1,189.44 


17.00 


1,172.44 


1,721.07 


118.55 


1,602.52 



Cr. by receipt of treasurer, No. 71 



Literest collected, 1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 

Cr. by receipt of treasurer 



DR. 



1889. 



To resident list . 
non-resident list 
voluntary taxes 



CR. 



1889. 



By casli paid city treasurer, 
per receipts 

cash paid county treasur- 
er, per receipts . 

discounts 

abatements 

unpaid taxes June 1,1890 



$162.61 
162.61 



$4.76 
3-69 

-» r ^ 

11.86 
;iS.6o 



$342.44 
342.44 



$435-928.7T 

1,363-98 

494.45 



$382,332.87 

40.508.54 

10,330.20 

2,849.25 

1,566.28 



$437,587-14 



;7, 587-14 



596 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

- City of Manchester to George E. Morrill. 

DR. 

To salary for the year ending June 

I, 1889 .... ^1,650.00 

commissions on old taxes . . '^'^•33 



$1,660.33 



CR. 



By cash paid by treasurer, on ac- 
count of salary . . . ^800.00 
balance, by treasurer, as per bill 860.33 



^1,660.33 



Manchester, N. H., June 20, 1890. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George 
E. Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same 
correct and as above stated. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

G'ty Auditor. 



BONDED DEBT. 



597 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MAN- 
CHESTER, N. H., FROM JANUARY 1, 1890, TO 
DECEMBER 31, 1890. 











$70,0 00 is- 






Six per 
cent to 
build 
water- 
woi-ks. * 






sued Oct. 


Issued July 




Re-funded 


Five per 


31,1863. 


1, 1881,4 


Year. 


at 4 per 


cent 


$.50,0 is- 


per cent, to 


cent, water- 


cemetery 


sued July 


build Mc- 




works.* 


bonds, t 


1,1864. Six 


Gregor 








per cent, to 


bridge. 










fund debts. 




1890 


$400,000 


$200,000 


$13,850 


$120,000 


$60,000 



] ssued 
April 1, 1885, 

4 per 
cent, to fund 

debts. 



$155,000 



Total. 



$948,850 



Amount of 

6 per cent 

bonds 

due and 

paid. 



$99,900* 




$100,000 



$948,850 



Amount of 

6 per cent 
water bonds 

on which 
interest has 
ceased, not 
yet presen- 
ted for 

payment. 



$100 



• $400,000, water bonds, issued January 1, 1872; $100,000 of these bonds re- 
funded January 1, 1887. 

* $200,000, water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 of these bonds re-funded 
July 1, 1890. , 

t$2,200, cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds each year. 
The city guai-antees the perpetual care of lots in the cemeteries. Bonds 
payable July 1, 1913. 



598 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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BONDED DEBT. 



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600 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Remarks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in 
the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $ioo and upward. 
There are ^13,850 in cemetery bonds, so called, in the hands of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the 1^935,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, including cem- 
etery bonds ....... $948,850. 00 

Net indebtedness for water purposes . . . 600,000.00 



Net debt after deducting water debt . 
As shown in the assessors' books for the year 

1890 : 
The assessed value of personal property, includ 

ing poll tax ...... 

The assessed value of real estate 

Total value for taxation 
Tax rate, 1.9 1 per cent on a hundred (excep 

$34,000 taxed at i per cent). 
Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation 
Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation 

Population, census of 1890 . . . . 
Population, census of 1880 . . . . 

Increase of population in ten years . 



$348,850.00 



$4,241,170.00 
19^966,570.00 



524,207,740.00 



1. 441 



3-919 

43.9S3 
32,458 

ii'525 



No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly- paid at 
maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in 
gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6,. 
chapter 70, New Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled " An act to 
enable the city of Manchester to establish water-works." 



BONDED DEBT. 



601 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHiVRGE ON THE BONDED 

DEBT. 



Year. 


*Six per 

cent 

water 

bonds. 


*Four 

per cent 

water 

bonds. 


Five per 
cent 
ceme- 
tery 
bonds. 


Six per 

cent to 

fund 

debts. 


Four per 

cent to 

build 

Mc- 

gregor 

bridge. 


Four per 

cent to 

fund 

debts. 


Total of 
annual in- 
terest. 


1890..: 


$27,000 


$6,000 


$623.75 


$7,200 


$2,400 


$6,200 


$49,423.75 



SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded debt January i, 

1890 ^945,950.00 

Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 

1890 ...... 2,900.00 

Amount of water bonds re-issued . 100,000.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt . 21,277.50 



Water bonds paid in 1890 

Total indebtedness, Jan. i, 1891 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



11,070, 127. 50 
99,900.00 



170,227.50 



Net cash on hand January i, 1891 
Taxes uncollected, list of 1890 
Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad, 
estimated value 

Total net indebtedness . 



$79,552.02 
19,798.71 

12,500.00 



;iii,85o.73 



,376-77 



* $400,000, water bonds, issued January 1, 1872; $100,000 re-funded at 4 per 
cent, January 1, 1887. 

* $200,000, water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 re-funded at 4 per cent, 
July 1, 1890. 

$60,000, bridge bonds, issued July 1, 1881, at 4 per cent. 

$155,000, bonds issued April 1, 1885, at 4 per cent. 

$70,000, bonds to fund debts, issued October 1, 1863, and are due November 1, 
1893. 

$50,000, bonds to fund debts, issued July 1, 1864, and are due July 1, 1894. 

$2,200, cemetery bonds, Issued in 1884, and other additional bonds, each suc- 
ceeding year. The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in tlie ceme- 
teries. 

Bonds payable July 1, 1913, to the trustees of cemetery funds; not nego- 
tiable. 



602 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



603 













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604 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



605 



REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



SCHOOLHOUSES 

High schoolhouse and lot 
Franklin-street schoolhouse and lot 
Spring-street schoolhouse and lot 
Lincoln-street schoolhouse and lot 
Ash-street schoolhouse and lot 
Main-street schoolhouse and lot . 
Webster-street schoolhouse and lot 
JBlodget-street schoolhouse and lot 
Bridge-street schoolhouse and lot 
Lowell-street schoolhouse and lot 
Merrimack-street schoolhouse and lot 
Wilson Hill schoolhouse and lot . 
School-street schoolhouse and lot 
South Main-street schoolhouse and lot 
Bakersville schoolhouse and lot . 
Stark district schoolhouse and lot 
Amoskeag schoolhouse and lot 
Goffe's Falls schoolhouse and lot . 
Harvey District schoolhouse and lot 
Webster's Mills schoolhouse and lot 
Hallsville schoolhouse and lot 
Y'^oungsville schoolhouse and lot . 
Mosquito Pond schoolhouse and lot 
Park-street schoolhouse and lot 
Y'arney schoolhouse and lot 



550,000.00 

20,000.00 

16,000.00 

50,000.00 

58,000.00 

23,000.00 

17,500.00 

3,500.00 

4,000.00 

7,000.00 

15,985.00 

3,300.00 

5,000.00 

2,800.00 

15,000.00 

3,000.00 

3,700.00 

3,600.00 

2,500.00 

600.00 

3,500.00 

1,400.00 

1,200.00 

8,500.00 

50,000.00 

,085.00 



ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house, stable and land, Vine-street . 
Main street, West Manchester . 
Cottage and lot, Lake avenue, corner 
of Massabesic street 



;47,ooo.oo 
20,000.00 

19,371.00 



606 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Engine-house and lot, Webster street, corner Chest- 
nut ...... 

Clinton-street, West Manchester . 
Hose-house, cottage and lot . . . . 



^13,000.00 
2,500.00 
5,000.00 

$106,871.00 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library, building and lot 

City hall, building and lot . 

City farm and permanent improvements 

Court-house and lot , 

Battery building on Manchester street 

Police station on Manchester street 

City stables and city yard 

Gravel lot, Belmont street . 

Gravel lots, ward 8 

Gravel lots, Bakersville 

Gravel lots, district No. 8 . 



$41,000.00 

60,000.00 

34,000.00 

51,000.00 

18,000.00 

43,300.00 

36,000.00 

1,200.00 

400.00 

700.00 

150.00 

$285,75000 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Property in care city engineer .... $848.24 

in care the chief engineer of fire dept. . 91,096.00 

in care superintendent highway dist. No. 2 25,000.00 

in care superintendent highway dist. No. 10 666.85 

in care superintendent of schools . . 34,287.00 

in care city messenger .... 2,759.00 

in care city marshal and janitor . . 1,970.25 

in care superintendent of city farm . 10,139.40 

in care trustees of city library . . 27,332.90 
in care superintendent of Pine Grove 

cemetery ...... -48-35 

in care superintendent of Valley cemetery 106.00 

Stock in Suncook Valley R. R. in care city treas. 50,000.00 

Personal property in care of city weigher . . 1,000.00 



REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



607 



Uncollected taxes in 18S9 
Uncollected taxes in 1890 
Net cash in the treasury, December 31 



1890 



$1,566.28 
19,798.71 
79.552-02 



$346,371.00 

OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED hV CITY. 



Soldiers' monument ..... 

Permanent inclosure of commons 
Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 
Fountains and water troughs on streetsand common 
Two city tombs ...... 

McGregor bridge ..... 

Granite bridge ...... 

South Main-street bridge over Piscataquog river 
Print-Works bridge on Granite, over lower canal 
Two bridges in highway district No. 9 
One bridge at Goffe's Falls .... 

Expended on construction of sewers 



PARKS AND CEMETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres . 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 64 acres* 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.05 acres 

Stark park, 28 acres 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 

Tremont common, 2.25 acres 

Hanover common, 3 acres . 

Park common, 3.49 acres 

Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 



WATER-WORKS. 

Real estate and personal property of Water-Works 
at cost price ....... 

* 16 acres have since been purchased. 



$25,000.00 

10,200.00 

25,000.00 

3,500.00 

10,000.00 

90,000.00 

25,000.00 

IO,OOO.OD 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

244,470.00 

$451,170.00 

$200,000.00 

40,000.00 

4,000.00 

9,000.00 

25,000.00 

200,000.00 

40,000.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 

200,000 00 

$878,000.00 



$958,140.09 



608 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the city, schoolhouses 

Real estate owned by the city 

Real estate owned by the city, engine-houses 

Water-Works at cost price . . . . 

Personal property owned by the city 

Other real and personal property 

Parks and cemeteries . . . . . 



PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 

Inventory of assets December 31, 

1889 j?2, 373, 424.00 

Cemeteries and commons, Decem- 
ber 31, 1889 . . . 845,000.00 



,085.00 
285,750.00 
106,871.00 
958,140.09 
346,371.00 
451,170.00 
878,000.00 

5^395. 387-09 



Total valuation . 
Inventory of assets December 31, 1890 

Gain in valuation 



53,218,424.00 
3,395'387-oo 

$176,963.00 



Inventories of personal property in the care of the superinten- 
dents, trustees, and heads of departments have been taken, result- 
ing in the increase above stated. Some of that increase may be 
stated as follows: Varney school, $43,250; new city stables, 
^6,000 ; expended on sewers, $39,298 ; Stark park, land pur- 
chased, $8,000 ; Derryfield park, which was taken from the city 
farm, $25,000, but the remaining land is estimated to be worth 
$41,000, and the old valuation is not changed ; city library, 
books, furniture, etc., not included in the inventory of 1889, 
$27,332.90; superintendent of schools, $26,412, the increase 
owing to the free-text book law, and the furnishing of many 
■new schoolhouses since the taking of the previous inventory. 
The details of these inventories are on file in the auditor's office. 
The city-hall building, valued at $60,000, is considered by good 
judges of real estate as worth on the market $150,000 ; while 
the Water-Works would sell readily at $1,500,000. 



COMMUNICATIONS TO CITY COUNCILS. 609 

COMMUNICATIONS OF CITY AUDITOR TO THE 
CITY COUNCILS. 

To the City Councils of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — Having been "appointed b}- the Mayor and 
approved by the Board of Aldermen, as a competent person to 
act as auditor of the city for the year following my appointment 
and until my successor is appointed and qualified, " and having 
accepted said office in accordance with the law and the ordinance 
relating to the same, allow me in this communication to your 
honorable body to tender rny thanks for the honor conferred, 
and to express a hope that with your cordial support the duties 
of the auditor's office maybe performed in a satisfactory manner. 

It is among the prescribed duties of the auditor that " he shall 
carefully examine all accounts and bills against said city and 
shall approve no such bill or account unless the same shall be 
accompanied by a certificate of the Mayor or some other city 
official, committee, or agent, authorized in behalf of said city to 
make the contract, or cause the expenditure to be made, upon 
which such account or bill is founded, that the same is correct ; 
and no such bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer 
until said auditor has approved it as correct. " 

It is the duty of ah auditor to examine all matters of law and 
fact which affect the question of indebtedness before him (see 
Moulton vs. Parker & Young, 35 N. H. R. 92), and make report 
thereon. In view of the importance of these duties and of the 
many persons who may be affected thereby, I deem it proper to 
call the attention of the City Councils, city officials, and the pub- 
lic to some of the legal conclusions and specific rules that may 
govern the future decisions of the auditor and the business meth- 
ods of the office. The principle is a plain one, that the public 
trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the City Councils 
of Manchester, N, H., to wit, all the powers of towns to be ex- 
ercised by it at such times, under such restrictions and in such 
manner as the laws direct (Dillon's Municipal Corporations, 
39 



610 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

section 96, vol. i), cannot be delegated to others. By the Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter 46, section 13, " no member of either branch 
[of the City Councils] except the Mayor shall receive any com- 
pensation for his services or shall hold any office or agency cre- 
ated during his continuance in office." 

And by section 14, " the executive powers of the city and the 
administration of police, except where vested in the mayor, shall 
be exercised by the mayor and aldermen ; and they shall have 
the powers and do and perform all the duties which the select- 
men of towns have, are authorized, or required to do or perform 
in regard to their towns, unless it is otherwise provided by law." 

Hence it follows that any new work to be done or public im- 
provement to be made, can be commenced and carried on only 
upon the order of the City Councils, stating specifically the work 
to be done or the improvements to be made, and appropriating 
money for the same. It is essential for the purpose of accuracy 
and clearness of statement in the accounts of the city, that an 
account in each case with said improvements should be opened 
and such specific appropriation charged directly to such account, 
either by transfer from some annual appropriation or by loan, as 
the City Councils may direct. It also follows that joint standing 
committees possess advisory powers only ; they cannot legally be 
endowed with executive or legislative powers by ordinance or 
resolution of the City Councils, as by General Laws, chapter 48, 
section ic, par. 14, "no by-law or ordinance shall be repugnant 
to the constitution or laws of the State. " No member of either 
branch of the City Councils can enterin to any verbal or written 
contract to furnish supplies to, or do any work for the city. Any 
firm of which a member is also a member of the City Councils, is 
included in this prohibition. No city official, or department, or 
board of officials having legal power to expend money for the 
benefit of the city can purchase of or contract with themselves, 
with any one of the board, or with any firm of which one of said 
officials is a member. 

The following, from Judge Dillon's text-book on Municipal 
Corporations, vol. i, page 436, section 444, with the reported 
decisions of the courts as there noted, gives in apt language the 



COMMUNICATIONS TO CITY COUNCILS. 611 

reasons for the last two statements : " It is a well established and 
salutary rule in equity that he who is intrusted with the business 
of others cannot be allowed to make such business an object of 
pecuniary profit to himself. This rule does not depend on rea- 
soning technical in its character, and is not local in its applica- 
tion. It is based upon principles of reason, of morality, and of 
public policy. It has its foundation in the very constitution of 
our nature, for it has been authoritatively declared that a man 
cannot serve two masters, and is recognized and enforced wher- 
ever a well regulated system of jurisprudence prevails. One 
who has power, owing to the frailty of human nature, will be too 
readily seized with the inclination to use the opportunity for se- 
curing his own interest at the expense of that for which he is en- 
trusted. It has, therefore, been said that the wise policy of the 
law has ' put the sting of disability ' into the temptation as a de- 
fensive weapon against the strength of the danger which lies in 
the situation. This conflict of interest is the rock, for shunning 
which the disability under consideration has obtained its force, 
by making that person who has the one part intrusted to him 
incapable of acting on the other side, that he may not be seduced 
by temptation and opportunity from the duty of his trust. The 
law will in no case permit persons who have undertaken a char- 
acter or a charge to change or invert that character by leaving it 
and acting for themselves in a business in which their character 
binds them to act for others. The application of the rule 
may in some instances appear to bear hard upon individuals who 
had committed no moral wrong ; but it is essential to the keep- 
ing of all parties filling a fiduciary character to their duty to pre- 
serve the rule in its integrity, and to apply it to every case which 
justly falls within its principle. The principle generally applica- 
ble to all officers and directors of a corporation is that they can- 
not enter into contracts with such corporations to do any work 
for it, nor can they subsequently derive any benefit personally 
from such contract. To deny the application of the rule to 
municipal bodies would be to deprive it of much of its value ; for 
the well working of the municipal system, through which a large 
portion of the affairs of the country are administered, must de- 



612 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

pend very much upon the freedom from abuse with which they 
are conducted. It is obvious that nothing can more tend to 
correct the tendency to abuse than to make abuses unprofitable 
to those who engage in them, and to have them stamped as 
abuses." 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appro- 
priation to which the same should be charged ; and the moneys 
paid by virtue of the auditor's certificate thereon should be 
charged to such appropriations only. 

No part of any appropriation shall be applied to the purchase 
of or payment for any articles except such as the Mayor and Al- . 
dermen, or the Mayor, or the official or head of the department 
having the charge of the work for which said appropriation is 
made, shall deem necessary and proper to carry on the said work, 
and shall by written order direct to be procured and charged to 
such appropriation. All bills against the city requiring meas- 
urements either of dimensions, quantity, or weight, should con- 
tain a full, clear, and correct statement of such measurements. 
When deemed necessary, such bills will be referred to the city 
engineer for his measurement and sworn certificate thereto. 

Extraordinary repairs involving a large expenditure of money 
should in all cases be submitted to the City Councils, and a spe- 
cial appropriation made therefor. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to 
make expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their re- 
spective departments : 

For fire department and fire-alarm telegraph, the chief engi- 
neer, to be submitted monthly to the approval of the board of 
engineers ; for police department, city marshal ; for police court, 
police judge ; for water- works department, superintendent, sub- 
ject to the rules of the board of commissioners and the ordi- 
nances relating thereto; for city farm, superintendent; for over- 
seers of the poor, each overseer, subject to the rules of the board 
of overseers, and their monthly review and approval ; for schools, 
superintendent, or such person as the board of school committee 
may designate, bills to be approved by the board monthly ; 
for streets, sewers, and other work under these departments, 



COMMUNICATIONS TO CITY COUNCILS, 613 

superintendent of each district, under control of Mayor and 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen ; for city clerk's office, treasurer's 
office, tax collector's office, assessors' office, auditor's office, 
incidental expenditures, city physician, city messenger, city so- 
licitor, city engineer, Mayor ; for cemeteries, board of trustees 
(to consist of citizens not members of the City Councils) ; for 
city library, board of trustees ; for health department, the 
board of health, subject to approval of mayor. It may be stated 
as a general rule that all subordinate officials are under the super- 
vision and control of the Mayor, subject to such limitations and 
restrictions as the Board of Aldermen, acting as a board, may re- 
quire. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for consideration, 
the following points will be considered and passed upon, and in 
all questions involving doubt the opinion of the city solicitor 
will be requested : 

1. Is the subject-matter of the bill under examination within 
the scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city 
government ? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make 
the contract or cause the expenditure to be made ? 

3. Has an appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, 
and is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill ? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements, 
either of dimensions, quantities, or weights, correctly and fully 
stated, and is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole 
amount charged sufficient? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely 
in excess as to require the attention of the City Councils to be 
called to the same ? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair, legible hand, correctly cast, and 
on paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its proper 
backing and filing ? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and 
the total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the 
amount of the work not yet completed, and the per cent retained, 
(if any) must be stated on the bill. 



614 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

8. Any otlier inquiries in matters of law and fact which af- 
fect the question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information, 
or correction, as the circumstances in each case may require. 

The foUowmg bills presented to the city auditor January 24, 
1890, have been rejected on the ground that " the sting of disa- 
bility " is present in them all. 

In consideration that the common law of agency has not here- 
tofore been strictly applied by any of the City Councils that have 
existed since the organization of the city government in 1846, 
and that the parties to these contracts have parted with their 
property at fair prices, and for the benefit of the city, I would 
advise that these contracts and any other contracts made prior to 
February i, 1890, be ratified by a vote of the City Councils (if 
they have the power), and the auditor be instructed to pass the 
same. (Here follows a list of bills, amounting in the aggregate 
to ^547.28, due sundry persons who were members of the City- 
Councils, overseers of the poor, etc.) 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor. 
February 4, 1890. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The city auditor has before him for consid- 
eration a bill against the city of Manchester, of which the follow- 
ing is a copy : 

The City of Manchester, N. H., to Joint Standing Committee 
on Fire Department, Dr. 

To expenses of joint standing committee on fire department to 
Lawrence, Haverhill, Worcester, and Boston, in the interest of 
the aerial truck and combination wagon : 

Fares $21.72 

Hotel and meals . . . . . . .16.05 

Total $37-77 



COMMUNICATIONS TO CITf COUNCILS. 615 

This bill is approved by the Mayor and the chairman of the 
joint standing committee on fire department. The auditor is in- 
formed that this bill includes the expenses of six persons, the 
committee (five), and the chief engineer of the fire department 
(one). The auditor infers that the gentlemen who contracted this 
expenditure believed themselves authorized to do so by the 
order that passed the Common Council April i, 1890, and was 
approved by the Board of Aldermen May 6, 1890, " To purchase 
a combination hose wagon for use in West Manchester, " and 
that the expenditure was necessary for the proper performance of 
the duty devolved upon them by the order of May 6, 1890. All 
orders passed by the City Councils authorizing a ministerial act 
to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly construed, 
and the act to be done must be specifically stated. It is a matter 
of doubt in the mind of the auditor whether or not the appoint- 
ment of any member, or any number of members of the City 
Councils on a committee authorized to perform executive or 
ministerial acts can be made without a violation of section 13, 
chapter 46 of the General Laws of New Hampshire. The 
Mayor is the chief executive officer of the city, and the chief 
engineer of the fire department is his subordinate officer. They 
are both paid officials, appointed for the express purpose of 
doing just such executive business as was enjoined on this com- 
mittee, and their executive responsibilities should not be ren- 
dered nugatory by being dissipated over a large number of 
persons. If it was necessary for the committee appointed by the 
resolution of May 6 to visit four cities in our sister state of 
Massachusetts, in order to " purchase a combination hose wagon," 
and to take with them the chief engineer of the fire department, 
some words should have been used in the resolution giving 
specific authority for such an excursion, and providing for the 
payment of the expenses by the city. It will be judicious and 
save the auditor much inconvenience if such expenditures are 
in all future cases first submitted to the action of the City Councils 
before they are incurred by the committee. 

This bill cannot be certified as "correct" by the auditor 



616 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

until it has been ratified and confirmed by vote of the City 
Councils. Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor. 
June 3, 1890. 



To the City Councils of Mmichester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — The auditor herewith submits for your consid- 
eration the bill of against the city of Manchester, 

for three perfection nozzles and holders, Nos. 509, 510, 511, at 
$35, $105, " purchased by order of the joint standing committee 
on fire department. " I am not aware of any order passed by the 
City Councils authorizing the purchase of the nozzles and hold- 
ers above described. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards, and 
by chapter 106, section 11, "the chief fireward shall keep, or 
cause to be kept, in order all apparatus provided by such town for 
the extinguishment of fires." They have no power conferred 
upon them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus of any 
kind. The joint standing committee on fire department have 
advisory powers only. This bill cannot be certified as " correct " 
by the city auditor without ratification by the City Councils. It 
will save the auditor, and all other parties, much trouble and 
inconvenience, if the authority to purchase new apparatus is 
obtained of the City Councils, before the contract is made. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor. 
Manchester, N. H., July i, 1890. 



To the City Councils of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — The city auditor has rejected the following 
bills against the city : 

, foreman ...... $28.75 

, hoseman ..... 50.00 



COMMUNICATIONS TO CITY COUNCILS. 617 

— , assistant foreman . . . . $55.00 

— , hoseman . ■. . . . 25.00 



The above named parties at the time these bills were con- 
tracted were members of the City Councils, and the first three 
named are still acting as such. When these parties accepted and 
were qualified as aldermen and members of the Common Council 
and acted and continued to act as such, they were legally dis- 
qualified from holding any office or agency created during their 
term of service, or any office of profit. (See General Laws of New 
Hampshire, chapter 46, section 13, and chapter 48, section 2.) 

" It is a well established and salutary rule in equity, that he who 
is intrusted with the business of others cannot be allowed to 
make such business an object of pecuniary profit to himself. " 
See Dillon's Municipal Corporations, vol. i, p. 436, sect. 
444. " This rule does not depend on reasoning technical in its 
character, and is not local in its application. It is based upon 
principles of reason, of morality, and of public policy. It has 
its foundation in the very constitution of our nature, for it has 
been authoritatively declared that a man cannot serve two masters, 
and is recognized and enforced wherever a well regulated system 
of jurisprudence prevails." These claims founded upon transac- 
tions prohibited by law are illegal and void in their inception 
and cannot be made valid by ratification of the City Councils. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor. 

Manchester, N. H., July i, 1890. 



To tlie City Councils of Manciiestcr, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — Your attention is herewith called to the fact 
that the following appropriations are overdrawn to the respective 
amounts placed against each : 

Printing and stationery . . . . , . 65654.09 

Sewers and drains ...... 2.456.04 

Fire-alarm telegraph ...... 293.85 

City teams ........ 477-6i 



618 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Fuel, school department . . . . . ^241.65 

Printing and advertising, school department . . 22.03 

Contingent expenses, school department . . 106.42 

Chapter 48, section 6, of the General Laws of New Hamp- 
shire says : "The city councils shall take proper care that no 
money be paid from the city treasury, unless previously granted 
and appropriated." Section 4, chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, 
says : "Whenever any appropriation shall be expended, the city 
clerk shall immediately give notice thereof to the mayor, to the 
city councils, and to the committee on accounts, which commit- 
tee shall pass or allow no claim or account chargeable to any 
head or appropriation which is expended, until the city coun- 
cils shall have provided the means of paying the same." Sec- 
tion 4 of the ordinance relating to the duties of the city audi- 
tor, approved January 7, 1890, says : "In case there are bills or 
accounts which said auditor shall not approve, he shall present 
them to said committee on accounts, with his reasons for refusing 
to approve the same. Said committee on accounts shall not cer- 
tify any such bill or account which has not been approved by the 
auditor, and no such bill or account shall be paid by the city 
treasurer until said auditor has approved it as correct, in addition 
to the other indorsements heretofore required." 

After a full and careful consideration of the requirements of 
the Laws and Ordinances, as above stated, the city auditor has 
arrived at the conclusion that duty requires him to withhold his 
signature in future from all bills against any appropriation where 
the amount of the appropriation is expended. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor. 

Manchester, N. H., September 2, 1890. 



To the City Couniils of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — The following bills have been presented to the 
city auditor, approved by the chief engineer of the fire depart- 
ment, and indorsed " Firemen's Annual Parade." 



COMMUNICATIONS TO CITY COUNCILS. 619 

To dinner for 413 at 65c. each $277.45 

Cash paid for postage, on account firemen's annual 

parade ......... 3.50 

Services of band at firemen's annual parade . . 52.00 

Printing 300 invitations, two lots .... 3.25 

300 envelopes ........ .90 

175 circulars to firemen ...... 2.75 

150 cards ......... i.oo 

500 programs, line of march ..... 3-oo 



Making in all the sum of .... . $343.85 

In 1 87 1 the City Councils made for the first time an annual ap- 
propriation of $300 for firemen's annual parade, and since then 
have made each year, up to and including the year 1889, a like 
amount for the same purpose. In the present year the appro- 
priation is $500. The total amount paid by the city for the last 
nine years is $2, .7 79. 68. 

The city auditor is unable to find the slightest legal basis on 
which an appropriation, covering such expenditures as are pre- 
sented in the foregoing bills, can be made. Chapter 106 of the 
General Laws of New Hampshire relating to the powers and 
duties of the firewards, contains no provisions that by the most 
liberal construction can be made to sanction such expenditures. 
In Gove vs. Epping, 41 N. H. 539, Doe, judge, says : 
'* The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived 
solely from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to cer- 
tain specified objects and other necessary charges." 

" Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those 
prescribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, 
and generally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into ef- 
fect." It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discre- 
tion of towns to vote gifts or to select donees ; their charity is a 
duty defined, commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects 
of it are designated by law. A majority cannot dispose of the prop- 
erty of a minority in an unlimited manner." The expenditures 
represented by these bills are not necessary for the extinguish- 
ment of fires, for the care or repair or protection of the property 



620 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

of the cit}'. The feeding of a multitude on special invitation 
can not be regarded as essential to the discipline of the firemen. 
The City Councils cannot ratify and thereby make legal that 
which is illegal in its inception. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor. 
Manchester, N. H., October 31, 1890. 



To the City Councils of Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — The following appropriations are overdrawn to 
the amount placed against each. (Here follow sundry appropria- 
tions with the amount overdrawn placed against each.) 

The necessity for a transfer to each appropriation to balance 
the overdraft, need not be dwelt upon. If further expenditures 
are to be made on sewers and drains, an amount sufficient to cover 
those expenditures should be transferred. The power possessed 
by the City Councils to limit the expenditures of the city govern- 
ment in all of its departnients lies chiefly in its right to give or 
to withhold supplies. This power is conferred upon it by the 
State and cannot be legally delegated to any other person or per- 
sons. (Gillis vs. Bailey, 21 R. 149). Section 12, chapter 30 
of the ordinance of the city relating to water-works, says : "All 
money received on account of water-works shall be paid weekly, 
or oftener, into the city treasury, and a receipt taken for the 
same ; and all moneys paid into the treasury on account of said 
works shall be placed to the credit of the water-works, and shall 
not be paid out except under the provisions of section 6." " All 
bills for expenditures for the water-works shall be approved by 
the board of water commissioners or by some person by them des- 
ignated, examined by the city auditor, and allowed by the com- 
mittee on accounts, before they are paid by the treasurer." " Sec- 
tion 8. The board of w^ater commissioners shall have no 
power to expend any money, or to incur any debt, or commence 
any work that shall require any money beyond the amount of ap- 
propriations made by the city councils." The board of water 



COMMUNICATIONS TO CITY COUNCILS. 621 

commissioners have in the past acted upon the presumption that 
section 12 was an appropiation made by the City Councils, and 
have expended large sums of money for the extension and repairs 
of the water-works without obtaining from the City Councils any 
further specific authority. In fact, the board has acted as an in- 
dependent body, not bound like the school committee, the en- 
gineers of the fire department, the superintendent of streets, and 
other subordinate officials, by specific appropriations made for 
certain specific well-defined purposes, but has had, and now has, 
the entire receipts of the water-works at its disposal. These re- 
ceipts now amount annually to a sum exceeding ^So,ooo, and are 
yearly increasing. The city auditor is of the opinion that sec- 
tion 12 is not a legal appropriation, and that the City Councils 
have no power to delegate to others discretionary powers con- 
ferred upon them by the Legislature. The auditor submits for 
your consideration an ordinance in amendment of said section 12, 
which, if passed by your honorable body, will remove all legal 
doubts herein raised, and place the board of water commission- 
ers in their proper legal relations with the City Councils. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor, 
Manchester, N. H., October 7, 1890. 



To the City Councils of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — In the bills of the Manchester Water-Works for 
the month of December, 1890, presented to the city auditor for 
his approval are the following : 

(Here follows a list of bills for attendance upon meetings of 
board of water commissioners, amounting in all to the sum of 
$609.) 

The auditor is unable to find any legal foundation for these 
charges and is therefore compelled to withhold his approval. 
Section 3, chapter 30 of the ordinance relating to water-works, 
provides that " the board of water commissioners shall have 
power to appoint a superintendent and all subordinate agents and 



622 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

assistants, and may fix their compensation." On the subject of 
the compensation of the water commissioners the laws and ordi- 
nances are silent. The auditor finds no record in the printed 
city reports of any compensation being paid to a water commis- 
sioner prior to 1880. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. STRAW, City Auditor. 



RE-FUNDING OF WATER BONDS. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution in regard to water bonds. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the city of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 
That for the purpose of re-funding the water bonds, due July i, 
1890, the Mayor and the joint standing committee on finance 
be and are hereby authorized and empowered to issue water 
bonds to the amount of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000), 
payable July i, 19 10, and bearing interest at a rate not exceed- 
ing four per cent, and the Mayor and city treasurer are hereby 
authorized to sign said bonds for and in behalf of the city. 

[Passed April i, 1890.] 

LETTER TO N. W. HARRIS & CO. 

Manchester, N. H., June 19, 1890. 

N. If. Hai-ris &= Co., Boston, Mass. : 

Gentlemen, — Your bid of $105,670 for $100,000 Manchester 
bonds, as per circular sent you, is accepted. We will furnish you 
^ny satisfactory papers such as you may require, or if you wish to 



RE-FUNDING WATER BONDS. 623 

send a man here to investigate matters, we shall be happy to fur- 
nish him with all the necessary information. 
I am, yours respectfully, 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 
Per J. B. S. 

BIDS FOR WATER BONDS. 

List of bids for ^100,000 water bonds re-issued July i, 1890, 
city of Manchester, N. H. Bids made June 18, 1890. 

N. W. Harris & Co., Boston, Mass., bid ^105,670. 
R. L. Day & Co., of Boston, Mass., bid ^105,176. 
N. H. Trust Co., Manchester, N. H., bid $103,000. 
Amoskeag National Bank, Manchester, N. H., bid $104,390. 
Adams, Blodgett & Co., Boston, Mass., bid $103,125. 

At a meeting of the finance committee of the city of Manches- 
ter, a quorum being present, the bids were opened for the one 
hundred thousand dollars four per cent twenty-year water-works 
bonds, and said bonds were awarded to N. W. Harris & Co., of 
Boston, for one hundred five thousand six hundred and seventy 
•dollars ($105,670), and same is hereby confirmed. 

GEORGE C. CHASE, 

D. E. VARNEY, 
W. B. STEARNS, 

E. S. HEATH, 

Finance Committee of City of Alanchester, N. H. 
FROM THE GENERAL LAWS OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

CHAPTER 37. 

Section 16. Any town may fund its debt, by vote of any legal 
meeting, and any such indebtedness may include the bounty of 
the general goverment to volunteers, conscripts, or substitutes 
which such town has assumed and paid for the purpose of filling 
its quota. And any town that may have funded its debt, or any 



624 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

part thereof, may at any legal meeting ratify and confirm the 
same, and may issue bonds payable at such time and place as they 
may by vote authorize, with coupons for interest, payable an- 
nually or semi-annually, in gold or other lawful currency, at a 
rate not exceeding 6 per cent. 

CHAPTER 44. 

Section i. All cities now or hereafter incorporated, shall 
have, exercise, and enjoy all the rights, immunities, and privi- 
leges, and shall be subject to all the duties incumbent upon or 
appertaining to the town corporations to which they succeed. 

CHAPTER 48. 

Section i. All the powers vested by law in towns, or in the 
inhabitants thereof, shall be exercised by the city councils by 
concurrent vote, each board having a negative upon the other. 

CHAPTER 70. 

An Act to enable the city of INIanchester to establish water- 
works. 

Section 6. Said city is authorized to levy taxes to defray the 
expense of such water-works, and to borrow money therefor, not 
exceeding in the whole the sum of six hundred thousand dollars, 
and to issue the notes, bonds, or obligations of said city therefor, 
payable at such time and at such rate of interest as the city 
councils of said city shall determine ; and such notes, bonds, and 
obligations shall be legal and binding on said city. — Laws of 
i8ji. 



WATER BILLS AGAINST THE CITY FOR THE YEAR 1S90. 

HYDRANTS. 

January ....... $4,390.00 

April ....... 4,390.00 

July 4o5o-oo 

October ....... 4,550.00 

$17,880.00 



ANNUAL CITY WATER BILL. 



625 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



January 
April 

July 

October 



January 
April . 

July • 

October 



January 
April 
July 
October 



January 
April . 
July . 
October 



January 
April . 
July . 
October 



January 
April . 

July . 

October 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



WATER TROUGHS. 



SPRINKLING. 



CITY HALL. 



$274-63 

255-73 
292.78 
208.93 



S53-IO 
91-95 
93-45 
53-40 



!i23.45 

150-30 
118.05 

68.55 



$265.50 
265.50 
265-50 
265-50 



,050.00 
680.00 
720.00 
720.00 



$167-85 
156.00 
156.00 
171.60 



,1,032.07 



J291.90 



$460.35 



11,062.00 



$2,780.00 



40 



$652.05 



626 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STONE CRUSHER. 



January ...... 

April * . 

July • 

October ...... 

City library, annual bill, April 
Pine Grove cemetery, annual bill, October 
Valley cemetery, annual bill, October 
Amoskeag cemetery, annual bill, October 
Fountains, cemetery, annual bill, October 



$7-50 

7-5° 
7-5° 

7-5° 






$30.00 
16.00 










300.00 








35-55 
12.00 




$■ 




300.00 




24 


,851.92 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS 

PASSED IN 1890. 



City of Manchester, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Chapter 14, Section 27, of the 
Laws and Ordinances. 

That chapter 14, section 27, of the Laws and Ordinances, be 
amended by inserting after the word "payments" in the third 
line thereof the words, "The superintendent of highways in 
district number ten shall receive two dollars and fifty cents 
per day, payable monthly," so that said chapter shall read as 
follows: "The superintendent of highways in district number 
two shall receive twelve hundred dollars per annum, to be paid 
in equal monthly payments, the superintendent of highways in 
district number ten shall receive two dollars and fifty cents per 
day, payable monthly, and in each of the other districts two 
dollars per day for each day actually employed, payable monthly." 

Passed to be ordained May 6, 1S90. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one thousand EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY. 

An Ordinance to amend Section 6, Chapter 14 of the Ordi- 
nances of the City of Manchester, in relation to the duties 
and compensation of City Officers. 



628 ORDINANCES. 

Section i. Section 6 of chapter 14 of the Ordinances of the 
City of Manchester is hereby amended by striking out the word 
"five" and inserting instead thereof the word "eight," so that 
said section as amended shall read as follows : " Section 6. The 
city solicitor shall receive in full for his services as city solicitor 
and for all the duties appertaining to said office the sum of eight 
hundred dollars per annum, to be paid in equal quarterly pay- 
ments." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed to be ordained June 3, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 
An Ordinance establishing a Scavenger Service. 

Section i. The scavenger service of the city shall be under 
the general control of the mayor and aldermen, and shall be per- 
formed by the superintendents of highways in their respective 
districts, or such other persons as said board shall from time to 
time contract with for that service. 

Sect. 2. Each superintendent or contractor shall cause all the 
compactly built portion of his district to be regularly and fre- 
quently visited by suitable men and vehicles for the removal of 
all rubbish, waste, and noxious or unsightly matter found in any 
street, lane, or public place, and the removal of all such matters 
and things which may for that purpose be placed upon, or con- 
venient to, any street or lane, in the manner and at the time 
hereinafter specified. He shall carry them to such location 
distant from the compact part of the city as the mayor and 
aldermen may designate, and shall there make such disposition 
of them by burning, burying, or otherwise, as said board may 
direct. 

Sect. 3. Ashes, earth, brick, and lime, rubbish and other 
innoxious and imperishable waste, shall be collected separately 
from perishable waste, and when so collected may be used for 
filling new streets or low ground. 



ORDINANCES. 629 

Sect. 4. Every person owning, occupying, or having the 
care of any building, premises, or business located in the com- 
pact part of the city in which any perishable or burnable waste, 
whether of vegetable or animal origin, is produced, shall pro- 
vide and keep a suitable vessel in which all such waste shall 
be deposited ; and no water, earth, ashes, stones, or brick 
shall be mingled therewith. All ashes and other imperishable 
waste which may properly be removed by the scavenger depart- 
ment shall be placed in a separate receptacle, and no perishable 
or burnable waste shall be deposited therewith. Each of said 
receptacles, with its contents, shall be set out upon the back 
street, or upon the edge of the sidewalk, in the morning of the 
day on which the scavenger teams are to pass through the street 
for the removal of that kind of waste. 

Sect. 5. Any person violating any provisions of the preced- 
ing sections shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding ten 
dollars. 

Passed to be ordained June 3, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

An Ordinance relating to throwing paper and other rubbish 
into public streets and commons. 

Section i. No person shall, in any public street or common 
in the city of Manchester, distribute to other persons there being 
or passing, any handbills, cards, or papers, and no person shall 
sweep into, throw, place, or drop in any public street or common 
any cards, paper, or any offensive or noxious or refuse liquid or 
solid matter or substance. But this section shall not be con- 
strued to prohibit the selling of newspapers upon the public 
streets or commons. 

Sect. 2. Whoever violates any of the provisions of the fore- 
going section shall be punished by a fine not exceeding ten 
dollars. 

Passed to be ordained July i, 1890. 



630 ordinances. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

An Ordinance in relation to the pay of Overseers of the Poor. 

Section i8 of chapter 14 of the Ordinances of the city of Man- 
chester is hereby amended by striking out the words " to be paid 
at the expiration of their term of office" and by inserting in- 
stead thereof the words "per annum," so that said section as 
amended shall read : "Section 18. The overseers of the poor shall 
receive in full for their services the sum of twenty-five dollars 
each per annum. " And this ordinance shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

Passed to be ordained August 5, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 
IN the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

An Ordinance in relation to the duties of the Assistant City 

Marshal. 

It shall be the duty of the assistant city marshal, in addition 
to the duties now by law and ordinance upon him imposed, to 
investigate all cases of claims against the city, to ascertain the 
circumstances of all accidents happening, and all other matters 
of a similar nature, when so directed by the mayor, and make 
report to the mayor- of his investigations in every case, for 
which service no additional compensation, beyond the salary now 
fixed by ordinance, shall be paid. 

Passed to be ordained September 2, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

An Ordinance changing the name of a street. 

That the street on the east side of the Merrimack river, known 
as the " River road, " shall be called and known as Brown ave- 



ORDINANCES. 631 

nue, commencing at junction of River road south, so called, and 
Elm street, thence southwesterly to Goffe's Falls, and now known 
as River road south. 

Passed to be ordained December 2, 1S90. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 12, Chapter 30, of the 
Ordinances of the city, relating to Water- Works. 

That section 12, chapter 30 of the Ordinances of the city, re- 
lating to water-works, be amended so as to read as follows : 
"Sect. 12. All moneys received on account of the water- 
works shall be paid weekly, or oftener, into the city treasury, 
and a receipt taken for the same, and shall be subject to appro- 
priation by the city councils for any legal municipal expenditure. 
The board of water commissioners is hereby required to submit 
to the finance committee each year, on or before the third Tues- 
day in November, their estimate of the receipts of the water- 
works for the ensuing municipal year, the amount required for 
current expenses, ordinary repairs, interest on water bonds, and 
the annual construction expenses. They shall also make in de- 
tail all such further statement of matters relating to the extension 
or improvements of the water-works, which may, if voted by the 
city councils, require an appropriation for the construction ac- 
count larger than the ordinary annual construction expenses. 
All expenditures shall be charged to the appropriation to which 
they properly belong, and no transfers shall be made from one 
appropriation to another without a vote of the city councils au- 
thorizing the same. This amendment shall take effect Novem- 
ber I, 1890. 

Passed to be ordained January 2, 1891. 



632 RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

An Ordinance relating to repeal of Section lo of Chapter 28 of 
the City Ordinances. 

That section 10 of chapter 28 of the City Ordinances, relating 
to discount on taxes, be and is hereby repealed. 
This act shall take effect on its passage. 

Passed to be ordained March 3, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

An Ordinance in amendment of Section 22, Chapter 30 of the 
Ordinances, relating to Water-Works. 

That section 22, chapter 30 of the City Ordinances, be 
amended so as to read as follows: "Section 22. The sum of 
($5,000) five thousand dollars annually shall be paid by the 
city for water for fire and other purposes, and shall be charged to 
hydrant service and credited to water-works receipts. " 

No other charge shall be made against the city for use of water. 
This amendment shall take effect from January i, 1891. 

Passed to be ordained March 3, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY. 

Resolution relative to Temporary Loan. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city as 
may fall due before the ist day of July, 1890, the mayor be ^ 



RESOLUTIONS. 633 

authorized to make a temporary loan, for the use of the city, of a 
sum not exceeding one hundred thousand dollars, giving for the 
same the notes of the city, signed by the mayor and counter- 
signed by the city treasurer, said notes to be paid before the 
1 2th day of July, 1890. 

Passed February 4, 1890. 



City of Manchester, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relative to discontinuance of a portion of Hooksett 
road, so called. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That so much of the old Hooksett road, so called, as lies 
between the intersection of Pennacook street with said road on 
the south, and its intersection with Webster street on the north, 
be discontinued, and that the mayor, in the name of the city, be 
authorized to apply to the court for its approval and discontin- 
uance. 

Passed February 4, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relating to City Auditor's Report of February 4, 

1890. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

Resolved, that the contracts or bills mentioned in the city 
auditor's report of February 4, 1890, in consideration of the rea- 



634 RESOLUTIONS. 

sons therein suggested, be and hereby are ratified and confirmed,, 
and that the city auditor is requested to certify the same to the 
city treasurer for payment. 

Passed February 12, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relative to Derryfield Park. 

Resolvedhy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Comman Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the land at city farm lately set apart for a public park 
by the city government, be known as Derryfield Park. 

Passed February 12, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and NINETY. 

Resolution relating to a Reward for the conviction of parties 
setting fires. 

Resolvedhy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That a reward of fifty dollars be and the same hereby is 
offered for the detection and conviction of any person or persons 
who maliciously or through criminal carelessness shall set fires in 
any forest, wood lot, sprout lot, pasture, field, or any other place 
within the limits of the city of Manchester, said reward to be 
paid to any person who shall furnish the evidence which shall 
lead to such detection and conviction, upon proof satisfactory to 
his honor the mayor, that his evidence led to the conviction of 
any offender by the court ; the expense authorized by this re- 



RESOLUTIONS. 635 

solution to be charged to the appropriation for incidental expen- 
ses, and the city marshal is hereby intrusted to see that the 
rewards hereby authorized are properly posted or otherwise 
advertised. 

Passed March 4, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relative to the Kimball Carriage Company. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

Whereas, " The Kimball Carriage Company," a corporation 
duly established by law with a capital of thirty thousand dollars, 
desire to locate their factory and carry on their business in the 
city of Manchester, providing sufficient inducements are given 
them by the city government ; therefore. 

Resolved^ that if the said Kimball Carriage Company will 
locate and establish their business in this city, that the factory 
and real estate on which the same is located, and the machinery 
therein and other property necessary in conducting said business, 
shall be exempt from all taxation for a period of ten years 
from April i, 1890. 

Passed April i, 1890. ' 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY. 

Resolution relative to Water Bonds. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of re-funding the water bonds due July 
I, 1890, the mayor and the joint standing committee on finance 



636 RESOLUTIONS. 

be and are hereby authorized and empowered to issue water 
bonds to the amount of one hundred thousand dollars (;^ioo,ooo), 
payable July i, 1910, and bearing interest at a rate not exceeding 
four per cent, and the mayor and city treasurer are hereby 
authorized to sign said bonds for and in behalf of the city. 
Passed April i, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relating to the purchase of the Stark land for the 
purposes of a Public Park. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Conncil of 
the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the proposition to purchase the Stark land, consisting 
of about 27 acres, on which it is proposed, in the bill now pend- 
ing before the Congress of the United States, to erect an eques- 
trian statue in memory and in honor of that Revolutionary hero, 
Major General John Stark, and to convert the same, under cer- 
tain restrictions, to the purposes of a public park for the city 
of Manchester, meets with the hearty concurrence of this 
council. 

Resolved, that the Selectmen in the several wards of the city 
are hereby required to insert an article in their respective war- 
rants at the next annual meeting, to take the sense of the legal 
voters as to their approval or disapproval of the foregoing propo- 
sition to purchase said land for the purposes stated, as required 
in section 4, chapter 49 of the Laws of the State of New 
Hampshire, and that the mayor and city solicitor be appointed 
a committee to see to the proper carrying out of this matter. 

Passed May 2, 1890. 



RESOLUTIONS. 637 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relative to the death of ex-Mayor John Hosley. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of 
the City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the members of the city councils have learned with pro- 
found regret of the recent death of Hon. John Hosley, three 
times the mayor of this city and for many years connected with 
its government in other capacities ; and they desire to express 
their sense of the great loss which this city has sustained in the 
death of one who ever had its interests at heart, whose pride 
in the progress of Manchester was the strongest, and whose 
influence was always given to the advancement of its best wel- 
fare. He was a man of most rugged honesty, of great cheer- 
fulness and courtesy, of unusual executive ability, and in the 
administration of the city's affairs was impartial, able, and suc- 
cessful. When holding public station he was devoted to his 
duty to the public ; when in private life he was a good citizen ; 
and at all times he was an upright and conscientious man. 

Resolved, that the members of the city councils extend their 
heartfelt sympathy to his bereaved family ; that these resolu- 
tions be spread upon the records, and the city clerk instructed 
to transmit a copy to the family of the deceased. 

In Joint Convention of the City Councils. May 6, 1890. 
Passed unanimously. 

D. B. VARNEY, Mayor. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY. 

Resolution providing for an Appropriation for the Contingent 
Expenses of the Mayor's Office. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 
That the sum of three hundred dollars be and the same is here- 
by transferred from the appropriation for incidental expenses, to 



638 RESOLUTIONS. 

be held as a special appropriation for t|ie contingent expenses of 
the mayor's office; and the city clerk is instructed to open an 
account for such appropriation, and his honor the mayor is 
hereby authorized to draw from such account for the necessary 
contingent expenses of the mayor's office, and his approval of 
such bills shall constitute a sufficient certificate thereof. 

This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 3, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 
Resolution providing for two beds at the Elliot Hospital. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and C'ommon Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 
That the sum of six hundred dollars be paid to the trustees of 
the Elliot Hospital for the support of two beds in said hospital 
for the term of one year after such payment, for the use of such 
persons as may be sent to it by the direction of his honor the 
mayor ; and the sum of six hundred dollars is hereby transferred 
from the reserved fund and made a special appropriation for the 
foregoing purpose. 

Passed June 3, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY. 

Resolution authorizing the Mayor to sell a Lot of Land on 
Maple street at public auction, and sign deed of the same to 
purchaser in behalf of the city. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the mayor is hereby authorized to sell at public auction, 
to the highest bidder, a lot of land now owned by the city, and 



KESOLUTIONS. 639 

situated in Manchester, N. H., bounded and described as follows : 
Beginning at a point on the east line of Maple street, and one 
hundred feet north of the north line of Brook street, thence 
northerly by east line of Maple street fifty (50) feet, thence at 
right angles to Maple street easterly one hundred (100) feet, 
thence southerly, parallel to Maple street, fifty (50) feet, thence 
westerly, at right angles to Maple street, one hundred (100) feet 
to the place of beginning, and containing five thousand (5,000) 
square feet ; said premises being the same conveyed to the city by 
Horace P. Simpson and Mary B. Simpson, by their deed dated 
the eleventh (nth) day of November, 1885 '> ^^''d the Mayor is 
further hereby authorized to sign the deed of the same, in behalf 
of the city, to the purchaser thereof. 

Passed July i, 1890.. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 
Resolution relating to purchase of horses for use at City Farm. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 
That the mayor and joint standing committee on city farm be 

and are hereby authorized to purchase a pair of horses for use at 

said city farm. 

Passed July i, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

In the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relating to New City Stables. 

Resolved \)y the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and 
buildings be and hereby are duly authorized to receive proposals 



640 RESOLUTIONS. 

and make contracts for the buildin^j; of new city stables on the 
lot of land now owned and occupied by the city on Franklin 
street, according to the plans and specifications reported by said 
committee, said contract to be subject to the subsequent ratifica- 
tion or rejection of the city councils. The sum of six thousand 
dollars is hereby transferred from the reserved fund to the account 
of " New City Stables, " and the expenditure in relation thereto 
is not to exceed the amount appropriated by this resolution. 

Passed July i, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relating to contract for new City Stables. 

That the proposal of Mead, Mason & Co. is hereby accepted 
and the contract with said firm ratified and confirmed, and the 
mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings are 
hereby authorized to sign all necessary papers for the completion 
of said contract in behalf of the city. 

Passed to be ordained July 22, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 



IN the year one thousand eight hundred and NINETY. 

Resolution authorizing the Mayor to sell a lot at the corner of 
West and Douglas streets at public auction, and sign the deed 
of the same to the purchaser, in behalf of the city. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the mayor is hereby authorized to sell at public auction, 
to the highest bidder, a lot of land now owned by the city and 
situate in Manchester, N. H., and bounded as follows : Begin- 
ning at a stake standing forty feet north 79 ^ degrees west 
from the southwest corner of a piece of land sold by Peter O. 



RESOLUTIONS. 641 

Woodman to Ruel Fellows ; thence north 79^ degrees west 
fifty feet to a stake ; thence north nine degrees east about one 
hundred and ten feet, to a line formerly dividing Goffstown and 
Bedford ; thence east by said dividing line about fifty feet to the 
line of West street; thence southerly by the line of West 
street to the bound first mentioned. The mayor is further 
hereby authorized to sign the deed of the same, in behalf of the 
city, to the purchaser thereof. 

Passed August 5, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 

Resolution relating to sale of land on east side of Ash street. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the mayor be and hereby is authorized to sell at public 
auction, and to the highest bidder, the following bounded and 
described piece of land situated in said Manchester : Beginning 
at the intersection of the south line of Lowell street and the east 
line of Ash street, and thence in an easterly direction on the line 
of Lowell street (5.22) five and twenty-two hundredths feet to a 
stone bound, there making an angle of 90 degrees 37 min- 
utes to the south (23.55) twenty-three and fifty-five one-hun- 
dredths feet to a stone bound ; thence southeasterly, making an 
angle of 239 degrees 23 minutes, thirty and eleven one hun- 
dredths feet, to land now or formerly owned by John Davis, Jr. ; 
thence southwesterly, by an angle of 88 degrees 15 minutes, thirty 
and ninety-four one-hundredths feet ; thence southeasterly, by an 
angle of 272 degrees 32 minutes, thirty-two and seven tenths feet 
to land now or formerly owned by J. C. Hoyt ; thence south- 
westerly, by an angle of 85 degrees 42 minutes, about eighty feet, 
to east line of Ash street ; thence northerly by east line of Ash 
street (147.6) one hundred forty-seven and six tenths feet, to 
point first mentioned ; said land containing about twenty-eight 



642 RESOLUTIONS. 

hundred seventy-five and one half square feet, reference being 
made to plan No. 472 in city engineer's office. The mayor is 
further authorized, in behalf of the city, to sign a conveyance to 
the purchaser. 

Passed August 5, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 

jn the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety, 

"Resolution to exempt West Side Company from taxation. 

.Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That whereas, the West Side Company, for the purpose of 
establishing a new industry in the city of Manchester, propose 
to erect a factory in which to carry on the business of manufac- 
turing shoes and other articles, on a tract of land situate in 
West Manchester, bounded westerly by an extension of Second 
■street, southerly by West Hancock street, easterly by the land of 
the New Hampshire Improvement Company, and northerly by 
the Piscataquog river, containing about 38,000 square feet ; 
therefore, 

Resolved, that said land, the buildings erected thereon by the 
West Side Company, and the machinery therein, and the capital 
and property of the parties who are to occupy said land and 
buildings and to carry on the manufacturing business therein, 
shall be exempt from taxation for the term of ten years from the 
first day of January, 1891 ; providing the amount invested in 
said buildings, machinery, capital, and property shall not be less 
than twenty-eight thousand dollars. 

Passed to be enrolled September 16, 1890. 



ORDER. 643 

CiTV OF Manchester. 

IN THE YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY. 

Resolution relating to Manchester & North Weare Railroad. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That we heartily sanction the effort to be made before the 
Legislature of 1891 to bring about the re-laying of the rails on 
the Manchester &: North Weare Railroad, so called, between 
the present terminus of the railroad in Weare to the village in 
Henniker, and believe that the realization of this would redound 
greatly to the benefit of our city. This being the fact, we 
respectfully ask of our senators and representatives elect the 
consecration of their best efforts to bring about the accomplish- 
ment of this important measure. 

Passed December 2, 1890. 



City of Manchester. 



An Order relating to the purchase of land for a Public Park. 

Ordered, if the board of ma3'or and aldermen concur, that the 
mayor be and hereby is authorized to purchase of the Stark 
heirs the Stark land, so called, subject to the conditions herein- 
after named, and bounded and described as follows : Northerly 
on land of the State of New Hampshire, known as the Industrial 
School premises ; westerly by land of the Concord Railroad ; 
southerly by land of Elizabeth B. Stark ; easterly by the River 
road, so called, reserving the land now owned by said city ; 
also all the right and title of the grantor in the land westerly of 
said west line and east of the Merrimack river, subject to the 
Amoskeag Company's right of flowage ; also another piece of 
land, bounded as follows : Northerly by land of Augustus H. 



644 ORDER. 

Stark ; westerly by land of the Concord & Montreal Railroad ; 
southerly by land formerly owned by the late George Clark ; 
easterly by the River road (excepting and reserving the land 
now owned by said city, containing 12.961 acres); also all 
the right and interest of the grantor in the land between said 
western line and the Merrimack river ; said premises to be sub- 
ject to the Amoskeag Company's rights of flowage. Said con- 
veyances are to be upon the following conditions: r. Said 
premises are to be used as a public park only, and not to be 
conveyed by said city, except to the State of New Hampshire^ 
or the United States of America, for the same purpose ; 2. No 
buildings are to be erected on said premises except such as may 
be deemed necessary and appropriate for the purposes of said 
park ; 3. Said city is to expend at least ^300 per annum for 
care of and improvements thereon, on the average. Said prem- 
ises are the same referred to in the resolution of the city councils 
dated May 2, 1890, and on the purchase of which the approval 
of the legal voters was given at the last annual election as re- 
quired by section 4, chapter 49 of the Laws of the State of 
New Hampshire. The sum of eight thousand dollars ($8,000) 
is hereby transferred from water-works to Stark Monument 
Square, for the payment for said land. 

Passed January 2, 1891. 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS. 



SCHOOLHOUSES. 



I. 

2. 

3- 
4- 
5- 
6. 

7- 
8. 

9- 

lO. 

II. 

12. 

13- 

14. 

15- 

16. 

17- 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23- 
24. 



Ash-street Schoolhouse 
Amoskeag District Schoolhouse 
Bakersville Schoolhouse 
Blodget-street " 
Franklin-street " 
Gcffe's Falls " 
Hallsville 
High Schoolhouse 
Harvey District Schoolhouse 
Lincoln-street " 
Lowell-street " 
Main-street " 
Merrimack-street Schoolhouse 
Mosquito Pond Schoolhouse 
Park -street Schoolhouse 
School-street " 
South Main-street Schoolhouse 
Spring-street Schoolhouse 
Stark District Schoolhouse . 
Varney Schoolhouse, W. M. 
Webster's Mills Schoolhouse 
Webster-street Schoolhouse 
Wilson- hi 11 " 

Youngsville " 



Engine-Houses 



25. Central Fire Station — Vine Street 

26. Clinton-street Station .... 

27. Fire King Station — North Main Street 

28. Gen. Stark Station — Webster Street 

29. Independent Hose House — Amoskeag 



PAGE 
271 
271 

235 
271 

235 
238 
227 

235 
238 
238 
271 
227 
271 
238 

235 
227 
227 

235 
271 
227 
238 

235 
227 
238 



93 
93 
93 
147 
93 



646 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS. 



30. Merrimack Engine-house — Lake Avenue 

31. Massabesic Hose — Maple vStreet 

Other City and Public Buildings 

32. Battery Building — Manchester Street 
^;^. City P'arm Buildings — Mammoth Road 

34. City Hall Building — Elm Street 

35. County Jail — Willow Street 

36. Court House — Franklin Street . 

37. Government Building, Post-office, etc. — Hanover Street 

38. City Stables and City Scales — Franklin Street 

39. Police Station — Manchester Street 

40. Pumping Station — Cohas Avenue 

41. Soldiers' Monument — Merrimack Square . 

42. State Industrial School — River Road North 
O. City Library — Franklin Street . 

44. Derryfield Park 



147 
147 



147 

3 

3 

3 

147 

329 

407 

3 

3 

3 

407 

147 
49 



INDEX. 



INDEX 



A 

PAGE 

Advertising and Printing 509 

Abatement on Taxes 586 

Address, Mayor Varney . .. 17 

Assets, statement of, from 1880 to 1889 Inclusive 338 

Inventory of, 1889 339-341 

Annual Interest charge oii Bonded Debt, 1880 to 1889 inclusive 346 

Auditor, City, report of 350 

Appropriations for 1890 by City Councils 587-590 

Auditor, Communications of 609-622 

B 

Bridges 471 

Books and Stationery 508 

Buildings, repairs of 546 

Board of Water Commissionex-s, organization of. 22 

report of 23 

Health, report of 299 

Bonded Debt, statement of, 1880 to 1889 inclusive 337 

Tabular statement of, for 1890 597 

Detailed " " " " 342,598,600 

Buildings, Public, occupied by private parties 602-604 

Bonds Re-lunded, Letter, etc., relating thereto 622, 623, 624 

Bonded Debt, Annual Interest Charge from 1880 to 18S9 inclusive 346 

c 

City Hall 395 

Citj' OlHcers' Salaries 407 

City Teams 476 

Contingent Expenses 511 

Care of Rooms 513 

City Library 521 

Commons 552 

Cemeterj', Pine Grove 555 

Valley 559 

City Farm 572 



650 INDEX. 

County Tax 587 

City Officials, List of 3-14 

Engineer, report of 51 

Engineer's Department, organization of 50 

Library, repoi't of Trustees of 147 

Treasurer's report 154-15S 

Librarian's " 159-162 

Donations to 163-174 

Cemeteries, report of Sub-Trustees of Valley 177 

Pine Grove 179 

Treasurer 184 

Fund of, report of Trustees 186 

City Farm , report of Joint Standing Committee 201 

Solicitor, report of 207 

Marshal, report of 319 

Committee, School, report of 231 

Contract with and bond of Manchester Electric Light Co 325 

Census, Letter to Hon. R. P. Porter 347 

City Auditor's report 350 

Treasurer, repoi't of 358 

Communications of City Auditor 609-622 

City Ordinances ana Amendments t;27-633 

Councils, Resolutions and Order 632-644 

Stables, new 549 

D 

Debt, Payment of Funded 391 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves 584 

Discount on Taxes 586 

Debt, Bonded, Statement of, 1880 to 1889 inclusive .337 

Tabular Statement of, for 1890 597 

, Detailed Statement of, for 1890 342 

E 

Engineer's Department 494 

Expenses, Incidental 373 

Mayor's 406 

Contingent 511 

Evening Schools 514 

School, Mechanical Drawing 516 

Electric Lights, Location of 315 

Light Company, Contract with, Bond of 325 

Engravings of Public Buildings, list of 645 

Elliot Hospital 583 

F 

Fund, Reserved 391 

Fuel 504 

Furniture aud Supplies 505 

Free Text-Books 519 



INDEX. 651 

Fire Department 524 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph 537 

Firemen's Parade 539 

Farm, Paupers off. 569 

Free Beds, Elliot Hospital 5S3 

Fire Department, report of Chief Engineer 93 

Value of Personal Property 118-124 

Names and Residences of Members 125-132 

Farm, City 572 

a 

Grading for Concrete 463 

Graves, Decoration of Soldiers' 584 

Gas Lights, Location of 322 

H 

Highway District No 1 *1* 

2 and 3 414 

4.. 421 

5 422 

6 423 

7 425 

8 426 

9 428 

10 430 

11 432 

12 434 

13 435 

Highways, New 436 

Land taken for 441 

Watering 442 

Paving 447 

Macadamizing 452 

Grading for Concrete on 463 

Scavenger Teams 464 

Sweeping 466 

Lighting 467 

Bridges 471 

City Team8 476 

Sewers and Drains 482 

Health Department 498 

Hydrant Service 539 

Hospital, Women's Aid and Relief 583 

Elliot, Free Beds 583 

Highway Districts, reports of Surveyors 70-89 

Hydrants, Location of 132-144 

Health, Board of, report of 299 



Interest 390 

Incidental Expenses 373 

Indigent Soldiers 581 



652 INDEX. 

Interest on Taxes 585 

Inspector, Milk, report of 213 

Inventory of Assets for 1889 339-341 

Interest, Annual, on Douded Debt, 1880 to 1889 inclusive 346 

Interest, Annual Cliarge, Bonded Debt for 1890 601 

L 

Loan, Teniporarj' 390 

Laud taken for Highways 441 

Lighting Streets 467 

Library, City — 521 

Location of Electric Lights .. 315 

of Gas Lights 322 

of Oil Lamps 324 

List of Water Bills against the City for one year 625 

List of Engravings of Public Buildings 645 

M 

Mayor's Incidentals 406 

Macadamizing Streets 452 

Militia 583 

Milk Inspector, report of '. 213 

Marshal, City, report of 215 

Manchester Electric Light Co., Contract with and Bond of 329 

Municipal Receipts and Expenditures for 1890 (net) 364 

N 

New Highways 436 

New City Stables 549 

New Schoolhouse, West Manchester 550 



Officials, City, Salaries of 407 

Order to Print Forty-fifth Annual Report 2 

Organization of Board of Water Comniissioners 22 

Overseers of the Poor, report of 195 

Oil Lamps, Location of 324 

Ordinances, City, Amendments of 627-633 

Relating to Pay of Superintendent, District 2 and District 10 627 

Relating to Salary of City Solicitor 627 

Establishing a Scavenger Service 628 

Relating to Throwing Paper, etc., into Streets, etc 629 

Relating to Pay of Overseers of Poor 630 

Relating to Duties of Assistant City Marshal 630 

Changing Name of River Road to Brown Avenue 630 

Relating to Water- Works 631, 032 

Repealing Discount on Taxes 632 

Oi'der Authorizing Purchase of Stark Land 643 

Organization of School Board for 1891 288 



INDEX. 653 



Payment of Funded Debt 391 

Printing and Stationery 399 

Paving Streets 447 

Printing and Adv-ertising 509 

Police Department 540 

Pine Grove Cemetery 555 

Paupers off tlie Farm 569 

Property Account, Real and Personal 605-608 

Public Buildings occupied by Private Parties 602-604 

Public Buildings, List of Engravings of. 645 

R 

Reserved Fund 391 

Repairs of Sclioolhouses 500 

Rooms, Care of 513 

Receiving Tomb 561 

Report of Board of Water Commissioners 23 

Superintendent of Water-Works 36 

City Engineer 51 

Highway District Surveyors 70-89 

Chief Engineer Fire Department 93 

Trustees of City Library 147 

Committees on Cemeteries 177 

Sub-Trustees of Valley Ceruetery 177 

Pine Grove Cemetery 179 

Treasurer of Cemeteries Ig4 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund 186 

Overseers of the Poor 195 

Joint Standing Committee on City Farm 201 

City Solicitor 207 

Milk Inspector 213 

City Marshal 219 

School Committee 231 

Superintendent 235 

Board of Health 299 

Receipts and Expenditures from 18S0 to 1889 inclusive 320-326 

Report of City Auditor 350 

Treasurer 358 

Receipts and Expenditures, Municipal, for 1890 (net) 364 

(gi'oss) 369 

Resolutions and Order of City Councils 632-640 

Relating to Temporary Loan 632 

Discontinuance of Hooksett road 633 

Auditor's Report, February 4, 1890 633 

Relative to Derryfleld Park 634 

Relating to Conviction of Parties Setting Fires 634 

Exempting Kimball Carriage Co. from Taxation 635 

Relative to Water Bonds, Re-funding 635 

Relating to Stark Land Purchase 636 

Death of ex-Mayor Hosley 637 



654 INDEX. 

Resolutions Providing for Mayor's Incidentals 637 

Relating to Elliot Hospital 638 

Authorizing Sale of Land, Maple Street 638 

Relating to Purchase of City Farm Horses 639 

Building of City Stables 639,640 

Authorizing Sale of Land on Douglas Street 640 

East Side Ash Street 641 

Exempting West Side Company from Taxation 642 

Relating to Manchester & North Weare Railroad 643 

Repairs of Buildings 546 

Real Estate owned by the City 605-608 



Salaries of City Officials 407 

Scavenger Teams 464 

Street Sweeping 466 

Sewers and Drains 482 

School Department 227 

Schoolhouses, repairs of 500 

Supplies and Furniture 505 

Stationery and Books 508 

Salaries, Teachers' 518 

School, Evening, Mechanical Drawing 516 

Stables, New City 549 

Stark Monument Square 555 

Soldiers, Indigent 581 

State Tax 586 

Solicitor, City, report of 207 

School Committee, report of 231 

School Superintendent's report 235 

Statistics of Wealth, Debt, and Taxation 330-348 

Statement of Bonded Debt from 1880 to 1889, inclusive 337 

Assets from 1880 to 1SS9, inclusive 338-341 

Total Taxation for 1890 592 

Public Buildings occupied by Private Parties 602-604 

School Statistics 272 

School Attendance 274 

T 

Temporary Loans 390 

Text- Books, Free 519 

Teachers' Salaries 518 

Tomb, Receiving 561 

Taxes, Interest on 585 

Abatement of 586 

Discount on 586 

Tax, State •••• 586 

Tax, County 587 

Treasurer, City, report of 358 

Taxation 586-593 

Appropriations for 1890 587-590 



INDEX. 655 

Taxation by Koard of Assessors for 18!)0 5i)l 

Statement of total 592 

Table of Taxes due ami uncollected 593 

V aluations from 184G to 1890, inclusive 594 

Settlement of Tax Collector's account to June 1, 1S90 595 

Tuition 519 

Teams, City 476 

A" 

Varney SchooUiouse , 550 

Valley Cemetery 559 

Valuation and Taxes 592 

w 

Watering Streets 442 

Water-Works, Superintendent's report 26 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 583 

Water- Works, Commissioners' ]-eport 23 

Water- Works, Appropriation account 5(i2 

Water Bills against the City for one year, list of 625 

Water r.onds, Refunding of 022, (i23, 624