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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

Forty-Sixth annual Report 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City q£ Manchester 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



;HE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER "ji, 189 



TOGETHER WITH 



OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




MANCHESTER: 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE CO. 
1892. 



N 

MZ£b 
\89\ 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Forty-sixth Annual Report of the Receipts and Ex- 
penditmes of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the joint 
standing committee on finance be, and they hereby are, authorized to procure, 
for the use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing of the Forty-sixth An- 
nual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, in- 
cluding the reports of the joint standing committee on finance, the city 
auditor, the school board, and superintendent of schools, superintendent of 
water-works, water commissioners, engineer of fire department, city mar- 
shal, overseers of the poor, trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city 
library, committee on cemeteries, joint standing committee on city farm, 
city physician, city solicitor, city engineer, and such other matters relating to 
city affairs as said finance committee may direct, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for printing and stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. February 2, 1892. 
Passed. 

EDSON S. HEATH, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. February 2, 1892. 
Passed in concurrence. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor. 




3. CITY FARM. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 
1 891. 



Mayor. 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON .... Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1890. Salary, $1,800 per annum, 
payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1848, section 1. General Laws, chapter 44, 
section 3. Chapter 223, Laws of 1883.) Residence, 533 Lake avenue. Tel- 
ephone at house and office. 



Aldermen. 



Act of June, 1848, section I. General Laws, chapter 44, section 3. 

Ward 1. John L. Sanborn, 25 Amoskeag Corporation, Market 
street. 

Ward 2. Oliver B. Green, 749 Pine street. 

Ward 3. William Corey, 488 Maple street. 

Ward 4. W. Byron Stearns, 320 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. John J. Holland, 21S Central street. 

Ward 6. Byron Worthen, 524 Lake avenue. 

Ward 7. Andrew J. Dickey, 9 Manchester Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Walter M. Fulton, 664 Main street, West Manchester. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

President of the Common Council. 

Edson S. Heath, 13 Amoskeag Corporation, Middle street. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of June, 1848, section 1. General Laws, chapter 44, section 3. 
Ward 1. 

John P. Mullen, Amoskeag Corporation, 12 Whitney street. 
Oliver J. Batman, 26 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark street. 
Thomas Wilkinson, Amoskeag Corporation, 3 Boyden street. 

Ward 2. 

Alfred D. Maxwell, Goffstown road near Front street. 
Kirk C. Bartlett, 91 Harrison street. 
Fred T. Dunlap, 220 Prospect street. 

Ward 3. 

George W. Reed, 490 Chestnut street. 
George M". Clark, 88 Ash street. 
Alfred Nerbonne, 280 East High street. 

Ward 4. 

Charles E. Cox, 475 Hanover street. 
John P. Cronin, 126 Manchester street. 
Evangeliste V. Turcotte, 229 Merrimack street. 

Ward 5. 

Richard J. Barry, 195 Central street. 
Daniel J. Ahern, 21 Spruce street. 
William G. Cotter, 72 Spruce street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



Ward 6. 



Thomas Walker, Jr., Goffe's Falls. 

George M. Bean, Candia road near Massabesic. 

Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas Avenue near water-works. 

Ward 7. 

Edson S. Heath, 13 Amoskeag corporation, Middle street. 
Charles C. Chapman, 78 Amoskeag Corporation, West Merri- 
mack street. 

Levi K. Snow, 86 Amoskeag Corporation, Canal street. 

Ward 8. 

John H. Schimmel, 266 Douglas street, West Manchester. 

Francois X. Robitaille, 51 Lake Avenue. 

Christian L. Wolff, 36 Clinton street, West Manchester. 



Clerk of Common Council. 



George L. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 



Salary, $200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws and Or- 
dinances, page 23, chapter 14, section 11, as amended December 13, 1887.) 



City Clerk. 

Nathan P. Kidder Office, City Hall 

.Salary, $900. The city clerk, in addition to his salary, is in receipt of fees 
as registrar of births, marriages, and deaths, and as a recording officer for record 
of mortgages on personal property, of attachments of real estate, of partnerships 
and assignments, and for recording various other legal papers. He also receives 
fees for issuing dog licenses, billiard and bowling alley licenses, for certifying 
records, and for various other matters. 

These fees are established by the state legislature under various laws, and 
are estimated to be between $2,100 anc i $2,500 per annum. Chosen in conven- 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

tion of City Councils in January, annually. (Charter, section 22. General 
Laws, chapter 47, sections 1-6, Act of 1849. City Laws and Ordinances, 
pages 24, 25, 86, 87, 88, 112, 113.) Residence. 313 Manchester street. 



City Auditor. 

James B. Straw Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,000. Appointed by Mayor, and approved by Board of Aldermen, 
in January, annually. (Laws of 1889, chapter 287. City Ordinance of January 
7, 1890.) Residence, 593 Union street. 



Auditor's Clerk. 



Allan E. Herrick . ' . . . Auditor's Office, City Hall 
Salary, $650. Residence, 534 Maple street. 



City Treasurer. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Elected in convention of City Councils, in January, annu- 
ally. (Charter, section 23. Act of 1856, section 4. General Laws, chapter 48,. 
sections 3, 4. Act of 1859, section 4. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 27- 
86.) Residence, 437 Amherst street. 



Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,850 and fees. Elected by Mayor and Aldermen before May I,, 
annually. (Act of July, 185 1. Act of June, 1859, section 6. General Laws, 
chapter 42, sections 7-9. City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 28.) Residence,. 
13 Harrison street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 7 

Deputy Collector of Taxes. 

Edwin C. Paul .... Collector's Office, City Hall 

Paid by collector. Appointed by tax collector with approval of Mayor and 
Aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 28, section 3.) Residence 
416 Central street. 



City Solicitor. 

Edwin F. Jones . . Office, Patten's Block, 936 Elm street 

Salary, $800. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annually. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 13, 14, pages 86, 87.) Residence, 15 
High street. 



City Messenger. 

John A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, $700. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annually 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 13, section 1. Chapter 14, section 7.) 
Residence, 49 Appleton street. 



Joint Standing Committees. 

On Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Stearns ; Council- 
men Walker, Jr., Cox, and Dunlap. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Worthen and Stearns ; Councilmen 
Reed, Turcotte, and Wolff. (Meet Wednesday succeeding the 
twenty-fourth of each month. All bills must be left at the city 
auditor's office, properly approved, not later than the twentieth 
of each month.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Stearns and Green; Councilmen 
Chapman, Reed, and Barry. (Meet third Friday of each 
month.) 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

On Streets. — Aldermen Corey and Green ; Councilmen Max- 
well, Clark, and Walker, Jr. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Holland and Dickey ; 
Councilmen Maxwell, Clark, and Peaslee. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Green and Sanborn ; Coun- 
cilmen Cox, Bartlett, and Snow. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Worthen and Fulton ; 
Councilmen Cronin, Wilkinson, and Chapman. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Dickey and Corey ; Coun- 
cilmen Butman, Cronin, and Nerbonne. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Sanborn and Hol- 
land ; Councilmen Bean, Snow, and Wolff. 

On Public Instruction. — Aldermen Stearns and Sanborn ; 
Councilmen Schimmel, Ahern, and Robitaille. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Holland and Sanborn ; Coun- 
cilmen Mullen, Barry, and Nerbonne. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Fulton and Worthen; Council- 
men Peaslee, Butman, and Ahern. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Sanborn and Dickey; 
Councilmen Mullen, Ahern, and Wolff. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Fulton and Stearns; Coun- 
cilmen Turcotte, Cotter, and Schimmel. 



Standing Committees. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Fnrollmefit. — Aldermen Green and Holland. 
On Bills on Second Beading. — Aldermen Holland and Ful- 
ton. 

On Market. — Aldermen Fulton and Green. 

On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Dickey and Worthen. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Corey and Sanborn. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Stearns and Corey. 

On Special Police. — Aldermen Worthen and Dickey. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



On Election Returns. — Councilmen Cox, Bartlett, and 
Walker, Jr. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Councilmen Clark, Dunlap, 
and Snow. 

On Enrollment. — Councilmen Chapman, Wilkinson, and 
Barry. 



City Physician. 

FREDERICK PERKINS . . . Office, 895 Elm street. 

Salary, $200. Elected by City Councils in convention, in January, annually. 
(Laws of 1870, chapter 99. City Ordinances, chapter 13 and chapter 14, sec- 
tion 28, as amended by City Councils, September 1, 1885.) May be allowed 
such further compensation, for unusual and extraordinary medical or surgical 
services, as shall from time to time be deemed reasonable. Residence, 490 
Lake avenue. 



City Engineer. 



WINFRED H. BENNETT . . . Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Chosen by City Councils in convention, in January, annu- 
ally. (City Ordinances, chapter 14, sections 30, 31, and amendments March 4, 
1890.) 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 1 871. City Ordinances, chapter 30, also amendment to 
section 12, chapter 30, passed January 2, i89i,and amendment to section 22, 
chapter 30, passed March 3, 1891, and Laws of 1891, act approved March 31, 
1891.) One commissioner elected annually by Mayor and Aldermen, in the 
month of September, for a term of six years. Office at Court House, corner 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Franklin and West Merrimack streets. Telephone at office and at pumping 
station. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex-officio. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1895. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1894. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1893. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
James A. Weston, term expires January, 1897. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January, 1896. 
Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 

James A. Weston, Clerk. Salary $100. Chosen by the board 
of commissioners. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker . Office, Court House, Franklin street. 

Salary, $1,600. Chosen annually by water commissioners. Residence, 68 
South Main street, West Manchester. 



Clerk of the Water- Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns . . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, $1,200. Chosen by the water commissioners annually. Residence, 
421 Hanover street. 



Engineer at Pumping Station. 

* Charles C. Cole. Salary, $800, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Josiah Laselle. Salary, $700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen by water commissioners annually. 
* Deceased. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 11 



Justice of the Police Court. 

Nathan P. Hunt, Court room at Police Station, corner Man- 
chester and Chestnut streets. 

Salary, $1,500. Appointed by Governor, with the advice of the Council. 
(General Laws, chapter 215; chapter 163, sections 17, 18, 19 of the Laws of 
1878, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1S81.) Residence, 747 Union street. 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath . . Salary, $2 per day of actual service 

Appointed by the Governor, with advice of the Council. (Chapter 215, 
General Laws, sections 2-14.) Residence, 16 High street. 



Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bickford Salary, $600 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 17-19, 
General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881.) Residence, 15 Ash 
street. 



POLICE. 



The members of the police force are appointed by the Mayor and Alder- 
men, in January of alternate years, for a term of two years, unless sooner re- 
moved for cause. They are by virtue of their appointment constables and 
conservators of the peace, and their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. 
The term of any officer elected to fill a yacancy or to increase the number of 
officers, expires at the time of the next regular election. (Chapter 253, section 
5, General Laws; Chapter 303, Laws of 1887; City Ordinances, chapter 5, 
as amended by Ordinance dated March 5, 1889.) Police Station at the corner 
of Chestnut and Manchester streets. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

City Marshal. 

Horatio W. Longa .... Office at Police Station 

Salary, $900. Residence, River Road, north, near West Webster street. 
Telephone at house and office. 



Assistant Marshal. 

John F. Cassidy .... Office at Police Station 
Salary, $800. Residence, 415 Manchester street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Lafayette Tebbetts. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 222 
Laurel street. 



Day Police. 

Salary, $2.25 per Day. 

Randall W. Bean, 73 Ash street. 

Edgar Farrar, 341 Chestnut street. 

Ira P. Fellows, 82 A street, West Manchester. 

Edwin A. Hutchins, n Mill street, Amoskeag. 

John T. O'Dowd, 528 Granite street, West Manchester. 

Florence Sullivan, 213 Cedar street. 

Bartlett N. Wilson, 51 C street, West Manchester. 



Night Patrol. 

Salary, $2.25 per Day. 

Michael J. Healy (Sergeant), 551 Granite street, West Man- 
chester. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Francois E. Bourrassa, 556 Lincoln street. 

Henry A. Burns, 505 Maple street. 

William M. Caldwell, 467 Central street. 

George W. Cheney, 1490 Elm street. 

Norbert Decoteau, 302 Cartier street, West Manchester. 

James F. Dunn. 237 Elm street. 

Edward C. Emerson, 309 Lake avenue. 

George E. Flanders, 655 Chestnut street. 

Jonathan E. Floyd, 823 Union street. 

Lowell O. Fowler, 141 7 Elm street. 

Edward H. Holmes, 541 Chestnut street. 

Benjamin F. Lake, 772 Elm street. 

George A. Lovejoy, 99 Orange street. 

Andrew J. Mayhew, 554 Chestnut street. 

Samuel L. Mitchell, 414 Merrimack street. 

John F. O'Malley, 130 Merrimack street. 

Francis Renville, 44 Beauport street, West Manchester. 

Philip Reischer, 292 Main street, West Manchester. 

Olof Ring, 8 Dean street, room 18. 

Gilbert A. Sackett, 1429 Elm street. 

Timothy P. Shea, 213 Auburn street. 

Charles W. Stevens, 12 Russell street. 

George E. Varnum, 211 Massabesic street, East Manchester. 

John C. Colburn, deceased. 

* William Bourrassa, 1449 Elm street. 



Janitor of Station. 

Peter Larabee. $1.75 per day. Residence 124 Willow street. 



Matron. 
Miss A. B. Brown. $1 per day. Residence, 329 Chestnut 



street. 

: Elected to fill vacancy. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1890; Mayor and president of 
the Common Council members ex officio. The board of school committee 
choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of public instruction, the 
truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, and determine their sal- 
aries. They have charge of the repairs of schoolhouses, to a limited extent, 
and the purchase of free text-books and other supplies, and are limited by the 
appropriations of the City Councils. The salary of the committee is $10 each. 

Ward i. 

Charles H. Manning, 17 Mechanic street. 

Charles D. Sumner, 22 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark street. 

Ward 2. 

William H. Morrison, 82 Prospect street. 
George H. Stearns, 1934 Elm street. 

Ward 3. 

George D. Towne, 170 Lowell street. 
Louis E. Phelps, 103 Walnut street. 

Ward 4. 

Stephen B. Stearns, 464 Amherst street. 
Edwin L. Richardson, 304 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. 

James P. Slattery, 217 Central street. 
William J. Sughrue, 61 Spruce street. 

Ward 6. 

F. T. E. Richardson, 481 Lincoln street. 
George W. Dearborn, 131 Massabesic street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

Ward 7. 

Marshall P. Hall, 26 Amoskeag Corporation, Market street. 
Edward B. Woodbury, 1 Manchester Corporation, Pleasant 
street. 

Ward 8. 

Luther C. Baldwin, 157 Milford street. 
William K. Robbins, 290 McGregor street. 

Edson S. Heath, ex officio, 13 Amoskeag Corporation, Middle 
street. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, chairman, 533 Lake avenue. Office, City 
Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury, clerk, salary $100, 1 Manchester Cor- 
poration, Pleasant street. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

William E. Buck Office, City Hall 

Salary, $2,000. Residence, 324 Myrtle street. 



Truant Officer. 



Samuel Brooks Office, City Hall 

Salary, $750. Residence, 413 Beech street. 



Assessors. 



One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in November. 
Paid $2.50 each, for each day while employed in the assessment and abate- 
ment of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. General Laws, chap- 
ter 47, sections 9-12. City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 25.) Assistant 
assessors, not exceeding six, chosen by the City Councils. 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward i. Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 2. John E. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 

Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. John Ryan, 228 Chestnut street. 

Ward 6. George H, Dudley, 159 Laurel street. 

Ward 7. William T. Rowell, 14 Manchester Corporation. 

Ward 8. Frank T. Provost, 21 Amory street, West Manchester. 

CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David O. Furnald Office, City Hall 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

George H. Dudley Office, City Hall 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in November. Compen- 
sation, $2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, City Hall. 
(Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, II, 12, 13, 14, 16, and 
City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward 1. George C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block. 
Ward 2. Benjamin L. Hartshorn, 28 Blodget street. 
Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 
Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 
Ward 5. Patrick E. Daly, 80 Auburn street. 
Ward 6. Isaac Whittemore, River road, south. 
Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The Mayor is 
a member ex officio. Compensation, $25 per annum, each ; clerk of the board, 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 17 

$75 per annum, determined by City Ordinance, chapter 14, section 18, as 
amended by Ordinance of August 5, 1890. Meet third Wednesday of 
each month in City Hall building. 

Ward 1. William H. Maxwell, clerk, 20 Amoskeag Corpo- 
ration, Stark street. 

Ward 2. Thomas L. Quimby, railroad station, foot West Sal- 
mon street. 

Ward 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4. George S. Holmes, 296 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Patrick Costello, 106 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road, East Manchester. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. William Weber, 187 Second street, West Man- 
chester. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex officio, office, City Hall. 



Board of Health. 



(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, chap- 
ter 165; Laws of 1887, chapter 227.) One member appointed by the Mayor 
in January of each year, to hold office for a term of three years. Salary, $200 
each per annum. 

George C. Hoitt, M. D., 1 1 79 Elm street. Term expires first 
Monday in February, 1893. 

Joseph B. Sawyer, clerk, civil engineer, 356 Hanover street. 
Term expires first Monday in February, 1892. 

Cornelius F. Starr, M. D., 49 Manchester street. Term ex- 
pires first Monday in February, 1894. 

Russell White, sanitary inspector, 575 Union street. Office, 
936 Elm street. 

Melvin J. Jenkins, sanitary inspector, 31 Nashua street. 
Office 936 Elm street. 
2 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Fire Department. 

The chief engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen annually in the 
month of January, by a majority vote of the City Councils in convention. The 
salary of the chief engineer is $1,000 per annum; the assistant engineers, 
each $125 per annum They exercise the powers and perform the duties of 
firewards. The said engineers constitute the board of engineers, and elect a 
clerk whose compensation is $25 a year. The annual compensation of the 
members of the several hook and ladder, hose, steam fire engine, and chemical 
engine companies is as follows : Foremen, each $115 : assistant foremen, each 
#110; clerks, each $110; engineers, each $135; assistant engineers, each 
$105 ; all other members, each $100; payable in equal semi-annual payments, 
on the first of January and July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. General Laws 
chapter 106. City Ordinances, chapter 8, and chapter 14, sections 22, 23, 
as amended by ordinance of December 31, 1886, and December 13, 1887.) 
Nineteen members are steadily employed as teamsters and engineers, etc. : Two 
at ^62.50 per month, each; eleven at #55 per month, each; four at $50 per 
month, each ; two at $45 per month, each. Members of the companies are 
appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen, in the month of February, annu- 
ally, on list presented by the board of engineers. Each company has the elec- 
tion of its officers subject to the approval of the board of engineers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. Lane . . Office, Central Station, Vine street 
Residence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

Fred S. Bean, clerk, 102 Orange street. 
Ruel G. Manning, 52 Douglas street, West Manchester. 
Eugene S. Whitney, River road, north, corner West street. 
Clarence R. Merrill, 414 Merrimack street. 

For further information see chief engineer's report. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester Atheneum, 
printed on pages 107, 108 of City Report for fiscal year ending January 31, 
1855.) Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected by Aldermen and 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 19 

board of trustees, in joint convention in September annually. Term of ser- 
vice, six years ; no salary. Two additional trustees, Mayor, and president of 
Common Council, ex officio. 

Lucien B. Clough, term expires October i, 1895, I ^ 1 Walnut 
street. 

Nathan P. Hunt, term^expires October 1, 1894, 747 Union 
street. 

Herman F. Straw, term expires October 1, 1893, 607 Chest- 
nut street. 

Walter M. Parker, term expires October 1, 1892, West Web- 
ster street, corner Elm. 

Isaac W. Smith, term expires October 1, 1898, 1855 Elm street. 

Moody Currier, term'expires October 1, 1897, Ash street, cor- 
ner Myrtle. 

Benjamin C. Dean, term expires October 1. 1896, Ash street, 
corner Myrtle. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex officio, 533 Lake avenue. 

Edson S. Heath, ex officio, 13 Amoskeag Corporation, Middle 
street. 



Highway Surveyors. 

Elected annually in joint convention of City Councils in January. 

District No. 1. Raymond P. Campbell, Union street, north. 
Salary, $2 per day. 

Districts Nos. 2 and "3. William Sanborn, 89 Pennacook 
street. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

District No. 4. Cassius C. Webster, River road, south. Sal- 
ary, $2 per day. 

District No. 5. Mark E. Harvey, Nutt road, south. Salary, 
$2 per day. 

District No. 6. Greenleaf C. Coleman, Island Pond road. 
Salary, $2 per day. 

District No. 7. Charles Francis, Candia road, East Manches- 
ter. Salary, $2 per day. 

District No. 8. Harrison M. Clough, Hanover street, Candia 
road. Salary, $2 per day. 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

District No. 9. Alphonso Boyce, Mammoth road. Salary, $2 
per day. 

District No. 10. Charles O. Phelps, 341 South Main street. 
Salary, $2.50 per day. 

District No. 11. Frank D. Hanscom, Goffstown road. Salary, 
$2 per day. 

District No. 12. Leroy M. Streeter, Mammoth xo?d, city farm. 
Salary, $2 per day. 

District No. 13. Eben Carr, Union street, north. Salary, $2 
per day. 

Telephone at house and office of superintendent in District No. 2. 



City Weigher. 

Elected annually in convention of City Councils. Salary, $400 per annum, 
all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn statement. 
Stationed at city scales on Franklin street. 

William Bailey ...... Office, city scales 

Residence, 74 Main street, West Manchester. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Albert T. Barr, 257 Merrimack street. 

Elected annually in January by City Councils in convention. Paid by fees. 
(Section 12, chapter 40, General Laws, and chapter 121 General Laws.) 



Fish and Game Wardens. 

(General Laws, chapter 176.) Elected by City Councils in convention. 

John C. Higgins, 143 Orange street. 

George A. Clark, 304 Central street. 

Samuel S. James, 184 Laurel street. 

William C. Clarke, 711 Pine, corner North street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 21 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 



(City Ordinances, chapter 40, sections 1, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected by 
City Councils in convention in January, annually, for the term of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

For four years, George W. Bacon, 65 Stark Corporation, Ca- 
nal street. 

For four years, William H. Huse, Mammoth road. 

For three years, Nathan P. Hunt, Union street, near Blodget. 

For three years, Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. 

For two years, John M. Kendall, 311 Central street. 

For two years, Hiram Stearns, east side of Front street, Amos- 
keag. 

For one year, Charles H. Bartlett, 60 Walnut street. 

For one year, John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. 

S. B. Putnam, clerk and treasurer, 437 Amherst street. 



Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman John J. Holland, 218 Central street. 
Councilman Levi K. Snow, 86 Amoskeag Corporation. 
Nathan P. Hunt, 747 Union street. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street. 
John M. Kendall, 311 Central street. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 

Councilman George M. Bean, Candia road, Massabesic street. 

George W. Bacon, 66 Stark Corporation, Canal street. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 60 Walnut street. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Councilman Chris. L. Wolff, 36 Clinton street, West Man- 
chester. 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Hiram Stearns, east side Front street, Amoskeag. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road, East Manchester. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Byron A. Stearns. Office at the cemetery; residence, 254 
Taylor street. Telephone at house and cemetery. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery; residence, 267 
Lake avenue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

James A. Weston, chairman, 621 Maple street. 
Person C. Cheney, Harrison street, corner Elm. 
Edgar J. Knowlton (ex-officio), 533 Lake avenue. 



Inspector of Milk. 

H. F. W. Little . . . Office rear of 13 Lowell street 

Residence, 385 Lowell street. Term expires February 1, 1892. (General 
Laws, chapter 271, chapter 122. Laws of 1881, chapter 81. Laws of 1883, 
chapter 42. Laws of 1885, chapter 52.) Appointed by Mayor and Aldermen. 
Salary, $150 per annum. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Thomas W. Lane . . Office at Central Fire Station. 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
biennially, in February. Salary, $lco per annum. (City Ordinances, chapter 
39, Moore's Compilation. Laws of 1883, chapter 94.) Telephone at house 
and office. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 23 



Inspectors of Oil. 

Edward J. Powers . 117 Bowman street, West Manchester 
Joseph B. Baril ...... 28 Hanover street 

(General Laws, chapter 122, sections 30, 31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38. 
City Ordinances, chapter 22, Moore's Compilation.) Paid by fees, % of 1 per 
cent per gallon. 



Moderators. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, section 3, section 9; chap- 
ter 36, section 9; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 
21.) 

Ward 1. Abial W. Eastman, 24 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark 
street. 

Ward 2. Nicholas Nichols, 587 Chestnut street. 

Ward 3. Lyman W. Colby, Chestnut street, north. 

Ward 4. Joshua B. Estey, 254 Myrtle street. 

Ward 5. William Howe, 64 Auburn street. 

Ward 6. Henry B. Fairbanks, 303 Central street. 

Ward 7. Joseph W. Bean, 10 Manchester Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Charles G. Ranno, 63 Parker street, West Man- 
chester. 



Ward Clerks. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. City Ordi- 
nances, page 11, sections 5, 6, 8, 10, 11.) 

Ward 1. Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm street. 
Ward 2. Daniel C. Smith, 1855 Elm street. (Removed to 
Lawrence.) 

Ward 3. Samuel C. Kennard, 609 Beech street. 
Ward 4. Harrie M. Young, ^^ Dutton street. 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 5. Timothy F. Lynch, 25 Spruce street. 
Ward 6. George B. Rogers, 277 Laurel street. 
Ward 7. James E. Arthur, 38 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Frank O. Clement, 47 Dover street. 



Selectmen. 



Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter I, section 27; chapter 12, sec- 
tion 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, sec- 
tion 1. City Ordinances, page Ji, section 5; page 92, section 20.) 

Ward i. 

John H. Wales, Jr., 19 Machine Shop block, Water street. 

Joseph Tait. 

John F. Reardon, 12 Arkwright street. 

Ward 2. 

Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 
Robert R. Chase, 841 Union street. 
Harry P. Ray, State Industrial School. 

Ward 3. 

David Thayer, 102 Walnut street. 
John Cronin, 284 Bridge street. 
Charles C. Clifford, 99 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. 

John K. Currier, 43 Ashland street. 
Jeff. T. Perry, 166 Merrimack street. 
Charles H. Bodwell, 257 Merrimack street. 

Ward 5. 

Laurence F. Mahoney, 104 Auburn street. 
John B. Laforest, 242 Lake Avenue. 
Arthur Allen, 74 Auburn street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 25 



Ward 6. 



George F. Sargent, Mammoth road, East Manchester. 
John T. Gott, 301 East Spruce street. 
Peter D. St. Germain, 306 Auburn street. 

Ward 7. 

Willie D. Wheeler, 25 Manchester Corporation, Grove street. 
William J. Welch (deceased). 

John F. Mellady, 53 Amoskeag Corporation, West Merrimack 
street. 

Ward 8. 

George E. Fellows, 316 Milford street. 

Frank St. John, 5 Barr street, West Manchester. 

Odilon Doucet, 126 McGregor street. 



OTHER CITY OFFICERS. 

City Ordinances, chapter 13, election of city officers, section 1 : " The City 
Councils in convention shall, in the month of January, annually, elect corders 
and measurers of wood, bark, and manure, weighers of hay, straw, coal, and 
other articles, surveyors of lumber, fence-viewers, sealer of weights and meas- 
ures, pound keeper, cullers of brick, measurers of stone, measurers of brick and 
plastering, measurers of painting, cullers of hoops and staves, sealers and meas- 
urers of leather, measurers of coal." 



Weighers of Hay, Straw, Corders and Measurers of 
Wood, etc. 

W. W. Dickey, Harvey road, sworn in January 25, 1891. 

Charles E. Bartlett, timekeeper Amoskeag Corporation, sworn 
in January 20, 1891. 

George L. Stearns, clerk P. C. Cheney Paper Co., sworn in 
January 29, 1891. 



26 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

William Bailey, city scales, Franklin street, sworn in February 

2, 1891. 

Benjamin S. Nichols, 27 Pennacook street, sworn in February 

3, 1891. 

Benjamin F. Kinsley, foot of Franklin street, sworn in Febru- 
ary 3, 1891. 

Robert Leggett, Amoskeag Corporation, sworn in February 3, 
1891. 

J. F. Wyman, 85 South Main street, West Manchester, sworn 
in February 3, 1891. 

I. W. Wakefield, 62 Amoskeag Corporation, sworn in Febru- 
ary 3, 1891. 

C. W. Quimby, 134 Milford street, sworn in February 3, 1891. 

George H. Butterfield, North Bedford road, West Manchester, 
sworn in February 3, 1891. 

J. W. Dickey, Amoskeag Corporation, sworn in February 3, 
1 891. 

W. H. Gilmore, Taylor street, East Manchester, sworn in Feb- 
ruary 3, 1 89 1. 

James A. Doe, 485 Elm street, sworn in February 3, 1891. 

F. B. Balch, L. B. Bodwell Co., Elm street, sworn in February 

4, 1891. 

George A. Stokes, 34 Machine Shop block, sworn in February 

5, 1891. 

John S. Lovering, E. P. Johnson Co., Elm street, sworn in 
February 5, 1891. 

James Benson, Candia road, Massabesic, sworn in February 6, 
1891. 

J. M. Moore, 1308 Elm street, sworn in February 10, 1891. 

Dexter L. Wilson, 64 Granite street, sworn in February 10,1891. 

Joseph A. Brown, Young street above Beech, sworn in Febru- 
ary 14, 1 89 1. 

Horatio Fradd, 3 South Main street, West Manchester, sworn 
in February 16, 1891. 

Edgar W. Poore, 690 Elm street, sworn in February 17, 1891. 

Charles S. Kidder, Union above Clarke street, sworn in Febru- 
ary 21, 1891. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 27 

H. I. Dodge, Devonshire Mills, sworn in February 21, 1891. 

Alvin G. Bean, 181 Massabesic street, East Manchester, sworn 
in February 27, 1891. 

D. A. Holland, 1158 Elm street, sworn inJMarch 16, 1891. 

D. M. Poore, 11 39 Elm street, sworn in March 27, 1891. 

C. A. Blood, 295 South Main street, West Manchester, sworn 
in March 31, 1891. 

F. G. Putney, P. C. Cheney Paper Co., Amoskeag, sworn in 
April 3, 1891. 

Jason P. Simmons, sworn in May 1, 1891. 

Frank P. Colby, Windsor Hotel, sworn in August 5, 189 1. 

T. M. Hall, 69 Amherst street, sworn in August 22, 1891. 



Constables. 



James A. Broderick, 26 Pembroke building, sworn in January 
7, 1891. 

John M. Crawford, 30 Manchester street, sworn in June 24, 
1891. 



Fish and Game Warden. 

J. C. Higgins, Amory Manufacturing Co., sworn in January 
24, 1891. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Albert T. Barr, 257 Merrimack street, sworn in February 3, 
1801. 



Cullers of Brick, Measurers of Stone, Stonework, 
Plastering, Painting, etc. 

T. Frank Dickey, 78 Concord street, sworn in February 3, 
1801. 



28 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Joseph E. Bennett, 554 Beech street, sworn in February 3, 
1891. 

Joel Daniels, 1094 Elm street, sworn in February 3, 1891. 
Jeremiah Choate, 1330 Elm street, sworn in February 3, 1891. 
John P. Young, 852 Elm street, sworn in February 4, 1891. 
George H. Allen, 924 Elm street, sworn in February 7, 1891. 
Anson Minard, 453 Pine street, sworn in February 11, 1891. 



Inspector of Petroleum. 

Edward J. Powers, Concord & Montreal freight depot, sworn 
in March 7, 1891. 



Surveyors of Lumber. 

Chandler H. Clough, Concord & Montreal Railroad, sworn in 
February 3, 1891. 

Jerome J. Lovering, 300 Pine street, sworn in February 4, 
1.891. 

Charles Jacobs, 61 C street, West Manchester, sworn in Febru- 
ary 5, 1 89 1. 

F. A. Senter, Manchester Print Works, sworn in February 7, 
1891. 

A. C. Wallace, 168 South Main street, West Manchester, sworn 
in February 7, 1891. 

Edwin L. Tinkham, 346 Granite street, West Manchester, 
sworn in February 10, 1891. 

J. L. Smith, S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., sworn in February 
12, 1891. 

George P. Tarr, S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., sworn in Febru- 
ary 18, 1891. 

C. W. Piper, 16 Orange street, sworn in March 7, 1891. 

John H. Proctor, Candia road, sworn in March 26, 1891. 



■■ .: ■ '■' ;, ii :■ ; : :■ I'M 




37. 60YERNWENT BUILDING. 

Man Chester. N. H. 



|j||if I' 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL AD- 
DRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Having been selected to assume the direction of city affairs 
for the two years ensuing, through confidence in our ability and 
integrity to serve the public weal, we have assembled here in the 
early dawn of a new year to accept the trust confided to our 
keeping. Great responsibilities are before us, and it is only by 
reliance on Him whose blessing and kindly guidance have been 
invoked, and the unselfish consecration of our best energies to 
the work before us, that we can hope to give to our city a satis- 
factory administration of affairs. 

I am free to say that my only purpose is to serve our growing 
and prosperous city honorably and faithfully, and to give to the 
people the full fruitage to which they are entitled in return for 
the heavy burdens of taxation which are laid upon them. It is 
incumbent upon us that we do not allow ourselves to be cramped 
within party lines, or permit party spirit to dominate our actions. 
Good men of all parties should come together for united action 
when matters of local government are to be considered, and 
sweep from the municipal field political parties and politicians 
alike, for they can have nothing in common with the interests of 
the people. 

It is admitted on all sides that one of the most disturbing 
problems of the day is that of municipal government. The 
statement has been made, and reiterated again and again, that 
the people of our American cities are misgoverned to a greater 
degree than those of any other country. The reason for this, it 
seems to me, is that our business men do not, as a rule, concern 



32 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

themselves with municipal affairs, and there is lacking that indi- 
vidual and persistent effort which is the foundation of every suc- 
cess in business life. The result has been that the interests of the 
people have suffered, and there is an all-pervading and well- 
grounded belief that our cities are receiving but a fractional part 
of what they pay for. In almost every department men are 
foisted upon the pay-rolls, not because of any special fitness for 
the positions they are presumed to fill, or ability to serve the city 
and give an honest day's work for their pay, but because they 
are either serviceable as party men or are indebted to some mer- 
chant politician, who seeks by forcing the city to employ these 
men to secure the money due him for merchandise. 

There appears to exist a misconception, in the minds of many, 
that cities are rich and well able to support all manner of ex- 
travagances, and they are therefore pounced upon, vulture-like, 
by men in all the walks of life, who seem to regard a municipal- 
ity as common prey. The result has been a veritable scramble 
to determine who would secure the largest share of spoils, there- 
by displaying a selfish greed and lack of conscience which are 
the greatest enemies to both private rights and the public wel- 
fare. Faster even than the rapid growth of our city has been the 
ratio of increase in expenses. Some of these have been legiti- 
mate while others have not been. The pay of men has been 
increased in several departments when there were scores of appli- 
cants seeking the positions of those in employment at the old 
rate of payment. The time to increase wages would seem to be 
when capable men are not to be had for the amount being paid. 
If we can but bring people to a true understanding of this sub- 
ject, that cities, states, and nations are not wealthy, but on the 
contrary are the veriest mendicants, — eternally seeking alms, 
which are wrung from the people by one form of taxation or 
another, — we may be able to correct some of the abuses which 
we have seen grow up around us. 



Of all the manifold duties which beset us none are more im- 
portant, and none call for a display of intelligence and wisdom 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 33 

to a greater degree, than does the management of the financial 
affairs of our city. Good judgment here, supported by execu- 
tive ability elsewhere, will insure an administration that will be 
satisfactory in the main to all our citizens and tax-payers. 

The financial condition of the city on the first day of January 
was reported to be as follows : 
Amount of funded debt, January i, 

1890 $945,950.00 

Cemetery bonds issued during the 

year ...... 2,900.00 

Amount of funded debt, January 1, 189 1 . $948,850.00 
Interest due, estimated . . . $20,000.00 
Bills outstanding .... 55,042.97 

$75>°42-97 



Total indebtedness, January 1, 1891 . $1,023,892.97 

Cash in treasury, January 1, 1891 .... 134,594.99 



Net indebtedness, January 1, 1891 . . . $889,297.98 
Net indebtedness, January 1, 1890 . . . 886,100.67 

Increase of net indebtedness during the year $3>i97-3i 
Although the figures given above indicate a somewhat heavy 
indebtedness, the fact is that our superior system of water-works, 
owned by the city, can readily be sold for an amount largely in 
excess of the city debt, and leave our municipality not only free 
from moneyed obligations but with a handsome surplus in its 
treasury. 

Of the bonded debt $520,000 bears six per cent interest, and 
$415,000 four per cent. No part of the city's bonded indebted- 
ness will become due the present year, but an amount aggregat- 
ing $100,000, bearing six per cent interest, will have to be 
provided for January 1, 1892, and this, I trust, we may be able 
to cancel in part, and refund the balance for four or a less per 
cent. 

The excellent financial status of our city is a source of great 
gratification, and yet I am earnestly of the opinion that the pol- 



34 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

icy heretofore followed in matters of finance should undergo a 
radical change. I believe that all expenditures in the line of 
permanent improvements should be done by loan, and whenever 
this is done accompany the act by a provision for the laying 
aside annually of a sufficient amount of money, which, when the 
loan shall mature, will be sufficient to entirely meet the obliga- 
tion. This sinking-fund I would have sacred and inviolate, and 
in charge of a board of trustees. This, it seems to me, is the 
only perfect financial policy which a growing city can devise, 
and nothing could be better. This is a system which will mete 
out justice to ourselves and to those who come after us. For 
what we enjoy and derive benefits from we shall help to pay for, 
and so, in like measure, will our children and those who succeed 
them. Why should we continue what to us is a ruinous policy, 
and submit to grievous burdens of taxation for the creation of 
enduring improvements, when we can experience but a fractional 
part of the advantages and blessings to be received therefrom ? 
Why not permit those who are to reap the ripened harvest of our 
endeavors to assist in meeting the obligations thereby assumed, 
as where all help there is an equal distribution of the burden, and 
taxation is at no time excessive ? 

The most serious obstacle in the pathway of Manchester's 
prosperity to-day is her excessive tax-rate. A decreased rate will 
add materially to the valuation of the city, and no other agency 
can be so potent for its good. It will be an invitation for a 
multiplicity of industries to make their homes in our beautiful 
city, and lead local capitalists to invest their money, for their 
own and the city's good, at home, instead of placing it in doubt- 
ful schemes at remote points in the West and South. 

In making the appropriations for the current year we cannot 
be too careful and considerate. An examination should be 
made into the needs of every department, the same computed in 
dollars and cents so far as may be, and the apportionment of 
money then made commensurate with a judicious and discreet 
administration of affairs. We should impress upon those who 
are to have the expenditure of money that economy is the first 
duty which they owe the city. We should not, unless in cases 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 35 

of the greatest emergency, permit appropriations to be over- 
drawn, and every official who allows this to be done without 
proper authority should be held personally accountable for all 
that is expended in excess of the appropriation. 

VALUATION. 

The information is obtained from the assessors that only the 
legitimate, natural increase in valuation can be expected this 
year, which means that we can derive added revenue only from 
new buildings, or from property situated in some exceptional 
localities, where increased value has been given the same by rea- 
son of the erection of new public buildings and industries. The 
assessors' valuation last year was $24,173,240, which is an ad- 
vance of $1,210,450 over the previous year. This substantial 
increase was the result of the expiration of the ten years' ex- 
emption on the Amory Mill, and the increase in the valuation of 
property on Elm street to the extent of $200,000. 

The industrial property at present exempt from taxation in- 
cludes the Jefferson Mill, Everett Knitting Works, the new 
Stark Mill, the Manchester Shoe Manufacturing Company's 
shop, the West Side Company's shop and equipment, A. P. 
Olzendam & Son's hosiery mill, and the W. W. Hubbard shop. 

DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

For the past year the city paid the considerable sum of $11,- 
265.25 as discount on taxes. I believe that we should follow the 
custom of most other cities and abolish this practice. 

WATER-WORKS. 

The foresight of those who some twenty years ago planned 
our excellent system of water-works receives daily demonstration 
in the blessings which we enjoy from a pure and abundant water 
supply, and also in the revenue derived from its use. The policy 
of the water commissioners in buying up the fiowage land about 
Lake Massabesic is commendable, and the time may not be re- 
mote when it will be necessary, as a matter of protection to 



36 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

the health of thousands of consumers, for the city to possess the 
entire area which is flowed by the lake. 

One of the important matters which will command our early 
attention is the proposition for the establishment of a high- 
pressure service on Oak Hill. The report of the engineer en- 
gaged to make surveys has been published, and of the eight dif- 
ferent estimates presented the lowest sum for which the object 
desired can be secured is placed at $82,218.56, and from this up 
to $184,297.16. We should not take action in this matter until 
we are entirely satisfied as to what is the true policy of the city. 
If it is deemed advisable to authorize the construction of this 
addition to our water-works system, allow me to suggest it should 
be done gradually, and that the expense should be met from 
the income derived from the works, in-order not to increase the 
burdens of the people by further taxation. 

It has been the practice since the construction of the water- 
works for the city to raise by taxation and pay over to this de- 
partment a large sum of money for hydrant service, sprinkling 
the streets, use of water in city buildings, etc., which sum for 
the past year amounted to practically $25,000. This was well 
enough at the inception of the water-works, but now that they 
are more than self-supporting I seriously question the advisability 
of longer continuing this severe strain upon the tax-payers and 
would recommend that in lieu thereof the amount to be paid the 
water- works for the use of water by the city be limited to $5,000 
per annum. 

CITY AUDITOR. 

The experience of the past year has justified in ample measure 
the wisdom of creating the office of city auditor. The auditor 
has materially lessened the work in several departments and is 
rapidly reducing the affairs of the city, so far as can be done by 
book-keeping, to a business basis. 

SEWERS AND DRAINS. 

This is a subject of the utmost importance and merits prompt 
consideration. There is urgent necessity of the introduction of 



MAYOR KNOWLTON's INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 37 

a system of sewerage at Amoskeag village, and for the extension 
of the sewerage system throughout the southern section of the 
city and that portion of McGregorville which has not yet been 
reached. There is a demand also for the enlargement of the 
main sewer running from Granite street through South Main 
street and having for its outlet Piscataquog river. The present 
sewer is deemed too small to afford adequate drainage for the 
territory tributary to it. 

Nothing should be allowed to stand in the way of giving to 
our city as perfect a system of sewerage and drainage as it is 
possible to have, as the protection of the public health is of the 
weightiest consequence. Our city has been fortunate in not hav- 
ing experienced the ravages of terrible epidemics within the last 
few years, and let us not invite their visitation by neglect of duty 
where prompt action on our part may avert calamity. By the 
affordance to our city of proper sewerage and drainage facilities 
and the maintenance of an active^and vigilant board of health 
we shall have done our duty. 

In the construction of sewers we should have resort to machin- 
ery in order to facilitate their building, and I believe it would 
be for the interest of the city to contract much of the work in 
this and also in other departments of the city. 

HIGHWAYS, SIDEWALKS, AND BRIDGES. 

Compared with other cities Manchester has but little to boast 
of when it comes to the consideration of well-made and attrac- 
tive streets. This is not because we are lacking in conditions, for 
there is not a city in New England which is more abundantly 
favored with beauty of surroundings, or where nature has been 
more lavish in the bestowal of her diversified gifts of river and 
mountain scenery, and where field and forest mingle more pleas- 
antly in the perspective, and yet despite all that nature has done 
for us there is a woeful lack of beautiful drives, which are so 
fascinating to people who have the leisure and means for their 
enjoyment, and which are a recommendation in the eyes of 
visitors for any city possessing them. To the rapid growth of 
the city, with its incessant calls for new streets, repairs and im- 



38 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

provements, the present unsatisfactory condition of our highways 
is largely due. The showing which has been made in our city by 
the experimental stretches of concrete leads me to recommend 
that we continue this method of street building on a more liberal 
scale than has hitherto been the practice. The concrete street is 
far more durable than a macadamized highway, costs no more, 
and it affords a delightful surface to drive over. 

In the suburbs there is room for improvement in every direc- 
tion, and I deem it imperative that there be a more liberal ex- 
penditure of money upon the highways leading in and out of our 
city in order that they may be put in the best possible condition. 
I would recommend that the portable stone crusher betaken into 
all of the outlying districts in order that stone may be delivered 
and crushed near the locality where it will be needed, and by 
this method a substantial saving in expense can be made. 

In the matter of new streets there is a demand for more enter- 
prise than has heretofore been shown. The street should be the 
pioneer to lead the way for house building, rather than to await 
the time when its construction can no longer be averted, and 
when localities have been built upon for which the grade has not 
been established. 

Sidewalk construction needs to be pushed forward more rap- 
idly, as there is no one thing which contributes more abundantly 
to the comfort and convenience of the public. Investigation 
and observation both lead me to the conclusion that the city 
should take charge of the establishment of sidewalks and assess 
one half of the expense of their construction to the abutters. By 
this practice, they will be made uniform and their extension 
more vigorously promoted. There is an advantage to the abut- 
ters, also, in that the city will have the ownership and care of the 
walks for all time, and will be accountable for their condition. 

The bridges are generally in good condition, but there is need 
of a new and wider bridge to take the place of the present nar- 
row crossing which spans the Piscataquog river on South Main 
street. This bridge is wholly inadequate to properly care for the 
uses demanded of it by the public. 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 39 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The largest single item of municipal expenditure arises from 
the maintenance of our system of public education. 

For this heavy outlay, however, we have the recompense, which 
a study of the facts implies, that of all the various uses to which 
the money of the tax-payers is put, none give better, if as good, 
returns as do the schools of our city. The burden which their 
fostering entails is borne cheerfully by an enlightened and pro- 
gressive citizenship, as throughout the changing current of events 
it becomes more and more apparent that the public school is one 
of the foundation stones of the republic. The fidelity and loy- 
alty of our people to this beneficent institution find eloquent ex- 
pression in our school-crowned hills, and the schools in return 
shed luster on the fair fame of our city, as in competitive trials 
with those of other cities and states the laurel wreath has been 
allotted to the pupils of the Manchester public schools. 

The continued and rapid growth of the city calls for increased 
school accommodations, and in several directions the demand is 
imperative. By the completion of that magnificent temple of 
learning, dedicated a few days ago, and which bears the name of 
our honored retiring chief magistrate, the wants of the West Side 
have been provided for and anticipated for some years to come. 
In the eastern section of the city, the situation is the reverse, 
however, and immediate provision should be made to accommo- 
date the flood of incoming pupils. At the East Manchester 
school there are but sixty-eight sittings to accommodate an en- 
rolled membership of seventy-seven, and there is good reason to 
believe that nearly one hundred pupils will seek admission to 
this school at the spring term. A new schoolhouse, and one 
which will provide for not only the immediate but the future 
needs of this rapidly growing section, is a necessity which I trust 
you will not long permit to go unsupplied. 

The Wilson Hill school is also very much overcrowded, and 
the pressure upon the Ash and Lincoln street grammar schools is 
so great that in the case of the former it has been found necessary 
to fit up a classroom in the hall on the third floor. It has been 



40 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

suggested that the proper thing to do to relieve all three of these 
schools is to build a new high-school house, and to utilize the 
present structure for grammar, middle, and primary schools. 
This is a matter which should command our most considerate 
and painstaking attention, and if new schoolhouses are to be 
reared let us have buildings which shall be constructed with a 
view to utility rather than to display. 

There are other matters, the importance of which I desire to 
emphasize at this time. One of these is the great need of the 
introduction of manual training into our schools in order that 
children may be educated industrially as well as intellectually. 
New Hampshire being a manufacturing state and peopled by an 
industrious population, it is eminently desirable that the young 
men and women who must look to their own hands and brains 
for a livelihood should be properly equipped by our schools for 
the battle of life, and I believe we shall not have done our duty 
by them until we have combined with the culture of the brain 
the training of the hands. 

Another much-needed innovation is a gymnasium, and if this 
cannot be supplied for all the schools of grammar grade, it 
should at least be given a place at the high school. 

CITY LIBRARY. 

The usefulness of our excellent and well-managed free public 
library is one of the proud boasts of our citizens. Its shelves are 
constantly receiving valuable acquisitions, and the number of 
volumes of which they are now the repository aggregates more 
than thirty-three thousand. Their stores of knowledge are free 
to all classes, and they provide the means for both entertainment 
and instruction. The great need of the library is suitable read- 
ing-room accommodations, but it is doubtful if the city should 
go to the expense of building an extension for this purpose on 
the present site, as the time cannot be remote when a new build- 
ing, and one adapted and properly equipped to meet the require- 
ments of such an institution, will be called for in another locality. 

The enterprise of preparing a new catalogue has progressed 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 41 

during the past year, and the patrons of the library have the 
promise of a new and complete index in the near future. 

The custom, inaugurated some years ago, of presenting to the 
library portraits of our eminent citizens who have been prominent 
in their fostering care for the best interests of the city is a happy 
one, and deserves to be encouraged. The acquisitions to the 
library's portrait gallery the past year included portraits of the 
late Dr. Josiah Crosby, Hon. Samuel N. Bell, and ex-Mayor 
John Hosley. The latter, by the provisions of his will, set aside 
the generous sum of $5,000 for the purchase of non-sectarian 
newspapers and magazines for a free public reading-room in con- 
nection with the library. This sum is held in trust, the income 
going to the daughter of the deceased during her life. 

The settlement of the estate of the late Mrs. Eliza A. Eaton, 
now nearly if not quite consummated, will give to the library a 
fund amounting to about $2,500. 

I would reinforce the suggestion which has repeatedly been 
made by some of our citizens that the library be open to the 
public for both reading purposes and the delivery of books for a 
few hours on Sundays. I believe the influence resulting from 
such an innovation could not be otherwise than elevating, and I 
also believe that the tendency would be to further popularize the 
institution. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Our citizens are proud of their fire department, and the de- 
partment in return justifies the feeling. For intrepidity, vigor, 
and promptness of movement it has long taken high rank. It 
costs a great deal of money to maintain it, but the compensation 
comes in keeping our losses from fire at the minimum. We should 
not withhold from this arm of the municipal service anything 
that is needed to give additional security to our city in case of 
fire, or that would add to the efficiency of the department, as 
neglect, no matter how slight, might lead to the most disastrous 
consequences. 

The citizens of South Manchester have for several years pressed 
their claims for a hose-house, and as they are located fully a mile 



42 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

from any fire apparatus it would seem that with the continued 
growth in that direction the time has come when their petition 
should be granted. This could be done without great expense, 
as the hose carriage at the Fire King house, recently displaced 
by a combination hose carriage and hook and ladder truck, could 
be transferred to South Manchester, and the enterprising citizens 
of that locality have made known their willingness to organize a 
volunteer company to man the same. The citizens of McGreg- 
orville have also asked for a hose-house. An urgent need, it 
seems to me, is an aerial ladder truck, as the department at the 
present time is deficient in apparatus of this character, which 
would insure the best results in case of fire in the upper story of 
some of our highest buildings. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

There is no department of the public service which calls for 
greater manliness and more absolute integrity that that of the 
police, but the highest ideal of a police department can never be 
secured in a community where political considerations are 
allowed a controlling influence in the make-up of the force, and 
we shall never see our department elevated to the standard of 
efficiency desirable until it is divorced from political influences 
and placed in charge of a commission, the officers to serve con- 
tinuously unless removed for cause. 

There is a feeling that we have too many officers at present for 
a law-abiding community, such as is ours, and an investigation of 
the manner in which the force is distributed seems to justify this 
theory. One of the most forceful reasons given why the city 
should assume the great expense of an all-night electric-lighting 
service at the time of its introduction was that the system would 
do away with the necessity of employing as many officers as had 
been the custom, and while this, I am told, has been the fact in 
other cities, the reverse has been true with us. Instead of dimin- 
ishing the force it has been greatly and I believe unnecessarily 
augmented, until to-day we have an officer for nearly every thou- 
sand of our population and the force has attained to the limit 
allowed by law. If, upon investigation, we find that the force 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 43 

cannot be reduced and the interests of property holders properly 
protected, we should, I think, arrange to have the city patrolled 
at hours of the day and night when there is not now any guar- 
dianship whatsoever exercised. 

CITY FARM. 

One of the constant complaints coming from the great body 
of our tax-payers is that this farm, naturally productive, and 
abundantly supplied with all the appliances and stock needful 
for its successful cultivation, is not managed so as to be some- 
where near self-supporting. In room of this a large sum of 
money has been wrung from the tax-payers for its maintenance. 
For the ten years ending with January i, 1890, the sum of 
$29,000 was appropriated by the city councils and devoted to 
this farm, and in addition to this the receipts of the farm for the 
same period, amounting to $17,266.78, were also applied for the 
same purpose, the appropriations and receipts together making a 
total of $46,266.78. But even this large sum was not sufficient, 
as the total expenses for the ten years aggregated $67,882.94, an 
excess of [$21,616.16 above both appropriations and receipts, 
which had to be met by transfers from the reserved fund or some 
other appropriation. 

It will be well for us to give this subject our serious attention 
at once, for it would seem that we should be able to devise some 
means to stop this excessive draft upon the city treasury. The 
able-bodied men and women who are maintained at the farm, 
whether as paupers or as transgressors, should be set to work and 
thereby lighten the burdens of the industrious and toiling masses 
who are supporting this institution. 

COMMONS AND PARKS. 

The progress which has been made in recent years in beautify- 
ing our commons is most gratifying, and we should pursue a line 
of policy which will continue to add to their attractiveness. 

By popular vote our citizens have overwhelmingly declared 
themselves in favor of the creation of Derryfield park in the 



44 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

northeastern section of the city, composed of sixty-seven acres of 
land which has heretofore been a portion of the city farm, and 
with equal unanimity they have expressed themselves favorable 
to the establishment of a park, consisting of twenty-five acres of 
land situated in the northern section of the city, in which rest 
the ashes of the hero of the North, General John Stark. He 
was one of the central figures of the Revolution, as you all 
know, and it seems eminently proper that our city, where the 
greater part of his life was spent, should recognize his exalted 
patriotism and conspicuous achievements, and thereby discharge 
a duty which has long slumbered, while we at the same time 
point a lesson of loyalty to country and devotion to duty which 
will not be without its effect upon succeeding generations. The 
national government can undoubtedly be relied upon to assist in 
this matter, as an appropriation of $50,000 has once passed the 
senate for an equestrian statue at the hero's grave, and the effort 
to get the bill through both houses of congress is to be renewed. 
The city should therefore see to it that the grounds, having been 
purchased, are made, as rapidly as possible, to conserve the pur- 
poses of a public park. The outlay upon the city parks need 
not be heavy in any one year, but by the expenditure of a small 
sum annually they will soon assume proportions of great beauty. 

STREET LIGHTING. 

Manchester deserves the reputation which she enjoys of being 
one of the best lighted of cities, and I very much doubt if the 
people would ever consent to a backward step in this -direction. 
The electric-lighting service has been extended until now there 
are 252 lights, besides 83 gas lights and 65 oil lamps. The 
present three years' contract for street lighting by electricity ex- 
pires December 26 of the present year, and with the progress 
which has been made in the methods for producing such light 
the people will expect us to make a contract more favorable to 
the city. The total sum expended for street lighting the past 
year exceeded $41,000. 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 45 



CEMETERIES. 

The management of our cemeteries has been commendable to 
a high degree, and the introduction of modern appliances to in- 
crease their beauty and attractiveness has been rapid and produc- 
tive of the best results. The Valley and Pine Grove cemeteries 
are beautiful, sacred spots, where, after "life's fitful fever" has 
ended, have been gathered the remains of thousands of our pop- 
ulation. It is a religious and hallowed duty to make as attrac- 
tive as possible the resting places of the dead. The only sug- 
gestion I have to offer at the present time is that the outlying 
cemeteries, other than the two named above, should also be the 
objects of our thoughtful care and solicitude. 

CITY ENGINEER. 

This office is one of increasing importance as the city expands. 
Excellent progress has been made in procuring maps of streets 
and sewers, but the need is now felt for a larger map of the city, 
showing all the streets, together with the frontage and area of 
every plot of land. This should be made as early as practicable, 
and arrangements likewise entered upon the present year to have 
all the outlying roads marked by stone bounds, and the same 
system of marking also applied to streets wherever necessary. In 
order to carry forward all the work demanded of this depart- 
ment there is necessity for an increase in the appropriation. 

GRANITE-STREET CROSSING. 

The grade crossing at Granite street, aside from being danger- 
ous, is a source of great annoyance to the business interests of the 
city, as the delay occasioned by the unavoidable passing to and 
fro of trains is a matter which concerns a large number of people. 
Various plans have been suggested for doing away with both the 
danger and annoyance of this crossing, among them that of 
tunneling beneath the tracks. This, however, practical engineers 
do not consider would be satisfactory, and the only plan remain- 
ing which promises relief is that of an overhead crossing north of 
the passenger depot, which would take all of the light travel. 



46 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

It is deeply to be regretted that Manchester, with a population 
noted for their character and enterprise, and affording a vast 
business for the railroads, has not before this time been provided 
with a new depot and train-shed in keeping with the advance- 
ment which has been made in other directions. 

PUBLIC PLAYGROUND. 

As the encouragement of legitimate sport and recreation tends 
to a happy manhood and the prolongation of life, I would sug- 
gest that the city provide a public playground for its youth. A 
section of the proposed Derryfield park could be set aside for 
this purpose, and the same fitted up for base ball, foot ball, and 
kindred sports at a trifling expense. I am in favor of pursuing a 
liberal policy towards the youth of our city, as I believe that a 
little attention shown them, and a regard manifest for their en- 
joyment, will be the means of keeping them from harmful influ- 
ences in a large measure, and whatever we do in this direction 
we do for posterity. 

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES. 

Our city seems to be behind other municipalities of equal 
population in the direction of providing free public bath-houses. 
I believe we should regard with favor a movement calling for a 
reasonable outlay for such a purpose. 

RAILROAD EXTENSION. 

At the session of the legislature which convenes to-morrow an 
attempt will be made to procure such legislation as will bring 
about the relaying of the rails on the Manchester & North Weare 
Railroad between Weare and Henniker. This is a movement 
which intimately concerns the material interests of the city, and 
we should lend encouragement to the effort in every manner 
possible. Not only is this extension needed, but the time is at 
hand when the business interests will demand another and direct 
route to the West, and one which will bring us into intimate re- 
lationship with the flourising city of Fitchburg and the large 
railroad interests centering at that point. 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 47 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS. 

The large number of public buildings now owned by the city, 
and the considerable expense required to keep them in repair, 
lead me to recommend the creation of the office of superintend- 
ent of public buildings. The duties of this official would be to 
pass upon all repairs demanded and superintend whatever work 
was deemed necessary. This would centralize a great deal of 
work which is now scattered through various committees. 

CITY REPAIR SHOP. 

I believe that a substantial saving of both time and money 
can be made for the city by the establishment of a city repair 
shop. This could be done by an addition to the city stable 
building. 

BOARD OF TRADE. 

This organization of our business men, formed in the early 
part of the preceding year, has demonstrated that there is an 
ample field here for its labors, and that it can be made a power- 
ful agency in the upbuilding of our city. I trust that our citi- 
zens generally will become members of the organization, and by 
so doing assure its continuance and activity. 

THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC. 

This much-mooted subject, although a matter of agitation for 
nearly half a century, still remains unsettled. We shall, un- 
doubtedly, find it a vexatious problem, as have those who have 
preceded us in authority, but when our course is once deter- 
mined upon we should stand to it unflinchingly. 

That intemperance is an evil of gigantic proportions there are 
but few, if any, in this day of enlightened thought and widely 
distributed knowledge, who will attempt to deny. For a long 
period of time, people of all classes have assented to this view of 
the question, and laws have been enacted and spread upon our 
statute books seeking the abolition of the liquor traffic. But 



48 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

while people have agreed with practical unanimity as to the evil 
of this business, they have widely differed, and do to-day. as to 
the methods for its suppression and the limitation of its powers. 
The prohibitory laws have not been enforced, and almost every 
attempt to carry out their intent and purpose has resulted in ig- 
noble failure. The great weakness of the law is that there is 
very little of active public sentiment behind it, and the attempt 
to found a third party on the principle of prohibition has as yet 
made but little progress, as the casting of but 1,363 votes in a 
total poll of 86,240 at the late election in this state is conclu- 
sive evidence. 

I have entertained the opinion for some years that the most 
practical way to deal with this question, and one which would 
give the best results, would be by the enactment of a judicious 
license law with a local option clause. It seems clear, after so 
many years of prohibitory legislation, that it is only by a license 
law that we can circumscribe and restrict the scope of the 
liquor traffic and bring the evil within control. Certain it is 
that under a license law the traffic in the sale of intoxicating 
liquors could not have greater freedom than it enjoys to-day 
under our prohibitory legislation, and at the same time the city 
has nothing to show for the prevalence of this unbridled evil 
but the poverty, vice, and ignorance which ever follow in the 
train of intemperance. Enact a license law and not only will 
the operations of the liquor business be curtailed, as I believe, 
but the city will derive a revenue which will materially lessen 
the burdens of taxation and assist in the creation of a moral 
sentiment, by means of educational influences, which must event- 
ually drive the occupation of selling liquor for other than the 
best purposes from the field. When it is known that our sister 
cities, like Lowell and Lawrence, annually derive a fund of more 
than $100,000 from liquor licenses, we can comprehend some- 
thing of the disadvantages under which we labor as a municipal- 
ity as compared with those cities. Within a few weeks two thirds 
of the cities of Massachusetts have placed themselves on record 
in favor of license by an overwhelming declaration of public 
opinion, and this, too, in instances where license did not prevail 



MAYOR KNOWLTON'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 49 

during the preceding year. Public sentiment is progressive, and 
if we may judge by what has taken place in Massachusetts, 
license, as long as the conditions which govern society remain as 
they are, is the basis upon which we shall eventually arrive. 

But to return to matters as we find them, we are admonished 
that there is no license law in New Hampshire, and we cannot, 
therefore, deal with this question from that standpoint. It is 
our duty, under the circumstances, to see to the impartial en- 
forcement of the laws as we find them. 

POWERS OF THE MAYOR. 

I would briefly remind you that our city charter is so drawn as 
to deprive the mayor of almost every semblance of power save 
that exercised in the veto. While ostensibly the chief executive 
of the city he is practically without authority. I do not refer to 
this subject in any personal sense but because I believe the inter- 
ests of the city would be better advanced if additional powers 
were conferred upon the mayor, and he then held accountable 
for the exercise of authority granted him. The tendency in 
most cities at the present time is to invest the office of mayor 
with increased responsibilities. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, I assure you of my hearty and 
active co-operation in all matters destined to promote the public 
good, and I have no doubt but that our official intercourse will 
prove pleasant to ourselves and profitable to our city. The more 
we study into the duties, the performance of which we have 
undertaken, the greater need we shall find for the exercise of an 
individual interest and the utmost vigilance and faithfulness over 
the affairs which we hold in trust for the people. We have in our 
midst potent examples of what we may accomplish for our city 
by well-directed and consecrated effort, in the manner in which 
our great manufacturing corporations are managed. Their an- 
i 



50 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

nual expenditures largely exceed those of the city ; they employ 
a larger number of men and have as great interests at stake, and 
yet there is never a rumor of mismanagement there. With these 
examples before us, and inspired by a determination to do our 
duty regardless of besetting influences, we cannot fail to make 
honorable history for ourselves and for our city, which is worthy 
of our most exalted endeavors. 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, 

Mayor. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Board of Water commissioners. 

1891. 



E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex-officio. 
Alpheus Gay, President, term expires January, 1893. 
James A. Weston, Clerk, term expires, January, 1897. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
A. C. Wallace, term expires January, 1894. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1895. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January, 1896. 



Officers. 



Charles K. Walker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Josiah Laselle, Engineer at Pumping- Station. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners have the 
honor to submit herewith their twentieth annual report for the 
year ending December 31, 1891, together with the report of the 
superintendent covering the same period of time, to which refer- 
ence is made for the details of the service connected with this 
department. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year have been as 
follows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1890 . . $60,648.89 
Receipts from all sources in 1891 . . . 76,605.23 

Total $137,254.12 

Interest on water bonds . . $32,168.00 

Current expenses .... 4,962.85 

Repairs and renewals . . . 21,995.06 

Construction .... 22,667.74 

Total expenditures $81,793.65 

Balance unexpended ...... $55,460.47 

The decrease in gross receipts over the year 1890 is $13,858. 14 
and the deficiency for the past year is $5,188.42. 



54 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This exceptional result arises in consequence of a change niade 
in the ordinance relating to water-works about one year ago, by 
which the rental of the hydrants for the whole city was reduced 
to $5,000, and the water for all other city purposes made free. 

It is probable that the entire earnings of this department will 
be needed the coming year to meet the ordinary expenses, to 
keep up the renewal of pipes, and to make such outlay for con- 
struction as the necessities of our growing population demand. 

The subject of a high-service system, to which reference was 
made in the last annual report to your honorable body, con- 
tinues to be an interesting theme for discussion, and in connec- 
tion therewith some method by which the present system can be 
made secure and serviceable beyond contingency, has received 
considerable attention. 

In December last your commissioners received a communica- 
tion from the joint standing committee on water-works, to which 
a reply was returned and is here inserted to emphasize the opin- 
ions therein expressed, believing the maintenance of the present 
system is of paramount importance. 

"The board of water commissioners beg to acknowledge the 
receipt of your communication of the 18th ult,relating to a high- 
service system of water-works, in which you desire to have a plan 
submitted that under all the circumstances will be best for the 
city to adopt. 

"In reply the commissioners have the honor to say that the 
subject of a high-service system of water-works to supply water 
to the more elevated portions of the city has received very care- 
ful consideration. In connection therewith attention has also 
been given respecting the desirability of adopting some method 
of duplicating the present pumping plant by an entirely separate 
and distinct system that may be used in connection with either 
the high or low service, as occasion requires. To accomplish 
both objects the commissioners unanimously recommend the 
construction of a pumping station of sufficient capacity for both 
purposes, near the mouth of Slager brook, which is about one 
third of a mile northerly of Fletcher's Island, or at Proctor's 
grove, still further north. In either case the force main would be 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 55 

laid on the most advantageous route to the Candia road ; thence 
it would follow the Candia road to its junction with the Mam- 
moth road, where a connection is proposed with the present 
system of water-works. From this point the pipe would follow 
the most desirable location to the proposed high-service reservoir 
on the south slope of Oak Hill, just north of Derryfield park, 
— the construction of the reservoir and the plan of distribution 
for the high service to be substantially as described in Mr. 
Tidd's report. 

"It will readily be observed that a considerable portion of the 
cost of this scheme is to supplement the present system, a subject 
which has claimed the attention of the commissioners for years, 
and which in their opinion cannot be delayed any longer with 
prudence. 

" The cost of what is now proposed, as estimated by Mr. Tidd 
on pages 14 and 15 of his report, 'exclusive of water rights and 
land damages,' is $154,021.80. When this work is fully and 
properly constructed, including land damages, distribution pipes, 
which were not estimated, with some other necessary changes 
and additions, it is believed the total cost will be considerably 
in excess of the above sum." 

As further expressing the views of your commissioners upon 
this subject, liberal quotations are here inserted from a compre- 
hensive and well considered article which recently appeared in a 
local paper over the signature of J. B. Sawyer, civil engineer. 
He says : 

"The question of the best plan for building and equiping a 
high-pressure water service is controlled by the larger and more 
important question of enlarging and reinforcing the present- 
works. If we were sure of being able to keep an abundant sup- 
ply of water in the reservoir for the next ten or twenty years with 
our present pumping apparatus, or with any enlargement of that 
apparatus which could be run by water power, the question would 
be easily answered. The best arrangement would be to build a 
small steam pumping station at some point on the Portsmouth 
Railroad in East Manchester, taking the water from the present 
pipes and delivering it to the reservoir to be built on Oak Hill. 



56 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

" But our present works, originally designed for a population of 
thirty thousand, have now been running about eighteen years. 
In that time the population of the city has grown from twenty- 
seven thousand to forty-six thousand, and the works, with only 
the addition of a new set of pumps in 1S86, the substitution of 
new and more powerful water wheels in 1887, and a large yearly 
increase of the length of distribution pipes, have continued to 
serve us, practically without an hour's interruption. From the 
earnings they have paid the interest on their cost, amounting to 
thirty-six thousand dollars per annum, made the improvements 
and extensions above mentioned, and paid for a large number of 
lots of land purchased for the protection of the lake, or to extin- 
guish claims for damages, and one year ago they had accumulated 
a surplus or reserve of sixty thousand dollars to help in meeting 
such an emergency as is now before us. This is a record to be 
proud of. 

" But eighteen years is a large part of the lifetime of such a 
plant. The canal needs repairs and cleaning out ; the forebay 
and the wooden penstock six hundred feet long, are getting old 
and are eighteen years nearer their day of failure than they were 
when new. How soon that day will come, no man can tell. 
Thorough examination and repairs or renewals cannot be made 
in the few brief hours in which the pumps can be stopped. These 
considerations show that the pumping works ought to be dupli- 
cated immediately. 

"The present low water in the lake admonishes us that the limit 
of pumping by water-power has nearly been reached, and that if 
we would secure ourselves against an occasional water famine, we 
must have steam power ready for an emergency, although it 
would not be necessary for ordinary use. 

%. >(c ^ >j< # % % 

" It being admitted that a steam plant auxiliary to the present 
works is a necessity, and that a high service is desirable, economy 
dictates that the pumping plant for both purposes should be in 
the same building, and should be identical and interchangeable 
to the fullest practical extent. The best location for such a plant 
is probably the one recommended by the commissioners, on the 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 57 

westerly shore of the lake, northward of Fletcher's Island. The 
situation with regard to both reservoirs is the best practicable ; 
it is near the railroad, so that coal can be handled cheaply ; and 
the water there taken will undoubtedly be as good as from any 
other part of the lake. 

" This work cannot be commenced too soon. If begun the 
coming spring, by the time it is completed and in running order 
the present works will be about twenty years old, and our popu- 
lation will be fifty thousand." 

In conclusion, it is a source of gratification to be able to state 
that nothing has occurred during the past year to impair the effi- 
ciency of the water service, and that the advantages and comforts 
of an abundant supply of good water have been enjoyed by our 
citizens without serious interruption. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ALPHEUS GAY, 
E. J. KNOWLTON, 
A. C. WALLACE, 
HENRY CHANDLER, 
JOSEPH F. KENNARD, 
C. H. MANNING, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 

Water Commissioners. 
January 2, 1892. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Commissioners of the City 
of Manchester: 

I herewith submit my annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1891. 



MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water in the lake has been lower this year than it has been 
since 1886. That year, on the 17th of November, the lowest 
point reached was 23^ inches below the clam. This season it 
was i8}4 inches below, December 20. January 1, 1892, it was 
16 inches below. Low water occasionally should have its advan- 
tages, for if the water takers would take a look at the outlet of 
the lake at such times they would not persist in wasting it. 

Let us look at it from another standpoint. Property owners 
around the lake shore have claimed that the city is responsible 
for the height of the water, and the washing out of the banks 
where they were sandy. They did not find any fault this sea- 
son, and if they will look at it as it is they will find that the 
rainfall has something to do with the height of the water, and 
not altogether the city. There is just as much fault found with 
low water as high, and this management has failed to satisfy the 
people that live on the borders of the lake in this regard. 

The following table shows the amount of rainfall, kindly fur- 
nished us by Sergeant J. H. Melton, which includes melted 
snow and sleet for the year 1891 : 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



59 



January 








6.10 


inches 


February 








3.26 


" 


March 








3-94 


" 


April 








1.63 


" 


May 








1.90 


u 


June 








.3-58 


" 


July 








3-i4 


" 


August 
September . 
October 








2.01 
1.61 
2.16 


« 


November . 








1.74 


" 


December . 








3-27 


" 


1S91 






34-34 


inches. 


1890 






45-7° 


" 


1889 






36.94 


a 


1888 






46.81 


" 


1 rainfall in 


18S0 


was but 27.76 


nch 


es. 





The old dam at the outlet is in bad condition, having been 
partly torn down to let boats run down the brook to the Island 
Pond road. This dam should be rebuilt. It played an impor- 
tant part when the channel was lowered, in holding back the 
water, and if the pond at any time should have to be drawn off 
to repair the gates at the head of the canal, this dam would be a 
necessity. When rebuilt, it should be about 150 feet long, and 
average about 5 feet in height, with a raceway 10 feet wide. 

A few repairs have been made at the new dam in repointing 
the stone work and the piers under the road bridge. 



PUMPING STATION. 

C. C. Cole, the superintendent of the pumping station, died 
suddenly October 12, after having had charge of the station 
from the first. He was an able, trusty man. No accident hap- 
pened in the eighteen years he had charge, caused by any neg- 
lect or carelessness on his part, and in his death the city lost a 
faithful servant. 



60 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Josiah Laselle was elected to fill his place, and took charge 
November i. A few repairs of an ordinary nature have been 
made on the machinery. Blinds have been put on the house 
and barn. The tin on the roof and the coping have been re- 
painted. 

The following table shows the amount of water pumped each 
month, during the year 1891, by each pump. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



m 



•8SB.I9AU &IV8Q 



•IHUOUI qOUa ItJlOJ, 



•cluind 
ci o 13 a suoiiuS -ox 



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ci ci o ci — — ci 01 -h — d c =' co o 

CI 01 CI CI CI CI CI CI CI CI CI CI CI CI CI 

!:::::::>::::: 

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_ CO CO >C C) CI ■* "O CO >S ■* — 1 CI CI -* 

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ci ci c: ; — / ci cc .- ■- — ci co = co 
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: :rs :-c : : : ■ :, o : • • 

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c3 ci .oi .c3rt-c3-ci . ~ ci o3 
PPKCtfQPPPPPSPPP 

- J fcj • : • • ■ • :S3 '■ ob, 

c^5ir is ^ b = r- i£, Ei- - i 
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02 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The force and supply main hold good and few repairs have 
been made on these two lines. Nothing has been done about 
the reservoir, but the banks need top-dressing very much. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES. 

Pipes have been extended in the following-named streets : 

Auburn, Amory, Adams, Bismark, Beech, Colby, River Cross- 
ing, Chestnut, Conant, Concord, Cleveland, Cartier, Goffe, 
Dartmouth, Franklin, Grove, Gore, Highland, Jewett, Lake 
avenue, Milford, Morrison, Mast road, Manchester, Orange, 
Pearl, Prospect, Salmon, Sullivan, Third, Union, Vine, Walnut, 
Wilkins, Young. 

The whole length, 15,910 feet, equals a little over 3 miles. 
The number of feet laid on each street varies from 25 to 1,400 
feet, as required by the water takers, and all under the 6 per cent 
rule, excepting on Beech street, Franklin street, and the line laid 
across Piscataquog river at the west end of Riddle's island. 
These three lines were laid for a better fire protection, and in 
order that people living in South Manchester and south of Pis- 
cataquog river could have water when repairs were being 
made on Elm below Valley and Main street south of Ferry, by 
giving these sections two sources of supply. The city is grow- 
ing, new streets are laid out and they call for water before they 
are graded. The pipes have been laid as soon as practicable, 
and sometimes before. It is not best to have to lower the pipe 
after grading the streets, or to dig an extra depth before. 

During the past year 9,973 feet of cement pipe, equal to 1.89 
miles, have been laid over with cast iron at an expense of about 
^8,500. The length and size of the pipe are as follows: 1,707 
feet 4-inch; 4,927 feet 6-inch; 1,191 feet 8-inch; 909 feet 10- 
inch ; 539 feet 12-inch; 700 feet 14-inch. 

Pipe taken out was from the streets where the pipes caused the 
most trouble. Your honorable board voted two years ago to lay 
new pipe east from Elm to Pine street, beginning on Auburn 
street and taking all the streets north to Pearl excepting Lowell, 
the size to be 8 inches in place of the old 6-inch cement pipe. 
This has been done with the exception of Central, Amherst, and 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 63 

Bridge streets. These three streets have not given us much 
trouble, and we have laid over the pipe in some other streets 
where bursts were more frequent. The 14-inch on Elm street 
east of Blood's foundry was so deeply covered by the raising of the 
grade it could not be repaired without a great deal of expense, 
so it was thought best to relay it with cast iron, beginning at a 
point just below Hutchinson's machine shop, extending south to 
the corner of Cove street, 700 feet in length, and also 500 feet 
on Valley street, which would make the pipe all cast iron from 
Valley street south, with the exception of 9 feet of 1 2-inch ce- 
ment just south of the Lawrence Railroad track. It is evident 
that we shall have to continue to take out the cement pipe as fast 
as means will allow. 

Eight hundred tons of pipe were bought of the McNeil Pipe & 
Foundry Co., of Burlington, N. J., at a cost of $28.50 per ton of 
2,240 pounds, delivered on the cars at the pipe yard in this city. 

The following places are where cement-lined pipe was taken 
up and relaid with cast iron : 



64 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Streets. 


Length of pipe in feet. 






4 in. 


6 in. 


8 in. 


10 in. 


12 in. 


14 in. 








67 
31 






























202 














510 

530 




























109 








Railroad crossing. 




516 
25 










Chestnut 














55 










Corner Pine. 
South of Valley. 










36 


700 






231 








9 


















909 








Manchester. . 




24 

319 


































Pine 




800 












m 














1,032 





























721 














319 
303 












Valley 


30 






503 












302 












Willow 

Young road . . 


535 










Valley to Young. 












Totals 


,„ 


4,927 


1,191 


909 


539 


700 





Total, 9,973 feet, or 1.888 miles. 

On Bedford street, 8-inch pipe was taken up, 6-inch laid in- 
stead. 

On Pine street, south to Auburn from Lake avenue, 8-inch was 
laid in place of 6-inch. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



65 



PIPES, GATES, AND HYDRANTS LAID IN 



Streets. 


Pipe laid in feet. 


Gates set. 


o5 

w 


Location. 


4 in. 


6 in. 


Sin. 


12 in. 


a 


C 

to 


i 


Adams (No.).. 




252 








1 
1 






North of Appleton. 
East side of Pine. 
















150 













863 










1 


East of Maple. 












1 

.... 

1 

2 












928 




... i.... 


















170 
■246 

207 


















































1 

1 






























168 










"i 












1 


i 


"i 








997 












253 












123 
288 
140 
575 
590 
483 
183 
399 
524 

61 
75 




















l 
l 

l 




l 
"l 


West of Dubuque. 


























































Orove 










l 
l 




l 
l 




Highland. ... 


















South of Valley. 


































Last ward to Milton. 
East side of Pine. 












l 
l 

l 




.... 






18 

558 

352 

1,284 

76 


266 






Milford 




























3 




2 
1 




























2 














1 








156 
544 

307 
276 
245 
495 
400 


...... .. .. 
























Amiiry to Kelly. 
North of Amory. 






... 














1 




.... 


























477 


....! l 


•J 




South of W. Hancock. 


Silver 


























1 

1 


















69 
220 




;::: 






1 




Third 






1 ... 

1 ... 
.... . 
















275 
39 





Blodget north. 
To hydrant. 


Vine 














Willow 






1 




Corner Young. 


Wilkins 




1,377 
220 
240 






3 
























East of Maple. 
















Totals 


2S9 


13,547 


1,146 928 


7 34 


5 


17 





Number miles of pipe laid 1891, 3.013, or 15,910 feet, 
gates set, 46. 
5 hydrants set, 17. 



66 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



67 





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68 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



69 



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To 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



71 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 1 89 1. 

Auburn, corner Maple; Chestnut, corner Salmon ; Cleveland, 
corner Second ; Conant, corner Rimmon ; Dartmouth, corner 
O'Neil; Grove (East Manchester); Highland (West Manches- 
ter) ; Milford, corner Bismark ; Orange, corner Linden ; Or- 
ange, corner Hall ; Pearl, corner Morrison ; Salmon, corner 
Union; Vine; Walnut, corner Sagamore; AVilkins, corner 
Highland ; Wilkins, corner Mast ; AVilkins, opposite Tirrell resi- 
dence. 

One hydrant on Pine, corner Hanover, was taken out. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1891. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20 inch diameter 


20,560.00 feet. 


5,146.00 feet. 


9 


14 inch diameter 


6,125.00 " 


S,29S.U0 " 


11 


12 inch diameter 


7,444.00 " 


13,176.00 " 


20 


10 inch diameter 


3,474.75 " 


12,103.00 " 


14 


8 inch diameter 


S.315.00 " 


23.6S2.00 " 


49 


6 inch diameter 


65,475.50 " 


115,145.00 " 


329 


4 inch diameter 


5,067.00 " 


11,952.00 " 


47 




116,461.25 feet. 


189,502.00 feet. 


479 



Cement-lined pipe 
Cast-iron pipe . 

Total pipe 

479 g ate s- 
477 hydrants. 
7 air valves. 



22.057 miles 
35-89o " 



57.947 miles 



The number of meters set during the year was one hundred 
and seventy-eight (178). 

Total number of meters now in use, thirteen hundred and 
thirteen (1,313). 



72 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The number of applications for water to date has been thirty- 
seven hundred and eighty-five (3,785). 



SERVICE PIPES. 



Two hundred and thirty-four service pipes have been laid this 
year, as follows : 
234 1 inch diameter 5,910.9 feet. 



SERVICE PIPES RELAID. 

1 I inch diameter, 17.4 feet to 1 inch diameter, 17.4 feet. 
10 f " " 316.3 " to 1 " " 300.9 " 

11" " 33.0 " to 1 " " 28.0 " 

Thirty-six hundred and twenty-six (3,626) service pipes have 
been laid to date, as follows : 



38 


h 


inch diameter 


1758 


3 

4 


n 


1733 


1 


a it 


2 3 


ii 


" " 


18 


il 


it it 


47 


2 


" " 


1 


2* 


a it 


1 


3 


tt it 


7 


4 


( 1 11 



827.6 feet. 


46,157.6 


" 


44,3 I 9-7 


" 


1-293.5 


< i 


552-3 


" 


1,904.9 


a 


57-o 


" 


16.8 


it 


233-0 


tt 


95,362.4 feet. 



Total length of service pipe 
Number of miles of service pipe, 18.061. 

The income from the sale of water for 1891 has been as 
follows : 



jived for water by rate 


#35 


,178.79 


" for water by meter . 


40,479.25 


" for building purposes 




494.80 


" from fines 




160.40 


" for labor and pipe sold . 




200.99 


of G. G. Griffin (lease) . 




1. 00 


" of Fletcher Brown (lease) 




1. 00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



7:1 



Rece 



ved of W. Cx. Brown (rent) . 
of Mr. Prescott, (rent) . 

' of William Bryant (rent) 
of B. P. Kimball (grass) 
of G. W. Reed (grass) . 

' of C. H. Patten (grass) . 



Abatements, $204.44. 

Current expenses for 1891 
Repairs for 189 1 . 
Construction expenses for 1891 

Total .... 
Interest .... 

Expenditures over receipts 



CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1 89 1. 

Superintendence, repairs, and renewals 

Stationery and printing 

Office and incidental expenses 

Pumping expenses 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoii 

Repairs to buildings 

Current expenses for 1891 

Service pipes 
Distribution pipes . 
Fire-hydrants and valves 
Meters and fixtures 
Pump house and buildings 
Land ..... 

Construction expenses for 1! 

Total 



$21.00 
50.00 
8.00 
2.00 
5.00 
3.00 
$76,605.23 



$4,962.85 
21,995.06 
22,667.74 

$49,625.65 
32,168.00 



581,793.65 
$5,188.42 



$23,782.77 






201.66 






53983 






2,139s 1 






106.10 






188.36 






$26 


958 


23 


$2,006.48 






14,445-34 






1,246.89 






2,400.30 






i5 2 -47 






2,415.94 


,667 




$22 


42 


$49 


625 


65 



74 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Land and water rights 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 

Pumping machinery, pump house, and 

buildings . ... 

-Distributing reservoir 
Force and supply main 
Distribution pipes . 
Fire-hydrants and valves . 
Tools and fixtures . 
Boarding and store houses 
Roads and culverts . 
Supplies .... 
Engineering 

Livery and traveling expenses 
Legal expenses 
Grading and fencing 
Service pipes . 
Meters and fixtures . 

Total construction account to 
Dec. 31, 1 89 1 . 

Current expenses : 

Superintendence, collecting, and re- 
pairs .... 

Stationery and printing . 

Office and incidental expenses 

Pumping expenses and repairs 

Repairs to buildings 

Repairs to dam, canal, races, and res 
ervoir ..... 



^59>799- I 4 
101,399.16 

107,596-54 
71,542-36 
89,769.02 

383 5 o43-59 

43,109.89 

10,649.35 

919.36 

2,193.49. 

55o-39 

22,176.19 

2,856.64 

563-79 
13,588.26 
49,699.22 
28,765.43 



$164,396.84 

5,681.66 

18,852.79 

41,168.59 

i,764-45 

3,83 I - 2 5 



Total current expenses to Dec. 
31, 1891 .... 

Interest ...... 

Highway expenditures 

Total amount of bills approved 
to date .... 



$40,678.51 
14,000.53 



$235,695-58 



$54,679.04 



$1,278,596.44 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 75 

Interest, discount,and labor performed 
on highways, trans., and tools and 
materials sold .... $62,385.34 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1891 . 235,695.58 

$298,080.92 

Total cost, exclusive of interest 

and current expenses . . $980,515.52 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 1890 $627,096.51 
Interest for 1891 .... 32,168.00 



Total interest and discount to 

Dec. 31, 1891 . . . $659,264.51 

Amount paid toward interest to Dec. 

31, 1890 ..... $485,000.00 
Amount paid toward interest, 1891 . 32,168.00 



$517,168.00 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



i Jail. 


4 


Cemeteries. 


21 Churches. 


1 


Orphanage. 


1 Court-house. 


1 


Post-office. 


6 Hose companies. 


1 


City library. 


4 Fire-engines. 


6 


Banks. 


1 Hook-and-ladder. 


8 


Hotels. 


2 Opera-houses. 


1 


Masonic Hall. 


i Convent. 


1 


Odd Fellows' Hall 


2 City hospitals. 


1 


Holly Tree Inn. 


2 Old Ladies' Homes. 


3 


Halls. 


1 Soldiers' monument. 


24 


Schoolhouses. 


1 Turner Hall. 


1 


Battery building. 


4 Fountains. 


1 


Skating-rink. 


2 Trust companies. 







7G 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



i Hosiery mill. 


2 Granite works. 


i Silver-plating. 


2 Electric light stations. 


2 Iron foundries. 


3 Sash and blind shops. 


2 Dyehouses. 


1 Brewery. 


4 Machine-shops. 


1 Shoe-shop. 


6 Clothing manufactories, 


1 Gas-works. 


8 Harness-shops. 


4 Slaughter-houses. 


i Brush-shop. 


1 Soap manufactory. 


9 Carriage-shops. 


4 Needle manufactories. 


1 2 Cigar factories. 


4 Beer-bottling. 


i Brass and copper found 


ry. 3 Book-binderies. 


i Locomotive works. 


1 Paper-mill. 


i Grist-mill. 


2 Box makers. 




MARKETS. 


5 Fish. 


2 Meat (wholesale). 


9 Meat and fish. 






STABLES. 


19 Livery. 


853 Private. 


1 Horse-railroad. 






OFFICES. 


15 Dentists. 


14 Printing. 


1 Telephone. 


1 Gas. 


2 Telegraph. 


9 Coal. 


3 Express. 






SHOPS. 


27 Barber. 


2 Currying. 


9 Wheelwright. 


6 Plumber and gas and water 


12 Blacksmith. 


pipe. 


7 Carpenter. 


10 Paint. 


1 Tinsmith. 


1 Gunsmith. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



77 



4 Auction. 
29 Drug. 
13 Jewelry. 

1 Fur. 

2 House-furnishing goods. 

20 Fancy goods. 

1 Wholesale paper. 

5 Wholesale produce. 

21 Dry goods. 
12 Candy. 

1 Cloak. 

15 Millinery. 

2 Tea. 

9 Furniture. 



86 Grocery. 

5 Meal. 

3 Hardware. 
30 Boot and shoe. 

8 Stove. 
17 Gents' furnishing goods. 

7 Book. 

1 Leather and shoe-finders. 

3 Music. 

3 Upholstery. 

8*Undertakers. 

5 Sewing-machine. 

1 Feather-cleaner. 

1 Rubber. 



:i Dining. 
6 Billiard. 



SALOONS. 

74 Liquor. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



6 Club-rooms. 

2 Bleacheries. 
19 Laundries. 

3 Icehouses. 

10 Photographers. 



7 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. 
18 Bakeries. 
2 Waste. 
1 Business college. 



WATER FIXTURES, JETC. 



8,293 Families. 

1 20 Boarding-houses. 

10,370 Faucets. 

1,648 Wash-bowls. 

3,009 Water-closets. 

256 Wash-tubs. 

885 Bath-tubs. 

132 Urinals. 



2,126 Sill-cocks. 
477 Fire-hydrants. 
35 Stand-pipes. 
21 Watering-troughs. 
4 Drinking-fountains. 
2,035 Horses. 
99 Cattle. 
1 Public urinal. 



78 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following amounts have been paid over to 
urer, and credited to the water-works: 

1872, supplies and materials sold . 

1873, supplies and materials sold . 
accrued interest on water bonds sold 
accrued interest on state bonds sold 
water rents 

1874, supplies and materials sold . 
March 12, highway "expenditures, trans, from 

water account 
March 17, interest and discount trans, from 

water account 
September 1, interest and discount trans 

from water account 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 
December 29, interest transferred 

1875, December 18, one anvil sold 
September 25, engine, crusher, and material 

sold 
water and hydrant rent, etc 

1876, May 20, derrick sold . 
May 20, rent of derrick 
water and hydrant rent, etc 

1877, water and hydrant rent, etc 

1878, water and hydrant rent, etc 
old plow sold 

1879, derrick sold 
May 20, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1880, water and hydrant rent, etc 
sale of grass 
level, transit, etc. 

1 88 1, water and hydrant rent, etc 
sale of grass 
derrick 
received of G. G. Griffin 

1882, water and hydrant rent, etc 
received of G. G. Griffin 



the city treas- 

$573-6i 
177.07 
193.26 
146.00 

I ? 9 2 °-53 
607.89 

14,000.53 

12,347-25 

22,361.74 

3°> 2 33-54 

4,566.25 

15.00 

2,089.45 

27,119.15 

125.00 

24.00 

38,879-47 
43,823.30 
48,873.26 
1. 00 
75.00 
53,068.17 

57,395-25 

10.00 

250.00 

60,154.62 

10.00 

50.00 

1. 00 

67,403.76 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



7!) 



1882, received of James Baldwin & Co. 
received from the sale of grass 
received from Goodhue & Birnie 
received for old plank 
received for use of derrick 

1883, received of G. G. Griffin 
received from sale of grass , 
water and hydrant rent, etc 

1884, received of G. G. Griffin 
received for stone 
received from sale of grass 
received from pipe sold and labor 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1885, received from G. G. Griffin 
B. P. Kimball, for grass 
labor and pipe sold . 

received for water and hydrant rent 

1886, received from G. G. Griffin 
B. P. Kimball, for grass 

for wood ..... 
labor and pipe .... 
water and hydrant rent 

1887, received for labor and pipe 
received of G. G. Griffin . 
received of C. C. Cole • . 
received of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
received of A. J. Crombie, for grass 
received of A. Goodwin, for poles 
received of W. G. Brown 

received of T. H. Risdon & Co., for 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1888, received for labor and pipe 
received of G. G. Griffin . 
received of George P. Clark 
received of R. D. Wood & Co. (gear) 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1889, received for labor and pipe 



freigl 



$175.00 
10.00 

24-37 

1. 00 

15.00 

1. 00 

20.00 

73>437-2o 

1. 00 

5.00 

10.00 

616.20 

74,947.88 

1. 00 

10.00 

13-45 

80,379.67 

1. 00 

5.00 

37.80 

282.43 

74,803.76 

768.86 

1. 00 

•5° 

10.00 

5.00 

10.00 

25.00 

15.11 

79,682.70 

227.33 

1. 00 

2.00 

16.29 

85-397-20 

89.77 



80 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1889, received of G. G. Griffin . 
received of B. P. .Kimball, for grass 
received of W. G. Brown, for rent 
received of James Baldwin, for pipe 
received of Mr. Clement, for pipe 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1890, received of G. G. Griffin (lease) 
received of Fletcher Brown (lease) 
received of George P. Clark (lease) 
received of B. P. Kimball, for grass 
received of W. G. Brown, for rent 
received of N. W. Ellis & Co., for pipe 
received of J. H. Dearborn for pipe 
received for water and hydrant rent 

1 89 1, received for water and hydrant rent 
received for labor and pipe sold . 
received of G. G. Griffin (lease) . 
received of Fletcher Brown (lease) 
received of W. G. Brown (rent) . 
received of Mr. Prescott (rent) . 
received of William Bryant (rent) 
received of B. P. Kimball (grass) 
received of G. W. Reed (grass) 
received of C. H. Patten (grass) 

Total received for water, etc. 
Amount appropriated to date 

Amount received to date 
Amount of bills approved to date 

Amount transferred toward interest 

Balance on hand December 31, 1891 



$1.00 

2.00 

50.00 

65.00 

•5° 
86,492.19 

1. 00 

1. 00 

2.00 

2.00 

36.00 

i53-oo 

35-4o 

90,232.97 

76,3i3- 2 4 

200.99 

1. 00 

1. 00 

21.00 

50.00 

8.00 

2.00 

5.00 

3- 



.00 



$1,211,224.91 
640,000.00 

$1,851,224.91 
1,278,596.44 

$572,628.47 
51 7,168.00 

#55>46o.47 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



SI 



Material on hand. 



2,500 feet 20 in. 
i, 800 feet 12 in. 
3,300 feet 14 in. 
2,900 feet 10 in. 



4,680 feet 8 in. 

13,000 feet 6 in. 

6,000 feet 4 in. 



5 4 m. 

1 10 in. 



GATES. 

1 8 in. 



1 20 in. 

412 in. 

13 



6 in. 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 

414 in. 
11 10 in. 
10 4 in. 



BRANCHES. 



1 double 6 on 12 

2 double 6 on 10 
4 double 4 on 6 
7 double 4 on 4, 

:o double 8 on 8 

3 double 4 on 8 

4 double 6 on 8 
2 single 6 on 14 
1 single 12 on 14 



3 single 6 on 12. 
2 single 10 on 10. 



2 single 

3 single 
7 single 

4 single 
1 single 
1 single 

5 sin g le 



6 on 10. 
8 on 8. 
6 on 8. 
4 on 6. 
4 on 4. 
8 on ic. 
6 on 6. 



14 in. 9 feet. 

in. 450 feet. 

% in. 200 feet. 



SERVICE PIPE. 



300 



feet. 



401 feet. 
590 feet. 



82 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 







CLAMP 


SLEEVES. 


3 


20 in. 




3 


14 in. 


5 


12 in. 




19 


10 in. 


5 


8 in. 




60 


6 in. 


o 


4 in. 









1 


14 in. 




11 


8 in. 


1 


12 in. 




2 


6 in. 


4 


10 in. 




2 


4 in. 








REDUCERS. 


1 


14 to 


12. 


8 


6 to 4. 


8 


8 to 


6. 


2 


12 to 6. 


4 


10 to 


6. 


5 


8 to 10. 


3 


8 to 


4- 







1 10 in. 1-8. 4 6 in. 1-4. 

1 14 in. 1-8. 9 8 in. 1-4. 

1 6 in. 1-8. 1 12 in. 1-8. 

3 8 in. 1-8. 



Report of the Engineer Appointed by the Board of 
Water Commissioners to Devise a Plan for a Sup- 
ply of Water to the Higher Parts of the City. 

To the Citizens of Manchester : 

Some months since, a petition, numerously signed, was pre- 
sented to the City Councils, asking for the construction of a 
high-service system of water-works, for the purpose of supplying 
water to citizens living in the elevated portions of the city which 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 83 

cannot be reached by the water-works as now constructed, and for 
furnishing water for protection against fires in the districts 
named. The petition was referred to the board of water com- 
missioners, and has received careful attention. 

The necessity for such a system in connection with the Man- 
chester water-works at some time in the future has been recog- 
nized from the very beginning of the enterprise. In a report on 
the sources of water supply made by J. T. Fanning, C. E., dated 
March i, 1872, and published in connection with the first annual 
report of the board of water commissioners, he says: "As the 
city extends back on the hillside, and the high lands are more 
thickly covered with buildings, a high-service reservoir on Wil- 
son Hill will be found desirable." 

This was said in connection with the outline of the plan, which 
was afterwards adopted, of taking the supply from Lake Massa- 
besic and locating the reservoir on the ridge just south of Man- 
chester Center. In considering this and other plans he goes on 
to say: "Each of the plans herein suggested contemplates a 
division of the distribution into high and low services whenever 
the growth of the city on to high lands shall make it desirable, 
excepting the Maple Falls gravitation plan, whose reservoir would 
be nearly on a level with the summit of Wilson Hill." 

In his report dated December 31, 1874, he says: 

" The complete plan of work includes two reservoirs, one lo- 
cated at the Center, and one on Wilson Hill. The one at the 
Center, already constructed, has its water service one hundred 
and fifty-two feet above Elm street at the City Hall, one hundred 
and eighty-eight feet above the track of the railway station, and 
two hundred and three feet above State street. 

" The lift of water from the surface of the lake to the reservoir 
is one hundred and thirteen feet. The reservoir on Wilson Hill 
may be sixty feet higher than that at the Center, and it was pro- 
posed to connect the pipes east of Beech street for a high-service 
system. 

" The high service system may not be required for several years 
unless the number of buildings on the hill shall increase very 
rapidly. When the high-service reservoir is built, an additional 



84 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

main of twenty-four inches diameter should be laid from the 
pump-house to the city." 

The board of water commissioners, after conferring with the 
joint standing committee of the City Councils on water-works,, 
employed Mr. M. M. Tidd, a hydraulic engineer of ability and 
of large experience in this particular line, to make examinations 
of the various plans suggested, and, by the help of surveys already 
made by Mr. J. B. Sawyer, of this city, to present a comprehen- 
sive report embracing the facts necessary to form correct conclu- 
sions, with estimates of the costs of the various plans which have 
been discussed, and his recommendation as to the one best 
adapted to meet the requirements of the case. This report was. 
received on the first instant, and is printed herewith. 

With reference to the location of the proposed reservoir, it 
may be said that the growth of the city since Colonel Fanning's 
report was written has made it evident that when a high service 
shall be built, it must be planned to supply and protect buildings 
on other eminences besides Wilson Hill, and that a reservoir for 
that purpose should be not less than one hundred feet above the 
present reservoir. The extreme summit of Wilson Hill being 
only sixty-four feet above that reservoir, a suitable location has 
been found on Oak Hill, north of and adjoining the proposed 
Derryfield park. The particular spot which offers the best nat- 
ural facilities for the construction of a reservoir is at such an 
elevation that the surface of the water would be, as fixed by Mr. 
Tidd, one hundred and thirty-nine feet above that of the present 
reservoir. 

The following table gives the height of each reservoir above 
some of the prominent points in the city, also the pressure at 
some of them as observed by employes of the water department 
some years since. It is believed that no important variations, 
from these pressures would now be found. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



85 



LOCATION'S. 



Elm street, corner River road, Bakersville. 

Elm street, corner Valley 

Elm street, corner Market 

Elm street, corner Bridge 

Elm street, corner Brook 

Elm street, corner Webster 

Elm street, near D. Ready's house 

Elm street, north, highest point in 

Canal street, corner Brook 

Canal street, corner Granite 

State street, corner Granite 

•Granite street, corner River 

Granite street, corner Main 

•Granite street, corner Quincy 

Main street, corner Winter 

Main street, corner Milford 

Milford street, corner Carroll 

Beech street, corner Park 

Beech street, corner Hanover 

Beech street, corner Lowell 

Beech street, corner Brook 

Park street, corner Lincoln 

Park street, corner Pine 

Park street, corner Massabesic 

Hanover street, corner Hall 

Hanover street, corner Beacon 

Arlington street, corner Ashland .. 

Lowell street, corner Belmont 

Araory street, corner McGregor 

Amory street, corner Main 

Amory street, corner Dubuque 

Front street, corner Amoskeag 

Goffstown road, top Jones's Hill 

Union street, near H. Willey's house 

Summit of Oak Hill 

Summit of Wilson Hill 

Elliot Hospital, first floor 

Railroad crossing, Massabesic street 

Young road, corner Taylor street 

Cilley road, corner Taylor street 

Cilley road, corner Jewett street 

Cilley road, 1,800 feet west of Taylor street. 




291 



'217 



::r, 
34ii 
:;:.:; 
336 
315 
356 



264 
257 
229 



249 
206 
149 
198 
151 
309 
298 
247 
293 
'JIT 
109 
•29 
64 
17", 
212 
202 
If',.' 



152 
143 
126 
108 
70 
52 
181 
186 
201 
214 
197 
176 
217 
190 
151 
129 
125 
118 
90 
121 
142 
110 
67 
10 
59 
12 
170 
159 
108 
154 
108 
*30 
*168 
♦75 



It would probably be found best to fix the boundary between 
the high and low service districts somewhat higher than was pro- 
posed by Colonel Fanning. There is little or no complaint of 
lack of pressure below the contour line at one hundred and eighty 



86 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

feet above the city datum. This line is eighty feet below the 
present reservoir, and two hundred and nineteen feet below the 
one proposed. A head less than eighty feet will not be satisfac- 
tory to our people for a domestic supply, and one hundred and 
forty feet is necessary for a good hydrant service ; but as most of 
the ground down to the line one hundred feet below the reservoir 
could be covered with hose of moderate length attached to the 
high service hydrants, and as the district between Beech and 
Ashland streets is occupied mainly by detached residences, in 
which fires rarely occur, and where those that do occur are not 
likely to become great conflagrations, it will probably be best to- 
make the boundary nearly as above suggested. 

This line runs along at the foot of Wilson Hill near Ashland 
street. To the north of Myrtle street it is nearly coincident with 
Maple street. Extended south, it runs near the corner of Lake 
avenue and Beacon street, and includes in the high-service dis- 
trict the grounds of the Elliot Hospital, also most of the terri- 
tory south of the Portsmouth Railroad. At the north end of the 
city it crosses Union street about four hundred feet north of 
Clarke street, and crosses Elm street at the old Clark quarry. It will 
thus be seen that on the north, the east, and the south, the limit 
of a satisfactory water service has nearly been reached, and that 
there are already many buildings beyond that limit. 

The report and estimates of Mr. Tidd, together with these 
statements and suggestions, are submitted to the public for infor- 
mation, with the hope that they will aid in an intelligent settle- 
ment in the public mind of the questions whether the time for 
the construction of a high service system has arrived, and if so > 
what ought to be its plan, its extent, and its cost. 

Alpheus Gay, 

D. B. Varney, 
A. C. Wallace, 

E. H. Hobbs, 
Henry Chandler, 
Joseph F. Kennard, 
James A. Weston, 

Water Commissioners^ 
Manchester, October 28, 1890. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To Alpheus Gay, Esq. , Chairman Board Water Commissioners, 
Manchester, N. H. : 

Dear Sir, — At your request I have examined into the matter 
of a high-service water supply for the city of Manchester, and 
herewith hand you my report : 

My attention has been called to six different projects by which 
it is assumed that the town can be supplied. One of these 
schemes is based upon a proposition to supply from the present 
source (Massabesic lake), at the southerly end of land now owned 
by the city at Proctor's Grove, the water to be taken by a 20- 
inch pipe to the hard land below the Borough road, near the 
Concord & Portsmouth Railroad, and at that point to be pumped 
through a 16-inch cast-iron main directly across the Borough 
road, and the Concord & Portsmouth Railroad, to the corner of 
the Candia road and Bridge-street extension ; thence through 
new Bridge-street extension to Highland street ; thence across 
Derryfield park in the line of the continuation of Highland 
street to the reservoir, located upon the land of the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company, on the southerly slope of Oak Hill, 
northwest of the pest house. The distance by this line from the 
lake to the corner of old Bridge and Highland streets is 12,800 
feet ; the distance from there to the proposed reservoir is 800 
feet, making in all, 13,600 feet of 16-inch pipe. 

This reservoir is proposed to be 248 feet long on the top, and 
200 feet long on the bottom, and 158 feet wide on the top, and 
no feet wide on the bottom, to be 17 feet deep from the top of 
the bank to the bottom, and to carry 14 feet depth of water, and 
to contain three million gallons ; the water level when full to be 



88 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

at city grade 399, or 139 feet higher than the present reser- 
voir and 252 feet higher than Lake Massabesic. 

It is proposed to construct this reservoir of earth and masonry 
of the materials found upon the ground. 

In all the schemes mentioned in this report for high service, 
this reservoir will be used. 

It has been suggested that this plan would be preferable to any 
of the others, as it would give another connection with the lake, 
which, in case of an interruption of the present supply, would 
keep the city supplied with water until the trouble could be re- 
moved. There may be some truth in this proposition, but it 
must be remembered that a portion of the present pipe system is 
of cement-lined wrought iron, which is now nearly twenty years 
old, and r mnot be expected to carry the present head much 
longer; when 139 feet more are added to it, the consequences 
may not be pleasant. 

If the high service is to be connected with that in view, it 
would be necessary to use pumping apparatus of greater capacity 
than would be required for the high service alone, and would 
therefore involve more expense. If you are prepared to put in 
more cost this might be made available for an additional supply 
by connecting the old system with the new one by a 16 or 18 
inch branch from the new reservoir into the 20-inch iron main in 
Valley street, by way of Weston and Taylor streets, and from 
thence pumping into the old reservoir and the entire old system. 
This would of course be always kept open into the old reservoir 
when open into the new one, to keep down the pressure to the 
normal amount. 

A serious objection to this plan would be that you would be 
obliged to pump all the water required for the low service 139 
feet higher than was desired into the new system, to be lost in 
running down again to the low one. In this case the same 
pumps would be used for either service, of course not at the 
same time, but using more steam pressure when pumping into the 
high service than when pumping into the low one ; this, however, 
would involve an expense of two mains, one 16-inch pipe for the 
high service and a 20-inch pipe for the low. By this plan you 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 89 

could pump to both systems at the same time, if you used two 
pumps, as shown upon the accompanying plan marked " A." 

In this case if we used the pumps of two million gallons capacity, 
they could be so arranged that either or both could pump into 
either main at the same time, so that if you were called upon to 
supply the low service entirely from this source, both pumps 
could be worked into the old system through the 20-inch main, 
and thus supply two million gallons in twelve hours, or, if run 
twenty-four hours continuously, would furnish four million gallons^ 
per day. If you run the entire twenty-four hours, it would require 
two sets of men, which increases the expense, but as this would 
probably only occur in an emergency, the objections may not be 
serious. 

I think it would be better to use one larger pump, say five 
million gallons capacity, if you expect to pump to the old service 
much, but as the cost of the larger apparatus is considerable, it 
might not pay, or it might be cheaper in the end to run the 
smaller pumps a longer time. The 2,000,000 gallon pumps are 
large enough to furnish water for the high service alone for a 
long time. 

If it was proposed to furnish supply enough from this source in 
case of an emergency for the entire city, the main pipe should 
be at least twenty inches in diameter from the pumps to the junc- 
tion of Bald Hill road and new Bridge-street extension, a dis- 
tance of 11,300 feet. From this point it would leave the street 
and pass across the country, following the contour of grade 260, 
to the intersection of Mammoth road and Hanover street, a dis- 
tance of 2,600 feet ; thence 4,200 feet to Massabesic street, where 
it would connect with the present 20-inch main, and through 
that with the entire present system, making a total length of 
18,100 feet of 20-inch pumping-mains to supply the low service. 

At the junction of Bald Hill road and new Bridge-street ex- 
tension, where the 20- inch main leaves the street, there should 
be a 16-inch branch extending up to new Bridge street, and 
through old Bridge street to Highland street, thence to the new 
reservoir as before mentioned, a distance of 2,300 feet of 16-inch 
pipe ; this to be for the supply for the high service alone. With 



90 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



this arrangement water could be pumped to either reservoir as 
desired. 

It would be better to lay a separate 20-inch main from the 
new pumping-station to the old reservoir by the way of Bridge 
street, to a point near the city farm, or to the level of grade 260, 
thence by the way of the Mammoth road to the old reservoir, 
keeping the pipe down to that grade. It would be as well to 
connect with the old 20-inch main at the corner of Mammoth 
road and Candia road. In that case you could pump directly 
into the old system, or into that and the old reservoir combined, 
without danger of increasing the pressure above the normal 
amount. Then the engines at the new station could pump into 
either reservoir as may be desired, or into both at the same time. 
The head to be pumped against in this case would be 258 feet to 
the new high-service reservoir, including friction, if we used a 
16-inch pipe, and 113 feet in pumping to the old reservoir. 

The cost of this scheme would be approximately as follows : 
Cost of entering the lake, including coffer dams and 

laying the pipe eight feet below the full pond . $1,000.00 

Gate house at pond 800.00 

650 feet of 24-inch conduit pipe at $5 per foot . 3,250.00 
Pump house, suction well, coal shed, and chimney . 16,000.00 
Two compound duplex pumping-engines, 16 inches 
by 30 inches, and 14 inches by 24 inches, of ca- 
pacity each to pump two million gallons per day, 
including heater, air pump, feed pump, and con- 
denser, 16-inch check valve, and 4-inch relief 
valve, all set up and connected, three horizontal 
tubular boilers, each 85 horse-power under 70 
pounds steam, with all gauges, safety valves, check 
valves, etc. ........ 24,625.00 

13,600 feet of 16-inch main pipe and pumps to res- 
ervoir at $2.25 ....... 30,600.00 

18,100 feet 20-inch pipe at $2.82 .... 51,042.00 

1,582 cubic yards of rock at $3.50 . . . . 5,537«°o 

Eight tons special 16-inch castings at $60 . . 480.00 

Ten tons 18-inch special castings at $60 . . . 600.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



91 



ESTIMATE OF COST OF RESERVOIR. 

4,968 cubic yards of earth excavation, including 

loam, at 50 cents .... 

784 cubic yards borrowed earth at 60 cents 
500 cubic yards loam placed on top of bank and 

slope at 25 cents ..... 

5,372 cubic yards rock excavation at $1.50 
1,060 cubic yards retaining-wall laid dry at $2 
1,419 cubic yards concrete at $5 . 
300 cubic yards rubble masonry at $4 
375 cubic yards broken stone at $1.50 . 
1,040 square yards paving at $1.50 
62 cubic yards coping at $5 . 
90 feet of 16-inch iron pipe at $2.50 
170 feet 18-inch vitrified pipe at 75 cents 
100 feet of 18-inch iron pipe at -90 cents 
30 feet 16-inch conduit pipe at $2 . 
Gate house complete, with gates, screens, etc. 



Add 15 per cent for contingencies . 

Total cost $184,297.16 

In this estimate, nothing has been included for land or water 
damages. 

I think in the above mentioned plan it would be cheaper to 
take the 20-inch main from the pumping-station at Proctor's 
grove to the junction of new Bridge-street extension and the 
Candia road ; thence through the Candia road to Massabesic 
street, and by that to the present 20-inch main, where it can 
connect with the entire present system, at the junction of the 
Candia and the Mammoth roads; a 16-inch branch can be laid 
through the latter to old Bridge street, and through that to the 
proposed high-service reservoir, as in the former plan. 

I think the Candia road is a better line on some accounts than 
that by the way of new Bridge-street extension. There is less 
ledge in it ; probably not over 300 lineal feet in all. 



$2,484.00 


470-40 
1 


125.00 


8,058.00 


2,120.00 


7,095.00 


1,200.00 


562.50 


1,560.00 


310.00 


225.00 


127.50 


90.00 


60.00 


1,837.00 


$160,258.40 


24,038.76 



92 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

This will require 12,168 feet of 20-inch force main from the 
pumping-station to Massabesic street at the connection with the 
present 20-inch main, and 7,800 feet of 16-inch pipe from the 
junction of Candia road and Massabesic streets to the new reser- 
voir on Oak Hill. 

This would cost $28,200 less than the line by the way of new 
Bridge-street extension, barring what ledge cut there may be in 
Mammoth road, and would be equally efficient. 

Another proposition is to locate the pumping-station at Ash- 
land street, to take the supply from the 10-inch cast-iron main in 
that street and pump it into the proposed reservoir, located as 
before. In this case, if we located the pumps at the corner of 
Ashland and Bridge streets the water would be pumped through 
Bridge street to the corner of Highland street, thence directly to 
the reservoir by a continuation of the line of Highland street. 
The present pipe in Ashland street, from which street the supply 
in this case would be taken, is of cast iron from the corner of 
Amherst street to Bridge street, but that is supplied from the 20- 
inch cement-lined pipe in Lake Avenue through Wilson street by 
cement-lined 10-inch pipe, making the supply pipe 3,100 feet of 
10-inch pipe, which is altogether too small to furnish the water 
required, although it would be furnished under about 70 feet back 
pressure. I do not think it would be advisable to adopt this 
plan unless you are prepared to lay a new 16-inch cast-iron pipe 
from the 20-inch iron main at corner of Valley and Wilson 
streets through Wilson, Hanover, and Ashland streets to Bridge 
street, a distance of 3,100 feet, at a cost, including specials, of 

$7,°95- 

This is safer than to take the supply from the 20-inch cement 
pipe, which I consider hazardous. 

A 16-inch pipe with 70 feet back pressure, which it would 
have then, would furnish an ample supply for the pumps. I am 
not informed as to the amount of ledge that would be encoun- 
tered in these streets, and in my estimate of the cost of this I put 
none in. 

In this case the water would be pumped against a head of 214 
feet or 92 pounds, and the coal must be carted from the railroad 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 93 

to that point. The back pressure of 75 feet would, of course, 
help the pump in just that amount, leaving actually 139 feet head 
resistance. I am of the opinion that it would be far better to 
locate the pump at the present pipe yard at the railroad, where 
the coal would be taken from the cars, and pump through the 
16-inch line which 1 have already suggested. This would not 
only leave the present 10-inch main for the present service, to 
furnish the branch lines connected with it, but would add a first- 
class high pressure pipe to those streets through which it passes. 

If, as has been suggested, instead of taking the water directly 
from the 10-inch main in Ashland street, we construct a well or 
reservoir and run the water into it, to be taken by the pump and 
forced to the reservoir, we should reduce the pressure in the 10- 
inch pipe to such an extent as to render it useless for any pur- 
pose, losing the benefit of the 75 feet back pressure on the 
pumps, and thereby be obliged to pump against 214 feet head, 
instead of 139 as in the case of the 16-inch main supply pipe. 

I do not think it is practicable. 

The cost of this scheme may be considered as follows : 

Pum ping-station $10,000.00 

Well to contain 50,000 gallons, circular, 30 feet diam- 
eter, 30 feet deep 3,300.00 

Machinery : two pumping-engines, 10 inches by 20 

inches and 14 inches by 18 inches, three boilers . 15,100.00 

3,100 feet of 16-inch supply pipe and specials . . 7,095.00 

4,300 feet of 16-inch force main .... 9,675.00 

Reservoir as before ....... 26,324.40 



$71,494.40 
Add 15 per cent for contingencies .... 10,724.16 



Total cost $82,218.56 

Again, it is proposed to take the supply from the cast-iron 
20-inch main at the corner of Belmont and Valley streets, and 
pump it through Belmont and old Bridge streets to Highland 
street, thence as before to the reservoir. It seems to me that this 
plan is the best one for high- service supply, as the pumps can be 



94 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

located near the railroad, where the coal can be had easily, and 
Belmont street gives a good line to the reservoir ; besides it will 
pipe a street which is now piped only from Valley street to 
Spruce street with a 6-inch pipe. 

In this case the water would be pumped against a practical 
head of 139 feet, as in the case of Ashland street, where the sup- 
ply would be taken from the 16-inch main under back pressure. 
The actual head pumped against would be the difference between 
the head and back pressure. 

The cost of this plan may be estimated thus 



Pumping-station . 

Machinery as at Ashland street 

8,664 feet of 16-inch force main at $2.25 

5.5 tons of specials at $60 

1,400 lineal feet of rock cut at $2.00 

Reservoir as before 



$10,000.00 

15,100.00 

19,494.00 

330.00 

2,800.00 

26,324.40 



$74,048.40 
Add 15 per cent for contingencies .... 11,107.26 

Total cost $85,155.66 

The city can be supplied by another plan by taking the water 
from the lake near the mouth of Slager brook, which enters the 
lake on the west side, north of road leading to Fletcher's island. 
The pumping-station can be located at the shore of the lake, and 
a 16-inch pipe laid up the valley of the brook, crossing the Bor- 
ough road, and entering the Proctor road at a point 1,752 feet 
from the lake, thence by that road to the Candia road, thence by 
that road 7,200 feet to the Mammoth road and Massabesic street, 
where it could be connected with the present 20-inch main, and 
through that to the present reservoir and the old system when- 
ever desired. At the junction of Mammoth road and Massa- 
besic street a 16-inch branch could be laid through Mammoth 
road and old Bridge street to the proposed new reservoir for the 
high service. 

By this plan water can be pumped into either reservoir as may 
be desired, but not at the same time. This may be controlled 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



95 



by the gates at the connection with the old system. I think the 
1 6-inch main, however, is not large enough to furnish both 
systems through for any great length of time. If it was pro- 
posed to furnish the low service through this plant for any con 
siderable length of time, I am of the opinion that it would be 
better to lay a 20-inch main from the pumps to Massabesic street, 
and a 16-inch one from there to the proposed high-service reser- 
voir, and have one 4,000, ooo-gallon pump and one 2,000,000 
gallon one. This would give you sufficient capacity to furnish the 
entire city if occasion for it should arise. 

The expense of this plant, if 16-inch pipe was used entirely, 
would be about as follows : 



Cost of entering lake 

100 feet of 18-inch conduit pipe at $4 

Pump house, coal shed, chimney, etc. 

Two compound duplex pumping-engines, 16 inches 
by 30 inches and 14 inches by 24 inches, of capa- 
city to pump 2,000,000 gallons per day, including 
heater, air pump, feed pump, and condenser, 16- 
inch check valve, and 4-inch relief valve, all set up 
and connected, two 85 horse-power boilers, with 
all gauges, check valves, safety-valves, etc 

20,000 feet of i6inch pipe at $2.25 

Six 16-inch stop gates at $80 . 

Fifty-two tons special castings at $60 

1,850 lineal feet of ledge cut at $2 . 

Reservoir as before .... 

Add 15 per cent for contingencies . 



16, 



000.00 
400.00 
000.00 



625.00 
000.00 
480.00 
720.00 
700.00 
324.40 



Total cost 



$118,249.40 
• i7>737-4i 

.$139,986.81 



If, instead of using two 2, 000, ooo-gallon pumps we use one 
of that capacity and one of 4,000,000 gallons, with boilers to 
match, and a 20-inch main to Mammoth road, and a 16-inch 
one from there to the proposed reservoir, the cost would be as 
follows : 



96 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Cost of entering lake . 

ioo feet of 24-inch conduit pipe at $5 

Pump house, wells, etc. 

One 2,000,000-gallon pumping-engine 

One 4,500,000-gallon pumping-engine 

Two 85 horse-power boilers . 

One 95 horse-power boiler . 

11,700 feet of 20-inch main pipe at $2.82 

8,300 feet of 16-inch main pipe at $2.25 

Twelve tons of special castings at $60 

Three 20-inch stop gates at $115 . 

Three 16-inch stop gates at $80 

1,850 lineal feet of ledge cut at $2 

Reservoir ..... 

Add 15 per cent for contingencies 
Total 



$1,000.00 

500.00 

16,000.00 

1 1,000.00 

18,684.00 

2,400.00 

1,350.00 

32,994.00 

18,675.00 

720.00 

345-°o 

240.00 

3,700.00 

26,324.00 

20,089.80 
$154,021.80 

If we should take the new supply from the point in the lake 
where the present supply is taken, I am of the opinion that on 
account of the present condition of the canal, and the gate house 
at the lower end of it, it would be the best policy to take the 
supply from the lake immediately south of the present dam, and 
lay a 24-inch pipe from thence along a line south of the present 
canal to the present pumping-station, a distance of about 2,000 
feet, where a new station could be built in which new steam ma- 
chinery similar to that proposed at Proctor's grove could be 
located. In this case I would recommend one 2,000,000-gallon 
pump for the high service, and one of larger capacity, say 4,000,- 
000 gallons, for the low service. 

For the high service there would be required a 16-inch inde- 
pendent main from the 2,000,000-gallon pump to the high service 
through Cohas street, passing the present reservoir, and through 
the Mammoth road to Highland, where it would pass to the high- 
service reservoir across Derryfield park, as in the previous plans. 

The force main from the 4,000, ooo-gallon pump, or the low 
service one, can be connected with the present one immediately 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 97 

outside the pump station. This latter pump could easily furnish 
water for the entire low service in an emergency, connected in 
this manner. 

If you desire to lay a new 20-inch main from the pumping- 
station to the present reservoir, then either one or both of the 
new pumps could pump to the high service or low, as might be 
desired. This might be done through the present main, if it is 
strong enough to endure the pressure of 139 feet additional head. 
As that is the only pipe to supply the city, I do not think it would 
be advisable to attempt it. 

If the four million pump is to be used to pump into the high 
service at any time, the steam cylinders must be large enough to 
work against the head of 252 feet, as well as the 113 feet due to 
the low service head, or a higher pressure of steam must be used 
in such case. If a 16-inch pipe is laid from the present pump- 
ing-station to the proposed new reservoir, it will require 21,925 
feet of that pipe, which at $2.25 would cost $49,321.25, if there 
was no rock to be cut. 

If this new line of 20-inch pipe be laid from the pump station 
to the old reservoir, and there reduced to a 16-inch pipe laid 
from there to the new reservoir, it will require about 8,000 feet 
of 20-inch at an expense of $2.82 per foot, or $22,560, and 
13,925 feet of 16-inch pipe at $2.25 per foot, or $31,331.25, 
amounting to $53,981.25 for the whole line, which is $4,660 
more than the line would cost if it was all laid in 16-inch pipe. 
I am informed by Mr. Sawyer that there will probably be 1,550 
lineal feet of ledge encountered in this line, which will increase 
the cost of the whole to $57,081.25. 

There is one advantage in this plan over the others, if you de- 
sire to supply both systems from it, which is certainly worth con- 
sidering ; it is that the whole pumping machinery is brought 
under one management. It is true that all the coal must 
be carted from the city to the station, which will probably add 
fifty cents per ton to its cost ; but assuming that the consumption 
of coal for the high service amounts to one hundred tons per 
year, the additional cost of carting the coal would be only $50 
for the year, while you would dispense with the services of one 
7 



98 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



extra man and possibly two. It is hardly possible to estimate the 
cost of running this entire plant, on account of uncertainty as to 
how much the low service portion will be required per year. 
Should you prefer for the immediate future to put in two 2,000,000 
pumps for the high service alone, and lay a 20-inch main to the 
present reservoir and a 16-inch one from there to the new one, it 
can be so connected as to pump into the low service at will, but 
of course not at the same time as into the high service. In this 
case a check-valve would be placed in the main immediately 
above the connection with the old reservoir, to hold the pressure 
from the high service while pumping into the lower system. 
The cost of this system would be approximately as follows : 

Tapping lake eight feet below surface, including 

coffer-dams etc. ....... $2,000.00 

Gate-house, screens, etc 1,500.00 

19,822 feet of 16-inch pipe, at $2.25 . . . 44,599.50 
2,200 feet of 24-inch conduit pipe, at $5 . . 11,000.00 

One 24-inch stop-gate 150.00 

Ten tons of special castings, at $60 . . . 600.00 

Three 16-inch gates, at $80 240.00 

One 16-inch check-valve ..... 150.00 
1,550 lineal feet rock cut, at $2 . . . 3,100.00 
Machinery : two pumping-engines, 16 inches by 30 
inches and 14 inches by 24 inches, three 85 
horse-power boilers, feed-pump with all connec- 
tions 24,625 

Pump house, coal shed, and chimney . 
Reservoir as before ..... 



12,000 
26,324 



Add 15 per cent for contingencies 



Total 



$126,288 
18,943 



$i45> 2 3 2 - 2 4 

Should you decide that you would use a plant to supply both 
systems, and use one larger pump, say of 4,000,000 gallons ca- 
pacity in twenty-four hours, for low service, and one of 2,000,- 
000 gallons for high service, and a 20-inch pipe from the pumps 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



99 



to the old reservoir, and a 1 6-inch one from there to the proposed 
new one, then the cost would be about as follows : 



Tapping the lake as before .... 
2,200 feet of 24-inch conduit pipe to pump, at $5 
Gate house, screens, etc. .... 
Pumping-station, coal sheds, and chimney 
One 2,000,000-gallon pumping-engine . 
One 4,500,000-gallon pumping engine . 
Two horizontal 85 horse-power boilers . 
One horizontal 95 horse-power boiler . 
11,822 feet of 1 6-inch pipe, at $2.25 laid 
8,000 feet of 20-inch pipe, at $2.82 
1,550 lineal feet rock cut, at $2 
Ten tons of special castings, at $60 
Two 20-inch stop-gates .... 
One 24-inch stop-gate .... 
Reservoir as before .... 



$2,000.00 
11,000.00 

1,500.00 
12,000.00 
11,000.00 
18,684.00 

2,400.00 

1,350.00 
26,599.50 
22,560.00 

3,100.00 

600.00 

230.00 

150.00 

26,324.40 

# r 39, 497-9° 
20,924.68 



Add 15. per cent for contingencies 

Total cost $160,422.58 

Recapitulation of the estimates of cost of the different plans 
for additional water supply for Manchester : 



Pumping-station at Lake Massabesic and using a 16-inch main 
to the high-service reservoir and a 20-inch main to the low ser- 
vice reservoir. Total cost, $184,297.16. 



Pumping-station in same location as above, and using a 20-inch 
main through Candia road to the junction of Mammoth road, 
and a 16 -inch branch from Candia road through Mammoth road 
to high-service reservoir. Total cost, $156,297.16. 



100 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Pumping-station at Ashland street, with a brick suction-weli 
for high service alone. Total cost, $82,218.56. 



Pumping-station at the corner of Belmont and Valley streets, 
taking the water out of the 20-inch iron pipe in Valley street 
and pumping it to the high- service reservoir. Total cost, $85,- 
155.66. 



Pumping-station near mouth of Slager brook, which enters the 
lake on the west side, using a 16-inch main connecting with a 
20-inch cement pipe at Mammoth road, and from there to the 
high-service reservoir, and two 2,000,000-gallon pumps. Total 
cost, $135,986.81. 



Same location of pumping-station, with 20-inch main to the 
junction of Mammoth road and Massabesic street, and 16-inch 
branch from there to the high-service reservoir, using one 4>5°°r 
000 and one 2,000,000 gallon pump. Total cost, $154,021.80. 



With pumping-station at the old station, using two 2,000,000- 
gallon pumps and 16-inch main to the high-service reservoir. 
Total cost, $145,232.24. 



Same location of pumping-station, using one 4,500,000 and 
one 2,000,000 gallon pump and 20-inch main to low service res- 
ervoir and 16-inch main from there to high service reservoir. 
Total cost, $160,422.58. 

In view of the above comparison of cost of the various plans, 
it seems to me that if you desire to furnish the high service alone, 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 101 

plan C would be the most economical and efficient. Should you 
decide to arrange the proposed plant to furnish the high service 
and also the low one to any considerable extent, I am of the 
opinion that either of the plans E would be preferable. Which 
one of these two' would be advisable depends upon how much 
you may be called on to furnish the entire city with water from 
this plant. The prices quoted are based upon the cost of labor 
and materials at the present time, and are subject to the fluctua- 
tions of the market. 

Trusting that the above will convey the information that you 
desire, I remain 

Respectfully yours, 

M. M. TIDD, 

Boston, October i, 1890. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Department. 
1891. 



City Engineer. 
WINFRED H. BENNETT, 



Assistants. 

Harrie M. Young. 



George W. Wales. 

Harry J. Briggs. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my sixth annual report, 
being the thirteenth annual report of the work in the citv engi- 
neer's department and the several highway districts of the city of 
Manchester, for the year ending December 31, 189 1. 

Expenses of the department for the year 1891 : 



For salary of city engineer 


. $1,171.20 




salary of assistants 


1,709.25 




supplies for the office 


96.24 




additions to office furniture 


14.83 




additional horse hire 


353-25 




stakes ..... 


37-5° 




horse-shoeing and repairs of wagoi 


1 




and harness .... 


44-85 




street-car fares .... 


5-7o 




printing reports 


20.85 




express and postage . 


3.80 




repairing .... 


7.80 




expenses ..... 


3.66 




books and folios 


14-37 




folio case .... 


5.00 




Derry field park, plans and printing 


5.60 




copying-press and book . 


6.00 




Total 




$3,499.90 


Appropriation 




3,500.00 



Balance 



$0.10 



106 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The items for salary of assistants may be divided as follows : 

For giving lines and grades for the extension and 
construction of streets and sidewalks 



plans and profiles relating to the construction o 
streets and sidewalks .... 

surveys and levels for the construction of streets 
and sewers ...... 

giving lines and grades for the construction of 
sewers not mentioned in these items 

plans and profiles relating to the construction of 
sewers as above 

surveys, measurements, and plans for the assign 
ment of street numbers .... 

plans, levels, lines, and grades relating to the 
construction of sewers in Granite street section 

making plans for improvements other than those 
mentioned in this account .... 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for improvements in Pine Grove ceme- 
tery 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for improvements in Valley cemetery . 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for repairing and extending the street 
railway 

collecting data, classifying accounts, and other 
work in relation to office report 

plans, notes, and lines for Derryfield park . 

plan, levels, and notes for Stark park 

survey of Piscataquog river .... 

plans for improvements in various city buildings 

copying records of highways .... 

indexing plans and notes ..... 

checking notes, figures, etc. .... 

making plans of streets in city clerk's book of 
records ........ 

plotting sewers in sewer book .... 



$258.40 

163.34 

260.14 

150.40 

5SM7 

47-5 2 

53-25 

i35-i8 

104.89 
5.62 



17.89 

44.12 
36-3° 
40.55 
16.87 
24.36 
9-56 
2 9-57 
16.45 

22.28 
10.77 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 107 

For locating street signs $3-4° 

preparing and mounting drawing paper for office 

use . . . . . . . . 17.22 

locating cesspools, manholes, etc. . . . i°-75 

office work, preparing notes, data, records, etc. . 93-87 
office work, information given engineers and 

others regarding lines, grades, sewers, etc. . 77-38 

£i,7°9-25 

The items for salary of city engineer may be divided as follows : 

For information and data given engineers and others 

regarding lines, grades, sewers, etc. . . $225.60 

new ordinance for sewer committee ... 1.60 
attending meetings of the committee on sewers, 

as clerk 28.80 

tabulating sewer notes for the year . . . 9.60 
time spent on various sewers, instructing work- 
men regarding the construction, etc. . . 237.60 
looking up notes in reference to claims and acci- 
dents 8.80 

attending meetings of committee on claims . 1.60 
time spent in reference to East Manchester 

schoolhouse . 2.00 

preparing plans for addition to city farm build- 
ings ........ 7.20 

preparing plans of Webster schoolhouse exten- 
sion and supervising construction . . . 18.80 
attending meetings of committee on lands and 

buildings ....... 3.60 

preparing list of electric lights for committee on 

lighting streets ...... 2.40 

time spent on the various streets giving explana- 
tions and instructions regarding work . . 182.00 
attending meetings of committee on streets . 18.40 
preparing plans for street hearings . . . 25.20 
procuring abutters' names and data for city clerk 36.80 
attending meetings of Board of Aldermen . 12.80 



108 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



For preparing plans, data, etc., for other committees 
attending committee meetings not included in 

the above ..... 
preparing data for yearly report 
estimates given for new work 
fixing grades, etc., on plans 
keeping weather record 
plans for improvements in Valley cemetery, and 

suggestions given 

giving lines and grades and preparing plans foi 

work in Pine Grove cemetery 
work on street books and numbers . 
time spent in relation to union passenger sta- 
tion, with officials and others 
preparing data for Mayor 
work in Derryfield park .... 
work in Stark park, not charged to other appro 

priafions 

indexing plans, notes, and records . 
preparing census statistics . . . . * 

preparing plans and notes in reference to Second 

street river bridge 
collecting data and making plans referring to 

city lots sold on Belmont street 
measuring and tabulating concrete work for the 

year ...... 

preparing notes in reference to perambulation of 

town line, not charged to. incidentals 
work not included in the above 

Total amount charged to engineer's depart 
ment ..... 

Amount charged to incidentals for perambulation of 
town line ...... 

Amount charged to Stark park appropriation 

Total amount paid city engineer . 



$19.20 

8.80 
16.40 
32.40 
51.60 

8.00 

1 7.60 

46.80 
17.20 

12.00 
4.00 
4.80 

3.60 
18.00 
10.00 

4.00 

9.60 

41.20 

1.60 
21.60 



$1,171.20 

4.00 
24.80 

$1,200.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 109 

The following bills charged to other appropriations have been 
approved by this department : 

Head & Dowst, putting up street signs ... . $4. 23 

E. T. James, team used in locating street signs . 5.00 

Surveys, levels, and plans of Stark park . . . 124.30 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing sewer permits . . 4.25 

John B. Clarke, printing bills . . . . . 1.75 
Whitten & Fifield, team for perambulation of town 

line 3.00 

W. H. Bennett, amount deducted from engineer's 

appropriation for perambulating town line between 

Manchester and Hooksett ..... 4.00 



Total #146.53 

Amount of concrete laid for the city by Charles H. Robie and 

George F. Higgins, as measured by this department, 17,010.3 

sq. yards. 

Amount of curbstone furnished the city by Warren Harvey, 

as measured by this department, 239. 84 feet. 

Expenses for soldiers' monument : 

For water $200.00 

gas .56 



Total $200.56 

The amount of work done in the office during the year is as 
follows : 

Number of orders for surveys, street lines, and grades 
Number of orders for sewer and paving grades 
Number of orders for street railway grades 
Number of orders for profile levels . 

Total number of orders 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 44,2c 
8.39 miles. These profiles, having three lines of levels on each 
street, make a total distance actually leveled of 132,843 feet. 



es 


• 9°3 




• I3 1 




7 




43 




. 1,084 


feet, 


equal to 



110 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Levels for sewer profiles .... 

Levels for other center profiles 

Levels in Pine Grove cemetery 

Other levels ...... 

Total levels taken .... 
Equal to 30.69 miles. 

Surveys of streets and street lines 
Surveys in Pine Grove cemetery . 
Surveys in Valley cemetery .... 
Surveys for street numbers .... 
Other surveys 

Total surveys made .... 
Equal to 36.01 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground 

Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove cemetery 

Lines of lots and avenues, Valley cemetery 

Lines for street centers 

Lines for gutters 

Lines for curb 

Lines for sewers . 

Lines for street railway 

Lines of land sold 

Other lines 

Total length of lines marked on ground 
Equal to 22.41 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks 

Grades set for centers . 

Grades set for gutters . 

Grades set for curb 

Grades set for sewers . 

Grades set for street railway tracks 

Grades set for building streets 

Grades set in Pine Grove cemetery 



. $2,864 feet 


1,642 


ti 


10,616 


te 


14,064 


a 


. 162,029 


feet 


. 114,800 feet 


. 14,880 


(< 


200 


<< 


. 18,290 


a 


• 4i,979 


it 


. 190,149 


feet 


61,280 


feet. 


8,640 


" 


100 


it 


2,603 


a 


12,138 


it 


• 2,895 


1 1 


18,742 


" 


!>37° 


" 


2,866 


1 1 


7,700 


n 


JI 8,334 


feet. 


27,35* 


feet. 


2,603 


1 1 


12,138 


1 1 


. 2,895 


<t 


18,742 


" 


1,37° 


" 


16,413 


it 


3, 6 32 


" 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



Ill 



Grades set in Valley cemetery 


$074 feet 


Other grades 


728 " 


Total length of grades set . . 


. 85,946 feet. 


Equal to 16.28 miles. 




Area leveled for cross section 


1,372,090 sq. feet 


Profile measurements made .... 


12,000 feet. 


Equal to 2.27 miles. 




Perambulation of lines between Manchester 


and 


surrounding towns . . . . . 


. 37,276 feet 


Equal to 7.06 miles. 




BATTERS SET. 





Bowman street, retaining wall. 

East Manchester, schoolhouse. 

Spruce street, retaining wall. 

Webster schoolhouse, addition. 
Old lots relaid in Valley cemetery 
Old lots relaid in Pine Grove cemetery . 
New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 

Total cemetery lots laid out . 

Street numbers assigned and put on 

Street numbers replaced 

Street numbers assigned, but not put on 

Total 



6 

56 

IX 3 

T 75 
2S9 

5° 

377 



This year, as in previous years, the city engineer has investi- 
gated and made surveys in all cases where suits were liable to be 
brought against the city. Cases investigated and reported to the 
committee on claims, 15. 



PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

Allen street, from Main to Boynton street. 
Barr street, from Granite to Conant street. 
Beauport street, from Conant to Sullivan street. 



112 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Belmont street, from Valley to Clay street. 

Belmont street, from Bridge to Harrison street. 

Boynton street, from A to north of Allen street. Two plans. 

Cartier street, from Conant to Sullivan street. 

Conant street, from Cartier street westerly. 

Dartmouth street, from Log to Wingate street. 

Dickey street, from Main to West Hancock street. 

Douglas street, from Main to Railroad street. Two plans. 

Ferry street, from River to Main street. 

Frederick street, from Main to Merrimack river. 

Granite street, from Main to Winter street. Three plans. 

Green street, from Granite to Conant street. 

Grove street, from Belmont to Taylor street. 

Hall street, from Bridge to Harrison street. 

Hanover street, from Union to Beech street. 

Hanover street, from Maple to Wilson street. Two plans. 

Kelley street extension, from Kelley street to M. & N. W.R.R. 

McDuffie street, from Boynton to Huntress street. 

McNeil street, from Dartmouth to West Hancock street. 

Morrison street, from Arlington to Pearl street. 

Prince street, from Boynton to Huntress street. 

Quincy street, from Granite to Conant street. 

Rimmon street, from Conant to Gates street. 

Salmon street, from Pine to Walnut street. 

Second street, from Piscataquog river to Bell street. Two 
plans. 

Summer street, from Belmont to Massabesic street. 

Walnut street, from Gore to Webster street. Two plans. 

West street, from Parker to Conant street. 

West Webster street, from River road to Merrimack river. 

Wheelock street, from West Hancock to Belknap street. 

Young street, from Taylor street to Mammoth road. Two 
plans. 

Total plans and profiles. 42. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

Bath street, from River to Third street. 
Belmont street, from Massabesic to Valley street. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 113 

Blaine street, from Main street to Merrimack river. 
Brown avenue, from Elm to Shasta street. 
Cypress street, from Massabesic street to Young road. 
Douglas street, from Main to Railroad street. Two plans. 
East Spruce street, from Belmont to Canton street. 
Ferry street, from River to Main street. 
Granite street, from Main to Quincy street. Two plans. 
Hanover street, from Maple to Lincoln street. 
Harrison south back street, from Union to Walnut street. 
Lincoln street, from Hanover to Amherst street. 
Main street, from Granite to Amory street. 
Massabesic street, from Cypress street to Mammoth road. Two 
plans. 

McGregorville, sewer mains and laterals. 
Milford street, from Main street to old Bedford road. 
Myrtle street, from Russell to Belmont street. 
Second street, from Piscataquog river to Bell street. 
Third street, from Piscataquog river to M. & N. W. R. R. 
West Hancock street, from Main street to Merrimack river. 
Total sewer plans and profiles, 23. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Baker street, Brown avenue to Nutt road. Three plans. 

Bell street, Main to Second street. 

Belknap street, Main to Wheelock street. 

Calef road, Welch avenue to Elm street. Two plans. 

Colby street, West Hancock to Log street. 

Dartmouth street, Log street to Harvell land. 

Dickey street, Main to West Hancock street. 

Dinsmoor street, West Hancock street to Piscataquog river. 

Frederick street, Main street to Merrimack river. 

Gilman street, Second to Wentworth street. 

Hale street, Frederick street to Harvell land. 

Harvey street, West Hancock street to Piscataquog river. 

Hill street, Frederick street to Harvell land. 

Log street, West Hancock street to Piscataquog river. 



114 . ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

McNeil street, Dartmouth to West Hancock street. 
Morrison street, Arlington to Pearl street. 
Second street, M. & N. W. R. R. to Harvell land. Two 
plans. 

Walnut street, Gore to Webster street. Three plans. 
Wentvvorth street, West Hancock street to Harvell land. 
Wheelock street, West Hancock to Belknap street. 
Wingate street, Wheelock to Hale street. 
Woodbury street, Main to Hill street. 
Total numbering plans, 28. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Baker street and Calef road, land of Benjamin M. Boyes, 
copy. 

Belmont street, lots sold by city at sand bank. 

Blaine and Cleveland streets, land of Lane and Dowst, copy. 

Chestnut street. Hanover to Amherst street, proposed widen- 
ing. 

City farm, proposed addition. 

Conant street and Amoskeag Company's south line, copy. 

Concord street, lots adjoining land of George Porter, copy. 

Elm, Union, Central, and Auburn streets, square bounded by, 
equaling nine plans. 

Fuller land, West Manchester, copy. 

Government building, plan of grounds, copy. 

Mammoth road, plan of J. J. Bell's lots, copy. 

McGregcrville and Amoskeag, Amoskeag Company's land, 
copy. Two plans. 

Merrimack street, Beacon to Hanover street, location of, 
equaling four plans. 

Milford street extension, land of Brock, Brooks, and Brock, 
copy. 

Pine Grove cemetery, original plan, copy. 

Pine Grove cemetery, location of water-pipes. 

River road, north, land of A. J. Lane, copy. 

South Manchester, sectional map, equaling eight plans. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. . 115 

Summer street, Wilson to Massabesic street, location. 
Union street, land of Josiah Carpenter, copy. 
Valley cemetery, proposed improvements. 
Varney schoolhouse, plan of foundation. 
Webster schoolhouse addition, ventilation plan. 
Young road, Belmont to Jewett street, location of, equaling 
seven plans. 

Young road, estate of Thomas Johnson, copy. 
Total miscellaneous plans, 50. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Belmont street, Bridge to Hanover street. Profile. 

Belmont street, city sand bank. Two plans. 

Canal and Central south back street. Two sewer profiles. 

Chestnut street, Merrimack to Hanover street. Two profiles. 

Chestnut east back street, Salmon street northerly. Sewei 
profile. 

Dubuque street, Amory to Kelley street. Profile. 

Elm street, Hanover to Amherst street, Profile. 

Elm west back street, Dean to Langdon street. Profile. 

Granite street, River to Main street. Profile. 

Pattern for manhole cover. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Chessom avenue. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan of Chandler lots. 

Pine Grove cemetery.Willow avenue, Locust avenue northerly. 
Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Riverside avenue, Elmwood avenue 
northerly. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Woodside avenue, south to Alder ave- 
nue. Profile. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Chandler lots. Two plans on deeds. 

Prospect street, Union to Linden street. Two profiles. 

Rimmon street, Kelley to south of Wayne street. Profile. 

River road, plan of Stark park by J. B. Sawyer. 

Salmon street. Pine to east of Walnut street. Profile. 

Second street, M. & N. W. R. R. to West Hancock street. 
Two profiles. 



116 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

South Main street, plan of the Allen land. 
Spruce street, Elm to Chestnut street. Profile. 
Union street, Laurel street to Lake avenue. Profile. 
Walnut street, Orange to Gore street. Profile. 
West Merrimack street, Elm to Franklin street. Profile. 
Weston street, Spruce street to Lake avenue. Sewer profile. 
Total working plans, 33. 



Belmont street, lots at city sand bank. 

Brown avenue and adjacent lots. Two plans. 

Cheney place, location of street lines. Three plans. 

Conant south back street, Main street to Amoskeag Company's 
west line. 

Concord R. R. yard, location of tracks and buildings. 

Elm, Canal, Langdon, and Bridge streets, square bounded by. 

Hall street, Central to Spruce. 

McGregorville and Amoskeag, Amoskeag Company's streets. 

Milford and Main streets, section showing lots. 

Pine Grove cemetery, section north of tool house, location of 
lots. Two plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, section north of tool house, for grades. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan of H. H. Huse's lot. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan of Chandler lots. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots on east side. Three plans. 

River and Calef roads, proposed addition to Pine Grove ceme- 
tery. 

River road, plan of Stark park. 

Second street extension, location of. 

St. James M. E. church, perspective for city auditor. 

Stark park, showing contours. 

Union passenger station, proposed location. 

Union passenger station, ground plan. 

Valley, Young, Beech and Maple streets, square bounded by. 

Valley cemetery, proposed improvements. 

Valley cemetery, plan of ironwork in tomb. 

Webster schoolhouse addition, ventilation plan. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 117 

Webster schoolhouse addition. 

West Webster street, River road to Merrimack river. 
Total tracings, 32. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

M. & N. W. R. R. bridge, abutments at Second street. 
N. H. Improvement Company's land. 
Union passenger station. Four plans. 
Total blue prints, 6. 



City of Manchester, showing scavenger district. 
Stark park, showing contours. 
Derryfield park, for photographing for report. 
Total maps, 3. 

Twenty-one plans of streets laid out have been copied in the 
city clerk's book of records, and nine tracings made for the same. 

Total of all plans made, 246. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on laid out streets, 
28,732 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on streets not laid 
out, 13,969 feet. 

Total, 42,701 feet, equal to 8.09 miles. 



118 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Ash east back 

Barr 

Barr 

Bath 

Bay east back 

Beauport 

Beech east back 

Belmont 

Belmont 

Belmont 

Brown avenue 

Canal 

Canal 

Central south back 

Chestnut east back 

Cypress 

Cypress 

Cypress 

Douglas 

Douglas 

Douglas 

Elm east back 

Elm east back 

Elm west back 

Ferry 

Ferry 

Fourth 

Fourth 

Fourth 

Front 

Granite 

Granite 

Green 

Harrison 

Oak 

Harrison south back 

Lake avenue 

Lake avenue 

Lake avenue 

Lake avenue 

Lake avenue 

Lake avenue south back 

Chestnut west back 

Chestnut west back 

Main 

Main 

Manchester 

Manchester 

Mast 

J. 'Baldwin & Co.'siand.. 

Milforcl 

Milford 

Milforcl 

Milforcl 

Myrtle 

Orange 

Orange 

Orange 

Orange 

Orange 

Parker 

Quincy 



Amount carried up. 



North of Harrison 

Granite northerly 

Northerly to Douglas 

River to Second 

Webster southerly 

Adams to Schuyler. — . .• 

From Amherst northerly 

Massabesic to Summer 

Summer to Grove 

Grove to C. & P. R. R 

South of Elm 

Granite to Depot 

Depot to Central south back 

Canal to Elm west back 

Salmon to north of North 

From Massabesic southerly — 

Southerly to Valley 

Valley to Young 

Green to Railroad 

From Green easterly 

From Barr easterly 

Cedar to Spruce south back 

Spruce s'th b'k to Lake ave s'th b'k 

Pleasant to Merrimack 

Third to Fourth 

Fourth to Main 

Ferry to School south back 

At School south back 

From Walker southerly 

From Black brook southerly 

From Barr easterly 

Barr to Green 

Granite to Douglas 

From Oak westerly 

From Harrison southerly 

Union to Walnut 

Weston to Highland 

At Cass 

Highland to Canton 

Highland to Canton 

Weston to Beacon 

Elm east back to Chestnut west b'k. 
Lake avenue south back southerly.. 
Lake avenue south back northerly.. 

Schuyler to Sullivan 

Froni Wayne northerly 

Belmont to Milton 

Belmont to Milton 

From east of Riddle westerly 

From east of Riddle westerly 

Mast to Piscataquog river 

From east of Tilton to Williams ... 

Williams to proposed street 

Proposed street to west of Carroll . 

West of Carroll 

Russell to east of Linden 

From Russell easterly 

East of Russell 

Easterly to east of Linden 

Easterly to east of Linden 

East of Maple 

From winter northerly 

From Douglas southerly 



Portland. 
Akron ... 



Portland. 
Akron ... 



Brick . 

Akron 



Portland . 
Akron . .. 
Portland. 

Iron 

Akron . .. 
Portland. 
Akron . . . 



Brick .... 
Portland. 

Akron ... 

Portland. 

Akron . .. 



Portland. 

Iron 

Portland . 
Akron . . . 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, 



119 



Size in Length in Length in 
inches, feet, new. ft., relaid 



in; 
100 
135 
L60 

137 

■i-ir, 



.".(in 

Kill 
251 
137 



12 
455 

::<.i:; 



24:. 
It:; 



ins 
191 
534 

12 
227 

16 
350 



30 
70 
68 
516 
198 
202 
403 

18 
611 
40 
12 
455 



Kl'.l 

182 

62 

117 
2i HI 
121 



Man- 

holes. 



Lamp- Y 

holes, hranches, 



Total cost. C ?J*& ep 



f41.59 
3,257.14 



$0,358 
13.S60 



177.32 


1.249 


43.65 


.320 


1S9.24 


837 


224.55 


-816 



2,703.70 
120.79 

2,936.97 
733.61 

1,985.76 

1,069.57 
572 17 
128.54 



! '•« 



132,73 
908.41 
236 96 
251.50 
532. i5 
1,826.69 
905.81 
351.87 
188.32 

2,842.70 



2,681.61 
234.99 



2,912.22 

2,052.01 

054.68 

1,259. S9 

80.50 
222.35 
161.99 



1.207 
3.979 



2.130 
3.140 
2.073 
2 54S 
1.070 
1.700 
1.569 
1.470 
1.507 



3 724 

1.460 

1.071 

1.617 

1.610 
1.670 
2.249 



120 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Street. 


Location. 


Material. 












Akron 






,, 






,, 




'Squog river to south of McNeil 

'Squog river to south of McNeil 


ii 










Spruce 




Trnn 












Total 














REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
IN 1891.— Continued. 



121 



Size in 
inches. 


Length in 
feet, new. 


Length in 
ft, relaid. 


Man- 
holes. 


Lamp- 
holes. 


Y 

branches. 


Total cost. 


Cost per 
fool. 




11,376 
270 


3,332 


51 

1 


19 


468 
9 


$34,476.77 

1 2,340.12 

} 772.84 

| 4,703.04 

84.41 

437.97 




24 






67 


$4,239 




215 
400 
131 
975 
17 
111 
279 




1 
........ 


5 
5 
5 

27 








1 




10 










3 








4.740 










4 
4 


.760 






1 




1.569 










13,774 


3,399 


57 


21 


527 


$42,815.15 









122 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PIPE REMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT. 



Street. 


Location. Materia 


, Size in Length 
inches, in feet'. 


Beech east back 




Amherst to Concord Cemen 


12 




'-'T") 






From Ban- easterly Akron . 


12 




62 








Elm east back . 






12 




41fi 


Elm west back.. 




Pleasant to Merrimack Cemenl 


. n 


150 






Barr to Green Cemenl 

Granite to Douglas Cemen 

From Schuyler southerly — Brick. . 


10 


1(51 






. 




Main 


io 






From Wayne northerly Akron 






Milford 


12 


390 




























2 


585 




SUMMARY. 






Total 26 x 39 


inches, brick . . 


514 feet. 


22x33 


nches, brick 










8 




24-inch Portland pipe. 










1,363 




24-inch Akron pipe 










438 




24-inch 


iron pipe 










12 














1,110 




20-inch Portland pipe 










335 




20-inch 


iron pipe 










17 




18-inch Akron pipe 










817 




1 5 -inch Akron pipe 










2,037 




12-inch Akron pipe 










3> 2 °7 














140 




12-inch 


iron pipe 










12 














5,5*7 




10-inch Por 


land pipe . 












1,24 


t 





REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



123 



Total 8-inch Akron pipe .... 

20-inch Akron pipe cesspools and connec 

tions 

1 8-inch Akron pipe cesspools and connec 

tions 

1 2 -inch Akron pipe cesspools and connec 

tions ...... 

io-inch Akron pipe cesspools and connec 

tions ...... 

8-inch Akron pipe cesspools and connec 

tions ...... 



402 feet. 

10 " 

18 " 

68 " 

484 " 

2,026 " 

19,779 feet. 



Total sewers built in 1891 
Equal to 3.75 miles. 
Following is the total amount of sewerage in the city January 1, 
1892. 

8-inch Akron pipe 6,858 feet. 

10-inch Akron pipe . 
12-inch Akron pipe . 
15-inch Akron pipe . 
18-inch Akron pipe . 
20-inch Akron pipe . 
24-inch Akron pipe . 

Total Akron pipe 
Equal to 26.078 miles. 
8-inch Portland pipe, old . 
12-inch Portland pipe, old . 
18-inch Portland pipe, old . 

Total Portland pipe, old 
Equal to 0.919 miles. 
10-inch Portland pipe, new 
12-inch Portland pipe, new 
20-inch Portland pipe, new 
24-inch Portland pipe, new 



42,418 




59<7i° 


1 1 


^.s ? 


" 


3> 6 5 2 


" 


6,003 


" 


3^548 


(C 


137,696 


feet 


90 


feet 


3.99° 


" 


770 


a 



Total Portland pipe, new 
Equal to 0.583 miles. 



4,850 feet. 

1,244 feet. 
140 " 
335 " 

i>363 " 

3,082 feet. 



124 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



9-inch cement pipe 
1 2-inch cement pipe 
1 5 -inch cement pipe 
1 8-inch cement pipe 
24-inch cement pipe 

16 x 24 inches, cement pipe 

Total cement pipe 
Equal to 7.818 miles. 

10-inch earthen pipe . 
12 inch earthen pipe . 

Total earthen pipe 
Equal to 0.704 miles. 

18-inch brick sewers . 
24-inch brick sewers . 
29-inch brick sewers . 
36-inch brick sewers . 
42-inch brick sewers . 
44-inch brick sewers . 
57-inch brick sewers . 

17 x 26 inches, brick sewers 
20 x 30 inches, brick sewers 
22 x 33 inches, brick sewers 
24 x 36 inches, brick sewers 
26 x 39 inches, brick sewers 
29^ x 44 inches, brick sewers 
30 x 46 inches, brick sewers 
32 x 48 inches, brick sewers 
40 x 44 inches, brick sewers 

Total brick sewers . 

Equal to 6.938 miles. 

12-inch iron pipe . 
14-inch iron pipe . 
20-inch iron pipe . 



15,861 


feet. 


21,629 




« 


490 




" 


860 




1 


735 




" 


1,697 


" 


41,282 


feet 


1. 175 


feet 


2 .545 




ft 



36,615 feet. 

12 feet. 
12 " 
62 " 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



1-25 



24-inch iron pipe. 

36-inch iron pipe ..... 

Total iron pipe .... 
Equal to 0.071 miles. 

48-inch steel pipe .... 

Equal to 0.052 miles. 

Total in all sewers .... 
Equal to 43.169 miles. 

The following table shows the amount of concrete laid for the 
city in 1891, by Charles H. Robie. The measurements relating 
thereto have been made by this department and rendered as 
vouchers for the same. 



12 


feet. 


277^ 


" 


375 •} 


feet 


312 


feet 


• 227,932! 


feet 



STREET CROSSINGS. 








Sq. yd. 


Price per yd. 


Total cost. 


Ash east back, at Concord 


. 17.70 


#°-75 


#13-27 


Barr, at Granite 


. lS.66 


•75 


T 3-99 


Beacon, at Lake avenue 


. 28.60 


•75 


21-45 


Beech, south of Amherst 


25'3° 


•35 


8.85 


Beech, at Amherst 


34.OO 


•75 


25-5° 


Beech east back, at Harrison . 


. 17.70 


•35 


6.x 9 


Belmont, at Massabesic . 


45-33 


•75 


34.00 


Belmont, at Manchester 


31.00 


•75 


23-33 


Belmont, at Hanover, 2 


• 59-°S 


•75 


44-3 1 


Blodget south back, at Chestnut 


17.70 


•75 


13.28 


Cedar, at Union, 4 


120.88 


•5° 


60.44 


Chandler at West Webster 


33-33 


•75 


25.00 


Depot at Elm and Elm west back, 








at Depot .... 


71. 10 


•75 


53-32 


Douglas, at Main . 


26.60 


•35 


9-3 1 


Elm east back, at Hanover . 


20.00 


•35 


7.00 


Elm east back, at Salmon 


17.70 


•75 


13.28 


Granite, at Green .... 


24.88 


•75 


18.66 


Harrison south back, at Pine . 


17.70 


•35 


6.20 



126 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Harrison south back, at Union, 2 

High east, at Nashua 

Laurel south back, at Maple . 

Lincoln, at Spruce, 2 . 

Lowell, at Birch . 

Maple, at East High 

Massabesic, at Lake avenue 

McNeil, at Second 

Milford 

Milton, at Hanover 

Nashua 

Pine, at Harrison . 

Pine east back, at North 

Spruce, at Massabesic . 

Spruce, at Union, 3 

Spruce south back, at Union 

Union, at Amherst 

Union, at High . 

Union, at Prospect, 2 . 

West Hancock, 2 . 

West Hancock, at Second 

Totals 



Sq. yd. 
3I.OO 
42.60 

17.70 
67.60 

5-3° 
35-5° 
83.10 
26.60 
65.70 

47-77 
29.00 

33-8° 
13:3° 
5!-55 

90.66 

*3-3° 

23-5° 
32.00 
58.60 
65.70 
38.20 

1,499.74 



Price per yd. 

$0.75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•35 
•75 
•75 
•5° 
•5° 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 
•75 



Total cost. 

$23.24 

3 J -95 
13.28 
50.70 

3-97 
26.62 
62.32 

19-95 
49.27 

35-83 
2i-75 
11.83 
9.99 
38.66 

45-33 

6.65 

17.63 

24.00 

43-95 
49.28 
28.65 

$1,012.23 



SIDEWALKS. 

Bowman, at Varney school 
Chestnut, Hanover to Merrimack . 

City hall 

Granite and Green 

High, east, and Maple . 

Lake avenue and Massabesic, at 

True J. Perry's block 
Lake avenue, at Mrs. L. A. Smyth's 
Main-street schoolhouse 
Nashua street .... 



Sq. yds. Price per yd. Total cost. 



21.77 

92.88 

147.IO 

IO.83 

2.00 



147-5° 

3I.4O 

2II.50 

27.30 



50.45 

•45 
•25 
•45 
•45 

•45 
•45 
•45 
•45 



$9-79 
41.80 

3 6 -77 

4.87 

.90 

66.37 
14-13 
95-J7 
12.29 



REPORT OP THE CITY ENGINEER. 



127 



Sq. yds. 



Price per yd. Total cost. 



Pearl, at C. C. Hayes's, ^ 
Sagamore and Elm 
Union, Laurel to Concord 
Webster, at N. G. Newton's 
West Central street 

Totals 



; of 


bill 80.00 


$C 


•25 


$10.00 




25.00 




•45 


11.25 


. 


• *3-3 l 




•45 


5-99 


's . 


. 123.40 




•45 


55-54 




. 265.00 
1,198.99 




•25 


66.25 




$431.12 


ROM 


)WAYS. 









Sq. yds. Price per yd. Total cost. 

Chestnut, Hanover to Merrimack 2,497.83 $0.75 $1,873.37 

99.10 .35 34.68 

835-4o .75 626.55 

274.22 .75 205.66 

349.26 .75 130.97 

211.70 .75 158-77 

2,283.26 .75 1,712.44 

1,210.30 .75 907.72 



Concord, Elm to Vine 

Concord, Elm to Vine 

Lake avenue, at engine-house 

Merrimack, south back, }4 of bill 

Sagamore and Elm 

Union, Lake avenue to Laurel . 

Union, Concord to Lowell. 



Totals 


. 7-761-07 




$5,650.16 


MISCELLANEOUS. 








Sq. yds. 


Price per y 


i. Total cost. 


Hanover square . 


80.90 


$0.25 


$20.22 


Hanover square . 


177.OO 


•45 


79-65 


Merrimack square 


• 983-54 


•25 


245-88 


Park square 


742.OO 


•45 


333-90 


Pine Grove cemetery, roadway 


. 1,392.00 


•65 


904.80 


Webster-street school yard . 


. 124.40 


•25 


31.10 


Webster-street school yard . 


. 115.44 


•45 


5 1 95 



Totals 



3,615.28 



$1,667.50 



128 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CONCRETE LAID BY GEORGE F. HIGGINS. 



Crossings. 

Sq. yds. Price per yd. Total cost. 

Bowman, at Varney school . . 12.44 $°-75 59*33 

Central, at Kimball Carriage Co.'s 33-30 .75 25.00 

Central, at Hall .... 30.20 .75 22.65 

Chestnut west back, at Spruce . 23.10 .75 1 7.33 

Elm east back, at Spruce, 3 . . 58.60 .75 43-95 

Elm east back, at Washington . 33.80 .75 25.35 

Elm east back, at Pearl . . .17.70 .35 6.20 

Ferry south back, at River . . 17.70 .25 4.42 

Lake avenue south back, at Union .17.70 .75 13-28 

McGregor and Amoskeag Co.'s walk 107.50 .75 80.62 

Merrimack south back and Union . 17.70 .75 13-28 

Prospect and Russell . . . 41.70 .75 31-28 

Spruce, west of Chestnut . .8.00 .75 6.00 

Walker and River .... 34.60 .75 25.95 



Totals 


• 454-Q4 
Sidetaalks. 




$3 2 4-64 




Sq. yds. 


Price per yd. 


Total cost. 


Spruce, west of Chestnut 


. 32.OO 


$0.45 


$14.40 


Varney schoolhouse 


. 828.22 


•45 


372.70 



Totals 



860.22 



$387.10 



Roadways. 

Sq. yds. 

West Merrimack, Elm to Franklin 1,620.96 



Price yer yd. Total cost. 
$0.75 $1,215.72 



SUMMARY. 

Concrete laid by Charles H. Robie. 
Crossings .... 1,499.74 sq. yds. $1,012.23 



Sidewalks 



•99 " 



431.12 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 129 



Roadways . 
Miscellaneous 


7,761.07 sq. yds. 
3*615-28 « " 


$5,650.16 
1,667.50 


Totals 


14,075.08 sq. yds. 
Concrete laid by George F. Higgins. 


$8,761.01 


Crossings 
Sidewalks 
Roadways 


454.04 sq. yds. 
860.22 " " 
1,620.96 " " 


$324.64 

387.10 

1,215.72 



Totals . . . 2,935.22 sq. yds. $1,927.46 

Total concrete laid by city, 17,010.30 sq. yds., $10,688.47. 



9 



130 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, and num- 
ber of spans of the various bridges within the city limits. 



Length 
in 
feet. 



Arnoskeag 

Bridge street, at canal 

Bridge St., McGregor and approaches 

Cohas avenue, at Great Cohas 

Derry road, at Great Cohas 

Derry road, near Cohas avenue 

Derry road , near town line 

Dunbarton road, Black brook 

Elm street, at railroad 

Front street, Black brook 

Granite street, at canal 

Granite street, at river 

Harvey road, at Great Cohas 

Island Pond road, outlet to lake 

Main street, at Piscataquog river 

Mammoth road, at Great Cohas 

Mammoth road, near town line 

Mill road, at " Harvey's mill " 

River road, at Goffe's Falls 

River road , at Little Cohas 

River road, below James Cheney's. . . 

South road 

Webster road, at water-works dam. . . 
Weston road, east of D. Connor's .. 



765.5 

57 



20 
21 
25 
89 

16.5 
56.3 
465 
32 
41 
70.5 



Width 

in 
feet. 



20 

22.5 

24 

30.5 

20 

17 

20.5 

17.5 

29.5 

33 

37.3 

26 

21 

16 7 

20.8 



No. of 
walks. 



Width 

of 
walks. 



22 

17.5 

16 



Wood. 
Iron. 



Stone. 
Wood. 



Arch- 
es or 
spans. 

! 

i 3 
1 



Iron. 
Wood. 



Stone bridges, i ; iron, 3 ; wood, 20 ; total, 24. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



131 



As will be seen by referring to the table of new streets laid out, 
about eight miles, in length, of highways have been added to 
the large number existing. It is gratifying to note this increase 
as indicative of the growth and extension of the city. 



NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT IN 1891. 



Adams Webster to Appleton 

Allen Main to Boynton 

Amory Dubuque to Kimball 

Auburn Beech to Lincoln 

Beauport Amory to Kelley 

Belmont Bridge to old Bridge 

Belmont Young to Clay 

Boynton E. Hartshorn's to Bedford line . 

Cheney place Elm to Brown avenue .... 

Oonant Dubuque to Hevey 

Cypress M. Prout's line to Young 

Dartmouth West Hancock to Dickey 

Dartmouth Dickey to Frederick 

Dickey Main to West Hancock 

Elm Baker to Grover 

Elm Grover to H. D. Lord's line 

Frederick Second easterly 

Granite M. & N. W. R. R. to Winter 

Green Douglas northerly 

Grove Belmont easterly 

Hall Central to Lake avenue 

Hall Bridge to north side Prospect . . . 

Huntress Albert to north of Prince 

Jewett Cilley to Weston road 

Kelley Kelley to M. & N. W. R. R 

Knowlton Young southerly 

Maple Young to Shasta 

Maple Shasta to Cilley road 

McDuffie Boynton to Huntress 

McNeil Second to West Hancock 

Merrimack Hall to Hanover 

Morrison Arlington to Pearl 

Old Ferry road. . . . Belmont to Taylor 

Prince Boynton to Huntress 

Quincy Douglas northerly 

Rim mon Amory to Kelly 

Rim mon Amory to south of Wayne 

Rimmon Conant to Gates ." 

Sagamore Union to Walnut 

Salmon Pine to Walnut 

Second Piscataquog river to Frederick . . . 

Second Frederick to Main 

Second Blaine to south side 'Squog river 

Summer Belmont to Massabesic 

Walnut Gore to Salmon 

Wilson road Concord to Lowell. 



Young Ainsworth's line to Mason Dec. 15 



June 
July 
Nov. 
July 
May 
Sept. 
Sept. 
July 
Sept. 
Aug. 
July 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
June 
Oct. 
Aug. 
June 
July 
Oct. 

June 

June 
Sept. 

Nov. 

June 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

July 

May 

July 

Sept. 

July 

June 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Aug. 

June 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

July 

Aug. 



Width 
in feet. 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
35 
50 
50 
40 
50 
40 
100 
100 
50 
40 
40 
50 
40 
50 



Length 
in feet. 



700 

3,499 

1,250 

700 

225 

1,395 

2,,S44 

381 

544 

59 

146 

490 

857 

382 

81 

300 

310 



052 
487 



2,447 
372 
570 



700 
785 
488 
270 
764 
600 

4,100 
828 
610 
891 
310 

1,170 



132 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There is an urgent necessity of establishing and thoroughly 
defining the boundary lines of all highways leading out of the 
city as much as those in the city proper, so that the abutters will 
recognize the city's right of way and respect it. A beginning 
has been made in this direction, and several of the outlying roads 
thus marked and defined. With the constantly increasing de- 
mands on this department, the work has not progressed as rapidly 
as could be desired, or in fact as it should for the city's welfare. 
Each year obliterates some of the marks, which in time will be 
totally destroyed unless means are taken to preserve them either 
by surveys at the present time, or by relocation in the future at 
considerable expense. 

The policy of narrowing a four rod right of way to a fifty foot 
street is folly. If the future growth of the city may be judged by 
the past, a four rod street will be none too wide for the traffic, 
with the street cars and other vehicles. 

The course pursued in laying out streets twenty-five, thirty, 
and thirty-five feet wide is hardly in keeping with modern ideas, 
and should be deprecated. The niggardly, grasping methods of 
landowners in laying out the greatest possible number of house 
lots in a given piece regardless of how the street runs, or whether 
it conforms to the surrounding streets both as to direction and 
width, is one that calls for the harshest criticism. The idea 
seems to be to put every foot of land possible into the market 
regardless of how the streets may come. This may be of advan- 
tage to those having land to dispose of, but it is not conducive 
to the appearance of the city or the usefulness of the streets as 
means of communication. 

It is gratifying to note that the more progressive property own- 
ers have recognized the need of wide thoroughfares and divided 
their property accordingly. 

It would seem good policy to appoint a special committee to 
consider the city's needs in this direction and formulate a plan 
for laying out streets that should be strictly adhered to, no devia- 
tion whatever being allowed. Such a plan should show the 
width, direction, and location of all streets that may be built, as 
far as practicable. The least that could be done would be to 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 133 

pass an ordinance denning the minimum width of streets together 
with their direction as compared to other streets, and compel 
property owners to conform thereto. 

Until something of this nature is done, the city will continue 
to be cut up by passageways, which, though dignified by the name 
of streets and avenues, are in reality but lanes and alleys. 

In building the streets after they have been accepted and laid 
out, great care should be exercised. The idea is not to see how 
many yards can be constructed in a day, rough, uneven, and 
unstable, but how much can be properly built with a good foun- 
dation and a firm, smooth roadbed ; one that will be lasting 
rather than one that will need continual repairing, simply be- 
cause the first cost is less and a greater showing made. 

In many cities property owners desiring streets through their 
land are required to give the land for the streets and build them 
to a grade satisfactory to the committee before they will be ac- 
cepted by the city. The same idea in vogue here would be of 
incalculable benefit in many ways. The*sum annually spent for 
land damages in purchasing streets, and the cost of building, two 
important items, would be saved. As it is the property owner 
who derives the greatest benefit, it seems but just that he should 
do this. 

SEWERS. 

By a perusal of the various tables it will be seen that a large 
number of sewers have been constructed this year, and the de- 
mand for others is increasing. There are many sections of the 
city that are in need of these adjuncts to health, perhaps as much 
so as those that are already supplied. The policy of the com- 
mittee has been to supply those whose needs seemed most urgent, 
as under the prevailing system but about so much can be done 
each year. As will be noticed, the principal item of expense has 
been for labor, mainly in digging and filling the trenches. This 
is an important part of the work, and care should be exercised in 
determining the width of the trench not to remove any superflu- 
ous earth other than the actual amount necessary to properly pro- 
ceed with the pipe laying. At the depth necessary for some of 
the sewers to be built, the cost of each cubic foot of earth is no 



134 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

inconsiderable amount, and money saved in this direction will 
be appreciated in the various extensions. 

Too much care cannot be taken in making connections from 
house drains to the city sewers. Nearly all the complaints made 
regarding sewers becoming clogged are traced directly to these 
connections made by incompetent workmen. The work should 
be done by men in the employ of the sewer department, and who 
thoroughly understand their business, the cost to be assumed by 
the abutter. In conjunction with this a record should be kept of 
each connection and properly filed for future reference. 

During the year a new set of ordinances was drawn up for the 
committee on sewers and drains, and so much of it as pertained 
to the sewer permit and licence was adopted by the city councils. 

The following report was prepared by the city engineer, as 
clerk of the committee on sewers and drains : 

Manchester, N. H., Dec. i, 1891. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Your committee on sewers and drains, to whom has been dele- 
gated the important work of the city's business, having completed 
the work intrusted to them for the season of 189 1, make at this 
time a return to you of their stewardship, its cost, and the 
amount of work done. 

When they began at the first of the year they found that their 
predecessors had left twenty- four sewers voted in by the city gov- 
ernment. Of these, ten have been constructed this season. 
Your committee has held twenty-one meetings and had fifty peti- 
tions referred to them. Of these, thirty-four have been granted 
by the committee, and their report and an order for building the 
same have been presented to your honorable board. The total 
number of orders presented to your board was forty. 

The following table shows the different seWers built, their 
length, cost, and the cost per foot to build the same. 

(See table of new sewers built.) 

#*****;(; 

The average cost per foot being $2,497. 

The above rate is from three to six cents per foot less than the- 
cost in many cities where the betterment plan is used. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



135 



In the 17.173 feet of sewers there were built 60 manholes and 
19 lampholes ; 76 cesspool connections were put in besides the 
Y branches for 445 house connections. 

There have been 91 cesspools built at a cost of §2,988.44, 66 
repaired at a cost of $474-25 and 5 cesspool manholes costing 
§202.62. 

In addition to the above the main outlet of the main sewer at 
the river was completed at a cost of $395-12. 

The cost of repairs on sewers has been S244.53. 

From the monthly pay-roll the following shows how the cost 
has been divided : 



Castings 
repairs 

and 
black- 
smithing 




January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November ... 



-"- ■ 
745.12 
619.20 
1,623.31 
3,893.62 
4,416.54 
3.020.90 
4,701.63 
5,811.15 
5,285.27 
1,847.73 



$17.-1 
33.96 
36.40 
241.08 
125.02 
341.45 
. _■ 
324.64 
421.51 
242.80 



$33,088.06 $2,040.! 



Pipe. 



Inci- 
dentals. 



1,189.21 

4.121.13 



1,643.05 
215.06 



$3.64 
58.94 
25 35 

188.47 





543.11 J 546.00 
441.40 



125.10 227.50 



$527.23 
821.90 
648.51 

2,149.17 

■ - 
4,498.23 
5,187.77 

12,791.23 



$12,469.44 $4,523.63 $1,228.50 $53,350.61 



Included in the incidentals was a bill of $986.85 paid for a 
steam boiler and pump, $1,062.33 paid for cement, and $821.04 
paid for hardware, tools, and supplies. 

The stock on hand is as follows : 



Brick in District No. 2 


. 8,000, valued at 


$59- 2 ° 


Brick in District No. 10 


• 53 = 976, " 


385-43 



136 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Pipe on hand . . . 4,793 ft. valued at $3>4 OI -9i 

Branches on hand . . 346 pieces, ." 1,064.04 

Total #4,910.58 

Most of the pipe on hand, which is worth about #3,000, is for 
the McGregorville sewer, which was only partly completed this 
year and which will be the first to start upon next season. 



Appropriation for 1891 
Drafts for 1 89 1 

Balance December 1, 1891 

Unpaid bills, about 
Unpaid brick bills 



$55,000.00 
53>35°-6i 

$1,649-39 



$300.00 
686.41 



$986.41 



Leaving a balance of about .... $662.98 
Respectfully submitted. 

John J. Holland, 
A. J. Dickev, 
A. D. Maxwell, 
George M. Clark, 
A. J. Peaslee, 
Committee o?i Sewers and Drams. 

PUBLIC PARKS. 

Owing to the pressure of office work and the immediate de- 
mand for a plan of Stark park, Mr. Joseph B. Sawyer, C. E., 
was employed to make the survey. The levels for cross-section- 
ing were taken by this office, and a contour map made, a tracing 
of which was forwarded to William Doogue, superintendent of 
public parks, Boston. A plan is to be prepared, under his direc- 
tion, showing the proposed walks and drives. 

A reduced copy of the Derryfield park map was made in India 
ink for reproduction in the city reports. In this park the lines 
were given for the circular play-ground. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 137 

Mr. John Fullerton has had charge of the work on the public 
parks and squares, and under his direction the underbrush on 
both Stark and Derryfield parks has been removed. The various 
squares have been carefully looked after during the season. 

STREET LINES AND GRADES. 

Too much care cannot be exercised in establishing street lines 
and grades which, once established, should not be changed, ex- 
cept for the most urgent reasons, and then only as a last resort. 
Grades are established on a street as a whole, and while the 
grade of parts of a street may not appear to be correct by itself, 
when the entire street is completed the uniformity will be ap- 
parent. Provisions should be made for procuring plans and 
establishing grades on all projected streets so that orders for 
grades may receive immediate attention. The appearance of a 
street is not improved by compelling abutters to build hap- 
hazard without grade owing to the inability of this department 
through lack of time or data to attend to it. 

SUGGESTIONS. 

This department is in immediate need of a complete property 
map of the city drawn to a large scale. Such a map would re- 
quire being made up in sheets and for the present would in- 
clude about twenty parts, though to cover the entire city about 
ten additional parts would be needed. We have made a slight 
beginning in this direction. 

With the present force it is impossible to keep the office open 
more than a few hours each day during the outside working sea- 
son, as all are busy attending to the numerous demands for 
lines, grades, etc. Each year makes it more imperative that an 
assistant should remain at the office constantly for the purpose of 
issuing permits, showing plans, and looking up data for the 
various departments and for others who require them. 

There are various minor details that would materially assist 
the work of this department, but which must be dispensed with 
owing to the insufficiency of the appropriation, it being barely 
• large enough, with the utmost economy, to last the entire year. 



138 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



COMMITTEE WORK. 



At the first meetings held by the committees on streets and 
sewers and drains, the city engineer was elected clerk and in that 
capacity has attended each meeting, keeping a complete record 
of the proceedings which are on file in this office. In addition 
various other committee meetings have been attended as follows : 

City government, 5 ; Amoskeag cemetery, 2 ; Valley ceme- 
tery, 5 ; Pine Grove cemetery, 4 ; city farm, 3 ; finance, 1 ; 
lands and buildings, 9 ; claims, 4 ; commons, 3 ; parks, 1 ; 
Board of Aldermen, 9 ; streets, n ; sewers and drains, 21 : joint 
committee, streets, and sewers and drains, 2, — a total of 80. 

In addition to the work before enumerated, many questions 
have been answered from engineers, boards of trade, and others 
in various cities throughout this country and Canada. 

I would respectfully tender my acknowledgments to His 
Honor the Mayor and the various committees of the City Coun- 
cil, for the support which they have given. 

I wish also to acknowledge the courtesies shown by the various 
heads of departments, and the co-operation of the assistants of 
this department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT, 

City Engineer. 

January i, 1892. 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT SURVEYORS. 



Report of the work done in the various highway districts dur- 
ing the year 1891 : 



No report. 



District No. 1 . 

District No. 2. * 

William Sanborn, Superintendent. 

COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Street. 


Sq. 
yards. 


No. 
loads. 


Cost per 
load. 


Cost of 
stone. 


Cost of 
labor. 




67 
117 
140 
200 

50 
200 
667 
400 

72 


5 
14 
21 
24 

4 

9 
76 
43 

6 


$1.60 
1.60 
1.60 
1.60 
1 60 
1.60 
1.60 
1.60 
1.60 


$8.00 
22.40 
33.60 
38.40 
6.40 
14.40 

121.60 
68.80 
9.60 
16.00 

129.00 


$14.00 
20.25 
57.00 

78.75 


Concord and Hall 

Lake avenue, near Hall 

Lake avenue, east of Beacon 


Milton, Hanover to Manchester 


33.50 
12S. 13 

78.00 


Spruce, Elm to Chestnut 




























1,913 


202 




$468.20 


$430.63 







1 District No. 3 is now included in this district. 



140 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Total cost of the foregoing work, $898.83, an average cost of 
$0.47 per square yard. 

EDGE STONES SET 

Auburn, between Pine and Union . 

Blodget and Chestnut 

Blodget south back at Chestnut 

Central and Hall .... 

Central, between Elm and Chestnut 

Chestnut and Manchester 

Concord and Union 

Concord, between Ash and Maple . 

Elm and Depot .... 

Elm, near Granite .... 

Franklin and West Central 

Hanover and Belmont 

Lake avenue and Massabesic . 

Lake avenue, east of Lincoln . 

Lake avenue, at True J. Perry's block 

Laurel, at No. 100 . 

Laurel, east of Chestnut 

Linden and Bridge . 

Maple, between Concord and Lowell 

Maple and East High 

Merrimack 

Merrimack, near Union 

Orange and Linden 

Pine and Auburn . 

Prospect and Union 

Sagamore and Elm . 

Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm . 

Union, between Concord and Lowell 

Union and Lake avenue . 

Union and Auburn .... 

Union, between Laurel and Lake avenue 

Union and Amherst 

Totals 

Average cost per foot, $0,131. 



Feet. 


Cost. 


35 


$3-53 


20 


3-44 


24 


3-5° 


• 36 


3-5° 


282 


48.75 


120 


11.28 


292 


42.00 


• 257 


38.00 


28 


12.00 


IOO 


10.29 


64 


8.15 


21 


2.50 


53 


5.00 


75 


i3-5° 


246 


62.37 


2 5 


6.62 


37 


7-25 


89 


10.50 


206 


20.75 


8 


i-7S 


10 


3.00 


84 


6.87 


21 


i-75 


16 


3-5° 


21 


3.20 


3 2 


6-75 


26 


3-29 


IOO 


14.60 


142 


8-75 


194 


15.62 


460 


37.12 


• 254 


23-3° 


• 3.373 


$442.43 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



141 



EDGE STONES RESET. 



Canal, near passenger station . 

Central, west of Elm .... 

Central, near Pine 

Chestnut, between Hanover and Merrimack 
Depot, between Canal and Franklin 
Elm and Lake avenue .... 
Elm, north of Hanover .... 
Hanover, opposite postoffice . 
Hanover, and Hall .... 

Merrimack, between Elm and Franklin . 
Pearl, between Elm and Chestnut . 
Union, near St. Anne's church 



Totals .... 
Average cost per foot, $0,154. 



Feet. 


Cost. 


229 


$29.28 


75 


IO.80 


33 


4.OO 


222 


38.6 3 


250 


26.75 


262 


3S.OO 


5° 


9.00 


45 


8.00 


65 


9.OO 


i J 3 


30.60 


39 


7-25 


20 


4-5° 


1.403 


$215.81 



PAVING RELAID. 



Canal, at passenger station 
Canal, at freight station . 
Concord and Elm 
Concord and Maple . 
Depot, Franklin to Canal . 

Elm 

Granite .... 
Hanover .... 
Lake avenue, west of Cass 
Manchester 

Total . 
In this connection forty-six extra 



1,225 S Q- yds. 

30 

328 

130 

1,953 

2,850 

54 
1,500 

58 
1,200 



9>333sq. yds. 
oads of paving were used, 



costing $73.60 ; and 120 loads of paving sand, costing $12. 

The amount paid for labor of men and teams on the above 
work was $1,748.43, making the total cost $1,834.03, an average 
cost of $0.1965 per square yard. 



142 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



143 



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144 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





SUMMARY. 








Sq. yds. 


Loads of stone 


Total cost. 


Macadamizing . 


5>47i-3 2 


1,322 


$4,667.62 


Top-dressing 


l6,74I.OO 


1,263 


3,617.60 


General repairs . 


6,000.00 


57° 


1,875.71 


Picking and rolling 


2,000.00 




21.62 


Concreting 


9,382.03 




8,589.10 


Totals 


• 39.594-35 

STREETS GRADED. 




$18,771.65 



Adams Cut. 

Auburn 

Bay 

Beech and Gore.. 

Hall 

Maple* 

Milton 

Morrison 

Orange 

Pearl 

Sagamore 

Walnut Cut.. 

West Webster f.... " .. 
Young " 



Cut 
or rill, 



Fill.. 



Cut.. 
Both. 
Cut.. 
Both. 



Cubic 
yards. 



Loads 1 Labor 
moved. [ of men. 



4,333 

1,154 

542 

590 

350 

1,000 



1,388 1,450 



680 710 

10,555 10,700 

293 293 

2,056 2,150 

4,500 

1,200 

560 

750 

370 

1,400 



Totals 24,742 25,993 $2,828.03 $2,568.90 $56.89 $5,453.82 



Labor 
ofteams. 



8300.75 
30.00 
104.32 
42.48 
210.35 
280.75 
150.49 
161.20 
520.65 
240.80 
160.49 
197.25 
113.75 
314.75 



Inci- 
dentals, 



$190.00 
10.00 
47.00 
26.40 
88.00 

790.00 
64.00 
80.10 

280.00 

120.40 
90.00 
84.00 
87.00 

612.00 



$4.50 
1.00 
2.00 
1.20 
3.00 
8.10 
5.00 
3.50 
5.34 
4.00 
2.50 
4.50 
2.25 

10.00 



Total 
cost. 



$495. 
41. 



1,078, 
219. 
244. 
805. 
365. 
252. 
2S5. 



* 3,626 loads of material came from Fred T. Dunlap's lot, 1,400 loads from 
Young street, and 5,574 loads from other sources. 

f The material removed from this street was mostly loam, which was 
placed in the high school yard. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



145 



STREETS GRAVELED. 



Adams, Webster northerly . 
Amherst, East of Hall 
Amherst, from Ashland westerly 
Amherst, from Vine easterly 
Ash, north of Harrison 
Bay, from Sagamore northerly 
Beech, north of sash and blind shop 
Brook, from Elm easterly 
Brown avenue, Elm southerly 
Calef road, Elm southerly 
Chestnut, at North End 
Chestnut, from Central southerly 
Concord, from Chestnut easterly 
Hall, north of Amherst 
Hanover, from Beacon easterly 
Harrison, from Elm easterly . 
Jane, from Nashua southerly 
Laurel, from Beech easterly . 
Lincoln, north of Merrimack 
Lowell, east of Maple . 
Maple, from Myrtle northerly 
Maple, from Pearl northerly . 
Milton, from Hanover southerly 
Myrtle, from Oak westerly . 
Nashua, from Bridge northerly 
Nutt road, near fair grounds . 
Oak, from Maple southerly . 
Orange, from Chestnut easterly 
Pearl, from Ashland westerly 
Pine, south of Valley cemetery 
Prospect, from Maple easterly 
Sagamore, from Pine westerly 
Union, from Concord southerly 
Union, from Sagamore southerly 



650 feet. 

200 
300 
500 
300 

55° 

T,000 

700 
1.75° 
4,675 

500 

600 

3OO 

200 
2,200 • 

850 

400 

45° 

400 

700 

200 

300 

250 

260 

100 
4,000 

300 
1,200 

55° 

300 

200 

200 
1,200 
1,600 



146 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Valley, east of Elm 
Wilson, from Laurel northerly 
Wilson road, from Lowell northerly 
Young, from Beech easterly . 



300 


feet 


700 


" 


500 


Cf 


600 


a 



Total 291985 feet. 

Loads of gravel used on foregoing streets, 9,785. 
Loads of coal cinders used on foregoing streets, 492. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



147 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Ash, north of Harrison 

Ashland, north of Lowell 

Auburn, east of Pine 

Auburn, West of Maple 

Auburn, east of Chestnut 

Bay, north of Sagamore 

Bay, north of Sagamore 

Beech and Gore 

Central, west of Hall 

Concord, west of Hall 

East High, east of Nashua 

East High 

Elm, from North northerly. . . 

Gore and Walnut 

Hall, from Central northerly. 
Lake avenue, east of Beacon 
Lake avenue, east of Beacon 

Liberty, north of North 

Linden and Myrtle 

Lowell, west of Ashland 

Lowell, east of Ashland 

Milton, south of Hanover 

North, east of Liberty 

North, west of Elm 

Pine, north of Salmon 

Russell and Prospect 

Sagamore, east of Elm 

Webster, west of Elm 



Length Width 
in feet, in feet. 



urn 

450 
150 
75 
100 

100 

4011 
180 



550 
550 
150 
300 
100 
100 
440 
100 
150 
150 
280 
120 
410 



Feet 
cut. 



Totals 6,805 



1 
2.5 



Feet 
fill. 



10 
5 



3 

0.5 

1 
1 

3 

0.5 

1 



148 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS 



Grading for concrete and excavating cellar, on ac- 
count of lowering Perry block, Lake avenue and 
Massabesic ....... 

Labor of men and teams, sanding streets, January i 
to March 21 . 

Labor of men and teams, drawing sand and sanding 
streets to December 31 

E. Hartshorn, 394 loads of sand .... 

Frank S. Bodwell, stone ...... 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



24-inch 
24-inch 
24-inch 
20-inch 
20-inch 

20-inch 
18-inch 
18-inch 
1 5 -inch 
1 5 -inch 
12-inch 
1 2 -inch 
12-inch 
12-inch 
1 o-inch 
10-inch 
10-inch 
8-inch 



Portland pipe . 
Akron pipe 
iron pipe . 
Akron pipe 
Portland pipe . 
iron pipe . 
Akron pipe 
Akron pipe (relaid) 
Akron pipe 
Akron pipe (relaid) 
Akron pipe 
Akron pipe (relaid) 
Portland pipe 
iron pipe . 
Akron pipe 
Akron pipe (relaid) 
Portland pipe . 
Akron pipe 



$299.89 

2,025.92- 

220.13 
39-4o- 
59.00. 



785 feet 
270 

12 
975 
137 

17 
670 

147 

860 

269 
1,032 

637 

756 

12 

2,047 

409 

376 



Total ....... 10,544 feet. 

The foregoing sewers were constructed at a cost of $23,721.64. 



CESSPOOL CONNECTIONS. 



1 2-inch pipe . 
10 inch pipe . 

8-inch pipe . 

8-inch pipe (repairing) . 

Total . 



66 feet. 
310 " 

1,151 " 
50 " 

1,577 feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



149 



SEWERS REPAIRED. 



18-inch pipe . 
1 2-inch pipe . 
8-inch pipe . . 

Total . 

Total pipe laid 

Equal to 2.308 miles. 





18 feet. 




2 " 




48 « 




68 feet. 


2 


189 feet. 



NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Cost of 
material. 



Cost of 
labor. 



Appleton, corner of Ray 

Belmont, corner of Manchester 

Bridge, corner of Linden , 

Bridge, corner of Ash 

Cedar, corner of Chestnut 

Central, near Cass 

Depot, between Elm and Franklin 

Depot, corner of Canal 

Elm west back, between Depot and Granite 

Front, south of Black brook 

Gore, corner of Walnut 

Hall, at Amherst and Concord 

Harrison south back, between Union and Walnut 

Lake avenue, coiner of Hall 

Lake avenue, at engine-house 

Lake avenue, corner of Cass 

Lake avenue, corner of Weston 

Lake avenue south back, west of Chestnut 

Manchester, corner of Chestnut 

Manchester south back, between Pine and Union. 

Maple, corner of Cedar 

Nashua, between Concord and Bridge 

North, corner of Chestnut 

Nutt road, near Elm 

Orange, corner of Maple 

Pearl, corner of Russell 

Pine, corner of Cedar 

Spruce, near Chestnut 

Union, between Merrimack and Central 

Union, between Cedar and Lake avenue 

Union, corner of Auburn 

Union, between Concord and Lowell 

Totals 



$21.35 
71.00 
20.72 
21.29 
41.70 
10.81 
19.10 
25 90 
10.08 
41.53 
19.48 
75.43 
17 19 
30.01 
52 39 
72.90 
59.19 
21.09 

22 98 
10.04 
73.31 

130.35 
122.85 

23 90 
19.91 
17.21 
23.00 
17.39 
02.50 
59.74 
57.12 
19.00 



$12.(10 
40.00 
15.95 
13.37 
25.30 
18.75 
17.25 
14.35 
13.50 
40.00 
12.25 
38.37 
10.50 
33.00 
42.87 
40.05 
45 45 
10.50 
10.00 
10.25 
01.00 
80.10 

189.49 
7.88 
18.37 
19.00 
15.87 
9.50 
53.12 
39.25 
38.88 
15.95 



$1,322.49 



150 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CESSPOOLS REPAIRED. 



Adams 

Amherst, corner of Dutton 

Amherst, corner of Hall 

Auburn, corner of Franklin 

Cedar, corner of Union 

Cedar, corner of Maple 

Cedar, corner of Chestnut 

Central, corner of Union 

Chestnut, near Pennacook 

Chestnut, corner of Merrimack 

Chestnut, corner of Amherst 

Church, corner of Washington 

Concord, corner of Elm 

Concord, corner of Vine 

Concord, near Maple 

Concord, corner of Hall 

Concord, corner of Belmont 

Depot, corner of Canal 

Granite south hack 

Hall, corner of Central 

Hanover square 

Harrison, corner of Union 

High, corner of Union 

Lake avenue, corner of Union 

Lake avenue, corner of Pine 

Lake avenue south hack, near Union. 
Lincoln west back, near Merrimack . . 

Lowell 

Lowell, corner of Ashland 

Manchester, corner of Chestnut 

Pearl, corner of Elm 

Pine, corner of Lake avenue 

Pine, north of Brook 

Russell 

Spruce, corner of Union 

Spruce 

Spruce south hack and Elm east back , 
Union, between Laurel and Central.. ., 

Union, corner of Spruce , 

Union and Amherst , 



Cost of 
material. 



Cost of 
labor. 



Totals 56 



.74 
2.80 
4.45 
3.20 
7.86 
2.00 
3.50 
4.80 
2.80 
2.80 
1.00 
5.00 
5.00 
1.00 
3.00 
20.27 
5.03 
6.35 
3.14 
1.50 
2.00 
5.15 
4.00 
9.11 
1.60 
5.85 
5.85 
4.50 
6.00 
2.79 
9.31 
2 22 
5 20 
6.00 
100 
7.44 

.50 
3.00 



$178.36 



$3.6S 

2.'0o 
3.68 

12.50 
7.30 
5.50 
3.5a 
4.00- 
5.18 
3.68 
3.68 
2.50 
6.75 
7.50 
1.75 
3.75 

22.50 

12.75 
5.00 
4 00 
2.75 
3.00 

10.25 
4.50 
4.50 
5.20 
5.50 
6.10 
6.00 
8.50 
3.67 

10.00 
2. 00 

10.25 
5.50 
1.50 

12.50 
1.00 
2.75 



$230.3 



CENTER CESSPOOLS. 



Street. 


No. 


Cost of 
material. 


Cost of 
labor. 




1 


$57.72 
57.40 
34.01 


$25.50 

20.00 






8.00 






Totals 


5 


$149.13 


$53.50 







REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



151 



REPAIRING SEWERS. 



Street. 



Cost of 
material. 



Cost of 
labor. 



Beech east back 

Canal, near Depot 

Chestnut and Blodget 

Elm east back 

Lincoln and Amherst 

Lowell at Birch 

Totals 

•Manholes built, 36; lampholes, 8. 

PIPE CULVERTS 



$2.43 
6.30 
3.64 
1.21 



$31. 



$3.75 
13.75 

5.50 

5.74 

2.63 

107.65 

$139.02 



Street. 


Size in 
inches. 


Length 
in feet. 


Cost of 
material. 


Cost of 
labor. 




8 
8 
8 

10 
8 
8 

10 


16 
54 
46 
18 
138 
12 
12 


$3.24 
10.91 
9.29 
6.43 
30.25 
2 43 
4.29 


$5.00 




6.00 




4.00 








11.00 




3.50 














296 


$06.84 


$29.50 









MAIN SEWER OUTLET. 



Paid Head & Dowst Co. for stone 
for labor of men 
for labor of teams . 



$50.00 

275.12 

70.00 



'395- 12 



152 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PIPE ON HAND AT CITY YARD. 



24-inch . . . . . 

20-illch ..... 

1 8-inch ..... 
15-inch ..... 
12-inch ..... 
12-inch, old .... 
10-inch .... 

8-inch 

Total pipe on hand 
43 Y branches, 8 on 24 inches. 
26 Y branches, 8 on 20 inches. 

4 Y branches, 8 on 18 inches. 
24 Y branches, 8 on 15 inches. 
82 Y branches, 8 on 12 inches. 
74 Y branches, 8 on 10 inches. 
21 Y branches, 6 on 10 inches. 
23 Y branches, 8 on 8 inches. 

6 15-inch quarter turns. 

10 12-inch quarter turns. 
6 10-inch quarter turns. 

5 8-inch quarter turns. 
1 6-inch quarter turn. 

11 1-8 bends, 15 -inch. 
5 1-8 bends, 10-inch. 

14 24-inch rings. 
93 12-inch rings. 
8 M brick. 



398 feet 

186 

5° 

7 2 

622 

300 

1,654 

120 

3,402 feet. 



STONE CROSSINGS. 



Canal and Central 
Elm and Merrimack, 2 
Lake avenue and Pine 
Pine and Auburn . 
Pine and Cedar . 

Totals 



Feet. 


Cost. 


34 


55.00 


200 


26.OO 


21 


4.OO 


34 


5.00' 


3° 


3-24 



319 



$43- 2 4 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 153 



CONCRETE. 



(See table.) 



District No. 4. 
Cassius C. Webster, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked 40 rods. 

Graded and graveled 500 rods, using 350 loads of gravel. 

Repaired the road on Derry hill, and also the road near Cohas 
brook bridge. 

Repaired this bridge by putting in new floor, stringers, and 
rails. 

Replanked the bridge south of James Cheney's. 

Made general repairs on about one and one half miles of the 
River road and on other roads in district as needed. 



District No. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey, Surveyor. 

Graveled ........ 5,450 feet. 

Turnpiked 535 " 

Graded, by cut, on Dickey hill south road, 222 cubic yards, 
and on Weston road, by cut, 115 cubic yards. 

The "Harvey mill " bridge across Cohas brook has been re- 
paired by placing new floor timbers under the east section, new 
plank upon the west section, and a new railing. 

The other bridges in the district are in fair condition. 

Sixty-two feet of 12-inch pipe have been laid as a side culvert in 
front of Libby Bros.' house on Nutt road, and filled over the 
same. 

Bushes have been cut on one half-mile of road. 

Have removed stones from road once a month and made gen- 
eral repairs where needed. 

Amount of appropriation, $600. Balance, $3.39. 



154 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

District No. 6. 

Greenleaf C. Colman, Surveyor. 

Turnpiked ........ 114 rods. 

Graveled 160 " 

Built two culverts, one 12" X 12" X 24', and 15" X 12" 
by 15'. 

Removed stones from roadbed, cut bushes throughout district, 
and made other necessary repairs. 

Amount of appropriation, $500. Balance, $1.62. 



District No. 7. 

Charles Francis, Surveyor, 
macadamizing. 

Massabesic street, 800 feet long, 22 feet wide, 1,955.5 square 
yards. Total cost, $1,379.15. Cost per yard, $0,705. 



Massabesic street . . . 540 ft., 3 ft. wide. 
Massabesic street, relaid . . 252 " 3 " " $93-oo 

Jewett street .... 600 " 3 " " 75. 00 



Total .- 1 >39 2 ft- $168.00 

STONE WORK. 

East Spruce street. Culvert 77 feet long, 4 feet wide, and 5 
feet high, covered with one foot split stone. 

Retaining wall, 100 feet long, 5.5 feet high. 

Total cost for men, teams, and grading, and including such 
material as was purchased, $350. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



155 



CESSPOOLS. 



Massabesic and Taylor .... 
East Spruce near Beacon 

Massabesic at Spruce, in track, built by District No. 2 



Material. Labor. 
$25.40 $46.00 
4.62 4.00 



GRADE FOR CONCRETE. 

Cypress street 
Jewett street 
Massabesic street 
Valley street 

Total 
Equaling 975 yards and costing $50. 





200 


feet 




600 


" 




100 


u 




200 


" 


I 


,100 


feet 



GRAVELING. 



Belmont street 
Candia road . 
Jewett street . 
Mammoth road 



2-0 rods. 

45 " 
30 " 
20 « 



Young street . . . . . . . . 45 " 

Total . . . . . . . .160 rods. 



GRADING. 

Cypress street, cut 1.5 feet . 

Jewett street, slight fill 

Made general repairs throughout the district w 
needed. 



300 feet. 
300 " 

here most 



District No. 8. 
H. M. Clough, Surveyor. 

Graveled 480 rods. 

Turnpiked and graveled . . . . . 40 " 

Graded by cut 10,560 cu. ft. 



156 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Built one new culvert. Made other repairs in various places 
to the extent of the appropriation. An increase is needed in 
this district to carry out the improvements that are urgently 
demanded. 



District No. 9. 
Alphonso N. Bovce, Surveyor. 



No report. 



District No. 10. 
Charles O. Phelps, Superintendent. 



COBBLE PAVING. 

Bowman street .... 

Granite street (relaid) 

Main street (relaid) .... 

Main street, north of Monmouth 

Mast street, near John Smith's 

West Hancock street, Main easterly . 



Totals 



Feet. 


Sq. 


Yards. 


5° 




17 
IOO 

400 


225 




88 


35° 




218 


1,400 




544 



2,025 I >3 6 7 



COBBLE EDGING. 

West Hancock street, Main easterly 

EDGE STONES. 

Douglas and Barr streets 
Dubuque and Amory streets . 
Second and West Hancock streets . 



1,400 



feet. 



60 feet. 
50 " 
iS " 



Total 



128 feet. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



157 



STREETS GRAVELED. 



Amory street, Main to Dubuque 
Beauport street, Putnam to Kelley 
Bridge street, McGregor easterly 
Conant street, West easterly . 
Dubuque street, Amory to Wayne 
Main street, Milford to Mast . 
Mast street .... 
McGregor street . 
Milford street, Main westerly 
Putnam street, Main to Cartier 
Shirley Hill road . 
West Hancock street, Main easterly 
Gravel used in patching 

Totals 



STREETS GRADED. 

Amory street, Beauport to Dubuque 
Beauport street, south of Sullivan . 
Beauport street, Amory to Kelley 
Blaine street, east of Third 
Cartier street, Sullivan southerly 
Cleveland street, Second westerly . 
Dartmouth street ..... 
Dubuque street, Amory to Wayne . 
Kelley street, Manchester & North Weare Rail 

road easterly .... 
Main west back street, Amory to Wayne 
Rimmon street, Kelley to Amory 
Second street, at Manchester & North Weare 

Railroad ..... 
Second street, south of Manchester & North 

Weare Railroad .... 
Second street, River southerly 



Feet. Cu. Yards. 


8 5 


I >°73 


T >75° 


1,296 


35° 


147 


230 


75 


500 


37° 


55° 


254 


700 


432 


1,200 


576 


1,450 


805 


55o 


339 


500 


5° 


1,400 


881 




500 


10,030 


6,798 


Feet. C 


1. Yards. 


35° 


3 8S 


200 


60 


700 


3> 2 4o 


400 


A4 8 


I96 


S70 


300 


162 


500 


-'77 


500 
1- 


555 


1,000 


1,100 


500 


741 


650 


2,404 



63 2,204 



250 
55° 



277 
,038 



158 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Third street, Blaine to river bank . 
West Hancock street, Main easterly 

Totals . 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Amory street, west of Main 
Amory street, west of Beauport 
Blaine street, west of Third 
Cartier street, south of Amory . 
Fourth street, corner of Ferry . 
Frederick street, east of Second 
Granite street, west of Green . 
Main street, south of Milford . 
Second street, Frederick northerly 
Varney school yard . 
Wayne street, west of Main 
West Hancock street, both sides 



Totals 5,540 2,858 

Loam used at the North Main street school yard, 218 loads. 



Feet. 


Cu. yards. 


300 


463 


1,650 


4,155 


8,109 


18,382 


Feet. Cu. Yards. 


200 


75 


170 


20 


200 


65 


43° 


70 


90 


46 


100 


59 


100 


3° 


150 


2 5 


600 


355 




40 


200 


118 


3,3°° 


i,955 



WOODEN RAILING. 

Douglas street, at Manchester & North Weare R. R. 
Granite street, at Manchester & North Weare R. R. 
New Mast road ....... 

Second street, at river bank . 

Total 



70 feet. 
50 " 

189 " 

50 « 

359 feet - 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



26 X 39 inches brick (relaid) 
22 X 33 inches brick . 
24-inch Akron pipe 
24-inch Portland pipe ■ 
24-inch Portland pipe (relaid) 



514 feet. 

8 « 

168 " 

516 « 

62 " 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



159 



20-inch 
20-inch 
15-inch 
1 5 -inch 
12-inch 
12-inch 
10-inch 
10-inch 
10-inch 
8-inch 



Akron pipe 
Portland pipe . 
Akron pipe 
Akron pipe (relaid) 
Akron pipe 
Akron pipe (relaid) 
Akron pipe 
Akron pipe (relaid) 
Portland pipe . 
Akron pipe 



135 feet. 

198 " 

202 " 

706 " 

692 " 

230 " 

2,263 " 

425 " 

131 '< 

26 " 



Total 6,276 feet. 

The foregoing sewers were constructed at a cost of $18,561.36. 



CESSPOOLS AND CONNECTIONS. 

20-inch pipe 10 feet. 

10-inch pipe 30 " 

8-inch pipe 933 " 

Total 973 feet. 

Total pipe laid, 7,249 feet, equal to 1.37 miles. 



NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Barr, corner of Granite 
Dover, corner of Douglas . 
Douglas, Barr to Railroad 
Ferry, at Third and Fourth 
Fourth, Ferry northerly 
James Baldwin Co.'s land 
Mast, Riddle westerly 
Milford, Tilton to Carroll 
Main and McGregor west back 
Main and West Hancock . 
Parker near Winter . 
Williams near Milford 

Totals . 



No. 


Cost. 


I 


$27.50 


I 


20.00 


6 


WS© 


4 


1 10.00 


3 


82.50 


3 


60.00 


5 


165.00 


9 


2 47-.S° 


1 


40.13 


1 


25-5 6 


1 


27.50 


2 


55-oo 



37 $1,018.19 



160 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CESSPOOLS REPAIRED. 



Bowman, corner of Milford 
Green, corner of Douglas . 
Main at M. & N. W. R. R. 
Main at M. & N. W. R. R. 
Main, corner of Mast 
Main, south of Milford 
Second, corner of Walker 



Totals . 
Manholes built, 21 ; lampholes, 13 

ON HAND AT YARD 



Jo. 


Cost. 


2 


$5.00 


2 


I I. OO 


I 


5.OO 


I 


!9-55 


I 


3.00 


2 


7.00 


I 


20.00 



24-inch pipe 

15-inch pipe 

8-inch pipe 



$7°-55 



930 feet. 

399 " 
138 « 



Total 1,467 feet. 

44 Y branches, 8 on 24 inches. 

1 Y branch, 10 on 15 inches. 

2 Y branches, 6 on 16 inches. 
53,976 bricks. 

20 M lumber. 



District No. 1 1. 

Frank D. Hanscom, Surveyor. 



Graveled .... 
Turnpiked with road-machine 
Rail fence built . 



320 rods. 
1,280 " 
40 " 



FRONT STREET. 



Cobble edging 
Gutters paved . 
Sidewalks built 



1,950 feet. 
650 so. yds. 
975 feet - 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 161 

Graveled . . . . . . .1,100 feet. 

Earth moved ....... 2,900 loads. 

Set fence back on east side from Hiram Stearns's to Black 
brook, and cut west side to conform to line established by city 
government. 

A 10-inch Akron pipe sewer 353 feet in length has been laid 
in this street. Connected with it are 2 cesspools. The work 
was done by employes of district No. 2 at a cost of $532.15. 

Built two plank culverts, each 20' X 12" X 15"- Cleaned 
gutters, removed stones from road, filled mudholes, and made 
general repairs. 

District No. 12. 
Leroy M. Streeter, Surveyor. 
No report. 



District No. 13. 

Eben Carr, Surveyor. 

Have used road-machine to good advantage on about 4,300 
feet of roadway. 

Built one 10-inch Akron pipe culvert 105 feet in length. 

Took up, cleaned, and relaid three culverts, total length 54 
feet. 

Fifteen rods of roadway have been underdrained by building a 
blind ditch through the center, the roadbed being graded after- 
wards. 

At Mr. Boynton's built blind drain 100 feet long and grader] 
the driveway. 

Paid for stone chips, 50 loads ..... $8.55 

for gravel, n loads ...... 1.10 

for tools ........ 6.02 

Amount of appropriation 200.00 

Balance ......... 17.00 

n 




||l!III!IIIIIIIIIII!!IIIIIIIiII!!H 
25. CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 



iliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiili 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineer's Office, Vine Street, 
Manchester, N. H., Dec. 31, 1891. 
To his Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

In compliance with the laws and ordinances of the city, I 
herewith submit my thirteenth annual report (it being the forty- 
sixth of this department) giving a complete record of the opera- 
tions of the department for the year ending December 31, 1891, 
with a detailed statement of the fires and alarms that have been 
responded to by a portion or all of the force, together with the 
cause of such fires as far as the same have been ascertained, with 
the amount of insurance carried upon the property endangered, 
the amount of loss, and amount of insurance paid thereon. 

The report will also contain a complete list of the working 
force of the department, giving their rank, occupation, residence, 
etc., a list of the fire-alarm stations and locations of keys to the 
same, location of hydrants, etc. 

During the past year the department has responded to thirty- 
five " bell alarms " and thirty-six "stills," making in all seventy- 
one, an increase of six stills over the year 1890, while the bell 
alarms are the same number. 

The total amount of insurance upon the property thus endan- 
gered by fire, as will be seen by the following pages under the 



166 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

head of "Fires and Alarms," was $358,420.00; damage result- 
ing therefrom, $59,542.63 ; amount of insurance paid, $43,227.- 
63 ; leaving $16,315 as the net loss over and above insurance. 

THE FORCE 

remains the same as last year, and consists of one hundred and 
twenty-four men, eighteen of whom are permanent, and one hun- 
dred and eight call men, divided as follows : 

1 chief engineer. 

4 assistant engineers. 

5 steamer companies of 14 men each. 

2 horse hose companies, — 12 men each. 
1 hook-and-ladder company, — 20 men. 

1 chemical engine company, — 5 men. 

In addition to the above there is a volunteer hand-hose com- 
pany in Amoskeag village of twelve men. 

THE BUILDINGS 

are generally in fair condition, and aside from "touching up '* 
some of them with paint inside, and repairing the roof of Central 
Station, the outlay probably will not be very large upon the 
present structures. 

THE APPARATUS. 

as at present located consists of — 

2 steam fire-engines at Central station, with horse hose wagons. 
1 steam fire-engine with two-horse hose wagon and hook-and- 
ladder combination, North Main street. 

1 steam fire-engine and hose carriage, at corner of Lake ave- 
nue and Massabesic street. 

1 steam fire-engine and two-horse hose carriage and hook-and- 
ladder combination, at corner of Webster and Chestnut streets. 

1 horse hose carriage at Central station. 

1 horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

1 horse hose carriage (spare), at Lake avenue station. 

1 hook-and-ladder truck at Central station. 

1 hook-and-ladder truck (old), at Lake avenue station. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 167 

i double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Central 
station. 

1 supply wagon at Central fire station. 

1 steam fire-engine (reserve) at old engine-house, Clinton 
street, of but little use for fire purposes. 

1 hand hose carriage at junction of Old Falls road and Front 
street, Amoskeag. 

1 two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's Falls. 

1 exercise wagon (with pole and shafts) at Central station. 

In May last, steamer No. 1 was supplied with a new set of 
tubes, its running work received a general overhauling and re- 
pairing and was repainted, at a cost of $663.22, by the Manches- 
ter Locomotive Works. These repairs, with those upon steamer 
No. 4 the previous year, place all our steamers in first-class 
shape. 

THE HORSES. 

On the 14th of April, one of the bay horses of Pennacook 
Hose No. 1 that had been afflicted for a year or more with rheu- 
matism, was sold, and another purchased to replace him. 

On the 1 8th of June a pair of gray horses was purchased for 
the Hook-and-Ladder Company, and after trial one, not being 
adapted for fire service, was transferred to District No. 2 of the 
street department, and was replaced by another that thus far has 
proved well. 

The pair previously used by this company, while the property 
of the fire department, are now used by District No. 2, and I 
would recommend that they, with the one used by District No. 
10, on the West Side, be either sold or transferred, inasmuch as 
this department gets no credit for the work performed by them, 
though it bears the entire expense of the keeping of the one on 
the West Side. 

The horses of Steamer No. 4 are getting pretty well along in 
years, and a change for a younger and heavier pair would be de- 
sirable in the near future. 

The gray horses of the combination hose carriage of steamer 
No. 5, over which there has been so much uncalled for, senseless 



.168 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

controversy by outside " interested (?) parties," have shown a 
decided improvement since the discharge of M. W. Ford, Jr., as 
driver, which occurred October 29, and now compare favorably 
with any in the department. 

There are now twenty-eight horses owned by the department, 
including the three mentioned as doing duty in Districts Nos. 2 
and 10. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

This important branch of the service has been called into 
requisition thirty-five times during the year, and satisfactory re- 
sults have attended its working. 

The severe snowstorm of April 3 caused serious damage to the 
system, breaking every circuit with one exception, and most of 
them in from one to twenty-five places. With the assistance of 
additional linemen, the main lines were all in operation before 
night. 

Several times during the year we have been called upon to 
remove wires and open circuits to accommodate the removal of 
buildings. I have several times remonstrated against this prac- 
tice, and am of the firm opinion if it is allowed to continue, 
serious losses may occur. 

The two boxes ordered at the time of my last report have been 
put into service and located as follows: No. 321 at corner of 
Beauport and Main streets, and No. 513 at corner of Milford and 
Carroll streets. 

There are now about thirty-one (31) miles of main lines wire 
and thirty (30) miles of "tapper" lines, that require the ser- 
vices of four hundred and one (401) jars of gravity battery. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The question of the legality of the appropriation for this pa- 
rade was settled by the legislature at its January session of this 
year by the passage of the following act : 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 169 

" Chapter 151, Pamphlet Laws, 1891. 

<l Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
Ceneral Court convened : 

"Section i. The city council of the city of Manchester is 
hereby authorized and empowered to appropriate annually to pay 
the expense of the firemen's parade, when ordered out by the 
chief engineer, a sum not to exceed five hundred dollars ($500). 

" Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

"Approved February 18, 1891." 

The twelfth annual parade occurred on Thursday, October 15, 
and was observed by a street parade, which was participated in 
by Hook-and-Ladder Co. of Nashua, together with delegations 
of firemen from Portsmouth, Concord, and other places. 

THE FIREMEN'S RELIEF ASSOCIATION 

organized in 1873, nas contributed to the relief of such of its 
members as have had the misfortune to receive injuries " while 
going to, working at, or returning from a fire." 

The income for the past few years has been by donations from 
generous citizens, as will be seen by the following list, for which, 
in behalf of the association, I would return grateful thanks. 

The condition of its treasury at the annual meeting, February 
10, 1 89 1, was 

Cash on hand $2,718.83 

Interest on deposits 119.29 

Cash for membership .... 6.00 
From George N. Burpee (balance from as- 
sessments for entertaining visitors) . 1.64 
First Free Baptist Society .... 6.50 
A. P. Olzendam & Sons .... 25.00 
Peoples Insurance Co. .... 25.00 

Board of Trade 25.00 

Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley .... 10.00 

Hon. P. C. Cheney ..... 10.00 

Hon. Moody Currier . . 10.00 



170 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Maj. Lewis Simons $10.00 



Frank W. Fitts 


10.00 


Cash 


10.00 


Chandler Brothers (George B. and Henry) 


10.00 


Hon. J. F. James 


5.00 


Hon. D. B. Varney 


5.00 








• $3> 00 7- 2t> 


CONTRA. 




Paid E. E. Hubbell 


$87.00 


H. A. Boone ..... 


6.00 


J. E. Merrill, secretary 


25.00 


postals and printing .... 


2.25 




$120.25 


Balance in treasury .... 


. $2,887.01 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I desire to repeat my recommendations for the past few years 
for additional ladder service, and the outlook for an aerial truck 
seems favorable. I trust one fully equipped will be procured at 
an early date, that the one now in use may be put into service in 
some other section of the city. 

I would recommend that the engine-house to be built the 
coming year in the new ward nine be planned so as to accommo- 
date, in the future, in this fast-growing part of the city, a 
steamer, hose wagon, and light hook-and-ladder truck. To meet 
the immediate wants, I think a combination chemical and hose 
wagon would be the most desirable piece of apparatus for the 
present use. 

I would recommend the placing of the spare hose carriage, 
with proper equipments, in the southerly thickly settled portion 
of Bakersville, and hope some steps may be taken to secure a lot 
and erect a proper building thereon for that purpose. I would 
again recommend permanent engineers for steamers 1 and 4 at 
central station. 

To comply with the foregoing recommendations necessarily 
requires a considerable outlay of money, but our citizens should 



KEPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 171 

bear in mind that as our city is rapidly growing and extending 
its limits, its fire department must also be enlarged to meet the 
exigencies of the occasion. 

PERSONAL. 

In compliance with a resolution passed by your Councils, I at- 
tended the National Association of Fire Engineers, at Spring- 
field, Mass., August 11-14. The convention was largely at- 
tended by chief engineers, fire underwriters, electrical experts, 
and manufacturers of fire and life-saving apparatus. 

Exhibitions and tests were given of the different appliances, 
and interesting and valuable papers presented and discussed by 
the leading firemen of the country. Altogether it was a very 
interesting and instructive convention. 

I desire to return to the City Councils my thanks for this and 
other courtesies received, to his Honor Mayor Knowlton, to the 
committee on fire department, who have striven hard for the 
efficiency of the department, to City Marshal Longa and his 
police force for their aid rendered at fires and parade, to my 
associate engineers and officers and members of the several com- 
panies, who are entitled to the highest praise for their fidelity 
and the prompt manner with which they have responded to all 
calls upon them for duty. 

The thanks of the members of the department are again ten- 
dered to Mr. Charles Williams for his continued supply of coffee 
at fires. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer' Eire Department. 



List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 
1891, with Losses and Insurance. 

Box 62. Saturday, January 17, 9.24 a. m. Cottage house on 
River road south, in Bakersville, owned by Edwin Kennedy 
and occupied by John W. Law. The fire originated in partition 



172 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

near the roof from defective chimney, and was confined wholly 
to the roof. Insured for $350. Damage, $40. Insurance paid, 
$40. 

Box 56. Monday, January 19, 6.15 p.m. Two-story brick 
dryhouse, situated on Mast road, owned and occupied by the 
James Baldwin Company. Fire supposed to have caught from a 
match carelessly dropped by one of the workmen. Damage to 
building, $50; to stock, $250. No insurance. 

Box 4. Monday, February 2, 5.49 p.m. Two-and-a-half 
story wooden tenement house, No. 45 Central street, owned by 
E. W. Dunbar and occupied by Leander Lavine and others. 
The fire originated in a bed from some unknown cause. Build- 
ing insured for $2,000. Damage to building, $13.45. Damage 
to contents, $10. No insurance. 

Box 45. Monday, February 9, 8.39 p. m. Three-story brick 
building, corner of Canal and Auburn streets, owned and occu- 
pied by the S. C. Forsaith Machine Company as a machine-shop. 
The fire originated under the work bench of the pattern-maker, 
supposed from a hot bearing. The heat started the automatic 
sprinklers, and the damage by fire was so slight that no insurance 
was claimed. Building insured for $20,000. 

Still. Wednesday, February n, 11.54 a, m. Ash box on 
east wall of Music Hall block. Extinguished with " pony " 
without damage. 

Box 8. Thursday, February 12, n. 11 a. m. Four-story 
brick block, corner of Myrtle and Elm streets, owned by Hoyt 
& James and occupied for stores and tenements. The cause of 
the alarm was clothes on line too near the stove in room No. 35, 
occupied by Mrs. Nelson White. The fire was extinguished 
without damage before the arrival of the department. 

Still. Saturday, February 14, 4.43 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 190 Chestnut street. Used " pony." No damage. 

Still. Saturday, February 14, 5.56. Burning chimney at 
No. 69 Amherst street. Used "pony." No damage. 

Still. Sunday, February 15, 5.05 p. m. The cottage house, 
No. 79 Laurel street, owned by Edward McDonald. The fire 
originated from an overheated chimney, igniting the woodwork. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 173 

Building insured for $1,500. Damage to building, $23.50. In- 
surance paid, $23.50. Damage to contents, $100. No insurance. 

Box 4. Wednesday, February 18, 7.53 p. m. Four-story 
brick block, corner of West Cedar and Franklin streets, owned 
and occupied by the Manchester Provision Company. The fire 
originated in the smokehouse, on the fourth floor, doing but little 
damage. Building insured for $39,000; contents for $52,000. 
Damage to building, $25.40. Insurance paid, $25.40. No 
damage to contents. 

Box 45. Monday, February 23, 8.40 p. m. Three-story 
brick building, corner of Canal and Auburn streets, owned and 
occupied by the S. C. Forsaith Machine Company as a machine- 
shop. The fire originated in the flue, or shaft for blowing shav- 
ings from planing mill to boiler-room, from some unknown 
cause. Building insured for $20,000. Damage, $204.31. In- 
surance paid, $204.31. 

Box 23. Thursday, February 26, 8.48 p. m. Two-and-a-half- 
story tenement block, No. 411 Beech street, owned by Charles 
D. Welch and occupied by John Woods and others. The fire 
originated among some clothes in a closet in the attic from some 
unknown cause, and burned through into the partition. Build- 
ing insured for $6,000. Damage to building, $130. Insurance 
paid, $130. Damage to contents, $20. Uninsured. 

Still. Saturday, February 28, 6.25 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 107 Cedar street, in house owned by Joseph Hamilton. 
Chemical called. Used "pony." No damage. 

Still. Sunday, March 1, 10.03 p - M - The chemical was 
called to a needless alarm for a smoky chimney on Manchester 
street, opposite the Battery building. No fire. 

Still. Tuesday, March 3, 10 a. m. Burning chimney at No. 
112 Myrtle street, in dwelling owned and occupied by Mrs. Ade- 
line Hartshorn. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, March 3, 7.15 p. m. Three-story tenement 
block, corner of Mast and South Main streets, owned by I. R. 
Dewey. The fire originated in a shoeshop in the basement, by 
carelessness of the occupant. Fire King Company responded. 
Damage slight. 



174 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 4. Tuesday, March 3, 10.19 p. m. Three-story tenement 
block at No. 236 Chestnut street, owned by Dr. Thomas Wheat 
and occupied by Patrick Casey and others. The fire originated 
in a closet in Casey's tenement from some unexplained cause, 
doing but slight damage. Extinguished by chemical engine. 
Building insured for $3,000. Damage, $10. Insurance paid, 
$10. Contents damaged, $5. Uninsured. 

Still. Tuesday, March 10, 9.55 a. m. Cottage house at No. 
559 Granite street, owned by Horatio Fradd, and occupied by 
Robert D. W. McKay. The fire originated from sparks from 
chimney, igniting the shingles. Fire King Company No. 2 
responded with hose wagon. Building insured for $1,000. 
Damage, $22. Insurance paid, $22. No damage to contents. 

Still. Sunday, March 15, 9.40 a. m. Two-story tenement 
block, No. 7 Clark's avenue, Pearl street, owned by heirs of 
Joseph B. Clark. Burning chimney. Used "pony." No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, March 17, 9 A. m. Burning chimney in 
Kcehler & Sons' bakery, corner of South Main and School 
streets. Fire King Company No. 2 responded. Used "pony." 
No damage. . 

Still. Tuesday, March 17, 6.48 p. m. Burning chimney at 
No. 69 Bridge street. Chemical responded with "pony." No 
damage. 

Still. Tuesday, March 17, 9.20 p. m. Four-story brick 
block, No. 790 Elm street, owned by Brown & Straw and oc- 
cupied by Frank L. Downs and others. The fire originated in 
the shoe store of Mr. Downs from an overheated chimney. 
The damage was mostly from smoke. No damage to building. 
Stock and fixtures insured for $3,000. Damage, $70. Insurance 
paid, $70. Chemical engine responded. 

Still. Friday, April 3, 7.45 a. m. Burning chimney in 
Wyman's block, Douglas street. Responded to by Fire King 
Company No. 2. No damage. 

Box 212. Tuesday, April 14, 10.52 a. m. Farm buildings 
on the Weston road, about three miles from Central station, 
owned by Daniel Connor and occupied by Dennis Sullivan. 
The fire originated in the barn, from a boy playing with 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 175 

matches. The building and contents insured for $3,000. Dam- 
age, $3,500. Insurance paid, $2,450. 

Box 27. Tuesday, April 14, 3.03 p. m. Burning grass in 
orchard of Holmes R. Pettee, 448 Amherst street. No damage. 

Box 21. Saturday, April 25, 10.27 a. m. Wooden "ten- 
footers," corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets, owned by 
Mrs. Abbie M. Head and occupied by E. S. Newton as fish mar- 
ket, John Delorne as fancy goods and confectionery, and Hatch 
& Titus as steam laundry. The fire originated from the smoke 
stack of the laundry. Building insured for $2,700. Damage, 
$300. Insurance paid, $300. E. S. Newton's stock and fixtures 
insured for $1,070. Damage, $50. Insurance paid, $50. John 
Delorne's stock and fixtures insured for $200. Damage, $15. 
Insurance paid, $15.00. Hatch & Titus's stock and fixtures in- 
sured for $1,000. Damage, $150. Insurance paid, $100. 

Still. Sunday, April 26, 3 p. m. Burning chimney, corner 
of West and Granite streets. Fire King Company No. 2 
responded. No damage. 

Still. Monday, April 27, 4.20 p. m. Brush fire on McGregor 
hill. Fire King Company No. 2 responded with hose wagon. 
No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, April 28, 11.03. Brush fire on McGregor 
hill. Fire King No. 2 responded with hose wagon. 

Box 8. Tuesday, April 28, 12.37 p. m. Two-story wooden 
tenement block, No. 1,299 Elm street, occupied by John Wil- 
liamson and others. Sparks from the chimney ignited the 
shingles, doing but slight damage. Extinguished by chemical 
engine. 

Box 71. Tuesday, April 28, 3.08 p. m. Two-and-a-half- 
story dwelling-house and store at No. 135 East Spruce street, 
owned by Michael Tagney and occupied by Dennis V. O'Leary. 
The fire originated under the kerosene oil room in rear of store, 
probably by children playing with matches. Building insured 
for $2,000. Damage, $30. Insurance paid, $30. No damage 
to contents. 

Box 313. Monday, May 4, 3.46 p. m. Four-story brick 
picker-house on Bridge street at McGregor bridge, owned and 



176 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

occupied by Stark Mills. Fire originated from some foreign 
substance in cotton, and struck from beater in picker. Insured 
in Manufacturers' Mutual Insurance Company, for t: blanket " pol- 
icy. Damage, $2,000. Insurance paid, $2,000. 

Box 41. Monday, May 4, 5.25 p. m. Two-story house at 
No. 112 Lake avenue, owned and occupied by John Morrison. 
Sparks from chimney ignited the shingles, burning the roof 
slightly. Building insured for $1,500. Damage to budding, 
$33. Insurance paid, $33. Contents uninjured. 

Still. Wednesday, May 6, 12.20 p. m. The automatic alarm 
at Crafts & Green's shoe shop rang on account of thermostat 
out of adjustment. 

Box 5. Thursday, May 7, 7.47 p. m. Three-story tenement 
block, corner of Chestnut and Laurel streets, owned by Mehita- 
ble and Etta L. Bartlett, and occupied by George D. Johnson, 
George M. Hobbs, G. D. Martin, and Mrs. Martha Oshier. The 
fire originated in a closet in the attic of the tenement of Mr. 
Johnson, from some unexplained cause, and communicated to 
the roof before it was discovered. The building, was insured for 
$4,600. Damage to building, $1,745.20. Insurance paid, 
Si, 745. 20. George D. Johnson's furniture insured for $310. 
Damage, $310. Insurance paid, $310. George M. Hobbs's fur- 
niture uninsured. Damage, $150. George D. Martin uninsured. 
Damage. $20. Mrs. Martha Oshier uninsured. Damage, $200. 

Still. Saturday, May 9, 3 p. m. Burning chimney at No. 
123 Amherst street. Used " pony." No damage. 

Still. Monday, May 11, 6.30 p. m. An unadjusted ther- 
mostat caused false alarm at Crafts & Green's shoe factory. 
Responded to by Fire King Co. No. 2 with hose wagon. No 
damage. 

Still. Sunday, May 17, 9.50 p. m. Burning chimney on 
Douglas street. Responded to by Fire King Co. No. 2 with 
"pony." No damage. 

Still. Friday, May 22, 4.15 p. m. Tenement block, corner 
of Barr and Douglas streets, owned by Frank P. Johnson. Fire 
in woodpile in cellar. Extinguished by Fire King Co. No. 2 
with "pony" without damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 177 

Box 315. Monday, May 25, 1.59 p. M. Two-story wooden 
block on Front street ('Skeag) owned by Mrs. Hannah Stearns, 
and occupied by Fred Miller and others. The fire of burning 
brush in rear of house communicated with roof of shed and was 
nearly extinguished by hydrant stream of Independent Hose Co. 
No. 5 before the arrival of the department from this side. Dam- 
age, $20. No insurance. 

Box 21. Wednesday, May 27, 12.24 p. m - Two-story wood- 
en block No. 126 Manchester street, owned by Timothy Sullivan, 
and occupied by him and others. Sparks from the chimney 
caught on the roof. Extinguished with water from line of gar- 
den hose. Building insured for $3,000. Damage, $12. Insur- 
ance paid, $12. 

Still. Sunday, June 14, 12.33 p - M - At No. 26 Print Works 
Corporation, in tenement occupied by J. Libbey, a kerosene oil 
stove tipped over. The chemical responded to a telephone call, 
but their services were not needed. 

Still. Monday, June 15, 3 p. m. Sparks from a locomotive 
on Concord & Portsmouth R. R., set fire to grass on Stevens's 
farm on the Hall road. Chemical called, but fire extinguished 
by railroad employes before the arrival of engine. 

Still. Tuesday, June 16, 2.40 p. m. The overflowing of an 
oil stove in tenement at No. 190 Manchester street, occupied by 
Charles Voyer, was the cause for calling chemical engine. Ex- 
tinguished without damage. 

Box 51. Wednesday, June 17, 12.01 a. m. Railroad bridge 
across the Merrimack river, belonging to the Manchester & North 
Weare R. R. Supposed to have been caused by a spark from 
locomotive. Total loss and damage estimated at $24,000. In- 
sured for $10,000. Insurance paid, $10,000. 

Box 23. Wednesday, June 17, 9.20 a. m. A barn in rear of 
No. 232 East Spruce street, owned by Mrs. W. Q. Sargent, and 
occupied for a woodshed by Mrs. Bridget Buckley and Mrs. 
Catherine Cronin. The fire originated in the shed from some 
unknown cause, and communicated with the L of the house 
south, and a carriage shed and barn west, owned by same party. 
House insured for $2,350. Damage, $75. Insurance paid, $75. 



178 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Shed insured for $150. Damage, $98. Insurance paid, $98. 
Shed and barn west insured for $400. Damage, $144. Insur- 
ance paid, $144. Damage to contents, $20. Uninsured. 

Still. Wednesday, June 24, 1.58 p. m. Brick boiler-house 
of A. C. Wallace's saw and planing mill. Fire originated in the 
shavings bin, probably from spark from the boiler. Fire King 
No. 2 responded with hose wagon. 

Box 53. Wednesday, June 24, 3.40 p. M. Rekindling of 
same fire. Building insured for $500. Damage, $66. Insur- 
ance paid, $66. 

Box 511. Saturday, July 4, 1.30 a. m. Shed on Douglas 
street, belonging to James B. Scott, and unoccupied. Caused 
by fire-crackers. Damage estimated at $50. No insurance. 

Box 8. Thursday, July 16, 7.52 a. m. Two and a half story 
tenement block on Clark's avenue on Pearl street, owned by 
the heirs of Jcseph B. Clark, and occupied by Telesphore For- 
tier. Fire in bundle of rags. Extinguished by chemical with- 
out damage. 

Box 4. Sunday, July 26, 5.06 A. m. Three-story brick block 
corner of Elm street and Lake avenue, occupied by stores and 
tenements. Fire originated in the store of Michael H. Lavery, 
probably from spontaneous combustion. Damage to building, 
$28, on which there was no insurance. Lavery's stock and fixtures 
insured for $500. Damage, $90.77. Insurance paid, $90.77. 

Box 15. Wednesday, August 5, 10.30 p. m. Barn in rear of 
No. 76 Pearl street, owned and occupied by A. J. Austin. The 
fire originated in some rubbish from some unknown cause. Barn 
insured for $200. Damage, $20. Insurance paid, $20. 

Still. Thursday, August 6, 12.20 p. M. (Out of town.) In 
response to telegram from Epping, took steamer No. 4 and hose 
wagon and proceeded to Epping camp grounds. Owing to 
" waits" on the railroad for incoming trains, considerable time 
was consumed in transportation, and on arrival there the fire was 
under control. Returned without unloading apparatus. 

Box 21. Friday, August 21, 5.21 a. m. Saloon at No. 206 
Manchester street, kept by James M. Donnegan. Fire in wooden 
spittoon. Damage very slight. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 179 

Still. Monday, August 24, 12.22 p. m. (Out of town.) In 
response to a telephone message, took steamer No. 1 with hose 
wagon, horses, and squad of men, and proceeded to Derry Depot 
for a fire in Pillsbury's kit factory. The twelve-mile run by rail 
was made in thirteen and a half minutes. Unloaded apparatus 
and played upon the ruins several hours; returning, left Derry 
about 6.30 p. M. 

Box 23. Saturday, September 19, 8. 24 p. m. Needless alarm 
was given for a burning ash barrel, rear of 257 Merrimack street. 
No damage. 

Box 4. Sunday, October 25, 10.35 A - M - Four-story brick 
block on corner of Franklin and West Cedar streets, owned and 
occupied by Manchester Provision Company. The fire originat- 
ed in the smokehouse on the fourth floor. Building and refrig- 
erator insured for $38,000. Damage to building $70.51. Con- 
tents insured for $40,000. Damage, $270.80. Insurance paid, 
$270.80. 

Box 5. Wednesday, October 28, 5.58 p. m. Four-story brick 
block on corner of Elm and Merrimack streets, owned by Brown 
& Straw, known as Hotel Lamprey, and occupied by John J. 
Driscoll. The fire originated in the rooms occupied by John P. 
Emerson, from some unknown cause. Building insured for 
$18,000. Damage to building, $77.70. Insurance paid, $77.- 
70. Driscoll's property insured for $900. Damage, $105. In- 
surance paid, $105. Emerson's damage, $100. No insurance. 
Extinguished by chemical engine. 

Box 4. Sunday, November 1, n. 01 a. m. Three-story tene- 
ment house, No 172 Pine street, owned by Mrs. Martha A. 
Batchelder, and occupied by Rhoda Carroll and others. The 
fire originated near the chimney, under the roof, from a defec- 
tive flue. Building insured for $2,500. Damage to building, 
$71.32. Insurance paid, $71.32. No damage to contents. 

Still. Monday, November 2, 1.25 p. m. Brush fire on 
North Union street. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Thursday, November 5, 7.30 a. m. Four-story brick 
block, No. 895 Elm street, owned by William H. Plumer, and 
occupied by Plumer & Holton, clothiers, and W. R. Call, pho- 



180 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

tographer. The fire originated in Call's " printing-room,'* 
probably by carelessness of one of the workmen in smoking. 
Building insured for $15,000. Damage to building, $8. Insur- 
ance paid, $8. Call's damage, $25. No insurance. 

Box Si. Sunday, November 22, 7.02 a. m. Two-story brick 
block, 995 Elm street, owned by Chas. F. Duncklee, and occupied, 
by Thomas F. Sullivan as a cigar store. The fire originated in 
Sullivan's dry-room, from a gas jet. Building insured for $20,- 
000. Damage to building, $131. Insurance paid, $131. Sul- 
livan's stock and fixtures insured for $2,000. Damage, $1,250.. 
Extinguished by chemical engine. 

Still. Thursday, November 26, 4.10 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney in Ryan's block, No 120 Central street. Chemical respond- 
ed. No damage. 

Still. Friday, November 27, 6.05 a. m. Wooden " ten- 
footer," corner of Pearl and Elm east back streets, owned by- 
George H. Dorr, and occupied by Frank Parker as a saloon. A 
kerosene lamp set fire to the partition and coving. Damage to 
building, $17, on which there was no insurance. Contents un- 
injured. Extinguished by chemical engine. 

Box 313. Friday, November 27, 8.15 a. m. Three-story 
brick block, corner of McQregor and Marion streets, owned by 
R. W. Pillsbury, and occupied by Pierre Lemay as a saloon and 
by several families as tenants. The fire originated in the cellar 
adjoining Lemay 's saloon, probably from carelessness of boys. 
Building insured for $15,000. Damage to building, $32.50. 
Insurance paid, $32.50. Lemay's damage to stock and fixtures,. 
$10. Uninsured. 

Box 21. Saturday, December 12, 10.28 p. m. Stable in rear 
of No. 40 Merrimack street, owned by John D. Murphy, and oc- 
cupied by Everett L. Carswell as a livery stable. Barn insured 
for $200. Damage to barn, $125. Insurance paid, $125. Cars- 
well's loss on contents, $40. Uninsured. Damage to L of 
building adjoining stable, $19.12. Insurance paid, $19.12. In- 
surance on house and L, $1,000. 

Still. Thursday, December 17, 6.15 p. m. Burning chim- 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



181 



ney in Thorp's block ('Squog). Responded to by Fire King Co. 
No. 2. Used " pony." No damage. 

Still. Thursday, December 17, 6.42 p, 
ney at No. 42 Church street. Used " pony. 

Still. Saturday, December 19, 
ney at No. 112 East Spruce street, 
age. 

Still. Saturday, December 19, 8.14 p. 
ney at No. 304 Pine street. Used " pony." 

Box 7. Tuesday, December 29, 12.21 



3.28 p. 
Used 



m. Burning chim- 

No damage. 
m. Burning chim- 
; ' pony." No dam- 



M. Burning chim- 

No damage. 
p. m. Three-story 
owned by Weston, 



wooden block, Nos. 105 5-1 063 Elm street 
Hill & Fitts, and occupied by Mrs. L. A. Bennett as a millinery 
store, Frank P. Kimball as a clothing store, and John Gagnon 
as a boarding-house. The fire is supposed to have originated 
from a defective flue in Mrs. Bennett's store. Building insured 
for $4,700. Damage to building, $2,800. Insurance paid, $2,- 
800. Mrs. Bennett's stock and fixtures insured for $2,000. 
Damage, $2,000. Insurance paid, $1,900. Kimball's insurance 
on stock and fixtures, $21,000. Damage, $17,954.55. Insurance 
paid, $17,954.55. Gagnon's goods insured for $500. Damage, 
$337-5°- Insurance paid, $337-5°- 



Number of bell alarms 
Number of still alarms 



Total 



Total amount of losses for 1891 
Amount of insurance paid 

Net loss above insurance paid 



35 

" Z l 
7i 

$59,542.63 
43> 22 7- 6 3 

$16,315.00 



182 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE 



SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFERENT BOXES ON FIRST, SEC- 
OND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 





^ 


, 


1 














1 


I 










Hose No. 2. 


s 


6 




S 

a 
o 


a . 
o a 


3 


n 


in 

6 






1b 


to 
a 
o 






a 

a 










































C8 








a-2 


a 


a 


a 


I 








a 

J3 




r 


OQ 


02 


I 


1 


£ 

£ 


1 


o 
o 
W 


3 




2 


3 


i 


3 




3 


3 






4 




2 


2 


i 


3 




2 


2 






5 




2 


2 


i 


3 




2 


2 






6 




1 


3 


2 


2 






2 






7 




1 


3 


2 








1 






8 




1 


3 


2 








1 






9 




3* 


3 


3 








2 






12 




3 


3 


3 








2 






13 




2 


3 


3 








1 






14 




2 


3 


3 








1 






15 




1 


3 


2 








1 






16 




2 


3 


1 


2 






1 






17... 




2 


3 


1 


3 






1 






18 




2 


3 


1 


3 






1 






21 




2 


3 


1 


3 






2 






23 




2 


3 


1 


3 






2 


1 1 1 


24 




2* 


3 


1 


Q 






2 


1 1 


25 




2 


3 


1 


3 






1 


1 j 


26 




2 


3 


1 


3 






1 




27 




2* 


3 


1 


3 






2 






31.... 




2 


2 


2 


1 






2 






32 




2 


2 


3 


1 






2 






34 








2 


1 






1 






35 








2 


1 






2 






36 








2 


2 






2 






41 








1 


1 






2 






42 








1 


2 






2 


1 




43 




2 




1 


3 




2 


2 


1 




45 




1 




1 


3 




2 


2 






51 




3 




2 


3 




3 


3 






52 




3 




2 


3 




3 


3 






53 




3 




2 


3 




3 


3 




54 




3* 




3 


3 




3 


3 


1 J 


56 




3* 




2 


3 




3 


3 


1 1 ! 


61 






3 


1 


3 




3 


3 


1 1 


62 




2* 


3 


1 


3 




3 


3 


1 1 


71 




2 


3 


1 


3 




2 


2 




72 




2 


3 


1 


3 




' 1 


2 


1 i 


73 




2 


3 


1 


3 




2 


2 


1 1 J 


81 




1 


3 


2 


2 




1 


2 


1 j i 


112 




2 


3 


3 


1 




1 


1 


1 1 


113 




2 


3 


3 


1 




1 


1 


1 1 


114 




2 


3 


3 


1 




1 


1 


1 1 


212 




3* 


3 


1 


3 




2 


2 


1 


213 




2* 


3 


1 


3 




3 


3 






312 




2 


1 


3 


2 




2 


2 






313 




2 


1 


3 


2 




2 


2 






314 




2* 


3 


3 


1 




2 


2 






315 




3* 


3 


3 


1 




3 


3 






321 




2 


1 


3 


2 




2 


2 


1 J 1 


511 




2 


1 


3 


3 




3 


3 




513 


2 


3* 


1 


3 


3 




3 


3 


1 i 1 



'On first alarm, the horses of second-run engine will double on engine of first run. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 183 

Number and Location of Alarm-Boxes and Keys. 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of E. P. Johnson 
Co., gas-works, county jail, DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, 
and Charles H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel 
Belmont, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Gannon's, Horse 
Railroad stables, and W. C. Blodgett's office. 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm Streets. Keys at Teb- 
betts &: Soule's and Currier's drug stores, and Manchester 
House. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Mead's drug 
stores, and J. A. Riddle's office. 

No. 7. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east back 
streets. Keys at Higgins Bros. Co.'s, Lowell-street stable, and 
Eames Bros.' drug store. 

No. 8. Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Smith & 
Co.'s and Colby's drug stores, and Partridge Bros.' grain store. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, J. B. Jones, 
and General Stark engine-house. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of William C. Clarke, George Emerson, and Walter A. 
Green. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at 
residences of Welcome Jencks and Lewis Simons, and No. 1 Sen- 
ter's block. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of W. Ireland, Mrs. N. L. Hardy, and D. J. Adams. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Willie H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. 18. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at 
residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Perkins. 



184 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at 
A. D. Smith's drug store, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. 
Walker's office, and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Merrimack Steamer house, corner of Massabesic street 
and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. Goodwin and 
Steamer house. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at 
residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, Horace Stearns, 
and the late Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at Mc- 
Crillis's carriage-shop, George W. Bailey's stable, and residence 
of John N. Chase. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at 
residences of H. M. Tarbell, A. G. Fairbanks, William B. Orrill, 
E. S. Fletcher, William Carr, and George H. Hubbard. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's shop. 
Keys at office and Amory Mills watch-room. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon 
watch-room, and Electric Light station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watch-room and pumping 
station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 36. Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at freight 
depot and S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at 
stores of F. Riedel and William Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd & Co.'s 
and A. N. Clapp's stores and Merrimack House. 

No. 53. Wallace's steam-mill. Keys at the office and I. R. 
Dewey's tenement block. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 185 

No. 54. Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Lord sisters and Neil Fullerton. 

No. 56. Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office 
and residences of J. C. Smith and E. P. Littlefield. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon, Carney, Lynch & Co.'s 
brewery, and residence of H. F. Dillingham. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool and Leather Co.'s, River road. Keys 
at tannery and residence of Edwin Kennedy. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at the resi- 
dences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, and Thomas J. Smith. 

No. 72. Corner of Park and Lincoln streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of the late Austin Jenkins, James Briggs, and Clarence 
D. Palmer. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the 
engine-rooms. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of Woodbury Davison and W. T. Stevens. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. Topliff. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Oizendam, W. S.Shannon, and 
John J. Bennett. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of shoe 
factory, and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, 
Mrs. Milton A. Abbott, and M. V. B. Garland. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory, South Beech street, junc- 
tion of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at office of Austin, Flint & 
Day. 

No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. 
Keys at residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas 
Bolton, and Amoskeag Co.'s gate. 

No. 313. Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Bouthillier & 
Gingras's drug store, and Amoskeag Co.'s gate. 



186 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 314. P. C. Cheney Company's paper-mill. Keys at office 
and Independent Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick Store at 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders's store, 
Independent Hose house, and Robinson's residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at 
Holy Angels Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of 
E. H. Doherty and Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Henry Harmon, Amelia Davis, and Charlotte T. 
Snow. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at 
residences of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Ward. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time from Cambridge Observatory will be given at 
precisely 12.30 p. m. from Charles A. Trefethen's jewelry store, 
and will be denoted by one strike of the fire-bells. 



Telephone Calls. 

Central station, Chemical Engine 
Chief Engineer Lane's residence . 
Assistant Engineer Whitney's residence 
Assistant Engineer Merrill's residence . 
Assistant Engineer Merrill's store 
Fire King Steamer No. 2 
Merrimack Steamer No. 3 
General Stark Steamer No. 5 
Massabesic Hose No. 2 



64-3 

64-4 

34-4 
7i-3 
55-4 
59-3 
56-3 
64-6 
1 1 6-4 



Instructions to Key-holders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice should be immediately 
communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the keys to which are in 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 187 

the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the 
corner or nearest houses. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive in- 
formation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once 
as far as it will go (without jerking) and then let go. Shut the 
door, but do not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a 
trap-lock, and can only be removed with a release-key, which is 
carried by each of the engineers, who will, as soon as convenient, 
release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by 
the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull 
again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box, 
procure another key, and give an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the 
box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no cause 
other than actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chimney 
fire. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called 
for by the chief engineer. If you change your residence or place 
of business, where the keys are kept, return the keys to the same 
officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are reque.-ted to inform 
themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their property, 
also all places where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is 
promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in the city, 
and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 6, six blows, 
22 seconds apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, 
pause of 6\ seconds, one blow, same pause, and two blows, 
2 — 1 — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the 
bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, each test 
will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 

SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, close the pri- 
mary schools ; and to close all the schools, two immediate 



188 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds two more immediate 
strokes, — the time of striking the bells being at 7.45 a. m. for 
closing the schools during the forenoon, and at 11.30 a. m. or 
1. 15 p. m. for closing them during the afternoon. 



Rules and Regulations in regard to responding to 
Fires and Alarms. 

The following order has been adopted by the board of engi- 
neers, and the fire department will strictly comply until otherwise 
ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as follows : 

1. Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1, Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1, 
and Chemical Engine Co. No. 1 will report for duty to all boxes 
on first alarm. 

2. Amoskeag Steamer Co. No. 1 will report for duty, on days 
of its first run, on first alarm to all boxes except 9, 12, 51, 54, 56 
315, 513 ; on second alar m, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 35, 
36, 41, 42, 45, 81 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 13, 14, 
16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 62, 71, 72, 73, 
112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314, 321, 511 ; on third alarm, to 
all other boxes. 

3. Fire King Steamer Co. No. 2 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 52. 53, 54, 56, 
312, 313, 321, 511, 513; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 5, 31, 32; 
on third alarm, to all other boxes. 

4. Merrimack Steamer Co. No. 3 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 41, 42, 
43, 45, 61, 62, 71, 72, 73, 212, 213 ; on second alarm, to boxes 
6, 7, 8, 15, 31, 34, 35, 36, 51, 52, 53, 56, 81 ; on third alarm, 
to all other boxes. 

5. N. S. Bean Steamer Co. No. 4 will report for duty, on days 
of its first run, on first alarm to all boxes except 9, 12, 51, 54, 56, 
315 ; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 15, 34, 35, 
36, 41, 42, 45, 81 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 13, 14, 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 189 

16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 62, 71, 72, 73, 

112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314, 321, 511 ; on third alarm, to 
all other boxes. 

6. Gen. Stark Steamer Co. No. 5 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 31, 32, 34, 35, 41, I12) 

113, 114, 314, 315 ; on second alarm, to boxes 6, 16, 36, 42, 81, 
312, 313, 321; on third alarm, to all other boxes. 

7. Massabesic Hose Company No. 2 will report for duty, on 
days of its first run, on first alarm, to boxes 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 

16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 72,. 
81, 112, 113, 114; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 5, 9, 12, 43, 45, 
71, 73, 212, 312, 313, 314, 321; on third alarm, to all other 
boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 

17, 18, 25, 26, 34, 112, 113, 114; on second alarm, to boxes 4, 
5, 6, 9, 12, 21, 23, 24, 27, 31, 32, 35, 3 6, 41, 42, 43, 45, 71, 72, 
73,81, 212, 312, 313, 314, 321; on third alarm, to all other 
boxes. 

8. On the first alarm from boxes 9, 24, 27, 54, 56, 61, 62, 212, 
213, 314, 315, 513, the horses of the second run will double on 
to the engine of its first run, and on the arrival at the fire 

THE SECOND-RUN HORSES WILL RETURN TO THEIR HOUSE, and 

in case of an alarm from any other box the company will imme- 
diately respond with their engine. 

9. During the progress of a fire, any of the apparatus not 
called on that alarm will promptly respond to an alarm from any 
other box. 

10. At any time when an alarm of fire is given, the engine, 
hose-carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will have the 
right to lead to the fire. No running by will be allowed, 

EXCEPT IN CASE OF ACCIDENT, UNDER PENALTY OF DISMISSAL. 
OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

11. The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with 
the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy 
weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit any one to ride 
upon their apparatus when returning from fires. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the first. 



190 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



alarm will prepare for a start, and hold themselves in readiness 
for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, one stroke on 
the bells and gongs by the engineer in charge will be the signal 
for discharge to all companies remaining at the houses ; or in 
case this one blow is not struck within thirty minutes, companies 
may consider themselves dismissed ; except the drivers, who will 
remain in the houses with their horses until the two blows to 
limber up, and the return to quarters of engines on duty at the 
fire. 

13. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those at a fire 
to limber up. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



Amoskeag Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 



LOCATED OX VINE STREET. 



i extra first-size Amoskeag steamer 
1 one-horse hose-wagon 
1 pair gray horses for steamer 
1 black horse for hose-wagon 
3 swinging harnesses . 
1 pair double harnesses (for street wo 
1 single harness (for street.work) 
2,000 feet fabric hose 
100 feet three-inch leather hose 
1 double cart .... 
1 single cart .... 
1 sled 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. . 

Tools, furniture, and fixtures . 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



k) 



$4,000.00 
450.00 
800.00 

375-°° 

150.00 

60.00 

50.00 

1,300.00 

50.00 

100.00 

100.00 

40.00 

60.00 

200.00 

200.00 



$7>935-°° 



REPOKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



191 



Fire King Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 2. 



LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, SQUOG. 



i second-size Amoskeag steamer 
i combination hose-wagon 
i pair bay horses for steamer 
i pair gray horses for combination 
3 street harnesses, 2 at $40, 1 at $20 
2 pairs swinging harnesses 
1 single cart .... 
1 two-horse cart 
1 double sled .... 
1 single sled .... 
2,500 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures and blankets . 

Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. 

Firemen's suits and badges . 

Total amount . 



$4,000.00 

650.00 

800.00 

600.00 

100.00 

200.00 

100.00 

75.00 

75.00 

50.00 

1,625.00 

60.00 

466.00 

150.00 

$8,951.00 



Merrimack Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 3. 



LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSAFiESIC STREET. 



1 second-size Amoskeag steamer 


$3,500.00 


1 pair black horses ...... 


600.00 


1 single horse 


250.00 


3 street harnesses, 2 at $50, 1 at $40 


140.00 


3 swinging harnesses .... 


150.00 


1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 


600.00 


1 double cart ...... 


162.50 


1 single cart ...... 


40.00 


1 single sled ...... 


40.00 


00 feet fabric hose ..... 


1,625.00 



192 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. . . . $50.00 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc. . 575.00 

Total amount ...... $7,732.50 



N. S. Bea 



n Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 



4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



i second-size Amoskeag steamer 
1 hose-wagon .... 
1 pair bay horses for steamer . 
1 horse for hose-wagon 
1 pair street harnesses 
1 pair swinging harnesses for steamer 
1 single swinging harness for hose-wagon 
1,550 feet fabric hose .... 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc. 

Stable fixtures and blankets . 

Firemen's suits and badges . 



Total amount 



$3,500.00 
400.00 
600.00 
200.00 

50.00 
100.00 

50.00 

1,007.50 

275.00 

75.00 
150.00 

$6,407.50 



General Stark Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 5. 



LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT, 



i third-size Amoskeag steamer 



combination hose reel and ladder 

pair bay horses 

pair gray horses 

double carts . 

double sleds . 

pairs swinging harnesses 

pairs street harnesses 



$3,600.00 
1,000.00 
600.00 
400.00 
225.00 
150.00 
200.00 
180.00. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



193 



feet fabric hose 
Furniture, fixtures, tools, etc. 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits, badges, etc. 

Total amount 



$1,625.00 

175.00 

80.00 

150.00 

$8,385.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire-Engine. 

LOCATED AT OLD ENGINE-HOUSE, CLINTON STREET. 

Old U tank Amoskeag engine . . . $500.00 



Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



i four-wheeled Amoskeag hose- 


carria 


ge 




$600.00 


2 horses ...... 




600.00 


2 single harnesses 








70.00 


1 single cart 








50.00 


1 single sled . 








40.00 


1 hose sled .... 








20.00 


2,300 feet fabric hose 








1,495.00 


3,000 feet leather hose . 








1,500.00 


Furniture and fixtures . 








200.00 


Stable fixtures and blankets 








50.00 


Firemen's suits and badges 








175.00 


Total amount . 


$4,800.00 



Massabesic Hose Company No. 2. 

LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 

i four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 

1 bay horse ....... 

13 



000.00 
350.00 



194 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



i street harness 
i swinging harness 
i single cart . 
i single sled . 
2,000 feet fabric hose 
2,000 feet leather hose 

Furniture and fixtures 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount . 



$40.00 

50.00 

60.00 

40.00 

1,200.00 

1,000.00 

100.00 

175.00 

$3,615.00 



Excelsior Hook-and- Ladder Company No. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 hook-and-ladder truck . 

1 reserve truck at Lake avenue station 

1 pair bay horses 

1 pair exercise harnesses . 

1 pair swinging harnesses . 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders 
7 rubber blanket covers . 

Furniture and fixtures . 
Stable fixtures and blankets . 
Firemen's suits and badges . 

Total amount . 



$1,700.00 
300.00 
600.00 

30.00 
100.00 
360.00 
16S.00 
200.00 

50.00 
280.00 

$3,788.00 



Chemical Engine Company No. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 double tank (60 gallons each) engine 
1 pair black horses .... 
1 pair exercise harnesses . 
1 pair swinging harnesses . 



$2,250.00 

750.00 

50.00 

100.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



Furniture and fixtures 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



195 

$75.00 
50.00 

$3>3 IO -oo 



Supply Wagon. 

1 supply wagon, with boxes and engineer's 

lanterns $312.00 



Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 



Soo feet leather hose 
,000 feet fabric hose 

Total amount 



$400.00 
625.00 

$1,025.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

four-wheeled exercise wagon, with pole and shafts 

and coal boxes $350.00 



Engineers' Department. 



5 fire hats . 

5 engineers' white rubber coats 
Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount . 



$10.00 

37-5o 

175.00 

$222.50 



196 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Independent Hose Company No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 



i four-wheeled hand hose-carriage 
600 feet leather hose 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc. . 
Furniture and fixtures 

Total amount . 



$400.00 

300.00 

40.00 

10.00 

$750.00 



Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 



i two-wheeled hose-carriage 
300 feet fabric hose 
2 hose-pipes 



Total amount 



$50.00 

150.00 

10. CO 

$210. oa 



Sleeping-Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

7 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. 



1275.00 



Spare Hose-Carriage. 

1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage . 



$600.00. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



197 



Extra Horses. 



i horse at Central station for spare duty 
i horse at District No. 10 for street work 
2 horses at District No. 2 for street work 

Total 



$200.00 
150.00 
300.00 

$650.00 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 



At cost (including additions previoi 
Remodeling in 1885 
Additions in 1886 . 

" in 1887 . 

" in 188S . 
in 1889 • 

" in 1890 . 

" in 1 89 1 
" Individual Tapper " system 
Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc. 

Total 



s to 1885) 



$21,625.00 
6,000.00 
775.00 
375-°° 
575-°o 
430.00 
300.00 
280.00 
3,000.00 
125.00 

$33>485.oo 



Recapitulation. 

Amoskeag Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 1 
Fire King Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 2 
Merrimack Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 3 
N. S. Bean Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 4 
Gen. Stark Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 5 
E. W. Harrington Steamer (old) . 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. 1 . 
Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 
Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. 1 . 



$7,935-°° 
8,951.00 

7,73 2 -5° 
6,407.50 
8,385.00 
500.00 
4,800.00 
3,615.00 
3,788.00 



198 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Chemical Engine Co. No. i . 


$3,310.00 


Supply wagon ...... 


312.00 


Spare hose ....... 


1,025.00 


Exercise wagon ...... 


350.00 


Engineers' department ..... 


222.50 


Independent Hose Co. No. 5 ... 


750.00 


Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage .... 


210.00 


Sleeping-Hall (Central Station) . 


275.00 


Spare carriage ...... 


600.00 


Fire-Alarm Telegraph 


33,485.00 


Extra horses ....... 


650.00 


Total 


$93,3°3-5° 



Names and Residences of the Members of the Fire 
Department. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



6D • 

— z 

I* 

pq 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


Thomas W. Lane 


Chief 




1937 Elm. 


R 


Asst. and clerk 
Assistant 


Machinist 

Carpenter 

Supt. Electric L't 
Grain dealer .... 




4 
5 


Ruel G. Manning 

Eugene S. Whitney.. 
Clarence R. Merrill . . 


52 Douglas. 
River road, N. 
414 Merrimack. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



199 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

No. 28 Vine Street. 



o 
go 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charles F. McCoy.... 


Foreman 


Machinist 


5M. S. B. 


8 


Frank E.Stearns 


Asst. foreman. 


Paper-hanger. .. 


3S9 Lake ave- 




Henry C. Parsons — 
Charles F. Hall 








6 


Engineer 


Machinist 


146 Orange. 


13 


Joseph H. Gould 


Asst. engineer. 





10S7 Elm. 


11 


Charles H. Rogers . . . 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


28 Vine. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker . . 


Driver of hose. 


" 


■' 


16 


Frank B. Marston 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


11 M. S. B. 


19 


Henry A. Boone 





Machinist 


24 M. S. B. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt.... 





Carpenter 


41 Middle. 


18 


James L. Brock 





Tinsmith 


21 Market. 


9 


Lewis G. Bryant 





Carpenter 


31 M. S. B. 


14 


Edgar A. Young 

Lucius M. Rollins... 


„ 


Clerk 




10 


« 


Holder 


174 Conconl. 



200 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



FIRE KING STEAM EIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on North Main Street, 'Sguog. 



® . 

b£>C 

pq 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


67 


David G. Mills 


Foreman 


Contractor 


607 Granite ex. 


71 


Charles G. Ranno.... 


Asst. foreman. 


Harness-maker . 


63 Parker. 


„„ 










120 


Thomas F. Dodge 


Engineer 


Engineer 


Engine house. 


119 


Stephen Thomes 


Asst. engineer.' Carpenter 


55 Douglas. 


7G 


Jeremiah Lane 


Driver steamer Teamster 


Engine house. 


69 


Arthur W. Whitcomb 


Driver of hose. " 


<« « 


72 


Samuel A. Hill 


Hoseman 


Janitor 


SG School. 


75 


Robert J. Hill 





Carpenter 


" 


77 


Daniel B. Emery 


" 


Machinist 


Williams. 


73 


Charles S. Cousins... 





Harness-maker . 


53 Douglas. 


74 


Thomas C. Foote 





Wool-sorter 


56 N. Main. 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 





Wool--waste-s't'r 


34 Douglas. 


70 


Charles M.Tewksbury 


" 


Freight-handler. 


86 School. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



201 



MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 



"S O 
- 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


86 


Frank F. Porter 


Foreman 


Manufacturer. .. 


330 Spruce. 




Louis N. Dufrain 

Will P. Emerson 


Asst. foreman. 
Clerk 






85 


Carpenter 


294 Laurel. 


121 


George B. Forsaith . . . 


Engineer 


Engineer 


196 Laurel. 


122 


Edwin E. Weeks 


Asst. engineer. 


Machinist 


510 Wilson. 


87 


George H. Wheeler. . . 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


419 Lake Ave. 


SI 


William S.McLeocl... 


Driver of hose. 





347 Spruce . 


78 


George Dunnington.. 


Hoseman 


Clerk 


510 Wilson. 


S4 


Charles H. Colburn. . . 





Carpenter 


294 Laurel. 


SO 




,, 


Clerk 




s? 




( , 






S3 


Ernest E. Hubbell .... 





Yeast agent 


428 Central. 


ss 


Fred S. Sloan 





Painter 


58 Massabesic. 


89 


Parker R. Brown 


" 













202 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



N. S. BEAN STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 
House on Vine Street. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


26 
23 


Lorenzo J. Chandler.. 
George A. Cann 






123 Orange. 
27 Middle. 


Asst. foreman. 


Watchman 


20 
24 


Lucius B. Snelling.... 
Albert Merrill 


Clerk 






Engineer 


Electrician 


River road N. 


21 


Edgar G. Abbott 


Asst. engineer. 


Machinist 


12 Linden. 


31 


Frank J. Dustin 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


29 


Alplionso E. Foster .. 


Driver of hose. 





20 Vine. 


28 


Willie H. Dodge 


Hoseman 


R. R. fireman 


530 Chestnut. 


33 


Henry C.Morrill 

Benj. R. Richardson. . 


« 


Machinist 


112 Pearl. 

12 Mechanic. 


30 


Ellsworth V. Rowe . . . 





Section-hand 


1261 Elm. 


22 


Walter A. Clarkson . . . 





Carpenter 


98 Sagamore. 


25 

27 


Frank B Stevens 

Edward Sargent 


.. 


Clerk 


310 Central. 


" 


Machinist 


954 Elm. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



203 



GENERAL, STARK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 

House No. 44 Webster .Street. 



® 

tuo - 

2,5 










Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


19 


Charles W.Brown — 
George R. Simmons . . 


Foreman 

Asst. foreman. 




16 Hazel. 


123 


Machinist 


82 Pennacook. 


4fi 


Woodbury Davison. .. 
Daniel W. Morse 


Clerk 


Carpenter 

Engineer 


7S5 Union. 


42 


Engineer 


1419 Elm. 


lif 




Asst. engineer. 
Driver steamer 






125 


Emil H.Smith 


Teamster 


44 Webster. 


124 


Henry S. Reed 


Driver hose . .. 


" 


44 Webster. 


41 


Arthur A. Smith 


Hoseman 


Blacksmith 


W. Appleton. 


47 


Russell L. Cilley 

Edward H. Clough .... 
John J. Kelley 








95 






Appleton. 
River road N. 


99 




Machinist 


101 


Milo B. Wilson 






48 Blodget. 
817 Union. 


108 


Luville 0. Blanchard. 




Blacksmith 


126 


Alvin McLane 




Carpenter 


061 Chestnut. 



204 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY NO. 1. 

House No. 26 Vine Street. 



S 6 

P5 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


34 


Albert Maxfield 


Foreman 


Belt-maker 


98 Liberty. 


36 


Joseph E. Merrill 






21 Ash. 


50 


Frank D. Burleigh .... 
Walter L. Blenus 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


6M. S. B. 


37 




26 Vine. 


3S 


George H.Porter 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


279 Laurel. 


48 


Albert A. Puffer....... 





R. R. employe . . . 


499 Beech. 


52 


Charles B.French .... 





Carpenter 


39 M. S. B. 


53 


John E. Sanborn 








274 Laurel. 


35 


Samuel W. Patten .... 





Belt-maker 


3 M. S. B. 


45 


George I. Ayer 





Electrician 


28 M. S. B. 


51 


Edwin W. Merrill. ... 





Clerk 


21 Ash. 


30 




" 


Machinist 


7 M. S. B. 









MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on Maple Street, corner East High. 



<0 

T - 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


54 


John F. Seaward 


Foreman 


Carpenter 


27 Warren. 


55 


Revilo G. Honghton.. 


Asst. foreman. 


Gas-fitter 


288 Bridge. 


">S 


Henry G. Seaman 

Walter Seaward 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


14 South. 


57 




521 Maple. 




George W. Huntley. . . 
Jos. W. Batchelder . . . 


Hosem a 






59 


Carpenter 


467 Maple. 


64 


Albert E. Batchelder. 


(l 





407 Maple. 


65 








27 South. 


fi? 


Julien B. Huntley — 
Frank E.Heald 




,< 


36 Dutton. 


63 


■' 


Book-keeper .... 


289 Concord. 


60 


Charles W. Powell . . . 





Carpenter 


540 Maple. 


61 


Addison Seaward 


" 


'• 


296 Orange. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



205 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 

Hotise No. 8 Vine Street. 



so • 

a* 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


116 


George N. Burpee 

Jesse W. Truell 

Warren F. Wheeler. . . 
Frank A. Pherson — 
Frank H. Harvey * — 


Foreman 


Electrician 

Hackman 

Teamster 

Engineer 

Teamster 


19 Ash. 


117 






118 
44 


Engineer 

Fireman 


8 Vine. 

546 Chestnut. 



EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 

House No. IS Vine Street. 



u 

- 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


91 


Jerome J. Lovering.. 


Foreman 


Carpenter 


300 Pine. 


111 










90 


Henry Johnson 

Charles M. Denyou . . . 
Oscar P. Stone 








°i\ 








m 




Clerk 


696 Elm. 










100 Blodget. 
268 Bridge. 




John N. Chase 





Overseer 






" ' Carpenter 

" Taxidermist 


19 Warren. 
33 Dutton. 


100 


Hiram P. Young 


103 


Luther J. Flint 





Carpenter 


4 Dutton. 


104 


Harrison H. Cole 








45 M. S. B. 


109 


George M. Jones 





Gardener 


558 Chestnut. 


llll 


Pharis E. Rogers 

Charles W. Bailey .... 






135 Orange. 
Linden. 


97 





Carriage-maker.. 






„ 




4 Whitney. 
27 Middle. 


113 


Charles H. Laxon 


" Carpenter 


106 


Charles Edgar 




16 M. S. B. 


105 






301 E. Spruce. 
234 Lake ave. 


112 


Henry C. Crosby 




93 


Charles H. Gile 


Carpenter 


56 Stark corp. 



' Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



206 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



INDEPENDENT HOSE COMPANY NO. 5. 

House corner of Front Street and Old Falls Road, Amoskeag. 



$6 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


133 


Charles E. Stearns ... 


Foreman 


Milk dealer 


Front. 


134 


Thomas Hamilton.... 


Asst. foreman . 


Handle-maker .. 


Goffstown r'd. 


135 
136 


George B. Glidden.... 
George Lawrence — 








Steward 




Front. 


137 
138 
139 










Andrew J. Moynihan. 










Machinist 










Clerk 




141 


William F. Stearns. .. 




Leather-cutter . . 




142 


Alfred D. Maxwell — 




Ice-Dealer 


Goffstown r'd. 


143 
144 


Elbridge G. Reed 

Benjamin Herbert — 




Driver 

















Location of Hydrants. 



Amherst, northwest corner of Vine street. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 207 

Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Appleton, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Appleton, northwest corner of Union street. 

Arlington, northwest corner of Cross street. 

Arlington, northwest corner of Warren street. 

Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Ash, front of No. 32. 

Auburn, corner of Franklin street. 

Auburn, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Auburn, front of No. 40. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Adams street. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Union street. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Auburn, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Baker, corner of Elm street. 

Baker, corner of River road. 

Baker, corner of Calef road. 

Baker, corner of Nutt road. 

Bay, corner of Salmon street. 

Bedford, northwest corner of Granite street. 

Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 

Bedford, northwest corner of Central street. 

Beech, northwest corner of Park street. 

Beech, front of No. 584. 

Belmont, near No. 345. 

Belmont, corner Young street. 

Belmont, near Coffin residence. 

Birch, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Birch, northwest corner of Washington street. 

Blodget, front of primary-school house. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Union street. 

Bridge, front of No. 26. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Union street. 



208 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Bridge, near No. 242. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Bridge, northwest corner of Linden street. 
Bridge, corner of Ashland street. 
Bridge, corner of Hall street. 
Brook, northwest corner of P. Adams's lot. 
Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Union street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Brook, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Calefroad, near Patrick Harrington's. 
Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 
Canal, near east corner of Depot street. 
Canal, near office door M. L. W. 
Cedar, corner of Elm street. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Central, northwest corner of Union street. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Central, front of No. 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 209 

Central, corner of Cass street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Chestnut, opposite High street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect street. 

Chestnut, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Clarke, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Clarke, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Concord, corner Elm street. 

Concord, opposite Vine street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Union street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Concord, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Cypress, south end of street. 

Cypress, at Manchester shoeshop. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm street. 

Elm, opposite foot of Manchester street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon street. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove street. 

Franklin, opposite Middle street. 

Gore, corner of Beech street. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Granite, near Franklin street. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm street. 

Grove, in East Manchester. 

14 



210 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Hancock street. 

Hancock, near shoeshop. 

Hancock, northwest corner of River road. 

Hancock, near brewery. 

Hanover, corner of Elm street. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont street. 

Harrison, opposite No. 15. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Union street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Russell street. 

High, corner of Ashland street. 

High, corner of South street. 

High, fifty feet east of Wilson road. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

Hollis, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Jewett, corner of Massabesic street. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 

Kidder, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Lake avenue, near No. 36. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Union street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 211 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Lake avenue, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Lake avenue, corner of Cass street. 
Lake avenue, east end near Hastings residence. 
Langdon, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Langdon, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Union street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Laurel, near No. 244. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Laurel, near Belmont street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Milton street. 
Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Lowell, northwest corner of South street. 
Lowell, front of No. 276. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 
Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland street. 
Mammoth road. 

Manchester, corner of Elm street. 
Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Central street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Union street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Hall street. 
Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Maple, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Maple, front of No. 350. 



212 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Market, near Canal street. v 

Market, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of Old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor street. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mechanic, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Mechanic, near second back street west of Elm street. 

Mechanic, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, corner of Elm street. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 

Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall street. 

Merrimack, near Belmont street. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beacon street. 

Middle, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Middle, near No. 67 Amoskeag corporation. 

Monroe, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Union street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell street. 

North, northwest corner of Bay street. 

North, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 213 

North, northwest corner of Pine street. 

North, corner of Liberty street. 

Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 

Orange, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Union street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Walnut street. 

Orange, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Orange, corner of Ash street. 

Orange, corner of Maple street. 

Orange, corner of Oak street. 

Orange, corner of Russell street. 

Orange, corner of Linden street. 

Orange, corner of Hall street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Elm street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Union street. 

Pearl, corner of Beech street. 

Pearl, corner of Walnut street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Ash street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Maple street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Oak street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Russell street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Linden street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Ashland street. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Morrison street. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine street. 

Pennacook, northwest corner of Union street. 

Pine, near Road House. 

Pine, northwest corner of Lake avenue. 

Pine, northwest corner of Concord street. 

Pine, northwest corner of Lowell street. 

Pine, northwest corner of High street. 

Pine, northwest corner of Bridge street. 

Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal street. 

Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester corporation. 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin street. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut streets. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Walnut street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak street. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell street. 
Prospect, corner of Linden street. 
Reservoir, on force main. 
River road (north), north of Webster street. 
River road (north), near Mrs. John Kelly's. 
River road (north), near J. Otis Clark's. 
River road (south), near gate of tannery. 
Sagamore, corner of Union street. 
Salmon, corner of Union street. 
Shasta, corner of Elm street. 
Shasta, corner of River road. 
Shasta, corner of Beech street. 
Silver, corner of Union street. 
Silver, corner of Beech street. 
Somerville, corner of Union street. 
Spring, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Charles street. 
Spring, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Spring, corner of Elm street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Union street. 
Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm streets. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Maple street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln street. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 215 

Spruce, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Spruce, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Spruce, near T. J. Perry's house. 
Stark, northeast corner of Canal street. 
Stark, near No. 13 Stark corporation. 
Stark, northwest corner of Elm street. 
State, northwest corner of Granite street. 
State, opposite No. 57 Manchester corporation. 
State, opposite No. 13 Manchester corporation. 
State, corner of West Central street. 
Summer, corner of Elm street. 
Taylor, corner Young road. 
Union, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Union, northwest corner of High street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Willow street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Beech street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Wilson street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Belmont street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Taylor street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Cypress street. 
Valley, northwest corner of Jewett street. 
Valley, 150 feet east of J. L. Woodman's. 
Vine, opposite Central station. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell street. 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Sagamore street. 
Water, near No. 38 Amoskeag corporation. 
Water, northwest corner of Elm street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut street. 
Webster, corner of Adams street. 
Webster, northwest corner of Union street. 
West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal street. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs street. 
West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm street. 
West Brook, northeast corner of Canal street. 



216 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

West Brook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Central, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Central, corner of Franklin street. 

West Central, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal street. 

West Merrimack, near in Amoskeag corporation. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin street. 

West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Webster, northwest corner of Elm street. 

West Webster, northeast corner of River road. 

Wilson, corner of Lake avenue. 

Young, corner of Elm street. 

Young, northwest corner of Beech street. 

Young, corner of Maple street. 

Young, 96 feet east of R. N. Batchelder's. 

Young, corner of Jewett street. 

Young road. 

PISCATAQUOG AND MCGREGORVILLE. 

A, corner of South Main street. 
A, near No. 73. 
A, northwest corner of B street. 
Adams, corner of Main street. 
Adams, corner of Beauport street. 
Amory, corner of Beauport street. 
Amory, near Dubuque street. 
Amory, corner of Rimmon street. 
Bath, corner of River street. 
Bath, corner of Shirley street. 
Bedford road, near Huntress's. 
Bennington, corner of Main street. 
Blaine, corner of Wayne street. 
Blaine, corner of Cleveland street. 
Blaine, east end of street. 



REPORT OP THE FIRE ENGINEER. 217 

Bowman street, opposite cemetery. 

C street, corner of Bedford road. 

Cartier, corner of Sullivan street. 

Cartier, corner of Putnam street. 

Carroll street. 

Cleveland, northwest of Second street. 

Clinton, corner of Dover street. 

Clinton, corner of South Main street. 

Conant, corner of Cartier street. 

Conant, corner of Dubuque street. 

Conant, corner of Rimmon street. 

Dartmouth, corner of O'Neil street. 

Douglas, corner of Quincy street. 

Douglas, corner of Green street. 

Douglas, corner of Barr street. 

Douglas, corner of West street. 

Douglas, corner of Main street. 

Douglas, east of Main street. 

Ferry, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Quincy street. 

Granite, corner of Green street. 

Granite, corner of Barr street. 

Granite, corner of West street. 

Granite, corner of Dover street. 

Granite, corner of Main street. 

Granite, corner of Shirley street. 

Granite, corner of River street. 

Highland, between Wilkins and Mast streets. 

Kelley, corner of Beauport street. 

Kelley, corner of Cartier street. 

Kelley, corner of Dubuque street. 

Main, near Milford street. 

Marion, corner of McGregor street. 

Mast, corner of South Main street. 

Mast, corner of Bowman street. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main streets. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 



218 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mast, 400 feet west of Charles Hoitt's house. 

Mast, near J, P. Brock's. 

Mast, near the J. N. Prescott house. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite "Reed" house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main street. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman street. 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 

Milford, corner of Bismark street. 

Patten, corner of Ferry street. 

Putnam, corner of Main street. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport street. 

Putnam, corner of Dubuque street. 

Riddle, near Mast street. 

School, corner of South Main street. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 

School, corner of River street. 

Shirley, northwest corner of Walker street. 

Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry street. 

Sullivan, corner of Main street. 

Sullivan, corner of Beauport street. 

Temple, corner of Main street. 

Walker, corner of River street. 

Walker, corner of Patten street. 

Walker, corner of Parker street. 

Walker, near corner of South Main street. 

Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 

Wayne, near corner of Beauport street. 

Wayne, near corner of Main street. 

Wilkins, northwest corner of Highland street. 

Wilkins, northwest corner of Mast street. 

Wilkins, opposite Tirrell residence. 

Winter, corner of South Main street. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Dunbarton road, corner of Front street. 
Dunbarton road, near L. D. Colby's. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 219 

Goffstown road, four hydrants. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter-works. 

Main, near brick schoolhouse. 

Main, corner of Goffstown road. 

Main, opposite the John E. Stearns house. 

Main, near the Hiram Stearns house. 

Mill, near paper-mill. 

Mill, corner of Main street. 

Varnum, corner of Main street. 

In addition to the above, there are five private hydrants that 
are available in case of need : 
Two at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at the A. H. Lowell iron foundry. 
Total number, 455. 



R E PO R 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 




--I !' :: :i I ;i:;!hi^ J iMIiIIm: : ■ ■ . .— ■■. Miliyiijin 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith respectfully submit 
their thirty-eighth annual report of the affairs and condition of 
the library, and, accompanying the same, the report made to 
them by the treasurer of the board, containing a statement of the 
amounts received and the expenditures made by him in behalf of 
the board from the funds in their possession and under their con- 
trol ; and also the report of the librarian, which gives in detail 
the statistics of the operation of the library during the year, and 
the condition of the property under her charge at the close of the 
year. 

From the report of the treasurer it appears that during the year 
the sum of eighteen hundred and eighty-five dollars and one cent 
has been expended for the purchase of books, and the sum of 
one hundred and seventy-one dollars and ninety-three cents for 
the purchase of periodicals, being a total expenditure for both 
these purposes of two thousand and fifty-six dollars and ninety- 
four cents. Of the amount expended for the purchase of books, 
the sum of eleven hundred and eighty dollars and forty-six cents 
was taken from the income of the Dean fund and applied for the 
increase of that department of the library, and the sum of sixty- 
seven dollars and fifty-two cents was expended in the purchase 



224 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

of books to replace those worn out and withdrawn from circula- 
tion. Exclusive of these two amounts the sum expended for the 
purchase of miscellaneous books was six hundred and thirty-seven 
dollars and three cents, leaving a balance in the hands of the 
treasurer, at the close of the year, of the amounts appropriated 
by the city councils for the purchase of books, of seven hundred 
and nine dollars and twenty-three cents. 

The balance of the accumulated income of the Dean fund, un- 
expended at the close of the year, was five thousand three hun- 
dred and thirteen dollars and sixty-three cents. In expending 
the income of this fund the trustees have continued the plan 
originally adopted, and made purchases of works on scientific 
and mechanical subjects. 

The accumulated income of the Mary E. Elliot fund at the 
close of the year was six hundred and thirty-six dollars and sixty- 
three cents. No books have been purchased from the income of 
this fund, as the trustees have not deemed it advisable to make 
such purchases until suitable accommodation could be provided 
for the shelving of the books by themselves in a separate depart- 
ment of the library, and proper arrangements made for their con- 
sultation by the members of the medical profession in the city. 

The removal of another department of the library to the base- 
ment of the library building, which has been accomplished dur- 
ing the year, will probably provide suitable room for this new 
department. The trustees have invited the co-operation of the 
members of the medical profession, resident in the city, in the 
selection of medical works to be placed in this department of the 
library for reference. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have- 
been three thousand five hundred and twenty-five dollars and 
seventy-three cents, which amount includes the sum of one thou- 
sand one hundred and twenty-seven dollars and sixty-six cents 
expended in the preparation of the new catalogue. The items 
of these expenditures may be found in detail in the annual re- 
port of the city, the bills for the same having been paid by the 
city treasurer from the sum appropriated for the library upon, 
their approval by the trustees. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 225 

The librarian reports that the library has been open for the 
delivery of books three hundred and eight days. During this 
period the number of books delivered for home use was fifty-six 
thousand two hundred and sixty-five, being an average of nearly 
one hundred and eighty-three per day. In addition to the num- 
ber delivered for home use, eight thousand two hundred and 
seventy books were delivered for use in the reading-room, an 
average of twenty-seven per day. The total number of books 
delivered for both these purposes was sixty-four thousand five 
hundred and thirty-five, an average of two hundred and nine 
per day. As compared with the preceding year, the circulation 
for home use shows an increase of four thousand seven hundred 
and sixty-seven, while the number delivered for use at the library 
room shows a decrease of one thousand seven hundred and forty- 
five. The circulation of books for home use during the past 
year was the largest recorded since the library was established. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last 
report was thirty-three thousand six hundred and thirty-nine. 
There have been added during the year by purchase, seven hun- 
dred and sixty-two volumes ; by donation, four hundred and 
forty-seven volumes, and eighty-one volumes of periodicals have 
been bound, making the number of bound volumes in the library, 
at the end of the year, thirty-two thousand nine hundred and 
twenty-three, and the total number, including maps and pam- 
phlets, thirty-four thousand nine hundred and twenty-nine. 

Seventy-nine different periodicals have been regularly received 
at the library during the year, — fifty-eight by purchase and 
twenty-one by donation — and as the various volumes have been 
completed they have been bound and placed upon the shelves for 
circulation. 

During the year, seventy-one volumes have been withdrawn 
from circulation, having become too much worn to be fit for 
further use. Of this number, and of others retired from circu- 
lation in previous years, eighty-six volumes have been replaced 
at a cost of sixty-seven dollars and fifty-two cents. 

Accompanying the report of the librarian is a list of books 
presented to the library during the year, with the names of the 



226 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

persons presenting them, so far as known. The trustees have 
caused due acknowledgment to be made in behalf of the city 
to all who have thus manifested their interest in the growth 
of the library. 

The estate of the late Eliza A. Eaton, the residue of which, 
after payment of debts and legacies, was bequeathed to the city 
for the benefit of the library, still remains in the hands of the ad- 
ministrator, although nearly three years have elapsed since the 
death of the testatrix. The trustees are not aware of any reason 
why the administrator should not at once make a final settlement 
of his trust in the probate court, and pay over the balance of the 
estate found remaining in his hands to the party authorized to 
receive the same. 

The vacancy in the board of trustees, caused by the death of 
Hon. Daniel Clark, in January of last year, was filled by the 
election of Mr. Walter M. Parker for the unexpired term. 

The preparation of the new catalogue of the library for pub- 
lication has been continued during the year by the compiler, Mr. 
Charles A. Durfee. Mention was made in our last report that 
the work upon the catalogue had not progressed so rapidly as the 
trustees were led to expect, and that to secure the completion of 
the manuscript at as early a date as possible the services of Mrs. 
Emma A. H. Piper were obtained as an assistant to Mr. Durfee. 
Mrs. Piper has been employed upon the catalogue during the 
whole of the past year, and has rendered material assistance 
toward the completion of the manuscript. At the end of the 
year Mrs. Piper was transferred from this work to the preparation 
of a card catalogue for use at the library rooms, since which 
time Mr. Durfee has carried on the work alone. It is now ex- 
pected that the catalogue will be ready to be placed in the hands 
of the printer within a few months. 

The preparation of a card catalogue of the library was com- 
menced at the beginning of the year, and' work upon the same 
will be carried forward as rapidly as practicable. The trustees 
have deemed it advisable to catalogue the novels and juvenile 
books first, these being most frequently called for. This list is 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 227 

now nearly completed, and Mrs. Piper expects it will be ready 
for use within a short time. 

The public documents contained in the library, as well as the 
newspapers, have during the year been moved to the basement of 
the library building, proper shelving and cases having been con- 
structed for the same by the committee on lands and buildings. 
This change has long been needed and will enable the trustees 
to properly arrange for the growth of the library in its various 
departments, and particularly the purchases to be made from 
the Mary E. Elliot fund. 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher has discharged the duties of librarian 
during the year with the same fidelity and conscientious en- 
deavor for the accommodation of the patrons of the library 
as in the past, and to the satisfaction of the trustees. 

The trustees desire to express their acknowledgments to the 
members of the city councils for their cordial co-operation in 
matters relating to the affairs of the library, and for the courtesy 
and consideration with which all suggestions of the trustees for 
its improvement have been received and carried out. 

March 12, 1892. 

In board of trustees read and approved, and ordered to be 
signed by the chairman and clerk of the board and transmitted 
to the city councils. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor. 

N. P. Hunt, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The treasurer of the board presents the following account of 
the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received 
on account of the library. 

1891. Dr. 

Jan. 1. To balance of appropriation $483.04 

Appropriation for 1891, 

for books . . 1,000.00 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, cata- 
logues sold . . 2 5-3° 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, for 

books lost, etc. . . 5.21 

Mrs. M. J. Buncher, bal- 
ance of fines . . 72.16 



$1,585-71 



Jan. 1. To balance of income of 

Dean fund . . $5,957.10 

income of Dean fund . 153.00 

July 1. income of Dean fund . 153-00 
interest on accumulation 

of income . . . 230.99 



— $6,494.09 



Jan. 1. To Mary E. Elliot fund . $2,000.00 
balance of interest on 

Mary E. Elliot fund . 522.82 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 229 



April i. To interest on Mary E. Elliot 
fund .... 
interest on accumulation 
of income 



$90.00 
23-5° 



Jan. 



Feb. 



March 



Apri 



Paid New England News Co., periodicals 
The History Co., books . 
Boston Book Co., periodicals . 
J. H. Hickcox, periodicals 
Frank B. Webster, periodicals . 
Lend-a-Hand Co., periodicals . 
D. C. Heath & Co., books 
George H. Polley & Co., periodicals 
New England News Co., periodicals 
D. Van Nostrand Co., (Dean fund) 

books ..... 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
Central Law Journal Co., periodicals 
Charles Scribner's Sons, books . 
Estes & Lauriat, books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
George E. Littlefield, books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Augusta H. Worthen, books 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Estes & Lauriat, books 
D. Van Nostrand Co., (Dean fund) 

books ..... 
George H. Polley & Co., (Dean fund) 

books 

Charles W. Smiley, periodicals . 
Temple & Farrington Co., books 
J. S. Smith, periodicals 
James D. & E. S. Dana, books . 



52,636.32 
$10,716.12 

Cr. 

$11.90 

4-5° 
5.00 
5.00 
1. 00 
2.00 

•43 

6.00 

12.94 



619.04 

7.70 
5.00 
6.50 
9.00 

12.36 
3.60 

l °-33 
3-5° 
5-5° 
9.00 

112.75 

43.00 

1. 00 

2.00 

2.00 

•75 



230 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



May 



June 



July 

Aug. 
Sept. 



3°- 

4- 

12. 

I 2. 



Oct. 



1 1. 

12. 

13- 

J 3- 

iS. 

22. 

27- 

3°- 

3- 
ii. 

14- 

4- 

*3- 

4- 
M- 

22. 

2 3- 
2 3- 

3- 
6. 



Paid A. A. Grant, books . 

Little, Brown & Co., books 

New England News Co., periodicals 

Balch Brothers, books 

George H. Polley & Co., (Dean fund) 

books ..... 
New England News Co., periodicals 
D. Van Nostrand Co., (Dean fund) 

books ..... 
W. B. Clarke & Co, books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., (replaced) books 
Estes & Lauriat, books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing Co. 

books 

George E. Littlefield, books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
Little, Brown & Co., books 
George H. Polley & Co., (Dean fund) 

books 

New England News Co., periodicals 
D. Van Nostrand Co., (Dean fund) 

books ..... 
D. Appleton & Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
A. S. Clark, (replaced) books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
George C. Gilraore, books 
Boston Society Natural History, peri 

odicals .... 

Henry P. Rolfe, books 
D. Van Nostrand Co., (Dean fund) 

books ..... 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Samuel Cooper, books 
Little, Brown & Co., books 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 231 



Oct. 

Nov. 



Dec. 



Paid W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., (replaced) books 
New England News Co., periodicals . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., (replaced 22, 46) 
books ...... 

Balch Brothers, books 

New England News Co., periodicals . 

W. B. Clarke & Co., books 

balance of appropriation . 

balance of Dean fund 

Mary E. Elliot fund and interest 



$3.26 

150.13 

23.90 
12.74 

10.00 
10.46 

5°3 
709.23 

5>3i3-63 
2,636.32 



§10,716.12 

The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library, 
including the amounts paid on account of the preparation of the 
new catalogue, for the year ending December 31, 1892, which 
were paid by the city treasurer, upon the approval of the com- 
mittee on accounts of the board of trustees, the items of which 
may be found in the annual report of the city, have been as 
follows : 



Services of librarian 








$800.00 


Services of assistant to librarian 








353-85 


Gas 








200.06 


Insurance .... 








125.00 


Binding 








14S.70 


Re-binding . . . . . 








203.42 


Fuel 








4S2.57 


Supplies 








57-io 


Printing trustees' report . 








15.00 


Newspapers .... 
Incidentals .... 








6.00 
6-37 


New catalogue 








1,127.66 


Total 








^3,5 2 5-73 



232 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Balance of appropriation, Dec. 31, 1890 $2,695.69 
Appropriation for 1891 . . . 3,800.00 



$6,495.69 

Balance of amount appropriated for catalogue, Dec. 

3 1 . l8 9° 3>3 8 7-98 



$9,883.67 



Paid trustees for purchase of books . $1,000.00 

Paid incidental expenses and catalogue . 3,525.73 

Balance of appropriation, Dec. 31, 1891 3,097.62 
Balance of appropriation for catalogue, 

Dec. 31, 1891 ...... 2,260.32 



#9*883.67 

Respectfully submitted. 

NATHAN P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library. 

December 31, 1891. 
We have examined the foregoing report, and find the same 
correctly cast and properly vouched. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 
Committee on accounts of City Library. 

December 31, 1891. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and 
expenditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of 
the trustees of the city library, and find the same correctly cast 
and properly vouched. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

I have the honor to submit to you my fourteenth yearly report, 
being the thirty-eighth annual report of the City Library. 

Whole number of volumes December 31, 1890 . 33,639 

Accessions during the year : 

By purchase 762 

Donated ...... 447 

Periodicals and papers bound . . 81 



Whole number of volumes at present : 

Maps 16 

Pamphlets ..... 1,990 

Bound volumes .... 32,923 

Number of periodicals and papers regularly received 
by purchase ...... 

Number by gift 

Number of days open to the public for reading and 
distribution of books .... 

Number of volumes delivered for home use 

Average per day 

Largest number delivered in one day, April 4 

Largest any one month, March 

Smallest any one month, June . 

Number of books delivered in the reading-roor 



1,290 



34,929 



58 


21 


308 


5 6 ' 26 5 


*83 


487 


5,702 


4,107 


8,270 



234 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Average per day ..... 
Number of guarantees received for new cards 
Whole number issued since new registration 
Number of cards returned to library 
Number of cards used on deposit 
Postals sent to delinquents 
Number of books taken from circulation, unfit for use 
Volumes replaced during the year . 
Number of books lost or injured and paid for 
Number unpaid for .... 

Number of books missing at close of year 
Number repaired and rebound at the bindery 
Number repaired and covered at the library 

Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 1890 . 
Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1S91 



27 

5°3 
8,197 

68 

9 

379 

7i 

86 

2 

1 

1 

595 
6,018 

$72.16 
122.18 



Amount paid for express, stationery, and 

incidental expenses .... $5 5 -30 
Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer . . . 72.16 



Balance of fines on hand Dec. 31, 189 1 

Balance of cash on hand Dec. 31, 1890, for findin 
lists and lost and injured books . 

Amount received from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1891 : 

For 144 finding-lists 

Two books lost .... 

By gift from depositor 



14.40 

i-9S 

3.00 



Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 



$194-34 



$127.46 



$30-51 



19-35 

$49-86 

30-5 1 



Balance of fines on hand 
Total balance 



$19-35 
66.88 

$86.23 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 235 

The review of the work of the last year brings a good deal of 
satisfaction in respect to the improvements made in connection 
with the compiling of the new catalogue. 

The reclassifying and rearranging has in many cases brought 
order out of disorder. In the early years of the library the want 
of room obliged the librarian to locate books wherever there was 
available space. Consequently, in time, volumes belonging to 
the same set became widely separated and gradually brought ir- 
regularity and confusion. In the recataloguing of the old part 
of the library, the early errors became glaring faults, and de- 
manded correction. The work of bringing the stray volumes 
into consecutive order has given us much additional labor, but 
with it has come, also, a feeling of great satisfaction, for the 
convenience of those using the library will be greatly increased, 
as well as that of the librarian. 

Another improvement has been made in providing a suitable 
place for our public documents and bound newspapers. The 
basement room has been amply shelved, and the regular set of 
executive documents, numbering 2,561, exclusive of duplicates, 
have been removed and arranged by congresses and sessions. 
The eight hundred newspapers have also been given their new 
location, in which they are easy of access, and can be consulted 
with perfect convenience. The remaining documents, 739 in 
number, bound in cloth, and mostly regular yearly reports from 
the several departments, have been brought together and arranged 
in sets. All duplicates will occupy a separate location. The 
above changes have been made in connection with the regular 
work of the library, with no interruption or confusion to mar 
even the usual quiet of the reading-room. 

The number of volumes added to the library the past year is 
1,290, by purchase, 762. Of this number 354 are added to the 
Dean donation, and include many valuable publications. The 
number of gifts has been unusually large. Only those already 
entered in the accession book appear in the yearly addition. 
We have received seventy-one volumes of the regular set of exec- 
utive documents, and the several departments of Congress have 
shown their usual liberality. 



236 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The circulation of the past year shows the same variation in 
figures. While the number delivered for use in the reading- 
room falls considerably short of last year, the home circulation 
has greatly increased, and exceeds that of any previous year. It 
is difficult to explain these fluctuations. It is worthy of note, 
however, that although the circulation has been so large, only 
one French book is unaccounted for at the close of the year. 
Seventy-one volumes were removed from circulation unfit for 
use, and eighty-six replaced. The work of repairing and recover- 
ing in the library increases yearly; the number sent to the 
bindery for repairs, about as usual. 

The issue of new cards is somewhat larger than the preceding 
year, and the number returned less. 

It is a pleasure to report a year of steady progress, as the past 
seems to have been, and with the completion of the work, and 
the use of the new catalogue, we may reasonably anticipate great- 
er results. 

Respectfully submitted. 

MRS. M. J. BUNCHER, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 
iSqi. 



Secretary of State of New Hampshire. 

Annual State Reports. 3 vols. 1890. 8vo. 

" Hammond " State Papers. Vol. 18. 8vo. 

New Hampshire Manual of the General Court, with com- 
plete official succession, 1 680-1 891. By H. B. Carter. 
121110. 

First Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers in the Re- 
bellion. By Rev. Stephen G. Abbott, chaplain. 1890. 
Svo. 

Journal of New Hampshire Senate and House (Special Ses- 
sion). 1890. 

Irving A. Watson, M. D., Secretary. 

Ninth Annual Report of the New Hampshire State Board of 
Health. 1890. 1 vol. Svo. 

First Annual Report of the Board of Commissioners of Lu- 
nacy. 1890. 1 vol. Svo. 

Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, and Twelfth Reports on Registra- 
tion of Births, Marriages, and Deaths of New Hampshire. 

City of Manchester, N. H. 

Sixty-eight volumes of Municipal Reports of various cities 
and towns in the United States. 8vos. 

E. W. Towns, City Clerk. 

Eight volumes of Municipal Reports of the City of Worces- 
ter, Mass. 8vo. 



238 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

James H. Dodge, Auditor. 

Ten volumes of Municipal Reports of Boston, Mass. 8vos. 

Heirs of Hon. John B. Clarke. 

A set of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate 
Armies during the Rebellion. 37 vols, and 19 dupli- 
cates. 

Heirs of James Mitchell, Esq., Manchester. 

Forty-three volumes of Harper's Monthly, Vols. 41 to 83 
inclusive, and 14 volumes of miscellaneous books. 
Judge and Mrs. J. W. Fellows. 

Sixty-six volumes of miscellaneous books (largely medical), 
and 118 unbound numbers on the same subjects, many of 
them of very early date. 

Dr. W. W. Wilkins, Manchester. 

Fifty-six bound volumes and 75 unbound numbers, 88 mis- 
cellaneous pamphlets, mostly on medical subjects. 

Heirs of Hon. Daniel Clark. 

Forty-two volumes of miscellaneous books, among which 
are eight volumes of " The American Review," published 
in 1845. i2mo. 

Rev. G. L. Demarest, Manchester. 

Six volumes of periodicals for the year 1891, viz. : Popular 
Science Monthly, North American Review, and the Forum. 

Right Rev. Bishop Bradley, Manchester. 

History of the Catholic Church in the United States from 
1S43 to 1890. 8vo. 
Hon. James F. Briggs, Manchester. 

Six volumes of the Official Records of the Rebellion. 8vo. 

Mrs. A. M. Scott, Manchester. 

The Story of the Irish in Boston. Edited by James B. Cul- 
len, 111. 1889. Svo. 

Sereno D. Nickerson, R. G. S. 

Nineteen volumes of the Proceedings of the Masonic Grand 
Lodge of Massachusetts. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIERARY. 239 

John H. Steele, Esq., Peterborough, N. H. 

Sesqui-Centennial of Peterborough. October 24, 1889. 8vo. 

Alfred Gilman, Esq., Secretary. 

Contributions of the "Old Residents' Historical Society," 
of Lowell, Mass. Vol. 4. 1891. 
Christian Science Dispensary, Manchester. 

Science of Health, with key to the Scriptures. By Mary B. 

G. Eddy. 8vo. 
Christian Science Journal for the year 1891. 

Bushrod W. Hill, Esq., Manchester. 

Gleanings from the Sea. By Joseph W. Smith, Esq. 1887. 
8vo. 
James Eddy, Providence, R. I. 

Thoughts on Religion and morality. 1891. 8vo. 

S. C. Gould, Esq., Manchester. 

Notes and Queries for the year T891. Vol. 8. 8vo. 
Fifteenth Annual Report of the Grand Lodge of the Knights 
of Honor. October, 1891. Pamphlet. 

Charles A. Durfee, Manchester. 

The World Almanac and Bureau of Information. 1891. 

i2mo. 
Schiller's complete poems. 121110. 
Goethe's complete poems. 121110. 
The Sketch-Book. Washington Irving. 121110. 

Harry Clifton, Manchester. 

History of New Hampshire. By John N. McClintock. 

1888. 8vo. 
Veterans' Advocate for the year 1891. Folio. 

J. C. Dana, Denver, Col. 

Denver Illustrated. 1890-91. 4to. 

Denver Real Estate and Stock Exchange Annual Report. 

R. H. Tilley, Newport, R. I. 

New-England Notes and Queries. Vol. 1. 1890. 121110. 



240 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

G. C. Gilmore, Esq., Manchester. 

Journal of the Senate and House, State of New Hampshire, 

for the year 1870. 8vo. 
" Secure a Home in New Hampshire." 
" Lakes and Summer Resorts of New Hampshire." By 

N. J. Bachelder. 

Other pamphlets. 

City Clerk, Salem, Mass. 

Six volumes of Municipal Reports, 1885 to 1890 inclusive. 
8vo. 

E. M. Bowman, Esq., city clerk, Nashua, N. H. 

Five volumes Municipal Reports for the years 1874, '76, 
'88, '89, '90. 

Thomas Cooke & Son, N. Y. 

The Business of Travel. A fifty years' record of progress. 
By W. F. Rae. 1891. 121110. 

Cobden Club, London. 

The Tariff of the United States in relation to Free Trade. 
By Sir Lyon Playfair. 1890. 

Minneapolis Public Library. 

" Illustrated Minneapolis." A souvenir of the Minneapolis 

Journal. By E. W. Mather and H. N. Blood. Oblong. 
" Minneapolis — A Study of the City and Its Surroundings, 

Resources, etc." 1891. 
Eighth Annual Report of the Chamber of Commerce. 
1891. 8vo. 
New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company, Manchester. 

Manchester and Its Leading Business Men, Embracing 
also those of Goffstown. By George F. Bacon. Illus- 
trated. 1891. 4to. 

Edward C. Shirley, Esq. 

Sketch of the Erection and Dedication of the Statue of 
General John Stark, by the State of New Hampshire, 
October 23, 1890. 4to. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 241 

C. B. Spofford, Esq., Clareraont, N. H. 

Early History of Claremont, and other pamphlets of in- 
terest. 

Commercial Club, Concord, N. H. 

Concord, Past, Present, and Prospective. Illustrated. By 
G. F. Bacon. 4to. 

William A. Peele. 

Third Biennial Report of Department of Statistics, State of 
Indiana. 1889-90. 8vo. 

James B. Straw, Esq. 

Municipal Reports of the City of Manchester, for the year 
1890. i2tno. 

Charles F. Livingston, Esq. 

Proceedings of the National Editorial Association of the 

United States. Cincinnati. 
Report of the Board of Education, Los Angeles. 
Other pamphlets. 

B. P. Cilley, Esq., Manchester. 

A Sketch of the Life of Maj. Gen. Joseph Cilley, of Not- 
tingham, N. H. By George William Plummer, of 
Epping. 
Hon. Charles H. Bartlett, Manchester. 

Oration delivered before the Grand Army, on the Life and 
Character of General Gilman Marston, May 30, 1891. 
Howard J. Kimball, Esq. 

Names and Records of the Members of the First New 
Hampshire Battery during the Rebellion. Pamphlet. 
Henry E. White, West Newton, Mass. 

Origin of the American Navy. Pamphlet. 
New Bedford Board of Trade. 

Interesting Manufacturing Statistics for 1891. Pamphlet. 
Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer. 

Annual Report of the Fire Department, Manchester, for the 
year 1890. Pamphlet. 



242 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

John F. Clough, county commissioner. 

Annual Report of Hillsborough County. Year ending 
April, 1 89 1. Pamphlet. 

Unknown. 

Annual Address before the American Bar Association : "The 
Ideal and Actual in the Law." By James C. Carten, 
N. Y., 1890. Pamphlet. 

Address before the American Bankers' Association. By 
Edmund J. James, Philadelphia. 1891. Pamphlet. 

Address of the Representative of the Religious Society of 
Friends for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware, in 
behalf of the Indians. 1891. Pamphlet. 

The Persecution of the Jews in Russia and a Summary of 
Special Restriction Laws. By the Russo-Jewish Commit- 
tee. London, 1890. Pamphlet. 

Political and Financial Errors of our Recent Monetary Leg- 
islation. By Francis A. Brooks. Pamphlet. 

Sketch of Pine Hill School District, Dover, N. H. By 
Herman W. Stevens. Pamphlet. 

Exposition of Illegal Acts of ex-President Balmaceda. By 
Pedro Montt, confidential agent of the constitutional 
government of Chili. Washington, D. C, 1891. Pam- 
phlet. 

Annual Report of the Board of Trade of Seattle, Wash., 
with a Review of the Commerce of the City, etc. Pam- 
phlet. 

Catalogues of Schools. 

Harvard University: Catalogue for the year 1890-91. 
Pamphlet. 

Cornell University : Register for the year 1890-91. Pam- 
phlet. 

Amherst College : Catalogue for the year 1890-91. Pam- 
phlet. 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.: Catalogue for the year 
1891-92. Records Nos. 1 and 2. Circular of Informa- 
tion. Four pamphlets. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 243 

University of Pennsylvania : Catalogue and Announcement. 

1890-91. Pamphlet. 
University of California : Register for the year 1890-91. 

Pamphlet. 

Rev. Marvin D. Bisbee, Dartmouth College. 

Catalogues of Dartmouth College for the years 1877, 1878) 
1S90, 1 89 1. Four pamphlets. 
William T. Gibson, the Editor. 

"The Rambler." Published monthly during the school 
year by the Conference Seminary at Tilton, N. H. No- 
vember to June, 1890-91. Vol. 4. 

Reports of Librarians and Boards of Trustees. 

Boston, Mass. Annual Reports of the Boston Public Li- 
brary. Nos. 6 and 23. 1S5S and 1875. Two pam- 
phlets. 

Brooklyn. N. Y. Thirty-third Annual Report of the Pub- 
lic Library. March, 1891. Bulletin 29. December, 
1 89 1. Two pamphlets. Nineteenth Annual Report of 
the Mercantile Library Association. 1875. Pamphlet. 

Baltimore, Md. Peabody Institute, Twenty-fourth Annual 
Report. June, 1891. Pamphlet. 

Brookline, Mass. Thirty-fourth Annual Report of the Free 
Public Library. 1890. Pamphlet. 

Birmingham, Eng. Twenty-ninth Annual Report of the 
Free Public Libraries. 1890. Pamphlet. 

Bridgeport, Conn. Annual Report of the Public Library 

■ and Reading-room. July, 1891. Pamphlet. 

Chicago, 111. Nineteenth Annual Report of the Public 
Library, June, 1891. Pamphlet. Ten Finding-lists of 
the various departments of Literature, bulletins from 10 
to 14 inclusive, making sixteen pamphlets. Proceedings 
of the Trustees of the Newbury Library, and Librarian's 
Report. January, 1891. Pamphlets. 

Cincinnati, O. Annual Report of the Public Library. 
June, 1890. Quarterly Bulletin. April-June, 1891. 
Two pamphlets. 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Clinton, Mass. Seventeenth Annual Report of the Bigelow 
Library. Year 1890. Pamphlet. 

Cambridge, Mass. Public Library Report for the Year 
1890. Pamphlet. 

Denver, Col. Bulletins of Public Library, Nos. 1 to 9 in- 
clusive. 1890, '91. 

Dover, N. H. Pamphlet. Eighth Annual Report of Pub- 
lic Library. 1890. Pamphlet. 

Fall River, Mass. Annual Report of Free Library for the 
Year 1890. Pamphlet. 

Germantown, Phila. Annual Report of the Friends' Free 
Library and Reading-room for 1890. Pamphlet. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Finding-list of the Poetry and the 
Drama, Literature and Polygraphy, belonging to the Pub- 
lic Library of Indianapolis. 4to. 

Lawrence, Mass. Reports of the Free Public Library for 
the Years 1874, 1875, l8 77> ar >d 1890. Bulletins Nos. 5, 
6, and 7. Seven pamphlets. 

Lynn, Mass. Twenty-eighth Annual Report of the Trus- 
tees and Librarian. December, 1890. Pamphlet. 

Los Angeles, Cal. Annual Report of the Public Library 
for 1890. Pamphlet. 

Lowell, Mass. Annual Report of the Free City Library for 
the Year 1884. Pamphlet. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Thirteenth Annual Report. October 1, 
1890. 

Maiden, Mass. Thirteenth Annual Report of the Public 
Library. 1890. Pamphlet. 

Manchester, Eng. Thirty-ninth Annual Report on the 
Working of the Public Free Libraries. 1890. Pamphlet. 

Minneapolis, Minn. First Annual Report of the Free 
Public Library. December 31, 1890. Bulletin No. 3. 
February, 1891. Two pamphlets. 

Melrose, Mass. Reports of the Public Library, Nos. 1 to 8 
inclusive, and for the year 1890. Nine Pamphlets. 

New York. Astor Library Reports, from 1869, '77, '78, 
and 1886, to 1890. Nine pamphlets. Annual Report of 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 245 

the Maimonides Library for 1890. Supplement to the 
Catalogue of German Fiction and Juvenile. Two pam- 
phlets. 

Natick, Mass. Eighteenth Annual Report of Morse Insti- 
tute, for the Year ending February, 1S91. Pamphlet. 

Newton, Mass. Report of the Free Public Library, year 
ending December 31, 1890. Pamphlet. 

Newport, N. H. By-laws, Rules, and Regulations of the 
Richards Free Library, with Historical Sketch of its 
Foundation. Pamphlet. Catalogue and Supplement No. 
1. July, 1890. Two pamphlets. 

New Haven, Conn. Reports of the Free Library for the 
Years 1889 and 1890. Two pamphlets. 

New Jersey. Rules and Regulations of the Free Public 
Library of Jersey City, 1891; and Supplement No. 1 to 
Finding-list. October 1, 1891. Two pamphlets. 

Omaha, Neb. Fourteenth Annual Report of the Board of 
Directors of the Public Library, Year ending May, 1891. 
Pamphlet. 

Providence, R. I. Thirteenth Annual Report of the Pub- 
lic Library, for the year 1890. Pamphlet. 

Portland, Me. Second Annual Report of the Public 
Library. 1890-91. Pamphlet. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Seventy-first Annual Report of the 
Apprentice's Library Company. 1890. Pamphlet. Bulle- 
tins of Library Company Nos. 26 and 27. 1891. Two 
pamphlets. 

Peabody, Mass. Annual Reports of the Peabody Institute, 
for the years 1872, '73, '78, '80, '81, '85, '87, and 1890. 
Eight pamphlets. 

Southampton Borough, Eng. Second Annual Report of 
Committee on Public Library. June 1, 1889, to August 
30, 1890. Pamphlet. 

Swansea, Wales. Seventeenth Annual Report of .the Public 
Library and Gallery of Art Committee. 1890-91. 
Pamphlet. 



246 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

San Francisco, Cal. Thirty-eighth Annual Report of the 
Mercantile Library Association. 1890. Report of Board 
of Trustees and Librarian of the Free Public Library, 
June, 1 89 1. Classified English Prose Fiction. Transla- 
tions and Juvenile Works, etc., No. 6, 1891. Two pam- 
phlets. 

St. Louis, Mo. Annual Report of the Free Public Li- 
brary. 1889-90. Forty-Fifth Annual Report of the 
Mercantile Library Association. 1890. Two pamphlets. 

St. Joseph, Mo. Annual Report of the Free Public Li- 
brary. 1890-91. Classified List of Books in the Library, 
May, 1891. Two pamphlets. 

Springfield, Mass. Annual Report of the Library Associ- 
ation, for year ending May 6, 1891. Pamphlet. Bul- 
letins Nos. i-i2, inclusive, for the year 1891. 

Salem, Mass. Trustees' Report of Salem Public Library. 
December, 1890. Pamphlet. 

West Bromwich, London. Report of Committee of Hands- 
worth Public Library, for the year ending March, 1891. 
Pamphlet. 

Wilmington, Del. Thirty-fourth Annual Report of the 
Wilmington Institute. 1891. Pamphlet. 

Waterbury, Conn. Reports of the Board of Agents of the 
Bronson Library Fund, for the years 1888-S9, 1889-90. 
Two pamphlets. 

Worcester, Mass. Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the Free 
Public Library, for the year 1890. Pamphlet. 

Windham, N. H. Twentieth Annual Report of the Trus- 
tees of the Nesmith Library. March, 1891. Pamphlet. 

From the Several Publishers : 

"American Young Folks," a monthly magazine. G. Waldo 

Brown, publisher, Manchester, N. H. 4to. 
" American Sentinel." Pacific Press Association, Oakland, 

Cal. For the year 1891. Folio. 
" City Library." City Library Association, Springfield, 

Mass., publishers. Vol. 4, 1891. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 247 

" Colorado Sun." Published in Denver. For the year 

1S91. Folio. 
" Canadien." E. R. Dufresne, proprietaire, Manchester, 

N. H. For 1891. Folio. 
" Daily Press." Press Publishing Co., Manchester, N. H. 

For the year 1891. Folio. 
" Good Health." From the Sanitarium Health and Tem- 
perance Co., Battle Creek, Mich. 1S91. 4to. 
" High School Echo." Published by the senior class of the 

Manchester High School. Vol. 2. 1891. 4to. 
" Lawrence Anzeiger " (German). Published at Lawrence, 

Mass. For 1891. Folio. 
" Le Fidele Messager, Journal Mensuel." Thos. A. Dorion, 

proprietaire, Manchester, N. H. 1891. 4to. 
"Manifesto." From Shaker Village, Canterbury, N. H. 

For 1 89 1. 8vo. 
"New Hampshire Catholic." Chas. A. O'Connor, Esq., 

publisher, Manchester, N. H. 
"Plymouth Record." Record Publishing Co., Plymouth, 

N. H., 1891. Folio. 
" Practical Mechanic." F. S. Blanchard & Co., Worces- 
ter, Mass. For 1891. Folio. 
" Saturday Telegram." William M. Kendall, publisher, 

Manchester, N. H. 1891. Folio. 
" Students' Phonographic Journal." Andrew J. Graham, 

publisher, New York. For the year 1891. 4to. 
" Travelers' Record." Travelers' Insurance Co., Hartford, 

Conn. 4to. 189 1. 
"The Voice." A temperance journal published by Funk 

& Wagnalls, New York City. 1891. Folio. 
"Weirs Times." M. N. Calvert, publisher, Weirs, N. H. 

For the tourist season of 1891. Folio. 

united states government. 
State Department. 

Consular Reports, Vols. 33 and 34, Nos. 128 to 131 of Vol. 
35- 1891. 



248 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Bureau of Statistics. Special Reports Nos. i to 5, inclusive, 
completing volumes 2, 3, and 4. 

International American Conference. Reports of Commit- 
tees and Discussions thereon. 2 vols. 4to. 

Hon. W. G. Veazey, commissioner. Fourth Annual Re- 
port of the Interstate Commerce Commission. Decem- 
ber, 1890. 8vo. 

Treasury Department. 

Report of the Superintendent of the United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey, for 1888 and 1889. 2 vols. 4to. 
Bulletins Nos. 19 to 23, inclusive. 
Catalogue of Charts and other Publications of the United 
States Coast Survey. 1890. 4to. 

Interior Department. 

From Hon. Alonzo Nute, M. C. 

Geological Surveys. J. W. Powell, Director. 3 vols. 4to. 
Report on Navigation for the year 1889. 8vo. 
Report of the Commissioners of Education. 1887-88. 8vo. 
Smithsonian Reports for the year 1887. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Report of Commissioner of Pensions. June, 189 1. 8vo. 
Report on the Fisheries of Alaska. 1889. 8vo. 
Message and Documents for the year 1889-90. 8vo. 
Atlas Sheets. Geology of the Quicksilver Deposits on the 

Pacific Slope. By Becker. 4to. 
From Hon. H. W. Blair. 

United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the 

Rocky Mountain Region. J. W. Powell, Director. 
Report of the Geology and Resources of the Black Hills of 

Dakota. 2 vols. 4to. 
Observations made during the years 1883 and 1884 at the 

U. S. Naval Observatory. 2 vols. 4to. 
From Bureau of Education. 

Publications of United States Bureau of Education from 

1867 to 1890. 8vo. 
Circular of Information No. 1, 1S91. Higher Education in 

Indiana. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 249 

From Hon. Wm. T. Harris, Commissioner. 

" Reciprocidad Commercial Entre Mexico Los Estados 
Unidos." 1890. 8vo. 

Smithsonian Institution. 

Miscellaneous Collections. Vol. 34. Svo. 

Annual reports of the Institution for the years 1888 and 

1889. 2 vols. Svo. 
Annual Report of the National Museum. June 30, 1888. 

Svo. 
Experiments in Aerodynamics. By S. P. Langley. No. 801, 

Smithsonian Series. 
Nos. 671 and 672 Natural History illustrations, viz., The 

Anatomy of Astrangia Danse, and six species of North 

American fresh water fishes. Two numbers. 4to. 1889. 

War Department. 

Official Records of the Union and Confederate armies. 

From volume 32 to 37, with parts. 15 vols. 
Annual Report of the Life-Saving Service. Year, June, 

1889. Svo. 
Atlas to accompany the Official Records of the Union and 

Confederate Armies in the War of the Rebellion. 

Quartermaster-General U. S. A. 

Flags of the Army of the United States during the War of 
the Rebellion. 1861-1865. 4to. 

Regulations of the Uniforms of the United States Army, Il- 
lustrated. 4to. 

Commanders of Army Corps, Divisions, and Brigades of the 
United States. 4:0. 

Twelve volumes of the " Roll of Honor " and Index. 

Four volumes relating to the removal of deceased Union 
soldiers to national cemeteries in the Southern and West- 
ern States. Svo. 

Navy Department. 

United States Board of Geographical Names. Bulletins 
Nos. 1 and 2. 1891. 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

M. McDonald, commissioner. 

Annual Report for the year 1887. Part 15. 8vo. 

Bureau of Statistics of Labor. 
Carroll D. Wright, commissioner. 

Report on Marriage and Divorce in the United States. 

1867-1886. 8vo. 
Fifth and Sixth Annual Reports of the Commissioner of La- 
bor. 1889, 1890. 2 vols. 8vo. 

United States Congress. 

Seventy-one volumes of Public Documents of the Forty- 
ninth, Fiftieth, and Fifty- first Congresses. 



REPORTS 



COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUND. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Fund have the 
honor to present herewith their twelfth annual report, embracing 
the report of their treasurer, which shows the financial operations 
for the year ending December 31, 1891, and the condition of 
the fund at the present time. 

No work has been attempted the past year beyond the ordinary 
care of the endowed lots, nor can any improvements of consider- 
able magnitude be accomplished until the means at the command 
of your trustees increase to such an extent as to warrant the out- 
lay. In this connection we desire to reiterate what has been said 
in former reports relating to the meager amounts that have, in 
many instances, been donated for this purpose, as the interest 
only can be used. 

The trustees have expended the means at their command for 
the care and preservation of lots as well as they were able, and 
are pleased to say that their efforts have generally received the 
commendation of parties interested. 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, 
P. C. CHENEY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund, 
January 1, 1892. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Cemetery Fund : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit to you the ninth annual 
report of the funds received and expenses paid to December 31, 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 



Amount of permanent fund on hand, as 




per last report .... 


$10,045.71 


Received during the year from : 




Charles W. Brown 


162.32 


Mrs. S. J. N. S. Woods . 


174.74 


Mrs. Stephen E. Sawtelle . 


142.27 


Charles Brown .... 


162.64 


Mrs. Safford W. Prescott . 


100.00 


Mr. and Mrs. John Kilgore 


166.71 


Alfred F. Patten and others 


I34-3 6 


Benjamin J. and Fred A. Robinson 


145.80 


Daniel Butterfield and others 


134.48 


Thomas L. Thorpe 


171.90 


Orrin E. Kimball 


205.50 


Charles C. Cole 


J 58.97 


Dr. C. M. Dodge 


160.00 


Nellie E. Robinson estate . 


200.00 


Josiah Carpenter 


344.00 


Martin V. B. Edgerly 


I49-3I 



REPORT OF COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 



255 



Freeman Higgins 


$128.84 




Alfred D. Stark 


I33-52 




Alvin Pratt estate 


300.00 




Samuel Thompson 


97.46 




Selwin B. Wallace 


97.46 




George A. Alger 


83.72 




A. G. Fairbanks 


175.26 




Total permanent fund . 


• $ 


[ 3>774-97 


Income on hand as per last report 


$467.66 




Income received since last report 


529-77 




Total income . 




$997-43 


Expenses paid as follows: 






James Bros. .... 


$32-63 




Sidney A. Blood 


16.25 




Pine Grove cemetery, care of lots 


290.50 




Joseph B. Sawyer 


41.30 




Total expense 


$380.68 




Cash in hand 


616.75 








$997-43 


Valley Cemeter 


y- 




Amount of permanent fund on hand, as 






per last report .... 


$3,450.00 




Received since last report from : 






Charles F. Durgin estate 


200.00 




John J. Underhill . 


100.00 




Adaline Hartshorn 


100.00 




Asenath Bugbee .... 


100.00 




Mrs. E. P. Merrill 


50.00 




Samuel N. Bell estate . 


500.00 




Eliza Edgerton .... 


100.00 





Total amount of permanent fund 



$4,600.00 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Income as per last report . . . $324.76 
Income received since last report . 178.75 



Total income 




Expenses paid as follows : 




Palmer & Garmon 


$20.00 


Valley cemetery, care of lots 


•85.15 


Total expense 


• $105.15 


Cash on hand 


398.36 



$5°3-5 r 



$503-5* 



Piscataquog Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand, as 

per last report $200.00 

Received during the year from : 

Sarah B. Gage 100.00 

Total amount of permanent fund . . . $300.00 

Income on hand as per last report . $11-25 
Income received since last report . 10.83 

Total income $22.08 



Merrill Cemetery. 

Amount of permanent fund on hand, as per last re- 
port $200.00 

Income received since last report .... $10.00 

Expenses paid as follows : 

G. B. Tilton $6.00 

Cash on hand 4-°° 

$10.00 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer of Trustees of Cemetery Fund. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 257 

This is to certify that I have examined the books of accounts 
of Sylvanus B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of the cemetery 
fund, embracing the receipts and expenditures for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1891, and that I find the same correct and 
properly vouched. I have also examined the securities in which 
said fund is invested, and find as follows : 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 

5 per cent, 1913 .... $13,750.00 
Cash on hand . . . . . 24.97 



Total amount of permanent fund . . . $13,774,97 



Valley Cemetery. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 

5 per cent, 1913 .... $4,600.00 



Total amount of permanent fund . . . $4,600.00 



Piscataquog Cemetery. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 

5 per cent, 1913 .... $300.00 



Total amount of permanent fund . . . $300.00 



Merrill Cemetery. 
Bonds of the city of Manchester, N. H., 

5 per cent, 1913 .... $200.00 

Total amount of permanent fund . . . $200.00 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 
February i, 1892. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery have the honor 
to submit the following report : 

During the past year substantial progress has been made in the 
development and ornamentation of this cemetery. Thirteen 
hundred yards of concrete drive have been laid ; 400 feet of 3- 
inch and 175 feet of 2-inch pipe put down, and 12 hydrants and 
3 catch-basins set. 

No new avenues have been laid out the present year. Those 
previously constructed have received careful attention, and 1,020 
loads of gravel used upon them. Loam to an amount of 247 
loads has been used, and 250 loads of muck taken from the Straw 
lot ready for use the coming season ; 403 loads of sand have also 
been removed. 

Of the 30 lots on Hillside lawn unsold at the commencement 
of the year, 23 have been sold, leaving but 7 undisposed of, and 
for a portion of these, negotiations are now pending. The ex- 
haustion of this source of supply of perpetual care lots must soon 
create a demand for those on Riverside lawn, which will be ready 
for sale early in the coming season. 

The demand for lots of this character will necessitate the early 
setting apart of other parts of the cemetery for a like purpose, 



REPORT OF COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 259 

and their development ; the effect of such lots upon the general 
appearance of the grounds is so gratifying that their sale ought 
to be encouraged in all legitimate ways. 

The Hill and Barton mausoleum, erected on Chapel lawn dur- 
ing the year, is one of the finest structures of this character to be 
found in this section of the country, and must always remain a 
beautiful ornament to the cemetery and a lasting tribute to the 
affection and generosity of those whose name it bears. 

The year has also witnessed the erection of thirty-one monu- 
ments, many of which are remarkable for their beauty and elab- 
oration of design, and all of them highly appropriate for their 
intended use. 

The Swedish lot has been extended southerly and westerly, so 
as to meet the demand for family lots which now exists among 
this class of our people. Four granite curbings have also been 
put in, adding greatly to the beauty of the lots so inclosed. 

An attempt was made to purchase the Benjamin Mitchell lot, 
so called, as authorized by the city councils, and the offer of the 
owners was accepted, but the interference of other parties during 
the negotiations prevented the purchase. 

The superintendent, Byron A. Stearns, has proved a very ac- 
ceptable incumbent of that position, and deserves great credit 
for his interest in and devotion to the duties which have de- 
volved upon him. 

The sub-trustees append the following statistical tables to their 
report with the hope that they may be satisfactory to the lot 
owners, and give desirable information in regard to the duties 
performed by the superintendent. 

Superintendent's Account. 

Received for deposit on lots . 

for interments .... 
for water rents .... 
for labor on lots 
for removals .... 
for removing sand . 



p 


#777-°o 


447.50 


443-75 


5^3-55 


68.50 


37.00 



260 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Received for trimming graves 
for clay sold 



$16.00 
3.00 



$2,376.30 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Lots sold on Hillside lawn 

Lots unsold on Hillside lawn 

Restricted lots sold 

Restricted lots unsold 

Ordinary lots sold . 

Ordinary lots unsold 

Total lots sold during the yea 

Number of interments . 

Number of removals 

Clay used on avenue borders (loads) 

Water rents due and unpaid . 

Labor on lots ....... 

John L. Sanborn. 

George W. Bacon. 

John P. Young. 

George M. Bean. 

Charles H. Bartlett 



2 3 
7 
32 
39 
28 

3° 

33 

235 

17 

9 

$!35-5° 

$128.00 



Valley Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the cemetery known as "the Valley" 
respectfully submit the following report for the year 1892 : 

During the year the usual amount of labor has been expended 
in keeping the cemetery in proper condition ; and in addition 
quite a number of improvements have been made. A new arbor 
or summer house has been constructed a short distance below the 
one previously built, and a substantial bridge placed across the 
brook at a convenient distance from the same. The valley on 



REPORT OF COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 



261 



both sides of the brook has been graded and grassed over as far 
as the brook has been paved, thus adding greatly to the beauty 
of the cemetery. The paving of the bottom' and edges of the 
brook has been extended about two hundred feet, and it is ex- 
pected that the remaining portion can be completed during the 
coming year. 

Since the new tomb was constructed, considerable trouble has 
been experienced in properly placing the bodies deposited there- 
in, on account of the lack of racks for their reception. During 
the year the trustees have caused the tomb to be furnished with 
racks sufficient to provide for the reception of seventy-five bodies, 
each separate from any other, a great improvement upon the cus- 
tom followed in past years of placing them on the floor in piles. 
It is the intention of the trustees to have the roof of the tomb, 
which has never been water-tight since it was built, thoroughly 
repaired during the next year. 

During the year there have been seventy-nine interments in 
the cemetery, and seventeen removals of bodies, while forty-six 
bodies have been placed in the tomb. 



Materials used 


n improvements have been as 


follows : 


Turf . 




. 3,240 feet. 


Loam . 




243 loads. 


Stone . 




30 " 


Gravel . 




141 " 


Sand . 




225 " 


Manure 




2 cords. 


Ashes . 




3 tons. 


Phosphate . 




y 2 ton. 


Monuments have been erected on the folio 


ving lots : E. T. 


Baldwin, G. W. Morrison, Mrs. W. F. Bradbury, — - McCoy, 


C. H. Perkins, Samuel Mitchell, and Taylor G. 


Sweatt. 


RECEIPTS. 




Appropriation 


. $2,800.00 


Tomb fees $2 


24.00 


Graves and remov 


als . 2 


42.50 



262 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Care and water . 


$775-°° 


Grass and wood sold . 


20.50 


Labor and materials . 


238.00 




$1,500.00 


Total 


. $4,300.00 


EXPENDITURES. 




Paid C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 


$728.00 


C. H. Griffin, labor 


339- 2 9 


Luther Leavitt, labor 


3°3-5° 


James Hannan, labor 


248.91 


Joseph Simoneau, labor . 


223.26 


C. Henry Gilman, labor . 


8.26 


George Van Brocklin, labor 


19.88 


B. F. Bascomb, team, gravel, etc. 


239-25 


Temple & Farrington Co., book, etc 


4.10 


District No. 2, sand 


4.00 


F. G. Riddle, printing 


3-35 


C. H. G. Foss, shrubs 


15-7° 


Timothy Carr, loam 


4.00 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware and phos 




phate ..... 


51.21 


Peter Woodman, loam and turf 


77.90 


H. H. Huntress, plants . 


3.00 


J. Francis, rubber boots . 


3.00 


J. Francis, plants and labor 


49.14 


T. W. Lamprey, shrubs . 


4.00 


Killey & Wadleigh, hardware . 


8-75 


Michael Murray, manure 


10.00 


J. A. Auger, ashes . 


1.67 


H. McEvoy, loam . 


38.40 


J. Hodge, lumber . 


2.15 


T. A. Lane, pipe 


42.51 


Pike & Heald, pipe and hose . 


21.18 


Ray Brook Garden Co., plants 


13.48 


B. W. Hill, cloth . 


4-25 



REPORT OF COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 



263 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., hardware $2>-°9 

J. J. Abbott, paint . . . . 2.78 
Head & Dowst, bridge and summer 

house 287.78 

N. J. Whalen, repairing straps . . .50 

Stone & Wellington, shrubs . . 4.00 

B. A. Stearns ..... 6.00 

W. Smith, stones . . . . 1.50 

L. M. Aldrich .... .20 

J. R. Vance & Co., stove-pipe . 1.80 

Welcome Jencks, loam . . . 14-50 



S. B. Putnam, treasurer 
Balance 



Total 



Appropriation for repair of city tomb 
Transfer ..... 



$2,794.79 

1,500.00 

5.21 

$4,300.00 
$500.00 



$520.00 

Paid Manchester Heating and Lighting Co. . . $520.00 

The superintendent, Mr. Charles H. G. Foss, has continued to 
discharge the duties of his position with the same fidelity as in 
the past, and to the entire satisfaction of the sub-trustees. 

John J. Holland, 
Levi K. Snow, 
Bushrod W. Hill, 
N. P. Hunt, 
J. M. Kendall, 
Sub- Trustees of the Valley Cemetery. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual report of 
the money received by me during the year ending December 31, 
1891 : 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Number of deeds delivered during the year 1891, seventy-six. 



#4,583-77 
#4,583-77 



Valley Cemetery. 

To cash received from superintendent . . . $1,500.00 
By superintendent's receipts ..... 1,500.00 

All money received by me has been turned into the city treas- 
ury, for which I have the proper vouchers from the city clerk. 

I have in my possession forty- one deeds ready for delivery, the 
most of which will be taken in a few months ; there are a few, 
however, which have been standing for a long time with no pros- 



To cash received for the same 


• #2,952.30 


interest ..... 


32.17 


cash received from superintendent 


1,599.30 


By superintendent's receipts . 


• #1,599-3° 


treasurer's receipts . 


2,984.47 



REPORT OF COMMITTEES ON CEMETERIES. 265 

pect of their being delivered. They have been repeatedly noti- 
fied, but show no disposition to complete their contract. In one 
case during the past year, one lot that was contracted for eight 
years ago by J. O. Webster, was declared forfeited by the sub- 
trustees, the body that was buried thereon removed to the public 
grounds, and the lot sold to another party. A few more of such 
extreme measures will have to be resorted to in order to clear up 
and dispose of long-standing contracts. 

Most respectfully submitted. 

SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 
Treasurer of Trustees of Cemeteries. 

Manchester, N. H., February 6, 1892. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus 
B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the 
same correct and properly vouched for. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of 

Manchester : 

In compliance with the ordinances of said city, the Overseers 
of the Poor herewith present their annual report for the year 
1S91. 

The whole number of families that have received more or less 
assistance off the farm during the year has been sixty, consisting 
of two hundred and twenty-four persons, all of whom have a 
settlement in this city. Three of this number died during the 
year. 

The whole number of paupers supported at the city farm dur- 
ing the year has been three. 

The whole number of persons supported at the State Industrial 
School during the year has been two, at a cost of one dollar and 
fifty cents per week for each person. 

The whole number of persons supported at the county farm 
during the year has been one, at a cost of two dollars per week. 

The overseers of the poor have given and allowed four hun- 
dred and fifty orders to paupers off the farm during the year, 
consisting chiefly of groceries, fuel, medicine, board, clothing, 
and emergencies. 



270 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The amount allowed to the several wards is as follows : 



Ward i 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 



Ward 8 

Bills allowed for emergency cases 

Total allowed . 
Cash received from county 



$62.31 
106.40 
171.20 
220.30 
1,598.86 

398-85 
594.06 



#3> x 5 x -98 

1,779.29 

$4,931.29 
1,634.31 



$3,296.96 



Total cost 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

William H. Maxwell, Ward 1, Clerk. 
Thomas L. Quimby, Ward 2. 
Benjamin F. Garland, Ward 3. 
George S. Holmes, Ward 4. 
Patrick Costello, Ward 5. 
Charles Francis, Ward 6. 
William Marshall, Ward 7. 
William Weber, Ward 8. 



A true copy. 



WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 

Clerk of the Board. 



To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City 

of Manchester : 

In compliance with chapter 81, sections 1 and 2, Laws, State 
of New Hampshire, passed at the June session, 1889, the Over- 
seers of the Poor herewith present their annual report, under the 
head of "Aid to Dependent Soldiers and their Families." 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 271 

The whole number of families of indigent soldiers who have 
received more or less aid during the year has been thirteen, con- 
sisting of thirty-four persons, at a cost of nine hundred and 
seven dollars and ninety cents. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

William H. Maxwell, Ward i, Clerk. 

Thomas L. Quimby, Ward 2. 

Benjamin F. Garland, Ward 3. 

George S. Holmes, Ward 4. 

Patrick Costello, Ward 5. 

Charles Francis, Ward 6. 

William Marshall, Ward 7. 

William Weber, Ward 8. 

A true copy. 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 

Clerk of the Board. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON 
CITY FARM. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY 
FARM. 



To his Honor the Mayor and City Councils of the City of Man- 
chester : 

Gentlemen, — The Joint Standing Committee on City Farm 
hereby submit to you their annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1891. Having fairly and impartially appraised 
all personal property at the farm, we find the summary as fol- 
lows : 



Live stock . 




$1,867.00 


Wagons, carts, and team 


furnishings . 


1,029.45 


Farming implements . 




1,189.15 


Hay, grain, and produce 




3>4ii-75 


Household furniture 




2,328.96 


Provisions and fuel 




1,461.26 



Statement of accounts for the year 1891 : 

Dr. 
To appropriation .... $6,500.00 
overdraft ..... 12.05 



$11,287.57 



$6,512.05 



276 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Cr. 



By cash receipts of the farm 


• $1,774-46 


increase in stock . 


. 2,490.56 


permanent improvements 


565-5° 


bills receivable 


32.08 


Balance 


. 1,649.45 



$6,512.05 

Cash paid city treasurer, $1,774.46. 

Total number of weeks' board, 2,213. 

Average cost of board per week for each person, 74^ cents. 

Your committee thought it advisable to abolish the old system 
of charging one thousand dollars interest against the farm as 
heretofore, as there is no other department in the city that pays 
interest on the money invested ; therefore the rate of board is 
reduced forty-five cents and two mills per week, whereas, if the 
one thousand dollars interest had been charged, the rate of 
board per week for each person would have been one dollar and 
nineteen cents and seven mills. 

A gain in stock of $2,490.56 is shown since our appraisal one 
year ago, which is vouched for by the immense amount of prod- 
uce raised on the farm the past season, which will be more than 
sufficient to feed the stock and fatten the pork the coming year. 

It has been customary for the superintendent, the past two 
years, to raise produce enough on the farm to feed the stock and 
make their own pork without buying meal or swill, which was 
not the case a few years ago, as the reports show that from two to 
three hundred dollars per year was paid for city swill. 

Following is a list of crops harvested the past season, not 
counting what was consumed through the summer and fall. 



Corn 
Potatoes 
Mangold beets 
Blood beets 
Sugar beets . 
Carrots . 
Turnips . 



946 bushels. 
6S3 " 

826 " 

130 " 
80 
265 

33° " 



20 


bushels. 


• • 6 5 


" 


i 5 


(c 


175 
8,ooo 


pounds 


• 9>3°o 


" 


2,000 


" 


5,226 
• • 665 

75 


barrels. 


7 
500 1 


Dunches 


100 


ons. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 277 

Parsnips 

Onions ..... 
Beans ..... 

Oats 

Squashes ..... 
Cabbage .... 

Pumpkins .... 

Pork 

Beef 

Apples 

Cider 

Celery ..... 
Hay 

One of the most extensive improvements on the farm was the 
clearing of stone and the plowing up of eight acres of the old 
pasture land ready for cultivation next season ; this makes about 
fifteen acres of pasture land plowed up the past two years. There 
has been a new hen-house built, which gives room to keep one 
hundred fowls in place of sixty as heretofore ; also numerous re- 
pairs in and about the buildings. 

By way of improvements our anticipations have not been real- 
ized. With the view of utilizing the labor of the prisoners, we 
hoped to have furnished crushed stone for the street department, 
to have secured much of the work done in Derryfield park, and 
to have secured the contract for the collection and disposal of 
garbage, for which a bid, based on a faithful service, and 30 per 
cent less than the previous year, was presented. An effort was 
also made to place highway district No. 8 in charge of Superin- 
tendent Streeter ; this was defeated in your joint councils, con- 
trary, we believe, to the best interests of the city and district. 

We condemn the practice of the street department in hiring 
private teams, when there is as good a one belonging to the city, 
at the farm, spoiling for work. A little protection to home in- 
dustry in this direction would be for the interest of the city. 

Early in the year your committee were impressed with the ne- 
cessity of relieving the hampered condition of the prison quar- 
ters, and the urgent necessity of the erection of a suitable prison 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

building, where the inmates would have proper sanitary condi- 
tions, and where the foul-mouthed, hardened criminal could, at 
least in a measure, be isolated from the younger men just started 
in crime. Such a building is called for in the interest of morals, 
and that the institution be in fact as in name, correctional. 
Later on, we were apprised of the fact that we were exceeding 
our duties, that these matters belonged to the committee on the 
house of correction. Feeling somewhat relieved, we gladly wel- 
comed them to an investigation of the situation, they agreeing 
with us in our conclusions. The joint committee considered va- 
rious plans of overcoming the difficulty by remodeling the build- 
ings, but finally decided to ask for an appropriation for a new 
building the ensuing year. Whether or not this much needed 
building will be erected rests with the committee on the house 
of correction and the city councils. 

The number of paupers cared for is happily small, still it is 
necessary that we should be in a position to care for such as there 
may be of this unfortunate class not provided for elsewhere. 

We append to this report an interesting essay on " The De- 
fective Classes," by A. O. Wright, secretary of the State Board 
of Charities and Reform of Wisconsin, which contains much 
matter for serious consideration. 

The annual inspection, November 12, was an occasion of more 
than usual interest. His Honor the Mayor very thoughtfully ex- 
tended an invitation to their Honors Mayors Clapp of Concord 
and Beasom of Nashua to accept the hospitalities of our city on 
the occasion. The latter was unavoidably detained at home, 
but the pleasure of the occasion was much enhanced by the pres- 
ence of the genial mayor of the capital city. After a thorough 
inspection of the premises, the immense stores of garnered prod- 
uce, the finely conditioned draught horses, sleek kine, pork, 
present and prospective, were pronounced good. Even the corn- 
sheller elicited commendation from the alderman from ward 7. 
Feeling satisfied that the interests of the city were being cared 
for at the farm, the invitation of Mrs. Streeter to one of her ex- 
cellent suppers was all the more acceptable. That it was enjoyed 
goes without saying. After cigars were lighted, the company 




IQS. ST. JOSEPH'S HIGH SCHOOL. 109. ST. AGNES SCHOOL. CATH 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 279 

followed the bent of their inclinations, congregating in coteries 
throughout the house. An hour or two was profitably as well as 
pleasantly spent. Mayor Clapp was the center of a very interest- 
ing group. He not only possesses a fund of valuable informa- 
tion, but has the happy faculty of imparting the same, and we 
have no doubt that much profit was derived from the interchange 
of views relating chiefly to municipal affairs. 

Our duties have been made comparatively easy, from the fact 
that in the superintendent and matron, Mr. and Mrs. Streeter, 
the city has officers in every way qualified for their arduous and 
ofttimes unpleasant duties. 

Walter M. Fulton, 
Byron Worth en, 
Oliver J. Butman, 
Albert J. Peaslee, 
D. J. Ahern, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Fartn. 



THE DEFECTIVE CLASSES. 



BY A. O. WRIGHT, EX-SECRETARY OF THE STATE BOARD OF CHARITIES 
AND REFORM OF WISCONSIN. 



The defective classes form a series of small but very trouble- 
some tumors upon the body politic. For various reasons, rang- 
ing all the way from the imperative need of protection to society 
up to those humane influences for which our century is distin- 
guished, these classes have fallen under the more or less effective 
guardianship of government in all civilized countries. Private 
effort is also doing much to palliate or to prevent the evils which 
the defective classes bring on themselves, and upon society at 
large. 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I propose the following classification of the defective classes, 
depending upon the three divisions of the mental faculties which 
are generally accepted by psychologists : Insanity and idiocy 
are different forms of defective intellect. Crime and vice are 
caused by defect of the emotions or passions ; and pauperism is 
caused by defect of the will. Blindness and deaf-mutism are de- 
fects of the senses, requiring special forms of education, but are 
not defects of the mind any more than the loss of an arm or a 
leg. Blind or deaf people, properly educated, are not a burden 
or a danger to society as are criminals, insane persons, or pau- 
pers. Their defects are physical not mental, and they should 
not be classed with people who have these mental defects. The 
above classification has the advantage of starting from the center 
instead of from the circumference. " The mind is the measure 
of the man," and it is the abnormal and defective mind which 
produces the mischief. Anything which fosters abnormal and 
ill-regulated thoughts or passions, or which weakens the control of 
the reason, conscience, and will over the mind, tends to produce 
insanity, crime, and pauperism. Everything which aids self- 
control reduces the tendency to these abnormalities. 

The distribution of the defective classes by nationality, edu- 
cation, wealth, age, sex, occupation, and the like, is interesting 
from a scientific point of view, and important from a practical 
standpoint. A study of the distribution of insanity, crime, and 
pauperism may reveal the conditions which create or foster them. 
And, as society has more or less control over social conditions, it 
may be possible to heal some of these ulcers on the body politic if 
we know where they are and what irritant produced them. But 
please notice I say may, not shall. The small success of all effort 
in the past toward curing these evils ought to make social re- 
formers modest. 

First, the question of sex. Men and women are about equally 
afflicted with insanity. Either the causes are the same in men 
and women which produce insanity, or they are equivalent. 
Heredity, worry, overwork, under-feeding, sickness, and the 
weaknesses of old age affect women and men equally ; and the 
perils of childbirth and of loneliness for solitary farmers' wives 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 281 

are about equal to the dangers from accident and the vices to 
which men are exposed. But crime and pauperism are liabilities 
of men much more than of women. There are generally about 
forty times as many men as women in our prisons. The dispro- 
portion is not quite so great in some states, and is still less in 
European countries. In Europe there is no sentimental pity for 
a woman on account of her sex. But even in Europe the pro- 
portion of men to women is perhaps ten to one. Women do not 
commit crime as readily as men do, — it may be from principle, 
it may be from cowardice, it may be from lack of temptation. 
And women do not become paupers as readily as men. In get- 
ting outdoor relief, it is true, women are a little ahead of men ; 
but that is because it is easier for a woman to get poor relief than 
for a man. And, in fact, where outdoor relief is laxly administered, 
though it is the women who usually apply for it, there are often 
lazy men behind them, sending them for it, or else drinking up 
all their earnings in the comfortable consciousness that the public 
will support their families. So that, even in outdoor relief, it is 
probable that the men have a good share of the pauperism. And 
in the poorhouses there are about twice as many men as women. 

Second, as to age. About an equal number of each sex are 
born idiots, and remain so all their lives, so that the question of 
age in idiocy need not be taken into account, except that idiots 
are not long-lived. But insanity is a defect of mature years. 
Going through an insane asylum, you are struck with the general 
age of the patients in contrast with the youth of the attendants. 
This, of course, is partly caused by the fact that insanity is not 
very curable. Only about one fourth of the insane recover. A 
few die, and the rest end their days as chronic insane. But it is 
also caused by the fact that most insane are middle-aged or 
elderly before they become insane. 

Crime is rarely committed by little children, and, when com- 
mitted, is frequently excused by the law or by the judges and 
jury. But every visitor to a jail or state's prison must notice 
the comparative youthfulness of the prisoners. The average age 
of the convicts in state prison is twenty-seven. Or, to put it in 
another way, the majority of convicts in state prison are under 



282 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

twenty-five. The difference between twenty-seven and twenty- 
five is accounted for by the difference between an average and a 
majority. The direct opposite of this is the case with pauperism. 
The majority of paupers are over fifty years old. Criminals are 
mostly young men. Paupers are mostly old men and old 
women. Youth is the age of passion, and perverted passions 
lead to crime. The author of "The Jukes Family" says that 
among the descendants of Margaret, the "mother of criminals," 
it is very noticeable that in youth they were prostitutes and 
criminals and in age beggars and paupers. The same perverted 
instincts which led them to prey upon the community took the 
direction of crime in the time of strength and of pauperism in 
the time of weakness. 

The question of education is often stated, as if education 
favored insanity and opposed crime and pauperism. As a fact, 
I do not think that education has so great an influence either way 
as many seem to think. We were told half a century ago that it 
was cheaper to build schoolhouses than jails and poorhouses. 
We have dotted the country over with schoolhouses, and we find 
that jails and poorhouses are just as necessary as ever. But 
some one may say that this is because there is no compulsory 
education and because we have an unusual number of ignorant 
foreigners coming to our shores. But this is sufficiently answered 
by looking at Germany with its homogeneous population and 
compulsory education, and compulsory religious as well as sec- 
ular education at that. In Germany, crime and pauperism and 
insanity are increasing, as they are with us. Criminals, paupers, 
and insane all average a little below the rest of the community 
in education. Their smaller knowledge and less natural ability 
make them break down into insanity more easily, and also more 
easily drift into crime or pauperism. The best statistics of crim- 
inals have been kept for over half a century by the Eastern 
Pennsylvania Penitentiary. The result of these statistics seems 
to show that idleness rather than ignorance is the mother of 
crime. An investigation, which I made a few years ago by per- 
sonal inquiries from poorhouse to poorhouse in Wisconsin, satis- 
fied me that about one third of the paupers are made so by idle- 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 283 

ness, one third by liquor, and one third by all other causes com 
bined. In my judgment, the idleness which makes truants 
from school, and therefore poor scholars, leads to crime or pau- 
perism in many cases, and in these cases it is not ignorance which 
is the cause of crime, but idleness which is the cause of both 
ignorance and crime. 

The question of social standing is not of as great importance 
in this democratic country as in Europe. Paupers, of course, do 
not come from the wealthy or the middle classes. Many of the 
laboring classes do drop into pauperism through misfortune or 
vice. But many of the paupers are not even of the laboring 
class, but come from the outcasts of society. The same is the 
case with the criminals. They do not come chiefly from the 
wealthy or middle classes. Some of them come from the labor- 
ing classes. But they are very largely from the outcasts of soci- 
ety. The insane are found in all classes in considerable numbers. 
But the laboring class furnishes more than its share of insane, 
and the outcasts an immense proportion to their number. Crim- 
inals and paupers and tramps frequently become insane, — I 
should say ten times as many as from the same number of aver- 
age humanity. 

The advantages and disadvantages of city life have often been 
talked of. Many people suppose that the excitement and strain 
of city life conduce to insanity. Others say that the loneliness 
of country life has the same effect. An English physician has 
taken the pains to tabulate the statistics of insanity for the city 
of London for forty years, and for several purely agricultural 
counties in the south of England with about the same population 
for the same period, and finds that there is no difference between 
city and country in the amount of insanity. But for crime all 
statistics show clearly that crime is concentrated in the cities, . 
which are the refuge of the criminal classes and the nurseries of 
young criminals in the neglected street children. Pauperism is 
greater in the city than in the country, though this may arise 
from the corrupt municipal governments encouraging pauperism 
to win votes. 

The effects of climate have not been much considered ; but I 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

believe it will be found that warm climates do not have so great 
a proportion of insanity as cold climates. It is certain that in 
Europe Greece has a much less proportion of insanity than Nor- 
way. In this country there is less insanity in the South than in 
the North in proportion to population. A part of this is due to 
the negroes in the South having a small proportion of insanity, and 
the foreigners in the North having a large proportion. But it is 
possible that climate has also something to do with it. I cannot 
discover that climate has anything to do with crime. Pauperism 
is increased in cold climates by the greater difficulty of getting a 
bare subsistence. 

Much has been said about the rapid increase of the defective 
classes, especially of the insane. Statistics show this both in 
Europe and America. But statistics of the mere numbers of in- 
sane at any given time are very deceptive. The greater humanity 
with which the insane are treated now than a hundred or even 
twenty-five years ago, has preserved their lives, and thereby 
caused an accumulation of the insane. This greatly increases 
the numbers who are alive at any given time, but does not show 
that any more persons become insane in any one year than ever. 
Careful statistics have been kept in England with reference to the 
latter point, and it is found that there was an increase in the 
proportion of commitments to the total population up to a recent 
time, but that it now seems to have reached its highest point and 
become stationary. It is believed that the increase in the com- 
mitments was caused partly by the discovery and placing in in- 
stitutions of cases that would otherwise have been hidden at 
home and partly by calling things insanity which formerly would 
have been called by some other name, such as senile dementia, 
epilepsy, eccentricity, or primary dementia. I believe that these 
statistics show that insanity is not now increasing faster in Eng- 
land than the population. 

In the United States insanity is obviously increasing very rap- 
idly. In ten years in Wisconsin their insane under public care 
have increased from about 1,700 to over 3,000. This is partly 
due to the causes discussed above ; but it is also due to another 
fact, to which I think I was the first to call attention — that the 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 285 

ratio of insanity to the population is much greater in the older 
states than in the newer ones, and in the older counties of Wis- 
consin than in the newer ones. The rapid increase of crime in 
this country is doubtless an incident of the rapid growth of city 
population. But probably the more careful administration of 
the laws has increased the number of prisoners, while the system 
of reformatories for boys and girls, and all the good influences of 
Christian civilization, have been resisting the increase of crime. 
It is noteworthy that a better prison system in England than we 
have in this country, joined to the private reformatory work of 
all kinds, has brought the increase of crime to a stop, and that 
there is absolutely less crime in Great Britain now than there was 
fifteen years ago, notwithstanding the increase of population. 

The same causes have made an increase of pauperism in this 
country, — the growth of cities, and the foolish or corrupt use of 
public money in aiding undeserving applicants for poor relief. 

To a considerable extent these three defective classes link into 
one another. It is hard to say whether a tramp is a pauper or a 
criminal. Many crimimals may be called insane — and some 
are so adjudged when they have money or friends to help them, 
— and some insane have criminal tendencies. A very large per 
cent of criminals become insane in prison or afterward. A con- 
siderable number of paupers become insane. The children of 
the one class pass easily into the other class. Street children, 
who are the children of misfortune, are easily drawn into crime. 
Here and there in our country, and in every other one, are knots 
of defectives all tangled up together, — families closely related 
furnishing a whole population of criminals, paupers, idiots, and 
lunatics among themselves. Such were the family in Ulster 
County, New York, called by Dr. Dugdale "The Jukes Family," 
to disguise their real name. Such is the "Tribe of Ishmael " 
recently described by Mr. McCulloch in Indianapolis. The in- 
terchangeability of these defects is very clearly shown in these 
cases. 

What are we now doing with the defective classes ? With 
some exceptions all civilized nations are pursuing the following 
lines of policy. Pauperism is relieved and discouraged. The 



286 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

treatment fluctuates between the extremes of lavish relief and 
stringent discouragement, but is generally a compromise between 
these two extremes. Insanity is cared, if possible; if not, it is 
usually protected in institutions of some sort. Crime is punished 
in prisons, and prevented in reformatories. 

These methods express the average wisdom of the present gen- 
eration, which is far in advance of what has previously been done 
for the defective classes. It does not follow that this is the best 
that can possibly be done for them. In fact, here and there ex- 
periments are in progress which, I believe, represent not the 
average wisdom, but the best wisdom of our times. Here and 
there private societies have taken up the work of eradicating pau- 
perism, not by relief, which often encourages it, nor by merely 
repressive measures, but by carrying out the motto of the charity 
organization societies, "Not alms, but a friend." And Rev. 
J. H. Crooker, of Madison, has recently shown that this is not a 
new discovery, but is a century old, when it was more fully ap- 
plied to public poor relief than it has since been. The methods 
of reforming criminals and thus reducing crime have been dis- 
covered and applied in the British Isles, while in America they 
have been only so applied in a few places. The methods of 
treating the insane have been growing milder and more humane 
in Europe and America within a few years. In my judgment, 
the state hospital of Alabama, and the county asylums for the 
chronic insane of Wisconsin, mark the highest point yet reached 
in the direction of liberty for the insane. At the rate of progress 
which we are now making, it will take a generation for the aver- 
age American treatment of the defective classes to reach the 
standard set for pauperism by the charity organization societies, 
for crime by Elmira and Concord, and for insanity by the Wis- 
consin system of care for the chronic insane. 

Our measures of treatment of the defective classes sometimes 
increase the very evils we meant to cure. Poor relief, instead of 
relieving pauperism, very often increases it; insane asylums seem 
to increase the number of insane ; prisons, of criminals. This, 
however, is not a necessity of the case, but only an incidental 
evil which needs to be guarded against. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 287 

We must allow that our humane methods of treatment, in ad- 
dition to the good effects which they have, do also tend to in- 
crease the numbers of the defective classes by prolonging their 
lives and making their lot a more desirable one. I have already 
mentioned the accumulation of insanity by the mere prolonga- 
tion of life in the insane in civilized countries. It is still a ques- 
tion whether this does not account for the greater number of 
insane in civilized over savage countries. Where the insane are 
killed as witches, or executed as criminals, or killed by private 
vengeance or malice, or allowed to die by neglect, and where 
only the robust can survive the hardships and perils of life, in 
any case it is not wonderful that the insane existing at any given 
time are few. So also with pauperism. If no poor relief is 
given, there will be no paupers; for some will starve and others 
will steal. But crime seems to decrease with milder punishments, 
whether these are the causes of the decrease or only a result of 
the general civilization of society, which is reducing both crime 
and punishment alike. It is also true that we discover and do 
something for a large number of cases now who would not be 
known as defectives under a less perfect administration of gov- 
ernment. This is one of the causes of the apparent increase of 
insanity, as I have already said. Crime is more completely 
looked after, and things are called crime now which would not 
have been called so a few years ago. 

But, on the whole, I believe that the measures we are taking 
to treat the defective classes are really reducing their numbers. 
For one thing, we keep them shut up in institutions, where they 
are not allowed to propagate their kind or to practice or teach 
their vices. A notable exception to this is the county jail sys- 
tem, where prisoners are herded together in idleness to consti- 
tute schools of crime and vice. Our methods do also cure many 
of the defectives. About one fourth of the insane are perma- 
nently cured. From half to two thirds of the criminals are 
never convicted a second time. Many paupers and tramps do 
finally drop back into society again. It is of course a struggle 
which may be made to appear to be tending one way or the 
other according as we are optimistic or pessimistic in the bent of 



288 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

our own minds. But I take the side of the optimist, and believe 
we are gradually healing up these ulcers upon society. 

The best sign of the future is that public sentiment and legis- 
lation are steadily tending in the direction of prevention as well 
as cure. Some measures of prevention, like the various phases 
of child-saving work, have been already fruitful of good results. 
In other cases, it is still doubtful what is best to be done in the 
way of prevention. But I believe the time is coming when, by 
the combination of public and private effort, we shall greatly re- 
duce, if we do not entirely eradicate, the defective classes. 

In my dealings with them I am sometimes tempted to despair 
of humanity. But then I look at our churches and schools, our 
literature and our industries, and, best of all, our happy homes, 
the pledge of the future, and I take heart again. I remember 
that after all, the total number of prisoners, paupers, insane, and 
idiots in the United States, is only one per cent of the popula- 
tion, a less proportion than any other civilized country has. 



REPORT 



CITY SOLICITOR 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit my report for 1891, as city 
solicitor. 

Of the cases pending in the supreme court for Hillsborough 
county, January 1, the following, viz., those of Emmeline C. 
Call, Worthley Brothers, Frederick E. Scheer, Hannah Ryan, 
and Edwin R. Whitney, all for damages for personal injuries re- 
ceived in the use of alleged defective highways ; that of Caroline 
S. Head and others, for damages to land by water flowing on it 
from the highway ; and that of Rebecca C. Newton, for land 
damages by changing the grade of Webster street, were all 
settled without trial, and in a manner, in my judgment, benefi- 
cial to the city. In my view it is for the interest of the city to 
settle highway accident cases when it can be done reasonably, 
even in instances where no actual fault can be imputed to those 
having charge of the streets. The law imposes upon municipal 
corporations in the care of their highways a burden which, prop- 
erly interpreted, is a just and suitable one. Reasonable care 
under all circumstances is the rule the law sets up ; but when the 
decision of what is reasonable care is left solely to the jury, as it 
is in this state, the city or town is apt to suffer. The ordinary 
juryman in this class of cases seems to consider the results of the 
accident to the plaintiff far more carefully than he does the re- 
spopsibility for it. Prejudice against a wealthy municipal cor- 
poration, the feeling that the city is able to pay without much 
inconvenience or expense to any individual, sympathy for the 
suffering of the plaintiff, play a far more important part in de- 
termining the juror's decision than the calm judgment, the im- 



292 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

partial weighing of the testimony, and the unbiased conclusions 
therefrom, which the law makes the criteria of a just verdict. 
Therefore it has been my policy since holding this office to settle 
as many cases as possible upon a fair basis. It is better, I think, 
to pay a small sum in a peaceful settlement than it is to take the 
chances of a jury's giving much larger damages ; and every ver- 
dict against the city, by the publicity given by the press and 
otherwise, encourages more suits, while a quiet settlement out of 
court avoids this result. Upon this basis, settlements were made 
in the foregoing suits, as well as in the cases of Hannah Connor 
and Mary Gendron, begun during the year, and in some in- 
stances of claims where no suit had been begun. 

The cases of Louis Laventure and Margaret Golden, both 
highway accident cases, in which the New England Telegraph 
and Telephone Company and John H. Maynard were respectively 
called in to defend, were disposed of by those parties without 
expense to the city ; and in the first taxable costs were recovered 
for the city. 

The case of William M. Parsons, of the same nature, was 
tried by a jury at the March term of court, and a verdict of 
34,000 damages was given him. A motion for a nonsuit and to 
set aside the verdict was made and argued before the full bench 
at the December law term, and a decision will probably be 
rendered upon that motion in March. 

The appeal of Maxwell and Campbell from the judgment of 
the committee of appraisers, for the value of a horse killed by 
order of the mayor and aldermen, as having glanders, was also 
transferred to the law term, and a decision may be expected in 
March. The other cases upon the docket January i, viz., those 
of Augusta A. Currin, Maria Colby, T. S. Colby, Lee Big, and 
Edwin Branch, all for damages for personal injuries received in 
the use of highways; and the petition of P. C. Cheney Com- 
pany and others for a new highway from Amoskeag village to 
Mast road in Goffstown, are still pending on the docket. 

The cases of the city against M. J. Jenkins and his bondsmen, 
which were begun before January i, were entered at the March 
term, and it has been agreed to refer them to some experienced 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 293 

person, as they are not proper suits for a jury trial, but the ref- 
eree has not yet been agreed upon. 

The following cases have been entered during the past year, 
and are now pending in the supreme court : 

AT THE MARCH TERM : 

Catherine McCarthy v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for breaking a leg by falling on the side- 
walk of Auburn street, caused by an alleged icy condition of 
the walk. 

Celia Clark v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for personal injuries received by falling on 
the sidewalk of Middle street, March 8, 1890, owing to the 
alleged icy condition of the same. The Amoskeag Manufactur- 
ing Company, which by an old agreement with the city has the 
care of Middle street, has been summoned to appear and defend 
this action. 

Manchester v. James A. Weston and Others, Owners 
of the old Manchester House. 

To recover the amount of the verdict paid by the city in the 
case of Mary Kildea v. Manchestei-, she being injured while 
passing in front of their building, while in process of removal. 

Manchester v. John Ferguson. 

To recover the amount of the verdict in the case against the 
city of Margaret Kelley, who fell into an open bulkhead leading 
into the cellar of a building owned by him on Central street. 

AT THE SEPTEMBER TERM. 

Honora Russell v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for personal injuries alleged to have been 
occasioned by falling on the sidewalk of Lake avenue, April 9, 
1891, owing to a projecting water pipe. 



294 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Sarah E. Mayhew v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for personal injuries occasioned by being 
thrown from a sleigh, January 24, 1891, on Chestnut street. 
The defect charged was a depression in the street made by the 
tracks of the Bridge-street line of the Manchester Street Railway, 
which corporation has been called in to take care of the case. 

Inez Tirrell v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for personal injuries occasioned by falling 
on the sidewalk of South Main street, February 27, 1891, owing 
to the alleged defective condition of the same due to ice. 

Rodney N. Whittemore v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for personal injuries alleged to have been 
caused by being thrown from his wagon on the River road, 
March 30, 1891. The defect charged was that one of several 
logs which had been piled by the side of the road had fallen into 
the traveled roadway. The parties cutting the timber on the ad- 
joining lot, who placed the logs there, have been summoned to 
take care of the action. 

Thomas Lane v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for personal injuries caused, April 4, 1891, 
by falling from the steps of a saloon on Elm street, which steps 
are alleged to be an obstruction in the highway. The owners of 
the building have been summoned to appear and defend the 
same. 

Edward Wyman v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for personal injuries alleged to have been 
caused by catching his foot on a projecting root, and falling on 
the sidewalk of Parker street, June n, 1891. 

Charles S. Cousins v. Manchester. 
A suit to recover the annual salary of a fireman for the year 
1890, the same being withheld on the ground that the plaintiff 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 295 

at the time of his appointment as a fireman was a member of the 
Common Council. 

The appeal of Elijah Chadwick from the award of damages 
for land taken for a new highway in West Manchester. In this 
case the highway has since been discontinued, and it will prob- 
ably not occasion much trouble. 

The foregoing constitutes a brief summary of the work in the 
supreme court for the past year. But, as I stated in my last 
annual report, this work constitutes but a small part of the duties 
of this office. It is impossible to give any detailed report of the 
greater portion of the labors of the solicitor. Looking up law, 
investigating claims and accidents, drawing all necessary legal 
documents, counseling and advising city officers of all depart- 
ments, attending police court, meetings of city government, and 
committee meetings, these and many other things make this 
office a busy one. All such duties have been performed to the 
best of my ability. I would express my hearty appreciation of 
the kindly treatment I have received from all the members of 
the city councils, and from the various officials with whom I 
have been brought in contact. To his Honor the Mayor, to the 
committee on claims, and to the city marshal, whom I meet 
more frequently than the others, I am under especial obliga- 
tions for their unvarying courtesy and kindness. 
Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

City Solicitor. 



R E PORT 



CITY PHYSICIAN 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To his Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 
I herewith submit my report for the year 1891. 
The health of the city poor has been exceptionally good, no 

death having occurred. 

Total number of patients, 121. 

Total number of visits made, 1,234. 

Diseases treated : Alcoholic neuritis, 1 ; bronchitis, acute, 6 ; 
bronchitis, chronic, 2 ; cholera morbus, 1 ; childbirth, 1 ; 
coryza, 1 ; dermatitis, 1 ; delirium tremens, 5 ; gonorrhea, 3 ; 
general debility, 1; hemorrhoids, 1 ; insanity, 16; locomotor 
ataxia, 1 ; miscarriage, 1 ; mitral regurgitation, 1 ; phthisis 
pulmonalis, 10 ; paraphimosis, 1 ; acute articular rheumatism, 
1 ; senile debility, 2 ; stomatitis, 3 ; suppurating tubercular 
gland, 1 ; typhoid fever, 2 ; ulcer of leg, 1 ; urethral stricture, 
1 ; vaccination, 4 ; varicose veins, 1 ; venereal warts, 1 ; acci- 
dents requiring surgical treatment, 39. 

In the treatment of many cases among the city poor, the at- 
tendance of a trained nurse is as essential as that of the physi- 
cian and many such cases could be properly cared for in their 
own homes but for the lack of such service, and I would respect- 
fully recommend that the city physician be authorized in those 
cases where he should consider it necessary, to employ such 
nurses. 

FREDERICK PERKINS, M. D., 

City Physician. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To his Honor the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen of the 

City of Manchester : 

I herewith submit a report for the year 1891. 

The method of inspection followed has been nearly the same 
as that practiced in the city of Boston, Mass. 

The towns of Bedford, Goffstown, and Dunbarton have fur- 
nished the larger part of the milk used in the city for the year, 
Bedford furnishing more than any other town. 

No cases of tuberculosis were reported during the year, which 
shows that more attention has been paid to the health of the 
herds from which the milk supply of the city is obtained. The 
thorough inspection of cattle in surrounding towns has undoubt- 
edly had a good effect, as it has stimulated cattle owners to 
cause their herds to be more closely cared for, both in a sanitary 
way and in the matter of feed. 

The inspection was carried on most extensively at night, be- 
tween the hours of 1 o'clock and 7 o'clock a. m., during the 
summer months, without using the same evenings in each succes- 
sive week. As the warm weather came on, the demand materi- 
ally increased and the supply decreased, which occasioned a 
shortage which tempted dealers who might not care to be strictly 
honest in their business to '•' extend " the milk they brought in 
to meet the demand. This was done with water and a little 
sweetening and coloring. — but still the demand increased and 
the supply grew shorter at the farms. This state of things neces- 
sitated a more rigid inspection, and "extended" milk was 
found. To further facilitate the work, the services of a profes- 
sional chemist were engaged with the permission and advice of 
the Mayor. Mr. Clarence Bancroft was engaged for this pur- 
pose, and all samples collected and found deficient in specific 



304 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

gravity and butter-fat, and below the per cent of total solids re- 
quired by law, were at once analyzed. In a short time fourteen 
complaints were sworn out, and at the fall term of the supreme 
court, held at Nashua, fourteen indictments were found by the 
grand jury, the indictments being against eight different parties, 
the complaints being presented by the milk inspector. The 
prosecution of the cases was placed in the hands of the county 
solicitor. The cases were brought before Judge Isaac W. Smith, 
who imposed a fine of one hundred dollars and ten dollars costs 
in each case, and where more than one indictment was found 
against a single individual, the fine was paid on one and filed on 
the others. Two of the parties prosecuted had three indictments 
each, two had two each, and the other four had one each, and all 
the fines were paid, with one exception, without a hearing, and in 
each case the full extent of the fine imposed was paid, with costs, 
the city receiving one half of the fines and one half of the costs, 
and the other half of the fines and costs going to the state, ac- 
cording to law. In the prosecution of these cases it was deemed 
advisable to bring the complaints directly before the supreme 
court, as being much the shorter method of procedure. 

During the summer months and during the autumn the milk 
supply continued short, and especially was it quite noticeable 
immediately after the indictments were found by the grand jury. 
The result was that at one time milk brought 64 cents per can of 
eight and one half quarts, and very few routes could procure 
enough to supply the demand. Many customers, and especially 
stores, were cut down in quantity, and this scarcity continued 
until cold weather came on, and the demand, in a measure, for 
extra milk ceased. The deficiency in the supply from the farms 
in the surrounding towns was caused by the excessive drouth, the 
feed in pastures becoming almost worthless, and the streams and 
wells becoming so dry that it was almost impossible in many 
cases to supply herds with the proper amount of good pure water, 
and in fact, in some localities the water was worth almost as 
much as the milk. 

In the month of October a meeting of the milk dealers was 
held, an association was formed, and the price of milk was ad- 
vanced to six cents per quart, and I think the people of our city 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 305 

made no objection to the advance in price providing they could 
be insured a straight article. This association, if properly con- 
ducted, may be the means of doing much good eventually in 
regulating the future supply of milk brought to the city, and can 
largely aid in keeping the quality up to the standard required by 
law. The advance in price, if divided with the farmer, will allow 
him to feed a little better, thereby improving the quality of his 
milk. There has for many years been a tendency among those 
who have furnished milk from the herds, to purchase those cows y 
in replacing their stock, which would produce quantity without 
regard to quality, which has been one cause of lowering the 
standard, and this should be corrected as fast as circumstances 
will permit. 

One hundred and thirty-three licenses have been issued during 
the year and duly recorded, amounting to $66.50. There are 89 
regular routes, and the average number of quarts of new milk de- 
livered daily is 16,195. Average number of quarts of skimmed 
milk delivered daily. 1,235. Estimated number of cows to pro- 
duce the daily supply of milk for the city, 2,563. 

The fines and costs on eight prosecutions amounted to $880, 
of which the city received $440, and the state $440. 

The duties devolving upon this office necessitate a large outlay 
of time and expense, and are assuming such proportions that it 
really should have the whole time of one person devoted to it. 
This work has to be done largely during the hours of the night, 
and often consumes the time of the following day, and many 
cases are made by private parties who have samples of milk in- 
spected for their own information, which is important, espe- 
cially in cases where it concerns the milk supply of the city. 
Within the limits of the city I have occasionally visited the farms 
where a portion of our milk supply is obtained, and sampled the 
milk in order to ascertain the quality before it left the farm. 

There have been but few complaints from customers during 
the year, and they were properly attended to in each case. 

Very respectfully, 

H. F. W. LITTLE, 
20 Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL 



REPORT OF CITY MARSHAL. 



Manchester, N. H., Feb. 14, 1892. 
To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit to you my annual 
report of the police department for the year ending December 
31, 1 89 1, showing the strength and condition of' the force, and 
reviewing briefly the service performed by it during the year. 

Police Department. 
The police force of Manchester, on the 31st of December, 1891, 
consisted of thirty-four men, organized with rank and title as 
follows : viz., One city marshal, one deputy marshal, one cap- 
tain, seven day patrol, and twenty-four night patrol, with one 
night patrolman detailed to take charge of the station nights. 

SUMMARY OF THE WORK ACCOMPLISHED BY THE DEPARTMENT. 

Fines and costs, $6,668.97. Assaults, 216; assault on officer, 
7; adulteiy, 3; burglary, 12 ; breaking glass, 13 ; drunk, 1,179; 
defacing buildings, 2 ; disorderly house, 5 ; exposure of person, 
6; embezzlement, 2 ; evading car-fare, 3; fornication, 31; fast 
driving, 4; gambling, 1 ; keeping liquor for sale, 182 ; keeping 
open Sunday, 22; larceny from person, 14; larceny, 109; vag- 
abond, 9 ; noise and brawl, 29 ; obstructing sidewalk, 1 ; ped- 
dling without a license, 2 ; playing ball in streets, 6 ; keeping 
lottery tickets for sale, 1 ; assault with attempt to kill, 2 ; neglect 
to support child, 1; common drunkard, 1 ; overdriving, 1 ; 
playing cards Sunday, 3 ; keeping dog without a license, 5 ; kid- 
naping, 2 ; obscene and profane language, 4 ; obtaining money 
by false pretenses, 4 ; attempt to rape, 2 ; rape, 1 ; throwing 
stones in street, 6 ; aggravated assault, 1 ; disorderly conduct, 5 ; 
selling short lobsters, 1 ; discharging firearms in street, 1 ; injury 



310 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to buildings, i ; tramp, i ; running away from house of correc- 
tion, 6. 

The cases were disposed of as follows : 

Paid fines imposed, 627 ; committed to the house of correc- 
tion for non-payment of fines, 665 ; committed to the house of 
correction on sentence, 57; committed to jail for non-payment 
of fines, 97 ; committed to jail on sentence, 5 ; committed to 
the state reform school, 4; bound over for their appearance at 
the supreme court, 158 ; committed to jail, bail not furnished, 
58 : committed to the county house of correction at Wilton, 37 ; 
sentence suspended, 21; appealed, 15; nol. prcs'd, 33; dis- 
charged, 62 ; \yhole number of arrests, 2,401 ; whole number of 
females, 280; whole number of males, 2,121; on file, 101 ; 
whole number admitted for lodging, 1,277; accidents reported, 
24 ; assisted out of town officers, 27 ; buildings found open and 
secured, 419 ; cases investigated, 482 ; cases of cruelty to animals 
investigated, 22; defective streets and sidewalks reported, 116; 
disturbances suppressed, 528; dogs killed, 114; dogs lost and 
found, 29 ; dangerous dogs, notices served to owners, 45 ; fires 
discovered and alarms given, 5 ; fires extinguished without an 
alarm, 13. 

Injured and sick persons assisted, 60 ; intoxicated persons 
taken home, 199; lights extinguished in buildings, 77; lights 
furnished for dangerous places, 122; lost children restored to 
their parents, 113; money or other stolen property recovered, 
13,281.68; nuisances abated, 59; search warrants for liquor 
served, none found, 35 ; search warrants for stolen goods served, 
18; stray teams put up, 100; street obstructions removed, 246. 

In closing my report I extend my heartfelt thanks to the hon- 
orable board, to Judge Hunt, Police Clerk Bickford, and Solici- 
tor Jones; and for the members of the police department, with 
one or two exceptions, I have only words of praise for the man- 
ner in which they have performed their duties during the past 
fiscal year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

H. W. LONGA, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the City Councils : 

The school committee respectfully presents the following re- 
port, it being the forty -fifth in the annual series. In the ap- 
pendix will be found in tabulated form all the usual statistics 
pertaining to the schools. 

The year just closed has been one of marked prosperity in the 
public schools of Manchester. We have enjoyed freedom from 
accidents, epidemics, and other disturbing causes. The corps of 
teachers has remained intact more perfectly than in previous 
years. All the principals remain with us, and but few changes 
have been made among the other teachers. In these instances 
we have lost the services of some valuable teachers, but have 
been very fortunate in securing trained and faithful instructors to 
take their places. 

With the growth of such a prosperous city as ours, we naturally 
expect an increase in the school population from year to year. 
Such has been the case in 1891, and two hundred and fifty-seven 
more pupils have been enrolled this year than last. The services 
of six additional teachers have been required for their instruc- 
tion ; four were employed regularly throughout the year, and 
special divisions, organized for a term or more, required the 
equivalent of two more. Some of these divisions must continue 
regularly, others will be organized at the opening of the next 
term, and still others cannot be delayed longer than the Febru- 
ary promotions. 

SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

We congratulate you upon the completion of the new school- 
house in East Manchester, which will give ample accommodation 



314 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to that section for years to come. While unpretentious in exter- 
nal appearance, it will take rank among the very best school 
buildings of the day. 

The addition to the Webster-street building affords abundant 
school room in that section, and we are gratified with the pros- 
pect of a new schoolhouse being erected in ward No. 9 early in 
the coming spring. 

But the eastern central part of the city is now in sore need of 
relief. The Wilson Hill, Lincoln-street, and Ash-street schools 
are all crowded beyond the limits of safety and good health. 

Whatever plan may be adopted- for the relief of the others, the 
immediate erection of a building upon the Bridge-street lot 
seems necessary for the accommodation of the Ash-street pupils. 
The buildings at Bakersville and Goffe's Falls are also crowded 
and must very soon be enlarged. The need of more room at the 
high school is apparent, and the demand is urgent that the build- 
ing be enlarged and remodeled. 



The school property is in a good state of repair, considering 
the limited appropriation for that purpose. 

Within the past year several considerable items of expense 
have been incurred in this direction. At the Ash-street school a 
new boiler has been added, which, together with the old one 
will furnish ample steam for all kinds of weather. The radiating 
surface throughout the building has been increased fifty per cent. 
Outside doors were provided for the basement, and the ceilings 
were renewed in eight rooms. The sanitary arrangements at the 
high school were thoroughly overhauled and repaired. New 
floors were laid in several rooms of the Franklin-street building, 
and the Wilson-hill building was reshingled. At Bakersville the 
old furnace was replaced by an entire new steam-heating plant, 
which is now ready for use. Of the general repairs, those upon 
furniture and blackboards require the greatest outlay. 

The proper maintenance of the city's school property has 
grown to be an undertaking of no small proportions, and is de- 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 315 

serving of a more liberal consideration than is usually given it. 
In this connection the subject of ventilation demands our most 
serious attention. We have but two school-buildings properly 
ventilated. In some few others a fruitless attempt has been 
made in that direction, but in most of them absolutely nothing 
has been done to that end. The typical schoolroom is a closed 
box, with steam-pipes around the sides and with no possible 
means of admitting fresh air save through open door or window, 
and many of the latter are double during the greater part of the 
school year. 

Several inexpensive and plausible methods of ventilating have 
been suggested, but owing to lack of funds none can be tried. A 
moderate sum at the disposal of the committee on repairs for ex- 
perimenting with some of these methods in a small way appears 
to be a necessity. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The high school has done a very satisfactory year's work. It 
has materially increased in size since free text-books have been 
furnished. 

The additional teacher employed during this year has afforded 
much relief, but many of the classes are still too large. Another 
teacher could be profitably employed now, and will be required 
in the near future. 

It is the opinion of the principal that the pupils should enter 
the high school at an earlier age. The general verdict seems to 
be that the younger members take a deeper interest in their 
studies and fall in more readily with the general routine of 
school work. 

While it is the aim of this board to keep the Manchester high 
school fully up to the best as a high school, we offer no encour- 
agement to the imitation of college customs, especially in the 
line of sports. The tendency toward professionalism in athletics 
is to defeat its own end. It induces a few to indulge in danger- 
ous strains upon the system, while it discourages the many from 
taking healthful exercise. A large gymnasium would be a most 



316 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

valuable addition to the school, wherein moderate exercise, so 
necessary to health, should be taken by every boy and girl in the 
school. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The training school suffered in the early part of the year from 
a lack of teachers in the training classes. In view of this fact, 
and after making careful inquiry among the graduates of the 
high school, the sub-committee deemed it advisable to modify 
the conditions of admission so as to permit the graduates from 
our own high school to enter the training-school without pre- 
vious examination, and to serve one term on trial before taking 
the regular teachers' examination. A few minor changes also in 
the conditions of remaining in the school were thought proper, 
in order to give a more certain assurance that any graduate can 
be vouched for as a competent teacher. 

The full board adopted these recommendations. In conse- 
quence of these changes an unusually large number of young la- 
dies were admitted to the school at the opening of the fall term. 
The success of this school is not only an honor to the city but a 
convenience and source of economy. We draw upon it contin- 
ually for substitutes as well as for new teachers. Their satisfac- 
tory work in the schoolroom, together with the difficulty we find 
in obtaining competent substitutes and teachers for the grammar 
schools, would justify the early extension of the training course 
to grammar grade work. 

GRAMMAR AND LOWER GRADE SCHOOLS. 

These are distinctively the public schools, for at present no 
parents seriously think of anything less than a grammar school 
education for their children. If the higher schools are to get 
their students at an earlier age it is here they must come to bring 
about the change. Again, if there be any superfluous time spent, 
the poorer classes are losers to the extent of the wages of their 
children for such time. Will, then, anything less than the nine 
years now required suffice to give the average pupil a grammar 
school education, or can a more extended and useful education 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 317 

be given in that time ? These are questions of great importance 
and for continual consideration. Progression constantly tends 
towards the addition of some new branch to the course of study, 
and we strive to retain or only modify what we already have. 
The last subject to knock for admission to our course is manual 
training. This has so many good points in its favor, and is spo- 
ken of so highly by those who have introduced it, that we can- 
not afford longer to be without a practical test of its merits. 
Time must be found for this, and doubtless will be, without pro- 
ducing any undue pressure, such as some of our citizens mistak- 
enly believe to exist at present. A very little modification will 
answer at first, and experience will show where greater subse- 
quent changes may be made. 

It will require but little persistent visiting in our schools to 
convince any one that the children are not at all overworked. 
If any objection can be raised it will be to the hurry in getting 
through a long routine of exercises in the short school day. The 
five-hour day was established because of the constant brain work 
required. Now that so many manual exercises are interposed to 
the relief of mental exertion, we may well consider the advisabil- 
ity of a longer school day and also a longer school year. 

TRUANCY. 

The truant officer's report shows a satisfactory decrease in tru- 
ancy and in the number of labor certificates granted. This of- 
ficer is compelled to do his work under very unfavorable condi- 
tions. As there is absolutely no reliable census of the children of 
school age, it is only by chance that he finds those whose names 
are not already upon the school enrollment. Some action 
should be taken to secure annually a complete and accurate 
enumeration of the children of school age, to the end that our 
laws for compulsory education may be more strictly enforced. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The evening schools have been as prosperous as in years past, 
and the attendance as good. Their value is, however, scarcely 
appreciated. The formalities and limitations necessary to the 



318 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

graded day schools are not used here, and the individual is more 
nearly approached. It is sought to take the pupil just as he is, 
and give him some needed mental discipline and useful informa- 
tion. In many instances quite as good results are obtained, in 
proportion to the time spent, as in the day schools. These 
schools reach a class that no day school can, however free and 
attractive it may be, or however exacting the laws in regard to 
labor and education. When these facts are better understood by 
the general public, a much larger number will avail themselves 
of the priceless opportunities our city offers. 

The public exercises conducted by this board in the year past 
consisted of the annual contest for the Clarke prizes, a musical 
festival by the combined high and grammar schools, and the 
usual graduating exercises of the high school. To all of these, 
as indices of the work done in the schools, we refer with satis- 
faction. 

Through some misapprehension the appropriations for school 
purposes this year were greatly inadequate. Especially was this 
the case with the item of teachers' salaries. We would call at- 
tention to the necessary and non-flexible nature of these expen- 
ditures, and the consequent accuracy of our estimates, and would 
bespeak a more favorable consideration of the request of our 
finance committee for the ensuing year. 

In conclusion we commend the abilities and faithful work of 
superintendent, teachers, and other officers connected with the 
schools, and thank your honorable bodies for thoughtful co-op- 
eration. 

WILLIAM K. ROBBINS, 

For the Committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Manchester School Board : 

Gentlemen, — The following is respectfully offered as the 
Annual Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for 
the year 1891. 

Organization and Attendance. 

Throughout the year six teachers have been employed in the 
high school, also one for two terms. In the grammar schools 
there have been twenty-three teachers for the year, one for two 
terms and another for one term, — an equivalent of twenty-four 
in all. In the middle schools there have been sixteen teachers 
throughout the year. In the primary schools there have been 
twenty-eight teachers during the entire year ; also three others for 
one term each, — an equivalent of twenty-nine primary schools 
in all, taught by twenty-six teachers. This is accounted for by 
the fact that the principal of the training school, who for con- 
venience is reckoned among the middle-school teachers, has 
charge of three primary schools where no regular teachers are 
employed. There have also been two partially graded schools* 
employing three teachers, and six ungraded schools f with one 
teacher for each. 

The organization of the city schools for 1891 has therefore 
been equivalent to eighty-four distinct schools of a single room 
each, taught by eighty-two teachers. The number of pupils is 
257 greater than last year's enrollment, and six additional teach- 

* The upper room at Amoskeag and the Hallsville school. 
t Country suburban. 



Av. Enroll- 


Av. No. be 


ment. 


longing. 


35 


31 


36 


33 


40 


36 


46 


40 


35 


27 


21 


19 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ers have been employed for their instruction. The size of the 
city schools may be seen from the following : 

Average Number of Pupils per Teacher, upon both the Average 
Enrollment and the Average Number belonging. 



High .... 
Grammar .... 
Middle .... 
Primary .... 
Partially graded 
Ungraded 

The number of pupils registered in the different ungraded (or 
suburban) schools varies widely, ranging from 16 in the school 
at Webster's Mills to four times as many, or 64, in the school at 
Goffe's Falls. By an inspection of the attendance tables in the 
"Appendix" (pages C, D, E, and F, as lettered at the foot of 
the pages), great differences may also be seen in the number of 
pupils belonging to the various schools of respective grades. 
This cannot be helped, and is chiefly owing to two facts : one, 
that the growth of population is much more rapid in some sec- 
tions than in others ; the other, that sufficient rooms for school 
purposes have not been available in sections where some of the 
schoolrooms have long since been unduly crowded. Neverthe- 
less, the table above presented shows averages for the several 
grades as satisfactory as could be reasonably expected for the 
proper assignment in eighty-four rooms (an aggregate average of 
48 pupils to each room) of the 4,071 children scattered over so 
large a territory. 

The number of pupils in attendance upon the public schools 
this year is, I think, the largest in the history of the city except 
for the years 1881 and 1882, when pupils of French parentage 
began to be rapidly transferred to the parochial schools. Of the 
4,071 pupils at school, the attendance upon respective grades 
may be shown as follows : 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



321 



High . 
Grammar 
Middle . 
Primary . 
Partially graded 
Ungraded 

* Totals 



Enroll- 
ment. 


Per cent of 
Eni'ollment 


224 


5-5 


979 

6S7 

I>895 


24.0 
16.9 
46.6 


124 


3-° 


162 


4.0 



4,071 



The following tabular arrangement will show the comparative 
rate of tardinesses for five years, including the present year : 

Average Tardinesses on Average Attendance, per Pupil. 



Schools. 



1.^7 



High 4.6 

Grammar 2.6 

Middle 3.2 

Primary 2.1 

Partially graded 2.9 

Ungraded 4.1 



1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


4.0 


4.8 


28 


2.0 


2.0 


1 .9 


3.2 


3.1 


2.4 


24 


2.8 


2.3 


2.7 


4.2 


3.4 


2.7 


2.1 


1.1 



No grade except the high school has lowered its rate of tardi- 
ness below the record of its own grade for last year. The 
Hallsville school is very largely responsible for the high rate of 
tardinesses in the partially graded schools, as heretofore ; but it 
is hoped that the improved facilities for this school will arouse 
the people to greater co-operation with the teachers in their 
attempts to establish habits of punctuality and otherwise to se- 
cure right training for the Hallsville children. 

NEED OF MORE SCHOOLROOMS. 

The rapid growth of the city this year has made it more appa- 
rent than ever that there is imperative need of immediate action 

* Exclusive of duplicate enrollments. 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

for the relief of the over-crowded school buildings in the eastern 
section of the city. 

In the Lincoln-street schoolhouse there has this year been a 
school for two terms upon the third floor. A similar arrange- 
ment will have to be repeated next year, and likely enough con- 
tinued during the entire year. The new building at Hallsville 
will not materially relieve the over-crowded condition in the 
Lincoln-street schoolhouse ; for there are only about twenty pu- 
pils in the latter house who can attend the former, and of these 
there are so few in the several rooms of the Lincoln-street school 
that their withdrawal will hardly be perceptible. In the Ash- 
street schoolhouse there has this year been a school upon the 
third floor for the entire year, and also another for one term ; 
and a similar arrangement will have to be repeated there next 
year, except that the additional room will have to be continued 
for at least two terms, instead of one. The two primary schools 
in the Wilson Hill house also continue to be distressed for suffi- 
cient room. Notwithstanding several pupils have been sent out 
of their district to the training-school, the lower primary at the 
Wilson Hill house was obliged to receive 54 pupils for the fall 
term ; and this, too, where rooms are ill constructed, cannot be 
properly ventilated, and are only designed for and regularly pro- 
vided with but 45 sittings. 

It seems to me that the best way to relieve the schools in the 
eastern section would be to build three small schoolhouses instead 
of one large one, all for primary schools, as follows : a two-story 
house on the city lot at the corner of Bridge and Union streets, 
with two schoolrooms on the lower floor, and a wardroom on 
the upper floor ; a four-room house where the Wilson Hill build- 
ing now stands ; and a house of two or four rooms upon the 
extension of Orange street or Pearl street, east of Linden street. 
These houses should all be built as soon as- possible. 

With a new four-room building on the Wilson Hill lot, the 
two primaries now there and the one in the Lincoln-street school 
could be organized in the new house on the Wilson Hill lot as 
four schools, with about three dozen pupils for each. Space for 
another dozen in each room, together with space available in the 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 323 

training school (if necessity should require more) would provide 
the southeastern section with sufficient primary-school facilities till 
the proper time comes for the erection of another schoolhouse 
farther south. The withdrawal of the primary grade from the Lin- 
coln-street house would render its room available for the school 
otherwise compelled to occupy the third floor. With the sug- 
gested new house at the corner of Bridge and Union streets, pupils 
enough for two schools there could be taken from the three prima- 
ries at the Ash-street school and still leave pupils enough for two 
primary schools, one of which should be transferred to a new house 
east of Linden street. The four primary schools thus organized 
out of the three unduly large ones now in the Ash-street school, 
two being located at the corner of Bridge and Union streets, one 
in the Ash-street house, and another east of Linden street (as be- 
fore suggested), would have about thirty-six pupils each without 
making any allowance for the increase in this section ; but this 
would be provided for by space for a dozen more pupils in each 
of the four schools just mentioned. These changes would render 
two rooms now occupied by primary schools in the Ash-street 
house available for use by the two divisions otherwise compelled 
to occupy the third floor. 

Three important advantages would arise from the plan above out- 
lined : first, the primary-school children would be housed nearer 
home and in buildings by themselves ; second, the Webster-street, 
Ash-street, and Lincoln-street schools, with proper readjustment of 
boundaries, would probably accommodate the grammar and mid- 
dle grades in the eastern section of the city till necessity requires 
a new schoolhouse in the section far south where the city is likely 
to continue the rapid growth of the last year or two, which has 
already made six schools a necessity at Bakersville where but four 
can now be properly cared for ; and, third, the general plan sug- 
gested would, I think, save much ultimate expense, for it would 
seem that another house in the remote southern section will 
prove an eventual necessity, whatever others may be provided. 
These suggestions, I may say, are based upon the supposition 
that whatever changes are made for the better accommodation of 
the high school will probably be made upon its present site. If 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the present high-school property is to be used for other public 
school purposes, the matter here so largely discussed would need 
further consideration. 

The movement already made for more school room in Mc- 
Gregorville is in the right direction, and should be urged. 

Conditions about the school at Goffe's Falls are likely to de- 
mand your attention, and I therefore deem it proper to explain 
them. By an act of the last legislature, fifteen homesteads, in 
that part of Londonderry near Goffe's Falls, were set off from 
that town and joined to Manchester for school purposes only. 
As a result of this, the school was so increased in the spring and 
fall by the attendance of 14 pupils from seven of the London- 
derry homesteads that the school numbered 48 pupils for the 
spring term and 57 pupils for the fall term. The schoolhouse 
can hardly accommodate properly the 57 — 14, or 43, belonging 
to Manchester; for there is but one room, and three dozen 
pupils are full enough for one teacher in an ungraded school. 
The average daily attendance this fall has been 50, and the 
energies of the teacher have been severely taxed. One cannot 
endure such work long. But what will be done if the other 
eight homesteads also furnish two pupils each? Already the 
chairman of the sub-committee has been requested to improve the 
school by the employment of an assistant teacher. Such employ- 
ment and an additional schoolroom at Goffe's Falls are con- 
tingencies for which you may have soon to provide. 

TEACHERS. 

The following teachers have withdrawn from the schools dur- 
ing the year: Misses Nancy S. Bunton, Clara E. Woods, and 
Bertha L. Dean, from the Ash-street school ; Miss Carrie E. 
Hoit, from the Bakersville school ; Miss E. C. Root, from the 
high school, and Miss Abbie R. West was by death called from 
her position in the Hallsville school. 

The three first named had no superiors in the grades in which 
they respectively taught. Miss Bunton had been longest in the 
service, but her interest and enthusiasm never flagged. She was 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 325 

principal of the City Training School for Teachers till its re- 
organization, and was then transferred to the higher middle grade 
in the Ash-street school, where she continuously served till the 
time of her resignation. Her early success as a teacher led to 
her appointment as principal of the training school, and she fully 
met the expectations of all in every position entrusted to her 
care. For more than a score of years Miss Bunton was regarded 
as one of the most efficient teachers in the corps. Misses Dean 
and Woods each taught about a dozen years. Miss Dean was 
earnest, persistently faithful, unusually thorough, and to a high 
degree successful. Her pupils had the beneficial influence of a 
lady of exemplary character, genuine refinement, and much 
culture. Miss Woods was the genius of our primary schools. 
She early displayed unusual tact in the training of little children, 
soon took front rank among our primary teachers and easily 
maintained it. Her love for children seemed well-nigh un- 
bounded, and they in turn delighted in or worshiped their 
teacher. Misses Hoit and Root each taught but a few months 
in our schools, but they manifested excellent qualities as instruc- 
tresses, which portends well for their future success. 

OBITUARY. 

Universal grief was felt upon the death of Miss West. None 
knew her but to love and admire. She was not only in every 
way refined and ladylike, but of noble character and presence. 
She was also singularly sweet-tempered, and instinctively won 
the hearts of her pupils. Though a beginner in the service of 
her chosen vocation, she manifested great aptness in the work, 
had wrought a good degree of success, and gave great promise of 
a brilliant future. 

Now, at the close of the year, come the resignations of two 
other good teachers, Misses Nettie F. Ainsworth, of the Lincoln- 
street school, and Ella F. Sanborn, of the Franklin-street school. 
These ladies had acquired an experience and attained successes 
that make it certain the city will deeply regret their withdrawal 



326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

from its service. Miss Ainsworth, by the strength of her charac- 
ter and dignified ways, has, for several years, handled and taught 
a large school with apparent ease and signal success. Miss San- 
born, by faithful endeavor and persistent determination, has won 
success in a grade not most in accord with her tastes. 

Changes in the corps of teachers by transfer, etc., may be seen 
on page J of the " Appendix." 

High School. 

The high school appears to be in unusually good condition. 
The pupils are evidently trusted with the confidence of their 
teachers, and seem desirous of demonstrating that they are 
worthy of trust and capable of properly caring for their own 
conduct. There is also manifest not only a willingness to prop- 
erly prepare lessons, but a desire that amounts to determination 
to learn for the sake of the knowledge that may be acquired. 

In fact, the school has rarely been infested with disturbing 
elements during the fall and winter terms. Any that have be- 
come manifest usually appeared in the spring, upon the assign- 
ment of parts for graduating exercises to occur at the end of the 
term, and it does seem that there should be some improved 
method for the assignment of honorary parts to pupils entitled 
to participate in the high school graduating exercises. For many 
years there has been a feeling among both pupils and parents 
that the honorary parts of highest distinction have frequently 
been given to others than those most worthy. Considerable un- 
pleasantness has arisen in consequence and much dissatisfaction 
often been felt, though generally somewhat smothered. It is 
certainly difficult, and probably impossible, to devise any plan en- 
tirely unobjectionable; but improvement may be made, and I 
submit the following for consideration. 

In the first piace, I think the award should be made on the 
basis of scholarship instead of scholarship and deportment com- 
bined, as heretofore. My reason is that the deportment record 
is not made from a uniform standard for all, for it is the result 
of the combined reports of several different teachers, whose 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 327 

judgments undoubtedly differ more or less in regard to the mark- 
ing of even similar misdemeanors. Moreover, certain pupils are 
chiefly under the supervision of one set of teachers and others of 
another set ; and the circumstances that occasion marks for mis- 
demeanors vary widely in the different localities assigned to the 
charge of the several teachers, depending upon the size of classes 
and width of passage ways, or the number of pupils seated in a 
room and the purposes for which there. Hence it is unjust and 
wrong to base the award of honorary parts, in any degree, upon the 
deportment record, or upon any other record resulting from 
marks compiled from varying standards. And, for this reason, it 
is neither just nor right to base the award of parts upon the tab- 
ulated averages in scholarship of the entire senior class, without 
regard to the divisions of the course of study pursued, for there 
is no uniformity of standard when so done. The divisions of 
the course of study, being " English," "Classical," "College 
Preparatory," and "Scientific Preparatory," vary much in re- 
spect to subjects of study, as may be seen from an inspection of 
the course itself. (See " Appendix," page Z.) There is not 
only a vide difference in the character and degree of difficulty 
in the studies taken by different members of the senior class but 
the pupils are taught, examined, and marked by different stt^ of 
teachers, who are appropriately assigned the various studies of the 
several divisions of the course. The lack of uniformity, when 
averages of scholarship are tabulated from results found under 
such circumstances, is quite apparent. 

The question is, therefore, how to indicate with fairness those 
pupils most deserving distinction upon graduation. I reply that 
it may be done by tabulating the scholarship averages of each of 
the four divisions of the senior class separately, and having the 
names of those ranking first and second in each division printed 
as such upon the program of the graduating exercises. * This 
plan would make prominent a larger number of the worthy, 
make no invidious distinctions, and have the merit of being 
much more just than any method yet tried. From the eight pu- 
pils thus ranked as first or second, two in each of the four divis- 
ions of the course, the teachers should select the valedictorian 

* See illustration upon page P of the " Appendix." 



328 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and salutatorian of the class, without other consideration than to 
secure those who would perform such parts as acceptably as any 
in the list. These parts would not then have to be taken, as 
sometimes heretofore, by diffident young ladies, with voices in- 
sufficient to be heard, under the stress of a rank alone regarded 
as first or second ; for the organization of the school is such, and 
the work required under the several divisions of the course of 
study is so different, that the best or second best scholar of the 
senior class or any other class, regarded as a unit, cannot be posi- 
tively decided. 

Under the plan I have suggested for determining honors, the 
graduating exercises may be so arranged as to reflect most credit 
upon the school, without detriment to the reputation of the best 
scholars in the class, for the names of the best scholars would ap- 
pear as such prominently printed upon the program of graduat- 
ing exercises; and the teachers being limited to the list only in 
their choice of valedictorian and salutatorian could select for the 
other parts those pupils from the entire class who would best per- 
form such parts, and that, too, without ignoring a recognition of 
the best scholars in the class, whether more than two of them 
should be selected for parts in the graduating exercises or not. 

The Training School. 

During the first half of the present year, the training school 
was without its regular complement of sub-teachers, a fact owing 
to the lack of a full quota of applicants for admission to the 
class in both September of last year and February of this year — 
months when the sub teachers' class is usually re-organized and 
enlarged. But by the temporary employment as teachers of two 
or three graduates of the school, and by extra labor upon the 
part of the principal, the work was not allowed to deteriorate. 

At the opening of the fall term the number of candidates 
seeking admission to the sub-teachers' class was eleven, the larg- 
est number ever at one time applying, and all were admitted. 
The school, therefore, now contains fourteen sub-teachers, only 
one of whom will graduate next month. By reason of the 



|||l|!l!l!lllllllll!lj!lll!l^ 




REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 329 

amendment recently made to the " Rules" for the government 
of the training school, the semi-annual examination of those 
serving the trial period in the school will also occur next 
month, and some may be retired in consequence of failure prop- 
erly to meet the requirements of that, but the contrary is fer- 
vently hoped. * There are, however, a few applications for 
admission to the school on file at this office, and it is not expected 
that there will be any lack of a full class for at least a year to come. 

A circular of information in regard to the training school has 
recently been prepared, jointly by the sub-committee of the 
school and the superintendent, which I here incorporate, in the 
hope that it will be of general interest to our citizens, and in the 
belief that its provisions may yet prove of historical importance. 

The usual list of members belonging to the training school 
during the year, with dates of entrance and graduation, will be 
found in the "Appendix," page J. 



{Copy of Circular of Information.) 

CITY TRAINING SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS. 

This, school was first organized in 1869. The design of the 
school was to afford means for supplying the city schools with 
better teachers, and with those somewhat conversant with a 
graded system ; and also to provide for a better class of substi- 
tute teachers than could be secured from among the fresh gradu- 
ates of the high school. It was reasoned that the city schools 
could in no way be so surely and economically improved as by 
the establishment of a school for the proper training of the young 
lady residents here rapidly assuming teachers' positions. For 
about a dozen years the work was wholly practical, and the train- 
ing otherwise acquired was almost entirely by observation. 

In 1882 the school was reorganized, to secure the advantages 
to be derived from a course of professional training for the teach- 
ers' class. The school has since prospered, and continued to 

* All successfully passed the examination in January, 1S92. 



330 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

supply the city schools with a large majority of their lady teach- 
ers. Many of its graduates are also successful teachers in other 
places. 

This school affords excellent opportunities for normal study, 
and for observation and practice in graded schools, at a moder- 
ate expense. Its advantages are offered, preferably, to young 
lady residents of Manchester, and graduates of the Manchester 
High School, but other applicants will be admitted upon con- 
ditions and terms which may be learned by addressing an appli- 
cation to the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Manchester, 
N. H. 

The plan adopted upon reorganization in 1882, and which has 
since been pursued as far as practicable, is as follows : 

There is a principal, upon whom devolves the twofold respon- 
sibility of carrying on a school of about one hundred and fifty 
pupils, occupying four rooms, including six primary and two 
middle school classes, with a four years' course of study, and of 
giving to the pupil teachers one year's course of study in normal 
training, and a year and a half of actual teaching under her di- 
rection. There are twelve sub-teachers, in three classes of four 
each, — a senior class, each member of which, having completed 
the course of study, has charge of a room an entire term, a mid- 
dle class, and a junior class. The members of the middle and 
junior classes divide their time between study and recitation in 
the normal class, and assisting the seniors in teaching. The 
whole course, as indicated above, occupies one year and a half. 

The object of the school is to fit teachers for the work of or- 
ganizing, governing, and teaching in the public schools. 

This work recognizes the necessity of a thorough knowledge, 
first, of the laws of growth or development of the mind ; second, 
of the subjects required to be taught ; and third, of the best 
methods of teaching. 

The subjects are taught on the topical plan, text-books being 
used as reference books. Teaching exercises by the principal 
and the sub-teachers form a large part of the class work. 
Throughout the course, written abstracts of lessons and written 
criticisms are required. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 331 

The efforts and attainments of pupils in the normal class, and 
their success in actual teaching, will constitute the data upon 
which the principal will make her reports to the sub-committee, 
as required by the rules of the school board. 

The subjects upon which candidates for admission to the 
school are examined are reading, spelling, penmanship, arithme- 
tic, language, history, geography, physiology, music, and draw- 
ing. 

Pupil teachers (or sub-teachers) are admittted to the school 
upon the opening of the fall term of the city schools, and Febru- 
ary i * of each year. Resident candidates are given the prefer- 
ence of admission when more than the requisite number of qual- 
ified ones make application. 

The course of study for the normal class is as follows (forty-five 
minutes a day being devoted to recitation) : 

Junior Class. Reading, Writing, Language, Oral Instruction, 
Elementary Botany, Elementary Physiology and Hygiene, with 
reference to the effects of stimulants and narcotics, Elementary 
Geography, Arithmetic, Drawing, Clay Modeling, Care of School- 
room and Children, Reading of Educational Papers and Maga- 
zines, followed by discussions of matter read. 

Middle Class. Psychology, with reference to the development 
of the child mind, Art of Teaching, School Government, School 
Organization, History of Pedagogy, School Laws of New Hamp- 
shire, Reading of Educational Papers and Magazines, followed 
by discussion of matter read. 

Extract from Chapter V. of the Rules of the School Board. 

Section i. Pupils desiring to enter the training school as sub-teachers shall 
make written application for admission to the board, stating therein where ed- 
ucated, what experience, if any, they have had in teaching, and the grade 
(whether primary or higher) for which they propose to. fit. Such applications 
shall be referred to the sub-committee on the training school, who shall have 
power to admit the applicants to the school, under the regulations. 

Sect. 2. Candidates for admission must be graduates of some high school, 
or an equivalent, -f and furnish evidence of good moral character. Pupils will 

* At option of the sub-comrnittee of the school, when more sub-teachers may be needed. 

t The attainment required must be equivalent to a course as comprehensive, at least, as 
the three-years course of the English division in the Manchester High School, well under- 
stood. 



332 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

be admitted at the beginning of the fall term in each year ; at other times only 
in special instances, subject to the decision of the sub-committee. 

Sect. 3. The number of pupils constituting the training class shall be de- 
termined from time to time by the sub-committee of the school, but as a rule 
only two pupils shall be assigned for practice in any schoolroom. 

Sect. 4. Members of the training school shall be held responsible for their 
deportment and work as pupils, by the principal of the school, and in their prac- 
tice work shall be recognized as sub-teachers, subject to the general rules which 
control regular teachers. 

Sect. 5. The course of instruction in the training department shall continue 
for three periods of five school months each. The first period shall be called 
the trial period, during which the condidates shall serve without compensation. 

Before the close of this period, candidates must pass an examination in sub- 
ject matter required by the board for teachers ; and the principal of the school, 
and the superintendent, shall give to the sub-committee on the training school, 
upon blanks prepared for that purpose, the result of the examination, and their 
judgment of each candidate, as to her fitness for the work and probable success 
as a teacher. From those who receive their approval shall be selected by the 
sub-committee, according to their rank, as many as can be admitted for the sec- 
ond period. 

Before the close of the second period the principal of the training school and 
the superintendent shall report to the committee :n regard to each teacher in 
the same manner as before. And if there are any whose work during this pe- 
riod has not been satisfactory, and who do not promise success in the future, 
they shall be dropped and their places filled by others. 

To those who complete the course in the training school the committee will 
give a certificate stating the fact. 

Pupils in the training class may be assigned by the superintendent to serve as 
substitutes for other teachers, as in his discretion occasion may require. 

Sect. 6. Any member of the training class who shall be elected a teacher 
in any school of the city before completing the course of study, upon the recom- 
mendation of the principal of the school or the sub-committee of the school to 
which she may be elected, will be entitled to a certificate to teach in the grade 
for which she was admitted, without further examination ; and the sub-commit- 
tee may, if they deem it advisable, in consideration of service as a teacher, grant 
her the diploma of the school. 

SECT. 7. The regular course of study for those who desire professional train- 
ing for primary teaching will be one year, and an advanced course of five 
months will be required of those who are admitted to, and desire certificates to 
teach in, the higher grades. Graduates of the one-year primary course, and also 
graduates of any state normal school, may take the advanced course of five 
months, upon application and admission in accordance with these rules, for 
practice and professional training in grades above the primary. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 333 

The course of study in the training class shall be such as may be prescribed 
by the sub-committee. 

Sect. 8. The principal of the training school shall perform in that school 
the usual duties of principal of a school, and also such special duties in connec- 
tion with the training school as the sub-committee and superintendent may di- 
rect. The rank of teachers other than principal, and the course of study in the 
schools used for practice by the training class, shall be the same as in other 
schools of the city of the same grades. 

Sect. 9. The principal of the training school shall, when requested by the 
superintendent, visit the school of any graduate or pupil of the training school 
who may be elected as teacher of any school in the city, for the purpose of ob- 
servation in regard to her success. 

Sect. 10. Pupils in the training class shall be paid at the rate of $10 per 
month after five months', and at therate of #20 per month after a year's service, 
for actual work in the school. 

Sect, i i Annually, in the month of June, and prior to the election of 
teachers, the principal shall report to the sub-committee the names of the sub- 
teachers who have graduated within the previous year, with the qualifications, 
rank, prospects of success of each, and with such special recommendations and 
suggestions as she may deem advisable and necessary to acquaint the commit- 
tee with their capacity for teaching, the substance of which report shall be com- 
municated to the board by the sub- committee, and upon the selection of teachers, 
the graduates of this school shall have the preference if equally qualified.* 

Sect. 12. As a condition of admission to the training school, candidates 
will be required to sign a contract whereby they shall agree to conform to and 
abide by the rules and regulations made for the government of the school. 

Drawing and Manual Training. 

The study of drawing has not only been long recognized as a 
subject worthy of place in our course of study, but it has been 
deemed of sufficient importance to receive special treatment. At 
irregular intervals special teachers have been employed in an 
endeavor to have the study put upon as firm a basis, and as thor- 
oughly taught, as any of the other studies in our schools. The 
"standing committee on drawing" in various years has, in due 
appreciation of the importance of the study, presented to the 
board the need of a permanent special teacher of drawing, and 
the board has concurred in the opinion of the committee, and 
repeatedly endeavored to get an appropriation for the purpose ; 

* But no guarantee of any oosition in the city schools is thus implied. 



334 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

but it has never succeeded in getting an adequate amount, and 
hence the study has never been a complete success, and must 
therefore be characterized as a partial failure. Properly taught, 
the study would be held in as high esteem as that of music, found 
to be of as much ethical value, and very much more largely to 
afford a training sure to bear directly in a most helpful way upon 
the endeavors of all, and especially of those who seek to better 
their condition in life chiefly through the employment of their 
hands. Is it not, indeed, because of the better understanding 
which some minds have of common mechanisms, through a 
knowledge of the principles involved in drawing (either intui- 
tively understood or by study attained), that many excel and 
obtain better positions in common life, while others for this rea- 
son become inventors or occupy the highest positions in their 
respective callings ? It is in the belief of this, as I understand 
the matter, that further help of a similar sort is thought to be 
afforded by such instruction as can be given in the schools by 
what has come to be known as " Manual Training." 

Its introduction in the public schools is already an established 
fact in most cities of the size of ours, and even in many smaller 
towns to a much larger extent than in our own good city. It 
will doubtless be a matter of surprise to most citizens, and possi- 
bly to not a few of our teachers, that I have here used language 
implying the introduction of manual training in our schools to 
even a limited extent. But if so, the surprise will be for the rea- 
son that form study and drawing are not recognized as elements 
of manual training, though they constitute its base and embody 
its most prominent characteristics. As the possibly best aid to 
the formation of a correct idea of what is meant by manual train- 
ing, as advocated for attention in the public schools, there may 
first be made a declaration of what it is not. 

"It is not more valuable to the mechanic than to the states- 
man, or to the man of letters ; it is not the teaching of a single 
trade, for as soon as the pupils know how to do anything well 
they cease to do that, and learn to do something a little more 
difficult ; it is not an education of the hand to the neglect of the 
brain, an education in the power of doing to the detriment of 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 335 

the power of thinking; it is not an end, but a means; it is not a 
shop, but a school — a well-developed youth being the only com- 
modity that it seeks to put upon the market ; it is not even the 
beginning of a technical education, for it has no more relation 
to a polytechnic school than the ordinary grammar school has to 
a college of medicine." 

Then what is manual training, what is the purpose of teaching 
it somewhat extendedly in the public school, and how can it 
there be properly taught ? 

" Manual training is a system of methods and devices in teach- 
ing, which take into account the paramount importance of ad- 
dressing the mind of the child through the avenues of all his 
sense-organs, laying particular stress upon the use, hitherto much 
neglected, of the sense of touch and the muscular sense, — mere 
hand training being regarded as purely incidental, though im- 
mensely valuable." .... "Full benefit is realized only when 
the spirit of such teaching enters into, and finds expression in, 
all the exercises of the school." ....." Teachers who witness 
daily lessons in hand training soon learn that its value consists 
largely in the emphasis given to sense activity, and seek to apply 
this principle while instructing in other branches. Thus the 
spirit of the school is greatly improved." 

The leading purposes of manual training in the schools are 
" to stimulate correctness of perception, soundness of judgment, 
taste in design, ingenuity in overcoming difficulties, deftness in 
manipulation, and neatness of wrought as well as of written work ; 
to give the pupil the power to do things, as well as to think and 
to talk about them ; to pay a premium on energy, diligence, 
originality, and manliness ; to place a barrier against idleness, as 
the beginning of all crimes, and save the boy from incompetence 
and dishonesty ; to keep the boys in school until the high school 
course is completed ; to reduce the difficulty of discipline to a 
minimum ; to awaken and sharpen attention, and give children 
an appreciation of, and love for, order and exactness ; to accus- 
tom the pupil to do thoroughly and well whatever he undertakes ; 
to foster habits of observation, accuracy, and perseverance ; to 
lay the foundation for many trades, by the presentation and 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

mastery of the principles that underlie all trades; to provide a 
third mode of expressing thought through forms represented and 
things produced ; to produce more complete, and therefore more 
competent men, by educating all the powers of every boy; to 
take away the bitterness of the boy who is dull with his books 
and ready with his hands, because it teaches him to see that he 
is good for something; to restore his confidence, quicken his 
interest in school, save his self-respect, and open a welcome door 
into practical life ; to make the boy who chooses a learned pro- 
fession a more useful and broad-minded citizen; to teach the 
future man to know, love, and respect labor, to appreciate cor- 
rectly the value of labor products, and to comprehend the social 
value of laboring people." 

It is not easy to indicate, nor yet settled, how all these end s 
can be best attained ; but pedagogical investigations and the 
experiments of recent years, founded thereon, prove that the ob- 
ject in view can be most largely realized by a proper adjustment 
and application of such exercises as best train both the mind and 
hand. 

Says Rabelais : 

"Teach through the senses; inculcate independence of 
thought; train for practical life; develop mind and body 
equally." 

Bacon : 

"Education is the cultivation of a just and legitimate famil- 
iarity betwixt the mind and things." 

Comenius : 

"Schools have been fitly called the workshops of humanity." 

Pestalozzi : 

"Man must seek his chief instruction in his chief work, and 
not allow the empty teaching of the head to precede the labor of 
the hand." 

Froebel : 

" For what man tries to represent or to do he begins to under- 
stand." 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 337 

Carlyle : 

"All speech and rumor is short-lived, foolish, and untrue. 
Genuine work alone, what thou workest faithfully, that is eternal 
as the Almighty Founder and World Builder himself." 

Spencer : 

"Science is organized knowledge; and before knowledge can 
be organized some of it must first be possessed. Every study, 
therefore, should have a purely experimental introduction ; and 
only after an ample fund of observations has been accumulated 
should reasoning begin." 

Rusk in : 

" Let the youth once learn to take a straight shaving off a 
plank, or draw a fine curve without faltering, or lay a brick level 
in its mortar, and he has learned a multitude of other matters 
which no lips of man could ever teach him." 

Charles H. Ham : 

"These emphatic opinions of great teachers, scientists, and 
philosophers, in support of the educational principles which un- 
derlie drawing, object lessons, constructive exercises, and labora- 
tory processes of every description, cannot be whistled down the 
wind. They are the deductions of scientific research, the fruit- 
age of an intimate acquaintance with the laws of psychology, the 
embodiment of the wisdom of the ages. In the rich realms of 
literature, science, and philosophy, the names of these men are 
pre-eminent. The dead among them, departing, left few peers 
behind ; and the living — proud distinction ! — receive the hom- 
age of a grateful world, which venerates them while it enjoys the 
royal bounty of their genius." 

Now the means thought best to attain the ends in view, through 
the aid of the school, are, in the 

Primary grades : 

Development of conceptions of form, through the handling 
and critical observation of objects, and the representation of 
those conceptions by clay-modeling, tablet-laying, stick-laying, 
paper-folding, paper-cutting, and drawing. 



338 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Grammar grades : 

Drawing, free-hand and mechanical, sewing, cooking, wood- 
working, including wood-carving. 

High school : 

A course similar to that for grammar grades, but more ex- 
tended. 

Such a course of instruction, combined with a properly modi- 
fied form of the hitherto generally recognized common-school 
course of study, will, it is believed, afford a very much better 
preparation for intelligent, useful, and self-sustaining citizenship. 
Before another decade shall have passed, it will be held in great 
surprise if the managers of the public schools of Manchester shall 
not have provided a thorough basis for the kind of school des- 
tined soon to exist in every city of importance ; for it cannot be 
long before our citizens, seeing the needs of communities else- 
where much more effectually met in the public school, will de- 
mand from our schools the better advantages ; but they must be 
doomed to disappointment in any expectation that the schools 
will speedily afford the desired improvements in full, unless prior 
to such demand the conditions in the schools shall have been 
made right for the suggested change. 

It may be properly inferred that I think the coming school, at 
least for cities of the size of ours, and for which our citizens will 
ere long call, will be an organization for the training of both the 
mind and the hand ; for the average citizen must realize from 
his own experience the advantages arising from the reflex action 
of the training of either upon the other — mind or hand — and 
recognizing the effect of such action as proof that the cotempo- 
rary culture of the mind and hand will afford the best education, 
he will not be long, after once set seriously to thinking about it, 
in demanding such culture for his children. 

In his inaugural address his Honor, the Mayor, and also the 
vice-chairman of our board previously and repeatedly, have put 
themselves on record as advocates of manual-training instruction 
in the city schools. It must seem, too, to every one giving the 
matter any thought, that the time has surely come when that in- 
struction already in the schools constituting an essential part of 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 339 

such training should be unified and fully utilized. I refer to 
instruction in the study of form, in clay-modeling, tablet-laying, 
stick-laying, paper-folding, and paper cutting, now undertaken 
to a greater or less extent in our various primary schools, and to 
drawing in all our grades. The instruction afforded in these sub- 
jects is far from best or any considerable uniformity in degree of 
efficiency ; for it is dependent upon the knowledge and skill of 
a corps of teachers whose training, as a whole, has not been 
adequate to this line of instruction. Cities and towns which 
have been determined that this department of instruction (so 
important of itself, and absolutely essential to any system of 
manual training in the schools) should be treated with a thor- 
oughness at least commensurate with the amount of time devoted 
to it, have found it necessary to employ continuously for years a 
special agent for the purpose, known as the teacher of drawing, 
and that, too, notwithstanding the fact that the corps of teachers 
in many of such cities and towns has been chiefly selected from 
among the graduates of the best normal schools. The reason for 
this felt necessity has been because of the rapid development and 
growth of the subject in question, and until its principles and 
methods become as settled and well understood by the average 
teacher as are the principles and methods pertaining to the other 
subjects taught in the schools, there will be need of a special 
teacher of drawing wherever a proper equivalent shall be de- 
manded for the money put into paper, books, pencils, and for 
the valuable time devoted to the study. 

The efforts that have ever been made here to put the study of 
drawing upon a proper footing in our schools, by the occasional 
employment of a special teacher for a few months, or for a longer 
period for only a day or two a week, have been insufficient for 
much lasting good, and chiefly significant in revealing the great- 
est weakness in our schools. I trust, gentlemen of the school 
board, that you may see a way speedily to act in this matter in 
accordance with what I believe must be your convictions, and 
soon furnish our schools with a special teacher in drawing who 
shall devote his, or her, full time to the advancement of this im- 
portant study in our schools, direct the work, and instruct our 



340 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

teachers in accordance with their needs. This I deem highly 
advisable for the proper accomplishment of our present course, as 
well as for what are likely to be any future courses of study in our 
schools, and absolutely necessary to the establishment of proper 
conditions for the speedy and successful introduction of a full 
course in manual training whenever determined. The cost, in 
addition to what is now annually expended upon this department 
of our work, should not exceed fifteen hundred dollars, a total of 
two thousand dollars ; or, otherwise expressed, about a cent and 
a third a week per scholar, annually. 

My object in writing so fully upon manual training is twofold: 
first, to show that form study and drawing constitute an essen- 
tial part of such training (as far as it is designed to be taught in 
the public school) and almost the whole of it as applied to grades 
below the grammar school, in which lower. grades there is 6$}£ 
per cent of all the pupils enrolled in our schools, and that there- 
fore to have form study and drawing rightly and thoroughly 
taught would afford about two thirds of our pupils all the manual 
training, except penmanship * and sewing, that is anywhere ad- 
vocated for instruction in primary and middle grades, to say 
nothing of such instruction as a necessary preparation for the 
more advanced similar work now attempted in our higher grades, 
which should likewise be better done ; second, to disclose the 
purpose for which manual training is being advocated as a sub- 
ject of instruction in the public school, to indicate its general 
character, and to make clear that it is no part of its purpose to 
teach any trade or trades. 

In General. 

The other studies taught are in general well handled, and the 
schools have upon the whole made at least a good degree of pro- 
gress during the year. 

I had designed in this report to outline some of the improve- 
ments made in the study of language by our schools in recent 
years, a study whose importance is second to none, and to fur- 
nish some tangible evidence of successes attained ; but the too 
♦Already taught. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 341 

great length of this report is already manifest, and I will defer 
any further treatment of the subject for the present. 

There is, however, one other subject to which I wish to call 
your attention as needing early treatment. This is reading. 
Several years ago a few hundred dollars were expended for what 
was known as supplementary reading matter, comprising such 
classics as The Seven Little Sisters, ^Esop's Fables, Robinson 
Crusoe, Swiss Family Robinson, Scott's Tales of a Grandfather, 
Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare, Lady of the Lake, Evangeline, 
The Autobiography of Franklin, American Authors, also pro- 
ductions from such eminent writers as Dickens, Goldsmith, Addi- 
son, and Tennyson. The favorable effect of the use of such 
reading by the pupils in our schools has been very marked in in- 
troducing pupils to an acquaintance with the most noted and 
best authors, in cultivating a taste for exalted thoughts clothed 
in best styles of expression, and in putting the schools in close 
connection with the city library. The enduring good that must 
have been derived by the hundreds of children who have been 
benefited by the use and influence of such literature as has thus 
been afforded can scarcely be estimated, and is far beyond all 
comparison with the cost of supply. 

The books named are now nearly all worn out, from the circu- 
lation and use given them in the schools, and I recommend as 
action of the utmost importance that you promptly again furnish 
the schools with another supply of choice reading matter, that 
the children now in the schools may therefrom derive the bene- 
ficial influences bestowed upon their predecessors. Your chil- 
dren may have an acquaintance with the best in literature from 
access to it in the home library, but the very large majority of 
the children in our schools are sure to have any acquaintance of 
the sort only as it is made in the schools. Moreover, the great 
advantages named can be had virtually without additional cost, 
for the city now furnishes the regular text-books in reading, 
needed for drill exercises in earliest attempts at reading, and in 
elocution. Hence, these text-books will be saved wear and tear 
in proportion to the extent it is bestowed upon the books asked 
for supplementary reading. 



342 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The general subject of reading may be also improved, 
without much cost to the city, by again employing a special in- 
structor in elocution and charging the greater part of the ex- 
pense thereof to the John B. Clarke prize-speaking fund. I may 
here say that it was the wish and earnest desire of the late Col- 
onel Clarke that the board annually supplement the prize-speak- 
ing fund by an amount sufficient to procure the permanent em- 
ployment of a special instructor in elocution. 

Conclusion. 

In closing this somewhat lengthy report, I wish to express my 
gratitude to the teachers for their faithful, earnest, and efficient 
work; and to you, gentlemen of the school board, for your loy- 
alty and the assistance you have rendered me, as well as for the 
liberal policy that has characterized your efforts in behalf of the 
schools. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III. Schools. 

IV. Teachers. 
V. Pupils. 

VI, Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1891. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1892. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1892. 

XIII. School Year, 1892. 



APPENDIX 



STATISTICS. 



I. — Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1890 . . 43,983 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 

II. — Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use . . . . . .22 

Number of schoolhouses not in use 1 

(Bridge-street house, corner of Union.) 
Number of schoolrooms used for day schools . . .84 

(Three of the same, and six others, used for evening schools. Rooms unoc- 
cupied by city for day schools are two at Spring-street house, three at Lowell- 
street and two at Bridge-street, the last two being unfit.) 
Number of rooms used for High-school classes ... 7 
Number of rooms used for Grammar schools . . .24 
Number of rooms used for Middle schools . . . .16 
Number of rooms used for Primary schools . . . .29 
Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools . . 2 
Number of rooms used for Ungraded Schools ... 6 



ill. — Schools. 



(All for both sexes.) 
Number of High Schools 



(A) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



345 



Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle 
and Primary) schools ...... 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools (Merri 
mack-street or Training school) .... 

Number of schools all Primary grade 

Number of Partially Graded schools .... 

Number of Ungraded schools ..... 



IV.— Teachers. 



Male teachers in the High school 
Female teachers in the High school . 
Male teachers in the Grammar schools 
Female teachers in the Grammar schools . 
Female teachers in the Middle schools 
Female teachers in the Primary schools 
Female teachers in the Partially Graded schools 
Female teachers in the Ungraded schools . 
Special teachers : One male in music the entire year 
Average number of male teachers * . 
Average number of female teachers . 
Male teachers in the evening schools 
Female teachers in the evening schools 
Average number of male teachers in the evening schools 
Average number of female teachers in the evening schools 
Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools . 
Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawin 
schools ........ 



3 

4 

5 

J 9 

16 

26 

3 
6 



of special teachers. 



(B) 



346 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



a 

2 a 



S.S? S S« -■s .2 "3,8 

« H ^ "-3 °° a °e c 






. a g „ 



1 .Qn -; 



J fc<C5SS 



u So 



■paiiojua 
•ON sjoiiAi 



•aDirepn^ 
-ye i^nup 

JO ;U90 J9J 


03 


-t co — es 
io co c* co 

oocc 


© lO 

a? * ~" 


93.8 
95.4 
93.0 
92.7 
93.6 

93.6 


95.2 
92.3 
92.6 
90.5 


1 
8 


•aoutjpaajie 


C5 
CI 


— ■■£ 1Q N 

C-l C» CO CO 


-r a 


83S83 


§ 


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s 


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•ojj eSBJaAy 


Ol 


01 t- CO CO 
CM O) COCO 


IM CN 


r- •# co -h t- 

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§ 


*«S ?? 


a 






S - — CO - 



r- ^ ,o 



a-= j= £ 



I I 



J4 "3 * 



(C) 



REPORT OP THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



347 



i£%£ a 



gi 



« 1 ; 

c s • cm 









Ortfflj; 10 
c«oia I ~i 



O ScOO5O3OSCoS0500O35sOS0 



o oococcoot-cot-iot-coiQco* 



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(D) 



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ills 



Ill' 



0000 

cot re co 


1 


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r- H 51 CI 


T 


8 




C5 
CM 


■* fll-l"*5H9IOt-<OtOM1<0 
■* CO n M -* •* CM CO CM CO CO CO CO CI 


CM 


10 


s?ssg 


IO 


ONOH 
C) « CM CI 





s 


s 


§3 


CO lOrtClt-t-OtoeJNOtONM 
■* COCOClTt>"*COCOCMTj<>#COCOCl 


S§ 


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— CO CO 

CI CO CO (M 


O 


CO CM t- C) 


10 


CM 


10 


3 


O CC-ICMOOCJIOCDr-CMCMt-COCM 
CO CI >- t-c 01 CMCM CI C) — CO CI CM " 


2! 


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C! O C-l fl 


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8 283£22822ci22£ 


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> 0° 

'Ii3 2 



348 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



W 

a 
o 

H 
H 


Mary G. Tynan. 

Lettie M. Smith. 

Gertrude H. Brooks. 

Georgiana Dow. 

May F. Nutt. 
i Clara E. Woods, 2 terms. 
1 Annie B. Goodwin, 1 term. 

Bertha A. Young, 1 term. 

Helen M. Morrill. 

Nellie I. Sanderson. 

Lucia E. Esty. 

Maude L. Kent. 

Huldah C. Graupner. 

Ella Hope. 

Theodora Richardson. 

J C. E. Wing, Principal. 

Nellie M. James. 
Ella F. Sanborn. 
Mary E. Brophy. 
Mary J. Walsh. 
Mary A. Clement. 
Kate T. Clarke. 
Gertrude L. Southard. 


•aouupuai 
-ijb ifi!«p 
jo ;ua3 jaj 


eoooot-io oo oo»-<CiO<ot-ciooc©a}io<£>cicoiot--co© 


ocjQCJCj as cooocncnoSaoooos DOQOCOOOOCJOQOI 


•aouBpnauB 

A"[IBp 33BJ3AV 


ncstonn as toiofcoioiociojocoiot-ooooiiMto 

TfCNCJCO-* CO COC0COCOC0COCCC0COCOTt<C0C0COC0C0-#CO 


•SniSaoiaq 
•o]g' 9Sbj8av 


ffliNoo<ot- o i- i-Ht-ait-asoo<M'*t-oot i en ci o io o 

-*COCNCO^< ■* •* Tf CO CO CO CO CO ■* Tjl CO Ttl CO •* CO •* -* rr •* 


.* | aa [ t-t-MIN'* i-( -#001010000 — C O CO C CO O X 10 us ei « 
O ti i "3 CO -11-1 CO C-l CO •* •# o< -# CI CI ■# C< CO CO C3 CI •* " CI CI -r •# 

*3 3 1 


Whol 
Belon 

Boys. 


SSSSS & ESSSSSSSSSoSSSSaSSS 


•pa[10jua 
•OK ajoqM. 


S^§5§ § S|8£SSSSS§gg3c€g£g£3 


CO 

►J 

O 
O 
« 

1 


Amoskeag, Higher and Lower 

Webster-street, Higher and Lower 

Blodget-street, Higher 

" Lower 

Ash-street, Higher 

" Lower 

' ' Lower 

Spring-street, Higher 

" Lower 

Wilson Hill, Lower 

Lincoln-street, Higher 

Merrimack -street, Higher 

" Lower 

" Lower 

" Lower 

" Lower 



(E) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



349 



jz-B a 






in o ci <-< ct o 

•H O C5t)H 00 I O 
05 OS 00 00 CO I 00 



w to « t 

CO CO Ml 



S S K^S 3 



O ■* 1OH00 IC 
CM CO M* CM 



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CM CI HCOH 



cow t- p 






^ 2 is 



si-la- 






?M S3 - O 

2 ®PDS . 



oo co oo o en oo 

rt C4 CO CM CO 00 

ooaaa t- oo 



— o in oo o 



•- .- 
i 3 






23 



_« O != M _ 



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2 ^.2 
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O <r> O 

<=■§ a 

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!'* 

§1 = 



3-5 3 






(F) 



350 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DAY SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance upon the several grades of public 
day schools for the year 1891 : 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primary 

Partially graded . 
Ungraded 



Totals, 1891 
Totals, 1890 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls. 



102 
448 
330 
970 
62 
Ml 



122 
531 
357 
925 



II 



217 
797 
578 
1,154 
82 
112 



2,940 
2,795 



"8 g 

Is 



212 

743 
524 
1,037 
72 
101 



'i»5 

, ■- f 



97.9 
93.2 

90.7 
S9.9 
87.8 
90.2 



91.5 

90.7 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance upon the several grades of public 
evening schools for the year 1891 : 





Whole number 
different pupils. 


"* 
1- 


11 
1* 


oj, . 

^a » 

§ J 




Boys. 


Girls. 


k"Sl ° 




291 




260 
60 


66 
43 
50 
60 


47 
34 
35 
50 

166 
141 


71.2 




79.1 






54 
110 


70.0 




83.3 








455 
430 


320 

257 


219 
1S9 


75.8 




74.1 







(G) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 351 

Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal of Lowell-street school, for 
boys. 

Assistants — Etta S. Dana, C. A. Bohlin, David Eckvall, Ar- 
thur W. Morgan, W. J. Mooar, John J. Shea, Nellie M. James, 
Gertrude A. Burns, and Millie S. Morse. 

Frank S. Sutcliffe (Winter), and William J. Mooar (Fall), 
principals of Spring-street school, for girls. 

Assistants — Lizzie D. Hartford, Maggie Linen, Alice H. 
Boyd, and Edith S. Dole. 

Charles W. Bickford (Winter), and L. H. Carpenter (Fall), 
principals of School-street school, for both sexes. 

Assistants — Nellie M. Atwood, Evelyn Prescott, and Mary A. 
Clement. 

Evening Drawing-School Teachers. 

John M. Kendall, Henry W. Allen, and xAJphonzo H.Sanborn. 

(H) 



352 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



The following table presents the main features of interest per- 
taining to the attendance upon the public schools for the last ten 
years. 



Date. 


1 

3 
s 

a 

i-3 

S2 O 

it 


Whole No. 
belonging. 


1 

a 

s 
a 
ti 

II 

a o 


& 

'a 

to m 

> a 


i 

o . 
« £ 

%2 


S « 

* to 

a, a 

g 01 

> *> 


1 

a*. 

51 

•3" 
3 S 
g a 


o 

"o 

o 


a 

o 

"So 
£2 

a 8 


a 

■^ . 

Il 
11 


8 
S 

ac, 

g£ 

g 3 










H 






-0 


< 


&H 


•4 


O 


PM 


H 


o 


^ 


1S82 


4,095 


2,086 


2,009 


2,957 


2,712 


91.7 


104 


76 


65 


57 


53 


73 


18S3 


4,002 


2,061 


2,001 


2,848 


2,012 


91.4 


103 


97 


75 


66 


27 


. 71 


1S84 


3,918 


1,924 


1,994 


2,872 


•2,645 


92.1 


95 


85 


71 


49 


38 


72 


1S85 


3,806 


1,891 


1,915 


2,725 


2,430 


90.6 


90 


98 


S9 


71 


35 


72 


188C 


3,032 


1,812 


1,820 


2,698 


2,475 


91.9 


79 


78 


71 


53 


42 


74 


1887. ... 


3,670 


1,817 


1,853 


2,711 


2,468 


90.8 


98 


98 


95 


61 


42 


70 


1888 


3,712 


1,806 


1,906 


2,768 


2,500 


90.3 


116 


88 


SO 


58 


45 


7G 


1889 


3,787 


1,862 


1,925 


2,801 


2,581 


92.2 


177 


101 


90 


73 


55 


75 


1890 


3,814 


1,881 


1,933 


•J,795 


2.536 


90.7 


141 


121 


114 


83 


33 


75 


1891 


4,071 


2,003 


2,068 


2,940 




91.5 


160 


120 


101 


69 


26 


82 



CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The whole number of different teachers employed one term or 
more in the day schools, within the year, has been 91. Their 
respective positions may be learned from the attendance table on 
pages C, D, E, and F of the Appendix, but the various changes 
made within the year can be more readily understood by an in- 
spection of the following : 

* Including grammar classes in suburban schools. 

f Usually some pupils have annually entered- from other schools. This 
year seven Lave so entered. 

(I) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



353 





Date of effect 


Teachers. 


of resignation. 


Nancy S. Bunton. 


Mar. 20. 


Carrie E. Hoit. 


June 26. 


Abbie R. West.* 


June 26. 


Clara E. Woods. 


June 26. 


Bertha L. Dean. . 


Nov. 20. 


E. C. Root. 


Nov. 25. 




Date of effect 




of transfer. 


Gertrude A. Burns. 


Sept. 14. 


Annie B. Goodwin. 


Sept. 14. 


Olive A. Rowe. 


Sept. 14. 


Annie M. Sleeper.f 


Sept. 14. 



Date of begin- 
Teachers. ning service. 

Gertrude A. Burns. Jan. 26. 

Annie M. Sleeper. Jan. 26. 

Emma J. Cooper. Apr. 13. 

Nellie M. Atwood. Sept. 14. 

Georgia M. Cheney. Sept. 14. 

Augusta S. Downs. Sept. 14. 

Mary G. Worthen. Oct. 12. 

Edith S. Dole. Nov. 23. 

Mary H. Cutler. Nov. 31. 



Genevieve B. Knight. Oct. 12. 



TRAINING SCHOOL SUB-TEACHERS. 



Gertrude A. Burns-! 
Georgia M. Cheney.J 
Annie M. Sleeper. J 
Gertrude L. Southard. 
Mary G. Worthen. J 
Mary A. Clement.J 
Susie L. Dodge. 1 1 
B. Millie Cayzer.§ 
Carrie E. Litch.g 
Mary W. Allen. ^[ 
Issa M. Tuttle.^f 



Mabel R. Brown.** 
Lucy M. Choate.** 
Mary J. Corcoran.** 
Annie R. Corson.** 
AlfredaHall.** 
Mertie C. Hawks.** 
Carrie E. Head.** 
Perley E. Higgins.** 
Mary S. Richardson.* * 
Josie L. Riddle.* * 
M. Minnie Sturtevant.* ' ; 



* Died July 3. f Substitute for Miss Chandler in Franklir. -street school, fall term. 

{Graduated January 30, 1891. IT Entered February.-, i8gr. 

|| Graduated June 26, 1891. ** Entered September 14, 18.11. 

§ Withdrew. 



(J) 



354 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



VI. — Work of Truant Officer. 





Absentees 
reported from 


No. volunta- 
rily returned 
to. 


No. reported 
caused to 
attend. 


|. 


3 




i 




4 


Is 

15 o 
o o 


5 s 


2-g 


1 
>>.e 

•- i 


S 1i 

11 


No. mov 
• the cit 

No. fou 
and u 
attend 


ill 

o o 2 


a 
si 


January 

February 

March 

K3K i 


16 
24 
11 
18 
28 
19 
12 
29 
17 
13 


22 
23 
16 
27 
15 
21 
30 
42 
21 
14 


6 
6 
1 

3 
9 
2 

7 
3 
3 




1 
3 
2 

9 


9 

16 
9 
10 
17 

12 
' 10 
12 
7 
7 


14 
16 
10 
23 
11 
17 
20 
22 
19 
9 

161 


1 
3 

5 

2 

3 
1 

~ is" 


3 
4 

5 
3 
1 
4 
2 
19 
3 
3 


5 
3 
2 
3 
5 
3 
2 
6 
3 
3 




May — 

Juue 

September. . . . 

October 

November — 
December 


l 
l 

l 


Totals 


187 


231 


40 


109 


47 


35 


3 



No. truants 

caused 
to attend. 



I! 



si 



January. .. 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

September. 
October . . . 
November.. 
December . 



Totals. 



(K) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 355 

VII. — Finance.— 1891. 



Items op Account. 


Resources from appro- 
priations and transfers. 


Expenditures, 1891. 




$49,398.52 

300.00 

3,210.73 

750.00 


$49,398.52 
62.50 
















3,715.75 3,715.75 

4,673.51 4,673.54 

400.00 396.11 

931 92 931.92 






Contingent expenses 




600.00 553.71 






$69,525.34 


$68,797.65 





COST OF CITY SCHOOLS, 1 89 1. 

Expenditures, as above specified . 

Salaries. 



Members of the school board 
Clerk of the board ..... 
Superintendent of schools .... 
Truant officer . 

Total 

Receipts on Account of the Schools. 

Literary fund 

Non-resident tuition 

Sale of text-books ..... 



Total 



(L) 



$68,797.65 



180.00 

100.00 
2,000.00 

750.00 

$71,827.65 



$5*287.50 
320.95 
138-52 

$5>746.97 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Net amount raised by taxation .... $66,080.68 
Raised by taxation in 1890 67,581.71 



Reduction ...... $1,501.03 

The city valuation for 1891 is $24,872,492 ; and hence the 
rate of school tax for the year is $66,080.68 -=- $24,872,492, or 
.00265 -(-. 

The following account of school property is largely the same 
as for last year, when an accurate inventory was made of it. The 
expenditures this year may be supposed to offset ordinary wear 
and tear, except in the case of new buildings. 

SCHOOL PROPERTY, DECEMBER 31, 1 89 1. 

Furniture. Included under this head are teachers' and pupils' 
desks, chairs, settees, tables, portable blackboards, clocks, pianos 
and their appurtenances, ladders, double windows, and heating 
apparatus. 

General Supplies. Included under this head are ink-stands, 
bells, waste baskets, thermometers, brooms, floor-brushes, dusters, 
dust pans and brushes, door-mats, pails, dippers, wash basins, 
window brushes, mops, coal hods, shovels, axes, hammers, screw- 
drivers, and wheelbarrows. 

(M) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



357 



School Buildings. 



Furniture. 


General supplies. 


$ 3 ,4-28.00 


$25.00 


2,229.00 


30.00 


1,937.00 


28.00 


3,355.00 


56.00 


3,231.00 


30.00 


2,107.00 


30.00 


2,108.00 


54.00 


813.00 


15.00 


1,605.00 


25.00 


228.00 


7 00 


302.00 


11.00 


1,613.00 


28.00 


321.00 


9 00 


319.00 


12 00 


345.00 


S (10 


169.00 


7.00 


94.00 


4 00 


114.00 


5.00 


124.00 


6 00 


S5.00 


5.00 


05.00 


5.00 


62.00 


4.00 


250.00 


200.00 


$24,904.00 


$610.00 



High scliool 

Franklin-street . . 

Spring-street 

Lincoln-street — 

Ash-street 

Main-street 

Webster-street... 

Bakersville 

Varney school — 
Blodget-street — 
Lowell-street . . . 
Training school.. 

Wilson Hill 

South Main-street 

Amoskeag 

Hallsville 

Stark District 

Goffe's Falls 

Harvey District.. 

Youngsville 

Webster's Mills . 
Moscpiito Pond. .. 
Evening Schools. 

Total 



Special Supplies. Included under this head are maps, globes, 
charts and chart supporters, numeral frames, slates, pencils, pen- 
cil sharpeners, pens, penholders, crayon, erasers, pointers, meas- 
ures, geometrical forms, compasses, and rulers. 

(N) 



358 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Grades. 


Special supplies. 


Unabridged d i c- 
tionaries and li- 
brary or refer- 
ence books. 


Regular 
text- 
books. 


High school 


$200.00 
900.00 
500.00 
387.00 
154.00 
5.00 


$575.00 
325.00 
190.00 
150.00 
75.00 


$1,600.00 
2,600.00 




1 ,225.00 




550.00 


Suburban schools — 


350.00 










$2,146.00 


$1,315.00 


'$6,375.00 







Amount of totals in two foregoing tables . . $35,350.00 

SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, DECEMBER 3 1, l8qo. 



Value of furniture . 

general supplies 
special supplies . 
blank books and paper 
regular text-books 



$250.00 

25.00 

110.00 

150.00 

350.00 



Aggregate total of personal property belonging to 

city school department ..... $36,235.00 

VIII. -School Year. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened December 29, 1890, 
closed March 20, 1891. Vacation of three weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 13, closed June 26. 
Vacation of ten weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 14, closed De- 
cember 18. Vacation of. two weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above by the 
school board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 176. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of " Teachers' Institutes," and half- 
days on account of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 

(O) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



359 



IX.— High School Graduating Class. 

FOUR YEARS' COURSE. 



George P. Beckford, cl. 
Mabel Ruth Brown, cl. 
Almy Chase, cl. 
Helen Wood Clark, e. 
Annie Rosmer Corson, cl. 
Eustache Charles E. Dorion, c. 
John Henry Fahey, cl. 
Samuel Thomas Ferguson, c. 
Mary Isabel Gould, cl. 
Mertie Clara Hawkes, cl. 



Perla Eva Higgins, cl. 

Sally Hunt, c. 

Hattie Eunice Kidder, c. 

Minot Taylor Phelps, e. 

Minnie Mabelle Phillips, cl. 

Mary Shaw Richardson, e. 

Josephine Lillian Riddle, e. 

Lizabel Savory, e. 

M. Minnie Sturtevant, cl. 

Fred Maurice Weston, e. 



THREE YEARS COURSE 

Edith Alfreda Hall, s. 
Josie May Hardy, e. 
Leola Almira Morey, cl. 

E signifies English Division. 
S signifies Scientific Division 



A. Ardelle Nourse, cl. 
Rose Leillia Still, s. 
Frederick N. Walker, cl. 

Cl. signifies Classical Division. 
C signifies College Division. 



The following arrangement for indicating pupils entitled to honors was not 
published upon the program of graduating exercises ; but it is here presented 
to illustrate the method which, under " High School," in the superintendent's 
report, is suggested for future programs. 

HONORS. 

Number of pupils zuho pursued the English Division of the course 
of study, 7. 
1. Lizabel Savory. 
2. Josephine Lillian Riddle. 
Number in the Scientific Preparatory Division, 2.* 

1. Rose Leillia Still. 

* When there are but two pupils in a division, the one not first is of necessity second and 
cannot therefore with propriety be credited with an honor. 

(P) 



360 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Number in the Classical Division, 13. 

1. Almy Chase. 

2. May Isabel Gould. 

Number in the College Preparatory Division, 4. 

1. Sally Hunt and Hattie Eunice Kidder. * 

2. Eustache Charles E. Dorion. 



X. — Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 29, 1 89 1. 

Alice Chalk, $13. Josie E. Cass, #7. 

Grettie E. Canney, $11. Sarah E. Wylde, $5. 

A. Ardelle Nourse, $9. Frank Bartlett, $5. 



XI. — Organization, 1892. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex officio, Chairman. 
EDSON S. HEATH, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 
Ward 1. Charles H. Manning. 

Charles D. Sumner. 
Ward 2. William H. Morrison. 

George H. Stearns. 
Ward 3. George D. Towne. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Ward 4. Stephen B. Stearns. 

Edwin L. Richardson. 
Ward 5. James P. Slattery. 

William J. Sughrue. 
Ward 6. Frank T. E. Richardson. 

George W. Dearborn. 

* Misses Hunt and Kidder had the same scholarship rank. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 361 

Ward 7. Marshall P. Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8. William K. Robbins. 

Luther C. Baldwin. 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

■ EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finance. The Mayor, Messrs. Heath, Hall, Woodbury, and 
F. T. E. Richardson. 

Salaries. Messrs. Woodbury, Robbins. and Slattery. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. Messrs. Manning, S. B. 
Stearns, and Sumner. 

Text-Books, Apparatus, and Studies. Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, 
and G. H. Stearns. 

Drawing. Messrs. Baldwin, Hall, and Phelps. 

Music. Messrs. F. T. E. Richardson, Phelps, and Morrison. 

Fuel and Heating. Mr. G. H. Stearns, The Mayor, Messrs. 
Heath, Manning, and Dearborn. 

Examination of Teachers. Messrs. Robbins, Morrison, and 
Towne. 

Attendance. Messrs. E. L. Richardson, S. B. Stearns, and 
Sughrue. 

Health. Messrs. Towne, Slattery, and Sumner. 

(R) 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 



High School. Messrs. Manning, Hall, Morrison, S. B. Stearns, 
Robbins, and Towne. 

Frankli?i-street School. Messrs. Woodbury, Sumner, and 
Baldwin. 

Spri7ig-street and Lowell-street Schools. Messrs. Towne, Slat- 
tery, and Sumner. 

Lincoln-street School. Messrs. S. B. Stearns, F. T. E. Rich- 
ardson, and E. L. Richardson. 

Ash-street School.* Messrs. Phelps, Towne, and Hall. 
Webster-street and Blodget-street schools. Messrs. G. H. 
Stearns, Morrison, and Woodbury. 

Bakersville School. Messrs. Morrison, F. T. E. Richardson, 
and Woodbury. 

Varney School. Messrs. Baldwin, S. B. Stearns, and Phelps. 

Training School and Wilson Hill School. Messrs. Hall, Rob- 
bins, and Phelps. 

Main-street and South Main-street Schools. Messrs. Robbins, 
Baldwin, and Dearborn. 

Amoskeag and Stark District Schools. Messrs. Sumner, Dear- 
born, and Sughrue. 

Hallsville and Youngsville Schools. Messrs. Dearborn, Man- 
ning, and Sughrue. 

Gofe's Falls and Harvey District Schools. Messrs. Slattery, 
G. H. Stearns, and E. L. Richardson. 

Webster's Mills and Mosquito Fond Schools. Messrs. E. L. 
Richardson, Slattery, and Sughrue. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. F. T. E. Richardson, Manning, and 
G. H. Stearns. 

XII. — List of Teachers. 

HIGH SCHOOL. BEECH STREET. 

Master. Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 

* Also of any others that may be organized on Bridge street. 

(S) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Assistants. William T. Abbott. 

Lucretia E. Manahan.* 
Mary Stanton. 
Nellie Pickering. 
Mary H. Cutler. 
Camille Benson. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 



363 



Principal. Charles W. Bickford. 
Assistants. Annie O. Heath. 

Jennie M. Chandler. 

Carrie E. Reid. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. C. Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle. Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Ella F. Sanborn. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove (4th Grammar division). 
Higher Middle. Emma L. McLaren. 



First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. Maude L. Kent. 

* Deceased. 

(T) 



364 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Frank S. Sutcliffe. 
Assistants. Annie W. Patten. 

Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mary F. Barnes. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Grammar and Middle. Annie M. Sleeper. 
Higher Middle. Susie G. Woodman. 
Lower Middle. Cora B. Gilford. 
Higher Primary. Theodora Richardson. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. Fred C. Baldwin. 
Assistants. Gertrude F. How.* 

Mary E. Bunton. 

Edith S. Dole. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primary. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Annie B. Goodwin. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. B. S Andrews. 
Assistants. F. Maude Joy. 

Anna P. Cummings. 

Alta C. Willand. 

* Third floor. 

(U) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 365 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. Eva F. Tuson. 
Mixed Primary. Lettie M. Smith. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns (grammar classes). 
Assistant. Lelia A. Brooks.* 
Higher Middle. Issa M. Tuttle.* 
Lower Middle. Augusta S. Downs. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Principal. George Winch. 
Assistant. Barbara B. Joy. 

First Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Assistants. Lillian Little (Third Division). 

Maria Dickey (Fourth Division). 

Mary J. Dowd (Fourth Division). 
Higher Middle. Ellen E. McKean. * 
Mixed Middle. Nettie C. Woodman. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Principal. William H. Huse. 
Mixed Middle. Ella F. Barker. 
Mixed Primary. Olive A. Rowe. 



(V) 



366 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

(Merrimack street, cor. Union.) 
Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 

A lower Middle School (No. 15), a higher (No. 21), and two 
lower (Nos. 22 and 23) primary schools, embracing first four 
years of school work. Principal is assisted by members of Train- 
ing Class. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell (Higher Middle). 
Lower Middle. Millie S. Morse. 
Higher Primary. Mary E. Brophy. 
Higher Primary. Mary J. Walsh. 

First Floor. — Primary Grades. 

Mixed Primary. Mary A. Clement. 

Mixed Primary. Gertrude A. Burns. 

Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 

Lower Primary. Gertrude L. Southard. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. Georgianna Dow. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 

Lower Primary. Genevieve B. Knight. 

(W) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 867 

First Floor. 
Higher Primary. Helen M. Morrill. 

WILSON-HILL SCHOOL. 

Lower Primary. Huldah C. Graupner. 
Lower Primary. Ella Hope. 

SOUTH MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Higher Primary. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Nettie B. Fogg. 
Mixed Primary. Mary G. Tynan. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS. 

No. i. Stark. Inez M. Warren. 

2. Goffe's Falls. Georgia Kendrick. 

3. Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 

4. Youngsville. Mary A. Seavey. 

5. Webster's Mills. Mary G. Worthen. 

6. Mosquito Pond. Nellie M. Atwood. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. J. J. Kimball. 

JANITORS. 

Webster- street and Blodget-street Schools. 
Michael Finley, Pearl, near Chestnut. 

High School and Ash-street School. 

John S. Avery, 404 Merrimack. 
(X) 



368 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lincoln-street and Wilson-Hill Schools. 
William Stevens, 418 Central. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. 
William H. Morrill, 45 Pennacook. 

Franklin-street and Training Schools. 
Edward P. Cogswell, 218 Central. 

Varney and South Main-street Schools. 
H. G. Batchelder, 123 Carroll. 

Main-street School. 
J. C. Blaine, 58 School. 

Hallsville. 
William H. Newry, 538 Central. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey, Bakersville. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

(Open from October to March, five evenings each week.) 
Lotuell-street Building. 
Three schools for boys. 
Spring-street Building. 
Two schools for girls. 
School-street Building. 

Two schools, one for each sex. 

(Y) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 369 



EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

(Open from October to March.) 
Spring-street Building. 

Machine-drawing classes meet on Monday and Thursday even- 
ings. 

Architectural-drawing classes meet on Tuesday and Friday 
evenings. 

GRADUATES OF TRAINING SCHOOL NOT EMPLOYED AS REGULAR 
TEACHERS, FEBRUARY 20, 1 89 1. 

Emma B. Abbott.* Alverta P. Barrett.* 

Emma M. Streeter.* 

OTHERS NEVER HERE EMPLOYED IN TEACHING, WHO HAVE CER- 
TIFICATES OF QUALIFICATION. 

Maud Bell, Fannie L. Perry, Fannie E. Smith, Martha T. 
Learnard, Lizzie M. McAfee, Hattie J. Hoyt, Evelina Davis, 
William S. Harris, Hattie N. Gage, Carrie L. Barker, Georgie F. 
Drake, and Lucie G. Thompson. All certificated for grammar 
and lower grades. 

Helen W. Poor, Belle F. Small, Hattie M. Ellis, Hattie E. 
Merrill, Alithea M. Hutchins, Amy B. Smith, and S. Louise Val- 
entine. Certificated for middle and primary grades. 

XIII.— School Year, 1892. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 4, closes March 25. 
Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 11, closes June 24. 
Rest of year not yet determined. 

* Certificated for primary and middle grades. 

(Z) 



370 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



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1 



R EPORT 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To his Honor the Mayor : 

The Board of Health submits its annual report for the year 
1891. 

At the beginning of the year the board consisted of George C. 
Hoitt, M. D., chairman; Joseph B. Sawyer, C. E., clerk; and 
William M. Parsons, M. D. The term of Dr. Parsons expired 
on the first Monday in February, and Neil F. Starr, M. D., was 
appointed to the office. On the same day the board was reor- 
ganized by the choice of Dr. Hoitt as chairman, and of Mr. 
Sawyer as clerk, and the board as thus constituted and organized 
remained unchanged to the end of the year. 

EXPENDITURES. 

These have been : 

Pay of employees $1,203.88 

Street-carfares 38-85 

Stationery and postage ...... 9.35 

Carriage hire . . . . . . . . 16. 75 

Printing and advertising 62.52 

Traveling expenses . . . . . . . 1.30 

Removing dead animals, etc., ..... 9.25 

Analysis of water from suspected wells ... 9.60 
Removing cases of infectious disease to city hospital 

and caring for them 12.50 



Total ....... $1,364.00 

The salaries of the members of the board, added to the above 
amount, make the total cost of the health department $1,964. 



376 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

WORK OF THE INSPECTORS. 

Two inspectors have been employed, Mr. Russell White 
throughout the year, and Mr. M. J. Jenkins from March 2 to 
December 31. Mr. White has, under the direction of the board, 
had charge of the restriction of contagious diseases, the removal 
of dead animals, and the supervision of vault cleaners. He re- 
ports as follows : 

Houses placarded for scarlet fever . . . . .23 

for diphtheria . . . . 17 

for measles ...... S3 

Total 123 

School teachers, employers, and others have been notified of 
the existence of the disease whenever that precaution was neces- 
sary. 

Houses containing cases of typhoid fever visited . . 69 
Privy vaults inspected after being cleaned : 

Cleaned by Timothy McKenna . . . . 821 

by Thomas Welch . . . . . 521 

by John T. Gott 35 

Total 1,377 

Dead animals removed and buried : 

Swine . . . . . . . . . .12 

Horses .......... 2 

Dogs . 30 

Cats 9 

Total 53 

Complaints investigated and nuisances abated . . .154 

Mr. Jenkins was employed in the investigation of complaints, 
the serving of notices, and a part of the time in the supervision 
of the vault cleaners. A large part of his work was done by per- 
sonal interviews with the owners or agents of the premises, and 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 377 

he secured the abatement of a large number of nuisances in that 
way ; but he kept no account of the number. He served formal 
legal notices as follows : For the removal of swine, 3 ; abate- 
ment of sink-water nuisances, 5 ; to enter sewer, 3 ; to abolish 
privy vaults, 31 ; to remove drains entering Mile brook, 9; to 
cleanse and repair privies, 2 ; to put dwellings in a proper sani- 
tary condition, 5. In most of these cases compliance with the 
notice was secured. In some cases the owners have been reluc- 
tant and tardy. In a few others, where it appeared to the satis- 
faction of the board that rebuilding or extensive alterations are 
contemplated in the immediate future, the notice was suspended. 

VAULT CLEANING. 

Three parties have been licensed to do this work, viz., Timo- 
thy McKenna, Patrick Welch, and John T. Gott. It has been 
necessary to exercise a close and constant supervision of the 
cleaners in order to secure reasonably good work. This has 
taken much of the time of our men, and so long as it is the ob- 
ject of those who do the business to make money rather than to 
do good, satisfactory work, this supervision will be necessary. It 
is our belief that the licensing system should be abolished, and 
that the board should be given the means and the authority for 
vault cleaning. This is generally regarded as one branch of the 
legitimate work of a health department, and there is no more 
reason for having it done by a licensee or contractor than there 
is for having the duties of the fire or police department so done. 
The same thing is true of the scavenger service. 

REMOVAL OF PRIVY VAULTS. 

In the autumn of 1890 the board issued notices for the removal 
of all vaults on the west side of Church street between Washing- 
ton and Bridge streets, and the orders were complied with in the 
spring of 1891. On April n the board determined to begin the 
removal of all the vaults on lots fronting on Elm street between 
Central and Harrison streets, and soon after the work was ex- 
tended to Vine street from Amherst to Concord streets. On 



378 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



August 24 it was voted to issue notices for the discontinuance of 
all vaults on Amherst street between Elm and Chestnut streets, 
and the work was begun at once. In all these districts it is now 
well advanced. In several instances where the vaults still remain, 
the water-closets which are to be substituted are partly in place. 
In other instances the vaults will give place to new blocks which 
are to be built the coming season. In a few cases a little legal 
coercion may be required. It is the intention of the board to 
finish up what they now have in hand, and to extend the work as 
fast as practicable. 

A few vaults in other localities have been abolished at the sug- 
gestion or direction of the board, and in several instances which 
have come to our knowledge, the owners have substituted water- 
closets without any intervention of the department. It is grati- 
fying to know of these and other evidences of the growing public 
sentiment in favor of better sanitation. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The number of cases of contagious diseases reported to the 
board in each month, with the number of deaths therefrom as. 
reported to the city registrar, is given in the following table : 



Diseases. 


I 1 
4 £ 


1 =3 

1 s: 


>> 

1 





~3 


1 

3 
< 


1 
1 


1 
3 


1 
1 

•A 


1 
S 

I 


H 


# 

1 




7 3 

4 7 
2 3 

2 7 


2 1 




1 


1 


2 
10 


1 
11 
2 


2 

14 
1 


1 

3 
13 
11 


3 
4 
9 
39 


21 
25 
76 
89 










1 2 


2 
2 


5 
2 


3 
15 


















REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



379 



The next table epitomizes the history of these diseases for the 
last five years so far as it is known to the board : 



Diphtheria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Tot 




« 




00 




00 




0> 




















1 

t3 


§ 
o 


1 


OS 

O 


3 


3 


"of 


03 


Q 


73 


17 


94 


4 


28 


18 


# 


9 


* 


126 


30 


44 


1 


35 


12 


187 


9 


392 


79 


23 


259 


5 


36 


16 


54 


4 


428 


41 


9 


G3 


3 


3G 


17 


298 


6 


438 


21 


2 


25 




76 


18 


89 


2 


211 



The figures giving the numbers of deaths are probably accu- 
rate, or very nearly so. Those for cases of diphtheria are thought 
to be approximately correct ; but scarlet fever and measles have 
been so little feared by large numbers of our population that 
many cases were not put under the care of a physician, and con- 
sequently were not reported. There is need of a law like that 
of some other states, requiring householders to report in such 
cases. Occasionally some person will tell us that he knows of a 
bad case of some contagious disease of which we know nothing, 
and which requires the immediate attention of the board. When 
asked where the case is, he refuses to tell on the ground that he 
does not wish to meddle with the affairs of his neighbor. Such 
a course is about as foolish and pusillanimous as it would be to 
know that his neighbor's buildings were on fire, and his own in 
danger, and to refuse to give an alarm lest he should be med- 
dling with his neighbor's business. 

With regard to typhoid fever it may be said that sanitary 
authorities generally agree that there are eight or ten cases for 
every death. If that proportion holds in this city, less than one 
half of the cases have come to our knowledge. The state board 
of health, acting under authority conferred by statute, requires 
physicians to report all cases of this disease. It is probable that 



380 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

in so grave a disease nearly every case must come to the notice 
of some physician, and it seems that there must be great negli- 
gence on the part of some members of the profession. 

It is sometimes asked. What is the necessity of reporting 
typhoid fever since there is no need of isolation ? The answer 
is that the disease is controllable by other means, which it is the 
business of the board to see carried into effect. Typhoid fever 
is one of the preventable diseases, and if all health officers, phy- 
sicians, and nurses would do their whole duty it would be a rare 
disease. This opinion is based upon the fact that intelligent 
efforts to restrict it are attended with most successful results, show- 
ing that the natural history of the disease and the proper means 
for its restriction are well understood. The disease is not often, 
possibly it is never, contracted directly from the sick person by 
way of respiration, but the contagious principle, being eliminated 
in the discharges from the bowels, enters the systems of new vic- 
tims by way of the stomach. The most usual carrier of the dis- 
ease is the drinking-water. Fearful outbreaks have been caused 
by contaminated wells, and even by public water supplies. Milk 
also is known to be an occasional vehicle of the typhoid germ. 
Moreover, if there is any weight to be given to the testimony of 
close observers and careful investigators, then the evidence is 
overwhelming that typhoid fever is a filth disease, and that any 
mass of decomposing organic matter, such as foul privy-vaults, 
filthy drains, pig-stys, damp and unclean cellars or rooms, affords 
a fertile field for the reproduction and multiplication of the 
typhoid germ. It is evident from the above consideration that 
every case should be reported to the health department as soon as 
it is known, and that the department should at once take ener- 
getic measures for the restriction of the disease. To say that it 
is unnecessary to report because isolation does not apply is much 
like saying that it is unnecessary because vaccination is not called 
for in the case. But just as vaccination is useful in preventing 
epidemics of smallpox, so, probably to an equal extent, are clean- 
liness and the thorough disinfection of the stools useful measures 
in exterminating typhoid fever. 

There is another phase of this subject to which in the interest 



KEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 381 

of humanity we cannot forbear to call the attention of our people. 
It is well known that our sewers lead directly from our homes to 
the Merrimack, and that the water supplies of Lowell and Law- 
rence are drawn from the same river. It is known also that these 
cities are scourged much worse than is Manchester by this dis- 
ease. In Lowell the record is as follows : 

1889, cases reported, 194, deaths, 65. 

1890, " " 454, " 123. 

1891, " " 296, " 77. 

In the last year only thirty-three of the seventy-seven deaths 
were in cases which had been reported, the ratio being one in 
nine. If the same ratio held as to the forty-four deaths in unre- 
ported cases there were about seven hundred cases in that city 
last year. Their board of health says that " in our opinion 
typhoid fever is more to be dreaded by the population of Lowell 
than all other contagious diseases, and so long as the sewage of 
Manchester, Hooksett, Suncook, and Nashua drains into our 
water supply, we are surrounded by its infection and cannot 
escape." 

It is enough that we defile the stream with all our sewage as 
well as with great quantities of hurtful manufacturing waste and 
slaughter-house drainage, without poisoning it by the dejections 
of our sufferers from typhoid fever. To divert the sewage from 
the river would require time and the outlay of a vast sum of 
money, albeit it is an outlay which the city will some day be 
obliged to make, but to keep out the poison of typhoid dejec- 
tions is a duty so imperative and so easily performed that no one 
can willfully or carelessly neglect it and be worthy of respect as 
a humane man or a good citizen. 

The table shows an increase of the number of cases of typhoid 
which, not being accompanied by a corresponding increase in 
the number of deaths, is probably due to better reporting on the 
part of physicians, and is thus more apparent than real. Other 
noticeable features of the table are that scarlet fever has caused 
no deaths, and that diphtheria and measles are each chargeable 
with but two, while the totals for these four of the principal com- 



382 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

municable diseases show but two hundred and eleven cases and 
twenty-two deaths. 

The mortality from these diseases is regarded by most author- 
ities as one of the principal indices of the sanitary condition of 
a community, and of the efficiency and value of its health ser- 
vice. It would be presumption to claim that the annual diminu- 
tion of the figures in the last column of the table is due solely 
to the work of this board, but the movement is at any rate in the 
right direction, and whatever may be the cause of the diminu- 
tion, the table is submitted as a sufficient answer to those igno- 
rant and irresponsible persons who, in their warfare upon the 
board of health, have not scrupled to slander the good name of 
the city for healthfulness and decency, and to represent the place 
as a Black Hole of filth and sickness. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



383 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND BY 

MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1 89 1 , COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF THE CITY REGISTRAR. 



Causes of Death. 


3 

5 
i-s 


0> 


* 


<1 




"3 

1-5 


P 
< 


05 
JO 

g 
S 


0) 


O 


0) 

S 
O 
> 
O 

y 


s 
s 

4) 
03 
Q 


- 
1 
























1 


1 










1 
1 

1 


........ 






























1 




























1 










1 


















Accidents not specified... 
" run over by cars 


2 












1 


1 
1 


2 






n 


1 










9, 






i 














1 






1 




1 












" fly-wheel burst. 














1 






1 










1 






































1 


^ 


" coasting 


1 






















1 




















1 
"i" 


"i" 

1 
1 
























1 
1 

1 


























Aneurism, rupture of 

Apoplexy, not specified... 




.... 






"i" 


"4' 


.... 

1 
2 

"1 
1 
1 


1 




1 




































1 


'2' 






i 


i 














.... 1 








1 






1 














1 
1 
1 
2 

2 

1 

"3- 










1 
1 















" congestion 












1' 
1 
3 












1 
1 
3 


"i" 


'2' 


::::"8 


"i" 

2 

1 

.... 






1 
1\ 


s 


4 


2 
3 

1 


11 








1 












1 










1 
1 
1 






















Cancer, not specified 


2 






1 


1 




2 


1 
1 


1 


13 








.... 

1 








1 


1 
1 








1 






1 












1 


1 




















Childbirth 














51 
5 








1 








I 






1 

6 
3 


s 
9 


32 

5 


15 
11 

1 


12 
5 

1 


2 


1<>o 


Consumption 


9 


3 
3 


10 
1 


84 










2 






Cough 






1 
1 


















Croup 






1 















1 
3 
1 
3 










1 















Cellulitis, pelvic 




........ 
















Debility 


3 
1 


i 2 









4 


3 


2 

11 


1 


22 
5 
4 


Dentition 






2 


Diabetes 


1 




1 








1 







384 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


s 

1 


2 


1 
3 


p. 
< 




V 

S 

•-s 


>> 
i-s 


in 

3d 

B 


s 

® 


u 

4) 
| 
O 

O 


® 
= 

> 

o 


e 

.Q 
S 

0) 

o 

ft 


7t 

o 






















1 


1 














1 
















.'.:."" 






1 
1 


.... 


1 
.... 

1 


2 










:::::::: 












1 


























1 


2 
1 


1 

1 
































! 

1 
















1 
1 










:::: :::: 


















1 












1 


1 














1 
3 


















1 


2 
1 

1 
















i 
















2 


























T 


i 


















2 ° 


1 




3 


1 
1 




s 




IS 


















1 




l 


























1 














p • 






















3 
3 
2 










1 






















2 


l 


6 


4 


2 

1 


4 

1 


4 

1 


.... 3 
2 • • ■ 




1 
1 


30 






11 enlargement 


1 






"i" 




1 












1 
































1 














l 
































1 
1 




















1 


































1 






















































1 






















1 
















1 




1 






























1 


"i - 


1 
1 








1 












2 












2 


2 




















1 




























1 


i 
























1 








l 


























1 






1 


1 




1 


















1 




















1 




1 










" congestion 

11 acute y'Pw atrophy 




1 




1 






1 






S 


o 






































1 
1 


1 




1 






i 


"i 

i 
i 

2 
















1 


s 








l 
l 


1 
3 


1 


1 


2 


2 














9 


Meningitis 

11 acute 


3 






3 


1 


1 


..]. 


1 




18 
2. 



KEPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



385 



TABLE. 



Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


i \ft 

2 B 


fl 

M 
l 


1 


>> 

c3 

a 
i 


6 
a 

1-5 


>> 


3 
be 


i 
p. 

1 


u 

£ 
O 
o 
O 

1 


.a 



0J 

O 


3 
S 

Q 


B5 
O 
H 






5 


" cerebrospinal 


.... i 


1 


















1 






1 

1 
1 
1 






1 




































1 








1 
























1 




































1 
2 








1 






1 






,., 


















1 
2 




























1 
20 


Old age . 


4 , 


3 
1 


1 


i 

3 

1 


1 

1 






1 
1 




5 

1 


1 








1 




















1 


"f 


1 










1 




1 




1 












1 


























1 
20 






6 


5 
1 


1 


5 


6 


3 


1 




2 


2 


3 


60 
























1 
1 


1 
















1 














1 
4 


3 




1 












7 
16 




3 


2 


1 
1 
1 






1 


1 
















1 










1 




1 








1 












1 












1 


















1 














.... 


1 




3 

1 
1 
1 


































1 
























1 








































1 


1 












1 
1 


3 

4 




1 




1 












1 








1 
















1 

1 












































1 

1 
1 






















1 






1 






















1 






1 


2 


.... 
23 

124 


10 
70 


"2 
12 
4 

83 


"7' 
5 

55 






1 


1 






r 










1 4 




5 

8 

66 


4 
4 

58 


6 
3 

63 


4 
62 


6 


6 
70 


16 
109 


Still-born 


3 
112 


54 
934 





386 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CO OO OS 
OOr^CS^ CO r<» Mt-K — 



=: = I - to 

OS OCI to 

• i' co ~ x r. -r *^ r. i-*: c~ ».* r.fiaa-^o 
> — ic ■* o: or. l- -m -i c- co ■* m 



! f-i ci r. o 



^ 



CO Ol r 



o o : c 

Hi 



r= O 






1 <„ 03 g_ g C S '~ 

- - - : - ± '" - 



- - 



lit 

■~— ■- 






Sd'ci'rSO C 






REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 387 

These tables are as nearly perfect as they can be made from 
the city registrar's books. With respect to the number of deaths, 
they are believed to be substantially correct, but in other re- 
spects carelessness and ignorance in making returns have marred 
the usefulness and perfection of the record, and have to an equal 
extent vitiated the tables. In more than one eighth of the cases 
the cause of death is not given, and some of the causes which are 
given, such as "cough" and "headache" might as well have 
been omitted. 

It is believed that the importance of these records is not ap- 
preciated as it should be. Aside from their value and interest to 
the sanitarian and statistician, they have a value as evidence in 
questions of citizenship, inheritance of property, pension claims, 
and divorce, and are of interest to the antiquarian and genealo- 
gist. Unlike many other records, these, if well kept, will have a 
permanent and increasing value. The statute recognizes this 
value and has provided liberal compensations for returns and 
registration. 

These tables compare favorably with those of other New Eng- 
land towns of similar size and with a similar population. 

The "grippe" has left its mark upon the record. In the 
month of December it caused three deaths in its own name, 
twenty-four were charged to pneumonia, and four to croup, 
swelling the list for the month to one hundred and twelve, as 
against seventy-one for the corresponding month of the previous 
year. The recent visitation of this disease, whether estimated by 
the amount of sickness and loss of time which it has caused, or 
by the number of valuable lives cut short, is probably the most 
calamitous pestilence that has ever visited the adult population 
of the country. It appears to be a disease against which boards 
of health and physicians are nearly powerless. Let us hope that 
means for its restriction and cure will soon be discovered. 

Another noticeable feature of the tables is the high death rate 
of children under five years of age. Annually from 42 to 48 per 
cent of our deaths are of this class, and they occur largely among 
our foreign population. Cholera infantum is the principal cause. 
It is a disease but slightly controllable by public sanitation, unless 



388 ANNUAL OFFICIAL EEPORTS. 

it is seconded by intelligent care and regimen in the particulars 
of diet, bathing, clothing, and fresh air. The department has a 
great responsibility in this matter, but so long as people will 
crowd into tenement blocks, and be careless, ignorant, and stu- 
pid, this disease will continue to decimate the children. 

The absence of deaths from scarlet fever is noticeable, as is 
also the small number of deaths from this cause in the preceding 
years. The disease has almost ceased to be feared ; and herein 
lies a possible danger. It may at any moment assume its old-time 
malignity, when it stalked abroad under the names of canker 
rash and putrid sore throat. 

In conclusion, we take great pleasure in testifying to the har- 
monious and helpful relations which have existed between the 
board of health and city councils, and especially, sir, in ac- 
knowledging the many helpful and kindly acts and words of 
your Honor. 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE C. HOITT, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
NEIL F. STARR, 
Board of Health of Manchester* 
March, 1802. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, ETC. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND 
OIL LAMPS. 



Electric Lights in Use. 

No. i. Corner Cypress and Massabesic, arm. 

2. Massabesic-street watering-trough, pole. 

3. Corner Park and Beacon, pole. 

4. Corner Central and Hall, arm. 

5. Corner Lake avenue and Massabesic, arm. 

6. Corner Wilson and Laurel, arm. 

7. Corner Merrimack and Hall, arm. 

8. Corner Manchester and Hall, arm. 

9. Corner Manchester and Wilson, arm. 

10. Corner Hanover and Ashland, arm. 

11. Corner Hanover and Hall, arm. 

12. Corner Hanover and Beacon, arm. 

13. Corner Concord and Ashland, arm. 

14. Corner Bridge and Hall, arm. 

15. Corner Myrtle and Russell, arm. 

16. Corner Pearl and Linden, arm. 

17. Corner Pearl and Russell, arm. 

18. Corner Bridge and Nashua, arm. 

19. Corner Nashua and High, arm. 

20. Corner Concord and Dutton, arm. 

21. Corner Amherst and Porter, arm. 

22. Corner Hanover and Lincoln, arm. 

23. Corner Manchester and Lincoln, arm. 

24. Corner Merrimack and Lincoln, arm. 

25. Corner Laurel and Lincoln, arm. 



392 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 26. Corner Central and Lincoln, arm. 

27. Corner Lake avenue and Lincoln, arm. 

28. Corner Spruce and Lincoln, arm. 

29. Corner Spruce and Maple, arm. 

30. Corner Lake avenue and Maple, arm. 

31. Corner Central and Maple, arm. 

32. Corner Merrimack and Maple, arm. 

33. Corner Manchester and Maple, arm. 

34. Corner Hanover and Maple, arm. 

35. Corner Amherst and Maple, arm. 

36. Corner Concord and Maple, arm. 

37. Corner Lowell and Nashua, arm. 

38. Corner Bridge and Maple, arm. 

39. Corner Myrtle and Maple, arm. 

40. Corner Orange and Ash, arm. 

41. Corner Harrison and Beech, arm. 

42. Corner Myrtle and Beech, arm. 

43. Corner Pearl and Beech, arm. 

44. Corner Bridge and Beech, arm. 

45. Corner Lowell and Ash, arm. 

46. Corner Amherst and Ash, arm. 

47. Corner Lowell and Beech, arm. 

48. Corner Concord and Walnut, arm. 

49. Corner Amherst and Beech, arm. 

50. Corner Hanover and Beech, arm. 

51. Hanover Square, pole. 

52. Corner Manchester and Beech, arm. 

53. Corner Merrimack and Beech, arm. 

54. Corner Laurel and Beech, arm. 

55. Corner Central and Beech, arm. 

56. Corner Lake avenue and Beech, arm. 

57. Corner Spruce and Beech, arm. 

58. Corner Cedar and Union, arm. 

59. Corner Lake avenue and Union, arm. 

60. Corner Central and Union, arm. 

61. Corner Laurel and Union, arm. 

62. Corner Merrimack and Union, arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 393 

No. 63. Corner Manchester and Union, arm. 

64. Corner Hanover and Union, arm. 

65. Corner Amherst and Union, arm. 

66. Corner Concord and Union, arm. 

67. Corner Lowell and Walnut, arm. 
6S. Corner Lowell and Union, arm. 

69. Corner High and Union, arm. 

70. Corner Bridge and Union, arm. 

71. Corner Bridge and Walnut, arm. 

72. Corner Orange and Union, arm. 

73. Corner Prospect and Union, arm. 

74. Corner Brook and Union, arm. 

75. Corner Pennacook and Union, arm. 

76. Corner Webster and Pine, arm. 

77. Corner North and Pine, pole. 

78. Corner Sagamore and Pine, arm. 

79. Corner Blodget and Pine, arm. 
So. Corner Harrison and Hazel, arm. 

81. Corner Prospect and Pine, arm. 

82. Corner Myrtle and Pine, arm. 
S3. Corner Orange and Pine, arm. 

84. Corner Pearl and Pine, arm. 

85. Corner Bridge and Pine, arm. 

86. Tremont Square, pole. 

87. Corner High and Pine, arm. 

88. Corner Lowell and Pine, arm. 

89. Corner Concord and Pine, arm. 

90. Corner Amherst and Pine, arm. 

91. Corner Hanover and Pine, arm. 

92. Corner Manchester and Pine, arm. 

93. Corner Merrimack and Pine, arm. 

94. Corner Laurel and Pine, arm. 

95. Corner Central and Pine, arm. 

96. Corner Lake avenue and Pine, arm. 

97. Corner Cedar and Pine, arm. 

98. Corner Auburn and Pine, arm. 

99. Corner Cedar and Chestnut, arm. 



394 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. ioo. Park Square, pole. 

101. Corner Lake avenue and Chestnut, arm. 

102. Corner Central and Chestnut, arm. 

103. Merrimack Square, pole. 

104. Corner Merrimack and Chestnut, arm. 

105. Corner Manchester and Chestnut, arm. 

106. Corner Hanover and Chestnut, arm. 

107. Concord Square, east, pole. 

108. Concord Square, west, pole. 

109. Corner Chestnut and Concord B. S., arm. 
no. Corner Chestnut and High, arm. 

in. Corner Chestnut and Bridge, arm. 

112. Corner Chestnut and Pearl, arm. 

113. Corner Chestnut and Myrtle, arm. 

114. Corner Chestnut and Harrison, arm. 

115. Corner Chestnut and Brook, arm. 

116. Corner Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

117. Corner Salmon and Chestnut, pole. 

118. Corner Webster and Chestnut, arm. 

119. Corner Clarke and Elm, arm. 

120. Corner Webster and Elm, arm. 

121. Corner North and Elm, arm. 

122. Corner Salmon and Elm, arm. 

123. Corner Pennacook and Elm, arm. 

124. Corner Brook and Elm, arm. 

125. Corner Harrison and Elm, arm. 

126. Langdon street, pole. 

127. Corner Dean and Elm, arm. 

128. Corner Prospect and Chestnut, arm. 

129. Corner Orange and Elm, arm. 

130. Corner Kidder and Elm, arm. 

131. Elm east B. S., on Pearl, arm. 

132. Corner Bridge and Elm, arm. 

133. Corner Washington and Church, arm. 

134. Corner Birch and Lowell, arm. 

135. Corner Lowell and Elm, arm. 

136. Elm East B. S. between Lowell and Concord, arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 395 

No. 137. Corner Water and Elm, arm. 

138. Corner Vine and Concord, arm. 

139. Corner Vine and Amherst, arm. 

140. Corner Amherst and Elm, arm. 

141. Corner Mechanic and Elm West B. S., arm. 

142. Stark street, arm. 

143. Corner Market and Franklin, arm. 

144. Corner Market and Elm, arm. 

145. Corner Hanover and Elm east B. S., arm. 

146. Corner Elm and Manchester, arm. 

147. Corner Dean avenue and Elm west B. S., arm. 

148. Corner Elm and Merrimack, arm. 

149. Corner Merrimack and Franklin, arm. 

150. Middle street, arm. 

151. Merrimack Square, west, pole. 

152. Corner Elm and Central, arm. 

153. Corner Elm and Lake avenue, arm. 

154. Corner Elm and Spruce, arm. 

155. Beech and Cedar, pole. 

156. Corner Elm and Cedar, arm. 

157. Corner Franklin and Granite, arm. 

158. Corner Elm and Auburn, arm. 

159. Corner Elm and Green, arm. 

160. Corner Elm and Valley, arm. 

161. Bakersville watering trough, arm. 

162. Corner Summer and State, pole. 

163. Corner Granite and State, arm. 

164. Granite Bridge, east, pole. 

165. Corner Bedford and Granite, pole. 

166. Corner Canal and Granite, pole. 

167. Corner Depot and Canal, pole. 

168. Central between Franklin and Canal, pole. 

169. Corner Bedford and Central, arm. 

170. Corner Canal and Merrimack, arm. 

171. Corner Canal and Middle, arm. 

172. Corner Canal and Stark, arm. 

173. Corner Canal and Mechanic, arm. 



6X0 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 174. Corner Canal and Spring, arm. 

175. Corner Canal and Bridge, arm. 

176. McGregor Bridge, east, pole. 

177. Corner Canal and Hollis, pole. 

178. Corner Canal and Dean, pole. 

179. Corner Canal and Langdon, arm. 

180. Corner River road and North street, 1 

181. Amoskeag bridge, east, arm. 

182. Amoskeag bridge, west, arm. 

183. Amoskeag watering-trough, pole. 

184. Amoskeag brick store, pole. 

185. Corner McGregor and Main, pole. 

186. Corner McGregor and Bridge, pole. 

187. McGregor bridge, west, pole. 

188. Corner Amory and Main, pole. 

189. Corner Amory and Beauport, pole. 

190. Corner Wayne and Beauport, pole. 

191. Corner Marion and Main, pole. 

192. Corner McGregor and Wayne, pole. 

193. Corner McGregor and Putnam, arm. 

194. Corner Sullivan and Main, pole. 

195. Corner Beauport and Sullivan, pole. 

196. Corner Main and Schuyler, pole. 

197. Corner Wilton and Mam, pole. 

198. Corner Douglas and Main, arm. 

199. Corner Douglas and Barr, arm. 

200. Corner Granite and Green, arm. 

201. Corner West and Granite, arm. 

202. Corner Granite and Main, arm. 

203. Corner Granite and Second, arm. 

204. Granite bridge, west, pole. 

205. Corner School and River, arm. 

206. Corner School and Third, arm. 

207. Corner Second and Bath, pole. 

208. Corner Ferry and River, arm. 

209. Corner Ferry and Third, arm. 

210. Corner Walker and Second, arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 397 

No. 211. Corner Blaine and Third, arm. 

212. Corner Clinton and Main. arm. 

213. Corner Walker and Main, arm. 

214. Corner Parker and West, arm. 

215. Corner Winter and Parker, arm. 

216. Corner Main and Mast, pole. 

217. Corner Main and Milford, arm. 

218. Corner Main and A, arm. 

219. Corner Carroll and Milford, arm. 

220. Corner Old Mast road and Mast, arm. 

221. Corner Hall and Amherst, arm. 

222. Corner Laurel and Maple, arm. 

223. Corner Central and Wilson, arm. 

224. Corner Harrison and Pine, arm. 

225. Corner Massabesic and Belmont, pole. 

226. Corner Union and Appleton, arm. 

227. Corner Elm and railroad crossing, pole. 

228. Corner Franklin and Pleasant, arm. 

229. Corner Elm and Appleton, arm. 

230. Corner 'Milford and Riddle, arm. 

231. Corner Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad, pole. 

232. Corner Lake avenue and Canton, pole. 

233. Corner Laurel and Hall, arm. 

234. Corner Beech and Brook, arm. 

235. Corner Kidder and Boyden, pole. 

236. Corner Myrtle and Walnut, arm. 

237. Bridge and Linden, arm. 

238. Corner Lowell and Ashland, arm. 

239. Corner Lowell and Belmont, arm. 

240. Corner Pearl and Union, arm. 

241. Corner Salmon and Union, pole. 

242. Water street, arm. 

243. Corner Arlington and Ashland, arm. 

244. Corner Orange and Oak, arm. 

245. Corner Prospect and Oak, arm. 

246. Corner Arlington and Russell, arm. 

247. Corner Gore and Walnut, arm. 



398 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 248. Corner Laurel and Milton, arm. 

249. Massabesic street — Hospital, pole. 

250. Corner Lake avenue and Wilson, arm. 

251. Corner Bridge and Ash, arm. 

252. Hanover street, east, pole. 

253. Corner Franklin and Depot, arm. 

254. Corner Spruce and Union, arm. 

255. Corner East High and Wilson road, pole. 

256. Corner Beech and Auburn, pole. 

257. Corner Kidder and Whitney, pole. 

258. Corner Valley and Jewett, pole. 

259. Corner Concord and Derry, pole. 

260. Corner Auburn and Union, pole. 

261. Corner Harrison and Walnut, arm. 

262. Corner West Hancock and Second, pole. 

263. Corner Douglas and West, pole. 

264. Corner Hooksett road, Anioskeag, pole. 



Gas-Lights in Use. 

Appleton and Pine. 

Clarke and Chestnut. 

Clarke and River road. 

Elm, near Ray brook. 

Monroe street. 

Appleton, west end. 

Webster and River road. 

Salmon and River road. 

Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 

Canal, near paper mill. 

Blodget, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Blodget and Chestnut. 

Brook and Pine. 

Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Myrtle, between Elm and Chestnut. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 399 

Orange and Chestnut. 

Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Bridge, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Pearl and Walnut. 

Orange and Walnut. 

Orange and Beech. 

Myrtle and Ash. 

Pearl and Maple. 

Arlington and Maple. 

East High and Maple. 

Lowell and South. 

Lowell and Jane. 

Amherst and Ashland. 

Concord and Hall. 

Lowell and Hall. 

Concord and Belmont. 

Amherst and Belmont. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

Lowell and Beacon. 

East High and Belmont. 

Prospect and Russell. 

Harrison and Russell. 

Harrison and Oak. 

Harrison and Maple. 

Harrison and Ash. 

Prospect and Ash. 

Prospect and Beech. 

Prospect and Walnut. 

Belmont and Central. 

Maple and Cedar. 

Willow and Merrill. 

Two lights on South Elm. 

Two lights on Hancock and River road. 

Auburn and Franklin. 

Three lights on State. 

River street, near Turner Hall. 

Milford and Bowman. 



400 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Mast and Bowman. 

Dover and Clinton. 

Dover and Granite. 

Two lights on Hancock, west of River road. 

Dover and Douglas. 

Douglas, half way between Main and River streets. 

Two lights on Pleasant, between Franklin and Canal. 

Merrimack Common. 

Two lights on Mechanic. 

Spring street. 

Wilson and Merrimack. 

Manchester and Belmont. 

Hanover and Milton. 

Two lights on River road, between Hancock and Baker streets. 

Hanover and Belmont. 



Oil Lights in Use. 



Clarke and Union. 

Concord and Beacon. 

East High and Hall. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and Mammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Mammoth road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

Two lights on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quincy. 

Granite and Quincy. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll street. 

Bowman street. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 401 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

" " and Island Pond road. 

" " and Cilley. 

" " and Young. 

" " and Candia road. 

Massabesic and Old Falls road. 
Massabesic and Taylor. 
Belmont and Green. 
Belmont, at A. L. Walker's house. 
Belmont and Valley. 
Valley and Taylor. 
Valley and Cypress. 
Valley and Jewett. 
Cypress and Prout avenue. 
Jewett and Young. 
Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on River road south of Blue store. 
Three lights in Amoskeag. 
Ten lights in Goffe's Falls. 
Three lights in Youngsville. 
One light on Candia road, near Noah Reed's. 
One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 
One light at junction Lake avenue and Hanover. 
One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam House. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — The Auditor herewith submits to your honora- 
ble body his second annual report. 

WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during the year the usual examinations 
of the treasurer's accounts, examinations of the city clerk's ac- 
counts, annual examination and settlement with the tax collector, 
annual examination of water-works accounts, annual examina- 
tion of accounts of superintendents of Pine Grove and Valley 
cemeteries, and of the treasurer of the cemeteries, annual exami- 
nation of the accounts of the superintendent of the city farm, 
monthly examination of the accounts of the weigher at the city 
scales, quarterly examinations of the accounts of city marshal, 
semi-annual examination of the account of the clerk of the po- 
lice court. 

Above six thousand bills against the city have been examined 
and certified as "correct." All the pay-rolls for the thirteen 
highway districts, for the schools, for the fire department, the 
water-works, the police department, the cemeteries, and the city 
officials have been examined and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to $858,- 
031.79, have been drawn on the city treasury. 

Accounts have been kept with all the appropriations, with the 
treasurer, and the tax collector. 

Thirteen ordinances, twelve recommendations, eighteen orders, 
eight resolutions, five contracts, two copies of perambulation of 



406 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

town lines have been typewritten in this office for use of com- 
mittees, etc.; also three messages and other documents, letters, 
etc., for the mayor, one hundred and fifty letters and five com- 
munications for city auditor, and one hundred and fifty circu- 
lars prepared and typewritten ; lists of non-resident tax-payers 
typewritten for use of tax collector. The labor connected with 
the refunding of $100,000 of water bonds was mostly done in 
this office. The City Report for 1891 is compiled by the audi- 
tor, as required by the ordinance. The engravings contained 
therein, in their details, were under the direct supervision of the 
auditor's clerk, Mr. Allan E. Herrick. 

Mr. Herrick's experience as a shorthand writer and reporter 
was of great advantage to the city solicitor, in the case of Par- 
sons v. City, as the entire testimony was taken by him and tran- 
scribed on the typewriter. 

IMPROVEMENTS SUGGESTED. 

Your attention is called to the suggestions made in my report 
of last year, in relation to the office of city clerk. The prospect 
of a removal of the New Hampshire Trust Company to their new 
building to be erected during the present year will afford the city 
councils an opportunity to recover, without friction, the use of 
the city property, and place the city clerk in a room sufficiently 
large for the easy and proper performance of the duties of his of- 
fice. 

If the auditor were placed on the first floor, near to the treas- 
urer's office, some changes could be made in the methods now in 
use, and additional and more direct checks obtained on the 
treasurer's office. 

The bills after being listed and approved by the committee on 
accounts, as they now are, would remain in the possession of the 
auditor, and be paid by check of the auditor drawn on the treas- 
urer. A copy of the list, furnished to the treasurer, would give 
him the means of comparing all checks of the auditor before pay- 
ment thereof. The auditor would give his check for the total 
amount of all pay-rolls, and the treasurer would pay the same as 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 407 

now by the envelope system. All bills and pay-rolls would be 
numbered, and that number would be found in the auditor's 
check and on the list. In some cities the treasurer is also the 
tax collector, and in such cases no receipt of the tax collector is 
valid unless countersigned by the city auditor. In this way the 
daily collections of the tax collector are within the knowledge of 
the auditor, and balances are made daily, and deposits made 
daily by the collector to the credit of the city. In some cities it 
is also the custom for the city to place its money in that bank 
which will pay the highest interest on the average deposits ; the 
bank giving sufficient bonds to the city to secure such deposits. 
The city has been fortunate in having for its treasurers and tax 
collectors, honest men ; such good fortune may not always en- 
dure, and it would be well if the city council should revise its 
methods adopted forty-six years ago, and bring them more in 
touch with modern and improved systems of accounting. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The amount of the appropriation for auditor's de- 
partment was ..... . . $1,700.00 

There was expended for salary of auditor $1,000.00 

There was expended for salary of audit- 
or's clerk 598.30 

There was expended for supplies . . 101.21 

Balance ....... .49 

$1,700.00 

The auditor acknowledges his indebtedness for the loan of 
plans and other services in illustrating and preparing this city 
report to T. A. McKinnon, Esq., superintendent of the Concord 
& Montreal R. R. ; Hon. J. W. Sanborn, superintendent of the 
Boston & Maine R. R. ; Rev. M. V. B. Knox, of St. James M. 
E. church ; C. W. Damon, Esq., of Haverhill, Mass. ; Rt. Rev. 
Pierre Hevey, of St. Mary's church ; John M. Kendall, Esq. ; 
Robert Laing, Esq. ; Rev. H. E. Cooke, of the Episcopal 
church ; Rev. Thomas M. Davies, of the Westminster Presbyte- 
rian church ; Mrs. William H. Berry, of the building commit- 



408 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



tee of the Children's Home; Walter G. Africa, Esq., superin- 
tendent of the Manchester Electric Light Co. 

He also returns his thanks to the Mayor and city councils and 
heads of departments for their uniform courtesy and kindness. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus B. 
Putnam, city treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 1891, 
and find proper vouchers for all payments, and all receipts are 
duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January 1, 1891, was . . $79,552.02 
Receipts during the year 871,669.91 



Amount of drafts during the year . 
Net cash on hand December 31, 1891 



$951,221.93 

$858,031.79 
93,190.14 



$951,221.93 

The cash balance taken December 31, 1S91, I find to be as 
follows : 



Deposited in Suffolk National Bank 


$8,949-00 


First National Bank . 


19,102.11 


Second National Bank 


20,649.28 


Manchester National Bank . 


28,189.82 


Amoskeag National Bank . 


19,267.03 


Merchants National Bank . 


24,436.36 


office safe .... 


9>439-49 


Gross amount of cash on hand 


• #i30>°33-09 


Deduct amount of bills unpaid 


36,842.95 


Net cash on hand December 31, 1891 


• $93,190.14 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 409 

The accounts for the year ending December 31, 1891, of the 
city clerk, of the superintendent of schools, of the tax collector, 
of the water-works, olTthe city marshal, of the clerk of the police 
court, of the superintendent of the Pine Grove cemetery, of the 
superintendent of the Valley cemetery, of the treasurer of the 
cemetery trustees, of the superintendent of the city farm, and of 
the weigher at the city scales, have each and all been carefully 
examined and the income from these sources, as shown by the 
said books, has been deposited with the city treasurer, and ap- 
pears in his accounts. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor.. 



410 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Dr. Sylvatms B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



To cash on hand January t, 1891 


• $134,594-99 


temporary loan 


210,000.00 


insurance tax ..... 


3,920.25 


railroad tax ...... 


22,059.03 


savings bank tax 


73>275>55 


literary fund ...... 


5,287.50 


diseased cattle killed .... 


138.50 


board of paupers off the farm 


1,789.10 


city farm ...... 


1,774.46 


Miville &: Co., overdraft 


7.26 


city teams, District No. 2, pay-roll 


3>o38.74 


Isaac Huse, overdraft .... 


8.84 


Joseph H. Dearborn .... 


8.88 


E. W. Harrington .... 


9-25 


Alpheus Gay 


21.00 


highway district No. 2 . 


2.00 


Gordon Woodbury, 10 loads gravel 


10.00 


Head & Dowst, for labor 


5-4o 


C. H. Hutchinson, old iron . 


33-36 


sewer licenses ..... 


2.103.50 


Manchester Heating & Lighting Co., overdraf 


3-94 


Killey & Wadleigh, overdraft 


11.88 


commons, pay-roll, overdraft 


22.50 


Ebenezer Hartshorn, bridge plank 


4-45 


redemption of land sold for taxes . 


374-5° 


C. E. Crombie, lamp-post 


3-25 


S. J. Mills, one lantern .... 


2.00 


James H. Sargent, three lamp-posts 


10.00 


Orrin E. Kimball, one lamp-post . 


3-33 


W. H. Carpenter, old building 


10.00 


Charles W. Calif, street lantern 


2.00 


George E. Morrill, two lamp-posts 


6.66 


David Perkins, three lamp-posts . 


10.00 



Amount carried forward 



$458,552.12 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



411 



City of Manchester, year ending December ji, i8pi. 



Cr. 



3y unpaid bills January i, 1891 . . . $55,042.97 


temporary loan . 






180,000.00 


funded debt 






100.00 


interest .... 






4,659.34 


coupons, water bonds . 






32,093.00 


coupons, city bonds 






15,584.00 


coupons, cemetery bonds 






729-35 


paupers off the farm 






4,928.24 


city farm .... 






6,512.89 


city teams .... 






5» 2 9o-73 


highway district No. 1 






345-29 


" " " 2 and 3 






12,028.39 


4- 






385-74 


" " 5 • 








596.61 


6 . 








498-38 


7. 








1,474.07 


8 . 








1,028.81 


" " " 9 . 








504.15 


10 . 








4,473.80 


a a XI t 








1,107.80 


12 . 








224.37 


" 13 . 








182.88 


new highways 








14,448.09 


damage for land taken f 


or highway 


s 




5.704-45 


watering streets . 








5,364.26 


lighting streets 








42,908.78 


paving streets 








6,511.80 


macadamizing 








19,616.23 


grading for concrete 








5.532-84 


sewers and drains . 








55.409-73 


commons 








2,406.76 


bridges 








2,672.25 


incidental expenses 






15,639.62 


Amount carried forward . 




. $504,005.62 



412 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward . 


#458,55 2 -i2 


To Joseph Quirin, land sold 


414-73 


L. W. Page, land sold .... 


454-55 


Philip Riley, land sold 


918.55 


Mrs. Delie McDonald, land sold . 


39-13 


Marian J. Parsons, land sold 


100.00 


Pine Grove cemetery, sale of lots 


2,984.47 


B. A. Stearns, superintendent Pine Grove cem 




etery . ..... 


i>599-3o 


J. O. Webster, forfeiture of lot 


10.00 


C. H. G. Foss, superintendent Valley cemeten 


j 1,500.00 


D. A. Simons, overdraft 


21.80 


Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Company, ren 


t 


of hall 


24.00 


Eureka Fire Hose Co., freight on hose . 


10.39 


A. M. Finney, overdraft . 


8-97 


fire department, team work 


4,910.21 


C. W. Downing, overdraft . 


•5° 


Manchester Locomotive Co., work on the olc 


1 


boiler ...... 


250.00 


police department .... 


7,96i.54 


city hall ...... 


2,355-°° 


W. E. Moore, overdraft 


12.00 


rent of tenements .... 


508.29 


Hillsborough county, repairs on court house 


57-48 


city officers' salaries, overdraft 


80.00 


Amasa S. Hilands, overdraft 


2.50 


Jerome B. Titus, overdraft . 


2.50 


water-works ..... 


76,605.23 


J. J. Abbott, overdraft 


1.52 


Carl E. York, overdraft 


i-43 


W. E. Buck, text-books sold 


138-52 


Joseph B. Sawyer .... 


1.20 


Amount carried forward . 


S559.525-93 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



413 



City of Manchester, year ending December ji, i8pi. 



Cr. 



Amount brought forward .... $504,005.62 


By Pine Grove cemetery 


5>94i-34 


Valley cemetery .... 






2,794.79 


fire department 






40,641.04 


fire-alarm telegraph 






1,154.66 


hydrant service 






5,000.00 


police department 






37,937-°7 


city hall ..... 






1,380-37 


printing and stationery 






2,304.62 


repairs of buildings 






2,456.96 


city library .... 






4,5 2 5-73 


militia ..... 






875.00 


abatement of taxes 






2,557-24 


state tax ..... 






6 3>435-°° 


county tax ..... 






46,032.47 


city officers' salaries . . 






14,798-45 


water-works .... 






49,625.65 


health department 






1,964.00 


city engineer's department . 






3,499-9° 


scavenger teams . 






18,892.25 


repairs of schoolhouses 






4,044.88 


fuel 






4,673.54 


furniture and supplies . 






746.46 


books and stationery 






62.50 


printing and advertising 






396.10 


contingent expenses 






931.92 


care of rooms 






3>7i5-75 


evening schools 






1,064.53 


teachers' salaries . 






49^398-52 


mechanical drawing school . 






552-71 


Women's Aid and Relief Society 






400.00 


decoration of soldiers' graves 






333-54 


Elliot Hospital, free beds 






600.00 


Amount carried forward . 


. $876,742.61 



414 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forward 


• $559.5 2 5-93 


To Russell White 


9.90 


dog licenses 


2,155.58 


billiard table licenses . 


315.00 


trustees cemetery fund . 


5,000.00 


show licenses 


169.00 


Smith & Smith, old shed 


10.00 


Union Publishing Co., overc 


raft . . . 14.00 


city scales 


415.67 


tuition 


320.95 


Frederick W. Stickney 


115.40 


Grand Rapids School Furnit 


ure Co., discount 


and freight 


4i-59 


milk licenses 


65.50 


Lizzie D. Hartford, overdraf 


t 5.00 


Maggie G. Linen, overdraft 


4.50 


interest on taxes . 


411.96 


taxes for the year 1885 


. . . 1.63 


" 1886 


1.62 


" 1887 


6.80 


« " 1888 


15.99 


" 1889 


153.70 


" " 1890 


18,348.89 


" " 1891 


419,156.29 



Unpaid bills January 1, 1892 



$1,006,264.90 
36,842.95 

$1,043,107.85 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



415 



City of Manchester, year ending December ji, 1891. Cr. 



Amount brought forward . 


$876,742.61 


By firemen's parade 


755-32 


Stark park ...... 


371.81 


Derryfield park 


409.07 


free supplies ...... 


3> 2IO -73 


indigent soldiers 


906.40 


street sweeping ..... 


i,i 9 8. 3I 


mayor's incidentals .... 


234-25 


auditor's office 


1,699.51 


addition to Webster-street schoolhouse . 


5,138.80 


new schoolhouse, Hallsville . 


20,759-25 


Varney school ..... 


1,128.70 


receiving tomb ..... 


520.00 




$9 I 3»°74-76 


Cash on hand ..... 


i3°;°33-°9 




$1,043,107.85 



416 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE CITY OF MANCHESTER, 
N. H., FOR THE YEAR 1891. 

Receipts. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Received from : 
Direct city taxes 
County taxes . 
Insurance taxes 
Railroad taxes 
Savings bank taxes 
Literary fund . 
Cost and interest on taxes 
Licenses to enter sewer . 
Licenses to keep dog 
Licenses to sell milk 
Licenses to keep billiard table 
Licenses to shows and exhibitions 

Rents 

Land redeemed 

Land sold .... 

Temporary loan, anticipation tax 

1891 

Temporary loan, anticipation tax 

1892 

Cemetery bonds 



$391,652.45 

46,032.47 

3,920.25 

22,059.03 

73,275.55 

5*287.50 

411.96 

2,103.50 

2,i55-S8 

6 5-5° 

315-0° 

169.00 

2,887.29 

374-5o 

1,926.96 

180,000.00 

30,000.00 
5,000.00 



$767,636.54 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Received from : 
Bridges . 
City scales 
Street department teams 



$4-45 

415-67 

3,047-58 



$3,467-7o 



MUNICIPAL RECEIPTS. 417 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from text-books and tuition . . . $459.47 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from fire department teams . . . $4,920.60 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from court fines and costs . . . $7,962.04 

PUBLIC PLACES. 

Received from : 

Pine Grove cemetery . . . $4,593-77 
Valley cemetery . . . . 1,500.00 

$6,093.77 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts $76,605.23 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Received from : 

City farm $1,783.72 

Hillsborough county (boarding pau- 
pers) 1,789.10 

$3>572-82 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Received from miscellaneous sources . . . $951.74 

Total amount of receipts during the year . $871,669.91 
Net cash on hand January 1,1 891 . . 79,552.02 



$951,221.93 



418 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT, 



Interest. 

Paid on account Stark park purchase 
August i, 1890, to January 3 
1891 .... 

interest on water-bonds 

interest on city bonds . 

interest on cemetery bonds . 

interest on temporary loan, an 
ticipation tax, 1891 

interest on temporary loan, an 
ticipation tax, 1892 

Paid funded debt 

temporary loan . 

city hall .... 

printing and stationary 

incidental expenses 

mayor's incidentals 

city officers' salaries* . 

city auditor's department 



$200.00 

32,093.00 

15,584.00 

729-35 

4,009.34 

450.00 

$100.00 
:8o,ooo.oo 

i.38o-37 
2,304.62 

15,639.62 
234-25 

11,768.45 
1,699.; 



$53> o6 5- 6 9 



$266,192.51 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

$345-29 

12,028.39 

385-74 

596.61 

498.38 

1,474.07 

I,028.Sl 

504-I5 

4,473.80 

1,107.80 

224.37 

♦Salaries of superintendent, school committee, and truant officer transferred from city 
officers' salaries and carried to school department. 



id highway district No. 


1 


highway districts Nos. 


2,3 


highway district No. 


4 


highway district No. 


5 


highway district No. 


6 


highway district No. 


7 


highway district No. 


8 


highway district No. 


9 


highway district No. . 


10 


highway district No. 


11 


highway district No. 


12 



MUNICIPAL EXPENDITURES. 



419 



Paid highway district No. 13 
new highways 
land taken for highways 
watering streets . 
paving streets 
macadamizing 
grading for concrete 
scavenger teams . 
street sweeping 
lighting streets 
bridges 
city teams . 
sewers and drains 



$182.88 
14,448.09 

5.704-45 
5,364.26 
6,511.80 

19,616.23 
5 5 532-84 

18,892.25 
1,198.31 

42,908.78 
2,672.25 

5>29°-73 
55,409-73 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 

Paid engineer's department . 



$206,400.01 



$3,499.90 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Paid health department 



$1,964.00 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Paid repairs of schoolhouses 


. $4,044.88 


fuel 


4,673-54 


furniture and supplies . 


746.46 


books and stationery . 


62.50 


printing and advertising 


396.10 


contingent expenses 


931.92 


care of rooms 


3>7i5-75 


evening schools . 


1,064.53 


teachers' salaries . 


49,398-52 


salaries school committee, clerk 




truant officer * . 


1,030.00 


salary of superintendent public in- 




struction * 


2,000.00 



♦Salaries of superintendent, school committee, and truant officer transferred from city 
officers' salaries and carried to school department. 



420 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid evening school mechanical draw- 
ing $55 2 -7i 

free text-books .... 3,210.73 

$71,827.64 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid city library . $4*525.73 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid fire department .... $40,641.04 
fire-alarm telegraph . . . 1,154.66 

hydrant service .... 5,000.00 
firemen's parade . . . . 755-3 2 



$47,551.02 



POLICE. 

Paid police department ..... $37,937.07 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Paid repairs of buildings . . . $2,456.96 
addition Webster-street school- 
house 5,138.80 

new schoolhouse, West Manchester 1,128.70 

new schoolhouse, Hallsville . . 20,759.25 



WATER-WORKS. 



Paid water-works, construction . . $22,667.74 
repairs . . . 21,995.06 
current expenses . 4,962.85 



$29,483.71 



$49,625.65 



PUBLIC PLACES. 

Paid commons ..... $2,406.76 

Stark park 37 T -Si 

Derryfield park .... 409.07 

Pine Grove cemetery . . . 5,941.34 



MUNICIPAL EXPENDITURES. 421 

Paid Valley cemetery .... $2,794.79 
receiving tomb .... 520.00 

$12,443.77 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPN 

Paid paupers off the farm 

city farm ..... 
indigent soldiers .... 
Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 
free beds, Elliot Hospital 
decoration soldiers' graves . 
militia . ... 

$i4.-55 6 ^7 

TAXES. 

Paid abatement of taxes ..... $2,557.24 
Total of municipal expenditures . . $748,564.32 

STATE AND COUNTY 1 

Paid state tax $63,435.00 

county tax ..... 46,032.47 



HILANTH 


ROl 


$4,928, 


.24 


6,512. 


89 


906. 


40 


400. 


OO 


600. 


OO 


333 


r 1 


875 


OO 



Total state and county tax . . . . $109,467.47 



Grand total of expenditures during the year $858,031.79 

Cash on hand December 31, 1891 $130,033.09 

Less unpaid bills 36,842.95 



Xet ca-,h on hand ..... 593,190.14 



$951,221.93 



422 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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424 



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428 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Interest. 

Appropriation ..... $51,500.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 3,000.00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid interest on Stark park purchase, 

Aug. 1, 1890, to Jan. 3, 1891 . $200.00 

Amoskeag National Bank on $50,- 
ooo-loan from May 1 to Dec. 
1-4, 1891, due Dec. 1, 1891 . 1,319.27 

Second National Bank on $50,000- 
loan, two notes of $25,000 each, 
from June 1 to Dec. 1, 1891 . 1,096.10 

Granite State Trust Co., on $50,- 

000 loan, two notes of $25,000 
each, at 4.31 per cent, from July 

1 to Dec. 1, 1891 . . . 1,055.86 
Granite State Trust Co., on one 

note of $30,000, due Dec. 1, 
1 89 1, from Aug. 1 to Dec. 1, 
1891, four months, three days, 
at 5^ per cent . . . 538.11 

Granite State Trust Co., discount 
on one note of $30,000, payable 
Dec. 1, 1892 .... 75-Qo 

Granite State Trust Co., interest 
on one note of $30,000, due 
Dec. 1, 1892, for three months to 
Dec. 1, 1 89 1, at 5 per cent . 375-°o 

coupons on city bonds . . 15,584.00 

coupons on water bonds . . 32,093.00 

coupons on cemetery bonds . 729.35 



$53> o6 5- 6 9 
Transferred to reserved fund . . 1,434.31 



$54,500.00 



$54,500.00 




iff 



110. ST. AU6USTINE CHURCH. 

pass- 





113. RES.PR1EST ST. ANNS CATH. j 114. RES. PRIEST ST.AUGUST1NE. 



RESERVED FUND. 



429 



Payment of Funded Debt. 
Appropriation ...... 

EXPENDITURE. 

Paid water bond redeemed .... 



$100.00 



Reserved Fund. 



ropnation . 








$20,000.00 


transfers from the following accounts 






Pine Grove cemetery 


• $3 


,000.00 




" " " 






58.66 




Interest .... 




1 


,434-3 J 




City hall . 






719.63 




Printing and stationery 






I95-38 




Mayor's incidentals . 






6 5-75 




City officers' salaries 






701.55 




Auditor's department 






•49 




Highway district No. 1 






4.71 




« 4 






114.26 




" 5 






3-39 




" 6 






1.62 




a a a - 






2 5-93 




" II 






42.20 




" 13 






17.12 




Damage for land taken for 


high 








ways 






795-55 




Street sweeping 






1.69 




Engineer's department 






.10 




Health department . 






36.00 




Furniture and supplies 






3-54 




Books and stationery 






237-5° 




Printing and advertising 






3-8 9 




Evening schools 






435-47 




Evening schools, mech 


anical 






drawing 






47.29 





430 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Fire-alarm telegraph . 
Repairs of buildings . 
Water-works, repairs 
Water-works, current expenses 
Commons 
Stark park 
Valley cemetery 
Derryfield park 
Indigent soldiers 
Militia 

Cash on hand not otherwise specif! 
cally appropriated 



EXPENDITURES. 

By transfers to the following accounts 
Pine Grove cemetery . 
Printing and stationery 
Highway District No. i 



New highways 

Damage for land taken for highway 

Scavenger teams . 

Watering streets . 

Macadamizing 

Bridges 

Paving streets 

Grading for concrete 

Lighting streets . 

City teams . 

Sewers and drains 

Interest 



$245-34 

114.09 

4.94 

37-15 

593-24 

128.19 

5.21 

9°-93 

592.60 

25.00 

12,434-54 



$3,000.00 

500.00 

50.00 

28.39 

28.81 

4-i5 
673.80 
150.00 

24-37 

4,448.09 

4,500.00 

6,892.25 

564.26 

2,316.23 

472.25 

1,011.80 

532-84 

908.78 

290.73 

409.73 

3,000.00 



$22,217.26 
$42,217.26 



hkskrved fund. 



431 



Incidental expenses 


$639.60 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 


33-54 


Firemen's parade 


2 55-3 2 


Repairs of schoolhouses 


44.88 


Fuel 


973-54 


Contingent expenses 


131.92 


Care of rooms 


I 5-7S 


Teachers' salaries 


2,398.52 


Free text-books . 


210.73 


Fire department . 


3,641.04 


Police department 


937.07 


Water-works, construction . 


2,667.74 


Receiving tomb . 


20.00 


Paupers off the farm 


428.24 


City farm .... 


12.89 



$42,217.26 



Temporary Loan. 



Received from Amoskeag National Bank, on note 
dated May 1, 1891, due December 1, 
1891 ...... $25,000.00 

from Amoskeag National Bank, on note 
dated May 1, 1891, due December 1, 
1891 ....... 25,000.00 

from Granite State Trust Co., on note 
dated August 1, 1891, due December 
1, 1S91 ...... 30,000.00 

from Granite State Trust Co., on note 
dated July 1, 1891, due December 1, 
1891 ....... 25,000.00 

from Granite State Trust Co., on note 
dated July 1, 1891, due December 1, 
1891 ....... 25,000.00 

from Second National Bank, on note dat- 
ed June 1, 1891, due December 1, 1891 25,000.00 



432 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Received from Second National Bank, on note dat- 
ed June i, 1891, due December 1, 1S91 $25,000.00 
(Above notes given to anticipate the 
tax of 1891.) 
from Granite State Trust Co., on note 
dated August 31, 1891, due December 
1, 1892, given on account of sewers 
and in anticipation of the taxes of 1892 30,000.00 



$210,000.00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Amoskeag National Bank two 
notes of $25,000 each, dated 
May 1, 1891 .... $50,000.00 

Granite State Trust Co., two notes 
of $25,000 each, dated July 1, 
1891 ..... 50,000.00 

Granite State Trust Co., one note 

of $30,000, dated August 1, 1891 30,000.00 

Second National Bank, two notes 
of $25,000 each, dated June 1, 
1891 ..... 50,000.00 

By balance to new account ..... 



Appropriation 



City Hall. 



Expenditures. 



$180,000.00 
30,000.00 

$210,000.00 



$2,100.00 



PUBLIC COMFORT. 

Paid Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Company, 15 lbs. mop waste . $2.25 

J. J. Abbott, 4 lbs. black paint and 

brush 1.25 

W. B. Abbott, paint and labor . 11-30 



$14- 



CITY HALL. 433 



FUEL AND LIGHTS. 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 10 tons egg 

coal, at $6.5.0 .... $65.00 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 tons egg 

coal, at $6.50 .... 13-0° 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 1 cord hard 

wood ...... 7.00 

E. P. Johnson Co., 95,650 lbs. egg 

coal, at $6.25 per ton . , 298.91 

People's Gas-Light. Co., for gas . 257.74 



— $641.65 



TELEPHONE. 



Paid New England Telegraph and Telephone Co., 

use of telephones, etc ..... $78.46 



Paid M. P. Barker, making awning for 

engineer's office .... $24.00 

M. J. Coleman, repairs on water- 
closet . . . . . 25.63 
J. R. Carr & Co., setting 10 lights 

of glass, etc. . . . . 4.71 

A. M. Eastman, brooms, mops, 

soap, handles, etc. . . . S.S7 

Head & Dowst : 

Labor and materials on City Hall 

drugstore . . . . 146.05 

Labor and materials on City Hall 

drug store . . . . 1.05 

Labor and materials on City Hall 

drug store .... 2.43 

Labor and materials on door . 3.91 

Labor and materials on flag-pole, 

etc. . . . . . 62.25 



434 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Labor and materials on sky-light, 

etc. 

Paid Peter Harris, 21 keys 

Thos. A. Lane, i-pan valve on 

water-closet . 
Thos. A. Lane, labor on water- 
closet 

Thos. A. Lane, labor and materials 

on gas fixtures, etc. . 
James Martin & Son, one 15x9 

American flag . 
James Martin & Son, two 4x4 

weather signals .... 
Henry McAllister, materials and 

labor . 

Manchester Hardware Co., 2 balls 

twine for city treasurer's office 
Noyes Manufacturing Co., repairing 

gas regulator 
Pike .& Heald, repairs on roof 
J. Stickney, 2 chair cushions, asses 

sors' office . 

Mary Shiney, 586^ hours' labor 

at 20 cents per hour . 
J. B. Varick Co. : 

1 steel coal-barrow 

25 feet ^-inch rubber hose 

Ropes, needles, and twine fo 
awnings 

1 16-inch ostrich duster 

5 gallons ozone and 1 5-gallor 
can .... 

1 No. 2 claw hatchet . 

5^ square feet wire screen 
John Williams, 4 days' labor 

settees .... 

John Williams, glue, screws, and 

nails ..... 



^o.6o 

2-75 

3-5° 



23.5 



12.50 



2.25 



2.85 



35-°° 
3-55 



JI 7-35 

10.00 
2.25 



1.90 
.60 



13-25 
•75 
.29 



1.90 



CITY HALL. 



435 



Paid Weston & Hill, 2^ yards carpet . 
E. J. Williams, 275 slate, at 6 

cents, repairing City Hall roof . 
E. J. Williams, cement, nails, and 

zinc ...... 

E. J. Williams, 50 hours' labor, at 

3 oc - 

Dana W. King, fees as register of 
deeds ..... 

William B. Abbott, paint, paper, 
and labor, city messenger's room 

Cummings & Co., shellac, varnish, 
sand-paper, and 9 days 3 hours' 
labor on mayor's and clerk's of- 
fices, etc. ..... 

John Barker, cash paid for express . 

J. S. Holt & Co., 38 gallons of 
soap ...... 

O. P. Lucier, 3 ozonators, public 
comfort and city hall 

Charles E. Lord, 7 hours' labor, 
mason work .... 

Charles E. Lord, stock on city mes- 
senger's office .... 

Henry McAllister, repairing lock . 

Whitten & Fifield, teams delivered 
to John Barker .... 

L. M. Aldrich, 1 screen door, 
treasurer's office 

Pike & Heald, 1 Jenk automatic 
air valve ..... 

Pike & Heald, labor at mayor's 
office . . . . . 



Total expenditure 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



16.50 
1.65 

15.00 
3.82 

16.98 



25.00 
.90 



75 



So 



.40 
$645.51 

• $1,380.37 
719.63 



$2,100.00 



436 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Printing and Stationery. 

Appropriation ..... $2,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 500.00 

$2,500.00 

Expenditures. 

assessors. 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., advertising 

notices, April 6-16, 2 inches . $n-5o 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 6 

cards .75 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank 

books ..... 106.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., pencils, 

blotting-paper, etc. . . . 6.97 

Temple & Farrington Co., pass- 
books, etc. . . . . 3.65 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 copy 

Pamphlet Laws . . . . 1.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
assessors' notice, 3 squares, from 
April 6-15 .... 15-00 

SJ45-37 

CITY CLERK. 

Paid N. J. Bachelder, 800 blank dog 

licenses ..... $7-5° 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 1,200 blank 

death returns .... 4.00 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 500 permits 

and licenses .... 4.25 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 900 blanks, 

various kinds .... n.15 



CITY HALL. 



437 



id P. D. Harrison, 300 rosters . 


$15.00 


P. D. Harrison, 300 blanks for 




clerk of common council . 


3.00 


P. D. Harrison, 200 notices to 




jurors ..... 


1.25 


P. D. Harrison, 200 orders . 


2.25 


S. S. Piper, stamps and postals 


3.00 


Sampson, Murdock & Co., New- 




England Business Directory 


6.00 


Temple & Farrington Co. : 




Mucilage and ink 


i-37 


1 blank-book .... 


i-35 


1 gross of pens .... 


1.50 


1 dozen license books 


8.00 


1 blank-book .... 


16.00 


1 canvas cover .... 


1.50 


3 gross rubber bands . 


.90 


4 dozen pencils 


2.00 


2 dozen pen -holders . 


1. 10 


Mucilage, pens, etc. 


1. 61 


2,600 blanks, various kinds 


19.25 


1 blank book .... 


7-5° 


2 waterproof bookcases 


1.50 


Paper, rubber bands, etc. . 


9.76 


2 blank books .... 


23.24 


2 canvas covers .... 


3.00 


Stationery .... 


6.00 


1 blank book .... 


S.00 


1 canvas cover .... 


1.25 


1 index ..... 


•5o 


Diary and envelopes . 


1.60 


Manchester post-office, postage 




stamps ..... 


•5° 


J. Arthur Williams, 2,800 blank re- 




ceipts, permits, etc. . 


9.60 


J. Arthur Williams, 900 blank re- 




ceipts, permits, etc. 


6 -35 



438 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. Arthur Williams, 400 ordinances 
H. A. Greenough & Co., Merri- 
mack River Directory 



CITY TREASURER. 



5.00 



$197.78 



id Novelty Advertising Co., ink rib- 




bon and ink .... 


$0.75 


Novelty Advertising Co., set of 




dates for Atlas Dater . 


•75 


S. S. Piper, P. M., for 500 envelopes 


10.90 


S. S. Piper, P. M., for 500 envelopes 


11.50 


Temple & Farrington Co.: 




2,500 envelopes 


3-25 


4,000 pay envelopes . 


4.00 


4,000 pay envelopes . 


4.00 


1 dozen pencils .... 


■5° 


2,000 pay envelopes . 


2.00 


Repairing shade 


• 2 5 


Pen-holders, eraser, and ink 


•58 


1 dozen pass-books 


.42 


2,000 pay envelopes . 


2.00 


Ink 


•75 


Thos. H. Tuson, printing 300 re- 




ceipt blanks .... 


2.40 


J. A. Williams, 300 postal cards and 




printing same .... 


3-9o 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., 1,000 note 

heads ..... 

J. B. Clarke, advertising sale of 

non-resident lands 
J. B. Clarke, printing 20,000 bills 
Republican Press Association, ad- 
vertising non-resident sale . 



$3-°° 

32.40 
20.00 

9.90 



$47-95 



CITY HALL. 




Paid Temple & Farrington Co., i blank 




book ..... 


$10.00 


Temple & Farrington Co., 2 gross 




pens, stationery 


3.08 


Temple & Farrington Co., 4 blank 




books ..... 


4.00 


Temple & Farrington Co., station- 




ery 


2.25 


Manchester post-office, 1,025 2- 




cent envelopes .... 


22.54 


CITY AUDITOR. 




Paid John B. Clarke, printing 10,000 




blanks 


$40.00 


John B. Clarke, printing 600 blanks 


7-65 


« u u 300 « 


6-75 


a << u u 200 l< 


i-75 


Hammond Typewriter Co., 5 reams 




No. 57 paper .... 


15-50 


Manchester post-office, 100 10-cent 




stamps ..... 


10.00 


Manchester post-office, 100 5 -cent 




stamps ..... 


5.00 


Manchester post-office, 100 3-cent 




stamps 


3.00 


Manchester post-office, postage 


5.00 


Temple & Farrington Co.: 




Stationery 


2.78 


1 bill case 


2.25 


6 sheets blotting paper 


.42 


Paste, blocks, ink, etc. . * . 


3.08 


2 blank books .... 


5.00 


Dictionary, etc. 


2.25 


1 copy Pamphlet Laws 


1. 00 


American Express Co., express on 




65 packages .... 


11.92 



439 



$107.17 



440 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Novelty Advertising Co., printing 

200 statements bonded debt . $4. 50 

A. Hilcken, binding paper blocks . 1.69 



SUNDRIES. 



$129.54 



Paid Thos. A. Brennan, 100 press proofs 

for the city report of 1890 
J. B. Clarke : 

Printing 1,500 copies of city re- 
port for 1890, as per contract 

Advertising for proposals for ad 
dition to Webster-street school- 
house, 5 squares 7 times 

Printing 300 copies Mayor's Ad- 
dress, etc. 

Binding 150 Reports 

Printing 125 half-letter circulars 
bonded bebt . 

Advertising dog licenses, 5 squares 
10 times 

Advertising amendment, ordi- 
nance, 6 inches 3 times . 

Advertising refunding of water 
bonds .... 

J. G. Ellinwood, reduction of Der- 
ryfield map for City Report, 1890 

Hub Engraving Co.,i cut and elec- 
trotype of Derryfield park for 
City Report, 1890 . 

A. E. Herrick, expenses to Boston 

and return .... 

A. E. Herrick, expenses to Boston 

and return .... 

Kilburn & Cross, engraving plates 
for the City Report for 1890 . 



$70.00 



960.71 



13.12 

32.00 
218.58 



!5-25 



14.40 



10.85 



25 



6.00 



2.90 



2.85 
;S-45 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 441 



Paid Manchester post-office, stamps for 
Mayor 

Manchester post-office, stamps for 
Mayor ..... 

Manchester post-office, stamps for 
Mayor 

Win. E. Moore, printing letter- 
heads, etc., for Mayor 

Wm. E. Moore, printing letter- 
heads, etc., for Mayor 

Wm. E. Moore, printing and 2 box- 
es envelopes . ■ . 

Temple & Farrington Co., 492 
boxes for mailing City Report . 

Temple & Farrington, 6 gross rub- 
ber bands .... 

Temple & Farrington Co., binding 
pay-roll and 6 blocks 

Western Union Telegraph Co., tel- 
egram to Boston 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



2.50 




24.60 




8.IO 




2-75 




• 2 5 


$1,676.81 

$2,304.62 
I95-38 






$2,500.00 



Incidental Expenses. 



Appropi 


nation 






$15,000.00 


Transferred from resen 


fed fund 




639.60 






Expenditures. 






BIRTHS, 


MARRIAGES, 


AND 


DEATHS. 


Paid 0. 


D. Abbott 






$10.25 


D. 


S. Adams . 






7-5° 


E. 


Bernier 






14-75 



5,639.60 



442 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



id J. M. Collity 








$4-75 


C. W. Downing 








7.00 


C. M. Dodge 








9-25 


E. M. Fugere 








2.50 


George Frechette 








9.00 


L. French 








3-75 


L. M. French 








14.25 


L. B. How . 








3-75 


J. A. Jackson 








12.25 


M. E. Kean . 








11.25 


J. E. Lamaitre 








34-5° 


J. E. A. Lanouette 






47.00 


J. W. D. McDonald 






1 7.00 


G. B. Morey . 






4-75 


J. E. E. Roy . 








7-75 


E. Sylvain 








3 6 -75 


C. B. Sturtevant 








7.00 


George D. Towne 








4-5° 


Ellen A. Wallace 








2.00 


E. B. Dunbar 








5-75 


C. F. Flanders 








30.00 


H. W. Boutwell 








3°-5° 


J. Ferguson . 








41.50 


A. G. Straw . 








1.25 


N. P. Kidder, fees for 480 marriages 72.00 


N. P. Kidder, fees for 1,075 deaths 161.25 


N. P. Kidder, fees 


or 96 


5 bir 


hs . 


144-75 



$758-50 



moor 01 men ana teams as 
January .... 


Der pay-ron : 

$21.00 


February 


21.00 


March .... 


21.00 


April .... 


113.86 


May .... 


110.07 


June .... 


214.52 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 



443 



July . 




$i53- 6 3 


August . 




152.42 


September 




198.48 


October . 




55- 2 5 


November 




32-25 


December 


DISTRICT NO. IO. 


39-25 



$i>i3 2 -73 



Paid labor of men and teams as per pay- roll 
August, North Main-street schoolhouse 



$195.00 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 



Paid Milton A. Abbott, damage to crops, 

fence, and lawn in building sewer $30.00 

Johanna Cronin, personal injuries 

received on Dean street . . 150.00 

Margaret Connor, damages settled 

by agreement .... 200.00 

Emeline C. Call, damages settled by 

agreement ..... 1,250.00 

James Dearborn, damages from 

sewer overflow . . . . 5.00 

Achsah L. Elliott, personal damages, 
falling on Lincoln street, Decem- 
ber 26, 1890 .... 240.00 

C. S. Head and W. G. H. Dunham, 

damages settled by agreement . 425.00 

E. Y. Harvvood, damages by falling 

into a vault . . . . 10.00 

Hepzibah A. Johnson, personal dam- 
ages, falling on Manchester street 50.00 

Antoine Sevigney, damage to real 

estate by grading Beauport street 632.33 

Lewis K. Mead, bill paid in settle- 
ment of A. L. Elliott . . 2.40 



444 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Hannah Mead, personal damage on 

Chestnut street .... $80.00 

Hannah Ryan, personal damage, 

settlement of suit . . . 400.00 

George W. Reed, damage to hack . 15.00 

Frederick E. Scheer, personal injur- 
ies, suit settled : 300.00 

Joseph H. Wiggin, injury to horse 200.00 

Worthley Bros., settlement of suit . 50.00 

Edwin R. Whitney, settlement of 

suit, personal injury . . . 1,500.00 

James Taylor, damage by reason of 

obstruction in Central street . 10 00 

John T. Beach, repairing wagon of 

Taylor 8.98 

Rebecca Newton, settled by agree- 
ment, on file in the city clerk's 
office ..... 50.00 

Mary Sheehan, damage to person on 

Cedar street .... 60.00 

estate of Daniel Farmer, land dam- 
age on highway by reason of 
flowage . . . . . 50.00 

Elliot Hospital, board and care of 

• C. B. Clarkson for six weeks . 60.00 

Mrs. Luther Campbell, damage to 

hens by dog . . . . 2.00 

Mrs. Luther Campbell, damage to 

turkeys by dog . . . . 13. 00 

Thomas Bolton, damage to real es- 
tate by change of grade on Beau- 
port street . . . . 575.00 

Charles H. Bartlett, one third the 
amount paid Charlotte Hovey, 
injuries received by falling into 
an open bulk-head . . . 115.00 



$6,483.71 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 445 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Paid J. M. Collity, services in case of R. 

Call $35-°° 

A. E. Herrick, 118 pages typewrit- 
ten testimony from shorthand 
notes, 17 cents per page, in case 
of Dr. Parsons v. city . . 20.00 

John G. Hutchinson, service of 
notices and fees paid witnesses in 
sundry cases . . . . 21.06 

Edwin F. Jones, cash paid for writs 

and entry fees in supreme court . 6.50 

W. W. Wilkins, services in case of 

R. Call ..... 25.00 

W. W. Wilkins, services in case of 

Dr. Parsons . . . . 50.00 

Kennard, Young, and Harvey, ref- 
erees' fees . . . . . 15-00 

Charles H. Reed, services looking 
up witnesses, in suit of Parsons v, 
Manchester . . . . 56.25 

L. B. How, services, examination, 
and testimony in the case of Dr. 
Parsons v. the City of Manches- 
ter 50.00 

J. B. Clarke Co., printing 30 briefs 

Parsons v. City .... 13-00 

Edwin F. Jones, expenses attending 

law term, and postage . . 4.61 

William W. Wilkins, consultation 
in case of fractured leg of Julia 
Guedrow ..... 

William W. Wilkins, consultation 
in case of injured hip of Hannah 
Olo 



5.00 



5.00 

$306.42 



446 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY COUNCIL AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid Ezra S. Stearns, copy of act of legis- 
lature ..... $!-5° 

Ezra S. Stearns, copy of act of legis- 
lature ..... 3.50 

John P. Bartlett, professional ser- 
vices before the legislature . . 200.00 

Edwin F. Jones, services and ex- 
penses at Concord on legislature 
matters, as per agreement with 
special committee of the city 
councils ..... 280.00 

Western Union Telegraph Co., tele- 
grams to Concord and Boston . 4.66 

H. E. Burnham, services and ex- 
penses on legislative matters . 150.00 

W. J. Freeman, hacks and teams for 

Mayor and committees . . S7.00 

James Brothers, use of hack to city 

farm. . . . . . 5.00 

E. T. James, hacks, etc., for com- 
mittee on streets, putting up signs, 
etc., etc. ..... 81.75 

A. L. Jenness & Son, use of hacks, 

etc., by sundry committees . 73 .50 

Jesse W. Truell, use of hack, com- 
mittee on commons, streets, cem- 
eteries, etc. .... 49.00 

Whitten & Fifield, use of hacks by 

committees .... 26.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

dog license notice . . . 17-5° 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

proposals for water bonds . . 10.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of hacks 

for committees .... 44.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 447 

Paid O. E. Branch, services and expenses 

at Concord before the legislature $25.00 

John B. Clarke, advertising propos- 
als for coal, six squares eight times 15-00 

John B. Clarke, advertising propos- 
als for electric lighting . . 14.40 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising notice relating to dog law 9.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

proposals for coal and wood . 18.66 

Union publishing Co., advertising 
proposals for electric lighting, 
four and one half squares, Tues- 
day, Thursday, and Saturday to 
September 25 . . . . 21.00 

Manchester post-office, 200 tvo-cent 

stamps, Mayor's office . . 4.00 

Novelty Advertising Co., stamps, 

etc., for clerk of common council 2.00 

American Bank Note Co., 100 blank 

water bonds .... 65.00 

C. H. Simpson, use of hacks for 

committees, etc. . . . 10.00 

$1,217.47 



CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid John A. Barker, care of boiler at 

city library .... $119.50 

Robert Clark, work done in and 
around the city library building, 
sweeping sidewalks, shoveling 
snow and ice, cutting grass . 63.13 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., one table 2.50 

Head & Dowst, lumber and labor 

for shelving, etc. . . . 323.97 

Thos. A. Lane, materials and labor 5.03 



$5i4-i3 



448 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



DISEASED CATTLE. 

Paid H. Fox Davis, et al. : 

Services as appraisers of horse of C. 

H. Simpson $6.00 

Killing and burying same . . . 2.00 

Five days' labor at state industrial 
school examining and killing cattle, 
and use of team . . . « ^S-°° 

Services of three appraisers, cows of 

Patrick Harrington . . . 6.00 

Killing one cow at same place . . 3.00 

Paid H. Fox Davis, burying glandered 

horse of A. Eastman . . . 200 

H. Fox Davis, services in two other 

cases ..... 2.00 

A. L. Dodge, examining horse of 

Flanders, Mills & Fairbanks . 7.00 

A. L. Dodge, use of team . . 5.00 

D. C. James, services in August 
and December relating to glan- 
dered horses .... S.00 
Patrick Harrington, one cow killed 20.00 
H. Fox Davis, killing and burying 

glandered horse of John S. Miller 3.00 

Henry P. Mullowney, examination, 

etc., of diseased horse . . 5.00 

A. L. Dodge, examination of W. E. 

Prescott's horse . . . 2.00 

A. L. Dodge, examination of C. E. 

Smith's horse .... 3.00 



CITY SCALES. 



Paid William Bailey, for services as city 

weigher, to December 1 . . $333-33 

F. H. Crawford, for services as city 

weigher 33.33 



$89.00 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 449 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., i ton of egg 

coal $6.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., y 2 ton stove 

coal 3-75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 feet mixed 

wood . . . . • 1.87 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 1^ tons 

stove coal . . . . . i°-5° 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 feet hard 

wood, sawed and split . . 2.25 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., lumber 

used in repairing building . . 12.16 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., labor 

and lumber . . . . 7.59 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 gross 

of pens . . . . . 1. 00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 bottle 

of ink ..... .38 

Temple & Farrington Co., note. 

paper ..... .42 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 direc- 
tory ...... 2.00 

J. Y. McQueston & Co., 1 office 

high chair . . . . 1.00 

Walter Neal, labor and material, 

(December, 1890) . . . 5.33 

$421.16 

MILK INSPECTOR. 

Paid John B. Clarke, advertising no- 
tice, 2 inches, 2 times 

H. F. W. Little, 30 postal cards, 
etc 

H. F. W. Little, lactoscope, hy- 
drometer, etc. .... 

J. A. Williams, printing 300 notices 



4.50 


•55 


8.90 


1.50 



450 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. A. Williams, printing 300 envel- 
opes . . . . . . $1-25 

Clarence Bancroft, analyzing milk 90.00 



RELATING TO THE STREETS. 

Paid C. E. Crombie & Co., 54 rock 

maple- and elm trees . . . $54-oo 

Fred S. McLearn, 173 signs . . 75.13 

Whitten & Fifield, teams used in 
November and December, town 
line work . . . . . ii-5° 

Head & Dowst, 17 hours' labor, 4 
lbs. 8-penny wire nails, street 
signs 4.23 

John Williams, 8 days' labor on 

tree boxes 20.00 

John B. Varick Co., hoop-iron and 

nails on tree boxes ... 2.15 

Manchester Hardware Co., nails on 

tree boxes . . . . . 1.33 

Merrill & Freeman, 4 barrels lime 

on tree boxes .... 4.00 

J. B. Varick Co., hoop-iron, wire 

nails, etc., on tree boxes . . 4.55 

L. N. Westover, lumber and labor 

on tree boxes . . . . 10.48 

Pike & Heald, materials and labor 
at True Perry's house on Lake 
avenue 49-83 

Head & Dowst Co., materials and 
labor on True Perry's house, Lake 
av enue 35 6 -45 

Mclver & Follansbee, lowering 
True Perry's house on Lake ave- 
nue ...... 130.00 



$106.70 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 451 

Paid Charles H. Robie, concrete work at 
True Perry's block on Lake ave- 
nue and Massabesic street, 147.5 
yds., at 45c. . . . $66.37 

D.C.Whittemore,use of land forroad 20.00 

F. S. Bodwell & Co., 1 step at New- 
ton's, on Webster street . . 17-14 

George Holbrook, labor and use of 
tools, cutting and trimming trees, 
etc 133-34 

George Holbrook, taking down 

sign of J. Hodge . . . 1.75 

James Kirby, services 7^ days 

trimming trees . . . . 15-00 
W. G. Landry, bank wall on Bow- 
man street 5 75. 00 

John F. Larkin, pipes, crosses, ties, 

brimstone, etc. . . . 39-32 

John F. Larkin, drilling stone holes 6.00 

John F. Larkin, labor, putting up 

fence-rail at East Spruce street . 45.00 

H. D. Lord, 1 2-wheel road-scraper 25.00 

J. B. Varick, 1 wheel-scraper . 46.00 

J. B. Varick, 2 axes and 2 ax- 
handles ..... 2.10 

Charles H. Robie, concrete work, 
West Central street, 265 yards, at 
25c 66.26 

Charles H. Robie, concrete work, 

City Hall, 147. 1 yards, at 25c. 36.77 

Charles H. Robie, concrete work, 
Main-street schoolhouse, 2 n. 5 
yds., at 45c 95.17 

Charles H. Robie, concrete work, 
Newton and Webster streets, 
1 1 2. 1 yds., at 45c . . . 5°-45 

Flint & Little, repairing levels, dis- 
trict No. 2 . . . . 2.80 

$1,967.11 



452 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



ASSESSORS. 

Paid H. D. Lord, furnishing transfers of 

real estate for one year .... . $12.00 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid George A. Alger, rebate on tax of 
Hilan Pare, 1889, sold for taxes 
(duplicate) . . . . £9-04 

W. E. Dealand, redeemed taxes on 
property of Eliza Eaton, now 
owned by City Library . . !5-°5 

W. E. Dealand, tax of William Cur- 
rier, 1889, being duplicate of 
William Carrignant . . . 6.83 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes 
sold and purchased as agent for 
the city 816.28 

George E. Morrill, distributing tax- 
bills 63.20 

$910.40 



MEDICAL ATTENDANCE. 

Paid C. W. Downing, services in sundry 

cases $37. 25 

Thomas Franker, services as inter- 
preter ..... 2.00 

Fred Perkins, certificate of insanity, 

F. Searle ..... 3.00 

Fred Perkins, certificate of insanity, 

H. Minard .... 3.00 

Fred Perkins, certificate of insanity, 

Armidas Duncourse . . . 3.00 

Fred Perkins, medicine per order 

of the Mayor . . . . 10.70 



INCIDENTAL EXPENSES. 453 

Paid Fred Perkins, services rendered M. 
Houlihan, Charles Clarkson, and 
Cornelius Linnehan, as per award 
of joint standing committee on 
claims . . . . $28.00 

#86.95 



Paid G. F. Bosher, advertising, postage, 
and posting, and selling two lots 
of land on Lowell street . . $41.50 

J. A. Barker, night services, March 
12 and 26, April 9 and 10, Octo- 
ber 29, and November 12 . . 20.00 

water-works, water rent for Women's 
Aid and Relief Society Hospital 
to July 1 . . . . . 10.98 

water-works, water rent for Women's 
Aid and Relief Society Hospital, 
to January 1, 1892 . . . 21.96 

water-works, water rent for Women's 
Aid and Relief Society Hospital, 
to April 1, 1892 . . . 10.98 

J. B. Varick Co., tools for sealer of 
weights and measures 

A, F. Barr, for cash paid county 
sealer ..... 

A. F. Barr, for sealing city scales . .75 

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & 
Insurance Co., insurance on boil- 
ers in eight schoolhouses for three 
years 320.00 

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & 
Insurance Co., insurance policy 
No. 1 7231, for one year on stone- 
crusher boiler . . . . 22.50 

J. A. Williams, 2,000 note circulars 5.00 



5-i5 

3-95 



454 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Mrs. N. P. Kidder, clerical services 

in city clerk's office . . . $150.00 

Mrs. N. P. Kidder, clerical services 

in city clerk's office to October 1 75-°o 

Mrs. N. P. Kidder, clerical services 

in city clerk's office to December 1 75 .00 

A. D. Gooden, land, deed dated 
July 18, 1 89 1, and acknowledged 
August 6, 189 1 . . . . 345. 00 

H. Giebel, decorating City Hall, 

Merchants' Week . . . 57-5°- 

Head & Dowst, 210 feet sapling, 

city pest house . . . . 5.25 

Head & Dowst, 48 feet 2x4 spruce, 

city pest house . . . . .75 

William E. Moore, printing lot of 

slips for city report, 1891 . . 8.00 

First Light Battery, cartridges, etc., 
and firing national salute July 4, 
1891 41-85 

town of Goffstown, taxes on land 

for 1890-91 .... 1.74 

Dana W. King, recording deed . 1.09 

Pike & Heald, stovepipe at pest 

house . . . . . 1. 15 

G. F. Bosher : 

100 large posters, house lots . 3-5°- 

Posting same . . . . 1.50 

Advertising in "Daily Union" 3°-5S 

Advertising in " Daily Mirror " I 9-5° 

Advertising in "Daily Press " . 13-00 

Services selling 5 house lots . 25.00 

A. E. Herrick, expense to Boston 
and return, to see about engrav- 
ings for the city report . . 2.80 

A. E. Herrick, expense to Boston 

and return, twice . . . 5.80 



mayor's incidentals. 455 

Paid A. E. Herrick, cash paid for ex- 
press, etc. ..... $°-5o 

S. B. Putnam, expense to Concord 
and return, to settle with state 
treasurer .72 

Pike & Heald, stove and furniture 

at city pest house . . . 33-88 

A. D. Sherer, 83 feet pine, 1 J hours' 

labor, screws, nails . . . 2.81 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 25 city 

directories, 1891 . . . 50.00 

Hub Engraving Co., 1 relief plate, 
map of sewer system, and 1 elec- 
trotype of same for report of 1 89 2 14. 65 

$1,429.34 

PERAMBULATION OF TOWN LINES. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, perambulation of 
town line between Manchester 
and Hooksett .... $4.00 

Whitten & Fifield, use of team . 5.00 

$9.00 

Total expenditures ..... $15,639.62 



Mayor's Incidentals. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid William Sanborn, expense of enter- 
taining officers of Portland Pipe 

Co $4-5o 

E. T. James, hack to pond . . 5.00 

E. T. James, hack, etc., to pond . x 9-5° 



456 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid E. J. Knowlton, expenses of five 

trips to Concord on city business $3. 75 

E. J. Knowlton, allowance for hire 

of teams . . . . . 115.00 

H. W. Herrick, work on pictures 

in Mayor's office . . . 8.00 

Hale & Whittemore, 2 frames for 

the Mayor's office . . . 6.00 

Frank W. Elliott, entertainment 
furnished visitors from Boston in 
company with city officials . 50.00 

W. J. Freeman, team for Mayor at 

sundry times .... 5.50 

J. C. Nichols & Son, span and car- 
ryall ..... 6.00 

Whitten & Fifield, use of team . 11.00 

Total expenditure ..... $234.25 
Transferred to reserved fund . . . . . 65.75 

$300.00 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Appropriation ....... $15,500.00 

Expenditures. 

central department. 

Paid E. J. Knowlton, mayor . . $1,800.00 

Nathan P. Kidder, city clerk . 900.00 

Sylvanus B. Putnam, city treasurer 1,200.00 

Edwin F. Jones, city solicitor . 800.00 
George L. Stearns, clerk of common 

council ..... 200.00 

T. W. Lane, inspector of buildings 100.00 



CITY OFFICERS SALARIES. 



457 



Paid T. W. Lane, inspector of buildings 
from Feb. i to Dec. 31, 1890 
John A. Barker, city messenger 
J K. Rhodes, 14 days substituting 
for messenger .... 



$91.67 

700.00 

24.50 



— #5,816.17 



CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Paid Fred Perkins, city physician . 

E. J. Knowlton, chairman, ex officio, 

overseers poor . 
William H. Maxwell, ward 1 
Thomas L. Quimby, ward 2 
B-enj. F. Garland, ward 3 
George S. Holmes, ward 4 
Patrick Costello, ward 5 . • 

Charles Francis, ward 6 
William Marshall, ward 7 
William Weber, ward 8 
William H. Maxwell, clerk of board 
Judith Sherer, matron at pest house 



25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
75.00 
360.00 



$860.00 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Paid William E. Buck, superintendent of 

schools ..... $2,000.00 

Samuel Brooks, truant officer . 750.00 

E. J. Knowlton, chairman, ex officio 10.00 
Edward B. Woodbury, clerk of 

board ..... 100.00 

C. H. Manning, ward 1 . . . 10.00 

C. D. Sumner, ward 1 . . . 10.00 

W. H. Morrison, ward 2 . . 10.00 

George H. Stearns, ward 2 . . 10.00 

George D. Towne, ward 3 . . 10.00 

Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 . . 10.00 



458 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Stephen B. Stearns, ward 4 . 

E. L. Richardson, ward 4 
James P. Slattery, ward 5 
William J. Sughrue, ward 5 . 

F. T. E. Richardson, ward 6 . 
George W. Dearborn, ward 6 
Marshall P. Hall, ward 7 
Edward B. Woodbury, ward 7 
Luther C. Baldwin, ward 8 . 
William K. Robbins, ward 8 
Edson S. Heath, president common 

council, ex officio 



$10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



$3,030.00 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 



Paid Henry Lewis, ward 1, assessor 

John E. Stearns, ward 2, assessor . 
David O. Fernald, ward 3, assessor 
Harrison D. Lord, ward 4, assessor 
John Ryan, ward 5, assessor . 
George H. Dudley, ward 6, assessor, 
clerk of board .... 
William T. Rowell, ward 7, assessor 
Frank T. Provost, ward 8, assessor 
E. W. Brigham, assistant assessor . 
John Cayzer, assistant assessor 
Hiram Forsaith, assistant assessor . 
Nicholas Nichols, assistant assessor 
Henry H. Stone, assistant assessor . 
Isaac Whittemore, assistant assessor 
A. Z. Adam, interpreter, assistant 
assessor ..... 
Louis Comeau, interpreter, assistant 
assessor ..... 
W. G. Fernald, clerk, assistant as- 
sessor 



$147-5° 
160.00 
792.50 
235.00 
165.00 

425.00 
145.00 

i47-5° 
227.50 
30.00 
27.50 
297.50 
40.00 
80.00 



3°- 



city auditor's department. 459 

Paid M. Gilbert, interpreter, assistant as- 
sessor ..... $20.00 

Harry F. Lord, clerk, assistant as- 
sessor ..... 12.50 

H. D. Lord, furnishing transfers of 

real estate for one year . . 12.00 



$3^44-5° 



CITY TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid George E. Morrill : 

Quarter ending February 28, 1 89 1 . $200.00 

Quarter ending May 31, 1891 . . 200.00 

Balance of salary and commissions to 

June 1, 189 1 . . . . . 860.28 

Quarter ending August 31, 189 1 . 200.00 

Quarter ending November 30,1891 . 200.00 



11,660.28 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

Paid H. F. W. Little, as milk inspector 
from February 1, 1890, to Feb- 
ruary 1, 1891 .... $150.00 
H. F. W. Little, as milk inspector 
from February 1, 1891, to De- 
cember 31, 1891 . . . 137-50 



$287.50 



Total expenditures ..... $14,798.45 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . 701.55 

$15,500.00 



City Auditor's Department. 
Appropriation ...... . $1,700.00 



460 report of the city auditor. 
Expenditures. 



Paid James B. Straw, auditor, salary for 

the year 1891 .... $1,000.00 
A. E. Herrick, clerk, salary for the 

year 1891 598.30 



$0.50 



7.00 

2.2s 



Paid A. E. Herrick, for cash paid for 
fountain eraser .... 

A. E. Herrick, for cash paid for ex- 
press i. 5 o 

Albert Hilcken, 1 ledger with cover 

Albert Hilcken, 1 book 

Albert Hilcken, 50 pieces cardboard .25 

Albert Hilcken, binding book for 

inventories .... 1.75 

Hammond Typewriter Co., repair 

on typewriter . . . . 5.09 

Hammond Typewriter Co., 1 rec- 
ord ribbon .... .94 

Manchester Hardware Co., ball of 

twine ..... .10 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 paper of tacks . .08 

Novelty Advertising Co., 39 rubber 

stamps . . . . ." 19.45 

George H. Ritcher & Co., 12 bind- 
ing cases 2.75 

Geo. H. Ritcher & Co., 6 E. cases 1.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 100 

sheets carbon paper . . . 3.75 

Temple & Farrington Co., 9 sheets 

No. 25 book board ... 1.80 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 quire 

manilla paper .... .75 



$i,59 8 -3° 



Ijllljlflllljllllli ; ' t i : " ' : ;,;..; ;' ; it 








llllllll 
42. STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 1. 



461 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., muci- 
lage and paste .... 
Hale & Whittemore, framing pho- 
tographs of public buildings 
Manchester post-office, 1002c. stamps 
National Typewriter Co., part pay- 
ment On typewriter . 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$1.10 

2.00 
2.00 

47.00 



$101.21 

$1,699.51 
•49 



Highway District No. 1 



11,700.00 



Appropriation .... 


$300.00 




Amount transferred from reserved fun 


i . 50.00 






— . 


$350.00 


Expenditures. 




Paid labor as per pay-rolls : 






February .... 


$27.50 




March 


57-75 




June ..... 


112.88 




July 


78.50 




August ..... 


21.50 




December .... 


i3-5° 


$3 Il - 6 i 






Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 






3 spades ..... 


$2.70 




1 cask 600 wire nails 


2.50 




1 street hoe .... 


.50 




1 rake ..... 


•45 




1 shovel 


•65 





462 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. C. Ray, i road scraper 

J. H. Campbell, 2 loads of stone 
for culvert .... 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 time- 
book ..... 

J. P. Fellows, sharpening tools 

Edward Dodge, 163 loads of gravel 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



1.24 



.62 



2. 'JO 




16.30 


$33-66 






$345- 2 9 




4.71 



Highway Districts Nos. 2 and 3. 

Appropriation 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 



Expenditures. 



#350.00 



#12,000.00 
28.39 

$12,028.39 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll : 

January ..... $1,115. 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July . 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 



1,112.17 


1,148.28 

788.43 


711. 81 


769.12 
1,098.99 

776-75 


923.09 


1,049.74 
787.09 
989-33 

$11,270.68 



HIGHWAY DISTRICTS NOS. 2 AND 3. 



463 



Paid R. N. Whittemore, 4 days' labor of 
men and teams in December and 

January $ 19.75 

Whitten & Fifield, team . . 1.00 



$20.75 



Paid L. D. M. McDonald, 100 feet drag 




plank . 


$4.00 


C. H. Hutchinson, 1 steel stamp . 


4-5° 


J. B. Varick Co.: 




2 dozen No. 3 scoop shovels 


20.00 


2 dozen No. 3 scoop shovels 


16.00 


34 dozen contractors' picks 


9-75 


1 dozen pick handles 


2.50 


10 plow points . 




9.00 


1 standard plow 




2.50 


2 dozen snow shovels 




7-5° 


1 pair cutting-nippers 




1. 00 


28)4 lbs. steel crowbars 




i-43 


1 Doe E. No. 8 landside 




.90 


1 Doe E. No. 8 handle 




■75 


1 post-hole digger 




2.00 


20 lbs. 60-penny cone cut nails . 


•5° 


1 14-tooth steel rake 


•35 


Manchester Hardware Co.: 




1 dozen Ames square-point shove' 


s 10.50 


2 leaden jacks . 


5.00 


1 saw-horse 


•35 


io}4 feet No. mill chains 


.58 


1 dozen Ames square-point shovel 


s 10.50 


3 axes .... 


2 -55 


3 ax wedges 


■15 


2 14-tooth rakes 


.63 


50 lbs. wire nails 


1.78 


Killey & Wadleigh : 




1 16-tooth steel rake . 




.40 



464 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



5-6 dozen snow shovels 


$2.71 


2 axes with handles . 


2.00 


1 dozen Ames shovels 


10.50 


y 2 dozen heavy picks 


5.00 


]/ 2 dozen hickory pick handles 


1.00 


2 dozen hickory pick handles 


4.00 


1 dozen picks . 


10.00 


y 2 dozen striking hammer handles 1.00 


1 dozen street brooms 


6.00 


1 priming hammer 


!-I3 


1 handle .... 


•!S 


1 No. 3 B. hatchet 


•85 


1 dozen brooms 


6.00 


EXPLOSIVES. 





£165.46. 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 100 feet D. F. 
fuse ...... 

Killey & Wadleigh, 9 pounds of 
powder ..... 

Killey & Wadleigh, 50 feet W. P. 
fuse ...... 

Killey & Wadleigh, 50 feet plati- 
num fuse ..... 



$0-65 


i-i3 


■33 


1.88 



?3-99 



TELEPHONE, GAS, STATIONERY. 

Paid New England Telegraph &: Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas at office 

Temple & Farrington Co. : 

1 ledger ..... 



record book and other stat 
fountain pen and ink 
6 time-books 
1 directory 
mounting one map 



onery 



24.00 
33- J 9 

1.25 

1.99 

2.00 

15.00 

2.00 
•75 



HIGHWAY DISTRICTS NOS. 2 AND 3. 



46; 



2 dozen time-books . 


$10.00 


i blank-book 


1. 00 


4 memorandum books 


1.02 


2 dozen pencils . 


1. 00 


ink, paper, and pass-books 


2.17 


13 blank-books . 


16.20 


E. R. Coburn & Co., 25 blank 




books .... 


20.97 



$132-54 



BLACKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid Welcome & Son, sharpening picks J1.00 

M. J. Whalen, repairing belt . 1.00 

Thomas Hickey, sharpening picks .85 

Pike & Heald, repairing railings, 

etc., South Manchester . . 3.64 

J. T. Beach, repairs on street 

sweeper . . . . . 1.25 

J. Hadlock, 4 new champion edge 

plates . . . . . 16.00 

J. Hadlock, 20 bolts for same . 2.00 

Thomas A. Lane, repairs and mate- 
rials on pumps, etc. . . . 18.06 
Sanborn Carriage Co., links in 
spreader chain and fitting whiffle- 
tree spring . .40 
J. O. Tremblay, repairing hoe . .40 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 1 hour 

labor on plow point ... .40 



MATERIALS. 



545' 



Paid R. R. Reif, 23 loads of sand . . $2.30 

Daniel Connor, 284 loads of sand . 28.40 

A. G. Gray, 764 loads of sand . 76.40 

Mary Hastings, 585 loads of sand . 58.50 



466 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Head & Dowst, lumber and labor . $6.55 
F. S. Bodwell : 

10 circles at 3.50 . . . 35-°° 
81 feet edge stones, 40 Union 

street ..... 32.40 
16 feet edge stones, Hanover and 

Belmont .... 6.40 
8 feet edge stones, Concord street, 

William Corey's . . . 3.20 

27 feet edge stones, Olzendam's . 10.80 

Frank Li bbey, 1 01 loads gravel . 10.10 

Daniel Connor, 74 loads gravel . 7.40 



#277-45 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, glass, putty, and 

nails ..... $0.40 

Killey & Wadleigh, 30 lbs. 60- 

penny nails . . . . 1. 15 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 stable pails . .50 

Manchester Hardware Co., tacks, 

rubber cloth, etc. ... 1.73 

Manchester Hardware Co., 6 tire 

bolts . . . . . .12 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware . . 1.15 

J. B. Varick Co., 2 lbs. lead . '. .16 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware . . 2.86 

J. B. Varick Co., glue and sand- 
paper . . . . . .71 

J. J. Bell, rent of office for one 

half month . . . . 3.00 

Eager & Rand, 8 bushels of salt . 4.80 
T. L. Thorpe, 10 lbs. copper waste 1.00 
McQuade Bros. , 1 barrel . . .75 
J. R. Carr, 1 light of glass and set- 
ting 1.75 

Thomas A. Lane, materials and 

labor ..... 25.92 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 4. 



467 



Paid Pike & Heald, 6 dippers, mops, 
basin, etc. .... 

Hale & Whittemore, 2 frames for 
photographs .... 

American Express Company, on 
cutters for road-machine . 

A. N. Clapp, 1 barrel kerosene oil 

J. W. Wilson, moving blacksmith 
shop ..... 

Whitten & Fifield, team for use of 
Hartshorn .... 

L. M. Aldrich, filing cross-cut saw 
three times .... 

Eager & Rand, 40 gallons kerosene 
oil 

Martin Fitzgerald, labor on stone- 
work at sundry times and places 

Temple & Farrington Co., 2 shades 

Total expenditures . 



;i.8o 

3.00 

.40 
6.14 



3° 


25 








1 


°S 








5 


20 








16 


18 
50 














$112 


5 2 




$ 


12,028 


39 



Highway District No. 4, 



Appropriation 


















Expenditures. 










labor. 






Paid labor of men 


and teams, as per pay 


-rolls 




January 
February 
March : 












$44-75 

6.78 

24.64 


May 
June 












10.50 
66.50 



$500.00 



468 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



September ..... 


#53-i 2 




November ..... 


136.49 




December ..... 


17-45 


$360.23 






MATERIALS. 






Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 35 lbs. 60- 






penny wire nails 


$1-23 




Killey & Wadleigh, 8 lbs. 30-penny 






wire nails ..... 


•32 




Devonshire mills, 40 loads of gravel, 






at 6c. 


2.40 




Head & Dowst, 1,115 f eet 3-inch 






spruce plank .... 


17.84 




Byron Moore, 62 loads of gravel . 


3-72 








$25.51 


Total expenditures 


S385-74 


Amount transferred to reserved fund 




114.26 



$500.00 



Highway District No. 5. 



Appropriation 














Expenditures. 










labor. 








Paid labor of men 


and teams, as per pay 


rolls 






January . 






$3 


00 


February 








6 


00 


March . 








40 


26 


April 








8. 


00 


May 








126. 


5° 



$600. OQ 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 5. 



469 



June .... 


#58.00 


July .... 


2.25 


August .... 


73-5° 


September . 


122.35 


October 


43.00 


November 


46.00 


December 


3-5° 



$532.36 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., 4 Ames shovels . $2.50 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 No. 3 Doe 

plow point .... .60 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 No. 3 Doe 

plow cutter .... .80 



$3-9° 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid R. W. Flanders, sharpening tools . 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Henry Golden, 41 loads of gravel . 

Libbey Bros., 185 loads of gravel . 

Mark E. Harvey, 166 loads of 

gravel ..... 

Head & Dowst, 625 feet spruce, 

3x5 

Head & Dowst, 20 chestnut posts . 

Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$4.10 

18.50 

16.60 

10.00 
3.60 



#7-55 



#52.80 

#596.61 
3-39 



470 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Highway District No. 6. 



Appropriation 


















Expenditures. 










labor. 






Paid labor of men 


and 1 


earns, as per pay 


-rolls 




January 
February 
March . 












54-5° 

4-75 

43.60 


May 

August . 
October 












67-45 

292.23 

27.00 


November 












37-5° 



#500.00 



#477-03 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., 1 plow 
J. B. Varick Co., 6 shovels 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid James Morrison, sharpening picks, etc. 



$11.00 

4-5° 



#i5-5o 



#5- J o 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 1 time-book 

Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



#0.75 

#498.38 
1.62 



#500.00 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 7. 



471 



Highway District No. 7. 



Appropriation 



$1,500.00 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 



January 










$64 


5° 


February 










37 


2 5 


March . 










96 


•35 


April 










7i 


1 2 


May 










3 2 9 


*3 


June 










478 


74 


July . 










19 


5° 


August . 










11 


46 


September 










184 


85 


October 










5° 


1 1 


November 










87 


5° 



$i,43°-5 I 



Paid J. B. Varick Co. : 




8 round-point shovels 


#5-33 


3 round-point shovels 


2.00 


3 No. 5 E. Doe plow points 


2.25 


1 E. Doe plow point . 


2.25 


2 red lantern globes . 


1.50 


2 36-inch sledge handles . 


•34 


4^ lbs. sledges and shims . 


.66 


1 handled ax ... . 


•87 


MATERIALS. 





$15.20 



Paid J. S. Coffin, 11 loads of sand . $2.20 

Head & Dowst, 93 feet 3-inch plank 1.3 1 



$3-5i 



472 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid Welcome & Sons, sharpening picks, etc. 

Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



#24.85 

$i,474-07 
2 5-93 

$1,500.00 



Highway District No. 8. 

Appropriation ...... 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 



Expenditures, 
labor. 
Paid labor of men and teams as per pay-rolls 



$1,000.00 
28.81 

$1,028.81 



January .... 




$24.00 




February 




13.00 




March .... 




3!-37 




April .... 




9'3° 




May .... 




130.60 




June .... 




311.98 




July . / . . 




93- 2 5 




August . . 




329.98 








$943-48 


city farm, labor of men and te 


ims 




50.00 



$993-48 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co. 
3 Ames round-point shovels 
1 E. Doe point . 
13 lbs. plow castings . 



$2.63 

•57 
.78 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 8. 



473 



i No. 4 plow handle .... $0.75 
i plow point, 49 lbs., at 6c. . . 2.94 
Paid J. B. Varick Co., 4 8-lb. contract- 
or's picks ..... 3.32 
J. B. Varick Co., 4 pick handles . .68 
J. B. Varick Co., 18 lbs. i-inch 

octagon steel .... 2.70 
J. B. Varick Co., 1 7-foot pump 

and tubing .... 4.50 



; 1 8.8 7 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid H. F. Thompson, sharpening drills and other 
tools ......... 



$8.55 



EXPLOSIVES. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 
2 lbs. powder 
1 2 feet of fuse . 
8 lbs. A mining powder, at 20c. 
30 feet fuse 
50 feet fuse 
10 lbs. powder . 



.06 
1.60 

• J 5 

.20 

2.00 



*4-5i 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 1 time- 
book 

V. M. Currin, labor in picking up 
and removing stones from the 
highway, from the 12th to the 
1 8th of December, 1890 

Total expenditures . 



2.40 



$1 



$3-40 
,028.81 



474 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Highway District No. 9. 



Appropriation 




Amount transferred from reserved fund . 




Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid labor of men and teams as per pay-roll : 




March 


g58-87 


June 


186.22 


August 


141.24 


December 


9 2 -37 


MATERIALS. 




Paid Oliver Merrill, 163 loads of gravel . 


$16.30 


J. B. Varick Co., 50 E. C. bolts, 




A 1 /* x Yz 


115 



$500.00 

4-15 

!5°4-i5 



$478-70 



£i7-45 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid R. W. Flanders, sharpening tools . . . $3- 1( > 

TOOLS. 

Paid J. B. Varick Co., 2 lanterns with red 

globes $4.00 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 solid steel ax . .90 

$4.90 

Total expenditures ..... $504.15 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 10. 



475 



Highway District No. 10. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 

Transferred from reserved fund 



;oo.oo 
1 73.80 



#3,800.00 



673.80 

$4,473-8o 







Expenditures. 




LABOR. 


Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 


January . 


#239.02 


February 






289.41 


March . 






289.15 


April 






236.62 


May 






185.51 


June 






267.39 


July . 






429.71 


August . 






588.89 


September 






511.26 


October . 






122.00 


November 






77-54 


December 






184.75 



$3*421.25 



Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 1,010 
hours of team labor .... 



404.00 





$ 


3,825.25 


TOOLS. 






Paid C. H. Hutchinson, 1 steel stamp . 


$5-7° 




J. B. Varick Co., 1 electric battery 


22.00 




Killey & Wadleigh : 






6 snow shovels .... 


2.00 




2 wheelbarrows .... 


4.00 




1 1 o-pound stone hammer . 


1.80 





476 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



3 hickory handles 


$0.60 


i coal screen .... 


S.OO 


Manchester Hardware Co.: 




9 Ames scoops .... 


9-38 


i spade ..... 


.80 


i light handle round-point shovel 


•65 


i scythe ..... 


.60 


i scythe stone .... 


.IO 


3 14-tooth rakes. 


•95 


Pike & Heald, 2 small scoops 


•75 


Pike & Heald, 2 galvanized iron 




scoops ..... 


3.00 


A. N. Clapp, 6 lantern globes 


•75 


BLACKSMITHING. 





11.08 



Paid D. F. Cressey, sharpening drills, etc. 

A. Filion, setting tire on road-ma- 
chine wheel .... 

A. Filion, 2 bolts 

A. Filion, making and ironing 
neck yoke .... 

setting up road-scraper and making 
draw hooks for same . 



$ I 3- I 5 

4.00 
• 2 5 



MATERIALS. 




Paid A. G. Wallace : 




104 feet of pine, etc 


$2.43 


60 feet 3-inch hemlock 


.90 


128 feet 2 -inch spruce 


2.05 


456 feet spruce, 2x6 and 1x6. 


7-3° 


26 chestnut posts .... 


5.20 


150 feet pine finish .... 


3-75 


Sawing and planing hard wood . 


•5° 


Paid Charles A. Brooks, gravel lot, dis- 




trict 10 . ... . . 


500.00 



121.40 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 11. 



477 



Paid James Baldwin Co., 172 feet hard- 
wood plank, for plows 



$6.88 
$529.01 



SUNDRIES. 



feet 



sag 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 3 
mill chains 

Manchester Hardware Co., 
screws and washers . 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 

J. F. Wyman, 4 feet pine wood 

J. F. Wyman, 2,750 lbs. egg coal . 

J. F. Wyman, 2,000 lbs., egg coal . 

Temple & Farrington Co., ink, pen- 
cils, memorandum books . 

Temple & Farrington Co., 12 time- 
books ..... 

People's Gas-Light Co., for gas 

A. N. Clapp, sandpaper and putty 

A. N. Clapp, 1 broom, 2 gallons oil, 
4 lbs. wire nails .... 

A. N. Clapp, wire spikes, scythe 
stones, etc. .... 

A. N. Clapp, glass, putty, and nails 

J. Stickney, chamois skin 

Thomas A. Lane, 1 lb. $/% packing 

Total expenditures . 



So.; 



65 






29 






50 






75 


$37 


06 




$4,473 


8a 



Highway District No. 1 1 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



1,000.00 
150.00 



150.00. 



478 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



Paid pay-rolls, labor of men and teams : 

February $83.25 

March ...... 62.00 

April ...... 99.75 

May ...... 216.00 

June ...... 207.00 

J ul y 257.75 

MATERIALS. 

Paid Joseph Kennard, 410 loads of stone 

at 25c. ..... $102.50 

Head & Dowst, 399 feet spruce 

plank at 16c. .... 6.38 
Head & Dowst, 200 feet spruce 

boards at 17c. . . . . 3.40 
Head & Dowst, 842 feet spruce, 

2x5, at 1 6c 13.47 

Killey &: Wadleigh, 74 lbs. 50- 

penny wire nails . . . 2.22 

W. H. Colby, 42 loads of gravel . 10-50 

C. H. Hoitt, 93 posts . . . 9.30 

Oliver G. Stevens, damage to plow 10.00 
Killey & Wadleigh, 23* lbs. steel 

bars 1. 41 

Killey & Wadleigh, 1 long-handled 

spade .75 

Lizzie Farmer, 84 loads of gravel . 8.40 

Ira Hardy, 85 loads of gravel . 8.50 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid J. R. Ferson, sharpening tools . $1-30 

Joseph Greenwood, sharpening tools 2.50 



$925-75 



$176.83 



53.80 



HIGHWAY DISTRICT NO. 13. 479 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, i shovel . 
Killey & Wadleigh, i spade . 


$°-75 
.67 


$1.42 


Total expenditures . 
Transferred to reserved fund . 


$1,107.80 
42.20 




12. 


$1,150.00 


Highway District No. 




Appropriation ..... 
Transferred from reserved fund 


$200.00 
24-37 


$224.37 






Expenditures. 






labor. 






Paid city farm in March 

city farm in April .... 
city farm in June .... 


54.00 
I37-25 




Total expenditures . 




$224.37 



Highway District No. 13. 
Appropriation ...... 

Expenditures. 

labor. 

Paid labor of men and teams : 

February $7-oo 

March . . . . . . 15-00 

June . . . . . . 21.00 



480 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



August . 

October 

November 



$84.88 
26.50 
12.63 



$167.01 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 






2 Ames shovels 




$1.71 


2 Ames shovels 




1. 71 


1 14-tooth rake 




•5° 


3 pick-handles 




.60 


2 steel scoops 


MATERIALS. 


1.50 



Paid Willey & Rowe, 18 loads stone 

chips ..... $3-06 

J. H. Campbell, 32 loads stone 

chips 5.44 

E. O. Dodge, n loads of gravel . 1.10 



$6.02 



S9.60 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 1 time-book . 

Total expenditures ..... 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



^0-25 

$182.88 
17.12 

$200.00 



New Highways. 

Appropriation ...... . $10,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . $318.57 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 2,000.00 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 



481 



Amount transferred from reserved fund 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 



$2,000.00 



2 9-5 : 



- $4,448.09 
$14,448.09 



Expenditures. 

labor. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 2 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



$383 
1,063 
921 
r.403 
675 
3 l 9 
256 

131 

40 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 1 : 
October 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 7 : 
August ....... 



labor of men an 


i teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 


trict No. 10 : 




April 


• $35 2 -&9 


May 




1,078.01 


June 




871.56 


July . . 




1,020.70 


August . 




653.71 


September 




925.01 


December 




114.19 



$5,196.03 



$163.25 



$300.00 



;, 046.07 



482 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 1 1 : 
August $213.12 

Paid Head & Dowst, use of one wheel- 
scraper, 3 days . . . . $1-50 

Concord & Montreal Railroad, for 
masonry built in the two abut- 
ments at Second street, West 
Manchester, 382.5 cubic yards, at 
$6.50 2,486.25 

Concord & Montreal Railroad, 

cash, consulting engineer . . 39-6o 

$2,527.35 

EXPLOSIVES. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 10 lbs. No. 1 

forcite, district No. 2 . . $3-60 

Killey & Wadleigh, 15 lbs. No. 1 

forcite, district No. 2 . . 5.40 

$9.00 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 6 Ames round- 
point shovels, district 2 
A. N. Clapp, 9 axes and 2 handles 
Manchester Hardware Co. : 

24 Ames round-point shovels, dis 

trict No. 2 . . . 
y 2 dozen extra pick-handles 
y 2 dozen round-point shovels 
1 dozen picks, district No. 10 
1 dozen hickory handles, distric 

No. 10 . 
1 dozen Ames round - poin 
shovels, district No. 10 . 



5-75 

21.00 
1. 00 

5-25 
10.00 

3.00 

10.50 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 483 

i dozen Ames round - point 
shovels, district No. 10 . . $10.00 

1 dozen hickory handles, district 

No. 10 . . . . . 1.50 

John B. Varick Co. : 

6 Doe plow-points, district No 2 5.40 

1 dozen side tubular lanterns, dis- 
trict No.»2 .... 4.50 

1 dozen ruby globes, district No. 2 6.50 

1 dozen No. 1 wicks, district No. 

2 . . . . . . .10 

1 7 24 -pound crowbar, district No. 

2 .89 

6 E No. 8 Doe plow-points, dis- 
trict No. 2 

1 ax-handle, district No. 2 

2 handled axes, district No. 2 . 1.50 
1 5-inch steel tape, district No. 2 5.76 
Y^ pound marline, district No. 2 .12 
42^ lbs. steel bars, district No. 2 2.57 
1 nut auger, 1^, district No. 2 . .70 
1 dozen contractors' picks, dis- 
trict No. 2 

1 dozen No. 1 pick-handles, dis- 
trict No. 2 . . . . 

2 pinning-hammers, jJq lbs., dis- 

trict No. 2 . . . . 1.26 



5-4o 
.20 



3.00 
2.50 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid Thomas Hickey, sharpening picks, 

district 2 . . . . . $8.10 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening picks, 

etc., district 10 ... 70.47 

J. B. McCrillis, sharpening picks, 

etc., district 2 . . . . 16.71 



$123.65 



$95.2! 



484 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STONE, LUMBER, AND OTHER 

Paid F. S. Bodwell : 

5 2 feet flagstones on Concord street, at 

90c. .... 

3 circles, 3 feet, at $3.50 . 
12 feet edge stones, Nashua street, at 

40c ..... 
7.6 feet edge stones,' Depot street 

15.6 feet edge stones, St. Anne's church 

6 circles, Chestnut street, at $3.50 

1.2 feet circle, Chestnut street . 
42 feet edge stones, Chestnut street 

4 circles, West Merrimack street 
2 circles, 2 feet, Merrimack street 
6 circles, city yard . 
50 feet edge stones, city yard 

88.7 feet edge stones, Union street 
1 7. 7 feet edge stones, Blodget street 

1.3 feet circle, corner Amherst and 
Union streets 

60 feet 10-inch flag stones, Elm and 

Depot streets .... 
3,264 perch wall stone, laid, at $3.00 
1 1.6 perch cover stone, laid, at $4.50 
21 feet edge stone, at 40c. 

1 circle corner .... 
6 cesspool stones at $2.75 . 

18 feet edge stones, corner Hancock 
street 

2 circles, corner Second and Hancock 
streets ..... 

18 feet edge stones . 
4 circles ..... 
Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 
Lumber and planing . 
140 feet 12-inch spruce at 16c. . 
240 feet fence boards 



MATERIAL. 



$46.80 
IO.50 

4.80 

3.OO 

7.20 

2I.OO 

2.50 

16.80 

I4.OO 

5.OO 

2I.OO 

20.00 

35-43 
6.80 

3-5° 

54-75 
97.92 
52.20 
8.40 
5.00 
16.50 

7.20 



7.00 


14.00 


7.20 


1334 


2.24 


4.08 



NEW HIGHWAYS. 485 

77 chestnut posts .... $12.32 

48 feet 1 x 6 spruce . . . . .77 

766 feet spruce boards . . . 13-02 
Paid A. C. Wallace, 440 feet spruce 4x6 

and 1 x 10 . . . . 7.04 

A. C. Wallace, 256 feet spruce, 2x8 4.10 

A. C. Wallace, 14 Chestnut posts . 2.80 

A. C. Wallace, 1 pine board . . .20 
Warren Harvey, 12 perch covering 

stone at $4 . . . . 48.00 
Charles A. Bailey, 145 feet curb- 
stone, at 40c. .... 58.00 
Charles A. Bailey, 14 feet corner 

stone, $2.50 . . . . . 35-°° 

Charles A. Bailey, 3 circles at $3 . 9.00 
William Corey, cash paid Isaac 
Huse for 100 feet edge stone at 

20c. ..... 20.00 

Paid J. B. Varick Co., 1 ball of twine . 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 4-gallon pail . 

J. B. Varick Co., 29 lbs. wire nails 

Pike & Heald, 4 fiber pails . 

Pike & Heald, 1 dipper 

Thomas A. Lane, materials and 
labor in plumbing 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 balls of twine 

Killey & Wadleigh, 1 tape measure 

Killey & Wadleigh, 1 dozen pencils 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 colored pen- 
cils ...... .10 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, sharpening 

picks and bars . . . . 1.50 

A. N. Clapp, 15 lbs. nails . .45 

$55-93 

Total expenditures ..... $14,448.09 



$0.35 


1.25 


.87 


1.80 


.10 


47.61 


.80 


.60 


•50 



486 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



$2,000.00 
4,500.00 



#6,500.00 



Expenditures. 



DAMAGES AWARDED BY MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 



Paid J. Ferguson, land damage, exten- 
sion of Elm street 
J. M. Stanton, land damage, exten 

sion of Elm street 
Samuel Hall, land damage, exten 

sion of Webster street 
Samuel Hall, land damage, exten 

sion of Webster street 
Nathaniel Perkins, land damage 

extension of Hall street . 
Reuben Flanders, land damage, ex 

tension of Hall street 
John H. Maynard, land damage 

extension of Hall street 

Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$i95-85 
1,642.40 

3°5-3° 

915.90 

1,500.00 

1,025.00 



$5,704-45 
795-55 

#6,500.00 



Watering Streets. 

Appropriation 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 



$470.62 
93- 6 4 



$4,800.00 



564.26 



#5,364.26 



WATERING STREETS. 



487 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 2, as per 
pay-rolls : 
January . $43-88 

February 



March . 
April 
May 
June 

July . 

August . 
September 
October . 
December 



45.22 
68.12 
244.50 
647.62 
882.50 
812.15 
674.04 
470.80 
193.18 
32.00 



labor of men and 


teams in district No. 10, as per 


pay-rolls : 








April 
May 












$22.00 
94.00 


June 












181.00 


July . 
August . 
September 
October . 












183.00 
185.00 
198.00 

48.00 



$4,114.01 



$911.00 



Paid Thomas A. Lane : 

Labor and plumbing materials on 
fountains and water-troughs in De- 
cember, 1890 ..... $10.05 

21 dippers 4.20 

Labor and materials on fountains . 6.00 

Labor and materials on stand-pipes . 2 °-53 



488 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Labor and materials on troughs and 

fountains . . ... . $14.74 

Labor and materials on troughs and 

fountains 4.24 

Labor and materials on troughs and 

fountains 7.86 

Labor and materials on stand-pipes . 3. n 
Labor and materials on troughs and 

fountains 13-21 

Labor and materials on troughs and 

fountains ..... .69 

Labor and materials on troughs and 

fountains ..... 8.49 
Labor and materials on troughs and 

fountains 18.26 

Labor and materials on stand-pipe . 1.50 

Labor and materials on stand-pipe . 6.50 

Labor and materials on stand-pipe . 5.50 

Labor and materials on stand-pipe . .55 
Labor and materials on troughs and 

fountains ..... 23.94 
Paid Pike & Heald : 

Labor and materials on water-cart . 25.23 

Labor and materials on troughs . . 1.67 

24 drinking cups for fountains . . 4.80 

Chain and labor ..... 4.02 

Labor and materials on water-cart . 19.04 

Repairing trough front of Central block 3.48 
2 drinking cups, chain, and labor on 

fountains at Ash-street schoolhouse . .87 

24 drinking cups, chains, and labor . 8.25 

Cleaning waste to trough ... .50 

Paid Geo. A. Durgin, painting water-cart 40.00 

A. Filion, repairs on water-cart . 2.25 

D. F. Cressey, repairs on water-cart 7.05 

Killey & VVadleigh, paint, varnish, 

etc., for carts .... 34-36 



PAVING STREETS. 



489 



Paid John T. Beach, shade on sprinkler 
John T. Beach, cross sill in Moni 

tor No. i . 
John T. Beach, ironwork in Moiii 

■ tor No. i . 
John T. Beach, work on spring 
A. D. Gooden, maintaining water 

ing-trough on Lake avenue foi 

the year 1890 
J. B. Varick Co., 5 lbs. refined iron 
D. F. Cressey, 1 water wrench 
D. F. Cressey, 1 long 3-16 rod of 

iron ..... 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, material 

and labor on water-carts 
Harden & Woodbury, labor re-set- 
ting stone troughs on Lowell street 
H. C. Ranno, axle grease 

Total expenditures . 



$5-°° 




2.60 




4.00 

•75 




3.00 
.ri 




1. 00 




.40 




16.40 




3- 2 5 
1.85 


$339-25 
$5,364.26 



Paving Streets. 

Appropriation ..... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 



$5,500.00 
1,011.80 

$6,511.80 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 2, as 
per pay-rolls : 

April $332-88 

May 365.58 



490 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



June 










#374-62 


July . 










329.92 


August . 










291.50 


September 










2 33-53 


October 










268.52 


November 










137.22 


December 










36.26 


Paid labor of mer 


1 and 


teams in district No. 7, as 


per pay-roi: 


s : 








May 








$43.00 


August . 


and 


teams in distric 


75.00 


Paid labor of men 


t No. 10, as 


per pay-roll 


s : 








April 








#23.75 


May 










120.25 


June 










358.62 


July • 










112. 14 


August . 










31-5° 


September 










r 5°-75 


October 










12.63 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 11, as 
per pay-rolls : 

August #213.13 

482.12 



October 



PAVING STONE AND GRAVEL. 



Paid W. H. Coburn, 26 loads of stone 
E. Hartshorn, 32 loads of stone 
Charles P. Still, 5 loads of stone 
Head & Dowst Co., stone 
A. G. Bean, 14 loads of stone 
J. L. Fogg, 22 loads of stone 



#45-5° 
19 20 

7.50 

103.80 

22.40 

35-2Q 



#2,370.03 



$118.00 



$809.64 



$695-25 



PAVING STREETS. 



491 



Paid George S. Smith, 8 loads of stone . 
Marden & Woodbury, 15 loads of 

stone 

John Proctor, 5 loads of stone 
John B. Clarke, 30 loads of stone . 

E. Hartshorn, 50 loads of gravel . 
Mary Hastings, gravel . 

Daniel Connor, paving . 

F. S. Bodwell, 49 feet edge stones 
on Spruce street 

Warren Harvey, 183. 11 feet of curb- 
ing at various places . 

Warren Harvey, 2,842 feet of edge 
stone, Elm and Sagamore . 

Warren Harvey, 625 feet 1 cut curb 
1,250 at 40c 

Warren Harvey, 15 feet curbing at 
Walnut and Prospect 



!i2.8o 

11.25 

8.00 
15.60 
5.00 
8.00 
4.80 

19.60 

73-5 6 
11.36 

5.00 
6.00 



$4i4-57 



CONCRETE CROSSINGS AND OTHER WORK. 

Paid Charles H. Robie : 

Milford street, 65.7 yards at 75c. 
Nashua street, 29 yards at 75c. . 
Nashua street, 27.3 yards at 45c. 
Beech street and South Amherst, 25.3 

yards at 35c 

West Hancock, 65.7 yards at 75c. 
Douglas and Main, 26.6 yards at 35c. 
Lincoln and Spruce, 67.6 yards at 75c 
Elm and Depot, etc., 71.1 yards at 

75C 

Lake ave. and Massabesic, 83.1 yard 

at 75 c 

Elm east back and Hanover, 20 yards 

at 35 c 

Amherst and Union, 23.5 yards at 75c 



#49- 2 7 


2i-75 


12.29 


8.85 


49.28 


9-3 1 


50.70 



53-32 

62.32 

7.00 

17.63 



492 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Amherst and Beech, 34 yards at 75c. . $25.50 

Lowell and Birch, 5.3 yards at 75c. . 3.97 

Union and High, 32 yards at 75c. . 24.00 

Pine and Harrison, 33.8 yards at 35c. 11-83 

Pine and Prospect, 17.7 yards at 35c. 6.20 

Harrison and Maple, 17.7 yards at 35c. 6.19 

Salmon and Elm east back, 17.7 yards 

at 75c 13-28 

Laurel back and Maple, 17.7 yards; 

Massabesic and Spruce, 51.55 yards ; 

Massabesic and Belmont, 45.33 yds. ; 

Manchester and Belmont, 31 yards; 

Hanover and Belmont, 28.88 yards ; 

Hanover and Milton, 21.33 y ar ds ; 

Hanover and Milton, 26.44 yards, 

— 222.31 yards at 75c. . . . 166.75 

Spruce and Union (3), 90.66 yards at 

50c. ...... 45.33 

Spruce back and Union, 13.3 yards at 

5° c 6.65 

Cedar and Harrison (4), 120.88 yards 

at 50c. ...... 60.44 

Granite and Barr, 18.66 yards at 75c. *3-99 

Granite and Green, 24.88 yards at 75c. 18.66 

Granite and Green, walk, 10.83 yards 

at45 c 4-87 

Varney school, 21.77 yards at 45c. . 9.79 

Lake ave. engine house, 274.22 yards 

at 75c 205.66 

Elm, west side Merrimack common, 
478.21 yards at 25c; Central-street 
side Merrimack common, 505.33 

yards at 25c 245.88 

Chestnut and Blodget, 17.7 yards at 

75 c ; J 3-28 

Sagamore and Elm, 2 n. 7 yards at 75c. 158.77 

Sagamore and Elm, 25 yards at 45c. . 11-25 



PAVING STRKKTS. 



Webster, Newton's, 11.3 yards at 45c. 
Pine east back, corner North, 13.33 

yards at 75c 

Union, west side, and Harrison south 

back, 15.5 yards at 75c. . 
Union, east side, and Harrison south 

back, 15.5 yards at 75c. . 
Union and Prospect (2), 58.6 yards at 

75 c 

Pearl, north side, y^ walk, 40 yards at 

2 5 (: 

East High and Maple, 35.5 yards at 

75C 

Patching, 2 yards at 45c. . 

East High and Nashua, 42.6 yards at 

75c 

Ash east back and Concord, 17.7 yards 

at 75 c 

Hanover and Belmont, 30.2 yards at 

75 c 

Lake ave. and Beacon, 28.6 yards at 

75C 

Lake ave., Smith's, 31.4 yards at 45c. 

Second, south West Hancock (2), 
64.8 yards at 75c. . 

West Webster and Chandler (1), ^^.^ 
yards at 75c. . 
Paid George W. Higgins : 

Merrimack and south back Union, 
17.7 yards ; Lake ave. and south 
back Union, 17.7 yards; Walker 
and River, 34.1 yards; Central, 
Kimball Co., 33.3 yards, — 103.03 
yards at 75c. . 

Ferry south back and River, 17.7 yards 
at 25c. ...... 

Spruce, walk, 32 yards at 45c. . 



#5.08 
9.99 
11.62 
11.62 
43-95 



26.62 
.90 

3 r -95 

13.28 

22.65 

21.45 
14 13 

48.60 



77-47 



4.42 
14.40 



494 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Spruce-street crossing, 8 yards, at 75c. $6.00 

Spruce and Chestnut west back, 23.1 
yards ; Spruce and Elm east back, 
40.9, — 64 yards, at 75c. . . 48.00 

Varney school, walks outside, 16.7 

yards, at 45c. . . . . . 75 . 1 5 

Varney school, driveway, 12.44 yards, 

at 75C 9-33 

Elm east back street, south side, 17.7 
yards ; Hall and Central, 30.2 yards ; 
Prospect and Russell, 41.7 yards; 
Washington and Elm east back, 16.9 
yards ; Washington and Elm east 
back, 16.9 yards; McGregor street 
and Amoskeag Corporation, 107.5 
yards, — 230.9 yards, at 75c. . . 172.50 

Elm east back street, Pearl, 17.7 yards, 

at 35c 6.19 



$2,104.31 



Total expenditures ..... ^6,5 1 1 . < 



Macadamizing. 



Appropriation ..... . . $18,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . $457-83 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 1,858.40 

2,316.23 

$20,316.23 

Expenditures. 

labor. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 2 : 
January ..... $68.81 

February . . . . . 59-87 



MACADAMIZING. 




March . 


$66.00 


April 


456 


06 


May 


. 1,456 


60 


June 


• 2,458 


40 


July . . . 


• 1.553 


22 


August . 


• 1,485 


58 


September 


• 1,713 


1 3 


October 


374 


99 



495 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 7 : 
May 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 10 : 

June $67.50 

July 13-5° 



$9,692.66 



$467.62 



Paid E. W. Atwood, 122,340 lbs. stone . 

G. W. Butterfield, 125,750 lbs. 

stone ..... 

E. W. Butterfield, 56,865 lbs. stone 

D. Butterfield, 342,690 lbs. stone . 

F. M. Barnard, 31,275 lbs. stone . 
W. H. Coburn, 4,655 lbs. stone 

E. B. Fellows, 28,075 lbs. stone 
James Fullerton, 509,295 lbs. stone 
Palmer & Garmon, 32 loads of 

chips ..... 

C. P. Stills, 105,145 lbs. stone 
Joseph Tirrell, 341,615 lbs. stone . 

F. B. Worthley, 322,060 lbs. stone 
J. A. Brown, 276,220 lbs. stone 

C. E. Bursill, 126,525 lbs. stone . 
W. H. Carpenter, 61,990 lbs. stone 



$3°-5 7 



3' 


42 


14 


21 


85 


65 


7 


81 


1 


16 


7 


00 


27 


3 2 


23-50 


26 


28 


85 


39 


80 


50 


69 


°5 


31 


63 


15-5° 



496 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. S. Carpenter, 124,560 lbs. stone $31.14 

Lewis Cyr, 259,725 lbs. stone . 64.92 

H. L. Kimball, 24,320 lbs. stone . 6 07 

J. L. Fogg, 64,400 lbs. stone . . 16.10 
William G. Landry, 235,180 lbs. 

stone ...... 58.79 

H. S. Plummer, 115,090 lbs. stone 28.76 

C. H. Robie, 649,095 lbs. stone . 162.25 

C. H. Tirrell, 128,595 lbs. stone . 3 2 - I 4 

Willey & Rowe, 166,195 ^s. stone 41 .54 

Charles Downing, 16,620 lbs. stone 4.15 

F. R. French, 29,770 lbs. stone . 7.44 

Mrs. Hartshorn, 12,525 lbs. stone . 3.13 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, 

6,994,045 lbs. stone . . . 874.24 



GAS, FUEL, AND FREIGHT. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for gas in 

January $0.28 

People's Gas-Light Co., for gas in 

February .14 

E. P. Johnson Co., 5,500 lbs. 

Cumberland coal . . .. 19.00 

E. P. Johnson Co., 2,100 lbs. 

pea coal, for the year 1890 . 3.15 

E. P. Johnson Co., 2 barrels of 

coal . . . . . . 2.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 1,000 lbs. 
Franklin coal, for crusher, dis- 
trict No. 7 .... 4.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 1,500 lbs. 

Franklin coal, for crusher . . 6.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 3,250 lbs. 

Franklin coal, for crusher . . J 3- 2 5 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 cords of 

pine slabs, for crusher . . 8.00 



1,967.66 



MACADAMIZING. 



497 



Paid J. A. Brown, 12 cords of wood, at 



$3-5° 


$42.00 


Gilman Clough, 10 j4 cords 0; 




wood, $3.50 . 


3 6 -75 


C. H. Hutchinson, 290 lbs. oi 




foundry coke . 


1.45 


People's Gas-Light Co., 10 chal- 




drons of coke . 


44.00 


Boston & Maine R. K., freight on 




castings . . . . . 


3.01 


Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 




on wood . 


S.00 


Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 




on castings . . . . 


2.69 


TOOLS. 




Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 




1 dozen picks .... 


$10.00 


1 dozen hickory handles . 


2.00 


1 dozen sledge handles 


M5 


3 lbs. stone wedges . 


.60 


1 mattock .... 


.60 


1 hickory handle 


•25 


Paid J. B. Varick Co. : 




1 nail hammer .... 


•55 


1 50-foot tape measure. 


•50 


1 100-foot tape measure 


1. 00 


55 lbs. steel bars 


8.25 


12 trays for canal barrows . 


9.00 


12 sledge handles 


2.00 


12 sledge handles 


2.00 


4 lantern globes, red . 


2.40 


2 pick handles .... 


.40 


12 sledge handles 


2.25 


6 ax handles .... 


ll 3 


32 





$194.22 



498 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



2 Snell's bits 

1 2 ruby globes .... 

12 ruby globes .... 

i basket 

i dozen safety lanterns, no globes 
i steel flue brush 
35 lbs. steel, i}£ x $/% 
Paid Killey & Wadleigh, i dozen 36 
inch sledge handles . 
Pike & Heald, 1 10-gallon galvan 
ized can with faucet . 



$0.43 
6.60 
6.00 

•25 
4-5° 

•75 
5- 2 5 



5.80 



$ 7 6.2( 



LUMBER, CASTINGS, AND REPAIRS. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, filing large saw 

J. Stickney, 40 feet 15 -inch leather 

belting 

J. Stickney, 42 feet 6-inch leather 

belting for stone crusher 

L. N. Westover, labor and lumber . 

L. N. Westover, 154 feet rock maple 

L. N. Westover, 19^ hours' labor 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

24 feet spruce, 3x4. 

Balance due on anvil vise . 

Labor and materials on crusher . 

26 hours' labor .... 

6 washers ..... 

Iron grates and bars, 22 lbs., for road 

roller ..... 
30^ hours' labor 
y 2 lb. iron .... 

9 lbs. babbitt .... 
1 i^-inch oil cup 
Paid Farrell Foundry & Machine Co. 
pieces 15x9 plates . 



$0.40 



39 



.60 



15.96 
2.96 
6.99 

7. So 

•38 

1.48 

21.23 

10.40 

.21 

.66 

12.40 

.02 

3.60 

•75 

45.96 



MACADAMIZING. 499 

Paid Farrell Foundry & Machine Co., 

planing same . . . . $6.00 

Farrell Foundry & Machine Co. . 37. 13 

Paid Charles H. Hutchins : 

62 lbs. babbitt for crusher . . . 12.40 

20 hours' labor, babbitting on crusher 8.00 

19^ hours' labor on crusher . . 7.70 

15 lbs. iron for crusher ... .45 

9 lbs. soft steel for crusher ... .36 

35 lbs. castings for crusher . . 1.05 

27^ lbs. soft steel .... 1.10 

40^ hours' labor on picks . . . 16.20 

Labor and material on crusher . . 82.59 

4 pieces castings, 327 lbs. . . . 9.81 
6 pieces castings, plugs, 18 lbs. . . .54 

Paid J. B. Varick Co., cylinder oil, pack- 
ing, belting, glass, putty, glue, 

and other hardware . . . 57-87 

Pike & Heald, pipe and labor . 2.28 

Thomas A. Lane, pipe and labor . 1.30 
Paid Head & Dowst : 

334 feet timber 5.35 

416 feet timber ..... 6.66 

5 fence rails 1.25 

14 feet timber ..... .23 

12 feet ii's-inch spruce ... .30 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 1 bar Norway 

iron, 30 lbs. . . . . 1.05 

John B. Varick Co., 1,010 elevator 

bolts 17.68 

John B. Varick Co., 50 lbs. tallow 3.50 

John T. Beach, labor, etc., sharp- 
ening steam driller, sharpening 

tools 5.80 

Thomas Hickey, sharpening picks, 

etc. ...... 10.80 



3- 2 5 

•5° 



500 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid George Holbrook, 50 feet chestnut 

plank $1.25 

George Holbrook. iron and bolts . 2.00 

George Holbrook, teaming . . .25 
George Holbrook, 1 3-10 days' 

labor, sidewalk of LaBonte 
Thomas A. Lane, 2 Scotch glass 
tubes ..... 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

Labor and materials on road roller . 18.88 

Setting and filing cross-cut saw . . 1.00 

Labor and iron on crusher . . .94 

2 xy 2 x|4 cap screws . . . .10 

168 lbs. machine steel, for picks . 11.76 

10 hours' labor on grates . . . 4.00 

73 hours' labor on picks . . . 29.20 

1 10 inch file . . . . . .12 

5 hours' labor on crusher . . . 2.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Thomas L. Thorp, 100 lbs. cop 

waste $10.00 

J. B. Varick Co., flax packing, cyl- 
inder oil, rivets, machine bolts, 
band iron, carriage bolts, glue, 
lacing, etc 32.17 

Eager & Rand, 15 gallons kerosene 

oil 1.95 



Paid George W. Higgins, concreting 
roadway, Merrimack street, 1,620.- 
96 yards, at 75c. . . . $1,215.72 

Paid Charles H. Robie : 

Concreting on Chestnut street, from 
Hanover to Merrimack streets, 
2,497-83 yards, at 75c. . . . 1,873.37 



1543-45 



$44-i. 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 501 

Patching walks on Chestnut street, 

92.88 yards, at 45c. . . . $41.80 

Concrete work on Concord street, 

99.1 yards, at 35c 34-68 

Concrete work on Concord street, 

835.4 yards at 75c 626.55 

On Union street, from Laurel to Lake 

avenue, 2,283.26 yards, at 75c. . 1,712.44 
On Merrimack south back street, from 

east of Union street, 174.63 yards 

at 75c, being )/?, of total amount, 

349.26 yards 130. 9 7 

Concreting roadway on Union street, 

between north side of Lowell and 

south sideof Concord street, 1,210.3 

yards at 75c 907.72 

Patching and repairing on above, 13.31 

yards at 45c 5.99 

$6,549.24 

Total expenditures .... $19,616.23 

Amount transferred to bridges . . $200.00 
Amount transferred to health department 500.00 



700.00 
#20,316.23 



Grading for Concrete. 

Appropriation . $5,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 532.84 

$5,532.84 



502 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 

labor. 

Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 2, as 
per pay-rolls : 



January 
February 










652.13 


March . 










434.46 


April 










119.89 


May 










290.05 


June 










43-5° 


July . 










78.13 


August . 










214.49 


September 










222.75 


October 










229.18 


November 










41.50 


December 










220.13 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 
per pay-rolls : 



January * 










$167.01 


February 










169.86 


March . 










108.38 


April 










206.25 


May 










299-75 


June 










231.00 


July . 










248.21 


August . 










168.0S 


September 










42.75 


October 










37-25 


December 










J 95-46 


Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 7, as 


per pay-rolls : 


August $25.00 


October 










25.00 



$3*485.54 



$1,874.00 



$50.00 



SCAVENGER TEAMS. 



503 



SAND AND GRAVEL. 

Paid E. Hartshorn, 320 loads of sand . $32.00 

M. A. Hartshorn, 134 loads of sand 13-4° 

Benjamin Mack, 58 loads of sand . 5.80 



$51.20 



STONE. 




lid Frank S. Bodwell : 




2 circles, Jencks 


$7.00 


14 feet edge stones 


5.60 


1 circle, Auburn, corner Union . 


3'5° 


16 feet edge stones 


6.40 


1 circle, corner Hanover and Hall 


3-5° 


2 circles, city yard . . . . 


7.00 


12^ feet edge stones, city yard . 


5.00 


6 circles, city yard 


21.00 


SUNDRIES. 





Paid Pettee & Adams, 10 bags of salt . $8.00 

L. B. Bodwell, 1 cord of pine slabs 4.00 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools . 1.10 

Total expenditures . . . 



#59-°° 



$13.10 

;>53 2 -84 



Scavenger Teams. 

Appropriation ...... . $12,000 00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . $2,000.00 

" " " " " . 1,500.00 

<< . 683.38 

2,708. S7 

6,892.25 

$18,892 25 



504 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 2, as per 
pay-rolls : 



ja.nua.iy 

February 








£>7 ou - u 3 

773-37 


March . 








906.16 


April 








1,481.73 


May 








1,238.83 


June 








1,283.94 


July . . 








1,196.17 


August . 








1,226.24 


September 








I ) 2 95-57 


October 








1,042.90 


November 








970.98 


December 








1,160.30 

$13,357-32 



Paid labor of men and teams in'district No. 10, as 
per pay-rolls : 
January ...... $162.20 



February 












162.01 




March . 












140.56 




April 












190.00 




May 












182.25 




June 












197.90 




July . 












162.00 




August . 












166.77 




September 












197-5° 




October . 












180.00 




November 












H4-54 




December 












135-0° 


$i,990.73 








ON CONTRACT AS SCAVENGER. 




Paid Timothy Shea, third quarter end- 








ing March 9 










$1 


,225.00 





SCAVENGER TEAMS. 



505 



Paid Timothy Shea, fourth quarter end 
ing June 4 

Paid H. E. Vaughn : 
1 month ending July 9 
i month ending August 9 . 
1 month ending September 9 
21 days ending October 1 . 
1 month ending November 1 
1 month ending December 1 
1 month ending December 31 



$1,225.00 

I58-33 
I58-33 
158.33 
110.S3 

I58-33 
I 58-33 
158.34 



,510.8: 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 6 street 
rakes ..... 

Manchester Hardware Co., 12 
square-point Ames shovels . 

Manchester Hardware Co., 3 Hea- 
ry steel rakes .... 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 



$3-°° 
10.50 



$i5-38 



Paid Union Publishing Co., publishing 
proposals for scavenger service, 
$y 2 squares daily 4 times . 
John B. Clarke, publishing propos- 
als, 2^ inches 4 times 



$8.75 



9-25 

#iS.oo 



Total expenditures . 



18,892.25 



506 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Appropriation 



Street Sweeping. 



Expenditures. 



$1,200.00 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 2, as per 
pay-rolls : 
April $58.12 



May 
June 

July . 

August . 
September 
October . 
November 



Paid labor of men and teams 
per pay-rolls : 
April . 
July . 

September 



166.50 
121.49 

J 53-9i 
167.0S 
183.14 
136.10 

15.00 



in district No. 10, as 

$38.00 
16.50 

42.50 



$1,001.34 



$97.00 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Head & Dowst, lumber and labor, 

repairs on street sweeper . . $9-32 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 1 hour's 

labor on bolt '. .40 

S. A. Felton <S: Son, 1 street-sweep- 
er cylinder refilled . . . 32.00 

S. A. Felton & Son, 1 street-sweep- 
er cylinder refilled . . . 32.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., 12 rat- 
tan street brooms . . . 4.00 



LIGHTING STREETS. 



507 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 12 han- 
dles for brooms .... 
Killey & Wadleigh, 12 street brooms 
Killey & Wadleigh, 24 street brooms 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$1-25 






6.00 






12.00 






3.00 









*I 


$99-97 




,198.31 






1.69 




#1 


,200. CO 





Lighting Streets. 




Appropriation ..... 




Amount transferred from reserved fund . 




Expenditures. 




ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 




Paid Manchester Electric Light Co. : 




Charges. 


Discount 


January $3-33 s - s 5 


$5-95 


February 




3-339-63 


1.48 


March . 




3,016.44 


16.13 


April 




3-345-4S 


10.70 


May 




3> 2 43- 6 ° 


2.84 


June 




3>3S*-7* 


49.86 


July . 




3> 2 45-9S 


1.27 


August . 




3,366.15 


6.06 


September 




4,375-9° 


1.49 


October 




3,268.20 


2-45 


November 




• 3,377-i4 


"•35 


December 


3,838.81 


35-4i 




$40,107.90 


$144-99 


Total discounts de- 




ducted . . 14499 





$42,000.00 

908.78 



$42,908.78 



$39,962.91 



508 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., 


for gas : 




January .... 


$110.88 


February 






104.30 


March . 






85.40 


April 






86.38 


May 






78.12 


June 






71.68 


July . . 






64-54 


August . 






66.78 


September 






70.42 


October 






76.16 


November 






95-48 


December 




91.00 


Soldiers' monument 




•56 


Light on engine ho 


use 




6.44 



$1,008.14 



CARE OF GAS AND OIL LIGHTS. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for lighting, extinguish- 
ing, and care of gas and oil street lights : 



januaiy . 
February 










;M39- 22 
143-93 


March . 










109.60 


April 










160.43 


May 










131.IS 


June 










136.03 


July . 










146.92 


August . 










140.69 


September 










*38.59 


October . 










128.65 


November 










148.06 


December 










130.28 



$1,653.55 





BRIDGES. 




509 


SUNDRIES. 






Paid People's Gas-Light Co. : 






15 barrels and 5 gallons kerosene oil . 


$76.60 




8 barrels kerosene oil . 


34-38 




7 gallons of whisky 






15-75 




1 oil can 






.42 




3 bushings y± x ^ 






.09 




3 pounds of waste 






.26 




y 2 box 10 x 12 glass 






1.38 




y 2 box 12 x 14 glass 






1.62 




3 glass cutters 






• 2 5 




3 glass cutters 






•31 




2 gallons sperm oil 






2 00 




3 barrels kerosene oil 






13.29 




1 box of glass 10 x 12 




2.50 




1 box of glass 12x14 




3.00 




1 box of glass 14 x 16 




3.00 




Setting oil-post at Massabesic house 


3-75 




Teaming post to Massabesic house 


2.00 




6 glass cutters .... 


.42 




Paid Eager & Rand, matches 


4-35 




Thomas A. Lane, repairs on lanterr 


•58 




J. B. Varick Company, 6 glass-cut 






ters ..... 


•75 




Clark M. Bailey, for matches, chim 






neys, burners 


117.48 









$284.18 


Total expenditures . 




£42,908.78 


Bridges. 






Appropriation .... 




$2,000.00 


Amount transferred from macadamizing 


$200.00 




Amount transferred fron 


l reserved 1 


und 


100.00 





510 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Amount transferred from reserved fund 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 



340.66 



Expenditures. 

labor. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 2 



January 
February 
March . 
April . 
May 
June 

July • 

August . 
October 
November 
December 



SI47-62 

J25-37 
116.75 
120.48 

12.50 
60.87 

42.93 
64.88 

2 5- J 3 

46.87 

169.65 



earns, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 



$672.25 
2,672.25 



$933-05 



$16.64 



Paid labor of men and 
trict No. 4 : 
June 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 5 : 

J^y ss.13 

September 3.75 

$11.88 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 9 : 
September . $109.50 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 10 : 
November $8.87 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in 
district No. n : 

January 

Paid E. A. G. Holmes, 23 days' labor 

'Squog bridge $57-5° 

Paid Walter Neal : 

1 day's labor on bridges . . . 3.00 

3^ days' labor on Amoskeag bridge . 9.75 

3 days' labor on Amoskeag bridge . 7.50 

3^ days' labor, with horse, on Amos 

keag bridge .... 
Cash paid for ironwork 
45 lbs. nails .... 



y^ day's labor on McGregor bridge 
34 day's labor on McGregor bridge 
3/£ day's labor, with horse, on Mc 

Gregor bridge 
7 lbs. nails .... 

1 73^ days' Jabor on Granite bridge 
igy 2 days' labor on Granite bridge 
83^ days' labor on Granite bridge 
17^ days' labor, with horse, on Gran 

ite bridge .... 
Work patching .... 
Ironwork .... 

Hammer handles 



4.87 
4 00 
1.45 
2.25 
1.87 



1. 12 

•23 

5 2 -5° 
48.74 

M6.57 

26.62 

2.00 

2.25 

.60 



511 



$24.00 



$372-82 



Paid A. C. Wallace : 

1,733 f eet pine, 12x12 and 9x12, for 

district No. 5 
1 chestnut post, district No. 5 
Trucking the above . 
336 feet pine, 4x10 and 4x6, Amos 

keag bridge . 



$38.13 

.20 

4.00 

6-95 



512 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



326 feet chestnut, iy 2 x 2, Amoskeag 

bridge 

4,598 feet chestnut, 3x6, Granite 

street ..... 
Planing and grooving the same . 
61,287 f eet 3-inch hemlock plank 

Granite bridge 
70 feet 8x10 chestnut, Granite bridge 
145 feet pine, P. and S. cleats . 
700 feet hard pine for sidewalk . 
Paid Head & Dowst : 
112 feet 3-jnch sapling 
1,209 f eet 3-inch sapling, bridges, dis 

trict No. 9 
1,100 feet 3-inch sapling, bridges, dis 

trict No. 9 
267 feet 8x10 inch sapling, bridges 

district No. 9 
470 feet 4x4 spruce, bridges, No. 9 
8 7-inch and 2 9-inch chestnut posts 

district No. 9 
15 chestnut posts, bridges, district No 

9 

465 feet spruce timber, bridges, dis 

trict No. 9 . . . . 

424 feet spruce timber 
12 chestnut posts 
293 feet 3-inch spruce plank 
32 feet 4x4 spruce . 
158 feet 2-inch chestnut 
32 feet hard pine, Granite street 
218 feet 1 1^ -inch pine 
Sawing and planing . 
'213 feet ij^-inch hard pine 
Sawing and planing . 
Teaming bridge timber, Granite street 



$8.15 

101. 16 
13- 79 

766.09 

I-S4 

2.90 
12.60 

1.79 

19-34 

17.60 

4.27 
7-5 2 

1.7S 

2.40 



44 
78 
92 

77 
5 1 
95 
96 
01 
60 
,90 
.60 
5° 



BRIDGES. 513 

240 feet i^-inch hard pine and saw- 
ing . . . . . . $8.85 

1,385 feet, 3-inch hemlock plank, 

bridge, district No. 5 I 9-39 

1,340 feet spruce . . . . 21.44 

Sawing and planing same . . . 3.73 

Paid George W. Rief, 84 feet 2-inch oak 3.36 

George W. Rief, 9^ hours labor . 3.80 

A. C. Wallace, 60 feet 3-inch pine 

planed and sawed . . . 1.20 

A. C. Wallace, 20 feet oak planed 

and sawed ..... .60 

A. C. Wallace, lot of chestnut 6x6 

and sawing for wedging . . 2.25 



HARDWARE. 




Paid J. B. Varick Co. : 




6 C. E. bolts 3^ x y%, 'Squog bridge 


$0.12 


25 pounds lead, 'Squog bridge . 


1.88 


1 quart lard oil, 'Squog bridge . 


•!5 


39 pounds 1% cast washers, 'Squog 




bridge 


1. 17 


1 cask 6-penny wire spikes . 


2-75 


15 pounds 20 steel wire nails 


•45 


Paid Isaac Webster, stone for bridge in 




district No. 9 . 


3-5° 


Allen N. Clapp, 25 pounds spikes 




('Squog) 


•75 


Killey & Wadleigh, 10 pounds 10- 




penny nails .... 


■35 


Killey & Wadleigh, 10 pounds 8- 




penny nails .... 


•35 


Killey & Wadleigh, spikes and nails 




for Granite bridge 


50.61 


Killey & Wadleigh, 1 cask 6-inch 




spikes ..... 


3.00 



514 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 13 

pounds 10-penny nails 
Manchester Hardware Co., nails 

and spikes 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 200 

feet i^-inch hard pine, Granite 

bridge 

L. M. Aldrich, filing 8 saws . 



$0.52 
3.80 



5.00 
1.60 



$76.00 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid D. F. Cressey, ironwork 
Total expenditures . 



#5-72 
$2,672.25 



City Teams. 

Appropriation .... 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



$5,000.00 
290.73 

$5>2Qo.73 







Expenditures. 




LABOR. 


id labor of men and teams in district No. 2, as 


per pay-rolls : 


January $173.88 


February 










176.86 


March 










I54-38 


April 










216.89 


May 










143.81 


June 










163.16 


July 










90.50 


August . 










95.81 


September 










115.87 





CITY TEAMS. 




October . 




$97-13 


November 




90.34 


December 




IOI.25 



515 



$1,619. 



OATS, CORN, FEED, HAY, STRAW. 



Paid Drake & Parker, 20 bags of oats . $28.00 

Drake & Parker, 40 bags of oats . 53 <0 ° 
Drake & Parker, 4 bags of cracked 

corn 6.40 

Drake & Parker, 12 bags of ground 

feed !7-7° 

Paid Pettee & Adams : 

4 boxes salt, 20 pounds . . . .80 

241 bags of oats ..... 277.95 

46 bags of cracked corn . . . 67.16 

785 pounds of bran .... 10.05 

3 bags of feed 4.20 

Paid Partridge Bros., 156 bags oats . 189.00 
Partridge Bros., 30 bags cracked 

corn ...... 46.40 

Partridge Bros. , 26 bags ground feed 36.90 

city farm, 13,600 pounds of hay . 118.87 
J. A. Brown, 12,950 pounds of hay ^ 103.60 
Waterman Smith, 3,735 pounds of 

hay 28.00 

D. Butterfield, 2,175 pounds of hay 17.40 

Isaac Huse, 2,210 pounds of hay . 1 7.7S 

C. C. Webster, 4,225 pounds of hay 38.02 
Paid Merrill & Freeman : 

406 bags of oats . . . . . 316.25 

83 bags of cracked corn . . . 119-45 

44 bags of feed 59-6o 

950 pounds of bran .... 12.40 

7,672 pounds of rye straw . . . 77-86 

60 pounds best wheat . . . 1.50 

Paid C. D. Welch, 12,390 pounds of hay 11 1.67 



516 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

#9 2 -43 



Paid G. F. Mills, 10,270 pounds of hay 
B. W. Hill, 4,580 pounds of straw, 

at $18 41.22 

A. E. Horton, 2,235 pounds of 

carrots, at 80c 17.88 

P. M. Lord, 7,215 pounds of hay, 

at 90-950 65.64 

A. G. Bean, 1,685 pounds of carrots 13-48 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid Thos. Hickey, shoeing horses, etc. $15 7. 75 
Connor & Grossman, shoeing horses, 

etc 78-25 

J. Tremblay, shoeing horses, etc. . 26.85 

J. F. Woodbury & Co., shoeing 

horses, etc. .... 5 1.25 

Mahaney & McSvveeney, shoeing 

horses, etc. .... 13-00 

HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 

Paid J. Stickney, material and labor re- 
pairing horse cover . . . #1.00 

F. N. McLaren 4 repairing harness, 

collars, etc. . . . . 5.20 

Thos. P. Riley, repairing harnesses 41-70 

N. J. Whalen, repairing harnesses, 

blacking, oiling, etc. . . 1 7.35 

Frederick Allen, repairing harness- 
es, etc. . . . . . IT -35 

Kimball Carriage Co., 1 pair of 

collars ..... 24.00 

N. J. Whalen, 1 heavy draft harness 60.00 

N. J. Whalen, 1 heavy rubber horse 

cover ..... 6.00 

N. J. Whalen, 1 horse sheet . . 2.00 



$1,990.61 



127.10 



168.60 



CITY TEAMS. 



517 



REPAIRS ON CARRIAGES AND NEW CARRIAGES. 



Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 




2 new cart tires . 


$8.oo 


New bed ..... 


3.00 


Labor on cart gear 


4.00 


i new cart body 


20.00 


Labor ironing body and part of gear 


28.00 


8 stakes ..... 


4.00 


Painting cart .... 


10.00 


Bolts and other repairs 


54-42 


2 one-horse dump carts 


200.00 


Ironwork on sundry carts . 


3-75 


Paid American Horse Protector Co., t 




whiffietrees, springs, and sinks 


' 13-80 


J. T. Beach, repairs on teams 


155-49 


HARDWARE. 




Paid Manchester Hardware Co., bolts 




sandpaper, and other hardware . 


$4-85 


Killey & Wadleigh, soap, lanterns 




hay rake, and other hardware 


8.90 



Paid J. B. Varick Co. : 

Bolts, chain, door spring, rings, rope, 
neat's-foot oil, refined iron, bit, files, 
whip, sponge, hose nozzle, screws, 
steel rakes, stake irons, wire nails, 
knob, latches, window brush, horse 
brush ...... 

Hay fork, brooms, etc. 

Paints, varnish, brushes, putty, glass . 

Boiled oil and glass 



15.80 

3°- 6 3 

5-63 

18.34 



MEDICINES AND MEDICAL SERVICES. 



Paid J. Alexander : 

1 visit to horse (colic) and medicine . $1-25 

Visits to bay horse, Joe (sprained) . 21.00 



$504.46 



$84.15 



518 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Medicine ...... $3*25 

Gray horse sprained in fore feet . . 2.00 

1 day and 1 night attendance on horse 

( colic ) 3-5° 

Medicine . . . . . . 1.50 

Paid Pulsifer Chemical Co., horse liniment 4.00 

J. S. Golden, treatment of horse, 

3 visits ..... 3.00 

J. S. Golden, medicine . . . 2.00 

J. S. Golden, treatment and medi- 
cine to Dec. 5, 1891 . . . 49-50 

A. N. Baker, dentistry work on 

horses ..... 20.00 

John B. Hall, medicine . . 4.40 

Nathan Chandler, 1 can of oint- 
ment ..... .75 

Smith & Gould, 6 bottles Gray's 

Lotion ..... 3.00 

Z. F. Campbell, medicines . . 6.51 



GAS, TELEPHONE, COAL. 

Paid Peoples Gas-Light Co., for gas . $99-26 

N. E. Telegraph and Telephone 

Co., use of telephone . . 39-15 

Fred T. Dunlap, 1 ton egg coal 

bought in November, 1890 . 7.00 

E. P. Johnson Co., 2 tons egg coal 14.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 4 tons egg 

coal, in November, 1890 . . 25.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 4 tons egg 

coal in January, 1891 . . 25.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 tons egg 

coal in November, 1891 . . 13-50 



$125.66 



$222.91 



CITY TEAMS. 519 



Paid Manchester Horse Railway, i pack- 
age horse-car tickets . . . $4-5° 

E. T. James, use of wagons, horses, 

sleigh, etc. .... 121.50 

Whitten & Fifield, horse hire . 10.00 

E. B. Merrill, 1 pail harness oil . 3.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight . 4.40 

W. H. Vickery, 15 dozen keys . 3.00 

White Mountain Oil Co., $H S al_ 

lons axle oil ... 2.75 

Pike & Heald, labor, etc., repair- 
ing stove 5.37 

Pike & Heald, mop stick, waste, 

and dipper .... .79 

Pike & Heald, materials and plumb- 
ing at stables .... 29.87 

Head & Dowst, lumber at city sta- 
bles 23.87 

L. N. Westover, lumber and labor 

in city stables . . . . 12.84 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 200 

feet northern hard pine, city yard 4.00 

Lubrion Compound Co., 10 pounds 

axle lubrion . . . . 2.50 

O. D. Grant, 1 No. 2 Sampson jack 5.00 

Thomas A. Lane, pipe and fittings, 
and labor of 2 men 5 hours on 
gas, at city stables . . . 3.62 

A. N. Clapp, 52^ gallons oil . 4.46 

C. N. Fisher, 2 keys ... .36 

Eager & Rand, ginger, ivorine, oil, 
salt, matches, soap, wicks, etc. . 5.53 

#247.36 



Total expenditures ..... $5,290.73 



520 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Sewers and Drains. . 

Appropriation ..... . $25,000.00 

Amount received from temporary loan . $30,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 409.73 

30)409-73 



Expenditures. 



$55=409-73 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 2, as per 
pay-rolls : 



januui) ..... 
February .... 


2,440.04 
690.97 


March 


502.77 


April 


1,065.38 


May 


2,422.63 


June ..... 


2,765-3 2 


July 


2,107.24 


August 


2,639.13 


September 


3> J 5i-69 


October ..... 


2,33 8 -4i 


November .... 


874.06 


December .... 


411.50 



$19,417.1, 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 7, as 
per pay-roll : 
January ..... $49.48 

April 13.50 

June ...... 46.00 



$108. 



Paid labor of men and teams in district No. 10, as 
per pay-roll : 
January ...... $26.07 

February 54. 25 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



521 



March . 

April 

May 

June 

July . 

August . 

September 

October 

November 

December 



EXPLOSIVES. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 

305 lbs. forcite, district No. 10 . 
350 feet platinum fuse, district No. 10 
300 feet W. platinum fuse, district No 
10 

4 rolls connecting wire, district No. 10 
1 keg of powder, district No. 10 
12 lbs. powder . 
300 feet D. T. and W. P. fuse 
1 box blasting caps . 
170^ lbs. forcite 
250 feet platinum fuse 
450 feet platinum fuse 
205 lbs. No. 1 forcite 
18 lbs. blasting powder 

5 lbs. Weld's Compound 
5 lbs. No. 3 c. forcite 
100 feet D. F. fuse 
200 feet W. P. fuse 
100 feet W. P. fuse 
25 feet cotton fuse 
1 coil cannon wire 
100 feet platinum fuse, district No. 10 
50 lbs. No. 1 forcite, district No. 10 . 
100 feet cannon wire, district No. 10 



$116 

544 
1,470 
1,605 

2,062 

2,659 

2,946 

973 

I 3 I 



#14,105.04 



$103.80 
13.16 

5-°5 
2.00 

2-75 
i-Si 

1.97 

1.50 

64.70 

9.76 

16.92 

73.80 

2.25 

1. 00 

1.25 

•65 

1.30 

.60 

•15 

•5° 

3-76 

18.00 



1. 00 

$3 2 7-3 8 



522 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 

2 dozen No. i oak pick handles 
i dozen round-point shovels 
7 32-inch sledge handles . 
1 dozen round-point shovels 
1 dozen pick handles 

1 dozen oak handles . 
3f6 lbs. drill hammer, district No 

2 handles, district No. 10 . 
12 picks, district No. 10 . 
12 handles, district No. 10 
28 lbs. steel bars, district No. 10 
56 lbs. 5-16 cable chain, district No. 10 
2 hand drill hammer handles, district 

No. 10 . 
6 striking-hammer handles, district 

No. 10 . 
15 lbs. striking hammers, district No. 

10 . 
1 S/{ stone hammer with handle, dis- 
trict No. 10 . 
6 oak striking-hammer handles, dis- 
trict No. 10 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 2 pine 

stable pails .... 

Manchester Hardware Co., 1 rule . 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., district 

No. 10 : 

6 street hoes 

1 socket hoe 

6 lanterns .... 
12 red globes 
6 peerless shovels 
24 round-point shovels 

2 light handled shovels 



$4-5° 

1 1. 00 

1. 17 

10.50 

i-75 

2.00 

•94 

.20 

10.50 

2.00 

i-54 

4.48 



.90 

2.25 



.70 
•15 



2.19 

■35 

2.00 

5-5° 

5-75 

21.00 

1 . 30 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



523 



12 picks ..... 


$10.00 


12 hickory pick handles 


i-75 


- 2 50-foot tape lines 


1. 00 


1 brick hammer .... 


•75 


1 nail hammer .... 


.50 


1 handled ax ... 


1. 00 


Other tools .... 


.. 2.08 


1 greasing jack .... 


2.50 


6 Ames and 2 square-point shovels 


5-75 


1 saw set . 


.65 


1 saw clamp .... 


•75 


1 hammer handle 


.10 


1 dozen round-point shovels 


10.50 


1 plumb ball .... 


.90 


Files and cord .... 


1.49 


4 mattocks .... 


2 -33 


4 hickory pick handles 


•67 


8 peerless shovels 


8.00 


1 hand ax .... 


.62 


6 canal barrows . . 


10 00 


6 red lantern globes . . . . 


2.00 


3 canal barrows 


5-25 


4 peerless shovels 


4.00 


19 lbs. cast steel .... 


1.90 


4 canal barrows .... 


7.00 


1 spirit level .... 


.60 


1 6-inch double pulley block 


1.25 


1 6-inch single pulley block 


.70 


4 street hoes 


1.46 


6 tubular lanterns 


3-5° 


10 red lantern globes 


3-33 


6 hickory pick handles 


1.50 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 




6 Ames round-point shovels, district 




No. 10 . 


5- 2 5 


6 "Peerless" shovels, district No. 10 


6.00 


6 tubular lanterns, district No. 10 


3-5° 



524 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



i red lantern globe, district No. 10 


$4-°° 


12 hickory handles, district No. 10 


3.00 


12 lead pencils, district No. io . 


.40 


io lbs. English steel, district No. io 


1.60 


26 lbs. 1 -^ octagon cast-steel, district 




No. 10 . 


2.60 


25 lbs. iyi Jersey steel, district No. ic 


> 3-75 


6 Harvey's picks 


5.00 


20 lbs. drill steel 


2.00 


4 mattocks .... 


2.20 


4 hickory handles 


1. 00 


6 striking-hammer handles . 


•50 


Paid J. B. Varick Co. : 




12 pick handles .... 


2.00 


2 gimlets ..... 


.20 


3 handles ...... 


•3° 


1 saw ..... 


1. 12 


1 plumb bob and line. 


1. 00 


16 lbs. cast-steel 


2.40 


18 lbs. cast-steel 


2.70 


12 pick handles .... 


2.00 


147 lbs. cast-steel 


22.05 


2 tape-measures .... 


1.70 


1 blacksmith hammer 


1. 00 


1 brick-hammer 


•75 


2 7*^ -inch trowels 


1.20 


6 ruby lantern-globes . 


3.60 


6 spading-forks .... 


3.40 


1 14-inch Stilson wrench . 


2.25 


10 contractor's picks . 


7-5° 


1 18-inch Stillman's wrench 


3.00 


12 contractor's picks 


7.00 


12 pick handles 


2.00 


1 steel square .... 


.60 


2 34-inch sledge handles . 


.30 


1 hand-ax .... 


.10 


5 lbs. rope .... 


•55 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



525 



12 cesspool handles . 
12 sledge handles 

12 tubular lanterns and ruby globes 
18 " Granite State" shovels 
Paid John F. Conway, measuring guage 
George L. Robinson, 6 pairs of 

rubber boots . 
William P. Farmer, 7 pairs of rub 

ber boots .... 
J. Stickney, 2 pairs of boots . 
J. Stickney, 2 oil suits . 
J. Stickney, 1 pair oil overs . 
J. Stickney, 2 oil suits, district No 
10 .... 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

1 new Knowles steam-pump, with 
boiler and fittings as per contract . 
Steel spanner for steam pump 
140 lbs. brass castings for reducer for 

steam pump . 
18^ hours' labor on the above . 
1 new portable forge, complete 

SEWER-PIPE. 



$4-5° 
1.50 

12.00 

9.00 

•75 

18.00 

i7-3° 

7.00 

4-5° 
1.25 

4-5° 



970.00 


■35 


5.18 


7.40 


35-4Q 



1,397-36 



Paid George D. Goodrich, sewer-pipe, 

per contract .... $264.26 

George D. Goodrich, sewer-pipe, 

per contract .... 297.77 

George D. Goodrich, sewer-pipe, 

per contract .... 215.06 

Henry Fisk, sewer-pipe, per con- 
tract ..... 5,428.29 

Henry Fisk, sewer-pipe, per con- 
tract ..... 369.10 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., sewer-pipe, as per contract 323.18 



526 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Manchester Heating and Lighting 
Co., sewer-pipe, as per contract 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 
Co., sewer-pipe, as per contract 

Pettee & Adams, sewer-pipe . 

MATERIALS, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid Charles H. Hutchinson : 

13,755^2 lbs. manholes, grates, traps, 

etc. .... 
io}4 lbs. brass pins for traps 
72 feet pine lumber . 
1 lb. of glue 

1 pint of shellac 

2 dozen screws . 

44 hours' labor on traps, covers, etc. 
34^4 hours' labor on new manhole and 

cover pattern .... 

Repairing stamp 

2,257 lbs. manholes, castings, etc. 

725 lbs. manholes, castings, etc. . 

6 hours on mammoth grate, etc. . 
Paid George F. Higgins, 220 lbs. 8-inch 

cast-iron pipe, used as culvert under 

crossing on McGregor street 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

2,534 lbs. grates and covers 

974 lbs. grates ..... 

8 lbs. castings (brass) .... 

26 lbs. forgings 

1 T 8 ^ days' labor on 26 forgings . 

7,765 lbs. castings, traps, manholes, 
etc. ...... 

10,309 lbs. castings, traps, manholes, 
etc. 

3,505 lbs. castings, traps, manholes, 
etc. ...... 



$329-18 

5,267.14 
337-31 



$12,831.29 



$412.67 

315 
1.44 

•50 

.40 

. 10 

17.60 

13.80 

67.71 

2i-7S 
2.40 



6.60 

76.02 
29.22 

2.00 
.78 

7.20 

232-95 
309.24 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



527 



4 lbs. castings (brass), manholes, etc. 

1,407 lbs. castings, traps, manholes, 

etc. ...... 

1,170 lbs. castings, traps, manholes, 

etc. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane : 

50 feet ^ -inch hose, district No. 10 . 
2^ lbs. hemp packing, district No. 10 
1 ball asbestos packing, district No. 10 

1 flue cleaner and wire, district No. 10 
50 feet 4-ply hose, district No. 10 

2 Edison diaphragms, district No. 10 . 
28 feet suction hose, district No. 2 

2 set of hose couplings, district No. 2 
12 suction hose packings, district No. 2 
Materials and labor, district No. 2 
Materials and labor, district No. 10 . 
Materials and labor, district No. 2 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

1 1 -inch smoke-stack, 60 lbs., for steam 

drill 

1 water glass for steam drill 

I tie piece and express for steam drill 
8 hours' labor on steam drill 
i7}4 hours' labor on steam drill 
Globe, valves, elbows, etc., for steam 

drill 

146 lbs. of castings at 3^0. 

I I hours' labor . . . 
9^ hours' labor on steam drill . 
5,342 feet spruce plank 
214 feet spruce joist . 
270 feet pine .... 
30 feet fence cap 
4 hours' labor on drills, district No 

10 ..... 



$1.00 
43- ir 
35- IQ 

6.00 
.68 

•25 
1. 00 

9-5° 

4-5° 

50.00 

9.00 

1.20 

43-°9 
4.94 

3-°4 



3.00 

■ 2 5 
2. 10 
3.20 
7.00 

8.22 

4.40 
3.80 
«5-47 
3-42 
5- x 3 
•75 

1.60 



528 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

28}^ hours' labor on drills . . $11.40 

Norway iron, 2 lbs. .... .14 

Paid Allen N. Clapp, pails, oils, and 

other supplies for district No. 10 85.97 

John Driscoll, l / 2 dozen dippers . .87 

John Driscoll, 1 large dipper - . .50 

J. Hodge, 67 feet i-inch sapling . 1.68 

J. Hodge, 6% hours' labor . . 2.50 

J. Hodge, screws .... .50 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

16 hooks, 20 lbs. refined iron . .60 
12 brass rivets, 4 lbs. brass castings . 1.00 
16-10 days' labor on above . . 6.40 
5,434 lbs. grates, traps, and other cast- 
ings ...... 163.02 

1,822 lbs. grates, traps, and other cast- 
ings for district No 10 . . . 54.66 
Paid Marden & Woodbury, labor on 

stone cutter, 3^ days . . IJ -37 
Concord Foundry Co., 1 18-inch 

base grate . . . . . 5.00 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid D. F. Cressey, sharpening picks and 

other tools, district No. 10 . $23.26 

D. F. Cressey, work on steam drill 372.10 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 12 

hours' labor sharpening drills . 5.28 

John T. Beach, sharpening tools of 

all kinds 7.33 

Joseph Greenwood, sharpening 

picks, drills, etc. . . . 12.10 

Thomas Hickey, sharpening picks, 

drills, etc. . . . . 16.20 

James Morrison, sharpening drills, 

picks, .etc. .... 2.15 



$2,003.30 



$43 8 -42 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 529 

CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid Merrill & Freeman, 13 barrels Nor- 
ton cement .... $21.45 

Pettee & Adams, 733 barrels Norton 

cement ..... 1,032.83 

Pettee & Adams, 1 barrel of Port- 
land cement . . . . 3.00 

Pettee & Adams, four barrels bag 

strings ..... .50 

W. F. Head & Son, 189,000 brick 

at 56.50 1,228.50 

Waterman Smith, 16.S perch stone, 

Hanover-street culvert . . 33- 60 

F. S. Bod well, 77 cesspool stones . 225.60 

Head & Dowst Co., lot of paving 
stone, corner of Central and 
Canal streets . . . • 50.00 

Head & Dowst Co., 1,400 U and 

D brick . . . . . 11.90 

L. M. Aldrich, labor and lumber . 1.65 

A. C. Wallace, 22,081 feet spruce 

boards and plank, district No. 10 353-5° 

A. C. Wallace, 664 feet spruce 4x6 10.62 

A. C. Wallace, 9,020 feet spruce 

plank, etc., in district No. 10 . 148.09 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

Lumber, labor, etc., boxing pump on 

engine at Barr-street sewer, district 

No. 10 8.71 

25 feet 1 % spruce at $25, district No. 10 .63 

105 feet drag plank at $40, district 

No. 10 . . . . . . 4.20 

3,946 feet spfuce at $16, district No. 

10 ...... 63.13 

4,390 feet old plank at #10, district 

No. 10 . . . . . . 43- 90 

34 



530 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

43 feet 4 x 4 spruce .... $0.69 

Paid Flint & Little, 100 feet of lumber 

on Lowell street . . . 1.40 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 504 

feet spruce fence boards, at the 

Hallsville sewer, near shoeshop . 8.06 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 102 

feet spruce boards and joists . 1.63 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 3,010 

feet spruce plank, Belmont street 48.16 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 112,- 

000 brick, at $7.15 . . . 800.80 

L. M. Aldrich, 16 feet of chestnut 

lumber ..... .40 

L. M. Aldrich, spikes and three 

hours' labor .... .80 



$4,103.75 



Paid Concord & Montreal Railroad, freight on brick 

and castings ...... . $171.05 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Pike & Heald, drinking cups, etc. $5-68 

Pike & Heald, lead pipe and labor, 

depot supply pipe . . . 11.76 

A. Moulton, 2 hogsheads . . 2.50 

Palmer & Gannon, cutting sewer 

stones . . . . . 1.67 

J. B. Clarke, advertising notice, 2 

inches to March 16 . . . 12.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
proposals for sewer pipe, 3 squares, 
9th to 18th . . . . u.25 

S. M. Worthley, 7^ gallons of ker- 
osene oil . . . . . 3.60 

S. M. Worthley, 1 water pail . .45 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 531 

Paid S. M. Worthley, oatmeal . . . $2.10 

Dennis Kerwin, 8 lbs. tallow . . .48 

E. R. Coburn, 26 special blank- 
books ..... 20.98 

J. H. Wiggin, 3 empty barrels . .54 

Manchester Horse Railway, 100 car 

tickets ..... 4.50 

L. B. Bodwell, y 2 cord of pine slabs 2.00 

L. B. Bodwell, 2,100 lbs. Cumber- 
land coal 6.82 

J. F. Wyman, 2,445 -^ s - e gS coa b 

district No. 10 . . . . 7.88 

J. F. Wyman, 9,440 lbs. Cumber- 
land coal, district No. 10 . . 30.68 

J. F. Wyman, 2 cords of pine wood, 

district No. 10 . . . . 10.00 

J. F. Wyman, 6,820 lbs. Cumber- 
land coal, district No. 10 . . 22.16 

E. P. Johnson Co., 1 barrel of 

Cumberland coal, in 1890 . . 1.25 

E. P. Johnson Co., }( ton of Cum- 
berland coal, in 1890 . . 1.85 

E. P. Johnson Co., 6 barrels Cum- 
berland coal . . . . 7.50 

E. P. Johnson Co., 2,000 lbs. Le- 
high coal, on Russell-street sewer 7.50 

Orin Rawson, lot of cut wood, Rus- 
sell-street sewer . . . . n-75 

Pettee &: Adams, 5^ pounds of 

string .83, 

Pettee & Adams, 1 cask of lime . 1.00 

Pettee & Adams, 2 cider barrels . .60 

Pettee & Adams, salt ... .55 

John W. Wilson, moving black- 
smith shop .... 6.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 1 gal- 
lon cylinder oil . . . . .80 



532 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., i load 

stub wood ..... $2.25 
J. Stickney, 3 pounds rubber pack- 
ing • -75 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware . . 51-68 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware, district 

No. 10 5.65 

Manchester Hardware Co., hard- 
ware . . . . . . 4.10 

Killey& Wadleigh, repairing steam 

drill 46.15 

Killey & Wadleigh, hardware . 53-38 

Head & Dowst Co., use of engine 

18 days, from April 25, 189 1 . 18.00 

Head & Dowst Co., use of drill iS 

days, from April 25, 1891 . . 18.00 

Thos. L. Thorpe, 126 pounds bags 3.78 

F. A. Platts, 6 gallons kerosene oil, 

2 lantern globes ... .98 

J. W. Wilson, teaming . . . 14.98 

E. P. Annis, 16 gallons kerosene 

oil, 8 pounds of suet . . 2.32 

A. & D. M. Poore, % ton Cumber- 
land coal . . . . . 1.60 

Paid John F. Larkin, Webster-street en- 
gine house : 
57 feet 4 inches soil pipe . . . 10.26 

1 4-inch trap ..... 1.50 

Fittings ...... 7.26 

Putting conductor pipe and gutter . 6.50 

Labor 5 days, 2 men .... 30.00 

Paid Thos. A. Lane, 25 feet 7-ply steam 

wound hose, district No. 10 . 21.25 

Thos. A. Lane, other materials, dis- 
trict No. 10 ... 4.60 
Thos. A. Lane, labor 1 man 3 hours 

on hose, district No. 10 . . 1.2a 



engineer's department. 533 

Paid Horace Holbrook, 2 loads for cov- 
ering blasts .... $2.00 
Eager & Rand, 5 gallons kerosene 

oil, 1 jug, 1 gallon vinegar . 1.15 

$506.02 



Total expenditures $55A°9-73 



Engineer's Department. 

Appropriation $3,500.00 

Expenditures, 
labor. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, service as city en- 
gineer . . . . $1,171.00 

H. J. Briggs, 20S 3-10 days' labor 
assisting engineer 

D. I. Dewey, 1 1 days' labor in office 

H. M. Young, 309 6-10 days' labor 
assisting engineer 

G. W. Wales, 294 6-10 days' labor 
assisting engineer 

John M. Kendall, work on plans of 
receiving tomb, Valley cemetery 



415-95 


14.50 


690.60 


5S5.20 


3.00 



,1,709.25 



TEAM AND TEAM EXPENSES. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, cash paid for horse 

one half-day . . . . $1.25 

Connor & Grossman, shoeing horse 7.50 

J. F. Woodbury, shoeing horse . 3.50 

E. T. James, horse hire . . 164.50 
Whitten & Fifield, horse hire, April, 

May, June, and July . . 91.25 



534 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Whitten & Fifield, horse hire, Au 
gust to September 12 
Whitten & Fifield, horse hire to 

November 7 
J. T. Beach, repairing wagon 
Frederick Allen, repairing bridle 

50c, harness, $3.50 . 
A. H. Stark, varnishing democrat 
wagon .... 



$47-5° 

43-75 
21.85 

4.00 



S.00 



SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 



Paid H. M. Young, 1 tape clamp . 


$0 75 


H. M. Young, use of team 2 days 


5.00 


H. M. Young, repairing bag and 




rubber boots .... 


•75 


Paid W. H. Bennett : 




1 paper of tacks .... 


• 2 5 


Postage stamps . . 


2.00 


Express 


.20 


Paste and gum ..... 


.56 


Horse-car fares ..... 


5-7° 


Expense to Concord and return 3 times 


3.66 


Repairs of tapes, etc. 


7-°5 


Paid Buff & Berger, 1 Boston rod . 


15.00 


George Blanchet, 82 yards of cot- 




ton cloth ..... 


11.49 


George Blanchet, 1 walnut case 


5.00 


Paid E. R. Coburn & Co. : 




1 copying press and book . 


6.00 


15 dozen pencils .... 


13.70 


1 roll tracing cloth .... 


9-45 


2 rolls blue print .... 


2-75 


Ink, fasteners, letter file, 3 triangles, 




blank-book, pens, and other station- 




ery ...... 


i8.S3 



engineer's department. 535 

i draughtsman's scale . . . $5-°° 

6 record books 4-°° 

$% pounds egg shell paper . . i.88 

India ink ...... 2.40 

Paid Albert Hilcken, repairing binding 

on books 2.45 

Manchester Hardware Co., 1 level, 

2 4-foot rules .... 2.85 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., 6 Man- 
chester maps . . . . 1-50 
Temple & Farrington Co., 2 blank 

books 8.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., ink and 

other stationery . . . 4-44 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 lantern . . .35 

J. B. Varick Co., 6-inch belt punch 1.12 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 feather duster . 2.25 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 hand hammer . 1.25 
T. H. Tuson, printing on blanks 

for sewer orders ... .60 

Thos. W. Lane, 1 long curve bracket 1.83 

Thos. W. Lane, 1 self-lighter . .75 
A. S. Campbell & Co., 100 postals 

and printing . . . . 1.60 



Paid John B. Clarke, printing 125 re- 
ports, 42 pages . . . . $20.85 

John B. Clarke, printing plan of 

Derryfield park . . . . 5.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 1,000 
chestnut stakes, pointed . . 15-00 

Head & Dowst, lumber and labor 

at engineer's office . . . 12.25 

J. Hodge, 2,500 pine grade stakes 22.50 



$i5< 



536 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. B. Varick Co., paint brush, nails, 
and twine ..... 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



£°-59 


$76.19 




$3>499-9° 
.10 




$3,500.00 



Health Department. 

Appropriation ..... . . $1,500.00 

Expenditures. 



Paid Geo. C. Hoitt, salary as health offi- 
cer from February, 1890, to Feb- 
ruary, 1 89 1 . . . . $200.00 

W. M. Parsons, salary as health of- 
ficer, as above .... 200.00 

Joseph B. Sawyer, salary as health 

officer, as above . . . 200.00 

Russell White, inspector, 310 days' 

labor ..... 620.00 

M. J. Jenkins, inspector, 2 29 y 2 

days' labor . . . . 5 16. 38 

Chas, Ff. Reed, 30 days' services 

from Aug. 19 to Sept. 30, 1890 67.50 



$1,803.88 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



John B. Clarke, 150 reports, 16 

pages, cover . . . . $8.90 

John B. Clarke, publishing notice, 

3 inches 3 times . . . 8.50 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



537 



Paid Union Publishing Co., publishing 

notice, 4 squares 3 times . 
A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 650 

blanks and 100 2-cent envelopes 
A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 200 

note heads . 

Budget Job Printing Co., printing 

health bulletins for January 
Frank H. Challis, printing health 

bulletins for 5 months ending 

June 30 ... 
Frank H. Challis, printing health 

bulletins for 3 months, July, Au 

gust, September 
Temple & Farrington Co., 1 record 

book .... 

J. B. Sawyer, stationery 
J. B. Sawyer, 500 one-cent stamped 

envelopes .... 
J. B. Sawyer, stationery, etc. 
S. S. Piper, postmaster, 500 one 

cent stamped envelopes 



$8.00 

7-5° 
1. 10 
2.50 

12.50. 

7-5° 

•55 
•45 

5.60 
3.86 

6.00 



$72.96 



Paid F. X. Chenette, use of team . 

F. X. Chenette, hacks and team re 
moving family to the pest-house 
J. Freeman, use of team 
M. J. Jenkins, horse- car fares 

E. T. James, horse and buggy to 
Londonderry 

Russell White, horse-car fares 
Russell White, expenses to Law 
rence and return 

F. X. Chenette, removing dead 
horse .... 



$3-°° 

4-5° 
1. 00 

4-75 

2.50 
33'76 

1.30 

4.00 



538 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Thos. Franker, services with team, 
burning bed and clothing infect- 
ed with typhoid fever 

David Perkins, burying large dead 
dog 

Russell White, team carrying infect- 
ed bed to furnace 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of team . 

J. E. A. Lanouette, 2 visits to Ger- 
vais family at pest-house . 



$i-5° 



3-5° 



§64.06 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Hall, prescriptions for Ger 
vais family 

George H. Dorr, appraising beds 
and clothing of Gervais family 

A. L. Jenness & Son, use of hack 
by board of health 

A. D. Sherer, cleansing and fum 
gating tenement on Lake avenue 
(Gervais family) 

J. C. Nichols, use of horse and car 
riage .... 

C. O. Phelps, removing and bury- 
ing dead horse, by order of board 
of health .... 

E. R. Angell, analysis of water, etc 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



2.50 



2.50 
9.60 



$2.3.10 

$1,964.00 
36.00 



§2,000.00 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 539 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 

Appropriation . $4,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 44.88 



Expenditures. 



MASON -WORK. 



Paid B. W. Robinson, whitewashing, 
patching, labor, and stock on 14 
schoolhouses .... $184.08 
Charles E. Lord, stock and labor 

on Spring-street schoolhouse . 231.58 

Paid B. W. Robinson : 

Brickwork on chimneys, smoke-pipe, 

etc 11.73 

i2^f days' mason labor, at $3.50 . 42.87 

7 days' tending, at $1.75 . . . 12.25 

2 casks of lime, \ x / 2 casks of cement . 4.25 

i,6oo brick at $8.50, setting steps at 

Ash-street schoolhouse . . . 13-60 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 18 
stones, 49.59 cubic feet, for Ash-street 
school basement steps . . . !9-S3 



PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

Paid John A. Sargent, painting and glaz- 
ing, stock and labor on sundry 
schoolhouses .... $346.73 

James R. Carr, frosting 8 windows 

at Webster-street schoolhouse . 2.00 

Samuel A. Hill, 13 lights of glass 
and 5 pounds of paint in 4 
schoolhouses .... 3.59 



$4,044- S8 



$520.19 



540 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Samuel A. Hill, n lights of glass . $2.18 

J. C. Blaine, putty, glass, etc. . 1.00 
L. & W. Seiberlich, glass, paint, 

and varnish .... 2.09 
J. J. Abbott, painting and glazing 

in 5 schoolhouses . . . 21.30 
J. J. Abbott, stain, shellac, varnish, 

and labor ..... 4.59 



CLEANING VAULTS. 

Paid J. S. Webster, cleaning 2 vaults in 

Webster district . . . §2.50 

T. McKenna, cleaning 10 vaults at 

£3-5° 34-5° 

C. C. Webster, cleaning vault at 

Harvey district schoolhouse . 2.50 

C. C. Webster, cleaning vault at 

Goffe's Falls schoolhouse . . 2.qo 



WOODWORK. 

Paid Head & Dowst, for sheathing and 
other lumber at the Webster-street 
schoolhouse . . . . §22.31 

Head & Dowst, for sheathing and 
other lumber at the Lincoln-street 
schoolhouse . . . . 40.22 

Head & Dowst, for sheathing and 
other lumber at the North Main- 
street schoolhouse . . . 3.40 

George H. Dudley, labor, lumber, 
and hardware . . . . 1,157.74 

A. C. Wallace, stick of timber, 

flag pole ..... 12.00 



S333-48 



§42.00 



§1,235.67 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 541 



PLUMBING AND IRONWORK. 



Paid Thos. A. Lane : 

For materials and labor in plumbing, 

piping, etc., in various schoolhouses $400.70 
Boiler for Ash-street schoolhouse, con- 
tract ...... 490.00 

Plumbing materials, at Ash -street 

schoolhouse . . . . . 575.42 

Hand-hold, packings, and labor on 

boiler ...... 4.90 

Paid Mahurin Lightning Rod Co., for 
44 feet rod on Webster-street 
schoolhouse . . . . 17.60 

Mahurin Lightning Rod Co., for 
90 feet rod on new wing Web- 
ster-street schoolhouse . . 36.00 
Mahurin Lightning Rod Co., one 

point . . . . . 2.00 

Pike & Heald, labor on furnaces, 

boilers, etc. . . . . 78. oS 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, fire-irons for 

Ash-street schoolhouse . . 2.08 

D. J. Adams, fitting keys, repairs 
on door bell, etc. . . . 1.65 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 
Co., bell and tube-work at Web- 
ster-street schoolhouse . . 146.00 
Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 26 

pairs desk legs, 490 lbs., at 5c. . 24.80 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., forg- 
ing for flag pole . . . 2.54 



Paid George Whitford, grading yard at 

Lincoln-street schoolhouse . $19. 3 7 



$1,781.77 



542 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Henry C. Dickey, sinking and con- 
necting barrel at Bakersville 
schoolhouse . . . . $5-oo 

Francis Galipian, filling for North 
Main-street schoolhouse yard, 356 
loads, at 15c. .... 53-4o 

Francis Galipian, grading of each 

load . . . . . 1.50 

F. P. Colby, moving pianos at 

Webster-street schoolhouse . 1.50 

J. S. Avery, glazing 1 light of glass 

at Ash-street schoolhouse . . .50 

Samuel Boyce, piling wood and 
setting glass at Varney school . .50 

#81.77 

Total expenditures .... $4, 044. 88 



Fuel. 
Appropriation ....... $3,700.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 973-54 

$4,673.54 
Expenditures. 



Paid L. B. Bod well & Co., 265,480 lbs. 

of egg coal .... $852.63 

A. & D. M. Poore, 402,170 lbs. egg 

coal 1,258.78 

Moore & Preston, 343,870 lbs. egg 

coal, at $6.25 .... 1,074.59 
Moore & Preston, 24,000 lbs. egg 

coal, at $7 84.00 



FUEL. 



543 



Paid DeCourcy &: Holland, 6,000 lbs. 
egg coal, at $6.75 
DeCoury & Holland, 6,250 lbs. 
egg coal 



$20.25 
19-54 



#3>3°9-79 



Paid DeCourcy & Holland, 1 cord hard 

wood, cut .... 

DeCourcey & Holland, 1 cord of 

white pine wood, cut 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., 1% cords 

hard wood, sawed 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., 7 barrels 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., 266,810 lbs 

egg coal .... 
Moore & Preston, 6 cords of beech 

and maple, sawed 
Moore & Preston, ^H cords of 

pine wood, sawed 
J. H. Proctor, 1 cord of pine wood 

sawed and split . 
W. Finley, sawing old wood . 
C. N, Harvey, y 2 cord of hard 

wood .... 

C. N. Harvey, y? cord of pine 

wood ..... 
C. N. Harvey, sawing and splittin 
J. Hodge, kindlings 
M. Dana, moving wood 
S. A. Blood, \% cords of wood 
Paid Warren Harvey : 

45 cords of wood for sundry schools 
Teaming from Lincoln-street school to 

training school 
\y 2 cords sawed at the high school 



$7 


00 


5-5° 


10 


50 




70 


833 


78 


40 


75 


148 


5° 


5 


00 




75 



$1 

3 
3 

7 

265 



544 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

\y 2 cords sawed at the South Main- 
street school . . . . . $1-50 

Sawing and splitting at Wilson school- 
house .75 



$i>343- 2 5 



CHARCOAL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 49 barrels charcoal . $20.50 



Total expenditures ..... 54,673.54 



Furniture and Supplies. 

Appropriation ..... . . $750.00 

Expenditures. 

djhemical apparatus and supplies. 

Paid Tebbetts & Soule, for chemical supplies . . $60.85 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, floor brushes, 
screwdriver, ax handle, pick handle, 
and other hardware .... $11-85 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

2 wire door mats .... 5.00 

1 truck for superintendent's office . 2.50 

Screws, baskets, snow shovels, floor 
brush, brooms, water pails, steel 
hoes, and other hardware . . 74. 36 

12 ash barrels, hardware, etc. . . 58.16 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., tacks, 
snow shovels, 4 call bells, and other 

hardware 23.42 

$175.29 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



545 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Silver, Burdette & Co., for histories, 
index, and maps 
A. G. Whitcomb, 5 dozen ink wells 
Paid J. L. Hammett : 

16 Stanford's maps 

3 gross maple rules 

y? dozen compasses 

1 dozen call bells 

5 gross gem erasers 

1 gross Ross ink wells 

20 gross lead pencils . 

y 2 gross H. and C. compasses 

3 Johnson's maps 
Paid Ginn & Co., music charts 



$3° 


*5 


10 


2 5 


60 


00 


4 


60 


10 


80 


7 


00 


3 2 


*5 


7-5° 


45 


CO 


10 


80 


8 


2 5 


15-3° 



$241.80 



FURNITURE. 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co. : 
Re-seating chair 
1 desk and 1 table 
5 10-foot settees, 50 feet at 60c. 

1 desk .... 

2 office chairs . 

3 chairs .... 
Re-seating 2 chairs . 
2 2-gallon jars .... 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 40 shade 

fixtures, rings, and labor for the 

Varney schoolhouse . 
George F. King & Merrill, 2 9- 

inch globes . 

George F. King & Merrill, 4 pairs 

of compasses . . . . 
D. A. Simons, 2 chairs . 
C. A. Abbott, 1 teacher's des'<; 



$0.35 

14.25 

30.00 

11.25 

3.00 

2.62 

1. 10 

.90 



6 5-5° 



T -75 

3-5° 
9- 6 5 



546 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



$25.00 

5-4o 



Paid George S. Perry, 2 revolving black- 
boards 

George S. Perry, 1 portable black- 
board ..... 

George H. Richter & Co., 1 20- 
drawer Shannon cabinet, black 
walnut ..... 56.00 

Head & Dowst Co., 229 feet of sap- 
ling, sawing and planing foot- 
rests for small children . . 7.0S 



Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$245-35 



Paid A. S. Barnes & Co., 10 gallons 

black ink ..... $6.00 

Thorp, Adams, & Co., 10 gallons 

black ink ..... 6.00 

A. N. Clapp, soap, Tuxedo, etc. .89 

A. M. Eastman, ivorine, oil, gold 

dust soap, brooms, etc. . . 3.40 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning piano at 

Franklin-street school . . 1.50 

A. A. Jenkins, 2 strings on piano 

at training school ... .50 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning piano at 

high school . . . . 2.00 

Prang Educational Co., 12 bricks 

of clay, for molding in primary 

schools 2.88 

$23.17 

Total expenditures ..... $746.46 

3-54 

$750.00 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 547 

Books and Stationery. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Paid American Book Co., 2 Webster's 

International dictionaries . . $17.20 

American Book Co., 50 Wentworth's 

Arithmetical Problems . . 12.21 

J. L. Hammett, 10 quarts carmine 

ink 6.25 

J. B. Lippincott, 1 Worcester's 

quarto dictionary . . . 7.00 

E. B. Woodbury, postal cards and 

paper 2.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., 12 sheets 

paper for high school . . .24 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, 1 typewriter 

ribbon for high school . . 1.00 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, 500 sheets 

Griffin paper for high school . .65 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, 500 sheets 
Griffin paper for superintendent's 
office .65 

W. P. Goodman, ink stands, blot- 
ting paper, envelopes, mucilage, 
stands, rubber bands, ink, Mc- 
Gill's fasteners, etc. . . . 12.05 

S. S. Piper, P. M., postage stamps 

for use of board . . . 5.00 

Total expenditures ..... $62.50 

Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 237.50 

$300.00 



548 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Printing and Advertising. 



Appropriation .... 




Expenditures. 




sundries. 




Paid John B. Clarke, printing : 




130 postals, ringing out 


$2.60 


600 manuals, 16 pages, cover 


16.75 


200 certificates, teachers' . 


T -75 


125 organizations, 16 pages, bound 


16.00 


250 postals, truant officer . 


4-75 



$400.00 



Advertising teachers' examination, 

squares 2 weeks, daily . 
Advertising teachers' examination, '. 

squares 2 times, weekly . 
160 lists mill pupils ... 
300 cards for frames, to show grade 

classes, etc. .... 
300 ruled cards 
160 lists mill pupils . 
50 placards .... 
1,000 corporal punishment blanks 
1,000 cards ruled two ways 
Advertising Varney school, 5^ squares 

2 times ..... 
1,000 half-note headings . 
400 pamphlets .... 
600 reports, 72 pages, cover, 4 plates 
2,400 examination papers . 
115 note circulars 
700 examination papers 
500 examination papers 
554 tickets, reserved, high school 
1,800 programs, high school 



10.50 

5-5° 
4.60 

1.50 
2.25 
6.00 
2.00 
5.00 
4.00 

6.20 

3-75 

1.25 
50.80 
19.85 

2.50 
rS.10 
1 1. 00 

2.25 
10. CO 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 



549 



40 lists teachers and salaries 

100 half-note circulars, contracts 

Cutting and punching cardboard 

Rebinding 3 vols. Scribner's Reader . 

Blank order book of 200 pages 

5,000 primary Friday cards 

160 lists mill pupils . 

20 lists school slips . 

5 lists school slips 

125 letter circulars to teachers 

1,000 certificates 

1,500 cards ruled both ways 

2,825 blanks of various kinds 

1 blank record book . 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., 200 postals 
and printing .... 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 200 yea and 
nay cards ..... 

A. S. Campbell & Co., 300 postals 
and printing same 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising teachers' examinations, 4 
squares 11 times 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
teachers' examinations, 2 squares, 
Daily and Weekly, 2 weeks 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$4-5° 
2.25 
1. 00 
1.25 

3-75 
9.00 
7.00 
1.50 

•5° 
6.00 

2-75 

6.00 

98.00 

9-5° 



2-75 
1.60 
3.86 

13.00 



$361.90 



$34-21 

$396.11 
3-S 9 



$400.00 



Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 



$800.00 
131.92 



$93 l -92 



550 report of the city auditor. 

Expenditures. 



Paid J. G. Jones, freight and cartage . $33-65 

W. R. Blakeley & Co., moving 
books from North Main-street to 
Varney schoolhouse . . . 2.30 

W. R. Blakeley & Co., trucking 
school furniture from and to sun- 
dry schoolhouses 



WATER AND GAS. 



SUNDRIES. 



7.OO 



Paid Manchester Water-works, water for 
October, November, and Decem- 
ber, 1890 #91.20 

People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . 145.18 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 1 feather dus- 
ter, steel rake, lag screws, cord, 
and other hardware . . . $2.65 

J. B. Varick Co., oil, cord, shoe 
pegs, floor brushes, 1 steel rake, 
1 dog scissors, rim locks, window 
brush and handle . . . 10.10 

Higgins Bros. Co., use of 25 chairs 

at Opera House . . . 1.50 

L. K. Mead, 3 boxes chlorides (dis- 
infectant) ..... 1.26 

Manchester Hardware Co., wrap- 
ping twine, floor brushes, screw 
hooks and eyes, wire nails . . 3.S6 

Edward B. Woodbury, postage . 3.00 



$23,6.^8 



1.20 



8. 5 c 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., card- 
board, drawing paper, carbon pa- 
per, 1 20 sheets of paper, and 
other stationery . • ■ M,4 ° 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 box of 
charcoal, 2 quires 50-pound pa- 
per for drawing at high school . 
C. A. Trefethen, repairs on clocks 
and microscope from April 22 to 
October 28 
C. A. Trefethen, repairs on clocks 

February 9 to October 10, 1891 . 2 °-5° 

Peter Harris, keys, key rings, re- 
pairing locks . 
W. P. Goodman, mucilage, memo- 
randa, inkstands, and other sta- 

10.01 
tionery . 

J. S. Avery, setting glass at sundry 

schoolhouses . 

Allen N. Clapp, 6 pounds soap 

Hammond Typewriter Co., 1 dozen 

blue carbon, superintendent's 

office • • • • • 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., 2 glass jars for the high 

school battery . ,7 ° 

Pike & Heald, dipper, waste, mop 

sticks, cleaning and repairing 

stoves and pipes, brushes, labor, 

etc. .••••* 

George S. Perry, 40 packages sand 

disks 

George S. Perry, 12 No. 12 turkey 

dusters 

R.. H. McDonough, chloride of 

lime (disinfectant) . • • 3-33 



551 



1.02 



•5° 



25.72 
6.00 
5.00 



552 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Thorp & Adams Manufacturing Co., 
10 gallons jet black ink, less kegs 
returned ..... $S- 1Q 

A. A. Jenkins, repairing and tun- 
ing pianos .... 20.00 
A. A. Jenkins, tuning piano at Op- 
era House (graduation) . . 2.00 
William E. Buck, for carriage hire, 

visiting schools .... 56.00 

William E. Buck, for telegrams and 

expressage . . . . 34.79 

William E. Buck, for postage, stamps 

and cards ..... 7.00 

William E. Buck, for carriage hire, 

visiting schools, etc. . . . 35 .00 

Gust. Foster, rent of hall for school 3400 

E. T. James, horse and sleigh . 3.00 

G. H. Dudley, 3 days' labor on in- 
ventory ..... 7.50 
Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, 1 
N°- 5 5 77S Remington type- 
writer ..... 100.00 
Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, 2 

8-drawer cabinets . . . 48. 00 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, 2 

Longley copy holders . . 3.00 

Opera House Co., rent of Opera 

House, Thursday, June 25, 1891 25.00 

William Heron, Jr., 134 diplomas . 2 5-7° 

Albert Somes, expenses to Boston 

and return .... 4.65 

William H. Elliott, 4 pitch pipes . 1.00 

William H. Elliott, 1 piano cover . 2.50 

Ginn & Co., 1 new 2d music chart 7.75 

J. L. Hammett, books and maps . 21.15 

Prang Educational Co., 100 school 

squares No. 2 . . . . 6.55 



CARE OF ROOMS. 



553 



Paid Eastern Educational Bureau, sub- 
scription for "Common School 
Education" for year beginning 
January, 1890, for training school 
Educational Publishing Co., sub- 
scription to " Popular Educator," 
beginning November, 1890, for 
training school . 
Frank H. Kasson, subscription for 
" Education " for two years begin 
n-ing January, 1890 . 
Ruby I. Fox, cleaning Youngsville 

schoolhouse in December, 1890 
Margaret Flynn, cleaning school 

house at Goffe's Falls 
Frank W. Fitts, ribbon for diplomas 
Hale & Whittemore, framing 4 pho 

graphs school buildings 
Harley & Robbie, ribbon for diplo 

mas ..... 
S. S. Piper, P. M., postage stamps 
Joel Daniels & Co., paint 
Frank P. Colby, moving pianos 
F. T. E. Richardson, cash paid ex 
penses of musical festival . 

Total expenditures . 



$2.00 



6.00 

2.50 

2.50 
5-5° 

8.00 

1. 19 
10.00 

1.56 
14.00 

35- 2 5 



£652.59 
$931.92 



Care of Rooms. 



Appropriation .... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 



$3,700.00 
r 5-75 



#3<7i5-75 



554 report of the city auditor. 

Expenditures. 

labor. 

Paid J. S. Avery, janitor high and Ash- 
street schoolhouses . . . 5600.00 

Ella F. Barker, janitor Hallsville 

schoolhouse , 34-5° 

Inez M. Warren, janitor 14 weeks 

Stark schoolhouse . . . 14.00 

Joseph C. Blaine, janitor South 

Main-street schoolhouse . . 243.52 

James E. Bailey, janitor Amoskeag 

schoolhouse .... 170.00 

E. P. Cogswell, janitor training- 
school house .... 360.55 

E. P. Cogswell, extra labor piling 

wood . . . . . .50 

H. C. Dickey, janitor Bakersville 

schoolhouse .... 295.84 

D. S. Dunbar, janitor Mosquito 

Pond schoolhouse 23 weeks . 18.00 

Andrew Dobbins, janitor Goffe's 

Falls schoolhouse . . . 37-oo 

Rose Elliott, janitor Webster's Mills 

schoolhouse .... *7-5° 

Delia R. Webster, janitor Hallsville 

schoolhouse .... 7.00 

E. J. Ela, janitor Harvey district 
schoolhouse .... 47-87 

Olive A. Rowe, janitor Hallsville 

schoolhouse 14 weeks . . 21.00 

Michael Finley, janitor at Webster 

and Blodget street schoolhouses . 277.75 

Ruby I. Fox, janitor Youngsville 

schoolhouse .... 14.00 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 555 

Paid Samuel A. Hill, janitor at West 
Manchester schoolhouses at $525 
P er year $337-5° 

Samuel A. Hill, janitor at Varney 
and School-street schoolhouses at 
$450 per year .... 75-°° 

Samuel A. Hill, extra labor from 
December 24, 1890, to January 
31, 1891, 39 days . . . 26.88 

Wm. H. Morrill, janitor at Spring- 
street and Lowell-street school- 
houses at $350 per year . . 350.04 

A. M. Robinson, janitor at Stark 

district schoolhouse . . . 26.25 

Etta B. Proctor, janitor at Youngs- 

ville schoolhouse . . . 7.00 

Etta B. Proctor, cleaning school- 
house ..... 2.50 

Wm. Stevens, janitor Lincoln and 
Franklin street schoolhouses 6 
months at $600 per year . . 300.00 

Wm. Stevens, janitor at Lincoln 
street and Wilson Hill school- 
houses at $450 per year . . 225.00 

H. G. Batchelder, janitor at Varney 

and South Main street schools . 66.30 

V. M. Curran, janitor at Webster 

and Blodget street schoolhouses 122.20 

Harry Richardson, care of Foster's 

Hall, spring term . . . 13-00 

Mrs. Nathan Sleeper, cleaning Halls- 

ville schoolhouse . . . 2.50 

Tebbetts & Soule, 3 pints of am- 
monia delivered to E. P. Cogs- 
well ...... .60 

J. C. Blair, brooms, mop, pearline, 

and soap ..... 1.95 

Total expenditures . . . $3; 7 '5- 75 



556 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Evening Schools. 
Appropriation ...... . $1,500.00 

Expenditures, 
salaries. 

Paid Nellie Atwood, 10 evenings at $1.00 $10.00 

Charles W. Bickford, 20 evenings 

at $2.20 ..... 44.00 

C. A. Bohlin, 32 evenings at 90c. . 28.80 

Charles E. Cochran, 80 evenings at 

$2.20 ..... 176.00 

Etta S. Dana, 30 evenings at 90c. 27.00 

Lizzie D. Hartford, 40 evenings at 

$1.00 ...... 40.00 

Maggie G. Linen, 85 evenings at 

9 oc 7 6 -5° 

William J. Mooar, n evenings at 

90c. ...... 9.90 

William J. Mooar, 31 evenings at 

$2.00 ..... 62.00 

F. S. Sutcliffe, 25 evenings at $2.20 55-°° 

M. J. Brickett, 5 evenings at 90c. . 4.50 

Alice H. Boyd, 45 evenings at $1 45-oo 
Gertrude A. Bums, 34 evenings at 

90c. . . . . -. 30.60 

Mary A. Clement, 45 evenings at $1 45. 00 
L. H. Carpenter, 45 evenings at 

$2.20 99.00 

Edith S. Dole, 20 evenings at 90c. . 18.00 

David Ekvall, 44 evenings at 90c. 39. 60 
Nellie M. James, 10 evenings at 

90c. ...... 9.00 

Millie S. Morse, 25 evenings at 90c. 22.50 
Arthur W. Morgan, 45 evenings at 

$1.00 ..... 45-oo 



EVENING SCHOOL MECHANICAL DRAWING. 557 

Paid Evelyn E. Prescott, 37 evenings at 

90° $33-3° 

John J. Shea, 44 evenings at 90c. . 39. 60 



>°-3° 



JANITORS. 

Paid William H. Morrill, for services as 

janitor ..... $77.80 

Samuel A. Hill, services as janitor 6.00 

J. C. Blaine, services as janitor . 17.20 



— $101.00 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid John B. Clarke, printing 75 placards $3. 00 

Allen N. Clapp, 2 gallons of oil . .23 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$3-23 



*I 


,064.53 




435-47 


Si 


,500.00 



Evening School Mechanical Drawing. 

Appropriation $6co.oo 

Expenditures, 
salaries. 

Paid Henry W. Allen, for services . $ 178. 75 

John M. Kendall, for services . icS.oo 

A. H. Sanborn, for services . . *3!-25 

$4iS.co 

JANITORS. 

Paid W. H. Morrill, for services . . £30.00 



558 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., 300 thumb tacks . $1.80 
J. B. Varick Co.,i gross thumb 

tacks ..... 2.25 

J. B. Varick Co., 24 rubber tri- 
angles, 6 inch, 60x30 . . 8. 40 
John B. Clarke, 75 placards . . 3.00 
John B. Clarke, 1,500 note circu- 
lars ...... 8.50 

Novelty Advertising Co., 1 No. 2 

midget stamp . . . . 1.25 

Novelty Advertising Co., 500 labels 

for models . . . . 1.00 

E. R. Coburn, drawing paper . 31-64 

Head & Dowst, labor and lumber . 40.92 
D. A. Simons, 7 stools . . . 5.95 



$104.71 

Total expenditures ..... $552.71 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 47-29 



Teachers' Salaries. 

Appropriation ....... $47,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 2,398.52 



$49,398-52 



Expenditures. 

Paid teachers, as per pay-roll : 

January ..... $4,011.00 

February . . . . . 5,528.48 

March ...... 4,724.73 



FREE TEXT-BOOKS. 



559 



April 






. $4,865. 42 


May 






• 5,3i7-43 


June 






• 4,97i-53 


September 






4,905.94 


October 






• 5>°°3-75 


November 






• 5, I26 -34 


December 


expei 


iditures . 


4.943.90 


Total 


• $49,39S-52 



Free Text-Books. 



Appropriation .... 




$3,000.00 


Amount transferred from reserved fund 




210.73 
$3> 2r °-73 


Expenditures. 






FREE TEXT-BOOKS 






Paid American Book Co. 


$995.66 




Warren P. Adams . 


44-54 




Boston Supply Co. 


!5-5 




E. R. Coburn & Co., 


19.20 




Effingham, Maynard & Co. . 


38.0S 




John B. Clarke . 


8-75 




D. C. Colesworthy 


45.60 




William P. Goodman . 


7.20 




Joseph Gillott & Sons . 


43-iS 




Ginn & Co. 


309.94 




D. C. Heath & Co. 


H3-49 




Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


IO -35 




J. L. Hammett 


46.70 




Harper & Bros. 


16.S5 




G. F. King & Merrill . 


300.06 




Lee & Shepard 


8-49 





o60 report of the city auditor. 




Paid J. B. Lippincott . 


$78.00 




Novelty Advertising Co. 


•63 




G. L. Perry .... 


116.09 




Prang Educational Co. . 


198.76 




Carl Schoenhof 


10.44 




Silver, Burdette & Co. . 


43.00 




Smith & White . 


50-79 




Thorp & Adams . 


68.40 




Thompson & Brown 


3 x - 6 5 




University Publishing Co. 


58.19 




William Ware & Co. . 


268.20 




Educational Publishing Co. . 


1. 00 




Leach, Shewell & Sanborn 


3.60 








$2,952.34 


LABOR, ETC. 






Paid J. G. Jones, cartage 


$7-88 




Fannie L. Sanborn, for services a:' 






clerk ..... 


250.50 


S258.38 






Total expenditures . 




$3^ J °-73 



City Library. 



Balance from last year unexpended 
Appropriation . 



E<PJNDiTURES. 



LIBRARIAN AND ASSISTANT. 



$5,888.17 
3,800.00 



$9<9S3.i7 



Paid Mrs. M. J. Buncher . . . £8oc.co 

A. F. Payne, assistant librarian . 553-85 



$i>i53-85 



CITY LIBRARY. 




561 


CATALOGUE. 






Paid Charles A. Durfee 


$750.00 




Emma A. H. Piper, assistant in 






cataloguing .... 


372-45 




Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 






y^ ream of cap .... 


.88 




i record . . . . . 


•55 




500 postal cards, printed for library . 


6.50 




600 gummed slips, printed for library . 


1.25 




1 bottle of ink . . : . . 


■33 




12 lbs. paper and cutting . 


1.20 




Cutting paper ..... 


•25 









$i>i33-4i 


NEW BOOKS. 






Paid trustees of city library . 




$1,000.00 



BINDING, RE-BINDING, AND SEWING. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. .... $354.92 

GAS, FUEL, AND INSURANCE. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . $200.06 
L. B. Bodwell & Co., 20,045 ]] >s. 

egg coal, at $6.50 . . . 65.15 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 131,015 lbs. 

egg coal, at $6.25 . . . 409.42 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., }/> cord pine 

slabs ..... 2.25 

A. & D. M. Poore, y 2 cord of pine 

wood 2.50 

A. & D. M. Poore, )/ 2 cord of hard 

wood ..... 3.25 

L. B. Clough, agent, premium on 

policy No. 1,108, .Ftna Insurance 

Co. ...... 62.50 



562 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid L. B. Clough, agent, premium on 
policy No. 32,700, New Hamp- 
shire Insurance Co. . . . $62.50 



NEWSPAPERS. 



$807.63 



Paid John B. Clarke, for daily "Mirror and Ameri- 
can," to April 1, 1S91 ..... $6.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 1 blank- 
book, No. 3,064 . . . 54.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 5,600 

library cards . . . . 31-60 

Temple & Farrington Co., 45,000 

slips ..... 9.00 

C. F. Livingston, printing 4,250 
covers ..... 4.25 

John B. Clarke, printing 200 

reports, 32 pages, covers, 2 plates 15.00 

John B. Clarke, 12 lbs. paper . 1.20 

L. B. Bod well & Co., 15 lbs. of ice 

daily, June 1 to October 1 . 4.37 

$69.92 

Total expenditures ..... $4,525.73 
Balance transferred to new account . . . 5,162.44 

$9,688.17 



Fire Department. 

Appropriation ... ... $37,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 3,641.04 

$40,641.04 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



563 



Expenditures. 



services. 

Paid Thomas W. Lane, chief engineer 
Fred S. Bean, assistant . 
Ruel G. Manning, assistant . 
Eugene S. Whitney, assistant 
Clarence R. Merrirt, assistant 
Fred S. Bean, clerk 



$1,125.00 
125.00 
125.00 
125.00 
125.00 
25.00 
$1,650.00 



Paid 19 teamsters and ei 


lgineers, as 


per pay-rolls : 




January . 


. $1,008.25 




February 








1,000.00 




March . 








I,OII.OO 




April 








1,002.50 




May 








97S.50 




June 








1,003.38 




July . . 








999.25 




August . 








1,003.00 




September 








1,033.25 




October . 








1,022.25 




November 








992.25 




December 








1,027.50 






— $12,081 


13 




CALL 


MEMI 


5ERS. 







Paid Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co., 

for the year 1891 . . . $1,485.00 

Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co., 

extra labor, July 3 and 4 . . 8.00 

Fire King Steam Fire Engine Co., 

for the year 1891 . . . 1,485.00 

Fire King Steam Fire Engine Co., 

extra labor, July 3 and 4 . . 8.00 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co., 

for the year 1891 . . . 1,485.00 



564 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co. 

extra labor, July 3 and 4 . 
Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Co. 

for the year 1891 
Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Co. 

extra labor July 3 and 4 
Gen. Stark Steam Fire Engine Co. 

for the year 1891 
Gen. Stark Steam Fire Engine Co. 

extra labor July 3 and 4 
Chemical Engine Co., for the year 

1891 .... 

Massabesic Hose Co., for the year 

1891 

Massabesic Hose Co., extra labor 

July 3 and 4 . 
Pennacook Hose Co., for the yea 

1891 .... 

Pennacook Hose Co., extra labor 

July 3 and 4 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co., for 

the year 1891 . 
Excelsior Hook and Ladder Co., ex 

tra labor July 3 and 4 



OTHER LABOR. 



$8.00 

1,485.00 

8.00 

1,485.00 

8.00 

535-°° 
1,245.00 

8.00 
1,245.00 

8.00 
2,045.00 

8.00 



$12,559.00 



Paid Henry C. Crosby, 7 nights' service 
as driver of "doubling" horse 
on Hook and Ladder at 25c. . ^1.75 

Charles M. Denyou, expenses to 
Lebanon on account of fire de- 
partment horses . . . 5.42 

Henry C. Parsons, 34 days and 
nights "doubling" horse on 
Chemical Engine Co. . . 17.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 565 

Paid Henry C. Parsons, 57 nights' cer- 

viceon Chemical Engine Co., as 

driver "doubling" horse . . ^ 1 4. 7 5 

Henry S. Reed, 79 nights' driving 

"doubling" horse for Hose No. 1 20.25 

Win. Scheer, 6 days driving horse 

for Steamer No. 2 . . . 9.00 

Stephen Thomes, 9 days' services 

as engineer for Steamer No. 2 . 15.75 

Stephen Thomes, 7 days' services 

as engineer for Steamer No. 3 . 12.25 

Stephen Thomes, 2 days' services 

as engineer for Steamer No. 2 . 3.50 

Fred Charron, for services . . 3.25 

Edwin E. Weeks, 2 weeks' services 

as engineer for Steamer No. 3 . 20.50 

J. N. Brown, 7 days' services as 

engineer for Steamer No. 2 . 12.25 

John Shea, 28 days' services as 

driver for Steamer No. 2 . . 42.00 

Charles E. Stearns, for use of horse 

for Hose No. 5 . . . . 3.00 

$180.67 



Paid Mrs. George B. Forsaith, laundry 

work, etc. .... $3125 

Mrs. H. M. Hulme, laundry work, 

etc. ...... 50.90 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham, laundry work, 

etc. ...... 24.52 

Mrs. Warren F. Wheeler, laundry 

work, etc. .... 14-30 



FURNITURE, ETC. 



$120.97 



Paid Barton & Co., 25 yards matting at 

$i-i2>4 $28.13 



566 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Barton &: Co., 10 yards matting at 

75 c 

Barton & Co., zincing ends . 
Hale &: Whittemore, framing 2 pho 

tographs .... 
J. B. Jones, 3 office chairs 
Sargent's Chair Brace Co., 2^ doz-' 
en braces adjusted to chairs 
Paid Darwin A. Simons 
1 water pitcher . 

1 bedstead 

2 mattresses 

1 wire spring 

2 chairs 
2 chairs 
2 comforters 
1 pair of pillows 
1 bedstead and other furniture . 

Paid J. Stickney, 2 yards black cloth 

J. Stickney, 1 piece of matting cut 

to order . 
Temple & Farrington Co., making 

and hanging 2 shades 
Temple & Farrington Co., 2 dozen 
picture hooks . 
Paid Weston & Hill : 

873 yards matting for N. S. Bean Co 
Zincing ends .... 
Sewing 

2% yards carpet for Lake avenue sta 
tion ..... 

1 mat for Lake avenue station 
6 pillow slips for N. S. Bean Co. 

2 spreads for N. S. Bean Co. 
2 pillow shams for Steamer No. 4 
1 5-6 yards matting for Steamer No. 2 
2673 yards matting for Fire King Co. 



#7-87 
3.00 

4.00 
3-75 

7-5° 

.40 

4-5° 
3-75 
2-55 
4.00 

3-5° 

2.00 

1.50 

21.80 

.67 

i-7S 

1.97 

.84 

5-85 
2.87 
•5° 

1.46 

i-75 

1. 00 
1.96 

1.45 

1.56 

1S.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



567 



Zincing ends for Fire King Co. . 


$3.62 


Laying for Fire King Co. . 


1.25 


20^ yards matting for Vine street 


14.01 


Zincing ends for Vine street 


4.25 


ioyi yards matting for Vine street 


5.06 


Laying for Vine street 


.61 


40 yards crash .... 


4.00 


\]^ yards matting for Vine street 


.85 


Galvanizing iron on ends for Vine street 1.00 


54 yards of matting for Webster street 36.45 


Galvanizing iron on ends for Webste 


r 


street ..... 


7.60 


Laying matting for Webster street 


2.25 


573 yards drapery silk 


4.96 


47-12 feet of rod 


.23 


1 pair of brackets 


• l 3 


Labor ..... 


•35 


4 pairs pillows, sewing 


1. 00 


12 pillow cases .... 


2.25 


6 sheets ..... 


5-5 2 


PRINTING AND STATIO 


NERY. 


Paid John B. Clarke, printing : 




300 envelopes .... 


$1-25 


300 order blanks, bound . 


2-75 


150 postal notices 


2-75 


350 reports, 56 pages, cover, 2 plates 


35-3° 


250 1 2 note circulars 


2.00 


200 postal notices .... 


3.00 


250 blanks, quarterly reports 


6.25 


1,000 y 2 note headings 


2-75 


50 yi note circulars .... 


1.25 


10 cards box 56 


1.25 


500 postal headings . 


6.50 


Other printing .... 


1. 00 


Paid Thomas W. Lane, postage on re- 




ports .... 


2.80 



$225.27 



568 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid L. T. Mead, ink, blotting paper, etc. 

Temple & Farrington Co.,j4 M 

envelopes ..... 



GAS AND TELEPHONE. 



$1-85 



i-75 



Paid New England Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone . $202.08 
People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . 801.93 



$72.45 



$1,004.01 



Paid L. B. Bodwell, 80,500 lbs. egg coal, 

at $6.50 

L. B. Bodwell, l / 2 cord of hard 

wood ..... 

L. B. Bodwell, 2 cords of pine 

slabs 

DeCourcy & Holland, 130,000 lbs. 

egg coal, at $6.25 
DeCourcy &: Holland, 153,735 

lbs. egg coal, at $6.25 
Fred. Charron, sawing and splitting 

13 feet kindling 
E. P. Johnson Co., 30,790 lbs. egg 

coal, at $6.25 . 



$261 

3 

7 

406 

480 

3 
96 



$i ; 258-59 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., for freight $0.50 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 11-63 
Thos. W. Lane, for expressage paid 

from January 8 to June 11 . 8.20 
John W. Wilson, for truckage at 

sundry times .... 4.50 



$24.83 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



569 



SUPPLIES. 



Paid Boston Belting Co., 2 4^-inch 
clamps, for suction hose 
C. M. Bailey, 24 brooms (rattan) . 
C. M. Bailey, 612 lbs. waste . 
C. M. Bailey, 10 reams 15 x 20 tis- 
sue paper .... 
J. A. & W. Bird & Co., 

soda, 896 lbs. 
J. A. & W. Bird & Co 
soda, 448 lbs. 
Paid Cornelius Callahan Co. : 
3 Boston pipes . 
1 1 4- inch gauge 



2 barrels 



1 barrel 



$45.00 



$1.60 
11.00 
61.20 

5.00 

31.86 

15-68 



less long striker, returned 



2 Coleman extra holders . 
Repairing chemical engine 
1 chemical shut-off .... 
1 New Eng. bell, and repairing striker 

1 i}£ tap 

1 die, for cutting thread . 

1 intermediate piece .... 

Paid Cavanaugh Bros., bay horse, No. 

34, with commission and keep, 

$332.25, less amount for horse 

sold at auction, $42.50 

Cavanaugh Bros., pair of gray 

horses ..... 

Eureka Fire Hose Co., 3,000 feet 

2^ -inch "knit jacket" firehose, 

at 65c 

Charles T. Hollovvay, 1 gross 3- 
ounce bottles, with rubber stops 



50.00 
20.00 

3-5° 
i7-5° 

4-75 

1.50 
10.00 

1. 00 



2S9.75 



700.00 



1,872.00 



7.00 



570 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR 
gross pony 
f 



Paid J. Hinman & Co. 

bottles and corks 
A. W. Harris Oil Co., 5 gallons o 

oil 

A. W. Harris Oil Co., 1 5 -gallon 

can ..... 
Dennis Kerwin, soap and soapine 
Manchester Locomotive Works, 1 

forged wrench . 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, 2 pairs elec 

trie wire cutters 
Plumer & Holton, 10 reefers 
George W. Rief, 5 stands for noz 

zles ..... 
Schollay & Rich, 140 lbs. diamond 

polish 
Ford's Wheel-Hub Ring Co., 12 

rubber wheel-hub rings 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., 5 boxes, 30 

lbs. salt 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., 12 bottles 

ammonia . 
Killey & Wadleigh, 3 horse brushes 
Killey & Wadleigh, 1 pair 3x3 

butts . • 

J. B. Varick Co., spirits of turpen- 
tine, drawing knife, and octagon 

rimmer .... 
A. H. Paige, stencil-plate alarm 
A. H. Paige, 1 box black paste 
S. L. Flanders, 1 oil tank 
S. L. Flanders, 10 gallons of oil 
S. L. Flanders, J cord wood . 



PLUMBING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid James R. Carr, 30 lights of glass 
and setting .... 



$5.00 
3'4o 



•75 
24.60 

i-75 



35 


00 


87 


5° 


1 


50 


35 


5° 


14 


00 



3.00 

4-5° 



i-95 
•3° 
•50 
1.25 
1.40 
3-63 



i°-3 : 



$3,330.02 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



571 



Paid Flint & Little, grinding 12 fire-axes $1-50 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 50 feet 4-ply 

engine hose . . . . *7-5o 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 2 sets i-inch 

coupling and rings . . . 3.50 

Charles H. Hutchinson, labor and 

stock, repairing . . . . 1S.27 

Peter Harris, repairing lock, nozzle, 

etc 1.30 

Head & Dowst, 4 brass pulleys . .40 

Head & Dowst, labor and stock . 14.26 

Thomas A. Lane, labor and plumb- 
ing materials .... 124.19 
Mills & Sturtevant, lumber, hard- 
ware, and labor . . . . 2S.5 7 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

4 hours' labor . . . . . 1.60 

Repairs on steam fire engine No. 629 . 1.60 

Repairs on hose carriage ... 6.80 

Repairs on chemical engine $30.74 
Repairs on 4 trace chains 

with snap hooks . . 10.00 



$40.74 
Creditor by 356 lbs. old 

copper tubes . . . 35. 60 



1 wheel cap, wrench, and fitting 

4 pump leathers .... 

Labor and stock on Amos- 

keag steamer No. 1 . $724.72 

Less 615 lbs. old copper 

tubes .... 61.50 

1 day's labor on steam fire engine No. 
621 ...... 

1 front spring binder .... 

Repairs of suction hose 



663. 

4- 
1. 



572 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Manchester Mills, lumber, bolts 

paint and labor repairing gate in 

jured by steamer 
Pike & Heald, hardware, etc. 
Sanborn Carriage Co., sundry re 

pairs .... 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clock 
John K. Wilson, lumber and labor 

on stables at Webster-street en 

gine house 
J. T. Beach* repairing hooks, bar 

etc. .... 



- 

$18 


16 


14.97 


1 


1 5 


1 

r 


00 


- 

52 


3 1 


3 


60 



;i,ooo.6o 



HARDWARE. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware . 



$87.89 
82.66 
19.25 



189.80 



MEDICAL AND SURGICAL. 



Paid J. Alexander, visits and medicine . 
A. W. Baker, dentistry on 12 horses 
J. O. Burbank, 2 packages horse 
powders ..... 
E. H. Currier, Williams's sure cure 
A. L. Dodge, visits and medicines . 
G. H. Ellinwood, veterinary sur- 
gery 

A. D. Smith, medicines 
Snelling & Woods, medicines and 
disinfectants .... 
Smith & Gould, 1 dozen lotion 
Z. F. Campbell, Medicine 



$51.40 
24.00 

2-75 

7.00 

22.75 

2.00 
1 1.70 



34-o5 
6.00 



183.77 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



573 



CARRIAGE WORK AND CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 



Paid A. Filion, making cart body and 
ironing the same for steamer 

No. 2 .... . 

A. Filion, repairing sleds, pole, and 
ironwork ..... 

A. Filion, other repairs . 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, for labor 
and materials on carriage repairs 

Manchester Locomotive Works, re- 
pairs on horse pole for the 
" 'Squog " hose wagon 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 
one horse pole, leather covered . 

Manchester Locomotive Works, re- 
pairs on Merrimack hose carriage 

Sanborn Carriage Co., sundry re- 
pairs ..... 



$70.00 

5-5° 
7-8 5 

795-92 



2 3-5° 

6.00 

10.15 



BLACKSMITHING. 




id D. F. Cressey .... 


$104.00 


Thomas Hickey .... 


76.50 


James Morrison .... 


4.60 


Mahaney & McSweeney 


337-05 


J. O. Tremblay .... 


97-45 


J. F. Woodbury & Co. . 


3°-5° 



$930.92 



$650.1. 



HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 

Paid Daniel Butterfield, 9,920 lb-, hay . $84.85 

city farm, 19,405 lbs. hay . . 171.76 

William Clark, 32,820 lbs. hay . 297.46 
William A. Dunton, 680 lbs. rye 

straw . . . . . 6.12 



574 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Drake & Parker, oats, shorts, meal, 

etc $686.13 

H. Fradd & Co., 125 lbs. bran . 1.38 

Charles Francis, 2,155 lbs. carrots . 17-24 

Moore & Preston, 1,005 ^s. straw . 9.05 

Partridge Bros., oats, feed, straw, 

etc. ...... 702.09 

Pettee & Adams, oats, hay, straw, 
corn, etc. ..... 

Waterman Smith, 11,485 lbs. of hay 
L. Shelters, 36,880 lbs. of hay 

B. E. Thompson, 10,035 lbs. of hay 
John L. Woodman, 7,415 lbs. hay 
Henry Chandler, 12 bushels carrots 

C. D. Welch, 8,065 lbs - of h ay . 
G. L. Colby, 1,180 lbs. straw 
Melvin Hall, 26 weeks' pasturing 

department horses at $1.25 
Henry W. Parker, oats, shorts, etc. 
J. H. Wiggin & Co. , 1 bag of flour 
C. M. Wheeler, 5,880 lbs. carrots 

at $18 

Samuel T. Page, 14,805 lbs. hay . 
A. D. Haynes, 8,295 lbs. hay at $19 



HARNESS AND HARNESS REPAIRS. 

Paid Frederick Allen : 

16 cans oleo ..... $17.00 

2 horse covers ..... 6.50 

Harness repairs . . . . . 2.50 

2 fancy horse pads .... 10.00 

Leathering pole .... 2.50 

1 fly terret . . . . . 1.00 

Cleaning, oiling, and repairing harness 12. 68 

1 cushion ...... 3.50 

Paid W. H. Adams, harness, repairs, etc. 192.20 



92S.86 


86. 


•14 


3 2 3- 


12 


85 


.29 


59 


•32 


9- 


00 


70 


,98 


11. 


62 


3 2 


•5° 


185 


• 2 5 




.80 


52 


.92 


133- 


2 5 


78. 


80 



$4,033-93 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



575 



Paid Kimball Carriage Co., repairin 
collars .... 
Chas. E. Beny, 12 rein snaps 
Chas. E. Berry, 6 trace snaps 
Chas. E. Berry, new top of hame 
C. B. Merrill, 5 cans of oil . 
Paid H. C. Ranno : 

Repairs on heavy express harness 

3 dust blankets . 
Canvas cushion . 

1 express draw part . 

2 flag collars 

1 pair double reins 

4 whips .... 
10 coat straps . 

3 whips .... 

2 extra large fawn blanket hood: 
Harness, repairs, etc. . 
Making over 2 salem collars 
1 pair 1 i/o -inch double pole straps 

1 bristle horse brush . 
Part of swing harness 
Horse collar 
Parade bridle . 
Extra draw part 

2 steel ring bits 
Wool mat 
Repairs, etc. 
3.9 lbs. woolen blankets 

3 whalebone whips, eel-skin lined 
Lettering blankets 
Extra large blanket hood 
Repairs, etc. 



$2.00 

10.00 

6.50 

4.00 

5.00 

35-75 
9.00 

i-75 
9- 2 5 
1.50 

3-5° 
7-5° 
3-5° 
5-5° 
11.00 
56.5S 
5.00 

4-5° 
2.50 
22.00 
3-25 
3-9° 
8.00 
1. 00 
2.00 
5.60 

2i-75 
6.00 

2.00 
5.00 
1.40 



$514.11 



576 REPORT 


OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 


LABOR. 






Paid labor of men and teams, as per pa\ 


-roll 


in dis- 


trict No. 2 








January 






$34-13 


February 








3 2 - 2 5 


March . 










20.25 


April 












4-5° 


May 












10.95 


June 












14.90 


July . 












28.23 


August . 












54-34 


September 












136.62 


October 












69.19 


November 












59-49 


December 




su 


NDR1I 


:s. 




27.22 



$492-07 



Paid Thos. W. Lane, expenses to Spring- 
field, Mass., attendance on Na- 
tional Association of Fire Engi- 
neers, August 11, 12, 13 . 

Thos. W. Lane, express at sundry 
times ..... 

Thos. W. Lane, telegrams 

Timothy Shea, cleaning vault, Mas- 
sabesic hose house 

Cavanaugh Bros., use of horse 11 
days, at $1.50 . 

Cavanaugh Bros., use of horse 20 
days, from July 29 to August 18 

Cavanaugh Bros., use of horse from 
Aug. 19 to Sept. 9 . . . 

A. M. Finney, laying carpets 

Thos. Welch, cleaning vault . 



$24.06 

6.30 
•65 



16.50 



jo. 00 
10.04 
3-5° 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



577 



Paid H. F. McKean, rent of stable 12 
months, to Dec. 1, 1891 . 
L. M. Aldrich, wicket in window . 

Total expenditures . 



$24.00 
•75 



$138-80 
$40,641.04 



Appropriation 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 



Expenditures. 



$1,400.00 



Paid Geo. E. Badger, 11 3-10 days' labor 
at $1.25 . 
Geo. N. Burpee, labor . 
M. A. Weathers, labor stringing wires 
across the river . 
Paid Thos. W. Lane, Jr., labor as per pay 
roll: 
October . 
November 
December 
Paid Chas. Kean, labor . 



Paid Pike & Heald for acid, coal hod, 

and solder ..... 

Warren Harvey, 12 chestnut poles, 

7 inches, at $3 . 
Manchester Hardware Co., for sash 
cord, cutting plyers, screws, tools, 
lag screws, washers, bolts, oil, 
white lead, and 2 doz. split rings 
37 



$14.25 
6.00 



5.00 
* 

407-75 

47-25 

45-5° 

47-^5 

2.00 



$1.90 
36.00 

10.83 



$575-°° 



578 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 10 lbs. 

washers 

Manchester Hardware Co., 5006.x 

S/i coach screws 
Manchester Hardware Co., screws, 
trowel, and cement . 
Paid American Electrical Works : 

6$y 2 lbs. 18 assorted annunciators at 

»5#c 

14 lbs. 18 double con. office wire 

33-16 lbs. yellow fixture wire 

1 box .... 

io^ lbs. continental braid 

38 lbs. conductors 

17*/^ lbs. conductors . 

Boxes .... 

Paid J. H. Bunnell & Co., 300 No. 12 

B. & S. Mclntyre connectors, 7c 

J. H. Bunnell & Co., 1 S. L. key 

J. H. Bunnell & Co., 24 Leek zincs 

Manchester Locomotive Works, 8 

pieces of brass .... 

W. H. Darling, 394 zinc 

castings . . . $137.90 

Creditor by 499 lbs. battery 
copper at 4c. , and 330 lbs. 
battery copper at 2c. . 26.56 



James Baldwin Co., 325 oak pins 
and 1 barrel .... 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., 2 keys . 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., pocket 
screwdrivers and Boston tape 

Electric Gas Lighting Co., 1 Samp- 
son battery .... 

Eastern Electrical Supply Co., 192 
lbs. (2 miles) No. 14 galvanized 
iron wire ..... 



$0.50 

13-75 

i-43 



16.70 

37i 

2.81 

•3° 
2. 84 

8-93 
4.29 

•35 

21.00 

1.50 



in. 34 



3-45 
1.08 



.98 



7.80 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 579 

Paid Eastern Electrical Supply Co., 2,293 

lbs. (5 barrels) blue vitriol at 14c. $91-72 

Eastern Electrical Supply Co., 300 

feet No. 14 Clarke wire . . 5.17 

Eastern Electrical Supply Co., 1 lb. 

^-inch tape .... .45 

Pike & Heald, ifi/% lbs. of copper . 1.52 

New England Gamewel) Co., 5 re- 
lease keys at 50c. . . . 2.50 

repairing alarm gong . . . 8.35 

1 fire alarm gong .... 30.00 

Washburn & Moen Manufacturing 
Co., 324 lbs. copper wire (3 
miles) at i8^c. . . . 59.13 

E. S. Greeley & Co., 1 pair 16^ 

Weldon climbers . . . 2.25 

E. S. Greeley & Co., 300 regular 

insulators ..... 8.25 

E. S. Greeley & Co., 300 Mclntyre 

connectors . . . . 10.20 

J. Hodge, 282 feet 3-inch spruce . 17-67 

J. Hodge, 21^ hours' labor . . 8.50 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 rachet bit brace 1.50 

J. B. Varick Co., 1 bit . . . .20 

J. B. Varick Co., 5 lbs. No. 18 cop- 
per wire . . . . . 1.50 

Thos. A. Lane, 27 feet J^-inch pipe 
and labor ..... 1.48 

$515-66 



FREIGHT, TRUCKAGE, ETC. 

Paid A. L. Jenness, use of horse and 

wagon ..... $11-50 

W. B. Corey, truckage, moving 

poles, etc. .... T 3- 2 5 

J. W. Wilson, truckage . . 8.20 



580 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on sundries .... $3-85 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight . .29 



Paid Chas. E. Lord, stock and labor re- 
building chimney (damage by 
telegraph) .... $4.75 

Jas. R. Carr & Co., painting 3 poles 1.50 

George Holbrook, stock and labor, 

damage by telegraph . . . 12.25 

J. B. Clarke, printing 700 alarm- 
box lists .... 

J. J. Abbott, 2,% lbs. of paint 

Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$37-09 



S.00 




.41 


$26.91 

$1,154.66 
245-34 






$1,400.00 



Hydrant Service. 

Appropriation ...... . $5,000.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Water-Works, use of water .... $5,000.00 



Firemen's Parade. 

Appropriation ...... . $500.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 2 55-3 2 

#755-32 



firemen's parade. 581 

Expenditures. 



Paid John B. Clarke, printing 300 invita- 
tions, 300 envelopes, 175 circu- 
lars, 150 cards, 500 programs, for 
the year 1890 .... $10.90 

John B. Clarke, printing orders for 

parade for 189 1 . . . . 2.50 

John 15. Clarke, printing 300 invi- 
tations and envelopes for 1891 . 4.00 

John B. Clarke, printing 500 routes 

of procession .... 3.00 

M. C. Paige &: Co., 413 dinners at 

65c, for 1S90 .... 268.45 

M. C. Paige & Co., use of table and 

chairs ..... 9.00 

M. C. Paige & Co., 458 plates, at 

70c, collation for 1891 . . 320.60 

Manchester Military Band (First 

Regiment), services 1890 . . 52.00 

Manchester Military Band (First 

Regiment), services 1891 . . 52.00 

Thos. W. Lane, cash paid for post- 
age for 1890 .... 3.50 

Thos. W. Lane, cash paid for post- 
age for 1891 .... 2.87 

F. H. Pike, services as drum major 
for 189 1 . . . . 3.00 

Manchester Drum Corps, services 

rendered parade . . . . 10.00 

H. W. Cook, printing 250 Mer- 
chants' Week firemen's parade 
ribbon badges for 1S91 . . 12.50 

Thos. Brown, services at hall door. 1.00 



Total expenditures ..... $755-32 



582 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Police Department. 

Appropriation ..... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 



Expenditures. 



$37,000.00 
937-o7 

$37,937-°7 



SERVICES. 

Paid N. P. Hunt, police justice . . $1,500.00 

I. L. Heath, associate justice . . 82. 00 

J. B. Pattee, associate justice . . 8.48 

J. C. Bickford, clerk ... 600.00 

H. W. Longa, marshal . . . 900.00 

J. F. Cassidy, assistant marshal . 800.00 

night patrol 20,972.50 

day patrol 5,508.00 

extra time cf regular patrol . . 829.71 

extra time of special patrol . . i j533-9S 

Thomas Francour, as janitor . . 63.88 

Peter Larrabee, as janitor . . 579.00 

Miss A. B. Brown, as matron. . 365.00 
C. B. Hildreth, expenses to Boston 

and Holyoke, looking for prisoner 10.00 
C. B. Hildreth, services during Mer- 
chants' Week . . . . 15-00 



$33,767-52 



GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, AND FUEL. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for gas 

Electric Company, 2S electric lights 
Moore & Preston, y 2 cord sawed 

pine wood 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., y 2 cord sawed 

hard wood 

L. B. Bod.well & Co., 4,000 lbs. egg 

coal, Clinton station . 



$280.98 
216.57 

2-75 

3-25 

12.50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



583 



Paid DeCourcy & Holland : 
76,000 lbs. egg and broken coal 
1,000 lbs. stove coal . 
2 cords wood, chunks 
i cord of birch, sawed and split 
1 5 cords of hard wood, cut 
i cord of hard wood, sawed and spli 
64,805 lbs. egg and broken coal 
2,200 lbs. egg coal . 

TELEPHONE AND TELEC 

Paid New England Telephone and Tele 
graph Co., telephones and tolls 
Western Union Telegraph Co., for 
telegrams .... 



1256.50 

3.62 

15-5° 

3-6 3 

12.25 

3-75 
202.51 



$ x 59-95 
22.52 



$1,026.94 



$182.47 



Paid E. T. James, for use of teams 

A. L. Jenness & Son, for use of 

hack ...... 

A. Netble, for use of team 

George C. Wheeler, use of team . 

Joseph Monyer, use of team and 

services in arresting prisoner at 

Suncook, N. H. . 
J. C. Nichols & Son, use of team . 
Whitten & Fifield, use of team 



$161.50 

1-25 

2.00 
2.00 



5.00 
1. 00 



75 



$i73-50 



FEEDING PRISONERS. 



Paid Daniel Davis, rations, from June 10 

to December 28, 1890 . . $93-85 

Carl E. York, crackers . . . 15-17 



$109.02 



584 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid John B. Clarke : 

Printing blank letter headings, bill 
heads, blank warrants, blank writs 
etc., for court and marshal's office 
i blank-book, roll-call 
ioo reports, 8 pages, cover, i plate 
i blank-book, record of arrests . 
Advertising Fourth of July notice, 2 

inches 2 times . 

Printing 150 -£ -letter headings . 
200 photograph labels 
Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 
civil dockets, blank writs, etc. 
for the police court . 
Temple & Farrington Co., ink 
mucilage, and other stationery 
for the police court . 
Temple & Farrington Co., ink 
blotters, and other stationery, fo 
police court 
Temple & Farrington Co., 250 en 

velopes and 12 blocks 
Temple & Farrington Co., rubber 
bands, spool of tape, blotting- 
paper, etc. .... 
Union Publishing Co., fireworks 
notice, 3 J squares 1 time . 



#47-75 
6-75 
8.00 



4-5° 

!- 2 5 
!- 2 5 



82.75 



■7 



i-59 



3-5° 



$182.39 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, labor and lumber . 
M. J. Coleman, plumbing and ma- 
terials, labor on water-closets, 
sewer-drains, etc. 



95- J 4 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 585 

Paid James H. Cram, repairing shovels, 

bedstead, etc. .... $5-°° 

J. J. Abbott, 3 lights of glass and 

setting 3.35 

Peter Harris, fitting key, repairing 

handcuffs, etc. .... 2.75 

Head & Dowst Co., repairing roof 

and stock 10.51 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and 

labor ..... 83.22 

Head & Dowst Co., labor in box- 
ing steam-pipes . . . . 5.25 

Thos. A. Lane, silver polish and 
labor ...... .70 

Thos. A. Lane, making fire tools . 3.60 

C. G. McDuffie, repairing snow- 
shovels and chain ... .40 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware . . 4.44 

Thos. A. Lane, boiler at police sta- 
tion, as per contract . . . 445. 00 

Thos. A. Lane, cutting hole through 

wall . . . . . . 10.00 

Thos. A. Lane, labor and materials 

on steam-pipe, etc. . ... 229.66 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing, mate- 
rials, and labor .... 6.84 

Frank S. Bodwell, stonework on 
coal pocket at station, as per con- 
tract . . . . . . 180.00 

district No. 2, pay-roll . . . 17.00 

$1,123.14 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Robitaille Bros., milk, coffee, etc. . $10.88 

Patrick Scollard, brooms, matches, 

etc I3-9 6 



586 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Carl E. York, coffee, milk, and 
sugar, from December 2 to Feb- 
ruary 25, 1891 . 
B. F. Currier, 1 police belt . 
A. W. Graves, 1 13-foot ladder 
Paid Chas. A. Hoitt : 

Repairing chair .... 
3 chair cushions 

1 table 

1 log pillow .... 
Upholstering student chair 
1 water cooler .... 
Paid Weston & Hill, 2^ yards matting 
and zincing 
Weston & Hill, 2 yards oil matting 
John Driscoll, second-hand range, 

etc 

N. J. Whalen, police belts, straps, 
etc. ...... 

N. J. Whalen, repairing police belt 
Clark M. Bailey, matches, toilet 

paper, and paper bags 
Longa and Cassidy, conveying pris- 
oners . . . . . 

H. W. Longa, cash paid for witness 

fees and other expenses 
Mrs. Filibert, washing blankets, 
towels, scrubbing, cleaning, etc. . 
Thos. Franker, care of lost children 

(25) 

Ada Franker, washing towels, 
sheets, etc. . . . . 

I. L. Carpenter, certificate of insan- 
ity ( John Sullivan) . 

Dennis Kerwin, for soap 

J. B. Varick Co., dusters, sponges, 
brushes, rope, and other supplies 



$26.66 


2.25 


1.30 


.50 


3-25 


6.00 


1.25 


2.00 


2.75 


3 

5-59 


g 1. 00 



19.50 
13-38 

1. 00 

2 5-5° 
756.00 
99.08 
77.00 
23.00 
5.00 



7-39 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 587 

Paid J. B. Varick Co., 5 gallons ozone 

and 1 gallon can . . . $13.15 

Killey & Wadleigh, 1 22-inch 

duster ..... 2.50 

Killey & Wadleigh, 1 mop handle .15 

O. P. Lucier, 3 Roberts ozonators 

at $3 . . . . . 9.00 

N. H. Colby, 6 dozen Elatol (dis- 
infectant) . . . . . 27.00 

L. K. Mead, medicines, ammonia, 

and other disinfectants . . 22.87 

L. K. Mead, 1 emergency case, etc. 6.60 

L. K. Mead, prescription . .75 

Frederick Perkins, extra services as 

surgeon, etc 116.00 

Frederick Perkins, certificate of in- 
sanity, J. Sullivan . . . 3.00 

J. W. Wilson, trucking acid from 

depot .50 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

on ammonia .... .42 

Dunn & Burns, killing 8 dogs from 

January 7 to March 2, 1891 . 4.00 

Thomas Franker, killing 4 dogs . 2.00 

Peter Larrabee, killing 27 dogs 
from February 21 to May 18, 
1891 13.50 

Harley & Robbie, screen cloth . 1.26 

Baker Telephone Index Co., G tel- 
ephone index for marshal's office 3.50 

Higgins Bros., 1 stand lamp . . 2.50 

L. W. Colby, 42 photographs of 

6 criminals .... 7.00 

Thomas A. Lane, taking down signs 1.35 

J. F. Cassidy, conveying Winfield 
Miner to the asylum for the in- 
sane at Concord, May, 1891 . 4.80 



OOO REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. M. Collity, certificate of insanity, 

J. Sullivan .... $3-oo 

$1,372.09 

Total expenditures .... . $37,937.07 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation . $2,500.00 

Amount transferred from new schoolhouse, West 

Manchester . . . . . . . 71-05 



$2,571.05 



Expenditures. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, 1 3-light chande- 
lier, Park-street wardroom . . $4. 50 

Thomas A. Lane, pipe, ties, and el- 
bows, Park-street ward-room . 1.93 

Thomas A. Lane, labor 2 men, 6 

hours 3.30 

CITY STABLES. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, plumbing mate- 
rials and labor . . . . $8.68 
Killey & Wadleigh, hardware . 1.30 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware . . 2.48 
Head & Dowst, 1,303 feet sheathing 31-88 
Head & Dowst, 65 feet spruce 

boards . . . . . 1.04 
Head & Dowst, 250 feet hard pine 

floor boards . . . . 10.00 

Head &: Dowst, other lumber . 1.35 

L. N. Westover, lumber and labor . 3.88 
W. F. Hubbard, door jambs, door 

casings, etc. . . . . 4.48 



$9-73 



$65.09 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 589 



CITY LIBRARY. 



Paid Thomas A. Lane, plumbing and 




labor ...... 


$0.92 


Paid R. Landers : 




2 men 2 days' labor each . 


12.00 


94 slate ...... 


3-76 


28 lbs. zinc ..... 


2.24 


12 lbs. cement ..... 


.96 


Nails 


■*5 


Paid J. J. Abbott, 5 lights of glass and 




setting 


1-25 


John Driscoll, materials and labor 




on roof, etc. .... 


74.90 



BATTERY BUILDING. 



Paid Sullivan & Dunbar, materials and 

labor, painting . . . . $125.82 

L. N. Westover, labor and lumber . 2. 87 



VARNEY SCHOOL HOUSE. 



Paid George F. Higgins, concreting 

walks, 661,222 sq. yds. at 45c. . $297.55 
F. S. Bodwell, 8 steps for Varney 

school ..... 117-32 



COURT HOUSE. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, labor of 2 men 32 

hours . . . . $17.16 

Thomas A. Lane, mason-work . 19.60 

Thomas A. Lane, contract on boiler 70.00 
Thomas A. Lane, lime, slate, brick, 

pipe, etc. . . . . . 8. 19 



$96.18 



$128.69 



$4M.87 



590 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Hillsborough county, y 2 expense of 

repairs on steam heating apparatus $43-33 

J. J. Abbott, 3 lights and setting . 2.75 



CITY HALL BUILDING. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., painting at 

drugstore . . . . . $0.65 

Head & Dowst, lumber and labor 
on fence about the public com- 
fort 12.13 

Manchester Hardware Co., 25 feet 

rubber hose for public comfort 2.50 

M. J. Coleman, repairs on pipes, 

water-closets, etc. . . . 7.06 



ENGINE HOUSES. 

Paid M. J. Coleman, materials and labor 

at Merrimack engine house . $30.47 

M. J. Coleman, materials and labor 

at central station . . . 1 x 7.31 

W. M. Darrah & Co., 29.59 squares 

5 -ply beehive roofing . . 146.83 

W. M. Darrah & Co., other mate- 
rials and labor, Vine-street engine 
house . . . . . 11.84 

John Driscoll, materials and labor 
on galvanized gutters, etc., on 
Vine-street engine house . . 27.30 

Marston & Gates Bros., mason-work, 

stock, and labor .... 4.00 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, paper and 

paper hanging, Fire King house 10.42 

J. Choate, varnishing inside of Fire 

King engine house . . . 52.00 



$161.03 



$22.34 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 



591 



Paid Head & Dowst, labor and hardware : 
Merrimack engine house . 
Webster-street engine house 
Fire King engine house 
Vine-street engine house 
Massabesic hose house 
Lake-avenue engine house 
Hook-and-Ladder house 
• Fire King engine house 
Gen. Stark engine house 
Vine-street engine house 
Webster-street engine house 
Fire King engine house 
Paid J. F. Larkin, putting in sewe 
Webster-street engine house 
C. H. Hutchinson, repairing clock 

on Webster-street schoolhouse 

J. R. Carr, room paper, border, 

moldings, and hanging paper 



$i-5° 
38.96 
42.02 
271.87 
3°-3* 
3 2 -23 
•3° 
7.09 

•3i 
164.59 

8.15 
.80 

51-76 



33-8: 



id labor of men and 


teams in district No. 2, as 


per pay-rolls : 




January . 


$48.93 


February 






83.98 


March . 






117.63 


April 






27.60 


May 






21.00 


Tune 






27.00 


July . . 






21.00 


August 






21.00 


September 






27.00 


October . 






21.00 


November 






21.00 


December 






25.50 



11,085.89 



$462.64 



Paid M. J. Coleman, repairs on waste 
pipe, central station . 



$2.00 



592 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid M. J. Coleman, repairs on drain 

pipe, Merrimack engine house . $1-25 

John Driscoll, repairs on roof at 

central station .... 7.25 



$10.50 



Total expenditures ..... $2,456.96 



Amount transferred to reserved fund 



114.09 

$2,571.05 



New Schoolhouse (Varney), West Manchester. 

Balance from last year unexpended . . . $199- 75 

Appropriation ....... 1,000.00 



$i,i99-75 



Expenditures. 

furniture. 

Paid Grand Rapids School Furniture Co., 
50 desks, 8 rear seats, and 1 

teacher's desk .... $200.76 

Grand Rapids School Furniture Co., 

2 single seats, rear . . . 4.64 

C. A. Trefethen, 6 clocks at $4 • 24.00 

C. A. Trefethen, 1 clock . . 5.50 
Chas. A. Hoitt & Co., 60 8-foot set- 
tees, 4S0 feet, at 60c. . . 2SS.00 

D. A. Simons, 18 chairs at 50c. . 9.00 
D. A. Simons, 6 chairs at $1.62 . 9.72 
J. W. Wilson, freight and truckage .96 

PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 



$542.58 



Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising dedication, 

4 squares 2 times .... . . $6.oo 



ADDITION TO WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 593 



Paid Thos. A. Lane, gas fixtures, as per 

contract . . . . . $179.11 
Head &: Dowst, labor and materials 
in making and erecting flag pole, 
and putting in electric bells and 
speaking tubes .... 322.02 

F. S. Bodwell, 3 stone steps . . 44.00 

A. N. Clapp, for fuse ... .25 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening drills, etc. 5-24 

Labor of men and teams, district 

No. 10 .... 18.00 

Labor of men and teams, district 

No. 10, in August . . . n-5° 



Total expenditures . . . . . $1,128.70 

Balance transferred to repairs of buildings . . 71-05 

$i>iQ9-75 



Addition to Webster-street Schoolhouse. 



Appropriation ..... 


. $8,000.00 


Expenditures. 




contract. 




Paid Mead, Mason & Co., on account, 




as per contract .... 


$4,987.00 


Mead, Mason & Co., changing 12 




second-story windows 


44.00 


Mead, Mason & Co., extra door and 




trimmings in basement 


7.00 



594 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 

Paid Daily Press Publishing Co., for ad- 
vertisement of sealed proposals, 3 
squares 7 times . . . . $7.25 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
for sealed proposals, 3 squares 6 
times ..... 10.50 



$17-75 



Paid Chas. H. Robie, concrete work, 

124.4 yards at 25c. . . . 531-10 

Chas. H. Robie, concrete work, 

115.44 yards at 45c. . . . 51.95 

$83.05 

Total amount of expenditures . . . $5,138.80 

Amount transferred to Hallsville schoolhouse . . 2,861.20 



Hallsville Schoolhouse. 

Appropriation, ....... $18,000.00 

Amount transferred from Webster-street schoolhouse 2,861.20 



$20,861.20 
Expenditures. 



Paid Sarah B. Woodman, consideration for land, 

deed dated March 23, 1891 ..... $3,300.00 

architects' compensation. 

Paid Wm. C. Butterfield, preliminary 

drawings ..... $62.50 



HALLSVILLE SCHOOLHOUSE. 



595 



Paid Bartlett, Gay & Young, plans sub- 
mitted for schoolhouse 

McFarland, Goodrich & McFarland, 
making plans for schoolhouse 

McFarland, Goodrich & McFarland, 
part commission for services 



$50.00 



500. 



$912. 50 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 

Paid Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising for sealed proposals, 3 
squares, 1 week 3 days 
Union Publishing Co., advertising 
for sealed proposals, 3 squares, 8 
times ...... 

John B. Clarke, advertising for 
sealed proposals, from April 17 
to April 25, 1 89 1, 2 inches, 7 



$8.25 



28.00 



times ..... 


10.50 




$46.75 


BUILDING. 




Paid Head & Dowst, on contract : 




July 


$4,000.00 


August ..... 


4,000.00 


September .... 


4,000.00 


October . 


1,500.00 


November .... 


2,000.00 


December .... 


1,000.00 




$16,500.00 


Total expenditures . 


• $20,759.25 


Balance to new account 


101.95 



$20, £ 



596 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Water-Works, Construction Account. 



Appropriation .... 

Amount transferred from reserved fund 



$25,000.00 
2,667.74 

$27,667.74 





Expenditures. 






LABOR. 






Paid men as per pay-rolls : 






April ..... 


$250.00 




May 






210.00 




June 






5 2 5-°° 




July . 






700.00 




August . 






325.00 




September 






375-°° 




October 






310.00 




November 






350.00 




December 




350.00 








$3>395-°° 






SUPPLIES. 






Paid Builders' Iron Foundry, iron pipe 






branches, increasers, bends, etc. 


$35 -32 




Chadwick Lead Works, 9,248 lbs 






pig lead a 


t $4.40 




406.91 





Chadwick Lead Works, 639 lbs. 3- 

lb. pipe, $38.42, less reels returned, 

$11.98 26.44 

Chadwick Lead Works, 100 lbs. 

fine solder 15-00 

McNeal Pipe & Foundry Co., iron 

pipe, branches, etc. . . . 9,767.43 
Manchester Locomotive Works, 

2,594 lbs. plugs, covers, and curbs 77-82 

Thos. A. Lane, couplings, unions, 

elbows, etc. .... 15 .49 



WATER-WORKS, CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 



597 



Paid Chapman Valve Co., 12 6-inch bell 

end water gates . 
Holyoke Hydrant and Iron Works 

10 5 -double hydrants, 5 j4 feet 
Holyoke Hydrant and Iron Works 

10 5 5/^ hydrants 
Edison Manufacturing Co., 1 brass 

water-way valve for pump . 
Hays Manufacturing Co., 200 service 

boxes, 5 feet 9 inches . 
Hays Manufacturing Co., 220 

inch curb cocks at $1.05 . 
Hays Manufacturing Co., 1 i-inch 

Payne corp. cock, J^ bend 
Hays Manufacturing Co., cartage 
Ludlow Valve Manufacturing Co. 

1 10-foot, 1 12-foot, and 1 14 

inch gates .... 
Whittier Machine Co., 1,059 ft- 7 

inches of i-inch "Adamanta 

pipe, at 13^0., 3,692 feet 2 inch 

es of i-inch "Adamanta" pipe. 

less 37^ per cent 
Whittier Machine Co., 6 4-inch and 

6 6-inch bell-end water gates 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 204 

lbs. jute packing at 65c. 
Thompson Meter Co., 1 2-inch me 

ter 

Thompson Meter Co., 20 5/g-inch 

meters .... 
Thompson Meter Co., 3 ^-inch 

meters .... 
Thompson Meter Co., couplings 
Paid National Meter Co. : 

121 2-inch Crown Comp. meters 
1 j-inch Crown Comp. meter 



141 


90 


355 


00 


34o 


00 


3 


2 3 


200 


75 


231 


00 


1 


• J 5 




•5° 



126.50 

423.70 

182.70 

13.26 

60.00 
190.00 

42.00 

10.95 

,936.00 

16.00 



598 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



2 24 -inch Crown Comp. meters . 


$5 2 -°° 


3 24 -i ncn Crown Comp. meters . 


78.00 


i i-inch N. meter .... 


10.75 


Paid Smith & Anthony Stove Co., 2 cocks 


6.05 


Walworth Manufacturing Co., 200 




corp. cocks .... 


100.25 


Walworth Manufacturing Co., 1 D. 




Miller cutter, etc. 


10.00 


Paid Newark Brass Co., tapping machine 




with gaskets : 




2 to 1 inch 


50.00 


1 | tap and drill (extra) 


2-75 


1 1 -inch tap and drill (extra) 


3.00 


1 J-inch corp. stop .... 


.58 


1 |-inch corp. stop .... 


1.04 


1 1 -inch corp. stop .... 


1.60 



£15,250.07 



HARDWARE, BLACKSMITHING, FREIGHT. 



Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

iron pipe, hydrants, etc. 
Concord Railroad Corporation, 

freight on pipe, oil, lead, etc. 
D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools, etc. 
Killey & Wadleigh, 1 keg of powder 
Manchester Hardware Co., 2 dozen 

Ames shovels .... 
Manchester Hardware Co., 1 dozen 

pick handles .... 
J. B. Varick Co., hardware of all 

kinds 

G. R. Vance & Co., 6 galvanized 

pails 



$i>353-96 

2I -53 
28.77 

2-75 



!-75 



39-9 2 



6.00 



$i,475- 6 8 



Paid Samuel H. Hunting, land as per deed $211.63 



WATER-WORKS, REPAIRS. 



599 



Paid Regina L. Brown, land in Auburn, 
as per deed .... 

James B. Hunting, land as per deed 
John J. Bell, land, etc., as per deed 
Woodbury A. Brown, land in Au- 
burn, as per deed 
Lizzie J. Richardson and others, 

land as per deed 
Mary E. & Joseph B. Young, land 
as per deed .... 



$IOO.OO 

I52-3 1 
800.00 

600.00 

215.00 



337.00 



— $2,415.94 



Paid E. A. G. Holmes, labor and teaming 


550.00 




Paid Jere. Hodge : 






97 feet 2$ Michigan pine . 


6.60 




28 window blinds .... 


26.76 




2 gothic blinds ..... 


3-25 




C. W. blinds, gothic heads 


n.40 




Other lumber and labor 


x 5-39 




Lumber, 2I hours' labor 


1. 10 




50 boxes at 30c. .... 


15.00 




Paid Charles H. Hutchinson, repairing 






tools ..... 


.80 




A. Filion, repairing derrick . 


•75 


$i3 l -°5 






Total expenditures . 




$22,667. 74 


Amount transferred to water-works repairs 




5,000.00 



127,667.74 



Water-Works, Repairs. 

Appropriation $17,000.00 

Transferred from water-works, construction . . 5,000.00 



$22,000.00 



600 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 



Paid labor of men, 


as per pay- 


rolls 








January . 
February 
March 












$615.78 
578.30 
608.55 


April 
May 












775-38 
1,067.91 


June 












754-29 


July . 
August . 
September 
October . 












397-43 
697.21 
867.30 
616.25 


November 






37o-52 


December 






582.33 


IRON PIPE, CASTING 


5, LEAD, 


ETC. 


Paid Builders' Iron 


Four 


idry, 


5 bra 


nches 




$33-25 



Chadwick Lead Works, 13,924 lbs. 
lead 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 
2,156 lbs. castings at 3c. . $64.68 
96 rough bolts at 8c. . . 7.68 



610.83 





$72.36 




Less 5,930 lbs. cast iron . 


47-44 









24.92 


1,000 lbs. castings 




30.20 


3,252 lbs. castings at 3c. . 




97-56 


1,190 lbs. castings at 3c. 




35-7o 


6 3-10 days' labor 




26.00 


37)^ lbs. steel at 4c. . 




1.50 


Team .... 




2.00 


205 lbs. castings at 3c. 




6.15 



$1W- 2 S 



WATER-WORKS, REPAIRS. 601 

Paid Taunton Locomotive Works, 66 lbs. 

grate casting at 4c $2.64 

Paid Union Brass Co. : 

1 dozen ^2 -inch corporation cocks 

with couplings .... 5.75 

2 dozen J^-inch corporation cocks . 11.50 
1 dozen ^-inch corporation cocks . 8. 50 

1 dozen i-inch sold, nipples . . 1.25 

2 dozen y 2 -mch corporation cocks, 

without couplings . . . . 9.50 

Paid Union Water Meter Co., for meters 

and repairs .... 264.41 

M. T. Davidson, 1 i-2-inch globe 

check valve . . . . .75 

National Meter Co., repairs on 

meters 64.50 

Peet Valve Co., 1 6-inch H. E. 

grate ..... 12.00 

Peet Valve Co., 4 6-inch H. E. 

grates 4S.00 

McNeal Pipe &: Foundry Co., iron 
water pipe and branches, pipe at 
$28.50 per ton, branches at 2^0 
per pound .... 10,000.00 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

2 curbs, 238 lbs., at 3c. . . . 7.14 

12 6-inch plugs, 205 lbs., at 3c. . . 6.15 

96 rough bolts and nuts at 8c. . . 7.68 

1 cover with rings, 60 lbs. plate at 6c. 3.60 

2y 2 hours' labor . . . . 1.00 

$11,322.48 

OIL, BELTING, PACKING, AND OTHER SUPPLIES. 

Paid Boston Belting Co., 19^ lbs., pack- 
ing at 50c $9.75 

J. Hodge, 100 meter boxes . . 30.00 

36 feet 3-inch Georgia pine . . 1.80 



602 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid i hour's labor . . . . $0.40 

P. C. Cheney Co., 461 lbs. No. 1 

wiping waste at 8c. . . . 36.88 

Thomas A. Lane, plumbing mate- 
rials, valves, hose, etc. . . 83.41 
Leonard & Ellis, 5^ gallons of oil 3 J -5o 
Underhay Oil Co., 5 barrel mon. 

grease, 251 lbs. at 16c. . . 40.16 

Underhay Oil Co., I barrel mon. 
red engine oil, 50 4-5 gallons at 
60c. ...... 30.48 

Merrill & Freeman, 1 barrel cement 1.45 

Pettee & Adams, 28 barrels cement 41.20 

Pettee & Adams, 1 barrel of lime . 1.00 

J. Stickney, 3 lbs. belt leather . . 75 

J. Stickney, 4 oak leather packings, 

cut to order . . . . 20.25 

J. Stickney, 1 dozen rubber chair 

tops .75 

Fred H. Holton & Co., 25 rubber 

washers . . . . . 1.50 

Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 6 coils 

jute packing, 620 lbs. . . 4°-3° 

Vacuum Oil Co., oil . . . 2 4-33 

A. M. Eastman, 14 gallons of oil . 2.52 

BLACKSMITHING, HARDWARE, AND FREIGHT. 

Paid D. F. Cressey, sharpening picks and 

other tools .... $65.76 

Concord Railroad Corporation, 

freight on pipe, meters, etc. . 1,149.53 

Killey & Wadleigh, hammer and 

brass lantern . . . . 1.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., 1 breast 

drill 2.25 

Manchester Hardware Co., i£ doz- 
en shovels . . . . . 15. 75 



$398-43 



WATER-WORKS, REPAIRS. 



603 



Paid G. R. Vance & Co., i fire-pot 

J. B. Varick Co., hardware of all 

kinds 

Waldo Bros., 5 barrels raw fire clay 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

on casting, oil, etc. . 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

on 13 meters .... 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 

on sundries .... 
Charles K. Walker, cash paid for 

expressage .... 

Charles K. Walker, cash paid for 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., plan- 
ing and finishing 1 ring gear, 125 
tons, $170, less 1 20-inch sleeve, 

$5 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., plan 
ing 1 steel pinion gear, 26 teeth 
with royalty 
J. J. Abbott, painting . 
John T. Beach, making wrench for 

drag .... 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 3 barrels 
charcoal .... 
Paid Head & Dowst : 
146 feet spruce timber 
112 feet 6x8 spruce . 
124 feet spruce timber 
12 feet spruce boards . 
Planing ..... 
100 U. and D. brick . 
15 hours' labor .... 
1 iron for derrick 



$1.00 

110.69 

7-5° 

2.70 

i-33 

.82 



1.82 



1165. 



24.00 
102.64 



1.40 

2.49 

1.79 

1.98 

.19 

.40 

•35 

3-75 

1. 00 



$1,362.85 



604 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid E. A. G. Holmes : 
Labor on shed and fence 
On icehouse 
Doors in house . 
Lumber 

Labor on outside windows 
Labor 

Labor boxing pipes . 
Paid A. Filion, repairing derrick 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairing tools 
Manchester Heating and Lighting 
Co., wringing coil, labor and ex- 
pense ..... 
Charles H. Robie, 2-horse team 
J day, carting gear to pumping 
station . 
Charles K. Walker, cash paid ex- 
press on grates, etc. . 
Charles K. Walker, cash paid team 
William E. Williams, repairing slate 
roof at station .... 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., boiler 

plate and brass castings 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 32^ 
hours' labor .... 
E. P. Johnson Co., 96,230 lbs. egg 

coal, at $7 
E. P. Johnson Co., 3 tons stove 
coal, at $7.25 .... 
Mills & Sturtevant, lumber . 
J. B. Sawyer, 15 bound stones 

Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . 



$25-5° 

21.00 

9.00 

.92 

5-5° 
100.00 

45-5° 
1. 00 
2.03 



5-5° 



6-37 

•5° 

9-3° 

1.80 

13.00 

336-So 

21-75 
62.54 

3-75 



>°-25 



#21,995.06 

4.94 

$22,000.00 



WATER-WORKS, CURRENT. 



605 



Appropriation 



Water-Works, Current. 



Expenditures. 



Paid Charles K. Walker, salary as supe 
intendent, to April i 
Charles K. Walker, salary as super 
intendent, to December 31 



$375-°° 



1,199.97 



Paid for gas . 






$31.48 


for telegrams .... 


.25 


for expenses at sundry times . 


.85 


for medicine (E. H. Currier) . 


1.25 


for sawdust and shavings 


.50 


for stamps . 


15.00 


for filing saws 


.30 


for directory and stamp . 


2.30 


for sundries .... 


2.47 


Paid labor, as per pay-roll : 




January 


$211.67 


February 






211.67 


March . 






211.67 


April 






211.67 


May 






in. 67 


June 






311.67 


July . 






211.67 


August . 






225.67 


September 






211.67 


October . 






204.00 


November 






2I 9-33 


December 






203.33 



$1,574-97 



$54-4o 



$2,545.69 



606 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Joseph B. Sawyer, services of self 
and assistant, in making sundry 
surveys, in making deeds, etc., 
etc., from January 30, 1891, to 
May 13, 1891 .... $55.70 

Joseph B. Sawyer, services of self 
and assistant, in making sundry 
surveys, in making deeds, etc., 
etc., from June 23, 1891, to No- 
vember 11, 1 89 1 . . . 60.00 

F. W. Elliott, May 20, meals to 
commissioners .... 12.00 

A. R. Ingham, January 24, 5 din- 
ners for commissioners . . 3.75 

A. R. Ingham, June 23, luncheon 

and dinners .... 6.00 

A. R. Ingham, June 23, use of 

steamer 4 hours .... 6.00 

James Bros., hack to Auburn . . . 8.00 

E. T. James, teams at sundry times 38.00 

New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., use of telephones . 110.00 

town of Auburn, tax on sundry 

pieces of land . . . . 45-03 

M. E. Kean, medical and surgical 

treatment of P. McDonough . 15-00 

G. B. Hoyt, recording deeds and 

postage 3.56 

Charles H. Reed, 23 bound stones, 
at 40c. ..... 9.20 

A. S. Campbell, 14,825 blank 

notices 2 3-5° 

A. S. Campbell, 500 postals, and 

printing same .... 6.00 

John B. Clarke, printing 500 re- 
ports, 32 pages, cover, and plate 28.00 

John B. Clarke, printing 14,150 

blank bills ..... 32.00 



WATER-WORKS, CURRENT. 



607 



Paid John B. Clarke, advertising water- 
works notices .... 

John B. Clarke, advertising, and 
binding water reports 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
water-works notices . 

Moore & Preston, 4 tons egg coal, 

at $7-25 

D. A. Simons, 4 cane-seat chairs, 

and gluing .... 

D. A. Simons, repairing 4 chairs . 

D. A. Simons, 4 office chairs . 
Frederick Perkins, treatment of 

John Hussey, 14 visits 
Frederick Perkins, treatment of 

Thomas McDonough, 9 visits . 
F. S. Bodwell, 5 bound stones 
John Ferguson, medical services 

rendered McDonough, from 

March 15 to May 30 
Pike & Heald, balance due on 

labor at pumping station . 

E. R. Coburn & Co., 7 meter books 
E. R. Coburn & Co., 4 day books 
E. R. Coburn & Co., 3 meter and 

rate books 
E. R. Coburn & Co., paper, envel 

opes, stationery 
H. C. Dimond & Co., platforn 

stamp .... 
James A. Weston, clerk of board of 

water commissioners . 



$i-75 

5- 2 5 

10.60 

29.00 

4.00 
1. 00 
6.00 



25.00 
5-5° 



1S.00 

i-39 

12.00 
30.00 

39.00 

11.56 

6.00 



$787-7a 



Total expenditures " 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



#4,962.85 
37-15 



$5,000.00 



608 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 







Commons. 




Appropriation 




Expenditures. 


. $3,000.00 


Paid as per pay- 


rolls 


of commons : 




April 






$182.25 


May 








187.25 


June 








i9 6 -75 


July . 








I 53-5° 


August . 








55-°° 


September 








121.00 


October 








167.00 


November 








129.50 
$1,192.25 



Paid as per pay-roll, district No. 2 
April 



17.00 



REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, repairing saws, etc. $1-25 

C. H. Hutchinson, repairing lawn 

mowers, etc. .... 38-56 
Peter Harris, sharpening lawn mow- 
ers 5.40 

Jere. Hodge, 947 feet 2^-inch sap- 
ling, for seats . . . . 23. 6S 
Jere. Hodge, 232 feet 2^-inch sap- 
ling, for seats . . . . 5.80 
Jere. Hodge, 6}^ hours' labor . 2.60 
H. Liebing, painting fountains and 

fences, 42^ lbs. paint . . 5.10 

H. Liebing, 11 6-10 days' labor . 26.10 

John A. Sargent, paints and oils . 13-62 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 gears for lawn 

mower ..... .50 



COMMONS. 609 

Paid John B. Varick Co., hardware, 

tools, etc. .... $57-96 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing materials, 

labor, etc. . . . . 41 .79 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing materials 
and labor on Hanover-street 
fountain . . . . . 18.26 

Thos. A. Lane, 2 cast nozzles for 

fountains ..... 8.55 

Thos. A. Lane, nipples, hose noz- 
zles, dippers, and labor . . 3.80 

L. Pope, sharpening picks, etc. . 1.00 

Flint & Little, lumber and labor . .45 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 10 

stakes . . . . . 1.50 

J. T. Beach, work on wrench . 1.00 

Geo. F. Rief, materials and labor 

on settees . . . . 12.02 

J. J. Abbott, 2>Y\ lbs. paint and 
putty .50 

Pettee & Adams, 6 barrels cement 16.45 



MACADAMIZING. 

Paid Chas. H. Robie, for concrete work, 
Hanover common, 80.9 yards 

at 25c $20.22 

Chas. H. Robie, for concrete work, 
Hanover common, 177 yards at 

45C 79-65 

Chas. H. Robie, for Park common 

walks, 742 yards at 45c. . . 333-9° 



FLOWERS, LOAM, ETC. 

Paid Ray Brook Garden Co., plants 
around fountain on Tremont 



$20.00 



$285.89 



$433-77 



610 



E CITY AUDITOR. 

*S I -S3 



Paid H. H. Huntress, plants on commons 
J. S. Holt & Co., 5 cords leached 

ashes . . . . . 

J. S. Holt & Co., 95 bushels leached 

ashes . . . . . 

J. B. Varick Co., clover, bent, and 

red-top seed, etc. 
J. B. Varick Co., 1,000 lbs. Coe's 

phosphate . 

Morrill & Goggin, 46 loads loam 
Morrill & Goggin, 4 loads of loam 

at 30c. . 
George Whitford, 10 loads of loam, 

Hanover common 
F. S. Worthen, 2 flower beds on 

Hanover common 
Chas. H. Robie, 1 load of gravel . 
D. H. Young, 1 cord of manure . 
A. H. Hood, plants for 2 beds on 

Tremont common 
Joseph N. Auger, 7^ cords leached 

ashes . 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



Appropriation 



Stark Park. 



Expenditures. 



62.50 
11.87 

5-75 

i7-5° 
46.00 



40.00 



4.00 




40.00 




86.25 


$397-85 






$2,406.76 

593-24 




$3,000.00 



$500.00 



Paid labor on commons, as per pay-rolls 
May 



$16.00 





STARK PARK. 




June . 






$8-75 


July . . 






22.50 


August . 






73.OO 


September 






9°-75 


November 






I5.OO 




HARDWARE, 


ETC. 





611 



$226.00 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., scythes, bush 
hooks, grass hooks, lawn rakes, 
and other hardware . . . $7.76 

American Express Co., for flag . 3.75 

Harry J. Briggs, 1 day setting stone 

bounds ..... 2.00 

Harry J. Briggs, 44 hours' work on 

surveys ..... 8.80 

Geo. W. Wales, 1 day setting stone 

bounds ..... 2.00 

Geo. W. Wales, 13 4-10 days sur- 
veying plans and tracings . . 26. So 

F. S. Bodwell, 4 stone posts, cut on 

taper, 6 inches on sides . . 10.00 



ENGINEERING SERVICES. 



$6l.II 



Paid W. H. Bennett, 62 hours' labor on 
survey notes and plans 

Harrie M. Young, 44 hours' work 
on survey and plans . 

Harrie M. Young, use of team 2 days 

Joseph B. Sawyer, 3^ days' sur- 
vey of Stark park, self and 2 men 
at $10 ..... 

Joseph B. Sawyer, 1 day's labor of 
assistant making plan 

Joseph B. Sawyer, expense . 



$24.80 

9.90 

5.00 



37-5° 



3.00 

•75 



612 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Eben T. James, team i]4 days for 
survey of the park 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$3-75 



#84.70 

$371.81 
128.19 

$500.00 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 
Appropriation ...... . $6,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund, for purchase 

of land ........ 3,000.00 



,9,000.00 



Expenditures. 



id labor, as per pay-r 


all, at cemetery 




January 




$187.11 


February 










147.36 


March . 










123.36 


April . 










235.45 


May 










370.00 


June 










507-25 


July . 










364.28 


August . 










346.95 


September 










434.84 


October 










30S.13 


November 










334- 20 


December 










284.62 


PLANTS, 


TREES, LOAM, AI 


iT> CLAY. 


id A. A. Ainsworth,- 


1 loads of loam 


$10.50 


J. Francis, p 


ants 








14.37 



#3^43-55 



H. H. Huntress, plants . 



53-75 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 613 

Paid Manchester Horse Railroad, 124 

loads of loam, at $1.25 . . $155.00 
Manchester Horse Railroad, 98 

loads of loam, at $1.25 . . 122.50 
J. B. Varick Co., 500 lbs. Coe's 

phosphate 8. 75 

J. B. Varick Co., 20 lbs. mixed 

grass seed 2.70 

J. B. Varick Co., grass and other 

seeds . . . . . . 12.79 

J. B. Varick Co., red-top, clover 

seed, etc 5.61 

C. C. Webster, 9 loads of clay . 9.00 

John Woodman, 20 loads of loam . 27.00 

$421.97 



FUEL, TELEPHONE, ETC. 

Paid E. P. Johnson Co., 5 tons of egg- 
coal $35-5° 

New England Telegraph and Tele- 
phone Co 54.25 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid William E. Moore : 

Printing and binding 2 blank receipt 
books ...... 

100 postals and printing 

Letter-heads and blocking . 

Printing postals and water receipts 

Printing, binding, and lettering blank- 
book, certificate of lots . 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co., station- 
ery and blank-books 



$6.00 


2.00 


2.50 


3-50 


5-5° 


9.64 



$89.75 



\2g.l4 



614 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 17 win- 
dow shades . . . . 514-45 

John Clifford, 3 days' mason work 9.00 

Head & Dowst Co., labor and ma- 
terials 26.64 

J. Hodge, 400 2-inch chestnut 

grade stakes .... 9.00 

J. Hodge, 100 pine grade stakes . .90 

C. H. Hutchinson, 7]- hours' labor 

on pruning-knife ... .50 

C.A. Hoitt & Co., repairing 4 chairs 2.75 

H. Liebing, painting and frescoing 

main building .... 175-00 

H. Liebing, painting tool-house . 30.00 

Timothy McKenna, cleaning vault 

at cemetery .... 3.50 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, materials, 

and labor t 410.S3 

Palmer & Gannon, 6 range posts, 
and cutting, rubbing, and letter- 
ing same 7.53 

C. H. Robie, concreting roadway, 

1,392 yards, at 60c. . . . 904.80 

J. Stickney, green covering cloth 

and tacks .27 

J. Stickney, 1 pair long rubber 

gloves . . . . . 1.50 

Whitten & Fifield, team delivered 

to John Young .... 7.50 

J. B. Varick Co., glass, putty, oil, 
varnish, sheet lead, nails, 4 mat- 
tocks, 1 screwdriver, 2 snow 
shovels, ax, lawn rakes, 25 feet 
of hose, floor brush, turkey- 
feather duster, wrench, file, and 
other hardware . . . . 56.73 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



615 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 300 
chestnut stakes, 2x2, pointed . 

Marden & Woodbury, granite steps 
and posts 

Bartlett, Gay & Young, 3 half-wash 
hydrants ..... 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saw 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Byron A. Stearns, cash paid for ex 
penses of trustees of Pine Grove 
cemetery to Forest Hill ceme 
tery, Boston, Mass., and return 

Byron A. Stearns, cleaning house a 
cemetery .... 

Wingate & Gould, 1 pair rubber 
boots .... 

Union Publishing Co., notice to 
water takers, etc. 

G. R. Vance & Co. 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$4-5° 

50.00 

16.25 
.20 



$16.00 
1.78 

2-75 

4.00 
•55 



$i,73i-85 



$25.08 

,941-34 
,058.66 



$9,000.00 



Appropriation 



Valley Cemetery. 

Expenditures, 
labor. 



Paid labor, as per pay-roll, at cemetery : 

January $5 8 - 8 3 

February 63.16 



52,800.00 



616 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Septembe 

October 

Novembe 

December 



Paid labor as per pay-roll, district No. 
B. F. Bascomb, team labor 



$63.95 
I43-5 6 
206.74 
266.07 
209.01 
199.56 
238.83 
I54-64 
M5-07 
122*68 



$4.00 
153-°° 



$1,872.10 



:57.oo 



TURF, SAND, LOAM, PLANTS, ETC. 



Paid B. F. Bascomb, 24 loads of stone . 
B. F. Bascomb, 43 loads of sand . 

B. F. Bascomb, 141 loads of gravel 
Timothy Carr, 4 loads of loam 

J. Francis, plants of various kinds . 

C. H. G. Foss, cash paid John L. 
Chilas, for trees and shrubs 

C. H. G. Fcss, cash paid Dingee & 

Conard Co., for trees and shrubs 

C. H. G. Foss, cash paid H. M 

Whiting, for trees and shrubs 
C. H. G. Foss, cash paid H. M 

Whiting for shrubs 
R. W. Lamprey, 3 shrubs 
Henry McEvoy, 96 loads of loam 
H. H. Huntress, 3 dracaena . 
Michael Murray, 2 cords of manure 
Ray Brook Garden Co., plants of 
various kinds .... 
J. B. Varick Co., seeds and phos- 
phate ..... 



$27.00 

14.10 

45-12 

4.00 

49.14 

6.25 

4-25 



1. 00 

4.00 
38.40 

3.00 
10.00 

13.48 
3 2 -33 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 617 

Paid Peter O. Woodman, 2,790 feet of 

turf ...... $27.90 

Peter O. Woodman, 100 loads of 

loam ...... 50.00 

Killey & Wadleigh, 100 lbs. lawn 

dressing ..... 2.75 

J. N. Auger, 10 bushels of ashes . 1.67 

Stone & Wellington, 1 double flow- 
ering cherry .... 1.00 

Stone &: Wellington, 5 shrubs . 3.00 

Welcome Jencks, 29 loads of loam . 14*50 

Waterman Smith, 1 load of stone . 1.50 

— $356-39 



STATIONERY. 

Paid Freeman G. Riddle, 1 book of re- 
ceipts $1-85 

Freeman G. Riddle, 1 blank-book . 2.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 direc- 
tory ...... 2.00 

Temple &: Farrington Co., ink, 
blotting paper, pencils, envelopes, 
mucilage, etc. . . . . 2.13 

C. H. G. Foss, cash paid for 100 

stamped envelopes . . . 2.20 



REPAIRS, EXTENSIONS, TOOLS. ETC. 

Paid J. Hodge, 78 feet 2-inch sapling . $i-95 

J. Hodge, y 2 hour's labor . . .20 
Pike & Heald, plumbing materials 

and labor 21.18 

Thomas A. Lane, plumbing materi- 
als and labor .... 42.51 
J. Francis, 1 pair of rubber boots . 3.00 
Killey & Wadleigh, 2 lawn rakes, 1 

spade 1.35 



10.18 



618 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Killey &: Wadleigh, 2 chain wheel- 
barrows 

Killey & Wadleigh, 1 shovel . 
Head & Dowst, building summer- 
house and bridge, as per contract 
Head & Dowst, material and labor 
on seats in summer house, etc. . 
J. B. Varick Co., 30 ft. '.-inch hose 
J. B, Varick Co., ax, scythe, stones, 

and reel .... 
J. B. Varick Co., other hardware 
G. R. Vance & Co., 18 lbs. stove 

Pipe 

Hill & Co., 40 lbs. canvas, 12 x 10 

at ioc. .... 
Hill & Co., express 
L. M. Aldrich, filing saw 
Manchester Hardware Co., 1 plane 

2 rakes, 1 ball of twine 
1 set grindstone fixtures 
M. J. Whalen, repairing strap 
J. J. Abbott, paint, shellac, and 
labor 



$4-oo 
•6.5 

275.00 

12.78 
2.70 

1.28 
13.90 

1.80 



'•59 

•5° 
•5° 

2.78 



vS393- 



Paid Byron A. Stearns, cash paid for expenses of trus- 
tees of the Valley Cemetery to Forest Hill Ceme- 
tery, Boston, Mass., and return . 



$6.00 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



52,794-79 
5.21 



i2, 800. OO 



DERRYFIELD PARK. 619 



Receiving Tomb. 



Appropriation ...... . $500.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 20.00 



Derryfield Park. 



Paid J. B. Varick, axes, scythes, garden 

rakes, and other hardware . . $12.66 

Leander Pope, blacksmithing . 2. So 



$520.00 



Expenditures. 

Paid Manchester Heating and Lighting Co., 1 iron 

rack, as per contract .... . . $520.00 



Appropriation ..... 




$500.00 


Expenditures. 






labor. 






Paid labor as per commons pay-roll : 






August ...... 

September ..... 

October 


$129.50 

166.74 

91-75 


$387-99 
5.62 


city farm, labor of nine men f day each 





$15-46 



Total expenditures . . . . . $409.07 

Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 9°-93 

$500.00 



620 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paupers off the Farm. 

Appropriation $4,500.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 428.24 



$4,928.24 



Expenditures. 




groceries. 




id G. W. Adams 


$72.00 


B. Bresnehan 




8.00 


A. N. Clapp 




18.00 


A. M. Eastman 




5.00 


Eager & Rand 




55-°° 


T. F. Fifield . 




12.00 


H. Fradd & Co. . 




18.00 


Griffin Bros. . 




714.00 


P. Harrington 




50.00 


0. D. Knox & Co. 




7S.00 


Thomas Mahoney . 




207.00 


McQuade Bros. 




90.00 


D. M. Poore . 




36-31 


Joseph Quirin 




150.00 


Robitaille Bros. 




24.00 


P. Ryan 




133.00 


D. A. Shannahan . 




66.00 


Henry Weber 




132.18 


Joseph Wiggin 




21.00 


Hallsville Grocery Store 




2.00 


Bartlett & Thompson . 




48.00 


T. E. McDerby . 




24.00 



$1,963.49 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. 
J. H. Coburn 
F. X. Chenette . 



$11.50 
15.00 
19.20 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



621 



Paid DeCourcy & Holland . 


$40.25 


S. L. Flanders 


10.00 


E. P. Johnson Co. 


58.20 


Merrill & Freeman 


4.00 


August Schink 


S.50 


F. T. Dun lap 


5-95 


Moore & Preston . 


3-25 


BOARD AND 


CARE. 


Paid Mrs. William Chase 


$120.00 


Hillsborough county farm 


90.00 


A. D. Hatch 


I20.00 


Carrie E. Jackson 


95.24 


Agnes Masse 


56.OO 


Christiana Maycock 


I2S.32 


William J. Powers 


52.OO 


State Industrial School . 


1,642.27 


J. D. Welcome 


60.OO 


Carrie M. Watts . 


21.47 


Daniel Stevens 


16.OO 


Hannah Murphy . 


IO.OO 


CLOTHI1S 


G. 


Paid Dodge & Straw . 


$1-25 


Joseph Murray 


2.6o 


Weston & Martin 


"•75 


M. A. McDonough 


13.70 


E. F. Scheer & Co. 


1.25 


Fred Dow 


1.50 


MEDICIN 


ES. 


Paid John B. Hall 


#2.75 


L. K. Mead . 


98.15 



$175-3; 



$2,411.30 



$32-05 



noo.90 



622 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Clarke, printing 400 postal 

blanks . . . . . $5- 2 5 

John B. Clarke, printing 2,000 bill- 
heads ..... 9.25 
John B. Clarke, printing 36 envel- 
opes, 2C. stamp . . . . 1.50 
Temple & Farrington Co., paper, 
envelopes, rubber bands, pens, 

penholders, etc 2.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 1 blank- 
book . . . . . . 2.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 8 di- 
rectories . . . . . 16.00 

Paid Fred Perkins: 

Certificate of insanity for Julia Paul . 3.00 

Extra services for Mrs. Edward Mas- 
son . . . . . . 15.00 

Surgical and medical services for Lizzie 

Farnum . . . . . . 15-00 

Certificate of insanity, Frank L. Blais- 

dell 3.00 

Certificate of insanity, L. M. Goward 3.00 

Medical services for Timothy Devan . 5.00 

Paid Henry W. Boutwell, consultation 

and visit to Mrs. Edward Masson 3.00 

A. G. Straw, certificate of insanity 

for Julia Paul .... 3.00 

A. G. Straw, certificate of insanity 

for L. M. Goward . . . 3.00 

William W. Wilkins, examination 

of Frank L. Blaisdell, insane . 3.00 

F. X. Chenette, burial expenses of 

John Morency . . . . 25.00 

H. D. W. Carvelle, professional ser- 
vices rendered Fred Spaess, set- 
tlement made by overseers of the 
poor 58.00 



CITY FARM. 



623 



Paid Peter T. Kean, burial of child of 

Edward Masson 
F. L. Wallace & Co., conveying J. 

Welch to city farm 
F. L. Wallace & Co., burial of 

Nancy J. Ray .... 
F. L. Wallace & Co., burial of 

Adam D. Wilson 
J. L. Robinson, medical attendance 

on Nora Griffin .... 
William H. Maxwell, stationery 

and other office supplies 



$3-°° 



25.00 



2.15 



5244-65 



Total expenditures . 



$4 ; 9 2 8-24 



City Farm. 



Appropriation 



$6,500.00 



Expenditures. 



HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 



Paid 



L. M. Streeter, Superint 


endent . $500.00 


Mary E. Streeter, Mat-rc 


n . . 300.00 


Emma M. Streeter 


57.01 


A. Bancroft . 


21.99 


Thomas Burke 


162.00 


Mary Ban- 


19.71 


George Baker 


18.75 


Levi 'Carter . 


18.66 


Thomas J. Estes . 


174.62 


Mrs. T. J. Estes . 


102.47 


Hannah Hackett . 


65.59 


Kate Houghton . 


16.06 


D. B. Hutchins . 


205.65 



624 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 




Paid Mrs. D. B. Hutchins . 


$85.32 




L. J, Proctor 




96-45 




C. W. Pike . 




3 I2 5 




Samuel Richardson 




.86 




H. Southworth 




4.66 




Fred Shaw . 




5-33 




W. K. Stockdale . 




x 3-5° 




Fred Sanborn 




220.61 




Lewis Wilber 




.S5-3 2 




Hattie Covell 




27.44 




Merritt Covell 




38.40 




Mary J. Davis 




4.00 




Joseph Murphy 




3i-99 




Mary Morse . 




43-72 




Maria Nichols 




3°-43 




Lottie Flynn 




3-43 




Jane Carpenter 




6-43 




Mrs. Charles Thompson 




3.00 




Charles Thompson 




4.66 




district No. 2, 2^ days' labor, mer 






and teams 


2.00 


$2,371-31 



Paid Moore & Preston, 2,225 pounds 

furnace coal at $6.50 . . $7-3* 
Moore & Preston, 10,000 pounds 

stove coal at $7 . . . 35 .00 
Moore & Preston, 24,000 pounds 

furnace coal at $5.85 . . . 70.20 
Paid A. & D. M. Poore : 

12,985 pounds stove coal at $7 . . 45-45 

19,940 pounds egg coal at $6 . . 5 9. 81 

5,835 pounds egg coal at $6 . . T 7-5° 

2,000 pounds stove coal at $7 . . 7.00 

1 barrel Cumberland coal at $1 . . 1.00 

Paid A. C. Wallace, 1 load of sawdust . 1.00 



$244.27 



CITY FARM. 



625 



CLOTHING AND DRY GOODS. 



Paid Barton & Co., cotton, quilts, towels 
crash, gingham, prints, ticking 
napkins, and other dry goods 
George Blanchet, cotton batting 
shirting, ticking, toweling, prints 
and other dry goods . 
Clark & Estey, socks, needles, thim 
bles, elastics, buttons, oil-cloth 
combs, etc. ... 
Frank L. Downs, 4 pairs of men'; 
rubber boots .... 
Frank L. Downs, 1 pair men's lace 

balmorals .... 
Jas. A. Folsom, overalls, caps, jump 
ers, pants, and other clothing 
Paid W. P. Farmer : 
9 pair of brogans 
6 pairs ladies' shoes . 
3 pairs rubber boots . 
Repairs ..... 
Brogans, shoes, and repairs 
Paid H. M. Moody, hats, overalls, jump 
ers, mittens, coat, necktie, col 
lars, gloves, vests, drawers, pants 
and other clothing 
Miville & Co., gingham, batting 

and cambric ... 
Miville & Co., gingham, batting 

and cambric 
Wingate & Gould, boots, shoes 

rubbers, umbrellas, etc. 
G. W. Dodge, 6 pairs men's shoes 
G. W. Dodge, 2 pairs slippers 
G. W. Dodge, 4 pairs soles . 



$101.97 



51.28 



2 9-39 

10.50 
1.50 

3i-5° 

1 1 . 05 

7.10 

8. 04 

•55 

5-8 5 



108.05 
7.26 



7.26 



19 


21 


7 


75 


1 


60 




20 



$410.06 



626 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 



Paid Bartlett &: Thompson, 658 pounds 
of beef ..... 

Bartlett & Thompson, 9 pounds of 

pork chops 
Bartlett & Thompson, 81 pound 

of cabbage 
O. Brochue, 33 bushels of potatoes 
Dodge & Laing, 71 bushels of pota 
toes ..... 

Dodge & Laing, 2)4 bushels beans 

John F. Dowd, groceries 

Drake & Parker, 34 barrels Pills 

bury's best flour 
Drake & Parker, 4 barrels Wash 

burn's best flour 
Drake & Parker, 1 barrel Millwood 
Drake & Parker, 2 barrels P. flour . 
A. G. Grenier, groceries 
Hardy & Co., groceries 
Geo. H. Hubbard, 127 lbs. smok- 
ing tobacco .... 

Daniel Johnson, 83 lbs. sausage at 
ioc. ..... 

Daniel Johnson, 2 lbs. sage . 
W. D. Ladd & Co., 2 barrels of 
crackers .... 

Manchester Beef Co., 2 kegs of tripe 
Manchester Beef Co., 14 lbs. ger 

mans at ioc. 
Manchester Beef Co., 178 lbs. of 

beef at 74c. 
A. McDougal, 12 bushels potatoes 
McQuade Bros., groceries 
E. S. Newton, boneless cod . 
Public Market, groceries 



$41-03 



2.60 

35-So 

77-52 
5-38 
7-43 



23.60 

4-75 

9-5° 

62.21 

45.61 

34.08 

8.30 

•5° 

4-35 
2.20 

1.40 

13-79 
12.30 

216.80 
37-8 9 

205.89 



CITY FARM. 627 

Paid J. H. Pierce & Co., tea, coffee, 

spices, and flavoring extracts . $52.80 
Joseph Quirin, groceries . . 107.04 
Tom. W. Robinson, 586 lbs. beef . 36.51 
E. M. Slayton, 50 bushels potatoes 57-35 
L. Shelters, 4 barrels potatoes . ^^3-^5 
L. Shelters, 13 bushels potatoes . J 3-4i 
Union Pacific Tea Co., 7 lbs. tea . 4.00 
Union Pacific Tea Co., 6 lbs. coffee 1.92 
H. I. Woods, bread and crackers . 3.64 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., groceries . !8-35 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., 72 lbs. tobacco 16.80 
Carl E. York, groceries . . . 71.81 
Clough & Co., groceries . . 33-oi 
Henry W. Parker, 12 barrels Pills- 
bury' s flour . . . . 73. 20 
Robinson Bros., 14 lbs. tobacco . 3.30 

$1,562.60 



FURNITURE AND COOKING UTENSILS. 



Paid Barton & Co. : 




2 yards of oil-cloth 


$ -5° 


2 yards of tapestry .... 


1. 00 


2 shades ...... 


•5° 


3 skeins carpet thread 


.12 


3 yards oil-cloth .... 


2.10 


28}^ yards carpet .... 


18.53 


Paid Clark M. Bailey, pails, brooms, dry 




measures, and dairy pans . 


13.86 


F. E. Nelson, crockery, flour sieves, 




dippers, plates .... 


3.68 


F. E. Nelson, kettles, milk-pail, 




etc 


28.81 


Pike & Heald, merchandise and 




labor ...... 


29.58 


J. N. Tuck, 1 alarm clock 


5-5° 


D. B. Varney, 1 copper kettle 


10.80 





$19.21 




11.29 




2-75 




•15 




•25 


Home), 6 






1.98 


Home), i 





628 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Weston & Hill : 
33 T A yards carpet 
Other dry goods 
iSyi yards hemp carpet 
Thread 
1 shade 
Paid " The Kitchen " (R. K. 
chambers . 
"The Kitchen" (R. K. 

ewer and basin .... .95 

"The Kitchen" (R. K. Home), 

paper and paper tacks . . .43 
"The Kitchen (R. K. Home), 
scrub brushes, lantern globe, bas- 
ket, etc 7.03 

Higgins Bros. Co., 2 steam- 
holders ..... .66 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., 1 No. 28 pastry-oven stove. 12.50 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 
Co., putting up stove and new 
Pipe 2.50 



SERVICES AND MEDICINE. 

Paid J. A. Alexander, veterinary ser- 
vices, etc $29.00 

John B. Hall, medicines on pre- 
scriptions, etc., from May, 18S9, 
to April 4, 1891 . . . 21.75 

O. P. Lucier, 3 Roberts ozonators 

(disinfectants) .... 9.00 

L. K. Mead, medicines . . . 6.50 

Eames Bros., prescription . . .35 

Z. F. Campbell, medicines . . 8.74 



$174.68 



$75-34 



CITY FARM. 629 



FERTILIZERS, SEEDS, ETC. 



Paid Gregory & Son, seeds of various 

kinds $4-65 

W. P. Jerrard, seeds of various 

kinds 3.55 

Aretas Blood, 3^ cords of manure, 

at $3.50 12.25 

S. B. Putnam, 3 cords of manure . 5.00 



HARDWARE. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, ground bone, 
whiting, adze handles, poultry net- 
ting, wire nails, oyster shells, rat 
traps, brooms, pail, solder, pow- 
der, trace chains, 4 wood-saws, 
126 lbs. galvanized wire, axle 
grease, other hardware and agri- 
cultural supplies .... $67.78 
Manchester Hardware Co., 1 spring- 
tooth harrow, 1 dozen shovels, 1 
grindstone, nails, spring door- 
lock, other hardware . . . 88. 33 
J. B. Varick Co., 1 hand force- 
pump, ]/ 2 dozen square-point 
shovels, other hardware . . 17-64 



HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Paid Merrill & Freeman, meal, oats, 

bran, middlings, etc. . . $566.70 

Partridge Bros., bran, oats . . 2 3-5° 

Pettee & Adams, oats, middlings, 

bran, and grinding, etc. . . 81.44 



$25.45 



$173-75 



$671.64 



630 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



Paid John T. Beach, i dump cart . 

John T. Beach, ironing lead bar, 

whiffletree, painting 
D. E. Guiney, materials and labor 
repairing steam-pipe . 
Paid C. H. Hutchinson : 

Norway iron, soft steel, and 12 hours' 
labor on shackles, 1 hour's labor on 
box wrench . 
Materials and labor on mowing-ma 

chine and cutter . 
21^/2 hours' labor on boiler 
1 hand-hole gasket 
3 glass gauges, gasket, etc. . 
108 Hill patent boiler-plugs, 289 lbs 
Paid Peter Harris, sharpening and repair 
ing lawn mower 
Peter Harris, 3 keys 
Peter Harris, 2 keys 
Head & Dowst, timber, boards, 
brick, and other materials and 
labor on various repairs 
T. A. Lane, labor on water-pipe, at 

barn 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, printing, re 
pairing, and other work and ma 
terials on carts, wagons, etc. 
Pike & Heald, repairing pumps, 

water-pipe, etc. 
R. M. Rollins & Son, Pitman bolts 
guards, knives, etc., for mowin_ 
machine .... 
J. Stickney, sole leather, pegs 

nails, etc. 
L. N. Westover, 6 ash stakes, at 8c 



: 70.00 
3.00 
2. So 

5-33 

11.25 

8.60 

• 2 5 

•35 

15.90 

1. 00 
•45 
•5° 

83.98 



52-05 

11.25 

2.88 



CITY FARM. 



631 



Paid L. N. Westover, 145 feet oak plank 

L. N. Westover, 13^ hours' labor 

Shirley & Stuart, 2 whitewash 
brushes . ... 

Shirley & Stuart, lime . 

J. J. Abbott, paints, etc. 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 86 feet 
of spruce, 4x4, planed four 
sides, at 2^c. .... 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 72 feet 
of spruce, 1^x3, planed two 
sides, at 2c 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 46 feet 
of spruce furring, at 1.6c. 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saws 



BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC 

Paid J. H. Cram & Co., shoeing horses 
C. G. McDuffie, shoeing horses 
Thos. P. Riley, repairing harnesses 
etc. ..... 

Thos. P. Riley, axle grease, fly col 
lars, etc. .... 

J. O. Tremblay, shoeing horses 
F. N. McLaren, repairing harnesses 
Amos Dow & Son, shoeing horses 
Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 
1 pair horse covers . 
1 pair zinc pads 
1 pair sheets 

1 pair flag collars 
4 collar pads 

2 rope ties .... 
Paid H. C. Ranno & Son, repairing team 

harness, etc. 
N. J. Whalen, stock and lash 



$6.53 
5.00 



2.00 

•75 
13.28 



1.44 



•74 

•5° 



$9.00 
5.18 

9.00 



3.00 


40.00 


n-57 


3.00 


1.40 


1.50 


1. 00 


1.50 


3.00 


•36 


4.40 


1.25 



$418.02 



$951.16 



632 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid John Dowst, agent, insurance on 
city farm property in the Capitol 
Fire Insurance Co., policy 18,829 $20.00 

C. M. Edgerly, agent, insurance on 
farm buildings and contents, pol- 
icy 100,829 Peoples Fire Insur- 
ance Co., $40, less dividend of $8 32.00 
Paid A. Elliott & Co., insurance on farm 
buildings and contents : 
Granite State Insurance Co., policy No. 

35>9 2 5> $2,000 .... 40.00 

Northern Insurance Co., policy No. 

10,064, $2,000 .... 40.00 

Paid E. P. Richardson, agent, insurance 

on building and contents, N. H. 

Fire Insurance Co., policy No. 

32,682 ..... 60.00 

A. W. Baker, dentistry work on 

horses ..... 8. 00 

Concord Railroad Corporation, for 

freight .32 

N. E. Telegraph &: Telephone Co., 

use of telephone . . . 42.00 

" New England Homestead," sub- 
scription to March 1, 1892 . 1.50 
S. S. Piper, postmaster, rent of 
post-office box for quarter ending 
June 30, 189 1 . . . . .75 

S. S. Piper, postmaster, rent of 
post-office box for quarter ending 
September 30, 1891 ... .75 

S. S. Piper, postmaster, rent of 
post-office box from January 1 to 
March 31 . . . . . .67 

Dennis Shea, use of boar . . 2.00 



INDIGENT SOLDIERS. 



633 



Paid L. M. Streeter, express, stamps, and 

box rent $3.55 

E. C. Tilton, scraping snow and 

cutting ice .... 14.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank- 
books, postage stamps, and other 
stationery . . . . 7.31 

Samuel Richardson, grinding and 

pressing 82 bushels apples . . 5.01 

J. F. Baldwin, 1 box of watch clock 

dials ...... 2.00 

Wm, Hayes, 4 cider casks . . 4.00 

Robert I. Stevens, services of bull . 4.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

pigs for sale, 1 inch 2 weeks . 1.25 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 

for help ..... 1.50 



i2QO. 61 



Total expenditures 



$6,512.89 



Indigent Soldiers. 



Appropriation 



$i,5< 



Paid 



Expenditures. 




groceries. 




G. W. Adams 


$154.00 


Bartlett & Thompson . 


54.00 


Griffin Bros. 


260.00 


Thomas H. Mahoney . 


96.00 


D. A. Shannahan 


84.00 


McQuade Bros. 


6.00 


Geo. C. Lord 


6.00 



$660.00 



684 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 



Paid L. B. Bodwell .... 


$2.00 


Fred T. Dunlap .... 


3-75 


DeCourcy & Holland . 


8.25 


Merrill & Freeman 


16.25 


Moore & Preston .... 


3-75 


BOARD AND CARE. 




Paid Mary McCook .... 


$78.00 


Daniel Sullivan .... 


62.00 


E. C. Tilton .... 


36.00 


John Flynn ..... 


16.00 


MEDICINES. 





Paid L. K. Mead 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Clarke, 1,000 bill-heads and filing 

Total expenditures .... 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 
Balance 



$34.00 



$192.00 



$15-15 



$5-25 



40 
592.60 

1. 00 

11,500.00 



Women's Aid and Relief Hospital. 

Appropriation $400.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Women's Aid and Relief Hospital . . . $400.00 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 635 

Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation $600.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Elliot Hospital, amount for 2 free beds . . $600.00 



Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Appropriation ...... . $300.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 33-54 



Expenditures. 

Paid to John T. Beach, commander of Louis Bell 
Post G. A. R., bills paid sundry persons for ex- 
penditures incurred on Memorial Day, May 30, 
1891 : 

PRINTING. 

Paid John B. Clarke, printing 1,816 

flags ...... $20.40 

F. R. Challis, printing 1,000 pro- 
grams 2.75 



CARRIAGE HIRE. 

Paid E. V. Turcotte, use of two hacks 

and one barge .... $11.00 

F. X. Chenette, use of two barges 

and one hack . . . . 15.00 

Felch's stable, use of hack and 

horse hire . . . . . 6.00 



$333-54 



$23.15 




95. ST. PATRICK CATH. SCHOOL. 



iiiiiniiiiiMiuniiiinin 


WW 

Mr 



91. ST. JOSEPH'S. CATHOLIC. 




93. ST. MARY'S. FR. CATH. 






94. ST. GEORGE. FR. CATHOLIC. 



DECORATION OF SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 635 

Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 
Appropriation ....... $600.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Elliot Hospital, amount for 2 free beds . . $600.00 



Decoration of Soldiers' Craves. 

Appropriation ...... . $300.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . 33-54 



Expenditures. 

Paid to John T. Beach, commander of Louis Bell 
Post G. A. R., bills paid sundry persons for ex- 
penditures incurred on Memorial Day, May 30, 
1891 : 

PRINTING. 

Paid John B. Clarke, printing 1,816 

flags $20.40 

F. R. Challis, printing 1,000 pro- 
grams ..... 2.75 



CARRIAGE HIRE. 

Paid E. V. Turcotte, use of two hacks 

and one barge . . . . $11.00 

F. X. Chenette, use of two barges 

and one hack . . . . 15-00 

Felch's stable, use of hack and 

horse hire . . . . 6.00 



$333-54 



$23.15 



osn 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid A. L. Jenness & Son, use of hack 
Whitten & Fifield, use of hack 
E. T. James, use of hack 
G. W. Reed, use of hack 
J. C. Nichols & Son, use of two 
hacks .... 

C. H. Simpson, use of hack . 
J. Freeman, use of hack 
J. W. Truel, use of hack 

D. H. Morgan, use of team . 



$4-oo 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 

8.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
2.00 



MUSIC AND SINGING. 

Paid Manchester Military (First Regi- 
ment) band .... $75-oo 

Manchester Drum Corps (J. H. Mc- 

Cabe) 12.00 

Manchester War Veterans' Drum 

Corps . . . . . 15 .00 

G. A. R. Quartet (H. Parker 

French) ..... 8. 00 



$70.00 



$110.00 



Paid J. B. Varick Co., garden trowels, 

etc $3-oo 

J. Hodge, flag staffs . . . 12.00 

Head & Dowst Co., labor and ma- 
terials for platform on Monument 

square 51-00 

Palmer & Gannon, 25 markers . 17-25 

Killey & Wadleigh, garden trowels, 

etc .87 

Manchester Mills, 206)^ yards 

worsted goods . . . . 16.50 

Thomas Stewart, trucking settees 

to and from Monument square . 10.00 



637 



Paid First Light Battery, N. H. N. G., 
for powder .... 

J. Shiney, putting flags on stakes . 

J. Shiney, team to French ceme- 
tery ...... 

L. N. Westover, 48 flag stakes 

Total expenditures 



10.00 

5-75 



1. 00 

3.00 



$i3°-39 

$333-54 



Militia. 



Dpropriation ..... 




$900.00 


Expenditures. 






id Amoskeag Veterans 


$100.00 




First Regiment, N. H. N. G. 


100.00 




City Guards ..... 


100.00 




Lafayette Guards, Co. H, First 






Regiment, N. H. N. G. . 


100.00 




Manchester Cadets 


100.00 




Manchester War Veterans 


100.00 




First Regiment Headquarters, N. 






H. N. G 


100.00 




Sheridan Guards .... 


100.00 




(The above for maintenance of 






armories from February 12, 1891, 






to February 12, 1892.) 






Upton Light Infantry, to February 






12, 1892 ..... 


75.00 




Total expenditures . 




$875.00 


nount transferred to reserved fund 




25.00 



$900.00 



638 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Abatement of Taxes. 

Appropriation ..... . . $3,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid sundry persons on taxes abated . $2,557.24 
by balance transferred to new ac- 
count ..... 442.76 

$3,000.00 



State Tax. 
Appropriation $63,435.00 

Expenditure. 
Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer . . . $63,435.00 



County Tax. 
Appropriation $46,032.47 

Expenditure. 
Paid Edwin F. Jones, county treasurer . . . $46,032.47 



NEW DEPOT. 639 

General Descriptive Memorandum, to Accompany 
Sketches for the Union Passenger Station, Man- 
chester, N. H. 

Bradford L. Gilbert, of New York City, 
Wm. M. Butterfield, of Manchester, N. H., 

Associate Architects. 

The general perspective sketch is intended to represent the 
exterior of the building as it will appear when completed, and 
together with the general plans, elevations, and sections, indi- 
cates fully the entire design and the general features incorporated 
in the same. 

The position of the station building proper has of necessity 
been determined by the location of the proposed overhead cross- 
ing of Central street, and the natural grade of the site proper. 
The arrangement of the general ground plan has been carried 
out as most desirable for the accommodation and convenience 
of the public, and an expeditious administration of the railroad 
service. Nothing known to modern railroad construction, which 
would tend to emphasize these special features, has been omitted, 
but the whole design is intended to suggest a building which, 
when erected, will be a model of convenience and comfort, a 
structure for which the citizens of Manchester will justly feel a 
local pride, and need offer no apologies. 

The material of which the building will be constructed has 
been selected with a special reference to the location. The en- 
tire exterior exposed to view will be of rockfaced New Hamp- 
shire granite, with quoins around the openings, tooled so as to 
form a contrast with the rockfaced work, all backed up with 
brick. No detail or fancy ornamentation has been provided for 
anywhere, but the entire effect of the exterior is intended to be 
one of massive simplicity and graceful contour lines, formed by 
constructional outlines in correct and effective architectural de- 
sign, forming a building which will show upon its face the pur- 
pose for which it has been erected. To enhance the effect of 
height, the tower has been designed, which will also be utilized 



640 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

for storage purposes, and for the large illuminated clocks as 
shown. 

As previously stated, every accommodation possible has been 
provided for the public. Outside of the building on the track 
side, wide platforms have been provided, and the covered train 
shed, about ninety-two ieet in width and seven hundred feet in 
length, covering all tracks and platforms. Ample egress has been 
provided from this train shed by means of wide platforms and 
sidewalks, covered in every case by overhead awnings. The 
roofs of the building will be entirely of slate, special attention 
having been paid to the matter of protection from damage by 
heavy snow storms. 

On the street side of the station, a very wide and generous 
porte cochere has been provided, capable of affording shelter for 
several carriages at the same time. The rotunda, or general 
waiting-room, opening at this point, has been made a special 
feature of the design, the space opening through the clere story 
to the roof trusses with large generous windows at either end. A 
large open fireplace has also been provided. The entire floor 
and wainscoting of the rotunda, about ten feet in height, is in- 
tended to be carried out in marble. The size of this room will 
be sixty feet by sixty feet, and about fifty feet in height. From 
this rotunda the various rooms open off as most convenient. 

The ladies have been provided with a large and generous pri- 
vate room, set apart exclusively for their use, and everything 
which might tend to their comfort and convenience. The res- 
taurant is so located as to afford the most desirable service. An- 
other large waiting-room has been provided with all conveniences 
for passengers who may not wish to use the rotunda. The large 
union ticket office has also been arranged conveniently to both 
waiting-rooms, and with a special feature for quick service. 

The gentlemen are provided with a generous smoking-room 
with all conveniences. The express rooms are located at the 
south end of the building, and the baggage rooms where most 
central, at the northern end. Offices are provided also for the 
station agent, train dispatchers, telegraph service, and conduct- 
ors. The sizes of these various rooms are marked on the general 



NEW DEPOT. 641 

ground plan. The second story of the building where utilized 
is arranged for railroad offices on the north side of the rotunda, 
and on the south side for the kitchen and serving pantries in 
connection with the restaurant (thus obviating all disagreeable 
odors from the cooking). The entire basement is excavated, and 
will be utilized for heating and storage purposes. 

The questions of heating and plumbing have been given thor- 
ough and careful attention, and all known sanitary appliances 
conducive to health and comfort have been provided. 

A fountain has been suggested in the triangular square facing 
the building, which if desired can be made a very pleasant and 
practicable feature. 

It is intended to provide a large map on the wall of the ro- 
tunda, showing the various railroads and connections, as a matter 
of convenience for the public. 

In addition to the foregoing description of the passenger sta- 
tion the citizens of Manchester are amply interested in the mat- 
ter of the grade crossings at Granite and Central streets. 

The grade crossing at Granite street has received the most 
careful attention of the Concord officials and others interested. 

The practicability of abolishing the crossing by the substitution 
of a tunnel under the tracks, or any other feasible means, was 
submitted to John E. Cheney, engineer for the city of Boston, 
who has had a long experience in devising means to do away 
with grade crossings, and his opinion is recognized as authority 
upon such questions. 

After a thorough investigation of more than a year of the loca- 
tion of the crossing and the lands adjoining (including the Man- 
chester mill property and Bedford street south of the crossing, 
which would be practically destroyed by a tunnel), Mr. Cheney 
advises it is practically impossible to substitute a tunnel in place 
of the present crossing. 

The plans submitted to the Manchester city government by 
the Concord & Montreal Railroad are recommended by him as 
the only feasible method of dealing with the crossing question. 

The grade crossing at Central street will be abolished, and the 
overhead way will so relieve the pressure of traffic on Granite 

41 



642 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



street that the gates can be closed whenever it is necessary to use 
that crossing for trains. 

The overhead way like the one proposed has been adopted in 
many places, including five or six different places in New Eng- 
land, and although objected to before being built has been 
found in every case to accomplish the purpose for which it 
was designed, and in actual use to be thoroughly satisfactory to 
the public. 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropria- 
tions for the Year 1891. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Coutuil of the 
City of Manchester in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the sum of four hundred and forty thousand, forty-two 
and forty-seven one hundredths dollars ($440,042.47) be raised 
'for the use of the city for the year 1891, by tax on the polls and 
estates liable to be taxed therein, which, together with such un- 
appropriated money as may be now in the city treasury, or may 
hereafter come into it, shall be appropriated as follows : 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Interest 










$51,500.00 


Payment of funded debt 










100.00 


Reserved fund 










20,000.00 


City hall 










2,100.00 


Printing and stationery 










2,000.00 


Incidental expenses 










15,000.00 


Mayor's incidentals 










300.00 


City officers' salaries 










15,500.00 


STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 


Highway district No. 1 ..... $300.00 


" " 2, 3 .... 12,000.00 


" " 4 .... 500.00 


5 










600.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



643 



Highway district No. 6 












$500.00 


7 










1,500.00 


8 










1,000.00 


" < c 9 










500.00 


" " IO 










3,800.00 


" " ii 










1,000.00 


" " 12 










200.00 


13 










200.00 


New highways 










10,000.00 


Land taken for highways 










2,000.00 


Watering streets . 










4,800.00 


Paving streets 












5,500.00 


Macadamizing streets 












18,000.00 


Grading for concrete 












5,000.00 


Scavenger teams . 












12,000.00 


Street sweeping 












1,200.00 


Lighting streets . 












42,000.00 


Bridges 












2,000.00 


City teams . 












5,000.00 


Sewers and drains 












25,000.00 


Engineer's department . 












3,500.00 


Health department 












1,500.00 


City auditor's departme 


nt 










1,700.00 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Repairs of schoolhouses . 






$4,000.00 


Fuel 






3,700.00 


Furniture and supplies . 






750.00 


Books and stationery 






300.00 


Printing and advertising 






400.00 


Contingent expenses 






800.00 


Care of rooms 






3,700.00 


Evening schools 






1,500.00 


Teachers' salaries . 






47,000.00 


Evening school, mechanical drawing 




600.00 


Free text-books 






3,000.00 



644 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY LIBRARY. 

City library $3,800.00 

FIRE. 

Fire department $37,000.00 

Fire-alarm telegraph 1,400.00 

Hydrant service ....... 5,000.00 

Firemen's parade 500.00 

POLICE. 

Police department $37,000.00 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Repairs of buildings .... 
Varney school house .... 
Addition to Webster-street schoolhouse . 
New schoolhouse at Hallsville 



$2,500.00 
1,000.00 
8,000.00 

18,000.00 



WATER-WORKS. 



Construction $25,000.00 

Repairs 17,000.00 

Current expenses ....... 5,000.00 



PUBLIC PLACES. 



Commons 

Stark park 

Pine Grove cemetery 

Valley cemetery 

Derryfield park 

Repairs receiving tomb 



$3,000.00 

500.00 

6,000.00 

2,800.00 

500.00 

500.00 



PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 



Paupers off the farm 
City farm 



$4,500.00 
6,500.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



645 



Indigent soldiers .... 








$1,500.00 


Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 






400.00' 


Free beds, Elliot Hospital 






600.00 


Decoration of soldiers' graves 






300.00 


Militia 






900.00 


TAXES. 


Abatement of taxes ...... $3,000.00 


State taxes . . . . . . . . 63,435.00 


County tax . 


46,032.47 


$635,217.47 


ESTIMATED RECEIPTS. 


Amount to be raised by tax . . . . . $440,042.47 








3,700.00 


Railroad tax .... 








21,000.00 


Savings bank tax . 








68,000.00 


Literary fund 








4,000.00 


Water-works 








72,000.00 


City hall .... 








2,400.00 


City teams ..... 








2,500.00 


Tuition ..... 








350.00 


Fire department . 








4,500.00 


Police Department 








6,900.00 


Pine Grove cemetery . 








4,200.00 


Valley cemetery .... 








1,100.00 


County of Hillsborough 








2,200.00 


City farm ..... 








2,000.00 


Interest on taxes .... 








325.00 




$635,217.47 



February 10, 1891, 



646 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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VALUATION AND TAXES. 



647 



Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the City of Manchester, do solemnly 
swear that in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the 
foregoing taxes, we appraised all taxable property at its full 
value, and as we would appraise the same in payment of a just 
debt due from a solvent debtor. So help us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 



The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on the real and 
personal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. H., for the year 
1 89 1, was as follows: 





Valuation. 


^ate per $1,000. 


Tax. 


Real estate 


• $20,557,146 


#17.80 


#365,917.20 


Personal property 


3,278,646 


17. So 


5^359-89 


Overlay . 






•4i 



No. of polls, 10,367 



$23,835,792 
1,036,700 



17.80 



Totals . . $24,872,492 
Special tax on 713 male dogs, at $1 
Special tax on 49 female dogs, at $2 

Total 

The share distributed to Manchester of the 
amount of the tax assessed, as per returns made 
by the corporations to state treasu 

On railroads .... 
On savings banks 
On insurance companies . 
On literary fund . . 

Grand tax total 



#424,277.50 
18,453-26 



$442,730.76 

713.00 

98.00 

$443,541-76 



#22,059.03 

73,275-55 
3,920.25 
5,287.50 

$548,084.09 



648 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Appropriated and assessed in 1891, for city ap- 
propriation $427,275.00 

Appropriated and assessed in 1891, for state tax 63,435.00 

Appropriated and assessed in 1891, for county 

tax 46,032.47 

Overlay* 11,341-62 

Grand tax total $548,084.09 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the 
state, see State Treasurer's Report of June 1, 1891. 

TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



Year. 




£ & 

P to 

<D 00 


ii 


OS 

X 

B 
-a 











s 





p . 

§1 




§1,170.10 

1,397.21 

1,208.13 

1,266.47 

1,172.44 

1,602.52 

1,566.28 

367.89 1 
19.79S.71 1 

443,541.76 






§1,170.10 








1,397.21 






$1.63 

1.62 

6.80 

15.99 

153.70 

16,394.92 

41S,5S7.59 


1,206.50 


Taxes of 1886 




1,264.85 




1,165.64 






1,586.53 






1,412.58 




1,953.97 
568.70 


1,817.71 




Taxes of 1891 


24,385.47 




$473,091.51 


$2,522.67 


$435,162.25 


$35,406.59 







*This overlay consists of $Sn special dog taxes, $2,688.29 assessed by the local assessors, 
under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 57, section 4, and the sum of $7,842.33 in the 
amount received from railroads, banks, insurance companies, and literary fund above the 
amount estimated by the city councils. 



TAX VALUATIONS. 



649 



Tax Valuations, Etc., from 1846 to 1891, Inclusive. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. Polls. 


Poll Tax. 


Val.of poll. 


1846 . . 


$3,187,726 


$22,005.95 


1,808 


$2.10 


$300 


1847 . . 


4,488,550 


24,953.54 


2,056 


1.68 


300 


1848 . . 


4,664,957 


39,712.53 


2,688 


2.58 


300 


1849 . . 


5,500,049 


44,979.92 


2,518 


2.47 


300 


1850 . . 


5,832,080 


48,974.23 


2,820 


2.37 


300 


1851 . . 


6,906,462 


51,798.47 


2,910 


2.25 


300 


1852 . . 


6,795,682 


54,379.45 


2,745 


1.92 


240 


1853 . . 


6,995,528 


61,545.81 


2,907 


1.82 


240 


1854 . . 


8,237,617 


62,022.44 


2,814 


1.80 


240 


1855 . . 


8,833,248 


71,952.09 


3,725 


1.94 


240 


1856 . . 


9,244,062 


114,214.88 


3,760 


2.96 


240 


1857 . . 


9,983,862 


84,862.98 


3,695 


2.04 


240 


1858 . . 


10,259,080 


78,210.85 


3,695 


1.83 


240 


1859 . . 


9,853,310 


81,368.01 


3,495 


1.92 


240 


1860 . . 


9,644, < . : >: : ;7 


86,804.87 


3,651 


2.16 


240 


1861 . . 


9,343,254 


99,104.96 


3,974 


2.40 


240 


1862 . . 


8,891,250 


84,827.45 


3,071 


2.21 


240 


1863 . . 


9,597,786 


96,233.86 


2,995 


2.40 


240 


1864 . . 


9,517,512 


142,815.98 


3,168 


3.50 


240 


1865 . . 


9,478,368 


209,696.20 


3,176 


5.18 


240 


1866 . . 


10,050,020 


245,567.19 


4,114 


5.50 


240 


1867 . . 


10,101,556 


207,457.39 


4,170 


4.61 


240 


1868 . . 


9,929,072 


208,783.07 


4,583 


2.85 


150 


1869 . . 


10,205,303 


254,022.43 


4,709 


3.72 


150 


1870 . . 


10,710,252 


234,047.63 


4,959 


3.27 


150 


1871 . . 


11,365,162 


236,639.74 


5,404 


3.12 


150 


1872 . . 


11,542,632 


259,196.67 


5,911 


2.24 


100 


1873 . . 


12,001,200 


300,768.00 


6,212 


2.50 


100 


1874 . . 


12,716,892 


312,835.05 


6,219 


2.46 


100 


1875 . . 


14,195,102 


315,131.29 


6,227 


2.22 


100 


1876 . . 


15,309,348 


248,900.93 


6,295 


1.62 


100 


1877 . . 


15,605,918 


246,573.46 


6,341 


1.58 


100 


1878 . . 


15,912,234 


276,873.32 


6,477 


1.74 


100 


1879 . . 


17,482,132 


264,406.73 


6,633 


1.50 


100 


1880 . . 


17,735,990 


263,812.17 


7,219 


1.48 


100 


1881 . . 


17,943,308 


316,462.26 


7,574 


1.76 


100 


1882 . . 


19,175,408 


312,673.82 


7,831 


1.62 


100 


1883 . . 


20,055,986 


332,741.72 


7,944 


1.65 


100 


1884 . . 


20,613,032 


361,401.61 


8,143 


1.75 


100 


1885 . . 


21,137.464 


345,260.15 


8,157 


1.63 


100 


1886 . . 


21,379,384 


347,009.31 


8,602 


1.62 


100 


1887 . . 


21,905,476 


373,138.96 


8,996 


1.70 


100 


1888 . . 


22,162,928 


432,914.45 


9,344 


1.95 


100 


1889 . . 


22,962,790 


437,092.69 


9,527 


1.90 


100 


1890 . . 


24,207,740 


462,869.17 


9,723 


1.91 


100 


1891 . . 


24,872,492 


443,541.76 


10,367 


1.78 


100 



650 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Settlement of the Account of Ceorge E. Morrill, Col- 
lector of Taxes, June 1 , 1 89 1 . 





Amount out- 
standing, June 
1, 1890. 


Amount 
collected. 


Balance out- 
standing, June 
1, 1891. 


Tax list, 1885 


$1,208.13 


#I-63 


$1,206.50 


1886 


1,266.47 


I.62 


1,264.85 


1887 


1,172.44 


6.80 


1,165.64 


1888 


1,602.52 


15-99 


1,586.53 


1889 


1,566.28 


*53-7° 


1,412.58 



Cr. by receipt of treasurer, No. 81 

Interest collected, 1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 



Cr. by receipt of treasurer, No. 81 



$179-74 
179-74 

$0.89 

.72 
2.06 

3- 2 9 

17.99 

387.01 

$411.96 
411.96 



Dr. 



1890. 



To resident list 


$461,290.59 


non-resident list 


i,578.53 


voluntary taxes . 


367-89 
$463,237.06 


Cr. 




By cash paid city treasurer, 




per receipts . 


$401,167.54 


cash paid as per county 




treasurer's receipt . 


46,032.47 


discounts . 


11,265.25 


abatements 


2,954.09 


unpaid taxes, June 1, 1891 . 


1,817.71 
$463,237.06 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION. 651 

City of Manchester to George E. Morrill. 
Dr. 

To salary for the year ending June i, 

1891 $1,650.00 

commissions on old taxes . . 10.28 



$i,66o.2< 



Cr. 



By cash paid by treasurer, on account 

of salary $800.00 

balance paid by treasurer, as per 

bill 860.28 



1,660.28 



Manchester, N. H., July 9, 1891. 
I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George 
E. Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same 
correct, as above stated. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions 
from Taxation. 

Constitution of New Hampshire, Article 82, Page 38, Public Stat- 



ENCOURAGEMENT OF LITERATURE, ETC. 

Article 82. " Knowledge and learning generally diffused 
through a community being essential to the preservation of a 
free government, and spreading the opportunities and advantages 
of education through the various parts of the country being highly 
conducive to promote this end, it shall be the duty of the legis- 



652 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

lators and magistrates, in all future periods of this government, 
to cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and all sem- 
inaries and public schools ; to encourage private and public 
institutions, rewards and immunities for the promotion of agri- 
culture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and nat- 
ural history of the country ; to countenance and inculcate the 
principles of humanity and general benevolence, public and pri- 
vate charity, industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, 
sincerity, sobriety, and all social affections and generous senti- 
ments among the people ; provided, nevertheless, that no money 
raised by taxation shall ever be granted or applied for the use of 
the schools or institutions of any religious sect or denomination." 

Public Statutes, chapter 55, section 2 : 

Section 2. "Real estate, whether improved or unimproved, 
and whether owned by residents or others, is liable to be 
taxed, except houses of public worship, twenty-five hundred dol- 
lars of the value of parsonages owned by religious societies and 
occupied by their pastors, schoolhouses, seminaries of learning, 
real estate of the United States, state, or town used for public 
purposes, and almshouses on county farms." 

Section ii. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for 
a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment 
proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capi- 
tal to be used in operating the same, unless such establishment 
has been previously exempted from taxation by some town." 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 N. H. Rep. page 623. "The exemption in each case is 
limited to ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power 
of taxation would be the destruction of government ; and the 
dangerous tendency of legislation suspending any part of that 
power, for any period, is manifest. P. Bank v. Billings, 4 Pet. 
514, 561. So long as the existing laws remain unrepealed, and 
the constitutional construction heretofore adopted remains un- 
changed, contracts hereafter made under those laws and that 
construction will be valid. If the legislature for any reason wish 



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EXEMPTIONS FEOM TAXATION. 653 

to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their object 
can be accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective 
charters as " being of the nature of a public charity," as follows : 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 
1889, chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, N. H. Laws of 18S1, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Relief Society, organized in 
January, 1875 ; N. H. Laws, 1S91, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover 
street, N H. Laws, 18S3, chapter 56. 



Memoranda. 



An extension, to the east, of St. Joseph's cathedral and a 
chapel, both in process of building, will soon occupy the two 
lots between the cathedral and the bishop's residence on Lowell 
street. 

The house formerly on these two lots has been moved to the 
lot of the "Old Ladies' Home," and is being converted into a 
hospital fronting on Amherst street. The city council have 
voted to sell the Park-street schoolhouse for parochial school 
purposes. 

St. Mary's French catholic church is not yet completed. 
When finished, it will cost, with land, about $100,000. 

St. George's French catholic church is not yet completed. 
When finisded, it will cost, with land, about $75,000. 

The Second Advent church building and lot have been sold to 
the Swedish Baptist society. 

The South Manchester union chapel is in process of building. 

It is probable that a lot will be purchased during the coming 
year, and a building erected for the " Gale Home." The real 
estate and personal property in the hands of trustees will now 
exceed in value $120,000. 



654 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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BONDED DEBT. 



655 



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656 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MAN- 
CHESTER, N. H., FROM JANUARY 1, TO DECEMBER 31. 





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At 4 per 
water-work 


Five per c 
cemetery bo 


$70,000 issuei 
31, 1803. * 
issued Jul 
1864. Six pel 
to fund deb 


•d <o <s be 


1890 


$400,000 


$200,000 


$13,850 


$120,000 


$60,000 


1891 


400,000 


200,000 


18,850 


120,000 


60,000 







u 




<*H 1 


fc( GO • - ' 








Cjgcd 


oe 


Amount of 6 pe 
cent water bond 
on which intei 
est has ceaset 
not yet present 
ed for payment. 


p mo 
nog O 


Total. 


Amount of 6 p 
Cent bonds d 
and paid. 


a H p, 
ill 


Is* 

©5rH 


$155,000 


$948,S50 


$99,900* 


$100,000 


$948,850 


$100 


155,000 


953,850 


100 




953.850 









Remarks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in 
the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay $ioo and upward. 
There are $18,850 in cemetery bonds, so called, in the hands of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $935,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, including cem- 
etery bonds ...... $953,850.00 

Net indebtedness for water purposes . . . 600,000.00 



Net debt after deducting water debt 



$353^5°-°° 



* $400,000, water bonds, issued January 1, 1872;" $100,000 of these bonds re- 
funded January 1, 1887. 

t $200,000, water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 of these bonds re-funded 
July 1, 1890. 

I $2,200, cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds each year. 

The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the cemeteries. Bonds 
payable July 1, 1913. 



BONDED DEBT. 



657 



As shown in the assessors' books for the year 
1S91 : 

The assessed value of personal property, includ- 
ing poll tax $4,315,346.00 

The assessed value of real estate . . . 20,557,146.00 



Total value for taxation . 

Tax rate 1.7S per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt fo: 

water purposes) to assessed valuation 
Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt fo 

water purposes) to assessed valuation 

Population, census of 1890 
Population, census of 1880 



. $24,872,492.00 



1.422 

3-834 

43>9§3 
3 2 5 458 



Increase of population in ten years . . 1 1,525 

Increase of population in 1891 (estimated at) . i>5oo 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at 
maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in 
gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sum of $600,000 by section 6, chap- 
ter 70, New Hampshire Laws of 187 1, entitled "An act to enable 
the city of Manchester to establish water-works." 

42 



658 



REPORT OF THE GITY AUDITOR. 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDED 
DEBT. 



Year. 


* Six per 
cent 
water 
bonds. 


t Four 

per cent 

water 

bonds. 


Five per 

cent 
ceme- 
tery 
bonds. 


Six per 
cent to 
fund 
debts. 


Four per 
cent to 
build 
Mc- 
Gregor 
bridge. 


Four per 

cent to 

fund 

debts. 


Total of 
annual in- 
terest. 


1S90 

1891 


$27,000 
24,000 


$6,000 
8,000 


$623.75 
813.92 


$7,200 
7,200 


$2,400 
2,400 


$6,200 
6,200 


$49,423.75 
48,613.92 



SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT. 

Amount of bonded debt January i, 

1S91 $948,850.00 

Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 

1891 5,000.00 

Temporary loan ; note due Decem- 
ber 1, 1892 .... 30,000.00 

Accrued interest on temporary loan 125.00 

Accrued interest on bonded debt . 21,392.26 



Total indebtedness Jan. 1, 1892 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 
2 



Net cash on hand January 1, 1 
Taxes uncollected, list of 1891 
Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad 
estimated value . 



$93,190.14 
24»385-47 



14,000.00 



1,005,367.26 



— $131,575-61 



* $400,000, water bonds, issued January 1, 1872 ; $100,000 re-funded at 4 per 
cent, January 1, 18S7. 

t $200,000, water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 re-funded at 4 per cent, 
July 1, 1890. 

$60,000, bridge bonds, issued July 1, 1881, at 4 per cent. 

$155,(100. bonds issued April 1, 1885, at 4 per cent. 

s* 70,000, bonds to fund debts, issued October 1, 1863, and are due November 1, 
1893. 

$50,000, bonds to fund debts, issued July 1, 1864, and are due July 1, 1894. 

$2,200, cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds, each suc- 
ceeding year. The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the ceme- 
teries. 

Bonds pavable July, 1913, to the trustees of cemetery funds; not negotiable. 
Amount that can be issued limited to the sum of $20,000. 



BONDED DEBT. 659 

Total net indebtedness January 

h 1892 $873,791.65 

Total net indebtedness January 

i, 1891 858,376.77 

Increase .... . . $15,414.88 



660 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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Druggist. 

Real -estate office, etc. 
Banking. 

Banking. 
f Rented for various purposes 
] at $5 per evening, but al- 
1 lowed to be occupied for 
1 charitable purposes free. 


os" 


Occupant. 
City. 


Heat 

furnished 
by 


City. 


3 si 


Store and 
basement. 

Office 

(bank). 
Office 

(bank). 
Hall. 


5 

3 

o 

O 


John J. Holland. 

A. J. Lane. 

N. 11. Trust Company. 

Second National Bank. 
Sundry persons. 


5 

"3 
o 

1-1 


904 Elm street. 

918 

90S 
914 

City Hall on third story. 


1*3 

2a 
a o> 
a * 


$360.00 

800.00 
550.00 

700.00 

Uncer- 
tain. 



M 

3 
3 

3 


Battery occupies first and sec- 
ond floor and basement. 

Guards occupy third floor. 

Ward meetings are held in bat- 
tery room on second floor. 


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REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



663 



Real Estate Owned by the City. 



SCHOOLHOUSES. 



High school house and lot . 
Franklin-street schoolhouse and lot 
Spring-street schoolhouse and lot 
Lincoln-street schoolhouse and lot 
Ash-street schoolhouse and lot 
Main-street schoolhouse and lot . 
Webster-street schoolhouse and lot 
Blodget-street schoolhouse and lot 
Bridge-street schoolhouse and lot 
Lowell-street schoolhouse and lot 
Merrimack-street schoolhouse and lot 
Wilson Hill schoolhouse and lot . 
School-street schoolhouse and lot 
South Main -street schoolhouse and lot 
Bakersville schoolhouse and lot . 
Stark district schoolhouse and lot 
Amoskeag schoolhouse and lot . 
Goffe's Falls schoolhouse and lot 
Harvey district schoolhouse and lot 
Webster's Mills schoolhouse and lot 
Hallsville schoolhouse and lot (old) 
Youngsville schoolhouse and lot . 
Mosquito Pond schoolhouse and lot 
Park-street schoolhouse and lot . 
Varney schoolhouse and lot 
Hallsville schoolhouse and lot (new) * 



$50,000.00 

20,000.00 

16,000.00 

50,000.00 

58,000.00 

23,000.00 

22,639.00 

3,500.00 

4,000.00 

7,000.00 

15,985.00 

3,300.00 

5,000.00 

2,800.00 

15,000.00 

3,000.00 

3,700.00 

3,600.00 

2,500.00 

600.00 

3,500.00 

1,400.00 

1,200.00 

8,500.00 

50,000.00 

20,759.00 



ENGINE-HOUSES. 



$394,9 8 3-°° 



Engine-house, stable and land, Vine street . 
Main street, West Manchester 



$47,000.00 
20,000.00 



> Amount expended in 



664 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Engine-house, cottage and lot, Lake avenue, cor- 
ner of Massabesic street . . $19,371.00 

and lot, Webster street, corner Chest- 
nut ...... 13,000.00 

Clinton street, West Manchester . 2,500.00 
Hose-house, cottage and lot corner Maple and 

E. High ........ 5,000.00 

$106,871.00 

OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library, building and lot . . . . $41,000.00 

City hall, building and lot . . . . . 60,000.00 

City farm and permanent improvements . . 34,000.00 

Court-house and lot ...... 51,000.00 

Battery building on Manchester street . . . 18,000.00 

Police station on Manchester street . . . 43,300.00 

City stables and city yard ..... 36,000.00 

Gravel lots, 2 acres, Goffstown .... 400.00 

Gravel lots, Bakersville ..... 700.00 

Gravel, district No. 10, Brooks & Brock . . 500.00 

Land bought of A. D. Gooden .... 345 .00 

$285,245.00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 

Property in care city engineer .... $848.24 

in care chief engineer of fire department 93,303.00 
in care superintendent highway district 

No. 2 ..... . 26,698.00 

in care superintendent highway district 

No. 10 666.85 

in care superintendent of schools . . 36,235.00 

in care city messenger .... 2,759.00 

in care city marshal and janitor . . 1,970.25 

in care superintendent of city farm . 11,287.57 

in care trustees of city library . . 28.332.90 



REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



665 



Property in care superintendent of Pine Grove 
cemetery ...... 

in care superintendent Valley cemetery 
Stock in Suncook Valley R. R., in care city treas. 
Personal property in care city weigher 



Uncollected taxes in 1890 . 
Uncollected taxes in 1891 . 
Net cash in the treasury, December 31. 



1890 



$248.35 

106.00 

50,000.00 

1,000.00 

$253,455-16 

$i,8i7-7i 
24,3 s 5-47 
93,190.14 



H9>393-3< 



OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OWNED BY CITY. 



Soldiers' monument ..... 

Permanent inclosure of commons 
Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 
Fountains and water troughs on streets and com 
mons ....... 

Two city tombs ...... 

McGregor bridge ..... 

Granite bridge . . . . 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls 

Expended on construction of sewers . 



$25,000.00 
10,200.00 
25,000.00 

3,500.00 

10,000.00 

90,000.00 

25,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

294,470.00 

$501,170.00 



PARKS AND CEMETERIES 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 80 acres 

Amoskeag cemetery, 1.05 acres . 

Stark park, 28 acres 

Derryfield park, 76 acres 

Concord common, 4.48 acres 



$200,000.00 

40,000.00 

4,000.00 

9,000.00 

25,000.00 

200,000.00 



666 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Tremont common, 2.25 acres 
Hanover common, 3 acres . 
Park common, 3.49 acres 
Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 



$40,000.00 

100,000.00 

60,000.00 

200,000.00 

000.00 



WATER- WORKS. 



Real estate and personal property of water-works, 
at cost price ....... 



RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the city, schoolhouses 

Real estate owned by the city 

Real estate owned by the city, engine-houses 

Water-works at cost price . 

Personal property owned by the city 

Uncollected taxes and cash 

Other real and personal property 

Parks and cemeteries . 



$394,983- 00 
285,245.00 
106,871.00 
988,221.82 
• 253,455.16 
ii9,393-32 
501,170.00 
878,000.00 

$3,527,339-3° 



PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 



Inventory of assets, December 31, 1891 . . $3,527,339.30 

Inventory of assets, December 31, 1890 . . 3,395,387.00 

Gain in valuation ..... $131,952.30 

The increase in the valuation as above stated results from the 
amount expended in 1891, on : 

Sewers and drains ...... $50,000.00 

Hallsville schoolhouse ..... 20,759.00 

Addition to Webster-street schoolhouse . . 5,139.00 

Gravel lot, bought of Brooks & Brock . . 500.00 

Land bought of A. D. Gooden . . . 345.00 

Increase in property value of fire department . 2,207.00 



REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



667 



Increase in district No. 2 
Increase in school department 
Increase in city farm 
Increase in city library . 
Increase in uncollected taxes 
Increase in net cash on hand 
Increase in value of water-works 



Deduct value of land sold on Belmont 
street ...... $1, 200. 00 

Deduct value of land sold Brooks & 

Brock ...... 150.00 



$1,698.09 
1,948.00 
1,148.17 
1,000.00 
4,838.19 
13,638.12 
30,081.73 

i33'3° 2 -3° 



$1,350.00 



Total net gain ..... $131,952.30 

Details of inventory are on file in the auditor's office. The 
city-hall building, valued at $60,000, is considered by good 
judges of real estate as worth on the market $150,000, while the 
water-works would sell readily at $1,500,000. 



668 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Among the assets of the city of Manchester is a certificate for 
five hundred (500) shares of the Suncook Valley Railroad as 
follows : 

SUNCOOK VALLEY RAILROAD. 



One Hundred Dollars 
per Share. 



5c. Revenue 
Stamp can- 
celled. 



500 Shares. 



" Be It Known, That the City of Manchester is proprietor 

of five hundred shares in the capital stock of the Suncook 

Valley Railroad, of the par value of one hundred dollars per 
share, subject to the provisions of the charter, and the by-laws of 
the corporation, and to the conditions hereon expressed, the 
same being transferable by an assignment in the books of said 
corporation ; or by a conveyance, in writing recorded in said 
books. And when .a transfer shall be made or recorded in the 
books of the corporation, and this certificate surrendered, a new 
certificate or new certificates will be issued." 

Dated this 9th day of April, 1S70. 

S. N. BELL, 

President. 

25c. Rev- fE.W.H-) E.W.HARRINGTON, 

enue Stamp < 



cancelled. 



{E.W.H^ 
Seal. J 



>r lis arcr 



The following is printed in red ink across the face of the cer- 
tificate : "No dividends, income, or profits are to be paid to 
or received by the holders of these shares of stock in said rail- 
road, their successors or assigns, during the term of forty-two 
years from January 1, 1870, the same being in accordance with 
the original subscription therefor, and the holder thereof takes 
said shares of stock subject to said condition, and his agreement 
and consent to said condition is expressed by his signature here- 
to, this day of 18 ." 



auditor's office. 669 

Had this $50,000 been invested by the city at 6 per cent, 
compound interest, for forty-two years, it would in that time 
amount to $577,851.75, a sum sufficient to pay more than one 
half of the present bonded debt of the city. Soon after this 
investment in railroad stock bearing no dividends, the people of 
the state of New Hampshire amended their constitution by 
adopting the following : " Provided, That the general court 
shall not authorize any town to loan or give its money or credit, 
directly or indirectly, for the benefit of any corporation, having 
for its object a dividend of profits, or in any way aid the same 
by taking its stocks or bonds." 

This conservative action of the state has thus far saved her 
towns and cities from many extravagant and unprofitable invest- 
ments, and kept them in sound financial conditions. 



Auditor's Office. 

City Hall building. Open from 8 to 12 a. m. ; 2 to 5 p. m. 
7 to 9 p. M. on Thursday and Saturday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for his approval, the 
following points will be considered and passed upon : 

1. Is the subject-matter of the bill under examination within 
the scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city 
government? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make 
the contract, or cause the 'expenditure to be made ? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, 
and is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill ? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements 
either of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly and fully 
stated, and is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole 
amount charged sufficient ? 

5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely 
in excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be 
called to the same? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair, legible hand, correctly cast, 



670 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

and on paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its 
proper backing and filing ? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and 
the total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the 
amount of the work not yet completed, and the per cent re- 
tained, if any, should be stated on the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect 
the question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information 
or correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COURT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS AND RULES, RELATING TO THE 
APPROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the 
auditor has approved it as correct. 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city 
councils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon 's Municipal Cor- 
porations, section 96, volume 1. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except the 
mayor, shall receive any compensation for his services, or shall 
hold any office or agency created during his continuance in 
office. General Laws, chapter 46, section 13. 

The executive powers of the city and the administration of 
police, except where vested in the mayor, shall be exercised by 
the mayor and aldermen. General Laws, chapter 46, section 
14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority 
of selectmen of towns, unless it is otherwise provided by law. 
General Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only, they 
cannot legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers 
by ordinance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law or 
ordinance shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of the 
state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter 
into any verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do 



auditor's office. 671 

any work for the city. Any firm of which a member is also a 
member of the city councils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having 
legal power to expend money for the benefit of the city, can pur- 
chase of or contract with themselves, with any one of the board, 
or with any firm of which one of said officials is a member. 
Dillon' 's Municipal Corporations, volume i, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appro- 
priation to which the same should be charged, and the moneys 
paid will be charged to such appropriations only. 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be al- 
lowed to make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a ministerial 
act to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly con- 
strued, and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter 106, section n.) They have no power con- 
ferred upon them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus 
of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advis- 
ory powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold 
his signature from all bills against any appropriation where the 
amount of the appropriation is expended, until the city council 
shall have provided the means of paying the same. Section 4, 
chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances re- 
lating to duties of the city auditor, approved January 7, 1890. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived 
solely from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to cer- 
tain specified objects and other necessary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those pre- 
scribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled and 
generally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of 
towns to vote gifts or to select donees ; their charity is a duty 
defined, commanded, enforced, and regulated, and .the objects 
of it are designated by law. 



672 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an 
unlimited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to 
make expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their 
respective departments. For fire department and fire-alarm tele- 
graph, the chief engineer, to be submitted monthly to the ap- 
proval of the board of engineers ; for police department, city 
marshal ; for police court, police judge ; for water-works depart- 
ment, superintendent, subject to the rules of the board of com- 
missioners and the ordinances relating thereto ; for city farm, 
superintendent ; for overseers of the poor, each overseer, subject 
to the rules of the board of overseers, and their monthly review 
and approval ; for schools, superintendent, or such person as the 
board of school committee may designate, bills to be approved 
by the board monthly ; for streets, sewers, and other work under 
these departments, superintendent of each district, under control 
of mayor and board of mayor and aldermen ; for city clerk's 
office, treasurer's office, tax collector's office, assessors' office, 
auditor's office, incidental expenditures, city physician, city 
messenger, city solicitor, city engineer, — mayor ; for cemeteries, 
superintendents, subject to board of trustees (to consist of citi- 
zens not members of the city councils) ; for health department, 
board of health, subject to approval of mayor; city library, 
board of trustees, or person designated by them. It may be 
stated as a general rule, that all subordinate officials are under 
the supervision and control of the mayor, subject to such limita- 
tions and restrictions as the board of aldermen, acting as a 
board, may require. 



FORM OF BLANK. 



673 



The following form of blank is used in payment of ordinary 
bills for supplies or services, and can be obtained at the city au- 
ditor's office : 




The Citv of Mknchester, IS. M. 

To Dr. 



Date. 


Description of purchase. 




Amount. 












































































































... 












1 " 



Received of the city treasurer 189, the sum of 

$ in full payment of the above account. 

Signed 





Fold on this line. 

Make all monthly bills in this form, and in a legi- 
ble handwriting. 

Blank bills can be obtained at the city auditor's 
office. 

Do not write on the back of this bill; that is re- 
served for official purposes. In no case must any 
voucher include items pertaining to two separate 
appropriations. 

«S= All monthly bills must be presented on or be- 
fore the 20th day of each month. 






$ 


Appropriation For 




I hereby certify that the articles 
herein mentioned have been re- 
ceived and services performed, that 
they were necessary for, and have 
been, or will be, applied to the work 
covered by the appropriation above 
mentioned, and the prices charged 
are just and reasonable. 




Approved. 


Mayor. 

Approved. 


Chairman Committee on 



674 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Communications of City Auditor to the City Councils. 

To his Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen, — Peter Larrabee presents a bill against the city 
for killing thirteen dogs, at one dollar each (thirteen dollars), 
from May 15 to June 23, 1 891, inclusive. This bill the auditor de- 
clines to certify for payment for the following reasons : 

Section 1 1 of an act passed by the last legislature, entitled 
" An act to prevent the destruction of sheep, and other damages 
by dogs," which took effect May n, reads as follows: 
"Section ii. The mayor of each city and the selectmen of 
each town shall unnually, within ten days from the first day of 
May, issue a warrant to one or more police officers or constables, 
directing them to proceed forthwith either to kill, or cause to be 
killed, all dogs within such city or town not licensed and col- 
lared according to the provisions of this chapter, and to enter 
complaint against the owners or keepers thereof; and any per- 
son may, and every police officer and constable shall, kill or 
cause to be killed all such dogs whenever and wherever found. 
Such officers, other than those employed under regular pay, shall 
receive one dollar for each dog so destroyed from the treasurers 
of their respective cities or towns. All bills for such services 
shall be approved by the Mayor of the city or the selectmen of 
the town in which said dogs are destroyed, and shall be paid 
from moneys received under the provisions of this chapter." 

Mr. Larrabee is employed as special police officer and janitor 
at the police station, at one dollar and seventy-five cents per 
day, and, being regular pay, he is not entitled to the sum 
claimed. If it be said that he is paid simply as a janitor and 
not as a police officer, then, not being commissioned as a " dog 
killer," he has no claim for compensation under the law. His 
time is at the service of the city as an employee. 

Chapter 17 of the city ordinances is superseded by the state 
law. Mr. Larrabee desires the auditor to place this matter be- 
fore your honorable board. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 

Manchester, N. H., July 7, 1891. 



COMMUNICATIONS TO CITY COUNCILS. 675 

To the City Councils of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — The firm of Robitaille Bros, presents to the 
city auditor a bill for crackers, milk, etc., furnished to the police 
station during the months of March, April, May, and June, 
amounting to the sum of $14.76. This bill is rejected by the 
city auditor under the rule that " no member of either branch of 
the city councils can enter into any verbal or written contract to 
furnish supplies to, or do any work for the city." 

" Any firm of which a member is also a member of the city 
councils is included in this prohibition." (See pages 610 and 
611 of the City Report of 1S90.) 

The senior member of the firm of- Robitaille Bros, is at this 
time a member of the common council from ward 8. 
Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 

August 4, 1 89 1. 



To the City Councils, Manchester, N. H.: 

Gentlemen, — In reply to the resolution of the city council, 
passed August 4, 1891, " instructing the city auditor to furnish 
information at its next regular meeting as to the amount of sal- 
ary and extra compensation received by the city physician each 
year for the last five years," the following statements, taken 
from the published city reports, are respectfully submitted : 





Medicines. 


Extra services. 


Salary. 


In the year 1886, paid, 


$279.97 


$43.00 


$200.00 


In the year 1887, paid, 


357-So 


II.OO 


200.00 


In the year 1888, paid, 


121. 15 


IIO.OO 


200.00 


In the year 1889, paid, 


176.60 


I37.OO 


I98.9I 


In the year 1890, paid, 


47.OO 


J 35- 2 5 


200.00 


Total for five years, 


$982.52 


$436-25 


$998.91 


Average for each year, 


196.50 


87-25 


199.78 



676 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Of the cost of medicines furnished above, a large part is for 
disinfectants used about the police station, city farm, etc., and 
also some medicines for cattle at the farm. 

The auditor is of the opinion that an average of $75 per an- 
num will pay for all medicines furnished on the order of the city 
physician. 

During the years above stated the following sums have been 
paid to other than the regular city physician : 



In the year 1886 . 


£114.50 


In the year 1887 . 


58.00 


In the year 1888 . 


167.00 


In the year 1889 . 


217.00 


In the year 1890 . 


28.25 


Total for five years 


$584.75 


Average for each year . 


116.95 




JAMES B. STRAW, 




City Auditor. 



Manchester, N. H., 
September 1, 1891. 



Communications from the Mayor. 



Office of the Mayor, 
Manchester, N. H., July 9, 1891. 

To the County Solicitor, Hillsborough County : 

Sir, — I, Edgar J. Knowlton, mayor of the city of Manches- 
ter, in said county, do hereby certify that within ten days after 
the 1st day of May, 1891, I issued a warrant to H. W. Longa, 
city marshal, directing him to proceed in accordance with the 
provisions of the law passed at the January session, 1S91, enti- 
tled, " An act to prevent the destruction of sheep and other dam- 
ages by dogs "; and on the 1st day of July said Longa reported 



RE-FUNDING WATER BONDS. 677 

that he had attended to his duties and that there were not, to the 
best of his knowledge and belief, any unlicensed dogs in the city 
of Manchester. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, 

Mayor. 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, Hillsborough ss. 
Personally appeared Edgar J. Knowlton, mayor, and made 
oath to the above certificate by him subscribed. 

Before me. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 
Justice of the Peace. 
Manchester, N. H., July 10, 1891. 



Re-funding of Water Bonds. 

CIRCULAR LETTER. 

Manchester, N. H., November 9, 1891. 

Dear Sir, — Inclosed I send you a statement of the bonded 
debt of the city of Manchester, N. H. The following notice will 
be published by the city, and we would like to receive a bid 
from you within the time mentioned. 

Yours respectfully, 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, 

Mayor. 



Office of Mayor, 
Manchester, N. H., December 2, 1891. 

In accordance with a resolution passed by the city councils, 
October 6, 1891, under authority conferred by section 16, chap- 
ter 37, and section 1. chapter 48, of the General Laws of New 



678 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Hampshire, the city of Manchester, N. H., will re-fund one hun- 
dred thousand dollars of water bonds due January i, 1892. 

The new loan will consist of 100 bonds of $1,000 each, in all 
$100,000 ; they will be dated January 1, 1892, and will be pay- 
able January 1, 191 2, at the treasurer's office in Manchester, and 
will bear interest at the rate of 4 per cent, coupons payable in 
July and January at the Suffolk National Bank in Boston, Mass. 

Sealed proposals for the purchase of whole amount of bonds will 
be received at the mayor's office, in said Manchester, until the 
15th day of December, 1891, at 7.30 p. m., the city reserving 
the right to reject any and all bids. 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, 

Mayor. 



Office of the Mayor, 
Manchester, N. H., December 16, 1S91. 

Adams, Blodgett 6° Co., 20 Congress St., Boston, Mass. : 

Gentlemen, — Your bid for issue of $100,000 city of Man- 
chester water four per cent re-funding bonds of $102,178 is ac- 
cepted. 

Please acknowledge, either by person or by letter, the accep- 
tance. Below we give you list of the bids. 

N. W. Harris & Co $101,530 

R. L. Day 102.050 

100.760 
101.810 

102.178 
100.340 
101.290 
101.035 
101.810 



Blake Brothers & Co. 
Brewer, Cobb & Estabrook 
Adams, Blodgett & Co. . 
George A. Fernald & Co. 
Gay & Stanwood 
G. B. Chandler 
Kidder, Peabody & Co. . 



Very respectfully, 

THOMAS WALKER, JR., 

Chairman Finance Committee. 



RE-FUNDING WATER BONDS. 679 

Boston, Mass.. Dec. 17, 1891. . 

Thomas Walker, Jr., Esq., Chairman Finance Committee, Man- 
chester, JV. H. : 

Dear Sir, — We have your favor of the 16th inst., and we 
beg to confirm purchase of you of $100,000 city of Manchester 
four per cent water re-funding bonds dated January 1, 1892, due 
January 1, 191 2, at $102,178 and accrued interest. 

Please forward us at your earliest convenience full papers evi- 
dencing legality of the issue. 

We thank you for giving us full list of the bids and bidders, 
and awaiting your favors, beg to remain 

Yours very truly, 

ADAMS & BLODGETT. 



Manchester, N. H., Dec. 21, 1891. 
Adams, Blodgett & Co., 20 Congress St., Boston, Mass. : 

Gentlemen, — At a meeting of the finance committee of the 
city of Manchester, a quorum being present, the bids were opened 
for the one hundred thousand dollars four per cent twenty-year 
water-works bonds, said bonds were awarded to Adams, Blodgett 
& Co., of Boston, for one hundred and two thousand one hun- 
dred and seventy-eight dollars ($102,178), and same is hereby 
confirmed. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, Mayor, 

Thomas Walker, Jr., Chairman, 

W. Byron Stearns, 

Charles E. Cox, 

Fred T. Dunlap, 

Joint Standing Committee on Finance. 



680 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

City of Manchester. 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution relative to water bonds. 

Resolved, by the mayor, aldermen, and common council of the 
city of Manchester, in city council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of re-funding the water bonds, due January 
i, 1892, the mayor and joint standing committee on finance be and 
are hereby authorized and empowered to issue water bonds to the 
amount of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000), payable 
January 1, 1912, and bearing interest at a rate not exceeding 
four per cent, and the mayor and city treasurer are hereby 
authorized to sign said bonds for and in behalf of the city. 

In board of Common Council. October 6, 1891. 
Passed. 

Edson S. Heath, President. 

In board of Mayor and Aldermen. October 6, 1891. 
Passed. 

E. J. Knowlton, Mayor. 

A true copy. Attest. 



From the General Laws of New Hampshire. 

CHAPTER 37. 

Section 16. Any town may fund its debt by vote of any 
legal meeting, and any such indebtedness may include the bounty 
of the general government to volunteers, conscripts, or substi- 
tutes which such town has assumed and paid for the purpose of 
filling its quota. And any town that may have funded its debt, 
or any part thereof, may at any legal meeting ratify and confirm 



RE-FUNDING WATER BONDS. 681 

the same, and may issue bonds payable at such time and place as 
they may by vote authorize, with coupons for interest, payable 
annually or semi-annually, in gold or other lawful currency, at a 
rate not exceeding 6 per cent. 

chapter 44. 

Section i. All cities now or hereafter incorporated shall 
have, exercise, and enjoy all the rights, immunities, and privi- 
leges, and shall be subject to all the duties incumbent upon or 
appertaining to the town corporations to which they succeed. 

chapter 48. 

Section i. All the powers vested by law in towns, or the in- 
habitants thereof, shall be exercised by the city councils by con- 
current vote, each board having a negative upon the other 

chapter 70. 

An Act to enable the city of Manchester to establish water- 
works. 

Section 6. Said city is authorized to levy taxes to defray the 
expense of such water-works, and to borrow money therefor, not 
exceeding in the whole the sum of six hundred thousand dollars, 
and to issue the notes, bonds, or obligations of said city therefor, 
payable at such time and at such rate of interest as the city coun- 
cils of said city shall determine ; and such notes, bonds, and ob- 
ligations shall be legal and binding on said city. — Laws 0/1871. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS 

PASSED IN 1 89 1. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 4, chapter 40 of the 
Laws and Ordinances. 

That section 4, chapter 40 of the Ordinances in relation to 
cemeteries be amended to read as follows : " Section 4. The pro- 
ceeds of the sales of lots in said cemeteries shall be paid into the 
city treasury, and a receipt taken for the same, and shall be sub- 
ject to the appropriations of the city councils, for any legal mu- 
nicipal expenditure." 

Passed to be ordained April 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 7, section 1, of the 
Laws and Ordinances. 

That section 1 of chapter 7 of the Laws and Ordinances of the 
city of Manchester, N. H., be amended after the word "license" 
in the last line, as follows: "Whosoever intends to erect or to 



686 ORDINANCES. 

make alterations in the external walls of a building of any de- 
scription, shall fifteen days at least before he proceeds to build or 
erect the same, or to lay the foundation thereof, or to make the 
said alterations, or to do any act for carrying into execution his 
intention to do such things, give to the inspector of buildings 
notice in writing of his intention, with the dimensions of the 
structure proposed, the materials to be used, the number on the 
street or the precise location, and the name of the owner or own- 
ers of the land, in order that any encroachment or other injury 
or inconvenience to the public streets which might otherwise 
happen, may be thereby prevented ; and in default thereof the 
city shall be discharged from all damages of any nature whatso- 
ever resulting from the failure to give notice as above ; provided 
particularly from all such damages or expenses as have been en- 
hanced or occasioned by reason of anything done previously to 
or without such notice. 

The penalty for non-compliance with the provisions of this 
section will be the same as stated in section 28. 

Passed to be ordained May 5, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 22, chapter 14 of the 
Laws and Ordinances. 

That section 22 of chapter 14 of the Ordinances of the city of 
Manchester be amended by striking out the words "one thou- 
sand," in the eighth line, and inserting in place thereof the words 
* ( thirteen hundred." 

Passed to be ordained, October 6, 1891. 



ORDINANCES. 687 

City of Manchester. 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 
An Ordinance relating to building and rebuilding privy vaults. 

No privy vault shall, after the passage of this ordinance, be 
constructed or placed within one hundred feet of any public 
sewer, nor shall any privy vault be constructed as an appurte- 
nance to or be used in connection with any building which is 
within one hundred feet of any public sewer. 

Nor shall any privy vault now existing within one hundred 
feet of any public sewer, or used in connection with any build- 
ing which is within one hundred feet of any public sewer, be re- 
built after the passage of this ordinance. 

Any person who shall build or rebuild any privy vault in vio- 
lation of the provisions of this ordinance shall be punished by a 
fine not exceeding twenty dollars, and all ordinances and parts 
of ordinances inconsistent with the provisions of this ordinance 
are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect on its 
passage. 

Passed to be ordained, November 3, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 5, chapter 12, Laws 
and Ordinances. 

That section 5, chapter 12, Laws and Ordinances, be amend- 
ed by adding after the word " same," in the eighth line of said 
section, the following words : " Before any license can be grant- 
ed by the city clerk for a connection with any public sewer or 
any house drainage put in or repairs made on them, a permit 



688 KESOLUTIONS. 

must first be obtained of the city engineer, stating the frontage 
of the lot and the location of the same, with the plan proposed 
approved by him for the committee on sewers and drains, said 
permit to be made upon such forms as approved by the commit- 
tee on sewers and drains ; and all connections with the city's 
sewers shall be made with Y branches," so that section 5, chap- 
ter 12, as amended, will read as follows : 

" No person shall enter any drain or pipe into any of the sew- 
ers constructed by the city without first obtaining a license 
therefor, and any person violating the provisions of this section 
shall be fined not less than one nor more than ten dollars, and a 
like penalty for every day he shall suffer such drain or pipe to 
continue so entered, after notice from the city clerk to discon- 
nect the same. Before any license can be granted by the city 
clerk for a connection with a public sewer or any house drain- 
age put in or repairs made on them, a permit must be first ob- 
tained of the city engineer, stating the frontage of the lot and 
the location of the same, with the plan proposed approved by him 
for the committee on sewers and drains, such permit to be made 
upon such forms as approved by the committee on sewers and 
drains ; and all connections with the city's sewers shall be made 
with Y branches." 

Passed to be ordained, November 3, 1891. 



Citv of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution constituting a Special Committee to secure legisla- 
tion enabling the City of Manchester to raise by the issue of 
bonds the money necessary to defray the expense of Perma- 
nent Municipal Improvement. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 



RESOLUTIONS. 689 

That a special committee,consisting of his Honor, one alderman, 
and one member of the common council be appointed, and said 
committee is hereby authorized to take the necessary steps to pro- 
cure from the New Hampshire legislature, now in session at Con- 
cord, if possible, the passage of an act which shall enable the city 
of Manchester to raise money by the issue of bonds to defray the 
expense of permanent municipal improvement, when deemed ad- 
visable by the city councils ; provided, that the sum total of said 
bonds shall not exceed three hundred thousand dollars ($300,- 
000), and said bonds to be issued at such time or times, for such 
specified objects and in such quantities, the sum total not to ex- 
ceed the amount of issue, as the city councils may direct, and 
furthermore that said bonds run for such a period and become 
redeemable at such time as the city councils shall determine at 
the time of issue. 

Passed January 16, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution in regard to Additional Legislation. 

Resolvedly the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That a special committee, consisting of his Honor the Mayor, 
one alderman, and one councilman be appointed to consider 
whether any further legislation is required in order to guard the 
public health against impurities in the city's source of water sup- 
ply, and also in other matters pertaining to the interests of the 
city ; and that said committee is hereby authorized to bring all 
such matters before the legislature if they deem it advisable. 

Passed February 3, 1891. 



690 RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution confirming contract made with the Concord & 
Montreal Railroad. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the agreement made on the 9th day of May, 1S91, by and 
between the Concord & Montreal Railroad and the city of Man- 
chester, by the mayor represented, relative to an underpass 
through the embankment and under the track of the Manchester 
& North Weare Railroad, be and hereby is ratified and confirmed. 

Passed June 2, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution confirming the contract relating to the New School 
Building in East Manchester, N. H. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the agreement relating to the new school building in 
East Manchester made on the 4th day of May, 1891, between 
Head & Dowst of the first part and the city of Manchester, as 
represented by the mayor and joint standing committee on lands 
and buildings, of the second part, be and hereby is ratified and 
confirmed. 



Passed June 2, 1891. 



RESOLUTIONS. 691 

City of Manchester. 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution confirming Contract relating to the addition to 
Webster-street schoolhouse. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the agreement relating to the addition to the Webster- 
street schoolhouse, made on the eighth day of April, 1891, be- 
tween Mead, Mason & Co., of the first part, and the Mayor and 
joint standing committee on lands and buildings as representa- 
tives of the city of Manchester, N. H., of the second part, be 
and is hereby ratified and confirmed. 

Passed June 2, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

IN the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution relating to public park. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That a committee of five, consisting of two aldermen and 
three councilmen, be appointed for the purpose of making in- 
quiry and investigation as to the necessity and desirability of a 
public park in the southern section of the city. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



692 RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution discontinuing a highway. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the following highway, situated in said city, be and is 
hereby discontinued, to wit: Beginning at a stake on the east 
side of Boynton street, on the land of Henry E. Hoyt, and then 
in an easterly direction to a stake on the west side of South 
Main street on land of Walter B. Balch. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution for the discontinuance of a part of the highway 
known as " Old Bridge Street Road." 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That so much of that highway known as " Old Bridge Street 
Road," as lies between the intersection of said road with the 
northerly line of Bridge street and a point in said old Bridge 
street road where the westerly line of Belmont street extended in 
a northerly direction intersects with said road, be and the same 
hereby is discontinued, and that application be made to the 
supreme court to secure its consent to said discontinuance. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 



RESOLUTIONS. 693 



City of Manchester, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety -one. 

Resolution relative to the legacy of Eliza A. Eaton to the city 
of Manchester. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the treasurer of the trustees of the city library be author- 
ized to receive from the administrator of the estate of Eliza A. 
Eaton the legacy bequeathed to the city of Manchester in her 
last will and testament and to sign and execute in behalf of the 
city any receipt or other voucher that may be necessary, and 
that the trustees of the city library be authorized to invest the 
money received from the said administrator, and apply the in- 
come thereof for the purpose indicated in said last will. 

November 3, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution relating to Exempting from Taxation, The Queen 
City Manufacturing Company. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That whereas, the Queen City Manufacturing Company, a 
corporation established by law with a capital of fifty thousand 
dollars, desire to locate their factory and to carry on their busi- 
ness in said city of Manchester, providing sufficient induce- 
ments are given the corporation by the city government ; there- 
fore, 

Resolved, That the capital of the Queen City Manufacturing 
Company aforesaid, and its machinery, raw materials, and other 



694 RESOLUTIONS. 

property necessary in conducting its manufacturing business, and 
the land and the buildings used and occupied by said corporation 
in its business, shall be exempt from all taxation for a period of 
ten years from October 6, 1891. 

Passed October 13, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution relative to plan for Stark Park. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the Mayor and joint standing committee on commons 
be authorized to procure plans for Stark park. The expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for Stark park. 

Passed December 1, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution relative to Engine-House and Ward-room in 
Ward 9. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the Mayor and joint standing committee on lands and 
buildings be authorized to procure plans and receive proposals for 
building a new engine-house and ward-room in ward 9. The ex- 
pense thereof not to exceed the sum of ten thousand dollars. 

Passed December 1, 1891. 



RESOLUTIONS. 695 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one. 

Resolution relative to the discontinuance of a portion of Canal 
street in Manchester, so called, and a portion of Pleasant street, 
so called, in Manchester. 

Resolved 'by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That so much of said Canal street, and so much of said Pleas- 
ant street as is contained within the following descriptions 
respectively, to wit : Commencing at a point where the north- 
erly line of Merrimack street intersects the westerly line of Canal, 
street, marked A ; thence southerly by the westerly line of said 
Canal street about 503 feet to the northerly side of the Central 
street "ramp" marked B, as shown upon the plan hereinafter 
designated ; thence easterly on said northerly line of said 
"ramp," about 44 feet to a point marked C ; thence northerly 
at right angles about 25 feet to the east line of Canal street, 
marked D ; thence northerly by said line of said Canal street 
about 165 feet to the southerly line of Pleasant street, marked 
E ; thence easterly by said line of said Pleasant street about 32 
feet to the bank wall shown upon the plan marked F ; thence 
northerly by said bank wall as shown upon said plan to the place 
of beginning. 

Also commencing at a point on the westerly side of Canal 
street 84 feet southerly from the southerly line of said Central 
street " ramp," at a point marked G ; thence southerly by said 
line of said Canal street about 307 feet to a point marked H ; 
thence easterly on a line at right angles to the main track of the 
Concord & Montreal Railroad, in the passenger station, about 32 
feet to point marked I ; thence northerly parallel to said tracks 
about 130 feet to a point marked J ; thence easterly at right an- 
gles 25 feet to a point marked K; thence northerly at right an- 
gles 71 feet to a point marked L ; thence westerly at right angles 
25 feet to a point marked M ; thence northerly at right angles 



696 ORDERS. 

106 feet to a point marked N ; thence westerly at right angles 
about 43 feet to the place of beginning ; all of the foregoing be- 
ing shown by lines and limitations denoted and delineated by 
red lines and letters, upon a certain plan marked and designated, 
as follows, to wit, Union passenger station, Manchester, N. H., 
dated August, 1891, filed with the city records of said Manches- 
ter, and made a part thereof, November 19, 1891, and the same 
is discontinued, and that the mayor in the name of the city be 
authorized to apply to the supreme court for its consent and 
approval and the discontinuance aforesaid. 

Passed December 9, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to print Mayor Knowlton's Inaugural Address. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on finance cause to be 
printed three hundred copies of Mayor Knowlton's inaugural ad- 
dress ; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
printing and stationery. 

Passed January 6, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Addition to Webster-street School Build- 
ing. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to receive proposals for and construct two addi- 
tional rooms at Webster-street school building ; the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation for addition to Web- 
ster-street school building. 

Passed March 3, 1891. 



ORDERS. 697 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Purchase Land in Hallsville, etc. 

Ordered, if the Beard of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to purchase land in Hallsville for a new school- 
house, and they hereby are empowered to receive proposals and 
erect a schoolhouse upon said lot ; the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for new schoolhouse, Hallsville. 

Passed March 3, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to buy a Dump-cart for use at City Farm. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on city farm be authorized to pur- 
chase a dump-cart for use at city farm ; the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for city farm. 

Passed March 3, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Purchase a Steam Boiler and Pump for the Sewer 
Department. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers and drains 
purchase a 12-horse-power boiler and pump combined, for use in 
pumping out sewer trenches, and the boiler to be arranged to 
run the steam drill ; and that the expense of the same be charged 
to the appropriation for sewers and drains. 

Passed March 3, 1891. 



698 ORDERS. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Sewer Pipe. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers and drains be 
and they hereby are authorized to contract for such quantities of 
sewer pipe as in their judgment the city may require for this 
year's use ; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for sewers and drains. 

Passed March ■z, i8qi. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the Board of Water Commissioners to 
Purchase Land. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the board of water commissioners be and hereby are authorized 
in behalf of the city of Manchester, to purchase of Mary E. and 
Joseph B. Young a lot of land measuring ten acres and thirty- 
two square rods, more or less, and situate in said Manchester, for 
the sum of three hundred and thirty-seven dollars ($337); also 
of Lizzie J. Richardson and others, seven (7) acres and twenty- 
seven (27) square rods of land situate in said Manchester, for 
the sum of two hundred and fifteen dollars (#215) ; and that the 
expenditure for the same be charged to water-works construction 
appropriation. 

Passed April 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order Relating to the Purchase of three Horses for Fire 
Department. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department are 



ORDERS. 699 



hereby authorized to purchase three horses for the said depart- 
ment, and that the expense of the same be charged to the appro- 
priation for the fire department. 

Passed April 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to Erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lighting streets cause to be 
erected an electric light at the corner of Beech and Auburn 
streets. 

May 5, 1 89 1. 



City of Manchester. 

orders to build certain sewers. 

Passed May 5, 1891. 

Beginning at the south side of Massabesic street at Cypress, 
thence southerly to Young street. 

From the back street in Fourth street south of School street, 
thence southerly to Ferry street, and through Ferry street to 
Third street. 

From the corner of Myrtle and Russell streets easterly through 
Myrtle street to Linden street. 

From a point east of Main street in Blaine street ; thence 
through Blaine and Third streets to the Piscataquog river, ac- 
cording to the city's plan of sewerage. 

Beginning at Massabesic and Belmont streets, thence south- 
erly to the Portsmouth Railroad crossing. 



700 OKDERS. 

Beginning at the junction of the back streets, between Cen- 
tral and Depot streets and the back street west of Franklin 
street ; thence to Canal street and through Canal street to the 
Granite-street sewer. 

Upon petition of Charles Davis and others, from present ter- 
minus of Spruce-street sewer at Belmont street; thence easterly 
to the proposed Weston street ; thence easterly in Lake avenue 
to Canton street, also westerly to Beacon street. 

Passed June 2, 1891. 

On Beauport street ; from Adams northerly on Beauport street 
to the foot of the bluff, about 200 feet. 

Maple-street sewer, from Russell and Myrtle easterly through 
Myrtle street to its intersection with Ashland street produced. 

From Walker street southerly to the New Hampshire Central 
Railroad land on Fourth street. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 

On North Main street, from Conant street northerly to Amory 
street. This is occasioned by the continual trouble with the 
present sewers in this section, they being too small and poorly 
constructed, the proposed changes to be in accordance with the 
improved sewerage plan for this section on file in city engineer's 
office. 
Passed August 22, 1891. 

In West street, from near the Head property ; thence westerly 
about 600 feet ; thence about 200 feet across the Baldwin land 
to Piscataquog river. 

Passed September 1, 1891. 

On Second street, from Piscataquog river to about 150 feet 
south of West Hancock street. 

On Wilson road, from Bridge street to East High, and on 
East High street from Jane to Ashland street. On Massabesic 
street from Cypress to Jewett street, and on Jewett street from 
Massabesic street to new schoolhouse. 

Passed October 6, 1891. 

In Pearl street from present terminus of Pearl street, thence 
easterly about 100 feet toward Morrison street. In Bay east back 



ORDERS. 701 

street, from North street northerly about 300 feet. In Amory 
street, from Dubuque street westerly to Rimmon street, about 
270 feet. 

Passed December 1, 1891. 

In Merrimack street, from Belmont to Milton, about 200 feet 
in length. 

In Main street, from present terminus to C street, and in C 
street to B street. 

In Sullivan street, from sewer in Main street to Beauport, 
about 200 feet. 

In Carroll street, from Milford northerly, about 400 feet. 

In Amherst street, from Belmont to Beacon, about 400 feet. 

In Harrison street, from Oak street to Russell, about 400 feet. 

Also for building certain cesspools on Cedar street and North 
street, four in number. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 

On Orange street, from Russell to a point about 250 feet east 
c f Linden street. On Manchester street, from present terminus 
to Milton street. In Harrison south back street, from Union to 
Walnut street. In Cartier street, from Amory to Kelly street. 
Prom Kelly and Beauport streets to Amory and Main streets. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 

In Parker street, from Winter street northerly about 100 feet. 

And the expense thereof (of all the above orders) to be charged 
to the appropriation for sewers and drains. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to Purchase Land in West Manchester. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 



702 ORDERS. 

be authorized to purchase land in McGregorville, on which to 
build a hose-house and ward-room for ward 9. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
reserved fund. 

Passed May 5, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order Relating to the Building of the Extension of Web- 
ster street. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
Webster street, from the River road to the Concord Railroad 
land, as laid out October 28, 1890, by board of mayor and 
aldermen, be built to grade, with suitable gutters, as shall be 
established by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation 
for new highways. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the Mayor to execute a quitclaim deed to 
D. C. Whittemore. 

Be it Ordered by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen, the 
Common Council concurring : That His Honor the Mayor be 
and hereby is authorized to execute for and in the name of the 
city of Manchester to David C. Whittemore, a quitclaim deed 
of the property described in the deed of Henry R. Chamberlain 
of May 20, 1879, in which he quitclaimed to the city of Man- 
chester all the right, title, and interest in certain land of said 
Whittemore's which he received in a tax deed dated May 5, 
1879, fr° m John Hosley, collector of taxes, the property being 
sold for unpaid taxes in 1875, trie taxes having been afterwards 



ORDERS. 703 

paid and accepted by the city and the property taxed ever since 
to said Whittemore. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to Macadamize. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be authorized 
to macadamize Bridge street from the west end of McGregor 
bridge to McGregor street, a distance of about four hundred 
feet. The expense of the same to be charged to appropriation 
for macadamizing. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 

An Order to concrete Nashua street from Lowell to Concord 
street, the expense of the same to be charged to appropriation 
for macadamizing. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to Concrete. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets repair the 
concrete roadway on Concord street from the east line of Elm 
street, passing to the east line of Vine street, and supply neces- 
sary flagging and corner curbing. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



704 ORDERS. 

To concrete the roadway on Merrimack street from Elm to 
Franklin streets, and supply necessary flagging and corner curb- 
ing. 

Passed July 7, 1S91. 

To concrete Chestnut street from the north line of Hanover 
street to the south line of Merrimack street, and supply neces- 
sary flagging and corner curbing. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 

To concrete Union street from Lowell to Concord street, and 
furnish necessary flagging and curbstones. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 

To concrete the roadway on Union street from the north line 
of Laurel street to the south line of Lake avenue, and supply 
necessary flagging and corner curbing. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 

The expense of all of the same to be charged to the appro- 
priation for macadamizing. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build certain Streets. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets build Walnut 
street from Gore street northerly to Salmon street, and Salmon 
street from Pine street easterly to Walnut street, as shown on the 
plans of said streets on file in engineer's department. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 

To build Allen street from Main to Boynton street. 
Passed August 4, 1891. 



ORDERS. 705 

To build Rimmon street from Amory to Kelly street. 
Passed August 4, 1891. 

To build Cartier street from Amory to Kelly, as shown by 
plans in the city engineer's office. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 

To build Kelly street from a point at west end of old laying 
out to the North Weare Railroad track as recently laid out, the 
expense of the same to be charged to appropriation for new 

highways. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to establish Grades. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the following grades are established as shown on their several 
plans. 

Adams street, Webster street to the Adams land, plan 147. 

Beauport street, Amory to Kelly, plan 129. 

Hall street, Bridge to Prospect, plan 888. 

West Webster street, River road to Concord Railroad land, 
plan 707. 

Morrison street, Pearl to Arlington, plan 708. 

West Hancock street, Main to Wentworth. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build a Bank Wall. 

Ordered, if the Mayor and Board of Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets build a bank 

45 



706 ORDERS. 

wall on the north line of Bridge street, west of McGregor 
bridge. The building of this wall is necessary in order to build 
the street the full width, and the expense thereof is to be 
charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the purchase of a new Boiler for the 
Police Station. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the committee on lands and buildings be and are hereby author- 
ized to contract for a new boiler for the police station, with 
power to dispose of the old one now in there, the expense of the 
same to be charged to the appropriation for police department. 

July 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase Gravel and sell lot of Land in West 
Manchester. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be authorized 
to purchase five hundred dollars' worth of gravel of Charles 
Brooks, also to sell to said Charles Brooks a lot of land in West 
Manchester of about one half an acre in extent, the expense for 
gravel to be charged to the appropriation for district No. 10. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



707 



City of Manchester. 



An Order to receive proposals for and contract for the building 
of Retaining Wall on Bowman street, West Manchester. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be authorized 
to receive proposals for and contract for the building of a retain- 
ing wall on the east side of Bowman street adjoining the Piscat- 
aquog cemetery ; the expense thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidental expenses. 

Passed July 7, 1S91. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing a temporary loan for purposes of Sewers 
and Drains. 

Be it ordered by the Common Council of the City of Man- 
chester, the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concurring : That 
his Honor the Mayor and the city treasurer be and they hereby 
are authorized to borrow for and in the name of the city of Man- 
chester the sum of thirty thousand dollars ($30,000), to be used 
in the construction of sewers and drains, and to be placed in the 
treasury to the credit of the account for sewers and drains ; the 
note or notes for said sum to be signed by the mayor, counter- 
signed by the city treasurer, and payable December 1, 1892. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase and locate a Drinking Fountain. 

Ordered, if the board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be and here- 



708 ORDERS. 

by are authorized to purchase a drinking fountain and place the 
same on the northeast corner of Granite and Main streets, the 
cost not to exceed $100; the expense to be charged to the appro- 
priation for watering streets. 

Passed July 7, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the purchase of hose for the Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 
and are hereby authorized to purchase three thousand (3,000) 
feet of hose for the use of the fire department, and that the ex- 
pense of the same be charged to the appropriation for the fire de- 
partment. 

Passed July 7, 1S91. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase land for the extension of Amoskeag 
Cemetery. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and committee on the Amoskeag cemetery be author- 
ized to purchase a piece of land of F. D. Hanscom twenty feet 
wide and the length of the cemetery, starting from the highway, 
for the purpose of laying a water pipe and constructing a drive- 
way and properly inclosing the grounds, and the expense thereof 
be charged to the reserved fund. 

Passed May 5, 1891. 



ORDERS. 709 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to establish certain Grades. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the grades on Putnam street, as shown on plans in city engineer's 
office, Cartier to Dubuque street, be established. 

Passed October 4, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to establish Grades. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the grades, as shown on the following plans in the city engineer's 
department, be established : Rimmon street, Amory to Kelly ; 
Salmon, Pine to Walnut. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to change the grade of certain Streets. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the grades of certain streets be changed as follows : Concord 
street at Hall, plan No. 161 ; Milton street, Manchester to Han- 
over, plan No. 178; Hall street at Concord, plan No. 161 ; as 
shown on file drawing in city engineer's department. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 



710 ORDERS. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lighting streets cause to be 
erected an electric light at the corner of Valley and Jewett 
streets ; the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for lighting streets. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order authorizing the Mayor to purchase a lot of land of 
A. D. Gooden. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor be authorized to purchase a lot of land on Spruce 
street containing 5,750 square feet (adjoining land of the city of 
Manchester) of A. D. Gooden for six cents per square foot ; the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for inciden- 
tal expenses. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to buy Wheel Scrapers. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be authorized 
to purchase three wheel scrapers to be used in street work for 
grading purposes, the same not to cost over $100, and the ex- 
pense thereof be charged to the appropriation for incidental ex- 
penses. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 



ORDERS. 711 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Repair Spruce Street. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets repair Spruce 
street with crushed stone and build gutters on the same from Elm 
to Chestnut at an expense not exceeding $300 ; and the expense 
thereof be charged to appropriation for macadamizing. 

Passed August 4, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Proposals for Electric Lighting. 

Ordered, if the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
joint standing committee on lighting streets be authorized to 
receive proposals for lighting the streets of Manchester with elec- 
tric lights for the term of three years commencing December 26, 
189 1, and report the same to the city government at its regular 
meeting October 6, 1891. 

Passed September 1, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Purchase of lot of Land in McGregorville 
for School Purposes. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and hereby are authorized to purchase a lot of land at the 
northwest corner of Amory and Dubuque streets, containing fif- 
teen thousand nine hundred (15,900) square feet, at not more 



712 ORDERS. 

than fifteen cents (15c.) per foot. Purchase to be made early in 
the year 1892; expense of the same to be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidental expenses. 

Passed December 1, 1891. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Furnishing of Room for the Matron of 
Police Station. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be and are hereby authorized to hire and furnish a suitable room 
as an office for Miss A. B. Brown, for the purpose of facilitating 
her work as matron of the police station ; the expense of the 
same not to exceed seventy-five ($75) dollars per annum, and 
this sum to be charged to the appropriation for police depart- 
ment. 

Passed December 1, 1801. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Appointment of Consulting Engineer by 
Board of Water Commissioners. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the board of water commissioners be and are hereby authorized 
to procure the services of a consulting engineer relative to the 
best plan of establishing a high pressure service. 

Passed December 9, 1891. 



STREET LIGHTING. 713 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Furnish an Additional Room at the Varney 
School. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur: That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to procure furniture for furnishing an additional 
room at the Varney school building ; and that the expense be 
charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed January 2, 1892. 



Street Lighting. 

PROPOSALS FOR LIGHTING THE CITY OF MANCHESTER WITH ELEC- 
TRICITY, 

Two hundred or more arc lights of 2,000 candle power each 
being required, will be received by the joint standing com- 
mittee on lighting streets at the office of the city clerk until 
7.30 o'clock p. m., September 19, 1891. The lights will be re- 
quired to run from twilight to twilight, and the system to be 
used must be the Thomson-Houston, or one equally good. Any 
contract when made must go into effect December 26, 189 1, and 
to expire December 26, 1894. 

The lighting company is to assume all claims for damages that 
may arise fiom poles, wires, lamps, dynamos, or other causes in 
such service. All bids to be accompanied by an acceptable bond 
of $20,000 guaranteeing the execution of contract. The city 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. 

OLIVER B. GREEN, 

Chairman Com. on Lighting Streets. 
Manchester, N. H., Sept. 4, 1891. 



714 STREET LIGHTING. 

Manchester, N. H., Sept. 25, 1891. 

Committee on Lighting Streets, Oliver B. Green, Chairman : 

Gentlemen, — The Manchester Electric Light Company re- 
spectfully submit the following bid of 37}^ cents per night for 
lights on mast arms, and 34^ cents per night for lights on poles, 
in response to your advertisement for proposals, dated September 
4, 1891. 

Signed, 

ALONZO ELLIOTT, 
J. C. MOORE, 
H. E. PARKER, 
Committee duly authorized by the 

Manchester Electric Light Co. 



articles of agreement. 



The Manchester Electric Light Company, a corporation duly 
established by law, and doing business in Manchester, in the 
county of Hillsborough and state of New Hampshire, and the 
city of Manchester, a municipal corporation in said county and 
state, hereby agree as follows, to wit : 

The said company, for the consideration hereinafter men- 
tioned, agrees for itself, its successors and assigns, at its own ex- 
pense, to provide and maintain as the same are now established, 
two hundred and fifty (250) electric lights, to be of the standard 
of two thousand candle power arc lamps ; to keep the same lighted 
from twilight to twilight upon every night of the year, in accord- 
ance with the requirements of the joint standing committee on 
lighting streets, and to use in the maintenance of said lights the 
Thomson-Houston system of electric lighting, or a system equally 
as good. 

The said city agrees to pay monthly for said two hundred and 
fifty lights herein provided for and maintained as they are now 



STREET LIGHTING. 715 

established, the sum of 34^ cents per night each for all lamps 
on posts, and the sum of 37^ cents per night each for all lamps 
placed on mast arms; but in case any lamps, for any cause, shall 
fail to be lighted, upon such nights or parts of nights as they 
shall be unlighted a proportionate reduction in price shall be 
made. 

The said city further agrees that said company may maintain 
its present lines through and over the streets of said city, and 
erect such new lines as may be required, and any additional con- 
struction shall be as good as that now in use, and erected under 
the same conditions, and the lights located as hereinafter pro- 
vided. 

The said city is hereby authorized to use the topmost arm on 
such poles or posts as said company has erected, or may hereaf- 
ter erect, for its system of fire-alarm telegraph. 

It is hereby understood and mutually agreed that all damages 
or injuries to said lights or lines arising from fire or other una- 
voidable casualty shall be repaired by said company with reason- 
able diligence, and shall not vitiate this contract, and that all 
damages to any person or property, caused by the poles, lamps, 
wires, or other apparatus used by said company, or by the use of 
same, occasioned by the negligence or want of care of said com- 
pany, or its servants or agents, shall be borne by said company ; 
that all liability because of damages from the maintenance of the 
system of electric lighting used by said company shall rest upon 
said company ; that this contract shall terminate in three years 
from December 26, 1891. 

At the termination of this contract all property used by said 
company under the same shall remain the property of said com- 
pany, its successors or assigns. 

If during the period for which this contract shall remain in 
force said city shall desire more electric lights, said company 
agrees to furnish the same at a price not exceeding the price fixed 
for the two hundred and fifty lights herein provided for, and the 
joint standing committee on lighting streets shall fix the location 
of said lamps, but within a radius of one and one quarter miles 
from the city hall. 



716 STREET LIGHTING. 

In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seals 
this the seventeenth day of November, 1891. 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 
By E. J. Knowlton, Mayor. 
THE MANCHESTER ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., 
[Seal.] By A. Elliott, President, 

Walter G. Africa, Treasurer. 



Know all men by these presents, that we, The Manchester 
Electric Light Co., J. C. Moore, Frank Dowst, and Alonzo El- 
liott, are held and firmly bound to the city of Manchester in the 
sum of fifteen thousand dollars, to be paid to said city of Man- 
chester, and to the payment whereof we bind ourselves, our suc- 
cessors, and our heirs, firmly by these presents. 

Sealed with our seal and dated the 25th day of September, A. 
D. 1891. 

The condition of this obligation is, that whereas The Man- 
chester Electric Light Co., a corporation duly established by law, 
has made to the city of Manchester a proposition for lighting the 
streets of said city by electricity, for the term of three years, from 
December 26, 1891, to December 26, 1894; 

Now if said contract is awarded to said Manchester Electric 
Light Co. by said city, and said electric light company shall 
faithfully perform and fulfil all the conditions and requirements 
of said contract as set forth therein, and shall not default them, 
this obligation shall be void. 

MANCHESTER ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., 
[Seal] By A. Elliott, President. 

J. C. Moore. [Seal.] 



Signed, sealed, and delivered 
in the presence of 
Charles S. Stevens, 
Ned T. Wallace. 



Frank Dowst. [Seal.] 
Alonzo Elliott. [Seal.] 



ADDITION TO WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 717 

House and Bridge at Valley Cemetery. 

Manchester, N. H., May 7, 1891. 
John J. Holland : 

Dear Sir, — We will build the house and bridge at Valley 
cemetery, according to plans by W. H. Bennett, for the sum of 
two hundred and seventy-five dollars ($275). 
Yours truly, 
THE HEAD & DOWST CO. 



Addition to Webster-street Schoolhouse. 

CONTRACT. 

An agreement of two parts made this eighth day of April, A. 
D. 1891, between Mead, Mason & Co., party of the first part, 
and the committee on lands and buildings of the city govern- 
ment of the city of Manchester, party of the second part. 

The said party of the first part, in consideration of the sum of 
money to be paid by the said party of the second part, as herein- 
after mentioned, and the covenants and agreements hereinafter 
recited to be kept and performed by the said party of the second 
part, do for themselves, their heirs and assigns, covenant, prom- 
ise, and agree to and with the said party of the second part, that 
the said party of the first part shall and will, in a good workman- 
like manner, and according to the best of their ability, build ac- 
cording to the plans and specifications here annexed, and pro- 
vide all specified materials for the same. And the said party of 
the first part further agrees that the work shall be commenced 
and constantly prosecuted, and that the material shall be prompt- 
ly furnished. 

It is agreed by and between the parties to this agreement as 
follows : 

1. That the said party of the first part shall make no charge 
of any kind to the said party of the second part beyond the sum 



718 ADDITION TO WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 

of the original contract unless the said party of the second part 
alters the plans and specifications, in which case the value of 
such alterations shall be added to the amount to be paid, or de- 
ducted from the amount as the case may be. It is to be under- 
stood that no alterations are to be made except authorized by the 
party of the second part or representatives. 

2. It is agreed that insurance shall be effected on the building 
as soon as the roof is put on and covered. The amount to be 
determined upon by said party of the second part, and it is to 
be increased as mutually understood by parties to the agreement, 
the policy to be made payable to the party of the second part, 
as their interest may appear, and each party to pay one half of 
the cost of the insurance. 

3. That each and every person employed by sub-contract by 
said party of the first part shall be a suitable, competent, and sat- 
isfactory person to do the work. 

4. The said party of the first part shall provide during the 
progress of the work a suitable foreman whose duty it shall be to 
attend to the work of the framing, laying out all measurements 
upon the works hereby agreed upon, in conformity with said 
plans and specifications furnished. 

5. If at any time the party of the second part shall find that 
said work is not carried forward with sufficient rapidity, or ma- 
terials are not furnished as fast as required, he shall give notice of 
insufficiency to the party of the first part, or his foreman, and if 
within five days the defects are not remedied in a satisfactory 
manner, the said party shall hire men or furnish material and the 
expense of the same be charged to the party of the first part, 
and will be deducted from the original sum. 

6. The said party of the first part shall be responsible for any 
injury received by any person or persons during the progress of 
the work, and the said party shall furnish all necessary protection 
to the public during the progress of the work. 

7. It is understood by the party of the first part that all works 
described or referred to in the annexed specifications are to be 
executed by the said party of the first part, whether or not the 
works are illustrated by the plans or working drawings, and is to 



- ADDITION TO WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 719 

execute all work on plans and working drawings, whether or not 
they are described and referred to in the specifications and com- 
pleted ready for the occupancy by said committee on or before 
the 29th day of August, 1891. 

8. If any discrepancy shall be found to exist between the 
plans, working drawings, and specifications, the decision as to 
the fair construction of the true intent and meaning of the plans 
and working drawings and specifications shall be made by 
W. H. Bennett, city engineer, and the said party of the first 
part will execute the work in accordance with this decision. 

9. Should any misunderstanding arise as to addition to or 
omission from the contract, caused by alteration, the said party 
of the second part shall have power to employ such means as shall 
be justifiable to obtain the true value of such alterations, the ex- 
pense thereof to be equally divided between the parties to this 
agreement, and the above decision, when given, to be accepted 
by both parties. 

The said party of the second part does for legal repre- 

sentatives, in consideratiou of the materials being provided as 
herein required by the said party of the first part, covenant, 
promise, and agree to and with the said party of the first part, that 
they will well and truly pay, or cause to be paid the party of the 
first part the sum of four thousand nine hundred and eighty- 
seven dollars ($4,987). 

Mead, Mason & Co. 

First Party. 
E. J. Knowlton, Mayor, 
Byron Worthen, 
Walter M Fulton, 
Thomas Wilkinson, 
John P. Cronin, 
Charles E. Chapman, 

Second Party. 
Winfred H. Bennett, 

Witness. 
This contract ratified and confirmed by vote of the city coun- 
cils June 2, 1 89 1. 



720 HALLSVILLE SCHOOLHOUSE. 



Hallsville Schoolhouse. 

This memorandum of an agreement made and executed this 4th 
day of May, 1891, by and between William F. Head and Frank 
Dowst, partners and contractors under the firm name of Head 
& Dowst, and the city of Manchester Witnesseth, that for and 
in consideration of the mutual promises and agreements herein- 
after set forth, said parties do contract and agree together as 
follows : 

Said firm of Head & Dowst hereby contracts and agrees to 
furnish all materials and build and complete for said city a school 
building in East Manchester, in accordance with the plans and 
specifications prepared by McFarland, Goodrich & McFarland, 
architects, which plans and specifications are hereby made a part 
of this contract, and to furnish and complete in said building a 
heating and ventilating system and sanitary closets in accordance 
with the proposals of the Fuller & Warren W. and V. Co., which 
are hereby made a part of this contract, for the sum of twenty- 
two thousand and sixty dollars ($22,060), all of said materials 
to be in accordance with said specifications, and the work is to 
be done in a thorough and workmanlike manner, and the whole 
building to be completed on or before the 20th day of Decem- 
ber, 1 89 1, all of said work to be subject to the acceptance of the 
committee on lands and buildings of the city councils. Said 
city of Manchester hereby agrees to pay to said firm of Head & 
Dowst said sum of twenty-two thousand and sixty dollars ($22,- 
060) in monthly payments ; no such monthly payment to ex- 
ceed 80 per cent of the amount of materials and labor furnished 
by said firm of Head & Dowst to the date of the payment, and 
upon the completion and acceptance of the said school building 
to pay the balance until the whole sum of twenty-two thousand 
and sixty dollars shall be paid. 



RAILROAD OVER SECOND STREET. 721 

In witness whereof the parties have hereunto affixed their 
hands this day and year above named. 

HEAD & DOWST. 

THE CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

By E. J. Knowlton, 
Byron Worthen, 
Thomas Wilkinson, 
Walter M. Fulton, 
Joint Standing Committee on Lands and Buildings. 

This contract ratified and confirmed by vote of city councils, 
June 6, 1 89 1. 



Railroad over Second Street. 

Memorandum of an agreement made this ninth day of May, 
1 89 1, by and between the Concord & Montreal Railroad and 
the city of Manchester, for the construction of an underpass 
through the embankment and under the track of the Manchester 
& North Weare Railroad, for the purpose and convenience of 
said city, extending Second street, so called, at West Man- 
chester, 

Witnesseth : Said city of Manchester is to pay to said Con- 
cord & Montreal Railroad all cost or expense of excavating for 
said underpass, including the trenches for abutments ; the cost 
of the abutments complete, including expenses of material and 
labor, and the cost of putting on the false work for carrying the 
track and trains during the progress of the work. 

Said railroad is to furnish timber for the false work free of 
charge, and is to assume expense of the superstructure only. 



722 SCAVENGER SERVICE. 

All work is to be done under the direction, and to the sat- 
isfaction, of the chief engineer of said railroad. 

CITY OF MANCHESTER, 

Per E. J. Knowlton, Mayor. 
W. A. STOWELL, 

Superintendent of Cotistruction, Concord 6° Montreal Railroad. 

This contract ratified and confirmed by vote of the city coun- 
cils, June 6, 1 89 1. 



New Boiler at Police Station. 

July 16, 1891. 
To the Committee on Lands and Buildings, Byron Worthen 
Chairman : 

Gentlemen, — My estimate for putting in a steel boiler and 
taking out the old boiler at police station, as follows : 

Steel boiler, 12 feet long, 42 inches diameter, 52 2^-inch tubes, 
including front and grate set up and connected to the pipes now 
in, ready to fire up, is four hundred and forty-five dollars 
($445), first class in every respect. The city to cut the hole 
through the wall and replace where the boiler is to go out. 

Yours truly, 

THOS. A. LANE. 



Scavenger Service. 

This agreement, made and executed this sixth day of June, 
1 89 1, by and between Hartley E. Vaughn, of Manchester, in 
the county of Hillsborough and state of New Hampshire, and 
the city of Manchester, a municipal corporation in said county 
and state, acting by Edgar J. Knowlton, mayor, specially 
authorized thereto by vote of the city councils, 



SCAVENGER SERVICE. 723 

Witnesseth : That for and in consideration of the mutual 
promises and agreements hereinafter set forth, said parties do 
hereby contract and agree together as follows, to wit : Said 
Hartley E. Vaughn hereby contracts and agrees to remove all 
perishable matter from the limits fixed and bounded in the com- 
pact part of said city of Manchester, as shown upon the map of 
said city in the office of the city engineer, in accordance with 
the provisions of the ordinance of said city of Manchester, 
establishing a scavenger service, passed May 6, 1890, for the 
term of one year from the ninth day of June, 1891, for the sum 
of one thousand, nine hundred dollars ($1,900), to be paid by 
said city. 

And he further agrees and contracts to use good horses and 
wagons, and a sufficient number for the suitable performance of 
the work, and to remove all of said matter at least two miles 
from the city limits and at least one fourth of a mile distant 
from any house, and to do all of said work in a proper and suit- 
able manner, in all respects in accordance with the aforesaid 
ordinance, and to the satisfaction of the board of mayor and 
aldermen. And said city of Manchester hereby contracts and 
agrees to pay to said Hartley E. Vaughn, upon the satisfactory 
performance of his contract, the sum of one thousand nine hun- 
dred dollars ($1,900), in monthly payments. 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, Mayor. 
HARTLEY E. VAUGHN, Contractor. 



LIST OF ENGRAVINGS. 



SCHOOLHOUSES. 

PAGE 

1. Ash-street schoolhouse 343 

2. Amoskeag district schoolhouse . . 343 

3. Bakersville schoolhouse 319 

4. Bloclget-street schoolhouse 343 

5. Franklin-street schoolhouse 319 

6. Goffe's Falls schoolhouse 329 

7. Hallsville schoolhouse (old) 313 

8. High school house 319 

9. Harvey district school house 329 

10. Lincoln-street schoolhouse 329 

11. Lowell -street schoolhouse 343 

12. Main-street schoolhouse 313 

13. Merrirnack-street schoolhouse 343 

14. Mosquito Pond schoolhouse 329 

15. Park-street schoolhouse 319 

16. School-street schoolhouse 313 

17. South Main-street schoolhouse 319 

18. Spring-street schoolhouse 313 

19. Stark district schoolhouse 343 

20. Varney schoolhouse, West Manchester 313 

21. Webster's Mills schoolhouse 329 

22. Webster-street schoolhouse — 319 

23. Wilson Hill schoolhouse 313 

24. Youngsville schoolhouse 329 

45. Hallsville school (new) 373 

ENGINE-HOUSES. 

25. Central fire station, Vine street 1G3 

26. Clinton-street station 163 

27. Fire King station, North Main street 163 

28. General Stark station, Webster street 223 

29. Independent hose house, Amoskeag 163 

30. Merrimack engine-house, Lake avenue 223 

31. Massabesic hose, Maple street 223 



726 LIST OF ENGRAVINGS. 



OTHER CITY AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

32. Battery building, Manchester street 223 

33. City farm buildings, Mammoth road 3 

34. City Hall building, Elm street 3 

35. County jail, Willow street 3 

36. Court-house, Franklin street 223 

37. Government building, post-office, etc., Hanover street 29 

38. City stables and city scales, Franklin street 461 

39. Police station, Manchester street 3 

40. Pumping station, Cohas avenue 3 

41. Soldiers' monument, Merrimack square 3 

42. State industrial school, river road north 461 

0. City library, Franklin street 223 

44. Derryflekl park 103 

CHURCHES, CONVENTS, PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS, HOSPITALS, ETC. 

60. First Baptist church, Union corner Concord street 2S9 

61. Second Baptist church, Merrimack east of Pine street 289 

62. Freewill Baptist church, Merrimack corner Chestnut street 289 

63. People's Baptist church, Concord corner Chestnut street 289 

64. Christian church, Pine corner Merrimack street 289 

65. City Mission chapel, Merrimack corner Beech street 289 

66. South-Main-street Congregational church, South-Main corner Mil- 

ford street 303 

67. Hanover-street Congregational church, Hanover corner Union street . 303 

68. Franklin-street Congregational church, Franklin cor. Market street. 303 

69. Goffe's Falls Congregational church, Goffe's Falls 303 

70. Union Chapel, Elm street, South Manchester 303 

71. Parsonage, Hanover-street Congregational, 590 Beech street 303 

72. St. Paul's M. E. church, Union corner Amherst street 309 

73. St. James M. E. church, Pennacook corner Pine street 309 

74. First M. E. church, Valley street corner Jewett 309 

75. Massabesic chapel, M. E., Candia road near Massabesic Lake 309 

76. Parsonage, St. Paul's, 528 Union street 309 

77. Parsonage, St. James, Pennacook street 309 

78. Parsonage, First M. E., 782 Valley street 309 

79. Swedish Lutheran church, Sagamore street 391 

80. Westminster Presbyterian church, Hazel corner Brook 391 

81. German Presbyterian church, Second corner Bath street 391 

82. Advent chapel, Arlington street 391 

83. Parsonage, Advent chapel, Pearl street 391 

84. W. C. T. U. Mercy Home, Mammoth road 391 

85. First Unitarian church, Concord corner Beech street 405 

86. Grace Episcopal church, Pine corner Lowell street 405 

87. First Universalist church, Lowell near Elm street . 405 

88. Rectory, Grace Episcopal church, Harrison corner Union 405 

89. Elliot Hospital, East Manchester 405 

90. Women's Aid Hospital, 180 Pearl street 405 

91. St. Joseph (Catholic) cathedral, Pine corner Lowell 635 

92. St. Anne's (Catholic) church, Union corner Merrimack street 635 

93. St. Mary's (French Catholic) church, Beauport corner Wayne street. 635 



LIST OF ENGKAVINGS. 727 

94. St. George's (French Catholic) church, Pine corner Orange street. . . 635 

95. St. Patrick's school (Catholic), Beauport street 635 

96. Mt. St. Mary's academy, Laurel corner Beech street 651 

97. Union-street school (Catholic), Union corner Laurel street 651 

98. Convent of Jesus Mary (French Catholic) E. Spruce n'r Beech street 651 

99. Convent of the Holy Angels (French Catholic), Beauport corner 

Wayne street 651 

100. St. Augustine's academy (French Catholic), 259 Lake avenue 651 

101. St. Mary's school (French Catholic), Wayne street, W. M 651 

102. St. Raphael's school (German Catholic), Third corner Ferry street.. 651 

103. St. Joseph's school, girls' (Catholic) , Pine corner Lowell street 279 

104. St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum (Catholic), Pine corner Amherst street. 279 

105. St. Joseph's high school, hoys' (Catholic) Lowell corner Birch street. 279 

106. St. Patrick's Orphan Asylum (Catholic), 184 Hanover street 279 

107. Old Ladies' Home (Catholic) , 222 Hanover street 279 

108. Convent, Mt. St. Mary's (Catholic), Union corner Laurel street 279 

109. St. Agnes' school (Catholic), Cedar corner of Union street 279 

110. St. Augustine's church (French Catholic), Beech cor. E. Spruce street 429 

111. Residence Catholic bishop, 145 Lowell corner Union street 429 

112. Residence priest of St. Mary's (French Catholic), 376 Beauport street 429 

113. Residence priest of St. Anne's (Catholic), 231 Merrimack street 429 

114. Residence priest of St. Augustine's (French Cath.), 383 Beech street. 429 

115. Residence priest of St. George's (French Catholic), 114 Orange street 429 

116. Children's Home (Protestant), Webster street 373 

117. Parsonage, Swedish Lutheran church (Prot.), 68 Sagamore street ... 373 

118. Proposed depot, Concord & Montreal Railroad 639 

119. Proposed depot, Boston & Maine Railroad 297 

120. Plan of improved sewerage system 105 



INDEX 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Advertising and printing 548 



Abatement on taxes 

Address, Mayor Knowlton 

Assets, statement and inventory of 

Annual interest charge on bonded debt . 

Auditor, city, report of 

Appropriations for 1891 by city councils . 

Auditor, communications of 

Auditor's department 

Addition to Webster-street schoolhouse. 



405 

642 

.674-676 

.459-669 



B 

Bridges 509 

Books and stationery 547 

Buildings, repairs of 58S 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 9-10-52 

report of 53 

health, report of 375 

Bonded debt 654 

tabular statement of 656 

detailed statement of, for 1S91 654 

Buildings, public, occupied by private parties 

Bonds re-funded, letters, etc., relating thereto 

Bonded debt, annual interest charge 



Certificate of mayor relating to dog law 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 
City hall 



City officers' salaries * 56 

City teams 5U 

Contingent expenses 549 

Care of rooms 553 

City Library 56 ° 

Commons 6° 8 

Cemetery. Pine Grove ---^ 612 

Valley 615 



732 INDEX. 

City farm 623 

County tax 638 

City officials, list of 3-2S 

engineer, report of 105 

engineer's department, organization of 103 

library, report of trustees of 223 

treasurer's report 228 

librarian's report 233 

donations to 237 

Cemeteries, report of sub-trustees of Valley 260 

Pine Grove 258 

treasurer 254 

fund of, report of trustees 253 

City farm, report of joint standing committee 275 

solicitor, report of 291 

marshal, report of 309 

Committee, school, report of 313 

Contract with and bond of Manchester Electric Light Co 714-716 

City auditor's report 405 

treasurer's report 410 

Communications of city auditor 674-676 

City ordinances and amendments 6S3 

councils, resolutions and orders 688-713 

physician, report of 299 

auditor's department 459-669 

Contracts 714-723 

Contract with Manchester Electric Light Co 714 

Head & Dowst Co., house and bridge at Valley cemetery 717 
Mead, Mason & Co., addition to Webster-street school- 
house 717 

Head & Dowst Co., Hallsville schoolhouse 720 

Concord & Montreal R. R., underpass on Second street . . 721 

Thomas A. Lane, new boiler at police station 722 

Hartley E. Vaughn, scavenger service 722 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 429 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 635 

Debt, bonded, statement of 654-656 

tabular statement of 656 

detailed statement of, for 1S91 654 

Defective classes, the 279 

Derryfleld park 619 

Depot, new, Concord & Montreal R. R 639 

Dog law, certificate of mayor 676 

E 

Engineer's department 533 

Expenses, incidental 441 

mayor's 455 

contingent 549 



INDEX. 733 

Evening schools 556 

school, mechanical drawing 557 

Electric lights, location of 391 

Light Company, contract with, bond of 714-716 

Engravings of public buildings, list of 725-727 

Elliot hospital 635 

Exempted from tax, property 651-653 

F 

Fund, reserved 429 

Fuel 542 

Furniture and supplies 544 

Free text-books 559 

Fire department 562 

Fire-alarm telegraph 577 

Firemen's parade „ 580 

Farm, paupers off 620 

Free beds, Elliot Hospital 635 

Fire department, report of chief engineer 165 

value of personal property 190-198 

names and residences of members 198-206 

location of hydrants 206-219 

Farm, city 623 

G 

Grading for concrete 501 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 635 

Gas-lights, location of 398 

H 

Highway district No. 1 461 

2 and 3 462 

4 467 

5 468 

6 470 

7 471 

8 472 

9 474 

10 475 

11 477 

12 479 

13 479 

Highways, new 480 

land taken for 486 

watering 486 

paving 489 

macadamizing 494 

grading for concrete on 501 

scavenger teams 503 



734 INDEX. 

Highways, sweeping 506 

lighting 507 

bridges 509 

city teams 514 

sewers and drains 520 

Health department 536 

Hydrant service 580 

Hospital, Women's Aid and Relief 634 

Elliot, free beds 635 

Highway districts, reports of surveyors 139 

Hydrants, location of 206-219 

Health, hoard of, report of 375 

Hallsville schoolhouse 594 

Hospitals, churches, etc., exempt from taxation 652 

I 

Interest 428 

Incidental expenses 441 

Indigent soldiers 633 

Inspector, milk, report of 303 

Inventory of assets 663-669 

Interest, annual charge, bonded debt 658 

Inaugural address, Mayor Knowlton's 31 

L 

Loan, temporary 431 

Land taken for highways 4S6 

Lighting streets 507 

Library, city 560 

Location of electric lights 391 

of gas lights 398 

of oil lamps 400 

List of engravings 725-727 

of churches, etc., exempt from tax 652 

M 

Mayor's incidentals 455 

Macadamizing streets 494 

Militia 63 ? 

Milk inspector, report of 303 

Marshal, city, report of 309 

Manchester Electric Light Co., contract with and bond of 714-716 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 416-421, 422-427 

Manufacturing property exempt from taxation 652 

N 

New highways 480 

New.schoolhouse, West Manchester 592 



735 



New schoolhouse, Hallsville 

addition to Webster-street 
New depot, Concord & Montreal Railroad 



O 



Officials, city, salaries of 456 

Order to print f ort y -sixth annual report 2 

Organization of board of water commissioners 53-59 

Overseers of the poor, report of 269 

Oil lamps, location of 400 

Ordinances, city, amendments of 683 

Organization of school board for 1891 14-15 

Ordinance amending section 4, chapter 40 of the ordinances relating to 

cemeteries 685 

amending section 1, chapter 7, in relation to the erection of 

buildings 685 

amending section 22, chapter 14, increasing salary of chief 

engineer of fire department 686 

relating to privy vaults 687 

amending section 5, chapter 12, relating to sewers 687 

Order to print Mayor Knowlton's inaugural address 6G6 

relative to Webster-street school building 696 

to purchase land for Hallsville schoolhouse 697 

to buy dump-cart for city farm 697 

to buy steam boiler and pump for sewer department 697 

relative to purchase of sewer pipe 698 

authorizing water commissioners to buy land 698 

to buy three horses for fire department 698 

to erect electric light 699, 710, 711 

to build certain sewers 699-701 

to buy land for hose-house and ward -room, ward 9 701 

to extend Webster street 702 

relating to quitclaim deed to D. C. Whittemore 702 

to macadamize Bridge street, West Manchester 703 

to macadamize Nashua street, Lowell to Concord street 703 

relative to concreting sundry streets 703, 704 

to build certain streets 704, 705 

to establish the grades of certain streets 705 

to build bank wall on Bridge street, West Manchester 705 

to change the grade of certain streets 709 

relative to new boiler for police station 706 

to buy gravel and sell land 706 

to contract for building retaining wall on Bowman street 707 

authorizing temporary loan for sewers 707 

to buy and locate fountain 707 

to buy hose for fire department 70S 

to buy land for extension of Amoskeag cemetery 70S 

to buy land of A. D. Gooden 710 

to buy wheel scrapers 710 

to repair Spruce street 711 

to buy land in McGregorville for school purposes 711 



736 INDEX. 

Order to furnish room for matron at police station 712 

to appoint consulting engineer by water commissioners 712 

to furnish additional room at Vamey school building. 713 

P 

Payment of funded debt 429 

Printing and stationery 436 

Paving streets 489 

Printing and advertising 548 

Police department 582 

Pine Grove cemetery 612 

Paupers off the farm 620 

Property account, real and personal 663-669 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 660-662 

Public buildings, list of engravings of 725-727 

Park, Derryfield 619 

Stark 610 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation 652 

R 

Reservedfund 429 

Repairs of schoolhouses 539 

Rooms, care of 553 

Receiving tomb 619 

Report of Board of Water Commissioners 53 

Superintendent of Water-Works 58 

City Engineer 105 

Highway District Surveyors 139-161 

Chief Engineer Fire Department 165 

Trustees of City Library 223 

Committees on Cemeteries 253 

Sub-Trustees of Valley Cemetery 260 

Pine Grove Cemetery 258 

Treasurer of Cemeteries 254 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund 253 

Overseers of the Poor 269 

Joint Standing Committee on City Farm ... 275 

City Solicitor 291 

Milk Inspector 303 

City Marshal 309 

School Committee 313 

Superintendent 319 

Board of Health 375 

Repairs of buildings 588 

Real estate owned by the city 663-669 

Real property, exempt from taxation, other than public property 662 

Rules, etc., relating to bills against the city (auditor's department) . . . .669-673 

Receipts and expenditures, 1890 and 1891 422-427 

Report of city auditor 405 

treasurer 410 



INDEX. 737 

Receipts and expenditures, municipal, for 1891 416 

Report of M. M. Tidd on high-pressure water service 82 

of city physician 299 

on the defective classes 279 

Resolutions and orders of the city councils 688 

raising money and making appropriations for 1891 642 

Resolution relative to the issue of bonds for permanent improvements 688 
relative to guarding public health against impurities in 

water 689 

confirming contract with Concord & Montreal Railroad 690 

relating to IJallsville schoolhouse 690 

addition to Webster-street 

schoolhouse 691 

relating to public park 691 

discontinuing highway 692 

part of old Bridge-street road 692 

relative to legacy of Eliza A. Eaton 693 

exempting Queen City Manufacturing Co 693 

relating to plan of Stark park 694 

engine house and ward room, ward 9 694 

relative to a discontinuance of a portion of Canal street and 

a portion of Pleasant street 695 



Salaries of city officials 456 

Scavenger teams 503 

Street sweeping 506 

Sewers and drains 520 

School department 360 

Schoolhouses, repairs of 539 

Supplies and furniture 544 

Stationery and books 547 

Salaries, teachers' 558 

School, evening, mechanical drawing 557 

Stark park 610 

Soldiers, indigent 633 

State tax 638 

Solicitor, city, report of 291 

School committee, report of 313 

superintendent's report 319 

Statement of bonded debt 656 

total taxation for 1891 647 

public buildings occupied by private parties 660 

School statistics 343 

attendance 319 

Schoolhouse, Hallsville 594 

addition to Webster-street 593 

West Manchester, Varney 592 

German School Society 652 

Schoolhouses, parochial, and seminaries of learning 652 

Summary of city debt 658 

47 



738 



Temporary loans 431 

Text-books, free 559 

Teachers' salaries 55S 

Tomb, receiving 619 

Taxes, abatement of 638 

Tax, state 638 

county 638 

Treasurer, city, report of 410 

Taxation 646-653 

appropriations for 1891 642 

exemption 651-653 

by board of assessors 646 

statement of total 647 

table of taxes due and uncollected 648 

valuations from 1846 to 1891, inclusive 649 

settlement of tax collector's account to June 1, 1891 650 

Teams, city 514 

The Defective Classes 279 

Tabular statement of receipts and expenditures 422-427 

churches, hospitals, etc., exempt from taxation. . 652 

u 

Union passenger station , 639 

V 

Varney schoolhouse 592 

"Valley cemetery 615 

Valuation and taxes 647 

w 

Watering streets 486 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 634 

Water bonds, re-funding of 677-681 

Water-works, superintendent's report 58 

commissioner's report 53 

high-pressure service 82 

construction account 596 

repairs account 599 

current expenses 605