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Full text of "Report of the selectmen of the Town of Manchester"

City of Manchester, N. H. 




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Forty-Seventh Annual Report 



Receipts and Expenditures 



City OF Manchester 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1892 

TOGETHEK WITy 

OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS AND PAPERS RELATING TO 
THE AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




MANCHESTER: 

PRINTED BY THE JOHN B. CLARKE COMPANY 
1893 



.07 






City of Manchester. 



In Board of Common Council. 

AN ORDER to print the Forty-seventh Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Manchester. 

Ordered, If the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur, that the joint stand- 
ing committee on finance be, and they hereby are, authorized to procure, for the 
use of the inhabitants of said city, the printing of the Forty-seventh Annual Re- 
port of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City of Manchester, including the 
reports of the joint standing committee on finance, the city auditor, the school 
board, and superintendent of schools, superintendent of water-works, water 
commissioners, engineer of fire department, city marshal, overseers of the poor, 
trustees, librarian, and treasurer of the city library, committee on cemeteries, 
joint standing committee on city farm, city physician, city solicitor, city engineer, 
and such other matters relating to city affairs as said finance committee may 
direct, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for printing and 
stationery. 

In Board of Common Council. February 7, 1893. 
Passed. 

FRED T. DUNLAP, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen. February 7, 1893. 
Passed in concurrence. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor. 



MANCHESTER 

CITY GOVERNMENT. 

1892. 



Mayor. 



EDGAR J. KNOWLTON .... Office, City Hall 

Chosen at biennial election in November, 1S90. Salary, $1,800 per annum, 
payable quarterly. (Act of June, 1S48, section i. Chapter 2^3, Laws of 1883. 
Public Statutes, chapter 47.) Residence, 533 Lake avenue. Telephone at 
house and office. 



Aldermen. 



Act of June, 1848, section i. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward I. John L. Sanborn, 25 Amoskeag Corporation, Market 
street. 

Ward 2. Oliver B. Green, 749 Pine street. 

Ward 3. William Corey, 488 Maple street. 

Ward 4. W. Byron Stearns, 320 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. John J. Holland, 218 Central street. 

Ward 6. Byron Worthen, 5_'4 Lake avenue. 

Ward 7. * Andrew J. Dickey, 9 Manchester Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Walter M. Ftilton, 664 Main street, West Manchester. 

* Deceased December 12, 1S92. 



MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

President of the Common Council. 

Edson S. Heath, 13 Amoskeag Corporation, Middle street. 



Members of the Common Council. 

Act of June, 1848, section i. Public Statutes, chapter 48. 

Ward i. 

John P. Mullen, Amoskeag Corporation, 12 Whitney street. 
Oliver J. Butman, 26 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark street. 
Thomas Wilkinson, Amoskeag Corporation, 3 Boyden street. 

Ward 2. 

Alfred D. Maxwell, Goffstown road near Front street. 
Kirk C. Bartlett, 91 Harrison street. 
Fred T. Dunlap^ 220 Prospect street. 

Ward 3. 

George W. Reed, 490 Chestnut street. 

George M. Clark, 88 Ash street. 

Alfred Nearbonne, 280 East High street. 

Ward 4. 

Charles E. Cox, 475 Hanover street. 
John P. Cronin, 126 Manchester street. 
Evangeliste V. Turcotte, 229 Merrimack street. 

Ward 5. 

Richard J. Barry, 195 Central street. 
Daniel J. Ahern, 21 Spruce street. 
William G. Cotter, 72 Spruce street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



Ward 6. 



Thomas Walker, Jr., Goffe's Falls. 

George M. Bean, Candia road near Massabesic. 

Albert J. Peaslee, Cohas avenue near water-works. 

Ward 7. 

Edson S. Heath, 13 Amoskeag Corporation, Middle street. 
Charles C. Chapman, 78 Amoskeag Corporation, West Merri- 
mack street. 

Levi K. Snow, 86 Amoskeag Corporation, Canal street. 

Ward 8. 

* John H. Schimmel, 266 Douglas street, West Manchester. 

Francois X. Robitaille, 51 Lake avenue. 

Christian L. Wolff", 36 Clinton street, West Manchester. 



Clerk of Coinmon Council. 
George L. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 

Salarj', ^200. (General Laws, chapter 46, sections 7-9. City Laws and 
Ordinances, page ;^2> chapter 6, section 11.) 



City Clerk. 
Nathan P. Kidder Office, City Hall 

Salary, $900. The city clerk, in addition to his salary, is in receipt of fees 
as registrar of births, marriages, and deaths, and as a recording officer for record 
of mortgages on personal property, of attachments of real estate, of partnerships 
and assignments, and for recording various other legal papers. He also receives 
fees for issuing dog licenses, billiard and bowling alley licenses, for certifying 
records, and for various other matters. 

These fees are established by the state legislature under various laws, aiKi 
are estimated to be between $2,100 and $2,500 per annum. Chosen inconven- 

* Deceased Octobers, 1892. 



6 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

tion of City Councils in January, annually. (Charter, section 22. Public Stat- 
utes, chapter 50. Act of 1849. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 42, 43, 68, 
72, 73, 84, 86, 89, 114, 122, 123, 124, 166, 189.) Residence, 313 Manchester. 



City Auditor. 



James B. Straw Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,000. Appointed by Mayor, and approved by Board of Aldermen, 
in January, annually. ( Laws of 1889, chapter 287. City Ordinances, pages 44, 
71, 83-88, 173.) Residence, 593 Union street. 



Auditor's Clerk. 

L. M. Cogswell . . . Auditor's Office, City Hall 

Salary, $600. Residence, 645 Union street. 



City Treasurer. 

Sylvanus B. Ptitnam ..... Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^1,200. Elected in convention of City Councils, in January, annu- 
ally. (Charter, section 23. Act of 1856, section 4. General Laws, chapter 
48, sections 3, 4. Act of 1859, section 4. City Laws and Ordinances, pages 
36, 86-89, 170, 172.) Residence, 437 Amherst street. 



Collector of Taxes. 

George E. Morrill ■ . . ' . . . Office, City Hall 

Salary, ;^i,65o and fees. Elected by Mayor and Aldermen before May i, 
annually. (Act of July, 185 1. Act of June, 1859, section 6. Public Statutes, 
chapter 43. City Laws and Ordinances, chapter 33.) Residence, 740 Chest- 
nut street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 



Deputy Collector of Taxes. 



Edwin C. Paul . . ■ . . Collector's Office, City Hall 

Paid by collector. Appointed by tax collector with approval of Mayor and 
Aldermen. (City Laws and Ordinances, chapter t,;^, section 3.) Residence, 
416 Central street. 



City Solicitor. 

Edwin F. Jones . . Office, Patten's Blocl:, 936 Elm street. 

Salary, $Soo. Elected in conven'.ion of City Councils in January, annually. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6, pages 70, 72 ) Residence, 15 High 
street. 



City Messenger. 
Jolin A. Barker Office, City Hall 

Salary, ^700. Elected in convention of City Councils in January, annually. 
(City Laws and Ordinances, chapters 4, 6.) Residence, 49 Appleton street. 

Joint Standing Committees. 

0/i Finance. — The Mayor and Alderman Stearns ; Council-- 
men Walker, Jr., Cox, and Dunlap. 

On Accounts. — Aldermen Worthen and Stearns ; Councilmen 
Reed, Turcotte, and Wolff. (Meet Wednesday sacceeding the 
twenty-fourth of each month. All bills must be left at the city 
auditor's office, properly approved, not later than the twentietli 
of each montli.) 

On Claims. — Aldermen Stearns and Green; Councilmen 
Chapman, Reed, and Barry. (Meet third Friday of each month.) 

On Streets. — Aldermen Corey and Green ; Councilmen Max- 
well, Clark, and Walker, Jr. 

On Sewers and Drains. — Aldermen Holland and Dickey; 
Councilmen Maxwell, Clark, and Peaslee. 



8 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

On Lighting Streets. — Aldermen Green and Sanborn ; Coun- 
cilmen Cox, Bartlett, and Snow. 

On Lands and Buildings. — Aldermen Worthen and Fulton ; 
Councilmen Cronin, Wilkinson, and Chapman. 

On Fire Department. — Aldermen Dickey and Corey; Coun- 
cilmen Butman, Cronin, and Nearbonne. 

On Commons and Cemeteries. — Aldermen Sanborn and Hol- 
land ; Councilmen Bean, Snow, and Wolff. 

On Public Lnstruction. — Aldermen Stearns and Sanborn; 
Councilmen Schimmel, Ahern, and Robitaille. 

On Water-Works. — Aldermen Holland and Sanborn; Coun- 
cilmen Mullen, Barry, and Nearbonne. 

On City Farm. — Aldermen Fulton and Worthen; Council- 
men Peaslee, Butman, and Ahern. 

On House of Correction. — Aldermen Sanborn and Dickey ; 
Councilmen Mullen, Ahern, and Wolff. 

On Military Affairs. — Aldermen Fulton and Stearns; Coun- 
cilmen Turcotte, Cotter, and Schimmel. 



Standing Committees. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



On Enrollment. — Aldermen Green and Holland. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Aldermen Holland and Fulton. 

On Market. — Aldermen Fulton and Green. 

On Marshal's Accounts. — Aldermen Dickey and Worthen. 

On Licenses. — Aldermen Corey and Sanborn. 

On Setting Trees. — Aldermen Stearns and Corey. 

On Special Police. —Aldermen Worthen and Dickey. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

On Flection Returns. — Councilmen Cox, Bartlett, and 
Walker, Jr. 

On Bills on Second Reading. — Councilmen Clark, Dunlap, 
and Snow. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 9 

On Enrollment. — Couiicilmen Chapman, Wilkinson, and 
Barrv. 



City Physician. 

Frederick Perkins .... Office, 895 Elm street 

Salary, $200. Elected by City Councils in convention, in January, annually. 
{Laws of 1870, chapter 99. City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections 29, 30.) Res- 
idence, 490 Lake avenue. 



City Engineer. 

Winfred H, Bennett . ... Office, City Hall 

Salary, $1,200. Chosen by City Councils in convention, in January, annu- 
ally. (City Ordinances, chapter 6, sections t,t„ 34.) 



Water Commissioners. 

(Chapter 70, Laws of 187 1. City Ordinances, chapter 36, and Laws of 1891, 
chapter 26, page 319, act approved March 31, 1891.) One commissioner 
elected annually by mayor and aldermen, in the month of September, for a term 
of six years. Office at Court House, corner Franklin and West Merrimack 
streets. Telephone at office, and at pumping station. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex-officio. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1895. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1894. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
James A, Weston, term expires January, 1897. 
Joseph F. Kennard, term expires January, 1896. 
Alpheus Gay, Chairman. 

James A. Weston, C/(f/'/^. Salary, ^100. Chosen by the board 
of commissioners. 



10 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Superintendent of Water-Works. 

Charles K. Walker . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, ^i,6oo. Chosen by water commissioners annually. Residence, 68 
South Main street, West Manchester. 



Clerk of the Water-Works. 

Arthur E. Stearns . . Office, Court House, Franklin street 

Salary, ^1,200. Chosen by the water commissioners annually. Residence, 
421 Hanover street. 



Engineer at Pumping Station. 

Josiah Laselle. Salary, $700, rent, fuel, and use of land. 
Chosen by water commissioners annually. 



Justice of tine Police Court. 

Nathan P. Hunt, court room at Police Station, corner Man- 
chester and Chestnut streets. 

Salary, ^1,500. Appointed by Governor, with the advice of the Council. 
(General Laws, chapter 215; chapter 163, sections 17, 18, 19 of the Laws of 
1S78, as amended by chapter 236, Laws of 18S1. Public Statutes, chapter 211.) 
Residence, 747 Union street. 



Associate Justice of the Police Court. 

Isaac L. Heath ' . . Salary, $2 per day of actual service 

Appointed by the Governor, with advice of the Council. (Chapter 21 15, Gen- 
eral Laws, sections 2-14. Public Statutes, chapter 211.) Residence, 16 High 
street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 11 



Clerk of the Police Court. 

John C. Bicktbrd ...... Salary, ^600 

Appointed by the justice of the police court. (Chapter 163, sections 17-19, 
General Laws, amended by chapter 236, Laws of 1881. Public Statutes, chap- 
ter 211.) Residence, 15 Ash street. 



Police. 



The members of the police force are appointed by the Mayor and Aldermen, 
in January of alternate years, for a term of two years, unless sooner removed for 
cause. They are, by virtue of their appointment, constables and conservators of 
the peace, and their jurisdiction extends throughout the city. The term of any 
officer elected to fill a vacancy, or to increase the number of officers, expires at 
the time of the next regular election. (Chapter 253, section 5, General Laws ; 
chapter 303, Laws of 1887; City Ordinances, pages 30, 34, 35, 37, 53, 54, 76, 
102, 103, 107, 164.) Police station at the corner of Chestnut and Manchester 
streets. 



City Marshal. 



Michael J. Healy .... Office at Police Station 

Salary, ;^900. Residence, 551 Granite si reet. West Manchester. Telephone 
at house and office. 



Assistant Marshal. 

John F. Cassidy Office at Police Station 

Salary, $800. Residence, 415 Manchester street. 



Captain of the Watch. 

Lafayette Tebbetts. Salary, $2.50 per day. Residence, 222 
Laurel street. 



12 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Day Police. 

SALARY, $2.25 PER DAY. 

Randall W. Bean, 77 Ash street. 

Edgar Farrar, 74 Penacook street. 

Ira P. Fellows, 82 A street, West Manchester. 

Edwin A. Hutchins, 11 Mill street, Amoskeag. 

Henry McAllister, 852 Elm street, room 18. 

John T. O'Dowd, corner Pine and Laurel streets. 

Florence Sullivan, 21^ Cedar street. 



Night Patrol. 

SALARY, $2.25 PER DAY. 

* Jonathan E. Floyd, 823 Union street. 

Halbert A. Bond, 136 Concord street. 

Henry A. Burns, 505 Maple street. 

Ira F. Davis, 38 Stark street. 

Norbert Decoteau, 302 Cartier street, West Manchester. 

James F. Dunn, 237 Elm street. 

Lowell O. Fowler, 141 7 Elm street. 

John Hartnett, 206 Cedar street. 

John J. Hurley, 270 Auburn street. 

Benjamin F. Lake, 732 Elm street. 

George A. Lovejoy, 99 Orange street. 

Augustus C. Martin, 46 Parker street, West Manchester. 

Henry Masse, 332 Beauport street, West Manchester. 

Kenneth McDonald, 305 Chestnut street. 

Samuel L. Mitchell, 430 Manchester street. 

Frank P. Moore, 411 Belmont street. 

John F. O'Malley, 130 Merrimack street. 

Wallace Parmenter, 32 Arkwright street. 

Francois Reinville, 410 Dubuque street, West Manchester. 

* Resigned in November. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 13 

Philip Reischer, 292 Main street, West Manchester. 

Olat'Ring, 8 Dean street, room 18. 

Lyman Roby, 403 Lake avenue. 

Gilbert A. Sackett, 589 North Main street, West Manchester. 

Timothy P. Shea, 213 Auburn street. 

John T. Welch, 1263 Elm street. 

Charles W. Stevens, 9 Russell street. 

* Theodore Floden, 852 Elm street. 



Janitor of Station. 

Peter Larabee. ^1.75 per day. Residence, 124 Willow street. 



Matron. 



Miss A. B. Brown. ^415 per annum. Residence, 329 Chestnut 
street. 



School Committee. 

Chosen at the biennial election in November, 1890 ; Mayor and president of 
the Common Council members ex officio. The board of school committee 
choose the clerk of the board, the superintendent of pubhc instruction, the 
truant officer, and the teachers in the public schools, and determine their sal- 
aries. They have charge of the repairs of schoolhouses, to a limited extent, 
and the purchase of free text-books and other supplies, and are limited by the 
appropriations of the City Councils. The salary of the committee is ^10 each, 

Ward i. 

Charles H. Manning, 17 Mechanic street. 

Charles D. Sumner, 22 Amoskeag Corporation, Stark street. 

Ward 2. 

f Charles S. Murkland, 906 Chestnut street, above Clark street. 
\ William H. Morrison, 82 Prospect street. 
George H. Stearns, 1934 Elm street. 

* Elected to fill vacancy. 

t Chosen to fill unexpired term September 6, 1892. 

X Moved out of the ward ; resigned September 6, 1892. 



14 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Ward 3. 

George D. Towne, 170 Lowell street. 
Louis E. Phelps, 103 Walnut street. 

Ward 4. 

Stephen B. Stearns, 464 Amherst street. 
Edwin L. Richardson, 304 Manchester street. 

Ward 5, 

James P. Slattery, 217 Central street. 
William J. Sughrue, 61 Spruce street. 

Ward 6. 

F. T. E. Richardson, 481 Lincoln street. 
George W. Dearborn, 131 Massabesic street. 

Ward 7. 

Marshall P. Hall, 26 Amoskeag Corporation, Market street. 
Edward B. Woodbury, i Manchester Corporation, Pleasant 
■street. 

Ward 8. 

Luther C. Baldwin, 157 Milford street. 
William K. Robbins, 290 McGregor street. 

Edson S. Heath, ex officio, 13 Amoskeag Corporation, Middle 
street. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, chairman, 533 Lake avenue. Office, City 
Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury, clerk, salary $100, i Manchester Cor- 
poration, Pleasant street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 15 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

William E. Buck Office, City Hall 

Salary, $2,000. Residence, 324 Myrtle street. 



Truant Officer. 

.Samuel Brooks ...... Office, City Hall 

Salary, $750. Residence, 413 Beech street. 



Assessors. 



One assessor from each ward chosen at the biennial election in November. 
Paid ;?2. 50 each, for each day while employed 'in the assessment and abate- 
ment of taxes. Office, City Hall. (Charter, section 25. Public Statutes, 
chapter 4S, section i ; chapter 50, section 4; chapter 49, sections 10, 11, 12. 
City Ordinances, chapter 6, section 26.) Assistant assessors, not exceeding 
six, chosen Ijy the City Councils. 

Ward I. Henry Lewis, 32 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 2. John E. Stearns, 58 Myrtle street. 

Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. John Ryan, 22S Chestnut street. 

Ward 6. George H. Dudley, 159 Laurel street. 

Ward 7. William T. Rowell, 14 Manchester Corporation. 

Ward 8. Frank T, Provost, 21 Amory street, West Manchester. 

CHAIRMAN OF ASSESSORS. 

David O. Furnald Office, City Hall 

CLERK OF ASSESSORS. 

George H. Dudley Office, City Hall 



16 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Inspectors of Check-Lists. 

One in each ward, chosen at the biennial election in Novembei. Compen- 
sation, ^2.25 per day for each day actually employed. Office, City HalL 
(Laws of 1878, chapter 163, sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, and 
City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 9.) 

Ward I. George C. Kemp, 40 Machine Shop block. 

Ward 2. * Benjamin L. Hartshorn, 28 Blodget street. 

Ward 2. t Charles B. Tucker, 777 Union street. 

Ward 3. David O. Furnald, 384 Lowell street. 

Ward 4. Harrison D. Lord, 387 Hanover street. 

Ward 5. Patrick E. Daly, 80 Auburn street. 

Ward 6. Isaac Whittemore, River road, south. 

Ward 7. Joseph A. Foster, 42 Amoskeag Corporation. 

Ward 8. Charles C. Tinkham, 9 Parker avenue. 

Ward 9. Williarn K. Robbins, 290 McGregor street. 



Overseers of the Poor. 

One in each ward, chosen at biennial election in November. The Mayor is 
a- member ex officio. Compensation, ^25 per annum, each ; clerk of the board, 
$75 per annum, determined by City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 18, as 
amended by Ordinance of August 5, 1890. Meet third Wednesday of each 
month in City Hall Building. 

Ward I. William H. Maxwell, clerk, 20 Amoskeag Corpora- 
tion, Stark street. 

Ward 2. Thomas L. Quimby, railroad station, foot West Sal- 
mon street. 

Ward 3. Benjamin F. Garland, 28 Linden street. 

Ward 4. George S. Holmes, 296 Hanover street. 

W^ard 5. Patrick Costello, 106 East Spruce street. 

Ward 6. Charles Francis, Candia road, East Manchester. 

Ward 7. William Marshall, 72 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

* Deceased April 2, 1892. t Chosen September 6, 1892, for unexpired term. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 17 

Ward 8. William Weber, 187 Second street, West Man- 
chester. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex officio, office, City Hall. 



Board of Health. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 14, section 10, as amended. Laws of 1885, chap- 
ter 165; Laws of 18S7, chapter 227; Public Statutes, chapters 108, 109, no.) 
One member appointed by the Mayor in January of each year, to hold office 
for a term of three years. Salary, $200 each per annum. 

George C. Hoitt, M. D., 11 79 Elm street. Term expires first 
Monday in February, 1893. 

Joseph B. Sawyer, clerk, civil engineer, 356 Hanover street. 
Term expires first Monday in February, 1895. 

Cornelius F. Starr, M. D., 49 Manchester street. Term ex- 
pires first Monday in February, 1894. 

* Russell White, sanitary inspector, 575 Union street. Office, 
936 Elm street. 

f Melvin J. Jenkins, sanitary inspector, 31 Nashua street. 
Office 926 Elm street. 

Herbert S. Clough, sanitary inspector, Hanover-street road. 
Office City Hall. 

John F. Looney, sanitary mspector, 164 Auburn street. Office 
City Hall. 



Fire Department. 

The chiel engineer and four assistant engineers are chosen annually in the 
month of January, by a majority of the City Councils in convention. The 
salary of the chief engineer is ^1,000 per annum ; the assistant engineers, 
each $125 per annum. They exercise the powers and perform the duties of 
firewards. The said engineers constitute the board of engineers, and elect a 
clerk whose compensation is ^^25 a year. The annual compensation of the 
members of the several hook and ladder, hose, steam fire engine, and chemical 
engine companies is as follows : Foremen, each $115 ; assistant foremen, each 

* Retired April i, 1892. 
t Retired February i, 1892. 



18 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

^iio; clerks, each $iio; engineers, each ^135; assistant engineers, each 
^105; ail other members, each ^loo; payable in equal seVni-annual payments, 
on the first of January and July. (Laws of 1870, chapter 99. General Laws, 
chapter 106. City Ordinances, chapters 6 and 12.) Nineteen members are 
steadily employed as teamsters and engineers, etc. : Two at ^62.50 per 
month, each ; eleven at ^55 P*^"" mf^nth, each ; four at ^50 per month, each ; 
two at $45 per month, each. Members of the companies are appointed by 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen, in the month of F"ebruary, annually, on list 
presented by the board of engineers. The officers of each company are ap- 
pointed by the board of engineers. 



Chief Engineer. 

Thomas W. I.ane . . Office, Central Station, Vine street 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Telephone at house and office. 

Fred S. Bean, clerk, 102 Orange street. 
Ruel G. Manning, 52 Douglas street, West Manchester. 
Eugene S. Whitney, River road, north, corner West street. 
Clarence R. Merrill, 414 Merrimack street. 

for further information see chief engineer's report. 



Trustees of City Library. 

(Laws of 1854, chapter 1588. See contract with Manchester Atheneum, 
printed on pages 107, io8 of City Report for fiscal year ending January 31, 
1855. '> Board of seven trustees, one of whom is elected by Aldermen and 
board of trustees, in joint convention, in September annually. Term of ser- 
vice, seven years ; no salary. Two additional trustees. Mayor, and president of 
Common Council, ex ojjicio. 

Lucien B. Clough, term expires October i, 1895, 181 Walnut 
street. 

Nathan P. Hunt, term expires October i, 1894, 747 Union 
street. 

Herman F. Straw, term expires October i, 1893, ^°7 Chest- 
nut street. 

Walter M. Parker, term expires October i, 1S99, West Web- 
ster street, corner Elm. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 19 

Isaac VV. Smith, term expires October i, 1898, 1855 Elm 
street. 

Moody Currier, term expires October i, 1897, Ash street, cor- 
ner Myrtle. 

* Benjamin C. Dean, term expires October i, 1896, Ash street, 
corner Myrtle. 

Edgar J. Knowlton, ex officio, 533 Lake avenue. 
* Edson S. Heath, ex officio, 13 Amoskeag Corporation, Middle 
street. 



Highway Surveyors. 

Elected annually in joint convention in City Councils in January. 

District No. i. Raymond P. Campbell, Union street, north. 
Salary, $2 per day. 

District No. 2. William Sanborn, 89 Pennacook street. Sal- 
ary, $1,200 per annum. 

District No. 3. Eben Carr, Union street, north. Salar\-, %2 
per day. 

District No. 4. Byron E. Moore, Goffe's Falls. Salary, $2 
per day. 

District No. 5. Mark E. Harvey, Nutt road, south. Salary, 
^2 per day. 

District No. 6. Greenleaf C. Coleman, Island Pond road. 
Salary, $2 per day. 

District No. 7. Charles Francis. Candia road, East Manches- 
chester. Salary, $2 per day. 

District No. 8. George H. Penniman, Hanover street, corner 
of Mammoth road. Salary, $2 per day. 

District No. 9. Alphonso Boyce, Mammoth road. Salary, $2 
per day. 

District No. 10. Charles O. Phelps, 341 South Main street. 
Salary, $2.50 per day. 

District No. 11. Frank D. Hanscom, Goffstown road. Sal- 
ary, %2 per day. 

* Resigned. C. D. McDuffie elected March 12, 1892, for balance of term. 



20 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

District No. 12. Leroy M. Streeter, Mammoth road, city 
farm. Salary, $2 per day. 

Telephone at house and office of superintendent in district No. 2. 



City Weigher. 

Elected annually in convention of City Councils. Salary, ^400 per annum, 
all fees for weighing returned monthly to city treasurer with sworn statement. 
Stationed at city scales on Franklin street. 

William Bailey ...... Ofifice, city scales. 

Residence, 74 Main street, West Manchester. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Albert T. Barr, 257 Merrimack street. 

Elected annually in Janizary by City Councils in convention. Paid by fees. 
(Section 25, chapter 43, Public Statutes, and chapter 125, Public Statutes.) 



Fish and Game Wardens. 

(Public Statutes, chapter 130.) Elected by City Councils in convention. 

John C. Higgins, 143 Orange street. 

George A. Clark, 304 Central street. 

Samuel S. James, 184 Laurel street. 

William C. Clarke, 711 Pine, corner North street. 

C. R. Hodge, 574 Hall street. 



Trustees of Cemeteries. 

(City Ordinances, chapter 39, sections i, 2, 3, 4.) Two trustees elected by 
City Councils in convention in January, annually, for the term of four years. 
Sub-trustees appointed by board of trustees. 

George W. Bacon, 65 Stark Corporation, Canal street, term 
expires January, 1895. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 21 

V/illiam H. Hiise, Mammoth road, term expires 1895. 
Nathan P. Hunt, Union street nearBlodget, term expires 1894. 
Bushrod W. Hill, 299 Hanover street, term expires 1894. 
John M. Kendall, 311 Central street, term expires 1893. 
Hiram Stearns, east side of Front street, Amoskeag, term ex- 
pires 1893. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street, term expires January, 1896. 
John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street, term expires January, 



i; 



S. B. Putnam, clerk and treasurer, 437 Amherst street. 



Sub-Trustees of Cemeteries. 

VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Alderman John J. Holland, 218 Central street. 
Councilman Levi K. Snow, 86 Amoskeag Corporation, 
Nathan P. Hunt, 747 Union street. 
Bushrod W. Hill. 299 Hanover street. 
John M. Kendall, 311 Central street. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Alderman John L. Sanborn, 25 Market street. 

Councilman George M. Bean, Candia road, Massabesic street. 

George W. Bacon, 66 Stark Corporation, Canal street. 

John P. Young, 346 Merrimack street. 

Charles H. Bartlett, 25 High street. 

AMOSKEAG CEMETERY. 

Councilman Chris. L. Wolff, 36 Clinton street. West Man- 
chester. 

Hiram Stearns, east side Front street, Amoskeag. 
William H. Huse, Mammoth road, East Manchester. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

Byron A. Stearns. Office at the cemetery; residence, 254 
Taylor street. Telephone at house and cemetery. 



22 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF VALLEY CEMETERY. 

Charles H. G. Foss. Office at the cemetery ; residence, 267 
Lake avenue. 

TRUSTEES OF CEMETERY FUNDS. 

James A. Weston, chairinan^ 621 Maple street. 
Person C. Cheney, Harrison street, corner Elm. 
Edgar J. Knowlton, {ex-officio), 533 Lake avenue. 



Inspector of Milk. 

H. F. W. Little . . . Office, rear of 13 Lowell street 

Residence, 385 Lowell street. Term expires February i, 1893. (Public 
Statutes, chapter 127.) Appointed by Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $2s'^<y 
per annum. 



Inspector of Buildings. 

Thomas W. Lane . . . Office at Central Fire Station 

Residence, 1937 Elm street. Appointed by Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
biennially, in February. Salaiy, 5 100 per annum. (City Ordinances, chapter 
15. Laws of 1883, chapter 94. PubHc Statutes, page 170) Telephone at 
house and office. 



Inspectors of Oil. 

William Bailey , ' . . 74 Main street, West Manchester 
Joseph B. Baril ...... 28 Hanover street 

, (Public Statutes, chapter 126, sections 25-34. City Ordinances, chapter 25.) 
Paid by fees, ^ of I per cent per gallon. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 23 

Moderators. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 31, sections 3,9; chapter 36, 
section 9 ; chapter 44, section 7. City Ordinances, page 1 8.) See Public Stat- 
utes relating to towns and cities. 

Ward I. Abial W. Eastman, 24 Anioskeag Corporation, Stark 
street. 

Ward 2. Nicholas Nichols, 587 Chestnut street. 

Ward 3. E. R. Robinson, 517 Chestnut street, north. 

Ward 4. George C. Gilmore, 323 Manchester street. 

Ward 5. William Howe, 64 Auburn street. 

Ward 6. Henry B. Fairbanks, 303 Central street. 

Ward 7. Frank A. Dockham, 18 Pleasant street. 

Ward 8. Charles G. Ranno, 63 Parker street. West Manchester. 

Ward 9. Horace P. Simpson, corner McGregor and Amory. 



Ward Clerks. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter 44, sections 10, 12. City Ordi- 
nances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and cities.) 

Ward I. Frank X. Foster, 1382 Elm street. 

Ward 2. Daniel C. Smith, 1855 ^Im street. (Removed to 
Lawrence.) 

Ward 3. Samuel C. Kennard, 609 Beech street. 

Ward 4. Harrie M. Young, ;^;^ Button street. 

Ward 5. Timothy F. Lynch, 25 Spruce street. 

Ward 6. George B. Rogers, 277 Laurel street. 

Ward 7. Charles A. Foster, 44 Amoskeag Corporation, West 
Merrimack street. 

Ward 8. Frank O. Clement, 47 Dover street. 

Ward 9. Israel W. Dickey, 258 McGregor street. 



Selectmen. 

Elected biennially. (General Laws, chapter i, section 27 ; chapter 12, sec- 
tion 6; chapter 40, sections 2, 3 ; chapter 109, section 27; chapter 213, sec- 
tion I. City Ordinances, page 18. Public Statutes relating to towns and 
cities.) 



24 MANCHESTER CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Ward i. 

John H. Wales, Jr., 19 Machine Shop Block, Water street. 

Joseph Tait. 

John F. Reardon, 12 Arkwright street. 

Wakd 2. 

Daniel G. Andrews, 777 Union street. 
Robert R. Chase, 841 Union street. 
Harry P. Ray, State Industrial School. 

Ward 3. 

David Thayer, 102 Walnut street. 
John Cronin, 284 Bridge street. 
T. P. Heath, 280 Pearl street. 

Ward 4. 

John K. Currier, 43 Ashland street. 
Jeff. T. Perry, 166 Merrimack street. 
Charles H. Bodwell, 257 Merrimack street. 

Ward 5. 

Laurence F. Mahoney, 104 Auburn street. 
John B. Laforest, 242 Lake avenue. 
Arthur Allen, 74 Auburn street. 

Ward 6. 

George F. Sargent, Mammoth road. East Manchester. 
John T. Gott, 301 East Spruce street. 
Peter D. St. Germain, 306 Auburn street. 

Ward 7. 

Willie D. Wheeler, 25 Manchester Corporation, Grove street. 
Sumner D. Claflin, 32 Pleasant street. 



LIST OF OFFICERS. 25 

John F. Mellady, 53 Amoskeag Corporation, West Merrimack 
street. 

Ward 8. 

George E. Fellows, 316 Milford street, West Manchester. 
Frank St. John, 5 Barr street, West Manchester. 
Odilon Doucet, 126 McGregor street. 

Ward 9. 

William J. Price, 178 Main street, West Manchester. 
Oswald Paris, corner Dubuque and Wayne street. 
Edward P. French, 338 McGregor street. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 

1892. 



E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex officio. 
Alpheus Gay, term expires January, 1899. 
Andrew C. Wallace, term expires January, 1894. 
James A. Weston, term expires January, 1897. 
Henry Chandler, term expires January, 1898. 
Charles H. Manning, term expires January, 1895. 
Charles T. Means, term expires January, 1896. 



Officers. 



Alpheus Gay, President. 

James A. Weston, Clerk. 

Charles K. Wai,ker, Superintendent. 

Arthur E. Stearns, Registrar. 

Josiah Laselle, Engineer at Pumping Station. 



REPORT 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Board of Water Commissioners have the 
honor to submit herewith their twenty-first annual report for the 
year ending December 31, 1892, together with the report of the 
superintendent covering the same period of time, to which refer- 
ence is made for the details of the service connected with this de- 
partment. 

The receipts and expenditures for the year have been as fol- 
lows : 

Balance unexpended December 31, 1891 . . . ^55,460.47 
Receipts from all sources in 1892 . . . . 83,474.79 



Interest on water bonds . 
Current expenses 
Repairs and renewals 
Construction 

Total expenditures 



^138,935-26 
$31,069.00 
4,778.00 
I5J56-42 
29,410.93 
$81,014.35 



Balance unexpended ...... $57,920.91 

The increase in gross receipts over the year 1891 is $6,869.56, 
and the increase of receipts over expenditures is $2,460.44. 

As predicted in the last annual report, it has required substan- 
tially the entire earnings of this department to meet the ordinary 



30 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

expenses, to keep up the renewals of pipes, and to make such 
outlays for extensions as the rapid expanse of the city limits de- 
mands. Nor is it probable that these conditions will be im- 
proved in the immediate future. On the other hand, the exten- 
sive renewal of pipes that must be provided for to keep the ser- 
vice in a reasonably safe and reliable condition will require a sum 
very much in excess of what has heretofore been expended for 
this purpose. As an example, the superintendent reports that 
the 20 inch force main has given some trouble and a great deal 
of anxiety the past year. This is the main artery of the system, 
and any accident to this pipe that would require much lime to 
repair would leave the whole city destitute of water. 

This force main has been laid more than eighteen years, and 
has rendered excellent service, but the date of its failure no one 
can foretell. Nor is this the only place that requires attention 
to insure the efficiency of the works, as has been pointed out in 
previous reports. In a matter so important the city cannot af- 
ford to take chances, and your commissioners desire to urge in 
the most positive manner the necessity of an appropriation suffi- 
cient to re-lay the force main with cast-iron pipe and to do such 
other work as may be necessary to properly guard against a ca- 
lamity that would be sure to follow the failure of our water sup- 
ply. 

The construction of the high-service system of water-works has 
been delayed for reasons that are well understood. Time serves 
to show the needs of this addition to our general system to be 
more emphatic. The commissioners therefore desire to renew 
their recommendation under this head as expressed in their last 
annual report. 

Respectfully submitted. 
ALPHEUS GAY, 
ANDREW C. WALLACE, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 
HENRY CHANDLER, 
CHARLES H. MANNING, 
CHARLES T. MEANS, 
January 2, 1893. Water Coinuiissioncrs, 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Water Cojnnn'ssioners of the City 

of ^Manchester : 

The report of the superintendent of water-works for the year 
ending December 31, 1892, is respectfully submitted. 



MASSABESIC LAKE. 

The water in the lake has been well up to the mark this sea- 
son. Last year the water at one time was 18}^ inches below the 
dam ; this year the lowest point reached was 7^^ inches above, 
making 26 inches more water during the dryest time this season 
than the lowest point reached last year. While in some portions 
of New England there has been a scarcity of water, and a water 
famine threatened, our supply has been ample and the lake 
higher than it has been on the average in the summer months. 

The following table shows the amount of rainfall, kindly fur- 
nished us by Sergeant J. H. Melton, which includes melted 
snow and sleet, for the year 1892 : 



January 








3.46 inches. 


February . 








2.18 


March 








2.29 " 


April 








.69 inch. 


May 








5.42 inches. 


June 








4.68 


July 








1.72 " 


August 








6.43 " 


September 








1.39 


October 








1. 01 


November 








3.89 - 


December 








.86 inch. 


Total for the ye 


ar 18 


92, ZA 


.02. 





32 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Land has been bought of the heirs of James M. Webster, 
which includes two houses and two barns, situated south of the 
canal and north of the highway, also another piece of land bor- 
dering on the old mill-pond, with one house standing on the 
premises, about eleven acres in all. This gives the city a strip of 
land 600 feet wide and 1,050 feet long, bordering on the canal. 

PUMPING STATION. 

Few repairs have been made on the machinery, which is in good 
order today. You will notice by this report and the others that 
have been written since the Davidson pump was put in, that the 
figures show more water pumped by this pun'p than by the R. 
D. Wood. I suppose the reason is that the men in charge can 
get a quarter of a million gallons more water into the reservoir 
in ten hours by running the Davidson than by running the 
R. D. Wood pump. 

A water-closet and a bath-tub have been added to the water 
fixtures in the dwelling part, and new timbers put under the 
lower floor. These timbers were very rotten, caused by no cir- 
culation of air underneath. Two windows were put in to 
remedy this defect. 

The following is the amount of water pumped : 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



3a 



•oSc.iaAi3 ^{ivta 


1 

r/5" 


2,107,895 
1,890,733 
1,786,263 

""1,852,869" 

""2,243^458" 

""2,460,892" 
2,220,880 
1,952,516 
1,919,284 
2,075,843 
2,230,364 


is 

s 

SI 


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62,128,972 
58,612,720 
53,587,908 

57,437',684" 

67,a"03,736 

76,287,664 
68,847,540 
58,575,480 
50,497,824 
62,275,312 
69,141,304 


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34 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There has been quite an amount of repairs made on the force 
main, principally on the portion lying in the Dickey swamp. 
A small gang of men worked most of the time in the month of 
January repairing leaks on this line. The leaks were not large 
and were in the joints, but in order to put a sleeve on each 
joint had to have more or less sheet piling in order to get around 
it. This pipe may last a number of years by patching up, but 
it would be well to get pipe enough to renew it. We have 
enough 20-inch pipe in the pipe-yard to lay over about half the 
distance from the pumping station to the reservoir. On the sup- 
ply main only two leaks have been repaired this last year, and 
that is all the trouble we have had with the supply main. 

The superintendent will say in this connection that when the 
repairs on the supply main are being made, this side of the 
Hallsville schoolhouse, the water is brought to the city by the 
way of Valley street, but with four to seven pounds less pressure, 
which means ten to fifteen feet less head. This route has mor 
turns and the water has farther to go before it is distributed into 
the main part of the city, and consequently there is more fric- 
tion. Twelve-inch pipe laid on Beech street from Auburn to 
Valley, and lo-inch on Wilson from Spruce to Valley would 
help keep up the common prtfssure of sixty-two pounds on Elm 
street. When the pressure is reduced four pounds by letting the 
water run on lawns and commons or by repairing leaks, we hear 
complaints from the residents on Wilson Hill where the water 
runs only into the first story with full pressure. 

RESERVOIR. 

January i anchor ice broke the screens and ran into the pipe 
chamber at the intake and shut off the water almost entirely. This 
was discovered in the morning, and it was two o'clock p. m. be- 
fore the ice was removed so that all the city would be supplied. 
This is the first time that anchor ice has given us any trouble. 
The putting in of new screens is all the repairs made about the 
reservoir. 

Pipes have been extended nearly five miles, making about six- 
ty-three miles of distribution pipe now in the city. Pipes were 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 35 

extended in Amory, Ash, Adams, Bismark, Brook, Beech, Boyn- 
ton road, Chestnut, Cartier, Clark, East High, George, Gore, 
Grove, Harvard, Huntress, Liberty, Laurel, Maple, McDuffie, 
North, North River road, Pine, Prospect, Prince, Pearl, Prout's 
avenue, Silver, Webster, Wilson, Wilson road, Wilkins, Union, 
Young, making thirty-four different streets, at an expense of 
$194,850. 

During the past year 5,027 feet of cement pipe was taken out 
and cast iron substituted ; last season, 9,973 feet were laid over, 
more than twice as much as this year. We have laid nearly 
two miles more of extensions. The cost of relaying pipe this 
season has been about $4,000. Bought five hundred tons of pipe 
from McNiel Co., Burlington, New Jersey, at $26.65 P^'" ^o" ^f 
2,240 pounds, delivered on the cars in this city. This is the 
loAvest price ever paid. 

We have had very little trouble with the pipes this season ; two 
bursts are all that did any damage to private property. Relay- 
ing pipe has not been done as fast as it should be, but as fast as 
the city councils will allow the means with which to do the work. 
It is necessary to have a small sum on hand in case of accident. 

We have had from twelve to fifteen men at work laying exten- 
sions, taking out pipe, and making repairs. The fact stands be- 
fore us that we have over twenty-one miles of old cement pipe to 
take out and many new streets to put the water in, so it looks to 
the superintendent as though all the money collected for water 
rates and the $60,000 credited to us January i, 1890, is needed 
in order to keep up the plant. 



36 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



2; 

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< 



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Clark street south. 
Riramon west. 
Near Brook. 
Silver to Somerville. 




To Maple. 
Corner Market. 
Near gates. 
South of Sullivan. 
North to Clark. 
Corner Central. 
To Union. 
To Belmont. 
Milford north. 
To Maple. 
Corner Main. 


c 


Corner Union. 
Beech to Lincoln. 
Near Prince s^trect. 
High to Lowell. 
Corner Elm. 
Beacon east. 
Corner Chestnut. 
Salmon south. 
Harrison to Gore. 
Boyntoji to B. 
Corner Beech. 
To Union. 
To Hall. 
Sagamore north, 


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BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



37 



Valley to Auburh. 
Boynton to B. 
To Hall. 

South of Young. 
North to Clark. 
Corner Pine. 
Corner Liberty. 
Beech to Wilson. 
Beech to Maple. 
Belmont east. 
North to Appleton. 
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38 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The following places are where cement-lined pipe was taken 
up and it was relaid with cast iron : 



Amherst 

Auburn 

Canal . 

Central 

Chestnut 

Granite 

Hanover 

Kidder Court. 

Laurel 

Laurel 

Mechanic 

Merrimack 

Spring 

Stark 

Water 



Length in Feet. 



Sin. 



1,369 



4 in. 



107 

5.55 

25 

101 

806 

1-2 

679 



449 



249 



Location. 



103 i ... Corner Union. 

444 t Pine to Union. 

Bridge to Market. 

Corner Maple. 

Merrimack to Central. 

West side of Main. 

Union to Beech. 

Elm, westward. 

Corner Maple. 

Chestnut to Union. 

Corner Canal. 

Beech to Maple. 

9 ; Corner Canal. 

'20 Corner Canal. 

15 Corner Canal. 



Totals 1,369 2,960 



698 



Total feet relaid, 5,027. 



BOAKD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 39 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS SET, 1 892. 

Amory, corner Hevey ; Amory, corner Montgomery ; Amory, 
corner Lafayette ; x\mory, corner Morgan. 

Boynton road, 300 feet south of Hartshorn's j Boynton road, 
east of Colley pond ; Boynton road, corner of Grant street. 

Chestnut street, near Henry Chandler's. 

Clark, corner Union ; Clark, corner Adams. 

East High, corner Hall ; East High, corner Belmont. 

George, corner 

Gore, corner Maple ; Gore, corner Ash. 

Harvard, corner Lincoln. 

Laurel, corner Chestnut ; Laurel, near Tierney residence. 

McDufifie, corner Boynton road ; McDufifie, corner B street. 

Prince, corner B; Prince, corner Boynton road. 

Prospect, corner Hall. 

River road, corner Clark street. 

Sagamore, corner Pine. 

Silver, corner Lincoln ; Silver, corner Wilson. 

Somerville, corner Beech ; Somerville, corner Maple. 

Summer. 

Webster, corner Walnut ; Webster, near railway station. 

Wilkins, near Carswell residence. 



40 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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a 

o 




















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: : • : 






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1 

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IS 
02 


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s 


supply inain 

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Appleton 

Amherst 

Arlington 

Ash 


■6 
3 

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5 

3 

■a c 




Kay 

Beacon 

Bedford 

Beech 


a 
o 


5 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



41 



TT lO Ot 


5C101 •■*O^00— -IMO^ 




. CC la ; ; ^ 




; " i i ! ! 






e» . . . . 00 ; • ; 


i-< • • >-i CJ 


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147 




t- • • 1< 00 c» 
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31 

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1949 
2287 
2142 
1830 
1793 

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aress 

in 




tton 

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1 avenue 

ter avenue .... 
nkliu 



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42 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



L) 



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O 

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630 
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= 

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4 t4 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



43 





JsiMCT-HtO'-iMeo 


CO CO C<1 — 


m 


• CO •* • . 


-1 ■* CO 


":::::;: 










: : : : "^ . '^ : 




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: : : i : : i : 


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2280 
427 

2378 
657 

1118 

71 




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ui ; CI CO t- 


25 
1107 

2804 
1570 
1845 






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3422 

11 08 J 

962 


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2865 
768 


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road 

ee 


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s s 



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44 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



ca 
o 



H 






5 
o 

03 



•siatijp^H 


U 


>* — 


CT 


<N >-i M 


■# 


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Gates set 


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1586 
12 

2462 
300 

2832 
590 
275 
711 

3143 
474 

17 

3979 

26 

799 

562 

1422 


•^ '. '• 








; ; ; ^ 
































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IN 








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Length and size of cement-lined pipe laid. 


d 

_B 
S 

fi 
00 

s 

o 
























s 










«5 o 00 00 OJ 
. eo o g t- lO 




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Sagamore 

Salmon 


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Somerville 

South 

Spring 


■J 




5 




I 


' 



BOARD OF AVATER COMMISSIONERS. 



45 



« OS iH CO 




so c- 


rt • • lo -H • eo c-5 


-< 00 • CJ ■* 












c<i*c<ieoco ••»H(M--i-( 


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CO • ■ • IM • 'M CO 










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46 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



<: 



o 

►J 

p 

Q 

02 



•S^HBjpXH 


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ceo — 10 -OINOt-O 

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1006 
575 
374 

2408 
1210 


00 








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5 G Q C 





BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



47 



•* -00 • (N .-c 



■- — oo c<i J) eo o 



-^ -H ^ <M ■ la. 



— i.-irHi/:i,-,eo(Ne^ 



Cl -r O r- 00 ^1 (M O 00 M 



2 ■£ 



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— c 



o = s £ :: •« 

tS S 5 ° 2 It 



48 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 






O 






•s^aijp^H 


(NC-I •'-1 • .CJCO^^ — ^MMt-t 


•8aAi«A jiy j ::::::::::::::: : 




Gate^ set. 


.a 1 ^ : I j . I : : : : r^ ^ . 1 : c* 


S 1 • • 


00 i ■;.;., ','.'.'.'. 


'S \ '■•'■'■'■'.'■'•'•'■'■■'■'.■ '. 


a \ 

SI:":::::::::::::: 


c ... 

5 1::::: : :::::":: : 


a • • ... 




•6 
■5 

« 
c 
'q. 



1 


a> 

i 

a 
2 




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: : : : : J: : : : g gj : : >» 


VS it • in — ?J t- « 10 10 M =; « t~ 

.- , ■ ta ■ '^ 2: ■* C-) -c .1 C5 ?•; 


8 in. 
477 

1217 




: : : ■ :::::::::;■ 
01::: .:■■•■ 


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:5 1 ;:.:::::::::::: : 


c i ■ • ■ 




"2 ^ 
'5 

a, 
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5 

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HI 


c 


CO .CO M 

a ...in. -50 00 

5 .:::'-: : :::::::■ ^ 





: : : : : : : 00 : : : : : : 

: : ; : ; : : ^ : : : ^' : • : ^ 


.E ' : : : ::::;:::: 
'*:::::::::::::: 


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2 




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.= 1 : : : : ; : : : : ; ; ; : : '. 

2 1 ■•■'::::::::: ' 


° \ i i • : : : i ■ • i ■ • • ■ i 


Streets. 




t^ !!:::: . •;:;.■: 

1 ;;;••:■: ^ ■••■• • 

|i|.|||^J||||i||l 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



49 







CO (M 


5 1 




'• • 1 '~ 




o 


- - - \% i 




'^"'11 






i ; h§ 






• • 1 o 






: ^ S 






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3 






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2 ^ 


1 






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Ol 






3300 
142C3 






, 00 

o 
• : 1 g 






1 o 

: : 1 3 












Sill 








in 
1 








i 




- 


i : 1 1 

• • , CO 




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IS 

3 








(M 










3 - 

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"a 



50 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES AND GATES LAID TO DECEMBER 31, 1892. 



Size. 


Cement-lined pipe. 


Cast-iron pipe. 


Gates. 


20 inch diameter 


20,560.00 feet. 


5,146.00 feet. 


9 


14incli diameter 


6,125.00 " 


8,298.00 " 


11 


12 inch diameter 


7,444.00 " 


14,263.00 " 


21 


10 inch diamej.er 


3,474.75 " 


12,303.00 " 


16 


S inch diameter 


6,946.00 " 


31,652.00 " 


58 


6 inch diameter 


62,515.50 " 


133,840.00 " 


356 


4 inch diameter 


4,369.00 " 


14,423.00 " 


50 




111,434.25 feet. 


219,925.00 feet. 


521 



Cement-lined pipe 
Cast-iron pipe . 

Total pipe 

521 gates. 
510 hydrants. 
7 air valves. 



21.105 iiiilcs 
. 41-652 " 



62.757 miles 



SERVICE PIPES. 



Two hundred and thirty-four service pipes have been laid this 
year as follows : 

234 I inch diameter ..... 5,843.3 feet 



SERVICE PIPES RELAID. 

I ^ inch diameter, 17.0 feet to ^ inch diameter 15.0 feet 

I j4 " " 36.4 " to I " " 34.0 " 

6 2^" " 152.0 " to I " " 152.0 " 

II" " 17.0 •■' to 2 " " 17.0 " 
I i}( " " 400.0 " to 4 " 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



51 



Thirt)^-eight hundred and fifty-nine (3,859) service pipes have 
been laid to date, as follows : 



3^ 


H 


inch diameter 


1753 


H 






1973 


I 






22 


i^ 






18 


^y^ 






48 


2 






I 


^y 






I 


3 






7 


4 







Total length of service pipe 
Number of miles of service pipe, 19 



774.2 


feet 


46,020.6 




5o>332-o 




893-5 




552-3 




1,921.9 




57-0 




16.8 




233-0 





100,801.3 feet 



091. 



METERS. 

The number of meters set during the year was two hundred 
and ninety-five (295). 

Total number of meters now in use, sixteen hundred and eight 
(1608). 

The number of applications for water to date has been forty 
hundred and twenty-two (4,022). 

The income from the sale of water for 1892 has been as fol- 
lows : 

Received for water by rate . . . ^36,344.24 
for water by meter . . 46,139.35 

for water for building purposes 416.00 

from fines 

for labor and pipes sold . 
of G. G. Grififin (lease) . 
of Fletcher Brown (lease) 
of T. C. Pratt, for house 
of William Prescott, for barn 
of G. G. Prescott, rent . 
of William G. Brown, rent 



of Auburn Grange, rent . 



168.40 

45-55 

1. 00 

1. 00 

100.00 

15.00 

30. oc 

21.00 

50.00 



52 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Received of G. S. Patten, grass . . $7-do 

of C. F. Whittemore, grass . 4.00 

of Charles Reed, grass . . 4.00 

of Nason Hall, use of pasture . 20.00 
of DeCourcy, Holland & Co., 

ice ..... 10.00 

for potatoes .... 4.00 

for old cement pipe . 94' 25 



Abatements, ^116.19. 

Current expenses for 1892 
Repairs for 1892 . 
Construction for 1892 . 


, M,778-oo 

• i5'756-42 

• 29,410.93 


Total 
Interest for 1892 . 


• $49>94.S-35 
31,069.00 



Receipts over expenditures . . . . 

CLASSIFICATION OF ACCOUNTS FOR 1 89 2. 



Superintendence, repairs, and renewals 

Stationery and printing 

Office and incidental expenses 

Pumping expenses 

Repairs to dam, canal, and reservoir 

Repairs to buildings 

Current expenses for 1892 . 

Service pipes 
Distribution pipes 
Fire hydrants and valves 
Meters and fixtures 
Pump house and buildings 
Land .... 

Construction expenses for 1892 

Total .... 



,474-79 



81,014.35 
$2,460.44 



117,139.02 
167.91 

537-05 
2,071.03 

125-59 
493.82 



$20,534.42 



$3,109.44 

14,463.88 

3,036.08 

5'493-54 
307.99 

3,000.00 



29,410.93 



$49>945-35 



BOARD OF WATEK COMMISSIONERS. 



53 



Land and water rights 

Dam, canal, penstock, and races 

Pumping machinery, pump house, and 

buildings 
Distributing reservoir 
Force and supply main 
Distribution pipes . 
Fire-hydrants and valves . 
Tools and fixtures . 
Boarding and store houses 
Roads and culverts . 
Supplies .... 
Engineering . 
Livery and traveling expenses 
Legal expenses 
Grading and fencing 
Service pipes . 
Meters and fixtures . 

Total construction account to 
Dec. 31, 1892 

Current expenses : 

Superintendence, collecting, and re- 
pairs ...... 

Stationery and printing . 

Office and incidental expenses . 

Pumping expenses and repairs . 

Repairs to buildings 

Repairs to dam, canal, races, and res- 
ervoir ...... 

Total current expenses to Dec. 
31, 1892 .... 

Interest ...... 

Highway expenditures 

Total amount of bills approved 
to date .... 



^62,799.14 
101,399.16 

107,904.53 
7i»542.36 
89,769.02 

397>5o7-47 

46,145-97 

10,649.35 

919.36 

2,193.49 

550-39 
22,176.19 

2,856.64 

563-79 
13,588.26 
52,808.66 
34,258.97 



$1,017,632.75 



ii8i,535.86 

5,849-57 
19,389.84 
43,239.62 

2,258.27 

3.956.84 



$40,678.51 
14,000.53 



$256,230.00 



$54,679.04 



$1,328,541-79 



54 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Interest, discount,and labor performed 

on highways, transfers, and tools 

and materials sold . . . ;g62,792.i4 

Current expenses to Dec. 31, 1892 . 256,230.00 



^319,022.14 

Total cost, exclusive of interest 

and current expenses . . ^1,009,519.65 

Interest and discount to Dec. 31, 1891 $659,264.51 
Interest for 1892 .... 31,069.00 



Total interest and discount to 

Dec. 31, 1892 . . . ;?69o,333.5i 

Amount paid toward interest to Dec. 

31. 1S91 $517,168.00 

Amount paid toward interest, 1892 . 31,069.00 



,237.00 

The following amounts have been paid over to the city treas- 
urer, and credited to the water-works : 

1872, supplies and materials sold . . . $573-6i 

1873, supplies and materials sold • • • i77-o7 
accrued interest on water bonds sold . . 193.26 
accrued interest on state bonds sold . . 146.00 
water rents ...... 1^920.53 

1874, supplies and materials sold . . . 607.89 
'* March 12, highway expenditures, transferred 

from water account .... 14,000.53 
March 17, interest and discount transferred 

from water account .... 12,347.25 
September i, interest and discount trans- 
ferred from water account . . . 22,361.74 
water and hydrant rent, etc. . . . 30,233.54 
December 29, interest transferred . . 4,566.25 

1875, December 18, one anvil sold . . . 15-00 
September 25, engine, crusher, and material 

sold ....... 2,089.45 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



55 



1875, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1876, May 20, derrick sold . 
May 20, rent of derrick 
water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1877, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1878, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
old plow sold .... 

1879, derrick sold .... 
May 20, water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1880, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
sale of grass .... 
level, transit, etc. 

1881, water and hydrant rent, etc. 
sale of grass .... 
derrick . . 
received of G. G. Griffin 

1882, water and hydrant rent, etc., 
received of G. G. Griffin . 

of James Baldwin & Co. 
from the sale of grass . 
from Goodhue & Birnie 
for old plank 
for use of derrick 

1883, received of G. G. Griffin . 

from sale of grass . 

for water and hydrant rent, etc. 

1884, received of G. G. Griffin . 

for stone 

from sale of grass . 
from pipe sold and labor 
for water and hydrant rent 

1885, received from G. G. Griffin 

B. P. Kimball, for grass 

labor and pipe sold 

for water and hydrant rent 

1886, received from G. G. Griffin 

B. P. Kimball, for srass 



$27,119-55 

125.00 

24.00 

38.879.47 

43*823.30 

48,873.26 

1. 00 

75.00 

53,068.17 

57,395-25 

10. 00 

250.00 

60,154.62 

10.00 

50.00 

1. 00 

67,403.76 

1. 00 

175.00 

10.00 

24-37 

1. 00 

15.00 

1. 00 

20.00 

73,437-20 

1. 00 

5.00 

10.00 

616.20 

74,947.88 

1. 00 

10.00 

13-45 

80,379.67 

1. 00 

5.00 



56 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1886, received for wood ..... $37-8o 

for labor and pipe . . . . 282.43 

water and hydrant rent . . . 74,803.76 

1887, received for labor and pipe .... 768.86 

of G. G. Griffin .... i.oo 

of C. C. Cole .... .50 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass . . 10.00 

of A. J. Crombie, for grass . . 5.00 

A. Goodwin, for poles . . , ' 10.00 

of W. G. Brown .... 25.00 

of T. H. Risdon & Co., for freight 15-11 

for water and hydrant rent . . 79,682.70 

1888, received for labor and pipe .... 227.33 

of G. G. Griffin .... i.oo 

of George P. Clark . . . 2.00 

of R. D. Wood & Co. (gear) . 16.29 

for water and hydrant rent . . 85,397.20 

1889, received for labor and pipe . . . 89.77 

ofG.G. Griffin .... i.oo 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass . . 2.00 

ofW. G. Brown, for rent . . 50.00 

of James Baldwin, for pipe . . 65.00 

of Mr. Clement for pipe . . .50 

for water and hydrant rent . . 86,492.19 

1890, received of G. G. Griffin (lease) . . i.oo 

of Fletcher Brown (lease) . . i.oo 

of George P. Clark (lease) . . 2.00 

of B. P. Kimball, for grass . . 2.00 

of AV. G. Brown, for rent . .. 36.00 

of N. W. Ellis & Co., for pipe . i53-oo 

of J. H. Dearborn, for pipe . . 35-4° 

for water and hydrant rent . . 99,232.97 

1891, received for water and hydrant rent . . 76,313.24 

for labor and pipe sold . . . 200.99 

of G. G. Griffin (lease) . . i.oo 

of Fletcher Brown (lease) . . i.oo 

oi W. G. Brown (rent) . . 21.00 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



1 89 1, received of Mr. Prescott (rent) . 

of William Bryant (rent) 
of B. P. Kimball (grass) 
of G. W. Reed (grass) . 
of C. H. Patten (grass) 

1892, received for water and hydrant rent 

for labor and pipe sold 

of T. C. Pratt, for house 

for cement-lined pipe 

of grange, for rent 

of William Prescott, for barn 

for potatoes . 

for cutting ice 

of W. G. Brown, rent 

of G. G. Griffin (lease) 

of F. Brown (lease) 

of H. N. Hall (use of pasture) 

of C. F. Whittemore (grass) 

of Charles Reed (grass) 

of G. S. Patten (grass) . 

of G. G. Prescott (rent) 

Total received for water, etc. 
Amount appropriated to date 

Amount of bills approved to date 

Amount transferred toward interest 
Amount on hand December 31, 1892 . 



57 

$50.00. 
8.00 
2.00 
5.00 
3,00 
83,067.99 

45-55 
100.00 

94-25 

50.00 

15.00 

4.00 

10.00 

21.00 

1. 00 

1. 00 

20.00 

4.00 

4.00 

7.00 



51,294,699.70 
640,000.00 

^1,934,699. 70 
i,.'?28,54i.79 

$606,157.91 

548,237.00 

$57,920.91 



Uses for which Water is Supplied. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



I Jail. 
2 2 Churches. 



4 Cemeteries. 
I Orphanage. 



58 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



I Court house. 


I Post-office. 


7 Hose companies. 


I City library. 


5 Fire-engines. 


7 Banks. 


2 Hook-and-ladder. 


9 Hotels. 


2 Opera houses. 


I Masonic Hall. 


I Convent. 


I Odd Fellows' Hall 


3 City hospitals. 


I Holly Tree Inn. 


2 Old Ladies' Homes. 


3 Halls. 


I Soldiers' monument. 


25 Schoolhouses. 


I Turner Hall. 


I Battery building. 


4 Fountains. 


I Skating-rink. 


2 Trust companies. 





MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 



I Hosiery mill. 

1 Silver-plating. 

2 Iron foundries. 
2 Dyehouses. 

4 Machine-shops. 

6 Clothing manufactories. 

8 Harness-shops. 
I Brush-shop. 

9 Carriage-shops. 
1 2 Cigar factories. 

I Brass and copper foundry. 
I Locomotive works. 
I Grist-mill. 



2 Granite works. 

2 Electric light stations. 

3 Sash and blind shops. 
I Brewery. 

3 Shoe-shops. 
I Gas-works. 

4 Slaughter-houses. 

I Soap manufactory. 
4 Needle manufactories. 
4 Beer-bottling. 
3 Book-binderies. 

1 Paper-mill. 

2 Box makers. 



6 Fish. 
12 Meat and fish. 



MARKETS. 

3 Meat (wholesale). 



19 Livery. 
I Horse-railroad. 



STABLES. 

892 Private. 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



59 





OFFICES. 


15 Dentists. 


14 Printing. 


I Telephone. 


I Gas. 


2 Telegraph. 


9 Coal. 


3 Express. 




■» 


SHOPS. 


39 Barber. 


2 Currying. 


9 Wheelwright. 


6 Plumber and gas and water 


12 Blacksmith. 


pipe. 


7 Carpenter. 


10 Paint. 


I Tinsmith. 


I Gunsmith. 



STORES. 



4 Auction. 
32 Drug. 

14 Jewelry. 
I Fur. 

3 House-furnishing goods. 

20 Fancy goods. 

I Wholesale paper. 

5 Wholesale produce. 

21 Dry goods. 
12 Candy. 

1 Cloak. 

15 Millinery. 

2 Tea. 

9 Furniture, 

I Wholesale grocer. 



91 Grocery. 

5 Meal. 

3 Hardware. 
30 Boot and shoe. 

8 Stove. 
17 Gents' furnishing goods. 

7 Book. 

I Leather and shoe-finders. 

3 Music. 

3 Upholstery. 

8 Undertakers. 

5 Sewing-machine. 
I Feather-cleaner. 
I Rubber. 



II Dining. 
6 Billiard. 



SALOONS. 

93 Liquor. 



60 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



6 Club-rooms. 

2 Bleacheries. 
21 Laundries. 

3 Icehouses. 

lo Photographers. 



7 Greenhouses. 
2 Band rooms. 
1 8 Bakeries. 
2 Waste. 
I Business college. 



WATER FIXTURES, ETC. 



8,848 Families. 

130 Boarding-houses. 
11,090 Faucets. 
1,983 Wash-bowls. 
4,392 Water-closets. 

284 Wash-tubs. 
1,126 Bath-tubs. 

148 Urinals. 



2,743 Sill-cocks. 
510 Fire-hydrants. 
35 Stand-pipes. 
22 Watering-troughs. 
5 Drinking-fountains. 
2,090 Horses. 
107 Cattle. 

I Public urinal. 



3,700 feet 20 in. 
4,500 feet 14 in. 
2,440 feet 12 in. 
3,900 feet 10 in. 



Material on hand. 

PIPE. 



1,940 feet 8 in. 
5,800 feet 6 in. 
3,480 feet 4 in. 



GATES. 



3 20 m. 

4 12 in. 
3 10 in. 



8 double 6 on 12. 
I double 6 on 10. 



8 8 in. 








17 6 in. 








13 4 in. 








BRANCHES. 








2 single 


10 


on 


10, 


3 single 


6 


on 


10, 



BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



61 



22 double 6 on 8 

2 double 8 on 8 

3 double 4 on 8 
2 double 4 on 6 
7 double 6 on 6 
5 double 4 on 4 

1 single 12 on 14 

2 single 6 on 14. 



1 single 8 on 10. 
21 single 6 on 8. 

2 single 8 on 6. 
1 7 single 6 on 6. 

2 single 8 on 8. 
2 single 6 on 12. 
I single 6 on 20. 
I single 20 on 20. 



SERVICE PIPE. 



2 inch 450 feet. 
lyi inch 200 feet. 
13^ inch 300 feet. 



I 10 inch 1-8. 

1 14 inch 1-8. 
7 6 inch 1-8. 

2 8 inch 1-8. 



6 20 in. 

4 14 in. 

I 12 in. 

20 8 in. 



2 14 in. 
112 in. 
7 8 in. 



I inch 400 feet. 
^ inch 500 feet. 



BENDS. 



I 6 inch 1-4. 
7 8 inch 1-4. 
112 inch 1-8. 



CLAMP SLEEVES. 

19 10 in. 
60 6 in. 
12 4 in. 

PLUGS. 



14 6 in. 
8 4 in. 



WHOLE SLEEVES. 



1 20 in. 

2 14 in. 

3 12 in. 
II 6 in. 



15 8 in. 

6 10 in. 

21 4 in. 



62 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



I 14 to 12. 
10 8 to 6. 
3 10 to 6. 
3 8 to 6. 5 8 to 10. 



3 8 to 


4- 


6 6 to 


4^ 


2 12 to 


6, 



REPORT 



OF THE 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Engineers' Office, No. S Vine Street, 

Manchester. N. H., Dec. 31, 1892. 
, To His Ho7ior the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

In compliance with the laws and ordinances of the city, I 
herewith submit my fourteenth annual report (it being the forty- 
seventh of this department) giving a complete record of the op- 
erations of the department for the year ending December 31, 
1892, with a detailed statement of the fires and alarms that have 
been responded to by a portion or all of the force, together with 
the cause of such fires as far as the same have been ascertained, 
with the amount of insurance carried upon the property endan- 
gered, the amount of loss, and amount of insurance paid thereon. 

The report will also contain a complete list of the working 
force of the department, giving their rank, occupation, residence, 
etc., a list of the fire-alarm stations and locations of keys to the 
same, location of hydrants, etc. 

There have been loi alarms during the year of 1892, 
divided as follows : 39 bell alarms and 62 still alarms, which 
have been responded to by different portions of the depart- 
ment. The " stills " have been conveyed to the several stations 
either by messenger or telephone, in most cases by the latter, and 
while a majority of these have been harmless chimney fires, some, 
if immediate attention had not been given, might have proved 



66 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

disastrous fires. One bell alarm February i8 from box 53 was 
for the burning of the Catholic college in Goffstown ; and one 
" still," December 6, was for a fire in Raymond, to which we 
sent one steamer and a hose wagon. 

The amount of insurance carried upon property where fires 
have occurred is $246,075 ; the amount of damage as assessed, 
^116,210.05 ; and the insurance paid on losses, $94,124.05 ; mak- 
ing the net loss uncovered by insurance, $22,086. This year 
have occurred the greatest losses since the " noted fire of 1870," 
and while the aggregate loss is greatly in excess of any year since 
then, the net loss to the insured is only $5,771 more than during 
the year 1891. 

The Varick fire of February 7 was the occasion of the greatest 
loss, and while considerable comment has been made on this fire, 
not a word of explanation has ever been given why it was not 
discovered before it gained such headway, in a locality where so 
many officers are on duty at or in close vicinity. 

A second alarm and telephone summoned the entire depart- 
ment, and the steamer belonging to the Amoskeag Manufactur- 
ing Company was tendered and brought into service, for which I 
desire to return thanks. 

THE FORCE 

consists of twenty-one permanent and one hundred and three 
call men, divided as follows : 

1 chief engineer. 

4 assistant engineers — call. 

5 steamer companies of 14 men each — 14 permanent and 56 
call. 

2 hose companies of 12 men each — 2 permanent and 22 call. 
I hook-and-ladder company of 20 men — 2 permanent and 18 

call. 

I chemical, 5 men — 2 permanent and 3 call, one of whom is 
detailed as driver of supply wagon. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 67 



THE BUILDINGS 

that are occupied by the department are in a pretty fair condi- 
tion and will not require any extraordinary repairs, except the 
quarters of the N. S. Bean Steamer Company, which will require 
alterations to adapt it to the new first size Amoskeag steamer, 
with a three-horse hitch, which is soon to take the place of the 
engine now in the service of this company, and that engine to be 
transferred to the new fire station just completed in McGregor- 
ville ; also changes in the quarters of the Excelsior Hook-and- 
Ladder Company to adapt it to the new aerial truck when that 
arrives. 

There seems to be some difficulty in the draft to the chimney 
at the Lake avenue station. With a strong westerly wind it is 
almost impossible to make the fire burn, and the entire building 
will be filled with coal gas. I have several times called the 
attention of committees to this matter, apid it seems as though 
some means might be devised to remedy the evil. 

THE APPARATUS 

as at present located consists of — 

2 steam fire-engines at Central station, with horse hose wagons. 

I steam fire-engine with two-horse hose wagon and hook-and- 
ladder combination, North Main street. 

I steam fire-engine and hose carriage, at corner of Lake ave- 
nue and Massabesic street. 

I steam fire-engine and two-horse hose carriage and hook-and- 
ladder combination, at corner of Webster and Chestnut streets. 

I horse hose carriage at Central station. 

I horse hose carriage, corner Maple and East High streets. 

I hook-and-ladder truck at Central station. 

I hook-and-ladder truck (old) at Lake avenue station. 

I double tank (60 gallons each) chemical engine at Central 
station. 

I supply wagon at Central fire station. 



68 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I Steam fire-engine (reserve) at old engine-house, Clinton 
street, of but little use for fire purposes. 

I hand hose carriage at junction of Old Falls road and Front 
street, Amoskeag. 

I two-wheeled hose carriage, Devonshire Mills, Goffe's Falls. 

I exercise wagon (with pole, shafts, and three-horse hitch) at 
Central station. 

I horse hose carriage in the shops of the Manchester Locomo- 
tive Works, being repainted and undergoing repairs to put it in 
first-class serviceable condition, to be placed in the new station 
at McGregorville. 

Additional apparatus ordered and soon to be delivered, is one 
first-class Amoskeag steamer, one Babcock aerial truck, both 
pieces expected the last of February or early in March, and 
one hook-and-ladder truck from the Abbott-Downing Co., of 
Concord, for McGregorville, expected about the first of July. 

The new steamer is to take the name and place of the present 
Steamer No. 4, and that engine to be changed to Fulton Steamer 
No. 6, and placed in the new station at McGregorville. 

The aerial truck is to be placed in the house of the present 
Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder truck, and it is proposed to put the 
latter one into Steamer Three's house on Lake avenue, — although 
I think it would be better to put a lighter truck there and keep 
the old one still on duty at the Central station, and both run by 
the same company ; but as a matter of economy to the city it 
was thought best to make the above-mentioned transfer. 

Three-horse hitch attachments have been placed on Steamers 
Nos. I and 2, and the Hook-and-Ladder truck, which will facili- 
tate reaching the scene of fire with the heavy pieces of apparatus. 

THE HORSES. 

There are at present twenty-seven horses on duty and one spare, 
which is also oil duty the majority of the time. During the year 
we have lost two by death, — one of the grays of Steamer No. i, 
and the. black oneof the hose wagon of same company. Eight 
horses have been purchased, — three for the Hook-and-Ladder 
three for Steamer No. i, one for Steamer No. 2, and one for 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 69 

Hose No. I, and the bay horse of Steamer No. 5 exchanged for 
another. The horses purchased are not of that quality they 
should be for the prices paid, which has »been enough in each 
•case to get the very best the market affords for fire department 
use, particularly the one for Hose No. i. While all the horses 
were "on trial " before they were bought, this one was paid for 
before it ever had a "fire run," and the first one it had fully 
showed his entire unfitness for the position. 

Horses should be selected for adaptability as well as soundness, 
for the positions they are to fill ; and a horse may be sound and 
wholly unfit for fire department service, and should possess a little 
more than the ordinary " horse-sense " to fit him for such a place, 
and be capable of much endurance. 

The exercising of horses on horseback has been agitated, and 
I believe it impracticable, as we do not have fire duty enough to 
keep their muscles hard ; and in my opinion they should be ex- 
ercised daily with loads behind them, so that when the alarm 
comes, the}' may know the use of the collar and harness. If our 
alarms were as numerous as in Boston, where the service gives them 
work enough to keep them in condition, it would be different. 

Two of the horses formerly in use by the Hook-and-Ladder 
truck have been transferred to the street department in District 
No. 2, and one to District No. 10, which should appear to the 
credit of this department's expenses, as well as the one sold from 
the Pennacook Hose Company. 

THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

This branch of the service has been called upon to give thirt)-- 
nine alarms and one second alarm, and has performed its work in 
a satisfactory manner. 

We have had the customary annoyance of cutting wires and 
opening circuits for moving buildings to contend with, thus leav- 
ing sections of the city unprotected in case of fire. 

Quite a number of changes have been made by removal and 
transfer of wires during the year. 

The main line circuits at the South End, through the Eddy 
from Amoskeag to McGregorville, and on Amherst street, east 



70 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

end, have been changed to new poles, taking them out of the trees 
in each case, thus insuring better efificiency and less liability of 
breaking. New poles have also been set on Jane street, and the 
line across McGregor bridge has been rebuilt. 

June 14 the lightning burned out the main line at box 6i and 
two instruments on the " tapper " circuits, and June 1 7 burned out 
the lighting instrument at Lake avenue engine house and five 
places on the tapper circuits. 

One box, No. 82, has been placed upon the police station at 
the corner of Manchester and Chestnut streets, which for good 
reasons will probably be put in the place of box 7 and the latter 
take the place of box 82. 

There are now about thirty-one miles of mainline wires divid- 
ed into seven circuits, and thirty-two miles of tapper lines divid- 
ed intcw four circuits, requiring the services of four hundred and 
eleven jars of gravity battery. 

THE ANNUAL PARADE. 

The thirteenth annual parade occurred on Thursday, October 
13, during Merchants' Week, and formed one of the leading at- 
tractions for that week, as was evident by the crowds upon our 
streets that witnessed it. 

CASUALTIES. 

Death has entered our ranks the first time for nine years, and 
taken our comrade, 



HIRAM PERKINS YOUNG, 

Born in Barrington, N. H., 
March 29, 1835. 

DIED AT 

Manchester, N. H., June 12, 1892. 
Aged jy years, 2 months, 14. days. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 71 

He was an active member of the Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder 
Company for upwards of twenty-seven years. His funeral was 
attended by the entire department on Wednesday, June 15. 

In his death the department loses an active and zealous fire- 
man, his family a kind and loving husband and father, and the 
city a just, upright, and honest man. Outside of his family none 
will miss him more than those of the department who have been 
associated with him officially and socially during these years. 

At the Varick fire February 7, James Orrill, of the Hook-and- 
Ladder Company, shattered the bones of his ankle while lower- 
ing a ladder, confining him to his house five weeks. 

April II, Thomas J. Wyatt, of Steamer No. i, ruptured the 
muscles of the leg while responding to an alarm from box 51, con- 
fining him to the house several weeks. 

Wednesday evening, June 15, while Mrs. Marguerita Eismann 
was carrying a lighted lamp she fell, shattering the lamp, and 
was so severely burned that she died in a few hours. 

Sunday morning, July 24, at the " laundry fire," No. 412 Bel- 
mont street, Mrs. Nancy Sargent was so overcome by heat and 
smoke that she fell back into the flames just as a ladder was 
raised to the roof of the piazza where she was standing. 

At this fire Mr. L. M. Rollins, of Steamer No. i, sustained in- 
juries to his back that confined him to his house one week, and 
December 5, while at the Raymond fire, he stepped upon a nail, 
the result of which confined him two weeks. 

THE firemen's RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 

Organized in 1873, i^ ^^^ received donations yearly through 
the generosity of some of our citizens, as will be seen by the fol- 
lowing list, for which I desire to return the thanks of the associ- 
ation. 

treasurer's account. 

Cash on hand at tlie annual meeting of February 9, 1892 — $2,887.01 

Interest on deposits 127.07 

Membership fee 1.00 

Frank P. Kimball, donation 100.00 

Family of the late Hiram P. Young 25.00 

Col. W. S.Pillsbury, Derry 25.00 



72 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

A. P. Olzeudam & Sons $25.00 

The People's Insurance Co 25.00 ' 

Merchants' Week Commitlee 25.00 

Mrs. Hannah F. Straw 15.00 

Hon. Moody Currier 10.00 

The P. C. Cheney Co 10.00 

Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley 10.00 

G. B. and H. Chandler 10.00 

Hon. E. J. Knowlton 10.00 

A Friend 10.00 

L.B. Bodwell & Co 10.00 

Major Lewis Simons 10.00 

Frank W. Fitts 10.00 

Hon. H. D. Upton 10.00 

Partridge Bros 10.00 

Hon. D. B. Varnej'^ 5.00 

Michael McCabe 5.00 

Hon. L. P. Reynolds 5.00 

Hon. Freeman Higgins 5.00 

Charles L. Richardson 5.00 

$3,390.08 

Contra. 

Paid J. E. :Merrill, secretary $25.00 

J. E. Merrill, postals and printing 4.20 

H. P. Young, funeral benefit 50.00 

Lucius M. Rollins, two benefits 21.00 

James Orrill, benefit 43.25 

$143.45 

Balance in treasury $3,246.63 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I would recommend the purchase of 4,000 feet of rubber-lined 
fabric hose, as it will require 2,000 feet to equip the new Fulton 
Steamer Co. No. 6, and the balance should be in reserve. 

I would recommend the selling or exchanging of the carts novv 
belonging to the department and procuring supply wagons that 
can be used to exercise the horses with, as I do not consider it 
gives them proper exercise by riding them horseback, as previ- 
ously referred to in this report. 

The increasing tendency of erecting high buildings calls for 
some new methods of fire-fighting, and I would recommend to 
all putting up such structures that they supply each floor with 
stand-pipes and also have them upon the roofs. Waiting for a 
fire to burn down within reach of our apparatus is dangerous busi- 
ness. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 73 

There should be a supply wagon for exercising at the houses of 
Steamers Nos. 2, 3, and 5, and a lighter one at Hose No. 2. The 
one for Steamer No. 2 could be used in common with Steamer 
No. 6 and thus save our supply wagon from crossing the river on 
first alarm. 

I would recommend the appointment of four call men for the 
hose carriage at Amoskeag, and with such volunteers as they now 
have they could do better service for that section, and keep the 
house and apparatus in better condition. 

I would recommend the purchase of light, high-running hose 
pungs for use of each steamer and hose company during the deep 
snows in the winter. 

I have several times called attention to the benefits of a protec- 
tive department carrying blankets for covering goods to prevent 
damage by water, and I can see no reason, if sufficient encour- 
agement be given our insurance underwriters, why we cannot 
maintain an insurance patrol or protective department, as in larger 
cities, thus saving them in many cases much damage by water. 

With the few blankets carried by our department, several in- 
stances have occurred where, if a properly trained protective 
patrol had been present in the early stages of the fire, a large 
portion of the expense of maintaining such a company would 
have been saved. 

I would recommend the appointment of an additional perma- 
nent man on the aerial truck. This seems a necessity as it can 
leave the house with no less than two men, the driver and tiller- 
man, and some provision must be made for their meal hours. 

PERSONAL. 

By courtesy of the city councils I attended the convention of 
the National Association of Fire Engineers, at Louisville, Ky., 
October 4-7. 

This meeting was quite fully attended, and the exhibits above 
the average. Papers upon important topics pertaining to the 
fire service were read and ably discussed by the leading fire and 
insurance men of the country, and the benefits derived from 
these meetings are many and varied. 



74 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Comment is often made and comparisons cited as to the ex- 
penses of our fire department of today and years gone by which 
are unfair unless the expense is compared with the percentage of 
population and valuation of then and now. We cannot expect 
to have all the appliances of a modern fire department without 
paying for it, nor keep up with the line of progression without 
cost, and the saying that " Expensive things are usually good, 
and good things are expensive," well applies to fire apparatus. 

During the time I have held the position of chief engineer, 
I have endeavored to conduct the affairs in as ieconomical a 
manner as the efficiency of the department would warrant, but 
when expenses are incurred by others over which I have no con- 
trol, and if prices are paid which seem exorbitant, the board of 
engineers ought not to take the blame. 

There has been a growing tendency for larger and heavier ap- 
paratus, — that means slower getting to a fire, — and much of 
our success in the past has been due to getting on to a fire in its 
earliest stages. While heavy apparatus is a good thing in its 
place, we should not be deprived of all our lighter apparatus 
that we can handle easily and quickly, even in the business sec- 
tions of our city where most of our fires are likely to occur. 

I hope that feature in the past, of combining fire stations with 
ward-rooms, has had its day, and we shall not see any more such 
in the future. I firmly believe it is detrimental to the depart- 
ment and not at all beneficial or pleasant to the voters. 

In concluding, I desire to extend my thanks to his Honor 
Mayor Knowlton, to the members of the city councils, partic- 
ularly to the committee on fire department, for the interest they 
have manifested in the welfare of the department and their ex- 
ertions to promote its welfare, to my associate engineers and offi- 
cers and men in the department for their faithfulness to duty and 
the promptness and obedience with which they have responded 
to every call. . 

The thanks of the department are tendered to Gen. Charles 
Williams for the continuous supply of coffee at fires. 
Respectfully submitted. 

THOMAS W. LANE, 
Chief Engineer Fire Department, 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 75 

List of Fires and Alarms Responded to During 1892, 
witli Losses and Insurance. 

Still. Tuesday, January 12, 6.45 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 164 Douglas street. Members of Steamer 2 responded. 
No damage. 

Box 71. Saturday, January 16, 5.20 a. m. A needless alarm 
given for a burning chimney at No. 136 Lake avenue. No dam- 
age. Box pulled by police officer. Companies responding, 
Steamers i and 3, Hose i, Hook-and-Ladder i, and Chemical. 

Box 71. Sunday, January 17, 6.05 a. m. Two-story dwell- 
ing house, No. 168 East Spruce street, owned by Mrs. Bridget 
Donovan, of Concord, and occupied by A. Du-Grenier and 
Joseph B. Monette. Caused by thawing out water with burning 
paper which ignited the sawdust packing. Box pulled by citi- 
zen. Companies responding: Steamers 3 and 4, Hose i, Chem- 
ical and Hook-and-Ladder i. Damage to building, ^1,600. 
Insurance, ^2,400. Insurance paid, ^1,600. Damage to con- 
tents, ^200. No insurance. 

Still. Tuesday, January 26, 2.40 p.m. Chimney fire, No. 
27 Hollis street. No damage. Used " pony " extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, January 26, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Fremont block, No. 239 Manchester street. No damage. Used 
''pony" extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, January 26, 8.55 p. m. Chimney fire in 
block owned by Joseph B. Clark estate, No. 25 Orange street. 
No damage. Used " pony " extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, January 26, 9.50 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 44 Church street. No damage. Used "pony" extin- 
guisher. 

Box 5. Sunday, February 7, 2.51 a. m. Second alarm 
pulled immediately. Two-story block, Nos. 809-813 Elm street, 
owned by John B. Varick and Mrs. Georgietta Chamberlin, and 
occupied by John B. Varick Co. as hardware store. Several 
causes are assigned as the origin of the fire, such as defective 
flue, spontaneous combustion, etc., but I am of the opinion that 
electric wires are responsible. Damage to building, $6,800. 



76 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Insurance, $6,800. Damage to Varick's stock, $48,000. Insur- 
ance, $36,000. Insurance paid, $36,000. 

Mitchell & Truesdale's block adjoining. Damaged $2,437.50. 
Insurance, $5,000. Insurance paid, $2,437.50. Truesdale's 
damage to stock, $3,525. Insurance, $8,000. Insurance paid, 
$3,525. A. & W. S. Heath's stock damaged $3,900. Insur- 
ance, $4,500. Insurance paid, $3,900. George Benoir and 
boarders, damage, $1,000. No insurance. 

Straw block, owned by Mrs. Hannah F. Straw. Damage to 
building, $1,000. Insurance, $15,000. Insurance paid, $1- 
000, Manchester One Price Clothing Co. Damage to stock, 
by water, $8,000. Insurance, $40,000. Insurance paid, 
$5,700. W. H. Mara, clothing store. Damage to stock, by 
water, $1,150. Insurance, $3,000. Insurance' paid, $1,150. 
Other tenants of block, damage, $500. Insurance, $3,000. In- 
surance paid, $200. 

Granite block, owned by John Cleworth, Damage to build- 
ing, $2,850. Insurance, $15,000. Insurance paid, $2,850. 
J. F. Dignam & Co.'s drugstore. Stock damaged $1,900. 
Insurance, $2,500. Insurance paid, $1,250. Robert E. Mc- 
Kean, clothing store. Stock damaged, $4,000. Insurance, 
$6,000. Insurance paid, $3,000. 

Roger G. Sullivan, cigars and tobacco. Stock damaged, 
$9,000. Insurance, $15,000. Insurance paid, $9,000. 

Catholic Total Abstinence Society Hall. Damage to contents 
(by water), $740. Insurance, $800. Insurance paid, $520. 

Pembroke Block, Weston & Hill Company, dry goods and 
carpets. Stock damaged (by water in basement), $3,000. In- 
surance, $40,000. Insurance ])aid, $2,800. Total damage, 
$100,377.50. Insurance, $196,125. Insurance paid, $80,432.50. 

Box 81. Saturday, February 13, 5.22 a. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 448 Chestnut street. No damage. Box pulled by officer. 
Companies responding, Steamer No. 4, Hose No. i, Hook-and- 
Ladder No. i, and Chemical. 

Still. Wednesday, February 17, 4.30 A. m. Chimney fire 
rear of No. no Amherst street. Chemical responded with " po- 
ny" extinguisher. No damage. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 77 

Box 53. Thursday, February 18, 8.13 p. m. This box was 
pulled by a citizen of Ward 8 for a fire in Goffstown, — the burn- 
ing of the Benedictine College, in process of building. Being 
within the limits of Goffstown no damage is given. 

Still. Monday, February 29, 3.05 p. j\l Rekindling in the 
rubbish of the Varick fire of the 7th instant. No damage. 
Chemical responded. 

Still. Saturday, March 5, 11.55 a. m. Kettle of lard caught 
fire in W. D. Ladd & Co.'s bakery. No. 1208 Elm street. Chem- 
ical called. Fire extinguished before their arrival. No damage. 

Still. Monday, March 14, 12.37 p. m. Chimney fire No. 
186 Manchester street. Used "pony" extinguisher. No dam- 
age. 

Still. Monday, March 14, 3.55 p. m. Fire in rubbish of the 
Varick fire. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Still. Tuesday, March 15, i.io a. m. Grass fire at foot of 
Pennacook street on railroad banking. Set by sparks from loco- 
motive. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 8. Tuesday, March 22, 7.26 a. m. Two-story wooden 
tenement house Nos. 3 and 4 Elm east back street, owned by 
George H. Dorr, and occupied by F. F. Parker. Cause, sparks 
ignited shingles on roof, doing slight damage. Box pulled by 
citizen. Companies responding : Steamers Nos. i, 4, and 5, 
Hose Nos. I and 2, Hook-and-Ladder No. i, and Chemical. 
Damage to building, $2.25. Insurance, $600. Insurance paid, 
^2.25. No damage to contents. 

Box 61. Sunday, April 3, 11.40 a. m. Grass fire on tannery 
lot in Bakersville, owned by Waterman Smith. No damage. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Box 21. Sunday, April 3, 1.33 p. m. Chimney fire in Wig- 
gin Block, corner of Pine street and Lake avenue, owned by Mrs. 
John Kearns. No. damage. Box pulled by citizen. , 

Still. Friday, April 8, 3 p.m. Brush fire in Riddle's Grove, 
'Squog. No damage. Responded to by hose wagon of Steamer 
No. 2. 

Box 7. Friday," April 8, 9.16 p. m. Two-story wooden tene- 
ment block, No. 16 Church street, owned by John Cleworth and 



78 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

occupied by Joseph Blanchard and others. The fire started in a 
closet in Blanchard's tenement. Probable cause, rats and 
matches. Extinguished by Chemical engine. Companies re- 
sponding: Steamers Nos. i, 4, and 5, Hose Nos. i and 2, Hook- 
and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. Damage to 
building, $20. Insurance, $500. Insurance paid, $20. No 
damage to contents. 

Box 4. Saturday, April 9, 11.28 a. m. Three and a half 
story wooden tenement block, No. 180 Chestnut street, owned 
by Job W. Hill and occupied by several families. Fire caught 
on roof from sparks from chimney. Companies responding : 
Steamers Nos. 3 and 4, Hose No. i, Hook-and-Ladder No. i, 
Chemical engine. Damage to building, $8. Insurance, $1,500. 
Insurance paid, $8. Contents uninjured. Box pulled by officer. 

Box 71. Sunday, April 10, 12.24 p. m. Cottage house No. 
124 Auburn street, owned and occupied by Patrick Brannan. 
Slight fire in cellar, extinguished before arrival of department 
without damage. Companies responding : Steamers Nos. i and 
3, Hose No. I, Hook and Ladder No. i, and Chemical engine. 
Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Sunday, April 10, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire at No. 30 
Washington street. Chemical responded. No damage. 

Box 51. Monday, April 11,9.25 A. m. Woodshed, rear of 
block Nos. 190 and 192 Second street, owned by Joseph Burk- 
hardt. Cause, children playing with matches. Companies re- 
sponding: Steamers Nos. i and 2, Hose No. i, Hook-and-Lad- 
der No. I, and Chemical. Damage to building, $125. Damage to 
contents, $25. No insurance on either. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Monday, April 11, 1.45 p. m. Brush fire on Bedford 
road. Hose wagon of Steamer No. 2 responded. No damage. 

Box 4. Wednesday, April 13, 1.50 a. m. Four-story brick 
block Nq. 631 Elm street, owned by Daniel Connor and occu- 
pied by Joseph Murray as boot and shoe store. Cause of fire 
unknown. Companies responding : Steamers No. 3 and 4, Hose 
No. I, Hook-and-Ladder No. i, and Chemical. Box pulled by 
officer. Damage to building, $100. No insurance. Damage 
to stock, $925. Insurance, $2,000. Insurance paid, $925. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 79 

Still, Sunday, April 17, 2.15 p. m. Brush fire on McGregor 
hill. Responded to by Steamer Co. No. 2 with hose wagon. 
No damage. 

Box 56. Monday, April 18, 9.09 P. m. Brush fire on Mast 
road near Goffstown line. Needless alarm. Box pulled by 
watchman at Baldwin's bobbin shop. 

Still. Saturday, April 23, 4.07 p. m. Burning chimney at 
No. 286 Pine street, in block owned by Thomas Corcoran. No 
damage. Used "pony" extinguisher. 

Stili . Saturday, April 23, 7.25 p. M. Dime Museum in 
Stark Block, No. loio Elm street. Kerosene lamp overturned. 
Damage, ^10. No insurance. Chemical responded. 

Still. Sunday, April 24, 1.15 p. m. Three-story wooden 
tenement block No. 611 Elm street, owned by Daniel Connor.' 
Overheated chimney ignited woodwork, causing slight damage. 
Damage, $6. No insurance. Chemical responded. 

Still. Tuesday, April 26, 2.40 p. m. Brush fire north Union 
street and Hooksett road. Chemical responded. 

Box 112. Tuesday, April 26, 4.15 P. M. While the chemical 
engine was at a hydrant filling its tanks after about an hour and 
a half's work on the brush fire mentioned above, the " Tilton 
cottage" owned by Weston, Harvey & Upton, that had been 
moved to the eastern part of the Tilton field, on Walnut street 
extension, took fire from the burning grass, and was nearly de- 
stroyed. It was unoccupied. Damage to building, $800. In- 
surance, ^500. Insurance paid, ^500. Companies responding: 
Steamers Nos. i and 5. Hose Nos. i and 2, Hook-and-Ladder, 
and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, April 27, 10.45 ^- ^^- Brush fire on Smyth 
road. No damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Wednesday, April 27, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire at 
No. 73 Amherst street. No damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Thursday. April 28, 1.45 P. M. Burning chimney at 
No. 3S0 Granite street. Responded to by members of Steamer 
No. 2, No damage. Used two charges of " pony " extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, April 30, 10.20 a. m. Burning chimney at 
No. 52 Lake avenue. No damage. Used " pony " extinguisher. 



80 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box 71. Tuesday, May 10, 2.32 p. u. Three-story tenement 
block, No. 180 Chestnut street, owned by Grififin Bros, and oc- 
cupied by several families. Fire was discovered in one of the 
tenements on third floor. Cause unknown. Damage to build- 
ing, $14. Insurance, $i,Soo. Insurance paid, $14. Damage to 
contents, $15. No insurance. Companies responding : Steam- 
ers Nos. I and 3, Hose i, Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Still. Friday, May 13, i.io p. i\l Burning chimney at No. 
156 East Spruce street. Chemical responded. Used " pony " ex- 
tinguisher. No damage. 

Still. Saturday, May 14, 2.02 p. m. Two-story wooden 
block. No. 16 Church street, owned by John Cleworth and oc- 
cupied by Joseph Blanchard. Boy set fire to some rags in a 
closet. Chemical responded. Fire extinguished before arrival 
of engine. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, May 18, 10.48 a. m. In railroad yard 
below gas works. Fire in a pile of ties used for filling over 
a culvert. Pennacook hose carriage with detail of men laid 1,050 
feet of hose, and after about two hours of work fire was extin- 
guished without any material damage, as the ties were uninjured 
for the purposes used. 

Still. Wednesday, May 18, 12 m. Burning chimney at 
Nos. II and 12 Pearl street. Used "pony" extinguisher. No 
damage. 

Box 8. Sunday, May 29, 8.42 p. m. Two-and-one-half-story 
house. No. 30 Orange street, occupied by James D. Sullivan. 
Feather-bed fire. No damage. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 21. Monday, May 30, 8.05 p. m. Three-story brick 
block, No. 1 01 Manchester street, owned by Catherine Kerin 
and occupied by Robitaille Bros, as a grocery store. Cause, 
lamp explosion in basement, where fire was wholly confined, but 
stock in store above was somewhat damaged by smoke. Dam- 
age to building,' ^87.50. Insurance, $3,000. Insurance paid, 
$87.50. Damage to contents, $329.50. Insurance, $800. In- 
surance paid, $329.50. Box pulled by officer. 

Still. Wednesday, June i, 12.20 p. m. Burning chimney 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 81 

at No. 190 Lake avenue. Chemical responded. No damage. 
Used "pony" extinguisher. 

Box 7. Saturday, June 4, 8.14 p. .m. Three-story brick block,. 
Nos. 1105-1107 Elm street, owned by E. K. Rowell and occu- 
pied by Alfred De Moulpied as a furniture store. The iire orig- 
inated in a closet under the roof from some unknown cause, and 
was confined to that locality. Extinguished with chemical en- 
gine. Companies responding: Steamers Nos. 1, 4, and 5, Hose 
Nos. I and 2, Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical. Damage to 
building, $300. No msurance. Damage to contents, 5439-10. 
Insurance, 53,600. Insurance paid, $439.10. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Sunday, June 5, 3.30 a. .m. Chemical called to Moul- 
pied's store, as above, for slight fire smoldering in roof timbers. 
Extinguished without further damage. 

Box 212. Monday, June 6, 1.5 1 a. ^l Two-and- one-half- 
story dwelling. No. 236 Jewett street, owned .by P. O. Wood- 
man and occupied by Mrs. W. E. Richardson. Fire originated 
from some unknown cause in some excelsior packing in base- 
ment, and was extinguished without any material damage. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Still. Saturday, June 11, 12.35 ^- ^^- False alarm from 
Kimball Bros.' shoe-shop caused by unadjusted thermostat. Re- 
sponded to by hose carriage of Steamer No. 3. 

Box 21. Saturday, June 11, 8.15 p. yi. While filling a light- 
ed kerosene lamp in tenement of Henri Millot, rear of S;^ Man- 
chester street, the oil ignited causing alarm. No damage. Com- 
panies responding : Steamers Nos. 3 and 4, Hose No. i, Hook- 
and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Sunday, June 12, 11.20 a. m. False alarm from Kim- 
ball Bros.' shoe-shop, caused by an unadjusted thermostat. Hose 
carriage of Steamer No. 3 responded. 

Box 51. Wednesday, June 15, 8.47 p. m. Breaking of kero- 
sene lamp in the hands of Mrs. Marguerita Eismann burned her 
in such a manner that death resulted in a few hours. No dam- 
age to the building. Companies responding : Steamer No. 2, 
Hose No. I, Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled by 
citizen. 

6 



82 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box i8. Saturday, June i8, 8.58 a. m. Two-and-one-half- 
story dwelling at No. 310 Central street, owned by D. M. K. 
Phillips and occupied by him and Frank B. Stevens. Cause, ex- 
plosion of oil stove. Damage to building, $275. Insurance, 
$4,000. Insurance paid, $:i75. Damage to contents, $70. In- 
surance, $500. Insurance paid, $75. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 5. Friday, June 24, 3.01 p. m. Three-story brick Mock, 
No. 820 Elm street, owned by Mrs. Herman Foster and occupied 
by Charles A. Hoitt & Co. as furniture store. The fire originat- 
ed in a closet among some excelsior packing, probably by lighted 
match being thrown in from sidewalk. No material damage. 
Companies responding : Steamers Nos. i and 3, Hose No. i, 
Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, June 29, g.15 p. m. Engine building for 
hoisting-engine, belonging to Head & Dowst Co., at corner 
of Elm and Mechanic street'^. Cause, spontaneous combustion 
from oily waste. Damage, $10. No insurance. Extinguished 
by Chemical engine. 

Still. Monday, July 4, 11. 10 a. m. While Mrs. Everett L. 
Caswell, at 397 Manchester street, was filling gasoline stove the 
oil ignited burning her hands quite severely. No other damage. 
Hose carriage from Steamer No. 3 responded. 

Still. Monday, July 4, 12.03 ^- ^^' A firecracker on the 
roof of F. P. Danforth's buildings at No. 549 Lake avenue caused 
a slight fire. Hose carriage of Steamer No. 3 responded. 

Still. Sunday, July 10, 11. oS a. m. False alarm from Kim- 
ball Bros.' shoe-shop caused by an unadjusted thermostat. Hose 
carriage from Steamer No. 3 responded. 

Box 21. Tuesday, July 12, 5.25 p. m. Lumber shed at cor- 
ner of Merrimack and Union streets, owned and occupied by 
John H. Maynard. Cause, children playing with matches. Dam- 
age to contents, $5. No insurance. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 45. Tuesday, July 19, 4.35 p. m. One-story wooden 
building, corner Franklin and West Auburn streets, owned by 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. and occupied by L. H. Josselyn & 
Co. as a furniture manufactory. Cause, drunken visitor throw- 
ing lighted match into varnish. A line of hose from the S. C. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 83 

Forsaith Co., before the arrival of the department, did good ser- 
vice and prevented much damage. Damage to building, ^200. 
Insurance, $i,e^oo. Insurance paid, ^200. Damage to contents, 
$294.39. Insurance, ^4,500. Insurance paid, $294.39. Box 
pulled by citizen. 

Box 26. Friday, July 22, 9.55 a. m. Explosion of kerosene 
stove in tenement No. 85 Arlington street occupied by Mrs. De- 
mers, caused an alarm, without any damage. Box pulled by cit- 
izen. 

Box .24. Sunday, July 24, 8.25 a. m. Three-story wooden 
building, No. 412 Belmont street, owned by Melvin Badger and 
occupied by Charles W. Goodwin as residence and laundry. 
Cause, Alice Hazen filling a gasoline stove while burning, fol- 
lowed by an explosion of can of gasoline near by. The flames 
spread so rapidly as to prevent the removal of any contents of 
the building. The occupants, except Mrs. Nancy Sargent, es- 
caped. She was so overcome with heat and smoke that, as a lad- 
der was raised to her assistance, she fell back into the flames. 
The cottage house a few feet south, owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Philena Merrill, was somewhat damaged by fire and water. Dam- 
age to Badger's house, $3,000. Insurance, $2,700. Insurance 
paid, $2,700. Damage to contents, $600. No insurance. Dam- 
age to Mrs. Merrill's house, $250. Insurance, $1,100. Insur- 
rance paid, $250. No damage to contents. Box pulled by a 
member of the department. 

Still. Sunday, July 24, 11. 10 a. m. Brush fire, rear of Aus- 
tin, Flint & Day Co.'s works. No damage. Hose carriage of 
Steamer No. 3 responded. 

Still. Saturday, July 30, 9.43 a. m. Stable in rear of No. 
203 Merrimack street, owned by John H. Maynard. Chemical 
responded. Extinguished without damage before arrival of en- 
gine. 

Still. Thursday, August 4, 9.45 p. m. Two-and-one-half- 
story house, No. 530 Maple street, owned and occupied by James 
K. Goodwin. The fire originated from some unknown cause in 
the L part. Damage to building, $15. Insurance, $2,500. In- 
surance paid, $15. Responded to by Hose No. 2. 



84 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Box. 5. Thursday, August 11, 3.40 a. m. The Elm House^ 
No. 742 Ehn street, owned by Dr. J. F. Brown and D. F. Straw, 
occupied by M. S. Chamberlin. Cause, mattress on the roof of 
the L part caught, probably from a cigar stub. Used," pony " 
extinguisher. No damage. Companies responding : Steamers 
Nos. I, 3, 4, Hose No. i, Hook-and-Ladder, with three-horse 
hitch for first time, and Chemical engine. Box pulled by Officer 
Lovejoy. 

Box 81. Tuesday, August 16, 11.40 a. m. Two-and-half- 
story tenement block, Nos. 65-69 Amherst street, owned by 
William T. Stevens and Mrs. Frank E. Boyd, and occupied by 
several families. Cause, overheated chimney. Damage to Ste- 
vens building, I27.11. Insurance, $800. Insurance paid, 
$27.11. Companies responding: Steamers Nos. i and 4, Hose 
No. I, Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled by member 
of department. 

Box 4. Saturday, September 3, 10.55 ^- ^^- Burning chim- 
ney rear of No. 46 Auburn street. No damage. Needless 
alarm. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 7. Tuesday, September 6, 7.58 p. m. Barn in rear of 
No. 27 Birch street, owned by William M. Lane, and occupied 
by Michael Labreche. Cause, overturned lantern. Companies 
responding: Steamers Nos. i, 4, 5, Hose Nos. i, 2, Hook-and 
Ladder, and Chemical. Damage to building, $200. Insurance, 
$200. Insurance paid, $200. Damage to contents, ^75. In- 
surance, $500. Insurance paid, $75. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Friday, September 16, 5.04 p. m. Smoking chimney 
at Stickney's. leather store, 1064-1068 Elm street, caused needless 
alarm. Chemical responded. 

Still. Thursday, September 29, 12.45 •■^- ^^- ^^ small one- 
story building, corner South Main and Log streets, owned by 
Walter Tirrell and occupied by Albert E. Abel & Co. as boot 
and shoe store. Cause, carelessness from overheated stove. 
Damage to building, $75. No insurance. Damage to stock, 
$600. Insurance, $900. Insurance paid, $600. Responded to 
by Assistant Engineer Manning and members of Steamer No. 2 
with hose wagon. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 85 

Still. Tuesday, October 4, 9.10 p. m. Bake shop of Man- 
chester Tea Store, rear of 39 Amherst street. Cause, hot baking 
tins ignited paper. No damage. Chemical responded. 

Box 7. Friday, October 7, 10.45 p- ^i- Rubbish in rear of 
No. 1073 Ehai street. No damage. Needless alarm. Com- 
panies responding : Steamers Nos. i, 4, 5, Hose Nos. i, 2, 
Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Box 315. Tuesday, October 11, 10.15 P- ^^- Two-story 
wooden building, Nos. 156-162 Front street, Amoskeag, owned 
and occupied by James R. Ferson as a carriage manufactory. 
Cause supposed to be from spontaneous combustion. Damage 
to building, $200. Insurance, $1,500. Insurance paid, $200. 
Damage to contents, $250. Insurance, $1,000. Insurance paid, 
$250. Companies responding : Steamer No. 5, Hose No. i, 
Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Sunday, October 23, 9.07 p. m. Burning chimney 
in Riddle building, No. 885 Elm street. Chemical responded. 
No damage. Used "pony" extinguisher. 

Box 21. Tuesda}^, October 25, 7.50 p. m. Three-story 
wooden tenement block, No. 334 Pine street, owned by Storer 
Nason and occupied by W. E. Woodward. Cause, overheated 
stove set fire to paper. Damage to building, $16.70. Insur- 
ance, $800. Insurance paid, $16.70. No damage to contents. 
Companies responding: Steamers Nos. 3, 4, Hose No. i, Hook- 
and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, October 26, 1.50 p. m. Slight fire in 
Thorp's block, corner Granite and West streets. No damage. 
Hose carriage of Steamer No. 2 responded. 

Box 8. Tuesday, November i, 10.31 a. ri. Two-story 
wooden tenement block, No. 67 Kidder street, owned by Amos- 
keag Corporation and occupied by Dennis Magner. Cause, 
children playing with matches. Barrel shavings consumed. No 
other damage. Companies responding : Steamers Nos. i, 4, 5, 
Hose Nos. I, 2, Hook-and-Ladder, and Chemical. Box pulled 
by citizen. 

Still. Wednesday, November 2, 12.25 P- ^^- Burning chim- 
ney in residence of Gov. J. A. Weston, No. 621 Maple street. 



86 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No damage. Chemical responded. Used three charges with 
" pony " extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, November 5, 8.35 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 124 Central street. No damage. Used "pony " extin- 
guisher. 

Still. Saturday, November 5, 9.10 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 210 Lake avenue. No damage. Used "pony" extin- 
guisher. 

Still. Sunday, November 13, 6 p. m. Four-story brick 
block, owned by Johnson heirs. Cause, lamp explosion in room 
16, occupied by D. S. Cotting. Chemical responded but fire 
extinguished with slight damage before arrival of engine. 

Box 314. Sunday, November 13, 6,54 p. m. Cottage house, 
No. 2 Mill street, Amoskeag, leased by the P. C. Cheney Co. 
and occupied by John Lane. Cause, overturned kerosene lamp. 
Damage to building, ^50. No insurance. No damage to con- 
tents. 

Box 52. Thursday, November 24, 10.35 P- ^^- Three-story 
wooden building, Nos. 17-21 South Main street, owned by Dan- 
iel and Michael Connor and occupied by Moulton & Lamprey as 
Hotel Merrimack. A drunken guest set fire to a bed in room 
No. I, and came near losing his life thereby. Damage to build- 
ing estimated at $200. No insurance. Damage to Moulton & 
Lamprey's contents, ^200. No insurance. Damage to Henry 
Herbert's barber shop, ^65. Insurance, ^200. Insurance paid, 
^65. Box pulled by officer. 

Still. Monday, November 28, 12.43 p- ^^- Chimney fire at 
L. W. Ray's, No. 212 LaKe avenue. No damage. LTsed 
"pony'' extinguisher. 

Box 82. Saturday, December 3, 1.13 a. m. Two two-story 
wooden buildings owned by Hiram Hill and Dodge heirs, occu- 
pied by the Novelty Advertising Company and the Hanover 
Street Laundry. The fire started in rear part of basement of 
Novelty Co., probably from defective chimney. Damage to 
Hill's building, ^500. Insurance, ^500. Insurance paid, $500. 
Damage to Dodge's building, $800. Insurance, ^2,200. Insur- 
ance paid, ^800. Damage to Novelty Co., $2,813. Insurance,. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 87 

^3,000. Insurance paid, $2,813. Damage to Laundry Co., 
$300. Insurance, $375. Insurance paid, $200. Box pulled by 
officer. 

Still. Tuesday, December 6 (Raymond). A fire broke out 
in Raymond last evening, and a little past twelve this morning 
word was telephoned for help. Took Steamer No. i with hose 
wagnn and twenty-five men and went by special train, and ren- 
dered material aid, which was appreciated by the New Hamp- 
shire Insurance Co. of this city by their sending check of $5 to 
each member of this department that went down. 

Still. Saturday, December 10, 2.45 p. m. Slight fire in 
People's Market, No. 335 Granite street. Steamer Co. No. 2 re- 
sponded with "pony" extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, December 13, 11.30 p. m. Word was tele- 
phoned from Goffe's Falls of fire in James Cheney's barn, about 
five and a half miles from City Hall. Took Steamer No. 4 
with hose wagon and delegation of men. The barn and con- 
tents were entirely consumed. Damage to barn, ;^4oo. Insur- 
ance, ;^ioo. Insurance paid, $ioo. Damage to contents, $700. 
Insurance, $100. Insurance paid, $100. 

Still. Wednesday, December 21, 4.02 p. m. Kimball Bros.' 
Shoeshop, Hallsville. Cause, pail of cement accidentally 
caught fire. Steamer No. 3 and hose carriage responded. Ex- 
tinguished before arrival of steamer. No damage. 

Still. Wednesday, December 21, 6.04 p. m. Burning chim- 
ney at No. 127 Merrimack street. No damage. Used " pony " 
extinguisher. 

Still. Saturday, December 24, 5.40 a. m. Burning chim- 
ney at No. 170 Lake avenue. No damage. Chemical called. 

Still. Saturday, December 24, 4.40 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 107 Amherst street. No damage. Chemical responded. 

Still. Saturday, December 24, 5.35 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 61 Cedar street. No damage. Used "pony" extin- 
guisher. 

Still. Saturday, December 24, 9.45 p. m. Burning chimney 
at James B. Scott's, No. 554 Lake avenue. Hose carriage of 
Steamer No. 3 resoonded. No damage. 



«« ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Still. INIonday, December 26, 5.45 p. M. Burning chimney 
at No. 341 Chestnut street. No damage. Used "pony" ex- 
tinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, December 27, 7.05 a. m. Three-story tene- 
ment house No. 207 Cedar street, owned by Mary Flynn and 
occupied by Hannah Flynn. Cause, overheated chimney set 
fire to '"header" near chimney. Damage to building, ^15. In- 
surance, $2,500. Insurance paid, $15. 

Still. Tuesday, December 27, 6.40 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 60 Cedar street. No damage. Used "pony" extin- 
guisher. 

Still Tuesday, December 27, 7.55 p. m. Burning chimney 
at No. 169 Laurel street, Clark M. Bailey's. No damage. Used 
" pony " extinguisher. 

Still. Tuesday, December 27, 10.50 p. m. Bake-shop of 
Manchester Tea Store, rear of 39 Amherst street. Slight fire 
under sink. No damage. Chemical responded. 

Number of bell alarms ..... . '39 

Number of still alarms ..... . .62 

Total ....... . loi 

Aggregate losses for 1892 . . . . . $116,210.05 
Amount of insurance paid ..... 94,124.05 

Net loss above amount paid . . . $22,086.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



89 



TABLE 

SHOWING THE APPARATUS CALLED TO DIFFEP.ENT BOXES ON FIRST, SEC- 
OND, AND THIRD ALARMS. 



Boxes. 



9. 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

21. 

23. 

24. 

25. 

26. 

27. 

31. 

32. 

34. 

35. 

36. 

41. 

42. 

43. 

45. 

51. 

52. 

53. 

54. 

56. 

61. 

62. 

71. 

72. 

73. 

81. 

82. 
112. 
113. 
114. 
212. 
213. 
312. 
313. 
314. 
315. 
321. 
511. 
513. 



2 
1 
3 

3 
3 
3* 
3* 

2* 
2* 



•On first alarm, the horses of second-run engine will double on engine of first run. 



90 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Number and Location of Alarm-Boxes and Keys. 

No. 3. Blood's lower shop. Keys at offices of E. P. Johnson 
Co., gas-works, county jail, DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, and 
Charles H. Hutchinson's shop. 

No. 4. Corner of Spruce and Elm streets. Keys at Hotel Ox- 
ford, L. B. Bodwell & Co.'s, Palmer & Garmon's, Horse Rail- 
road stables, and W. C. Blodgett's office. • 

No. 5. Corner of Merrimack and Elm streets. Keys at Teb- 
betts & Soule's and Currier's drug-stores, and Manchester House. 

No. 6. City Hall. Keys at Holland's and Thurston's drug- 
stores, and J. A. Riddle's office. 

No. 7. Police station, corner of Manchester and Chestnut 
streets. Keys at city marshal's office, and with all police officers. 

No. 8. Corner Elm and Hollis streets. Keys at Smith & Co.'s 
and Colby's drug stores, Partridge Bros.' grain store, and E. V. 
Rowe's residence, 1261 Elm street. 

No. 9. Corner of Elm and Webster streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. D. Corliss, J. Freeman Clough, J. B. Jones, 
and General Stark engine-house. 

No. 12. Corner of North and Pine streets. Keys at residences 
of William C. Clarke, George Emerson, and Walter A. Green. 

No. 13. Corner of Brook and Chestnut streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Welcome Jencks and Lewis Simons, and No. i Senter's 
block. 

No. 14. Corner of Prospect and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. W. Ireland, Mrs. N. L. Hardy, Mrs. George W. 
Riddle, and D. J. Adams. 

No. 15. Corner of Pearl and Chestnut streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Willie H. Dodge and Ervin S. Lyford. 

No. 16. Corner of Lowell and Union streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rt. Rev. Bishop Bradley, and R. H. Hassam. 

No. 17. Corner of Amherst and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Mrs. H. P. Watts and Michael Connor. 

No. iS. Corner of Manchester and Maple streets. Keys at 
residences of the late H. E. Stevens, A. N. Baker, and Mrs. "Wil- 
liam Perkins. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 91 

No. 21. Corner of Merrimack and Pine streets. Keys at A. D. 
Smith's drug store, J. McKeon's grocery store, A. L. Walker's 
office, and residence of James F. Gillis. 

No. 23. Corner of Central and Beech streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Eben T. James and Mrs. Josiah Stevens. 

No. 24. Merrimack Steamer house, corner of Massabesic street 
and Lake avenue. Keys at residence of D. M. Goodwin and 
Steamer house. 

No. 25. Corner of Hanover and Ashland streets. Keys at 
residences of George F. Lincoln, A. D. Gooden, Horace Stearns, 
and the late Horace Gordon. 

No. 26. Corner of Bridge and Russell streets. Keys at Mc- 
Crillis's carriage shop, George W. Bailey's stable, and residence 
of John N. Chase. 

No. 27. Corner of Belmont and Amherst streets. Keys at 
residences of H. M. Tarbell, A. G. Fairbanks, William B. Orrill, 
E. S. Fletcher, William Carr, and George H. Hubbard. 

No. 31. Corner of Canal and Hollis streets, Blood's shop. 
Keys at office, Amory Mills, Langdon Mills watch-rooms. 

No. 32. Langdon Mills block, corner of Canal and Brook 
streets. Keys at the Amoskeag Paper Company's mill, Langdon 
watch-room, and Electric Light station. 

No. 34. Jefferson Mill. Keys at watch-room and pumping 
station. 

No. 35. Stark Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 36. Amory Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 41. Amoskeag Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 42. Manchester Mills. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 43. Olzendam's Mill. Keys at watch-room. 

No. 45. The S. C. Forsaith Co.'s shops. Keys at freight vdepot 
and S. C. Forsaith Co.'s office. 

No. 51. Corner of Walker and Second streets. Keys at stores 
of F. Riedel and William Weber. 

No. 52. Barr's brick block, 'Squog. Keys at Fradd & Co.'s 
and A. N. Clapp's store, Merrimack House, and Steamer No. 2 
house. 



92 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 53. Wallace's steam mill. Keys at the office and I. R. 
Dewey's tenement block. 

No. 54. Corner of A and Bowman streets. Keys at residences 
of Lord sisters and Neil Fullerton. 

No. 56.' Baldwin's bobbin shop. Keys at Baldwin's office 
and residences of J- C. Smith, E. P. Littlefield, and with watch- 
man at works. 

No. 61. Corner of River road and Hancock street, Bakers- 
ville. Keys at Mary Stack's saloon. True W. Jones Co.'s brew- 
ery, and residence of H. F. Dillingham. 

No. 62. Gerrish Wool and Leather Co.'s, River road. Keys 
at tannery and residence of Edwin Kennedy. 

No. 71. Corner of Cedar and Pine streets. Keys at the resi- 
dences of T. Collins, Daniel Sheehan, and Thomas J. Smith. 

No. 72. Corner of Park and Lincoln streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of the late Austin Jenkins, James Briggs, and Clarence 
D. Palmer. 

No. 73. Corner of Beech and Cedar streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Rev. J. A. Chevalier and Timothy Carr. 

No. 81. Central Fire Station, Vine street. Keys at all the 
engine-rooms. 

No. 82. Old City Hotel, corner Lowell and Elm east back 
streets. Keys at Higgins Bros. Co.'s, Lowell-street stable, 
Nichols's stable, and Eames Bros.' drug store. 

No. 112. Corner of Sagamore and Union streets. Keys at 
residences of W. T. Stevens, W. A. Clarkson, and Charles F. 
Chase. 

No. 113. Corner of Oak and Prospect streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of William B. Abbott, W. N. Johnson, and E. M. Topliff. 

No. 114. Corner of Pearl and Ash streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of A. P. Olzendam, G. A. Olzendam, W. S. Shannon, 
and John J. Bennett. 

No. 212. Shoeshop, Hallsville. Keys at the office of shoe 
factory and residences of Charles C. Chase, G. W. Dearborn, 
Mrs. Milton A. Abbott, and M. V. B. Garland. 

No. 213. Sash and blind factory, South Beech street, junction 
of Portsmouth Railroad. Keys at office of Austin, Flint & Day. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



93 



No. 312. Corner of Putnam, Main, and McGregor streets. 
Keys at residences of James Spence (309 Main street), Thomas 
Bolton, and gate of No. 11 mill. 

No. 313. Corner of Amory and Main streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Allen Dean and Lawrence M. Connor, Bouthillier & 
Gingras's drug store, Miville & Co.'s drug store, and gate of No. 
II mill. 

No. 314. P. C. Cheney Company's paper-mill. Keys at office, 
Randall & Co.'s store, and Independent Hose house. 

No. 315. Old Brick Store at 'Skeag. Keys at Flanders's store, 
Randall & Co.'s store, Independent Hose house, and Robinson's 
residence. 

No. 321. Corner Beauport and Wayne streets. Keys at Holy 
Angels' Convent, the Brothers' School, and residences of E. H. 
Doherty and Rev. Father Hevey. 

No. 511. Corner of Douglas and Green streets. Keys at resi- 
dences of Amelia Davis, William A. Tufts, and James Kearnes. 

No. 513. Corner of Milford and Carroll streets. Keys at 
residences of J. W. Abell, James Ward, and Mrs. Elizabeth 
Ward. 

Also, keys will be found in the hands of all regular police. 

The true time will be given at precisely 12.30 p. M. from 
Charles A. Trefethen's jewelry store, and will be denoted by one 
strike of the fire-bells. 



Telephone Calls. 



Central station, Chemical Engine 
Chief Engineer Lane's residence 
Assistant Engineer V/hitney's residence 
Assistant Engineer Whitney's office 
Fire King Steamer No. 2 . 
Merrimack Steamer No. 3 . 
General Stark Steamer No. 5 
Massabesic Hose No. 2 . . . 



64-3 
64-4 

34-4 

39-3 

59-3 

140-3 

64-6 
1 16-4 



94 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Instructions to Key-holders and Citizens. 

1. Upon the discovery of a fire, notice sliould be immediately 
communicated to the nearest alarm-box, the keys to which are in 
the hands of all regular police, and generally of persons at the 
corner or nearest house. 

2. Key-holders, upon the discovery of a fire, or positive in- 
formation of a fire, will unlock the box, pull down the hook once 
as far as it will go (without jerking) and then let go. Shut the 
door, but do not try to remove the key, as it is locked in by a 
trap-lock, and can only be removed with a release-key, which is 
carried by each of the engineers, who will, as soon as convenient, 
release and return it. 

3. All persons giving fire alarms are requested to remain by 
the box a moment, and if no clicking is heard in the box, pull 
again ; if you still hear no clicking, go to the next nearest box, 
procure another key, and give an alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the 
box except to give an alarm of fire. Give an alarm for no cause 
other than actual fire. Don't give an alarm for a chimney 

FIRE. 

5. Never let the keys go out of your possession unless called 
for by the chief engineer. Jf you change your residence or place 
of business, where the keys are kept, return the keys to the same 
officer. 

6. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform 
themselves of the location of alarm-boxes near their property, 
also all places where the keys are kept. Be sure the alarm is 
promptly and properly given. 

7. Alarms will be sounded upon all the fire bells in the city, 
and the number of the box will be given thus : Box 6, six blows, 
2\ seconds apart, repeated three times. Box 212, two blows, 
pause of 6i seconds, one blow, same pause, and two blows, 
2 — I — 2, repeated three times. 

8. The engineers reserve the right to give one stroke of the 
bells at any time ; and, in case of testing the boxes, each test 
will be preceded by one stroke of the bells. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 95 



SCHOOL SIGNAL. 

Two Strokes, with fifteen seconds between them, close the pri- 
mary and middle schools ; and to close all the schools, two imme- 
diate strokes, and after a lapse of fifteen seconds two more imme- 
diate strokes, — the time of striking the bells being at 7.45 a. m. 
for closing the schools during the forenoon, and at 11.30 a. m. 
or 1. 15 p. M. for closing them during the afternoon. 



Rules and Regulations in regard to responding to 
Fires and Alarms. 

The following order has been adopted by the board of engi- 
neers, and the fire department will strictly comply until otherwise 
ordered, and will attend alarms of fire as follows : 

1. Pennacook Hose Co. No. i. Hook-and-Ladder Co No. i, 
and Chemical Engine Co. No. i will report for duty to all bo.xes 
on first alarm. 

2. Amoskeag Steamer Co. No. i will report for duty on days 
of its first run, on first alarm to all boxes except 9, 12, 51, 54, 
56, 315, 513, 511 ; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 6, 8, 15, 34, 35, T^d, 
41, 42, 45, 81, 82 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 7, 13, 14, 
16, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 62, 71, 72, 73, 
112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314, 321 ; on third alarju, to all 
other boxes. 

3. Fire King Steamer Co. No. 2 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 52. 53, 54, 56, 
312, 313, 321, 511, 513; on second alar JH, to boxes 4, 5, 31, 32; 
on third alarm, to all other boxes. 

4. Merrimack Steamer Co. No. 3 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 3, 4, 5, 7, 16,17, iS- 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27,41, 42, 
43' 45' 61, 62, 71, 72, 73, 212, 213 ; on second alarm, to boxes 
6, 8, 15, 31, 34, 35, 36, 51, 52, 53, 56, 81, 82 ; on third alann, 
to all other boxes. 



96 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

5. N. S. Bean Steamer Co. No. 4 will report for duty, on days 
of its first run, on first aia?'in to all box':es except 9, 12, 51, 54, 56^ 
315 ; on second alarm, to all other boxes. 

Second Run. On first alarm, to boxes 6, 8, 15, 34, 35. 
36, 41, 42, 45, 81, 82 ; on second alarm, to boxes 3, 4, 5, 7, 13, 
14, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23.. 24, 25, 26, 27, 31, 32, 43, 61, 62, 71, 72, 
73, 112, 113, 114, 213, 312, 313, 314, 321 ; on third alarm, to 
all other boxes. 

6. Gen. Stark Steamer Co. No. 5 will report for duty on first 
alarm to boxes 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 31, 32, 34, 35, 41, 82, 112, 
113, 114, 314, 315 ; on secofid alartn, to boxes 6, 16, 36, 42, 81,, 
312, 313, 321 ; on third alarm, to all other boxes. " 

7. Massabesic Hose Company No. 2 will report for duty on 
first alartn, to boxes 6, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 24, 25, 26, 27, 

34, 35, 36, 41, 42, 82, 112, 113, 114; on second alarm, to box- 
es 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 21, 23, 31, 32, 43, 45, 71, 72, 73, Si, 314; on 
third alartn, to all other boxes. 

8. On the first alarm from boxes 9, 24, 27, 54, 56, 61, 62, 212,. 
213, 314, 315, 513, the horses of the second run will double on 
to the engine of its first run, and on the arrival at the fire. 

THE SECOND-RUN HORSES WILL RETURN TO THEIR HOUSE, and> 

in case of an alarm from any other box the company will imme- 
diately respond with their engine. 

9. During the progress of a fire, any of the apparatus not 
called on that alarm will promptly respond to an alarm from any 
other box. 

10. At any tjme when an alarm of fire is given, tlie engine, 
hose carriage, or truck that leaves the house first will have the 
right to lead to the fire. No running by will be allowed, 

EXCEPT IN CASE OK ACCIDENT, UNDER PENALTY OF DISMISSAL 
OF THE DRIVER FROM THE DEPARTMENT. 

11. The drivers shall not permit persons not connected with 
the department to ride upon their apparatus, and in muddy 
weather or heavy wheeling they shall not permit any one to ride 
upon their apparatus when returning from fires. 

12. The companies of the department not called on the first 
alarm will prepare for a start, and hold themselves in readiness 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 97 

for a second or third alarm ; and, if not needed, one stroke on 
the bells and gongs by the engineer in charge will be the signal 
for discharge to all companies remaining at the houses ; or in 
case this one blow is not struck within thirty minutes, companies 
may consider themselves dismissed ; except the drivers, who will 
remain in the houses with their horses until the two blows to 
limber up, and the return to quarters of engines on duty at the 
fire. 

13. Engineers of steamers will not run over eighty-pound 
water-pressure^ except when orders are received from a member 
of the board of engineers or the officer in command of the com- 
pany. 

14. Two strokes on the bells will be a signal for those at a fire 
to limber up. 

WHISTLE SIGNALS. 

The following code of signals will be observed by members of 
the department : 

For captaii^, or officer in command of company, one long 
whistle. 

For coal, two long whistles followed by as many short whis- 
tles as indicate the number of the engine. 

To LIMBER UP, three long whistles. 

7 



98 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



ESTIMATED VALUE OF PROPERTY. 



Amoskeag Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 1 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I extra first-size Amoskeag steamer . 
I one-horse hose-wagon 

3 gray horses for steamer 

I gray horse for hose- wagon 

4 swinging harnesses 

I pair double harnesses (for street work) 
I single harness (for street work) 
2,ooo feet fabric hose .... 

loo feet three-inch leather hose . 
I double cart ..... 

I single cart ..... 

I sled ...... 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. 
Tools, furniture, and fixtures 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount .... 



1,4,000.00 

400.00 

685.00 

225.00 

200.00 

50.00 

40.00 

1,200 00 

50.00 

75.00 

75.00 

40.00 

60.00 

200.00 

200.00 

$7,500.00 



Fire King Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 2. 

LOCATED AT NORTH MAIN STREET, 'SQUOG. 



I second-size Amoskeag steamer 

I combination hose-wagon 

3 bay horses for steamer . 

I pair gray horses for combination . 

3 street harnesses, 2 at $40, i at $20 

5 swinging harnesses 

I single cart . 

I two-horse cart , . 

I double sled . 

I single sled 



^,000.00 

600.00 

617.00 

534- 00 

100.00 

250.00 

75.00 

60.00 

60.00 

40.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



99 



2,500 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures and blankets 
Furniture, fixtures, carpets, etc. 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



11,500.00 

60.00 

466.00 

150.00 

58,512.00 



Merrimack Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 3. 



LOCATED ON LAKE AVENUE, CORNER MASSABESIC STREET. 



I second-size Amoskeag steamer 
I pair black horses .... 
I single horse .... 

3 street harnesses, 2 at ^50, i at $40 
3 swinging harnesses 
I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage 
I double cart . , 
■ I single cart . 
I single sled . 
2,500 feet fabric hose 

Stable fixtures, blankets, etc. , 

Beds, bedding, carpets, hall furniture, etc. 

Total amount 



$3,500.00 

417.00 

150.00 

140.00 

150.00 

600.00 

125.00 

40.00 

40.00 

1,500.00 

50.00 

575-00 

$7,287.00 



N. S. Bean Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 4. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I second -size Amoskeag steamer 
I hose-wagon .... 
I pair bay horses for steamer . 
I horse for hose-wagon 
1 pair street harnesses 
3 swinging harnesses 



$3,500.00 
400.00 
266.00 
133.00 
40.00 
150.00 



100 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1,550 feet fabric hose . . . . . 

Hall furniture, beds, bedding, etc. . 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



3 1, 000.0c 

275.00 

75.0c 

150.00 

$5>989-cc 



General Stark Steam Fire-Engine Company No. 5. 



LOCATED ON WEBSTER STREET, CORNER CHESTNUT 



I third-size Arnoskeag steamer 

I combination hose reel and ladder 

I pair bay horses 

1 pair gray liorses . 

2 double carts . 
2 double sleds . 
2 pairs swinging harnesses 
2 pairs street harnesses 

,500 fett fabric hose 

Furniture, fixtures, tools, etc 
Stable fixtures and blankets 
Firemen's suits, badges, etc. 

Total amount 



$3,600.00 
1,000.00 
534-oc 
400.00 
150.00 
100.00 
200. cc 
150.00 
1,500.00 

175.00 

80.00 
150.00 

$8,039.00 



E. W. Harrington Steam Fire-Engine. 

LOCATED AT OLD ENCINE-HOUSE, CLINTON STUEET. 

Old U tank .\moskeag engine .... S500.0C 



REPOKT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



101 



Pennacook Hose Company No. 1 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 



1 rour-wneeied Amoskeag hose-carnage . 


$600.00 


2 horses 


534- 00 


2 single harnesses ..... 


70.00 


I single cart . . . 


40.00 


I single sled ...... 


40.00 


I hose sled 


20.00 


2,500 feet fabric hose ..... 


1,500.00 


1,000 feet leather hose ..... 


500.00 


Furniture and fixtures .... 


200.00 


Stable fixtures and blankets 


50.00 


Firemen's suits and badges 


175.00 


Total amount .... 


$3,729.00 



Massabesic Hose Company No. 2. 



LOCATED ON MAPLE STREET, CORNER EAST HIGH. 



1 four-wheeled Amoskeag hose carriage . 


$600.00 


I bay horse ...... 


150.00 


I street harness ..... 


30.00 


I swinging harness ..... 


50.00 


I single cart 


50.00 


I single sled . . . . . 


30.00 


2,000 feet fabric hose 


1,200.00 


^,000 feet leather hose ..... 


800.00 


Furniture and fixtures . . . . . 


100.00 


Firemen's suits and badges 


175.00 



Total amount 



$3,185.00 



102 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Company No. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I hook-and-ladder truck 

I reserve truck at Lake avenue station 

3 horses ..... 

1 pair exercise harnesses 
3 swinging harnesses 

2 extra Bangor extension ladders . 
7 rubber blanket covers 
Furniture and fixtures . 
Bed, bedding, and furniture . 
Stable fixtures and blankets . 
Firemen's suits and badges . 

Total amount 



^1,700.00 

200.00 

800.00 

30.00 

150.00 

360.00 

168.00 

200.00 

40.00 

50.00 

280.00 

$3,978.00 



Chemical Engine Company No. 1. 



LOCATED ON VINE STREET. 

I double tank (60 gallons each) engine 

I pair black horses 

I pair exercise harnesses 

I pair swinging harnesses 

Furniture and fixtures . 

Stable fixtures and blankets 

Firemen's suits and badges 

Total amount 



$2,250 


00 


534. 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


75 


00 


50 


00 


35 


00 



$3,094.00 



Supply Wagon. 

I supply wagon, with boxes and engineers' lanterns $250.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 103 

Spare Hose. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

Soo feet leather hose ...... $400.00 

600 feet fabric hose ...... 375-oo 



Total amount ...... $775.00 



Exercise Wagon. 

CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

I four-wheeled exercise wagon with pole, shafts, 

three-horse hitch, and coal boxes . . . $350.00 



Engineers' Department. 

5 fire hats . . . . . . . . $10.00 

5 engineer's white rubber coats . . . . 37-5° 

Furniture and fixtures . . . . . . i75-oo 



Total amount ...... $222.50 



Independent Hose Company No. 5. 

LOCATED AT CORNER OF OLD FALLS ROAD AND FRONT STREET. 



1 four-wheeled hand hose- carriage 
800 feet leather hose 

2 hose-pipes, spanners, etc. 
Furniture and fixtures . 

Total amount 



$400.00 

300.00 

40.00 

10.00 

$750.00 



104 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage. 

LOCATED AT DEVONSHIRE MILLS. 



1 two-wheeled hose-carriage 
300 feet fabric hose 

2 hose-pipes 

Total amount 



Sleeping-Hall. 

AT CENTRAL STATION, VINE STREET. 

7 beds, bedding, wardrobes, etc. . 



Spare Hose-Carriage. 

I four-wheeled Amoskeag hose-carriage (being re- 
paired for Steamer No. 6) . 



Extra Horses. 

I horse at Central station for spare duty 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 



^30.00 

100.00 

10.00 

$140.00 



$275.00 



$200.00 



At cost (including additions 


previous to 1885) 


$21,625.00 


Remodeling in 1885 




6,000.00 


Additions in 1886 




775-"° 


in 1887 


. 


375-00 


in 1888 




575-00 


in 1889 




430.00 


in 1890 




300.00 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



105 



Additions in 189 1 
in 1 89 2 
" Individual Tapper " system 
Wire, ladders, arms, brackets, etc. 

Total .... 



$280.00 
150.00 

3,000.00 
125.00 

53'635-oo 



Recapitulation. 

Amoskeag Steam Fire-Engine Co. No i 
Fire King Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 2 
Merrimack Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 3 
N. S. Bean Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 4 
Gen. Stark Steam Fire-Engine Co. No. 5 
E. W. Harrington Steamer, (old) 
Pennacook Hose Co. No. i . 
Massabesic Hose Co. No. 2 . 
Excelsior Hook-and-Ladder Co. No. i 
Chemical Engine Co. No 
Supply wagon 
Spare hose . 
Exercise wagon 
Engineers' department 
Independent Hose Co. No. 5 
Goffe's Falls Hose-Carriage . 
Sleeping-Hall (Central Station) 
Spare Hose-Carriage 
Fire- Alarm Telegraph . 
Extra horse .... 

Total . ... 



$7,500.00 

8,51 2.00 

7,287.00 

5,989.00 

8,039.00 

500.00 

3,729.00 

3,185.00 

3,978.00 

3,094.00 

250.00 

775.00 

350.00 

222.50 

750.00 

140.00 

275.00 

600.00 

33'635-oo 
200.00 

^89,010.50 



106 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 



Names and Residences of the Members of the Fire 
Department. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Name. 



1 : Thomas VV. Lane .. 

2 Fied S. Bean 

3 I Ruel G. Manning.. . 

4 j Eugene S. Whitney 

5 i Clarence R. Merrill 



Rank. 



Chief 

Asst. and clerk 
Assistant 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



1937 Elm. 

Machinist i 102 Orange. 

Carpenter 52 Douglas. 

Supt. ElectricL't River road, N. 
Grain dealer 414 Merrimack 



AMOSKEAG STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House No. 28 Vine Street. 



11 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


7 


Charles F. McCoy... 


Foreman ? 


Machinist 


5M. S. B. 


S 


Frank E. Stearns 


Asst. foreman 


Paper-hanger . . 


389 Lake ave. 


17 


Henry C. Parsons 


Clerk 


Auctioneer 


28 Vine. 


6 


Charles F. Hall 


Engineer 


Machinist 


28 Vine. 


13 


Joseph H. Gould 


Asst. engineer. 





1087 Elm. 


11 


Charles H. Rogers .... 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


28 Vine. 


12 


Artemas C. Barker . . . 


Driver of hose. 





28 Vine. 


15 


Thomas J. Wyatt 


Hoseman 


Carpenter 


44 Middle. 


16 


Frank B. Marston 


" 





11 M. S. B. 


19 


Henry A. Boone 





Machinist. . 


24 M. S. B. 


9 


Lewis G. Bryant 


" 


Carpenter 


31 M. S. B. 


18 


James L. Brock 


,, 


Tinsmith 


21 Market. 


14 


Edgar A. Young 




Clerk 


371 Merrimack 


10 


Lucius M. Rollins — 


' 


Molder 


174 Concord. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



107 



FIRE KING STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 2. 

House on North Main Street, 'Squog. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


67 


David G. Mills 


Foreman 


Contractor 


607 Granite ex. 


71 


Charles G Ranno 


Asst. foreman. 


Harness-maker.. 


63 Parker. 


fiS 


John Martin 


Clerk 


Machinist 


624 N. Main. 


120 


Harry C. Morrill 


Engineer 


Engineer 


Engine-house. 


119 


Stephen Thomes 


Asst. engineer. 


Carpenter 


55 Douglas. 


76 


Jeremiah Lane 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


Engine-house. 


69 


Arthur W. Whitcomb. 


Driver of hose. 





Engine-house. 


19. 


Samuel A. Hill 


Hoseman 


Janitor 


86 School. 


75 


Robert J. Hill 




Carpenter 

Machinist 


86 School. , 


77 


Daniel B. Emery '. 




Williams. 


73 


Charles S. Cousins... 




Harness-maker.. 


53 Douglas. 


74 


Thomas C. Foote 




Wool sorter 


56 N. Main. 


66 


Joseph H. Alsop 




Wool waste sort'r 


34 Douglas. 


70 


Chas. M. Tewksbury.. 




Freight handler. 


86 School. 



MERRIMACK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 3. 

House on Lake Avenue, corner Massabesic. 





Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


86 


Frank F. Porter 


Foreman 


Manufacturer . . . 


330 Spruce. 


79 


Louis N. Dufrain 


Asst. foreman. 


Plumber 


3:3 Hall. 


83 


Ernest E. Hubbell ... 


Clerk 


Carpenter 


417 Central. 


121 


George B. Forsaith. .. 


Engineer 


Machinist 


Engine-house. 


122 


Edwin E. Weeks 


Asst. engineer. 





255 Lake ave. 


87 


George H. Wheeler... 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


Engine-house. 


81 


William S. McLeod... 


Driver of hose. 





Engine-house. 


SS 










80 


Ernest L. George 




Clerk 


366 Lake ave. 


84 


Charles H. Colburn ... 





Carpenter 


294 Laurel. 


85 


Will P. Emerson 







294 Laurel. 


89 


Parker R. Brown 





Clerk 


422 Merrimack 


78 


George Dunnington.. 




Harness-maker . 


510 Wilson. 


8-^ 


Lyman W. Piper . . 







464 Central. 









108 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



N. S. BEAN HTEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 4. 

House on Vine street. 



r; 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


26 


Lorenzo J. Chandler. . 


Foreman 


Clerk 


123 Orange. 


23 


George A. Cann 


Asst. foreman. 


Watchman 


27 Middle. 


20 


Lucius B. Snelling 


Clerk 


Pharmacist 


269 Hanover. 


21 


Edgar G. Abbott 


Engineer 


Machinist 


20 Vine. 


32 


Benj. R. Richardson.. 


Asst. Engineer 





12 Mechanic. 


31 


Frank J. Dnstin 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


20 Vine. 


29 


Alphouso E. Foster. . . 


Driver of hose. 





20 Vine. 


28 


Willie H. Dodge 


Hoseman 


Railroad flrem'n 


530 Chestnut. 


30 


Ellsworth V. Rowe. . . . 


" 


Section hand — 


1261 Elm. 


22 


Walter A. Clarkson. . . 


" 


Carpenter 


98 Sagamore. 


25 


Frank B. Stevens 


" 


Clerk 


310 Central. 


27 


Edwartl Sargent 


" 


Machinist 


954 Elm. 


24 


Edward C. Gould 


" 


Clerk 


26 Mechanic. 


33 


Thomas W. Lane. Jr. . 


" 


Electrician 


1937 Eln.. 



GENERAL STARK STEAM FIRE-ENGINE COMPANY NO. 5. 
House No. 44 Webster Street. 





j 
Name. ' 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


49 


Charles W. Brown — 


Foreman 


Clerk 


16 Hazel. 


123 


George R. Simmons . . . 


Asst. foreman. 


Machinist 


82 Pennacook. 


46 
42 


Woodbury Davison . . . 
Daniel VV. aiorse 


Clerk 


Carpenter 

Engineer 


817 Union. 


Engineer 


1419 Elm. 


102 


W alter Morse 


Asst. engineer. 


Machinist 


831 Union. 


125 


EmilH. Smith 


Driver steamer 


Teamster 


44 Webster. 


124 

101 
47 
95 






I, 


44 Webster. 


Milo B Wilson 






48 Blodget. 


Russell L.Cilley 

Edward H. Clough ... 




Clerk 


860 Chestnut. 






8.59 Chestnut. 


41 


Arthur A. Smith 


,, 


Blacksmith 


11 W. Applefn 


12(i 


Al vin McLane 




Carpenter 


15 Liberty. 


99 


Joseph I. Risvold 




Machinist 


130 Myrtle. 


108 


Edwin L. Towle 




Clerk 


62 Webster. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 



109 



PENNACOOK HOSE COMPANY N(^. 1. 
House No. 26 Vine Street. 



'Z O; 



Name. 



Occupation. 



Albert lla.xlieUl. j Foreman I5flt maker. 

Jcsepli K. Merrill Asst. foreman. Currier. 

Frank D. Burleigb Clerk Carpenter.. . 

Waller L. Blenus Driver Teamster... 



George PI. Porter.. 
Albert A. Putrer... 
Charles B. Frencli. 
John E. Sanborn.. 
Samuel \V. Patten . 

George I. Ayer 

Edwin VV. Merrill . 
Henry Gray 



Hosuman Carpenter 

" Kailr'd employee 

" ■ . ■ . Carpenter 



Belt maker 
Electrician. 

Clerk 

Macliinist .. 



Residence. 

9S Liberty. 
21 Asb. 
(j M. S. B. 
■2G Vine. 
27'J Laurel. 
499 Beecb. 
39 M. S. B. 
■274 Laurel. 
3 M. S. B. 
28 M. S. IJ. 
21 Ash. 
7 .•\L S. 15. 



MASSABESIC HOSE COMPANY NO. 2. 
House on Jfajjle Street, come)' East High. 



zP 6 



Namk. 



Rank. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



John F. Seaward Foreman Caipenter 27 W'arieii. 

Revilo G. Houghton.. Asst. foreman. Gas litter 288 Bridge. 

Ilenrj' G. Seaman — Clerk Carpenter \ 14 South. 

Walter Seaward Driver Teamster I ,t21 Maple. 

Jos. W. Batcbelder . . . Hosen\;in ' Cai'penter j 467 Maple. 



Albert E. Batcbelder. 

Fred S. Lewis 

Julien B. Huntley 

Charles W. Powell 

Addison Seaward 

Arthur B. Merrill 

.Tames A. Rogers 



i 4G7 :\[aple. 

Plumber i 27 South. 

'■ :J6 Dutton. 

Carpenter 540 Maple. 

2,J0East High. 

I 

C02 Hall. 

I 
•' I 70 Beech. 



110 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CHEMICAL ENGINE COMPANY NO. 1. 
House No. 8 Vine Street. 



o 
so . 

1^ 


Name. 


Rank. 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


116 


George N. Burpee 


Foreman 


Electrician 


19 Ash. 


117 


"Warren F. Wheeler .. 


Clerk & driver 


Teamster 


8 Vine. 


lis Frank A. Pherson 


Pipeman 


^Machinist 


8 Vine. 


115 Jesse W. Truell 


Fireman 


Hackman 


153 Hanover. 


44 Frank H. Harvey*.... 




Teamster 


546 Chestnut. 



* Detailed as driver of supply wagon. 

EXCELSIOR HOOK-AND-LADDER COMPANY NO. 1. 
House No. IS Vine Street. 



o 

1= NAME. 


Rank. Occupation. 


Residence. 


91 Jerome J. Lovering . . 


Foreman ; Carpenter 


300 Pine. 








46 Stark Corp. 
20 M. S. B. 


90 Henry Johnson 


Clerk 


Piper 


94 Charles iM. Denyou . . . 




Teamster 


18 Vine. 






100 Blodget. 
268 Bridge. 


98 John N. Chase 




Overseer 


92 Oscar P. Stone 


.< 


Clerk 


312 Manchest'r 


114 John Wilson 


„ 


Carpenter 


19 Warren. 


103 Luther J. Flint 





4 Button. 


104 Harrison H. Cole 








45 M. S. B. 


109 George >I. Jones 





Gardener 


558 Chestnut. 


110 Pharis E. Rogers 

97 Charles W. Bailey... 


„ 




135 Orange. 


" 


Carriage maker 


Linden. 


107 Wf»nri7 TTpiin 


„ 


Manufacturer . . . 


4 Whitney. 


113 


Charles H. Laxon 


" 


Carpenter 


27 Middle. 


106 


Charles Edgar 


" 


16 M. S. B. 


105 


JohnT.Gott 


" Teamster 


301 E. Spruce. 


112 


Henrj' C. Crosby 


" 


234 Lake ave. 


93 


Charles H. Gile 


" Carpenter 


56 Stark Corp. 


100 


Frank M. Frisselle. ... 





Reporter ' 


Hanover. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. Ill 

Location of Hydrants. 

The following locations of hydrants are as furnished by the 
water- works office in 1891. 

I applied to the office for those set during the year and could 
not obtain them, the clerk refusing to furnish the list. 

Amherst, northwest corner of Vine. 
Amherst, southwest corner of Chestnut. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Pine. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Union. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Walnut. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Beech. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Maple. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Lincoln. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Ashland. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Hall. 
Amherst, northwest corner of Belmont. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Elm. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Pine. 
Appleton, northwest corner of Union. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Cross. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Warren. 
Arlington, northwest corner of Ashland. 
Ash, front of No. 32. 
Auburn, corner of Franklin. 
Auburn, northeast corner of Elm. 
Auburn, front of No. 40. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Adams. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Union. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Beech. 
Auburn, northwest corner of Maple. 
Baker, corner of Ehn. 
Baker, corner of River road. 
Baker, corner of Calef road. 



112 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Baker, corner of Nutt road. 

Bay, corner of Salmon. 

Bedford, northwest corner of Granite. 

Bedford, near No. 36 M. P. W. corporation. 

Bedford, northwest corner of Central. 

Beech, northwest corner of Park. 

Beech, front of No. 584. 

Behnont, near No. 345. 

Belmont, corner Young. 

Belmont, near Coffin residence. 

Birch, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Birch, northwest corner of Washington. 

Blodget, front of primary school house, 

Blodget, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Pine. 

Blodget, northwest corner of Union. 

Bridge, front of No 26. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Union. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Walnut. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Beech. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Ash. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Maple. 

Bridge, near No. 242. 

Bridge, northwest corner oT Russell. 

Bridge, northwest corner of Linden. 

Bridge, corner of Ashland. 

Bridge, corner of Hall. 

Brook, northwest corner of 1'. Adams's lot. 

Brook, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Brook, northwest corner of Pine. 

Brook, northwest corner of Union. 

Brook, northwest corner of Beech. 

Brook, northwest corner of Ash. 

Calef road, near Patrick Harrington's. 

Calef road, near D. T. Smith's house. 

Canal, near east corner of Depot. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 113 



Canal, near office door M. L. W. 
Cedar, corner of Elm. 
Cedar, front of No. 36. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Pine. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Union. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Beech. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Maple. 
Cedar, northwest corner of Lincoln. 
Central, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Central, northwest corner of Pine. 
Central, northwest corner of Union. 
Central, near gate, Merrimack square. 
Central, northwest corner of Beech. 
Central, northwest corner of Maple. 
Central, northwest corner of Lincoln. 
Central, front of No. 374. 
Central, northwest corner of Wilson. 
Central, northwest corner of Hall. 
Central, corner of Cass. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Lowell. 
Chestnut, opposite High. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Pearl. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Orange. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Myrtle. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Prospect. 
Chestnut, northwest corner of Salmon. 
Clarke, northwest corner of Elm. 
Clarke, northwest corner of Union. 
Concord, corner Elm. 
Concord, opposite Vine. 
Concord, northwest corner Chestnut. 
Concord, northwest corner of Union. 
Concord, northwest corner of Walnut. 
Concord, northwest corner of Beech. 
Concord, northwest corner of Maple. 



114 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Concord, northwest corner of old Amherst. 

Concord, northwest corner of Ashland. 

Concord, northwest corner of Hall. 

Concord, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Cypress, south end of street. 

Cypress, at Manchester shoeshop. 

Dean, northeast corner of Canal. 

Dean, northwest corner of Elm. 

Depot, northeast corner of Elm. 

Elm, opposite foot of Manchester. 

Elm, northwest corner of Salmon. 

Elm, northwest corner of Cove. 

Franklin, opposite Middle. 

Gore, corner of Beech. 

Granite, northwest corner of Elm. 

Granite, near Franklin. 

Granite, northeast corner of Canal. 

Granite, east end of Granite bridge. 

Grove, corner of Elm. 

Grove, in East Manchester. 

Hancock. 

Hancock, near shoeshop. 

Hancock, northwest corner River road. 

Hancock, near brewery. 

Hanover, corner of Elm. 

Hanover, front of Opera House. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Pine. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Union. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Beech. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Maple. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Ashland. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Hall. 

Hanover, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Harrison, opposite No. 15. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Chestnut. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 115 

Harrison, northwest corner of Pine. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Union. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Beech. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Maple. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Oak. 

Harrison, northwest corner of Russell. 

High, corner of Ashland. 

High, corner of South. 

High, fifty feet east of Wilson road. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Canal. 

Hollis, northeast corner of Hobbs. 

Hollis, northwest corner of Elm. 

Jewett, corner of Massabesic. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Canal. 

Kidder, northeast corner of Hobbs. 

Kidder, northwest corner of Elm. 

Kidder's court, northwest corner of Elm. 

Lake avenue, near No. 36. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Union. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Maple. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Lake avenue, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Lake avenue, corner of Cass. 

Lake avenue, east end, near Hastings residence. 

Langdon, northwest corner of Elm. 

Langdon, northeast corner of Canal. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Pine. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Union. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beech. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Maple. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Laurel, near No. 244. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Laurel, near Belmont. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Milton. 

Laurel, northwest corner of Beacon. 



116 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Beech. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ash. 

Lowell, northwest corner of South. 

Lowell, front of No. 276. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Wilson road. 

Lowell, northwest corner of Ashland. 

Mammoth road. 

Manchester, corner of Elm. 

Manchester, front of James Bros.' stable. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Central. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Pine. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Union. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Beech. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Maple. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Hall. 

Manchester, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Maple, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Maple, front of No. 350. 

Market, near Canal. 

Market, near second back street west of Elm. 

Market, northwest corner of Elm. 

Massabesic, northwest corner of Old Falls road. 

Massabesic, southeast corner of Taylor. 

Massabesic avenue. 

Massabesic, near Mammoth road. 

Mechanic, northeast corner of Canal. 

Mechanic, near second back street west of Ehn. 

Mechanic, northwest corner of Elm. 

Merrimack, corner of Elm. 

Merrimack, opposite gate, Merrimack square. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Pine. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Union. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Beech. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Maple. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 117 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Merrimack, near No. 362. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Merrimack, northwest corner of Hall. 

Merrimack; near Belmont. 

Merrimack, northeast corner of Beacon. 

Middle, northeast corner of Canal. 

Middle, near No. 67 Amoskeag corporation. 

Monroe, northwest corner of Elm. 

Myrtle, opposite No. 33. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Pine. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Union. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Walnut. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Beech. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Ash. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Maple. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Oak. 

Myrtle, northwest corner of Russell. 

North, northwest corner of Bay. 

North, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

North, northwest corner of Pine. 

North, corner of Liberty. 

Orange, opposite Clark's avenue. 

Orange, northwest corner of Pine. 

Orange, northwest corner of Union. 

Orange, northwest corner of Walnut. 

Orange, northwest corner of Beech. 

Orange, corner of Ash. 

Orange, corner of Maple. 

Orange, corner of Oak. 

Orange, corner of Russell. 

Orange, corner of Linden. 

Orange, corner of Hall. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Elm. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Clark's avenue. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Pine. 

Pearl, northwest corner of Union. 



118 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Pearl, corner of Beech. 
Pearl, corner of Walnut. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ash. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Maple. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Oak. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Russell, 
Pearl, northwest corner of Linden. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Ashland. 
Pearl, northwest corner of Morrison. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Pine. 
Pennacook, northwest corner of Union. 
Pine, near Road House. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lake avenue. 
Pine, northwest corner of Concord. 
Pine, northwest corner of Lowell. 
Pine, northwest corner of High. 
Pine, northwest corner of Bridge. 
Pleasant, northeast corner of Canal. 
Pleasant, near No. 35 Manchester corporation. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Franklin. 
Pleasant, northwest corner of Elm. 
Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Pine. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Union. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Walnut. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Beech. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Ash. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Maple. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Oak. 
Prospect, northwest corner of Russell. 
Prospect, corner of Linden. 
Reservoir, on force main. 
River road (north), north of Webster. 
River road (north), near Mrs. John Kelly's. 
River road (north), near J. Otis Clark's. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 119 

River road (south), near gate of tannery. 

Sagamore, corner of Union. 

Salmon, corner of Union. 

Shasta, corner of Elm. 

Shasta, corner of River road. 

Shasta, corner of Beech. 

Silver, corner of Union. 

Silver, corner of Beech. 

Somerville, corner of Union. 

Spring, northeast corner of Canal. 

Spring, northwest corner of Charles. 

Spring, northwest corner of Elm. 

Spring, corner of EMm. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Chestnut. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Pine back. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Union. 

Spruce, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Beech. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Maple. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Lincoln. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Wilson. 

Spruce, northwest corner of Belmont. 

Spruce, near T. J. Perry's house. 

Stark, northeast corner of Canal. 

Stark, near No. 13 Stark corporation. 

Stark, northwest corner of Elm. 

State, northwest corner of Granite. 

State, opposite No. 57 Manchester corporation. 

State, opposite No. 13 Manchester corporation, 

State, corner of West Central. 

Summer, corner of Elm. 

Taylor, corner of Young road. 

Union, northwest corner of Lowell. 

Union, northwest corner of High. 

Valley, northwest corner of Elm. 

Valley, northwest corner of Willow. 

Valley, northwest corner of Beech. 



120 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Valley, northwest corner of Wilson. 
Valley, northwest corner of Belmont. 
Valley, northwest corner of Taylor. 
Valley, northwest corner of Cypress. 
Valley, northwest corner of Jewett. 
Valley, 150 feet east of J. L. Woodman's. 
Vine, opposite Central station. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Lowell- 
Walnut, opposite No. 79. 
Walnut, northwest corner of Sagamore. 
Water, near No. $8 Amoskeag corporation. 
Water, northwest corner of Elm. 
Webster, northwest corner of Chestnut. 
Webster, corner of Adams. * 

Webster, northwest corner of Union. 
West Auburn, northeast corner of Canal. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Canal. 
West Bridge, northeast corner of Hobbs. 
West Bridge, northwest corner of Elm. 
West Brook, northeast corner of Canal. 
West Brook, northwest corner of Elm. 
West Cedar, northeast corner of Canal. 
West Cedar, northwest corner of Elm. 
West Central, northeast corner of Canal. 
West Central, corner of Franklin. 
West Central, northwest corner of Elm. 
West Merrimack, northeast corner of Canal. 
West Merrimack, near in Amoskeag corporation. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Franklin. 
West Merrimack, northwest corner of Elm. 
West Pennacook, northwest corner of Elm. 
West Webster, northwest corner of Elm. 
West Webster, northeast corner of River road. 
Wilson, corner of Lake avenue. 
Young, corner of Elm. 
Young, northwest corner of Beech. 
Young, corner of Maple. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 121 

Young, 96 feet east of R. N. Batchelder's. 
Young, corner of Jewett. 
Young road. 

PISCATAQUOG AND IMCGREGORVILLE. 

A, corner of South Main. 

A, near No. 73. 

A, northwest corner of B. 

Adams, corner of Main. 

Adams, corner of Beauport. 

Amory, corner of Beauport. 

Amory, near Dubuque. 

Amory, corner of Rimmon. 

Bath, corner of River, 

Bath, corner of Shirley. 

Bedford road, near Huntress's. 

Bennington, corner of Main. 

Blaine, corner of Wayne. 

Blaine, corner of Cleveland. 

Blaine, east end of street. 

Bowman, opposite cemetery. 

C, corner of Bedford road. 

Cartier, corner of Sullivan. 

Cartier, corner of Putnam. 

Carroll. 

Cleveland, northwest corner of Second. 

Clinton, corner of Dover. 

Clinton, corner of South Main. 

Conant, corner of Cartier. 

Conant, corner of Dubuque. 

Conant, corner of Rimmon. 

Dartmouth, corner of O'Neil. 

Douglas, corner of Quincy. 

Douglas, corner of Green. 

Douglas, corner of Barr. 

Douglas, corner of West. 

Douglas, corner of Main. 

Douglas, east of Main. 



122 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Ferry, corner of Main. 

Granite, corner of Quincy. 

Granite, corner of Green.* 

Granite, corner of Barr. 

Granite, corner of West. . 

Granite, corner of Dover. 

Granite, corner of Main. 

Granite, corner of Shirley. 

Granite, corner of River. 

Highland, between Wilkins and Mast. 

Kelley, corner of Beauport. 

Kelley, corner of Cartier. 

Kelley, corner of Dubuque. 

Main, near Milford. 

Marion, corner of McGregor. 

Mast, corner of South Main. 

jNIast, corner of Bowman. 

Mast, between Bowman and South Main. 

Mast, opposite J. C. Smith's house. 

Mast, 400 feet west of Charles Hoitt's house. 

Mast, near J. P. Brock's. 

Mast, near the J. N. Prescott house. 

McGregor, near Johnson block. 

McGregor, opposite "Reed " house. 

Milford, southwest corner of South Main. 

Milford, southeast corner of Bowman. 

Milford, corner of old Bedford road. 

Milford, corner of Bismark. 

Patten, corner of Ferry. 

Putnam, corner of Main. 

Putnam, corner of Beauport. 

Putnam, corner of Dubuque. 

Riddle, near Mast. 

School, corner of South Main. 

School, opposite schoolhouse. 

School, corner of River. 

Shirley, northv/est corner of Walker. 



REPORT OF THE FIRE ENGINEER. 123 

Shirley, southwest corner of Ferry. 

Sullivan, corner of Main. 

Sullivan, corner of Beauport. 

Temple, corner of Main. 

Walker, corner of River. 

Walker, corner of Patten. 

Walker, corner of Parker. 

Walker, near corner of South Main. 

Wayne, near G. Belisle's house. 

Wayne, near corner of Beauport. 

Wayne, near corner of Main. 

Wilkins, northwest corner of Highland. 

Wilkins, northwest corner of Mast. 

Wilkins, opposite Tirrell residence. 

Winter, corner of South Main. 

AMOSKEAG. 

Dunbarton road, corner of Front. 

Dunbarton road, near L. D. Colby's. 

Goffstown road, four hydrants. 

Main, at Robinson's slaughter works. 

Main, near brick schoolhouse. 

Main, corner of Goffstown road. 

Main, opposite the John E. Stearns house. 

Main, near the Hiram Stearns house. 

Mill, near paper-mill. 

Mill, corner of Main. 

Varnum, corner of Main. 

In addition to the above, there are five private hydrants that 
are available in case of need : 

Two at P. C. Cheney Co.'s paper-mill. 
One at S. C. Forsaith Co.'s machine shop. 
One at J. Hodge's wood-working establishment. 
One at the A. H. Lowell iron foundry. 
Total number, 477. 



REPORT 



CITY ENGINEER 



City Engineer's Department. 
1892. 



City Engineer. 
WINFRED H. BENNETT 



Assistants. 



Harrie M. Young. 

George W. Wales. 

Harry J. Briggs. 

Edgar E. Farmer. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To His Honor the Mayor, and Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

Sirs, — I have the honor of presenting my seventh annual re- 
port, being the fourteenth annual report of the work in the city 
engineer's department and the several highway districts of the 
city of Manchester, for the year ending December 31, 1892 : 

Expenses of the department for the year 1892 : 



For salary of city engineer .... 


$1,200.00 


salary of assistants ..... 


2,202.80 


supplies for the office .... 


107.86 


additions to office furniture . . . 


58.43 


new team ...... 


302.86 


stakes ....... 


45.00 


horse-shoeing and repairs of wagon and harnes 


3 13-15 


street-car fares . . . . 


.90 


printing reports ..... 


28.00 


express and postage .... 


5-34 


repairing ...... 


14.00 


expenses ...... 


8.92 


books and folios ..... 


43-3° 


drawing paper ...... 


96-35 


printing ....... 


7-5° 


rent of telephone 


25-50 


incidentals ....... 


.70 


Total ....... 


$4,160.61 


Appropriation . . 


4,000.00 


Amount overdrawn . . . . . 


$160.61 



128 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The items for salaries may be divided as follows : 

For giving lines and grades for the extension and 
% construction of streets and sidewalks . . $303.26 

plans and profiles relating to the construction 

of streets and sidewalks .... 253.50 

surveys and levels for the construction of streets 

and sewers ....... 2S2 62 

giving lines and grades for and superintending 

the construction of sewers . . ... 188.50 

plans and profiles relating to the construction 

of sewers ....... 176.30 

surveys, measurements, and plans for the assign- 
ment of street numbers .... 265.74 

making plans for improvements other than 

those mentioned in this account . . . 133.60 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for improvements in Pine Grove ceme- 
tery 88.75 

surveys, levels, and plans, aiso lines and grades 

given for improvements in Valley cemetery . ii-55 

surveys, levels, and plans, also lines and grades 
given for repairing and extending the street 
railway ....... 32.40 

collecting data, classifying accounts, and other 

work in relation to office report . . . 84.98 

plans, notes, etc., relating to Stark park . . 46.30 

survey of Piscataquog river .... i5-02 

ward nine engine-house, plans, specifications, 

and superintendence ..... m-35 

Vine street engine-house, plans, specifications, 

and measurements . . . . . 42.00 

copying records of highways and of streets laid 

0"t 25.75 

indexing plans and notes .... 59 20 

copying index to transit and level books . . 108.94 

checking notes, figures, etc. . . . . 27.51 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 129 

For making plans of streets in city clerk's book of 

records ....... ;g43.42 

plotting sewers in sewer book and on map . 29.40 

locating and putting up street signs . . 57-oo 

preparing and mounting drawing paper for of- 
fice use ....... 29.73 

locating and setting stone bounds . . . 38.86 

office work, preparing notes, data, records, etc. 248.47 

measuring various bridges . . . . 5.40 

plotting sectional maps of city . . . 61.50 

procuring abuttors' names .... 57-o8 

lettering and finishing plans . . . . 70.50 

locating cesspools, manholes, etc. . . . 35-25 

office work, information given engineers and 

others regarding lines, grades, sewers, etc. . 248.02 

notes in relation to Putnam street for county 

commissioners ...... 8.00 

computing areas of land taken for new streets . 60.00 

plans for and attendance upon board of alder- 
men at street hearings .... 32.00 

city farm, measuring well, to verify bill for city 

auditor ....... 2.90 

orders and petitions written for presentation 

to the city government . . . . 16.00 

attendance upon meetings of the committee on 

streets and plans pertaining thereto . . 64.00 

investigating and reporting cases to committee 

on claims . . . . . . . 10.00 

attendance upon meetings of the committee on 
sewers and drains, clerical work, including or- 
ders written ...... 28.00 



Total ^3,402.80 

The following bills, charged to other appropriations, have been 
certified to by this department : 

Balance of G. W. Whitford's bill of 1890 . . ^201.04 



130 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank book for commit- 
tee on sewers and drains 
T. H. Tuson, printing for same committee 
Union Manufacturing Co., street numbers 
Flint & Little, putting up street signs 
Frank Cummings, painting steeet signs . 
Warren Harvey, Maple-street culvert 



$12.25 

5-35 

68.49- 

22.95 

76.00 

3»333-oo 

S3, 719. 08 



Total 

Amount of concrete laid for the city by Charles H. Robie, the 
Charles H. Robie Company, and George F. Higgins, as meas- 
ured by this department, 13,052.38 square yards. 

Expenses for soldiers' monument : 
For water ........ $200.00 

For gas ......... .14 



Total ........ $200.14 

The amount of work done by this department during the year 
is as follows : 

Number of orders for surveys, street lines, and grades 897 

for sewer grades .... 99 

for paving grades ... 55 

for street railway grades . . 3 

for profile levels .... 55 



Total number of orders . . . . 11 09 

Levels for profiles for establishing grades, 54,730 feet, equal to 
10.36 miles. These profiles, having three lines of levels on each 
street, make a total distance actually leveled of 164.190 feet. 

Levels for sewer profiles . . . . . 31584 feet, 

for other center profiles . ' . . . 10,719 " 

in Pine Grove cemetery .... 200 " 

Other levels 7,476 " 



Total levels taken . . . . .186,169 f^^t- 
Equal to 35.26 miles. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



131 



Surveys of streets and street lines 

in Pine Grove cemetery 

in Valley cemetery . 

for street numbers . 
Other surveys 

Total surveys made .... 
Equal to 45.69 miles. 

Street lines marked on ground 

Lines of lots and avenues, Pine Grove cemetery 

of lots and avenues, Valley cemetery 

for street centers 

for gutters 

for curb 

for sewers . 

for street railway 
Other lines .... 

Total length of lines marked on ground 
Equal to 24.69 miles. 

Grades set for sidewalks 

for centers . 

for gutters . 

for curb 

for sewers . 

for street railway tracks 

for building streets 

in Pine Grove cemetery 

in Valley cemetery 
Other grades .... 

Total length of grades set 

Equal to 18.88 miles. 
Profile measurements made . 

Equal to 2.45 miles. 
Lot owners looked up 

Equal to 13.18 miles. 



115,516 fe 


et 


11,410 " 


1,500 " 


34,055 " 


78,790 '' 


241,271 feet. 


56,200 feet. 


12,700 ' 




900 ' 




10,179 ' 




14,431 ' 




4,541 ' 




16,782 ' 




9,200 ' 




5,450 ' 




130,383 feet. 


25,317 feet. 


'1,779 ' 




14,431 ' 




4,541 ' 




16,782 ' 




1,803 ' 




28,655 ' 




4,463 ' 




464 ' 




1,451 ' 




99,686 fe( 


it. 



12,935 feet. 



71,620 feet. 



132 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



BATTERS SET. 

McGregorville, Fulton engine house. 
Maple street, culvert. 

Old lots relaid in Valley cemetery . 

in Pine Grove cemetery . 
New lots laid out in Pine Grove cemetery 

Total cemetery lots laid out 

Street numbers assigned and put on 
replaced 
changed 
assigned but not put on 

Total 

Street signs put on, east side . 
put on, west side 
to be put on, east side 
to be put on, west side 



Total .... 

Number sewer permits granted 

This year, as in previous years, the city engineer has 



5 

28 
117 

175 

512 

280 

92 

66 

950 

74* 
109 

78 
i8i 



1,009 

214 

investi- 
gated all cases where suits were liable to be brought against the 
city, and reported to the committee on claims. 

PLANS AND PROFILES MADE FOR SIDEWALK GRADES. 

B, from Prince to Milford. 

Calef road, from Elm to Webster. Nine plans. 

Canton, from Lake avenue to Auburn. 

Cleveland, from Blaine to Merrimack river. 

Dearborn, from Summer to Taylor. 

Elm east back, from Hanover to Concord. 

Jewett, from Massabesic to Cilley road. Two plans. 

Merrimack, from Beacon to Hanover. 

North, from Elm to River road. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 133 

Second, from Cleveland to Bell. Three plans. 
Wilson road, from Concord to Bridge. 
Woodbury, from Hill to South Main. 
Total plans and profiles, 23. 

SEWER PLANS AND PROFILES. 

A, from Boynton to B. 

Amory, from Beauport to Bennett boulevard. 

Ashland, from Amherst to Concord. 

Barr, from Granite to Conant. 

Bowman, from Mast to A. 

Boynton, from A to McDuffie. 

C, from Boynton to B. 

Carroll, from Milford to Amherst road/ 

Cartier, from Wayne to south of Sullivan. 

Cartier east back, from Amory to Kelley. 

Chandler, from West North to West North north back. 

Chestnut, from Manchester to Amherst. 

Chestnut east back, from Salmon to north of North. 

Conant, from Cartier to west of Quincy. 

Coolidge avenue, from Amory to Kelley. 

Dubuque, from Amory to Putnam. 

Dubuque east back, from Amory to Kelley. 

East High, from Wilson road to Hall. 

Elm west back, from West North north back to Webster. 

Front, from Goffstown road to north of Dunbarton road. Two 

plans. 
Granite, from Green to Winter. 
Green, from Granite to Conant. 
Grove, from Belmont to Taylor. 
Jewett, from Massabesic to Young road. 
Kelley, from Coolidge avenue westerly. 
Lake avenue, from Beacon to Canton. 
Laurel, from Lincoln to Belmont. 
Linden, from Bridge to Pearl. 
Mast, from Bowman to Mast road. 
Morrison, from Pearl to Arlington. 



134 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Orange, from Russell to Belmont. 
Parker, from Winter to M. & N. W. R. R. 
Quincy, from Granite to Conant. 
Riddle, from Milford to Mast. 
Sullivan, from Main to Beauport. 
Third, from School to Blaine. 
Union, from Cedar to Summer. 
Webster, from Union to east of Oak. 
West, from Parker to Conant. 
Weston, from Spruce to Lake avenue. 
West North, from River road to Elm. 
West North north back, from Chandler to Elm west back. 
Wilson road, from Bridge to East High. 
Wilson road, from Bridge to Concord. 
Total sewer plans and profiles, 45. 

NUMBERING PLANS. 

Amory, Dubuque to Bennett boulevard. Two plans. 

B, Prince to Milford. 

Barr, Conant southerly. 

Bell, Second to South Main. Two plans. 

Belmont, Young to Cilley. Three plans. 

Belmont, Bridge to Harrison. Three plans. 

Bridge, Hall to Mammoth road. Three plans. 

Brown avenue, Elm southerly. Four plans. 

Cedar, Lincoln to Spruce. Two plans. 

Cheney place, Elm to Brown avenue. 

Clay, Elm to Porter. Nine plans. 

Colby, West Hancock to Log. 

Conant, Dubuque to Quincy. 

Cypress, Massabesic to Cilley. Four plans. 

Dartmouth, Log to south of Wingate. Three plans. 

Dickey, West- Hancock to South Main. 

Dinsmoor, West Hancock to Piscataquog river. 

Foster avenue. Valley to Young. 

Frederick, Wentworth to South Main. Two plans. 

Front, Mill to Dunbarton road. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 135 

Garland avenue, Taylor to Cypress. 

Gilman, Wentworth to Second. 

Green, Conant southerly. 

Green, Canal to Belmont. Six plans. 

Grove, Canal to Belmont. Six plans. 

Hale, Frederick to Wingate. Two plans. 

Hall, Lake avenue to Cilley. Six plans. 

Hall, Bridge to Harrison. Three plans. 

Harrison, Russell to Belmont. Two plans. 

Harvey, West Hancock to Piscataquog river. 

Harvard, Elm to Porter. Six plans. 

Hevey, Conant to Kelley. Five plans. 

Hill, Frederick to south of Gilman. Two plans. 

Jewett, Massabesic to Cilley. Four plans. 

Kelley, Beauport to M. & N. W. R. R. Seven plans. 

Lincoln, Auburn to Cilley. Five plans. 

Linden, Orange to Gore. Two plans. 

Main, Granite to A. 

Marlborough, Bowman westerly. 

Massabesic, Lake avenue to Mammoth road. Six plans. 

McDuffie, Boynton to Huntress. 

McNeil, West Hancock to Dartmouth. 

Mead, Hall to Belmont. 

Merrill, Elm to Porter. Nine plans. 

Mill, Front easterly. 

Myrtle, Linden to Belmont. Two plans. 

Old Falls road, Belmont to Massabesic. Two plans. 

Orange, Linden to Belmont. Two plans. 

Pearl, Linden to Belmont. Two plans. 

Prescott, Elm to Belmont. Six plans. 

Prince, Boynton to Huntress. 

Prospect, Linden to Belmont. 

Quincy, Conant southerly. 

Second, Mill northerly. 

Second, Cleveland to Bell. Three plans. 

Shasta, Elm to Porter. Ten plans. 

Short, Elm to Belmont. Five plans. 



136 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Silver, Elm to Porter. Nine plans. 

Somerville, Elm to Porter. Nine plans. 

Summer, Canal to Massabesic. Six plans. 

Taylor, Massabesic to Cilley. Five plans. 

Third, Mill to West Salmon. 

Valley, Elm to Massabesic. Nine plans. 

Wayne, Dubuque to Hevey. 

Wentworth, West Hancock to Oilman. Two plans. 

Wheelock, West Hancock to Belknap. Three plans. 

Wilson, Cedar to Cilley. Seven plans. 

Woodbury, Hill to South Main. Two plans. 

Young, Elm to Massabesic. Ten plans. 

, Front easterly. 

Numbering sheets made for new book, 199. 

Total numbering plans made, 427. 

MISCELLANEOUS PLANS. 

Adams, Ray, Union, and Chestnut streets, Phinehas Adams's 
farm. Copy. 

Amory, Essex, and Columbus streets, land owned by J. A. 
Sheehan & Co. Copy. 

Amory, Essex, Congress, and Monitor streets, plan of D. C. 
Whittemore's lots. Copy. 

Amory, Kelley, and Joliet streets, land of J. McGovern, Copy. 

B street, land bought of Fairbanks and Fisher by E. E. Bul- 
lard. Copy. 

Bartlett, Thornton, and Whipple streets, plan of D. C. Whit- 
temore's lots. Copy. 

Boynton street, plan of " Glen wood." Copy. 

Central street, Lake avenue, and James Hall road, land of 
Frederick Allen. Copy. 

Jewett and Cypress streets, land of H. H. Young. Copy. 

Kelley street, plan of Bowman land. Copy. 

Kelley, Amory, Joliet, and Lafayette streets, land owned by 
Sullivan and Sheehan. Copy. 

Lake avenue, Lincoln, Belmont, and Young streets, land of 
Amoskeag company. Copy. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER, * 137 

Mast street, plan of the Head estate. Copy. 

Morgan, Moore, Kimball, and other streets, plan of William 
B. Morgan's lots. Copy. 

Pine Grove cemetery, lots and avenues in northwest corner. 

Sagamore street, land of Upton, Harvey, and Weston. Copy. 

Spring, Bridge, Elm, and Canal streets, Amoskeag company's 
lots. Copy. 

Trenton street. Miss Elizabeth B. Stark's farm. Copy. 

Wilkins street, land of U. A. and E. G. Carswell. Copy. 
Total miscellaneous plans, 19. 

WORKING PLANS. 

Adams, Webster to Clarke. Profile. 
Amory, Main to Coolidge avenue. Center profile. 
Amory, Beauport to edge of bluff. Profile. 
Amory extension, Amory to Bartlett. Profile. 
Amory, Ward 9 engine-house. Thirteen plans. 
Amory, Ward 9 engine-house, detail of date stone. 
Auburn, Elm to Pine east back. Sewer profile. 
Auburn, Pine to Pine east back. Sewer profile. 
Auburn south back, Pine east back to Beech. Two sewer pro- 
files. 

Auburn, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 

Bartlett, Amory extension to south of Sullivan. Profile. 

Bay east back. Sketch showing sewer. 

Beech, Cedar to Nutt road. Profile. 

Bell, Wilson to Belmcnt. Profile. 

Cedar, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 

Cheney place. Elm to Brown avenue. Profile. 

Chestnut, Appleton to Clarke. Center profile for water-works. 

Concord and Nashua. Plan for curbing at William Corey's. 

Coolidge avenue, Amory to Kelley. Center profile. 

Details for curbs for superintendent of streets. 

Dubuque, Amory to Kelley. Profile. 

Dubuque east back, Amory to Kelley. Sewer profile. 

Elm, Manchester to Hanover. Profile. 

Elm, Bridge to Market. Profile. 



138 ' ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Elm, Concord to Lowell. Profile for grades. 

Elm, Stark block section. Plan and grades. 

Franklin, Granite to Auburn. Profile. 

George, Milford northerly. Profile. 

Green, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 

Grove, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 

Hall, Lake avenue to Young. Profile. 

Hall, Young to Clay. Profile. 

Harrison, Russell to Belmont. Profile. 

Harvard, Pine to Belmont. Profile. 

Hevey, Bennett boulevard to Coolidge avenue. Profile. 

High, Ashland to Belmont. Center profile fi^r water-works. 

Jewett, Valley to Cilley road. Plan for locating line. 

Kelley, Beauport to M. & N. W. R. R. Profile. 

Kelley, Coolidge avenue to Dubuque east back. Center profile. 

Lincoln, Lake avenue to Cilley road. Profile. 

Lowell, Wilson road to Belmont. Profile. 

Main, Sullivan to Wayne. Sewer profile. 

Maple, Hanover to Cilley road. Profile. 

Maple street culvert. Plan and sections. 

Mead, Hall to Belmont. Profile. 

Merrill, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 

Pine, Cedar to Auburn. Sewer profile. 

Pine east back. Auburn to Auburn south back. Two sewer 
profiles. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Plan of J. L. Stevens's lot. 

Prospect, Russell to east of Belmont. Profile. 

Prospect, Linden to Derry old line. Center profile for water- 
works. 

Putnam-, Main to west of M. & N. W. R. R. Profile. 

Ray, Webster to Clarke. Profile. 

Silver, Pine to Belmont. Profile. 

Stark park, location of trees for landscape gardeners. 

Summer, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 

Three-horse hitch. Plans and sections. 

Union, Young to Auburn. Profile. 

Valley cemetery, plan of Olzendam's lot for F. S. Bodwell. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 139 

Valley, Elm to Massabesic. Center profile. 
Wilson, Young to Clay. Profile. 
Wilson road. Bridge to East High. Sewer profile. 
Young, Wilson to Belmont. Profile. 
Total working plans, 77. 

TRACINGS. 

Amory, Ward 9 engine-house. Thirteen plans. 

Amory, Ward 9 engine-house. Part of basement. 

Auburn, Canton to James Hall road. For road hearing. 

Belmont, Lincoln, Shasta, and Valley. Square showing lots. 

Belmont and Summer. Dr. Parsons's lot. 

Boynton, " Glenwood " section. 

Bremer. Amoskeag Company's profile. 

Brown avenue, Baker southerly. 

Cemetery brook. Pine to Beech. For Inspector O'Dowd. 

Central, James Hall road and Lake avenue. Land of Freder- 
ick Allen. 

Coolidge avenue, west of Amoskeag Company's lots. 

Elm, Stark block section. Plan and grades for architect. 

Jewett and Young. Schoolhouse lot, location of trees. 

Kelley, Amory, Joliet, and Lafayette. Land of Sullivan and 
Sheehan. 

Lincoln, Belmont, Lake avenue and Young. Land of Elliot 
Manufacturing Company. 

Maple street culvert. Plan and section. 

Mitchell, Calef to River road. For road hearing. 

New Hampshire Improvement Company's land, showing 
grades. 

Pine Grove cemetery. Heath lot curbing. 

Pine Grove cemetery, plan of J. L. Stevens's lot. 

Pine Grove cemetery, part of Landscape lawn. 

Pine Grove cemetery, Swedish section. Three plans. 

Pine Grove cemetery, section north of Swede lot. Three 
plans. 

Second, at Piscataquog river. 

Second, Cleveland to West Hancock. 



140 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Stark park, location of trees. 
Stevens, Baker southerly. For road hearing. 
Three-horse hitch. Plans and sections. 
Trenton, farm of Miss Elizabeth B. Stark. 
Ward 5, location of. 
Ward 9, location of. 

West Manchester, Amoskeag Company's plan. 
Wilkins, land of U. A. and E. G. Carswell. 
Total tracings, 50. 

BLUE PRINTS. 

Amory, Ward 9 engine-house. Twenty-six plans. 

Canal, Granite to Pleasant. Location. 

Hall, Lake avenue to Central. Street railway tracks. 

Massabesic, street railway turnout. 

Milford, land of Brooks, Brock, and Brooks. 

Second, Cleveland to West Hancock. Two plans. 

Second, M. & N. W. R. R. to West Hancock. Two plans. 

Second, at Piscataquog river. 

Three-horse hitcli. Two plans. 

Trenton, land of Miss Elizabeth B. Stark. 

Ward 5, location of. 

Total blue prints, 39. 

MAPS. 

McGregorville, showing lots from Merrimack river to town 
line and from Wayne street to Goffstown road.' 

West Manchester, property map, including section from Mer- 
rimack river to town line and from Mast to Adams street. 

West Manchester, sewer map, additional sections and changes. 
Total maps, 3. 

Forty-three plans of streets laid out have been copied in the 
city clerk's book of records. 

Total of all plans made, 726. 

Twelve plans are under way which will be completed during 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 141 

the year. Twenty-three miscellaneous plans have been lettered 
and finished. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on laid oi:t streets, 
62,763 feet. 

Plans made for the establishment of grade on streets not laid 
out, 18,704 feet. 

Total, 81,467 feet, equal to 15.43 miles. 



142 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Adams 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Ashland 

Belmont 

Bridge 

Wilson road 

Wilson road 

Central 

Central 

Central 

Elm west back 

Grove 

Hall 

Central 

High, East 

High, East 

Jewett 

Lake ave 

Lake ave 

Laurel 

Linden 

Lowell south back. 

Massabesic 

Morrison 

Morrison 

Orange. 

Pearl 

Webster 

Webster 

Wilson road 



Totals. 



Location. 



•From Appleton northerlv 

West of Union westerly 

West of Union westerly 

From Concord southerly 

From south of Lowell to High. 

Easterly to Wilson road 

Bridge to East High 

Bridge to East High 

From Franklin easterly 

From Franklin easterly 

From Franklin easterly 

From Bridge southerly 

From Belmont easterl j' 

Spruce to Central 

From Hall east and west 

Wilson i-oad to Ashland 

Wilson road to Ashland 

Massabesic southerly 

Hall to Belmont 

Hall to Belmont , 

West of Wilson westerly 

From Arlington northerly 

From Chestnut easterly 

Cypress to Jewett 

Pearl to Arlington 

Pearl to Arlington 

East of Linden , 

Easterly to Morrison 

Union to Walnut , 

Union to Walnut 

From Lowell southerly 



Material. 



Portland 
Akron — 
Portland 



Akron. . . . 
Brick . . . . 
Portland . 

Iron 

Akron.... 
Portland 



Akron. 



Portland 



Akron.. . 
Portland 



Akron — 
Portland 

Akron 

Portland 



Akron. 



Portland 
Aliron.. .. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 
IN 1892. — EAST SIDE. 



143 



Size in 
inches. 


Length in 
feet, new. 


Length in 
ft., relaid. 


Man- 
holes. 


Lamp- 
holes. 


Y 

branches. 


Total cost. 


Cost 
per ft. 


10 


213 

80 

6 

200 

548 




I 
1 







'S 
3 


$379.59 

1 100.37 

24S.30 

809.11 

1 
1 
y 1,475.28 

1 
J 

1 

}■ 1,025.50 

1 
J 

374.49 
440.94 

1 1,432 42 

1 599.76 

1,450.94 

1 396.78 

214.86 

228.24 

74.51 

3,676 35 

1 375.67 

202.86 
395.70 

( 430.01 

157.62 


$1,782 


10 




10 




1.167 


10 


2 
32 


2 
2 

1 
1 




7 
22 


1.242 
1.471 


10 
24x36 


1 


15 


373 
12 


........ 




13 


3.538 


14 






20 


4 

198 

16 


2 








20 






11 


4.704 


16 


165 

491 
538 . 




12 


2 

1 
2 






7 
19 
15 


2.269 


12 




.898 


24 






10 


55 


2.662 


12 


200 
304 
650 
293 

61 
255 
167 

44 
483 
108 
202 
153 
222 

64 
291 

99 


1 




11 

20 
10 

2 
12 

6 

1 
13 

3 

7- 

4 

9 

2 

6 
5 




10 




1.190 


15 




1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


1 
1 


2.232 


12 






12 




1.121 


8 




.843 


10 
10 




1.366 
1.693 


20 




2 


7.611 


10 






10 
10 






1 
1 


1.211 
1 326 


10 




1 


1.783 


15 






15 




1 
1 




1 


1.211 


10 




1.592 










6,222 


307 


26 


6 


323 


$14,489.30 









144 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SEWERS BUILT 



Street. 



A 

Amory. ... 

Amory 

Bath 

Beauport . 

Blaine 

Blaine — 
Bowman. 



Caitier 

Caitier 

Cartier 

Putnam 

Cartier east back... 
Cooiitlge avenue — 
Coolidge avenue — 

Kelley 

Dubuque east back . 

Gi'anite 

Main 

Main 

Main 

Main 

Main 

Boynton 

Sullivan , 

Third 

Third 

Third 

Third 

Totals 



Location. 



Main to B 

Main to B 

Main to B 

Main to Coolidge avenue 

Dubuque to Rimmon 

From Second westerly 

From Schuyler northerly 

Third to Cleveland 

Third to Cleveland 

A to Milford 

Boynton to B 

Boynton to B 

Boynton to B 

Wayne to south of Sullivan 

Wayne to south of Sullivan 

Wayne to south of Sullivan 

From Cartier westerly 

From Kelley southerly 

From Amory northerly 

Northerly to Kelley 

Beauport to Dubuque east back. 

From Kelley southerly 

From Winter northerly 

Sullivan to Wayne 

Sullivan to Wayne 

Wayne to Amory 

South of Milford to A 

South of Milford to A 

A to C 

From Main westerly 

Piscataquog river to Cleveland. 
Piscataqnog river to Cleveland. 

Cleveland to Blaine 

Ferry to.Ferry south back 



Material. 



Altron . . . 
Portland . 



Akron 

Portland. 



Akron.... 
Portland . 



Akron — 
Portland . 



Brick . . . . 
Portland. 



Akron — 
Portland . 
Akron.. .. 
Portland. 

Iron 

Portland. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



145 



IN 1892. — WEST SIDE. 



Size in 
inches. 


Lengtli in 
feet, new. 


Length in 
ft., relaid. 


Man- 
holes. 


Lamp- 
holes. 


Y 

branches. 


Total cost. 


Cost 
per ft. 


12 


112 

29 
666 
135 
270 
137 
332 
435 
200 
545 
540 

48 

39 
740 

60 
430 

31 
.548 
575 
160 
414 
557 
174 








3 


y $929.65 

281, 8U 
394.69 
129.09 
293.45 

1 1,460.53 

490.05 

648.83 
J- 1,633.49 

1 

J • 

801.11 
416.89 

1 1,491.48 

839.12 
116.45 

}■ 6,937.26 
J 

1 

;■ 1, .556. 07 

J 

249.38 

y 702.94 

166.47 




12 




1 
2 

1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
2 

1 




$1,152 


10 






33 


20 




2.088 
1.461 

.942 

.884 

2.300 


12 




1 

1 


6 
6 
12 
16 
6 
23 
24 


10 




10 




12 
10 




10 




1.899 


12 




12 




1.035 


10 




1 
3 




3 

30 


12 






12 






10 




1 


1 


17 

2 

20 


1.328 


12 






10 




] 
2 

1 

2 

1 


1 


1.462 
7*^5 


20 




20 










20 






9 
21 
10 

33 

21 


2.598 


10 




1 603 


10 




.669 


24x36 


Ill 

877 
486 


24 




4 
2 




4.706 


24 




15 


40 
623 

381 
207 
80 
12 
243 
175 




15 




2 
2 
1 


1 


27 

14 

6 




15 






10 




1.204 


15 




12 








2 098 


12 




2 
1 




9 
4 




10 




.951 




8,938 


1,474 


40 


5 


359 


$19,592.75 









10 



146 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

PIPE REMOVED WHERE NEW SEWERS HAVE BEEN BUILT. 



Street. 


Location. 


Material 


Size in Length 
inclies. | in feet 




From Wilson road westerly. 

From Franklin easterly 

At Hall 


Akron . 


10 S'> 




15 
10 
15 
12 


202 


Central 


55 




Sullivan to Putnam 


430 


Main 


Putnam to Amory..* 


1,044 






1 76.3 









SUMMARY OF SEWERS BUILT IN 1 89 2. 

Total 24x36 inches, brick . 
24-inch Portland pipe 
20-inch Akron pipe . 
20-inch Portland pipe 
1 5 -inch Akron pipe . 
1 5 -inch Portland pipe 
14-inch iron pipe 
12-inch Akron pipe . 
12-inch Portland pipe 
1 2 -inch iron pipe 
J 10-inch Akron pipe . 
lo-inch Portland pipe 
S-inch Portland pipe . 
1 5 -inch pipe, cesspools, and connections 
12-inch pipe, cesspools, and connections 
lo-inch pipe, cesspools and connections 
8-inch pipe, cesspools, and connections 



143 feet 
1,901 

4 

1.965 
687 

1,831 

12 
1,684 
2,034 

12 
1,612 

4,799 

255 
40 

140 

978 
1,521 



19,618 feet. 



Total sewers built in 1892 
Equal to 3.71 miles. 

Following is the total amount of sewerage in the city January 
I, 1892 : 

8-inch Akron pipe ...... 7,113 feet. 

10-inch Akron pipe ...... 43,943 " 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



147 



1 2-inch Akron pipe 
15-inch Akron pipe 
18-inch Akron pipe 
20-inch Akron pipe 
24-inch Akron pipe 

Total Akron pipe 

Equal to 26.548 miles. 

8-inch Portland pipe, old '. 
12-inch Portland pipe, old . 
18-inch Portland pipe, old" , 

Total Portland pipe, old 

Equal to 0.919 miles. 

lo-inch Portland pipe, new . 
12-inch Portland pipe, new. 
15-inch Portland pipe, new. 
20-inch Portland pipe, new . 
24-inch Portland pipe, new . 

Total Portland pipe, new 

Equal to 2.956 miles. 

9-inch cement pipe . 
12-inch cement pipe . 
15-inch cement pipe . 
18-inch cement pipe . 
24-inch cement pipe . 
16 X 24 inches, cement pipe 

Total cement pipe 

Equal to 7.818 miles. 

10- inch earthen pipe . 
12-inch earthen pipe . 

Total earthen pipe . 
Equal to 0.704 miles. 



60,350 


feet 


i5>562 


iC 


3.652 


(( 


6,007 


ii 


3>548 


a 


140,175 


feet 


90 


feet 


3^990 


n 


770 


i i 



4,850 feet. 



6,043 


feet 


2,174 


(( 


1,831 


a 


2,300 


i { 


3,264 


(C 


15,612 


feet 


15,861 


feet 


21,629 


IS 


490 


it 


860 


it 


735 


ft 


1,697 


it 


41,272 


feet 


1,175 


feet 


2,545 


(C 



3,720 feet. 



148 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



1 8-inch brick sewers 
24-inch brick sewers 
29-inch brick sewers 
36-inch brick sewers 
42-inch brick sewers 
44-inch brick sewers 
57-inch brick sewers 
17 X 26 inches, brick sewers 
20 X 30 inches, brick sewers 
22 X 33 inches, brick sewers 
24 X 36 inches, l^rick sewers 
26 X 39 inches, brick sewers 
2914^ X 44 inches, brick sewers 
30 X 46 inches, brick sewers 
32 X 48 inches, brick sewers 
40 X 44 inches, brick sewers 

Total brick sewers 
Equal to 6.962 miles. 



12-inch 



14-inch iron pipe 



iron pipe 



20-inch 
24-inch 



ron pipe 
ron pipe 



5,725 feet 

3,187 
1,600 

545 
446 

1,195 

1,400 
1,506 
1,197 

387 
9,097 

514 

4,53° 
1,360 

3,279 
790 



36,758 


feet 


24 


feet 


24 


iC 


62 


il 


12 


u 


277>^ 


11 



36-inch iron pipe 

Total iron pipe ..... 399/'2 feeL 

Equal to 0.075 I'^^iles. 
48-inch steel pipe . . . . . . 312 feeL 

Equal to 0.052 miles. 
Total in all sewers ...... 243,108^ feet. 

Equal to 46.043 miles. 

The following shows the amount of concrete laid for the city 
in 1892, by Charles H. Robie and the Charles H. Robie Com- 
pany. The measurements relating thereto have been made bj 
this department and rendered as vouchers for the same. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



149 



STREET CROSSINGS, 





Sq. j'ds. Price pr. yd. 


Total cost. 


Amory, at Main, 2 . 


56.80 ^0 


•75 


^42.60 


Arlington, at Russell 


29.77 


•75 


22.33 


Blodget, at Chestnut, 2 


64.00 


75 


48.00 


Blodget, at Pine, 3 . 


85.77 


75 


64.32 


Blodget, at Union 


32.00 


•75 


24.00 


Blodget south back, at Union 


17.77 


75 


^3-33 


Central, at Franklin, 2 


63.00 


75 


47-2$ 


Concord, at Maple, 4 


105.28 


75 


78.96 


Depot, near city yard 


21.00 


•37 


7-77 


Douglas, at West 


21.30 


75 


15.98 


Elm west back, at Pleasant 


17.77 


37 


6-57 


Ferry, at Second 


44.40 


75 


33-33 


Granite, south of city yard 


32.90 


37 


12.17 


Hanover, at Hall 


39.10 


75 


29.32 


Lake avenue, at Elm east back 


17.77 


37 


6.55 


Lake avenue, at Wilson 


52-44 


75 


33'33 


Lowell, at Union east back 


15-50 


37>^ 


5.81 


Manchester, at Hall, 2 


30.00 


75 


22.50 


Marion, at Main 


28.40 


75 


21.30 


Marion, at Main 


28.40 


37 


10.50 


McGregor west back, at Marion 


17-50 


75 


13.12 


Merrimack, at Wilson 


21-33 


75 


16.00 


North, at Pme east back . 


^3-33 


75 


10.00 


Orange, at Linden . 


30.22 


75 


22.66 


Pennacook, at Pine . 


17.77 


75 


13-32 


Pleasant, at Franklin 


25.70 


37 


9-51 


School, at Third 


31.10 


75 


23-32 


Valley, at Cypress, 3 


92.88 


75 


69.66 


Walnut, at Gore 


32.00 


75 


24.00 


Wayne, at Main, 2 . 


57.60 


37 


21.30 


Webster, at Bay 


30.22 


75 


22.66 


Totals . . . . 


1,172.95 


$791-47 



150 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SIDEWALKS. 

Sq. yds. Price pr. yd. Total cost. 
Depot, at city yard . . . $64.22 $0.25 $16.05 
Dover, at Granite . . . 70.70 .35 24.74 
Elm, north of Concord . . 33-33 -45 i4'99 
Franklin and Merrimack . . 543-00 .25 ^35-75 
Granite, at city yard . . 187.50 .25 46.88 
Hanover and Union, ^ of bill . 188.65 .25 23.58 
Hanover and Union, ^ of bill . 309.83 .45 69.71 
Hanover square . . . 166.20 .45 74-79 
Lake avenue, at schoolhouse . 84.35 -25 21.09 
Merrimack, at Perry A. Eaton's 28.00 .45 12.60 
Nashua, at No. 28, ^ of bill . 31-00 .30 4.65 
Nashua and Maple, at hose-house 277.55 -^5 69.38 
Pine, at Pennacook, Mr. Brooks 73- 16 .45 32.92 
Pine, at Blodget, Mr. Cheney's 71.33 -45 32.10 
South Main, at Gordon Wood- 
bury's 73.90 .50 36.95 



Totals .... 2,202.72 $616.18 

ROADWAYS. 

Sq. yds. Price per yd. Total cost. 

Hanover, Union to Beech . 1,409.90 $0.75 $1,057.43 

Main, at Granite . . . 28.10 .37 10.40 

Maple, Merrimack to Central . 1,788.40 .75 1,341.30 

South Elm, at railroad bridge . 150.66 .50 75-33 

Union, Hanover to Amherst . 946.51 .75 709.88 

Union, Amherst to Concord . 1,170.17 i.oo 1,170.17 

West, Douglas northerly . . 331.44 -75 248.58 



Totals .... 5,825.18 $4,613.09 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Sq. yds. Price pr. yd. Total cost. 
Belmont, driveway at Geo. W. 

Rief's 8.66 $0.37 $3.20 

Lake ave., at engine-house . 99.00 .45 44-55 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



151 



Lake ave., at ward-room . 
Maple and Myrtle, gutters at J. 

A. Weston's, one half of bill 
Maple, at hose-house 
Pine Grove cemetery, roadway 
Tremont square 
Union, at Mrs. Wallace's 
Webster street, schoolhouse 
Webster street, schoolhouse 

Totals .... 



Sq. yds. Price pr. yd. Total cost. 
18.33 ^o-45 ^8.25 



I97-50 


75 


74.09 


132.20 


•25 


33-05 


1,117.20 


•65 


726.18 


3°-33 


45 


13-65 


12.33 


•45 


5-55 


339-92 


45 


152.96 


76.48 


25 


19.12 



2,031.95 



$i,oSo.6o 



The following table shows the amount of concrete laid for the 
city in 1892 by George F. Higgins. The measurements relat- 
ing thereto have been made by this department and rendered as 
vouchers for the same. • 



STREET CROSSINGS. 





Sq. yds. 


Price pr. yd. 


Total cost. 


Amory, at Cartier . 


33-77 


^0.75 


$25.33 


Cartier east back, at Amory 


17.77 


•75 


^3-33 


Central, at Milton . 


26.66 


•75 


20.00 


Central, at Hall 


33-77 


•75 


25-33 


Chestnut, at Lowell south bad 


'- 17-77 


•75 


^3-33 


Chestnut, at North . 


38.33 


-75 


28.75 


Chestnut east back, at North . 


18.22 


•75 


13.67 


Elm, north of Washington, 2 


75-50 


1.50 


113.24 


Elm, south of Bridge 


75-50 


•75 


56.62 


Elm, at North, 2 


16S.60 


•75 


127.99 


Elm east back, at Pearl . 


17.77 


•75 


13^33 


Elm west back, at Bridge . 


26.60 


-75 


19^95 


Elm avenue, at Elm 


25-50 


•75 


19. T2 


Kidder court, at Elm 


35-97 


•75 


26.98 


Lake ave., at Chestnut west bad 


: 24.44 


-75 • 


18.33 


Lowell south back, at Pine 


20.00 


•75 


15.00 


Maple, at Amherst, 2 


72.47 


•75 


54-36 


Orange, at Elm east back . 


26.66 


-75 


20.00 



152 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Sq. yds. Price pr. yd. Total cost. 

Pearl, at Russell, 4 . . . 141-15 ^o-75 $105-86 

Pleasant, at Franklin, 2 . . 83.10 .75 62.32 



Sagamore, at Pine, 4 


. 


163.31 


•75 


122.48 


Sullivan, at Beauport 




33-7° 


•75 


25.26 


Union, at Pennacook 


. 


30.20 


•75 


22.65 


Totals . 


1,206.76 


$9^3-23 




MISCELLANEOUS. 










Sq. yds. 


Price pr. yd. 


Total cost. 


Franklin street, schoolhouse 


283.52 


$0.33 


$93-56 


Main street, schoolhouse . 


136.61 


•45 


61.47 


North, at Elm 




4.20 


•45 


1.89 


Pearl, at Nos. 28-42, 


72 of bill 


45-63 


•45 


10.26 


South Manchester, schoolhouse 


69.36 


•45 


31.21 


West Webster, at new 


depot 


73-5° 


•75 


55-12 



Totals .... 612.82 $253.51 

SUMMARY. 

Concrete laid by Chas H. Robie and the Chas. H. Robie Co. 

Crossings .... 1,172.95 

Sidewalks . . . . 2,202.72 

Roadways .... 5,825.18 

Miscellaneous . . . 2,031.95 



q. 


yds. 


$791-47 


u 


a 


616.18 


u 


CI 


4,613.09 


u 


u 


1,080.60 



Totals . . . 11,232.80 sq. yds. ^7,101.34 

Concrete laid by Geo. F. Higgitis. 

Crossings .... 1,206.76 sq. yds. ^963.23 

Miscellaneous . . . 612.82 " " 253.51 



Totals . • . . 1,819.58 sq. yds. $1,216.74 

Total concrete laid by the city, 13,052.38 sq. yds., $8,318.08. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENtJINEER. 



153 



BRIDGES. 



The following table gives the dimensions, material, and num- 
ber of spans of the various bridges within the city limits. 



Amoskeag 

Bridge street, at canal 

Bridge st., McGregor and approaches 

Cohas avenue, at Great Cohas 

Derry road, at Great Cohas 

Derry road, near Cohas avenue 

Derry road, near town line 

Dunbarton read, Black brook 

Elm street, at railroad 

Front street, Black br ^ok 

Granite street, at canal 

Granite street, at river 

Harvey road, at Great Cohas 

Island Pond road, outlet to lake 

Main street, at Piscataquog river 

Mammotli road, at Great Cohas 

Mammoth road, near town line 

Mill road, at Harvey's mill 

Parker street, at railroad 

River road, at Goffe's Falls 

River road, at Little Cohas 

River road, below James Cheney's. .. 

South road 

Webster road, at water-works dam.. . 
Weston road, east of D. Connor's 



Length 

in 
feet. 



Width 

of 

roadway 



No. of 
walks. 



7C5.5 

57 
1,085 

36 

38 

20 

21 

25 

89 

16.5 

56.3 
465.7 

32 

41 

70 5 

38 

14 

59 

53 

30 

16 

6 

12 
100 



20 

22.5 

24 

30.5 

20 

17 

20.5 

17.5 

29.5 

33 

37.3 

26 

21 

16.7 

20.8 

IS 

20 

20.5 

24 

30 

20 

16 

22 

17.5 

16 



Width 

of Material, 
walks. ; 



5.5 



4.5 







1 








2 

























Wood. 
Iron. 



Stone. 
Wood. 



Iron. 
Wood. 



Iron. 
Wood. 



Arch- 
es or 
spans. 

3 
1 
3 



Stone bridges, 1 ; iron, 4; wood, 20; total, 25. 



154 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
NEW HIGHWAYS LAID OUT IN 1892. 



Street. 



Location. 



Aclains . . 

Amory extension 

Auburn j 

Auburn ' 

B 

B 

Bartlett... 

Bell 

Bennett boul 

Blaine 

Brown ave* i 

Brown ave* . . . . 

Campbell 

Canal 

Canton 

Cedar 

Central 

Central so'th back 

Cbestnut* 

Cleveland 

Conant 

Cypress 

Dearborn 

Dubuque 

Gilman 

Gllman 

Glenwood ave — 

Hall 

Hall 

Hampton 

Hampton 

Hampton 

Harrison 

Harvard 

Hevey '. 

Highi'ndPark ave 

Liberty 

Lincoln 

Linden 

Longwood ave... 

Mitchell 

Mystic ave 

Oakland ave 

Orchard ave 

Revere ave 

Riramon 

Silver 

Somei'ville 

Stevens 

Summer 

Summer 

Trenton 

Union 

Walnut 

Wayland ave — 

Wilkins ;.... 

Wilson 

Woodbine ave . . . 
Woodland ave . . . 

Young 

Young 



Appleton to Clarke 

Amory to Bartlett 

Wilson easterly 

Belmont westerly 

Prince to C 

A to Milford 

Amory extension to Putnam 

Wilson easterly 

Cartier to Amory 

Second to Hiram ; 

Baker to Hancock 

Baker southerly 

Union to Ash 

82 ft. north of Pleasant to Granite. 

Spruce to Auburn 

Wilson to east of Hall 

James Hall road westerly 

AVilsonto Hall 

Hanover to Amherst 

Blaine to Merrimack river 

West to Dubuque 

Lake avenue to Auburn 

Summer to Taylor 

Conant northerly 

Wilson to east of Hall 

Belmont westerly 

Mammoth road to J. Cronin's 

Spruce to Bell 

Young street to Young road 

Wilson to east of Hall 

Belmont westerly 

Taylor westerlj' 

Russell to Belmont 

Union to Maple 

Kelley to Bennett boulevard 

Candia i-oad to Glenwood ave 

North, southerly 

Cedar to Shasta 

Prospect to Harrison 

Mammoth road to Woodbine ave. 

Brown ave. to Calef road 

Candia road northerly 

A. W. Palmer's to J. Cronin's . 

Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

310 ft. north of Wayne to 210 ft 

south of Wayne 

Union to Maple 

Union to Hall 

Baker southerly 

Wilson easterly 

Belmont westerly 

Elm to Union 

Auburn to Nutt road 

Salmon to Webster 

Mammoth road to Revere ave 

Rockland ave. to Bedford line 

North line of C. & P. R. R. to Clay. 

Candia road to C. & P. R. R 

C. & P. R. R. to James Dearborn's 

Wilson to Hall 

Mason to Mammoth road 

Central to Pleasant 



When 
laid out. 



July 26. 
July 26. 
Aug. 15. 
Aug. 15. 
Jan. 15. 
Jan. 15 
July 26. 
Aug. 15. 
Jlay 20. 
May 20. 
June 27. 
July 6. 
Sept. 26. 
Jan. 15. 
Oct. 25. 
Aug. 15. 
July 6. 
June 7. 
July ' 5. 
May 20. 
Oct. 25. 
Dec. '28. 
May 20. 
May 20. 
Aug. 15. 
Sept. 9. 
Dec. 28. 
Aug. 15. 
July 6. 
Aug. 15. 
Sept. 9. 
Dec. 28. 
Oct. 25. 
June 7. 
July 6. 
Dec. 28. 
April 26. 
May 20, 
Oct. 25. 
Dec. 28. 
Nov. 28. 
Dec. 28. 
Dec. 28. 
Dec. 28. 
Dec. 28. 

Sept. 26. 
June 7. 
May 20. 
Nov. 28. 
Aug. 15. 
Sept. 9. 
May 20. 
Oct. 25. 
May. 20. 
Dec. 28. 
July 6. 
July 26. 
Dec. 28. 
Dec. 28. 
July 6. 
May 20. 
June 7. 



Width 
in feet. 



50 
50 
50 
50 
40 
40 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

40 
50 
40 
20 
&3 
40 
50 
50 
40 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
46 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
40 
50 
50 
40 
50 
50 
50 



* Widening. 



t Distances as given on petition. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 155 



SUBURBAN HIGHWAYS. 

The matter of defining and establishing the boundary lines of 
the suburban highways still remains unsettled. Each succeeding 
year is making it more difficult to retrace and relocate old points, 
and it is but a question of tniie when they will be entirely de- 
stroyed, and the correct lines become a doubtful quantity. On 
many of the roads the abuttors are constantly encroaching upon 
city land, thoughtlessly, perhaps, but still with each successive 
improvement taking in more and more of the highway. Jt has 
been the aim of this department to secure what data could be 
had in relation to these roads, and mark the lines as fast as pos- 
sible, but regular work has prevented any systematic attempt to 
straighten matters out. This is a very important item, and should 
receive immediate attention by providing means for a complete 
survey of all the outlying roads while the points still remain. 

It hardly seems good judgment, in view of the rapid growth of 
the city and the constantly increasing traffic, to narrow a four- 
rod road to a fifty foot street whenever the bounds are estab- 
lished. This has been done in the past, but should not be the 
future policy. 

STREETS. 

The same may be said this year as has been said in previous 
reports in regard to laying out streets twenty-five, thirty, or thir- 
ty-five feet wide. This evil still exists, and will continue to exist 
so long as there are land-owners who care for nothing but to sell 
every inch of land possible, regardless of whether the adjoining 
streets are of sufficient width to accommodate traffic or not. We 
have streets in the city dignified by the name of avenues where 
it is impossible to turn a truck team or dray without running 
upon the sidewalks. This method of dividing land is advanta- 
geous to property owners, but scarcely in keeping with modern 
ideas. 

There are those, however, who keep abreast of the times, and 
recognizing the necessity of broad thoroughfares, have divided 
their property accordingly. It would be better for the appear- 
ance of the city if there were more of them. 



156 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There is an urgent need of some action being taken looking to 
regularity in setting apart land for streets, either by an ordinance 
or by the appointment of a commission for that purpose. As it 
is now, each land-owner can put a street where he pleases, re-- 
gardless of how it compares with those adjoining as to direction 
or distance therefrom. By preparing a plan showing the loca- 
tion of proposed streets, and compelling land-owners to adhere 
to it, the city would be rid of the interminable jumble of streets, 
lanes, and alleys running in all directions, confusing to a stranger 
and detracting greatly from the beauty of the city and the effi- 
ciency of the highways as means of communication. 

It is time this matter received serious attention, as each year 
sees a material growth of the city in the outlying districts, and a 
consequent addition of numerous narrow, crooked, and almost 
useless highways, called by the high-sounding name of avenues, 
which are but monuments to some one's cupidity and avarice. 

Building new streets that have been laid out is quite an impor- 
tant matter, and one requiring the exercise of good judgment. 
The idea is not how many yards can be built, but how much can 
be built to last. It may not show up so well to an unthinking 
person, but it is more than folly to half do the work, and then 
have to go over it the next year and each succeeding year. Far 
better build one yard that will stand than ten that it is impossi- 
ble to haul a heavy load over. 

The practice in many cities is for the property owner who de- 
sires a street through his land, to build it to an established grade 
before the city will accept it. They also require the land to be 
given to, instead of being purchased by, the city, sometimes at 
exorbitant rates. They argue that as the owner derives the ben- 
efit through the increased valuation of his land, it is for his inter- 
est to do so. 

Manchester is considerably behind the times in these two im- 
portant features of economical city administration. 

SEWERS. 

Under the present system it is impossible to construct all the 
sewers asked for each year, and the committee have followed out 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 157 

the policy of building those there seemed to be the greatest need 
of. Under their direction considerable progress has been made 
along the line of improvement. As soon as the right can be ac- 
quired from the legislature to issue bonds, the extensions will be 
pushed more rapidly. 

The new ordinances adopted by the city councils relating to 
sewers and sewer entering, have worked satisfactorily, the plumb- 
ers readily falling into the, new order of things. Entrances 
are now required to be made by a Y branch, and breaking into 
a piece of pipe is strictly prohibited. The city furnishes the Y 
branch free of charge, and the plumber is required to remove a 
length of pipe to admit it. That part of the ordinance requiring 
a return to be made to this department of all connections made 
has not been wholly lived up to, as out of 214 sewer permits 
issued but 89 returns have been received. 

A detailed statement of the work done during the year is given 
in the following report, prepared by the city engineer, as clerk 
of the committee on sewers and drains : 

Manchester, N. H., December 30, 1892. 
Gentlemen of the City Councils : 

The committee appointed by your honorable board to super- 
intend the construction and repairs of sewers and drains would 
submit the following report of their doings for the present year. 

At the opening of the season there were twenty-seven orders 
for sewers, already voted in but not built ; of these, fifteen have 
been completed. During the year thirty-three orders have re- 
ceived favorable action, and out of this number, eighteen sewers 
have been built. At the present time there are orders for twenty- 
seven sewers which have passed your board but which have not 
been constructed. 

The committee has held nine meetings and considered for- 
ty-eight petitions. Of this number, thirty-three have been act- 
ed favorably upon, and the report and an order recommending 
their construction have been presented your board. The remain- 
ing fifteen were given leave to withdraw. 

The most important sewer constructed during the year on this 
side of the river has been the Massabesic-street main. Consider- 



158 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

able talk has been indulged in by residents of that locality and 
others as to the reason for laying the pipe to such a depth. 

This sewer is designed to be the main for that section and, 
when completed, will extend to the Mammoth road, draining 
about three hundred acres east of Jewett street. The major por- 
tion of this is very low and flat, particularly so along Porter 
street, where a sub-main is designed to be laid. In order to ob- 
tain the necessary grade and still be low enough to properly drain 
the entire section, the depth aforesaid was a necessity. As there 
are but few houses at present east of Jewett street the committee 
deemed it advisable to raise the grade so as to clear the ledge 
and lay a temporary sewer to care for the houses on Jewett street. 

On the west side, the South Main-street main has been com- 
pleted to C street, with laterals on A and C streets. The North 
Main-street main has been relaid to Amory street, with sub-mains 
on Amory street, Coolidge avenue, and Kelley street, draining 
that section of McGregorville. 

By an arrangement with the Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany the excavating and back filling were done by their work- 
men, the only expense to the city being the cost of the pipe and 
laying, and the services of the engineer. 

The following table shows the different sewers built, their 
length, cost, and the cost per foot to build the same. 

(See table of new sewers built.) 

The average cost per foot in District No. 2 has been ^2.22, 
while that in District No. 10 has been but ^1.88. This differ- 
ence is due to the nature of the soil on the west side. The great- 
er part of the sewer excavation was through sand, easily worked 
but still firm enough to stand with but slight bracing. On this 
side nearly all the sewers were laid through a kind of clayey 
gravel, quite difficult to remove without considerable exertion. 

The average cost per foot in 1891 was ^2.50. 

In the 16,941 feet of sewers there were built 66 manholes and 
1 1 lampholes ; 74 cesspool connections were put in besides the 
Y branches for 508 house connections. 

There have been loi cesspools built, at a cost of ^2,806, and 
60 repaired, at a cost of $387.43. 

The cost of repairs on sewers has been $229.82. 



THE REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



159 



From the monthly pay-roll the following shows how the cost 
has been divided : 



cc m oi CO 

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C-l CO O 00 t' 






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M -^ -* 



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160 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The stock on band is as follows : 

Brick in District No. 2, 5,300, valued at 
Pipe on hand, 820 feet, valued at . 
Branches on hand, 182 pieces, valued at 
Bends on hand, 74 pieces, valued at 

Total 

Appropriation for 1892 . 
Transfer , . . 

Total 

Total expenses for the year . 
Overdraft ...... 



^36-57 
212.65 

157-84 
61.02 

$468.08 

$30,000.00 
2,293.26 

$32,293.26 

^39>724.65 

7.421.39 



Two hundred and fourteen sewer permits have been granted 
during the year and returns made by plumbers of 89 house con- 
nections. 

It is with much sadness that your committee refers to the one 
break in our ranks during our term of office, this being occa- 
sioned by the death of Alderman Andrew J. Dickey, who died 
suddenly on the morning of December 12, from an apoplectic 
shock from which he suffered the preceding day. 

The city government never contained a more tireless or zeal- 
ous worker for the good of the community than Alderman Dickey. 
Prompt in his attendance upon meetings, considerate of the 
wants of all, fair minded, and impartial. We pay this deserved 
tribute to the memory of one who was our worthy associate, our 
adviser, our counselor, and our friend. 

Respectfully submitted. 

. JOHN J. HOLLAND, 
A. D. MAXWELL, 
GEORGE M. CLARK, 
A. J. PEASLEE, 

Committee on Sewer's and Drains. 
W. H. BENNETT, 

Clei'k of Committee, 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 161 

PUBLIC PARKS. 

A costly plan of Stark park has been received from the office 
of Morton and Quimby, landscape gardeners of Boston, showing 
the design to be followed in laying out the grounds. Nothing 
has been done as yet except cut the grass and trim the trees. 

In Derryfield park the grove has been cleaned up, and seats 
added. It is already becoming a popular resort during the warm 
summer days. 

Mr. John Fullerton has had charge of the work in the various 
parks and squares, and under his careful eye everything has been 
well attended to. 

STREET LINES AND GRADES. 

With the rapid extension of the city the calls for lines and 
grades increase, and this department is taxed to its utmost to 
attend to them all. Oftentimes persons are compelled to build 
hap-hazard, as n© time can be spared to prepare plans of the 
street. This brings up the method previously spoken of, that is, 
of requiring the streets to be built to grade before being accepted 
by the city ; also a point advocated in former reports, that a 
complete plan of the street should be prepared, showing the lines 
and grades, the same to be presented for consideration at the 
time the street is laid out. With these done the department 
could work to better advantage, and possibly silence those who 
make it a point to find fault because their wants are not attended 
to immediately, regardless of the fact that the department has no 
data for the work. 

INDEXING. 

In the matter of indexing plans, notes, and records, great im- 
provements have been made. The card index of plans has been 
in use for two years, and has more than paid its cost in the time 
saved in looking up a plan. The old field book indices, not be- 
ing large enough to properly enter the various items, were en- 
tirely overhauled. Larger books were made, the work recopied, 
and provisions made for years to come. Each street has a por- 
11 



162 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

tion of the book to itself instead of being mixed up with other 
streets beginning with the same letter. 

Small plan indices have also been prepared of the laid-out 
streets, improved streets, plans and profiles, sewer plans, and 
numbering plans. 

All the indices have been reduced to a system, and greatly 
enhance the efficiency of the office. 

SUGGESTIONS. 

The finance committee, grasping the situation as outlined in 
the last report, made provisions for the employment of an addi- 
tional assistant by an increased appropriation. This gave an op- 
portunity to keep one man in the office all of the time, and 
proved of great convenience to persons having business with this 
department. 

The coming season promises to be an active one in every line, 
and the necessity of an increase in the force is apparent. The 
rapid extension of streets, and consequent increase in building 
operations, call for more work than the present force can attend 
to, and still keep up the regular routine work. If the appropria- 
tion could be made large enough, another party would be put 
into the field, and the work kept well in hand. 

Aside from this comes up the matter of compensation. It is 
an acknowledged fact that this city pays ridiculously low salaries 
as compared to other places of like size and importance. It is 
out of the question to think of keeping a man, skilled in the pro- 
fession and understanding the details of city work, while other 
places are holding out inducements greatly .in advance of Man- 
chester. It would seem good policy to keep such a man here 
ratlier than handicap the efficiency of the department by employ- 
ing those unfamiliar with the work just because the city will not 
pay what he is worth. It is hoped the incoming city council will 
view the matter in its proper light, and make provisions accord- 
ingly. 

COMMITTEE WORK. 

At the first meetings held by the committees on streets and on 
sewers and drains, the city engineer was elected clerk, as in pre- 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 163 

vious years, and in that capacity has attended each meeting, 
keeping a complete record of the proceedings, which are on file 
in this office. 

In addition, meetings have been attended of the city govern- 
ment, committees on the Amoskeag cemetery, Valley cemetery, 
Pine Grove cemetery, city farm, finance, lands and buildings, 
claims, commons, parks, and the board of aldermen. 

Besides the work before enumerated, many questions have been 
answered from engineers, boards of trade, and others in various 
cities throughout this country and Canada. 

I would respectfully tender my acknowledgments to his 
Honor the Mayor and the various committees of the city coun- 
cil, for the support which they have given. 

I wish also to acknowledge the courtesies shown by the various 
heads of departments, and the co-operation of the assistants of 
this department. 

. Respectfully submitted. 

WINFRED H. BENNETT, 

City Engineer. 
January i, 1893. 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT SURVEYORS. 



Report of the work done in the various highway districts dur- 
ing the year 1S92 : 



No report. 



District No. 1. 



District No. 2. 



William Sanborn, Superintendent. 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING. 



Arlington and Linden 

Belmont, Manchester to Hanover 

Chestnut and Central 

Chestnut and Pennacook 

Concord and Maple 

Derry 

Franklin, Granite to Auburn 

Hall 

Hanover and Hall 

Lake avenue and Canton 

Laurel and Hall 

Lowell and Ashland 

Maple and Lake avenue 

Merrimack, Beech to Maple 



CO 



167 

147 

34 

94 

17 

225 

150 

150 

35 

110 

141 

278 

1241 

400 



22 
17 

4 
12 

2 
20 
35 
32 

5 
13 
11 
34 
28 
36 



»^ 



$1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 



crj C 
C 11 



$37.40 
28.90 

6.80 
20.40 

3.40 
34.00 
59.50 
54.40 

8.50 
22.10 
18.70 
57.80 
47.60 
61.20 



o .^ 



$38.41 
33.81 

7.82 
21.62 

3.91 
51.75 
34.5e 
34.50 

8.05 
25.30 
32.40 
63.94 
55.43 
92.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



165 



COBBLE GUTTER PAVING.— Continued. 



Street. 




1 
O 

d 

'A 


o 

ai o 
O 


Coat of 
stone. 


^ s 

O 




92 

278 

83 

17 

33 

183 

469 

418 

161 

50 

73 

88 


11 

33 

10 

2 

4 

22 

58 

54 

16 

6 

9 

9 


$1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 


$18.70 
56.10 
17.00 
3.40 
6.80 
37.40 
98.60 
91.80 
27.20 
10.20 
15 30 
15.30 


$21.16 




63.94 


Pearl and Russell 


19.09 




3.91 


River road near Mrs. Eastman's 


7.59 




42.09 




107.87 


Spmce, Lincoln to Wil son 


96.14 


Union, Hanover to Amherst 


37.03 


Union and Concord 


11.50 


Union and Pearl 


16.79 


Union and Brook, twice 


20.24 








4,134 


505 




$858.50 


$950.79 





Total cost of the foregoing work, $1,809.29 ; an average cost 
of §0.437 per square yard. 



EDGE STONES SET 



Arlington and Ashland 

Arlington and Linden 

Auburn, near Union 

Beech 

Beech and Hanover 

Beech and Concord, set twice 

Blodget and Pine . 

Bridge and Ashland 

Bridge and Russell . 

Brook and Hazel 

Cedar and Union . 



30 

16 

102 

60 

54 
iS 

34 
21 
16 
18 

50 



ieet. 



166 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Central, between Elm and Chestnut 

Central and Pine 

Chestnut and Concord . 

Chestnut and North 

Concord,' Union east back to Walnut 

Concord and Maple 

Elm, Kidder to Bridge . 

Elm, near Bridge 

Elm and Webster 

Elm west back and West Central 

Elm west back, near Bridge 

Franklin, near Granite . 

Franklin and Central 

Franklin and Pleasant 

Gore and Walnut . 

Hanover, near Pine 

Hanover and Union 

Hanover and Hall . 

Lowell, near Elm . 

Lake avenue and Chestnut 

Lake avenue and Hall 

Lake avenue and Canton 

Linden and Arlington 

Manchester and Hall 

Maple, Merrimack to Lake avenue 

Maple and Amherst 

Merrimack, west of Union, set three times 

Merrimack and Wilson 

Nashua and Concord 

North and Elm 

Oak and Myrtle 

Orange and Elm 

Orange and Linden, set twice 

Pearl, Elm east back and Pearl south back 

Pearl and Russell ..... 

Pennacook and Union .... 

Pine and Lake avenue .... 



98 feet, 

252 

19 

20 

100 

492 

76 

54 

3 

217 

20 
62 

30 
75 
36 
56 

350 
24 
12 
40 
40 

19 
120 

21 
500 

21 

26 

20 
404 
no 

20 

255 

21 
240 

74 

17 

75 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



167 



Pine and Laurel . 

Pine and Salmon . 

Sagamore and Pine 

Salmon and Chestnut . 

Spruce, Pine and Pine east back 

Union, Hanover to Amherst . 

Union and Brook . 

Webster and Bay . 

Webster and Chestnut . 

Welch avenue 

Wilson and Lake Avenue 

Total .... 

Total cost of the foregoing work 
$o. ii6 per foot. 



1 68 feet. 
19 

77 

20 
228 
656 

98 

20 
157 

50 
28 



5,959 feet. 
^692.84, an average cost of 



EDGE STONES RESET. 



Amherst, near Union . 


25 feet 


Blodget and Union . . . ' 


75 ' 




Bridge, near Union 


. .. 14 ' 




Canal, Granite to Depot 


300 ' 




Central, west of Elm . 


75 ' 




Chestnut and Central . 


100 ' 




Elm, near Hanover 


50 ' 




Elm, near Bridge 


140 ' 




East High, near Ashland 


20 ' 




Granite, between Franklin and Canal 


200 ' 




Lowell, near Elm 


44 ' 




Total 


. 1,043 fe 


et 



Total cost of the foregoing work, ^110.66, an average cost of 
$0,106 per foot. 

In setting edge stones, there were used 27 six-foot, 35 four- 
foot, and 15 three-foot circular corner stones. 



168 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



PAVING RELAID. 




Auburn and Franklin . . . . . 


50 sq 


Bridge and Elm ...... 


65 


Canal and Depot . . . . . . . 


220 


Concord and Maple . . . . . 


58 


Elm, 


2,820 


Granite, near bridge .... 


266 


Hanover, Union to Beech, twice 


340 


Lake avenue and Hall . . 


33 


Merrimack and Hall .... 


128 


Nashua and Concord .... 


90 


Pearl avenue ...... 


14 



Total 

Total cost of the foregoing work, 
50.182 per square yard. 



yds. 



4,084 sq. yds. 
29, an average cost ot 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



169 







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J CO 



170 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



171 



< 
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$1,761.74 

2,034.90 

547.40 

870.11 

1,341.03 


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NO. 
loads 
stone. 










8 


Sq. yds. 

earth 
removed 

1,778 
2,128 
2,133 
2,095 
2,232 


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172 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 





SUMMARY. 








Sq. yds. 


Loads stone. Total cost. 


Macadamizing 


10,816.00 


2,135 


^5,469.70 


Top-dressing 


• 24,835.00 


790 


1,314.24 


General repairs 




850 


1,463.44 


Concreting . 


• 5>3i4-98 


556 


6,555-24 


Crushed stone on hand 




60 


118.77 


Totals 


. 40,965.98 


4,391 


$14,921.39 



STREETS GRADED. 









Labor of 






Street. 


Cut or 


Cubic 


men and 


Inciden- 


Total 




fill. 


yards. 


teams. 


tals. 


cost. 


Belmont, south of Manchest'r 


Cut... 


346 


$100.38 


$3.46 


$103.84 




Fill... 
Cut... 


336 
311 


67.20 
35.88 


5.19 
3.11 


72.39 


Cedar, west of Lincoln 


38 99 




Both.. 


518 


48.00 


5.18 


53 18 


Chestnut, north of Aiipleton.. 




3,000 


573.75 


*64 60 


638.25 




" 


2 222 


250.00 
35.00 
66.00 
56.80 


22.22 

20.00 

1.84 

2.78 


272.22 




55.00 


Hall, north of Orange 


Fill... 
Both.. 


184 

278 


67.84 


Liberty, soutli of Salmon 


59.58 


Lincoln, south of Young 


'< 


3,S.i8 


474.60 


38.58 


513.18 


Lincoln, north of Cedar 


Cut... 


126 


16.20 


^ 1.26 


17.46 


Maple, at culvert 


Fill.... 


14,475 


2,364.60 


t963.00 


3,327.60 


Myrtle, east of Linden 


Both.. 


2,197 


312.00 


21.97 


333.97 


Old Bridge 


" 


580 


116.00 


5.80 


121.80 




Cut... 


378 
945 
378 


47.50 
62.73 
125.84 


3.78 
9.45 
3.78 


51.28 




73.18 


Sagamore, •west of Union 


139.63 


Sagamore, east of LTnion 


Both.. 


163 


65.00 


1.63 


66.63 


Salmon, east of Union 


" 


3,648 


333.30 


36.48 


369.78 


Silver, Beech to C. & P. R. R.. 


Cut... 


310 


32.40 


3.10 


35.50 


Spruce, east of Beech 


»* 


126 


29.52 


1.26 


30.78 


Union, north of Salmon 


Both.. 


800 


322.00 


8.00 


330.00 


Union, north of Appleton 


"Fni.... 


201 


96.00 


2.01 


98.01 


Union east back, near Webst'r 


" 


92 


52.00 


.92 


52.92 


Valley, east of Elm 


Both . 


252 


57.60 


2.52 


60.12 




Cut... 


1,027 


102.40 


10.27 


112.67 


Valley, west of Wilson 


Fill.... 


333 


11.10 


3.33 


14.43 


Walnut, north of Gore 


Both . 


1,448 


628.00 


14.48 


642 48 


Walnut, north of Salmon 


Fill.... 


2,422 


642.82 


24.22 


667.04 


Webster, west of River road.. 


Both. 


1,185 


192.00 


11.85 


203.85 


Webster, east of Union 


Cut... 


277 


39.40 


2.77 


42.17 


Wilson, south of Valley... ... 


" 


252 


8.40 


2.52 


10.92 


Wilson road, near Lowell 


Fill.... 


222> 


43.20 


2.22 


45.42 


Young . . 


Both . 


3,370' 
45,260 


333.40 


23.70 


357.10 


Totals 


$7,741.02 


$1,327.18 


$9,068.20 









♦Including $34.50 paid Horace Holbrook for gravel. 

t Including $818,25 paid Head & Dowst Co. for 3,273 loads. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



173 



STREETS GRAVELED. 



Amherst, east of Ash 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Baker . 

Beech 

Calef road . 

Central 

Cheney place 

Concord 

Derry 

Button 

Laurel 

Lincoln 

Manchester 

Maple 

Merrimack 

Mitchell 

Nutt road . 

Pearl . 

Pine . 

Sagamore . 

South Elm . 

Spruce 

Union 

Valley, west of Wilson 

Walnut 

Webster 

Young 

Total 



1,200 


feet 


700 




100 




500 




750 




850 




400 




450 




1,000 




350 




450 




500 




200 




750 




500 




2,200 




500 




Soo 




300 




1,220 




300 




i>930 




350 




2,425 




3:-o 




200 




320 




550 





20,145 feet. 



STREETS TURNPIKED WITH ROAD-MACHINE. 



Arlington 1,110 feet. 

Ash 1,445 " 

Beech . . . . . . . . . 9,141 ** 



174 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Blodget 

Bridge 
Brook . 
Calef road 

Central 

Chestnut 

Cilley . 

Gore . 

Hall . 

Harrison 

Hazel . 

Lake avenue 

Liberty 

Lincoln 

Linden 

Lowell 

Maple . 

Myrtle 

Nashua 

North 

Oak . 

Orange 

Pearl 

Pennacook 

Pine . 

Prospect 

River road 

Russell 

Sagamore 

Salmon 

Silver 

Spruce 

Union 

Walnut 

Warren 

Webster 

Wilson 

Total 



1,428 feet 


1,676 


a 


1.497 


i i 


4,630 


<( 


2,083 


a 


1,022 


a 


2,242 


li 


835 


i i 


223 


a 


2,505 


< i 


385 


( i 


2,885 


" 


740 


ii 


^ 480 


n 


840 


a 


444 


i i 


2,233 


a 


3,869 


a 


3S0 


i i 


924 


a 


1,768 


a 


3,77c 


a 


3,105 


( ( 


1,428 


a 


5>476 


a 


2,726 


a 


7,381 


c< 


1,120 


li 


508 


ii 


447 


(C 


998 


i( 


2,240 


a 


1,800 


a 


1.385 


a 


446 


li 


2,090 


It 


480 


ti 



80,185 feet. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



175 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Street. 



Arlington, east of Linden 

Arlington, west of Linclen 

Ash 

Ash, north of Harrison 

Ashland, north of Lowell 

Ashland, Bridge northerly 

Baker 

Bay, north of North 

Belmont, north of Merrimack 

Blodget, west of Union 

Brown avenue, south of Hancock... 
Brown avenue, south of Hancock. . . 

Canton, Lake avenue southerly 

Central, hetw'n Franklin and Canal. 

Cheney place 

Chestnut, north of Appleton 

Derry 

EltQ, north of railroad bridge 

Elm, Kidder court northerly 

Hall, south of Merrimack 

Hamilton, west of Brown avenue 

Hanover, west of Union 

Lake avenue, east of Hall 

Lake avenue, Canton westerly 

Laurel, east of Hall 

Laurel, west of Hall 

Laurel, east of Milton 

Lincoln, south of Amherst 

Lowell, east of Ashland ;... 

Milton, Merrim'k to Laurel, blasting 

Milton, north of Laurel 

Nashua 

Orange 

Orange, near Hall '. 

Pearl 

Pearl, east of A.shland 

Pearl, west of Russell 

Pine 

Pine, north of Sagamore 

Prospect, east of Russell 

Prospect, east of Linden 

River road 

Russell, north of Bridge 

Russell, north of Pearl 

Russell, north of Pearl 

Russell and Prospect 

Sagamore, west of Pine 

Sagamore, east of Pine 

South Elm 

Spruce, west of Maple 

Union, south of Blodget 

Union and Sagamore, blasting 

Walnut, soutli of Gore 

Walimt, south of Webster 

Welch avenue 

Wilson road, north of Lowell 



Length Width 



Totals. 



feet. 



150 
360 

25 

50 
100 
150 
237 
100 
150 

50 
150 
.525 

75 
100 

65 
150 
100 
640 
100 
220 
l.oO 
100 
1.50 
200 
300 
100 

50 
100 
175 



100 
150 
270 
100 
300 
450 
50 
50 
100 
1.50 
75 
500 
220 
100 
150 
200 
150 
100 
160 
200 
200 



200 
50 
40 

300 



9,187 



feet. 



Feet 
cut. 



Feet 
fill. 



1.5 

3 

1.5 



0.5 
2^75 



0.5 

1 

1 

1.5 

0.5 

6 



1 

0.5 



0.5 
0.5 
1 
1 



1 

1.5 



1.5 
0.5 
1.5 
1 



0.5 
1 



3 
2 
0.6 

2 



Cost. 



817.21 
81.85 

9.80 
11.47 
17.21 
51.59 
46.66 
22.95 
17.21 

2.68 
63.87 
163.73 

8.61 
17.22 
14.92 
20.25 

9.95 
36.35 
17.21 
24.86 
25.63 

6.88 
63.87 
22.95 
34.43 

6.12 

5.79 
11.47 
19.90 
14.00 
45.52 
13.47 

9.62 

17.22 

30.30 

153.09 

5.35 
10.30 
22.57 
34.43 
12.25 
35.55 
25.63 
11.09 
34.43 
24.95 
16.83 
11.47 
40.52 
10.90 
22.57 
56.23 
67.88 
11.47 

1.91 
67.88 



$1660.07 



176 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



SANDING. 

Paid Mary A. Hartshorn, for 658 loads sand 
George F. Higgins, for 44 loads sand 
Pettee & Adams, for salt 
labor of men and teams 

Total 



$65.80 

4.40 

5.10 

1,424.22 

$1,499.52 



FENCE BUILT. 

Brook, near Ash . . . . 

Manchester, west of Beacon . 
Merrimack, east of Beacon 

Total 

The above was built at a cost of $46.23. 



225 feet. 
225 " 
100 " 

550 feet. 



STONE. 



Paid Frank S. Bodwell for stone 
Charles A. Bailey, for stone 

Total .... 



^339-19 
513-82 

$853.01 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



24 X 36 inches, brick 
24-inch Portland pipe . 
20-inch Akron pipe, relaid 
20-inch Portland pipe . 
20-inch Portland pipe, relaid 
15-inch Akron pipe 
15-inch Portland pipe . 
15-inch Portland pipe, relaid 
14-inch iron pipe . 
12-inch Akron pipe 
12-inch Portland pipe . 
1 0-inch Ak'ron pipe 



32 feet. 

538 

4 

483 

198 

64 

1,314 

16 

12 

261 

949 
1.405 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



177 



lo-inch Akron pipe, relaid 
lo-inch Portland pipe . 
lo-inch Portland pipe, relaid 
8-inch Portland pipe 

Total 6,529 feet. 

Manholes, 26 ; lampholes, 6 ; Y branches, 223. 

The foregoing sewers were constructed at a cost of ^14,489.30. 



2 


feet. 


941 


a 


55 


(C 


255 


a 



CESSPOOLS AND CONNECTIONS. 



1 5 -inch pipe . 
12-inch pipe . 
12-inch pipe, repairing 
lo-inch pipe . 
1 0-inch pipe, repairing 
8-inch pipe . 
8-inch pipe, repairing 

Total 



SEWERS REPAIRED 



1 2-inch pipe . 

lo-inch pipe . 

8-inch pipe . 

Total 

Total pipe laid 

Equal to 1.565 miles. 
12 



40 feet 

6 
134 
436 
178 
614 

8 

1,416 feet. 



134 


feet. 


178 


cc 


8 


a 


320 


feet 


,265 


feet 



178 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Street. 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



Cost of 
labor. 



Ash, between Harrison and Brook 

Blodget south back, between Pine and Union 

Chestnut and Clarke 

Elm, corner of Hanover 

Elm, cor aer of Water 

Elm west back, between Central and Depot.. 

Franklin 

Gore, between Walnut and Beech 

Hall, coi'ner of Lake avenue 

Lake avenue and Hall 

Lake ave. south back, betw'n Lincohi and Wilson 

Laurel south back and Maple 

Maple, corner of Laui-el 

Maple, between Merrimack and Central 

Maple, corner of Concord , 

Massabesic, between Cypress and Jewett 

Merrimack and Beacon 

Pine, north of Sagamore 

Sagamore, corner of Bay 

South, between Lowell and East High 

Spruce, corner of Lincoln 

Union, corner of Hanover 

Union east back, near Brook 

Union east back, between Brook and Sagamore . . 
Walnut east back, between Harrison and Brook . 

Webster, corner of River road , 

Webster, corner of Bay 



Totals 



$14.29 
13.87 
38.20 
12.40 
18.22 
16.55 
51.99 
14.08 
65.90 
22.41 
14.29 
12.70 
10.15 
83.50 
16.03 
15.64 
19.88 
17.83 
38.96 
23.90 
41.77 
30.66 
18.04 
28.16 
14.20 
43.79 
18.66 

$716.15 



$7.80 

9.62 

24.76 

19.00 

22.80 

18.90 

21.75 

10.50 

35.62 

25.00 

8.75 

11.20 

5.50 

60.24 

8.50 

21.40 

12.00 

11.62 

27.45 

12.40 

28.50 

14.75 

9.74 

20.82 

9.21 

50.75 

13.87 

$522.45 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



179 



CESSPOOLS REPAIRED. 



Street. 



Amherst, corner of Union 

Ash east back, between Brook and Harrison 

Cass, corner of Lake avenue 

Central south back, between Beech and Maple. . 

Cedar, corner of Pine 

Cedar, between Union and Beech 

Cedar south back and Elm east back 

Chestnut, between Pearl and Orange 

Button and Amherst 

Elm, corner of Central 

Elm, south of Myrtle 

Elm, comer of Harrison 

Elm east back, between Cedar and Spruce 

Hanover, corner of Union 

Lake avenue, near Hall 

Laurel, corner of Hall 

Lowell and Elm 

Manchester south back betw'n Elm and Chestnut 
Maple. 



No. 



Maple, corner of Central 

North north back, near Chandler 

Orange, corner of Elm 

Pearl, corner of Chestnut 

Pearl, corner of Russell 

Pennacook, corner of Elm 

Pine, south of Auburn 

Pine, between Central and Laurel 

Russell and Pearl 

Spruce, corner of INIaple 

Spruce south back, near Elm east back. 
Union, including repairs on manhole . . . 

Union, corner of Cedar 

Union, corner of Cedar 

Union, near Brook 

Washington, corner of Birch 

Webster, corner of Chestnut 

Miscellaneous, grates only 



Totals. 



55 



Cost of 
material. 



$1.98 
1.21 
3.45 
1.04 
2.03 
2.04 
1.26 
2.24 
1.94 
7.40 
1.79 
2.07 
2.24 
7!o4 
1.38 
2.41 
9.44 
3.96 
2.07 
1.21 
1.94 
4.14 
2.25 
L38 
1.98 

12.08 
1.3S 
6.38 
2.07 
1.97 
4.48 
2.24 
1.26 
L9S 
2.07 
2.25 

17.46 



Cost of 
labor. 



$125.13 



$1.33 
1.46 
3.00 
3.00 
5.58 
5.59 
2.79 
4.60 
1.00 

12.50 

10.00 
2.25 
4.60 

10.50 
2.75 
3.93 

J 0.50 
2.68 
3.75 
1.46 
1.00 
5.50 
4.60 
1.75 
1.33 

28.00 
1.83 
4.00 
4.76 
1.33 
5.00 
4.60 
2.79 
1.33 
4.00 
4.60 

30.80 



$197.66 



REPAIRING SEWERS. 



Street. 


Cost of 
material. 


Cost of 
labor. 


Elm east back, between Prospect and Harrison 

Myrtle south back, west of Chestnut 


$29.51 

.78 

40.05 


$38.00 


Pearl, between Pine and Union 


42.75 




Totals . 


$70.34 


$85.75 





180 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



All of the cesspools in the city have been cleaned out three 
times during the summer, and the sewers flushed when necessary. 
The cost of the same, labor of men and teams, was ^1,850.62. 



PIPE CULVERTS. 



Street. 



Elm, corner of Salmon 

Hanover and Beacon 

Maple and Gore 

Maple and Gore 

Mitchell, near Calef road. . . . 

One culvert 

Orange, east of Russell 

Prospect, east of Linden. ... 
Webster, west of Elra, two. 



Totals. 



Size in 
inches. 



Length 
in feet. 



24 
10 

72 
44 
102 
10 
11 
18 
36 



327 



Cost of 
material. 



$2 48 
1.50 

19.24 

82.88 
1.04 
1.64 
1.86 
7.04 



$117.68 



Cost of 
labor. 



$4.75 
3.00 

39.90 

2.76 



3.00 
6.00 
».60 



$69.01 



Connections were made for the fountain, corner of Lake ave- 
nue and Hall street, using 52 feet of 8-inch pipe. Cost of mate- 
rial, $5.64; cost of labor, $20.50. 



STONE CULVERTS. 



Street. 



Jane, north of East High 

Union, south of North 

Walnut 

Wilson road, north of East High. 

Totals'. 



Size in 
inches. 



30x36 
36x48 



Length 
in feet. 



35 

20 

70 

120 



Cost. 



$87.50 
52.50 

143.13 
35.00 

$31S.12 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



181 



$16.41 


I-35 


.69 


2.00 



The following material has been delivered to plumbers and 
others according to the city ordinance : 

FOR JANE-STREET SEWER. 

Lewis and Pattee, 8-inch pipe, 154 feet 
lo-inch pipe, 4 feet 
Vz barrel cement .... 
team ...... 

$20.45 

William F. Hubbard, 8-inch pipe, 128 feet . . $13-51 

Ira F. Sturtevant, lo-inch pipe, 118 feet . . 17-97 

• Fairbanks and Hutchinson, Beacon street, 12-inch pipe, 335 

feet and 3 8 on 1 2 Y branches. 

Y branches: 6 on 10, 22 ; 6 on 12, 22 ; 6 on 15, i ; 8 on 10, 

22 ; 8 on 12, 47 ; 8 on 15, 12 ; 8 on 18, i ; 8 on 20, 4 ; 8 on 

24, I. Total, 132. 

ON HAND AT CITY YARD. 



24-inch pipe ....... 


18 feet 


18-inch pipe 


28 " 


15-inch pipe 


186 " 


1 2-inch pipe 


33 " 


lo-inch pipe 


166 » 


8-inch pipe 


112 " 


Total . . ■ 


543 feet 


3 Y branches, 8 on 24 inches. 




3 Y branches, 8 on 20 inches. 




2 Y branches, 8 on 18 inches. 




22 Y branches, 8 on 15 inches. 




18 Y branches, 8 on 12 inches. 




28 Y branches, 8 on 10 inches. 




39 Y branches, 8 on 8 inches. 




4 Y branches, 6 on 8 inches. 




17 1-8 bends, 15-inch. 





182 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

10 1-8 bends, 1 2-inch. 
6 1-8 bends, lo-inch. 
2 1-8 bends, 8-inch. 

6 i5-inch quarter turns. 
2o 1 2-inch quarter turns. 

2 lo-inch quarter turns. 
8 8-inch quarter turns. 
5,300 brick. 

1 1 barrels cement. 

2 cesspool grates. 

II 18-inch old style cesspool grates. 

3 14-inch old style cesspool grates. 
5 open manhole covers. 

5 closed manhole covers. 
3 12-inch lamphole covers. 

2 ID-inch lamphole covers. 

3 Concord grates and traps. 

5 upright cesspool grates. ' 

7 cesspool stones. 



District No. 3. 

Eben Carr, Surveyor. 

Macadamized on Union street seventeen rods, using 200 loads 
of gravel. Charged to another appropriation. 

Graveled Union street from Clarke street to Willey's ledge, 
2,300 feet, using 200 loads of gravel. 

Removed all the large boulders and smaller stones from Union 
street hill. 

Laid over three stone culverts, 20 feet long by 18 inches 
square, and built one new culvert of 12-inch pipe, 15 feet long. 

General repairs made where needed. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 183 

District No. 4. 

Byron E. Moore, Surveyor. 

Repaired and widened the road on Derry liill and also the 
road near Little Cohas brook bridge, using about 200 loads of 
clay and gravel. Laid a side open culvert, 20 rods long, on 
Derry hill. 

Graded and graveled about 34 rods on Fox's hill, using 125 
loads of clay and gravel ; also graded and graveled near Great 
Cohas brook about 122 rods of road, using 25 loads of clay and 
gravel. Repaired about 50 rods of sidewalk. 

Graded and graveled road from Devonshire Mills to depot, 
about one half mile, using 500 loads of clay and gravel. 

Graded and repaired road at north end of district, about 270 
rods, using 350 loads of clay and gravel. 

Made general repairs on about one mile of the River road and 
on other roads in district as needed. 



District No. 5. 

Mark E. Harvey, Surveyor. 

Graveled ........ 5,135 feet. 

Turnpiked ........ 1,300 " 

Average width of graveling, 13 feet ; average depth, 7 inches. 
Graded by cut on Weston road . . . 296 cu. yds. 

Graded by fill on Weston road . . . 259 " 

Graded by fill on Nutt road .... 40.5 " 

Built 300 feet of railing on Goffe's Falls and Center road. 

Cut bushes on three fourths of a mile of road. 

Removed stones from roads once a month from May to Octo- 
ber, and made all general repairs throughout the district. 

Amount of appropriation, $800. Balance, $25.54. 



184 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



District No. 6. 

Greenleaf C. Coleman, Surveyor. 



Turnpiked 
Graveled 



238 rods. 



Built one stone culvert on Cohas avenue, 25' X 2' X 2'. 
Repaired two culverts. 

Rebuilt the bridge over the dam, this being charged to 
another appropriation. 

Removed stones from road and made all necessary repairs. 



District No. 7. 



Charles Francis, Surveyor. 



GUTTERS. 



Belmont street 
Cypress street 
Spruce street 
Valley street 

Total 



2, 000. ft., 3 ft. wide. 
300 " 3 " " 

150 " 3 " " 
800 " 3 " " 



3,250 ft. 



GRADING FOR CONCRETE. 



Belmont street, by cut, 600 feet long, 8 feet wide. 
Cypress street, by cut, 150 feet long, 8 feet wide. 
Taylor street, by cut and fill, 600 feet long, 8 feet wide. 
Valley street, by cut and fill, 950 feet long, 8 feet wide. 
Total, 2,300 feet. 

STONE WORK. 

Massabesic street. Culvert 115 feet long, 4.5 feet wide, and 
5 feet high. 

Massabesic street. Culvert lengthened 25 feet, 4 feet wide, 
and 5 feet high. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 185 

Porter street. Culvert lengthened 12 feet, 4 feet wide, and 4 
feet high. 

Belmont street. Culvert 42 feet long, 1.5 feet wide, and 2 
feet high. 

Spruce street. Retaining wall 67 feet long, 6 feet high, and 2 
feet thick. 

GRADING AND GRAVELING. 

Belmont street has been graded and graveled for 1,400 feet, 
and the extension south turnpiked for 82 rods. 

Page street has been partially graded. 

Summer street has been graded sufficiently to allow of water- 
pipes being laid. 

One cesspool has been built on Cypress street and one on 
Spruce street. 

Three concrete crossings have been laid at Cypress and Valley 
streets, containing 92.88 square yards, costing $69.66. 

General repairs were made where needed. 



District No. 8. 

George H. Penniman, Surveyor. 

borough road. 

Repaired road where needed from Hanover street road to 
Thomas Stearns's old place, and turnpiked 25 rods. 

Rebuilt two stone culverts. 

Lengthened culvert at Slager brook 10 feet and widened road 
to correspond. 

Cut bushes, cleaned out gutter^, and made general repairs. 

BRIDGE STREET. 

Removed large boulders by blasting. 

Built one culvert, cleaned and repaired gutters, and made 
other general repairs where needed. 



186 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

JAMES HALL ROAD. 

Graveled the road between Lake avenue and Hanover street, 
using 50 loads of material. 

MAMMOTH ROAD. 

Graveled the road, using 25 loads of material. 

PROCTOR ROAD. 

Turnpiked 3 rods and filled mud holes. 

Lengthened culvert and widened road to correspond around 
bend by Dr. Canney's land. 

HANOVER STREET. 

Graded 24 rods between Hall road and Lake avenue, and 
turnpiked 8 rods. 

Lengthened culvert 8 feet and widened road by filling with 
stone, 6 rods in length, 6 feet wide. 

HANOVER STREET ROAD. 

Widened road east of brook by Samuel T. Page's cottage by 
building blind ditch 10 feet wide, 2 feet deep, and 15 rods long, 
covering this with gravel. 

Made fill of 8 rods between Rand's and Smith's, and repaired 
one culvert. 

Filled dangerous place at Bodwell's and built one cesspool 
opposite, at McGregor's. 

Cleaned and relaid one stone culvert 75 feet long around 
Smith's corner, also repaired culvert at James H. Cram's. 

Two hundred and fifty loads of gravel were taken from the 
cut on Proctor road and used in making general repairs from 
Smith's to Reed's. 

Graded the sidewalk and made driveways at Benson's and 
Fox's. 

Built stone culvert 50 feet long at Harvey's store and did 
what filling was necessary. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 187 

A large amount of work has been done on this road at Page's 
hill, by which the road has been built to its proper width and 
the grade of the hill reduced. A detailed statement follows : 

Built 73.5 rods of face wall an average height of 5 feet. 

Made fill next to Sargent's, at brook, 29 rods long, one rod 
wide, and 3 feet deep. 

Made stone fill 10 rods long, 2 rods wide, and i foot deep, 
also dirt fill 10 rods long, 4 rods wide, and i foot deep. 

Made stone fill at Chenette's and Stevens's 20 rods long, 2 
rods wide, and 4 feet deep. Graded for sidewalk and paved gutter 
on same. 

Graded the road from Morgan's to Rand's, a distance of one 
half mile. 

Built culvert, 32' X 2' X i' ; culvert over brook, 20' X 3' X 
4' ; culvert for R. I. Stevens, 20' X 2' X i' ; culvert at A. G. 
Fairbanks's, 33' X 2' X i'- 

In removing the 1,500 perch of stone on the hill, 1,600 feet 
of one and one half inch holes were hand-drilled, and 800 
charges of blasting material used. 



District No. 9. 

Alphonso N. Boyce, Surveyor. 
No report. 



District No. 10. 

Charles O. Phelps, Superintendent. 



COBBLE paving. 



Beauport, Adams to Sullivan . 
Beauport, Adams to Sullivan, relaid 
Bridge, McGregor to bridge . 



Feet. 


Sq. yds. 


t,340 


596 


700 


311 


725 


242 



188 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Douglas, Barr to Green . 
Dubuque, Amory southerly . 
Ferry, Second westerly . 
Granite, Main easterly, relaid 
Putnam street, relaid 

Totals 



Feet. 


Sq. yds. 


532 


177 


400 


^33 


100 


33 


100 


22 


150 


67 



4,047 



1,581 



COBBLE EDGING. 

Beauport, Adams to Sullivan . 
Beauport, Adams to Sullivan, relaid 
Douglas, Barr to Green . 
Dubuque, Amory southerly 
Ferry, Second westerly . 
Main, Monmouth northerly 
Second, Ferry northerly 

Totals 



1,340 


feet 


500 




450 




350 




100 




350 




50 





3,140 feet. 



EDGE STONES. 



Bridge, McGregor to bridge 
Douglas, West westerly . 
Granite, Main easterly, reset 
Main, Conant northerly, reset 
West .... 
West, Douglas northerly 

Totals 



725 


feet 


50 




125 




10 




44 




180 





1,134 feet. 



STREETS GRAVELED. 



A, Main westerly , 
Amherst road 
Bowman, A northerly . 
Boynton, Main southerly 
Forest . ' . 



Length. 


Width. 


Cu. yds. 


210 


8 


31 


200 


16 


59 


1 80 


6 


19 


330 


8 


49 


600 


33 


183 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



189 



Length. Width. Cn. yds. 



Main, Milford to Boynton 
Mast .... 
Mast road, near Brock's 
Milford, at cemetery- 
River, Walker northerly 
Rockland avenue . 
Walker, River westerly . 

Totals 



720 


6 


80 


2,100 


20 


778 


300 


24 


200 


1,000 


20 


617 


700 


15 


259 


240 


25 


III 


700 


15 


259 



6,680 



2,449 



STREETS GRADED. 



Length. Width. 

Amory, Rimmon westerly, cut . .1,150 34 

Amory extension, cut . . . . 768 50 

Bartlett, Amory extension southerly, fill 1,150 34 

Bennett boulevard, Amory westerly, cut, 1,600 10 

Dubuque street, Amory southerly, cut . 400 34 



Totals 



5,068 



Cu. yds. 
3,620 
4,267 
3,620 

^,778 
^00 



5,785 



WOODEN RAILING. 

New Mast 895 feet. 

On Beauport street, between Schuyler and Sullivan streets, a 
large amount of clay was taken out and a fill made with sand. 
Coal cinders have been used to a great extent in grading side- 
walks. 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



24 x 36 inches, brick, relaid 
24-inch Portland pipe, relaid 
20-inch Portland pipe 
15-inch Akron pipe 
15-inch Portland pipe 
12-inch Akron pipe 
12-inch Portland pipe 



III feet. 

1,363 " 

1,284 " 

623 " 

501 " 

1,423 " 

1,085 '* 



190 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

1 2-inch iron pipe . . . . . . . 12 feet. 

lo-inch Akron pipe . . . . . • . 207 " 

lo-inch Portland pipe ...... 3,803 " 



Total. ...... 10,412 feet. 

The foregoing sewers were constructed at a cost of ^19,592.75. 



CESSPOOLS AND CONNECTIONS. 



lo-inch pipe . . . . . . ... 364 feet. 

8-inch pipe ........ 899 " 



Total ........ 1,263 feet. 

Total pipe laid, 11,675 feet, equal to 2.21 miles. 

Manholes built, 40 ; lampholes, 5 ; Y branches, 359. 



REPOKT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



191 



NEW CESSPOOLS. 



Street. 



A, Main to B 

Batli, corner of Second 

Beauport, corner of Amory 

Beauport, corner of Amory , 

Bowman, A to Milford 

Bridge, at west end of bridge 

Bridge, at west end of bridge 

C, Boynton to B 

Cartier 

Cartier, Wayne to Sullivan , 

Conant, corner of West 

Douglas, corner of Green 

Kelley, Coolidge avenue, westerly 

Main, near Mast 

Marion, corner of McGregor 

Monmouth 

Nortli Main , 

River 

South Main and Boynton 

Sullivan, corner of Beauport 

Third, Ferry southerly 

Third, corner of Bath 

Wilton, corner of Beauport 

Totals 



No. 



59 



Cost of 
material. 



$111.13 
95.49 
15.66 
18.05 
56.71 

8.04 
18.94 
69.63 
14.11 
63.03 

9.75 
27.03 
37.61 
16.77 
10.95 
15.56 
15.01 
14.26 
182.14 
44.27 
28.10 
12.16 
17.45 



$901.85 



Cost of 
labor. 



$56.00 
78.51 
13.65 
16.09 
32.00 
12.13 
20.31 
42.50 
12.57 
64.00 
12.00 
16.25 
11.38 
30.50 
18.75 
19.01 
13.65 
14.25 
93.50 
48.00 
17.00 
8.50 
15.00 



$665.55 



192 



AI^NUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



CESSPOOLS REPAIRED. 



Street. 



Cartier, north of Wayne 

James Baldwin Co.'s yard. .. 

Parker 

Sullivan, corner of Beauport 
Third, corner of Walker 

Totals 



No. 



Cost of 
material. 



$1.10 
1.15 
6.77 

2.06 



$11.08 



Cost of 
labor. 



$18.00 

2.56 

6.00 

20.00 

7.00 



$53.56 



SEWERS REPAIRED. 



Street. 



Cost of 
material. 



Cost of 
labor. 



Amory, east of Main 
Douglas, east of Barr 

Totals 



$0.68 
.68 



$1.36 



$49.62 
16.75 



J66.37 



One manhole was repaired at a cost of $6. 



PIPE CULVERTS. 



Bartlett street, 20-inch pipe . 
Milford street, 8-inch pipe 

Total 



50 feet. 
65 feet. 



ON HAND AT YARD. 



24-inch pipe 
20-inch pipe 
1 5 -inch pipe 
12-inch pipe 
lo-inch pipe 



66 feet. 
2 " 
22 " 
121 " 

24 '^ 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 193 

8-inch pipe 22 feet. 

6-inch pipe, old 20 " 

Total 277 feet. 

1 Y branch, 8 on 24 inches. 

26 Y branches, 8 on 12 inches. 

2 Y branches, 6 on 12 inches. 

27 Y branches, 6 on 10 inches. 
8 Y branches, 8 on 10 inches. 
2 Y branches, 6 on 15 inches. 
I T branch, 10 on 15 inches. 

1 T branch, 10 on 12 inches. 

2 15-inch ys bends. 

I lo-inch quarter turn. 
100 15-inch rings. 

40 12-inch rings. 
I barrel cement. 
I manhole casting. 
6 old cesspool grates. 
6 cesspool stones. 



District No. 1 1. 

Frank D. Hanscom, Surveyor. 

Graveled 640 rods in length, 15 feet in width. 

Laid 151 yards of paving on Eddy hill and graveled the same. 

Turnpiked and graveled the hill at south end of district. 

Raised Black brook bridge fourteen inches, put in six new 
stringers, replanked it, and built new railing. 

Built 40 rods of railing on the Goffstown road. 

Cut bushes on sides of roads for 350 rods, fixed culverts, and 
made all necessary repairs. 

13 



194 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

District No. 12. 

Lerov M. Streeter, Surveyor. 

Bald hill road has been repaired from Bridge street to the top 
of the hill east of the woods. The road -machine was used nearly 
the entire distance. Many large stones were blasted and re- 
moved and a good passable road has been made. 

The most extensive repairs were made on Bridge street by wid- 
ening it nearly its entire length in the district. Bushes have 
been cut, stumps and stones removed, and other repairs made on 
the street. 

Mammoth road, north of Hanover street, has been made wider 
and graveled on the sand hill, improving the road for heavy traf- 
fic. 

All other necessary repairs have been made throughout the 
district. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

The Trustees of the City Library herewith respectfully submit 
their thirty-ninth annual report of the affairs of the library, and 
with the same the report made to them by the treasurer of the 
board, containing a statement of the sums received and the ex- 
penditures made by him in behalf of the board from the funds in 
their possession and under their control, and also the report of 
the librarian, giving in detail the statistics of the operation of the 
library during the past year and its condition at the close of the 
year. 

The treasurer's report shows that during the year the sum of 
four hundred and fifty-eight dollars and ninety-one cents has 
been expended for the purchase of books, and the sum of one 
hundred and seventy-three dollars and sixty-five cents for the pur- 
chase of periodicals, making a total expenditure for both these 
purposes of six hundred and thirty-two dollars and fifty-six cents. 
Of the amount expended for the purchase of books the sum of one 
hundred and forty-seven dollars and eighty-nine cents was used 
for the purchase of books to replace those worn out and with- 
drawn from circulation, and the sum of five dollars and fifty cents 
was taken from the income of the Dean fund and used for the 
purchase of books for that department of the library. Excluding 
these two amounts the sum expended for the purchase of new 
books was three hundred and five dollars and fifty-two cents, 
leaving a balance in the hands of the treasurer at the close of the 



198 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

year of the amounts appropriated by the city councils for the pur- 
chase of books of eleven hundred and sixty-eight dollars and for- 
ty cents. 

The balance of the accumulated income of the Dean fund at 
the end of the year was five thousand eight hundred and three 
dollars and twenty-seven cents. Only the sum of five dollars 
and fifty cents was expended from this fund during the year. 

The accumulated income of the Mary E. Elliot fund at the 
close of the year was seven hundred and fifty-four dollars and 
ninety-four cents. 

A less number of new books than usual were purchased during 
the year, as the trustees did not deem it advisable to make 
large accessions of books during the compilation of the new cat- 
alogue, the completion of which has already been too long de- 
layed. 

The incidental expenses of the library for the past year have 
been three thousand eight hundred and sixty-four dollars and 
forty-nine cents, which amount includes the sum of one thou- 
sand four hundred and ninety dollars and fifteen cents, expended 
for the preparation of the new catalogue. The items of these ex- 
penditures may be found in detail in the annual report of the 
city, the bills for the same having been paid by the city treasurer 
from the sum appropriated for the library upon their approval by 
the trustees. 

In the early part of the year Mr. Wilberforce Ireland, adminis- 
trator of the estate of Mrs. Eliza Eaton, the residue of whose es- 
tate after the payment of debts and legacies was bequeathed to 
the city for the benefit of the library, notified the trustees that he 
was ready to render an account of his administration in the pro- 
bate court, and upon settlement of his account to pay over the 
amount for which' he might be found chargeable. The death of 
Mr. Ireland shortly after the filing of his account in the probate 
court occasioned some delay in the final settlement of the estate, 
but in July last the administratrix of Mr. Ireland paid over to the 
treasurer of the board the sum of two thousand eight hundred and 
eighty-seven dollars and eighty cents, being the balance of the es- 
tate of Mrs. Eajton found by the probate court remaining in the 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 199 

hands of her administrator on final settlement of his account. The 
sum of nine dollars and fifty-five cents has since been received 
for interest on funds deposited in savings banks, making the 
total amount of this fund in the hands of the treasurer at the end 
of the year, two thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven dol- 
lars and thirty-five cents. 

The librarian reports that the library has been open for the 
delivery of books three hundred and four days, during which 
time the number of books delivered for home use was fifty-five 
thousand eight hundred and seventy-four, being an average of 
about one hundred and eighty-four per day. In addition to this 
number delivered for general circulation, seven thousand eight 
hundred and forty-six books were delivered for use in the read- 
ing-room at the library, an average of about twenty-six per day. 
The total number of books delivered during the year for both 
these purposes was* sixty-three thousand seven hundred and 
twenty, an average of almost two hundred and ten per day. As 
compared with the year preceding, the circulation for home use 
and for use at the reading-room both show a slight decrease, but 
is above the average for the past few years. 

Seventy-six different periodicals have been regularly received 
at the library, — fifty-five by purchase and twenty-one by dona- 
tion — and at the completion of the several volumes they have 
been bound and placed upon the shelves for general circulation. 

The number of volumes withdrawn from circulation during 
the year on account of their worn and defaced condition was 
one hundred and ten. Of this number, and of others retired 
from circulation in previous years for the same reason, one hun- 
dred and six volumes have been replaced at a cost of one hun- 
dred and forty-seven dollars and eighty-nine cents. Many of 
the books purchased during the early years of the library have 
become badly worn and defaced from long and constant use and 
must soon be replaced by new editions, the expense of which 
will be no inconsiderable item for several years. In this connec- 
tion the trustees respectfully renew the recommendation made 
two years ago, that a special appropriation should be made by 
the city councils to cover the expense of purchasing books to 



200 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

replace those worn out, so that the usual annual appropriation 
may be used, as no doubt intended in the original contract with 
the city, for the increase of the library by the purchase of new 
books and periodicals rather than for the replacing those books 
which have become worn out. 

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the last 
report, including one thousand nine hundred and ninety pam- 
phlets and sixteen maps, was thirty-four thousand nine hundred 
and twenty-nine. During the year there have been added by pur- 
chase one hundred and fifty-two volumes, by donation seven 
hundred and nineteen volumes, and one hundred and seven vol- 
umes of periodicals have been bound. In addition, twelve hun- 
dred and eighty-eight of the pamphlets in the library have been 
systematically arranged and bound into one hundred and sixty- 
one volumes, making the total number of bound volumes in the 
library at the close of the year, thirty-five thousand three hun- 
dred and fifty, and the total number, including sixteen maps and 
seven hundred and two pamphlets remaining unbound, thirty- 
six thousand and sixty-eight. 

Following the report of the librarian will be found a list of 
the books presented to the library during the year, with the 
names of the persons presenting them. To all those who have 
thus contributed to the increase of the library, the trustees have 
caused due acknowledgment to be made. 

At the date of the last report, the trustees were assured by Mr. 
Charles A. Durfee, the compiler of the new catalogue, that the 
work upon which he had been engaged during the two preced- 
ing years would be finished in a few months. Much to the dis- 
appointment uf the trustees the compilation was not completed 
during the year just closed. In February last, however, Mr. 
Durfee notified the trustees that he had completed the compil- 
ation of the manuscript of the catalogue. Before accepting the 
manuscript it was thought advisable to have the work of Mr. 
Durfee examined by some person familiar with the preparation 
of catalogues for libraries who would report to the trustees 
whether the compilation was properly prepared. Should this re- 
port be favorable, the trustees expect that the public can have 
the benefit of the catalogue within a short time. 



KEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 201 

Mrs. E. A. H. Piper has continued to be en^ployed at the li- 
brary during the year, part of the time as an assistant to Mr. 
Durfee in his work, but devoting as much of her time as possible 
to copying for the card catalogue. In the early part of the year 
the catalogue of the works of fiction and juvenile books was 
completed and arranged for use, much to the satisfaction of the 
patrons of the library. The work of copying the rest of the 
catalogue is well advanced, and as fast as completed will be ar- 
ranged for consultation of the public at the library. 

The duties of librarian have been discharged by Mrs. M. J. 
Buncher with the same conscientious fidelity to the public as 
heretofore, and to the satisfaction of the trustees. 

The trustees desire to renew their acknowledgments to the 
members of the city councils for the courtesy and consideration 
with which their suggestions relating to the library have been re- 
ceived and carried out. 

March 13, 1893. 

In board of trustees read and approved and ordered to be 
signed by the chairman and clerk of the board, and transmitted 
to the city councils. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor. 

N. P. Hunt, Clerk. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the City Library : 

The treasurer of the board presents the following account of 
the receipts and expenditures by the board of the funds received 
on account of the library : 



1892. 




Dr. 


Jan. I. 


To balance of appropriation . 
Mrs. M. J. Buncher, bal- 


^709.23 




ance of fines 


66.88 




Mrs. M. J. Buncher, cata- 






logues sold . 


14.40 




Mrs. M. J. Buncher, for 






book lost 


I-9S 




Mrs. M. J. Buncher, gift 


3.00 




appropriation for 1892, for 






books .... 


1,000.00 



Jan. I . 


To balance of income of Dean . 








fund .... 


^5 


^3^3-^3 




income of Dean fund 




153-00 


April I. 


income of Dean fund 




16.88 


July I. 


income of Dean fund 
interest on accumulation 




108.00 




of income . 




217.26 



Jan. I. To Mary E. Elliot fund . . $2,000.00 
balance of interest on Mary 

E. Elliot fund . . 636.32 



$1,795-46 



$5,808.77 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 203 



April I. To interest on Mary E. Elliot 

fund .... ^90.00 

interest on accumulation of 

income . . . 28.62 



July 7. To Eliza A. Eaton fund . ^2,887.80 

Aug. I. interest on Eliza A. Eaton 

fund .... 9.55 



1892. 

Jan. 



Feb. 



6. 

8. 

19. 

22. 

25- 

25- 
2. 

3- 

4- 
4- 
4- 
4- 
4- 

10. 
II. 
IS- 
18. 
24. 



March i . 

2. 

22, 

23- 



Paid New England News Co.. periodicals 
Boston Book Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
The History Co., books 
The History Co., books . 
George H. Policy & Co., periodicals 
New England News Co., periodicals 
J. H. Hickcox, periodicals . 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., books 
Frank B. Webster Co., periodicals 
Boston Public Library, periodicals 
American Microscopical Journal, pe 

riodicals .... 
John N. McClintock, books . 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co;, books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
D. Appleton & Co., books 
Central Law Journal Co., period! 

cals ..... 
The History Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
Geo. A. Blanchard, books 



^2,754-94 



^2,897.35 

513^256.52 

Cr. 
$10.21 
5.00 

3-5C 
20.00 
18.00 

4-So 
6.00 
16.16 
5.00 
2.00 
1. 00 

I.OO 

2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

82.16 

10.85 

9.00 

5.00 

4-SO 
11-43 
32-77 

4-5° 



204 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



April 4. 
5' 



8. 

18. 
19. 
19. 
26. 

2. 

4- 
7- 



May 



21. 
21. 

2. 
29. 



June 

July 



27. 

Aug. 5. 
Sept. 3. 

15- 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



19. 

5- 
^3- 

3- 
19. 
22. 

6. 
19. 
20. 
SI- 
SI- 
SI- 



Paid Y. W. C. A., books 

New England News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books .' 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
The History Co., books . 
Moses G. Shirley, books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing 

Co., books .... 

D. Appleton & Co., books 
W. B. Clarke & Co., books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Little, Brown & Co., books . 
New England News Co., periodicals 
The History Co., books 
New England News Co., periodicals 
New England News Co., periodicals 
Chas. Scribner's Sons, (Dean fund) 

books ..... 

Little, Brown & Co., books 

New England News Co., periodicals 

D. H. Hurd & Co., books 

New England News Co. , periodicals 

Geo. E. Littlefield, books 

Geo. E. Littlefield, books 

New England News Co., periodicals 

Little, Brown & Co., books . 

books ...... 

balance of appropriation 

balance of Dean fund 

Mary E. Elliot fund and interest 

Eliza A. Eaton fund and interest . 



^20.00 
12.82 
S-75 
25-23 
15-55 
31-51 
54-25 

4.50 

1. 00 

16.04 

5.00 
5.00 

48.34 

11.36 

2.00 

11.94 

4-50 
11.51 
13.66 

5-50 

3-50 

10.86 

15.00 

11.89 

11.25 

1. 00 

10.77 

4-25 

2.00 

1,168.40 

5»8o3-27 
2,754-94 
2,897.35 



^i3>256.52 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 205 



The expenditures for the incidental expenses of the library, 
inchiding the amounts paid on account for the preparation of 
the new catalogue, for the year ending December 31, 1892, the 
bills for which were paid by the city treasurer, upon the approval 
of the committee on accounts of the board of trustees, and the 
items of which may be found in the annual report of the city, 
have been as follows : 
Services of librarian 
Services of assistant librarian 



Gas 

Binding 

Rebinding . 

Fuel 

Insurance 

Supplies 

Incidentals . 

Water . 

Newspapers . 

Printing trustees' report 

Catalogue . ' . 

Total 

RECAPITULATION 

Balance of appropriation Dec. 31, 1892 . 
Balance of appropriation for catalogue, 

Dec. 31, 1892 . 
Appropriation for 1892 

Paid trustees for purchase of books 
Paid incidental expenses and catalogue . 
Balance of appropriation Dec. 31, 1892 
Balance of appropriation for catalogue, 
Dec. 31, 1892 . . . . . 



$3,097.62 

2,260.32 
3,800.00 

^1,000.00 
3,864.49 
3;523-28 

770.17 



gooo.oo 

382.50 
227.50 

318.93 
175.28 
248.58 

125.00 
26.90 

36-65 

16.00 

6.00 

11.00 

1,490.15 
$3,864.49 



^9,157-94 



), ^57-94 



Respectfully submitted. 

NATHAN P. HUNT, 
Treasurer of the Trustees of the City Library^ 



206 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

December 31, 1892. 
We have examined the foregoing report and find the same cor- 
rectly cast and properly vouched. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, 
L. B. CLOUGH, 

Committee on Accounts of City Library. 

December 31, 1892. 
I certify that I have examined the several items of receipts and 
expenditures embraced in the foregoing report of the treasurer of 
the City Library, and find the same correctly cast and properly 
vouched. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Trustees : 

I respectfully submit to you my fifteenth yearly report, being 
the thirty-ninth annual report of the city library : 

Whole number of accessions December 31, 1 89 1 . 34)929 

Added during the year : 

By purchase . . ' . . . 152 

Donated ...... 719 

Periodicals and papers bound . . 107 

Volumes of pamphlets bound . . 161 



Whole number at present : 

Maps 
Pamphlets 
Bound volumes 



16 

702 

35.350 



Number of periodicals and papers regularly received 
by purchase ..... 

Number by gift ..... 

Number of days open to the public for reading and 
distribution of books .... 

Number of volumes delivered for home use 

Average per day . . . 

Largest number any one day, — March 19 

Largest number any one month, — March 

Smallest number any one month, — July . 

Number delivered in the reading-room . 

Average per day ..... 



1)139 



36,068 

55 
21 

304 

55*874 

184 

438 

5.636 

4,140 

7,846 

26 



208 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Number of guarantees received for new cards . 

Whole number received since the new registration 

Number of cards used on deposit . 

Number returned to the library 

Postals sent to delinquents .... 

Number of volumes removed from circulation, worn 
out ......•• 

Volumes replaced during the year . 
Number lost or injured and paid for 
Number of volumes missing at close of the year 
Number repaired and rebound at the bindery . 
Number repaired and recovered at the library 

Balance of cash on hand December 31, 189 1 . 

Amount received from Jan. i, to Dec. 31, 1892 : 

For fines $126.57 

For finding lists, 56 at loc. . . 5.60 

Books lost or injured, and paid for . 3.42 



Paid N. P. Hunt, treasurer 



Paid for expressage and incidental expenses 



39& 

8,595 

7 

54 

350 

no 

106 

4 

5 

741 

6,496 

$86.23 



|i35-59 

$221.82 
86.23 

$135-59 
52.61 



Total cash on hand $82.98 

The work of the year just closed has been one of the most 
laborious of the present administration. The re-classification 
and re-arranging of so large a number of books has brought a 
greater increase of labor than could be anticipated. A detailed 
account cannot be given, but we trust the improved condition of 
the library will fully repay for the time and work given. The 
general work of the library varies but little, if any, from the 
preceding years. 

The addition to the library by gift has been unusually large, 
including a valuable collection of medical works from our local 
physicians ; a large number of municipal, educational, and vari- 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 209 

ous Other reports to fill the incomplete sets before the closing of 
the new catalogue. The departments at Washington have 
favored us, as usual, in supplying our deficiencies. We returned 
to them fifty-eight volumes of duplicates for the use of other 
libraries. 

The circulation shows some decrease from last year. It is by 
no means as large as it ought to be, and it is to be hoped that 
when the knowledge of the real contents of the library is given 
to the public in the new catalogues, that the circulation will 
show by its increase the appreciation it deserves. 

The number of new cards issued is smaller than in any year 
since the new registration, a fact of which no satisfactory expla- 
nation can be given. About the same number are in constant use, 
and less have been returned. 

The service of the library to the public schools seems greatly 
increased, particularly on the part of the teachers. There has 
been a greater demand for books, and they have received every 
privilege possible in connection with their school work. It 
would be well if we had the same plan adopted by some other 
libraries, of providing a larger number of copies for the use of 
pupils, giving them an opportunity of using the same book under 
the guidance of their teachers. It is always a source of disap- 
pointment when they are sent to the library for certain books, 
and find the only copy already taken by the teacher. 

The statistics of the reading-room is not a fair estimate of the 
year's attendance. Having such limited arrangements for con- 
sulting reference books, the interior of the circulating depart- 
ment has accommodated a larger number of visitors than ever 
before, not only for educational research connected with schools, 
but of those connected with the various literary clubs of our city, 
and in the formation of a new historical social club, viz., "The 
Daughters of the Revolution," the draft upon the historical 
and genealogical department has been very great. If to this 
large number of visitors were added those consulting the "Pa- 
tent Office Gazette" and law reports, the figures would be 
greatly increased. The suggestion of the mayor in his last inau- 
gural was a timely one. We do need a large and pleasant read- 



210 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ing-room, and other accommodations for our patrons, whether 
they come for recreation or useful information. There is a con- 
stant desire expressed by the public for that improvement in our 
library. 

At the close of our last examination quite a number of books 
were missing. This was not unexpected after the changes made 
in the location of so many books ; but they have gradually re -ap- 
peared, and at the present time only five are unaccounted for, 
none of special value. 

There has been over one hundred volumes replaced, but many 
more are waiting to be removed for better copies. The wear and 
tear increases yearly, and the repairing and re-covering requires 
no inconsiderable part of the time on general work. 

In closing the record of the last year we desire to express a 
hope and belief that the one we have entered upon will, with its 
improved facilities for obtaining the knowledge of the contents 
of our library, bring a wider usefulness to our city. 

Respectfully, 

Mrs. M. J. BUNCHER, 

Librarian. 



DONATIONS TO THE CITY LIBRARY. 
1892. 



Secretary of State of New Hampshire. 

Public Statutes of New Hampshire. 1891. 8vo. 

Journal of the New Hampshire Senate and House. 1891. 
8vo. 

New Hampshire Laws. 1891. 8vo. 

History of the Sixth New Hampshire Volunteers in the War 
for the Union. By Capt. Lyman Jackson. 8vo. 

History of the Eleventh New Hampshire Regiment. By 
L. W. Cogswell. 1889. 8vo. 

History of the Thirteenth New Hampshire Regiment of Vol- 
unteers. By S. M. Thompson. 1888. 8vo. 6 vols. 

Hon. E. S. Stearns, Secretary of State. 
Laws of New Hampshire for 1874. 8vo. 
Journals of the Senate and House for 1842. 8vo. 

Rev. C. L. Tappan, Librarian Historical Society of New Hamp- 
shire. 

Public Laws of New Hampshire for the years 181 1, '20, '23, 
'58, '64, '68, and '76. 7 vols. 

Arthur R. Kimball, State Librarian. 

Reports of the State Library for 1 891, 1892. 2 vols. 

Hon. J. W. Patterson, Superintendent Public Instruction of 
New Hampshire. 

Five volumes of reports, from 1886 to 1891. 8vo. 
Hon. J. C. Linehan, N. H. Insurance Commissioner. 



212 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

Annual reports of the New Hampshire Insurance Commis- 
sion for 1890, 1 89 1. 2 vols. 8vo. 

Irving A. Watson, M. D., Secretary. 

Tenth Annual Report of the State Board of Health of New- 
Hampshire. 1891. 8vo. 
Heirs of John B. Clarke, Manchester. 

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. 51 

vols. 
Fifty-two volumes on Agriculture and other miscellaneous 
subjects. 

Dr. Wm. W. Wilkins's Estate, Manchester. 

Ninety bound volumes of Medical Works, including " Zims- 
sen's Encyclopedia of the Practice of Medicine," 17 vols; 
''The Medical Times and Gazette," 10 vols. (London 
edition), and a large number unbound. 

Dr. Henry de Carvelle, Manchester. 

Thirty-two bound volumes of Medical^Works, including 13 
volumes of the " Boston Medical and Surgical Journal." 

Twelve volumes of the " Medical Record " and many un- 
bound numbers and medical pamphlets. 

Dr. Albert Pick, Manchester. 

Eighty-six bound volumes of Medical Works, including 20 
volumes of the medical publications of the Sydenham So- 
ciety, London, and various other publications in the En- 
glish and French languages. 

Rev. G. L. Demarest, Manchester. 

The Forum. For the year 1892. 2 vols. 

Popular Science Monthly. 1892. 2 vols. 

North American Review. 1892. 2 vols. 

Review of Reviews. 1891. i vol. 7 vols. 
Mrs. B. p. Cilley, Manchester. 

Six volumes of the United States Statistics. 

Two volumes of the Scientific American. 1851, 1852. 

Miscellaneous books and pamphlets. ♦ 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 213 

George C. Gilmore, Esq., Manchester. 
The Library Journal. 1891. i vol. 
The Literary News. 1891. i vol. 
The Sons of the American Revolution, i pamphlet. 

S. C. Gould, Manchester. 

Notes and Queries for the year 1892. 8vo. i vol. 
Report of the Odd Fellows' Mutual Relief Association. 1892. 
Dedication of Masonic Hall, Manchester, October, 1890. 
Societas Rosicruciana Catechesis Archani. A paper read 

before the Massachusetts College, Boston, January, 1892. 

3 pamphlets. 

W. C. T. U., Manchester. 

The Temperance Journal for the year 1892. 
A complete set of the reports of the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union of New Hampshire to 1892. 

Charles F. Livingston, Manchester. 

The Printer's Text-Book. By J. Wesley Barker. 4to. 
The United States Type Foundry. 4to. 

Judge David Cross, Manchester. 

History of American Currency. By Wm. G. Summers. 

i2mo. 
Southern New Hampshire Press Association. 1892. Pam- 
phlet. 

Rev. Thomas A. Dorion, Manchester. 

Bibliotheque du Fidele Messager. Vol. i. 1892. i2mo. 

James A. Fracker, Esq., Manchester. 

History of Ridgely Lodge No. 74, I. O. O. F., and original 
poem by James A. Fracker. 8vo. i vol. 

N. P. Kidder, City Clerk. 

Laws of the State of New Hampshire, passed June, 1872, 
i873> 1875- 3 pamphlets. 
H. W. Eastman, Secretary. 

The Board of Trade Journal. 1891, 1892. 4to. 



214 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Thomas W. Lane, Chief Engineer. 

Annual Report of the Fire Department of Manchester for 
the year 1891. Pamphlet. 
C. H. Kimball, Esq., Manchester. 

Three cases of miscellaneous periodicals and newspapers, un- 
bound. 
George P. Clews, Esq., Concord, N. H. 

Journal of Proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Ma- 
sons, State of New Hampshire, for the years 1873, '75) '78, 
'82, '8^, '89. 6 pamphlets. 
Proceedings of the Grand Commandery of Knights Tem- 
plar of New Hampshire for 1877, 1891. 2 vols. 8vo. 

Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Reports from 1876 to 1891, inclusive. 16 pamphlets. 
Morris R. Hamilton, Esq., State Librarian. 

New Jersev Archives. Volumes 15 and 16. 2 vols. 8vo. 
Charles L. Brace, Secretary. 

Annual reports of the Children's Aid Society of New York 
from 1882 to 1 89 1, inclusive. 9 pamphlets. 

Gordon, H. L., Chicago. 

" The Feast of the Virgin and Other Poems." 189 1. i2mo. 
Joseph W. Errant, Secretary. 

" The Echoes of the Sunset Club." 1891. Chicago. i2mo. 
John R. Ham, M. D. 

Bibliography of Dover, N. H. 1892. 

Dover, N. H., in the United States Navy during the Civil 
War. 1892. 2 pamphlets. 

Henry E. Waite, Esq. 

The Origin of the American Navy. 1890. 4to. 

Y. M. C. Association, England. 

Success in Life. A Present to Youths and Young Men. 2 
vols. l8qi. 121110. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 215 

C. J. H. Woodbury, Lynn, Mass. 

Addresses at the presentation to the city of Lynn of the first 
casting made in America by the Saugus Iron Works in 
1642. Pamphlet. 

Christian Science Dispensary, Manchester. 

Christian Science Journal for the year 1892. 8vo. 

William L Kimball, City Clerk, Lawrence. 

Municipal Reports for the years 1887 to 1891, inclusive. 
5 vols. 

Rev. H. L. Wheeler, Burlington, Vt. 

Christianity and Life, an address before the American 
Canoe Association. Pamphlet. 

Fred A. Chase, Librarian, Lowell. 

Origin and Genealogy of the Hildreth family of Lowell, 
Mass. Pamphlet. 

Dr. L. Bremer, St. Louis. 

Tobacco, Insanity, and Nervousness. By Dr. L. Bremer, 
1892. Pamphlet. 

Denis A. Holland, President. 

First and third annual reports of the Society of St. Vincent 
de Paul. 2 pamphlets. 

Joseph E, Bennett, Esq. 

First Annual Report of Elliot Hospital for the year 1891. 
Pamphlet. 

E. M. Bowman, City Clerk, Nashua. 

Municipal Report of the City of Nashua for 1891. i2mo. 

James B. Straw, Auditor. 

Forty-sixth Annual Report of the City of Manchester. 
1891. i2mo. 

From the Mayor's Office. 

126 volumes of Municipal Reports of various cities and 
towns in the United States. 



216 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Unknown. 

Nicaragua Canal, The Gateway of the Pacific. 4to. 
James R. Carnahan's reply to Dr. John A. Wyeth, on The 

Treatment of Prisoners at Camp Morton, Indianapolis. 
Protection and Free Trade. By Henry George. 
Official Report of the New Hampshire Music Teachers' 
Association. 1891. 4 pamphlets. 

Universities and Colleges. 

Cornell University: Register for 1891-92. Pamphlet. 

Amherst College : Catalogue for 1891-92. Pamphlet. 

Harvard University : Reports of President and Treasurer 
for the year 1891-92. Pamphlet. 

University of California: Register for 1891-92. PaYn- 
phlet. 

University of Chicago : Quarterly Calendar, No. 3 ; Offi- 
cial Bulletin, No. 6. 2 pamphlets. 

University of Denver and Colorado Seminary : Catalogue 

for 1892-93. Pamphlet- 
University of Pennsylvania : Proceedings of the Opening 
of the Library, February 7, 1891, and Catalogue An- 
nouncement, 1891-92. 2 pamphlets. 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.': Catalogue, 1892-93. 

Reports from Librarians and Boards of Trustees. 

Baltimore, Maryland. Annual Report of the Peabody In- 
stitute, June I, 1892. Pamphlet. 

Birmingham, England. Thirtieth Annual Report of the 
Free Public Libraries.. 1891. Pamphlet. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Thirty-fourth Annual Report of the 
Brooklyn Library. March, 1892. Pamphlet. 

Brookline, Mass. Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the Free 
Public Library. 1891. Pamphlet. 

Bridgeport, Conn. Annual Report of Public Library. 
August, 1892. Pamphlet. 

Burlington, Vt. Annual Report of the Fletcher Free Li- 
brary, for the year 1891. Pamphlet. 



REPOKT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY, 217 

Cleveland, Ohio. Twenty-third Annual Report of the 

Public Library. August 31, 1891. Pamphlet. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. Annual Report of the Public Library. 

June 30, 1891-92. Two pamphlets. 
Chicago, 111. Report of the Newbury Library for 1891. 

Chicago Public Library. June, 1892. Two pamphlets. 
■Columbus, Ohio. Public Library and Reading-room for 

the year 1891-92. Pamphlet. 
Concord, N. H. Report of Public Library for 1891. 

Pamphlet. 
Chelsea, Mass. Annual Report, for the year 1891, of the 

Fitz Public Library. Pamphlet. 
Clinton, Mass. Report of the Bigelow Free Library for 

1891. 
Detroit, Mich. Report of the Library Commission for the 

years 1891, 1892. Two pamphlets. 
Dover, N. H. Ninth Annual Report of Public Library, 

1891. Pamphlet. 

Fall River, Mass. Annual Report of Public Library for 
the year 1891. Pamphlet. 

Germantown, Phil. Report of the Friends' Free Library 
and Reading-room for 1891. Pamphlet. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. Report of Free Public Library for 
the year 1892. Pamphlet. 

Jersey City, N. J. First Annual Report of the Free Public 
Library. Pamphlet. Monthly Record for the year 1892. 

Los Angeles, Cal. Annual Report for the yearj_i89i. Pam- 
phlet. 

Lawrence, Mass. Bulletin No 8 of Free Public Library. 

Lynn, Mass. Twenty- ninth Annual Report of the Public 
Library. 1891. Pamphlet. 

Lowell, Mass. Report of the City Library for 1890 and 

1892. Two pamphlets. 

Melrose, Mass. Twenty-first Annual Report of Public Li- 
brary. Two pamphlets. 

Maiden, Mass. Fourteenth Annual Report of Public Li- 
brary. Two pamphlets. 



218 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Minneapolis, Minn. Second Annual Report of Free Li- 
brary. Two pamphlets. 

Manchester, Eng. Report of Committees of Public Free 
Libraries for the year 1891-92. Pamphlets. Address on 
The Moral Influence of Free Libraries. By Alexander 
Ireland, at the opening of the Longstreet Branch Library. 
July, 1892. Pamphlet. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Fourteenth Annual Reports of the Public 
Library. October, 1892. Pamphlet. 

New York. Annual Report of the Mercantile Library As- 
sociation for 1891-92. Pamphlet. Maimonides Library. 
Report for the year 1891. Pamphlet. 

Newark, N. J. Third Annual Report of Free Library. 
Pamphlet. 

Newton, Mass. Annual Report of Public Library. 1891. 
Pamphlet. 

Natick, Mass. Report of Morse Institute for 1891. Pam- 
phlet. 

Omaha, Neb. Public Library Report for year ending May, 
1892. Pamphlet. 

Providence, R. I. Fourteenth Annual Report of the Free 
Public Library. 1891. Pamphlet. 

Philadelphia Library Company. Bulletin No. 29. Septem- 
ber, 1892. 

Philadelphia Apprentice's Library Company, Annual Re- 
port for 1892. Finding List. 1892. Two pamphlets. 

San Francisco Free Library Report. June, 1891. Pam- 
phlet. 

San Francisco Mercantile Library Association. Report for 
1 89 1. Pamphlet. 

Scranton, Penn. Annual Report of Scranton Public Li- 
brary for the year 1891. Pamphlet. 

Salem, Mass. Report of Free Public Library. 1891. 
Pamphlet. 

St. Louis, Mo. Mercantile Library Association. Reports 
and Catalogues, 13 pamphlets. Report of the Free Pub- 
lic Library for the year 1890-91. Pamphlet. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 219 

Springfield, Mass. Report of the Library Association for 
the year ending May, 1892. Pamphlets. Bulletins Nos. 
1-12. Vol. 5. 1892. 4to. 

Worcester, Mass. Thirty-sixth Annual Report of the Pub- 
lic Library. November, 1892. 

Warner, N. H. Dedication of the Pillsbury Free Library 
Building. 1892. Pamphlet. 

From the Several Publishers. 

" Colorado Sun." Published in Denver. For the year 
1892. Folio. 

"High School Echo." Published by the senior class of 
the Manchester High School. Vol. 3. 1892. 4to. 

"Lawrence Anzeiger." (German.) Published at Law- 
rence, Mass. For the year 1892. Folio. 

''Le National." Published in Manchester, N. H. Benja- 
min Lenthier, proprietor. (French daily.) 

"Manifesto." From Shaker Village, Canterbury, N. H. 
For 1892. 8vo. 

" New Hampshire Catholic." Charles A. O'Connor, Esq., 
publisher, Manchester, N. H. Folio. 

"Plymouth Record." Record Publishing Company, Ply- 
mouth, N. H. i85'2. Folio. 

"Students' Phonographic Journal." Andrew J. Graham, 
publisher. New York. For 1892. 4to. 

"Saturday Telegram." William M. Kendall, publisher, 
Manchester, N. H. For 1892. Folio. 

"The Voice." A Temperance Journal. Funk & Wag- 
nails, publishers. New York. For 1892. Folio. 

"Travelers' Record." Travelers' Insurance . Company, 
Hartford, Conn. 1892. 4to. 

"Weirs Times." M. W. Calvert, publisher, Weirs, N. H. 
For the tourist season of 1892. Folio. 

"The Worcester Council" (The Board of Trade). Pub- 
lished by F. S. Blanchard & Co., Worcester, Mass. For 
1892. 4to. 



220 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 



State Department. 

Report of the cholera in Europe and India. By Edward O. 

Shakespeare of Philadelphia, commissioner. 1890. 4to. 
Commercial relations of the United States for the years ' 

1888, 1889, 1890, 1891. 8vo. 
Consular reports, 13 numbers, completing Vols. 36, 37, 38, 

and 39. 
Special Consular Reports, i to 4. 1892. 
Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission for 1891. 

8vo. 
Report on the Statistics of Railways in the United States. 

Vol. 3. June 30, 1890. 8vo. 

Treasury Department. 

Report of the Comptroller of the Currency. 1891, 1892. 

Two volumes. 8vo. 
Report of the Secretary of the Treasury for 1890. 8vo. 
Report of the Superintendent of the Coast Survey for 1890. 

4to. Bulletin No. 25. October 14, 1892. 
Modern Lighthouse Service. By,, Arnold B. Johnson, chief 

clerk United States Lighthouse Board. 1889. ^^o* 
First report of the United States Board of Geographic 

Names. 1890, 1891. 8vo. 

War Department. 

Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. 
From Vol. 38 to 40, with parts. 9 vols. 

Alphabetical List of additions to the War Department Li- 
brary, from May, 1884, to 1891. 8vo. 

Atlases accompanying the Official Records of the War, parts 
4 to 10. 

Interior Department. 

Report of the Secretary of the Interior, and fourteen miscel- 
laneous pamphlets, viz. : Reports of Governors of Arizo- 
na, Utah, New Mexico, Alaska, and Oklahoma. Reports 



REPOKT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE CITY LIBRARY. 221 

of the Government Hospital for the Insane, Freedmen's 
Hospital, Howard University, Sequoia and General Grant 
National Parks, Commission of Pensions, etc., etc. 

List of Congressional Documents from the Fifteenth to the 
Fifty-first Congress inclusive. By J. G. Ames. 8vo. 

Congressional Directory. June, 1892. Pamphlet. 

Receipts and Distribution of Documents. 1890 and 1891. 
Pamphlet. 

Fifty-eight volumes of Public Documents, and fifteen 
pamphlets to fill vacancies. 

Bureau of Education. 

Report of the Commissioner of Education. 1888 and 1889. 

Two vols. 8vo. 
Circulars of Information, Nos. i to 9, 1891. No. i, 1892. 

Ten pamphlets. 
Education of Deaf Children. Evidences of Edward M. 

Gallaudet and Alex G. Ball. 1892. 

Navy Department. 

United States Coast Pilot, Atlantic Coast, Parts i and 2. 
From the St. Croix River to Cape Ann. By Richardson 
Glover, hydrographer, United States Coast Survey. 1891. 
4 to. 
Agricultural Department. 

Weather Bureau. Report on the Climate of California and 
Nevada, with reference to Irrigation and Water-Storage 
in the Arid Regions. 1891. 4to. 

Bulletins Nos. i to 5 inclusive, relating to the Physical Prop- 
erties of Soils, etc.. New Methods of Magnetic Observa- 
tions, Fluctuations of Ground Waters, etc. 
Smithsonian Institution. 

Contributions to Knowledge. Vol. 28. 4to. 

Annual Report of the Institution for the year 1889, includ- 
ing the report of the National Museum. Bulletins Nos. 
41 and 42. 

The Museums of the Future. By G. B. Goode. Pam- 
phlet. M. M. McDonald, commissioner. 



222 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Bulletin of the United States Fish Commission for the year 
1889. 8vo. 

United States Congress. 

Seventy-four volumes of Public Documents of the Fiftieth, 

Fifty-first, and Fifty-second Congresses. 
The Congressional Record of the First and Second Sessions 

of the Fifty-second Congress. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUNDS. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF THE CEMETERY FUNDS. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Trustees of the Cemetery Funds have the 
honor to present herewitb their thirteenth annual report, embrac- 
ing the report of their treasurer, which exhibits the financial 
operations for the year ending December 31, 1892, and the con- 
dition of the fund at the present time. 

All endowed lots have received the usual care and attention 
since our last annual report. Special and somewhat extensive 
improvements have been made at the tomb erected by the late 
Col. George W. Bailey, by the erection of a substantial bank 
wall in place of a more temporary structure, to hold the earth in 
place. It was a work that had long been needed, but was de- 
layed to allow the fund to accumulate to an extent that would 
warrant the outlay. 

The trustees have referred more than once in former reports to 
the inadequate sums that have, in some cases, been left for the 
care of lots ; and they have in several instances been compelled 
to decline to receive the sums so left, in justice to those who had 
provided more liberal amounts. Under these circumstances it 
seemed desirable that a minimum sum should be fixed for tire 
care of isolated lots; and after mature consideration the trustees 
have decided in no case to accept less than seventy-five cents per 
square foot. Where expensive structures are upon lots, especially 
if the material used is marble, a larger sum should be deposited, 

15 



226 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

in order that the income may be sufficient to meet the demands 
that are sure to come, in time, to all work constructed of this 
material. 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, 
P. C. CHENEY, 
JAMES A. WESTON, 

Trustees of Cemetery Funds. 
January 2, 1893. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of Cemeteries : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith present to you my annual report of 
the money received by me during the year ending December 31, 
1892 : 

Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Number of deeds delivered during the year, seventy-seven. 

To cash received for the same . . ^2,691.16 
interest ...... 5.74 

cash received from superintendent . 2,011.68 



Cr. 

By treasurer's receipt .... ;g2, 696.90 
superintendent's receipts . . . 2,011.68 



$4,708-58 



^708.58 



Valley Cemetery. 



To cash received from superintendent . . . $1,800.00 
By treasurer's receipts ...... 1,800.00 

All money received by me has been turned into the city treas- 
ury, for which I have the proper vouchers from the city clerk. 

I have thirty deeds ready for delivery, which, with a few ex- 
ceptions, will be taken in a few weeks. There are one or two 
which I doubt if ever the contract will be completed. Such 
cases should receive your earliest attention. 

Most respectfully submitted, 
SYLVANUS B. PUTNAM, 

Treasurer. 



228 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus 
B. Putnam, treasurer of the trustees of cemeteries, and find the 
same correctly cast and properly vouched for. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

January 2, 1893. City Auditor. 



REPORT 



TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the Pine Grove Cemetery have the honor 
to submit the following report : 

The past year has witnessed very satisfactory and marked im- 
provement in the development of this cemetery. 

More than a thousand yards of concrete have been laid and 
the iron fence has been removed from the north end of the lot 
and placed upon the east side against the highway. This should 
be extended to the south end of the cemetery at no distant day. 

Many monuments have been erected and quite a number of 
beautiful and elegant design. Very few spots can be found in 
any cemetery anywhere, excelling or equaling in beauty and at- 
tractiveness Hillside lawn in this cemetery. Its lots are now 
all sold and nearly all to some extent occupied. 

Surveying the cemetery from the elevation at this point one 
can but feel that it would have been wise, in the first instance, to 
have placed the whole cemetery under conditions of perpetual 
care, but if this would have made the lots too expensive for per- 
sons of limited means, in every deed of sale there could have 
been inserted a condition of care on the part of the owner, and 
in case of neglect, the city to have power to supply the same and 
the cost to be a lien upon the lot, enforceable by forfeiture of 
title. 



230 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



A neglected grave is not only repulsive and unsightly in itself, 
but it is a blotch upon the locality that mars the beauty of its 
surroundings. The few hours of labor and the trifling expense 
required to keep a lot in at least a presentable condition are too 
trifling to seriously burden any lot owner, and the neglect now 
painfully apparent in too many cases must be attributed to want 
of appreciation and sensibility rather than to poverty. 

The completion of Riverside lawn, with its 126 lots now ready 
for sale and occupancy, will for the present meet the demand for 
perpetual-care lots, but at the present rate of sale this source of 
supply cannot be relied upon for many years. In fact, the pres- 
ent rate of sale will exhaust the supply of all lots in this cemetery 
in from six to eight years. 

This fact most emphatically emphasizes the importance of ear- 
ly securing additional grounds for cemetery purposes adjoining 
the present lot if that locality is to be looked to to supply the fu- 
ture demands of our population in this direction. 

GEORGE W. BACON. 
JOHN P. YOUNG. 
C. H. BARTLETT. 

Superintendent's Account. 



RECEIPTS. 

The following are the receipts of the Superintendent of Pine 
Grove Cemetery from Januaay i to December 31, 1892 : 

Received as part payment on lots sold 
for interments 
for removals . 
for water rents 
for labor on lots 
for wood and logs . 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Number of interments 
removals 



022.00 

507-50 

57-50 

596,00 

793-05 
55-63 



^2,631.68 



171 
18 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES. 



231 



Number of restricted lots sold . 

restricted lots unsold 
Ordinary lots sold .... 
Ordinary lots unsold 
Lots sold on Hillside lawn 

(Lots on Hillside lawn are now all 
Lots sold on Riverside lawn 
Lots unsold on Riverside lawn 
Number of loads of loam used . 
clay used . 
gravel used 
sand removed . 
feet of 3-inch water pipe laid 
hydrants put in 
yards of concrete put down 



sold.) 



21 
112 

31 
II 
II 

I 
126 

354 
300 

324 

465 

7 



Valley Cemetery. 

The sub-trustees of the cemetery known as the Valley respect- 
fully submit the following report : 

During the year, in addition to the ordinary amount of labor 
expended in keeping the grounds in proper condition, the iron 
and wooden fences about the cemetery have been repaired, the 
former at an expense of one hundred and ten dollars, and the lat- 
ter at an expense of twelve dollars. The fence was also painted 
at a cost of one hundred and seventy dollars. The bank wall on 
Pine street, near the brook, which had been undermined and 
damaged by surface water from the street, has been repaired at 
a cost of fifty dollars. The work of paving the bottom and edg- 
es of the brook, which had been carried on for several years, was 
finished the past year to the west line of the cemetery. Stone 
steps have also been placed in the path leading up the eastern side 
of the valley at a cost of seventy dollars. 

The roof of the tomb, which has never been water tight since 
it was built, has been thoroughly repaired during the year at an 
expense of about three hundred dollars, and the trustees believe 
that no further trouble will be experienced therefrom. 



232 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The trustees are pleased to report that during the year greater 
interest than ever before has been taken in the affairs of the cem- 
etery by the owners of lots therein, and a larger number of the 
lots have been improved and beautified during the last year than 
in previous years. 

During the year monuments have been erected on the follow-- 
ing lots : Nathaniel Baker, Edward P. Johnson, David Thayer, 
Joseph P. Felt, Miss Lucretia E. Manahan, Sewell L. Fogg, 
Frank B. Eaton, Russell, and Demay. 

There have been eighty-six interments in the cemetery during 
the year, six removals of bodies, and forty-five bodies have been 
placed in the tomb. 

The following is the account of the receipts and expenditures 
as reported to the committee by the superintendent : 

Superintendent's Account, 
receipts. 



Appropriation .... 

Tomb fees 

Graves and removals 


$3,000.00 
158.50 
245.00 


Care and water .... 
Labor and materials 


850.00 
546.50 



$4,800.00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Pay-Roll. 

Paid C. H. G. Foss, superintendent 
C. H. Griffin, labor 
L. Leavitt, labor . 
James Hannan, labor 
Jacques Bilodeau, labor . 
J. Concannon, labor 
H. Read, labor 



$728.00 
341.24 
332-25 
209.72 
212.25 
27.69 
7-65 



$1,858.80 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF CEMETERIES, 



233 



MISCELLANEOUS. 




Paid F. G. Riddle, printing .... 


53-25 


J. H. Rand, ashes 


30-58 


AVilliam Sutcliffe 


.90 


Manchester Hardware Co., hardware 


1.70 


Michael Murray, manure 


15.00 


B. F. Bascomb, teaming 


62.40 


P. 0. Woodman, turf and loam 


26.75 


J. B. Varick Co., hardware and seed 


55-96 


J. Francis, plants and labor . 


56.82 


J. Hodge, lumber 


•45 


F. M. Barnard, teaming 


16.00 


H. M. Whiting, shrubs .... 


1.25 


M. Haley, loam 


28.00 


Hartley Vaughan, manure 


5.00 


T. A. Lane, pipe and hose 


22.26 


Manchester Water-works 


45-45 


F. L. Bodwell, labor and stone ' . 


117-37 


Patrick Knee, labor . . . . . 


5.00 


L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor . 


11. 97 


M. S. & R. Co., phosphate . 


6.00 


Ray Brook Garden Co., plants 


62.23 


J. Brown, loam and labor 


159-65 


H. H. Huntress, plants .... 


3.00 


Temple & Farrington Co 


1. 10 


S. C. Forsaith Co., repairing fence 


105.28 


Pike & Heald, pipe and labor 


84.86 


Jones & Co., painting fence . 


179.00 


George Dodge, rubber boots . 


2.25 


H. E. Babcock, shrubs .... 


2.00 


S. S. Piper, stamps .... 


2.18 


F. X.. Chenette, sand, etc. 


9-^3 


Palmer & Garmon . . . . 


•45 


L. L. Aldrich, labor .... 


.81 




52,982.85 


Paid S. B. Putnam, city treasurer . 


^1,800.00 


Balance 


17-15 



^4,800.00 



234 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



REPAIRS ON CITY TOMB. 

Appropriation ^350.00 

Paid Head & Dowst .... ^290.22 
F. Bodwell 5.00 



$295.22 

Balance . . . . . : • ■ 54- 7^ 



The duties of superintendent have been discharged during the 
year by Mr. Charles H. G. Foss with the same fidelity as in past 
years, and to the entire satisfaction of the committee. 

JOHN J. HOLLAND, 

LEVI K. SNOW, 

N. P. HUNT, 

J. M. KENDALL, 

Sub- Trustees of the Valley -Cemetery. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Mayor ^ Aldermen^ and Common Council of the City of 

Manchester: 

In compliance with the ordinance of said city the Overseers of 
the Poor herewith present their annual report for the year 1892 : 

The whole number of families that have received more or less 
assistance off the farm during the year has been seventy, consist- 
ing of two hundred and thirty-four persons, all of whom have a 
settlement in this city. Four of this number died during the 
year. The whole number of paupers supported at the city farm 
during the year has been three more or less of the whole time. 

The overseers of the poor recommend that the poor people 
sent to the city farm be kept exclusively from the prisoners sent 
to that institution, which is not the case at the present time ; also 
that the poor people be supplied with reading matter in the shape 
of books and newspapers containing the news of the day, and that 
a proper room be set apart where the poor shall be allowed to 
go and read such books and papers, and that all profanity of 
whatever description shall be forbidden by the superintendent 
and his assistants when indulged in by any of the city poor ; 
also that the superintendent be forbidden to punish any poor per- 
son under his charge at the city farm. 

The whole number of persons supported at the state industrial 
school during the year has been two, at a cost of one dollar and 
fifty cents per week for each person. 

The whole number of persons supported at the county farm 
during the year has been two, at a cost of two dollars per week 
for each person. 



238 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



The overseers of the poor have given and allowed five hun- 
dred and eighty orders to the city poor during the year, consist- 
ing chiefly of groceries, fuel, medicine, board, clothing, and 
emergencies. 

The amount allowed to the several wards is as follows : 

Ward I 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Ward 8 



$S2 


50 


2l6 


13 


334 


15 


594- 


88 


1,914 


66 


392. 


12 


737.09 



^J26I.53 



MISCELLANEOUS BILLS ALLOWED. 



State Industrial School, board of inmates ^1,171.08 
Town of Lebanon, support of Dinnis Sul- 
livan . . . . . . . 164.21 

Books and stationery . . . . 19-37 



Total cost ..... 
Cash received from county of Hillsborough 



^1,354.66 

^5,616.19 
1,171.08 

^4,445-" 



Total expense ...... 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

William H. Maxwell, 
Thomas L, Quimby, 
Benjamin F. Garland, 
George S. Holmes, 
Patrick Costello, 
^ Charles Francis, 
William Marshall, 
William Weber, 

Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 
A true copy. Attest : 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 239 

To the May or ^ Aldermen^ aud Common Council of the City of 
Manchester : 

In compliance with chapter 8i, sections i and 2, Laws of the 
State of New Hampshire, passed at the June session, 1889, the 
Overseers of the Poor herewith present their annual report under 
the head of "Aid to Dependent Soldiers and their Families." 

The whole number of indigent soldiers who have received 
more or less aid during the year has been sixteen, consisting of 
ten families, all of whom have a settlement in this city, at a cost 
of two hundred eighty-one dollars and twenty-six cents. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 
WiLLiAJi H. Maxwell, 
Thomas L. Quimby, 
Benjamin F. Garland, 
George S. Holmes, 
Patrick Costello, 
Charles Francis, 
William Marshall, 
Willlam Weber, 

Overseers of the Poor for the City of Manchester. 

A true copy. Attest : 

WILLIAM H. MAXWELL, 

Clerk. 



REPORT 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON 
CITY FARM. 



16 



REPORT 

OF THE 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON CITY 

FARM. 



To His HoJior the Mayor and City Councils of the City oj 

Manchester : 

Gentlemen, — The Joint Standing Committee on City Farm 
hereby submit to you their annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1892. 

Having fairly and impartially appraised all personal property 
at the farm, we find the summary as follows : 
Live stock ........ ^2,293.00 

Wagons, carts, and team furnishings . . . 1,091.70 

Farming implements ...... 1,208.00 

Hay, grain, and produce ..... 3,223.12 

Household furniture ...... 2,693.99 

Provisions and fuel ...... 1,379.80 



^11,889.61 



Statement of accounts for the year 1892 : 

Dr. 

To appropriation . . . . . $ 
overdraft ...... 



7,500.00 
759-17 



$8,259.17 



244 ANNUAL OFFICIAL 


REPORTS. 


Cr. 




By cash receipts of th'e farm . 


. $2,458.11 


increase in stock 


602.04 


permanent improvements . 


2,029.36 


bills receivable 


19-35 


Balancce 


• 3. 150-31 



i,529.i7 



Cash paid city treasurer, $2,458.11. 

Total number of weeks board, 2,645. 

Average cost of board per week for each person, $1.19. 

Following is a list of crops harvested the past season, not in- 
cluding the amount used through the summer and fall : 

Corn ........ 1,000 bushels. 

Potatoes . 

Carrots . 

Mangold beets 

Blood beets 

Turnips 

Onions 

Popcorn 

Beans 

Parsnips 

Cider 

Apples 

Hay . 

Corn fodder 

Meadow hay 

Cabbage 

Squash 

Celery 

Pork 

Beef 

Among the permanent improvements at the farm was the 
drilling of a new well which, with the piping and a new pump, 



400 


i i 


616 


a 


800 


a 


142 


i i 


75 


a 


60 


a 


10 


i i 


12 


a 


10 


le 


30 


casks. 


80 


barrels. 


100 


tons. 


25 


(( 


8 


(( 


2 


iC 


2 


I i 


1,000 


bunches 


5,587 pounds. 


1,120 


(( 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CITY FARM. 245 

cost about twelve hundred and fifty dollars. The sewerage in 
the cellar has all been remodeled, and iron pipe hung through 
the cellar in place of akron pipe, and all the under-ground 
steam pipes have been replaced with new pipe. The large arch 
in the wash-room has been laid new and new kettles set, the arch 
in the kitchen has also been rebuilt. 

Quite a large job of ditching has been commenced in the field 
between Lowell and Bridge streets, west of the Mammoth road ; 
some of it is now quite near completion. 

The old blind ditch put in years ago from Bridge to Lowell 
streets was quite a large part of it Akron pipe, laid with cement, 
which gave the water no chance whatever to drain off. If the 
new ditch is completed as intended to be, and as some of it is 
nearly finished now, it will make a great improvement to the farm, 
for a part of the field is nearly worthless to cultivate as it has 
been years past. 

We have been this year, as last, unable to realize what we ought 
from the labor of the prisoners, who might be used to good ad- 
vantage on the streets. As a class they are able bodied and 
should be made to sweat the rum out of themselves to some pur- 
pose and profit, instead of being hived up in idleness in a sweat- 
box known as a prison. To the knowledge of your committee 
no prisoner has escaped during the year, which speaks volumes 
in favor of its claim as a popular resort. Long after seashore and 
mountain boarders are gone its patrons linger. But, in all seri- 
ousness, the city should no longer be a party to this farce of sup- 
posed punishment. It has a duty to perform. The prisoners are 
subjects of its care, and, while they may be deprived of their lib- 
erty, ought not to be confined in unhealthy quarters. Nor should 
the moral atmosphere be such, from necessarily close contact 
that all alike become hardened criminals. 

A suitable prison building is imperatively needed, so that a 
classification can be made and a stricter discipline enforced ; a 
bill of fare should be established embracing only the necessaries, 
and it be made in fact a correctional institution. 

Your committee have overcome a difficulty which has come up 
periodically for years, the scarcity of water. 



246 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Last year an artesian well was sunk in the well near the house. 
About the time it was completed the ordinary supply from the 
other well being forthcoming, nothing further was done until the 
drouth of the past summer, when your committee, using their 
best judgment, put in a hand or brake pump. While its cheap- 
ness was a consideration, the utilizing of prison labor was the de- 
sideratum. 

A test was made. Four men very lazily raised the water in the 
reservoir one and five eighths inches in fifteen minutes, which 
would give nearly fifteen barrels per hour, or one barrel more 
than stipulated. This can be increased very readily twenty per 
cent, so that your committee are very much pleased with their 
much criticised venture. 

The appointment of the same aldermen on the city farm and 
house of correction committees is a move in the right direction, 
as much better results can be attained by placing the responsibil- 
ity on one committee. 

In this connection we would tender our hearty thanks to the 
committee on house of correction for the considerate and gentle- 
manly manner in which we were met at all times. 

The hampered condition of the buildings is such as to very ma- 
terially handicap the superintendent and his efficient matron from 
obtaining the best results, yet an examination of the foregoing 
statements will contrast favorably with former years. 
Respectfully submitted. 

WALTER M. FULTON, 
BYRON WORTHEN, 
ALBERT J. PEASLEE, 
D. J. AHERN, 
Joint Standing Committee on City Farm. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



REPORT OV CITY SOLICITOR. 



To the City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — I hereby submit my report for the year 1892 
■as City Solicitor. 

Following the views expressed in my last report as to the expe- 
diency of settling suits to which the city is a party when it can 
be done on a reasonable basis, the following named cases, which 
were upon the docket of the supreme court January i, 1892, were 
disposed of by his Honor the Mayor and myself, under authority 
from the city councils, without trial, and, in my judgment, in a 
manner beneficial to the city, viz.: Lee Big \. Manchester^ Ed- 
win Branch v. Manchester, Honora Russell v. ^Manchester, Ed- 
ward Wyman v. Manchester^ all suits for damages for personal in- 
juries resulting from alleged defective highways ; Manchester v. 
Weston and others, to recover damages paid by the city on the 
verdict in action Mary Kildea v. Manchester; Manchester v. John 
Fergicson, to recover damages paid by the city on the verdict in 
action Margaret Kelley v. Manchester. Also the following suits, 
begun during the year, were disposed of in the same manner, viz.: 
Michael Collins v. Manchester, Bridget Hodgkins v. Manchester, 
Emerance Desilets v. Manchester, being all suits for damages for 
personal injuries, the first received while working in one of the 
city sewer trenches, the others received in the use of alleged de- 
fective highways. 

The cases of T. S. Colby v. Manchester and M. Colby v. Man- 
chester, pending January i, were withdrawn by the plaintiffs after 
being in court nearly three years. 

The cases of Celia Clark v. Manchester, Inez Tirrell v. Man- 
chester, R. N. Whittemore v. Manchester, Thomas Lane v. Man- 



250 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Chester, and Sarah E. Mayheio v. Manchester^ at the March term 
of the court were tried by jury and resulted, the first three in ver- 
dicts against the city, while the jury rendered verdicts in favor 
of the city in the last two. 

The case of William M. Parsons v. MancJiester, which was 
tried by jury in 1891 and taken to the law term by the city, was 
decided in favor of the plaintiff and judgment ordered on the 
verdict. 

The appeal of Campbell 6^ Maxiuell v. Alanchester was before 
the law term and a decision rendered in favor of the city, but an 
amendment to the case was allowed and it is still pending in 
court. 

The cases of the City v. M. J. Jenkins and Ids boiidsmen^ pend- 
ing January i, have been referred to Thos. D. Luce, Esq., and 
will be pushed to trial as soon as possible. 

The case of Charles S. Cousins, pending January i, was taken 
to the law term on an agreed case, and judgment rendered in fa- 
vor of the plaintiff. 

The cases of Augusta Currin v. Manchester and Catherine 
McCarthy v. Manchester are still pending on the docket. 

During the year the following cases were begun against the 
city and are now pending in court . 

Mary Dickey v. Manchester and D. H. Dickey v, Man- 
chester, 

Being suits for damages to land owned by the plaintiffs by the 
overflow of water from the city reservoir. 

C. H. Bodwell v. Manchester, 

A suit for damages for personal injuries received by being thrown 
from his carriage owing to an alleged defect in Nutt road. 

T. E. McDerby v. Manchester. 
Brought to recover damages caused by water flooding the cel- 
lar of the plaintiff's store on corner of Pine and Laurel streets, 
by the bursting of a city water pipe. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 251 

Michael Williams v. Manciiester. 

An action for personal injuries caused by an icicle dropping 
from the roof of the court house on plaintiff's head. 

Janet B. White v. Manchester. 

A suit for damages for personal injuries caused by falling on 
South Main street, owing to an alleged icy condition thereof. 

S. Woodman v. Manchester. 

A suit to recover the damages allowed by the board of mayor 
and aldermen for land taken for a new highway, but disallowed 
by the city auditor, on the ground that the plaintiff, or her grant- 
or, had laid the street out on a plan, and sold lots by the plan. 
A question of law only is involved in this case. 

Manchester v. Warren & Beede. 

■ Brought to recover the damages the city paid on the verdict 
in the case of R. N. Whittemore v. Manchester. 

The city recovered about ^800 in an action with the estate of 
John R. Hanson, on a note and mortgage over twenty years old, 
after a trial before Judge Clark. 

The case of J. O. Burbank to recover ^64 damages caused by 
lowering the grade of Massabesic street was tried before Judge 
Clark, and judgment rendered in favor of the plaintiff. 

The petition of D. C. Whittemore and others for the extension 
of Putnam street was tried before the county commissioners, and 
the petition dismissed, the city agreeing to build a substitute 
therefor. 

The petition of the city for the discontinuance of a portion of 
old Bridge street road was tried before the county commission- 
ers, and the petition was denied. 

The petition of P. C. Cheney and others for a new highway 
from Manchester to Goffstown is still pending, but has never 
been pushed for hearing by the petitioners, and will probably be 
dropped during the coming year. 



252 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPOKTS. 

Two matters in which the city of Manchester is a party are 
pending in court, which arise from the controversy over a site for 
a new railroad station, viz., the petition of Manchester for the 
discontinuance of a portion of Canal and Central streets, and the 
appeal of the Boston & Maine Railroad from the decision of the 
mayor and aldermen in widening and straightening Canal street. 

The Kimball Carriage Co. has an appeal from the tax imposed 
by the assessors in 1891, pending on the docket. 

The following cases are on the session's docket, all being ap- 
peals from the award for damages made by the mayor and alder- 
men for land taken for new highways, viz., Batchelder &= Clai-k 
V. Manchester; Executrix of John S. Woodman v. Matichester ; 
A. Elliott V. Manchester ; and Abbie M. Sawtelle v. Manchester. 

The foregoing is a summary of the matters which during the 
past year have been before the supreme court. I have the pleas- 
ure of announcing that not for a number of years has the docket, 
of cases against the city contained so few and so unimportant 
actions. The old and vexatious cases have been disposed of, 
and those which remain are not what are usually considered bad 
ones. But, as I have stated in former reports, the business 
in court is but a small part of the solicitor's duties. The other 
duties of the office have all received my attention and my best 
efforts. Many claims have been investigated, legal conundrums 
answered, many.meetings of the mayor and aldermen and of com- 
mittees have been attended, legal documents drawn, and all city 
officials advised to the best of my ability. To the various city 
officers I am indebted for assistance and courtesy, and to His 
Honor the Mayor especially I would express my hearty apprecia- 
tion of his uniform kindness and apparent confidence. 

Respectfully submitted. 

EDWIN F. JONES, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To His Honor the Mayor and Ge?iflemen of the City Councils : 
I herewith submit my report for the year 1892 : 
Total number of patients, 98. 
Total number of visits made, 872. 

Diseases treated : Bronchitis, acute, 4 ; bronchitis, chronic, 2 ; 
phthisis pulmonalis, 9 ; acute indigestion, 3 ; rheumatic arthritis, 
5 ; chronic constipation, 4; locomotor ataxia, i ; varicose veins, 
4; folicular tonsilitis, 5 ; miscarriage, i ; peritonitis, i ; cerebro- 
spinal meningitis, i ; delirium tremens, 12 ; syphilis, 2 ; cholera 
morbus, 4 ; urethral stricture, 2 ; cystitis, chronic, 2 ; insanity, 
8 ; cases requiring surgical treatment, 28. 

I would respectfully call the attention of your honorable body 
to the urgent and immediate necessity of an emergency hospital. 
The rapid growth of the city has made the need the more press- 
ing. Manchester is destitute of a place to care for insane, de- 
lirium tremens, or confinement cases. None of the hospitals of 
the city will receive persons suffering from insanity or delirium 
tremens. The Mercy Home is the only place where confinement 
cases are received, and the great distance of the latter institution 
from the center of the city renders it useless in cases of emer- 
gency. 

There have been many persons suffering from contagious dis- 
eases the past year, and the city and the county have been to 
great expense in caring for such patients at the pest-house, where 
the necessary facilities for proper care are entirely wanting. 

I have had cases of delirium tremens where the victim was 
compelled to stay in one of the cells at police headquarters for 



256 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

three or four days, his condition being aggravated by his drunk- 
en neighbors, and his recovery retarded. 

One of the chief needs of a hospital is the great number of 
surgical cases, now increasing, that are coming into police head- 
quarters. The chances for successful operations are very small 
when the surroundings and conveniences are taken into account. 
Loss of life will be the inevitable result, unless some means are 
provided for their care. 

FREDERICK PERKINS, M. D., 

City Physicia7i.. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



To his Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen of the City 
of Manchester : 

I herewith submit a report for the year 1892 : 

The method of inspection of the samples gathered and of 
those submitted by private parties during the year is exactly the 
same as for the past two years, all samples being first tried by in- 
struments to ascertain if they were up to the required per cent 
of solids, and are not submitted to chemical analysis unless 
found below the standard by the instruments, unless they are 
submitted for the purpose of finding coloring matter, conserra- 
line, or preventive. The time best suited for gathering sam- 
ples is from i o'clock to 6 o'clock a. m., as nearly every milk 
route in the city supplies its customers between these hours dur- 
ing the summer months, while in cold weather they do not de- 
liver the milk until after daylight. 

The samples taken during this year have been much better 
than a year ago, and the shortage during the summer months 
was much less, besides, dealers have made better arrangements 
for obtaining supplies than formerly, in order to guard against 
any drouth or long dry season whereby the supply would be di- 
minished. 

The milk supply of the city has been somewhat augmented by 
the fact that the Messrs. Hood & Sons, of Derry, during the 
past year have taken a license and have set off milk from their 
cars to those who wished it, and the Messrs. Whiting & Sons, 
of Wilton, have done the same. These two firms have each two 
milk cars passing through the city daily for the Boston market, 
the cars of one firm going by the way of Nashua while the 



260 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Others go' over the Lawrence road. The samples taken frora 
the milk set off from these cars have proved of good quality. It 
is only a matter of time when a full car of milk will have to be 
left at our station in addition to the supply brought to the city 
by teams. 

At the March term of the supreme court eight indictments 
were found against as many dealers, all the complaints but one 
having been made in the latter part of 1891, subsequent to the 
September term of court, and could not be brought before 
grand jury unlil the March term of 1892. The committee on 
revision of statutes in the legislature had in the meantime 
changed the law regarding the evidence required for conviction, 
and when the cases were brought to trial the court ruled that 
they must be tried under the revised law, and the cases were nol 
prosed as it entirely dispensed with the evidence found from 
chemical analysis. A bill has been introduced in the present 
legislature to so amend the law as to make it available in pro- 
tecting the people of our city against " extended " and adulter- 
ated milk. There is no reason why we should not have a good, 
pure milk sold in our city, and that it should be of a good mer- 
chantable standard, and the law protecting the quality cannot be 
too severe. 

There has been an increase of small routes during the year, 
some only carrying one or two cans, the cans holding eight and 
one half quarts each. 

There are now 104 milk routes which deliver daily within the 
city limits, 17,374 quarts of new milk and 1,485 quarts of 
skimmed milk. Estimated number of cows to produce the daily 
supply of milk for the city, 2,693. Nearly all the milk pro- 
duced within a radius of eight or nine miles of the city is used 
within the city limits, and a prolonged drouth of a few weeks in 
the summer season creates a shortage which has caused at times 
in the past much inconvenience to those depending largely 
upon milk as an article of food. 

The number of licenses issued during the year was 133, 
amounting to $66.50. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 261 

No cases of tuberculosis have been reported to the office dur- 
ing the year. 

Seventeen complaints regarding milk were made during the 
year to this office, and were at once attended to. 

The ruling price per quart has been five cents, although many 
put up the price to six cents during the winter months, but the 
larger part of the milk men kept the old price and sold for five 
cents. 

With the license at fifty cents, there is very little protection 
to the business of selling milk, yet the milkman who pays that 
attention to his busmess which it deserves has invariably a better 
route and is always in demand with his customers. 

Very respectfully, 

H. F. W. LITTLE, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



Manchester, N. H., December 31, 1892. 
To the Honorable May 07' and Board of Aldermen : 

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit to you the annual 
report of the police department for the year ending December 
31, 1892, showing the strength and condition of the department. 
At the date of making this report the department consists of 
one city marshal, one assistant city marshal, one captain of the 
night patrol, and thirty-three patrolmen. One of the patrolmen 
was detailed by your honorable boar(^ to act as sergeant of the 
night patrol, and another of them was detailed by myself to act 
as inspector. During the year two patrolmen who were acting 
as sergeant resigned, viz. : Melvni J. Jenkins and Jonathan E. 
Floyd, and the vacancy was filled by the election of Charles W. 
Stevens and Theodore Floden. Henry A. Burns was selected 
to act as sergeant and has done so satisfactorily. 

discipline. 

It has been my design since taking charge of the department 
to place the force on as good a footing as possible for one of its 
size, to have discipline and to require the men to perform their 
duties according to the rules and regulations of the department, 
and in consequence thereof the force, in my opinion, has been 
improved and brought to a better standard of discipline, and in 
the diligent discharge of its duty fully merits the confidence of 
the people of this city. The officers, wdth a few exceptions, 
have shown a disposition to do their duty faithfully and impar- 
tially. Four officers have been suspended by me during the 



266 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

year for misconduct, two of whom resigned, one suspended 
without pay for twenty days, and the other I allowed to return 
to duty after a few days' absence, on promise of better behavior. 

DETECTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

During the last nine months of the year I have, with the con- 
sent and approval of his Honor the Mayor, detailed ofificer John 
T. O'Dowd to act as inspector and look after the detective work 
of the department, which he has done with skill and energy, 
working night as well as day when required. Neither time nor 
distance has prevented the pursuit of criminals. Several have 
been overtaken and brought back from other cities and states 
and punished for their offenses. The wisdom of having an in- 
spector is shown by the good work done by the department dur- 
ing the past year in recovering lost and stolen property. Lost 
property to the amount of three thousand five hundred and 
fifty-three dollars and eighty-five cents, and stolen property to 
the amount of three thousand eleven dollars and fifteen cents 
has been recovered and returned to the owners thereof. Among 
the list of stolen property recovered are several teams, and in 
every instance but one the thief has been captured and punished, 
and he is now serving a sentence for horse stealing in a Massa- 
chusetts house of correction. 

MATRON. 

This department has been looked after very efficiently by the 
present matron, Miss A. Burnett Brown, who takes great interest 
in her work, in providing for and attending to the wants of all 
unfortunate women who are arrested and brought to the station- 
house, and to all others who need her assistance. I would rec- 
ommend that a portion of the prison be set aside for the exclu- 
sive use of females, and that a room be provided somewhere in 
the building for the use of the matron. 

MORALE OF THE CITY. 

There has been an increase of arrests over last year, but the 
city as a whole has been remarkable for its good order and free- 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 267 

dom from what is considered the heavier class of crime. This 
was particularly noticeable last summer and fall, when we had 
several large celebrations, such as circus processions, torchlight 
processions, etc., which called out a large number of our people. 
There have been more gatherings of this nature during the past 
year than any preceding year to my knowledge. 

POLICEMEN. 

The police business, from its nature, is liable to make enemies, 
for the officer who, in performance of his duty, conscientiously 
shows no favors is liable to run against the sharp corners of men, 
and test the peculiarities of human nature, for seldom is a man 
arrested who has not sympathizing friends who are ready to be- 
lieve the officer has exceeded his authority. So long as it is ne- 
cessary to arrest annually several hundreds of persons, so long 
will there be a considerable number of people who are not 
friendly towards the police, and who will criticise it and mag- 
nify its shortcomings whenever an opportunity offers. 

The officer who is a good fellow is liable to be a bad officer. 
The duties of the police are of such a character that it is abso- 
lutely impossible for a conscientious officer to pander in the 
smallest degree to the wishes of the disorderly element. Again, 
respectable business men fail to comply with or wilfully violate 
certain ordinances. It is the sworn duty of the officer to bring 
this good citizen into court. He discharges that duty promptly 
and gets the lasting enmity of not only the respectable busi- 
ness man but of all the large circle of friends of the said business 
man. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I would recommend that something be done towards establish- 
ing an emergency hospital in or near the station. It seems to 
me that in a city of this size, where large manufactories are lo- 
cated, accidents are liable to occur any time, and the injured 
should have hospital treatment at once. That we have been slow 
in this matter is a fact that cannot be disputed. 

I earnestly recommend to your favorable consideration the 
matter of establishing the police telegraph system in this city. 



268 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Although we have the full complement of men allowed by the 
ordinance, viz., thirt3'-six men, there is a constant demand for 
more police protection. I desire earnestly but respectfully to 
call your attention to the fact that there are a number of streets 
that are never visited by any member of the police force unless 
an officer is especially summoned. I would therefore recom- 
mend that the ordinance be amended so as to provide for an in- 
crease of the force at an early date. 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordinance I 
would submit the following report of all cases which have been 
brought before the police court, and their results, during the year 
1892: 

Assault, 145; aggravated assault, 4 ; assault on officer, 5 ; 
abortion, i ; adultery, 3 ; begging, 5 ; breaking and entering, 27 ; 
bigamy, i ; breaking glass, 5 ; bound over to keep the peace, 2 ; 
building privy vault, i ; common street walkers, 2 ; drunk, 
1,546; driving team on sidewalk, i ; distributing handbills, 4; 
driving over hose at fires, i ; evading car-fare, 2 ; exposure of 
person, 4 ; embezzlement, 7 ; felonious assault, i ; fornication, 
16 ; fast driving, 17 ; idle person, i ; gambling, 2 ; injury to per- 
sonal property, i ; keeping spirituous liquor for sale, 43 ; keeping 
malt liquor for sale, second offense, 19 ; keeping malt liquor for 
sale, 113; keeping spirituous liquor for sale, second offense, i ; 
keeping open Sunday, 22 ; keeping dog without license, 37 ; lar- 
cen}' from person, 4; larceny, 112 ; manslaughter, i ; non-sup- 
port, 2 ; noise and brawl, 57 ; obscene and profane language, 8 ; 
obtaining goods by false pretences, i ; obstructing officer, i ; per- 
mitting gambling, i ; playing ball in streets, 3 ; rape, i ; receiv- 
ing stolen goods, 3 ; running away from house of correction, 7 ; 
stealing a ride, 3 ; selling liquor, 2 ; stubborn child, 3 ; truants, 
4 ; throwing snowballs, 2 ; vagabond, 6 ; vagrant, i ; total, 
2,264. 

The foregoing cases were disposed of as follows : 

Gave bail to keep the peace, i ; nol pros'd, 35 ; paid fine im- 
posed, 794 ; committed to the house of correction for non-payment 
of fines, 760 ; committed to the house of correction on sentence, 
69 ; committed to jail for non-payment of fine, 65 ; committed 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 269^ 

to jail on a sentence, 2 ; committed to the state reform school, 8; 
bound over for their appearance at the supreme court, 96 ; com- 
mitted to jail, bail not furnished, 78 ; committed to the county 
house of correction at Wilton, 55 ; committed to the county 
house of correction at the jail, 2 ; sentence suspended, 158; ap- 
pealed, 20; nol pros'd, paid costs, 10; discharged, 36; contin- 
ued for sentence. 34; whole number arrests, 2,683 5 whole num- 
ber females, 340 ; whole number males, 2,343 : on file, 40; whole 
number admitted for lodging, 1,207 ! accidents reported, 14 ; as- 
sisted out-of-town officers, 58 ; buildings found open and secured, 
415 ; cases investigated, 569 ; cases cruelty to animals investi- 
gated, 40; defective streets and sidewalks reported, 173; distur- 
bances suppressed, 531 ; dogs killed, 41 ; dogs lost and found, 
18; dangerous dogs, notice served to owners, 30; fires discov- 
ered and alarms given, 20 ; fires extinguished without an alarm, 
38 ; injured and sick persons assisted, 49 ; intoxicated persons 
taken home, 308; lights extinguished in buildings, 74 ; lights 
furnished for dangerous places, 173; lost children restored to 
their parents, 99 ; money or other stolen property recovered, 
;g3,oii.i5; money or other lost property recovered, $3,553-85; 
nuisances abated, 48; search warrants for liquor served, none 
found, 6 ; stray teams put up, 48 ; street obstructions removed, 
366. 

The following amount has been received for fines and costs im- 
posed by the police court from December 31, 1891, to Derember 
31, 1892, $8,304.25. It has been paid over to the city treasurer. 

In closing my report I would tender my thanks to his Honor 
the Mayor for the advice I have received at his hands, to the 
city council for the courteous treatment and cordial sup- 
port I have received from them. I also extend my thanks to 
Judge Hunt, Clerk Bickford, and City Solicitor Jones for their 
advice and support. I would also remember the members of the 
police department for their efficient aid in the discharge of their 
duties. 

Respectfully submitted. 

M. J. HEALY, 

Ci'fy Marshal. 



REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



REPORT OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Manchester, New Hampshire, 

December 28, 1892. 
To the Honorable City Councils : 

The forty-sixth annual report of the School Committee of the 
city of Manchester, and the final report of the present board, is 
respectfully submitted to you and to the citizens of Manchester. 

In submitting this report the committee desires to acknowledge 
the courtesies it has received from your honorable bodies. This 
is the more necessary because of the anomalous position in which 
the school committee is placed. Elected by direct popular vote, 
and being, therefore, primarily responsible to the people, this com- 
mittee has not even concurrent voice in determining the amount 
of appropriations for school use or in deciding what accommo- 
dations shall be provided for the increasing number of children 
of school age. The committee having presented its recommend- 
ations becomes thereupon a pensioner upon your bounty. Con- 
fusion of responsibility is inevitable. The school committee 
might be justified if it were to feel itself discharged of all finan- 
cial obligation to the citizens save that involved in the judicious 
expenditure of the whole amount placed at its disposal. 

Year after year, the appropriations granted by the city coun- 
cils have been appreciably less than the amounts asked for by 
the successive school committees. And the actual expenditures 
have been faithfully kept within the amounts of the appropria- 
tions. This committee has followed the same course during the 
past year, thought not withou: sacrificing something of efficiency 
in the schools. In view of these facts, it seems to us either that 
the fuil amounts asked for, as given in the report of the sub- 
committee on finance, be set aside for school use ; or, that the 



274 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

proper steps be taken to so amend the charter of the city that 
the school committee, itself a popular and representative assembly, 
shall have power to originate measures involving the expenditure 
of money for educational purposes, and to act thereupon in con- 
currence with the city council and the board of aldermen. And 
this matter is respectfully submitted to you for your earnest con- 
sideration. 

At a special meeting of this committee, held December 30, 
1891, it was voted, upon recommendation of a committee ap- 
pointed to consider the matter in all its bearings, that " the city 
councils be requested to appropriate ^1,500 to enable the board 
to establish a course of manual training in connection with the 
grammar schools during the (then) coming year." This request 
seems never to have had full discussion. The pressure of other 
demands may, very likely, have made it appear wise for your 
honorable bodies to ignore this communication. More prob- 
ably, the antique position which our schools are compelled to 
take in this respect is the result of erroneous impressions as to 
the purpose and scope of the request. A full discussion of the 
system of manual training is not possible within the limits of 
this report. Fortunately, the ground has been admirably cov- 
ered in previous reports. The question, /. <?., that of the ad- 
visability of introducing manual training into the common school 
course, is no longer debatable. Manual training, not technical 
training, designed not to fit pupils for different trades, but to 
develop their resources and qualify them with power, with quick- 
ness and precision in apprehension and with facility in execution, 
is an admitted necessity to the best modern common school edu- 
cation. It is of immediate importance, therefore^ that the 
request of this committee be no longer disregarded, and that 
suitable provision be made for the preliminary steps leading to 
the full development of this system in our public schools. For 
that purpose the amount indicated in the recommendation of this 
board is less than might profitably be used. 

There is urgent need of more school room. Aside from the 
districts where new schoolhouses have recently been erected, the 
demand is universal. Ward nine has no provision made for the 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 275 

children who do not attend the parochial schools, or who would 
not attend them if there were another school accessible. The 
Lincoln-street building is overcrowded. The Webster-street 
school, if not over full, imperatively needs more room for the 
proper grading of classes. The Ash-street school would overflow 
if there were an}^ other place for the superabundant pupils. At 
the first meeting in the year, January i, 1892-, it was voted that 
the city government be requested to erect a building to accom- 
modate at least two schools, on the city's lot at the corner of 
Bridge and Union streets. At the meeting of the board held 
April 1, 1892, it was voted in response to a communication from 
the city councils, that it was advisable to sell the Lake avenue 
school building, and to erect, from the proceeds of the sale, a 
suitable school building upon the site mentioned above. The 
Lake avenue building was sold ; the lot at the corner of Bridge 
and Union streets is still vacant. 

If the necessity of erecting a building for school use upon this 
lot be questioned, there can be no question as to the necessity of 
providing more school room somewhere in the northeastern part 
of the city. A communication from this board, by vote passed 
at the regular meeting of October 7, 1892, has been presented to 
you, suggesting the advisability of providing new accommoda- 
tions within the present Ash-street district, preferably somewhere 
in the vicinity of Orange and Linden streets. This matter can- 
not be much longer delayed. Already the children in that dis- 
trict are put to serious inconvenience, and the usefulness of the 
Ash-street school is impaired by lack of room.^ 

In the Webster-street school also, the accommodations are 
inadequate. In this case the difficulty is two-fold, — the pressure 
of numbers, and the need of better grading. With a very few 
scholars, a teacher may successfully care for classes in six or seven 
different grades. On the other hand, with but one grade or per- 
haps two, a teacher need have no great difficulty in caring for as 
many scholars as the room can be made to hold ; but no teacher 
can do justice to a room full of scholars representing halfa-dozen 
different grades. And there is, moreover, a deplorable nervous 
exhaustion manifest in the young children who must be present 

* Since this report was presented some steps liave been taken towards 
providing a new school on Pearl and Linden streets. 



276 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

while recitations are being conducted by many classes with differ- 
ent lessons. 

In a short time the Children's Home will be brought within 
this district, and provision must be made for this sudden increase 
in the lower primary school. The recommendation submitted 
by vote of this board will be at best but a temporary measure. 

In ward nine there are some children attending the parochial 
school who would, if they could, attend the public school. It is 
the opinion of this board that the education made possible by 
the public schools is far better than that which can be afforded 
by any private enterprise. Whether this opinion is justified or 
not, it is the duty of the city government to provide suitable 
accommodations for every child who wishes to avail himself of 
this common-school education. If there are very few such chil- 
dren, it may be best to provide free transportation to the nearest 
public school. On the other hand, if establishing a public school 
in this vicinity would tend to draw pupils to that school be- 
cause of its inherent superiority, the expenditure would be jus- 
tified if there should be but two or three scholars registered at 
the first. The fact must be emphasized that our common duty is 
not only to provide such accommodations as are definitely de- 
manded, but also to stimulate the demand tor such education as 
our common schools afford, and to increase their constituency 
by their manifest superiority and by their ready availability. It 
was in view of these facts that the recommendation was presented 
to you, suggesting that a school building be erected in this dis- 
trict providing two rooms, and so constructed that the number 
of rooms may be increased with slight expense whenever it may 
seem expedient.* 

No definite recommendation has been submitted to your hon- 
orable bodies relative to the need of more room in the Lincoln- 
street district. There is some difficulty in deciding upon the 
best plan for relieving the extreme pressure now felt in this 
school, but there is no difficulty in perceiving that some provi- 
sion must be made, at no distant day, for the demand thus in- 
dicated. 

*This recommendation also has been acted upon by the city councils. 
(April, 1893.) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 277 

In view of these considerations, this committee would respect- 
fully request that a joint commission be appointed, including one 
member of the school committee from each ward, one member 
of the city councils from each ward, and his Honor the Mayor, 
ex officio ; and that this commission be given full power to take 
such action as it may find expedient regarding the increase of 
school accommodations in the city ; and it is recommended 
that this be made a standing commission. 

Aside from the matter of accommodations, the buildings 
under our care are turned over to our successors in as good con- 
dition as is possible in view of the limited amount placed at our 
disposal. Some of them should be repaired, some should be 
replaced ; very few are satisfactory. This committee, while in- 
sisting that its responsibility is limited by the restrictions im- 
posed by the cutting down of its estimates, feels that it has not 
done all that the best interests of the city have demanded. It 
has only done what was possible to it. Either the appropriations 
must be increased, or there will soon come an immediate and 
urgent demand for an expenditure far exceeding the sum of the 
amounts supposed to be saved yearly by trimming down the esti- 
mates of successive committees. In educational matters, above 
all else, the wisest expenditure is the truest economy. The 
economy is in the use rather than in the amount. If there is a 
prospect that the city may issue bonds for internal improve- 
ments, special provision should be made in the enabling measure 
setting aside at least eight per cent of the face of the bonds for 
school purposes. In any event, this whole item of schoolhouses 
could with profit be permanently referred to such a commission 
as is recommended above. 

During the year six new rooms have been opened : two in the 
Varney school, and one each in the Goffe's Falls, South Man- 
chester, East Manchester, and Ash-street sohools. 

Upon recommendation of a committee appointed to consider 
the request of the principals of the Varney and Ash-street schools, 
the school hours were so changed at these schools as to do away 
with the afternoon recess. At the Ash-street school this arrange- 
ment is still continued, and seems to give general satisfaction. 



278 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

At the regular meeting of June 3, 1892, Mr. William E. 
Buck was unanimously re-elected superintendent of public 
schools. We heartily commend his faithful and efficient admin- 
istration of the affairs entrusted to him. He has been in the 
service of the city in this capacity for fifteen years, and during 
that time our schools have made great progress in all respects. 
We forward his detailed report to you, in full, and commend to 
your consideration the recommendations therein embodied, with 
our unanimous approval. 

At the meeting held September 3, 1892, Mr. Samuel Brooks 
was unanimously re-elected truant officer. His report may be 
found with the statistics in the Appendix. In this connection, 
attention should again be called to the fact that there is no ade- 
quate provision made for an accurate school census. Under the 
present arrangement the assessors are supposed to report the num- 
ber of children of school age in the city. For some reason, the 
number thus reported has repeatedly been found less than the 
number of scholars actually attending the public and parochial 
schools. A census of this kind is worse than useless, it is mis- 
leading. It is the opinion of this committee that provision 
should be made for a special school census, to be taken yearly 
under the direction of the school committee and by an officer 
appointed for that purpose. The work of the assessors being 
thus reduced, it would be possible to carry out this plan with lit- 
tle if any extra expense. 

From the report of the truant officer it appears that 445 em- 
ployment certificates have been granted, the average age of the 
children receiving them being approximately fourteen and one 
half years. Of these 445, all but 79 were of foreign birth or 
parentage. ^ Two hundred and sixteen, or a little more than 
forty-eight per cent of the whole number, were of French extrac- 
tion, and of these children only 72, exactly one third, were re- 
ported as able to read in the English language. It is unfortunate 
that more than sixteen per cent of all the children granted em- 
ployment certificates should pass out from the schools in the city 
with no apparent familiarity with the common tongue of the 
land. Some of these 144 children will, undoubtedly, acquire. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 279 

if they have not already acquired, a speaking knowledge of 
English. Nevertheless, this is evident : the requirements of 
American citizenship demand that the law as it now stands upon 
the statute books should be so amended that its original inten- 
tion may be carried out and the English language be legally 
established as the only one in which anv official test of ele- 
mentary learning may be given. And this case is respectfully 
commended to the consideration of the people, and of their 
representatives in the legislature. 

The evening schools opened last winter as hitherto reported, 
completed the full term, and the sub- committee having them in 
charge reported a good attendance and satisfactory progress on 
the part of the pupils. The session of this winter began No- 
vember 14, and continues with similar results. 

Too much cannot be said in favor of these schools, or in com- 
mendation of the evening drawing schools. The value of the 
latter is shown not only by the drawings produced but also by the 
general improvement in the workmanship of those to whom this 
practice in drawing has given deftness and skill. As is the case 
in all branches of manual training, the benefit is more than the 
mere acquirement of a new accomplishment. It is found in the 
greater accuracy of perception, the increased mechanical skill 
and understanding, and the general ability to unite thought and 
act. 

It has not been thought best to prepare any exhibit for the 
World's Fair. This committee shares the common regret that 
the excellent work done in our schools will thus be deprived of 
a possible international recognition, but the decision was rather 
one of necessity than one of choice. While there was yet time 
to prepare an exhibit that would be fairly representative, it ap- 
peared that no sufficient floor space would be afforded by the 
commissioners. When it transpired that room could be secured 
in the New Hampshire building, it was too late to prepare a sat- 
isfactory exhibit. And this committee was unanimously of the 
opinion that it would be better to have no showing at all than to 
have one hastily prepared and sure only to misrt] resent the work 
of our schools. 



280 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

One teacher, loved and respected by all, has been removed by 
death, Miss Lucretia E. Manahan. 

At the meeting of this committee, held February 5, 1892, the 
following resolutions were unanimously adopted by a rising vote : 

Whereas, God in His wisdom has removed from our midst Miss Lucretia 
E. Manahan, for many years a teacher in the High School ; 

Resolved, That her zeal and devotion to her duties and her untiring energy 
have earned our deepest respect, and that we feel that our school has met with 
a serious loss. 

Resolved, That, as a token of our respect, these resolutions be entered in the 
minutes of the board, and that a copy be sent to her mother. 

It was also voted that, in view of the extra services of Miss 
Manahan, her salary be continued through the month of Jan- 
uary. 

It is hardly possible that any two minds would agree as to the 
best course of study to be followed in our schools from the low- 
est to the highest. Probably no member of this committee 
is entirely satisfied, so far as his individual opinion is concerned, 
with the present curriculum. It must be understood that here, 
as everywhere else where the. needs and opinions of many peo- 
ple are to be considered, it is only by general compromise that 
any approximately satisfactory results are secured. Moreover, 
it is a well established fact that the character of the schools at 
large is determined from the highest down, not from the lowest up. 
The college or the university gives its tone to the high school, 
the high school acts upon the intermediate schools, and so on. 
This is a truth which does not at all depend upon the wishes of 
school boards or upon the opinions of individuals. The com- 
mon characteristics of the lower schools, and the ordinary courses 
of study to be pursued in them, were practically determined 
for this country when Harvard College was established in 1636. 
The limits circumscribing such a report as this preclude the pos- 
sibility of verifying these statements at length. And, indeed, 
they may be easily verified by a little reflection. But there are 
implied some things which may be here touched upon. 

Where a- large percentage of the pupils look forward to the 
highest education, the difficulty of determining the courses of 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 281 

Study in the lower and preparatory schools is reduced to a mini- 
mum. Where, on the other hand, but few of the pupils are so 
inclined or so directed, the difficulty is at the greatest. There is 
no sign more encouraging to those who have the welfare of our 
schools at heart than the fact that more and more of our children 
of both sexes are seeking for the higher education. It should 
never be forgotten that every pupil in our common schools who 
prepares for college not only adds to the general culture by the 
amount of his attainment and by the contagion of his purpose, 
but also exerts a reflex beneficial effect upon the schools. The 
colleges in this country are tending always to elevate the stand- 
ard of scholarship and at the same time to get into closer touch 
with modern life. These institutions are more sensitive to the 
needs of the people than are our high and grammar schools, and 
the demands they make upon the lower schools are imperative. 

Where the higher institutions have little contact with the pub- 
lic schools, there the courses of study are most completely at the 
mercy of caprice and passing whims. Parents and voluntary 
spokesmen find it comparatively easy to insist upon such measures 
as are likely to result in the most brilliant immediate showing, 
and to demand that the children be filled with knowledge rather 
than that they be developed in power. Our schools are not en- 
tirely free from the effect of such conditions. 

The growing sentiment throughout the country seems to ap- 
prove the declaration of President Eliot to the effect that years 
are wasted in the preparatory schools through faulty direction, 
and that, as compared with those of Germany, the schools of 
America are inferior in respect of economy in time and effort. 
This is not to be charged to deficiency on the part of school 
boards, much less to any failing on the part of the executive of- 
ficers who are but the representatives of those boards. It is rath- 
er to be considered an expression of an uijdeveloped public sen- 
timent. The remedy will come unless the signs that are in the 
air all fail ; first, through the changed demands made by the 
higher institutions, and then, as an indirect consequence, through 
the developed sentiment of the people. 

It may be frankly stated that the courses of study followed in our 



282 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

schools, and the methods employed, are not ideal. There are some 
changes that will not be long deferred. Already from one col- 
lege and another comes a demand for better equipment in the un- 
derstanding and use of the English language. It is coming to 
be seen that life itself calls for power and facility of mind, rather 
than for variety and extent of information. And our schools 
will respond. But it is the conviction of this committee that in 
these respects, as in others, our schools are not inferior to those 
of any other city in the land where no better facilities are af- 
forded. We are proud of our public schools ; so proud of them 
that we are eager for such public aid, through suggestion and sup- 
port, as will make even the appearance of rivalry with them im- 
possible. To that end we urge upon your honorable bodies, and 
upon the citizens at large, the necessity of a deeper concern in all 
matters pertaining to public instruction, and a more generous con- 
sideration of these supremely important items in the public ex- 
penditure. 

To that end, also, we urge upon the parents of the scholars in 
our schools the duty of closer identification with the schools by 
personal visiting, by constant interest in the work of the scholars, 
by more thoughtful regard for the purpose of all true education, 
and by insistence upon the methods which shall secure the high- 
est, broadest, deepest culture for their children. 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES S. MURKLAND, 

For the Committee. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Manchester School Board : 

Gentlemen, — The following is presented as the Annual Re- 
port of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the year 
1892 : 

ORGANIZATION AND ATTENDANCE. 

The high school has this year been more liberally supplied 
with teachers than ever before, and much to its advantage. It 
has had seven teachers throughout the year, another also during 
the fall term. The average number of pupils belonging to the 
school has been nine greater than last year ; but the additional 
teacher has been needed on account of the increased number of 
classes rather than because of the slight increase in the attend- 
ance. 

There have been twenty-four grammar-school divisions during 
the entire year, also two others for two terms each — one on the 
third floor of the Lincoln-street house and one on the third floor 
of the Ash-street house, where the second division of that school 
has been, continuously, for two years or more. In all, there 
have been two more grammar divisions than last year * — one 
organized at Hallsville, the other in the Varney house. Besides 
these grammar school changes, one of the divisions at the Web- 
ster-street house has been discontinued ; and the mixed grammar 
and middle school in the Lincoln-street house has become a 
school of middle grade. But the loss of these two divisions is 
offset by the organization of grammar divisions on third floofs, 
one each at the Lincoln-street and Ash-street houses for two 
terms, and one for the year at Bakersville. 

* Reckoning the two schools for partial time equivalent to one for the year. 



284 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

There have been seventeen middle schools throughout the year 
— a gain of one over last year, which was organized at Halls- 
ville. The apparent increase by the addition to the middle- 
school list of the heretofore mixed grammar and middle school 
in the Lincoln-street house is offset by the change of another 
school in that house from middle to primary grade. 

There have been thirty-one primary schools during the entire 
year, also another for two terms and still two others for one term 
each. This makes an equivalent in all for the year of at least 
thirty-two primary schools. Last year there were twenty-nine ; 
hence there has been a gain of three primary schools — one at 
the Lincoln-street house, as before mentioned, one at the Main- 
street house, one at the Lowell-street house for two terms, also 
one at Hallsville and one at Goffe's Falls for one term each. 

These changes have resulted in transferring the Goffe's Falls 
school from the list "of- ungraded schools to the partially graded, 
and the Hallsville school from the list of partially graded to that 
of the graded schools. 

Besides the special teacher of drawing, the additional teacher 
in the high school for one term, and three masters' assistants in 
the grammar schools during the fall term, there has been em- 
ployed in the day schools for the year an equivalent of three 
teachers more than last year, also the same as two others for one 
term each. The equivalent of four new teachers has therefore 
been employed on account of the increase in the enrollment over 
last year, an increase of 227 pupils in the aggregate. 

For five years prior to 1886, the period during which the 
French parochial schools v/ere being organized, our city schools 
suffered an average annual decrease of 121 pupils. For the next 
five years, the city schools made an average annual gain of 88 
pupils. Last year the gain was 257, and this year the gain is 227 
over last year's total. 

Great improvement has been made in the organization of 
the* schools both at Hallsville and at Goffe's Falls. At 
Hallsville there are now four schools, and should be another, 
where last year there were but two schools — one in Foster's 
Hall. The number of different pupils in the new Hallsville 



REPOKT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 285 

house has this year been 175; and there will doubtless be 40 
pupils more before July, but the classification of those now in 
attendance is such that another teacher should be supplied the 
school as early as February. 

The school at Goffe's Falls has been resolved into two schools, 
a mixed primary school and a mixed grammar and middle 
school, much to the advantage of the pupils in attendance. 

The attendance upon respective schools may be seen by an in- 
spection of the statistical tables to be found in the appendix to 
this report, — pages C, D, E, and F. 

MORE SCHOOLROOMS NEEDED. 

For fully three years the Ash-street schoolhouse has been insuf- 
ficient for the proper accommodation of the school children liv- 
ing in its district ; and those living in its northwestern quarter 
have, as largely as possible, been sent to the Webster-street house, 
where there have this fall been 23 of these, also to the Blodget- 
street house where there have been 4. Four (4) others have been 
to the Wilson Hill school, and still others have been to the 
Lincoln-street school, which has returned, in exchange, pupils 
of other grades for the Ash-street grades not so crowded as cor- 
responding ones at the Lincoln-street house. In fact, the Ash- 
street, Lincoln-street, and Wilson Hill schoolhouses, combined, 
are utterly inadequate for the proper accommodation of the chil- 
dren who must attend in the immediate vicinity of these houses. 
In spite of all the changing about, to secure any accommodations 
in appropriate grades at these three houses this fall, the seven 
rooms at the Ash-street house, below the second division grade, 
have respectively enrolled 50, 51, 53, 52, 56, 53, and 61 pupils ; 
at the Lincoln-street house, in the six rooms below the second 
division there have been enrolled in respective schools 52, 55, 
54, 54, 47, and 51 pupils; and in the lowest grade at Wilson 
Hill, 53 pupils. In these fourteen rooms, where there are, regu- 
larly, only 661 pupils' sittings, there have this fall been enrolled 
742 pupils. An excess of 81 pupils, enough for two schools, has 
therefore had to be accommodated by placing the necessary 
number of extra desks in the aisles of the fourteen rooms named. 



286 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

What shall be done, at the opening of the spring term in April, 
with the 30 or more beginners almost certain then to knock at 
the doors of the lower primaries at Ash-street and Wilson Hill? 

The best course of procedure, in my judgment, for the relief 
of the three schools in question, is first to secure a two-rooni 
building for primary schools on Pearl street east of Linden, but 
not far from the latter street. This would partially relieve the 
Ash-6treet school, and also the one at Wilson Hill. Between 
this latter school and the location which I have suggested for a 
new house on Pearl street, and from the houses now in easy sight 
and but a short distance to the north of this location, are pupils 
now attending the Ash-street and Wilson Hill schools sufficient 
to fill the house proposed, and that, too, Avith children who would 
not have to go so far to school as they now do. Relief at Wilson 
Hill will avoid in part, at least, the pressure upon the Lincoln- 
street school. 

Second, for full relief of the Ash-street school, two more 
schoolrooms should be secured on the vacant city lot at the cor- 
ner of Bridge and Union streets. In order to remove schools 
from, and keep them off, the third floor of the Ash-street house, 
and not allow the other floors of this house to be overcrowded, 
the two schoolhouses indicated should both be had at the earliest 
moment possible ; and first, perhaps, the one which can be 
quickest obtained. 

By the opening of the fall term, next year, more schoolrooms 
will also be desired at the Hallsville and Webster-street houses, 
either on account of the anticipated increase in the number of 
pupils or in order that the schools in these buildings may be 
properly classified. A new schoolhouse should also be provided 
in ward nine, early in the coming year. 

BREVITY OF PUPILAGE. 

Greatest hindrance to the attainment of the end for which our 
schools are maintained is brevity of pupilage. The course of 
study for the various grades below the high school covers a period 
of nine years'; and the average term of pupilage for this period 
is only four years and a sixth, ascertained from a compilation of 
our school statistics for the last eight years, (1884 to 1891, inclu- 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 287 

sive), the school reports for previous years not giving sufficient 
details for making desired calculations. 

It has been the purpose of my investigations to ascertain the 
times and causes of the more marked instances of permanent de- 
crease in the pupilage of the schools, with the view of diminish- 
ing the causes as much as possible. The revelations of the figures 
are so interesting and convincing that I present them for inspec- 
tion. It may be well, however, for the benefit of the casual 
reader, first to explain why I have used the "Average number of 
pupils belonging" as the basis of my computations. This term 
indicates the average membership of a school, as may be seen 
from the following simple illustration : If it should be found that 
40 pupils had been enrolled in a school for any year and that 5 
of these had not attended the school during any part of the first 
half of the year, while another 5 had not attended during any 
part of the last half of the year, it would be evident that 35 
would be the average membership, or average number of pupils 
belonging. Hence is seen the propriety of basing calculations 
upon the average number of pupils belonging, instead of upon 
the entire enrollment, in determining the duration of the average 
period of pupilage. I therefore present these averages, as follows : 

Averages for Eight Years, 1884 to i8g2. 



Grades of Schools. 

Lower Primary 

Higher Primary 

Lower Middle . 

Higher Middle . ' . 

Fourth Division, Grammar 
Third Division 
Second Division 
First Division . 

Below Grammar Grades . 
Grammar Grades 
High School . 



AJinual Av'ge 




Years at 


of the Av'ge 


Per cent of 


End of Res- 


No. of Pupils 


Total Xo. 


pective 


Belonging. 




Grades. 


675 


26 


^% 


467 


18 


3 


316 


12 


4 


249 


9>< 


5 


225 


W2 


6 


179 


7 


7 


160 


6>^ 


8 


143 


S% 


9 


1,707 


65>< 


5 


707 


273^ 


9 


181 


7 


13 



Totals . . . 2,595 



288 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Average number graduated from grammar schools, 99.* 
Average number admitted to high school, 90 * 
Average number entered the high school, 65.* 
Average number graduated from the high school, 40. 



The average term of 


pupi 


lage is 


computed 


from 


data found in 


the foregoing 


table, as 


follows : 










675 


X 




1/2' 




= 




1013 


467 


X 




3 




= 




I401 


316 


X 




4 




= 




1264 


249 


X 




5 




= 




1245 


225 


X 




6 




= 




1350 


179 


X * 




7 




=r 




1253 


160 


X 




8 




= 




1280. 


M3 


X 




9 




= 




1272 



2414 . 10,078 

10078 —- 2414 = 4.17 

The average term of pupilage in our grades below the high 
school is 4! years, nearly. 

It may be observed that the two partially graded and the 
suburban schools are left out of the account, because I desire at 
this time to present the facts of attendance pertaining to the 
graded schools only. 

From the foregoing table it is apparent that of those pupils 
who enter the lower primary schools, which include the yfrj/ 
year and a /la// o( school work, nearly one third of the entire 
number closes public school life in or with this grade ; for it is 
seen that only about two thirds of the number appear in the next 
grade, the higher primary. 

What thus early becomes of a third of all who begin the pub- 
lic school course ? The greater part, doubtless, enter the parochial 
schools, from which they have previously been withheld, accord- 
ing to the testimony of parents, on account of the distance 
of such schools from the homes of this portion of youngest 
pupils. A similar depletion again occurs in or at the close of the 

*The variations from year to year may be seen on page I of the appendix.^ 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 289 

higher primary course, or second year and a half of school life. 
What becomes of nearly a third of this grade? The higher 
primary pupils who withdraw from school secure employment; 
and, for the most part, in the mills, the required literary qualifi- 
cation being by this time attained. This class of pupils, how- 
ever, intermittently return to school, as required by law ; but only 
the lesser portion of them get beyond the lower middle grade 
before they attain the age of sixteen, when they altogether cease 
attending the day schools. These pupils constitute the bulk of 
that fifth part of the lower middle schools which closes its school 
life by the end of the fourth year of the course. The pupils re- 
ferred to as withdrawing from the higher primary schools and be- 
coming employed in the mills, or elsewhere, are those who con- 
stitute the older and overgrown portion of the higher primary 
grades ; and, for the most part, they are pupils from eight to four- 
teen years of age who enter our primaries from other places, 
with little or no schooling. 

A further inspection of the statistics submitted will show that 
the annual depletion between the grades of school above the 
lower middle school is conipai-atively small, and not very marked 
till the interval between the first grammar division and the high 
school is reached. And between the grammar schools and the 
high school the loss is not so great as at first appears ; for the 
first grammar divisions average a graduation of 99 out of 143, 
the 44 remaining in the second class* being required to return 
to the grammar school for another year.f Hence the number of 

* There are graduated from the second class only those who do its work 
suflSclently well to insure proper progress in the high school, without re- 
viewing the work of the second class. 

t Nearly all so return, and the number of them who do not is offset by the 
number of graduates who enter advanced schools other than our high school; 
so my statistical comparisons are not vitiated by the failure of a few to re- 
turn. 

Those who return are not, however, kept reviewing the entire year, as may 
be seen from our course of study. It may also be said in passing, for the ben- 
efit of those not acquainted with our form of school organization, that there 
are two classes (doing different grades of work) in each of the schools abov 
the primary; and in each of the primary schools there are three such classes. 
The classes all through the schools, below the high school, are therefore but 
five months apart in their work. Hence the ease with which individual pro- 
motions may be made at irregular times and the readiness with which the 
work of certain classes may he skipped, the result of which is that the 
school course is much shortened by a considerable number of the more cap. 
able pupils. 

19 



290 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

pupils completing their school life at the end of the grammar 
school course is represented by the difference between the 99 
graduates and the 65 who enter the high school, or 34 ; and this 
loss is but little greater, proportionally, than the loss between the 
two grades of middle school, and much less than the loss between 
the primaries or between the primaries and the middle schools,— 
three stages early in the course at which so great losses are much 
the more regretable. It is clearly in evidence that two thirds of 
our pupils leave school before sufficiently advanced to enter the 
lowest grammar grade ; for the eight years' averages, as presented, 
show 675 pupils in the lower primary schools, and just one third 
of this number, or 225, to have continued long enough in school 
to enter the 'fourth or lowest division of the grammar schools. 
Thus it appears that two thirds of our pupils get all their school- 
ing in the primary and middle grades only, and that one third 
of all who enter the lower primary schools do not attend the 
public schools longer than a year and a half ; and by far the 
greater portion of such appear to be withdrawn for the purpose 
of enrolling them in denominational schools, because their par- 
ents prefer they shall attend such schools, as soon as large 
.enough to travel the necessary distance, merely because they are 
schools of their own denomination. This is a right which we 
must all concede, however much the withdrawals on this account 
may be regretted. A third of those who remain to enter our 
higher primary grades leave school altogether by the end of the 
fourth or fifth year of the public school course ; and, as I have 
previously indicated, these are the ones who largely represent 
our floating population, which comes and goes as the demand 
for labor is good or poor. The services of the children of this 
class of our people are largely demanded, often with apparent ne- 
cessity. 

It must therefore be evident that to suggest an effectual rem- 
edy for preventing the large withdrawals from the lower grade 
schools is not easy, since the causes seem to lie wholly outside of 
and beyond the authority or power of the board. If there are 
adequate \vays of overcoming the losses, I must for the present, 
at least, leave the invention and announcement of them to those 
able to devise the remedies. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 291 

It does seem, however, that there must be some effectual means 
for much lessening the decrease of pupilage within the grammar 
schools, whose rate of decrease is more than one half the enor- 
mous rate of loss below the grammar schools. Below these 
schools the losses have been shown to be 66|- per cent of the 
number entering the lower primaries, and within the grammar 
schools the loss is 2^^ per cent of the number entering the fourth 
or lowest grammar division ; for the statistical table, showing av- 
erages for eight years, indicates 225 in the fourth division grade 
and only 143 in the first division. 

These are unpleasant revelations, but it is better that they 
should be faced ; and the actual conditions are indeed improv- 
ing, as might be seen by a study of the school statistics of the more 
recent years. But the improvement has not been sufficiently rapid 
or sufficiently great, and yet the grammar divisions are excellent 
schools, among our best, and apparently as good as those elsewhere 
inspected. It is for this reason, and the further fact that they are 
composed of the better part of the material from the lower 
schools, that it seems it should not be difficult to hold their pupil- 
age. I fear we have failed to realize the magnitude of the loss 
in the grammar schools, because the average rate of decrease 
from grade to grade has been so much smaller than that between 
the lower schools — 12 J per cent, as against about 28 per cent. 
I surmise that the failure of one pupil in eight of every gram- 
mar division to pass on to the next higher division is largely the 
result of thoughtlessness on the part of both pupil and parent. It 
is so common for parents to extol the scholastic attainments of 
their children, and compare them with the meagerness of their 
own school results, that it can hardly be held as a matter of 
great surprise that when pupils who have been thus extolled take 
the notion that they wish to leave school and go to work, 
tempted perhaps by the glitter of earnings they see made by 
others of their own age, they are not greatly troubled to obtain 
the consent of parents not highly appreciative of a more ex- 
tended education. Doubtless some grammar school pupils with- 
draw before completing the course on account of forced neces- 
sities, greatly to the regret of both parent and pupil ; but this 



292 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

would not be largely inferred by any one frequenting these 
grades of school. There may, however, be other reasons than 
the glitter of a youth's wages why some are ready to go out 
into life with less than a full grammar-school education ; and it 
may be profitable to consider the more natural ones, in order 
the more easily to determine what remedies to apply. 

Among these reasons may be named insufficiency of the course 
of study to meet the pupil's wants, neglect of the teacher to be 
properly interested in the pupil, dislike to a change of teachers, 
lack of comfortable environment on account of advancement in 
years or size, and loss of promotion. 

If there is anything about the course of study that fails to 
meet the desires of the dissatisfied grammar school pupil, I think 
it may be safely assumed to be his feeling that it does not par- 
ticularly prepare him for the duties of active life ; and it is not 
surprising that so young persons should fail to see the bearing of 
the ordinary common-school course for this purpose. Hence, in 
part, the advocacy of the introduction of manual training as a 
portion of the school course, which was extendedly discussed in 
my annual report to the board last year. 

Neglect of the teacher to become duly interested in the dissat- 
isfied pupil is much more likely to occur in large schools where 
the over-weighted teacher has to husband her resources in order 
to continue in the service. The restless pupil is by such a teacher 
too frequently regarded as an annoyance ; and the temptation, 
under the circumstances, is at least to refrain from making an ef- 
fort to prevent any anticipated withdrawal. The remedy is in 
smaller schools where more individual work caij be done ; or, in 
case of necessity for large schools, the remedy is in the employ- 
ment therefor of teachers of unusual powers and skill. 

Many pupils are so sensitive that, if left to their own choice, 
they would quit school altogether rather than make the acquain- 
tance of another teacher ; and other pupils, left free to decide 
for themselves, would withdraw from school rather than make the 
acquaintance of the teacher in the next higher grade, simply be- 
cause of prejudice against her, probably derived from acquain- 
tances under her charge who do not enjoy themselves on account 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 293 

of the treatment felt necessary by the teacher in consequence of 
their ill disposed inclinations ; or possibly, in exceptional cases, 
the prejudice may arise from the general dissatisfaction with 
which pupils regard a particular teacher. The remedy against 
so frequently requiring pupils to make a change of teachers may 
be found in a plan that I advocated several years ago,* as fol- 
lows : 

First. At the close of the spring term, advance to the room 
of next higher grade both classes in every school between the 
primary and the high, and from each primary school then advance 
the first and second classes to the next higher room. 

Second. At the end of the first four weeks of the winter term 
(about the first of February), again make promotions, but with- 
out then changing the classes to other rooms. 

Third. Annually, at the close of the spring term, change the 
position of all teachers between the lower primary grade and the 
highest-division grammar, so that the higher-primary and the 
middle school teachers shall go round with their pupils from 
school to school, starting with the higher primary and ending 
with the higher middle ; and so, likewise, have the grammar- 
school grade assistants perform the circuit of the three lower di- 
visions of the grammar school with their pupils. 

Under the present arrangement there is not, for several weeks 
after a pupil comes under the tuition of a new teacher, a realiza- 
tion of the outmost limit, and just that, of the knowledge from 
which the pupil is actually prepared to advance or an understand- 
ing of his abilities or power to accomplish results, to say nothing 
of that acquaintance with the disposition necessary to obtain the 
best results in the most agreeable manner. 

On the other hand, the pupil not infrequently suffers in the 
mean time because of the feeling that he is not appreciated ; and, 
in consequence, his confidence, co-operation, and love are tar- 
dily won. The changes I have suggested would produce such 
conditions that pupils would, during their elementary course of in- 
struction, have but four different teachers where they now have 
eight ; and I believe better results would thereby be attained with 
* See Annual Report for 1885, page 35. 



294 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

less friction, for reasons already suggested, and the additional one 
that the teacher would be led better to see the relation of the work 
as comprised in the several grades and to treat it more harmoni- 
ously as a whole, thus becoming broader herself and less likely to 
"get into ruts." 

Whenever reviews are taken of work done in prior grades, ' 
there is a frequent feeling upon the part of the teacher that the 
work therein must have been faulty, because of the apparent pov- 
erty of results found at the later date ; but I think the difficulty 
most largely lies in the fact that teachers do not sufficiently fa- 
miliarize themselves with the work done by their pupils when in 
lower classes and that they do not therefore keep them fresh in 
the essentials of that w^ork, — as they might easily, and naturally 
would, do, if they were fully familiar with it. The plan above 
outlined for the rotation of teachers would dispose of this omis- 
sion more effectually than any other which I can suggest. By 
the plan suggested no principle for securing best results through 
a division of labor would be violated, for the character of the 
work throughout each circuit named for the rotation of the 
teacher is not unlike that required in any grade of the same cir- 
cuit. By this plan, the teacher of the lower primary school would 
continue therein as heretofore. This is deemed advisable, be- 
cause of the special qualifications essential for the exceptional 
character of the work done during the first year and a half. Dur- 
ing this period, too, there is less danger of a teacher's performing 
merely routine work. For the next three years and a half, pu- 
pils would enjoy the advantages derived from being under the 
same instructor, and, likewise, under but one other teacher dur- 
ing the three years covered by the course in the three lower di- 
visions of the grammar grade. 

Pupils unduly advanced in years and size, as compared with 
their classmates, and who on this account feel uncomfortable in 
our schools, are pupils who for the. most part have not had the 
advantages in early youth which their new found classmates have 
enjoyed; for such pupils chiefly come here from towns where 
their environment did not reveal to them the backwardness of 
their schooling. Pupils of this class would find their embarrass- 



■REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 295 

ment much relieved by opportunities afforded in a course of 
manual training, for in this at least they could show their class- 
mates that pupils from the back towns would not be found in- 
ferior ; and thereby they would soon command admiration from 
their mates instead of being regarded as the dullards of their 
class, and in consequence of this difference in their status they 
would not feel so uncomfortable in their environment as to med- 
itate speedy withdrawal from school. 

The number of pupils who withdraw from school in conse- 
quence of loss of promotion is believed to be extremely small, 
smaller than for any other reason ; because I can recall no in- 
stance in which a parent has expressed dissatisfaction to me in 
consequence of such loss who has therefor withdrawn his child 
from school. On the other hand, parents in such instances have, 
upon investigation, almost uniformly become satisfied with the 
judgment of the teacher and that their children had been given 
due consideration and proper treatment. 

In any effort that may be made greatly to reduce the number 
of withdrawals from school, the one agency to which we must 
look with greatest expectations of success is the personal interest 
and influence of teachers. Without this, all other means must 
fall short of great results ; but I feel sure that with the facts and 
figures before them, which I have herewith presented, our teach- 
ers will promptly examine themselves for any signs of neglect, so 
earnestly desirous are they to exert proper influences and in ev- 
ery way to render best services. Small, I trust, will be the num- 
ber of teachers obliged to reflect that schools theirs for any con- 
siderable time have been sufficiently full only for brief periods 
after semi-annual promotions. 

SUPERVISORY PRINCIPALS. 

Much help in checking withdrawals from school will, I am 
sure, be found to have been afforded by the appointment of the 
grammar masters as supervisory principals. They now come in 
much closer contact with all the pupils in their buildings than 
was ever before possible. This new relation has existed only 
since the opening of.the fall term, but it is already apparent that 



296 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the establishment of it will work more for the ultimate good of 
the schools than any other single step taken by the board for 
many years. The masters are earnestly studying the relations of 
the work required in the various grades, by personally conduct- 
ing class exercises therein, with the view of enabling themselves 
to determine how best to aid their assistants in operating the 
course of study as a harmonious whole, and to secure chief atten- 
tion to emphasizing essentials. 

As I have before intimated, the grade teacher is apt to do the 
work assigned to her own classes, year after year, without thought 
of its relation to the work done by her pupils while in lower 
classes sufficient to cause her to keep in due repair the various 
links of the educational chain ; nor is she apt to consider what 
her pupils will be expected to do in subsequent classes enough to 
cause her to put other links, in advance of her grade, even in a 
formative process. If, therefore, a bright pupil much leads the 
first class of such a teacher, she dares not recommend him for 
double promotion because she does not well enough understand 
the work beyond to feel sure he can do it properly. Hence 
bright pupils have doubtless failed to gain time which they might 
have better utilized. The teacher should be the best judge of 
her pupils' ability to do the work of a higher grade ; and another 
who does not come in quite frequent contact with her classes 
cannot safely select pupils for double promotion, or for advance- 
ment at irregular intervals. This is an important office which 
the grammar masters, with the opportunities now at their disposal, 
can safely perform ; and I have called their attention to those 
stages in the course of study at which pupils may with most ease 
be doubly pronioted. We may therefore reasonably expect that 
in future many pupils will annually be doubly promoted, in place 
of the few heretofore so honored and encouraged. 

By properly looking after the interests of every pupil, so far as 
to secure for him all the advancement to which his merits at any 
time entitle him, and by exerting that influence which present ' 
opportunities afford the grammar masters for keeping pupils in 
the schools as long as possible, in addition to the other work 
naturally theirs, the grammar masters will render services far 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 297 

more valuable than the additional expense found necessary to 
constitute them supervisory principals. 

DRAWING. 

Another important act of the board, this year, has been the 
appointment of Miss C. J. Emmins, a graduate of the Massachu- 
setts Normal Art School, as special instructor in drawing for full 
time. Miss Emmins became acquainted with the needs of our 
schools through her employment here last year, two days a week. 
She entered heartily upon the work in September, last, with 
the evident determination to do all possible for our schools ; 
and, if she fails to accomplish much for the improvement of 
drawing here, it will be no fault of hers. She is highly compe- 
tent, has excellent judgment about the application of her work, 
and is herself an enthusiastic and » indefatigable worker. The 
city is fortunate in having secured her services. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Our evening drawing school, taught during the fall and winter 
months, continues to prosper. It is highly appreciated by those 
in attendance ; and its graduates have been able, in consequence 
of their course of instruction at this school, to take a higher stand, 
or become leaders, in their various vocations. It is a most help- 
ful institution to the young mechanics of the city ; and to this 
they themselves attest, by good attendance and unqualified words 
of praise. 

The evening schools in which tlie common English branches 
are taught are largely but very irregularly attended. They, 
doubtless, do enough good to compensate for their cost ; but 
nothing in comparison to what they might do, if regularity of 
attendance could be secured. In former reports I have discussed 
these schools at length, and suggested ways for improving them. 
I cannot now offer anything more helpful than again to com- 
mend a trial of the plan adopted by several cities in Massachu- 
setts, and this w^inter by Nashua, for securing greater regularity 
of attendance upon evening schools. This plan, in brief, re- 
quires pupils upon registration to deposit one dollar as a guaranty 



298 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

of good faith in their intention to attend regularly enough to 
make their course one of reasonable profit. The dollar is paid 
back to those who may have been in attendance seventy per cent 
of a term, and by the others the dollar is forfeited to the evening 
school fund. The plan, wherever tried, is said to have effected 
great improvements. 

DAY SCHOOLS. 

The high school has continued to do "sound, solid, and sub- 
stantial" work throughout the year. It has been improved by the 
addition of one to its corps of teachers, there being seven during 
the winter and spring terms and eight during the fall terra. In 
consequence of this increase in the number of teachers, it has 
been possible this fall to organize and prosecute the instruction 
given in this school, more fully than ever before, upon the 
departmental plan ; and, also, to arrange the classes in smaller 
divisions, thus providing for more attention to the individual. 
These interests have been further promoted by having the draw- 
ing taught in this school by another than a member of its regular 
corps of teachers, that is, by the special teacher of drawing. This 
arrangement has had the effect of adding still another teacher 
to the corps of high school teachers for two fifths of the time. 
The school would be further and greatly helped by the employ- 
ment of one who could well teach both elocution and English 
literature. 

No students are admitted, except by examination, to Harvard, 
Yale, or Bowdoin ; but all the other leading eastern colleges re- 
ceive' students from our high school upon the mere certificate of 
its teachers. This concession, however, was not accorded till 
after due investigation had been made. I may also add that the 
principal of the high school has several very complimentary let- 
ters from professors in the colleges which our pupils have entered 
by certificate, in regard to the character and thoroughness of 
their preparation for college work. Other graduates of the high 
school reflect equal credit upon the school, and upon themselves, 
in the various walks of life. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 299 

Surely no other city of the size and enterprise of ours, in most 
things, requires 245 * pupils belonging to its most advanced 
school to seek accommodation at only 187 desks in its assembly 
room, or to be cramped as is our high school for sufficient recita- 
tion-room accommodations. Nor should Manchester longer 
allow its high school to suffer for lack of usual school conven- 
iences. A school doing work so good and well that such col- 
leges as Dartmouth, Amherst, Brown, Williams, Smith, Vassar, 
and Wellesley fling wide open their doors at sight of students 
bearing the certificate of our high school should have granted it 
facilities for doing its work with at least ordinary comfort. 

The following changes in the high school corps of teachers 
have occurred within the year : Withdrawn, Miss Lucretia E. 
Manahan, and Mr. William T. Abbott, who for two years had 
rendered excellent service; entered, Miss Camille Benson and 
Mr. Willis B. Moore. 

OBITUARY. 

Miss Lucretia E. Manahan died January 29, 1892. She was 
an excellent woman and a person of unusual strength of charac- 
ter. She was an enthusiastic, energetic, devoted, and thorough 
teacher. She expected and required much of her pupils ; but 
not more than she believed within the bounds of accomplish- 
ment by reasonable effort, ror more than appeared right for a 
proper utilization of the time at the disposal of her pupils. 
During more than a score of years of service in our schools, she 
taught in various grades, but always with distinguished success. 
Her pupils will ever remember her for those traits of character 
and training that she was largely instrumental in forming which 
have given them greatest powers for winning success in life. 

Another of our important schools, the City Training School 
for Teachers, is also unduly cramped for want of room ; but it 
is hoped that the recent application of the Board to the City 
Councils for an enlargement of the training-school building will 
meet with a favorable and prompt response. 

* The number enrolled in the fall. ,..,j 



300 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The training school has done its work not only more easily 
but better than last year. In 1891 the school was crippled for 
lack of a sufficient number of sub-teachers. After January there 
were but five sub-teachers, when there should have been twelve. 
Of these five, one graduated at the end of the spring term, and 
two of the others then withdrew. To the two remaining there 
were added, at the opening of the fall term, eleven others, all 
fresh graduates of the high school. Fortunately, fully half of 
these were better fitted, both by nature and education, to do pre- 
paratory work in the training school than the average of those 
who have entered the school for several years. Consequently, 
by the opening of the present year, the class large and strong, 
as a whole, has rendered the principal more assistance than re- 
cent former classes ; and the school has therefore done go'od 
work throughout the year. It is too much to expect that the 
principal of this school can keep it in excellent condition with- 
out a fully trained and experienced assistant, unless aided by a 
sub-teachers' class of proper size and good material. 

The training school, as I have several times before said, 
might be much improved and render a great deal more efficient 
service in the preparation of young ladies for teachers' positions, 
if it were accorded the opportunities granted similar schools in 
other cities, — better house accommodations, other and higher- 
grade classes, and one or more regular and right assistant teach- 
ers. These conditions might all be available without additional 
cost, if the first requisite, a suitable house, were at hand ; for 
the other expenses would be offset by a discontinuance of teach- 
ers' salaries for other and higher grade classes that should be 
put into the training school when properly housed, enlarged, 
and improved. 

The other day schools have industriously applied themselves, 
throughout the year, to a proper performance of the work as- 
signed thera. They have in general done that work well; and 
many of them have done in a very thorough and most excellent 
manner not only the specific assignments required by the course 
of study, but much more also in the way of general culture and 
ethical training, as designed by the spirit of the course. Each 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 301 

school has attained results commensurate with the competency of 
its teacher. So must it ever be ; and I therefore repeat, what I 
have reiterated in former reports as most essential to the highest 
interests of the schools, that there is no service which the mem- 
bers of the school board can render that is more important or 
vital than that they see to it that every vacancy in the corps of 
teachers be filled by the best fitted available teacher, without re- 
gard to other considerations. It gives me pleasure to add, also, 
that I think this has uniformly been your earnest and praise- 
worthy endeavor. 

It is proposed during the coming year, if approved by the 
board, so to modify the course of study that more attention shall 
be given to instruction in the use of the English language in all 
grades ; to extend the instruction in nature studies, in primary 
and middle grades, as a fit preparation for the introduction of a 
brief course in elementary science in the grammar grades. Civ- 
ics has this year been restored to a place for study in the first 
division grammar grade, and with good results. 

I recommend that one year's study of French be added to the 
college division of the high-school course. It is conceded that 
the work of the senior class is easier than that of any other in 
this school, and the opinion of the high-school master and my- 
self is that French may well be taken as a fourth study during 
the senior year. The graduates of our High School who enter 
college are, in general, acknowledged to be well fitted in those 
studies which they have taken ; but in the study of French, 
which is required during the first year of college work, our stu- 
dents find themselves at great disadvantage, because their class- 
mates from most other schools take at least a year of French in 
their preparatory course. The college professors upon learning 
this set the pace for their freshman class at such a rate that it 
requires extraordinary efforts upon the part of our students to 
maintain even a fair standing in this study ; and, thus crippled,, 
it is much more difficult for them to attain a high average during 
their first year in college. Besides, those colleges which do not 
now require preparation in French, as a condition of entrance 
upon their courses, intimate that they will do so ere long. I 



302 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

commend my recommendation in tliis matter to the early consid- 
eration of the board. 

COLUMBUS DAY. 

In common with the schools throughout the country, our city 
schools duly observed " Columbus Day " by carrying out the of- 
ficial program, prepared by the "Youth's Companion" for all 
schools, with such additions for each school as to the teacher 
seemed advisable. The exercises were highly interesting and 
impressive ; in some schools quite elaborate, and in all heartily 
entered upon and well performed. The lessons of that day must 
be indelibly impressed upon many hearts, and it is fondly hoped 
they will be sufficiently effective forever to restrain every parti- 
cipant from any act of disloyalty to our common country. 

CONCLUSION. 

Once again I extend thanks to you, as members of the school 
board, for your cordial support, friendly advice, and right courses 
of procedure in the interests of the schools. I sincerely regret the 
withdrawal of each of the three members of the board whose 
term of service will expire by limitation af'the close of the pres- 
ent year. I should do violence to my own feelings, and I be- 
lieve also to yours, if I did not here remind the city govern- 
ment in particular and our citizens in general of the exception- 
ally valuable services of that withdrawing member of the board 
who for nine consecutive years has devoted much time and thought, 
with rare equipment for the purpose, to the improvement of our 
schoolhouses and other school property ; and who, likewise, as 
member of the high-schoc>l sub-committee, has done as much as 
any member towards securing the present high standing of our 
city high school. 

My thanks are also due and heartily extended to our corps of 
teachers, for generous co-operation and united efforts in second- 
ing my labors for the prosperity and success of our schools. 
Respectfully submitted. 

WM. E. BUCK, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Population, etc. 

II. SCHOOLHOUSES. 

III, Schools. 

IV, Teachers. 
V. Pupils. 

VI. Truancy. 

VII. Finance. 

VIII. School Year, 1892. 

IX. High School Graduating Class. 

X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

XI. Organization of Committees, 1893. 

XII. List of Teachers, 1893. 

XIII. School Year, 1893. 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICS. 

1.— Population. 

Population of the city by last census, 1890 . . 43, 98^. 

Legal school age, 5 to 21. 

II. — Schoolhouses. 

Number of schoolhouses in use ...... 22 

Number of schoolhouses not in use ..... r 

(Old house in Hallsville.) 
Number of schoolrooms used for day schools . . .89 

(Three of the same, and six others, used for evening schools. Rooms unoc- 
cupied by city for day schools are two at Spring-street house, and three at the 
Lowell-street house.) 

Number of rooms used for High-school classes . . . *y 

Nimiber of rooms used for Grammar schools . . . *25 

Number of rooms used for Middle schools . 

Number of rooms used for Primary schools 

Number of rooms used for Partially Graded schools 

Number of rooms used for Ungraded schools ... 5 

III. — Schools. 

(All for both sexes.) 
Number of High Schools . . . . . . . i; 

(A) 
*Another, also, for one term. 



17 

*32 

2 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



305 



Number of combined Grammar and lower grade (Middle 
and Primary) schools ....... 

Number of combined Middle and Primary schools 
Number of schools all Primary grade ..... 

Number of Ungraded schools ...... 



lO 

2 

4 

5 



IV. —Teachers. 

Male teachers in the High school . . . . .3 

Female teachers in the High school . . . . • *4 

Male teachers in the Grammar schools .... 6 

Female teachers in the Grammar schools . . . . ^19 

Female teachers in the Middle schools . . . -17 

Female teachers in the Primary schools .... ^29 

Female teachers in the Partially Graded schools . . 2 

Female teachers in the Ungraded schools .... 5 

Special teachers ........ 2 

Average number of male teachers f . . . . -9 

Average number of female teachers . . . . -77 

Male teachers in the evening schools .... 7 

Female teachers in the evening schools .... 9 

Average number of male teachers in the evening schools . 5 
Average number of female teachers in the evening schools . 5 
Male teachers in the evening Drawing schools ... 3 
Average number of male teachers in the evening Drawing 
schools ......... 3 

*Anotber, also, for one term. Three of the thirty-two primaries were in 
the Training Scliool. They had no regular teachers, being taught by sub- 
teachers nnder the direction of the principal, who, for convenience, is reck- 
oned among the middle-school teachers. 

t Exclusive of special teachers. 



(B) 



20 



306 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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(C) 



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(E) 



REPOKT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



309 



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310 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



DAY SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance upon the several grades of 
day schools for the year 1892 : 



public 



Grades. 



High 

Grammar 

Middle 

Primai-y 

Partially graded . 
Ungraded 

Totals, 1892 
Totals, 1891 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls. 



108 

471 

388 

1,101 

53 

60 



2,181 
2,003 



129 

524 

371 

1,004 

53 

36 



2,117 
2,068 



6 - 

S 
S 
1- 


Average daily 
attendance. 


226 


217 


852 


787 


603 


546 


1,301 


1,158 


74 


64 


74 


65 


3,130 


2,837 


2,940 


2,689 



O j_ 

'si S 



96.0 
9-2.4 
90 5 

S9.0 
86 5 
87.8 



90.6 
91.5 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Summary of the attendance upon the several grades of 
evening schools for the year 1892 : 



public 



Schools. 



Lowell street. 
Spring street 
School street. 



Drawing schools 



( Mechanical . . . 
I Architectural . 



Totals, 1892 . 
Totals, 1891 . 



Whole number 
different pupils. 



Boys. Girls. 



334 



117 

79 
44 



574 
455 

(G) 



137 
57 



194 
320 



213 
219 



174 
166 



'■a. 



74.0 
78.0 
73.0 
83.3 

85.7 



81.8 
75.8 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 311 

Evening School Teachers. 

Charles E. Cochran, principal of Lowell street school, for 
boys. 

Assistants — David Eckvall, Arthur W. Morgan, John J. Shea, 
Fannie L, Sanborn, Gertrude A. Burns, and Honora J. Crough. 

William J. Mooar (Winter), and Louis H. Bailey (Fall), prin- 
cipals of Spring-street school, for girls. 

Assistants — Lizzie D. Hartford, Maggie Linen, Alice H. 
Boyd, and Annie Brigham. 

L. H. Carpenter, principal of School-street school, for both 
sexes. 

Assistants — Mary A. Clement and Attie S. Marshall. 

Evening Drawing-School Teachers. 

John M. Kendall, Henry W. Allen, and Alphonzo H. Sanborn. 

(H) 



812 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



The following table presents the main features of interest per- 
taining to the attendance upon the public schools for the last ten 
years. 





Date. 


a 


Whole No. 
beloDging. 


i 

u 

a 

3 

a 

be" 
a 60 

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< 


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>. 

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S.Sf 


a 

"Co 


1 

I 

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•2 « 




Boys. 


Girla. 


CD h 


1883 

1884... . 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 


4,062 
3,918 
3,806 
3,632 
3,670 
3,712 
3,787 
3,814 
4,071 
4,298 


2,061 
1,924 
1,891 
1,812 
1,817 
1,806 
1,862 
1,881 
2,003 
2,181 


2,001 
1,994 
1,915 
1,820 
1,853 
1,906 
1,925 
1,933 
2,068 
2,117 


2,848 
2,872 
2,7-25 
2,698 
2,711 
2,768 
2,801 
2,795 
2,940 
3,130' 


2,612 
2,645 
2,430 
2,475 
2,468 
2,500 
2,581 
2,536 
2,689 
2,837 


91.4 
92.1 
90.6 
91.9 
90.8 
90.3 
92.2 
90.7 
91.5 
90.6 


103 
95 
96 
79 
98 
116 
177 
141 
166 
174 


97 

85 
98 
78 
98 
88 
101 
121 
120 
116 


75 

71 

89 

71 

95 

80 

96 

114 

101 

103 


66 
49 
71 
53 
61 
58 
73 
83 
69 
67 


27 
38 
35 
42 
42 
45 
55 
33 
26 
42 


71 

72 
72 
74 
76 
76 
75 
75 
82 

m 



CHANGES IN CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

The whole number of different teachers employed one term or 
more in the day schools, within the year, has been 94. Their 
respective positions may be learned from the attendance table 
on pages C, D, E, and F of the Appendix, but the various 
changes made within the year can be more readily understood 
by an inspection of the following : 

* Including grammar classes in suburban schools. 

t Usually some pupils have annually entered from other schools. This j-ear 
six have so entered. 

X There being three grammar master's assistants, each for one term, or an 
average of one for the year ; hence 86 others. 

(I) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



313 



Teachers. 
Wm. B. Abbott. 
Georgiana Dow. 
Gertrude F. How. 
Alice P. Cumniings. 



Date of effect Dateofbegin- 

of resignation. Teachers. ning service. 

June 24. Willis B. Moore. Sept. 12. 

June 24. Cora F. Sanborn. Sept. 12. 

June 24. Viola E. McClure. Sept. 12. 

June 24. Amelia L. Graupner. Sept. 12. 

Carrie E. Hoit. Sept. 12. 

Edith L. Hammond. Sept. 12. 

E. Alfreda Hall. Sept. 12. 

Mertie C. Hawks. Sept. 26. 

Lucy M. Choate. Oct. 3. 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Sub-teachers. 


Graduated. 


Mary W. Allen. 


June 


24, 


'92 


Issa M. Tuttle. 


June 


24, 


'92. 


Mabel R. Brown. 


Jan. 


27. 


'93 


Lucy M. Choate. 


Jan. 


27, 


'93 


Mary J. Corcoran. 


Jan. 


27> 


'93- 


Annie R. Corson. 


Jan. 


27, 


'93- 


Alfreda Hall. 


Jan. 


27. 


'93- 


Mertie C. Hawks. 


Jan. 


27, 


'93 


Carrie E. Head. 


Jan. 


27, 


'93 


Mary S.Richardson 


. Jan. 


27» 


'93 



Entered. 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 12 
Oct. — 



Sub-teachers. 
Bertha L. Kemp. 
Nellie C. Parker. 
Nellie M. Smith. 
Bessie E. Dodge. 
Josie L. Riddle. Jan. 27, '93 
M. Min. Sturtev'nt. Jan.27,'93 
Perley E. Higgins. Withdrew 



(J) 



314 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



VI.— Work of Truant Officer. 



reported 
from 



January. . . . 

February .. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

September . 
October — 
November . 
December . . 



9 
13 

16 

15 
21 
14 
11 
8 
18 
12 



Totals 137 



U 
35 
26 
36 
55 
16 
13 



No. volun- 
tarily re- 
turned to 



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14 
10 


4 


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25 



No. reported 

caused to 

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5 


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03 


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7 


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8 


7 


2 


6 


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10 


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1 


i 15 


20 


3 


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! 11 


16 


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4 


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33 


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3 


9 


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10 


2 


5 


1 


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12- 


2 

20 






88 


138 


44 


19 






January . . 
February . 
March . . . 
April .... 

May 

June 

September 
October . . 
November 
December 

Totals 



80 



No. truants 
caused 
to attend 






.3 m S 

o a o 

. o « 
o=" ■" 



81 
64 
96 
53 
97 
64 
75 
65 
64 
42 



81 
62 
47 
47 
80 
44 
111 
71 
45 
33 



621 



«o 



O J, . 

Cos a 

*^ c if 
o'C'S 



19 



445 



(K) 



REPOKT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
VII.— Finance.— 1892. 



315 



Items of Accottkt. 



Salaries of teachers 

Books aud stationery 

Free text-books and supplies 

Furniture and supplies 

Repairs 

Care of rooms 

Fuel 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Evening common schools . . . 
Evening drawing schools. . . . 

Totals 



Resources from 

appropriations and 

transfers. 


Expenditures, 1892. 


§56,000.00 


$54,660.36 


300.00 


299.73 


3.500.00 


3,489.31 


800.00 


634 57 


5,000.00 


4,952.26 


4,050.77 


4,050.77 


4,500.00 


4,297.40 


400.00 


333.75 


1,2-27 99 


1,227.99 


1,200.00 


973.93 


COO. 00 


405.15 


$77,578.76 


$75,325.22 



COST OF CITY SCHOOLS. 

Expenditures, as above specified 

Salaries. 

Members of the school board 
Clerk of the board 
Superintendent of schools 
Truant officer 

Total . 

Receipts on Account of Schools. 

Literary fund 
Non-resident tuition 
Sale of text-books . 

Total . 

*InclncUng $32.77 received from Londonderry. 

t Including $11.95 refunded the city on account of overdraft. 

(L) 



S75)325-22 

180.00 

100.00 

2,000.00 

750.00 



o55-22 



. $6,010.88 

* 414.22 

1 162.54 
. $6,587.64 



316 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Net amount raised by taxation .... $71,767.58 

The city valuation for 1892 is $25,932,044; and hence the 
rate of school tax for the year is $71,767.58 -^- $25,932,044, or 
.00276 -(-. 



VIII.— School Year. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opened January 4 ; closed March 
25. Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opened April 1 1 ; closed June 24. 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opened September 1 2 ; closed De- 
cember 16. Vacation of two weeks. 

Number of school days in the year, as provided above by the 
school board, 185. 

Average number of days the schools were taught, 173. 

(Being closed several holidays, days of " Teachers' Institutes," and halt 
tJays on account of bad weather or insufficient heat.) 



IX.— High School Graduation. 

Program. 

Salutatory, with Essay . . . Blanche Laura Bachelder 
Chorus, " On Life's Journey " ..... Veazie 

History ....... Morton Julius Fitch 

Violin Duet ...... Krommer, Opus 33 

Annie Florence Abbott. Barton P. Bachelder. 

Class Oration, " For Commerce or Life " George Kendrick Buck 
Double Quartet. 

Minnie Willemine Orrill. Louis Sherburne Cox. 

Florence Barnard. Orien Brown Dodge. 

Annie Florence Abbott. Charlie Brooks Bodwell. 

Julia Frances Stearns. George Henry Abbott. 

(M) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



317 



Class Poem, " What I have Wrought, I am. 



Galop, Banjo and Guitar Quartet. 

James Dunnington. 

French Campbell. 
Prophecies .... 
Chorus, " Song of the Triton " 
Valedictory, with Essay . 
Presentation of Diplomas . 
Singing of the Ode. 



Lillian Angela McAUester. 

Louis Sherburne Cox. 
Morton Julius Fitch. 

Mabelle Ethelyn Bosher 

Molloy 

Florence Barnard 

. Rev. W. C. McAUester 



Graduates. 



FOUR YEARS CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Annie Florence Abbott. 
Barton P. Bachelder. 
Blanche Laura Bachelder. 
Florence Barnard. 
Charlie Brooks Bodwell. 
Mabelle Ethelyn Bosher. 
French Campbell. 
Annie Wainwright Colby. 
Walter Edward Currier. 
Orien Brown Dodge. 



William Rodney Eaton. 
Elsie Daniels Fairbanks. 
Morton Julius Fitch. 
Ethelyn Louise Marshall. 
Lillian Angela McAUester. 
Minnie Willemine Orrill. 
Joseph Louis Poor. 
Nellie May Smith. 
Mabel Marion Stevens. 
Leon Luther Sweet. 



FOUR YEARS COLLEGE COURSE. 



George Kendrick Buck. 
Louis Sherburne Cox. 



Henry Hadley Stark. 
William Williamson. 



FOUR YEARS ENGLISH COURSE. 



Leonard D. Dickinson. 
Bessie Eleanor Dodge. 
Albert Clark Frost. 
Ethel Lunette George. 



Stephen James Putnam. 
Nellie Frances Smith. 
Julia Frances Stearns. 
Leon Clark Wheeler. 



Bertha Leona Kemp. 
(N) 



318 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

THREE YEARS SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Charles M. Baker. James Dunnington. 

Charles B. Manning. 

THREE YEARS ENGLISH COURSE. 

George Henry Abbott. Rowena Louise Walker. 

Herman Hunter Dinsmore. John Mason Boutwell. 
Fannie Esther Ramsey. M. Lizzie Dealey. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Edward Winslow Cross, in College Course. 

Flora Belle Patch, in English Course. 

HONOR SCHOLARS. 

Determined by rank in scholarship and deportment. 

Classical Course ..... Florence Barnard 

College Course ...... Henry Hadley Stark 

English Course .... Leonard D. Dickinson 

Scientific Course ..... James Dunnington 



X. Winners of Clarke Prizes. 

FOR EXCELLENCE IN ELOCUTION AT CONTEST, JANUARY 26, 1 89 2. 

EffieS. Wilbur, $i6. Alice E. Balch, ^6. 

Grettie E. Canney, $12. J. Etta Doherty, ^4. 

Anson G. Osgood, ^10. Alice G. Colby, $2.* 

Sadie Stewart, $8. Florence Caldwell, ^2.^ 



XI. Organization, 1893. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

EDGAR J. KNOWLTON, Mayor, ex officio, Chairman. 
FRED T. DUNLAP, 

President of the Common Council, ex officio. 

* A school prize, awarded the better of the two from each school not win- 
ning one of the six prizes offered those most meritorious. 

(O) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



319 



Ward I. Charles D. Sumner. 

Walter H. Lewis. 
Ward 2. George H. Stearns. 

Charles S. Murkland. 
Ward 3. George D. Towne. 

Louis E. Phelps. 
Ward 4. Stephen B. Stearns. 

Edwin L. Richardson. 
Ward 5. James P. Slattery. 

William J. Sughrue. 
Ward 6. Frank T. E. Richardson. 

George W. Dearborn. 
Ward 7. Marshall P. Hall. 

Edward B. Woodbury. 
Ward 8. Luther C. Baldwin. 

Josiah G. Dearborn. 
Ward 9. Edward J. Doherty. 

Scott E. Sanborn, 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD. 

MARSHALL P. HALL. 

CLERK OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD B. WOODBURY. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

WILLIAM E. BUCK. 

superintendent's clerk. 
FANNIE L. SANBORN. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

SAMUEL BROOKS. 
(P) 



320 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Finajice. The Mayor, Messrs. Dunlap, Hall, Woodbury, F. T. 
E. Richardson. 

Salaries. Messrs. Woodbury, Slattery, Sumner. 

Repairs, Furniture, and Supplies. Messrs. S. B. Stearns, Sum- 
ner, Baldwin. 

Text-Books., Apparatus, and Studies. Messrs. Hall, Baldwin, 
G. H. Stearns. 

Drawing. Messrs. Baldwin, Hall, J. G. Dearborn. 

Music. Messrs. F. T. E. Richardson, Phelps, Lewis. 

Fuel and Heating. Mr. G. H. Stearns, the Mayor, Messrs. 
Dunlap, G. W. Dearborn, Phelps. 

Examination of Teachers. Messrs. Towne, Murkland, J. G. 
Dearborn. 

Attendance. Messrs. E. L. Richardson, Doherty, Sughrue. 

Health. Messrs. Towne, Slattery, Sanborn. 

. SUB -COMMITTEES. 

High School. Messrs. Murkland, Hall, S. B. Stearns, Towne, 
Phelps, Slattery, J. G. Dearborn. 

Franklin-street School. Messrs. Woodbury, Sumner, Baldwin. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. Messrs. Towne, Slat- 
tery, Sughrue. 

Lincoln- street School. Messrs. S. B. Stearns, F. T. E. Rich- 
ardson, E. L. Richardson. 

Ash-street School. * Messrs. Phelps, Towne, Hall. 

Webster-street and LUodget-street Schools. Messrs. G. H. 
Stearns, Murkland, Slattery. 

Bakersville School. Messrs. Sumner, F. T. E. Richardson, 
Lewis. 

Varney School. Messrs. Baldwin, J. G. Dearborn, Murkland. 

Training School. Messrs. Hall, Phelps, G. H. Stearns. 
Wilson Hill School. Messrs. Lewis, Sanborn, E. L. Richard- 
son. 

Main-street and South Main-street Schools. Messrs. J. G. 
Dearborn, Baldwin, Sanborn. 
* Also of any others that may be organized on Bridge street. 

(Q) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 321 

Ainoskeag and Stark ScJwols. Messrs. Slattery, G. W. Dear- 
born, Doherty. 

Hallsville and Youngsville Schools. Messrs. G. W. Dearborn, 
E. L. Richardson, Sughrue. 

Goffe's Falls and Harvey Schools. Messrs. Sughrue, Lewis, 
Doherty. 

IVebsler' s Mills and Mosquito Pond Schools. Messrs. E. L. 
Richardson, Sughrue, Woodbury. 

Evening Schools. Messrs. F. T. E. Richardson, G. H. Stearns, 
Suinner. 



XII. — List of Teachers. 

HIGH SCHOOL. — BEECH STREET. 

Master. Albert Somes. 
Sub-Master. George I. Hopkins. 
Assistants. Willis B. Moore. 

Mary Stanton. 

Nellie Pickering. 

Mary H. Cutler. 

Camille Benson. 

Mary A. Hawley. 

FRANKLIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Charles W. Bickford. 
Master's Assistant. Amelia L. Graupner. 
Assistants. Annie O. Heath. (Leave of absence granted.) 
Carrie E. Hoit in charge. 

L. Mary Choate. 

Carrie E. Head. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. C. Augusta Abbott. 
Lower Middle. Hattie G. Flanders. 
Higher Primary. Nellie M. James. 
Lower Primary. Susie L. Dodge. 
21 (R) 



322 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

SPRING-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Lizzie P. Gove. (Grammar classes.) 
Higher Middle. Emma L. McLaren. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Lower Middle. Fannie D. Moulton. 
Higher Primary. Nellie I. Sanderson. 
Lower Primary. Lucia E. Esty. 
Lower Primary. Maude L. Kent. 

LINCOLN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Frank S. Sutcliffe. 

Master's Assistant. Annie W. Patten. 

Assistants. Isabelle R. Daniels. 

Mabel J. Brickett. 

Mary F. Barnes. 
■ Mary J- Corcoran. * 

Josephine A. Mitchell. * 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Annie ISL Sleeper. 
Lower Middle. Susie G. Woodman. 
Higher Primary. Cora B. Gilford. 
Mixed Primary. Theodora Richardson. 

ASH-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. Fred C. Baldwin. 

Masteris Assistant. Mary E. Bunton. 

Assistants." Mary Hickey Dowd.* 

* Third floor. 

(S) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 323 

Jennie M. Chandler. 
Edith S. Dole. 
Mabel R. Brown.* 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Middle. Emma J. Cooper. 
Lower Middle. Kittie J. Ferren. 
Higher Primar}-. May F. Nutt. 
Lower Primary. Annie B. Goodwin. 
Lower Primary. Bertha A. Young. 

WEBSTER-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Graynmar Grades. 

Master. B. S. Andrew. 
Master's Assistant. Cora F. Sanborn. 
Assistants. Rose Dearborn. 
Alta C. Willand. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Mixed Middle. Eva F. Tuson. 
Higher Primary. Lettie M. Smith. 
Lower Primary. Edith L. Hammond. 

BAKERSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Secotid Floor. — Mixed G?-ades. 

Principal. Lizzie A. Burns. 
Assistant.* Lelia A. Brooks. 
Higher Middle.* Issa May Tuttle. 
Lower Middle. Augusta S. Downs. 

First Floor. — Lower Grades. 

Higher Primary. S. Izetta Locke. 
Lower Primary. Annie Brigham. 

* Third floor. 

(T) 



324 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

VARNEY SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Grammar Grades. 

Master. George Winch. 

Master's Assistant. Barbara B. Joy. 

Assistant. Viola E. McClure. 

First Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Assistants. Lillian Little. 

E. Maria Dickey. 

Ellen E. McKean. 
Higher Middle. Mary E. Moulto.n. 
Lower Middle. Nettie C. Woodman. 

HALLSVILLE SCHOOL. 

Master. William H. Huse. 

Mixed Middle. Ella F. Barker. 

Assistant. Mary G. Worthen (Lower classes from each of above 

rooms). 
Mixed Primary. Olive A. Rowe. 
Lower Primary. E. Alfreda Hall. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

(Merrimack Street, corner Union.) 
Principal. Caroline E. Wing. 

A lower Middle School (No. 15), a higher (No. 21), and two 
lower (Nos. 22 and 23) primary schools, embracing first four years 
of school work. Principal is assisted by members of the training 
class. 

MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. — Mixed Grades. 

Principal. Mary W. Mitchell (Higher Middle). 
Lower Middle. Millie S. Morse, 
Higher Primary. Mary E. Brophy. 
Mixed Primary. Mary J. Walsh. 

(U) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 325 

First Floor. — Primary Grades. 

Mixed Primary. Mary A. Clement. 

Lower Primary. Gertrude A. Burns. 

Lower Primary. Kate T. Clarke. 

Lower Primary. Gertrude L. Southard. 

BLODGET-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Higher Primary. Gertrude H. Brooks. 

First Floor. 
Lower Primary. Edith M. Stebbins. 

LOWELL-STREET SCHOOL. 

Second Floor. 
Lower Primary. Mary S. Richardson. 

First Floor. 
Higher Primary. Helen M. Morrill. 

WILSON HILL SCHOOL. 

Lower Primary. Hulda C. Graupner. 
Lower Primary. Ella Hope. 

SOUTH MAIN-STREET SCHOOL. 

Higher Primary. Delle E. Haines. 
Lower Primary. Georgia M. Cheney. 

PARTIALLY GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Amoskeag. Nettie B. Fogg (Grammar and middle-school 

classes). 
Mixed Primary. Mary G. Tynan. 

(V) 



326 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

GoflFe's Falls.* Georgie Kendrick (Grammar and middle-school 

classes). 
Mixed Primary. Mertie C. Hawks. 

UNGRADED SCHOOLS.* 

No. I. Stark. Inez M. Warren. 

2. Harvey. Emma J. Ela. 

3. Youngsville. Mary A. Seavey. 

4. Webster's Mills. Josephine L, Riddle. 

5. Mosquito Pond. Nellie M. Atwood. 

SPECIAL TEACHERS. 

Music. J. J. Kimball. 
Drawing. C. J. Emmins. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

(Open from October to March, five evenings each week.) 
Low ell- street Building. 
Three schools for boys. 

I Spring-street Building. 

Two schools for girls. 

School-street Building. 
Two schools, one for each sex. 

EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 

(Open from October to March.) 
Spring- street Building. 

Machine-drawing classes meet on Monday and Thursday even- 
ings. 

Architectural-drawing classes meet on Tuesday and Friday 
evenings. 

JANITORS. 

High School and Ash-street School. 

John S. Avery, 404 Merrimack. ^600. 

* Suburban . 

(W) 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 327 

Lincoln-street and Wilson Hill Schools. 
William Stevens, 418 Central. $450. 

Webster-street a?id Blodget-street Schools. 
Michael Finley, Pearl, near Chestnut. $425. 

Spring-street and Lowell-street Schools. 
William H. Morrill, 45 Pennacook. $350. 

Training School and Fratiklin-street School. 
Edward P. Cogswell, 409 Cedar. $475. 

Varney and South Main-street Schools. 
H. G. Batchelder, 123 Carroll. $450. 

Main-street School, 
J. C. Blaine, 58 School. $350. 

Bakersville School. 
H. C. Dickey, Bakersville. $300. 

LLallsville School. 
William H. Newry, corner Beacon and Laurel. $300. 

Amoskeag School. 
James E. Bailey. $170. 



XIII. — School Year, 1893. 

Winter term of twelve weeks opens January 2, closes March 24. 
Vacation of two weeks. 

Spring term of eleven weeks opens April 10, closes June 23. 
Vacation of eleven weeks. 

Fall term of fourteen weeks opens September 11, closes De- 
cember 15. 

(X) 



328 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



329 




REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To his Honor the Mayor : 

The Board of Health submits its report for the year 1892 : 
At the beginning of the year the board consisted of Dr. George 
C. Hoitt, chairman, Joseph B. Sawyer, clerk, and Dr. Neil F. 
Starr. The term of Mr. Sawyer expired on the first Monday in 
February, and he was reappointed by the Mayor. On the same 
day the board was organized by the re-election of the officers of 
the preceding year, and it has since remained unchanged. 

EXPENDITURES. 



Clerk hire ....... 


$25.00 


Pay of inspectors ....... 


1,422.50 


Salaries of the members of the board 


600.00 


Printing, stationery, etc. .... 


113.18 


Legal expenses ...... 


67-55 


Street-car fares ...... 


52-59 


Postage stamps and envelopes .... 


30-43 


Furniture ....... 


44.90 


Carriage hire . . . 


27.25 


Board of persons committed to city hospital 


26.00 


Sundries ........ 


14.61 




$2,424.01 



INSPECTORS AND THEIR WORK. 



Mr. Herbert S. Clough and Mr. John Looney have been in 
the employ of the board as inspectors from the first of March to 
the end of the year, the former at three dollars per day and the 



334 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

latter at two dollars. They have been faithful and efficient and 
have discharged their duties to the satisfaction of the board. 
Their report, submitted herewith, gives the details of their work. 
In prosecuting that work it has been the rule that on finding any 
nuisance or unsanitary thing they are to call the attention of the 
owner or person in charge of the premises to it in a personal in- 
terview, or by a courteous note sent through the post-office. In 
the majority of cases this secures the abatement of the nuisance. 
In the cases where it does not suffice, the board visits the premises, 
makes an examination of the thing complained of, and, if neces- 
sary, issues a notice to the responsible person requiring the re- 
moval or abatement of the nuisance. These notices are served 
by the inspector, and the proper return is made. The inspect- 
ors' report shows that two hundred and fifty-nine such notices 
have been issued and served during the year. Such a document, 
indicating as it does the probability of further legal proceedings, 
is usually heeded by the delinquent. In only four instances has 
it been found necessary to enter complaints in police court, and 
in all these the requirements of the notice were complied with 
immediately thereafter. 

A HOUSE-TO-HOUSE INSPECTION. 

Under an order of the board, a house-to-house inspection of 
the compactly built portions of the city was begun in August 
last. This work was commenced at Auburn street and had been 
extended northerly to Bridge street when it was stopped by the 
advent of winter. It is the intention of the board to resume it 
again with the opening of spring, and to continue it until all 
parts of the city are put in a good sanitary condition. Some of 
the results of this inspection are given in the inspectors' report. 

VAULT CLEANING. 

The board licensed three parties to clean privy vaults the past 
season, viz. : J. T. Gott, Timothy McKenna, and Thomas 
Welch. The last-named sold his teams and apparatus to Gott 
after continuing in business but a short time. The number of 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 335 

vaults cleaned by each is given in the report of the inspectors. 
It was found necessary to suspend McKenna's license twice, once 
for dumping too near dwelling houses, and once on account of 
the bad condition of his apparatus. 

Several complaints have come to the office that the night-soil 
had been dumped in such places, or left in such a condition, as 
to be a nuisance. A few of these complaints were perhaps need- 
less, but all were attended to by the inspectors, and the nuisances 
were abated. 

Notwithstanding these occasional complaints it was the con- 
viction of the board that the excavator service, under the vigi- 
lant care of the inspectors, has been a success. It is true that 
it has not been strictly odorless, but, considering the vile nature 
of the stuff to be dealt with, it is not probable that any plan 
strictly without offensive smell, and yet economically workable, 
will soon be devised. As long as vaults exist and have to be 
emptied, they will cause constant, or at least occasional, annoy- 
ance. 

THE ABOLISHMENT OF VAULTS. 

This work, entered upon two years since, has been pursued as 
fast as possible, but considering the large number of vaults built 
appurtenant to new houses on unsewered streets, it is doubtful 
whether the total number of these structures has been at all di- 
minished. The unusual activity in all building trades has some- 
times made it impossible to secure the services of joiners and 
plumbers to do the work promptly when changes have been or- 
dered. 

The board has been reasonable, however, and in all cases 
where the owner or agent showed an honest endeavor to comply 
with their requirements no prosecution has been commenced. 

The board has sought to do the greatest good to the greatest 
number by confining the work to the most crowded parts of the 
city. In a few instances where the conditions were especially 
bad, it was necessary to order changes in property in other loca- 
tions. 



336 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 



PLUMBING AND DRAINAGE. 

Attention is invited to that part of the inspectors' report which 
touches upon this subject. The board has long been aware of 
the existence of the evils complained of, but lack of means for 
the employment of a suitable man for an inspector, together with 
the lack of appreciation of the necessity and value of good plumb- 
ing, on the part of the general public, has heretofore delayed 
action, but it is hoped that the appropriation for the health de- 
partment for the current year will be sufficient to allow the em- 
ployment of a suitable inspector in this line of sanitary work, 
and a code of plumbing rules is now being framed. 

SEWERS. 

The rapid growth of the city and the inability of the city gov- 
ernment to promptly provide sewers for the new streets which 
are constantly being opened, has made the disposal of the house 
drainage one of the troublesome questions which our inspectors 
have had to deal with. In McGregorville, in the early summer, 
they found more than forty kitchen sinks pouring their sewage 
into the streets, or upon the surface of the ground about the 
houses. All the householders professed a willingness to enter 
sewers as soon as the city would provide them, but very generally 
they demurred at the idea of caring for their sewage in a lawful 
manner until that time. Legal notices, however, had the desired 
effect, and means of conveying the sewage away under ground in 
a manner not to be offensive were provided. These unsanitary 
conditions will continue to be found so long as thickly built 
streets are left without sewers. 

There is a great deal of misapprehension on the part of many 
householders as to the respective duties of the city and themselves 
in this matter. The law requires every man to keep his premises 
free from nuisances to his neighbors and the public. By the 
same rule that he must care for his privy-vault and his pig-sty, he 
must also care for his sink-water ; and this he must do even when 
there is no sewer near his premises. The city is under obligation 
to build sewers for the public good. It has no right to build, 
them for the convenience or profit of an individual. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 337 

The Hall street sewer, built many years ago to discharge the 
storm water from a very sparsely built territory, was allowed to 
discharge its water into Cemetery brook. As the territory had 
gradually become thickly built, the sewage at the outlet had be- 
come correspondingly objectionable, and at times of low water 
in the brook was bad in the extreme. This nuisance had been 
spoken of in a previous report of this board, and had otherwise 
been urged upon the attention of previous city governments. 
We are happy to say that this year his Honor the Mayor and the 
committee on sewers promptly remedied the trouble when it was 
called to their attention by extending the sewer and connecting 
it with another. 

THE COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF WASTES. 

So long as the swill is collected by a contractor who does busi- 
ness for the making of money, so long will the service be unsat- 
isfactory ali^ce to the citizens, the public, and the health depart- 
ment. Deluded with the idea that the perishable wastes of the 
city contain much valuable food for domestic animals, bidders 
have lowered the price of the work until, as we believe, there is 
not a living profit in the job. The consequence is that boys or 
cheap irresponsible men are employed as collectors. They are 
more anxious to do their work quickly than to do it well. In 
making their rounds places are omitted, frequently to the great 
annoyance and discomfort of the householder ; and although 
when their delinquencies are reported the swill is promptly 
removed, yet it is probable that many citizens suffer in silence. 
With a contract which requires only the collection of perishable 
matters put in proper and separate receptacles, and which custom 
has interpreted to include only swill and things which are sup- 
posed to have some value as food for animals, and which thus 
excludes ashes, waste paper, dung, and carcasses of small dead 
animals, they have no difficulty in leaving all these things to the 
city scavenger carts, and even in frequently leaving the swill it- 
self, when it is mingled with them. The city men have orders 
to take nothing perishable to the dumping-places, and so the 
noxious mass remains on the premises of the householder until he 



338 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

complains to the health department, or else gets unreasonably 
vexed at a state of things for which he himself is primarily re- 
sponsible, and dumps the vile stuff into the street. Imperfect as 
the scavenger service under its present organization is admitted 
to be, we believe that most of the inconvenience and annoyance 
to householders is caused by their own carelessness in neglecting 
to comply with the ordinance requiring them to keep the differ- 
ent classes of wastes separate, to keep them in suitable recepta- 
cles, and to set them out upon the back street at the right time 
for their removal. There is no better way of getting one's self 
properly served by others than to be scrupulous in the discharge 
of our own duties towards them. 

In some parts of the city the people are too ignorant or too 
untrained in habits of neatness and order to take any care of 
their wastes, and the back street is used as a dumping ground for 
everything, no matter how offensive, which they have occasion 
to get rid of. Here again the same thing occurs. * Neither set 
of men takes the offensive mixture, and the back street is in a 
chronic state of filthiness and neglect. 

The swill collected must be carried a long distance out of the 
city, and even then it is liable to become a nuisance unless im- 
mediately buried or fed to animals. In the latter case the beef, 
milk, or pork which comes from animals fed upon it, is anything 
but desirable for food. Swill milk, in particular, has long and 
deservedly been under the ban of all physicians and other intel- 
ligent persons whose attention has been called to the subject. 

As a way of remedying these evils we would suggest the follow 
ing measures, all of which we believe to be in the line of neces- 
sary improvements : 

1. To consolidate the two branches of the scavenger service, 
and to put the whole work into the care of the health depart- 
ment. It is understood that an ordinance making this change is 
already before the city councils. 

2. To abolish the contract system of collecting and removing 
swill. It is submitted that there is no more propriety in getting 
this work done by contract than there would be in getting the 
business of the fire department or the school department so done. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



339 



3. To dispose of the swill and all other burnable wastes, ex- 
cepting, perhaps, night-soil, by cremation. It will cost some- 
thing to run a furnace for that purpose, but the expense will be 
largely offset by the lessened cost of attending to the city dump, 
where nothing but such things as ashes, brickbats, and lime rub- 
bish would then be deposited ; and it would be further and more 
largely offset by the shorter haul which would be made practica- 
ble. A furnace may be run in any neighborhood where ordinary 
mechanical business is carried on, without creating the least nui- 
sance or cause of reasonable complaint. The swill is now carried 
more than two miles out of town, and even there it is the subject 
of some complaint. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

An epidemic of measles began in November, 1891, and con- 
tinued until the summer of 1892. With this exception, conta- 
gious diseases have dealt very lightly with the people of Man- 
chester. Typhoid fever has caused a smaller number of deaths 
than in any year since the beginning of 1885, when our records 
commence. Deaths from diphtheria have been less numerous 
than in any year excepting the one immediately preceding. 

The following table shows the number of cases of the principal 
contagious diseases reported to the board in each month of the 
year, together with the number of deaths from each disease, as 
taken from the books of the city registrar: 





>, 






















s 

J3 






Diseases. 




a 





P. 




6 
5 


"3 


5) 


fa 

03 








s 




s 




'3 



CD 

0) 




•-s 





^ 
^ 


<; 
5 


7 


1 


1-5 


< 


02 




^ 


&5 






^ 
1 


H 


Q 


Diplitberia 


^ 


Scarlet fever 


S) 


3 


?, 


8 


5 


3 


3 


3 


1 




1 


in 


44 


2 








'> 


1 


1 


1 


7 


^ 


B 


4 


"i 


3 


33 


11 


Measles 


81 


111 


131 


35 


20 


4 


6 




1 






1 


390 


11 











To this number should be added sixty-one cases of measles, 
which occurred at the Catholic Children's Home on Hanover 



340 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



Street, during the epidemic, and which were all reported at one 
time, making the total for measles four hundred and fifty-one. 

The following table gives the number of cases of contagious 
diseases reported for the last six years, together with the number 
of deaths from those diseases in the past eight years : 



Teaks. 



1SS5 

18S6 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 



Diphtheria. 



Scarlet 
fever. 



73 

126 
79 
41 
21 
26 



94 
44 
259 
63 
25 
44 



Typhoid 
fever. 



n —- 



Measles. 



CO I Ah 



Totals. 



187 
54 

298 
89 

451 



392 

428 
438 
211 
554 



* No returns. 



PRECAUTIONS AGAINST SMALL-POX. 



In June last the board received a communication from Dr. 
Watson, secretary of the state board of health, giving the names 
of four immigrants from Europe who had crossed the ocean on 
the steamer iVmerica, a vessel on which this disease had broken 
out, and who were probably then in this city. Our inspectors 
promptly located the four men, and as a precautionary measure 
they and their baggage were taken to the city hospital for conta- 
gious diseases, and there detained in isolation until the period of 
incubation of the disease had passed. 

PRECAUTIONS AGAINST CHOLERA. 

During the summer this disease was brought into the harbor of 
New York from Europe, and a very general state of apprehension 
existed that it would pass the quarantine and become epidemic 
in this country. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 341 

In view of this danger the board redoubled its exertions to 
make and to keep the city clean, and at once instituted the visi- 
tation and inspection already spoken of. They also prepared a 
circular of information, which was printed in English, French, 
and German, and freely distributed among the people, and which 
was also published in the daily papers. The work of the board 
in the direction of cleaning the city was ably and zealously 
seconded by Superintendent Sanborn, of the highway depart- 
ment, of whose work the scavenger service is now a branch. 

In common with the country at large we were happily spared 
a visitation of the disease ; but the danger, in abeyance through 
the winter, is not yet passed, and vigorous measures for the fur- 
ther cleaning of the city will be resumed at the earliest moment 
after the snow and ice have left the yards and alleys. Other 
preparations putting the board in readiness for instantly dealing 
properly with the first and every succeeding case of the disease 
will be made at an early day. The scourge may not reach us ; 
let us hope that it will not. but scores of other forms of sickness 
are sure to be here, and against them all cleanliness is a defense 
more reliable than prayers or medicine. 



342 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

TABLE 

SHOWING THE MORTALITY OF THE CITY BY DISEASES AND BY 

MONTHS FOR THE YEAR 1 89 2, COMPILED FROM 

THE RECORDS OF THE CITY REGISTRAR. 



Causes of Death. 




B 
1^ 


1 


a 
< 


^ 
g 


6 


3 

1^ 


3 
bo 

a 
<! 


s 

ft 
a? 


aj 
-a 


1 


3 

s 

> 

5? 


Of 

g 


« 

Q 













1 


















1 




1 






















1 


























1 


Accident, not specifled — 
" killed by cars... 
" fall ...' 


1 

1 


1 


— 


1 

1 

.... 


"'i' 




1 










7 






S 










1 




2 










1 
1 


2 






^ 










.... 














1 






I 




1 
1 




















1 
















1 




T 
























1 


1 










1 
















] 


Amyloid liver .T-nd kidneys 








1 




[ 










1 
















1 




2 


















1 
2 

1 


"i' 


4 
















1 
2 











2 


1 


2 






2 

1 


15 













1 
















1 




1 
1 






















1 




1 
1 




..: 






1 
1 


2 
2 
1 










7 




1' 




■> 




1" 




4 
.... 

1 
"i' 


4 














1 




5 
3 

1 
4 






1 


2 




1 


1 




3 
1 

"i 


18 




1 
1 
2 








1 










2 


1 


1 




s 


" capillary 


9 
1 




1 
1 


"'i' 


1 
... 


1 


3 

1 






1 


i 




1? 




(; 






.... - 























2 


^ 






1 
















1 








1 








1 








fi 














1 


























1 






1 




















1 
















1 










1 


Cerebral effusion 




1 




















1 














44' 'di' 
2 1 


22 

1 








1 


Cholera infantum 




2 




1 




6 
3 






2 


103 

s 










1 








T 


" with phthisis 
Convulsions 




"3' 




1 








i 


i" 








ii 







1 
1 








" membraneous 


















1 










1 










1 




















1 




1 

28 


Debility, general 


2 


2 


6 


4 


4 


4 


1 


2 


2 





REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 343 

TABLE. — Continued. 



Causes of Death. 


i 

•-5 


1 

Em 


p 


ft 




6 

5 


3 


3 
bo 

3 


a 

a 

ft 







3 
S 

> 





s 



Q 







1 






1 








^' } ' 


1 

2 

1 




6 
5 
5 
1 
3 
2 
3 






1 
1 






; I 
1 




1 


1 






1 






1 




Dropsy 


1 




1 




















I 






1 


Enteritis 






1 






1 


.... 


1 




" gastro 


1 i.... 




1 










Empyeinia 










• . . . 


1 
2 

1 
3 
2 
1 
11 
4 


Endocarditis 








1 




1 


1 










" rheumatic... 














1 






Epilepsy 


1 

2 






1 


1 














Erysipelas 
















. . . . 


Exhaustion 










1 








.... 


Fever, typhoid 


2 1.... 


1 
1 


1 

i' 




3 


....j 1 


■ 1" *■ 


1 


" puerperal 


1 




1 .... 








i 
























1 


1 
1 

16 
1 

29 
1 
2 
1 
1 
<> 


" chronic 












1 




.... 






9 


1 


1 
1 
1 


4 






1 









Hfematocele, pelvic 










3 


1 




3 




7 


4 
1 
1 


4 


... 1 3 


3 


" " organic 


Heart, fatty degeneration. 




















1 




" apoplexy 












1 








" paralysis 










1 













" failure 






1 












1 






" neuralgia 












1 










1 
9 


" valvular disease. .. 


3 


1 


"i 




2 




1 


1 






1 


" rheumatism 






1 







Hepatitis 


















1 




1 
3 
1 


Hfemoptysis 


2 

1 








1 












Hemorrhage 






















" cerebral 


















! 






1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
6 
4 
1 


" postpartum.. 




















i 


















1 


1 
1 




" acute 








1 








1 


Hernia 








1 










Inanition 


2 
3 








2 








1 




1 


Influenza 






1 










Jaundice 
















1 
1 






' ' hemorrhagic 






















1 


Kidneys, disease of 


1 




















" inflammation. . . . 


I 














1 






2 


Laryngitis 


1 


















" croupous 


1 




















1 
3 
2 


Liver disease 
















1 




2 


" " obstructive.. 


1 
















Liver, cirrhosis 




1 








1 


1 






1 .... 


3 
1 


" yellow atrophy 


1 










1 






Locomotor ataxia 
















I 
"3 








1 


















1 


i 


""1 




1 

g 


Lungs, congestion 


1 
1 
1 
3 






1 








" inflammation 




1 


1 


"i" 


^ 


Malaria 


















Marasmus 




1 


1 






2 


3 




1 




j2 


Malformation of heart 






1 




2 


Metritis | 




1 










2 




1 




4 



344 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 
TABLE. — Continued. 



1 

Causes of Death. 


5 
5 


s 




a 
< 




0) 




CO 

bi) 
< 


53 

01 

+^ 

0) 


o 

O 


CI 

s 

o 


0) 

5 
o 


o ■ 




2 






















_^ 
























1 


1 




1 
1 
2 

1 


5 


3 
1 


1 

2 












2 




1 


11 




"\ 


\ 


1 


1 








9 




.7 




1 


1 




1 










1 


•Tj 




** cerebro-spinal. 














1 












1 








1 
1 
















O 








2 


1 










1 






" *( tubal 








1 








1 








1 










1 








'> 








1 












1 














1 


1 














5 
1 


4 
2 


1 
2 


1 
2 


1 

1 


1 

3 


1 
1 


1 


1 


3 

1 


lf> 




2 




io 






1 

2 


1 




1 


"i' 


3 




2 


1 




2 






11 








1 








1 


















1 




















2 


.... 










1 
6 
2 

1 


12 
5 














1 


Phthisis 


9 
14 


4 
3 


7 
2 

1 


6 
2 


12 


6 

1 


6 


6 


11 
5 


4 


Si) 




31 








1 
























1 






















1 




1 














1 
1 








1 

1 


2 






1 








5 


1 


1 


1 




1| 




1 








1 




{ 






















1 


























1 










1 
















1 




1 
1 
2 


1 






3 














^ 


Shock . 




















1 


Still-born 


2 


2 


6 


2 


8 


11 


6 


3 


7 


3 

1 


5 


^- 




1 


















1 






1 
















1 
1 










1 
















i 1 


1 








3 
















1 






1 




1 










j 












1 






















1 
1 




1 
























1 




















1 




1 




















1 

1 
16 






1 


Returned *'cause unkno'n' 
No cause assigned.... 


6 

16 

1 

1 


1 
10 


1 
23 


2 
9 


1 
7 


1 15 

1 


•29 


2 
20 


2 
12 


"'e' 


1 

13 


17 

176 

o 














1 









Cold 


1 




















1 
























] 


1 


Complicat'n of diseas's 








2 
70 


1 
3 

58 










1 

1 

75 




•> 


.5 

14 


67 

1 


1 

— 
84 


77 


2 
14 










14 


Totals 


< im 


) 81 


68 


51 


r 

moo 











REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 345 

The foregoing table has been compiled from the city regis- 
trar's books by Inspector Clough. There is no reason to doubt 
that the undertakers' returns in the hands of the registrar afford 
a practically correct basis for the enumeration of the deaths in 
each month and of the total for the year, but a large part of 
them are very defective in other respects. In this connection 
attention is invited to the last eight items, which have purposely 
been grouped in the table. Here are 215 deaths, more than one 
fifth of the whole number, the causes of which are tiot returned in 
any proper or lawful manner. These omissions impair very seri- 
ously the value, for statistical purposes, of the whole registration. 
For instance, we cannot say that there were only eleven deaths 
from typhoid fever or only one hundred and three from cholera 
infantum. In all probability a good registration would have 
shown that there were not less than two hundred victims of this 
.last-named disease. There are many other serious defects, but the 
returns seem to have been accepted, recorded, and paid for as if 
they had been made in conformity to the statute. Inquiry at the 
city auditor's office brings out the fact that the returns and registra- 
tion of vital statistics for the year cost $996.95. If the record were 
as complete as the law requires, it would be worth all it cost. 

For some other aspects of this subject, reference may be made 
to the vigorous words of the inspectors' report. As a ^mrtial 
remedy for some of the evils complained of the board would re- 
spectfully suggest the passage by the city councils of an ordi- 
nance providing that in all cases where a person dies having had 
no attending physician, and where the friends are unable or un- 
willing to employ a reputable physician for the service, it shall 
be the duty of the undertaker to procure from the city physi- 
cian, or some other practitioner appointed for that purpose, a 
certificate of the probable cause of death as it shall appear after 
■^iewing the remains of the deceased, and after a careful and suf- 
ficient inquiry into the history and circumstances of the sick- 
ness and death, and fixing a proper compensation to the exam- 
ining physician, to be paid out of the city treasury. It is be- 
lieved that this arrangement, if faithfully carried into practice, 
would render it materially more difficult to conceal crime, and it 
would certainly greatly increase the scientific value of the regis- 
tration records. 



346 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 347 

The estimate of population is for the middle of the year 1892, 
and is made on the best procurable data. It is believed to be 
very nearly correct. 

The death rate still continues to be about twenty per thou- 
sand. This, though higher than it ought to be, compares well 
with that of the county and of the state. In 1890, the last year 
for which the statistics are at hand, the death rate for Hillsbor- 
ough county was 21.14, ^.nd that for the whole state was 19.56. 
Manchester's rate for that year was 20.40. Our death rate is 
made higher than it otherwise would be by our excessive infant 
mortality. Five hundred children less than five years of age 
died in this city last year. This is more than half of the whole 
number of deaths. The number occurring in each month is as 
follows: January, 46; February, 34; March, 32; April, 29; 
May, 21; June, 46; July, 104; August, 66 ; September, 47; 
October, 32; November, 18 ; December, 25. One hundred and 
three of these are returned as due to cholera infantum ; twenty- 
one deaths were caused by measles, diphtheria, croup, and scarlet 
fever, but only a part of these were of persons under five. 
Nearly all of the 176 deaths for which no cause is given, the 14 
for which headache is assigned, and the 17 with "cause un- 
known " are of this class. The remainder of the 500 are mostly 
due to those diseases which afflict persons of all ages. If the 
proportion of infantile deaths could be reduced so as to be like 
that of the whole state, that is to say, to about one fourth of the 
total number of all ages, 350 lives would be saved annually, and 
the death rate would be reduced to about 13, which is as low as 
that of Coos, the most healthful county in the state. 

The returns of places of interment indicate that a very large 
majority of the deaths occur in the families of the foreign-born 
element of our population. Ignorance on the part of the parents of 
the way of properly caring for their children, inability through 
poverty to so care for them, and, in too many cases, that neglect 
which is caused by intemperance and vice and by the low value 
set upon the lives and health of the little ones, are the prime 
causes of this wholesale destruction of infant life. How best to 
dispel, or at least to mitigate, the effects of this ignorance, pov- 



348 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS, 

erty, and vice is a question pressing alike upon the health officer, 
the citizen, and the Christian. One measure towards which we 
look forward, and which only lack of the necessary funds pre- 
vents us from immediately adopting, is the establishment of a 
daily medical visitation of these families during the two or three 
warm months when this mortality chiefly occurs. Such a patrol 
wisely conducted would speedily vindicate itself as one of our 
most beneficent public charities. 

The increase in the death rate of this class from 8.64, in 1891, 
to 10.42, in 1 89 2, shows that some unfavorable influence was present 
during the year. If the rate had remained as in the preceding year, 
eighty-five infants now dead would have remained alive. The 
change of the statute regulating the sale of milk, made in the 
general revision of the statutes, which came into effect on the first 
day of the year and which made it much more difficult to se- 
cure the conviction and punishment of dealers in poor milk, is 
the only adverse influence known to the board ; and this increase 
in the infantile mortality is precisely the result which was fore- 
seen by physicians and others when in the early part of the year 
it became generally known that such a change had been made 
by the revisers. 

The board has been in existence eight years. As in previous 
annual reports, we again have occasion to congratulate our citi- 
zens on the steady growth of the public interest insanitary work. 
While year by year we find the expectations of our people as to 
the duties and powers of the department, and the calls upon us 
for service, growing more numerous, more urgent, and more in- 
telligent, we observe also abundant evidence of a better concep- 
tion in the minds of the people of their own rights and respon- 
sibilities in this direction. We note with especial gratification 
the changed attitude of the public mind in regard to the exist- 
ence of privy vaults, and as to the manner and time of cleaning 
them ; the impropriety of using garbage for filling streets and 
lots ; the impropriety of keeping swine and fowls ; the better 
ideas as to the contagious and preventable nature of certain dis- 
eases, and as to the duty of the board to isolate persons who are 
suffering from them. We remember also the abolishment of the 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 349 

filthy ponds in our public squares, a change in favor of which 
the board contributed its whole influence. It is worth some- 
thing, too, that in spite of our great influx of foreigners, British- 
Americans, Europeans, and Asiatics, our death rate has not in- 
creased. These are some of the results thus far secured, but 
there remains much ground yet to be occupied. The establish- 
ment of a medical patrol for the treatment of cholera infantum, 
of a well-appointed house of isolation for contagious diseases, 
and of a garbage crematory, the weekly removal of the dung 
from stables, are some of the points yet to be gained. 

To be the faithful servants of the people, and yet to be their 
leaders in these and all other sanitary reforms, is the duty of this 
board, and we hope to see the time when the amount expended 
by the city for the protection of health will bear some just re- 
lation to that expended for the protection of our buildings and 
of the public peace. 

We thank your Honor for your unflagging interest and for 
many courtesies and helpful suggestions in the discharge of our 
duties. 

GEORGE C. HOITT, 
JOSEPH B. SAWYER, 
NEIL F. STARR, 
Board of Health of Manchester. 

March 15, 1893. 



INSPECTORS' REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Health : 

The undersigned beg leave to submit the following report of 
the work done in the inspectors' department for the past year. 
The present inspectors commenced their work March i, from 
which time a daily record of the work has been kept, and with 
the exception of the contagious diseases reported in January and 
February, all the work has been done since that date : 

Inspections were made as follows : 

Vaults and privies before cleaning' 

Vaults and privies after cleaning 

Cellars 

Water-closets 

Alleys and yards 

Tenements and blocks 

Stables 

Latrines 

Teams and rigging of excavators 

Soaperies, slaughter-houses, etc. . 

New blocks .... 

Cleaning or repairs were ordered in the following cases, and in 
nearly all cases the orders were complied with : 



1,650 


1,701 


1,310 


716 


629 


74 


54 


35 


54 


12 


15 



Cellars 


387 


Vaults 


314 


Alleys and yards ..... 


* 159 


Privies ....... 


65 


Water-closets ...... 


98 


Tenements and blocks .... 


10 


Vault'covers ...... 


109 


Leaky sink pipes ..... 


73 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 351 

Sink water was discovered running on the surface of the ground 
in 117 places, and in all cases where the sewer was within the 
legal distance, entries were ordered. In cases where there was 
no sewer it was cared for in a manner not to be offensive. Com- 
plaints to the number of 360 have come to the office. In 163 
cases the complaint was without cause or of such a nature that 
there was no remedy. In the remaining 197 cases the nuisances 
were abated. 

Thirty complaints have been entered against the scaveng-er ser- 
vice. The contractor was notified, and relief promptly given in 
all cases. 

Eighteen catch basins were complained of, and were repaired 
or flushed by the superintendent of streets at the request of the 
inspector. 

Fifty-two dead animals were buried. 

In seventeen cases the inspectors went through large blocks 
and warned the inmates to stop throwing swill and slops from 
the windows. 

By direction of the board samples of water from two suspected 
wells were sent to Prof. Angell, of Derry, for analysis. In both 
cases he pronounced the water good. 

Seven permits were granted to householders for the cleaning 
of their own vaults. 

Ten animals were found being kept in cellars of dwellings, 
and were ordered removed. 

Nuisances were abated in fifty-five cases not covered in the 
above list. 

One hundred and thirty hogs were discovered in the compact 
part of the city, and ordered removed. 

Monthly reports were made to the State Board of Health, and 
weekly reports to the U. S. Marine Hospital service at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Early in the spring a few house drains were found emptying 
into Mile brook. A warning to the delinquent parties was found 
sufficient, however, and an inspection in the summer failed to 
show any contamination of the brook by sewage. 

Five hundred and fifty-four contagious diseases were reported ; 



352 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



485 houses were placarded, and the cards removed at the termi- 
nation of the sickness; 104 sanitary surveys were made of houses 
in which contagious diseases existed. In fifteen cases it was 
found disinfectants were not being used, and they were ordered 
and in some cases furnished. Forty-three children living in 
houses in which contagious diseases existed were kept from at- 
tending school. In three cases fumigation was made by the 
inspectors after the termination of the disease. 

In addition to the above, 2,645 <^^^^s were made, and 429 let- 
ters written in pushing the work of the department. Two hun- 
dred and fifty-nine legal notices have been made out and served, 
and the proper returns made. 

Changes have been made in the sanitary arrangements, water- 
closets being substituted for vaults and barn cellars, as follows: 



A . . . . 

Adams 






1 

2 


Amherst 






32 


Amoskeag Manufacturing C 


3., north of Brid 


ge . 


112 


Amory 






6 


Appleton 






I 


Auburn 






2 


Beauport 






6 


Birch .... 






16 


Blaine 






4 


Blodget 






2 


Bowman 






I 


Boynton 






4 


Bridge 






47 


Brown avenue 






I 


Brook .... 






I 


Cedar . . . 


». 




3 


Central 






27 


Chestnut . . . . 






25 


Church 






4 


Concord . • . 






2 


Dover . . . 






I 


Douglas 






20 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



353 



Elm . 

Ferry . 

Granite 

Grove 

Hanover 

High . 

Hollis 

Jane . 

Lake avenue 

Laurel 

Liberty 

Lowell 

^lain . 

Manchester 

Maple 

Mast . 

McGregor 

Merrimack 

Milford 

Munroe 

Myrtle 

Nashua 

Orange 

Pearl . 

Pennacook 

Pine . 

Prospect 

Russell 

Sagamore 

Stark 

School 

Second 

Spruce 

Union 

Wavne 

Walnut 



corporation 



172 
2 

24 
2 

59 
5 
5 
I 

18 
8 
I 

10 

34 
29 

3 

I 

22 
8 
2 
I 
2 
5 

35 

94 
5 

19 

3 

5 
I 

8 

I 

3 
10 

5 
3 
3 



23 



354 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

West . 3 

Washington ........ 7 

Wilson road ........ i 

Winter ......... i 

94-1 

Six latrines have been substituted for privy vaults containing 
61 closets, or what is equivalent to 1,002 water-closets. 

VAULTS. 

The number of vaults cleaned by the three licensed cleaners 
was as follows: John T. Gott, 1,012 ; T. McKenna, 657; Thom- 
as Welch, 81, making a total of 1,750, being a gain of 373 over 
last year. The inspectors have examined nearly all of them 
directly after cleaning, and but rarely has it been necessary to 
send back the cleaners to remove any matter left in the vault, 
the work having been generally well done. The class of men 
which the cleaners must of necessity employ, renders it hard to 
have the work done with the neatness and dispatch which is de- 
sirable. The inspectors have kept constant watch, however, and 
have insisted on the teams and rigging being kept clean and in a 
good state of repair. The inspectors have made earnest endeav- 
ors to find something which would kill the stench arising during 
the progress of the work. Correspondence with other cities and 
with firms engaged in the manufacture and sale of disinfectants 
and deodorizers has failed to produce anything of practical value. 

Of the vaults themselves nothing that is good can be said. 
Many are without bottom except mother earth, and the liquid 
filth thrown into them is almost entirely absorbed. In most 
cases where vaults have been removed the past summer, the in- 
spectors have noticed that even when the bottoms were supposed 
to be tight, the matter managed in some way to leach through, 
and the earth was filthy in the immediate vicinity. 

Four cases have been brought to the police court of parties 
who were dilatory or obstinate in the matter of making changes. 
One escaped through a technicality, one settled before the case 
came to trial, and two were bound over to the supreme court. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 355 

One of these settled, and the trial of the other will probably take 
place in this city in March. 

WATER-CLOSETS. 

The substitution of water-closets for privy vaults in so many 
places is good only where good closets are provided. Cheapness, 
not perfection, has been the aim of some of the property owners 
who have been obliged to make changes the past summer. Some 
closets have been put in that the inspector^ have reason to be- 
lieve are no better, if as good, as the privy vault. Lack of 
proper traps and lack of ventilation of the house drain and soil 
pipe, and an insufficient water supply, are some of the glaring de- 
fects. The day of pressure closets has gone by. In most cities 
nothing but a tank flush is allowed. The experience of others 
should be our gain. In the absence of plumbing rules, and ow- 
ing to a lack of knowledge of the business, the inspectors have 
hesitated to interfere in cases where perhaps those of more expe- 
rience would have found some remedy. The inspectors would 
strongly recommend that a set of plumbing rules be adopted, and 
if possible an experienced plumber be secured as an inspector. 

OVERCROWDING. 

Some cases have been discovered the past year, and the trouble 
remedied. Where the landlord is at fault this can be easily ar- 
ranged. Most of the trouble is due to the fact that poor people 
in large families secure small tenements for cheap rent. Some 
sublet rooms, and even parts of rooms, or take boarders. In 
case the inspectors discover indications of overcrowding, the peo- 
ple at fault lie most vigorously in the matter, so that it is hard to 
secure good evidence. The law provides no punishment for the 
offense. But little can be done in the matter until the statutes 
define what overcrowding is, and provide a penalty for the 
offense. Families cannot very well be separated, and in the 
other cases the people when driven out of one place simply herd 
together in another in a manner fully as bad. 



356 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



HOUSE TO HOUSE INSPECTION. 



A systematic house to house inspection of the thickly settled 
pant of the city was begun the latter part of August. The results 
were gratifying in the extreme. Cellars, yards, vaults, alleys, 
water-closets, and drain pipes received a thorough examination, 
and when it was necessary were ordered cleaned or repaired. 
Barn cellars containing piles of manure which had been, m some 
cases, two or more years in accumulating ; house cellars which 
probably had never been cleaned since the buildings over them 
were erected ; and vaults which, although not full, in some cases 
had not been cleaned for three years, were all put in proper sani- 
tary condition. In one case eight loads of filth were taken from 
a small cellar under part of a tenement block. Investigation 
showed that this cellar had been used as a sty for swine some 
years before, and the filth was the manure which had never been 
removed. The fear of a cholera epidemic helped much to stir 
the delinquent ones to an effort to reform in sanitary matters ; 
and the inspectors are also indebted to members of the Catholic 
clergy, who gave much good advice to their parishioners at this 
time. Nearly everybody complied with the requests of the in- 
spectors or orders of the board. In two cases it became neces- 
sary to employ men and have the v/ork done under the supervision 
of the inspectors. In both cases the owners were obliged to set- 
tle for the work done and costs accruing. • 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The city has continued to be fortunate the past year in the 
matter of dangerous contagious diseases. While there is but 
little doubt in the minds of the inspectors that some cases are 
never reported, yet they also believe that most of our physicians 
endeavor to do their duty in this matter. The inspectors can 
most heartily endorse what has been heretofore recommended in 
the matter of changing the law so that householders would be 
held equally responsible with the physician in the matter of re- 
porting. Cases sometimes occur where the disease is in so mild 
a form that no physician is called, and no report comes to the 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 357 

board. Thus no efforts are made to prevent its spread. As a 
person can catch a disease in a malignant form from one who is 
only slightly sick, it can readily be seen that great damage is 
liable to be done even with the best of intentions, and all attempts 
to prevent the spread of a disease may be frustrated by some 
careless person who is only slightly affected. 

MEASLES. 

Measles, which assumed an epidemic form in December of last 
year, continued to rage until about June i. All but 12 of the 451 
cases occurred before that time. The disease evidently stopped 
for lack of material to feed upon, as the measures taken to pre- 
vent its spread proved ineffectual. This was due in a great meas- 
ure to the fact that many persons seemed to have no fear of the 
disease, and took no pains to avoid the contagion. In some 
cases parents exposed their children so that they might have the 
disease while young and at home. Many cases occurred where 
no physician was employed, and they were never reported to the 
board. 

The returns sent to the city clerk show that 11 deaths occurred. 
Only one of these fatal cases was reported to the board. In most 
of the other cases no physician was employed, so that there may 
be some doubt as to the cause of death. The undertakers, by 
whom the returns were made, knowing that measles was the pre- 
vailing disease, evidently considered it as good a cause for death 
as anything else, and so reported. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

Scarlet fever, although visiting several neighboring cities, failed 
to appear here to any extent until December, ten of the forty- 
four cases being reported in that month. Four of these cases oc- 
curred in a tenement block on Birch street, all being members of 
one family. The cases were not reported until one child had 
died, no physician having been called in until just as death oc- 
curred. Prompt and energetic measures were taken by the board 
and inspectors. The family Avas removed to the hospital for 



358 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

contagious diseases, and the tenement and furniture thoroughly 
disinfected. Immediately afterwards two. other persons who had 
boarded in the family were taken sick and they were removed to 
the same place. These cases have all recovered. While no epi- 
demic has as yet appeared, there are more cases at present in the 
city than is desirable. Extra exertions are being made to keep 
every case isolated and the inspectors are hopeful that an epi- 
demic may be averted. Only two deaths occurred from this dis- 
ease during the year. 

DIPHTHERIA. 

Twenty-seven cases of this disease have been reported the past 
year, five of them proving fatal. In this as in the other conta- 
gious diseases the inspectors have not always been able to trace 
the cause of the disease, some cases occurring in houses where the 
sanitary surroundings were as good as possible. The failure of 
people to heed the warning of the board of health to keep en- 
tirely away from a person sick with this disease was the cause of 
at least five cases and two deaths. The circumstances were as 
follows : 

April 19 the board of health received notice of a case of diph- 
theria on the corporation, in the person of Mrs. A. The house 
in which she lived was a boarding house, and Mrs. A the land- 
lady. The inspector immediately placarded the house and made 
a sanitary inspection. The sinks were all trapped. The cellar 
had a concreted bottom and no vegetable refuse or other objec- 
tionable matter was found in it. The privy was situated in the 
shed, which is some thirty feet from the house, and underneath 
it was a common vault which a few days before had overflowed 
into the back street. It was cleaned nearly as soon as discov- 
ered and chloride of lime had been freely used before the clean- 
ing and other disinfectants when the cleaning was done. The 
yard was neat and clean and no refuse matter of any kind was 
lying about. In the yard was a slop hopper which had the ap- 
pearance of being unused and no smell proceeded from it. The 
sanitary surroundings were marked by the inspector as first-class. 

The lady in charge of the house stated that Mrs. A was thor- 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 359 

oughly isolated and that only the nurse was allowed to enter the 
room. Disinfectants w§re also being used, and the inspector left, 
feeling that the disease would be properly looked after and would 
not spread. 

May 4 two cases of diphtheria were reported from Granite 
street, West Manchester, in the persons of a little girl and her 
grandmother. The house was also a boarding house and the 
sanitary examination revealed a state of things which alarmed the 
inspector. The owner of the place went to work very promptly, 
however, and by noon everything had been put in good condi- 
tion. The health officer found on inquiry that the little girl, 
who was visiting at the place and who belonged in Massachu- 
setts, was taken sick April 30, and previous to that time had been 
much at the boarding house of Mrs. A on the corporation. 

The grandmother was taken sick May 2. The little girl was 
very sick and died within twenty-four hours of the inspector's 
visit. The grandmother recovered from the diphtheria but re- 
mained in a weak state and finally contracted another disease 
which proved fatal. 

May 10 a case of diphtheria was reported from Dover street, 
just around the corner from the case on Granite street. On in- 
quiry it was found to be a little girl who had been playing with 
the children living at the infected house on Granite street. She 
recovered. 

May 13 another case was reported from Mrs. A's house on the 
corporation and the patient died. 

May 20 a case was reported from another corporation board- 
ing house. Inquiry revealed the fact that this person had also 
been visiting at Mrs. A's house. Luckily the ladies in charge at 
the last place were intelligent and willing to do any and every 
thing possible to isolate the patient, and no more cases resulted. 

These facts go to show that if complete isolation is required it 
cannnot be obtained in tenement blocks and boarding houses 
unless officers are stationed in every house where these diseases 
occur, with the most stringent orders to prevent all contact with 
the sick one or the infected room. Boards of health and sanita- 
rians all over the country are asking for contagious disease ho.s- 



360 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

pitals. Had Mrs. A, who was only mildly sick, been immedi- 
ately removed and the house thoroughly^ disinfected, it is fair to 
presume that the succeeding cases and deaths would not have oc- 
curred. 

DEATH RETURNS. 

The returns from which the table of mortality was compiled 
continue to be as unsatisfactory as in former years. Cough and 
headache still figure as a cause for death. Were the question any 
less serious it would be farcical. The worst feature of the case is 
the fact that 176 of the returns have no stated cause for death and 
evidently no attempt was made to find what the disease might 
have been. The number of such returns has been increasing 
from year to year until the total is something appalling. One 
hundred and seventy-six babies, for they were mostly children 
under one year of age, were sick and died in this city the past 
year and no physician was summoned in an attempt to save their 
lives. Truly, human life is dirt cheap when parents allow their 
children to die like beasts. Animals of any value receive better 
treatment. But there is another side more horrible still. How 
many of those little ones died of disease and how many were 
murdered ? That is a hard word to use but who can say it is not 
a just one ? The looseness in this matter certainly leaves the door 
open for a wholesale slaughter of the innocents. And the crimi- 
nal records are full of casQs where men and women have sacri- 
ficed their children for their own convenience or selfishness. The 
inspectors strongly recommend a reform in this matter. If it is 
the fault of the law let sume amendment be added so that it shall 
be the duty of some person to inquire into each case so reported 
and let no person be buried the cause of whose death can be 
considered at all suspicious. Let the community feel sure that 
each death was caused by natural causes and that crime, if it oc- 
curs, is justly punished. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, the inspectors would say that while their efforts 
in some cases have fallen short of what they hoped to attain, yet 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 361 

they feel that there has been a decided improvement in the san- 
itary condition of the city. Places exist which are far from san- 
itary in their condition, but in a city with a population drawn 
from nearly all the countries on the globe it is not strange that 
perfection -is not found. _ Many of these people are ignorant of 
the commonest sanitary laws, and many more are too indolent 
when the necessary information is imparted to them to care to 
take advantage of it for their own and the public good. Should 
they be finally aroused to a sense of what is proper, new arrivals 
come who render it necessary to go over the same ground again, 
and until they, too, are instructed the trouble continues. 

The inspectors desire to thank each and every one who has 
helped them in their work, and especially his Honor Mayor 
Knowlton and the heads of the different departments, who have 
been ready at all times to forward the work of the department. 

HERBERT S. CLOUGH. 
JOHN F. LOONEY. 



362 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

The Path of the Pestilence. 



Over the waters there comes a cry : 

" Cholera stalks the world once more ! " 

And the wandering wind, as it whistles by, 
Bears the fell echoes from shore to shore. 

Silent and sure, in the track of doom. 

The Reaper is swinging his fatal steel : 
And the winter hoar and the springtide bloom 

Alike the edge of his cold blade feel. 

Nor clime nor creed doth the Pestilence spare : 
The northern frosts and the southern heats. 

The pagan's howl and the Christian's prayer. 
In his deadly march alike he greets. 

He breathes awhile through the palace gates : 
A wail goes forth for the mighty dead ! 

By the cabin door he grimly waits : 
The angels weep round a lowly bed ! 

A thousand leagues he has still to go — 
A thousand leagues o'er the billowy main, 

Ere his awful breath the fiend shall blow 
O'er the summer bloom of this land again. 

There is time to arm for the deadly strife, 
With the only weapons shall keep us whole : 

The burnished shield of a virtuous life 

And the trenchant sword of a fearless soul ! 

These, with an earnest faith in God, 
The pestilence, haply, shall turn aside ; 

But he that is bound to the reeking sod 

With the shackles of vice — oh, woe betide ! 

— N ev) York Ledger. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, ETC. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND 
OIL LAMPS. 



Electric Lights in Use. 

No. I. Cypress and Massabesic, arm 

2. Massabesic-street watering-trough, pole 

3. Park and Beacon, arm 

4. Central and Hall, 

5. Lake avenue and Massabesic, 

6. Wilson and Laurel, 

7. Merrimack and Hall, 

8. Manchester and Hall, 

9. Manchester and Wilson, 

10. Hanover and Ashland, 

11. Hanover and Hall, 

12. Hanover and Beacon, 

13. Concord and Ashland, 

14. Bridge and Hall, 

15. Myrtle and Russell, 

16. Pearl and Linden, 

17. Pearl and Russell, 

18. Bridge and Nashua, 

19. Nashua and High, 

20. Concord and Button, 

21. Amherst and Porter, 

22. Hanover and Lincoln, 

23. Manchester and Lincoln, 

24. Merrimack and Lincoln, 

25. Laurel and Lincoln, 



366 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

No. 26. Central and Lincoln, arm. 

27. Lake avenue and Lincoln, " 

28. Spruce and Lincoln, " 

29. Spruce and Maple, " 

30. Lake avenue and Maple, " 

31. Central and Maple, '" 
. 32. Merrimack and Maple, " 

33. Manchester and Maple, " 

34. Hanover and Maple, " 

35. Amherst and Maple, " 

36. Concord and Maple, " 

37. Lowell and Nashua, " 

38. Bridge and Maple, " 

39. Myrtle and Maple, " 

40. Orange and Ash, " 

41. Harrison and Beech, " 

42. Myrtle and Beech, " 

43. Pearl and Beech, " 

44. Bridge and Beech, " 

45. Lowell and Ash, " 

46. Amherst and Ash, " 

47. Lowell and Beech, " 

48. Concord and Walnut, " 

49. Amherst and Beech, " 

50. Hanover and Beech, " 

51. Hanover Square, pole. 

52. 'Manchester and Beech, arm. 

53. Merrimack and Beech, " 

54. Laurel and Beech, " 

55. Central and Beech, " 

56. Lake avenue and Beecji, " 

57. Spruce and Beech, " 

58. Cedar and Union, " 

59. Lake avenue and Union, " 

60. Central and Union, " 

61. Laurel and Union, " 

62. Merrimack and Union, " 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 867 



No. 6 



64. 

65- 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 

71- 

72. 

73- 
74- 

75- 
76. 

77- 
78. 

79- 
80. 
81. 
82. 

83- 
84. 

85 
86. 

87. 
88. 
89. 
90. 
91. 
92. 

93- 
94. 

95- 
96. 

97- 
98. 
99. 



Manchester and Union, 
Hanover and Union, 
Amherst and Union, 
Concord and Union, 
Lowell and Walnut, 
Lowell and Union, 
High and Union, 
Bridge and Union, 
Bridge and Walnut, 
Orange and Union, 
Prospect and Union, 
Brook and Union, 
Pennacook and Union, 
Webster and Pine, 
North and Pine, 
Sagamore and Pine, 
Blodget and Pine, 
Harrison and Hazel, 
Prospect and Pine, 
Myrtle and Pine, 
Orange and Pine, 
Pearl and Pine, 
Bridge and Pine, 
Tremont Square, 
High and Pine, 
Lowell and Pine, 
Concord and Pine, 
Amherst and Pine, 
Hanover and Pine, 
Manchester and Pine, 
Merrim.ack and Pine, 
Laurel and Pine, 
Central and Pine, 
Lake avenue and Pine, 
Cedar and Pine, 
Auburn and Pine, 
Cedar and Chestnut, 



pole, 
arm. 



pole, 
arm. 



368 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 



oo. Park square, pole, 

oi. Lake avenue and Chestnut, arm. 

02. Central and Chestnut, " 

03. Merrimack square, pole. 

04. Merrimack and Chestnut, arm. 

05. Manchester and Chestnut, " 

06. Hanover and Chestnut, " 

07. Concord square, east, pole. 

08. Concord square, west, " 

09. Chestnut and Concord back, arm. 

10. Chestnut and High, " 

11. Chestnut and Bridge, " 

12. Chestnut and Pearl, " 

13. Chestnut and Myrtle, " 

14. Chestnut and Harrison, " 

15. Chestnut and Brook, *' 

16. Pennacook and Chestnut, pole. 

17. Salmon and Chestnut, " 

18. Webster and Chestnut, arm. 

19. Clarke and Elm, " 

20. Webster and Elm, " 

21. North and Elm, " 

22. Salmon and Elm, " 

23. Pennacook and Elm, ■ '' 

24. Brook and Elm, " 

25. Harrison and Elm, " 

26. Langdon, pole. 

27. Dean and Elm, arm. 

28. Prospect and Chestnut, " 

29. Orange and Elm, " 

30. Kidder and Elm, " 

31. Elm east back, on Pearl, " 

32. Bridge and Elm, " 

33. Washington and Church, " 

34. Birch and Lowell, " 

35. Lowell and Elm, " 

36. Elm east back,, between Lowell and Concord, " 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 369 



No. 



137- 


Water and Elm, 


arm 


138. 


Vine and Concord, 


<< 


139- 


Vine and Amherst, 


(( 


140. 


Amherst and Ehn, 


<c 


141. 


Spring and Ehn west back, 


(t 


142. 


Stark, 


(( 


143- 


Market and FrankHn, 


a 


144. 


Market and Ehn, 


(C 


145- 


Hanover and Ehn east back, 


le 


146. 


Ehn and Manchester, 


ii 


147. 


Dean avenue and Ehn west back. 


11 


148. 


Elm and Merrimack, 


<( 


149. 


Merrimack and Franklin, 


(( 


150. 


Middle, 


a 


151- 


Merrimack square, west, 


pole 


152. 


Elm and Central, 


arm 


153- 


Elm and Lake avenue, 


a 


154. 


Elm and Spruce, 


le 


155- 


Beech and Cedar, 


pole 


156. 


Elm and Cedar, 


arm 


157- 


Franklin and Granite, 


ce 


158. 


Elm and Auburn, 


<( 


159- 


Elm and Green, 


(C 


160. 


Elm and Valley, 


( I 


161; 


Bakersvilje watering-trough, 


(( 


162. 


Summer and State, 


pole. 


163. 


Granite and State, 


arm. 


164. 


Granite bridge, east, 


pole. 


165. 


Bedford and Granite, 


<( 


166. 


Canal and Granite, 


a 


167. 


Depot and Canal, 


le 


168. 


Central between Franklin and Canal, 


(t 


169. 


Bedford and Central, 


arm. 


170. 


Canal and Merrimack, 


a 


171. 


Canal and Middle, 


it 


172. 


Canal and Stark, 


.( 



370 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 173. 


Canal and Mechanic, 


174. 


Canal and Spring, 


175- 


Canal and Bridge, 


176. 


McGregor bridge, east, 


177. 


Canal and Hollis, 


178. 


Canal and Dean, 


179. 


Canal and Langdon, 


180. 


River road and North, 


181. 


Amoskeag bridge, east. 


182. 


Amoskeag bridge, west, 


18.3. 


Amoskeag watering-trough 


184. 


Amoskeag brick store, 


185. 


McGregor and Main, 


186. 


McGregor and Bridge, 


187. 


McGregor bridge, west. 


188. 


Amory and Main, 


189. 


Amory and Beauport, 


190. 


Wayne and Beauport, 


191. 


Marion and Main, 


192. 


McGregor and Wayne, 


193- 


McGregor and Putnam, 


194. 


Sullivan and Main, 


195- 


Beauport and Sullivan, 


196. 


Main and Schuyler, 


197. 


Wilton and Main, 


198. 


Douglas and Main, 


199. 


Douglas and Barr, 


200. 


Granite and Green, 


201. 


West and Granite, 


202. 


Granite and Main, 


203. 


Granite and Second, 


204. 


Granite bridge, west. 


205. 


School and Turner, 


206. 


School and Third, 


207. 


Second and Bath, 


208. 


Ferry and Turner, 


209. 


Ferry and Third, 



pole. 



pole. 



arm. 
pole. 



pole, 
arm. 

pole, 
arm. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 371 



No. 2IO 


. Walker and Second, 


arm. 


211. 


Blaine and third, 


({ 


212. 


Clinton and Main, 


C( 


213. 


Walker and Main, 


> it 


214. 


Parker and West, 


11 


215. 


Winter and Parker, 


ei 


216. 


Main and Mast, 


pole. 


217. 


Main and Milford, 


arm. 


218. 


Main and A, 


(( 


219. 


Carroll and Milford, 


(( 


220. 


Old Mast road and Mast, 


(( 


221. 


Hall and Amherst, 


e< 


222. 


Laurel and Maple, 


ti 


223. 


Central and Wilson, 


tt 


224. 


Harrison and Pine, 


11 


225. 


Massabesic and Belmont, 


pole. 


226. 


Union and Appleton, 


arm. 


227. 


Elm and railroad crossing, 


pole. 


228. 


Franklin and Pleasant, 


arm. 


229. 


Elm and Appleton, 


It 


230. 


Milford and Riddle, 


11 


231. 


Nutt road and Portsmouth railroad, 


pole. 


232. 


Lake avenue and Canton, 


(( 


233- 


Laurel and Hall, 


arm. 


234- 


Beech and Brook, 


<< 


235- 


Kidder and Boyden, 


pole. 


236. 


Myrtle and Walnut, 


arm. 


237- 


Bridge and Linden, 


11 


238. 


Lowell and Ashland, 


It 


239- 


Lowell and Belmont, 


ti 


240. 


Pearl and Union, 


It 


241. 


Salmon and Union, 


pole. 


242. 


Water, 


arm. 


243- 


Arlington and Ashland, 


tt 


244. 


Orange and Oak, 


tt 


245- 


Prospect and Oak, 


t( 


246. 


Arlington and Russell, 


tt 



372 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



No. 247. Gore and Walnut, 

248. Laurel and Milton, , 

249. Massabesic — Hospital, 

250. Lake avenue and Wilson, 

251. Bridge and Ash, 

252. Hanover and Highland, 

253. Franklin and Depot, 

254. Spruce and Union, 

255. East High and Malvern, 

256. Beech and Auburn, 

257. Kidder and Whitney, 

258. Valley and Jevvett, 

259. Concord and Derry, 

260. Auburn and Union, 

261. Harrison and Walnut, 

262. West Hancock and Second, 

263. Douglas and West, 

264. Hooksett road, Amoskeag, 

265. Prospect and Ash, 

266. Salmon and Canal, 

267. Harrison and Russell, 

268. Gates and Dubuque, 

269. Parker and Elm, 

270. Auburn and Maple, 

271. Salmon and Pine, 

272. Appleton and Adams, 

273. Clark and River road, 

274. Amoskeag eddy, south, 

275. Elm east back, between^Spruce and Cedar, 

276. Cass and Lake avenue, 

277. Riddle and Mast, 

278. Brown avenue and Baker, 

279. Brown avenue and Hancock, 

280. Clark and Union, 

281. Prospect and Linden, 

282. Bro'ok and Maple, 
2S3. Brook and Hazel, 



arm. 
II 

pole. 

arm. 
(I 

pole, 
arm. 



pole. 



arm. 
pole. 



arm. 
pole. 



arm. 
pole. 



arm. 
pole, 
arm. 
pole. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 373 



No. 284. Webster and Walnut, 

285. Chestnut and Ray brook, 

286. Webster and River road, 

287. Market and Canal, 

288. Concord and Beech, 

289. Pearl and Morrison, 

290. Concord and Hall, 

291. Merrimack and Belmont, 

292. Spruce and Beacon, 

293. Belmont and Grove, 

294. Bowman, 

295. Amory and Rimmon, 

296. Manchester and Milton, 

297. Valley and Pine, 

298. Mammoth and Candia roads, 



pole. 



pole, 
arm. 



pole. 



SERIES INCANDESCENT LAMPS. 



299. Walker and Third, 

300. Winter, 

301. East High and Jane, 



pole. 



Gas-Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Chestnut. 

Clarke and River road. 

Elm, near Ray brook. 

Monroe. 

Appleton, west end. 

Salmon, between Elm and Canal. 

Canal, near paper mill. 

Blodget, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Blodget and Chestnut. 

Brook and Pine. 

Prospect, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Myrtle, between Elm and Chestnut. 

Orange and Chestnut. 



374 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

Orange, between Chestnut and Elm. 

Bridge, between Chestnut and Ehii. 

Pearl and Walnut. 

Orange and Walnut. 

Orange and Beech. 

Pearl and Maple. 

Arlington and Maple. 

East High and Maple. 

Lowell and South. 

Lowell and Jane. 

Amherst and Ashland. 

Lowell and Hall. 

Concord and Belmont. 

Amherst and Belmont. 

Amherst and Beacon. 

Lowell and Beacon. 

East High and Belmont. 

Harrison and Oak. 

Harrison and Maple. 

Harrison and Ash. 

Belmont and Central. 

Maple and Cedar. 

Willow and Merrill. 

Two lights on South Elm. 

Auburn and Franklin. 

Three lights on State. 

River, near Turner Hall. 

Milford and Bowman. 

Milford and B. 

River and Douglas. 

Mast and Bowman. 

Dover and Clinton. 

Dover and Granite. 

Two lights on Hancock, west of River road. 

Dover and Douglas. 

Douglas, half way between Main and River streets. 

Two lights on Pleasant, between Franklin and Canal. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS, GAS LIGHTS, AND OIL LAMPS. 375 

Merrimack common. 

Two lights on Mechanic. 

Spring street. 

Manchester and Behiiont. 

Hanover and Milton. 

One light on River road, corner Shasta. 

Hanover and Belmont. 



Oil Lights in Use. 

Clarke and Adams. 

Concord and Beacon. 

East High and Hall. 

Pearl and Linden. 

Canal, near Amoskeag bridge. 

Merrimack and Beacon. 

Hanover and Mammoth road. 

Lake avenue and Hall road. 

Elm and Shasta. 

Elm and Baker. 

One light on Baker. 

Douglas and West. 

Douglas and Quincy. 

Granite and Quincy. 

Mast road and Riddle. 

Carroll street. 

Bowman street. 

A and B streets. 

Light near the Huntress gardens. 

Mammoth road and Cohas avenue. 

" '* and Island Pond road. 

'' " and Cilley. 

" " and Young. 

Massabesic and Hall road. 
Massabesic and Taylor. 
Belmont and Green. 



376 ANNUAL OFFICIAL KEPORTS. 

Valley and Taylor. 

Valley and Cypress. 

Cypress and Prout avenue. 

Jewett and Young. 

Young and Taylor. 

Three lights on River road south of Blue store. 

Ten lights in Goffe's Falls. 

Three lights in Youngsville. 

One light on Candia road, near Noah Reed's. 

One light on Candia road, near Walter Cody's house. 

One light at junction of Lake avenue and Hanover. 

One light on Island Pond road, Mill-Dam House. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young road. 

One light at junction Ainsworth avenue and Young street. 

One light On Taylor, near Byron Stearns's house. 

One light on Taylor, near Gilmore's house. 

One light on Valley, near Eastman's store. 

One light on Candia road, at P. Rogers's. 

One light on Candia road, at Dan Cronin's. 

One light on Candia road, at G. Bean's. 

One light on Candia road, at C. Francis's. 

One light on Candia road, at S. Mead's. 

One light on Candia road, at Claflin's. 

One light on Hanover, at Sam Page's. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Page. 

One light at Brown's. 

One light at Junction of Hanover and Proctor. 

One light at junction of Hanover and Candia road. 

One light at junction of Proctor and Candia roads. 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTING IN AMERI- 
CAN CITIES. 



BY ROBERT J. FINLEV, 



Although it has been less than six years since the field of elec- 
tric lighting was first entered by the municipality, more than one 
hundred and twenty-five cities in the United States now own and 
operate plants. The movement has not been a local one. It 
has extended across the country from Bangor, Me., to Galveston, 
Tex. So far this movement has been confined chiefly to the 
smaller cities, but the larger cities are beginning to discover that 
the element of size is not necessarily a bar to their entrance upon 
the same course. Chicago at a very recent date was operating 
successfully seven hundred and twenty-five arc lights, and the 
sphere of its operations in this field has been growing rapidly. The 
mayors of New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Atlanta, 
and other of the larger cities have discussed in their messages 
the advisability of the assumption by the municipal government 
of these quasi-public works. 

COST OF MUNICIPAL ELECTRIC LIGHTING. 

The Statistics and information relating to municipal ownership, 
given in this article, have been obtained by direct inquiry, and 
are based upon official and authoritative statements coming from 
the various cities owning electric-lighting plants. They are tak- 
en as the result of many facts secured, as to cost and full capacity 
of city plant, value of property occupied, number and candle 
power of arc lights, and number of lights burned and cost of each 



378 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

to the city. Of seventy-five cities from which data were gath- 
ered, only twenty-three furnish facts from which the cost of oper- 
ation and the value of the plants and buildings can be deter- 
mined, and for these it has been found necessary, for purposes of 
completeness and accuracy, to tabulate the operations of the 
plants for the fiscal year 1889-90. The returns for the succeed-' 
ing years show, so far as they are conclusive, that the cities 
have been able to reduce the cost much below the average given 
in Table I. 

From this table it is seen that the average cost of each arc 
light owned and directly operated by twenty-five cities is $53.04 
a year. In the case of only three or four of the cities does it 
appear that interest on the investment has been included. Ob- 
viously, account should be taken of both interest and deprecia- 
tion of property, which items, computed at twelve per cent of the 
total value of the twenty-three plants and buildings, would add 
$33.60 to the first cost, making the average final cost to the 
twenty-three cities operating electric lighting plants $86.64 per 
arc light per year. 

CONTRACT PRICES CHARGED BY PRIVATE COMPANIES. 

Table II. gives the contract prices paid by twenty-nine cities to 
private electric lighting companies during the same period cov- 
ered by Table I. It is compiled from a government report on 
gas and electric lighting, published as " Senate Miscellaneous 
Document No. 56, Fifty-first Congress, Second Session," and 
the aim in its preparation has been to select from the parts of the 
country in which the twenty-three municipal works are situated 
private plants having the same arc light capacity. For instance, 
Peoria, 111., vvith a capacity of two hundred and thirty-three arc 
lights is set over against Bloomington, 111., with two hundred 
and forty arcs. Twenty-nine cities rather than twenty-three 
have been taken, for the reason that in six of the cities most 
nearly fulfilling the conditions upon which the selections were 
based, the cost appears to be abnormally high. The average 
yearly price charged for each of the arc lights by the twenty-nine 
private companies is shown to be $106.01, or nearly $20 a lamp 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTING IN AMERICAN CITIES. 379 

more than it costs the twenty-three cities to supply themselves 
with this service. This price is only $2.79 greater than the av- 
erage charged by * all the private companies, large and small, in 
the twelve states covered by the tables, and cannot be regarded 
as due to exceptional conditions. Most of the contract prices 
given for the private lamps still obtain, and therefore the two 
tables fairly represent the present relative costs under municipal 
and private control. The number of hours each plant was oper- 
ated is given in the tables for the benefit of those who care to 
make a more detailed comparison. 

COMPARISON OF THE PRICES CHARGED FOR THE SAME SERVICE. 

This comparison of city and private plants of equal arc light 
capacity is the fairest that can be made, excepting, perhaps, that 
between the cost of the same light under the two systems. For- 
tunately, even this test can be applied, as several of the cities 
now owning works vvcre, previously to assuming control, furnished 
with light by private corporations. Until March, 1889, the city 
of Elgin, 111., paid local companies at the rate of $266.66 per 
arc light per year for service with which it now supplies itself for 
less than one quarter of this sum. Municipal electric lighting 
costs Lewiston, Me., only one third, and Galveston, Tex., one 
half the contract prices these cities formerly gave to private com- 
panies. Bangor, Me., saves $100 per light by the change, and 
so on. If the reports of the mayors of various cities having had 
such an experience are to be believed, the change has in every 
instance brought more efficient service, with one or two excep- 
tions due to special and temporary causes. 

WHY MUNICIPALITIES FURNISH LIGHT MORE CHEAPLY THAN COM- 
PANIES. 

Many of the municipal electric lighting plants are operated in 
connection with municipal water-works, and this is one of the 
chief reasons why cities furnish themselves with light more 
cheaply than private companies perform this service. By unit- 

* The list given in tbe government report on gas and electric lighting was 
taken at the basis of calculation. 



380 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

ing these two services the running expenses of the plant are 
made comparatively light. One building often suffices for both 
water and lighting plants, and the same power is utilized. Sev- 
eral cities have found it necessary to add only two or three em- 
ployees to the water-works force. 

Then, too, the municipal plant is not operated for profit, while 
the prices of the private companies are regulated to yield a re- 
turn on the investment. Often the item of profits represents the 
only difference between the cost of municipal and private elec- 
tric lighting. 

But even if companies could do the lighting as cheaply as 
municipalities, it is a doubtful question whether or not they 
would. Electric lighting is one of the services the rates of 
which are practically precluded from the regulating influence of 
competition. On account of the limited number of companies 
that can operate in the same territory at the same time, free and 
natural competition is made impossible. Rival companies 
occupying the same field may induce a temporary lowering of 
the price, but the causes which render competition inoperative 
make easily possible a combination of the one, two, or three 
companies, and no one needs to be told that in the end, if not 
at the time, the consumer pays for the multiplication of engines, 
dynamos, lines, and linemen. 

The facts and statistics presented in this paper do not intro- 
duce any new principle for municipal action. They only em- 
phasize what has already been demonstrated a hundred times by 
experiment, — that pursuits which from their very nature are 
natural monopolies cannot be so economically administered by 
private corporations as by the government. 



ELECTRIC STREET LIGHTING IN AMERICAN CITIES. 381 



TABLE I. 



Cities operating elec- 
tric lighting plants. 



Little Rock, Ark 

Aurora, 111 

Bloomingtoii, 111 

Decatur, 111 

Elgin, 111 

Moliue.Ill 

Paris, 111 

Madison, Ind 

Topeka, Kan 

Bowling Green, Ky 

Bangor, Me 

Le wiston, Me 

Bay City, Mich 

Ypsilanti, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo 

Gallon, Ohio 

Marietta, Ohio 

Chambersburg, Penn . . 

Easton, Penn 

Meaclville, Penn 

Titusville, Penn 

Galveston, Tex 

Staunton, V a. (1,200 
candle power.) 



Number of 
arc lights, 
2,000 can- 
dle power. 



Ill 
81 

240 
61 
80 
80 
60 
85 

184 
60 

140 

100 

143 
80 

208 
73 
65 
62 
82 
74 
60 

175 

50 



Period of illumi- 
nation. 



Cost per 
arc light 
per jear.. 



Eight hours 

Seven h. 36 min. 

All night 

Dark nights 

Ten hours 

All night 

Seven hours 

Moon, all night.. 

All night 

Moon, all night.. 

All night 

Moon, all night.. 
Moon, all night.. 
Moon, to 1 A. M.. 

Eight hours 

Moon, all night.. 
Dark to mid night 

Six hours 

All dark nights . 

Seven hours 

Ten hours 

Seven hours. ... 

Ten hours 




24.00 



Average cost per light per year of arcs operated by 

twenty-three cities ....... $53-04 

Interest and depreciation at 12 per cent total cost of 
plant and buildings of twenty-three city owned elec- 
tric lighting works, per light ..... 33-60 

Total average cost per light .... $86.64 



382 



ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 



TABLE II. 



Cities supplied by pri- 
vate companies. 



Texarkana, Ai-k 

Danville, 111 

Jacksonville, 111 

Joliet, III 

Peoria, 111 

Springfield, 111 

Streator, 111 

Kokomo, Ind 

Logansport, Ind 

Arkansas City, Kan 

Fort Scott, Kan 

Owensborougli, Ky 

Augusta, IMe 

Bath, Me 

Grand Rapids, Mich". 

Lansing, Mich 

Kansas City, Mo 

Sedalia, Mo 

Springfield, Mo 

Bellaire, Ohio 

Tremont, Ohio 

Hillsborough, Ohio 

Allentown, Penn 

Lebanon, Penn 

Newcastle, Penn 

South Bethlehem, Penn. . 

Dallas, Tex 

Houston, Tex 

Parkersburg, -Va 



Number of Contract 

arc lights, „.,,.,, . ^. < price per 

2.000 can- 1 Period of illummation. ^rc light 

die power. [ per jear. 



31 

SO 

"I 

121 

233 

130 

60 

56 

85 

35 

75 

32 

68 

31 

120 

100 

128 

92 

.t4 

52 

70 

63 

98 

60 

50 

55 

165 

92 

58 




All night 
As ordered 
Moon, all night 

All night 

Moon, all night 

Moon, all night 

All night , 

All night 

Moon, all night 

To 12 p. M , 

Moon schedule to 1 a. m 
Moon schedule to 1 A. M 
Nine hours 

To 1 A. M 

All night 

Moon, all night 

All night 

Moon, all night 

Moon, all night 

Moon, all night 

All night 

Moon, all night 

All dark nights 

To 12 p. M 

All night 

Moon to 12 p. M 

All night 

All night 

All night 



$160.00 

80.00 

96.00 

124.00 

145.00 

137.00 

96.00 

100.00 

100 00 

72 00 

80.00 

110.00 

76.33 

125.00 

109.50 

100.00 

200.75 

87.00 

136.00 

90 00 

90.00 

70.00 

100.00 

80.00 

80.00 

81.82 

95.85 

150.00 

102.00 



Average cost per light per year of arcs operated by twenty- 
nine private companies, $io6.oi. 

Note. — All night, 10y4 hours. Moon, all night, 6 hours. Till 12 o'clock, 51/8 
hours. 



QUOTATIONS 



MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLANEOUS 
SOURCES. 



A Warning. 



Out of the office the man was thrown, 
And down a couple of flights of stairs; 
■ He had no business of his own, 

And he would'nt let others attend to theirs. 
— Neiu York Press. 

I would again renew last year's recommendation relative to 
procuring maps of the whole city, so that the work of the 
assessors' department may be done more accurately. I believe 
that in case maps were made, the returns to the city would more 
than offset the outlay, as is exemplified in cities where they are 
in use. By means of maps a great amount of property may be 
discovered which for years has escaped taxation. 

I again recommend that industrial education or manual train- 
ing be made a part of the school system to a greater extent than it 
is now. The character of our industries, the trend and necessi- 
ties of our times, make this requirement obligatory. This kind 
of an education is now given in our high school, but it should be 
extended to the grammar grade also. The larger number of 
scholars never reach the high school, yet it is essential that they 
should enjoy the benefits of manual training, especially as so 
many of them will devote their energy, in the future, to indus- 
trial pursuits. — Fro?n City Report of Fall River, Mass., for 1891. 

The actual needs of a rapidly increasing community like 
ours, which every one will acknowledge to be pressing, far exceed 
our ability to pay for them. It sounds v^^ell to talk of less ex- 
penses and lower taxes, but the problem in city governments is 
not to expend less money for the public welfare, protection, and 
improvement, but how to raise more revenue with which to con- 
duct the public business without imposing additional burdens 
upon the taxpayers or increasing the municipal debt. City debts 



386 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and expenses are increasing rapidly and constantly all over the 
world. In fifteen years, taking fourteen of the largest cities in 
the United States, city expenses in them average to increase 363 
per cent, while the population averaged to increase only 70 per 
cent. The population in Lynn since 1855 has increased nearly 
four times, while the city expenditures are more than twenty- 
three times as much. In ten years the expenses of Vienna have 
doubled, in Florence trebled, and m Paris city expenses increased 
from S^ to 196 million francs. It is evident, from their con- 
stantly accumulating debts, that the present revenue system in 
use in cities is inadequate to meet the demands that are being 
made upon it. Our system of municipal taxation, devised in all 
its essential features three centuries ago, has not been changed, 
while nearly every department that depends for development and 
support upon this system of taxation has undergone very import- 
ant changes. 

City expenditures are more liable to increase than decrease ; 
indeed, this must be the tendency. We all desire better schools, 
better roads and sidewalks, to take better care of our poor and 
unfortunate, to be more reasonable and liberal in our treatment 
of the insane, to establish a better condition of public health, 
and to advance in the ways of civilization. All this requires 
money. The question is, how to get it. 

There is no political side to the great problem of municipal 
revenue. It is a matter of business, and has an important eco- 
nomic aspect which presents one of the most difficult public 
questions of our time. 

It is true that the municipal water debts are very large indeed. 
Fully 39 per cent of the municipal indebtedness in Massachusetts 
is for water loans ; but indebtedness is not a source of anxiety 
providing the income derived from the money borrowed when 
invested will yield a greater income than the rate of interest paid. 
This is true of public or private business. I am of the opinion 
that the general policy pursued in the management of public 
water supplies might be profitably extended to other municipal 
departments. 

The present method of buying supplies for the city appears 
defective. While I am uQable to find any legal authority em- 
powering committees to purchase supplies without the direct 
authority of the city council, it has generally been the custom, 
and there is practically no check upon the contraction of bills 
against the city. It is true that bills contracted by committees 
mav not be approved, or the mayor may refuse to draw a warrant 
on the city treasurer for their payment, but this power can only 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. 387 

be exercised after the bills have been contracted, and it would 
be a question for the courts to determine whether or not parties 
selling to the city could not recover the amount of their bills, 
even in case of the refusal referred to. No private corporation, 
however limited its business, would allow bills to be contracted 
against it in this indiscriminate manner. It is estimated that 
the supplies for the city of Lynn cost annually ^250,000. I rec- 
ommend the election of a purchasing agent by the city councils, 
who shall be placed under suitable bonds. The purchasing agent 
shall not purchase supplies without the contract or bargain there- 
for being approved by the committee on finance of the city coun- 
cil, and said committee shall approve all bills contracted by him. 
This recommendation may be carried into effect in other and 
better ways perhaps, but everyone must see that it would save 
delays and money to have some system and checks in the buying 
of city supplies. 

Industry and attention count for as much in public life as 
elsewhere. We owe it to those who have elected us, we owe it 
to the city, and we owe it to ourselves, to discharge our duties 
with dignity and diligence, being swerved neither by hope of 
applause or the fear of criticism from that which in our judgment 
is the plain line of public duty. — Fro7n City Report of Lynn, 
Mass., for 1891. 

The tenure of office of our police commissioners begins to- 
day. In my opinion Gov. Tuttle and his council are entitled to 
great credit for their selection of this board. The gentlemen 
appointed are all men of high character, and of experience which 
particularly fits them for these difficult positions ; without reflec- 
tion on other candidates for commissioners, I think their appoint- 
ment meets the general approbation of our best citizens. Their 
duties are the most difficult of any part of our public service. 
To appoint a police force satisfactory to every citizen is an im- 
possibility ; it never has been and never will be done. The 
main object of the police commission bill is to divorce this de- 
partment from politics, to select the officers with reference to 
ability, and to maintain a tenure of office that will attract to this 
service good men and keep them there. Rules for the proper 
government of such a body are necessarily strict, and of a mili- 
tary character. Such rules were impossible to frame under our 
old system of appointments. Hence by no possibility could any 
police force of the past attain the efficiency which I confidently 
expect under the new order of things. 

In this connection it is necessary for us to understand that it 
is a financial impossibility for this or any other city to lay out 



388 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

and grade new streets in all directions, many of them to develop 
private property, and have money left to properly maintain and 
beautify the highways we already have. In my opinion, now is 
the time, and this board of aldermen is the body, to call a halt 
in unnecessary street grading. By the above term, I mean all 
streets not clearly for the benefit of the general public should be 
graded at the expense of the individuals through whose land they 
run, and not by the tax-payers in general. 

A street for the " benefit of the public " should be one laid out 
and graded for the benefit of the whole public, not for the im- 
mediate abuttors or a very few persons residing in the immedi- 
ate vicinity. 

The great argument in favor of laying out and grading all 
streets petitioned for has been, " Lots are sold, houses are built, 
and they are taxable property brought into existence." 

I fail to see how this argument has further force. Plenty of 
streets are now opened so that a person wishing a house lot can 
procure one in any direction. In fact, I think the streets already 
laid out afe sufficient for a city of 30,000 inhabitants or more. 
Private land should be developed at the expense of the owners, 
and when the street is graded, or nearly so, it is time to ask the 
city to accept it. 

It is hard to overestimate the importance of good streets 
and roads, well cared for and kept in good condition. With a 
view to improvement I am of the opinion that much more 
crushed stone should be used than in the past, not only on our 
streets but on our country roads. Nashua has grown and is now 
growing very rapidly. That growth should be encouraged, and 
especially should an effort be made to make our city a larger bus- 
iness center for the surrounding country. I know of few better 
ways to do this than to give the people surrounding us easy ac- 
cess to our city by first-class roads. 

Quite a radical change took place in this department last 
year. In place of the election of a so-called superintendent of 
sewers by the political party in power at the time, and who often 
has been a man unfamiliar with this most difficult work, the work 
on sewers has all been done under contract, and I think, all 
things considered, in a mo«t satisfactory manner. By restricting 
the bidders to citizens of Nashua, and placing the minimum lim- 
it of wages at a fair figure for those employed in the work, mon- 
ey has been kept at home, and the city has had the benefit of 
every dollar expended, while the contractor has made a profit. 
The work done under the supervision of the city engineer has 
been first-class and of a permanent character. 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLAXEOUS SOURCES. 389 

Not the least feature in this method of sewer construction is 
the immunity of the city from risk of accident, a bond being 
given by the contractor to assume all liability in such cases. 

The engineering department may well be spoken of in con- 
nection with the streets and sewers. 

I consider this one of the most important offices in the gift 
of the city, and one that should forever be kept out of politics, 
as it has been in the past. More money can either be saved or 
lost through the capabilities of the city engineer than through 
the ability of any other city official. Early in 1891 a proposi- 
tion was made to the city councils to adopt a set of assessors' 
maps, their advantage being conceded by all. Engineers from 
another city estimated the cost at about $10,000, and the time 
three years for completion. At the suggestion of our city engi- 
neer the work was undertaken by the city, and under his direc- 
tion with this result : April i, 1892, will see nearly half, and the 
worst half, of our city on paper, and in shape for the assessors. 
Mr. Burley estimates that the maps can be completed by April, 
1893, at a cost of $4,500, which sum includes all notes made, 
which was not the case with the $10,000 estimate. I urge upon 
you the importance of continuing the work on the same lines and 
of retaining our present city engineer. — From City Report of 
Nashua^ N. H.^for 1891. 

As one most important duty will be to watch the details of ex- 
penditures so as to reduce taxation, and at the same time see 
that appropriations are so applied as to obtain the most benefit, 
I would call your attention to what I have deemed a valuable 
suggestion from prominent tax-payers looking to a consolida- 
tion of the offices of civil engineer and the street commissioner, 
abolishing the latter and placing it under the control of the civil 
engineer. The reasons for this proposed change will in due time 
be laid before you or the proper committees. — From City Report 
of Portland^ Me., for 1S91. 

I am firmly of the opinion that a great improvement in the 
form of our city government and the election of its members 
could be made, and one that will save to the city several thou- 
sands of dollars every year,_and I will offer it as a suggestion for 
you to consider, of the advisability of asking of the next legisla- 
ture the right to change our form of city government to one of 
one board only, which shall be composed of three members from 
each ward, or twenty-one in all, who shall be elected to serve 
three years, electing one third of that board, or one from each 
ward, each year. 



390 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORT. 

You will readily see that you would then have a majority of 
the city government at all times who would be experienced in 
the city affairs, and as a large part of the important business for 
the year is done at the very first meetings of the new city gov- 
ernment, you can easily see how important it is to have experi- 
enced men in the board. I believe the work could be done much 
more expeditiously and at a great saving of expense in running 
the city, and I believe it would place the city affairs far above 
the influence of private parties, and instead of the city govern- 
ment being a schoolroom, so to speak, or the stepping-stone to 
men's political ambition, it would be more of a business institu- 
tion, and run more closely upon business principles. — From City 
Report of Bangor, Me. , for 1 89 1 . 

In presenting to you a proposition to reorganize the legisla- 
tive branches of the city government by placing the administra- 
tion of the municipal affairs in one board, I anticipate that my 
recommendation will meet with opposition. This opposition 
will arise mainly from those who object to so radical a change 
from long established usage, and also from others who seek polit- 
ical preferment and position without due regard for the duties 
which that position in the city government imposes. 

The prevailing idea that a dual legislative body is necessary 
for the proper administration of the fiscal, prudential, and muni- 
cipal affairs of a city, with the conduct and government thereof, 
has existed so long that it is hard for many to believe that they 
can be vested in one legislative body and better results obtained. 

From a personal experience in the common council, and after 
careful observation and thoughtful consideration of the subject in 
all its different phases, I am unqualifiedly of the opinion that that 
branch of the city government can be done away with and the 
legislative authority vested in one body. 

I have frequently expressed my conviction of the desirability 
of abolishing the common council as a co-ordinate branch of the 
city council, deeming it entirely unnecessary and not in accord 
with the principles recognized by business men in the control 
and management of private corporations. 

The government of the ijiunicipality should assimilate, as near 
as possible, to that of a well organized private corporation, and 
its affairs should be conducted upon the same general principles. 
No well organized private corporation, however large, is man- 
aged by dual boards of direction, and no one thinks that an or- 
ganization ujDon such a plan would be either beneficial, econom- 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. 391 

ical, or necessary. Why, then, should it be thought necessary in 
the management of a municipal corporation ? 

I am informed that a few eastern cities, and many in the more 
progressive West, have but a single legislative body for the ad- 
ministration of their fiscal, prudential, and municipal affairs, and 
the good reports from these fully justify the wisdom of such an 
organization. The problem of how best to conduct a municipal 
government is one which requires broad and comprehensive con- 
sideration, and one of the ways to aid in the solution of that 
problem, in order to obtain the best results, is to divorce the leg- 
islative body from political affiliations and place its management 
upon a business basis. 

I therefore recommend that you make an application to the 
general assembly which shall so amend the charter of the city as 
to provide for the abolishment of the common council, and also 
for biennial elections for the mayor and the members of the legis- 
lative branch which with him will compose the city council. 
When that is done, the mayor should be given broader execu- 
tive powers and authority than is possible under the present 
organization of the government, and the council which is associ- 
ated with him be made more of a board of direction. 

There is a widespread feeling that the city of Providence has 
entered upon an era of great industrial progress and commercial 
activity which will result in a large increase in wealth and popu- 
lation. It is my belief that if our business men and legislators 
will each do their part to assist the onward movement, the census 
of 1900 will show this city to be in the first rank of American 
municipalities. Whatever will tend to promote its growth and 
prosperity should be urged forward, and undue conservatism in 
the management of municipal affairs ought not to be permitted. 

Questions involving the improvement of commercial relations, 
the furnishing of better means for more rapid transit, the security 
of health and property, and the extension of educational benefits, 
should be met and discussed with comprehensive views. Petty 
and selfish interests ought not to be allowed to interfere with the 
determination of questions which have for their purpose the ben- 
efit of all the people alike, if this city is to prosper in the future. 

Progress should be the watchword of a city which already pos- 
sesses the advantages of a beautiful situation, a temperate climate, 
a water supply pure and abundant, well-kept highways having a 
reputation extending far beyond the borders of New England ; 
private and public schools unrivalled, where the poor man's son 
can traverse the several grades, even beyond the high school and 
into one of the first universities in the land, and at a nominal 



392 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

expense ; industries flourishing and diversified, where the most 
famous steam engines, the best locomotives, and the finest ma- 
chines and machine tools are made ; a city Avithin which and its 
environs are located many of the largest and most successful cot- 
ton and woolen mills in the country, the most extensive jewelry 
manufactories, and the largest silverware plant in the world. 
These are some of the advantages which should make our city a 
favorite place for investment and residence. Just how far the 
city council can properly go in the direction of making the city 
better known abroad along the above lines, and seeking to attract 
new enterprises hither, after the manner of progressive cities of 
the great West, is a question worthy of your consideration, and 
one in which you should not allow traditional conservatism to clog 
the wheels of legitimate progress. — From City Report of Provi- 
dence^ R. I.^for 1 89 1. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT AND FIRE LOSSES. 

Before the joint special committee of the city council of Bos- 
ton, Mass., Mr. Atkinson entered into a very comprehensive dis- 
cussion of the fire department of Boston, and the question of fire 
losses generally. 

As president of a factory mutual insurance company carrying 
risks of over gioo, 000,000, with but four risks in Boston, he con- 
sidered that he dealt with the commercial part of the city from 
an impartial standpoint in what he might have to say. 

The fire losses of the present year, he said, were likely to 
amount to ^150,000,000 in the United States, and the cost of 
sustaining the insurande companies will not be less than ^65,- 
000,000, and fire departments an additional ^35,000,000, or a 
total fire tax of ^250,000,000 a year. In other words, the fire tax 
was equal to between 10 and 20 per cent of the net profits of the 
whole nation in a prosperous year. 

He did not consider the business section of the city rightly 
guarded and protected by the city government, and the fire de- 
partment was not as efficient as it should be, nor as well organ- 
ized. 

The great majority of the buildings, he said, were not properly 
constructed with a view to the hazard of fire, the owners not do- 
ing what they should do for themselves. 

The area of the fire district of Boston is comprised in 145 
acres, with |ioo,ooo,ooo of property in its limits, the insurable 
value standing at about that figure. During the past ten years 
the losses have been ^10,000,000. 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. ' 393 

It follows, therefore, that the average rate of insurance on 
property within that district should have been throughout that 
period at least i]4. per cent, or $1,500,000 a year, to cover losses 
and expenses, even without profits. 

While not intending to criticise the fire department, Mr. At- 
kinson said that the whole service of the city of Boston is one of 
the most complete examples of how not to do the work effectually 
that could possibly have been invented. 

Any great business enterprise undertaken on such a disorgan- 
ized system would fail once a year. 

The fire commission hold a position that should be held by 
one strong, comprehensive man, capable of supervising the whole 
work and enforcing its right execution. I would choose a man, 
he said, who by natural aptitude and capability of directing other 
men, would become a major-general in the army in a very short 
period. Only such a man is fit for the service. In my judg- 
ment the chief of the fire department should be the inspector of 
buildings, because it is with a view of safety from fire and to the 
saving of life that the inspector is required. 

Every district or assistant chief should be qualified to act as an 
inspector of buildings in his district. The Dunne fire escape is 
an example of the inefficiency of the fire service. I myself 
pointed out the worthlessness of this device on the school build- 
ing to the mayor of the city, and it was referred to him by the 
inspector of buildings. Why has it not been remedied ? The 
lives- of the school children to-day are at a hazard on account of 
the criminal negligence of some of the city officers, unless a rem- 
edy has been very recently applied. 

Mr. Atkinson criticised the handling of the Webster fire on 
Summer street, where, he said, nine streams of water were wasted 
because the fire was in the rear instead of the front, where the 
engines were directing the water. 

He said, in speaking of the Brown, Durrell & Co. building 
that it was fitted throughout the upper stories with fire shutters. 
The big windows in the lower story were not protected. For 
some inscrutable and unknown reason, the building act does not 
require shutter protection on the lower story, and the owners take 
advantage of the act without regard to their own responsibility. 
The fire did not pass into the Brown, Durrell & Co. building, 
however, through those lower windows. It did pass through 
windows above, the shutters of which were not closed. One of 
my employees saw it and timed it. 

Had the Boston fire department been organized according to 
what I should deem a suitable manner, the first duty of a dele- 



394 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

gated body of the firemen who reached the building would have 
been to enter it and close those shutters, in which case the build- 
ing would probably have been saved. 

Had that building been a factory, under the factory mutual 
supervision, the employees would themselves have been organized 
for that purpose. 

In a Lynn factory, the great Lynn fire was stopped at a build- 
ing in which the shutters were closed by the employees, who then 
kept them cool and prevented the fire from coming through the 
cracks with buckets of water and brooms. 

No one doubts the individual capacity and bravery of the fire 
department. Witness Assistant Engineer Egan's experience on 
the roof of the Brown-Durrell building. 

I observed that in dealing with other witnesses you called for 
statements that the witnesses had derived from other persons. It 
happens that several of our most experienced men were present at 
this last fire, and they concur with me in the judgment of an ap- 
parent lack of habit on the part of the men in working under 
definite direction. 

My observation of that fire is this : The general directions 
given by Acting Chief Reagan for the disposition of the appara- 
tus must have been excellent. The lack of organization was in- 
dicated by the apparent want of method and previous instruction 
and discipline ; and that, I think, is the sum and substance of 
the objection to the present fire organization. 

The most terrible element of hazard in these Boston buildings, 
in my judgment, is to be found in the great open stairways and 
open areas in buildings that are filled with combustible mer- 
chandise. There are buildings in this city of many stories in 
height which I have charged my family not to enter above the 
lower stor)^, because although nominally even fireproof, the smoke 
and heat of a fire originating in the lower stories may at any time 
cause a fearful disaster to the crowd in the upper stories, so rapid 
might be the upward extension of the heat and flame generated 
by the mere combustion of the contents of such buildings. — Bos- 
ton Herald. 

A SIGNIFICANT COMPARISON. 

An insurance expert in England has been recently making a 
careful examination into the average rates of premium paid in 
the different countries in which the English fire insurance com- 
panies do .business, with results that have an interest to us in Bos- 
ton, in view of our recent experiences and the apparent unwil- 
lingness of fire insurance organizations to take large risks even 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. 



395 



at what seem to be high rates. This expert, after a careful exam- 
ination, states that the average rates on all classes of risks in the 
several countries referred to are as follows, the amounts given re- 
presenting payment for $ioo of insurance protection : 



France . 

Germany 

England 

Australia 

Austria . 

Russia . 

The United States 



8 cents. 

15 " 

25 " 

36 " 

38 " 

61 " 

100 " 



We have no means of determining the accuracy of these sta- 
tistics, except the experience of the United States, and here we 
should say that the rate has been slightly under rather than 
over estimated. In Boston there is about $330,000,000 of in- 
sured property, and the annual premium receipts are not far 
from $3,000,000, which would imply an average rate of a little 
less than $1 per hundred. But it is generally understood that 
the rates in Boston have been lower than in a great many other 
parts of the country, and if that is the case the estimate of the 
English expert may be a little under the mark. 

But what is of especial interest to us is the regular rate at 
which property is insured in different countries of Europe, where 
the profits of insurance are quite as great as they are in America. 
In France this average rate of eight cents, which includes what 
is paid by manufacturers of all classes, is far below what is con- 
sidered prudent to charge for the very best risks in this country. 
It is said that with us certain brick dwelling-houses have been 
insured at as low a price as eight cents per annum, but it is an 
exceedingly exceptional event, and is about one half the usual 
charge, and would imply that in France the liabilities to loss by 
fire in dwelling-house risks must be exceedingly slight, for in 
order to get the average they must be written at hardly more 
than two or three cents per annum per $100. 

This result is attained in France largely by approved construc- 
tion, for there, at least, the clinaate does not differ materially 
from our own. In England, where the rates of insurance are 
about one quarter of what they are here, the diminution in loss 
may be partly due to the dampness of the atmosphere and the 
little use in winter of those means of heating the interior of 
houses, which with us have the effect of drying woodwork so 
as to make it exceedingly inflammable. Building construction 
in England is not much better than it is in this country ; but 



396 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

the interiors of the buildings in the English cities are much 
more moist than they are here, and furnish very much less op- 
portunity for a speedy extension of flames. 

In Germany and Austria, and presumably in Australia, the 
conditions of climate are not widely different from those as we 
find them ; hence their relatively small fire losses must be due to 
the greater precaution taken in so constructing their buildings 
that a fire occurring within one of them does not extend readily 
to other parts of the same structure or permit of an extension to 
adjoining buildings. 

Perhaps no better illustration than this can be given of the 
immense advantage to be derived by carefully prepared and 
thoroughly enforced building regulations. The amount of pre- 
mium paid to the fire insurance companies in the United States 
for protection against loss is certainly not less than $200,000,000 
a year. Now the same amount of protection could be obtained 
at the premium rates charged in France for $16,000,000 a year, 
which would constitute a saving to the community of $184,000,- 
000 per annum. That this saving is made is due simply to the 
fact that fires do not occur. In France this may be partly occa- 
sioned by the restrictive laws which make a property owner or 
his tenant personally responsible if a fire upon his premises in- 
jures the property of another. This leads to the introduction of 
many safeguards, and an amount of prudence which would not 
be thought of here. But all this constitutes a saving of created 
wealth, by means of which the community is made better and 
more prosperous. If our country were not as wealthy as it is, if 
it did not possess its great natural resources, and if our people 
were not so energetic and hard-working, the drain that we now 
impose upon ourselves, which is more than equal to the tax of the 
standing armies and navies of any of the great military nations 
of Europe, would inevitably tell severely upon our national wel- 
fare. — Bosfoti Herald. 

CIVIL SERVICE REFORM. 

True democracy means, as Abraham Lincoln expressed it, 
" Government of the people, by the people, and for the people." 
Public ofiite, bestowed either by the people directly or through 
their chosen servants is, therefore, necessarily a " public trust." 
It is instituted not for the benefit of the office-holder, nor for the 
benefit of his party, but for the benefit of the people. The people 
are evidently entitled to the best service they can get, and those 
who are intrusted with the power of appointing officers are, there- 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. 397 

fore, in duty bound to appoint only persons fit to give the people 
the best possible service. They can discharge this duty only by 
selecting persons for office according to their fitness for the ser- 
vice to be rendered. The most faithful observance of this prin- 
ciple will also secure to every man aspiring to public employ- 
ment his rightful chance, for every man will have a chance ac- 
cording to his merit, and not according to his " pull." This is 
genuine democratic doctrine. 

In fact, nothing more undemocratic can be imagined than a 
system of appointment to office by favor. It rules out the good 
citizen who is poor and without friends, however great his personal 
merit may be. It yields a decisive advantage to him who has power 
at his back. It takes from office the character of duty and gives it 
the character of reward. It bestows this reward not for services 
rendered to the people, but for services rendered to a political 
party or to some influential politician. It thus transforms political 
contests that should turn upon questions of public interest into 
scrambles for plunder. It enables politicians to sustain themselves 
in public life by building up an influence through the organization 
of place-hunters. It thus fills legislative halls and executive posi- 
tions with small selfish schemers and drives away from public life 
men of conviction, of the pride of ability, and of high aims. 
It degrades the character of the office-holder, for it makes him a 
dependent on the favor of an influential patron instead of a man 
standing upon his own merit as a servant of the people. It pro- 
motes in politics a vulgar aristocracy of influence and an irre- 
sponsible despotism of bosses and machines. 

It is true, the belief that the distribution of offices as rewards 
is necessary to hold political parties together is still entertained 
by many. It is a humiliating belief, for it is based upon the 
assumption that the American people would cease to take an in- 
terest in their own interests if they were not stimulated by the 
expectation of individu:il pay for their zeal. It is a demoraliz- 
ing belief, for it brings forth appeals to the lowest order of mo- 
tives. Fortunately it is an unfounded belief. We do not deny 
that there are many mercenary persons engaged in American pol- 
itics, but we do deny that there would be an end of American 
politics if the greed of these mercenary persons were systemati- 
cally disappointed. The gaps caused by their disappearance 
from the field would quickly be filled by men whom their prom- 
inence had driven away in disgust. It is a notorious fact that 
the larger the number of offices grows the less they are an ele- 
ment of strength to a political party. And the more the party 
in power treats the offices as spoils, the greater an element of 
weakness they become. 



398 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

A journal in the West wisely remarks, " If Congressmen from 
the different states openly organize themselves into patronage 
boards, they will probably be convinced of their mistake by the 
returns of the next congressional election." He is the best cit- 
izen who is the most strenuous opponent of the aristocracy of 
' influence, and the most earnest advocate of an equal chance for 
all, according to merit. And this mean? civil service reform. — 
Harper' s Weekly. 

THE MAIN BUSINESS OF A CHURCH. 

I believe that it is the primary duty of churches and ministers to 
apply themselves to the problems of practical morals that con- 
front them in society to-day. The main business of a church is 
to build up pure and noble manhood and womanhood ; to pu- 
rify society ; to show up vice in all its hideous deformity ; to un- 
mask its covert forms ; to make men hate it, so that they shall 
wage a perpetual war against it in all its phases. — Rev. W. H. 
Ramsay. 

THE PROHIBITORY LAW, LICENSE SYSTEM, POLICE COMMISSION, 
AND LIQUOR TRAFFIC. 

To begin with, we have the farce of state prohibition. I fear 
I shall hurt the feelings of my prohibitionist friends, but I can't 
help that. I respect the convictions of the genuine, sincere pro- 
hibitionist, who is bravely fighting for a principle, the applica- 
tion of which he believes is going to regenerate the world. I 
shall not discuss the abstract principle of prohibition now ; it is 
a matter upon which honest people differ widely. But apart 
entirely from its theoretical aspect it has not been successful in 
large cities anywhere, so far as I can learn \ quite the contrary. 
The prohibitionists are simply playing into the hands of the li- 
quor dealers ; their pretended friends have no faith in the move- 
ment and simply adopt their method because it serves their own 
ends more effectually. The prohibitionist in New Hampshire is 
the unwilling dupe and ally of the liquor dealer. Both of them 
are agreed that there sh^l be no license — the one sincerely and 
from conviction, the other because it is money in his pocket. 
Nevertheless, I am fully convinced that the most effective meth- 
od of dealing with the evils arising out of the drink business in 
a city like Manchester, with its promiscuous population, com- 
posed so largely of foreign elements, uneducated in our more en- 
lightened American ideas about the use of intoxicants, is a sys- 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. 399 

tern of high license, just as high as it can be put, this side of pro- 
hibition. 

This method would serve several good ends : First, it would 
compel the liquor dealer to pay his legitimate share of the taxes 
which his traffic entails ; secondly, it would, I believe, secure 
decenter and better kept saloons, where the concomitants of 
gambling and prostitution would be shut out j and, thirdly, it 
would close up the hundreds of miserable rumholes that now 
flourish in kitchens and cellars and bogus groceries all over the 
city, because those who paid a high fee for the privilege of sell- 
ing liquor would see to it that their business was not infringed 
upon by illicit dealers. In connection with this, I would advo- 
cate the centralizing of the entire business withm a short radius 
from the police station, where it would be under the supervision 
and control of the police. It has been argued that while good 
for cities and large towns such a system would be demoralizing 
to country villages. By no means. The law should be permis- 
sive. Local option would provide for places where the sentiment 
is now strong enough to shut out saloons. Where such senti- 
ment does not exist those who wish for liquor can always obtain 
all they want. 

But even as the law stands to-day it is absolutely certain that 
we could have a vastly better condition of things but for the in- 
efficiency of our present control. This is due, in great measure, 
to the influence of party politicians and others, who are interested 
in keeping things as they are. This kind of influence and inter- 
ference is an incidental evil growing out of the mistaken princi- 
ple upon which city charters were framed in the past. Professor 
Bryce makes this fact very clear in his magnificent work on the 
" American Commonwealth." " Charters were framed," he 
says, "as though cities were little states. Many of the mistakes 
which have marked the progress of American cities up to this 
point have sprung from that defective conception. The aim de- 
liberately was to make a city government where no officer by 
himself should have power to do much harm. The natural re- 
sult was to create a situation where no officer had power to do 
much good. Meanwhile bad men united for corrupt purposes, 
and the whole organization of the city government aided such 
in throwing the responsibility from one to another." We are 
only learning now, after years of bitter experience, that cities are 
not so mijch little states as large corporations. 

In all our great business enterprises we are shrewd enough to 
understand that, for their effective management, power and re- 
sponsibility must go together. All effective reforms in munici- 



400 ANNUAL OFFICIAL REPORTS. 

pal government that have taken place in this country have pro- 
ceeded upon this principle. I can but hail the recent decision 
by our state legislatute to put the appointment and government 
of the police in this city into the hands of a board of commis- 
sioners as a step in the right direction. The success of the move- 
ment will, of course, depend entirely upon the character of the 
men who are appointed. But it will have this good effect, any 
way : It will free the city marshal and police from the control of 
local political bosses and corrupt politicians, who have hitherto 
hindered all efforts towards a proper control of the saloon busi- 
ness. 

The city directory gives us a list of about sixty saloons. As a 
matter of fact there are nearly four hundred places where liquor 
is known to be sold, besides a host of kitchens and cellars where 
the most disreputable kind of business is carried on. 

Another obstacle in the way of reform in our city is the fact 
that many of the buildings in which the worst business is carried 
on are owned by men and women to whom the evil is a source of 
large revenue and who have not moral grit enough to do their 
duty. In some cases they are, possibly, ignorant of the facts. 
However this may be, the evils of this drink business, as it is 
conducted now, are appalling. 

Last year there were 2,264 arrests, and out of these nearly 
1,600 were what are vulgarly known as " drunks." Seven hun- 
dred of those paid the regulation fine of $7.62, making a total of 
^6,000 in round numbers. This money came from those who 
could least afford to pay it. For the families of those men it 
meant greater poverty, thinner clothes, thinner blankets, and a 
diminishment of the necessaries of life. Besides this misery that 
has come to the surface in the police court, there is a vast amount 
of demoralization and vice that is eating at the heart of hundreds 
of homes. 

What is needed greatly in our city to-day is a higher and bet- 
ter tone in the general public sentiment on this question. If 
those who believe in reform, in decency, and public morality 
will only unite their forces an immense deal can be done towards 
abating these evils. 

Nothing ever comes right of itself, either in politics or morals, 
or social economy. If an evil exists anywhere it can only be 
righted by a return to the principles of right behavior. The 
evils of dirt and bad ventilation will, if left alone, scourge a city 
with small-pox, and typhus, and cholera. Human society is an 
organism, 'bound together by a network of the most delicate re- 
lations. Touch one part of it and you touch it all. The atmos- 



QUOTATIONS FROM MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES. 401 

phere of a vile cesspool will pollute a whole city, and send its 
deadly vapors into all homes, without respect of persons. So 
will a moral cesspool. The atmosphere of an impure or vicious 
man or woman infects and curses the life of a community. '' No 
man liveth unto himself and no man dieth unto himself." The 
only way to deal with any evil that infects the world is bravely 
to attack it, wrestle with it, and strangle it. — Rev. W. H. Ram- 
say. 

26 



i 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



REPORT OF CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils : 

Gentlemen, — The Auditor herewith submits to your honora- 
ble body his third annual report. 

WORK OF THE OFFICE. 

There have been made during the year the usual examinations 
of the treasurer's accounts, examinations of the city clerk's ac- 
counts, annual examination and settlement with the tax collector, 
annual examination of water-works accounts, annual examination 
of accounts of superintendents of Pine Grove and Valley ceme- 
teries, and of the treasurer of the cemeteries, annual examination 
of the accounts of the superintendent of the city farm, monthly 
examination of the accounts of the weigher at the city scales, 
quarterly examinations of the accounts of city marshal, semi- an- 
nual examination of the account of the clerk of the police court. 

Five thousand two hundred and seventy-six bills against the 
city have been examined and certified as " correct." All the 
pay-rolls for the twelve highway districts, for the schools, for the 
fire department, the water-works, the police department, the cem- 
eteries, and the city officials have been examined and certified to. 

Twelve monthly drafts, amounting in the aggregate to ^981,- 
174.81, have been drawn on the city treasury. 

Accounts have been kept with all the appropriations, with the 
treasurer, and the tax collector. 

Eight recommendations, fourteen ordinances and resolutions, 
and fifteen orders have been typewritten in this office for use of 



406 "REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

committees, etc. ; also forty-three letters, one message (three 
copies), one communication to city government, thirty-two cir- 
culars and other papers for the Mayor ; fifteen and one half 
hours' work for the city engineer, and four hundred and twenty- 
four letters, communications, and miscellaneous papers for the 
auditor. The City Report for 1892 is compiled by the auditor- 
as required by the ordinance. 

Mr. Allan E. Herrick left the employment of the city as audi- 
tor's clerk, after a service of two years and five months, to ac- 
cept a situation in the counting room of the Amoskeag Manu- 
facturing Company, at an increase of salary. Miss Lizzie M. 
Cogswell of this city is employed as his successor. 

FINANCIAL. 

Quite a large saving has been effected by the city during the 
last two years by the repeal of the ordinance allowing a discount 
to tax-payers. This discount (which was at the annual rate of 
six per cent on taxes paid in advance of December i, when ten 
per cent interest could be legally charged) resulted in giving to 
the city a large sum in advance of their immediate wants, and 
this large balance remained on deposit in sundry banks, the city 
receiving no interest whatever on it. 

During the year 1890, the total of discounts and money paid 
on temporary loans was $11,820.82. In 1891, the amount paid 
in lieu of discounts on temporary loans was $4,459.34. In 
1892, it was $3,772.14, which on the same valuation and rate of 
tax as in the year 1890 has made a saving to the city of 
$15,410.16 in their interest account during the two past years. 

Should the city adopt the plan of placing its money in that 
bank which will pay the highest interest on its average deposits, 
a still further deduction in its interest account would be man- 
ifest. 

The amount paid to the People's Gas-Light Company, for gas 
consumed by the police department in 1890, was $742.60. In 
April, 1 89 1, the Electric Company contracted with the city to 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 407 

furnish twenty-eight electric lights at the police station for 
twenty-eight dollars per month. The financial result was as 
follows : 

Paid in 1891, People's Gas-Light Company . . $280.98 

Electric Company . . . . 216.57 



Total $497-55 

Paid in 1S92, People's Gas-Light Company . . $61.18 

Electric Company . . . . 354.67 



Total $415-85 

Showing a reduction in expense, in 1891, of $245.05, and in 
1892, of $326.55 as compared with the expense of lighting in 
1890. The same economy exercised in relation to the lighting 
of the engine-houses and other public buildings would produce 
a desirable shrinkage in the expense. 

EXPENDITURES. 

The amount of the appropriation for auditor's de- 
partment was ...... . $2,000.00 

There was expended for salary of auditor $1,000.00 

There was expended for salary of clerks 711.90 

There was expended for supplies . . 218.17 

Balance ...... 69.93 



$2,000.00 

The auditor returns his thanks to the Mayor and the city 
councils and heads of departments for their uniform courtesy 
and kindness. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



408 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



To the City Councils of the City of Manchester, N. H. : 

Gentlemen, — I have examined the accounts of Sylvanus B. 
Putnam, city treasurer, for the year ending December 31, 1892, 
and find proper vouchers for all payments, and all receipts are 
duly accounted for. 

The net cash on hand January i, 1892, was . $93,190.14 

Receipts during the year ..... 984,461.85 



Amount of drafts during the year 
Net cash on hand December 31, 1892 . 



The cash balance taken December 
follows : 



$1,077,651.99 

. $981,174-81 
96,477.18 

$1,077,651.99 
)2, I find to be as 



Deposited in Suffolk National Bank 
First National Bank 
Second National Bank 
Manchester National Bank 
Amoskeag National Bank 
Merchants National Bank 
National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Granite State Trust Company . 
office safe .... 

Gross amount of cash on hand . 
Deduct amount of bills unpaid . 

Net cash on hand December 31, 1892 



$8,070.00 
202.56 
11,600.25 
20,285.07 
21,891.30 
14,212.66 
24,372.91 
68.02 
23,872.76 

^124,575-53 
28,098.35 

$96,477.18 



The accounts for the year ending December 31, 1891, of the 
city clerk, of the superintendent of schools, of the tax collector, 
of the water-works, of the city marshal, of the clerk of the police 
court, of the superintendent of the Pine Grove cemetery, of the 
superintendent of the Valley cemetery, of the treasurer of the 
cemetery trustees, of the superintendent of the city farm, and of 
the weigher at the city scales, have each and all been carefully 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 409 

examined and the income from these sources, as shown by the 
said books, has been deposited with the city treasurer, and ap- 
pears in his account?. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



410 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Dr. Sylvamis B. Putnam, Treasurer, in accotint zuith the 



To cash on hand January i, 1892 

bonds sold Adams, Blodget & Co. . 
premium on bonds sold .... 
temporary loan ..... 
city hall, rents ..... 
John B. Clarke Co., overdraft 
one half costs and fines in seven milk cases 
C. W. Strain estate, land sold 
J. R. Hanson estate, land sold 

E. F. Jones, costs in Lavantine case 
Kimball Carriage Co. .... 
J. A. Weston and others, settlement of suit 
John Ferguson, settlement of suit . 
Marion J. Parsons, land sold . 

William Stearns, overdraft 

F. X. Chenette, old building . 

E. F. Jones, City v. Dowd, settlement of suit 

F. C. Dow, use of road roller . 
Solon A. Carter, diseased cattle 
Freeman Higgins, settlement of suit 
Herbert S. Clough, for Hobbs and Maynard 
Allen Chisholm, overdraft 

John J. Lyons, Lake avenue schoolhouse 
Patrick Finn, overdraft . 
Timothy Sullivan, overdraft 
Lewis Baker, overdraft . 
M. Noland, overdraft 
Edward Foster, overdraft 
Wadleigh Flardware Co., overdraft 
Sanborn Carriage Co., overdraft 
Head & Dowst Co., crushed stone 
John N. Chase, chopping block 
Frank A. Dockham, lamp post 

Amount carried forward . 



• ^i30)033-09 


100,000.00 


2,178.00 


150^000.00 


2,556.00 


2.00 


350.00 


446.53 


7S6.62 


16.00 


12.48 


400.00 


200.00 


377.00 


3.00 


12.00 


26.05 


18.50 


4.00 


10.50 


22.38 


9.00 


2,800.00 


2.62 


2.25 


5-25 


1.88 


S.63 


24.88 


3.00 


90.00 


12.00 


10.00 


• $3905423.66 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



411 



City of Manchester, year ending December 31, 1892. 



Cr. 



By unpaid bills January i, 1892 . . . . • $36,842.95 


interest on temporary loans 








3>772-i4 


on water bonds . 








31,069.00 


on city bonds . 








15,929.00 


on cemetery bonds 








9.25.48 


payment funded debt 








99,900.00 


temporary loan 








180,000.00 


city hall 








2,193.60 


printing and stationery . 








2,239.62 


incidental expenses 








29.753-76 


mayor's incidentals 








221.80 


city officers' salaries 








17,154.18 


city auditor's department 








1,930.07 


highway district No. i . 








620.50 




" 2 . 








ii>925-39 




" 3 • 








361.24 




" 4 . 








485.32 




" 5 • 








774.46 




" 6 . 








484.46 




" 7 . 








1,515-61 


( 


" 8 . 








991.16 




" 9 . 








491.83 




' " " 10 . 








4,460.46 




" II . 








1,368.28 


." 12 . 








497-12 


new highways 








24,038.08 


land taken for new highways 








11,601.73 


watering streets 








3,988.43 


paving .... 








7,540.11 


macadamizing 








16,083.83 


grading for concrete 




, 




5,564-90 


scavenger teams 








15,555-31 


street sweeping 








1,293-79 


Amount carried forward . 


^531,573-61 



412 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Dr. 



Sylvaiiiis B. Putnam, Treasurer, in account with the 



'* Amount brought forward . 
To F. H. Webster, sewer pipe 

J. P. Russell, sewer-pipe . 

P. O. Woodman, sewer pipe 

Oliver B. Green, sewer pipe 

A. G. Savory, sewer pipe 
Gordon Woodbury, sewer pipe 
T. A. Lane Co., sewer connections . 
Head & Dowst Co., one grate 
William Corey, labor entering sewer 
Bartlett, Gay& Young . 
Boston & Maine R. R., overdraft . 
Portland Stone Ware Co., rebate on freight 
sewer licenses 
Ginn & Co., overdraft . 
W. E. Buck, text-books sold 
Henry S. Reed, overdraft 
Stark Mills, overdraft 
New England Telephone and Telegraph Co. 

moving poles .... 
H. W. Longa, police department . 
Michael J. Healy, police department 
John C. Bickford, police department 

B. D. Luce, overdraft 
rent of tenements .... 
water-works, receipts 

B. A. Stearns, superintendent Pine Grove cem 
etery ...... 

S. B. Putnam, lots sold, Pine Grove cemetery 

C. H. G. Foss, superintendent Valley cemetery 
board of paupers off, the farm . 
Dodge & Straw, overdraft 
L. M. Streeter, superintendent city farm 

Amoujzt carried forward . 



$390>423-66 

23.40 

20.00 

2.85 

6.4S 

1.94 

36.oo\ 

25.40 

2.46 

14.50 

100.00 

.60 

20.40 

3,126.05 

11-95 

150.59 

8.34 

1. 00 

4.00 

90.97 

8,206.90 

1,415.70 

2.00 

574-97 

83>474-79 

2,011.68 
2,696.90 
i,8co.oo 
1,192.93 
1.60 
2,458.11 

^497,906.17 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



418 



City of Manchester^ year ending December 31, 1892. 



Cr. 



' Amount brought foimiard 
By lighting streets 

bridges . 

city teams 

sewers and drains . 

engineers' department 

health department . 

repairs of schoolhouses 

fuel 

furniture and supplies 

books and stationery 

printing and advertising 

contingent expenses 

care of rooms 

evening schools 

teachers' salaries . 

mechanical drawing school 

free text-books 

city library . 

fire department 

fire-alarm telegraph 

firemen's parade 

police department . 

repairs of buildings 

new schoolhouse, Hallsville 

addition to Goffe's Falls schoolhouse 

engine house and ward room, ward 9 

water-works, construction 

water-works, repairs 

water-works, current expenses 

commons .... 

Stark park .... 

Pine Grove cemetery 

Amount carried forward . 



38,746.31 
3^133-68 
6,129.08 

39>724-65 
4,160.61 
2,424.01 
4,952.26 
4,297.40 

634.57 
299.73 

333-75 
1,227.99 

4,050.77 

973-93 
54,660.36 

405.15 

3^489.31 

4.86S.44 

42,262.88 

1,269.62 

441-55 

40,405.28 
2,892,75 
8,845-61 

2,000.00 
870.00 

29,410.93 

15,756.42 
4,778.00 
3,726.64 
1,500.25 

7,361.26 

$867,606.80 



414 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Dr. 



Sylvanus B. Putnam^ Treasurer, in account with the 



Amount brought forivard 
To insurance tax 
railroad tax . 
savings bank tax 
literary fund . 
city scales 
tuition . 
milk licenses . 
Jeremiah Sullivan, overdraft 
Joseph Bushey, overdraft 
cemetery bonds sold 
show licenses 
dog licenses . 
billiard table licenses 
interest on taxes 
taxes for the year 1885 



1890 
1891 
i8q2 



Unpaid bills January i, 1893 



,906.17 

4,199.25 

25^849.65 

78,101.94 

6,010.88 

521.12 

414.22 

66.50 

9.00 
1,150.00 

266.00 
2,060.97 

400.00 

514-13 

•79 

1.70 

3-9° 

9-85 

98.31 

22,583.91 

474,325-52 

51,114,494.94 
28,098.35 



^15142,593-29 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



415 



City of Mancheste7-, year ending Decejuber 31, 1892. 



Amount brought forzvard . 


. ^867,606.80 


By Valley cemetery .... 


2,982.85 


receiving tomb .... 


295.22 


Derryfield park .... 


500.05 


East Manchester cemetery 


99-35 


Amoskeag cemetery 


178.09 


paupers ofif tlie farm . ' . 


5,726.94 


city farm 


8,259.17 


indigent soldiers .... 


261.46 


Women's Aid Hospital . . . . 


500.00 


Elliot Hospital, free beds 


900.00 


decoration of soldiers' graves . 


321-75 


militia ...... 


900.00 


abatement of taxes .... 


2,794.53 


state tax 


65,615.00 


county tax .... . 


61,076.55 




$1,018,017.76 


Cash on hand January i, 1893 


• 124,575.53 




?i;M2,593.29 



416 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



STATEMENT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OFTHE CITY OF MANCHESTER, N. H., 
FOR THE YEAR 1892. 

Receipts. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from : 

Direct city taxes .... $435,947.43 
Cost and interest on taxes . . 5^4-^3 

Licenses to enter sewer . . . $3,126.05 

Licenses to keep dog . . . 2,060.97 

Licenses to sell milk . . . 66.50 

Licenses to keep billiard table . 400.00 

Licenses to shows and exhibitions . 266.00 

Rents ...... • • 



$436,461.56 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 

Received from city scales . . . . . 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Received from text-books and tuition . 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Received from court fines and costs . 



5>9i9-52 
3>i30-97 

$445,512.05 



$576.76 



)^7i5-57 



PUBLIC PLACES. 



Received from : 

Pine Grove cemetery 
Valley cemetery 



$4,708.58 
1,800.00 



$6,508.58 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR.- 417 

WATER-WORKS. 

Gross receipts ..... . . 1^83,474.79 

CHARITABLE, PATRIOTIC, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Received from : 

City farm ..... $2,458.11 
Hillsborough county, boarding pau- 
pers 1,192-93 

$3,651-04 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Received from : 

Judgments recovered • • . $950.00 

Premium on bonds sold . . . 2,178.00 

Land sold . . . . . 1,610.15 

Sale of Park-street schoolhouse and 

lot . . . . . . 2,800.00 

Other miscellaneous sources . . 575-52 



5,113.67 



Total ordinary receipts during the year 1892 $558,073. 5S 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Received from loans in anticipation of tax of 1S92 $150,000.00 

STATE. 

Received from : 

Insurance taxes . . . • . $4,199.25 

Railroad taxes .... 25,849.65 
Savings bank taxes . . . 78,101.94 

Literary fund .... 6,010.88 

$114,161.72 

COUNTY. 

Received from direct tax on city property . . $61,076.55 

37 



418 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

BONDED DEBT. 

Received from : 

Water bonds sold .... ;^ioo,ooo.oo 
Cemetery bonds sold . . . 1,150.00 



^101,150.00 

Gross receipts .... . . ^984,461.85 

Net cash on hand January i, 1892 . . 93,190.14 



^1,077,651.99 



Expenditures. 

♦Salaries of superintendent, school committee, and truant officer trans- 
ferred from city officers' salaries and carried to school department. 

t Transf eiTed from incidental expenses to the following : Watering streets ; 
$563.86; highway districts, $671.42; schoolhouse lot, West Manchester, $2,490; 
hose house, South Manchester, $684.48; furniture and supplies, $172.20; school- 
house repairs, $42. 75. 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 

Interest. 

Paid interest on water bonds . . ^31,069.00 
interest on city bonds . . 15,929.00 
interest on cemetery bonds . 925.48 
interest on temporary loan, anti- 
cipation tax, 1892 . . 3,772.14 



Paid city hall ..... $2,193.60 

printing and stationery . . 2,239.62 

incidental expenses* . . 25,129.05 

mayor's incidentals . . . 221.80 

city ofificers' salaries f . . 14,124.18 

city auditor's depaj-tment . . 1,930.07 



$51,695.62 



$45)838-32 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Paid highway district No. i . . $620.50 

highway district No. 2 . . 11,925.39 
highway district No. 3 . . 361.24 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



419 



W 



Paid highway district No. 


4 


^485.32 


highway district No. 


5 


774.46 


highway district No. 


6 


484.46 


highway district No. 


7 


1,515.61 


highway district No. 


8 


991.16 


highway district No. 


9 


491.83 


highway district No. 


lO 


4,460.46 


highway district No. 


II 


1,368.28 


highway district No. 


12 


497.12 


incidental expenses ^ 




671.42 


new highways 




24,038.08 


land taken fot highw 


'ays 


11,601.73 


watering streets * 


. 


4,552-29 


paving streets 


. 


7.540.1 1 


macadamizing . 


. 


. 16,083.83 


grading for concrete 


• 


5,564.90 


scavenger teams . 




i5>555-3i 


street sweeping . 


• 


^293.79 


lighting streets . 




■ 38,746.31 


bridges 


• 


3-I33-58 


city teams . 


. 


6,129.08 


sewers and drains 


• 


39,724-65 



^198,611.01 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



Paid engineer's department 



$4,160.61 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 




Paid health department 


• 


$2,424.01 


SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 




Paid repairs of schoolhouses* 


$4,995.01 




fuel 


4,297.40 




furniture and supplies 


S06.77 




books and stationery . 


299.73 




printing and advertising 


333-75 




contingent expenses . 


1,227.99 





420 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid care of rooms .... ^4,050.77 

evening schools .... 973-93 

teachers' salaries . . . 54,660.36 
salaries school committee, clerk, 

truant officer f . . . 1,030.00 
salary of superintendent f . . 2,000.00 
evening school mechanical draw- 
ing 405-15 

free textbooks .... 3,489.31 



^7»,57o-i7 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid city library .... . . $4,868.44 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid fire department .... $42,262.88 
fire-alarm telegraph , . . 1,269.62 
firemen's parade . . . 441-55 

^43^974-05 

POLICE. 

Paid police department ..... $40,405.28 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Paid repairs of buildings . . . $2,892.75 

addition Goffe's Falls schoolhouse 2,000.00 

new schoolhouse, Hallsville . 8,845.61: 
engine-house and ward-room, 

ward 9 . . . . . 870.00 
schoolhouse lot, West Manches- 
ter * . . . . . 2,490.00 
hose house lot, South Manches- 
ter* $684.48 



$17,782.84 



WATER-WORKS. 



Paid water-works, construction . . $29,410.93 

repairs . . . 15,756.42 
current expenses . 4,778.00 



;?49j945-35 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



421 



PUBLIC PLACES. 




Paid commons 


$3,726.64 


Stark park ..... 


1,500.25 


Derryfield park .... 


500.05 


Pine Grove ceijietery . 


7,361.26 


Valley cemetery 


2,982.85 


receiving tomb .... 


295.22 


East Manchester cemetery . 


99-35 


Amoskeag cemetery . 


178.09 



$16,643.71 



PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, AND PHILANTHROPIC. 

Paid paupers off the farm . . . $5,726.94 
city farm ..... 8,259.17 

indigent soldiers . . . 261.46 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospi- 
tal . . . . . 
free beds, Elliot Hospital . 
decoration soldiers' graves . 
militia ..... 



500.00 
900.00 

321-75 
900.00 



ABATEMENTS. 

Paid abatement of taxes ... 

Total of ordinary municipal expenditures 

TEMPORARY LOAN. 

Paid loan made in anticipation of tax for 1892 

BONDED DEBT. 

Paid water loan (re-funded) 



STATE AND COUNTY TAXES. 



Paid state tax 
county tax 



$65,615.00 
61,076.55 



Grand total of expenditures during the 
year ..... 



$16,869.32 

^2,794-53 
^574,583-26 

$180,000.00 
$99,900.00 

$126,691.55 
!i, 1 74.81 



422 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Cash on hand December 31, 1892 . $124,575.53 

Less unpaid bills .... 28,098.35 

Net cash on hand . . . 



Interest. 



,47 7-1 S'- 



$1,077,651.99; 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



;i,5co.oo 
195.62 



;i,695.6z 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid National Bank of the Common- 
wealth, discount on two notes of 
$25,000 each, six months twenty- 
six days, at 31^^- per cent . . $925.27 
National Bank of the Common- 
wealth, discount on two notes of 
$50,000 each, six months three 
days, at 2| per cent . . . 1,334-37 

Granite State Trust Co., one year 
three days' interest on note of 
$30,000 due December i, 1892, 
at 5 per cent .... 1,512.50 
coupons on water bonds . . 31,069.00 

coupons on city bonds . . . 15,929.00 
coupons on cemetery bonds . . 925.48 



,695.62 



RECEIPTS. 





' »S"" 


-S^'- 


OMUUd 


u.„™. 


P«npent 


u. 


"» '"S" 


sS 


isssffi tete 


'■£J^ 


— 


c»- ^ 


Sr :™'''SS' 


W^S 


r... 


..». 


s'^ 


^ 


u- 




.?ls. 




'""■ 


'^"-'o'?/ 


'^oAT'' 


^1 


'.« 


sr 


t™„»,. 




•*»" 


. «T9.Me.33 


•I09,oni.vi 
lU.94T.4a 


•319.44 


|I.01».40,«I.30I.IO 
2,10a.M S,166.fifl 
3,lSfl,0a 2.1HM),97 


E: 


9100.00 1 $3.sri.u 


«!.iei 


»lU!,201./y7 


'!:! 


z'Z 


~: 


'^^I'"":! 


I'j:^ 


""'" 


""■"•'■""■" 


srsm 


«,83B.i7 
7,962.04 


'i: 


*:E 


«*r 


SOO.OSC.ll 
BM.073.58 




5,000.00 46.033.47^ 9,9!0.35 3i,OB0.08 73.276.M , 5,187.30 j 3flB.674.80 
101,160.00 0I,O70.a 4.190.25 36,»49.05 78.101.94' 0,010.88 ' 490,388.27 


"»"« 


""' 












1.077,101.93 













































EXPENDITURES. 
















































- 






^. 






11 


1 


II 

6-= 


i 
1 


















""■-■"'-'""•"• 










s 










...«,.» 


.,„-„. 










„, ^.,. 




°!^r 


Mf 


iiSp' 


0„^. 


r." 


'■'•kP 


|.,. 


aw 


„,Kff... 


.,„,.„... 


,,.....« 


■tM 


""■ rjs. 


^'i- 


..?S.. 


■:»!» 


1 » 


* — 


"IS.:."" 


■SK- 


"St" 


..,, 


ST 


(141.36 (389.05 


(830.10 
,.,29.9 


(3.371.76 


SSK 


^S 


r 


(1.0!0.00t 
1,030.(<) 
1. 030.00 


S&# 


ffi" 


'Kr 


■;= : "-- 


:■ 






»34,177.00 
32,093.00 


(13.771.00 


729.35 


"'■ 


20.8 


* J2.0B8.18 
2.304.02 


»17,S80.91- 


♦188.00 


';;■;::: 


»2.741.79 


i™07 


•21.016.4 




018 08 


(838.13 


r,fia3.oo 


(6.038 75 (20.025.62 (5,089.80 


816,968.46 


l'»93 79 


(41,099.6 


4 (3.870.08 


«1,2.10.19 \ (39,297.97 


':; 


O.Sl 


~~ 


(3.703.J2 


973.93 


(45,4 


:: 


(2.000M (0 
9,0OOi>i 4 


"s 


:: 


5.11 


(3.289.88 (1.000.M 


.„»,^..,„„ 


,.„.,,.„„. 


..-...„..„,.„„., 


......„„„» 




































































































































EXPENDITURES.-cos 


rmoKD. 






































r>„.i...T.». 


1 


i 


1 


1 1 ii i 


1 
i 

820,769.86 
8,846.61 












.»....o».. 1 






™«,o,u™. 










"»"■ 




'-"■ 








•"- 


C»l.l,l.,- 1 .."'gS"" 


-rin-- 




.., 


i 


f ^ 


'jl* 


«2.0OO.O0 


W 




I 


iL 




i 


1 


1 


(8.000. 


a 3,3. 


|t 


i 


II 

(99.36 


li 

J! 


1 1 


M± 


1 

(400.00 


i 1 B 


i;£>s? 




;l 


P 


-1 


i 

1 

(4.214.03 

2.4M.7 


(60.75 


1 
1 


8737.82 






•"■* 


«P.S8 


(1.585.43 


«1B.080.0 


«7fi&.3I 


«a7.osa.io 


»4,MS-87 

»,«e.«6 

2*12.76 


(I.9H.0S 


(43,704.11 1 

1.128.70 (5,138J10i 

1 1 


i^'» 


(11,3 


a.m 


(17,508.01 


(4,382.81 






i: 


(60.S6- 


""« 


6.612.89 


:: 




2.U7.M 


Ce80,M9JfT 


_.^Z 


8ioo.ooo.on 

180.000.00 
180.000.00 


(63.438.00 
68,435.60 


(4«.0»!i;j (309,337.47 
4B.03*.4: 289,507.47 
8I,0»iJ 1 406.691.63 


"EE 


t79^1.01 


m 


„ 5.941.34 2,794.79 

.. 0.840.97 (520.59 2.982.86 


(520.00 


ZllZZ 


96.177.18 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



423 



Payment of Funded Debt. 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from sale of bonds, refunded . . ;$ 100,000.00 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid water bonds, redeemed . 

bond outstanding (carried to new 
account) ..... 



,900.00 



-$100,000.00 



Reserved Fund. 



RECEIPTS. 



To appropriation .... 


. $20,000.00 


transfers from the following accounts 




Mayor's incidentals 


$78.20 


Auditor's department . 


69.93 


Highway district No. 2 


74.61 


" " " 4 . . 


14.68 


" " 5 • • 


25-54 


(( a (( g 


15-54 


<< (( (< Q 


8.84 


" " 9 


8.17 


Macadamizing streets . 


1,916.17 


Grading for concrete 


500.00 


Lighting streets . . . . 


1,253.69 


Bridges . . . . . 


500.00 


Health department 


75-99 


Repairs of schoolhouses . 


47-74 


Fuel 


202.60 


Furniture and supplies . 


165.43 



424 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 



Books and stationery 


$0.27 


Printing and advertising 


66.25 


Evening schools . 


226.07 


Teachers' salaries . 


1,339-64 


Evening schools, mechanical draw 




ing 


194.85 


Free text-books . 


10.69 


Fire-alarm telegraph 


130-38 


Firemen's parade . 


58.45 


Water-works, construction . 


589.07 


" repairs 


1,243.58 


" current expenses 


222.00 


Valley cemetery . 


17-15 


East Manchester cemetery 


•65 


Receiving tomb, repairs 


54-78 


Goffe's Falls cemetery . 


100.00 


Indigent soldiers . . . . 


73S.54 


Cash on hand not otherwise specifi 




cally appropriated 


38.598-34 



^48,547.84 
^68,547.84 



EXPENDITURES. 

By transfers to the following accounts : 
Interest . 
City hall 

Printing and stationery 
Incidental expenses . 
City officers' salaries 
Highway District No. i 





3 


li le 


" 7 


li a 


" 10 


i( a 


" II 


ee tl 


'' 12 


New highways . 





^195.62 
93.60 
39.62 

14,753-76 

1,454.18 

320.50 

161.24 

15.61 

460.46 

368.28 

197.12 
14,038.08 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



425 



Damage for land taken for liighways 


. $2,601.73 


Watering streets 


988.43 


Paving streets .... 


2,040.11 


Grading for concrete 


1,064.90 


Scavenger service . 


4,555-31 


Street sweeping 


93-79 


Bridges 


1,133.68 


City teams .... 


1,129.08 


Sewers and drains » 


9,724.65 


Engineer's department 


160.61 


Contingent expenses 


27.99 


Care of rooms .... 


50-77 


Fire department . . . 


3,262.88 


Police department . 


3,105.28 


Repairs of buildings 


392-75 


New schoolhouse, Hallsville 


743.66 


Commons .... 


726.64 


Stark park .... 


•25 


Pine Grove cemetery 


761.26 


Amoskeag cemetery 


78.09 


Derryfield park . . . . 


•05 


Paupers off the farm 


726.94 


City farm .... 


75917 


Elliot Hospital, free beds 


300.00 


Addition to Goffe's Falls schoolhouse 


2,000.00 


Decoration of soldiers' graves . 


21-75 



5,547-84 



426 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Temporary Loan. 

Receipts. 

To appropriation ..... 

Received from National Bank of the 
Commonwealth, on two notes 
dated May 5, 1892, due De- 
cember I, 1892 . . . $\ 
from National Bank of the 
Commonwealth, on two notes 
dated June i, 1892, due De- 
cember I, i8q2 . 



100,000.00 
150,000.00 



5180,000.00 



Expenditures. 



Paid Granite State Trust Co., note dated 

Sept. I, 1891, due Dec. i, 1892 ^SOjOoo-oo 

National Bank of the Common- 
wealth, two notes dated May 5, 
1892 ...... 50,000.00 

National Bank of the Common- 
wealth, two notes dated June i, 
1892 ...... 100,000.00 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



Paid Head & Dowst Co., materials and 
labor 





$ 1 80,000.00 


City Hall. 




. 


^2,100.00 


ed fund 


93.60 




p2,i93.uo 


Expenditures. 




PUBLIC COMFORT. 





REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 42if 

Paid M. J. Coleman, materials and labor $139.51 
Sargent & Corson, materials and 

labor ..... 25.79 

C. E. Lord, masonwork and stock 1.95 
Manchester Heating & Lighting 

Co., 15 lbs. mop waste ' . . 3.75 



FUEL AND LIGHTS. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 37,840 lbs. 

egg coal $118.25 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., l4 cord hard 

wood ..... 2.50 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 87,580 

lbs. egg coal .... 260.55 

Moore & Preston, }4 cord slabs . 2.25 

J. G. Jones, three barrels and saw- 
dust 1.20 

People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . 302.12 

The Electric Company, electric 

lights ..... 38.60 

Manchester Electric Light Co., 

16,000 watts at 22 cents . . 3.20 



LABOR. 



TELEPHONE. 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid George H. Richter & Co., 2 dozen 
long document files, for city 
clerk's office .... $24.75 



;245.2i 



$728.67 



Paid labor men and teams, as per pay-roll, district 

No. 2 $5.38 



Paid New England Telegraph and Telephone Co., 

use of telephones .... . $75'96 



428 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid J. H. Wiggin, y^ gross matches . ^0.12 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

22,000 receipt blanks . . 22.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., toilet 

paper ..... .10 

Weston & Hill Co., matting and 

zincing ends for city clerk's office 4,01 

John A. Barker, extra night ser- 
vices ..... 20.00 

Mary Shiney, 550^ hours' labor, 

at 20 cents per hour . . . no. 15 

M. P. Barker, making awning for 

city treasurer's office . . . 10.00 

Peter Harris, i key and repairing 

lock . . . . . . 1.25 

A. M. Eastman, soap, matches, 

brooms, etc. .... 4.36 

J. K. Rhodes, services as city mes- 
senger one week . . . 12.25 

Manchester Heating & Lighting 

Co., 15 lbs. mop waste . . 2.25 

L. M. Aldrich, labor and materials 4.77 

The Kitchen, 2 tumblers for col- 
lector's office . . . . .16 

J. S. Holt, 10 gallons soap . . 1.25 

E. H. Currier, 203 lbs. Babbitt's 

potash ..... .40 

John J. Holland, allowance on bill 
for painting and decorating drug- 
store in 1891 .... 90.00 

Pike & Heald, ash hod and pail . 2.65 

Pike & Heald, repairs on roof . 234.37 

Pike & Heald, plumbing . . 23.28 

Head & Dowst Co., labor and ma- 
terials, sundry repairs . . 38-99 

,C. H. Wood, painting 3 tin signs, 

ladies' toilet .... 1.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 429" 

Paid S. C. Austin, repairing rods on 

building ..... $10.00 

J. Y. McQueston, i No. 7 glass, 

20 X 12 . . . . . 2.00 

James R. Carr, 19 lights glass and 

setting same .... 4.75 

D. J. Adams, fitting 4 keys . . .50 

Thomas A. Lane : 

labor and materials, gas-pipe in 

hall 2.80 

6 Beacon shades in treasurer's 

office ..... 2.10 

50 ft. hose, I hose nozzle, and 

2 sets couplings . . . 6.15 

material and labor on water- 
closets . . . ... 2.98 

material and labor on boiler . 11.29 

material and labor in treasurer's 

and assessor's office . . 8.79 

material and labor, various offices i8.o6- 

Sanborn Carriage Co., blade on 

slice bar ..... 2.00 

Whitten & Fifield, teams for city 

messenger .... 8.00 

John K. Wilson, shelves and door 

in city engineer's office . . 7.00" 

The John B. Varick Co., glue, 
snow scraper, twine, rope, dust- 
ers, brooms, hose, toilet paper, 
waste basket, etc. . . . 19-37 

M. J. Coleman, material and labor, 

repairs on pipes . . . 43-27 

Water-works, use of water to Oct. 

I, 1892 354-3° 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 4 chairs 
for rooms of aldermen and coun- 
cilman ..... 20.00' 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co., re-seat- 
ing chairs . . . . $1.20 

Charles A, Hoitt Sj Co., re-caning 

5 chairs ..... 4.50 

J. G. Jones, freight and cartage 

on document files . . . .80 





• 


i»l,iJO.^/ 


Total expenditures 


$2,193.60 


Printing and Stationery, 




Appropriation ..... 


^2,200.00 




Transferred from reserved fund 


39.62 


$2,239.62 






Expenditures. 






ASSESSORS. 






Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 






ing annual meeting of assessors . 


$12.33 




The John B. Clarke Co., printing 






200 half-note circulars 


4-50 




Temple & Farrington Co., 26 blank 






books 


100.50 




Temple & Farrington Co., enve- 






lopes, pens, ink .... 


10.42 




Temple & Farrington Co., station- 






* ery 


8.99 




Temple & Farrington Co., 60 pos- 






tal cards 


1. 10 


<#T ^ ►, ^ 



TAX COLLECTOR. 



Paid The John B. Clarke Co., advertis- 
ing non-resident land sale . . $29.70 
The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

5,000 receipt blanks . . . 7.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



431 



Paid Novelty Advertising 


Co., printing 




5,000 notices to tax-payers 


$7-5° 


Paid Temple & Farrington 


Co.: 




12 pencils . 




.40 


I quire foolscap paper 




•25 


McGill's fasteners 




•25 


8 pass-books 




.40 


I gross rubber bands . 




.70 


I index book 




.38 


6 pencils . 




.25 


I blank 




.25 


Blotting paper and penholders . 


.80 


Paid Charles C. Clark, 6 b 


lanks 

ITV CLERK. 


.50 


c 





$48.38 



Paid J. Arthur Williams : 

Printing 300 blanks, petitions for high- 
ways . . . . . 
" 2,000 blanks, return of deaths 
" 1,000 blanks, dog licenses 
" 300 rosters . 
" 200 burial permits 
" 300 petitions 
" 300 envelopes, 2-cent stamp 
" 500 marriage certificates 
'' 1,400 dog licenses, burial per 

mits .... 
" 2,700 notices to jurors, etc. 
" 500 letter heads 
" 500 election certificates 
" 200 resolutions 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

I blank book .... 

I canvas cover .... 

I blank book . ^ . . 



^3.00 

5-75 
6.50 

15.00 

1. 10 

3.00 

7-50 
4.00 

8.25 

8.75 

2.25 

3-25 
4.00 

12.00 
1.25 
4.40 



432 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Envelopes, ink, mucilage, rubber bands, 

seals, pens, blotting paper, lettering 

Public Statutes, postals, printing, 

and stationery .... ^24.03-, 

Paid N. P. Kidder, cash paid for ink 

well ....... 1. 00 



CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

I receipt book ..... ^lo.oo' 

1 account book ..... 10.00 

2 canvas covers . . . . . 2.50 
52 pay-roll sheets .... 5.45 
10.000 pay envelopes . , . 7.50 
6 binding cases ..... 2.52 
I cash book ..... 6.00 
I canvas cover ..... i.oo 
Mucilage, envelopes, ink, pencils, etc. 24.99 

Paid The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

pay-roll blanks .... 4.50 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

86 cemetery bonds, etc. . . 23.50 

J. Arthur Williams, printing 2,000 

order blanks .... 4.00 

J. Arthur Williams, 2,000 receipts 

and note circulars . . . 5.00 

J. Arthur Williams, 300 postal 

cards and printing . . . 3.90 

S. S. Piper, 100 2-cent postage 

stamps ..... 2.00 

Novelty Advertising (^o., set of 

bands for Atlas dater ... .30 



Paid American Express Co., express on 

reports ..... $22.01 



SII5-03-. 



$113.16= 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 43S 

Paid Manchester post-office, postage . $13-50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 500 en- 
velopes ..... 2.50 

Temple & Farrington Co., 100 pay- 
roll sheets . . . . . 8.15 

Temple & Farrington Co., paste . .10 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

500 billheads .... 5.50 

The John B. Clarke Co., binding 2 

volumes Census Bulletin . . 2.00 

The John B. Clarke Co., printing 

800 billheads .... 9.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., i ball 

twine . . . . . .15 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printmg 300 

orders for supplies . . . $i-75 

Temple & Farrington Co., i blank 

book ..... 12.25 

Thomas H. Tuson, 300 postal cards 

and printing same '. . . 5.35 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid American Express Co., express on 

electrotypes .... ;$o-5o 

J. G. Jones, 4 hours' work deliver- 
ing city reports . . . 2.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs for 

city report of 1 89 1 . . . 63.25 

H. W. Herrick, services and ex- 
penses for city report . . 33-3^ 

Kilburn & Cross, engravings and 
electrotypes for annual report of 
1891 324-75 

28 



)2.91 



SI9-35 



434 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid H. C. Whitcomb& Co., electrotype 

of Derryfield park . . . ^i-i5 

W. P. Goodman, i box pens, may- 
or's office ..... .40 

William E. Moore, printing 1,000 

letter and note heads for mayor . 6.00 

William E. Moore, letter heads, en- 
velopes, etc., for mayor . . 9.50 

Novelty Advertising Co., 200 letter 
blanks for clerk of common coun- 
cil ..... . 1.50 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 1,500 
copies city report for 1 891, as per 
contract ..... 1,092.25 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising pe- 
tition for discontinuance of high- 
way and order of court thereon . 8.25 

John B. Clarke Co., binding 150 

reports, full sheep . . . 172.50 

Manchester post-office, 300 2-cent 

stamps for mayor's office . . 6.00 

Thomas H. Tuson, printing 100 

postal cards for mayor's office . 1.60 

Thomas H. Tuson, 300 notices . 2.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 6 weigh- 
er's books for city scales . . 18.00 



$1,742.95 

Total expenditures .... . $2,239.62 



Incidental Expenses. 

Appropriation ..... $15,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 14,753.76 



$29,753.76 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



435 





Expenditures. 




LABOR. 


labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in 


district No. 2 : 


January 
February 
March . 








^21.00 

45-75 
21.00 


April . 
May 








77-13 
86.25 


June 








142.62 


July . . 

August . 








145-37 
181.48 


September 
October 








102.40 
171.00 


November 








174.13 


December 








73-40 



^1,24153 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in 
district No. 7 : 
January . . . . , ^7'00 

August 34-00 



^41-00 



BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS. 



id 0. D. Abbott 






$11.00 


D. S. Adams . 






4.75 


E. Bernier 






13-25 


Charles E. Dodge . 






17-50 


Clarence M. Dodge 






9.00 


C. W. Downing . 






4-50 


E. B. Dunbar 






5.00 


Charles Corey 






-50 


N. L. Colby . 






25.00 


J. A. Chevalier 






44-5° 


E. B. Eddy . 






6.00 



436 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid J. G. Fortier 






• ^28.25 


George Frechette . 






10.25 


Eugene Fugiere 






24.00 


C. F. Flanders 






34.00 


L. M. French 






11.50 


John Ferguson 






40.75 


William Holland . 






•50 


Charles D. Hills . 






10.00 


J. A. Jackson 






11.50 


M. E. Kean . 






15-50 


N. G. Laberge 






21.75 


J. E. A. Lanouette 






44-50 


J. G. Lemaitre 






23.00 


J. D. Lemay 






.31-50 


J. W. D. McDonald 






12.00 


A. D. Mackey 






26.75 


W. H. Morrison . 






11.50 


Frederick Perkins 






5.00 


W. H. Pattee 






3.00 


J. L. Robinson 






16.25 


J. E. Roy . 






6.50 


Neil F. Starr 






2.00 


C. B. Sturtevant . 






6.75 


Gillis Stark . 






3.00 


E. Sylvain . 






51-25 


G. D. Towne 






3-50 


W. F. Templeton . 


r 


7.25 


Thomas Wheat 




6.75 


N. P. Kidder, fees for 985 births . 


147-75 


N. P. Kidder, fees for 549 marriages S2.35 


N. P. Kidder, fees for i 


049 c 


ieaths 


157.35 



$996-95 



DAMAGES AND JUDGMENTS. 



Paid D'. S. Adams, surgical attendance 
on C. B. Clarkson 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 437 

Paid Burnham, Brown & Warren, at- 
torneys, in settlement of Lee Big 
V. Manchester and Edwin Branch 
V. Manchester, personal damages $1,400.00 

Wm. T. Bass, personal damages, 
falling on sidewalk on the south 
side of Hanover street between 
Beech and Maple streets , . 25.00 

Joseph Cram, injury to horse, wag- 
on, and harness on Shirley Hill 
road, and in full for all claims . 50.00 

Hattie D. Cram, personal injury 
on Shirley Hill road, and for all 
damages ..... 925.00 

Michael Collins, settlement of suit, 

personal injury .... 700.00 

Celia Clark, on execution, personal 
injury 2,355.44 

C. M. Dodge, damage to team . 25.00 

"G. H. Ellinwood, injury to horse 

on Merrimack street . . . 25.00 

Hannah Connor, suit settled by 

agreement .... 850.00 

J. Mary Gendrou, suit settled by 

agreement .... 300.00 

Bridget Hodgkins, suit settled by 

agreement . . . . 350.00 

John J. Jones, damage to person on 
Laurel street . . . . 50.00 

Nancy B. Morse, damage to person 

on Hanover street . . . 224.00 

Philomene Morin, personal injuries 375-oo 

William M. Parsons, on execution, 

personal injury .... 4,303-37 

Honora Russell, personal injury, 
suit settled .... 350.00 



438 EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Mrs. Hiram Simons, damage to 

sleigh $25.00 

Hiram Turner, damage to dog . 10.00 

Inez Tirrell, personal injury, on ex- 
ecution ..... 2,071.08 

Edward Wyman, personal injury, 

suit settled • . . . . 350.00 

Rodney Whittemore, personal in- 
jury, on execution . . . 2,568.35 

Elliot Hospital, board and nursing 

of Patrick Ford . . . 8.00 

Harper & Nichols, damage to wag- 
on of Joseph Brooks . . . 5.65 

Mary Bouchard, damage to person 

on Park common '. . . 175-00 

Mrs. D. H. Dickey, personal in- 
jury ...... 30.00 

H. M. Clough, appraised value of 
horse killed by order of State 
Board of Cattle Commissioners . 5.00 



$17,650.89 



LEGAL EXPENSES. 

Paid D. S. Adams : 

Examination and services in case of 

Celia Clark ..... $45.00 
Examination and services in case of R. 

N. Whittemore . . . . 45- 00 

Examination and services in case of 

Inez Tirrell . . . . . 35 -oo 

Examination and services in case of 

Michael Collins .... 25.00 

Paid Walter E. Abbott, witness fee, Lane 

V. Manchester . . . . 1.37 

Charles E. Cheney, witness fee, R. 

N. Whittemore z^. city . . 2.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 439 

Paid A. M. Corning, witness fees and 
summoning in case of R. Whitte- 
more v. city .... ^41.94 

John F. Cassidy, sundry witness 
fees and travel in case of R. Whit- 
temore . . . . . 25.72 

J. G. Ellinwood, photographs for 

use in case of R. Whittemore . 4.00 

A. M. Foster, M. D., services in case 

of Mayhew z/. city . . . 10.00 

L. B. How, M. D., examination as 
medical expert in case of Tirrell 
V. city ..... 40.00 

Paid Charles H. Hodgman : 

Serving notices in case of Clark v. city 1.62 

Witness fees, travel, etc., for sundry 
persons in case of R. Whittemore v. 

city 17.15 

In case of Inez Tirrell z/. city . . 9.18 

In case of Lane v. city . . . 6.36 

Paid E. F. Jones, paid T. D. Luce, trans- 
ferring and printing case. Parsons 
V. city ... . . . 22.00 

E. F. Jones, paid J. B. Swift for 
serving notice, etc., in case of R. 
Whittemore v. city . . . 1.5a 

E. T. James, for team, county com- 
missioners' hearing on Goffstown 
road ..... 5.00 

E. T. James, for team for J. F. Cas- 
sidy ...... 2.50 

H. E. Loverin, services in case of 

Clark V. city .... 15-00 

H. E. Loverin, summoning witness- 
es in case of Whittemore v. city 9.90 



440 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid H. E. Loverin, fees and travel paid 
witnesses in case of Whittemore 
V. city $35-49 

C. H. Little, services taking testi- 
mony at trial of Inez Tirrell v. 
city ...... 5.00 

Manchester Street Railway, use of 
barge for jury in case of Whitte- 
more V. city .... 6.00 

J. T. O'Dowd, expenses to^ Lowell 
and Edgeville in case of McCar- 
thy V. city .... 6.65 

Oscar Perkins, fees and services in 

sundry cases . . . . 5.00 

Frederick Perkins, medical expert 
testimony in cases Clark v. city, 
Tirrell v. city .... 75 -oo 

Daniel L. Stevens, serving notices » 

in case of Lane v. city, Mayhew 
V. city ..... 6.48 

William Stearns, services in case of 

Nancy B. Morse v. city . . 6.00 

Whitten & Fifield, team to Goffe's 

Falls for city solicitor . . 2.50 

George D. Towne, medical expert 
testimony in case of Collins v. 
city ...... 25.00 

H. E. Loverin, services in case of 

Lane v. city .... 10.00 

E. F. McQuesten, examination, tes- 
timony, and expenses in case of 
Whittemore v. citTy . . . 100.00 

John A. Bruce, services in case of 

Whittemore v. city . . . 5.00 

Paid T. D. Luce, clerk of supreme court : 
Costs Manchester petition to discon- 
tinue . ..... 2.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR, 441 

Costs transfer and printing case Man- 
chester petition .... $12.50 
Costs in case of Manchester v. Jenkins 3.25 
Costs entry case of Manchester v. War- 
ren & Beede ..... 1.20 
Paid Burnham, Brown & Warren, retain- 
er in case of Mayhew v. city . 25.00 
D. A. Taggart, services and expens- 
es in case of Whittemore v. city 66.77 ' 
Kimball Carriage Co., repairs on 

wagon of E. O. Murphy . . 4.00 

county commissioners of Hillsbor- 
ough county, fees and expenses 
in hearing in relation to old 
Bridge street .... 40.30 

J. H. Melton, fees as witness in the 
case of Clark, Tirrell, Mayhew v. 

City, $1.37 each ... 4-11 

$812.99 



CITY COUNCIL AND COMMITTEES. 

Paid Union Publishing Co. : 

Advertising proposals for sewer pipe, 2 

squares, six times .... $7'Oo 

Advertising proposals for engine-house, 

3 squares, eleven times . . . 13- 75 

Advertising dog licenses. 4 squares . 26.00 

Advertising proposals for collecting 

garbage, 3^ squares, six times . i3-i2 

Advertising proposals for stone culvert, 

23^ inches, every other day, six times 9.60 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., advertising: 
Proposals for engine-house, 2 inches, 

ten times ..... 12.32 

Proposals for collecting garbage, 5 

squares, five times .... 10.50 



442 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Proposals for furnishing sewer pipe, 2 

inches, six times .... $9.00 

Proposals for stone culvert, 2^ inches, 

five times ..... 9.50 

Proposals for coal, 2^ inches, six 

times ...... 12.38 

Notice relating to dog licenses, 2}4 

inches, three weeks . . . 21.25 

Paid A. R. Ingham, twelve suppers for 
board of aldermen, laying out 
road ..... 9.00 

Jesse W. Truell, use of hacks for 

committees .... 35-oo 

E. T. James, use of carriages for 

committees .... 69.50 

Edson C. Eastman, four copies Pub- 
lic Statutes of New Hampshire . 12.00 
W. J. Freeman, use of hacks . 104.00 
Benjamin Lenthier, advertising 

licenses "pour les chiens" . . 10.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of hacks 64.00 

Robert J. Peaslee, services revising 

the City Ordinances . . . 200.00 

John B. Clarke Co., printing 500 

copies City Ordinances . . 503'37 

A. L. Jenness & Son, use of hacks, 

etc. ...... 30-50 

Novelty Advertising Co., one 
Champion dater for clerk of com- 
mon council .... 2.25 

Union Publishing Co., advertising 
proposals for coal^ 4 squares, six 
times ..... 14.00 

Paid Press Printing & Publishing Co. : 
Proposals for wood and coal, '2^^ 

inches, five times . . . . 6.13 

Proposals for collecting garbage . . 5.62 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 443 

Proposals for building stone culvert . ^5-83 

Proposals for building engine-house, 

ward 9 . . . . . . 9.00 

Notice, " License your Dog " . . 15-87 

Paid Whitten & Fifield, use of teams for 

committee .... 24.00 

Whitten & Fifield, use of teams for 

city messenger .... 3.00 

John A. Barker, horse car fares . 2.00 

"New Hampshire Post," advertis- 
ing dog licenses . . . 4.50 
William E. Moore, postal cards and 

printing (death of Schimmel) . 1.50 

William E. Moore, postal cards and 

printing (Columbus Day) , . 1.50 

William E. Moore, printing 1,000 

note heads for Mayor . . 4.50 

$1,281.49 



CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid John A. Barker, care of boiler, etc. $133.50 

Robert Clark, work do,ne in and 

around the city library building, 

cutting lawn, cleaning sidewalks, 

washing windows, etc. . . 56.70 

Head & Dowst Co., 4 feet half-inch 

pine, 4 feet half-inch whitewood .26 

Thomas A. Lane, repairing hose . .20 

Thomas A. Lane, labor on boiler . 5.00 



$195.66 



DISEASED CATTLE. 

Paid A. L. Dodge, examination of glan- 

dered horse (Bascomb) . . $4-oo 

A. L. Dodge, examination of glan- ' 

dered horse (Dowd) . . . 4.00 

H. Fox Davis, killing and burying 

horse of Fred Berry . . . 3.00 



444 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY SCALES. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 500 lbs. stove 

coal $1.87 

L. B. Bodwell, 2 ft. mixed wood . "2.00 

L. B. Bodwell, 3,000 lbs. coal . 11-25 

A. T. Barr, testing and sealing 

scales ..... .75 

John B. Varick Co., 2 dozen brass 

hooks ..... .20 



MILK INSPECTOR. 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., advertising 
notice under section 11, chapter 
42, Laws of 1883 . . . $4-75 

John B. Clarke Co., advertising 
notice of election, etc., 2 in., one 
time. ..... 3.00 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising notice of election, etc., 2 
inches, one time . . . 1.50 

Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising notice under section 11, 
chapter 42, Laws of 1883 . . 3.00 

J. Arthur Williams, printing letter- 
heads, postal cards, tags . . 6.40 

H. F. W. Little, cash paid for one 

copy of Public Statutes . . 3.25 

H. F. W. Little, cash paid for re- 
pairing lactometers, etc. . . 3.60 



RELATING TO THE STREETS. 



Paid James M. Crombie, for trees in com- 
mons and school yards . . $40.00 
Head & Dowst Co., lumber and la- 
bor, boxing trees . . . 46.11 



$16.07 



$25.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 445 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber and la- 
bor, sidewalk, Pembroke block . ^2.88 

Merrill & Freeman, 2 bbls. lime, i 

bag salt, whitewashing tree boxes 2.52 

F. S. Sloan, 9 hitching posts for 

Hallsville schoolhouse . . 8.00 

Dana W. King, recording deeds 

and postage .... 3.09 

Geo. Holbrook, labor, etc., on trees 77-85 

Geo. Kolbrook, clearing snow from 

buildings ..... 21.50 

H. W. Clapp, 3 fountains . . 300.00 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on fountains .... 2.83 

Pike & Heald, labor on fountain in 

West Manchester . . . 129.27 

Pike & Heald, labor on fountain at 
corner of Lake avenue and Elm 
street . . . . . 131-76 

D. C. Whittemore, use of land for 
road for the year ending April, 
1892 ..... 20.00 

Thomas A. Lane Co., labor lower- 
ing water-pipes .... 2.89 

John Maynard, repairs on Paige and 
Fairbanks houses, damaged by 
blasting ..... 16.87 

Manchester Hardware Co., 21 lbs. 

manilla rope .... 2.73 

M. E. Kean, pumping out water in 

barn cellar ..... 3.00 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., lum- 
ber, etc. . . . . . 8.53 

Simon Dodge, guide boards . . 2.50 

Flint & Little, labor and materials 

for sign boards .... 22.95 

$845.28 



446 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



ASSESSORS. 

Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 

notice, 3 squares, eleven times . ^13- 75 

S. S. Piper, postmaster, 100 2-cent 

stamps ..... 2.00 

Benj. Robinson, use of horse one day 1.50 

H. D. Lord, furnishing transfers of 

real estate for one year . . 12.00 



TAX COLLECTOR. 

Paid Republican Press Association, adver- 
tising non-resident tax, 4^^^ 
squares ..... $6.45 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of team . 7.50 

George E. Morrill, collector, taxes 
sold and purchased as agent for 
the city ..... 643.19 

George E. Morrill, three months' 
labor as acting city treasurer (Feb- 
ruary, March, and April, 1892) . 200.00 

David W. Craig, agent, one No. 45 
Diebold safe .... 325.00 

J. W. Wilson, moving safe into office 8.00 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on safe ..... 3.60 

George E. Morrill, expense of self 
and committee purchasing safe in 
Boston ..... 11.62 

George E. Morrill, expense distrib- 
uting tax bills . '^ . . . 74*49 

Head & Dowst Co., labor in office 2.90 

Pike & Heald, 2 tin cases . . 1.40 



$29.25 



$1,284.15 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



447 



POLITICAL EXPENSES. 

Paid Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., lo hand lamps for ward i . 
David Thayer, labor arranging hall, 

etc., ward 3 . . . . 
Chas. A. Hoitt & Co., i table for 

ward 4 .... . 

J. Y. McQueston & Co., 4 tables, 9 

chestnut chairs, i light tepoy for 

ward 5 . . . . 
John Stewart, cleaning ward 5 ward 

room ..... 

The Electric Company, running 

lights, ward 9 ward room . 
G. H. Dudley, labor, etc., ward 2 . 
Paid Head & Dowst Co., material and labor 

Ward I 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 



City hall stand 
Paid John B 
check 



Clarke Co., printing 690 
lists . . . . . 

John B. Clarke Co., printing addi- 
tions to check-lists 

Oscar Perkins, cleaning court room, 
ward 7 . ... 

Temple & Farrington, 13 indexes 

Temple «S: Farrington, 18 blank 
books .... 

Temple & Farrington, legal cap 



7.00 
2.25 

13.40 

5.00 

3.00 

3-25 

17.77 
19.08 
19-57 
30-35 
45-45 
24.60 

IO-53 
18.25 

31-41 
13-41 

312.75 

27.00 

5-50 
3-38 

9.00 
1. 10 



448 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Timothy F. Lynch, ink, envelopes, 

and stamps, ward 5 . . . $0.49 

C. H. Clark, 20 lamps, 2 qts. oil, i 

2-quart oil-can, ward 4 . . 5.85, 

Isaac Whittemore, use of horse and 

carriage as inspector . . . 10.00 

Aretas Blood, use of Mechanics 

Hall November 8, 9, and 10 . 90.00 

John Driscoll, 2 large ash barrels . 9.00 

D. G. Andrews, labor and supplies 

for ward room No. 2 . . . 13-75 
Paid L. M. Aldrich : 

69 ft. stair rail, ward 6 . . . 6.21 
16 stair rail brackets, ward 6 . . 2.00 
12^ hours' labor, ward 6 . . . 3.13 
2 hours' labor and screws, ward 4 . .55 
Paid C. H. Simpson, use of hack in put- 
ting up check-lists . . . 5.00 
Clement Beaudet, wood and coal 

for ward room No. 9 . . . 4.50 
D. E. Guiney, gas-piping ward 6 

ward room . . . . 22.53 



RELATING TO SCHOOLS. 

Paid John H. Proctor, grading Youngs- 

ville schoolhouse yard . . $42.75 

Grand Rapids School Furniture Co., 

seats and desks for Varney school i55-o7 

J. G. Jones, freight on furniture . 17-13 

Allen Chisholm, land for school- 
house. West Manchester, deed 
dated March 6, 1892 . . 900.00 

error, overdraft . . . . 9.00 

James T. Donahoe, land for school- 
house, West Manchester, deed 
dated March 5, 1892 . . 1,590.00 



$798.06 



$2,713.95 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



U9 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Jones's Baggage Express, 5^/^ hours 
delivering reports 

Hill & Co., express on packages to 
New York city .... 

Novelty Advertising Co., 24 Midg- 
et stamps ..... 

H. Eunice Kidder, services as clerk 
for the year 1892 

Albert Blood, land for hose house 
in South Manchester, deed dated 
May 26, 1S92 .... 

estate of Wilberforce Ireland, claim 
for labor on Webster-street en- 
gine-house .... 

Chas. A. Hoitt & Co., repairing 
chair ..... 

Manchester post-office, postage 
stanfps and postals 

Frederick Perkins, sewing up wound, 
etc., on Pat Williams 

Frederick Perkins, setting broken 
arm of Mike Collins, etc. . 

Frederick Perkins, sewing wound 
and attendance on Barney Luney 
Paid D. A. Simons, bedding for pest-house 
6 mattresses 
6 comforters 
6 pillows . 

2 mattresses, soft top 

3 hand lamps 

3 comforters 

4 pillows . 
Screen cloth 

Paid estate of John B. Clarke, rebate of 
amount paid for entering sewer . 



$2-7S 

1-57 

10.80 

275.00 

684.48 

376.67 

•25 

29.25 

5.00 

8.00 

12.00 
10.50 

4-50 

6.00 

.90 

5-25 

3.00 

.40 

15.00 



450 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid town of Goffstown, taxes on land . $1-45 

D. Barker, 7 days' services as city 

messenger . . . . . 12.25 

H. P. Mulloney, examination of 

glandered horse (White) . . 5.00 

H. P. Mulloney, examination of 

glandered horse (of J. Bourque) 5.00 

First N. H. Battery, powder, pri- 
mers, cartridges, and firing salute 
of 50 guns July 4, 1892 . . 42.00 

Charles H. Wood, painting sign . 2.00 

Pike & Heald, 6 cash boxes for 

treasurer's office . . . 1.98 

S. J. Putnam, labor in treasurer's 

office 132 days .... 132.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., one ball 

twine ..... .10 

D. W. King, copies of deeds . 10.26 

D. W. King, recording deeds . .81 

Charles E. Lord, mason work at 

pest-house . . . . 20.15 

James P. Finn, painting at pest- 
house ..... 

Flint & Little, jury-box for ward 9 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 25 city 

directories .... 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., 24 maps 



32 


.92 


I 


•75 


50.00 


6. 


00 



$1,809.99 



Total expenditures ..... $29,753.76 



Mayor's Incidentals. 

Appropriation $300.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid E. J. Knowlton, entertainment of 
R. A. Quimby, of Boston, Mass., 
designer of Stark park . . $3-00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 451 

Paid A. M. Winchester, dinners . . ^9«o5 

Frank W. Elliott, dinners for guests 
from Boston fire department and 
members of city government . 38.50 

J. W. Truell, four hacks May 12 

and 13 for guests from Boston . 27.00 

Western Union Telegraph Co., tel- 
egram .25 

E. J. Knowlton, expense of com- 
mittee on commons to Boston to 
inspect plan of Stark park . . 11.00 

E. J. Knowlton, allowance for hire 

of teams ..... 133-00 



Total expenditure . . , . . ^221.80 

Transferred to reserved fund .... . 78.20 



City Officers' Salaries. 

Appropriation ..... ^15,700.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 1,454.18 



^I7,i54-i< 



Expenditures. 



CENTRAL DEPARTMENT. 



Paid E. J. Knowlton, mayor . . . ^1,800.00 
Nathan P. Kidder, city clerk . 900.00 
Sylvanus B. Putnam, city treasurer 1,200.00 
Edwin F. Jones, city solicitor . 800.00 
George L. Stearns, clerk of com- 
mon council .... 200.00 
Thomas W. Lane, inspector of 

buildings . . . . . 100.00 

H. F. W. Little, milk inspector . 300.00 



452 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid William Bailey, weigher at city 
scales from Dec. i, 1891, to Dec. 

3I' 1892 $413-78 

Frank H. Crawford, weigher at city 

scales ..... 30.00 

John A. Barker, city messenger . 700.00 

John A. Barker, extra time . . 2.00 



$6,445-7S 



CITY PHYSICIAN AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Paid Frederick Perkins, city physician . 
E. J. Knowlfon, chairman, ex officio, 

overseers poor . 
William H. Maxwell, ward i 
Thomas L. Quimby, ward 2 . 
Benjamin F. Garland, ward 3 
George S. Holmes, ward 4 . 
Patrick Costello, ward 5 
Charles Francis, ward 6 
William Marshall, ward 7 
William Weber, ward 8 
William H. Maxwell, clerk of board 
Judith Sherer, matron at pest-house 



$200.00 

25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
75.00 
360.00 



$860.00 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND BOARD OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



Paid William E. Buck, superintendent of 
schools ..... 
Samuel Brooks, truant officer 
E. J. Knowlton, chairman, ex officio 
Edward B. Woodbury, clerk of 
board ..... 
Edson S. Heath, president common 

council, ex officio 
C. H. Manning, ward i 
C. D. Sumner, ward i . 



$2,000.00 

750.00 

10.00 



10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



453 



Paid William H. Morrison, ward 2 
Charles S. Murkland, ward 2 . 
George H. Stearns, ward 2 
George D. Towne, ward 3 . 
Louis E. Phelps, ward 3 
Stephen B. Stearns, ward 4 . 
Edwin L. Richardson, ward 4 
James P. Slattery, ward 5 
William J. Sughrue, ward 5 . 
F. T. E. Richardson, ward 6 
George W. Dearborn, ward 6 
Marshall P.. Hall, ward 7 
E. B. Woodbury, ward 7 
Luther C. Baldwin, ward 8 . 
William K. Robbins, ward 8 . 



$6.67 

3-33 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



$3,030.00 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 



Paid Henry Lewis, ward i, assessor 
John E. Stearns, ward 2, assessor 

D. O. Furnald, ward 3, assessor 
H. D. Lord, ward 4, assessor 
John Ryan, ward 5, assessor . 
George H. Dudley, ward 6, assessor 
William T. Rowell, ward 7, assessor 
Frank T. Provost, ward 8, assessor 

E. W. Brigham, assistant assessor . 
Nicholas Nichols, assistant assessor 
Hiram Forsaith, assistant assessor . 
Isaac Whittemore, assistant assessor 
John Cayzer, assistant assessor 
Henry F. Stone, assistant assessor . 
Harry T. Lord, clerk 

Jabez Adams, interpreter 
Louis Cormier, interpreter . 



5150.00 
171.25 
782.50 

237-50 
142.50 

432-50 

150.00 

166.25 

257-50 

302.50 

55-00 

66.25 

42.50 

45.00 

67.50 

30.00 

52-50 



,151-25 



454 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CITY TAX COLLECTOR. 



Paid George E. Morrill : 

Quarter ending February 29, 1892 . $200.00 

Quarter ending May 31, 1892 . . 200.00 
Balance of salary for the year ending 

June I, 1892 ..... 850.00 

Commission on old taxes . . . 6.53 

Salary, quarter ending August 31, 1892 200.00 

Quarter ending November 30, 1892 . 200.00 



$1,656.53 



MODERATORS, 1 89 1 AND 1 892. 



Paid Abial W. Eastman, ward i 
Nicholas Nichols, ward 2 
E. R, Robinson, ward 3 
George C. Gilmore, ward 4 
William Howe, ward 5 . 
Henry B. Fairbanks, ward 6 
Frank A. Dockham, ward 7 
Chas. G. Ranno, ward 8 
Horace P. Simpson, ward 9 



510.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



$90.00 



WARD CLERKS, 1 89 1 AND 1 892. 



Paid Frank X. Foster, ward i 
Daniel C. Smith, ward 2 
Samuel C. Kennard, ward 3 
Harrie M. Young, ward 4 
Timothy F. Lynch,'' ward 5 
George B. Rogers, ward 6 
Charles A. Foster, ward 7 
Frank O. Clement, ward 8 
Israel W. Dickey, ward 9 



510.00 
10.00 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 



;^90.oo 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 455 

INSPECTORS OF CHECK-LIST, 1 89 1 and 1 89 2. 



Paid Geo. C. Kemp, ward i, 40 days at 




$2.25 


§90.00 


Chas. B. Tucker, ward 2, 40 days 




at $2.25 


90.00 


David 0. Furnald, ward 3, 14 days 




at $2.25 


31-50 


Harrison D. Lord, ward 4, 60 days 




at §2.25 


135-00 


Patrick E. Daily, ward 5, 43 days 




at $2.25 


96-75 


Isaac Whittemore, ward 6, 54 days 




at $2.25 


121.50 


Joseph A. Foster, ward 7, 36 days 




at $2.25 ..... 


81.00 


Chas. C. Tinkham, ward 8, 43^ 




days at $2.25 .... 


97.87 


Wm. K. Robbins, ward 9, 38 days 




at $2.25 


85-50 


Frank Bourassa, as interpreter, 10 




days at §2.25 .... 


22.50 


W. G. Fernald, as. clerk, 22 days 




at $2.25 


49-50 


H. D. Lord, as clerk 


22.50 



SUPERVISORS, 1 89 1 AND 1 892. 

Paid W. B. Stearns, ward i, 8 days at 

§1.75 . . . . . §14.00 

S. L. Farnham, ward i, 8 days at 

§1-75 14-00 

Fred C. Hale, ward 2, 8 days at § i . 75 1 4.00 

Chas. S. Partridge, ward 2, 8 days 

at §1.75 14-00 

H. F. W. Little, ward 3, 8 days at 

$1-75 14-00 



§923.62 



456 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid David H. Young, ward 3, 4 days at 

$1-75 $7-°° 

Chas. Uhlig, ward 4, 1 1 days at $1.75 19-25 

P. Fahey, ward 4, 11 days at $1.75 19-25 
David Reardon, ward 5, 10 days at 

^1-75 17-50 

John Conway, ward 5, 10 days at 

^1-75 17-50 

William C. Blodgett, ward 6, 14 

days at $1.75 .... 24.50 

Edward P. Cogswell, ward 6, 14 

days at ^1.75 .... 24.50 

William T. Payne, ward 7, 6 days 

at $1.75 10.50 

John W. Davis, ward 7, 6 days at 

^1-75 10-50 

Fred R. Stark, ward 8,11 days at 

$1-75 ^9-25 

Charles H. Hodgman, ward 8, 11 

days at $1.75 .... 19.25 

Eugene Quirin, ward 9, 8 days at 

$1-75 14-00 

Thomas C. Martin, ward 9, 8 days 

at $1.75 14.00 



$287.00 



SELECTMEN, 1 89 1 and 1892. 



John H. Wales, Jr., wa 


rd I 


$10.00 


Joseph Tait, ' 


' I 


10.00 


John F. Reardon, ' 


' I 


10.00 


Daniel G. Andrews, ' 


' 2 


10.00 


Harry P. Ray, ^ ' 


' 2 


10.00 


David Thayer, ' 


' 3 


10.00 


John Cronin, ' 


' 3 


10.00 


T. P. Heath, 


' 3 


10.00 


John k. Currier, ' 


' 4 


10.00 


Jeff. T. Perry, 


' 4 


10.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



457 



Paid Charles H. Bodwell, ward 
Lawrence F. Mahoney, " 

John B. LaForest, " 

Arthur Allen, " 

George F. Sargent, " 
John T. Gott, 

Peter D. St. Germain, " 
William D. Wheeler, 

Sumner D. Claflin, " 
John F. Mallady, 

George E. Fellows, " 
Frank St. John, 

Odilon Doucet, " 
William J. Price, 

Oswald Paris, " 

Edward P. French, " 



4 


^lO.OO 


5 


lO.OO 


5 


lO.OO 


5 


lO.OO 


6 


lO.OO 


6 


lO.OO 


6 


lO.OO 


7 


lO.OO 


7 


lO.OO 


7 


lO.OO 


8 


lO.OO 


8 


lO.OO 


8 


lO.OO 


9 


lO.OO 


9 


lO.OO 


9 


lO.OO 



$260.00 



BALLOT INSPECTORS, 1 89 2. 



id Silas C. Stetson, 


ware 


I 


$10.00 


Hiram Wingate, 




I 


10.00 


William F. Graner, 




I 


10.00 


Zepherine Cote, 




I 


10.00 


Harry C Andrews, 




2 


10.00 


John W, Center, 




2 


10.00 


AVm. M. Butterfield, 




2 


10.00 


Walter M. Morgan, 




2 


10.00 


C. H. Little, 




3 


10.00 


J. W. Fellows, 




3 


10.00 


Frank M. Forsaith, 




3 


10.00 


Cyrille Lebrun, 




3 


10.00 


Harry T. Lord, 




4 


10.00 


Frank H. Lussier, 




4 


10.00 


Frank Bourassa, 




4 


10.00 


John P. Broderick, 




4 


10.00 


Michael Hawkins, 




5 


10.00 


William \N. Boisvert, 




5 


10.00 



458 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid John J. McAllister, wa 
John J. Minturn, ' 
William Burpee, ' 


rd5 

' 5 
' 6 


$io.oo 

lO.OO 

lO.OO 




Peter Farrell, ' 


' 6 


lO.OO 




John M. Kendall, 


' 6 


lO.OO 




Charles Robitaille, ' 


' 6 


lO.OO 




William T. Rowell, 


' 7 


lO.OO 




William D. Ladd, 


' 7 


lO.OO 




William Marshall, ' 


' 7 


lO.OO 




Edward J. Sheehan, ' 
Edward Scheer, ' 


' 7- 
' 8 


lO.OO 
lO.OO 




John McDonough, ' 
Arthur Moquin, ' 
Edward Bunker, ' 


' 8 
' 8 
' 8 


lO.OO 
lO.OO 
lO.OO 




Frank E. Putney, ' 

Oliver H. Granger, ' 

, John Montplaisir, ' 

John B. Bourque, ' 


' 9 
' 9 
' 9 
' 9 


lO.OO 
lO.OO 
lO.OO 
lO.OO 


^360.00 




. $^ 


Total expenditures 


7,154.18 



Auditor's Department. 



Appropriation 



52, 000. co- 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Paid James B. Straw, auditor, salary for 

the year 1892 . '' . . . ^1,000.00 

A. E. Herrick, clerk, salary from 

Jan. I to August, 1892 . . 501.90 

Lizzie M. Cogswell, clerk, from 

Aug. 26 to Dec. 31, 1892 . . 210.00 



$1,711.90 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 459 



SUPPLIES. 

Paid A. E. Herrick, cash paid for express 

on electrotypes. . . . |i.oo 

A. E. Herrick, expenses to Con- 
cord twice and return . . 1.74 
J. B. Straw, cash paid for express . 3.10 
J. W. Wilson, freight and truckage 

on desks ..... 1.34 

Manchester post-office, postage . 2.00 

Peter Harris, one key ... .25 

George H. Richter & Co., i white 

enameled cloth bath . . . 5.25 

George H. Richter & Co., i box 

Havelock fasteners ... .75 

H. C. Dimond & Co., i pad and 

bottle red ink .... .50 

H. C. Dimond & Co., i 4-wheel 

Monarch hand stamp . . 14.00 

J. Stickney, i rubber mat for type- 
writer ..... .75 

Paid The Hammond Typewriter Co.: 
Balance due on exchange of type- 
writer ...... 30.00 

Express and repairs on typewriter . 2.75 

1 ream No. 28 paper .... 2.00 

2 typewriter desks .... 50.00 
Paid Novelty Advertising Co., 30 Midg- 
et stamps . . , . . 17-85 

Paid National Typewriter Co.: 

I blue record ribbon .... .60 

1 long-handled brush . . . .20 

Balance due on typewriter No. 2635 . 13.00 

4 copying ribbons .... 2.85 

Express to Philadelphia and return . 2.15 



460 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co., twine . $0.15 

Manchester Hardware Co., glue . .20 

J. W. Robinson, interest tables, etc. 7.00 

Daniels & Downs, 12 sheets carbon .50 
Daniels & Downs, i ream No. 8 

ruled paper . . . . 2.10 

Daniels & Downs, i box carbon . 3,00 
Pike & Heald, 2 tin trunks . . 7,76 
Head & Dowst Co., labor and lum- 
ber for stamp case . . . 4.35 
W, E. Moore, 500 2-cent envelopes 

and printing same . . . 12.50 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

4 gross rubber bands .... 3.60 

I bottle ink ..... .75 

2jboxes McGill fasteners ... .90 

130 sheets carbon paper . . . 5.25 

I record book and i brush ... .65 

Paste, ink, etc. ..... 3,28 

Paid Moores & Martin, labor, etc., pack- 
ing desk ..... 1.75 

John^B. Varick Co., i waste basket 1.25 

John B. Varick Co., i brush . . .10 

John][B. Clarke Co., printing blanks 9.00 

E. T. James, use of team . . 2.00 



$218.17 



Total expenditures ..... $1,930.07 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 69.93 



Highway District No. 1. 

Appropriation ..... $300.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 320.50 



)20.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



461 





Expenditures. 




Paid labor, as per pay-rolls : 


February $16.00 


March . 








18.50 


April 








78.25 


May 








120.00 


June 








181.75 


July . . . 








46.75 


August . 








54.00 


November 








40.00 


December 








2 7-7.S 



LUMBER, PIPE, ETC. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., 210 feet 2 by 6 

spruce ..... 

Head & Dowst Co., 10 chestnut 

posts ..... 

Pike & Heald, 6 feet 3-inch iron 

pipe . . . . . 
Pike & Heald, i foot 3-inch elbow 
William Campbell, 67 loads gravel 
E. Dodge, 157 loads gravel . 

TOOLS. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 
2 round-point shovels 
2 picks ...... 

1 steel hoe ..... 

2 pick handles ..... 
Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., i square- 
point shovel .... 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 20 lbs. 60- 

penny wire nails 
John B. Varick Co., 20 lbs. wire 

nails ..... 



$3-3^ 


1. 60 


•39 


.20 


6.70 


15-70 



$1-30 

2.00 

•50 
.40 

.65 

.60 
.60 



$583-00 



$27.95 



$6.05 



462 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid J. P. Fellows & Co., sharpening tools, etc. . $3.50 

Total expenditures ..... ^620.50 



Highway District No. 2. 



Appropriation 


• 


• 






. $12,000.00 


Expenditures. 




Paid labor as per pay-rolls : 


" 


January .... 


$650.83 


February 










800.38 


March . 










664.90 


April 










735-76 


May 










939-73 


June 










1,233.21 


July . . 


. 








1,072.47 


August . 










944.72 


September 










799.10 


October 










1,329.78 


November 










872.84 


December 










1,294.15 






di' -F 'W ^ ^ ^ tm 




p^^^2)Zi'°i 


Paid City Farm for labor in breaking re 


)ads in Feb- 


ruary and March 


$11.50 


TOOLS AND HARDW7> 


lRE. 


Paid Riehle Bros., i five-ton Robie jack 




No. 7 . . . . . 


$19.00 


Head & Dowst Co., 116 feet drag 




plank 


. 


. 






4.64 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



463 



Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 
6 canal barrows . 
12 sledge-hammer handles . 
3 level glasses 

I Little Gem nickel lantern 
1 2 Ames shovels . 
12 picks and handles . 
I twelve-inch blind wrench 
Other hardware . 
Paid John B. Varick Co., round-point 
shovels, Norway iron, man ilia 
rope, plo\v points, shovels, octa- 
gon steel, pick handles, han^mers, 
hammer handles, and other hard- 
ware . . . 
Killey & Wadleigh, rule, tape meas- 
ure, hoes, brooms, pick handles, 
shovels, snow shovels, and other 
hardware ..... 
Wadleigh Hardware Co., 12 round- 
point shovels .... 
Wadleigh Hardware Co., i feather 
duster ..... 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 12 square- 
point shovels .... 
C. C. Harriraan, 2 wheel-barrows . 
C. C. Harriman, 20 pick handles . 
J. Stickney, 5 lbs. belt seat . 
J. Stickney, 4 doz. gilt tacks 



$10.00 

i'75 
.21 

1. 00 

11.00 

15.00 

•75 
11.80 



137.72 



55-30 
11.00 

•75 

10.50 

2.00 

3.00 

1.38 

.20 



TELEPHONE, GAS, STATIONERY. 

Paid New .England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone . ^36.75 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 

24 blank-books ..... 10.00 

12 memorandum books . . . .96 



$297.00 



464 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Mucilage, pencils, paper . . . $i'23 
Ink, stamped envelopes and other sta- 
tionery ....... 7.30 

Paid Nate Kellogg, 500 blank bills . 2.25 



•49 



BLACKSMITHING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, gas pipe, railing, 

etc. ...... $10.67 

John T. Beach, sharpening tools, 

etc 15.15 

J. O. Tremblay, repairing tools, 

etc. ...... 1.50 

L. M. x\ldrich, filing saws, etc. . 6.85 



•17 



MATERIALS. 

Paid C. H. Hoyt, 102 loads gravel . $10.20 

Vacuum Oil Co., one half barrel . i.oo 

Vacuum Oil Co., 28 gallons oil . 18.20 

E. Gratz, lumber and labor . . 1.35 
Thomas A. Lane, material and 

labor ..... 2.34 
Head & Dowst Co., 3 loads filling .75 
Manchester Provision Co., i hogs- 
head ..... 1.25 
Addison Gray, 1 2 loads stone . 3.00 
Addison Gray, 377 loads gravel . 3 7- 70 
D. M. Poore & Son, 13 bu. old salt 2.60 
James Briggs, galvanized pipe and 

elbow ..... 1.24 
James Briggs, galvanized pipe, etc., 

at sand shed . . . . 6.2^ 



$85.86 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



465 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 
jack ...... 

E. T. James, use of carriages 
Whitten & Fifield, use of teams . 
M. E. Kean, medical attendance 
on John Kelly for injured wrist . 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$0.50 




85.00 




12.00 




3.00 


$100.50 






^iT>925-39 




74.61 




$12,000.00 



Highway District No. 3. 



Appropriation 






$200.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 


161.24 


Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid labor as per ] 


)ay-roIls : 




March . 




$11.13 


May . 






8.75 


Tune 






34.88 


July . . 






27.25 


August . 






23-13 


September 






92-75 


November 






120.36 


December 






8.62 


District No. 2, labor in month 


f 


July, as per 


pay-roll . 




3.00 



$361.24 



30 



^329.-87 



466 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



GRAVEL. 



Paid J. H. Campbell, loi loads gravel . ^15-70 

J. H. Campbell, 20 loads stone . 5.00 

Arthur Campbell, 42 loads gravel . 4.55 

Sarah E. Robie, 14 loads stone . 3.50 



HARDWARE. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., i ruby lantern 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid J. P. Fellows & Co., sharpening picks, etc. 
Total expenditures .... 



$28.75 



^0-33 



$2.29 
$361.24 



Appropriation 



Highway District No. 4. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 



January 


$7-45 


March . 


20.25 


June 


133-25 


August . 


69.50 


October 


88.50 


November 


131.62 



TOOCS. 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., 2 Ames 

round-point shovels . . . $1.80 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., i Hodg- 
den round-point shovel . . .65 



.^453-57 



$2.45 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



467 



MATERIALS. 



Paid Byron E. Moore, cash paid Reu- 
ben Flanders for sharpening tools 
Byron E. Moore, 65 loads clay 
C. C. Webster, 380 loads clay and 
gravel ..... 
Thomas Walker, Jr. , 60 loads gravel 
Mrs. Fox, 25 loads gravel 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



^0.50 
3-9° 

22.80 
3.60 
1.50 



332-30 

^485.32 
14.68 



Highway District No. 5. 



$500.00 



Appropriation 



$800.00 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



id labor of men 


and teams, 


as per pay 


-rolls : 


February 
March . 










$24.12 
4-88 


Ma}' . 










62.99 


June 
July . 
August . 
September 
October 










124.25 
20.25 

18.75 

186.87 

90.62 


November 










112.49 


December 










18.75 



$663.97 



468 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



MATERIALS. 

Paid Libbey Bros., 484 loads gravel 
Mark E. Harvey, 28 loads'gravel 
Charles Wheeler, 35 loads gravel 
John Parmeuter, 50 loads gravel 
estate of Mary Golden, gravel 
Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 
657 ft. 3-inch hemlock plank 
675 ft. 3x5 spruce . 
20 ft. chestnut .... 
15 chestnut posts 
Paid Wallace & Pierce, 66 loads loam 



$48.40 
2.80 

. 3-5° 
5.00 
3.00 

9.20 
10.00 
3.20 
2.40 
6.60 



$94.10 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid R. W. Flanders, sharpening tools , 



;i2.o5 



TOOLS. 



Paid John B. Varick Co. 
6 pick handles . 
3 square-point shovels 
I round-point pick . 
I E No. 3 plow point 
13 lbs. nails 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$0.85 




1.50 




1. 00 




.60 




•39 


$4-34 


• • 


$774-46 


. 


25-54 



500.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



469 



Highway District No. 6. 



Appropriation 


• 


• 


. 




• 




Expenditures. 








LABOR. 






Paid labor of men 


and teams, as per pay 


rolls 




February 


. 




$21.00 


March . 






. 




15-75 


May 






. 




40.00 


June 






. 




158-50 


September 






. 




121. 51 


October 






. 




97.00 


December 






• 




24.00 



;oo.oo 



$477-76 



TOOLS. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., i doz. No. 3 

cutter point . . . . $0.75 

John B. Varick Co., i doz. No. 4 

cutter poin't .... .80 

Sanborn Carriage Co., i plow beam 3- 00 



M.55 



BLACKSMITHING. 



Paid James Morrison, repairing chains and sharpen- 
ing tools ....... 



i2.i5 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$484.46 
15-54 



$500.00 



470 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Highway District No. 7. 

Appropriation $1,500.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 15 •61 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 

January $55-25 

February ..... 83.92 

March ...... 26.50 

April ...... 292.47 

May 249.33 

June ...... 237.48 

July ...... 104.62 

August ..... 93-6i 

September . . . . . 74- 50 

October ..... 157-75 

November ..... 32.62 



TOOLS. 




Paid John B. Varick Co.: 




I mattock .... 


$1.00 


6 contractors' picks . 


6-39 


28 lbs. steel drills 


3.92 


2 No. 104 scoops 


2.00 


6 pick handles .... 


1-13 


6 pick handles .... 


1-13 


I stone-hammer and handle 


•75 


2 36-inch sledge-hamma: handles 


.40 


6 round-point shovels . . 


4-25 


2 plow points and bolt 


1.60 


8 lbs. 6o-penny nails 


.24 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 3^ lbs 




shims and wedges 


•49 



$1,515-61 



$1,408.05 



$23.30 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 471 



MATERIALS. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., 50 feet drag 

plank ..... g2.oo 

Head &: Dowst Co., 50 chestnut 

posts ..... 9.00 

Head & Dowst Co., 467 feet i by 7 

spruce ..... 7.47 

Warren Harvey, 2 loads stone . 5.00 

Warren Harvey, i load covering 

stone ..... 3.00 

Charles Dudley, 12 loads paving 

stone . ._ . . . 18.00 

Alvin G. Bean, 6 loads paving stone 9.00 

Chas. P. Still, 4 loads paving stone 5.00 



BLACKSMITHING. 



Paid James Morrison, sharpening tools . $4-oo 

Welcome & Son, sharpening drills, 

picks, etc. .... 10.58 



WATERING-TROUGHS, ETC. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, material and labor S7-o4 

Thos. A. Lane, i lo-inch Akron Y 1.17 
John F. Larkin, disconnecting pipe 

to lamp posts .... 3.00 



$58.47 



$14-58 



$11.21 



Total expenditures ..... $1,515.61 



472 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Highway District No. 8. 



Appropriation . . . . . 

Expenditures. 






LABOR. 






Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay 


■rolls 




February ..... 




521.00 


March . . . . . 




315-37 


May . . ' . 




218.62 


June . . . . . <•. 




44-05 


July ■ . 




232.50 


October . . . . . 




34.13 


November . . . . . 




94.26 



$1,000.00 



^959-93 



TOOLS. 



Paid John B. Varick Co.: 
2 round-point Ames shovels 
I pick handle . 

1 32-inch sledge handle 

2 shovels . 
62 lbs. drill steel 
9^ lbs. wood washers 
I 7-lb. striking-hammer and handle 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., 76 feet drag 
plank ..... 
R. I. Stevens, i stoi\e drag 
Killey & Wadleigh, i}4 lbs. shims 



51.50 

.20 

.20 

1.50 

5-27 

•95 

1.04 

3-04 
5.00 



$19.00 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid H. F. Thompson, sharpening tools 



;2.oo 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



473 



MATERIALS. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 5 lbs. wire 

spikes ..... $0-15 

Frank S. Bodwell, 10 feet covering 

stone ..... 5.00 

Geo. H. Penniman, cash paid for 4 

gallons of oil . . . . .50 

Geo. H. Penniman, 2 pails . . .70 

Geo. H. Penniman, 2 dippers . ' .30 



EXPLOSIVES. 




Paid Killey & Wadleigh : 


- 


10 feet cotton fuse .... 


$0.06 


i^ lbs. forcite .... 


.61 


I doz. blasting caps .... 


.24 


5 lbs. No. I forcite . . . • . 


1.80 


50 feet W. P. fuse . . . " . 


•25 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., i time book 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



■65 



$2.96 

^0.62 

$991.16 

8.84 

$1,000.00 



Appropriation 



Highway District No. 9. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 

May $61.50 

June 135.75 



$500.00 



474 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



August . 
September 
October . 
December 



TOOLS. 

Paid John B. Varick Co., 2 shovels, i ax 

BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid R. W. Flanders, sharpening tools . 

MATERIALS. 

Paid Oliver Merrill, 113 loads gravel 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$i2i.S6 
31.00 
85.00 
-.8.62 



Highway District No. 10. 

Appropriation ..... $4,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 460.46 



S473-73 



S2.25 



54-55 



Sii.30 

$491-83 
S.17 

$500.00 



S4.460.46 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 

January _ $213.38 

February ..... 260.50 

March . . . . . 252.25 

April 543-00 

May . . . . . . 614.78 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



475 



June .... 


5295-50 


July .... 


901.13 


August . . • . 


45-75 


September 


131.70 


October .... 


324.63 


November 


211.88 


December 


271.86 



§4,066.36 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid J. Hadlock, 2 sets American Cham- 
pion sections .... $16.00 
J. Hadlock, 12 bolts and 4 castings 1.60 
John B. Varick Co., plow points, 5 

pick handles, and other hardware 5.17 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 cross-cut saws, 

files, 10 coal scoops, i padlock . 11.61 

Manchester Hardware Co., bolts, 
washers, padlock, callipers, ruby 
lanterns, pails, shovels, Norway 

iron, etc 34.50 

Joseph Demers, 2 lbs. spikes . . .70 

Joseph Demers, 4 lbs. nails . . .20 



$69.78 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid D. F. Cressey, sharpening and repairing tools . 

MATERIALS. 

Paid Allen N. Clapp, nails and screws . $iO'56 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, oil, paint, 

brush, setting glass, etc. . . 6.88 

Head & Dowst Co., 46 ft. Michigan 

pine ...... 2.30 

James Baldwin Co., no ft. maple 

plank ..... 4.40 



$14-79 



476 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. C. Wallace, i,i86 ft. spruce . ^18.75 

A. C. Wallace, 108 ft. pine boards 1.94 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

4 grates for boiler .... 8.00 

Labor on drills and clamps . . 6.60 

Labor on boiler ..... .60 

Bolts and iron . . . . . .18 

Paid F. M. Barnard, 215 chestnut posts 32-25 
A. & D. M. Poore, 2 barrels Cum- 
berland coal .... 2.50 

William Scheer, 9,860 lbs. coal . 33-24 



;i25.2o 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 24 time- 
books ..... $i7'76 
Temple & Farrington Co., ink, 
inkstand, pencils, paper, pass- 
books, and other stationery . 11.42 
L. M. Aldrich, filing saw . . .35 
P. Duval, filing saws . . . 1.80 
Charles O. Phelps, keeping of horse 
one year ..... 150.00 



$181.33 
Total expenditures ..... $4,460.46 



Highway District No. 11. 

Appropriation ..... $1,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 368.28 



$1,368.28 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 

February ..... $403.13 
March ...... 36.75 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



477 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 



340.25 
74.00 
254-25 
217.50 
236.50 



$1,262.38 



MATERIALS. 

Paid Charles Shirley, 3 perch stone for 

bridge . . '" . 
Wadleigh Hardware Co., 70 lbs. 

wire nails ..... 
Amoskeag Mfg. Co., 59 loads stone 
Geo. Colby, 105 loads gravel 
David Wells, 40 posts for fence on 

Goffstown road 
Lizzie Farmer, 127 loads gravel 



$6.00 



2 


10 


59 


00 


10 


50 


6 


00 


12 


70 



$96.30 



TOOLS. 



Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co. : 
2o|^ lbs. stone-hammers 

2 sledge handles 

3 bush scythes . 
3 bush scythe snaths . 



53-71 
•30 

1-95 
2.25 



EXPLOSIVES. 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., 2^ lbs. 
forcite . . . . . 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 25 ft. 
cotton fuse .... 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 8 blast- 
ing caps . . . . . 



il.IO 

•13 

.16 



$1-39 



Total expenditures 



$1,368.28 



478 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Highway District No. 12. 

Appropriation ..... $300.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 197.12 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 



Paid city farm in February 
March 
April 
May . 
June . 
November 



^25.75 

3-87 

9.00 

44.00 

297.00 

105.00 



Paid Melvin Hall, 2 days' labor . . $4-5o 

S. H. Smith, 2 days' labor, self 

and team . . . . . , 8.00 



$497.12 



$484.62 



;i2.5o 



Total expenditures ..... $497.12 



New Highways. 

Appropriation ..... $10,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 14,038.08 

$24,038.08 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and 'teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 2 : 

January $7.50 

April ...... 696.40 

May . . ^ . . . . 735-54 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



479 



June 


• ^1,537-97 


July . . . 


1,200.91 


August . 


1,612.69 


September 


233.87 


October 


715.96 


November 


648.23 


December 


225.97 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 7 : 



May .... 


^300.00 


June . . . .• 


600.00 


July .... 


250.00 


August .... 


500.00 


September 


31-50 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 8 : 



June . 

July • 

August 
October 



$653.29 

948.78 

1,234.63 

54-69 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis- 
trict No. 10: 



May .... 


$206.73 


June .... 


1,053.87 


July .... 


352.63 


August 


1,015.77 


September . 


713.70 


October 


534-87 


November . 


1,006.92 


December . 


157-75 



$7,615.04 



$1,681.50 



$2,891.39 



;,o42.24 



480 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Geo. Whitford, removing 
4,123! yards of earth on 
Beauport street, at 17 
cents per yard, as per 
contract . . $701.04 

credit by cash in 1890 . 500.00 



Balance ..... $201.04 

Concord & Montreal R. R., bal- 
ance due for masonry underpass 
on Second street . . . 31-20 

Dodge & Webster, building Mitch- 
ell street 100 rods at $3 per rod 300.00 

Mills & Sturtevant, moving and 
repairing house of Hannah Ste- 
vens ..... 99-69 

A. & E. Reed, repairs on Samuel 
Page's house, damaged by blast- 
ing 3-00 



$634-93 



TOOLS. 

Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 

12 Ames round-point shovels, district 2 $11.00 

12 railroad picks, district 10 . . 12.00 

12 pick handles, district 10 . . 3.00 

12 ruby globes, district 10 . . 3.50 

2 axes, district 10 . . . . 1.50 

2 ax handles, district 10 . . . .50 
107 lbs. steel bar .... 5.89 
Other hardware .... 6.75 

Paid John B. Varick Cq,: 

3 lbs. 5-16 cable chains, district 2 . .21 
12 lbs. 32-inch sledge handles, district 

2 . . . . . . . 2.00 

32 lbs. "Norway iron, district 2 . . 1.20 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 481 

6 lbs. Michigan steel, district 2 . $0.18 
12 tubular lanterns, district 2 . . 4.50 
12 ruby globes, district 2 . . . 5.50 
I No. 8 lock cutter for Doe plow, dis- 
trict 2 . . . . . . 3.25 

I No. 8 Doe plow clevis, district 2 . .75 

6 lbs. Norway iron . . . . .23 

36 lbs. ^-inch cable chain, district 2 1.98 

Other hardware, district 2 . . 45-28 
Steel wedges and shims, 2 hammers, 3 

handles, crowbar, etc., district 8 . 14.8c 

Other hardware, district 8 . . 33-oo 

Hardware ..... 4.34 

Paid J. Hadlock, sundry pieces for road 

machine . . . . . i7'75 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., i ball 

marline, district 8 . . . .15 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 4 steel 

crowbars, 40 lbs., district 8 . 2.40 
Wadleigh Hardware Co., other. 

hardware, district 8 . . . .64 

Sanborn Carnage Co., i plow beam 3.00 

$185.30 

EXPLOSIVES. 

Paid John B. Varick Co.: 

F. G. powder, district 2 . . . $0.68 
100 feet double tape fuse, district 2 . .60 
31^ lbs. dynamite, district 7 . . 1.12 
100 dynamite caps, district 7 . . 1.25 
Cotton fuse, district 7 . . . .40 
ij^ lbs. No. 2 ^-inch cartridges, dis- 
trict 8 .38 

No. I forcite, caps and fuse, district 8 108.65 

20 lbs. blasting powder, district 8 . 3.00 

Forcite, caps and fuse, district 2 . 3.20 

31 



482 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Killey &Wadleigh, loo feet double 
tape fuse, district 2 . 
Killey & Wadleigh, i box blasting 
caps, district 2 ... 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co : 
10 lbs. No. I forcite, district 2 . 
14^ lbs. No. I forcite, district 8 
500 feet cotton fuse .... 
2 boxes caps ..... 
413^ lbs. No. I forcite 
4^ lbs. powder . . . . 



$0.60 
1.50 

4.00 

5-90 

2.00 

3.00 

16.60 

.68 



— ^153-56 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid D. F. Cressey, sharpening picks, 

etc., district 10 ... $1-24 

H. F. Thompson, sharpening drills, 

etc., district 8 . . . . 50.65 

Welcome & Son, sharpening tools, 

etc., to July 29, 1892 . . 47-99 



STONE, LUMBER, AND OTHER MATERIAL. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

- 65 loads filling ..... $16.25 

710 loads filling, Maple street . . i77-5o 

43 loads filling, Maple street . . 10.75 

1,773 loads filling, Maple street . 443-25 

211 loads gravel, Lincoln street . 16S.80 

1,184 loads filling, Maple street . 296.00 

8 loads sand, Beech street . . . 4.00 

Paid Frank S. Bodwell : 

19 stone, 149 feet, sundry streets . 59«6o 

8 circles, 24 feet, sundry streets . 43-oo 
40 feet covering stone at McCrillis's 

shop 20.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



483 



Stone and labor on Central-street cul- 
vert ...... 

58 perch of stone, bank wall on Ash- 
land street ..... 

272 feet mortar wall, Milford street . 
5 circles, city yard .... 

18 feet edgestones, city yard 

28 feet edgestones, Wagner's block . 

I circle ...... 

1 load rimmers, Milford street . 

75 bound posts . . . . . 

90 feet* edgestones at Judge Hunt's . 
Paid Frank S. Bodwell, 62 feet edge- 
stones, city yard 
Chas. A. Bailey, 948^ feet curb- 
stone at 45 cents a foot 
Chas. A. Bailey, 3 circles, 4 feet 
radius . . . . . 

Chas. A. Bailey, 21 circles, 3 feet 
radius ..... 

Warren Harvey, contract for Ma- 
ple-street culvert 
Dean & Provost, 127 loads dirt . 
Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 
Moving stone at Bakersville 
52 feet drag plank . . . . 

9 feet oak ..... 

ID hours' labor building drag for Page 

hill 

Paid D. E. Guiney : 

Drilling 14 2-inch holes, 6 inches deep 

270 feet I ^ -inch pipe 

3 feet 154^-inch railing ell . 

14 I ^ -inch tees 

14 I ^ -inch crosses . 

Brimstone and wedges 



174.00 
108.80 

17-50 

7.20 

11.20 

3-50 

4.00 

75.00 

18.00 

24.80 

426.82 

13-50 

73-50 

3>333-oo 
19.05 



19-39 

2.08 



.27 
2.25 

9-50 
21.60 

-75 
3-50 

3-55 
.40 



484 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Labor of 2 men 6 days 


§36.00 


Labor of i man i day 


4.0c 


Putting in iron fence railing on East 




Spruce street to above Belmont 




street ...... 




Paid Addison Gray, 113 loads gravel . 


11.30 


Joseph Poor, 31 loads gravel 


3.1C 


Allen N. Clapp, 52^ gallons oil . 


3-94 


Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 




160 feet fence boards 


2.06 


14 chestnut posts .... 


2.24 


9 round posts ..... 


1.44 • 


5 square posts ..... 


1.50 


336 feet fence boards 


5-37 


17 chestnut posts .... 


2.72 


360 feet spruce ..... 


5-76 


Paid Horace Holbrook, 115 leads gravel 


34.50 




?>5)734-24 



Total expenditures 



$24,038.08 



Damage of Land Taken for Highways. 



Appropriation .... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 



i9, 000.00 
2,601.73 



$11,601.73 



Expenditures. 



DAMAGES AWARDED BY MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Paid Clara A. Fogg, ecjgestone, River 

road, Amoskeag . . . .l3-5o 

E. M. Slayton, land damage, River 

road north .... 40.00 

H. K. Slayton, land damage. River 

road north .... 20.00 



ii 



i 



REPOKT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



485 



Paid John J. McGovern, additional land 

damage, Amory street 
Richard Evans, damage to shade 

trees, Spruce street . 
William E. Moore, land damage on 

Grove street 
A. L. Walker & Son, land damage 

on Grove street 
A. L. Walker & Son, additional 

land damage on Grove street 
Sidney A. Blood, land damage on 

Grove street 
Austin Goings, land damage on 

Summer street . 
John A. Kane, land damage, Che 

ney place .... 
A. A. Ainsworth, land damage 

Young street ... 
A. A. Ainsworth, additional land 

damage, Young street 
John C. Ferguson, land damage 

Elm street south 
John Muir, land damage, Belmon 
« street .... 

Joseph Quirin, land damage, Bel 

niont street 
P. McGranigan, land damage, Bel 

mont street ... 
William L. Riley, land damage 

Belmont street . 
W. J. Poirier, land -damage, Bel 

mont street 
G. C. O'Malley, land damage, Bel 

mont street 
P. H. O'Malley, land damage, Bel 

mont street 
J. Mitchell, land damage, Belmont 

street .... 



^160.00 
25.00 

485-79 
359-97 
143-99 
502.54 
1,366.44 

153-43 
291.00 
291.00 
75.00 
162.82 
280.71 
117.00 
149.90 
134.11 
263.28 
154.12 
261.96 



486 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid George Gouthier, land damage, Bel- 
mont street 
Emma C. Barlow, land damage, Bel 

mont street 
Dunbar, land damage, Bel 

mont street 
Margaret C. Golden, land damage 

Belmont street . 
John Golden, land damage, Bel 

mont street 
Lydia M. Webster, land damage 

Cheney place . 
John M. Stanton, land damage 

Elm street south 
James A. McKenzie, land damage 

Elm street south 
Fred A. Platts, land damage 

Young street 
J. L. Woodman, land damage 

Young street 
George Theobald, moving house 

and barn on B street 
Louisa M. Prince, land damage, B 

street 
Abbie M. Sawtelle, land damage 

Brown avenue . 
Adelaide E. Smith, land damage 

Brown avenue . 
Wheeler & Sloan, land damage 

Auburn street west 
Emma C. Barlow, land damage 

Summer street .'^ 
Alonzo Elliott, land damage, Som 

erville street 
Lucia A. Clough, land damage 
C. W. Noyes, land damage, B 

street . . . 



$129.96 

496.94 

5-57 
16.68 

158.47 
240.07 
246.81 
82.40 
18.15 
300.00 



167.18 



700.71 


768.97 


665.00 


515-38 



69.32 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



487 



Paid Daniel L. Ordway, land damage, B 

street.. ^5.11 

G. W. Platts & Son, land damage, 

Canton street .... 484.62 

Hannah Stevens, land damage, B 

♦street 589-97 

George B. Wheeler, land damage. 
Auburn street, west of Belmont 
street ..... 42.46 

Total expenditures ..... $11,601.73 



Watering Streets. 



Appropriation ..... $3,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 988.43 



$3,988.43 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in 
district No. 2 : 



January 










$48.62 


February 










48.87 


March . 










49.24 


April 










241.55 


May 










253-75 


June 










533-65 


July . . 










484-37 


August . 










587.28 


September 










173-50 


October 










92.17 


November 










23-99 


December 










35-12 



$2,572.09 



i88 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, in dis 
trict No. lo : 
March 



April . 
May . 
June . 
July . 
August 
September 
October 
November 
December 



REPAIRS. 



Paid John T. Beach, repairs on sprink- 
lers ...... 

A. Filion, spider chain and neck 
yoke ..... 

Paid D. F. Cressey : 

I water-wrench . . ' . 

Repairing 2 water-wrenches 

I pair leaf springs .... 

4 bolts and labor .... 

Repairs on water-cart 
Paid Killey & Wadleigh, varnish, paint, 
turpentine, lampblack, brushes . 

Paid Thomas A. Lane : 

Material and labor on watering-trough 
Material and labor on fountains and 

stand-pipes ..... 
23 2-inch Chapman valves 

at ^4.17 . . . $95-91 
Labor on valves . . 20.15 



Cr. by 157 lbs. old brass . 



$116.06 
9.42 



g2I.OO 

76.00 

94.40 

133.00 

125.00 

191.00 

125.50 

12.00 

106.89 

12.01 



510.05 
6.00 
1.50 

•75 
2.50 

.40 
3-59 

17.61 
13.00 
87.87 



$896.80 



106.64 



REPORT .OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 489 

Labor and material on troughs and 

fountains . . . . . ^13-82 

Paid Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., i 2-inch 

drip valve .... 5.38 

Manchester Hardware Co., paints 

and varnish, district 10 . . 9.19 

A. H. Stark, paint and labor on 

.sprinklers .... 3.25 

H. C. Ranno & Son, 2 quarts axle 

grease ..... .40 

Pike & Heald, dippers, chains, and 
other materials and labor on 
fountains . . . . . 181.69 

Paid J. B. McCrillis & Son : 

I whiffletree . . . . . 1.25 

New whiffletree hooks, eye bolts, links, 

repairing springs and collars, 5 lbs. 

Norway iron 

Painting water-cart . 

Lettering water-cart . 

Repairing water-cart 

Paid John T. Beach, repairing springs 

on sprinkler .... 4.75 



6-45 

40.00 

1-75 
1.70 



$519-54 
Total expenditures ..... ^3,988.43 



Paving Streets. 

Appropriation ..... ^5,500.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 2,040.11 



$7,540.11 



Expe:nditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, district 
No. 2 : 

January $3.50 

March ..-.., 10.50 



490 



REPORT OF THE CITY -AUDITOR. 



April 


529.87 


May ..... 


40S.67 


June ..... 


404.41 


July 


526.30 


August .... 


606.17 


September .... 


180.99 


October .... 


227.42 


November .... 


93.18 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, district 
' No. 7 : 



May . 
June . 
July . 
August 



$150.00 

150.00 

100.00 

16.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-roll, district 
No. 10 : 



May . 


. . . $86.40 


June . 


217.73 


July . . . 


119.63 


August 


722.76 


September . 


140.50 


October 


175.69 


November . 


21.84 


December . 


4.50 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 1 1 : 



October 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 



Paid John B. Varick Co., 2 66-foot tape 
measures ..... 
Killey Sc Wadleig}i, i ball mason, 
twine . ..... 



|i.oo 



.42 



52,491.01 



$416.00 



51,489.05 



^254-75 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



491 



Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co., i stone- 

haramer and handle . . . ^i-37 

I mattock hoe and handle . . .95 



^3-74 



PAVING STONE AND GRAVEL. 



Paid W. H. Coburn, 24 loads stone 
Cavanaugh Bros., 6 loads stone 
H. C. Cunningham, 88 loads stone 
H. Faucher, 9 loads stone 
G. W. Higgins, 76 loads stone 
Charles P. Still, 10 loads stone 
Joseph Quirin, 20 loads stone 
H. M. Clough, 3 loads stone 
J. P. Brock, 8 loads stone 
Joseph Brown, 9 loads stone 
F. C. Campbell, 2 loads stone 
John Gott, 23 loads stone 
S. M. Hazelton, 9 loads stone 
E, C. Hoyt, 49 loads stone . 
C. H. Robie Co., 71 loads stone 
George Whitford, 7 loads stone 
A. J. Wilkinson, 1 7 loads stone 
J. L. Fogg, 18 loads stone . 
C. A. Brooks, 17 loads stone 
Alvin G. Bean, 25 loads stone 
John Proctor, 6 loads stone . 
Addison Gray, 258 loads gravel 
Mrs. A. M. Lewis, i load cobble 
stones and labor stoning gutter 
Paid Charles A. Bailey : 

425 cubic feet covering stone 

153 feet 9-inch curbing 

7 circles, 4 ft. radius 

15 circles, 3 ft. radius 

9 feet 4- inch curbing 



$40.80 
10.20 
44.00 

15-30 
129.20 
15.00 
30.00 
5.10 
13.60 

15-30 

3-40 

39.10 

15-3.0 
83-30 
120.70 
11.90 
28.90 
30.60 
28.90 
37-50 
10.20 
28.60 

2.50 

68.00 
76.87 
31-50 
52-50 
3-73 



)2.00 



492 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CONCRETE CROSSINGS AND OTHER WORK. 



Paid estate of C. H. Robie 
Webster and Bay 
North and Pine east back 
Pennacook south back and Pine 
Blodget and Pine 
Blodget and Pine 
Blodget and Pine 
Blodget and Chestnut 
Blodget and Chestnut 
Walnut and Gove 
Lake avenue and Wilson 
Lake avenue and Wilson 
Concord and Maple . 
Concord and Maple . 
Concord and Maple . 
Concord and Maple . 
Blodget south back and Union 
Blodget and Union . 



448.58 yards at 75c. . 
Lake avenue engine-house, 99 yards 
Massabesic hose house, 409.75 yards . 
Pine-street walks for Mr. Brooks, 73.16 

yards at 45c. . . . . 

Pine-street walks for Mr. Cheney, 71.33 

yards at 45c. .... 

Paid George F. Higgins : 

Kidder court and Elm, 35.576 yards 
Chestnut east back and North, 18.22 

yards ...... 

Chestnut and North, 38.33 yards 
Pearl and Russell, 39.73 yards . 
Pearl and Russell, 35.88 yards . 



30.22 


yards. 


13-33 


a 


17.77 


i( 


28.00 


i c 


30.22 


a 


27-55 


it 


32.00 


it 


32.00 


i( 


32.00 


ti 


29-33 


(C 


23.11 


(( 


30.22 


a 


30.22 


a 


21-33 


1 1 


21.51 


a 


17.77 


ti 


32.00 


a 


448.58 yards. 


$336-44 




44-55 



102.43 
32.92 
32.09 

26.98 

13.67 

28.75 

29.80 
26.91 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 49S 

Pearl and Russell, 27.77 yards • • $20.83 

Pearl and Russell, 37.77 yards . . 28.33 

Maple and Amherst, 30.33 yards . 22.75 

Maple and Amherst, 42.139 yards . 31-60 
Araory and Cartier east back, 17.77 

yards 13.33 

Cartier and Amory, south side, 33.77 

yards 25.33 

Orange and Elm east back, 26.66 

yards ...... 20.00 

Sagamore and Pine, 44.44 yards . 33-33 

Sagamore and Pine, 36.66 yards . 27.55 

Sagamore and Pine, 44.44 yards . 33-33 

Sagamore and Pine, 37.77 yards . 28.33 
Chestnut and Lowell south back, 17.77 

• yards 13.33 

Pearl and Ehn east back, north side, 

17.77 yards 13.33 

Central and Milton, 26.66 yards . 20.00 

Central and Hall, 33.77 yards . . 25.33 
Lake avenue and Chestnut west back, 

24.44 yards 18.33 

Pearl, No. ^8 to No. 42, one half of 

bill for 45.633 yards at 45c., $20.53 10.26 

Paid estate of C. H. Robie : 

543.027 yards at court-house, at 25c. . i35'75 

17.77 yards crossing, Elm west back 
and Pleasant, at 37c. . . . 6.57 

25.7 yards crossing. Pleasant and 

Franklin, at 37c. . . . 9.51 

30 yards crossing, Central and Frank- 
lin, at 75c. ..... 22.50 

33 yards crossing, Central and Frank- 
lin, at 75c. . . . . . 24.75 

187.5 yards on Granite south of city 

yard, at 25c. ..... 46.87 



494 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

32.9 yards on Granite south of city 

yard, at 37c. .... $12.18 

21 yards on Depot, north of city yard, 

at 37c 7.77 

64.22 yards on Depot, north of city 

yard; at 25c. .... 16.05 

44.4 yards crossing, Ferry and Sec- 
ond, at 75c 33.30 

28.1 yards crossing, Main and Gran- 
ite, at 37c. ..... 10.40 

70.7 yards sidewalk repairs, Dover and 

Granite, at 35c. .... 24.74 

One half of 197.588 yards at James A. 

Weston's, at 75c., $148.19 . . 74-io 

30.22 yards crossing. Orange and Lin- 
den, at 75c. ..... 22.66 

One half of 31 yards at No. 28 Nashua 

street, at 30c., $9.30 . . . 4.65 

39.1 yards crossing, Hanover and Hall 29.32 

28 yards walk, P. Eaton's, Merrimack 

street ...... 12.60 

Paid C. H. Robie Co. : 

One half of 224.016 yards sidewalk 
on Hanover street, north side, front 
of First Congregational church, at 
45c., $100.80 .... 50.40 

15.5 yards crossing, Lowell and Union 

east back, south side, at 37^0. . 5.81 

30.33 on Tremont square , . . ^3-^5 

29.99 yards, two crossings, Manchester 

and Hall ..... 22.50 

8.66 yards driveway SX G. W. Rief's 

on Belmont street .... 3.20 

92.88 yards crossing, Valley and Cy- 
press ...... 69.66 

21.33 yards crossing, Merrimack and 

Wilson . . . . . . 16.00 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

^8.25 

75-33 



495 



18.33 yards at ward 5 ward-room 
150.66 yards on south Elm street 

bridge ...... 

33.33 yards sidewalk on Elm, near 

Concord . . . . . 

73.9 yards on South Main, near Piscat- 

aquog river bridge . . . . 
3 1. 1 j^ards crossing, School and Third, 

at 50c. ...... 

Total expenditures 



14.99 

36-95 
23-32 



$1,893.56 



^540. 1 1 



Appropriation 



Macadamizing. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



$18,000.00 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 2 : 



March .... 


$37.00 


April 


330.82 


May 


1,254.75 


June 


1,508.38 


July 


995-91 


August .... 


1,291.81 


September .... 


1,401.16 


October . . . 


241.00 


November .... 


182.68 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 10: 



April 
May 



^iS.oo 
56-05 



)243-5i 



496 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



June . 


. 


^90.03 


July . 




140.75 


August 




I50-50 


September . 




118.00 


October 




19.50 


November . 




11.00 


December , 




2.48 




STONE. 





$606.31 



Paid John Alston, 19,620 lbs. stone 

D. W. Atwood, 517,915 lbs. stone 
Frank Bodwell, 116 loads stone 

A. Boyce, 21,395 lt)s. stone. 
L. W. Bartlett, 23,250 lbs. stone 
J. A. Brown, 395,370 lbs. stone 
Daniel Butterfield, 332,810 lbs 

stone .... 
S. A. Blood, 18,470 lbs. stone 
Geo. Butterfield, 335,560 lbs. stone 
N. Bournival, 379,915 lbs. stone 
C. E. Bursiel, 448,885 lbs. stone 
H. C. Cunningham, 3,310 lbs. stone 
Wm. H. Colburn, 14,640 lbs. stone 
Louis Cyr, 10,210 lbs. stone 
J. G. EUinwood, 31,300 lbs. stone 

E. Emerson, 214,805 lbs. stone 

F. R. French, 493,370 lbs. stone . 
James Fullerton, 732,740 lbs. stone 
J. L. Fogg, 66,710 lbs. stone 

J. J. Faucher, 131,215 lbs. stone . 
H. Faucher, 797,410 lbs. stone 
Head & Dowst Co., 83,245 lbs. 
stone ..... 
C. N.. Harvey, 31,800 lbs. stone . 
Geo. F. Higgins, 739,82olbs. stone 



$4-89 

129.46 

29.00 

5-34 

5.81 

98.80 

83-17 
4.61 

83.87 

94.96 

112. ig 

.82 

3.66 

2-54 
7.82 

53-69 
123.32 
183.16 

16.67 

32-79 
199-33 

20.80 

7-94 

184.95 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



497 



Paid Hadley F. Higgins, 23,930 lbs. 

stone . . . . . 
H. L. Kimball, 397,495 lbs. stone 
Joseph King, 50,875 lbs. stone 
Wm. G. Landry, 124,550 lbs. stone 
Ira McDougall, 10,270 lbs. stone . 
C. Manseau, 68,940 lbs. stone 
Hugo Paff, 248,440 lbs. stone 
Palmer & Garmon, 16 loads stone 

chips ..... 
Wm. Berwick, 38,090 lbs. stone . 
John H. Proctor, 3,965 lbs. stone 
C. H. Robie, 332,950 lbs. stone . 
Horace Willey, 389,955 lbs. stone 
George Whitford, 72,255 lbs. stone 
Willey &: Rowe, 201 loads stone . 
Philip White, 64,900 lbs. stone 

F. B. Worthley, 469,265 lbs. stone 
C. H. Robie Co., 12,305 lbs. stone 
C. H. Tyrrell, 530,835 lbs. stone 
Horace Holbrook, 102,890 lbs 

stone .... 
John P. Brock, 98,965 lbs. stone 
John C. Ray, 20,500 lbs. stone 
Dennis Morgan, 10,800 lbs. stone 
P. Sway, 121,135 lbs. stone . 
Joseph Tirrell, 120,365 lbs. stone 
C. A. Brooks, 33,220 lbs. stone 
E. W. Butterfield, 83,630 lbs. stone 
Fred Campbell, 81,090 lbs. stone 
Adam Dickey, 190,150 lbs. stone 
E. C. Hoytt, 54,145 lbs. stone 
S. M. Hazelton, 87,330 lbs. stone 
Wm. Morgan, 133,075 lbs. stone 
Timothy Shea, 35,925 lbs. stone 

G. O. Spencer, 25,630 lbs. stone 

32 



^5-98 

99-35 
12.71 

31-13 
2.56 

17.22 

62.09 

12.00 

9-52 

•99 

83-25 
97.48 
1S.05 

50-25 
16.22 

117.28 

3.07 

132.69 

25.72 

24-73 
5.12 

2.70 
30.27 
30.08 

8.30 
20.90 
20.26 
47-52 
13-52 
21.82 
33-26 

8.98 

6.40 



498 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Dr. Sturtevant, 59,680 lbs. stone . $14-91 
F. H. Taylor, 113,690 lbs. stone . 28.41 
J. W. Tyrrell, 140,675 lbs. stone . 35-i6 
A. J. Wilkinson, 81,580 lbs. stone 20.39 
Warren Harvey, 7 feet 2 -inch curb- 
stone ..... 2.87 
Warren Harvey, 2 corner circles . 15-62 
Warren Harvey, 20 feet edgestones 8.00 
W. T. Morgan, 15 loads stone chips 11-25 



$2,697.60 



GAS, FUEL, FREIGHT, AND WATER. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., 13 chald- 
rons coke .... 

Dunlap &: Wason Coal Co., J ton 
Cumberland coal 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 
on oil .... . 

Water-Works, use of water, engine, 
and stone-crusher to January i, 

1893 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas . 



552.00 

3-25 
2.68 



30.00 
.14 



.07 



TOOLS AND HARDWARE. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 2 padlocks and 
I 5-inch bit ... . 
Killey & Wadleigh, 200 bolts 
Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Sperm oil, cast steel, wicking, wire 
nails, butts and screws, flax packing 
wood wedges, cylinder oil, wrench 
pick handles, lacing, belt punch 
files, bolt clipper, two-bushel basket 
and other hardware 
12 wheelbarrow trays 



;i.27 
1. 16 



37-84 
1052 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



499 



1,230 elevator bolts, i x i){ 




^24.60 


179 lbs. band iron . 




5-37 


120 lbs. hoop iron . 




4.38 


151^ feet suction hose 




25.16 


I Edison diaphragm pump 




26.00 


2 couplings 




9.00 


I strainer .... 




4.00 


2 spanners 




1-75 


26 lbs. tallow . 




2.08 


Express .... 




1.50 


12 Lansing barrows . 




24.00 


Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 


I 12 


- 


inch R. B. file . 




.20 



SI78.83 



LUMBER, CASTINGS, AND REPAIRS. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, filing saws 

L. M. Aldrich, setting level vials . 

E. Gatz, lumber and labor at city 

yard ...... 

Paid J. Stickney : 

34^ feet 14-inch double leather belt- 
ing 

Putting on double belt 

10 lbs. belt dressing . 

42^ feet 6-inch double leather belt 

ing 

6 yards f English duck 
i)^ lbs. rubber packing 
Paid Farrell Foundry & Machine Co., i 
pair 15x9 plates, 680 lbs., at 

3^c 

planing . . . . . 

Paid Thomas A. Lane : 

20 feet I -inch hose . . . . 
2 patented bands . . . . 



$0.85 
•75 

5.28 



59.66 

1.50 
2.50 

30.69 

2.40 

■3S 



23.80 
3.00 

4.00 
•30 



500 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Labor ...... 

I 3 L. Nip 

Paid James Briggs, lo tin boxes for 
crusher . . . . 

James Briggs, i tin boiler 
Head & Dowst Co., 2 feet 5x6 

spruce, and planing . 
Farrell Foundry & Machine Co., i 
set 15x9 steel bearings 
Paid C. H. Hutchinson : 

146 hours' labor on patterns, fitting 

scoop and iron, repairing crusher, 

fitting pulley and roller links, etc 

637 lbs. castings^ pulleys, etc. 

Steel 

5 lbs. babbitt . 
Iron and rivets . 
Lumber . 

I steam gauge . 
182 lbs. castings for crusher 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 
96 feet spruce, city yard 
1,007 f'Set fence boards, city yard 
45 feet pine 1)^ x^, city yard . 
100 chestnut posts 
5 feet hard wood on crusher 

I I hours' labor on crusher 
9 lbs. brass gibbs 
14^ hours' labor on gibbs and pattern 
5 hours' labor on crusher apron . 
I new No. 6 crank shaft for crusher 
21 hours' labor on same 
Freight on same 

Paid Thomas L. Thorpe, 50 lbs. cop 

waste . . . . . 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 



$0.20 


.48 


3.00 


1-75 


•47 


12.70 



58.70 

19.71 

.08 

1.25 

•17 

4.00 
6.00 

5-46 
1.54 

1 6. 1 1 

20.00 

•25 
4.40 

3-15 

5.80 
2.00 

55-00 
8.40 

2.50 

5.00 
1.94 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 501 

Paid Vacuum Oil Co., 27 gallons oil and 

barrel ^18.55 

Farrell Foundry & Machine Co., i 

pair 15x9 plates, 680 lbs., at 3^c. 23.80 

Farrell Foundry & Machine Co., 

planing 3.00 



CONCRETE. 

Paid estate of Charles H. Robie, con- 
crete work on Union, from Con- 
cord to Amherst, 1,170.17 yards 

at$i ^1,170.17 

12.33 yards , at 45c. • • • 5-55 

Paid C. H. Robie Co. : 

Concreting Amherst to Hanover, 

946.51 yards, at 75c. . . . 709.88 

Concreting on Hanover, 1,409.9 j^ards, 

at 75c 1,057.43 

166.2 yards, at 45c 74-79 

Concrete work on Union street side 
of Hanover-street church property, 
188.65 yards, at 25c., ^47.16 ; 85.82 
yards, at 45c., ^38.61 ; total, ^85.77. 
One half paid by city . . . 42.88 

Concreting roadway on West, north 

of Douglas, 331.44 yards . . 248.58 

Concreting roadway on Maple, 1,788.4 

yards 1,341.30 

Concreting walks, Lake-avenue school- 
house, 84.35 yards . . s. . 21.09 
Concreting crossing, Elm east back . 6.55 
Concreting crossing, Douglas and 

West, 21.3 yards .... i5'97 

Concreting crossing, Wayne to Main, 

59.6 yards 21.32 



$421.65 



502 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Concreting crossing, Marion and Main, 

28.4 yards .... 
Concreting crossing, Marion and Main, 

28.4 yards .... 
Concreting crossing, Amory and Main 

56.8 yards .... 
Concreting crossing, Marion and Mc 

Gregor west back, 1 7.5 yards . 
Concreting crossing, Arlington and 

Russell, 29.77 yards 



$10.50 
21.30 
42.60 
13.12 



$4,825.36 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 
and Insurance Co., policy No. 
18,647, for one year . 

Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$22.50 

$16,083.83 
1,916.87 

$18,000.00 



Grading for Concrete. 

Appropriation ..... $5,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 1,064.90 



5,064.90 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 2 : 



January . 
February 
March . 



$324.38 
486.23 
306.63 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



503 



April 


. $187.72 


May 


152.48 


June 


166.82 


July . . . 


. '. . 118.38 


August . 


184.94 


September . ' . 


. . 302.39 


October . 


317.01 


November 


163.63 


December 


278.28 



$2,988.89 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 7 : 



May . 

July . 

September 

December 



$50.00 
25.00 

175.00 
12.25 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 10 : 



January .... 


$119.50 


February .... 


242.75 


March .... 


94.50 


April ..... 


115-50 


May . . . . 


59-56 


June ..... 


195-55 


July 


182.13 


August .... 


158.96 


September .... 


235-25 


October .... 


64.62 


November .... 


177.09 


December . * . 


335-30 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 1 1 : 



$262.25 



$1,980.71 



December 



S140.25 



504 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SAND AND GRAVEL. 



Paid Mary A. Hartshorn, 399 loads sand 
George Higgins, 88 loads sand 
C. B. Sturtevant, 97 loads gravel . 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Pettee & Adams, 6 bags salt . 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 3 78 
feet spruce .... 



STONE. 



Paid Frank S. Bodwell : 
44J feet edgestone at 40c. . 
10 4-foot circles at $6.00 . 
7 3-foot circles at ^3.50 
16 feet edgestone at 40c. . 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$39-90 
8.80 

24.25 



6.05 



^17.80 

60.00 

24.50 

6.40 



Scavenger Teams. 

Appropriation . . . . . ^11,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 4)555-3i 



'2-95 



ill. 15 



$108.70 

5)564-9o 
500.00 

6,064.90 



$i5>555-3i 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 2 : 



January 
February 



5625.26 
906.79 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



505 



March 
April . 
May . 
June . 










$698.52 

838.44 

819.51 

1,068.87 


July . 
August 
September 
October 










977.07 
1,309.10 
1,277.84 
1,252.10 


November 
December 










1,235.34 

997-93 

$12,006.77 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 10 ; 



January 










$108.00 


February 










134-25 


March . 










109.50 


April . 










171-75 


May . 










170.62 


June 










135-00 


July . 










133.00 


August . 










135-32 


September . 










241-75 


October 










196.50 


November 










137.00 


December 










119.44 



!i, 792-13 



ON CONTRACT AS SCAVENGER. 



Paid H. E. Vaughan, as contractor from 
January i to June 9, 1892, inclu- 
sive $839-19 

Paid William H. Carpenter, as contract- 
or from June 9 to June 30, 1892 . 93-32 

July ^33-33 

August 133.33 

September i33-33 



506 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



October . 
November 
December 



TOOLS. 



Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 2 4-tine forks 
Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 
2 steel rakes, 14-tooth 

2 mattocks and handles 
4 steel rakes, i6-tooth 
I 4-tined manure fork 
1 2 ruby lanterns 

3 files 
I saw 
Other hardware 

Paid John B. Varick Co., i shovel 

John B. Varick Co., i fork 

H. C. Ranno & Son, repairs on 

harnesses, etc. . . . . 

Total expenditures 



5133-33 
133-33 
^33-33 



.90 
2.00 
2.40 

•50 
7.00 

•38 

1-75 

2.09 

.60 

•65 

4-65 



$1,732-49 



$23.92 

$15,555-31 



Street-Sweeping. 

Appropriation ..... ^1,200.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 93-79 



$1,293.79, 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in dis- 
trict No. 2 : 

April $88.25 

May ' 101.90 

June ...... 103.50 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



507 



July . 






. 


^153-68 


August 








192.43 


September 








74.74 


October 








129.12 


November 


in and teams 


as per pay 


199.80 


Paid labor of me 


rolls, in dis- 


trict No. 


lo : 








April . 


. 




. 


$42.00 


June 




\ 


. 


27.10 


July . 








40.00 


November 








36.00 




SUNDRIES. 





$1,043.42 



SI45.IO 



Paid James Briggs, repairs on sweeper . 

C. H. Hutchinson, 86^ hours' la- 
bor, repairs on sweeper 

C. H. Hutchinson, 18 lbs. old iron 

John B. Varick Co., i reflector lan- 
tern ..... 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 4 
hours' labor on sweeper . 

S. A. Felton & Son, i street sweep- 
er refilled ..... 

S. A. Felton & Son, i street sweep- 
er refilled .... 



34 


.70 




•54 




75 


I 


.60 


32 


00 


32 


.00 



$105.27 



Total expenditures 



$1,293.79 



508 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Lighting Streets. 



Appropriation 


Expenditures, 
electric lights. 




Paid Manchester Electric Light Co.: 






Charges. 


Discounts. 


January 


. ^2,476.50 


^1-13 


February 


2,992.28 


8.13 


March . 


• 2,823.15 


2-59 


April • 


. 3»oi7-85 


1. 12 


May . 


. 2,920.50 


4.78 


June 


3,026.10 


3.00 


July . . 


• 2,945.57 


1.66 


August . 


. 3,147-88 


3-57 


September . 


• 3.158.05 


5-36 


October 


• 3.077-37 


2.81 


November 


- 3.191-24 


5-30 


December 


• 3.084.95 
^35,861.44 


4-50 




;^43-95 


Total discount 


s de- 




ducted . 


43-95 





3,000.00 



$35,817-49 



GAS. 



Paid People's Gas-light Co.: 




January . . . 


^103.74 


February . . ^-^ . 


97.02 


March ..... 


82.04 


April ..... 


79.66 


May ..... 


70.28 


June ■ . 


64.68 


July 


56.28 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



509 



August 


^54-74 


September 


60.06 


October 


64.12 


November 


79-IO 


December 


79.66 



SSgi-sa 



CARE OF GAS AND OIL LIGHTS. 



Paid People's Gas 


-light Co., 


for lighting, extinguish- 




ing, and care of gas and oil street lights : 




January $140.81 




February 








133-37 




March . 








150.62 




April . 








123.50 




May 








167.17 




June 








118.75 




July . 








162.37 




• August . 








137-75 




September . 








112.00 




October 








166.50 


f 


November 








147-35 




December 








139.92 


$1,700.11 




SUNDRIES. 




Paid People's Gas-light Co.: 




1 7 barrels kerosene oil . . . $7i'59 




7 barrels kerosene oil 


27.42 




9 barrels kerosene oil 


36-15 




2 gallons whisky 


4-5° 




Matches (of Eager & Rand) 


2.98 




2 gallons sperm oil . 


2.00 




2 gallons sperm oil . 


2.00 




I 6-quart oil can 


1-15 




T 4-quart oil can 


.84 




I glass cutter . 


. 






•15 





610 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



I can 




$0.25 


I box glass, lo X 12 . 




2.38 


2 boxes glass, 12 x 14 




5-85 


2 boxes glass, 12x14 


• . 


5-40 


I box glass, 12x12 . 


. 


2.25 


Soap and glycerine . 




4-30 


lid Clark M. Bailey, c 


himneys, burn- 




ers, wicks 


. 


165.65 


C. H. Hutchinson, 


repairing torch, 




three times 


. 


1.87 


Pike & Heald, i oi 


1 can 


.60 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



>337-33 

$38,746.31 
1.253.69 

$40,000.00 



Bridges. 



Appropriation .... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 



$2,500.00 
1,133.68 



^35633-68 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 2 : 



January .... 


$112.19 


February .... 


III. 30 


March . . . '^ . 


31.06 


April 


96.49 


May 


135-38 


June ..... 


12.87 


July ■ 


65.81 


August . . . 


47-38 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 511 

September . . . . . $36.63 

October 68.66 

November 201.88 

December ..... 76-39 

$996.04 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 6 : 

August $76-25 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 9 : 

June . . . $15.00 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 10 : 

April $4.50 

June 36.85 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. II : 



$41.35 



May $68.25 

LUMBER. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

13,516 feet hemlock, at $14, districts 

2 and II .... . $179.59 

4,201 feet spruce at ^16, districts 2 and 

II ...... 67.21 

300 feet Georgia pine, districts 2 and 11 1 1 .40 

417 feet 10 X 10 chestnut, at $25, dis- 
trict 9 . . . . . . 10.43 

175 feet 10 X 10 hemlock, at ^14, dis- 
trict 9 ..... . 2.49 

620 feet 3-inch spruce at $16, district 2 9.92 

Lumber for bridge, district 8 . . 230.90 

384 feet 3 X 12 spruce, McGregor 

bridge 6.14 



512 



REPORT OF THeTcITY AUDITOR. 



534 feet 10 X 10 spruce 
Paid Oilman Clough, 39,489 feet plank 
L. A. Clough, 41,919 
feet hemlock plank . $503.02 
less freight . . 3 7- 60 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 

1,000 feet i}{ hard pine, Granite bridge 

500 feet hard pine . 

413 feet hard pine 

1,017 f'^^t spruce plank 

2,842 feet spruce plank 

594 feet 8x10 spruce 

Paid A. C. Wallace, 9,908 feet 3-inch 

hemlock plank .... 

David Wells, 5 stringers 12 x 14 x 

24 feet, at $5, for bridge over 

Black brook, district 11. 



$8.54 
552.84 



465.42 

25.00 
12.50 

IO-33 
16.27 

48.38 
9-50 

12S.80 



2i:;.oo 



$1,820.66. 



HARDWARE. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, i cask 6-inch 

wire spikes .... 

Killey & Wadleigh, i cask 6- inch 

wire spikes .... 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 handled axes 

Manchester Hardware Co., i hand 

ax . 
Manchester Hardware Co., nails . 
Paid John B. Varick Co. : 
6 casks 7-inch wire spikes . 
4 casks 6-penny wire spikes 
25 lbs. 7-penny wire nails . 
23 lbs. lo-penny wire nails 
I ii^-lb. hammer . 
I ax 



$2.75 

2-75 
2.00 



•85 
3.10 

13-50 
9.00 

■^3 
•63 
•50 
.90 



BRIDGES. 




I ax handle ..... 


^0.25 


2 files ...... 


1. 00 


I cask 6o-penny wire nails 


2.00 


i^ kegs wire spikes and nails, district 6 


3.85 


4 lanterns and ruby globes, district 6 . 


2.60 


15 lbs. wire nails .... 


•45 


2 kegs 60-penny wire nails 


4.00 


I ax ...... 


•75 


Other hardware .... 


4.19 


Paid A. N. Clapp, 25 lbs. spikes . 


•75 


A. N. Clapp, I keg spikes 


2.25 


A. N. Clapp, 90 lbs. nails 


2.03 


Wadleigh Hardware Co., 6 casks 




60-penny nails .... 


12.30 


BLACKSMITHING. 




Paid James Morrison, fixing staples, dis- 




trict 6 


^1-25 


James Morrison, 20 new irons, dis- 




trict 6 


4.00 


James Morrison, fixing bolts, dis- 




trict 6 


•25 


FREIGHT. 




Paid Boston & Maine Railroad, fi-eight 




on lumber .... 


$16.00 


Concord & Montreal Railroad, 




freight on lumber 


21.60 



513 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$73-03 



$5.50 



537.60 

$3>i33-68 

500.00 



33 



53^633.68 



614 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



City Teams. 



Appropriation ..... $5,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 1,129.08 



$6,129.08 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 2 : 



January 

February 
March . 
April . 
May . 
June 
July . 
August . 
September 
October 
November 
December 



$127.87 

143-99 
121.37 

118.88 
121.75 
157-40 
137-38 
157-67 
140.51 

135-96 
179.64 
163.18 



$1,705.60 



OATS, CORN, FEED, HAY, AND STRAW. 



Paid Adams & Tasker : 




Oats 


S207.50 


Corn 




66.01 


Feed 




38.40 


Hay 




55.85 


Straw 




60.29 


Bran . . 




11.90 


Salt . 




7.89 



CITY TEAMS. 


Paid H. H. Freeman : 




Rye straw .... 


$37-9° 


Oats 


18.40 


Feed 


6.30 


Shorts 


1.90 


Paid Merrill & Freeman : 




Oats 


202.15 


Corn . . . . 


59.20 


Bran ..... 


II. II 


Feed 


30.48 


Rye straw .... 


46.22 


Paid Henry W. Parker : 




Oats 


152.80 


Corn ..... 


34.00 


Meal 


2.88 


Feed 


21.15 


Salt 


•15 


Bran ..... 


3-85 


Paid Partridge Brothers : 




Oats 


243.00 


Corn ..... 


72.30 


Feed 


22.80 


Shorts 


6.20 


Hay 


80.43 


Paid Pettee & Adams, oats . 


19.00 


Pettee &: Adams, feed . 


8.40 


Pettee & Adams, bran . 


2.40 


George Butterfield, hay 


84.57 


Paid Clarence R. Merrill : 




Corn 


2.30 


Oats 


23.50 


Feed . . . . . 


7-35 


Bran , . . . . 


2.00 


Paid A. Emery, hay 


8.03 


A. L. Hadley, hay 


142.30 


H. A. Horton, carrots . 


9.26 



515 



516 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid H. S. Plummer, hay . 






$156.00 


George M. Bean, carrots 




18.02 


Leonard Shelters, hay . 




26.77 


B. E. Thompson, hay 






85-53 


E. W. Stevens, hay 






22.10 


Isaac Whittemore, hay 






27.77 


C. D. Welch, hay 






113.71 


B. W. Hill, straw . 






29.07 


D. H. Dickey, straw 






19.68 


City farm, hay 






76.31 


D. H. Young, hay 






29.87 


Thomas Burns, hay 






21.40 


0. C. Lord, hay . 






12.45 


BLACKSMITHING 




Paid D. F. Cressey, horseshoeing . 


59.00 


Conner & Grossman, horseshoeing 


137.40 


Thomas Hickey, horseshoeing 


271.50 


Mahaney & McSweeney, horseshoe 


- 


ing . 






50.90 



$2,448.85 



$468.80 



HARNESSES AND REPAIRS. 



Paid Frederick Allen : 

2 horse blankets .... 

1 team collar ..... 

2 stable blankets . . 
Blacking and harness dye . 

Paid F. N. McLaren, i pair ij^-inch 

hame sockets . . . . . 
Paid Thomas P. Riley : 

Repairing harnesses .... 

2 pairs reins . . 

2 pairs reins ..... 

Bells 



513.00 

4-50 
6.00 

1.50 



59-37 

7-5° 
8.00 
.^.00 







CITY TEAMS. 




I pair reins 
I halter . 










$3-5° 
2.25 


Bit . 










1. 00 


1 pair reins 
Bells 
Blankets . 










3-5° 
1-75 

2.25 


Brushes . 










5.00 


Horse cover 










3-50 


Horse brush 










3.00 


1 pair traces 

2 bridles . 










16.00 
13-50 


2 pair side straps 
Other articles . 








8.00 
72.25 


Paid Kimball Carriage Co., i blanket . 


7.00 


Kimball Carriage Co., i leather 




blanket ..... 


3.00 


Kimball Carriage Co., i collar 


12.00 


Paid N. J. Whalen : 




I heavy horse cover .... 
8 letters for bridle .... 


4-50 
1. 00 


I pair team harnesses 


75.00 


Repairing and oiling harnesses . 


12.10 


Paid The Ranno Harness Co., repairing 




harnesses . 


, 


. 






2.8=; 



517 



REPAIRS ON CARRIAGES AND NEW CARRIAGES. 



Paid Sanborn Carriage Co., repairs on 




whiffletree .... 


^1.20 


John T. Beach, repairs on carts, etc. 


166.15 


John T. Beach, i horse dump cart 


110.00 


Paid J. B. McCriUis : 




I dump cart ..... 


110.00 


Patent gear 


12.00 


New tires ..... 


6.00 


Other work 


15.80 



518 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. Filion, new tail board for cart . $2.25 

A. Filion, new shaft for cart . 2.15 



HARDWARE. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, turpentine, 

paint, and varnish . . . $ 14-45 

Killey & Wadleigh, i coil spring . .25 

Killey & Wadleigh, 14 bolts . . .62 

Manchester Hardware Co., 50 feet 

^-inch hose .... 4.50 

Manchester Hardware Co., 25 feet 

^-inch hose .... 2.25 

Manchester Hardware Co., other 

hardware ..... 20.41 

Clark M. Bailey, 6 rattan filled 

brooms ..... 3.00 

Pike &: Heald, 6 lantern globes . .72 

Pike & Heald, i coffee boiler . 6.50 

Pike & Heald, pipe, coupling, etc. 2.74 

John B. Varick Co., stable brooms, 
saw handles, soap, wire nails, 
screws, bolts, Norway iron, 2 
whips, axle grease, plow points, 
sponge, padlock, hinges, etc. . 68.82 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 2 fibre 

pails, I chamois skin . . . 1.25 



MEDICINES AND MEDICAL SERVICES. 

Paid A. W. Baker, dentistry work on 

nine horses .... ^18.00 

E. H. Currier, 6 large bottles Wil- 
liams's Sure Cure . . . 3.50 

J. L. Golden, services at sundry 

times as veterinary surgeon . 166.45 



^25•55 



$125.51 



CITY TEAMS. 519 

Paid Pulsifer Chemical Co., 3 gallons 

Positive Healer . . . . $12.25 

Smith & Goold, i^ dozen Gray's 

Lotion ..... 9.00 

Z. Foster Campbell, medicine . 1.90 



WATER, GAS, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone . $36.00 

People's Gas-Light Co., gas at sta- 
bles and office .... 100.94 

Water-Works, use of water at sta- 
bles . . . . . . 45.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 10,070 lbs. 

egg coal 31.46 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 6,245 ^^s. 

egg coal 19.49 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 10,160 

lbs. Lehigh coal .. . . 30-23 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

Lumber at city yard .... 

Pine sheathing for door 

5 hours' labor ..... 

Lumber and labor .... 

Paid E. T. James, horse and buggy to 

Pembroke ..... 

E. T. James, horse and buggy 

around town .... 

Mrs. E. G. McKean, rent of stable 

from April i, 1892, to January i, 

1893 

Thomas A. Lane, 12 lava tips 



$7-47 


•56 


1.25 


5-89 


3-50 


47.00 


18.00 


.10 



$263.12 



520 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, 2 )^x}i pen- 
dant cocks . . . . . $0.68 

Thjomas A. Lane, 6 }( x }i pen- 
dant cocks ..... 1.80 

McQuade Bros., 2 gallons vinegar. .40 
McQuade Bros., soap and salt . 2.65 
Manchester Street Railway, tickets 9.00 
Whitten & Fifield, use of team . 1.50 
Allen N. Clapp, 51 gallons kero- 
sene ...... 4.08 

John Driscoll, galvanized pan, etc. 4.75 

Adams & Tasker, j4 cask lime . .48 

G. W. Hamlin, setting glass . . 3.72 

John Bryson, setting glass . . i.oo 

Henry W. Parker, 2 casks lime . 2.00 
Pike & Heald, putty, copper wire, 

and labor ..... 1.35 

Pike & Heald, i water pot . . i.oo 

Pike & Heald, brick for stove, etc. 2.25 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 95 feet 

oak and sawing .... 3.05 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on oil . . . . . .25 



' 



^123.73 

Total expenditures ..... $6,129.08 



Sewers and Drains. 

Appropriation ..... $30,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 9,724.65 



$39>724.^ 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 2 : 
January . . . . . . $178.58 

February ..... 277.30 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



521 



March 
April 
May- 
June 

July 

August 
September 
October . 
November 
December 



$271.34 
204.03 

751-69 
2,510.41 
2,158.92 
2,542.11 
2,287.81 
1,360.96 

571-91 
291.66 



labor of men and 


teams, as 


per pay-rolls, dis- 


trict No. 10: 


January $5 5 -5° 


February 








76.75 


March . 








39-5° 


April 








38.25 


May 








748.20 


June 








3.178.99 


July . . 








2,224.34 


August . 








3^434.58 


September 








2,957.26 


October 








2,733-40 


November 








1,027.10 


December 








200.38 



^13,406.72 



$16,714.25 



TOOLS. 

Paid George Ames, 2 16-foot ladders at 

I2>^C 

W. P. Farmer, 8 pairs rubber boots 
Paid J. Stickney : 

3 pairs rubber boots .... 

3 oil suits ...... 

3 hats ...... 

2 oil suits ...... 



$4.00 
24.00 

8.50 

6.75 
1.50 
5.00 



522 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Clark M. Bailey, 2 doz. lanterns 

and red globes .... 520.00 

Clark M. Bailey, lanterns, globes, 

oil cans, pails . . . . i5-i5 

Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

I No. 3 steel scraper with runners, dis- 
trict 2 . 
12 picks and 12 handles, district 2 
I No. 3 steel road scraper, district 10 

3 long mattocks, district 10 
Repairs on battery, and express, dis 

trict 10 . 
I No. 52 bulldog vise, district 10 
12 plug drills, 23 lbs., district 10 

4 trays for canal barrows, district 10 
I forge, district 10 . 
I anvil, 156 lbs., district 10 

1 Edson diaphragm pump, district 10 
27 feet suction hose, 'district 10 . 

2 sets couplings, district 10 
I brass strainer, district 10 
23 lbs. plug drills, district 2 
^^ lbs. manilla rope, district 2 . 
12 L. H. round-point shovels, district 2 
1 2 L. H. square-point shoveb, district 2 
Cast steel, Norway iron, cut nails, files, 

gimlets, tape measures, manilla rope 
Sledge handles, shovels,' tongs, chisels 
Wrenches, rivets, iron jack chains 
pulley block and other hardware . 84.51 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, 6 cesspool 

scoops . . " . . . 4.50 

Killey & Wadleigh, 2 long-handled 

spades ..... 1.30 

Killey & Wadleigh, 36 ruby globes »2.oo 

Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co. : 

1 2 fibre water pails .... 2.38 



9.00 
9-75 
7-50 
1.80 

4-75 

6.00 

4.14 

4.00 

18.00 

16.38 

26.00 

44-55 
9.00 
4.00 
4.14 
4.12 
8.50 
8.50 

44-85 

63-73 
43.22 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



523 



12 H. pick handles . 
8 lbs. ^-inch manilla rope 
12 shovels .... 
6 scoop handles 
2 pair steam drills 
1 8 round-point shovels 
Paid Manchester Hardware Co. : 
12 Harvey picks, district lo 
24 hickory handles, district 10 
12 lanterns with red globes, district 10 
I '2-foot rule, district 10 
6 street brooms, district 10 
2 rattan stable brooms, district 10 
I hand saw, district 10 
12 round-point shovels, district 10 
Bit brace and 2 sets bits, district 10 
12 round-point shovels, district 10 
1 2 hickory pick handles, district 1 2 
Other hardware, district 10 
Paid Pike & Heald, 6 vault scoops 

^llen N. Clapp, oil, nails, wicks, 
matches, ax, tallow, soap, etc. . 
G. W. Dodge, 3 pairs rubber boots 
George L. Robinson, i pair rub- 
ber boots . . . . . 
George L. Robinson, 2 pairs rub- 
ber boots . . . . . 



$2.00 
1. 00 

10.50 
1.80 
8.50 

16.50 

12.00 
6.00 
9.00 
1. 00 
4.00 
.90 
1.50 

11.00 

4-5° 
7-5° 
3.00 

44-89 
7.80 

60.58 
6.75 

3-25 
6.00 



$761.49 



EXPLOSIVES. 



Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co. : 
150 lbs. No, I forcite, district 10 
150 plat, fuse, district 10 . 
200 feet common wire, district 10 
Powder, fuse, forcite, etc., district 2 
50 plat, fuse .... 



I56.00 

5-51 
1. 00 

39-39 
1.88 



524 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Forcite, fuse, etc., district lo 



Paid Manchester Heating and Lighting 
Co., 2^ lbs. wire for blasting . 



$42.26 
51.66 
30.68 

1.60 



$229:98 



SEWER PIPE. 

Paid Portland Stone Ware Co., sewer pipe, per con- 
tract . . . . . . . . . 

MATERIALS, LABOR, ETC. 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson : 

12 grates, 1,162 lbs., at 3c. . . $34-86 

I lantern hole and cover, 1 70 lbs., at 3c. 5.10 
2}^ hours repairing steam pump . .90 

3 lantern holes and covers, 538 lbs. . 16.14 

II hours' labor on drills and staples . 4.40 

1 hour's labor ..... .20 

4 lbs. iron . . . . . .12 

2 lantern holes, 338 lbs., at 3c. . . 10.14 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

12 traps . . . 936 lbs. 

16 flat grates . . 1,576 " 
I manhole and cover. 590 " 
I manhole and cover . 144 " 



3,246 lbs., at 3c. 


97-38 


12 hooks to pattern, 16 lbs. 


.48 


24 brass rivets, 8 lbs. 


2.40 


I day's labor 


4.00 


12 manholes and centers, 5 grates, 




6,070 lbs., at 2fc. 


144.16 


12 hooks, 15 lbs. refined iron . 


•45 


1 1 hours' labor ..... 


4.40 


5,781 lbs. castings, manholes, covers, 




traps ...... 


158.64 



$3,588.63 



SEWERS AND DKAINS. 



525 



4 lbs. brass castings .... 


$r.oo 


4,969 lbs. manholes, covers, traps. 




grates ...... 


118. 01 


9,625 lbs. manholes, covers, traps, 




grates 


228.59 


3,518 lbs. manholes, covers, traps. 




grates . . .... 


83.55 


12 hoods, 15 lbs. refined iron . 


•45 


12 hours' labor on hoods . 


4.80 


907 lbs. traps and grates at 2^ cents . 


21.54 


Paid Concord Foundry Co.: 




6 manhole castings .... 


48.00 


6 manhole castings . . . ~ . 


48.00 


6 manhole castings .... 


48.00 


6 No. 18 base and grate . 


30.00 


6 No. 18 traps ..... 


15-75 


6 No. 16 base and grate . 


6.00 


I No. 16 trap ..... 


1.88 


Paid Thomas A. Lane : 




Repairing steam pump 


.40 


I i-inch heavy hose band . 


.40 


9 feet 2-inch pipe .... 


1-35 


I piece for Edson pump 


2.25 


Labor on Edson pump 


1.20 


I 8-inch Akron Y . . . . 


.81 


I 1)4^ -inch hose band 


.20 


Labor 


.10 


Glass and labor on street lantern 


1-55 


Labor of 2 men 4 hours on steam drill 


2.40 


Material and labor,Hallsville sewer,etc. 


14.32 


48 feet 8-inch Akron pipe, district 10 


8.64 


2 3-inch suction hose, 12- 




foot lengths . . . 548.00 




2 set 3-inch hose coupling . 7.00 




I 8-inch Akron Y . . 2.02 




6 8-inch Akron curves . 10.80 





526 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



20 feet steam hose, wound, 
district 10 . . . 
50 feet ^-inch hose . 
3 8-inch Akron curves 
Other work 



60 per cent of $18.23 



$20.88 
7.00 
5-40 
2.59 

$103.69 
10.93 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

Repairing steam pump 

Packing, bolt, water glass, nipple 

I padlock, rivets, and Norway iron 

23 hours' labor on sewer cover . 

I 1 1 -pound gear 

3^ hours' labor 

134 feet white oak 

Paid A. Filion, iron, wood, etc., for tool 

house .... 

A. Filion, drilling casting 

P. Duval, filing saws 

J. T. Beach, repairing sewer trap 

Allen N. Clapp, oil, etc. 

J. B. McCrillis & Son, i pair 31^ 

cart-wheel drags 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, other work 
Palmer & Garmon, 15 hours' labor 
Thos. A. Lane Co., pipe, hose, fit- 
tings, etc., for boiler 
Thos. A. Lane Co.,steam gauges,etc. 
Thos. A. Lane, new glass in 3 lan- 
terns, and repairiryg same . 
H. C. Ranno & Son, pump washers 

and repairing tape 
Adams & Tasker, 4 lbs. marline . 
McQuade Brothers, 2 pails . 
McQuade Brothers, tallow . 



$92.76 

6.40 

1-13 

1.42 

9.20 

•39 

1.40 

5-36 

6.45 
.20 

7-50 

.60 

18.60 

58.96 
16.90 

6-75 

20.81 
6.19 

4.00 

•25 
.12 
.90 

•77 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



527 



Paid T. L. Thorpe, 16 lbs. waste . 

Albert Moulton, water barrels for 
blacksmith shop 



$1.60 
1-95 



$1,443-57 



BLACKSMITHING. 



Paid D. F. Cressey, iron work and shar- 
pening tools .... $13-84 
Connor & Grossman, sharpening 

picks ..... 4.50 



CEMENT, BRICK, STONE, LUMBER. 

Paid Merrill & Freeman, 355 barrels ce- 
ment, district 10 . . • . $493.09 
Merrill & Freeman, 199 barrels ce- 
ment, district 2 . . . 271.39 
Adams & Tasker, 94 barrels cement 131-11 
Adams & Tasker, 3 barrels lime . 2.80 
W. F. Head & Son, 140,000 brick 

at $6 . . . . . 840.00 

Pike & Heald, 26 feet Akron pipe, 

8-inch . . . . . 4,16 

Frank S. Bod well, 64 cesspool 

stones ..... 188.00 

Frank S. Bodwell, 2 ft. edgestones 11.20 

Frank S. Bodwell, 2 3-foot circles 9.00 
Paid Head & Dowst Co.: 

184 feet spruce ...... 2.95 

2 level glasses ..... .20 

35 feet Michigan pine " . . , 1.75 

5,200 brick ..... 44.20 

8,940 feet spruce a.t $16 . . . 143-04 

4,426 feet spruce at $16, district 10 . 70.82 

1,200 U. D. brick, district 10 . . 8.00 

300 hemlock boards at $14, district 2 4.20 



$18.34 



528 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



loo laths .... 
Labor on steam drill, district 2 
13,263 feet spruce boards, plank, and 

joist, district 2 
3,323 feet spruce, district 2 
2,400 brick 
4,800 brick 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

2,018 feet spruce plank, Bridge and 

Wilson 
2,004 feet spruce plank. Bridge and 

Wilson 
1,000 feet spruce plank, shoe-shof 

sewer .... 

1,093 f^^^ spruce 

Paid A. C. Wallace : 

9,562 feet spruceat ^16 

184 feet pine at $24 . 

Sawing hard wood . 

1,020 feet spruce plank 

8 feet Michigan pine 

1,548 feet spruce 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 50 

feet Georgia pine, district 10 

James Baldwin Co., 74 feet rock 

maple plank at ^40 . 
A. J. Sawyer, 1,494 feet spruce 
Martin Fitzgerald, cutting stone at 

city yard .... 
Palmer & Garmon, 40^ hours' la 
bor cutting stone on car . 

FREIGHT. 



$0.28 
10.00 

212.21 

53-17 
20.40 

34.00 



32.-29 

32.06 

16.00 

17.49 

152.99 

4.42 

•75 
16.32 

.28 

24.71 

1.50 

2.96 
23.90 

3-15 
18.33 



$2,903.12 



Paid Concord & Montreal R. R. : 
Freight on 42,000 brick 
Freight on castings from Boston 



$33-6o 
1.66 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



529 



Freight on castings from Concord 

Freight on 49,000 brick . 

Freight on 14,000 brick 

Freight on castings from Concord 

Freight on 18,000 brick . 

Freight on 35,000 brick 
Paid Pierce F. Lanergan, four-horse team 
hauling 24-inch pipe from Al- 
bany street to depot . 
Boston & Maine R. R., freight on 

pipe 

J. W. Wilson, freight and trucking 
castings ..... 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid William E. Williams, repairing roof 
C. C. Rowe's house . 

E- P. Johnson Co., i^ tons Cum- 
berland coal .... 

A. & D. M. Poore, y^ ton Cumber- 
land coal . 

H. Fradd & Co., 16 lbs. tallow 

H. Fradd & Co., pail . 

J. F. Wyman, 14,435 ^^s. Cumber- 
land coal ..... 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 10,750 
lbs. Cumberland coal 

Fred G. Stark, 2^4 loads bundle 
brush ..... 

James Briggs, 2 dippers 

Dr. Carpenter, repairing wagon 

Manchester Horse Railway, car- 
fare . . . ... 

Adams & Tasker, 4 lbs. string 



Total expenditures 
34 



^1.44 
39.20 
11.20 
1.38 
16.80 
28.00 



399.00 
5.16 



$2.05 


8.50 


3.20 


•74 


•45 


40.25 


35-04 


5.00 


.90 


2.50 



10.90 



$549-44 



;io9.ii 



^39)724-65 



530 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Second Street Bridge. 



Appropriation 



),000.00 



Expenditures. 
Balance transferred to new account 



),000.00 



Engineer's Department. 



Appropriation .... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 



Expenditures. 



l-jOOO.OO 

I60.6I 



,160.61 



LABOR. 

Paid W. H. Bennett, services as engineer $1,200.00 
Harry J. Briggs, 306 days' labor, 

assisting engineer . . . 612.00 

Edgar E. Farmer, 196 days' labor, 

assisting engineer . . . 196.00 

John M. Kendall, 4 days' labor, 

assisting engineer . . . 12.00 

John M. Kendall, 24 days' labor 

on plans for ward 9 engine-house 

and ward room . . . 42.00 

George W. Wales, 317 1\ days' 

labor, assisting engineer . . 634.80 

Harrie M. Young, 312 days' labor, 

assisting engineer . . . 702.00 

Carrie H. Bennett, 4 days' labor in 

engineer's office . . . 4.00 



,402.80 



ENGINEER S DEPARTMENT. 



531 



TEAM AND TEAM EXPENSES. 



Paid Charles Williams, i gray horse 




called Dick .... 


$190.00 


Paid Kimball Carriage Co. : 




I wagon ...... 


75.00 


I harness ...... 


25.00 


I stable blanket .... 


2.50 


I street blanket .... 


6.50 


I halter ...... 


1.50 


I surcingle ..... 


.60 


Paid Connor & Grossman, shoeing horse 


10.45 


George W. Wales, horse-car fares . 


•50 


John T. Beach, carriage work 


2.70 


TELEPHONE. 





114.75 



Paid New England Telegraph and Telephone Co., 
use of telephone .... 



525-50 



SUPPLIES AND OFFICE EXPENSES. 



Paid Harrie M. Young, cash paid sundr> 




small items . . . . 


$0.85 


George W. Wales, i box pearline 


•25 


George W. Wales, twine 


•50 


Paid W. H. Bennett : 




Expenses to Boston in reference to 




Stark park . . . . . 


3.60 


Postage stamps . . . . . 


4.00 


Drawing point for office 


2.25 


Expenses to Nashua . 


.72 


Expenses to Boston with instruments 


4.60 


Blotter bath for copying press . 


3-5° 


Repairs on tape 


•45 


Dustpan 


•25 


Express 


1-34 



532 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Otis Barton, 105 yards cotton cloth 
at 8j^c 

Paid Buff & Berger : 

I tripod head for transit, without bolts 
I transit foot plate .... 

1 packing piece for transit 

2 plumb bobs ..... 
Repairing transit, 6}^ hours' labor 

Paid A. V. Benoit, 20 yards plans 
mounted on cloth 
A. V. Benoit, i roll drawing paper 
Paid E. R. Coburn & Co. : 

3 quires Imp. drawing paper 
2 rolls Paragon drawing paper 
2 quires bond T. paper 

2 quires drawing paper 
I quire Imp. paper . 
Index 

Rubber bands and paper 
Triangle . 

3 rolls blue print paper 
I roll tracing cloth . 

Paid W. P. Farmer, i pair rubber boots 
Head & Dowst Co., brass butts, 
screws, labor, and lumber . 
Paid Jere. Hodge : 

3,000 pine grade stakes 

Labor on drafting boards 

205 feet 2j^-inch Michigan pine 

25^ hours' labor 

Shellac, alcohol, and oil 

2,000 pine grade stakes 
Paid Thomas A. Lane : 

I crown burner 

Labor 

I Argand chimney . 



$8.93 

4.00 
3.00 
1.50 
5.00 
3-9° 

15.00 
15.00 

7.00 
24.00 
•4.80 

9.00 

2-35 
.30 

•85 

•75 

3-75 

9-45 

3-25 

11.90 

27.00 
1.50 

14-35 
10.20 

•85 
18.00 

•75 
•25 
.10 



engineer's department. 



633 



I torch and tapers .... 


^I.OO 


Labor i hour on safe 


.40 


Paid William E. INfoore, i nickel-plated 




numbering machine . 


18.00 


Novelty Advertising Co., i font 




type with 12 holders 


5.00 


Paid John B. Varick Co. : 




6 No. 7 brooms . . . . 


1.88 


I 50-foot steel tape .... 


6.00 


I 100-foot steel tape .... 


10.25 


2 Yale padlocks .... 


1.76 


100 yards silk line .... 


1.50 


36 Ven. red French crayons 


1.05 


2 plumb bobs ..... 


4.00 


I lb. powdered emery 


.10 


I nickel-plated cup turn . 


.40 


I hand saw ..... 


1.25 


5 lbs. nails ..... 


•15 


15 feet level chain .... 


1.20 


I hammer ..... 


•50 


Paid Charles H. Woods, painting rods . 


3-50 


Charles H. Woods, repairing in- 




strument boxes, etc. . 


1.50 


The John B. Clarke Co., printing 




50 cards, Derryfield park . 


1.80 


The John B. Clarke Co., printing 




15,0 reports with covers 


28.00 


Press Printing & Publishing Co., 




printing 200 blank contracts 


5-25 


Paid Temple & Farrington Co. : 




12 maps of Manchester 


3.00 


I blank book, No. 3370 . 


8.50 


I blank book. No. 3371 


8.50 


I blank book, No. 3447 . 


6.60 


Shades and fixtures .... 


13.90 


Ink wells, rubber bands, ink, and sta- 




tionery ...... 


9.80 



534 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

2 index books ..... ;^i.oo 

Stationery, etc. . . . . 13-15 

Paid T. H. Tuson, printing 100 cards 

for index case .... .45 

D. H. Hurd & Co., i copy town 
and city atlas, state of New 
Hampshire .... 15-00 

E. E. Taylor, i set scales . . 7.68 
E. E. Taylor, i cell straight edge 1.75 
Walter Blenus, repairing tapes . 4.65 

$417-56 

Total expenditures ..... $4,160.61 



Health Department. 

Appropriation . $2,500.00 

Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid Geo. C. Hoitt, salafy as health offi- 
cer for year ending Feb. i, 1893 $200.00 
Neil F. Starr, salary as health officer 

for year ending Feb. i, 1893 • 200.00 

Jos. B. Sawyer, salary as health offi- 
cer for year ending Feb. i, 1893 200.00 

Harry E. French, 12 days' labor 

as inspector .... 18.00 

M. J. Jenkins, 10 clays' labor as in- 
spector ..... 22.50 

Russell White, 49^ days' labor as 

inspector ..... 99.00 

H. S. Clough, 257 days' labor as 

inspector ..... 771.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 535 

Paid John F. Looney, 256 days' labor 

as inspector .... $512.00 
Sarah G. Sawyer, making out 
monthly bulletin and table of 
mortality for 189 1 . . . 25.00 



$2,047.50 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., printing 150 
reports, 16 pages and cover 
John B. Clarke Co., 100 J^^ -sheet 
posters, notice .... 

John B. Clarke Co., 500 ^ letter 
notices ..... 

Paid Press Printing and Publishing Co. : 
1,500 notices ..... 

500 notices ..... 

1,000 regulations for restriction of 

pestilential diseases 
Publishing regulations, 5^ inches, 3 
times ...... 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing : 
500 blanks, 100 placards, 500 postals. 
500 note heads ..... 

500 2-cent stamped envelopes . 
2,000 copies, 9 page circular (cholera) . 
500 notices and duplicates to swine 
owners ...... 

1,000 note heads in 8 tablets 
1,000 2-cent stamped envelopes and 
envelopes ..... 23.50 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., record 
book, inkstand, penholder, ink, 
pens, and paper . . . 3.60 

Temple & Farrington Co., i blank 

book ..... 5.50 



2.25 


3.00 


4-50 


2.50 


4-25 


10.45 


11-35 


1-95 


11-75 


7-50 


4.25 


3-50 



536 "REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid " N. H. Post," printing i,ooo chol- 
era pamphlets (German) . . $10.50 

Joseph B. Sawyer, ledger paper and 

postage stamps .... 1.40 

H. S. Clough, 30 Spencerian pens .25 

Nate M. Kellogg, printing and 

binding 1,000 vault notices . 3.50 

Le Progres Co., printing 2,000 

cholera pamphlets (French) . 14.00 



TEAMS. 

Paid F. X. Chenette, use of team . . $i-75 

J. G. Ellinwood, use of team . 1.75 
W. J. Freeman, use of hacks and 

teams ..... 19-50 

W. B. Corey & Co., trucking from 

pest house .... i.oo 

John Looney, horse-car fares . 11.80 

H. S. Clough, horse-car fares . 25.32 

Russell White, horse-car fares . 8.35 

M. J. Jenkins, horse-car fares . .40 

Harry E. French, horse-car fares . 1.75 
Paid H. S. Clough : 

Railroad fare to Lawrence and return 1.30 

Railroad fare to Massabesic and return .20 

Job team to remove swill ... .55 

Team ...... .50 

Fare to Concord and return . . .72 
,Paid John Looney, fare to Massabesic 

and return . "^ . . . .20 

John Looney, horse-car fares . 2.55 

John Looney, book and oil . . .10 



$138-50 



$77-74 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 537 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid H. S. Clough : 

Cash paid for basket . . . $0.60 

Tacks and envelopes . . ^ . .18 

Postage stamps, disinfectants, etc. . 5.54 

Postage stamps .... 2.50 

Recovering keys .... .25 

Fixing knob on door . . . .20 

Paid John Looney, tacks and chloride of 

lime ..... .10 

Joseph B. Sawyer, 2 tack hammers 

and screw driver ... .40 

E. J. Doherty, labor ... i.oo 

D. J. Adams, i mail box, 2 drawer 

locks, and labor on the same . 4.15 

Frank P. Colby, posting 100 quar- 
ter sheets ..... i.oo 

Frank P. Colby, distributing 5,000 

cholera pamphlets . . . 6.25 

Higgins Bros., i oak desk . . 40.00 

John B. Varick Co., lantern, sperm 

oil, tape measure ... 1.05 

Burnham, Brown & Warren, ser- 
vices, counsel, and advice in sun- 
dry cases ..... 41-50 

Manchester Hardware Co., lantern .50 

George W. Prescott, legal services 
and expenses in State v. Lawrence 
Dowd ..... 26.05 

John T. Gott, burying dead animals 3.00 

Judith Sherer, boarding 4 men 13 
days at 50 cents each, German 

immigrants exposed to small-pox 26.00 

^160.27 



Total expenditures ..... ^2,424.01 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 75-99 

^2,500.00 



5^8 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Appropriation 



Repairs of Schoolhouses. 

Expenditures, 
mason work. 



Paid B. W. Robinson, repairing plaster- 
ing at Bakersville schoolhouse . 
B. W. Robinson, whitewashing, kal- 
somining, etc., sundry school- 
houses . . . . . 
Paid W. M. Darrah&Co.: 
Slater and tender 33^ hours 
26 slates ..... 
3 lbs. sheet zinc (Spring street) 
Labor ..... 
Paid Chas. E. Lord, mason work, white 
washing, etc., sundry schoolhouses 



PAINTING AND GLAZING. 

Paid K. G. Batchelder, setting glass in 

Varney and South-Main-street 

schoolhouses .... 

J. S. Avery, setting glass at High 

and Ash-street schoolhouses 

Paid John A. Sargent : 

18 lights glass and setting same at 

Spring-street schoolhouse 
4 lights glass and setting same at Low- 
ell-street schoolhouse 
15 yards blackboard slating at Ash- 
street schoolhouse 
Painting 



$2.50 

109.05 

1-75 

1.04 

.21 

8.23 

127.82 



$2.00 



3.60 



4-55 



3-75 
7.66 



;,ooo.oo. 



$250.60 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 539 

Paid Sargent & Corson, paint, painting 
and glazing at High school, Lin- 
coln-street, North-Main-Street, 
Ash-street,and other schoolhouses $ 1 63.45 
Paid Henry McEhvin, repairing black- 
boards as follows : 
1,850 sq. ft. paper at 8c. at Lincoln- 
street schoolhouse . . . 148.00 
8^8 sq. ft. repairs at 5c., Lincoln-street 

schoolhouse ..... 41.90 

1,318 sq. ft. repairs at 5c., North-Main- 

street schoolhouse .... 65.90 

991 sq. ft. repairs at 5c., Spring-street 

schoolhouse ..... 49'55 

848 sq. ft. repairs at 5c., Bakersville 

schoolhouse . . . . . ^2.40 

Paid J. A. Svvasey, 420 sq. ft. 

paper blackboard, 8c. ^33-6o 
J. A. Swasey, 35 sq. ft. 
slating old black- 
boards . . . 1.75 



$35-35 
Discount . . . 4.00 



Paid J. A. Swasey, 141 sq. ft. blackboard 
surface ..... 

J. J. Abbott, stock and labor at 
sundry schoolhouses . 

John Bryson, painting and grain- 
ing strips ..... 

George S. Perry & Co., 147 feet 
8}^-inch blackboard 

CLEANING VAULTS. 



31-35 


14.10 


208.25 


•75 


35-44 



^23.65 



Paid Timothy McKenna, cleaning vaults at 9 school- 
houses ........ $24.75 



540 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



CONCRETING. 

Paid estate C. H. Robie, 33,992 yards at 

45 c., Webster-street schoolhouse ^152.96 

estate C. H. Robie, 7,648 yards at 

25c., Webster-street schoolhouse 19.12 

estate C. H. Robie, grading, Web- 
ster-street schoolhouse . . i35'75 



WOODWORK. 

Paid Geo. H. Dudley, labor^ lumber, and 

hardware ^890.76 

J. Hodge, 504 feet 13^ -inch pic- 
ture molding . . . . 5.67 

Paid Head & Dowst : 

Lumber and labor on Stark district 

schoolhouse ..... 34-65 

Lumber and labor on old High school 
house ...... 

9 flagpoles ..... 

Repairs on Goffe's Falls schoolhouse . 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

819 feet pine boards, planed and sawed 

202 feet fence capping 

297 slats ...... 

North River road schoolhouse . 
Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., la- 
bor finishing and setting 11 flag- 
poles ..... 1 15-65 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., la- 
bor on desk legs, braces, etc. . 28.35 



103. 


.78 


72. 


.00 


158. 


,00 


15 


•56 


5' 


•05 


8, 


.91 



PLUMBING AND IRONWORK. 



Paid H. G. Batchelder, repairing heater 

in Varney schoolhouse . . $2.00 



$3°7-^3 



$1,438.38 



REPAIRS OF SCHOOLHOUSES. 541 

Paid Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 6 
days' labor covering steam pipe 
at Ash-street schoolhouse . . $12.00 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 2 

brass plugs and labor . . 3.60 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., i 

valve wrench . . . . i.to 

Thomas A. Lane, materials and 
labor in plumbing, piping, etc., 

, in schoolhouses . . . 398.42 

Manchester Heating & Lighting 

Co., 4 gongs at Hallsville school 36.00 

Manchester Heating & Lighting 
Co., electric work on schoolhouse 
as per contract .... 254.00 

Mahurin Lightning-Rod Co., re- 
pairing rod on Webster-street 
schoolhouse .... 3.50 

Mahurin Lightning-Rod Co., re- 
pairing rod on Bakersville school- 
house ..... i3'5o 

Pike & Heald, steam heating Spring- 
street schoolhouse, as per contract 86 7.00 

Pike & Heald, plumbing, materials, 
pipe, and labor at Bakersville, 
Blodget street, etc. . . . 74-42 

Pike & Heald, tin, solder, roofing 

cement, and labor . . . 1 16.51 

John B. Varick Co., bolts, screws, 

brass locks, etc. . . . 18.10 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., i step- 
ladder 1.25 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 6 

galvanized ash cans . . . 14.40 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., 442 
hours' labor grading, Webster- 
street schoolhouse . . . 91-27 

Amoskeag Manufacturing Co., i 

valve wrench . . . . i.io 

^1,908.17 



542 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid John B. Varick, loo lbs. phosphate $i'75 

John B. Varick Co., i coil ^\ ma- 

nilla rope . . . . . 5.70 

Weston & Hill Co., 10 flags . 45-00 

J. C. Blair, locks, screws, etc. . 1.31 

Edward Sears, putting flag rope 

through sheave of flag pole, Var- 

ney school .... i.oo 

Pay-roll, district No. 10, grading for 

concrete at Varney school . . 110.50 

Albert Somes, expense to Boston 

and return, to buy dynamo . 2.12 

Alphonso Boyce, labor of men and 

teams, grading schoolhouse yard 

in district No. 9 . . . 31-50 

Total expenditures . . . . . 

Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$198.88 

4,952.26 

47-74 



Fuel. 



;, 000.00 



Appropriation 



^,500.00 



Expenditures. 



COAL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & C©., 151,908 lbs. 

egg coal, at $6.25 . . . $474-7i 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 966,090 lbs. 

egg coal, at ^5.95 . . . 2,874.11 
DeCoiircy, Holland & Marshall, 

20,300 lbs. egg coal, at $6.25 . 63.44 



FUEL. 543 

Paid Moore & Preston, 42,000 lbs. Le- 
high egg coal, at $6.25 . . $131.25 
A. & D. M. Poore, 72,355 lbs. Le- 
high egg coal, at ;^6. 25 . . 226.12 



^3>769-63 



WOOD. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co., 2 cords slabs $11.00 

Moore & Preston, 4 cords of pine 

wood, sawed, at $5.25 . . 21.00 

Moore & Preston, 2 cords beech 

and maple, sawed . . . i5'Oo 

Moore &: Preston, 2 cords pine 

wood, at $4- 75 • • • • 9-5o 

Paid A. & D. M. Poore : 

2 cords hard wood, sawed . . . 16.00 

I cord hard wood .... 8.00 

I cord, 3^ hard wood and ^ pine . 7.50 

I cord, Yz hard wood and ^ pine . 7.00 

5 barrels charcoal .... 2.00 

i^ cords wood, sawed and split . ii'25 

Paid J. Hodge, kindlings . . . 2.00 

William H. Newry, cutting wood 

at Hallsville school . . . 4.25 

J. P. Russell & Co., 52)^ cords of 

wood, at $5.75 .... 301.87 

J. P. Russell & Co., surveying . .90 

J. P. Russell & Co., moving and 

sawing wood .... 2.00 

Dennis Murphy, 2 days' labor saw- 
ing wood at Webster-street school- 
house . . . . . 3.00 
Luther S. Proctor, 22 cords pine, 
sawed and delivered at 22 school- 
houses . . . . . 88.00 



;io.27 



544 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid John B. Varick Co. : 






2 wheelbarrows . 


. 


^6.00 


I No. 8 scoop . 




1.25 


50 feet hose 


. 


5.00 


I ash barrel 




3-25 


Small shovel, hose nozzle, 


2 thermom- 




eters, i coal hod . 




2.00 



$17-50 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



,297.40 
202.60 



Furniture and Supplies 




Appropriation 


• 


Expenditures. 




HARDWARE. 




Paid Manchester Hardware Co., 2^8 lbs. 




twine ..... 


$0.48 


Killey & Wadleigh, floor brushes, 




snow shovel .... 


7.40 


John B. Varick Co., 2 No. 20 feather 




dusters ..... 


4.00 


John B. Varick Co., 2 No. 14 floor 




brushes ..... 


4-50 


Paid John B. Varick Co. : 




1 2 No. 3 counter dusters . 


2.50 


12 No. 7 brooms .... 


3.00 


5 18 X 30 wire mats .... 


8.75 


2 wire mats ..... 


5-25 


2 galvanized coal hods 


1.30 


3 waste baskets .... 


3-75 



,500.00 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 



545 



Bolts, pail, and other hardware for 




Hallsville school . 




$1-56 


4 waste baskets 






4.48 


i6 i8 X 30 wire mats 






24.00 


2 No. 14 floor brushes 






4-5^ 


I No. 18 ostrich duster 






1-75 


12 No. 12 turkey dusters 






4-5° 


12 ash barrels . 






39.00 


Other supplies . 






41-73 


48 doz. Jap. pocket scissors 




24.00 


Paid Wadleigh Hardware Co.: 






2 floor brushes . 




3-50 


I feather duster 




2.00 


I floor brush 




1-75 


Other hardware 






3.85 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Boston School Supply Co., 6 cop- 
per ink fillers .... $7-5° 
Boston School Supply Co., i chart 7.15 
Ginn & Co., music chart and easel 8.58 
Ginn & Co., 2 easels and 155 coda 5.29 
Paid J. L. Hammett : 

14x5 blackboard and stand . . 12.00 

21 Stanford's maps . . . . 78-75 

2 Rand & McNally and N. E. . . 4.50 

7 Stanford's maps . . . . 26.25 

I case crayons , . ' . . . 6.75 

I set model relief maps . . . 2.40 
Paid Silver, Burdett & Co., maps and 

charts ..... 20.80 

Temple & Farrington Co., 105 tags .20 
Temple & Farrington Co., curtains, 

fixtures, and hanging . . 16.53 
Temple & Farrington Co. , 6 sheets 

cardboard .... .46 

3.5 



^'^igy-ss 



$197.16 



546 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



FURNITURE. 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 14 chairs 

for sundry schools . . . ^iS-So 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 4 high 

cane-seated chairs . . . 7.00 

Paid C. A. Trefethen : 

2 clocks, Bakersville .... 7.50 

2 clocks ...... 8.00 

Repairing clocks, Webster-street and 

Amoskeag ..... 2.00 

Repairing clocks, and 2 clocks . . 8.50 

Paid Jos. Lewis, repairing i ofifice chair .60 

George S. Perry & Co., 17 doz. 

ink-wells . . . . . 34.55 

Head & Dowst Co., lumber and la- 
bor on footrests for various 
schools ..... 10.00 

R. D. Gay, shades and fixtures for 

schools ..... 18.05 

J. J. Abbott, repairing i desk . 2.00 

J. J. Abbott, finishing i desk , . 1.50 

L. P. LaBonte, draperies and cur- 
tains for Bakersville school . i.oo 
Vermont School Seat 

Co., 3 teachers' desks ^37-50 
Less freight and repairs 3.35 



34-15 

Winchester Furniture Co., i No. 20 

teacher's desk .... 17.00 

D. M. Poore & Son, 3 gallons kero- 
sene oil . ^ . . . .45 

R. McQuarry, i granite wash basin .40 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid Barton & Co., drapery and sash rods ^6.37 

J. Henry Ling, 12 pitch pipes . 1.56 



FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES. 547 

Paid W. O. Davidson, 83^ hours' truck- 
ing and storing old furniture 
from Bridge-street schoolhouse . ^4-37 

Alfred Mudge & Son, i Elect, music 3.25 

H. J. Holmes, i 3-gallon oil can . 1.20 

H. J. Holmes, 3 gallons oil . . .39 

J. Stickney, 2 pecks shoe pegs . .50 

The Holtzer-Cabot Electric Co., i 
■1- H. P. 12 volt motor with pul- 
ley, No. 225 D., speed 3,000 . 32.00 
W. A. Choate & Co., Johnston 

map of So. America on rollers . 3.00 

Public school celebration, 200 offi- 
cial programs, Columbus Day . 2.00 
Allen N. Clapp, 4 papers gold dust i.oo 
A. M. Eastman, 4 gallons oil . .60 
A. M. Eastman, 4 packages ivorine .48 
Novelty Advertising Co., card- 
board, etc. .... 3.38 
Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., 12 hose menders . . .55 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 
Co., telegraph machine, etc., for 
high school .... 7.96 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., 4 battery cells . . . 2.40 

Tebbetts & Soule, 4^ doz. corks . .65 

S71.66 



Total expenditures .... . . ^634.57 

Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 165.43 



548 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Books and Stationery. 
Appropriation ..... . . ^300.00 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

Paid American Book Co., 3 Webster's 

dictionaries .... $25.75 

B. A. Fowler & Co., 7 sets Inter- 
national Cyclopedia, exchanged 
for others for High, Lincoln, 
Franklin, Ash, Webster, Train- 
ing, and Varney schools . . 200 00 
W. P. Goodman, record book, en- 
velopes, note paper, inkstand, 
and stationery . . . . 27.19 

Paid Hammond Typewriter Co. : 

I ream No. 11 letter paper . . 1,20 

3 dozen carbon .... 1.12 

3 dozen blue carbon .... 1.50 

Paid G. F. King & Merrill, 5 gross pens 23.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., 2 gross 

rubber bands .... .34 

Smith & White, stationery . . 6.72 

A. S. Barnes & Co., Popular His- 
tory ...... 2.68 

George F. Cram, atlas . . . 3.75 ,- 

Ginn & Co., Our World . . 1.40 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., HTstory 

of Our Country .... 3.48 

Daniels & Downs, i ream paper . 1,35 



5299-73 

Total expenditure ..... $299. 73 
Transferred to reserved fund .... . .27 

^300.00 



PRINTING AND ADVERTISING. 549 

Printing and Advertising. 

Appropriation ...... . $400.00 

"Expenditures, 
sundries. 

Paid John B. Clarke Co. : 
Printing 500 reports, 66 pages and 

cover ...... $41-25 

Advertising examination of teachers . 7.25 

Printing blanks, examination papers, 
note heads, circulars, coupon sheets, 
labels for school books, mill blanks, 
and various other blanks in use by 
superintendent, truant officer, and 
teachers . . . . . 155-00 

Tickets, programs, etc., for graduation 69.25 

12,000 programs, Columbus Day . 25.00 

1,000 blanks ..... 7.00 

100 half-note circulars . . . 1.50 

1,100 blanks ..... io-5o 

Paid Daily Press Publishing Co., adver- 
tising teachers' examination . 3.00 
Union Publishing Co., advertising 
examination of teachers, 4 squares, 
daily 4 times and weekly i time 14.00 

^333-75 



Total expenditures ..... $333-75 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 66.25 



550 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Contingent Expenses. 

Appropriation ..... ^1,200.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 27.99 



^1,227.99 



Expenditures, 
freight and cartage. 

Paid J. G. Jones, freight and cartage . ;^37'26 

J. B. Lippincott Co., express on 

encyclopaedia, returned . . 1.45 

G. E. Fellows, carting 3 loads 

chairs ..... 2.00 

L. Rowe, moving books, furniture, 

and seats ..... 2.00 

Hartley E. Vaughan, moving seats, 

Columbus Day .... 5.00 



WATER AND GAS. 



Paid People's Gas-Light Co., gas . . $186.90 
Water-Works, water for July, Au- 
gust and September . . . 103.95 



ANNUAL GRADUATION. 

Paid R. W. Bean, services at Opera 

House ..... $2.25 

W. Heron, Jr., 170 diplomas . 29.55 

Manchester Opera^ House Co., use 

of Opera House, June 22, 1892 40.00 

Arthur Stockin, 300 diplomas, 

parchment . . . . 68.50 

Arthur Stockin, lithograph stone 

with engraving . . . . 10.00 



M7-7I 



$290.85 



I 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 551 

Paid Weston & Hill Co., i8 rolls ribbon $20.79 

Clark & Estey, ribbon . . . 2.80 
F. P. Colby, moving piano to and 

from Opera House . . . 6.00 
Higgins Bros., use of 245 chairs at 

Opera House . , . . 14-70 

$194-59 

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT AND SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Paid Manchester post-office, postage 

stamps ..... $20.00 

E. I. Woodbury, postage . . 2.50 

H. C. Dimond & Co., 2 Midget 

stamps ..... 2.00 

W. P. Goodman, rubber bands, 

inkstand, envelopes . . . 2.27 

M. P. Hall, expense visiting schools 

in Boston, Cambridge, Waltham, 

Mass., and Concord, N. H. . 3.92 

C. H. Manning, expense visiting 

schools as above . . . 3.20 

L. C. Baldwin, expense visiting 

schools, as above . . . 3.20 

J. B. McCrillis «&: Son, i typewriter 

ribbon ..... i.oo 

J. B. Sanborn, 3 copies school laws 2.25 

William Buck, for carriage hire, 

visiting schools, to Dec. 31, 1892 94-50 

S. S. Piper, postmaster, postage . 10.00 

$144-84 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS FOR HIGH SCHOOL. 

Paid Tebbetts & Soule, chemical supplies . . $34-94 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. S. Avery, glass and setting same 

at Ash-street schoolhouse . . $2.00 



552 ■ REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid D. J. Adams, repairing pencil 

sharpener, fitting keys, etc. . $3-65 

The American Book Co., Gray's 

microscope, 2 lenses . . . i4-55 

Boston School Supply Co., i Mon- 
roe's Primary Reading Chart . 7.75 

John B. Clarke Co., binding i vol- 
ume school register ... .50 

Joel Daniels & Co., setting 4 lights 

glass, Webster-street school . 1.40 

Joel Daniels & Co., paint and labor. 

Spring-street school . . . 2.84 

W. P. Goodman, inkstands, muci- 
lage, rubber bands, blotting pa- 
per, and stationery . . . 12.14 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., 3 chairs . 11.00 

Charles A. Hoitt & Co., reseating 

2 chairs ..... .50 

Novelty Advertising Co., 1,512 

sheets cardboard, and cutting . 15-69 

Novelty Advertising Co., 250 col- 
ored envelopes . . . 1.25 

New England Publishing Co., sub- 
scription for " Journal of Educa- 
tion " three years ending Janu- 
ary, 1893, and subscription for 
" American Teacher " three years 
ending January, 1893 . . 9.00 

Educational Publishing Co., two 
years subscription to " Popular 
Educator, ' ' from November, 
1891, to November, 1893 . • 2.00 

John H. Proctor, cleaning vault 2 

times ..... 5.00 

L. C. Paige, 4 lights glass and set- 
ting ..... .90 



CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 553 

Paid Pike & Heald, grates, mops, dust- 
pans, etc. .... $20.84 

George S. Perry, 10 gallons black 

ink ...... 6.40 

L. & W. T. Seiberlich, glass and 

putty .48 

Albert Somes, expenses to Boston 

and return .... 3.50 

Weston & Hill Co., 8 mats for 

Spring-street school . . . 5.36 

Weston & Hill Co., zincing 4 

ends, Spring-street school . . 2.25 

Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict, 2 

Paragon ribbons . . . 2.00 

Killey & Wadleigh, 4 floor brushes 7.00 

Manchester Hardware Co., hard- 
ware . . . . . 6.27 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 3 floor 

brushes . . . . . 5.25 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., i feather 

duster ..... 2.25 

John B. Varick Co., brushes, sta- 
ples, butts, wire nails, locks, 
mops, etc. . . . . 35-14 

Frank P. Colby, moving piano, 

Hallsville school . . . 2.00 

Wm. H. Elliott & Son, pitch pipes 2.50 

Silver, Burdett & Co., 210 music 8. 82 

Ginn & Co., 1,855 niusic books . 32.91 

A. A. Jenkins, tuning pianos . . 16.00 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clocks 10.00 

Allen N. Clapp, 2 gals, oil, oil can .73 

R. McQuarry, 12 wash basins . i.oo 

Henry Gorman, 6 gals, oil, Web- 
ster-street school . . . .90 

Oliver Ditson Co., music . . 13.02 

Ginn & Co., music . . . 17.01 



554 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

laid Water-works, use of water from 

January to July . . . $210.60 

Barton & Co., 36 yards cambric 
for drawing exhibit, Ash-street 
school ..... 2.16 

Edward J. Boyle, six days' service 
as special police officer, securing 
truants ..... 10.50 



515.06 
Total expenditures ..... $1,227.99 



Care of Rooms. 

Appropriation . . . ... $4,000.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 50-77 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid John S. Avery, janitor High and 

Ash-street schoolhouses . . $600.00 

Edward P. Cogswell, janitor Frank- 
lin and Training school houses . 475.00 

Wm. Stevens, janitor Lincoln-street 

and Wilson hill schoolhouses . 450.00 

H. G. Batchelder, janitor Varney 

and Piscataquog schoolhouses . 450.00 

Michael Finley, Webster-street and 

Blodget-street schoolhouses . 341-64 

Wm. H. Morrill, janitor Spring- 
street and Lowell-street school- 
houses ..... 350.04 

Joseph- C. Blaine, janitor North- 

Main-street schoolhouse . . 350.04 



^,050.77 



CARE OF ROOMS. 555 

Paid Henry C. Dickey, janitor Bakers- 

ville schoolhouse . . . $300.00 

Wm. H. Newry, janitor Hallsville 
» schoolhouse .... 274.98 

James E. Bailey, janitor Amoskeag 

schoolhouse .... 170.04 

D. S. Dunbar, janitor Mosquito 

Pond schoolhouse . . . 19-50 

Andrew J. Dobbin, janitor Goffe's 

Falls schoolhouse . . . 3.3-5° 

Frank French, janitor Harvey Dis- 
trict schoolhouse . . . 12.00 

Etta B. Proctor, janitor Youngs- 

ville schoolhouse . . . 29.75 

Inez M. Warren, janitor Stark Dis- 
trict schoolhouse . . . 41-25 

M. G. Worthen, janitor Webster's 

Mills schoolhouse . . . 40.00 

M. G. Worthen, piling wood and 

cleaning house ... 2.75 

C. M. Whiting, care of Webster- 
street and Blodget-street school- 
houses, as substitute for janitor . 70-83 

Margaret Flynn, cleaning Goffe's 

Falls schoolhouse . , . 5.00 

Samuel N. Boyce, janitor Harvey 

District schoolhouse . . 11.00 

Emma J. Ela, services as janitor . 21.00 

Emma J. Ela, putting wood in shed 1.75 

Emma J. Ela, setting glass, etc. . .70 



^4,050.77 

Total expenditures ..... ;^4,o5o.77 



550 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Evening Schools. 



Appropriation .... 


• 


Expenditures 




SALARIES. 




Paid Alice H. Boyd, 37 evenings 


$3500 


Mabel J. Brickett, 7 evenings 


6.30 


Gertrude A. Burns, 35 evenings 


31-50 


L. H. Carpenter, 71 evenings 


154.00 


Mary A. Clement, 54 evenings 


50.60 


Chas. E. Cochran, 70 evenings 


154.00 


Lizzie D. Hartford, 38 evenings 


38.00 


David P. Ekvall, 44 evenings 


39.60 


Maggie G. Linen, 35 evenings 


66.50 


Arthur W. Morgan, 64 evenings 


64.00 


William J. Mooar, 36 evenings 


33-50 


John J. Shea, 10 evenings 


9.00 


H. J. Crough, 35 evenings . 


31-50 


Attie S. Marshall, 30 evenings 


30.00 


Fannie L. Sanborn, 22 evenings 


19.80 


Louis H. Bailey, 35 evenings 


77.00 


Annie Brigham, 24 evenings . 


2I.6o 


SUPPLIES. 





Paid Edward E. Babb & Co., 72 Franklin and Pro- 
gressive readers ..... 



$1,200.00 



I 



(1.90 



S25.63 



JANITORS. 



Paid J. C. Blaine, services as janitor 

Wm. H. Morrill, services as janitor 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



^26,00 
60.40 



$86.40 



^973-93 
226.07 



$1,200.00 



EVENING SCHOOL MECHANICAL DRAWING. 



557 



Teachers' Salaries. 



Appropriation 







EXPENDITURES. 




Paid teachers, as per pay-rolls : 




January 


^4,869.99 


February 






5,666.24 


March 






55344-24 


April 






5,188.05 


May 






5^79-38 


June 






5)344-34 


September 






5,687.91 


October 






5)847-99 


November 






• 5)675-95 


December 




• 


5)656.27 


Total expenditures 


• ^54,660.36 


Amount transferred to reserved fund 


1,339-64 


• 




$56,000.00 



Evening Scliool IVIechanical Drawing. 



Appropriation 



$600.00 



Expenditures. 



SALARIES. 



Paid Henry W. Allen, for services . 
John M. Kendall, for services 
A. H. Sanborn, for services . 



SUPPLIES. 



Paid Temple & Farrington Co., 800 
sheets ruled in checks 
John B. Varick Co., 18 doz. thumb 
tacks ..... 



^159-75 

120.00 

77.00 



$5-75 
2.25 



^356-7; 



558 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., i con- 
necting rod, I valve, i eccentric 
strap ..... 



$20.00 



JANITOR. 

Paid William H. Morrill, for services as janitor 

Total expenditures .... 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$28.40 

^405.15 
194.85 

$600.00 



Free Text-Books. 



Appropriation 




Expenditures. 




FREE TEXT-BOOKS AND 


SUPPLIES. 


Paid American Book Co. 


$686.45 


W. P. Adams 


21.67 


F. M. Ambrose 


6.00 


Boston School Supply Co. 


12.75 


D. C. Colesworthy 


27.50 


Effingham, Maynard & Co. . 


41.14 


Frost (Sc Adams 


11.56 


Joseph Gillott & Sons . 


43-28 


W. P. Goodman . 


3-36 


Ginn & Co 


414.16 


William H. Huse . 


6.12 


D. C. Heath & Co. " . 


46.44 


J. L. Hammett 


117.05 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 


7.78 


King.& Merrill . . . . 


174.98 


Lee & Shepard 


125.39 



j,5oo.oo 



CITY LIBRARY 


• 


Paid Mills & Thompson 


$336 


Novelty Advertising Co. 


2-75 


George S. Perry & Co. 


306.09 


Prang Educational Co. . 


229.96 


Willard Small 


10.65 


Silver, Burdett & Co. . 


105.24 


Smith & White . 


30.91 


Thorpe &: Adams Manufacturing Co 


51.00 


Thompson, Brown & Co. 


18.97 


Temple &: Farring'on Co. 


1.80 


University Publishing Co. 


130.06 


William Ware & Co. . 


325-71 


E. R. Coburn & Co. . 


37-64 


Eagle Pencil Co. . . . . 


14.25 


Mead, Dodge & Co. . 


7.80 


Carl Schoenhof 


59-59 


P. P. Caproni & Brother 


7-65 


Greenough, Adams & Gushing 


13-75 


McMillan & Co. . 


7.00 


Holden Patent Book Cover Co. 


125.00 



559 



S3)234-8i 



LABOR. 

Paid Fannie L. Sanborn, services as clerk 

Total expenditures . . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$254-50 

$3,489-31 
10.69 

$3,500.00 



City Library. 

Balance from last year unexpended . $5,162.44 
Appropriation ..... 3,800.00 



5,962.44 



560 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures, 
librarian and assistant. 

Paid Mrs. M. J. Buncher, librarian . $800.00 
A. F. Payne, assistant librarian . 382.50 



$1,182.50 



CATALOGUE. 

Paid Charles A. Durfee . . ■•■. $m-S° 
Emma A. H. Piper, assistant in cat- 
aloguing 447-05 

Paid Library Bureau : 

2 card catalogue cases and fittings . 100.00 
21,000 catalogue cards . . . ■ 56.70 

2 card catalogue cases . . . 85.00 

10,000 catalogue cards . . . 27.00 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber and la- 
bor for card catalogue ... .85 



$1,494.10 

BINDING, REBINDING, AND RESEWING. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co. .... $494.31 

NEW BOOKS. 

Paid trustees of city library ..... $1,000.00 

WATER, GAS, FUEL, AND INSURANCE. 

Paid Water-works, use of water for 1892 $16.00 

People's Gas-light Co., for gas . 227.50 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., i>4 cords of 

pine slabs .... 6.75 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 80,530 lbs. 

egg coal, at $5.95 . . . 239.58 

L.B.' Bodwell & Co., 15 lbs. ice 

daily from June 13 to Sept. 13 . 3.75 



4 



CITY LIBRARY. 561 

Paid Moore & Preston, ^ cord slabs . $2.25 

L. B. Clough, agent, premium on 
$10,000 insurance on contents of 
library, JEtua. and N. H. Insur- 
ance Cos. .... 125.00 

$620.83 



NEWSPAPERS. 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., for " Daily Mirror and 

American" to April i, 1892 .... $6.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., printing 200 

reports . . . . . $11.00 
John B. Clarke Co., ruling paper 

and paper .... .60 
Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 

I ream packet note .... 3.50 

45,500 slips 9.00 

Repairing and regilding portrait frames 23.80 

Cord and hanging same . . " . i.oo 

24,000 slips ..... 4.80 

I blank book ..... 4.50 
Paid Thos. A. Lane Co., repairing gas 

leaks ..... 3.00 

Library Bureau, i dating stamp . 5.00 
N. P. Hunt, cash paid for postage, 

etc., for 1891 .... 2.40 
N. P. Hunt, cash paid for postage, 

etc., for 1892 .... 2.10 

$70.70 

Total expenditures ..... $4,868.44 
Balance transferred to new account . . . 4,094.00 

$8.96-'. 44 



562 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Fire Department. 

Appropriation ..... ^39,000.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 3,262.88 



Expenditures. 



SERVICES. 



Paid Thos. W. Lane, chief engineer 

Fred S. Bean, assistant engineer . 

Ruel G. Manning, assistant en- 
gineer ..... 

Eugene S. Whitney, assistant en- 
gineer ..... 

Clarence R. Merrill, assistant en- 
gineer ..... 

Fred S. Bean, clerk 



$1,300.00 
125.00 

125.00 

125.00 

125.00 
25.00 



teamsters anc 


engineers, 


as per pay-rolls : 


January ..... $1,015.50 


February 








1,020.00 


March . 








i,oiS.oo 


April 








1,013.00 


May 








969.50 


Tune 








944.00 


July . 








1,020.00 


August . 








1,023.00 


September 








1,174.00 


October 








1,181.50 


November 








1,183.00 


December 








1,181.50 



CALL MEMBERS. 



Paid Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co., 
for the year 1892 
Amoskeag Steam Fire Engine Co., 
extra labor July 3 and 4 . 



$1,485.00 
8.00 



1-2, 262. J 






$1,825.00 



$12,743.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 563 

Paid Fire King Steam Fire Engine Co.. 

for the year 1S92 . . . $1,485.00 

Fire King Steam Fire Engine Co., 

extra labor July 3 and 4 . . 8.00 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co.. 

for the year 1892 . . . 1,485.00 

N. S. Bean Steam Fire Engine Co., 

extra labor July 3 and 4 . . 8.00 

Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Co., 

for the year 1892 . . . 1,485.00 

Merrimack Steam Fire Engine Co.. 

extra labor July 3 and 4 . . 8.00 

General Stark Steam Fire Engine 

Co., for the year 1892 . . 1,485.00 

General Stark Steam Fire Engine 

Co., extra labor July 3 and 4 . 8.00 

Chemical Engine Co., for the .year 

1892 535-00 

Massabesic Hose Co., for the year 

1892 . . . . . 1,245.00 

Massabesic Hose Co., extra labor 

July 3 and 4 . . . . 8.00 

Pennacook Hose Co., for the year 

1892 ..... 1,245.00 

Pennacook Hose Co., extra labor 

July 3 and 4 . . . . 8.00 

Excelsior Hook & Ladder Co., for 

the year 1892 .... 2,045.00 
Excelsior Hook & Ladder Co., ex- 
tra labor July 3 and 4 . . 8.00 

$12,559.00 



OTHER LABOR. 



Paid Manley S. Adams, 130 days' la- 
bor as teamster . . . $195.00 
George Ames, 12 days' labor, driv- 
ing steamer .... t8.oo 



564 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid John Burke, driving supply wagon, 

5 alarms ..... $5-oo 

J. Newell Brown, lof weeks' ser- 
vices as engineer Steamer No. 2 ^S^-'^S 

J. Newell Brown, 14 daj-s' services 

as engineer Steamer No. 3 . 24.50 

Stephen Thomes, 13 days' services 

as engineer Steamer No. 2 . 22.75 

Thomas Brown, 14 days driver of 

Steamer No. 5 . . . . 21.00 

Ralph C. Mitchell, 28 days driver 

of Steamer No. 3 . . . 42.00 

Chas. Wiiley, care of horse, 4 nights 6.00 

~ Chas. Wiiley, driving horse. 2 days 3.00 

Thomas F. Dodge, engineer Steam- 
er No. 2, 5 days . . . 11.80 

George W. Bacon, services as fire- 
man for the year 1890 . . 31-45 

Charles S. Cousins, services as fire- 
man for the year 1890 

Charles S. Cousins, costs 

Roscoe Dyer, services as fireman 
for the year 1890 

Clarence R. Merrill, services as 
fireman for the year 1890 . 



LAUNDRY. 

Paid Mrs. George B. Forsaith, laundry 

work, etc. .... $19-25 

[Mrs. M. H. Hulme, laundry work, 

etc. . . " . . . 43-65 

Mrs. C. C. Tinkham, laundry 

work, etc. .... 26.02 

: . Mrs. W. F. Wheeler, laundry work, 

etc. . . . 38,45 



III. 


.10 


23.41 


122. 


.21 


28. 


.00 



$796-47 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



565 



Mrs. George M. Goodwin, laundry 

work, etc. .... $10.65 

Mrs. F. J. Dustin, laundry work, 

etc. 5-40 

FURNITURE, ETC. 

Paid Weston & Hill Co. : 

50 yards crash at 12 i^c. . . . $6.25 
8^ yards matting at Sjj^c. . . 5-49 
Ironing ends ..... 1.75 
40 yards matting at 671^0. . . 27.00 
Ironing ends ..... 3.50 
12 pillow slips ..... 2.50 
28 yds. matting, Hook-and-Ladder Co. 18.70 
Ironing ends ..... 2.25 
12 pillow slips, Fire King Co. . . 3.00 
12 sheets, Fire King Co. . . . 11.04 
26 yds. matting, Pennacook Hose Co. 17-56 
Ironing ends, Pennacook Hose Co. . 2.*5o 
^yi, yards matting, Fire King Co. . 5.33 
Ironing ends, Fire King Co. . . 1.50 
12 sheets, Vine street engine-house , 11.04 
4 spreads, Vine street engine-house . 5.00 
2 yds. silesia, Vine street engine-house .30 
151/5 yards matting. Vine street en- 
gine-house . . . . . 10.27 
Ironing ends ..... i.oo 

Paid D. A. Simons, 10 arm office chairs i7-5o 

D. A. Simons, i 2-gallon jar . .50 

Paid Charles A. Hoitt & Co. : 

2 chamber sets, etc., for Hook-and- 
Ladder No. I and Amoskeag Steam- 
er No. i 80.88 

I comforter . ... . . 1.50 

I wardrobe ..... ^3-5° 

1 spring ...... 4.00 



$143-42 



566 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Weston & Hill Co., it}( yards 

matting, Central Fire Station . $11-56 

Weston & Hill Co., ironing ends . 3.60 

Weston & Hill Co., 12 sheets, 12 

pillow slips, 6 towels . . 14.29 



$283.31 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



raia j. wscar isuruanK, printing i 
culars 


00 cir- 


$2.50 


Paid John B. Clarke Co. : 






Printing 500 envelopes 




12.25 


Printing 200 blanks, report fees 




2-75 


Printing 200 lists 




4-50 


Printing 150 envelopes 




•25 


Printing 400 reports, 58 pages 




35-00 


Printing 400 comp. slips . 




1.25 


Paid Nate Kellogg : 






4 blank order books 




4.40 


125 postal cards and printing 




2-75 


150 half- note circulars 




2.50 


150 half-note circulars 




2.25 


125 letter slips . 




1. 00 


Paid C. P. Trickey, i blank book 




1.50 


C. P. Trickey, 2 sheets blotti 


ng pa- 




per, 3 pass books 




•35 


C. P. Trickey, envelopes, 


mucil- 




age, etc. . 




5.00 


Temple & Farrington Co., 


I box 




envelopes . 




•50 


Temple & Farrington Co., 


I box 




elastic bands 




.14 



$78.89 



WATER, GAS, AND TELEPHONE. 



Paid Water- Works, use of water to Sep- 
tember I, 1892 , 



$731-35 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 567 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . ^903.84 
New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephones . 220.36 

$1,855.55 



FUEL. 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 

48,240 lbs. egg coal, at $6.25 . . $150-75 
50,000 lbs. cannel coal, at $16 . . 400.00 

2 barrels charcoal .... i.oo 

I cord pine slabs, sawed . . . 4.50 

Paid J. E. French, 12 feet pine wood . 7.50 

Stephen Gardiner, sawing and split- 
ting 2 cords kindling wood . 5.00 
Stanislaus Lavie, 4 cords wood, 2 

cords sawed and split . . 20.40 

Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 347,- 

195 lbs. egg coal, at $5.95 . . 1,032.91 
Moore & Preston, 3 cords slabs, 

sawed ..... 16.00 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 



Paid Boston. & Maine R. R., freight on 

2 barrels soda .... $0.72 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight .75 

John W. Wilson, truckage . . 5.09 



SUPPLIES. 

Paid J. A. & W. Bird, 2 barrels, 896 

lbs., soda . . . . . $31-36 

J. A. &. W. Bird, truckage . . .25 

Boston Belting Co., 4 clamps to 

fit 4j4-inch hose . . . 3-20 



$1,638.06 



$6.56 



568 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Boston Woven Hose ^: Rubber 
Co., 50 ft. chemical hose . 



S14.80 



Clark M. Bailey, 12 barn brooms . 


5-50 


Clark M. Bailey, 10 reams tissue 




paper ..... 


5.00 


Paid Cavanaugh Bros. : 




I gray horse ..... 


300.00 


I gray horse ..... 


325-00 


I gray horse ..... 


350.00 


I bay horse, Pennacook 


350.00 


I bay horse, Fire King 


2S0.20 


I gray horse, Amoskeag engine . 


350.00 


Paid Cornelius Callahan Co. : 




I Boston pipe ..... 


15. CO 


I extra pipe 


1.50 


I Perry Halloway Extinguisher . 


30.00 


2 dozen Regan rim snaps . 


24.00 


Paid P. C. Cheney Co., i horse in ex- 




change 


250.00 


DeVoursney Bros., i Neptune lan- 




tern Xo. 5 


3-75 


Paid A. S. Jackson : 




I gong 


12.00 


I strike bar . . . . . • 


5.00 


6 hose brushes, long handles 


7-50 


2 Boston pipes ..... 


30.00 


Paid Dennis Kerwin, i box Welcome 




soap 


4.25 


Dennis Kerwin, 2 boxes Soapine . 


8.00 


Cavanaugh Bros., use of horse 


36.00 


Plumer & Holton,^^5 pairs heavy 




overalls 


37-50 


Plumer & Holton. 15 reefers for 




Hook-and-Ladder Co. 


131-25 


Plumer & Holton, 16 reefers, at 




S8.75 


140.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 569 

Paid L. (Sc W. T. Seiberlich, small can 

linseed oil . . . . . So.iS 

Stark Mills, 14 yards No. 12 duck . 1.99 

J. H. Wiggin &: Co., i dozen am- 
monia ..... 3.00 

J. H. Wiggin, 4 lbs. sugar . . .28 

J. H. Wiggin, 3 gross matches, etc. 1.93 

D. Milton Goodwin, 12 heavy 

brooms ..... 4.75 

Daniels Cornell Co., soap and soap- 

ine ...... 8.15 

Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., 
I barrel Bicarb, soda, 400 lbs., 
at 3^c 13.00 

Clark M. Bailey, 440 lbs. waste . 44.00 

Ford Rubber Co., 4 5^ x i^ rub- 
ber wheel hub rings . . . 2.40 

S. F. Haywood & Co., i gross 

pony bottles and corks . . 9.00 

Pike & Heald, lantern globes, tin 

dippers, tin pails, chimneys, etc. 3.65 

Samuel Eastman <S: Co., 12 hook 

and ladder straps . . . 12.00 

Ellis Lubricator Co., 5 i-pint cyl- 
inder lubricators . . . 25.00 

Daniels Cornell Co., i box soapine 3.60 

$2,883.99 



PLUMBING AND REPAIRS. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber, screws, and 

labor . . . . . 53-42 

Flint & Little, repairing hooks, lad- 
ders, etc. ..... 4.10 

E. L. Gaouette, repairing 14 chairs . 4.00 

J. Hodge, materials and labor, 

Vine street . ... 6.57 



570 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Peter Harris, making keys, repair- 
ing locks, repairing engine . . $3.20 
Head & Dowst Co., lumber and 

labor, various engine-houses . 34-25 

Kimball Carriage Co., i splasher 

for Steamer No. 3 . . . 5.00 
H. Leibing, i gallon turpentine . .60 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing mate- 
rial and labor .... i5i'36^ 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 
2 5-10 days' labor repairing hose car- 
riage 10.00 

4 lantern springs, special size . , 2.00 

Metallic packing for 2 rod boxes . 2.00 

5-10 day's labor .... 2.00 

Alteration of gong striking gear for 

supply wagon ..... 10.80 

Repairs on hose carriage . . . 4.5a 

2}4 days' labor ..... 10.00 

Paid Pike & Heald, repairing oil can and 
lantern, 6 lantern globes for 
Chemical, repairing lantern for 
Chemical . . . . . 16.37 

Fred S. Sloan, painting run board 

for Chemical No. i . 
C. A. Trefethen, 6 bottles clock oil 

C. A. Trefethen, repairing clock . 

D. B. Varney, repairing side sheet 
for engine ..... 

D. B. Varney, 204 lbs. brass cast- 
ings 

S. F. Flay wood & Go., i 6o-gallon 
acid jar .... . 
C. H. Hutchinson, i weight, 47 lbs. 
C. H. Hutchinson, 7 lbs. iron 
Paid C. H. Hutchinson : 

143 hours' labor fitting brass casting 57-20 



II 


.00 


2 


.oa 




•SO 




•50 


71' 


.40. 


15 


.00 


I 


.41 




.21 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



571 



174^ hours' labor fitting brass casting 
11^ feet wire screening . 
Screws, 44 lbs. castings 
Paid James R. Carr & Co. , i light glass 
and setting, Gen. Stark engine 
house ..... 
James R. Carr & Co., glass and 
setting same, Gen. Stark engine 
house ..... 
James R. Carr & Co., glass and 
setting, Massabesic Hose Co. 
house ..... 
J. J. Abbott, ^ lb. red paint 
Scrannage Bros., making acid jar 
Paid Manchester Locomotive Co.: 
I 3-horse hitch attached to Hook-and 

Ladder truck 
Repairs o;i bar handle spring . 
Setting tires on hose wagon 

1 side piece of grate . 
6 suction hose gaskets 

2 hours' labor .... 
Repairs of Gen. Stark Combination : 

24 carriage wheel spokes 
9^ lbs. brass castings . 
4j^ days' labor 
For Fire King Steamer No. 2 : 

I Amoskeag 3-horse hitch attached 

I rear steam gauge 

Paid Mills & Sturtevant, materials and 

labor on Fire King engine house 

Mills & Sturtevant, materials and 

labor on Vine-street station 
Scollay & Rich, 6 qts. polish 



$69.80 

6. OCT 

1-37 



1.25 



8.62 



2-35 

•13 

8.00 



160.00 
1. 00 
S.50 
1.60 
1.02 
.80 

2.88 

2.85 

18.00 

160.00 
15.00 

58.46 

13.72 
3-25 



^973-99 



73-52 
29.29 


|22.30 
28.00 



672 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

HARDWARE. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hardware, etc. $17.01 

Manchester Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, etc. . . . . 139-37 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., hardware, 
etc. ...... 

John B. Varick Co., hardware, etc. 

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL. 

Paid J. Alexander, visits and medicine . 
A. W. Baker, dentistry on 14 horses 
J. A. Charest, visits and medicine 225.00 

E. H. Currier, 12 bottles Williams' 

Sure Cure • . . . 7.00 

N. Chandler, 12 cans hoof oint- 
ment ..... 9.00 
E. B. Dunbar, Condition Powders .50 
A. L. Dodge, visits, naedicine, and 

adjusting teeth . . . . 28.25 

Pulsifer Chemical Co., i galvan- 
ized heater .... 4.00 
A. D, Smith, medicines and disin- 
fectants ..... 9.66 
Snelling & Woods, medicines . 47.74 
Z. F. Campbell, medicines . . ^^'33 



CARRIAGE WORK AND CARRIAGE REPAIRS. 

Paid A. Filion, labor on cart seat . . $1.00 

A. Filion, rivets and bolt . . . .25 

A. Filion, labor on hose wagon . i.oo 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, labor and 
materials on new carts and on 

repairs . . . . . 471.80 
Sanborn Carriage Co., labor and 

material on carts, engines, etc. . 7i-i5 



$259.19 



192.78 



$545-2o 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



573 



BLACKSMITHING. 




Paid D. F. Cressey .... 


$88.33 


Thomas Hickey .... 


72.25 


James Morrison .... 


1.60 


Mahaney & McSweeney 


462.50 


J. 0. Tremblay .... 


116. 15 


\Yelcome & Son, repairs 


6.25 



$747-oS 



HAY, GRAIN, ETC. 



Paid Adams & Tasker, oats, straw, hay 

corn, etc. 
H. J. Cilley, 9,190 lbs. hay . 
Wm. Clark, 25,378 lbs. hay . 
H. R. Hall, 5,610 lbs. hay . 
L. Shelters, 20,357 lbs. hay . 
C. M. Wheeler, 10,125 lbs. hay 
Chas. D. Welch, 10,625 lbs. hay 
J. B. Huse, 1,540 lbs. hay . 
Gage & McDougall, 17,550 lbs. hay 
Cavanaugh Bros., 15,720 lbs. hay 
A. B.. Chase, 1,030 lbs. hay . 
A. F. Davis, 1,575 lbs. hay . 
H. A. Horton, 2,210 lbs. hay 
Drake & Parker, oats, meal, shorts 

etc. ..... 

Henry W. Parker, oats, shorts 

bran, etc. ... 

Partridge Bros., oats, straw, hay 

shorts, etc. 
Pettee & Adams, meal, corn, oats 

etc. ..... 

Stearns & Co., oats 
C. M. Watts, 5,292 lbs. straw 
P. Doyle, 2,500 lbs. straw . 
J. F. Moore, 1,510 lbs. straw 



$427-25 
91.90 

250-73 

56.10 

224.59 

104.24 

109.46 

16.94 

162.32 

157.20 

10.30 

14.18 

19.S9 

175-76 

542.56 

1,007.75 

54.56 
29.25 

47-63 

22.50 

13-59 



574 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Melvin Hall, pasturing 2 horses 10 

weeks ..... $10.00 

city farm, 7,000 lbs. carrots . . 63.00 

HARNESS AND HARNESS REPAIRS. 

Paid Fred Allen : 

7^ gals, harness dressing . . . $9-3° 

2 pairs rim holders and splices . . 2.75 

1 lo-fcot lash ..... ■ 1. 00 
Other repairs ..... 17-50 

Paid N. J. Whalen, harness dressing . .50 

W. H. Adams, harness, repairs, etc. 205.95 
Paid Chas. E. Berry : 

12 rein snaps ..... 10.00 

2 pair harnesses .... 40.00 
2 collars ...... 12.00 

I pair harnesses .... 20.00 

II collars ..... 6.00 
Paid H. C. Ranno & Son : 

I pair woolen blankets, 90 x 96 . . 14-50 

Leathering ..... 2.50 

I stable blanket, extra large . . 4.25 

I pair heavy double reins . . . 4.00 

I team collar ..... 4.50 

I stable blanket . . . . 3.00 

1 halter bit .... . 4.25 
6 Dandy brushes .... 2.50 

2 seat cushions ..... 2.00 

Repairing harnesses . . . . 1.75 

6 flail whips ..... 12.00 

Tool case ....... 2.50 

Exercise bridle ..... 6.50 

Repairing and altering Hook-and-Lad- 

der harness . . . . . 48.50 

Collar ....... 3.00 

Other articles .... 75-7o 



$3,611.70 



$516.45 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



575 





] 


.ABOR 






id labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, in 


district No. 2 : 


January $12.12 


February 








70.63 


March . 








6.13 


April . 








13.88 


May 








7-75 


June 








17-75 


July . . 








16.13 


August . 








38.88 


September 








34.12 


October 








32-63 


November 








1.63 


December 








11.56 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid John T. Gott, cleaning vaults at 

Massabesic hose-house . . $5-oo 

S. A. Garland, 14 quarts beans (Var- 

ick fire) ..... 2.10 

S. A. Garland, 4 loaves bread (Var- 

ick fire) ..... .40 

E. J. Knowlton, cash paid, ex- 
penses of committee to Boston 
and return, examination of aerial 
truck ..... 30.40 

Mrs. E. G. McKean, rent of stable 
from December i, 1891, to April 
I, 1892 ..... 8.00 

Charles H. Rogers, expenses to and 
from Guildhall, Vt., relating to 
purchase of horses . . . 6.42 

H. E. Vaughan, burying dead 

horses ..... 6.00 



$263 21 



576 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Thomas W. Lane : 
Cash paid for express 
Cash paid for carting poles and hose . 
Cash paid for express 
Expenses to National Association of 
Fire Engineers, Louisville, Ky. 
Paid A. J. Dickey, expenses incurred by 
visit of fire department commit- 
tee and fire engineers to Concord, 
to place an order for a hook-and- 
ladder truck .... 



$3-85 
1-55 
3-65 

68.25 



4.41 



5140.03 



Total expenditures 



$42,262.88 



Fire-Alarm Telegraph. 



Appropriation 



$ 1, 400.0a 







Expenditures 






LABOR. 


id Thomas W. 


Lane, Jr., labor, as per pay-rolls : 


January 


$45-50 


February 










43-75 


March . 










47-25 


April . 










47-25 


May . 










47-25 


June 










42.75 


July . 










52.50 


August 




^* 






49.00 


September . 










48.25 


October 










47-25 


November 










45-50 


Decem-ber 










49.00 



$565-25 



FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



577 



Paid M. S. Adams, 4814 days' labor 

Charles Kean, labor moving wires 

in railroad yard 
Napoleon Lemay, 4 days' labor 
George N. 3urpee, labor on fire- 
alarm telegraph 



72.13 

2.50 
5.00 

6.00 



>.63 



SUPPLIES. 



Paid American Electrical Works, 44 


2 


feet rubber 


$8.84 


Paid Eastern Electrical Supply Co. : 




I vise and drill .... 


1.00 


100 rubber hooks 


8.00 


100 2-inch wood cleats 


.40 


2 lbs. E. tacks .... 


.40 


24 rubbers .... 


• .48 


. 24 prisms ..... 


6.24 


I pair 8-inch Hub pliers and box 


1.25 


100 I2X 12 connectors 


6.30 


I pair 5-inch Kent pliers . 


•75 


I Compound Electric vise . 


2.10 


3 lbs, E. tacks .... 


■38 


I pair Weldon chambers without strap 


s 2.50 


Repairing i chamber 


1. 00 


3 lbs. wire tape 


1.80 


Paid Electric Gas-Lighting Co., No. ] 




Lamson battery . 


15.12 


J. Hodge, 425 feet spruce lumber 


8.24 


J. Hodge, 12^ hours' labor . 


5.10 


0. S. Janney & Co., 3,526 lbs. 




blue stone . . . . 


132.23 


'0. S. Janney & Co., cartage 


1-^5 


Manchester Hardware Co., 4 5 x 5/g 




bolts 


.12 



578 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid New England Gamewell Co. : 

1 Non-Interfering fire-alarm box 
Labor and expense repairing striker 

and 2 gongs . . . . 

6 springs for repeater 
3 lightning arresters . 

2 signal boxes .... 

3 plug cutouts .... 
I iron case with door and plate for gas 

box ...... 

Paid E. S. Greeley & Co., 26 binding 

posts, 24 double connections 
D. B. Varney, 201 zincs, $70.35, 

less old junk and copper, $59.60 
D. B. Varney, 338 zinc castings 
Washburn & Moen Manufacturing 

Co., 282)4 lbs. copper wire 
James R. Carr, paint and labor 
Talbot Dyewood & Chemical Co., 2 

barrels vitriol, 905 lbs. 
Manchester Locomotive works, i 

turned stud . . . . 
Pike & Heald, 5 lbs. copper . 
The Electric Co., 3 poles 



;i25.oo 

17.17 

•75 

. 3-00 

6.00 

.90 



5-31 

10.73 

118.30 

40.60 
14-25 

32.81 

1.60 

1.20 

10.50 



)oi.62 ; 



FREIGHT AND TRUCKAGE. 

Paid_,Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on wire and vitriol . 
John W. Wilson, truckage . 
W. B. Corey, truckage, tools, and 

poles . .^ . . . 

Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



$4.62 






1 


2.25 






1 


10.25 




$17 


1 






1 2 


• 


^I 


,269 


7. 1 


• 




130 


38 ^ 



$1,400.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 579 

Firemen's Parade. 

Appropriation ..... . . $500.00 

Expenditures. 

sundries. 

Paid J. K. Moore, collation . 

West Side Drum Corps, services . 

First Regiment Military Band, ser- 
vices ..... 

F. H. Pike, services as drum major 

Nate Kellogg, printing invitations, 
circulars, and programs 

Thomas W. Lane, postage . 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 

$500.00 



^359-io 




10.00 




52.00 




3.00 




14.25 




3.20 






;^44i-55 




. 


^441-55 


• 


58.45 



Police Department. 



Appropriation . . . . . 


$37,300.00 


Transferred from reserved fund 


3,105.28 








S>40)405'2o 


Expenditures. 




SERVICES. 




Paid N. P. Hunt, police justice . 


$1,500.00 


Isaac L. Heath, associate justice . 


98.00 


Geo. W. Prescott, associate justice 


2.12 


J. C. Bickford, clerk . . 


600.00 


H. W. Longa, marshal 


12.50 



580 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid Michael J. Healy, marshal 

J. F. Cassidy, assistant marshal 
night patrol 
day patrol . 

extra time of regular patrol 
extra time of special patrol 
Peter Larrabee, as janitor 
Miss A. B. Brown, as matron 
Myra W. Spalding, as matron 
C. B. Hildreth, 7 days' police ser 
vice ..... 



I900.00 

800.00 

21,626.2.6 

5)637-39 

2,141.02 

1,521.6s 

642.25 

412 00 

10.00 

25.00 



$35,928.22 



GAS, ELECTRIC LIGHTS, AND FUEL. 

Paid People's Gas-Light Co., for gas . $61 

Electric Company, 28 electric 

lights from Dec. i, 1891, to Dec. 

3i» 1S92 

DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall, 

104,955 lbs, egg coal at $6.25 . 
E. P Johnson Co., 12,875 ^^s. L. 

broken coal at $6.25 . 
Dunlap & Wason Coal Co., 35,590 

lbs. egg coal at $5.95 



354-67 

327.98 

40.23 

105.88 



5889.94 



WATER, TELEPHONE, AND TELEGRAPH. 

Paid Water- Works, use of water from 

April I to December 31 . . $207.90 

New England Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co., use ©.f telephones . 169.85 

J. Dana & Son, use of telephone at 

McGregorville .... 4.00 

Western Union Telegraph Co., for 

telegrams. . . . . 33.51 



$415.26 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 681 



TEAMS. 

Paid W. J. Freeman, use of teams . . ^103.50 

C. H. Simpson, use of team . . 9.00 

E. T. James, use of teams . . 164.75 
H. W. Longa, use of horse and 
wagon from August i, 1889, to 

January i, 1892 . . . 125.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of teams 11.00 

A. L. Jenness & Son, use of team . i.oo 

Whitten & Fifield, use of team . 1.50 

G. H. Nichols & Co., use of team i.oo 

$416.75 



FEEDING AND CONVEYING PRISONERS. 

Paid Mrs. Thomas Francoeur, board and 

care of lost children . . . ^22.00 

Daniel Davis, rations furnished at 
police station from January 4, 
1891, to December 30, 1891 204.75 

Daniel Davis, rations furnished from 

January i to December 13, 1892 203.61 

Robitaille Bros., groceries . . i9-39 

W. D. Ladd & Co., 48 lbs. com- 
mon crackers . . . . 2.55 

McQuade Bros., 87 lbs. crackers . 5.00 

Carl E. York, 47 lbs. crackers . 2.39 

Longa & Cassidy, conveying pris- 
oners to House of Correction, 
from December 22, 1891, to 
January 5, 1892 ... 21.00 

Healy and Cassidy, conveying pris- 
oners to House of Correction, etc. 848.00 

M. J. Healy, conveying Joseph 

Devine to insane asylum . . 3.80 

officers Fowler and Welch, convey- 
ing Joseph Devine to insane asy- 
lum ...... 4.50 



$i>336-99 



582 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 



Paid John B. Clarke Co., printing : 
800 blank warrants for court 
2,050 letter headings, postals, envel 

opes, and quarterly reports . 
Roll-call, blank book 
1,300 slips and envelopes 
300 half-note circulars 
400 blank writs 
750 notices 
4,600 cards, envelopes, letter head 

ings, and other blanks 
3,000 writs 
400 circulars 
450 blanks 

Advertising Fourth of July notice 

Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 

civil dockets for police court 

A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 

blanks for court 
A. S. Campbell & Co., printing 
1,100 mittimuses 
Paid W. P. Goodman : 

1 scrap-book .... 
36 standard diaries . 
6 blotting sheets 

2 record books .... 
I quart Carter's ink . 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co.: 
I Public Statutes for police court 
Ink, paper, and pens for police court 
I cash book .... 
I journal ..... 
I Public Statutes . . 
Blank books and other stationery 

Paid Union Publishing Co., publishing 
notice, fireworks, 3 squares 2 times . 



$16.00 

9-5° 
4.00 

3-75 
2.50 
6.00 
3.00 

33-00 
13.00 

1-75 

10.00 

3.00 

44.00 



12 


25 


7 


.00 


I 


•50 


21 


00 




33 


I 


75 




60 


3 


00 


3 


27 


2 


25 


2 


25 


3 


00 


16 


78 


4-5° 



$228.98 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 583 



MEDICAL AND SURGICAL. 



Paid Dr. I. L. Carpenter : 

Ether to James Thompson . . $3-oo 

Attending one Greenwood, found on 

railroad . . . . . 1.50 

Attending one Dickinson, 4 Canal 

street ...... 1.50 

Attending one Flanders, insane, night 

call ...... 2.50 

Paid L. K. Mead : 

82 bottles ammonia .... 10.66 

6 sponges ..... .75 

Prescriptions ..... 3.55 

Oil of cedar and roach exterminator . .65 

Paid Dr. Frederick Perkins : 

Dressing gunshot wound in arm of 

Jerry Cronin, Jr., 10 times . . 10.00 

Treatment of broken jaw of Patrick 

Dillon ...... 15-00 

Sewing up wounds around left eye, 

Kane ...... 3.00 

Setting dislocated shoulder for Mary 

Clark ...... 5.00 

Sewing up scalp wound and ear for 

Clovis Goodreau .... 5.00 

Scalp wound and fracture of shoulder 

blade, Jerry Burke . . . 5.00 

Sewing up wound in wrist of Martin 

Brown ..... 3.00 

Sewing up scalp wound extending 
across the forehead from outside of 
one eye to outside of the other for 
Mrs. Davis, and subsequent care . 10.00 

Wound of Daniel Long, bitten by dog 2.00 

Dressing wound on back, John Ken- 
nedy, bitten by a dog . . . 3.00 



584 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Sewing scalp wound for John Wells . $3-00 

Dressing two wounds over eye and one 

on nose for Michael Godfrey . . 5.00 

Sewing scalp wound on back of head 

for Antoine Ready . . . 3.00 

Sewing wound under the chin for An- 
toine Therrien .... 3.00 

Dressing scalp woilnd three inches long 

on back of head for Kate Chadwick 5.00 

Dressing hand of Patrick Connor, cut 

in five places .... 5.00 

Sewing up eight large scalp wounds 
and several small ones for Maurice 
Houlihan, and nine subsequent 
visits ...... 15-00 

Attendance on James Thompson at 
police station sewing upper lip, 
which was cut from the right angle 
of the mouth by the left nostril ; sew- 
ing wound under left eye ; sewing 
wound on forehead and setting frac- 
tured nose . . . . . 15-00 

Dressing incised wound over eye for 

William Warren . . . . 3.00 

Dressing scalp wound on back of head 

three inches long for John Doyle . 5.00 

Attendance on James Quinn, broken 

ankle, plaster bandage . . . 5.00 

Dressing lacerated wound under left 

eye for Lucy Colville . . . 3.00 

Attendance on one Gevorge, stoppage, 

catheterization . ^ . . 3.00 

Sewing up hand of one Houlihan . 5.00 

Paid F. H. Thurston, prescriptions . 3.30 

F. H. Thurston, 102 lbs. ammonia 12.24 

Dr. M. E. Kean, services in case of 

Chas. D. Magoon, suicide . 1.50 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 585 

Paid Dr. M. E. Kean, sewing wounds of 
scalp and lower lip and after treat- 
ment of Mark Carr . . . $5'Oo 
Dr. M. E. Kean, treatment, Mrs. 

Wm. Patnaude . . . . 4.50 

Dr. D. S. Adams, surgical attend- 
ance on Frank Tucker . . 10.00 

$199.65 



REPAIRS. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, materials and labor $85.77 

Jas. R. Carr & Co., paint and labor 11.27 

Aloysius Eastman, brick, cement, 
and labor resetting locks on cell 
doors ..... 2.96 

R. D. Gay, repairing flag . . .50 

R. D. Gay, shades and pulleys . 2.85 

Peter Harris, repairing cell and safe 

locks, hinge, and door shutter . 6.25 

John Smiley, repairing bunks . i.oo 

N. J. Whalen, repairing police belts 3.25 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., electric materials and labor 3.90 

M. J. Coleman, repairs on water- 
closets, etc. .... 94-85 
R. D. Martin, re-nickeling and re- 
forming No. 24 police badge . .75 
C. W. Anderson & Co., repairing 

clock, city marshal's office . i.oo 

C. W. Anderson & Co., repairing 

clock, Judge Hunt's office . i.co 

J. J. Abbott, painting, glazing, etc. 9.26 

L. & W. T, Seiberlich, 4 lights 

glass and setting . . . 1.20 



$225.81 



586 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR*. 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Concord & Montreal R. R., freight $0.25 

Miss A, B. Brown, furnishing room 

for matron .... 75-oc> 

John Driscoll, mop waste . . 1.95 

E. H. McQuade, 2 electric batter- 
ies . . . . . . 1.40 

E. H. McQuade, 3 hours' labor . 1.20 

J. G. Brown, 1 office chair . . 5.50 

L. W. Colby, photographing pris- 
oners ..... 32.00 

J. T. Langley, 6 card photographs 

of Chas. Smith . . . i.oo 

West Side Steam Laundry, laundry 

work on blankets . . . 1.60 

Mrs. Filbert, washing blankets, tow- 
els, and cleaning and scrubbing 87.90 
Gazaille &: Co., 40 yards crash . 4.80 
Gazaille «Sr Co., 6 towels . . 1.50 
Dennis Kerwin, soapine . . 8.00 
Manchester Hardware Co., ;^}4 oz. 

sponge ..... .70 

J. B. Varick Co., 6 brooms, i os- 
trich duster, i pail, i lock, i 
mop-stick, window and scrub 
brushes, and other hardware . 16.88 

Paid Clark M. Bailey : 

2 cases toilet paper .... 

500 I -pound bags . ... 

5 gross Portland matches . 
I case toilet paper 
Paid Thomas D. Luce, certifying sundry 
appeals to police court 
H. W. Longa, cash paid out in 
sundry cases .... 



20.00 


.60 


2.50 


10.00 


7.00 


21.25 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 587 

Paid M. J. Healy, cash paid witness fees 

and other expenses . . . $439.25 

W. H. Drury, services for two mi- 
nors under the age of sixteen 
years ..... 2.00 

J. G. Ellinwood, i^ doz. photo- 
graphs ..... 3.00 

L. B. Bodwell & Co., 20 lbs. ice 

daily . . . . . 8.40 

Clement Langers, i stove, station, 

West Manchester . . . 10.00 

S763.68 



Total expenditures ..... $40,405.28 



Repairs of Buildings. 

Appropriation ..... $2,500.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 392.75 

^ $2,892.75 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Lovejoy & Stratton, labor and care of clocks on 
schoolhouses and other public buildings, from Jan- 
uary 5, 1891, to December 31, 1S91 . . . $301.75 

CITY HALL. 

Paid William E. Williams, slate, zinc, and labor re- 
pairing roof ..... . . $27.99 

WARD ROO.M, LAKE AVENUE. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber and labor . . $24.30 

CITY LIBRARY. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor . $12.59 

Thomas A. Lane, 1 1 feet portable 

tubing ..... 2.75 



588 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, labor on gas . $0.53 

Thomas A. Lane, materials and la- 
bor on gutter, etc. . . . 14-85 
Head & Dowst Co., i hour's labor .28 
W. M. Darrah, labor and materials, 
slating, including bill of Head 
& Dowst Co., of ^5.73 . . 13-91 
Charles E. Lord, mason work and 

stock . . . . . 4.12 



BATTERY BUILDING. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, labor on sink, 

gas, etc. ..... ^2.67 

Wm. H. Sullivan, tinting ceiling in 
Emmet Guards hall in water col- 
ors, and battery hall ceiling in 
oil colors ..... 

Jones & Co., painting cannon 
room as per contract 

Head & Dowst Co , lumber and 
labor ..... 

L. M. Aldrich, lumber and labor . 

CITY YARD, STOREHOUSE, AND STABLE. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber, labor, 

etc ^174.14 

Head & Dowst Co., 558 feet grav- 
el roof ..... 25.11 

G. W. Hamlin, paints and labor 

on storehouse . ^ . . . 12.04 



115.00 


80.00 


29.50 


3-44 



ENGINE HOUSES. 

Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber, labor, and 
hardware at Massabesic Hose 
house $29.87 



$49-03 



$230.61 



;2ii.29 



REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 589 

Paid John Bryson, paints and painting 

Vine-street engine-house . . 546.50 
M. J. Coleman, plumbing material 
and labor, Vine-street engine- 
house 319-00 

W. M. Darrah & Co., material and 
labor on roof, Vine-street en- 
gine-house .... 4.61 

Joel Daniels & Co., painting and 
papering tenements, Vine-street 
engine-house .... 42.93 

John Driscoll, labor and material 
tinning roof, Vine-street engine- 
house . . . . . 15-25 

John Driscoll, labor and material on 

roof, Webster-street engine-house 48-50 

James P. Finn, stock and painting 
on Central fire station, and Mer- 
rimack engine-house . . . 166.91 
Paid Head & Dowst Co., labor, lumber, 
hardware : 
Vine-street engine-house . , . 519-43 
Merrimack engine-house . . . 65.44 
Clinton-street engine-house . . 9.84 
Webster-street engine-house . . 28.56 
Massabesic Hose house . . . 9.26 
Stone work on Lake-avenue engine- 
house ...... 26.94 

Paid Jones & Co., stock and labor paint- 
ing and papering Webster-street 
engine-house .... 16.80 

Jones & Co., stock and labor paint- 
ing and papering Massabesic 
Hose house .... 29.85 

Thomas A. Lane, labor and plumb- 
ing materials at Massabesic Hose 
house . . . . . 104.78 



590 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Thomas A. Lane, i Sheffield grate $32 00 

John F. Larkin, repairs on waste 
pipe and bath tub, Webster-street 
engine-house .... 6.00 

Chas. E. Lord, mason work at Vine- 
street engine-house, and Massa- 
besic Hose house . . . 28.05 

Mills & Sturtevant, lumber, hard- 
ware, labor on Fire King engine- 
house ..... 87.05 

Mills & Sturtevant, paper, and hang- 
ing same, and whitewashing two 
halls 36.55 

Pike & Heald, stable drain, etc., at 
Webster-street engine-house . 24.65 

Pike & Heald, piping , . . 14.00 

Pike & Heald, repairing water pipe. 

Vine-street engine-house . . 1.80 

Manchester Hardware Co., 2 floor 

lights, B. E. wrought door . 21.00 

William E. Williams, repairing 
gravel roof around ventilators, 
and roofing ventilators, Vine- 
street engine-house . . . 26.96 



COURT-HOUSE. 



Paid J. J. Abbott, 12 lights glass and 

setting $8.20 

James R. Carr & Co., 2 lights glass 

and setting .... 1.43 



Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls, dis- 
trict No. 2 : 
January ..... $26.49 

February ..... 25.50 

March ...... 21.00 



$i>762.53 



$9-63 



NEW SCHOOLHOUSE, HALLSVILLE. 



591 



April . 








$21.00 


May 






21.00 


June 








28.63 


July : 








21.00 


August 








25-50 


September 








21.00 


October 








21.00 


November 








25-50 


December 








18.00 



Total expenditures 



$275.62 
$2,892.75 



New Schoolhouse, Hallsville. 



Balance from old account 
Appropriation .... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 



Expenditures. 



$101.95 

8,000.00 

743.66 



5,845.61 



ARCHITECTS COMPENSATION. 



Paid McFarland, Goodrich »S: McFarland, balance 
due for services ..... 



$303.00 



ON CONTRACT. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., final payment on contract $5,560.00 



ON FURNITURE. 



Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 
I No. 25 teacher's desk 
I No. 20 teacher's desk 
Freight and teaming desks 
School furniture 



$24.00 

34.00 

1-34 

545-58 



504.92 



592 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



EXTRAS ON BUILDING. 



Paid Head & Dovvst Co. : 

I No. I striking town clock, 4 dials 
I bell, 1,519 lbs. 

1 set No. I hangings . 
900 lbs. clock weights 

282 hours' labor of men . 

Lumber, bolts, screws, hinges, team 

ing, freight, iron, etc. 
Grading, extra .... 

2 6-inch beams, change over front en 
trance ..... 

5 galvanized screens and screws . 
Lathing and plastering ceiling in base 

ment ..... 
Blacksmith work on vane . 
Lumber, basement, tower, and walk 
Hardware, window weights, nails 

screws, windows in second story 
Labor on all above, blinds and walks 
Painting tower and blinds . 
Inside blinds .... 
Slating, change from shingles 
Plumbing in basement, sinks, etc. 
Tinning scuttle, tower changed on ac 

count of bell .... 
Gas piping, tower to clock 
Electric and tube work, additional 
Paid John B. Varick Co., i weather vane 



$407.00 

326.59 

48.30 

22.50. 
73-57 

45.66 
271.07 

13.90 
22.01 

132.80 

1. 00 

48.91 

71.40 
89.61 
88.50 
184.06 
394.64 
53-15 



9.00 

35-50 
36.00 



$2,377.69 



Total expenditures 



5,845.61 



WATER-WORKS, CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 593 

Engine-House and Ward Room, Ward 9. 

Appropriation ..... . • $10,000.00 

Expenditures. 

LAND. 

Paid Edmond St. John and Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Co., lot No. 2,987 
in McGregorville, 6,090 sq. ft., at 
i4^c 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to new account 



$870.00 


$■- 


$870.00 






$870.00 
9,130.00 




ro,ooo.oo 



Addition to Goffe's Falls Schoolhouse. 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . . . $2,000.00 

Expenditures. 

Paid Head & Dowst Co., building addition as per 

contract ...... . $2,000.00 



Water-Works, Construction Account. 

Appropriation .... .$25,000.00 
Amount transferred from Water-Works, 

repairs ...... 5,000.00 



-Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid men, as per pay-roll : 

April . . . . . . $200.00 

May .'..... 630.00 

3S 



594 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



June ...... 


$400.00 


July 


450.00 


August ...... 


550.00 


September ..... 


550.00 


October ..... 


635.00 


November . . . . . 


610.00 


December ..... 


600.00' 


SUPPLIES. 




Paid Boston Belting Co.: 




300 feet linen hose .... 


$90.00 


2 sets 2^ -inch coupling . 


5.00 


I 2^-inch nozzle .... 


4.00 


Express ...... 


•15 


Paid Builders' Iron Foundry, 125 branches 


647.72 


Chad wick Lead Works, 1,291^ lbs. 




3-lb. pipe 


69.86 


Chadwick Lead Works, 23,132 lbs. 




pig lead ..... 


969.90 


Chadwick Lead Works, 100 lbs. 




solder ..... 


15.00 


Paid Chapman Valve Co.: 




10 5 -foot hydrants .... 


343-54 


4 lo-inch water gates 


123.12 


15 8-inch water gates 


303-15 


4 12-inch water gates 


167.04 


3 20-inch water gates 


372.33 


Paid F. R. French, 60 chestnut posts at 




I2C. 


7.20 


Hersey Mfg. Co., 6 ^g brass meters 


82.80 


Hersey Mfg. Cot, 6 set couplings . 


4-5° 


Hersey Mfg. Co., boxing 


1.50 


New England Water Pipe Co., 




.3,150 feet i-inch pipe at 15c. 


472.46 


New England Water Pipe Co., 547 




feet pipe 


54-79 



WATER-WORKS, CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 595 

Paid New England Water Pipe Co., 

2,045 ^^^^ 2-inch pipe at 15c. . $306.77 
Holyoke Hydrant & Iron Works, 
10 double and steamer hydrants, 
51^ feet long .... 
Holyoke Hydrant & Iron Works, 
200 No. 3 service boxes . 
Paid National Meter Co.: 
325 Crown Comp. meters . 
7 ^-inch Crown Comp. meters 
2 I -inch Crown Comp. meters . 
38 glasses ..... 

Paid Pratt & Cady Co., 20 5 and 5^'- 
foot hydrants .... 
Peet Valve Co., 9 4-inch H. E. 
gates ..... 
Peet Valve Co., 45 6-inch H. E. 
gates ..... 

Peet Valve Co-., 2 2-inch brass 
valves ..... 
Smith & Anthony Stove Co., 2 14- 
inch S. A. bands, i cocks 
Smith & Anthony Stove Co., 3 6- 

inch S. A. bands, ^ cocks 
Sewall & Day Cordage Co., 12 coils, 

1,288 lbs., jute packing 
Union Brass Co., curb stops, corp. 
cocks, etc. . . . 

Paid Geo. Woodman & Co.: 
1,059^ feet i-inch E. pipe 
200 Clo. nips ..... 
11814 lbs. E. mall .... 
50 i^-inch En. coupling . 
Barrel and bag 
Paid Adams & Tasker, 4 barrels cement 
McNeil Pipe and Foundry Co., 

cast-iron pipe .... 7,845.34 



342 


■50 


180. 


50 


,143-75 


177 


.00 


70 


.00 




.41 


640 


.00 


72. 


,00 


540 


.00 


6 


.00 



7.20 


83.72 


580.71 


95-89 


6.00 


16.36 


1.50 


•35 


5.80 



596 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Chas. K. Walker, cash paid for ex- 
press . . . . . $3.30 
Manchester Locomotive 
Works, 2,833 ^bs. cast- 
ings, domes, covers, 
plugs, sleeves, at 3c. . ^84.99 
Cr. 2,580 lbs. old iron . 15-48 



Paid Manchester Locomotive Works, 5 

hours' labor drilling, etc. . . . 2.00 



69.51 

$19,941.68 



HARDWARE, BLACKSMITHING, FREIGHT. 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R., freight on ^ 

pipe, etc $65.30 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on pipe, etc. .... 1,402.15 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening and re- 
pairing tools, etc. . . . 49.18 

James Morrison, sharpening and re- 
pairing tools, etc. . . . 45-07 

Killey & Wadleigh, i doz. round- 
point shovels .... 10-50 

Killey & Wadleigh, i doz. pick 

handles ..... 2.00 

Killey & Wadleigh, 15 lbs. boat 

pitch ...... .75 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 2 kegs 

blasting powder . . . 5.50 

John B. Varick Co., hardware . 48.76 



$1,629,211 

LAND. 

Paid Jas. M. Webster heirs, land as per deed . . $3,000.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid J. J. Abbott, paints, painting, pa- 
per, and hanging same . . $33.84 
J. Hodge, 30 feet 13^ -inch birch . 1.20 



WATER-WORKS, REPAIRS. 



597 



Paid J. Hodge, 12^ hours' labor • . 

Thos. A. Lane, plumbing materials 

and labor on bathroom at station, 

etc. ...... 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



175.00 



Appropriation 



Water-Works, Repairs. 



Expenditures. 



$215.04 

$29,410.93 
589.07 

$30,000.00 



$22,000.00 







LABOR. 




Paid labor of men, as per pay-rolls : 


January $704-32 


February 








749.03 


March . 








777.40 


April . 








587.20 


May 








284.79 


June 








769-87 


July . 








502.14 


August . 








670.72 


September 








393-77 


October 








321.28 


November 








552.08 


December 








389.90 



IRON PIPE, CASTINGS, LEAD, ETC. 

Paid Builders Iron Foundry, 30 branches 

and bends . .... $124.90 
Chadwick Lead Works, 100 lbs. 

solder 1500 



$6,702.50 



598 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid ^hadwick Lead Works, 12,097 lbs. 

pig lead ..... 

Holyoke Hydrant & Iron Works, 

repairing hydrant 

Holyoke Hydrant & Iron Works, i 

new chest, complete, for 4-inch 

hydrant . . . . . 

McNeil Pipe Sz Foundry Co., pipe, 

less freight . . . . 

Paid Manchester Locomotive Works : 

7,414 lbs. castings, j)lugs, sleeves, 

domes, covers, at 3c. 
3^ hours' labor, drilling cocks , 
5 hours' labor on chuck 
171^ hours' labor 
I crank pin, 128 lbs., blown steel 
Washer and nut, 19 lbs., forged iron 
Teaming, four trips . 
74^ hours' labor . . $29.80 

196 lbs. blown steel . . 7.84 

100 4^2 X ^ 6-sq. head bolts, 

100 lbs. nuts . . . 8.00 



Cr. by 760 lbs. old iron 



$45-64 
6.08 



1,371 lbs. castings, plugs, sleeves, etc. 

Paid Pratt & Cady Co., i 5}^ x 5 hydrant 

Peet Valve Co., 6 4-inch water gates 

Thompson Meter Co.. repairing 2 

I -inch meters .... 
Union Water Meter Co., repairing 

water meters .... 
Henry R. Worthington, repairing 3 

meters ..... 
National Meter Co., repairing 

meters ..... 



$524-17 
10.14 

20.00 
5,000.00 



222.42 

1.40 

2.00 

68.60 

6.40 

•57 
5.00 



39-56 
41-13 
32.00 
48.00 



224.81 

19-57 

24.25 



WATER-WORKS, REPAIRS. 



599 



Paid J. Hodge, 275 boxes . . . $82.50 

J. Hodge, I case .... 6.50 

J. Hodge, cutting down desk . .50 
Sumner & Goodwin, 100 No. 28 

stop boxes .... 90.00 

Sumner & Goodwin, cartage . i.oo 

D. B. Varney, ^ lb. castings . .22 



),62o.64 



OIL, BELTING, PACKING, AND OTHER SUPPLIES. 

Paid Edson Manufacturing Co., 16 feet 

suction hose .... $25.08 

Edson Manufacturing Co., set of 

couplings ..... 3.56 

Edson Manufacturing Co., i G lobe 

strainer ..... 3.80 

J. Stickney, i pair 5^ long heavy 

mitts 1.75 

J. Stickney, 25 rubber gaskets . 2.50 

J. Stickney, i pair heavy mitts . 1.75 

Eager & Rand, oil, soap, etc. . 23.18 

George Woodman & Co., plumbing 

materials, nipples, etc. . . 127.24 

Thomas A. Lane, plumbing mate- 
rials, etc. ..... 109-53 

John T. Beach, work on pole . .75 

Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. : 
91,645 lbs. B. M. egg coal, at $7.00 . 320.76 
2 barrels charcoal . • . . . .90 
5 tons egg coal ..... 36.25 
}4 ton stove coal .... 3.50 
163^ feet wood, sawed and split . . i9-34 
Paid E. C. Haskell, load of wood . . 2.50 
P. C. Cheney Co., 50 lbs. waste . 4.00 
William P. Miller & Co., keg lu- 
bricant, 115 lbs., at i8c. . . 20.70 



600 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid A. M. Eastman, 75 gallons oil . $12.75 
Dennis Kervvin, 157 lbs. tallow at 

6c. ..... . 9.42 

Pettee & Adams, 8 barrels cement . 13-15 

Adams & Tasker, 18 barrels cement 27.65 

Adams & Tasker, 126 lbs. oatmeal .88 

Leonard & Ellis, 208}^ gallons oil 145-50 
George R. Vance, 12 galvanized 

pails ..... 12.00 

Paid E. A. G. Holmes : 

100 hours' labor at reservoir . . 28.50 

298 feet Georgia pine at reservoir . ii-52 

23 days' labor on gear teeth at station 65.50 
Lumber, sawing and planing, teaming, 

station . . . . . . 21.90 

Paid repairs at pumping station : 

88 days' labor ..... 227.00 

Mason labor . . . . . 12.75 

Trucking ...... 4.00 

Lumber, mortar, repairing slate . . 76.62 

Screen door, door frame, sash, molding 5.88 

Labor at office . • . . . . .60 

8 days' labor at I3.00 ; 9 days' labor at 

$2.50 ; lumber, building boat . . 86.09 
Paid Charles E. Lord, 2 casks lime, at 

station ..... 2.00 

Shirley & Smith, materials and ma- 
son labor at station . . . 9.00 
Head & Dowst Co., lumber and 

labor on derrick . . . 9.08 
John Driscoll, dippers, gallon meas- 

sures, etc. . . -^ . . . 4.45 



$15493-33 



WATER-WORKS, REPAIRS. 601 

BLACKSMITHING, HARDWARE, FREIGHT. 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson, 37^ hours' 
labor, making and finishing rods, 
forging, making washers, etc. . ^19.47 

C. H. Hutchinson, 127 lbs. iron . 3.96 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 20 lbs. 

boiler plate . . . . 1.20 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 24 

No. 20 machine screws . . .15 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 17 

hours' labor .... 6.80 

D. F. Cressey, sharpening tools, etc. 49-3 1 
Manchester Hardware Co., hard- 
ware, all kinds .... 8.70 

John B. Varick Co., hardware . 178.36 

Boston &: Maine R. R., freight on 

pipe, etc 33.69 

Concord & Montreal R. R., freight 

on pipe, etc. . . . . 9.23 

$310.87 



DAMAGES. 

Paid Thomas E. McDerby, goods dam- 
aged by water .... $274.82 

John J. Hersey, personal damages . 100.00 

Charles H. Robie estate, 32 yards 

concrete on Manchester street . 16.00 

Charles H. Robie estate, 757^ yards 

concrete on Laurel and Pine . 37'82 

Charles H. Robie estate, 38^ yards 

concrete, Pleasant street . . 19.16 

Charles H. Robie, 51^ yards con- 
crete, repairing Chestnut street, 
corner Amherst . . . 20.60 



602 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Charles H. Robie, 51 yards con- 
crete, repairing at Head & Dowst 
Co.'s ofifice .... ^20.40 

C. H. Robie, 214 yards concrete, 
repairing Vine street . . 82.60 

C. B. Littlefield, hooks, lumber, 
glass, putty, and labor at corner 
Pine and Laurel streets . . 1.08 

Mrs. Charles Clough, damage to 

house and cellar. Pearl street . 25.00 



^597-48 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid E. T. James, hack and carriage hire $31.00 

C. G. H. Bennink, 12 |^-band 

rubbers ..... .60 



$31.60 

Total expenditures . . . • . . $15,756.42 

Amount transferred to water-works, construction ac- 
count ...... . . 5,000.00 

Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 1,243.58 



$22,000.00 



Water-Works, Current Expenses. 

Appropriation ..... . . $5,000.00 



EXPENDITURES. 




Paid Charles K. Walker, salary as super- 




intendent .... 


$1,600.05 


for gas .... 


16.66 


express and telegrams . 


2.23 


2 inkstands and postage stamps 


22.15 


sundries 


2.44 


James A. Weston, services as clerk 




of water board . . . . 


100.00 



$1,743-53 



WATER-WORKS, 


CURRENT 


EXPENSES. 


lid labor, as per pay-rolls : 




January .... 


$203.33 


February 










207.33 


March . 










203.33 


April . 










203.33 


May 










203.33 


June 










203.33 


July . 










203.33 


August . 










203.33 


September 










203.33 


October 










203.33 


November 










203.33 


December * . 










203.34 


id E. T. James, use of teams and hacks 


$37-50 


F. H. Partelow, use of steamboat 


7-50 


F. H. Partek 


)w, re 


freshr 


nents 




3.00 



603 



F. W. Elliot, dinner for commis- 
sioners ..... 
F. W. Elliot, dinner for water 

board, annual inspection . 
Joseph B. Sawyer, services of self 
and assistants making sundry sur- 
veys, plans, recording deeds, etc., 
from December 19, 1891, to No- 
vember 22, 1892 
New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co., use of 3 telephones . 
Paid John B. Clarke Co., printing: 
15,000 bills ..... 
500 reports, 32 pages, and cover 
1,200 blanks of various kinds . 
Advertising i line at sundry times ■ . 
Paid Union Publishing Co., advertising 
sundry notices .... 
Paid A. S. Campbell & Co., printing: 
2,000 postals and printing 



5.00 



166.85 



34 


00 


31 


00 


6 


75 


8 


50 


8 


25 


24. 


25 



$2,443-97 



C04 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



1,500 note heads in blocks 
13,700 water notices 
500 postals and printing . 
1,700 bill heads . . . . 

Paid N. P. Hunt, services in drawing lease 
N. P. Hunt, services in Brown deed 
N. P. Hunt, services in Webster 
deed . . . . . 

Oilman B. Hoyt, recording deeds 
Paid town of Auburn : 

Tax on J. P. Chase land, 1892 
Tax on store land, 1892 
Grififin & Chase land, 1892 
G. & G. W. Reed land, 1892 
Neal land, 1892 
Page land, 1892 
Woodbury & Brown land, 1892 
Whittemore land, 1892 
Paid John Bryson, painting 3 signs 

E. R. Coburn & Co., rubber bands, 
envelopes, paper, and other sta- 
tionery . . . . . 
Moore & Preston, 5 tons egg coal 



^5-5° 

20.10 

6.00 

9-5° 

2.00 
2.00 

2.00 
•77 

1. 10 

12.04 
2.49 

6-33 
2.49 

•57 
4-3^ 
6-57 
2.50 



14.06 
37-50 



590.50 



Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



^, 7 78.00 
222.00 



Commons. 



;,ooo.oo 



Appropriation 

Transferred from reserved fund 



5,oco.oo 
726.64 



5,726.64 





COMMONS. 




Expenditures. 


LABOR. 


Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls : 


January ..... $6.50 


February 






42.50 


April . 






199-75 


May 






234-50 


June 






305-50 


July . . 






180.25 


August 






140.75 


September 






156.75 


October 






183-75 


November 






94.00 


December 






55-25 


Paid as per pay-roll, district No. 2 : 




January ^io-34 


February 


. 


. 


71.48 


March . 






6.25 


May 




. 


1-75 


June 






9-93 



605 



Si, 599-50 



J>99-75 



REPAIRS AND GENERAL EXPENSES. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, repairing fence, etc. $2.63 

L. M. Aldrich, filing saws, etc. . 2.00 

S. C. Dwinnells, 6 rakes and re- 
pairing 5 rakes .... 4.60 
F. S. Bodwell, labor repairing fence 

on Merrimack square . . 25.75 

Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co.: 

Repairs on lawn mower . . . i.oo 
1,580 feet chestnut, Merrimack com- 
mon 39.50 



606 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

112 feet spruce, Merrimack common . $2.24 

10 hours' labor, Merrimack common 4.00 

Paid Water- Works, use of water . . 600.00 

Paid Flint &: Little : 

Making i new and repairing .1 old 
ladder ...... 

Filing saws, etc. .... 

Labor, lumber, and hardware on band 

stands . . . ' . 

45 hours' labor on tree boxes . 
Paid Head & Dowst Co., 152 feet i by 
6 spruce, Merrimack common . 
Higgins Bros. Co., 100 settees, as 
per contract . . > . 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson : 

Sharpening and repairing lawn mowers 

17 hours' labor, repairs on fence 

2 lbs. iron ..... 

I grate, 197 lbs. .... 

Screws ...... 

Paid Peter Harris, sharpening lawn 

mowers ...... 3.00 

Paid H. Leibing : 

Painting iron fence on Merrimack 

common . .. . . . 135 00 

Painting fence around monument .• 13-05 

Painting fountains, fences, and urinal 29.17 

Painting band stand. Concord com- 
mon . . . . . . 22.12 

Paid Thos. A. Lane, labor and materials, 

Hanover spring and fountain . 8.25 

Thos. A. Lane, dippers, sheet cop- 
per, and labor on fountains . 26.58 
J. B. McCrillis, repairing mowing 

machine ..... 1.65 

J. B. McCrillis, repairing horse rake 1.25 



6-33 


2.04 


43-71 


11.25 


2.43 


437-5° 


32.29 


6.80 


.06 


2.91 


•15 



COMMONS. 



607 



Paid David Thayer, stove and stovepipe ^2.50 

L. Pope, making 26 irons for seats 3.00 

L. Pope, iron for gate . . . .50 

L. Pope, sharpening picks and drills 4.90 

Paid Pike &: Heald, for band stand. 
Concord common : 
^296 lbs. galvanized iron . . . 22.20 

25 lbs. solder ..... 5.00 
5 lbs. nails . . . . • . .50 

26 hours' labor .... 12.60 
Paid A. & D. M. Poore, i^ ton Cum- 
berland coal .... 3.25 

A. & D. M. Poore, wood . . .50 

Carl E. York, 6 barrels . . 3.00 

Sargent &: Corson, 19 lbs. Mars 

green 3.42 

Sargent & Corson, y^ gal. spirits .25 

John B. Varick Co., garden rakes, 
wire, pails, brooms, rifles, wire 
nails, weeding hooks, staples, oil, 
chains, screws, lantern globe, etc. 68.39 

Adams & Tasker, 2 casks N. ce- 
ment ..... 2.70 
John J. Bennett, 230 brick and % 

day's labor .... 2.47 

A. J. Sawyer, 4,139 feet planks 

and boards . . . . 66.22 



$1,668.66 



FLOWERS, LOAM, ETC. 



Paid J. N. Auger, 316 bushels leached 

ashes $36.48 

H. H. Huntress, plants for Merri- 
mack common .... 49*25 
J. S. Holt & Co., 8 cords, 60 bush- 
els, leached ashes . . . 1 07*50 



608 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Manchester Slaughtering & Ren- 
dering Co., 1,000 lbs. fertilizer 
stock ..... $10.00 

Ray Brook Gardens, plants for 

Hanover common . . . 20.00 

John B. Varick Co., redtop, white 

clover, and other seeds . . 29.50 

D. H. Young, 8 feet manure . 4.00 

Frank Fitts, plants for Hanover 

common ..... 20.00 

A. G. Hood, filling 3 flower beds 

on Tremont common . . 60.00 

H. E. Babcock, 1,100 tulips . . 22.00 



$358-73 

Total expenditures .... . $3,726.64 



Stark Park. 



Appropriation ..... $1,500.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund. .25 



$1,500.25. 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid men and teams, as per pay-roll, commons : 

June ...... $18.00 

September ..... 153-50 

October ..... 242.50 

November . . . . . 5i-75 



$465.75 



ENGINEERING SERVICES. 



Paid Morton. & Quimby, furnishing design for Stark 

park garden $1,000.00 



I 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 



609 



TOOLS. 



Paid A. & W. S. Heath, 5 pairs rubber 




boots ..... 


;?i4-75 


Paid John B. Varick Co. : 




I Clipper scythe .... 


.60 


I ash snath . . . . 


•50 


I 3-horse Yankee plow 


14.50 


I 2-horse Yankee plow point 


•65 


4 bolts and 2 pick handles 


.60 



BLACKSMITHING. 

Paid Leander Pope, sharpening tools 
Total expenditures 



— $31-60 



$2.90 



$1,500.25 



Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Appropriation ..... $6,600.00 

Amount transferred from reserved fund . 761.26 



Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per pay-rolls 



January 


. $186.38 


February 


201.95 


March . 


149.61 


April . 


241.49 


May . . . 


361.89 


June 


517.65 


July . . . 


404.85 



$7,361.26 



3i) 



610 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



August .... 


^591.87 


September 


512.70 


October 


440.85 


November 


256.10 


December 


156.00 



$4,021.34 



LAND. 



Paid Harriet James for land, deed dated 

June 28, 1892 .... $260.15 
John" C. Ray, land, deed dated 

June 28, 1892 ..... 260.14 



$520.26 



PLANTS, TREES, LOAM, CLAY, ETC. 

Paid H. H. Huntress, plants of all kinds $51-10 

J. L. Golden, 7 loads loam . . 3.50 

Joseph Quirin, 36 loads loam . 54-00 

Waterman Smith, 250 feet turf . 5.00 

Gordon Woodbury, 225 loads loam 281.25 

C. C. Webster, 354 loads clay . 354-00 

Crafts & Green, 88 loads loam . 44.00 

John Muir, 15 loads loam . . 7.50 

John B. Varick Co., grass seed, etc. 19.10 



>i9-4S 



WATER, TELEPHONE, FUEL. 

Paid Water- Works, 332,000 cubic feet 

water at 15c. . . . . $498.00 
New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephone, 
cemetery, and house of superin- 
tendent ..... 84.00 
E. P. Johnson Co., 4 tons egg coal 28.50 



)io.5o 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 611 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Paid William E. Moore : 

Printing and binding i blank book . ^4.00 

Printing and binding interment book 4.00 

500 note heads, blocked . . . 2.50 

Postals and printing .... 3.00 

50 blank bills with stub . . . 2.00 
Other printing . , . . . 5.00 
Paid John B. Clarke Co., printing 200- 
page blank book ... 6.25 
John B. Clarke Co., advertising 

water bills, 4 lines, 3 times . 2.40 
Temple & Farrington Co., ink, 

paper, penholder, pencils, etc. . 4.76 
Temple «Sr Farrington Co., other 

stationery . . . ... 3.87 

• $37-78 



REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid Bartlett, Gay & Young, 3 y^-wash 

hydrants $i5-7S 

Bartlett, Gay & Young, 2 No. 18 

grates ..... 10.67 

John T. Beach, carriage repairs . 19-65 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 300 

stakes and trucking . . . 5.75 

S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., 216 

hours' labor on fence . . 86.40 

John T. Gott, cleaning one vault . 4.00 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson, repairs on fence: 

57 lbs. iron at 3c. . . . . 1.71 

8 lbs. babbitt 2.00 

38^ hours' labor ... . i5'3o 

Repairs on lawn mower ... .70 

Paid Thomas A. Laqe : 

41 2 J/^ feet 3-inch T. pipe . . . 87.83 



612 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



6 3 X I T. cross . 
123x1 tees 
13x1 cross 
2 3 inch plugs . 
Trucking and freight 
Materials and labor . 
Paid James Morrison, sharpening and re 
pairing picks 
L. M. Aldrich, filing 2 saws . 
Pike & Heald, damper,, mica, col 

lar, etc., for stove 
Pike & Heald, plumbing materials 

and labor .... 
B. A. Stearns, cash paid F. L. Wal 
lace & Co., for one casket bar 
Paid John B. Varick Co. : 
2 lawn mower^ . . . 
650 lbs. barbless wire 
300 feet 5-inch hose . 
100 feet f-inch hose . 
2 brass padlocks 
2 dump wheelbarrows 
2 steel scythes .... 
Other hardware .... 
Paid Head «S: Dowst Co., 140 chestnut 
posts . 
Head & Dowst Co., 1,636 ft. spruce 

joists 
Estate Charles H. Robie, 11 17.2 

sq. yards concrete 
J. J. Abbott, paint and labor 
sewers and drains, EHstrict No. 

I grate .... 
sewers and drains. District No. 
500 brick at 69c. per hundred 
sewers and drains. District No. 
barrel cement . 



$12.78 


17.16 


2.13 


1.00 


3-74 


13-34 


2.10 


.40 



96.88 

2.25 

6.00 

22.75 
22.50 

9.00 

1.50 

4-5° 

1-35 

19.62 



26.18 

726.18 
' 9.61 

1.94 

3-45 
1.38 



$1,288.60 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



613 



SUNDRIES. 



Paid B. A. Stearns, cash paid for clean- 
ing house $3-8o 

Whitten & Fifield, use of teams by 

committee .... 53-5° 

John Driscoll, water filter . . i.^o 

John Driscoll, 6 large sprinklers . 4.50 

Total expenditures ..... 



$63.30 
$7,361.26 



Appropriation 



Valley Cemetery. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



$3,000.00 



Paid labor of men 


and team? 


, as per pay-rolls : 


January 

February 

March 










$72-31 
81.36 
66.34 


April . 
May . 










141-73 
199.00 


June . 
July . 
August 
September . 
October 




> 






275-50 
215-13 
257-49 
180.54 
150.80 


November 










158.85 


December 










59-75 



Paid B. F. Bascomb, 13^4 days' labor of 

team ..... $51-00 

F. M. Barnard, 4 days' labor of 

team ..... 16.00 



$1,858.80 



614 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



I'aid ratrick Kane, labor 


^5.00 


Joseph Brown, team 6g}4 hours . 


27.80 


F. X. Chenette, team . 


4.00 




di- -r ^ ^ Oy* 




JSIO3.OO 


WATER. 




Paid Water-Works, use of water 


^45-45 


TURF, LOAM, PLANTS, 


ETC. 


Paid Joseph Brown, 98 loads loam 


$126.60 


J. Francis, plants 


56.82 


H. H. Huntress, wintering plants 


3.00 


M. Haley, 28 loads loam 


28.00 


Michael Murray, 3 cords manure . 


15.00 


Manchester Slaughtering & Ren- 




dering Co., 600 lbs. fertilizer . 


6.00 


J. W. Rand, 5,560 lbs. wood ashes 


30-58 


Ray Brook Garden, plants . 


62.23 


John B. Varick Co., grass seed. 




etc. ..... 


21.95 


H. Vaughan, manure . 


5.00 


H. M. Whitney, i Japan snowball 


1.25 


Peter 0. Woodman, 26 loads loam 


13.00 


Peter 0. Woodman, 850 feet turf . 


10.25 


Peter 0. Woodman, 7 loads loam . 


3-5° 


B. F. Bascomb, 3 loads loam 


3-9° 


H. E. Babcock & Co., plants 


2.00 


F. X. Chenette, 27 loads sand 


5-13 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY. 

Paid Temple & Farrington Co., paper, ^ 
pencils, mucilag?, pens, and 
other stationery . . . $i-io 

F. G. Riddle, printing blanks . 3.25 

S. S. Piper, postmaster, 100 

stamped envelopes . . . 2.18 



•53 



VALLEY CEMETERY. 



615 



REPAIRS, TOOLS, AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



Paid L. M. Aldrich, lumber, hardware, 
and labor .... 

Paid F. S. Bodwell : 
Labor, 4 men, 42 days 
I load stone .... 
4* days' use of derrick 
10 stone steps .... 
Paid J. Hodge, 14 ft. 2-inch sapling 
J. Hodge, T hour's labor 
Thomas A. Lane, oval bowl, putty 

200 hose washers, and labor 
Thomas A. Lane, 56 hose bands 
Thomas A. Lane, plumbing mate 

rials and labor . 
Manchester Hardware Co., 2 steel 

rakes .... 
Manchester Hardware Co., 2 wood 

en rakes .... 
William Sutcliffe, sharpening and 
repairing picks 
Paid John B. Varick Co. : 

Brooms, shovels, grass hooks, scythe 
stones, wire nails, and other hard 
ware ..... 
150 feet rubber hose . _ . 

I lawn mower . 
Wedges and twine . 
Paid J. Brown, 3 loads stone 

B. F. Bascomb, 5 loads stone 
Paid S. C. Forsaith Machine Co. : 
221^ hours' labor . . ^88.60 
556 lbs. castings . . 19.46 

124 lbs. iron . . . 3.72 



^12.78 

40.50 

3-5° 

3-37 

70.00 

•35 
.10 

5.10 

2.24 

14.92 
.90 
.80 
.90 



13.84 

13-50 

6.00 

.67 

5-25 
7-50 



Less 2,100 lbs. old iron 



;iii.78 

10.50 



101. 2e 



616 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

2 2-inch pine boxes, 94 X 40 X 12 , $4.00 

Paid Jones & Co., painting fence as per 

contract ..... 179.00 

Pike & Heald, plumbing materials 

and labor . . . . 84.86 

Palmer (S; Garmon, labor on Sewall 

Fogg's lot ... . .45 



Receiving Tomb. 
Appropriation ...... 

Expenditures. 
Paid Head & Dowst Co., materials and 

labor ..... $290.22 
Frank S. Bodwell, 3 men, 3 hours, 
resetting steps .... 
Frank S. Bodwell, i load stone 



Total expenditures . 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



Derryfield Park. 

Appropriation ..... $500.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . .05 



171-81 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid G. W. Dodge, i pair rubber boots . . $2.25 



Total expenditures . . . . . $2,982.85 

Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 17-15 



2.00 
3.00 


$295.22 




. 


$295.22 
54-78 



$350.00 



$500.05 



EAST MANCHESTER CEMETERY. 



617 



* Expenditures. 

LABOR. 

Paid labor of men and teams, as per commons pay- 
roll : 
July . 
August 
September 
October 



November 



goo. GO 
229.25 
1 1 1. GO 

61.75 

I. GO 



BLACKSMITHING AND HARDWARE. 



Paid Leander Pope, sharpening drills , 

John B. Varick Co., 2 manure 
forks ..... 

John B. Varick Co., axes, ax han- 
dle, saws, mattocks, stone wedg- 
es, shims, drill hammers and 
handles, dynamite and fuse, and 
other hardware . . . 

L. M. Aldrich, spruce lumiber, la- 
bor, etc. ..... 

J. J.Abbott, painting and letter- 
ing 12 sig.13 

Total expenditures 



^1-55 
1.5G 

18.19 
3.81 
6.00 



$469.00 



$31-05 



500-05 



Appropriation 



East Manchester Cemetery. 



Expenditures. 



LABOR. 



Paid George Drennells, 4 days' labor 
H. C. Dickey, 6 days' labor . 



$b.GO 

10.50 



$IOG.OO 



618 KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Paid Wm. Hardy, 33^ days' labor . $5-25 

J. M. Hall, 6 days' labor . . 9.00 

Charles Palmer, 6 days' labor » . 9.00 

C. P. Still, 6 days' labor with team 24.00 

Chas. Shannessey, 2 days' labor . 3.00 

Alvin G. Bean, 6 days' labor with 

team ..... 22.00 

R. P. Stevens & Co., man and 

team one day .... 4.00 

R. P. Stevens & Co., 100 lbs. lead 

at 45C. ..... 

John B. Varick Co., 6 lbs. powder 
John B. Varick Co., 50 feet fuse . 
John B. Varick Co., i mattock 

Total expenditures 
Amount transferred to reserved fund 



4-5° 




.90 




.20 




1. 00 






$99-35 




. 


$99-35 


• 


■65 




$100.00 



Goffe's Falls Cemetery. 

Appropriation . ;^ 100.00 

Expenditures. 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . $100.00 



Amoskeag Cemetery. 

Appropriation ..... $100.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 78.09 



$178.09 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



619 



Expenditures. 




LABOR. 




Paid Jas. E. Bailey, 41 days' labor 


$73-64 


Jas. E. Bailey, labor of team, 3 J 




days ..... 


5-25 


Jas. E. Bailey, labor of A. McGaff- 




ney, 4 days .... 


6.00 



$84.89 



WATER. 

Paid Water- Works, use of water, season 1892 



;i2.oo 



SUNDRIES. 






Paid James E. Bailey : 






40 loads gravel .... 


§2.00 




31 posts ...... 


4.65 




62 lbs. nails ..... 


2.17 




16 days' labor, self .... 


28.00 




5 days' labor, Jos. Hamilton 


7-5° 




eyz days' labor, F. D. Heath . 


11.38 




3 days' labor, A. McGaffney 


4-5° 




Paid Head & Dowst Co., lumber for 






fence ...... 


21.00 


S81.20 







Total expenditures 



$178-09 



Paupers off the Farm. 

Appropriation ..... $5,000.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 726.94 



$5,726.94 



620 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Expenditures. 




GROCERIES. 


Paid G. W. Adams .... $67.00 


Bartlett & Thompson 






85.00 


John Cashman 






87.85 


Eager & Rand 






65.00 


H. I. Faucher 






20.00 


T. F. Fifield 






245.00 


Griffin Brothers 






937-50 


H. J. Holmes 






10.66 


0. D. Knox & Co. 






66.00 


George C. Lord . 






10.00 


Lacourse & Laneville 






57-92 


McQuade Brothers 






72.00 


Thomas H. Mahoney . 






242.05 


D. M. Poore 






40.00 


E. W. Perkins . 






46.00 


Joseph Quirin 






, 74-84 


D. A. Shanahan . 






144.00 


Henry Weber 






247-35 


S. M. Worthley . 






8.00 


Carl E. York 






57.00 



^2,583.17 



FUEL. 



Paid L. B. Bodwell & Co. . 


$15.12 


F. X. Chenette . 


16.80 


DeCourcy, Holland & Marshall 


45.00 


Dunlap & Wason Coal Co. . 


46.51 


S. L. Flanders . '^ . 


36.00 


E. P. Johnson Co. 


49.14 


Charles Lessard . 


-50 


Moore & Preston . 


9-37 


August Schink 


18.30 



PAUPERS OFF THE FARM. 



621 



Paid J. P. Russell & Co. 


I36.00 




John Perham 


3.00 




W. E. Prescott . 


3-25 


$278.99 






BOAR! 


) AND CARE. 




Paid J. S. Bodkins 


$21.00 




Mrs. William Chase 


40.00 




Charles H. Giles . 


101.50 




A. D. Hatch 


120.00 




Carrie E. Jackson 


123.30 




William Larkin 


3-5° 




Charles Lowe 


91.26 




W. B. Linehan . 


3.00 




H. P. Marshall . 


. 4.50 




Christina Maycock 


125.90 




Mrs. Agnes Masse 


96.00 




N. H. Asylum for Insai 


le . . 39.7S 




State Industrial school 


1,171.08 




Daniel Stevens 


96.00 




William H. Gilmore 


29.31 




St. Patrick's Orphan H 


ome . . 70.00 




town of Lebanon . 


164.21 




John D. Welcome 


20.00 




county of Hillsborough 


126.68 




William Whelpley 


52.00 




Bridget McLane . 


18.00 


$2,517.02 






CI 


.OTHING. 




Paid James T. Donahoe 


$5.00 




Dodge & Straw 


4.45 




Joseph Murray 


10.65 




M. A. McDonough 


5.00 




Michael F. 'Toole 


1.50 




E. F. Scheer 


1.25 




Weston & Martin . 


5.90 


<-2?.7C 



622 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

MEDICINES, MEDICAL SERVICES, FUNERAL EXPENSES. 

Paid Lewis K. Mead, prescriptions and 

medicines . . . . . $79' 15 

F. H. Thurston, medicines . . So-^S 
Dr. I. L. Carpenter, certificate of 

insanity, Florence Sullivan . 3.00 
Paid Dr. Fred Perkins : 

Certificate of insanity, Lucius Colby . 3.00 
Certificate of insanity, Florence Sulli- 
van ...... 3.00 

Certificate of insanity, Ludger Garvis 3.00 

Services in case of E. C. Miller . . 13-00 

Certificate of insanity . . . 3.00 
Paid J. Frank Robinson, .certificate of 

insanity, Lucius Colby . . 3.00 
Amos G. Straw, certificate of in- 
sanity, Ludger Garvis . . 3.00 
F. X. Chenette, funeral expenses of 

Rene Tousignant . . . 10.00 
Paid Kean & Sheehan, funeral expenses : 

Child of George P. Hastings . . 15-00 

Joseph Cardinal .... 25.00 



Patrick Ford ..... 25.00 

Mrs. Patrick Donnelly . . . 40.00 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid John B. Clarke Co., printing 500 

blanks $2.25 

Temple & Farrington Co., 8 direc- 
tories ..... 16.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., i al- 
manac ..... .08 

Temple & Farrington Co., ink, 

rubber bands, etc. . . . i.io 



^278.98 



CITY FARM. 



623 



Paid Whitten & Fifield, use of team to 
city farm ..... 

B. F. Lake, _ expense conveying 
Ludger Garvis and Florence Sul- 
livan to insane asylum 

W. J. Freeman, -hack to city farm . 

Total expenditures 



12. lO 

1.50 



$35-03 
$5,726.94 



City Farm. 








Appropriation .... 
Amount transferred from reserved fund 


$7,500.00 
759-17 


$8,259. 


17 






Expenditures. 








HOUSE AND FARM LABOR. 






Paid L. M. Streeter, superintendent 


$500.00 






Mary E. Streeter, matron 


300.00 






Emma M. Streeter 




13436 






Thomas Burke 






146.25 






Ann Cunningham 






17-57 






Jane Carpenter 
F. W. Clark 






2.15 
23.00 






Mrs. C. A. Goddard 






27.65 






Charles A. Goddard 






40.98 






Daniel Grant 






142.20 






Hannah Hackett . 






67-56 






John Murray 
J. T. Murphy 
E. S. Merrill 






4.00 
60.65 
12.86 






Maria Nichols 






16.29 






James Powers 
L. J. Proctor 
Herbert Quimby . 






15-33 

350-55 

76.65 







624 



•REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



id Mrs. Herbert Quimby . 


$49.29 


Fred Sanborn 


242.60 


W. K. Stockdale . . . . 


4-5° 


Mrs. Charles Thompson 


23-35. 


Charles Thompson 


43-65 


E. S. Young 


• * 3-00 


Mary Maloney 


14.14 


Henry Swain 


44.72 


Mary McGuire .... 


17.36 


Mary Smith 


3.00 


Nellie Pingree 


17.50 


John McNally . . . . 


7-99 


Mrs. D. B. Hutchins . 


7.00 


Rose Fisk .... 


3.86 


Mary Eagan 


6.00 


Annie Cook 


1.50 


Kate Rogers 


4.08 


Susan Taylor 


9.00 



$2,440.59. 



FUEL. 

Paid A. & D. M. Poore, 54^095 lbs. egg 

and broken coal . . . $158.75 
A. & D. M. Poore, 2 barrels Cum- 
berland coal .... 2.00 
A. & D. M. Poore, i bbl. charcoal .40 
Moore & Preston, 22,820 lbs. stove 

coal 79-83 



$240.98- 



CLOTHING AND DRY GOODS. 

Paid George Blanchet, cotton, print, 

cambric, etc. .... $34-62 

Barton & Co., print, flannel, crash, 

napkins, batting, cambric, etc. . 161.83 

Cushmah & Hardy, jumpers, over- 
alls, suspenders, pants, hats, etc. 18.55 



CITY FARM. 



625. 



Paid Clark & Estey, hose, socks, under- 
vests, rubbers, fine combs, elas- 
tic, etc $28.54 

G. W. Dodge, boots, shoes, and 
rubbers from Sept. 3 to Dec. 28, 
1 89 1, and from January to May 

II, 1892 55.94 

Paid Fred. C. Dow : 
3 pairs gum boots 
I pair strap shoes 
I pair glove congress 
Other boots and shoes 
Paid James A. Folsom, pants and vests 
A. & W. S. Heath, 16 pairs shoes 
H. M. Moody, coats, vests, pants, 

hats, neckties, etc. . . . 149-73 
Weston & Hill Co., print and bat- 
ting 3-76 

Wingate & Gould, boots and shoes 11-85 



7-50 


1. 00 


1.25 


9.50 


6.50 


s 16.40 



^506.97 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Paid Bartlett & Thompson, beef, pork, 

etc $48.43 

Allen N. Clapp, 2 barrels kerosene 

oil, 100^ gallons, at 8^c. . 8.54 
Dodge & Laing, beans, beef, tur- 
keys, etc. ..... 96.38 

A. G. Grenier, coffee, peas, etc. . 66.11 

Hardy & Co., coffee, tea, yeast, etc. 21.05 

Geo. H. Hubbard, 171 lbs. tobacco 47-46 

Daniel Johnson, 162 lbs. sausage . 17-64 

Daniel Johnson, 2 lbs. sage . . .50 

W. D. Ladd& Co., 4 bbls. crackers 10.20 
McQuade Brothers, i box tobacco, 

34 lbs 8.50 



626 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Paid McQuade Brothers, 55 lbs. tobacco §i3-75 

McQuade Brothers, groceries . 180.17 

Manchester Provision Co., 11 lbs. 

bologna ..... .66 

Merrill & Freeman, 12 barrels Pills- 

bury's flour .... 68.10 

E. S. Newton, boneless cod and 

other fish 74-78 

New York Market, meats, etc. . 73-42 

Henry W. Parker, 47 barrels Pills- 

bury's flour .... 267.50 

Henry W. Parker, 5 barrels Mill- 
wood flour .... 23.25 
Henry W. Parker, 3 barrels St. 

Louis flour .... 13-00 

Public Market, meats and other 

provisions. .... 220.87 

Jos. Quirin, 91 J lbs. tobacco . 22.98 

Jos. Quirin, molasses and other gro- 
ceries ..... 261.04 
H. N. Robbins, soap and horse- 
radish ..... 1.30 
C. W. Stevens, 206 lbs. tea . . 43-oo 
S. M. Swett, groceries . . . 12.54 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., groceries . 28.45 
Carl E. York, groceries . . 69.72 
Clarence R. Merrill, 8 barrels Pills- 

bury's flour .... 40.00 



$i-739-34 



FURNITURE AND COOKING UTENSILS. 



Paid Clark M. Bailey, 24 Tto-quart milk- 
Fans $3.50 

Clark M. Bailey, 3 milk-pans . 2.00 

Clark M. Bailey, drip-pan, knife, 

tray, brooms, etc. . . . 16.94 



CITY FARM. 627 

Paid Wm. H. Elliott, i piano box . $2.00 

" The Kitchen," 6 lamps, 2 cad- 
dies, sieves, scoops, stone jar, etc. 13-42 

R. McQuarry, i 6-gallon jar . i.oo 

Manchester Heating & Lighting 
Co., I short center No. to Pal- 
ace R .85 

Manchester Heating and Lighting 

Co., 2 grates for range . . 3.00 

F. E. Nelson, dippers, strainers, 
pie-plates, coffee, pots, nappies, 
chimneys, dishes, etc. 

Darwin A. Simons, 12 chairs 
Darwin A. Simons, 12 chairs 
Darwin A. Simons, rent on chairs 
and crockery . . . ; 

C. A. Trefethen, i alarm clock 

G. R. Vance, 2 5-gallon cream 
pails ..... 

G. R. Vance, i strainer 

D. B. Varney, copper boiler 
L. M. Streeter, 2 bedsteads, com- 
mode, set of springs . . . 6.00 

Pike & Heald, coal hod, sad irons, 

etc 5.38 

■ — ^170. 



75-71 


8.50 


7.80 


1.72 


1.00 


2.00 


1.00 


18.70 



MEDICAL SERVICES AND MEDICINE. 

Paid I. L. Carpenter, M. D., consulta- 
tion on L. Colby as to insanity $3-oo 
L. K. Mead, medicines . . .''6.05 
W. F. Childs, services as dentist 
from March 12, 1S91, to April 

7, 1892 3.25 

Z. F. Campbell, medicines . . 3.05 

A. J. Rotchford, hoof ointment . 1.70 



$67-05 



628 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



FERTILIZERS, SEEDS, ETC. 

Paid Mrs. J. Ahern, ;^^}^ ft. manure . $16.62 
Thomas Frain, ly's cords manure . 4.00 
James J. H. Gregory, garden seeds 9.95 
E. T. James, 12 cords, 73 feet, ma- 
nure ..... 50.28 
Merrill & Freeman, 2,000 lbs. 

Reese fertilizer . . . 33'00 
Merrill & Freeman, 25 bushels seed 

oats ..... 11.88 

S. B. Putnam, 3 loads manure . 5.00 
H. E. Vaughan, 5 36-128 cords of 

manure . . . . . 18.48 
John B. Varick Co., 104 lbs. timo- 
thy seed . . . . . 4.42 
J. J. Sullivan, 2 loads manure . 3.00 



HARDWARE. 

Paid Killey & Wadleigh, hone, screw- 
driver, four rim locks, tacks, cat- 
tle cards, sponges, currycombs, 
and other hardware . . . $12.35 

Manchester Hardware Co., harrow 25.00 

Manchester Hardware Co.,hardware 77-56 

John B. Varick Co., i creamer . 48.00 

John B. Varick Co., 2 butter- 
workers ..... .24 

Jol n B. Varick Co., wire nails, fuse, 

locks, knobs, and other hardware 10.84 

Wadleigh Hardware Co., 6 scythe 
stones, casting, and other hard- 
ware ..... 56.65 



$156.63 



^230. 64 



CITY FARM. 



6^9 



HAY, GRAIN, AND OTHER FEED. 

Paid Adams & Tasker, bran, oats, wheat, 

etc. ...... $115.61 

McDougall Brothers, threshing 168 
bushels oats at 6c. . . . 10.08 

Merrill & Freeman, bran, mid- 
dlings, salt .... 21.30 

Merrill & Freeman, oats and grind- 
ing corn . . . . . 364.32 

Pettee & Adams, grinding . . 8.79 

Clarence R. Merrill, bran, etc. . 97'33 

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Paid James R. Carr &: Co., paints, oil, 

etc. ...... $36.80 

James R. Carr & Co., 20 days' 

labor ..... 45-00 

D. E. Guiney, repairs on steam 

pipe and packing 20 steam valves 4.25 
Paid Head & Dowst Co. : 

700 chimney brick .... 4.55 

200 feet 12-inch spruce boards . . 3.20 

Repairing pump . . .' . 1.50 

444 feet spruce . . . . 7.10 

100 feet barn boards . . . 2.30 

716 feet hemlock boards . . . 10.02 

214 feet spruce .... 6.17 

1,000 cedar shingles . . . . 31-76 

56 feet drag plank . . . . ' 2.24 

Paid Peter Harris, making six keys . i.oo 

Paid C. H. Hutchinson, iron and lum- 
ber ...... .17 

2634^ hours' labor on windmill, repair- 
ing shackles ..... 10.50 



$617.43 



6B0 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Boiler repairs , . . . . $7' 15 

Labor and material making scrapers . 3.34 
Paid Kimball Carriage Co., repairs on 

sleigh 43-5° 

Thomas A. Lane, labor and mate- 
rial for pump .... 205.59 
Mahurin Lightning-Rod Co., la- 
bor and rods .... 64.50 
Manchester Locomotive Works, 45 

lbs. steel plate . . . . 1.80 

L. M. Aldrich, 5 hours' labor . 1.25 
Pike & Heald, repairing windmill 

pump ..... 6.92 
Pike & Heald, materials and labor 

on various things . . . 13-86 
R. M. Rollins & Son, knives, Pit- 
man rod, box tedder forks, etc., 

for machine . . . . 16.55 
Smith & Winchester, 128 ft. 6 in. 

artesian well .... 1,024.00 

J. H. Wales, i^ days' mason work 6.13 

J. H. Wales, cement . . . .15 

L. N. Westover, 10^ hours labor 4.30 

L. N. Westover, 11 feet white oak .66 

L. N. Westover, 6 maple table legs 1.20 

Adams & Tasker, i cask lime . .95 

J. J. Abbott, ^2 gallon varnish . 1.50 

J. J. Abbott, cherry stain . . .50 

E. Gatz, 7^ hours' work . . 2.90 

E. Gatz, 4 feet pine . . . .10 
J. B. McCrillis & Son, repairing 

wagons, etc. . . '' . . 47.86 

Peter Harris, keys ... -3° 

BLACKSMITHING, HARNESSES, ETC. 

Paid Amos Dow, shoeing horses . . $8.65 

J. O. Tremblay, shoeing horses . 83.00 



^1,621.57 



CITY FARM. 631 

Paid F. N. McLaren, repairing harnesses, 

etc. ...... $i.oo 

Hill, Spaulding & Co., lap robe, 

etc 4.15 

N. J. Whalen, whips, chamois, axle 

grease, etc. .... 25.90 

Thomas P. Riley, robe, brush, etc. 9.75 



INSURANCE. 

Paid John Dowst, agent, insurance on 
city farm buildings, in the Cap- 
itol Fire Insurance Co., policy 
18,856 ..... $20.00 

C. M. Edgerly, insurance in the 
Peoples Fire Insurance Co., pol- 
icy No. 100,943 . . . 40.00 

A. Elliott & Co., insurance in the 
Granite State Insurance Co., pol- 
icy No. 43,316 .... 40.00 

A. Elliott & Co., insurance in the 
Northern Insurance Co., policy 
No. 10,124 .... 40.00 

E. P. Richardson, agent, insurance 

in the N. H. Fire Insurance Co. 60.00 



TELEPHONE AND STATIONERY. 

Paid New England Telegraph & Tele- 
phone Co., use of telephones . $42.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., blank 

books, paper, mucilage, etc. . 12.25 

J. O. Burbank, printing postals, 

bill-heads ..... 6.00 

Nate Kellogg, 100 postals . . i.oo 

Nate Kellogg, printing and sta- 
tionery ..... 5.00 



$132.45 



$66.25 



632 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



SUNDRIES. 

Paid Clark M. Bailey, 2 dozen brooms . $7-5o 

J. Hayes & Co., 14 barrels . . 14-25 

J. Hayes & Co., i half-barrel . 1.50 

" New England Homestead," from 

March i, 1892,10 March 1,1893 ^-5° 

L. M. Streeter, postofifice box rent, 

quarter ending March i, 1892 . .75 

L. M. Streeter, expenses to Groton 

and Wentworth, after help . 6.50 

Union Publishing Co., "Daily 

Union " to Jan. i, 1892 . . 6.00 

Union Publishing Co., advertis- 
ing wants . . . . . 1.75 
E. C. Tilton, cutting ice . . 7.50 
Charles C. Chase, castrating pigs . 3.00 
Samuel Richardson, grinding 395 

bushels of apples . . . 18.50 



$68.75 



Total expenditures 



>259-i7 



Indigent Soldiers. 
Appropriation ..... 




Expenditures. 




GROCERIES. 




Paid G. W. Adams .... 


$38.00 


A. M. Eastman . 








10.01 


Griffin Brothers . 








20.00 


George C. Lord . 








6.00 


E. W. Perkins 








16.00 


Thomas H. Mahoney 








12.00 


Eager & Rand . 








6.00 


0. D. Knox & Co. 








16.00 



$1,000.00 



; 1 24.0 1 



FREE BEDS, ELLIOT HOSPITAL. 633 



FUEL. 



Paid Decourcy & Holland 
Moore & Preston . 
J. Masse 



BOARD AND CARE. 



Paid Bridget Milene 
Mary McCook 
John Flynn . 



Paid L. K. Mead 

F. H. Thurston 



MEDICINES. 



$2.00 




3-75 

7-5° 


$13-25 




^68.00 
38.00 
10.00 


$116.00 




$6.70 
1.50 


S8.20 



Total expenditures ..... $261.46 
Amount transferred to reserved fund . . . 738.54 



$1,000.00 



Women's Aid and Relief Hospital. 

Appropriation ...... . . $500.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Women's Aid and Relief Hospital . . $500.00 



Free Beds, Elliot Hospital. 

Appropriation ..... $600.00 
Amount transferred from reserved fund . 300.00 

$900.00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Elliot Hospital, amount for 3 free beds . . $900.00 



034 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Decoration of Soldiers' Graves. 

Appropriation . . . . . $300.00 
Transferred from reserved fund . . 21.75 



Expenditures. 

Paid to A. D. Scovell, commander of Louis Bell Post 
No. 3, G. A. R., bills paid sundry persons for ex- 
penditures incurred on Memorial Day, May 30, 
1891: 

PRINTING. 

Paid Press Printing and Publishing Co., 

50 general orders . . . $o-75 
John B. Clarke Co., 100 half-note 

circulars . . . . . i.oo 

John B. Clarke Co., 420 postals . 1.75 

John B. Clarke Co., 1,000 programs 4.00 

Temple & Farrington Co., 50 blanks .87 



CARRIAGE HIRE. 

Paid C. H. Simpson, use of hack . . $4-oo 

E. T. James, use of landau . . ,4-oo 

G. W. Reed, use of hack . . 4.00 

Felch's stable, use of hack . . 4.00 

E. V. Turcotte, use of hack and 

barge ..... 9.00 
A. L. Jenness & Son, use of carry- 
all 1.50 

A. L. Jenness & Son, use of landau 4.00 

J. C. Nichols & Son, use of hack . 4.00 

Whitten & Fifield, ust of hack . 4.00 

F. X. Chenette, use of hack . . 4.00 
W. J. Freeman, use of hack . . 4.00 
Geo. E. Wheeler, use of barouche 4.00 
George E. Wheeler, use of carryall 

and driver .... 3.00 



;2i-75 



•37 



DECORATION OP SOLDIERS' GRAVES. 



635 



Paid C. C. Webster, use of barge 
J. W. Truell, use of hack 



4.00 



MUSIC AND SINGING. 

Paid West Manchester Drum Corps . $10.00 
Manchester Drum Corps . . 10.00 
Manchester Military (First Regi- 
ment) band . . . . 75 -oo 
Apollo Club .... 10.00 

SUNDRIES. 

Paid Palmer & Garmon, 50 stone mark- 
ers . . . . . . $22.50 

John B. Varick Co., 4 hammers 

and tacks ..... .72 

First N. H. Battery, powder, etc. . 10.25 
J. H. Wiggin & Co., 7 doz. lem- 
ons, 10 lbs. sugar . . . 2.25 
Jas. W. Wilson, flowers and plants i.6o 
E. R. Coburn & Co., i flag . . 3.25 
Hartley E. Vaughan, labor and 

teams . . . . . 12.10 

J. Shine, for team . . . i.oo 
D. H. Morgan, use of team to get 

flowers ..... 4.00 

Clark Waters, services . . . 2.00 
A. D. Scovell, use of team . . 2.00 
A. D. Scovell, postal cards and sun- 
dries . . . . . • 5.70 

Louis Bell Post No. 3, 543 flags . 54-3o 
Head & Dowst Co., labor and lum- 
ber, stand on common . . 23.71 



$105.00 



$145-38 



Total expenditures 



;2i.75 



636 



EEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOK. 



Militia. 



Appropriation 



S900.00 



Expenditures. 



Paid the following parties for maintenance of ar- 
mories from Feb. 12, 1S92, to Feb. 12, 1893 : 



Amoskeag Veterans 




5100.00 


City Guards .... 


. 


100.00 


First Regiment, N. H. X. G. (band) 


100.00 


First Regiment Headquarters, X. 


H. 




X. G 




100.00 


Lafayette Guards . 




100.00 


^Manchester Cadets 




100.00 


Manchester War Veterans 




100.00 


Sheridan Guards . 




100.00 


Upton Light Infantry . 




100.00 



Total expenditures 



$900.00 
$900.00 



Abatement of Taxes. 



Appropriation 

Balance from old account 



S3;Ooo.oo 
442.76 



$3^442.76 



EXPEN'DITURES. 



Paid sundr}' persons on taxes abated . $2,794.53 
Balance transferred to new account . 648.23 



$3,442.76 



APPROPRIATIONS. 637 

State Tax. 
Appropriation ..... . . $65,615.00 

Expenditures. 
Paid Solon A. Carter, state treasurer . . . 565.615.00 



County Tax. 
Appropriation $61,076.55 

Expenditures. 
Paid Edwin F. Jones, county treasurer . . . $61,076.55 



Resolution Raising Money and Making Appropria- 
tions for the Year 1 S92. 

Resolved by the Mayor, AiJcrmen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follon'S : 

That the sum of four hundred and ninety-eight thousand live 
hundred and ninety-one and iifty-five hundredths dollars ($498.- 
591.55) be raised for the use of the city for the year 1892 by tax 
on the polls and estates liable to be taxed therein, which, to- 
gether with such unappropriated money as may be now in the 
city treasury, or may hereafter come into it, shall be appropri- 
ated as follows : 

central department. 

Interest ........ ^51.500.00 

Reserved fund ....... 20.000.00 

Temporary loan ....... 30,000.00 

City hall 2,100.00 



eas 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Printing and stationery 
Incidental expenses 
Mayor's incidentals 
City officers' salaries 
City auditor's department 



$2,200.00 

15,000.00 

300.00 

15,700.00 

2,000.00 



STREET AND SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Highway District No. i 

Nos. 2 and -z 



No 


• 4 




5 




6 




7 




8 




9 




10 




II 




12 



" 13 

New highways 

Land taken for highways 

Watering streets . 

Paving 

Macadamizing 

Grading for concrete 

Scavenger teams . 

Street sweeping . 

Lighting streets . 

Bridges 

City teams . 

Sewers and drains 

Second-street bridge 

Engineer's Department 

Health Department . 



$300.00 

12,000.00 

500.00 

800.00 

500.00 

1,500.00 

1,000.00 

500.00 

4,000.00 

1,000.00 

300.00 

200.00 

10,000.00 

9,000.00 

3.000.00 

5,500.00 

iS,ooo.oo 

5,000.00 

1 1,000.00 

1,200.00 

40,000.00 

2,500.00 

5,000.00 

30,000.00 

6,000.00 

4,000.00 

2,500.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



639 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Repairs of schoolhouses 

Fuel .... 

Furniture and supplies . 

Books and stationery 

Printing and advertising 

Contingent expenses 

Care of rooms 

Evening schools . 

Teachers' salaries . 

Evening school, mechanical drawing 

Free text-books and supplies . 

CiTV Library .... 



FIRE. 



Fire department . 
Fire-alarm telegraph 
Firemen's parade . 



Police department 



POLICE. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



Repairs of buildings 

New schoolhouse, Hallsville . 

Engine-house and ward room No. 9 



WATER-WORKS. 



Construction 
Repairs 
Current expenses 



Commons 
Stark park . 
Derryfield park 
Pine Grove cemetery 



PUBLIC PLACES. 



$5,000.00 

4,500.00 

800.00 

300.00 

400.00 

1,200.00 

4,000.00 

1,200.00 

56,000.00 

600.00 

3,500.00 

3,800.00 

$39,000.00 

1,400.00 

500.00 

$37)300-00 



$2,500.00 

8,000.00 

10,000.00 



525,000.00 

22,000.00 

5,000.00 



53,000.00 

1.500.00 

500.00 

6,6co.oo 



640 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Valley cemetery . 

East Manchester cemetery 

Goffe's Falls cemetery . 

Amoskeag cemetery 

Receiving tomb, Valley cemetery 

PATRIOTIC, CHARITABLE, 

Paupers off the farm 

City farm .... 

Indigent soldiers . 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 

Free beds, Elliot Hospital 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 

Militia .... 



AND PHILANTHROPIC. 



§3,000.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
350.00 



$5,000.00 
7,500.00 
1,000.00 
500.00 
600.00 
300.00 
900.00 



TAXES. 



Abatement of taxes 
State taxes . 
County tax . 



§3,000.00 
65,615.00 
61,076.55 

§706,941.55 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS FOR THE VEAR 1 89 2. 



Amount to be raised by 
Insurance tax 
Railroad tax 
Savings bank tax . 
Literary fund 
Water-W-orks 
City hall 

Tuition . . . 

Police department 
Pine Grove cemetery 
Valley cemetery . 
County of Hillsborough 
City farm 
Interest on taxes . 






$498091-55 

3,800.00 

21,500.00 

74,000.00 

4,500.00 

85,000.00 

2,500.00 

400.00 

7,500.00 

4,400.00 

1,100.00 

1,600.00 

1,700.00 

350.00 



.^7o6.94T.5^5 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



641 



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642 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Assessors' Oath. 

We, the Assessors of the City of Manchester, do solemnly 
swear that in making the invoice for the purpose of assessing the 
foregoing taxes, we appraised all taxable property at its full 
value, and as we would appraise the same in payment of a just 
debt due from a solvent debtor. So help us God. 



Valuation and Taxes. 



The amount of taxes assessed on the polls and on 
personal estate, within the city of Manchester, N. 
year 1892, was as follows : 



Real estate 
Personal property 
Overlay 

No. of polls, 10,673 



Valuation. 
$21,559,978 
3,304,766 

$24,864,744 
1,067,300 



Rate per Sl.OOO. 

$19.50 

19.50 



19.50 



Totals . . $25,932,044 
Special tax on 700 male dogs, at $1 . 
Special tax on 43 female dogs, at $2 . 

Total 

The share distributed to Manchester of the 
amount of the tax assessed, as per returns made 
by the corporations to state treasurer : 

On railroads . . *■ . 
On savings banks . 
On insurance companies . 
On literary fund 

Grand tax total . 



the real and 
H., for the 



Tax. 

$420,419.57 
64,442.94 

4-31 

$484,866.82 
20,812.35 

$505,679.17 

700.00 

86.00 
$506,465.17 



$25,849.65 

78,101.94 

4,199.25 

6,010.88 

$620,626.89 



VALUATION AND TAXES. 



643 



Appropriated and assessed in 1892, for city' ap- 
propriation ....... ^475,700.00 

Appropriated and assessed in 1892, for state tax 65,615.00 

Appropriated and assessed in 1892, for county 

tax 61,076.55 

Overlay* . . . . . . . 18,235.34 

Grand tax total ..... §620,626.89 

For further information in relation to taxes collected by the 
state, see State Treasurer's Report. 

TABLE OF TAXES DUE AND UNCOLLECTED. 



Year. 


Due June 1, 1892; 
assessed in 1892. 


= 1 

11 


p 
C 

o 
o 




Duo December 31, 

1892. 




$1,206.50 
1,264.85 
1,165.64 
1,586.53 
1,412.58 
1,817.71 

24,.385.47 ) 




$0.79 


$1,205.71 
1,264.85 
1,163.94 
1,582.63 
1,402.73 
1,719.40 


Taxes of 18S6 




Taxes of 1887 




1.70 
3.90 

9.85 
98.31 

20,694:60 

473,302.14 


Taxes of 1888. 




Taxes of 1889 




Taxes of 1890.' 




Taxag of 1891 




Ta:^s of 1891 


435.27 } »l.S»y-31 
506 465.17 l.n2S..'?8 


2,236.83 


Taxes of 189'' .. 


32,139.65 








Totals 


$539,739.72 


$2,912.69 


$494,111.29 


$42,715.74 



♦This overlay consists of $786, special clog tax; $7,087.62, assessed by the 
local assessors under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 57, section 4 ; 
and the sum of $10,361.72, in the amount received from railroads, banks, in- 
surance companies, and literary fund above the amount estimated by the 
city councils. 



644 



REPORT 0-F THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Tax Valuations, etc., from 1890 to 1892, Inclusive. 



Year. 


Valuation. 


Taxes. 


No. polls. 


Poll tax. 


Val.ofpoll 


1890 


S24,207,740 
24,872,492 
25 932,044 


$462,869.17 
443,541.76 


9,723 
10,367 
10,673 


$1.91 
1.7S 
1.95 


100 


1891 


100 


1892 


100 









For years prior to 1890, see reports of iSgo^and 1891. 



Settlement of the Account of George E. Morrill, Tax 
Collector for City of Manchester, N. H., June 1 , 1 892. 



Amount out-. Balance out- 

standing, June Collected, standing, June 





1, 1S91. 




1, 1892. 


Tax list, 1S85 


$1,206.50 


$0.79 


$1,205.71 


1S86 


1,264.85 




1,264.85 


1887 


1,165.64 


1.70 


1,163.94 


1888 


1,586.53 


3-9° 


1,582.63 


1889 


1,412.58 


9-85 


1,402.73 


1890 


1,817.71 


98.31 


1,719.40 



June 3, 1892, credited by receipt of 
treasurer, No. 72 



§114-55 



1M.55 



St collected, 1885 


$ioi 


1886 




1887 . • 


.60 


1 888^ 


1.27 


1889 


. • 1.46 


1890 


10.52 


1891 


. 498-77 



$514-13 



ACCOUNT OF GEORGE E. MORRILL, COLLECTOR. 645 

June 3, 1892, by receipt of treasurer, 

No. 71 $510-03 

July 7, 1892, by receipt of treasurer, 

No. 97 . • • • • • 4- 10 



$514-13 



1 89 1. To resident list, including 

dog tax . . . $442,252.77 

non-resident list . . 1,288.99 

voluntary taxes . . 435-2 7 



$443j977-o3 



Cr. 

1 89 1. By cash paid city treasurer, 

per receipts . . $393,249.72 
cash paid as per county 

treasurer's receipts . 46,032.47 
abatements . . . 2,458.01 

unpaid taxes, June i, 

1892 .... 2,236.83 



$443,977-03 



City of Manchester to George E. Morrill. 

Dr. 

To salary for the year ending June 

I, 1892 ..... $1,650.00 
commission on old taxes . . 6.53 



$1,656.53 



Cr. 

By cash paid by treasurer, on account 

salary ..... $800.00 

balance paid by treasurer, as per 

bill 856.53 



$1,656.53 



646 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Manchester, N. H., July 7, 1892. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the account of George 
E. Morrill, tax collector of said Manchester, and find the same 
correct, as above stated. 

JAMES B. STRAW, 

City Auditor. 



Some Laws and Decisions Relating to Exemptions 
from Taxation. 

Constitution of New Hampshire; Article 82, Page t^Z, 
Public Statutes. 

encouragement of literature, etc. 

Article 82. " Knowledge and learning generally diffused 
through a community being essential to the preservation of a 
free government, and spreading the opportunities and advantages 
of education through the various parts of the country being 
highly conducive to promote this end, it shall be the duty of the 
legislators and magistrates, in all future periods of this govern- 
ment, to cherish the interest of literature and the sciences, and 
all seminaries and public schools ; to encourage private and pub- 
lic institutions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of 
agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manufactures, and 
natural history of the country ; to countenance and inculcate 
the principles of humanity and general benevolence, public and 
private charity, industry and economy, honesty and punctuality, 
sincerity, sobriety, and all social affections and generous senti- 
ments among the people ; provided., nevertheless, that no money 
raised by taxation shall ever be granted or applied for the use of 
the schools or institutions" of any religious sect or denomina- 
tion." 

Public Statutes, chapter 55, section 2. 
Section 2: " Real estate, whether improved or unimproved, 
and whether owned by residents or others, is liable to be 



EXEMPTIONS FROM TAXATION, 647 

taxed, except houses of public worship, twenty-five hundred dol- 
lars of the value of parsonages owned by religious societies and 
occupied by their pastors, schoolhouses, seminaries of learning, 
real estate of the United States, state, or town used for public 
purposes, and almshouses on county farms." 

Section ii. "Towns may by vote exempt from taxation for 
a term not exceeding ten years any manufacturing establishment 
proposed to be erected or put in operation therein, and the capi- 
tal to be used in operating the same, unless such establishment 
has been previously exempted from taxation by some town." 

OPINION OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

58 N. H. Rep. page 623. " The exemption in each case is 
limited to ten years. A perpetual alienation of the whole power 
of taxation would be the destruction of government : and the 
dangerous tendency of legislation suspending any part of that 
power, for any period, is manifest. P. Bank v. Billings^ 4 Pet. 
514, 561. So long as the existing laws remain unrepealed, and 
the constitutional construction heretofore adopted remains un- 
changed, contracts hereafter made under those laws and that 
construction will be valid. If the legislature for any reason wish 
to prevent the making of any more such contracts, their object 
can be accomplished by a repeal of the laws authorizing them." 

Hospitals, etc., are exempt from taxation in their respective 
charters as " being of the nature of a public charity," as follows : 

Gale Home for Aged and Destitute Women, N. H. Laws of 
1889, chapter 199. 

Elliot Hospital, N. H. Laws of 1881, chapter 178. 

Manchester Women's Aid and Relief Society, organized in 
January, 1875 j N- H. Laws, 1891, chapter 283. 

Orphanage and Home for Old Ladies (Catholic) on Hanover 
street, N. H. Laws, 1883, chapter 56. 



648 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Schedule of Property used for Religious, Charitable 
and Educational Purposes, and Exempt from Tax- 
ation by Law, not including that Owned by the City 
of Manchester. 

98. Convent, Sisters Jesus Mary, French Catholic ; 
East Spruce street, near Beech . 

Building ..... $10,000.00 
13,000 square feet of land . . 2,600.00 

$12,600.00 

108. Convent, Sisters of Mercy, Catholic; 415 Un- 
ion street, corner Laurel : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
12,600 square feet of land . . 6,300.00 

$36,300.00 

96. Mount St. Mary's Academy, Catholic; from 
ccnvent lot east to Beech street : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
31,500 square feet of land . . 9,450.00 

$34,450.00 

Lot south side Laurel street, corner Union street, un- 
occupied. Catholic : 

10,800 square feet of land . . $5,400.00 Taxable. 

107. Hospital of the Sacred Heart and Old Ladies' 
Home, Catholic ; Amherst and Hanover streets : 
Building ..... $8,000.00 
40,500 square feet of land . . 30,375.00 

^38,375-00 

106. St. Patrick's Orphan ^Asylums, Catholic ; 184 
Hanover street : 

Building ..... $35,000.00 
40,500 square feet of land . . 40,500.00 

$75,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 649 

105. St. Joseph's High School, Catholic ; Lowell 
street, corner of Birch : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
8,000 square feet of land . . 8,000.00 

$20,000.00 

15. Lake avenue school, Catholic ; Lake avenue, near 
Elm street : 

Building ..... $2,800.00 
10,500 square feet of land . . 15,750.00 

■ — $18,550.00 

97. Union-street school. Catholic; corner Union 
and Laurel streets : 

Building ..... $4,000.00 

5,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$6,500.00 



109. St. Agnes' school. Catholic ; corner Cedar and 
Pine streets : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 
20,000 square feet of land . . 3,200.00 



$15,200.00 

103. St. Joseph's school for girls, Catholic ; corner 
Pine and Lowell streets : 

Building ..... $10,000.00 

Land included in cathedral lot . $10,000.00 

99. Convent of the Holy Angels, French Catholic ; 
Beauport street, corner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building . . ... . $15,000.00 

22,500 square feet of land . . 4,500.00 

$i9.5oo-oo 

Open square bounded by Beauport, Wayne, and Put- 
nam streets ; French Catholic : 

90,50c square feet of land . . $18,100.00 Taxable. 

100. St. Augustine's academy, French Catholic; 
corner Beech and Spruce streets : 

Building ..... $8,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land . . 4.500.00 

$12,500,00 



650 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

loi. St, Mary's parochial school, French Catholic; 
corner Wayne and Cartier streets : 

Building ..... ^12,000.00 
25,000 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 

^14,000.00 

114. Residence priest St. Augustine's church, French 
Catholic ; No. 383 Beech street : 

Building ..... |6,ooo.oo 
7,500 square feet of land . . 1,875.00 



$7,875.00 $2,500.00 



113. Residence priest St. Anne's church. Catholic; 
No. 231 Merrimack street : 

Building ..... $5,000.00 
8,820 square feet of land . . 2,646.00 



$7,646.00 $2,500.00 

III. Residence Catholic bishop; No. 145 Lowell 
street : 

Building ..... $40,000.00 

24,000 square feet of land . . 12,000.00 



;2,ooo.oo $2,500.00 



115. Residence priest St. George's church, French 
Catholic ; Orange street, corner Pine : 

Building ..... $2,500.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 4,000.00 



,500.00 $2,500.00 



112. Residence priest St. Mary's church, French 

Catholic; 376 Beauport stre"fet, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $2,500.00 

5,000 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 



5,500.00 $2,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 651 

92. St. Anne's church, Catholic ; Union street, cor- 
ner Merrimack : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
10, 180 square feet of land . . 5,090.00 

$35,090.00 

no. St. Augustine's church, French Catholic ; Beech 
street, corner East Spruce : 
' Building ..... $28,000.00 
13,000 square feet of land . . 3,250.00 

$31)250.00 

91. St. Joseph's cathedral and chapel, Catholic; 
Pine street, corner Lowell : 

Building . . . . . $70,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land . . 30,375.00 

$100,375.00 

93. St. Mary's church, French Catholic ; Beauport 
street, corner Wayne, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $25,000.00 
70,000 square feet of land . . 14,000.00 

$39,000.00 

. 102. St. Raphael's church and school, German Cath- 
olic ; Third street, corner Ferry, West Manchester ; 
Building ..... $35,000.00 
8,000 square feet of land . . 3,400.00 



5,400.00 



94. St. George's church, French Catholic; Pine 
street, corner Orange : 

Building ..... $75,000.00 
18,690 square feet of land . . 7,614.00 



)2,6i4.oo 



95. St. Patrick's church and school. Catholic ; Kel- 
ley street, Cartier street, and Cooledge avenue : 
School building . . . . $2o,ooq.co 
56,281 square feet of land . . 4,502.00 

$24,502.00 



652 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

60. First Baptist church ; Union street, corner Con- 
cord : 

Building $28,000.00 

11,250 square feet of land . . 6,750.00 

^34,750-00 

62. First Freewill Baptist church ; Merrimack street, 
corner Chestnut : 

Building $12,400.00 * 

12,600 square feet of land . . 12,600.00 

$25,000.00 

61. Second Baptist church ; Merrimack street near 
Pine : 

Building $9,000.00 

9,450 square feet of land . . 3,780.00 

$12,780.00 

6^. People's Baptist church ; Chestnut street, cor- 
ner Concord : 

Building $8,000.00 

3,200 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 

$10,000.00 

67. First Congregational church ; Hanover street, 
corner Union : 



Building $30,000.00 

43,200 square feet of land . ; 34,560.00 



t,56o.oo 



68. Second Congregational church ; Market street, 
corner Franklin : 

Building $25,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land . . 19,000.00 



$44,000.00 

66. Third Congregational church ; South Main street, 
corner Milford, West Manchester : 

Building $8,000.00 

23,000 square feet of land . . 3,000.00 

$11,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 653 

74. First M. E. church : Valley street, corner Jew- 
ett: 

Building is8,ooo.oo 

11,400 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

$9,000.00 

72. St. Paul's M. E. church ; Union street, corner 
Amherst : 

Building ..... ^25,000.00 
10,010 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 

$31,000.00 

73. St. James M. E. church ; Pennacook street, cor- 
ner Pine : 

Building ..... $9,000.00 
11,000 square feet of land . . 2,200.00 

Si 1,200.00 

86. Grace church, Episcopal ; Lowell street, corner 
Pine : 

Building ..... $20,000.00 
9,300 square feet of land . . 6,975.00 

— ' $26,975.00 

85. First Unitarian church ; Concord street, corner 
Beech : 

Building ..... $24,000.00 
13,500 square feet of land . . 6,000.00. 

$30,000.00 

87. First Universalist church; Lowell street, near 
Elm: 

Building $17,000.00 

10,000 square feet of land . . 15,000.00 

$32,000.00 

64. Christian church, Protestant ; Pine street, cor- 
ner Merrimack : 



Building ..... $6,000.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 6,700.00 



$12,700.00 



654 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

8i. First Presbyterian church, German; Second 
street, corner Bath, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $3,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 



,500.00 



79. Swedish Lutheran church, Protestant ; Saga- 
more street, corner Pine : 

Building ..... $7,500.00 
10,950 square feet of land . . 2,000.00 



$9,500.00 



82. Swedish Baptist church ; Arlington street, near 
Maple : 

Building ..... $5,000.00 
4,432 square feet of land . . 1,100.00 



), 100.00 



Second Advent church ; Amherst street, between 
Pine and Union : 

Building ..... $5,100.00 
4,500 square feet of land . . 3)375-oo 



5,475.00 



65. City Mission chapel, Protestant; Merrimack 
street, corner of Beech : 

Building ..... $7,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land . . 6,000.00 



$13,000.00 

80. Westminster Presbyterian church ; Brook street, 
corner Hazel : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$17,500.00 

70. South Manchester Union chapel, Protestant ; 
Elm street, south : 

Building $2,500.00 

10,747 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 

$3,500.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 665 

Episcopal Mission church ; North Main street, cor- 
ner School, West Manchester : 

Building ..... $3,500.00 
19,412 square feet of land . . 4,000.00 

$7,500.00 

76. Residence pastor St, Paul's M. E. church ; 
Union street, near Amherst : 

Building $3,000.00 

$2,500.00 

71. Residence pastor First Congregational church ; 
No. 590 Beech street, near Bridge : 

Building . , . . . $5,000.00 
8,100 square feet of land . . 2,400.00 

. $2,500.00 

$7,400.00 

88. Residence pastor Grace Episcopal church ; cor- 
ner Harrison and Union streets : 

Building ..... $6,000.00 
15,000 square feet of land . . 3,750.00 

$2,500.00 

$9,750.00 

German School Society; Third, Bath, and Ferry 
streets : 

Building $4,500.00 

10,187 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$7,000.00 

89. Elliot Hospital, Protestant ; East Manchester : 

Building $23,000.00 

Land ...... 7,000.00 

$30,000.00 

Elliot Hospital lot ; Hanover street, corner Chest- 
nut : 

Building $3,000.00 

Land ...... 13,000.00 

$16,000.00 



656 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

84. W. G. T. U. Mercy Home ; Mammoth road, 
East Manchester : 

Building ..... ^3,000.00 
Land ...... 3,700.00 



), 700.00 



90. Women's Aid and Relief Hospital; Pearl street, 
corner Beech : 

Building 515,000.00 

57,530 square feet of land . . 10,000.00 



$25,000.00 

116. Manchester Children's Home ; Webster street : 

Building $20,000.00 

55,000 square feet of land . . 2,500.00 

$22,500.00 

117. Residence pastor Swedish Lutheran church; 
Sagamore f,treet, corner Pine : 

Building $3,000.00 

10,200 square feet of land . . 1,020.00 

$2,500.00 

$4,020.00 

Gale Home : 

One half Manchester Bank block, 

Elm street ..... $38,000.00 
One half Martin's block, Elm street 25,000.00 

$63,000.00 

Hospital St. Vincent de" Paul, French Gatholic ; 
Lake avenue and Beech streets : 

Hospital ..... $3,000.00 
Land . . . . ' . . 4,000.00 

Taxable. 

o $7,000.00 



RECAPITULATION. 657 

Recapitulation. 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 



Church property, Catholic . . $351,231.00 
Convent property, Catholic . . 68,400.00 
Parochial residences. Catholic . 12,500.00 
Parochial schools. Catholic . . 131,200.00 
Hospitals and other charitable in- 
stitutions ..... 113,8715.00 



5677,206.00 



Church property, Protestant . . $426,040.00 
Parochial residences, Protestant . 10,000.00 
Private school property, Protestant 7,000.00 
Hospitals and other charitable insti- 
tutions ..... 156,500.00 



^599>54o.oo 



TAXABLE. 



Land and buildings, Catholic . $95,521.00 
Land and buildings, Protestant . 14,170.00 
Mercy Home, W. C. T. U. . . 6,700.00 



$116,391.00 
$i)393>T37-oo 

MEMORANDA. 

St. Patrick's church and school, church building not yet 
erected. 

St. George's church, in process of building. 

St. Mary's church, in process of building. 
. 42 



658 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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RECAPITULATION. 



659 



TABULAR STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT, CITY OF MAN- 
CHESTER, N. H., FROM JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31 





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$400,000 
400,000 


^200,000 
200,000 
300,000 


$13,850 
18,850 
20,000 


$120,000 
120,000 
120.000 


$60,000 
60,000 
60,000 


1891 


1892 


300,000 


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$155,000 


$948,850 


$99,900* 


8100,000 


$948,850 


$100 , 


155,000 


953,850 


100 




953,850 




155,000 


955,000 


99,900 


100,000 


i 
955,000 


100 



Remarks. — The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in 
the cemeteries of the city to parties who pay gioo and upward. 
There are $20,000 in cemetery bonds, so called, in the hands of 
the city treasurer, which are not included in the $935,000. 

Total amount of bonded debt, including ceme- 
tery bonds $955,000.00 

Net indebtedness for water purposes . . . 600,000.00 



Net debt after deducting water debt 



'$400,000 water bonds, issued January I, 1S72; $100,000 of these bonds re- 
funded January 1, 1887; $100,000 re-funded January 1, 1892. 

t $200,000, water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 of these bonds re-funded 
July 1, 1890. 
' t $2,200 cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds each year. 

The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the cemeteries. Bonds 
payable July 1, 191.3. 



660 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



As shown in the assessors' books for the year 1892 : 
The assessed value of personal property, includ- 
ing poll tax ....... 

The assessed value of real estate 

Total value for taxation .... 

Tax rate, 1.95 per cent on a hundred. 

Per cent of net indebtedness (excluding debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation 
Per cent of net indebtedness (including debt for 

water purposes) to assessed valuation 

Population, census of 1890 
Population, census of 1880 



$4,372,066.00 
2i,559'978-oo 

$25,932,044.0,0 



1.369 



3.682 


43^983 


32,458 


11,525 


1,500 


2,517 



Increase of population in ten years 
Increase of population in 1891 (estimated at) 
Increase of population in 1892 (estimated at) 

No issue of bonds has ever been contested. 

The interest on the debt has always been promptly paid at 
maturity. 

None of the bonds are stated specifically as being payable in 
gold. 

None of the bonds can be called for redemption. 

The power of the city to borrow money in relation to the 
water-works is limited to the sum of ^600,000 by section 6, chap- 
ter 70, New Hampshire Laws of 1871, entitled "An act to ena- 
ble the city of Manchester to establish water-works," except as 
further extended by 



Laws of New Hampshire, 1891. 

^CHAPTER 26. 

An Act to Preserve the Purity of the Water Supply of the city 
of Manchester. 

Section -2. The board of water commissioners of the city of 
Manchester is hereby authorized to purchase for and in the name 



LAWS OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, 1891. 661 

of said city of Manchester, such land surrounding Lake Massabe- 
sic, and along any stream tributary thereto, as said board shall 
deem necessary for the preservation of the purity of the water of 
said Lake Massabesic, from which the water supply of said city 
of Manchester for domestic purposes is taken ; and the action of 
said board in making any such purchase shall be binding upon 
said city of Manchester ; and in case said board shall not be 
able to secure, on satisfactory terms, by purchase, such land as 
said board deems necessary for the purpose aforesaid, said board 
may, in the name of said city of Manchester, apply to the county 
commissioners of the county in which such land is situated, to 
assess the damages to the owner of such land as said board de- 
sires to acquire for the purpose aforesaid ; and said county com- 
missioners shall proceed in the same manner as in the assessment 
of damages for lands taken for public highways, and upon pay- 
ment or tender to the owner of the sum assessed by said county 
commissioners, the title to said land shall vest in said city of 
Manchester ; and the same right of appeal from such award of 
the county commissioners shall exist as in the case of lands taken 
for highways by the action of said commissioners. 



662 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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BONDED DEBT. 



663 



STATEMENT OF THE ANNUAL INTEREST CHARGE ON THE BONDED 

DEBT. 



Year. 


*Six per 
cent 
water 
bonds. 


t Four 
per cent 
water 
bonds. 


Five per 
cent 

ceme- 
tery 

bonds. 


Six per 

cent to 

fund 

debt. 


Four per 
cent to 
build 
Mc- 
Gregor 
bridge. 


Four per 

cent to 

fund 

debt. 


Total of 
annual 
interest. 


1890 

1891 

1893 


$27,000 
24,000 
18,000 


$6,000 

8,000 

12,000 


$623.75 

813.92 

1,000.00 


$7,200 
7,200 
7,200 


$2,400 

• 2,400 

2,400 


$6,200 
6,200 
6,200 


$49,433.75 
48,613.92 
46,800.00 



SUMMARY OF CITY DEBT 

Amount of bonded debt January i, 1892 
Amount of cemetery bonds issued in 1892 
Accrued interest on bonded debt 

Total indebtedness January i, 1893 

AVAILABLE ASSETS. 

Net cash on hand January i, 1893 

Taxes uncollected, list of 1892 .... 

Stock of Suncook Valley Railroad, estimated value 

BONDED DEBT. 

Total net indebtedness January i, 1892 
Total net indebtedness January i, 1893 

Decrease ....... 



$953'85o.oo 

1,150.00 

21,050.00 

$976,050.00 



$96,477.18 

32,139-65 

14,500.00 

$143,116.83 

$873,791.65 
332,933-17 

$40,858.48 



* $400,000 water bonds, issued .Januarj' 1, 1873; $100,000 re-funded at 4 per 
cent, January 1, 1887; and $100,000 re-funded at 4 per cent, January 1, 1S92. 

t $200,000, water bonds, issued July 1, 1874; $100,000 re-funded at 4 per cent, 
July 1, 1890. 

$60,000, bridge bonds, issued July 1, 1881, at 4 per cent. 

S155,000, bonds issued April 1, 1885, at 4 per cent. 

$70,000, bonds to fund debts, issued October 1, 1863, and are due November 1, 
1893. 

$50,000, bonds to fund debts, issued July 1, 1864, and are due July 1, 1894. 

$2,200, cemetery bonds, issued in 1884, and other additional bonds, each suc- 
ceeding year. The city guarantees the perpetual care of lots in the ceme- 
teries. 

Bonds payable July, 1913, to the trustees of cemetery funds; not negotiable. 
Amount that can be issued limited to the sum of $70,000. 



664 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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666 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



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VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 667 

Valuation of Real Estate Owned by the City. 

High School, Beech street, corner Lowell : 

Building ..... ^40,000.00 
59,400 square feet of land . . 17,820.00 

^57,820.00 

Franklin-street school, Franklin street, corner 
* Pleasant : , 

Building ..... $16,000.00 
19,200 square feet of land . . 19,200.00 

$35,200.00 

Spring-street school, Spring street : 

Building ..... $13,000.00 
13,600 square feet of land . . 13,600.00 

$26,600.00 

Lincoln-street school, Lincoln street, corner Merri- 
mack : 

Building . . . ' . . $45,000.00 

40,000 square feet of land . . . 8,000.00 

$53,000.00 

Ash-street school. Ash street, corner Bridge : 

Building ..... $50,000.00 
57^537 square feet of land . . 17,262.00 

$67,562.00 

Main-street school. North Main street. West Man- 
chester : 

Building $6,000.00 

40,293.4 square feet of land . . 10,073.00 

$16,073.00 

Webster-street school, Webster street : 

Building $30,000.00 

55, 7 1 43<^ square feet of land . 13,928.00 

$43,928.00 



668 REPORT OP THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Blodget-street school, Blodget street : 

Building ..... $1,500.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 3,600.00 

$5,100.00 

Schoolhouse lot, Bridge street, corner Union : 

10,000 square feet of land .... $5,000.00 

Lowell-street school, Lowell street, corner Chest- 
nut : 

Building ..... $1,000.00 
9,000 square feet of land . . 9,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Merrimack-street school, Merrimack street, corner 
Union : 

tuilding . " . . . . $15,000.00 

12,600 square feet of land . . 6,300.00 

$21,300.00 

Wilson Hill school, Manchester street, corner Wil- 
son : 

Building ..... $500.00 
15,850 square feet of land . . 1,902.00 

$2,402.00 



School-street school. School street. West Manchester 
Building ..... $1,000.00 
12,176 square feet of land . . 3,044.00 



$4,044.00 



South Main-street school, South Main street. West 
Manchester : 

Building ..... $500.00 
13,650 square feet of land . . 2,047.00 



$2,547.00 

Bakersville school. Elm street, south : 

Building . . . . . . $10,000.00 

24, 184 square feet of land . . 3,628.00 $13,628.00 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 669 

Stark District school, River road, north : 

Building ..... $1,000.00 
43,560 square feet of land . . 100.00 



Amoskeag school, Front street, Amoskeag : 

Building ..... $1,500.00 
6,000 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 



Harvey District school, Nutt road : 

Building ..... $2,000.00 
21,780 square feet of land . . 100.00 



Webster Mills school, Webster Mills : 

Building ..... $400.00 
5,445 square feet of land . . 100. co 



Old Hallsville school. East Manchester : 

Building ..... $500.00 
30,075 square feet of land . . 3,008.00 



Youngsville school, Youngsville : 

Building ..... $500.00 
51,228 square feet of land . . ico.oo 



Mosquito Pond school, Mosquito Pond : 

Building ..... $400.00 
10,890 square feet of land . . 100.00 



$1,100.00 



$2,500.00 

Lot, corner Amory and Dubuque streets, fur school 
purposes : 

16,600 square feet of land .... $2,490.00 

Goffe's Falls school, Goffe's Falls : 

Building ..... $4,000.00 
47,916 square feet of land . . 250.00 



$4,250.00 



$2,100.00 



$500.00 



$3,508.00 



670 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Park-street school,* Lake avenue : 

Building ..... $2,800.00 
10,500 square feet of land . . 15,750.00 



$18,550.00 



Varney school, Bowman street, corner Mast, West 
Manchester : 

Building $43,750.00 

Land ...... 6,700.00 



$50,450.00 



New Hallsville school, Jewett street, corner Young, 
East Manchester : 

Building ..... $26,300.00 
44,000 square feet of land . . 3,300.00 



$29,600.00 
$480,052.00 

ENGINE-HOUSES. 

Engine-house and stable. Central station. Vine 
street : 

Building ..... $30,000.00 
12,718.86 square feet of land . 25,438.00 

$55)43S-oo 

Clinton-street engine-house, Clinton street. West 
Manchester : 

Building . . . . . $1,000.00 
3,790 square feet of land . . 1,000.00 



52, 000. 00 



North-Main-Street engir^e-house. North Main street, 
West Manchester : 

Building ..... $18,000.00 
11,819 square feet of land . . 2,955.00 

$20,955.00 

Webster-street engine-house, Webster street, corner 
Chestnut : 

Building ..... $12,000.00 

8,510 square feet of land . . 2,180.00 

$14,180.00 

& * Sold to Rev. J. J. Lyons by vote of the city councils. 



VALUATION OF KEAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 671 

Merrimack engine-house, Lake avenue : 

Building ..... $15,000.00 
10,000 square feet of land . . 3,000.00 



— Sid.OOO.OO 



Hose house and cottage, Maple street, corner East 
High: 

Building ..... $3,000.00 
18,330 square feet of land . . 3,666.00 



$6,666.00 

Engine-house and ward room, ward 9, Rimmon and 
Amory streets, West Manchester : 

Building . . (In process of erection.) 

6,000 square feet of land . . $870.00 $870.00 

Lot for hose house. South Manchester : 

4,278 square feet of land . . $684.48 $684.48 



$119,793.48 

OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND LOTS. 

City library, Dean avenue, corner Franklin street : 
Building . . . . • . $35,000.00 

15,000 square feet of land . . 30,000.00 



$65,000.00 



City Hall, Elm street, c®rner Market : 

Building ..... $10,000.00 
100,000 square feet of land . . 150,000.00 



$160,000.00 



City farm. Mammoth road : 

Buildings ..... $5,000.00 
46.66 acres, west Mammoth road 70,000.00 
81.55 acres, east Mammoth road . 65,240.00 

$140,240.00 

Court house, Franklin street, corner West Merri- 
mack : 

Building ..... $20,000.00 

19,000 square feet of land . . 57,000.00 

$77,000.00 



672 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Battery building, Manchester street : 

Building ..... $13,000.00 
3,400 square feet of land . . 5,100.00 

$18,100.00 

Police station, Manchester street, corner Chestnut : 
Building ..... $40,000.00 
7,500 square feet of land . . 15,000.00 

$55)Ooo-oo 

City stable and other buildings, Franklin street : 
Buildings ..... $12,000.00 
44,656 square feet of land . . 89,312.00 

$101,312.00 

City scales, Franklin street : 

Building ...... . $300.00 

Gravel lots, Goffstown : 

2 acres ...... . $400.00 

Gravel lots, Bakersville, South Manchester . . $700.00 

Gravel lot, district No. 10, bought of Brooks & 
Brock (city has right to femove gravel until Au- 
gust 25, 1903) : 

13/3 acres ....... $500.00 

Land bought of A. D. Gooden : 

28,750 square feet of land . .... $1,351.00 



»i9,903.oo 



PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED PA' THE CITY. 

Property in care city engineer .... $1,149.00 

in care chief engineer fire department . 89,010.00 
in care superintendent highway district 

No. 2 ..... . 27,000.00 

in care superintendent highway district 

No. 10 ..... . 2,365.00 

in care superintendent of schools . . 36,755.00- 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY, 673 



Property in care city messenger .... 

in care city marshal and janitor 
in care superintendent of city farm 
in care trustees of city library 
in care superintendent of Pine Grove 
cemetery ....... 

in care superintendent Valley cemetery . 

Stock in Suncook Valley R. R., in care of city 
treasurer ........ 

Personal property in care city weigher . 



Uncollected taxes in 189 1 . 
Uncollected taxes in 1S92 . 
Net cash in the treasury, December 3] 



1892 



;^2,759.oo 

1,971.00 

11,889.61 

29)333-00 

248.35 
106.00 

50,000.00 
1,000.00 

S253.5S5-96 

$2,236.83 

32,139-65 
96,477.18 



5130,853.66 



OTHER REAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



Soldiers' monument ..... 

Permanent inclosure of commons 
Amoskeag bridge over Merrimack river 
Fountains and water-troughs on streets and com 
mons . . . . . . . 

Two city tombs . . . . . 

McGregor bridge ..... 

Granite bridge . . ■ . 

South Main-street bridge, over Piscataquog river 

Print-Works bridge, on Granite, over lower canal 

Two bridges in highway district No. 9 

One bridge at Goffe's Falls .... 

Expended on construction of sewers 



PARKS AND CEMETERIES. 

Valley cemetery, 19.7 acres 

Pine Grove cemetery, about 80 acres . 
43 



$25,000.00 
JO, 200 00 
25,000.00 

3.500.00 

10,000.00 

90,000.00 

25,000.00 

10,000 00 

5, 000. 00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

334,194.00 

$540,894.00 



$200,000.00 
40,000.00 



C74 



KEPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



Amoskeag cemetery, 1.05 acres 
Stark park, 28 acres . 
Derryfield park, 76 acres 
Concord common, 4.48 acres 
Tremont common, 2.25 acres 
Hanover comijTion, 3 acres . 
Park common, 3.49 acres . 
Merrimack common, 5.89 acres 



$4,000.00 
9,000.00 

25,000.00 
200,000.00 

40,000.00 
100,000.00- 

60,000.00 
200,000.00 



,000.00 



WATER- WORKS. 



Real estate and personal property of water-works. 



at cost price 



• $1,009,519.65 



RECAPITULATION. 

Real estate owned by the city, schoolhouses 

Real estate owned by the city 

Real estate owned by the city, engine-houses 

Water-works at cost price . 

Personal property owned by the city 

Uncollected taxes and cash 

Other real and personal property . 

Parks and c£meteries ... 



$461,502.00 
619,903.00 
119,793.48 

1,009,519.65 
253,585-96 
i3o>853-66 
540,894.00 
878,000.00 

;4,oi4,o5i.75 



PROPERTY ACCOUNT. 



Inventory of assets, December 31, 1892 
Inventory of assets, December 31, 1891 



;4,oi4,o5i.75 
3,527, 339-3° 



Gain in valuation *"..... §486,712.45 

The increase in the valuation as above stated results from the 
amount expended in 1892, on : 

$39,724-00 



Sewers and drains 



Hallsville schoolhouse 



8,845-61 



VALUATION OF REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 675 

Goffe's Falls schoolhouse ..... $2,000.00 

Engine-house and ward room, ward 9 . . 870.00 

Water-works, construction .... 21,297.83 

Land corner Amory and Dubuque streets for 

schoolhoyse ....... 2,490.00 

Lot for hose house. South Manchester . . 684.48 
Increased by re-valuation on schoolhouses and 

lots, net 71.733-39 

Increased by re-valuation, engine-houses and 

lots, net . . . . . . ■ . 11,368.00 

Increased by re-valuation, other public build- 
ings and land, net ..... 334,658.00 

Increased by re-valuation, personal property 

owned by the city ..... 130.80 

Increase in uncollected taxes .... 8,173.30 

Increase in net cash in treasury . . . 3,287.04 



505,262.45 



Deduct Park-street schoolhouse and lot, sold to 
Rev. J. J. Lyons by vote of the mayor, alder- 
men, and common council for $2,800.00 . . $18,550.00 



Total net gain ...... $486,712.45 

Details of inventory are on file in the auditor's office. The 
water-works would sell readily for $1,750,000, and are growing 
yearly more valuable to the city. The large increase in the re- 
valuation of the public buildings and lands owned by the city is 
fully warranted by the opening and improvement of Derryfield 
park in the vicinity of the city farm lands, the high pressure ser- 
vice about to be introduced under the management of the water- 
works, the facilities for travel furnished by the street railway, 
and the rapid increase in our population and industries. 

J. B. S. 



676 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Auditor's Office. 

City Hall building. Open from 8 to 12 a. m. ; 2 to 5 P. m., 
7 to 9 p. M. on Thursday and Saturday. 

In every bill presented to the city auditor for bis approval, the 
following points will be considered and passed upon : 

1. Is the subject matter of the bill under examination within 
the scope of the powers conferred by the legislature on the city 
government ? 

2. Is the bill certified by the party legally authorized to make 
the contract, or cause the expenditure to be made ? 

3. Has any appropriation been made to meet the expenditure, 
and is there a balance unexpended sufficient to pay this bill ? 

4. Are the number of articles in the bill, or the measurements 
either of dimensions, quantities, or weights correctly and fully 
stated, and is the proof of the delivery to the city of the whole 
amount charged sufficient? 

.5. Is the price charged a fair market price, or is it so largely 
in excess as to require the attention of the city councils to be 
called to the same ? 

6. Is the bill written in a fair, legible hand, correctly cast, 
and on paper of sufficient length and width to admit of its 
proper backing and filing? 

7. If the bill is in part payment of a contract, the date and 
the total amount of the contract, the amount already paid, the 
amount of the work not yet completed, and the per cent re- 
tained, if any, should be stated on the bill. 

8. Any other inquiries in matters of law and fact which affect 
the question of indebtedness before the auditor. 

9. Approval, rejection, or suspension for further information 
or correction as the circumstances of each case may require. 

COURT DECISIONS, LEGAL POINTS AND RULES, RELATING TO THE 
APPROVAL OR DISAPPROVAL OF CLAIMS AGAINST THE CITY. 

No bill or account shall be paid by the city treasurer until the 
auditor has approved it as correct. 



auditor's office. 677 

Public trusts or powers devolved by law or charter on the city 
councils cannot be delegated to others. Dillon' s Municipal Cor- 
porations, section 96, volume i. 

No member of either branch [of the city councils], except the 
mayor, shall receive any compensation for his services, or shall 
hold any office or agency created during his continuance in 
office. General Laws, chapter 46, section 13. 

The executive powers of the city and the administration of 
police, except where vested in the mayor, shall be exercised by 
tt^ mayor and aldermen. General Laws, chapter 46, section 
14. 

The mayor and aldermen have all the powers and authority 
of selectmen of towns, unless it is otherwise provided by law. 
General Laws, chapter 46, section 14. 

Joint standing committees have advisory powers only, they 
cannot legally be endowed with executive or legislative powers 
by ordinance or resolution of the city councils, as no by-law or 
ordinance shall be repugnant to the constitution or laws of the 
state. 

No member of either branch of the city councils can enter 
into any verbal or written contract to furnish supplies to, or do 
any work for the city. Any firm of which a member is also a 
member of the city councils is included in this prohibition. 

No city official, or department, or board of officials having 
legal power to expend money for the benefit of the city, can pur- 
chase of or contract with themselves, with any one of the board, 
or with any firm of which one of said officials is a member. 
DilloJi' s Municipal Corporations, volume i, page 436, section 444. 

Every bill against the city shall specify the particular appro- 
priation to which the same should be charged, and the moneys 
paid will be charged to such appropriations only. 

He who is intrusted with the business of others cannot be al- 
lowed to make such business a source of profit to himself. 

All orders passed by the city councils authorizing a ministerial 
act to be performed by its agent or agents must be strictly con- 
strued, and the act to be done must be specifically stated. 



678 REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

The board of engineers have the authority of firewards. (Gen- 
eral Laws, chapter io6, section ii.) They have no power con- 
ferred upon them by law or ordinance to purchase new apparatus 
of any kind. 

The joint standing committee on fire department have advis- 
ory powers only. 

The laws and ordinances require the city auditor to withhold 
his signature from all bills against any appropriation where the 
amount of the appropriation is expended, until the city council 
shall have provided the means of paying the same. Section 4, 
chapter 3 of the City Ordinances, and section 4, ordinances re- 
lating to duties of the city auditor, approved January 7, i8go. 

The power of towns to raise and appropriate money is derived 
solely from statutory provisions, which restrict the power to cer- 
tain specified objects and other necesgary charges. 

Votes to raise or pay money for purposes other than those pre- 
scribed by statute are void, and towns cannot be compelled, and 
generally will not be permitted, to carry such votes into effect. 

It is not left to the unrestricted and irresponsible discretion of 
towns to vote gifts or to select donees; their charity is a duty 
defined, commanded, enforced, and regulated, and the objects 
of it are designated by law. 

A majority cannot dispose of the property of a minority in an 
unlimited manner. Gove v. Epping, 41 N. H. 539. 

The following parties are authorized by law or ordinance to 
make expenditures, within the scope of their powers, for their 
respective departments. For fire department and fire-alarm tele- 
graph, the chief engineer, to be submitted monthly to the ap- 
proval of the board of engineers; for police department, city 
marshal ; for police court, police judge ; for water-works depart- 
ment, superintendent, subject to the rules of the board of com- 
missioners and the ordinances relating thereto ; for city farm, 
superintendent ; for overseers of the poor, each overseer, subject 
to the rules of the board of overseers, and their monthly review 
and approval ; for schools, superintendent, or such person as the 
board of school committee may designate, bills to be approved 
by the board monthly ; for streets, sewers, and other work under 



auditor's office. 679 

these departments, superintendent of each district, under control 
of mayor and board of mayor and aldermen ; for city clerk's 
office, treasurer's office, tax collector's office, assessors' office, 
auditor's office, incidental expenditures, city physician, city 
messenger, city solicitor, city engineer, — mayor ; for cemeteries, 
superintendents, subject to board of trustees (to consist of citi- 
zens not members of the city councils) ; for health department, 
board of health, subject to approval of mayor ; city library, 
board of trustees or person designated .by them. It may be 
stated as a general rule, that all subordinate officials are under 
the supervision and control of the mayor, subject to such limita- 
tions and restrictions as the board of aldermen, acting as a 
board, may require. 



680 



REPORT OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 



The following form of blank is used in payment of ordinary- 
bills for supplies or services, and can be obtained at the city au- 
ditor's office. 




THE CITY OF MANCHESTER, N. H. 
To 



.Dr. 



Date. 



Description of purchase. 



Amount. 



Received of the city treasurer 189 , the sum of 

$., in full payment of the above account. 

Signed 



Draft 189 



Appropriation For 



I hereby certifj' that the articles 
herein mentioned have been re- 
ceived and services perf ormed,that 
they were necessary for, and have 
been, or will be, applied to the 
work covered by the appropriation 
above mentioned, and the prices 
charged are just and reasonable. 



Approved. 



Mayor. 



Approved. 

Chairman Committee on 



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. 2 ft 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS 

PASSED IN 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An O^der for an Artesian Well. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
city farm be authorized to contract for the boring of an artesian 
well at the city farm, and that the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for city farm. 

Passed January 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to Purchase of Land in South Manchester, 
on which to erect a Hose House. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
lands and buildings be and are hereby authorized to purchase a 
lot of land in South Manchester, on which to erect a hose house, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for inci- 
dental expenses. 

Passed January 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Patrol and Ambulance Wagon. 

Ordered, That a sum not exceeding seven hundred dollars 
700) be appropriated for combined patrol and ambulance 



684 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

wagon and swing harness, the same to be charged to reserved 
fund. 

Passed January 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase a Horse for use in Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
fire department be authorized to purchase a horse for use in the 
fire department, the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for fire department. 

Passed January 23, 1892. 



CiTV OF Manchester. 

An Order to purchase a Horse and Wagon. 

Ordered, That the mayor and city engineer be authorized to 
purchase a horse, wagon, and necessary fittings for the use of the 
city engineer's department, and the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for engineer's department. 

Passed February 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to Contract for an Ambulance and Patrol 

Wagon. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint special committee on am- 
bulance and patrol wagon be authorized to contract for an ambu- 
lance and patrol wagon, the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for reserved fund. 

Passed February 2, 1892. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 685 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect certain Lamp Posts. 

Ordered, That the joint standing committee on lighting 
streets be authorized to erect certain lamp posts as follows : At 
Amoskeag Village, corner of Douglas and West streets ; corner 
of Union and Auburn streets ; corner of Harrison and Walnut 
streets; corner of Derry and Concord streets; corner of West 
Hancock and Second streets, — the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed February 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to assign Street Numbers. 

Ordered^ That the city engineer be authorized to prepare 
plans and assign the numbers for the new streets and extensions 
not already provided for, subject to chapter 36 of the City Or- 
dinances, under the direction of the mayor, and the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for city engineer's de- 
partment. 

Passed February 2, 1S92. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to erect a Fountain at corner of Lake Avenue and 

Elm Street. 

Ordered, That the joint standing committee on commons be 
authorized to purchase and erect a fountain at the corner of Lake 
avenue and Elm street, the expense thereof not to exceed one 
hundred dollars, and to be charged to the appropriation for inci- 
dental expenses. 

Passed February 4, 1892. 



686 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to City Treasurer Sylvanus B. Putnam. 

Ordered, That in consideration of the long and faithful ser- 
vice of Sylvanus B. Putnam, the city treasurer, and of his pres- 
ent serious illness, that said city treasurer be granted a leave of 
absence, and that he be empowered to appoint a deputy to per- 
form the duties of his office during his illness. 

Passed February 17, 1892. 



City of Manchester. ^ 

An Order. 

Ordered, That the city marshal be given authority to detail 
an officer to act as houseman, and that the officer under detail 
receive extra compensation in return for such services. 

Passed March i, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to the Names of Schoolhouses. 

Ordered, That the names of schoolhouses be hereafter known 
as follows : 

Ash-street schoolhouse. 
Amoskeag District schoolhouse. 
Bakersville schoolhouse. 
Blodget-street schoolhouse^ 
Franklin-street schoolhouse. 
Goffe's Falls schoolhouse. 
Hallsville schoolhouse. 
High schoolhouse. 
Harvey District schoolhouse. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 687 



Lincoln-Street schoolhouse. 
Lowell-street schoolhouse. 
Main-street schoolhouse. 
Merrimacic -street schoolhouse. 
Mosquito Pond schoolhouse. 
Park-street schoolhouse. 
School-street schoolhouse. 
South Main-street schoolhouse. 
Spring-street schoolhouse. 
Stark District schoolhouse. 
Varney schoolhouse, West Manchester. 
Webster-street schoolhouse. 
Webster's Mills schoolhouse. 
Wilson Hill schoolhouse. 
Youngsville schoolhouse. 

Passed March i, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

Resolution for the discontinuance of a part of the Old Falls 

Road. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That so much of the highway in said city of Manchester, 
known as the Old Falls road, as lies between the intersection of 
said Old Falls road with the south line of Lake avenue, so called, 
and the intersection of said Ol'd Falls road with the north line 
of East Sprucg street, so called, be and the same is hereby dis- 
continued ; and resolved further that application be made to the 
supreme court for its consent to said discontinuance. 

Passed March i, 1892. 



688 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

Resolution to make a Temporary Loan of ;5i5o,ooo. 

Resolved hy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That for the purpose of paying such claims against the city 
as may fall due before the first day of December, 1892, the 
mayor be authorized to make a temporary loan for the use of the 
city of a sum not exceeding one hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars (^150,000), giving for the same the notes of the city, signed 
by the mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer. 

Passed May 3, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

in THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-TWO-. 

Resolution relating to Exemption from Taxation the Elliott 
Manufacturing Co. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That whereas the Elliott Manufacturing Company, a corpora- 
tion established b)' law, with a capital of one hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars (^150,000), desires to locate their factory and 
to carry on their business of manufacture and sale of their 
own products of knit or woven fabrics, made from cotton, silk, 
or wool, in said city of Manchester, providing sufficient induce- _ 
ments are given said corporation by the city government ; there- 
fore, 

Resolved, That the capital of the Elliott Manufacturing Com- 
pany aforesaid, and its machinery, raw materials, and other 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 689 

property necessary in conducting its business of manufacturing 
fabrics aforesaid, and the land and buildings used and occupied 
by said corporation in its said business, shall be exempt from all 
taxation for a period of ten years from April 5, 1892. 

Passed April 5, i8q2. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

Resolution to adopt a Plan for Streets at the West Side. 

Hesolvedhy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Councils assembled, as follows : 

Whereas, The interests of the city require that the streets 
hereafter to be laid out in the city should be in continuation of 
those already constructed, or parallel to them, so that they may 
intersect at right angles, and that a systematic plan be adopted 
for that purpose ; and, 

Whereas, it is essential in order to avoid future complica- 
tions and unnecessary expense that such plan as may be adopted 
by the city council should be made public for the information of 
all parties interested ; therefore, 

Resolvedly the mayor, aldermen, and city council of the city 
of Manchester in city council assembled, as follows : That the 
plan presented to the city councils for the laying out of streets 
on the West Side by the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, 
and No. 42,124 in city engineer's office, be adopted as the guide 
for future construction of streets in the system embraced in said 
plan, and that hereafter when new streets shall be required there, 
they be laid out in accordance with such plan, and not other- 
wise. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 
44 



690 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

Resolution for discontinuing part of the Highway known as 
Cartier Street. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That so much of Cartier street, situated in said city, be and is 
hereby discontinued, to wit : Beginning at a stake in the center 
of Cartier street, and about seventy-five feet north of north line 
of Adams street, at the foot of the bluff; thence in a northerly 
direction, about 275 feet, to a stake on the top of said bluff, as 
shown by the accompanying plan. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered^ That the grades upon the following streets be estab- 
lished as shown upon the several plans : 

Sullivan street from Beauport to Cartier, as shown On plan 
No. 112. 

Beauport street from Amory to Kelley, as shown on plan 
No. 129. 

Manchester street from Milton to Beacon, as shown on plan 
No. 142. 

North street from Pine east back to Union, as shown on plan 

No. 145- 

Nashua street from Bridge to Pearl, as shown on plan No. 146. 

Adams street from Webster to P. Adams land, as shown on 
plan No. 147. 

Adams street from Clark northerly 363 feet, as shown on plan 
No. 148. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 691 

Spruce back street from Lincoln to Wilson, as shown on plan 
No. 149. 

McGregor west back street from Marion to Wayne, as shown 
on plan No. 150. 

Elm avenue from Elm to Calef road, as shown on plan No. 701. 

Chestnut street from Clarke northerly 356 feet, as shown on 
plan No. 702. 

East High street from Jane to Wilson road, as shown on plan 
No. 703. 

Central street from Beacon to Cass, as shown on plan No. 704. 

Second street from North Weare Railroad to river, as shown 
on plan No. 705. 

West Hancock street from Dartmouth to River, as shown on 
plan No. 706. 

West Webster street from River road to railroad track, as 
shown on plan No. 707. 

Morrison street from Pearl to Arlington, as shown on plan 
No. 708. 

Summer street from Belmont to Massabesic, as shown on plan 
No. 714. 

Central street from Chestnut to Union, as shown on plan 
No. 757. 

Lake avenue from Old Falls road to Mammoth road, as shown 
on plans No. 792, 793, and 794. 

AVilson street from Lake avenue to Hanover, as shown on plan 
No. 796. 

Bowman street from Mast to A, as shown on plan No. 800. 

Merrimack street from Elm to Wilson, as shown on plans Nos. 
851, 852, 853, and 854. 

Front street from brick store to Black brook, as shown on 
plans Nos. 857, 858, 859. 

Massabesic street from Cypress to Mammoth road, as shown 
on plans Nos. 860 and 861. 

Hanover street from Elm to Wilson, as shown on plans Nos. 
952, 953. 954, 955^ 95^, 957- 

Hall street from Bridge to Prospect, as shown on plan No. 888. 

Belmont street from Valley to Clay, as shown on plan No. 889. 



692 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Young street from A. A. Ainsworth's land to Mason, as shown 
on plans Nos. 890 and 891. 

Walnut street from Gore to Salmon, as shown on plan No. S92. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order for plans and estimates of Bridges. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to procure plans and estimates for a bridge 
at Second street in West Man'chester, and report upon the same 
to the city government, the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for Second-street bridge. 

Pa.ssed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relative to purchase of Settees for use on Public 

Commons. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
commons be authorized to purchase 100 settees for use on the 
public commons, the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for commons. 

Passed April 5, 1892. » 



CiTy OF Manchester. 
An Order to build Grove Street. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to build Grove street from Belmont street 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 693 

easterly 500 feet, and the expense thereof be charged to the ap- 
propriation for new highways. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to visit of Committee on Fire Department 

to Boston. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
fire department, and the chief engineer, be and hereby are au- 
thorized to visit the city of Boston, to investigate the merits of 
the aerial ladder trucks, the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for fire department. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. . 
An Order to build Belmont Street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to build Belmont street from Young road 
to Clay street, and the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for new^highways. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relating to the purchase of an Aerial Ladder Truck. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
fire department purchase an aerial ladder truck, and the same to 
be charged to the appropriation for the fire department. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



694 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester, 
, An Order to build Bay Street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and hereby are authorized to build Bay street, and the' 
expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for new high- 
ways. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to Shade Trees. 

Ordered, That the mayor and committee on setting trees be 
authorized to purchase and set all the shade trees required by the 
city for the year 1892, the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to Sewer Pipe. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
sewers and drains be and they are hereby authorized to contract 
for such quantities of sewer pipe as in their judgment the city 
may require for this year, and the expense thereof be charged to 
the appropriation for sewers and drains. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to revise and print City Ordinances. 

Ordered, That the mayor be authorized to employ some suita- 
ble person to revise the City Ordinances, and cause to be printed 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 695 

500 copies of such revised ordinances, for the use of the city, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for incidental 
expenses. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Salmon Street, 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee 
on streets be authorized to build Salmon street from Pine to 
Walnut street, and the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for new highways. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order for two Carts. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to procure two carts for the use of district 
No. 2, street department, and the expense thereof be charged to 
the appropriation for city teams. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build Summer Street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to build Summer street from Belmont to 
Massabesic street, and the expense thereof be charged to the 
appropriation for new highways. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



696 ORDERS AKD RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Culvert. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to build a culvert on Cemetery brook at 
Maple street, and the expense thereof be charged to the appro- 
priation for new highways. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Hall Street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to build Hall street from Central street 
southerly to Lake avenue, a distance of 220 feet, and the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for new highways. 

Passed April 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to retaining Horses at three Fire Engine 

Stations. 

Ordered, That the chief of the fire department be and hereby 
is authorized to retain horses at the following fire engine houses, 
viz., at the Merrimack fire engine house, Lake avenue ; the Gen- 
eral Stark fire engine house, JVebster street ; the Fire King en- 
gine-house, Main street ; and Massabesic hose house, the expense 
of the same to be charged to the appropriation for fire depart- 
ment. 

Passed May '3, 1S92. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 697 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Elm Street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to build Elm street from 
Baker street southerly as laid out, and the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for new highways. 

Passed May 3, 1S92. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to care for Team of Superintendent of District No. 10. 

Ordered, That the city take care of the team of superintendent 
of streets in district No. 10, in a sum not exceeding one hundred 
and fifty dollars per year, the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for district No. 10. 

Passed May 3, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect a Watering-Trough. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to erect a watering-trough at the corner of 
Second and Walker streets, supplied with city water and the over- 
flow connected with the city's sewers, and the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed May 3, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Cartier Street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to build Cartier street from Wayne street 



698 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

southerly to the top of the bluff, and the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for new highways. 

Passed May 3, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to Concrete. 

Ordered. That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to concrete Union street 
from the south side of Concord street lo the south side of Hano- 
ver street, and the expense thereof be charged to the appropria- 
tion for macadamizing. 

Passed May 3, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Green Street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to build Green street from 
Douglas street northerly about one hundred feet, and the expense 
thereof be charged to the appropriation for new highways. 

Passed May 3, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to Electric Lights. 

Ordered, That the joint standing committee on lighting streets 
cause to be erected certain electric lights as follows : East side 
of Elm back street between Spruce and Cedar streets ; corner of 
Salmon street and Falls road ; corner of Gates and Dubuque 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 699 

streets ; corner of Appleton and Adams streets ; lower end of 
Elm street ; corner of Prospect and Ash streets ; corner of Ma- 
ple and Auburn streets ; corner of Cass street and Lake avenue ; 
corner of Harrison and Russell streets ; the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed May 3, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to build : 

Chestnut street from Appleton to Clarke street. 

Amory street from Beaumont to Kimball street. 

Lincoln street from Young to Silver street. 

Myrtle street, from Linden to Belmont street. 

Mitchell street from Calef road to Beech street. 

B street from Milford to Prince street. 

The expense thereof to be charged to appropriation for new 
highways. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order relating to the Purchase of Horses for Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
fire department be and hereby are authorized to purchase three 
(3) horses for the use of the fire department, the expense of the 
same to be charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



700 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to establish Certain Grades. 

Ordered, That the grades as shown on plan 784 of Cartier 
street from Amory to Kelley, and dated June 7, 1892, be estab- 
lished, and that the grade on the west side of Maple street from 
Amherst to Concord, as shown on plan No. 71, established 
March 6, 1883, signed by George H. Allen, city engineer, be 
changed to grade as shown on said plan of date June 7, 1892. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to Macadamize. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to macadamize Maple street 
from Lake avenue to Merrimack street, and the expense thereof 
be charged to the appropriation for macadamizing. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase a Transit. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and city engineer be authorized to 
purchase a transit instrument for the city engineer's department, 
the expense thereof to be charged to appropriation for the en- 
gineer's department. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to pave Certain Streets. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to pave Granite street from 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 701 

the river bridge to the canal bridge, and the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for paving. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to Concrete certain Streets. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to concrete Pine street from 
Lake avenue to Cedar street, and the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for macadamizing. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect certain Lamp Posts. 

Ordered, That the joint standing committee on lighting cause 
to be erected certain lamp posts, as follows : 

Oil light at the corner of Cohas avenue and Dickey road. 
Electric lights at the corner of North River road and Clark 
street ; at the corner of Elm and Baker streets ; at the terminus 
of horse car railway, south, — the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a portion of Page Street, so called. 

Ordered, That the highway surveyor in district No. 7 be di- 
rected to build a portion of highway known as Page street, ly- 
ing between Hanover street and Candia road, so called, suitable 



702 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

for public travel, the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for new highways. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee of 
sewers and drains,be authorized to build certain sewers, as fol- 
lows : 

In Elm west back Bridge street, southerly about 200 feet. 

In Adams street, from Appleton northerly about 200 feet. 

In Ashland street, from Concord to Amherst streets. 

In Webster street, from Union to Walnut streets. 

In Cheney place, from Brown avenue to Elm street. 

In Cartier street, from Wayne to Putnam. 

In Pearl street, easterly about 100 feet (near Morrison). 

In Belmont, from present sewer northerly to East High. 

In Wilson road, from Lowell to Concord street. 

In Grove street, from Belmont street easterly about 500 feet. 

In Linden street, to Arlington northerly about 100 feet. 

In Morrison street, from Pearl southerly about 200 feet. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for sewers and drains. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
sewers and drains be authorized to build certain sewers as fol- 
lows : 

From a point in Auburn south back street at Beech street ; 
thence westerly, in Auburn south back street, to Pine east back 



ORDERS 'AND RESOLUTIOXS. 703 

Street ; thence northerly, in Pine east back street, to Auburn 
street ; thence westerly in Auburn street to Elm-street sewer, 
according to the city's plan of sewers, and the expense thereof 
be charged to appropriation for sewers and drains. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the purchase of Land for an Addition to Pine 
Grove Cemetery. 

Ordered, That the mayor and trustees of Pine Grove cemetery 
be authorized to purchase for and in behalf 'of the city of Man- 
chester, from John C. Ray and Mrs. Jacob F. James, three 
acres of land, more or less, being a certain lot which adjoins 
land now owned by the city, for an addition to Pine Grove cem- 
etery, at a price not to exceed five hundred and thirty dollars 
for the whole of said land, the cost of the same to be charged 
to the appropriation for Pine Grove cemetery. 

Passed June 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order in relation to the Motive Power of the Manchester 
Street Railway. 

Ordered by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen : That the 
Manchester Street Railway be and it is hereby authorized and 
empowered to use upon its Massabesic extension as now laid out, 
and upon any of its other extensions, any motive power, and 
the same form and manner of application, that said road is or 
may be authorized to use upon its main line in said city. 

Passed July 5, 1892. 



704 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to build certain Streets. 

Ordered^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to build certain streets, as 
follows : 

Dickey street, from West Hancock to Main street. 

Prince street, from Boynton to Huntress street. 

McDuffie street, from Boynton to Huntress street. 

Hall street, from Bridge to Prospect street. 

To widen and straighten Brown avenue, from Hancock to 
Baker street. 

And the expense tljereof be charged to the appropriation for 
new highways. 

Passed July 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order making transfer of Appropriation. 

Ordered^ That the city clerk be authorized to transfer two 
thousand dollars ($2,000) from tl:e reserved fund for the purpose 
of building an addition to the Goffe's Falls schoolhouse. 

Passed July 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order for the Purchase of a Safe. 

Ordered, That the mayor and city tax collector be authorized 
to purchase a safe for the use of the city treasurer and city tax 
collector, at an expense not exceeding $375, and that the same 
be charged to the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed July 5, 1892. 



orders and resolutions. 705 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect an Electric Light. 

Ordered, That the mayor cause to be erected an electric light 
on the road near the Eddy, as called for by the petition of Den- 
nis Haggerty et al., the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for lighting streets. 

Passed July 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
sewers and drains be authorized to build certain sewers as fol- 
lows : 

In Salmon street, from Pine to Union east back. 

In Amherst street, from present end easterly seventy-five feet 
towards Union street. 

In Young street, from Cypress to Jewett street. 

To build a cesspool corner of Third and Blaine streets. 

And the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation for 
sewers and drains. 

Passed July 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order for the erection of certain Electric Lights. 

Ordered^ That the joint standing committee on lighting streets 
be authorized to erect electric light poles at the following places : 

At corner of Pine and Sagamore streets. 
At corner of Merrimack and Wilson streets. 



706 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

At corner of Fourth and Walker streets. 
On Winter between Main and Parker streets. 
On Bowman between Milford and A streets. 
The expense of which is to be charged to the appropriation for 
lighting streets. 

Passed July 5, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

Resolution authorizing the issue of Bonds to the Trustees of the 
Cemetery Funds. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the mayor be authorized to issue bonds of the city of 
Manchester, N. H., to the trustees of the cemetery fund in such 
sums as they may require from time to time (the amount not to 
exceed fifty thousand [^50,000] dollars), for the investment of 
the money left in trust for the care of lots and grounds in the 
cemeteries of said city ; the rate of interest not to exceed five 
per cent, payable annually on the first day of July each year, 
said bonds to be signed by the mayor, countersigned by the city 
treasurer, and not negotiable. 

Passed July 7, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

IN THE year one THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-TWO. 

Resolution relative to plan of Stark Park. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That the plan of Stark park submitted by the joint standing 
committee on commons, and made by Messrs. Morton and 
Quimby, of Boston, Mass., be and the same is hereby adopted. 

Passed July 5, 1892. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 707 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

Resolution for the discontinuance of a part of the Highway 
known as the " Old Falls Road." 

Resolvedhy the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

That so much of that highway known as the " Old Falls road " 
as lies between the intersection of said road with the easterly line 
of Nashua street, and a point in the northerly line of Concord 
street where the center of the "Old Falls road " intersects with 
the north line of Concord street, be and the same is hereby dis- 
continued, and that application be tnade to the supreme court to 
secure its consent to said discontinuance. 

Passed July 6, 1892. 



City of Manchester. . 

in the YEAR ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND NINETY-ONE. 

Resolution relating to Mast Street. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows : 

Whereas Mast street is unsafe and unsightly by reason of the 
bend in the same opposite the mills of the Baldwin Co., that the 
joint standing committee on streets ascertain the probable cost 
of straightening said street and making it safe for public travel. 

Passed August 2, 1892. 



708 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

Resolution relating to Manchester Steam Company. 

Resolved by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

That the right and permission is hereby granted to The Man- 
chester Steam Company, their successors and assigns, to enter 
upon and construct, lay, operate, and maintain in the public 
streets of the city of Manchester, a system of pipes with all neces- 
sary branches, cutoffs, and manholes for conveying steam to pub- 
lic or private consumers within said city, for heating or power 
purposes, and to enter upon the same from time to time, as may 
be necessary for its maintenance, operation, repairs, and renew- 
als of said system or any portion of the same. 

Provided, however, that when said parties shall enter upon any 
streets for the purpose of constructing or repairing any portion 
of said system, they shall prosecute their work with due diligence, 
and shall close all trenches and holes as soon as possible as the 
work progresses, leaving said streets in as good condition as they 
found them at the time of entry \ and provided, further, that said 
parties shall be liable to said city of Manchester, and to private 
persons for all damages and injury caused by or arising from the 
use or occupancy of any of the streets by them, for the purpose 
aforesaid, and said parties shall at all times hold said city harm- 
less of and from all claims for damages arising from or by reason 
of the entry or occupancy of said streets, shall defend all suits 
brought for the enforcement of such claims, and pay all judg- 
ments obtained as a result of said suits. 

Passed September 6, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to concrete Maple Street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to concrete Maple street 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 709 

from Lake avenue to Merrimack street, instead of macadamizing 
as previously ordered, and the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for macadamizing. 

Passed August 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build Certain Streets. 

Ordei-ed^ That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to build the following streets: 

Hevey street from Kelly street southerly to the Boulevard, a 
distance of 1,150 feet. 

Rimmon street from Amory street southerly to the Boulevard, 
a distance of about 950 feet. 

Amory-street extension and Bartlett street from Hevey street 
to Putnam street. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
new highways. 

Passed August 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order making a transfer of an Appropriation. 

Ordered, That the city clerk be authorized to transfer three 
hundred dollars (^300) from reserved fund to free beds at Elliot 
Hospital. 

Passed August 2, .1892. 



City of Manchester.' 

An Order relative to Addition to Goffe's Falls Schoolhouse. 

Ordered, That the joint standing committee on lands and 
buildings be authorized to build the addition to the Goffe's Falls 



710 ORDEKS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

schoolhouse, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for addition to Goffe's Falls schoolhouse. 

Passed July i8, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to Concrete Certain Streets. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to concrete certain streets, 
as follows : 

On INIerrimack street from Beech to Maple street. 

On Hanover street from Union to Beech street. 

On West street from Douglas northerly about 122 feet. 

And the expense thereof to be charged to the. appropriation 
for macadamizing. 

Passed August 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase pump for- artesian ^vell at City Farm. 

Ordered^ That the joint standing committee on city farm be 
authorized to purchase a pump for artesian well at city farm, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for city farm. 

Passed August 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase stone for Macadamizing. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to purchase Salem ground- 
stone to topdress Bridge street from the bridge to McGregor 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 711 

Street, and the expense thereof be charged to the appropriation 
for macadamizing. 

Passed August 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to remove trees in Massabesic street. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be authorized to remove the obstructions, otherwise known 
as trees, on Massabesic street, in front of land of Peter O. Wood- 
man, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
incidental expenses. 

Passed July 20, 1892. 



City of Manchester, 
An Order to purchase horse for Pennacook Hose Co. 

Ordered, That the joint standing committee on fire depart- 
ment be authorized to dispose of one horse and purchase another 
for Pennacook Hose Co., the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed August 2, 1802. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase Watering-Troughs. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to purchase and set in posi- 
tion, with necessary connections, two combination drinking foun- 
tains for man and beast, to be located as follows : One at Mc- 
Gregor and Bridge streets and one at Lake avenue and Hall 



712 ORDERS AXD RESOLUTIONS. 

Street, and the expense thereof be charged to appropriation for 
incidental expenses. 

Passed August 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to macadamize certain Streets. 

Ordered, That the mayor and joint standing committee on 
streets be and are hereby authorized to macadamize Central street 
from ^Nlaple to Wilson street, and the expense thereof be charged 
to the appropriation for macadamizing. 

Passed August 2, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build a Se^ve^. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
a sewer be built commencing at Douglas street on Barr street, 
and extending north to Conant, then west to Rimmon street, 
then north on Rimmon street about 200 feet. 

Passed September 6, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order for Street Signs. 

Ordered, if the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on streets be and are hereby 
authorized to procure street signs for the several streets, and 
place the same in position, the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for incidental expenses. 

Passed September 9, 1892. 



orders a^d resolutioxs. 713 

City of Manchester. 
An Order to purchase three horses for use in Fire Department. 

Ordered^ if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on fire department purchase three 
horses, one for use in Fire King Engine Co., and the others for 
use in Amoskeag Fire Engine Co., the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for fire department. 

Passed September 6, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers and drains be 
and are hereby authorized to build certain sewers as follows : 

' In Elm street from Sagamore 300 feet northerly. 

In Hanover street from Milton street easterly to Beacon street. 

In Beacon street from Hanover street northerly about 100 feet. 

In Bowman street from A street northerly to Milford street. 

The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
sewers and drains. 

Passed September 6, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
• An Order to sell schoolhouse on Lake Avenue. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on lands and buildings 
be authorized to sell the schoolhouse on Lake avenue. 

Passed September 6, 1892. 



714 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to build certain Streets. 

Ordered^ if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be and are 
hereby authorized to build Young street from Beech to Hall 
street as already laid out, the expense thereof to be charged to 
the appropriation for new highways. 

Passed September 6, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to concrete Main Street. 

Ordered^ if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be and are 
hereby authorized to concrete Main street from Amory to Put- 
nam street, the expense thereof to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for macadamizing. 

Passed September 6, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
x\n Order relative to Land and Buildings on Park Street. 

Ordered^ if the Board of Common Council concur : That 
whereas the city of Manchester, N. H., having sold the buildings 
and lot of land belonging to it known as the Park-street school 
house, situate on Lake averme, be it ordered that the mayor, 
Edgar J. Knowlton, be and is hereby appointed agent to make 
conveyance in the name of the city, and to execute the deed of 
said property in accordance with said sale- 
Passed October 4, 1S92. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 715 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to establish certain Grades. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the grades as shown on certain plans, as follows, be and are here- 
by established as the grades for such streets : 

Boynton street from A southerly, about 1,940 feet. Plans Nos. 
958 and 959. 

Prince street from Boynton to Huntress street, 550 feet. Plan 
No. 710. 

McDuffie street from Boynton to Huntress street, 475 feet. 
Plan No. 711. 

Passed October 4, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers be and are 
hereby authorized to build the following sewers : * 

On Granite street from Winter, northerly about 150 feet. 
On Third street from Ferry, southerly about 150 feet. 
On Orange street from present sewer, easterly about 60 feet. 
The expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
sewers and drains. 

Passed October 4, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to erect certain Electric Lights. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lighting streets be authorized to 
erect certain electric lights : 

On Chestnnt, between Appleton and Clarke. 

On Union, corner of Clarke. 



716 ORDERS AXD RESOLUTIONS. 

On Brook, corner of Maple. 
On Concord, corner of Beech. 
On Prospect, corner of Linden. 
On Belmont, corner of Gove. 
On Hall, corner of Concord. 
On corner of Cheney place and River road. 
The same to be charged to the appropriation for lighting 
streets. 

Passed October 4, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order relative to Ward Rooms for Wards i, 2, 3, and 7. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
until otherwise established ward rooms, for the purpose of hold- 
ing elections in wards i, 2, 3, and 7, be established as follows: 

Ward No. i, the City Hall. 

Ward No. 2, Blodget-street schoolhouse. 

Ward No. 3, Mechanics' Hall. 

Ward No. 7, court house. 

Passed October 4, 1S92. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to establish Grades. 

Ordered^ if the Board of Conimon Council concur: That 
the grades as shown on the following plans in the city engi- 
neer's department be established : 

Amory, from Beauport to Kimball. 

Hall, from Lake avenue to Bell. 

Hall, from Young to Young road. 

Wilson, from Young to Clay. 

Bartlett, from Amory to Putnam. 

Silver, from Lincoln to Hall. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 717 

Candia road, from Mammoth road to Londonderry turnpike. 
Plans Nos. 862 to 876. 

Lowell, from Wilson to Belmont. 

Boynton, from South Main to Allen. Plans Nos. 958 and 

959- 

Adams, from Appleton to Clarke. 

Jewett, from Massabesic to Cilley road. 2 plans. 

Massabesic, from Cypress to Mammoth road. Plans Nos. 860 
and 861. 

Young, from A. A. Ainsworth's land to Mammoth road. 
Plans Nos. 890 and 891. 

Frederick, from Second easterly about 300 feet. Plan No. 
898. 

Second, from Piscataquog river to Bell. Plans No. 965 and 
966. 

McNeil, from West Hancock to Second. Plan No. 713. 

Dickey, from South Main to West Hancock. Plan No. 897. 

Dartmouth, from West Hancock to Frederick. Plan No. 900. 

Cheney place, from Elm to Brown avenue. 

Cedar, from Wilson to Elliott Manufacturing Co.'s east line. 

Bell, from Wilson to Elliott Manufacturing Co.'s east line. 

Auburn, from Wilson to Belmont. 

Summer, from Wilson to Belmont. 

Hampton, from Wilson to Belmont. 

Oilman, from Wilson to Belmont. 

Young, from Wilson to Hall. 

Russell, from Orange to Harrison. 

Belmont, from Valley to Clay. Plan No. 889. 

Prospect, from Russell to Linden. 

And the grades on the following streets changed : 
Prospect, from Belmont westerly. 
Hall, from Prospect to Myrtle. 
Chestnut, from Appleton to Clarke. 

Passed November i, 1892. 



718 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to remove Watering-Trough at corner of Hanover 
and Hall Streets. 

Ordered, if the Board of Common Council concur : That the 
mayor and joint standing committee on streets be authorized to 
remove the watering-trough at the corner of Hanover and Hall 
streets. 

Passed November i, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to concrete certain Streets. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on streets be and are 
hereby authorized to concrete Granite street roadway on one 
side from car track to gutter, from Granite bridge to Main street, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for 
macadamizing. 

Passed November i, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to change the Grade df Riddle Street. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the grade on Riddle street, West Manchester, be changed to 
conform to the grade as shown on plan No. 769, in the city engi- 
neer's department. 

Passed November i, 1892. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 719 

City of Manchester. 

An Order to purchase an Extra First Size Steam Fire Engine, 
and one Combination Chemical Engine. 

Ordered, if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on fire department be 
authorized to purchase an extra first size steam fire engine and 
one combination chemical engine for use in the fire department, 
the expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation for West 
Side engine-house for 1893. 

Passed November i, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 
An Order to build certain Sewers. 

Ordered^ if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the mayor and joint standing committee on sewers and drains be 
authorized to build certain sewers as follows : 

In Webster street from Walnut street easterly about 300 feet. 

In Jane street from Nashua street easterly about 150 feet. 

In Prospect street from Russell easterly to Hall street. 

In Blaine street from Second street easterly to Hiram street. 

In West Hancock street from South Main street easterly to 
Merrimack river. 

In Welch avenue from Elm street easterly to Calef road. 

In Elm avenue from Elm street easterly to Calef road. 

The expense thereof to be charged to appropriation for sewers 
and drains. 

Passed December 6, 1892. 



720 OKDEKS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

City of Manchester, 
An Order to erect certain Electric Lights. 

Ordered^ if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the joint standing committee on lighting streets be authorized 
to erect certain lamp-poles, as follows : 

Corner Market and Canal streets. 
Corner Brook and Hazel streets. 
Corner Belmont and Merrimack streets. 
Corner Pine and Valley streets. 
Corner South Jane and High streets. 
Corner Spruce and Beacon streets. 
Corner Pearl and Morrison streets. 
Corner Milton and Manchester streets. 
Corner Webster and Walnut streets. 
Corner Rimmon and Amory streets. 

The same to be charged to the appropriation for lighting 
streets. 

Passed December 6, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

An Order providing for the pay of the Election Officers at the 
late Election. 

Ordered^ if the Board of Mayor and Aldermen concur : That 
the moderators, selectmen, and inspectors of elections of the 
several wards of the city, who acted in said capacities at the elec- 
tion just past in November ,''be paid for all services in connec- 
tion with elections the sum of ten dollars each, the same to be 
inclusive of all pay for such services now provided for by ordi- 
nance. 

Passed December 6, 1892. 



ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 721 

City of Manchester. 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 
Resolution relating to exemption of Kennedy Land Company. 

Resolved^ by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Councils assembled, as follows : 

That whereas the Kennedy Land Co., a corporation duly es- 
tablished by law, propose to erect buildings and lease the same, 
with a tract of land not exceeding one acre, to Josselyn & Sea- 
vey for the manufacture of furniture, upon the land south of the 
brewery, on the line of the Concord & Montreal Railroad, pro- 
vided sufficient inducements be given by the city ; therefore, 

Resolved, That the buildings erected upon said premises for 
the use of Josselyn & Seavey, or whoever else may occupy the 
same for manufacturing purposes, with land used by them in said 
business, not exceeding one acre, shall be exempt from taxation 
for and during the term often years from December 12, 1892. 

Passed December 17, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninetv-two. 

Resolution relating to exemption from Taxation of Josselyn & 

Seavey. 

Resolved^ by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the 
City of Manchester, in City Council assembled, as follows: 

Whereas, Lewis H. Josselyn, of Manchester, and Edward J. 
Seavey, of Goffstown, partners under the firm of Josselyn & 
Seavey, propose to engage extensively in the manufacture of 
furniture in buildings to be erected by the Kennedy Land Com- 
pany upon the land of the said company adjoining the Concord 



722 ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

& Montreal Railroad south of the brewery, provided the city will 
give sufficient encouragement in exemption from taxation ; there- 
fore 

Resolved, That the machinery, stock, and tools of said Josselyn 
& Seavey upon the aforesaid premises used in manufacturing, and 
the furniture manufactured and in process while upon said prem- 
ises, be exempted from taxation for and during ten years from 
December 6, 1892. 

Passed December, 1892. 



City of Manchester. 

in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

Resolution of the Common Council on the death of John 
Henry Schimmel. 

Whereas, God in His Divine Providence has seen fit to re- 
move from our number one in active life, John Henry Schimmel, 
our associate in the Common Council of the City of Manchester, 
recognizing the frailty of earthly existence, and our dependence 
upon a power higher than ours, we desire to express our feelings 
of sorrow and loss, therefore 

Resolved, That in John Henry Schimmel we lost one 'active, 
fearless, and sincere in his dealings with men, who took great 
interest in the prosperity of our city, and an open advocate of 
all measures which he considered in the interest of the people. 

Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt sympathy to his family 
in this their bereavement. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his fam- 
ily and placed upon the records of the council. 

FRED T. DUNLAP, 
JOHN P. MULLEN, 
THOS. WILKINSON, 

Committee on Resolutions. 

Passed in Common Council, December 6, 1892. 



CONTRACT. 723 

City of Manchester. 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety^- wo. 

: ' ■- , ,-:■'■ 

Resolution of the Board of Aldermen on the death of Andrew 

J. Dickey. 

Whereas, in the dispensation of Divine Providence, Andrew 
Tackson Dickey, one of our associates in the board of aldermen 
of Manchester, has been suddenly taken from our number, thus 
reminding us of the uncertainty of human life, and desiring to 
express our feelings of regret and sorrow at our loss, therefore 

Resolved^ That in Andrew Jackson Dickey we have lost an 
honest and earnest worker for the best interests of the city, one 
who was careful and considerate in all matters relating to its 
prosperity, fearless and outspoken against all measures detri- 
mental to its present or future welfare. t^"'-^ ff'*^' 

Resolved^ That we extend our heartfelt sympathy to his family 
and friends in their great and unexpected bereavement. 

Resolved^ That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his family 
and placed upon the records of the board of aldermen. 

.-.Ian. , m;. ■ ^■^- STEARNS, • 

''"''' JOHN L. SANBORN, 

\., Committee on Resolutions. 
Passed in Board of Aldermen, December 17, 1893. 



Contract. 



City of Manchester, N. H., by S. ' F.^cjEiay^^rafd & Cortipiny. 
■ Dated, September 6, 1892. ^i loornoJ l; 

September' '6; ' iB^^r 
To the Fire Committee, Maiichester, N. H.: i •;'-c- ' ■ - ,1 -■ 

■;'J'!ff:Oj llO jg3d t)f[j 

; Gentlemen, — The Fire Extinguisher Manufacturing Com- 
pany, S. F. Hay ward & Co., general eastern agents, will build 
[for the city of Manchester the following apparatus, to wit; 

One Babcock aerial turn-table hook-and-ladder truck, as per 
*Steck's patent of November 11, 1884; July 7, 1885 ; September 



724 CONTRACT. 

7, 1886; March 13, 1888, and April 10, 1888, with all the latest 
improvements and as per the following specifications, to wit : 

One main or aerial ladder to be trussed, making it very rigid, 
impossible for it to bend under regular, ordinary use, impossible 
for it to break. 

One extension or fly ladder, the two when raised and extended ' 
to reach eighty-five feet from the ground. The fly ladder to 
have a 2-foot iron splice on end. (Our patent.) 

The main aerial ladder to be trussed both ways and to be 
raised by two vertical screws, operated by cranks in the hands of 
men standing on the ground. These screws to work at right 
angles with the ladder, forming a brace as same is being raised. 
There is no lost power in raising the ladder because we have no 
longitudinal strain. 

The ladder is additionally braced by phosphor bronze cable, 
reaching from end to end. By our process of raising the ladder 
the strain is not at the raising point but from end of the ladder, 
consequently can be raised with less men and easier than any 
other known truck. 

The truck is not to be over six feet high from the ground to 
the top of the ladder as it lies horizontally on the frame. 

The fly ladder is operated by men by metal cranks, standing 
on the ground and not on the turn-table. Nor is it necessary to 
send a man up the aerial ladder to loosen the dogs to allow the 
fly ladder to come down, as this is controlled by men with 
cranks, there being automatic dogs and hooks. 

One steel turn-table over front gear, made of three parts, to 
turn aerial ladder in any position. 

Frame of truck to be of channel steel. 

Axles to be of best Lomoor iron and to have solid collars and 
round shoulders. 

Springs, platform, threc-front and three rear, constructed of 
the best oil- tempered Swede steel. 

Wheels, Archibald patent, with brass closed end hub caps and 
round edge steel tires. 

Platform at sides of truck covered with rubber matting and 
corrugated brass strips. 



CONTRACT. 725 

Seats, one driver's seat with cushion and whip socket ; one 
steersman's seat with cushion, wheel, and shaft. This seat is made 
to throw over and when in position to have bayonet lock attach- 
ment. 

The steersman is over all ladders and has as clear a view of all 
that is before him as has the driver. 

One three-horse hitch complete. 

Brake, Steck's patent quick acting, by which means brake 
chains work through hollow king bolt, so that wheels can be 
locked by a man from driver's seat in any position. 

Ladders, which are as follows, are made of the best clear sea- 
soned Oregon pine with Ash rounds. 

Two 35-foot single ladders. 

Two 30-foot single ladders. 

Two 25 -foot single ladders, to be carried at sides of truck. 

One 20-foot single ladder. 

One 16-foot single ladder. 

One 16-foot roof ladder. 

One 12-foot roof ladder. 

Truck to be fitted for one 60-foot Bangor ladder, which you 
are to furnish. 

Ladders carried on rubber covered rollers, and have number 
of feet marked on ends so that any particular ladder can quickly 
be gotten off of truck. These ladders or the lengths of same 
can be changed about to suit your wishes. 

Pike poles, ten assorted lengths, from six to ten feet. 

Extinguishers, two pony Babcock, with charges for same. 

Axes, six pick back. 

Door openers, one Detroit. (Our patent.) 

Crowbars, one steel. 

Pitchforks, four. 

Shovels, two. 

Sledge, one. 

Lanterns, four eclypse. (Our patent.) 

Wrenches, one each, monkey and hub. 

Wire baskets, one under frame. 

Tool box, one. 



726 scavenger's contract. 

Buckets, four rubber. 

Gong, one 15 -inch. 

All tools attached by proper holders and scabbards. 

Painted as desired. 

Lettered as desired. 

We hereby agree that the workmanship and materials shall be 
of the best quality and all parts to work in a manner satisfactory 
to your board. And further agree that any part breaking or 
giving out inside of one year from date of going into service, 
attributable to any fault of ours as manufacturers, vye agree to 
make good without cost to your city. 

The above described apparatus and equipments shall be built 
and delivered to your board within ninety days from the date of 
the acceptance of this bid, delivered freight prepaid in the city 
of Manchester, for the sum of thirty-five hundred dollars 

($3'5oo)- 

We further agree to furnish one 12-foot Pompier ladder and 

one 14-foot Pompier ladder, with proper attachments for carry- 
ing on truck, for the sum of forty dollars and fifty cents (^40. 50) 
extra. 

Respectfully submitted. 
FIRE EXTINGUISHER MFG. CO., 
S. F. Hay ward (S^ Co., General Eastern Agents. 



Scavenger's Contract. 

THIS AGREEMENT, 

Made and executed this 8th day of June, 1892, by and between 
William H. Carpenter, of Manchester, in the county of Hills- 
borough and state of New Hampshire, and the city of Manches- 
ter, a municipal corporation in said county and state, acting by 
E. J. Knowlton, mayor, specially authorized thereto by vote of 
the city councils, 

WITNESSETH : That for and in consideration of the mutual 
promises and agreements hereinafter set forth, said parties do 



scavenger's bond. 727 

hereby contract and agree together as 'follows, to wit : Said 
William H. Carpenter hereby contracts and agrees to remove all 
perishable matter from the limits fixed and bounded in the com- 
pact part of said city of Manchester, as shown upon the map of 
said city in the office of the city engineer, in accordance with 
the provisions of the ordinance of said city of Manchester, estab- 
lishing a scavenger service, passed May 6, iSgo, for the term of 
one year from the 9th day of June, 1892, for the sum of one 
thousand six hundred dollars (^1,600), to be paid by said city. 
And he further agrees and contracts to use good horses and 
wagons, and a sufficient number for the suitable performance of 
the work, and to remove all of said matter at least two miles from 
the city limits, and at least one fourth of a mile distant from any 
house, and to do all of said work in a proper and suitable man- 
ner, in all respects in accordance with the aforesaid ordinance, 
and to the satisfaction of the board of mayor and aldermen. 
And said city of Manchester hereby contracts and agrees to pay 
said Carpenter, upon the satisfactory performance of his con- 
tract, the sum of one thousand six hundred dollars ($1,600), in 
monthly payments. 

E. J. KNOWLTON, Mayor. 
W. H. CARPENTER, Contractor. 
Witness : N. P. Kidder. 



Scavenger's Bond. 

Know all men by these presents, that we, William H. Carpen- 
ter, as principal, and Alfred G. Fairbanks and James F. Cava- 
naugh, us sureties, all of Manchester, in the county of Hillsbor- 
ough and state of New Hampshire, are held and firmly bound to 
the city of Manchester, a municipal corporation in said county 
and state, in the sum of sixteen hundred dollars ($1,600), to be 
paid to said city of Manchester, to the payment whereof we 
jointly and severally bind ourselves and our heirs firmly by these 
presents. 



728 CONTRACT. 

Sealed with our seals and dated the eighth day of June, A. D. 
1892. The condition of this obligation is, That whereas the 
above-named William H. Carpenter has this day entered into a 
contract with the said city of Manchester to do scavenger work 
in accordance with the ordinances of said city, now if the said 
William H. Carpenter shall well and truly perform all the ser- 
vices, duties, and conditions of said contract, and by it imposed 
upon him, then this obligation shall be void. 

W. H. CARPENTER, [l. s.] 
ALFRED G. FAIRBANKS, [l. s.] 
JAMES F. CAVANAUGH. [l. s.] 

Signed, sealed, and delivered 
in the presence of 

F, L. Wallace. 

C. H. BUTMAN. 



Contract 



Between the Head & Dowst Co., of the first part, and the 
City of Manchester of the second part. Dated October 6, 1892. 

THIS AGREEMENT 

Made and entered into this 6th day of October, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-two, by and between The 
Head & Dowst Co., of the city of Manchester, county of Hills- 
borough, and state of New Hampshire, of the first part, contract- 
ors ; and the city of Manchester, a municipal corporation in the 
county of Hillsborough, and state of New Hampshire, of the sec- 
ond part : 

WITNESSETH : First. The said first party do hereby, for their 
heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, covenant, promise, 
and agree to and with the said second party, its successors or 
assigns, that they the said first party, their heirs, executors, ad- 
ministrators, or assigns, shall and will, for the consideration here- 
nafter mentioned, on or before the ist day of October, in the 



COXTRACT. 729 

year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two, well and suffi- 
•ciently erect, finish, and deliver in a true and thoroughly work- 
manlike manner, all the several specified works required in the 
erection and completion of an addition 28' 6" X 36' 4" to 
schoolhouse at Goffe's Falls for the said second party, on ground 
situated in the city of Manchester, county of Hillsborough, and 
state of New Hampshire, agreeably to the plans and drawings 
prepared for the said works by The Head & Dowst Co., and un- 
der the direction and personal supervision of the committee on 
lands and buildings, and will find and provide such good, proper, 
and sufficient materials, of all kinds whatsoever, as shall be proper 
and sufficient for the completing and finishing, in a proper man- 
ner, all the works mentioned in the specifications, or set forth 
by the plans and details for the said works within the time afore- 
said, for the sum of two thousand dollars. 

In consideration of the prompt and faithful performance of the 
foregoing terms and covenants by the said first party, the said 
second party agrees and hereby binds itself, its successors, or 
assigns, to pay or cause to be paid unto the said first party, or 
unto their heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, the sum of 
two thousand dollars, lawful money of the United States of 
America. 

AND IT IS HEREBY FURTHER AGREED, BY AND BETWEEN THE 
SAID PARTIES. 

First. That the specifications and drawings are intended to 
■co-operate, so that any works exhibited in the drawings, and not 
mentioned in the specifications, or vice versa, are to be executed 
the same as if mentioned in the specifications and set forth by 
the drawings, to the true intent and meaning of the said draw- 
ings and specifications. 

Second. The contractors, at their own proper cost and charges, 
are to provide all manner of labor, materials, apparatus, scaffold- 
ing, utensils, and cartage of every description, needful for the 
due performance of the several works ; must produce, whenever 
required by the city, all vouchers showing the quality of goods 
and materials used ; and render all due and sufficient facilities to 



730 CONTRACT. 

the city or its agent for the proper inspection of the works and 
materials, and wjiich are to be under their control ; and the city 
may require the contractor to dismiss any workman or workmen 
who they may think incompetent or improper to be employed. 
The contractor shall deliver up the works to the city in perfect 
repair and in good condition when complete. The contractor 
shall not sub-let any of the works, without consent of the city. 

Third. Should the city, at any time during the progress of 
the said works, require any alterations of, additions to, or omis- 
sions in the specifications or plans, it shall have the right or 
power to make such change or changes and the same shall in no 
way injuriously affect or make void the contract ; but the differ- 
ence for work omitted shall be deducted from the amount of the 
contract, by a fair and reasonable valuation ; and for additional 
work required in alterations, the amount shall be agreed upon in 
writing, and such agreement shall state also the extension of 
time (if any) which is to be granted by reason thereof. 

Fourth. Should the contractor, at any time during the prog- 
ress of the said works, become bankrupt, refuse or neglect ta 
supply a sufficiency of material or of workmen, or cause any un- 
reasonable neglect or suspension of work, or fail or refuse to 
follow the drawings and specifications, or comply with any of 
the articles of agreement, the city or its agent shall have the 
right and power to enter upon and take possession of the prem- 
ises, and may at once terminate the contract, whereupon all claim 
of the contractor, their heirs, executors, administrators, or as- 
signs shall cease, and the city may provide materials and work- 
men sufficient to complete the said works, after giving forty-eight 
hours' notice in writing, directed and delivered to the contrac- 
tor, or residence or his place of business ; and the expense of 
the notice and the completing of the various works will be de- 
ducted from the amount of contract, or any part of it due, or to 
become due, to the contractor ; and in such case no scaffolding 
or fixed tackle of any kind, belonging to such contractor, shall 
be removed so long as the same is wanted for the work. But if 
any balance on the amount of this contract remains after com- 
pletion in respect of work done during the time of the default- 



CONTRACT. 731 

ing contractor, the same shall belong to the persons legally rep- 
resenting them, but the city shall not be liable or accountable to 
them in any way for the manner in which it may have gotten 
the work completed. 

Fifth. Should any dispute arise respecting the true construc- 
tion or meaning of drawings or specifications, or as to what is 
extra work outside of contract, the same shall be decided by the 
, and his decision shall be final and conclusive; but 
should any dispute arise respecting the true value of any works 
omitted by the contractor, the same shall be valued by two com- 
petent persons, one employed by the city and the other by the 
contractor, and these two shall have the power to name an um- 
pire whose decision shall be binding on all parties. 

Sixth. The city will not, in any manner, be answerable or ac- 
countable for any loss or damage that shall or may happen to the 
said works, or any part or parts thereof respectively, or for any 
of the materials or other things used and employed in finishing 
and completing the said works ; or for injury to any person or 
persons, either workman or the public, or damage to the ad- 
joining property, from any cause which might have been pre- 
vented by the contractor or his workmen, or any one em- 
ployed by him against all which injuries and damages to 
persons and property, the contractor having control over such 
work must properly guard against, and must make good all damage 
from whatever cause, being strictly responsible for the same. 

Seventh. The contractor will insure the building to cover his 
interest in the same from time to time, as required, and for 
any loss of the contractor by fire the city will not under any cir- 
cumstances be answerable or accountable, but the city may pro- 
tect itself by insurance to cover its interest when payments have 
been made to contractor. 

Eighth. All works and materials, as delivered on the premises 
to form a part of the works, are to be considered the property of 
the city and are not to be removed without its consent ; but the 
contractor shall have the right to remove all surplus materials 
after his completing the works. 



732 CONTRACT. 

Ninth. Should the contractor fail to finish the work at or be- 
fore the time agreed upon, shall pay to or allow the city, by 
way of liquidated damages, the sum of dollars per diem, for 

each and every day thereafter the said works shall remain incom- 
plete. 

In witness whereof We have hereunto affixed our signatures 
and seals, the day and year above written. Signed and sealed 
in presence of 

THE HEAD & DOWST CO., [l. s.] 

By F. DowsT, President. 
Witness : 

John Dowst. 
Frank A. Cadwell. 

THE CITY OF MANCHESTER, [l. s.] 

By E. J. Knowlton. 
Witness : 

M. J. Healy. 



INDEX, 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Advertising and printing 549 

Abatement ou taxes 636 

Assets, statement and inventory of 667-675 

Annual interest cliarge on bonded debt 663 

Auditor, city, report of 405 

Appropriations for 1S92 by city councils 637 

Auditor's department 458-676 

Appendix, school 304 

Addition to Goffe's Falls schoolliouse 593 

Amoskeag cemetery 618 

B 

Bridges 510 

Books and stationery 548 

Buildings, repaii's of. 587 

Board of water commissioners, organization of 9-10-28 

report of 29 

liealth, report of 333 

Bonded debt 659-663 

tabular statement of 659 

detailed statement of for 1892 662 

Buildings, public, occupied by private parties 661-666 

Bonded debt, annual interest charge 663 

Bridge, Second-street 530 

c 

Churches, etc., valuation of, exempt from tax 648 

City Hall 426 

City oflScers' salaries 451 

City teams 514 

Contingent expenses 550 

Care of rooms 554 

City library 559 

Commons 60-t 



736 I^^I)EX. 

Cemetery, Pine Grove 609 

Valley 613 

East Manchester 617 

Goffe's Falls 618 

Amoskeag 618 

City farm 623 

County tax 637 

City officials, list of 3-25 

engineer, report of. 127 

engineer's department, organization of 126 

library, report of trustees of 197 

treasurer's report 202 

librarian's report. 207 

donations to 211 

Cemeteries, report of sub-trustees of Valley 231 

Pine Grove 229 

treasurer 227 

fund of, report of trustees 225 

City farm, report of joint standing committee 243 

solicitor, report of 249 

marshal , report of ■. 265 

Committee, school, report of 273 

City auditor's report 405 

treasurer's report 410 

councils, resolutions and orders 683 

physician , r-eport of , 255 

auditor's department 458-676 

Contracts 723-732 

Contract with S. F. Hay ward & Co., aerial ladder truck 723 

"ST. H. Carpenter, scavenger service 726 

Head & Dowst Co , Goffe's Falls sclioolhouse 728 

D 

Debt, payment of funded 423 

Decoration of soldiers' graves 634 

Debt, bonded, statement of 659-662 

tabular statement of 659 

detailed statement of , for 1892 662 

Derryfleld park 616 

E , 

Engine-house and ward room, ward 9 593 

Engineer's department 530 

Expenses, incidental 434 

mayor's 450 

contingent 550 

East Manchester cemetery 617 

Evening schools 556 

school, mechanical tlrawing 557 

Electric lights, location of 365, 373 

Elliot Hospital...-. ., 633 

Exempted from tax, property 646-657 

Electric street lighting in American cities 37T 



INDEX. 737 

F 

Fund, reserved 423 

Fuel ■ • 542 

Furniture and supplies 544 

Free text-books 558 

Fire department 562 

Fire-alarm telegraph 576 

Firemen's parade 579 

Farm, paupers off 619 

Free beds, Elliot Hospital 633 

Fire department, i-eport of chief engineer 65 

value of personal property 98-105 

names and residences of members 106-110 

location of hydrants 111-123 

Fai'm, city 623 

G 

Grading for concrete 502 

Graves, decoration of soldiers' 634 

Gas-lights, location of 373-375 

Goffe's Falls cemetery 618 

H 

Highway district No. 1 460 

2 463 

3 465 

4 466 

5 467 

6 469 

7 470 

S 472 

9 473 

10 474 

11 476 

12 478 

Highways, new 47S 

land taken for 484 

watering 487 

paving 489 

macadamizing 495 

grading for concrete on 502 

scavenger teams 504 

sweeping 506 

lighting 508 

bridges 510 

city teams 514 

sewers and drains 520 

Health department 534 

Hospital, Women's Aid and Relief 633 

Elliot, free beds 633 

47 



.738 INDEX. 

Highway districts, reports of surveyors 164-194 

Hydrants, location of 111-12S 

Health, board of, report of 333 

Hallsville schoolhouse ■. 591 

Hospitals, churches, etc., exempt from taxation 646-657 

I 

Interest 422 

Incidental expenses 434 

Indigent soldiers 632 

Inspector, milk, report of 257 

Inventory of assets 667-675 

Interest, annual charge, bonded debt 663 



Loan, temporarj- 426 

Land taken for highways 484 

Lighting streets 508 

Library, city 559 

Location of electric lights 365-373 

of gas-lights 373-375 

of oil lamps 375-376 

List of churches, etc., exempt from tax 648 

of city officials 3-25 

M 

Mayor's incidentals 450 

Macadamizing streets 495 

Militia .- 636 

Milk inspector, report of 257 

Marshal, city, report of 265 

Municipal receipts and expenditures 416-422 

Manufacturing property exempt from, taxation 653 

N 

New highways 478 

schoolhouse, Hallsville 591 

O 

Officials, city, salaries of 451 

Order to print forty-seventh annual report 2 

Organization ot board of water commissioners 28-9-10 

Overseers of the poor, report of 247 

Oil lamps, location of 373 



INDEX. 739 

Organizatiou of school board for 1892 13-318 

Orders and resolutions 683 

Order for an artesian well 683 

to purchase land for a hose-house in South Manchester 683 

relating to patrol and ambulance ■wagon 683, 684 

to purchase horse for the fire department 684, 699, 711, 713 

to purchase horse, wagon, and necessary fittings for engineer's 

department 684 

to erect lamp posts 685 

to assign street numbers 685 

to erect fountain. Lake avenue and Elm street 685 

relating to appointment of deputy treasurer 686 

authorizing detail of an officer as houseman 686 

relative to names of schoolhouses 686 

establishing gi-ades 690, 700, 715, 716 

relating to plans and estimates for Second-street bridge 692 

to purchase settees for commons 692 

to build Grove street 692 

relating to visit of fire department committee to Boston 693 

to build Belmont street 693 

to build Bay street 694 

to purchase aerial ladder truck 693 

relative to purchase of shade trees 694 

relative to contract for sewer pipe 694 

to revise and print city ordinances ^ . . 694 

to build Salmon street 695 

to purchase two carts for st reet department 695 

to build Summer street. 695 

to build culvert on Cemetery brook 696 

to build Hall street 696 

to build Elm street from Baker street southerly 697 

relating to retaining horses at fire stations 696 

relating to care of superintendent's team, district No. 10 697 

to erect watering-trough . 697 

to build Cartier street 697 

to build Green street 698 

to concrete Union street, south side Concord street to south side 

Hanover street 698 

to erect electric lights 698, 705, 715, 720 

to build certain streets 699,704,709,714 

to macadamize Maple street from Lake avenue to Merrimack 

street 700 

to purchase transit for engineer's department 700 

to pave Granite street from river bridge to canal bridge 700 

to concrete Pine street from Lake avenue to Cedar street 701 

to erect lamp posts and electric lights 701 

to build Page street 701 

to build certain sewers 702, 705, 712, 713, 715,719 

to purchase additional land for Pine Grove cemetery 703 

relating to motive power of the Manchester Street Kailway 703 

relating to addition to Goffe's Falls schoolhouse 704-709 

to purchase safe for tax collector and treasurer 704 

relating to Elliot hospital 709 



740 INDEX. 

Order to concrete certain streets 708, 710, 714, 71S 

to purchase pumps for artesian well at city farm 710 

to purchase stone for macadamizing 710 

to remove trees in Massahesic street 711 

to purchase two drinking fountains 711 

to macadamize Central street 712 

for street signs 712 

I'elating to sale of Park-street schoolhouse 713-714 

establishing ward-rooms 716 

to remove watering-trough at corner of Hanover and Hall streets 718 

to change the grade of Riddle street 71S 

to purchase steam lire engine and combination chemical engine 719 

relating to pay of election officers 720 

P 

Payment of funded debt .' 423 

Printing and stationery 430 

Paving streets 489 

Printing and advertisuig 549 

Police department 579 

Pine Grove cemetery 609 

Paupers oflfthe farm 619 

Property account, real and personal 667-675 

Public buildings occupied by private parties 664-666 

Park, Derryfield 616 

Stark 608 

Parsonages, valuation of, exempt from taxation? 646-657 

Q 

Quotations from miscellaneous sources 385-401 

R 

Reserved fund 423 

Repairs of schoolhouses 538 

Rooms, care of 554 

Receiving tomb 616 

Report of Board of ^yater Commissioners 29 

Superintendent of Water-Works 31 

City Engineer 127 

Highway District Surveyors 164-194 

Chief Engineer Fire Department 65 

Trustees of City Library 197 

Sub-Trustees of Tallej"^ Cemetei-y 231 

Pine Grove Cemetery 229 

Treasurer of Cemeteries 227 

Trustees of Cemetery Fund 225 

Overseers of tlie Poor 237 

•Toint Standing Committee on City Farm 243 



INDEX. 



741 



Heport of City Solicitor 249 

Milk Inspector 257 

City Marshal 265 

School Committee 273 

Superintendent 383 

Board of Health 333 

Repairs of iDuildings 587 

Real estate owned by the city 667-675 

Real property, exempt from taxation, other than public property 646-657 

Rules, etc., relating to hills against the city (auditor's department) . . . .676-679 

Receipts and expenditures, 1890, 1891, and 1892 422 

Report of citj' auditor 405 

treasurer 410 

Receipts and expenditures, municipal, for 1892 416 

Report of city physician 255 

Resolutions and orders of the city councils 683 

raising money and making appropriations for 1892 637 

Resolution relating to discontinuance of a part of Old Falls road 687-707 

relating to temporary loan 688 

exempting Elliott Manufacturing Co. from taxation 688 

adopting a plan for streets at West Side 689 

discontinuing part of Cartier street 690 

relating to increase in amount of cemetery bonds 706 

relative to plan of Stark park , 706 

relating to JNIast street 707 

relating to Manchester Steam Company 708 

relating to exemption of Kennedy Land Co. from taxation 721 

relating to exemption from taxation of Josselyn & Seavey. 721 

relating to death of John Henry Schimmel 722 

relating to death of Andrew J. Dickey 723 

S 

Second-street bridge 580 

Salaries of city oflBcials 451 

Scavenger teams 504 

Street sweeping 506 

Sewers and drains 520 

School department 318 

Schoolhouses, repairs of 538 

Supplies and furniture 544 

Stationery and books 548 

Salaries, teachers' 557 

School, evening, mechanical drawing 557 

Stark park 608 

Soldiers, indigent 632 

* State tax 637 

Solicitor, city, report of 249 

School committee, report of 273 

superintendent's report 383 

Statement of bonded debt 662 

total taxation for 1892 • 642 

public buildings occupied by private parties 664-666 



742 INDEX. 

School statistics 30i 

attendance 307 

SchoolhoiTse, Hallsville 591 

acMition to Goffe's Falls 593 

Schoolhouses, parochial, and seminaries of learning . 648 

Summary of city debt 663 

Street lighting, electric, in American cities 377 

T 

Temporary loans 426 

Text-hooks, free 558 

Teachers' salaries 557 

Tomb, receiving 616 

Taxes, abatement of 636 

Tax, state 637 

county 637 

Treasiirer, city, report of 410 

Taxation 637-658 

appropriations for 1892 637 

exemption 646-657 

by board of assessors 641 

statement of total 647 

table of taxes due and uncollected 643 

valuations from 1846 to 1892, inclusive 644 

settlement of tax collector's account to June 1, 1892 644 

Teams, city 514 

Tabular statement of receipts and expenditures 422 

The Path of the Pestilence 362 

V 

VSllley cemetery 613 

Valuation and taxes 642 

w 

Watering streets 487 

Women's Aid and Relief Hospital 633 

Water-works, superintendent's report 31 

commissioners' report 29 

construction account 593 

repairs account 597 

current expenses v 602 

Ward room and engine-house (ward 9) 593.